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Sample records for chromosome segregation

  1. Chromosome segregation in plant meiosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda eZamariola

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Faithful chromosome segregation in meiosis is essential for ploidy stability over sexual life cycles. In plants, defective chromosome segregation caused by gene mutations or other factors leads to the formation of unbalanced or unreduced gametes creating aneuploid or polyploid progeny, respectively. Accurate segregation requires the coordinated execution of conserved processes occurring throughout the two meiotic cell divisions. Synapsis and recombination ensure the establishment of chiasmata that hold homologous chromosomes together allowing their correct segregation in the first meiotic division, which is also tightly regulated by cell-cycle dependent release of cohesin and monopolar attachment of sister kinetochores to microtubules. In meiosis II, bi-orientation of sister kinetochores and proper spindle orientation correctly segregate chromosomes in four haploid cells. Checkpoint mechanisms acting at kinetochores control the accuracy of kinetochore-microtubule attachment, thus ensuring the completion of segregation. Here we review the current knowledge on the processes taking place during chromosome segregation in plant meiosis, focusing on the characterization of the molecular factors involved.

  2. Bacterial chromosome organization and segregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badrinarayanan, Anjana; Le, Tung B K; Laub, Michael T

    2015-01-01

    If fully stretched out, a typical bacterial chromosome would be nearly 1 mm long, approximately 1,000 times the length of a cell. Not only must cells massively compact their genetic material, but they must also organize their DNA in a manner that is compatible with a range of cellular processes, including DNA replication, DNA repair, homologous recombination, and horizontal gene transfer. Recent work, driven in part by technological advances, has begun to reveal the general principles of chromosome organization in bacteria. Here, drawing on studies of many different organisms, we review the emerging picture of how bacterial chromosomes are structured at multiple length scales, highlighting the functions of various DNA-binding proteins and the impact of physical forces. Additionally, we discuss the spatial dynamics of chromosomes, particularly during their segregation to daughter cells. Although there has been tremendous progress, we also highlight gaps that remain in understanding chromosome organization and segregation. PMID:26566111

  3. Progressive segregation of the Escherichia coli chromosome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Henrik Jørck; Youngren, Brenda; Hansen, Flemming G.;

    2006-01-01

    We have followed the fate of 14 different loci around the Escherichia coli chromosome in living cells at slow growth rate using a highly efficient labelling system and automated measurements. Loci are segregated as they are replicated, but with a marked delay. Most markers segregate in a smooth...

  4. Dynamics of chromosome segregation in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Henrik Jørck

    2007-01-01

    Since the 1960’es the conformation and segregation of the chromosome in Escherichia coli has been a subject of interest for many scientists. However, after 40 years of research, we still know incredibly little about how the chromosome is organized inside the cell, how it manages to duplicate this...... and reliable method enabled us to start the analysis on the distribution of various chromosomal loci inside slowly growing cells. With the actual counting and measuring no longer being any problem we could easily analyze 14 loci distributed on the E.coli chromosome. More than 15.000 cells were...... on the P1 par system. Using the new system, which is based on the pMT1 par system from Yersenia pestis, we labeled loci on opposite sides of the E.coli chromosome simultaneously and were able to show that the E.coli chromosome is organized with one chromosomal arm in each cell half. This astounding...

  5. Plasmid and chromosome segregation in prokaryotes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller-Jensen, Jakob; Bugge Jensen, Rasmus; Gerdes, Kenn

    2000-01-01

    Recent major advances in the understanding of prokaryotic DNA segregation have been achieved by using fluorescence microscopy to visualize the localization of cellular components. Plasmids and bacterial chromosomes are partitioned in a highly dynamic fashion, suggesting the presence of a mitotic......-like apparatus in prokaryotes. The identification of chromosomal homologues of the well-characterized plasmid partitioning genes indicates that there could be a general mechanism of bacterial DNA partitioning. Udgivelsesdato: July 1...

  6. Chromosome segregation: learning to let go.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Jonathan M G

    2013-10-01

    To ensure accurate chromosome segregation, cohesion between sister chromatids must be released in a controlled manner during mitosis. A new study reveals how distinct centromere populations of the cohesin protector Sgo1 are regulated by microtubule attachments, cyclin-dependent kinases, and the kinetochore kinase Bub1. PMID:24112985

  7. A polarity factor takes the lead in chromosome segregation

    OpenAIRE

    Kirkpatrick, Clare; Viollier, Patrick

    2010-01-01

    Several recent studies shed light on how bacteria achieve rapid and accurate chromosome segregation through an interplay of Par-type partitioning systems, cytokinesis regulators and a polarity determinant.

  8. Chromosome segregation errors: a double-edged sword

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, A.

    2012-01-01

    Unequal separation of the mother cells’ DNA over its two daughter cells upon cell division is a prevalent phenotype found in cancer cells. This imbalanced nuclear division manifests itself as chromosome segregation errors in the final phases of Mitosis. Chromosome unstable (CIN) cancer cells continu

  9. Dynamics of Escherichia coli Chromosome Segregation during Multifork Replication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Henrik Jørck; Youngren, Brenda; Hansen, Flemming G.;

    2007-01-01

    Slowly growing Escherichia coli cells have a simple cell cycle, with replication and progressive segregation of the chromosome completed before cell division. In rapidly growing cells, initiation of replication occurs before the previous replication rounds are complete. At cell division, the...

  10. A novel chromosome segregation mechanism during female meiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNally, Karen Perry; Panzica, Michelle T; Kim, Taekyung; Cortes, Daniel B; McNally, Francis J

    2016-08-15

    In a wide range of eukaryotes, chromosome segregation occurs through anaphase A, in which chromosomes move toward stationary spindle poles, anaphase B, in which chromosomes move at the same velocity as outwardly moving spindle poles, or both. In contrast, Caenorhabditis elegans female meiotic spindles initially shorten in the pole-to-pole axis such that spindle poles contact the outer kinetochore before the start of anaphase chromosome separation. Once the spindle pole-to-kinetochore contact has been made, the homologues of a 4-μm-long bivalent begin to separate. The spindle shortens an additional 0.5 μm until the chromosomes are embedded in the spindle poles. Chromosomes then separate at the same velocity as the spindle poles in an anaphase B-like movement. We conclude that the majority of meiotic chromosome movement is caused by shortening of the spindle to bring poles in contact with the chromosomes, followed by separation of chromosome-bound poles by outward sliding. PMID:27335123

  11. csi2p modulates microtubule dynamics and organizes the bipolar spindle for chromosome segregation

    OpenAIRE

    Costa, Judite; Fu, Chuanhai; Khare, V. Mohini; Tran, Phong T.

    2014-01-01

    Proper chromosome segregation is of paramount importance for proper genetic inheritance. Defects in chromosome segregation can lead to aneuploidy, which is a hallmark of cancer cells. Eukaryotic chromosome segregation is accomplished by the bipolar spindle. Additional mechanisms, such as the spindle assembly checkpoint and centromere positioning, further help to ensure complete segregation fidelity. Here we present the fission yeast csi2 +. csi2p localizes to the spindle poles, where it regul...

  12. Time scale of entropic segregation of flexible polymers in confinement: Implications for chromosome segregation in filamentous bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Arnold, Axel; Jun, Suckjoon

    2007-01-01

    We report molecular dynamics simulations of the segregation of two overlapping chains in cylindrical confinement. We find that the entropic repulsion between the chains can be sufficiently strong to cause segregation on a time scale that is short compared to the one for diffusion. This result implies that entropic driving forces are sufficiently strong to cause rapid bacterial chromosome segregation.

  13. Dual mechanisms prevent premature chromosome segregation during meiosis

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Seoyoung; Meyer, Régis; Chuong, Hoa; Dawson, Dean S.

    2013-01-01

    In meiosis I, the segregation of homologous chromosomes before pairing would be catastrophic. Kim et al. describe two mechanisms that prevent this. In early meiosis, Ipl1 triggers shedding of a kinetochore protein and prevents microtubule attachment. Ipl1 localizes to the spindle pole bodies (SPBs), where it blocks spindle assembly. These processes are reversed upon expression of Ndt80. CDK phosphorylates Ipl1, delocalizing it from SPBs and triggering spindle assembly. Ipl1 and Ntd80 coordina...

  14. Chromosome segregation control by Escherichia coli ObgE GTPase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foti, James J; Persky, Nicole S; Ferullo, Daniel J; Lovett, Susan T

    2007-07-01

    Escherichia coli cells depleted of the conserved GTPase, ObgE, show early chromosome-partitioning defects and accumulate replicated chromosomes in which the terminus regions are colocalized. Cells lacking ObgE continue to initiate replication, with a normal ratio of the origin to terminus. Localization of the SeqA DNA binding protein, normally seen as punctate foci, however, was disturbed. Depletion of ObgE also results in cell filamentation, with polyploid DNA content. Depletion of ObgE did not cause lethality, and cells recovered fully after expression of ObgE was restored. We propose a model in which ObgE is required to license chromosome segregation and subsequent cell cycle events. PMID:17578452

  15. Back to the roots: segregation of univalent sex chromosomes in meiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabig, Gunar; Müller-Reichert, Thomas; Paliulis, Leocadia V

    2016-06-01

    In males of many taxa, univalent sex chromosomes normally segregate during the first meiotic division, and analysis of sex chromosome segregation was foundational for the chromosome theory of inheritance. Correct segregation of single or multiple univalent sex chromosomes occurs in a cellular environment where every other chromosome is a bivalent that is being partitioned into homologous chromosomes at anaphase I. The mechanics of univalent chromosome segregation vary among animal taxa. In some, univalents establish syntelic attachment of sister kinetochores to the spindle. In others, amphitelic attachment is established. Here, we review how this problem of segregation of unpaired chromosomes is solved in different animal systems. In addition, we give a short outlook of how mechanistic insights into this process could be gained by explicitly studying model organisms, such as Caenorhabditis elegans. PMID:26511278

  16. Dysfunctional MreB inhibits chromosome segregation in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kruse, Thomas; Møller-Jensen, Jakob; Løbner-Olesen, Anders;

    2003-01-01

    cytometric and cytological analyses indicated that MreB-depleted cells segregated their chromosomes in pairs, consistent with chromosome cohesion. Overexpression of wild-type MreB inhibited cell division but did not perturb chromosome segregation. Overexpression of mutant forms of MreB inhibited cell...

  17. Chromosomal rearrangement segregating with adrenoleukodystrophy: Associated changes in color vision

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alpern, M.; Zhang, H. (Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)); Sack, G.H. Jr.; Moser, H.W. (Johns Hopkins Univ. School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States)); Krantz, D.H. (Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States))

    1993-10-15

    A patient from a large kindred with adrenoleukodystrophy showed profound disturbance of color ordering, color matching, increment thresholds, and luminosity. Except for color matching, his performance was similar to blue-cone [open quotes]monochromacy,[close quotes] an X chromosome-linked recessive retinal dystrophy in which color vision is dichromatic, mediated by the visual pigments of rods and short-wave-sensitive cones. Color matching, however, indicated that an abnormal rudimentary visual pigment was also present. This may reflect the presence of a recombinant visual pigment protein or altered regulation of residual pigment genes, due to DNA changes - deletion of the long-wave pigment gene and reorganized sequence 5[prime] to the pigment gene cluster - that segregate with the metabolic defect in this kindred. 25 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Physical Model of Segregation of E.coli Chromosomes using Molecular Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alnahhas, Faisal; Kharel, Savan

    2016-03-01

    Chromosome segregation is one of the most interesting physical processes during a bacterial cell cycle. We will use molecular dynamics simulations which will help us understand how strongly confined polymer segregates. In the presentation, we will discuss how segregation of initially overlapping circular chromosome occurs during a cell cycle. In particular, we will describe the role played by entropic mechanism in the demixing of overlapping circular polymer confined in a cylindrical boundary. We discuss how our polymer chains modeled as an E-coli chromosome experiences an effective repulsion, which ultimately leads to partition driven by the entropic forces. Also, we will also discuss how the segregation of circular chromosome in cylindrical confinement differs from a spherical confinement. Finally, we will discuss the role played by proteins and supercoiling in during the segregation process.

  19. Phosphorylation of centromeric histone H3 variant regulates chromosome segregation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    OpenAIRE

    Boeckmann, Lars; Takahashi, Yoshimitsu; Au, Wei-Chun; Prashant K. Mishra; Choy, John S.; Dawson, Anthony R.; Szeto, May Y.; Waybright, Timothy J.; Heger, Christopher; McAndrew, Christopher; Goldsmith, Paul K.; VEENSTRA, TIMOTHY D.; Baker, Richard E.; Basrai, Munira A.

    2013-01-01

    The centromeric histone H3 variant (CenH3) is essential for chromosome segregation in eukaryotes. We identify posttranslational modifications of Saccharomyces cerevisiae CenH3, Cse4. Functional characterization of cse4 phosphorylation mutants shows growth and chromosome segregation defects when combined with kinetochore mutants okp1 and ame1. Using a phosphoserine-specific antibody, we show that the association of phosphorylated Cse4 with centromeres increases in response to defective microtu...

  20. DNA damage response during mitosis induces whole chromosome mis-segregation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhoum, Samuel F.; Kabeche, Lilian; Murnane, John P.; Zaki, Bassem I.; Compton, Duane A.

    2014-01-01

    Many cancers display both structural (s-CIN) and numerical (w-CIN) chromosomal instabilities. Defective chromosome segregation during mitosis has been shown to cause DNA damage that induces structural rearrangements of chromosomes (s-CIN). In contrast, whether DNA damage can disrupt mitotic processes to generate whole chromosomal instability (w-CIN) is unknown. Here we show that activation of the DNA damage response (DDR) during mitosis selectively stabilizes kinetochore-microtubule (k-MT) attachments to chromosomes through Aurora-A and Plk1 kinases, thereby increasing the frequency of lagging chromosomes during anaphase. Inhibition of DDR proteins, ATM or Chk2, abolishes the effect of DNA damage on k-MTs and chromosome segregation, whereas activation of the DDR in the absence of DNA damage is sufficient to induce chromosome segregation errors. Finally, inhibiting the DDR during mitosis in cancer cells with persistent DNA damage suppresses inherent chromosome segregation defects. Thus, DDR during mitosis inappropriately stabilizes k-MTs creating a link between s-CIN and w-CIN. PMID:25107667

  1. A minimal number of MELT repeats supports all functions of KNL1 in chromosome segregation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Gang; Lischetti, Tiziana; Nilsson, Jakob

    2013-01-01

    The Bub1-Bub3 and BubR1-Bub3 checkpoint complexes, or the Bubs, contribute to the accurate segregation of chromosomes during mitosis by promoting chromosome bi-orientation and halting exit from mitosis if this fails. The complexes associate with kinetochores during mitosis, which is required for...

  2. A role for the fission yeast Rqh1 helicase in chromosome segregation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Win, Thein Z; Mankouri, Hocine W; Hickson, Ian D;

    2005-01-01

    DNA repeat by deletion of reb1+ partially suppresses rqh1delta phenotypes. These data are consistent with the function of the Top3-RecQ complex in maintenance of the rDNA structure by processing aberrant chromosome structures arising from DNA replication. The chromosome segregation defects seen...

  3. Dbl2 Regulates Rad51 and DNA Joint Molecule Metabolism to Ensure Proper Meiotic Chromosome Segregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polakova, Silvia; Molnarova, Lucia; Hyppa, Randy W; Benko, Zsigmond; Misova, Ivana; Schleiffer, Alexander; Smith, Gerald R; Gregan, Juraj

    2016-06-01

    To identify new proteins required for faithful meiotic chromosome segregation, we screened a Schizosaccharomyces pombe deletion mutant library and found that deletion of the dbl2 gene led to missegregation of chromosomes during meiosis. Analyses of both live and fixed cells showed that dbl2Δ mutant cells frequently failed to segregate homologous chromosomes to opposite poles during meiosis I. Removing Rec12 (Spo11 homolog) to eliminate meiotic DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) suppressed the segregation defect in dbl2Δ cells, indicating that Dbl2 acts after the initiation of meiotic recombination. Analyses of DSBs and Holliday junctions revealed no significant defect in their formation or processing in dbl2Δ mutant cells, although some Rec12-dependent DNA joint molecules persisted late in meiosis. Failure to segregate chromosomes in the absence of Dbl2 correlated with persistent Rad51 foci, and deletion of rad51 or genes encoding Rad51 mediators also suppressed the segregation defect of dbl2Δ. Formation of foci of Fbh1, an F-box helicase that efficiently dismantles Rad51-DNA filaments, was impaired in dbl2Δ cells. Our results suggest that Dbl2 is a novel regulator of Fbh1 and thereby Rad51-dependent DSB repair required for proper meiotic chromosome segregation and viable sex cell formation. The wide conservation of these proteins suggests that our results apply to many species. PMID:27304859

  4. The dynamics of signal amplification by macromolecular assemblies for the control of chromosome segregation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Semin eLee

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The control of chromosome segregation relies on the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC, a complex regulatory system that ensures the high fidelity of chromosome segregation in higher organisms by delaying the onset of anaphase until each chromosome is properly bi-oriented on the mitotic spindle. Central to this process is the establishment of multiple yet specific protein-protein interactions in a narrow time-space window. Here we discuss the highly dynamic nature of multi-protein complexes that control chromosome segregation in which an intricate network of weak but cooperative interactions modulate signal amplification to ensure a proper SAC response. We also discuss the current structural understanding of the communication between the SAC and the kinetochore; how transient interactions can regulate the assembly and disassembly of the SAC as well as the challenges and opportunities for the definition and the manipulation of the flow of information in SAC signaling.

  5. Nuclear envelope expansion is crucial for proper chromosomal segregation during a closed mitosis

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    Takemoto, Ai; Kawashima, Shigehiro A.; Li, Juan-Juan; Jeffery, Linda; Yamatsugu, Kenzo; Elemento, Olivier; Nurse, Paul

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Here, we screened a 10,371 library of diverse molecules using a drug-sensitive fission yeast strain to identify compounds which cause defects in chromosome segregation during mitosis. We identified a phosphorium-ylide-based compound Cutin-1 which inhibits nuclear envelope expansion and nuclear elongation during the closed mitosis of fission yeast, and showed that its target is the β-subunit of fatty acid synthase. A point mutation in the dehydratase domain of Fas1 conferred in vivo and in vitro resistance to Cutin-1. Time-lapse photomicrography showed that the bulk of the chromosomes were only transiently separated during mitosis, and nucleoli separation was defective. Subsequently sister chromatids re-associated leading to chromosomal mis-segregation. These segregation defects were reduced when the nuclear volume was increased and were increased when the nuclear volume was reduced. We propose that there needs to be sufficient nuclear volume to allow the nuclear elongation necessary during a closed mitosis to take place for proper chromosome segregation, and that inhibition of fatty acid synthase compromises nuclear elongation and leads to defects in chromosomal segregation. PMID:26869222

  6. How chromosome mis-segregation leads to cancer: lessons from BubR1 mouse models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyunsook

    2014-10-31

    Alteration in chromosome numbers and structures instigate and foster massive genetic instability. As Boveri has seen a hundred years ago (Boveri, 1914; 2008), aneuploidy is hallmark of many cancers. However, whether aneuploidy is the cause or the result of cancer is still at debate. The molecular mechanism behind aneuploidy includes the chromo-some mis-segregation in mitosis by the compromise of spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC). SAC is an elaborate network of proteins, which monitor that all chromosomes are bipolarly attached with the spindles. Therefore, the weakening of the SAC is the major reason for chromosome number instability, while complete compromise of SAC results in detrimental death, exemplified in natural abortion in embryonic stage. Here, I will review on the recent progress on the understanding of chromosome mis-segregation and cancer, based on the comparison of different mouse models of BubR1, the core component of SAC. PMID:25256220

  7. Methylation of CenH3 arginine 37 regulates kinetochore integrity and chromosome segregation

    OpenAIRE

    Samel, Anke; Cuomo, Alessandro; Bonaldi, Tiziana; Ehrenhofer-Murray, Ann E

    2012-01-01

    Centromeres of eukaryotic chromosomes mark the site for kinetochore formation and microtubule attachment and are essential for accurate chromosome segregation. Although centromere identity is defined by the presence of the histone H3 variant CenH3/centromere protein A (CENP-A), little is known about how epigenetic modifications on CenH3 might regulate kinetochore assembly and centromere function. Here we show that CENP-A from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, termed Cse4, is methylated on arginine 37...

