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Sample records for chromosomes 3q 4q

  1. Linkage of atopic dermatitis to chromosomes 4q22, 3p24 and 3q21

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Ulla; Møller-Larsen, Steffen; Nyegaard, Mette

    2009-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a common, itchy skin disease of complex inheritance characterized by dermal and epidermal inflammation. The heritability is considerable and well documented. To date, four genome scans have examined the AD phenotype, showing replicated linkage at 3p26-22, 3q13-21 and 18q11...

  2. Fine-scale mapping of type I allergy candidate loci suggests central susceptibility genes on chromosomes 3q, 4q and Xp

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haagerup, A; Børglum, A D; Binderup, H G

    2004-01-01

    and prevention. Like for other complex disorders, achievement of the knowledge necessary depends on confirmation of reported genomic candidate regions. METHODS: We performed a two-stage fine-scale linkage analysis in 11 selected candidate regions on chromosome 3p, 3q, 4p, 4q, 5q, 6p, 9p, 12q, 12qter, 18q and Xp...

  3. Prenatal diagnosis of 4p and 4q subtelomeric microdeletion in de novo ring chromosome 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbas, Halit; Cine, Naci; Erdemoglu, Mahmut; Atay, Ahmet Engin; Simsek, Selda; Turkyilmaz, Aysegul; Fidanboy, Mehmet

    2013-01-01

    Ring chromosomes are unusual abnormalities that are observed in prenatal diagnosis. A 23-year-old patient (gravida 1, para 0) referred for amniocentesis due to abnormal maternal serum screening result in the 16th week of second pregnancy. Cytogenetic analysis of cultured amniyotic fluid cells revealed out ring chromosome 4. Both maternal and paternal karyotypes were normal. Terminal deletion was observed in both 4p and 4q arms of ring chromosome 4 by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). However deletion was not observed in the WHS critical region of both normal and ring chromosome 4 by an additional FISH study. These results were confirmed by means of array-CGH showing terminal deletions on 4p16.3 (130 kb) and 4q35.2 (2.449 Mb). In the 21th week of pregnancy, no gross anomalia, except two weeks symmetric growth retardation, was present in the fetal ultrasonographic examination. According to our review of literature, this is the first prenatal case with 4p and 4q subtelomeric deletion of ring chromosome 4 without the involvement of WHS critical region. Our report describes the prenatal case with a ring chromosome 4 abnormality completely characterized by array-CGH which provided complementary data for genetic counseling of prenatal diagnosis.

  4. Prenatal Diagnosis of 4p and 4q Subtelomeric Microdeletion in De Novo Ring Chromosome 4

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    Halit Akbas

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Ring chromosomes are unusual abnormalities that are observed in prenatal diagnosis. A 23-year-old patient (gravida 1, para 0 referred for amniocentesis due to abnormal maternal serum screening result in the 16th week of second pregnancy. Cytogenetic analysis of cultured amniyotic fluid cells revealed out ring chromosome 4. Both maternal and paternal karyotypes were normal. Terminal deletion was observed in both 4p and 4q arms of ring chromosome 4 by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH. However deletion was not observed in the WHS critical region of both normal and ring chromosome 4 by an additional FISH study. These results were confirmed by means of array-CGH showing terminal deletions on 4p16.3 (130 kb and 4q35.2 (2.449 Mb. In the 21th week of pregnancy, no gross anomalia, except two weeks symmetric growth retardation, was present in the fetal ultrasonographic examination. According to our review of literature, this is the first prenatal case with 4p and 4q subtelomeric deletion of ring chromosome 4 without the involvement of WHS critical region. Our report describes the prenatal case with a ring chromosome 4 abnormality completely characterized by array-CGH which provided complementary data for genetic counseling of prenatal diagnosis.

  5. Chromosome 4q;10q translocations; Comparison with different ethnic populations and FSHD patients

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    Zhang Cheng

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by the weakness of facial, shoulder-girdle and upper arm muscles. Most patients with FSHD have fewer numbers of tandem repeated 3.3-kb KpnI units on chromosome 4q35. Chromosome 10q26 contains highly homologous KpnI repeats, and inter-chromosomal translocation has been reported. Methods To clarify the influence on the deletion of the repeats, we surveyed three different ethnic populations and FSHD patients using the BglII/BlnI dosage test. Results The frequency of translocation in 153 Japanese, 124 Korean, 114 Chinese healthy individuals and 56 Japanese 4q35-FSHD patients were 27.5%, 29.8%, 19.3%, and 32.1%, respectively. The ratio of '4 on 10' (trisomy and quatrosomy of chromosome 4 was higher than that of '10 on 4' (nullsomy and monosomy of chromosome 4 in all populations. Conclusions The inter-chromosomal exchange was frequently observed in all four populations we examined, and no significant difference was observed between healthy and diseased groups.

  6. Allergic rhinitis - a total genome-scan for susceptibility genes suggests a locus on chromosome 4q24-q27

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haagerup, A; Bjerke, T; Schøitz, P O

    2001-01-01

    definition of both clinical allergic rhinitis and confirmed specific allergy were chosen. Thirty-three affected sib-pair families qualified for the scan that was undertaken using 446 microsatellite markers. Non-parametric linkage results were obtained from MAPMAKER/SIBS computer program. The study revealed...... one major candidate region on chromosome 4q24-q27 (LOD=2.83) and eight minor candidate regions 2q12-q33, 3q13, 4p15-q12, 5q13-q15, 6p24-p23, 12p13, 22q13, and Xp21 (LOD=1.04-1.63) likely to contain susceptibility genes for allergic rhinitis. Our findings did not support a previous report of linkage...... of allergic rhinitis to chromosome 12q14-q24 but they added positive evidence to the asthma and atopy candidate regions 2q33 and 6p23. Further identification of the specific genes involved in allergic rhinitis will give opportunities for improved diagnosis and treatment....

  7. Highly significant linkage to chromosome 3q13.31 for rhinitis and related allergic diseases

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    Brasch-Andersen, C; Haagerup, A; Borglum, AD

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Allergic diseases such as asthma and rhinitis have closely related phenotypes and often occur with atopy. They show strong familial and intra-individual clustering, suggesting overlapping disease aetiology. Various loci and candidate genes have been suggested to underlie allergy. Many...... in candidate regions showing maximum likelihood scores (MLS) > or =1.5 in the genome-wide scans. RESULTS: Twenty eight microsatellite markers in a denser map on chromosome 3q were analysed in 236 allergy sib-pair families including 125 sib pairs with rhinitis. We report significant evidence for linkage...... to chromosome 3q13.31 for rhinitis (MLS 5.55, identity by descent (IBD) 63.9%) and atopy (increased specific immunoglobulin E) (MLS 3.71, IBD 61.7%). We obtained an MLS of 5.1 (IBD 67.3%) at 3q13.31 when sib pairs with both rhinitis and atopy were analysed. CONCLUSION: This study reports the first statistically...

  8. Epstein-Barr virus integrates frequently into chromosome 4q, 2q, 1q and 7q of Burkitt's lymphoma cell line (Raji).

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    Gao, Jianming; Luo, Xiaomin; Tang, Ke; Li, Xiaoling; Li, Guiyuan

    2006-09-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) integration into a Burkitt's lymphoma (BL) cell line (Raji) was investigated, using polymerase chain reaction (PCR), Southern hybridization, genomic library screening and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). BaMHIW fragments of the EBV genome and DNA sequences of the viral latent membrane protein (LMP)1 and LMP2 genes were detected in Raji cells. BaMHI-digested high-molecular weight DNA from Raji cells generated 4 and 10 kb, 23 kb fragments that hybridized to Probe-1 (EBV genome 13232-16189) and Probe-2 (EBV genome 5-3271). Genomic library for Raji cells was constructed. Plaques (1 x 10(5)) were screened with Probe-2, and four positive clones were obtained. Chromosomal integration of EBV DNA was detected in the Raji cell. The viral integration sites included 1p, 1q, 2q, 3p, 3q, 4q, 5q, 6q, 7p, 7q, 9q, 11p, 14q and 15q. Despite this multiplicity of integration sites, integration showed high frequency only at the sites 4q, 2q, 1q and 7q; 64% of the total signals were found in these four chromosomal bands. No viral integration occurred in chromosomes 16-22 or the sex chromosomes (X, Y). This study is the first comprehensive FISH analysis of EBV integration into the chromosomes of the Raji cell line. The findings support the notion that EBV integrates into the Raji cell genome non-randomly.

  9. Highly significant linkage to chromosome 3q13.31 for rhinitis and related allergic diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brasch-Andersen, C; Haagerup, A; Borglum, AD

    2006-01-01

    or all are still inconclusive. Following genome-wide scans on multiple phenotypes, we previously suggested that chromosome 3q13.12-q21.2 harbours an allergy locus. OBJECTIVE: To identify candidate loci in the Danish population, two additional independent sets of sib-pair families were fine-scale mapped...... in candidate regions showing maximum likelihood scores (MLS) > or =1.5 in the genome-wide scans. RESULTS: Twenty eight microsatellite markers in a denser map on chromosome 3q were analysed in 236 allergy sib-pair families including 125 sib pairs with rhinitis. We report significant evidence for linkage...... to chromosome 3q13.31 for rhinitis (MLS 5.55, identity by descent (IBD) 63.9%) and atopy (increased specific immunoglobulin E) (MLS 3.71, IBD 61.7%). We obtained an MLS of 5.1 (IBD 67.3%) at 3q13.31 when sib pairs with both rhinitis and atopy were analysed. CONCLUSION: This study reports the first statistically...

  10. Genetic Linkage of Bietti Crystallin Corneoretinal Dystrophy to Chromosome 4q35

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    Jiao, Xiaodong; Munier, Francis L.; Iwata, Fumino; Hayakawa, Mutsuko; Kanai, Atsushi; Lee, June; Schorderet, Daniel F.; Chen, Muh-Shy; Kaiser-Kupfer, Muriel; Hejtmancik, J. Fielding

    2000-01-01

    Bietti crystalline corneoretinal dystrophy (BCD) is an autosomal recessive retinal degeneration characterized by multiple glistening intraretinal dots scattered over the fundus, degeneration of the retina, and sclerosis of the choroidal vessels, ultimately resulting in progressive night blindness and constriction of the visual field. Although BCD has been associated with abnormalities in fatty-acid metabolism and absence of fatty-acid binding by two cytosolic proteins, the genetic basis of BCD is unknown. We report linkage of the BCD locus to D4S426 (maximum LOD score [Zmax] 4.81; recombination fraction [θ] 0), D4S2688 (Zmax=3.97; θ=0), and D4S2299 (Zmax=5.31; θ=0), on chromosome 4q35-4qtel. Multipoint analysis confirmed linkage to the region telomeric of D4S1652 with a Zmax of 5.3 located 4 cM telomeric of marker D4S2930. PMID:11001583

  11. A new case of interstitial deletion of chromosome 3q, del(3q)(q13.12q21.3), with agenesis of the corpus callosum.

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    Genuardi, M; Calvieri, F; Tozzi, C; Coslovi, R; Neri, G

    1994-10-01

    We describe a boy with an interstitial deletion of the proximal portion of chromosome 3q. Prominent physical characteristics were a dysmorphic face with apparent hypertelorism, signs of prenatal lymphedema, foot contractures and agenesis of the corpus callosum. The finding of corpus callosum agenesis in a previously reported patient with an overlapping deletion suggests an additional locus for this malformation.

  12. Genome-wide linkage scan for colorectal cancer susceptibility genes supports linkage to chromosome 3q

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    Velculescu Victor E

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Colorectal cancer is one of the most common causes of cancer-related mortality. The disease is clinically and genetically heterogeneous though a strong hereditary component has been identified. However, only a small proportion of the inherited susceptibility can be ascribed to dominant syndromes, such as Hereditary Non-Polyposis Colorectal Cancer (HNPCC or Familial Adenomatous Polyposis (FAP. In an attempt to identify novel colorectal cancer predisposing genes, we have performed a genome-wide linkage analysis in 30 Swedish non-FAP/non-HNPCC families with a strong family history of colorectal cancer. Methods Statistical analysis was performed using multipoint parametric and nonparametric linkage. Results Parametric analysis under the assumption of locus homogeneity excluded any common susceptibility regions harbouring a predisposing gene for colorectal cancer. However, several loci on chromosomes 2q, 3q, 6q, and 7q with suggestive linkage were detected in the parametric analysis under the assumption of locus heterogeneity as well as in the nonparametric analysis. Among these loci, the locus on chromosome 3q21.1-q26.2 was the most consistent finding providing positive results in both parametric and nonparametric analyses Heterogeneity LOD score (HLOD = 1.90, alpha = 0.45, Non-Parametric LOD score (NPL = 2.1. Conclusion The strongest evidence of linkage was seen for the region on chromosome 3. Interestingly, the same region has recently been reported as the most significant finding in a genome-wide analysis performed with SNP arrays; thus our results independently support the finding on chromosome 3q.

  13. Trisomy 17 in a bonobo (Pan paniscus) and deletion of 3q in a lowland gorilla (Gorilla gorilla gorilla): comparison with human trisomy 18 and human deletion 4q syndrome.

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    Lear, T L; Houck, M L; Zhang, Y W; Debnar, L A; Sutherland-Smith, M R; Young, L; Jones, K L; Benirschke, K

    2001-01-01

    A female bonobo (Pan paniscus) born at the San Diego Zoo exhibited inability to nurse and progressive weakness plus multiple congenital abnormalities including aural canal atresia and stenosis, malformed auricles, clenched hands, lordosis, agenesis of the caudal vertebra and cardiac abnormalities. Chromosome analysis identified the bonobo as being trisomic for chromosome 17, the homolog of human chromosome 18. Genotyping with human microsatellites suggested the extra chromosome was maternal in origin. In addition, a male lowland gorilla (Gorilla gorilla gorilla), also born at the zoo, exhibited postnatal growth retardation, facial dysmorphisms and small hands with short fingers. Karyotype analysis revealed the gorilla carried a deletion of the distal q arm of chromosome 3, the homolog of human chromosome 4. The phenotypic and karyotypic abnormalities found in the bonobo and gorilla were consistent with the characteristics of human trisomy 18 and human deletion 4q syndrome, respectively. Copyright 2002 S. Karger AG, Basel

  14. Suggestive linkage of familial mesial temporal lobe epilepsy to chromosome 3q26.

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    Fanciulli, Manuela; Di Bonaventura, Carlo; Egeo, Gabriella; Fattouch, Jinane; Dazzo, Emanuela; Radovic, Slobodanka; Spadotto, Alessandro; Giallonardo, Anna Teresa; Nobile, Carlo

    2014-02-01

    To describe the clinical findings in a family with a benign form of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy and to identify the causative genetic factors. All participants were personally interviewed and underwent neurologic examination. The affected subjects underwent EEG and most of them neuroradiological examinations (MRI). All family members were genotyped with the HumanCytoSNP-12 v1.0 beadchip and linkage analysis was performed with Merlin and Simwalk2 programs. Exome sequencing was performed on HiSeq2000, after exome capture with SureSelect 50 Mb kit v2.0. The family had 6 members with temporal lobe epilepsy. Age at seizure onset ranged from 8 to 13 years. Five patients had epigastric auras often associated to oro-alimentary automatic activity, 3 patients presented loss of contact, and 2 experienced secondary generalizations. Febrile seizures occurred in 2 family members, 1 of whom also had temporal lobe epilepsy. EEG showed focal slow waves and epileptic abnormalities on temporal regions in 1 patient and was normal in the other affected individuals. MRI was normal in all temporal lobe epilepsy patients. We performed single nucleotide polymorphism-array linkage analysis of the family and found suggestive evidence of linkage (LOD score=2.106) to a region on chromosome 3q26. Haplotype reconstruction supported the linkage data and showed that the majority of unaffected family members carried the haplotype at risk. Whole exome sequencing failed to identify pathogenic mutations in genes of the candidate region. Our data suggest the existence of a novel locus for benign familial mesial temporal lobe epilepsy on chromosome 3q26. Our failure to identify pathogenic mutations in genes of this region may be due to limitations of the exome sequencing technology. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. True 3q chromosomal amplification in squamous cell lung carcinoma by FISH and aCGH molecular analysis: impact on targeted drugs.

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    Matteo Brunelli

    Full Text Available Squamous lung carcinoma lacks specific "ad hoc" therapies. Amplification of chromosome 3q is the most common genomic aberration and this region harbours genes having role as novel targets for therapeutics. There is no standard definition on how to score and report 3q amplification. False versus true 3q chromosomal amplification in squamous cell lung carcinoma may have tremendous impact on trials involving drugs which target DNA zones mapping on 3q. Forty squamous lung carcinomas were analyzed by FISH to assess chromosome 3q amplification. aCGH was performed as gold-standard to avoid false positive amplifications. Three clustered patterns of fluorescent signals were observed. Eight cases out of 40 (20% showed ≥8 3q signals. Twenty out of 40 (50% showed from 3 to 7 signals. The remaining showed two fluorescent signals (30%. When corrected by whole chromosome 3 signals, only cases with ≥8 signals maintained a LSI 3q/CEP3 ratio >2. Only the cases showing 3q amplification by aCGH (+3q25.3-3q27.3 showed ≥8 fluorescent signals at FISH evidencing a 3q/3 ratio >2. The remaining cases showed flat genomic portrait at aCGH on chromosome 3. We concluded that: 1 absolute copy number of 3q chromosomal region may harbour false positive interpretation of 3q amplification in squamous cell carcinoma; 2 a case results truly "amplified for chromosome 3q" when showing ≥8 fluorescent 3q signals; 3 trials involving drugs targeting loci on chromosome 3q in squamous lung carcinoma therapy have to consider false versus true 3q chromosomal amplification.

  16. Deletion polymorphism at chromosome 3q26.1 and oral squamous cell carcinoma

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    KAWACHI, HOMARE; SUGAHARA, KEISUKE; NAKAMURA, YASUTAKA; KATAKURA, AKIRA; MINAGUCHI, KIYOSHI; SHIBAHARA, TAKAHIKO

    2013-01-01

    Several recent studies have investigated DNA instability in malignancies including deletions and duplications of part of the chromosome using array-based comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) analysis. Using the same approach on oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) tissue samples, we found a frequent deletion at chromosome 3q26.1 in OSCC patients; this polymorphism showed a gene frequency of 0.293–0.368 in healthy volunteers (n=60) and 0.129–0.195 in OSCC patients (n=54). Detailed analysis around the polymorphic region revealed the deletion breakage point. A significant association of gene frequency for the deletion polymorphism between healthy volunteers and patients implicated genetic factors related to this polymorphism in the development of OSCC. Currently, no gene is predicted to lie within the 3,606-kbp region around the polymorphism. Thus, although a single-gene model could not explain the occurrence of OSCC, we believe that examining this polymorphism could be useful in identifying risk factors for OSCC. PMID:23258604

  17. 1.3 Mb de novo Deletion in Chromosome Band 3q29 Associated with Normal Intelligence in a Child

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    abnormalities 2/21 2/22 Nasal Voice 2/22 2/23 Ligamentous laxity þ 1/22 2/23 Macrocephaly 1/22 1/23 Cleft lip/ palate 1/22 1/23 Abnormal skin pigmentation 1...per formal IQ testing , was not found to have frank mental retardation as has been previously reported among patients with chromosome 3q29 terminal...chromosome 3q29 microdeletion syndrome to include the possibility of normal intelligence as corroborated by formal, longitudinal psycho-educational testing

  18. Neuropeptide Y receptor genes on human chromosome 4q31-q32 map to conserved linkage groups on mouse chromosomes 3 and 8

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    Lutz, C.M.; Frankel, W.N. [Jackson Lab., Bar Harbor, ME (United States); Richards, J.E. [Univ. of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)] [and others

    1997-05-01

    Npy1r and Npy2r, the genes encoding mouse type 1 and type 2 neuropeptide Y receptors, have been mapped by interspecific backcross analysis. Previous studies have localized the human genes encoding these receptors to chromosome 4q31-q32. We have now assigned Npy1r and Npy2r to conserved linkage groups on mouse Chr 8 and Chr 3, respectively, which correspond to the distal region of human chromosome 4q. Using yeast artificial chromosomes, we have estimated the distance between the human genes to be approximately 6 cM. Although ancient tandem duplication events may account for some closely spaced G-protein-coupled receptor genes, the large genetic distance between the human type 1 and type 2 neuropeptide Y receptor genes raises questions about whether this mechanism accounts for their proximity. 20 refs., 1 fig.

  19. SNP identification, linkage and radiation hybrid mapping of the porcine lamin A/C (LMNA) gene to chromosome 4q.

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    Wagenknecht, D; Stratil, A; Bartenschlager, H; Van Poucke, M; Peelman, L J; Majzlík, I; Geldermann, H

    2006-08-01

    The lamins are components of nuclear lamina and they have a profound influence on nuclear structure and functions. They are encoded by three genes, LMNA, LMNB1 and LMNB2. A genomic fragment of the porcine LMNA gene (822 bp; from exons 7 to 9) was amplified by polymerase chain reaction and comparatively sequenced. Four single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were identified in intronic sequences: G162A, G208A, T367G and C618T. The SNPs are within the restriction sites for enzymes Bsh1236I, HpaII, AluI and Bsh1236I respectively. Allele frequencies at SNPs G208A, T367G and C618T were determined by using eight pig breeds. Linkage analysis in the Hohenheim Meishan x Piétrain family placed the LMNA gene in the chromosome 4q linkage group, between MEF2D and GBA (MEF2D - 3.0 cM - LMNA - 0.2 cM - GBA). In radiation hybrid mapping LMNA was most significantly linked to SW270 on chromosome 4 (39 cR; LOD = 7.86). The LMNA gene is located in the quantitative trait loci region for some carcass traits on chromosome 4q.

  20. Deletion of Chromosome 4q Predicts Outcome in Stage II Colon Cancer Patients

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    R. P. M. Brosens

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Around 30% of all stage II colon cancer patients will relapse and die of their disease. At present no objective parameters to identify high-risk stage II colon cancer patients, who will benefit from adjuvant chemotherapy, have been established. With traditional histopathological features definition of high-risk stage II colon cancer patients is inaccurate. Therefore more objective and robust markers for prediction of relapse are needed. DNA copy number aberrations have proven to be robust prognostic markers, but have not yet been investigated for this specific group of patients. The aim of the present study was to identify chromosomal aberrations that can predict relapse of tumor in patients with stage II colon cancer.

  1. Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease: Localization of the second gene to chromosome 4q13-q23

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    Kimberling, W.J.; Kumar, S.; Kenyon, J.B.; Connolly, C.J. (Creighton Univ. Medical School, Omaha, NE (United States)); Gabow, P.A. (Colorado Univ. Health Sciences Center, Denver, CO (United States)); Somlo, S. (Albert Einstein School of Medicine, Bronx, NY (United States))

    1993-12-01

    At least two loci are known to exist for autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). One was localized to 16p, but the second less common locus has remained unlinked. Over 100 microsatellite markers, distributed across all chromosomes, have been typed on informative family members from the large Sicilian kindred in which the genetic heterogeneity was first discovered. Both the affected and the unaffected status of every family member used in the study were consulted in the successful localization of a second ADPKD gene to chromosome 4q. It was found to be flanked by the markers D4S231 and D4S414, defining a segment that spans about 9 cM. The new locus has been designated PKD4. This second localization will allow researchers to target another ADPKD gene for isolation in an effort to understand the pathogenesis of this common disorder. Furthermore, when flanking markers for the second ADPKD gene are used in conjunction with flanking markers for PKD1, the accuracy of the diagnosis of the subtype of ADPKD present in any particular family will be enhanced. This will improve the accuracy of linkage-based presymptomatic diagnoses by reducing the error due to genetic heterogeneity. 42 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Assignment of electron transfer flavoprotein-ubiquinone oxidoreductase (ETF-QO) to human chromosome 4q33 by fluorescence in situ hybridization and somatic cell hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spector, E B; Seltzer, W K; Goodman, S I

    1999-08-01

    Electron transfer flavoprotein-ubiquinone oxidoreductase (ETF-QO) is a nuclear-encoded protein located in the inner mitochondrial membrane. Inherited defects of ETF-QO cause glutaric acidemia type II. We here describe the localization of the ETF-QO gene to human chromosome 4q33 by somatic cell hybridization and fluorescence in situ hybridization. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  3. Multivariate analysis of anxiety disorders yields further evidence of linkage to chromosomes 4q21 and 7p in panic disorder families.

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    Logue, Mark W; Bauver, Sarah R; Knowles, James A; Gameroff, Marc J; Weissman, Myrna M; Crowe, Raymond R; Fyer, Abby J; Hamilton, Steven P

    2012-04-01

    Replication has been difficult to achieve in linkage studies of psychiatric disease. Linkage studies of panic disorder have indicated regions of interest on chromosomes 1q, 2p, 2q, 3, 7, 9, 11, 12q13, 12q23, and 15. Few regions have been implicated in more than one study. We examine two samples, the Iowa (IA) and the Columba panic disorder families. We use the fuzzy-clustering method presented by Kaabi et al. [Kaabi et al. (2006); Am J Hum Genet 78: 543-553] to summarize liability to panic disorder, agoraphobia, simple phobia, and social phobia. Kaabi et al. applied this method to the Yale panic disorder linkage families and found evidence of linkage to chromosomes 4q21, 4q32, 7p, and 8. When we apply the same method to the IA families, we obtain overlapping evidence of linkage to chromosomes 4q21 and 7p. Additionally, we find evidence of linkage on chromosomes 1, 5, 6, 16, and 22. The Columbia (CO) data does not indicate linkage to any of the Kaabi et al. peaks, instead implicating chromosomes 2 and 22q11 (2 Mb from COMT). There is some evidence of overlapping linkage between the IA and CO datasets on chromosomes 1 and 14. While use of fuzzy clustering has not produced complete concordance across datasets, it has produced more than previously seen in analyses of panic disorder proper. We conclude that chromosomes 4q21 and 7p should be considered strong candidate regions for panic and fear-associated anxiety disorder loci. More generally, this suggests that analyses including multiple aspects of psychopathology may lead to greater consistency across datasets. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. The existence of Usher syndrome type III proven by assignment of its locus to chromosome 3q by linkage

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    Sankila, E.M.; Aittomaeki, K.; Kaeaeriaeinen, H. [Univ. of Helsinki (Finland)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Usher syndromes (USH) are genetically and clinically heterogeneous autosomal recessive disorders with combined visual and hearing loss. Usher syndrome type III (USH3) is characterized by progressive bilateral sensorineural deafness and progressive pigmentary retinopathy leading to blindness. USH3 has been conservatively estimated to comprise 2% of the three clinical USH types, and its existence has even been questioned. However, based on clinical criteria, in Finland 42% of USH patients have USH3 suggesting gene enrichment by a founder effect. Genes whose defects cause USH have so far been mapped to four different locations in three chromosomes. We have excluded the previously mapped USH regions as the site of USH3 disease locus. Systematic search for USH3 by genetic linkage analyses of 11 multiple affected families using highly polymorphic microsatellite markers revealed significant linkage with five markers mapping to chromosome 3q. Two-point lod scores at zero recombination distance were 5.24 for D3S1308, and 7.71 for D3S1299, respectively. Multipoint linkage analysis gave a maximum lod score of 8.68 at D3S1299 assigning USH3 to the 4 cM interval between markers D3S1555 and D3S1279 in 3q21-25. Of 20 parental disease chromosomes, 15 had identical alleles at three marker loci covering 3 cM genetic distance and the putative USH3 mutation. These findings prove the existence of USH3 as a distinct entity, pinpoint a fifth USH locus, and suggest enrichment of a major mutation in the isolated Finnish population.

  5. Segregation of a paternal insertional translocation results in partial 4q monosomy or 4q trisomy in two siblings

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    Hegmann, K.M.; Spikes, A.S.; Orr-Urtreger, A.; Shaffer, L.G. [Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States)

    1996-01-02

    A genetics evaluation was requested for a 6-week-old infant with multiple congenital malformations including mild craniofacial anomalies, truncal hypotonia, hypospadias, and a ventriculoseptal defect. Blood obtained for chromosome analysis revealed an abnormal chromosome 4. Paternal chromosome analysis showed a 46,XY, inv ins (3;4)(p21.32;q25q21.2), inv(4)(p15.3q21.2) karyotype. Therefore, the proband`s chromosome 4 was the unbalanced product of this insertional translocation from the father resulting in partial monosomy 4q. Additionally, the derivative 4 had a pericentric inversion which was also seen in the father`s chromosome 4. During genetic counseling, the proband`s 2-year-old brother was evaluated. He was not felt to be abnormal in appearance, but was described as having impulsive behavior. Chromosome analysis on this child revealed 46, XY, der(3) inv ins(3;4)(p21.32;q25q21.2)pat. This karyotype results in partial trisomy 4q. FISH using two-color {open_quotes}painting{close_quotes} probes for chromosomes 3 and 4 confirmed the G-banded interpretation in this family. The segregation seen in this family resulted in both reciprocal products being observed in the two children, with partial 4q monosomy showing multiple congenital anomalies, and partial 4q trisomy showing very few phenotypic abnormalities. 13 refs., 5 figs.

  6. Atrial Fibrillation associated chromosome 4q25 variants are not associated with PITX2c expression in human adult left atrial appendages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shamone R Gore-Panter

    Full Text Available Atrial Fibrillation (AF, the most common sustained arrhythmia, has a strong genetic component, but the mechanism by which common genetic variants lead to increased AF susceptibility is unknown. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS have identified that the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs most strongly associated with AF are located on chromosome 4q25 in an intergenic region distal to the PITX2 gene. Our objective was to determine whether the AF-associated SNPs on chromosome 4q25 were associated with PITX2c expression in adult human left atrial appendages. Analysis of a lone AF GWAS identified four independent AF risk SNPs at chromosome 4q25. Human adult left atrial appendage tissue was obtained from 239 subjects of European Ancestry and used for SNP analysis of genomic DNA and determination of PITX2c RNA expression levels by quantitative PCR. Subjects were divided into three groups based on their history of AF and pre-operative rhythm. AF rhythm subjects had higher PITX2c expression than those with history of AF but in sinus rhythm. PITX2c expression was not associated with the AF risk SNPs in human adult left atrial appendages in all subjects combined or in each of the three subgroups. However, we identified seven SNPs modestly associated with PITX2c expression located in the introns of the ENPEP gene, ∼54 kb proximal to PITX2. PITX2c expression in human adult left atrial appendages is not associated with the chromosome 4q25 AF risk SNPs; thus, the mechanism by which these SNPs are associated with AF remains enigmatic.

  7. Genetic abnormalities in sporadic parathyroid adenomas: Loss of heterozygosity for chromosome 3q markers flanking the calcium receptor locus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, D.B.; Samowitz, W.S.; Davis, K. [Univ. of Utah School of Medicine, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)] [and others

    1995-10-01

    Inactivating mutations of the parathyroid cell calcium receptor (CaR) gene cause one form of familial benign/hypocalciuric hypercalcemia, and in homozygous form, cause neonatal severe primary hyperparathyroidism with parathyroid hyperplasia. Thus, we postulated that partial or total loss of CaR function might contribute to calcium insensitivity or even stimulate cell proliferation in sporadic parathyroid adenomas (PAds). To examine this possibility, we sought loss of heterozygosity (LOH) for markers flanking the CaR locus (3cen-3q21) in 35 PAds. We used 16 highly-polymorphic PCR-based markers in paired normal and tumor DNA, extracted from archived surgical specimens. Nineteen to twenty-four of the DNA pairs were informative with at least one marker. In two informative pairs, we found LOH for markers D3S1303, D3S1267, or D3S1269, which are tightly-linked with and flank the CaR locus. In one tumor, deletion mapping confined the lost area between D3S1271 and D3S1238 (41.7 centimorgans, cM). In the other tumor, LOH spanned most of chromosome 3, ranging at least from D3S1307 to D3S1311 (271.4 cM). LOH was confirmed by repetition of the experiments and quantified by phosphorimaging. Thus, we found LOH encompassing the CaR locus in approximately 10% of sporadic PAds. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that loss of CaR function may occur in PAds, with functional consequences for calcium sensitivity and cell proliferation. 20 refs., 2 figs.

  8. Colorectal cancer linkage on chromosomes 4q21, 8q13, 12q24, and 15q22.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mine S Cicek

    Full Text Available A substantial proportion of familial colorectal cancer (CRC is not a consequence of known susceptibility loci, such as mismatch repair (MMR genes, supporting the existence of additional loci. To identify novel CRC loci, we conducted a genome-wide linkage scan in 356 white families with no evidence of defective MMR (i.e., no loss of tumor expression of MMR proteins, no microsatellite instability (MSI-high tumors, or no evidence of linkage to MMR genes. Families were ascertained via the Colon Cancer Family Registry multi-site NCI-supported consortium (Colon CFR, the City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center, and Memorial University of Newfoundland. A total of 1,612 individuals (average 5.0 per family including 2.2 affected were genotyped using genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism linkage arrays; parametric and non-parametric linkage analysis used MERLIN in a priori-defined family groups. Five lod scores greater than 3.0 were observed assuming heterogeneity. The greatest were among families with mean age of diagnosis less than 50 years at 4q21.1 (dominant HLOD = 4.51, α = 0.84, 145.40 cM, rs10518142 and among all families at 12q24.32 (dominant HLOD = 3.60, α = 0.48, 285.15 cM, rs952093. Among families with four or more affected individuals and among clinic-based families, a common peak was observed at 15q22.31 (101.40 cM, rs1477798; dominant HLOD = 3.07, α = 0.29; dominant HLOD = 3.03, α = 0.32, respectively. Analysis of families with only two affected individuals yielded a peak at 8q13.2 (recessive HLOD = 3.02, α = 0.51, 132.52 cM, rs1319036. These previously unreported linkage peaks demonstrate the continued utility of family-based data in complex traits and suggest that new CRC risk alleles remain to be elucidated.

  9. Colorectal Cancer Linkage on Chromosomes 4q21, 8q13, 12q24, and 15q22

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicek, Mine S.; Cunningham, Julie M.; Fridley, Brooke L.; Serie, Daniel J.; Bamlet, William R.; Diergaarde, Brenda; Haile, Robert W.; Le Marchand, Loic; Krontiris, Theodore G.; Younghusband, H. Banfield; Gallinger, Steven; Newcomb, Polly A.; Hopper, John L.; Jenkins, Mark A.; Casey, Graham; Schumacher, Fredrick; Chen, Zhu; DeRycke, Melissa S.; Templeton, Allyson S.; Winship, Ingrid; Green, Roger C.; Green, Jane S.; Macrae, Finlay A.; Parry, Susan; Young, Graeme P.; Young, Joanne P.; Buchanan, Daniel; Thomas, Duncan C.; Bishop, D. Timothy; Lindor, Noralane M.; Thibodeau, Stephen N.; Potter, John D.; Goode, Ellen L.

    2012-01-01

    A substantial proportion of familial colorectal cancer (CRC) is not a consequence of known susceptibility loci, such as mismatch repair (MMR) genes, supporting the existence of additional loci. To identify novel CRC loci, we conducted a genome-wide linkage scan in 356 white families with no evidence of defective MMR (i.e., no loss of tumor expression of MMR proteins, no microsatellite instability (MSI)-high tumors, or no evidence of linkage to MMR genes). Families were ascertained via the Colon Cancer Family Registry multi-site NCI-supported consortium (Colon CFR), the City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center, and Memorial University of Newfoundland. A total of 1,612 individuals (average 5.0 per family including 2.2 affected) were genotyped using genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism linkage arrays; parametric and non-parametric linkage analysis used MERLIN in a priori-defined family groups. Five lod scores greater than 3.0 were observed assuming heterogeneity. The greatest were among families with mean age of diagnosis less than 50 years at 4q21.1 (dominant HLOD = 4.51, α = 0.84, 145.40 cM, rs10518142) and among all families at 12q24.32 (dominant HLOD = 3.60, α = 0.48, 285.15 cM, rs952093). Among families with four or more affected individuals and among clinic-based families, a common peak was observed at 15q22.31 (101.40 cM, rs1477798; dominant HLOD = 3.07, α = 0.29; dominant HLOD = 3.03, α = 0.32, respectively). Analysis of families with only two affected individuals yielded a peak at 8q13.2 (recessive HLOD = 3.02, α = 0.51, 132.52 cM, rs1319036). These previously unreported linkage peaks demonstrate the continued utility of family-based data in complex traits and suggest that new CRC risk alleles remain to be elucidated. PMID:22675446

  10. Refining the localization of the PKD2 locus on chromosome 4q by linkage analysis in Spanish families with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease type 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    San Millan, J.L.; Viribay, M.; Peral, B.; Moreno, F. [Unidad de Genetica Molecular, Madrid (Spain); Martinez, I. [Hospital de Galdacano (Spain); Weissenbach, J. [Genethon, Evry (France)

    1995-01-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is a genetically heterogeneous disorder. At least two distinct forms of ADPKD are now well defined. In {approximately}86% of affected European families, a gene defect localized to 16p13.3 was responsible for ADPKD, while a second locus has been recently localized to 4q13-q23 as candidate for the disease in the remaining families. We present confirmation of linkage to microsatellite markers on chromosome 4q in eight Spanish families with ADPKD, in which the disease was not linked to 16p13.3. By linkage analysis with marker D4S423, a maximum lod score of 9.03 at a recombination fraction of .00 was obtained. Multipoint linkage analysis, as well as a study of recombinant haplotypes, placed the PKD2 locus between D4S1542 and D4S1563, thereby defining a genetic interval of {approximately}1 cM. The refined map will serve as a genetic framework for additional genetic and physical mapping of the region and will improve the accuracy of presymptomatic diagnosis of PKD2. 25 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  11. A high-resolution linkage map of the achondroplasia critical region on human chromosome 4q16.3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiller, G.E.; Polumbo, P.A. [Vanderbilt Univ. School of Medicine, Nashville, TN (United States)

    1994-09-01

    Achondroplasia is the most common nonlethal skeletal dysplasia, with an incidence of greater than 1/40,000 births. Recently, a random search of the genome using highly polymorphic autosomal markers has localized the gene for achondroplasia to the distal portion of human chromosome 4p. We report here the construction of a high-resolution linkage map of the critical region including the achondroplasia locus. The CEPH panel of pedigrees was genotyped at several loci using highly polymorphic markers, including the Huntington locus (IT15), D4S43, D4S115, and the gene for the {beta}-subunit of rod cGMP phosphodiesterase (PDEB). These data were incorporated into the CEPH v.6.6 database and a multipoint map was generated using the LINKAGE programs v.5.1. Based on reported recombination events in achondroplasia pedigrees, the gene for achondroplasia lies distal to the anonymous marker D4S43, in the 8 cM region defined as follows: cen-IT15-D4S43-D4S98-[D4S115-D4S111]-D4S90-PDEB. The disparity between the genetic distance and the physical distance (2 mB) among these markers likely reflects the high rate of recombination within the region. Extension of this linkage map further toward the telomere and identification of distal recombinant markers should expedite efforts directed toward isolation of the gene for achondroplasia.

  12. Chromosomal localization of the genes encoding the kinetochore proteins CENPE and DENPF to human chromosomes 4q24{r_arrow}q25 and 1q32{r_arrow}q41, respectively, by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Testa, J.R.; Zhou, J.Y.; Bell, D.W.; Yen, T.J. [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    1994-10-01

    CENPE and CENPF are human kinetochore proteins of 312 and {approximately}400 kDa, respectively. As part of an effort to characterize the functions of these two proteins, we have used their respective cDNAs to map their human chromosomal locations by fluorescence in situ hybridization. The gene that encodes CENPE, a kinetochore-associated motor protein that is postulated to segregate chromosomes during mitosis, maps to chromosome 4q24{r_arrow}q25. The CENPF gene, which encodes a structural protein of the kinetochore, maps to chromosome 1q32{r_arrow}q41 within close proximity to the genetic locus that is linked to Van der Woude syndrome. 8 refs., 1 fig.

  13. Genetic refinement of dominant optic atrophy (OPA1) locus to within a 2 cM interval of chromosome 3q.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Votruba, M; Moore, A T; Bhattacharya, S S

    1997-01-01

    Autosomal dominant optic atrophy (OPA, MIM 165500) is an eye disease characterised by variable optic atrophy and reduction in visual acuity. It has an insidious onset in the first decade of life and is clinically highly heterogeneous. It is associated with a centrocecal scotoma of varying size and density and an acquired blue-yellow dyschromatopsia. Recent studies of three large Danish pedigrees have mapped a gene for dominant optic atrophy (OPA1) to a 10 cM region on chromosome 3q, between markers D3S1314 and D3S1265 (3q28-qter). Genetic linkage analysis in five British pedigrees confirms mapping to chromosome 3q28-qter. Haplotype analysis of a seven generation pedigree positions the disease causing gene between loci D3S3590 and D3S1305, corresponding to a genetic distance of 2 cM. This represents a significant linkage refinement and should facilitate positional cloning of the disease gene. PMID:9039986

  14. Chromosome r(10(p15.3q26.12 in a newborn child: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonasson Jon

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ring chromosome 10 is a rare cytogenetic finding. Of the less than 10 reported cases we have found in the literature, none was characterized using high-resolution microarray analysis. Ring chromosomes are frequently unstable due to sister chromatid exchanges and mitotic failures. When mosaicism is present, the interpretation of genotype-phenotype correlations becomes extremely difficult. Results We report on a newborn girl with growth retardation, microcephaly, congenital heart defects, dysmorphic features and psychomotor retardation. Karyotyping revealed a non-mosaic apparently stable ring chromosome 10 replacing one of the normal homologues in all analyzed metaphases. High-resolution oligonucleotide microarray analysis showed a de novo approximately 12.5 Mb terminal deletion 10q26.12 -> qter and a corresponding 285 kb terminal deletion of 10pter -> p15.3. Conclusion This case demonstrates that an increased nuchal translucency thickness detected by early ultrasonography should preferably lead to not only QF-PCR for the diagnosis of Down syndrome but also karyotyping. In the future, microarray analysis, which needs further evaluation, might become the method of choice. The clinical phenotype of our patient was in agreement with that of patients with a terminal 10q deletion. For the purpose of genotype-phenotype analysis, there seems to be no need for a "ring syndrome" concept.

  15. Pericentric inversion of chromosome 11 (p14.3q21) associated with developmental delays, hypopigmented skin lesions and abnormal brain MRI findings - a new case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zachor, D.A.; Lofton, M. [Univ. of Alabama, Birmingham (United States)

    1994-09-01

    We report 3 year old male, referred for evaluation of developmental delays. Pregnancy was complicated by oligohydramnios, proteinuria and prematurity. Medical history revealed: bilateral inguinal hernia, small scrotal sac, undescended testes, developmental delays and behavioral problems. The child had: microcephaly, facial dysmorphic features, single palmar creases, hypopigmented skin lesions of variable size, intermittent exotropia and small retracted testes. Neurological examination was normal. Cognitive level was at the average range with mild delay in his adaptive behavior. Expressive language delays and severe articulation disorder were noted, as well as clumsiness, poor control and precision of gross and fine motor skills. Chromosomal analysis of peripheral leukocytes indicated that one of the number 11 chromosomes had undergone a pericentric inversion with breakpoints on the short (p) arm at band p14.3 and the long (q) arm at band q21. An MRI of the brain showed mild delay in myelinization pattern of white matter. Chromosome 11 inversion in other sites was associated with Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome and several malignancies. To our knowledge this is the first description of inv(11)(p14.3q21) that is associated with microcephaly, dysmorphic features, hypopigmented skin lesions and speech delay. This inversion may disrupt the expression of the involved genes. However, additional cases with the same cytogenetic anomaly are needed to explore the phenotypic significance of this disorder.

  16. Mapping of Spinocerebellar Ataxia 13 to Chromosome 19q13.3-q13.4 in a Family with Autosomal Dominant Cerebellar Ataxia and Mental Retardation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman-Bert, Alexandra; Stevanin, Giovanni; Netter, Jean-Claude; Rascol, Olivier; Brassat, David; Calvas, Patrick; Camuzat, Agnès; Yuan, Qiu-ping; Schalling, Martin; Dürr, Alexandra; Brice, Alexis

    2000-01-01

    We examined a large French family with autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia (ADCA) that was excluded from all previously identified spinocerebellar ataxia genes and loci. The patients—seven women and a 4-year-old boy—exhibited slowly progressive childhood-onset cerebellar gait ataxia associated with cerebellar dysarthria, moderate mental retardation (IQ 62–76), and mild developmental delays in motor acquisition. Nystagmus and pyramidal signs were also observed in some cases. This unique association of clinical features clearly distinguishes this new entity from other previously described ADCA. Cerebral magnetic-resonance imaging showed moderate cerebellar and pontine atrophy in two patients. We performed a genomewide search and found significant evidence for linkage to chromosome 19q13.3-q13.4, in an ∼8-cM interval between markers D19S219 and D19S553. PMID:10820125

  17. Microarray analysis unmasked two siblings with pure hereditary spastic paraplegia shared a run of homozygosity region on chromosome 3q28-q29.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Wenqian; You, Xiangdong; Wang, Dong; Dong, Kai; Su, Jing; Li, Chuanfen; Liu, Jinxiu; Zhang, Qianqian; You, Feng; Wang, Xiangrong; Huang, Jing; Qiao, Bin; Duan, Wenyuan

    2015-12-15

    Hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) is a clinical and genetic heterogeneity group of neurodegenerative disorders which is characterized by progressive weakness and spasticity of the lower limbs. More than 70 genetic types of HSP have been described so far. Here we describe a Chinese non-consanguineous family with two affected siblings manifesting early-onset autosomal recessive HSP in pure forms. To identify genotype and characterize phenotype, CytoScan HD array analysis was performed on the two siblings. A run of homozygosity (ROH) shared by the two patients was detected on chromosome 3q28-q29. The ROH region, about 7.7Mb on the chromosome 3:190172058-197851260 partially overlapped with the ROH region of SPG14 previously reported. Subsequently, microsatellite analysis confirmed this ROH and whole-exome sequencing was carried out while no causative mutations were found in the exons of known HSP genes and 68 candidate genes in that region. In conclusion, our data suggest the ROH in this region may play a pivotal role in SPG14 pathogenesis. This is the first clinical description of a pure form spastic paraplegia in a non-consanguineous family associated with the SPG14 locus. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Molecular characterization of human neogenin, a DCC-related protein, and the mapping of its gene (NEO1) to chromosomal position 15q22.3-q23

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vielmetter, J.; Miskevich, F.; Lane, R.P. [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA (United States)] [and others

    1997-05-01

    Neogenin was first identified in the chick embryo, and like a number of cell surface proteins of the immunoglobulin (Ig) superfamily, including N-CAM and L{sub 1} (generally called cell adhesion molecules or CAMs), it is expressed on growing nerve cells in the developing nervous system of vertebrate embryos. Neogenin is also expressed in other embryonic tissues, suggesting a more general role in developmental processes such as tissue growth regulation, cell-cell recognition, and cell migration. Neogenin, unlike the CAMs, is closely related to a unique tumor suppressor candidate molecule, deleted in colorectal carcinoma (DCC). Like DCC, the neogenin protein consists of four immunoglobulin-like (Ig-like) domains followed by six fibronectin type III domains, a transmembrane domain, and an intracellular domain. We now report the cloning and sequencing of cDNA clones coding for the human neogenin protein. Human neogenin shares 87% identity with its chicken homolog, and like its chicken counterpart it is expressed in at least two different isoforms derived from alternative splicing in the intracellular domain. Northern blot analysis revealed two mRNA species of about 5 and 7 kb. The chromosomal location of the human neogenin gene (HGMW-approved symbol NEO1) was determined as 15q22.3-q23, using fluorescence in situ hybridization. The gene therefore maps in the vicinity of a locus associated with Bardet-Biedl syndrome. The identification of human neogenin and its chromosomal location provides a basis for studying its involvement in genetic disorders or diseases. 26 refs., 4 figs.

  19. A novel locus for alopecia with mental retardation syndrome (APMR2) maps to chromosome 3q26.2-q26.31.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wali, A; John, P; Gul, A; Lee, K; Chishti, M S; Ali, G; Hassan, M J; Leal, S M; Ahmad, W

    2006-09-01

    Congenital alopecia may occur either alone or in association with ectodermal and other abnormalities. On the bases of such associations, several different syndromes featuring congenital alopecia can be distinguished. Alopecia with mental retardation syndrome (APMR) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder, clinically characterized by total or partial hair loss and mental retardation. In the present study, a five-generation Pakistani family with multiple affected individuals with APMR was ascertained. Patients in this family exhibited typical features of APMR syndrome. The disease locus was mapped to chromosome 3q26.2-q26.31 by carrying out a genome scan followed by fine mapping. A maximum two-point logarithm of odds (LOD) score of 2.93 at theta=0.0 was obtained at markers D3S3053 and D3S2309. Multipoint linkage analysis resulted in a maximum LOD score of 4.57 with several markers, which supports the linkage. The disease locus was flanked by markers D3S1564 and D3S2427, which corresponds to 9.6-cM region according to the Rutgers combined linkage-physical map of the human genome (build 35) and contains 5.6 Mb. The linkage interval of the APMR locus identified here does not overlap with the one described previously; therefore, this locus has been designated as APMR2.

  20. Genome-wide linkage scans for type 2 diabetes mellitus in four ethnically diverse populations; significant evidence for linkage on chromosome 4q in African Americans: the Family Investigation of Nephropathy and Diabetes (FIND) Research Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malhotra, Alka; Igo, Robert P.; Thameem, Farook; Kao, W.H. Linda; Abboud, Hanna E.; Adler, Sharon G.; Arar, Nedal H.; Bowden, Donald W.; Duggirala, Ravindranath; Freedman, Barry I.; Goddard, Katrina A.B.; Ipp, Eli; Iyengar, Sudha K.; Kimmel, Paul L.; Knowler, William C.; Kohn, Orly; Leehey, David; Meoni, Lucy A.; Nelson, Robert G.; Nicholas, Susanne B.; Parekh, Rulan S.; Rich, Stephen S.; Chen, Yii-Der I.; Saad, Mohammed F.; Scavini, Marina; Schelling, Jeffrey R.; Sedor, John R.; Shah, Vallabh O.; Taylor, Kent D.; Thornley-Brown, Denyse; Zager, Philip G.; Horvath, Amanda; Hanson, Robert L.

    2009-01-01

    Background Previous studies have shown that, in addition to environmental influences, type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) has a strong genetic component. The goal of the current study is to identify regions of linkage for T2DM in ethnically diverse populations. Methods Phenotypic and genotypic data were obtained from African American (AA; total number of individuals (N)=1004), American Indian (AI; N=883), European American (EA; N=537), and Mexican American (MA; N=1634) individuals from the Family Investigation of Nephropathy and Diabetes. Nonparametric linkage analysis, using an average of 4,404 SNPs, was performed in relative pairs affected with T2DM in each ethnic group. In addition, family-based tests were performed to detect association with T2DM. Results Statistically significant evidence for linkage was observed on chromosomes 4q21.1 (LOD=3.13; genome-wide p=0.04) in AA. In addition, a total of eleven regions showed suggestive evidence for linkage (estimated at LOD>1.71), with the highest LOD scores on chromosomes 12q21.31 (LOD=2.02) and 22q12.3 (LOD=2.38) in AA, 2p11.1 (LOD=2.23) in AI, 6p12.3 (LOD=2.77) in EA, and 13q21.1 (LOD=2.24) in MA. While no region overlapped across all ethnic groups, at least five loci showing LOD>1.71 have been identified in previously published studies. Conclusions The results from this study provide evidence for the presence of genes affecting T2DM on chromosomes 4q, 12q, and 22q in AA, 6p in EA, 2p in AI, and 13q in MA. The strong evidence for linkage on chromosome 4q in AA provides important information given the paucity of diabetes genetic studies in this population. PMID:19795399

  1. Genome-wide linkage scans for type 2 diabetes mellitus in four ethnically diverse populations-significant evidence for linkage on chromosome 4q in African Americans: the Family Investigation of Nephropathy and Diabetes Research Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malhotra, Alka; Igo, Robert P; Thameem, Farook; Kao, W H Linda; Abboud, Hanna E; Adler, Sharon G; Arar, Nedal H; Bowden, Donald W; Duggirala, Ravindranath; Freedman, Barry I; Goddard, Katrina A B; Ipp, Eli; Iyengar, Sudha K; Kimmel, Paul L; Knowler, William C; Kohn, Orly; Leehey, David; Meoni, Lucy A; Nelson, Robert G; Nicholas, Susanne B; Parekh, Rulan S; Rich, Stephen S; Chen, Yii-Der I; Saad, Mohammed F; Scavini, Marina; Schelling, Jeffrey R; Sedor, John R; Shah, Vallabh O; Taylor, Kent D; Thornley-Brown, Denyse; Zager, Philip G; Horvath, Amanda; Hanson, Robert L

    2009-11-01

    Previous studies have shown that in addition to environmental influences, type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) has a strong genetic component. The goal of the current study is to identify regions of linkage for T2DM in ethnically diverse populations. Phenotypic and genotypic data were obtained from African American (AA; total number of individuals [N] = 1004), American Indian (AI; N = 883), European American (EA; N = 537), and Mexican American (MA; N = 1634) individuals from the Family Investigation of Nephropathy and Diabetes. Non-parametric linkage analysis, using an average of 4404 SNPs, was performed in relative pairs affected with T2DM in each ethnic group. In addition, family-based tests were performed to detect association with T2DM. Statistically significant evidence for linkage was observed on chromosome 4q21.1 (LOD = 3.13; genome-wide p = 0.04) in AA. In addition, a total of 11 regions showed suggestive evidence for linkage (estimated at LOD > 1.71), with the highest LOD scores on chromosomes 12q21.31 (LOD = 2.02) and 22q12.3 (LOD = 2.38) in AA, 2p11.1 (LOD = 2.23) in AI, 6p12.3 (LOD = 2.77) in EA, and 13q21.1 (LOD = . 2.24) in MA. While no region overlapped across all ethnic groups, at least five loci showing LOD > 1.71 have been identified in previously published studies. The results from this study provide evidence for the presence of genes affecting T2DM on chromosomes 4q, 12q, and 22q in AA; 6p in EA; 2p in AI; and 13q in MA. The strong evidence for linkage on chromosome 4q in AA provides important information given the paucity of diabetes genetic studies in this population.

  2. Familial insertion (3;5)(q25.3;q22.1q31.3) with deletion or duplication of chromosome region 5q22.1-5q31.3 in ten unbalanced carriers.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arens, Y.H.; Engelen, J.J.M.; Govaerts, L.C.P.; Ravenswaaij-Arts, C.M.A. van; Loneus, W.H.; Lent-Albrechts, J.C. van; Blij-Philipsen, M. van der; Hamers, A.J.H.; Schrander-Stumpel, C.T.R.M.

    2004-01-01

    We report on the clinical and cytogenetic data of a large family with an unbalanced insertion translocation (3;5)(q25.3;q22.1q31.3). Analysis of GTG-banded chromosomes demonstrated that unbalanced inheritance of a parental insertion translocation caused either a partial deletion or duplication 5q in

  3. PARTIAL 3Q DUPLICATION SYNDROME AND ASSIGNMENT OF D3S5 TO 3Q25-3Q28

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANESSEN, AJ; KOK, K; van den Berg, Anke; DEJONG, B; STELLINK, F; BOS, AF; SCHEFFER, H; BUYS, CHCM

    We report a girl with a de novo duplication of the distal part of the long arm of chromosome 3 and review the literature. Our patient had the facial characteristics and many other anomalies of the partial 3q duplication syndrome. As a hitherto undescribed symptom in partial 3q trisomy syndrome, she

  4. A genome wide association study of mathematical ability reveals an association at chromosome 3q29, a locus associated with autism and learning difficulties: a preliminary study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Baron-Cohen

    Full Text Available Mathematical ability is heritable, but few studies have directly investigated its molecular genetic basis. Here we aimed to identify specific genetic contributions to variation in mathematical ability. We carried out a genome wide association scan using pooled DNA in two groups of U.K. samples, based on end of secondary/high school national academic exam achievement: high (n = 419 versus low (n = 183 mathematical ability while controlling for their verbal ability. Significant differences in allele frequencies between these groups were searched for in 906,600 SNPs using the Affymetrix GeneChip Human Mapping version 6.0 array. After meeting a threshold of p<1.5×10(-5, 12 SNPs from the pooled association analysis were individually genotyped in 542 of the participants and analyzed to validate the initial associations (lowest p-value 1.14 ×10(-6. In this analysis, one of the SNPs (rs789859 showed significant association after Bonferroni correction, and four (rs10873824, rs4144887, rs12130910 rs2809115 were nominally significant (lowest p-value 3.278 × 10(-4. Three of the SNPs of interest are located within, or near to, known genes (FAM43A, SFT2D1, C14orf64. The SNP that showed the strongest association, rs789859, is located in a region on chromosome 3q29 that has been previously linked to learning difficulties and autism. rs789859 lies 1.3 kbp downstream of LSG1, and 700 bp upstream of FAM43A, mapping within the potential promoter/regulatory region of the latter. To our knowledge, this is only the second study to investigate the association of genetic variants with mathematical ability, and it highlights a number of interesting markers for future study.

  5. A genome wide association study of mathematical ability reveals an association at chromosome 3q29, a locus associated with autism and learning difficulties: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron-Cohen, Simon; Murphy, Laura; Chakrabarti, Bhismadev; Craig, Ian; Mallya, Uma; Lakatošová, Silvia; Rehnstrom, Karola; Peltonen, Leena; Wheelwright, Sally; Allison, Carrie; Fisher, Simon E; Warrier, Varun

    2014-01-01

    Mathematical ability is heritable, but few studies have directly investigated its molecular genetic basis. Here we aimed to identify specific genetic contributions to variation in mathematical ability. We carried out a genome wide association scan using pooled DNA in two groups of U.K. samples, based on end of secondary/high school national academic exam achievement: high (n = 419) versus low (n = 183) mathematical ability while controlling for their verbal ability. Significant differences in allele frequencies between these groups were searched for in 906,600 SNPs using the Affymetrix GeneChip Human Mapping version 6.0 array. After meeting a threshold of p<1.5×10(-5), 12 SNPs from the pooled association analysis were individually genotyped in 542 of the participants and analyzed to validate the initial associations (lowest p-value 1.14 ×10(-6)). In this analysis, one of the SNPs (rs789859) showed significant association after Bonferroni correction, and four (rs10873824, rs4144887, rs12130910 rs2809115) were nominally significant (lowest p-value 3.278 × 10(-4)). Three of the SNPs of interest are located within, or near to, known genes (FAM43A, SFT2D1, C14orf64). The SNP that showed the strongest association, rs789859, is located in a region on chromosome 3q29 that has been previously linked to learning difficulties and autism. rs789859 lies 1.3 kbp downstream of LSG1, and 700 bp upstream of FAM43A, mapping within the potential promoter/regulatory region of the latter. To our knowledge, this is only the second study to investigate the association of genetic variants with mathematical ability, and it highlights a number of interesting markers for future study.

  6. Three new cases of chromosome 3 rearrangement in bands q21 and q26 with abnormal thrombopoiesis bring further evidence to the existence of a 3q21q26 syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jotterand Bellomo, M; Parlier, V; Mühlematter, D; Grob, J P; Beris, P

    1992-04-01

    Defects of 3q in bands q21 and q26 have been reported in more than 70 cases of acute nonlymphocytic leukemia (ANLL), myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), and myeloproliferative disorder (MPD) in blast crisis. In this paper three additional patients are described: patient 1 with refractory anemia with excess of blasts in transformation (RAEB-T) and inv(3)(q21q26), patient 2 with RAEB-T and t(3;3)(q21;q26), and patient 3 with myelofibrosis with myeloid metaplasia (MMM) in blast crisis and inv(3)(q21q26). In addition to 3q rearrangements, monosomy 7 and del(7)(q22q36) were observed in patients 1 and 2, respectively. In the three patients, the most characteristic clinical features were elevated platelet counts, marked hyperplasia with dysplasia of the megakaryocytes, and poor prognosis. Although disturbance of thrombopoiesis was not systematically observed in all patients with t(3;3)(q21;q26), inv(3)(q21q26), and ins or dup(3)(q21----q26), study of the 77 cases reported and of the three cases presented here brings further evidence to the existence of a cytogenetic syndrome involving bands q21 and q26 simultaneously, which represents a subtype of ANLL, MDS, and MPD, characterized by normal or elevated platelet counts, hyperplasia with dysplasia of megakaryocytes, multilineage involvement, young median age of patients with MDS, preferential involvement of women in t(3;3), high incidence of chromosome 7 defects in MDS and ANLL, short duration of the MDS phase, no response to chemotherapy, short survival, and por prognosis.

  7. cDNA cloning of the human peroxisomal enoyl-CoA hydratase: 3-Hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase bifunctional enzyme and localization to chromosome 3q26. 3-3q28: A free left Alu arm is inserted in the 3[prime] noncoding region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoefler, G.; Forstner, M.; Hulla, W.; Hiden, M.; Krisper, P.; Kenner, L.; Zechner, R. (Univ. of Graz (Austria)); McGuinness, M.C. (Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States)); Ried, T.; Lengauer, C. (Univ. of Heidelberg (Germany)) (and others)

    1994-01-01

    Enoyl-CoA hydratase:3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase bifunctional enzyme is one of the four enzymes of the peroxisomal, [beta]-oxidation pathway. Here, the authors report the full-length human cDNA sequence and the localization of the corresponding gene on chromosome 3q26.3-3q28. The cDNA sequence spans 3779 nucleotides with an open reading frame of 2169 nucleotides. The tripeptide SKL at the carboxy terminus, known to serve as a peroxisomal targeting signal, is present. DNA sequence comparison of the coding region showed an 80% homology between human and rat bifunctional enzyme cDNA. The 3[prime] noncoding sequence contains 117 nucleotides homologous to an Alu repeat. Based on sequence comparison, they propose that these nucleotides are a free left Alu arm with 86% homology to the Alu-J family. RNA analysis shows one band with highest intensity in liver and kidney. This cDNA will allow in-depth studies of molecular defects in patients with defective peroxisomal bifunctional enzyme. Moreover, it will also provide a means for studying the regulation of peroxisomal [beta]-oxidation in humans. 33 refs., 5 figs.

  8. An interstitial duplication of chromosome 13q31.3q32.1 further delineates the critical region for postaxial polydactyly type A2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Zwaag, Paul A.; Dijkhuizen, Trijnie; Gerssen - Schoorl, Klasientje; Colijn, Anja W.; Broens, Paul M. A.; Flapper, Boudien; van Ravenswaaij-Arts, Conny M. A.

    2010-01-01

    Postaxial polydactyly type A2 (PAP-A2; OMIM 602085) is a common feature seen in patients with a partial duplication of the long arm of chromosome 13. Dose dependency has been shown for digital malformations in this region, deletions resulting in oligodactyly and duplications in polydactyly. We aimed

  9. Clinical, Molecular, and Prognostic Significance of WHO Type inv(3)(q21q26.2)/t(3;3)(q21;q26.2) and Various Other 3q Abnormalities in Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lugthart, Sanne; Groschel, Stefan; Beverloo, H. Berna; Kayser, Sabine; Valk, Peter J. M.; van Zelderen-Bhola, Shama Lydia; Ossenkoppele, Gert Jan; Vellenga, Edo; van den Berg-de Ruiter, Eva; Schanz, Urs; Verhoef, Gregor; Vandenberghe, Peter; Ferrant, Augustin; Kohne, Claus-Henning; Pfreundschuh, Michael; Horst, Heinz A.; Koller, Elisabeth; von Lilienfeld-Toal, Marie; Bentz, Martin; Ganser, Arnold; Schlegelberger, Brigitte; Jotterand, Martine; Krauter, Jurgen; Pabst, Thomas; Theobald, Matthias; Schlenk, Richard F.; Delwel, Ruud; Dohner, Konstanze; Lowenberg, Bob; Doehner, Hartmut

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) with inv(3)(q21q26.2)/t(3; 3)(q21; q26.2) inv(3)/t(3; 3)] is recognized as a distinctive entity in the WHO classification. Risk assignment and clinical and genetic characterization of AML with chromosome 3q abnormalities other than inv(3)/t(3; 3) remain largely

  10. The gene for spinal cerebellar ataxia 3 (SCA3) is located in a region of {approximately} 3 cM on chromosome 14q24.3-q32.2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevanin, G.; Cancel, G.; Duerr, A.; Dubourg, O.; Agid, Y.; Brice, A. [Hopital de la Salpetriere, Paris (France); Chneiweiss, H.; Weissenbach, J.; Cann, H.M.

    1995-01-01

    SCA3, the gene for spinal cerebellar ataxia 3, was recently mapped to a 15-cM interval between D14S67 and D14S81 on chromosome 14q, by linkage analysis in two families of French ancestry. The SCA3 candidate region has now been refined by linkage analysis with four new microsatellite markers (D14S256, D14S291, D14S280, and AFM343vf1) in the same two families, in which 19 additional individuals were genotyped, and in a third French family. Combined two-point linkage analyses show that the new markers, D14S280 and AFM343vf1, are tightly linked to the SCA3 locus, with maximal lod scores, at recombination fraction, ({theta}) = .00, of 7.05 and 13.70, respectively. Combined multipoint and recombinant haplotype analyses localize the SCA3 locus to a 3-cM interval flanked by D14S291 and D14S81. The same allele for D14S280 segregates with the disease locus in the three kindreds. This allele is frequent in the French population, however, and linkage disequilibrium is not clearly established. The SCA3 locus remains within the 29-cM region on 14q24.3-q32.2 containing the gene for the Machado-Joseph disease, which is clinically related to the phenotype determined by SCA3, but it cannot yet be concluded that both diseases result from alterations of the same gene. 30 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. Further contribution to the description of phenotypes associated with partial 4q duplication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zollino, M.; Zampino, G.; Torrioli, G. [Universita Cattolica, Rome (Italy)] [and others

    1995-05-22

    We report on a 15-year-old girl with previously undescribed de novo duplication of segment 4q13.1{r_arrow}q22.2. The origin of the extrachromosomal material on 4q was unequivocally established by fluorescent in situ hybridization with a chromosome 4 painting probe. Clinical manifestations included moderate mental retardation, destructive behavior, and minor physical anomalies. An analysis of the literature on partial 4q trisomy led us to identify a region comprising bands 4q22-q23, which may be involved in the development of the acrorenal field. 17 refs., 5 figs., 21 tabs.

  12. Satellited 4q identified in amniotic fluid cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, I.; Hsieh, C.L.; Songster, G. [Stanford Univ. Medical Center, Stanford, CA (United States)] [and others

    1995-01-16

    Extra material was identified on the distal long arm of a chromosome 4 in an amniotic fluid specimen sampled at 16.6 weeks of gestational age. There was no visible loss of material from chromosome 4, and no evidence for a balanced rearrangement. The primary counseling issue in this case was advanced maternal age. Ultrasound findings were normal, and family history was unremarkable. The identical 4qs chromosome was observed in cells from a paternal peripheral blood specimen and appeared to be an unbalanced rearrangement. This extra material was NOR positive in lymphocytes from the father, but was negative in the fetal amniocytes. Father`s relatives were studied to verify the familial origin of this anomaly. In situ hybridization with both exon and intron sequences of ribosomal DNA demonstrated that ribosomal DNA is present at the terminus of the 4qs chromosome in the fetus, father, and paternal grandmother. This satellited 4q might have been derived from a translocation event that resulted in very little or no loss from the 4q and no specific phenotype. This derivative chromosome 4 has been inherited through at least 3 generations of phenotypically normal individuals. 8 refs., 3 figs.

