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Sample records for chromosomes preserves genetic

  1. Chromosome engineering: power tools for plant genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Simon W L

    2010-12-01

    The term "chromosome engineering" describes technologies in which chromosomes are manipulated to change their mode of genetic inheritance. This review examines recent innovations in chromosome engineering that promise to greatly increase the efficiency of plant breeding. Haploid Arabidopsis thaliana have been produced by altering the kinetochore protein CENH3, yielding instant homozygous lines. Haploid production will facilitate reverse breeding, a method that downregulates recombination to ensure progeny contain intact parental chromosomes. Another chromosome engineering success is the conversion of meiosis into mitosis, which produces diploid gametes that are clones of the parent plant. This is a key step in apomixis (asexual reproduction through seeds) and could help to preserve hybrid vigor in the future. New homologous recombination methods in plants will potentiate many chromosome engineering applications. PMID:20933291

  2. Genetics Home Reference: ring chromosome 20 syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 3 links) Encyclopedia: Chromosome Encyclopedia: Epilepsy Health Topic: Epilepsy Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (1 link) Ring chromosome 20 Additional NIH Resources (2 links) National Human Genome Research Institute: Chromosome Abnormalities National Institute of ...

  3. Genetics Home Reference: ring chromosome 14 syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Encyclopedia: Chromosome Health Topic: Developmental Disabilities Health Topic: Epilepsy Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (1 link) Ring chromosome 14 Additional NIH Resources (2 links) National Human Genome Research Institute: Chromosome Abnormalities National Institute of ...

  4. Genetic conflict and sex chromosome evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meiklejohn, Colin D; Tao, Yun

    2009-01-01

    Chromosomal sex determination systems create the opportunity for the evolution of selfish genetic elements that increase the transmission of one sex chromosome at the expense of its homolog. Because such selfish elements on sex chromosomes can reduce fertility and distort the sex ratio of progeny, unlinked suppressors are expected to evolve, bringing different regions of the genome into conflict over the meiotic transmission of the sex chromosomes. Here we argue that recurrent genetic conflict over sex chromosome transmission is an important evolutionary force that has shaped a wide range of seemingly disparate phenomena including the epigenetic regulation of genes expressed in the germline, the distribution of genes in the genome, and the evolution of hybrid sterility between species. PMID:19931208

  5. Cryopreservation for preservation of potato genetic resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niino, Takao; Arizaga, Miriam Valle

    2015-03-01

    Cryopreservation is becoming a very important tool for the long-term storage of plant genetic resources and efficient cryopreservation protocols have been developed for a large number of plant species. Practical procedures, developed using in vitro tissue culture, can be a simple and reliable preservation option of potato genetic resources rather than maintaining by vegetative propagation in genebanks due their allogamous nature. Cryopreserved materials insure a long-term backup of field collections against loss of plant germplasm. Occurrence of genetic variation, in tissue culture cells during prolonged subcultures, can be avoided with suitable cryopreservation protocols that provide high regrowth, leading and facilitating a systematic and strategic cryo-banking of plant genetic resources. Cryopreservation protocols for potato reviewed here, can efficiently complement field and in vitro conservation, providing for preservation of genotypes difficult to preserve by other methods, wild types and other species decided as priority collections. PMID:25931979

  6. Genetics Home Reference: isodicentric chromosome 15 syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and a spine that curves to the side ( scoliosis ). Related Information What does it mean if a ... health conditions: Diagnostic Tests Drug Therapy Surgery and Rehabilitation Genetic Counseling Palliative Care Related Information How are ...

  7. Use of chromosome aberrations for predicting genetic hazards to man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The question of the use of chromosome aberrations for predicting genetic hazards to man is discussed under the following headings: interspecific comparisons of dicentric and deletion production in peripheral leukocytes; comparison of dicentric yields in leukocytes to reciprocal translocation yield in spermatogonia; recovery of spermatogonia induced translocations in the sons of irradiated males; cytologically and genetically detected deletions; and current gaps in our knowledge and problems of future interest

  8. Genetic and physical mapping of the bovine X chromosome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeh, Chen Chen; Taylor, J.F.; Sanders, J. O. [Texas A& M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)] [and others

    1996-03-01

    Three hundred eighty reciprocal backcross and F{sub 2} full sib progeny from 33 families produced by embryo transfer from 77 Angus (Bos taurus), Brahman (Bos indicus), and F{sub 1} parents and grandparents were used to construct genetic maps of the bovine X and Y chromosomes. All individuals were scored for 15 microsatellite loci, with an average of 608 informative meioses per locus. The length of the bovine X chromosome genetic map was 118.7 cM (female only) and of the pseudoautosomal region was 13.0 cM (male only). The 15-marker framework map in Kosambi centimorgans is (BM6017-6.1-TGLA89-35.8-TEXAN13-3.4-TGLA128-1.3-BM2713-21.1-BM4604-2.4-BR215-12.9-TGLA68-10.0-BM4321-1.0-HEL14-4.9-TGLA15-2.3-INRA120-12.5-TGLA325-1.6-MAF45-3.2-INRA30), with an average interval of 7.91 cM. Clones containing pseudoautosomal or sex-linked microsatellites were isolated from a bovine bacterial artificial chromosome library and were physically mapped to bovine metaphase chromosomes by fluorescence in situ hybridization to orient the X and Y chromosome maps. BAC57, containing the pseudoautosomal microsatellite INRA30, mapped to the distal end of the long arm of the X chromosome at q42-ter and to the short arm of the Y chromosome at p13-ter. This confirms the published assignment of this region to Yp12-ter, but challenges the published assignment of Xp14-ter and thus reorients the X chromosome physical map. BAC204, containing the X-linked microsatellite BM4604, mapped to the middle of the long arm of the X chromosome at q26-q31. The position of the physically mapped to the middle of the long arm of the X chromosome at q26-q31. The position of the physically mapped markers indicates either a lack of microsatellite markers for a large (30 to 50 cM) region of the short arm of the X chromosome or heterogeneity of recombination along the X chromosome. 46 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. A chromosomal-genetic theory of electromechanical systems by the example of electromechanical disintegrators

    OpenAIRE

    Lushchik, V. D.

    2012-01-01

    Inefficiency and nonserviceability of the electromechanical disintegrators developed by means of a chromosomal-genetic theory is justified. Conclusions are made about futility of the chromosomal-genetic theory in electromechanical science.

  10. Genetic and physical mapping of the bovine X chromosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, C C; Taylor, J F; Gallagher, D S; Sanders, J O; Turner, J W; Davis, S K

    1996-03-01

    Three hundred eighty reciprocal backcross and F(2) full sib progeny from 33 families produced by embryo transfer from 77 Angus (Bos taurus), Brahman (Bos indicus), and F1 parents and grandparents were used to construct genetic maps of the bovine X and Y chromosomes. Ml individuals were scored for 15 microsatellite loci, with an average of 608 informative meioses per locus. The length of the bovine X chromosome genetic map was 118.7 cM (female only) and of the pseudoautosomal region was 13.0 cM (male only). The 15-marker framework map in Kosambi centimorgans is [BM6017-6.1 -TGLA89-35.8-TEXAN13-3.4-TGLA128-1.3 -BM2713 -21.1 -BM4604-2.4-BR215 - 12.9-TGLA68-10.0-BM4321 - 1.0-HEL14-4.9-TGLA15-2.3-INRA12O- 12.5-TGLA325- 1.6-MAF45-3.2-INRA3O], with an average interval of 7.91 cM. Clones containing pseudoautosomal or sex-linked microsatellites were isolated from a bovine bacterial artificial chromosome library and were physically mapped to bovine metaphase chromosomes by fluorescence in situ hybridization to orient the X and Y chromosome maps. BAC57, containing the pseudoautosomal microsatellite INRA3O, mapped to the distal end of the long arm of the X chromosome at q42-ter and to the short arm of the Y chromosome at p13-ter. This confirms the published assignment of this region to Ypl2-ter, but challenges the published assignment of Xpl4-ter and thus reorients the X chromosome physical map. BAC2O4, containing the X-linked microsatellite BM4604, mapped to the middle of the long arm of the X chromosome at q26-q31. The position of the physically mapped markers indicates either a lack of microsatellite markers for a large (30 to 50 cM) region of the short arm of the X chromosome or heterogeneity of recombination along the X chromosome. PMID:8833151

  11. Ancient Male Recombination Shaped Genetic Diversity of Neo-Y Chromosome in Drosophila albomicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satomura, Kazuhiro; Tamura, Koichiro

    2016-02-01

    Researchers studying Y chromosome evolution have drawn attention to neo-Y chromosomes in Drosophila species due to their resembling the initial stage of Y chromosome evolution. In the studies of neo-Y chromosome of Drosophila miranda, the extremely low genetic diversity observed suggested various modes of natural selection acting on the nonrecombining genome. However, alternative possibility may come from its peculiar origin from a single chromosomal fusion event with male achiasmy, which potentially caused and maintained the low genetic diversity of the neo-Y chromosome. Here, we report a real case where a neo-Y chromosome is in transition from an autosome to a typical Y chromosome. The neo-Y chromosome of Drosophila albomicans harbored a rich genetic diversity comparable to its gametologous neo-X chromosome and an autosome in the same genome. Analyzing sequence variations in 53 genes and measuring recombination rates between pairs of loci by cross experiments, we elucidated the evolutionary scenario of the neo-Y chromosome of D. albomicans having high genetic diversity without assuming selective force, i.e., it originated from a single chromosomal fusion event, experienced meiotic recombination during the initial stage of evolution and diverged from neo-X chromosome by the suppression of recombination tens or a few hundreds of thousand years ago. Consequently, the observed high genetic diversity on the neo-Y chromosome suggested a strong effect of meiotic recombination to introduce genetic variations into the newly arisen sex chromosome. PMID:26494844

  12. Genetic control of chromosome behaviour: Implications in evolution, crop improvement, and human biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chromosomes and chromosome pairing are pivotal to all biological sciences. The study of chromosomes helps unravel several aspects of an organism. Although the foundation of genetics occurred with the formulation of the laws of heredity in 1865, long before the discovery of chromosomes, their subsequ...

  13. Chromosome-specific staining to detect genetic rearrangements associated with chromosome 3 and/or chromosome 17

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, Joe W. (San Francisco, CA); Pinkel, Daniel (Lafayette, CA); Kallioniemi, Olli-Pekka (Turku, FI); Kallioniemi, Anne (Tampere, FI); Sakamoto, Masaru (Tokyo, JP)

    2009-10-06

    Methods and compositions for staining based upon nucleic acid sequence that employ .[.nudeic.]. .Iadd.nucleic .Iaddend.acid probes are provided. Said methods produce staining patterns that can be tailored for specific cytogenetic analyses. Said probes are appropriate for in situ hybridization and stain both interphase and metaphase chromosomal material with reliable signals. The nucleic acid probes are typically of a complexity greater than 50 kb, the complexity depending upon the cytogenetic application. Methods and reagents are provided for the detection of genetic rearrangements. Probes and test kits are provided for use in detecting genetic rearrangements, particularly for use in tumor cytogenetics, in the detection of disease related loci, specifically cancer, such as chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML), retinoblastoma, ovarian and uterine cancers, and for biological dosimetry. Methods and reagents are described for cytogenetic research, for the differentiation of cytogenetically similar but genetically different diseases, and for many prognostic and diagnostic applications.

  14. Chromosome-specific staining to detect genetic rearrangements associated with chromosome 3 and/or chromosome 17

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, Joe W.; Pinkel, Daniel; Kallioniemi, Olli-Pekka; Kallioniemi, Anne; Sakamoto, Masaru

    2008-09-09

    Methods and compositions for staining based upon nucleic acid sequence that employ nucleic acid probes are provided. Said methods produce staining patterns that can be tailored for specific cytogenetic analyses. Said probes are appropriate for in situ hybridization and stain both interphase and metaphase chromosomal material with reliable signals. The nucleic acid probes are typically of a complexity greater than 50 kb, the complexity depending upon the cytogenetic application. Methods and reagents are provided for the detection of genetic rearrangements. Probes and test kits are provided for use in detecting genetic rearrangements, particularly for use in tumor cytogenetics, in the detection of disease related loci, specifically cancer, such as chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML), retinoblastoma, ovarian and uterine cancers, and for biological dosimetry. Methods and reagents are described for cytogenetic research, for the differentiation of cytogenetically similar but genetically different diseases, and for many prognostic and diagnostic applications.

  15. Chromosome-specific staining to detect genetic rearrangements associated with chromosome 3 and/or chromosome 17

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Joe W.; Pinkel, Daniel; Kallioniemi, Olli-Pekka; Kallioniemi, Anne; Sakamoto, Masaru

    2002-01-01

    Methods and compositions for staining based upon nucleic acid sequence that employ nudeic acid probes are provided. Said methods produce staining patterns that can be tailored for specific cytogenetic analyses. Said probes are appropriate for in situ hybridization and stain both interphase and metaphase chromosomal material with reliable signals. The nucleic acid probes are typically of a complexity greater than 50 kb, the complexity depending upon the cytogenetic application. Methods and reagents are provided for the detection of genetic rearrangements. Probes and test kits are provided for use in detecting genetic rearrangements, particularly for use in tumor cytogenetics, in the detection of disease related loci, specifically cancer, such as chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML), retinoblastoma, ovarian and uterine cancers, and for biological dosimetry. Methods and reagents are described for cytogenetic research, for the differentiation of cytogenetically similar but genetically different diseases, and for many prognostic and diagnostic applications.

  16. In vitro preservation of genetic resources: Techniques and problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owing to depletion of the naturally occurring pools of germplasm, there is an urgent need to generate and preserve genetic resources by methods other than conventional. For this purpose, various in vitro methods, such as minimal medium and growth retardants, storage at low temperatures (2-10 deg. C), use of mineral oil, partial dehydration of tissues, etc., have been employed. However, these methods cannot be employed for the long-term conservation of germplasm. Cell cultures, on periodic transfer, undergo genetic erosion, resulting, as a consequence, in a heterogeneous population of cells. In this regard, freeze preservation of cultures in liquid nitrogen (-196 deg. C) has attracted much attention for the establishment of germplasm banks and for the international exchange of genetic stocks. During the last five years, considerable progress has been made in cryobiology, and entire plants have been regenerated from cryopreserved cells, meristems and embryos of a number of crop species. There are three areas where cryopreservation can be of immediate use: (1) recalcitrant seeds; (2) vegetatively propagated plants; (3) storage of selected cell lines. There are obvious merits, demerits and problems associated with every method, the most important problem being genetic instability during storage. Though some changes cannot be avoided, it is assumed that a judicious choice of the material (to avoid selection pressure), refinement of the protocol (particularly pre-freezing treatments) and the use of appropriate cryoprotectants can reduce the possibility of aberrations. It is envisaged that cryopreservation will be increasingly employed for the conservation of rare, elite and desirable cultures, for the preservation of the germplasm of vegetatively propagated crops and plants with recalcitrant seeds and also for the establishment of germplasm banks and for the international exchange of materials. (author)

  17. Chromosome-specific staining to detect genetic rearrangements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Joe W.; Pinkel, Daniel; Tkachuk, Douglas; Westbrook, Carol

    2013-04-09

    Methods and compositions for staining based upon nucleic acid sequence that employ nucleic acid probes are provided. Said methods produce staining patterns that can be tailored for specific cytogenetic analyzes. Said probes are appropriate for in situ hybridization and stain both interphase and metaphase chromosomal material with reliable signals. The nucleic acid probes are typically of a complexity greater than 50 kb, the complexity depending upon the cytogenetic application. Methods and reagents are provided for the detection of genetic rearrangements. Probes and test kits are provided for use in detecting genetic rearrangements, particularly for use in tumor cytogenetics, in the detection of disease related loci, specifically cancer, such as chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) and for biological dosimetry. Methods and reagents are described for cytogenetic research, for the differentiation of cytogenetically similar but genetically different diseases, and for many prognostic and diagnostic applications.

  18. Preserving Yeast Genetic Heritage through DNA Damage Checkpoint Regulation and Telomere Maintenance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huilin Zhou

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available In order to preserve genome integrity, extrinsic or intrinsic DNA damages must be repaired before they accumulate in cells and trigger other mutations and genome rearrangements. Eukaryotic cells are able to respond to different genotoxic stresses as well as to single DNA double strand breaks (DSBs, suggesting highly sensitive and robust mechanisms to detect lesions that trigger a signal transduction cascade which, in turn, controls the DNA damage response (DDR. Furthermore, cells must be able to distinguish natural chromosomal ends from DNA DSBs in order to prevent inappropriate checkpoint activation, DDR and chromosomal rearrangements. Since the original discovery of RAD9, the first DNA damage checkpoint gene identified in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, many genes that have a role in this pathway have been identified, including MRC1, MEC3, RAD24, RAD53, DUN1, MEC1 and TEL1. Extensive studies have established most of the genetic basis of the DNA damage checkpoint and uncovered its different functions in cell cycle regulation, DNA replication and repair, and telomere maintenance. However, major questions concerning the regulation and functions of the DNA damage checkpoint remain to be answered. First, how is the checkpoint activity coupled to DNA replication and repair? Second, how do cells distinguish natural chromosome ends from deleterious DNA DSBs? In this review we will examine primarily studies performed using Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model system.

  19. Effect of Sodium Benzoate Preservative on Micronucleus Induction, Chromosome Break, and Ala40Thr Superoxide Dismutase Gene Mutation in Lymphocytes

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Sodium benzoate is food preservative that inhibits microbial growth. The effects of sodium benzoate preservative on micronucleus induction, chromosome break, and Ala40Thr superoxide dismutase gene mutation in lymphocytes were studied. Sodium benzoate concentrations of 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0 mg/mL were treated in lymphocyte cell line for 24 and 48 hrs, respectively. Micronucleus test, standard chromosome culture technique, PCR, and automated sequencing technique were done to detect micronucleu...

  20. Chromosome-specific staining to detect genetic rearrangements associated with chromosome 3 and/or chromosome 17

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, Joe W.; Pinkel, Daniel; Kallioniemi, Olli-Pekka; Kallioniemi, Anne; Sakamoto, Masaru

    2009-10-06

    Methods and compositions for staining based upon nucleic acid sequence that employ nudeic nucleic acid probes are provided. Said methods produce staining patterns that can be tailored for specific cytogenetic analyses. Said probes are appropriate for in situ hybridization and stain both interphase and metaphase chromosomal material with reliable signals. The nucleic acid probes are typically of a complexity greater than 50 kb, the complexity depending upon the cytogenetic application. Methods and reagents are provided for the detection of genetic rearrangements. Probes and test kits are provided for use in detecting genetic rearrangements, particularly for use in tumor cytogenetics, in the detection of disease related loci, specifically cancer, such as chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML), retinoblastoma, ovarian and uterine cancers, and for biological dosimetry. Methods and reagents are described for cytogenetic research, for the differentiation of cytogenetically similar but genetically different diseases, and for many prognostic and diagnostic applications.

  1. Genetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Inheritance; Heterozygous; Inheritance patterns; Heredity and disease; Heritable; Genetic markers ... The chromosomes are made up of strands of genetic information called DNA. Each chromosome contains sections of ...

  2. Model selection emphasises the importance of non-chromosomal information in genetic studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reda Rawi

    Full Text Available Ever since the case of the missing heritability was highlighted some years ago, scientists have been investigating various possible explanations for the issue. However, none of these explanations include non-chromosomal genetic information. Here we describe explicitly how chromosomal and non-chromosomal modifiers collectively influence the heritability of a trait, in this case, the growth rate of yeast. Our results show that the non-chromosomal contribution can be large, adding another dimension to the estimation of heritability. We also discovered, combining the strength of LASSO with model selection, that the interaction of chromosomal and non-chromosomal information is essential in describing phenotypes.

  3. Genetic divergence and the genetic architecture of complex traits in chromosome substitution strains of mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spiezio Sabrina H

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The genetic architecture of complex traits strongly influences the consequences of inherited mutations, genetic engineering, environmental and genetic perturbations, and natural and artificial selection. But because most studies are under-powered, the picture of complex traits is often incomplete. Chromosome substitution strains (CSSs are a unique paradigm for these genome surveys because they enable statistically independent, powerful tests for the phenotypic effects of each chromosome on a uniform inbred genetic background. A previous CSS survey in mice and rats revealed many complex trait genes (QTLs, large phenotypic effects, extensive epistasis, as well as systems properties such as strongly directional phenotypic changes and genetically-determined limits on the range of phenotypic variation. However, the unusually close genetic relation between the CSS progenitor strains in that study raised questions about the impact of genetic divergence: would greater divergence between progenitor strains, with the corresponding changes in gene regulation and protein function, lead to significantly more distinctive phenotypic features, or alternatively would epistasis and systems constraints, which are pervasive in CSSs, limit the range of phenotypic variation regardless of the extent of DNA sequence variation? Results We analyzed results for an extensive survey of traits in two new panels of CSSs where the donor strains were derived from inbred strains with more distant origins and discovered a strong similarity in genetic and systems properties among the three CSS panels, regardless of divergence time. Conclusion Our results argue that DNA sequence differences between host and donor strains did not substantially affect the architecture of complex traits, and suggest instead that strong epistasis buffered the phenotypic effects of genetic divergence, thereby constraining the range of phenotypic variation.

  4. Linked genetic variants on chromosome 10 control ear morphology and body mass among dog breeds

    OpenAIRE

    Webster, Matthew T.; Kamgari, Nona; Perloski, Michele; Höppner, Marc P.; Axelsson, Erik; Hedhammar, Ake; Pielberg, Gerli; Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin

    2015-01-01

    Background The domestic dog is a rich resource for mapping the genetic components of phenotypic variation due to its unique population history involving strong artificial selection. Genome-wide association studies have revealed a number of chromosomal regions where genetic variation associates with morphological characters that typify dog breeds. A region on chromosome 10 is among those with the highest levels of genetic differentiation between dog breeds and is associated with body mass and ...

  5. Genetic architecture of sexual dimorphism in a subdioecious plant with a proto-sex chromosome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sexual dimorphism is thought to arise once sexually antagonistic genes accumulate on sex chromosomes early in their evolution. Yet because the earliest stages of sex chromosome evolution are elusive, we lack empirical evidence supporting this theory. In this study, we shed first light on the genetic...

  6. Guidelines of Special Care Dentistry in Patients with Chromosomal and Genetic syndromes

    OpenAIRE

    Cremonesi, Ilaria

    2015-01-01

    Chromosomal and genetic syndromes are frequently associated with dental and cranio-facial alterations. The aim of our study is to identify and describe the dental and craniofacial alterations typical of six genetic and chromosomal syndromes examined. Materials and Methods- A dental visit was performed to 195 patients referred from Sant’Orsola Hospital of Bologna, University of Bologna, to Service of Special Need Dentistry, Dental Clinic, Department of Biomedical and Neuromotor Science, U...

  7. Genetic evidence for chromosome 4 loci influencing learning and memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anselmi, Mayara; Correa, Fernanda Junkes; Santos, José Ronaldo; Silva, Anatildes Feitosa; Cunha, João Antônio; Leão, Anderson Henrique Figueiredo; Campêlo, Clarissa Loureiro Chagas; Ribeiro, Alessandra Mussi; Silva, Regina Helena; Izídio, Geison Souza

    2016-05-01

    The Lewis (LEW) and SHR (Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats) inbred rat strains differ in several anxiety/emotionality and learning/memory-related behaviors. We aimed to search quantitative trait locus (QTL) that influence these behaviors and confirm their effects in a congenic rat strain SLA16 (SHR.LEW.Anxrr16). LEW females and SHR males were intercrossed to produce F2 rats (96/sex), which were all tested in the plus-maze discriminative avoidance task (PMDAT), open-field (OF), object recognition (OR), spontaneous alternation (SA) and fear conditioning (FC). All animals were genotyped for microsatellite markers located on chromosome (Chr) 4. Behavioral and genotypic data were used to perform factor and QTL analyses. Also, to confirm the QTL effects, we tested male and female SLA16 rats and their isogenic control SHR in the same behavioral tests. A factor analysis of the F2 population revealed a correlation between anxiety/emotionality related behaviors and learning/memory in both sexes. QTL analysis revealed two significant QTL in males and three in females, on behavioral parameters in the PMDAT, OF and FC. Four QTL found herein were confirmed in SLA16 rats. The SLA16 strain displayed lower levels of anxiety/emotionality, higher locomotor activity and deficits in learning/memory in comparison with SHR strain. The Chr 4 contains genes influencing anxiety/emotionality and learning/memory behaviors and the SLA16 strain represents a valuable tool in the search for them. The use of the SLA16 strain as a genetic model for studying behavioral phenomena and their implications for psychiatric disorders are discussed. PMID:27044679

  8. Refining the genetic portrait of Portuguese Roma through X-chromosomal markers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pereira, Vania; Gusmão, Leonor; Valente, Cristina;

    2012-01-01

    non-Gypsies. When the pattern of differentiation on the X chromosome was compared with that of autosomes, there was evidence for asymmetries in female and male effective population sizes during the admixture between Roma and non-Roma. This result supplements previous data provided by mtDNA and the Y...... chromosome, underlining the importance of using combined information from the X chromosome and autosomes to dissect patterns of genetic diversity. Following the out-of-India dispersion, the Roma acquired a complex genetic pattern that was influenced by drift and introgression with surrounding populations...

  9. The genetic content of chromosomal inversions across a wide latitudinal gradient.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Simões

    Full Text Available There is increasing evidence regarding the role of chromosomal inversions in relevant biological processes such as local adaptation and speciation. A classic example of the adaptive role of chromosomal polymorphisms is given by the clines of inversion frequencies in Drosophila subobscura, repeatable across continents. Nevertheless, not much is known about the molecular variation associated with these polymorphisms. We characterized the genetic content of ca. 600 individuals from nine European populations following a latitudinal gradient by analysing 19 microsatellite loci from two autosomes (J and U and the sex chromosome (A, taking into account their chromosomal inversions. Our results clearly demonstrate the molecular genetic uniformity within a given chromosomal inversion across a large latitudinal gradient, particularly from Groningen (Netherlands in the north to Málaga (Spain in the south, experiencing highly diverse environmental conditions. This low genetic differentiation within the same gene arrangement across the nine European populations is consistent with the local adaptation hypothesis for th evolutionof chromosomal polymorphisms. We also show the effective role of chromosomal inversions in maintaining different genetic pools within these inverted genomic regions even in the presence of high gene flow. Inversions represent thus an important barrier to gene flux and can help maintain specific allelic combinations with positive effects on fitness. Consistent patterns of microsatellite allele-inversion linkage disequilibrium particularly in loci within inversions were also observed. Finally, we identified areas within inversions presenting clinal variation that might be under selection.

  10. Genetic homogeneity of Taylorella equigenitalis from Norwegian trotting horses revealed by chromosomal DNA fingerprinting.

    OpenAIRE

    Thoresen, S I; Jenkins, A.; Ask, E

    1995-01-01

    Chromosomal DNA fingerprinting indicated that Norwegian Taylorella equigenitalis strains are genetically homogeneous and similar to some Swedish isolates but different from other European strains. As contagious equine metritis is rarely a serious disease in Norwegian horses, we conclude that the dominant T. equigenitalis strain in Norway is a genetically homogeneous clone of low virulence.

  11. Genetic and physical mapping of two centromere-proximal regions of chromosome IV in Aspergillus nidulans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aleksenko, Alexei Y.; Nielsen, Michael Lynge; Clutterbuck, A.J.

    2001-01-01

    revision of the genetic map of the chromosome, including the position of the centromere, Comparison of physical and genetic maps indicates that meiotic recombination is low in subcentromeric DNA, its frequency being reduced from 1 crossover per 0.8 Mb to approximately 1 crossover per 5 Mb per meiosis, The...

  12. Overview of Epidemiology, Genetics, Birth Defects, and Chromosome Abnormalities Associated With CDH

    OpenAIRE

    Pober, Barbara R.

    2007-01-01

    Congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) is a common and well-studied birth defect. The etiology of most cases remains unknown but increasing evidence points to genetic causation. The data supporting genetic etiologies which are detailed below include the association of CDH with recurring chromosome abnormalities, the existence of CDH-multiplex families, and the co-occurrence of CDH with additional congenital malformations.

  13. Accuracy of preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) of single gene and chromosomal disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verlinsky, Y.; Strom, C.; Rechitsky, S. [Reproductive Genetics Institute, Chicage, IL (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    We have developed a polar body inferred approach for preconception diagnosis of single gene and chromosomal disorders. Preconception PCR or FISH analysis was performed in a total of 310 first polar bodies for the following genetic conditions: cystic fibrosis, hemophilia A, alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency, Tay Sachs disease, retinitis pigmentosa and common chromosomal trisomies. An important advantage of this approach is the avoidance of sperm (DNA) contamination, which is the major problem of PGD. We are currently applying FISH analysis of biopsied blastomeres, in combination with PCR or separately, and have demonstrated a significant improvement of the accuracy of PGD of X-linked disorders at this stage. Our data have also demonstrated feasibility of the application of FISH technique for PGD of chromosomal disorders. It was possible to detect chromosomal non-disjunctions and chromatid malsegregations in the first meiotic division, as well as to evaluate chromosomal mutations originating from the second meiotic nondisjunction.

  14. Genetic control over the processes of postirradiation recovery of a compact chromosome in micrococcus radiodurans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    X-irradiation of Micrococcus radiodurans cells with sublethal doses caused disturbances in the structure of a membrane-bound compact chromosome. Recovery of the compact chromosome occurred during the postirradiation incubation of the wild type cells and cells of the UVS-17 mutant deficient in DNA-polymerase. This process was blocked in cells of rec-30 mutant with the impaired system of genetic recombination: this is indicative of an important role played by rec-30 gene product in the postirradiation recovery of the compact chromosome in M. radiodurans cells

  15. Chromosome-Specific Staining To Detect Genetic Rearrangements Associated With Chromosome 3 And/Or Chromosone 17

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray; Joe W.; Pinkel; Daniel; Kallioniemi; Olli-Pekka; Kallioniemi; Anne; Sakamoto; Masaru

    2002-02-05

    Methods and compositions for staining based upon nucleic acid sequence that employ nucleic acid probes are provided. Said methods produce staining patterns that can be tailored for specific cytogenetic analyses. Said probes are appropriate for in situ hybridization and stain both interphase and metaphase chromosomal material with reliable signals. The nucleic acid probes are typically of a complexity greater than 50 kb, the complexity depending upon the cytogenetic application. Methods and reagents are provided for the detection of genetic rearrangements. Probes and test kits are provided for use in detecting genetic rearrangements, particularly for use in tumor cytogenetics, in the detection of disease related loci, specifically cancer, such as chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML), retinoblastoma, ovarian and uterine cancers, and for biological dosimetry. Methods and reagents are described for cytogenetic research, for the differentiation of cytogenetically similar but genetically different diseases, and for many prognostic and diagnostic applications.

  16. Genetic divergence in domesticated and non-domesticated gene regions of barley chromosomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Songxian Yan

    Full Text Available Little is known about the genetic divergence in the chromosomal regions with domesticated and non-domesticated genes. The objective of our study is to examine the effect of natural selection on shaping genetic diversity of chromosome region with domesticated and non-domesticated genes in barley using 110 SSR markers. Comparison of the genetic diversity loss between wild and cultivated barley for each chromosome showed that chromosome 5H had the highest divergence of 35.29%, followed by 3H, 7H, 4H, 2H, 6H. Diversity ratio was calculated as (diversity of wild type - diversity of cultivated type/diversity of wild type×100%. It was found that diversity ratios of the domesticated regions on 5H, 1H and 7H were higher than those of non-domesticated regions. Diversity ratio of the domesticated region on 2H and 4H is similar to that of non-domesticated region. However, diversity ratio of the domesticated region on 3H is lower than that of non-domesticated region. Averaged diversity among six chromosomes in domesticated region was 33.73% difference between wild and cultivated barley, and was 27.56% difference in the non-domesticated region. The outcome of this study advances our understanding of the evolution of crop chromosomes.

  17. Genetics of dioecy and causal sex chromosomes in plants

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sushil Kumar; Renu Kumari; Vishakha Sharma

    2014-04-01

    Dioecy (separate male and female individuals) ensures outcrossing and is more prevalent in animals than in plants. Although it is common in bryophytes and gymnosperms, only 5% of angiosperms are dioecious. In dioecious higher plants, flowers borne on male and female individuals are, respectively deficient in functional gynoecium and androecium. Dioecy is inherited via three sex chromosome systems: XX/XY, XX/X0 and WZ/ZZ, such that XX or WZ is female and XY, X0 or ZZ are males. The XX/XY system generates the rarer XX/X0 andWZ/ZZ systems. An autosome pair begets XY chromosomes. A recessive loss-of-androecium mutation (ana) creates X chromosome and a dominant gynoecium-suppressing (GYS) mutation creates Y chromosome. The ana/ANA and gys/GYS loci are in the sex-determining region (SDR) of the XY pair. Accumulation of inversions, deleterious mutations and repeat elements, especially transposons, in the SDR of Y suppresses recombination between X and Y in SDR, making Y labile and increasingly degenerate and heteromorphic from X. Continued recombination between X and Y in their pseudoautosomal region located at the ends of chromosomal arms allows survival of the degenerated Y and of the species. Dioecy is presumably a component of the evolutionary cycle for the origin of new species. Inbred hermaphrodite species assume dioecy. Later they suffer degenerate-Y-led population regression. Cross-hybridization between such extinguishing species and heterologous species, followed by genome duplication of segregants from hybrids, give rise to new species.

  18. Identification of embryonic chromosomal abnormality using FISH-based preimplantaion genetic diagnosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    叶英辉; 徐晨明; 金帆; 钱羽力

    2004-01-01

    Objective: Embryonic chromosomal abnormality is one of the main reasons for in vitro fertilization (IVF)failure. This study aimed at evaluating the value of Fluorescence in-situ Hybridization (FISH)-based Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis (PGD) in screening for embryonic chromosomal abnormality to increase the successful rate of IVF. Method:Ten couples, four with high risk of chromosomal abnormality and six infertile couples, underwent FISH-based PGD during IVF procedure. At day 3, one or two blastomeres were aspirated from each embryo. Biopsied blastomeres were examined using FISH analysis to screen out embryos with chromosomal abnormalities. At day 4, embryos without detectable chromosomal abnormality were transferred to the mother bodies as in regular IVF. Results: Among 54 embryos screened using FISH-based PGD, 30 embryos were detected to have chromosomal abnormalities. The 24 healthy embryos were implanted,resulting in four clinical pregnancies, two of which led to successful normal birth of two healthy babies; one to ongoing pregnancy during the writing of this article; and one to ectopic pregnancy. Conclusion: FISH-based PGD is an effective method for detecting embryonic chromosomal abnormality, which is one of the common causes of spontaneous miscarriages and chromosomally unbalanced offsprings.

  19. Identification of embryonic chromosomal abnormality using FISH-based preimplantaion genetic diagnosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    叶英辉; 徐晨明; 金帆; 钱羽力

    2004-01-01

    Objective: Embryonic chromosomal abnormality is one of the main reasons for in vitro fertilization (IVF) failure. This study aimed at evaluating the value of Fluorescence in-situ Hybridization (FISH)-based Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis (PGD) in screening for embryonic chromosomal abnormality to increase the successful rate of IVF. Method: Ten couples, four with high risk of chromosomal abnormality and six infertile couples, underwent FISH-based PGD during IVF procedure. At day 3, one or two blastomeres were aspirated from each embryo. Biopsied blastomeres were examined using FISH analysis to screen out embryos with chromosomal abnormalities. At day 4, embryos without detectable chromosomal abnormality were transferred to the mother bodies as in regular IVF. Results: Among 54 embryos screened using FISH-based PGD, 30 embryos were detected to have chromosomal abnormalities. The 24 healthy embryos were implanted, resulting in four clinical pregnancies, two of which led to successful normal birth of two healthy babies; one to ongoing pregnancy during the writing of this article; and one to ectopic pregnancy. Conclusion: FISH-based PGD is an effective method for detecting embryonic chromosomal abnormality, which is one of the common causes of spontaneous miscarriages and chromosomally unbalanced offsprings.

  20. From nucleosome to chromosome: a dynamic organization of genetic information

    OpenAIRE

    Fransz, P.; Jong, de, M.C.M.

    2011-01-01

    Gene activity is controlled at different levels of chromatin organization, which involve genomic sequences, nucleosome structure, chromatin folding and chromosome arrangement. These levels are interconnected and influence each other. At the basic level nucleosomes generally occlude the DNA sequence from interacting with DNA-binding proteins. Evidently, nucleosome positioning is a major factor in gene control and chromatin organization. Understanding the biological rules that govern the deposi...

  1. Genetic variation of goat Y chromosome in the Sardinian population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonello Carta

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Sardinian goat population is commonly considered a crossbred of autochthonous animals with improved Mediterranean breeds, mainly the Maltese. It has been demonstrated by using autosomal microsatellites that the Sardinian goats can be divided into three subpopulations: Sardinian, crossbred with Maltese, and Maltese. The aim of this study was to evaluate sequence variation at Y chromosome in Sardinian bucks and to integrate autosomal microsatellites data. Blood from 190 bucks from 68 farms spread in the main Sardinian goat farming areas was sampled. Three ECONOGENE project primer pairs plus an additional one corresponding to a total of 7 SNPs were used. For all common SNPs, the most frequent allele corresponded to the ECONOGENE one. The additional analysed SNP showed allelic frequencies similar to the other markers. The comparison with haplotypes based on the 6 common SNPs showed that the Sardinian most frequent haplotype corresponded to the predominant one in Central Europe. Results of this study showed that the Sardinian goat population has 8 haplotypes resulting in a large diversity of paternal lineages. The next step will be linking autosomal information to Y chromosome data. In fact, up to date, it seems unfeasible to detect recent upgrading breeds by using Y chromosome variation only.

  2. Markets for non Genetically Modified Identity Preserved crops and derived products

    OpenAIRE

    Pascal Tillie; Mauro Vigani; Koen Dillen; Emilio Rodríguez Cerezo

    2012-01-01

    The Institute for Prospective Technological Studies (IPTS) of the European Commission’s Joint Research Centre (JRC) is currently undertaking research activities in order to describe the current situation and functioning of the markets for non Genetically Modified Identity Preserved crops and derived products. For this purpose, JRC-IPTS organized an International Workshop on "Markets for non-GM Identity Preserved crops and derived products" in Seville on 21&22 June 2012. This workshop brought ...

  3. Analysis of Y chromosome microdeletions and CFTR gene mutations as genetic markers of infertility in Serbian men

    OpenAIRE

    Dinić Jelena; Kušić Jelena; Nikolić Аleksandra; Divac Aleksandra; Ristanović Momčilo; Radojković Dragica

    2007-01-01

    Background/Aim. Impaired fertility of a male partner is the main cause of infertility in up to one half of all infertile couples. At the genetic level, male infertility can be caused by chromosome aberrations or gene mutations. The presence and types of Y chromosome microdeletions and cystic fybrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene mutations as genetic cause of male infertility was tested in Serbian men. The aim of this study was to analyze CFTR gene mutations and Y chromosome...

  4. Chromosome and genetic testing using ChIP assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohzaki, Hidetsugu; Asano, Maki

    2016-01-01

    Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay can be used to easily visualize information about proteins, DNA, and RNA on chromosomes and is widely used for analysis of genomes, epigenomes, mRNAs, and non-coding RNAs. The ChIP assay can detect, not only DNA-binding proteins of various organisms, but also the temporal and spatial regulating mechanisms of RNA-binding proteins. Because of these features, demand for ChIP assay is expected to grow. Here, by using yeast and Drosophila as examples, we describe the superiority of the improved ChIP assay that we have developed. PMID:27100707

  5. Genetic architecture of sexual dimorphism in a subdioecious plant with a proto-sex chromosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spigler, Rachel B; Lewers, Kim S; Ashman, Tia-Lynn

    2011-04-01

    The rise of sexual dimorphism is thought to coincide with the evolution of sex chromosomes. Yet because sex chromosomes in many species are ancient, we lack empirical evidence of the earliest stages of this transition. We use QTL analysis to examine the genetic architecture of sexual dimorphism in subdioecious octoploid Fragaria virginiana. We demonstrate that the region housing the male-function locus controls the majority of quantitative variation in proportion fruit set, confirming the existence of a proto-sex chromosome, and houses major QTL for eight additional sexually dimorphic traits, consistent with theory and data from animals and plants with more advanced sex chromosomes. We also detected autosomal QTL, demonstrating contributions to phenotypic variation in sexually dimorphic traits outside the sex-determining region. Moreover, for proportion seed set we found significant epistatic interactions between autosomal QTL and the male-function locus, indicating sex-limited QTL. We identified linked QTL reflecting trade-offs between male and female traits expected from theory and positive integration of male traits. These findings indicate the potential for the evolution of greater sexual dimorphism. Involvement of linkage groups homeologous to the proto-sex chromosome in these correlations reflects the polyploid origin of F. virginiana and raises the possibility that chromosomes in this homeologous group were predisposed to become the sex chromosome. PMID:21062281

  6. [Research progress in lampbrush chromosomes and some suggestions for their use in genetics teaching].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanguo, Chen; Qingqing, Li

    2016-02-01

    Lampbrush chromosomes (LBCs) are transient giant transcripts that exist at the diplotene stage of the first meiotic division in female gametocytes of almost all animals except mammals. LBCs are named for their lampbrush-like structure, however, they received the lowest research attention in studies of three classical cytogenetic chromosomes. They have been excellent models for studying the structure, organization, transcription, and transcriptional processing of chromosomes during meiosis. Here we briefly summarized these studies and LBCs forming mechanism and also discussed their possible functions, such as providing enough transcriptional products for embryonic development by oocytes LBCs or polyploidy demonstrated by previous reports. Finally, we discussed the possibility of introducing this typical case into our genetics teaching to inspire students' interest in genetics. PMID:26907781

  7. Culture creates genetic structure in the Caucasus: Autosomal, mitochondrial, and Y-chromosomal variation in Daghestan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harpending Henry C

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Near the junction of three major continents, the Caucasus region has been an important thoroughfare for human migration. While the Caucasus Mountains have diverted human traffic to the few lowland regions that provide a gateway from north to south between the Caspian and Black Seas, highland populations have been isolated by their remote geographic location and their practice of patrilocal endogamy. We investigate how these cultural and historical differences between highland and lowland populations have affected patterns of genetic diversity. We test 1 whether the highland practice of patrilocal endogamy has generated sex-specific population relationships, and 2 whether the history of migration and military conquest associated with the lowland populations has left Central Asian genes in the Caucasus, by comparing genetic diversity and pairwise population relationships between Daghestani populations and reference populations throughout Europe and Asia for autosomal, mitochondrial, and Y-chromosomal markers. Results We found that the highland Daghestani populations had contrasting histories for the mitochondrial DNA and Y-chromosome data sets. Y-chromosomal haplogroup diversity was reduced among highland Daghestani populations when compared to other populations and to highland Daghestani mitochondrial DNA haplogroup diversity. Lowland Daghestani populations showed Turkish and Central Asian affinities for both mitochondrial and Y-chromosomal data sets. Autosomal population histories are strongly correlated to the pattern observed for the mitochondrial DNA data set, while the correlation between the mitochondrial DNA and Y-chromosome distance matrices was weak and not significant. Conclusion The reduced Y-chromosomal diversity exhibited by highland Daghestani populations is consistent with genetic drift caused by patrilocal endogamy. Mitochondrial and Y-chromosomal phylogeographic comparisons indicate a common Near Eastern

  8. Assignment of genetic linkage maps to diploid Solanum tuberosum pachytene chromosomes by BAC-FISH technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tang, X.; Boer, de J.M.; Eck, van H.J.; Bachem, C.W.B.; Visser, R.G.F.; Jong, de J.H.

    2009-01-01

    A cytogenetic map has been developed for diploid potato (Solanum tuberosum), in which the arms of the 12 potato bivalents can be identified in pachytene complements using multicolor fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with a set of 60 genetically anchored bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC)

  9. FASEB Summer Research Conference. Genetic Recombination and Chromosome Rearrangements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jinks-Robertson, Sue

    2002-02-01

    The 2001 meeting entitled ''Genetic Recombination and Genome Rearrangements'' was held July 21-26 in Snowmass, Colorado. The goal of the meeting was to bring together scientists using diverse approaches to study all aspects of genetic recombination. This goal was achieved by integrating talks covering the genetics, biochemistry and structural biology of homologous recombination, site-specific recombination, and nonhomologous recombination. The format of the meeting consisted of a keynote address on the opening evening, two formal plenary sessions on each of the four full meeting days, a single afternoon workshop consisting of short talks chosen from among submitted abstracts, and afternoon poster sessions on each of the four full meeting days. The eight plenary session were entitled: (1) Recombination Mechanisms, (2) Prokaryotic Recombination, (3) Repair and Recombination, (4) Site-specific Recombination and Transposition, (5) Eukaryotic Recombination I, (6) Genome Rearrangements, (7) Meiosis, and (8) Eukaryotic Recombination II. Each session included a mix of genetic, biochemical and structural talks; talks were limited to 20 minutes, followed by 10 minutes of very lively, general discussion. Much of the data presented in the plenary sessions was unpublished, thus providing attendees with the most up-to-date knowledge of this rapidly-moving field.

  10. Cytogenetic and genetic studies of radiation-induced chromosome damage in mouse oocytes. Part 2. Induced chromosome loss and dominant visible mutations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The rates of X-ray induced loss of chromosome 19 in mouse oocytes were investigated in 2 experiments using a genetic complementation test. After 1 Gy of acute X-rays to immediately preovulatory stage oocytes, chromosome 19 loss was estimated to have occurred in 1.68% of cells. In comparison, after 4 Gy of acute X-rays to dictyate stage oocytes, the rate was estimated at 1.18%. The slightly higher rate of chromosome loss in the former cell stage after a smaller dose of radiation reflects the known increased radiosensitivity of mouse oocytes in the period shortly before ovulation. Comparison of the observations here for chromosome 19 with published data for chromosome 1 suggests that chromosome length is one of the principal factors in determining the initial rate of induced loss in mouse oocytes. Ten dominant visible mutations were recovered among 1674 offspring following irradiation of preovulatory oocytes, and 8 in 2025 offspring after treatment of dictyate cells. Nine dominant mutations were karyotyped, 5 of these were found to be associated with a visible chromosome rearrangement. The data obtained in the present study show that radiation-induced chromosome anomalies in female germ cells are not all filtered out by prenatal embryonic death but that a proportion has the potential to contribute to the genetic burden of the next generation

  11. Molecular genetic approach to human meningioma: loss of genes on chromosome 22

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seizinger, B.R.; De La Monte, S.; Atkins, L.; Gusella, J.F.; Martuza, R.L.

    1987-08-01

    A molecular genetic approach employing polymorphic DNA markers has been used to investigate the role of chromosomal aberrations in meningioma, one of the most common tumors of the human nervous system. Comparison of the alleles detected by DNA markers in tumor DNA versus DNA from normal tissue revealed chromosomal alterations present in primary surgical specimens. In agreement with cytogenetic studies of cultured meningiomas, the most frequent alteration detected was loss of heterozygosity on chromosome 22. Forty of 51 patients were constitutionally heterozygous for at least one chromosome 22 DNA marker. Seventeen of the 40 constitutionally heterozygotic patients (43%) displayed hemizygosity for the corresponding marker in their meningioma tumor tissues. Loss of heterozygosity was also detected at a significantly lower frequency for markers on several other autosomes. In view of the striking association between acoustic neuroma and meningioma in bilateral acoustic neurofibromatosis and the discovery that acoustic neuromas display specific loss of genes on chromosome 22, the authors propose that a common mechanism involving chromosome 22 is operative in the development of both tumor types. Fine-structure mapping to reveal partial deletions in meningiomas may provide the means to clone and characterize a gene (or genes) of importance for tumorigenesis in this and possibly other clinically associated tumors of the human nervous system.

  12. Mapping autism risk loci using genetic linkage and chromosomal rearrangements.

    OpenAIRE

    Szatmari, Peter; Paterson, Andrew; Zwaigenbaum, Lonnie; Roberts, Wendy; Brian, Jessica; Liu, Xiao-Qing; Vincent, John; Skaug, Jennifer,; Thompson, Ann; Senman, Lili; Feuk, Lars; Qian, Cheng; Bryson, Susan; Jones, Marshall,; Marshall, Christian

    2007-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) are common, heritable neurodevelopmental conditions. The genetic architecture of ASDs is complex, requiring large samples to overcome heterogeneity. Here we broaden coverage and sample size relative to other studies of ASDs by using Affymetrix 10K SNP arrays and 1,168 families with at least two affected individuals, performing the largest linkage scan to date while also analyzing copy number variation in these families. Linkage and copy number variation analys...

  13. Genetic polymorphisms of 17 short tandem repeat loci on Y chromosome in central Croatian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gršković, Branka; Mršić, Gordan; Polašek, Ozren; Vrdoljak, Andro; Merkaš, Siniša; Anđelinović, Simun

    2011-06-01

    In forensic casework, Y-chromosome short tandem repeat (STR) haplotyping is used in human identification, paternity testing and sexual assault cases where Y-STRs provide a male-specific DNA profile. The aim of this study was to describe the genetic structure of Y chromosome in a central Croatian population. We carried out a statistical analysis of the data from previously performed genetic analyses collected during routine forensic work by the Forensic Science Centre "Ivan Vučetić". A total of 220 unrelated healthy men from central Croatia were selected for the purpose of this study. Genomic DNA was extracted using a Chelex procedure from FTA(®) cards. Y-chromosomal STRs were determined using the AmpFISTR Yfiler PCR amplification kit. The haplotype frequencies were determined by direct counting and analyzed using Arlequin 3.1 and analysis of molecular variance calculated with the Y chromosome haplotype reference database online analysis tool. A total of 212 haplotypes were identified, 204 of which were unique. Total haplotype diversity was 0.993. Locus diversity varied from 0.325 for DYS392 to 0.786 for DYS385. Discrimination capacity was 92.7%. Allele frequencies diversity was 0.615. Intermediate alleles 17.2, 18.2 and 19.2 were found at DYS458 locus. A comparison with published data for the European minimal haplotype set showed the closest relationship to the Croatian capital of Zagreb and Bosnia and Herzegovina with significant genetic distance from Slovenia and Austria. The central Croatian population is now well characterized in terms of Y-chromosome STRs, thus providing a solid basis for further forensic and genetic epidemiology studies. PMID:21279707

  14. Genetic mapping of high caries experience on human chromosome 13

    OpenAIRE

    Erika C Küchler; Deeley, Kathleen; Ho, Bao; Linkowski, Samantha; Meyer, Chelsea; Noel, Jacqueline; Kouzbari, M Zahir; Bezamat, Mariana; José M Granjeiro; Antunes, Leonardo S; Antunes, Livia Azeredo; de Abreu, Fernanda Volpe; Marcelo C. Costa; Tannure, Patricia N; SEYMEN, Figen

    2013-01-01

    Background Our previous genome-wide linkage scan mapped five loci for caries experience. The purpose of this study was to fine map one of these loci, the locus 13q31.1, in order to identify genetic contributors to caries. Methods Seventy-two pedigrees from the Philippines were studied. Caries experience was recorded and DNA was extracted from blood samples obtained from all subjects. Sixty-one single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 13q31.1 were genotyped. Association between caries experie...

  15. Chromosomal and Genetic Analysis of a Human Lung Adenocarcinoma Cell Line OM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong-Wu Li; Lin Bai; Lyu-Xia Dai; Xu He; Xian-Ping Zhou

    2016-01-01

    Background: Lung cancer has become the leading cause of death in many regions.Carcinogenesis is caused by the stepwise accumulation of genetic and chromosomal changes.The aim of this study was to investigate the chromosome and gene alterations in the human lung adenocarcinoma cell line OM.Methods: We used Giemsa banding and multiplex fluorescence in situ hybridization focusing on the human lung adenocarcinoma cell line OM to analyze its chromosome alterations.In addition, the gains and losses in the specific chromosome regions were identified by comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) and the amplifications of cancer-related genes were also detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR).Results: We identified a large number of chromosomal numerical alterations on all chromosomes except chromosome X and 19.Chromosome 10 is the most frequently involved in translocations with six different interchromosomal translocations.CGH revealed the gains on chromosome regions of 3q25.3-28, 5p13, 12q22-23.24, and the losses on 3p25-26, 6p25, 6q26-27, 7q34-36, 8p22-23, 9p21-24, 10q25-26.3, 12p 13.31-13.33 and 17p 13.1-13.3.And PCR showed the amplification of genes: Membrane metalloendopeptidase (MME), sucrase-isomaltase (SI), butyrylcholinesterase (BCHE), and kininogen (KNG).Conclusions: The lung adenocarcinoma cell line OM exhibited multiple complex karyotypes, and chromosome 10 was frequently involved in chromosomal translocation, which may play key roles in tumorigenesis.We speculated that the oncogenes may be located at 3q25.3-28, 5p13, 12q22-23.24, while tumor suppressor genes may exist in 3p25-26, 6p25, 6q26-27, 7q34-36, 8p22-23, 9p21-24, 10q25-26.3, 12p 13.31-13.33, and 17p 13.1-13.3.Moreover, at least four genes (MME, SI, BCHE, and KNG) may be involved in the human lung adenocarcinoma cell line OM.

  16. Genetic map of the Bacillus stearothermophilus NUB36 chromosome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vallier, H.; Welker, N.E. (Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (USA))

    1990-02-01

    A circular genetic map of Bacillus stearothermophilus NUB36 was constructed by transduction with bacteriophage TP-42C and protoplast fusion. Sixty-four genes were tentatively assigned a cognate Bacillus subtilis gene based on growth response to intermediates or end products of metabolism, cross-feeding, accumulation of intermediates, or their relative order in a linkage group. Although the relative position of many genes on the Bacillus subtilis genetic map appears to be similar, some differences were detected. The tentative order of the genes in the Bacillus stearothermophilus aro region is aspB-aroBAFEC-tyra-hisH-(trp), whereas it is aspB-aroE-tyrA-hisH-(trp)-aroHBF in Bacillus subtilis. The aroA, aroC, and aroG genes in Bacillus subtilis are located in another region. The tentative order of genes in the trp operon of Bacillus stearothermophilus is trpFCDABE, whereas it is trpABFCDE in Bacillus subtilis.

  17. Thai pigs and cattle production, genetic diversity of livestock and strategies for preserving animal genetic resources

    OpenAIRE

    Kesinee Gatphayak

    2013-01-01

    This paper reviews the current situation of livestock production in Thailand, genetic diversity and evaluation, as well as management strategies for animal genetic resources focusing on pigs and cattle. Sustainable conservation of indigenous livestock as a genetic resource and vital components within the agricultural biodiversity domain is a great challenge as well as an asset for the future development of livestock production in Thailand.

  18. Meiosis I: When Chromosomes Undergo Extreme Makeover

    OpenAIRE

    Miller, Matthew P.; Amon, Angelika; Ünal, Elçin

    2013-01-01

    The ultimate success of cell division relies on the accurate partitioning of the genetic material. Errors in this process occur in nearly all tumors and are the leading cause of miscarriages and congenital birth defects in humans. Two cell divisions, mitosis and meiosis, use common as well as unique mechanisms to ensure faithful chromosome segregation. In mitosis, alternating rounds of DNA replication and chromosome segregation preserves the chromosome complement of the progenitor cell. In co...

  19. Developmental Genetics of the 2c-D Region of the Drosophila X Chromosome

    OpenAIRE

    Perrimon, Norbert; Engstrom, Lee; Mahowald, Anthony P.

    1985-01-01

    We have conducted a genetic and developmental analysis of genes within the 2C-D area of the X chromosome. Phenotypes of 33 mutations representing nine adjacent complementation groups including eight recessive lethals and one visible homeotic mutation (polyhomeotic) are described. Germline clonal analysis of the eight zygotic lethals has revealed three types of gene requirements: (1) normal activity at two pupal lethal loci (corkscrew and C204) and one larval lethal locus (ultraspiracle) is r...

  20. Discovery of Genetic Variation on Chromosome 5q22 Associated with Mortality in Heart Failure

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, J. Gustav; Felix, Janine F.; Morrison, Alanna C.; Kalogeropoulos, Andreas; Trompet, Stella; Wilk, Jemma B.; Gidlöf, Olof; Wang, Xinchen; Morley, Michael; Mendelson, Michael; Joehanes, Roby; Ligthart, Symen; Shan, Xiaoyin; Bis, Joshua C.; Wang, Ying A.

    2016-01-01

    Failure of the human heart to maintain sufficient output of blood for the demands of the body, heart failure, is a common condition with high mortality even with modern therapeutic alternatives. To identify molecular determinants of mortality in patients with new-onset heart failure, we performed a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies and follow-up genotyping in independent populations. We identified and replicated an association for a genetic variant on chromosome 5q22 with 36% i...

  1. The Hmong Diaspora: preserved South-East Asian genetic ancestry in French Guianese Asians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brucato, Nicolas; Mazières, Stéphane; Guitard, Evelyne; Giscard, Pierre-Henri; Bois, Etienne; Larrouy, Georges; Dugoujon, Jean-Michel

    2012-01-01

    The Hmong Diaspora is one of the widest modern human migrations. Mainly localised in South-East Asia, the United States of America, and metropolitan France, a small community has also settled the Amazonian forest of French Guiana. We have biologically analysed 62 individuals of this unique Guianese population through three complementary genetic markers: mitochondrial DNA (HVS-I/II and coding region SNPs), Y-chromosome (SNPs and STRs), and the Gm allotypic system. All genetic systems showed a high conservation of the Asian gene pool (Asian ancestry: mtDNA=100.0%; NRY=99.1%; Gm=96.6%), without a trace of founder effect. When compared across various Asian populations, the highest correlations were observed with Hmong-Mien groups still living in South-East Asia (Fst<0.05; P-value<0.05). Despite a long history punctuated by exodus, the French Guianese Hmong have maintained their original genetic diversity. PMID:23199638

  2. Plant artificial chromosome technology and its potential application in genetic engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Weichang; Yau, Yuan-Yeu; Birchler, James A

    2016-05-01

    Genetic engineering with just a few genes has changed agriculture in the last 20 years. The most frequently used transgenes are the herbicide resistance genes for efficient weed control and the Bt toxin genes for insect resistance. The adoption of the first-generation genetically engineered crops has been very successful in improving farming practices, reducing the application of pesticides that are harmful to both human health and the environment, and producing more profit for farmers. However, there is more potential for genetic engineering to be realized by technical advances. The recent development of plant artificial chromosome technology provides a super vector platform, which allows the management of a large number of genes for the next generation of genetic engineering. With the development of other tools such as gene assembly, genome editing, gene targeting and chromosome delivery systems, it should become possible to engineer crops with multiple genes to produce more agricultural products with less input of natural resources to meet future demands. PMID:26369910

  3. GENETIC POLYMORPHISM OF SIX Y CHROMOSOMAL STR IN CHINESE HUI ETHNIC GROUP

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhu Bofeng; Lü Guiping; Yao Guifa; Zhu Jun; Dong Hongwang; Sun Qingdong; Huang Lei; Liu Yao

    2005-01-01

    Objective To study genetic polymorphism of 6 Y chromosomal STR in Hui ethnic group living in Ningxia Hui ethnic autonomous region, in order to evaluate their usefulness in forensic science and enrich the Chinese genetic information resources. Methods We investigated 101 unrelated, healthy, male individuals of Hui ethnic group and studied their allelic frequency distribution and haplotype diversity of 6 Y chromosomal STR. Primer for each loci was labeled with the fluorescent by FAM (blue) or TAMRA(yellow). The data of Hui ethnic group were generated co-amplification, GeneScan, genotype, and genetic distribution analysis. Results 31 alleles and 43 phenotype(DYS385) were detected, with the frequencies ranging from 0.0099-0.7129. Out of a total of 101 individuals, 96 showed different haplotypes; 91 were unique; 5 were found 2 times. The haplotype diversity for 6 Y-STR loci was 0.9990. Conclusion The date obtained can be valuable for individual identification, paternity testing in forensic fields and for population genetics because of 6 Y-STR loci high polymorphism.