  8. A role for Arf1 in mitotic Golgi disassembly, chromosome segregation, and cytokinesis

    OpenAIRE

    Altan-Bonnet, Nihal; Phair, Robert D.; Polishchuk, Roman S.; Weigert, Roberto; Lippincott-Schwartz, Jennifer

    2003-01-01

    In mitosis, chromosome, cytoskeleton, and organelle dynamics must be coordinated for successful cell division. Here, we present evidence for a role for Arf1, a small GTPase associated with the Golgi apparatus, in the orchestration of mitotic Golgi breakdown, chromosome segregation, and cytokinesis. We show that early in mitosis Arf1 becomes inactive and dissociates from Golgi membranes. This is followed by the dispersal of numerous Arf1-dependent peripheral Golgi proteins and subsequent Golgi...

  9. SMC is recruited to oriC by ParB and promotes chromosome segregation in Streptococcus pneumoniae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Minnen, Anita; Attaiech, Laetitia; Thon, Maria; Gruber, Stephan; Veening, Jan-Willem

    2011-01-01

    Segregation of replicated chromosomes is an essential process in all organisms. How bacteria, such as the oval-shaped human pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae, efficiently segregate their chromosomes is poorly understood. Here we show that the pneumococcal homologue of the DNA-binding protein ParB re

  10. Role of the Number of Microtubules in Chromosome Segregation during Cell Division

    CERN Document Server

    Bertalan, Zsolt; La Porta, Caterina A M; Zapperi, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Faithful segregation of genetic material during cell division requires alignment of chromosomes between two spindle poles and attachment of their kinetochores to each of the poles. Failure of these complex dynamical processes leads to chromosomal instability (CIN), a characteristic feature of several diseases including cancer. While a multitude of biological factors regulating chromosome congression and bi-orientation have been identified, it is still unclear how they are integrated so that coherent chromosome motion emerges from a large collection of random and deterministic processes. Here we address this issue by a three dimensional computational model of motor-driven chromosome congression and bi-orientation during mitosis. Our model reveals that successful cell division requires control of the total number of microtubules: if this number is too small bi-orientation fails, while if it is too large not all the chromosomes are able to congress. The optimal number of microtubules predicted by our model compa...

  11. Repulsive forces between looping chromosomes induce entropy-driven segregation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manfred Bohn

    Full Text Available One striking feature of chromatin organization is that chromosomes are compartmentalized into distinct territories during interphase, the degree of intermingling being much smaller than expected for linear chains. A growing body of evidence indicates that the formation of loops plays a dominant role in transcriptional regulation as well as the entropic organization of interphase chromosomes. Using a recently proposed model, we quantitatively determine the entropic forces between chromosomes. This Dynamic Loop Model assumes that loops form solely on the basis of diffusional motion without invoking other long-range interactions. We find that introducing loops into the structure of chromatin results in a multi-fold higher repulsion between chromosomes compared to linear chains. Strong effects are observed for the tendency of a non-random alignment; the overlap volume between chromosomes decays fast with increasing loop number. Our results suggest that the formation of chromatin loops imposes both compartmentalization as well as order on the system without requiring additional energy-consuming processes.

  12. Sli15 Associates with the Ipl1 Protein Kinase to Promote Proper Chromosome Segregation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Jae-Hyun; Kang, Jung-seog; Chan, Clarence S.M.

    1999-01-01

    The conserved Ipl1 protein kinase is essential for proper chromosome segregation and thus cell viability in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Its human homologue has been implicated in the tumorigenesis of diverse forms of cancer. We show here that sister chromatids that have separated from each other are not properly segregated to opposite poles of ipl1-2 cells. Failures in chromosome segregation are often associated with abnormal distribution of the spindle pole–associated Nuf2-GF...

  13. Looping in on Ndc80 - how does a protein loop at the kinetochore control chromosome segregation?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Jakob

    2012-01-01

    Segregation of chromosomes during mitosis requires the interaction of dynamic microtubules with the kinetochore, a large protein structure established on the centromere region of sister chromatids. The core microtubule-binding activity of the kinetochore resides in the KMN network, an outer...

  14. The multiple roles of Bub1 in chromosome segregation during mitosis and meiosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchetti, Francesco; Venkatachalam, Sundaresan

    2009-06-19

    Aneuploidy, any deviation from an exact multiple of the haploid number of chromosomes, is a common occurrence in cancer and represents the most frequent chromosomal disorder in newborns. Eukaryotes have evolved mechanisms to assure the fidelity of chromosome segregation during cell division that include a multiplicity of checks and controls. One of the main cell division control mechanisms is the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) that monitors the proper attachment of chromosomes to spindle fibers and prevents anaphase until all kinetochores are properly attached. The mammalian SAC is composed by at least 14 evolutionary-conserved proteins that work in a coordinated fashion to monitor the establishment of amphitelic attachment of all chromosomes before allowing cell division to occur. Among the SAC proteins, the budding uninhibited by benzimidazole protein 1 (Bub1), is a highly conserved protein of prominent importance for the proper functioning of the SAC. Studies have revealed many roles for Bub1 in both mitosis and meiosis, including the localization of other SAC proteins to the kinetochore, SAC signaling, metaphase congression and the protection of the sister chromatid cohesion. Recent data show striking sex specific differences in the response to alterations in Bub1 activity. Proper Bub1 functioning is particularly important during oogenesis in preventing the generation of aneuploid gametes that can have detrimental effects on the health status of the fetus and the newborn. These data suggest that Bub1 is a master regulator of SAC and chromosomal segregation in both mitosis and meiosis. Elucidating its many essential functions in regulating proper chromosome segregation can have important consequences for preventing tumorigenesis and developmental abnormalities.

  15. Segregation of an X ring chromosome in two generations.

    OpenAIRE

    Dallapiccola, B; Bruni, L.; Boscherini, B; Pasquino, A M; Chessa, L.; Vignetti, P

    1980-01-01

    A 45,X/46,X,r(X) mosaicism was found in a mother and daughter. Characterisation of the ring by banding studies showed that breakpoints had occurred at bands Xp13 and Xq27. It is confirmed that women heterozygotes for partial deficiencies of the short arm of an X chromosome are fertile. Although the mother developed secondary amenorrhoea at the age of 29, it is suggested that fertility per se may not be affected by deficiencies of the distal part of Xq.

  16. Large-scale selective sweep among Segregation Distorter chromosomes in African populations of Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presgraves, Daven C; Gérard, Pierre R; Cherukuri, Anjuli; Lyttle, Terrence W

    2009-05-01

    Segregation Distorter (SD) is a selfish, coadapted gene complex on chromosome 2 of Drosophila melanogaster that strongly distorts Mendelian transmission; heterozygous SD/SD(+) males sire almost exclusively SD-bearing progeny. Fifty years of genetic, molecular, and theory work have made SD one of the best-characterized meiotic drive systems, but surprisingly the details of its evolutionary origins and population dynamics remain unclear. Earlier analyses suggested that the SD system arose recently in the Mediterranean basin and then spread to a low, stable equilibrium frequency (1-5%) in most natural populations worldwide. In this report, we show, first, that SD chromosomes occur in populations in sub-Saharan Africa, the ancestral range of D. melanogaster, at a similarly low frequency (approximately 2%), providing evidence for the robustness of its equilibrium frequency but raising doubts about the Mediterranean-origins hypothesis. Second, our genetic analyses reveal two kinds of SD chromosomes in Africa: inversion-free SD chromosomes with little or no transmission advantage; and an African-endemic inversion-bearing SD chromosome, SD-Mal, with a perfect transmission advantage. Third, our population genetic analyses show that SD-Mal chromosomes swept across the African continent very recently, causing linkage disequilibrium and an absence of variability over 39% of the length of the second chromosome. Thus, despite a seemingly stable equilibrium frequency, SD chromosomes continue to evolve, to compete with one another, or evade suppressors in the genome. PMID:19412335

  17. Tumor-specific chromosome mis-segregation controls cancer plasticity by maintaining tumor heterogeneity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanjie Hu

    Full Text Available Aneuploidy with chromosome instability is a cancer hallmark. We studied chromosome 7 (Chr7 copy number variation (CNV in gliomas and in primary cultures derived from them. We found tumor heterogeneity with cells having Chr7-CNV commonly occurs in gliomas, with a higher percentage of cells in high-grade gliomas carrying more than 2 copies of Chr7, as compared to low-grade gliomas. Interestingly, all Chr7-aneuploid cell types in the parental culture of established glioma cell lines reappeared in single-cell-derived subcultures. We then characterized the biology of three syngeneic glioma cultures dominated by different Chr7-aneuploid cell types. We found phenotypic divergence for cells following Chr7 mis-segregation, which benefited overall tumor growth in vitro and in vivo. Mathematical modeling suggested the involvement of chromosome instability and interactions among cell subpopulations in restoring the optimal equilibrium of tumor cell types. Both our experimental data and mathematical modeling demonstrated that the complexity of tumor heterogeneity could be enhanced by the existence of chromosomes with structural abnormality, in addition to their mis-segregations. Overall, our findings show, for the first time, the involvement of chromosome instability in maintaining tumor heterogeneity, which underlies the enhanced growth, persistence and treatment resistance of cancers.

  18. Interplay between type 1A topoisomerases and gyrase in chromosome segregation in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usongo, Valentine; Tanguay, Cynthia; Nolent, Flora; Bessong, Jill Egbe; Drolet, Marc

    2013-04-01

    Escherichia coli possesses two type 1A topoisomerases, Topo I (topA) and Topo III (topB). Topo I relaxes excess negative supercoiling, and topA mutants can grow only in the presence of compensatory mechanisms, such as gyrase mutations. topB mutants grow as well as wild-type cells. In vitro, Topo III, but not Topo I, can efficiently decatenate DNA during replication. However, in vivo, a chromosome segregation defect is seen only when both type 1A topoisomerases are absent. Here we present experimental evidence for an interplay between gyrase and type 1A topoisomerases in chromosome segregation. We found that both the growth defect and the Par(-) phenotypes of a gyrB(Ts) mutant at nonpermissive temperatures were significantly corrected by deleting topA, but only when topB was present. Overproducing Topo IV, the major cellular decatenase, could not substitute for topB. We also show that overproducing Topo III at a very high level could suppress the Par(-) phenotype. We previously found that the growth and chromosome segregation defects of a triple topA rnhA gyrB(Ts) mutant in which gyrase supercoiling activity was strongly inhibited could be corrected by overproducing Topo III (V. Usongo, F. Nolent, P. Sanscartier, C. Tanguay, S. Broccoli, I. Baaklini, K. Drlica, and M. Drolet, Mol. Microbiol. 69:968-981, 2008). We show here that this overproduction could be bypassed by substituting the gyrB(Ts) allele for a gyrB(+) one or by growing cells in a minimal medium, conditions that reduced both topA- and rnhA-dependent unregulated replication. Altogether, our data point to a role for Topo III in chromosome segregation when gyrase is inefficient and suggest that Topo I plays an indirect role via supercoiling regulation. PMID:23396913

  19. Sex ratio in normal and disomic sperm: Evidence that the extra chromosome 21 preferentially segregates with the Y chromosome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffin, D.K.; Millie, E.A.; Hassold, T.J. [Case Western Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States)]|[Univ. Hospitals of Cleveland, OH (United States)] [and others

    1996-11-01

    In humans, deviations from a 1:1 male:female ratio have been identified in both chromosomally normal and trisomic live births: among normal newborns there is a slight excess of males, among trisomy 18 live borns a large excess of females, and among trisomy 21 live borns an excess of males. These differences could arise from differential production of or fertilization by Y- or X-bearing sperm or from selection against male or female conceptions. To examine the proportion of Y- and X- bearing sperm in normal sperm and in sperm disomic for chromosomes 18 or 21, we used three-color FISH (to the X and Y and either chromosome 18 or chromosome 21) to analyze > 300,000 sperm from 24 men. In apparently normal sperm, the sex ratio was nearly 1:1 (148,074 Y-bearing to 148,657 X-bearing sperm), and the value was not affected by the age of the donor. Certain of the donors, however, had significant excesses of Y- or X-bearing sperm. In disomy 18 sperm, there were virtually identical numbers of Y- and X-bearing sperm; thus, the excess of females in trisomy 18 presumably is due to selection against male trisomic conceptions. In contrast, we observed 69 Y-bearing and 44 X-bearing sperm disomic for chromosome 21. This is consistent with previous molecular studies, which have identified an excess of males among paternally derived cases of trisomy 21, and suggests that some of the excess of males among Down syndrome individuals is attributable to a nondisjunctional mechanism in which the extra chromosome 21 preferentially segregates with the Y chromosome. 17 refs., 2 tabs.

  20. The Condensin Complex Is Essential for Amitotic Segregation of Bulk Chromosomes, but Not Nucleoli, in the Ciliate Tetrahymena thermophila†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervantes, Marcella D.; Coyne, Robert S.; Xi, Xiaohui; Yao, Meng-Chao

    2006-01-01

    The macronucleus of the binucleate ciliate Tetrahymena thermophila contains fragmented and amplified chromosomes that do not have centromeres, eliminating the possibility of mitotic nuclear division. Instead, the macronucleus divides by amitosis with random segregation of these chromosomes without detectable chromatin condensation. This amitotic division provides a special opportunity for studying the roles of mitotic proteins in segregating acentric chromatin. The Smc4 protein is a core component of the condensin complex that plays a role in chromatin condensation and has also been associated with nucleolar segregation, DNA repair, and maintenance of the chromatin scaffold. Mutants of Tetrahymena SMC4 have remarkable characteristics during amitosis. They do not form microtubules inside the macronucleus as normal cells do, and there is little or no bulk DNA segregation during cell division. Nevertheless, segregation of nucleoli to daughter cells still occurs, indicating the independence of this process and bulk DNA segregation in ciliate amitosis. PMID:16738332

  1. Multiple subunits of the Caenorhabditis elegans anaphase-promoting complex are required for chromosome segregation during meiosis I.

    OpenAIRE

    Davis, Edward S.; Wille, Lucia; Chestnut, Barry A.; Sadler, Penny L.; Shakes, Diane C; Golden, Andy

    2002-01-01

    Two genes, originally identified in genetic screens for Caenorhabditis elegans mutants that arrest in metaphase of meiosis I, prove to encode subunits of the anaphase-promoting complex or cyclosome (APC/C). RNA interference studies reveal that these and other APC/C subunits are essential for the segregation of chromosomal homologs during meiosis I. Further, chromosome segregation during meiosis I requires APC/C functions in addition to the release of sister chromatid cohesion.

  2. P190B RhoGAP Regulates Chromosome Segregation in Cancer Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Melissa [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology and the Indiana University Simon Cancer Center, Indiana University School of Medicine, 1234 Notre Dame Avenue, South Bend, IN 46617 (United States); Peddibhotla, Sirisha [Department of Molecular and Human Genetics, Baylor College of Medicine, John P. McGovern Campus, NABS-0250, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); McHenry, Peter [Department of Biology, Southwestern Adventist University, 100 W. Hillcrest, Keene, TX 76059 (United States); Chang, Peggy; Yochum, Zachary; Park, Ko Un; Sears, James Cooper; Vargo-Gogola, Tracy, E-mail: vargo-gogola.1@nd.edu [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology and the Indiana University Simon Cancer Center, Indiana University School of Medicine, 1234 Notre Dame Avenue, South Bend, IN 46617 (United States)

    2012-04-25

    Rho GTPases are overexpressed and hyperactivated in many cancers, including breast cancer. Rho proteins, as well as their regulators and effectors, have been implicated in mitosis, and their altered expression promotes mitotic defects and aneuploidy. Previously, we demonstrated that p190B Rho GTPase activating protein (RhoGAP) deficiency inhibits ErbB2-induced mammary tumor formation in mice. Here we describe a novel role for p190B as a regulator of mitosis. We found that p190B localized to centrosomes during interphase and mitosis, and that it is differentially phosphorylated during mitosis. Knockdown of p190B expression in MCF-7 and Hela cells increased the incidence of aberrant microtubule-kinetochore attachments at metaphase, lagging chromosomes at anaphase, and micronucleation, all of which are indicative of aneuploidy. Cell cycle analysis of p190B deficient MCF-7 cells revealed a significant increase in apoptotic cells with a concomitant decrease in cells in G1 and S phase, suggesting that p190B deficient cells die at the G1 to S transition. Chemical inhibition of the Rac GTPase during mitosis reduced the incidence of lagging chromosomes in p190B knockdown cells to levels detected in control cells, suggesting that aberrant Rac activity in the absence of p190B promotes chromosome segregation defects. Taken together, these data suggest that p190B regulates chromosome segregation and apoptosis in cancer cells. We propose that disruption of mitosis may be one mechanism by which p190B deficiency inhibits tumorigenesis.