  13. Molecular cytogenetic characterization of Xp22.32→pter deletion and Xq26.3→qter duplication in a male fetus associated with 46,Y,rec(X)dup(Xq) inv(X)(p22.3q26.3), a hypoplastic left heart, short stature, and maternal X chromosome pericentric inversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chih-Ping; Chen, Chen-Yu; Chern, Schu-Rern; Wu, Peih-Shan; Chen, Yen-Ni; Chen, Shin-Wen; Lee, Chen-Chi; Town, Dai-Dyi; Lee, Meng-Shan; Yang, Chien-Wen; Wang, Wayseen

    2016-10-01

    We present molecular cytogenetic characterization of an Xp22.32→pter deletion and an Xq26.3→qter duplication in a male fetus with congenital malformations and maternal X chromosome pericentric inversion. A 22-year-old woman underwent amniocentesis at 17 weeks of gestation because of an abnormal maternal serum screening result. Prenatal ultrasound revealed a hypoplastic left heart and short limbs. Amniocentesis revealed a karyotype of 46,Y,der(X) t(X;?)(p22.31;?). The pregnancy was subsequently terminated, and a malformed fetus was delivered with short stature and facial dysmorphism. Repeat amniocentesis was performed before termination of the pregnancy. Array comparative genomic hybridization was performed on uncultured amniocytes and maternal blood. Conventional cytogenetic analysis was performed on cultured amniocytes, cord blood, and blood from both parents. Fluorescence in situ hybridization was performed on cultured amniocytes. The maternal karyotype was 46,X,inv(X)(p22.3q26.3). The fetal karyotype was 46,Y, rec(X)dup(Xq)inv(X)(p22.3q26.3) or 46,Y, rec(X)(qter→q26.3::p22.3→qter). Array comparative genomic hybridization on uncultured amniocytes revealed a 4.56-Mb deletion of Xp22.33-p22.32 encompassing SHOX, CSF2RA, and ARSE, and a 19.22-Mb duplication of Xq26.3-q28 encompassing SOX3, FMR1, MECP2, RAB39B, and CLIC2 in the fetus. The mother did not have X chromosome imbalance. Detection of X chromosome aberration in a male fetus should give suspicion of a recombinant X chromosome derived from maternal X chromosome pericentric inversion. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. The 4q27 locus and prostate cancer risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hopper John L

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic inflammation is considered to be implicated in the development of prostate cancer. In this study we are the first to investigate a potential association between variants in an autoimmune related region on chromosome 4q27 and prostate cancer risk. This region harbors two cytokine genes IL-2 and the recently described IL-21. Methods We genotyped six variants previously associated with autoimmune disease (namely rs13151961, rs13119723, rs17388568, rs3136534, rs6822844 and rs6840978 and one functional IL-2 promoter variant (rs2069762 for possible association with prostate cancer risk using the Australian Risk Factors for Prostate Cancer case-control Study. Results Overall, our results do not support an association between the seven variants at position 4q27 and prostate cancer risk. Per allele odds ratios (ORs were not significantly different from 1 (all P-values = 0.06. However, we found suggestive evidence for a significant association between the presence of the rs13119723 variant (located in a protein of unknown function and men with a family history of prostate cancer in first-degree relatives (P-value for interaction 0.02. The per allele OR associated with this variant was significantly higher than 1 (2.37; 95% C.I. = 1.01-5.57. Conclusions We suggest that genetic variation within the chromosome 4q27 locus might be associated with prostate cancer susceptibility in men with a family history of the disease. Furthermore, our study alludes to a potential role of unknown protein KIAA1109 in conferring this risk.

  15. Treatment of metastatic breast cancer in EU: Analysis of market research data from 4Q2013 till 3Q2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cepparulo, Mario; Schmidt, Nina

    2017-04-01

    Despite the scientific evidence undoubtedly influencing current guidelines on the management of metastatic Breast cancer (mBC), marketing research data suggests this may not be reflected in EU prescribing behavior. Specifically we would like to understand the use of combination chemotherapy vs monotherapy in mBC patients. This study is based on IMS Oncology Analyzer™, a web-based physician panel survey set-up by IMS Health, a global company which specializes in health care information including market research data. Analysis was carried out on prescribing behavior reflected in marketing research data from IMS source (from MAT Q42013 till MAT Q32014) and comparing the data with the current guidelines recommendation in mBC (ESO-ESMO 2nd international consensus guidelines). In 1st line mBC around 17% of patients are treated with combination chemotherapy drugs. The combination chemotherapy are essentially anthracycline based than taxane based. In 2nd(+) line mBC a higher proportion of monotherapy (chemotherapy+/-biologics) is being used. Despite the recommendation provided by current ESMO guidelines on mBC treatments, indicating the sequential use of single cytotoxic agents is a considerable alternative to standard multidrug chemotherapy regimens, marketing research data suggests this may not be reflected in EU prescribing behavior. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. A case of autism with an interstitial deletion on 4q leading to hemizygosity for genes encoding for glutamine and glycine neurotransmitter receptor sub-units (AMPA 2, GLRA3, GLRB and neuropeptide receptors NPY1R, NPY5R

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steinberg-Epstein Robin

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Autism is a pervasive developmental disorder characterized by a triad of deficits: qualitative impairments in social interactions, communication deficits, and repetitive and stereotyped patterns of behavior. Although autism is etiologically heterogeneous, family and twin studies have established a definite genetic basis. The inheritance of idiopathic autism is presumed to be complex, with many genes involved; environmental factors are also possibly contributory. The analysis of chromosome abnormalities associated with autism contributes greatly to the identification of autism candidate genes. Case presentation We describe a child with autistic disorder and an interstitial deletion on chromosome 4q. This child first presented at 12 months of age with developmental delay and minor dysmorphic features. At 4 years of age a diagnosis of Pervasive Developmental Disorder was made. At 11 years of age he met diagnostic criteria for autism. Cytogenetic studies revealed a chromosome 4q deletion. The karyotype was 46, XY del 4 (q31.3-q33. Here we report the clinical phenotype of the child and the molecular characterization of the deletion using molecular cytogenetic techniques and analysis of polymorphic markers. These studies revealed a 19 megabase deletion spanning 4q32 to 4q34. Analysis of existing polymorphic markers and new markers developed in this study revealed that the deletion arose on a paternally derived chromosome. To date 33 genes of known or inferred function are deleted as a consequence of the deletion. Among these are the AMPA 2 gene that encodes the glutamate receptor GluR2 sub-unit, GLRA3 and GLRB genes that encode glycine receptor subunits and neuropeptide Y receptor genes NPY1R and NPY5R. Conclusions The deletion in this autistic subject serves to highlight specific autism candidate genes. He is hemizygous for AMPA 2, GLRA3, GLRB, NPY1R and NPY5R. GluR2 is the major determinant of AMPA receptor structure. Glutamate

  17. Cultural stereotyping of the lady in 4Q184 and 4Q185

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ananda Geyser-Fouché

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Wisdom and wickedness as a ‘Woman’ have always attracted much discussion, especially in the ways images of the female are employed in wisdom literature. This article focuses on two Qumran texts that fall into the category of wisdom literature, namely 4Q184 and 4Q185, and the metaphorical appropriation of the woman as a figure of wisdom or a figure of wickedness. By combining a number of traditions in certain forms, sages tried to establish an education for their learners on how to obtain wisdom with the ultimate purpose of creating harmony. The ultimate purpose of the wisdom teachings of the sages was to confirm the harmony in the universe, and these teachings were also conveyed to their learners. In their instructions, they often employed binary opposites such as ‘wise’ and ‘fool’ according to which someone was characterised, or rather stereotyped. The result of such binary stereotyping was that the ‘whore’ and the ‘holy one’ represented opposite poles, and became fixed images in Judaism. According to feminist exegetes, these images typify the concept of cultural stereotyping. This article aims to illustrate that two Qumran texts, 4Q184 and 4Q185, regarded as wisdom texts, employ the female stereotypes that were known in the wisdom literature of Judaism.

  18. 3q27.3 microdeletional syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thevenon, Julien; Callier, Patrick; Poquet, Hélène

    2014-01-01

    to define a second region of overlap at the 3q27.3q28 locus for marfanoid habitus and severe ID. Indeed, the common morphological findings in the first four patients included skeletal features from the marfanoid spectrum: scoliosis (4/4), long and thin habitus with leanness (average Body Mass Index of 15...... that associates with a recognisable facial dysmorphism and marfanoid habitus including scoliosis, neuropsychiatric disorders of the psychotic spectrum and moderate to severe ID....

  19. Renal Failure Associated with APECED and Terminal 4q Deletion: Evidence of Autoimmune Nephropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Al-Owain

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidiasis-ectodermal dystrophy (APECED is a rare autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the autoimmune regulator gene (AIRE. Terminal 4q deletion is also a rare cytogenetic abnormality that causes a variable syndrome of dysmorphic features, mental retardation, growth retardation, and heart and limb defects. We report a 12-year-old Saudi boy with mucocutaneous candidiasis, hypoparathyroidism, and adrenocortical failure consistent with APECED. In addition, he has dysmorphic facial features, growth retardation, and severe global developmental delay. Patient had late development of chronic renal failure. The blastogenesis revealed depressed lymphocytes' response to Candida albicans at 38% when compared to control. Chromosome analysis of the patient revealed 46,XY,del(4(q33. FISH using a 4p/4q subtelomere DNA probe assay confirmed the deletion of qter subtelomere on chromosome 4. Parental chromosomes were normal. The deleted array was further defined using array CGH. AIRE full gene sequencing revealed a homozygous mutation namely 845_846insC. Renal biopsy revealed chronic interstitial nephritis with advanced fibrosis. In addition, there was mesangial deposition of C3, C1q, and IgM. This is, to the best of our knowledge, the first paper showing evidence of autoimmune nephropathy by renal immunofluorescence in a patient with APECED and terminal 4q deletion.

  20. Novel Vascular Malformation in an Affected Newborn with Deletion Del(4(q31.3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norma Elena de León Ojeda

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We report on a newborn male patient with a terminal deletion in the long arm of the chromosome 4 with a congenital heart defect unreported before in association with this syndrome. The patient had multiple congenital anomalies including a pointed duplicated fingernail, low set posteriorly rotated ears, large anterior fontanel, micrognathia, glabellar capillary vascular malformation, and Interrupted Aortic Arch type C. The patient died due to multiple congenital malformations; a peripheral chromosome analysis showed 46, XY, del(4(q31.3 de novo. The only reported case with the same deletion was a male newborn that exhibited the pattern of minor anomalies of deletion 4q31 syndrome. The parents were cytogenetically normal. We compare clinical signs to other cases with a deletion in long arm of chromosome 4.

  1. Evolutionary genomic remodelling of the human 4q subtelomere (4q35.2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riva Paola

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In order to obtain insights into the functionality of the human 4q35.2 domain harbouring the facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD locus, we investigated in African apes genomic and chromatin organisations, and the nuclear topology of orthologous regions. Results A basic block consisting of short D4Z4 arrays (10–15 repeats, 4q35.2 specific sequences, and approximately 35 kb of interspersed repeats from different LINE subfamilies was repeated at least twice in the gorilla 4qter. This genomic organisation has undergone evolutionary remodelling, leading to the single representation of both the D4Z4 array and LINE block in chimpanzee, and the loss of the LINE block in humans. The genomic remodelling has had an impact on 4qter chromatin organisation, but not its interphase nuclear topology. In comparison with humans, African apes show very low or undetectable levels of FRG1 and FRG2 histone 4 acetylation and gene transcription, although histone deacetylase inhibition restores gene transcription to levels comparable with those of human cells, thus indicating that the 4qter region is capable of acquiring a more open chromatin structure. Conversely, as in humans, the 4qter region in African apes has a very peripheral nuclear localisation. Conclusion The 4q subtelomere has undergone substantial genomic changes during evolution that have had an impact on chromatin condensation and the region's transcriptional regulation. Consequently, the 4qter genes in African apes and humans seem to be subjected to a different strategy of regulation in which LINE and D4Z4 sequences may play a pivotal role. However, the effect of peripheral nuclear anchoring of 4qter on these regulation mechanisms is still unclear. The observed differences in the regulation of 4qter gene expression between African apes and humans suggest that the human 4q35.2 locus has acquired a novel functional relevance.

  2. Chromosome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chromosomes are structures found in the center (nucleus) of cells that carry long pieces of DNA. DNA ... is the building block of the human body. Chromosomes also contain proteins that help DNA exist in ...

  3. Comprehensive review of the duplication 3q syndrome and report of a patient with Currarino syndrome and de novo duplication 3q26.32-q27.2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dworschak, G C; Crétolle, C; Hilger, A; Engels, H; Korsch, E; Reutter, H; Ludwig, M

    2017-05-01

    Partial duplications of the long arm of chromosome 3, dup(3q), are a rare but well-described condition, sharing features of Cornelia de Lange syndrome. Around two thirds of cases are derived from unbalanced translocations, whereas pure dup(3q) have rarely been reported. Here, we provide an extensive review of the literature on dup(3q). This search revealed several patients with caudal malformations and anomalies, suggesting that caudal malformations or anomalies represent an inherent phenotypic feature of dup(3q). In this context, we report a patient with a pure de novo duplication 3q26.32-q27.2. The patient had the clinical diagnosis of Currarino syndrome (CS) (characterized by the triad of sacral anomalies, anorectal malformations and a presacral mass) and additional features, frequently detected in patients with a dup(3q). Mutations within the MNX1 gene were found to be causative in CS but no MNX1 mutation could be detected in our patient. Our comprehensive search for candidate genes located in the critical region of the duplication 3q syndrome, 3q26.3-q27, revealed a so far neglected phenotypic overlap of dup(3q) and the Pierpont syndrome, associated with a mutation of the TBL1XR1 gene on 3q26.32. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Chromosomal Abnormalities Associated With Omphalocele

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Ping Chen

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Fetuses with omphalocele have an increased risk for chromosomal abnormalities. The risk varies with maternal age, gestational age at diagnosis, association with umbilical cord cysts, complexity of associated anomalies, and the contents of omphalocele. There is considerable evidence that genetics contributes to the etiology of omphalocele. This article provides an overview of chromosomal abnormalities associated with omphalocele and a comprehensive review of associated full aneuploidy such as trisomy 18, trisomy 13, triploidy, trisomy 21, 45,X, 47,XXY, and 47,XXX, partial aneuploidy such as dup(3q, dup(11p, inv(11, dup(1q, del(1q, dup(4q, dup(5p, dup(6q, del(9p, dup(15q, dup(17q, Pallister-Killian syndrome with mosaic tetrasomy 12p and Miller-Dieker lissencephaly syndrome with deletion of 17p13.3, and uniparental disomy (UPD such as UPD 11 and UPD 14. Omphalocele is a prominent marker for chromosomal abnormalities. Perinatal identification of omphalocele should alert chromosomal abnormalities and familial unbalanced translocations, and prompt thorough cytogenetic investigations and genetic counseling.

  5. Study of two patients with craniosynostosis and deletions of 11q: One with features of Saethre-Chotzen syndrome and the other with concomitant partial trisomy 4q

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morsey, S. [Johns Hopkins Univ. School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States)]|[Kennedy-Krieger Institute, Baltimore, MD (United States); Lewanda, A.F. [Johns Hopkins Univ. School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States)]|[Children`s National Medical Center, Washington, DC (United States); Reid, C.S. [Cooper Hospitsl/Univ. Medical Center, Camden, NJ (United States)

    1994-09-01

    Partial monosomy 11q is associated with metopic craniosynostosis and trigonocephaly. Prominant features in the over 30 reported cases include downslanting palpebral fissures, epicanthal folds, hypertelorism, ptosis, wide/depressed nasal bridge, low set malformed ears, downturned mouth, micro/retrognathia, digital and cardiac anomalies and psychomotor retardation. We evaluated two patients referred for abnormal head shape. The first carried a diagnosis of Saethre-Chotzen syndrome due to brachycephaly, facial asymmetry, ptosis, cupped ears, sundactyly of 2nd and 3rd digits, developmental delay, and VSD. Karyotype revealed 46,XY,del(11)(q24.1{yields}qter). No abnormality was noted of chromosome 7p, where the Saethre-Chotzen syndrome locus has been mapped. This suggests genetic heterogeneity for this condition. The second patient had no prior diagnosis. He had trigonocephaly, bilateral cryptorchidism and inguinal hernias. He also had hypotelorism, epicanthal folds, synophrys, posteriorly rotated ears, horizontal crease below his lower lip, unilateral single palmar crease, mild soft tissue syndactyly and a shawl scrotum. His karyotype of 46,XY,-11,+der(11)t(4;11)(q31.3;q25) revealed both partial 11q monosomy and partial 4q trisomy (the latter associated with cryptorchidism, horizontal chin crease and single palmar crease). Deletions of 11q appear to produce a wide spectrum of defects, which may even mimic other known craniosynostotic conditions. Study of these patients may lead to the identification of new genes involved in craniofacial morphogenesis.

  6. Scalar and Vector 4Q Systems in Anisotropic Lattice QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Loan, Mushtaq; Lam, Yu Yiu

    2009-01-01

    We present a detailed study of some $4q$ hadrons in quenched improved anisotropic lattice QCD. Using the $\\pi\\pi$ and diquark-antidiquark local and smeared operators, we attempt to isolate the signal for $I(J^{P})=0(0^{+}), 2(0^{+})$ and $1(1^{+})$ states in two flavour QCD. In the chiral limit of light-quark mass region, the lowest scalar $4q$ state is found to have a mass, $m^{I=0}_{4q}=927(12)$ MeV, which is slightly lower than the experimentally observed $f_{0}(980)$. The results from our variational analysis do not indicate a signature of a tetraquark resonance in I=1 and I=2 channels. After the chiral extrapolation the lowest $1(1^{+})$ state is found to have a mass, $m^{I=1}_{4q}=1358(28)$ MeV. We analysed the static $4q$ potential extracted form a tetraquark Wilson loop and illustrated the behaviour of the $4q$ state as a bound state, unbinding at some critical diquark separation. From our analysis we conclude that scalar $4q$ system appears as a two-pion scattering state and that there is no spatiall...

  7. Chromosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a new cell, the centromere serves as an attachment site for the two halves of each replicated ... of each chromosome is inherited from the female parent and the other from the male parent. This ...

  8. Reduction of a 4q35-encoded nuclear envelope protein in muscle differentiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ostlund, Cecilia [Department of Medicine, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032 (United States); Department of Pathology and Cell Biology, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032 (United States); Guan, Tinglu [Department of Cell Biology, Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA 92037 (United States); Figlewicz, Denise A. [Department of Neurology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Hays, Arthur P. [Department of Pathology and Cell Biology, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032 (United States); Worman, Howard J. [Department of Medicine, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032 (United States); Department of Pathology and Cell Biology, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032 (United States); Gerace, Larry [Department of Cell Biology, Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA 92037 (United States); Schirmer, Eric C., E-mail: e.schirmer@ed.ac.uk [Department of Cell Biology, Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA 92037 (United States); Wellcome Trust Centre for Cell Biology, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH9 3JR (United Kingdom)

    2009-11-13

    Muscular dystrophy and peripheral neuropathy have been linked to mutations in genes encoding nuclear envelope proteins; however, the molecular mechanisms underlying these disorders remain unresolved. Nuclear envelope protein p19A is a protein of unknown function encoded by a gene at chromosome 4q35. p19A levels are significantly reduced in human muscle as cells differentiate from myoblasts to myotubes; however, its levels are not similarly reduced in all differentiation systems tested. Because 4q35 has been linked to facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) and some adjacent genes are reportedly misregulated in the disorder, levels of p19A were analyzed in muscle samples from patients with FSHD. Although p19A was increased in most cases, an absolute correlation was not observed. Nonetheless, p19A downregulation in normal muscle differentiation suggests that in the cases where its gene is inappropriately re-activated it could affect muscle differentiation and contribute to disease pathology.

  9. De Novo 3q22.3q24 Microdeletion in a Patient With Blepharophimosis–Ptosis–Epicanthus Inversus Syndrome, Dandy-Walker Malformation, and Wisconsin Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramineni, Anand

    2016-01-01

    Interstitial deletions affecting the long arm of chromosome 3 have been associated with a broad phenotype. This has included the features of blepharophimosis–ptosis–epicanthus inversus syndrome, Dandy-Walker malformation, and the rare Wisconsin syndrome. The authors report a young female patient presenting with features consistent with all 3 of these syndromes. This has occurred in the context of a de novo 3q22.3q24 microdeletion including FOXL2, ZIC1, and ZIC4. This patient provides further evidence for the role of ZIC1 and ZIC4 in Dandy-Walker malformation and is the third reported case of Dandy-Walker malformation to have associated corpus callosum thinning. This patient is also only the seventh to be reported with the rare Wisconsin syndrome phenotype. PMID:28503614

  10. De Novo 3q22.3q24 Microdeletion in a Patient With Blepharophimosis-Ptosis-Epicanthus Inversus Syndrome, Dandy-Walker Malformation, and Wisconsin Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramineni, Anand; Coman, David

    2016-01-01

    Interstitial deletions affecting the long arm of chromosome 3 have been associated with a broad phenotype. This has included the features of blepharophimosis-ptosis-epicanthus inversus syndrome, Dandy-Walker malformation, and the rare Wisconsin syndrome. The authors report a young female patient presenting with features consistent with all 3 of these syndromes. This has occurred in the context of a de novo 3q22.3q24 microdeletion including FOXL2 , ZIC1 , and ZIC4 . This patient provides further evidence for the role of ZIC1 and ZIC4 in Dandy-Walker malformation and is the third reported case of Dandy-Walker malformation to have associated corpus callosum thinning. This patient is also only the seventh to be reported with the rare Wisconsin syndrome phenotype.

  11. De Novo 3q22.3q24 Microdeletion in a Patient With Blepharophimosis–Ptosis–Epicanthus Inversus Syndrome, Dandy-Walker Malformation, and Wisconsin Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anand Ramineni BSc, MBBS, GSCpMed

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Interstitial deletions affecting the long arm of chromosome 3 have been associated with a broad phenotype. This has included the features of blepharophimosis–ptosis–epicanthus inversus syndrome, Dandy-Walker malformation, and the rare Wisconsin syndrome. The authors report a young female patient presenting with features consistent with all 3 of these syndromes. This has occurred in the context of a de novo 3q22.3q24 microdeletion including FOXL2 , ZIC1 , and ZIC4 . This patient provides further evidence for the role of ZIC1 and ZIC4 in Dandy-Walker malformation and is the third reported case of Dandy-Walker malformation to have associated corpus callosum thinning. This patient is also only the seventh to be reported with the rare Wisconsin syndrome phenotype.

  12. Physiognomy and Eschatology: Some More Fragments of 4Q561

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Søren; Høgenhaven, Jesper

    2006-01-01

    Text, translation and discussion of previously unpublished fragments of "4Q561 Physiognomy". The content of the newly published fragments is of a narrative, and possibly eschatological nature, in contradistinction to the physiognomic divination in the previously known ones, causing the authors to...

  13. Fisiognomica a Qumran: a proposito di 4Q186

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catastini, Alessandro

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available In a previous study, the Author singled out physiognomonic practice by Essenes according to Flavius Josephus’ source in Ant II, 119-161. In this article, the research is extended to the Qumranic manuscript 4Q186, a parchment carrying a text whose content is manifestly physiognomonic. In consequence of a comparison between this text and the so-called Two Spirits Treatise of 1QS, the Author argues that the expression רוח לו, utilised in 4Q186, points out the “typology” of the spirit of the individuals that are considered in this text.

    En un estudio previo, el autor había estudiado la práctica fisiognómica de los esenios a partir de la evidencia recogida por Flavio Josefo (Ant II, 119-161. En esta ocasión, la investigación se extiende al manuscrito 4Q186, cuyo texto tiene un contenido claramente fisiognómico. La comparación entre este texto y el denominado Tratado de los Dos Espíritus (1QS, lleva al autor a señalar que la expresión רוח לו utilizada en 4Q186 muestra la «tipología» del espíritu de los individuos de los que trata este texto.

  14. Duplication 3q syndrome: Molecular delineation of the critical region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aqua, M.S.; Rizzu, P.; Lindsay, E.A. [Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States)] [and others

    1995-01-02

    The phenotype of dup(3q) syndrome partially overlaps with Brachmann-de Lange phenotype. Convulsions and eye, palate renal, and cardiac anomalies are more frequent in dup(3q) syndrome, while limb deficiencies, hirsutism, and synophrys are more characteristic of Brachmann-de Lange syndrome. Whether the two syndromes have a biological relationship has yet to be demonstrated. Using two patient translocation cell lines, each involving distal 3q, we have narrowed the critical region of the dup(3q) syndrome to the interval 3q26.31-q27.3 and initiated its molecular characterization. We have mapped in this region 6 cosmid clones spanning approximately 3 - 5 Mb. The critical region appears to overlap with the region where a balanced translocation was found in a Brachmann-de Lange patient. This work provides the mapping framework for finer molecular analysis dup(3q) syndrome. 25 refs., 3 figs.

  15. 3Q/4Q99 F-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility Corrective Action Report - Third and Fourth Quarter 1999, Volumes I and II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chase, J.

    2000-05-12

    Savannah River Site (SRS) monitors groundwater quality at the F-Area Hazardous Waste management Facility (HWMF) and provides results of this monitoring to the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) semiannually as required by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) permit. SRS also performs monthly sampling of the Wastewater Treatment Unit (WTU) effluent in accordance with Section C of the Underground Injection Control (UIC) application.

  16. Liveborn with both partial trisomy of 3q and partial monosomy of 9p

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farren-Chavez, D.M.; Guzman, E.R. [UMDNJ-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School and St. Peter`s Medical Center, New Brunswich, NJ (United States); Peters, T.L. [Duke Univ., Durham, NC (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    A 32-year-old G{sub 3}P{sub 2002} Hispanic female presented at 14 weeks gestation for routine dating ultrasound. At that time ultrasonography revealed a septated cystic hygroma, omphalocele, bilateral talipes equinovarus, and hydrops. Amniocentesis was performed at 15 weeks and revealed a 46,XX,9p+ chromosome complement. The origin of the extra material on the terminal short arm of chromosome 9 could not be identified. Chromosome analysis was performed on the parents and the mother was found to carry the balanced translocation 46,XX,p(3;9)(q23;p13). Further analysis revealed that the fetus had inherited the derivative 9 chromosome. The fetus was therefore monosomic for 9p13-9pter and trisomic for 3q23-3pter. The patient chose to continue the pregnancy. Serial ultrasonography later demonstrated a sloping forehead, small nose, micrognathia, ventriculomegaly, possible VSD, micropenis, hypospadias, cryptorchidism and post-axial polydactyly of the hands. The fetus was delivered prematurely at 31 weeks and survived one hour. Post-mortem examination confirmed the ultrasound findings and revealed additional stigmata consistent with both 9p monosomy and 3q trisomy. A review of the literature indicates no previous report of both syndromes concurrently.

  17. A case of de novo reciprocal translocation t(1;4)(q21;25) associated with Rieger syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masuno, M.; Makita, Y.; Imalzuml, K. [Kanagawa Children`s Medical Center, Yokohama (Japan)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Rieger syndrome (MIM No{sup *}180500) is characterized by malformation of the anterior chamber of the eye, hypodontia, and the failure of the periumbilical skin to involute. Recently, consistent chromosomal abnormalities within 4q23{r_arrow}q27 have been reported with Rieger syndrome, and significant linkage of Rieger syndrome to 4q markers has been identified. Here we present a case of Rieger syndrome with de novo t(1;4)(q21,q25). The propositus was the first product of a 37-year-old mother and unrelated 42-year-old father. He was born at 41 weeks of gestation. Birth weight was 3,955 g length 50.0 cm, and OFC 37.0 cm. He had irregular shaped pupils with a prominent Schwalbe`s line, umbilical hernia, bilateral vesico-ureteral regurgitation, gall stones, infantile spasms, and hypoplasia of the corpus callosum and agenesis of the anterior commissure. This and other previous reports suggest that the gene for Rieger syndrome maps to the 4q25{r_arrow}q26 segment. A cell line from our patient will contribute to isolating the gene for Rieger syndrome.

  18. Dimerization of pentanuclear clusters [Fe3Q(AsMe)(CO)9] (Q = Se, Te) as a conversion pathway to novel cubane-like aggregates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pushkarevsky, Nikolay A; Konchenko, Sergey N; Zabel, Manfred; Bodensteiner, Michael; Scheer, Manfred

    2011-03-07

    The first examples of carbonyl heterocubane-type clusters, [Fe(4)(μ(3)-Q)(2)(μ(3)-AsMe)(2)(CO)(12)] (2, Q = Se (a), Te (b)), which simultaneously contain elements of group 15 and 16, were obtained by thermolysis of [Fe(3)(μ(3)-Q)(μ(3)-AsMe)(CO)(9)] (1) in acetonitrile. The clusters 2 possess a cubic Fe(4)Q(2)As(2) core with alternating Fe and Q/As atoms. The coordination environment of the Fe atoms is close to octahedral, and those of Q or As atoms are tetrahedral, which determines the distorted cubic cluster core geometry. The second main products of thermolysis are the clusters [Fe(6)(μ(3)-Q)(μ(4)-Q)(μ(4)-AsMe)(2)(CO)(12)] (3a,b), whose core contains double the elemental composition of the initial cluster 1. In the case of the Se-containing cluster two other minor products [Fe(4)(μ(4)-Se)(μ(4)-SeAsMe)(CO)(12)] (4) and [Fe(3)(μ(3)-AsMe)(2)(CO)(9)] (5) are formed. Based on the structures and properties of the products, a reaction route for the conversion of 1 into 2 is proposed, which includes the associative formation of the clusters 3 as intermediates, unlike the dissociative pathways previously known for the transformations of similar clusters of the type [Fe(3)Q(2)(CO)(9)].

  19. de novo interstitial deletions at the 11q23.3-q24.2 region

    OpenAIRE

    Su, Jiasun; Chen, Rongyu; Luo, Jingsi; Fan, Xin; Fu, Chunyun; Wang, Jin; He, Sheng; Hu, Xuyun; Zhang, ShuJie; Yi, Shang; Chen, Shaoke; Shen, Yiping

    2016-01-01

    Background Jacobsen syndrome (JBS) is a contiguous gene deletion syndrome involving 11q terminal deletion. Interstitial deletions at distal 11q are rare and their contributions to the clinical phenotype of JBS are unknown. Case presentation We presented the chromosome microarray (CMA) data and the clinical features of two individuals carrying a non-overlapping de novo deletion each at the 11q23.3-q24.2 region in an effort to analyze the correlation between region of deletion at 11q and phenot...

  20. A Case with 46,XX,dup(X(q21.3q24 karyotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selda Şimşek

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between phenotype and Xq duplicationsin females remains unclear. Some females are normal;some have short stature; and others have features suchas microcephaly, developmental delay/mental retardation,body asymmetries, and gonadal dysgenesis. Somefeatures in these females resemble those in Turner syndrome.We, herein, presented a 15 years-old girl withshort stature and primary amenorrhea, who was referredto cytogenetic laboratory. Through karyotipe analysis performedby Giemsa banding technique, the patient wasdetermined to have positive Barr body and 46,XX,dup(X(q21.3q24 chromosomal constitution. Case was discussedaccording to information of present literatures.

  1. de novo interstitial deletions at the 11q23.3-q24.2 region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Jiasun; Chen, Rongyu; Luo, Jingsi; Fan, Xin; Fu, Chunyun; Wang, Jin; He, Sheng; Hu, Xuyun; Zhang, ShuJie; Yi, Shang; Chen, Shaoke; Shen, Yiping

    2016-01-01

    Jacobsen syndrome (JBS) is a contiguous gene deletion syndrome involving 11q terminal deletion. Interstitial deletions at distal 11q are rare and their contributions to the clinical phenotype of JBS are unknown. We presented the chromosome microarray (CMA) data and the clinical features of two individuals carrying a non-overlapping de novo deletion each at the 11q23.3-q24.2 region in an effort to analyze the correlation between region of deletion at 11q and phenotype. Both deletions are likely pathogenic for patient's condition. The deletion at 11q23.3q24.1 is associated with short stature, relative microcephaly, failure to thrive, hypotonia and sleeping disorder. The deletion at 11q24.2 involves HEPACAM and our patient's clinical presentation (relative macrocephaly, abnormal MRI, mild developmental delay and seizure) is not inconsistent with Megalencephalic leukoencephalopathy with subcortical cysts 2B. Our finds support the notion that more than one critical region at 11q23.3-qter are responsible for the variable clinical presentation of JBS, thus JBS is a true contiguous gene deletion syndrome where multiple loci contributed to the clinical characteristics of JBS. Small interstitial deletions at 11q23.3-q24.2 and their associated unique features also suggest emerging novel genomic disorders.

  2. Autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa: No evidence for nonallelic genetic heterogeneity on 3q

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar-Singh, R.; He Wang; Humphries, P.; Farrar, G.J. (Trinity College, Dublin (Ireland))

    1993-02-01

    Since the initial report of linkage of autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (adRP) to the long arm of chromosome 3, several mutations in the gene encoding rhodopsin, which also maps to 3q, have been reported in adRP pedigrees. However, there has been some discussion as to the possibility of a second adRP locus on 3q. This suggestion has important diagnostic and research implications and must raise doubts about the usefulness of linked markers for reliable diagnosis of RP patients. In order to address this issue the authors have performed an admixture test (A-test) on 10 D3S47-linked adRP pedigrees and have found a likelihood ratio of heterogeneity versus homogeneity of 4.90. They performed a second A-test, combining the data from all families with known rhodopsin mutations. In this test they obtained a reduced likelihood ratio of heterogeneity versus homogeneity, of 1.0. On the basis of these statistical analyses they have found no significant support for two adRP loci on chromosome 3q. Furthermore, using 40 CEPH families, they have localized the rhodopsin gene to the D3S47-D3S20 interval, with a maximum lod score (Z[sub m]) of 20 and have found that the order qter-D3S47-rhodopsin-D3S20-cen is significantly more likely than any other order. In addition, they have mapped (Z[sub m] = 30) the microsatellite marker D3S621 relative to other loci in this region of the genome. 27 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. Further delineation of complex chromosomal rearrangements in fertile male using multicolor banding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weise Anja

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Complex chromosomal rearrangements (CCRs are defined as structural chromosomal rearrangements with at least three breakpoints and exchange of genetic material between two or more chromosomes. Complex chromosomal translocations are rarely seen in the general population but the frequency of occurrence is anticipated to be much higher due balanced states with no phenotypic presentation. Here, we report a severely mentally retarded fertile male patient in whom further delineation of CCR involving chromosomes 1, 4 and 2 was carried out by using high resolution multicolor banding (MCB technique. As a FISH based novel chromosome banding approach, high resolution MCB allows for the differentiation of chromosome region specific areas at band and subband levels. Results Cytogenetic studies using high resolution banding of the proband necessitated further delineation of the breakpoints because of their uncertainty: 46,XY,t(1;4;2(p21~31;q31.3;q31. After using high resolution MCB based on microdissection derived region-specific libraries, the exact nature of chromosomal rearrangements for chromosomes 1, 2 and 4 were revealed and these breakpoints were located on 1p31.1, 1q24.3 and 4q31.3 giving rise to a balanced situation. Conclusion Further delineations are certainly required to provide detailed information about the relationship between balanced CCRs and their phenotypes in order to offer proper counseling to the families concerned. Carriers must be investigated with high resolution banding and molecular cytogenetic techniques to determine the exact locations of the breakpoints. High resolution MCB is an alternative and an efficient method to other FISH based chromosome banding techniques and can serve in clarifying the nature of CCR.

  4. Linkage of autosomal-dominant common variable immunodeficiency to chromosome 4q.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Finck, A.; Meer, J.W.M. van der; Schaffer, A.A.; Pfannstiel, J.; Fieschi, C.; Plebani, A.; Webster, A.D.; Hammarstrom, L.; Grimbacher, B.

    2006-01-01

    The phenotype of common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) is characterized by recurrent infections owing to hypogammaglobulinemia, with deficiency in immunoglobulin (Ig)G and at least one of IgA or IgM. Family studies have shown a genetic association between CVID and selective IgA deficiency (IgAD),

  5. The densest lattices in PGL3(Q2)

    OpenAIRE

    Allcock, Daniel; Kato, Fumiharu

    2011-01-01

    We find the smallest possible covolume for lattices in PGL3(Q2), show that there are exactly two lattices with this covolume, and describe them explicitly. They are commensurable, and one of them appeared in Mumford's construction of his fake projective plane. We also discuss a new 2-adic uniformization of another fake projective plane.

  6. A genome-wide search for linkage to asthma phenotypes in the genetics of asthma international network families: evidence for a major susceptibility locus on chromosome 2p.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillai, Sreekumar G; Chiano, Mathias N; White, Nicola J; Speer, Marcy; Barnes, Kathleen C; Carlsen, Karin; Gerritsen, Jorrit; Helms, Peter; Lenney, Warren; Silverman, Michael; Sly, Peter; Sundy, John; Tsanakas, John; von Berg, Andrea; Whyte, Moira; Varsani, Shela; Skelding, Paul; Hauser, Michael; Vance, Jeffery; Pericak-Vance, Margaret; Burns, Daniel K; Middleton, Lefkos T; Brewster, Shyama R; Anderson, Wayne H; Riley, John H

    2006-03-01

    Asthma is a complex disease and the intricate interplay between genetic and environmental factors underlies the overall phenotype of the disease. Families with at least two siblings with asthma were collected from Europe, Australia and the US. A genome scan using a set of 364 families with a panel of 396 microsatellite markers was conducted. Nonparametric linkage analyses were conducted for asthma and three asthma-related phenotypes: bronchial hyper-reactivity (BHR), strict definition of asthma and atopic asthma. Nine chromosomal regions with LOD scores greater than 1.5 were identified (chromosomes 1q, 2p, 3q, 4p, 4q, 6q, 12q, 20p and 21). Linkage refinement analysis was performed for three BHR loci by genotyping single nucleotide polymorphisms at an average marker density of 1 cM. The LOD scores increased to 3.07 at chromosome 4p and 4.58 at chromosome 2p, while the chromosome 6p locus did not refine. The LOD score at the chromosome 2p locus is highly significant on a genome-wide basis. The refined locus covers a region with a physical size of 12.2 Mb. Taken together, these results provide evidence for a major asthma susceptibility locus on chromosome 2p.

  7. Microarray comparative genomic hybridization detection of chromosomal imbalances in uterine cervix carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    García José

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chromosomal Comparative Genomic Hybridization (CGH has been applied to all stages of cervical carcinoma progression, defining a specific pattern of chromosomal imbalances in this tumor. However, given its limited spatial resolution, chromosomal CGH has offered only general information regarding the possible genetic targets of DNA copy number changes. Methods In order to further define specific DNA copy number changes in cervical cancer, we analyzed 20 cervical samples (3 pre-malignant lesions, 10 invasive tumors, and 7 cell lines, using the GenoSensor microarray CGH system to define particular genetic targets that suffer copy number changes. Results The most common DNA gains detected by array CGH in the invasive samples were located at the RBP1-RBP2 (3q21-q22 genes, the sub-telomeric clone C84C11/T3 (5ptel, D5S23 (5p15.2 and the DAB2 gene (5p13 in 58.8% of the samples. The most common losses were found at the FHIT gene (3p14.2 in 47% of the samples, followed by deletions at D8S504 (8p23.3, CTDP1-SHGC- 145820 (18qtel, KIT (4q11-q12, D1S427-FAF1 (1p32.3, D9S325 (9qtel, EIF4E (eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E, 4q24, RB1 (13q14, and DXS7132 (Xq12 present in 5/17 (29.4% of the samples. Conclusion Our results confirm the presence of a specific pattern of chromosomal imbalances in cervical carcinoma and define specific targets that are suffering DNA copy number changes in this neoplasm.

  8. Expanding the clinical phenotype of the 3q29 microdeletion syndrome and characterization of the reciprocal microduplication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Friedrich Christopher A

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interstitial deletions of 3q29 have been recently described as a microdeletion syndrome mediated by nonallelic homologous recombination between low-copy repeats resulting in an ~1.6 Mb common-sized deletion. Given the molecular mechanism causing the deletion, the reciprocal duplication is anticipated to occur with equal frequency, although only one family with this duplication has been reported. Results In this study we describe 14 individuals with microdeletions of 3q29, including one family with a mildly affected mother and two affected children, identified among 14,698 individuals with idiopathic mental retardation who were analyzed by array CGH. Eleven individuals had typical 1.6-Mb deletions. Three individuals had deletions that flank, span, or partially overlap the commonly deleted region. Although the clinical presentations of individuals with typical-sized deletions varied, several features were present in multiple individuals, including mental retardation and microcephaly. We also identified 19 individuals with duplications of 3q29, five of which appear to be the reciprocal duplication product of the 3q29 microdeletion and 14 of which flank, span, or partially overlap the common deletion region. The clinical features of individuals with microduplications of 3q29 also varied with few common features. De novo and inherited abnormalities were found in both the microdeletion and microduplication cohorts illustrating the need for parental samples to fully characterize these abnormalities. Conclusion Our report demonstrates that array CGH is especially suited to identify chromosome abnormalities with unclear or variable presentations.

  9. Molecular cytogenetic characterisation of a mosaic add(12(p13.3 with an inv dup(3(q26.31 → qter detected in an autistic boy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliveira Guiomar

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inverted duplications (inv dup of a terminal chromosome region are a particular subset of rearrangements that often results in partial tetrasomy or partial trisomy when accompanied by a deleted chromosome. Associated mosaicism could be the consequence of a post-zygotic event or could result from the correction of a trisomic conception. Tetrasomies of distal segments of the chromosome 3q are rare genetic events and their phenotypic manifestations are diverse. To our knowledge, there are only 12 cases reported with partial 3q tetrasomy. Generally, individuals with this genomic imbalance present mild to severe developmental delay, facial dysmorphisms and skin pigmentary disorders. Results We present the results of the molecular cytogenetic characterization of an unbalanced mosaic karyotype consisting of mos 46,XY,add(12(p13.3 [56]/46,XY [44] in a previously described 11 years old autistic boy, re-evaluated at adult age. The employment of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH and multicolor banding (MCB techniques identified the extra material on 12p to be derived from chromosome 3, defining the additional material on 12p as an inv dup(3(qter → q26.3::q26.3 → qter. Subsequently, array-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH confirmed the breakpoint at 3q26.31, defining the extra material with a length of 24.92 Mb to be between 174.37 and 199.29 Mb. Conclusion This is the thirteenth reported case of inversion-duplication 3q, being the first one described as an inv dup translocated onto a non-homologous chromosome. The mosaic terminal inv dup(3q observed could be the result of two proposed alternative mechanisms. The most striking feature of this case is the autistic behavior of the proband, a characteristic not shared by any other patient with tetrasomy for 3q26.31 → 3qter. The present work further illustrates the advantages of the use of an integrative cytogenetic strategy, composed both by conventional and

  10. Dandy-Walker malformation and Wisconsin syndrome: novel cases add further insight into the genotype-phenotype correlations of 3q23q25 deletions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraris, Alessandro; Bernardini, Laura; Sabolic Avramovska, Vesna; Zanni, Ginevra; Loddo, Sara; Sukarova-Angelovska, Elena; Parisi, Valentina; Capalbo, Anna; Tumini, Stefano; Travaglini, Lorena; Mancini, Francesca; Duma, Filip; Barresi, Sabina; Novelli, Antonio; Mercuri, Eugenio; Tarani, Luigi; Bertini, Enrico; Dallapiccola, Bruno; Valente, Enza Maria

    2013-05-16

    The Dandy-Walker malformation (DWM) is one of the commonest congenital cerebellar defects, and can be associated with multiple congenital anomalies and chromosomal syndromes. The occurrence of overlapping 3q deletions including the ZIC1 and ZIC4 genes in few patients, along with data from mouse models, have implicated both genes in the pathogenesis of DWM. Using a SNP-array approach, we recently identified three novel patients carrying heterozygous 3q deletions encompassing ZIC1 and ZIC4. Magnetic resonance imaging showed that only two had a typical DWM, while the third did not present any defect of the DWM spectrum. SNP-array analysis in further eleven children diagnosed with DWM failed to identify deletions of ZIC1-ZIC4. The clinical phenotype of the three 3q deleted patients included multiple congenital anomalies and peculiar facial appearance, related to the localization and extension of each deletion. In particular, phenotypes resulted from the variable combination of three recognizable patterns: DWM (with incomplete penetrance); blepharophimosis, ptosis, and epicanthus inversus syndrome; and Wisconsin syndrome (WS), recently mapped to 3q. Our data indicate that the 3q deletion is a rare defect associated with DWM, and suggest that the hemizygosity of ZIC1-ZIC4 genes is neither necessary nor sufficient per se to cause this condition. Furthermore, based on a detailed comparison of clinical features and molecular data from 3q deleted patients, we propose clinical diagnostic criteria and refine the critical region for WS.

  11. Genomic imbalances in 5918 malignant epithelial tumors: an explorative meta-analysis of chromosomal CGH data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baudis Michael

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chromosomal abnormalities have been associated with most human malignancies, with gains and losses on some genomic regions associated with particular entities. Methods Of the 15429 cases collected for the Progenetix molecular-cytogenetic database, 5918 malignant epithelial neoplasias analyzed by chromosomal Comparative Genomic Hybridization (CGH were selected for further evaluation. For the 22 clinico-pathological entities with more than 50 cases, summary profiles for genomic imbalances were generated from case specific data and analyzed. Results With large variation in overall genomic instability, recurring genomic gains and losses were prominent. Most entities showed frequent gains involving 8q2, while gains on 20q, 1q, 3q, 5p, 7q and 17q were frequent in different entities. Loss "hot spots" included 3p, 4q, 13q, 17p and 18q among others. Related average imbalance patterns were found for clinically distinct entities, e.g. hepatocellular carcinomas (ca. and ductal breast ca., as well as for histologically related entities (squamous cell ca. of different sites. Conclusion Although considerable case-by-case variation of genomic profiles can be found by CGH in epithelial malignancies, a limited set of variously combined chromosomal imbalances may be typical for carcinogenesis. Focus on the respective regions should aid in target gene detection and pathway deduction.

  12. Partial duplication of 13q31.3-q34 and deletion of 13q34 associated with diaphragmatic hernia as a sole malformation in a fetus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jønch, Aia E; Larsen, Lise G; Pouplier, Susanne

    2012-01-01

    Partial duplications and deletions of chromosome 13 are rare and the phenotypic expressions of both aneuploidies are highly variable. Here we report on a fetus diagnosed prenatally with partial trisomy of 13q and a diaphragmatic hernia as a sole malformation. The parents had decided to terminate...... analysis revealed additional material on chromosome 13, which was shown to be from the same chromosome, by FISH analysis. Array CGH demonstrated a partial duplication and a small deletion at the distal long arm of chromosome 13. The parents had normal karyotypes. This is the first case of a de novo pure...... partial duplication of 13q31.3-q34 and distal deletion of 13q34 with a phenotype apparently only involving a diaphragmatic hernia and three lung lobes on both sides. Microarray analysis was useful in refining the chromosomal imbalance and suggesting a candidate region for diaphragmatic hernia....

  13. Validity of three screening questions (3Q/TMD) in relation to the DC/TMD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lövgren, A; Visscher, C M; Häggman-Henrikson, B; Lobbezoo, F; Marklund, S; Wänman, A

    2016-10-01

    Temporomandibular disorders (TMD) are common but seem to be largely undetected within general dental care. To improve dentists' awareness of these symptoms, three screening questions (3Q/TMD) have been introduced. Our aim was to validate 3Q/TMD in relation to the diagnostic criteria for TMD (DC/TMD), while taking into account the severity level of the symptoms. The study population consisted of 7831 individuals 20-69 years old, who had their routine dental check-up at the Public Dental Health Service in Västerbotten, Sweden. All patients answered a health declaration, including the 3Q/TMD regarding frequent temporomandibular pain, pain on movement and catching/locking of the jaw. All 3Q-positives (at least one affirmative) were invited for examination in randomised order. For each 3Q-positive, a matched 3Q-negative was invited. In total, 152 3Q-positives and 148 3Q-negatives participated. At examination, participants answered 3Q/TMD a second time, before they were examined and diagnosed according to DC/TMD. To determine symptom's severity, the Graded Chronic Pain Scale and Jaw Functional Limitation Scale-20 (JFLS-20) were used. In total, 74% of 3Q-positives and 16% of 3Q-negatives met the criteria for DC/TMD pain or dysfunction (disc displacements with reduction and degenerative joint disorder were excluded). Fifty-five per cent of 3Q-positives had a TMD diagnosis and CPI score ≥3 or a JFLS-20 score ≥5, compared to 4% of 3Q-negatives. The results show that the 3Q/TMD is an applicable, cost-effective and valid tool for screening a general adult population to recognise patients in need of further TMD examination and management. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Detection of structural abnormalities in spermatozoa of a translocation carrier t(3;11)(q27.3;q24.3) by triple FISH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martini, E; von Bergh, A R; Coonen, E; de Die-Smulders, C E; Hopman, A H; Ramaekers, F C; Geraedts, J P

    1998-02-01

    Structural chromosome abnormalities in spermatozoa represent an important category of paternally transmittable genetic damage. A couple was referred to our centre because of repetitive abortions and the man was found to be a carrier of a reciprocal translocation t(3;11)(q27.3;q24.3). A tailored fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) approach was developed to study the meiotic segregation patterns in spermatozoa from this translocation carrier. A combination of three DNA probes was used, a centromeric probe for chromosome 11, a cosmid probe for chromosome 11q and a YAC probe for chromosome 3q. The frequency of spermatozoa carrying an abnormal chromosome constitution was compared with baseline frequencies in control semen specimens and it was found that a significantly higher percentage of spermatozoa carried an abnormal constitution for the chromosomes involved in the translocation. A normal or balanced chromosome constitution was found in 44.3% of the analysed spermatozoa, while the remainder exhibited an abnormal chromosome constitution reflecting different modes of segregation (15.9% adjacent I segregation, 6.5% adjacent II segregation, 28.9% 3:1 segregation, 0.8% 4:0 segregation, 3.6% aberrant segregation). The frequency of aneuploidy for chromosomes X, Y, 13 and 21 was assessed using specific probes but there was no evidence of interchromosomal effects or variations in the sex ratio in spermatozoa from the translocation carrier. In conclusion, structural aberrations can be reliably assessed in interphase spermatozoa using unique DNA probe cocktails, and this method provides insight into the genetic constitution of germ cells and enables evaluation of potential risks for the offspring.

  15. Midterm observations and recommendations from the evaluation of the AF4Q initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Jeffrey A; Scanlon, Dennis P; McHugh, Megan C; Christianson, Jon B; Mittler, Jessica N; Hasnain-Wynia, Romana; Beich, Jeff

    2012-09-01

    To offer midterm observations and recommendations based on how Aligning Forces for Quality (AF4Q) alliances are faring in their journey toward improving healthcare quality at the community level. This study used a mixed method design. Longitudinal evaluation data to date were analyzed, including results from multiple surveys, qualitative analysis of key informant interviews, review of secondary documents and analysis of secondary data, and ongoing tracking of the activities of the 16 participating alliances. The observations and recommendations are based on consensus achieved by the AF4Q evaluation team investigators after in-depth iterative discussions. Six formative observations are identified and discussed: (1) stakeholder support and participation has been maintained despite changes in economic and political environments; (2) progress on program goals has been slow; (3) the "alignment" in the AF4Q initiative has been slow to materialize; (4) the AF4Q initiative has established a productive network of peer communities; (5) the impact of the AF4Q initiative, and the time to observe impact, vary by community, based on history and context; and (6) sustainability is the major future challenge for the AF4Q initiative. Multi-stakeholder alliances' efforts to improve quality should be viewed as "pieces of the health reform puzzle" rather than stand-alone solutions. As healthcare reform is challenged politically, alliances can practice the bipartisanship that focuses conversation on what is good for the community and how best to achieve community goals amid a potential sea of change in both federal and state policy and funding.

  16. A Rare Chromosome 3 Imbalance and Its Clinical Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Sims

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The duplication of chromosome 3q is a rare disorder with varying chromosomal breakpoints and consequently symptoms. Even rarer is the unbalanced outcome from a parental inv(3 resulting in duplicated 3q and a deletion of 3p. Molecular karyotyping should aid in precisely determining the length and breakpoints of the 3q+/3p− so as to better understand a child’s future development and needs. We report a case of an infant male with a 57.5 Mb duplication from 3q23-qter. This patient also has an accompanying 1.7 Mb deletion of 3p26.3. The duplicated segment in this patient encompasses the known critical region of 3q26.3-q27, which is implicated in the previously reported 3q dup syndrome; however, the accompanying 3p26.3 deletion is smaller than the previously reported cases. The clinical phenotype of this patient relates to previously reported cases of 3q+ that may suggest that the accompanying 1.7 Mb heterozygous deletion is not clinically relevant. Taken together, our data has refined the location and extent of the chromosome 3 imbalance, which will aid in better understanding the molecular underpinning of the 3q syndrome.

  17. Clinical, Cytogenetic, and Biochemical Analyses of a Family with a t(3;13(q26.2;p11.2: Further Delineation of 3q Duplication Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Abreu-González

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Chromosomal abnormalities that result in genomic imbalances are a major cause of congenital and developmental anomalies. Partial duplication of chromosome 3q syndrome is a well-described condition, and the phenotypic manifestations include a characteristic facies, microcephaly, hirsutism, synophrys, broad nasal bridge, congenital heart disease, genitourinary disorders, and mental retardation. Approximately 60%–75% of cases are derived from a balanced translocation. We describe a family with a pure typical partial trisomy 3q syndrome derived from a maternal balanced translocation t(3;13(q26.2;p11.2. As the chromosomal rearrangement involves the short arm of an acrocentric chromosome, the phenotype corresponds to a pure trisomy 3q26.2-qter syndrome. There are 4 affected individuals and several carriers among three generations. The report of this family is relevant because there are few cases of pure duplication 3q syndrome reported, and the cases described here contribute to define the phenotype associated with the syndrome. Furthermore, we confirmed that the survival until adulthood is possible. This report also identified the presence of glycosaminoglycans in urine in this family, not related to the chromosomal abnormality or the phenotype.

  18. All (4,1): Sigma models with (4,q) off-shell supersymmetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hull, Chris [The Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London,Prince Consort Road London SW7 @AZ (United Kingdom); Lindström, Ulf [The Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London,Prince Consort Road London SW7 @AZ (United Kingdom); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Division of Theoretical Physics,Uppsala University, Box 516, SE-751 20 Uppsala (Sweden)

    2017-03-08

    Off-shell (4,q) supermultiplets in 2-dimensions are constructed for q=1,2,4. These are used to construct sigma models whose target spaces are hyperkähler with torsion. The off-shell supersymmetry implies the three complex structures are simultaneously integrable and allows us to construct actions using extended superspace and projective superspace, giving an explicit construction of the target space geometries.

  19. A colorectal cancer susceptibility new variant at 4q26 in the Spanish population identified by genome-wide association analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis M Real

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Non-hereditary colorectal cancer (CRC is a complex disorder resulting from the combination of genetic and non-genetic factors. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS are useful for identifying such genetic susceptibility factors. However, the single loci so far associated with CRC only represent a fraction of the genetic risk for CRC development in the general population. Therefore, many other genetic risk variants alone and in combination must still remain to be discovered. The aim of this work was to search for genetic risk factors for CRC, by performing single-locus and two-locus GWAS in the Spanish population. RESULTS: A total of 801 controls and 500 CRC cases were included in the discovery GWAS dataset. 77 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs from single-locus and 243 SNPs from two-locus association analyses were selected for replication in 423 additional CRC cases and 1382 controls. In the meta-analysis, one SNP, rs3987 at 4q26, reached GWAS significant p-value (p = 4.02×10(-8, and one SNP pair, rs1100508 CG and rs8111948 AA, showed a trend for two-locus association (p = 4.35×10(-11. Additionally, our GWAS confirmed the previously reported association with CRC of five SNPs located at 3q36.2 (rs10936599, 8q24 (rs10505477, 8q24.21(rs6983267, 11q13.4 (rs3824999 and 14q22.2 (rs4444235. CONCLUSIONS: Our GWAS for CRC patients from Spain confirmed some previously reported associations for CRC and yielded a novel candidate risk SNP, located at 4q26. Epistasis analyses also yielded several novel candidate susceptibility pairs that need to be validated in independent analyses.

  20. A Colorectal Cancer Susceptibility New Variant at 4q26 in the Spanish Population Identified by Genome-Wide Association Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Real, Luis M.; Ruiz, Agustín; Gayán, Javier; González-Pérez, Antonio; Sáez, María E.; Ramírez-Lorca, Reposo; Morón, Francisco J.; Velasco, Juan; Marginet-Flinch, Ruth; Musulén, Eva; Carrasco, José M.; Moreno-Rey, Concha; Vázquez, Enrique; Chaves-Conde, Manuel; Moreno-Nogueira, Jose A.; Hidalgo-Pascual, Manuel; Ferrero-Herrero, Eduardo; Castellví-Bel, Sergi; Castells, Antoni; Fernandez-Rozadilla, Ceres; Ruiz-Ponte, Clara; Carracedo, Angel; González, Beatriz; Alonso, Sergio; Perucho, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Background Non-hereditary colorectal cancer (CRC) is a complex disorder resulting from the combination of genetic and non-genetic factors. Genome–wide association studies (GWAS) are useful for identifying such genetic susceptibility factors. However, the single loci so far associated with CRC only represent a fraction of the genetic risk for CRC development in the general population. Therefore, many other genetic risk variants alone and in combination must still remain to be discovered. The aim of this work was to search for genetic risk factors for CRC, by performing single-locus and two-locus GWAS in the Spanish population. Results A total of 801 controls and 500 CRC cases were included in the discovery GWAS dataset. 77 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP)s from single-locus and 243 SNPs from two-locus association analyses were selected for replication in 423 additional CRC cases and 1382 controls. In the meta-analysis, one SNP, rs3987 at 4q26, reached GWAS significant p-value (p = 4.02×10−8), and one SNP pair, rs1100508 CG and rs8111948 AA, showed a trend for two-locus association (p = 4.35×10−11). Additionally, our GWAS confirmed the previously reported association with CRC of five SNPs located at 3q36.2 (rs10936599), 8q24 (rs10505477), 8q24.21(rs6983267), 11q13.4 (rs3824999) and 14q22.2 (rs4444235). Conclusions Our GWAS for CRC patients from Spain confirmed some previously reported associations for CRC and yielded a novel candidate risk SNP, located at 4q26. Epistasis analyses also yielded several novel candidate susceptibility pairs that need to be validated in independent analyses. PMID:24978480

  1. A Partial Reedition of 4Q26a (4QLeviticus/e): A New Fragment and a Reinterpretation

    OpenAIRE

    Tigchelaar, Eibert

    2014-01-01

    A new identification of a 4Q26a (4QLeviticus e) fragment, as well as the reinterpretation on the basis of new photographs of 4Q26a frag. 8 as preserving Lev 20:2-4, rather than Lev 22:4-6, requires a reedition of two sections of the manuscript, and enables a partial material reconstruction of the scroll.

  2. Global gene expression profiling reveals a suppressed immune response pathway associated with 3q amplification in squamous carcinoma of the lung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Qian

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Chromosome 3q26–28 is a critical region of genomic amplification in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC, particularly lung squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs. No molecular therapeutic target has shown clinical utility for SCC, in contrast with adenocarcinomas of the lung. To identify novel candidate drivers in this region, we performed both Array Comparative Genomic Hybridization (array CGH, Agilent Human Genome CGH 244A oligo-microarrays and Gene Expression Microarray (Agilent Human Gene Expression 4 × 44 K microarray on 24 untreated lung SCC specimens. Using our previously published integrative genomics approach, we identified 12 top amplified driver genes within this region that are highly correlated and overexpressed in lung SCC. We further demonstrated one of the 12 top amplified driver Fragile X mental retardation-related protein 1 (FXR1 as a novel cancer gene in NSCLC and FXR1 executes its regulatory function by forming a novel complex with two other oncogenes, protein kinase C, iota ( PRKCI and epithelial cell transforming 2 (ECT2 within the same amplicon in lung cancer cell. Here we report that immune response pathways are significantly suppressed in lung SCC and negatively associated with 3q driver gene expression, implying a potential role of 3q drivers in cancer immune-surveillance. In light of the attractive immunotherapy strategy using blockade of negative regulators of T cell function for multiple human cancer including lung SCC, our findings may provide a rationale for targeting 3q drivers in combination of immunotherapies for human tumors harboring the 3q amplicon. The data have been deposited in NCBI's Gene Expression Omnibus and are accessible through GEO Series accession number GSE40089.

  3. A 4q35.2 subtelomeric deletion identified in a screen of patients with co-morbid psychiatric illness and mental retardation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blackwood Douglas HR

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cryptic structural abnormalities within the subtelomeric regions of chromosomes have been the focus of much recent research because of their discovery in a percentage of people with mental retardation (UK terminology: learning disability. These studies focused on subjects (largely children with various severities of intellectual impairment with or without additional physical clinical features such as dysmorphisms. However it is well established that prevalence of schizophrenia is around three times greater in those with mild mental retardation. The rates of bipolar disorder and major depressive disorder have also been reported as increased in people with mental retardation. We describe here a screen for telomeric abnormalities in a cohort of 69 patients in which mental retardation co-exists with severe psychiatric illness. Methods We have applied two techniques, subtelomeric fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH and multiplex amplifiable probe hybridisation (MAPH to detect abnormalities in the patient group. Results A subtelomeric deletion was discovered involving loss of 4q in a patient with co-morbid schizoaffective disorder and mental retardation. Conclusion The precise region of loss has been defined allowing us to identify genes that may contribute to the clinical phenotype through hemizygosity. Interestingly, the region of 4q loss exactly matches that linked to bipolar affective disorder in a large multiply affected Australian kindred.

  4. Three members of the human cystatin gene superfamily, AHSG, HRG, and KNG, map within one megabase of genomic DNA at 3q27.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzu, P; Baldini, A

    1995-01-01

    While constructing a contig in the human chromosome region 3q27, we identified two YAC clones that were positive for the polymorphic marker D3S1602. One of these clones was also positive for a sequence-tagged site derived from the kininogen (KNG) gene. Because of the known evolutionary and structural relationship of KNG to other members of the cystatin gene superfamily, we tested the physical linkage of the genes encoding alpha-2HS-glycoprotein (AHSG), KNG, and histidine-rich glycoprotein (HRG), all of which were previously mapped to the long arm of chromosome 3. Our results show the colocalization of the three genes in two independent, partially overlapping YAC clones. The genomic inserts of the two clones were 1 Mb and 1.3 Mb in size, indicating that the three genes map within 1 Mb of DNA. The largest YAC was also positive for the polymorphic marker D3S1262, substantiating previously reported data of genetic linkage between this marker and HRG. Fluorescence in situ hybridization localized the two YAC clones to chromosome band 3q27.

  5. Molecular structure and spectral properties of ethyl 3-quinolinecarboxylate (E3Q) and [Ag(E3Q)2(TCA)] complex (TCA = Trichloroacetate)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soliman, Saied M.; Kassem, Taher S.; Badr, Ahmed M. A.; Abou Youssef, Morsy A.; Assem, Rania

    2014-09-01

    A new [Ag(E3Q)2(TCA)] complex; (E3Q = Ethyl 3-quinolinecarboxylate and TCA = Trichloroacetate) has been synthesized and characterized using elemental analysis, FTIR, NMR and mass spectroscopy. The molecular geometry and spectroscopic properties of the complex as well as the free ligand have been calculated using the hybrid B3LYP method. The calculations predicted a distorted tetrahedral arrangement around Ag(I) ion. The vibrational spectra of the studied compounds have been assigned using potential energy distribution (PED). TD-DFT method was used to predict the electronic absorption spectra. The most intense absorption band showed a bathochromic shift and lowering of intensity in case of the complex (233.7 nm, f = 0.5604) compared to E3Q (λmax = 228.0 nm, f = 0.9072). The calculated 1H NMR chemical shifts using GIAO method showed good correlations with the experimental data. The computed dipole moment, polarizability and HOMO-LUMO energy gap were used to predict the nonlinear optical (NLO) properties. It is found that Ag(I) enhances the NLO activity. The natural bond orbital (NBO) analyses were used to elucidate the intramolecular charge transfer interactions causing stabilization for the investigated systems.

  6. A neocentromere on human chromosome 3 without detectable alpha-satellite DNA forms morphologically normal kinetochores

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wandall, A; Tranebjaerg, L; Tommerup, Niels

    1998-01-01

    A neocentromere at 3q26 was observed in a father and his daughter on a chromosome 3 with deleted centromeric region. No alpha-satellite DNA was detectable at the 3q26 neocentromere, but it was weakly positive with anticentromere (CREST) antibodies. Electron microscopy showed that the neocentromere...

  7. Female patient with autistic disorder, intellectual disability, and co-morbid anxiety disorder: Expanding the phenotype associated with the recurrent 3q13.2-q13.31 microdeletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintela, Ines; Gomez-Guerrero, Lorena; Fernandez-Prieto, Montse; Resches, Mariela; Barros, Francisco; Carracedo, Angel

    2015-12-01

    In recent years, the advent of comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) arrays and its use as a first genetic test for the diagnosis of patients with neurodevelopmental phenotypes has allowed the identification of novel submicroscopic chromosomal abnormalities (namely, copy number variants or CNVs), imperceptible by conventional cytogenetic techniques. The 3q13.31 microdeletion syndrome (OMIM #615433) has been defined as a genomic disorder mainly characterized by developmental delay, postnatal overgrowth, hypotonia, genital abnormalities in males, and characteristic craniofacial features. Although the 3q13.31 CNVs are variable in size, a 3.4 Mb recurrently altered region at 3q13.2-q13.31 has been recently described and non-allelic homologous recombination (NAHR) mediated by flanking human endogenous retrovirus (HERV-H) elements has been suggested as the mechanism of deletion formation. We expand the phenotypic spectrum associated with this recurrent deletion performing the clinical description of a 9-year-old female patient with autistic disorder, total absence of language, intellectual disability, anxiety disorder and disruptive, and compulsive eating behaviors. The array-based molecular karyotyping allowed the identification of a de novo recurrent 3q13.2-q13.31 deletion encompassing 25 genes. In addition, we compare her clinical phenotype with previous reports of patients with neurodevelopmental and behavioral disorders and proximal 3q microdeletions. Finally, we also review the candidate genes proposed so far for these phenotypes. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Autosomal recessive spastic paraplegia (SPG45) with mental retardation maps to 10q24.3-q25.1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dursun, Umut; Koroglu, Cigdem; Kocasoy Orhan, Elif; Ugur, Sibel Aylin; Tolun, Aslihan

    2009-10-01

    Hereditary spastic paraplegias (HSPs) are characterized by progressive spasticity in the lower limbs. They are clinically heterogeneous, and pure forms as well as complicated forms with other accompanying clinical findings are known. HSPs are also genetically heterogeneous. We performed clinical and genetic studies in a consanguineous family with five affected members. A genome scan using 405 microsatellite markers for eight members of the family identified candidate gene loci, and subsequent fine mapping in 16 members identified the gene locus responsible for the HSP. The clinical manifestations were very early onset spastic paraplegia (SPG) accompanied by mental retardation and ocular signs. The gene locus was identified as the interval 102.05-106.64 Mbp on chromosome 10. Gene MRPL43 was analyzed in the patients. No mutation but high levels of mRNA were detected. We have mapped a novel autosomal recessive complicated form of HSP (SPG45) to a 4.6-Mbp region at 10q24.3-q25.1 with multipoint logarithm of odds scores >4.5.

  9. Chromosome Abnormalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... XX), and males have an X and a Y chromosome (XY). The mother and father each contribute one ... chromosome has attached to another at the centromere. Inversions: A portion of the chromosome has broken off, turned upside down, and reattached. ...