  4. Inter-chromosomal variation in the pattern of human population genetic structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baye Tesfaye M

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Emerging technologies now make it possible to genotype hundreds of thousands of genetic variations in individuals, across the genome. The study of loci at finer scales will facilitate the understanding of genetic variation at genomic and geographic levels. We examined global and chromosomal variations across HapMap populations using 3.7 million single nucleotide polymorphisms to search for the most stratified genomic regions of human populations and linked these regions to ontological annotation and functional network analysis. To achieve this, we used five complementary statistical and genetic network procedures: principal component (PC, cluster, discriminant, fixation index (FST and network/pathway analyses. At the global level, the first two PC scores were sufficient to account for major population structure; however, chromosomal level analysis detected subtle forms of population structure within continental populations, and as many as 31 PCs were required to classify individuals into homogeneous groups. Using recommended population ancestry differentiation measures, a total of 126 regions of the genome were catalogued. Gene ontology and networks analyses revealed that these regions included the genes encoding oculocutaneous albinism II (OCA2, hect domain and RLD 2 (HERC2, ectodysplasin A receptor (EDAR and solute carrier family 45, member 2 (SLC45A2. These genes are associated with melanin production, which is involved in the development of skin and hair colour, skin cancer and eye pigmentation. We also identified the genes encoding interferon-γ (IFNG and death-associated protein kinase 1 (DAPK1, which are associated with cell death, inflammatory and immunological diseases. An in-depth understanding of these genomic regions may help to explain variations in adaptation to different environments. Our approach offers a comprehensive strategy for analysing chromosome-based population structure and differentiation, and demonstrates the

  5. XWAS: A Software Toolset for Genetic Data Analysis and Association Studies of the X Chromosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Feng; Chang, Diana; Biddanda, Arjun; Ma, Li; Guo, Yingjie; Zhou, Zilu; Keinan, Alon

    2015-01-01

    XWAS is a new software suite for the analysis of the X chromosome in association studies and similar genetic studies. The X chromosome plays an important role in human disease and traits of many species, especially those with sexually dimorphic characteristics. Special attention needs to be given to its analysis due to the unique inheritance pattern, which leads to analytical complications that have resulted in the majority of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) either not considering X or mishandling it with toolsets that had been designed for non-sex chromosomes. We hence developed XWAS to fill the need for tools that are specially designed for analysis of X. Following extensive, stringent, and X-specific quality control, XWAS offers an array of statistical tests of association, including: 1) the standard test between a SNP (single nucleotide polymorphism) and disease risk, including after first stratifying individuals by sex, 2) a test for a differential effect of a SNP on disease between males and females, 3) motivated by X-inactivation, a test for higher variance of a trait in heterozygous females as compared with homozygous females, and 4) for all tests, a version that allows for combining evidence from all SNPs across a gene. We applied the toolset analysis pipeline to 16 GWAS datasets of immune-related disorders and 7 risk factors of coronary artery disease, and discovered several new X-linked genetic associations. XWAS will provide the tools and incentive for others to incorporate the X chromosome into GWAS and similar studies in any species with an XX/XY system, hence enabling discoveries of novel loci implicated in many diseases and in their sexual dimorphism. PMID:26268243

  6. Genetic integrity of the human Y chromosome exposed to groundwater arsenic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Sher

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Arsenic is a known human carcinogen reported to cause chromosomal deletions and genetic anomalies in cultured cells. The vast human population inhabiting the Ganges delta in West Bengal, India and Bangladesh is exposed to critical levels of arsenic present in the groundwater. The genetic and physiological mechanism of arsenic toxicity in the human body is yet to be fully established. In addition, lack of animal models has made work on this line even more challenging. Methods Human male blood samples were collected with their informed consent from 5 districts in West Bengal having groundwater arsenic level more than 50 μg/L. Isolation of genomic DNA and preparation of metaphase chromosomes was done using standard protocols. End point PCR was performed for established sequence tagged sites to ascertain the status of recombination events. Single nucleotide variants of candidate genes and amplicons were carried out using appropriate restriction enzymes. The copy number of DYZ1 array per haploid genome was calculated using real time PCR and its chromosomal localization was done by fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH. Results We studied effects of arsenic exposure on the human Y chromosome in males from different areas of West Bengal focusing on known recombination events (P5-P1 proximal; P5-P1 distal; gr/gr; TSPY-TSPY, b1/b3 and b2/b3, single nucleotide variants (SNVs of a few candidate Y-linked genes (DAZ, TTY4, BPY2, GOLGA2LY and the amplicons of AZFc region. Also, possible chromosomal reorganization of DYZ1 repeat arrays was analyzed. Barring a few microdeletions, no major changes were detected in blood DNA samples. SNV analysis showed a difference in some alleles. Similarly, DYZ1 arrays signals detected by FISH were found to be affected in some males. Conclusions Our Y chromosome analysis suggests that the same is protected from the effects of arsenic by some unknown mechanisms maintaining its structural and functional

  7. Genetic data from Y chromosome STR and SNP loci in Ukrainian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mielnik-Sikorska, Marta; Daca, Patrycja; Woźniak, Marcin; Malyarchuk, Boris A; Bednarek, Jarosław; Dobosz, Tadeusz; Grzybowski, Tomasz

    2013-01-01

    We have tested a sample of 154 unrelated males from Lviv region (Ukraine) for 11 Y-chromosomal single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and 17 Y-chromosomal STR loci (DYS19, DYS385a, DYS385b, DYS389I, DYS389II, DYS390, DYS391, DYS392, DYS393, DYS437, DYS438, DYS439, DYS448, DYS456, DYS458, DYS635, YGATA_H4.1). Haplotype and haplogroup diversity values were calculated for the population under study. Genetic distances (R(ST)) to 9 other Slavic populations were calculated based on 12 Y-STR loci. Haplotype frequencies and MDS plots were constructed based on genetic distances. Haplogroup frequency patterns revealed in Ukraine are similar to those characteristic of other European populations. However, it also allowed for identification a specific genetic component in Ukrainian sample which seems to originate from areas dwelled by Western Slavs, i.e. subhaplogroup R1a1a7, at frequency of 13.65%. Analysis of R(ST) distances and AMOVA revealed high level of heterogeneity between Slavic populations inhabiting the south and north part of Europe, determined geographically rather than by linguistic factors. It has also been found a closer similarity (in the values of R(ST)) between Ukrainian and Slovak populations than between Ukrainians and other Slavic population samples. PMID:22673612

  8. Physical and genetic map of the Clostridium saccharobutylicum (formerly Clostridium acetobutylicum) NCP 262 chromosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keis, S; Sullivan, J T; Jones, D T

    2001-07-01

    A physical and genetic map of the Clostridium saccharobutylicum NCP 262 chromosome was constructed. The order of macrorestriction fragments was determined by analysing fragments generated after single and double digestion with the restriction enzymes BssHII, I-CeuI, Sse8387I, RsrII and SfiI and separation by PFGE. The I-CeuI backbone of C. saccharobutylicum was constructed by indirect end-labelling with rrs- and 3' rrl-specific probes located on either side of the I-CeuI site in the rrn operon, and reciprocal separation of BssHII and I-CeuI digestion products by two-dimensional PFGE. The positions of BssHII fragments on the physical map were determined using a library of linking clones containing BssHII cleavage sites. The size of the circular genome was estimated to be 5.3 Mb with a mean resolution of approximately 140 kb. The chromosome of C. saccharobutylicum contains 12 rrn operons, located on 46% of the chromosome, which are transcribed divergently from the deduced origin of replication. The genetic map was constructed by determining the location of 28 genes involved in house-keeping, heat-shock response, sporulation, electron transfer and acid- and solvent-formation. Comparison of the C. saccharobutylicum genetic map with those of the spore-forming bacteria Bacillus subtilis, Clostridium acetobutylicum, Clostridium perfringens and Clostridium beijerinckii indicated C. saccharobutylicum to be most similar to the latter two Clostridium species, with the order of the genes within the gyrAB and recA loci being conserved. PMID:11429467

  9. [The construction of the genetic map and QTL locating analysis on chromosome 2 in swine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Yan-Chun; Deng, Chang-Yan; Xiong, Yuan-Zhu; Zheng, Rong; Yu, Li; Su, Yu-Hong; Liu, Gui-Lan

    2002-01-01

    The study constructed the genetic linkage map of porcine chromosome 2 and further analysis of quantitative trait loci was conducted. The results of the study demonstrated that all 7 microsatellite loci we chose were with relatively high polymorphism, and its polymorphic information content was from 0.40182 to 0.58477. The genetic map we constructed for resource family was 152.9 cM in length, with the order of all loci highly consistent with the USDA map. All marker intervals were longer than USDA map with the interval between marker Sw2516 and Sw1201 as an exception. Furthermore, we conducted QTLs locating analysis by combining the genetic map with the phenotypic data. QTLs affecting lively estimated traits such as lean meat percentage, were located at 60-65 cM on chromosome 2, while QTLs for the height and marbling of Longissmus dorsi muscle were located at 20 cM and 55 cM, respectively Among them, QTL for estimated lean meat percentage was significant at chromosome-wise level (P < 0.01) and was responsible for 21.55% of the phenotypic variance. QTLs for the height and marbling of Longissmus dorsi muscle were responsible for 10.12% and 10.97% of the phenotypic variance, respectively. The additive and dominance effect of lively estimated traits were in the inverse tendency, while the QTL for the height of Longissmus dorsi muscle had its additive and dominance effect in the same tendency and was with advantageous allele in Large White. The QTLs we detected had relatively large effect on phenotype and built a basis for molecular marker assisted selection and breeding. PMID:12645259

  10. Genetic population study of 11 Y chromosome STR loci in Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsaloulis, Panayotis; Tsekoura, Konstantina; Vouropoulou, Maria; Miniati, Penelope

    2013-05-01

    Statistical properties of eleven Y chromosome Short Tandem Repeat (STR) markers were analyzed (DYS391, DYS389I, DYS439, DYS389II, DYS438, DYS437, DYS19, DYS392, DYS393, DYS390 and DYS385) in a Greek population sample. The 200 subjects where distributed across Greece, from various Peripheries. 182 distinct haplotypes were found. To validate our results gene diversity has been calculated for the whole population, as well as for each locus individually. Genetic distance has been estimated between this population and Albanian, Egyptian, Italian and Turkish populations. The results indicate that all Y loci are useful for forensic sciences. PMID:23582698

  11. Genetic imbalance on chromosome 17 in papillary serous carcinoma of the peritoneum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandera, C A; Muto, M G; Welch, W R; Berkowitz, R S; Mok, S C

    1998-07-01

    We extend the evaluation of allelic loss patterns on chromosome 17 to papillary serous carcinoma of the peritoneum (PSCP) which is histologically identical to papillary serous ovarian carcinoma (PSOC). DNA was obtained from 11 archival cases of PSCP, with 1-11 tumor sites per case. Using ten loci spanning chromosome 17, loss of heterozygosity (LOH) was identified in all 11 cases (100%). Furthermore, 75-100% of informative cases exhibited LOH at the loci p53, D17S1322 (intragenic to the tumor suppressor gene BRCA1), D17S1327 and MPO. PSCP cases exhibit a higher rate of LOH at most loci when compared with PSOC. Alternating allelic loss at different tumor sites was identified in three cases supporting a multifocal origin of PSCP. Microsatellite instability (MI) is an uncommon event which was identified in four cases. These data implicate chromosome 17 as a potential location of genetic events important in the pathogenesis of PSCP as well as ovarian cancer. PMID:9692553

  12. Testing for Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium at biallelic genetic markers on the X chromosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graffelman, J; Weir, B S

    2016-06-01

    Testing genetic markers for Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE) is an important tool for detecting genotyping errors in large-scale genotyping studies. For markers at the X chromosome, typically the χ(2) or exact test is applied to the females only, and the hemizygous males are considered to be uninformative. In this paper we show that the males are relevant, because a difference in allele frequency between males and females may indicate HWE not to hold. The testing of markers on the X chromosome has received little attention, and in this paper we lay down the foundation for testing biallelic X-chromosomal markers for HWE. We develop four frequentist statistical test procedures for X-linked markers that take both males and females into account: the χ(2) test, likelihood ratio test, exact test and permutation test. Exact tests that include males are shown to have a better Type I error rate. Empirical data from the GENEVA project on venous thromboembolism is used to illustrate the proposed tests. Results obtained with the new tests differ substantially from tests that are based on female genotype counts only. The new tests detect differences in allele frequencies and seem able to uncover additional genotyping error that would have gone unnoticed in HWE tests based on females only. PMID:27071844

  13. Temporal differentiation across a West-European Y-chromosomal cline: genealogy as a tool in human population genetics

    OpenAIRE

    Larmuseau, Maarten HD; Ottoni, Claudio; Raeymaekers, Joost AM; Vanderheyden, Nancy; Larmuseau, Hendrik FM; Decorte, Ronny

    2011-01-01

    The pattern of population genetic variation and allele frequencies within a species are unstable and are changing over time according to different evolutionary factors. For humans, it is possible to combine detailed patrilineal genealogical records with deep Y-chromosome (Y-chr) genotyping to disentangle signals of historical population genetic structures because of the exponential increase in genetic genealogical data. To test this approach, we studied the temporal pattern of the ‘autochthon...

  14. Analysis of Y chromosome microdeletions and CFTR gene mutations as genetic markers of infertility in Serbian men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinić Jelena

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Impaired fertility of a male partner is the main cause of infertility in up to one half of all infertile couples. At the genetic level, male infertility can be caused by chromosome aberrations or gene mutations. The presence and types of Y chromosome microdeletions and cystic fybrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR gene mutations as genetic cause of male infertility was tested in Serbian men. The aim of this study was to analyze CFTR gene mutations and Y chromosome microdelations as potential causes of male infertility in Serbian patients, as well as to test the hypothesis that CFTR mutations in infertile men are predominantly located in the several last exons of the gene. Methods. This study has encompassed 33 men with oligo- or azoospermia. The screening for Y chromosome microdeletions in the azoospermia factor (AZF region was performed by multiplex PCR analysis. The screening of the CFTR gene was performed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE method. Results. Deletions on Y chromosome were detected in four patients, predominantly in AZFc region (four of total six deletions. Mutations in the CFTR gene were detected on eight out of 66 analyzed chromosomes of infertile men. The most common mutation was F508del (six of total eight mutations. Conclusion. This study confirmed that both Y chromosome microdeletions and CFTR gene mutations played important role in etiology of male infertility in Serbian infertile men. Genetic testing for Y chromosome microdeletions and CFTR gene mutations has been introduced in routine diagnostics and offered to couples undergoing assisted reproduction techniques. Considering that both the type of Y chromosome microdeletion and the type of CFTR mutation have a prognostic value, it is recommended that AZF and CFTR genotyping should not only be performed in patients with reduced sperm quality before undergoing assisted reproduction, but also for the purpose of preimplantation and

  15. Chromosomal Rearrangements as Barriers to Genetic Homogenization between Archaic and Modern Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Rebekah L

    2015-12-01

    Chromosomal rearrangements, which shuffle DNA throughout the genome, are an important source of divergence across taxa. Using a paired-end read approach with Illumina sequence data for archaic humans, I identify changes in genome structure that occurred recently in human evolution. Hundreds of rearrangements indicate genomic trafficking between the sex chromosomes and autosomes, raising the possibility of sex-specific changes. Additionally, genes adjacent to genome structure changes in Neanderthals are associated with testis-specific expression, consistent with evolutionary theory that new genes commonly form with expression in the testes. I identify one case of new-gene creation through transposition from the Y chromosome to chromosome 10 that combines the 5'-end of the testis-specific gene Fank1 with previously untranscribed sequence. This new transcript experienced copy number expansion in archaic genomes, indicating rapid genomic change. Among rearrangements identified in Neanderthals, 13% are transposition of selfish genetic elements, whereas 32% appear to be ectopic exchange between repeats. In Denisovan, the pattern is similar but numbers are significantly higher with 18% of rearrangements reflecting transposition and 40% ectopic exchange between distantly related repeats. There is an excess of divergent rearrangements relative to polymorphism in Denisovan, which might result from nonuniform rates of mutation, possibly reflecting a burst of transposable element activity in the lineage that led to Denisovan. Finally, loci containing genome structure changes show diminished rates of introgression from Neanderthals into modern humans, consistent with the hypothesis that rearrangements serve as barriers to gene flow during hybridization. Together, these results suggest that this previously unidentified source of genomic variation has important biological consequences in human evolution. PMID:26399483

  16. Genetic portrait of Tamil non-tribal and Irula tribal population using Y chromosome STR markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghunath, Rajshree; Krishnamoorthy, Kamalakshi; Balasubramanian, Lakshmi; Kunka Mohanram, Ramkumar

    2016-03-01

    The 17 Y chromosomal short tandem repeat loci included in the AmpFlSTR® Yfiler™ PCR Amplification Kit were used to analyse the genetic diversity of 517 unrelated males representing the non-tribal and Irula tribal population of Tamil Nadu. A total of 392 unique haplotypes were identified among the 400 non-tribal samples whereas 111 were observed among the 117 Irula tribal samples. Rare alleles for the loci DYS458, DYS635 and YGATAH4.1 were also observed in both population. The haplotype diversity for the non-tribal and Irula tribal population were found to be 0.9999, and the gene diversity ranged from 0.2041 (DYS391) to 0.9612 (DYS385). Comparison of the test population with 26 national and global population using principal coordinate analysis (PCoA) and determination of the genetic distance matrix using phylogenetic molecular analysis indicate a clustering of the Tamil Nadu non-tribal and Irula tribal population away from other unrelated population and proximity towards some Indo-European (IE) and Asian population. Data are available in the Y chromosome haplotype reference database (YHRD) under accession number YA004055 for Tamil non-tribal and YA004056 for the Irula tribal group. PMID:26024794

  17. Genetic admixture history of Eastern Indonesia as revealed by Y-chromosome and mitochondrial DNA analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mona, Stefano; Grunz, Katharina E; Brauer, Silke; Pakendorf, Brigitte; Castrì, Loredana; Sudoyo, Herawati; Marzuki, Sangkot; Barnes, Robert H; Schmidtke, Jörg; Stoneking, Mark; Kayser, Manfred

    2009-08-01

    Eastern Indonesia possesses more linguistic diversity than any other region in Southeast Asia, with both Austronesian (AN) languages that are of East Asian origin, as well as non-Austronesian (NAN) languages of likely Melanesian origin. Here, we investigated the genetic history of human populations from seven eastern Indonesian islands, including AN and NAN speakers, as well as the relationship between languages and genes, by means of nonrecombining Y-chromosomal (NRY) and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) analysis. We found that the eastern Indonesian gene pool consists of East Asian as well as Melanesian components, as might be expected based on linguistic evidence, but also harbors putative indigenous eastern Indonesian signatures that perhaps reflect the initial occupation of the Wallacea by aboriginal hunter-gatherers already in Palaeolithic times. Furthermore, both NRY and mtDNA data showed a complete lack of correlation between linguistic and genetic relationships, most likely reflecting genetic admixture and/or language shift. In addition, we noted a small fraction of the NRY and mtDNA data shared between eastern Indonesians and Australian Aborigines likely reflecting an ancient link between Asia and Australia. Our data thus provide insights into the complex genetic ancestry history of eastern Indonesian islanders characterized by several admixture episodes and demonstrate a clear example of the lack of the often-assumed correlation between the genes and languages of human populations. PMID:19414523

  18. Genetic determination of chromosomal radiosensitivities in G0- and G2-phase human lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: The radiosensitivity of human lymphocytes measured using a G0- or G2-assay has been linked with an individual's risk of developing normal tissue complications following radiotherapy. This study was performed to increase basic knowledge of the genetics of the human radiation response, and chromosomal aberration induction in particular. Materials and methods: The study was carried out with blood samples taken from 15 monozygotic twin pairs. G0-assay was performed for cells irradiated with 6 Gy counting only deletions and G2-assay for cells irradiated with 0.5 Gy scoring only chromatid breaks. Results: The mean number of deletions measured at 6 Gy for all 30 samples using the G0-assay amounted to 2.96 ± 0.37 (means ± SD), which corresponds to a coefficient of variation (CV) of 13%. There is a highly significant intra-pair correlation for this number among twins (r 2 = 0.911) demonstrating that this parameter is mostly determined by genetic factors. According to the mean number of deletions, a theoretical classification based on the definition =MV + SD as sensitive was made, identifying two pairs as sensitive or resistant, respectively, while nine were normal and two pairs are intermediate. For chromatid breaks measured at 0.5 Gy with the G2-assay the mean number was 1.35 ± 0.42 (means ± SD) corresponding to a CV of 31%. There was again a strong intra-pair correlation among twins with r 2 = 0.837 showing that this sensitivity is also determined mostly by genetic factors. There was, however, no inter-assay correlation between the G0- and G2-sensitivity (r 2 = 0.006) demonstrating that these two sensitivities depend on different genetic factors. Conclusion: The chromosomal radiosensitivity of lymphocytes as defined by G0- or G2-assay is largely determined by different genetic factors, which may allow the use of genetic profiling as an indicator of the respective individual radiosensitivity

  19. Dissection and cytological mapping of barley chromosome 2H in the genetic background of common wheat

    OpenAIRE

    Joshi, Giri Prasad; Nasuda, Shuhei; Endo, Takashi R.

    2011-01-01

    We used gametocidal (Gc) chromosomes 2C and 3C[SAT] to dissect barley 2H added to common wheat. The Gc chromosome induces chromosomal breakage resulting in chromosomal aberrations in the progeny of the 2H addition line of common wheat carrying the monosomic Gc chromosome. We conducted in situ hybridization to select plants carrying structurally rearranged aberrant 2H chromosomes and characterized them by sequential C-banding and in situ hybridization. We established 66 dissection lines of com...

  20. Genetic polymorphism of human Y chromosome and risk factors for cardiovascular diseases: a study in WOBASZ cohort.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grażyna Kostrzewa

    Full Text Available Genetic variants of Y chromosome predispose to hypertension in rodents, whereas in humans the evidence is conflicting. Our purpose was to study the distribution of a panel of Y chromosome markers in a cohort from a cross-sectional population-based study on the prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors in Poland (WOBASZ study. The HindIII, YAP Y chromosome variants, previously shown to influence blood pressure, lipid traits or height, as well as SNPs defining main Y chromosome haplogroups, were typed in 3026, 2783 and 2652 samples, respectively. In addition, 4 subgroups (N~100 each representing extremes of LDL concentration or blood pressure (BP were typed for a panel of 17 STRs. The HindIII and YAP polymorphism were not associated with any of the studied traits. Analysis of the haplogroup distribution showed an association between higher HDL level and hg I-M170 (P = 0.02, higher LDL level and hg F*(xI-M170, J2-M172, K-M9 (P = 0.03 and lower BMI and hg N3-Tat (P = 0.04. Analysis of STRs did not show statistically significant differences. Since all these associations lost statistical significance after Bonferroni correction, we conclude that a major role of Y chromosome genetic variation (defined by HindIII, YAP or main Y chromosome haplogroups in determining cardiovascular risk in Poles is unlikely.

  1. Sex chromosome linked genetic variance and the evolution of sexual dimorphism of quantitative traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husby, Arild; Schielzeth, Holger; Forstmeier, Wolfgang; Gustafsson, Lars; Qvarnström, Anna

    2013-03-01

    Theory predicts that sex chromsome linkage should reduce intersexual genetic correlations thereby allowing the evolution of sexual dimorphism. Empirical evidence for sex linkage has come largely from crosses and few studies have examined how sexual dimorphism and sex linkage are related within outbred populations. Here, we use data on an array of different traits measured on over 10,000 individuals from two pedigreed populations of birds (collared flycatcher and zebra finch) to estimate the amount of sex-linked genetic variance (h(2)z ). Of 17 traits examined, eight showed a nonzero h(2)Z estimate but only four were significantly different from zero (wing patch size and tarsus length in collared flycatchers, wing length and beak color in zebra finches). We further tested how sexual dimorphism and the mode of selection operating on the trait relate to the proportion of sex-linked genetic variance. Sexually selected traits did not show higher h(2)Z than morphological traits and there was only a weak positive relationship between h(2)Z and sexual dimorphism. However, given the relative scarcity of empirical studies, it is premature to make conclusions about the role of sex chromosome linkage in the evolution of sexual dimorphism. PMID:23461313

  2. Population genetic study of 34 X-Chromosome markers in 5 main ethnic groups of China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Suhua; Bian, Yingnan; Li, Li; Sun, Kuan; wang, Zheng; Zhao, Qi; Zha, Lagabaiyila; Cai, Jifeng; Gao, Yuzhen; Ji, Chaoneng; Li, Chengtao

    2015-01-01

    As a multi-ethnic country, China has some indigenous population groups which vary in culture and social customs, perhaps as a result of geographic isolation and different traditions. However, upon close interactions and intermarriage, admixture of different gene pools among these ethnic groups may occur. In order to gain more insight on the genetic background of X-Chromosome from these ethnic groups, a set of X-markers (18 X-STRs and 16 X-Indels) was genotyped in 5 main ethnic groups of China (HAN, HUI, Uygur, Mongolian, Tibetan). Twenty-three private alleles were detected in HAN, Uygur, Tibetan and Mongolian. Significant differences (p < 0.0001) were all observed for the 3 parameters of heterozygosity (Ho, He and UHe) among the 5 ethnic groups. Highest values of Nei genetic distance were always observed at HUI-Uygur pairwise when analyzed with X-STRs or X-Indels separately and combined. Phylogenetic tree and PCA analyses revealed a clear pattern of population differentiation of HUI and Uygur. However, the HAN, Tibetan and Mongolian ethnic groups were closely clustered. Eighteen X-Indels exhibited in general congruent phylogenetic signal and similar cluster among the 5 ethnic groups compared with 16 X-STRs. Aforementioned results proved the genetic polymorphism and potential of the 34 X-markers in the 5 ethnic groups. PMID:26634331

  3. GENETIC ALTERRATIONS OF MICROSATELLITE MARKERS AT CHROMOSOME 17 IN NON-SMALL CELL LUNG CANCER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO; Xue-jun

    2001-01-01

    [1]Froudarakis ME, Bouros D, Spandidos DA, et al. Microsatellite instability and loss of heterozygosity at chromosomes 17 in non-small cell lung cancer [J]. Chest 1998; 113:1091.[2]Fong KM, Zimmerman PV, Smith PJ. Microsatellite instability and other molecular abnormalities in non-small cell lung cancer [J]. Cancer Res 1994; 54:2098.[3]Mountain CF. A new international staging system for lung cancer [J]. Chest 1986; 89(suppl):225.[4]Shridhar V, Siegfried J, Hunt J, et al. Genetic instability of microsatellite sequences in many non-small cell lung carcinomas [J]. Cancer Res 1994; 54:2084.[5]Loeb LA. Microsatellite instability: Marker of a mutator phenotype in cancer [J]. Cancer Res 1994; 54:5059.[6]Sanchez CM, Monzo M, Rosell R, et al. Detection of chromosome 3p alterations in serum DNA of non-small cell lung cancer patients [J]. Ann Oncol 1989; 113.

  4. Genetic and radiation hybrid mapping of the hyperekplexia region on chromosome 5q

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryan, S.G.; O' Connell, P. (Univ. of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio (United States)); Dixon, M.J. (Univ. of Manchester (United Kingdom)); Nigro, M.A. (Wayne State Univ., Detroit, MI (United States)); Kelts, K.A. (Black Hills Neurology, Rapid City, SD (United States)); Markand, O.N. (Indiana Univ., Indianopolis (United States)); Shiang, R.; Wasmuth, J.J. (Univ. of California, Irvine (United States)); Terry, J.C.

    1992-12-01

    Hyperekplexia, or startle disease (STHE), is an autosomal dominant neurologic disorder characterized by muscular rigidity of central nervous system origin, particularly in the neonatal period, and by an exaggerated startle response to sudden, unexpected acoustic or tactile stimuli. STHE responds dramatically to the benzodiazepine drug clonazepam, which acts at gamma-aminobutyric acid type A (GABA-A) receptors. The STHE locus (STHE) was recently assigned to chromosome 5q, on the basis of tight linkage to the colony-stimulating factor 1-receptor (CSF1-R) locus in a single large family. The authors performed linkage analysis in the original and three additional STHE pedigrees with eight chromosome 5q microsatellite markers and placed several of the most closely linked markers on an existing radiation hybrid (RH) map of the region. The results provide strong evidence for genetic locus homogeneity and assign STHE to a 5.9-cM interval defined by CSF1-R and D5S379, which are separated by an RH map distance of 74 centirays (roughly 2.2-3.7 Mb). Two polymorphic markers (D5S119 and D5S209) lie within this region, but they could not be ordered with respect to STHE. RH mapping eliminated the candidate genes GABRA1 and GABRG2, which encode GABA-A receptor components, by showing that they are telomeric to the target region. 45 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  5. Prenatal assessment of fetal chromosomal and genetic disorders through maternal plasma DNA analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Gary J W; Chiu, Rossa W K; Lo, Y M Dennis

    2012-02-01

    The existence of cell free DNA derived from the fetus in the plasma of pregnant women was first demonstrated in 1997. This discovery offered the possibility of non-invasive sampling of fetal genetic material simply through the collection of a maternal blood sample. Such cell free fetal DNA molecules in the maternal circulation have subsequently been shown to originate from the placenta and could be detected from about 7 weeks of gestation. It has been shown that cell free fetal DNA analysis could offer highly accurate assessment of fetal genotype and chromosomal makeup for some applications. Thus, cell free fetal DNA analysis has been incorporated as a part of prenatal screening programs for the prenatal management of sex-linked and sex-associated diseases, rhesus D incompatibility as well as the prenatal detection of Down's syndrome.Cell free fetal DNA analysis may lead to a change in the way prenatal assessments are made. PMID:22198255

  6. Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis for Monogenic Disorders and Chromosomal Rearrangements – The German Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koehler U

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Since its dawn in the late 1980s, preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD, or präimplantationsdiagnostik, PID has evolved into a well-established technique, which can be offered to couples at risk of transmitting a mutation or a chromosomal aberration to their offspring. Polar bodies as well as day 3 blastomeres and day 5 blastocysts (trophectoderm can be employed for the detection of a specific gene mutation or unbalanced karyotypes. For the latter, array comparative genomic hybridisation (array CGH has replaced fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH approaches. Furthermore, as blastocysts seem to exhibit less mosaicism compared to blastomeres, current PGD protocols focus on the analysis of blastocysts, however polar body testing is still applied for maternally derived conditions. In November 2011, the German embryo protection law (ESchG has been supplemented by §3a, which defines the conditions for the legal implementation of PGD (PräimpG in Germany.

  7. Genetic mapping of the human tryptophan hydroxylase gene on chromosome 11, using an intronic conformational polymorphism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nielsen, D.A.; Goldman, D. (National Inst. on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, Bethesda, MD (United States)); Dean, M. (National Cancer Inst., Frederick, MD (United States))

    1992-12-01

    The identification of polymorphic alleles at loci coding for functional genes is crucial for genetic association and linkage studies. Since the tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH) gene codes for the rate-limiting enzyme in the biosynthesis of the neurotransmitter serotonin, it would be advantageous to identify a polymorphism in this gene. By examining introns of the human TPH gene by PCR amplification and analysis by the single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) technique, an SSCP was revealed with two alleles that occur with frequencies of .40 and .60 in unrelated Caucasians. DNAs from 24 informative CEPH families were typed for the TPH intron polymorphism and analyzed with respect to 10 linked markers on chromosome 11, between p13 and p15, with the result that TPH was placed between D11S151 and D11S134. This region contains loci for several important genes, including those for Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome and tyrosine hydroxylase. 37 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Genetic analysis of 17 Y-chromosomal STRs haplotypes of Chinese Tibetan ethnic minority group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Zhou; Jun, Wang; XingBo, Song; XiaoJun, Lu; Liu, Ding; BinWu, Ying

    2010-03-01

    We have co-amplified and analyzed 17 Y-chromosomal STRs loci (DYS19, DYS389I/II, DYS390, DYS391, DYS392, DYS393, DYS438, DYS439, DYS437, DYS448, DYS456, DYS458, DYS635, YGATA-H4 and DYS385a/b) in 132 healthy unrelated autochthonous male individuals of Chinese Tibetan ethnic group residing in Lassa area of China. The gene diversity values for the Y-STRs loci ranged from a minimum 0.206 for DYS391 locus to a maximum of 0.912 for DYS385a/b locus in the populations. A total of 123 haplotypes were identified, among which 115 were unique and 8 occurred more than once. The overall haplotype diversity for 17 Y-STRs loci was 0.998. Research results will be valuable for forensic use in the regions and for Chinese population genetic study. PMID:20116321

  9. Genome characterization through a mathematical model of the genetic code: an analysis of the whole chromosome 1 of A. thaliana

    OpenAIRE

    Properzi, Enrico

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this work is to characterize the genome of the chromosome 1 of A.thaliana, a small flowering plants used as a model organism in studies of biology and genetics, on the basis of a recent mathematical model of the genetic code. I analyze and compare different portions of the genome: genes, exons, coding sequences (CDS), introns, long introns, intergenes, untranslated regions (UTR) and regulatory sequences. In order to accomplish the task, I transformed nucleotide sequences...

  10. On the edge of Bantu expansions: mtDNA, Y chromosome and lactase persistence genetic variation in southwestern Angola

    OpenAIRE

    Beleza Sandra; Luiselli Donata; Sequeira Fernando; Coelho Margarida; Rocha Jorge

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Current information about the expansion of Bantu-speaking peoples is hampered by the scarcity of genetic data from well identified populations from southern Africa. Here, we fill an important gap in the analysis of the western edge of the Bantu migrations by studying for the first time the patterns of Y-chromosome, mtDNA and lactase persistence genetic variation in four representative groups living around the Namib Desert in southwestern Angola (Ovimbundu, Ganguela, Nyanek...

  11. Genetic variants on chromosome 1q41 influence ocular axial length and high myopia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiao Fan

    Full Text Available As one of the leading causes of visual impairment and blindness, myopia poses a significant public health burden in Asia. The primary determinant of myopia is an elongated ocular axial length (AL. Here we report a meta-analysis of three genome-wide association studies on AL conducted in 1,860 Chinese adults, 929 Chinese children, and 2,155 Malay adults. We identified a genetic locus on chromosome 1q41 harboring the zinc-finger 11B pseudogene ZC3H11B showing genome-wide significant association with AL variation (rs4373767, β = -0.16 mm per minor allele, P(meta =2.69 × 10(-10. The minor C allele of rs4373767 was also observed to significantly associate with decreased susceptibility to high myopia (per-allele odds ratio (OR =0.75, 95% CI: 0.68-0.84, P(meta =4.38 × 10(-7 in 1,118 highly myopic cases and 5,433 controls. ZC3H11B and two neighboring genes SLC30A10 and LYPLAL1 were expressed in the human neural retina, retinal pigment epithelium, and sclera. In an experimental myopia mouse model, we observed significant alterations to gene and protein expression in the retina and sclera of the unilateral induced myopic eyes for the murine genes ZC3H11A, SLC30A10, and LYPLAL1. This supports the likely role of genetic variants at chromosome 1q41 in influencing AL variation and high myopia.

  12. GENETIC ALTERRATIONS OF MICROSATELLITE MARKERS AT CHROMOSOME 17 IN NON-SMALL CELL LUNG CANCER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To analyse the microsatellite instability (MI) and loss of heterozygosity (LOH) in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods: MI and LOH at chromosome 17 were checked in 35 cases of NSCLC tumor-normal paired tissues using four microsatellite markers TP53 (17p13.1), THRA1 (17q11.2-12), D17S579 (17q12-21) and D17S855 (17q21) by PCR based analysis. Mutations of P53 exons 5-8 were also tested using PCR-single strand conformation polymorphism (PCR-SSCP) and PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) analysis. Results: 22 of 35 tumors (62.8%) displayed MI or LOH. 14 tumors (40.0%) exhibited MI, 11 tumors (31.4%) exhibited LOH, while 3 tumors (8.6%) exhibited MI and LOH concurrently. 23 tumors (65.7%) exhibited P53 gene mutations. The frequency of MI or LOH was obviously higher in the early-stage (stages I and II, 78.9%) than in the advanced-stage (stage III, 43.8%). However, the frequency of MI or LOH had no difference either between high-grade (75.0%) and low-grade (52.6%) differentiated NSCLC or between the tumors with P53 mutations (59.1%) and those without P53 mutations (69.2%). No relationship was observed between the presence of MI or LOH and the histologic subtype of NSCLC. Conclusion: The results suggest that MI and LOH at chromosome 17 may play a alterations on chromosome 17 in tumors of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In addition, studies reported contradictory results concerning the incidence of these alterations and the relationship between these genetic alterations and the clinical behavior of NSCLC. The aim of this study was to investigate the incidence of MI and LOH at chromosome 17 in tumors of patients with NSCLC and its association with clinical and histologic features of NSCLC.

  13. Genetics of panic disorder on the Faroe Islands: a replication study of chromosome 9 and panic disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, AG; Dahl, HA; Vang, M;

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The population of the Faroe Islands in the North Atlantic Ocean is likely to have the same ancestry as the Icelandic population. An Icelandic study on Panic Disorder has found some evidence for a loci on chromosome 9. METHODS: On the Faroe Islands we have an ongoing genetic project...

  14. Integration of genetic and physical maps of the chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) genome using flow-sorted chromosomes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zatloukalová, Pavlína; Hřibová, Eva; Kubaláková, Marie; Suchánková, Pavla; Šimková, Hana; Adoración, C.; Kahl, G.; Millán, T.; Doležel, Jaroslav

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 19, č. 6 (2011), s. 729-739. ISSN 0967-3849 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC06004 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : BAC-FISH * Chromosome isolation * Flow cytometric sorting Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.087, year: 2011

  15. Discovery of Genetic Variation on Chromosome 5q22 Associated with Mortality in Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J. Gustav; Felix, Janine F.; Morrison, Alanna C.; Trompet, Stella; Wilk, Jemma B.; Gidlöf, Olof; Morley, Michael; Joehanes, Roby; Ligthart, Symen; Shan, Xiaoyin; Bis, Joshua C.; Sjögren, Marketa; Ngwa, Julius; Stott, David J.; Aguilar, David; Rice, Kenneth M.; Sesso, Howard D.; Demissie, Serkalem; Buckley, Brendan M.; Taylor, Kent D.; Ford, Ian; Yao, Chen; Liu, Chunyu; Sotoodehnia, Nona; van der Harst, Pim; Stricker, Bruno H. Ch.; Kritchevsky, Stephen B.; Liu, Yongmei; Gaziano, J. Michael; Hofman, Albert; Moravec, Christine S.; Uitterlinden, André G.; Kellis, Manolis; van Meurs, Joyce B.; Margulies, Kenneth B.; Dehghan, Abbas; Levy, Daniel; Olde, Björn; Psaty, Bruce M.; Cupples, L. Adrienne; Jukema, J. Wouter; Djousse, Luc; Franco, Oscar H.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Boyer, Laurie A.; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; Butler, Javed; Vasan, Ramachandran S.; Cappola, Thomas P.; Smith, Nicholas L.

    2016-01-01

    Failure of the human heart to maintain sufficient output of blood for the demands of the body, heart failure, is a common condition with high mortality even with modern therapeutic alternatives. To identify molecular determinants of mortality in patients with new-onset heart failure, we performed a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies and follow-up genotyping in independent populations. We identified and replicated an association for a genetic variant on chromosome 5q22 with 36% increased risk of death in subjects with heart failure (rs9885413, P = 2.7x10-9). We provide evidence from reporter gene assays, computational predictions and epigenomic marks that this polymorphism increases activity of an enhancer region active in multiple human tissues. The polymorphism was further reproducibly associated with a DNA methylation signature in whole blood (P = 4.5x10-40) that also associated with allergic sensitization and expression in blood of the cytokine TSLP (P = 1.1x10-4). Knockdown of the transcription factor predicted to bind the enhancer region (NHLH1) in a human cell line (HEK293) expressing NHLH1 resulted in lower TSLP expression. In addition, we observed evidence of recent positive selection acting on the risk allele in populations of African descent. Our findings provide novel genetic leads to factors that influence mortality in patients with heart failure. PMID:27149122

  16. Chromosome 16p11.2 deletions: another piece in the genetic puzzle of childhood obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    del Giudice Emanuele

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Ipercaloric diet and reduced physical activity have driven the rise in the prevalence of childhood obesity over a relatively short time interval. Family and twin studies have led to the conclusion that the strong predicitve value of parental body mass index (BMI mainly stems from genetic rather than environmental factors. Whereas the common polygenic obesity arises when an individual genetic make-up is susceptible to an environment that promotes energy consumption over energy expenditure, monogenic obesity, on the contrary, is the obesity associated with a single gene mutation, which is sufficient by itself to cause weight gain in a food abundant context. Genes involved in the leptin-melanocortin pathway are often mutated in these cases. The cumulative prevalence of monogenic obesity among children with severe obesity is about 5%. Recently, deletions in the region p11.2 of the chromosome 16 encompassing the gene SH2B1, which is involved in the leptin and insulin signaling, have been reported in about 0.5% of children with severe early-onset obesity. These patients show extreme hyperphagia, severe insulin resistance and, in some cases, mild developmental delay.

  17. Identification of genetic variation on the horse y chromosome and the tracing of male founder lineages in modern breeds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Wallner

    Full Text Available The paternally inherited Y chromosome displays the population genetic history of males. While modern domestic horses (Equus caballus exhibit abundant diversity within maternally inherited mitochondrial DNA, no significant Y-chromosomal sequence diversity has been detected. We used high throughput sequencing technology to identify the first polymorphic Y-chromosomal markers useful for tracing paternal lines. The nucleotide variability of the modern horse Y chromosome is extremely low, resulting in six haplotypes (HT, all clearly distinct from the Przewalski horse (E. przewalskii. The most widespread HT1 is ancestral and the other five haplotypes apparently arose on the background of HT1 by mutation or gene conversion after domestication. Two haplotypes (HT2 and HT3 are widely distributed at high frequencies among modern European horse breeds. Using pedigree information, we trace the distribution of Y-haplotype diversity to particular founders. The mutation leading to HT3 occurred in the germline of the famous English Thoroughbred stallion "Eclipse" or his son or grandson and its prevalence demonstrates the influence of this popular paternal line on modern sport horse breeds. The pervasive introgression of Thoroughbred stallions during the last 200 years to refine autochthonous breeds has strongly affected the distribution of Y-chromosomal variation in modern horse breeds and has led to the replacement of autochthonous Y chromosomes. Only a few northern European breeds bear unique variants at high frequencies or fixed within but not shared among breeds. Our Y-chromosomal data complement the well established mtDNA lineages and document the male side of the genetic history of modern horse breeds and breeding practices.

  18. A genetic basis for a postmeiotic X versus Y chromosome intragenomic conflict in the mouse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Cocquet

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Intragenomic conflicts arise when a genetic element favours its own transmission to the detriment of others. Conflicts over sex chromosome transmission are expected to have influenced genome structure, gene regulation, and speciation. In the mouse, the existence of an intragenomic conflict between X- and Y-linked multicopy genes has long been suggested but never demonstrated. The Y-encoded multicopy gene Sly has been shown to have a predominant role in the epigenetic repression of post meiotic sex chromatin (PMSC and, as such, represses X and Y genes, among which are its X-linked homologs Slx and Slxl1. Here, we produced mice that are deficient for both Sly and Slx/Slxl1 and observed that Slx/Slxl1 has an opposite role to that of Sly, in that it stimulates XY gene expression in spermatids. Slx/Slxl1 deficiency rescues the sperm differentiation defects and near sterility caused by Sly deficiency and vice versa. Slx/Slxl1 deficiency also causes a sex ratio distortion towards the production of male offspring that is corrected by Sly deficiency. All in all, our data show that Slx/Slxl1 and Sly have antagonistic effects during sperm differentiation and are involved in a postmeiotic intragenomic conflict that causes segregation distortion and male sterility. This is undoubtedly what drove the massive gene amplification on the mouse X and Y chromosomes. It may also be at the basis of cases of F1 male hybrid sterility where the balance between Slx/Slxl1 and Sly copy number, and therefore expression, is disrupted. To the best of our knowledge, our work is the first demonstration of a competition occurring between X and Y related genes in mammals. It also provides a biological basis for the concept that intragenomic conflict is an important evolutionary force which impacts on gene expression, genome structure, and speciation.

  19. Genetic and Epigenetic Changes in Chromosomally Stable and Unstable Progeny of Irradiated Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baulch, Janet E.; Aypar, Umut; Waters, Katrina M.; Yang, Austin; Morgan, William F.

    2014-09-24

    Radiation induced genomic instability is a well-studied phenomenon, the underlying mechanisms of which are poorly understood. Persistent oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, elevated cytokine levels and epigenetic changes are among the mechanisms invoked in the perpetuation of the phenotype. To determine whether epigenetic aberrations affect genomic instability we measured DNA methylation, mRNA and microRNA (miR) levels in well characterized chromosomally stable and unstable clonally expanded single cell survivors of irradiation. While no changes in DNA methylation were observed for the gene promoters evaluated, increased LINE-1 methylation was observed for two unstable clones (LS12, CS9) and decreased Alu element methylation was observed for the other two unstable clones (115, Fe5.0-8). These relationships also manifested for mRNA and miR expression. mRNA identified for the LS12 and CS9 clones were most similar to each other (261 mRNA), while the 115 and Fe5.0-8 clones were more similar to each other, and surprisingly also similar to the two stable clones, 114 and 118 (286 mRNA among these four clones). Pathway analysis showed enrichment for pathways involved in mitochondrial function and cellular redox, themes routinely invoked in genomic instability. The commonalities between the two subgroups of clones were also observed for miR. The number of miR for which anti-correlated mRNA were identified suggests that these miR exert functional effects in each clone. The results of this study demonstrate significant genetic and epigenetic changes in unstable cells, but similar changes almost equally common in chromosomally stable cells. Possible conclusions might be that the chromosomally stable clones have some other form of instability, or that some of the observed changes represent a sort of radiation signature for and that other changes are related to genomic instability. Irrespective, these findings again suggest that a spectrum of changes both drive genomic

  20. Designing conservation strategies to preserve the genetic diversity of Astragalus edulis Bunge, an endangered species from western Mediterranean region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peñas, Julio; Barrios, Sara; Bobo-Pinilla, Javier; Lorite, Juan; Martínez-Ortega, M Montserrat

    2016-01-01

    Astragalus edulis (Fabaceae) is an endangered annual species from the western Mediterranean region that colonized the SE Iberian Peninsula, NE and SW Morocco, and the easternmost Macaronesian islands (Lanzarote and Fuerteventura). Although in Spain some conservation measures have been adopted, it is still necessary to develop an appropriate management plan to preserve genetic diversity across the entire distribution area of the species. Our main objective was to use population genetics as well as ecological and phylogeographic data to select Relevant Genetic Units for Conservation (RGUCs) as the first step in designing conservation plans for A. edulis. We identified six RGUCs for in situ conservation, based on estimations of population genetic structure and probabilities of loss of rare alleles. Additionally, further population parameters, i.e. occupation area, population size, vulnerability, legal status of the population areas, and the historical haplotype distribution, were considered in order to establish which populations deserve conservation priority. Three populations from the Iberian Peninsula, two from Morocco, and one from the Canary Islands represent the total genetic diversity of the species and the rarest allelic variation. Ex situ conservation is recommended to complement the preservation of A. edulis, given that effective in situ population protection is not feasible in all cases. The consideration of complementary phylogeographic and ecological data is useful for management efforts to preserve the evolutionary potential of the species. PMID:26844014

  1. Genetic Alterations in Pesticide Exposed Bolivian Farmers: An evaluation by analysis of chromosomal aberrations and the comet assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik Jørs

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pesticides are of concern in Bolivia because of increasing use. Frequent intoxications have been demonstrated due to use of very toxic pesticides, insufficient control of distribution and sale and little knowledge among farmers of protective measures and hygienic procedures.Method: Questionnaires were applied and blood tests taken from 81 volunteers from La Paz County, of whom 48 were pesticide exposed farmers and 33 non-exposed controls. Sixty males and 21 females participated with a mean age of 37.3 years (range 17–76. Data of exposure and possible genetic damage were collected and evaluated by well known statistical methods, controlling for relevant confounders. To measure genetic damage chromosomal aberrations and the comet assay analysis were performed.Results: Pesticide exposed farmers had a higher degree of genetic damage compared to the control group. The number of chromosomal aberrations increased with the intensity of pesticide exposure. Females had a lower number of chromosomal aberrations than males, and people living at altitudes above 2500 metres seemed to exhibit more DNA damage measured by the comet assay.Conclusions: Bolivian farmers showed signs of genotoxic damage, probably related to exposure to pesticides. Due to the potentially negative long term health effects of genetic damage on reproduction and the development of cancer, preventive measures are recommended. Effective control with imports and sales, banning of the most toxic pesticides, education and information are possible measures, which could help preventing the negative effects of pesticides on human health and the environment.

  2. [Effect of gametocidal chromosome 4S' on the phenotype segregation ratio in genetic analysis of common wheat lines].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vdovichenko, Zh V; Antoniuk, M Z; Ternovskaia, T K

    2003-01-01

    Using experimental data on genetic analysis of introgressive lines for the character "hairy leaf sheath" controlled by the "cuckoo" chromosome 4S1, the algorithm for calculation of the theoretical segregation ratio in F2 was developed. Segregation distortion is caused by non-viability of the majority of gametes lacking the chromosome 4S1. The frequency of functioning gametes without the chromosome 4S1 is determined by the probability p versus the theoretically expected ratio 7 nonviable: 9 viable ones. Since segregation involves two characters, gamete viability and hairiness, the ratio 15 hairy: 1 hairless was used as a basis for search of the frequency p by maximum-likelihood method using 16 populations F2 from crossing the lines differing in the character studied. PMID:14650327

  3. Population genetics of Y-chromosome STRs in a population of Northern Greeks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovatsi, Leda; Saunier, Jessica L; Irwin, Jodi A

    2009-12-01

    Seventeen Y STR loci were typed in a population sample of 191 unrelated male individuals from Northern Greece. Haplotypes are presented for the following loci: DYS456, DYS389I, DYS390, DYS389II, DYS458, DYS19, DYS385a/b, DYS393, DYS391, DYS439, DYS635, DYS392, Y GATA H4, DYS437, DYS438 and DYS448. The overall haplotype diversity was 0.9992. This database study provides significant additional information for the application of Y-chromosomal STRs to forensic identification efforts in Greece by nearly doubling both the number of individuals and the number of Y-loci typed from Greek populations. These samples have been previously typed for autosomal STRs [L. Kovatsi, T.J. Parsons, R.S. Just, J.A. Irwin, Genetic variation for 15 autosomal STR loci (PowerPlex 16) in a population sample from northern Greece, Forensic Sci. Int. 159 (2006) 61-63] and the mitochondrial DNA control region [J. Irwin, J. Saunier, K. Strouss, C. Paintner, T. Diegoli, K. Sturk, L. Kovatsi, A. Brandstatter, M.A. Cariolou, W. Parson, T.J. Parsons, Mitochondrial control region sequences from northern Greece and Greek Cypriots, Int. J. Legal Med. 122 (2008) 87-89]. PMID:19948315

  4. Syntenic relationships between cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) and melon (C. melo L.) chromosomes as revealed by comparative genetic mapping

    OpenAIRE

    Staub Jack E; Zalapa Juan; Garcia-Mas Jordi; Li Yuhong; Yang Luming; Cuevas Hugo E; Li Dawei; Luan Feishi; Reddy Umesh; He Xiaoming; Gong Zhenhui; Weng Yiqun

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Cucumber, Cucumis sativus L. (2n = 2 × = 14) and melon, C. melo L. (2n = 2 × = 24) are two important vegetable species in the genus Cucumis (family Cucurbitaceae). Both species have an Asian origin that diverged approximately nine million years ago. Cucumber is believed to have evolved from melon through chromosome fusion, but the details of this process are largely unknown. In this study, comparative genetic mapping between cucumber and melon was conducted to examine synt...

  5. Array-based technology and recommendations for utilization in medical genetics practice for detection of chromosomal abnormalities

    OpenAIRE

    Manning, Melanie; Hudgins, Louanne

    2010-01-01

    Laboratory evaluation of patients with developmental delay/intellectual disability, congenital anomalies, and dysmorphic features has changed significantly in the last several years with the introduction of microarray technologies. Using these techniques, a patient’s genome can be examined for gains or losses of genetic material too small to be detected by standard G-banded chromosome studies. This increased resolution of microarray technology over conventional cytogenetic analysis allows for...

  6. Genetic and physical mapping of the Chediak-Higashi syndrome on chromosome 1q42-43

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrat, F.J.; Auloge, L.; Pastural, E. [INSERM, Paris (France)] [and others

    1996-09-01

    The Chediak-Higashi syndrome (CHS) is a severe autosomal recessive condition, features of which are partial oculocutaneous albinism, increased susceptibility to infections, deficient natural killer cell activity, and the presence of large intracytoplasmic granulations in various cell types. Similar genetic disorders have been described in other species, including the beige mouse. On the basis of the hypothesis that the murine chromosome 13 region containing the beige locus was homologous to human chromosome 1, we have mapped the CHS locus to a 5-cM interval in chromosome segment 1q42.1-q42.2. The highest LOD score was obtained with the marker D1S235 (Z{sub max} = 5.38; {theta} = 0). Haplotype analysis enabled us to establish D1S2680 and D1S163, respectively, as the telomeric and the centromeric flanking markers. Multipoint linkage analysis confirms the localization of the CHS locus in this interval. Three YAC clones were found to cover the entire region in a contig established by YAC end-sequence characterization and sequence-tagged site mapping. The YAC contig contains all genetic markers that are nonrecombinant for the disease in the nine CHS families studied. This mapping confirms the previous hypothesis that the same gene defect causes CHS in human and beige phenotype in mice and provides a genetic framework for the identification of candidate genes. 36 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Individual detection of genetically modified maize varieties in non-identity-preserved maize samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akiyama, Hiroshi; Sakata, Kozue; Kondo, Kazunari; Tanaka, Asako; Liu, Ming S; Oguchi, Taichi; Furui, Satoshi; Kitta, Kazumi; Hino, Akihiro; Teshima, Reiko

    2008-03-26

    In many countries, the labeling of grains and feed- and foodstuffs is mandatory if the genetically modified organism (GMO) content exceeds a certain level of approved GM varieties. The GMO content in a maize sample containing the combined-trait (stacked) GM maize as determined by the currently available methodology is likely to be overestimated. However, there has been little information in the literature on the mixing level and varieties of stacked GM maize in real sample grains. For the first time, the GMO content of non-identity-preserved (non-IP) maize samples imported from the United States has been successfully determined by using a previously developed individual kernel detection system coupled to a multiplex qualitative PCR method followed by multichannel capillary gel electrophoresis system analysis. To clarify the GMO content in the maize samples imported from the United States, determine how many stacked GM traits are contained therein, and which GM trait varieties frequently appeared in 2005, the GMO content (percent) on a kernel basis and the varieties of the GM kernels in the non-IP maize samples imported from the United States were investigated using the individual kernel analysis system. The average (+/-standard deviation) of the GMO contents on a kernel basis in five non-IP sample lots was determined to be 51.0+/-21.6%, the percentage of a single GM trait grains was 39%, and the percentage of the stacked GM trait grains was 12%. The MON810 grains and NK603 grains were the most frequent varieties in the single GM traits. The most frequent stacked GM traits were the MON810xNK603 grains. In addition, the present study would provide the answer and impact for the quantification of GM maize content in the GM maize kernels on labeling regulation. PMID:18298063

  8. Genetic and physical mapping at the limb-girdle muscular dystrophy locus (LGMD2B) on chromosome 2p

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bashir, R.; Keers, S.; Strachan, T. [Univ. of Newcastle upon Tyne (United Kingdom)] [and others

    1996-04-01

    The limb-girdle muscular dystrophies (LGMD) are a genetically heterogeneous group of disorders, different forms of which have been mapped to at least six distinct genetic loci. We have mapped to at least six distinct genetic loci. We have mapped an autosomal recessive form of LGMD (LGMD2B) to chromosome 2p13. Two other conditions have been shown to map to this region or to the homologous region in mouse: a gene for a form of autosomal recessive distal muscular dystrophy, Miyoshi myopathy, shows linkage to the same markers on chromosome 2p as LGMD2B, and an autosomal recessive mouse mutation mnd2, in which there is rapidly progressive paralysis and muscle atrophy, has been mapped to mouse chromosome 6 to a region showing conserved synteny with human chromosome 2p12-p13. We have assembled a 6-cM YAC contig spanning the LGMD2B locus and have mapped seven genes and 13 anonymous polymorphic microsatellites to it. Using haplotype analysis in the linked families, we have narrowed our region of interest to a 0-cM interval between D2S2113 and D2S145, which does not overlap with the critical region for mnd2 in mouse. Use of these most closely linked markers will help to determine the relationship between LGMD2B and Miyoshi myopathy. YACs selected from our contig will be the starting point for the cloning of the LGMD2B gene and thereby establish the biological basis for this form of muscular dystrophy and its relationship with the other limb-girdle muscular dystrophies. 26 refs., 6 figs.

  9. Where the buffalo roam : Moving Sullys Hill herd to Nebraska designed to preserve genetic quality

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Newspaper article about the transfer of bison from Sullys Hill National Game preserve to Fort Niobrara National Wildlife Refuge, and bison from the National Bison...

  10. On the edge of Bantu expansions: mtDNA, Y chromosome and lactase persistence genetic variation in southwestern Angola

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beleza Sandra

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Current information about the expansion of Bantu-speaking peoples is hampered by the scarcity of genetic data from well identified populations from southern Africa. Here, we fill an important gap in the analysis of the western edge of the Bantu migrations by studying for the first time the patterns of Y-chromosome, mtDNA and lactase persistence genetic variation in four representative groups living around the Namib Desert in southwestern Angola (Ovimbundu, Ganguela, Nyaneka-Nkumbi and Kuvale. We assessed the differentiation between these populations and their levels of admixture with Khoe-San groups, and examined their relationship with other sub-Saharan populations. We further combined our dataset with previously published data on Y-chromosome and mtDNA variation to explore a general isolation with migration model and infer the demographic parameters underlying current genetic diversity in Bantu populations. Results Correspondence analysis, lineage sharing patterns and admixture estimates indicate that the gene pool from southwestern Angola is predominantly derived from West-Central Africa. The pastoralist Herero-speaking Kuvale people were additionally characterized by relatively high frequencies of Y-chromosome (12% and mtDNA (22% Khoe-San lineages, as well as by the presence of the -14010C lactase persistence mutation (6%, which likely originated in non-Bantu pastoralists from East Africa. Inferred demographic parameters show that both male and female populations underwent significant size growth after the split between the western and eastern branches of Bantu expansions occurring 4000 years ago. However, males had lower population sizes and migration rates than females throughout the Bantu dispersals. Conclusion Genetic variation in southwestern Angola essentially results from the encounter of an offshoot of West-Central Africa with autochthonous Khoisan-speaking peoples from the south. Interactions between the Bantus

  11. Conservation of chromosomal arrangement among three strains of the genetically unstable archaeon Halobacterium salinarium.

    OpenAIRE

    Hackett, N R; Bobovnikova, Y; Heyrovska, N

    1994-01-01

    Phenotypic variants of Halobacterium salinarium NRC-1 arise at a frequency of 10(-2). These result from transpositions of halobacterial insertion sequences and rearrangements mediated by halobacterial insertion sequences. We have tested the hypothesis that such mutations are confined to only a portion of the genome by comparing the chromosomal restriction map of H. salinarium NRC-1 and that of the derivative S9, which was made in 1969. The two chromosomes were mapped by using two-dimensional ...

  12. Prenatal Chromosomal Microarray Analysis and Identification of Genetic Variants in Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia.

    OpenAIRE

    Brady, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Chromosomal microarray analysis has gradually replaced conventional karyotyping over recent years in the postnatal setting which has revolutionized whole genome screening for genomic imbalances in patients. We sought to evaluate the benefits and the challenges of applying chromosomal microarrays to prenatal diagnosis for referrals with abnormal ultrasound findings. Our findings, presented in Chapter 3, demonstrate a diagnostic yield of ~10%. Importantly, ~3% are caused by submicroscopic CN...

  13. Intraspecific chromosomal and genetic polymorphism in Brassica napus L. detected by cytogenetic and molecular markers

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Alexandra V. Amosova; Lyudmila V. Zemtsova; Zoya E. Grushetskaya; Tatiana E. Samatadze; Galina V. Mozgova; Yadviga E. Pilyuk; Valentina T. Volovik; Natalia V. Melnikova; Alexandr V. Zelenin; Valentina A. Lemesh; Olga V. Muravenko

    2014-04-01

    The application of DNA intercalator 9-aminoacridine allowed us to increase the resolution of chromosome C-banding and DAPI-banding patterns and to investigate chromosomal polymorphism in karyotypes of seven spring and six winter rape varieties. It was shown that the pericentromeric and intercalary C-bands of most of the chromosomes in spring rape were smaller in size and less polymorphic than those of winter rape. More 26S and 5S rDNA sites were found in the winter rape karyotypes than the spring varieties. Separate or colocalized 26S and 5S rDNA sites were revealed on chromosomes 4, 5, 6, 8, 10, 14, 15, 16 and 18. Intervarietal and intravarietal polymorphism of the number and chromosomal localization of rDNA sites were detected. The generalized idiogram of chromosomes of 13 Brassica napus varieties with account of all possibilities of C-banding patterns as well as localization of 26S and 5S rDNA sites were constructed. Polymorphism of the examined molecular and cytogenetic markers as well as the heterozygosis level of FAE1.1 gene controlling erucic acid synthesis in rapeseed was higher in the winter varieties than in the spring ones. The obtained data were in a satisfactory agreement with increased tolerance to environmental stress conditions of winter rape.

  14. A Comparative Analysis of B Chromosomes and Genetic Diversity in Maize (Zea mays L.) Landraces from Southwest China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAO Qi-lun; YANG Ke-cheng; PAN Guang-tang; RONG Ting-zhao

    2007-01-01

    The number of B chromosomes (Bs) in 54 maize landraces from Southwest China was tested by means of cytological observations. Nine landraces with Bs were observed. A map, showing the geographic distribution of the landraces with Bs, was plotted. It was found that southeastern Sichuan Province in China was the main distribution area of the landraces with Bs in Southwest China. In order to obtain information on relationships between Bs and genetic variation, genetic diversity both among and within 11 landraces was evaluated. For each SSR marker, the number of alleles ranged from 3 to 12 with an average of 7.86, which revealed a high level of genetic diversity among maize landraces in Southwest China.Based on SSRs data, higher genetic variation was found in the landraces with 2B, and the genetic distance between the landraces with and without Bs was higher. The results together with the principal component analysis (PCA) supported the hypothesis that maize landraces in Southwest China were first introduced to the middle part of southwest Sichuan, China. At the same time, the effect of Bs on genetic variation was discussed.

  15. Development of Gossypium barbadense chromosome segment substitution lines in the genetic standard line TM-1 of Gossypium hirsutum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Peng; DING YeZhang; LU QiongXian; GUO WangZhen; ZHANG TianZhen

    2008-01-01

    Chromosome segment substitution lines (CSSL) consist of a battery of near-isogenic lines that have been developed and cover the entire genome of some crops. With the exception of one homozygous chromosome segment transferred from a donor parent, the remaining genome of each CSSL line is the same as the recipient parent. It is an ideal material for genome research and particularly QTL mapping. In the present study, we first developed one set of CSSL lines using G. Hirsutum acc. TM-1 (the genetic standard), as the recipient parent and G. Barbadense cv. Hai7124 as the donor parent using molecular assisted-selection in BC5S1-3 generations. The CSSL consisted of 330 different lines, in which 1-4 dif-ferent lines had the same or overlapping substituted segments. The genetic length of the substituted segments covered 5271.9 cM with an average segment distance of 10.9 cM, 1.5 times the total genetic length of Upland cotton (3514.6 cM). The substituted segments of each line varied in length, ranging from 3.5 cM for the shortest segment to 23.2 cM in the longest segment. Our CSSL have not yet to cover the entire tetraploid cotton genome, due to the absence of some donor parent interval segments.

  16. Genetic linkage between Becker muscular dystrophy and a polymorphic DNA sequence on the short arm of the X chromosome.