  3. P190B RhoGAP Regulates Chromosome Segregation in Cancer Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rho GTPases are overexpressed and hyperactivated in many cancers, including breast cancer. Rho proteins, as well as their regulators and effectors, have been implicated in mitosis, and their altered expression promotes mitotic defects and aneuploidy. Previously, we demonstrated that p190B Rho GTPase activating protein (RhoGAP) deficiency inhibits ErbB2-induced mammary tumor formation in mice. Here we describe a novel role for p190B as a regulator of mitosis. We found that p190B localized to centrosomes during interphase and mitosis, and that it is differentially phosphorylated during mitosis. Knockdown of p190B expression in MCF-7 and Hela cells increased the incidence of aberrant microtubule-kinetochore attachments at metaphase, lagging chromosomes at anaphase, and micronucleation, all of which are indicative of aneuploidy. Cell cycle analysis of p190B deficient MCF-7 cells revealed a significant increase in apoptotic cells with a concomitant decrease in cells in G1 and S phase, suggesting that p190B deficient cells die at the G1 to S transition. Chemical inhibition of the Rac GTPase during mitosis reduced the incidence of lagging chromosomes in p190B knockdown cells to levels detected in control cells, suggesting that aberrant Rac activity in the absence of p190B promotes chromosome segregation defects. Taken together, these data suggest that p190B regulates chromosome segregation and apoptosis in cancer cells. We propose that disruption of mitosis may be one mechanism by which p190B deficiency inhibits tumorigenesis

  4. Generation of meiomaps of genome-wide recombination and chromosome segregation in human oocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottolini, Christian S; Capalbo, Antonio; Newnham, Louise; Cimadomo, Danilo; Natesan, Senthilkumar A; Hoffmann, Eva R; Ubaldi, Filippo M; Rienzi, Laura; Handyside, Alan H

    2016-07-01

    We have developed a protocol for the generation of genome-wide maps (meiomaps) of recombination and chromosome segregation for the three products of human female meiosis: the first and second polar bodies (PB1 and PB2) and the corresponding oocyte. PB1 is biopsied and the oocyte is artificially activated by exposure to calcium ionophore, after which PB2 is biopsied and collected with the corresponding oocyte. The whole genomes of the polar bodies and oocytes are amplified by multiple displacement amplification and, together with maternal genomic DNA, genotyped for ∼300,000 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) genome-wide by microarray. Informative maternal heterozygous SNPs are phased using a haploid PB2 or oocyte as a reference. A simple algorithm is then used to identify the maternal haplotypes for each chromosome, in all of the products of meiosis for each oocyte. This allows mapping of crossovers and analysis of chromosome segregation patterns. The protocol takes a minimum of 3-5 d and requires a clinical embryologist with micromanipulation experience and a molecular biologist with basic bioinformatic skills. It has several advantages over previous methods; importantly, the use of artificial oocyte activation avoids the creation of embryos for research purposes. In addition, compared with next-generation sequencing, targeted SNP genotyping is cost-effective and it simplifies the bioinformatic analysis, as only one haploid reference sample is required to establish phase for maternal haplotyping. Finally, meiomapping is more informative than copy-number analysis alone for analysis of chromosome segregation patterns. Using this protocol, we have provided new insights that may lead to improvements in assisted reproduction for the treatment of infertility. PMID:27310263

  5. Cell division patterns and chromosomal segregation defects in oral cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaseb, Hatem O; Lewis, Dale W; Saunders, William S; Gollin, Susanne M

    2016-09-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is a serious public health problem caused primarily by smoking and alcohol consumption or human papillomavirus. The cancer stem cell (CSC) theory posits that CSCs show unique characteristics, including self-renewal and therapeutic resistance. Examining biomarkers and other features of CSCs is critical to better understanding their biology. To this end, the results show that cellular SOX2 immunostaining correlates with other CSC biomarkers in OSCC cell lines and marks the rare CSC population. To assess whether CSC division patterns are symmetrical, resulting in two CSC, or asymmetrical, leading to one CSC and one cancer cell, cell size and fluorescence intensity of mitotic cells stained with SOX2 were analyzed. Asymmetrical SOX2 distribution in ≈25% of the mitoses analyzed was detected. Chromosomal instability, some of which is caused by chromosome segregation defects (CSDs), is a feature of cancer cells that leads to altered gene copy numbers. We compare chromosomal instability (as measured by CSDs) between CSCs (SOX2+) and non-CSCs (SOX2-) from the same OSCC cell lines. CSDs were more common in non-CSCs (SOX2-) than CSCs (SOX2+) and in symmetrical CSC (SOX2+) mitotic pairs than asymmetrical CSC (SOX2+/SOX2-) mitotic pairs. CSCs showed fewer and different types of CSDs after ionizing radiation treatment than non-CSCs. Overall, these data are the first to demonstrate both symmetrical and asymmetrical cell divisions with CSDs in OSCC CSC. Further, the results suggest that CSCs may undergo altered behavior, including therapeutic resistance as a result of chromosomal instability due to chromosome segregation defects. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27123539

  6. Hormad1 mutation disrupts synaptonemal complex formation, recombination, and chromosome segregation in mammalian meiosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-Hyun Shin

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Meiosis is unique to germ cells and essential for reproduction. During the first meiotic division, homologous chromosomes pair, recombine, and form chiasmata. The homologues connect via axial elements and numerous transverse filaments to form the synaptonemal complex. The synaptonemal complex is a critical component for chromosome pairing, segregation, and recombination. We previously identified a novel germ cell-specific HORMA domain encoding gene, Hormad1, a member of the synaptonemal complex and a mammalian counterpart to the yeast meiotic HORMA domain protein Hop1. Hormad1 is essential for mammalian gametogenesis as knockout male and female mice are infertile. Hormad1 deficient (Hormad1(-/ (- testes exhibit meiotic arrest in the early pachytene stage, and synaptonemal complexes cannot be visualized by electron microscopy. Hormad1 deficiency does not affect localization of other synaptonemal complex proteins, SYCP2 and SYCP3, but disrupts homologous chromosome pairing. Double stranded break formation and early recombination events are disrupted in Hormad1(-/ (- testes and ovaries as shown by the drastic decrease in the γH2AX, DMC1, RAD51, and RPA foci. HORMAD1 co-localizes with γH2AX to the sex body during pachytene. BRCA1, ATR, and γH2AX co-localize to the sex body and participate in meiotic sex chromosome inactivation and transcriptional silencing. Hormad1 deficiency abolishes γH2AX, ATR, and BRCA1 localization to the sex chromosomes and causes transcriptional de-repression on the X chromosome. Unlike testes, Hormad1(-/ (- ovaries have seemingly normal ovarian folliculogenesis after puberty. However, embryos generated from Hormad1(-/ (- oocytes are hyper- and hypodiploid at the 2 cell and 8 cell stage, and they arrest at the blastocyst stage. HORMAD1 is therefore a critical component of the synaptonemal complex that affects synapsis, recombination, and meiotic sex chromosome inactivation and transcriptional silencing.

  7. Regulatory cross-talk links Vibrio cholerae chromosome II replication and segregation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiharu Yamaichi

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available There is little knowledge of factors and mechanisms for coordinating bacterial chromosome replication and segregation. Previous studies have revealed that genes (and their products that surround the origin of replication (oriCII of Vibrio cholerae chromosome II (chrII are critical for controlling the replication and segregation of this chromosome. rctB, which flanks one side of oriCII, encodes a protein that initiates chrII replication; rctA, which flanks the other side of oriCII, inhibits rctB activity. The chrII parAB2 operon, which is essential for chrII partitioning, is located immediately downstream of rctA. Here, we explored how rctA exerts negative control over chrII replication. Our observations suggest that RctB has at least two DNA binding domains--one for binding to oriCII and initiating replication and the other for binding to rctA and thereby inhibiting RctB's ability to initiate replication. Notably, the inhibitory effect of rctA could be alleviated by binding of ParB2 to a centromere-like parS site within rctA. Furthermore, by binding to rctA, ParB2 and RctB inversely regulate expression of the parAB2 genes. Together, our findings suggest that fluctuations in binding of the partitioning protein ParB2 and the chrII initiator RctB to rctA underlie a regulatory network controlling both oriCII firing and the production of the essential chrII partitioning proteins. Thus, by binding both RctB and ParB2, rctA serves as a nexus for regulatory cross-talk coordinating chrII replication and segregation.

  8. Interplay between Type 1A Topoisomerases and Gyrase in Chromosome Segregation in Escherichia coli

    OpenAIRE

    Usongo, Valentine; Tanguay, Cynthia; Nolent, Flora; Bessong, Jill Egbe; Drolet, Marc

    2013-01-01

    Escherichia coli possesses two type 1A topoisomerases, Topo I (topA) and Topo III (topB). Topo I relaxes excess negative supercoiling, and topA mutants can grow only in the presence of compensatory mechanisms, such as gyrase mutations. topB mutants grow as well as wild-type cells. In vitro, Topo III, but not Topo I, can efficiently decatenate DNA during replication. However, in vivo, a chromosome segregation defect is seen only when both type 1A topoisomerases are absent. Here we present expe...

  9. P190B RhoGAP Regulates Chromosome Segregation in Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tracy Vargo-Gogola

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Rho GTPases are overexpressed and hyperactivated in many cancers, including breast cancer. Rho proteins, as well as their regulators and effectors, have been implicated in mitosis, and their altered expression promotes mitotic defects and aneuploidy. Previously, we demonstrated that p190B Rho GTPase activating protein (RhoGAP deficiency inhibits ErbB2-induced mammary tumor formation in mice. Here we describe a novel role for p190B as a regulator of mitosis. We found that p190B localized to centrosomes during interphase and mitosis, and that it is differentially phosphorylated during mitosis. Knockdown of p190B expression in MCF-7 and Hela cells increased the incidence of aberrant microtubule-kinetochore attachments at metaphase, lagging chromosomes at anaphase, and micronucleation, all of which are indicative of aneuploidy. Cell cycle analysis of p190B deficient MCF-7 cells revealed a significant increase in apoptotic cells with a concomitant decrease in cells in G1 and S phase, suggesting that p190B deficient cells die at the G1 to S transition. Chemical inhibition of the Rac GTPase during mitosis reduced the incidence of lagging chromosomes in p190B knockdown cells to levels detected in control cells, suggesting that aberrant Rac activity in the absence of p190B promotes chromosome segregation defects. Taken together, these data suggest that p190B regulates chromosome segregation and apoptosis in cancer cells. We propose that disruption of mitosis may be one mechanism by which p190B deficiency inhibits tumorigenesis.

  10. [Effect of gametocidal chromosome 4S' on the phenotype segregation ratio in genetic analysis of common wheat lines].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vdovichenko, Zh V; Antoniuk, M Z; Ternovskaia, T K

    2003-01-01

    Using experimental data on genetic analysis of introgressive lines for the character "hairy leaf sheath" controlled by the "cuckoo" chromosome 4S1, the algorithm for calculation of the theoretical segregation ratio in F2 was developed. Segregation distortion is caused by non-viability of the majority of gametes lacking the chromosome 4S1. The frequency of functioning gametes without the chromosome 4S1 is determined by the probability p versus the theoretically expected ratio 7 nonviable: 9 viable ones. Since segregation involves two characters, gamete viability and hairiness, the ratio 15 hairy: 1 hairless was used as a basis for search of the frequency p by maximum-likelihood method using 16 populations F2 from crossing the lines differing in the character studied. PMID:14650327

  11. Long G2 accumulates recombination intermediates and disturbs chromosome segregation at dysfunction telomere in Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Habib, Ahmed G.K.; Masuda, Kenta; Yukawa, Masashi; Tsuchiya, Eiko [Department of Molecular Biotechnology, Graduate School of Advanced Sciences of Matter, Hiroshima University, 1-3-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-8530 (Japan); Ueno, Masaru, E-mail: scmueno@hiroshima-u.ac.jp [Department of Molecular Biotechnology, Graduate School of Advanced Sciences of Matter, Hiroshima University, 1-3-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-8530 (Japan); Research Center for the Mathematics on Chromatin Live Dynamics, Hiroshima University, 1-3-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-8530 (Japan)

    2015-08-14

    Protection of telomere (Pot1) is a single-stranded telomere binding protein which is essential for chromosome ends protection. Fission yeast Rqh1 is a member of RecQ helicases family which has essential roles in the maintenance of genomic stability and regulation of homologous recombination. Double mutant between fission yeast pot1Δ and rqh1 helicase dead (rqh1-hd) maintains telomere by homologous recombination. In pot1Δ rqh1-hd double mutant, recombination intermediates accumulate near telomere which disturb chromosome segregation and make cells sensitive to microtubule inhibitors thiabendazole (TBZ). Deletion of chk1{sup +} or mutation of its kinase domain shortens the G2 of pot1Δ rqh1-hd double mutant and suppresses both the accumulation of recombination intermediates and the TBZ sensitivity of that double mutant. In this study, we asked whether the long G2 is the reason for the TBZ sensitivity of pot1Δ rqh1-hd double mutant. We found that shortening the G2 of pot1Δ rqh1-hd double mutant by additional mutations of wee1 and mik1 or gain of function mutation of Cdc2 suppresses both the accumulation of recombination intermediates and the TBZ sensitivity of pot1Δ rqh1-hd double mutant. Our results suggest that long G2 of pot1Δ rqh1-hd double mutant may allow time for the accumulation of recombination intermediates which disturb chromosome segregation and make cells sensitive to TBZ. - Ηighlights: • We show link between long G2 and accumulation of toxic recombination intermediates. • Accumulation of recombination intermediates at telomere results in TBZ sensitivity. • Activation of DNA damage checkpoint worsens cells' viability in presence of TBZ.

  12. The Role of the CRL4Cdt2 Target Spd1 in Chromosome Segregation in Fission Yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Landvad, Katrine

    Ddb1, a component of the E3 ubiquitin ligase CRL4Cdt2, is needed for proper chromosome segregation in fission yeast as ddb1 deleted cells show unequal distribution of DNA to daughter cells and sensitivity to the microtubule destabilising drug TBZ. In this study we show that Δddb1 cells have....... Concomitant deletion of spd1, a known target of CRL4Cdt2, substantially reduces the observed defects of the ddb1 single mutant, indicating that degradation of Spd1 is important to ensure proper chromosome segregation. Spd1 is degraded on proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and we propose that...

  13. The CNA1 Histone of the Ciliate Tetrahymena thermophila Is Essential for Chromosome Segregation in the Germline MicronucleusD⃞

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervantes, Marcella D.; Xi, Xiaohui; Vermaak, Danielle; Yao, Meng-Chao; Malik, Harmit S.

    2006-01-01

    Ciliated protozoans present several features of chromosome segregation that are unique among eukaryotes, including their maintenance of two nuclei: a germline micronucleus, which undergoes conventional mitosis and meiosis, and a somatic macronucleus that divides by an amitotic process. To study ciliate chromosome segregation, we have identified the centromeric histone gene in the Tetrahymena thermophila genome (CNA1). CNA1p specifically localizes to peripheral centromeres in the micronucleus but is absent in the macronucleus during vegetative growth. During meiotic prophase of the micronucleus, when chromosomes are stretched to twice the length of the cell, CNA1p is found localized in punctate spots throughout the length of the chromosomes. As conjugation proceeds, CNA1p appears initially diffuse, but quickly reverts to discrete dots in those nuclei destined to become micronuclei, whereas it remains diffuse and is gradually lost in developing macronuclei. In progeny of germline CNA1 knockouts, we see no defects in macronuclear division or viability of the progeny cells immediately following the knockout. However, within a few divisions, progeny show abnormal mitotic segregation of their micronucleus, with most cells eventually losing their micronucleus entirely. This study reveals a strong dependence of the germline micronucleus on centromeric histones for proper chromosome segregation. PMID:16251352

  14. Cyc17, a meiosis-specific cyclin, is essential for anaphase initiation and chromosome segregation in Tetrahymena thermophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Guan-Xiong; Dang, Huai; Tian, Miao; Zhang, Jing; Shodhan, Anura; Ning, Ying-Zhi; Xiong, Jie; Miao, Wei

    2016-07-17

    Although the role of cyclins in controlling nuclear division is well established, their function in ciliate meiosis remains unknown. In ciliates, the cyclin family has undergone massive expansion which suggests that diverse cell cycle systems exist, and this warrants further investigation. A screen for cyclins in the model ciliate Tetrahymena thermophila showed that there are 34 cyclins in this organism. Only 1 cyclin, Cyc17, contains the complete cyclin core and is specifically expressed during meiosis. Deletion of CYC17 led to meiotic arrest at the diakinesis-like metaphase I stage. Expression of genes involved in DNA metabolism and chromosome organization (chromatin remodeling and basic chromosomal structure) was repressed in cyc17 knockout matings. Further investigation suggested that Cyc17 is involved in regulating spindle pole attachment, and is thus essential for chromosome segregation at meiosis. These findings suggest a simple model in which chromosome segregation is influenced by Cyc17. PMID:27192402

  15. Non-SMC condensin I complex proteins control chromosome segregation and survival of proliferating cells in the zebrafish neural retina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harris William A

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The condensation of chromosomes and correct sister chromatid segregation during cell division is an essential feature of all proliferative cells. Structural maintenance of chromosomes (SMC and non-SMC proteins form the condensin I complex and regulate chromosome condensation and segregation during mitosis. However, due to the lack of appropriate mutants, the function of the condensin I complex during vertebrate development has not been described. Results Here, we report the positional cloning and detailed characterization of retinal phenotypes of a zebrafish mutation at the cap-g locus. High resolution live imaging reveals that the progression of mitosis between prometa- to telophase is delayed and that sister chromatid segregation is impaired upon loss of CAP-G. CAP-G associates with chromosomes between prometa- and telophase of the cell cycle. Loss of the interaction partners CAP-H and CAP-D2 causes cytoplasmic mislocalization of CAP-G throughout mitosis. DNA content analysis reveals increased genomic imbalances upon loss of non-SMC condensin I subunits. Within the retina, loss of condensin I function causes increased rates of apoptosis among cells within the proliferative ciliary marginal zone (CMZ whereas postmitotic retinal cells are viable. Inhibition of p53-mediated apoptosis partially rescues cell numbers in cap-g mutant retinae and allows normal layering of retinal cell types without alleviating their aberrant nuclear sizes. Conclusion Our findings indicate that the condensin I complex is particularly important within rapidly amplifying progenitor cell populations to ensure faithful chromosome segregation. In contrast, differentiation of postmitotic retinal cells is not impaired upon polyploidization.

  16. Naturally occurring differences in CENH3 affect chromosome segregation in zygotic mitosis of hybrids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maheshwari, Shamoni; Tan, Ek Han; West, Allan; Franklin, F Chris H; Comai, Luca; Chan, Simon W L

    2015-01-01

    The point of attachment of spindle microtubules to metaphase chromosomes is known as the centromere. Plant and animal centromeres are epigenetically specified by a centromere-specific variant of Histone H3, CENH3 (a.k.a. CENP-A). Unlike canonical histones that are invariant, CENH3 proteins are accumulating substitutions at an accelerated rate. This diversification of CENH3 is a conundrum since its role as the key determinant of centromere identity remains a constant across species. Here, we ask whether naturally occurring divergence in CENH3 has functional consequences. We performed functional complementation assays on cenh3-1, a null mutation in Arabidopsis thaliana, using untagged CENH3s from increasingly distant relatives. Contrary to previous results using GFP-tagged CENH3, we find that the essential functions of CENH3 are conserved across a broad evolutionary landscape. CENH3 from a species as distant as the monocot Zea mays can functionally replace A. thaliana CENH3. Plants expressing variant CENH3s that are fertile when selfed show dramatic segregation errors when crossed to a wild-type individual. The progeny of this cross include hybrid diploids, aneuploids with novel genetic rearrangements and haploids that inherit only the genome of the wild-type parent. Importantly, it is always chromosomes from the plant expressing the divergent CENH3 that missegregate. Using chimeras, we show that it is divergence in the fast-evolving N-terminal tail of CENH3 that is causing segregation errors and genome elimination. Furthermore, we analyzed N-terminal tail sequences from plant CENH3s and discovered a modular pattern of sequence conservation. From this we hypothesize that while the essential functions of CENH3 are largely conserved, the N-terminal tail is evolving to adapt to lineage-specific centromeric constraints. Our results demonstrate that this lineage-specific evolution of CENH3 causes inviability and sterility of progeny in crosses, at the same time producing

  17. Type 1 protein phosphatase acts in opposition to IpL1 protein kinase in regulating yeast chromosome segregation.

    OpenAIRE

    Francisco, L; Wang, W.; Chan, C S

    1994-01-01

    The IPL1 gene is required for high-fidelity chromosome segregation in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Conditional ipl1ts mutants missegregate chromosomes severely at 37 degrees C. Here, we report that IPL1 encodes an essential putative protein kinase whose function is required during the later part of each cell cycle. At 26 degrees C, the permissive growth temperature, ipl1 mutant cells are defective in the recovery from a transient G2/M-phase arrest caused by the antimicrotubule ...