  10. Genome-wide linkage scan for loci of musical aptitude in Finnish families: evidence for a major locus at 4q22

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulli, K; Karma, K; Norio, R; Sistonen, P; Göring, H H H; Järvelä, I

    2008-01-01

    Background: Music perception and performance are comprehensive human cognitive functions and thus provide an excellent model system for studying human behaviour and brain function. However, the molecules involved in mediating music perception and performance are so far uncharacterised. Objective: To unravel the biological background of music perception, using molecular and statistical genetic approaches. Methods: 15 Finnish multigenerational families (with a total of 234 family members) were recruited via a nationwide search. The phenotype of all family members was determined using three tests used in defining musical aptitude: a test for auditory structuring ability (Karma Music test; KMT) commonly used in Finland, and the Seashore pitch and time discrimination subtests (SP and ST respectively) used internationally. We calculated heritabilities and performed a genome-wide variance components-based linkage scan using genotype data for 1113 microsatellite markers. Results: The heritability estimates were 42% for KMT, 57% for SP, 21% for ST and 48% for the combined music test scores. Significant evidence of linkage was obtained on chromosome 4q22 (LOD 3.33) and suggestive evidence of linkage at 8q13-21 (LOD 2.29) with the combined music test scores, using variance component linkage analyses. The major contribution of the 4q22 locus was obtained for the KMT (LOD 2.91). Interestingly, a positive LOD score of 1.69 was shown at 18q, a region previously linked to dyslexia (DYX6) using combined music test scores. Conclusion: Our results show that there is a genetic contribution to musical aptitude that is likely to be regulated by several predisposing genes or variants. PMID:18424507

  11. Genome-wide linkage scan for loci of musical aptitude in Finnish families: evidence for a major locus at 4q22.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulli, K; Karma, K; Norio, R; Sistonen, P; Göring, H H H; Järvelä, I

    2008-07-01

    Music perception and performance are comprehensive human cognitive functions and thus provide an excellent model system for studying human behaviour and brain function. However, the molecules involved in mediating music perception and performance are so far uncharacterised. To unravel the biological background of music perception, using molecular and statistical genetic approaches. 15 Finnish multigenerational families (with a total of 234 family members) were recruited via a nationwide search. The phenotype of all family members was determined using three tests used in defining musical aptitude: a test for auditory structuring ability (Karma Music test; KMT) commonly used in Finland, and the Seashore pitch and time discrimination subtests (SP and ST respectively) used internationally. We calculated heritabilities and performed a genome-wide variance components-based linkage scan using genotype data for 1113 microsatellite markers. The heritability estimates were 42% for KMT, 57% for SP, 21% for ST and 48% for the combined music test scores. Significant evidence of linkage was obtained on chromosome 4q22 (LOD 3.33) and suggestive evidence of linkage at 8q13-21 (LOD 2.29) with the combined music test scores, using variance component linkage analyses. The major contribution of the 4q22 locus was obtained for the KMT (LOD 2.91). Interestingly, a positive LOD score of 1.69 was shown at 18q, a region previously linked to dyslexia (DYX6) using combined music test scores. Our results show that there is a genetic contribution to musical aptitude that is likely to be regulated by several predisposing genes or variants.

  12. Novel Vascular Malformation in an Affected Newborn with Deletion Del(4)(q31.3)

    OpenAIRE

    de León Ojeda, Norma Elena; Soriano-Torres, Michel; Cabrera, Mercedes J.; Benítez Ramos, Dunia Bárbara

    2012-01-01

    We report on a newborn male patient with a terminal deletion in the long arm of the chromosome 4 with a congenital heart defect unreported before in association with this syndrome. The patient had multiple congenital anomalies including a pointed duplicated fingernail, low set posteriorly rotated ears, large anterior fontanel, micrognathia, glabellar capillary vascular malformation, and Interrupted Aortic Arch type C. The patient died due to multiple congenital malformations; a peripheral chr...

  13. Recognition of Temporomandibular Disorders : validity and outcome of three screening questions (3Q/TMD)

    OpenAIRE

    Lövgren, Anna

    2017-01-01

    Background Pain and dysfunction in the temporomandibular region (Temporomandibular Disorders, TMD) are common conditions in the general population with an estimated treatment need of 5-15% in the general population. However, in Sweden, traceable performed treatments are significantly lower. The reasons for this indicated under-treatment are not known. To easily detect patients with a potential TMD related condition, three screening questions, 3Q/TMD, have been introduced. The aim with this p...

  14. An 8.4-Mb 3q26.33-3q28 microdeletion in a patient with blepharophimosis-intellectual disability syndrome and a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Õunap, Katrin; Pajusalu, Sander; Zilina, Olga; Reimand, Tiia; Žordania, Riina

    2016-08-01

    3q26.33-3q27.2 microdeletion can be classified as a clinical entity characterized by intrauterine growth retardation, feeding problems in infancy, short stature, intellectual disability, hypotonia, dysmorphic facial features (medially sparse eyebrows, narrow horizontal palpebral fissures, epicanthal folds, flat nasal bridge and tip, short philtrum, and downturned corners of mouth), and teeth and feet abnormalities.

  15. Marker chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Kiran Prabhaker; Belogolovkin, Victoria

    2013-04-01

    Marker chromosomes are a morphologically heterogeneous group of structurally abnormal chromosomes that pose a significant challenge in prenatal diagnosis. Phenotypes associated with marker chromosomes are highly variable and range from normal to severely abnormal. Clinical outcomes are very difficult to predict when marker chromosomes are detected prenatally. In this review, we outline the classification, etiology, cytogenetic characterization, and clinical consequences of marker chromosomes, as well as practical approaches to prenatal diagnosis and genetic counseling.

  16. Chromosomal aberrations of malignant pleural effusions of lung adenocarcinoma: different cytogenetic changes are correlated with genders and smoking habits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, Chueh-Chuan; Liang, Shu-Ching; Jong, Yiin-Jeng; Chen, Yann-Jang; Lin, Chi-Hung; Chen, Yuh-Min; Wu, Yu-Chung; Su, Wu-Chou; Huang, Chi-Ying F; Tseng, Szu-Wen; Whang-Peng, Jacqueline

    2007-09-01

    Chromosomal aberrations of malignant cells from pleural effusions of 31 cases of lung adenocarcinoma were analyzed. Pooled CGH results showed frequent amplifications on chromosome arms 1p (22.6%), 1q (35.5%), 2q (25.8%), 3q (38.7%), 4q (41.9%), 5p (41.9%), 5q (51.6%), 6p (19.4%), 6q (25.8%), 7p (41.9%), 7q (35.5%), 8q (32.3%), 12q (38.7%), 13q (22.6%), 14q (35.5%), 17q (19.4%), Xp (22.6%), and Xq (38.7%). Frequent deletions were found on 1p (19.4%), 3p (16.1%), 4q (16.1%), 8p (25.8%), 9p (22.6%), 9q (29.0%), 10q (22.6%), 13q (22.6%), 16p (19.4%), 16q (22.6%), 17p (29.0%), 18q (16.1%), 19p (41.9%), 19q (32.3%), 20p (19.4%) and 22q (29%). These genomic changes were generally found consistent with previous reports of CGH analysis of primary tumors of lung adenocarcinoma. Loss of 19q and 22q were more frequently found in our studies (32.3% and 29.0%, respectively) than studies of primary tumors (less than 7% for both genetic changes). Gain of 11p, although not a frequent finding, was relatively more common in this (16%) than other studies (range, 2.9-11.8%). Interestingly, occurrences of 3p loss and 11p gain were higher in smokers than non-smokers, and deletion of 3p and increased copy number of 11p and Xp appeared more often in male than female patients. Among 17 male patients, gain of chromosomal 11p was a frequent aberration in tumors of smokers, while gain of Xp was more easily found in tumors of non-smokers. One candidate gene located within 11p15, lactate dehydrogenase C (LDHC), was selected for further study. Three cases with 11p gain had amplified FISH signals of LDHC. Also tumors from smokers or male had significantly higher transcript level of LDHC than non-smokers or female, respectively. The results demonstrate that different cytogenetic changes of malignant pleural effusions from lung adenocarcinoma are correlated with genders and smoking habits. The role of LDHC in the carcinogenesis of smoking-related lung adenocarcinoma, especially in male patients with

  17. 4q22.1 contributes to bone mineral density and osteoporosis susceptibility in postmenopausal women of Chinese Han population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Haojie; Zhang, Bo; Zhu, Jialin; Liu, Dan; Guan, Fanglin; He, Xijing

    2013-01-01

    Osteoporosis is a multifactorial disease in which genetic determinants are modulated by hormonal, environmental and nutritional factors. An important clinical risk factor in the pathogenesis of osteoporosis is the presence of genetics polymorphism in/around susceptibility genes/regions. This study explored whether the region of 4q22.1, which confers risk of developing osteoporosis in some populations, associated with bone mineral density and osteoporosis susceptibility in postmenopausal women of Han Chinese. We investigated 32 SNPs with minor allele frequencies ≥0.05 between 20 kb upstream and 20 kb downstream (40 kb window) of rs6532023, mapping in the 4q22.1 region, which was reported to be significantly associated with osteoporosis in previous studies. We found that rs6532023 was significantly associated with bone mineral density and osteoporosis (corrected p = 0.015) in our sample, including 440 cases and 640 controls, and allele G was supposed as a risk factor while T worked as a protective factor. Further genotype association analyses suggested a similar pattern (corrected p = 0.040). Additionally, analyses by haplotypes indicated that a haplotype block rs7683315-rs6532023-rs1471400-rs1471403 in the region associated with bone mineral density and osteoporosis (global p = 0.032), and risk haplotype A-G-G-C had almost 1.5-fold increased in the cases. To our knowledge, this is the first report to examine 4q22.1 region polymorphisms and osteoporosis in Han Chinese. Our results provide further evidence for an effect of the region of 4q22.1 on the etiology of osteoporosis and suggest that 4q22.1 may be a genetic risk factor for bone mineral density and osteoporosis.

  18. A balanced reciprocal translocation case in family with a history of recurrent abortions:46,XY,t(4;13(q31.3;q33

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazan Eras Erdoğan

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: A couple with recurrent spontaneous abortionshas been referred to cytogenetic laboratory of MedicalBiology and Genetics Department for chromosomalanalysis.Material and methods: For chromosome analysis, peripheralblood culture was performed. The samples werestained by Giemsa Technique (GTG.Results: Twenty metaphase chromosomes were karyotyped,and 46,XY,t(4;13(q31.3-q33 karyotype was identifiedin the case. As a result of the analysis, his wifewas found to have normal karyotype. He had balancedtranslocation between chromosome 4 and 13 breakpointsin bands: der(4 monosomy 4qteràq31.3, trisomy13qà33qter, and der(13 trisomy 4qteràq31.3, monosomy13qà33qter.Conclusions: Although no phenotypically abnormalitieswere found in the male, the habituel abortions werefrequently observed in his wife. We concluded thatthis carrier family might be due to the unbalanced distribution(46,XY/46,XX, monosomy 4qteràq31.3, trisomy13qà33qter or 46,XY/46,XX,der(13 trisomy4qteràq31.3, monosomy 13qà33qter of translocationduring gamete formation and prenatal diagnosis recommendedfor their further pregnancies. J Clin Exp Invest2012; 3(2: 290-292

  19. 4q25 microdeletion encompassing PITX2: A patient presenting with tetralogy of Fallot and dental anomalies without ocular features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vande Perre, P; Zazo Seco, C; Patat, O; Bouneau, L; Vigouroux, A; Bourgeois, D; El Hout, S; Chassaing, N; Calvas, P

    2018-02-01

    Axenfeld-Rieger syndrome (ARS) is a heterogeneous clinical entity transmitted in an autosomal dominant manner. The main feature, Axenfeld-Rieger Anomaly (ARA), is a malformation of the anterior segment of the eye that can lead to glaucoma and impair vision. Extra-ocular defects have also been reported. Point mutations of FOXC1 and PITX2 are responsible for about 40% of the ARS cases. We describe the phenotype of a patient carrying a deletion encompassing the 4q25 locus containing PITX2 gene. This child presented with a congenital heart defect (Tetralogy of Fallot, TOF) and no signs of ARA. He is the first patient described with TOF and a complete deletion of PITX2 (arr[GRCh37]4q25(110843057-112077858)x1, involving PITX2, EGF, ELOVL6 and ENPEP) inherited from his ARS affected mother. In addition, to our knowledge, he is the first patient reported with no ocular phenotype associated with haploinsufficiency of PITX2. We compare the phenotype and genotype of this patient to those of five other patients carrying 4q25 deletions. Two of these patients were enrolled in the university hospital in Toulouse, while the other three were already documented in DECIPHER. This comparative study suggests both an incomplete penetrance of the ocular malformation pattern in patients carrying PITX2 deletions and a putative association between TOF and PITX2 haploinsufficiency. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. A report of paracentric inversion of chromosome 8 in Moebius syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kersey, James P; Vivian, Anthony J; Reid, Evan

    2006-03-01

    An eight-year-old girl with bilateral facial paresis and restricted eye movements was diagnosed with Moebius syndrome. A chromosomal analysis showed a paracentric inversion on the long arm of chromosome 8 (46, XX, inv(8) (q21.3q24.13)). Candidate genes have been found on chromosomes 3q21, 10q21, and 13q12. We discuss the genes which are known to have associated ocular movement dysfunction in the 8q21-24 region. We hope this case will add to the current body of knowledge regarding Moebius syndrome and its genetics.

  1. Association of TRB3 Q84R polymorphism with polycystic ovary syndrome in Chinese women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tu Binbin

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tribbles 3 (TRB3 affects insulin signalling by inhibiting insulin-stimulated Akt phosphorylation and subsequent activation. A single nucleotide polymorphism located in the second extron of the human TRB3 gene is thought to be associated with insulin resistance. The latter is a core abnormality in PCOS independent of obesity. The present study was designed to clarify the relationships of TRB3 Q84R polymorphism with PCOS in a Chinese women group. Methods A case-control study with two groups: PCOS group (n = 336 and control group of infertility women for tubal and/or male factor (n = 116 was performed. Genotyping of the TRB3 R84 variant was determined by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP. Results The frequency of genotype QQ in PCOS women was significantly lower, while genotype QR and RR were significantly higher than that in control group (p Conclusions TRB3 Q84R polymorphism is associated with obesity and especially glucose metabolism and not associated with polycystic ovary syndrome because of compositional characteristics of phenotype in Chinese PCOS women.

  2. Interphase chromosomes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Graphics. Interphase chromosomes. Genomes within interphase nuclei occupy discrete, three-dimensional regions known as 'chromosome territories' (Bridger and Bickmore, 1998, Cremer and Cremer, 2001, Parada and Misteli, 2002). The non-randomness of CT organization within an ...

  3. Modeling Chromosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Carol

    2016-01-01

    Learning about chromosomes is standard fare in biology classrooms today. However, students may find it difficult to understand the relationships among the "genome", "chromosomes", "genes", a "gene locus", and "alleles". In the simple activity described in this article, which follows the 5E approach…

  4. Genetic Loci on Chromosomes 4q25, 7p31, and 12p12 Are Associated With Onset of Lone Atrial Fibrillation Before the Age of 40 Years

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Morten S; Holst, Anders G; Jabbari, Javad

    2012-01-01

    SNPs were genotyped using TaqMan assays (Applied Biosystems, Foster City, CA). RESULTS: Three SNPs were found to be significantly associated with early-onset lone AF: rs2200733 closest to PITX2 (odds ratio [OR], 1.62; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.16-2.27; P = 0.004), rs3807989 near to CAV1 (OR 1...

  5. Gain of chromosome 4qter and loss of 5pter: an unusual case with features of cri du chat syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheth, Frenny; Gohel, Naresh; Liehr, Thomas; Akinde, Olakanmi; Desai, Manisha; Adeteye, Olawaleye; Sheth, Jayesh

    2012-01-01

    Here, we present a case with an unusual chromosomal rearrangement in a child with a predominant phenotype of high-pitched crying showing deletion encompassing CTNND2 due to an unbalanced translocation of chromosomes 4 and 5. This rearrangement led to a duplication of ~35 Mb in 4qter which replaced 18 Mb genetic materials in 5pter. Even though, in this patient, there was no clinically obvious modification to the classical phenotypes of CdCS, and the influence of the 4q-duplication cannot be completely excluded in this case. However, the region 4q34.1-34.3 was previously reported as a region not leading to phenotypic changes if present in three copies, an observation which could possibly be supported by this case. Conclusion. This study showed that in a patient with an unbalanced translocation resulting in 5p deletion, the presence of partial trisomy of chromosome 4q could be clinically insignificant.

  6. Fine-scale mapping of the 4q24 locus identifies two independent loci associated with breast cancer risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xingyi; Long, Jirong; Zeng, Chenjie; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Ghoussaini, Maya; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Wang, Qin; Milne, Roger L.; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Cai, Qiuyin; Beesley, Jonathan; Kar, Siddhartha P.; Andrulis, Irene L.; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Arndt, Volker; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Beeghly-Fadiel, Alicia; Benitez, Javier; Blot, William; Bogdanova, Natalia; Bojesen, Stig E.; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brenner, Hermann; Brinton, Louise; Broeks, Annegien; Brüning, Thomas; Burwinkel, Barbara; Cai, Hui; Canisius, Sander; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Choi, Ji-Yeob; Couch, Fergus J.; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S.; Czene, Kamila; Darabi, Hatef; Devilee, Peter; Droit, Arnaud; Dörk, Thilo; Fasching, Peter A.; Fletcher, Olivia; Flyger, Henrik; Fostira, Florentia; Gaborieau, Valerie; García-Closas, Montserrat; Giles, Graham G.; Grip, Mervi; Guénel, Pascal; Haiman, Christopher A.; Hamann, Ute; Hartman, Mikael; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Hopper, John L.; Hsiung, Chia-Ni; Ito, Hidemi; Jakubowska, Anna; Johnson, Nichola; Kabisch, Maria; Kang, Daehee; Khan, Sofia; Knight, Julia A.; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Lambrechts, Diether; Marchand, Loic Le; Li, Jingmei; Lindblom, Annika; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Lubinski, Jan; Mannermaa, Arto; Manoukian, Siranoush; Margolin, Sara; Marme, Frederik; Matsuo, Keitaro; McLean, Catriona A.; Meindl, Alfons; Muir, Kenneth; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Nevanlinna, Heli; Nord, Silje; Olson, Janet E.; Orr, Nick; Peterlongo, Paolo; Putti, Thomas Choudary; Rudolph, Anja; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Sawyer, Elinor J.; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Shen, Chen-Yang; Shi, Jiajun; Shrubsole, Martha J; Southey, Melissa C.; Swerdlow, Anthony; Teo, Soo Hwang; Thienpont, Bernard; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Tollenaar, Robert A.E.M.; Tomlinson, Ian P.M.; Truong, Thérèse; Tseng, Chiu-chen; van den Ouweland, Ans; Wen, Wanqing; Winqvist, Robert; Wu, Anna; Yip, Cheng Har; Zamora, M. Pilar; Zheng, Ying; Hall, Per; Pharoah, Paul D.P.; Simard, Jacques; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Dunning, Alison M.; Easton, Douglas F.; Zheng, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Background A recent association study identified a common variant (rs9790517) at 4q24 to be associated with breast cancer risk. Independent association signals and potential functional variants in this locus have not been explored. Methods We conducted a fine-mapping analysis in 55,540 breast cancer cases and 51,168 controls from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium. Results Conditional analyses identified two independent association signals among women of European ancestry, represented by rs9790517 (conditional p = 2.51 × 10−4; OR = 1.04; 95% CI 1.02–1.07) and rs77928427 (p = 1.86 × 10−4; OR = 1.04; 95% CI 1.02–1.07). Functional annotation using data from the Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) project revealed two putative functional variants, rs62331150 and rs73838678 in linkage disequilibrium (LD) with rs9790517 (r2 ≥ 0.90) residing in the active promoter or enhancer, respectively, of the nearest gene, TET2. Both variants are located in DNase I hypersensitivity and transcription factor binding sites. Using data from both The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) and Molecular Taxonomy of Breast Cancer International Consortium (METABRIC), we showed that rs62331150 was associated with level of expression of TET2 in breast normal and tumor tissue. Conclusion Our study identified two independent association signals at 4q24 in relation to breast cancer risk and suggested that observed association in this locus may be mediated through the regulation of TET2. Impact Fine-mapping study with large sample size warranted for identification of independent loci for breast cancer risk. PMID:26354892

  7. Minocycline-induced hyperpigmentation: comparison of 3 Q-switched lasers to reverse its effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nisar, Mahrukh S; Iyer, Karthik; Brodell, Robert T; Lloyd, Jenifer R; Shin, Thuzar M; Ahmad, Asad

    2013-01-01

    Minocycline is a tetracycline derivative antibiotic commonly prescribed for acne, rosacea, and other inflammatory skin disorders. Minocycline turns black when oxidized, leading to discoloration of the skin, nails, bulbar conjunctiva, oral mucosa, teeth, bones, and thyroid gland. Hyperpigmentation has been reported after long-term minocycline therapy with at least 100 mg/day. Three types of minocycline-induced cutaneous hyperpigmentation can result. Type I is the most common, and is associated with blue-black discoloration in areas of previous inflammation and scarring. Type II most commonly affects the legs and is characterized by blue-gray pigmentation of previously normal skin. Type III is the least common and is characterized by diffuse muddy-brown discoloration predominantly on sun exposed skin. Minocycline-induced hyperpigmentation may be cosmetically disfiguring and prompt identification is essential. Without treatment, symptoms may take several months, to years to resolve, after discontinuation of the drug. However, the pigmentation may never completely disappear. In fact, there have been few reports of complete resolution associated with any therapeutic intervention. We report a case of a patient on long-term minocycline therapy utilized as an anti-inflammatory agent to control symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis, which led to minocycline-induced hyperpigmentation of the face. To remove the blue-gray cutaneous deposits, 3 Q-switched lasers (Neodymium: yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG) 1064 nm, Alexandrite 755 nm, and Ruby 694 nm) were used in test areas. The Alexandrite 755 nm laser proved to provide effective clearing of the minocycline hyperpigmentation requiring just 2 treatments, with minimal treatment discomfort and down time.

  8. Recombinant Chromosome 4 from a Familial Pericentric Inversion: Prenatal and Adulthood Wolf-Hirschhorn Phenotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Malvestiti

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Pericentric inversion of chromosome 4 can give rise to recombinant chromosomes by duplication or deletion of 4p. We report on a familial case of Wolf-Hirschhorn Syndrome characterized by GTG-banding karyotypes, FISH, and array CGH analysis, caused by a recombinant chromosome 4 with terminal 4p16.3 deletion and terminal 4q35.2 duplication. This is an aneusomy due to a recombination which occurred during the meiosis of heterozygote carrier of cryptic pericentric inversion. We also describe the adulthood and prenatal phenotypes associated with the recombinant chromosome 4.

  9. [Acute myeloid leukemia with monosomy 7 and inv(3)(q21q26.2) complicated with central diabetes insipidus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanno, Satoru; Hagihara, Kiyoyuki; Sakabe, Manami; Okamura, Hiroshi; Inaba, Akiko; Nagata, Yuki; Nishimoto, Mitsutaka; Koh, Hideo; Nakao, Yoshitaka; Nakane, Takahiko; Nakamae, Hirohisa; Shimono, Taro; Hino, Masayuki

    2013-04-01

    A 20-year-old female presented with thirst, polyposia, and polyuria and was referred to our hospital because of leukocytosis and anemia. Bone marrow aspiration revealed 66.8% myeloperoxidase-positive blasts and trilineage myelodysplasia. The karyotype was 45, XX, inv(3)(q21q26.2), -7[19]. Therefore, a diagnosis of AML with inv(3)(q21q26.2) complicated by -7 was made. Moreover, hyposthenuria and a low anti-diuretic hormone (ADH) level were observed. Although cerebrospinal fluid analysis was normal, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed the absence of hyperintensity in the neurohypophysis in T1-weighted images. Therefore, she was also diagnosed with diabetes insipidus. After she was administered a desmopressin nasal spray, the volume of urine produced decreased. Following treatment with second induction therapy containing high-dose cytarabine for AML, she achieved complete remission in the bone marrow. Moreover, when the abnormality on MRI and the volume of urine were normalized, she discontinued desmopressin. Although diabetes insipidus is a rare complication of AML, the majority of AML patients who have diabetes insipidus have the abnormal karyotypes with inv(3)(q21q26.2)/t(3;3)(q21;q26.2) and monosomy 7. Further study is required to clarify the pathogenesis and develop a strategy for the treatment of this category of AML.

  10. 18 CFR 260.300 - FERC Form No. 3-Q, Quarterly financial report of electric utilities, licensees, and natural gas...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ..., Quarterly financial report of electric utilities, licensees, and natural gas companies. 260.300 Section 260... ENERGY APPROVED FORMS, NATURAL GAS ACT STATEMENTS AND REPORTS (SCHEDULES) § 260.300 FERC Form No. 3-Q, Quarterly financial report of electric utilities, licensees, and natural gas companies. (a) Prescription...

  11. 18 CFR 141.400 - FERC Form No. 3-Q, Quarterly financial report of electric utilities, licensees, and natural gas...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ..., Quarterly financial report of electric utilities, licensees, and natural gas companies. 141.400 Section 141..., licensees, and natural gas companies. (a) Prescription. The quarterly report of electric utilities, licensees, and natural gas companies, designated as FERC Form No. 3-Q, is prescribed for the reporting...

  12. EIF4A2 is a positional candidate gene at the 3q27 locus linked to type 2 diabetes in French families

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cheyssac, Claire; Dina, Christian; Leprêtre, Frédéric

    2006-01-01

    RNA translation and protein synthesis rate in pancreatic beta-cells, and our data indicates that EIF4A2 is downregulated by high glucose in rat beta-INS832/13 cells. The potential role of EIF4A2 in glucose homeostasis and its putative contribution to type 2 diabetes in the presence of metabolic stress......One of the most replicated loci influencing type 2 diabetes-related quantitative traits (quantitative trait loci [QTL]) is on chromosome 3q27 and modulates both type 2 diabetes-and metabolic syndrome-associated phenotypes. A QTL for type 2 diabetes age of onset (logarithm of odds [LOD] score = 3.......01 at D3S3686, P = 0.0001) was identified in a set of French families. To assess genetic variation underlying both age-of-onset QTL and our previous type 2 diabetes linkage in a 3.87-Mb interval, we explored 36 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in two biologically relevant candidate genes for glucose...

  13. Minocycline-induced hyperpigmentation: comparison of 3 Q-switched lasers to reverse its effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nisar MS

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Mahrukh S Nisar,1 Karthik Iyer,1 Robert T Brodell,2 Jenifer R Lloyd,3 Thuzar M Shin,3 Asad Ahmad4 1Northeast Ohio Medical University, Rootstown, OH, USA; 2Division of Dermatology, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, MS, USA; 3Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Cleveland, OH, USA; 4Northside Medical Center, Youngstown, OH, USA Abstract: Minocycline is a tetracycline derivative antibiotic commonly prescribed for acne, rosacea, and other inflammatory skin disorders. Minocycline turns black when oxidized, leading to discoloration of the skin, nails, bulbar conjunctiva, oral mucosa, teeth, bones, and thyroid gland. Hyperpigmentation has been reported after long-term minocycline therapy with at least 100 mg/day. Three types of minocycline-induced cutaneous hyperpigmentation can result. Type I is the most common, and is associated with blue-black discoloration in areas of previous inflammation and scarring. Type II most commonly affects the legs and is characterized by blue-gray pigmentation of previously normal skin. Type III is the least common and is characterized by diffuse muddy-brown discoloration predominantly on sun exposed skin. Minocycline-induced hyperpigmentation may be cosmetically disfiguring and prompt identification is essential. Without treatment, symptoms may take several months, to years to resolve, after discontinuation of the drug. However, the pigmentation may never completely disappear. In fact, there have been few reports of complete resolution associated with any therapeutic intervention. We report a case of a patient on long-term minocycline therapy utilized as an anti-inflammatory agent to control symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis, which led to minocycline-induced hyperpigmentation of the face. To remove the blue-gray cutaneous deposits, 3 Q-switched lasers (Neodymium: yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG 1064 nm, Alexandrite 755 nm, and Ruby 694 nm were used in test areas. The Alexandrite 755 nm

  14. The novel desmopressin analogue [V4Q5]dDAVP inhibits angiogenesis, tumour growth and metastases in vasopressin type 2 receptor-expressing breast cancer models

    Science.gov (United States)

    GARONA, JUAN; PIFANO, MARINA; ORLANDO, ULISES D.; PASTRIAN, MARIA B.; IANNUCCI, NANCY B.; ORTEGA, HUGO H.; PODESTA, ERNESTO J.; GOMEZ, DANIEL E.; RIPOLL, GISELLE V.; ALONSO, DANIEL F.

    2015-01-01

    Desmopressin (dDAVP) is a safe haemostatic agent with previously reported antitumour activity. It acts as a selective agonist for the V2 vasopressin membrane receptor (V2r) present on tumour cells and microvasculature. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the novel peptide derivative [V4Q5]dDAVP in V2r-expressing preclinical mouse models of breast cancer. We assessed antitumour effects of [V4Q5]dDAVP using human MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 breast carcinoma cells, as well as the highly metastatic mouse F3II cell line. Effect on in vitro cancer cell growth was evaluated by cell proliferation and clonogenic assays. Cell cycle distribution was analysed by flow cytometry. In order to study the effect of intravenously administered [V4Q5]dDAVP on tumour growth and angiogenesis, breast cancer xenografts were generated in athymic mice. F3II cells were injected into syngeneic mice to evaluate the effect of [V4Q5]dDAVP on spontaneous and experimental metastatic spread. In vitro cytostatic effects of [V4Q5]dDAVP against breast cancer cells were greater than those of dDAVP, and associated with V2r-activated signal transduction and partial cell cycle arrest. In MDA-MB-231 xenografts, [V4Q5]dDAVP (0.3 μg/kg, thrice a week) reduced tumour growth and angiogenesis. Treatment of F3II mammary tumour-bearing immunocompetent mice resulted in complete inhibition of metastatic progression. [V4Q5]dDAVP also displayed greater antimetastatic efficacy than dDAVP on experimental lung colonisation by F3II cells. The novel analogue was well tolerated in preliminary acute toxicology studies, at doses ≥300-fold above that required for anti-angiogenic/antimetastatic effects. Our data establish the preclinical activity of [V4Q5]dDAVP in aggressive breast cancer, providing the rationale for further clinical trials. PMID:25846632

  15. The novel desmopressin analogue [V4Q5]dDAVP inhibits angiogenesis, tumour growth and metastases in vasopressin type 2 receptor-expressing breast cancer models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garona, Juan; Pifano, Marina; Orlando, Ulises D; Pastrian, Maria B; Iannucci, Nancy B; Ortega, Hugo H; Podesta, Ernesto J; Gomez, Daniel E; Ripoll, Giselle V; Alonso, Daniel F

    2015-01-01

    Desmopressin (dDAVP) is a safe haemostatic agent with previously reported antitumour activity. It acts as a selective agonist for the V2 vasopressin membrane receptor (V2r) present on tumour cells and microvasculature. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the novel peptide derivative [V4Q5]dDAVP in V2r-expressing preclinical mouse models of breast cancer. We assessed antitumour effects of [V4Q5]dDAVP using human MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 breast carcinoma cells, as well as the highly metastatic mouse F3II cell line. Effect on in vitro cancer cell growth was evaluated by cell proliferation and clonogenic assays. Cell cycle distribution was analysed by flow cytometry. In order to study the effect of intravenously administered [V4Q5]dDAVP on tumour growth and angiogenesis, breast cancer xenografts were generated in athymic mice. F3II cells were injected into syngeneic mice to evaluate the effect of [V4Q5]dDAVP on spontaneous and experimental metastatic spread. In vitro cytostatic effects of [V4Q5]dDAVP against breast cancer cells were greater than those of dDAVP, and associated with V2r-activated signal transduction and partial cell cycle arrest. In MDA-MB-231 xenografts, [V4Q5]dDAVP (0.3 µg/kg, thrice a week) reduced tumour growth and angiogenesis. Treatment of F3II mammary tumour-bearing immunocompetent mice resulted in complete inhibition of metastatic progression. [V4Q5]dDAVP also displayed greater antimetastatic efficacy than dDAVP on experimental lung colonisation by F3II cells. The novel analogue was well tolerated in preliminary acute toxicology studies, at doses ≥ 300-fold above that required for anti-angiogenic/antimetastatic effects. Our data establish the preclinical activity of [V4Q5]dDAVP in aggressive breast cancer, providing the rationale for further clinical trials.

  16. Economic Observation in 3Q E-business Fight - According to Analysis of Resource Allocation and Contract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Ruihu; Chen, Zeming; Kuang, Juchi

    Based on relation of resource allocation and marginal benefit of e-commence provider, both of origin and essence of the 3Q e-business fight were analyzed; and then contents of the contract between e-business company and users were elaborated. Moreover, liability for Qihoo's breach of the contract in 3Q e-business fight was discussed. Analysis of the contract indicated that blame of infringing on privacy of users from public, media or even a law professor for Tengxun Company is not exactly justicial. Some controversial rules which are not fit for usual practices in the QQ contract such as narrow definition of privacy were found out, whose reason lies in no relevant e-business standards or rules in our country. In the end, this passage points out that actions of government who intervened in market operations of Tengxun Company and QQ Company are inappropriate and unnecessary. Thus, responsibility for facing up to incomplete market rules of e-commence lies with government and government should strengthen market supervision by legislation so as to guide healthy development of e-business market, which is a key lesson we learn from the 3Q e-business fight.

  17. The diagnostic utility of combination of HMGA2 and IMP3 qRT-PCR testing in thyroid neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Long; Lloyd, Ricardo V; Henry, Michael R; Erickson, Lori A; Sebo, Thomas J; Rumilla, Kandelaria M; Zhang, Jun

    2015-01-01

    The diagnosis of malignant thyroid tumors in some cytologic and histologic specimens remains challenging. High-mobility group A2 (HMGA2) expression and insulin-like growth factor II mRNA-binding protein-3 (IMP3) expression were evaluated by relative quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the combination of HMGA2 and IMP3 qRT-PCR was diagnostically useful in differentiating benign from malignant thyroid neoplasms. Fine-needle aspiration (FNA) specimens from 120 patients including 56 benign lesions and 64 carcinomas were used. The available 80 corresponding formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) thyroid tissues from 66 patients were also included in this study. HMGA2 and IMP3 expression levels were detected by qRT-PCR and reported as relative fold change after normalizing with a calibrator. The diagnostic utilities of HMGA2 and IMP3 qRT-PCR tests were evaluated individually and in combination. In FNA specimens, HMGA2 and IMP3 expression was consistently higher in thyroid malignancies compared with benign lesions in all subgroups except in Hürthle cell tumors. After exclusion of Hürthle cell tumors, the sensitivity was 90.2% for HMGA2, 88.2% for IMP3, and 98% for HMGA2+IMP3; the specificity was 97.1% for HMGA2, 79.4% for IMP3, and 79.4% for HMGA+IMP3. qRT-PCR data showed similar results in FFPE tissues: the sensitivity was 84.2% for HMGA2, 85.7% for IMP3, and 94.7% for HMGA2+IMP3; the specificity was 96.9% for HMGA2, 91.2% for IMP3, and 90.6% for HMGA2+IMP3. qRT-PCR data were concordant between FNA and FFPE samples for HMGA2 (97.4%) and IMP3 (96.9%). The results indicate that HMGA2 qRT-PCR with high specificity may be a useful ancillary technique to assist in the classification of difficult thyroid specimens, excluding Hürthle cell tumors. The HMGA2 and IMP3 qRT-PCR combination model with increased sensitivity and negative predictive value (96.4%) may be useful in screening thyroid

  18. A novel microdeletion syndrome at 3q13.31 characterised by developmental delay, postnatal overgrowth, hypoplastic male genitals, and characteristic facial features

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Molin, Anna-Maja; Andrieux, J; Koolen, D A

    2012-01-01

    Congenital deletions affecting 3q11q23 have rarely been reported and only five cases have been molecularly characterised. Genotype-phenotype correlation has been hampered by the variable sizes and breakpoints of the deletions. In this study, 14 novel patients with deletions in 3q11q23 were...

  19. Synthetic chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindler, Daniel; Waldminghaus, Torsten

    2015-11-01

    What a living organism looks like and how it works and what are its components-all this is encoded on DNA, the genetic blueprint. Consequently, the way to change an organism is to change its genetic information. Since the first pieces of recombinant DNA have been used to transform cells in the 1970s, this approach has been enormously extended. Bigger and bigger parts of the genetic information have been exchanged or added over the years. Now we are at a point where the construction of entire chromosomes becomes a reachable goal and first examples appear. This development leads to fundamental new questions, for example, about what is possible and desirable to build or what construction rules one needs to follow when building synthetic chromosomes. Here we review the recent progress in the field, discuss current challenges and speculate on the appearance of future synthetic chromosomes. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Molecular cytogenetic characterization of Jacobsen syndrome (11q23.3-q25 deletion) in a fetus associated with double outlet right ventricle, hypoplastic left heart syndrome and ductus venosus agenesis on prenatal ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chih-Ping; Wang, Liang-Kai; Wu, Pei-Chen; Chang, Tung-Yao; Chern, Schu-Rern; Wu, Peih-Shan; Chen, Yen-Ni; Chen, Shin-Wen; Lee, Chen-Chi; Yang, Chien-Wen; Wang, Wayseen

    2017-02-01

    We present molecular cytogenetic characterization of Jacobsen syndrome (11q23.3-q25 deletion) in a fetus associated with double outlet right ventricle (DORV), hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS), and ductus venosus (DV) agenesis on prenatal ultrasound. A 26-year-old woman underwent prenatal ultrasound examination at 22 weeks of gestation, which revealed intrauterine growth restriction, short femurs, DORV, HLHS, DV agenesis, single umbilical artery, and curly fourth toe of the left foot. The parents elected to terminate the pregnancy, and a 500-g female fetus was delivered at 23 weeks of gestation with facial dysmorphism, bilateral camptodactyly, and hammertoes. The parental karyotypes were normal. Cytogenetic analysis of the cord blood and umbilical cord revealed a karyotype of 46,XX,del(11)(q23). Array comparative genomic hybridization analysis of the DNA extracted from the umbilical cord revealed a 14.38-Mb deletion of 11q23.3-q25 encompassing BSX, ETS1, FLI1, and ARHGAP32. Metaphase fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis using the probes RP11-209L12 (11q25) and RP11-25M7 (11q11) showed a distal 11q deletion in the aberrant chromosome 11 in 17/17 cells examined. Prenatal diagnosis of DORV, HLHS, DV agenesis associated with intrauterine growth restriction and short limbs should include a differential diagnosis of Jacobsen syndrome. Copyright © 2017 Taiwan Association of Obstetrics & Gynecology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Complex or monosomal karyotype and not blast percentage is associated with poor survival in acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome patients with inv(3)(q21q26.2)/t(3;3)(q21;q26.2): a Bone Marrow Pathology Group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Heesun J; Vardiman, James W; Anastasi, John; Raca, Gordana; Savage, Natasha M; Cherry, Athena M; Arber, Daniel; Moore, Erika; Morrissette, Jennifer J D; Bagg, Adam; Liu, Yen-Chun; Mathew, Susan; Orazi, Attilio; Lin, Pei; Wang, Sa A; Bueso-Ramos, Carlos E; Foucar, Kathryn; Hasserjian, Robert P; Tiu, Ramon V; Karafa, Matthew; Hsi, Eric D

    2014-05-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome with inv(3)(q21q26.2)/t(3;3)(q21;q26.2) have a poor prognosis. Indeed, the inv(3)(q21q26.2)/t(3;3)(q21;q26.2) has been recognized as a poor risk karyotype in the revised International Prognostic Scoring System. However, inv(3)(q21q26.2)/t(3;3)(q21;q26.2) is not among the cytogenetic abnormalities pathognomonic for diagnosis of acute myeloid leukemia irrespective of blast percentage in the 2008 WHO classification. This multicenter study evaluated the clinico-pathological features of acute myeloid leukemia/myelodysplastic syndrome patients with inv(3)(q21q26.2)/t(3;3)(q21;q26.2) and applied the revised International Prognostic Scoring System to myelodysplastic syndrome patients with inv(3)(q21q26.2)/t(3;3)(q21;q26.2). A total of 103 inv(3)(q21q26.2)/t(3;3)(q21;q26.2) patients were reviewed and had a median bone marrow blast count of 4% in myelodysplastic syndrome (n=40) and 52% in acute myeloid leukemia (n=63) (Pmyeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome patients with inv(3)(q21q26.2)/t(3;3)(q21;q26.2) (12.9 vs. 7.9 months; P=0.16). Eighty-three percent of patients died (median follow up 7.9 months). Complex karyotype, monosomal karyotype and dysgranulopoiesis (but not blast percentage) were independent poor prognostic factors in the entire cohort on multivariable analysis. The revised International Prognostic Scoring System better reflected overall survival of inv(3)(q21q26.2)/t(3;3)(q21;q26.2) than the International Prognostic Scoring System but did not fully reflect the generally dismal prognosis. Our data support consideration of myelodysplastic syndrome with inv(3)(q21q26.2)/t(3;3)(q21;q26.2) as an acute myeloid leukemia with recurrent genetic abnormalities, irrespective of blast percentage.

  2. Significant in vivo anti-inflammatory activity of Pytren4Q-Mn a superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2 mimetic scorpiand-like Mn (II complex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Serena

    Full Text Available The clinical use of purified SOD enzymes has strong limitations due to their large molecular size, high production cost and immunogenicity. These limitations could be compensated by using instead synthetic SOD mimetic compounds of low molecular weight.We have recently reported that two SOD mimetic compounds, the Mn(II complexes of the polyamines Pytren2Q and Pytren4Q, displayed high antioxidant activity in bacteria and yeast. Since frequently molecules with antioxidant properties or free-radical scavengers also have anti-inflammatory properties we have assessed the anti-inflammatory potential of Pytren2Q and Pytren4Q Mn(II complexes, in cultured macrophages and in a murine model of inflammation, by measuring the degree of protection they could provide against the cellular injury produced by lipopolisacharide, a bacterial endotoxin.In this report we show that the Mn(II complex of Pytren4Q but not that of Pytren2Q effectively protected human cultured THP-1 macrophages and whole mice from the inflammatory effects produced by LPS. These results obtained with two molecules that are isomers highlight the importance of gathering experimental data from animal models of disease in assessing the potential of candidate molecules.The effective anti-inflammatory activity of the Mn(II complex of Pytren4Q in addition to its low toxicity, water solubility and ease of production would suggest it is worth taking into consideration for future pharmacological studies.

  3. 31 CFR 30.4 - Q-4: What actions are necessary for a TARP recipient to comply with the standards established...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Q-4: What actions are necessary for a... or manipulation of earnings)? 30.4 Section 30.4 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of the Treasury TARP STANDARDS FOR COMPENSATION AND CORPORATE GOVERNANCE § 30.4 Q-4: What actions are...

  4. Chromosome abnormalities in primary ovarian cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yonescu, R.; Currie, J.; Griffin, C.A. [John Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States)

    1994-09-01

    Chromosome abnormalities that are specific and recurrent may occur in regions of the genome that are involved in the conversion of normal cells to those with tumorigenic potential. Ovarian cancer is the primary cause of death among patients with gynecological malignancies. We have performed cytogenetic analysis of 16 ovarian tumors from women age 28-82. Three tumors of low malignant potential and three granulosa cell tumors had normal karyotypes. To look for the presence of trisomy 12, which has been suggested to be a common aberration in this group of tumors, interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization was performed on direct preparations from three of these tumors using a probe for alpha satellite sequences of chromosome 12. In the 3 preparations, 92-98 percent of the cells contained two copies of chromosome 12, indicating that trisomy 12 is not a universal finding in low grade ovarian tumors. Endometrioid carcinoma of the ovary is histologically indistinguishable from endometial carcinoma of the uterus. We studied 10 endometrioid tumors to determine the degree of genetic similarity between these two carcinomas. Six out of ten endometrioid tumors showed a near-triploid modal number, and one presented with a tetraploid modal number. Eight of the ten contained structural chromosome abnormalities, of which the most frequent were 1p- (5 tumors), 19q+ (3 tumors), 6q- or ins(6) (4 tumors), 3q- or 3q+ (4 tumors). These cytogenetic results resemble those reported for papillary ovarian tumors and differ from those of endometrial carcinoma of the uterus. We conclude that despite the histologic similarities between the endometrioid and endometrial carcinomas, the genetic abnormalities in the genesis of these tumors differ significantly.

  5. Human twinning is not linked to the region of chromosome 4 syntetic with the sheep twinning gene FecB

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duffy, DL; Montgomery, GW; Hall, J.; Mayne, C.; Healy, S.C.; Brown, J; Boomsma, D.I.; Martin, N.G.

    2001-01-01

    The tendency to dizygotic (DZ) twinning is inherited in both humans and sheep, and a fecundity gene in sheep (FecB) maps to sheep chromosome 6, syntenic with human 4q21-25. Our aim was to see whether a gene predisposing to human DZ twinning mapped to this region. DNA was collected from 169 pairs and

  6. Association of Increased Serum Sema3E with TRIB3 Q84R Polymorphism and Carotid Atherosclerosis in Metabolic Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Ran-Ran; Song, Ming; Li, Yi-Hui; Wang, Feng; Zhou, Hui-Min; Liu, Ming-Hao; Zhong, Ming; Zhang, Yun; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Zhi-Hao

    2017-01-01

    Semaphorin-3E, provoking inflammation and insulin resistance which leads to metabolic syndrome, exerts obscure effects on carotid atherosclerosis in metabolic syndrome. The Tribbles 3 Q84R polymorphism is involved in insulin resistance. This study aims to investigate whether the Tribbles 3 Q84R polymorphism has profound effects on serum semaphorin 3E and what effect semaphorin 3E exerts on carotid atherosclerosis. A total of 518 unrelated Chinese subjects consisted of control (n=258) and metabolic syndrome (n=260) groups. Clinical and biochemical characteristics were collected. The level of serum semaphorin 3E was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Genotyping of the functional Tribbles 3 Q84R polymorphism was achieved by RFLP-PCR method. All subjects underwent carotid ultrasonography to determine carotid intima-media thickness (considered atherosclerosis if above 0.9 mm). Serum semaphorin 3E was significantly increased in metabolic syndrome (P=0.012) as compared with the control group. Among the metabolic syndrome group, those with RR84 genotype had significantly higher levels of serum semaphorin 3E than those with QQ84 or QR84 genotypes (P=0.003, P=0.004) with similarity amongst the control group. Factorial analyses showed statistically significant interactions between RR84 genotype and metabolic syndrome (P=0.019 for interaction for semaphorin 3E). Semaphorin 3E correlated positively with homeostasis model assessment insulin resistance (r=0.263, P=0.009) and carotid intima-media thickness (r=0.215, P=0.031). On partial analyses, after controlling for confounding factors, semaphorin 3E was positively correlated with carotid intima-media thickness (P=0.004). Individuals with metabolic syndrome demonstrated further increased serum semaphorin 3E, especially those with Tribbles 3 RR84 genotype. Increased serum semaphorin 3E may in part exacerbate insulin resistance and carotid atherosclerosis. © 2017 by the Association of Clinical Scientists, Inc.

  7. Sec62 bridges the gap from 3q amplification to molecular cell biology in non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linxweiler, Maximilian; Linxweiler, Johannes; Barth, Monika; Benedix, Julia; Jung, Volker; Kim, Yoo-Jin; Bohle, Rainer M; Zimmermann, Richard; Greiner, Markus

    2012-02-01

    The molecular carcinogenesis of lung cancer has yet to be clearly elucidated. We investigated the possible oncogenic function of SEC62 in lung cancer, which was predicted based on our previous findings that lung and thyroid cancer tissue samples exhibited increased Sec62 protein levels. The SEC62 gene locus is at 3q26.2, and 3q amplification is reportedly the most common genomic alteration in non-small cell lung cancer. We analyzed SEC62 mRNA and protein levels in tissue samples from lung cancer patients by real-time quantitative PCR, Western blot, and IHC and found significantly increased SEC62 mRNA and protein levels in tumors compared with tumor-free tissue samples from the same patients. Correlation analyses revealed significantly higher Sec62 levels in tumors with lymph node metastases compared with nonmetastatic tumors, as well as in poorly compared with moderately differentiated tumors. On the basis of these promising results, we examined the role of Sec62 in cancer cell biology in vitro. Cell migration assays with lung and thyroid cancer cells showed distinct stimulation of migration in SEC62-overexpressing cells and inhibition of migration in Sec62-depleted cells. Moreover, we found that SEC62 silencing sensitized the cells to thapsigargin-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress. Thus, our results indicate that SEC62 represents a potential candidate oncogene in the amplified 3q region in cases of non-small cell lung cancer and harbors various functions in cancer cell biology. Copyright © 2012 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. A de novo microdeletion in chromosome 8q12.3q13.2: Association with mild intellectual disability and epilepsy?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoeven, W.M.A.; Egger, J.I.M.; Feenstra, I.; Leeuw, N. de

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Whole genome microarray techniques are a primary tool for the etiological assessment in patients with intellectual disabilities. As a result, several novel microdeletions have been demonstrated that could be causatively related to the disorder. Interpretation of array results is

  9. A de novo microdeletion in chromosome 8q12.3q13.2: association with mild intellectual disability and epilepsy?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoeven, W.M.A.; Egger, J.I.M.; Feenstra, I.; Leeuw, N. de

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Whole genome microarray techniques are a primary tool for the etiological assessment in patients with intellectual disabilities. As a result, several novel microdeletions have been demonstrated that could be causatively related to the disorder. Interpretation of array results is

  10. Multi-stage genome-wide association study identifies new susceptibility locus for testicular germ cell tumour on chromosome 3q25

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Litchfield, Kevin; Sultana, Razvan; Renwick, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and subsequent meta-analyses have identified over 25 SNPs at 18 loci, together accounting for >15% of the genetic susceptibility to testicular germ cell tumour (TGCT). To identify further common SNPs associated with TGCT, here we report a three-stage ......) demonstrating association with TGCT [per-allele odds ratio (OR) = 1.16, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.06-1.27; P = 1.2 × 10(-9)]....

  11. Chromosome structure and function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Risley, M.S.

    1986-01-01

    This book presents topics in chromosome structure and function. Topics covered include: the structure of interphase chromatin; chromatin structure, gene expression and differentiation; organization of mitotic chromosomes; organization of meiotic chromosomes and synaptonimal complexes; the lampbrush chromsome of animal oocytes; dosage compensation in mammals: x chromosome inactivation; and polytene chromosomes.

  12. Chromosome Arm-Specific Long Telomeres: A New Clonal Event in Primary Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oumar Samassekou

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies demonstrated that critically shortened telomere lengths correlate with the chromosome instability in carcinogenesis. However, little has been noticed regarding the correlation of long telomeres at specific chromosomes with malignant disorders. We studied relative telomere lengths (RTLs for individual chromosomes using the quantitative fluorescence in situ hybridization technique in a cohort of 32 patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML and 32 normal samples. We found that telomeres at some specific chromosome arms remain well maintained or even lengthened in a high frequency (27/32 of leukemia cases. In particular, 10 chromosome arms, 4q, 5p, 7q, 11p, 13p, 13q, 14p, 15p, 18p, and Xp, with long telomeres were consistently identified in different samples, and six of them (4q, 5p, 13p, 13q, 14p, and Xp with relatively long telomeres were also observed in normal samples, but they appeared in lower occurrence rate and shorter RTL than in CML samples. Our results strongly indicate the presence of a special leukemia cell population, or a clone, originated from a common progenitor that is characterized with chromosome arm-specific long telomeres. We suggest that relatively long telomeres located at key chromosomes could be preferentially maintained or further elongated during the early stage of malignant transformation.

  13. Dysregulation of 4q35- and muscle-specific genes in fetuses with a short D4Z4 array linked to facio-scapulo-humeral dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broucqsault, Natacha; Morere, Julia; Gaillard, Marie-Cécile; Dumonceaux, Julie; Torrents, Julia; Salort-Campana, Emmanuelle; Maues De Paula, André; Bartoli, Marc; Fernandez, Carla; Chesnais, Anne Laure; Ferreboeuf, Maxime; Sarda, Laure; Dufour, Henry; Desnuelle, Claude; Attarian, Shahram; Levy, Nicolas; Nguyen, Karine; Magdinier, Frédérique; Roche, Stéphane

    2013-10-15

    Facio-scapulo-humeral dystrophy (FSHD) results from deletions in the subtelomeric macrosatellite D4Z4 array on the 4q35 region. Upregulation of the DUX4 retrogene from the last D4Z4 repeated unit is thought to underlie FSHD pathophysiology. However, no one knows what triggers muscle defect and when alteration arises. To gain further insights into the molecular mechanisms of the disease, we evaluated at the molecular level, the perturbation linked to the FSHD genotype with no a priori on disease onset, severity or penetrance and prior to any infiltration by fibrotic or adipose tissue in biopsies from fetuses carrying a short pathogenic D4Z4 array (n = 6) compared with fetuses with a non-pathogenic D4Z4 array (n = 21). By measuring expression of several muscle-specific markers and 4q35 genes including the DUX4 retrogene by an RT-PCR and western blotting, we observed a global dysregulation of genes involved in myogenesis including MYOD1 in samples with <11 D4Z4. The DUX4-fl pathogenic transcript was detected in FSHD biopsies but also in controls. Importantly, in FSHD fetuses, we mainly detected the non-spliced DUX4-fl isoform. In addition, several other genes clustered at the 4q35 locus are upregulated in FSHD fetuses. Our study is the first to examine fetuses carrying an FSHD-linked genotype and reveals an extensive dysregulation of several muscle-specific and 4q35 genes at early development stage at a distance from any muscle defect. Overall, our work suggests that even if FSHD is an adult-onset muscular dystrophy, the disease might also involve early molecular defects arising during myogenesis or early differentiation.

  14. De novo acute myeloid leukemia with inv(3)(q21q26.2) or t(3;3)(q21;q26.2): a clinicopathologic and cytogenetic study of an entity recently added to the WHO classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jianlan; Konoplev, Sergej N; Wang, Xuemei; Cui, Wei; Chen, Su S; Medeiros, L Jeffrey; Lin, Pei

    2011-03-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia with inv(3)(q21q26.2) or t(3;3)(q21;q26.2) is a rare type of leukemia recently added to the World Health Organization (WHO) classification scheme. In this study, we analyzed the clinicopathologic and cytogenetic features of 30 cases of de novo acute myeloid leukemia with inv(3)/t(3;3). The median patient age was 53 years (range, 27-77 years). The platelet count was variable (range, 21-597 × 10(9)/l, median: 128 × 10(9)/l), and two (6.7%) patients presented with thrombocytosis (>450 × 10(9)/l). Morphologically, these neoplasms showed a spectrum of findings. Myelomonocytic differentiation was most common in 11 (37%) cases. Morphological evidence of dysplasia was observed in at least one lineage in 23 of 25 (92%) cases in which maturing elements could be assessed. In all, 5 (17%) patients had isolated inv(3) or t(3;3) and 25 (83%) patients had additional cytogenetic abnormalities, most often monosomy 7 (40%). Eleven (37%) patients had a complex karyotype (≥ 3 additional abnormalities). FLT3 gene mutation by internal tandem duplication was identified in 2 of 23 (9%) cases assessed. No clinical, pathological, or cytogenetic features independent of inv(3) or t(3;3) correlated with a worse outcome. However, patients treated with allogeneic stem cell transplantation (n=11) had a significantly better survival than did those treated with chemotherapy alone (n=17) (13.8 vs 8.0 months, P=0.041). We conclude that de novo acute myeloid leukemia associated with inv(3)/t(3;3) is an aggressive type of leukemia regardless of morphological or karyotypic findings, supporting the inclusion of this disease as a specific entity defined by inv(3)/t(3;3) in the WHO classification. Allogeneic stem cell transplantation seems to improve outcome in patients with this disease.

  15. 3q27.3 microdeletional syndrome: a recognisable clinical entity associating dysmorphic features, marfanoid habitus, intellectual disability and psychosis with mood disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thevenon, Julien; Callier, Patrick; Poquet, Hélène; Bache, Iben; Menten, Bjorn; Malan, Valérie; Cavaliere, Maria Luigia; Girod, Jean-Paul; Thauvin-Robinet, Christel; El Chehadeh, Salima; Pinoit, Jean-Michel; Huet, Frederic; Verges, Bruno; Petit, Jean-Michel; Mosca-Boidron, Anne-Laure; Marle, Nathalie; Mugneret, Francine; Masurel-Paulet, Alice; Novelli, Antonio; Tümer, Zeynep; Loeys, Bart; Lyonnet, Stanislas; Faivre, Laurence

    2014-01-01

    Since the advent of array-CGH, numerous new microdeletional syndromes have been delineated while others remain to be described. Although 3q29 subtelomeric deletion is a well-described syndrome, there is no report on 3q interstitial deletions. We report for the first time seven patients with interstitial deletions at the 3q27.3q28 locus gathered through the Decipher database, and suggest this locus as a new microdeletional syndrome. The patients shared a recognisable facial dysmorphism and marfanoid habitus, associated with psychosis and mild to severe intellectual disability (ID). Most of the patients had no delay in gross psychomotor acquisition, but had severe impaired communicative and adaptive skills. Two small regions of overlap were defined. The first one, located on the 3q27.3 locus and common to all patients, was associated with psychotic troubles and mood disorders as well as recognisable facial dysmorphism. This region comprised several candidate genes including SST, considered a candidate for the neuropsychiatric findings because of its implication in interneuronal migration and differentiation processes. A familial case with a smaller deletion allowed us to define a second region of overlap at the 3q27.3q28 locus for marfanoid habitus and severe ID. Indeed, the common morphological findings in the first four patients included skeletal features from the marfanoid spectrum: scoliosis (4/4), long and thin habitus with leanness (average Body Mass Index of 15 (18.5habitus including scoliosis, neuropsychiatric disorders of the psychotic spectrum and moderate to severe ID.

  16. Measurements of electron-proton elastic cross sections for $0.4 < Q^2 < 5.5 (GeV/c)^2$

    CERN Document Server

    Christy, M E; Armstrong, C S; Arrington, J; Asaturyan, R; Avery, S; Baker, O K; Beck, D H; Blok, H P; Bochna, C W; Böglin, W; Bosted, P; Bouwhuis, M; Breuer, H; Brown, D S; Brüll, A; Carlini, R D; Chant, N S; Cochran, A; Cole, L; Danagulyan, S; Day, D B; Dunne, J; Dutta, D; Ent, R; Fenker, H C; Fox, B; Gan, L; Gao, H; Garrow, K; Gaskell, D; Gasparian, A; Geesaman, D F; Gueye, P L J; Harvey, M; Holt, R J; Jiang, X; Keppel, C E; Kinney, E; Liang, Y; Lorenzon, W; Lung, A; Markowitz, P; Martin, J W; McIlhany, K; McKee, D; Meekins, D G; Miller, M A; Milner, R G; Mitchell, J H; Mkrtchyan, H G; Müller, B A; Nathan, A; Niculescu, G; Niculescu, I; O'Neill, T G; Papavassiliou, V; Pate, S F; Piercey, R B; Potterveld, D; Ransome, R D; Reinhold, J; Rollinde, E; Roos, P; Sarty, A J; Sawafta, R; Schulte, E C; Segbefia, E; Smith, C; Stepanyan, S; Strauch, S; Tadevosyan, V; Tang, L; Tieulent, R; Uzzle, A; Vulcan, W F; Wood, S A; Xiong, F; Yuan, L; Zeier, M; Zihlmann, B; Ziskin, V

    2004-01-01

    We report on precision measurements of the elastic cross section for electron-proton scattering performed in Hall C at Jefferson Lab. The measurements were made at 28 unique kinematic settings covering a range in momentum transfer of 0.4 $<$ $Q^2$ $<$ 5.5 $(\\rm GeV/c)^2$. These measurements represent a significant contribution to the world's cross section data set in the $Q^2$ range where a large discrepancy currently exists between the ratio of electric to magnetic proton form factors extracted from previous cross section measurements and that recently measured via polarization transfer in Hall A at Jefferson Lab.

  17. Hydrazine-hydrothermal syntheses, characterizations and photoelectrochemical properties of two quaternary chalcogenidoantimonates(III) BaCuSbQ{sub 3} (Q = S, Se)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Chang; Hou, Peipei [State Key Laboratory of Silicon Materials, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Chai, Wenxiang [College of Materials Science and Engineering, China Jiliang University, Hangzhou 310018 (China); Tian, Jiawei; Zheng, Xuerong; Shen, Yaying; Zhi, Mingjia; Zhou, Chunmei [State Key Laboratory of Silicon Materials, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Liu, Yi, E-mail: liuyimse@zju.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Silicon Materials, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China)

    2016-09-15

    Two isostructural quaternary chalcogenidoantimonates(III) BaCuSbQ{sub 3} (Q = S, Se): BaCuSbS{sub 3} (1) and BaCuSbSe{sub 3} (2) have been successfully synthesized through a facile hydrazine-hydrothermal method. Both two compounds crystallize in the orthorhombic space group and feature a three-dimensional (3D) channeled [Cu{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Q{sub 6}]{sup 4-} framework, which is constructed by the distorted tetrahedral CuQ{sub 4} and pyramid SbQ{sub 3} units via vertex sharing. Both optical properties and theoretical studies show 1 and 2 are semiconductors with narrow band gaps. In addition, their photoelectrochemical properties have been investigated. - Highlights: • BaCuSbQ{sub 3} (Q = S, Se) were synthesized through a hydrazine-hydrothermal method. • BaCuSbQ{sub 3} (Q = S, Se) feature a 3D framework by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. • Experimental and theoretical studies confirm BaCuSbQ{sub 3} (Q = S, Se) are semiconductors. • Photoelectrochemical properties of BaCuSbQ{sub 3} (Q = S, Se) have been investigated.

  18. The Precarious Prokaryotic Chromosome

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Evolutionary selection for optimal genome preservation, replication, and expression should yield similar chromosome organizations in any type of cells. And yet, the chromosome organization is surprisingly different between eukaryotes and prokaryotes. The nuclear versus cytoplasmic accommodation of genetic material accounts for the distinct eukaryotic and prokaryotic modes of genome evolution, but it falls short of explaining the differences in the chromosome organization. I propose that the two distinct ways to organize chromosomes are driven by the differences between the global-consecutive chromosome cycle of eukaryotes and the local-concurrent chromosome cycle of prokaryotes. Specifically, progressive chromosome segregation in prokaryotes demands a single duplicon per chromosome, while other “precarious” features of the prokaryotic chromosomes can be viewed as compensations for this severe restriction. PMID:24633873

  19. Prenatal diagnosis of sex chromosomal inversion, translocation and deletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lin; Ren, Meihong; Song, Guining; Zhang, Yang; Liu, Xuexia; Zhang, Xiaohong; Wang, Jianliu

    2018-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to perform comprehensive prenatal diagnosis using various detection techniques on a fetus in a high‑risk pregnant woman, and to provide genetic counseling for the patient and her family so as to avoid birth defects. The routine karyotype analysis via amniocentesis, fluorescence in situ hybridization, and whole genome microarray technique were performed for the prenatal diagnosis of the fetus. The fetal karyotype was 46,X,ish der(X) inv(X)(p22.3q28)t(X;Y)(q28;q11.2)(XYqter+,SRY‑,DXZ1+, RP11‑64L19+,STS+,XYpter+); namely, one fetal X chromosome belonged to the derivative imbalanced chromosome and this chromosome demonstrated complex chromosomal rearrangements involving inversion, translocation and deletion. Notably, pericentric inversion between Xp22.3 and Xq28 was identified, and the chromosomal microarray technique confirmed that the long arm q28 of the derivative X chromosome had a 1.241‑Mb deletion in Xq28, which included Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man genes such as coagulation factor VIII, glucose‑6‑phosphate dehydrogenase, inhibitor of nuclear factor‑κB kinase subunit γ, trimethyllysine hydroxylase ε, Ras‑related protein Rab‑39B and chloride intracellular channel 2. In addition, this chromosome also exhibited the local translocation of fragment Yq11.21‑q11.23, which did not include the sex determining region Y gene. This fetus demonstrated deletion, inversion and translocation syndrome, and may exhibit the corresponding clinical phenotypes (e.g., intellectual disability or general delayed development) (1) of such chromosome abnormalities after birth. Therefore, in prenatal diagnosis, a variety of genetic diagnostic techniques should be comprehensively used based on specific clinical situations, which may accurately reveal the nature, sources and manifestations of the derivative chromosome abnormalities and avoid the birth of children with defects.

  20. Sex chromosomes and sex chromosome abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xu

    2011-12-01

    This article focuses on constitutional sex chromosome abnormalities detected by conventional cytogenetics and fluorescence in situ hybridization. The author discusses the two general classifications of abnormalities: numerical and structural. Also included are descriptions of unique aspects of X and Y chromosomes, technological advances in detection, and future perspectives.

  1. Fetal chromosome analysis: screening for chromosome disease?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Philip, J; Tabor, Ann; Bang, J

    1983-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the rationale of the current indications for fetal chromosome analysis. 5372 women had 5423 amniocentesis performed, this group constituting a consecutive sample at the chromosome laboratory, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen from March 1973 to September 1980 (Group...... A + B). Pregnant women 35 years of age, women who previously had a chromosomally abnormal child, families with translocation carriers or other heritable chromosomal disease, families where the father was 50 years or more and women in families with a history of Down's syndrome (group A), were compared...... to women having amniocentesis, although considered not to have any increased risk of fetal chromosome abnormality (1390 pregnancies, group B). They were also compared with 750 consecutive pregnancies in women 25-34 years of age, in whom all heritable diseases were excluded (group C). The risk of unbalanced...

  2. Chromosome Disorder Outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Visit our Photo Gallery Education, Advocacy, Information & Support Chromosome Disorder Outreach, Inc is a non-profit organization. ... Inc. All Rights Reserved You are donating to : Chromosome Disorder Outreach, Inc, a 501c non-profit organization. ...

  3. Chromosome painting in plants.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schubert, I.; Fransz, P.F.; Fuchs, J.; Jong, de J.H.

    2001-01-01

    The current 'state-of-art' as to chromosome painting in plants is reviewed. We define different situations described as painting so far: i) Genomic in situ hybridisation (GISH) with total genomic DNA to distinguish alien chromosomes on the basis of divergent dispersed repeats, ii) 'Chromosomal in

  4. ZEBRAFISH CHROMOSOME-BANDING

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    PIJNACKER, LP; FERWERDA, MA

    1995-01-01

    Banding techniques were carried out on metaphase chromosomes of zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos. The karyotypes with the longest chromosomes consist of 12 metacentrics, 26 submetacentrics, and 12 subtelocentrics (2n = 50). All centromeres are C-band positive. Eight chromosomes have a pericentric

  5. Mapping strategies: Chromosome 16 workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-01-01

    The following topics from a workshop on chromosome 16 are briefly discussed: genetic map of chromosome 16; chromosome breakpoint map of chromosome 16; integrated physical/genetic map of chromosome 16; pulsed field map of the 16p13.2--p13.3 region (3 sheets); and a report of the HGM10 chromosome 16 committee.

  6. Craniosynostosis, psychomotor retardation, and facial dysmorphic features in a Spanish patient with a 4q27q28.3 deletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Jaén, Alberto; Fernández-Perrone, Ana Laura; Fernández-Mayoralas, Daniel Martín; Calleja-Pérez, Beatriz; Sánchez-Hombre, María Del Carmen; Fernández, Ester Corbacho; López-Martín, Sara

    2014-12-01

    We describe an unusual clinical case with an 11-Mb deletion at 4q27 (chr4: 123094652-134164491), craniosynostosis (CS), mild psychomotor retardation, and facial dysmorphic features. This deletion involves 18 genes; FGF2, NUDT6, and SPRY1 are primarily or secondarily implicated in human cranial bone and sagittal suture development and could play an important role in CS. Clinicians should always contemplate genetic studies in patients with syndromic CS. Mutational targeted genetic testing is appropriate for patients with classical or specific CS syndrome. Nevertheless, array comparative genomic hybridization (array CGH) should be considered as a first-line test in nontypical syndromic CS phenotype. Cytogenetic studies are decisive for genetic counseling indeed.