    OpenAIRE

    Kingston, H. M.; Thomas, N S; Pearson, P.L.; Sarfarazi, M; Harper, P S

    1983-01-01

    A study of DNA restriction fragment polymorphisms and Becker muscular dystrophy has shown eight families informative for the cloned sequence L1.28, which is located on the short arm of the X chromosome between Xp110 and Xp113. Analysis of these families reveals linkage between the two loci, with the maximum likelihood estimate of the genetic distance being 16 centiMorgans (95% confidence limits between 7 and 32 centiMorgans). Since a study of DNA polymorphisms in Duchenne muscular dystrophy h...

  17. Genetic and molecular analyses of picA, a plant-inducible locus on the Agrobacterium tumefaciens chromosome.

    OpenAIRE

    Rong, L J; Karcher, S J; Gelvin, S B

    1991-01-01

    picA is an Agrobacterium tumefaciens chromosomal locus, identified by Mu d11681 mutagenesis, that is inducible by certain acidic polysaccharides found in carrot root extract. Cloning and genetic analysis of a picA::lacZ fusion defined a region of the picA promoter that is responsible for the induction of this locus. Furthermore, we identified a possible negative regulator of picA expression upstream of the picA locus. This sequence, denoted pgl, has extensive homology to polygalacturonase gen...

  18. Genetic Diversity and Differentiation in Urban and Indigenous Populations of Mexico: Patterns of Mitochondrial DNA and Y-Chromosome Lineages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Sobrino, Blanca Z; Pintado-Cortina, Ana P; Sebastián-Medina, Leticia; Morales-Mandujano, Fabiola; Contreras, Alejandra V; Aguilar, Yasnaya E; Chávez-Benavides, Juan; Carrillo-Rodríguez, Aurelio; Silva-Zolezzi, Irma; Medrano-González, Luis

    2016-01-01

    Aside from the admixture between indigenous people and people from overseas, populations in Mexico changed drastically after the Spanish conquest of the sixteenth century, forming an intricate history that has been underutilized in understanding the genetic population structure of Mexicans. To infer historical processes of isolation, dispersal, and assimilation, we examined the phylogeography of mitochondrial (mt) DNA and Y-chromosome lineages in 3,026 individuals from 10 urban and nine indigenous populations by identifying single nucleotide polymorphisms. A geographic array with a predominance of Amerindian lineages was observed for mtDNA, with northern indigenous populations being divergent from the central and southern indigenous populations; urban populations showed low differentiation with isolation by distance. Y-chromosome variation distinguished urban and indigenous populations through the Amerindian haplogroup Q frequency. The MtDNA and the Y-chromosome together primarily distinguished urban and indigenous populations, with different geographic arrays for both. Gene flow across geographical distance and between the urban and indigenous realms appears to have altered the pre-Hispanic phylogeography in central and southern Mexico, mainly by displacement of women, while maintaining the indigenous isolation in the north, southeast, and Zapotec regions. Most Amerindian mtDNA diversity currently occurs in urban populations and appears to be reduced among indigenous people. PMID:27050033

  19. Physical and genetic mapping of maize chromosome 9S using mutations with terminal deficiencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Undoubtedly, cytogenetic materials containing chromosomal alterations, such as translocation, and inversions derived from X ray irradiation or other means have made a tremendous contribution to our understanding of chromosome behaviour in plants. In maize, such materials have been applied to gene mapping and linkage group assignment dating back to the 1930s. The fate of the chromosomes with broken ends has been examined and it was found that when a chromatid is broken at meiotic anaphase fusion will occur between the two sister halves of this chromatid and a bridge will re-form during the following mitotic anaphase. This process is referred to as the breakage-fusion-bridge cycle. It has also been demonstrated that this cycle will continue in all subsequent gametophytic and endosperm mitoses following its origin at meiotic anaphase. However, this cycle will cease when the broken chromosome enters the zygote. The broken end heals permanently, since no further fusion and breakage are found in sporophytic mitoses or any other tissues of later generations. A series of terminal deficient mutants involving the short arm of chromosome 9 derived from the breakage-fusion-bridge cycle has been used to determine the physical order of genes for pale yellow (pyd1), yellow-green (yg2) and while (wd1) seedlings. The purpose of this present study was to use a series of terminal deficient materials reported by McClintock in order to establish the physical order of six RFLP markers and five morphological markers located at the distal end of chromosome 9S. 13 refs

  20. Chromosome flow-sorting and integration of genetic and physical maps in pea

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Neumann, Pavel; Požárková, Dana; Vrána, Jan; Doležel, Jaroslav; Macas, Jiří

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 9, Suppl.1 (2001), s. 98. ISSN 0967-3849 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5051902 Keywords : plants * genetics Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 1.835, year: 2001

  1. Fertility preservation in Turner syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grynberg, Michaël; Bidet, Maud; Benard, Julie; Poulain, Marine; Sonigo, Charlotte; Cédrin-Durnerin, Isabelle; Polak, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Premature ovarian insufficiency is a relatively rare condition that can appear early in life. In a non-negligible number of cases the ovarian dysfunction results from genetic diseases. Turner syndrome (TS), the most common sex chromosome abnormality in females, is associated with an inevitable premature exhaustion of the follicular stockpile. The possible or probable infertility is a major concern for TS patients and their parents, and physicians are often asked about possible options to preserve fertility. Unfortunately, there are no recommendations on fertility preservation in this group. The severely reduced follicle pool even during prepubertal life represents the major limit for fertility preservation and is the root of numerous questions regarding the competence of gametes or ovarian tissue crybanked. In addition, patients suffering from TS show higher than usual rates of spontaneous abortion, fetal anomaly, and maternal morbidity and mortality, which should be considered at the time of fertility preservation and before reutilization of the cryopreserved gametes. Apart from fulfillment of the desire of becoming genetic parents, TS patients may be potential candidates for egg donation, gestational surrogacy, and adoption. The present review discusses the different options for preserving female fertility in TS and the ethical questions raised by these approaches. PMID:26677790

  2. Genetic Heritage of the Balto-Slavic Speaking Populations: A Synthesis of Autosomal, Mitochondrial and Y-Chromosomal Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushniarevich, Alena; Utevska, Olga; Chuhryaeva, Marina; Agdzhoyan, Anastasia; Dibirova, Khadizhat; Uktveryte, Ingrida; Möls, Märt; Mulahasanovic, Lejla; Pshenichnov, Andrey; Frolova, Svetlana; Shanko, Andrey; Metspalu, Ene; Reidla, Maere; Tambets, Kristiina; Tamm, Erika; Koshel, Sergey; Zaporozhchenko, Valery; Atramentova, Lubov; Kučinskas, Vaidutis; Davydenko, Oleg; Goncharova, Olga; Evseeva, Irina; Churnosov, Michail; Pocheshchova, Elvira; Yunusbayev, Bayazit; Khusnutdinova, Elza; Marjanović, Damir; Rudan, Pavao; Rootsi, Siiri; Yankovsky, Nick; Endicott, Phillip; Kassian, Alexei; Dybo, Anna; Tyler-Smith, Chris; Balanovska, Elena; Metspalu, Mait; Kivisild, Toomas; Villems, Richard; Balanovsky, Oleg

    2015-01-01

    The Slavic branch of the Balto-Slavic sub-family of Indo-European languages underwent rapid divergence as a result of the spatial expansion of its speakers from Central-East Europe, in early medieval times. This expansion-mainly to East Europe and the northern Balkans-resulted in the incorporation of genetic components from numerous autochthonous populations into the Slavic gene pools. Here, we characterize genetic variation in all extant ethnic groups speaking Balto-Slavic languages by analyzing mitochondrial DNA (n = 6,876), Y-chromosomes (n = 6,079) and genome-wide SNP profiles (n = 296), within the context of other European populations. We also reassess the phylogeny of Slavic languages within the Balto-Slavic branch of Indo-European. We find that genetic distances among Balto-Slavic populations, based on autosomal and Y-chromosomal loci, show a high correlation (0.9) both with each other and with geography, but a slightly lower correlation (0.7) with mitochondrial DNA and linguistic affiliation. The data suggest that genetic diversity of the present-day Slavs was predominantly shaped in situ, and we detect two different substrata: 'central-east European' for West and East Slavs, and 'south-east European' for South Slavs. A pattern of distribution of segments identical by descent between groups of East-West and South Slavs suggests shared ancestry or a modest gene flow between those two groups, which might derive from the historic spread of Slavic people. PMID:26332464

  3. Synthetic chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindler, Daniel; Waldminghaus, Torsten

    2015-11-01

    What a living organism looks like and how it works and what are its components-all this is encoded on DNA, the genetic blueprint. Consequently, the way to change an organism is to change its genetic information. Since the first pieces of recombinant DNA have been used to transform cells in the 1970s, this approach has been enormously extended. Bigger and bigger parts of the genetic information have been exchanged or added over the years. Now we are at a point where the construction of entire chromosomes becomes a reachable goal and first examples appear. This development leads to fundamental new questions, for example, about what is possible and desirable to build or what construction rules one needs to follow when building synthetic chromosomes. Here we review the recent progress in the field, discuss current challenges and speculate on the appearance of future synthetic chromosomes. PMID:26111960

  4. The preservation of genetic resources of the vine requires cohabitation between institutional clonal selection, mass selection and private clonal selection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roby Jean-Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Clonal selection allows control of virus diseases and selection of genotypes on agronomic, viticultural or enological criteria. Clonal selection has the major drawback that it impoverishes genetic diversity and exposes growers to environmental instability of clones (genotype X environment interaction. Clonal selection has become the almost unique way of propagating plant material for vineyards, hence threatening the genetic diversity of the grapevine. For major grapevine varieties, some genetic diversity is maintained in institutional collections. However, this way of conservation is insufficiently developed, it is expensive and remains fragile. A cost effective way to preserve intra-varietal diversity is to maintain a limited proportion of mass selection in vine propagation. Private clonal selection can also contribute, in a more limited way, in maintaining genetic resources. Another approach to carry out conservation and selection of grapevine is the methodology followed in Portugal. This strategy is exemplified with the conservation/selection of an ancient Portuguese variety. The work begins with the “ex situ” conservation of a representative sample of the intravarietal diversity of the variety, which, in practice, corresponds to a large field trial with hundreds of clones under an experimental design suitable for reducing random variation of quantitative traits. From evaluating those traits (yield and must quality traits, the intravarietal diversity is quantified and the range of the predicted genotypic effects for each of those traits is analyzed. Different mass selections (polyclonal selections are carried out for distribution and planting of new vineyards. These different mass selections provide high economic gains and also the preservation of diversity in a complementary manner to that which started the work on-farm conservation.

  5. Chromosome Microarray.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Sharon

    2016-01-01

    Over the last half century, knowledge about genetics, genetic testing, and its complexity has flourished. Completion of the Human Genome Project provided a foundation upon which the accuracy of genetics, genomics, and integration of bioinformatics knowledge and testing has grown exponentially. What is lagging, however, are efforts to reach and engage nurses about this rapidly changing field. The purpose of this article is to familiarize nurses with several frequently ordered genetic tests including chromosomes and fluorescence in situ hybridization followed by a comprehensive review of chromosome microarray. It shares the complexity of microarray including how testing is performed and results analyzed. A case report demonstrates how this technology is applied in clinical practice and reveals benefits and limitations of this scientific and bioinformatics genetic technology. Clinical implications for maternal-child nurses across practice levels are discussed. PMID:27276104

  6. Cotton Chromosome Substitution Lines Crossed with Cultivars: Genetic Model Evaluation and Seed Trait Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seed from Upland cotton, Gossypium hirsutum L., provides a desirable and important nutrition profile. In this study, six seed traits (protein content, oil content, seed hull fiber content, seed index, seed volume, embryo percentage) for F3 hybrids of 13 cotton chromosome substitution lines crossed w...

  7. Genetic sub-structure in western Mediterranean populations revealed by 12 Y-chromosome STR loci

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodríguez, V; Tomas Mas, Carmen; Sánchez, J J;

    2008-01-01

    Haplotype and allele frequencies of 12 Y-chromosome short tandem repeat (Y-STR) loci (DYS19, DYS389I, DYS389II, DYS390, DYS391, DYS392, DYS393, DYS385 a/b, DYS437, DYS438 and DYS439) included in the Powerplex(R) Y System were determined in seven western Mediterranean populations from Valencia...

  8. Genetics and biology of human ovarian teratomas. II. Molecular analysis of origin of nondisjunction and gene-centromere mapping of chromosome I markers.

    OpenAIRE

    Deka, R; Chakravarti, A; Surti, U; Hauselman, E; Reefer, J; Majumder, P P; Ferrell, R E

    1990-01-01

    Chromosomal heteromorphisms and DNA polymorphisms have been utilized to identify the mechanisms that lead to formation of human ovarian teratomas and to construct a gene-centromere map of chromosome 1 by using those teratomas that arise by meiotic nondisjunction. Of 61 genetically informative ovarian teratomas, 21.3% arose by nondisjunction at meiosis I, and 39.3% arose by meiosis II nondisjunction. Eight polymorphic marker loci on chromosome 1p and one marker on 1q were used to estimate a ge...

  9. Radiation genetic studies in garden pea. Part 2. Caffeine potentiation and chromosome damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of 1.5x10-2 M caffeine post-treatments over the chromosome damage induced by 4kR X-ray 1.5x10-2 M Maleic hydrazide (MH) and N-Nitroso-N-urethane (NMU) treatments in the root top cells of a normal and trigenic leaf mutant of Pisum sativum was studied. While MH and NMU produced S-dependent effects, X-rays induced non-delayed S-independent effects. These effects got potentiated by caffeine treatments. With MH, the potentiation occurred when the cells got exposed to caffeine during S-phase and with X-rays, it occurred when the irradiated cells are treated in G2 or prophase stage. The caffeine potentiation of chromosome damage produced by MH was similar in the roots exposed to caffeine at 16 and 31degC but with NMU, the potentiation was lower at 31 than at 16degC. If the inhibitory effect of caffeine on gap filling process of the damaged DNA is the molecular mechanism responsible for caffeine potentiation of reproductive death it may be the mechanism responsible for the observed chromosome damage in MH treated cells exposed to caffeine during G1 and S phase. But the X-irradiated cells are insensitive to caffeine at such phases. In these cells caffeine probably acts as an inhibitor of the photoreactivating enzymes for binding sites or with the substrate in the irradiated cells post-treated during G2 and prophase. However, temperature independence of caffeine potentiation is not compatible with eithr of the above two views. Compared to the normal genotype, the trigenic mutant exhibited an increased chromosomal damage, but not the potentiation. Probably mutant genes reduce the resistance of a genome against mutagenic action, consequently enhance the suseptibility to chromosome damage. (author)

  10. Assessment of Genetic Stability Among In Vitro Plants of Arachis retusa Using RAPD and AFLP Markers for Germplasm Preservation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rachel Fatima Gagliardi; Luiz Ricardo Hanai; Georgia Pacheco; Carlos Alberto Oliveira; Leonardo Alves Carneiro; José Francisco Montenegro Valls; Elisabeth Mansur; Maria Lucia Carneiro Vieira

    2007-01-01

    Arachis retusa Krapov. et W. C. Gregory et Valls is endemic in the West-central region of Brazil, occurring in areas endangered by human actions. The establishment of in vitro preservation methods for wild species of Arachis isan alternative to seed banks for germplasm storage, multiplication and distribution. The risk of genetic changesinduced by tissue culture and the monitoring of the genetic stability of the biological material before, during andafter storage must be considered in the context of conservation. Random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) andamplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) fingerprinting were used to evaluate the genetic stability of invitro plants originated from cotyledons and embryo axes of A. retusa. Cotyledons originated shoots through directorganogenesis and embryo axes displayed multishoot formation induced by 110 mmol/L and 8.8 mmol/L BAP,respectively. Ninety genomlc regions (loci) generated from RAPD and 372 from AFLP analyses were evaluated. Allamplified fragments detected by both techniques in plants derived from the two explant types were monomorphic.The results indicate that the recovered shoots are genetically stable at the assessed genomic regions.

  11. Welfare Effects of Identity Preservation and Labelling of Genetically Modified Food

    OpenAIRE

    Lindner, Robert K.; Burton, Michael P.; James, Sallie; Pluske, Johanna M.

    2001-01-01

    Using a simple model of the world canola market, this paper explores the consequences of the introduction of GM canola on prices, production and consumer welfare. In particular, the model contains heterogeneous consumers who differentiate between GM and non-GM canola, but who can be captured by the GM market if the price discount for GM is sufficiently large. This leads to market segmentation, with the size of price differentials determined by identity preservation costs. A particular feature...

  12. Initial Development of a Temporal-Envelope-Preserving Nonlinear Hearing Aid Prescription Using a Genetic Algorithm

    OpenAIRE

    Sabin, Andrew T.; Souza, Pamela E.

    2013-01-01

    Most hearing aid prescriptions focus on the optimization of a metric derived from the long-term average spectrum of speech, and do not consider how the prescribed values might distort the temporal envelope shape. A growing body of evidence suggests that such distortions can lead to systematic errors in speech perception, and therefore hearing aid prescriptions might benefit by including preservation of the temporal envelope shape in their rationale. To begin to explore this possibility, we de...

  13. Chromosomal and Genetic Analysis of a Human Lung Adenocarcinoma Cell Line OM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-Wu Li

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: The lung adenocarcinoma cell line OM exhibited multiple complex karyotypes, and chromosome 10 was frequently involved in chromosomal translocation, which may play key roles in tumorigenesis. We speculated that the oncogenes may be located at 3q25.3-28, 5p13, 12q22-23.24, while tumor suppressor genes may exist in 3p25-26, 6p25, 6q26-27, 7q34-36, 8p22-23, 9p21-24, 10q25-26.3, 12p13.31-13.33, and 17p13.1-13.3. Moreover, at least four genes (MME, SI, BCHE, and KNG may be involved in the human lung adenocarcinoma cell line OM.

  14. Genetic polymorphism of 11 Y-chromosomal STR loci in Yunnan Han Chinese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanmei, Yang; Tao, Gu; Yubao, Zeng; Chunjie, Xiao; Bifeng, Chen; Shi, Luo; Bingying, Xu; Qiang, Jing; Qinyong, Zhuang; Wen, Zhang; Shengjun, Luo; Shengjie, Nie

    2010-02-01

    Allele frequencies and haplotypes of 11 Y-chromosome STR loci, DYS19, DYS389I, DYS389II, DYS390, DYS391, DYS392, DYS393, DYS385 ab, DYS438, DYS439 and DYS437 were determined in 320 unrelated Yunnan Han Chinese males. A total of 293 haplotypes were identified, of which 268 were unique, 23 were shared in two individuals, and 2 were shared in three individuals. The allele diversity values for each locus ranged from 0.4087 (DYS438) to 0.9701 (DYS385). The allele observed haplotypes diversity value was 0.9994. The combined Y-chromosome STR polymorphisms provide a powerful discrimination tool for routine forensic applications. PMID:20129460

  15. Genetic polymorphisms for 17 Y-chromosomal STR haplotypes in Jammu and Kashmir Saraswat Brahmin population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Bhuvnesh; Raina, Anupuma; Dogra, Tirath Das

    2010-09-01

    In this study 17 Y-chromosomal STRs (including DYS19, DYS389I, DS389II, DYS390, DYS391, DYS392, DYS393, DYS385a/b, DYS437, DYS438, DYS439, DYS448, DYS456, DYS458, DYS635 and Y GATA H4) were analysed using blood samples of 122 unrelated male individuals belonging to Saraswat Brahmin community from Jammu (ID YP000599) and Kashmir (ID YP000600) region of J&K state of India. The allelic frequency distribution and haplotype diversity of 17 Y-chromosomal STR for both the populations were calculated. In the Kashmiri Saraswat group, a total of 109 haplotypes were identified in 122 individuals, of these haplotypes, 101 were found only once. The gene diversity values of STR loci ranged from 0.4813 (DYS391) to 0.8645 (DYS385a/b) for Jammu & Kashmiri Saraswat Brahmins. PMID:20621539

  16. Comparative Genetic Mapping Points to Different Sex Chromosomes in Sibling Species of Wild Strawberry (Fragaria)

    OpenAIRE

    Goldberg, Margot T.; Spigler, Rachel B.; Ashman, Tia-Lynn

    2010-01-01

    Separate sexes have evolved repeatedly from hermaphroditic ancestors in flowering plants, and thus select taxa can provide unparalleled insight into the evolutionary dynamics of sex chromosomes that are thought to be shared by plants and animals alike. Here we ask whether two octoploid sibling species of wild strawberry—one almost exclusively dioecious (males and females), Fragaria chiloensis, and one subdioecious (males, females, and hermaphrodites), F. virginiana—share the same sex-determin...

  17. Genetic data for 17 Y-chromosomal STR loci in Macedonians in the Republic of Macedonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakovski, Zlatko; Nikolova, Ksenija; Jankova-Ajanovska, Renata; Marjanovic, Damir; Pojskic, Naris; Janeska, Biljana

    2011-08-01

    The population data were obtained for the 16 Y chromosomal STR loci included in the AmpFistr(®)Yfiler™ PCR Amplification Kit (DYS456, DYS389I, DYS390, DYS389II, DYS458, DYS19, DYS385 a/b, DYS393, DYS391, DYS439, DYS635, DYS392, Y-GATA H4, DYS437, DYS438, DYS448) in a sample of 262 unrelated men from the Republic of Macedonia. PMID:21549657

  18. Genetic and radiation hybrid mapping of the hyperekplexia region on chromosome 5q.

    OpenAIRE

    Ryan, S. G.; Dixon, M J; Nigro, M A; Kelts, K A; Markand, O N; Terry, J C; Shiang, R; Wasmuth, J J; O'Connell, P

    1992-01-01

    Hyperekplexia, or startle disease (STHE), is an autosomal dominant neurologic disorder characterized by muscular rigidity of central nervous system origin, particularly in the neonatal period, and by an exaggerated startle response to sudden, unexpected acoustic or tactile stimuli. STHE responds dramatically to the benzodiazepine drug clonazepam, which acts at gamma-aminobutyric acid type A (GABA-A) receptors. The STHE locus (STHE) was recently assigned to chromosome 5q, on the basis of tight...

  19. Remnants of ancient genetic diversity preserved within captive groups of scimitar-horned oryx (Oryx dammah).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyengar, A; Gilbert, T; Woodfine, T; Knowles, J M; Diniz, F M; Brenneman, R A; Louis, E E; Maclean, N

    2007-06-01

    Scimitar-horned oryx, now considered extinct in the wild, persists in large numbers in captivity. In this first molecular genetic study on this species, we explore the patterns of genetic diversity across European, North American, and a few other captive groups using microsatellite markers and mitochondrial control region sequencing. Strong population structure was not evident from microsatellite data but we discovered deep divergence within the mitochondrial DNA haplotypes from a network analysis where three disconnected networks were obtained, with estimated divergence times of c. 2.1-2.7 million years. Mismatch distribution analyses suggest population expansions c. 1.2 and 0.5 million years ago. We discuss our findings in the context of historical climatic changes in North Africa and use information obtained on current patterns of genetic diversity within captive groups to make recommendations for future captive management and reintroduction strategies. PMID:17561904

  20. Conservation of chromosomal arrangement among three strains of the genetically unstable archaeon Halobacterium salinarium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackett, N R; Bobovnikova, Y; Heyrovska, N

    1994-12-01

    Phenotypic variants of Halobacterium salinarium NRC-1 arise at a frequency of 10(-2). These result from transpositions of halobacterial insertion sequences and rearrangements mediated by halobacterial insertion sequences. We have tested the hypothesis that such mutations are confined to only a portion of the genome by comparing the chromosomal restriction map of H. salinarium NRC-1 and that of the derivative S9, which was made in 1969. The two chromosomes were mapped by using two-dimensional pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and the restriction enzymes AflII, AseI, and DraI. A comparison of the two deduced maps showed a domain of about 210 kbp to be subject to many rearrangements, including an inversion in S9 relative to NRC-1. However, the rest of the chromosome was conserved among NRC-1, S9, and an independent Halobacterium isolate, GRB, previously mapped by St. Jean et al. (A. St. Jean, B. A. Trieselmann, and R. L. Charlebois, Nucleic Acids Res. 22:1476-1483, 1994). This concurs with data from eubacteria suggesting strong selective forces maintaining gene order even in the face of rearrangement events occurring at a high frequency. PMID:8002597

  1. Beyond botany to genetic resource preservation: the S. P. Vander Kloet Vaccinium L. collections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dr. S. P. Vander Kloet, botanist, traveled the world examining and obtaining specimens to redefine infrageneric taxonomic units within Vaccinium L., family Ericaceae. Besides his botanical treatises, his legacy includes herbarium voucher specimens and ex situ genetic resource collections including a...

  2. Cytogenetic and genetic studies of radiation-induced chromosome damage in mouse oocytes. Part 1. Numerical and structural chromosome anomalies in metaphase II oocytes, pre- and post-implantation embryos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The incidences of X-ray induced numerical and structural chromosome anomalies were screened in a range of developmental stages from metaphase II oocytes through to post-implantation embryos. Following 1 Gy of acute X-rays to immediately preovulatory stage oocytes, the rate of hyperploidy (chromosome gain) was found to be elevated over levels in unirradiated controls, at metaphase II, in 1-cell and 3.5 day pre-implantation embryos but not in 8.5 day post-implantation foetuses. In the latter, however, the frequency of mosaicism was significantly increased. A similar response of an increase in mosaicism but not in hyperploidy in 8.5 day post-implantation embryos was also found after irradiation of dictyate stage oocytes with 4 Gy of acute X-rays. Significantly elevated frequencies of structural chromosome anomalies were present in metaphase II oocytes and pre-implantation embryonic stages, but could not be detected in block-stained chromosome preparations from 8.5 day post-implantation foetuses. However, analysis of chromosome preparations after G-banding showed that almost 14% of 14.5 day foetuses carried a chromosome rearrangement after 1 Gy of X-rays to immediately preovulatory stage oocytes. Overall, our data indicate that the presence of radiation-induced chromosome gains are incompatible with embryonic survival but that a proportion of embryos with structural chromosome damage develop past mid-gestation. These latter embryos are therefore potentially capable of contributing to the genetic burden of the next generation

  3. Novel QTL at chromosome 6p22 for alcohol consumption: Implications for the genetic liability of alcohol use disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kos, Mark Z; Glahn, David C; Carless, Melanie A; Olvera, Rene; McKay, D Reese; Quillen, Ellen E; Gelernter, Joel; Chen, Xiang-Ding; Deng, Hong-Wen; Kent, Jack W; Dyer, Thomas D; Göring, Harald H H; Curran, Joanne E; Duggirala, Ravi; Blangero, John; Almasy, Laura

    2014-06-01

    Linkage studies of alcoholism have implicated several chromosome regions, leading to the successful identification of susceptibility genes, including ADH4 and GABRA2 on chromosome 4. Quantitative endophenotypes that are potentially closer to gene action than clinical endpoints offer a means of obtaining more refined linkage signals of genes that predispose alcohol use disorders (AUD). In this study we examine a self-reported measure of the maximum number of drinks consumed in a 24-hr period (abbreviated Max Drinks), a significantly heritable phenotype (h(2)  = 0.32 ± 0.05; P = 4.61 × 10(-14)) with a strong genetic correlation with AUD (ρg  = 0.99 ± 0.13) for the San Antonio Family Study (n = 1,203). Genome-wide SNPs were analyzed using variance components linkage methods in the program SOLAR, revealing a novel, genome-wide significant QTL (LOD = 4.17; P = 5.85 × 10(-6)) for Max Drinks at chromosome 6p22.3, a region with a number of compelling candidate genes implicated in neuronal function and psychiatric illness. Joint analysis of Max Drinks and AUD status shows that the QTL has a significant non-zero effect on diagnosis (P = 4.04 × 10(-3)), accounting for 8.6% of the total variation. Significant SNP associations for Max Drinks were also identified at the linkage region, including one, rs7761213 (P = 2.14 × 10(-4)), obtained for an independent sample of Chinese families. Thus, our study identifies a potential risk locus for AUD at 6p22.3, with significant pleiotropic effects on the heaviness of alcohol consumption that may not be population specific. PMID:24692236

  4. Proceedings of a workshop on "Markets for non-Genetically Modified Identity Preserved crops and derived products" organised by the JRC

    OpenAIRE

    TILLIE PASCAL; VIGANI MAURO; DILLEN KOEN; Rodriguez Cerezo, Emilio

    2012-01-01

    The Institute for Prospective Technological Studies (IPTS) of the European Commission’s Joint Research Centre (JRC) is currently undertaking research activities in order to describe the current situation and functioning of the markets for non Genetically Modified Identity Preserved crops and derived products. For this purpose, JRC-IPTS organized an International Workshop on "Markets for non-GM Identity Preserved crops and derived products" in Seville on 21&22 June 2012. This workshop brou...

  5. Genetic Counseling for Patients Considering Screening and Diagnosis for Chromosomal Abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chard, Renée L; Norton, Mary E

    2016-06-01

    With the introduction of cell-free DNA screening for fetal aneuploidy and chromosomal microarray for prenatal diagnostic testing, options for pregnant women have become increasingly complex. Discussions regarding options for prenatal testing for aneuploidy should occur prior to any testing and should include pertinent risks and benefits of each alternative test. There is no single screening or diagnostic test option that is the right choice for all patients; patient decisions should be based on each individual woman's values and preferences after a discussion of all options. PMID:27235908

  6. Use of Recombination-Mediated Genetic Engineering for Construction of Rescue Human Cytomegalovirus Bacterial Artificial Chromosome Clones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalpana Dulal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC technology has contributed immensely to manipulation of larger genomes in many organisms including large DNA viruses like human cytomegalovirus (HCMV. The HCMV BAC clone propagated and maintained inside E. coli allows for accurate recombinant virus generation. Using this system, we have generated a panel of HCMV deletion mutants and their rescue clones. In this paper, we describe the construction of HCMV BAC mutants using a homologous recombination system. A gene capture method, or gap repair cloning, to seize large fragments of DNA from the virus BAC in order to generate rescue viruses, is described in detail. Construction of rescue clones using gap repair cloning is highly efficient and provides a novel use of the homologous recombination-based method in E. coli for molecular cloning, known colloquially as recombineering, when rescuing large BAC deletions. This method of excising large fragments of DNA provides important prospects for in vitro homologous recombination for genetic cloning.

  7. Tracing the evolution of male lineages in bears using genetic markers on the Y chromosome

    OpenAIRE

    Bidon, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    The mammalian family of bears (Ursidae) comprises eight extant species, occurring on four different continents. Among them are the iconic and well-known brown and polar bears, both widely distributed across the Northern hemisphere. Their intraspecific genetic structuring has been extensively investigated, albeit with a focus on genetic markers from maternally inherited parts of their genomes (mitochondrial DNA). The evolutionary relationship and divergence time between brown and polar bears h...

  8. Meiotic and mitotic behaviour of a ring/deleted chromosome 22 in human embryos determined by preimplantation genetic diagnosis for a maternal carrier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laver Sarah

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ring chromosomes are normally associated with developmental anomalies and are rarely inherited. An exception to this rule is provided by deletion/ring cases. We were provided with a unique opportunity to investigate the meiotic segregation at oogenesis in a woman who is a carrier of a deleted/ring 22 chromosome. The couple requested preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD following the birth of a son with a mosaic karyotype. The couple underwent two cycles of PGD. Studies were performed on lymphocytes, single embryonic cells removed from 3 day-old embryos and un-transferred embryos. Analysis was carried out using fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH with specific probe sets in two rounds of hybridization. Results In total, 12 embryos were biopsied, and follow up information was obtained for 10 embryos. No embryos were completely normal or balanced for chromosome 22 by day 5. There was only one embryo diagnosed as balanced of 12 biopsied but that accumulated postzygotic errors by day 5. Three oocytes apparently had a balanced chromosome 22 complement but all had the deleted and the ring 22 and not the intact chromosome 22. After fertilisation all the embryos accumulated postzygotic errors for chromosome 22. Conclusion The study of the preimplantation embryos in this case provided a rare and significant chance to study and understand the phenomena associated with this unusual type of anomaly during meiosis and in the earliest stages of development. It is the first reported PGD attempt for a ring chromosome abnormality.

  9. Y-Chromosome and mtDNA Genetics Reveal Significant Contrasts in Affinities of Modern Middle Eastern Populations with European and African Populations

    OpenAIRE

    Badro, Danielle A.; Haber, Marc; Soria-Hernanz, David F

    2013-01-01

    The Middle East was a funnel of human expansion out of Africa, a staging area for the Neolithic Agricultural Revolution, and the home to some of the earliest world empires. Post LGM expansions into the region and subsequent population movements created a striking genetic mosaic with distinct sex-based genetic differentiation. While prior studies have examined the mtDNA and Y-chromosome contrast in focal populations in the Middle East, none have undertaken a broad-spectrum survey including Nor...

  10. Autoexcision of Bacterial Artificial Chromosome Facilitated by Terminal Repeat-Mediated Homologous Recombination: a Novel Approach for Generating Traceless Genetic Mutants of Herpesviruses ▿

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Fuchun; Li, Qiuhua; Wong, Scott W.; Gao, Shou-jiang

    2010-01-01

    Infectious bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) of herpesviruses are powerful tools for genetic manipulation. However, the presence of BAC vector sequence in the viral genomes often causes genetic and phenotypic alterations. While the excision of the BAC vector cassette can be achieved by homologous recombination between extra duplicate viral sequences or loxP site-mediated recombination, these methods either are inefficient or leave a loxP site mark in the viral genome. Here we describe t...

  11. A variant at chromosome 9p21 is associated with recurrent myocardial infarction and cardiac death after acute coronary syndrome:the GRACE Genetics Study

    OpenAIRE

    Buysschaert, Ian; Carruthers, Kathryn F.; Donald R Dunbar; Peuteman, Gilian; Rietzschel, Ernst; Belmans, Ann; Hedley, Ann; Meyer, Tim; Budaj, Andrzej; Werf, Frans; Lambrechts, Diether; Fox, Keith A. A.

    2010-01-01

    Recent genetic studies identified the rs1333049 variant on chromosome 9p21 as a major susceptibility locus for coronary artery disease and myocardial infarction (MI). Here, we evaluated whether this variant also contributes to recurrent MI or cardiac death following an acute coronary syndrome (ACS).

  12. Vibrio chromosomes share common history

    OpenAIRE

    Gevers Dirk; Chang Sarah; Chang LeeAnn; Kirkup Benjamin C; Polz Martin F

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background While most gamma proteobacteria have a single circular chromosome, Vibrionales have two circular chromosomes. Horizontal gene transfer is common among Vibrios, and in light of this genetic mobility, it is an open question to what extent the two chromosomes themselves share a common history since their formation. Results Single copy genes from each chromosome (142 genes from chromosome I and 42 genes from chromosome II) were identified from 19 sequenced Vibrionales genomes ...

  13. Chromosome substituution lines: Concept, development and utilization in the genetic improvement of upland cotton

    Science.gov (United States)

    New alleles useful for agronomic and fiber quality must be discovered and bred into Upland cotton germplasm to remain competitive in the world economy of cotton production. Two of the primary challenges to genetic improvement of cotton are: 1) insufficient information about complex agronomic and fi...

  14. Ancestry of the Iban is predominantly Southeast Asian: genetic evidence from autosomal, mitochondrial, and Y chromosomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatum S Simonson

    Full Text Available Humans reached present-day Island Southeast Asia (ISEA in one of the first major human migrations out of Africa. Population movements in the millennia following this initial settlement are thought to have greatly influenced the genetic makeup of current inhabitants, yet the extent attributed to different events is not clear. Recent studies suggest that south-to-north gene flow largely influenced present-day patterns of genetic variation in Southeast Asian populations and that late Pleistocene and early Holocene migrations from Southeast Asia are responsible for a substantial proportion of ISEA ancestry. Archaeological and linguistic evidence suggests that the ancestors of present-day inhabitants came mainly from north-to-south migrations from Taiwan and throughout ISEA approximately 4,000 years ago. We report a large-scale genetic analysis of human variation in the Iban population from the Malaysian state of Sarawak in northwestern Borneo, located in the center of ISEA. Genome-wide single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP markers analyzed here suggest that the Iban exhibit greatest genetic similarity to Indonesian and mainland Southeast Asian populations. The most common non-recombining Y (NRY and mitochondrial (mt DNA haplogroups present in the Iban are associated with populations of Southeast Asia. We conclude that migrations from Southeast Asia made a large contribution to Iban ancestry, although evidence of potential gene flow from Taiwan is also seen in uniparentally inherited marker data.

  15. Ancestry of the Iban is predominantly Southeast Asian: genetic evidence from autosomal, mitochondrial, and Y chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonson, Tatum S; Xing, Jinchuan; Barrett, Robert; Jerah, Edward; Loa, Peter; Zhang, Yuhua; Watkins, W Scott; Witherspoon, David J; Huff, Chad D; Woodward, Scott; Mowry, Bryan; Jorde, Lynn B

    2011-01-01

    Humans reached present-day Island Southeast Asia (ISEA) in one of the first major human migrations out of Africa. Population movements in the millennia following this initial settlement are thought to have greatly influenced the genetic makeup of current inhabitants, yet the extent attributed to different events is not clear. Recent studies suggest that south-to-north gene flow largely influenced present-day patterns of genetic variation in Southeast Asian populations and that late Pleistocene and early Holocene migrations from Southeast Asia are responsible for a substantial proportion of ISEA ancestry. Archaeological and linguistic evidence suggests that the ancestors of present-day inhabitants came mainly from north-to-south migrations from Taiwan and throughout ISEA approximately 4,000 years ago. We report a large-scale genetic analysis of human variation in the Iban population from the Malaysian state of Sarawak in northwestern Borneo, located in the center of ISEA. Genome-wide single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers analyzed here suggest that the Iban exhibit greatest genetic similarity to Indonesian and mainland Southeast Asian populations. The most common non-recombining Y (NRY) and mitochondrial (mt) DNA haplogroups present in the Iban are associated with populations of Southeast Asia. We conclude that migrations from Southeast Asia made a large contribution to Iban ancestry, although evidence of potential gene flow from Taiwan is also seen in uniparentally inherited marker data. PMID:21305013

  16. Codling moth sex chromosomes and their potential for development of genetic sexing starins

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Marec, František; Fuková, Iva; Vítková, Magda; Nguyen, Petr; Traut, W.

    San Miguel deTucumán : Sociedad Entomológica Argentina , 2005. s. 45-45. [Congreso Argentino de Entomología /6./. 12.09.2005-15.09.2005, San Miguel de Tucumán] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50070508 Keywords : FISH * genomic hybridization * laser microdissection Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  17. BACTERIAL ARTIFICIAL CHROMOSOME(BAC)LIBRARIES CONSTRUCTED FROM THE GENETIC STANDARD OF UPLAND COTTON

    Science.gov (United States)

    Two BAC libraries and one plant transformation-competent BIBAC library were developed from the Gossypium hirsutum acc. TM-1 for the development of an integrative cotton physical and genetic map and other genomic applications. TM-1 is the most desirable choice for the physical map of Upland cotton be...

  18. From single nucleotide substitutions up to chromosomal deletions: genetic pause of leucism-associated disorders in animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleck, Katharina; Erhardt, Georg; Lühken, Gesine

    2016-01-01

    Leucism is characterized by a complete or partial white skin and hair in combination with pigmented irides, which can be vivid blue or heterochromatic. This is due to a complete or partial lack of melanocytes. The underlying pathogenesis is a disturbed emigration or differentiation of neural crest-derived cells. Therefore, leucistic phenotypes can be associated with defects, which mainly impair sensory organs and nerves. In humans, a well-known example is the Waardenburg syndrome. Leucism-associated disorders were also described in mouse, rat, hamster, rabbit, mink, cat, dog, pig, sheep, llama, alpaca, cattle and horse. In some of these species already identified causal mutations affect the genes EDN3, EDNRB, KIT, MITF, PAX3, SILV and SOX10. Defect alleles represent different types of genetic variation, ranging from single nucleotide substitutions up to larger chromosomal deletions. Some of the defect alleles produce desired coat color patterns. In some but not all cases, available genetic tests enable breeders to avoid production of animals affected by a leucism-associated disorder. PMID:27529988

  19. Continent-wide decoupling of Y-chromosomal genetic variation from language and geography in native South Americans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lutz Roewer

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Numerous studies of human populations in Europe and Asia have revealed a concordance between their extant genetic structure and the prevailing regional pattern of geography and language. For native South Americans, however, such evidence has been lacking so far. Therefore, we examined the relationship between Y-chromosomal genotype on the one hand, and male geographic origin and linguistic affiliation on the other, in the largest study of South American natives to date in terms of sampled individuals and populations. A total of 1,011 individuals, representing 50 tribal populations from 81 settlements, were genotyped for up to 17 short tandem repeat (STR markers and 16 single nucleotide polymorphisms (Y-SNPs, the latter resolving phylogenetic lineages Q and C. Virtually no structure became apparent for the extant Y-chromosomal genetic variation of South American males that could sensibly be related to their inter-tribal geographic and linguistic relationships. This continent-wide decoupling is consistent with a rapid peopling of the continent followed by long periods of isolation in small groups. Furthermore, for the first time, we identified a distinct geographical cluster of Y-SNP lineages C-M217 (C3* in South America. Such haplotypes are virtually absent from North and Central America, but occur at high frequency in Asia. Together with the locally confined Y-STR autocorrelation observed in our study as a whole, the available data therefore suggest a late introduction of C3* into South America no more than 6,000 years ago, perhaps via coastal or trans-Pacific routes. Extensive simulations revealed that the observed lack of haplogroup C3* among extant North and Central American natives is only compatible with low levels of migration between the ancestor populations of C3* carriers and non-carriers. In summary, our data highlight the fact that a pronounced correlation between genetic and geographic/cultural structure can only be expected under

  20. Continent-Wide Decoupling of Y-Chromosomal Genetic Variation from Language and Geography in Native South Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gusmão, Leonor; Gomes, Veronica; González, Miguel; Corach, Daniel; Sala, Andrea; Alechine, Evguenia; Palha, Teresinha; Santos, Ney; Ribeiro-dos-Santos, Andrea; Geppert, Maria; Willuweit, Sascha; Nagy, Marion; Zweynert, Sarah; Baeta, Miriam; Núñez, Carolina; Martínez-Jarreta, Begoña; González-Andrade, Fabricio; Fagundes de Carvalho, Elizeu; da Silva, Dayse Aparecida; Builes, Juan José; Turbón, Daniel; Lopez Parra, Ana Maria; Arroyo-Pardo, Eduardo; Toscanini, Ulises; Borjas, Lisbeth; Barletta, Claudia; Ewart, Elizabeth; Santos, Sidney; Krawczak, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Numerous studies of human populations in Europe and Asia have revealed a concordance between their extant genetic structure and the prevailing regional pattern of geography and language. For native South Americans, however, such evidence has been lacking so far. Therefore, we examined the relationship between Y-chromosomal genotype on the one hand, and male geographic origin and linguistic affiliation on the other, in the largest study of South American natives to date in terms of sampled individuals and populations. A total of 1,011 individuals, representing 50 tribal populations from 81 settlements, were genotyped for up to 17 short tandem repeat (STR) markers and 16 single nucleotide polymorphisms (Y-SNPs), the latter resolving phylogenetic lineages Q and C. Virtually no structure became apparent for the extant Y-chromosomal genetic variation of South American males that could sensibly be related to their inter-tribal geographic and linguistic relationships. This continent-wide decoupling is consistent with a rapid peopling of the continent followed by long periods of isolation in small groups. Furthermore, for the first time, we identified a distinct geographical cluster of Y-SNP lineages C-M217 (C3*) in South America. Such haplotypes are virtually absent from North and Central America, but occur at high frequency in Asia. Together with the locally confined Y-STR autocorrelation observed in our study as a whole, the available data therefore suggest a late introduction of C3* into South America no more than 6,000 years ago, perhaps via coastal or trans-Pacific routes. Extensive simulations revealed that the observed lack of haplogroup C3* among extant North and Central American natives is only compatible with low levels of migration between the ancestor populations of C3* carriers and non-carriers. In summary, our data highlight the fact that a pronounced correlation between genetic and geographic/cultural structure can only be expected under very specific

  1. Chromatid Painting for Chromosomal Inversion Detection Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose a novel approach to the detection of chromosomal inversions. Transmissible chromosome aberrations (translocations and inversions) have profound genetic...

  2. Systems genetics of hepatocellular damage in vivo and in vitro: identification of a critical network on chromosome 11 in mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebe, Roman; Hall, Rabea A; Williams, Robert W; Dooley, Steven; Lammert, Frank

    2013-10-16

    Quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping is a powerful method to find modifier loci that influence disease risk and progression without prior knowledge of underlying genetic mechanisms. The aim of this study is to identify gene loci that contribute to individual differences in liver fibrosis following chronic liver damage. For this purpose, we carried out a mapping study across a panel of 21 BXD recombinant inbred strains using primary hepatocytes challenged with transforming growth factor (TGF)-β for 48 h. We identified a 6 Mb interval on chromosome 11 that is a major modifier of TGF-β-induced hepatocyte injury. Corresponding in vivo genetic analysis of fibrosis after chronic hepatotoxic injury by carbon tetrachloride (CCl4 ip for 6 wk) highlighted the same locus. Expression QTL (eQTL) analysis in liver tissues in the BXD family identified six polymorphisms in this region that are associated with strong cis eQTLs and that correlate well with gene expression in liver after both 6 wk CCl4 treatment and acute ethanol damage of the liver. Within this interval we rank two genes containing coding sequence variants as strong candidates that may modulate the severity of liver fibrosis: 1) the extracellular proteinase inhibitor gene Expi (also known as Wdnm1 or Wfdc18) and 2) musashi RNA-binding protein 2 (Msi2). The powerful combination of experimental, genetics, and bioinformatics methods, as well as combined in vitro and in vivo approaches can be used to define QTLs, genes, and even candidate sequence variants linked to hepatotoxicity and fibrosis. PMID:23943854

  3. Radon exposure, chromosomal aberrations, and genetic polymorphisms in selected Slovak cave workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of work was genotoxic risk assessment of the Slovak show cave workers employed by the Slovak Caves Administration in Liptovsky Mikulas. They are guides or administrators of the four Slovak show caves: Vazecka, Demanovska, Bystrianska, and Harmanecka. We examined 51 workers exposed to radon, with average age 35.64 years ± 6.63 (SD) and average exposition time 9.78 years ± 6.27 (SD). They are 43 men (i.e. 84.31 %) and 9 women (i.e. 15.69 %). The control group consisted of 32 healthy workers from Faculty Hospital in Martin. The workers were not exposed to any genotoxic agents. The average age is 31.84 years ± 5.84(SD). From every subject we evaluated 100 mitosis, i.e. 5100 mitosis from exposed workers and 3200 mitosis from control subjects. In exposed group we found in 111 cells chromosomal aberrations, this present 2.18 % Ab.c. ± 0.19 (SEM), and in control 1st group 1.53 % ± 0.16 (SEM). There are 106 breaks (95.50%), and 5 exchanges (4.50%) on chromosomes. The highest number of Ab.c. we detected in workers of Vazecka (2.63 % Ab.c) and Bystrianska (2.00 % Ab.c.) caves. There is a significant increase (P < 0.05) in the mean number of Ab.c. in workers of cave Vazecka as compared to control. In 15 cases (i.e. 28.30 %) we found increase or high exposure to genotoxic agents, we found any difference between sex, and any dependence of the number of Ab.c. on age and time of exposure. The Vazecka cave workers showed three times higher mean effective doses all the year round (milliSievert) than workers additional caves. The measured values of radiation in the caves and mines exceeded the permissible limits and Regional Hygienist of the Central Slovakia declared in 1981 the risk zones and, at the same time, the monitoring of working atmosphere was initiated. Our evaluations referred to certain exposition of this carcinogen in cave workers too. The essence of prevention is based in the lowering of ionizing radiation and improvement of the sanitary-technical component

  4. Sex chromosome system in Lepidoptera and its potential for genetic sexing

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Marec, František

    Vídeň : International Atomic Energy Agency, 2003, s. 75-86. [First Research Co-ordination Meeting within the FAO /IAEA Co-ordinated Research Programme held in Kelowna.. Brithish Columbia (CA), 19.08.2002-23.08.2002] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KSK5052113 Grant ostatní: International Atomic Energy Agency(AT) 12055/RO Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5007907 Keywords : Lepidoptera * Bombyx mori Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  5. A Chromosome Segment Substitution Library of Weedy Rice for Genetic Dissection of Complex Agronomic and Domestication Traits.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasanta K Subudhi

    Full Text Available Chromosome segment substitution lines (CSSLs are a powerful alternative for locating quantitative trait loci (QTL, analyzing gene interactions, and providing starting materials for map-based cloning projects. We report the development and characterization of a CSSL library of a U.S. weedy rice accession 'PSRR-1' with genome-wide coverage in an adapted rice cultivar 'Bengal' background. The majority of the CSSLs carried a single defined weedy rice segment with an average introgression segment of 2.8 % of the donor genome. QTL mapping results for several agronomic and domestication traits from the CSSL population were compared with those obtained from two recombinant inbred line (RIL populations involving the same weedy rice accession. There was congruence of major effect QTLs between both types of populations, but new and additional QTLs were detected in the CSSL population. Although, three major effect QTLs for plant height were detected on chromosomes 1, 4, and 8 in the CSSL population, the latter two escaped detection in both RIL populations. Since this was observed for many traits, epistasis may play a major role for the phenotypic variation observed in weedy rice. High levels of shattering and seed dormancy in weedy rice might result from an accumulation of many small effect QTLs. Several CSSLs with desirable agronomic traits (e.g. longer panicles, longer grains, and higher seed weight identified in this study could be useful for rice breeding. Since weedy rice is a reservoir of genes for many weedy and agronomic attributes, the CSSL library will serve as a valuable resource to discover latent genetic diversity for improving crop productivity and understanding the plant domestication process through cloning and characterization of the underlying genes.

  6. Genetic Variant rs10757278 on Chromosome 9p21 Contributes to Myocardial Infarction Susceptibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangyuan Chen

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Large-scale genome-wide association studies (GWAS have revealed that rs10757278 polymorphism (or its proxy rs1333049 on chromosome 9p21 is associated with myocardial infarction (MI susceptibility in individuals of Caucasian ancestry. Following studies in other populations investigated this association. However, some of these studies reported weak or no significant association. Here, we reevaluated this association using large-scale samples by searching PubMed and Google Scholar databases. Our results showed significant association between rs10757278 polymorphism and MI with p = 6.09 × 10−22, odds ratio (OR = 1.29, 95% confidence interval (CI 1.22–1.36 in pooled population. We further performed a subgroup analysis, and found significant association between rs10757278 polymorphism and MI in Asian and Caucasian populations. We identified that the association between rs10757278 polymorphism and MI did not vary substantially by excluding any one study. However, the heterogeneity among the selected studies varies substantially by excluding the study from the Pakistan population. We found even more significant association between rs10757278 polymorphism and MI in pooled population, p = 3.55 × 10−53, after excluding the study from the Pakistan population. In summary, previous studies reported weak or no significant association between rs10757278 polymorphism and MI. Interestingly, our analysis suggests that rs10757278 polymorphism is significantly associated with MI susceptibility by analyzing large-scale samples.

  7. Polymorphism and genetic mapping of the human oxytocin receptor gene on chromosome 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michelini, S.; Urbanek, M.; Goldman, D. [National Institute of Health-National Institute of Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, Rockville, MD (United States)] [and others

    1995-06-19

    Centrally administered oxytocin has been reported to facilitate affiliative and social behaviors, in functional harmony with its well-known peripheral effects on uterine contraction and milk ejection. The biological effects of oxytocin could be perturbed by mutations occurring in the sequence of the oxytocin receptor gene, and it would be of interest to establish the position of this gene on the human linkage map. Therefore we identified a polymorphism at the human oxytocin receptor gene. A portion of the 3{prime} untranslated region containing a 30 bp CA repeat was amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), revealing a polymorphism with two alleles occurring with frequencies of 0.77 and 0.23 in a sample of Caucasian CEPH parents (n = 70). The CA repeat polymorphism we detected was used to map the human oxytocin receptor to chromosome 3p25-3p26, in a region which contains several important genes, including loci for Von Hippel-Lindau disease (VHL) and renal cell carcinoma. 53 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Isolation and preservation of schistosome eggs and larvae in RNAlater® facilitates genetic profiling of individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Webster Bonnie L

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Although field-sampling procedures to capture gDNA from individual schistosome larval stages directly from their natural hosts exist, they do pose some technical and logistical challenges hampering certain epidemiological studies. The aim of this study was to develop, refine and evaluate an alternative methodology, which enables better preservation of large numbers of individual schistosome larval stages and eggs collected in low resource endemic areas, to provide PCR-quality DNA for multi-locus genetic analysis. The techniques reported here present simple and effective short-term field and long-term laboratory preservation and storage systems for individually sampled schistosome eggs and larval stages using a commercially available aqueous stabilisation reagent, RNAlater® eliminating the need for more cumbersome resources such as refrigerators, heaters and centrifuge equipment for immediate specimen processing. Adaptations to a general gDNA extraction method are described, that enables the acquisition of a gDNA extract (~50 μl, facilitating multiple molecular analyses of each sampled schistosome. The methodology provided PCR-quality mitochondrial and nuclear DNA from laboratory cercariae, miracidia and eggs that had been stored at up to 37°C for 2 weeks and at 4°C for 6 months and also from field collected samples. This present protocol provides significant epidemiological, ethical and practical advantages over existing sampling methods and has the potential to be transferred to studies on other organisms, especially where specimens are unable to be seen by the naked eye, are difficult to handle and need to be obtained from a field environment.

  9. Genetic polymorphisms of 17 Y chromosomal STRs in She and Manchu ethnic populations from China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Rufeng; Liu, Yaju; Lv, Xiaojiao; Shi, Meisen; Ma, Shuhua

    2016-05-01

    To evaluate the utility of Yfiler haplotype for DNA testing in two ethnic populations of China, a sample of 413 unrelated individuals (152 Shes and 261 Manchus) was determined. In the She and Manchu populations, the haplotype diversity was 0.9990 and 0.9988, respectively, and the discrimination capacity was 0.9474 and 0.9080, respectively. Research results will be valuable for human identification and paternity tests in the two minority regions and for Chinese population genetic study in the future. PMID:26896052

  10. Assignment of the 5HT7 receptor gene (HTR7) to chromosome 10q and exclusion of genetic linkage with Tourette syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gelernter, J.; Rao, P.A.; Pauls, D.L. [Yale Univ. School of Medicine, West Haven, CT (United States)] [and others

    1995-03-20

    A novel serotonin receptor designated 5HT7 (genetic locus HTR7) was cloned in 1993. This receptor has interesting properties related to ligand affinity and CNS distribution that render HTR7 a very interesting candidate gene for neuropsychiatric disorders. We mapped this gene, first by physical methods and then by genetic linkage. First, we made a tentative assignment to chromosome 10, based on hybridization of an HTR7 probe to a Southern blot of DNA from somatic cell hybrids. We then identified a genetic polymorphism at the HTR7 locus. We identified one extended pedigree where the polymorphism segregated. Using the LEPED computer program for pairwise linkage analysis, we confirmed the assignment of the gene to chromosome 10, specifically 10q21-q24, based on a lod score of 5.37 at 0% recombination between HTR7 and D10S20 (a chromosome 10 reference marker). Finally, we excluded genetic linkage between this locus and Tourette syndrome under a reasonable set of assumptions. 15 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  11. Experimental population genetics of meiotic drive systems. I. Pseudo-Y chromosomal drive as a means of eliminating cage populations of Drosophila melanogaster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The experimental population genetics of Y-chromosome drive in Drosophila melanogaster is approximated by studying the behavior of T(Y;2),SD lines. These exhibit ''pseudo-Y'' drive through the effective coupling of the Y chromosome to the second chromosome meiotic drive locus, segregation distorter (SD). T(Y;2),SD males consequently produce only male offspring. When such lines are allowed to compete against structurally normal SD+ flies in population cages, T(Y;2),SD males increase in frequency according to the dynamics of a simple haploid selection model until the cage population is eliminated as a result of a deficiency in the number of adult females. Cage population extinction generally occurs within about seven generations

  12. Genetic dissection of milk yield traits and mastitis resistance QTL on chromosome 20 in dairy cattle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kadri, Naveen Kumar; Guldbrandtsen, Bernt; Lund, Mogens Sandø;

    2015-01-01

    Intense selection to increase milk yield has had negative consequences for mastitis incidence in dairy cattle. Due to low heritability of mastitis resistance and an unfavorable genetic correlation with milk yield, a reduction in mastitis through traditional breeding has been difficult to achieve....... Here, we examined quantitative trait loci (QTL) that segregate for clinical mastitis (CM) and milk yield (MY) on Bos taurus autosome 20 (BTA20) to determine whether both traits are affected by a single polymorphism (pleiotropy) or by multiple closely linked polymorphisms. In the latter but not the...... (RDC) and Danish Jersey cattle (JER) with the goal of determining whether these QTL identified in Holsteins were segregating across breeds. Genotypes for 12,566 animals (5,966 HOL, 5,458 RDC, and 1,142 JER) were determined by using the Illumina Bovine SNP50 BeadChip (50k), which identifies 1,568 single...

  13. A large-scale rheumatoid arthritis genetic study identifies association at chromosome 9q33.2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Chang

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a chronic, systemic autoimmune disease affecting both joints and extra-articular tissues. Although some genetic risk factors for RA are well-established, most notably HLA-DRB1 and PTPN22, these markers do not fully account for the observed heritability. To identify additional susceptibility loci, we carried out a multi-tiered, case-control association study, genotyping 25,966 putative functional SNPs in 475 white North American RA patients and 475 matched controls. Significant markers were genotyped in two additional, independent, white case-control sample sets (661 cases/1322 controls from North America and 596 cases/705 controls from The Netherlands identifying a SNP, rs1953126, on chromosome 9q33.2 that was significantly associated with RA (OR(common = 1.28, trend P(comb = 1.45E-06. Through a comprehensive fine-scale-mapping SNP-selection procedure, 137 additional SNPs in a 668 kb region from MEGF9 to STOM on 9q33.2 were chosen for follow-up genotyping in a staged-approach. Significant single marker results (P(comb 5.41E-09. The observed association patterns for these SNPs had heightened statistical significance and a higher degree of consistency across sample sets. In addition, the allele frequencies for these SNPs displayed reduced variability between control groups when compared to other SNPs. Lastly, in combination with the other two known genetic risk factors, HLA-DRB1 and PTPN22, the variants reported here generate more than a 45-fold RA-risk differential.

  14. A highly polymorphic insertion in the Y-chromosome amelogenin gene can be used for evolutionary biology, population genetics and sexing in Cetacea and Artiodactyla

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crouau-Roy Brigitte

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The early radiation of the Cetartiodactyla is complex, and unambiguous molecular characters are needed to clarify the positions of hippotamuses, camels and pigs relative to the remaining taxa (Cetacea and Ruminantia. There is also a need for informative genealogic markers for Y-chromosome population genetics as well as a sexing method applicable to all species from this group. We therefore studied the sequence variation of a partial sequence of the evolutionary conserved amelogenin gene to assess its potential use in each of these fields. Results and discussion We report a large interstitial insertion in the Y amelogenin locus in most of the Cetartiodactyla lineages (cetaceans and ruminants. This sex-linked size polymorphism is the result of a 460–465 bp inserted element in intron 4 of the amelogenin gene of Ruminants and Cetaceans. Therefore, this polymorphism can easily be used in a sexing assay for these species. When taking into account this shared character in addition to nucleotide sequence, gene genealogy follows sex-chromosome divergence in Cetartiodactyla whereas it is more congruent with zoological history when ignoring these characters. This could be related to a loss of homology between chromosomal copies given the old age of the insertion. The 1 kbp Amel-Y amplified fragment is also characterized by high nucleotide diversity (64 polymorphic sites spanning over 1 kbp in seven haplotypes which is greater than for other Y-chromosome sequence markers studied so far but less than the mitochondrial control region. Conclusion The gender-dependent polymorphism we have identified is relevant not only for phylogenic inference within the Cetartiodactyla but also for Y-chromosome based population genetics and gender determination in cetaceans and ruminants. One single protocol can therefore be used for studies in population and evolutionary genetics, reproductive biotechnologies, and forensic science.

  15. SEM of canine chromosomes: normal structure and the effects of whole-body irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canine chromosomes are not only numerous (38 autosomal pairs), but they are small (compared to human chromosomes) and morphologically similar as well. Analysis of the canine karyotype by light microscopy (LM) of banded chromosomes is, thus, difficult, and the literature on the canine karyotype is scanty. In this study, we describe examination of chromosomes from normal and chronically irradiated dogs with the scanning electron microscope (SEM). Metaphase chromosomes from bone marrow aspirates were Giemsa-banded with either 0.025% trypsin alone or 0.1% trypsin preceded by 10% H2O2 and prepared for SEM. Examination of chromosomes from normal dogs revealed cylindrical chromosome profiles with well-defined chromatids and centromeres. The chromosome arms were consistently marked by periodic grooves that had complementary structures on sister chromatids and may represent the trypsin-sensitive chromatic regions. The quality of the preservation varied from preparation to preparation and depended on the concentration and time of trypsin treatment. Chromosomes from irradiated dogs revealed translocations, deletions, and gaps. We conclude that SEM produces images superior to LM images of canine chromosomes; SEM images can be used not only to identify individual chromosomes, but also to identify genetic lesions in the chromosomes of chronically irradiated dogs. We further conclude that the two Giemsa-banding protocols used in the present study produced variable results, although 0.025% trypsin alone appeared to give better and more consistent results than 0.1% trypsin preceded by 10% H2O2

  16. Genetic control of chromosome instability in Aspergillus nidulans as a means for gene amplification in eukaryotic microorganisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A haploid strain of Aspergillus nidulans carrying I-II duplication homozygous for the leaky mutation adE20 shows improved growth on minimal medium. The duplication, though more stable than disomics, still shows instability. Several methods were used for detecting genetic control of improved stability. a) visual selection, using a duplicated strain which is very unstable due to UV sensitivity, (adE20, biAl/dp yA2; uvsB). One stable strain showed a deletion (or a lethal mutation) distal to biA on the segment at the original position (on chromosome I). This deletion reduces crossing-over frequency detween the two homologous segments. As the deletion of the non-translated segment (yellow sectors) must be preceded by crossing-over, the above reduces the frequency of yellow sectors. A deletion of the translocated segment (green sectors) results in non-viability due to the deletion, and such sectors do not appear. The net result is a stable duplication involving only 12 C.O. units carrying the gene in concern. b) Suppressors of UV sensitivity (su-uvsB) were attempted using the above uvs duplicated strain. Phenotypic revertants were easily obtained, but all were back mutations at the uvsB locus. c) Mutations for UV resistance higher than that of the wild type were not obtained, in spite of the strong selective pressure inserted. d) Recombination deficient mutations (rec), six altogether, all uvs+, did not have any effect on stability. (orig.)