  18. ParA and ParB coordinate chromosome segregation with cell elongation and division during Streptomyces sporulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donczew, Magdalena; Mackiewicz, Paweł; Wróbel, Agnieszka; Flärdh, Klas; Zakrzewska-Czerwińska, Jolanta; Jakimowicz, Dagmara

    2016-04-01

    In unicellular bacteria, the ParA and ParB proteins segregate chromosomes and coordinate this process with cell division and chromosome replication. During sporulation of mycelial Streptomyces, ParA and ParB uniformly distribute multiple chromosomes along the filamentous sporogenic hyphal compartment, which then differentiates into a chain of unigenomic spores. However, chromosome segregation must be coordinated with cell elongation and multiple divisions. Here, we addressed the question of whether ParA and ParB are involved in the synchronization of cell-cycle processes during sporulation in Streptomyces To answer this question, we used time-lapse microscopy, which allows the monitoring of growth and division of single sporogenic hyphae. We showed that sporogenic hyphae stop extending at the time of ParA accumulation and Z-ring formation. We demonstrated that both ParA and ParB affect the rate of hyphal extension. Additionally, we showed that ParA promotes the formation of massive nucleoprotein complexes by ParB. We also showed that FtsZ ring assembly is affected by the ParB protein and/or unsegregated DNA. Our results indicate the existence of a checkpoint between the extension and septation of sporogenic hyphae that involves the ParA and ParB proteins. PMID:27248800

  19. The Argonaute CSR-1 and its 22G-RNA co-factors target germline genes and are required for holocentric chromosome segregation

    OpenAIRE

    Claycomb, Julie M.; Batista, Pedro J; Pang, Ka Ming; Gu, Weifeng; Vasale, Jessica J.; van Wolfswinkel, Josien C.; Chaves, Daniel A.; Shirayama, Masaki; Mitani, Shohei; Ketting, René F.; Conte, Darryl; Mello, Craig C

    2009-01-01

    RNAi-related pathways regulate diverse processes, from developmental timing to transposon silencing. Here, we show that in C. elegans the Argonaute CSR-1, the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase EGO-1, the Dicer-related helicase DRH-3, and the Tudor-domain protein EKL-1 localize to chromosomes and are required for proper chromosome segregation. In the absence of these factors chromosomes fail to align at the metaphase plate and kinetochores do not orient to opposing spindle poles. Surprisingly, the ...

  20. Identification and Characterization of Segregation Distortion Loci Along Chromosome 5B in Tetraploid Wheat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segregation distortion genes are widespread in plants and animals and function by their effect on competition among gametes for preferential fertilization. In this study, we evaluated the segregation distortion of molecular markers in multiple reciprocal backcross populations derived from unique cy...

  1. Mutation of histone H3 serine 86 disrupts GATA factor Ams2 expression and precise chromosome segregation in fission yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Kim Kiat; Ong, Terenze Yao Rui; Tan, Yue Rong; Yang, Eugene Guorong; Ren, Bingbing; Seah, Kwi Shan; Yang, Zhe; Tan, Tsu Soo; Dymock, Brian W; Chen, Ee Sin

    2015-01-01

    Eukaryotic genomes are packed into discrete units, referred to as nucleosomes, by organizing around scaffolding histone proteins. The interplay between these histones and the DNA can dynamically regulate the function of the chromosomal domain. Here, we interrogated the function of a pair of juxtaposing serine residues (S86 and S87) that reside within the histone fold of histone H3. We show that fission yeast cells expressing a mutant histone H3 disrupted at S86 and S87 (hht2-S86AS87A) exhibited unequal chromosome segregation, disrupted transcriptional silencing of centromeric chromatin, and reduced expression of Ams2, a GATA-factor that regulates localization of the centromere-specific histone H3 variant CENP-A. We found that overexpression of ams2(+) could suppress the chromosome missegregation phenotype that arose in the hht2-S86AS87A mutant. We further demonstrate that centromeric localization of SpCENP-A(cnp1-1) was significantly compromised in hht2-S86AS87A, suggesting synergism between histone H3 and the centromere-targeting domain of SpCENP-A. Taken together, our work presents evidence for an uncharacterized serine residue in fission yeast histone H3 that affects centromeric integrity via regulating the expression of the SpCENP-A-localizing Ams2 protein. [173/200 words]. PMID:26369364

  2. Mitotic Spindle Disruption by Alternating Electric Fields Leads to Improper Chromosome Segregation and Mitotic Catastrophe in Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giladi, Moshe; Schneiderman, Rosa S; Voloshin, Tali; Porat, Yaara; Munster, Mijal; Blat, Roni; Sherbo, Shay; Bomzon, Zeev; Urman, Noa; Itzhaki, Aviran; Cahal, Shay; Shteingauz, Anna; Chaudhry, Aafia; Kirson, Eilon D; Weinberg, Uri; Palti, Yoram

    2015-01-01

    Tumor Treating Fields (TTFields) are low intensity, intermediate frequency, alternating electric fields. TTFields are a unique anti-mitotic treatment modality delivered in a continuous, noninvasive manner to the region of a tumor. It was previously postulated that by exerting directional forces on highly polar intracellular elements during mitosis, TTFields could disrupt the normal assembly of spindle microtubules. However there is limited evidence directly linking TTFields to an effect on microtubules. Here we report that TTFields decrease the ratio between polymerized and total tubulin, and prevent proper mitotic spindle assembly. The aberrant mitotic events induced by TTFields lead to abnormal chromosome segregation, cellular multinucleation, and caspase dependent apoptosis of daughter cells. The effect of TTFields on cell viability and clonogenic survival substantially depends upon the cell division rate. We show that by extending the duration of exposure to TTFields, slowly dividing cells can be affected to a similar extent as rapidly dividing cells. PMID:26658786

  3. PP2A(Cdc55)'s role in reductional chromosome segregation during achiasmate meiosis in budding yeast is independent of its FEAR function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, Gary W; Wong, Jin Huei; Arumugam, Prakash

    2016-01-01

    PP2A(Cdc55) is a highly conserved serine-threonine protein phosphatase that is involved in diverse cellular processes. In budding yeast, meiotic cells lacking PP2A(Cdc55) activity undergo a premature exit from meiosis I which results in a failure to form bipolar spindles and divide nuclei. This defect is largely due to its role in negatively regulating the Cdc Fourteen Early Anaphase Release (FEAR) pathway. PP2A(Cdc55) prevents nucleolar release of the Cdk (Cyclin-dependent kinase)-antagonising phosphatase Cdc14 by counteracting phosphorylation of the nucleolar protein Net1 by Cdk. CDC55 was identified in a genetic screen for monopolins performed by isolating suppressors of spo11Δ spo12Δ lethality suggesting that Cdc55 might have a role in meiotic chromosome segregation. We investigated this possibility by isolating cdc55 alleles that suppress spo11Δ spo12Δ lethality and show that this suppression is independent of PP2A(Cdc55)'s FEAR function. Although the suppressor mutations in cdc55 affect reductional chromosome segregation in the absence of recombination, they have no effect on chromosome segregation during wild type meiosis. We suggest that Cdc55 is required for reductional chromosome segregation during achiasmate meiosis and this is independent of its FEAR function. PMID:27455870

  4. PP2ACdc55’s role in reductional chromosome segregation during achiasmate meiosis in budding yeast is independent of its FEAR function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, Gary W.; Wong, Jin Huei; Arumugam, Prakash

    2016-01-01

    PP2ACdc55 is a highly conserved serine-threonine protein phosphatase that is involved in diverse cellular processes. In budding yeast, meiotic cells lacking PP2ACdc55 activity undergo a premature exit from meiosis I which results in a failure to form bipolar spindles and divide nuclei. This defect is largely due to its role in negatively regulating the Cdc Fourteen Early Anaphase Release (FEAR) pathway. PP2ACdc55 prevents nucleolar release of the Cdk (Cyclin-dependent kinase)-antagonising phosphatase Cdc14 by counteracting phosphorylation of the nucleolar protein Net1 by Cdk. CDC55 was identified in a genetic screen for monopolins performed by isolating suppressors of spo11Δ spo12Δ lethality suggesting that Cdc55 might have a role in meiotic chromosome segregation. We investigated this possibility by isolating cdc55 alleles that suppress spo11Δ spo12Δ lethality and show that this suppression is independent of PP2ACdc55’s FEAR function. Although the suppressor mutations in cdc55 affect reductional chromosome segregation in the absence of recombination, they have no effect on chromosome segregation during wild type meiosis. We suggest that Cdc55 is required for reductional chromosome segregation during achiasmate meiosis and this is independent of its FEAR function. PMID:27455870

  5. The role of meiotic cohesin REC8 in chromosome segregation in {gamma} irradiation-induced endopolyploid tumour cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erenpreisa, Jekaterina [Latvian Biomedicine Research and Study Centre, Riga, LV-1067 (Latvia); Cragg, Mark S. [Tenovus Laboratory, Cancer Sciences Division, Southampton University School of Medicine, General Hospital, Southampton SO16 6YD (United Kingdom); Salmina, Kristine [Latvian Biomedicine Research and Study Centre, Riga, LV-1067 (Latvia); Hausmann, Michael [Kirchhoff Inst. fuer Physik, Univ. of Heidelberg, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Scherthan, Harry, E-mail: scherth@web.de [Inst. fuer Radiobiologie der Bundeswehr in Verbindung mit der Univ. Ulm, D-80937 Munich (Germany); MPI for Molec. Genetics, 14195 Berlin (Germany)

    2009-09-10

    Escape from mitotic catastrophe and generation of endopolyploid tumour cells (ETCs) represents a potential survival strategy of tumour cells in response to genotoxic treatments. ETCs that resume the mitotic cell cycle have reduced ploidy and are often resistant to these treatments. In search for a mechanism for genome reduction, we previously observed that ETCs express meiotic proteins among which REC8 (a meiotic cohesin component) is of particular interest, since it favours reductional cell division in meiosis. In the present investigation, we induced endopolyploidy in p53-dysfunctional human tumour cell lines (Namalwa, WI-L2-NS, HeLa) by gamma irradiation, and analysed the sub-cellular localisation of REC8 in the resulting ETCs. We observed by RT-PCR and Western blot that REC8 is constitutively expressed in these tumour cells, along with SGOL1 and SGOL2, and that REC8 becomes modified after irradiation. REC8 localised to paired sister centromeres in ETCs, the former co-segregating to opposite poles. Furthermore, REC8 localised to the centrosome of interphase ETCs and to the astral poles in anaphase cells where it colocalised with the microtubule-associated protein NuMA. Altogether, our observations indicate that radiation-induced ETCs express features of meiotic cell divisions and that these may facilitate chromosome segregation and genome reduction.

  6. Intact Cohesion, Anaphase, and Chromosome Segregation in Human Cells Harboring Tumor-Derived Mutations in STAG2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung-Sik Kim

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Somatic mutations of the cohesin complex subunit STAG2 are present in diverse tumor types. We and others have shown that STAG2 inactivation can lead to loss of sister chromatid cohesion and alterations in chromosome copy number in experimental systems. However, studies of naturally occurring human tumors have demonstrated little, if any, correlation between STAG2 mutational status and aneuploidy, and have further shown that STAG2-deficient tumors are often euploid. In an effort to provide insight into these discrepancies, here we analyze the effect of tumor-derived STAG2 mutations on the protein composition of cohesin and the expected mitotic phenotypes of STAG2 mutation. We find that many mutant STAG2 proteins retain their ability to interact with cohesin; however, the presence of mutant STAG2 resulted in a reduction in the ability of regulatory subunits WAPL, PDS5A, and PDS5B to interact with the core cohesin ring. Using AAV-mediated gene targeting, we then introduced nine tumor-derived mutations into the endogenous allele of STAG2 in cultured human cells. While all nonsense mutations led to defects in sister chromatid cohesion and a subset induced anaphase defects, missense mutations behaved like wild-type in these assays. Furthermore, only one of nine tumor-derived mutations tested induced overt alterations in chromosome counts. These data indicate that not all tumor-derived STAG2 mutations confer defects in cohesion, chromosome segregation, and ploidy, suggesting that there are likely to be other functional effects of STAG2 inactivation in human cancer cells that are relevant to cancer pathogenesis.

  7. Dynamic and Stable Cohesins Regulate Synaptonemal Complex Assembly and Chromosome Segregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyuricza, Mercedes R; Manheimer, Kathryn B; Apte, Vandana; Krishnan, Badri; Joyce, Eric F; McKee, Bruce D; McKim, Kim S

    2016-07-11

    Assembly of the synaptonemal complex (SC) in Drosophila depends on two independent pathways defined by the chromosome axis proteins C(2)M and ORD. Because C(2)M encodes a Kleisin-like protein and ORD is required for sister-chromatid cohesion, we tested the hypothesis that these two SC assembly pathways depend on two cohesin complexes. Through single- and double-mutant analysis to study the mitotic cohesion proteins Stromalin (SA) and Nipped-B (SCC2) in meiosis, we provide evidence that there are at least two meiosis-specific cohesin complexes. One complex depends on C(2)M, SA, and Nipped-B. Despite the presence of mitotic cohesins SA and Nipped-B, this pathway has only a minor role in meiotic sister-centromere cohesion and is primarily required for homolog interactions. C(2)M is continuously incorporated into pachytene chromosomes even though SC assembly is complete. In contrast, the second complex, which depends on meiosis-specific proteins SOLO, SUNN, and ORD is required for sister-chromatid cohesion, localizes to the centromeres and is not incorporated during prophase. Our results show that the two cohesin complexes have unique functions and are regulated differently. Multiple cohesin complexes may provide the diversity of activities required by the meiotic cell. For example, a dynamic complex may allow the chromosomes to regulate meiotic recombination, and a stable complex may be required for sister-chromatid cohesion. PMID:27291057

  8. Fluorescence staining of live cyanobacterial cells suggest non-stringent chromosome segregation and absence of a connection between cytoplasmic and thylakoid membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scholz Ingeborg

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In spite of their abundance and importance, little is known about cyanobacterial cell biology and their cell cycle. During each cell cycle, chromosomes must be separated into future daughter cells, i.e. into both cell halves, which in many bacteria is achieved by an active machinery that operates during DNA replication. Many cyanobacteria contain multiple identical copies of the chromosome, but it is unknown how chromosomes are segregated into future daughter cells, and if an active or passive mechanism is operative. In addition to an outer and an inner cell membrane, cyanobacteria contain internal thylakoid membranes that carry the active photosynthetic machinery. It is unclear whether thylakoid membranes are invaginations of the inner cell membrane, or an independent membrane system. Results We have used different fluorescent dyes to study the organization of chromosomes and of cell and thylakoid membranes in live cyanobacterial cells. FM1-43 stained the outer and inner cytoplasmic membranes but did not enter the interior of the cell. In contrast, thylakoid membranes in unicellular Synechocystis cells became visible through a membrane-permeable stain only. Furthermore, continuous supply of the fluorescent dye FM1-43 resulted in the formation of one to four intracellular fluorescent structures in Synechocystis cells, within occurred within 30 to 60 minutes, and may represent membrane vesicles. Using fluorescent DNA stains, we found that Synechocystis genomic DNA is compacted in the cell centre that is devoid of thylakoid membranes. Nucleoids segregated very late in the cell cycle, just before complete closing of the division septum. In striking contrast to Bacillus subtilis, which possesses an active chromosome segregation machinery, fluorescence intensity of stained nucleoids differed considerably between the two Synechocystis daughter cells soon after cell division. Conclusion Our experiments strongly support the idea that

  9. High frequency of submicroscopic chromosomal imbalances in patients with syndromic craniosynostosis detected by a combined approach of microsatellite segregation analysis, multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification and array-based comparative genome hybridisation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jehee, F.S.; Krepischi-Santos, A.C.; Rocha, K.M.; Cavalcanti, D.P.; Kim, C.A.; Bertola, D.R.; Alonso, L.G.; D'Angelo, C.S.; Mazzeu, J.F.; Froyen, G.; Lugtenberg, D.; Vianna-Morgante, A.M.; Rosenberg, C.; Passos-Bueno, M.R.

    2008-01-01

    We present the first comprehensive study, to our knowledge, on genomic chromosomal analysis in syndromic craniosynostosis. In total, 45 patients with craniosynostotic disorders were screened with a variety of methods including conventional karyotype, microsatellite segregation analysis, subtelomeric

  10. Risk evaluation of carriers with chromosome reciprocal translocation t(7;13)(q34;q13) and concomitant meiotic segregation analyzed by FISH on ejaculated spermatozoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Midro, Alina T; Wiland, Ewa; Panasiuk, Barbara; Leśniewicz, Ryszard; Kurpisz, Maciej

    2006-02-01

    We performed the segregation analysis of a relatively large pedigree of t(7;13)(q34;q13) carriers together with the sperm karyotype analysis of the one carrier using a tri-color fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) method. The risk assessments for unfavorable pregnancy outcomes in a series of 36 pregnancies in eight reciprocal chromosome translocation (RCT) couples of carriers were estimated directly from a pedigree after ascertainment correction. The individual probability rate for unbalanced child was predicted according to Stengel-Rutkowski and co-workers. The unbalanced karyotypes in the form of monosomy 7q34-->qter and trisomy 13q13-->qter were detected among stillborn/early death newborns with holoprosencephaly (HPE), cyclopia and other malformations. Based on clinical description of unkaryotyped stillbirth progeny, it can be assumed that the phenotype distinctions were connected with the unbalanced karyotype from 2:2 segregation (monosomy 7q with trisomy 13q) and 3:1 segregation as interchange trisomy 13 (Patau syndrome). Probability rates for miscarriages, stillbirth/early death were 12.9 +/- 6% (4/31) and 29 +/- 8.2% (9/31), respectively. The results of the meiotic segregation pattern indicated the rate of unbalanced spermatozoa for about 60%, with the unusual high rate (29.4%) of 3:1 segregant (i.e., 13.4% of the tertiary segregation and 16% of the interchange segregation). Adjacent-1 segregation followed with 23.5% and adjacent-2 followed with 7.2% of analyzed spermatozoa. The high rate of unbalanced gametes in comparison to the number of stillborn/early death and miscarriages detected in pedigree suggests a strong selection against unbalanced chromosomal constitutions during fetal development. It corresponds to a very small probability rate (about 0.3%) of viable unbalanced progeny from 3:1 meiotic segregation predicted for maternal carriers. This knowledge can be used in genetic counseling of families with similar RCT ascertained in a different

  11. Mitotic spindle defects and chromosome mis-segregation induced by LDL/cholesterol-implications for Niemann-Pick C1, Alzheimer's disease, and atherosclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antoneta Granic

    Full Text Available Elevated low-density lipoprotein (LDL-cholesterol is a risk factor for both Alzheimer's disease (AD and Atherosclerosis (CVD, suggesting a common lipid-sensitive step in their pathogenesis. Previous results show that AD and CVD also share a cell cycle defect: chromosome instability and up to 30% aneuploidy-in neurons and other cells in AD and in smooth muscle cells in atherosclerotic plaques in CVD. Indeed, specific degeneration of aneuploid neurons accounts for 90% of neuronal loss in AD brain, indicating that aneuploidy underlies AD neurodegeneration. Cell/mouse models of AD develop similar aneuploidy through amyloid-beta (Aß inhibition of specific microtubule motors and consequent disruption of mitotic spindles. Here we tested the hypothesis that, like upregulated Aß, elevated LDL/cholesterol and altered intracellular cholesterol homeostasis also causes chromosomal instability. Specifically we found that: 1 high dietary cholesterol induces aneuploidy in mice, satisfying the hypothesis' first prediction, 2 Niemann-Pick C1 patients accumulate aneuploid fibroblasts, neurons, and glia, demonstrating a similar aneugenic effect of intracellular cholesterol accumulation in humans 3 oxidized LDL, LDL, and cholesterol, but not high-density lipoprotein (HDL, induce chromosome mis-segregation and aneuploidy in cultured cells, including neuronal precursors, indicating that LDL/cholesterol directly affects the cell cycle, 4 LDL-induced aneuploidy requires the LDL receptor, but not Aß, showing that LDL works differently than Aß, with the same end result, 5 cholesterol treatment disrupts the structure of the mitotic spindle, providing a cell biological mechanism for its aneugenic activity, and 6 ethanol or calcium chelation attenuates lipoprotein-induced chromosome mis-segregation, providing molecular insights into cholesterol's aneugenic mechanism, specifically through its rigidifying effect on the cell membrane, and potentially explaining why ethanol

  12. Multipolar spindle pole coalescence is a major source of kinetochore mis-attachment and chromosome mis-segregation in cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William T Silkworth

    Full Text Available Many cancer cells display a CIN (Chromosome Instability phenotype, by which they exhibit high rates of chromosome loss or gain at each cell cycle. Over the years, a number of different mechanisms, including mitotic spindle multipolarity, cytokinesis failure, and merotelic kinetochore orientation, have been proposed as causes of CIN. However, a comprehensive theory of how CIN is perpetuated is still lacking. We used CIN colorectal cancer cells as a model system to investigate the possible cellular mechanism(s underlying CIN. We found that CIN cells frequently assembled multipolar spindles in early mitosis. However, multipolar anaphase cells were very rare, and live-cell experiments showed that almost all CIN cells divided in a bipolar fashion. Moreover, fixed-cell analysis showed high frequencies of merotelically attached lagging chromosomes in bipolar anaphase CIN cells, and higher frequencies of merotelic attachments in multipolar vs. bipolar prometaphases. Finally, we found that multipolar CIN prometaphases typically possessed gamma-tubulin at all spindle poles, and that a significant fraction of bipolar metaphase/early anaphase CIN cells possessed more than one centrosome at a single spindle pole. Taken together, our data suggest a model by which merotelic kinetochore attachments can easily be established in multipolar prometaphases. Most of these multipolar prometaphase cells would then bi-polarize before anaphase onset, and the residual merotelic attachments would produce chromosome mis-segregation due to anaphase lagging chromosomes. We propose this spindle pole coalescence mechanism as a major contributor to chromosome instability in cancer cells.