  7. Mandatory chromosomal segment balance in aneuploid tumor cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Lung Maria

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Euploid chromosome balance is vitally important for normal development, but is profoundly changed in many tumors. Is each tumor dependent on its own structurally and numerically changed chromosome complement that has evolved during its development and progression? We have previously shown that normal chromosome 3 transfer into the KH39 renal cell carcinoma line and into the Hone1 nasopharyngeal carcinoma line inhibited their tumorigenicity. The aim of the present study was to distinguish between a qualitative and a quantitative model of this suppression. According to the former, a damaged or deleted tumor suppressor gene would be restored by the transfer of a normal chromosome. If so, suppression would be released only when the corresponding sequences of the exogenous normal chromosome are lost or inactivated. According to the alternative quantitative model, the tumor cell would not tolerate an increased dosage of the relevant gene or segment. If so, either a normal cell derived, or, a tumor derived endogenous segment could be lost. Methods Fluorescence in Situ Hybridization based methods, as well as analysis of polymorphic microsatellite markers were used to follow chromosome 3 constitution changes in monochromosomal hybrids. Results In both tumor lines with introduced supernumerary chromosomes 3, the copy number of 3p21 or the entire 3p tended to fall back to the original level during both in vitro and in vivo growth. An exogenous, normal cell derived, or an endogenous, tumor derived, chromosome segment was lost with similar probability. Identification of the lost versus retained segments showed that the intolerance for increased copy number was particularly strong for 3p14-p21, and weaker for other 3p regions. Gains in copy number were, on the other hand, well tolerated in the long arm and particularly the 3q26-q27 region. Conclusion The inability of the cell to tolerate an experimentally imposed gain in 3p14-p21 in

  8. Gain of Chromosome 4qter and Loss of 5pter: An Unusual Case with Features of Cri du Chat Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frenny Sheth

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Here, we present a case with an unusual chromosomal rearrangement in a child with a predominant phenotype of high-pitched crying showing deletion encompassing CTNND2 due to an unbalanced translocation of chromosomes 4 and 5. This rearrangement led to a duplication of ~35 Mb in 4qter which replaced 18 Mb genetic materials in 5pter. Even though, in this patient, there was no clinically obvious modification to the classical phenotypes of CdCS, and the influence of the 4q-duplication cannot be completely excluded in this case. However, the region 4q34.1–34.3 was previously reported as a region not leading to phenotypic changes if present in three copies, an observation which could possibly be supported by this case. Conclusion. This study showed that in a patient with an unbalanced translocation resulting in 5p deletion, the presence of partial trisomy of chromosome 4q could be clinically insignificant.

  9. Sex Chromosome Drive

    OpenAIRE

    Helleu, Quentin; Gérard, Pierre R.; Montchamp-Moreau, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Sex chromosome drivers are selfish elements that subvert Mendel's first law of segregation and therefore are overrepresented among the products of meiosis. The sex-biased progeny produced then fuels an extended genetic conflict between the driver and the rest of the genome. Many examples of sex chromosome drive are known, but the occurrence of this phenomenon is probably largely underestimated because of the difficulty to detect it. Remarkably, nearly all sex chromosome drivers are found in t...

  10. Chromosomal Evolution in Chiroptera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cibele G. Sotero-Caio

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Chiroptera is the second largest order among mammals, with over 1300 species in 21 extant families. The group is extremely diverse in several aspects of its natural history, including dietary strategies, ecology, behavior and morphology. Bat genomes show ample chromosome diversity (from 2n = 14 to 62. As with other mammalian orders, Chiroptera is characterized by clades with low, moderate and extreme chromosomal change. In this article, we will discuss trends of karyotypic evolution within distinct bat lineages (especially Phyllostomidae, Hipposideridae and Rhinolophidae, focusing on two perspectives: evolution of genome architecture, modes of chromosomal evolution, and the use of chromosome data to resolve taxonomic problems.

  11. Chromosome analyses in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimann-Berg, N; Bullerdiek, J; Murua Escobar, H; Nolte, I

    2012-01-01

    Cytogenetics is the study of normal and abnormal chromosomes. Every species is characterized by a given number of chromosomes that can be recognized by their specific shape. The chromosomes are arranged according to standard classification schemes for the respective species. While pre- and postnatal chromosome analyses investigate the constitutional karyotype, tumor cytogenetics is focused on the detection of clonal acquired, tumor-associated chromosome aberrations. Cytogenetic investigations in dogs are of great value especially for breeders dealing with fertility problems within their pedigrees, for veterinarians and last but not least for the dog owners. Dogs and humans share a variety of genetic diseases, including cancer. Thus, the dog has become an increasingly important model for genetic diseases. However, cytogenetic analyses of canine cells are complicated by the complex karyotype of the dog. Only just 15 years ago, a standard classification scheme for the complete canine karyotype was established. For chromosome analyses of canine cells the same steps of chromosome preparation are used as in human cytogenetics. There are few reports about cytogenetic changes in non-neoplastic cells, involving predominantly the sex chromosomes. Cytogenetic analyses of different entities of canine tumors revealed that, comparable to human tumors, tumors of the dog are often characterized by clonal chromosome aberrations, which might be used as diagnostic and prognostic markers. The integration of modern techniques (molecular genetic approaches, adaptive computer programs) will facilitate and complete conventional cytogenetic studies. However, conventional cytogenetics is still non-replaceable.

  12. Ring chromosome 13

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, C A; Hertz, Jens Michael; Petersen, M B

    1992-01-01

    A stillborn male child with anencephaly and multiple malformations was found to have the karyotype 46,XY,r(13) (p11q21.1). The breakpoint at 13q21.1, determined by high resolution banding, is the most proximal breakpoint ever reported in patients with ring chromosome 13. In situ hybridisation...... with the probe L1.26 confirmed the derivation from chromosome 13 and DNA polymorphism analysis showed maternal origin of the ring chromosome. Our results, together with a review of previous reports of cases with ring chromosome 13 with identified breakpoints, could neither support the theory of distinct clinical...

  13. A ScaI RFLP demonstrated for the GRO gene on chromosome 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beck, J.S.; Murray, J.C. (Univ. of Iowa Hospitals, Iowa City (USA)); Sager, R. (Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (USA))

    1989-11-11

    TC870 is a 0.85 kb fragment running from the EcoRI site 200 pb from the 5{prime} end of the human cDNA subcloned into the EcoRI site of pGEM3. ScaI detects a polymorphism with two variable bands of 19 kb and 16 kb. One strong constant band (14 kb) and two fainter constant bands (5 kb and 3 kb) are also present. The polymorphism type is unknown. GRO has been localized to 4q13-4q21 by somatic cell hybrid analysis and in situ hybridization. Codominant segregation and Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium demonstrated in 20 CEPH families. The probe also was assigned to chromosome 4 with significant linkage to ALB, GC, INP10, MT2P1. GRO may be the same gene as MGSA.

  14. A novel 5p15.33-14.1 deletion and 4q34.24-35.2 duplication in a ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    nancies including three spontaneous abortions in the first trimester and one induction delivery as microcephaly and multiple organ malformations of the feotus, came to our cen- tre for genetic counselling. The short arm of chromosome. 5 in her karyotype was abnormal as detected by karyoty- ing, which was not consistent ...

  15. Clonal analysis of stable chromosome rearrangements in Bloom's syndrome fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoehn, H; Salk, D

    1984-04-01

    In situ cytogenetic analysis was performed on colonies derived from single cells of cultured skin fibroblast-like strains from two patients with Bloom's syndrome (GM 1492 and GM 2520). Metaphases in all of the colonies displayed structural chromosome rearrangements. Among 212 metaphases from 24 colonies of GM 1492, only 16% were pseudodiploid, and there was a high incidence of de novo rearrangements within individual colonies. There were two "families" of 16 and five colonies, respectively, each containing identical or related aneusomies, and these could be arranged into pedigrees showing clonal evolution. The heterochromatic region of chromosome #1 and the telomeric regions of chromosome arms 2q, 3q, 4p, and 11q were most frequently involved in the rearrangements. In contrast, strain GM 2520 showed less intraclonal variation, was primarily pseudodiploid, and displayed only three clonal types, one of which had extensive subclonal variation (19 of 24 clones). A remarkable finding in GM 2520 was that, in some clones, extra copies of specific chromosome segments were present as translocations. These results caution against the use of strain GM 1492 as a prototype Bloom's syndrome strain for cell biological studies.

  16. A Novel Cryptic Three-Way Translocation t(2;9;18(p23.2;p21.3;q21.33 with Deletion of Tumor Suppressor Genes in 9p21.3 and 13q14 in a T-Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moneeb A. K. Othman

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute leukemia often presents with pure chromosomal resolution; thus, aberrations may not be detected by banding cytogenetics. Here, a case of 26-year-old male diagnosed with T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL and a normal karyotype after standard GTG-banding was studied retrospectively in detail by molecular cytogenetic and molecular approaches. Besides fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH, multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA and high resolution array-comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH were applied. Thus, cryptic chromosomal aberrations not observed before were detected: three chromosomes were involved in a cytogenetically balanced occurring translocation t(2;9;18(p23.2;p21.3;q21.33. Besides a translocation t(10;14(q24;q11 was identified, an aberration known to be common in T-ALL. Due to the three-way translocation deletion of tumor suppressor genes CDKN2A/INK4A/p16, CDKN2B/INK4B/p15, and MTAP/ARF/p14 in 9p21.3 took place. Additionally RB1 in 13q14 was deleted. This patient, considered to have a normal karyotype after low resolution banding cytogenetics, was treated according to general protocol of anticancer therapy (ALL-BFM 95.

  17. The human Y chromosome: a masculine chromosome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noordam, Michiel J.; Repping, Sjoerd

    2006-01-01

    Once considered to be a genetic wasteland of no scientific interest beyond sex determination, the human Y chromosome has made a significant comeback in the past few decades and is currently implicated in multiple diseases, including spermatogenic failure - absent or very low levels of sperm

  18. Chromosomal mosaicism goes global

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yurov Yuri B

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Intercellular differences of chromosomal content in the same individual are defined as chromosomal mosaicism (alias intercellular or somatic genomic variations or, in a number of publications, mosaic aneuploidy. It has long been suggested that this phenomenon poorly contributes both to intercellular (interindividual diversity and to human disease. However, our views have recently become to change due to a series of communications demonstrated a higher incidence of chromosomal mosaicism in diseased individuals (major psychiatric disorders and autoimmune diseases as well as depicted chromosomal mosaicism contribution to genetic diversity, the central nervous system development, and aging. The later has been produced by significant achievements in the field of molecular cytogenetics. Recently, Molecular Cytogenetics has published an article by Maj Hulten and colleagues that has provided evidences for chromosomal mosaicism to underlie formation of germline aneuploidy in human female gametes using trisomy 21 (Down syndrome as a model. Since meiotic aneuploidy is suggested to be the leading genetic cause of human prenatal mortality and postnatal morbidity, these data together with previous findings define chromosomal mosaicism not as a casual finding during cytogenetic analyses but as a more significant biological phenomenon than previously recognized. Finally, the significance of chromosomal mosaicism can be drawn from the fact, that this phenomenon is involved in genetic diversity, normal and abnormal prenatal development, human diseases, aging, and meiotic aneuploidy, the intrinsic cause of which remains, as yet, unknown.

  19. Association of breast cancer risk with genetic variants showing differential allelic expression: Identification of a novel breast cancer susceptibility locus at 4q21

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adoue, Véronique; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Canisius, Sander; Lemaçon, Audrey; Droit, Arnaud; Andrulis, Irene L; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Arndt, Volker; Baynes, Caroline; Blomqvist, Carl; Bogdanova, Natalia V.; Bojesen, Stig E.; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Bonanni, Bernardo; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Brand, Judith S.; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brenner, Hermann; Broeks, Annegien; Burwinkel, Barbara; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Couch, Fergus J.; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S.; Czene, Kamila; Darabi, Hatef; Dennis, Joe; Devilee, Peter; Dörk, Thilo; Dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Eriksson, Mikael; Fasching, Peter A.; Figueroa, Jonine; Flyger, Henrik; García-Closas, Montserrat; Giles, Graham G.; Goldberg, Mark S.; González-Neira, Anna; Grenaker-Alnæs, Grethe; Guénel, Pascal; Haeberle, Lothar; Haiman, Christopher A.; Hamann, Ute; Hallberg, Emily; Hooning, Maartje J.; Hopper, John L.; Jakubowska, Anna; Jones, Michael; Kabisch, Maria; Kataja, Vesa; Lambrechts, Diether; Marchand, Loic Le; Lindblom, Annika; Lubinski, Jan; Mannermaa, Arto; Maranian, Mel; Margolin, Sara; Marme, Frederik; Milne, Roger L.; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Nevanlinna, Heli; Neven, Patrick; Olswold, Curtis; Peto, Julian; Plaseska-Karanfilska, Dijana; Pylkäs, Katri; Radice, Paolo; Rudolph, Anja; Sawyer, Elinor J.; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Southey, Melissa C.; Swerdlow, Anthony; Tollenaar, Rob A.E.M.; Tomlinson, Ian; Torres, Diana; Truong, Thérèse; Vachon, Celine; Van Den Ouweland, Ans M. W.; Wang, Qin; Winqvist, Robert; Investigators, kConFab/AOCS; Zheng, Wei; Benitez, Javier; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Dunning, Alison M.; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Kristensen, Vessela; Hall, Per; Easton, Douglas F.; Pastinen, Tomi; Nord, Silje; Simard, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    There are significant inter-individual differences in the levels of gene expression. Through modulation of gene expression, cis-acting variants represent an important source of phenotypic variation. Consequently, cis-regulatory SNPs associated with differential allelic expression are functional candidates for further investigation as disease-causing variants. To investigate whether common variants associated with differential allelic expression were involved in breast cancer susceptibility, a list of genes was established on the basis of their involvement in cancer related pathways and/or mechanisms. Thereafter, using data from a genome-wide map of allelic expression associated SNPs, 313 genetic variants were selected and their association with breast cancer risk was then evaluated in 46,451 breast cancer cases and 42,599 controls of European ancestry ascertained from 41 studies participating in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium. The associations were evaluated with overall breast cancer risk and with estrogen receptor negative and positive disease. One novel breast cancer susceptibility locus on 4q21 (rs11099601) was identified (OR = 1.05, P = 5.6x10-6). rs11099601 lies in a 135 kb linkage disequilibrium block containing several genes, including, HELQ, encoding the protein HEL308 a DNA dependant ATPase and DNA Helicase involved in DNA repair, MRPS18C encoding the Mitochondrial Ribosomal Protein S18C and FAM175A (ABRAXAS), encoding a BRCA1 BRCT domain-interacting protein involved in DNA damage response and double-strand break (DSB) repair. Expression QTL analysis in breast cancer tissue showed rs11099601 to be associated with HELQ (P = 8.28x10-14), MRPS18C (P = 1.94x10-27) and FAM175A (P = 3.83x10-3), explaining about 20%, 14% and 1%, respectively of the variance inexpression of these genes in breast carcinomas. PMID:27792995

  20. Identification of a breast cancer susceptibility locus at 4q31.22 using a genome-wide association study paradigm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yadav Sapkota

    Full Text Available More than 40 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs for breast cancer susceptibility were identified by genome-wide association studies (GWASs. However, additional SNPs likely contribute to breast cancer susceptibility and overall genetic risk, prompting this investigation for additional variants. Six putative breast cancer susceptibility SNPs identified in a two-stage GWAS that we reported earlier were replicated in a follow-up stage 3 study using an independent set of breast cancer cases and controls from Canada, with an overall cumulative sample size of 7,219 subjects across all three stages. The study design also encompassed the 11 variants from GWASs previously reported by various consortia between the years 2007-2009 to (i enable comparisons of effect sizes, and (ii identify putative prognostic variants across studies. All SNP associations reported with breast cancer were also adjusted for body mass index (BMI. We report a strong association with 4q31.22-rs1429142 (combined per allele odds ratio and 95% confidence interval = 1.28 [1.17-1.41] and P combined = 1.5×10(-7, when adjusted for BMI. Ten of the 11 breast cancer susceptibility loci reported by consortia also showed associations in our predominantly Caucasian study population, and the associations were independent of BMI; four FGFR2 SNPs and TNRC9-rs3803662 were among the most notable associations. Since the original report by Garcia-Closas et al. 2008, this is the second study to confirm the association of 8q24.21-rs13281615 with breast cancer outcomes.

  1. The MeCP2/YY1 interaction regulates ANT1 expression at 4q35: novel hints for Rett syndrome pathogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forlani, Greta; Giarda, Elisa; Ala, Ugo; Di Cunto, Ferdinando; Salani, Monica; Tupler, Rossella; Kilstrup-Nielsen, Charlotte; Landsberger, Nicoletta

    2010-01-01

    Rett syndrome is a severe neurodevelopmental disorder mainly caused by mutations in the transcriptional regulator MeCP2. Although there is no effective therapy for Rett syndrome, the recently discovered disease reversibility in mice suggests that there are therapeutic possibilities. Identification of MeCP2 targets or modifiers of the phenotype can facilitate the design of curative strategies. To identify possible novel MeCP2 interactors, we exploited a bioinformatic approach and selected Ying Yang 1 (YY1) as an interesting candidate. We demonstrate that MeCP2 interacts in vitro and in vivo with YY1, a ubiquitous zinc-finger epigenetic factor regulating the expression of several genes. We show that MeCP2 cooperates with YY1 in repressing the ANT1 gene encoding a mitochondrial adenine nucleotide translocase. Importantly, ANT1 mRNA levels are increased in human and mouse cell lines devoid of MeCP2, in Rett patient fibroblasts and in the brain of Mecp2-null mice. We further demonstrate that ANT1 protein levels are upregulated in Mecp2-null mice. Finally, the identified MeCP2–YY1 interaction, together with the well-known involvement of YY1 in the regulation of D4Z4-associated genes at 4q35, led us to discover the anomalous depression of FRG2, a subtelomeric gene of unknown function, in Rett fibroblasts. Collectively, our data indicate that mutations in MeCP2 might cause the aberrant overexpression of genes located at a specific locus, thus providing new candidates for the pathogenesis of Rett syndrome. As both ANT1 mutations and overexpression have been associated with human diseases, we consider it highly relevant to address the consequences of ANT1 deregulation in Rett syndrome. PMID:20504995

  2. Association of breast cancer risk with genetic variants showing differential allelic expression: Identification of a novel breast cancer susceptibility locus at 4q21.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdi, Yosr; Soucy, Penny; Adoue, Véronique; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Canisius, Sander; Lemaçon, Audrey; Droit, Arnaud; Andrulis, Irene L; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Arndt, Volker; Baynes, Caroline; Blomqvist, Carl; Bogdanova, Natalia V; Bojesen, Stig E; Bolla, Manjeet K; Bonanni, Bernardo; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Brand, Judith S; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brenner, Hermann; Broeks, Annegien; Burwinkel, Barbara; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Couch, Fergus J; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S; Czene, Kamila; Darabi, Hatef; Dennis, Joe; Devilee, Peter; Dörk, Thilo; Dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Eriksson, Mikael; Fasching, Peter A; Figueroa, Jonine; Flyger, Henrik; García-Closas, Montserrat; Giles, Graham G; Goldberg, Mark S; González-Neira, Anna; Grenaker-Alnæs, Grethe; Guénel, Pascal; Haeberle, Lothar; Haiman, Christopher A; Hamann, Ute; Hallberg, Emily; Hooning, Maartje J; Hopper, John L; Jakubowska, Anna; Jones, Michael; Kabisch, Maria; Kataja, Vesa; Lambrechts, Diether; Le Marchand, Loic; Lindblom, Annika; Lubinski, Jan; Mannermaa, Arto; Maranian, Mel; Margolin, Sara; Marme, Frederik; Milne, Roger L; Neuhausen, Susan L; Nevanlinna, Heli; Neven, Patrick; Olswold, Curtis; Peto, Julian; Plaseska-Karanfilska, Dijana; Pylkäs, Katri; Radice, Paolo; Rudolph, Anja; Sawyer, Elinor J; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Southey, Melissa C; Swerdlow, Anthony; Tollenaar, Rob A E M; Tomlinson, Ian; Torres, Diana; Truong, Thérèse; Vachon, Celine; Van Den Ouweland, Ans M W; Wang, Qin; Winqvist, Robert; Zheng, Wei; Benitez, Javier; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Dunning, Alison M; Pharoah, Paul D P; Kristensen, Vessela; Hall, Per; Easton, Douglas F; Pastinen, Tomi; Nord, Silje; Simard, Jacques

    2016-12-06

    There are significant inter-individual differences in the levels of gene expression. Through modulation of gene expression, cis-acting variants represent an important source of phenotypic variation. Consequently, cis-regulatory SNPs associated with differential allelic expression are functional candidates for further investigation as disease-causing variants. To investigate whether common variants associated with differential allelic expression were involved in breast cancer susceptibility, a list of genes was established on the basis of their involvement in cancer related pathways and/or mechanisms. Thereafter, using data from a genome-wide map of allelic expression associated SNPs, 313 genetic variants were selected and their association with breast cancer risk was then evaluated in 46,451 breast cancer cases and 42,599 controls of European ancestry ascertained from 41 studies participating in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium. The associations were evaluated with overall breast cancer risk and with estrogen receptor negative and positive disease. One novel breast cancer susceptibility locus on 4q21 (rs11099601) was identified (OR = 1.05, P = 5.6x10-6). rs11099601 lies in a 135 kb linkage disequilibrium block containing several genes, including, HELQ, encoding the protein HEL308 a DNA dependant ATPase and DNA Helicase involved in DNA repair, MRPS18C encoding the Mitochondrial Ribosomal Protein S18C and FAM175A (ABRAXAS), encoding a BRCA1 BRCT domain-interacting protein involved in DNA damage response and double-strand break (DSB) repair. Expression QTL analysis in breast cancer tissue showed rs11099601 to be associated with HELQ (P = 8.28x10-14), MRPS18C (P = 1.94x10-27) and FAM175A (P = 3.83x10-3), explaining about 20%, 14% and 1%, respectively of the variance inexpression of these genes in breast carcinomas.

  3. Bardet-Biedl syndrome: Mapping of a new locus to chromosome 3 and fine-mapping of the chromosome 16 linked locus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwitek-Black, A.E.; Rokhlina, T.; Nishimura, D.Y. [Univ. of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS) is a heterogeneous autosomal recessive disorder characterized by mental retardation, post-axial polydactyly, obesity, retinitis pigmentosa, and hypogonadism. Other features of this disease include renal and cardiovascular abnormalities and an increased incidence of hypertension and diabetes mellitus. The molecular etiology for BBS is not known. We previously linked BBS to chromosome 16q13 in a large inbred Bedouin family, and excluded this locus in a second large inbred Bedouin family. We now report linkage of this second family to markers on chromosome 3q, proving non-allelic, genetic heterogeneity in the Bedouin population. A third large inbred Bedouin family was excluded from the 3q and 16q BBS loci. In addition to the identification of a new BBS locus on chromosome 3, we have identified and utilized additional short tandem repeat polymorphisms (STRPs) in the 16q BBS region to narrow the candidate interval to 3 cM. Additional recombinant individuals will allow further refinement of the interval. Identification of genes causing BBS has the potential to provide insight into diverse genetic traits and disease processes including obesity, hypertension, diabetes, retinal degeneration, and abnormal limb, renal and cardiac development.

  4. Association of microcephaly and cafe-au-lait spots in a patient with ring chromosome 12 syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zen, P R G; Pinto, L L C; Graziadio, C; Pereira, V B; Paskulin, G A

    2005-07-01

    We describe a patient who was evaluated because of delayed development. The patient had microcephaly and cafe-au-lait spots and the facial features included upward slanting of the palpebral fissures, short nasal bridge and a highly arched palate. In addition the external ears had bilateral over folded helices, there was clinodactyly of the fourth and fifth fingers and multiple cafe-au-lait spots on the back, buttocks and thighs. Chromosomal analysis of peripheral blood showed 46,XY,-r(12)(p13.3q24.33)[73]/45,XY,-12[8]/47,XY,r(12)(p13.3q24.33),+r(12)(p13.3q24.33)[2]. This is the eighth case of a patient with a ring chromosome 12 to be reported so far. The similarity of our patient to those previously described suggests that the ring chromosome 12 syndrome can be delineated as a distinct entity with characteristic clinical features.

  5. Complex Variant t(9;22 Chromosome Translocations in Five Cases of Chronic Myeloid Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Valencia

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The Philadelphia (Ph1 chromosome arising from the reciprocal t(9;22 translocation is found in more than 90% of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML patients and results in the formation of the chimeric fusion gene BCR-ABL. However, a small proportion of patients with CML have simple or complex variants of this translocation, involving various breakpoints in addition to 9q34 and 22q11. We report five CML cases carrying variant Ph translocations involving both chromosomes 9 and 22 as well as chromosomes 3, 5, 7, 8, or 10. G-banding showed a reciprocal three-way translocation involving 3q21, 5q31, 7q32, 8q24, and 10q22 bands. BCR-ABL fusion signal on der(22 was found in all of the cases by FISH.

  6. Defect Antiperovskite Compounds Hg3Q2I2 (Q = S, Se, and Te) for Room-Temperature Hard Radiation Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yihui; Kontsevoi, Oleg Y; Stoumpos, Constantinos C; Trimarchi, Giancarlo G; Islam, Saiful M; Liu, Zhifu; Kostina, Svetlana S; Das, Sanjib; Kim, Joon-Il; Lin, Wenwen; Wessels, Bruce W; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G

    2017-06-14

    The high Z chalcohalides Hg3Q2I2 (Q = S, Se, and Te) can be regarded as of antiperovskite structure with ordered vacancies and are demonstrated to be very promising candidates for X- and γ-ray semiconductor detectors. Depending on Q, the ordering of the Hg vacancies in these defect antiperovskites varies and yields a rich family of distinct crystal structures ranging from zero-dimensional to three-dimensional, with a dramatic effect on the properties of each compound. All three Hg3Q2I2 compounds show very suitable optical, electrical, and good mechanical properties required for radiation detection at room temperature. These compounds possess a high density (>7 g/cm3) and wide bandgaps (>1.9 eV), showing great stopping power for hard radiation and high intrinsic electrical resistivity, over 1011 Ω cm. Large single crystals are grown using the vapor transport method, and each material shows excellent photo sensitivity under energetic photons. Detectors made from thin Hg3Q2I2 crystals show reasonable response under a series of radiation sources, including 241Am and 57Co radiation. The dimensionality of Hg-Q motifs (in terms of ordering patterns of Hg vacancies) has a strong influence on the conduction band structure, which gives the quasi one-dimensional Hg3Se2I2 a more prominently dispersive conduction band structure and leads to a low electron effective mass (0.20 m0). For Hg3Se2I2 detectors, spectroscopic resolution is achieved for both 241Am α particles (5.49 MeV) and 241Am γ-rays (59.5 keV), with full widths at half-maximum (FWHM, in percentage) of 19% and 50%, respectively. The carrier mobility-lifetime μτ product for Hg3Q2I2 detectors is achieved as 10-5-10-6 cm2/V. The electron mobility for Hg3Se2I2 is estimated as 104 ± 12 cm2/(V·s). On the basis of these results, Hg3Se2I2 is the most promising for room-temperature radiation detection.

  7. Chromosomal Abnormalties with Epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available The correlation between specific chromosome abnormalties and various epilepsies was investigated by a study of 76 patients’ records obtained by questionnaires distributed to members of Kyoto Multi-institutional Study Group of Pediatric Neurology.

  8. Chromosomal abnormalities and autism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farida El-Baz

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Chromosomal abnormalities were not detected in the studied autistic children, and so the relation between the genetics and autism still needs further work up with different study methods and techniques.

  9. Activation of X Chromosome Inactivation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.M. Maduro (Cheryl)

    2016-01-01

    markdownabstractIn mammals, males are the heterogametic sex having an X chromosome and a Y chromosome whereas females have two X chromosomes. Despite originating from an ancient homologous autosomal pair, the X and Y chromosome now differ greatly in size and gene content after ~180 MY of evolution.

  10. Ring Chromosome 4 in a Child with Multiple Congenital Abnormalities: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. S. Paththinige

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A female child born preterm with intrauterine growth retardation and presenting with facial dysmorphism with clefts, microcephaly, limb deformities, and congenital abnormalities involving cardiovascular and urinary systems is described. Chromosomal analysis showed a de novo 46,XX,r(4(p15.3q35 karyotype. The clinical features of the patient were compared with the phenotypic characteristics of 17 previously reported cases with ring chromosome 4 and those with Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome (4p-. Clinical features observed in this case are consistent with the consensus phenotype in ring chromosome 4. Patent ductus arteriosus and bilateral talipes equinovarus observed in this baby widen the phenotypic spectrum associated with ring chromosome 4.

  11. Vibrio chromosomes share common history

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gevers Dirk

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While most gamma proteobacteria have a single circular chromosome, Vibrionales have two circular chromosomes. Horizontal gene transfer is common among Vibrios, and in light of this genetic mobility, it is an open question to what extent the two chromosomes themselves share a common history since their formation. Results Single copy genes from each chromosome (142 genes from chromosome I and 42 genes from chromosome II were identified from 19 sequenced Vibrionales genomes and their phylogenetic comparison suggests consistent phylogenies for each chromosome. Additionally, study of the gene organization and phylogeny of the respective origins of replication confirmed the shared history. Conclusions Thus, while elements within the chromosomes may have experienced significant genetic mobility, the backbones share a common history. This allows conclusions based on multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA for one chromosome to be applied equally to both chromosomes.

  12. Numerical chromosomal changes and risk of development of myelodysplastic syndrome--acute myeloid leukemia in patients with Fanconi anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Parinda A; Harris, Richard E; Davies, Stella M; Kim, Mi-Ok; Mueller, Robin; Lampkin, Beatrice; Mo, Jun; Myers, Kasiani; Smolarek, Teresa A

    2010-12-01

    Fanconi Anemia (FA) is an inherited bone marrow failure syndrome characterized by congenital abnormalities, progressive marrow failure and predisposition to myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), acute myeloid leukemia (AML), and solid tumors. The most common acquired chromosomal aberrations in FA patients are trisomy of 1q and monosomy of chromosome 7; the latter is known to be associated with poor prognosis. A few reports also suggest that gains of 3q are associated with progression to MDS-AML and overall poor prognosis. It is not uncommon for patients with Fanconi anemia to have easily detectable (oligoclonal) chromosomal alterations in their still normal (nonmalignant) marrow, which makes it even more challenging to determine the import of such alterations. We conducted a retrospective longitudinal analysis of fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis for gains in 1q and 3q and for monosomy 7 and 7q deletions on 212 bone marrow samples from 77 children with FA treated at our institution between 1987 and 2007. Given the baseline increased chromosomal instability and defective DNA repair in patients with FA, which leads to unbalanced chromosomal aberrations such as deletions, insertions, and translocations, for the purpose of this analysis an abnormal clone was defined as ≥10% abnormal cells. Chromosome 3 and 7 aberrations were associated with increased risk of developing MDS-AML (P = 0.019 and P < 0.001 respectively), although the significance of chromosome 3 aberrations disappeared when different observation times were accounted for. Gain of 1q alone did not predict development of MDS-AML. In conclusion, children with FA should be followed closely with FISH analyses, because some of the clonal chromosomal abnormalities may be early indicators of progression toward MDS-AML and thus also of the need for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Chromosomal rearrangements and the pathogenesis of differentiated thyroid cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan K.G. Grebe

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The majority of thyroid cancers arise from the follicular cells of the thyroid gland, which yield a wide variety of distinct morphotypes, ranging from relatively indolent lesions to the most malignant forms of cancer known. The remaining primary thyroid cancers arise from C cells within the gland and result primarily from mutations of the RET protooncogene, germ line mutations of which give rise to the various forms of multiple endocrine neoplasia. The most common of the follicular cell-derived cancers are papillary carcinomas, (PTC, followed by follicular carcinomas (FTC and its Hurthle cell variant (HCC and finally anaplastic carcinomas (ATC. The pathogenesis of many thyroid cancers, of both PTC and FTC morphotype, involves chromosomal translocations. Rearrangements of the RET protoconcogene are known to be involved in the pathogenesis of ca. 50% of PTC. A similar proportion of FTC have been associated with a t(2;3(q13;p25 translocation, fusing the thyroid-specific transcription factor PAX8 with the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ nuclear receptor, a ubiquitously expressed transcription factor. These rearrangements have analogy with translocations in erythropoetic cells, which form the only other known group of human malignancies that are largely the result of chromosomal translocation events. In this review we compare and contrast the oncogenic properties of thyroid and erythroid chromosomal transformations and speculate on mechanisms leading to their formation.

  14. [Y chromosome and spermatogenesis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravel, C; Siffroi, J-P

    2009-01-01

    Human Y chromosome evolution has progressively been directed towards a role in sex determination and reproduction. Cytogenetically visible structural abnormalities have determined long arm chromosomal regions which define the AZF factor that contains genes implicated in the spermatogenic process. By using molecular tools, the AZF factor has been subdivided into three loci, AZFa, b and c, the deletion of which leads to specific spermatogenesis impairments due to the loss of particular genes. Most AZF genes are specifically expressed in testis but their functions are far to be known precisely. Partial deletions of AZF regions have been described. Some of them have allowed to define more precise genotype-phenotype relationships whereas others are considered as variants in relation to Y chromosome polymorphism.

  15. Chromosomal imbalances in four new uterine cervix carcinoma derived cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vázquez Guelaguetza

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Uterine cervix carcinoma is the second most common female malignancy worldwide and a major health problem in Mexico, representing the primary cause of death among the Mexican female population. High risk human papillomavirus (HPV infection is considered to be the most important risk factor for the development of this tumor and cervical carcinoma derived cell lines are very useful models for the study of viral carcinogenesis. Comparative Genomic Hybridization (CGH experiments have detected a specific pattern of chromosomal imbalances during cervical cancer progression, indicating chromosomal regions that might contain genes that are important for cervical transformation. Methods We performed HPV detection and CGH analysis in order to initiate the genomic characterization of four recently established cervical carcinoma derived cell lines from Mexican patients. Results All the cell lines were HPV18 positive. The most prevalent imbalances in the cell lines were gains in chromosomes 1q23-q32, 3q11.2-q13.1, 3q22-q26.1, 5p15.1-p11.2, this alteration present as a high copy number amplification in three of the cell lines, 7p15-p13, 7q21, 7q31, 11q21, and 12q12, and losses in 2q35-qter, 4p16, 6q26-qter, 9q34 and 19q13.2-qter. Conclusions Analysis of our present findings and previously reported data suggest that gains at 1q31-q32 and 7p13-p14, as well as losses at 6q26-q27 are alterations that might be unique for HPV18 positive cases. These chromosomal regions, as well as regions with high copy number amplifications, coincide with known fragile sites and known HPV integration sites. The general pattern of chromosomal imbalances detected in the cells resembled that found in invasive cervical tumors, suggesting that the cells represent good models for the study of cervical carcinoma.

  16. DFT and modified Becke Johnson (mBJ) potential investigations of the optoelectronic properties of SnGa4Q7 (Q = S, Se) compounds: Transparent materials for large energy conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Wilayat; Azam, Sikander; Shah, Fahad Ali; Goumri-Said, Souraya

    2015-10-01

    Electronic structure and optical properties of SnGa4Q7 (Q = S, Se) compounds were investigated using a full potential linearized augmented plane wave method based on density functional formalism. Electronic band structures show an indirect semiconducting wide band gap two different approaches (EV-GGA and mBJ). The band gap values are estimated at 2.90 (2.25 eV) and 3.11 (2.49 eV) for EV-GGA and mBJ for SnGa4S7 (SnGa4Se7), respectively. Densities of states show that Sn-5s and S/Se-3p/4p states are dominating the region around Fermi level form valence band maximum and conduction band minimum. The computed electronic charge density contours demonstrate that SnGa4Q7 (Q = S, Se) show a mixture between ionic and covalent characters. Optical parameters including the dielectric constant, absorption coefficient, reflectivity, refractive index, energy loss function, and birefringence are also reported to investigate the potential role of SnGa4Q7 (Q = S, Se) compounds for solar energy conversion application.

  17. New Y chromosomes and early stages of sex chromosome ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2010-09-06

    Sep 6, 2010 ... [Traut W. 2010 New Y chromosomes and early stages of sex chromosome differentiation: sex determination in Megaselia. J. Genet. 89, ..... Schultheis C., Böhne A., Schartl M., Volff J. and Galiana-Arnoux D. 2009 Sex determination diversity and sex chromosome evolution in poeciliid fish. Sex. Dev. 3, 68–77 ...

  18. Genetic linkage studies in familial partial epilepsy: Exclusion of the human chromosome regions syntenic to the El-1 mouse locus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopes-Cendes, I. [Montreal General Hospital (Canada); Mulley, J.C. [Alelaide Children`s Hospital (Canada); Andermann, E. [Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital, Quebec (Canada)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Recently, six families with a familial form of partial epilepsy were described. All pedigrees showed autosomal dominant inheritance with incomplete penetrance. Affected individuals present with predominantly nocturnal seizures with frontal lobe semiology. In 1959, a genetic mouse model for partial epilepsy, the El mouse, was reported. In the El mouse, a major seizure susceptibility gene, El-1, segregates in an autosomal dominant fashion and has been localized to a region distal to the centromere of mouse chromosome 9. Comparative genetic maps between man and mouse have been used for prediction of localization of several human disease genes. Because the region of mouse chromosome 9 that is the most likely to contain the El-1 locus is syntenic to regions on human chromosomes 3q21-p22, 3q21-q23.3, 6q12 and 15q24, we adopted the candidate gene approach as an initial linkage strategy. Twenty-two polymorphic microsatellite markers covering these regions were used for genotyping individuals in the three larger families ascertained, two of which are Australian and one French-Canadian. Negative two-point lod scores were obtained separately for each family. The analysis of all three families combined significantly excludes the candidate regions on chromosomes 3, 6 and 15.

  19. Know Your Chromosomes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The organization of chromosomes, the structure and function of genes and the role of genetic mutations in diseases continue to be an area of intense scientific investigation. The size of an ... 39 years, while Mendel formulated his laws of inheritance 130 years ago ..... Harper International edition, Harper and Row, New York.

  20. Chromosomal abnormalities and autism

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Farida El-Baz

    2015-06-19

    Jun 19, 2015 ... Abstract Background: Autism is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by clinical, etio- logic and genetic heterogeneity. Many surveys revealed cytogenetically visible chromosomal abnor- malities in 7.4% of autistic patients documented as well as several submicroscopic variants. This study had ...

  1. Know Your Chromosomes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    a gene located on the X chromosome is expressed in males more often than in females? For most genes ..... Disease results in light sensitive skin lesions, fragile skin due to deficiency of uroporphyrinogen dicarboxylase, an enzyme involved in biosynthesis of ... Aufwomall'SctlSSlve protein. PX MPl Zellweger syndrome (ZS).

  2. The Y Chromosome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Offner, Susan

    2010-01-01

    The Y chromosome is of great interest to students and can be used to teach about many important biological concepts in addition to sex determination. This paper discusses mutation, recombination, mammalian sex determination, sex determination in general, and the evolution of sex determination in mammals. It includes a student activity that…

  3. Know Your Chromosomes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 1; Issue 3. Know Your Chromosomes The Strong Holds of Family Trees. Vani Brahmachari. Series Article Volume 1 Issue 3 March 1996 pp 30-38. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  4. Know Your Chromosomes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 1; Issue 1. Know Your Chromosomes Nature's Way of Packing Genes. Vani Brahmachari. Series Article Volume 1 Issue 1 January 1996 pp 40-47. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  5. Electochemical detection of chromosome translocation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kwasny, Dorota; Dimaki, Maria; Silahtaroglu, Asli

    2014-01-01

    Cytogenetics is a study of the cell structure with a main focus on chromosomes content and their structure. Chromosome abnormalities, such as translocations may cause various genetic disorders and heametological malignancies. Chromosome translocations are structural rearrangements of two...... chromosomes that results in formation of derivative chromosomes with a mixed DNA sequence. The method currently used for their detection is Fluorescent In Situ Hybridization, which requires a use of expensive, fluorescently labeled probes that target the derivative chromosomes. We present here a double...... hybridization approach developed for label-free detection of the chromosome translocations. For specific translocation detection it is necessary to determine that the two DNA sequences forming a derivative chromosome are connected, which is achieved by two subsequent hybridization steps. The electrochemical...

  6. Telomere dysfunction and chromosome instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murnane, John P., E-mail: jmurnane@radonc.ucsf.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California San Francisco, 2340 Sutter Street, San Francisco, CA 94143-1331 (United States)

    2012-02-01

    The ends of chromosomes are composed of a short repeat sequence and associated proteins that together form a cap, called a telomere, that keeps the ends from appearing as double-strand breaks (DSBs) and prevents chromosome fusion. The loss of telomeric repeat sequences or deficiencies in telomeric proteins can result in chromosome fusion and lead to chromosome instability. The similarity between chromosome rearrangements resulting from telomere loss and those found in cancer cells implicates telomere loss as an important mechanism for the chromosome instability contributing to human cancer. Telomere loss in cancer cells can occur through gradual shortening due to insufficient telomerase, the protein that maintains telomeres. However, cancer cells often have a high rate of spontaneous telomere loss despite the expression of telomerase, which has been proposed to result from a combination of oncogene-mediated replication stress and a deficiency in DSB repair in telomeric regions. Chromosome fusion in mammalian cells primarily involves nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ), which is the major form of DSB repair. Chromosome fusion initiates chromosome instability involving breakage-fusion-bridge (B/F/B) cycles, in which dicentric chromosomes form bridges and break as the cell attempts to divide, repeating the process in subsequent cell cycles. Fusion between sister chromatids results in large inverted repeats on the end of the chromosome, which amplify further following additional B/F/B cycles. B/F/B cycles continue until the chromosome acquires a new telomere, most often by translocation of the end of another chromosome. The instability is not confined to a chromosome that loses its telomere, because the instability is transferred to the chromosome donating a translocation. Moreover, the amplified regions are unstable and form extrachromosomal DNA that can reintegrate at new locations. Knowledge concerning the factors promoting telomere loss and its consequences is

  7. Correlation of chromosome patterns in leukemic cells of patients with exposure to chemicals and/or radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowley, J.D.

    1989-10-01

    We have identified two new recurring translocations involving chromosome 5; one is a 3;5 translocation and the other involves a rearrangement between chromosomes 5 and 7. The first is t(3;5)(q25.1;q35). We studied five patients with AML and a t(3;5) in their leukemic cells. At diagnosis, four of the patients had a t(3;5) as their sole karyotypic anomaly; the remaining patient had additional structural and numerical abnormalities. Careful cytogenetic analysis indicated that the breakpoints of this rearrangement were 3q25.1 and 5q34, in contrast to the various breakpoints reported in earlier studies (3q21 to 3q25 and 5q31 to 5q35). The karyotypic, morphologic, and clinical characteristics of this group, as well as those of 15 previously reported patients with the t(3;5), were compared to identify any features that might warrant consideration of this anomaly as a specific syndrome. The median age of the group, 37 years, as younger than that of all patients with AML, 49 years. A preceding myelodysplastic syndrome was observed in three patients. We have no information regarding the occupation of most of these patients. Except for acute promyelocytic leukemia, each morphologic subtype occurred in these patients; however, the frequency of erythroleukemia (M6) was much greater than expected. 11 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

  8. [Dicentric Y chromosome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelmoula, N Bouayed; Amouri, A

    2005-01-01

    Dicentric Y chromosomes are the most common Y structural abnormalities and their influence on gonadal and somatic development is extremely variable. Here, we report the third comprehensive review of the literature concerning dicentric Y chromosomes reported since 1994. We find 78 new cases for which molecular studies (PCR or FISH) have been widely applied to investigate SRY (68% of cases), GBY, ZFY, RFS4Y, GCY and different genes at AZF region. For dic(Yq), all cases (n = 20) were mosaic for 45,X and 4 of them were also mosaic for a 46,XY cell line. When breakpoints were available (15/20 cases), they were in Yp11. 50% of cases were phenotypic female and 20% phenotypic male while 20% of cases were reported with gonadal dysgenesis. Gonadal histology was defined in 8 cases but only in one case, gonadal tissu was genetically investigated because of gonadoblastoma. For dic(Yp) (n = 55), mosaicism concerned only 45,X cell line and was found in 50 cases while the remainder five cases were homogeneous. When breakpoints were available, it was at Yq11 in 50 cases and at Yq12 in two cases. 54% of cases were phenotypic female, 26% were phenotypic male and 18% were associated with genitalia ambiguous. SRY was analyzed in 33 cases, sequenced in 9 cases and was muted in only one case. Gonads were histologically explored in 34 cases and genetically investigated in 8 cases. Gonadoblastoma was found in only two cases. Through this review, it seems that phenotype-genotype correlations are still not possible and that homogeneous studies of dic(Y) in more patients using molecular tools for structural characterization of the rearranged Y chromosome and assessment of mosaicism in many organs are necessary to clarify the basis of the phenotypic heterogeneity of dicentric Y chromosomes and then to help phenotypic prediction of such chromosome rearrangement.

  9. Persistence of Breakage in Specific Chromosome Bands 6 Years after Acute Exposure to Oil.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Francés

    Full Text Available The identification of breakpoints involved in chromosomal damage could help to detect genes involved in genetic disorders, most notably cancer. Until now, only one published study, carried out by our group, has identified chromosome bands affected by exposure to oil from an oil spill. In that study, which was performed two years after the initial oil exposure in individuals who had participated in clean-up tasks following the wreck of the Prestige, three chromosomal bands (2q21, 3q27, 5q31 were found to be especially prone to breakage. A recent follow-up study, performed on the same individuals, revealed that the genotoxic damage had persisted six years after oil exposure.To determine whether there exist chromosome bands which are especially prone to breakages and to know if there is some correlation with those detected in the previous study. In addition, to investigate if the DNA repair problems detected previously persist in the present study.Follow-up study performed six years after the Prestige oil spill.Fishermen cooperatives in coastal villages.Fishermen highly exposed to oil spill who participated in previous genotoxic study six years after the oil.Chromosome damage in peripheral lymphocytes. For accurate identification of the breakpoints involved in chromosome damage of circulating lymphocytes, a sequential stain/G-banding technique was employed. To determine the most break-prone chromosome bands, two statistical methods, the Fragile Site Multinomial and the chi-square tests (where the bands were corrected by their length were used. To compare the chromosome lesions, structural chromosome alterations and gaps/breaks between two groups of individuals we used the GEE test which takes into account a possible within-individual correlation. Dysfunctions in DNA repair mechanisms, expressed as chromosome damage, were assessed in cultures with aphidicolin by the GEE test.Cytogenetic analyses were performed in 47 exposed individuals. A total of

  10. Mapping studies of Hirschsprung disease on chromosome 13q22

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puffenberger, E.G.; Washington, S.S. [Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States); Cass, D. [Westmead Hospital (Australia)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    We have identified a large, inbred, Mennonite kindred segregating HSCR. An association mapping study was initiated to identify the gene(s) involved in the development of HSCR. Presuming segregation of a recessive locus, we searched the genome at low resolution with three multi-case families for chromosomal regions demonstrating identity-by-descent (IBD). Regions demonstrating IBD in all three mapping panel families were analyzed at high resolution using 31 additional nuclear families. This method identified a major susceptibility locus on chromosome 13q22. Four microsatellite markers, viz. D13S162, D13S160, AFM240zg9, and D13S170, showed significant results (p<0.001) when the frequency of alleles at each locus was compared between transmitted (T) and untransmitted (U) parental alleles. An additional marker, D13S317, has since been genotyped and found to demonstrate significant linkage disequilibrium as well. At locus D13S160, the 235 bp allele shows the strongest association. To estimate the penetrance of the mutant gene on 13q22, we genotyped all 58 offspring in 14 segregating (for D13S160) nuclear families. This analysis demonstrated that 36% (8/22) of 235 bp homozygotes and 27% (7/26) of 235 bp heterozygotes we affected. Overall, the calculated penetrance is 31% which accords well with the 33% value estimated by Badner et al. (1990) for colonic HSCR. In addition, two patients with HSCR and interstitial deletions of chromosome 13 have been analyzed with microsatellite markers. The common overlap region includes l3q22 and is bounded distally by D13S160. This region is thought to be syntenic with mouse chromosome 14 where the piebald locus maps. While the piebald locus is recessive and the 13q22 deletion patients argue for dominant inheritance, the mapping data from the Mennonite kindred favors an intermediate model where homozygotes are at greatest risk, but heterozygotes have a measurable risk for HSCR development.

  11. Partial monosomy 8q and partial trisomy 9q due to the maternal translocation t(8;9(q24.3;q34.1)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tos, T; Alp, M Y; Eker, H K

    2014-01-01

    Partial trisomy 9q34-qter and partial monosomy 8q24.3-qter are very rare chromosomal abnormalities. Characteristic features of partial trisomy 9q34-qter are hypotonia, developmental delay, mild intellectual disability, dolichocephaly, distinct facial phenotype, long and thin fingers, and cardiac...

  12. Mapping Breakpoints of Complex Chromosome Rearrangements Involving a Partial Trisomy 15q23.1-q26.2 Revealed by Next Generation Sequencing and Conventional Techniques.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiong Pan

    Full Text Available Complex chromosome rearrangements (CCRs, which are rather rare in the whole population, may be associated with aberrant phenotypes. Next-generation sequencing (NGS and conventional techniques, could be used to reveal specific CCRs for better genetic counseling. We report the CCRs of a girl and her mother, which were identified using a combination of NGS and conventional techniques including G-banding, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH and PCR. The girl demonstrated CCRs involving chromosomes 3 and 8, while the CCRs of her mother involved chromosomes 3, 5, 8, 11 and 15. HumanCytoSNP-12 Chip analysis identified a 35.4 Mb duplication on chromosome 15q21.3-q26.2 in the proband and a 1.6 Mb microdeletion at chromosome 15q21.3 in her mother. The proband inherited the rearranged chromosomes 3 and 8 from her mother, and the duplicated region on chromosome 15 of the proband was inherited from the mother. Approximately one hundred genes were identified in the 15q21.3-q26.2 duplicated region of the proband. In particular, TPM1, SMAD6, SMAD3, and HCN4 may be associated with her heart defects, and HEXA, KIF7, and IDH2 are responsible for her developmental and mental retardation. In addition, we suggest that a microdeletion on the 15q21.3 region of the mother, which involved TCF2, TCF12, ADMA10 and AQP9, might be associated with mental retardation. We delineate the precise structures of the derivative chromosomes, chromosome duplication origin and possible molecular mechanisms for aberrant phenotypes by combining NGS data with conventional techniques.

  13. The chromosome cycle of prokaryotes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzminov, Andrei

    2013-01-01

    Summary In both eukaryotes and prokaryotes, chromosomal DNA undergoes replication, condensation-decondensation and segregation, sequentially, in some fixed order. Other conditions, like sister-chromatid cohesion (SCC), may span several chromosomal events. One set of these chromosomal transactions within a single cell cycle constitutes the “chromosome cycle”. For many years it was generally assumed that the prokaryotic chromosome cycle follows major phases of the eukaryotic one: -replication-condensation-segregation-(cell division)-decondensation-, with SCC of unspecified length. Eventually it became evident that, in contrast to the strictly consecutive chromosome cycle of eukaryotes, all stages of the prokaryotic chromosome cycle run concurrently. Thus, prokaryotes practice “progressive” chromosome segregation separated from replication by a brief SCC, and all three transactions move along the chromosome at the same fast rate. In other words, in addition to replication forks, there are “segregation forks” in prokaryotic chromosomes. Moreover, the bulk of prokaryotic DNA outside the replication-segregation transition stays compacted. I consider possible origins of this concurrent replication-segregation and outline the “nucleoid administration” system that organizes the dynamic part of the prokaryotic chromosome cycle. PMID:23962352

  14. Independent clonal origin of multiple uterine leiomyomas that was determined by X chromosome inactivation and microsatellite analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Canevari, Renata A; Pontes, Anaglória; Rosa, Fabíola E

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: In an attempt to clarify the clonality and genetic relationships that are involved in the tumorigenesis of uterine leiomyomas, we used a total of 43 multiple leiomyomas from 14 patients and analyzed the allelic status with 15 microsatellite markers and X chromosome inactivation analysis....... STUDY DESIGN: We have used a set of 15 microsatellite polymorphism markers mapped on 3q, 7p, 11, and 15q by automated analysis. The X chromosome inactivation was evaluated by the methylation status of the X-linked androgen receptor gene. RESULTS: Loss of heterozygosity analysis showed a different...... pattern in 7 of the 8 cases with allelic loss for at least 1 of 15 microsatellite markers that were analyzed. A similar loss of heterozygosity findings at 7p22-15 was detected in 3 samples from the same patient. X chromosome inactivation analysis demonstrated the same inactivated allele in all tumors...

  15. Chromosome 19 International Workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pericak-Vance, M.A. (Duke Univ., Durham, NC (United States). Medical Center); Ropers, H.H. (Univ. Hospital Nijmegen, (The Netherlands). Dept. of Human Genetics); Carrano, A.J. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States))

    1993-01-04

    The Second International Workshop on Human Chromosome 19 was hosted on January 25 and 26, 1992, by the Department of Human Genetics, University Hospital Nijmegen, The Netherlands, at the 'Meerdal Conference Center'. The workshop was supported by a grant from the European Community obtained through HUGO, the Dutch Research Organization (NWO) and the Muscular Dystrophy Association (MDA). Travel support for American participants was provided by the Department of Energy. The goals of this workshop were to produce genetic, physical and integrated maps of chromosome 19, to identify inconsistencies and gaps, and to discuss and exchange resources and techniques available for the completion of these maps. The second day of the meeting was largely devoted to region or disease specific efforts. In particular, the meeting served as a platform for assessing and discussing the recent progress made into the molecular elucidation of myotonic dystrophy.

  16. The X chromosome in space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jégu, Teddy; Aeby, Eric; Lee, Jeannie T

    2017-06-01

    Extensive 3D folding is required to package a genome into the tiny nuclear space, and this packaging must be compatible with proper gene expression. Thus, in the well-hierarchized nucleus, chromosomes occupy discrete territories and adopt specific 3D organizational structures that facilitate interactions between regulatory elements for gene expression. The mammalian X chromosome exemplifies this structure-function relationship. Recent studies have shown that, upon X-chromosome inactivation, active and inactive X chromosomes localize to different subnuclear positions and adopt distinct chromosomal architectures that reflect their activity states. Here, we review the roles of long non-coding RNAs, chromosomal organizational structures and the subnuclear localization of chromosomes as they relate to X-linked gene expression.

  17. Leiomyoma of uterus in a patient with ring chromosome 12: Case presentation and literature review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hajianpour, M.J.; Habibian, R.; Hajianpour, A.K. [Children`s Hospital, Los Angeles, CA (United States)] [and others

    1996-05-17

    We report on a 30-year-old woman with de novo ring chromosome 12 mosaicism, 46,XX,r(12)(p13.3q24.3)/46,XX. In addition to the clinical manifestations generally observed in {open_quotes}ring syndrome{close_quotes} cases such as growth retardation, short stature, microcephaly, and mental deficiency, she had a broad nasal bridge, micrognathia with overbite, underdeveloped breasts, mild dorsal scoliosis, clinodactyly of the fifth fingers with a single interdigital crease, symphalangism of thumbs, tapering fingers, mild cutaneous syndactyly between the second and third toes, multiple cafe-au-lait spots, sebaceous acne on the face and back, and mild dystrophic toenails. She developed a large, pedunculated uterine leiomyoma at age 28 years. To our knowledge, uterine leiomyoma in association with r(12) has not been reported previously. However, a gain of chromosome 12 and translocations involving 12q14-15 have been described. 12 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. The Gpn3 Q279* cancer-associated mutant inhibits Gpn1 nuclear export and is deficient in RNA polymerase II nuclear targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa-Camacho, Angel A; Méndez-Hernández, Lucía E; Lara-Chacón, Bárbara; Peña-Gómez, Sonia G; Romero, Violeta; González-González, Rogelio; Guerra-Moreno, José A; Robledo-Rivera, Angélica Y; Sánchez-Olea, Roberto; Calera, Mónica R

    2017-11-01

    Gpn3 is required for RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) nuclear targeting. Here, we investigated the effect of a cancer-associated Q279* nonsense mutation in Gpn3 cellular function. Employing RNAi, we replaced endogenous Gpn3 by wt or Q279* RNAi-resistant Gpn3R in epithelial model cells. RNAPII nuclear accumulation and transcriptional activity were markedly decreased in cells expressing only Gpn3R Q279*. Wild-type Gpn3R localized to the cytoplasm but a fraction of Gpn3R Q279* entered the cell nucleus and inhibited Gpn1-EYFP nuclear export. This property and the transcriptional deficit in Gpn3R Q279*-expressing cells required a PDZ-binding motif generated by the Q279* mutation. We conclude that an acquired PDZ-binding motif in Gpn3 Q279* caused Gpn3 nuclear entry, and inhibited Gpn1 nuclear export and Gpn3-mediated RNAPII nuclear targeting. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  19. Method for obtaining Chromosomes Method for obtaining Chromosomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogart James P.

    1973-09-01

    Full Text Available It is very easy to obtain chromosomes from anuran amphibians.Amphibians have very large chromosomes which can easily be seen with an ordinary microscope. The method used has been tested in the laboratory and also at collecting sites. All that is required are a few chemicals and simple equipment.It is very easy to obtain chromosomes from anuran amphibians.Amphibians have very large chromosomes which can easily be seen with an ordinary microscope. The method used has been tested in the laboratory and also at collecting sites. All that is required are a few chemicals and simple equipment.

  20. Y chromosome morphology of cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, W L; Upton, P C

    1979-11-01

    Metaphase chromosomes from cultured lymphocytes were prepared from 246 bulls including Bos indicus, Bos taurus. Bos (Bibos) banteng, Sanga and interspecific and intra-specific breed crosses. Morphology and karyotype position of the Y chromosome for each bull were noted. Karyotype position of the Y chromosome varied between bulls from 25th to 29th pair and the Y chromosomes of Bos indicus and breeds derived from Bos indicus bulls were acrocentric while those of Bos taurus, Sanga and breeds derived from these bulls were metacentric/submetacentric. Two forms of Y chromosome were noted in the Droughtmaster breed. C-banding patterns of the acrocentric Y chromosome were characteristic and enabled easy identification.

  1. Intraspecific chromosome variability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Dubinin

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available (Editorial preface. The publication is presented in order to remind us of one of dramatic pages of the history of genetics. It re-opens for the contemporary reader a comprehensive work marking the priority change from plant cytogenetics to animal cytogenetics led by wide population studies which were conducted on Drosophila polytene chromosomes. The year of the publication (1937 became the point of irretrievable branching between the directions of Old World and New World genetics connected with the problems of chromosome variability and its significance for the evolution of the species. The famous book of T. Dobzhansky (1937 was published by Columbia University in the US under the title “Genetics and the origin of species”, and in the shadow of this American ‘skybuilding’ all other works grew dim. It is remarkable that both Dobzhansky and Dubinin come to similar conclusions about the role of chromosomes in speciation. This is not surprising given that they both might be considered as representatives of the Russian genetic school, by their birth and education. Interestingly, Dobzhansky had never referred to the full paper of Dubinin et al. (1937, though a previous short communication in Nature (1936 was included together with all former papers on the related subject. In full, the volume of the original publication printed in the Biological Journal in Moscow comprised 47 pages, in that number 41 pages of the Russian text accompanied by 16 Figs, a table and reference list, and, above all, 6 pages of the English summary. This final part in English is now reproduced in the authors’ version with the only addition being the reference list in the originally printed form.

  2. A defined chromosome 6q fragment (at D6S310) harbors a putative tumor suppressor gene for breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theile, M; Seitz, S; Arnold, W; Jandrig, B; Frege, R; Schlag, P M; Haensch, W; Guski, H; Winzer, K J; Barrett, J C; Scherneck, S

    1996-08-15

    Recent evidence obtained by cytogenetic and molecular studies indicates that in breast cancer chromosome 6q is often affected by genetic changes suggesting the existence of putative tumor suppressor genes (TSGs). However the function of gene(s) on this chromosome in breast cancer suppression is not understood. To substantiate further the presence of breast cancer related TSGs at 6q and to define their location, we first performed microcell-mediated transfer of chromosome 6 to CAL51 breast cancer cells for studying possible suppression of malignant phenotype and secondly, we analysed DNAs from 46 primary breast cancers for loss of constitutive heterozygosity (LOH) using 24 poly-morphic microsatellite markers. The chromosome transfer resulted in loss of tumorigenicity and reversion of other neoplastic properties of the microcell hybrids. Polymorphism analysis of single hybrids revealed that they harbored only a small donor chromosome fragment defined by the marker D6S310 (6q23.3-q25) and flanked by D6S292 and D6S311. The LOH data suggest that four tumor suppressor gene loci mapped to the central and distal portion of 6q may be independently deleted in breast cancer. One of these regions corresponds to the region identified by chromosome transfer.

  3. Xq chromosome duplication in males: clinical, cytogenetic and array CGH characterization of a new case and review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Sabrina F; Rauen, Katherine A; Pinkel, Daniel; Albertson, Donna G; Cotter, Philip D

    2005-06-15

    Males with duplications within the long arm of the X chromosome are rare and most cases are inherited from a maternal heterozygote. We report a male with a de novo Xq duplication and review of the literature. The proband was ascertained prenatally after an abnormal expanded alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) screen and abnormal ultrasound findings. Chromosome analysis on amniocyte and subsequent peripheral blood lymphocyte cultures showed a male karyotype containing additional material on the long arm of the X chromosome. Fluorescence in situ hybridization with an X chromosome whole chromosome paint probe showed that the additional material was derived from the X chromosome, interpreted as a dup(X)(q13.3q24). Further characterization of the duplication by array CGH showed a duplication size between 30-44 Mb as determined by the map position of the flanking clones on the array, and refined the breakpoints of the duplicated region to Xq21.32 --> Xq25. At birth, the proband had multiple craniofacial abnormalities, musculoskeletal anomalies, bilateral cryptorchidism with scrotal hypoplasia, conductive hearing loss, and profound generalized hypotonia despite normal birthweight, length, and head circumference. Although data regarding Xq duplications in males are limited, a clear pattern of characteristic features can be discerned as illustrated in the present case and confirmed in our literature review. Mental, psychomotor and growth retardation, as well as, craniofacial anomalies, muscle hypotonia, hypoplastic genitalia, cryptorchidism, feeding difficulties, and endocrine dysfunction are all significant issues in these individuals.

  4. X Chromosome Evolution in Cetartiodactyla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proskuryakova, Anastasia A; Kulemzina, Anastasia I; Perelman, Polina L; Makunin, Alexey I; Larkin, Denis M; Farré, Marta; Kukekova, Anna V; Lynn Johnson, Jennifer; Lemskaya, Natalya A; Beklemisheva, Violetta R; Roelke-Parker, Melody E; Bellizzi, June; Ryder, Oliver A; O'Brien, Stephen J; Graphodatsky, Alexander S

    2017-08-31

    The phenomenon of a remarkable conservation of the X chromosome in eutherian mammals has been first described by Susumu Ohno in 1964. A notable exception is the cetartiodactyl X chromosome, which varies widely in morphology and G-banding pattern between species. It is hypothesized that this sex chromosome has undergone multiple rearrangements that changed the centromere position and the order of syntenic segments over the last 80 million years of Cetartiodactyla speciation. To investigate its evolution we have selected 26 evolutionarily conserved bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones from the cattle CHORI-240 library evenly distributed along the cattle X chromosome. High-resolution BAC maps of the X chromosome on a representative range of cetartiodactyl species from different branches: pig (Suidae), alpaca (Camelidae), gray whale (Cetacea), hippopotamus (Hippopotamidae), Java mouse-deer (Tragulidae), pronghorn (Antilocapridae), Siberian musk deer (Moschidae), and giraffe (Giraffidae) were obtained by fluorescent in situ hybridization. To trace the X chromosome evolution during fast radiation in specious families, we performed mapping in several cervids (moose, Siberian roe deer, fallow deer, and Pere David's deer) and bovid (muskox, goat, sheep, sable antelope, and cattle) species. We have identified three major conserved synteny blocks and rearrangements in different cetartiodactyl lineages and found that the recently described phenomenon of the evolutionary new centromere emergence has taken place in the X chromosome evolution of Cetartiodactyla at least five times. We propose the structure of the putative ancestral cetartiodactyl X chromosome by reconstructing the order of syntenic segments and centromere position for key groups.

  5. Distal 5q trisomy resulting from an X;5 translocation detected by chromosome painting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abuelo, D N; Ahsanuddin, A N; Mark, H F

    2000-10-23

    We describe the case of a 13-year-old girl with an apparently de novo unbalanced translocation resulting in the presence of additional chromosomal material on the short arm of one X chromosome, which was detected by conventional G-banding studies. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using the Chromoprobe Multiprobe-M protocol confirmed that the additional chromosomal material originated from chromosome 5. The karyotype of this patient is now established to be 46,X,der(X) t(X;5)(p22.3;q33), with a deletion of Xp22.3-pter and partial trisomy of 5q33-qter. The distal 5q trisomy genotype has been associated with clinical signs that include growth and mental retardation, eczema, craniofacial anomalies, and malformations of heart, lungs, abdomen, limbs, and genitalia. Our patient also has short stature, a prominent nasal bridge, a flat philtrum, a thin upper lip, dental caries, and limb and cardiac malformations, but she appears to be mildly affected compared with previously reported cases. This is the first case of distal 5q trisomy arising from a translocation with the X chromosome. Replication studies on this patient show that the derivative t(X;5) chromosome is late replicating in almost all cells examined, which indicates that this chromosome is preferentially inactivated. However, the translocated segment of chromosome 5 appears to be early replicating, which implies that the trisomic 5q segment is transcriptionally active. We cannot determine from these studies whether all or only some genes in this segment are expressed, but this patient's relatively mild clinical signs suggest that the critical region(s) that contribute to the distal 5q trisomy phenotype are at least partly suppressed. A review of other patients with X-chromosome translocations indicates that many but not all of them also have attenuated phenotypes. The mechanism of inactivation of autosomal material attached to the X chromosome is complex, with varying effects on the phenotype of the

  6. Overexpression of SnoN/SkiL, amplified at the 3q26.2 locus, in ovarian cancers: A role in ovarian pathogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nanjundan, Meera; Cheng, Kwai Wa; Zhang, Fan; Lahad, John; Kuo, Wen-Lin; Schmandt, Rosemarie; Smith-McCune, Karen; Fishman, David; Gray, Joe W.; Mills, Gordon B.

    2008-07-18

    High-resolution array comparative genomic hybridization of 235 serous epithelial ovarian cancers demonstrated a regional increase at 3q26.2 encompassing SnoN/SkiL, a coregulator of SMAD/TGF{beta} signaling. SnoN RNA transcripts were elevated in {approx}80% of advanced stage serous epithelial ovarian cancers. In both immortalized normal (TIOSE) and ovarian carcinoma cell lines (OVCA), SnoN RNA levels were increased by TGF{beta} stimulation and altered by LY294002 and JNK II inhibitor treatment suggesting that the PI3K and JNK signaling pathways may regulate TGF{beta}-induced increases in SnoN RNA. In TIOSE, SnoN protein levels were reduced 15min post TGF{beta}-stimulation, likely by proteosome-mediated degradation. In contrast, in OVCA, SnoN levels were elevated 3h post-stimulation potentially as a result of inhibition of the proteosome. To elucidate the role of SnoN in ovarian tumorigenesis, we explored the effects of both increasing and decreasing SnoN levels. In both TIOSE and OVCA, SnoN siRNA decreased cell growth between 20 and 50% concurrent with increased p21 levels. In TIOSE, transient expression of SnoN repressed TGF{beta} induction of PAI-1 promoters with little effect on the p21 promoter or resultant cell growth. In contrast to the effects of transient expression, stable expression of SnoN in TIOSE led to growth arrest through induction of senescence. Collectively, these results implicate SnoN levels in multiple roles during ovarian carcinogenesis: promoting cellular proliferation in ovarian cancer cells and as a positive mediator of cell cycle arrest and senescence in non-transformed ovarian epithelial cells.