  17. Genetic locus on chromosome 6p for multicystic renal dysplasia, pelvi-ureteral junction stenosis, and vesicoureteral reflux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devriendt, K.; Fryns, J.P. [University Hospital Leuven (Belgium)

    1995-11-20

    Robson et al. suggest that renal agenesis, multicystic renal dysplasia (MRD), and uretero-pelvic junction (PUJ) stenosis are pathogenetically related. They proposed a vascular disruption as the cause, with the variable severity of the disorder related to the timing of the abnormal blood supply to the ureteric bud. Alternatively, there exists convincing evidence of a genetic cause transmitted as an autosomal dominant disorder with variable expression, and with a candidate gene localized on chromosome arm 6p. Combinations of these urological malformations occur in the same individual or in different relatives in the same family. In several families with PUJ-stenosis, linkage with the HLA-locus on 6p has been demonstrated. Furthermore, we recently described a patient with a de novo reciprocal translocation involving the same region on 6p in a patient with bilateral multicystic renal dysplasia. Most disease-associated reciprocal translocations appear to have a breakpoint within a candidate gene: therefore, it is reasonable to hypothesize that the breakpoint on 6p in this patient resides within a gene causing MRD. This suggests that mutations in the same gene may lead either to PUJ-stenosis or, when the stenosis is complete, to MRD. A translocation is expected to result in a complete disruption of the gene, and this could explain the severe clinical expression of bilateral MRD. Less severe mutations in the same gene, associated with a partially conserved gene function, could lead to PUJ-stenosis. 11 refs.

  18. Active vibration reduction of a flexible structure bonded with optimised piezoelectric pairs using half and quarter chromosomes in genetic algorithms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The optimal placement of sensors and actuators in active vibration control is limited by the number of candidates in the search space. The search space of a small structure discretized to one hundred elements for optimising the location of ten actuators gives 1.73 × 1013 possible solutions, one of which is the global optimum. In this work, a new quarter and half chromosome technique based on symmetry is developed, by which the search space for optimisation of sensor/actuator locations in active vibration control of flexible structures may be greatly reduced. The technique is applied to the optimisation for eight and ten actuators located on a 500×500mm square plate, in which the search space is reduced by up to 99.99%. This technique helps for updating genetic algorithm program by updating natural frequencies and mode shapes in each generation to find the global optimal solution in a greatly reduced number of generations. An isotropic plate with piezoelectric sensor/actuator pairs bonded to its surface was investigated using the finite element method and Hamilton's principle based on first order shear deformation theory. The placement and feedback gain of ten and eight sensor/actuator pairs was optimised for a cantilever and clamped-clamped plate to attenuate the first six modes of vibration, using minimization of linear quadratic index as an objective function.

  19. Quantitative genetic study of maximal electroshock seizure threshold in mice: evidence for a major seizure susceptibility locus on distal chromosome 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraro, T N; Golden, G T; Smith, G G; Longman, R L; Snyder, R L; DeMuth, D; Szpilzak, I; Mulholland, N; Eng, E; Lohoff, F W; Buono, R J; Berrettini, W H

    2001-07-01

    We conducted a quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping study to dissect the multifactorial nature of maximal electroshock seizure threshold (MEST) in C57BL/6 (B6) and DBA/2 (D2) mice. MEST determination involved a standard paradigm in which 8- to 12-week-old mice received one shock per day with a daily incremental increase in electrical current until a maximal seizure (tonic hindlimb extension) was induced. Mean MEST values in parental strains were separated by over five standard deviation units, with D2 mice showing lower values than B6 mice. The distribution of MEST values in B6xD2 F2 intercrossed mice spanned the entire phenotypic range defined by parental strains. Statistical mapping yielded significant evidence for QTLs on chromosomes 1, 2, 5, and 15, which together explained over 60% of the phenotypic variance in the model. The chromosome 1 QTL represents a locus of major effect, accounting for about one-third of the genetic variance. Experiments involving a congenic strain (B6.D2-Mtv7(a)/Ty) enabled more precise mapping of the chromosome 1 QTL and indicate that it lies in the genetic interval between markers D1Mit145 and D1Mit17. These results support the hypothesis that the distal portion of chromosome 1 harbors a gene(s) that has a fundamental role in regulating seizure susceptibility. PMID:11472065

  20. Vibrio chromosomes share common history

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gevers Dirk

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While most gamma proteobacteria have a single circular chromosome, Vibrionales have two circular chromosomes. Horizontal gene transfer is common among Vibrios, and in light of this genetic mobility, it is an open question to what extent the two chromosomes themselves share a common history since their formation. Results Single copy genes from each chromosome (142 genes from chromosome I and 42 genes from chromosome II were identified from 19 sequenced Vibrionales genomes and their phylogenetic comparison suggests consistent phylogenies for each chromosome. Additionally, study of the gene organization and phylogeny of the respective origins of replication confirmed the shared history. Conclusions Thus, while elements within the chromosomes may have experienced significant genetic mobility, the backbones share a common history. This allows conclusions based on multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA for one chromosome to be applied equally to both chromosomes.

  1. Genetic Evaluation and Use of Chromosome Microarray in Patients with Isolated Heart Defects: Benefits and Challenges of a New Model in Cardiovascular Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helm, Benjamin M; Freeze, Samantha L

    2016-01-01

    Congenital heart defects (CHDs) are common birth defects and result in significant morbidity and global economic impact. Genetic factors play a role in most CHDs; however, identification of these factors has been historically slow due to technological limitations and incomplete understanding of the impact of human genomic variation on normal and abnormal cardiovascular development. The advent of chromosome microarray (CMA) brought tremendous gains in identifying chromosome abnormalities in a variety of human disorders and is now considered part of a standard evaluation for individuals with multiple congenital anomalies and/or neurodevelopmental disorders. Several studies investigating use of CMA found that this technology can identify pathogenic copy-number variations (CNVs) in up to 15-20% of patients with CHDs with other congenital anomalies. However, there have been fewer studies exploring the use of CMA for patients with isolated CHDs. Recent studies have shown that the diagnostic yield of CMA in individuals with seemingly isolated CHD is lower than in individuals with CHDs and additional anomalies. Nevertheless, positive CMA testing in this group supports chromosome variation as one mechanism underlying the development of isolated, non-syndromic CHD - either as a causative or risk-influencing genetic factor. CMA has also identified novel genomic variation in CHDs, shedding light on candidate genes and pathways involved in cardiac development and malformations. Additional studies are needed to further address this issue. Early genetic diagnosis can enhance the medical management of patients and potentially provide crucial information about recurrence. This information is critical for genetic counseling of patients and family members. In this review, we review CMA for the non-genetics cardiology provider, offer a summary of CNV in isolated CHDs, and advocate for the use of CMA as part of the cardiovascular genetics evaluation of patients with isolated CHDs. We

  2. Chromosome 9p21 and ABCA1 Genetic Variants and Their Interactions on Coronary Heart Disease and Ischemic Stroke in a Chinese Han Population

    OpenAIRE

    Xiao-Li Cao; Rui-Xing Yin; Feng Huang; Jin-Zhen Wu; Wu-Xian Chen

    2016-01-01

    The single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) related to both coronary heart disease (CHD) and ischemic stroke (IS) in Chinese individuals have not been identified definitely. This study was developed to evaluate the genetic susceptibility to CHD and IS on the chromosome 9p21 and the adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-binding cassette transporter A1 genes (ABCA1) in a Chinese Han population. Genotypes of the rs1333040, rs1333042, rs4977574, rs2066715 and rs2740483 SNPs were determined in 1134 unrelate...

  3. Genetic investigation of biological materials from patients after stem cell transplantation based on autosomal as well as Y-chromosomal markers

    OpenAIRE

    Jacewicz, Renata; Lewandowski, Krzysztof; Rupa-Matysek, Joanna; Jedrzejczyk, Maciej; Komarnicki, Mieczysław; Berent, Jarosław

    2012-01-01

    The authors presented the results of DNA polymorphism investigation of blood, buccal swabs and hair follicles originating from patients after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. The real-time and multiplex assays based on polymerase chain reaction within the range of autosomal as well as Y-chromosomal markers were applied to assess the possible dangers arising from investigation of these materials in forensic genetics. The results revealed that not only post-transplant blood a...

  4. A high-throughput strategy for screening of bacterial artificial chromosome libraries and anchoring of clones on a genetic map constructed with single nucleotide polymorphisms

    OpenAIRE

    Deal Karin R; Ma Yaqin; Xu Kenong; Luo Ming-Cheng; Nicolet Charles M; Dvorak Jan

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Current techniques of screening bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) libraries for molecular markers during the construction of physical maps are slow, laborious and often assign multiple BAC contigs to a single locus on a genetic map. These limitations are the principal impediment in the construction of physical maps of large eukaryotic genomes. It is hypothesized that this impediment can be overcome by screening multidimensional pools of BAC clones using the highly para...

  5. A high-throughput strategy for screening of bacterial artificial chromosome libraries and anchoring of clones on a genetic map constructed with single nucleotide polymorphisms

    OpenAIRE

    Luo, Ming-Cheng; Xu, Kenong; Ma, Yaqin; Karin R Deal; Nicolet, Charles M.; Dvorak, Jan

    2009-01-01

    Background Current techniques of screening bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) libraries for molecular markers during the construction of physical maps are slow, laborious and often assign multiple BAC contigs to a single locus on a genetic map. These limitations are the principal impediment in the construction of physical maps of large eukaryotic genomes. It is hypothesized that this impediment can be overcome by screening multidimensional pools of BAC clones using the highly parallel Illu...

  6. Genetic affinities among the lower castes and tribal groups of India: inference from Y chromosome and mitochondrial DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reddy B Mohan

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background India is a country with enormous social and cultural diversity due to its positioning on the crossroads of many historic and pre-historic human migrations. The hierarchical caste system in the Hindu society dominates the social structure of the Indian populations. The origin of the caste system in India is a matter of debate with many linguists and anthropologists suggesting that it began with the arrival of Indo-European speakers from Central Asia about 3500 years ago. Previous genetic studies based on Indian populations failed to achieve a consensus in this regard. We analysed the Y-chromosome and mitochondrial DNA of three tribal populations of southern India, compared the results with available data from the Indian subcontinent and tried to reconstruct the evolutionary history of Indian caste and tribal populations. Results No significant difference was observed in the mitochondrial DNA between Indian tribal and caste populations, except for the presence of a higher frequency of west Eurasian-specific haplogroups in the higher castes, mostly in the north western part of India. On the other hand, the study of the Indian Y lineages revealed distinct distribution patterns among caste and tribal populations. The paternal lineages of Indian lower castes showed significantly closer affinity to the tribal populations than to the upper castes. The frequencies of deep-rooted Y haplogroups such as M89, M52, and M95 were higher in the lower castes and tribes, compared to the upper castes. Conclusion The present study suggests that the vast majority (>98% of the Indian maternal gene pool, consisting of Indio-European and Dravidian speakers, is genetically more or less uniform. Invasions after the late Pleistocene settlement might have been mostly male-mediated. However, Y-SNP data provides compelling genetic evidence for a tribal origin of the lower caste populations in the subcontinent. Lower caste groups might have originated with

  7. Topography of genetic elements of X-chromosome relative to the cell nucleus and to the chromosome X territory determined for human lymphocytes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Falk, Martin; Lukášová, Emilie; Kozubek, Stanislav; Kozubek, Michal

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 292, 1-2 (2002), s. 13-24. ISSN 0378-1119 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IBS5004010; GA MZd NC5955; GA ČR GA202/01/0197; GA ČR GA301/01/0186 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5004920 Keywords : structure of chromosome X territories * chromatin condensation * nuclear topology Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 2.778, year: 2002

  8. Plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 gene is located at region q21. 3-q22 of chromosome 7 and genetically linked with cystic fibrosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klinger, K.W.; Winqvist, R.; Riccio, A.; Andreasen, P.A.; Sartorio, R.; Nielsen, L.S.; Stuart, N.; Stanislovitis, P.; Watkins, P.; Douglas, R.

    1987-12-01

    The regional chromosomal location of the human gene for plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI1) was determined by three independent methods of gene mapping. PAI1 was localized first to 7cen-q32 and then to 7q21.3-q22 by Southern blot hybridization analysis of a panel of human and mouse somatic cell hybrids with a PAI1 cDNA probe and in situ hybridization, respectively. The authors frequent HindIII restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) of the PAI1 gene with an information content of 0.369. In family studies using this polymorphism, genetic linkage was found between PAI1 and the loci for erythropoietin (EPO), paraoxonase (PON), the met protooncogene (MET), and cystic fibrosis (CF), all previously assigned to the middle part of the long arm of chromosome 7. The linkage with EPO was closest with an estimated genetic distance of 3 centimorgans, whereas that to CF was 20 centimorgans. A three-point genetic linkage analysis and data from previous studies showed that the most likely order of these loci is EPO, PAI1, PON, (MET, CF), with PAI1 being located centromeric to CF. The PAI1 RFLP may prove to be valuable in ordering genetic markers in the CF-linkage group and may also be valuable in genetic analysis of plasminogen activation-related diseases, such as certain thromboembolic disorders and cancer.

  9. Breeding Plan to Preserve the Genetic Variability of the Kootenai River White Sturgeon, Final Report, December 1993.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kincaid, Harold L.

    1993-11-01

    Natural reproduction in the Kootenai River white sturgeon population has not produced a successful year class since 1974, resulting in a declining broodstock and 20 consecutive year classes missing from the age-class structure. This report describes a captive breeding plan designed to preserve the remaining genetic variability and to begin rebuilding the natural age class structure. The captive breeding program will use 3--9 females and an equal number of males captured from the Kootenai River each spring. Fish will be spawned in pairs or in diallel mating designs to produce individual families that will be reared separately to maintain family identity. Fish will be marked to identify family and year class before return to the river. Fish should be returned to the river as fall fingerlings to minimize potential adaptation to the hatchery environment Initially, while tagging methods are tested to ensure positive identification after return to the river, it may be necessary to plant fish as spring yearlings. Number of fish planted will be equalized at 5,000 per family if fall fingerlings or 1,000 per family if spring yearlings. Assuming annual survival rates of 20% during the first winter for fall fingerling plants and 50% for years 1--3, and 85% for years 4--20 of all fish planted, the target numbers would yield 7.9 progeny per family or about 4 breeding pairs at age 20. Natural survival in the river environment during the 19+ years from planting to maturity would result in variability in genetic contribution of families to the next broodstock generation. Fish planted per family would be adjusted in future years when actual survival rate information is known. Broodfish will be tagged when captured to minimize multiple spawning of the same fish. implementation of this breeding plan each year for the 20-year generation interval, using 5 different mating pairs each year, will yield an effective population size of 200, or 22.5% of the estimated 1990 population.

  10. Y-chromosome and mtDNA genetics reveal significant contrasts in affinities of modern Middle Eastern populations with European and African populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badro, Danielle A; Douaihy, Bouchra; Haber, Marc; Youhanna, Sonia C; Salloum, Angélique; Ghassibe-Sabbagh, Michella; Johnsrud, Brian; Khazen, Georges; Matisoo-Smith, Elizabeth; Soria-Hernanz, David F; Wells, R Spencer; Tyler-Smith, Chris; Platt, Daniel E; Zalloua, Pierre A

    2013-01-01

    The Middle East was a funnel of human expansion out of Africa, a staging area for the Neolithic Agricultural Revolution, and the home to some of the earliest world empires. Post LGM expansions into the region and subsequent population movements created a striking genetic mosaic with distinct sex-based genetic differentiation. While prior studies have examined the mtDNA and Y-chromosome contrast in focal populations in the Middle East, none have undertaken a broad-spectrum survey including North and sub-Saharan Africa, Europe, and Middle Eastern populations. In this study 5,174 mtDNA and 4,658 Y-chromosome samples were investigated using PCA, MDS, mean-linkage clustering, AMOVA, and Fisher exact tests of F(ST)'s, R(ST)'s, and haplogroup frequencies. Geographic differentiation in affinities of Middle Eastern populations with Africa and Europe showed distinct contrasts between mtDNA and Y-chromosome data. Specifically, Lebanon's mtDNA shows a very strong association to Europe, while Yemen shows very strong affinity with Egypt and North and East Africa. Previous Y-chromosome results showed a Levantine coastal-inland contrast marked by J1 and J2, and a very strong North African component was evident throughout the Middle East. Neither of these patterns were observed in the mtDNA. While J2 has penetrated into Europe, the pattern of Y-chromosome diversity in Lebanon does not show the widespread affinities with Europe indicated by the mtDNA data. Lastly, while each population shows evidence of connections with expansions that now define the Middle East, Africa, and Europe, many of the populations in the Middle East show distinctive mtDNA and Y-haplogroup characteristics that indicate long standing settlement with relatively little impact from and movement into other populations. PMID:23382925

  11. Identification, by homozygosity mapping, of a novel locus for autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis on chromosome 17p, and evidence for further genetic heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krebsová, A; Küster, W; Lestringant, G G; Schulze, B; Hinz, B; Frossard, P M; Reis, A; Hennies, H C

    2001-07-01

    Autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis (ARCI) comprises a group of severe disorders of keratinization, characterized by variable erythema and skin scaling. It is known for its high degree of genetic and clinical heterogeneity. Mutations in the gene for keratinocyte transglutaminase (TGM1) on chromosome 14q11 were shown in patients with ARCI, and a second locus was described, on chromosome 2q, in families from northern Africa. Three other loci for ARCI, on chromosomes 3p and 19p, were identified recently. We have embarked on a whole-genome scan for further loci for ARCI in four families from Germany, Turkey, and the United Arab Emirates. A novel ARCI locus was identified on chromosome 17p, between the markers at D17S938 and D17S1856, with a maximum LOD score of 3.38, at maximum recombination fraction 0.00, at D17S945, under heterogeneity. This locus is linked to the disease in the Turkish family and in the German family. Extensive genealogical studies revealed that the parents of the German patients with ARCI were eighth cousins. By homozygosity mapping, the localization of the gene could then be refined to the 8.4-cM interval between D17S938 and D17S1879. It could be shown, however, that ARCI in the two Arab families is linked neither to the new locus on chromosome 17p nor to one of the five loci known previously. Our findings give evidence of further genetic heterogeneity that is not linked to distinctive phenotypes. PMID:11398099

  12. Genetic mapping of sex determination in a wild strawberry, Fragaria virginiana reveals earliest form of sex chromosome

    Science.gov (United States)

    The evolution of separate sexes (dioecy) from hermaphroditism is one of the major evolutionary transitions in plants and this transition can be accompanied by the development of sex chromosomes. However, we are now just beginning to gain insight into the initial stages of sex chromosome evolution vi...

  13. Pedigree with frontotemporal lobar degeneration – motor neuron disease and Tar DNA binding protein-43 positive neuropathology: genetic linkage to chromosome 9

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loy Clement T

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD represents a clinically, pathologically and genetically heterogenous neurodegenerative disorder, often complicated by neurological signs such as motor neuron-related limb weakness, spasticity and paralysis, parkinsonism and gait disturbances. Linkage to chromosome 9p had been reported for pedigrees with the neurodegenerative disorder, frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD and motor neuron disease (MND. The objective in this study is to identify the genetic locus in a multi-generational Australian family with FTLD-MND. Methods Clinical review and standard neuropathological analysis of brain sections from affected pedigree members. Genome-wide scan using microsatellite markers and single nucleotide polymorphism fine mapping. Examination of candidate genes by direct DNA sequencing. Results Neuropathological examination revealed cytoplasmic deposition of the TDP-43 protein in three affected individuals. Moreover, we identify a family member with clinical Alzheimer's disease, and FTLD-Ubiquitin neuropathology. Genetic linkage and haplotype analyses, defined a critical region between markers D9S169 and D9S1845 on chromosome 9p21. Screening of all candidate genes within this region did not reveal any novel genetic alterations that co-segregate with disease haplotype, suggesting that one individual carrying a meiotic recombination may represent a phenocopy. Re-analysis of linkage data using the new affection status revealed a maximal two-point LOD score of 3.24 and a multipoint LOD score of 3.41 at marker D9S1817. This provides the highest reported LOD scores from a single FTLD-MND pedigree. Conclusion Our reported increase in the minimal disease region should inform other researchers that the chromosome 9 locus may be more telomeric than predicted by published recombination boundaries. Moreover, the existence of a family member with clinical Alzheimer's disease, and who shares the disease

  14. Chromosomal abnormalities and autism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farida El-Baz

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Chromosomal abnormalities were not detected in the studied autistic children, and so the relation between the genetics and autism still needs further work up with different study methods and techniques.

  15. Fluorescent In Situ Hybridization as a Genetic Technology to Analyzing Chromosomal Organization of Alien Wheat Recombinant Lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fluorescent in situ hybridization is a valuable method for physical mapping of DNA sequence to chromosomes and genomes and to analyzing their organization, diversity, evolution and function. Using genomic DNA the origin of chromatin in hybrids and alien introgression lines can be identified and followed through breeding programmes. We have applied this technology to study the chromosome composition of new recombinants and genomes derived from spontaneous and induced translocations in particular involving rye and the goat grass Thinoyrum intermedium that transfer disease and stress resistance to wheat. We have established flow diagrammes for easy identification of the alien chromosome material. (author)

  16. Y chromosome genetic variation in the Italian peninsula is clinal and supports an admixture model for the Mesolithic-Neolithic encounter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capelli, Cristian; Brisighelli, Francesca; Scarnicci, Francesca; Arredi, Barbara; Caglia', Alessandra; Vetrugno, Giuseppe; Tofanelli, Sergio; Onofri, Valerio; Tagliabracci, Adriano; Paoli, Giorgio; Pascali, Vincenzo L

    2007-07-01

    The Italian peninsula, given its geographical location in the middle of the Mediterranean basin, was involved in the process of the peopling of Europe since the very beginning, with first settlements dating to the Upper Paleolithic. Later on, the Neolithic revolution left clear evidence in the archeological record, with findings going back to 7000 B.C. We have investigated the demographic consequences of the agriculture revolution in this area by genotyping Y chromosome markers for almost 700 individuals from 12 different regions. Data analysis showed a non-random distribution of the observed genetic variation, with more than 70% of the Y chromosome diversity distributed along a North-South axis. While the Greek colonisation during classical time appears to have left no significant contribution, the results support a male demic diffusion model, even if population replacement was not complete and the degree of Neolithic admixture with Mesolithic inhabitants was different in different areas of Italy. PMID:17275346

  17. Evaluation of genetic potential of Bacopa monnieri extract in Mouse bone marrow cells by chromosomal analysis test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shilki Vishnoi

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Herbs have always been used as a common source of medicines, the Bacopa monnieri is an important herb used in Aruveda as a traditional medicinal system of India. In the present investigations, the genotoxic potential of Bacopa monnieri Hydromethanolic extract (BMH was evaluated employing Chromosomal analysis assay invivo. BMH was administered to Swiss Albino mice as i.p. dose of 80mg/kg, 160mg/kg, 240mg/kg body wt., 24 hours prior the administration of cyclophosphamide (CP (positive control at the dose of 50 mg/kg body wt. A dose-dependent, significant decrease in chromosome aberration was observed with respect to control. Result suggested that BMHhave a preventive potential against CP induced chromosomal aberration in Swiss albino mouse bone marrow cells at the dose tested. Therefore seems to have a preventive potential against Chromosomal aberrations in Swiss Albinomouse bone marrow cells.

  18. Micromechanics of human mitotic chromosomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eukaryote cells dramatically reorganize their long chromosomal DNAs to facilitate their physical segregation during mitosis. The internal organization of folded mitotic chromosomes remains a basic mystery of cell biology; its understanding would likely shed light on how chromosomes are separated from one another as well as into chromosome structure between cell divisions. We report biophysical experiments on single mitotic chromosomes from human cells, where we combine micromanipulation, nano-Newton-scale force measurement and biochemical treatments to study chromosome connectivity and topology. Results are in accord with previous experiments on amphibian chromosomes and support the 'chromatin network' model of mitotic chromosome structure. Prospects for studies of chromosome-organizing proteins using siRNA expression knockdowns, as well as for differential studies of chromosomes with and without mutations associated with genetic diseases, are also discussed

  19. Cytogenetic characterization and AFLP-based genetic linkage mapping for the butterfly Bicyclus anynana, covering all 28 karyotyped chromosomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arjen E Van't Hof

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The chromosome characteristics of the butterfly Bicyclus anynana, have received little attention, despite the scientific importance of this species. This study presents the characterization of chromosomes in this species by means of cytogenetic analysis and linkage mapping. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Physical genomic features in the butterfly B. anynana were examined by karyotype analysis and construction of a linkage map. Lepidoptera possess a female heterogametic W-Z sex chromosome system. The WZ-bivalent in pachytene oocytes of B. anynana consists of an abnormally small, heterochromatic W-chromosome with the Z-chromosome wrapped around it. Accordingly, the W-body in interphase nuclei is much smaller than usual in Lepidoptera. This suggests an intermediate stage in the process of secondary loss of the W-chromosome to a ZZ/Z sex determination system. Two nucleoli are present in the pachytene stage associated with an autosome and the WZ-bivalent respectively. Chromosome counts confirmed a haploid number of n = 28. Linkage mapping had to take account of absence of crossing-over in females, and of our use of a full-sib crossing design. We developed a new method to determine and exclude the non-recombinant uninformative female inherited component in offspring. The linkage map was constructed using a novel approach that uses exclusively JOINMAP-software for Lepidoptera linkage mapping. This approach simplifies the mapping procedure, avoids over-estimation of mapping distance and increases the reliability of relative marker positions. A total of 347 AFLP markers, 9 microsatellites and one single-copy nuclear gene covered all 28 chromosomes, with a mapping distance of 1354 cM. Conserved synteny of Tpi on the Z-chromosome in Lepidoptera was confirmed for B. anynana. The results are discussed in relation to other mapping studies in Lepidoptera. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study adds to the knowledge of chromosome structure and

  20. Synchronous clear cell renal cell carcinoma and tubulocystic carcinoma: genetic evidence of independent ontogenesis and implications of chromosomal imbalances in tumor progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quiroga-Garza Gabriela

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Seven percent of renal cell carcinoma (RCC cases are diagnosed as "unclassified" RCC by morphology. Genetic profiling of RCCs helps define renal tumor subtypes, especially in cases where morphologic diagnosis is inconclusive. This report describes a patient with synchronous clear cell RCC (ccRCC and a tubulocystic renal carcinoma (TCRC in the same kidney, and discusses the pathologic features and genetic profile of both tumors. A 67 year-old male underwent CT scans for an unrelated medical event. Two incidental renal lesions were found and ultimately removed by radical nephrectomy. The smaller lesion had multiple small cystic spaces lined by hobnail cells with high nuclear grade separated by fibrous stroma. This morphology and the expression of proximal (CD10, AMACR and distal tubule cell (CK19 markers by immunohistochemistry supported the diagnosis of TCRC. The larger lesion was a typical ccRCC, with Fuhrman's nuclear grade 3 and confined to the kidney. Molecular characterization of both neoplasms using virtual karyotyping was performed to assess relatedness of these tumors. Low grade areas (Fuhrman grade 2 of the ccRCC showed loss of 3p and gains in chromosomes 5 and 7, whereas oncocytic areas displayed additional gain of 2p and loss of 10q; the high grade areas (Fuhrman grade 3 showed several additional imbalances. In contrast, the TCRC demonstrated a distinct profile with gains of chromosomes 8 and 17 and loss of 9. In conclusion, ccRCC and TCRC show distinct genomic copy number profiles and chromosomal imbalances in TCRC might be implicated in the pathogenesis of this tumor. Second, the presence of a ccRCC with varying degrees of differentiation exemplifies the sequence of chromosomal imbalances acquired during tumor progression. Virtual Slides The virtual slide(s for this article can be found here: http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/1790525735655283

  1. Differential genetic interactions between Sgs1, DNA-damage checkpoint components and DNA repair factors in the maintenance of chromosome stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doerfler Lillian

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genome instability is associated with human cancers and chromosome breakage syndromes, including Bloom's syndrome, caused by inactivation of BLM helicase. Numerous mutations that lead to genome instability are known, yet how they interact genetically is poorly understood. Results We show that spontaneous translocations that arise by nonallelic homologous recombination in DNA-damage-checkpoint-defective yeast lacking the BLM-related Sgs1 helicase (sgs1Δ mec3Δ are inhibited if cells lack Mec1/ATR kinase. Tel1/ATM, in contrast, acts as a suppressor independently of Mec3 and Sgs1. Translocations are also inhibited in cells lacking Dun1 kinase, but not in cells defective in a parallel checkpoint branch defined by Chk1 kinase. While we had previously shown that RAD51 deletion did not inhibit translocation formation, RAD59 deletion led to inhibition comparable to the rad52Δ mutation. A candidate screen of other DNA metabolic factors identified Exo1 as a strong suppressor of chromosomal rearrangements in the sgs1Δ mutant, becoming even more important for chromosomal stability upon MEC3 deletion. We determined that the C-terminal third of Exo1, harboring mismatch repair protein binding sites and phosphorylation sites, is dispensable for Exo1's roles in chromosomal rearrangement suppression, mutation avoidance and resistance to DNA-damaging agents. Conclusions Our findings suggest that translocations between related genes can form by Rad59-dependent, Rad51-independent homologous recombination, which is independently suppressed by Sgs1, Tel1, Mec3 and Exo1 but promoted by Dun1 and the telomerase-inhibitor Mec1. We propose a model for the functional interaction between mitotic recombination and the DNA-damage checkpoint in the suppression of chromosomal rearrangements in sgs1Δ cells.

  2. 黄牛Y染色体分子遗传多样性研究进展%Progress on Molecular Genetic Diversity of Cattle Y Chromosome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李冉; 常振华; 徐苹; 黄洁萍; 陈宏; 雷初朝

    2012-01-01

    Y chromosome molecular genetic diversity is an important tool for tracing animal origin, do- mestication history and migrating routines and it can also be used to analyze the paternal genetic diversity of a certain population or investigate the male-mediated introgression between populations. Y chromosome haplotype diversity can be revealed by Y chromosome single nucleotide polymorphism (Y-SNP) and Y chromosome mierosatellite (Y-STR) respectively or by combination of these two kinds of markers together to obtain more specific Y chromosome haplotypes. Cattle have three paternal origins (Y1 ,Y2 in Bos taurus and Y3 in Bos indicus) which can be distinguished by Y-SNP markers, while the abundant specific haplo- types in Y1,Y2 and Y3 haplogroup respectively can be further identified by using Y-STR markers. This paper reviewed the research progress on cattle Y chromosome diversity and paternal origins in China and other foreign countries.%Y染色体分子遗传多样性是追溯动物起源、驯化历史和迁徙路线的重要工具,也可以用来反映动物的父系遗传多样性及用于研究群体间父系介导的杂交情况。Y染色体单倍型多样性可以分别通过Y染色体单核苷酸多态性(Y-SNP)和Y染色体微卫星多态性(Y-STR)或这二者结合起来构建精确的Y染色体单倍型。黄牛有3种父系起源(普通牛Y1、Y2和瘤牛Y3单倍型组),可以通过Y-SNP来区分,通过-STR标记可以区分Y1、Y2和Y3所具有的丰富的精细单倍型。本文汇集了包括中国在内的国内外黄牛Y染色体遗传多样性与起源进化的研究进展。

  3. Incidence of chromosome abnormalities at a second-trimester genetic amniocentesis for Mainland Chinese women of advanced maternal age: a study of 6, 584 cases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qi Qing-wei; Jiang Yu-lin; Zhou Xi-ya; Liu Jun-tao; Bian Xu-ming

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to calculate the expected incidence of chromosomal aneuploidy at second trimester genetic amniocentesis in Mainland China in women aged 35 and older.Methods: We reviewed the genetic amniocenteses data in Peking Union Medical College Hospital between January 2001 to June 2011.The indication for genetic amniocentesis was solely advanced maternal age (AMA).A total of 6,584 cases were included in this study.The AMA women was divided into two groups by maternal age,the group of 35-39 years old and the group of ≥40 years old.The incidence of fetal Down syndrome was compared between the two groups by chi-square test.Results: A total of 121 cases were diagnosed to be chromosomally abnormal,giving an overall incidence of 18.38‰ (121/6,584).The abnormal karyotypes included 111 cases of various aneuploidies and 10 cases with various structural abnormalities.The aneuploidies(mosaicism included)were 59 cases of (47,+ 21),25 cases of (47,+ 18),2 cases of (47,+ 13),8 cases of (45,X),3 cases of (47,XXX),13 cases of (47,XXY) and 1 case of (47,XYY).The karyotype of (47,+21) was the most frequent chromosomal abnormality,with an overall incidence of 8.96‰,account for 53.1% of all aneuploidies.Sex chromosome aneuploidies were the next most common,with a total incidence of 3.80‰.The incidence of fetal Down syndrome was significantly higher in the group of ≥40 years old than that of the group of 35-39 years old (P=0.047).Conclusions: The incidence of chromosomal aneuploidy found in this study is the first data published for Mainland China and will be helpful for the counseling of pregnant women in this age group.Consideration may be given to prenatal screening versus prenatal diagnosis in women of advanced maternal age in Mainland China.

  4. Evolution of Sex Chromosomes in Insects

    OpenAIRE

    Kaiser, Vera B; Bachtrog, Doris

    2010-01-01

    Sex chromosomes have many unusual features relative to autosomes. Y (or W) chromosomes lack genetic recombination, are male- (female-) limited, and show an abundance of genetically inert heterochromatic DNA but contain few functional genes. X (or Z) chromosomes also show sex-biased transmission (i.e., X chromosomes show female-biased and Z-chromosomes show male-biased inheritance) and are hemizygous in the heterogametic sex. Their unusual ploidy level and pattern of inheritance imply that sex...

  5. Genetic architecture of early pre-inflammatory stage transcription signatures of autoimmune diabetes in the pancreatic lymph nodes of the NOD mouse reveals significant gene enrichment on chromosomes 6 and 7

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatrice Regnault

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune diseases are characterized by the stimulation of an excessive immune response to self-tissues by inner and/or outer organism factors. Common characteristics in their etiology include a complex genetic predisposition and environmental triggers as well as the implication of the major histocompatibility (MHC locus on human chromosome 6p21. A restraint number of non-MHC susceptibility genes, part of the genetic component of type 1 diabetes have been identified in human and in animal models, while the complete spectrum of genes involved remains unknown. We elaborate herein patterns of chromosomal organization of 162 genes differentially expressed in the pancreatic lymph nodes of Non-Obese Diabetic mice, carefully selected by early sub-phenotypic evaluation (presence or absence of insulin autoantibodies. Chromosomal assignment of these genes revealed a non-random distribution on five chromosomes (47%. Significant gene enrichment was observed in particular for two chromosomes, 6 and 7. While a subset of these genes coding for secreted proteins showed significant enrichment on both chromosomes, the overall pool of genes was significantly enriched on chromosome 7. The significance of this unexpected gene distribution on the mouse genome is discussed in the light of novel findings indicating that genes affecting common diseases map to recombination “hotspot” regions of mammalian genomes. The genetic architecture of transcripts differentially expressed in specific stages of autoimmune diabetes offers novel venues towards our understanding of patterns of inheritance potentially affecting the pathological disease mechanisms.

  6. E-cadherin and loss of heterozygosity at chromosome 16 in breast carcinogenesis: different genetic pathways in ductal and lobular breast cancer?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loss of heterozygosity at the long arm of chromosome 16 is one of the most frequent genetic events in breast cancer. In the search for tumour suppressor genes that are the target of loss of heterozygosity at 16q, the E-cadherin gene CDH1 was unveiled by the identification of truncating mutations in the retained copy. However, only lobular tumours showed E-cadherin mutations. Whereas investigations are still devoted to finding the target genes in the more frequent ductal breast cancers, other studies suspect the E-cadherin gene to also be the target in this tumour type. The present article discusses the plausibility of those two lines of thought

  7. Genetic analyses involving microsatellite ETH10 genotypes on bovine chromosome 5 and performance trait measures in Angus- and Brahman-influenced cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeAtley, K L; Rincon, G; Farber, C R; Medrano, J F; Luna-Nevarez, P; Enns, R M; VanLeeuwen, D M; Silver, G A; Thomas, M G

    2011-07-01

    ETH10 is a dinucleotide microsatellite within the promoter of signal transducer and activator of transcription 6 (STAT6) gene on bovine chromosome 5. ETH10 is included in the panel of genetic markers used in parentage testing procedures of cattle breed associations. Allelic sizes of ETH10 PCR amplicons range from 199 to 225 bp. Objectives of this study were to use microsatellite data from beef cattle breed associations to investigate genetic distance and population stratification among Angus- and Brahman-influenced cattle and to use ETH10 genotypes and growth and ultrasound carcass data to investigate their statistical relationships. Three series of genotype to phenotype association analyses were conducted with 1) Angus data (n=5,094), 2) Brangus data (3/8 Brahman × 5/8 Angus; n=2,296), and 3) multibreed data (n=4,426) of Angus and Brangus cattle. Thirteen alleles and 38 genotypes were observed, but frequencies varied among breed groups. Tests of genetic identity and distance among 6 breed composition groups increasing in Brahman influence from 0 to 75% revealed that as Brahman-influence increased to ≥50%, genetic distance from Angus ranged from 18.3 to 43.5%. This was accomplished with 10 microsatellite loci. A mixed effects model involving genotype as a fixed effect and sire as a random source of variation suggested that Angus cattle with the 217/219 genotype tended to have 2.1% heavier (P=0.07) 205-d BW than other genotypes. In Brangus cattle, allele combinations were classified as small (≤215 bp) or large (≥217 bp). Brangus cattle with the small/large genotype had 2.0% heavier (PBrangus cattle. Results from this study provide support for STAT6 as one of the candidate genes underlying cattle growth QTL on chromosome 5. PMID:21357449

  8. An X chromosome association scan of the Norfolk Island genetic isolate provides evidence for a novel migraine susceptibility locus at Xq12.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bridget H Maher

    Full Text Available Migraine is a common and debilitating neurovascular disorder with a complex envirogenomic aetiology. Numerous studies have demonstrated a preponderance of women affected with migraine and previous pedigree linkage studies in our laboratory have identified susceptibility loci on chromosome Xq24-Xq28. In this study we have used the genetic isolate of Norfolk Island to further analyse the X chromosome for migraine susceptibility loci.An association approach was employed to analyse 14,124 SNPs spanning the entire X chromosome. Genotype data from 288 individuals comprising a large core-pedigree, of which 76 were affected with migraine, were analysed. Although no SNP reached chromosome-wide significance (empirical α = 1 × 10(-5 ranking by P-value revealed two primary clusters of SNPs in the top 25. A 10 SNP cluster represents a novel migraine susceptibility locus at Xq12 whilst a 11 SNP cluster represents a previously identified migraine susceptibility locus at Xq27. The strongest association at Xq12 was seen for rs599958 (OR = 1.75, P = 8.92 × 10(-4, whilst at Xq27 the strongest association was for rs6525667 (OR = 1.53, P = 1.65 × 10(-4. Further analysis of SNPs at these loci was performed in 5,122 migraineurs from the Women's Genome Health Study and provided additional evidence for association at the novel Xq12 locus (P<0.05.Overall, this study provides evidence for a novel migraine susceptibility locus on Xq12. The strongest effect SNP (rs102834, joint P = 1.63 × 10(-5 is located within the 5'UTR of the HEPH gene, which is involved in iron homeostasis in the brain and may represent a novel pathway for involvement in migraine pathogenesis.

  9. Fine-scale genetic characterization of Plasmodium falciparum chromosome 7 encompassing the antigenic var and the drug-resistant pfcrt genes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ruchi Bajaj; Sujata Mohanty; A. P. Dash; Aparup Das

    2008-04-01

    The fact that malaria is still an uncontrolled disease is reflected by the genetic organization of the parasite genome. Efforts to curb malaria should begin with proper understanding of the mechanism by which the parasites evade human immune system and evolve resistance to different antimalarial drugs. We have initiated such a study and presented herewith the results from the in silico understanding of a seventh chromosomal region of the malarial parasite Plasmodium falciparum encompassing the antigenic var genes (coding pfemp1) and the drug-resistant gene pfcrt located at a specified region of the chromosome 7. We found 60 genes of various functions and lengths, majority (61.67%) of them were performing known functions. Almost all the genes have orthologs in other four species of Plasmodium, of which P. chabaudi seems to be the closest to P. falciparum. However, only two genes were found to be paralogous. Interestingly, the drug-resistant gene, pfcrt was found to be surrounded by seven genes coding for several CG proteins out of which six were reported to be responsible for providing drug resistance to P. vivax. The intergenic regions, in this specified region were generally large in size, majority (73%) of them were of more than 500 nucleotide bp length. We also designed primers for amplification of 21 noncoding DNA fragments in the whole region for estimating genetic diversity and inferring the evolutionary history of this region of P. falciparum genome.

  10. Fine mapping of genetic polymorphisms of pulmonary tuberculosis within chromosome 18q11.2 in the Chinese population: a case-control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dai Yaoyao

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recently, one genome-wide association study identified a susceptibility locus of rs4331426 on chromosome 18q11.2 for tuberculosis in the African population. To validate the significance of this susceptibility locus in other areas, we conducted a case-control study in the Chinese population. Methods The present study consisted of 578 cases and 756 controls. The SNP rs4331426 and other six tag SNPs in the 100 Kbp up and down stream of rs4331426 on chromosome 18q11.2 were genotyped by using the Taqman-based allelic discrimination system. Results As compared with the findings from the African population, genetic variation of the SNP rs4331426 was rare among the Chinese. No significant differences were observed in genotypes or allele frequencies of the tag SNPs between cases and controls either before or after adjusting for age, sex, education, smoking, and drinking history. However, we observed strong linkage disequilibrium of SNPs. Constructed haplotypes within this block were linked the altered risks of tuberculosis. For example, in comparison with the common haplotype AA(rs8087945-rs12456774, haplotypes AG(rs8087945-rs12456774 and GA(rs8087945-rs12456774 were associated with a decreased risk of tuberculosis, with the adjusted odds ratio(95% confidence interval of 0.34(0.27-0.42 and 0.22(0.16-0.29, respectively. Conclusions Susceptibility locus of rs4331426 discovered in the African population could not be validated in the Chinese population. None of genetic polymorphisms we genotyped were related to tuberculosis in the single-point analysis. However, haplotypes on chromosome 18q11.2 might contribute to an individual's susceptibility. More work is necessary to identify the true causative variants of tuberculosis.

  11. Effect of a genetic locus on rat chromosome 20 on metabolic rate in high-fat diet-induced obesity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hojná, S.; Lotfipour, S.; Kuneš, Jaroslav; Křen, V.; Pravenec, M.; Pausová, Z.

    Fyziologický ústav AV ČR, v. v. i.. Roč. 57, č. 3 (2008), 46P-46P ISSN 0862-8408. [International SHR Meeting /13./. 20.06.2008-22.06.2008, Praha] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : cpo1 * rat chromosome 20 * high-fat diet * obesity Subject RIV: ED - Physiology

  12. Reduction of transgenerational radiation induced genetic damages observed as numerical chromosomal abnormalities in preimplantation embryos by vitamin E

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To study the effects of parental gamma irradiation (4 Gy) of NMRI (Naval Medical Research Institute) mice on the numerical chromosome abnormalities in subsequent preimplantation embryos in the presence of vitamin E (200 IU/kg), super-ovulated irradiated females were mated with irradiated males at weekly intervals in successive 6 weekly periods. About 68 h post coitus, 8-cell embryos were fixed on slides using standard methods in order to screen for abnormalities in chromosome number. In embryos generated by irradiated mice, the frequency of aneuploids dramatically increased compared to control unirradiated groups (p < 0.001), while no significant difference were observed within irradiated groups mated at weekly interval. Administration of vitamin E significantly decreased chromosomal aberrations in all groups (p < 0.05). Data indicate that gamma irradiation affects spermatogenesis and oogenesis and causes DNA alterations that may lead to chromosome abnormalities in subsequent embryos. Vitamin E effectively reduced the frequency of abnormalities. The way vitamin E reduces genotoxic effects of radiation might be via radical scavenging or antioxidative mechanism. (authors)

  13. Congenital diaphragmatic hernia interval on chromosome 8p23.1 characterized by genetics and protein interaction networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Longoni, Mauro; Hansen, Kasper Lage; Russell, Meaghan K.;

    2012-01-01

    Chromosome 8p23.1 is a common hotspot associated with major congenital malformations, including congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) and cardiac defects. We present findings from high‐resolution arrays in patients who carry a loss (n = 18) or a gain (n = 1) of sub‐band 8p23.1. We confirm a regio...

  14. Gametocidal chromosomes enhancing chromosome aberration in common wheat induced by 5-azacytidine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, W-Y; Cong, W-W; Shu, Y-J; Wang, D; Xu, G-H; Guo, C-H

    2013-01-01

    The gametocidal (Gc) chromosome from Aegilops spp induces chromosome mutation, which is introduced into common wheat as a tool of chromosome manipulation for genetic improvement. The Gc chromosome functions similar to a restriction-modification system in bacteria, in which DNA methylation is an important regulator. We treated root tips of wheat carrying Gc chromosomes with the hypomethylation agent 5-azacytidine; chromosome breakage and micronuclei were observed in these root tips. The frequency of aberrations differed in wheat containing different Gc chromosomes, suggesting different functions inducing chromosome breakage. Gc chromosome 3C caused the greatest degree of chromosome aberration, while Gc chromosome 3C(SAT) and 2C caused only slight chromosome aberration. Gc chromosome 3C induced different degrees of chromosome aberration in wheat varieties Triticum aestivum var. Chinese Spring and Norin 26, demonstrating an inhibition function in common wheat. PMID:23884766

  15. Marine reserves help preserve genetic diversity after impacts derived from climate variability: Lessons from the pink abalone in Baja California

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrián Munguía-Vega

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Genetic diversity is crucial for the adaptation of exploited species like the pink abalone (Haliotis corrugata, faced with threats from climate change, overfishing and impacts associated with aquaculture production. While marine reserves are commonly used to mitigate risks to marine populations, the duration, size, location and larval connectivity needed for a reserve to help conserve genetic resources is still poorly understood. Here, we examine the effects of fishing, reserves, and restocking on the genetic diversity of 10 populations from central Baja California, Mexico, and Southern California, USA. We demonstrate that each population shows characteristic genetic signatures according to recent management decisions. We found high allelic diversity, particularly rare alleles, a larger effective population size and a lack of a recent genetic bottleneck in pink abalones within a small (0.8 km2, recently established (5 years reserve in Baja California, compared to other fished sites after a climatic bottleneck. Higher diversity may result from the presence of older animals in the reserve. Due to its location, the reserve may also act as an important hub connecting distant populations via larval dispersal. In contrast, a population from California showed genetic isolation, loss of allelic diversity and high relatedness, consistent with the collapse of fisheries in the 1990s and their lack of recovery thereafter. In addition, a fished area in Baja California with a history of restocking for over a decade showed an increase in frequency of related individuals and high genetic differentiation from nearby sites that were consistent with the production of larvae from a few adults in the laboratory. A network of strategically placed small marine reserves that considers ocean circulation patterns could help to maintain genetic diversity and connectivity of exploited populations.

  16. The preservation of genetic resources of the vine requires cohabitation between institutional clonal selection, mass selection and private clonal selection

    OpenAIRE

    Roby Jean-Philippe; Leeuwen Cornelis van; Gonçalves Elsa; Graça Antonio; Martins Antero

    2014-01-01

    Clonal selection allows control of virus diseases and selection of genotypes on agronomic, viticultural or enological criteria. Clonal selection has the major drawback that it impoverishes genetic diversity and exposes growers to environmental instability of clones (genotype X environment interaction). Clonal selection has become the almost unique way of propagating plant material for vineyards, hence threatening the genetic diversity of the grapevine. For major grapevine varieties, some gene...

  17. Genetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Likelihood of getting certain diseases Mental abilities Natural talents An abnormal trait (anomaly) that is passed down ... Human beings have cells with 46 chromosomes -- 2 chromosomes that determine what sex they are (X and ...

  18. Use of Recombination-Mediated Genetic Engineering for Construction of Rescue Human Cytomegalovirus Bacterial Artificial Chromosome Clones

    OpenAIRE

    Kalpana Dulal; Benjamin Silver; Hua Zhu

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) technology has contributed immensely to manipulation of larger genomes in many organisms including large DNA viruses like human cytomegalovirus (HCMV). The HCMV BAC clone propagated and maintained inside E. coli allows for accurate recombinant virus generation. Using this system, we have generated a panel of HCMV deletion mutants and their rescue clones. In this paper, we describe the construction of HCMV BAC mutants using a homologous recombination syste...

  19. Comparative genetic mapping between duplicated segments on maize chromosomes 3 and 8 and homoeologous regions in sorghum and sugarcane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dufour, P; Grivet, L; D'Hont, A; Deu, M; Trouche, G; Glaszmann, J C; Hamon, P

    1996-06-01

    Comparative mapping within maize, sorghum and sugarcane has previously revealed the existence of syntenic regions between the crops. In the present study, mapping on the sorghum genome of a set of probes previously located on the maize and sugarcane maps allow a detailed analysis of the relationship between maize chromosomes 3 and 8 and sorghum and sugarcane homoeologous regions. Of 49 loci revealed by 46 (4 sugarcane and 42 maize) polymorphic probes in sorghum, 42 were linked and were assigned to linkage groups G (28), E (10) and I (4). On the basis of common probes, a complete co-linearity is observed between sorghum linkage group G and the two sugarcane linkage groups II and III. The comparison between the consensus sorghum/sugarcane map (G/II/III) and the maps of maize chromosomes 3 and 8 reveals a series of linkage blocks within which gene orders are conserved. These blocks are interspersed with non-homoeologous regions corresponding to the central part of the two maize chromosomes and have been reshuffled, resulting in several inversions in maize compared to sorghum and sugarcane. The results emphasize the fact that duplication will considerably complicate precise comparative mapping at the whole genome scale between maize and other Poaceae. PMID:24166631

  20. Genetic locus on rat chromosome 20 regulates diet-induced adipocyte hypertrophy: a microarray gene expression study

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bourdon, C.; Hojná, S.; Jordan, M.; Berube, J.; Křen, V.; Pravenec, Michal; Liu, P.; Arab, S.; Pausová, Z.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 38, č. 1 (2009), s. 63-72. ISSN 1094-8341 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : obesity * genetics * gene expression profiles Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.931, year: 2009

  1. Plant sex chromosome evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlesworth, Deborah

    2013-01-01

    It is now well established that plants have an important place in studies of sex chromosome evolution because of the repeated independent evolution of separate sexes and sex chromosomes. There has been considerable recent progress in studying plant sex chromosomes. In this review, I focus on how these recent studies have helped clarify or answer several important questions about sex chromosome evolution, and I shall also try to clarify some common misconceptions. I also outline future work that will be needed to make further progress, including testing some important ideas by genetic, molecular, and developmental approaches. Systems with different ages can clearly help show the time course of events during changes from an ancestral co-sexual state (hermaphroditism or monoecy), and I will also explain how different questions can be studied in lineages whose dioecy or sex chromosomes evolved at different times in the past. PMID:23125359

  2. Patterns of chloroplast DNA polymorphism in the endangered polyploid Centaurea borjae (Asteraceae): Implications for preserving genetic diversity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lua LOPEZ; Rodolfo BARREIRO

    2013-01-01

    A previous study with amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) fingerprints found no evidence of genetic impoverishment in the endangered Centaurea borjae and recommended that four management units (MUs) should be designated.Nevertheless,the high ploidy (6x) of this narrow endemic plant suggested that these conclusions should be validated by independent evidence derived from non-nuclear markers.Here,the variable trnT-F region of the plastid genome was sequenced to obtain this new evidence and to provide an historical background for the current genetic structure.Plastid sequences revealed little genetic variation; calling into question the previous conclusion that C.borjae does not undergo genetic impoverishment.By contrast,the conclusion that gene flow must be low was reinforced by the strong genetic differentiation detected among populations using plastid sequences (global FST =0.419).The spatial arrangement of haplotypes and diversity indicate that the populations currently located at the center of the species range are probable sites of long-persistence whereas the remaining sites may have derived from a latter colonization.From a conservation perspective,four populations contributed most to the allelic richness of the plastid genome of the species and should be given priority.Combined with previous AFLP results,these new data recommended that five,instead of four,MUs should be established.Altogether,our study highlights the benefits of combining markers with different modes of inheritance to design accurate conservation guidelines and to obtain clues on the evolutionary processes behind the present-day genetic structures.

  3. Physical and genetic mapping of amplified fragment length polymorphisms and the leaf rust resistance Lr3 gene on chromosome 6BL of wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diéguez, M J; Altieri, E; Ingala, L R; Perera, E; Sacco, F; Naranjo, T

    2006-01-01

    The Argentinian wheat cultivar Sinvalocho MA carries the Lr3 gene for leaf rust resistance on distal chromosome 6BL. In this cultivar, 33 spontaneous susceptible lines were isolated and cytogenetically characterized by C-banding. The analysis revealed deletions on chromosome 6BL in most lines. One line was nulli-6B, two lines were ditelo 6BS, two, three, and ten lines had long terminal deletions of 40, 30, and 20%, respectively, three lines showed very small terminal deletions, and one line had an intercalary deletion of 11%. Physical mapping of 55 amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) markers detected differences between deletions and led to the division of 6BL into seven bins delimited by deletion breakpoints. The most distal bin, with a length smaller than 5% of 6BL, contained 22 AFLP markers and the Lr3 gene. Polymorphism for nine AFLPs between Sinvalocho MA and the rust leaf susceptible cultivar Gamma 6 was used to construct a linkage map of Lr3. This gene is at a genetic distance of 0.9 cM from a group of seven closely linked AFLPs. The location of the gene in a high recombinogenic region indicated a physical distance of approximately 1 Mb to the markers. PMID:16215730

  4. Fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase: Genetic and physical mapping to human chromosome 9q22.3 and evaluation in non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rothschild, C.B.; Akots, G.; Roh, B. [Wake Forest Univ., Winston-Salem, NC (United States)] [and others

    1995-09-01

    PCR primers specific to the human liver fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase (FBP) gene were designed and used to isolate a cosmid clone. Physical mapping of the FBP cosmid by FISH, and genetic mapping of an associated GA repeat polymorphism (PIC = 0.35), located the liver FBP gene to chromosome 9q22.3 with no recombination between FBP and the index markers D9S196 (Z{sub max} = 13.2), D9S280 (Z{sub max} = 11.7), D9S287 (Z{sub max} = 15.6), and D9S176 (Z{sub max} = 14.4). Amplification using FBP exon-specific primers with a YAC contig from this region of chromosome 9 further refined the placement of FBP genomic sequences to an approximately 1.7-cM region flanked by D9S280 and D9S287, near the gene for Fanconi anemia group C. Precise localization of the FBP gene enabled evaluation of FBP as a candidate gene for maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY) and non-insulin-dependent diabetes (NIDDM) in both Caucasian and African-American families, using the highly informative markers D9S287 and D9S176. Although FBP is a rate-limiting enzyme in gluconeogenesis, using both parametric and nonparametric analysis there was no evidence for linkage of FBP to diabetes in these families. 30 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Life table and male mating competitiveness of wild type and of a chromosome mutation strain of Tetranychus urticae in relation to genetic pest control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Males of Tetranychus urticae Koch (Acarina: Tetranychidae) from a strain, homozygous for a structural chromosome mutation (T) were competed against males from a standard (wild-type) strain for mating of wild-type fermales. The T-males exhibited only a slight reduction in male mating competitiveness. The debilitating influence of ageing on male mating competitiveness was equal for males of both strains. Life-table studies on both strains showed that the net reproductive rate (R0) of the T-strain was 53.3, which was higher than the R0-value of the standard strain (43.3). This difference was caused by the higher rate of age-dependent mortality of adult females of the standard strain. Also differences between both strains in the total sex-ratio were observed; the T-strain produced significantly fewer males and more females than the standard strain. The mean generation time of both strains was almost equal (14 days). The values of the intrinsic rate of increase (rsub(m)) for the T-strain and the standard strain were 0.286 and 0.273, respectively. The life-table data correspond well with those published elsewhere on Tetranychus urticae. The feasibility of T-strains for application in genetic pest control considering the use of structural chromosome mutations as a 'transport mechanism' for conditional lethals is discussed. (orig.)

  6. Genetic, physical and functional analysis of the ataxia-telangiectasia locus on chromosome 11q22-23

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiloh, Y.; Ziv, Y.; Savitski, K. [Tel Aviv Univ. (Israel)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T) is an autosomal recessive multisystem disorder featuring cerebellar degeneration, immunodeficiency, chromosomal instability, cancer susceptibility, and radiosensitivity. Four complementation groups have been observed in A-T. The two major groups, A and C, were localized to chromosome 11q22-23, and the other two, D and E, may map to the same chromosomal region. We developed an integrated system of positional and complementation cloning to identify the A-T gene(s). The A-T region was saturated with microsatellite markers by physically mapping markers generated at random by other labs and by identifying new polymorphic CA-repeats in YAC clones obtained from this region. According to recent linkage data based on these markers and linkage disequilibrium analysis in Moroccan Jewish A-T patients, the A-T(A) and A-T(C) mutations are contained within a 2 Mb interval between D11S1819 and D11S1960. This interval was cloned in YAC and cosmid contigs, and transcribed sequences were identified using the following methods: screening of cDNA libraries using cosmid clones; magnetic bead capture using YAC and cosmid clones; direct selection of cDNA clones using YAC clones immobilized on a solid matrix; and 3{prime} exon trapping. Preliminary results indicate that the A-T region is rich in transcribed sequences. Structural and functional analysis of these genes is being carried out by sequence analysis, by physical mapping using the cosmid contigs, and by testing their ability to complement the radiomimetic sensitivity of A-T cells.

  7. The genetic locus for free sialic acid storage disease maps to the long arm of chromosome 6.

    OpenAIRE

    Haataja, L.; Schleutker, J; Laine, A. P.; Renlund, M; Savontaus, M L; Dib, C.; Weissenbach, J.; Peltonen, L; Aula, P

    1994-01-01

    Salla disease (SD), or adult-type free sialic acid storage disease, is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disorder characterized by impaired transport of free sialic acid across the lysosomal membrane and severe psychomotor retardation. Random linkage analysis of a sample of 27 Finnish families allowed us to localize the SD locus to the long arm of chromosome 6. The highest lod score of 8.95 was obtained with a microsatellite marker of locus D6S286 at theta = .00. Evidence for linkage d...

  8. High-resolution genetic mapping of the sucrose octaacetate taste aversion (Soa) locus on mouse Chromosome 6

    OpenAIRE

    Bachmanov, Alexander A.; Li, Xia; Li, Shanru; Neira, Mauricio; Gary K Beauchamp; Azen, Edwin A.

    2001-01-01

    An acetylated sugar, sucrose octaacetate (SOA), tastes bitter to humans and has an aversive taste to at least some mice and other animals. In mice, taste aversion to SOA depends on allelic variation of a single locus, Soa. Three Soa alleles determine ‘taster’ (Soaa), ‘nontaster’ (Soab), and ‘demitaster’ (Soac) phenotypes of taste sensitivity to SOA. Although Soa has been mapped to distal Chromosome (Chr) 6, the limits of the Soa region have not been defined. In this study, mice from congenic ...

  9. Localization of genetic elements of intact and derivative chromosome 11 and 22 territories in nuclei of Ewing sarcoma cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Taslerová, R.; Kozubek, Stanislav; Bártová, Eva; Jirsová, Pavla; Kodet, R.; Kozubek, M.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 155, č. 3 (2006), s. 493-504. ISSN 1047-8477 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) 1QS500040508; GA ČR(CZ) GA202/04/0907; GA MZd(CZ) 1A8241; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA5004306; GA MŠk(CZ) LC535 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507 Keywords : chromatin structure * chromosome territory * Ewing sarcoma Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 3.496, year: 2006

  10. Genetics Home Reference: Genetic Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip to main content Your Guide to Understanding Genetic Conditions Enable Javascript for addthis links to activate. ... Conditions Genes Chromosomes & mtDNA Resources Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions Health Conditions Explore the signs ...

  11. Localization of a gene (CMT2A) for autosomal dominant Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2 to chromosome 1p and evidence of genetic heterogeneity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Othmane, K.B.; Loprest, L.J.; Wilkinson, K.M. (Duke Univ. Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)); Middleton, L.T. (Cyprus Institute of Neurology and Genetics, Nicosia (Cyprus)) (and others)

    1993-08-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease type 2 (CMT2) is an inherited peripheral neuropathy characterized by variable age of onset and normal or slightly diminished nerve conduction velocity. CMT2 is pathologically and genetically distinct from CMT type 1 (CMT1). While CMT1 has been shown to be genetically heterogeneous, no chromosomal localization has been established for CMT2. The authors have performed pedigree linkage analysis in six large autosomal dominant CMT2 families and have demonstrated linkage and heterogeneity to a series of microsatellites (D1S160, D1S170, D1S244, D1S228 and D1S199) in the distal region of the short arm of chromosome 1. Significant evidence for heterogeneity was found using admixture analyses and the two-point lod scores. Admixture analyses using the multipoint results for the markers D1S244, D1S228, and D1S199 supported the two-point findings. Three families, DUK662, DUK1241, and 1523 gave posterior probabilities of 1.0, 0.98, and 0.88 of being of the linked type. Multipoint analysis examining the [open quotes]linked[close quotes] families showed that the most favored location for the CMT2A gene is within the interval flanked by D1S244 and D1S228 (odds approximately 70:1 of lying within versus outside that interval). These findings suggest that the CMT2 phenotype is secondary to at least two different genes and demonstrate further heterogeneity in the CMT phenotype.