  13. Phosphorylation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis ParB participates in regulating the ParABS chromosome segregation system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grégory Baronian

    Full Text Available Here, we present for the first time that Mycobacterium tuberculosis ParB is phosphorylated by several mycobacterial Ser/Thr protein kinases in vitro. ParB and ParA are the key components of bacterial chromosome segregation apparatus. ParB is a cytosolic conserved protein that binds specifically to centromere-like DNA parS sequences and interacts with ParA, a weak ATPase required for its proper localization. Mass spectrometry identified the presence of ten phosphate groups, thus indicating that ParB is phosphorylated on eight threonines, Thr32, Thr41, Thr53, Thr110, Thr195, and Thr254, Thr300, Thr303 as well as on two serines, Ser5 and Ser239. The phosphorylation sites were further substituted either by alanine to prevent phosphorylation or aspartate to mimic constitutive phosphorylation. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays revealed a drastic inhibition of DNA-binding by ParB phosphomimetic mutant compared to wild type. In addition, bacterial two-hybrid experiments showed a loss of ParA-ParB interaction with the phosphomimetic mutant, indicating that phosphorylation is regulating the recruitment of the partitioning complex. Moreover, fluorescence microscopy experiments performed in the surrogate Mycobacterium smegmatis ΔparB strain revealed that in contrast to wild type Mtb ParB, which formed subpolar foci similar to M. smegmatis ParB, phoshomimetic Mtb ParB was delocalized. Thus, our findings highlight a novel regulatory role of the different isoforms of ParB representing a molecular switch in localization and functioning of partitioning protein in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

  14. When the genome plays dice: circumvention of the spindle assembly checkpoint and near-random chromosome segregation in multipolar cancer cell mitoses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Gisselsson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Normal cell division is coordinated by a bipolar mitotic spindle, ensuring symmetrical segregation of chromosomes. Cancer cells, however, occasionally divide into three or more directions. Such multipolar mitoses have been proposed to generate genetic diversity and thereby contribute to clonal evolution. However, this notion has been little validated experimentally. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Chromosome segregation and DNA content in daughter cells from multipolar mitoses were assessed by multiphoton cross sectioning and fluorescence in situ hybridization in cancer cells and non-neoplastic transformed cells. The DNA distribution resulting from multipolar cell division was found to be highly variable, with frequent nullisomies in the daughter cells. Time-lapse imaging of H2B/GFP-labelled multipolar mitoses revealed that the time from the initiation of metaphase to the beginning of anaphase was prolonged and that the metaphase plates often switched polarity several times before metaphase-anaphase transition. The multipolar metaphase-anaphase transition was accompanied by a normal reduction of cellular cyclin B levels, but typically occurred before completion of the normal separase activity cycle. Centromeric AURKB and MAD2 foci were observed frequently to remain on the centromeres of multipolar ana-telophase chromosomes, indicating that multipolar mitoses were able to circumvent the spindle assembly checkpoint with some sister chromatids remaining unseparated after anaphase. Accordingly, scoring the distribution of individual chromosomes in multipolar daughter nuclei revealed a high frequency of nondisjunction events, resulting in a near-binomial allotment of sister chromatids to the daughter cells. CONCLUSION: The capability of multipolar mitoses to circumvent the spindle assembly checkpoint system typically results in a near-random distribution of chromosomes to daughter cells. Spindle multipolarity could thus be a highly efficient

  15. Functional cooperation of Dam1, Ipl1, and the inner centromere protein (INCENP)–related protein Sli15 during chromosome segregation

    OpenAIRE

    Kang, Jung-seog; Cheeseman, Iain M.; Kallstrom, George; Velmurugan, Soundarapandian; Barnes, Georjana; Chan, Clarence S.M.

    2001-01-01

    We have shown previously that Ipl1 and Sli15 are required for chromosome segregation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Sli15 associates directly with the Ipl1 protein kinase and these two proteins colocalize to the mitotic spindle. We show here that Sli15 stimulates the in vitro, and likely in vivo, kinase activity of Ipl1, and Sli15 facilitates the association of Ipl1 with the mitotic spindle. The Ipl1-binding and -stimulating activities of Sli15 both reside within a region containing homology to...

  16. Specific deletion of Cdc42 does not affect meiotic spindle organization/migration and homologous chromosome segregation but disrupts polarity establishment and cytokinesis in mouse oocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Zhen-Bo; Jiang, Zong-Zhe; Zhang, Qing-Hua;

    2013-01-01

    female infertility in mice. Cdc42 deletion has little effect on meiotic spindle organization and migration to the cortex but inhibits polar body emission, although homologous chromosome segregation occurs. The failure of cytokinesis is due to the loss of polarized Arp2/3 accumulation and actin cap...... polarized actin cap and oocyte polarity, and it determines asymmetric divisions resulting in two polar bodies. Here we investigate the functions of Cdc42 in oocyte meiotic maturation by oocyte-specific deletion of Cdc42 through Cre-loxP conditional knockout technology. We find that Cdc42 deletion causes...

  17. MreBCD-associated Cytoskeleton is Required for Proper Segregation of the Chromosomal Terminus during the Division Cycle of Escherichia Coli

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu-Jia Huo; Ling Qiao; Xiao-Wei Zheng; Cheng Cui; Yuan-Fang Ma; Feng Lu

    2015-01-01

    Background:In prokaryotic organisms,the mechanism responsible for the accurate partition of newly replicated chromosomes into daughter cells is incompletely understood.Segregation of the replication terminus of the circular prokaryotic chromosome poses special problems that have not previously been addressed.The aim of this study was to investigate the roles of several protein components (MreB,MreC,and MreD) of the prokaryotic cytoskeleton for the faithful transmission of the chromosomal terminus into daughter cells.Methods:Strain LQ1 (mreB::cat),LQ2 (mreC::cat),and LQ3 (mreD::cat) were constructed using the Red recombination system.LQ11/pLAU53,LQ12/pLAU53,LQ13/pLAU53,LQ14/pLAU53,and LQ15/pLAU53 strains were generated by Pltransduction of (tetO)240-Gm and (lacO)240-Km cassettes from strains IL2 and IL29.Fluorescence microscopy was performed to observe localization pattern of fluorescently-labeled origin and terminus foci in wild-type and mutant cells.SOS induction was monitored as gfp fluorescence from PsulA-gfp in log phase cells grown in Luria-Bertani medium at 37℃ by measurement of emission at 525 nm with excitation at 470 nm in a microplate fluorescence reader.Results:Mutational deletion of the mreB,mreC,or mreD genes was associated with selective loss of the terminus region in approximately 40% of the cells within growing cultures.This was accompanied by significant induction of the SOS DNA damage response,suggesting that deletion of terminus sequences may have occurred by chromosomal cleavage,presumably caused by ingrowth of the division septum prior to segregation of the replicated terminal.Conclusions:These results imply a role for the MreBCD cytoskeleton in the resolution of the final products of terminus replication and/ or in the specific movement of newly replicated termini away from midcell prior to completion of septal ingrowth.This would identify a previously unrecognized stage in the overall process of chromosome segregation.

  18. Mutation of histone H3 serine 86 disrupts GATA factor Ams2 expression and precise chromosome segregation in fission yeast

    OpenAIRE

    Kim Kiat Lim; Terenze Yao Rui Ong; Yue Rong Tan; Eugene Guorong Yang; Bingbing Ren; Kwi Shan Seah; Zhe Yang; Tsu Soo Tan; Dymock, Brian W.; Ee Sin Chen

    2015-01-01

    Eukaryotic genomes are packed into discrete units, referred to as nucleosomes, by organizing around scaffolding histone proteins. The interplay between these histones and the DNA can dynamically regulate the function of the chromosomal domain. Here, we interrogated the function of a pair of juxtaposing serine residues (S86 and S87) that reside within the histone fold of histone H3. We show that fission yeast cells expressing a mutant histone H3 disrupted at S86 and S87 (hht2-S86AS87A) exhibit...

  19. Evolution and tinkering: what do a protein kinase, a transcriptional regulator and chromosome segregation/cell division proteins have in common?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derouiche, Abderahmane; Shi, Lei; Kalantari, Aida; Mijakovic, Ivan

    2016-02-01

    In this study, we focus on functional interactions among multi-domain proteins which share a common evolutionary origin. The examples we develop are four Bacillus subtilis proteins, which all possess an ATP-binding Walker motif: the bacterial tyrosine kinase (BY-kinase) PtkA, the chromosome segregation protein Soj (ParA), the cell division protein MinD and a transcription regulator SalA. These proteins have arisen via duplication of the ancestral ATP-binding domain, which has undergone fusions with other functional domains in the process of divergent evolution. We point out that these four proteins, despite having very different physiological roles, engage in an unusually high number of binary functional interactions. Namely, MinD attracts Soj and PtkA to the cell pole, and in addition, activates the kinase function of PtkA. SalA also activates the kinase function of PtkA, and it gets phosphorylated by PtkA as well. The consequence of this phosphorylation is the activation of SalA as a transcriptional repressor. We hypothesize that these functional interactions remain preserved during divergent evolution and represent a constraint on the process of evolutionary "tinkering", brought about by fusions of different functional domains. PMID:26286503

  20. Linking topology of tethered polymer rings with applications to chromosome segregation and estimation of the knotting length.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marko, John F

    2009-05-01

    The Gauss linking number (Ca) of two flexible polymer rings which are tethered to one another is investigated. For ideal random walks, mean linking-squared varies with the square root of polymer length while for self-avoiding walks, linking-squared increases logarithmically with polymer length. The free-energy cost of linking of polymer rings is therefore strongly dependent on degree of self-avoidance, i.e., on intersegment excluded volume. Scaling arguments and numerical data are used to determine the free-energy cost of fixed linking number in both the fluctuation and large-Ca regimes; for ideal random walks, for |Ca|>N;{1/4} , the free energy of catenation is found to grow proportional, variant|Ca/N;{1/4}|;{4/3} . When excluded volume interactions between segments are present, the free energy rapidly approaches a linear dependence on Gauss linking (dF/dCa approximately 3.7k_{B}T) , suggestive of a novel "catenation condensation" effect. These results are used to show that condensation of long entangled polymers along their length, so as to increase excluded volume while decreasing number of statistical segments, can drive disentanglement if a mechanism is present to permit topology change. For chromosomal DNA molecules, lengthwise condensation is therefore an effective means to bias topoisomerases to eliminate catenations between replicated chromatids. The results for mean-square catenation are also used to provide a simple approximate estimate for the "knotting length," or number of segments required to have a knot along a single circular polymer, explaining why the knotting length ranges from approximately 300 for an ideal random walk to 10;{6} for a self-avoiding walk. PMID:19518478

  1. Mutations reducing replication from R-loops suppress the defects of growth, chromosome segregation and DNA supercoiling in cells lacking topoisomerase I and RNase HI activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usongo, Valentine; Martel, Makisha; Balleydier, Aurélien; Drolet, Marc

    2016-04-01

    R-loop formation occurs when the nascent RNA hybridizes with the template DNA strand behind the RNA polymerase. R-loops affect a wide range of cellular processes and their use as origins of replication was the first function attributed to them. In Escherichia coli, R-loop formation is promoted by the ATP-dependent negative supercoiling activity of gyrase (gyrA and gyrB) and is inhibited by topoisomerase (topo) I (topA) relaxing transcription-induced negative supercoiling. RNase HI (rnhA) degrades the RNA moiety of R-loops. The depletion of RNase HI activity in topA null mutants was previously shown to lead to extensive DNA relaxation, due to DNA gyrase inhibition, and to severe growth and chromosome segregation defects that were partially corrected by overproducing topo III (topB). Here, DNA gyrase assays in crude cell extracts showed that the ATP-dependent activity (supercoiling) of gyrase but not its ATP-independent activity (relaxation) was inhibited in topA null cells lacking RNase HI. To characterize the cellular event(s) triggered by the absence of RNase HI, we performed a genetic screen for suppressors of the growth defect of topA rnhA null cells. Suppressors affecting genes in replication (holC2::aph and dnaT18::aph) nucleotide metabolism (dcd49::aph), RNA degradation (rne59::aph) and fimbriae synthesis (fimD22::aph) were found to reduce replication from R-loops and to restore supercoiling, thus pointing to a correlation between R-loop-dependent replication in topA rnhA mutants and the inhibition of gyrase activity and growth. Interestingly, the position of fimD on the E. coli chromosome corresponds to the site of one of the five main putative origins of replication from R-loops in rnhA null cells recently identified by next-generation sequencing, thus suggesting that the fimD22::aph mutation inactivated one of these origins. Furthermore, we show that topo III overproduction is unable to complement the growth defect of topA rnhA null mutants at low

  2. Chromosome Segregation: Disarming the Protector

    OpenAIRE

    Sanyal, Swastika; Kovacikova, Ines; Gregan, Juraj

    2013-01-01

    Summary One of the key features of meiosis is that shugoshin in complex with protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) protects centromeric cohesin during meiosis I, but not during meiosis II. A new model suggests that a PP2A inhibitor mediates deprotection of centromeric cohesin during meiosis II.

  3. Mitotic chromosome structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mounting evidence is compiling linking the physical organizational structure of chromosomes and the nuclear structure to biological function. At the base of the physical organizational structure of both is the concept of loop formation. This implies that physical proximity within chromosomes is provided for otherwise distal genomic regions and thus hierarchically organizing the chromosomes. Together with entropy many experimental observations can be explained with these two concepts. Among the observations that can be explained are the measured physical extent of the chromosomes, their shape, mechanical behavior, the segregation into territories (chromosomal and territories within chromosomes), the results from chromosome conformation capture experiments, as well as linking gene expression to structural organization.

  4. Quantitative Proteomics Reveals That the Inhibition of Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase Activity Affects S-Phase Progression Leading to a Chromosome Segregation Disorder by Attenuating the Aurora A Function in Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhongwei; Wang, Fengmei; Fan, Fengxu; Gu, Yanjun; Shan, Nana; Meng, Xiangyan; Cheng, Shixiang; Liu, Yingfu; Wang, Chengyan; Song, Yueying; Xu, Ruicheng

    2015-11-01

    Many studies have shown the Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase (NKA) might be a potential target for anticancer therapy. Cardiac glycosides (CGs), as a family of naturally compounds, inhibited the NKA activity. The present study investigates the antitumor effect of ouabain and elucidates the pharmacological mechanisms of CG activity in liver cancer HepG2 cell using SILAC coupled to LC-MS/MS method. Bioinformatics analysis of 330 proteins that were changed in cells under treatment with 0.5 μmol/L ouabain showed that the biological processes are associated with an acute inflammatory response, cell cycle, oxidation reduction, chromosome segregation, and DNA metabolism. We confirmed that ouabain induced chromosome segregation disorder and S-cell cycle block by decreasing the expression of AURKA, SMC2, Cyclin D, and p-CDK1 as well as increasing the expression of p53. We found that the overexpression or inhibition of AURKA significantly reduced or enhanced the ouabain-mediated the anticancer effects. Our findings suggest that AURKA is involved in the anticancer mechanisms of ouabain in HepG2 cells. PMID:26491887

  5. A dynamic meiotic SUN belt includes the zygotene-stage telomere bouquet and is disrupted in chromosome segregation mutants of maize (Zea mays L..

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaun Patrick Murphy

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The nuclear envelope (NE plays an essential role in meiotic telomere behavior and links the cytoplasm and nucleoplasm during homologous chromosome pairing and recombination in many eukaryotic species. Resident NE proteins including SUN (Sad-1/UNC-84 and KASH (Klarsicht/ANC-1/Syne-homology domain proteins are known to interact forming the Linker of Nucleoskeleton and Cytoskeleton (LINC complex that connects chromatin to the cytoskeleton. To investigate the possible cross-kingdom conservation of SUN protein functions in plant meiosis, we immunolocalized maize SUN2 using 3D microscopy of pollen mother cells from maize (Zea mays L., a large-genome plant model with a canonical NE zygotene-stage telomere bouquet. We detected SUN2 at the nuclear periphery and found that it exhibited a distinct belt-like structure that transitioned to a half-belt during the zygotene stage and back to a full belt during and beyond the pachytene stage. The zygotene-stage half-belt SUN structure was shown by 3D immuno-FISH to include the NE-associated telomere cluster that defines the bouquet stage and coincides with homologous chromosome synapsis. Microtubule and filamentous actin staining patterns did not show any obvious belt or a retracted-like structure other than a general enrichment of tubulin staining distributed widely around the nucleus and throughout the cytoplasm. Genetic disruption of the meiotic SUN belt staining patterns with three different meiosis-specific mutants, desynaptic (dy1, asynaptic1 (as1, and divergent spindle1 (dv1 provides additional evidence for the role of the nuclear envelope in meiotic chromosome behavior. Taking into account all of the observations from this study, we propose that the maize SUN belt is directly or indirectly involved in meiotic telomere dynamics, chromosome synapsis, and possibly integration of signals and forces across the meiotic prophase nuclear envelope.

  6. Measuring Segregation

    OpenAIRE

    David M. Frankel; Oscar Volij

    2004-01-01

    We propose a set of axioms for the measurement of multigroup school segregation. They are motivated by two criteria: do ethnic groups have similar distributions across schools? And are schools ethnically representative of their district? Our axioms are satisfied by a unique ordering. It is represented by the Mutual Information index. This index, originally proposed by Henri Theil, has a more intuitive decomposition than other indices. As an application, we find that segregation between distri...