  7. Know Your Chromosomes Hybrid Cells and Human Chromosomes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 1; Issue 6. Know Your Chromosomes Hybrid Cells and Human Chromosomes. Vani Brahmachari. Series Article Volume 1 Issue 6 June 1996 pp 41-49. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  8. Chromosome Connections: Compelling Clues to Common Ancestry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flammer, Larry

    2013-01-01

    Students compare banding patterns on hominid chromosomes and see striking evidence of their common ancestry. To test this, human chromosome no. 2 is matched with two shorter chimpanzee chromosomes, leading to the hypothesis that human chromosome 2 resulted from the fusion of the two shorter chromosomes. Students test that hypothesis by looking for…

  9. Spectrum of complex chromosomal aberrations in a myelodysplastic syndrome and a brief review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bani Bandana Ganguly

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS is a heterogeneous premalignant condition characterized by cytopenia, ineffective hematopoiesis, dysplastic marrow, and risk of progression to acute myeloid leukemia. Cytogenetic abnormalities, including del(3q/5q/7q/11q/12p/20q, monosomy 5/7, trisomy 8/19, i(17q, and -Y, are the indicators of diagnosis and risk stratification. The present case with bicytopenia detected with highly complex chromosome rearrangements with variability in numerical and structural combinations. Chromosome analysis was carried out following unstimulated marrow culture and G-banding. In addition to known MDS-aberrations, der(9p, der(12 dic(12;?19, +15, −18, and ring and marker chromosomes were recorded having, at least, nine abnormal chromosomes/cell. To our knowledge, this is the first case with all MDS-aberrations in one single individual. The case has been discussed in relevance to current MDS research. In the present case, i(17q/-17, der(12p, del(5q26, del(7q36, and del(20q11 indicate possible alterations in TP53, ETV6, IDH2, EZH2, and SRSF2 genes, which are responsible for pathomechanism, genetic instability, clonal evolution, and advancement of disease condition.

  10. Spectrum of complex chromosomal aberrations in a myelodysplastic syndrome and a brief review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganguly, Bani Bandana; Dolai, Tuphan Kanti; De, Rajib; Kadam, Nitin N

    2016-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) is a heterogeneous premalignant condition characterized by cytopenia, ineffective hematopoiesis, dysplastic marrow, and risk of progression to acute myeloid leukemia. Cytogenetic abnormalities, including del(3q/5q/7q/11q/12p/20q), monosomy 5/7, trisomy 8/19, i(17q), and -Y, are the indicators of diagnosis and risk stratification. The present case with bicytopenia detected with highly complex chromosome rearrangements with variability in numerical and structural combinations. Chromosome analysis was carried out following unstimulated marrow culture and G-banding. In addition to known MDS-aberrations, der(9p), der(12) dic(12;?19), +15, -18, and ring and marker chromosomes were recorded having, at least, nine abnormal chromosomes/cell. To our knowledge, this is the first case with all MDS-aberrations in one single individual. The case has been discussed in relevance to current MDS research. In the present case, i(17q)/-17, der(12p), del(5q26), del(7q36), and del(20q11) indicate possible alterations in TP53, ETV6, IDH2, EZH2, and SRSF2 genes, which are responsible for pathomechanism, genetic instability, clonal evolution, and advancement of disease condition.

  11. Ophthalmic and systemic findings in interstitial deletions of chromosome 14q: a case feport and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearce, Zachary D; Droste, Patrick J; Aaberg, Thomas M; Hassan, Adam S

    2012-09-01

    We report a patient with clinical anophthalmia, partial eyelid fusion and a hypoplastic socket on the right. The left eye has microphthalmia involving the anterior and posterior segments, microcornea, iris coloboma, chorioretinal dysgenesis, macular dysplasia, absence of retinal vessels, and optic nerve aplasia. Systemic abnormalities include microcephaly, bilateral hearing loss, and duodenal atresia. Electrophysiologic testing showed no response from either eye. Cytogenetic testing revealed a de novo interstitial deletion of chromosome 14q22.3q23.1. The literature of similar interstitial deletions and ongoing candidate gene studies are reviewed.

  12. Chromosomal rearrangements occurred repeatedly and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    All examined Paroedura showed NORs on the smallest chromosome pair; moreover, six of the eleven examined species show a 2n = 36 karyotype, with a pair of metacentrics and 17 telocentric pair. The remaining species exhibited karyotypes with a diploid chromosome number ranging from 2n = 31 to 2n = 38. We assume ...

  13. Vibrio chromosome-specific families

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lukjancenko, Oksana; Ussery, David

    2014-01-01

    many membrane-associated activities, such as ion channels, transmembrane transporters, and electron transport chain proteins. Thus, it appears that whilst there are many "housekeeping systems" encoded in chromosome 1, there are far fewer core functions found in chromosome 2. However, the presence...

  14. Cohesin in determining chromosome architecture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haering, Christian H., E-mail: christian.haering@embl.de [Cell Biology and Biophysics Unit, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), Heidelberg (Germany); Jessberger, Rolf, E-mail: rolf.jessberger@tu-dresden.de [Institute of Physiological Chemistry, Dresden University of Technology, Dresden (Germany)

    2012-07-15

    Cells use ring-like structured protein complexes for various tasks in DNA dynamics. The tripartite cohesin ring is particularly suited to determine chromosome architecture, for it is large and dynamic, may acquire different forms, and is involved in several distinct nuclear processes. This review focuses on cohesin's role in structuring chromosomes during mitotic and meiotic cell divisions and during interphase.

  15. Slit scan flow cytometry of isolated chromosomes following fluorescence hybridization: an approach of online screening for specific chromosomes and chromosome translocations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hausmann, M.; Dudin, G.; Aten, J. A.; Heilig, R.; Diaz, E.; Cremer, C.

    1991-01-01

    The recently developed methods of non radioactive in situ hybridization of chromosomes offer new aspects for chromosome analysis. Fluorescent labelling of hybridized chromosomes or chromosomal subregions allows to facilitate considerably the detection of specific chromosomal abnormalities. For many

  16. Chromosomal Evolution in Lower Vertebrates: Sex Chromosomes in Neotropical Fishes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo de Bello Cioffi

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Fishes exhibit the greatest diversity of species among vertebrates, offering a number of relevant models for genetic and evolutionary studies. The investigation of sex chromosome differentiation is a very active and striking research area of fish cytogenetics, as fishes represent one of the most vital model groups. Neotropical fish species show an amazing variety of sex chromosome systems, where different stages of differentiation can be found, ranging from homomorphic to highly differentiated sex chromosomes. Here, we draw attention on the impact of recent developments in molecular cytogenetic analyses that helped to elucidate many unknown questions about fish sex chromosome evolution, using excellent characiform models occurring in the Neotropical region, namely the Erythrinidae family and the Triportheus genus. While in Erythrinidae distinct XY and/or multiple XY-derived sex chromosome systems have independently evolved at least four different times, representatives of Triportheus show an opposite scenario, i.e., highly conserved ZZ/ZW system with a monophyletic origin. In both cases, recent molecular approaches, such as mapping of repetitive DNA classes, comparative genomic hybridization (CGH, and whole chromosome painting (WCP, allowed us to unmask several new features linked to the molecular composition and differentiation processes of sex chromosomes in fishes.

  17. Field-flow fractionation of chromosomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giddings, J.C.

    1990-09-01

    Research continued on field flow fractionation of chromosomes. Progress in the past year can be organized into three main categories: (1) chromosome sample preparation; (2) preliminary chromosome fractionation; (3) fractionation of a polystyrene aggregate model which approximates the chromosome shape. We have been successful in isolating metaphase chromosomes from the Chinese hamster. We also received a human chromosome sample from Dr. Carolyn Bell-Prince of Los Alamos National Laboratory. Results are discussed. 2 figs.

  18. Genome-wide association studies in women of African ancestry identified 3q26.21 as a novel susceptibility locus for oestrogen receptor negative breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Dezheng; Feng, Ye; Haddad, Stephen; Zheng, Yonglan; Yao, Song; Han, Yoo-Jeong; Ogundiran, Temidayo O; Adebamowo, Clement; Ojengbede, Oladosu; Falusi, Adeyinka G; Zheng, Wei; Blot, William; Cai, Qiuyin; Signorello, Lisa; John, Esther M; Bernstein, Leslie; Hu, Jennifer J; Ziegler, Regina G; Nyante, Sarah; Bandera, Elisa V; Ingles, Sue A; Press, Michael F; Deming, Sandra L; Rodriguez-Gil, Jorge L; Nathanson, Katherine L; Domchek, Susan M; Rebbeck, Timothy R; Ruiz-Narváez, Edward A; Sucheston-Campbell, Lara E; Bensen, Jeannette T; Simon, Michael S; Hennis, Anselm; Nemesure, Barbara; Leske, M Cristina; Ambs, Stefan; Chen, Lin S; Qian, Frank; Gamazon, Eric R; Lunetta, Kathryn L; Cox, Nancy J; Chanock, Stephen J; Kolonel, Laurence N; Olshan, Andrew F; Ambrosone, Christine B; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Palmer, Julie R; Haiman, Christopher A

    2016-11-01

    Multiple breast cancer loci have been identified in previous genome-wide association studies, but they were mainly conducted in populations of European ancestry. Women of African ancestry are more likely to have young-onset and oestrogen receptor (ER) negative breast cancer for reasons that are unknown and understudied. To identify genetic risk factors for breast cancer in women of African descent, we conducted a meta-analysis of two genome-wide association studies of breast cancer; one study consists of 1,657 cases and 2,029 controls genotyped with Illumina’s HumanOmni2.5 BeadChip and the other study included 3,016 cases and 2,745 controls genotyped using Illumina Human1M-Duo BeadChip. The top 18,376 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) from the meta-analysis were replicated in the third study that consists of 1,984 African Americans cases and 2,939 controls. We found that SNP rs13074711, 26.5 Kb upstream of TNFSF10 at 3q26.21, was significantly associated with risk of oestrogen receptor (ER)-negative breast cancer (odds ratio [OR]=1.29, 95% CI: 1.18-1.40; P = 1.8 × 10 − 8). Functional annotations suggest that the TNFSF10 gene may be involved in breast cancer aetiology, but further functional experiments are needed. In addition, we confirmed SNP rs10069690 was the best indicator for ER-negative breast cancer at 5p15.33 (OR = 1.30; P = 2.4 × 10 − 10) and identified rs12998806 as the best indicator for ER-positive breast cancer at 2q35 (OR = 1.34; P = 2.2 × 10 − 8) for women of African ancestry. These findings demonstrated additional susceptibility alleles for breast cancer can be revealed in diverse populations and have important public health implications in building race/ethnicity-specific risk prediction model for breast cancer.

  19. Integration sites of Epstein-Barr virus genome on chromosomes of human lymphoblastoid cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wuu, K.D.; Chen, Y.J.; Wang-Wuu, S. [Institute of Genetics, Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China)

    1994-09-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is the pathogen of infectious mononucleosis. The viral genome is present in more than 95% of the African cases of Burkitt lymphoma and it is usually maintained in episomal form in the tumor cells. Viral integration has been described only for Nanalwa which is a Burkitt lymphoma cell line lacking episomes. In order to examine the role of EBV in the immortalization of human Blymphocytes, we investigated whether the EBV integration into the human genome is essential. If the integration does occur, we would like to know whether the integration is randomly distributed or whether the viral DNA integrates preferentially at certain sites. Fourteen in vitro immortalized human lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) were examined by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with a biotinylated EBV BamHI w DNA fragment as probe. The episomal form of EBV DNA was found in all cells of these cell lines, while only about 65% of the cells have the integrated viral DNA. This might suggest that integration is not a pre-requisite for cell immortalization. Although all chromosomes, except Y, have been found with integrated viral genome, chromsomes 1 and 5 are the most frequent EBV DNA carrier (p<0.05). Nine chromosome bands, namely, 1p31, 1q31, 2q32, 3q13, 3q26, 5q14, 6q24, 7q31 and 12q21, are preferential targets for EBV integration (p<0.001). Eighty percent of the total 938 EBV hybridization signals were found to be at G-band-positive area. This suggests that the mechanism of EBV integration might be different from that of the retroviruses, which specifically integrate to G-band-negative areas. Thus, we conclude that the integration of EBV to host genome is non-random and it may have something to do with the structure of chromosome and DNA sequences.

  20. Prenatally diagnosed de novo complex chromosome rearrangements: Two new cases and review of the literature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruiz, C.; Grubs, R.E.; Jewett, T. [and others

    1994-09-01

    Complex chromosome rearrangements (CCR) are rare structural rearrangements involving at least three chromosomes with three or more breakpoints. Although there have been numerous reports of individuals with CCR, most have been ascertained through the presence of multiple congenital anomalies, recurrent pregnancy loss, or infertility. Few cases have been ascertained prenatally. We present two new cases of prenatally ascertained CCR. In the first case, an amniocentesis revealed an apparently balanced de novo rearrangement in which chromosomes 5, 6 and 11 were involved in a three-way translocation: 46,XY,t(6;5)(5;11)(q23;p14.3;q15;p13). The pregnancy was unevenful. Recently, at the age of 9 months, a physical and developmental evaluation were normal but, height, weight, and head circumference were below the 5th percentile. In the second case an amniocentesis revealed an unbalanced de novo rearrangement involving separate translocations and an interstitial deletion: 46,XY,del(6)(q25.3q27),t(3;8)(p13;q21.3),t(6;18)(p11.2;q11.2). A meconium plug was present at birth and at 6 months of age surgery for Hirschsprung`s disease was required. Currently, at 10 months of age, the patient has hypotonia and developmental delay. The paucity of information regarding prenatally diagnosed CCR poses a problem in counseling families. Of the four prenatally diagnosed balanced de novo CCR cases, three had abnormal outcomes. In a review of the literature, approximately 70% of the postnatally ascertained balanced de novo CCR cases were associated with congenital anomalies, growth retardation and/or mental retardation. More information regarding the outcome of prenatally ascertained balanced de novo CCR is required for accurate risk assessment.

  1. Phenotype and 244k array-CGH characterization of chromosome 13q deletions: an update of the phenotypic map of 13q21.1-qter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirchhoff, Maria; Bisgaard, Anne-Marie; Stoeva, Radka

    2009-01-01

    Partial deletions of the long arm of chromosome 13 lead to variable phenotypes dependant on the size and position of the deleted region. In order to update the phenotypic map of chromosome 13q21.1-qter deletions, we applied 244k Agilent oligonucleotide-based array-CGH to determine the exact...... breakpoints in 14 patients with partial deletions of this region. Subsequently, we linked the genotype to the patient's phenotype. Using this approach, we were able to refine the smallest deletion region linked to short stature (13q31.3: 89.5-91.6 Mb), microcephaly (13q33.3-q34), cortical development...... malformations (13q33.1-qter), Dandy-Walker malformation (DWM) (13q32.2-q33.1), corpus callosum agenesis (CCA) (13q32.3-q33.1), meningocele/encephalocele (13q31.3-qter), DWM, CCA, and neural tube defects (NTDs) taken together (13q32.3-q33.1), ano-/microphthalmia (13q31.3-13qter), cleft lip/palate (13q31.3-13q33...

  2. Chromosome abnormalities in diffuse large B-cell lymphomas: analysis of 231 Chinese patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiaoli; Fan, Rong; Lin, Guowei; Wang, Xiaoqin

    2013-09-01

    Genome instability is a hallmark of cancer. Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is the most common form of non-Hodgkin lymphoma with high levels of chromosomal aberrations. The purpose of this study was to characterize chromosomal aberrations in Chinese DLBCL patients and to compare chromosomal abnormalities between germinal centre B-cell-like (GCB) and non-GCB subgroups. Fluorescence in situ hybridization, G-band cytogenetics and immunohistochemistry were performed in 231 cases of de novo DLBCL. We demonstrated that the rate of abnormal and complex karyotypes was 89.1% (139/156) and 92.8% (129/139), respectively. We found a total of 490 structural chromosomal aberrations, including 96 frequent and recurring structural alterations. Most importantly, we identified several rare or novel chromosomal alterations: eight gains (5, 13, 14q, 17, 19p, 20, 21p, Y), one loss (21) and three recurrent translocations [t(7;15)(q22;q22), t(3;20)(p24;q13.1), t(2;3)(q21;q25)]. Moreover, the frequent recurrent genomic imbalance between GCB and non-GCB subgroups was different. Finally, we discovered two cases of concurrent IGH-BCL6 and MYC rearrangements. The rate of abnormal karyotypes in DLBCL patients of Chinese descent was similar to that of Western countries, but some common karyotypes were different, as were the abnormal karyotypes of GCB and non-GCB subgroups. Our discovery of rare and novel abnormal karyotypes may represent unique chromosomal alterations in Chinese DLBCL patients. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Mitotic chromosome condensation in vertebrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vagnarelli, Paola, E-mail: P.Vagnarelli@ed.ac.uk

    2012-07-15

    Work from several laboratories over the past 10-15 years has revealed that, within the interphase nucleus, chromosomes are organized into spatially distinct territories [T. Cremer, C. Cremer, Chromosome territories, nuclear architecture and gene regulation in mammalian cells, Nat. Rev. Genet. 2 (2001) 292-301 and T. Cremer, M. Cremer, S. Dietzel, S. Muller, I. Solovei, S. Fakan, Chromosome territories-a functional nuclear landscape, Curr. Opin. Cell Biol. 18 (2006) 307-316]. The overall compaction level and intranuclear location varies as a function of gene density for both entire chromosomes [J.A. Croft, J.M. Bridger, S. Boyle, P. Perry, P. Teague,W.A. Bickmore, Differences in the localization and morphology of chromosomes in the human nucleus, J. Cell Biol. 145 (1999) 1119-1131] and specific chromosomal regions [N.L. Mahy, P.E. Perry, S. Gilchrist, R.A. Baldock, W.A. Bickmore, Spatial organization of active and inactive genes and noncoding DNA within chromosome territories, J. Cell Biol. 157 (2002) 579-589] (Fig. 1A, A'). In prophase, when cyclin B activity reaches a high threshold, chromosome condensation occurs followed by Nuclear Envelope Breakdown (NEB) [1]. At this point vertebrate chromosomes appear as compact structures harboring an attachment point for the spindle microtubules physically recognizable as a primary constriction where the two sister chromatids are held together. The transition from an unshaped interphase chromosome to the highly structured mitotic chromosome (compare Figs. 1A and B) has fascinated researchers for several decades now; however a definite picture of how this process is achieved and regulated is not yet in our hands and it will require more investigation to comprehend the complete process. From a biochemical point of view a vertebrate mitotic chromosomes is composed of DNA, histone proteins (60%) and non-histone proteins (40%) [6]. I will discuss below what is known to date on the contribution of these two different classes

  4. Chromatid Painting for Chromosomal Inversion Detection Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose a novel approach to the detection of chromosomal inversions. Transmissible chromosome aberrations (translocations and inversions) have profound genetic...

  5. Chromatid Painting for Chromosomal Inversion Detection Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose the continued development of a novel approach to the detection of chromosomal inversions. Transmissible chromosome aberrations (translocations and...

  6. X Chromosome Evolution in Cetartiodactyla

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proskuryakova, Anastasia A.; Kulemzina, Anastasia I.; Makunin, Alexey I.; Kukekova, Anna V.; Lynn Johnson, Jennifer; Lemskaya, Natalya A.; Beklemisheva, Violetta R.; Roelke-Parker, Melody E.; Bellizzi, June; Ryder, Oliver A.; O’Brien, Stephen J.; Graphodatsky, Alexander S.

    2017-01-01

    The phenomenon of a remarkable conservation of the X chromosome in eutherian mammals has been first described by Susumu Ohno in 1964. A notable exception is the cetartiodactyl X chromosome, which varies widely in morphology and G-banding pattern between species. It is hypothesized that this sex chromosome has undergone multiple rearrangements that changed the centromere position and the order of syntenic segments over the last 80 million years of Cetartiodactyla speciation. To investigate its evolution we have selected 26 evolutionarily conserved bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones from the cattle CHORI-240 library evenly distributed along the cattle X chromosome. High-resolution BAC maps of the X chromosome on a representative range of cetartiodactyl species from different branches: pig (Suidae), alpaca (Camelidae), gray whale (Cetacea), hippopotamus (Hippopotamidae), Java mouse-deer (Tragulidae), pronghorn (Antilocapridae), Siberian musk deer (Moschidae), and giraffe (Giraffidae) were obtained by fluorescent in situ hybridization. To trace the X chromosome evolution during fast radiation in specious families, we performed mapping in several cervids (moose, Siberian roe deer, fallow deer, and Pere David’s deer) and bovid (muskox, goat, sheep, sable antelope, and cattle) species. We have identified three major conserved synteny blocks and rearrangements in different cetartiodactyl lineages and found that the recently described phenomenon of the evolutionary new centromere emergence has taken place in the X chromosome evolution of Cetartiodactyla at least five times. We propose the structure of the putative ancestral cetartiodactyl X chromosome by reconstructing the order of syntenic segments and centromere position for key groups. PMID:28858207

  7. The mouse Cat4 locus maps to chromosome 8 and mutants express lens-corneal adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favor, J; Grimes, P; Neuhäuser-Klaus, A; Pretsch, W; Stambolian, D

    1997-06-01

    Cat4 is the second largest allelism group in the collection of mouse dominant eye mutations recovered in Neuherberg and carriers express anterior polar cataract, central corneal opacity, and lens-corneal adhesions. We have mapped the Cat4 locus of the mouse to central Chromosome (Chr) 8 at position cM 31. Histological characterization of Cat4(a) heterozygotes and homozygotes indicates failure of separation of the lens vesicle from the surface ectoderm. Human anterior segment ocular dysgenesis (ASOD) is autosomal dominant, carriers express an eye phenotype similar to that of Cat4(a) carriers, and it has been mapped to a region of 4q homologous to mouse central Chr 8. Thus, on the basis of phenotype and map position, Cat4 may be a mouse model of human ASOD. The genes Junb, Jund1, Mel, and Zfp42 are discussed as possible candidates for Cat4.

  8. ¿Una teología del martirio en 1QHª y 4Q491c?: Aportes para la comprensión de la cristología del Hijo del hombre joánico ¿A Theology of martyrdom in 1QHª y 4Q491c?: Contributions to the understanding of the Chistology of the Johannine Son of man

    OpenAIRE

    César Carbullanca Núñez

    2011-01-01

    El artículo pretende poner en duda las explicaciones acerca de la existencia de una cristología de la exaltación o una dependencia de los dichos sinópticos sobre el Hijo del hombre y además pretende dar antecedentes sobre la vinculación entre exaltación y muerte en el texto de los 1QHa y 4Q491c presente en la literatura de Qumrán, lo que arroja luz acerca de la existencia de una teología del martirio que se desarrolló en tiempos pre-cristianos que integraba tanto los aspectos de persecución y...

  9. Chromosomal assignment of human nuclear envelope protein genes LMNA, LMNB1, and LBR by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wydner, K.L.; McNeil, J.A. [Univ. of Masssachusetts Medical Center, Worcester, MA (United States); Lin, Feng [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States)] [and others

    1996-03-05

    We have used fluorescence in situ hybridization to establish precise chromosomal localizations for three human genes encoding four different nuclear envelope proteins. Lamin A/C (LMN1, HGMW-approved symbol LMNA) mapped to 1q21.2-q21.3, with a most probable gene assignment to 1q21.3; lamin B receptor (LBR) was localized to 1q42.1; and lamin B1 (LMNB1) was mapped to the interface of bands 5q23.3-q31.1. Assignments were determined by direct placement of signals relative to high-resolution DAPI or G-bands. Comparison of these results of band positions predicted from fractional length measurements to signal placement indicated that more accurate predictions are made using Francke idiograms and that measurement strategy avoids variance due to polymorphic chromosome segments. 30 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Are There Knots in Chromosomes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan T. Siebert

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Recent developments have for the first time allowed the determination of three-dimensional structures of individual chromosomes and genomes in nuclei of single haploid mouse embryonic stem (ES cells based on Hi–C chromosome conformation contact data. Although these first structures have a relatively low resolution, they provide the first experimental data that can be used to study chromosome and intact genome folding. Here we further analyze these structures and provide the first evidence that G1 phase chromosomes are knotted, consistent with the fact that plots of contact probability vs sequence separation show a power law dependence that is intermediate between that of a fractal globule and an equilibrium structure.

  11. Chromosome fragility in Freemartin cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Barbieri

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to verify chromosome fragility in freemartin cattle using chromosome aberration (CA and sister chromatid exchange (SCE tests. A total of eighteen co-twins were investigated. Fourteen animals were identified as cytogenetically chimeric (2n=60, XX/XY while 4 were classified as normal. Freemartin cattle showed a higher percentage of aneuploid cells (18.64% and highly significant statistical differences (P < 0.001 in mean values of gaps (4.53 ± 2.05, chromatid breaks (0.26 ± 0.51, and significant statistical differences (P < 0.005 in mean values of chromosome breaks (0.12 ± 0.43 when compared to 10 control animals from single births (aneuploid cells, 11.20%; gaps, 2.01 ± 1.42; chromatid breaks, 0.05 ± 0.22; chromosome breaks, 0.02 ± 0.14.

  12. Dynamic organization of mitotic chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinoshita, Kazuhisa; Hirano, Tatsuya

    2017-06-01

    The assembly of rod-shaped chromosomes during mitosis is an essential prerequisite for faithful segregation of genetic information into daughter cells. Despite the long history of chromosome research, it is only recently that we have acquired powerful approaches and crucial tools that help to unlock the secret of this seemingly complex process. In particular, in vitro assays, mammalian genetics, Hi-C analyses and computer simulations have provided valuable information during the past two years. These studies are now beginning to elucidate how the core components of mitotic chromosomes, namely, histones, topoisomerase IIα and condensins, cooperate with each other to convert very long stretches of DNA into rod-shaped chromosomes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Origin and domestication of papaya Yh chromosome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sex in papaya is controlled by a pair of nascent sex chromosomes. Females are XX, and two slightly different Y chromosomes distinguish males (XY) and hermaphrodites (XYh). The hermaphrodite-specific region of the Yh chromosome (HSY) and its X chromosome counterpart were sequenced and analyzed previo...

  14. Numerically abnormal chromosome constitutions in humans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 24, discusses numerically abnormal chromosome constitutions in humans. This involves abnormalities of human chromosome number, including polyploidy (when the number of sets of chromosomes increases) and aneuploidy (when the number of individual normal chromosomes changes). Chapter sections discuss the following chromosomal abnormalities: human triploids, imprinting and uniparental disomy, human tetraploids, hydatidiform moles, anomalies caused by chromosomal imbalance, 13 trisomy (D{sub 1} trisomy, Patau syndrome), 21 trisomy (Down syndrome), 18 trisomy syndrome (Edwards syndrome), other autosomal aneuploidy syndromes, and spontaneous abortions. The chapter concludes with remarks on the nonrandom participation of chromosomes in trisomy. 69 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  15. Luminescent properties and structure of new CAPh-based lanthanide complexes [LnL3Q], containing additional bis-heterocyclic aromatic ligand-antenna 2-(1,3,4-oxadiazole-2-yl) pyridine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakovlev, Oleksii O.; Kariaka, Nataliia S.; Trush, Victor A.; Smola, Sergii S.; Siczek, Milosz; Amirkhanov, Vladimir M.

    2018-01-01

    The new lanthanide coordination compounds of general formula [LnL3Q], where Ln = Eu, Gd, Tb; L = dimethyl-N-trichloroacetylamidophosphate and Q = 2-(1,3,4-oxadiazole-2-yl)pyridine, have been synthesized and isolated in crystalline state with the purpose of finding new interesting optical materials. X-ray data reveal that complexes have molecular structure with numerous Van-der-Vaals contacts between molecules. All the ligands are coordinated in bidentate chelate manner, coordination polyhedron was interpreted as distored square antiprism (CN 8). The obtained complexes were investigated by means of IR, absorption and luminescence spectroscopy as well and thermal gravimetric analysis. It was found that complex [TbL3Q] is resistant to temperature of 200 °C. The Eu3+ and Tb3+ complexes exhibit bright metal-centered emission with decay time 1.65 and 1.74 ms respectively. Intrinsic quantum yield for [EuL3Q] equals 85% that is one of the highest values, known to date for CAPh based europium complexes.

  16. Evidence that meiotic pairing starts at the telomeres: Molecular analysis of recombination in a family with a pericentric X chromosome inversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shashi, V.; Allinson, P.S.; Golden, W.L.; Kelly, T.E. [Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States)

    1994-09-01

    Recent studies in yeast have shown that telomeres rather than centromeres lead in chromosome movement just prior to meiosis and may have a role in recombination. Cytological studies of meiosis in Drosophila and mice have shown that in pericentric inversion heterozygotes there is lack of loop formation, with recobmination seen only outside the inversion. In a family with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) we recognized that only affected males and carrier females had a pericentric X chromosome inversion (inv X(p11.4;q26)). Since the short arm inversion breakpoint was proximal to the DMD locus, it could not be implicated in the mutational event causing DMD. There was no history of infertility, recurrent miscarriages or liveborn unbalanced females to suggest there was recombination within the inversion. We studied 22 members over three generations to understand the pattern of meiotic recombination between the normal and the inverted X chromosome. In total, 17 meioses involving the inverted X chromosome in females were studied by cytogenetic analysis and 16 CA repeat polymorphisms along the length of the X chromosome. Results: (a) There was complete concordance between the segregation of the DMD mutation and the inverted X chromosome. (b) On DNA analysis, there was complete absence of recombination within the inverted segment. We also found no recombination at the DMD locus. Recombination was seen only at Xp22 and Xq27-28. (c) Recombination was seen in the same individual at both Xp22 and Xq27-28 without recombination otherwise. Conclusions: (1) Pericentric X inversions reduce the genetic map length of the chromosome, with the physical map length being normal. (2) Meiotic X chromosome pairing in this family is initiated at the telomeres. (3) Following telomeric pairing in pericentric X chromosome inversions, there is inhibition of recombination within the inversion and adjacent regions.

  17. Small supernumerary marker chromosomes (SMCs): genotype-phenotype correlation and classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starke, Heike; Nietzel, Angela; Weise, Anja; Heller, Anita; Mrasek, Kristin; Belitz, Britta; Kelbova, Christine; Volleth, Marianne; Albrecht, Beate; Mitulla, Beate; Trappe, Ralf; Bartels, Iris; Adolph, Sabine; Dufke, Andreas; Singer, Sylke; Stumm, Markus; Wegner, Rolf-Dieter; Seidel, Jörg; Schmidt, Angela; Kuechler, Alma; Schreyer, Isolde; Claussen, Uwe; von Eggeling, Ferdinand; Liehr, Thomas

    2003-12-01

    Small supernumerary marker chromosomes (SMCs) are present in about 0.05% of the human population. In approximately 30% of SMC carriers (excluding the approximately 60% SMC derived from one of the acrocentric chromosomes), an abnormal phenotype is observed. The clinical outcome of an SMC is difficult to predict as they can have different phenotypic consequences because of (1). differences in euchromatic DNA-content, (2). different degrees of mosaicism, and/or (3). uniparental disomy (UPD) of the chromosomes homologous to the SMC. Here, we present 35 SMCs, which are derived from all human chromosomes, apart from chromosome 6, as demonstrated by the appropriate molecular cytogenetic approaches, such as centromere-specific multicolor fluoresence in situ hybridization (cenM-FISH), multicolor banding (MCB), and subcentromere-specific multicolor FISH (subcenM-FISH). In nine cases without an aberrant phenotype, neither partial proximal trisomies nor UPD could be detected. Abnormal clinical findings, such as psychomotoric retardation and/or craniofacial dysmorphisms, were associated with seven of the cases in which subcentromeric single-copy probes were proven to be present in three copies. Conversely, in eight cases with a normal phenotype, proximal euchromatic material was detected as partial trisomy. UPD was studied in 12 cases and subsequently detected in two of the cases with SMC (partial UPD 4p and maternal UPD 22 in a der(22)-syndrome patient), indicating that SMC carriers have an enhanced risk for UPD. At present, small proximal trisomies of 1p, 1q, 2p, 6p, 6q, 7q, 9p, and 12q seem to lead to clinical manifestations, whereas partial proximal trisomies of 2q, 3p, 3q, 5q, 7p, 8p, 17p, and 18p may not be associated with significant clinical symptoms. With respect to clinical outcome, a classification of SMCs is proposed that considers molecular genetic and molecular cytogenetic characteristics as demonstrated by presently available methods.

  18. Investigating the role of X chromosome breakpoints in premature ovarian failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baronchelli Simona

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The importance of the genetic factor in the aetiology of premature ovarian failure (POF is emphasized by the high percentage of familial cases and X chromosome abnormalities account for 10% of chromosomal aberrations. In this study, we report the detailed analysis of 4 chromosomal abnormalities involving the X chromosome and associated with POF that were detected during a screening of 269 affected women. Conventional and molecular cytogenetics were valuable tools for locating the breakpoint regions and thus the following karyotypes were defined: 46,X,der(Xt(X;19(p21.1;q13.42mat, 46,X,t(X;2(q21.33;q14.3dn, 46,X,der(Xt(X;Y(q26.2;q11.223mat and 46,X,t(X;13(q13.3;q31dn. A bioinformatic analysis of the breakpoint regions identified putative candidate genes for ovarian failure near the breakpoint regions on the X chromosome or on autosomes that were involved in the translocation event. HS6ST1, HS6ST2 and MATER genes were identified and their functions and a literature review revealed an interesting connection to the POF phenotype. Moreover, the 19q13.32 locus is associated with the age of onset of the natural menopause. These results support the position effect of the breakpoint on flanking genes, and cytogenetic techniques, in combination with bioinformatic analysis, may help to improve what is known about this puzzling disorder and its diagnostic potential.

  19. Distal Deletion of Chromosome 11q Encompassing Jacobsen Syndrome without Platelet Abnormality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frenny J. Sheth

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Terminal 11q deletion, known as Jacobsen syndrome (JBS, is a rare genetic disorder associated with numerous dysmorphic features. We studied two cases with multiple congenital anomalies that were cytogenetically detected with deletions on 11q encompassing JBS region: 46,XX,der(11 del(11(q24. Array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH analysis confirmed partial deletion of 11.8–11.9 Mb at 11q24.1q25 (case 1 and 13.9–14 Mb deletion at 11q23.3q25 together with 7.3–7.6 Mb duplication at 12q24.32q24.33 (case 2. Dysmorphism because of the partial duplication of 12q was not overtly decipherable over the Jacobsen phenotype except for a triangular facial profile. Aberrant chromosome 11 was inherited from phenotypically normal father, carrier of balanced translocation 46,XY,t(11;12(q23.3; q24.32. In the present study, both cases had phenotypes that were milder than the ones described in literature despite having large deletion size. Most prominent features in classical JBS is thrombocytopenia, which was absent in both these cases. Therefore, detailed functional analysis of terminal 11q region is warranted to elucidate etiology of JBS and their clinical presentation.

  20. Distal Deletion of Chromosome 11q Encompassing Jacobsen Syndrome without Platelet Abnormality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheth, Frenny J; Datar, Chaitanya; Andrieux, Joris; Pandit, Anand; Nayak, Darshana; Rahman, Mizanur; Sheth, Jayesh J

    2014-01-01

    Terminal 11q deletion, known as Jacobsen syndrome (JBS), is a rare genetic disorder associated with numerous dysmorphic features. We studied two cases with multiple congenital anomalies that were cytogenetically detected with deletions on 11q encompassing JBS region: 46,XX,der(11) del(11)(q24). Array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) analysis confirmed partial deletion of 11.8-11.9 Mb at 11q24.1q25 (case 1) and 13.9-14 Mb deletion at 11q23.3q25 together with 7.3-7.6 Mb duplication at 12q24.32q24.33 (case 2). Dysmorphism because of the partial duplication of 12q was not overtly decipherable over the Jacobsen phenotype except for a triangular facial profile. Aberrant chromosome 11 was inherited from phenotypically normal father, carrier of balanced translocation 46,XY,t(11;12)(q23.3; q24.32). In the present study, both cases had phenotypes that were milder than the ones described in literature despite having large deletion size. Most prominent features in classical JBS is thrombocytopenia, which was absent in both these cases. Therefore, detailed functional analysis of terminal 11q region is warranted to elucidate etiology of JBS and their clinical presentation.

  1. Inherited unbalanced structural chromosome abnormalities at prenatal chromosome analysis are rarely ascertained through recurrent miscarriage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franssen, M. T. M.; Korevaar, J. C.; Tjoa, W. M.; Leschot, N. J.; Bossuyt, P. M. M.; Knegt, A. C.; Suykerbuyk, R. F.; Hochstenbach, R.; van der Veen, F.; Goddijn, M.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the mode of ascertainment of inherited unbalanced structural chromosome abnormalities detected at prenatal chromosome analysis. METHODS: From the databases of three centres for clinical genetics in the Netherlands, all cases of inherited unbalanced structural chromosome

  2. Inherited unbalanced structural chromosome abnormalities at prenatal chromosome analysis are rarely ascertained through recurrent miscarriage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franssen, M. T. M.; Korevaar, J. C.; Tjoa, W. M.; Leschot, N. J.; Bossuyt, P. M. M.; Knegt, A. C.; Suykerbuyk, R. F.; Hochstenbach, R.; van der Veen, F.; Goddijn, M.

    Objective To determine the mode of ascertainment of inherited unbalanced structural chromosome abnormalities detected at prenatal chromosome analysis. Methods From the databases of three centres for clinical genetics in the Netherlands, all cases of inherited unbalanced structural chromosome

  3. Radiation-induced chromosomal instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ritter, S. [GSI, Biophysics, Darmstadt (Germany)

    1999-03-01

    Recent studies on radiation-induced chromosomal instability in the progeny of exposed mammalian cells were briefly described as well as other related studies. For the analysis of chromosomal damage in clones, cells were seeded directly after exposure in cell well-dish to form single cell clones and post-irradiation chromosome aberrations were scored. Both exposure to isoeffective doses of X-ray or 270 MeV/u C-ions (13 keV/{mu}m) increased the number of clones with abnormal karyotype and the increase was similar for X-ray and for C-ions. Meanwhile, in the progeny of cells for mass cultures, there was no indication of a delayed expression of chromosomal damage up to 40 population doublings after the exposure. A high number of aberrant cells were only observed directly after exposure to 10.7 MeV/u O-ions, i.e. in the first cycle cells and decreased with subsequent cell divisions. The reason for these differences in the radiation-induced chromosomal instability between clonal isolates and mass culture has not been clarified. Recent studies indicated that genomic instability occurs at a high frequency in the progeny of cells irradiated with both sparsely and densely ionizing radiation. Such genomic instability is thought likely to increase the risk of carcinogenesis, but more data are required for a well understanding of the health risks resulting from radiation-induced delayed instability. (M.N.)

  4. Chromosome segregation in plant meiosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda eZamariola

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Faithful chromosome segregation in meiosis is essential for ploidy stability over sexual life cycles. In plants, defective chromosome segregation caused by gene mutations or other factors leads to the formation of unbalanced or unreduced gametes creating aneuploid or polyploid progeny, respectively. Accurate segregation requires the coordinated execution of conserved processes occurring throughout the two meiotic cell divisions. Synapsis and recombination ensure the establishment of chiasmata that hold homologous chromosomes together allowing their correct segregation in the first meiotic division, which is also tightly regulated by cell-cycle dependent release of cohesin and monopolar attachment of sister kinetochores to microtubules. In meiosis II, bi-orientation of sister kinetochores and proper spindle orientation correctly segregate chromosomes in four haploid cells. Checkpoint mechanisms acting at kinetochores control the accuracy of kinetochore-microtubule attachment, thus ensuring the completion of segregation. Here we review the current knowledge on the processes taking place during chromosome segregation in plant meiosis, focusing on the characterization of the molecular factors involved.

  5. New Advances in Chromosome Architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leake, Mark C

    2016-01-01

    Our knowledge of the "architecture" of chromosomes has grown enormously in the past decade. This new insight has been enabled largely through advances in interdisciplinary research methods at the cutting-edge interface of the life and physical sciences. Importantly this has involved several state-of-the-art biophysical tools used in conjunction with molecular biology approaches which enable investigation of chromosome structure and function in living cells. Also, there are new and emerging interfacial science tools which enable significant improvements to the spatial and temporal resolution of quantitative measurements, such as in vivo super-resolution and powerful new single-molecule biophysics methods, which facilitate probing of dynamic chromosome processes hitherto impossible. And there are also important advances in the methods of theoretical biophysics which have enabled advances in predictive modeling of this high quality experimental data from molecular and physical biology to generate new understanding of the modes of operation of chromosomes, both in eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells. Here, I discuss these advances, and take stock on the current state of our knowledge of chromosome architecture and speculate where future advances may lead.

  6. Mechanisms for Complex Chromosomal Insertions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Shen; Szafranski, Przemyslaw; Akdemir, Zeynep Coban; Yuan, Bo; Cooper, Mitchell L; Magriñá, Maria A; Bacino, Carlos A; Lalani, Seema R; Breman, Amy M; Smith, Janice L; Patel, Ankita; Song, Rodger H; Bi, Weimin; Cheung, Sau Wai; Carvalho, Claudia M B; Stankiewicz, Paweł; Lupski, James R

    2016-11-01

    Chromosomal insertions are genomic rearrangements with a chromosome segment inserted into a non-homologous chromosome or a non-adjacent locus on the same chromosome or the other homologue, constituting ~2% of nonrecurrent copy-number gains. Little is known about the molecular mechanisms of their formation. We identified 16 individuals with complex insertions among 56,000 individuals tested at Baylor Genetics using clinical array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Custom high-density aCGH was performed on 10 individuals with available DNA, and breakpoint junctions were fine-mapped at nucleotide resolution by long-range PCR and DNA sequencing in 6 individuals to glean insights into potential mechanisms of formation. We observed microhomologies and templated insertions at the breakpoint junctions, resembling the breakpoint junction signatures found in complex genomic rearrangements generated by replication-based mechanism(s) with iterative template switches. In addition, we analyzed 5 families with apparently balanced insertion in one parent detected by FISH analysis and found that 3 parents had additional small copy-number variants (CNVs) at one or both sides of the inserting fragments as well as at the inserted sites. We propose that replicative repair can result in interchromosomal complex insertions generated through chromothripsis-like chromoanasynthesis involving two or three chromosomes, and cause a significant fraction of apparently balanced insertions harboring small flanking CNVs.

  7. Mechanisms for Complex Chromosomal Insertions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shen Gu

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Chromosomal insertions are genomic rearrangements with a chromosome segment inserted into a non-homologous chromosome or a non-adjacent locus on the same chromosome or the other homologue, constituting ~2% of nonrecurrent copy-number gains. Little is known about the molecular mechanisms of their formation. We identified 16 individuals with complex insertions among 56,000 individuals tested at Baylor Genetics using clinical array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH. Custom high-density aCGH was performed on 10 individuals with available DNA, and breakpoint junctions were fine-mapped at nucleotide resolution by long-range PCR and DNA sequencing in 6 individuals to glean insights into potential mechanisms of formation. We observed microhomologies and templated insertions at the breakpoint junctions, resembling the breakpoint junction signatures found in complex genomic rearrangements generated by replication-based mechanism(s with iterative template switches. In addition, we analyzed 5 families with apparently balanced insertion in one parent detected by FISH analysis and found that 3 parents had additional small copy-number variants (CNVs at one or both sides of the inserting fragments as well as at the inserted sites. We propose that replicative repair can result in interchromosomal complex insertions generated through chromothripsis-like chromoanasynthesis involving two or three chromosomes, and cause a significant fraction of apparently balanced insertions harboring small flanking CNVs.

  8. Dean flow fractionation of chromosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hockin, Matt; Sant, Himanshu J.; Capecchi, Mario; Gale, Bruce K.

    2016-03-01

    Efforts to transfer intact mammalian chromosomes between cells have been attempted for more than 50 years with the consistent result being transfer of sub unit length pieces regardless of method. Inertial microfluidics is a new field that has shown much promise in addressing the fractionation of particles in the 2-20 μm size range (with unknown limits) and separations are based upon particles being carried by curving confined flows (within a spiral shaped, often rectangular flow chamber) and migrating to stable "equilibrium" positions of varying distance from a chamber wall depending on the balance of dean and lift forces. We fabricated spiral channels for inertial microfluidic separations using a standard soft lithography process. The concentration of chromosomes, small contaminant DNA and large cell debris in each outlets were evaluated using microscope (60X) and a flow cytometer. Using Dean Flow Fractionation, we were able to focus 4.5 times more chromosomes in outlet 2 compared to outlet 4 where most of the large debris is found. We recover 16% of the chromosomes in outlet #1- 50% in 2, 23% in 3 and 11% in 4. It should be noted that these estimates of recovery do not capture one piece of information- it actually may be that the chromosomes at each outlet are physically different and work needs to be done to verify this potential.

  9. A family of octahedral rhenium cluster complexes [Re6Q8(H2O)n(OH)6-n]n-4 (Q=S, Se; n=0-6): structural and pH-dependent spectroscopic studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brylev, Konstantin A; Mironov, Yuri V; Yarovoi, Spartak S; Naumov, Nikolai G; Fedorov, Vladimir E; Kim, Sung-Jin; Kitamura, Noboru; Kuwahara, Yusuke; Yamada, Konatsu; Ishizaka, Shoji; Sasaki, Yoichi

    2007-09-03

    The conversions of hexahydroxo rhenium cluster complexes [Re6Q8(OH)6]4- (Q=S, Se) in aqueous solutions in a wide pH range were investigated by chemical methods and spectroscopic measurements. Dependences of the spectroscopic and excited-state properties of the solutions on pH have been studied in detail. It has been found that a pH decrease of aqueous solutions of the potassium salts K4[Re6Q8(OH)6].8H2O (Q=S, Se) results in the formation of aquahydroxo and hexaaqua cluster complexes with the general formula [Re6Q8(H2O)n(OH)6-n]n-4 that could be considered as a result of the protonation of the terminal OH- ligands in the hexahydroxo complexes. The compounds K2[Re6S8(H2O)2(OH)4].2H2O (1), [Re6S8(H2O)4(OH)2].12H2O (2), [Re6S8(H2O)6][Re6S6Br8].10H2O (3), and [Re6Se8(H2O)4(OH)2] (4) have been isolated and characterized by X-ray single-crystal diffraction and elemental analyses and infrared (IR) spectroscopy. In crystal structures of the aquahydroxo complexes, the cluster units are connected to each other by an extensive system of very strong hydrogen bonds between terminal ligands.

  10. An 8.9 Mb 19p13 duplication associated with precocious puberty and a sporadic 3.9 Mb 2q23.3q24.1 deletion containing NR4A2 in mentally retarded members of a family with an intrachromosomal 19p-into-19q between-arm insertion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lybæk, Helle; ørstavik, Karen Helene; Prescott, Trine; Hovland, Randi; Breilid, Harald; Stansberg, Christine; Steen, Vidar Martin; Houge, Gunnar

    2009-01-01

    In a 2 and a half-year-old girl with onset of puberty before the age of 5 months, short stature, hand anomalies and severe mental retardation, an 8.9 Mb interstitial 19p13 duplication containing 215 predicted genes was detected. It was initially assumed that the duplication involved the kisspeptin receptor gene, GPR54, known to stimulate induction of puberty, but more refined duplication mapping excluded this possibility. In an attempt to further understand the genotype–phenotype correlation, global gene expression was measured in skin fibroblasts. The overall expression pattern was quite similar to controls, and only about 25% of the duplicated genes had an expression level that was increased by more than 1.3-fold, with no obvious changes that could explain the precocious puberty. The proband's mother carried a balanced between-arm insertion of the duplicated segment that resembled a pericentric inversion. The same insertion was found in several other family members, including one who had lost a daughter with severe mental retardation and menarche at the age of 10 years. Another close relative was severely mentally retarded, but neither dysmorphic nor microcephalic. His phenotype was initially ascribed to a presumed cryptic chromosome 19 imbalance caused by the 19p-into19q insertion, but subsequent array-CGH detected a 3.9-Mb deletion of 2q23.3q24.1. This novel microdeletion involves seven genes, of which FMNL2, a suggested regulator of Rho-GTPases, and NR4A2, an essential gene for differentiation of dopaminergic neurons, may be critical genes for the proposed 2q23q24 microdeletion syndrome. PMID:19156171

  11. Chromosomal Evolution in Lower Vertebrates: Sex Chromosomes in Neotropical Fishes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Cioffi, M. de B.; Yano, C. F.; Sember, Alexandr; Bertollo, L.A.C.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 10 (2017), č. článku 258. ISSN 2073-4425 R&D Projects: GA MŠk EF15_003/0000460 Institutional support: RVO:67985904 Keywords : alternative evolutionary models * simple and multiple sex chromosomes * independent and common origins Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 3.600, year: 2016

  12. Chromosomal localization of the human V3 pituitary vasopressin receptor gene (AVPR3) to 1q32

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rousseau-Merck, M.F.; Derre, J.; Berger, R. [INSERM, Paris (France)] [and others

    1995-11-20

    Vasopressin exerts its physiological effects on liver metabolism, fluid osmolarity, and corticotrophic response to stress through a set of at least three receptors, V1a, V2, and V3 (also called V1b), respectively. These receptors constitute a distinct group of the superfamily of G-protein-coupled cell surface receptors. When bound to vasopressin, they couple to G proteins activating phospholipase C for the V1a and V3 types and adenylate cyclase for the V2. The vasopressin receptor subfamily also includes the receptor for oxytocin, a structurally related hormone that signals through the activation of phospholipase C. The chromosomal position of the V2 receptor gene has been assigned to Xq28-qter by PCR-based screening of somatic cell hybrids, whereas the oxytocin receptor gene has been mapped to chromosome 3q26.2 by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). The chromosomal location of the V1a gene is currently unknown. We recently cloned the cDNA and the gene coding for the human pituitary-specific V3 receptor (HGMW-approved symbol AVPR3). We report here the chromosomal localization of this gene by two distinct in situ hybridization techniques using radioactive and fluorescent probes. 11 refs., 1 fig.

  13. Reproductive Incompatibility Involving Senegalese Aedes aegypti (L) Is Associated with Chromosome Rearrangements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickson, Laura B; Sharakhova, Maria V; Timoshevskiy, Vladimir A; Fleming, Karen L; Caspary, Alex; Sylla, Massamba; Black, William C

    2016-04-01

    used to identify AT-rich regions, chromomycin A3 following pretreatment with barium hydroxide stained for GC-rich regions and stained the ribosomal RNA locus and YOYO-1 was used to test for differential staining. Chromosome patterns in SenAae strains revealed by these three stains differed from those in IB12. For FISH, 40 BAC clones previously physically mapped on Aaa chromosomes were used to test for chromosome rearrangements in SenAae relative to IB12. Differences in the order of markers identified two chromosomal rearrangements between IB12 and SenAae strains. The first rearrangement involves two overlapping pericentric (containing the centromere) inversions in chromosome 3 or an insertion of a large fragment into the 3q arm. The second rearrangement is close to the centromere on the p arm of chromosome 2. Linkage analysis of the SDL and the white-eye locus identified a likely chromosomal rearrangement on chromosome 1. The reproductive incompatibility observed within SenAae and between SenAae and Aaa may be generally associated with chromosome rearrangements on all three chromosomes and specifically caused by pericentric inversions on chromosomes 2 and 3.

  14. Reproductive Incompatibility Involving Senegalese Aedes aegypti (L Is Associated with Chromosome Rearrangements.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura B Dickson

    2016-04-01

    staining was used to identify AT-rich regions, chromomycin A3 following pretreatment with barium hydroxide stained for GC-rich regions and stained the ribosomal RNA locus and YOYO-1 was used to test for differential staining. Chromosome patterns in SenAae strains revealed by these three stains differed from those in IB12. For FISH, 40 BAC clones previously physically mapped on Aaa chromosomes were used to test for chromosome rearrangements in SenAae relative to IB12. Differences in the order of markers identified two chromosomal rearrangements between IB12 and SenAae strains. The first rearrangement involves two overlapping pericentric (containing the centromere inversions in chromosome 3 or an insertion of a large fragment into the 3q arm. The second rearrangement is close to the centromere on the p arm of chromosome 2. Linkage analysis of the SDL and the white-eye locus identified a likely chromosomal rearrangement on chromosome 1. The reproductive incompatibility observed within SenAae and between SenAae and Aaa may be generally associated with chromosome rearrangements on all three chromosomes and specifically caused by pericentric inversions on chromosomes 2 and 3.

  15. Algorithm for sorting chromosomal aberrations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vogel, Ida; Lund, Najaaraq; Rasmussen, Steen

    2017-01-01

    Prenatal diagnostic methods and screening procedures change rapidly in these years. Years ago only karyotyping was performed prenatally, and we monitored only Down syndrome(1) . Since then the diagnostic possibilities have increased to QF-PCR, FISH, MLPA and chromosomal microarray....

  16. Interpreting chromosomal abnormalities using Prolog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, G; Friedman, J M

    1990-04-01

    This paper describes an expert system for interpreting the standard notation used to represent human chromosomal abnormalities, namely, the International System for Human Cytogenetic Nomenclature. Written in Prolog, this program is very powerful, easy to maintain, and portable. The system can be used as a front end to any database that employs cytogenetic notation, such as a patient registry.

  17. CHROMOSOMAL MULTIPLICITY IN BURKHOLDERIA CEPACIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    We have used CHEF gel electrophoresis to screen preparations of large DNA from different Burkholderia cepacia isolates for the presence of DNA species corresponding to the linearized forms of the three chromosomes of 3.4,2.5, and 0.9 Mb identified in B. cepacia strain 17616. DNA ...

  18. Associations between candidate gene markers at a quantitative trait locus on equine chromosome 4 responsible for osteochondrosis dissecans in fetlock joints of South German Coldblood horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittwer, Catherine; Dierks, Claudia; Hamann, Henning; Distl, Ottmar

    2008-01-01

    A previously accomplished whole-genome scan for osteochondrosis (OC) and OC dissecans (OCD) in South German Coldblood horses using 250 microsatellite markers identified putative quantitative trait loci (QTL). A chromosome-wide significant QTL for fetlock OCD was found on Equus caballus chromosome (ECA) 4q at a relative position of 70.0-73.3 cM. The aim of this study was to analyze associations of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in candidate genes for OC in this region. The association analysis included 32 affected and 64 unaffected horses. Three SNPs located in intron 8, intron 9, and 3'-untranslated region (UTR) of the acyloxyacyl hydrolase (AOAH) gene on ECA4q were significantly associated with OCD in fetlock joints. In order to control for systematic environmental and quantitative genetic effects, we employed a linear animal model. The association of the SNP (AJ543065:g.703A>G) in the 3'-UTR of exon 21 was confirmed in the animal model analysis and a significant additive genetic effect for fetlock OCD of 0.42 (P = 0.002) and a dominance effect of -0.32 (P = 0.03) was estimated. This is the first report on a marker in population-wide linkage disequilibrium with equine OCD in fetlock joints.

  19. Evaluation of chromosomal abnormalities by clg-FISH and association with proliferative and apoptotic indexes in multiple myeloma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linardi, C.C.G.; Martinez, G.; Velloso, E.D.R.P.; Leal, A.M.; Kumeda, C.A.; Buccheri, V. [Disciplina de Hematologia e Hemoterapia, Departamento de Clínica Médica, Hospital das Clínicas, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Azevedo, R.S. [Departamento de Patologia, Hospital das Clínicas, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Peliçario, L.M.; Dorlhiac-Llacer, P. [Disciplina de Hematologia e Hemoterapia, Departamento de Clínica Médica, Hospital das Clínicas, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2012-08-24

    Eighty-six newly diagnosed multiple myeloma (MM) patients from a public hospital of São Paulo (Brazil) were evaluated by cIg-FISH for the presence of del(13)(q14), t(4;14)(p16.3;q32) and del(17)(p13). These abnormalities were observed in 46.5, 9.3, and 7.0% of the patients, respectively. In order to identify the possible role of del(13)(q14) in the physiopathology of MM, we investigated the association between this abnormality and the proliferative and apoptotic indexes of plasma cells. When cases demonstrating t(4;14)(p16.3;q32) and del(17)(p13) were excluded from the analysis, we observed a trend towards a positive correlation between the proportion of cells carrying del(13)(q14) and plasma cell proliferation, determined by Ki-67 expression (r = 0.23, P = 0.06). On the other hand, no correlation between the proportion of cells carrying del(13)(q14) and apoptosis, determined by annexin-V staining, was detected (r = 0.05, P = 0.69). In general, patients carrying del(13)(q14) did not have lower survival than patients without del(13)(q14) (P = 0.15), but patients with more than 80% of cells carrying del(13)(q14) showed a lower overall survival (P = 0.033). These results suggest that, when del(13)(q14) is observed in a high proportion of malignant cells, it may have a role in determining MM prognosis. Another finding was a statistically significant lower overall survival of patients with t(4;14)(p16.3;q32) (P = 0.026). In the present study, almost half the patients with t(4;14)(p16.3;q32) died just after diagnosis, before starting treatment. This fact suggests that, in São Paulo, there may be even more patients with this chromosomal abnormality, but they probably die before being diagnosed due to unfavorable socioeconomic conditions. This could explain the low prevalence of this chromosomal abnormality observed in the present study.

  20. Robust associations of four new chromosome regions from genome-wide analyses of type 1 diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, John A; Walker, Neil M; Cooper, Jason D; Smyth, Deborah J; Downes, Kate; Plagnol, Vincent; Bailey, Rebecca; Nejentsev, Sergey; Field, Sarah F; Payne, Felicity; Lowe, Christopher E; Szeszko, Jeffrey S; Hafler, Jason P; Zeitels, Lauren; Yang, Jennie H M; Vella, Adrian; Nutland, Sarah; Stevens, Helen E; Schuilenburg, Helen; Coleman, Gillian; Maisuria, Meeta; Meadows, William; Smink, Luc J; Healy, Barry; Burren, Oliver S; Lam, Alex A C; Ovington, Nigel R; Allen, James; Adlem, Ellen; Leung, Hin-Tak; Wallace, Chris; Howson, Joanna M M; Guja, Cristian; Ionescu-Tirgoviste, Constantin; Simmonds, Matthew J; Heward, Joanne M; Gough, Stephen CL; Dunger, David B; Wicker, Linda S; Clayton, David G

    2007-01-01

    The Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium (WTCCC) primary genome-wide association (GWA) scan1 on seven diseases, including the multifactorial, autoimmune disease, type 1 diabetes (T1D), shows significant association (P < 5 × 10−7 between T1D and six chromosome regions: 12q24, 12q13, 16p13, 18p11, 12p13 and 4q27. Here, we attempted to validate these and six other top findings in 4,000 individuals with T1D, 5,000 controls and 2,997 family trios that were independent of the WTCCC study. We confirmed unequivocally the associations of 12q24, 12q13, 16p13 and 18p11 (Pfollow-up ≤ 1.35 × 10−9; Poverall ≤ 1.15 × 10−14), leaving eight regions with small effects or false-positive associations with T1D. We also obtained evidence for chromosome 18q22 (Poverall = 1.38 × 10−8) from a genome-wide association study of nonsynonymous SNPs. Several regions, including 18q22 and 18p11, showed association with autoimmune thyroid disease. This study increases the number of T1D loci with compelling evidence from six to at least ten. PMID:17554260

  1. Chromosome Aberrations by Heavy Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballarini, Francesca; Ottolenghi, Andrea

    It is well known that mammalian cells exposed to ionizing radiation can show different types of chromosome aberrations (CAs) including dicentrics, translocations, rings, deletions and complex exchanges. Chromosome aberrations are a particularly relevant endpoint in radiobiology, because they play a fundamental role in the pathways leading either to cell death, or to cell conversion to malignancy. In particular, reciprocal translocations involving pairs of specific genes are strongly correlated (and probably also causally-related) with specific tumour types; a typical example is the BCR-ABL translocation for Chronic Myeloid Leukaemia. Furthermore, aberrations can be used for applications in biodosimetry and more generally as biomarkers of exposure and risk, that is the case for cancer patients monitored during Carbon-ion therapy and astronauts exposed to space radiation. Indeed hadron therapy and astronauts' exposure to space radiation represent two of the few scenarios where human beings can be exposed to heavy ions. After a brief introduction on the main general features of chromosome aberrations, in this work we will address key aspects of the current knowledge on chromosome aberration induction, both from an experimental and from a theoretical point of view. More specifically, in vitro data will be summarized and discussed, outlining important issues such as the role of interphase death/mitotic delay and that of complex-exchange scoring. Some available in vivo data on cancer patients and astronauts will be also reported, together with possible interpretation problems. Finally, two of the few available models of chromosome aberration induction by ionizing radiation (including heavy ions) will be described and compared, focusing on the different assumptions adopted by the authors and on how these models can deal with heavy ions.

  2. Chromosome imaging by atomic force microscopy: influencing ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    investigated factors influencing chromosome ultrastructures or species-specific ultrastructural characteristics. We studied the effects of several factors on AFM imag- ing of chromosomal ultrastructures. We found that process- ing time had little effect on chromosomal ultrastructures, but that trypsin digestion had a large effect.

  3. Morphology and structure of polytene chromosomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhimulev, I.F. [Institute of Cytology and Genetics, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    1996-12-31

    The morphology and structure of polytene chromosomes is the subject of this detailed volume of Advances in Genetics. Polytene chromosomes are the only interphase chromosomes that appear throughout as individual structures, and therefore offer the kind of detail of the molecular biology that geneticists need. 2869 refs., 123 figs., 27 tabs.

  4. Chromosome number and cytomorphological characterization of a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chromosome counts from natural populations of Abrus pulchellus in Nigeria were carried out. Tetraploid (2n = 44) chromosome number was constant in all the samples investigated. The 44 chromosomes fall into three cytomorphological categories: eight metacentric and eight submetacentric pairs, and six acrocentric pairs.

  5. Familial transmission of a ring chromosome 21

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertz, Jens Michael

    1987-01-01

    A ring chromosome 21 was found in a phenotypically normal mother and her son. The clinical findings in the son were bilateral retention of the testes and a slightly delayed puberty onset. Consequences of a ring formation of a chromosome 21 in phenotypically normal patients are presented...... and discussed, and the previously reported cases of familially transmitted G-group ring chromosomes are reviewed....

  6. High resolution analysis of interphase chromosome domains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, A. E.; Jaunin, F.; Fakan, S.; Aten, J. A.

    2000-01-01

    Chromosome territories need to be well defined at high resolution before functional aspects of chromosome organization in interphase can be explored. To visualize chromosomes by electron microscopy (EM), the DNA of Chinese hamster fibroblasts was labeled in vivo with thymidine analogue BrdU. Labeled

  7. A DNA Crosslinker Collects Mitotic Chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Mingxuan; Heald, Rebecca

    2017-09-11

    Incorporating each set of daughter chromosomes into a single nucleus at the end of mitosis is essential for genome stability. In a recent Cell paper, Samwer et al. (2017) show that by non-covalently crosslinking DNA, BAF promotes chromosome coalescence, preventing nuclear membranes from enwrapping individual chromosomes to form micronuclei. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. A Plain English Map of the Human Chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Offner, Susan

    1992-01-01

    Presents a chromosome map for 19 known chromosomes in human genetics. Describes the characteristics attributed to the genetic codes for each of the chromosomes and discusses the teaching applications of the chromosome map. (MDH)

  9. Sex chromosome-linked genes in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsunaga, Sachihiro

    2006-08-01

    Recent studies of plant sex chromosome-linked genes have revealed many interesting characteristics, although there are limited reports about heteromorphic sex chromosomes in flowering plants. Sex chromosome-linked genes in angiosperms have been characterized mainly in the dioecious plant Silene latifolia. Although all such genes were isolated from transcripts of male flower buds of S. latifolia, most seem to be housekeeping genes except for the petal- and stamen-specific MADS box gene on the Y chromosome (SlAP3Y) and the male reproductive organ-specific gene on the X chromosome (MROS3X). Recent evolutionary studies have revealed at least three evolutionary strata on the X chromosome that are related to stepwise loss of recombination between the sex chromosomes. Moreover, genetic maps showed conservation of gene organization on the X chromosome in the genus Silene and substantial pericentric inversion between the X and Y chromosomes of S. latifolia during evolution. A comparison between paralogs on the sex chromosomes revealed that introns of the Y-linked genes are longer than those of X-linked paralogs. Although analyses of sex chromosome-linked genes suggest that degeneration of the Y chromosome has occurred, the Y chromosome in flowering plants remains the largest in the male genome, unlike that of mammals. Accumulation of repetitive sequences and the entire chloroplast genome on the Y chromosome appear to have contributed to this large size. However, more detailed studies will be required to help explain the basis for the fact that heteromorphic sex chromosomes in angiosperms are large.

  10. An autosomal recessive syndrome of severe mental retardation, cataract, coloboma and kyphosis maps to the pericentromeric region of chromosome 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahrizi, Kimia; Najmabadi, Hossein; Kariminejad, Roxana; Jamali, Payman; Malekpour, Mahdi; Garshasbi, Masoud; Ropers, Hans Hilger; Kuss, Andreas Walter; Tzschach, Andreas

    2009-01-01

    We report on three siblings with a novel mental retardation (MR) syndrome who were born to distantly related Iranian parents. The clinical problems comprised severe MR, cataracts with onset in late adolescence, kyphosis, contractures of large joints, bulbous nose with broad nasal bridge, and thick lips. Two patients also had uni- or bilateral iris coloboma. Linkage analysis revealed a single 10.4 Mb interval of homozygosity with significant LOD score in the pericentromeric region of chromosome 4 flanked by SNPs rs728293 (4p12) and rs1105434 (4q12). This interval contains more than 40 genes, none of which has been implicated in MR so far. The identification of the causative gene defect for this syndrome will provide new insights into the development of the brain and the eye.

  11. FISH mapping of six genes responsible for development of the nervous and skeletal systems on donkey (Equus asinus) chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugno-Poniewierska, Monika; Pawlina, Klaudia; Dardzińska, Aneta; Zabek, Tomasz; Słota, Ewa; Klukowka-Rötzler, Jolanta

    2010-06-01

    The results obtained in the present study made it possible to place selected markers responsible for development of the nervous and skeletal systems on the physical map of the donkey genome. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) was used to localize genes such as GDF5 (15q13), FRZB (4q23.1), TWIST (1q31), PAX6 (20q25), SALL1 (24q15) and SHH (1q35) on donkey chromosomes. The identification of their localization confirmed previously proposed homologies using ZOO-FISH technique, except for FRZB and SALL1 genes. This suggests that they were affected by rearrangements that changed their localization compared to horse, and in the case of the SALL1 gene also compared to human.

  12. Chromosomal localization and genomic organization of genes encoding guanylyl cyclase receptors expressed in olfactory sensory neurons and retina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Ruey-Bing; Fuelle, H.J.; Garbers, D.L. [Univ. of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States)

    1996-02-01

    We recently cloned three membrane guanylyl cyclases, designated GC-D, CG-E, and GC-F, from rat olfactory tissue and eye. Amino acid sequence homology suggests that they may compose a new gene subfamily of guanylyl cyclase receptors specifically expressed in sensory tissues. Their chromosomal localization was determined by mouse interspecific backcross analysis. The GC-D, CG-E, and GC-F genes (Gucy2d, Gucy2e, and Gucy2f) are dispersed through the mouse genome in that they map to chromosomes 7, 11, and X, respectively. Close proximity of the mouse GC-D gene to Omp (olfactory marker protein) and Hbb (hemoglobin {beta}-chain complex) suggests that the human homolog gene maps to 11p15.4 or 11q13.4-q14.1. The human GC-F gene was localized to the long arm of chromosome Xq22 by fluorescence in situ hybridization. The genomic organization of the mouse GC-E, and GC-F genomic clones contain identical exon-intron boundaries within their extracellular and cytoplasmic domains, demonstrating the conservation of the gene structures. With respect to human genetic diseases, GC-E mapped to mouse chromosome 11 within a syntenic region on human chromosome 17p13 that has been linked with loci for autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa and Leber congenital amaurosis. No apparent disease loci have been yet linked to the locations of the GC-D or GC-F genes. 39 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Mapping strategies: Chromosome 16 workshop. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-12-31

    The following topics from a workshop on chromosome 16 are briefly discussed: genetic map of chromosome 16; chromosome breakpoint map of chromosome 16; integrated physical/genetic map of chromosome 16; pulsed field map of the 16p13.2--p13.3 region (3 sheets); and a report of the HGM10 chromosome 16 committee.