  12. Assessment of genetic correlation between bacterial cold water disease resistance and spleen index in a domesticated population of rainbow trout: identification of QTL on chromosome Omy19.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory D Wiens

    Full Text Available Selective breeding of animals for increased disease resistance is an effective strategy to reduce mortality in aquaculture. However, implementation of selective breeding programs is limited by an incomplete understanding of host resistance traits. We previously reported results of a rainbow trout selection program that demonstrated increased survival following challenge with Flavobacterium psychrophilum, the causative agent of bacterial cold water disease (BCWD. Mechanistic study of disease resistance identified a positive phenotypic correlation between post-challenge survival and spleen somatic-index (SI. Herein, we investigated the hypothesis of a genetic correlation between the two traits influenced by colocalizing QTL. We evaluated the inheritance and calculated the genetic correlation in five year-classes of odd- and even-year breeding lines. A total of 322 pedigreed families (n = 25,369 fish were measured for disease resistance, and 251 families (n = 5,645 fish were evaluated for SI. Spleen index was moderately heritable in both even-year (h(2  = 0.56±0.18 and odd-year (h(2  = 0.60±0.15 lines. A significant genetic correlation between SI and BCWD resistance was observed in the even-year line (rg  = 0.45±0.20, P = 0.03 but not in the odd-year line (rg  = 0.16±0.12, P = 0.19. Complex segregation analyses of the even-year line provided evidence of genes with major effect on SI, and a genome scan of a single family, 2008132, detected three significant QTL on chromosomes Omy19, 16 and 5, in addition to ten suggestive QTL. A separate chromosome scan for disease resistance in family 2008132 identified a significant BCWD QTL on Omy19 that was associated with time to death and percent survival. In family 2008132, Omy19 microsatellite alleles that associated with higher disease resistance also associated with increased spleen size raising the hypothesis that closely linked QTL contribute to the correlation between

  13. Genetic effects of methylmercury in human chromosomes: I. A cytogenetic study of people exposed through eating contaminated fish

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monsalve, M.V.; Chiappe, C.

    1987-01-01

    An analysis of chromosomal aberrations (structural and numerical) and sister chromatid exchange (SCE) was carried out on 16 people exposed to methylmercury through eating fish caught in Cartagena Bay (Colombia), an area of known methylmercury contamination. Fourteen people whose diet consisted mainly of fish caught in another, noncontaminated area of the Atlantic acted as controls. The results showed a significant difference between the experimental and control groups in methylmercury (MM) concentrations measured in hair and peripheral blood. Subsequently, significant differences between levels of organic mercury in blood and hair were found when all the individuals studied were classified in two groups according to their blood mercury levels. When achromatic lesions were included, the frequency of structural chromosome aberrations and groups (exposed and control). When the achromatic lesions were excluded from the analyses, these differences were not found. There was a significant correlation between SCE and age. This is the first report of a study on the frequency of SCE in a population exposed to methylmercury.

  14. In search of the genetic footprints of Sumerians: a survey of Y-chromosome and mtDNA variation in the Marsh Arabs of Iraq

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivieri Anna

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background For millennia, the southern part of the Mesopotamia has been a wetland region generated by the Tigris and Euphrates rivers before flowing into the Gulf. This area has been occupied by human communities since ancient times and the present-day inhabitants, the Marsh Arabs, are considered the population with the strongest link to ancient Sumerians. Popular tradition, however, considers the Marsh Arabs as a foreign group, of unknown origin, which arrived in the marshlands when the rearing of water buffalo was introduced to the region. Results To shed some light on the paternal and maternal origin of this population, Y chromosome and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA variation was surveyed in 143 Marsh Arabs and in a large sample of Iraqi controls. Analyses of the haplogroups and sub-haplogroups observed in the Marsh Arabs revealed a prevalent autochthonous Middle Eastern component for both male and female gene pools, with weak South-West Asian and African contributions, more evident in mtDNA. A higher male than female homogeneity is characteristic of the Marsh Arab gene pool, likely due to a strong male genetic drift determined by socio-cultural factors (patrilocality, polygamy, unequal male and female migration rates. Conclusions Evidence of genetic stratification ascribable to the Sumerian development was provided by the Y-chromosome data where the J1-Page08 branch reveals a local expansion, almost contemporary with the Sumerian City State period that characterized Southern Mesopotamia. On the other hand, a more ancient background shared with Northern Mesopotamia is revealed by the less represented Y-chromosome lineage J1-M267*. Overall our results indicate that the introduction of water buffalo breeding and rice farming, most likely from the Indian sub-continent, only marginally affected the gene pool of autochthonous people of the region. Furthermore, a prevalent Middle Eastern ancestry of the modern population of the marshes of

  15. Identification of genetic markers for fat deposition and meat tenderness on bovine chromosome 5: development of a low-density single nucleotide polymorphism map.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, R T; Casas, E; Smith, T P L; Keele, J W; Harhay, G; Bennett, G L; Koohmaraie, M; Wheeler, T L; Shackelford, S D; Snelling, W M

    2005-10-01

    As genetic markers, SNP are well suited for the development of genetic tests for production traits in livestock. They are stable through many generations and can provide direct assessment of individual animal's genetic merit if they are in linkage disequilibrium and phase with functional genetic variation. Bovine chromosome 5 has been shown to harbor genetic variation affecting production traits in multiple cattle populations; thus, this chromosome was targeted for SNP-based marker development and subsequent association analysis with carcass and growth phenotypes. Discovery of SNP was performed in a panel of 16 sires representing two sires from each of seven beef breeds and two Holstein sires by PCR amplification and sequencing using primers designed from genomic sequence obtained by low-coverage sequencing of bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones. From 550 SNP, 296 (54%) were tentatively identified as having a minor allele frequency >10%. Forty-five SNP derived from 15 BAC were chosen based on minor allele frequency and were genotyped in 564 steers and their sires. Production and carcass data were collected on the steers as a part of the Germplasm Evaluation (GPE), Cycle VII Project at the U.S. Meat Animal Research Center (Clay Center, NE), which involves of the evaluation of sires from seven of the most popular U.S. breeds. Haplotypes based on seven SNP derived from a BAC containing the bovine genes HEM1 and PDE1B were associated with traits related to carcass fat. Steers homozygous for the major haplotype had 0.15 +/- 0.04 cm less subcutaneous fat, 0.57 +/- 0.18 kg less rib fat, 0.18 +/- 0.07 lower yield grade, 1.11 +/- 0.35% less predicted fat yield, and 0.79 +/- 0.3% greater predicted retail product yield than heterozygotes. The frequency of the major haplotype was 0.70 in the steers, and it ranged from 0.44 (Limousin) to 0.98 (Simmental and Gelbvieh) in a panel consisting of an average of 20 purebred sires from each of the seven breeds. A second set of

  16. Human tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI) gene: Complete genomic structure and localization on the genetic map of chromosome 2q

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Enjyoji, Kei-ichi; Emi, Mitsuru; Mukai, Tsunehiro; Imada, Motohiro; Kato, Hisao (National Cardiovascular Center, Osaka (Japan)); Leppert, M.L.; Lalouel, J.M. (Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Salt Lake City, UT (United States) Univ. of Utah Medical School, Salt Lake City, UT (United States))

    1993-08-01

    Tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI), a protease inhibitor that circulates in association with plasma lipoproteins (VLDL, LDL and HDL), helps to regulate the extrinsic blood coagulation cascade. The authors have cloned a 125-kb genomic region containing the entire human TFPI gene on six overlapping cosmids and prepared a restriction map of this contig to clarify gene structure. More than half (45 kb) of the 85-kb gene is occupied with 5[prime] noncoding elements: coding begins at exon 3. A HindIII RFLP identified with one cosmid was genotyped in the CEPH panel of 559 reference families. Linkage analysis using markers on human chromosome 2 located the TFPI gene on 2q, 36 cM proximal to D2S43(pYNZ15) and 13 cM distal to the crystalline [gamma]-polypeptide locus CRYGP1(p5G1). 31 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. Genetic evidence of an East Asian origin and paleolithic northward migration of Y-chromosome haplogroup N.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Shi

    Full Text Available The Y-chromosome haplogroup N-M231 (Hg N is distributed widely in eastern and central Asia, Siberia, as well as in eastern and northern Europe. Previous studies suggested a counterclockwise prehistoric migration of Hg N from eastern Asia to eastern and northern Europe. However, the root of this Y chromosome lineage and its detailed dispersal pattern across eastern Asia are still unclear. We analyzed haplogroup profiles and phylogeographic patterns of 1,570 Hg N individuals from 20,826 males in 359 populations across Eurasia. We first genotyped 6,371 males from 169 populations in China and Cambodia, and generated data of 360 Hg N individuals, and then combined published data on 1,210 Hg N individuals from Japanese, Southeast Asian, Siberian, European and Central Asian populations. The results showed that the sub-haplogroups of Hg N have a distinct geographical distribution. The highest Y-STR diversity of the ancestral Hg N sub-haplogroups was observed in the southern part of mainland East Asia, and further phylogeographic analyses supports an origin of Hg N in southern China. Combined with previous data, we propose that the early northward dispersal of Hg N started from southern China about 21 thousand years ago (kya, expanding into northern China 12-18 kya, and reaching further north to Siberia about 12-14 kya before a population expansion and westward migration into Central Asia and eastern/northern Europe around 8.0-10.0 kya. This northward migration of Hg N likewise coincides with retreating ice sheets after the Last Glacial Maximum (22-18 kya in mainland East Asia.

  18. DNA commission of the International Society for Forensic Genetics: recommendations on forensic analysis using Y-chromosome STRs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gill, P; Brenner, C; Brinkmann, B;

    2001-01-01

    During the past few years the DNA commission of the International Society of Forensic Genetics has published a series of documents providing guidelines and recommendations concerning the application of DNA polymorphisms to the problems of human identification. This latest report addresses a...

  19. DNA Commission of the International Society of Forensic Genetics: recommendations on forensic analysis using Y-chromosome short tandem repeats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gill, P.; Brenner, C.; Brinkmann, B.;

    2001-01-01

    During the past few years the DNA commission of the International Society of Forensic Genetics has published a series of documents providing guidelines and recommendations concerning the application of DNA polymorphisms to the problems of human identification. This latest report addresses a...

  20. DNA Commission of the International Society for Forensic Genetics: recommendations on forensic analysis using Y-chromosome STRs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gill, P; Brenner, C; Brinkmann, B;

    2001-01-01

    During the past few years, the DNA Commission of the International Society of Forensic Genetics has published a series of documents providing guidelines and recommendations concerning the application of DNA polymorphisms to the problems of human identification. This latest report addresses a...

  1. Isolated chromosomes as a new and efficient source of DArT markers for the saturation of genetic maps

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Wenzl, P.; Suchánková, Pavla; Carling, J.; Šimková, Hana; Huttner, E.; Kubaláková, Marie; Sourdille, P.; Paul, E.; Feuillet, C.; Kilian, A.; Doležel, Jaroslav

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 121, č. 3 (2010), s. 465-474. ISSN 0040-5752 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC06004 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : WHEAT TRITICUM - AESTIVUM * ARRAYS TECHNOLOGY DART * HEXAPLOID WHEAT Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.264, year: 2010

  2. Genetic map of the region around grizzled (gr) and mocha (mh) on mouse chromosome 10, homologous to human 19p13.3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kapfhamer, D.; Burmeister, M. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    1994-10-01

    Grizzled (gr) is a recessive mouse mutation resulting in a gray coat color and reduced perinatal viability. Mocha (mh) is one of several recessive mouse mutants characterized by platelet storage pool disorder, pigment abnormalities, reduced fertility, kidney function deficiencies, and, in some mutants, inner ear and natural killer cell deficiencies. Murine platelet storage pool deficient mutants may be models for Chediak-Higashi and Hermansky-Pudlak syndromes in humans. The genes for gr and mh are very closely linked to each other (0 {+-} 1.2 cM). However, their relative position with respect to molecular markers was previously unknown. Thus, genetic mapping of the gr locus will also yield information about the mh location. To map these two genes genetically, we have performed an intersubspecific backcross of grizzled mice with Mus musculus castaneus. In 539 progeny tested, we found no recombination between the gr gene, the gene for anti-Muellerian hormone (Amh), and the microsatellite markers D10Mit7, D10Mit21, and D10Mit23. One recombination event for each of the flanking markers Basigin (Bsg) and D10Mit22 was identified. These closely linked markers should provide entry points for positional cloning of the gr and mh genes. The region linked to grizzled is homologous to a gene-rich region on human Chromosome 19p13.3.

  3. Genetic map of the region around grizzled (gr) and mocha (mh) on mouse chromosome 10, homologous to human 19p13.3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapfhamer, D; Burmeister, M

    1994-10-01

    Grizzled (gr) is a recessive mouse mutation resulting in a gray coat color and reduced perinatal viability. Mocha (mh) is one of several recessive mouse mutants characterized by platelet storage pool disorder, pigment abnormalities, reduced fertility, kidney function deficiencies, and, in some mutants, inner ear and natural killer cell deficiencies. Murine platelet storage pool deficient mutants may be models for Chediak-Higashi and Hermansky-Pudlak syndromes in humans. The genes for gr and mh are very closely linked to each other (0 +/- 1.2 cM). However, their relative position with respect to molecular markers was previously unknown. Thus, genetic mapping of the gr locus will also yield information about the mh location. To map these two genes genetically, we have performed an intersubspecific backcross of grizzled mice with Mus musculus castaneus. In 539 progeny tested, we found no recombination between the gr gene, the gene for anti-Muellerian hormone (Amh), and the microsatellite markers D10Mit7, D10Mit21, and D10Mit23. One recombination event for each of the flanking markers Basigin (Bsg) and D10Mit22 was identified. These closely linked markers should provide entry points for positional cloning of the gr and mh genes. The region linked to grizzled is homologous to a gene-rich region on human Chromosome 19p13.3. PMID:7851892

  4. Genetic variability of microcystin biosynthesis genes in Planktothrix as elucidated from samples preserved by heat desiccation during three decades.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronika Ostermaier

    Full Text Available Historic samples of phytoplankton can provide information on the abundance of the toxigenic genotypes of cyanobacteria in dependence on increased or decreased eutrophication. The analysis of a time-series from preserved phytoplankton samples by quantitative PCR (qPCR extends observation periods considerably. The analysis of DNA from heat-desiccated samples by qPCR can be aggravated by point substitutions or the fragmentation of DNA introduced by the high temperature. In this study, we analyzed whether the heat desiccation of the cellular material of the cyanobacterium Planktothrix sp. introduced potential errors to the template DNA that is used for qPCR within (i 16S rDNA and phycocyanin genes and (ii the mcyA gene indicative of the incorporation of either dehydrobutyrine (Dhb or N-methyl-dehydroalanine (Mdha in position 7, and (ii the mcyB gene, which is indicative of homotyrosine (Hty in position 2 of the microcystin (MC molecule. Due to high temperature desiccation, the deterioration of the DNA template quality was rather due to fragmentation than due to nucleotide substitutions. By using the heat-desiccated samples of Lake Zürich, Switzerland the abundance of the Dhb, Mdha and Hty genotypes was determined during three decades (1977-2008. Despite major changes in the trophic state of the lake resulting in a major increase of the total Planktothrix population density, the proportion of these genotypes encoding the synthesis of different MC congeners showed high stability. Nevertheless, a decline of the most abundant mcyA genotype indicative of the synthesis of Dhb in position 7 of the MC molecule was observed. This decline could be related to the gradual incline in the proportion of a mutant genotype carrying a 1.8kbp deletion of this gene region. The increase of this mcyA (Dhb gene deletion mutant has been minor so far, however, and likely did not affect the overall toxicity of the population.

  5. Evaluating network inference methods in terms of their ability to preserve the topology and complexity of genetic networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiani, Narsis A; Zenil, Hector; Olczak, Jakub; Tegnér, Jesper

    2016-03-01

    Network inference is a rapidly advancing field, with new methods being proposed on a regular basis. Understanding the advantages and limitations of different network inference methods is key to their effective application in different circumstances. The common structural properties shared by diverse networks naturally pose a challenge when it comes to devising accurate inference methods, but surprisingly, there is a paucity of comparison and evaluation methods. Historically, every new methodology has only been tested against gold standard (true values) purpose-designed synthetic and real-world (validated) biological networks. In this paper we aim to assess the impact of taking into consideration aspects of topological and information content in the evaluation of the final accuracy of an inference procedure. Specifically, we will compare the best inference methods, in both graph-theoretic and information-theoretic terms, for preserving topological properties and the original information content of synthetic and biological networks. New methods for performance comparison are introduced by borrowing ideas from gene set enrichment analysis and by applying concepts from algorithmic complexity. Experimental results show that no individual algorithm outperforms all others in all cases, and that the challenging and non-trivial nature of network inference is evident in the struggle of some of the algorithms to turn in a performance that is superior to random guesswork. Therefore special care should be taken to suit the method to the purpose at hand. Finally, we show that evaluations from data generated using different underlying topologies have different signatures that can be used to better choose a network reconstruction method. PMID:26851626

  6. Genetic Variation of 25 Y-Chromosomal and 15 Autosomal STR Loci in the Han Chinese Population of Liaoning Province, Northeast China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Jun; Wang, Bao-jie

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated the genetic characteristics of 25 Y-chromosomal and 15 autosomal short tandem repeat (STR) loci in 305 unrelated Han Chinese male individuals from Liaoning Province using AmpFISTR® Yfiler® Plus and IdentifilerTM PCR amplification kits. Population comparison was performed between Liaoning Han population and different ethnic groups to better understand the genetic background of the Liaoning Han population. For Y-STR loci, the overall haplotype diversity was 0.9997 and the discrimination capacity was 0.9607. Gene diversity values ranged from 0.4525 (DYS391) to 0.9617 (DYS385). Rst and two multi-dimensional scaling plots showed that minor differences were observed when the Liaoning Han population was compared to the Jilin Han Chinese, Beijing Han Chinese, Liaoning Manchu, Liaoning Mongolian, Liaoning Xibe, Shandong Han Chinese, Jiangsu Han Chinese, Anhui Han Chinese, Guizhou Han Chinese and Liaoning Hui populations; by contrast, major differences were observed when the Shanxi Han Chinese, Yunnan Bai, Jiangxi Han Chinese, Guangdong Han Chinese, Liaoning Korean, Hunan Tujia, Guangxi Zhuang, Gansu Tibetan, Xishuangbanna Dai, South Korean, Japanese and Hunan Miao populations. For autosomal STR loci, DP ranged from 0.9621 (D2S1338) to 0.8177 (TPOX), with PE distributing from 0.7521 (D18S51) to 0.2988 (TH01). A population comparison was performed and no statistically significant differences were detected at any STR loci between Liaoning Han, China Dong, and Shaanxi Han populations. The results showed that the 25 Y-STR and 15 autosomal STR loci in the Liaoning Han population were valuable for forensic applications and human genetics, and Liaoning Han was an independent endogenous ethnicity with a unique subpopulation structure. PMID:27483472

  7. Association between genetic variation in a region on chromosome 11 and schizophrenia in large samples from Europe

    OpenAIRE

    Rietschel, M; Mattheisen, M; Degenhardt, F; Kahn, René S.; Linszen, Don H; Os, Jim van; Wiersma, Durk; Bruggeman, Richard; Cahn, Wiepke; De Haan, Lieuwe; Krabbendam, Lydia; Myin-Germeys, Inez; Mühleisen, T. W.; Kirsch, P; Esslinger, C

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Recent molecular studies have implicated common alleles of small to moderate effect and rare alleles with larger effect sizes in the genetic architecture of schizophrenia (SCZ). It is expected that the reliable detection of risk variants with very small effect sizes can only be achieved through the recruitment of very large samples of patients and controls (i.e. tens of thousands) , or large, potentially more homogeneous samples that have been recruited from confined geogr...

  8. Association between genetic variation in a region on chromosome 11 and schizophrenia in large samples from Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rietschel, M; Mattheisen, M; Degenhardt, F;

    2012-01-01

    Recent molecular studies have implicated common alleles of small to moderate effect and rare alleles with larger effect sizes in the genetic architecture of schizophrenia (SCZ). It is expected that the reliable detection of risk variants with very small effect sizes can only be achieved through t...... interface between emotion regulation and cognition that is structurally and functionally abnormal in SCZ and bipolar disorder.Molecular Psychiatry advance online publication, 12 July 2011; doi:10.1038/mp.2011.80....

  9. CHROMOSOME LOCATION OF GENETIC FACTORS DETERMINIG PHYSIOLOGICAL AND BIOCHEMICAL PROCESSES ASSOCIATED WITH DROUGHT TOLERANCE IN WHEAT TRITICUM AESTIVUM L.

    OpenAIRE

    Osipova S.; Permyakova, M.; Permyakov, A.; Pshenichnikova, T.; A. Börner; Verkhoturov, V.

    2012-01-01

    Drought tolerance is characterized as the most recalcitrant trait to improve for its complexity and considered target for genomic-assisted improvement. A profitable genetic strategy lies in the discovery and exploitation of quantitative trait loci (QTL) involved in determining tolerance to water deficit at the cellular level. Enzymes of the antioxidant system participating in detoxification of reactive oxygen species accumulating under stress are the essential component of the common protecti...

  10. Lack of association of genetic variation in chromosome region 15q14-22.1 with type 2 diabetes in a Japanese population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ichiishi Eiichiro

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chromosome 15q14-22.1 has been linked to type 2 diabetes (T2D and its related traits in Japanese and other populations. The presence of T2D disease susceptibility variant(s was assessed in the 21.8 Mb region between D15S118 and D15S117 in a Japanese population using a region-wide case-control association test. Methods A two-stage association test was performed using Japanese subjects: The discovery panel (Stage 1 used 372 cases and 360 controls, while an independent replication panel (Stage 2 used 532 cases and 530 controls. A total of 1,317 evenly-spaced, common SNP markers with minor allele frequencies > 0.10 were typed for each stage. Captured genetic variation was examined in HapMap JPT SNPs, and a haplotype-based association test was performed. Results SNP2140 (rs2412747 (C/T in intron 33 of the ubiquitin protein ligase E3 component n-recognin 1 (UBR1 gene was selected as a landmark SNP based on repeated significant associations in Stage 1 and Stage 2. However, the marginal p value (p = 0.0043 in the allelic test, OR = 1.26, 95% CI = 1.07–1.48 for combined samples was weak in a single locus or haplotype-based association test. We failed to find any significant SNPs after correcting for multiple testing. Conclusion The two-stage association test did not reveal a strong association between T2D and any common variants on chromosome 15q14-22.1 in 1,794 Japanese subjects. A further association test with a larger sample size and denser SNP markers is required to confirm these observations.

  11. Maternal and paternal transmission to offspring of B-chromosomes of Zea mays L. in the alien genetic background of Avena sativa L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    B-chromosomes are supernumerary dispensable chromosomes with highly host-specific organization, behavior, and mode of inheritance described in hundreds of animal, fungal, and plant species. We transferred native B chromosomes of maize (Zea mays L. ssp. mays cv. Black Mexican Sweet) to oats (Avena sa...

  12. Sequenced BAC anchored reference genetic map that reconciles the ten individual chromosomes of Brassica rapa

    OpenAIRE

    Park Beom-Seok; Jin Mina; Van Nguyen Dan; Hossain Md; Lee Seo; Hong Chang; Bae Jina; Choi Su; Kim HyeRan; Bang Jea-Wook; Bancroft Ian; Lim Yong

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background In view of the immense value of Brassica rapa in the fields of agriculture and molecular biology, the multinational Brassica rapa Genome Sequencing Project (BrGSP) was launched in 2003 by five countries. The developing BrGSP has valuable resources for the community, including a reference genetic map and seed BAC sequences. Although the initial B. rapa linkage map served as a reference for the BrGSP, there was ambiguity in reconciling the linkage groups with the ten chromos...

  13. Genetic polymorphisms and mutation rates of 27 Y-chromosomal STRs in a Han population from Guangdong Province, Southern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Zhang, Yong-Ji; Zhang, Chu-chu; Li, Ran; Yang, Yang; Ou, Xue-Ling; Tong, Da-yue; Sun, Hong-Yu

    2016-03-01

    In this study, we collected blood samples from 1033 father-son pairs of a Han population from Guangdong Province, Southern China, of which 1007 fathers were unrelated male individuals. All together, 2040 male individuals were analyzed at 27 Y-chromosomal short tandem repeats (Y-STRs) with Yfiler(®) Plus system. A total of 1003 different haplotypes were observed among 1007 unrelated fathers, with the overall haplotype diversity (HD) 0.999992 and discrimination capacity (DC) 0.996. The gene diversity (GD) values for the 27 Y-STR loci ranged from 0.4400 at DYS438 to 0.9597 at DYS385a/b. 11 off-ladder alleles and 25 copy number variants were detected in 1007 males. Population relationships were analyzed by comparison with 19 other worldwide populations. With 27,920 allele transfers in 1033 father-son pairs, 124 mutation events occurred, of which 118 were one-step mutations and 6 were two-step mutations. Eleven father-son pairs were found to have mutations at two loci, while one pair at three loci. The estimated locus-specific mutation rates varied from 0 to 1.74×10(-2), with an average estimated mutation rate 4.4×10(-3) (95%CI: 3.7×10(-3) to 5.3×10(-3)). Mutations were most frequently observed at three rapidly mutating Y-STRs (RM Y-STRs), DYS576, DYS518 and DYS627. However, at DYS570, DYS449 and DYF387S1 loci, which were also described as RM Y-STRs, the mutation rates in Guangdong Han population were not as high as estimated in other populations. PMID:26619377

  14. The Program of Sex Chromosome Pairing in Meiosis Is Highly Conserved Across Marsupial Species: Implications for Sex Chromosome Evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Page, Jesús; Berríos, Soledad; Parra, María Teresa; Viera, Alberto; Suja, José Ángel; Prieto, Ignacio; Barbero, José Luis; Rufas, Julio S; Fernández-Donoso, Raúl

    2005-01-01

    Marsupials present a series of genetic and chromosomal features that are highly conserved in very distant species. One of these features is the absence of a homologous region between X and Y chromosomes. According to this genetic differentiation, sex chromosomes do not synapse during the first meiotic prophase in males, and a special structure, the dense plate, maintains sex chromosome association. In this report we present results on the process of meiotic sex chromosome pairing obtained fro...

  15. EMQN best practice guidelines for the molecular genetic testing and reporting of chromosome 11p15 imprinting disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eggermann, Katja; Bliek, Jet; Brioude, Frédéric;

    2016-01-01

    disorders and the demand for molecular testing, it turned out that there is an urgent need for a standardized molecular diagnostic testing and reporting strategy. Based on the results from the first external pilot quality assessment schemes organized by the European Molecular Quality Network (EMQN) in 2014......Molecular genetic testing for the 11p15-associated imprinting disorders Silver-Russell and Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (SRS, BWS) is challenging because of the molecular heterogeneity and complexity of the affected imprinted regions. With the growing knowledge on the molecular basis of these......, and in the light of their feedback amendments were made. The final document was ratified in the course of an EMQN best practice guideline meeting and is in accordance with the general SRS and BWS consensus guidelines, which are in preparation. These guidelines are based on the knowledge acquired from...

  16. Genetic dissection of milk yield traits and mastitis resistance quantitative trait loci on chromosome 20 in dairy cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadri, Naveen K; Guldbrandtsen, Bernt; Lund, Mogens S; Sahana, Goutam

    2015-12-01

    Intense selection to increase milk yield has had negative consequences for mastitis incidence in dairy cattle. Due to low heritability of mastitis resistance and an unfavorable genetic correlation with milk yield, a reduction in mastitis through traditional breeding has been difficult to achieve. Here, we examined quantitative trait loci (QTL) that segregate for clinical mastitis and milk yield on Bos taurus autosome 20 (BTA20) to determine whether both traits are affected by a single polymorphism (pleiotropy) or by multiple closely linked polymorphisms. In the latter but not the former situation, undesirable genetic correlation could potentially be broken by selecting animals that have favorable variants for both traits. First, we performed a within-breed association study using a haplotype-based method in Danish Holstein cattle (HOL). Next, we analyzed Nordic Red dairy cattle (RDC) and Danish Jersey cattle (JER) with the goal of determining whether these QTL identified in Holsteins were segregating across breeds. Genotypes for 12,566 animals (5,966 HOL, 5,458 RDC, and 1,142 JER) were determined by using the Illumina Bovine SNP50 BeadChip (50K; Illumina, San Diego, CA), which identifies 1,568 single nucleotide polymorphisms on BTA20. Data were combined, phased, and clustered into haplotype states, followed by within- and across-breed haplotype-based association analyses using a linear mixed model. Association signals for both clinical mastitis and milk yield peaked in the 26- to 40-Mb region on BTA20 in HOL. Single-variant association analyses were carried out in the QTL region using whole sequence level variants imputed from references of 2,036 HD genotypes (BovineHD BeadChip; Illumina) and 242 whole-genome sequences. The milk QTL were also segregating in RDC and JER on the BTA20-targeted region; however, an indication of differences in the causal factor(s) was observed across breeds. A previously reported F279Y mutation (rs385640152) within the growth hormone

  17. A second generation genetic map of the bumblebee Bombus terrestris (Linnaeus, 1758) reveals slow genome and chromosome evolution in the Apidae

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background The bumblebee Bombus terrestris is an ecologically and economically important pollinator and has become an important biological model system. To study fundamental evolutionary questions at the genomic level, a high resolution genetic linkage map is an essential tool for analyses ranging from quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping to genome assembly and comparative genomics. We here present a saturated linkage map and match it with the Apis mellifera genome using homologous markers. This genome-wide comparison allows insights into structural conservations and rearrangements and thus the evolution on a chromosomal level. Results The high density linkage map covers ~ 93% of the B. terrestris genome on 18 linkage groups (LGs) and has a length of 2'047 cM with an average marker distance of 4.02 cM. Based on a genome size of ~ 430 Mb, the recombination rate estimate is 4.76 cM/Mb. Sequence homologies of 242 homologous markers allowed to match 15 B. terrestris with A. mellifera LGs, five of them as composites. Comparing marker orders between both genomes we detect over 14% of the genome to be organized in synteny and 21% in rearranged blocks on the same homologous LG. Conclusions This study demonstrates that, despite the very high recombination rates of both A. mellifera and B. terrestris and a long divergence time of about 100 million years, the genomes' genetic architecture is highly conserved. This reflects a slow genome evolution in these bees. We show that data on genome organization and conserved molecular markers can be used as a powerful tool for comparative genomics and evolutionary studies, opening up new avenues of research in the Apidae. PMID:21247459

  18. A second generation genetic map of the bumblebee Bombus terrestris (Linnaeus, 1758 reveals slow genome and chromosome evolution in the Apidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kube Michael

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The bumblebee Bombus terrestris is an ecologically and economically important pollinator and has become an important biological model system. To study fundamental evolutionary questions at the genomic level, a high resolution genetic linkage map is an essential tool for analyses ranging from quantitative trait loci (QTL mapping to genome assembly and comparative genomics. We here present a saturated linkage map and match it with the Apis mellifera genome using homologous markers. This genome-wide comparison allows insights into structural conservations and rearrangements and thus the evolution on a chromosomal level. Results The high density linkage map covers ~ 93% of the B. terrestris genome on 18 linkage groups (LGs and has a length of 2'047 cM with an average marker distance of 4.02 cM. Based on a genome size of ~ 430 Mb, the recombination rate estimate is 4.76 cM/Mb. Sequence homologies of 242 homologous markers allowed to match 15 B. terrestris with A. mellifera LGs, five of them as composites. Comparing marker orders between both genomes we detect over 14% of the genome to be organized in synteny and 21% in rearranged blocks on the same homologous LG. Conclusions This study demonstrates that, despite the very high recombination rates of both A. mellifera and B. terrestris and a long divergence time of about 100 million years, the genomes' genetic architecture is highly conserved. This reflects a slow genome evolution in these bees. We show that data on genome organization and conserved molecular markers can be used as a powerful tool for comparative genomics and evolutionary studies, opening up new avenues of research in the Apidae.

  19. Electochemical detection of chromosome translocation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kwasny, Dorota; Dimaki, Maria; Silahtaroglu, Asli;

    2014-01-01

    Cytogenetics is a study of the cell structure with a main focus on chromosomes content and their structure. Chromosome abnormalities, such as translocations may cause various genetic disorders and heametological malignancies. Chromosome translocations are structural rearrangements of two...... hybridization approach developed for label-free detection of the chromosome translocations. For specific translocation detection it is necessary to determine that the two DNA sequences forming a derivative chromosome are connected, which is achieved by two subsequent hybridization steps. The electrochemical...... impedance spectroscopy was selected as the sensing method on a microfabricated chip with array of 12 electrode sets. Two independent chips (Chip1 and Chip2) were used for targeting the chromosomal fragments involved in the translocation. Each chip was differentially functionalized with DNA probes matching...

  20. Plant Artificial Chromosome:The Vector for the Next Generation of Genetic Engineering%植物人工染色体:下一代基因工程的载体

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李晨; 闫晓红; 杨洁; 杨清; 魏文辉

    2011-01-01

    The simultaneous expression of multiple genes and genetically modified (GM) food security research have been considered as the research focus for genetic engineering in plants presently. Unlike conventional gene transformation technologies,plant artificial chromosomes provide one solution to the stable expression of multiple transgenes. As plant artificial chromosome segregation is independent of host chromosomes, they provide a platform for accelerating plant breeding and for studying the specific chromatin domains inserted into them. The generation of artificial plant chromosomes and their applications were reviewed in this article.%植物基因工程技术中的多基因转化及转基因安全已经成为其研究的2个重要方面.植物人工染色体可以在一条不含标记基因的附加染色体上提供稳定的多基因表达,是新一代的转基因载体.由于植物人工染色体独立于宿主染色体,为植物育种提供了便利,同时,也为研究染色质特殊区域的结构与功能提供了平台.本文就植物人工染色体的产生、研究现状及其应用前景等进行了综述和讨论.

  1. CHROMOSOMAL ABNORMALITIES IN PATIENTS WITH SPERM DISORDERS

    OpenAIRE

    L. Y. Pylyp; L. A. Spinenko; V. D. Zukin; N. M. Bilko

    2013-01-01

    Chromosomal abnormalities are among the most common genetic causes of spermatogenic disruptions. Carriers of chromosomal abnormalities are at increased risk of infertility, miscarriage or birth of a child with unbalanced karyotype due to the production of unbalanced gametes. The natural selection against chromosomally abnormal sperm usually prevents fertilization with sperm barring in cases of serious chromosomal abnormalities. However, assisted reproductive technologies in general and intrac...

  2. Software preservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadej Vodopivec

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Comtrade Ltd. covers a wide range of activities related to information and communication technologies; its deliverables include web applications, locally installed programs,system software, drivers, embedded software (used e.g. in medical devices, auto parts,communication switchboards. Also the extensive knowledge and practical experience about digital long-term preservation technologies have been acquired. This wide spectrum of activities puts us in the position to discuss the often overlooked aspect of the digital preservation - preservation of software programs. There are many resources dedicated to digital preservation of digital data, documents and multimedia records,but not so many about how to preserve the functionalities and features of computer programs. Exactly these functionalities - dynamic response to inputs - render the computer programs rich compared to documents or linear multimedia. The article opens the questions on the beginning of the way to the permanent digital preservation. The purpose is to find a way in the right direction, where all relevant aspects will be covered in proper balance. The following questions are asked: why at all to preserve computer programs permanently, who should do this and for whom, when we should think about permanent program preservation, what should be persevered (such as source code, screenshots, documentation, and social context of the program - e.g. media response to it ..., where and how? To illustrate the theoretic concepts given the idea of virtual national museum of electronic banking is also presented.

  3. A genetic map of chromosome 20q12-q13.1: Multiple highly polymorphic microsatellite and RFLP markers linked to the maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY) locus

    OpenAIRE

    Rothschild, Cynthia B.; Akots, Gita; Hayworth, Rosa; Pettenati, Mark J.; Rao, P. Nagesh; Wood, Patricia; Stolz, Frank-Michael; Hansmann, Ingo; Serino, Kristina; Keith, Tim P.; Fajans, Stefan S.; Bowden, Donald W.

    1993-01-01

    Multiple highly polymorphic markers have been used to construct a genetic map of the q12-q13.1 region of chromosome 20 and to map the location of the maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY) locus. The genetic map encompasses 23 cM and includes 11 loci with PIC values >.50, seven of which have PICs >.70. New dinucleotide repeat polymorphisms associated with the D20S17, PPGB, and ADA loci have been identified and mapped. The dinucleotide repeat polymorphisms have increased the PIC of the AD...

  4. 江门地区3782例遗传咨询者外周血染色体核型分析%Jiangmen city 3782 cases of peripheral blood chromosome analysis for genetic counseling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢志威; 张晶; 李卫凯

    2013-01-01

    Objective:To study the relationship between abnormal of chromosome of people of geneic counseling and diseases by analyzing the chromosomal karyotype in patients of genetic counseling.Methods:To collect peripheral blood samples.Chromosome specimens were made using routine culture of peripheral blood lymphocytes.The G-band technique was used in the cytogenetical analysis.Results:345 cases of chromosome abnormalities (9.12%) were detected in 3782 genetic consultants.There were 91 sex chromosome abnormalities (27%) and 254 autosomal abnormalities (73%) Conclusion:Chromosome abnormality is a considerable reason for primary or secondary amenorrhea,spontaneous abortion and stillbirth history,mental and sexual development abnormity.Chromosomes detection is necessary for the genetic consultant.%目的 通过对遗传咨询者的染色体核型分析,探讨染色体异常与疾病的关系.方法 抽取遗传咨询者外周血进行培养,收获染色体,G显带,显微镜下分析核型.结果 2009年到2011年来我院就诊的3782例遗传咨询者中检出异常核型345例,异常核型检出率为9.12%,其中性染色体异常91例,占27%;常染色体异常254例,占73%.结论 染色体异常是导致性发育异常、智力低下、反复流产、生育畸形儿、不孕症等的重要原因之一,对有临床症状的患者进行染色体检查十分必要,可为优生优育和产前诊断提供依据.

  5. Digital preservation

    CERN Document Server

    Deegan, Marilyn

    2013-01-01

    Digital preservation is an issue of huge importance to the library and information profession right now. With the widescale adoption of the internet and the rise of the world wide web, the world has been overwhelmed by digital information. Digital data is being produced on a massive scale by individuals and institutions: some of it is born, lives and dies only in digital form, and it is the potential death of this data, with its impact on the preservation of culture, that is the concern of this book. So how can information professionals try to remedy this? Digital preservation is a complex iss

  6. Genetic Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Care Online Health Resources For Health Professionals Competency & Curricular Resources Genetics 101 Genomic Medicine and Health Care ... of DNA. Think of it as a shuffling process, called recombination. The single chromosome in a reproductive ...

  7. Genetic Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 21 (Down syndrome) . Other trisomies include trisomy 13 (Patau syndrome) and trisomy 18 (Edwards syndrome) . Monosomy is ... which there is an extra chromosome. Trisomy 13 (Patau Syndrome): A genetic disorder that causes serious heart ...

  8. Comparisons of eccrine sweat gland anatomy in genetic, chromosomal, and other diseases, and a suggested procedure for use of sweat gland measurements in differential diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shankle, W R; Azen, S P; Landing, B H

    1982-04-01

    Statistical analysis of the dimensions of microdissected eccrine sweat glands (duct length, coil volume, ratio of coil volume to duct length, and axis ratio of coil) was performed for several diseases (cystic fibrosis of the pancreas, Werdnig-Hoffmann disease, tetralogy of Fallot, chronic renal disease, and trisomies 13, 18, and 21) using both individual and grouped age-matched control patients. Duct length, coil volume, and the ratio of the two all rise with age. Eccrine gland duct length was found to be significantly large in tetralogy of Fallot and Werdnig-Hoffmann disease and small in chronic renal disease (less so in males than in females, trisomy 13 and trisomy 18). Secretory coil volume was significantly smaller than normal in trisomy 21 (Down syndrome) and in chronic renal disease, and the ratio of coil volume to duct length was low in trisomy 21 and chronic renal disease. The shape of the secretory coil (axis ratio) was possibly abnormal in trisomy 13. Gland dimensions were normal for cystic fibrosis. Using the multivariate procedure of discriminant analysis, it was found that sweat gland measures significantly contributed to the differentiation of diseases, after adjustments were made for variations in age-at-death. This suggested the possibility that criteria for distinction of clinically similar genetic, metabolic, or chromosomal diseases by study of the anatomic properties of eccrine glands obtained by skin biopsy could be developed. A procedure of analysis comparing the "percentage of normal" of gland dimensions for each disease to control values, and thereby differentiating disease categories on the basis of the "percentage of normal" values, is presented. PMID:6213065

  9. Chromosome 19 International Workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pericak-Vance, M.A. (Duke Univ., Durham, NC (United States). Medical Center); Ropers, H.H. (Univ. Hospital Nijmegen, (The Netherlands). Dept. of Human Genetics); Carrano, A.J. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States))

    1993-01-04

    The Second International Workshop on Human Chromosome 19 was hosted on January 25 and 26, 1992, by the Department of Human Genetics, University Hospital Nijmegen, The Netherlands, at the 'Meerdal Conference Center'. The workshop was supported by a grant from the European Community obtained through HUGO, the Dutch Research Organization (NWO) and the Muscular Dystrophy Association (MDA). Travel support for American participants was provided by the Department of Energy. The goals of this workshop were to produce genetic, physical and integrated maps of chromosome 19, to identify inconsistencies and gaps, and to discuss and exchange resources and techniques available for the completion of these maps. The second day of the meeting was largely devoted to region or disease specific efforts. In particular, the meeting served as a platform for assessing and discussing the recent progress made into the molecular elucidation of myotonic dystrophy.

  10. Bacterial chromosome organization and segregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badrinarayanan, Anjana; Le, Tung B K; Laub, Michael T

    2015-01-01

    If fully stretched out, a typical bacterial chromosome would be nearly 1 mm long, approximately 1,000 times the length of a cell. Not only must cells massively compact their genetic material, but they must also organize their DNA in a manner that is compatible with a range of cellular processes, including DNA replication, DNA repair, homologous recombination, and horizontal gene transfer. Recent work, driven in part by technological advances, has begun to reveal the general principles of chromosome organization in bacteria. Here, drawing on studies of many different organisms, we review the emerging picture of how bacterial chromosomes are structured at multiple length scales, highlighting the functions of various DNA-binding proteins and the impact of physical forces. Additionally, we discuss the spatial dynamics of chromosomes, particularly during their segregation to daughter cells. Although there has been tremendous progress, we also highlight gaps that remain in understanding chromosome organization and segregation. PMID:26566111

  11. Mathematical glimpse on the Y chromosome degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobo, M. P.

    2006-04-01

    The Y chromosomes are genetically degenerate and do not recombine with their matching partners X. Non-recombination of XY pairs has been pointed out as the key factor for the degeneration of the Y chromosome. The aim here is to show that there is a mathematical asymmetry in sex chromosomes which leads to the degeneration of Y chromosomes even in the absence of XX and XY recombination. A model for sex-chromosome evolution in a stationary regime is proposed. The consequences of their asymmetry are analyzed and lead us to a couple of conclusions. First, Y chromosome degeneration shows up sqrt{2} more often than X chromosome degeneration. Second, if nature prohibits female mortalities from beeing exactly 50%, then Y chromosome degeneration is inevitable.

  12. The Role of the Y-Chromosome in the Establishment of Murine Hybrid Dysgenesis and in the Analysis of the Nucleotide Sequence Organization, Genetic Transmission and Evolution of Repeated Sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nallaseth, Ferez Soli

    ) sequence content of deletion products confirmed the previously unidentified loss of genetic control of mammalian chromosome biology and hybrid dysgenesis.

  13. Chromosomal aberration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chromosomal aberrations are classified into two types, chromosome-type and chromatid-type. Chromosom-type aberrations include terminal deletion, dicentric, ring and interstitial deletion, and chromatid-type aberrations include achromatic lesion, chromatid deletion, isochromatid deletion and chromatid exchange. Clastogens which induce chromosomal aberration are divided into ''S-dependent'' agents and ''S-independent''. It might mean whether they can induce double strand breaks independent of the S phase or not. Double strand breaks may be the ultimate lesions to induce chromosomal aberrations. Caffeine added even in the G2 phase appeared to modify the frequency of chromatid aberrations induced by X-rays and mitomycin C. Those might suggest that the G2 phase involves in the chromatid aberration formation. The double strand breaks might be repaired by ''G2 repair system'', the error of which might yield breakage types of chromatid aberrations and the by-pass of which might yield chromatid exchanges. Chromosome-type aberrations might be formed in the G1 phase. (author)

  14. Temporal genomic evolution of bird sex chromosomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Zongji; Zhang, Jilin; Yang, Wei;

    2014-01-01

    driving forces of Z chromosome evolution, we analyze here 45 newly available bird genomes and four species' transcriptomes, over their course of recombination loss between the sex chromosomes. RESULTS: We show Z chromosomes in general have a significantly higher substitution rate in introns and synonymous...... evolved very recently. CONCLUSIONS: In conclusion, we uncover that the sequence and expression patterns of Z chromosome genes covary with their ages of becoming Z-linked. In contrast to the mammalian X chromosomes, such patterns are mainly driven by mutational bias and genetic drift in birds, due...... to the opposite sex-biased inheritance of Z vs. X....

  15. Holoprosencephaly due to numeric chromosome abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Benjamin D; Rosenbaum, Kenneth N; Meck, Jeanne M; Muenke, Maximilian

    2010-02-15

    Holoprosencephaly (HPE) is the most common malformation of the human forebrain. When a clinician identifies a patient with HPE, a routine chromosome analysis is often the first genetic test sent for laboratory analysis in order to assess for a structural or numerical chromosome anomaly. An abnormality of chromosome number is overall the most frequently identified etiology in a patient with HPE. These abnormalities include trisomy 13, trisomy 18, and triploidy, though several others have been reported. Such chromosome number abnormalities are almost universally fatal early in gestation or in infancy. Clinical features of specific chromosome number abnormalities may be recognized by phenotypic manifestations in addition to the HPE. PMID:20104610

  16. 壮族Y染色体分型及其内部遗传结构%Y-chromosome Genotyping and Genetic Structure of Zhuang Populations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈晶; 李辉; 覃振东; 刘文泓; 林伟雄; 尹瑞兴; 金力; 潘尚领

    2006-01-01

    Zhuang, the largest ethnic minority population in China, is one of the descendant groups of the ancient Bai-Yue.Linguistically, Zhuang languages are grouped into northern and southern dialects. To characterize its genetic structure, 13 East Asian-specific Y-chromosome biallelic markers and 7 Y-chromosome short tandem repeat (STR) markers were used to infer the haplogroups of Zhuang populations. Our results showed that O*, O2a, and O1 are the predominant haplogroups in Zhuang.Frequency distribution and principal component analysis showed that Zhuang was closely related to groups of Bai-Yue origin and therefore was likely to be the descendant of Bai-Yue. The results of principal component analysis and hierarchical clustering analysis contradicted the linguistically derived north-south division. Interestingly, a west-east clinal trend of haplotype frequency changes was observed, which was supported by AMOVA analysis that showed that between-population variance of east-west division was larger than that of north-south division. O* network suggested that the Hongshuihe branch was the center of Zhuang.Our study suggests that there are three major components in Zhuang. The O* and O2a constituted the original component; later, O1was brought into Zhuang, especially eastern Zhuang; and fmally, northern Han population brought O3 into the Zhuang populations.%壮族是中国最大的少数民族,与东南亚的泰老族群关系密切,在东亚人群的遗传结构研究中地位非常特殊.本研究调查了壮族各个支系的Y染色体多样性,通过主成分分析、聚类分析和分子方差分析,揭示壮族的内部父系遗传结构.结果发现,壮族的主要Y染色体单倍群为O*,O2a,O1.传统的对壮族按方言分为南北二组的分类方法在遗传上并没有依据,壮族支系体现出从东往西的梯度变化过程.这说明壮族的结构中有几个层次,最早的成分普遍出现在各个支系中,第二层是由东部来的百越核心成

  17. Analysis of t(9;17)(q33.2;q25.3) chromosomal breakpoint regions and genetic association reveals novel candidate genes for bipolar disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rajkumar, A.P.; Christensen, Jane H.; Mattheisen, Manuel;

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Breakpoints of chromosomal abnormalities facilitate identification of novel candidate genes for psychiatric disorders. Genome-wide significant evidence supports the linkage between chromosome 17q25.3 and bipolar disorder (BD). Co-segregation of translocation t(9;17)(q33.2;q25.3) with...... psychiatric disorders has been reported. We aimed to narrow down these chromosomal breakpoint regions and to investigate the associations between single nucleotide polymorphisms within these regions and BD as well as schizophrenia (SZ) in large genome-wide association study samples. METHODS: We cross......-linked Danish psychiatric and cytogenetic case registers to identify an individual with both t(9;17)(q33.2;q25.3) and BD. Fluorescent in situ hybridization was employed to map the chromosomal breakpoint regions of this proband. We accessed the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium BD (n = 16,731) and SZ (n = 21...

  18. Genetic alterations on chromosome 16 and 17 are important features of ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast and are associated with histologic type

    OpenAIRE

    Vos, C B J; Haar, N.T. ter; Rosenberg, C; Peterse, J L; Cleton-Jansen, A-M; Cornelisse, C. J.; Vijver, M J van de

    1999-01-01

    We analysed the involvement of known and putative tumour suppressor- and oncogene loci in ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) by microsatellite analysis (LOH), Southern blotting and comparative genomic hybridization (CGH). A total of 78 pure DCIS cases, classified histologically as well, intermediately and poorly differentiated, were examined for LOH with 76 markers dispersed along all chromosome arms. LOH on chromosome 17 was more frequent in poorly differentiated DCIS (70%) compared to well-dif...

  19. Chromosomal instability in Streptomyces avermitilis: major deletion in the central region and stable circularized chromosome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen Ying

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The chromosome of Streptomyces has been shown to be unstable, frequently undergoing gross chromosomal rearrangements. However, the mechanisms underlying this phenomenon remain unclear, with previous studies focused on two chromosomal ends as targets for rearrangements. Here we investigated chromosomal instability of Streptomyces avermitilis, an important producer of avermectins, and characterized four gross chromosomal rearrangement events, including a major deletion in the central region. The present findings provide a valuable contribution to the mechanistic study of genetic instability in Streptomyces. Results Thirty randomly-selected "bald" mutants derived from the wild-type strain all contained gross chromosomal rearrangements of various types. One of the bald mutants, SA1-8, had the same linear chromosomal structure as the high avermectin-producing mutant 76-9. Chromosomes of both strains displayed at least three independent chromosomal rearrangements, including chromosomal arm replacement to form new 88-kb terminal inverted repeats (TIRs, and two major deletions. One of the deletions eliminated the 36-kb central region of the chromosome, but surprisingly did not affect viability of the cells. The other deletion (74-kb was internal to the right chromosomal arm. The chromosome of another bald mutant, SA1-6, was circularized with deletions at both ends. No obvious homology was found in all fusion sequences. Generational stability analysis showed that the chromosomal structure of SA1-8 and SA1-6 was stable. Conclusions Various chromosomal rearrangements, including chromosomal arm replacement, interstitial deletions and chromosomal circularization, occurred in S. avermitilis by non-homologous recombination. The finding of an inner deletion involving in the central region of S. avermitilis chromosome suggests that the entire Streptomyces chromosome may be the target for rearrangements, which are not limited, as previously

  20. Comparative genetic mapping revealed powdery mildew resistance gene MlWE4 derived from wild emmer is located in same genomic region of Pm36 and Ml3D232 on chromosome 5BL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Dong; WANG Yong; CHEN Yong-xing; LIU Zhi-yong; OUYANG Shu-hong; WANG Li-li; CUI Yu; WU Qiu-hong; LIANG Yong; WANG Zhen-zhong; XIE Jing-zhong; ZHANG De-yun

    2015-01-01

    Powdery mildew, caused by Blumeria graminis f. sp. tritici, is one of the most devastating wheat diseases. Wild emmer wheat (Triticum turgidum ssp. dicoccoides) is a promising source of disease resistance for wheat. A powdery mildew resistance gene conferring resistance to B. graminis f. sp. tritici isolate E09, originating from wild emmer wheat, has been transferred into the hexaploid wheat line WE4 through crossing and backcrossing. Genetic analyses indicated that the powdery mildew resistance was control ed by a single dominant gene, temporarily designated MlWE4. By mean of comparative genomics and bulked segregant analysis, a genetic linkage map of MlWE4 was constructed, and MlWE4 was mapped on the distal region of chromosome arm 5BL. Comparative genetic linkage maps showed that genes MlWE4, Pm36 and Ml3D232 were co-segregated with markers XBD37670 and XBD37680, indicating they are likely the same gene or al eles in the same locus. The co-segregated markers provide a starting point for chromosome landing and map-based cloning of MlWE4, Pm36 and Ml3D232.

  1. Digital Preservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakel, Elizabeth

    2001-01-01

    Reviews research on digital preservation issues, including born-digital and digitally recreated documents. Discusses electronic records research; metadata and other standards; electronic mail; Web-based documents; moving images media; selection of materials for digitization, including primary sources; administrative issues; media stability…

  2. Chromosome size in diploid eukaryotic species centers on the average length with a conserved boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Understanding genome and chromosome evolution is important for understanding genetic inheritance and evolution. Universal events comprising DNA replication, transcription, repair, mobile genetic element transposition, chromosome rearrangements, mitosis, and meiosis underlie inheritance and variation...

  3. Chromosomes, cancer and radiosensitivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samouhos, E.

    1983-08-01

    Some specific chromosomal abnormalities are associated with certain cancers. The earliest description of such a specific association is the one of the Philadelphia chromosome and myelogenous leukemia (1960). Other congenital karyotype abnormalities are associated with specific cancers. Examples of these are Down's syndrome with leukemia and Klinefelter's syndrome with male breast cancer. Genetic diseases of increased chromosome breakage, or of defective chromosome repair, are associated with greatly increased cancer incidence. Three such diseases have been recognized: 1) Fanconi's anemia, associated with leukemias and lymphomas, 2) Bloom's syndrome, associated with acute leukemias and lymphosarcoma, and 3) ataxia telangiectasia, associated with Hodgkin's disease, leukemia, and lymphosarcomas. Ten percent of individuals with ataxia telangiectasia will develop one of these neoplasms. Individuals with certain of these syndromes display an unusually high radiosensitivity. Radiation therapy for cancers has been fatal in patients who received as low as 3000 rad. This remarkable radiosensitivity has been quantitated in cell cultures from such cases. Evidence suggests that the apparent sensitivity may reflect subnormal ability to repair radiation damage. The rapid proliferation of information in this field stems from the interdigitation of many disciplines and specialties, including cytogenetics, cell biology, molecular biology, epidemiology, radiobiology, and several others. This paper is intended for clinicians; it presents a structured analytic scheme for correlating and classifying this multidisciplinary information as it becomes available.

  4. Chromosomes, cancer and radiosensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some specific chromosomal abnormalities are associated with certain cancers. The earliest description of such a specific association is the one of the Philadelphia chromosome and myelogenous leukemia (1960). Other congenital karyotype abnormalities are associated with specific cancers. Examples of these are Down's syndrome with leukemia and Klinefelter's syndrome with male breast cancer. Genetic diseases of increased chromosome breakage, or of defective chromosome repair, are associated with greatly increased cancer incidence. Three such diseases have been recognized: 1) Fanconi's anemia, associated with leukemias and lymphomas, 2) Bloom's syndrome, associated with acute leukemias and lymphosarcoma, and 3) ataxia telangiectasia, associated with Hodgkin's disease, leukemia, and lymphosarcomas. Ten percent of individuals with ataxia telangiectasia will develop one of these neoplasms. Individuals with certain of these syndromes display an unusually high radiosensitivity. Radiation therapy for cancers has been fatal in patients who received as low as 3000 rad. This remarkable radiosensitivity has been quantitated in cell cultures from such cases. Evidence suggests that the apparent sensitivity may reflect subnormal ability to repair radiation damage. The rapid proliferation of information in this field stems from the interdigitation of many disciplines and specialties, including cytogenetics, cell biology, molecular biology, epidemiology, radiobiology, and several others. This paper is intended for clinicians; it presents a structured analytic scheme for correlating and classifying this multidisciplinary information as it becomes available

  5. Intraspecific chromosome variability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Dubinin

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available (Editorial preface. The publication is presented in order to remind us of one of dramatic pages of the history of genetics. It re-opens for the contemporary reader a comprehensive work marking the priority change from plant cytogenetics to animal cytogenetics led by wide population studies which were conducted on Drosophila polytene chromosomes. The year of the publication (1937 became the point of irretrievable branching between the directions of Old World and New World genetics connected with the problems of chromosome variability and its significance for the evolution of the species. The famous book of T. Dobzhansky (1937 was published by Columbia University in the US under the title “Genetics and the origin of species”, and in the shadow of this American ‘skybuilding’ all other works grew dim. It is remarkable that both Dobzhansky and Dubinin come to similar conclusions about the role of chromosomes in speciation. This is not surprising given that they both might be considered as representatives of the Russian genetic school, by their birth and education. Interestingly, Dobzhansky had never referred to the full paper of Dubinin et al. (1937, though a previous short communication in Nature (1936 was included together with all former papers on the related subject. In full, the volume of the original publication printed in the Biological Journal in Moscow comprised 47 pages, in that number 41 pages of the Russian text accompanied by 16 Figs, a table and reference list, and, above all, 6 pages of the English summary. This final part in English is now reproduced in the authors’ version with the only addition being the reference list in the originally printed form.

  6. Identification of bacterial cells by chromosomal painting.

    OpenAIRE

    Lanoil, B. D.; Giovannoni, S J

    1997-01-01

    Chromosomal painting is a technique for the microscopic localization of genetic material. It has been applied at the subcellular level to identify regions of eukaryotic chromosomes. Here we describe the development of bacterial chromosomal painting (BCP), a related technology for the identification of bacterial cells. Purified genomic DNAs from six bacterial strains were labeled by nick translation with the fluorochrome Fluor-X, Cy3, or Cy5. The average size of the labeled fragments was ca. 5...

  7. Holoprosencephaly due to Numeric Chromosome Abnormalities

    OpenAIRE

    Solomon, Benjamin D.; Rosenbaum, Kenneth N.; Meck, Jeanne M.; Muenke, Maximilian

    2010-01-01

    Holoprosencephaly (HPE) is the most common malformation of the human forebrain. When a clinician identifies a patient with HPE, a routine chromosome analysis is often the first genetic test sent for laboratory analysis in order to assess for a structural or numerical chromosome anomaly. An abnormality of chromosome number is overall the most frequently identified etiology in a patient with HPE. These abnormalities include trisomy 13, trisomy 18, and triploidy, though several others have been ...

  8. How does DNA break during chromosomal translocations?

    OpenAIRE

    Nambiar, Mridula; Raghavan, Sathees C.

    2011-01-01

    Chromosomal translocations are one of the most common types of genetic rearrangements and are molecular signatures for many types of cancers. They are considered as primary causes for cancers, especially lymphoma and leukemia. Although many translocations have been reported in the last four decades, the mechanism by which chromosomes break during a translocation remains largely unknown. In this review, we summarize recent advances made in understanding the molecular mechanism of chromosomal t...

  9. Basic notions about genetic effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    First the genetic processes such as DNA and its chemical composition, cross breeding, chromosomes and their build-up, oogenesis, spermatogenesis, chromosomal division are described. Thus the genetic effects of radiation can be better explained: mutations, structural and numerical aberrations in chromosomes, and evolution are dealt with. (G.H.)

  10. X-Chromosome dosage compensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Barbara J

    2005-01-01

    In mammals, flies, and worms, sex is determined by distinctive regulatory mechanisms that cause males (XO or XY) and females (XX) to differ in their dose of X chromosomes. In each species, an essential X chromosome-wide process called dosage compensation ensures that somatic cells of either sex express equal levels of X-linked gene products. The strategies used to achieve dosage compensation are diverse, but in all cases, specialized complexes are targeted specifically to the X chromosome(s) of only one sex to regulate transcript levels. In C. elegans, this sex-specific targeting of the dosage compensation complex (DCC) is controlled by the same developmental signal that establishes sex, the ratio of X chromosomes to sets of autosomes (X:A signal). Molecular components of this chromosome counting process have been defined. Following a common step of regulation, sex determination and dosage compensation are controlled by distinct genetic pathways. C. elegans dosage compensation is implemented by a protein complex that binds both X chromosomes of hermaphrodites to reduce transcript levels by one-half. The dosage compensation complex resembles the conserved 13S condensin complex required for both mitotic and meiotic chromosome resolution and condensation, implying the recruitment of ancient proteins to the new task of regulating gene expression. Within each C. elegans somatic cell, one of the DCC components also participates in the separate mitotic/meiotic condensin complex. Other DCC components play pivotal roles in regulating the number and distribution of crossovers during meiosis. The strategy by which C. elegans X chromosomes attract the condensin-like DCC is known. Small, well-dispersed X-recognition elements act as entry sites to recruit the dosage compensation complex and to nucleate spreading of the complex to X regions that lack recruitment sites. In this manner, a repressed chromatin state is spread in cis over short or long distances, thus establishing the

  11. Power Preservation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galster, Kjeld

    Power Preservation (Abstract) In the 17th century, just as today, coalitions needed ‘lead nations’. This was assumed to be a power with great military and economic potentials, and Denmark endeavoured to act as such a leader in the Thirty Years War from 1626 to 28. The results were not encouraging...... stage gradually declined. Thus, Denmark of the 17th century is not to be counted amongst the great powers, but since Christian V’s accession to the throne in 1670 Denmark-Norway has developed into one of Europe’s most highly militarised states. Apart from a permanently combat ready navy, the country......-Scottish double monarchy, it is fair to assume that his political ambitions are of a far reaching nature. King Christian wants revenge on Sweden and he wishes to preserve the military and naval power generated during the latest war with that country. However, this is certainly not to be achieved cheaply. To...