  7. Waste segregation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A scoping study has been undertaken to determine the state-of-the-art of waste segregation technology as applied to the management of low-level waste (LLW). Present-day waste segregation practices were surveyed through a review of the recent literature and by means of personal interviews with personnel at selected facilities. Among the nuclear establishments surveyed were Department of Energy (DOE) laboratories and plants, nuclear fuel cycle plants, public and private laboratories, institutions, industrial plants, and DOE and commercially operated shallow land burial sites. These survey data were used to analyze the relationship between waste segregation practices and waste treatment/disposal processes, to assess the developmental needs for improved segregation technology, and to evaluate the costs and benefits associated with the implementation of waste segregation controls. This task was planned for completion in FY 1981. It should be noted that LLW management practices are now undergoing rapid change such that the technology and requirements for waste segregation in the near future may differ significantly from those of the present day. 8 figures

  8. Sgo1 is required for co-segregation of sister chromatids during achiasmate meiosis I

    OpenAIRE

    Dudas, Andrej; Ahmad, Shazia; Gregan, Juraj

    2011-01-01

    The reduction of chromosome number during meiosis is achieved by two successive rounds of chromosome segregation, called meiosis I and meiosis II. While meiosis II is similar to mitosis in that sister kinetochores are bi-oriented and segregate to opposite poles, recombined homologous chromosomes segregate during the first meiotic division. Formation of chiasmata, mono-orientation of sister kinetochores and protection of centromeric cohesion are three major features of meiosis I chromosomes wh...

  9. School Segregation, Residential Segregation: Some Speculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantrowitz, Nathan

    This essay addressed the question of to what extent does school segregation and school desegregation policy shape residential segregation. Census data, ethnic segregation, voluntary self-segregation, and attitude surveys are discussed in the residential segregation section. The Wolf and Lebeaux study is critically appraised in reference to school…

  10. Micromechanics of human mitotic chromosomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eukaryote cells dramatically reorganize their long chromosomal DNAs to facilitate their physical segregation during mitosis. The internal organization of folded mitotic chromosomes remains a basic mystery of cell biology; its understanding would likely shed light on how chromosomes are separated from one another as well as into chromosome structure between cell divisions. We report biophysical experiments on single mitotic chromosomes from human cells, where we combine micromanipulation, nano-Newton-scale force measurement and biochemical treatments to study chromosome connectivity and topology. Results are in accord with previous experiments on amphibian chromosomes and support the 'chromatin network' model of mitotic chromosome structure. Prospects for studies of chromosome-organizing proteins using siRNA expression knockdowns, as well as for differential studies of chromosomes with and without mutations associated with genetic diseases, are also discussed

  11. Residentielle Segregation

    OpenAIRE

    Dangschat, Jens S.

    2014-01-01

    "Die residentielle Segregation - verstanden als die ungleichmäßige Verteilung der Wohngelegenheiten sozialer Gruppen - wird über Segregationsindices als relative Abweichung der Anteilswerte in städtischen Teilgebieten gegenüber der Gesamtstadt gemessen. Diese Durchschnittswerte sagen jedoch nichts darüber aus, ob es in einer städtischen Agglomeration 'problematische' sozialräumliche Konstellationen gibt, sie haben daher keinen kommunalpolitischen oder stadtentwicklungsplanerischen Wert. Zudem...

  12. Meiosis I: When Chromosomes Undergo Extreme Makeover

    OpenAIRE

    Miller, Matthew P.; Amon, Angelika; Ünal, Elçin

    2013-01-01

    The ultimate success of cell division relies on the accurate partitioning of the genetic material. Errors in this process occur in nearly all tumors and are the leading cause of miscarriages and congenital birth defects in humans. Two cell divisions, mitosis and meiosis, use common as well as unique mechanisms to ensure faithful chromosome segregation. In mitosis, alternating rounds of DNA replication and chromosome segregation preserves the chromosome complement of the progenitor cell. In co...

  13. Radiation effects on segregating seed in rice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seeds of segregating lines selected from dES treated M2 populations of rice were irradiated with gamma rays with a view to enhance the variabiity and thus selection parameter. Seedling and mature plant parameters and frequency of dividing cells showed reduction upon treatment. Very high frequency of chromosomal interchanges including rare cases of those involving the two nucleolar chromosomes and plants with 13 II were recorded. Several types of desirable morphological mutants were isolated. 7 refs., 3 tables. (author)

  14. An EM algorithm for mapping segregation distortion loci

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang Yuan-Ming; Zhu Chengsong

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Chromosomal region that causes distorted segregation ratios is referred to as segregation distortion locus (SDL). The distortion is caused either by differential representation of SDL genotypes in gametes before fertilization or by viability differences of SDL genotypes after fertilization but before genotype scoring. In both cases, observable phenotypes are distorted for marker loci in the chromosomal region close to the SDL. Under the quantitative genetics model for viab...

  15. Expression of homosapiens chromosome segregation gene in homogenous nasopharyngeal carcinoma tissue cells%染色体分离基因在纯化鼻咽癌组织中的表达

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘仲奇; 田勇泉; 刘俊秀; 张迎宏; 马芙蓉; 胡永芳

    2007-01-01

    目的 研究染色体分离基因(homosapiens chromosome segregation gene,CSE1L)在纯化鼻咽癌及非癌组织中的表达.方法 首先从全基因组表达谱中筛选到鼻咽癌候选癌基因CSE1L.结合RNA保护、显微切割及线性扩增技术,获得纯化鼻咽组织中反义RNA(antisense RNA,aRNA),采用半定量逆转录聚合酶链式反应(semi-quantitative reverse transcriptionpolymerase chain reaction,sqRT-PCR)研究从全基因组表达谱中筛选的候选癌基因-CSE1L在两种不同纯化鼻咽组织aRNA中的表达.结果 在纯化鼻咽癌组织和鼻咽部非癌组织全基因组表达谱中,CSE1L基因表达值分别为1.056±0.296和0.465±0.835,相差2.27倍,两组比较有显著性差异(df=16,t=4.317,P=0.001<0.01).sqRT-PCR检测纯化鼻咽癌组织及非癌组织aRNA中CSE1L基因的表达,分别为1.740±1.105和0.618±0.183,两组比较有显著性差异(df=30,t=3.159,P=0.004<0.01).结论 利用全基因组芯片构建基因表达谱可筛选到鼻咽癌发病相关的候选靶基因,sqRT-PCR可验证芯片杂交结果,CSE1L基因是鼻咽癌发生、发展过程中重要的候选癌基因.

  16. Overcoming Triple Segregation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandara, Patricia

    2010-01-01

    Latinos are, after whites, the most segregated student group in the United States, and their segregation is closely tied to poor academic outcomes. Latinos experience a triple segregation: by race/ethnicity, poverty, and language. Racial segregation perpetuates negative stereotypes, reduces the likelihood of a strong teaching staff, and is often…

  17. Surface Segregation in YSZ

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bay, Lasse; Zachau-Christiansen, Birgit; Jacobsen, Torben

    1998-01-01

    The space charge layer formed due to segregation of yttria and oxygen ion vacancies in YSZ is described by a simple model. Effects of impurities segregation are omitted.......The space charge layer formed due to segregation of yttria and oxygen ion vacancies in YSZ is described by a simple model. Effects of impurities segregation are omitted....

  18. Poisson Indices of Segregation

    OpenAIRE

    Angelo, Mele

    2009-01-01

    Existing indices of residential segregation are based on an arbitrary partition of the city in neighborhoods: given a spatial distribution of racial groups, the index provides different levels of segregation for different partitions. This paper proposes a method in which individual locations are mapped to aggregate levels of segregation, avoiding arbitrary partitions. Assuming a simple spatial process driving the locations of different racial groups, I define a location-specific segregation i...

  19. Nonmetropolitan Residential Segregation Revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murdock, Steve H.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Analysis of 1980 and 1990 Censuses of Population and Housing for Texas found overall black-white and Anglo-Hispanic residential segregation declined substantially. Nonmetropolitan counties were more segregated than metropolitan counties in both years, but growing nonmetro places showed the greatest segregation declines. Analyses controlling for…

  20. Polymer segregation under confinement: Influences of macromolecular crowding and the interaction between the polymer and crowders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yuhao; Yu, Wancheng; Wang, Jiajun; Luo, Kaifu

    2015-10-01

    Entropy driven polymer segregation in confinements as a model for chromosome separation in bacteria has attracted wide attention; however, the effects of macromolecular crowding and the interaction between the binding protein and the newly replicated DNA on the segregation dynamics are not clear. Using Langevin dynamics simulations, we investigate the influences of crowders and the attractive interaction between the polymer and a small number of crowders on segregation of two overlapping polymers under a cylindrical confinement. We find that the segregation time increases with increasing the volume fraction of crowders due to the slower chain diffusion in crowded environments. For a fixed volume fraction of crowders, the segregation time decreases with increasing the size of crowders. Moreover, the attractive interaction between the polymer and a small number of crowders can significantly facilitate the chain segregation. These results are important for understanding the chromosome segregation in living cells.

  1. SYNAPTONEMAL COMPLEX ANALYSIS OF MUTAGEN EFFECTS ON MEIOTIC CHROMOSOME STRUCTURE AND BEHAVIOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homologous chromosome synapsis and crossing-over at meiosis are basic to mammalian gamete development. hey achieve genetic recombination, regulate chromosome segregation, and are believed to function in repair and maturation. ynaptonemal complexes (SCs) are axial correlates of me...

  2. Local versus overall segregation measures

    OpenAIRE

    Olga Alonso-Villar; Coral del Río

    2008-01-01

    This paper proposes a framework in which to study the segregation of a target group in a multigroup context, according either to an evenness perception or to a representativeness view of segregation, and offers a bridge between local segregation and overall segregation. In doing so, this paper first presents an axiomatic set-up within which local segregation measures can be evaluated, and defines local segregation curves. Next, a class of additive segregation indexes, related to the generaliz...

  3. On the Measurement of Segregation

    OpenAIRE

    Federico Echenique; Roland G. Fryer, Jr.

    2005-01-01

    This paper develops a measure of segregation based on two premises: (1) a measure of segregation should disaggregate to the level of individuals, and (2) an individual is more segregated the more segregated are the agents with whom she interacts. Developing three desirable axioms that any segregation measure should satisfy, we prove that one and only one segregation index satisfies our three axioms, and the two aims mentioned above; which we coin the Spectral Segregation Index. We apply the i...

  4. Measuring School Segregation

    OpenAIRE

    David M. Frankel; Volij, Oscar

    2011-01-01

    Using only ordinal axioms, we characterize several multi-group school segregation indices: the Atkinson Indices for the class of school districts with a given fixed number of ethnic groups and the Mutual Information Index for the class of all districts. Properties of other school segregation indices are also discussed. In an empirical application, we document a weakening of the effect of ethnicity on school assignment from 1987/8 to 2007/8. We also show that segregation between districts with...

  5. Segregation and Civic Virtue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merry, Michael S.

    2012-01-01

    In this essay Michael Merry defends the following prima facie argument: that civic virtue is not dependent on integration and in fact may be best fostered under conditions of segregation. He demonstrates that civic virtue can and does take place under conditions of involuntary segregation, but that voluntary separation--as a response to…

  6. Stable persistence of the yeast plasmid by hitchhiking on chromosomes during vegetative and germ-line divisions of host cells

    OpenAIRE

    Sau, Soumitra; Liu, Yen-Ting; Ma, Chien-Hui; Jayaram, Makkuni

    2015-01-01

    The chromosome-like stability of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae plasmid 2 micron circle likely stems from its ability to tether to chromosomes and segregate by a hitchhiking mechanism. The plasmid partitioning system, responsible for chromosome-coupled segregation, is comprised of 2 plasmid coded proteins Rep1 and Rep2 and a partitioning locus STB. The evidence for the hitchhiking model for mitotic plasmid segregation, although compelling, is almost entirely circumstantial. Direct tests for pla...

  7. Neighborhood Schools and Racial Segregation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelleher, Daniel T.

    1975-01-01

    Neighborhood school concept and racially segregated residential patterns account for most of the segregation in American public schools today. The focus of this article will be to explain the reasons for residential segregation. (Author/RK)

  8. Microtubule detyrosination guides chromosomes during mitosis

    OpenAIRE

    Barisic, Marin; Silva e Sousa, Ricardo; Tripathy, Suvranta K.; Magiera, Maria M.; Zaytsev, Anatoly V.; Pereira, Ana L.; Janke, Carsten; Grishchuk, Ekaterina L.; Maiato, Helder

    2015-01-01

    Before chromosomes segregate into daughter cells they align at the mitotic spindle equator, a process known as chromosome congression. CENP-E/Kinesin-7 is a microtubule plus-end-directed kinetochore motor required for congression of pole-proximal chromosomes. Because the plus-ends of many astral microtubules in the spindle point to the cell cortex, it remains unknown how CENP-E guides pole-proximal chromosomes specifically towards the equator. Here we found that congression of pole-proximal c...

  9. Mitosis. Microtubule detyrosination guides chromosomes during mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barisic, Marin; Silva e Sousa, Ricardo; Tripathy, Suvranta K; Magiera, Maria M; Zaytsev, Anatoly V; Pereira, Ana L; Janke, Carsten; Grishchuk, Ekaterina L; Maiato, Helder

    2015-05-15

    Before chromosomes segregate into daughter cells, they align at the mitotic spindle equator, a process known as chromosome congression. Centromere-associated protein E (CENP-E)/Kinesin-7 is a microtubule plus-end-directed kinetochore motor required for congression of pole-proximal chromosomes. Because the plus-ends of many astral microtubules in the spindle point to the cell cortex, it remains unknown how CENP-E guides pole-proximal chromosomes specifically toward the equator. We found that congression of pole-proximal chromosomes depended on specific posttranslational detyrosination of spindle microtubules that point to the equator. In vitro reconstitution experiments demonstrated that CENP-E-dependent transport was strongly enhanced on detyrosinated microtubules. Blocking tubulin tyrosination in cells caused ubiquitous detyrosination of spindle microtubules, and CENP-E transported chromosomes away from spindle poles in random directions. Thus, CENP-E-driven chromosome congression is guided by microtubule detyrosination. PMID:25908662

  10. Quantitative trait locus mapping can benefit from segregation distortion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shizhong

    2008-12-01

    Segregation distortion is a phenomenon that has been observed in many experimental systems. How segregation distortion among markers arises and its impact on mapping studies are the focus of this work. Segregation distortion of markers can be considered to arise from segregation distortion loci (SDL). I develop a theory of segregation distortion and show that the presence of only a few SDL can cause the entire chromosome to distort from Mendelian segregation. Segregation distortion is detrimental to the power of detecting quantitative trait loci (QTL) with dominance effects, but it is not always a detriment to QTL mapping for additive effects. When segregation distortion of a locus is a random event, the SDL is beneficial to QTL mapping approximately 44% of the time. If SDL are present and ignored, power loss can be substantial. A dense marker map can be used to ameliorate the situation, and if dense marker information is incorporated, power loss is minimal. However, other situations are less benign. A method that can simultaneously map QTL and SDL is discussed, maximizing both use of mapping resources and use by agricultural and evolutionary biologists. PMID:18957707

  11. Plasmid segregation mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebersbach, Gitte; Gerdes, Kenn; Charbon, Gitte Ebersbach

    2005-01-01

    Bacterial plasmids encode partitioning (par) loci that ensure ordered plasmid segregation prior to cell division. par loci come in two types: those that encode actin-like ATPases and those that encode deviant Walker-type ATPases. ParM, the actin-like ATPase of plasmid R1, forms dynamic filaments...... that segregate plasmids paired at mid-cell to daughter cells. Like microtubules, ParM filaments exhibit dynamic instability (i.e., catastrophic decay) whose regulation is an important component of the DNA segregation process. The Walker box ParA ATPases are related to MinD and form highly dynamic, oscillating...... filaments that are required for the subcellular movement and positioning of plasmids. The role of the observed ATPase oscillation is not yet understood. However, we propose a simple model that couples plasmid segregation to ParA oscillation. The model is consistent with the observed movement...

  12. Predicting polydisperse granular segregation

    OpenAIRE

    Isner, Austin; Schlick, Conor P.; Umbanhowar, Paul B.; Ottino, Julio M.; Lueptow, Richard M.

    2014-01-01

    Most granular materials in industrial applications and natural settings are size-polydisperse, but most models and simulations of segregation consider only bidisperse particle distributions. Here, we extend our recently developed theoretical advection–diffusion–segregation model to polydisperse particle distributions. To test the theoretical approach, we model and simulate grains log-normally distributed by size in a chute flow. In steady state, material near the free surface is dominated by ...

  13. Segregation by friction

    OpenAIRE

    Kondic, L.; Hartley, R. R.; Tennakoon, S. G. K.; Painter, B; Behringer, R. P.

    2002-01-01

    Granular materials are known to separate by size under a variety of circumstances. Experiments presented here and elucidated by modeling and MD simulation document a new segregation mechanism, namely segregation by friction. The experiments are carried out by placing steel spheres on a horizontal plane enclosed by rectangular sidewalls, and subjecting them to horizontal shaking. Half the spheres are highly smooth; the remainder are identical to the first half, except that their surfaces have ...