  14. Novel insights into mitotic chromosome condensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piskadlo, Ewa; Oliveira, Raquel A.

    2016-01-01

    The fidelity of mitosis is essential for life, and successful completion of this process relies on drastic changes in chromosome organization at the onset of nuclear division. The mechanisms that govern chromosome compaction at every cell division cycle are still far from full comprehension, yet recent studies provide novel insights into this problem, challenging classical views on mitotic chromosome assembly. Here, we briefly introduce various models for chromosome assembly and known factors involved in the condensation process (e.g. condensin complexes and topoisomerase II). We will then focus on a few selected studies that have recently brought novel insights into the mysterious way chromosomes are condensed during nuclear division. PMID:27508072

  15. Automated clinical system for chromosome analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castleman, K. R.; Friedan, H. J.; Johnson, E. T.; Rennie, P. A.; Wall, R. J. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    An automatic chromosome analysis system is provided wherein a suitably prepared slide with chromosome spreads thereon is placed on the stage of an automated microscope. The automated microscope stage is computer operated to move the slide to enable detection of chromosome spreads on the slide. The X and Y location of each chromosome spread that is detected is stored. The computer measures the chromosomes in a spread, classifies them by group or by type and also prepares a digital karyotype image. The computer system can also prepare a patient report summarizing the result of the analysis and listing suspected abnormalities.

  16. Chromosome congression explained by nanoscale electrostatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagliardi, L John; Shain, Daniel H

    2014-02-24

    Nanoscale electrostatic microtubule disassembly forces between positively charged molecules in kinetochores and negative charges on plus ends of microtubules have been implicated in poleward chromosome motions and may also contribute to antipoleward chromosome movements. We propose that chromosome congression can be understood in terms of antipoleward nanoscale electrostatic microtubule assembly forces between negatively charged microtubule plus ends and like-charged chromosome arms, acting in conjunction with poleward microtubule disassembly forces. Several other aspects of post-attachment prometaphase chromosome motions, as well as metaphase oscillations, are consistently explained within this framework.

  17. The Hypermethylated Regions in Avian Chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Michael; Steinlein, Claus

    2017-01-01

    Chromosomal locations and amounts of 5-methylcytosine-rich chromosome regions were detected in the karyotypes of 13 bird species by indirect immunofluorescence using a monoclonal anti-5-methylcytosine antibody. These species belong to 7 orders and 10 families of modern (Neognathae) and primitive (Palaeognathae) birds and are characterized by macro- and microchromosomes as well as ZW sex chromosomes. In all 13 species, the hypermethylated chromosome segments are confined to constitutive heterochromatin. The chromosomal locations of hypermethylated DNA regions in the karyotypes are constant and species-specific. There is no general rule with regard to the distribution of these hypermethylated chromosome regions in the genomes of birds. In most instances, hypermethylated segments are located in the centromeric regions of chromosomes, but in the sex chromosomes, these can also be found in telomeric and interstitial postitions. In most of the species studied, the centromeric heterochromatin in many, if not all, of the microchromosomes is hypermethylated. However, in one species, the only detectable hypermethylated heterochromatic regions are located in one pair of macroautosomes and in the Z sex chromosome, but none of the microchromosomes contains visible quantities of 5-methylcytosine. The analysis of 5-methylcytosine-rich chromosome regions can be very helpful for the comparative cytogenetics of closely related species or subspecies. It also reflects the dynamic evolutionary process operating in the highly repetitive DNA of eukaryotic chromosomes. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. Chromosomes aberations and enviromental factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marković Srđan Z.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Explanation the topic: Changes in genetic material can lead to aberrant cell in the direction of disorders of cellular regulation, malignant transformation, cell death, or if the adjustment was made at the level of the reproductive cells, to genetic changes in some of the consequent off spring. The topic position in scientific/professional public: Breaking of chromosomes can occur spontaneously or can be induced. Chromatid/chromosome breakings can be induced by different environmental factors: chemicals, biological clastogenic agents, accidentally or intentionally. Conclusions: The authors suggest: - making conditions for strong respect of environmental regulations; - to use higher plants for the early detection of environmental mutagens; - create and orderly update National radionuclide database.

  19. Dynamics of chromosome segregation in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Henrik Jørck

    2007-01-01

    Since the 1960’es the conformation and segregation of the chromosome in Escherichia coli has been a subject of interest for many scientists. However, after 40 years of research, we still know incredibly little about how the chromosome is organized inside the cell, how it manages to duplicate...... this incredibly big molecule and separate the two daughter chromosomes and how it makes sure that the daughter cells receives one copy each. The fully extended chromosome is two orders of magnitude larger than the cell in which it is contained. Hence the chromosome is heavily compacted in the cell......, and it is obvious that structured cellular actions are required to unpack it, as required for its replication, and refold the two daughter chromosomes separately without getting them entangled in the process each generation. The intention of the study was initially to find out how the chromosome is organized...

  20. CHROMOSOMAL ABNORMALITIES IN PATIENTS WITH RECURRENT MISCARRIAGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Mierla

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Chromosomal abnormalities are involved in the etiology of recurrent spontaneous pregnancy loss and sub-fertility. The purpose of this study was to determine the frequency and contribution of chromosomal abnormalities in recurrent miscarriages. The results obtained and literature review are helpful in understanding the importance of cytogenetics analysis of female infertility. To investigate the distribution of chromosomal abnormalities in the Romanian population with recurrent miscarriage, karyotype analysis by G-banding was performed from peripheral blood in 967 women infertility. Results: Chromosomal abnormalities were found to 79 women (8,17%. The percentage of chromosomal abnormalities in the studied population correlates with the data in the literature. Chromosomal abnormalities could play the important role in etiology of infertility and are more frequently detected in this group of patients compared to general population. In the infertile couples balanced chromosomal abnormalities are the main cause of spontaneous abortions.

  1. Environmental pollution, chromosomes, and health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Peter M.

    In mid-May, 1980, President Carter declared a state of emergency at the Love Canal area, near Niagara Falls, New York. The reason for this was for the U.S. to underwrite the relocation costs ($3-5 million) of some 2500 residents who, according to a report by the EPA (Environmental Protection Agency) may have suffered damaged chromosomes. These injuries were apparently caused by contact with toxic wastes that had been dumped in the area in the years prior to development for housing.That the toxic compounds exist in the Love Canal and Niagara Falls subsurface zones, including public water supplies, appears to be established fact. That the residents of the Love Canal area suffered chromosomal damage may be established fact as well. Whether or not these two findings can be linked to ill health of the residents is another matter. Recently, the EPA report has been described as having ‘close to zero scientific significance,’ and has been ‘discredited’(Science, 208, 123a, 1980). The reasons for this disparity go beyond differences of opinion, beyond possible inadequacies of the EPA study, and even beyond problems that probably will arise from future studies, including those now in the planning stages. The problem is that even if victims have easily recognizable injuries from toxic substances (injury that apparently has not occurred to Love Canal residents), medical science usually cannot show a causal relationship. Even chromosomal damage is, at best, difficult to interpret. In ideal studies of significant populations and control groups, the association of toxic chemical to chromosome damage and to cancer and birth defects is indirect and, up to now, has been shown to have little or no significance to an individual member of the exposed population.

  2. Chromosome microarrays in human reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajcan-Separovic, Evica

    2012-01-01

    Chromosome microarray (CMA) testing allows automatic and easy identification of large chromosomal abnormalities detectable by conventional cytogenetics as well as the detection of submicroscopic chromosomal imbalances. A PubMed search was performed in order to review the current use of CMA testing in the field of human reproduction. Articles discussing the use of CMA in the preimplantation setting, ongoing pregnancies, miscarriages and patients with reproductive disorders were considered. A high rate of concordance between conventional methods of detecting chromosomal abnormalities [e.g. fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), karyotyping] and CMA was reported in the prenatal setting with CMA providing more comprehensive and detailed results as it investigates the whole genome at higher resolution. In preimplantation genetic screening, CMA is replacing FISH and the selection of embryos based on CMA has already resulted in live births. For ongoing pregnancies and miscarriages, CMA eliminates tissue culture failures and artifacts and allows a quick turnaround time. The detection of submicroscopic imbalances [or copy number variants (CNVs)] is beneficial when the imbalance has a clear clinical consequence but is challenging for previously undescribed imbalances, particularly for ongoing pregnancies. Recurrent CNVs have been documented in patients with reproductive disorders; however, the application of CMA in this field is still limited. CMA enhances reproductive medicine as it facilitates better understanding of the genetic aspects of human development and reproduction and more informed patient management. Further clinical validation of CMA in the prenatal setting, creation of practice guidelines and catalogs of newly discovered submicroscopic imbalances with clinical outcomes are areas that will require attention in the future.

  3. Exclusion of linkage between cleft lip with or without cleft palate and markers on chromosomes 4 and 6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanton, S.H. [Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Malcolm, S.; Winter, R. [Institute of Child Health, London (United Kingdom)] [and others

    1996-01-01

    Nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without associate cleft palate (CLP) is a common craniofacial defect, occurring in {approximately}1/1,000 live births. While the defect generally occurs sporadically, multiplex families have been reported. Segregation analyses have demonstrated that, in some families, CLP is inherited as an autosomal dominant/codominant disorder with low penetrance. Several clefting loci have been proposed on multiple chromosomes, including 6p24, 4q, and 19q13.1. Association studies and linkage studies suggested a locus that mapped to 6p24. We were unable to confirm this in a linkage study of 12 multigenerational families. A subsequent linkage study by Carinci et al., however, found evidence for linkage to this region in 14 of 21 clefting families. Additionally, Davies et al. studied the chromosomes of three individuals with cleft lip and palate, all of whom had a rearrangement involving 6p24. Their investigation supported a locus at 6p24. Carinci et al. reported that the most likely position for a clefting locus was at D6S89, which is centromeric to EDN1. This is in contrast to the findings of Davies et al., who suggested a placement telomeric to EDN1. F13A, which had been implicated in the initial association studies, is telomeric to EDN1. Thus, the region between F13A and D6S89 encompasses the regions proposed by both Davies et al. and Carinci et al. A second clefting locus, at 4q, was proposed by Beiraghi et al., who studied a single multigenerational family by linkage analysis. Their data suggested a locus near D4S175 and D4S192. 10 refs., 1 tab.

  4. Microdissection and chromosome painting of the alien chromosome in an addition line of wheat-Thinopyrum intermedium

    Science.gov (United States)

    The chromosome painting is an efficient tool for chromosome research. However, plant chromosome painting is relatively underdeveloped. In this study, chromosome painting was developed and used to identify alien chromosomes in TAi-27, a wheat-Thinopyrum intermedium addition line, and chromosomes of...

  5. Chromosome aberration assays in Allium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grant, W.F.

    1982-01-01

    The common onion (Allium cepa) is an excellent plant for the assay of chromosome aberrations after chemical treatment. Other species of Allium (A. cepa var. proliferum, A. carinatum, A. fistulosum and A. sativum) have also been used but to a much lesser extent. Protocols have been given for using root tips from either bulbs or seeds of Allium cepa to study the cytological end-points, such as chromosome breaks and exchanges, which follow the testing of chemicals in somatic cells. It is considered that both mitotic and meiotic end-points should be used to a greater extent in assaying the cytogenetic effects of a chemical. From a literature survey, 148 chemicals are tabulated that have been assayed in 164 Allium tests for their clastogenic effect. Of the 164 assays which have been carried out, 75 are reported as giving a positive reaction, 49 positive and with a dose response, 1 positive and temperature-related, 9 borderline positive, and 30 negative; 76% of the chemicals gave a definite positive response. It is proposed that the Allium test be included among those tests routinely used for assessing chromosomal damage induced by chemicals.

  6. De Novo Chromosome Structure Prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    di Pierro, Michele; Cheng, Ryan R.; Lieberman-Aiden, Erez; Wolynes, Peter G.; Onuchic, Jose'n.

    Chromatin consists of DNA and hundreds of proteins that interact with the genetic material. In vivo, chromatin folds into nonrandom structures. The physical mechanism leading to these characteristic conformations, however, remains poorly understood. We recently introduced MiChroM, a model that generates chromosome conformations by using the idea that chromatin can be subdivided into types based on its biochemical interactions. Here we extend and complete our previous finding by showing that structural chromatin types can be inferred from ChIP-Seq data. Chromatin types, which are distinct from DNA sequence, are partially epigenetically controlled and change during cell differentiation, thus constituting a link between epigenetics, chromosomal organization, and cell development. We show that, for GM12878 lymphoblastoid cells we are able to predict accurate chromosome structures with the only input of genomic data. The degree of accuracy achieved by our prediction supports the viability of the proposed physical mechanism of chromatin folding and makes the computational model a powerful tool for future investigations.

  7. Mechanisms of Chromosome Congression during Mitosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helder Maiato

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Chromosome congression during prometaphase culminates with the establishment of a metaphase plate, a hallmark of mitosis in metazoans. Classical views resulting from more than 100 years of research on this topic have attempted to explain chromosome congression based on the balance between opposing pulling and/or pushing forces that reach an equilibrium near the spindle equator. However, in mammalian cells, chromosome bi-orientation and force balance at kinetochores are not required for chromosome congression, whereas the mechanisms of chromosome congression are not necessarily involved in the maintenance of chromosome alignment after congression. Thus, chromosome congression and maintenance of alignment are determined by different principles. Moreover, it is now clear that not all chromosomes use the same mechanism for congressing to the spindle equator. Those chromosomes that are favorably positioned between both poles when the nuclear envelope breaks down use the so-called “direct congression” pathway in which chromosomes align after bi-orientation and the establishment of end-on kinetochore-microtubule attachments. This favors the balanced action of kinetochore pulling forces and polar ejection forces along chromosome arms that drive chromosome oscillatory movements during and after congression. The other pathway, which we call “peripheral congression”, is independent of end-on kinetochore microtubule-attachments and relies on the dominant and coordinated action of the kinetochore motors Dynein and Centromere Protein E (CENP-E that mediate the lateral transport of peripheral chromosomes along microtubules, first towards the poles and subsequently towards the equator. How the opposite polarities of kinetochore motors are regulated in space and time to drive congression of peripheral chromosomes only now starts to be understood. This appears to be regulated by position-dependent phosphorylation of both Dynein and CENP-E and by spindle

  8. Chromosomal Diversity and Karyotype Evolution in South American Macaws (Psittaciformes, Psittacidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira Furo, Ivanete; Kretschmer, Rafael; O’Brien, Patrícia C.; Ferguson-Smith, Malcolm A.; de Oliveira, Edivaldo Herculano Corrêa

    2015-01-01

    Most species of macaws, which represent the largest species of Neotropical Psittacidae, characterized by their long tails and exuberant colours, are endangered, mainly because of hunting, illegal trade and habitat destruction. Long tailed species seem to represent a monophyletic group within Psittacidae, supported by cytogenetic data. Hence, these species show karyotypes with predominance of biarmed macrochromosomes, in contrast to short tailed species, with a predominance of acro/telocentric macrochromosomes. Because of their similar karyotypes, it has been proposed that inversions and translocations may be the main types of rearrangements occurring during the evolution of this group. However, only one species of macaw, Ara macao, that has had its genome sequenced was analyzed by means of molecular cytogenetics. Hence, in order to verify the rearrangements, we analyzed the karyotype of two species of macaws, Ara chloropterus and Anodorhynchus hyacinthinus, using cross-species chromosome painting with two different sets of probes from chicken and white hawk. Both intra- and interchromosomal rearrangements were observed. Chicken probes revealed the occurrence of fusions, fissions and inversions in both species, while the probes from white hawk determined the correct breakpoints or chromosome segments involved in the rearrangements. Some of these rearrangements were common for both species of macaws (fission of GGA1 and fusions of GGA1p/GGA4q, GGA6/GGA7 and GGA8/GGA9), while the fissions of GGA 2 and 4p were found only in A. chloropterus. These results confirm that despite apparent chromosomal similarity, macaws have very diverse karyotypes, which differ from each other not only by inversions and translocations as postulated before, but also by fissions and fusions. PMID:26087053

  9. Chromosomal divergence and evolutionary inferences in Rhodniini based on the chromosomal location of ribosomal genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Pita

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we used fluorescence in situ hybridisation to determine the chromosomal location of 45S rDNA clusters in 10 species of the tribe Rhodniini (Hemiptera: Reduviidae: Triatominae. The results showed striking inter and intraspecific variability, with the location of the rDNA clusters restricted to sex chromosomes with two patterns: either on one (X chromosome or both sex chromosomes (X and Y chromosomes. This variation occurs within a genus that has an unchanging diploid chromosome number (2n = 22, including 20 autosomes and 2 sex chromosomes and a similar chromosome size and genomic DNA content, reflecting a genome dynamic not revealed by these chromosome traits. The rDNA variation in closely related species and the intraspecific polymorphism in Rhodnius ecuadoriensis suggested that the chromosomal position of rDNA clusters might be a useful marker to identify recently diverged species or populations. We discuss the ancestral position of ribosomal genes in the tribe Rhodniini and the possible mechanisms involved in the variation of the rDNA clusters, including the loss of rDNA loci on the Y chromosome, transposition and ectopic pairing. The last two processes involve chromosomal exchanges between both sex chromosomes, in contrast to the widely accepted idea that the achiasmatic sex chromosomes of Heteroptera do not interchange sequences.

  10. Deletions in chromosome 4 differentially associated with the development of cervical cancer: evidence of slit2 as a candidate tumor suppressor gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ratnesh Kumar; Indra, Dipanjana; Mitra, Sraboni; Mondal, Ranajit Kumar; Basu, Partha Sarathi; Roy, Anup; Roychowdhury, Susanta; Panda, Chinmay Kumar

    2007-08-01

    The aim of this study was to locate the candidate tumor suppressor genes (TSGs) loci in the chromosomal 4p15-16, 4q22-23 and 4q34-35 regions associated with the development of uterine cervical carcinoma (CA-CX). Deletion mapping of the regions by microsatellite markers identified six discrete areas with high frequency of deletions, viz. 4p16.2 (D1: 40%), 4p15.31 (D2: 35-38%), 4p15.2 (D3: 37-40%), 4q22.2 (D4: 34%), 4q34.2-34.3 (D5: 37-59%) and 4q35.1 (D6: 40-50%). Significant correlation was noted among the deleted regions D1, D2 and D3. The deletions in D1, D2, D5 and D6 regions are suggested to be associated with the cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN), and deletions in the D2, D3, D5 and D6 regions seems to be associated with progression of CA-CX. The deletions in the D2 and D6 regions showed significant prognostic implications (P = 0.001; 0.02). The expression of the candidate TSG SLIT2 mapped to D2 region gradually reduced from normal cervix uteri -->CIN --> CA-CX. SLIT2 promoter hypermethylation was seen in 28% CIN samples and significantly increased with tumor progression (P = 0.04). Significant correlation was seen between SLIT2 deletion and its promoter methylation (P = 0.001), indicating that both these phenomena could occur simultaneously to inactivate this gene. Immunohistochemical analysis showed reduced expression of SLIT2 in cervical lesions and CA-CX cell lines. Although no mutation was detected in the SLIT2 promoter region (-432 to + 55 bp), CC and AA haplotypes were seen in -227 and -195 positions, respectively. Thus, it indicates that inactivation of SLIT2-ROBO1 signaling pathway may have an important role in CA-CX development.

  11. Chromosome analysis of arsenic affected cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Shekhar

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim was to study the chromosome analysis of arsenic affected cattle. Materials and Methods: 27 female cattle (21 arsenic affected and 6 normal were selected for cytogenetical study. The blood samples were collected, incubated, and cultured using appropriate media and specific methods. The samples were analyzed for chromosome number and morphology, relative length of the chromosome, arm ratio, and centromere index of X chromosome and chromosomal abnormalities in arsenic affected cattle to that of normal ones. Results: The diploid number of metaphase chromosomes in arsenic affected cattle as well as in normal cattle were all 2n=60, 58 being autosomes and 2 being sex chromosomes. From the centromeric position, karyotyping studies revealed that all the 29 pair of autosomes was found to be acrocentric or telocentric, and the sex chromosomes (XX were submetacentric in both normal and arsenic affected cattle. The relative length of all the autosome pairs and sex chrosomosome pair was found to be higher in normal than that of arsenic affected cattle. The mean arm ratio of X-chromosome was higher in normal than that of arsenic affected cattle, but it is reverse in case of centromere index value of X-chromosome. There was no significant difference of arm ratio and centromere index of X-chromosomes between arsenic affected and normal cattle. No chromosomal abnormalities were found in arsenic affected cattle. Conclusion: The chromosome analysis of arsenic affected cattle in West Bengal reported for the first time in this present study which may serve as a guideline for future studies in other species. These reference values will also help in comparison of cytological studies of arsenic affected cattle to that of various toxicants.

  12. Molecular and cytogenetic characterization of a recurrent unbalanced translocation (4;21) (p16.3;q22.1): Relevance to the Wolf-Hirschhorn and Down syndrome critical regions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sebastio, G.; Perone, L.; Guzzetta, V. [Universita Federico II, Naples (Italy)] [and others

    1996-05-17

    We report on an aneuploidy syndrome due to the unbalanced segregation of a familial translocation (4;21)(p16.3;q22.1) causing a partial 4p monosomy and a partial 21q trisomy. The three affected children presented with severe failure to thrive, short stature, microcephaly, profound hypotonia, and mental retardation. The face, very similar in the three children, is characterized by frontal bossing, upslanting of the palpebral fissures, short nose, and deep set ears, giving the overall appearance of the Down syndrome. The molecular study has defined the aneuploid segment on both 4p and 21q. Most of the Down syndrome critical region was found to be trisomic, while only part of the candidate Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome critical region was deleted, suggesting that this region is not critical for the major malformations characteristic for WHS. 15 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Random search for shared chromosomal regions in four affected individuals: the assignment of a new hereditary ataxia locus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikali, K.; Suomalainen, A.; Koskinen, T.; Peltonen, L. [Univ. of Helsinki (Finland); Terwilliger, J. [Univ. of Oxford (United Kingdom); Weissenbach, J. [Genethon, Evry (France)

    1995-05-01

    Infantile-onset spinocerebellar ataxia (IOSCA) is an autosomal recessively inherited progressive neurological disorder of unknown etiology. This ataxia, identified so far only in the genetically isolated Finnish population, does not share gene locus with any of the previously identified hereditary ataxias, and a random mapping approach was adopted to assign the IOSCA locus. Based on the assumption of one founder mutation, a primary screening of the genome was performed using samples from just four affected individuals in two consanguineous pedigrees. The identification of a shared chromosomal region in these four patients provided the first evidence that the IOSCA gene locus is on chromosome 10q23.3-q24.1, which was confirmed by conventional linkage analysis in the complete family material. Strong linkage disequilibrium observed between IOSCA and the linked markers was utilized to define accurately the critical chromosomal region. The results showed the power of linkage disequilibrium in the locus assignment of diseases with very limited family materials. 30 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Deciphering evolutionary strata on plant sex chromosomes and fungal mating-type chromosomes through compositional segmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Ravi S; Azad, Rajeev K

    2016-03-01

    Sex chromosomes have evolved from a pair of homologous autosomes which differentiated into sex determination systems, such as XY or ZW system, as a consequence of successive recombination suppression between the gametologous chromosomes. Identifying the regions of recombination suppression, namely, the "evolutionary strata", is central to understanding the history and dynamics of sex chromosome evolution. Evolution of sex chromosomes as a consequence of serial recombination suppressions is well-studied for mammals and birds, but not for plants, although 48 dioecious plants have already been reported. Only two plants Silene latifolia and papaya have been studied until now for the presence of evolutionary strata on their X chromosomes, made possible by the sequencing of sex-linked genes on both the X and Y chromosomes, which is a requirement of all current methods that determine stratum structure based on the comparison of gametologous sex chromosomes. To circumvent this limitation and detect strata even if only the sequence of sex chromosome in the homogametic sex (i.e. X or Z chromosome) is available, we have developed an integrated segmentation and clustering method. In application to gene sequences on the papaya X chromosome and protein-coding sequences on the S. latifolia X chromosome, our method could decipher all known evolutionary strata, as reported by previous studies. Our method, after validating on known strata on the papaya and S. latifolia X chromosome, was applied to the chromosome 19 of Populus trichocarpa, an incipient sex chromosome, deciphering two, yet unknown, evolutionary strata. In addition, we applied this approach to the recently sequenced sex chromosome V of the brown alga Ectocarpus sp. that has a haploid sex determination system (UV system) recovering the sex determining and pseudoautosomal regions, and then to the mating-type chromosomes of an anther-smut fungus Microbotryum lychnidis-dioicae predicting five strata in the non

  15. Scaling Chromosomes for an Evolutionary Karyotype: A Chromosomal Tradeoff between Size and Number across Woody Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Guolu; Chen, Hong

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to examine the expected scaling relationships between chromosome size and number across woody species and to clarify the importance of the scaling for the maintenance of chromosome diversity by analyzing the scaling at the inter- & intra-chromosomal level. To achieve for the goals, chromosome trait data were extracted for 191 woody species (including 56 evergreen species and 135 deciduous species) from the available literature. Cross-species analyses revealed a tradeoff among chromosomes between chromosome size and number, demonstrating there is selective mechanism crossing chromosomes among woody species. And the explanations for the result were presented from intra- to inter-chromosome contexts that the scaling may be compromises among scale symmetry, mechanical requirements, and resource allocation across chromosomes. Therein, a 3/4 scaling pattern was observed between total chromosomes and m-chromosomes within nucleus which may imply total chromosomes may evolve from more to less. In addition, the primary evolutionary trend of karyotype and the role of m-chromosomes in the process of karyotype evolution were also discussed.

  16. SMC complexes: from DNA to chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhlmann, Frank

    2016-07-01

    SMC (structural maintenance of chromosomes) complexes - which include condensin, cohesin and the SMC5-SMC6 complex - are major components of chromosomes in all living organisms, from bacteria to humans. These ring-shaped protein machines, which are powered by ATP hydrolysis, topologically encircle DNA. With their ability to hold more than one strand of DNA together, SMC complexes control a plethora of chromosomal activities. Notable among these are chromosome condensation and sister chromatid cohesion. Moreover, SMC complexes have an important role in DNA repair. Recent mechanistic insight into the function and regulation of these universal chromosomal machines enables us to propose molecular models of chromosome structure, dynamics and function, illuminating one of the fundamental entities in biology.

  17. Genetically determined chromosome instability syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, T M

    1982-01-01

    Spontaneously increased chromosomal instability is well documented in the three autosomal recessive diseases, Fanconi's anemia (FA), Bloom's syndrome (BS), and ataxia telangiectasia (AT). Other conditions have been reported to be associated with chromosomal breakage. Some are still single observations: in Werner's syndrome only fibroblasts are affected, and systemic sclerosis may not be an inherited disease. Various aspects of FA, BS, and AT are discussed which have emerged since recent reviews have been published. The differential diagnosis in FA has become more important than it was in the past. Proven heterogeneity in FA demands definition of what to name FA and FA variants. The analysis of cancer frequencies and types in FA and AT lacks important clues. This should stimulate all of us to mutual exchange of data and creation of registries not only of patients and follow-ups, but also of characterized cell strains. A synopsis of results from cell and cytogenetic studies demonstrates similarities and differences in detail of the general phenomenon of chromosomal instability which FA, BS, and AT share. Results from biochemical studies at the DNA level together with cytogenetic findings indicate different but still undefined failures in DNA metabolism or DNA repair mechanisms due to the different genes. A new approach to analyzing the impairment of DNA repair in FA is briefly described. DNA related enzymes are produced in the cytoplasm and have to be transported to the nucleus. The subcellular distribution of topoisomerase activity was found to be unusual in three placentas of FA patients. Other DNA enzymes were distributed normally. Thus, a specific mechanism for movement of the enzyme through the nuclear membrane seems to be defective.

  18. Chromosomal rearrangements in Tourette syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertelsen, Birgitte; Debes, Nanette Mol; Hjermind, Lena E

    2013-01-01

    Tourette syndrome (TS) is a childhood-onset complex neurobiological disorder characterized by a combination of persistent motor and vocal tics and frequent presence of other neuropsychiatric comorbidities. TS shares the fate of other complex disorders, where the genetic etiology is largely unknown...... been an efficient tool for the cloning of disease genes in several Mendelian disorders and in a number of complex disorders. Through cytogenetic investigation of 205 TS patients, we identified three possibly disease-associated chromosome rearrangements rendering this approach relevant in chasing TS...

  19. Deletion of chromosome 13 in Moebius syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slee, J J; Smart, R D; Viljoen, D L

    1991-01-01

    A girl aged 2 1/2 years with Moebius syndrome was found to have a deletion of band q12.2 in chromosome 13 (46,XX,del(13)(q12.2]. This is the second report concerning involvement of chromosome 13q and Moebius syndrome. The observation raises the possibility that a gene responsible for Moebius syndrome is located in this region of chromosome 13. Images PMID:1870098

  20. Deletion of chromosome 13 in Moebius syndrome.

    OpenAIRE

    Slee, J J; Smart, R D; Viljoen, D L

    1991-01-01

    A girl aged 2 1/2 years with Moebius syndrome was found to have a deletion of band q12.2 in chromosome 13 (46,XX,del(13)(q12.2]. This is the second report concerning involvement of chromosome 13q and Moebius syndrome. The observation raises the possibility that a gene responsible for Moebius syndrome is located in this region of chromosome 13.

  1. AB26. Y chromosome and male infertility

    OpenAIRE

    Iijima, Masashi

    2014-01-01

    In infertile couples, a male contribution to infertility is found in 45-50%. The cause of male factor infertility remains largely unexplained, but varicocele and genetic disorder are recognized as major causes leading to spermatogenesis disability. Genetic disorder leads to male infertility include chromosomal abnormalities and Y chromosome microdeletions. Chromosomal abnormalities (numerical or structural abnormalities) can be detected routine karyotype analysis. In non-obstructed azoospemia...

  2. Y chromosome haplogroups in autistic subjects

    OpenAIRE

    Jamain, Stéphane; Quach, Hélène; Quintana-Murci, Luis; Betancur, Catalina; Philippe, Anne; Gillberg, Christopher; Sponheim, Eili; Skjeldal, Ola H.; Fellous, Marc; Leboyer, Marion; Bourgeron, Thomas

    2002-01-01

    The male to female ratio in autism is 4:1 in the global autistic population, but increases to 23:1 in autistic subjects without physical or brain abnormalities. 1 Despite this well-recognised gender difference, male predisposition to autistic disorder remains unexplained and the role of sex chromosomes is still debated. Numerical and structural abnormalities of the sex chromosomes are among the most frequently reported chromosomal disorders associated with autism. However, genome scans have f...

  3. A novel human gene encoding a G-protein-coupled receptor (GPR15) is located on chromosome 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heiber, M.; Marchese, A.; O`Dowd, B.F. [Univ. of Toronto, Ontario (Canada)] [and others

    1996-03-05

    We used sequence similarities among G-protein-coupled receptor genes to discover a novel receptor gene. Using primers based on conserved regions of the opioid-related receptors, we isolated a PCR product that was used to locate the full-length coding region of a novel human receptor gene, which we have named GPR15. A comparison of the amino acid sequence of the receptor gene, which we have named GPR15. A comparison of the amino acid sequence of the receptor encoded by GPR15 with other receptors revealed that it shared sequence identity with the angiotensin II AT1 and AT2 receptors, the interleukin 8b receptor, and the orphan receptors GPR1 and AGTL1. GPR15 was mapped to human chromosome 3q11.2-q13.1. 12 refs., 2 figs.

  4. Localization of Shaw-related K+ channel genes on mouse and human chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, M; Ward, D C; Lee, J; Roses, A D; Clarke, V; D'Eustachio, P; Lau, D; Vega-Saenz de Miera, E; Rudy, B

    1993-12-01

    Four related genes, Shaker, Shab, Shaw, and Shal, encode voltage-gated K+ channels in Drosophila. Multigene subfamilies corresponding to each of these Drosophila genes have been identified in rodents and primates; this suggests that the four genes are older than the common ancestor of present-day insects and mammals and that the expansion of each into a family occurred before the divergence of rodents and primates. In order to define these evolutionary relationships more precisely and to facilitate the search for mammalian candidate K+ channel gene mutations, we have mapped members of the Shaw-homologous gene family in humans and mice. Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis of human metaphase chromosomes mapped KCNC2 (KShIIIA, KV3.2) and KCNC3 (KShIIID, KV3.3) to Chromosome (Chr) 19q13.3-q13.4. Inheritance patterns of DNA restriction fragment length variants in recombinant inbred strains of mice placed the homologous mouse genes on distal Chr 10 near Ms15-8 and Mdm-1. The mouse Kcnc1 (KShIIIB, NGK2-KV4, KV3.1) gene mapped to Chr7 near Tam-1. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that the generation of the mammalian KCNC gene family included both duplication events to generate family members in tandem arrays (KCNC2, KCNC3) and dispersion of family members to unlinked chromosomal sites (KCNC1). The KNCN2 and KCNC3 genes define a new synteny group between humans and mice.

  5. Giemsa C-banding of Barley Chromosomes. IV. Chromosomal Constitution of Autotetraploid Barley

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linde-Laursen, Ib

    1984-01-01

    The progeny of an autotetraploid barley plant (C1) consisted of 45 tetraploids and 33 aneuploids. Giemsa C-banding was used to identify each of the chromosomes in 20 euploid and 31 aneuploid C2--seedlings, and in 11 C3--offspring of aneuploid C2--plants. The euploid C2--seedlings all had four...... homologues of each of the chromosomes. The aneuploid C2--seedlings were fairly equally distributed on hypo-and hyperploids, and on the seven chromosome groups. This suggests that a particular chromosome is lost or gained at random in gametes and embryos. The 11 C3--seedlings comprised seven true euploids......, one seedling with 2n=28 having an extra chromosome 6 and missing one chromosome 3, and three seedlings with 2n=29. The chromosomal composition of aneuploid C3--seedlings did not reflect that of their aneuploid C2--parents with respect to missing or extra chromosomes. Two hypohexaploid C2--seedlings...

  6. New Y chromosomes and early stages of sex chromosome differentiation: sex determination in Megaselia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traut, Walther

    2010-09-01

    The phorid fly Megaselia scalaris is a laboratory model for the turnover and early differentiation of sex chromosomes. Isolates from the field have an XY sex-determining mechanism with chromosome pair 2 acting as X and Y chromosomes. The sex chromosomes are homomorphic but display early signs of sex chromosome differentiation: a low level of molecular differences between X and Y. The male-determining function (M), maps to the distal part of the Y chromosome's short arm. In laboratory cultures, new Y chromosomes with no signs of a molecular differentiation arise at a low rate, probably by transposition of M to these chromosomes. Downstream of the primary signal, the homologue of the Drosophila doublesex (dsx) is part of the sex-determining pathway while Sex-lethal (Sxl), though structurally conserved, is not.

  7. Maternal mosaicism of sex chromosome causes discordant sex chromosomal aneuploidies associated with noninvasive prenatal testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leilei Wang

    2015-10-01

    Conclusion: Our findings indicated that maternal mosaicism of sex chromosome could cause discordant sex chromosomal aneuploidies associated with NIPT. We highly recommended that maternal karyotype should be confirmed for the cases with abnormal results in NIPT.

  8. Partial trisomy 5q resulting from chromosome 7 insertion: An expansion of the phenotype

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fries, M.H.; Reilly, P.A.; Williams, T.C. [Keesler Medical Center, MS (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Partial trisomy 5q has been categorized into three separate phenotypes; however, a distinctive phenotype has not been described for duplications spanning 5q23-q35. We report a case of partial trisomy 5q for this region as a result of a ins(7,5)(q31.3;q23.2q35.1)mat. The liveborn male infant was delivered by emergency cesarean section at 37 weeks after a pregnancy notable for oligohydramnios, with birth weight 1792 g (<3%). Postnatal course was marked by psychomotor delay, failure to thrive, and biopsy demonstrated neonatal giant cell hepatitis with a paucity of intrahepatic bile ducts. His appearance was remarkable for lack of subcutaneous fat, midline displaced hair whorl, bitemporal narrowing with frontal bossing, wide anterior fontanel, widow`s peak, protuberant eyes with periorbital and lid edema, short flat nasal bridge with broad flattened nasal tip, long smooth philtrum, wide mouth with thin lips, wide gingival ridges, micrognathia, posteriorly rotated low-set ears, hepatomegaly, flexion contractions of elbows, and generalized hypertonicity. Urine organic acids, oligosaccharide/mucopolysaccharide screen, and plasma amino acids were negative. GTG-banding on prometaphase chromosomes showed an unbalanced translocation involving chr. 7. This was identified as an insertion of chr. 5 (q23.2q35.1) into distal 7q after FISH using chr. 5 and chr. 7 painting probes. The infant`s mother carries the balanced insertional rearrangement: 46,XX,dir ins(7,5)(q31.3;q23.2q35.1). This phenotype overlaps that of previously described duplications with the addition of giant cell hepatitis, coarsened facial features, gingival thickening, and flexion contractures, suggestive of a yet undiagnosed storage disorder.

  9. Structure and function of eukaryotic chromosomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hennig, W.

    1987-01-01

    Contents: Introduction; Polytene Chromosomel Giant Chromosomes in Ciliates; The sp-I Genes in the Balbiani Rings of Chironomus Salivary Glands; The White Locus of Drosophila Melanogaster; The Genetic and Molecular Organization of the Dense Cluster of Functionally Related Vital Genes in the DOPA Decarboxylase Region of the Drosophila melanogaster Genome; Heat Shock Puffs and Response to Environmental Stress; The Y Chromosomal Lampbrush Loops of Drosophila; Contributions of Electron Microscopic Spreading Preparations (''Miller Spreads'') to the Analysis of Chromosome Structure; Replication of DNA in Eukaryotic Chromosomes; Gene Amplification in Dipteran Chromosomes; The Significance of Plant Transposable Elements in Biologically Relevant Processes; Arrangement of Chromosomes in Interphase Cell Nuclei; Heterochromatin and the Phenomenon of Chromosome Banding; Multiple Nonhistone Protein-DNA Complexes in Chromatin Regulate the Cell- and Stage-Specific Activity of an Eukaryotic Gene; Genetics of Sex Determination in Eukaryotes; Application of Basic Chromosome Research in Biotechnology and Medicine. This book presents an overview of various aspects of chromosome research.

  10. The Y chromosomes of the great apes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallast, Pille; Jobling, Mark A

    2017-05-01

    The great apes (orangutans, gorillas, chimpanzees, bonobos and humans) descended from a common ancestor around 13 million years ago, and since then their sex chromosomes have followed very different evolutionary paths. While great-ape X chromosomes are highly conserved, their Y chromosomes, reflecting the general lability and degeneration of this male-specific part of the genome since its early mammalian origin, have evolved rapidly both between and within species. Understanding great-ape Y chromosome structure, gene content and diversity would provide a valuable evolutionary context for the human Y, and would also illuminate sex-biased behaviours, and the effects of the evolutionary pressures exerted by different mating strategies on this male-specific part of the genome. High-quality Y-chromosome sequences are available for human and chimpanzee (and low-quality for gorilla). The chromosomes differ in size, sequence organisation and content, and while retaining a relatively stable set of ancestral single-copy genes, show considerable variation in content and copy number of ampliconic multi-copy genes. Studies of Y-chromosome diversity in other great apes are relatively undeveloped compared to those in humans, but have nevertheless provided insights into speciation, dispersal, and mating patterns. Future studies, including data from larger sample sizes of wild-born and geographically well-defined individuals, and full Y-chromosome sequences from bonobos, gorillas and orangutans, promise to further our understanding of population histories, male-biased behaviours, mutation processes, and the functions of Y-chromosomal genes.

  11. [Chromosome breakage syndrome and fragile X syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiraishi, Y

    1995-11-01

    Chromosome instability is a characteristic cytogenetic feature of a number of genetically determined human disorders collectively known as chromosome breakage syndromes. Included among the disorders are Bloom's syndrome (BS), Fanconi's anemia (FA), ataxia telangiectasia (AT). In each of the syndromes chromosome instability exists in the form of increased frequencies of breaks and interchanges occurring either spontaneously or following treatment with various DNA-damaging agents. These diseases have in common an autosomal recessive transmission and an increased tendency to develop malignancies. The blood cells of subjects with AT, BS, or FA are significantly more radiosensitive than those of controls, particularly in the occurrence of chromosome aberrations.

  12. Movement of chromosomes with severed kinetochore microtubules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forer, Arthur; Johansen, Kristen M; Johansen, Jørgen

    2015-05-01

    Experiments dating from 1966 and thereafter showed that anaphase chromosomes continued to move poleward after their kinetochore microtubules were severed by ultraviolet microbeam irradiation. These observations were initially met with scepticism as they contradicted the prevailing view that kinetochore fibre microtubules pulled chromosomes to the pole. However, recent experiments using visible light laser microbeam irradiations have corroborated these earlier experiments as anaphase chromosomes again were shown to move poleward after their kinetochore microtubules were severed. Thus, multiple independent studies using different techniques have shown that chromosomes can indeed move poleward without direct microtubule connections to the pole, with only a kinetochore 'stub' of microtubules. An issue not yet settled is: what propels the disconnected chromosome? There are two not necessarily mutually exclusive proposals in the literature: (1) chromosome movement is propelled by the kinetochore stub interacting with non-kinetochore microtubules and (2) chromosome movement is propelled by a spindle matrix acting on the stub. In this review, we summarise the data indicating that chromosomes can move with severed kinetochore microtubules and we discuss proposed mechanisms for chromosome movement with severed kinetochore microtubules.

  13. Chromosomal replicons of higher plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van' t Hof, J.

    1987-03-16

    This brief discussion of replicons of higher plants offers a glimpse into the properties of chromosomal DNA replication. It gives evidence that the S phase of unrelated plant species is comprised of temporally ordered replicon families that increase in number with genome size. This orderly process, which assures a normal inheritance of genetic material to recipient daughter cells, is maintained at the level of replicon clusters by two mutually exclusive mechanisms, one involving the rate at which single replicons replicate their allotment of DNA, and another by means of the tempo-pause. The same two mechanisms are used by cells to alter the pattern of chromosomal DNA replication just prior to and during normal development. Both mechanisms are genetically determined and produce genetic effects when disturbed of disrupted by additional non-conforming DNAs. Further insight into how these two mechanisms operate requires more molecular information about the nature of replicons and the factors that govern when a replicon family replicates. Plant material is a rich and ideal source for this information just awaiting exploitation. 63 refs.

  14. Increased chromosome radiosensitivity during pregnancy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ricoul, Michelle; Sabatier, Laure; Dutrillaux, Bernard [Commissariat a l`Energie Atomique, Laboratoire de Radiobiologie et Oncologie, DRR, DSV, Fontenay aux roses (France)

    1997-03-04

    It was necessary to consider the risks of exposure of pregnant women, not only in relation to the child, but also in relation to their own hypersensitivity. We have demonstrated that pregnancy increases radiosensitivity of chromosome in the mouse at the end of gestation. This is of importance since it may have implications on radioprotection of pregnant women and give experimental guidelines to the problems of hypersensitivity to drugs and cancer aggravation during pregnancy. Blood obtained from women at various times of pregnancy was exposed to ionizing radiations. By comparison to non-pregnant women, an increase in chromosome breakage was observed in metaphases from lymphocytes, after short-term culture in the presence of the serum of the same donor. Immediately after delivery, this increase in radiosensitivity disappeared. In a prospective study, serial analyses showed a very strong correlation between the amount of pregnancy hormones, progesterone in particular, and the increase in radiosensitivity. Pregnant women may have an increased sensitivity to ionizing radiation during the second half of their pregnancy. This study provides the first evidence in human that radiosensitivity may vary in relation to physiological conditions.

  15. Stabilization of chromosomes by DNA intercalators for flow karyotyping and identification by banding of isolated chromosomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aten, J. A.; Buys, C. H.; van der Veen, A. Y.; Mesa, J. R.; Yu, L. C.; Gray, J. W.; Osinga, J.; Stap, J.

    1987-01-01

    A number of structurally unrelated DNA intercalators have been studied as stabilizers of mitotic chromosomes during isolation from rodent and human metaphase cells. Seven out of the nine intercalators tested were found to be useful as chromosome stabilizing agents. Chromosome suspensions prepared in

  16. Exchange of core chromosomes and horizontal transfer of lineage-specific chromosomes in Fusarium oxysporum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vlaardingerbroek, I.; Beerens, B.; Rose, L.; Fokkens, L.; Cornelissen, B.J.C.; Rep, M.

    2016-01-01

    Horizontal transfer of supernumerary or lineage-specific (LS) chromosomes has been described in a number of plant pathogenic filamentous fungi. So far it was not known whether transfer is restricted to chromosomes of certain size or properties, or whether 'core' chromosomes can also undergo

  17. [Frequency of chromosome variants in human populations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuleshov, N P; Kulieva, L M

    1979-01-01

    Chromosome variants were analyzed in the course of the population chromosome investigation of 6000 newborns and clinical cytogenetic studies of 403 married couples with recurrent spontaneous abortions, stillbirths or offsprings having congenital malformations or Down's syndrome. The following variants were determined: 1) Igh+, 9gh+, 16gh+ - the enlargement of the secondary constrictions of the size, more than 1/4 of the long arm of the chromosome; 2) Dp+ or Gp+ - the enlargement of the short arms of acrocentrics, their size being more than the short arm of the chromosome 18; 3) Ds+ or Gs - large satellites of the acrocentrics which are equal or more than the thickness of the chromatids of the long arms; 4) Es+ - satellites on the short arms of the chromosomes 17 or 18; 5) Dss of Gss - double satellites; 6) Yq+ - the enlargement of the long arm of Y chromosome, the size of which being more than G chromosome; 7) Yq- - deletion of the long arm of Y chromosome, the size of the long arm being less than chromosomes 21--22. The total frequency of variants in newborns was 12.8/1000 births. The incidence of different types of variants per 1000 births was as follows: Igh+ - 0.33; 9gh+ - 0.17; 16gh+ - 0.50; Ds+ - 2.33; Dp+ - 1.50; Dp- - 0.17; Gs+ - 0.83; Gp+ - 2.17; Yq+ - 6.91/1000 males; Yg- - 0.99/1000 males; double variants - 0.33; other variants - 0.33. 4.0% of married couples with recurrent spontaneous abortions had major chromosome aberrations, 14.6% - extreme variants of chromosomes. Among 113 couples with the history of congenital malformations in their offsprings major chromosome abnormalities were found in 4.4%, chromosome variants - 13.3%. The frequency of chromosome variants among 139 patients with Down's syndrome was 7.2%. In one case Robertsonian translocation t(DqGa) was determined. The most frequent types of variant chromosomes were Ds+, Dp+, Es+, Yq+.

  18. Chromosomal painting and ZW sex chromosomes differentiation in Characidium (Characiformes, Crenuchidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artoni Roberto F

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Characidium (a Neotropical fish group have a conserved diploid number (2n = 50, but show remarkable differences among species and populations in relation to sex chromosome systems and location of nucleolus organizer regions (NOR. In this study, we isolated a W-specific probe for the Characidium and characterized six Characidium species/populations using cytogenetic procedures. We analyzed the origin and differentiation of sex and NOR-bearing chromosomes by chromosome painting in populations of Characidium to reveal their evolution, phylogeny, and biogeography. Results A W-specific probe for efficient chromosome painting was isolated by microdissection and degenerate oligonucleotide primed-polymerase chain reaction (DOP-PCR amplification of W chromosomes from C. gomesi. The W probe generated weak signals dispersed on the proto sex chromosomes in C. zebra, dispersed signals in both W and Z chromosomes in C. lauroi and, in C. gomesi populations revealed a proximal site on the long arms of the Z chromosome and the entire W chromosome. All populations showed small terminal W probe sites in some autosomes. The 18S rDNA revealed distinctive patterns for each analyzed species/population with regard to proto sex chromosome, sex chromosome pair, and autosome location. Conclusions The results from dual-color fluorescence in situ hybridization (dual-color FISH using W and 18S rDNA probes allowed us to infer the putative evolutionary pathways for the differentiation of sex chromosomes and NORs, from structural rearrangements in a sex proto-chromosome, followed by gene erosion and heterochromatin amplification, morphological differentiation of the sex chromosomal pair, and NOR transposition, giving rise to the distinctive patterns observed among species/populations of Characidium. Biogeographic isolation and differentiation of sex chromosomes seem to have played a major role in the speciation process in this group of fish.

  19. How to Protect the Chromosomal Ends?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 15; Issue 6. How to Protect the Chromosomal Ends? - Telomerase, Chromosome Stability and Aging. Anurag N Paranjape Annapoorni Rangarajan. General Article Volume 15 Issue 6 June 2010 pp 538-547 ...

  20. X-chromosome inactivation and escape

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-11-06

    Nov 6, 2015 ... She predicted many of the features of X inactivation, for e.g., .... feature that locks silencing, i.e. DNA methylation at CpG islands of X-linked ..... 1996 XIST RNA paints the inactive X chromosome at interphase: evidence for a novel RNA involved in nuclear/chromosome structure. J. Cell Biol. 132, 259–275.

  1. Chromosome studies in Cashew ( Anacardium occidentale L ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chromosome studies in Cashew (Anacardium occidentale L.) OM Aliyu, JA Awopetu. Abstract. Despite the increased cultivation of cashew as a commodity crop in sub-Sahara Africa, Asia and South America there are few chromosome studies on it. The present study investigates number, structure and behavior of ...

  2. Determination of chromosomal ploidy in Agave ssp.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-10-19

    Oct 19, 2009 ... (2008) analyzed the karyotypes of several agave cul- tivars. Doughty (1936) reported the chromosomal ploidies of three varieties. However, little is known about the chromosome numbers of wild and local breeding. *Corresponding author. E-mail: lianzi9381@yahoo.com.cn. Tel: (+86)13922727215.

  3. Chromosome number9 specific repetitive DNA sequence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joste, N.E.; Cram, L.S.; Hildebrand, C.E.; Jones, M.; Longmire, J.; Robinson, T.; Moyzis, R.K.

    1986-05-01

    Human repetitive DNA libraries have been constructed and various recombinant DNA clones isolated that are likely candidates for chromosome specific sequences. The first clone tested (pHuR 98; plasmid human repeat 98) was biotinylated and hybridized to human chromosomes in situ. The hybridized recombinant probe was detected with fluoresceinated avidin, and chromosomes were counter-stained with either propidium iodide or distamycin-DAPI. Specific hybridization to chromosome band 9q1 was obtained. The localization was confirmed by hybridizing radiolabeled pHuR 98 DNA to human chromosomes sorted by flow cytometry. Various methods, including orthogonal field pulsed gel electrophoresis analysis indicate that 75 kilobase blocks of this sequence are interspersed with other repetitive DNA sequences in this chromosome band. This study is the first to report a human repetitive DNA sequence uniquely localized to a specific chromosome. This clone provides an easily detected and highly specific chromosomal marker for molecular cytogenetic analyses in numerous basic research and clinical studies.

  4. Genomic regulatory landscapes and chromosomal rearrangements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ladegaard, Elisabete L Engenheiro

    2008-01-01

    specificity of the individual CNEs. In this PhD study I have studied several chromosomal rearrangements with breakpoints in the vicinity of trans-dev genes. This included chromosomal rearrangements compatible with known phenotype-genotype associations (Rieger syndrome-PITX2, Mowat-Wilson syndrome-ZEB2...

  5. [CHROMOSOMAL ABNORMALITIES IN PATIENTS WITH INFERTILITY].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pylyp, L Y; Spinenko, L O; Verhoglyad, N V; Kashevarova, O O; Zukin, V D

    2015-01-01

    To assess the frequency and structure of chromosomal abnormalities in patients with infertility, a retrospective analysis of cytogenetic studies of 3414 patients (1741 females and 1673 males), referred to the Clinic of reproductive medicine "Nadiya" from 2007 to 2012, was performed. Chromosomal abnormalities were detected in 2.37% patients: 2.79% in males and 1.95% in females. Balanced structural chromosomal abnormalities prevailed over numerical abnormalities and corresponded to 80.2% of all chromosomal abnormalities detected in the studied group. Sex chromosome abnormalities made up 23.5% of chromosomal pathology (19/81) and included gonosomal aneuploidies in 84% of cases (16/19) and structural abnormalities of chromosome Y in 16% of cases (3/19). The low level sex chromosome mosaicism was detected with the frequency of 0.55%. Our results highlight the importance of cytogenetic studies in patients seeking infertility treatment by assisted reproductive technologies, since an abnormal finding not only provide a firm diagnosis to couples with infertility, but also influences significantly the approach to infertility treatment in such patients.

  6. Y chromosome haplogroups in autistic subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamain, S; Quach, H; Quintana-Murci, L; Betancur, C; Philippe, A; Gillberg, C; Sponheim, E; Skjeldal, O H; Fellous, M; Leboyer, M; Bourgeron, T

    2002-01-01

    The male to female ratio in autism is 4:1 in the global autistic population, but increases to 23:1 in autistic subjects without physical or brain abnormalities.(1) Despite this well-recognised gender difference, male predisposition to autistic disorder remains unexplained and the role of sex chromosomes is still debated. Numerical and structural abnormalities of the sex chromosomes are among the most frequently reported chromosomal disorders associated with autism. However, genome scans have failed to detect linkage on the X chromosome(2,3,4) and this approach cannot study the non-recombining region of the Y chromosome. In this study, we searched for a specific Y chromosome effect in autistic subjects. Using informative Y-polymorphic markers, the Y chromosome haplotypes of 111 autistic subjects from France, Sweden and Norway were defined and compared with relevant control populations. No significant difference in Y-haplotype distribution between the affected and control groups was observed. Although this study cannot exclude the presence of a Y susceptibility gene, our results are not suggestive of a Y chromosome effect in autism.

  7. Human male meiotic sex chromosome inactivation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, M. de; Vosters, S.; Merkx, G.F.M.; Hauwers, K.W.M. d'; Wansink, D.G.; Ramos, L.; Boer, P. de

    2012-01-01

    In mammalian male gametogenesis the sex chromosomes are distinctive in both gene activity and epigenetic strategy. At first meiotic prophase the heteromorphic X and Y chromosomes are placed in a separate chromatin domain called the XY body. In this process, X,Y chromatin becomes highly

  8. Chromosome number and cytomorphological characterization of a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Owner

    mistaken identity of species in earlier chromosome counts. Observations on chromosome morphology and size made in this study are an insight into what will be expected at meiosis. Distribution of several morphological categories namely acrocentrics, metacentrics and submetacentrics occurring in different size regimes as.

  9. Chromosomal Aneuploidies and Early Embryonic Developmental Arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Maurer

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Selecting the best embryo for transfer, with the highest chance of achieving a vital pregnancy, is a major goal in current in vitro fertilization (IVF technology. The high rate of embryonic developmental arrest during IVF treatment is one of the limitations in achieving this goal. Chromosomal abnormalities are possibly linked with chromosomal arrest and selection against abnormal fertilization products. The objective of this study was to evaluate the frequency and type of chromosomal abnormalities in preimplantation embryos with developmental arrest. Materials and Methods: This cohort study included blastomeres of embryos with early developmental arrest that were biopsied and analyzed by fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH with probes for chromosomes 13, 16, 18, 21 and 22. Forty-five couples undergoing IVF treatment were included, and 119 arrested embryos were biopsied. All probes were obtained from the Kinderwunsch Zentrum, Linz, Austria, between August 2009 and August 2011. Results: Of these embryos, 31.6% were normal for all chromosomes tested, and 68.4% were abnormal. Eleven embryos were uniformly aneuploid, 20 were polyploid, 3 were haploid, 11 displayed mosaicism and 22 embryos exhibited chaotic chromosomal complement. Conclusion: Nearly 70% of arrested embryos exhibit chromosomal errors, making chromosomal abnormalities a major cause of embryonic arrest and may be a further explanation for the high developmental failure rates during culture of the embryos in the IVF setting.

  10. The Barley Chromosome 5 Linkage Map

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, J.; Jørgensen, Jørgen Helms

    1975-01-01

    The literature is surveyed for data on recombination between loci on chromosome 5 of barley; 13 loci fall into the category “mapped” loci, more than 20 into the category “associated” loci and nine into the category “loci once suggested to be on chromosome 5”. A procedure was developed...

  11. CHROMOSOME STUDY OF SOME GRASSHOPPER SPECIES ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hence, this research is aimed at studying the chromosomes of some Ethiopian grasshopper species. The grasshopper specimens used in this study were collected from eight localities in central Ethiopia. The specimens were identified as belonging to two families (Acrididae and Tetrigidae). Chromosome preparations were ...

  12. Translocations used to generate chromosome segment duplications ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Supplementary figure 1. (a–i) Putative novel genes created by the breakpoints. Translocation chromosomes are shown with the translocated segment indicated in red and the untranslocated segments in black or blue. Purple arrows indicate whether the chromosome is a donor (arrow pointing up) or a recipient (arrow ...

  13. Translocations used to generate chromosome segment duplications ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    progeny bearing a duplication (Dp) of the translocated chromosome segment. Here, 30 ... [Singh P K, Iyer V S, Sowjanya T N, Raj B K and Kasbekar D P 2010 Translocations used to generate chromosome segment duplications in. Neurospora can ... of this work, namely, the definition of breakpoint junction sequences of 12 ...

  14. A sexy spin on nonrandom chromosome segregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charville, Gregory W; Rando, Thomas A

    2013-06-06

    Nonrandom chromosome segregation is an intriguing phenomenon linked to certain asymmetric stem cell divisions. In a recent report in Nature, Yadlapalli and Yamashita (2013) observe nonrandom segregation of X and Y chromosomes in Drosophila germline stem cells and shed light on the complex mechanisms of this fascinating process. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Role of chromosomal instability in cancer progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClelland, Sarah E

    2017-09-01

    Cancer cells often display chromosomal instability (CIN), a defect that involves loss or rearrangement of the cell's genetic material - chromosomes - during cell division. This process results in the generation of aneuploidy, a deviation from the haploid number of chromosomes, and structural alterations of chromosomes in over 90% of solid tumours and many haematological cancers. This trait is unique to cancer cells as normal cells in the body generally strictly maintain the correct number and structure of chromosomes. This key difference between cancer and normal cells has led to two important hypotheses: (i) cancer cells have had to overcome inherent barriers to changes in chromosomes that are not tolerated in non-cancer cells and (ii) CIN represents a cancer-specific target to allow the specific elimination of cancer cells from the body. To exploit these hypotheses and design novel approaches to treat cancer, a full understanding of the mechanisms driving CIN and how CIN contributes to cancer progression is required. Here, we will discuss the possible mechanisms driving chromosomal instability, how CIN may contribute to the progression at multiple stages of tumour evolution and possible future therapeutic directions based on targeting cancer chromosomal instability. © 2017 Society for Endocrinology.

  16. Cat-eye syndrome with unusual marker chromosome probably not chromosome 22.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenfeld, W; Verma, R S; Jhaveri, R C

    1984-05-01

    An unusual supernumerary chromosome with a single satellite on the long arm was found in a child with manifestations of the cat-eye syndrome including apparently low-set and malformed ears, preauricular tags, micrognathia, and imperforate anus. Although G-banding suggested that this extra material was chromosome 22, this was not confirmed by several other banding techniques. After examination of the parents' chromosomes, the nature and origin of this extra chromosome remains obscure. We conclude that patients previously diagnosed as having "partial trisomy 22" with incomplete cat-eye syndrome may have a different chromosome constitution when studied by various banding techniques.

  17. AcEST: DK962688 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ... 350 5e-95 tr|Q8GSN3|Q8GSN3_CUCMA Non-cell-autonomous heat shock cognate pr... 349 9e-95 tr|Q67BD0|Q67BD0...TVI Chromosome chr8 scaffold_23, whole genome... 349 9e-95 tr|Q8GSN4|Q8GSN4_CUCMA Non-cell-autonomous heat s...1 >tr|Q8GSN3|Q8GSN3_CUCMA Non-cell-autonomous heat shock cognate protein 70 OS=Cucurbita maxima GN=Hsc70-1 P

  18. AcEST: DK955613 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available aracterized protein OS=Oryza... 329 7e-89 tr|Q8GSN3|Q8GSN3_CUCMA Non-cell-autonomous heat shock cognate pr.....28 1e-88 tr|A7PNK8|A7PNK8_VITVI Chromosome chr8 scaffold_23, whole genome... 328 1e-88 tr|Q8GSN4|Q8GSN4_CUCMA Non-cell-autonomous...nomous heat shock cognate protein 70 OS=Cucurbita maxima...SQRQATKDAGVISGLNVMRIINEP Sbjct: 126 MVLNKMKETAEAYLGSTVKNAVVTVPAYFNDSQRQATKDAGVISGLNVMRIINEP 180 >tr|Q8GSN3|Q8GSN3_CUCMA Non-cell-auto

  19. Advances in understanding paternally transmitted Chromosomal Abnormalities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchetti, F; Sloter, E; Wyrobek, A J

    2001-03-01

    Multicolor FISH has been adapted for detecting the major types of chromosomal abnormalities in human sperm including aneuploidies for clinically-relevant chromosomes, chromosomal aberrations including breaks and rearrangements, and other numerical abnormalities. The various sperm FISH assays have been used to evaluate healthy men, men of advanced age, and men who have received mutagenic cancer therapy. The mouse has also been used as a model to investigate the mechanism of paternally transmitted genetic damage. Sperm FISH for the mouse has been used to detect chromosomally abnormal mouse sperm, while the PAINT/DAPI analysis of mouse zygotes has been used to evaluate the types of chromosomal defects that can be paternally transmitted to the embryo and their effects on embryonic development.

  20. Flow Analysis and Sorting of Plant Chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrána, Jan; Cápal, Petr; Šimková, Hana; Karafiátová, Miroslava; Čížková, Jana; Doležel, Jaroslav

    2016-10-10

    Analysis and sorting of plant chromosomes (plant flow cytogenetics) is a special application of flow cytometry in plant genomics and its success depends critically on sample quality. This unit describes the methodology in a stepwise manner, starting with the induction of cell cycle synchrony and accumulation of dividing cells in mitotic metaphase, and continues with the preparation of suspensions of intact mitotic chromosomes, flow analysis and sorting of chromosomes, and finally processing of the sorted chromosomes. Each step of the protocol is described in detail as some procedures have not been used widely. Supporting histograms are presented as well as hints on dealing with plant material; the utility of sorted chromosomes for plant genomics is also discussed. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  1. B chromosomes: from cytogenetics to systems biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valente, Guilherme T; Nakajima, Rafael T; Fantinatti, Bruno E A; Marques, Diego F; Almeida, Rodrigo O; Simões, Rafael P; Martins, Cesar

    2017-02-01

    Though hundreds to thousands of reports have described the distribution of B chromosomes among diverse eukaryote groups, a comprehensive theory of their biological role has not yet clearly emerged. B chromosomes are classically understood as a sea of repetitive DNA sequences that are poor in genes and are maintained by a parasitic-drive mechanism during cell division. Recent developments in high-throughput DNA/RNA analyses have increased the resolution of B chromosome biology beyond those of classical and molecular cytogenetic methods; B chromosomes contain many transcriptionally active sequences, including genes, and can modulate the activity of autosomal genes. Furthermore, the most recent knowledge obtained from omics analyses, which is associated with a systemic view, has demonstrated that B chromosomes can influence cell biology in a complex way, possibly favoring their own maintenance and perpetuation.

  2. Energy Landscapes of Folding Chromosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bin

    The genome, the blueprint of life, contains nearly all the information needed to build and maintain an entire organism. A comprehensive understanding of the genome is of paramount interest to human health and will advance progress in many areas, including life sciences, medicine, and biotechnology. The overarching goal of my research is to understand the structure-dynamics-function relationships of the human genome. In this talk, I will be presenting our efforts in moving towards that goal, with a particular emphasis on studying the three-dimensional organization, the structure of the genome with multi-scale approaches. Specifically, I will discuss the reconstruction of genome structures at both interphase and metaphase by making use of data from chromosome conformation capture experiments. Computationally modeling of chromatin fiber at atomistic level from first principles will also be presented as our effort for studying the genome structure from bottom up.

  3. Chromosomal context and replication properties of ARS plasmids in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ARS) elements function as plasmid as well as chromosomal replication origins in yeasts. As compared to ARSs, different chromosomal origins vary greatly in their efficiency and timing of replication probably due to their wider chromosomal ...

  4. Meiotic cohesin-based chromosome structure is essential for homologous chromosome pairing in Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Da-Qiao; Matsuda, Atsushi; Okamasa, Kasumi; Nagahama, Yuki; Haraguchi, Tokuko; Hiraoka, Yasushi

    2016-06-01

    Chromosome structure is dramatically altered upon entering meiosis to establish chromosomal architectures necessary for the successful progression of meiosis-specific events. An early meiotic event involves the replacement of the non-SMC mitotic cohesins with their meiotic equivalents in most part of the chromosome, forming an axis on meiotic chromosomes. We previously demonstrated that the meiotic cohesin complex is required for chromosome compaction during meiotic prophase in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. These studies revealed that chromosomes are elongated in the absence of the meiotic cohesin subunit Rec8 and shortened in the absence of the cohesin-associated protein Pds5. In this study, using super-resolution structured illumination microscopy, we found that Rec8 forms a linear axis on chromosomes, which is required for the organized axial structure of chromatin during meiotic prophase. In the absence of Pds5, the Rec8 axis is shortened whereas chromosomes are widened. In rec8 or pds5 mutants, the frequency of homologous chromosome pairing is reduced. Thus, Rec8 and Pds5 play an essential role in building a platform to support the chromosome architecture necessary for the spatial alignment of homologous chromosomes.