  12. Software preservation

    OpenAIRE

    Tadej Vodopivec

    2011-01-01

    Comtrade Ltd. covers a wide range of activities related to information and communication technologies; its deliverables include web applications, locally installed programs,system software, drivers, embedded software (used e.g. in medical devices, auto parts,communication switchboards). Also the extensive knowledge and practical experience about digital long-term preservation technologies have been acquired. This wide spectrum of activities puts us in the position to discuss the often overloo...

  13. Reciprocal chromosome translocation associated with TDNA-insertion mutation in Arabidopsis: genetic and cytological analyses of consequences for gametophyte development and for construction of doubly mutant lines

    OpenAIRE

    Curtis, Marc J.; Belcram, Katia; Stephanie R Bollmann; Tominey, Colin M.; Hoffman, Peter D.; Mercier, Raphael; Hays, John B.

    2008-01-01

    Chromosomal rearrangements may complicate construction of Arabidopsis with multiple TDNA-insertion mutations. Here, crossing two lines homozygous for insertions in AtREV3 and AtPOLH (chromosomes I and V, respectively) and selfing F1 plants yielded non-Mendelian F2 genotype distributions: frequencies of +/++/+ and 1/1 2/2 progeny were only 0.42 and 0.25%. However, the normal development and fertility of double mutants showed AtPOLH-1 and AtREV3-2 gametes and 1/1 2/2 embryos to be fully viable....

  14. Genetics Home Reference: adermatoglyphia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip to main content Your Guide to Understanding Genetic Conditions Enable Javascript for addthis links to activate. ... Conditions Genes Chromosomes & mtDNA Resources Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions adermatoglyphia adermatoglyphia Enable Javascript to ...

  15. HIGH GENETIC VARIATION IN Y CHROMOSOME PATTERNS OF THE MOCOVÍ POPULATION / Alta variación genética en los patrones del cromosoma Y de la población Mocoví

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Angela Glesmann

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In numerically small ethnic groups, the loss of genetic variability in the Y chromosome is frequent, because this genomic compartment is often subjected to selective sweeps. Despite its small size, the Mocoví population retains a significant amount of genetic variation in relation to other native communities, but their Y chromosome diversity is not known in depth. The aim of this study was to analyze the genetic variability of the Y chromosome in a sample of Mocoví males from Santa Fe province (Argentina. We genotyped 11 short tandem repeats (STRs and two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs: M3 and M346. The diversity observed was high, and the 25 haplotypes obtained were compared to the YHRD database, with 13 of them absent of that database. A comparison with previous data reported from other Gran Chaco native groups showed significant differences between the Mocoví and other populations of different ethnic origin. This result and other studies on molecular markers of the Mocoví prove that this ethnic group retains a high genetic diversity that clearly differentiate them from other Amerindian populations.   Keywords: Haplotypes; genetic diversity; STRs; M3; Amerindians.   Resumen La pérdida de variabilidad genética en el cromosoma Y es frecuente en grupos étnicos reducidos numéricamente, debido a que este cromosoma suele estar sometido a barridos selectivos. A pesar de ser pequeña, la población Mocoví conserva una cantidad significativa de variación genética en relación con otras comunidades nativas, pero su diversidad a nivel del cromosoma Y no se conoce en profundidad. El objetivo de este trabajo fue analizar la variabilidad genética del cromosoma Y en una muestra de varones Mocoví de la provincia de Santa Fe (Argentina. Se tipificaron 11 microsatélites (STRs y dos marcadores bialélicos (SNPs: M3 y M346. La diversidad observada fue elevada, y los 25 haplotipos obtenidos se compararon con la base de datos YHRD, donde 13

  16. Genetic toxicological evaluation of rats fed on diet containing salted, dried and irradiated mackerel. Part of a coordinated programme on radiation preservation of dried fish indigenous to Asia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An assessment of genotoxicity of salted and dried mackerel irradiated with 2 kGy was carried out by dominant lethal assay in mice, bone marrow micronucleus test in mice and bone marrow metaphase analysis in rats. No evidence of induced dominant lethality was observed in mice fed on irradiated mackerel. Similarly, no evidence of chromosomal damaging effects in rats and mice and no spindle effects in mice fed on nutritional adequate diet containing irradiated mackerel could be observed

  17. Preimplantation genetic screening for all 24 chromosomes by microarray comparative genomic hybridization significantly increases implantation rates and clinical pregnancy rates in patients undergoing in vitro fertilization with poor prognosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumdar, Gaurav; Majumdar, Abha; Lall, Meena; Verma, Ishwar C.; Upadhyaya, Kailash C.

    2016-01-01

    CONTEXT: A majority of human embryos produced in vitro are aneuploid, especially in couples undergoing in vitro fertilization (IVF) with poor prognosis. Preimplantation genetic screening (PGS) for all 24 chromosomes has the potential to select the most euploid embryos for transfer in such cases. AIM: To study the efficacy of PGS for all 24 chromosomes by microarray comparative genomic hybridization (array CGH) in Indian couples undergoing IVF cycles with poor prognosis. SETTINGS AND DESIGN: A retrospective, case–control study was undertaken in an institution-based tertiary care IVF center to compare the clinical outcomes of twenty patients, who underwent 21 PGS cycles with poor prognosis, with 128 non-PGS patients in the control group, with the same inclusion criterion as for the PGS group. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Single cells were obtained by laser-assisted embryo biopsy from day 3 embryos and subsequently analyzed by array CGH for all 24 chromosomes. Once the array CGH results were available on the morning of day 5, only chromosomally normal embryos that had progressed to blastocyst stage were transferred. RESULTS: The implantation rate and clinical pregnancy rate (PR) per transfer were found to be significantly higher in the PGS group than in the control group (63.2% vs. 26.2%, P = 0.001 and 73.3% vs. 36.7%, P = 0.006, respectively), while the multiple PRs sharply declined from 31.9% to 9.1% in the PGS group. CONCLUSIONS: In this pilot study, we have shown that PGS by array CGH can improve the clinical outcome in patients undergoing IVF with poor prognosis. PMID:27382234

  18. Application of the Alkaline Comet Assay and the Analysis of Structural Chromosome Aberrations in Assessment of Genetic Damage After Accidental Exposure to Ionising Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Living with the effects of low-level ionising radiation is one of the normal hazards of life. However, the effects of lower doses may not show up for years after exposure and are due to various changes in DNA molecules and chromosomes. Radiation-induced mutations seem to be brought about by the deletion of small pieces of chromosomes during the process of chromosome breakage and repair. Since chromosome damage is most likely to happen in dividing cells, ionising radiation usually cause cancer in those parts of the body where cells are actively dividing. Ionising radiation kills rapidly dividing cells, blood lymphocytes among them. People are exposed to high doses of ionising radiation when radiation accidents occur. The cytogenetical consequences of accidental exposure to gamma-radiation (radiation dose 221 mSv) were investigated by using alkaline Comet assay and the analysis of structural chromosomal aberrations (CA). Blood samples were repeatedly collected during one-year period after the accident. By using the Comet assay immediately after accidental exposure a high level of DNA damage was recorded. Although this level was decreasing over a one-year period, it was still elevated compared to normal values of DNA damage for unexposed persons. Immediately after the accident prevalence of CA (dicentrics, acentrics) over chromatid aberrations was recorded. However, one year afterwards only a few chromatid breaks were recorded. Our results confirmed usefulness of the alkaline Comet assay as a simple and sensitive technique for the biomonitoring of DNA damages, especially in the cases of accidental exposure to ionising radiation. (author)

  19. Preservation Priority

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    China ratified the UNESCO Convention Concerning the Protection of World Cultural and Natural Heritage in 1985. This set the tone for a course of action aimed at protecting the common heritage of mankind in tandem with the international community. Recently, Chao Huashan, a renowned expert on world heritage studies in China, spoke to Beijing Review reporter Zan Jifang, sharing his understanding about the value of the World Heritage Convention and his suggestions for China’s future work on preserving its heritage. Excerpts follow:

  20. Mitotic chromosome condensation in vertebrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vagnarelli, Paola, E-mail: P.Vagnarelli@ed.ac.uk

    2012-07-15

    Work from several laboratories over the past 10-15 years has revealed that, within the interphase nucleus, chromosomes are organized into spatially distinct territories [T. Cremer, C. Cremer, Chromosome territories, nuclear architecture and gene regulation in mammalian cells, Nat. Rev. Genet. 2 (2001) 292-301 and T. Cremer, M. Cremer, S. Dietzel, S. Muller, I. Solovei, S. Fakan, Chromosome territories-a functional nuclear landscape, Curr. Opin. Cell Biol. 18 (2006) 307-316]. The overall compaction level and intranuclear location varies as a function of gene density for both entire chromosomes [J.A. Croft, J.M. Bridger, S. Boyle, P. Perry, P. Teague,W.A. Bickmore, Differences in the localization and morphology of chromosomes in the human nucleus, J. Cell Biol. 145 (1999) 1119-1131] and specific chromosomal regions [N.L. Mahy, P.E. Perry, S. Gilchrist, R.A. Baldock, W.A. Bickmore, Spatial organization of active and inactive genes and noncoding DNA within chromosome territories, J. Cell Biol. 157 (2002) 579-589] (Fig. 1A, A'). In prophase, when cyclin B activity reaches a high threshold, chromosome condensation occurs followed by Nuclear Envelope Breakdown (NEB) [1]. At this point vertebrate chromosomes appear as compact structures harboring an attachment point for the spindle microtubules physically recognizable as a primary constriction where the two sister chromatids are held together. The transition from an unshaped interphase chromosome to the highly structured mitotic chromosome (compare Figs. 1A and B) has fascinated researchers for several decades now; however a definite picture of how this process is achieved and regulated is not yet in our hands and it will require more investigation to comprehend the complete process. From a biochemical point of view a vertebrate mitotic chromosomes is composed of DNA, histone proteins (60%) and non-histone proteins (40%) [6]. I will discuss below what is known to date on the contribution of these two different classes

  1. Mitotic chromosome condensation in vertebrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Work from several laboratories over the past 10–15 years has revealed that, within the interphase nucleus, chromosomes are organized into spatially distinct territories [T. Cremer, C. Cremer, Chromosome territories, nuclear architecture and gene regulation in mammalian cells, Nat. Rev. Genet. 2 (2001) 292–301 and T. Cremer, M. Cremer, S. Dietzel, S. Muller, I. Solovei, S. Fakan, Chromosome territories—a functional nuclear landscape, Curr. Opin. Cell Biol. 18 (2006) 307–316]. The overall compaction level and intranuclear location varies as a function of gene density for both entire chromosomes [J.A. Croft, J.M. Bridger, S. Boyle, P. Perry, P. Teague,W.A. Bickmore, Differences in the localization and morphology of chromosomes in the human nucleus, J. Cell Biol. 145 (1999) 1119–1131] and specific chromosomal regions [N.L. Mahy, P.E. Perry, S. Gilchrist, R.A. Baldock, W.A. Bickmore, Spatial organization of active and inactive genes and noncoding DNA within chromosome territories, J. Cell Biol. 157 (2002) 579–589] (Fig. 1A, A'). In prophase, when cyclin B activity reaches a high threshold, chromosome condensation occurs followed by Nuclear Envelope Breakdown (NEB) [1]. At this point vertebrate chromosomes appear as compact structures harboring an attachment point for the spindle microtubules physically recognizable as a primary constriction where the two sister chromatids are held together. The transition from an unshaped interphase chromosome to the highly structured mitotic chromosome (compare Figs. 1A and B) has fascinated researchers for several decades now; however a definite picture of how this process is achieved and regulated is not yet in our hands and it will require more investigation to comprehend the complete process. From a biochemical point of view a vertebrate mitotic chromosomes is composed of DNA, histone proteins (60%) and non-histone proteins (40%) [6]. I will discuss below what is known to date on the contribution of these two different

  2. DOP-PCR-based chromosome painting of rye (Secale cereale) and wheat-rye hybrid 1R and 1RS chromosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    The chromosome painting is an efficient tool for chromosome research. In oeder to determine whether the chromosome painting techniques can be used to identify rye genome in wheat genetic background, 1R and 1RS chromosomes were microdissected from rye (Secale cereale L. var. King ll) and wheat-rye a...

  3. Meiosis and chromosome painting of sex chromosome systems in Ceboidea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudry, M D; Rahn, I M; Solari, A J

    2001-06-01

    The identity of the chromosomes involved in the multiple sex system of Alouatta caraya (Aca) and the possible distribution of this system among other Ceboidea were investigated by chromosome painting of mitotic cells from five species and by analysis of meiosis at pachytene in two species. The identity of the autosome #7 (X2) involved in the multiple system of Aca and its breakage points were demonstrated by both meiosis and chromosome painting. These features are identical to those described by Consigliere et al. [1996] in Alouatta seniculus sara (Assa) and Alouatta seniculus arctoidea (Asar). This multiple system was absent in the other four Ceboidea species studied here. However, data from the literature strongly suggest the presence of this multiple in other members of this genus. The presence of this multiple system among several species and subspecies that show high levels of chromosome rearrangements may suggest a special selective value of this multiple. The meiotic features of the sex systems of Aca and Cebus apella paraguayanus (Cap) are strikingly different at pachytene, as the latter system is similar to the sex pair of man and other primates. The relatively large genetic distances between species presently showing this multiple system suggest that its origin is not recent. Other members of the same genus should be investigated at meiosis and by chromosome painting in order to know the extent and distribution of this complex sex-chromosome system. PMID:11376445

  4. Further study of genetic interactions: Loss of short arm material in patients with ring chromosome 4 changes developmental pattern of del(4) (q33)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lurie, I.W. [Univ. of Maryland, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    1995-04-10

    Segment 4q33 is not considered a probable location of a gene related with limb deficiency by Roberts and Tabin; however, the occurrence of ectrodactyly or its equivalents in at least 9 published cases of monosomy 4q33 suggests probable location of one of these genes in that region. Ulnar ray defects and/or ectrodactyly were the prevailing forms. An additional loss of the tip of 4p in patients with ring chromosome 4 leads to a change of limb deficiency type: 8 of 9 patients with r(4) and limb deficiency had radial ray defects. Therefore, interactions between a proposed {1/2} dose {open_quotes}ectrodactyly{close_quotes} gene on 4q33 and some {1/2} dosage genes on distal 4p (or disturbed cellular homeostasis due to a ring chromosome 4) can change the development pattern of limb deficiency. Possible mechanisms and significance of the phenomenon are discussed. 36 refs., 1 tab.

  5. Genetic improvement of Escherichia coli for ethanol production: chromosomal integration of Zymomonas mobilis genes encoding pyruvate decarboxylase and alcohol dehydrogenase II.

    OpenAIRE

    Ohta, K.; Beall, D S; Mejia, J P; Shanmugam, K. T.; Ingram, L O

    1991-01-01

    Zymomonas mobilis genes for pyruvate decarboxylase (pdc) and alcohol dehydrogenase II (adhB) were integrated into the Escherichia coli chromosome within or near the pyruvate formate-lyase gene (pfl). Integration improved the stability of the Z. mobilis genes in E. coli, but further selection was required to increase expression. Spontaneous mutants were selected for resistance to high level of chloramphenicol that also expressed high levels of the Z. mobilis genes. Analogous mutants were selec...

  6. Systematic characterisation of disease associated balanced chromosome rearrangements by FISH: cytogenetically and genetically anchored YACs identify microdeletions and candidate regions for mental retardation genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wirth, J; Nothwang, H G; van der Maarel, S;

    1999-01-01

    average one per 3 cM, spaced over the entire human genome. By fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH), we have performed a systematic search for YACs spanning translocation breakpoints. Patients with DBCRs and either syndromic or non-syndromic mental retardation (MR) were ascertained through the...... of disease in seemingly balanced chromosome rearrangements that are associated with a disease phenotype. Our region specific FISH probes, which are available to MCN members, can be a powerful tool in clinical cytogenetics and positional cloning....

  7. Genetic analysis and chromosome mapping of resistance to Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. niveum (FON) race 1 and race 2 in watermelon (Citrullus lanatus L.)

    OpenAIRE

    Ren, Yi; Di Jiao,; Gong, Guoyi; Zhang, Haiying; Guo, Shaogui; Zhang, Jie; Xu, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Fusarium wilt (FW) caused by Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. niveum (FON) is the major soilborne disease of watermelon (Citrullus lanatus L.). The development and deployment of resistant cultivars is generally considered to be an effective approach to control FW. In this study, an F8 population consisting of 103 recombinant inbred lines derived from a cross between the cultivar 97103 and a wild accession PI 296341-FR was used for FON race 1 and race 2 fungal inoculations. One major QTL on chromosom...

  8. Chromosomal rearrangement interferes with meiotic X chromosome inactivation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Homolka, David; Ivánek, Robert; Čapková, Jana; Jansa, Petr; Forejt, Jiří

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 17, č. 10 (2007), s. 1431-1437. ISSN 1088-9051 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0520; GA ČR GA301/06/1334; GA ČR GA301/07/1383 Grant ostatní: Howard Hughes Medical Institute(US) HHMI 55000306 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : chromosomal translocations * meiotic X chromosome inactivation * spermatogenesis Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 11.224, year: 2007

  9. Chromosome number evolution in skippers (Lepidoptera, Hesperiidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukhtanov, Vladimir A

    2014-01-01

    Lepidoptera (butterflies and moths), as many other groups of animals and plants, simultaneously represent preservation of ancestral karyotype in the majority of families with a high degree of chromosome number instability in numerous independently evolved phylogenetic lineages. However, the pattern and trends of karyotype evolution in some Lepidoptera families are poorly studied. Here I provide a survey of chromosome numbers in skippers (family Hesperiidae) based on intensive search and analysis of published data. I demonstrate that the majority of skippers preserve the haploid chromosome number n=31 that seems to be an ancestral number for the Hesperiidae and the order Lepidoptera at whole. However, in the tribe Baorini the derived number n=16 is the most typical state which can be used as a (syn)apomorphic character in further phylogenetic investigations. Several groups of skippers display extreme chromosome number variations on within-species (e.g. the representatives of the genus Carcharodus Hübner, [1819]) and between-species (e.g. the genus Agathymus Freeman, 1959) levels. Thus, these groups can be used as model systems for future analysis of the phenomenon of chromosome instability. Interspecific chromosomal differences are also shown to be useful for discovering and describing new cryptic species of Hesperiidae representing in such a way a powerful tool in biodiversity research. Generally, the skipper butterflies promise to be an exciting group that will significantly contribute to the growing knowledge of patterns and processes of chromosome evolution. PMID:25610542

  10. Chromosome number evolution in skippers (Lepidoptera, Hesperiidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Lukhtanov

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Lepidoptera (butterflies and moths, as many other groups of animals and plants, simultaneously represent preservation of ancestral karyotype in the majority of families with a high degree of chromosome number instability in numerous independently evolved phylogenetic lineages. However, the pattern and trends of karyotype evolution in some Lepidoptera families are poorly studied. Here I provide a survey of chromosome numbers in skippers (family Hesperiidae based on intensive search and analysis of published data. I demonstrate that the majority of skippers preserve the haploid chromosome number n=31 that seems to be an ancestral number for the Hesperiidae and the order Lepidoptera at whole. However, in the tribe Baorini the derived number n=16 is the most typical state which can be used as a (synapomorphic character in further phylogenetic investigations. Several groups of skippers display extreme chromosome number variations on within-species (e.g. the representatives of the genus Carcharodus Hübner, [1819] and between-species (e.g. the genus Agathymus Freeman, 1959 levels. Thus, these groups can be used as model systems for future analysis of the phenomenon of chromosome instability. Interspecific chromosomal differences are also shown to be useful for discovering and describing new cryptic species of Hesperiidae representing in such a way a powerful tool in biodiversity research. Generally, the skipper butterflies promise to be an exciting group that will significantly contribute to the growing knowledge of patterns and processes of chromosome evolution.

  11. X-chromosome SNP analyses in 11 human Mediterranean populations show a high overall genetic homogeneity except in North-west Africans (Moroccans)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tomas Mas, Carmen; Sanchez Sanchez, Juan Jose; Barbaro, Anna;

    2008-01-01

    overall homogeneity was found among the Mediterranean populations except for the population from Morocco, which seemed to differ genetically from the rest of the populations in the Mediterranean area. A very low genetic distance was found between populations in the Middle East and most of the western part...

  12. Making chromosome abnormalities treatable conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cody, Jannine DeMars; Hale, Daniel Esten

    2015-09-01

    Individuals affected by the classic chromosome deletion syndromes which were first identified at the beginning of the genetic age, are now positioned to benefit from genomic advances. This issue highlights five of these conditions (4p-, 5p-, 11q-, 18p-, and 18q-). It focuses on the increased in understanding of the molecular underpinnings and envisions how these can be transformed into effective treatments. While it is scientifically exciting to see the phenotypic manifestations of hemizygosity being increasingly understood at the molecular and cellular level, it is even more amazing to consider that we are now on the road to making chromosome abnormalities treatable conditions. PMID:26351122

  13. Human chromosome 'painting' probes used to measure chromosome translocations in non-human primates: extrapolations from monkey to man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chromosome painting with a probe specific for human chromosome 4 was used to 'paint' monkey chromosomes to measure the persistence of translocations in peripheral blood lymphocytes of a rhesus monkey exposed to ionising radiation more than 25 years ago. The human probe painted the entire length of two large rhesus and cynomolgus monkey chromosomes with no cross hybridisation to other chromosomes, facilitating rapid detection of chromosome translocations. Translocation frequency measured in one monkey was significantly higher than that for unirradiated animals. The use of human probes to obtain cytogenetic data from Macaca species irradiated years previously or exposed to chemical clastogens makes this genus an excellent model for studying genetic damage. (author)

  14. Application of chromosomal microarrays in the evaluation of intellectual disability/global developmental delay patients - A study from a tertiary care genetic centre in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Pankaj; Gupta, Neerja; Chowdhury, Madhumita Roy; Sapra, Savita; Ghosh, Manju; Gulati, Sheffali; Kabra, Madhulika

    2016-09-15

    Intellectual disability (ID)/Global developmental delay (GDD) is a diverse group of disorders in terms of cognitive and non-cognitive functions and can occur with or without associated co-morbidities. It affects 1-3% of individuals globally and in at least 30-50% of cases the etiology remains unexplained. The widespread use of chromosomal microarray analysis (CMA) in a clinical setting has allowed the identification of submicroscopic copy number variations (CNVs), throughout the genome, associated with neurodevelopmental phenotypes including ID/GDD. In this study we investigated the utility of CMA in the detection of CNVs in 106 patients with unexplained ID/DD, dysmorphism with or without multiple congenital anomalies (MCA). CMA study was carried out using Agilent 8×60K chips and Illumina Human CytoSNP-12 chips. Pathogenic CNVs were found in 15 (14.2%) patients. In these patients, CNVs on single chromosome were detected in 10 patients while 5 patients showed co-occurrence CNVs on two chromosomes. The size of these CNVs ranged between 322kb to 13Mb. The yield of pathogenic CNVs was similar for both mild and severe ID/GDD cases. One patient described in this paper is considered to harbour a likely pathogenic CNV with deletion in 17q22 region. Only few cases have been described in literature for 17q22 deletion and patient reported here was found to have an atypical deletion in 17q22 region (Case 90). This study re-affirms the view point that CMA is a powerful diagnostic tool in the evaluation of idiopathic ID/GDD patients irrespective of the degree of severity. Identifying pathogenic CNVs helps in counseling and prenatal diagnosis if desired. PMID:27291820

  15. Association between Genetic Polymorphisms of DNA Repair Genes and Chromosomal Damage for 1,3-Butadiene-Exposed Workers in a Matched Study in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menglong Xiang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to examine the association between polymorphisms of DNA repair genes and chromosomal damage of 1,3-butadiene- (BD- exposed workers. The study was conducted in 45 pairs of occupationally exposed workers in a BD product workshop and matched control workers in an administrative office and a circulatory water workshop in China. Newly developed biomarkers (micronuclei, MNi; nucleoplasmic bridges, NPBs; nuclear buds, NBUDs in the cytokinesis-blocked micronucleus (CBMN cytome assay were adopted to detect chromosomal damage. PCR and PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP are adopted to analyze polymorphisms of DNA repair genes, such as X-ray repair cross-complementing Group 1 (XRCC1, O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT, poly (adenosine diphosphate-ribose polymerases (ADPRT, and apurinic/apyrimidinic endonucleases (APE1. The BD-exposed workers exhibited increased frequencies of MNi and NPBs when compared to subjects in the control group. The results also show that the BD-exposed workers carrying XRCC1 diplotypes TCGA-CCGG (4.25±2.06‰ (FR=2.10, 95% CI: 1.03–4.28 and TCGG-TCGA (5.80±3.56‰ (FR=2.75, 95% CI: 0.76–2.65 had statistically higher NBUD frequencies than those who carried diplotype TCGG-TCGG (1.89±1.27‰. Our study suggests that polymorphisms of XRCC1 gene may influence chromosomal damage in BD-exposed workers.

  16. Genetic effects from radioactive isotopes. II.Chromosomal anomalies (translocations) induced by iodine 131 and strontium 89 in rats male germ cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Male sexually mature rats are treated intraperitoneally with a single dose of 3.5 μCi/g bodyweight of iodine-131 or 1.0 μCi/g bodyweight of strontium-89 in the form of aqueous sodium iodine, resp. strontium bichloride solution without carrier. Cytogenetic analysis is performed after six months on primordial spermatocytes in diakinesis metaphase I. The chromosomal translocations - 3/230 and 16/420 demonstrable in the gonadal cells of iodine-131, resp. strontium-89 - treated rats are a manifestation of severe damage to hereditary structures in gonadal cells of premeitic (spermatogonial) phase. (Ch.K.)

  17. Synchronous clear cell renal cell carcinoma and tubulocystic carcinoma: genetic evidence of independent ontogenesis and implications of chromosomal imbalances in tumor progression

    OpenAIRE

    Quiroga-Garza Gabriela; Piña-Oviedo Sergio; Cuevas-Ocampo Karime; Goldfarb Richard; Schwartz Mary R; Ayala Alberto G; Monzon Federico A

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Seven percent of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) cases are diagnosed as "unclassified" RCC by morphology. Genetic profiling of RCCs helps define renal tumor subtypes, especially in cases where morphologic diagnosis is inconclusive. This report describes a patient with synchronous clear cell RCC (ccRCC) and a tubulocystic renal carcinoma (TCRC) in the same kidney, and discusses the pathologic features and genetic profile of both tumors. A 67 year-old male underwent CT scans for an unrelate...

  18. Making the Chromosome-Gene-Protein Connection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulvihill, Charlotte

    1996-01-01

    Presents an exercise that demonstrates the chromosome-gene-protein connection using sickle-cell anemia, a genetic disease with a well-characterized molecular basis. Involves connecting changes in DNA to protein outcomes and tying them into the next generation by meiosis and gamete formation with genetic crosses. Motivates students to integrate…

  19. Interrogating the complex role of chromosome 16p13.13 in multiple sclerosis susceptibility: independent genetic signals in the CIITA-CLEC16A-SOCS1 gene complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuvich, Rebecca L; Bush, William S; McCauley, Jacob L; Beecham, Ashley H; De Jager, Philip L; Ivinson, Adrian J; Compston, Alastair; Hafler, David A; Hauser, Stephen L; Sawcer, Stephen J; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A; Barcellos, Lisa F; Mortlock, Douglas P; Haines, Jonathan L

    2011-09-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a neurodegenerative, autoimmune disease of the central nervous system, and numerous studies have shown that MS has a strong genetic component. Independent studies to identify MS-associated genes have often indicated multiple signals in physically close genomic regions, although by their proximity it is not always clear if these data indicate redundant or truly independent genetic signals. Recently, three MS study samples were genotyped in parallel using an Illumina Custom BeadChip. These revealed multiple significantly associated single-nucleotide polymorphisms within a 600 kb stretch on chromosome 16p13. Here we present a detailed analysis of variants in this region that clarifies the independent nature of these signals. The linkage disequilibrium patterns in the region and logistic regression analysis of the associations suggest that this region likely harbors three independent MS disease loci. Further, we examined cis-expression QTLs, histone modifications and CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF) binding data in the region. We also tested for correlated expression of the genes from the region using whole-genome expression array data from lymphoblastoid cell lines. Three of the genes show expression correlations across loci. Furthermore, in the GM12878 lymphoblastoid cell line, these three genes are in a continuous region devoid of H3K27 methylation, suggesting an open chromatin configuration. This region likely only contributes minimal risk to MS; however, investigation of this region will undoubtedly provide insight into the functional mechanisms of these genes. These data highlight the importance of taking a closer look at the expression and function of chromosome 16p13 in the pathogenesis of MS. PMID:21653641

  20. 广西仫佬族Y染色体和mtDNA的遗传结构分析%Genetic analysis of Y chromosome and mitochondrial DNA polymorphism of Mulam ethnic group in Guangxi, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王晓庆; 王传超; 邓琼英; 李辉

    2013-01-01

    文章对我国广西仫佬族91 个无关男性个体Y-STR、Y-SNP、mtDNA HVS-Ⅰ和mtDNA-SNP 等进行检测分型,探索仫佬族的分子遗传结构.结果显示:Y 染色体单倍群O1a1-P203 和O2a1*-M95 在仫佬族中为高频单倍群,利用Y-STR 构建的N-J 树中仫佬族与侗族聚类,说明在父系遗传上仫佬族与侗族遗传关系较近;mtDNA 中F1a、M*、B4a、B5a 等4 类单倍群高频出现,体现出仫佬族在母系遗传方面具有典型的东亚南方群体特征.17 个Y-STR 位点和mtDNA HVS-Ⅰ具有丰富的遗传多态性,在群体遗传学和法医学方面具有应用前景.%In order to study the molecular genetic structure of Mulam ethnic group in Guangxi, China, Y chromosome and mitochondrial DNA(mtDNA)polymorphisms were genotyped. High frequencies of the Y chromosome haplogroups Olal-P203 and O2al*-M95 were found in Mulam, exhibiting a pattern similar to the neighboring indigenous populations, especially the Daic populations. MtDNA lineages Fla, M*, B4a, B5a, M7b, and N9a were found in Mulam, which always present at high frequencies among the populations of East Asia. Mulam exhibits genetic characteristics of southern Chinese in both paternal and maternal lineages. Multiplex detection of the 17 Y-STR loci and mtDNA HVS-I revealed the distribution of highly genetic diversity in Mulam, which would have potential application in population genetics and forensic practice.

  1. Genetic population analysis of 17 Y-chromosomal STRs in three states (Valle del Cauca, Cauca and Nariño) from Southwestern Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julieta Avila, Sandra; Briceño, Ignacio; Gómez, Alberto

    2009-05-01

    Seventeen Y-chromosomal (DYS19, DYS389 I/II, DYS390, DYS391, DYS392, DYS393, DYS438, DYS439, DYS437, DYS448, DYS456, DYS458, DYS635, YGATA-H4 and DYS385a/b) short tandem repeat (STR) polymorphic systems were typed in three South West Colombian populations: Valle (short term for Valle del Cauca), Cauca and Nariño. DYS385a/b showed the highest gene diversity in the three populations. A total of 287 different Y-chromosome haplotypes were observed in the 308 males analyzed, and the haplotype diversity among populations was 0.9977. The most frequent haplotype was observed only three times and only nineteen others were observed two times. The highest gene diversity was found in Valle and the lowest in Cauca. Analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) revealed that variation is mainly within populations (99.1%) in agreement with previous results in European populations. In conclusion, these populations could be pooled together in order to create one "Colombian-Mestizo" database for forensic use. PMID:19329077

  2. 川麦42的1BS染色体臂对小麦主要农艺性状的遗传效应%Genetic Effects of 1BS Chromosome Arm on the Main Agronomic Traits in Chuanmai 42

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李俊; 魏会廷; 杨粟洁; 李朝苏; 汤永禄; 胡晓蓉; 杨武云

    2009-01-01

    川麦42的1BS染色体臂来源于人工合成小麦亲本Syn769.利用川麦42与含1BL/1RS易位系的四川小麦品种川农16构建的127个重组自交系(RIL,F_8),经3年4个环境的遗传评价,比较了川麦42的1BS和川农16的1RS染色体臂对小麦产量构成因子和产量的遗传效应.结果表明,RIL群体中川麦42的1BS染色体臂株系和川农16的1RS染色体臂株系在分蘖力、成穗率、全生育期、小穗数、收获指数和籽粒产量6个性状上存在显著差异;1BS染色体臂有利于提高成穗率和收获指数,而1RS染色体臂有利于提高分蘖能力和增加小穗数,1BS株系的籽粒平均产量比1RS株系增加2.91%.鉴于1RS染色体臂上的抗条锈病基因丧失抗性,其携带的黑麦碱基因对加工品质有明显的负向作用,而川麦42的1BS染色体臂携带高抗条锈病基因YrCH42,并对小麦籽粒产量有正向作用,因此建议在小麦遗传改良中利用川麦42的1BS替换1RS染色体臂.%Chuanmai 42 (Syn769/Sw3243//Chuan6415) is a non-1BL/1RS wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) cultivar with high-yield potential and good resistance to strip rust (Puccinia striiformis f. Sp. Tritici), which has been developed from an elite synthetic hexaploid wheat Syn769 (Decoy 1/Aegilops tauschii 188, 1BS/1BL). The 1BS chromosome arm of Chuanmai 42 is originated from Syn769 and carries a stripe rust resistance gene YrCH42. In purpose of understanding the genetic effects of 1BS and 1RS chromosome arm on yield-related traits in wheat, 127 recombinant inbred lines (RILs, F_8) derived from Chuanmai 42 and Chuan-nong 16 (1BL/1RS translocation cultivar) were evaluated in three years across four environments in Sichuan province from 2005 to 2008. A total of 16 traits of the two parents (Chuanmai 42 and Chuannong 16) and the RIL population, such as spike number, grain number per spike, thousand-grain weight, and grain yield, were investigated. 1BS chromosome arm lines derived from Chuanmai 42 and 1RS

  3. International workshop of chromosome 19

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pericak-Vance, M.A. (Duke Univ. Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States). Div. of Neurology); Carrano, A.J. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States))

    1991-09-16

    This document summarizes the workshop on physical and genetic mapping of chromosome 19. The first session discussed the major disease loci found on the chromosome. The second session concentrated on reference families, markers and linkage maps. The third session concentrated on radiation hybrid mapping, somatic cell hybrid panels, macro restriction maps and YACs, followed by cDNA and long range physical maps. The fourth session concentrated on compiling consensus genetic and physical maps as well as discussing regions of conflict. The final session dealt with the LLNL cosmid contig database and comparative mapping of homologous regions of the human and mouse genomes, and ended with a discussion of resource sharing. 18 refs., 2 figs. (MHB)

  4. Degeneration of the Y chromosome in evolutionary aging models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobo, M. P.; Onody, R. N.

    2005-06-01

    The Y chromosomes are genetically degenerated and do not recombine with their matching partners X. Recombination of XX pairs is pointed out as the key factor for the Y chromosome degeneration. However, there is an additional evolutionary force driving sex-chromosomes evolution. Here we show this mechanism by means of two different evolutionary models, in which sex chromosomes with non-recombining XX and XY pairs of chromosomes is considered. Our results show three curious effects. First, we observed that even when both XX and XY pairs of chromosomes do not recombine, the Y chromosomes still degenerate. Second, the accumulation of mutations on Y chromosomes followed a completely different pattern then those accumulated on X chromosomes. And third, the models may differ with respect to sexual proportion. These findings suggest that a more primeval mechanism rules the evolution of Y chromosomes due exclusively to the sex-chromosomes asymmetry itself, i.e., the fact that Y chromosomes never experience female bodies. Over aeons, natural selection favored X chromosomes spontaneously, even if at the very beginning of evolution, both XX and XY pairs of chromosomes did not recombine.

  5. Qualitative analysis of mouse specific-locus mutations: information on genetic organization, gene expression, and the chromosomal nature of induced lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russell, L.B.

    1982-01-01

    Analysis of mouse specific-locus (SL) mutations at three loci has identified over 33 distinct complementation groups - most of which are probably overlapping deficiencies - and 13 to 14 new functional units. The complementation maps that have been generated for the d-se and c regions include numerous vital functions; however, some of the genes in these regions are non-vital. At such loci, hypomorphic mutants must represent intragenic alterations, and some viable nulls could conceivably be intragenic lesions also. Analysis of SL mutations has provided information on genetic expression. Homozygous deficiencies can be completely viable or can kill at any one of a range of developmental stages. Heterozygonus deficiencies of up to 6 cM or more in genetic length have been recovered and propagated. The time of death of homozygous and the degree of inviability of heterozygous deficiencies are related more to specific content of the missing segment than to its length. Combinations of deficiencies with x-autosome translocations that inactivate the homologous region in a mosaic fashion have shown that organismic lethals are not necessarily cell lethal. The spectrum of mutations induced depends on the nature of the mutagen and the type of germ cell exposed. Radiation of spermatogonia produces intragenic as well as null mutations. Spontaneous mutations have an admixture of types not present in populations of mutations induced in germ cells, and this raises doubts concerning the accuracy of doubling-dose calculations in genetic risk estimation. The analysis of SL mutations has yielded genetic tools for the construction of detailed gene-dosage series, cis-trans comparisons, the mapping of known genes and identification of new genes, genetic rescue of various types, and the identification and isolation of DNA sequences. (ERB)

  6. Qualitative analysis of mouse specific-locus mutations: information on genetic organization, gene expression, and the chromosomal nature of induced lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Analysis of mouse specific-locus (SL) mutations at three loci has identified over 33 distinct complementation groups - most of which are probably overlapping deficiencies - and 13 to 14 new functional units. The complementation maps that have been generated for the d-se and c regions include numerous vital functions; however, some of the genes in these regions are non-vital. At such loci, hypomorphic mutants must represent intragenic alterations, and some viable nulls could conceivably be intragenic lesions also. Analysis of SL mutations has provided information on genetic expression. Homozygous deficiencies can be completely viable or can kill at any one of a range of developmental stages. Heterozygonus deficiencies of up to 6 cM or more in genetic length have been recovered and propagated. The time of death of homozygous and the degree of inviability of heterozygous deficiencies are related more to specific content of the missing segment than to its length. Combinations of deficiencies with x-autosome translocations that inactivate the homologous region in a mosaic fashion have shown that organismic lethals are not necessarily cell lethal. The spectrum of mutations induced depends on the nature of the mutagen and the type of germ cell exposed. Radiation of spermatogonia produces intragenic as well as null mutations. Spontaneous mutations have an admixture of types not present in populations of mutations induced in germ cells, and this raises doubts concerning the accuracy of doubling-dose calculations in genetic risk estimation. The analysis of SL mutations has yielded genetic tools for the construction of detailed gene-dosage series, cis-trans comparisons, the mapping of known genes and identification of new genes, genetic rescue of various types, and the identification and isolation of DNA sequences

  7. Advances in understanding paternally transmitted Chromosomal Abnormalities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchetti, F; Sloter, E; Wyrobek, A J

    2001-03-01

    Multicolor FISH has been adapted for detecting the major types of chromosomal abnormalities in human sperm including aneuploidies for clinically-relevant chromosomes, chromosomal aberrations including breaks and rearrangements, and other numerical abnormalities. The various sperm FISH assays have been used to evaluate healthy men, men of advanced age, and men who have received mutagenic cancer therapy. The mouse has also been used as a model to investigate the mechanism of paternally transmitted genetic damage. Sperm FISH for the mouse has been used to detect chromosomally abnormal mouse sperm, while the PAINT/DAPI analysis of mouse zygotes has been used to evaluate the types of chromosomal defects that can be paternally transmitted to the embryo and their effects on embryonic development.

  8. X-chromosome workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paterson, A D

    1998-01-01

    Researchers presented results of ongoing research to the X-chromosome workshop of the Fifth World Congress on Psychiatric Genetics, covering a wide range of disorders: X-linked infantile spasms; a complex phenotype associated with deletions of Xp11; male homosexuality; degree of handedness; bipolar affective disorder; schizophrenia; childhood onset psychosis; and autism. This report summarizes the presentations, as well as reviewing previous studies. The focus of this report is on linkage findings for schizophrenia and bipolar disorder from a number of groups. For schizophrenia, low positive lod scores were obtained for markers DXS991 and DXS993 from two studies, although the sharing of alleles was greatest from brother-brother pairs in one study, and sister-sister in the other. Data from the Irish schizophrenia study was also submitted, with no strong evidence for linkage on the X chromosome. For bipolar disease, following the report of a Finnish family linked to Xq24-q27, the Columbia group reported some positive results for this region from 57 families, however, another group found no evidence for linkage to this region. Of interest, is the clustering of low positive linkage results that point to regions for possible further study. PMID:9686435

  9. Chromosome analysis and sorting

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Doležel, Jaroslav; Kubaláková, Marie; Suchánková, Pavla; Kovářová, Pavlína; Bartoš, Jan; Šimková, Hana

    Weinheim : Wiley-VCH, 2007 - (Doležel, J.; Greilhuber, J.; Suda, J.), s. 373-403 ISBN 978-3-527-31487-4 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA521/04/0607; GA ČR GP521/05/P257; GA ČR GD521/05/H013; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06004 Grant ostatní: Mendelova zemědělská a lesnická univerzita v Brně / Agronomická fakulta(CZ) ME 844 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5038910 Source of funding: V - iné verejné zdroje ; V - iné verejné zdroje ; V - iné verejné zdroje ; V - iné verejné zdroje ; V - iné verejné zdroje Keywords : Plant flow cytometry * chromosome sorting * flow cytogenetics Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology http://books. google .com/books?id=3cwakORieqUC&pg=PA373&lpg=PA373&dq=Chromosome+analysis+and+sorting&source=web&ots=8IyvJlBQyq&sig=_NlXyQQgBCwpj1pTC9YITvvVZqU

  10. Genetics Home Reference: Partington syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip to main content Your Guide to Understanding Genetic Conditions Enable Javascript for addthis links to activate. ... Conditions Genes Chromosomes & mtDNA Resources Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions Partington syndrome Partington syndrome Enable ...

  11. Genetics Home Reference: dystonia 6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip to main content Your Guide to Understanding Genetic Conditions Enable Javascript for addthis links to activate. ... Conditions Genes Chromosomes & mtDNA Resources Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions dystonia 6 dystonia 6 Enable ...

  12. Genetics Home Reference: Friedreich ataxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip to main content Your Guide to Understanding Genetic Conditions Enable Javascript for addthis links to activate. ... Conditions Genes Chromosomes & mtDNA Resources Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions Friedreich ataxia Friedreich ataxia Enable ...

  13. Genetics Home Reference: MEGDEL syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip to main content Your Guide to Understanding Genetic Conditions Enable Javascript for addthis links to activate. ... Conditions Genes Chromosomes & mtDNA Resources Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions MEGDEL syndrome MEGDEL syndrome Enable ...

  14. Genetics Home Reference: Leigh syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip to main content Your Guide to Understanding Genetic Conditions Enable Javascript for addthis links to activate. ... Conditions Genes Chromosomes & mtDNA Resources Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions Leigh syndrome Leigh syndrome Enable ...

  15. Genetics Home Reference: androgenetic alopecia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip to main content Your Guide to Understanding Genetic Conditions Enable Javascript for addthis links to activate. ... Conditions Genes Chromosomes & mtDNA Resources Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions androgenetic alopecia androgenetic alopecia Enable ...

  16. Genetics Home Reference: cardiofaciocutaneous syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip to main content Your Guide to Understanding Genetic Conditions Enable Javascript for addthis links to activate. ... Conditions Genes Chromosomes & mtDNA Resources Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions cardiofaciocutaneous syndrome cardiofaciocutaneous syndrome Enable ...

  17. Genetics Home Reference: Canavan disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip to main content Your Guide to Understanding Genetic Conditions Enable Javascript for addthis links to activate. ... Conditions Genes Chromosomes & mtDNA Resources Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions Canavan disease Canavan disease Enable ...

  18. Genetics Home Reference: adiposis dolorosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip to main content Your Guide to Understanding Genetic Conditions Enable Javascript for addthis links to activate. ... Conditions Genes Chromosomes & mtDNA Resources Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions adiposis dolorosa adiposis dolorosa Enable ...

  19. Genetics Home Reference: Crouzonodermoskeletal syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip to main content Your Guide to Understanding Genetic Conditions Enable Javascript for addthis links to activate. ... Conditions Genes Chromosomes & mtDNA Resources Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions Crouzonodermoskeletal syndrome Crouzonodermoskeletal syndrome Enable ...

  20. Genetics Home Reference: cryptogenic cirrhosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip to main content Your Guide to Understanding Genetic Conditions Enable Javascript for addthis links to activate. ... Conditions Genes Chromosomes & mtDNA Resources Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions cryptogenic cirrhosis cryptogenic cirrhosis Enable ...

  1. Genetics Home Reference: Cushing disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip to main content Your Guide to Understanding Genetic Conditions Enable Javascript for addthis links to activate. ... Conditions Genes Chromosomes & mtDNA Resources Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions Cushing disease Cushing disease Enable ...

  2. Genetics Home Reference: Ochoa syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip to main content Your Guide to Understanding Genetic Conditions Enable Javascript for addthis links to activate. ... Conditions Genes Chromosomes & mtDNA Resources Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions Ochoa syndrome Ochoa syndrome Enable ...

  3. Genetics Home Reference: Maffucci syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip to main content Your Guide to Understanding Genetic Conditions Enable Javascript for addthis links to activate. ... Conditions Genes Chromosomes & mtDNA Resources Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions Maffucci syndrome Maffucci syndrome Enable ...

  4. Genetics Home Reference: Miller syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip to main content Your Guide to Understanding Genetic Conditions Enable Javascript for addthis links to activate. ... Conditions Genes Chromosomes & mtDNA Resources Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions Miller syndrome Miller syndrome Enable ...

  5. SYNAPTONEMAL COMPLEX ANALYSIS OF MUTAGEN EFFECTS ON MEIOTIC CHROMOSOME STRUCTURE AND BEHAVIOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homologous chromosome synapsis and crossing-over at meiosis are basic to mammalian gamete development. hey achieve genetic recombination, regulate chromosome segregation, and are believed to function in repair and maturation. ynaptonemal complexes (SCs) are axial correlates of me...

  6. Sorting of mitotic chromosomes in common wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) using flow cytometry

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vrána, Jan; Šimková, Hana; Kubaláková, Marie; Čihalíková, Jarmila; Lysák, Martin; Doležel, Jaroslav

    Dordrecht : Kluwer, 2001, s. 531-536 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IBS5038104 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5038910 Keywords : chromosome isolation * chromosome sorting * flow cytometry Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  7. Mitotic chromosome structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mounting evidence is compiling linking the physical organizational structure of chromosomes and the nuclear structure to biological function. At the base of the physical organizational structure of both is the concept of loop formation. This implies that physical proximity within chromosomes is provided for otherwise distal genomic regions and thus hierarchically organizing the chromosomes. Together with entropy many experimental observations can be explained with these two concepts. Among the observations that can be explained are the measured physical extent of the chromosomes, their shape, mechanical behavior, the segregation into territories (chromosomal and territories within chromosomes), the results from chromosome conformation capture experiments, as well as linking gene expression to structural organization.

  8. Genetic profiling of tumours using both circulating free DNA and circulating tumour cells isolated from the same preserved whole blood sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothwell, Dominic G; Smith, Nigel; Morris, Daniel; Leong, Hui Sun; Li, Yaoyong; Hollebecque, Antoine; Ayub, Mahmood; Carter, Louise; Antonello, Jenny; Franklin, Lynsey; Miller, Crispin; Blackhall, Fiona; Dive, Caroline; Brady, Ged

    2016-04-01

    Molecular information obtained from cancer patients' blood is an emerging and powerful research tool with immense potential as a companion diagnostic for patient stratification and monitoring. Blood, which can be sampled routinely, provides a means of inferring the current genetic status of patients' tumours via analysis of circulating tumour cells (CTCs) or circulating tumour DNA (ctDNA). However, accurate assessment of both CTCs and ctDNA requires all blood cells to be maintained intact until samples are processed. This dictates for ctDNA analysis EDTA blood samples must be processed with 4 h of draw, severely limiting the use of ctDNA in multi-site trials. Here we describe a blood collection protocol that is amenable for analysis of both CTCs and ctDNA up to four days after blood collection. We demonstrate that yields of circulating free DNA (cfDNA) obtained from whole blood CellSave samples are equivalent to those obtained from conventional EDTA plasma processed within 4 h of blood draw. Targeted and genome-wide NGS revealed comparable DNA quality and resultant sequence information from cfDNA within CellSave and EDTA samples. We also demonstrate that CTCs and ctDNA can be isolated from the same patient blood sample, and give the same patterns of CNA enabling direct analysis of the genetic status of patients' tumours. In summary, our results demonstrate the utility of a simple approach that enabling robust molecular analysis of CTCs and cfDNA for genotype-directed therapies in multi-site clinical trials and represent a significant methodological improvement for clinical benefit. PMID:26639657

  9. Demonstration, by somatic cell genetics, of coordinate regulation of genes for two enzymes of purine synthesis assigned to human chromosome 21.

    OpenAIRE

    Patterson, D.; Graw, S; Jones, C.

    1981-01-01

    A method for determining coordinate genetic regulation is proposed for mammalian cells. The method involves (i) isolation of a set of mutants defective in the relevant pathway; (ii) complementation analysis of these mutants to determine dominance and to categorize the mutants into various different complementation groups; (iii) determination of the biochemical blocks in the mutants; (iv) identification of individual mutants that fail to complement the members of at least two distinct compleme...

  10. Genetic Multipartitions Based on D-Loop Sequences and Chromosomal Patterns in Brown Chromis, Chromis multilineata (Pomacentridae, in the Western Atlantic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inailson Márcio Costa da Cunha

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Connectivity levels among Brazilian reef fish fauna populations have attracted growing interest, mainly between mainland shores and oceanic islands. The Pomacentridae, whose phylogeographic patterns are largely unknown in the Atlantic, are a family of dominant fish in reef regions. We present data on the variability and population structure of damselfish Chromis multilineata in different areas along the northeast coast of Brazil and in the waters around the oceanic islands of Fernando de Noronha (FNA and Saint Peter and Saint Paul Archipelago (SPSPA through analysis of the HVR1 mtDNA sequence of the control region. The remote SPSPA exhibits the highest level of genetic divergence among populations. Conventional and molecular cytogenetic analysis showed similar karyotype patterns (2n = 48 acrocentrics between these insular areas. Our estimates reveal three genetically different population groups of C. multilineata on the Brazilian coast. The level of genetic structure is higher than previous data suggested, indicating complex panel of interactions between the oceanic island and coastal populations of Brazil.

  11. Engineering Mouse Chromosomes with Cre-loxP: Range, Efficiency, and Somatic Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Zheng, Binhai; Sage, Marijke; Sheppeard, Elizabeth A.; Jurecic, Vesna; Bradley, Allan

    2000-01-01

    Chromosomal rearrangements are important resources for genetic studies. Recently, a Cre-loxP-based method to introduce defined chromosomal rearrangements (deletions, duplications, and inversions) into the mouse genome (chromosome engineering) has been established. To explore the limits of this technology systematically, we have evaluated this strategy on mouse chromosome 11. Although the efficiency of Cre-loxP-mediated recombination decreases with increasing genetic distance when the two endp...

  12. QoS-aware multi-path Web Service composition using variable length chromosome genetic algorithm%基于变长基因算法的服务质量驱动多路径Web服务组合

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姜红红; 杨小虎; 徐远; 柯杰瑞

    2011-01-01

    Combined with Petri net, a variable length chromosome Genetic Algorithm (GA) was proposed to handle QoS-aware service composition among multiple composite structures (paths) problem. Petri net was used to express kinds of Web Service composite structures. It listed all the execution sequences of Web Service to fulfill the user's functional requirements. Subsequently, parallel service execution structures were found out and added into execution sequence so as to modify execution sequence to represent the unique path. Based on paths from Petri net, the variable length chromosome GA represented composited services in multiple paths by variable length chromosomes and conducted the gene crossover operation by service parameters matching to implement the optimum Quality of Service (QoS) composition service search in multi-path. Based on the proposed algorithm, two improvements were put forward to enhance the stability of the algorithm. One was used to choose better initial generation and the other was to optimize the stage generations. Scalability of the algorithm was analyzed theoretically and experimental results demonstrated its effectiveness by comparing to traditional GA.%为解决在不同服务组合结构(路径)上的服务质量驱动服务组合问题,提出了一种结合Petri网的变长基因算法.用Petri网描述子服务的各种组合结构,列举出所有路径上能实现功能需求的服务执行序列,进一步找出并添加执行序列中的服务并发执行结构,以修正执行序列使之与路径对应,唯一代表路径;而变长基因算法则用不同长度的染色体代表不同路径上的组合服务,并通过服务参数的匹配实现基因的交叉互换,以最终实现在不同路径上搜寻服务质量最优的组合服务.基于所提算法,提出增强初始群体、优化中间群体两点改进,以提高算法稳定性.理论证明该算法具有良好的扩展性,且与传统遗传算法的对比验证了算法的有效性.

  13. Molecular mapping of chromosomes 17 and X

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barker, D.F.

    1989-01-01

    The basic aims of this project are the construction of high density genetic maps of chromosomes 17 and X and the utilization of these maps for the subsequent isolation of a set of physically overlapping DNA segment clones. The strategy depends on the utilization of chromosome specific libraries of small (1--15 kb) segments from each of the two chromosomes. Since the time of submission of our previous progress report, we have refined the genetic map of markers which we had previously isolated for chromosome 17. We have completed our genetic mapping in CEPH reference and NF1 families of 15 markers in the pericentric region of chromosome 17. Physical mapping results with three probes, were shown be in very close genetic proximity to the NF1 gene, with respect to two translocation breakpoints which disrupt the activity of the gene. All three of the probes were found to lie between the centromere and the most proximal translocation breakpoint, providing important genetic markers proximal to the NF1 gene. Our primary focus has shifted to the X chromosome. We have isolated an additional 30 polymorphic markers, bringing the total number we have isolated to over 80. We have invested substantial effort in characterizing the polymorphisms at each of these loci and constructed plasmid subclones which reveal the polymorphisms for nearly all of the loci. These subclones are of practical value in that they produce simpler and stronger patterns on human genomic Southern blots, thus improving the efficiency of the genetic mapping experiments. These subclones may also be of value for deriving DNA sequence information at each locus, necessary for establishing polymerase chain reaction primers specific for each locus. Such information would allow the use of each locus as a sequence tagged site.

  14. The Kub5-Hera/RPRD1B interactome: a novel role in preserving genetic stability by regulating DNA mismatch repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patidar, Praveen L; Motea, Edward A; Fattah, Farjana J; Zhou, Yunyun; Morales, Julio C; Xie, Yang; Garner, Harold R; Boothman, David A

    2016-02-29

    Ku70-binding protein 5 (Kub5)-Hera (K-H)/RPRD1B maintains genetic integrity by concomitantly minimizing persistent R-loops and promoting repair of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs). We used tandem affinity purification-mass spectrometry, co-immunoprecipitation and gel-filtration chromatography to define higher-order protein complexes containing K-H scaffolding protein to gain insight into its cellular functions. We confirmed known protein partners (Ku70, RNA Pol II, p15RS) and discovered several novel associated proteins that function in RNA metabolism (Topoisomerase 1 and RNA helicases), DNA repair/replication processes (PARP1, MSH2, Ku, DNA-PKcs, MCM proteins, PCNA and DNA Pol δ) and in protein metabolic processes, including translation. Notably, this approach directed us to investigate an unpredicted involvement of K-H in DNA mismatch repair (MMR) where K-H depletion led to concomitant MMR deficiency and compromised global microsatellite stability. Mechanistically, MMR deficiency in K-H-depleted cells was a consequence of reduced stability of the core MMR proteins (MLH1 and PMS2) caused by elevated basal caspase-dependent proteolysis. Pan-caspase inhibitor treatment restored MMR protein loss. These findings represent a novel mechanism to acquire MMR deficiency/microsatellite alterations. A significant proportion of colon, endometrial and ovarian cancers exhibit k-h expression/copy number loss and may have severe mutator phenotypes with enhanced malignancies that are currently overlooked based on sporadic MSI+ screening. PMID:26819409

  15. Fetal chromosome analysis: screening for chromosome disease?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Philip, J; Tabor, Ann; Bang, J;

    1983-01-01

    A + B). Pregnant women 35 years of age, women who previously had a chromosomally abnormal child, families with translocation carriers or other heritable chromosomal disease, families where the father was 50 years or more and women in families with a history of Down's syndrome (group A), were...... unbalanced chromosome abnormality in group A (women with elevated risk) is significantly higher than in group B + C (women without elevated risk) (relative risk 2.4). Women with a known familial translocation and women 40 years or more have a relative risk of 5.7 of having an unbalanced chromosome......The aim of the study was to investigate the rationale of the current indications for fetal chromosome analysis. 5372 women had 5423 amniocentesis performed, this group constituting a consecutive sample at the chromosome laboratory, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen from March 1973 to September 1980 (Group...

  16. 2756例外周血染色体核型分析及临床意义%Analysis and clinic meaning of chromosome karyotypes of 2756 genetic counseling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋桂宁; 梁梅英

    2011-01-01

    Objective To analysis the relationship between abnormal karyotypes and chromosome and disease.s, to offer basics for clinic genetic counseling. Methods 2 756 peripheral blood samples from outpatients with genetic counseling were tested for chromose karyotype. Results There were 181 cases of abnormal karyotypes with the rate of abnormal karyotypes of 6. 57%, Of which, 43 cases were Down's syndrome (1. 56%), 74 cases were abnormal karyotypes of euchromosome (2. 69%), 64 cases were abnormal karyotypes of sex chromosome (2. 32%). Conclusions The abnormal karyotype is the most common reason causing natural abortion, fetal death, congenital malfomtion, feeblemindedness, dead fetus, primary amenorrhea, infertility for man and obstacle of growth development. Chromose karyotype should be tested for these patients.%目的 分析染色体异常核型与临床常见疾患的关系,为临床咨询及处理提供参考依据.方法 对北京大学人民医院2000年1月至2010年6月2 756例具有不同临床表现的遗传咨询者进行外周血染色体核型检查,总结其结果,并分析其临床表现与染色体异常的相关性及临床意义.结果 2 756例染色体核型检查中发现异常核型181例,异常检出率为6.57%.其中21-三体综合征43例(1.56%),常染色体异常74例(2.69%),性染色体异常64例(2.32%).结论 染色体异常是造成智力低下、不良孕产史、原发闭经、男性不育等重要原因之一,临床上应重视对上述疾患者的染色体核型检查,从而为临床诊断和产前诊断提供依据.

  17. The Association between Serum LDL Cholesterol and Genetic Variation in Chromosomal Locus 1p13.3 among Coronary Artery Disease Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasser M. Rizk

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Several polymorphisms of a locus on chromosome 1p13.3 have a significant effect on low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C, atherosclerosis, and acute coronary syndrome (ACS. Methods. We aimed to investigate the association between rs599839, rs646776, and rs4970834 of locus 1p13.3 and serum LDL-C and severity of coronary artery stenosis in ACS patients. Genotyping of the rs599839, rs646776, and rs4970834 polymorphisms was performed on Arab patients undergoing coronary angiography for ACS. Patients were divided into group A (ACS with insignificant stenosis (<50% and group B (with significant stenosis (≥50%. Results. Patients carrying the minor G allele in rs599839 had significantly lower mean of LDL-C (2.58 versus 3.44 mM, P=0.026 than homozygous A allele carriers (GG versus AA. Carriers of minor C allele in rs64776 had significantly higher mean of HDL-C (2.16 versus 1.36 mM, P=0.004 than carriers of the T alleles (AA versus GG. The odd ratio and 95% confidence interval for dominant model for G allele carriers of rs599839 were 0.51 (0.30–0.92, P=0.038, among patients with significant stenosis. Conclusions. Polymorphisms rs646776 and rs599839 of locus 1p13.3 were significantly associated with LDL-C and other lipid parameters. In addition, the G-allele carriers of variant rs599839 had a significant protective effect against the atherosclerosis.

  18. LSD and Genetic Damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dishotsky, Norman I.; And Others

    1971-01-01

    Reviews studies of the effects of lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) on man and other organisms. Concludes that pure LSD injected in moderate doses does not cause chromosome or detectable genetic damage and is not a teratogen or carcinogen. (JM)

  19. Study of Chromosomes: Their Vital Importance in Agriculture, Biology, and Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Research on chromosomes has enriched the disciplines of genetics, plant breeding, biology, and medicine, which, in turn, have contributed to human welfare. Although the foundation of genetics occurred in 1865, long before the discovery of chromosomes, their subsequent discovery put genetics on a so...

  20. Catfish Preservation using Porphyra Yezoensis Composites Preservatives

    OpenAIRE

    Zhi-Gang Qian; Long-Fa Jiang; Li-Qiang Rui

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to preserve fresh catfish meat by using Porphyra Yezoensis extract, chitosan and lactic acid Nisin. The composite preservative obtained by sensory evaluation can effectively maintain the color, odor and texture of fresh catfish meat, as well as inhibit bacterial growth. Results show that treatment using a preservative solution (Porphyra Yezoensis extract 10%, Nisin 0.2% and chitosan 15%) extended the shelf life of the fresh catfish meat from 12 h to 24 h when stored at room te...

  1. Molecular mapping of chromosomes 17 and X

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barker, D.F.

    1991-01-15

    Progress toward the construction of high density genetic maps of chromosomes 17 and X has been made by isolating and characterizing a relatively large set of polymorphic probes for each chromosome and using these probes to construct genetic maps. We have mapped the same polymorphic probes against a series of chromosome breakpoints on X and 17. The probes could be assigned to over 30 physical intervals on the X chromosome and 7 intervals on 17. In many cases, this process resulted in improved characterization of the relative locations of the breakpoints with respect to each other and the definition of new physical intervals. The strategy for isolation of the polymorphic clones utilized chromosome specific libraries of 1--15 kb segments from each of the two chromosomes. From these libraries, clones were screened for those detecting restriction fragment length polymorphisms. The markers were further characterized, the chromosomal assignments confirmed and in most cases segments of the original probes were subcloned into plasmids to produce probes with improved signal to noise ratios for use in the genetic marker studies. The linkage studies utilize the CEPH reference families and other well-characterized families in our collection which have been used for genetic disease linkage work. Preliminary maps and maps of portions of specific regions of 17 and X are provided. We have nearly completed a map of the 1 megabase Mycoplasma arthritidis genome by applying these techniques to a lambda phage library of its genome. We have found bit mapping to be an efficient means to organize a contiguous set of overlapping clones from a larger genome.