  14. Estimating tempo and mode of Y chromosome turnover: explaining Y chromosome loss with the fragile Y hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackmon, Heath; Demuth, Jeffery P

    2014-06-01

    Chromosomal sex determination is phylogenetically widespread, having arisen independently in many lineages. Decades of theoretical work provide predictions about sex chromosome differentiation that are well supported by observations in both XY and ZW systems. However, the phylogenetic scope of previous work gives us a limited understanding of the pace of sex chromosome gain and loss and why Y or W chromosomes are more often lost in some lineages than others, creating XO or ZO systems. To gain phylogenetic breadth we therefore assembled a database of 4724 beetle species' karyotypes and found substantial variation in sex chromosome systems. We used the data to estimate rates of Y chromosome gain and loss across a phylogeny of 1126 taxa estimated from seven genes. Contrary to our initial expectations, we find that highly degenerated Y chromosomes of many members of the suborder Polyphaga are rarely lost, and that cases of Y chromosome loss are strongly associated with chiasmatic segregation during male meiosis. We propose the "fragile Y" hypothesis, that recurrent selection to reduce recombination between the X and Y chromosome leads to the evolution of a small pseudoautosomal region (PAR), which, in taxa that require XY chiasmata for proper segregation during meiosis, increases the probability of aneuploid gamete production, with Y chromosome loss. This hypothesis predicts that taxa that evolve achiasmatic segregation during male meiosis will rarely lose the Y chromosome. We discuss data from mammals, which are consistent with our prediction. PMID:24939995

  15. Homologue pairing, recombination and segregation in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zetka, M

    2009-01-01

    Meiosis in the free-living, hermaphroditic nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is marked by the same highly conserved features observed in other sexually reproducing systems. Accurate chromosome segregation at the meiotic divisions depends on earlier landmark events of meiotic prophase, including the pairing of homologous chromosomes, synapsis between them, and the formation of crossovers. Dissection of these processes has revealed a unique simplification of meiotic mechanisms that impact the interpretation of meiotic chromosome behaviour in more complex systems. Chromosome sites required for chromosome pairing are consolidated to one end of each chromosome, the many sites of recombination initiation are resolved into a single crossover for each chromosome pair, and the diffuse (holocentric) kinetic activity that extends along the length of the mitotic chromosomes is reduced to a single end of each meiotic chromosome. Consequently, studies from the nematode have illuminated and challenged long-standing concepts of homologue pairing mechanisms, crossover interference, and kinetochore structure. Because chromosome pairing, synapsis, and recombination can proceed independently of one another, C. elegans has provided a simplified system for studying these processes and the mechanisms mediating their coordination during meiosis. This review covers the major features of C. elegans meiosis with emphasis on its contributions to understanding essential meiotic processes. PMID:18948706

  16. Mitotic instability of Pichia pinus diploid cells 2. Segregation induced by gamma-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two types of genetic damages resulted from gamma rays in diploid cells of yeasts Pichia pinus MH4: nonlethal damages resulting in increasing frequency of mitotic crossing-over and lethal damages leading to cell death or arising unstable clones have been described. Survaving irradiated cells with lethal damages (which nature is not established) originate ''grown'' colonies which instability is manifested in the increased frequency of segregation of lethal sections and aneuploid segregants; in such colonies segregants without one, two or three nonhomologous chromosomes are often found. It is concluded that losses of separate chromosomes are not those primary damages which result in radiation inactivation of cells

  17. Understanding Segregation Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruch, Elizabeth

    There is growing consensus that living in neighborhoods of concentrated poverty increases the likelihood of social problems such as teenage parenthood, drug and alcohol use, crime victimization, and chronic unemployment. Neighborhood inequality is also implicated in studies of enduring race/ethnic health disparities, and there are recent moves to broaden the definition of health care policy to policies targeting social inequality (Mechanic 2007). Residential segregation affects health outcomes in several different ways. First, income, education, and occupation are all strongly related to health (Adler and Newman 2002). Segregation is a key mechanism through which socioeconomic inequality is perpetuated and reinforced, as it hinders the upward mobility of disadvantaged groups by limiting their educational and employment opportunities. Second, segregation increases minority exposure to unhealthy neighborhood environments. Residential segregation creates areas with concentrated poverty and unemployment, both of which are key factors that predict violence and create racial differences in homicide (Samson and Wilson 1995). Neighborhood characteristics, such as exposure to environmental hazards, fear of violence, and access to grocery stores, affect health risks and health behaviors (Cheadle et al. 1991). Tobacco and alcohol industries also advertise their products disproportionately in poor, minority areas (Moore, Williams, and Qualls 1996). Finally, residential segregation leads to inequalitie in health care resources, which contributes to disparities in quality of treatment (Smedley, Stith, and Nelson 2002).

  18. Measuring Inequality and Segregation

    CERN Document Server

    Roberto, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, I introduce the Divergence Index, a conceptually intuitive and methodologically rigorous measure of inequality and segregation. The index measures the difference between a distribution of interest and another empirical, theoretical, or normative distribution. The Divergence Index provides flexibility in specifying a theoretically meaningful basis for evaluating inequality. It evaluates how surprising an empirical distribution is given a theoretical distribution that represents equality. I demonstrate the unique features of the new measure, as well as deriving its mathematical equivalence with Theil's Inequality Index and the Information Theory Index. I compare the dynamics of the measures using simulated data, and an empirical analysis of racial residential segregation in the Detroit, MI, metro area. The Information Theory Index has become the gold standard for decomposition analyses of segregation. I show that although the Information Theory Index can be decomposed for subareas, it is misleadi...

  19. Stretching the Rules: Monocentric Chromosomes with Multiple Centromere Domains

    OpenAIRE

    Neumann, Pavel; Navratilova, Alice; Schroeder-Reiter, Elizabeth; Koblizkova, Andrea; Steinbauerova, Veronika; Chocholova, Eva; Novak, Petr; Wanner, Gerhard; Macas, Jiri

    2012-01-01

    The centromere is a functional chromosome domain that is essential for faithful chromosome segregation during cell division and that can be reliably identified by the presence of the centromere-specific histone H3 variant CenH3. In monocentric chromosomes, the centromere is characterized by a single CenH3-containing region within a morphologically distinct primary constriction. This region usually spans up to a few Mbp composed mainly of centromere-specific satellite DNA common to all chromos...

  20. The Role of Residential Segregation in Contemporary School Segregation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankenberg, Erica

    2013-01-01

    Inaction to address housing segregation in metropolitan areas has resulted in persistently high levels of residential segregation. As the Supreme Court has recently limited school districts' voluntary integration efforts, this article considers the role of residential segregation in maintaining racially isolated schools, namely what is known…

  1. Co-segregation of yeast plasmid sisters under monopolin-directed mitosis suggests association of plasmid sisters with sister chromatids

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Yen-Ting; Ma, Chien-Hui; Jayaram, Makkuni

    2013-01-01

    The 2-micron plasmid, a high copy extrachromosomal element in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, propagates itself with nearly the same stability as the chromosomes of its host. Plasmid stability is conferred by a partitioning system consisting of the plasmid-coded proteins Rep1 and Rep2 and a cis-acting locus STB. Circumstantial evidence suggests that the partitioning system couples plasmid segregation to chromosome segregation during mitosis. However, the coupling mechanism has not been elucidated. ...

  2. Applied Thermodynamics: Grain Boundary Segregation

    OpenAIRE

    Pavel Lejček; Lei Zheng; Siegfried Hofmann; Mojmír Šob

    2014-01-01

    Chemical composition of interfaces—free surfaces and grain boundaries—is generally described by the Langmuir–McLean segregation isotherm controlled by Gibbs energy of segregation. Various components of the Gibbs energy of segregation, the standard and the excess ones as well as other thermodynamic state functions—enthalpy, entropy and volume—of interfacial segregation are derived and their physical meaning is elucidated. The importance of the thermodynamic state functions of grain boundary se...

  3. Residential Segregation and School Integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivkin, Steven G.

    1994-01-01

    Asserts that school districts' efforts to integrate schools have failed to ameliorate the racial isolation of black students. Finds that schools remain segregated primarily because of continued residential segregation and that school integration efforts have had little long-term effect on residential segregation. (CFR)

  4. Chromosomal aberration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chromosomal aberrations are classified into two types, chromosome-type and chromatid-type. Chromosom-type aberrations include terminal deletion, dicentric, ring and interstitial deletion, and chromatid-type aberrations include achromatic lesion, chromatid deletion, isochromatid deletion and chromatid exchange. Clastogens which induce chromosomal aberration are divided into ''S-dependent'' agents and ''S-independent''. It might mean whether they can induce double strand breaks independent of the S phase or not. Double strand breaks may be the ultimate lesions to induce chromosomal aberrations. Caffeine added even in the G2 phase appeared to modify the frequency of chromatid aberrations induced by X-rays and mitomycin C. Those might suggest that the G2 phase involves in the chromatid aberration formation. The double strand breaks might be repaired by ''G2 repair system'', the error of which might yield breakage types of chromatid aberrations and the by-pass of which might yield chromatid exchanges. Chromosome-type aberrations might be formed in the G1 phase. (author)

  5. Segregation in Minds

    OpenAIRE

    Rácz, Attila

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, I explore socio-spatial segregation from a particular perspective, which may probably be considered a novelty in the investigation of spatial social patterns, as it focuses on questions such as: What kind of distinction occurs between socio-spatial patterns designated by statistical data and the cognitive representations of those patterns in people's minds? and What explains these diff erences, and what kind of impact can they generate?

  6. Patterns of residential segregation

    OpenAIRE

    Louf, Rémi; Barthelemy, Marc

    2015-01-01

    The spatial distribution of income shapes the structure and organisation of cities and its understanding has broad societal implications. Despite an abundant literature, many issues remain however unclear: there is no clear definition of what segregation is, no unambiguous definition of income classes, no clear way to identify neighborhoods, and no method to deal with the polycentric organization of large cities. In this paper, we address all these questions within a unique theoretical framew...

  7. Conditional Mutations in the Mitotic Chromosome Binding Function of the Bovine Papillomavirus Type 1 E2 Protein

    OpenAIRE

    Zheng, Peng-Sheng; Brokaw, Jane; Alison A McBride

    2005-01-01

    The papillomavirus E2 protein is required for viral transcriptional regulation, DNA replication and genome segregation. We have previously shown that the E2 transactivator protein and BPV1 genomes are associated with mitotic chromosomes; E2 links the genomes to cellular chromosomes to ensure efficient segregation to daughter nuclei. The transactivation domain of the E2 protein is necessary and sufficient for association of the E2 protein with mitotic chromosomes. To determine which residues o...

  8. How to build segregation complexes in bacteria: Use bridges

    OpenAIRE

    Funnell, Barbara E.

    2014-01-01

    This perspective discusses the novel molecular mechanism of ParB spreading that is reported by Graham et al. (this issue). Using single-molecule analysis, Graham et al. found that Bacillus subtilis ParB proteins use a previously uncharacterized looping and bridging activity to assemble three-dimensional nucleoprotein complexes with DNA flanking the parS site. Formation of this higher-order ParB/parS complex is necessary for SMC condensin complex recruitment and chromosome segregation.

  9. Synthetic chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindler, Daniel; Waldminghaus, Torsten

    2015-11-01

    What a living organism looks like and how it works and what are its components-all this is encoded on DNA, the genetic blueprint. Consequently, the way to change an organism is to change its genetic information. Since the first pieces of recombinant DNA have been used to transform cells in the 1970s, this approach has been enormously extended. Bigger and bigger parts of the genetic information have been exchanged or added over the years. Now we are at a point where the construction of entire chromosomes becomes a reachable goal and first examples appear. This development leads to fundamental new questions, for example, about what is possible and desirable to build or what construction rules one needs to follow when building synthetic chromosomes. Here we review the recent progress in the field, discuss current challenges and speculate on the appearance of future synthetic chromosomes. PMID:26111960

  10. Functions of spindle check-point and its relationship to chromosome instability

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    It is generally believed that the equal distribution of genetic materials to two daughter cells during mitosis is the key to cell health and development. During the dynamic process, spindle checkpoint plays a very important role in chromosome movements and final sister chromatid separation. The equal and precise segregation of chromosomes contributes to the genomic stability while aberrant separations result in chromosome instability that causes pathogenesis of certain diseases such as Down's syndrome and cancers. Kinetochore and its regulatory proteins consist of the spindle checkpoint and determine the spatial and temporal orders of chromosome segregation.

  11. Premature segregation of centromeres in persons exposed to ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study analyzed the frequency of premature centromeric division (PCD) in the metaphase in medical personnel occupationally exposed to ionizing radiation who had positive results of chromosome aberrations. The analysis included 30 exposed subjects , and 23 control subjects not exposed to familiar genotoxic agents. Chromosome aberrations in lymphocytes were analyzed according to a standard protocol (IAEA, 1986). Application of FISH for the analysis of PCD of chromosome 18 in interphase nuclei and methaphasis. FISH method was used for the analysis of premature segregation of centromeric regions. The assay of pL1. 84 αrepetitive DNA for chromosome 18 was used for detection of centromeric region. One-way ANOVA test and Mann-Whitney U test revealed that frequencies for eight variables: chromatid and chromosome breaks, acentrics, dicentrics,frequency of metaphase cells with PCD on any chromosome (MPCD), total number of chromosomes with PCD (TPCD), frequency of metaphase cells with PCd on acrocentric chromosomes (MAPCD),and total number of acrocentric chromosomes with PCD (TAPCD) were significantly higher in exposed group (P0.05). Our study shows high and statistically significant relative risk factors (RR) for five variables (chromatid break, chromosome break, acentric, MAPCD and TAPCD) regarding to radiation exposure (control versus exposed group). Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) showed that there was significant difference of percentage of metaphases with PCD and percentage of interphase nuclei PCD between the exposed and control group. Given that PCD may be observed as phenomenon representing the manifestation of genome instability which is caused by karyotype changes, our studies suggest that PCD should be reviewed as probable cytogenetic biomarker for individuals occupationally exposed to ionizing radiation

  12. Chromosome number reports in Astragalus sect. Onobrychoidei (Fabaceae from Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massoud Ranjbar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, original mitotic chromosome counts have been presented for 10 populations belonging to 6 species of Astragalus sect. Onobrychoidei: A. aduncus, A. arguricus, A. cancellatus, A. lilacinus and A. vegetus. All taxa were diploid and possessed 2n = 2x = 16 chromosome number, consistent with the proposed base number of x = 8. In addition, meiotic studies revealed chromosome number of 2n = 2x = 16 for A. aduncus21 and A. brevidens and also 2n = 4x = 32 for A. vegetus99. Although this taxon displayed regular bivalent pairing and chromosome segregation at meiosis, some abnormalities were observed.

  13. Patterns of Residential Segregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louf, Rémi; Barthelemy, Marc

    2016-01-01

    The spatial distribution of income shapes the structure and organisation of cities and its understanding has broad societal implications. Despite an abundant literature, many issues remain unclear. In particular, all definitions of segregation are implicitely tied to a single indicator, usually rely on an ambiguous definition of income classes, without any consensus on how to define neighbourhoods and to deal with the polycentric organization of large cities. In this paper, we address all these questions within a unique conceptual framework. We avoid the challenge of providing a direct definition of segregation and instead start from a definition of what segregation is not. This naturally leads to the measure of representation that is able to identify locations where categories are over- or underrepresented. From there, we provide a new measure of exposure that discriminates between situations where categories co-locate or repel one another. We then use this feature to provide an unambiguous, parameter-free method to find meaningful breaks in the income distribution, thus defining classes. Applied to the 2014 American Community Survey, we find 3 emerging classes-low, middle and higher income-out of the original 16 income categories. The higher-income households are proportionally more present in larger cities, while lower-income households are not, invalidating the idea of an increased social polarisation. Finally, using the density-and not the distance to a center which is meaningless in polycentric cities-we find that the richer class is overrepresented in high density zones, especially for larger cities. This suggests that density is a relevant factor for understanding the income structure of cities and might explain some of the differences observed between US and European cities. PMID:27315283

  14. Patterns of Residential Segregation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rémi Louf

    Full Text Available The spatial distribution of income shapes the structure and organisation of cities and its understanding has broad societal implications. Despite an abundant literature, many issues remain unclear. In particular, all definitions of segregation are implicitely tied to a single indicator, usually rely on an ambiguous definition of income classes, without any consensus on how to define neighbourhoods and to deal with the polycentric organization of large cities. In this paper, we address all these questions within a unique conceptual framework. We avoid the challenge of providing a direct definition of segregation and instead start from a definition of what segregation is not. This naturally leads to the measure of representation that is able to identify locations where categories are over- or underrepresented. From there, we provide a new measure of exposure that discriminates between situations where categories co-locate or repel one another. We then use this feature to provide an unambiguous, parameter-free method to find meaningful breaks in the income distribution, thus defining classes. Applied to the 2014 American Community Survey, we find 3 emerging classes-low, middle and higher income-out of the original 16 income categories. The higher-income households are proportionally more present in larger cities, while lower-income households are not, invalidating the idea of an increased social polarisation. Finally, using the density-and not the distance to a center which is meaningless in polycentric cities-we find that the richer class is overrepresented in high density zones, especially for larger cities. This suggests that density is a relevant factor for understanding the income structure of cities and might explain some of the differences observed between US and European cities.

  15. Lattice animal model of chromosome organization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Balaji V. S.; Arya, Gaurav

    2012-07-01

    Polymer models tied together by constraints of looping and confinement have been used to explain many of the observed organizational characteristics of interphase chromosomes. Here we introduce a simple lattice animal representation of interphase chromosomes that combines the features of looping and confinement constraints into a single framework. We show through Monte Carlo simulations that this model qualitatively captures both the leveling off in the spatial distance between genomic markers observed in fluorescent in situ hybridization experiments and the inverse decay in the looping probability as a function of genomic separation observed in chromosome conformation capture experiments. The model also suggests that the collapsed state of chromosomes and their segregation into territories with distinct looping activities might be a natural consequence of confinement.

  16. Waste segregation procedures and benefits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Segregation is a critical first step in handling hazardous and radioactive materials to minimize the generation of regulated wastes. In addition, segregation can significantly reduce the complexity and the total cost of managing waste. Procedures at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque require that wastes be segregated, first, by waste type (acids, solvents, low level radioactive, mixed, classified, etc.). Higher level segregation requirements, currently under development, are aimed at enhancing the possibilities for recovery, recycle and reapplication; reducing waste volumes; reducing waste disposal costs, and facilitating packaging storage, shipping and disposal. 2 tabs

  17. Premature dyad separation in meiosis II is the major segregation error with maternal age in mouse oocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Yun, Y.; Lane, SIR; Jones, KT

    2014-01-01

    As women get older their oocytes become susceptible to chromosome mis-segregation. This generates aneuploid embryos, leading to increased infertility and birth defects. Here we examined the provenance of aneuploidy by tracking chromosomes and their kinetochores in oocytes from young and aged mice. Changes consistent with chromosome cohesion deterioration were found with age, including increased interkinetochore distance and loss of the centromeric protector of cohesion SGO2 in metaphase II ar...

  18. Pericentric inversion of chromosome 12; a three family study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haagerup, A; Hertz, Jens Michael

    1992-01-01

    A pericentric inversion of chromosome 12 has been followed in three large independently ascertained Danish families. Out of a total number of 52 persons examined, 25 were found to carry the inversion. The breakpoints in all three families were localized to p13 and q13, resulting in more than one...... segregation rate is calculated to be 0.58, which is not significantly different from an expected segregation rate of 0.5. In family 3, an additional inversion of a chromosome 9 has been found in 4 individuals. Our results are discussed in relation to previous findings and with respect to the genetic...... counselling of families with pericentric inversions....

  19. Source Segregation and Collection of Source-Segregated Waste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas Højlund; Matsufuji, Y.

    2011-01-01

    The Segregation of individual material fractions at the waste source and keeping the fractions separate for collection is one of the key issues in modern waste management. In most cases the waste is just kept segregated from other waste according to certain criteria that improve the possibility of...... optimal handling of the waste. But in a few cases, the waste must also be separated at source, for example removing the protective plastic cover from a commercial advertisement received by mail, prior to putting the advertisement into the waste collection bin for recyclable paper. These issues are often...... more important it is to consider source segregation of the waste, since the amount of waste links to the possibility of obtaining manageable amounts of segregated waste with reasonable logistics as well as to the manpower that can be allocated at the source to perform source segregation of waste...

  20. Multilevel Modeling of Social Segregation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leckie, George; Pillinger, Rebecca; Jones, Kelvyn; Goldstein, Harvey

    2012-01-01

    The traditional approach to measuring segregation is based upon descriptive, non-model-based indices. A recently proposed alternative is multilevel modeling. The authors further develop the argument for a multilevel modeling approach by first describing and expanding upon its notable advantages, which include an ability to model segregation at a…

  1. The Dimensions of Residential Segregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massey, Douglas S.; Denton, Nancy A.