  5. Refined localization of the FAT1 quantitative trait locus on pig chromosome 4 by marker-assisted backcrossing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andersson Leif

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A major QTL for fatness and growth, denoted FAT1, has previously been detected on pig chromosome 4q (SSC4q using a Large White – wild boar intercross. Progeny that carried the wild boar allele at this locus had higher fat deposition, shorter length of carcass, and reduced growth. The position and the estimated effects of the FAT1 QTL for growth and fatness have been confirmed in a previous study. In order to narrow down the QTL interval we have traced the inheritance of the wild boar allele associated with high fat deposition through six additional backcross generations. Results Progeny-testing was used to determine the QTL genotype for 10 backcross sires being heterozygous for different parts of the broad FAT1 region. The statistical analysis revealed that five of the sires were segregating at the QTL, two were negative while the data for three sires were inconclusive. We could confirm the QTL effects on fatness/meat content traits but not for the growth traits implying that growth and fatness are controlled by distinct QTLs on chromosome 4. Two of the segregating sires showed highly significant QTL effects that were as large as previously observed in the F2 generation. The estimates for the remaining three sires, which were all heterozygous for smaller fragments of the actual region, were markedly smaller. With the sample sizes used in the present study we cannot with great confidence determine whether these smaller effects in some sires are due to chance deviations, epistatic interactions or whether FAT1 is composed of two or more QTLs, each one with a smaller phenotypic effect. Under the assumption of a single locus, the critical region for FAT1 has been reduced to a 3.3 cM interval between the RXRG and SDHC loci. Conclusion We have further characterized the FAT1 QTL on pig chromosome 4 and refined its map position considerably, from a QTL interval of 70 cM to a maximum region of 20 cM and a probable region as small as

  6. Evidence for an association between nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate and a gene located on the long arm of chromosome 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, L.E.; Healey, S.C.; Chenevix-Trench, G. [St. Louis Univ. Health Sciences Center, MO (United States)]|[Queensland Institute of Medical Research, Brisbane (Australia)

    1995-11-01

    Recent studies suggest that the familial aggregation of nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate (CL{+-}P) is likely to be attributable to the effects of several susceptibility loci, acting in a multiplicative fashion. Two potential CL{+-}P susceptibility loci (CSL), transforming growth factor alpha (TGFA) and retinoic acid receptor (RARA), have been identified through association studies. In addition, recent evidence of linkage between CL{+-}P and two markers (D4S175 and D4S192) in the region 4q25-4q31.3 raised the possibility that a CSL, with a larger effect than either TGFA or RARA, may reside within this region of the human genome. The present analyses were undertaken to determine whether D4S175 or D4S192 is significantly associated with CL{+-}P in a sample of unrelated patients that have previously provided evidence of associations between CL{+-}P and both TGFA and RARA. The results of these analyses provide further, tentative, evidence for the presence of a CSL locus on the long arm of chromosome 4 and help to refine the location of this locus in the region of D4S175 and D4S192. 28 refs., 4 tabs.

  7. Elucidation of structural abnormalities of the X chromosome using fluorescence in situ hybridisation with a Y chromosome painting probe.

    OpenAIRE

    Howell, R T; Millener, R; Thorne, S; O'Loughlin, J; Brassey, J; McDermott, A

    1994-01-01

    Particular regions of the X and Y chromosomes share DNA sequence homology to the extent that cross hybridisation occurs. Thus, chromosome painting with a whole Y chromosome probe consistently results in fluorescence on specific regions of the X chromosome as well as the complete Y chromosome. This phenomenon has been exploited to elucidate the structure of unusual X chromosome rearrangements, without Y involvement, in two females.

  8. Scaling behaviors of CG clusters for chromosomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng Jun [Department of Physics, Wenzhou Normal College, Wenzhou 325027 (China); Department of Physics, Jinhua University, Jinhua 321017 (China); Zhang Linxi [Department of Physics, Wenzhou Normal College, Wenzhou 325027 (China)]. E-mail: lxzhang@hzcnc.com

    2005-07-01

    In this paper we adopt a new method to study the scaling behaviors of CG clusters in different organism chromosomes. The statistical distributions of CG and AT clusters for different chromosomes have the same scaling behaviors, i.e. P(S){proportional_to}e{sup -{alpha}}{sup S}. The values of {alpha} are very close to each other for the same organism chromosomes, and depend on different organism chromosomes. We also find that the parameter {xi}(m)={sigma}(m)m of CG cluster complies with the good power law {xi}(m){proportional_to}m{sup -{gamma}}. Here {sigma}(m)=2-, and m is the number of bases in consecutive, non-overlapping blocks. The values of {gamma} have the same behavior as the values of {alpha} in statistical distributions of P(S){proportional_to}e{sup -{alpha}}{sup S}. Meanwhile, we also consider the relationship between the values of {gamma} and the percentage of cluster CG content for different organism chromosomes, and there are some relations between them. These investigations provide some insights into the nucleotide clusters of chromosomes, and help us understand DNA sequences of chromosomes.

  9. Nonrandom chromosomal changes in human malignant cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowley, J D

    1977-01-01

    The role of chromosomal changes in human malignant cells has been the subject of much debate. The observation of nonrandom chromosomal changes has become well recognized in chronic myelogenous leukemia, and more recently in acute myelogenous leukemia. In the present report, data are presented on the sites of duplication of chromosome No. 1 in hematologic disorders. Trisomy for region lq25 to lq32 was observed in every one of 34 patients whose cells showed duplication of some part of chromosome No. 1. Adjacent regions lq21 to lq25, and lq32 to lqter, also were trisomic in the majority of patients. Two patients had deletions, one of lq32 to qter, and the other, of lp32 to pter. The sites of chromosomal breaks leading to trisomy differ from those involved in balanced reciprocal translocations. Some of these sites are sometimes, but not always, vulnerable in constitutional chromosomal abnormalities. The nature of the proliferative advantage conferred on myeloid cells by these chromosomal changes is unknown.

  10. [Y chromosome structural abnormalities and Turner's syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravel, C; Siffroi, J-P

    2009-06-01

    Although specifically male, the human Y chromosome may be observed in female karyotypes, mostly in women with Turner syndrome stigmata. In women with isolated gonadal dysgenesis but otherwise normal stature, the testis determining factor or SRY gene may have been removed from the Y chromosome or may be mutated. In other women with Turner syndrome, the karyotype is usually abnormal and shows a frequent 45,X/46,XY mosaicism. In these cases, the phenotype depends on the ratio between Y positive and 45,X cell lines in the body. When in mosaicism, Y chromosomes are likely to carry structural abnormalities which explain mitotic instability, such as the existence of two centromeres. Dicentric Y isochromosomes for the short arm (idic[Yp]) or ring Y chromosomes (r[Y]) are the most frequent abnormal Y chromosomes found in infertile patients and in Turner syndrome in mosaic with 45,X cells. Although monocentric, deleted Y chromosomes for the long arm and those carrying microdeletions in the AZF region are also instable and are frequently associated with a 45,X cell line. Management of infertile patients carrying such abnormal Y chromosomes must take into account the risk and the consequences of a mosaicism in the offspring.

  11. Structure of the human chromosome interaction network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Sarnataro

    Full Text Available New Hi-C technologies have revealed that chromosomes have a complex network of spatial contacts in the cell nucleus of higher organisms, whose organisation is only partially understood. Here, we investigate the structure of such a network in human GM12878 cells, to derive a large scale picture of nuclear architecture. We find that the intensity of intra-chromosomal interactions is power-law distributed. Inter-chromosomal interactions are two orders of magnitude weaker and exponentially distributed, yet they are not randomly arranged along the genomic sequence. Intra-chromosomal contacts broadly occur between epigenomically homologous regions, whereas inter-chromosomal contacts are especially associated with regions rich in highly expressed genes. Overall, genomic contacts in the nucleus appear to be structured as a network of networks where a set of strongly individual chromosomal units, as envisaged in the 'chromosomal territory' scenario derived from microscopy, interact with each other via on average weaker, yet far from random and functionally important interactions.

  12. Analysis of chromosome conservation in Lemur catta studied by chromosome paints and BAC/PAC probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardone, Maria Francesca; Ventura, Mario; Tempesta, Sergio; Rocchi, Mariano; Archidiacono, Nicoletta

    2002-12-01

    A panel of human chromosome painting probes and bacterial and P1 artificial chromosome (BAC/PAC) clones were used in fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) experiments to investigate the chromosome conservation of the ring-tailed lemur (Lemur catta, LCA) with respect to human. Whole chromosome paints specific for human chromosomes 7, 9, 11, 13, 14, 17, 18, 20, 21, and X were found to identify a single chromosome or an uninterrupted chromosomal region in LCA. A large set of partial chromosome paints and BAC/PAC probes were then used to refine the characterization of the rearrangements differentiating the two karyotypes. The results were also used to reconstruct the ancestral Lemuridae karyotype. Lemur catta, indeed, can be used as an outgroup, allowing symplesiomorphic (ancestral) rearrangements to be distinguished from apomorphic (derived) rearrangements in lemurs. Some LCA chromosomes are difficult to distinguish morphologically. The 'anchorage' of most LCA chromosomes to specific probes will contribute to the standardization of the karyotype of this species.

  13. Insect sex chromosomes. VI. A presumptive hyperactivation of the male X chromosome in Acheta domesticus (L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, S R; Ali, S

    1982-01-01

    The functional status of the X chromosome in Acheta domesticus has been analysed at the whole chromosome level on the basis of (1) 3H-thymidine autoradiography, (2) 5-BrdU/AO fluorescence microscopy (3) in vivo 5-BrdU incorporation and (4) 3H-UdR induced aberrations. The rationale of these techniques in relation to the functional aspect of the X chromosome is that the inactive X chromosome would (1) show asynchrony in DNA synthesis, (2) show differential fluorescence, (3) respond differentially to in vivo 5-BrdU treatment and (4) the active X chromosome would show aberrations when treated with 3H-Uridine. From the results, it appears that the X chromosomes in both male (XO) and female (XX) somatic cells of Acheta are euchromatic (active). Further, the single X in the male is transcriptionally as active as the two X chromosomes in the female. In other words, the single X in the male is hyperactive when compared with the single X in the female. From this it is inferred that the male X chromosome is differentially regulated in order to bring about an equalization of it's gene product(s) to that produced by both Xs in the female. Drosophila melanogaster has a comparable system of dosage compensation. Thus, Acheta is yet another insect showing evidence for an X chromosome regulatory mechanism of dosage compensation. Additionally, it is surmised that sex determination in Acheta is based on an autosomes/X chromosome balance mechanism.

  14. Large-scale reconstruction of 3D structures of human chromosomes from chromosomal contact data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trieu, Tuan; Cheng, Jianlin

    2014-04-01

    Chromosomes are not positioned randomly within a nucleus, but instead, they adopt preferred spatial conformations to facilitate necessary long-range gene-gene interactions and regulations. Thus, obtaining the 3D shape of chromosomes of a genome is critical for understanding how the genome folds, functions and how its genes interact and are regulated. Here, we describe a method to reconstruct preferred 3D structures of individual chromosomes of the human genome from chromosomal contact data generated by the Hi-C chromosome conformation capturing technique. A novel parameterized objective function was designed for modeling chromosome structures, which was optimized by a gradient descent method to generate chromosomal structural models that could satisfy as many intra-chromosomal contacts as possible. We applied the objective function and the corresponding optimization method to two Hi-C chromosomal data sets of both a healthy and a cancerous human B-cell to construct 3D models of individual chromosomes at resolutions of 1 MB and 200 KB, respectively. The parameters used with the method were calibrated according to an independent fluorescence in situ hybridization experimental data. The structural models generated by our method could satisfy a high percentage of contacts (pairs of loci in interaction) and non-contacts (pairs of loci not in interaction) and were compatible with the known two-compartment organization of human chromatin structures. Furthermore, structural models generated at different resolutions and from randomly permuted data sets were consistent.

  15. Chromosomal aberrations in benign prostatic hyperplasia patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muammer Altok

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To investigate the chromosomal changes in patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH. Materials and Methods: A total of 54 patients diagnosed with clinical BPH underwent transurethral prostate resection to address their primary urological problem. All patients were evaluated by use of a comprehensive medical history and rectal digital examination. The preoperative evaluation also included serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA measurement and ultrasonographic measurement of prostate volume. Prostate cancer was detected in one patient, who was then excluded from the study. We performed conventional cytogenetic analyses of short-term cultures of 53 peripheral blood samples obtained from the BPH patients. Results: The mean (±standard deviation age of the 53 patients was 67.8±9.4 years. The mean PSA value of the patients was 5.8±7.0 ng/mL. The mean prostate volume was 53.6±22.9 mL. Chromosomal abnormalities were noted in 5 of the 53 cases (9.4%. Loss of the Y chromosome was the most frequent chromosomal abnormality and was observed in three patients (5.7%. There was no statistically significant relationship among age, PSA, prostate volume, and chromosomal changes. Conclusions: Loss of the Y chromosome was the main chromosomal abnormality found in our study. However, this coexistence did not reach a significant level. Our study concluded that loss of the Y chromosome cannot be considered relevant for the diagnosis of BPH as it is for prostate cancer. Because BPH usually occurs in aging men, loss of the Y chromosome in BPH patients may instead be related to the aging process.

  16. Chromosomal aberrations in benign prostatic hyperplasia patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bağcı, Özkan; Umul, Mehmet; Güneş, Mustafa; Akyüz, Mehmet; Uruç, Fatih; Uz, Efkan; Soyupek, Sedat

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the chromosomal changes in patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Materials and Methods A total of 54 patients diagnosed with clinical BPH underwent transurethral prostate resection to address their primary urological problem. All patients were evaluated by use of a comprehensive medical history and rectal digital examination. The preoperative evaluation also included serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) measurement and ultrasonographic measurement of prostate volume. Prostate cancer was detected in one patient, who was then excluded from the study. We performed conventional cytogenetic analyses of short-term cultures of 53 peripheral blood samples obtained from the BPH patients. Results The mean (±standard deviation) age of the 53 patients was 67.8±9.4 years. The mean PSA value of the patients was 5.8±7.0 ng/mL. The mean prostate volume was 53.6±22.9 mL. Chromosomal abnormalities were noted in 5 of the 53 cases (9.4%). Loss of the Y chromosome was the most frequent chromosomal abnormality and was observed in three patients (5.7%). There was no statistically significant relationship among age, PSA, prostate volume, and chromosomal changes. Conclusions Loss of the Y chromosome was the main chromosomal abnormality found in our study. However, this coexistence did not reach a significant level. Our study concluded that loss of the Y chromosome cannot be considered relevant for the diagnosis of BPH as it is for prostate cancer. Because BPH usually occurs in aging men, loss of the Y chromosome in BPH patients may instead be related to the aging process. PMID:26966725

  17. Trends in the evolution of reptilian chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olmo, Ettore

    2008-10-01

    Reptiles are a karyologically heterogeneous group, where some orders and suborders exhibit characteristics similar to those of anamniotes and others share similarities with homeotherms. The class also shows different evolutionary trends, for instance in genome and chromosome size and composition. The turtle DNA base composition is similar to that of mammals, whereas that of lizards and snakes is more similar to that of anamniotes. The major karyological differences between turtles and squamates are the size and composition of the genome and the rate at which chromosomes change. Turtles have larger and more variable genome sizes, and a greater amount of middle repetitive DNA that differs even among related species. In lizards and snakes size of the genome are smaller, single-copy DNA is constant within each suborder, and differences in repetitive DNA involve fractions that become increasingly heterogeneous with widening phylogenetic distance. With regard to variation in karyotype morphology, turtles and crocodiles show low variability in chromosome number, morphology, and G-banding pattern. Greater variability is found among squamates, which have a similar degree of karyotypic change-as do some mammals, such as carnivores and bats-and in which there are also differences among congeneric species. An interesting relationship has been highlighted in the entire class Reptilia between rates of change in chromosomes, number of living species, and rate of extinction. However, different situations obtain in turtles and crocodiles on the one hand, and squamates on the other. In the former, the rate of change in chromosomes is lower and the various evolutionary steps do not seem to have entailed marked chromosomal variation, whereas squamates have a higher rate of change in chromosomes clearly related to the number of living species, and chromosomal variation seems to have played an important role in the evolution of several taxa. The different evolutionary trends in

  18. Progressive segregation of the Escherichia coli chromosome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Henrik Jørck; Youngren, Brenda; Hansen, Flemming G.

    2006-01-01

    We have followed the fate of 14 different loci around the Escherichia coli chromosome in living cells at slow growth rate using a highly efficient labelling system and automated measurements. Loci are segregated as they are replicated, but with a marked delay. Most markers segregate in a smooth...... temporal progression from origin to terminus. Thus, the overall pattern is one of continuous segregation during replication and is not consistent with recently published models invoking extensive sister chromosome cohesion followed by simultaneous segregation of the bulk of the chromosome. The terminus...

  19. The Barley Chromosome 5 Linkage Map

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, J.; Jørgensen, Jørgen Helms

    1975-01-01

    The distances between nine loci on barley chromosome 5 have been studied in five two-point tests, three three-point tests, and one four-point test. Our previous chromosome 5 linkage map, which contained eleven loci mapped from literature data (Jensen and Jørgensen 1975), is extended with four loci......-position is fixed on the map by a locus (necl), which has a good marker gene located centrally in the linkage group. The positions of the other loci are their distances in centimorgans from the 0-position; loci in the direction of the short chromosome arm are assigned positive values and those...

  20. The terminal DNA structure of mammalian chromosomes.

    OpenAIRE

    McElligott, R; Wellinger, R J

    1997-01-01

    In virtually all eukaryotic organisms, telomeric DNA is composed of a variable number of short direct repeats. While the primary sequence of telomeric repeats has been determined for a great variety of species, the actual physical DNA structure at the ends of a bona fide metazoan chromosome with a centromere is unknown. It is shown here that an overhang of the strand forming the 3' ends of the chromosomes, the G-rich strand, is found at mammalian chromosome ends. Moreover, on at least some te...

  1. Chromosomal abnormalities in patients with sperm disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Y. Pylyp

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Chromosomal abnormalities are among the most common genetic causes of spermatogenic disruptions. Carriers of chromosomal abnormalities are at increased risk of infertility, miscarriage or birth of a child with unbalanced karyotype due to the production of unbalanced gametes. The natural selection against chromosomally abnormal sperm usually prevents fertilization with sperm barring in cases of serious chromosomal abnormalities. However, assisted reproductive technologies in general and intracytoplasmic sperm injection in particular, enable the transmission of chromosomal abnormalities to the progeny. Therefore, cytogenetic studies are important in patients with male factor infertility before assisted reproduction treatment. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the types and frequencies of chromosomal abnormalities in 724 patients with infertility and to estimate the risk of chromosomal abnormalities detection in subgroups of patients depending on the severity of spermatogenic disruption, aiming at identifying groups of patients in need of cytogenetic studies. Karyotype analysis was performed in 724 blood samples of men attending infertility clinic. Chromosomal preparation was performed by standard techniques. At least 20 GTG-banded metaphase plates with the resolution from 450 to 750 bands per haploid set were analysed in each case. When chromosomal mosaicism was suspected, this number was increased to 50. Abnormal karyotypes were observed in 48 (6.6% patients, including 67% of autosomal abnormalities and 33% of gonosomal abnormalities. Autosomal abnormalities were represented by structural rearrangements. Reciprocal translocations were the most common type of structural chromosomal abnormalities in the studied group, detected with the frequency of 2.6% (n = 19, followed by Robertsonian translocation, observed with the frequency of 1.2% (n = 9. The frequency of inversions was 0.6% (n = 4. Gonosomal abnormalities included 14 cases

  2. Mayans: a Y chromosome perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Benedico, David; La Salvia, Joel; Zeng, Zhaoshu; Herrera, Giselle A; Garcia-Bertrand, Ralph; Herrera, Rene J

    2016-01-01

    In spite of the wealth of available cultural and archeological information as well as general interest in the Mayans, little is known about their genetics. In this study, for the first time, we attempt to alleviate this lacuna of knowledge by comprehensively investigating the Y chromosome composition of contemporary Mayan populations throughout their domain. To accomplish this, five geographically targeted and ethnically distinct Mayan populations are investigated using Y-SNP and Y-STR markers. Findings: overall, the Mayan populations as a group are highly homogeneous, basically made up of only two autochthonous haplogroups, Q1a2a1a1*-M3 and Q1a2a1*-L54. Although the Y-STR data illustrates diversity, this diversity, for the most part, is uniformly distributed among geographically distant Mayan populations. Similar haplotypes among populations, abundance of singletons and absence of population partitioning within networks among Mayan populations suggest recent population expansion and substantial gene flow within the Mayan dominion, possibly due to the development of agriculture, the establishment of interacting City–State systems and commerce. PMID:26956252

  3. Detection of paternal uniparental disomy 9 in a neonate with prenatally detected mosaicism for a small supernumerary marker chromosome 9 and a supernumerary ring chromosome 9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chih-Ping; Chen, Ming; Wang, Liang-Kai; Chern, Schu-Rern; Wu, Peih-Shan; Chen, Shin-Wen; Lai, Shih-Ting; Chang, Shun-Ping; Yang, Chien-Wen; Pan, Chen-Wen; Wang, Wayseen

    2017-08-01

    We present the association of paternal uniparental disomy (UPD) 9 with mosaicism for a small supernumerary marker chromosome 9 [sSMC(9)] and a supernumerary ring chromosome 9 [r(9)]. A 38-year-old woman underwent amniocentesis at 17 weeks of gestation because of advanced maternal age. Amniocentesis revealed a karyotype of 47,XY,+mar [25]/48,XY,+mar,+r(9) [4]/47,XY,+r(9) [1]/46,XY [6]. The parental karyotypes were normal. Array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) of cultured amniocytes revealed a result of de novo 9p13.1q21.11 (38,792,472-71,026,063) × 2.64. The marker chromosome was determined to be an sSMC(9) by spectral karyotyping and aCGH. A phenotypically normal baby was delivered at 38 weeks of gestation. During pediatric follow-ups at age two years, the neonate manifested normal psychomotor and growth development. Cytogenetic analysis, metaphase fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) aCGH and polymorphic DNA marker analysis were performed on the peripheral blood of the neonate. The neonate's blood had the following results. Metaphase FISH confirmed coexistence of the sSMC(9) and the supernumerary r(9). The karyotype was 47,XY,+sSMC(9) [14]/48,XY, +sSMC(9),+r(9) [10]/47,XY,+r(9) [6]/46,XY [10]. SNP aCGH revealed arr 9p22.3q21.11 (14,234,165-71,035,608) × 2-3, arr 9p24.3p22.3 (216,123-14,629,321)hmz, arr 9p21.3p13.2 (24,769,722-36,732,597)hmz and arr 9q21.11q34.3 (71,013,799-141,011,581)hmz. Polymorphic DNA marker analysis showed paternal isodisomy 9. Individuals with mosaicism for sSMC(9) and supernumerary r(9) may be associated with paternal UPD 9. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Y chromosome haplogroups in autistic subjects : Y chromosome in autistic subjects

    OpenAIRE

    Jamain, Stéphane; Quach, Hélène; Quintana-Murci, Luis; Betancur, Catalina; Philippe, Anne; Gillberg, Christopher; Sponheim, Eili; Skjeldal, Ola,; Fellous, Marc; Leboyer, Marion; Bourgeron, Thomas

    2002-01-01

    The male to female ratio in autism is 4:1 in the global autistic population, but increases to 23:1 in autistic subjects without physical or brain abnormalities. Despite this well-recognised gender difference, male predisposition to autistic disorder remains unexplained and the role of sex chromosomes is still debated. Numerical and structural abnormalities of the sex chromosomes are among the most frequently reported chromosomal disorders associated with autism. However, genome scans have fai...

  5. The Chromosomal Passenger Complex Is Required for Meiotic Acentrosomal Spindle Assembly and Chromosome Biorientation

    OpenAIRE

    Radford, Sarah J.; Jang, Janet K.; McKim, Kim S.

    2012-01-01

    DURING meiosis in the females of many species, spindle assembly occurs in the absence of the microtubule-organizing centers called centrosomes. In the absence of centrosomes, the nature of the chromosome-based signal that recruits microtubules to promote spindle assembly as well as how spindle bipolarity is established and the chromosomes orient correctly toward the poles is not known. To address these questions, we focused on the chromosomal passenger complex (CPC). We have found that the CP...

  6. Chromosome characterization using single fluorescent dye

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crissman, Harry A. (Los Alamos, NM); Hirons, Gregory T. (Irvine, CA)

    1995-01-01

    Chromosomes are characterized by fluorescent emissions from a single fluorescent dye that is excited over two different wavelengths. A mixture containing chromosomes is stained with a single dye selected from the group consisting of TOTO and YOYO and the stained chromosomes are placed in a flow cytometer. The fluorescent dye is excited sequentially by a first light having a wavelength in the ultraviolet range to excite the TOTO or YOYO to fluoresce at a first intensity and by a second light having a wavelength effective to excite the TOTO or YOYO dye to fluoresce at a second intensity. Specific chromosomes may be identified and sorted by intensity relationships between the first and second fluorescence emissions.

  7. Genetics Home Reference: Y chromosome infertility

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... chromosomal abnormalities in 2078 infertile couples referred for assisted reproductive techniques. Hum Reprod. 2005 Feb;20(2):437-42. ... Yq microdeletions in infertile italian couples referred for assisted reproductive technique. Sex Dev. 2007;1(6):347-52. doi: ...

  8. Chromosomal contact permits transcription between coregulated genes

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Fanucchi, Stephanie

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available . To ask whether chromosomal contacts are required for cotranscription in multigene complexes, we devised a strategy using TALENs to cleave and disrupt gene loops in a well-characterized multigene complex. Monitoring this disruption using RNA FISH...

  9. Chromosomal aberrations in uranium and coal miners

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolf, G.; Arndt, D.; Kotschy-Lang, N.; Obe, G. [Robert Koch Inst., Berlin (Germany)

    2004-02-01

    Peripheral lymphocytes from 66 Wismut uranium miners (WUM) and 29 Ruhr coal miners (RGM) were cultured and analysed for structural chromosomal aberrations in Giemsa-stained M1 metaphases. Cytogenetic data from 23 male white-collar workers from public services were used as a historical control group. The frequencies of chromosomal aberrations and sister chromatid exchanges in WUM and RCM were quite similar. Compared with public services workers, WUM and RCM had significantly higher frequencies of chromosomal aberrations. It is concluded that chromosomal aberrations in WUM are not induced by radioactive particles inhaled during underground mining but as in RCM rather result from factors such as age, lifestyle, illnesses, medications and diagnostic irradiations.

  10. IAPT/IOPB chromosome data 25 - Asteraceae

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Krahulcová, Anna

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 66, č. 5 (2017), s. 1249-1249 ISSN 0040-0262 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : chromosome numbers * DNA ploidy level * anginosperms Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 2.447, year: 2016

  11. Genetics Home Reference: ring chromosome 20 syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... F, Verardi R, Grande G, Stabile M. Electroclinical evolution in ring chromosome 20 epilepsy syndrome: a case ... care or advice. Users with questions about a personal health condition should consult with a qualified healthcare ...

  12. Temporal genomic evolution of bird sex chromosomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Zongji; Zhang, Jilin; Yang, Wei

    2014-01-01

    driving forces of Z chromosome evolution, we analyze here 45 newly available bird genomes and four species' transcriptomes, over their course of recombination loss between the sex chromosomes. RESULTS: We show Z chromosomes in general have a significantly higher substitution rate in introns and synonymous...... protein-coding sites than autosomes, driven by the male-to-female mutation bias ('male-driven evolution' effect). Our genome-wide estimate reveals that the degree of such a bias ranges from 1.6 to 3.8 among different species. G + C content of third codon positions exhibits the same trend of gradual...... ('fast-Z' evolution). And species with a lower level of intronic heterozygosities tend to evolve even faster on the Z chromosome. Further analysis of fast-evolving genes' enriched functional categories and sex-biased expression patterns support that, fast-Z evolution in birds is mainly driven by genetic...

  13. Complement activation in chromosome 13 dementias

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rostagno, A.; Revesz, T.; Lashley, T.

    2002-01-01

    Chromosome 13 dementias, familial British dementia (FBD) and familial Danish dementia (FDD), are associated with neurodegeneration and cerebrovascular amyloidosis, with striking neuropathological similarities to Alzheimer's disease (AD). Despite the structural differences among the amyloid subunits...

  14. Non-disjunction of chromosome 13

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bugge, Merete; Collins, Andrew; Hertz, Jens Michael

    2007-01-01

    We performed a molecular study with 21 microsatellites on a sample of 82 trisomy 13 conceptuses, the largest number of cases studied to date. The parental origin was determined in every case and in 89% the extra chromosome 13 was of maternal origin with an almost equal number of maternal MI and MII...... recombination in both maternal MI and MII errors and the former is associated with a significant number of tetrads (33%) that are nullichiasmate, which do not appear to be a feature of normal chromosome 13 meiosis. This study supports the evidence for subtle chromosome-specific influences on the mechanisms...... that determine non-disjunction of human chromosomes, consistent with the diversity of findings for other trisomies....

  15. Cognitive and medical features of chromosomal aneuploidy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutaff-Lee, Christa; Cordeiro, Lisa; Tartaglia, Nicole

    2013-01-01

    This chapter describes the physical characteristics, medical complications, and cognitive and psychological profiles that are associated with chromosomal aneuploidy conditions, a group of conditions in which individuals are born with one or more additional chromosome. Overall, chromosomal aneuploidy conditions occur in approximately 1 in 250 children. Information regarding autosomal disorders including trisomy 21 (Down syndrome), trisomy 13 (Patau syndrome), and trisomy 18 (Edward syndrome) are presented. Sex chromosome aneuploidy conditions such as Klinefelter syndrome (47,XXY), XYY, trisomy X, and Turner syndrome (45,X), in addition to less frequently occurring tetrasomy and pentasomy conditions are also covered. Treatment recommendations and suggestions for future research directions are discussed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Meiosis I: When Chromosomes Undergo Extreme Makeover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Matthew P.; Amon, Angelika; Ünal, Elçin

    2013-01-01

    The ultimate success of cell division relies on the accurate partitioning of the genetic material. Errors in this process occur in nearly all tumors and are the leading cause of miscarriages and congenital birth defects in humans. Two cell divisions, mitosis and meiosis, use common as well as unique mechanisms to ensure faithful chromosome segregation. In mitosis, alternating rounds of DNA replication and chromosome segregation preserves the chromosome complement of the progenitor cell. In contrast, during meiosis two consecutive rounds of nuclear division, meiosis I and meiosis II, follow a single round of DNA replication to reduce the chromosome complement by half. Meiosis likely evolved through changes to the mitotic cell division program. This review will focus on the recent findings describing the modifications that transform mitosis into meiosis. PMID:23916768

  17. Demasculinization of the Anopheles gambiae X chromosome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magnusson Kalle

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In a number of organisms sex-biased genes are non-randomly distributed between autosomes and the shared sex chromosome X (or Z. Studies on Anopheles gambiae have produced conflicting results regarding the underrepresentation of male-biased genes on the X chromosome and it is unclear to what extent sexual antagonism, dosage compensation or X-inactivation in the male germline, the evolutionary forces that have been suggested to affect the chromosomal distribution of sex-biased genes, are operational in Anopheles. Results We performed a meta-analysis of sex-biased gene expression in Anopheles gambiae which provides evidence for a general underrepresentation of male-biased genes on the X-chromosome that increased in significance with the observed degree of sex-bias. A phylogenomic comparison between Drosophila melanogaster, Aedes aegypti and Culex quinquefasciatus also indicates that the Anopheles X chromosome strongly disfavours the evolutionary conservation of male-biased expression and that novel male-biased genes are more likely to arise on autosomes. Finally, we demonstrate experimentally that transgenes situated on the Anopheles gambiae X chromosome are transcriptionally silenced in the male germline. Conclusion The data presented here support the hypothesis that the observed demasculinization of the Anopheles X chromosome is driven by X-chromosome inactivation in the male germline and by sexual antagonism. The demasculinization appears to be the consequence of a loss of male-biased expression, rather than a failure in the establishment or the extinction of male-biased genes.

  18. Chromosomal abnormalities in child psychiatric patients.

    OpenAIRE

    Hong, K. E.; Kim, J. H.; Moon, S. Y.; Oh, S. K.

    1999-01-01

    To determine the frequency of chromosomal abnormalities in a child psychiatric population, and to evaluate possible associations between types of abnormalities and patient's clinical characteristics, cytogenetic examination was performed on 604 patients. Demographic data, reasons for karyotyping, clinical signs, and other patient characteristics were assessed and correlated with the results from karyotyping. Chromosomal abnormalities were found in 69 patients (11.3%); these were structural in...

  19. Chromosomal profile of indigenous pig (Sus scrofa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Guru Vishnu

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The objective of this study was to investigate the chromosomal profile of indigenous pigs by computing morphometric measurements. Materials and Methods: A cytogenetic study was carried out in 60 indigenous pigs to analyze the chromosomal profile by employing the short term peripheral blood lymphocyte culture technique. Results: The modal chromosome number (2n in indigenous pigs was found to be 38 and a fundamental number of 64 as in the exotic. First chromosome was the longest pair, and thirteenth pair was the second largest while Y-chromosome was the smallest in the karyotype of the pig. The mean relative length, arm ratio, centromeric indices and morphological indices of chromosomes varied from 1.99±0.01 to 11.23±0.09, 1.04±0.05 to 2.95±0.02, 0.51±0.14 to 0.75±0.09 and 2.08±0.07 to 8.08±0.15%, respectively in indigenous pigs. Sex had no significant effect (p>0.05 on all the morphometric measurements studied. Conclusion: The present study revealed that among autosomes first five pairs were sub metacentric, next two pairs were sub telocentric (6-7, subsequent five pairs were metacentric (8-12 and remaining six pairs were telocentric (13-18, while both allosomes were metacentric. The chromosomal number, morphology and various morphometric measurements of the chromosomes of the indigenous pigs were almost similar to those established breeds reported in the literature.

  20. Chromosomal evolution in the plant family Solanaceae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Feinan; Tanksley, Steven D

    2010-03-17

    Over the past decades, extensive comparative mapping research has been performed in the plant family Solanaceae. The recent identification of a large set of single-copy conserved orthologous (COSII) markers has greatly accelerated comparative mapping studies among major solanaceous species including tomato, potato, eggplant, pepper and diploid Nicotiana species (as well as tetraploid tobacco). The large amount of comparative data now available for these species provides the opportunity to describe the overall patterns of chromosomal evolution in this important plant family. The results of this investigation are described herein. We combined data from multiple COSII studies, and other comparative mapping studies performed in tomato, potato, eggplant, pepper and diploid Nicotiana species, to deduce the features and outcomes of chromosomal evolution in the Solanaceae over the past 30 million years. This includes estimating the rates and timing of chromosomal changes (inversions and translocations) as well as deducing the age of ancestral progenitor species and predicting their genome configurations. The Solanaceae has experienced chromosomal changes at a modest rate compared with other families and the rates are likely conserved across different lineages of the family. Chromosomal inversions occur at a consistently higher rate than do translocations. Further, we find evidences for non-random positioning of the chromosomal rearrangement breakpoints. This finding is consistent with the similar finding in mammals, where hot spots for chromosomal breakages have apparently played a significant role in shaping genome evolution. Finally, by utilizing multiple genome comparisons we were able to reconstruct the most likely genome configuration for a number of now-extinct progenitor species that gave rise to the extant solanaceous species used in this research. The results from this study provide the first broad overview of chromosomal evolution in the family Solanaceae, and

  1. Female meiotic sex chromosome inactivation in chicken.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sam Schoenmakers

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available During meiotic prophase in male mammals, the heterologous X and Y chromosomes remain largely unsynapsed, and meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI leads to formation of the transcriptionally silenced XY body. In birds, the heterogametic sex is female, carrying Z and W chromosomes (ZW, whereas males have the homogametic ZZ constitution. During chicken oogenesis, the heterologous ZW pair reaches a state of complete heterologous synapsis, and this might enable maintenance of transcription of Z- and W chromosomal genes during meiotic prophase. Herein, we show that the ZW pair is transiently silenced, from early pachytene to early diplotene using immunocytochemistry and gene expression analyses. We propose that ZW inactivation is most likely achieved via spreading of heterochromatin from the W on the Z chromosome. Also, persistent meiotic DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs may contribute to silencing of Z. Surprisingly, gammaH2AX, a marker of DSBs, and also the earliest histone modification that is associated with XY body formation in mammalian and marsupial spermatocytes, does not cover the ZW during the synapsed stage. However, when the ZW pair starts to desynapse, a second wave of gammaH2AX accumulates on the unsynapsed regions of Z, which also show a reappearance of the DSB repair protein RAD51. This indicates that repair of meiotic DSBs on the heterologous part of Z is postponed until late pachytene/diplotene, possibly to avoid recombination with regions on the heterologously synapsed W chromosome. Two days after entering diplotene, the Z looses gammaH2AX and shows reactivation. This is the first report of meiotic sex chromosome inactivation in a species with female heterogamety, providing evidence that this mechanism is not specific to spermatogenesis. It also indicates the presence of an evolutionary force that drives meiotic sex chromosome inactivation independent of the final achievement of synapsis.

  2. Chromosome 11q13 deletion syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Yu-Seon; Kim, Gun-Ha; Byeon, Jung Hye; Eun, So-Hee; Eun, Baik-Lin

    2016-01-01

    Chromosome 11q13 deletion syndrome has been previously reported as either otodental syndrome or oculo-oto-dental syndrome. The otodental syndrome is characterized by dental abnormalities and high-frequency sensorineural hearing loss, and by ocular coloboma in some cases. The underlying genetic defect causing otodental syndrome is a hemizygous microdeletion involving the FGF3 gene on chromosome 11q13.3. Recently, a new form of severe deafness, microtia (small ear) and small teeth, without the ...

  3. Plasmid and chromosome segregation in prokaryotes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller-Jensen, Jakob; Bugge Jensen, Rasmus; Gerdes, Kenn

    2000-01-01

    Recent major advances in the understanding of prokaryotic DNA segregation have been achieved by using fluorescence microscopy to visualize the localization of cellular components. Plasmids and bacterial chromosomes are partitioned in a highly dynamic fashion, suggesting the presence of a mitotic......-like apparatus in prokaryotes. The identification of chromosomal homologues of the well-characterized plasmid partitioning genes indicates that there could be a general mechanism of bacterial DNA partitioning. Udgivelsesdato: July 1...

  4. Abnormal sex chromosome constitution and longitudinal growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aksglaede, Lise; Skakkebaek, Niels E; Juul, Anders

    2008-01-01

    Growth is a highly complex process regulated by the interaction between sex steroids and the GH IGF-axis. However, other factors such as sex chromosome-related genes play independent roles.......Growth is a highly complex process regulated by the interaction between sex steroids and the GH IGF-axis. However, other factors such as sex chromosome-related genes play independent roles....

  5. Sequence conservation on the Y chromosome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gibson, L.H.; Yang-Feng, L. [Yale Univ. School of Medicine, New Haven, CT (United States); Lau, C. [Univ. of California, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    1994-09-01

    The Y chromosome is present in all mammals and is considered to be essential to sex determination. Despite intense genomic research, only a few genes have been identified and mapped to this chromosome in humans. Several of them, such as SRY and ZFY, have been demonstrated to be conserved and Y-located in other mammals. In order to address the issue of sequence conservation on the Y chromosome, we performed fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with DNA from a human Y cosmid library as a probe to study the Y chromosomes from other mammalian species. Total DNA from 3,000-4,500 cosmid pools were labeled with biotinylated-dUTP and hybridized to metaphase chromosomes. For human and primate preparations, human cot1 DNA was included in the hybridization mixture to suppress the hybridization from repeat sequences. FISH signals were detected on the Y chromosomes of human, gorilla, orangutan and baboon (Old World monkey) and were absent on those of squirrel monkey (New World monkey), Indian munjac, wood lemming, Chinese hamster, rat and mouse. Since sequence analysis suggested that specific genes, e.g. SRY and ZFY, are conserved between these two groups, the lack of detectable hybridization in the latter group implies either that conservation of the human Y sequences is limited to the Y chromosomes of the great apes and Old World monkeys, or that the size of the syntenic segment is too small to be detected under the resolution of FISH, or that homologeous sequences have undergone considerable divergence. Further studies with reduced hybridization stringency are currently being conducted. Our results provide some clues as to Y-sequence conservation across species and demonstrate the limitations of FISH across species with total DNA sequences from a particular chromosome.

  6. Chromosomal organization and segregation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle Vallet-Gely

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The study of chromosomal organization and segregation in a handful of bacteria has revealed surprising variety in the mechanisms mediating such fundamental processes. In this study, we further emphasized this diversity by revealing an original organization of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa chromosome. We analyzed the localization of 20 chromosomal markers and several components of the replication machinery in this important opportunistic γ-proteobacteria pathogen. This technique allowed us to show that the 6.3 Mb unique circular chromosome of P. aeruginosa is globally oriented from the old pole of the cell to the division plane/new pole along the oriC-dif axis. The replication machinery is positioned at mid-cell, and the chromosomal loci from oriC to dif are moved sequentially to mid-cell prior to replication. The two chromosomal copies are subsequently segregated at their final subcellular destination in the two halves of the cell. We identified two regions in which markers localize at similar positions, suggesting a bias in the distribution of chromosomal regions in the cell. The first region encompasses 1.4 Mb surrounding oriC, where loci are positioned around the 0.2/0.8 relative cell length upon segregation. The second region contains at least 800 kb surrounding dif, where loci show an extensive colocalization step following replication. We also showed that disrupting the ParABS system is very detrimental in P. aeruginosa. Possible mechanisms responsible for the coordinated chromosomal segregation process and for the presence of large distinctive regions are discussed.

  7. Chromosomal Abnormality in Men with Impaired Spermatogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Dana Mierla; Dumitru Jardan; Veronica Stoian

    2014-01-01

    Background: Chromosomal abnormalities and Y chromosome microdeletions are regarded as two most frequent genetic causes associated with failure of spermatogenesis in the Caucasian population. Materials and Methods: To investigate the distribution of genetic defects in the Romanian population with azoospermia or severe oligozoospermia, karyotype analysis by G-banding was carried out in 850 idiopathic infertile men and in 49 fertile men with one or more children. Screening for microdeletions in ...

  8. Modelling chromosomal aberration induction by ionising radiation: The influence of interphase chromosome architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottolenghi, A.; Ballarini, F.; Biaggi, M.

    Several advances have been achieved in the knowledge of nuclear architecture and functions during the last decade, thus allowing the identification of interphase chromosome territories and sub-chromosomal domains (e.g. arm and band domains). This is an important step in the study of radiation-induced chromosome aberrations; indeed, the coupling between track-structure simulations and reliable descriptions of the geometrical properties of the target is one of the main tasks in modelling aberration induction by radiation, since it allows one to clarify the role of the initial positioning of two DNA lesions in determining their interaction probability. In the present paper, the main recent findings on nuclear and chromosomal architecture are summarised. A few examples of models based on different descriptions of interphase chromosome organisation (random-walk models, domain models and static models) are presented, focussing on how the approach adopted in modelling the target nuclei and chromosomes can influence the simulation of chromosomal aberration yields. Each model is discussed by taking into account available experimental data on chromosome aberration induction and/or interphase chromatin organisation. Preliminary results from a mechanistic model based on a coupling between radiation track-structure features and explicitly-modelled, non-overlapping chromosome territories are presented.

  9. Application of chromosomal microdissection, polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and reverse chromosome painting in prenatal diagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, N.; Xu, J.; Cedrone, E. [Univ. of Rochester School of Medicine, Rochester, NY (United States)

    1994-09-01

    De novo marker chromosomes have been found in about 0.04% of amniotic fluid cultures. The origin of these marker chromosomes is difficult to identify by routine chromosome banding analysis. In the present study, we applied microdissection, PCR, and reverse chromosome painting to two amniotic fluid cases with a karyotype of 47,XX,+mar, and 47,XX,+?i(9p), respectively. Fluorescence in situ hybridization of the biotin-labeled DNA probe generated from 5 copies of the dissected marker chromosomes was applied to the normal metaphase spreads and revealed that the marker originated from the p arm of chromosomes 14 and 22, while the ?i(9p) was actually i(4p). Reverse painting of the same probe to the metaphase spreads of the patients completely painted the marker chromosomes in question, which confirms the accuracy of the analysis. Our study provides an example of the application of chromosome microdissection and molecular cytogenetics in prenatal diagnosis for the identification of marker chromosomes unidentifiable by routine analysis.

  10. Homomorphic sex chromosomes and the intriguing Y chromosome of Ctenomys rodent species (Rodentia, Ctenomyidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suárez-Villota, Elkin Y; Pansonato-Alves, José C; Foresti, Fausto; Gallardo, Milton H

    2014-01-01

    Unlike the X chromosome, the mammalian Y chromosome undergoes evolutionary decay resulting in small size. This sex chromosomal heteromorphism, observed in most species of the fossorial rodent Ctenomys, contrasts with the medium-sized, homomorphic acrocentric sex chromosomes of closely related C. maulinus and C. sp. To characterize the sequence composition of these chromosomes, fluorescent banding, self-genomic in situ hybridization, and fluorescent in situ hybridization with an X painting probe were performed on mitotic and meiotic plates. High molecular homology between the sex chromosomes was detected on mitotic material as well as on meiotic plates immunodetected with anti-SYCP3 and anti-γH2AX. The Y chromosome is euchromatic, poor in repetitive sequences and differs from the X by the loss of a block of pericentromeric chromatin. Inferred from the G-banding pattern, an inversion and the concomitant prevention of recombination in a large asynaptic region seems to be crucial for meiotic X chromosome inactivation. These peculiar findings together with the homomorphism of Ctenomys sex chromosomes are discussed in the light of the regular purge that counteracts Muller's ratchet and the probable mechanisms accounting for their origin and molecular homology. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. Paternal isodisomy of chromosome 6 in association with a maternal supernumerary marker chromosome (6)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James, R.S.; Crolla, J.A.; Sitch, F.L. [Salisbury District Hospital, Wiltshire (United Kingdom)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Uniparental disomy may arise by a number of different mechanisms of aneuploidy correction. A population that has been identified as being at increased risk of aneuploidy are those individuals bearing supernumerary marker chromosomes (SMCs). There have been a number of cases reported of trisomy 21 in association with bi-satellited marker chromosomes have described two individuals with small inv dup (15) markers. One had paternal isodisomy of chromosome 15 and Angelman syndrome. The other had maternal heterodisomy (15) and Prader-Willi syndrome. At the Wessex Regional Genetics Laboratory we have conducted a search for uniparental disomy of the normal homologues of the chromosomes from which SMCs originated. Our study population consists of 39 probands with SMCs originating from a number of different autosomes, including 17 with SMCs of chromosome 15 origin. Using PCR amplification of microsatellite repeat sequences located distal to the regions included in the SMCs we have determined the parental origin of the two normal homologues in each case. We have identified paternal isodisomy of chromosome 6 in a female child with a supernumerary marker ring chromosome 6 in approximately 70% of peripheral blood lymphocytes. The marker was found to be of maternal origin. This is the second case of paternal isodisomy of chromosome 6 to be reported, and the first in association with a SMC resulting in a partial trisomy for a portion of the short arm of chromosome 6. In spite of this, the patient appears to be functioning appropriately for her age.

  12. The hierarchically organized splitting of chromosomal bands for all human chromosomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liehr Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chromosome banding is widely used in cytogenetics. However, the biological nature of hierarchically organized splitting of chromosomal bands of human chromosomes is an enigma and has not been, as yet, studied. Results Here we present for the first time the hierarchically organized splitting of chromosomal bands in their sub-bands for all human chromosomes. To do this, array-proved multicolor banding (aMCB probe-sets for all human chromosomes were applied to normal metaphase spreads of three different G-band levels. We confirmed for all chromosomes to be a general principle that only Giemsa-dark bands split into dark and light sub-bands, as we demonstrated previously by chromosome stretching. Thus, the biological band splitting is in > 50% of the sub-bands different than implemented by the ISCN nomenclature suggesting also a splitting of G-light bands. Locus-specific probes exemplary confirmed the results of MCB. Conclusion Overall, the present study enables a better understanding of chromosome architecture. The observed difference of biological and ISCN band-splitting may be an explanation why mapping data from human genome project do not always fit the cytogenetic mapping.

  13. Whole chromosome gain does not in itself confer cancer-like chromosomal instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valind, Anders; Jin, Yuesheng; Baldetorp, Bo; Gisselsson, David

    2013-12-24

    Constitutional aneuploidy is typically caused by a single-event meiotic or early mitotic error. In contrast, somatic aneuploidy, found mainly in neoplastic tissue, is attributed to continuous chromosomal instability. More debated as a cause of aneuploidy is aneuploidy itself; that is, whether aneuploidy per se causes chromosomal instability, for example, in patients with inborn aneuploidy. We have addressed this issue by quantifying the level of somatic mosaicism, a proxy marker of chromosomal instability, in patients with constitutional aneuploidy by precise background-filtered dual-color FISH. In contrast to previous studies that used less precise methods, we find that constitutional trisomy, even for large chromosomes that are often trisomic in cancer, does not confer a significantly elevated rate of somatic chromosomal mosaicism in individual cases. Constitutional triploidy was associated with an increased level of somatic mosaicism, but this consisted mostly of reversion from trisomy to disomy and did not correspond to a proportionally elevated level of chromosome mis-segregation in triploids, indicating that the observed mosaicism resulted from a specific accumulation of cells with a hypotriploid chromosome number. In no case did the rate of somatic mosaicism in constitutional aneuploidy exceed that of "chromosomally stable" cancer cells. Our findings show that even though constitutional aneuploidy was in some cases associated with low-level somatic mosaicism, it was insufficient to generate the cancer-like levels expected if aneuploidy single-handedly triggered cancer-like chromosomal instability.

  14. Neo-sex chromosomes of Ronderosia bergi: insight into the evolution of sex chromosomes in grasshoppers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacios-Gimenez, O M; Marti, D A; Cabral-de-Mello, D C

    2015-09-01

    Sex chromosomes have evolved many times from morphologically identical autosome pairs, most often presenting several recombination suppression events, followed by accumulation of repetitive DNA sequences. In Orthoptera, most species have an X0♂ sex chromosome system. However, in the subfamily Melanoplinae, derived variants of neo-sex chromosomes (neo-XY♂ or neo-X1X2Y♂) emerged several times. Here, we examined the differentiation of neo-sex chromosomes in a Melanoplinae species with a neo-XY♂/XX♀ system, Ronderosia bergi, using several approaches: (i) classical cytogenetic analysis, (ii) mapping via fluorescent in situ hybridization of some selected repetitive DNA sequences and microdissected sex chromosomes, and (iii) immunolocalization of distinct histone modifications. The microdissected sex chromosomes were also used as sources for Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of RNA-coding multigene families, to study variants related to the sex chromosomes. Our data suggest that the R. bergi neo-Y has become differentiated after its formation by a Robertsonian translocation and inversions, and has accumulated repetitive DNA sequences. Interestingly, the ex autosomes incorporated into the neo-sex chromosomes retain some autosomal post-translational histone modifications, at least in metaphase I, suggesting that the establishment of functional modifications in neo-sex chromosomes is slower than their sequence differentiation.

  15. Interphase Chromosome Profiling: A Method for Conventional Banded Chromosome Analysis Using Interphase Nuclei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babu, Ramesh; Van Dyke, Daniel L; Dev, Vaithilingam G; Koduru, Prasad; Rao, Nagesh; Mitter, Navnit S; Liu, Mingya; Fuentes, Ernesto; Fuentes, Sarah; Papa, Stephen

    2017-10-05

    - Chromosome analysis on bone marrow or peripheral blood samples fails in a small proportion of attempts. A method that is more reliable, with similar or better resolution, would be a welcome addition to the armamentarium of the cytogenetics laboratory. - To develop a method similar to banded metaphase chromosome analysis that relies only on interphase nuclei. - To label multiple targets in an equidistant fashion along the entire length of each chromosome, including landmark subtelomere and centromere regions. Each label so generated by using cloned bacterial artificial chromosome probes is molecularly distinct with unique spectral characteristics, so the number and position of the labels can be tracked to identify chromosome abnormalities. - Interphase chromosome profiling (ICP) demonstrated results similar to conventional chromosome analysis and fluorescence in situ hybridization in 55 previously studied cases and obtained useful ICP chromosome analysis results on another 29 cases in which conventional methods failed. - ICP is a new and powerful method to karyotype peripheral blood and bone marrow aspirate preparations without reliance on metaphase chromosome preparations. It will be of particular value for cases with a failed conventional analysis or when a fast turnaround time is required.

  16. Coexistence of inverted Y, chromosome 15p+ and abnormal phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acar, H; Cora, T; Erkul, I

    1999-01-01

    In this study, we report conventional and molecular cytogenetic studies in a patient with multiple anomalies who is a carrier of a pericentric inversion on chromosome Y and a chromosome 15p+. His parents were phenotypically normal. The father is a carrier of a pericentric inversion of chromosome Y, and the mother carries a large chromosome 15p+ variant. The inverted Y chromosome was demonstrated by GTG- and CBG-banding, and DAPI-staining. The presence of extra chromosomal material on the chromosome 15p, that was C-band and DAPI positive, was demonstrated by trypsin G-banding. This suggests that the extra chromosomal material contained repetitive DNA sequences. NOR-staining indicated the presence a nuclear organizer region at the junction of the chromosome 15p+ material. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), with chromosome X and Y painting probes, alpha- and classic-satellite probes specific for chromosome Y, alpha- and beta-satellite III probes for chromosome 15 were used to elucidate the nature of both the inverted Y chromosome and chromosome 15p+. The result with chromosome X and Y painting probes, alpha-satellite, classic-satellite, and DYS59 probes specific for chromosome Y revealed the rearrangement of the Y chromosome was an inv(Y)(p11.2q11.22 or q11.23). FISH with alpha-satellite and beta-satellite III probes for chromosome 15 demonstrated that the extra chromosomal material on the chromosome 15 probably represents beta-satellite III sequences. The possible roles of the simultaneous occurrence of an inverted Y and the amplified DNA sequence on chromosome 15p in the abnormal phenotype of the proband are discussed.

  17. Centromeric banding pattern of mitotic chromosomes in Vigna vexillata

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Vigna vexillata chromosome characterization was carried out using the Leishman C- banding technique. The results showed that the chromosomes mostly exhibited bands at both the centromeric and telomeric regions. These bands will serve, as a valuable marker for the identification of the chromosomes. Chromosomes 2 ...

  18. Discovery of Supernumerary B Chromosomes in Drosophila melanogaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauerly, Elisabeth; Hughes, Stacie E.; Vietti, Dana R.; Miller, Danny E.; McDowell, William; Hawley, R. Scott

    2014-01-01

    B chromosomes are small, heterochromatic chromosomes that are transmitted in a non-Mendelian manner. We have identified a stock of Drosophila melanogaster that recently (within the last decade) acquired an average of 10 B chromosomes per fly. These B chromosomes are transmitted by both males and females and can be maintained for multiple generations in a wild-type genetic background despite the fact that they cause high levels of 4th chromosome meiotic nondisjunction in females. Most curiously, these B chromosomes are mitotically unstable, suggesting either the absence of critical chromosomal sites or the inability of the meiotic or mitotic systems to cope with many additional chromosomes. These B chromosomes also contain centromeres and are primarily composed of the heterochromatic AATAT satellite sequence. Although the AATAT sequence comprises the majority of the 4th chromosome heterochromatin, the B chromosomes lack most, if not all, 4th chromosome euchromatin. Presumably as a consequence of their heterochromatic content, these B chromosomes significantly modify position-effect variegation in two separate reporter systems, acting as enhancers of variegation in one case and suppressors in the other. The identification of B chromosomes in a genetically tractable organism like D. melanogaster will facilitate studies of chromosome evolution and the analysis of the mechanisms by which meiotic and mitotic processes cope with additional chromosomes. PMID:24478336

  19. Label Free Chromosome Translocation Detection with Silicon nanowires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kwasny, Dorota; Andersen, Karsten Brandt; Frøhling, Kasper Bayer

    HROMOSOME translocation, which is a rearrangement of arms between two chromosomes, is a major group of chromosome abnormalities leading to cancer. As a result, two derivative chromosomes with sequences coming from both chromosomes are formed. The current translocation detection method is a Fluore...

  20. Chromosomes in the genesis and progression of ependymomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rogatto, S R; Casartelli, C; Rainho, C A

    1993-01-01

    chromosomes in three cases. Structural rearrangements of chromosome 2 were a finding for all cases and involved loss of material at 2q32-34. Other structural chromosome abnormalities detected involved chromosomes 4, 6, 10, 11, 12, and X. We also reviewed data on 22 cases previously reported....

  1. Comparative chromosome painting in Carnivora and Pholidota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perelman, P L; Beklemisheva, V R; Yudkin, D V; Petrina, T N; Rozhnov, V V; Nie, W; Graphodatsky, A S

    2012-01-01

    The order of Carnivora has been very well characterized with over 50 species analyzed by chromosome painting and with painting probe sets made for 9 Carnivora species. Representatives of almost all families have been studied with few exceptions (Otariidae, Odobenidae, Nandiniidae, Prionodontidae). The patterns of chromosome evolution in Carnivora are discussed here. Overall, many Carnivora species retained karyotypes that only slightly differ from the ancestral carnivore karyotype. However, there are at least 3 families in which the ancestral carnivore karyotype has been severely rearranged - Canidae, Ursidae and Mephitidae. Here we report chromosome painting of yet another Carnivora species with a highly rearranged karyotype, Genetta pardina. Recurrent rearrangements make it difficult to define the ancestral chromosomal arrangement in several instances. Only 2 species of pangolins (Pholidota), a sister order of Carnivora, have been studied by chromosome painting. Future use of whole-genome sequencing data is discussed in the context of solving the questions that are beyond resolution of conventional banding techniques and chromosome painting. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Epilepsy and chromosome 18 abnormalities: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verrotti, Alberto; Carelli, Alessia; di Genova, Lorenza; Striano, Pasquale

    2015-11-01

    To analyze the various types of epilepsy in subjects with chromosome 18 aberrations in order to define epilepsy and its main clinical, electroclinical and prognostic aspects in chromosome 18 anomalies. A careful overview of recent works concerning chromosome 18 aberrations and epilepsy has been carried out considering the major groups of chromosomal 18 aberrations, identified using MEDLINE and EMBASE database from 1980 to 2015. Epilepsy seems to be particularly frequent in patients with trisomy or duplication of chromosome 18 with a prevalence of up to 65%. Approximately, over half of the patients develop epilepsy during the first year of life. Epilepsy can be focal or generalized; infantile spasms have also been reported. Brain imagines showed anatomical abnormalities in 38% of patients. Some antiepileptic drugs as valproic acid and carbamazepine were useful for treating seizures although a large majority of patients need polytherapy. Children with chromosomal 18 abnormalities can present different types of epilepsy, more frequently focal seizures in individuals with 18q- deletion syndrome, while both complex partial seizures and generalized tonic-clonic seizures have been described in patients who suffer for trisomy 18. Outcome in term of seizures frequency and duration seems to be variable and epilepsy is drug resistant in half of the children, especially in children with trisomy 18 and generalized epilepsy. Copyright © 2015 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. The genomics of plant sex chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyskot, Boris; Hobza, Roman

    2015-07-01

    Around six percent of flowering species are dioecious, with separate female and male individuals. Sex determination is mostly based on genetics, but morphologically distinct sex chromosomes have only evolved in a few species. Of these, heteromorphic sex chromosomes have been most clearly described in the two model species - Silene latifolia and Rumex acetosa. In both species, the sex chromosomes are the largest chromosomes in the genome. They are hence easily distinguished, can be physically separated and analyzed. This review discusses some recent experimental data on selected model dioecious species, with a focus on S. latifolia. Phylogenetic analyses show that dioecy in plants originated independently and repeatedly even within individual genera. A cogent question is whether there is genetic degeneration of the non-recombining part of the plant Y chromosome, as in mammals, and, if so, whether reduced levels of gene expression in the heterogametic sex are equalized by dosage compensation. Current data provide no clear conclusion. We speculate that although some transcriptome analyses indicate the first signs of degeneration, especially in S. latifolia, the evolutionary processes forming plant sex chromosomes in plants may, to some extent, differ from those in animals. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  4. Evolutionary stability of sex chromosomes in snakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovatsos, Michail; Vukić, Jasna; Lymberakis, Petros; Kratochvíl, Lukáš

    2015-12-22

    Amniote vertebrates possess various mechanisms of sex determination, but their variability is not equally distributed. The large evolutionary stability of sex chromosomes in viviparous mammals and birds was believed to be connected with their endothermy. However, some ectotherm lineages seem to be comparably conserved in sex determination, but previously there was a lack of molecular evidence to confirm this. Here, we document a stability of sex chromosomes in advanced snakes based on the testing of Z-specificity of genes using quantitative PCR (qPCR) across 37 snake species (our qPCR technique is suitable for molecular sexing in potentially all advanced snakes). We discovered that at least part of sex chromosomes is homologous across all families of caenophidian snakes (Acrochordidae, Xenodermatidae, Pareatidae, Viperidae, Homalopsidae, Colubridae, Elapidae and Lamprophiidae). The emergence of differentiated sex chromosomes can be dated back to about 60 Ma and preceded the extensive diversification of advanced snakes, the group with more than 3000 species. The Z-specific genes of caenophidian snakes are (pseudo)autosomal in the members of the snake families Pythonidae, Xenopeltidae, Boidae, Erycidae and Sanziniidae, as well as in outgroups with differentiated sex chromosomes such as monitor lizards, iguanas and chameleons. Along with iguanas, advanced snakes are therefore another example of ectothermic amniotes with a long-term stability of sex chromosomes comparable with endotherms. © 2015 The Author(s).

  5. Polytene chromosome map and inversion polymorphism in Drosophila mediopunctata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ananina Galina

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Drosophila mediopunctata belongs to the tripunctata group, and is one of the commonest Drosophila species collected in some places in Brazil, especially in the winter. A standard map of the polytene chromosomes is presented. The breakpoints of the naturally occurring chromosomal rearrangements are marked on the map. The distribution of breaking points through the chromosomes of D. mediopunctata is apparently non-random. Chromosomes X, II and IV show inversion polymorphisms. Chromosome II is the most polymorphic, with 17 inversions, 8 inversions in the distal region and 9 in the proximal region. Chromosome X has four different gene arrangements, while chromosome IV has only two.

  6. Small supernumerary marker chromosomes (sSMC in humans; are there B chromosomes hidden among them

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ogilvie Caroline

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Small supernumerary marker chromosomes (sSMC and B-chromosomes represent a heterogeneous collection of chromosomes added to the typical karyotype, and which are both small in size. They may consist of heterochromatic and/or euchromatic material. Also a predominance of maternal transmission was reported for both groups. Even though sSMC and B-chromosomes show some similarity it is still an open question if B-chromosomes are present among the heterogeneous group of sSMC. According to current theories, sSMC would need drive, drift or beneficial effects to increase in frequency in order to become B chromosome. However, up to now no B-chromosomes were described in human. Results Here we provide first evidence and discuss, that among sSMC B-chromosomes might be hidden. We present two potential candidates which may already be, or may in future evolve into B chromosomes in human: (i sSMC cases where the marker is stainable only by DNA derived from itself; and (ii acrocentric-derived inverted duplication sSMC without associated clinical phenotype. Here we report on the second sSMC stainable exclusively by its own DNA and show that for acrocentric derived sSMC 3.9× more are familial cases than reported for other sSMC. Conclusion The majority of sSMC are not to be considered as B-chromosomes. Nonetheless, a minority of sSMC show similarities to B-chromosomes. Further studies are necessary to come to final conclusions for that problem.

  7. Ring chromosome 13 syndrome characterized by high resolution array based comparative genomic hybridization in patient with 47, XYY syndrome: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu Fang

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction The co-occurrence of ring chromosome 13 syndrome and 47, XYY syndrome in the same individual is rare. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of the co-existence of this kind of chromosome aberrations. At present, the deletion 13q syndrome is divided into three groups based on the deletion's location relative to chromosomal band 13q32. Group 1 (proximal to q32 and group 2 (including q32 have shown distinctive phenotypes including mental retardation and growth deficiency. Group 3 (q33-34 deletion is defined by the presence of mental retardation but there is usually an absence of major malformations. Case presentation We describe a 10-month-old Chinese Han boy presenting with severe mental retardation, profound congenital bilateral hearing loss with a terminal 13q33.2 deletion and multiple malformations. Routine chromosome analysis disclosed a de novo complex karyotype 47, XYY, r(13(p11q34. Further investigation by high resolution array-based comparative genomic hybridization delineated an 8.5 Mb terminal deletion on the long arm of chromosome 13(13q33.2→q34. Conclusion The co-occurrence of double syndromes in the same individual is rare and its clinical presentation is variable depending on the predominating abnormality or a combination of the effect of both. Hearing impairment is suggested as another new clinical feature to 13qter deletion. This case report will contribute to more accurate genetic counselling and provide further insight to the syndrome.

  8. Chromosomal localization of mouse and human genes encoding the splicing factors ASF/SF2 (SFRS1) and SC-35 (SFRS2)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bermingham, J.R. Jr.; Arden, K.C.; Viars, C.S. [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States)] [and others

    1995-09-01

    The mammalian SR-type splicing factors ASF/SF2 and SC-35 play crucial roles in pre-mRNA splicing and have been shown to shift splice site choice in vitro. We have mapped the ASF/SF2 gene in mice and humans and the SC-35 gene in mice. Somatic cell hybrid mapping of the human ASF/SF2 gene (SFRS1 locus) reveals that it resides on chromosome 17, and fluorescence in situ hybridization refines this localization to 17q21.3-q22. Recombinant inbred mapping of the mouse ASF/ SF2 gene (Sfrs1 locus) and the mouse SC-35 gene (Sfrs2 locus) demonstrates that both genes are located in a part of mouse chromosome 11 that is homologous to human chromosome 17. Mapping of Sfrs1 using F{sub 1} hybrid backcross mice between the strains C57BL/6 and DDK places Sfrs1 very near the marker D11Mit38 and indicates that the ASF/SF2 gene is closely linked to the Ovum mutant locus. 59 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs.

  9. Sequencing of individual chromosomes of plant pathogenic Fusarium oxysporum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashiwa, Takeshi; Kozaki, Toshinori; Ishii, Kazuo; Turgeon, B Gillian; Teraoka, Tohru; Komatsu, Ken; Arie, Tsutomu

    2017-01-01

    A small chromosome in reference isolate 4287 of F. oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici (Fol) has been designated as a 'pathogenicity chromosome' because it carries several pathogenicity related genes such as the Secreted In Xylem (SIX) genes. Sequence assembly of small chromosomes in other isolates, based on a reference genome template, is difficult because of karyotype variation among isolates and a high number of sequences associated with transposable elements. These factors often result in misassembly of sequences, making it unclear whether other isolates possess the same pathogenicity chromosome harboring SIX genes as in the reference isolate. To overcome this difficulty, single chromosome sequencing after Contour-clamped Homogeneous Electric Field (CHEF) separation of chromosomes was performed, followed by de novo assembly of sequences. The assembled sequences of individual chromosomes were consistent with results of probing gels of CHEF separated chromosomes with SIX genes. Individual chromosome sequencing revealed that several SIX genes are located on a single small chromosome in two pathogenic forms of F. oxysporum, beyond the reference isolate 4287, and in the cabbage yellows fungus F. oxysporum f. sp. conglutinans. The particular combination of SIX genes on each small chromosome varied. Moreover, not all SIX genes were found on small chromosomes; depending on the isolate, some were on big chromosomes. This suggests that recombination of chromosomes and/or translocation of SIX genes may occur frequently. Our method improves sequence comparison of small chromosomes among isolates. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Additional chromosome abnormalities in chronic myeloid leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-Hua Hsiao

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The Philadelphia (Ph chromosome and/or Breakpoint cluster region-Abelson leukemia virus oncogene transcript are unique markers for chronic myeloid leukemia (CML. However, CML demonstrates heterogeneous presentations and outcomes. We analyzed the cytogenetic and molecular results of CML patients to evaluate their correlation with clinical presentations and outcome. A total of 84 newly diagnosed CML patients were enrolled in the study. Patients were treated according to disease status. Bone marrow samples were obtained to perform cytogenetic and molecular studies. Clinical presentations, treatment courses, and survival were reviewed retrospectively. Among 84 patients, 72 had chronic phase and 12 had accelerated phase CML. Cytogenetic study showed 69 (82.1% with the classic Ph chromosome, 6 (7.2% with a variant Ph chromosome, and 9 (10.7% with additional chromosome abnormalities. Fifty-four (64.3% cases harbored b3a2 transcripts, 29 (34.5% had b2a2 transcript, and 1 had e19a2 transcript. There was no difference in clinical presentations between different cytogenetic and molecular groups; however, additional chromosome abnormalities were significantly associated with the accelerated phase. Imatinib therapy was an effective treatment, as measured by cytogenetic response, when administered as first- and second-line therapy in chronic phase patients. Survival analysis showed that old age, additional chromosome abnormalities, high Sokal score, and no cytogenetic response in second-line therapy had a significant poor impact (p<0.05. In conclusion, we presented the cytogenetic and molecular pattern of CML patients and demonstrated that the additional chromosome abnormality was associated with poor outcome.