  2. Integration of the barley genetic and seed proteome maps for chromosome 1H, 2H, 3H, 5H and 7H

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Finnie, Christine; Bagge, Merethe; Steenholdt, Torben; Østergaard, Ole; Bak-Jensen, Kristian Sass; Backes, Gunter; Jensen, Anais; Giese, Nanna Henriette; Larsen, Jørgen; Roepstorff, Peter; Svensson, Birte

    2009-01-01

    variation, including peroxidases, serpins and proteins with unknown functions. Cultivars were clustered based on the spot variation matrix. Cultivars with superior malting quality grouped together, indicating malting quality to be more closely correlated with seed proteomes than with SSR profiles. Mass...... spectrometry showed that some spot variations were caused by amino acid differences encoded by single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Coding SNPs were validated by mass spectrometry, expressed sequence tag and 2D gel data. Coding SNPs can alter function of affected proteins and may thus represent a link...... between cultivar traits, proteome and genome. Proteome analysis of doubled haploid lines derived from a cross between a malting (Scarlett) and a feed cultivar (Meltan) enabled genetic localisation of protein phenotypes represented by 48 spot variations, involving e.g. peroxidases, serpins, alpha...

  3. Mathematical Modeling of Carcinogenesis Based on Chromosome Aberration Data

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-bo Li

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The progression of human cancer is characterized by the accumulation of genetic instability. An increasing number of experimental genetic molecular techniques have been used to detect chromosome aberrations. Previous studies on chromosome abnormalities often focused on identifying the frequent loci of chromosome alterations, but rarely addressed the issue of interrelationship of chromosomal abnormalities. In the last few years, several mathematical models have been employed to construct models of carcinogenesis, in an attempt to identify the time order and cause-and-effect relationship of chromosome aberrations. The principles and applications of these models are reviewed and compared in this paper. Mathematical modeling of carcinogenesis can contribute to our understanding of the molecular genetics of tumor development, and identification of cancer related genes, thus leading to improved clinical practice of cancer.

  4. Evaluation of the Genetic and Nutritional Control of Obesity and Type 2 Diabetes in a Novel Mouse Model on Chromosome 7: An Insight into Insulin Signaling and Glucose Homeostasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, S.; Dhar, M.

    2003-01-01

    Obesity is the main cause of type 2 diabetes, accounting for 90-95% of all diabetes cases in the US. Human obesity is a complex trait and can be studied using appropriate mouse models. A novel polygenic mouse model for studying the genetic and environmental contributions to and the physiological ramifications of obesity and related phenotypes is found in specific lines of mice bred and maintained at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Heterozygous mice with a maternally inherited copy of two radiation-induced deletions in the p region of mouse chromosome 7, p23DFioD and p30PUb, have significantly greater body fat and show hyperinsulinemia compared to the wild-type. A single gene, Atp10c, maps to this critical region and codes for a putative aminophospholipid translocase. Biochemical and molecular studies were initiated to gain insight into obesity and glucose homeostasis in these animals and to study the biological role of Atp10c in creating these phenotypes. Glucose and insulin tolerance tests were standardized for the heterozygous p23DFioD and control mice on a custom-made diet containing 20% protein, 70% carbohydrate, and 10% fat (kcal). Atp10c expression profiles were also generated using Reverse-Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR). Heterozygous p23DFioD animals showed insulin resistance after receiving a dose of either 0.375 or 0.75 U/kg Illetin R insulin. RT-PCR data also shows differences in Atp10c expression in the mutants versus control mice. Using these standardized biochemical assays, future studies will further the understanding of genetic and nutritional controls of glucose homeostasis and obesity in animal models and subsequently in human populations.

  5. Chromosomes Can Congress to the Metaphase Plate Before Biorientation

    OpenAIRE

    Kapoor, Tarun M.; Lampson, Michael A.; Hergert, Polla; Cameron, Lisa; Cimini, Daniela; Salmon, E. D.; McEwen, Bruce F.; Khodjakov, Alexey

    2006-01-01

    The stable propagation of genetic material during cell division depends on the congression of chromosomes to the spindle equator before the cell initiates anaphase. It is generally assumed that congression requires that chromosomes are connected to the opposite poles of the bipolar spindle (“bioriented”). In mammalian cells, we found that chromosomes can congress before becoming bioriented. By combining the use of reversible chemical inhibitors, live-cell light microscopy, and correlative ele...

  6. Repetitive Sequence and Sex Chromosome Evolution in Vertebrates

    OpenAIRE

    Ezaz, Tariq; Deakin, Janine E

    2014-01-01

    Sex chromosomes are the most dynamic entity in any genome having unique morphology, gene content, and evolution. They have evolved multiple times and independently throughout vertebrate evolution. One of the major genomic changes that pertain to sex chromosomes involves the amplification of common repeats. It is hypothesized that such amplification of repeats facilitates the suppression of recombination, leading to the evolution of heteromorphic sex chromosomes through genetic degradation of ...

  7. Nonrandom involvement of chromosomal segments in human hematologic malignancies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowley, J. D.

    1977-01-01

    The consistent occurrence of nonrandom chromosome changes in human malignancies suggests that they are not trivial epiphenomena. Whereas we do not understand their significance at present, one possible role which they may fulfill is to provide the chromosomally aberrant cells with a proliferative advantage as the result of alteration of the number and/or location of genes related to nucleic acid biosynthesis. It would be expected that the proliferative advantage provided by various chromosome aberrations differs in patients with different genetic constitutions.

  8. Pattern of Chromosomal Aberrations in Patients from North East Iran

    OpenAIRE

    Saeedeh Ghazaey; Farzaneh Mirzaei; Mitra Ahadian; Fatemeh Keifi; Semiramis Tootian; Mohammad Reza Abbaszadegan

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Chromosomal aberrations are common causes of multiple anomaly syndromes. Recurrent chromosomal aberrations have been identified by conventional cytogenetic methods used widely as one of the most important clinical diagnostic techniques. Materials and Methods: In this retrospective study, the incidences of chromosomal aberrations were evaluated in a six year period from 2005 to 2011 in Pardis Clinical and Genetics Laboratory on patients referred to from Mashhad and other cities in K...

  9. Chromosomes in the flow to simplify genome analysis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Doležel, Jaroslav; Vrána, Jan; Šafář, Jan; Bartoš, Jan; Kubaláková, Marie; Šimková, Hana

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 12, č. 3 (2012), s. 397-416. ISSN 1438-793X R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP501/10/1740; GA ČR GAP501/10/1778 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : Chromosome sorting * Chromosome-specific BAC libraries * Chromosome sequencing Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.292, year: 2012

  10. Linguistic and Psychomotor Development in Children with Chromosome 14 Deletions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zampini, Laura; D'Odorico, Laura; Zanchi, Paola; Zollino, Marcella; Neri, Giovanni

    2012-01-01

    The present study focussed on a specific type of rare genetic condition: chromosome 14 deletions. Children with this genetic condition often show developmental delays and brain and neurological problems, although the type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the size and location of the deleted genetic material. The specific aim of the…

  11. DNA sequence and analysis of human chromosome 18.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nusbaum, Chad; Zody, Michael C; Borowsky, Mark L; Kamal, Michael; Kodira, Chinnappa D; Taylor, Todd D; Whittaker, Charles A; Chang, Jean L; Cuomo, Christina A; Dewar, Ken; FitzGerald, Michael G; Yang, Xiaoping; Abouelleil, Amr; Allen, Nicole R; Anderson, Scott; Bloom, Toby; Bugalter, Boris; Butler, Jonathan; Cook, April; DeCaprio, David; Engels, Reinhard; Garber, Manuel; Gnirke, Andreas; Hafez, Nabil; Hall, Jennifer L; Norman, Catherine Hosage; Itoh, Takehiko; Jaffe, David B; Kuroki, Yoko; Lehoczky, Jessica; Lui, Annie; Macdonald, Pendexter; Mauceli, Evan; Mikkelsen, Tarjei S; Naylor, Jerome W; Nicol, Robert; Nguyen, Cindy; Noguchi, Hideki; O'Leary, Sinéad B; O'Neill, Keith; Piqani, Bruno; Smith, Cherylyn L; Talamas, Jessica A; Topham, Kerri; Totoki, Yasushi; Toyoda, Atsushi; Wain, Hester M; Young, Sarah K; Zeng, Qiandong; Zimmer, Andrew R; Fujiyama, Asao; Hattori, Masahira; Birren, Bruce W; Sakaki, Yoshiyuki; Lander, Eric S

    2005-09-22

    Chromosome 18 appears to have the lowest gene density of any human chromosome and is one of only three chromosomes for which trisomic individuals survive to term. There are also a number of genetic disorders stemming from chromosome 18 trisomy and aneuploidy. Here we report the finished sequence and gene annotation of human chromosome 18, which will allow a better understanding of the normal and disease biology of this chromosome. Despite the low density of protein-coding genes on chromosome 18, we find that the proportion of non-protein-coding sequences evolutionarily conserved among mammals is close to the genome-wide average. Extending this analysis to the entire human genome, we find that the density of conserved non-protein-coding sequences is largely uncorrelated with gene density. This has important implications for the nature and roles of non-protein-coding sequence elements. PMID:16177791

  12. Understanding the Y chromosome variation in Korea--relevance of combined haplogroup and haplotype analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Myung Jin; Lee, Hwan Young; Yang, Woo Ick; Shin, Kyoung-Jin

    2012-07-01

    We performed a molecular characterization of Korean Y-chromosomal haplogroups using a combination of Y-chromosomal single nucleotide polymorphisms (Y-SNPs) and Y-chromosomal short tandem repeats (Y-STRs). In a test using DNA samples from 706 Korean males, a total of 19 different haplogroups were identified by 26 Y-SNPs including the newly redefined markers (PK4, KL2, and P164) in haplogroup O. When genotyping the SNPs, phylogenetic nonequivalence was found between SNPs M117 and M133, which define haplogroup O3a3c1 (O3a2c1a according to the updated tree of haplogroup O by Yan et al. (European Journal of Human Genetics 19:1013-1015, 2011)), suggesting that the position of the M133 marker should be corrected. We have shown that the haplotypes consisted of DYS392, DYS393, DYS437, DYS438, DYS448, and DYS388 loci, which exhibit a relatively lower mutation rate, can preserve phylogenetic information and hence can be used to roughly distinguish Y-chromosome haplogroups, whereas more rapidly mutating Y-STRs such as DYS449 and DYS458 are useful for differentiating male lineages. However, at the relatively rapidly mutating DYS447, DYS449, DYS458, and DYS464 loci, unusually short alleles and intermediate alleles with common sequence structures are informative for elucidating the substructure within the context of a particular haplogroup. In addition, some deletion mutations in the DYS385 flanking region and the null allele at DYS448 were associated with a single haplogroup background. These high-resolution haplogroup and haplotype data will improve our understanding of regional Y-chromosome variation or recent migration routes and will also help to infer haplogroup background or common ancestry. PMID:22569803

  13. A high-resolution physical map integrating an anchored chromosome with the BAC physical maps of wheat chromosome 6B

    OpenAIRE

    Kobayashi, F; Wu, J. Z.; Kanamori, H; Tanaka, T.; Katagiri, S.; Karasawa, W.; Kaneko, S.; Watanabe, S; Sakaguchi, T; Šafář, J. (Jan); Šimková, H. (Hana); Mukai, Y.; M. Hamada; Saito, M; Hayakawa, K

    2015-01-01

    Background: A complete genome sequence is an essential tool for the genetic improvement of wheat. Because the wheat genome is large, highly repetitive and complex due to its allohexaploid nature, the International Wheat Genome Sequencing Consortium (IWGSC) chose a strategy that involves constructing bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC)-based physical maps of individual chromosomes and performing BAC-by-BAC sequencing. Here, we report the construction of a physical map of chromosome 6B with t...

  14. Formation of new chromosomes as a virulence mechanism in yeast Candida glabrata

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poláková, S.; Blume, C.; Zárate, J. A.;

    2009-01-01

    chromosomes were translocations of chromosomal arms. However, also larger segmental duplications were frequent and occasionally we observed novel chromosomes. Apparently, this yeast can generate a new chromosome by duplication of chromosome segments carrying a centromere and subsequently adding novel......In eukaryotes, the number and rough organization of chromosomes is well preserved within isolates of the same species. Novel chromosomes and loss of chromosomes are infrequent and usually associated with pathological events. Here, we analyzed 40 pathogenic isolates of a haploid and asexual yeast......, Candida glabrata, for their genome structure and stability. This organism has recently become the second most prevalent yeast pathogen in humans. Although the gene sequences were well conserved among different strains, their chromosome structures differed drastically. The most frequent events reshaping...

  15. Chromosomal mosaicism in human preimplantation embryos : a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Echten-Arends, Jannie; Mastenbroek, Sebastiaan; Sikkema-Raddatz, Birgit; Korevaar, Johanna C.; Heineman, Maas Jan; van der Veen, Fulco; Repping, Sjoerd

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although chromosomal mosaicism in human preimplantation embryos has been described for almost two decades, its exact prevalence is still unknown. The prevalence of mosaicism is important in the context of preimplantation genetic screening in which the chromosomal status of an embryo is d

  16. Characterization of Chenopodium quinoa chromosomes using fish and repetitive sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quinoa is one of the underestimated crops, which recently attracted attention. During last few years many efforts were done to save the natural genetic diversity of quinoa cultivars and landraces as well as to obtained new variability by mutagenesis. Plant characteristics based mainly on morphological and molecular markers. Cytogenetic analysis was not used for these studies. Quinoa is an allotetraploid species with 36 small chromosomes. To follow the chromosomal rearrangement cause by spontaneous or induced mutations it is necessary to find cytogenetics markers for chromosomes and chromosome arms. The physical mapping of repetitive DNAs by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) can provide a valuable tool in studies of genome organization and chromosome rearrangements. To characterized quinoa genome several repetitive sequences were used as DNA probes for FISH. Double FISH with rRNA genes as probes allowed to distinguished three pairs of homologue chromosomes. Telomeric repeats hybridisation signals were present only in terminal part of all chromosome arms and no intercalar position was observed. Other tandem repetitive sequence - minisatellite was characteristic for centromeric and pericentromeric region of all quinoa chromosomes although number of repeats differ between loci. It allowed to divided quinoa chromosomes into few groups. Disperse repetitive sequences such as mobile element-like sequences used in this study were detected in all eighteen chromosome pairs. Hybridization signals were characteristics for pericentromeric region of one or both chromosome arms as relatively weak but discrete signals although few chromosomes exhibited signals in intercalary position. Two others repetitive sequences also exhibited disperse organization; however they are not mobile elements. Their FISH signals were spread throughout whole chromosome arms but only one was present on all quinoa chromosomes. The other revealed hybridization signals only on the half of the

  17. Balanced Chromosomal Translocation of Chromosomes 6 and 7: A Rare Male Factor of Spontaneous Abortions

    OpenAIRE

    Resim, Sefa; Kadıoğlu, Ateş; Akman, Tolga; Bayrak, Ayşe Gül; Efe, Erkan

    2013-01-01

    Background: Carriers of structural chromosomal rearrangements such as Robertsonian or reciprocal translocations have an increased risk of spontaneous abortion and producing offspring with genetic abnormalities. Case Report: We report a man with balanced chromosomal translocations located at 6p22, and 7q22. His wife has a history of four spontaneous abortions. Conclusion: Couples with a history of abortions should be investigated cytogenetically, after other causes of mis...

  18. Engineered Plant Minichromosome and Its Application in Genomics and Genetic Engineering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Engineered minichromosomes have been constructed as novel artificial chromosome platforms for future genetic engineering in maize.We demonstrated that minichromosomes could be created by telomere-mediated chromosomal truncation of both normal A chromosomes and the supernumerary B

  19. Chromosome painting in plants.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schubert, I.; Fransz, P.F.; Fuchs, J.; Jong, de J.H.

    2001-01-01

    The current 'state-of-art' as to chromosome painting in plants is reviewed. We define different situations described as painting so far: i) Genomic in situ hybridisation (GISH) with total genomic DNA to distinguish alien chromosomes on the basis of divergent dispersed repeats, ii) 'Chromosomal in si

  20. A slow rate of chromosome evolution unites squamate reptiles

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pokorná, Martina; Kratochvíl, L.; Giovannotti, M.; Trifonov, V. A.; Ferguson-Smith, M. A.; Caputo, V.; Olmo, E.; Rens, W.

    Cordoba : Universidad de Cordoba, 2012. 63-63. [International Colloquium on Animal Cytogenetics and Gene Mapping /20./. 25.04.2012-28.04.2012, Cordoba] Institutional support: RVO:67985904 Keywords : chromosome evolution Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  1. Particle-induced chromosome aberrations and mutations: an overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ritter, S. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany)

    1997-09-01

    This overview will focus on progress in chromosome and mutation studies achieved by the application of new techniques. Furthermore, recent relevant data on longterm genetic effects of densely ionizing radiation will be summarized. (orig./MG)

  2. Sequencing of Wheat Chromosome 6B: Toward Functional Genomics

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tanaka, T.; Kobayashi, F.; Joshi, G.P.; Onuki, R.; Šimková, Hana; Nasuda, S.; Doležel, Jaroslav; Ogihara, Y.; Itoh, T.; Handa, H.

    Verlag: Springer, 2015 - (Handa, H.), s. 111-116 ISBN 978-4-431-55674-9 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : Chromosome 6B * Genome sequencing * Marker construction Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  3. American marsupials chromosomes: Why study them?

    OpenAIRE

    Marta Svartman

    2009-01-01

    Marsupials, one of the three main groups of mammals, are only found in Australia and in the American continent. Studies performed in Australian marsupials have demonstrated the great potential provided by the group for the understanding of basic genetic mechanisms and chromosome evolution in mammals. Genetic studies in American marsupials are relatively scarce and cytogenetic data of most species are restricted to karyotype descriptions, usually without banding patterns. Nevertheless, the fir...

  4. A high-resolution physical map integrating an anchored chromosome with the BAC physical maps of wheat chromosome 6B

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kobayashi, F.; Wu, J.Z.; Kanamori, H.; Tanaka, T.; Katagiri, S.; Karasawa, W.; Kaneko, S.; Watanabe, S.; Sakaguchi, T.; Šafář, Jan; Šimková, Hana; Mukai, Y.; Hamada, M.; Saito, M.; Hayakawa, K.; Doležel, Jaroslav; Nasuda, S.; Matsumoto, T.; Handa, H.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 16, AUG 12 (2015), s. 595. ISSN 1471-2164 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP501/12/G090; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1204 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : Centromere * Chromosomal rearrangement * Chromosome 6B Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.986, year: 2014

  5. GENETICS AND GENOMICS OF PLANT GENETIC RESOURCES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Börner A.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Plant genetic resources play a major role for global food security. The most significant and widespread mean of conserving plant genetic resources is ex situ conservation. Most conserved accessions are kept in specialized facilities known as genebanks maintained by public or private institutions. World-wide 7.4 million accessions are stored in about 1,500 ex situ genebanks.In addition, series of genetic stocks including chromosome substitution lines, alloplasmic lines, single chromosome recombinant lines, introgression lines, etc. have been created. Analysing these genetic stocks many qualitative and quantitative inherited traits were associated to certain chromosomes, chromosome arms or introgressed segments. Today, genetic stocks are supplemented by a huge number of genotyped mapping populations. Beside progenies of bi-parental crosses (doubled haploid lines, recombinant inbred lines, etc. panels for association mapping were created recently.In our presentation we give examples for the successful utilisation of genebank accessions and genetic stocks for genetic and genomic studies. Using both segregation and association mapping approaches, data on mapping of loci/marker trait associations for a range of different traits are presented.

  6. The DNA sequence of human chromosome 7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillier, Ladeana W; Fulton, Robert S; Fulton, Lucinda A; Graves, Tina A; Pepin, Kymberlie H; Wagner-McPherson, Caryn; Layman, Dan; Maas, Jason; Jaeger, Sara; Walker, Rebecca; Wylie, Kristine; Sekhon, Mandeep; Becker, Michael C; O'Laughlin, Michelle D; Schaller, Mark E; Fewell, Ginger A; Delehaunty, Kimberly D; Miner, Tracie L; Nash, William E; Cordes, Matt; Du, Hui; Sun, Hui; Edwards, Jennifer; Bradshaw-Cordum, Holland; Ali, Johar; Andrews, Stephanie; Isak, Amber; Vanbrunt, Andrew; Nguyen, Christine; Du, Feiyu; Lamar, Betty; Courtney, Laura; Kalicki, Joelle; Ozersky, Philip; Bielicki, Lauren; Scott, Kelsi; Holmes, Andrea; Harkins, Richard; Harris, Anthony; Strong, Cynthia Madsen; Hou, Shunfang; Tomlinson, Chad; Dauphin-Kohlberg, Sara; Kozlowicz-Reilly, Amy; Leonard, Shawn; Rohlfing, Theresa; Rock, Susan M; Tin-Wollam, Aye-Mon; Abbott, Amanda; Minx, Patrick; Maupin, Rachel; Strowmatt, Catrina; Latreille, Phil; Miller, Nancy; Johnson, Doug; Murray, Jennifer; Woessner, Jeffrey P; Wendl, Michael C; Yang, Shiaw-Pyng; Schultz, Brian R; Wallis, John W; Spieth, John; Bieri, Tamberlyn A; Nelson, Joanne O; Berkowicz, Nicolas; Wohldmann, Patricia E; Cook, Lisa L; Hickenbotham, Matthew T; Eldred, James; Williams, Donald; Bedell, Joseph A; Mardis, Elaine R; Clifton, Sandra W; Chissoe, Stephanie L; Marra, Marco A; Raymond, Christopher; Haugen, Eric; Gillett, Will; Zhou, Yang; James, Rose; Phelps, Karen; Iadanoto, Shawn; Bubb, Kerry; Simms, Elizabeth; Levy, Ruth; Clendenning, James; Kaul, Rajinder; Kent, W James; Furey, Terrence S; Baertsch, Robert A; Brent, Michael R; Keibler, Evan; Flicek, Paul; Bork, Peer; Suyama, Mikita; Bailey, Jeffrey A; Portnoy, Matthew E; Torrents, David; Chinwalla, Asif T; Gish, Warren R; Eddy, Sean R; McPherson, John D; Olson, Maynard V; Eichler, Evan E; Green, Eric D; Waterston, Robert H; Wilson, Richard K

    2003-07-10

    Human chromosome 7 has historically received prominent attention in the human genetics community, primarily related to the search for the cystic fibrosis gene and the frequent cytogenetic changes associated with various forms of cancer. Here we present more than 153 million base pairs representing 99.4% of the euchromatic sequence of chromosome 7, the first metacentric chromosome completed so far. The sequence has excellent concordance with previously established physical and genetic maps, and it exhibits an unusual amount of segmentally duplicated sequence (8.2%), with marked differences between the two arms. Our initial analyses have identified 1,150 protein-coding genes, 605 of which have been confirmed by complementary DNA sequences, and an additional 941 pseudogenes. Of genes confirmed by transcript sequences, some are polymorphic for mutations that disrupt the reading frame. PMID:12853948

  7. On orthogonality preserving quadratic stochastic operators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukhamedov, Farrukh; Taha, Muhammad Hafizuddin Mohd [Department of Computational and Theoretical Sciences, Faculty of Science International Islamic University Malaysia, P.O. Box 141, 25710 Kuantan, Pahang Malaysia (Malaysia)

    2015-05-15

    A quadratic stochastic operator (in short QSO) is usually used to present the time evolution of differing species in biology. Some quadratic stochastic operators have been studied by Lotka and Volterra. In the present paper, we first give a simple characterization of Volterra QSO in terms of absolutely continuity of discrete measures. Further, we introduce a notion of orthogonal preserving QSO, and describe such kind of operators defined on two dimensional simplex. It turns out that orthogonal preserving QSOs are permutations of Volterra QSO. The associativity of genetic algebras generated by orthogonal preserving QSO is studied too.

  8. Analysis of chromosomal karyotypes in 1950 cases of genetic counseling in Zaozhuang%枣庄地区1950例遗传咨询者细胞染色体核型分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙尚军; 甘信辉

    2013-01-01

    Zaozhuang 1950 cases genetic counseling's peripheral blood cell culture, conventional preparation of chromosome and G banding karyotype were analysed. It was found 175 cases abnormalities, abnormalities frequency for 8. 97% (175/1950) , abnormal karyotype involves trisomy, haplotype, Robertsonian translocation, and unbalanced rearrangement. 1125 cases of adverse pregnancy history subjects, detected abnormal karyotype 89 cases, accounting for abnormal karyotype 51% (89/175) , and varying degrees of mental retardation 356 cases, detected abnormal karyotype 54 cases, accounting for abnormal karyotype 31% (54/175), infertility 469 cases, abnormal karyotype 32 cases, accounting for 18% of the abnormal karyotype (32/175). Karyotype analysis for adverse pregnancy history, mental retardation, infertility, disease diagnosis is important, and interrelate to D, G group of the short arm of variation, and the length of the Y chromosome variation, these should cause clinical attention.%本文对枣庄地区1950例遗传咨询者进行外周血细胞培养,常规染色体制备,G显带核型分析,共检出异常核型175例,异常率为8.97% (175/1950),异常核型涉及到三体型、单体型、罗伯逊易位、不平衡重排等.受检者中不良孕产史1125例,检出异常核型89例,占异常核型的51% (89/175);不同程度的智力低下356例,异常核型54例,占异常核型的31% (54/175);不孕不育469例,异常核型32例,占异常核型的18% (32/175).结果表明,染色体核型分析对不良孕产史、智力低下、不孕不育等疾病的诊断具有重要意义,并且与D、G组短臂变异和Y染色体长度变异也有一定的相关性,应引起临床上高度重视.

  9. Chromosomal replicons of higher plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van' t Hof, J.

    1987-03-16

    This brief discussion of replicons of higher plants offers a glimpse into the properties of chromosomal DNA replication. It gives evidence that the S phase of unrelated plant species is comprised of temporally ordered replicon families that increase in number with genome size. This orderly process, which assures a normal inheritance of genetic material to recipient daughter cells, is maintained at the level of replicon clusters by two mutually exclusive mechanisms, one involving the rate at which single replicons replicate their allotment of DNA, and another by means of the tempo-pause. The same two mechanisms are used by cells to alter the pattern of chromosomal DNA replication just prior to and during normal development. Both mechanisms are genetically determined and produce genetic effects when disturbed of disrupted by additional non-conforming DNAs. Further insight into how these two mechanisms operate requires more molecular information about the nature of replicons and the factors that govern when a replicon family replicates. Plant material is a rich and ideal source for this information just awaiting exploitation. 63 refs.

  10. Chromosomal replicons of higher plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This brief discussion of replicons of higher plants offers a glimpse into the properties of chromosomal DNA replication. It gives evidence that the S phase of unrelated plant species is comprised of temporally ordered replicon families that increase in number with genome size. This orderly process, which assures a normal inheritance of genetic material to recipient daughter cells, is maintained at the level of replicon clusters by two mutually exclusive mechanisms, one involving the rate at which single replicons replicate their allotment of DNA, and another by means of the tempo-pause. The same two mechanisms are used by cells to alter the pattern of chromosomal DNA replication just prior to and during normal development. Both mechanisms are genetically determined and produce genetic effects when disturbed of disrupted by additional non-conforming DNAs. Further insight into how these two mechanisms operate requires more molecular information about the nature of replicons and the factors that govern when a replicon family replicates. Plant material is a rich and ideal source for this information just awaiting exploitation. 63 refs

  11. A review of metaphase chromosome image selection techniques for automatic karyotype generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Tanvi; Dhir, Renu

    2016-08-01

    The karyotype is analyzed to detect the genetic abnormalities. It is generated by arranging the chromosomes after extracting them from the metaphase chromosome images. The chromosomes are non-rigid bodies that contain the genetic information of an individual. The metaphase chromosome image spread contains the chromosomes, but these chromosomes are not distinct bodies; they can either be individual chromosomes or be touching one another; they may be bent or even may be overlapping and thus forming a cluster of chromosomes. The extraction of chromosomes from these touching and overlapping chromosomes is a very tedious process. The segmentation of a random metaphase chromosome image may not give us correct and accurate results. Therefore, before taking up a metaphase chromosome image for analysis, it must be analyzed for the orientation of the chromosomes it contains. The various reported methods for metaphase chromosome image selection for automatic karyotype generation are compared in this paper. After analysis, it has been concluded that each metaphase chromosome image selection method has its advantages and disadvantages. PMID:26676686

  12. A novel selection system for chromosome translocations in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    OpenAIRE

    Tennyson, Rachel B; Ebran, Nathalie; Herrera, Anissa E; Lindsley, Janet E.

    2002-01-01

    Chromosomal translocations are common genetic abnormalities found in both leukemias and solid tumors. While much has been learned about the effects of specific translocations on cell proliferation, much less is known about what causes these chromosome rearrangements. This article describes the development and use of a system that genetically selects for rare translocation events using the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. A translocation YAC was created that contains the breakpoint cluster regi...

  13. IAPT/IOPB chromosome data 20

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Altinordu, F.; Šumberová, Kateřina; Ankova, T.; Erst, A. S.; Kuzmin, I. V.; Shaulo, D. N.; Plugatar, Y. V.; Baltisberger, M.; Deldago, L.; Gallego Martín, F.; Rico, E.; Lavia, G. I.; Krapovickas, A.; de los Angeles Martines, M.; Lazaroff, Y.; Solis Neffa, V. G.; Ortiz, A. M.; Sivestri, M. C.; Pavlova, D.; Bani, A.; Polido, C. A.; Moraes, A. P.; Forni-Martins, E. R.; Probatova, N. S.; Kazanovsky, S. G.; Barkalov, V. Y.; Rudyka, E. G.; Shatokhina, A. V.; Krivenko, D. A.; Verkhozina, A. V.; Nechaev, V. A.; Romero-da Cruz, M. V.; Wefferling, K. M.; Owen, H. A.; Hoot, S. B.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 64, č. 6 (2015), s. 1344-1350. ISSN 0040-0262 R&D Projects: GA ČR GB14-36079G Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : chromosome count * plant s Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.299, year: 2014

  14. Chromosome Analysis and Sorting Using Flow Cytometry

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Doležel, Jaroslav; Kubaláková, Marie; Čihalíková, Jarmila; Suchánková, Pavla; Šimková, Hana

    New Jersey : Humana Press, 2011 - (Birchler, J.), s. 221-237 ISBN 978-1-61737-956-7 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA521/07/1573; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06004 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : Chromosome analysis * flow cytometry * root meristems Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  15. Sex-biased gene expression at homomorphic sex chromosomes in emus and its implication for sex chromosome evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicoso, Beatriz; Kaiser, Vera B; Bachtrog, Doris

    2013-04-16

    Sex chromosomes originate from autosomes. The accumulation of sexually antagonistic mutations on protosex chromosomes selects for a loss of recombination and sets in motion the evolutionary processes generating heteromorphic sex chromosomes. Recombination suppression and differentiation are generally viewed as the default path of sex chromosome evolution, and the occurrence of old, homomorphic sex chromosomes, such as those of ratite birds, has remained a mystery. Here, we analyze the genome and transcriptome of emu (Dromaius novaehollandiae) and confirm that most genes on the sex chromosome are shared between the Z and W. Surprisingly, however, levels of gene expression are generally sex-biased for all sex-linked genes relative to autosomes, including those in the pseudoautosomal region, and the male-bias increases after gonad formation. This expression bias suggests that the emu sex chromosomes have become masculinized, even in the absence of ZW differentiation. Thus, birds may have taken different evolutionary solutions to minimize the deleterious effects imposed by sexually antagonistic mutations: some lineages eliminate recombination along the protosex chromosomes to physically restrict sexually antagonistic alleles to one sex, whereas ratites evolved sex-biased expression to confine the product of a sexually antagonistic allele to the sex it benefits. This difference in conflict resolution may explain the preservation of recombining, homomorphic sex chromosomes in other lineages and illustrates the importance of sexually antagonistic mutations driving the evolution of sex chromosomes. PMID:23547111

  16. Linkage: from particulate to interactive genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falk, Raphael

    2003-01-01

    Genetics was established on a strict particulate conception of heredity. Genetic linkage, the deviation from independent segregation of Mendelian factors, was conceived as a function of the material allocation of the factors to the chromosomes, rather than to the multiple effects (pleiotropy) of discrete factors. Although linkage maps were abstractions they provided strong support for the chromosomal theory of inheritance. Direct Cytogenetic evidence was scarce until X-ray induced major chromosomal rearrangements allowed direct correlation of genetic and cytological rearrangements. Only with the discovery of the polytenic giant chromosomes in Drosophila larvae in the 1930s were the virtual maps backed up by physical maps of the genetic loci. Genetic linkage became a pivotal experimental tool for the examination of the integration of genetic functions in development and in evolution. Genetic mapping has remained a hallmark of genetic analysis. The location of genes in DNA is a modern extension of the notion of genetic linkage. PMID:12778899

  17. Advances in plant chromosome genomics

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Doležel, Jaroslav; Vrána, Jan; Cápal, Petr; Kubaláková, Marie; Burešová, Veronika; Šimková, Hana

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 32, č. 1 (2014), s. 122-136. ISSN 0734-9750 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP501/10/1740; GA ČR GAP501/10/1778; GA ČR GBP501/12/G090; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1204 Grant ostatní: GA MŠk(CZ) ED0007/01/01 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : BAC library * Chromosome sorting * Cytogenetics Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 9.015, year: 2014

  18. Combined Genetic and Physical Map of the Complex Genome of Agrobacterium tumefaciens

    OpenAIRE

    Goodner, Brad W.; Markelz, Brian P.; Flanagan, M. Casey; Crowell, Chris B.; Racette, Jodi L.; Schilling, Brittany A.; Halfon, Leah M.; Mellors, J. Scott; Grabowski, Gregory

    1999-01-01

    A combined genetic and physical map of the Agrobacterium tumefaciens A348 (derivative of C58) genome was constructed to address the discrepancy between initial single-chromosome genetic maps and more recent physical mapping data supporting the presence of two nonhomologous chromosomes. The combined map confirms the two-chromosome genomic structure and the correspondence of the initial genetic maps to the circular chromosome. The linear chromosome is almost devoid of auxotrophic markers, which...

  19. Chimpanzee chromosome 12 is homologous to human chromosome 2q

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, N. C.; Sun, C. R.Y.; Ho, T.

    1977-01-01

    Most of the 46 human chromosomes find their counterparts in the 48 chimpanzee chromosomes except for chromosome 2 which has been hypothesized to have been derived from a centric fusion of two chimpanzee acrocentric chromosomes. These two chromosomes correspond to the human chromosomes 2p and 2g. This conclusion is based primarily on chromosome banding techniques, and the somatic cell hybridization technique has also been used. (HLW)

  20. Evaluating the Relationship between Spermatogenic Silencing of the X Chromosome and Evolution of the Y Chromosome in Chimpanzee and Human

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulugeta Achame, Eskeatnaf; Baarends, Willy M.; Gribnau, Joost; Grootegoed, J. Anton

    2010-01-01

    Chimpanzees and humans are genetically very similar, with the striking exception of their Y chromosomes, which have diverged tremendously. The male-specific region (MSY), representing the greater part of the Y chromosome, is inherited from father to son in a clonal fashion, with natural selection acting on the MSY as a unit. Positive selection might involve the performance of the MSY in spermatogenesis. Chimpanzees have a highly polygamous mating behavior, so that sperm competition is thought to provide a strong selective force acting on the Y chromosome in the chimpanzee lineage. In consequence of evolution of the heterologous sex chromosomes in mammals, meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI) results in a transcriptionally silenced XY body in male meiotic prophase, and subsequently also in postmeiotic repression of the sex chromosomes in haploid spermatids. This has evolved to a situation where MSCI has become a prerequisite for spermatogenesis. Here, by analysis of microarray testicular expression data representing a small number of male chimpanzees and men, we obtained information indicating that meiotic and postmeiotic X chromosome silencing might be more effective in chimpanzee than in human spermatogenesis. From this, we suggest that the remarkable reorganization of the chimpanzee Y chromosome, compared to the human Y chromosome, might have an impact on its meiotic interactions with the X chromosome and thereby on X chromosome silencing in spermatogenesis. Further studies will be required to address comparative functional aspects of MSCI in chimpanzee, human, and other placental mammals. PMID:21179482

  1. Wheat chromosomes sorting: dividing a komplex genome into sub-genomic specific BAC libraries

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lucretti, S.; Doležel, Jaroslav

    2005. P. 2.11. [Italian Society of Agricultural Genetics Annual Congress . 12.09.2005-15.09.2005, Potenza] Keywords : Wheat * flow-sorted chromosomes * BAC library Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  2. Rapid vascular responses to anthrax lethal toxin in mice containing a segment of chromosome 11 from the CAST/Ei strain on a C57BL/6 genetic background.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigel, Kelsey J; Rues, Laura; Doyle, Edward J; Buchheit, Cassandra L; Wood, John G; Gallagher, Ryan J; Kelly, Laura E; Radel, Jeffrey D; Bradley, Kenneth A; LeVine, Steven M

    2012-01-01

    Host allelic variation controls the response to B. anthracis and the disease course of anthrax. Mouse strains with macrophages that are responsive to anthrax lethal toxin (LT) show resistance to infection while mouse strains with LT non-responsive macrophages succumb more readily. B6.CAST.11M mice have a region of chromosome 11 from the CAST/Ei strain (a LT responsive strain) introgressed onto a LT non-responsive C57BL/6J genetic background. Previously, B6.CAST.11M mice were found to exhibit a rapid inflammatory reaction to LT termed the early response phenotype (ERP), and displayed greater resistance to B. anthracis infection compared to C57BL/6J mice. Several ERP features (e.g., bloat, hypothermia, labored breathing, dilated pinnae vessels) suggested vascular involvement. To test this, Evan's blue was used to assess vessel leakage and intravital microscopy was used to monitor microvascular blood flow. Increased vascular leakage was observed in lungs of B6.CAST.11M mice compared to C57BL/6J mice 1 hour after systemic administration of LT. Capillary blood flow was reduced in the small intestine mesentery without concomitant leukocyte emigration following systemic or topical application of LT, the latter suggesting a localized tissue mechanism in this response. Since LT activates the Nlrp1b inflammasome in B6.CAST.11M mice, the roles of inflammasome products, IL-1β and IL-18, were examined. Topical application to the mesentery of IL-1β but not IL-18 revealed pronounced slowing of blood flow in B6.CAST.11M mice that was not present in C57BL/6J mice. A neutralizing anti-IL-1β antibody suppressed the slowing of blood flow induced by LT, indicating a role for IL-1β in the response. Besides allelic differences controlling Nlrp1b inflammasome activation by LT observed previously, evidence presented here suggests that an additional genetic determinant(s) could regulate the vascular response to IL-1β. These results demonstrate that vessel leakage and alterations to

  3. Chromosomes as Vehicle in Organization and Transmission of Characters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the fundamental aspects of genomes is the organization of the genes in packages known as chromosomes. All organisms from the simplest to the most complex possess chromosomes as part of their genome and they are characterized by a particular morphology and number characteristic of each species. Chromosome mutations induce changes that can originate in mitotic o meiotic errors in an individual, and these can become fixed in the population during evolution. This results either if the particular changes represent a selective advantage, or they may result in severe effects on the phenotype and fertility of its carriers that may be manifested as a genetic syndrome. In this essay I demonstrate how, using conventional and recent cytogenetic and molecular techniques we have begun understanding the function of chromosome arrangements in the differentiation of species and how particular defects or individual changes in the morphology or number of chromosomes can result in serious dysfunctions that are recognized as genetic syndromes.

  4. 新疆巴州维吾尔族17个Y-STR位点遗传多态性%Genetic polymorphism of seventeen Y-chromosomeal STR loci in XinJiang Bazhou Uygur population

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈慧锦; 蒲红伟; 胡佳; 王伟; 张丽萍

    2011-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the allelic and haplotype frequency distribution of seventeen short tandem repeat loci of Y chromosome in Xinjiang Uygur population in Bazhou. Methods:The template DNAs were extracted from blood samples of 149 unrelated Uygur male individuals,and seventeen Y-STR loci were amplified by the AmpFlSTR YfilerTM.The PCR products were analyzed and genotyped with ABI3130XL Sequencer. Results:The values of genetic diversity of DYS456,DYS389 Ⅰ /Ⅱ ,DYS390,DYS458,DYS19, DYS385a/b,DYS393,DYS391,DYS439,DYS635,DYS392,Y-GATA-H4,DYS437,DYS438,and DYS448 were between 0.4 982 and 0.9 485.A total of 148 different haplotypes were observed,and the value of genetic diversity of haplotypes was 0.99 986. Conclusion: The 17 Y-STR loci in Xinjiang Uygur population in Bazhou are highly polymorphic and suitable for paternity testing and paternal genetic lineage evolution.%目的:调查17个Y染色体短串联重复序列(Y-Short tandem repeat,Y-STR)基因座及其单倍型在新疆巴州维吾尔族人群中的分布情况.方法:应用AmpFlSTR YfilerTM荧光标记复合扩增系统,对149名维吾尔族无关男性个体血样进行17个Y-STR位点的复合扩增,用ABI 3130XL遗传分析仪对扩增产物进行检测分析.结果:DYS456、DYS389 Ⅰ/Ⅱ、DYS390、DYS458、DYS19、DYS385a/b、DYS393、DYS391、DYS439、DYS635、DYS392、Y-GATA-H4、DYS437、DYS438、DYS448各位点遗传多样性(Genetic diversity,GD)值分布在0.498 2~0.948 5之间;17个Y-STR位点共观察到单倍型148种,其单倍型多样性(Haplotype diversity,HD)值为0.999 86.结论:新疆巴州维吾尔族17个Y-STR位点具有丰富的遗传多样性,可为父权鉴定和父系进化研究提供有价值的遗传学资料.

  5. American marsupials chromosomes: why study them?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Svartman

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Marsupials, one of the three main groups of mammals, are only found in Australia and in the American continent. Studies performed in Australian marsupials have demonstrated the great potential provided by the group for the understanding of basic genetic mechanisms and chromosome evolution in mammals. Genetic studies in American marsupials are relatively scarce and cytogenetic data of most species are restricted to karyotype descriptions, usually without banding patterns. Nevertheless, the first marsupial genome sequenced was that of Monodelphis domestica, a South American species. The knowledge about mammalian genome evolution and function that resulted from studies on M. domestica is in sharp contrast with the lack of genetic data on most American marsupial species. Here, we present an overview of the chromosome studies performed in marsupials with emphasis on the South American species.

  6. Cytogenetic analysis of chromosomal abnormalities in Sri Lankan children

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Colombo; Sri Lanka

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cytogenetic analysis is a valuable investigation in the diagnostic work up of children with suspected chromosomal disorders. The objective of this study was to describe the prevalence of various types of chromosomal abnormalities in Sri Lankan children undergoing cytogenetic analysis. Methods: Cytogenetic reports of 1554 consecutive children with suspected chromosomal disorders who underwent karyotyping in two genetic centers in Sri Lanka from January 2006 to December 2011 were reviewed retrospectively. Results: A total of 1548 children were successfully karyotyped. Abnormal karyotypes were found in 783 (50.6%) children. Numerical and structural abnormalities accounted for 90.8% and 9.2%, respectively. Down syndrome was the commonest aneuploidy identifi ed. Other various autosomal and sex chromosomal aneuploidies as well as micro-deletion syndromes were also detected. Conclusions: The prevalence of chromosomal abnormalities in Sri Lankan children undergoing cytogenetic analysis for suspected chromosomal disorders was relatively higher than that in Caucasian and other Asian populations.

  7. Genetics Home Reference: myoclonus-dystonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip to main content Your Guide to Understanding Genetic Conditions Enable Javascript for addthis links to activate. ... Conditions Genes Chromosomes & mtDNA Resources Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions myoclonus-dystonia myoclonus-dystonia Enable ...

  8. Genetics Home Reference: progressive familial heart block

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip to main content Your Guide to Understanding Genetic Conditions Enable Javascript for addthis links to activate. ... Conditions Genes Chromosomes & mtDNA Resources Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions progressive familial heart block progressive ...

  9. Genetics Home Reference: sepiapterin reductase deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip to main content Your Guide to Understanding Genetic Conditions Enable Javascript for addthis links to activate. ... Conditions Genes Chromosomes & mtDNA Resources Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions sepiapterin reductase deficiency sepiapterin reductase ...

  10. Genetics Home Reference: dopamine transporter deficiency syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip to main content Your Guide to Understanding Genetic Conditions Enable Javascript for addthis links to activate. ... Conditions Genes Chromosomes & mtDNA Resources Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions dopamine transporter deficiency syndrome dopamine ...

  11. Genetics Home Reference: tyrosine hydroxylase deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip to main content Your Guide to Understanding Genetic Conditions Enable Javascript for addthis links to activate. ... Conditions Genes Chromosomes & mtDNA Resources Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions TH deficiency tyrosine hydroxylase deficiency ...

  12. Genetics Home Reference: GM1 gangliosidosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip to main content Your Guide to Understanding Genetic Conditions Enable Javascript for addthis links to activate. ... Conditions Genes Chromosomes & mtDNA Resources Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions GM1 gangliosidosis GM1 gangliosidosis Enable ...

  13. Genetics Home Reference: dopa-responsive dystonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip to main content Your Guide to Understanding Genetic Conditions Enable Javascript for addthis links to activate. ... Conditions Genes Chromosomes & mtDNA Resources Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions dopa-responsive dystonia dopa-responsive ...

  14. Genetics Home Reference: Buschke-Ollendorff syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip to main content Your Guide to Understanding Genetic Conditions Enable Javascript for addthis links to activate. ... Conditions Genes Chromosomes & mtDNA Resources Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions Buschke-Ollendorff syndrome Buschke-Ollendorff ...

  15. Genetics Home Reference: C3 glomerulopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip to main content Your Guide to Understanding Genetic Conditions Enable Javascript for addthis links to activate. ... Conditions Genes Chromosomes & mtDNA Resources Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions C3 glomerulopathy C3 glomerulopathy Enable ...

  16. Genetics Home Reference: Langer-Giedion syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip to main content Your Guide to Understanding Genetic Conditions Enable Javascript for addthis links to activate. ... Conditions Genes Chromosomes & mtDNA Resources Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions Langer-Giedion syndrome Langer-Giedion ...

  17. Genetics Home Reference: Langer mesomelic dysplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip to main content Your Guide to Understanding Genetic Conditions Enable Javascript for addthis links to activate. ... Conditions Genes Chromosomes & mtDNA Resources Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions Langer mesomelic dysplasia Langer mesomelic ...

  18. Genetics Home Reference: Melnick-Needles syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip to main content Your Guide to Understanding Genetic Conditions Enable Javascript for addthis links to activate. ... Conditions Genes Chromosomes & mtDNA Resources Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions Melnick-Needles syndrome Melnick-Needles ...

  19. Two-parameter characterization of chromosome-scale recombination rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wentian; Freudenberg, Jan

    2009-12-01

    The genome-wide recombination rate (RR) of a species is often described by one parameter, the ratio between total genetic map length (G) and physical map length (P), measured in centimorgans per megabase (cM/Mb). The value of this parameter varies greatly between species, but the cause for these differences is not entirely clear. A constraining factor of overall RR in a species, which may cause increased RR for smaller chromosomes, is the requirement of at least one chiasma per chromosome (or chromosome arm) per meiosis. In the present study, we quantify the relative excess of recombination events on smaller chromosomes by a linear regression model, which relates the genetic length of chromosomes to their physical length. We find for several species that the two-parameter regression, G = G(0) + k x P , provides a better characterization of the relationship between genetic and physical map length than the one-parameter regression that runs through the origin. A nonzero intercept (G(0)) indicates a relative excess of recombination on smaller chromosomes in a genome. Given G(0), the parameter k predicts the increase of genetic map length over the increase of physical map length. The observed values of G(0) have a similar magnitude for diverse species, whereas k varies by two orders of magnitude. The implications of this strategy for the genetic maps of human, mouse, rat, chicken, honeybee, worm, and yeast are discussed. PMID:19752285

  20. ATM Modulates the Loading of Recombination Proteins onto a Chromosomal Translocation Breakpoint Hotspot

    OpenAIRE

    Jiying Sun; Yukako Oma; Masahiko Harata; Kazuteru Kono; Hiroki Shima; Aiko Kinomura; Tsuyoshi Ikura; Hidekazu Suzuki; Shuki Mizutani; Roland Kanaar; Satoshi Tashiro

    2010-01-01

    textabstractChromosome translocations induced by DNA damaging agents, such as ionizing radiation and certain chemotherapies, alter genetic information resulting in malignant transformation. Abrogation or loss of the ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) protein, a DNA damage signaling regulator, increases the incidence of chromosome translocations. However, how ATM protects cells from chromosome translocations is still unclear. Chromosome translocations involving the MLL gene on 11q23 are the m...

  1. Induction of site-specific chromosomal translocations in embryonic stem cells by CRISPR/Cas9

    OpenAIRE

    Junfeng Jiang; Li Zhang; Xingliang Zhou; Xi Chen; Guanyi Huang; Fengsheng Li; Ruizhe Wang; Nancy Wu; Youzhen Yan; Chang Tong; Sankalp Srivastava; Yue Wang; Houqi Liu; Qi-Long Ying

    2016-01-01

    Chromosomal translocation is the most common form of chromosomal abnormality and is often associated with congenital genetic disorders, infertility, and cancers. The lack of cellular and animal models for chromosomal translocations, however, has hampered our ability to understand the underlying disease mechanisms and to develop new therapies. Here, we show that site-specific chromosomal translocations can be generated in mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs) via CRISPR/Cas9. Mouse ESCs carrying ...

  2. Confirmation of the synteny between human chromosome 22 and mouse chromosome 11

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Claudio, J.O.; Rouleau, G.A.; Malo, D. [McGill Univ., Quebec (Canada)

    1994-09-01

    Comparative mapping based on the existence of conserved synteny between human and mouse chromosomes is a useful strategy in determining the chromosomal location of a gene. Using recombinant inbred (RI) strains of mice derived from AKR/J and DBA/2J cross (AKXD), we confirmed the existence of a small area of synteny between the chromosome 22 segment carrying the gene for neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2) and the most proximal region of mouse chromosome 11 containing its homologue (Nf2). By analyzing the allele distribution pattern of 24 AKXD RI mice using a novel polymorphic dinucleotide (CT){sub n} repeat (D11Mcg1) in the 3{prime} untranslated region of the mouse Nf2 gene and PCR-based simple sequence repeat markers (Research Genetics), we established the chromosomal position of Nf23 on mouse chromosome 11. Minimizing the number of double recombinants in the RI strains analyzed suggests tight linkage of Nf2 to D11Mit1 and D11Mit72 which map to a region containing the genes for leukemia inhibitory factor (Lif) and neurofilament heavy chain polypeptide (Nfh). This region is syntenic to the segment carrying the genes LIF, NF2 and NEFH on human chromosome 22q. We show that D11Mcg1 will be useful for mapping of genes and closely linked loci on the proximal region of mouse chromosome 11. Our data demonstrate the predictive value of comparative mapping and confirm that human chromosome 22q12 is syntenic to the most proximal region of mouse chromosome 11.

  3. PRESERVATION OF MEDICINAL AND AROMATIC CROPS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The NPGS is a cooperative effort by public (State and Federal) and private organizations to preserve the genetic diversity of plants by long-term storage of germplasm, primarily in the form of seeds. The mission of the NPGS includes: 1.) the conservation of diverse crop germplasm through collectio...

  4. Pathogenesis of vestibular schwannoma in ring chromosome 22

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debiec-Rychter Maria

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ring chromosome 22 is a rare human constitutional cytogenetic abnormality. Clinical features of neurofibromatosis type 1 and 2 as well as different tumour types have been reported in patients with ring chromosome 22. The pathogenesis of these tumours is not always clear yet. Methods We report on a female patient with a ring chromosome 22 presenting with severe mental retardation, autistic behaviour, café-au-lait macules and facial dysmorphism. Peripheral blood lymphocytes were karyotyped and array CGH was performed on extracted DNA. At the age of 20 years she was diagnosed with a unilateral vestibular schwannoma. Tumour cells were analyzed by karyotyping, array CGH and NF2 mutation analysis. Results Karyotype on peripheral blood lymphocytes revealed a ring chromosome 22 in all analyzed cells. A 1 Mb array CGH experiment on peripheral blood DNA showed a deletion of 5 terminal clones on the long arm of chromosome 22. Genetic analysis of vestibular schwannoma tissue revealed loss of the ring chromosome 22 and a somatic second hit in the NF2 gene on the remaining chromosome 22. Conclusion We conclude that tumours can arise by the combination of loss of the ring chromosome and a pathogenic NF2 mutation on the remaining chromosome 22 in patients with ring chromosome 22. Our findings indicate that patients with a ring 22 should be monitored for NF2-related tumours starting in adolescence.

  5. Roles of the Y chromosome genes in human cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatsuo Kido

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Male and female differ genetically by their respective sex chromosome composition, that is, XY as male and XX as female. Although both X and Y chromosomes evolved from the same ancestor pair of autosomes, the Y chromosome harbors male-specific genes, which play pivotal roles in male sex determination, germ cell differentiation, and masculinization of various tissues. Deletions or translocation of the sex-determining gene, SRY, from the Y chromosome causes disorders of sex development (previously termed as an intersex condition with dysgenic gonads. Failure of gonadal development results not only in infertility, but also in increased risks of germ cell tumor (GCT, such as gonadoblastoma and various types of testicular GCT. Recent studies demonstrate that either loss of Y chromosome or ectopic expression of Y chromosome genes is closely associated with various male-biased diseases, including selected somatic cancers. These observations suggest that the Y-linked genes are involved in male health and diseases in more frequently than expected. Although only a small number of protein-coding genes are present in the male-specific region of Y chromosome, the impacts of Y chromosome genes on human diseases are still largely unknown, due to lack of in vivo models and differences between the Y chromosomes of human and rodents. In this review, we highlight the involvement of selected Y chromosome genes in cancer development in men.

  6. Chromosome Painting Reveals Asynaptic Full Alignment of Homologs and HIM-8–Dependent Remodeling of X Chromosome Territories during Caenorhabditis elegans Meiosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabeshima, Kentaro; Mlynarczyk-Evans, Susanna; Villeneuve, Anne M.

    2011-01-01

    During early meiotic prophase, a nucleus-wide reorganization leads to sorting of chromosomes into homologous pairs and to establishing associations between homologous chromosomes along their entire lengths. Here, we investigate global features of chromosome organization during this process, using a chromosome painting method in whole-mount Caenorhabditis elegans gonads that enables visualization of whole chromosomes along their entire lengths in the context of preserved 3D nuclear architecture. First, we show that neither spatial proximity of premeiotic chromosome territories nor chromosome-specific timing is a major factor driving homolog pairing. Second, we show that synaptonemal complex-independent associations can support full lengthwise juxtaposition of homologous chromosomes. Third, we reveal a prominent elongation of chromosome territories during meiotic prophase that initiates prior to homolog association and alignment. Mutant analysis indicates that chromosome movement mediated by association of chromosome pairing centers (PCs) with mobile patches of the nuclear envelope (NE)–spanning SUN-1/ZYG-12 protein complexes is not the primary driver of territory elongation. Moreover, we identify new roles for the X chromosome PC (X-PC) and X-PC binding protein HIM-8 in promoting elongation of X chromosome territories, separable from their role(s) in mediating local stabilization of pairing and association of X chromosomes with mobile SUN-1/ZYG-12 patches. Further, we present evidence that HIM-8 functions both at and outside of PCs to mediate chromosome territory elongation. These and other data support a model in which synapsis-independent elongation of chromosome territories, driven by PC binding proteins, enables lengthwise juxtaposition of chromosomes, thereby facilitating assessment of their suitability as potential pairing partners. PMID:21876678

  7. Chronopolis Digital Preservation Network

    OpenAIRE

    David Minor; Don Sutton; Ardys Kozbial; Brad Westbrook; Michael Burek; Michael Smorul

    2010-01-01

    The Chronopolis Digital Preservation Initiative, one of the Library of Congress’ latest efforts to collect and preserve at-risk digital information, has completed its first year of service as a multi-member partnership to meet the archival needs of a wide range of domains.Chronopolis is a digital preservation data grid framework developed by the San Diego Supercomputer Center (SDSC) at UC San Diego, the UC San Diego Libraries (UCSDL), and their partners at the National Center for Atmospheric ...

  8. Software Preservation Benefits Framework

    OpenAIRE

    Chue Hong, Neil; Crouch, Steve; Hettrick, Simon; Parkinson, Tim; Shreeve, Matt

    2010-01-01

    An investigation of software preservation has been carried out by Curtis+Cartwright Consulting Limited, in partnership with the Software Sustainability Institute (SSI), on behalf of the JISC. The aim of the study was to raise awareness and build capacity throughout the Further and Higher Education (FE/HE) sector to engage with preservation issues as part of the process of software development. Part of this involved examining the purpose and benefits of employing preservation measures in relat...

  9. Preserving Digital Materials

    CERN Document Server

    Harvey, Ross

    2011-01-01

    This book provides a single-volume introduction to the principles, strategies and practices currently applied by librarians and recordkeeping professionals to the critical issue of preservation of digital information. It incorporates practice from both the recordkeeping and the library communities, taking stock of current knowledge about digital preservation and describing recent and current research, to provide a framework for reflecting on the issues that digital preservation raises in professional practice.

  10. 新疆昌吉维吾尔族17个Y-STR基因座遗传多态性%Genetic polymorphisms of seventeen Y-chromosomeal STR loci in XinJiang Changji Uygur Population

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张丽萍; 陈健刚; 蒲红伟; 付志敏; 杨昊

    2012-01-01

    目的 调查17个Y染色体短串联重复序列(Y-STR)基因座及其单倍型在新疆昌吉地区维吾尔族人群中的分布情况.方法 采用AmpFlSTR YfilerTM荧光标记复合扩增系统,对154名维吾尔族无关男性个体血样进行17个Y-STR位点的复合扩增,用ABI 3130XL遗传分析仪对扩增产物进行检测分析.结果 DYS456、DYS389Ⅰ、DYS390、DYS389Ⅱ、DYS458、DYS19、DYS385a/b、DYS393、DYS391、DYS439、DYS635、DYS392、Y-GATA-H4、DYS437、DYS438、DYS448各位点遗传多样性(GD值)分布在0.529 7~0.959 9之间;17个Y-STR位点共观察到单倍型151种,其单倍型多样性GD值为0.999 7.结论 新疆昌吉地区维吾尔族17个Y-STR位点具有丰富的遗传多样性,可为父权鉴定和父系进化研究提供有价值的遗传学资料.%Objective To investigate the allelic and haplotype frequency distribution of seventeen short tandem repeat loci of Y chromosome in Xinjiang Uygur population in Changji. Methods Seventeen Y-STR loci of which the template DNAs were extracted from blood samples of 154 unrelated male individuals in Uygur population, were amplified by using the AmpFlSTR YfilerTM. The PCR products were analyzed and genotyped with ABI3130XL Sequencer. Results The gene diversity ranged from 0. 529 7 to 0. 959 9 at DYS456,DYS389 I ,DYS390,DYS389 II ,DYS458,DYS19 ,DYS385a/b,DYS393,DYS391 ,DYS439 ,DYS635 ,DYS392, Y-G∧T∧-H4,DYS4 37,DYS438, and DYS448. A total of 151 different haplotypes were observed. The haplotype diversity value calculated from all 17 loci was 0. 999 7. Conclusion The 17th Y-STR loci in Xinjiang Uygur population in Changji are highly affluent genetic polymorphic and can offer valuable genetic datas for paternity testing and paternal genetic lineages evolution.

  11. Genetic Counseling in Mental Retardation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, Peter

    The task of the genetic counselor who identifies genetic causes of mental retardation and assists families to understand risk of recurrence is described. Considered are chromosomal genetic disorders such as Down's syndrome, inherited disorders such as Tay-Sachs disease, identification by testing the amniotic fluid cells (amniocentresis) in time…

  12. Genetics Home Reference: Y chromosome infertility

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is a condition that affects the production of sperm , making it difficult or impossible for affected men ... children. An affected man's body may produce no sperm cells (azoospermia), a smaller than usual number of ...

  13. Preserving genes: Sullys Hill bison gain national prominence

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Newspaper article on transferring bison from Sullys Hill National Game Preserve to Fort Niobrara National Wildlife Refuge to help maintain as genetically pure...

  14. Chromosomal abnormalities in patients with sperm disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Y. Pylyp

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Chromosomal abnormalities are among the most common genetic causes of spermatogenic disruptions. Carriers of chromosomal abnormalities are at increased risk of infertility, miscarriage or birth of a child with unbalanced karyotype due to the production of unbalanced gametes. The natural selection against chromosomally abnormal sperm usually prevents fertilization with sperm barring in cases of serious chromosomal abnormalities. However, assisted reproductive technologies in general and intracytoplasmic sperm injection in particular, enable the transmission of chromosomal abnormalities to the progeny. Therefore, cytogenetic studies are important in patients with male factor infertility before assisted reproduction treatment. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the types and frequencies of chromosomal abnormalities in 724 patients with infertility and to estimate the risk of chromosomal abnormalities detection in subgroups of patients depending on the severity of spermatogenic disruption, aiming at identifying groups of patients in need of cytogenetic studies. Karyotype analysis was performed in 724 blood samples of men attending infertility clinic. Chromosomal preparation was performed by standard techniques. At least 20 GTG-banded metaphase plates with the resolution from 450 to 750 bands per haploid set were analysed in each case. When chromosomal mosaicism was suspected, this number was increased to 50. Abnormal karyotypes were observed in 48 (6.6% patients, including 67% of autosomal abnormalities and 33% of gonosomal abnormalities. Autosomal abnormalities were represented by structural rearrangements. Reciprocal translocations were the most common type of structural chromosomal abnormalities in the studied group, detected with the frequency of 2.6% (n = 19, followed by Robertsonian translocation, observed with the frequency of 1.2% (n = 9. The frequency of inversions was 0.6% (n = 4. Gonosomal abnormalities included 14 cases

  15. Nondisjunction in Favor of a Chromosome: The Mechanism of Rye B Chromosome Drive during Pollen Mitosis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Banaei-Moghaddam, A.M.; Schubert, V.; Kumke, K.; Weiβ, O.; Klemme, S.; Nagaki, K.; Macas, Jiří; González-Sánchez, M.; Heredia, V.; Gómez-Revilla, D.; González-García, M.; Vega, J.M.; Puertas, M.J.; Houben, A.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 24, č. 10 (2012), s. 4124-4134. ISSN 1040-4651 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50510513 Keywords : chromosomes * centromere * repeats Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 9.251, year: 2012

  16. Conservation of chromosomes syntenic with avian autosomes in squamate reptiles revealed by comparative chromosome painting

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pokorná, Martina; Giovannotti, M.; Kratochvíl, L.; Caputo, V.; Olmo, E.; Ferguson-Smith, M. A.; Rens, W.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 121, č. 4 (2012), s. 409-418. ISSN 0009-5915 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP506/10/0718 Institutional support: RVO:67985904 Keywords : sex- chromosome s * evolution * genome Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.340, year: 2012

  17. Chromosomal aberrations in tire plant workers and interaction with

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Musak, L.; Souček, P.; Vodičková, Ludmila; Naccarati, Alessio; Halasová, E.; Poláková, Veronika; Slyšková, Jana; Susová, S.; Buchancová, J.; Šmerhovský, Z.; Sediková, J.; Klimentová, G.; Osina, O.; Hemminki, K.; Vodička, Pavel

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 641, 1-2 (2008), s. 36-42. ISSN 0027-5107 R&D Projects: GA MZd NR8563 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390512 Keywords : Chromosomal aberrations * Genetic polymorphisms * DNA repair genes Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.198, year: 2008

  18. Autism and chromosome abnormalities-A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergbaum, Anne; Ogilvie, Caroline Mackie

    2016-07-01

    The neuro-behavioral disorder of autism was first described in the 1940s and was predicted to have a biological basis. Since that time, with the growth of genetic investigations particularly in the area of pediatric development, an increasing number of children with autism and related disorders (autistic spectrum disorders, ASD) have been the subject of genetic studies both in the clinical setting and in the wider research environment. However, a full understanding of the biological basis of ASDs has yet to be achieved. Early observations of children with chromosomal abnormalities detected by G-banded chromosome analysis (karyotyping) and in situ hybridization revealed, in some cases, ASD associated with other features arising from such an abnormality. The introduction of higher resolution techniques for whole genome screening, such as array comparative genome hybridization (aCGH), allowed smaller imbalances to be detected, some of which are now considered to represent autism susceptibility loci. In this review, we describe some of the work underpinning the conclusion that ASDs have a genetic basis; a brief history of the developments in genetic analysis tools over the last 50 years; and the most common chromosome abnormalities found in association with ASDs. Introduction of next generation sequencing (NGS) into the clinical diagnostic setting is likely to provide further insights into this complex field but will not be covered in this review. Clin. Anat. 29:620-627, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27012322

  19. Modes of fossil preservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schopf, J.M.

    1975-01-01

    The processes of geologic preservation are important for understanding the organisms represented by fossils. Some fossil differences are due to basic differences in organization of animals and plants, but the interpretation of fossils has also tended to be influenced by modes of preservation. Four modes of preservation generally can be distinguished: (1) Cellular permineralization ("petrifaction") preserves anatomical detail, and, occasionally, even cytologic structures. (2) Coalified compression, best illustrated by structures from coal but characteristic of many plant fossils in shale, preserves anatomical details in distorted form and produces surface replicas (impressions) on enclosing matrix. (3) Authigenic preservation replicates surface form or outline (molds and casts) prior to distortion by compression and, depending on cementation and timing, may intergrade with fossils that have been subject to compression. (4) Duripartic (hard part) preservation is characteristic of fossil skeletal remains, predominantly animal. Molds, pseudomorphs, or casts may form as bulk replacements following dissolution of the original fossil material, usually by leaching. Classification of the kinds of preservation in fossils will aid in identifying the processes responsible for modifying the fossil remains of both animals and plants. ?? 1975.

  20. Mass Preserving Image Registration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gorbunova, V.; Sporring, J.; Lo, P.;

    2010-01-01

    The paper presents results the mass preserving image registration method in the Evaluation of Methods for Pulmonary Image Registration 2010 (EMPIRE10) Challenge. The mass preserving image registration algorithm was applied to the 20 image pairs. Registration was evaluated using four different...

  1. Genetics Home Reference: Turner syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions Turner syndrome Turner syndrome Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Print All Open All Close All Description Turner syndrome is a chromosomal condition that affects development in ...

  2. Fertility Preservation for Female

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jack Huang; Seang Lin Tan; Ri-Cheng Chian

    2006-01-01

    Preservation of female fertility is an important issue today. However, there are few effective clinical options for preserving female fertility. Firstly, conventional in vitro fertilization (IVF) followed by embryo cryopreservation is an accepted procedure but is not applicable to all women. Embryo freezing is suitable only for women with a male partner and may not be acceptable to some patients due to moral and religious reasons. Ovarian tissue freezing is another option of female fertility preservation but is an invasive procedure and the efficacy of this technique remains to be determined.Oocyte cryopreservation is also method for fertility preservation. Egg freezing is minimally invasive and can avoid the ethical and moral concerns related to cryopreservation of embryos. However, conventional slow freezing/rapid thawing methods are associated with low survival of oocytes. Recent development in vitrification of oocytes appears promising. Therefore, vitrification of unfertilized eggs may be a novel method to preserve female fertility.

  3. The genetic history of Peninsular Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norhalifah, Hanim Kamis; Syaza, Fatnin Hisham; Chambers, Geoffrey Keith; Edinur, Hisham Atan

    2016-07-15

    This article explores the genetic history of the various sub-populations currently living in Peninsular Malaysia. This region has received multiple waves of migrants like the Orang Asli in prehistoric times and the Chinese, Indians, Europeans and Arabs during historic times. There are three highly distinct lineages that make up the Orang Asli; Semang, Senoi and Proto-Malays. The Semang, who have 'Negrito' characteristics, represent the first human settlers in Peninsular Malaysia arriving from about 50,000ya. The Senoi later migrated from Indochina and are a mix between an Asian Neolithic population and the Semang. These Asian genomes probably came in before Austroasiatic languages arrived between 5000 and 4000years ago. Semang and Senoi both now speak Austro-Asiatic languages indicative of cultural diffusion from Senoi to Semang. In contrast, the Proto-Malays who came last to the southern part of this region speak Austronesian language and are Austronesians with some Negrito admixture. It is from this group that the contemporary Malays emerged. Here we provide an overview of the best available genetic evidences (single nucleotide polymorphisms, mitochondrial DNA, Y-chromosome, blood groups, human platelet antigen, human leukocyte antigen, human neutrophil antigen and killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptor) supporting the complex genetic history of Peninsular Malaysia. Large scale sampling and high throughput genetic screening programmes such as those using genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism analyses have provided insights into various ancestral and admixture genetic fractions in this region. Given the now extensive admixture present in the contemporary descendants of ancient sub-populations in Peninsular Malaysia, improved reconstruction of human migration history in this region will require new evidence from ancient DNA in well-preserved skeletons. All other aspects of the highly diverse and complex genetic makeup in Peninsular Malaysia should be

  4. Chromosome anomalies in mouse oocytes after irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigated the cytogenetic effects of X-rays on unfertilized mouse oocytes. NMRI females received an irradiation with 0, 22.2, 66.6, 200, and 600 R during the preovulatory phase 3 hrs after HCG (human chorionic gonadotrophin). This is a stage during oogenesis in which the oocytes pass from late dictyotene to diakinesis. Chromosome anlysis was per formed after ovulation at metaphase II. From these experiments we can draw the following conclusions: X-rays induced during the preovulatory phase a high number of chromosome anomalies. Among these, structural anomalies prevail. 7 out of 144 ovulated oocytes in matched controls carried such an abnormality, whereas after irradiation we observed with 22.2, 66.6, 200, and 600 R, 11 out of 72, 34 out of 108, 89 out of 102, and 122 out of 124, respectively. Irradiation seems also to affect the chromosome segregation during the 1. meiotic division, as we observed after 22.2, 66.6 and 200 R a total of 6 oocytes out of 204 with a supernummary chromosome. In controls, however, no hyperploidy was found in 143 ova. This increase, however, was not significant. Chromosome anomalies, e.g. breaks and deletions that go back to a one-break event increased linearly with increasing dose. Exchanges, however, going back to two-break events fittet best to the linear-quadratic dose-response model. The dose of 600 R seems to represent a kind of borderline in this experiment, because nearly all (122 out 124) carried at least one structural chromosome anomaly. It is also this dose after which the highest frequency of reciprocal translocations was observed in a humpshaped slope in spermatocytes after irradiation of spermatogonia (Preston and Brewen, 1973). With an increasing dosage up to 1,200 R the frequency of translocations decrease again. The elimination of cells, crossing this borderline, might be due to genetic or non-genetic effects. (orig./GSE)

  5. Pattern of Chromosomal Aberrations in Patients from North East Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeedeh Ghazaey

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Chromosomal aberrations are common causes of multiple anomaly syndromes. Recurrent chromosomal aberrations have been identified by conventional cytogenetic methods used widely as one of the most important clinical diagnostic techniques.Materials and Methods: In this retrospective study, the incidences of chromosomal aberrations were evaluated in a six year period from 2005 to 2011 in Pardis Clinical and Genetics Laboratory on patients referred to from Mashhad and other cities in Khorasan province. Karyotyping was performed on 3728 patients suspected of having chromosomal abnormalities.Results: The frequencies of the different types of chromosomal abnormalities were determined, and the relative frequencies were calculated in each group. Among these patients, 83.3% had normal karyotypes with no aberrations. The overall incidences of chromosomal abnormalities were 16.7% including sex and autosomal chromosomal anomalies. Of those, 75.1 % showed autosomal chromosomal aberrations. Down syndrome (DS was the most prevalent autosomal aberration in the patients (77.1%. Pericentric inversion of chromosome 9 was seen in 5% of patients. This inversion was prevalent in patients with recurrent spontaneous abortion (RSA. Sex chromosomal aberrations were observed in 24.9% of abnormal patients of which 61% had Turner’s syndrome and 33.5% had Klinefelter’s syndrome.Conclusion: According to the current study, the pattern of chromosomal aberrations in North East of Iran demonstrates the importance of cytogenetic evaluation in patients who show clinical abnormalities. These findings provide a reason for preparing a local cytogenetic data bank to enhance genetic counseling of families who require this service.

  6. Long-term room temperature preservation of corpse soft tissue: an approach for tissue sample storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Disaster victim identification (DVI) represents one of the most difficult challenges in forensic sciences, and subsequent DNA typing is essential. Collected samples for DNA-based human identification are usually stored at low temperature to halt the degradation processes of human remains. We have developed a simple and reliable procedure for soft tissue storage and preservation for DNA extraction. It ensures high quality DNA suitable for PCR-based DNA typing after at least 1 year of room temperature storage. Methods Fragments of human psoas muscle were exposed to three different environmental conditions for diverse time periods at room temperature. Storage conditions included: (a) a preserving medium consisting of solid sodium chloride (salt), (b) no additional substances and (c) garden soil. DNA was extracted with proteinase K/SDS followed by organic solvent treatment and concentration by centrifugal filter devices. Quantification was carried out by real-time PCR using commercial kits. Short tandem repeat (STR) typing profiles were analysed with 'expert software'. Results DNA quantities recovered from samples stored in salt were similar up to the complete storage time and underscored the effectiveness of the preservation method. It was possible to reliably and accurately type different genetic systems including autosomal STRs and mitochondrial and Y-chromosome haplogroups. Autosomal STR typing quality was evaluated by expert software, denoting high quality profiles from DNA samples obtained from corpse tissue stored in salt for up to 365 days. Conclusions The procedure proposed herein is a cost efficient alternative for storage of human remains in challenging environmental areas, such as mass disaster locations, mass graves and exhumations. This technique should be considered as an additional method for sample storage when preservation of DNA integrity is required for PCR-based DNA typing. PMID:21846338

  7. Demarcation of informative chromosomes in tropical sweet corn inbred lines using microsatellite DNA markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedram Kashiani

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A study of genetic variation among 10 pairs of chromosomes extracted from 13 tropical sweet corn inbred lines, using 99 microsatellite markers, revealed a wide range of genetic diversity. Allelic richness and the number of effective alleles per chromosome ranged from 2.78 to 4.33 and 1.96 to 3.47, respectively, with respective mean values of 3.62 and 2.73. According to the Shannon's information index (I and Nei's gene diversity coefficient (Nei, Chromosome 10 was the most informative chromosome (I = 1.311 and Nei = 0.703, while Chromosome 2 possessed the least (I = 0.762 and Nei = 0.456. Based on linkage disequilibrium (LD measurements for loci less than 50 cM apart on the same chromosome, all loci on Chromosomes 1, 6 and 7 were in equilibrium. Even so, there was a high proportion of genetic variation in Chromosomes 4, 5, 8, 9 and 10, thereby revealing their appropriateness for use in the genetic diversity investigations among tropical sweet corn lines. Chromosome 4, with the highest number of loci in linkage disequilibrium, was considered the best for marker-phenotype association and QTL mapping, followed by Chromosomes 5, 8, 9 and 10.

  8. Chromosome polymorphism in a population of ceratitis capitata

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A morphological chromosomal polymorphism along with the observation of B chromosomes in a natural population of Ceratitis capitata is reported. A variability affecting the centromere size of chromosome 3 is described. The observed B chromosome is minute, heterochromatic and telocentric. The B chromosome was found in the male and female germ cells and it exhibited, in the males, intra-individual numerical variation with OB and IB cells, which suggested a mitotic instability. It was also found, in both sexes, in somatic cells (cerebral ganglia tissue). Only males transmitted the B chromosomes to the progeny. The high rate of transmission suggested a differential utilization of the sperm carrying the B chromosomes or a preferential segregation into secondary spermatocytes. Previously reported linkage relationship between a pupal esterase gene (Est-1) and a pupa colour mutant (nig) has been extended to a line carrying a Y-chromosome (Y,B) shorter than the one previously studied (Y,A). Furthermore, an elaborate crossing scheme has been devised in order to estimate the recombination distances between these two genes and a third one affecting pupal length (lp-1). It is concluded that all three genes are in the same linkage group but Est-1 is far from the other two. In turn, nig and lp-1 are separated by 14.9 map units. It is confirmed that genetic recombination does not regularly occur at high frequency in the male and this frequency is not increased by the varying length of the Y-chromosome. Refs, figs, tabs

  9. Deep Roots for Aboriginal Australian Y Chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergström, Anders; Nagle, Nano; Chen, Yuan; McCarthy, Shane; Pollard, Martin O; Ayub, Qasim; Wilcox, Stephen; Wilcox, Leah; van Oorschot, Roland A H; McAllister, Peter; Williams, Lesley; Xue, Yali; Mitchell, R John; Tyler-Smith, Chris

    2016-03-21

    Australia was one of the earliest regions outside Africa to be colonized by fully modern humans, with archaeological evidence for human presence by 47,000 years ago (47 kya) widely accepted [1, 2]. However, the extent of subsequent human entry before the European colonial age is less clear. The dingo reached Australia about 4 kya, indirectly implying human contact, which some have linked to changes in language and stone tool technology to suggest substantial cultural changes at the same time [3]. Genetic data of two kinds have been proposed to support gene flow from the Indian subcontinent to Australia at this time, as well: first, signs of South Asian admixture in Aboriginal Australian genomes have been reported on the basis of genome-wide SNP data [4]; and second, a Y chromosome lineage designated haplogroup C(∗), present in both India and Australia, was estimated to have a most recent common ancestor around 5 kya and to have entered Australia from India [5]. Here, we sequence 13 Aboriginal Australian Y chromosomes to re-investigate their divergence times from Y chromosomes in other continents, including a comparison of Aboriginal Australian and South Asian haplogroup C chromosomes. We find divergence times dating back to ∼50 kya, thus excluding the Y chromosome as providing evidence for recent gene flow from India into Australia. PMID:26923783

  10. Deep Roots for Aboriginal Australian Y Chromosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergström, Anders; Nagle, Nano; Chen, Yuan; McCarthy, Shane; Pollard, Martin O.; Ayub, Qasim; Wilcox, Stephen; Wilcox, Leah; van Oorschot, Roland A.H.; McAllister, Peter; Williams, Lesley; Xue, Yali; Mitchell, R. John; Tyler-Smith, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Summary Australia was one of the earliest regions outside Africa to be colonized by fully modern humans, with archaeological evidence for human presence by 47,000 years ago (47 kya) widely accepted [1, 2]. However, the extent of subsequent human entry before the European colonial age is less clear. The dingo reached Australia about 4 kya, indirectly implying human contact, which some have linked to changes in language and stone tool technology to suggest substantial cultural changes at the same time [3]. Genetic data of two kinds have been proposed to support gene flow from the Indian subcontinent to Australia at this time, as well: first, signs of South Asian admixture in Aboriginal Australian genomes have been reported on the basis of genome-wide SNP data [4]; and second, a Y chromosome lineage designated haplogroup C∗, present in both India and Australia, was estimated to have a most recent common ancestor around 5 kya and to have entered Australia from India [5]. Here, we sequence 13 Aboriginal Australian Y chromosomes to re-investigate their divergence times from Y chromosomes in other continents, including a comparison of Aboriginal Australian and South Asian haplogroup C chromosomes. We find divergence times dating back to ∼50 kya, thus excluding the Y chromosome as providing evidence for recent gene flow from India into Australia. PMID:26923783

  11. Sequential cloning of chromosomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacks, S.A.

    1991-12-31

    A method for sequential cloning of chromosomal DNA and chromosomal DNA cloned by this method are disclosed. The method includes the selection of a target organism having a segment of chromosomal DNA to be sequentially cloned. A first DNA segment, having a first restriction enzyme site on either side. homologous to the chromosomal DNA to be sequentially cloned is isolated. A first vector product is formed by ligating the homologous segment into a suitably designed vector. The first vector product is circularly integrated into the target organism`s chromosomal DNA. The resulting integrated chromosomal DNA segment includes the homologous DNA segment at either end of the integrated vector segment. The integrated chromosomal DNA is cleaved with a second restriction enzyme and ligated to form a vector-containing plasmid, which is replicated in a host organism. The replicated plasmid is then cleaved with the first restriction enzyme. Next, a DNA segment containing the vector and a segment of DNA homologous to a distal portion of the previously isolated DNA segment is isolated. This segment is then ligated to form a plasmid which is replicated within a suitable host. This plasmid is then circularly integrated into the target chromosomal DNA. The chromosomal DNA containing the circularly integrated vector is treated with a third, retrorestriction enzyme. The cleaved DNA is ligated to give a plasmid that is used to transform a host permissive for replication of its vector. The sequential cloning process continues by repeated cycles of circular integration and excision. The excision is carried out alternately with the second and third enzymes.

  12. Chronopolis Digital Preservation Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Minor

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The Chronopolis Digital Preservation Initiative, one of the Library of Congress’ latest efforts to collect and preserve at-risk digital information, has completed its first year of service as a multi-member partnership to meet the archival needs of a wide range of domains.Chronopolis is a digital preservation data grid framework developed by the San Diego Supercomputer Center (SDSC at UC San Diego, the UC San Diego Libraries (UCSDL, and their partners at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR in Colorado and the University of Maryland's Institute for Advanced Computer Studies (UMIACS.Chronopolis addresses a critical problem by providing a comprehensive model for the cyberinfrastructure of collection management, in which preserved intellectual capital is easily accessible, and research results, education material, and new knowledge can be incorporated smoothly over the long term. Integrating digital library, data grid, and persistent archive technologies, Chronopolis has created trusted environments that span academic institutions and research projects, with the goal of long-term digital preservation.A key goal of the Chronopolis project is to provide cross-domain collection sharing for long-term preservation. Using existing high-speed educational and research networks and mass-scale storage infrastructure investments, the partnership is leveraging the data storage capabilities at SDSC, NCAR, and UMIACS to provide a preservation data grid that emphasizes heterogeneous and highly redundant data storage systems.In this paper we will explore the major themes within Chronopolis, including:a The philosophy and theory behind a nationally federated data grid for preservation. b The core tools and technologies used in Chronopolis. c The metadata schema that is being developed within Chronopolis for all of the data elements. d Lessons learned from the first year of the project.e Next steps in digital preservation using Chronopolis: how we

  13. Bacterial Artificial Chromosome Mutagenesis Using Recombineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumaran Narayanan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Gene expression from bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC clones has been demonstrated to facilitate physiologically relevant levels compared to viral and nonviral cDNA vectors. BACs are large enough to transfer intact genes in their native chromosomal setting together with flanking regulatory elements to provide all the signals for correct spatiotemporal gene expression. Until recently, the use of BACs for functional studies has been limited because their large size has inherently presented a major obstacle for introducing modifications using conventional genetic engineering strategies. The development of in vivo homologous recombination strategies based on recombineering in E. coli has helped resolve this problem by enabling facile engineering of high molecular weight BAC DNA without dependence on suitably placed restriction enzymes or cloning steps. These techniques have considerably expanded the possibilities for studying functional genetics using BACs in vitro and in vivo.

  14. A new chromosome was born: comparative chromosome painting in Boechera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Marcus A

    2015-09-01

    Comparative chromosome painting is a powerful tool to study the evolution of chromosomes and genomes. Analyzing karyotype evolution in cruciferous plants highlights the origin of aberrant chromosomes in apomictic Boechera and further establishes the cruciferous plants as important model system for our understanding of plant chromosome and genome evolution. PMID:26228436

  15. Isoform-Level Gene Expression Profiles of Human Y Chromosome Azoospermia Factor Genes and Their X Chromosome Paralogs in the Testicular Tissue of Non-Obstructive Azoospermia Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi Rastegar, Diba; Sharifi Tabar, Mehdi; Alikhani, Mehdi; Parsamatin, Pouria; Sahraneshin Samani, Fazel; Sabbaghian, Marjan; Sadighi Gilani, Mohammad Ali; Mohammad Ahadi, Ali; Mohseni Meybodi, Anahita; Piryaei, Abbas; Ansari-Pour, Naser; Gourabi, Hamid; Baharvand, Hossein; Salekdeh, Ghasem Hosseini

    2015-09-01

    The human Y chromosome has an inevitable role in male fertility because it contains many genes critical for spermatogenesis and the development of the male gonads. Any genetic variation or epigenetic modification affecting the expression pattern of Y chromosome genes may thus lead to male infertility. In this study, we performed isoform-level gene expression profiling of Y chromosome genes within the azoospermia factor (AZF) regions, their X chromosome counterparts, and few autosomal paralogues in testicular biopsies of 12 men with preserved spermatogenesis and 68 men with nonobstructive azoospermia (NOA) (40 Sertoli-cell-only syndrome (SCOS) and 28 premiotic maturation arrest (MA)). This was undertaken using quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) at the transcript level and Western blotting (WB) and immunohistochemistry (IHC) at the protein level. We profiled the expression of 41 alternative transcripts encoded by 14 AZFa, AZFb, and AZFc region genes (USP9Y, DDX3Y, XKRY, HSFY1, CYORF15A, CYORF15B, KDM5D, EIF1AY, RPS4Y2, RBMY1A1, PRY, BPY2, DAZ1, and CDY1) as well as their X chromosome homologue transcripts and a few autosomal homologues. Of the 41 transcripts, 18 were significantly down-regulated in men with NOA when compared with those of men with complete spermatogenesis. In contrast, the expression of five transcripts increased significantly in NOA patients. Furthermore, to confirm the qPCR results at the protein level, we performed immunoblotting and IHC experiments (based on 24 commercial and homemade antibodies) that detected 10 AZF-encoded proteins. In addition, their localization in testis cell types and organelles was determined. Interestingly, the two missing proteins, XKRY and CYORF15A, were detected for the first time. Finally, we focused on the expression patterns of the significantly altered genes in 12 MA patients with successful sperm retrieval compared to those of 12 MA patients with failed sperm retrieval to predict the success of sperm retrieval in

  16. Dicentric Chromosome Formation and Epigenetics of Centromere Formation in Plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shulan Fu; Zhi Gao; James Birchler; Fangpu Han

    2012-01-01

    Plant centromeres are generally composed of tandem arrays of simple repeats that form a complex chromosome locus where the kinetochore forms and microtubules attach during mitosis and meiosis.Each chromosome has one centromere region,which is essential for accurate division of the genetic material.Recently,chromosomes containing two centromere regions (called dicentric chromosomes)have been found in maize and wheat.Interestingly,some dicentric chromosomes are stable because only one centromere is active and the other one is inactivated.Because such arrays maintain their typical structure for both active and inactive centromeres,the specification of centromere activity has an epigenetic component independent of the DNA sequence.Under some circumstances,the inactive centromeres may recover centromere function,which is called centromere reactivation.Recent studies have highlighted the important changes,such as DNA methylation and histone modification,that occur during centromere inactivation and reactivation.

  17. Radiation preservation of maize

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation preservation of maize was carried out. Radiation doses and sources, shielding materials, packaging materials, chemical radiation effects, biological radiation effects, were discussed. Experimental methods, samples and accessories were also presented. (SMN)

  18. Two preservation theorems

    OpenAIRE

    Zapletal, Jindrich

    2005-01-01

    I prove preservation theorems for countable support iteration of proper forcing concerning certain classes of capacities and submeasures. New examples of forcing notions and connections with measure theory are included.

  19. What Is Fertility Preservation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is the process of saving or protecting eggs, sperm, or reproductive tissue so that a person can ... children 2 . Fertility-preserving options for men include: Sperm cryopreservation (pronounced krahy-oh-prez-er-VEY-shuhn ). ...

  20. Transferring of the 2Ai-2 Chromosome into Wheat ph1b Genetic Background by Using Related Molecular Markers%利用分子标记将2Ai-2染色体转移到小麦ph1b遗传背景的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    雷昊; 张悦; 林志珊; 徐琼芳; 叶兴国

    2012-01-01

    小麦ph1b突变体可诱导部分同源染色体配对和交换,产生遗传上较为稳定、补偿性较好的重组体.将外源染色体引入ph1b的小麦遗传背景是产生目标染色体重组体的基础,但ph1b植株没有明显而稳定的表型性状,难以从表型上进行选择.本研究利用CSph1b缺失区中的分子标记Mads及外源染色体特异的分子标记P4和P68,对小麦-中间偃麦草2Ai-2(2B)异代换系N420与CSph1b的杂种F2群体及其衍生的F5株系进行ph1b-2Ai-2染色体综合体的选择,高效地获得了目标基因型.%Incident of homeologous chromosome pairing and exchange often occur in hexaploid wheat with phlb genetic background which can produce compensable and genetic stable recombinants. Therefore,transferring alien chromosomes into a wheat material with phlb background is the basis of generating translocations between the target chromosomes. However, it is difficult to identify phlb genotype according to its phenotype. In present study,some target plants with phlb and the alien chromosome 2Ai-2 were selected effectively by using molecular markers Mads (on the deletion region of phlb) for phlb,P4 and P68 (on the alien chromosome) for 2Ai-2 in the F2population of CSphlb crossed with N420,a wheat-Thiaopyrum intermedium 2B(2Ai-2)substitution line,and their derivative F5lines.

  1. Chimpanzee chromosome 13 is homologous to human chromosome 2p

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, N. C.; Sun, C. R.Y.; Ho, T.

    1977-01-01

    Similarities between human and chimpanzee chromosomes are shown by chromosome banding techniques and somatic cell hybridization techniques. Cell hybrids were obtained from the chimpanzee lymphocyte LE-7, and the Chinese hamster mutant cell, Gal-2. Experiments showed that the ACPL, MDHs, and Gal-Act genes could be assigned to chimpanzee chromosome 13, and since these genes have been assigned to human chromosme 2p, it is suggested that chimpanzee chromosome 13 is homologous to human chromosome 2p. (HLW)

  2. Chromosome condensation and segmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some aspects of chromosome condensation in mammalians -humans especially- were studied by means of cytogenetic techniques of chromosome banding. Two further approaches were adopted: a study of normal condensation as early as prophase, and an analysis of chromosome segmentation induced by physical (temperature and γ-rays) or chemical agents (base analogues, antibiotics, ...) in order to show out the factors liable to affect condensation. Here 'segmentation' means an abnormal chromosome condensation appearing systematically and being reproducible. The study of normal condensation was made possible by the development of a technique based on cell synchronization by thymidine and giving prophasic and prometaphasic cells. Besides, the possibility of inducing R-banding segmentations on these cells by BrdU (5-bromodeoxyuridine) allowed a much finer analysis of karyotypes. Another technique was developed using 5-ACR (5-azacytidine), it allowed to induce a segmentation similar to the one obtained using BrdU and identify heterochromatic areas rich in G-C bases pairs

  3. FARMLAND PRESERVATION PROGRAMS

    OpenAIRE

    Colyer, Dale

    1998-01-01

    Paper presented at the Seventh International Symposium on Society and Resource Management, University of Missouri, Columbia, May 25-27, 1998. The preservation of farmland is an important issue in most areas of the U.S. and all states have enacted legislation to promote this activity. This article reviews the various policy tools for preserving farmland. Use valuation of farmland for property tax purposes is the most common remedy but it is not effective where there are strong incentives to co...

  4. Digital preservation for heritages

    CERN Document Server

    Lu, Dongming

    2011-01-01

    ""Digital Preservation for Heritages: Technologies and Applications"" provides a comprehensive and up-to-date coverage of digital technologies in the area of cultural heritage preservation, including digitalization, research aiding, conservation aiding, digital exhibition, and digital utilization. Processes, technical frameworks, key technologies, as well as typical systems and applications are discussed in the book. It is intended for researchers and students in the fields of computer science and technology, museology, and archaeology. Dr. Dongming Lu is a professor at College of Computer Sci

  5. Geospatial Data Preservation Prime

    OpenAIRE

    Lauriault, Tracey P.; Hackett, Yvette; Kennedy, Ed

    2013-01-01

    This primer is one in a series of Operational Policy documents being developed by GeoConnections. It is intended to inform Canadian Geospatial Data Infrastructure (CGDI) stakeholders about the nature and scope of digital geospatial data archiving and preservation and the realities, challenges and good practices of related operational policies. Burgeoning growth of online geospatial applications and the deluge of data, combined with the growing complexity of archiving and preserving digita...

  6. Contrasting patterns of karyotype and sex chromosome evolution in Lepidoptera

    OpenAIRE

    Šíchová, Jindra

    2016-01-01

    It is known that chromosomal rearrangements play an important role in speciation by limiting gene flow within and between species. Furthermore, this effect may be enhanced by involvement of sex chromosomes that are known to undergo fast evolution compared to autosomes and play a special role in speciation due to their engagement in postzygotic reproductive isolation. The work presented in this study uses various molecular-genetic and cytogenetic techniques to describe karyotype and sex chromo...

  7. Phenotypic consequences of a mosaic marker chromosome identified by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) as being derived from chromosome 16

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ray, J.H.; Zhou, X.; Pletcher, B.A. [Cornell Univ. Medical College, Manhasset, NY (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    De novo marker chromosomes are detected in 1 in 2500 amniotic fluid samples and are associated with a 10-15% risk for phenotypic abnormality. FISH can be utilized as a research tool to identify the origins of marker chromosomes. The phenotypic consequences of a marker chromosome derived from the short arm of chromosome 16 are described. A 26-year-old woman underwent amniocentesis at 28 weeks gestation because of a prenatally diagnosed tetralogy of Fallot. Follow-up ultrasounds also showed ventriculomegaly and cleft lip and palate. 32 of 45 cells had the karyotype 47,XY,+mar; the remaining cells were 46,XY. The de novo marker chromosome was C-band positive and non-satellited and failed to stain with distamycin A/DAPI. At birth the ultrasound findings were confirmed and dysmorphic features and cryptorchidism were noted. Although a newborn blood sample contained only normal cells, mosaicism was confirmed in 2 skin biopsies. FISH using whole-chromosome painting and alpha-satellite DNA probes showed that the marker chromosome had originated from chromosome 16. As proximal 16q is distamycin A/DAPI positive, the marker is apparently derived from proximal 16p. At 15 months of age, this child is hypotonic, globally delayed and is gavage-fed. His physical examination is significant for microbrachycephaly, a round face, sparse scalp hair, ocular hypertelorism, exotropia, a flat, wide nasal bridge and tip, mild micrognathia, and tapered fingers with lymphedema of hands and feet. Inguinal hernias have been repaired. His features are consistent with those described for patients trisomic for most or all of the short arm of chromosome 16. Marker chromosomes derived from the short arm of chromosome 16 appear to have phenotypic consequences. As the origin of more marker chromosomes are identified using FISH, their karyotype/phenotype correlations will become more apparent, which will permit more accurate genetic counseling.

  8. Genetic Algorithms and Quantum Computation

    OpenAIRE

    Giraldi, Gilson A.; Portugal, Renato; Thess, Ricardo N.

    2004-01-01

    Recently, researchers have applied genetic algorithms (GAs) to address some problems in quantum computation. Also, there has been some works in the designing of genetic algorithms based on quantum theoretical concepts and techniques. The so called Quantum Evolutionary Programming has two major sub-areas: Quantum Inspired Genetic Algorithms (QIGAs) and Quantum Genetic Algorithms (QGAs). The former adopts qubit chromosomes as representations and employs quantum gates for the search of the best ...

  9. Chromosome numbers in Bromeliaceae

    OpenAIRE

    2000-01-01

    The present study reports chromosome numbers of 17 species of Bromeliaceae, belonging to the genera Encholirium, Bromelia, Orthophytum, Hohenbergia, Billbergia, Neoglaziovia, Aechmea, Cryptanthus and Ananas. Most species present 2n = 50, however, Bromelia laciniosa, Orthophytum burle-marxii and O. maracasense are polyploids with 2n = 150, 2n = 100 and 2n = 150, respectively, while for Cryptanthus bahianus, 2n = 34 + 1-4B. B chromosomes were observed in Bromelia plumieri and Hohenbergia aff. u...

  10. Contamination versus preservation of cosmetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundov, Michael Dyrgaard; Moesby, Lise; Zachariae, Claus;

    2009-01-01

    is dominated by a few preservatives: parabens, formaldehyde, formaldehyde releasers, and methylchloroisothiazolinone/methylisothiazolinone. Allergy to preservatives is one of the main reasons for contact eczema caused by cosmetics. Concentration of the same preservative in similar products varies greatly...

  11. A microfabricated platform for chromosome separation and analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    More and more diseases find their cause in malfunctioning genes. There is therefore still need for rapid, low-cost and direct methods to accurately perform genetic analysis. Currently the process takes a long time to complete and is very expensive. We are proposing a system that will be able to isolate white blood cells from blood, lyse them in order to extract the chromosomes and then perform chromosome sorting on chip. As the physical properties of the chromosomes, such as size and dielectric properties, are needed for designing the chip, we have measured them using an AFM microscope

  12. Chromosome Structural Alteration an Unusual Abnormality Characterizing Human Neoplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abolfazl Movafagh

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Ring chromosomes are rare cytogenetic abnormalities that occur in less than 10% of hematopoietic malignancies. They are rare in blood disorder. The present review has focused on the ring chromosome associated with oncology malignancies. Materials and Methods: By reviewing the web-based search for all English scientific peer review articles published, was initiated using Medline/PubMed, Mitelman database (http://cgap.nci.nih.gov/Chromosomes/Mitelman, and other pertinent references on websites about ring chromosomes in Oncology. The software program as End Note was used to handle the proper references for instruction to author. Karyotype descriptions were cited according to ISCN.Conclusion: Ring chromosomes are rare chromosomal aberrations, almost many times are of de novo origin, presenting a different phenotype regarding the loss of genetic material. The karyotype represents the main analysis for detection of ring chromosomes, but other molecular technics are necessary for complete characterization. The information of this review article adds to the spectrum of both morphology and genetic rearrangements in the field of oncology malignancies.

  13. Interspecific Y chromosome variation is sufficient to rescue hybrid male sterility and is influenced by the grandparental origin of the chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araripe, L O; Tao, Y; Lemos, B

    2016-06-01

    Y chromosomes display population variation within and between species. Co-evolution within populations is expected to produce adaptive interactions between Y chromosomes and the rest of the genome. One consequence is that Y chromosomes from disparate populations could disrupt harmonious interactions between co-evolved genetic elements and result in reduced male fertility, sterility or inviability. Here we address the contribution of 'heterospecific Y chromosomes' to fertility in hybrid males carrying a homozygous region of Drosophila mauritiana introgressed in the Drosophila simulans background. In order to detect Y chromosome-autosome interactions, which may go unnoticed in a single-species background of autosomes, we constructed hybrid genotypes involving three sister species: Drosophila simulans, D. mauritiana, and D. sechellia. These engineered strains varied due to: (i) species origin of the Y chromosome (D. simulans or D. sechellia); (ii) location of the introgressed D. mauritiana segment on the D. simulans third chromosome, and (iii) grandparental genomic background (three genotypes of D. simulans). We find complex interactions between the species origin of the Y chromosome, the identity of the D. mauritiana segment and the grandparental genetic background donating the chromosomes. Unexpectedly, the interaction of the Y chromosome and one segment of D. mauritiana drastically reduced fertility in the presence of Ysim, whereas the fertility is partially rescued by the Y chromosome of D. sechellia when it descends from a specific grandparental genotype. The restoration of fertility occurs in spite of an autosomal and X-linked genome that is mostly of D. simulans origin. These results illustrate the multifactorial basis of genetic interactions involving the Y chromosome. Our study supports the hypothesis that the Y chromosome can contribute significantly to the evolution of reproductive isolation and highlights the conditional manifestation of infertility in

  14. Chromosomal abnormalities in patients with autism spectrum disorders from Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Hsiao-Mei; Gau, Susan Shur-Fen; Tsai, Wen-Che; Fang, Jye-Siung; Su, Ying-Cheng; Chou, Miao-Chun; Liu, Shih-Kai; Chou, Wen-Jiun; Wu, Yu-Yu; Chen, Chia-Hsiang

    2013-10-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are childhood-onset neurodevelopmental disorders characterized by verbal communication impairments, social reciprocity deficits, and the presence of restricted interests and stereotyped behaviors. Genetic factors contribute to the incidence of ASD evidently. However, the genetic spectrum of ASD is highly heterogeneous. Chromosomal abnormalities contribute significantly to the genetic deficits of syndromic and non-syndromic ASD. In this study, we conducted karyotyping analysis in a sample of 500 patients (447 males, 53 females) with ASD from Taiwan, the largest cohort in Asia, to the best of our knowledge. We found three patients having sex chromosome aneuploidy, including two cases of 47, XXY and one case of 47, XYY. In addition, we detected a novel reciprocal chromosomal translocation between long arms of chromosomes 4 and 14, designated t(4;14)(q31.3;q24.1), in a patient with Asperger's disorder. This translocation was inherited from his unaffected father, suggesting it might not be pathogenic or it needs further hits to become pathogenic. In line with other studies, our study revealed that subjects with sex chromosomal aneuploidy are liable to neurodevelopmental disorders, including ASD, and conventional karyotyping analysis is still a useful tool in detecting chromosomal translocation in patients with ASD, given that array-based comparative genomic hybridization technology can provide better resolution in detecting copy number variations of genomic DNA. PMID:24132905

  15. Historic Preservation Information CFM Website

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The VA Historic Preservation Office keeps information about VA's programs to comply with Federal preservation requirements, and also interesting information about...

  16. Genetic effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Modeling analyses are used to predict the outcomes for two nuclear power plant accident scenarios, the first in which the population received a chronic dose of 0.1 Gy (10 rad) over a 50 year period, the second in which an equivalent population receives acute dose of 2 Gy. In both cases the analyses are projected over a period of five generations. The risk analysis takes on two major forms: the increase in genetic disease that would be observed in the immediate offspring of the exposed population, and the subsequent transmission of the newly induced mutations through future generations. The classes of genetic diseases studied are: dominant gene mutation, X-linked gene mutation, chromosome disorders and multifactorial disorders which involve the interaction of many mutant genes and environmental factors. 28 references, 3 figures, 5 tables

  17. Beyond the chromosome: the prevalence of unique extra-chromosomal bacteriophages with integrated virulence genes in pathogenic Staphylococcus aureus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryan Utter

    Full Text Available In Staphylococcus aureus, the disease impact of chromosomally integrated prophages on virulence is well described. However, the existence of extra-chromosomal prophages, both plasmidial and episomal, remains obscure. Despite the recent explosion in bacterial and bacteriophage genomic sequencing, studies have failed to specifically focus on extra-chromosomal elements. We selectively enriched and sequenced extra-chromosomal DNA from S. aureus isolates using Roche-454 technology and uncovered evidence for the widespread distribution of multiple extra-chromosomal prophages (ExPΦs throughout both antibiotic-sensitive and -resistant strains. We completely sequenced one such element comprised of a 43.8 kbp, circular ExPΦ (designated ФBU01 from a vancomycin-intermediate S. aureus (VISA strain. Assembly and annotation of ФBU01 revealed a number of putative virulence determinants encoded within a bacteriophage immune evasion cluster (IEC. Our identification of several potential ExPΦs and mobile genetic elements (MGEs also revealed numerous putative virulence factors and antibiotic resistance genes. We describe here a previously unidentified level of genetic diversity of stealth extra-chromosomal elements in S. aureus, including phages with a larger presence outside the chromosome that likely play a prominent role in pathogenesis and strain diversity driven by horizontal gene transfer (HGT.

  18. Chromosomal engineering and crop improvement in bread wheat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bread wheat is not only the world's most important food crop but is also an excellent model system for genetic analysis of allopolyploid plants. Diploid nuclear and cytoplasm donors are now known for polyploid wheats. The origin of disomic allopolyploid species can be traced back to a single plant. Establishment of nucleocytoplasmic compatibility is critical in allopolyploid speciation. Polyploid wheats show disomic inheritance that is genetically controlled. Genetic expression arises from interactive and dosage dependent effects. Apart form polyploidy, the basic wheat genome (1n = 1x = 7) is also huge (5.3 x 109 bp). Because of the availability of a large number of cytogenic stocks, target mapping is possible. It shows that the gene rich, recombinogenic regions are restricted to the distal ends of the chromosome arms and gene cloning by chromosome landing is feasible. Because of polyploidy, the wheat genome is highly buffered and transfer of chromosome segments of large linkage blocks is more important than single genes. There are spectacular examples of alien chromosome segments transferred to wheat, either by physical means (irradiation) or by genetic manipulation, which have immensely improved productivity. Therefore, enhancing the efficiency of chromosome engineering protocols is a worthwhile goal in wheat improvement. (author). 15 refs, 3 figs, 1 tab

  19. Molecular mapping of chromosomes 17 and X. Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barker, D.F.

    1989-12-31

    The basic aims of this project are the construction of high density genetic maps of chromosomes 17 and X and the utilization of these maps for the subsequent isolation of a set of physically overlapping DNA segment clones. The strategy depends on the utilization of chromosome specific libraries of small (1--15 kb) segments from each of the two chromosomes. Since the time of submission of our previous progress report, we have refined the genetic map of markers which we had previously isolated for chromosome 17. We have completed our genetic mapping in CEPH reference and NF1 families of 15 markers in the pericentric region of chromosome 17. Physical mapping results with three probes, were shown be in very close genetic proximity to the NF1 gene, with respect to two translocation breakpoints which disrupt the activity of the gene. All three of the probes were found to lie between the centromere and the most proximal translocation breakpoint, providing important genetic markers proximal to the NF1 gene. Our primary focus has shifted to the X chromosome. We have isolated an additional 30 polymorphic markers, bringing the total number we have isolated to over 80. We have invested substantial effort in characterizing the polymorphisms at each of these loci and constructed plasmid subclones which reveal the polymorphisms for nearly all of the loci. These subclones are of practical value in that they produce simpler and stronger patterns on human genomic Southern blots, thus improving the efficiency of the genetic mapping experiments. These subclones may also be of value for deriving DNA sequence information at each locus, necessary for establishing polymerase chain reaction primers specific for each locus. Such information would allow the use of each locus as a sequence tagged site.

  20. Chromosomal phylogeny and evolution of gibbons (Hylobatidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Stefan; Hollatz, Melanie; Wienberg, Johannes

    2003-11-01

    Although human and gibbons are classified in the same primate superfamily (Hominoidae), their karyotypes differ by extensive chromosome reshuffling. To date, there is still limited understanding of the events that shaped extant gibbon karyotypes. Further, the phylogeny and evolution of the twelve or more extant gibbon species (lesser apes, Hylobatidae) is poorly understood, and conflicting phylogenies have been published. We present a comprehensive analysis of gibbon chromosome rearrangements and a phylogenetic reconstruction of the four recognized subgenera based on molecular cytogenetics data. We have used two different approaches to interpret our data: (1) a cladistic reconstruction based on the identification of ancestral versus derived chromosome forms observed in extant gibbon species; (2) an approach in which adjacent homologous segments that have been changed by translocations and intra-chromosomal rearrangements are treated as discrete characters in a parsimony analysis (PAUP). The orangutan serves as an "outgroup", since it has a karyotype that is supposed to be most similar to the ancestral form of all humans and apes. Both approaches place the subgenus Bunopithecus as the most basal group of the Hylobatidae, followed by Hylobates, with Symphalangus and Nomascus as the last to diverge. Since most chromosome rearrangements observed in gibbons are either ancestral to all four subgenera or specific for individual species and only a few common derived rearrangements at subsequent branching points have been recorded, all extant gibbons may have diverged within relatively short evolutionary time. In general, chromosomal rearrangements produce changes that should be considered as unique landmarks at the divergence nodes. Thus, molecular cytogenetics could be an important tool to elucidate phylogenies in other species in which speciation may have occurred over very short evolutionary time with not enough genetic (DNA sequence) and other biological divergence to

  1. Training for Preservation Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirjam M. Foot

    1999-05-01

    Full Text Available In August 1997 the first of a series of summer schools in Preservation Management was held at the Archivschule in Marburg (Germany. The school was organised by the ECPA, the LIBER Division on Preservation, ICA and the Archivschule itself and was aimed at archivists and librarians in management positions from European institutions. It dealt with managerial, organisational and financial aspects of preservation and required active participation by those attending. Apart from introductory sessions by the teaching staff at the Archivschule, a large part of the course took the form of working groups, discussions, assignments and role play, to which participants were expected to take their own experience and problems. The school was conducted in German. Topics, spread over five days, ranged from preservation in the context of the core activities of libraries and archives; planning of preservation projects; general management issues, such as resource management, budgeting, priority setting, communication and effecting change; to more detailed considerations of day-to-day issues, such as storage, disaster control, microfilming and digitising, mass conservation processes, and moulds and fungi.

  2. Genetic radiation effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three types of genetic damage arising from irradiation are identified; (1) gene or point mutations at the level of the DNA molecule, which contains the genetic code. (2) chromosome breakage which may lead to translocations (3) uncontrolled distribution of the chromosomes into the daughter cells. Tabular information is drawn mainly from the UNSCEAR report, 1977, on the risk factors of genetic damage from various irradiation levels. Some detailed effects on genetic structure are described for recessive mutations, dominant mutations and trans-locations. Experimental work has in some cases been guided by X-ray irradiation with single and double dose effects, including tests on mice, for which subsequent herdity may be examined. (G.C.)

  3. Genetic effects, 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chromosomes of the children of A-bomb survivors and appropriate control groups in Hiroshima and Nagasaki have been investigated to see if there are any genetic effects of A-bomb irradiation on the germ cell chromosomes of their parents. Data thus obtained have been compared with those derived from surveys on consecutive live-born infants undertaken by investigators in western countries, as well as those from induced abortuses in Japan, in terms of the frequency of individuals with both sex chromosome aneuploidy and autosomal balanced structural rearrangements. A preliminary statistical analysis shows no significant difference in frequency of chromosome anomalies in children born to the exposed compared with children of non-exposed parents, or with neonates or abortuses. The need for continuing this survey is clearly indicated. (auth.)

  4. Study of 25 X-chromosome SNPs in the Portuguese

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pereira, Vania; Tomas Mas, Carmen; Amorim, António;

    2011-01-01

    The importance of X-chromosome markers in individual identifications, population genetics, forensics and kinship testing is getting wide recognition. In this work, we studied the distributions of 25 X-chromosome single nucleotide polymorphisms (X-SNPs) in population samples from Northern, Central...... and Southern Portugal (n=305). The data were also compared with previous data from the Mediterranean area confirming a general genetic homogeneity among populations in the region. The X-SNP distribution in the three Portuguese regional samples did not show any significant substructure and the X-SNP...

  5. Genetics and developmental biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Progress is reported on research activities in the fields of mutagenesis in Haemophilus influenzae and Escherichia coli; radioinduced chromosomal aberrations in mammalian germ cells; effects of uv radiation on xeroderma pigmentosum skin cells; mutations in Chinese hamster ovary cells; radioinduced hemoglobin variants in the mouse; analysis of mutants in yeast; Drosophila genetics; biochemical genetics of Neurospora; DNA polymerase activity in Xenopus laevis oocytes; uv-induced damage in Bacillus subtilis; and others

  6. Advanced Digital Preservation

    CERN Document Server

    Giaretta, David

    2011-01-01

    There is growing recognition of the need to address the fragility of digital information, on which our society heavily depends for smooth operation in all aspects of daily life. This has been discussed in many books and articles on digital preservation, so why is there a need for yet one more? Because, for the most part, those other publications focus on documents, images and webpages -- objects that are normally rendered to be simply displayed by software to a human viewer. Yet there are clearly many more types of digital objects that may need to be preserved, such as databases, scientific da

  7. Haploinsufficiency and the sex chromosomes from yeasts to humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver Stephen G

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Haploinsufficient (HI genes are those for which a reduction in copy number in a diploid from two to one results in significantly reduced fitness. Haploinsufficiency is increasingly implicated in human disease, and so predicting this phenotype could provide insights into the genetic mechanisms behind many human diseases, including some cancers. Results In the present work we show that orthologues of Saccharomyces cerevisiae HI genes are preferentially retained across the kingdom Fungi, and that the HI genes of S. cerevisiae can be used to predict haploinsufficiency in humans. Our HI gene predictions confirm known associations between haploinsufficiency and genetic disease, and predict several further disorders in which the phenotype may be relevant. Haploinsufficiency is also clearly relevant to the gene-dosage imbalances inherent in eukaryotic sex-determination systems. In S. cerevisiae, HI genes are over-represented on chromosome III, the chromosome that determines yeast's mating type. This may be a device to select against the loss of one copy of chromosome III from a diploid. We found that orthologues of S. cerevisiae HI genes are also over-represented on the mating-type chromosomes of other yeasts and filamentous fungi. In animals with heterogametic sex determination, accumulation of HI genes on the sex chromosomes would compromise fitness in both sexes, given X chromosome inactivation in females. We found that orthologues of S. cerevisiae HI genes are significantly under-represented on the X chromosomes of mammals and of Caenorhabditis elegans. There is no X inactivation in Drosophila melanogaster (increased expression of X in the male is used instead and, in this species, we found no depletion of orthologues to yeast HI genes on the sex chromosomes. Conclusion A special relationship between HI genes and the sex/mating-type chromosome extends from S. cerevisiae to Homo sapiens, with the microbe being a useful model for

  8. Molecular mapping of chromosomes 17 and X. Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barker, D.F.

    1991-01-15

    Progress toward the construction of high density genetic maps of chromosomes 17 and X has been made by isolating and characterizing a relatively large set of polymorphic probes for each chromosome and using these probes to construct genetic maps. We have mapped the same polymorphic probes against a series of chromosome breakpoints on X and 17. The probes could be assigned to over 30 physical intervals on the X chromosome and 7 intervals on 17. In many cases, this process resulted in improved characterization of the relative locations of the breakpoints with respect to each other and the definition of new physical intervals. The strategy for isolation of the polymorphic clones utilized chromosome specific libraries of 1--15 kb segments from each of the two chromosomes. From these libraries, clones were screened for those detecting restriction fragment length polymorphisms. The markers were further characterized, the chromosomal assignments confirmed and in most cases segments of the original probes were subcloned into plasmids to produce probes with improved signal to noise ratios for use in the genetic marker studies. The linkage studies utilize the CEPH reference families and other well-characterized families in our collection which have been used for genetic disease linkage work. Preliminary maps and maps of portions of specific regions of 17 and X are provided. We have nearly completed a map of the 1 megabase Mycoplasma arthritidis genome by applying these techniques to a lambda phage library of its genome. We have found bit mapping to be an efficient means to organize a contiguous set of overlapping@ clones from a larger genome.

  9. Genetic disorders as collective phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Genetic disorders due to human chromosome aberrations in number are discussed from the point of view of Molecular Genetics. The etiology of trisomy is discussed in the light of the collective variables recently introduced and an age-dependent metabolic disorder is suggested as a possible etiological factor. (author). 11 refs

  10. Y chromosome microdeletions in Turkish infertile men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zamani Ayse

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available AIMS: To detect the frequency and types of both chromosomal abnormalities and Y chromosome microdeletions in infertile men attending to our university intracytoplasmic sperm injection ICSI/IVF centre and fertile control subjects in our patient population. SETTINGS AND DESIGN: A total of 50 infertile men who were referred to IVF center of Meram medical faculty were selected for the molecular azospermia factor (AZF screening program. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Karyotype analysis and polymerase chain reaction amplification using 15 Y-specific sequence-tagged sites of AZF region were done. RESULTS: The total prevalence of chromosomal abnormalities was found to be 10% (5/50, including 4 patients with numerical and 1 patient with structural abnormalities. Overall, 4 of the 50 patients tested (8% exhibited deletions of the Y chromosome, 3 of them being azospermic and 1 of them oligospermic men. The frequency of the microdeletions in subgroups with azospermia and oligozoospermia was found to be 10.7% (3/29 and 4.7% (1/21 respectively. Microdeletions of AZFb and AZFc regions were detected in all of the 4 patients. Neither AZFa nor AZFd microdeletions were indicated. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest that one must know whether there is a genetic cause for male infertility before patients can be subjected to ISCI or testicular sperm extraction (TESE/ISCI treatment.

  11. Johannsen's criticism of the chromosome theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roll-Hansen, Nils

    2014-01-01

    The genotype theory of Wilhelm Johannsen (1857-1927) was an important contribution to the founding of classical genetics. This theory built on Johannsen's experimental demonstration that hereditary change is discontinuous, not continuous as had been widely assumed. Johannsen is also known for his criticism of traditional Darwinian evolution by natural selection, as well as his criticism of the classical Mendelian chromosome theory of heredity. He has often been seen as one of the anti-Darwinians that caused the "eclipse of Darwinism" in the early 20th century, before it was saved by the Modern Synthesis. This article focuses on Johannsen's criticism of the chromosome theory. He was indeed skeptical of the notion of the chromosomes as the sole carriers of heredity, but he praised the mapping of Mendelian genes on the chromosomes as a major step forward. Johannsen objected that these genes could not account for the whole of heredity, and that the stability of the genotype depended on much more than the stability of Mendelian genes. For Johannsen, the genotype, as a property of the whole organism, was the fundamental and empirically well-established entity. PMID:25345701

  12. Chromosome numbers in Bromeliaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cotias-de-Oliveira Ana Lúcia Pires

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study reports chromosome numbers of 17 species of Bromeliaceae, belonging to the genera Encholirium, Bromelia, Orthophytum, Hohenbergia, Billbergia, Neoglaziovia, Aechmea, Cryptanthus and Ananas. Most species present 2n = 50, however, Bromelia laciniosa, Orthophytum burle-marxii and O. maracasense are polyploids with 2n = 150, 2n = 100 and 2n = 150, respectively, while for Cryptanthus bahianus, 2n = 34 + 1-4B. B chromosomes were observed in Bromelia plumieri and Hohenbergia aff. utriculosa. The chromosome number of all species was determined for the first time, except for Billbergia chlorosticta and Cryptanthus bahianus. Our data supports the hypothesis of a basic number of x = 25 for the Bromeliaceae family and decreasing aneuploidy in the genus Cryptanthus.

  13. Those amazing dinoflagellate chromosomes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PETER J RIZZO

    2003-01-01

    Dinoflagellates are a very large and diverse group of eukaryotic algae that play a major role in aquatic food webs of both fresh water and marine habitats. Moreover, the toxic members of this group pose a health threat in the form of red tides. Finally, dinoflagellates are of great evolutionary importance,because of their taxonomic position, and their unusual chromosome structure and composition. While the cytoplasm of dinoflagellates is typically eukaryotic, the nucleus is unique when compared to the nucleus of other eukaryotes. More specifically, while the chromosomes of all other eukaryotes contain histones,dinoflagellate chromosomes lack histones completely. There are no known exceptions to this observation: all dinoflagellates lack histones, and all other eukaryotes contain histones. Nevertheless, dinoflagellates remain a relatively unstudied group of eukaryotes.

  14. A genetic study of the effects of the repair-deficient mei-9sup(a) mutation in Drosophila on spontaneous and X-ray-induced paternal sex chromosome loss

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The repair-deficient mutant, mei-9sup(a) in Drosophila melanogaster was investigated regarding its effect on spontaneous and X-ray induced chromosome loss in male postmeiotic cells. From matings of males carrying a mei-9sup(a) or an ordinary ring-X and a doubly marked Y chromosome (Bsup(s)Yy+) with mei-9sup(a) or ordinary females, the spontaneous frequencies of complete loss, partial loss, and inferred ring-X loss (based on shifts in sex ratio female:male) were significantly higher with mei-9sup(a) than with non-mei-9sup(a). When males were given 3000 rad X-irradiation, frequencies of induced partial loss, inferred ring-X loss and the reduction in the number of progeny per femal were significantly greater with mei-9sup(a) than with non-mei-9sup(a). The result provide evidence that the mei-9sup(a) is a potentiator of both spontaneous and X-ray-induced chromosome lesions in sperm of the Drosophila male. Evidence is presented which implicates the presence of mei-9sup(a) in the P1 female and not the male as (at least) largely responsible for the characteristic mei-9sup(a) effects. (orig.)

  15. Chromosomal rearrangements in cattle and pigs revealed by chromosome microdissection and chromosome painting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yerle Martine

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A pericentric inversion of chromosome 4 in a boar, as well as a case of (2q-;5p+ translocation mosaicism in a bull were analysed by chromosome painting using probes generated by conventional microdissection. For the porcine inversion, probes specific for p arms and q arms were produced and hybridised simultaneously on metaphases of a heterozygote carrier. In the case of the bovine translocation, two whole chromosome probes (chromosome 5, and derived chromosome 5 were elaborated and hybridised independently on chromosomal preparations of the bull who was a carrier of the mosaic translocation. The impossibility of differentiating chromosomes 2 and der(2 from other chromosomes of the metaphases did not allow the production of painting probes for these chromosomes. For all experiments, the quality of painting was comparable to that usually observed with probes obtained from flow-sorted chromosomes. The results obtained allowed confirmation of the interpretations proposed with G-banding karyotype analyses. In the bovine case, however, the reciprocity of the translocation could not be proven. The results presented in this paper show the usefulness of the microdissection technique for characterising chromosomal rearrangements in species for which commercial probes are not available. They also confirmed that the main limiting factor of the technique is the quality of the chromosomal preparations, which does not allow the identification of target chromosomes or chromosome fragments in all cases.

  16. Selection for digital preservation

    OpenAIRE

    Seadle, Michael

    2004-01-01

    This editorial discusses long-term archiving and long-term access to digital documents, with an emphasis on criteria for selection. Selecting materials for digital preservation depends on whether the materials are both valuable and endangered, whether appropriate digitization procedures and standards for these materials exist, and whether copyright allows reasonable access for educational and research purposes.

  17. Preservation in New Buildings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Kitching

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available In the United Kingdom (as in many other countries increasing attention is being paid to the importance of each library and archive having a written preservation strategy endorsed by its governing body. So increasingly we are asking: where does „preservation“ begin and what are its top priorities? Some would say preservation begins with the definition of collecting policies to ensure that only relevant items are acquired in the first place, and therefore that no unnecessary costs are incurred on the long-term care of unwanted and unconsulted items. Others might argue that the first priority must be the careful appraisal of existing holdings to determine their preservation and conservation requirements and to prioritise their treatment. Or should preservation begin with damage-limitation: restricting the physical handling of books and documents, on the one hand by providing whenever possible surrogate copies in digital formats or microform, and on the other hand by offering at least basic protection through appropriate boxing and packaging? This, surely, goes hand-in-hand with the education of staff and readers about the importance of treating rare or unique materials with proper respect.

  18. Foodstuffs preservation by ionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document contains all the papers presented at the meeting on foodstuffs preservation by ionization. These papers deal especially with the food ionization process, its development and the view of the food industry on ionization. Refs and figs (F.M.)

  19. Derivative chromosome 11 in a child resulting from a complex rearrangement involving chromosomes 3, 6 and 11 in father: Significance of parental karyotyping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prabhat Ranjan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The presence of derivative chromosome in a child with phenotypic features necessitates the need of parental karyotyping to ascertain the exact amount of loss or gain of the genetic material. The aim of this study was to emphasize the importance of parental karyotyping. Cytogenetic evaluation of the proband and his father were carried out at Laboratory. Cytogenetic analysis was performed on phytohemagglutinin stimulated cultures. The derivative chromosome 11 in proband was ascertained to have additional material from chromosome 6p arising from complex chromosomal rearrangement in the father. Karyotyping is the basic, cost-effective preliminary investigation in a child with mental subnormality or congenital anomalies.

  20. Chromosome mapping of the GD3 synthase gene (SIAT8) in human and mouse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuda, Yoichi; Saito, Toshiyuki [National Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Nara, Kiyomitsu [Tokyo Metropolitan Inst. of Medical Science (Japan)] [and others

    1996-02-15

    This article reports on the genetic mapping of the human and mouse GD3 synthase gene (SIAT8) using fluorescence in situ hybridization and interspecific backcross analysis. The human gene was localized to human chromosome 12p12.1-p11.2; the mouse homologue was localized to mouse chromosome 6, which has been shown to be syntenic with the short arm of human chromosome 12, suggesting a common evolution. 16 refs., 1 fig.