  11. Klinefelter syndrome and other sex chromosomal aneuploidies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graham John M

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The term Klinefelter syndrome (KS describes a group of chromosomal disorder in which there is at least one extra X chromosome to a normal male karyotype, 46,XY. XXY aneuploidy is the most common disorder of sex chromosomes in humans, with prevalence of one in 500 males. Other sex chromosomal aneuploidies have also been described, although they are much less frequent, with 48,XXYY and 48,XXXY being present in 1 per 17,000 to 1 per 50,000 male births. The incidence of 49,XXXXY is 1 per 85,000 to 100,000 male births. In addition, 46,XX males also exist and it is caused by translocation of Y material including sex determining region (SRY to the X chromosome during paternal meiosis. Formal cytogenetic analysis is necessary to make a definite diagnosis, and more obvious differences in physical features tend to be associated with increasing numbers of sex chromosomes. If the diagnosis is not made prenatally, 47,XXY males may present with a variety of subtle clinical signs that are age-related. In infancy, males with 47,XXY may have chromosomal evaluations done for hypospadias, small phallus or cryptorchidism, developmental delay. The school-aged child may present with language delay, learning disabilities, or behavioral problems. The older child or adolescent may be discovered during an endocrine evaluation for delayed or incomplete pubertal development with eunuchoid body habitus, gynecomastia, and small testes. Adults are often evaluated for infertility or breast malignancy. Androgen replacement therapy should begin at puberty, around age 12 years, in increasing dosage sufficient to maintain age appropriate serum concentrations of testosterone, estradiol, follicle stimulating hormone (FSH, and luteinizing hormone (LH. The effects on physical and cognitive development increase with the number of extra Xs, and each extra X is associated with an intelligence quotient (IQ decrease of approximately 15–16 points, with language most affected

  12. Molecular mapping of chromosomes 17 and X

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barker, D.F.

    1991-01-15

    Progress toward the construction of high density genetic maps of chromosomes 17 and X has been made by isolating and characterizing a relatively large set of polymorphic probes for each chromosome and using these probes to construct genetic maps. We have mapped the same polymorphic probes against a series of chromosome breakpoints on X and 17. The probes could be assigned to over 30 physical intervals on the X chromosome and 7 intervals on 17. In many cases, this process resulted in improved characterization of the relative locations of the breakpoints with respect to each other and the definition of new physical intervals. The strategy for isolation of the polymorphic clones utilized chromosome specific libraries of 1--15 kb segments from each of the two chromosomes. From these libraries, clones were screened for those detecting restriction fragment length polymorphisms. The markers were further characterized, the chromosomal assignments confirmed and in most cases segments of the original probes were subcloned into plasmids to produce probes with improved signal to noise ratios for use in the genetic marker studies. The linkage studies utilize the CEPH reference families and other well-characterized families in our collection which have been used for genetic disease linkage work. Preliminary maps and maps of portions of specific regions of 17 and X are provided. We have nearly completed a map of the 1 megabase Mycoplasma arthritidis genome by applying these techniques to a lambda phage library of its genome. We have found bit mapping to be an efficient means to organize a contiguous set of overlapping clones from a larger genome.

  13. Sequencing papaya X and Yh chromosomes reveals molecular basis of incipient sex chromosome evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianping; Na, Jong-Kuk; Yu, Qingyi; Gschwend, Andrea R; Han, Jennifer; Zeng, Fanchang; Aryal, Rishi; VanBuren, Robert; Murray, Jan E; Zhang, Wenli; Navajas-Pérez, Rafael; Feltus, F Alex; Lemke, Cornelia; Tong, Eric J; Chen, Cuixia; Wai, Ching Man; Singh, Ratnesh; Wang, Ming-Li; Min, Xiang Jia; Alam, Maqsudul; Charlesworth, Deborah; Moore, Paul H; Jiang, Jiming; Paterson, Andrew H; Ming, Ray

    2012-08-21

    Sex determination in papaya is controlled by a recently evolved XY chromosome pair, with two slightly different Y chromosomes controlling the development of males (Y) and hermaphrodites (Y(h)). To study the events of early sex chromosome evolution, we sequenced the hermaphrodite-specific region of the Y(h) chromosome (HSY) and its X counterpart, yielding an 8.1-megabase (Mb) HSY pseudomolecule, and a 3.5-Mb sequence for the corresponding X region. The HSY is larger than the X region, mostly due to retrotransposon insertions. The papaya HSY differs from the X region by two large-scale inversions, the first of which likely caused the recombination suppression between the X and Y(h) chromosomes, followed by numerous additional chromosomal rearrangements. Altogether, including the X and/or HSY regions, 124 transcription units were annotated, including 50 functional pairs present in both the X and HSY. Ten HSY genes had functional homologs elsewhere in the papaya autosomal regions, suggesting movement of genes onto the HSY, whereas the X region had none. Sequence divergence between 70 transcripts shared by the X and HSY revealed two evolutionary strata in the X chromosome, corresponding to the two inversions on the HSY, the older of which evolved about 7.0 million years ago. Gene content differences between the HSY and X are greatest in the older stratum, whereas the gene content and order of the collinear regions are identical. Our findings support theoretical models of early sex chromosome evolution.

  14. Marked chromosomes associations in catarrhine monkeys, with a note on chromosome associations in other primate groups

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, L.E.M. de

    In metaphase figures, obtained from cultures of whole blood, associations of the marked chromosomes were found in species of the following genera: Macaca, Cercocebus, Cercopithecus and Symphalangus. The different types of these associations are discussed. A note is given on chromosome associations

  15. Tracking of chromosome dynamics in live Streptococcus pneumoniae reveals that transcription promotes chromosome segregation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kjos, Morten; Veening, Jan-Willem

    Chromosome segregation is an essential part of the bacterial cell cycle but is poorly characterized in oval-shaped streptococci. Using time-lapse fluorescence microscopy and total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy, we have tracked the dynamics of chromosome segregation in live cells of the

  16. The Chromosomal Passenger Complex Is Required for Meiotic Acentrosomal Spindle Assembly and Chromosome Biorientation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radford, Sarah J.; Jang, Janet K.; McKim, Kim S.

    2012-01-01

    DURING meiosis in the females of many species, spindle assembly occurs in the absence of the microtubule-organizing centers called centrosomes. In the absence of centrosomes, the nature of the chromosome-based signal that recruits microtubules to promote spindle assembly as well as how spindle bipolarity is established and the chromosomes orient correctly toward the poles is not known. To address these questions, we focused on the chromosomal passenger complex (CPC). We have found that the CPC localizes in a ring around the meiotic chromosomes that is aligned with the axis of the spindle at all stages. Using new methods that dramatically increase the effectiveness of RNA interference in the germline, we show that the CPC interacts with Drosophila oocyte chromosomes and is required for the assembly of spindle microtubules. Furthermore, chromosome biorientation and the localization of the central spindle kinesin-6 protein Subito, which is required for spindle bipolarity, depend on the CPC components Aurora B and Incenp. Based on these data we propose that the ring of CPC around the chromosomes regulates multiple aspects of meiotic cell division including spindle assembly, the establishment of bipolarity, the recruitment of important spindle organization factors, and the biorientation of homologous chromosomes. PMID:22865736

  17. Exchange of core chromosomes and horizontal transfer of lineage-specific chromosomes in Fusarium oxysporum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlaardingerbroek, Ido; Beerens, Bas; Rose, Laura; Fokkens, Like; Cornelissen, Ben J C; Rep, Martijn

    2016-11-01

    Horizontal transfer of supernumerary or lineage-specific (LS) chromosomes has been described in a number of plant pathogenic filamentous fungi. So far it was not known whether transfer is restricted to chromosomes of certain size or properties, or whether 'core' chromosomes can also undergo horizontal transfer. We combined a directed and a non-biased approach to determine whether such restrictions exist. Selection genes were integrated into the genome of a strain of Fusarium oxysporum pathogenic on tomato, either targeted to specific chromosomes by homologous recombination or integrated randomly into the genome. By testing these strains for transfer of the marker to another strain we could confirm transfer of a previously described mobile pathogenicity chromosome. Surprisingly, we also identified strains in which (parts of) core chromosomes were transferred. Whole genome sequencing revealed that this was accompanied by the loss of the homologous region from the recipient strain. Remarkably, transfer of the mobile pathogenicity chromosome always accompanied this exchange of core chromosomes. © 2016 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Reassignment of chicken W chromosome sequences to the Z chromosome by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiglec, R; Ezaz, T; Graves, J A M

    2007-01-01

    There is much interest in the gene content of the small heterochromatic W chromosome of the chicken, on the supposition that it may contain sex-determining genes. A considerable region in the chicken genome has been assigned to the W chromosome on the basis of its repetitive sequences. Using fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) we localized five Bacterial Artificial Chromosomes (BACs) onto female chicken metaphase spreads. We physically mapped these BACs to the Z chromosome. The chicken genome database, however, assigned all five BACs to the W chromosome. Our results demonstrate that the 17 genes on these BACs are Z-specific, and points to the inadequacy of assigning regions of the genome based exclusively on repetitive sequences. Copyright 2007 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. Mechanisms of ring chromosome formation in 11 cases of human ring chromosome 21

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McGinniss, M J; Kazazian, H H; Stetten, G

    1992-01-01

    We studied the mechanism of ring chromosome 21 (r(21)) formation in 13 patients (11 unique r(21)s), consisting of 7 from five families with familial r(21) and 6 with de novo r(21). The copy number of chromosome 21 sequences in the rings of these patients was determined by quantitative dosage......), resulting in deletion of varying amounts of 21q22.1 to 21qter. The data from one individual who had a Down syndrome phenotype were consistent with asymmetric breakage and reunion of 21q sequences from an intermediate isochromosome or Robertsonian translocation chromosome as reported by Wong et al. Another......). The phenotype of patients correlated well with the extent of deletion or duplication of chromosome 21 sequences. These data demonstrate three mechanisms of r(21) formation and show that the phenotype of r(21) patients varies with the extent of chromosome 21 monosomy or trisomy....

  20. cDNA cloning and chromosomal mapping of a novel human GAP (GAP1M), GTPase-activating protein of Ras

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Shaowei; Nakamura, Shun; Hattori, Seisuke [National Center of Neurology and Psychiatry, Kodaira, Tokyo (Japan)] [and others

    1996-08-01

    We have previously isolated a novel Ras GTPase-activating protein (Ras GAP), Gapl{sup m}, from rat brain. Gap1{sup m} is considered to be a negative regulator of the Ras signaling pathways, like other Ras GAPs, neurofibromin, which is a gene product of the neurofibromatosis type I gene, and p120GAP. In this study we have isolated a human cDNA of this Gap and mapped the gene. The gene encodes a protein of 853 amino acids that shows 89% sequence identity to rat Gapl{sup m}. The human gene was mapped to chromosome 3 by PCR analysis on a panel of human-mouse hybrid cells. FISH analysis refined the location of the gene further to 3q22-q23. 11 refs., 2 figs.

  1. Chromosome 10q tetrasomy: First reported case

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blackston, R.D.; May, K.M.; Jones, F.D. [Emory Univ., Atlanta, GA (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    While there are several reports of trisomy 10q (at least 35), we are not aware of previous cases of 10q tetrasomy. We present what we believe to be the initial report of such a case. R.J. is a 6 1/2 year old white male who presented with multiple dysmorphic features, marked articulation problems, hyperactivity, and developmental delays. He is the product of a term uncomplicated pregnancy. There was a normal spontaneous vaginal delivery with a birth weight of 6 lbs. 4oz. and length was 19 1/2 inch. Dysmorphic features include small size, an asymmetrically small head, low set ears with overfolded helixes, bilateral ptosis, downslanting eyes, right eye esotropia, prominent nose, asymmetric facies, high palate, mild pectus excavatum deformity of chest, and hyperextensible elbow joints. The patient is in special needs classes for mildly mentally handicapped students. Chromosome analysis at a resolution of 800 bands revealed a complex rearrangement of chromosomes 10 and 11. The segment 10q25.3 to q16.3 appears to be inverted and duplicated within the long arm of chromosome 10 at band q25.3 and the same segment of chromosome 10 is present on the terminal end of the short arm of chromosome 11. There is no visible loss of material from chromosome 11. Fluorescence in situ hybridization was performed with a chromosome 10 specific {open_quotes}paint{close_quotes} to confirm that all of the material on the abnormal 10 and the material on the terminal short arm of 11 was from chromosome 10. Thus, it appears that the segment 10q25.3 to q26.3 is present in four copies. Parental chromosome studies are normal. We compared findings which differ in that the case of 10q tetrasomy did not have prenatal growth deficiency, microphthalmia, cleft palate, digital anomalies, heart, or renal defects. Whereas most cases of 10q trisomy are said to have severe mental deficiency, our case of 10q tetrasomy was only mildly delayed. We report this first apparent cited case of 10q tetrasomy.

  2. Origin of B chromosomes in the genus Astyanax (Characiformes, Characidae) and the limits of chromosome painting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de A Silva, Duílio M Z; Daniel, Sandro Natal; Camacho, Juan Pedro M; Utsunomia, Ricardo; Ruiz-Ruano, Francisco J; Penitente, Manolo; Pansonato-Alves, José Carlos; Hashimoto, Diogo Teruo; Oliveira, Claudio; Porto-Foresti, Fábio; Foresti, Fausto

    2016-06-01

    Eukaryote genomes are frequently burdened with the presence of supernumerary (B) chromosomes. Their origin is frequently investigated by chromosome painting, under the hypothesis that sharing the repetitive DNA sequences contained in the painting probes is a sign of common descent. However, the intragenomic mobility of many anonymous DNA sequences contained in these probes (e.g., transposable elements) adds high uncertainty to this conclusion. Here we test the validity of chromosome painting to investigate B chromosome origin by comparing its results for seven B chromosome types in two fish species genus Astyanax, with those obtained (1) by means of the physical mapping of 18S ribosomal DNA (rDNA), H1 histone genes, the As51 satellite DNA and the (AC)15 microsatellite, and (2) by comparing the nucleotide sequence of one of these families (ITS regions from ribosomal DNA) between genomic DNA from B-lacking individuals in both species and the microdissected DNA from two metacentric B chromosomes found in these same species. Intra- and inter-specific painting suggested that all B chromosomes that were assayed shared homologous DNA sequences among them, as well as with a variable number of A chromosomes in each species. This finding would be consistent with a common origin for all seven B chromosomes analyzed. By contrast, the physical mapping of repetitive DNA sequences failed to give support to this hypothesis, as no more than two B-types shared a given repetitive DNA. Finally, sequence analysis of the ITS regions suggested that at least some of the B chromosomes could have had a common origin.

  3. Chromosomal polymorphism in the Sporothrix schenckii complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Alexandre A; Fernandes, Geisa F; Rodrigues, Anderson M; Lima, Fábio M; Marini, Marjorie M; Dos S Feitosa, Luciano; de Melo Teixeira, Marcus; Felipe, Maria Sueli Soares; da Silveira, José Franco; de Camargo, Zoilo P

    2014-01-01

    Sporotrichosis is a polymorphic disease caused by a complex of thermodimorphic fungi including S. brasiliensis, S. schenckii sensu stricto (s. str.), S. globosa and S. luriei. Humans and animals can acquire the disease through traumatic inoculation of propagules into the subcutaneous tissue. Despite the importance of sporotrichosis as a disease that can take epidemic proportions there are just a few studies dealing with genetic polymorphisms and genomic architecture of these pathogens. The main objective of this study was to investigate chromosomal polymorphisms and genomic organization among different isolates in the S. schenckii complex. We used pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) to separate chromosomal fragments of isolated DNA, followed by probe hybridization. Nine loci (β-tubulin, calmodulin, catalase, chitin synthase 1, Internal Transcribed Spacer, Pho85 cyclin-dependent kinase, protein kinase C Ss-2, G protein α subunit and topoisomerase II) were mapped onto chromosomal bands of Brazilian isolates of S. schenckii s. str. and S. brasiliensis. Our results revealed the presence of intra and interspecies polymorphisms in chromosome number and size. The gene hybridization analysis showed that closely related species in phylogenetic analysis had similar genetic organizations, mostly due to identification of synteny groups in chromosomal bands of similar sizes. Our results bring new insights into the genetic diversity and genome organization among pathogenic species in the Sporothrix schenckii complex.

  4. Chromosome-specific DNA Repeat Probes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baumgartner, Adolf; Weier, Jingly Fung; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G.

    2006-03-16

    In research as well as in clinical applications, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) has gained increasing popularity as a highly sensitive technique to study cytogenetic changes. Today, hundreds of commercially available DNA probes serve the basic needs of the biomedical research community. Widespread applications, however, are often limited by the lack of appropriately labeled, specific nucleic acid probes. We describe two approaches for an expeditious preparation of chromosome-specific DNAs and the subsequent probe labeling with reporter molecules of choice. The described techniques allow the preparation of highly specific DNA repeat probes suitable for enumeration of chromosomes in interphase cell nuclei or tissue sections. In addition, there is no need for chromosome enrichment by flow cytometry and sorting or molecular cloning. Our PCR-based method uses either bacterial artificial chromosomes or human genomic DNA as templates with {alpha}-satellite-specific primers. Here we demonstrate the production of fluorochrome-labeled DNA repeat probes specific for human chromosomes 17 and 18 in just a few days without the need for highly specialized equipment and without the limitation to only a few fluorochrome labels.

  5. Chromosomal Abnormality in Men with Impaired Spermatogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dana Mierla

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chromosomal abnormalities and Y chromosome microdeletions are regarded as two most frequent genetic causes associated with failure of spermatogenesis in the Caucasian population. Materials and Methods: To investigate the distribution of genetic defects in the Romanian population with azoospermia or severe oligozoospermia, karyotype analysis by G-banding was carried out in 850 idiopathic infertile men and in 49 fertile men with one or more children. Screening for microdeletions in the azoospermia factor (AZF region of Y chromosome was performed by multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR on a group of 67 patients with no detectable chromosomal abnormality. The results of the two groups were compared by a two-tailed Fisher’s exact test. Results: In our study chromosomal abnormalities were observed in 12.70% and 8.16% of infertile and fertile individuals respectively. Conclusion: Our data suggests that infertile men with severe azoospermia have higher incidences of genetic defects than fertile men and also patients from any other group. Infertile men with normal sperm present a higher rate of polymorphic variants. It is important to know whether there is a genetic cause of male infertility before patients are subjected to intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI or testicular sperm extraction (TESE/ICSI treatment.

  6. Amphibian and Avian Karyotype Evolution: Insights from Lampbrush Chromosome Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zlotina, Anna; Dedukh, Dmitry; Krasikova, Alla

    2017-11-08

    Amphibian and bird karyotypes typically have a complex organization, which makes them difficult for standard cytogenetic analysis. That is, amphibian chromosomes are generally large, enriched with repetitive elements, and characterized by the absence of informative banding patterns. The majority of avian karyotypes comprise a small number of relatively large macrochromosomes and numerous tiny morphologically undistinguishable microchromosomes. A good progress in investigation of amphibian and avian chromosome evolution became possible with the usage of giant lampbrush chromosomes typical for growing oocytes. Due to the giant size, peculiarities of organization and enrichment with cytological markers, lampbrush chromosomes can serve as an opportune model for comprehensive high-resolution cytogenetic and cytological investigations. Here, we review the main findings on chromosome evolution in amphibians and birds that were obtained using lampbrush chromosomes. In particular, we discuss the data on evolutionary chromosomal rearrangements, accumulation of polymorphisms, evolution of sex chromosomes as well as chromosomal changes during clonal reproduction of interspecies hybrids.

  7. Generation of multicolor banding probes for chromosomes of different species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kosyakova Nadezda

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The multicolor banding (MCB/mBAND technique provides a unique opportunity to characterize intrachromosomal rearrangements and to determine chromosomal breakpoints. Until recently, MCB probes have only been available for human and some murine chromosomes. Generation of MCB probes for chromosomes of other species, useful and required in many cytogenetics research fields, was limited by technical difficulties. MCB probes are established by chromosome microdissection followed by whole genomic DNA amplification. However, unambiguous identification of the target chromosome is required for MCB-probe establishment. Previously proposed protocols suggested G-banding staining or preliminary FISH with whole chromosome paints (WCP as methods to identify the chromosome of interest. Results Here we present a complete workflow for MCB probe generation for those cases and species where chromosome morphology is too challenging to recognize target chromosomes by conventional methods and where WCP probes are not available. The workflow was successfully applied for murine chromosomes that are difficult to identify unambiguously. Additionally, we showed that glass-needle based microdissection enables establishment of a whole set of WCP paints by microdissection of individual chromosomes of a single metaphase Conclusions The present method can be applied for generation of whole or region-specific DNA probes for species, where karyotyping of G-banded chromosomes is challenging due to similar chromosome morphology and/or chromosome banding patterns.

  8. Generation of multicolor banding probes for chromosomes of different species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosyakova, Nadezda; Hamid, Ahmed Basheer; Chaveerach, Arunrat; Pinthong, Krit; Siripiyasing, Pornnarong; Supiwong, Weerayuth; Romanenko, Svetlana; Trifonov, Vladimir; Fan, Xiaobo

    2013-02-04

    The multicolor banding (MCB/mBAND) technique provides a unique opportunity to characterize intrachromosomal rearrangements and to determine chromosomal breakpoints. Until recently, MCB probes have only been available for human and some murine chromosomes. Generation of MCB probes for chromosomes of other species, useful and required in many cytogenetics research fields, was limited by technical difficulties. MCB probes are established by chromosome microdissection followed by whole genomic DNA amplification. However, unambiguous identification of the target chromosome is required for MCB-probe establishment. Previously proposed protocols suggested G-banding staining or preliminary FISH with whole chromosome paints (WCP) as methods to identify the chromosome of interest. Here we present a complete workflow for MCB probe generation for those cases and species where chromosome morphology is too challenging to recognize target chromosomes by conventional methods and where WCP probes are not available. The workflow was successfully applied for murine chromosomes that are difficult to identify unambiguously. Additionally, we showed that glass-needle based microdissection enables establishment of a whole set of WCP paints by microdissection of individual chromosomes of a single metaphase The present method can be applied for generation of whole or region-specific DNA probes for species, where karyotyping of G-banded chromosomes is challenging due to similar chromosome morphology and/or chromosome banding patterns.

  9. QTL Location and Epistatic Effect Analysis of 100-Seed Weight Using Wild Soybean (Glycine soja Sieb. & Zucc.) Chromosome Segment Substitution Lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Dawei; Qi, Zhaoming; Jiang, Hongwei; Hu, Zhenbang; Zhu, Rongsheng; Hu, Jiahui; Han, Heyu; Hu, Guohua; Liu, Chunyan; Chen, Qingshan

    2016-01-01

    Increasing the yield of soybean (Glycine max L. Merrill) is a main aim of soybean breeding. The 100-seed weight is a critical factor for soybean yield. To facilitate genetic analysis of quantitative traits and to improve the accuracy of marker-assisted breeding in soybean, a valuable mapping population consisting of 194 chromosome segment substitution lines (CSSLs) was developed. In these lines, different chromosomal segments of the Chinese cultivar Suinong 14 were substituted into the genetic background of wild soybean (Glycine soja Sieb. & Zucc.) ZYD00006. Based on these CSSLs, a genetic map covering the full genome was generated using 121 simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers. In the quantitative trait loci (QTL) analysis, twelve main effect QTLs (qSW-B1-1/2/3, qSW-D1b-1/2, qSW-D2-1/2, qSW-G-1/2/3, qSW-M-2 and qSW-N-2) underlying 100-seed weight were identified in 2011 and 2012. The epistatic effects of pairwise interactions between markers were analyzed in 2011 and 2012. The results clearly demonstrated that these CSSLs could be used to identify QTLs, and that an epistatic analysis was able to detect several sites with important epistatic effects on 100-seed weight. Thus, we identified loci that will be valuable for improving soybean 100-seed weight. These results provide a valuable foundation for identifying the precise location of genes of interest, and for designing cloning and marker-assisted selection breeding strategies targeting the 100-seed weight of soybean.

  10. [Penoscrotal hypospadias with XXYY chromosome pattern].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neugebauer, H; Steichen-Gersdorf, E; Glatzl, J

    1991-01-01

    This is the report of a boy, 2 years and 4 months of age who presented with an penoscrotal hypospadia with normal appearing testes. Physical examination and routine laboratory tests revealed--besides a broad base of the nose and clinodactyly--no abnormality. The boy exhibits a normal speech development with retarded global intellectual development. Investigation of the hormon status revealed a disturbance of testosteron secretion and a hypergonadotropic hypogonadism. Chromosomal analysis in lymphocyte cultures revealed a XXYY karyotyp. This chromosomal pattern is seen in 3% of patients with Klinefelter syndrom; the estimated frequency is 1 in 25,000 population. A combination of an XXYY chromosomal pattern with a penoscrotal hypospadia has not been reported in the literature so far.

  11. Chromosomal abnormalities in a psychiatric population

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, K.E.; Lubetsky, M.J.; Wenger, S.L.; Steele, M.W. [Univ. of Pittsburgh Medical Center, PA (United States)

    1995-02-27

    Over a 3.5 year period of time, 345 patients hospitalized for psychiatric problems were evaluated cytogenetically. The patient population included 76% males and 94% children with a mean age of 12 years. The criteria for testing was an undiagnosed etiology for mental retardation and/or autism. Cytogenetic studies identified 11, or 3%, with abnormal karyotypes, including 4 fragile X positive individuals (2 males, 2 females), and 8 with chromosomal aneuploidy, rearrangements, or deletions. While individuals with chromosomal abnormalities do not demonstrate specific behavioral, psychiatric, or developmental problems relative to other psychiatric patients, our results demonstrate the need for an increased awareness to order chromosomal analysis and fragile X testing in those individuals who have combinations of behavioral/psychiatric, learning, communication, or cognitive disturbance. 5 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  12. Can molecular cell biology explain chromosome motions?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gagliardi L

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mitotic chromosome motions have recently been correlated with electrostatic forces, but a lingering "molecular cell biology" paradigm persists, proposing binding and release proteins or molecular geometries for force generation. Results Pole-facing kinetochore plates manifest positive charges and interact with negatively charged microtubule ends providing the motive force for poleward chromosome motions by classical electrostatics. This conceptual scheme explains dynamic tracking/coupling of kinetochores to microtubules and the simultaneous depolymerization of kinetochore microtubules as poleward force is generated. Conclusion We question here why cells would prefer complex molecular mechanisms to move chromosomes when direct electrostatic interactions between known bound charge distributions can accomplish the same task much more simply.

  13. The complete sequence of human chromosome 5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmutz, Jeremy; Martin, Joel; Terry, Astrid; Couronne, Olivier; Grimwood, Jane; Lowry, State; Gordon, Laurie A.; Scott, Duncan; Xie, Gary; Huang, Wayne; Hellsten, Uffe; Tran-Gyamfi, Mary; She, Xinwei; Prabhakar, Shyam; Aerts, Andrea; Altherr, Michael; Bajorek, Eva; Black, Stacey; Branscomb, Elbert; Caoile, Chenier; Challacombe, Jean F.; Chan, Yee Man; Denys, Mirian; Detter, Chris; Escobar, Julio; Flowers, Dave; Fotopulos, Dea; Glavina, Tijana; Gomez, Maria; Gonzales, Eidelyn; Goodstenin, David; Grigoriev, Igor; Groza, Matthew; Hammon, Nancy; Hawkins, Trevor; Haydu, Lauren; Israni, Sanjay; Jett, Jamie; Kadner, Kristen; Kimbal, Heather; Kobayashi, Arthur; Lopez, Frederick; Lou, Yunian; Martinez, Diego; Medina, Catherine; Morgan, Jenna; Nandkeshwar, Richard; Noonan, James P.; Pitluck, Sam; Pollard, Martin; Predki, Paul; Priest, James; Ramirez, Lucia; Rash, Sam; Retterer, James; Rodriguez, Alex; Rogers, Stephanie; Salamov, Asaf; Salazar, Angelica; Thayer, Nina; Tice, Hope; Tsai, Ming; Ustaszewska, Anna; Vo, Nu; Wheeler, Jeremy; Wu, Kevin; Yang, Joan; Dickson, Mark; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Eichler, Evan E.; Olsen, Anne; Pennacchio, Len A.; Rokhsar, Daniel S.; Richardson, Paul; Lucas, Susan M.; Myers, Richard M.; Rubin, Edward M.

    2004-04-15

    Chromosome 5 is one of the largest human chromosomes yet has one of the lowest gene densities. This is partially explained by numerous gene-poor regions that display a remarkable degree of noncoding and syntenic conservation with non-mammalian vertebrates, suggesting they are functionally constrained. In total, we compiled 177.7 million base pairs of highly accurate finished sequence containing 923 manually curated protein-encoding genes including the protocadherin and interleukin gene families and the first complete versions of each of the large chromosome 5 specific internal duplications. These duplications are very recent evolutionary events and play a likely mechanistic role, since deletions of these regions are the cause of debilitating disorders including spinal muscular atrophy (SMA).

  14. Can molecular cell biology explain chromosome motions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shain, Daniel H; Gagliardi, L John

    2011-05-27

    Mitotic chromosome motions have recently been correlated with electrostatic forces, but a lingering "molecular cell biology" paradigm persists, proposing binding and release proteins or molecular geometries for force generation. Pole-facing kinetochore plates manifest positive charges and interact with negatively charged microtubule ends providing the motive force for poleward chromosome motions by classical electrostatics. This conceptual scheme explains dynamic tracking/coupling of kinetochores to microtubules and the simultaneous depolymerization of kinetochore microtubules as poleward force is generated. We question here why cells would prefer complex molecular mechanisms to move chromosomes when direct electrostatic interactions between known bound charge distributions can accomplish the same task much more simply. © 2011 Shain and Gagliardi; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  15. Mapping genes to human chromosome 19

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Connolly, Sarah [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States); Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1996-05-01

    For this project, 22 Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs) were fine mapped to regions of human chromosome 19. An EST is a short DNA sequence that occurs once in the genome and corresponds to a single expressed gene. {sup 32}P-radiolabeled probes were made by polymerase chain reaction for each EST and hybridized to filters containing a chromosome 19-specific cosmid library. The location of the ESTs on the chromosome was determined by the location of the ordered cosmid to which the EST hybridized. Of the 22 ESTs that were sublocalized, 6 correspond to known genes, and 16 correspond to anonymous genes. These localized ESTs may serve as potential candidates for disease genes, as well as markers for future physical mapping.

  16. Non-disjunction of chromosome 18

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bugge, M; Collins, A; Petersen, M B

    1998-01-01

    A sample of 100 trisomy 18 conceptuses analysed separately and together with a published sample of 61 conceptuses confirms that an error in maternal meiosis II (MII) is the most frequent cause of non-disjunction for chromosome 18. This is unlike all other human trisomies that have been studied......, which show a higher frequency in maternal meiosis I (MI). Maternal MI trisomy 18 shows a low frequency of recombination in proximal p and medial q, but not the reduction in proximal q observed in chromosome 21 MI non-disjunction. Maternal MII non-disjunction does not fit the entanglement model...... that predicts increased recombination, especially near the centromere. Whereas recent data on MII trisomy 21 show the predicted increase in recombination proximally, maternal MII trisomy 18 has non-significantly reduced recombination. Therefore, chromosome-specific factors must complicate the simple model...

  17. Origin of extra chromosome in Patau syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikiriyama, S; Niikawa, N

    1984-01-01

    Five live-born infants with Patau syndrome were studied for the nondisjunctional origin of the extra chromosome. Transmission modes of chromosomes 13 from parents to a child were determined using both QFQ- and RFA-heteromorphisms as markers, and the origin was ascertained in all of the patients. The extra chromosome had originated in nondisjunction at the maternal first meiotic division in two patients, at the maternal second meiosis in other two, and at the paternal first meiosis in the remaining one. Summarizing the results of the present study, together with those of the previous studies on a liveborn and abortuses with trisomy 13, nondisjunction at the maternal and the paternal meiosis occurred in this trisomy in the ratio of 14:3. This ratio is not statistically different from that inferred from the previous studies for Down syndrome. These findings suggest that there may be a fundamental mechanism common to the occurrence of nondisjunction in the acrocentric trisomies.

  18. The X--a sexy chromosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, J A; Delbridge, M L

    2001-12-01

    There is new and convincing evidence that the mammalian X chromosome, as well as the Y chromosome, contains an atypically high proportion of genes involved in sex and reproduction (SRR genes). Here we consider alternative explanations for this concentration. One possibility is that a particularly well-endowed autosome was "chosen" for a career as a sex chromosome. Alternatively, the high concentration of SRR genes may have resulted from the accumulation of these genes on the X after the degradation of the Y, either by transposition of autosomal SRR genes to a "selfish X", or by acquisition of SRR functions by widely expressed genes on the X. We suggest experiments to distinguish these possibilities, and speculate on the implications of gathering evidence that genes with other functions, too, are not distributed uniformly over the genome. Copyright 2001 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  19. Bias of purine stretches in sequenced chromosomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ussery, David; Soumpasis, Dikeos Mario; Brunak, Søren

    2002-01-01

    We examined more than 700 DNA sequences (full length chromosomes and plasmids) for stretches of purines (R) or pyrimidines (Y) and alternating YR stretches; such regions will likely adopt structures which are different from the canonical B-form. Since one turn of the DNA helix is roughly 10 bp, we...... to contain 1.0% of purine tracts and also 1.0% of the alternating pyr/pur tracts. In the vast majority of cases, there are more purine tracts than would be expected from a random sequence, with an average of 3.5%, significantly larger than the expectation value. The fraction of the chromosomes containing pyr......, in eukaryotes there is an abundance of long stretches of purines or alternating purine/pyrimidine tracts, which cannot be explained in this way; these sequences are likely to play an important role in eukaryotic chromosome organisation....

  20. Human male meiotic sex chromosome inactivation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marieke de Vries

    Full Text Available In mammalian male gametogenesis the sex chromosomes are distinctive in both gene activity and epigenetic strategy. At first meiotic prophase the heteromorphic X and Y chromosomes are placed in a separate chromatin domain called the XY body. In this process, X,Y chromatin becomes highly phosphorylated at S139 of H2AX leading to the repression of gonosomal genes, a process known as meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI, which has been studied best in mice. Post-meiotically this repression is largely maintained. Disturbance of MSCI in mice leads to harmful X,Y gene expression, eventuating in spermatocyte death and sperm heterogeneity. Sperm heterogeneity is a characteristic of the human male. For this reason we were interested in the efficiency of MSCI in human primary spermatocytes. We investigated MSCI in pachytene spermatocytes of seven probands: four infertile men and three fertile controls, using direct and indirect in situ methods. A considerable degree of variation in the degree of MSCI was detected, both between and within probands. Moreover, in post-meiotic stages this variation was observed as well, indicating survival of spermatocytes with incompletely inactivated sex chromosomes. Furthermore, we investigated the presence of H3K9me3 posttranslational modifications on the X and Y chromatin. Contrary to constitutive centromeric heterochromatin, this heterochromatin marker did not specifically accumulate on the XY body, with the exception of the heterochromatic part of the Y chromosome. This may reflect the lower degree of MSCI in man compared to mouse. These results point at relaxation of MSCI, which can be explained by genetic changes in sex chromosome composition during evolution and candidates as a mechanism behind human sperm heterogeneity.

  1. Chromosomes of Protists: The crucible of evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soyer-Gobillard, Marie-Odile; Dolan, Michael F

    2015-12-01

    As early as 1925, the great protozoologist Edouard Chatton classified microorganisms into two categories, the prokaryotic and the eukaryotic microbes, based on light microscopical observation of their nuclear organization. Now, by means of transmission electron microscopy, we know that prokaryotic microbes are characterized by the absence of nuclear envelope surrounding the bacterial chromosome, which is more or less condensed and whose chromatin is deprived of histone proteins but presents specific basic proteins. Eukaryotic microbes, the protists, have nuclei surrounded by a nuclear envelope and have chromosomes more or less condensed, with chromatin-containing histone proteins organized into nucleosomes. The extraordinary diversity of mitotic systems presented by the 36 phyla of protists (according to Margulis et al., Handbook of Protoctista, 1990) is in contrast to the relative homogeneity of their chromosome structure and chromatin components. Dinoflagellates are the exception to this pattern. The phylum is composed of around 2000 species, and characterized by unique features including their nucleus (dinokaryon), dinomitosis, chromosome organization and chromatin composition. Although their DNA synthesis is typically eukaryotic, dinoflagellates are the only eukaryotes in which the chromatin, organized into quasi-permanently condensed chromosomes, is in some species devoid of histones and nucleosomes. In these cases, their chromatin contains specific DNA-binding basic proteins. The permanent compaction of their chromosomes throughout the cell cycle raises the question of the modalities of their division and their transcription. Successful in vitro reconstitution of nucleosomes using dinoflagellate DNA and heterologous corn histones raises questions about dinoflagellate evolution and phylogeny. [Int Microbiol 18(4):209-216 (2015)]. Copyright© by the Spanish Society for Microbiology and Institute for Catalan Studies.

  2. From equator to pole: splitting chromosomes in mitosis and meiosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duro, Eris

    2015-01-01

    During eukaryotic cell division, chromosomes must be precisely partitioned to daughter cells. This relies on a mechanism to move chromosomes in defined directions within the parental cell. While sister chromatids are segregated from one another in mitosis and meiosis II, specific adaptations enable the segregation of homologous chromosomes during meiosis I to reduce ploidy for gamete production. Many of the factors that drive these directed chromosome movements are known, and their molecular mechanism has started to be uncovered. Here we review the mechanisms of eukaryotic chromosome segregation, with a particular emphasis on the modifications that ensure the segregation of homologous chromosomes during meiosis I. PMID:25593304

  3. DNA Repair Defects and Chromosomal Aberrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hada, Megumi; George, K. A.; Huff, J. L.; Pluth, J. M.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2009-01-01

    Yields of chromosome aberrations were assessed in cells deficient in DNA doublestrand break (DSB) repair, after exposure to acute or to low-dose-rate (0.018 Gy/hr) gamma rays or acute high LET iron nuclei. We studied several cell lines including fibroblasts deficient in ATM (ataxia telangiectasia mutated; product of the gene that is mutated in ataxia telangiectasia patients) or NBS (nibrin; product of the gene mutated in the Nijmegen breakage syndrome), and gliomablastoma cells that are proficient or lacking in DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) activity. Chromosomes were analyzed using the fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) chromosome painting method in cells at the first division post irradiation, and chromosome aberrations were identified as either simple exchanges (translocations and dicentrics) or complex exchanges (involving >2 breaks in 2 or more chromosomes). Gamma irradiation induced greater yields of both simple and complex exchanges in the DSB repair-defective cells than in the normal cells. The quadratic dose-response terms for both simple and complex chromosome exchanges were significantly higher for the ATM- and NBS-deficient lines than for normal fibroblasts. However, in the NBS cells the linear dose-response term was significantly higher only for simple exchanges. The large increases in the quadratic dose-response terms in these repair-defective cell lines points the importance of the functions of ATM and NBS in chromatin modifications to facilitate correct DSB repair and minimize the formation of aberrations. The differences found between ATM- and NBS-deficient cells at low doses suggest that important questions should with regard to applying observations of radiation sensitivity at high dose to low-dose exposures. For aberrations induced by iron nuclei, regression models preferred purely linear dose responses for simple exchanges and quadratic dose responses for complex exchanges. Relative biological effectiveness (RBE) factors of all of

  4. Design and chemical synthesis of eukaryotic chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Ze-Xiong; Liu, Duo; Li, Bing-Zhi; Zhao, Meng; Zeng, Bo-Xuan; Wu, Yi; Shen, Yue; Lin, Tao; Yang, Ping; Dai, Junbiao; Cai, Yizhi; Yang, Huanming; Yuan, Ying-Jin

    2017-11-27

    Following the discovery of the DNA double helix structure and the advancement of genome sequencing, we have entered a promising stage with regard to genome writing. Recently, a milestone breakthrough was achieved in the chemical synthesis of designer yeast chromosomes. Here, we review the systematic approaches to the de novo synthesis of designer eukaryotic chromosomes, with an emphasis on technologies and methodologies that enable design, building, testing and debugging. The achievement of chemically synthesized genomes with customized genetic features offers an opportunity to rebuild genome organization, remold biological functions and promote life evolution, which will be of great benefit for application in medicine and industrial manufacturing.

  5. Microdissection and chromosome painting of X and B chromosomes in the grasshopper Eyprepocnemis plorans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teruel, M; Cabrero, J; Perfectti, F; Acosta, M J; Sánchez, A; Camacho, J P M

    2009-01-01

    The relative location of 2 repetitive DNAs, i.e. ribosomal (rDNA) and a tandemly repeated satellite DNA (satDNA), with respect to the centromere, suggested that B chromosomes in the grasshopper Eyprepocnemis plorans derived intraspecifically from the X chromosome. To test this hypothesis, we microdissected X and B chromosomes and amplified the obtained DNA by 2 different procedures, the conventional DOP-PCR method and the single-cell whole-genome amplification GenomePlex method. We then generated DNA probes to perform chromosome painting. Our results have confirmed that X and B chromosomes share many DNA sequences between them and with most of the autosomes, especially at locations where the satDNA and rDNA reside, in consistency with previous information. This supports the hypothesis of an intraspecific origin of B chromosomes in E. plorans. Nevertheless, the present results did not help to clarify whether Bs were derived from the X chromosome or else from 1 or more autosomes. (c) 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. Maternal mosaicism of sex chromosome causes discordant sex chromosomal aneuploidies associated with noninvasive prenatal testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Leilei; Meng, Qian; Tang, Xinxin; Yin, Ting; Zhang, Jinglu; Yang, Shuting; Wang, Xuyun; Wu, Haiqian; Shi, Qingxi; Jenkins, Edmund C; Zhong, Nanbert; Gu, Ying

    2015-10-01

    To investigate the clinical efficiency of noninvasive prenatal test (NIPT) identifying fetal chromosomal aneuploidies. In the present study, 917 women with high-risk pregnancies were invited to participate in an NIPT trial based on an Illumina HiSeq massively parallel sequencing platform. Abnormal cases in NIPT were validated by karyotyping and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis. All of the participants' infants were examined clinically and followed up for at least 6 months. A total of 35 (3.82%) high-risk pregnancies were detected with abnormal results in NIPT, which included 25 cases (2.73%) of trisomy 21 (Tri21), four cases (0.44%) of trisomy 18 (Tri18), four cases (0.44%) of Turner syndrome (45, X), one cases (0.11%) of Klinefelter's syndrome (47, XXY), and one cases (0.11%) with lower X chromosome concentration. Further validation indicated that one case of Tri18 and the case with lower X chromosome concentration were false positive results (0.22%) in NIPT. Furthermore, it was found that the false positive case with lower X chromosome concentration in NIPT was caused by maternal sex chromosomal mosaicism (45, X and 46, XX). Our findings indicated that maternal mosaicism of sex chromosome could cause discordant sex chromosomal aneuploidies associated with NIPT. We highly recommended that maternal karyotype should be confirmed for the cases with abnormal results in NIPT. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Identification of novel translocation between short arm of chromosome 4 and long arm of chromosome 6 in an infertile man using Interphase Chromosome Profiling (ICP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaul, S; Kaur, H; Vats, S K S; Chawla, J; Jindal, R; Khetarpal, P

    2018-02-07

    Conventional cytogenetics has always been a favourite to detect chromosomal aberrations. Carriers of chromosomal translocation are often phenotypically normal but are infertile. Couples are often advised to go for karyotyping, but culture failure or improper metaphase spread with poor banding often makes the analysis difficult. We report here a novel translocation between short arm of chromosome 4 and long arm of chromosome 6 in an infertile man using an advanced molecular cytogenetic technique of Interphase Chromosome Profiling (ICP). © 2018 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  8. A maximum likelihood algorithm for reconstructing 3D structures of human chromosomes from chromosomal contact data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oluwadare, Oluwatosin; Zhang, Yuxiang; Cheng, Jianlin

    2018-02-23

    The development of chromosomal conformation capture techniques, particularly, the Hi-C technique, has made the analysis and study of the spatial conformation of a genome an important topic in bioinformatics and computational biology. Aided by high-throughput next generation sequencing techniques, the Hi-C technique can generate genome-wide, large-scale intra- and inter-chromosomal interaction data capable of describing in details the spatial interactions within a genome. These data can be used to reconstruct 3D structures of chromosomes that can be used to study DNA replication, gene regulation, genome interaction, genome folding, and genome function. Here, we introduce a maximum likelihood algorithm called 3DMax to construct the 3D structure of a chromosome from Hi-C data. 3DMax employs a maximum likelihood approach to infer the 3D structures of a chromosome, while automatically re-estimating the conversion factor (α) for converting Interaction Frequency (IF) to distance. Our results show that the models generated by 3DMax from a simulated Hi-C dataset match the true models better than most of the existing methods. 3DMax is more robust to structural variability and noise. Compared on a real Hi-C dataset, 3DMax constructs chromosomal models that fit the data better than most methods, and it is faster than all other methods. The models reconstructed by 3DMax were consistent with fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) experiments and existing knowledge about the organization of human chromosomes, such as chromosome compartmentalization. 3DMax is an effective approach to reconstructing 3D chromosomal models. The results, and the models generated for the simulated and real Hi-C datasets are available here: http://sysbio.rnet.missouri.edu/bdm_download/3DMax/ . The source code is available here: https://github.com/BDM-Lab/3DMax . A short video demonstrating how to use 3DMax can be found here: https://youtu.be/ehQUFWoHwfo .

  9. Neocentromeres Provide Chromosome Segregation Accuracy and Centromere Clustering to Multiple Loci along a Candida albicans Chromosome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura S Burrack

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Assembly of kinetochore complexes, involving greater than one hundred proteins, is essential for chromosome segregation and genome stability. Neocentromeres, or new centromeres, occur when kinetochores assemble de novo, at DNA loci not previously associated with kinetochore proteins, and they restore chromosome segregation to chromosomes lacking a functional centromere. Neocentromeres have been observed in a number of diseases and may play an evolutionary role in adaptation or speciation. However, the consequences of neocentromere formation on chromosome missegregation rates, gene expression, and three-dimensional (3D nuclear structure are not well understood. Here, we used Candida albicans, an organism with small, epigenetically-inherited centromeres, as a model system to study the functions of twenty different neocentromere loci along a single chromosome, chromosome 5. Comparison of neocentromere properties relative to native centromere functions revealed that all twenty neocentromeres mediated chromosome segregation, albeit to different degrees. Some neocentromeres also caused reduced levels of transcription from genes found within the neocentromere region. Furthermore, like native centromeres, neocentromeres clustered in 3D with active/functional centromeres, indicating that formation of a new centromere mediates the reorganization of 3D nuclear architecture. This demonstrates that centromere clustering depends on epigenetically defined function and not on the primary DNA sequence, and that neocentromere function is independent of its distance from the native centromere position. Together, the results show that a neocentromere can form at many loci along a chromosome and can support the assembly of a functional kinetochore that exhibits native centromere functions including chromosome segregation accuracy and centromere clustering within the nucleus.

  10. Female chromosome X mosaicism is age-related and preferentially affects the inactivated X chromosome

    OpenAIRE

    Machiela, MJ; Zhou, W; Karlins, E. (Eric); Sampson, JN; Freedman, ND; Yang, Q.; Hicks, B.; Dagnall, C; Hautman, C; Jacobs, KB; Abnet, CC; Aldrich, MC; Amos, C; Amundadottir, LT; Arslan, AA

    2016-01-01

    To investigate large structural clonal mosaicism of chromosome X, we analysed the SNP microarray intensity data of 38,303 women from cancer genome-wide association studies (20,878 cases and 17,425 controls) and detected 124 mosaic X events >2 Mb in 97 (0.25%) women. Here we show rates for X-chromosome mosaicism are four times higher than mean autosomal rates; X mosaic events more often include the entire chromosome and participants with X events more likely harbour autosomal mosaic events....

  11. Neo-sex chromosome inheritance across species in Silene hybrids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weingartner, L A; Delph, L F

    2014-07-01

    Neo-sex chromosomes, which form through the major restructuring of ancestral sex chromosome systems, have evolved in various taxa. Such restructuring often consists of the fusion of an autosome to an existing sex chromosome, resulting in novel sex chromosome formations (e.g. X1X2Y or XY1Y2.). Comparative studies are often made between restructured sex chromosome systems of closely related species, and here we evaluate the consequences of variable sex chromosome systems to hybrids. If neo-sex chromosomes are improperly inherited across species, this could lead to aberrant development and reproductive isolation. In this study, we examine the fate of neo-sex chromosomes in hybrids of the flowering plants Silene diclinis and Silene latifolia. Silene diclinis has a neo-sex chromosome system (XY1Y2) that is thought to have evolved from an ancestral XY system that is still present in S. latifolia. These species do not hybridize naturally, and improper sex chromosome inheritance could contribute to reproductive isolation. We investigated whether this major restructuring of sex chromosomes prevents their proper inheritance in a variety of hybrid crosses, including some F2 - and later-generation hybrids, with sex chromosome-linked, species-specific, polymorphic markers and chromosome squashes. We discovered that despite the differences in sex chromosomes that exist between these two species, proper segregation had occurred in hybrids that made it to flowering, including later-generation hybrids, indicating that neo-sex chromosome formation alone does not result in complete reproductive isolation between these two species. Additionally, hybrids with aberrant sex expression (e.g. neuter, hermaphrodite) also inherited the restructured sex chromosomes properly, highlighting that issues with sexual development in hybrids can be caused by intrinsic genetic incompatibility rather than improper sex chromosome inheritance. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Evolutionary Biology © 2014

  12. [Chromosomal mosaicism in spontaneous abortions: analysis of 650 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorsanova, S G; Iurov, I Iu; Kolotiĭ, A D; Beresheva, A K; Demidova, I A; Kurinnaia, O S; Kravets, V S; Monakhov, V V; Solov'ev, I V; Iurov, Iu B

    2010-10-01

    It is known that up to 50% spontaneous abortions (SA) in the first trimester of pregnancy are associated with chromosomal abnormalities. We studied mosaic forms of chromosomal abnormalities in 650 SA specimens using interphase mFISH and DNAprobes for chromosomes 1,9, 13/21, 14/22, 15, 16, 18, X, and Y. Numerical chromosomal abnormalities were discovered in 58.2% (378 cases). They contained combined chromosomal abnormalities (aneuploidy of several chromosomes or aneuploidy in combination with polyploidy in the same specimen) in 7.7% (29 cases) or 4.5% of the entire SA sample; autosomal trisomy, in 45% (18.2% in chromosome 16, 8.9% in chromosomes 14/22, 7.9% in chromosomes 13/21, 3.1% in chromosome 18, and 1.4% in chromosome 9). Chromosome X aneuploidy was found in 27% cases, among which 9.6% represented chromosome X monosomy. Polyploidy was observed in 22.9% cases. In 5.1% cases, we observed mosaic form of autosomal monosomy Among the SA cases with chromosomal abnormalities mosaicism was observed in 50.3% (approximately 25% of the entire SA sample). The results of the present study indicate that significant amount of chromosomal abnormalities in SA cells are associated with disturbances in mitotic chromosome separation, which represents the most common cause of intrauterine fetal death. It was also shown that original collection of DNA probes and the technique of interphase MFISH could be useful for detection of chromosomal mosaicism in prenatal cell specimens.

  13. Dispensable chromosomes in Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlaardingerbroek, Ido; Beerens, Bas; Schmidt, Sarah M; Cornelissen, Ben J C; Rep, Martijn

    2016-12-01

    The genomes of many filamentous fungi consist of a 'core' part containing conserved genes essential for normal development as well as conditionally dispensable (CD) or lineage-specific (LS) chromosomes. In the plant-pathogenic fungus Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici, one LS chromosome harbours effector genes that contribute to pathogenicity. We employed flow cytometry to select for events of spontaneous (partial) loss of either the two smallest LS chromosomes or two different core chromosomes. We determined the rate of spontaneous loss of the 'effector' LS chromosome in vitro at around 1 in 35 000 spores. In addition, a viable strain was obtained lacking chromosome 12, which is considered to be a part of the core genome. We also isolated strains carrying approximately 1-Mb deletions in the LS chromosomes and in the dispensable core chromosome. The large core chromosome 1 was never observed to sustain deletions over 200 kb. Whole-genome sequencing revealed that some of the sites at which the deletions occurred were the same in several independent strains obtained for the two chromosomes tested, indicating the existence of deletion hotspots. For the core chromosome, this deletion hotspot was the site of insertion of the marker used to select for loss events. Loss of the core chromosome did not affect pathogenicity, whereas loss of the effector chromosome led to a complete loss of pathogenicity. © 2016 THE AUTHORS. MOLECULAR PLANT PATHOLOGY PUBLISHED BY BRITISH SOCIETY FOR PLANT PATHOLOGY AND JOHN WILEY & SONS LTD.

  14. RESEARCH ARTICLE Y chromosome polymorphisms of the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2017-02-10

    Feb 10, 2017 ... individual camels. In addition, a TG repeat in the USP9Y gene was identified as the first polymorphic microsatellite in the camel Y chromosome, whereas microsatellites based on bovine sequences were not detected. The frequency of each allele varied among different populations.For the Nanjiang, Hexi ...

  15. Monosomic analysis reveals duplicated chromosomal segments in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    g bg. GGg or. Golden plant. –. bGg, GGGg. –, Indicates the absence of dominant allele (due to nondisjunction of chromosome carrying dominant allele) in the egg cell (female gamete) and consequently creating hemizygous condition in the embryos of monosomic plants. Journal of Genetics, Vol. 88, No. 3, December 2009.

  16. MORPHOLOGY AND CHROMOSOME NUMBERS OF Gongronema ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    journal

    Morphology and chromosome numbers than one nucleus per cell (Partanen, 1963). Polyploidy in some instances is advantageous as it affects plant part sizes like larger leaf areas, flowers and fruits (Walker et al. 2005; El-. Ferchichi et al. 2006; Samiha et al. 2009). The higher number of viable seeds per follicle and matured ...

  17. Turner Syndrome: Phenotypic Variability of Chromosomal Polymorphism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.O. Ryznychuk

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Turner syndrome was firstly described by N. Shereshevskyi in 1925, and then by H. Turner in 1938. In 1959, Ch. Ford found that in patients with this syndrome one X chromosome is absent. The cause of this is that in the process of fertilization, one of two X chromosomes of maternal egg or paternal sperm is lost. Recent studies have suggested that two-thirds of patients with Turner syndrome do not have one X chromosome. Patients are almost exclusively women. Their karyotype is 45, X. Among newborn girls, Turner syndrome occurs with a frequency of 1 : 3,000, and among girls suffering from mental retardation — 1 : 1,500. The decisive arguments in the diagnosis of Turner syndrome are typical clinical features; data of study of sex chromatin and karyotype; possible prenatal diagnosis of fetal pathology. Patients with Turner syndrome require hormone therapy (by growth hormone, sex hormones, correction of congenital malformations and aesthetic defects. This article summarizes data of features of phenotypic manifestations of Turner syndrome, depending on the variant of chromosomal abnormalities.

  18. Chromosomal evolution and phylogenetic analyses in Tayassu ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    (SFRH/BSAB/329/2003) sabbatical grants. References. Adega F., Chaves R. and Guedes-Pinto H. 2005 Chromosome re- striction enzyme digestion in domestic pig (Sus scrofa). Consti- tutive heterochromatin arrangement. Genes Genet. Sys. 80, 49–. 56. Adega F., Chaves R., Kofler A., Krausman P. R., Masabanda J.,.

  19. Insect chromosomes preparing methods for genetic researches ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cytogenetics are almost always based on the examination of the fixed mitotic chromosomes during the analyses of metaphase. During this phase of the cycle of cells, the DNA is folded up and chromatin is strongly condensed. The relative position of the centromere is constant, which means that the ratio of the lengths of the ...

  20. Evaluation of Chromosomal Abnormalities and Common ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Its' pathophysiology is poorly understood. Infections, genetic, endocrine, anatomic and immunologic problems have been suggested as causes for RM. Objective: To evaluate the frequency of chromosomal abnormalities and 3 common thrombophilic mutations in couples with RM. Methods: A retrospective data collection ...

  1. Association of recurrent pregnancy loss with chromosomal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EB

    Zhonghua Yi Xue Yi. Chuan Xue Za Zhi. 2011; 28: 575-8. 18. Kwinecka-Dmitriew B, Zakrzewska M, Latos-. Bieleñska A, Skrzypczak J. Frequency of chromosomal aberrations in material from abortions. Ginekol Pol 2010; 81: 896-901. 19. Be C, Velásquez P, Youlton R. Spontaneous abortion: cytogenetic study of 609 cases.

  2. New molecular techniques for chromosome analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pergament, E

    2000-08-01

    The advent of molecular genetic technology has significantly advanced knowledge about the structure of chromosomes and their behaviour during meiosis and mitosis, as well as delineating cytogenetic aberrations that cannot be identified by conventional chromosome analysis. Molecular cytogenetics, the visualization of genetic loci using the dynamic recombinant technology of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), now provides the obstetrician and gynaecologist with increasingly important diagnostic and prognostic information heretofore unavailable. The technical principles underlying FISH are briefly discussed. Emphasis is placed on the clinical applications of FISH and technologies derived from FISH, in particular comparative genome hybridization, microdissection FISH and multiplex FISH. These technologies play increasingly significant roles in preimplantation and prenatal genetic diagnosis, in the identification of microdeletion syndromes, cryptic translocations and marker chromosomes, and in defining chromosome mosaicism. FISH and related technologies also constitute essential diagnostic modalities in follow-up of organ transplantation, in a variety of haematological disorders and in determining the amplification of oncogenes associated with specific forms of cancer and neoplasia. Copyright 2000 Harcourt Publishers Ltd.

  3. Fetal chromosome abnormalities and congenital malformations: an ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: Our objective were to determine and evaluate the role of genetic counseling and amniocentesis in early detection of chromosomal abnormalities or congenital malformations among women at risk. Patients and Methods: The study was performed on 784 pregnant women. Results: The cause for seeking genetic ...

  4. Nondisjunction of chromosome 15: Origin and recombination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, W.P.; Bernasconi, F.; Schinzel, A.A.; Mutirangura, A.; Ledbetter, D.H. (Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States)); Langlois, S. (Univ. of Britisch Columbia, Vancouver (Canada)); Morris, M.A.; Malcolm, S.

    1993-09-01

    Thirty-two cases of uniparental disomy (UPD), ascertained from Prader-Willi syndrome patients (N=27) and Angelman syndrome patients (N-5), are used to investigate the pattern of recombination associated with nondisjunction of chromosome 15. In addition, the meiotic stage of nondisjunction is inferred by using markers mapping near the centromere. Two basic approaches to the analysis of recombination in specific pairwise intervals along the chromosome. This method shows a significant reduction in recombination for two of five intervals examined. Second, the observed frequency of each recombinant class (i.e., zero, one, two, three, or more observable crossovers) is compared with expected values. This is useful for testing whether the reduction in recombination can be attributed solely to a proportion of cases with no recombination at all (because of asynapsis), with the remaining groups showing normal recombination (or even excess recombination), or whether recombination is uniformly reduced. Analysis of maternal UPD(15) data shows a slight reduction in the multiple-recombinant classes, with a corresponding increase in both the zero- and one-recombinant classes over expected values. The majority, more than 82%, of the extra chromosomes in maternal UPD(15) cases are due to meiotic I nondisjunction events. In contrast, more paternal UPD(15) cases so far examined appear to have a postzygotic origin of the extra paternal chromosome. 33 refs., 1 fig., 7 tabs.

  5. The chromosome 9q subtelomere deletion syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stewart, D.R.; Kleefstra, T.

    2007-01-01

    The chromosome 9q subtelomere deletion syndrome (9qSTDS) is among the first and most common clinically recognizable syndromes to arise from widespread testing by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) of subtelomere deletions. There are about 50 reported cases worldwide. Affected individuals

  6. Chromosomal evolution and phylogenetic analyses in Tayassu ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The mammalian family Tayassuidae (peccaries) is confined to the New World and comprises three recognized extant species, white-lipped (Tayassu pecari), collared (Pecari tajacu) and chacoan (Catagonus wagneri) peccaries, which exhibit distinct morphological and chromosomal features. The phylogenetic relationships ...

  7. Chromosomal aberrations induced by Markhamia tomentosa (Benth ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Markhamia tomentosa (Benth.) K. Schum. Ex Engl. (Bignoniaceae) is used traditionally in the treatment of pain, oedema, pulmonary troubles and cancer. The genotoxic and cytotoxic effects of the ethanolic extract of the leaves of M. tomentosa was investigated using the Allium cepa root chromosomal aberration assay.

  8. Frequency of congenital malformations and chromosomal disorders ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The main congenital disorders observed were: cardiovascular system anomalies, musculoskeletal system, urogenital system, etc. During the investigation period, in the human population of Bacau county, 97 cases of newborns with chromosomal disorders were diagnosed (0.16% of the living newborns), while in Vaslui ...

  9. First trimester ultrasound screening of chromosomal abnormalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trninić-Pjević Aleksandra

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: A retrocervical subcutaneous collection of fluid at 11-14 weeks of gestation, can be visualized by ultrasound as nuchal translucency (NT. Objective. To examine the distribution of fetal nuchal translucency in low risk population, to determine the detection rate of chromosomal abnormalities in the population of interest based on maternal age and NT measurement. Method. Screening for chromosomal defects, advocated by The Fetal Medicine Foundation (FMF, was performed in 1,341 pregnancies in the period January 2000 - April 2004. Initial risk for chromosomal defects (based on maternal and gestational age and corrected risk, after the NT measurement, were calculated. Complete data were collected from 1,048 patients. Results. Out of 1,048 pregnancies followed, 8 cases of Down’s syndrome were observed, 7 were detected antenatally and 6 out of 7 were detected due to screening that combines maternal age and NT measurement. According to our results, sensitivity of the screening for aneuploidies based on maternal age alone was 12.5% and false positive rate 13.1%, showing that screening based on NT measurement is of great importance. Screening by a combination of maternal age and NT, and selecting a screening-positive group for invasive testing enabled detection of 75% of fetuses with trisomy 21. Conclusion. In screening for chromosomal abnormalities, an approach which combines maternal age and NT is effective and increases the detection rate compared to the use of any single test. .

  10. Taurodontism in females with extra X chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varrela, J; Alvesalo, L

    1989-01-01

    The association between taurodontism and extra X chromosomes was studied in four 47,XXX-females and in two 48,XXXX-females. Occurrence of the trait in the permanent mandibular molars was noted from orthopantomograms. Five first-degree relatives and a sample of 157 normal males and females were investigated as controls. Two of the 47,XXX-females and both 48,XXX-females each had at least one mandibular molar classified as taurodont. The two affected 47,XXX-females had hypotaurodont or mesotaurodont teeth, whereas both 48,XXXX-females showed hypertaurodontism. The manidubular molars of the other two 47,XXX females had normal root morphology. The only control relative with taurodont teeth was a sister to a 48,XXXX-female. In the population control group, four females had taurodont teeth. These results support the concept that a prevalence of taurodontism increases as the number of X chromosomes increases and also indicate that expression of the trait and the number of X chromosomes may be positively correlated. It is suggested that the X chromosome gene(s) influencing development of enamel may be involved in the development of taurodontism.

  11. Improved prenatal detection of chromosomal anomalies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frøslev-Friis, Christina; Hjort-Pedersen, Karina; Henriques, Carsten U

    2011-01-01

    Prenatal screening for karyotype anomalies takes place in most European countries. In Denmark, the screening method was changed in 2005. The aim of this study was to study the trends in prevalence and prenatal detection rates of chromosome anomalies and Down syndrome (DS) over a 22-year period....

  12. Association of recurrent pregnancy loss with chromosomal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To evaluate the association of parental and fetal chromosomal abnormalities with recurrent pregnancy loss in our area and to analyze the frequency of three types of hereditary thrombophilia's; (MTHFR C677T polymorphisms, FV Leiden G1691A mutation and Prothrombin (factor II) G20210A mutation) in these ...

  13. MORPHOLOGY AND CHROMOSOME NUMBERS OF Gongronema ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    journal

    Cytological studies on the root-tips of four clones of Gongronema latifolia Benth. were conducted to identify cross-compatible clones for possible improvement through hybridisation. The results showed that the diploid chromosomes number in G. latifolia was 2n = 16. Clones, IMS-20-NJIABA, AKS-33-EKPENE EDIENE, ANS-.

  14. Morphology and chromosome numbers of Gongronema latifolia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cytological studies on the root-tips of four clones of Gongronema latifolia Benth. were conducted to identify cross-compatible clones for possible improvement through hybridisation. The results showed that the diploid chromosomes number in G. latifolia was 2n = 16. Clones, IMS-20-NJIABA, AKS-33-EKPENE EDIENE, ...

  15. Chromosome Conformation Capture on Chip (4C)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leblanc, Benjamin Olivier; Comet, Itys; Bantignies, Frédéric

    2016-01-01

    4C methods are useful to investigate dependencies between regulatory mechanisms and chromatin structures by revealing the frequency of chromatin contacts between a locus of interest and remote sequences on the chromosome. In this chapter we describe a protocol for the data analysis of microarray...

  16. Monosomic analysis reveals duplicated chromosomal segments in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Monosomics for chromosome 2 expressed liguleless leaf phenotype due to hemizygous condition of recessive gene lg. Two monosomic-4 plants were identified after test crossing with monosomic tester (see table 2 in electronic supplemen- tary material). Monosomic-6 plants were identified by the cytological analysis (figure ...

  17. Ring Chromosome 7 in an Indian Woman

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Anupam; Dhillon, Sumit; Garg, P. D.; Singh, Jai Rup

    2008-01-01

    Background: Ring chromosome 7 [r(7)] is a rare cytogenetic aberration, with only 16 cases (including 3 females) reported in the literature to date. This is the first reported case of r(7) from India. Method: Clinical and cytogenetic investigations were carried out in an adult female with microcephaly and intellectual disability. Results: Ring…

  18. Mitotic chromosome compaction via active loop extrusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goloborodko, Anton; Imakaev, Maxim; Marko, John; Mirny, Leonid; MIT-Northwestern Team

    During cell division, two copies of each chromosome are segregated from each other and compacted more than hundred-fold into the canonical X-shaped structures. According to earlier microscopic observations and the recent Hi-C study, chromosomes are compacted into arrays of consecutive loops of ~100 kilobases. Mechanisms that lead to formation of such loop arrays are largely unknown. Here we propose that, during cell division, chromosomes can be compacted by enzymes that extrude loops on chromatin fibers. First, we use computer simulations and analytical modeling to show that a system of loop-extruding enzymes on a chromatin fiber self-organizes into an array of consecutive dynamic loops. Second, we model the process of loop extrusion in 3D and show that, coupled with the topo II strand-passing activity, it leads to robust compaction and segregation of sister chromatids. This mechanism of chromosomal condensation and segregation does not require additional proteins or specific DNA markup and is robust against variations in the number and properties of such loop extruding enzymes. Work at NU was supported by the NSF through Grants DMR-1206868 and MCB-1022117, and by the NIH through Grants GM105847 and CA193419. Work at MIT was supported by the NIH through Grants GM114190 R01HG003143.

  19. Chromosomes and plant cell division in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krikorian, A. D.

    1988-01-01

    The objectives were: examination of chromosomal aberrations; development of an experimental system; and engineering design units (EDUs) evaluation. Evaluation criteria are presented. Procedures were developed for shuttle-based investigations which result in the procurement of plant root tips for subsequent cytological examination.

  20. Transcript variations, phylogenetic tree and chromosomal ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Transcript variations, phylogenetic tree and chromosomal localization of porcine aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) and AhR nuclear translocator (ARNT) genes ... Prawochenskiego 5, 10-720 Olsztyn, Poland; Department of Genetics and Animal Breeding, Poznan University of Life Science, Wolynska 33, 60-637 Poznan, ...