    1988-01-01

    Evaluates 20 potential indicators of residential segregation using census data on Hispanics, Blacks, Asians, and non-Hispanic Whites in 60 U.S. metropolitan areas. Factor-analyzes the results to select a single best indicator for each of five dimensions of residential segregation. Contains 69 references and 22 statistical formulas. (SV)

  2. Effective formation of the segregation-competent complex determines successful partitioning of the bovine papillomavirus genome during cell division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silla, Toomas; Männik, Andres; Ustav, Mart

    2010-11-01

    Effective segregation of the bovine papillomavirus type 1 (BPV1), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), and Kaposi's sarcoma-associated human herpesvirus type 8 (KSHV) genomes into daughter cells is mediated by a single viral protein that tethers viral genomes to host mitotic chromosomes. The linker proteins that mediate BPV1, EBV, and KSHV segregation are E2, LANA1, and EBNA1, respectively. The N-terminal transactivation domain of BPV1 E2 is responsible for chromatin attachment and subsequent viral genome segregation. Because E2 transcriptional activation and chromatin attachment functions are not mutually exclusive, we aimed to determine the requirement of these activities during segregation by analyzing chimeric E2 proteins. This approach allowed us to separate the two activities. Our data showed that attachment of the segregation protein to chromatin is not sufficient for proper segregation. Rather, formation of a segregation-competent complex which carries multiple copies of the segregation protein is required. Complementation studies of E2 functional domains indicated that chromatin attachment and transactivation functions must act in concert to ensure proper plasmid segregation. These data indicate that there are specific interactions between linker molecules and transcription factors/complexes that greatly increase segregation-competent complex formation. We also showed, using hybrid E2 molecules, that restored segregation function does not involve interactions with Brd4. PMID:20810736

  3. Patterns of residential segregation

    CERN Document Server

    Louf, Rémi

    2015-01-01

    The spatial distribution of income shapes the structure and organisation of cities and its understanding has broad societal implications. Despite an abundant literature, many issues remain however unclear: there is no clear definition of what segregation is, no unambiguous definition of income classes, no clear way to identify neighborhoods, and no method to deal with the polycentric organization of large cities. In this paper, we address all these questions within a unique theoretical framework. We assume that households belonging to the same class tend to live close to each other, and households from different classes tend to avoid one another. Applied to the US 2000 Census Income data, 3 distinct classes emerge from the clustering of the original 16 income classes. Using these unambiguously defined classes, we cluster together contiguous similar areas and find that the number of clusters for each category scales with the city population, an effect that is more pronounced for rich households. Finally, using...

  4. Chromosome Microarray.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Sharon

    2016-01-01

    Over the last half century, knowledge about genetics, genetic testing, and its complexity has flourished. Completion of the Human Genome Project provided a foundation upon which the accuracy of genetics, genomics, and integration of bioinformatics knowledge and testing has grown exponentially. What is lagging, however, are efforts to reach and engage nurses about this rapidly changing field. The purpose of this article is to familiarize nurses with several frequently ordered genetic tests including chromosomes and fluorescence in situ hybridization followed by a comprehensive review of chromosome microarray. It shares the complexity of microarray including how testing is performed and results analyzed. A case report demonstrates how this technology is applied in clinical practice and reveals benefits and limitations of this scientific and bioinformatics genetic technology. Clinical implications for maternal-child nurses across practice levels are discussed. PMID:27276104

  5. Bod1, a novel kinetochore protein required for chromosome biorientation

    OpenAIRE

    Porter, Iain M.; McClelland, Sarah E.; Khoudoli, Guennadi A; Hunter, Christopher J; Andersen, Jens S; McAinsh, Andrew D.; Blow, J Julian; Swedlow, Jason R

    2007-01-01

    We have combined the proteomic analysis of Xenopus laevis in vitro–assembled chromosomes with RNA interference and live cell imaging in HeLa cells to identify novel factors required for proper chromosome segregation. The first of these is Bod1, a protein conserved throughout metazoans that associates with a large macromolecular complex and localizes with kinetochores and spindle poles during mitosis. Small interfering RNA depletion of Bod1 in HeLa cells produces elongated mitotic spindles wit...

  6. Mitotic Origins of Chromosomal Instability in Colorectal Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Dalton, W. Brian; Yang, Vincent W.

    2007-01-01

    Mitosis is a crucial part of the cell cycle. A successful mitosis requires the proper execution of many complex cellular behaviors. Thus, there are many points at which mitosis may be disrupted. In cancer cells, chronic disruption of mitosis can lead to unequal segregation of chromosomes, a phenomenon known as chromosomal instability. A majority of colorectal tumors suffer from this instability, and recent studies have begun to reveal the specific ways in which mitotic defects promote chromos...

  7. Cell division control by the Chromosomal Passenger Complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waal, Maike S. van der; Hengeveld, Rutger C.C.; Horst, Armando van der; Lens, Susanne M.A., E-mail: s.m.a.lens@umcutrecht.nl

    2012-07-15

    The Chromosomal Passenger Complex (CPC) consisting of Aurora B kinase, INCENP, Survivin and Borealin, is essential for genomic stability by controlling multiple processes during both nuclear and cytoplasmic division. In mitosis it ensures accurate segregation of the duplicated chromosomes by regulating the mitotic checkpoint, destabilizing incorrectly attached spindle microtubules and by promoting the axial shortening of chromosomal arms in anaphase. During cytokinesis the CPC most likely prevents chromosome damage by imposing an abscission delay when a chromosome bridge connects the two daughter cells. Moreover, by controlling proper cytoplasmic division, the CPC averts tetraploidization. This review describes recent insights on how the CPC is capable of conducting its various functions in the dividing cell to ensure chromosomal stability.

  8. The fragile Y hypothesis: Y chromosome aneuploidy as a selective pressure in sex chromosome and meiotic mechanism evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackmon, Heath; Demuth, Jeffery P

    2015-09-01

    Loss of the Y-chromosome is a common feature of species with chromosomal sex determination. However, our understanding of why some lineages frequently lose Y-chromosomes while others do not is limited. The fragile Y hypothesis proposes that in species with chiasmatic meiosis the rate of Y-chromosome aneuploidy and the size of the recombining region have a negative correlation. The fragile Y hypothesis provides a number of novel insights not possible under traditional models. Specifically, increased rates of Y aneuploidy may impose positive selection for (i) gene movement off the Y; (ii) translocations and fusions which expand the recombining region; and (iii) alternative meiotic segregation mechanisms (achiasmatic or asynaptic). These insights as well as existing evidence for the frequency of Y-chromosome aneuploidy raise doubt about the prospects for long-term retention of the human Y-chromosome despite recent evidence for stable gene content in older non-recombining regions. PMID:26200104

  9. A role for Aurora C in the chromosomal passenger complex during human preimplantation embryo development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Santos, Margarida Avo; van de Werken, Christine; de Vries, Marieke; Jahr, Holger; Vromans, Martijn J. M.; Laven, Joop S. E.; Fauser, Bart C.; Kops, Geert J.; Lens, Susanne M.; Baart, Esther B.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Human embryos generated by IVF demonstrate a high incidence of chromosomal segregation errors during the cleavage divisions. To analyse underlying molecular mechanisms, we investigated the behaviour of the chromosomal passenger complex (CPC) in human oocytes and embryos. This important m

  10. Probing CENP-E function in chromosome dynamics using small molecule inhibitor syntelin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xia Ding; Tongge Zhu; Jiancun Zhang; Zhen Dou; Xuebiao Yao; Feng Yan; Phil Yao; Zhihong Yang; Weihong Wan; Xiwei Wang; Jing Liu; Xinjiao Gao; Ariane Abrieu

    2010-01-01

    @@ Dear Editor, Chromosome movements during mitosis are orchestrated primarily by the interaction of spindle microtubules with the kinetochore [1], the site for attachment of spindle microtubules to the centromere. The kinetochore has an active function in chromosomal segregation through microtubule-based motors located at or near it [1-2].

  11. Can topology reshape segregation patterns?

    CERN Document Server

    Gandica, Yerali; Carletti, Timoteo

    2015-01-01

    We consider a metapopulation version of the Schelling model of segregation over several complex networks and lattice. We show that the segregation process is topology independent and hence it is intrinsic to the individual tolerance. The role of the topology is to fix the places where the segregation patterns emerge. In addition we address the question of the time evolution of the segregation clusters, resulting from different dynamical regimes of a coarsening process, as a function of the tolerance parameter. We show that the underlying topology may alter the early stage of the coarsening process, once large values of the tolerance are used, while for lower ones a different mechanism is at work and it results to be topology independent.

  12. School Desegregation and Residential Segregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billingsley, Andrew; And Others

    1979-01-01

    This statement on school and residential segregation, signed by 38 educators and social scientists, was prepared for attorneys connected with litigation concerning the Dayton and Columbus school systems. (RLV)

  13. Applied thermodynamics: Grain boundary segregation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lejček, Pavel; Zheng, L.; Hofmann, S.; Šob, Mojmír

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 16, č. 3 (2014), s. 1462-1484. ISSN 1099-4300 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP108/12/0311; GA ČR GAP108/12/0144; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0068 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 ; RVO:68081723 Keywords : interfacial segregation * Gibbs energy of segregation * enthalpy * entropy * volume * grain boundaries * iron Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.502, year: 2014

  14. Residential Segregation in General Equilibrium

    OpenAIRE

    Bayer, Patrick; McMillan, Robert; Rueben, Kim

    2005-01-01

    This paper studies the causes and consequences of racial segregation using a new general equilibrium model that treats neighborhood compositions as endogenous. The model is estimated using unusually detailed restricted Census microdata covering the entire San Francisco Bay Area, and in combination with a rich array of econometric estimates, serves as a powerful tool for carrying out counterfactual simulations that shed light on the causes and consequences of segregation. In terms of causes, a...

  15. Heterogeneous Immigration, Segregation and Trade

    OpenAIRE

    Fabien Candau

    2011-01-01

    By introducing taste heterogeneity between mobile workers in a New Economic Geography (NEG) model where the housing price is the main driving force behind dispersion of workers we show that residential segregation and agglomeration are not the sole stable equilibria and that dispersion also emerges with trade liberalization. In addition we find that contrary to the Tiebout hypothesis where segregation is efficient, here it is the dispersed and mixed equilibrium which can be improving for all.

  16. Plasmid and chromosome partitioning: surprises from phylogeny

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerdes, Kenn; Møller-Jensen, Jakob; Bugge Jensen, Rasmus

    2000-01-01

    Plasmids encode partitioning genes (par) that are required for faithful plasmid segregation at cell division. Initially, par loci were identified on plasmids, but more recently they were also found on bacterial chromosomes. We present here a phylogenetic analysis of par loci from plasmids...... and chromosomes from prokaryotic organisms. All known plasmid-encoded par loci specify three components: a cis-acting centromere-like site and two trans-acting proteins that form a nucleoprotein complex at the centromere (i.e. the partition complex). The proteins are encoded by two genes in an operon...... that is autoregulated by the par-encoded proteins. In all cases, the upstream gene encodes an ATPase that is essential for partitioning. Recent cytological analyses indicate that the ATPases function as adaptors between a host-encoded component and the partition complex and thereby tether plasmids and chromosomal...

  17. School Segregation: The Case of Amsterdam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gramberg, Peter

    1998-01-01

    Deals with facets of school segregation in Amsterdam, a city in which two-thirds of youth have a non-native background. The role of residential segregation in the segregation of elementary schools and the importance of educational background in the segregation of secondary schools are discussed. There are implications for schooling in the United…

  18. A Revaluation of Indexes of Residential Segregation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winship, Christopher

    1977-01-01

    Shows that there are at least two different perspectives from which residential segregation can be examined. Segregation can be measured as it deviates from a situation of complete desegregation or in terms of a situation in which there is random segregation in the city. New criteria for indexes of residential segregation are developed. (Author/JM)

  19. Assignment of the structural gene for the third component of human complement to chromosome 19.

    OpenAIRE

    Whitehead, A. S.; Solomon, E; Chambers, S.; Bodmer, W F; Povey, S; Fey, G

    1982-01-01

    The third component of complement (C3) is synthesized and secreted by cultured human primary fibroblasts. A monoclonal antibody having specificity for an antigenic determinant carried by human but not mouse C3 was used to study the continued expression of human C3 in three panels of independently derived human-mouse somatic cell hybrids. Expression of the human product was shown to segregate with human chromosome 19 and with no other chromosome or group of chromosomes. A unique-sequence human...

  20. Variations in the association of papillomavirus E2 proteins with mitotic chromosomes

    OpenAIRE

    Jaquelline G de Oliveira; Colf, Leremy A.; Alison A McBride

    2006-01-01

    The E2 protein segregates episomal bovine papillomavirus (BPV) genomes to daughter cells by tethering them to mitotic chromosomes, thus ensuring equal distribution and retention of viral DNA. To date, only the BPV1 E2 protein has been shown to bind to mitotic chromosomes. We assessed the localization of 13 different animal and human E2 proteins from seven papillomavirus genera, and we show that most of them are stably bound to chromosomes throughout mitosis. Furthermore, in contrast to the ra...

  1. Differential Management of the Replication Terminus Regions of the Two Vibrio cholerae Chromosomes during Cell Division

    OpenAIRE

    Gaëlle Demarre; Elisa Galli; Leila Muresan; Evelyne Paly; Ariane David; Christophe Possoz; François-Xavier Barre

    2014-01-01

    The replication terminus region (Ter) of the unique chromosome of most bacteria locates at mid-cell at the time of cell division. In several species, this localization participates in the necessary coordination between chromosome segregation and cell division, notably for the selection of the division site, the licensing of the division machinery assembly and the correct alignment of chromosome dimer resolution sites. The genome of Vibrio cholerae, the agent of the deadly human disease choler...

  2. Segregation distortion in chicken and the evolutionary consequences of female meiotic drive in birds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Axelsson, Erik Gunnar; Albrechtsen, Anders; Van, A. P.;

    2010-01-01

    rapid evolution as a result of a conflict between driving centromeres and the rest of the genome; and (2) segregation patterns should be skewed near centromeres and telomeres. To test these predictions, we first analyze the molecular evolution of seven centromere-binding proteins in nine divergent bird...... species. We find strong evidence for positive selection in two genes, lending support to the genomic conflict hypothesis. Then, to directly test for the presence of segregation distortion, we also investigate the transmission of approximately 9000 single-nucleotide polymorphisms in 197 chicken families....... By simulating fair Mendelian meioses, we locate chromosomal regions with statistically significant transmission ratio distortion. One region is located near the centromere on chromosome 1 and a second region is located near the telomere on the p-arm of chromosome 1. Although these observations do not provide...

  3. Public School Segregation in Metropolitan Areas

    OpenAIRE

    Charles T. Clotfelter

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents measures of segregation in public schools for metropolitan areas. It shows that, not only are metropolitan areas very segregated, most of that segregation is due to racial disparities between districts rather than segregative patterns within districts. Metropolitan areas in the South and West tend to have larger districts, and thus feature less fragmentation by school district. Segregation at the metropolitan level appears to vary systematically with size, racial mix, and ...

  4. Occupational segregation of immigrant women in Spain

    OpenAIRE

    Coral del Río; Olga Alonso-Villar

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to analyze occupational segregation in the Spanish labor market from a gender and an immigration perspective. In doing so, several local and overall segregation measures are used. Our results suggest that immigrant women in Spain suffer a double segregation since segregation affects them to a greater extent than it does either native women or immigrant men. There are, however, remarkable discrepancies among the segregation of immigrant women depending on their region ...

  5. The two chromosomes of Vibrio cholerae are initiated at different time points in the cell cycle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Tue; Jensen, Rasmus Bugge; Skovgaard, Ole

    2007-01-01

    The bacterium Vibrio cholerae, the cause of the diarrhoeal disease cholera, has its genome divided between two chromosomes, a feature uncommon for bacteria. The two chromosomes are of different sizes and different initiator molecules control their replication independently. Using novel methods for...... approximately the same time and the average number of replication origins per cell is higher for chromosome I than for chromosome II. Analysis of cell-cycle parameters shows that chromosome replication and segregation is exceptionally fast in V. cholerae. The divided genome and delayed replication of chromosome...

  6. Elevated tolerance to aneuploidy in cancer cells: estimating the fitness effects of chromosome number alterations by in silico modelling of somatic genome evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valind, Anders; Jin, Yuesheng; Gisselsson, David

    2013-01-01

    An unbalanced chromosome number (aneuploidy) is present in most malignant tumours and has been attributed to mitotic mis-segregation of chromosomes. However, recent studies have shown a relatively high rate of chromosomal mis-segregation also in non-neoplastic human cells, while the frequency of aneuploid cells remains low throughout life in most normal tissues. This implies that newly formed aneuploid cells are subject to negative selection in healthy tissues and that attenuation of this selection could contribute to aneuploidy in cancer. To test this, we modelled cellular growth as discrete time branching processes, during which chromosome gains and losses were generated and their host cells subjected to selection pressures of various magnitudes. We then assessed experimentally the frequency of chromosomal mis-segregation as well as the prevalence of aneuploid cells in human non-neoplastic cells and in cancer cells. Integrating these data into our models allowed estimation of the fitness reduction resulting from a single chromosome copy number change to an average of ≈30% in normal cells. In comparison, cancer cells showed an average fitness reduction of only 6% (p = 0.0008), indicative of aneuploidy tolerance. Simulations based on the combined presence of chromosomal mis-segregation and aneuploidy tolerance reproduced distributions of chromosome aberrations in >400 cancer cases with higher fidelity than models based on chromosomal mis-segregation alone. Reverse engineering of aneuploid cancer cell development in silico predicted that aneuploidy intolerance is a stronger limiting factor for clonal expansion of aneuploid cells than chromosomal mis-segregation rate. In conclusion, our findings indicate that not only an elevated chromosomal mis-segregation rate, but also a generalised tolerance to novel chromosomal imbalances contribute to the genomic landscape of human tumours. PMID:23894657

  7. Radiation-induced chromosome breakages in bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meiosis and pollen fertility were studied in the M2 generation in four varieties of hexaploid wheat. Meiosis was characterized by the formation of interchange configurations, such as rings and chains of four chromosomes in several cells. Chromosomal aberrations showed linear relationship with gamma irradiation; 45 kR dose induced the highest chromosomal abnormalities. Most multivalents were interchange rings of four chromosomes. Translocations involving two pairs of homologous or nonhomologous chromosomes seemed to be higher in frequency than those involving more than two pairs of chromosomes. Anaphase abnormalities, such as laggards, bridges and fragments and unequal segregation of chromosomes, were frequently observed. Pollen fertility was considerably reduced in the M2 plants arising form the treatments of higher doses of gamma rays because of the induced chromosome interchanges. (author)

  8. Filament depolymerization can explain chromosome pulling during bacterial mitosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward J Banigan

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Chromosome segregation is fundamental to all cells, but the force-generating mechanisms underlying chromosome translocation in bacteria remain mysterious. Caulobacter crescentus utilizes a depolymerization-driven process in which a ParA protein structure elongates from the new cell pole, binds to a ParB-decorated chromosome, and then retracts via disassembly, pulling the chromosome across the cell. This poses the question of how a depolymerizing structure can robustly pull the chromosome that disassembles it. We perform Brownian dynamics simulations with a simple, physically consistent model of the ParABS system. The simulations suggest that the mechanism of translocation is "self-diffusiophoretic": by disassembling ParA, ParB generates a ParA concentration gradient so that the ParA concentration is higher in front of the chromosome than behind it. Since the chromosome is attracted to ParA via ParB, it moves up the ParA gradient and across the cell. We find that translocation is most robust when ParB binds side-on to ParA filaments. In this case, robust translocation occurs over a wide parameter range and is controlled by a single dimensionless quantity: the product of the rate of ParA disassembly and a characteristic relaxation time of the chromosome. This time scale measures the time it takes for the chromosome to recover its average shape after it is has been pulled. Our results suggest explanations for observed phenomena such as segregation failure, filament-length-dependent translocation velocity, and chromosomal compaction.

  9. Grain Boundary Segregation in Metals

    CERN Document Server

    Lejcek, Pavel

    2010-01-01

    Grain boundaries are important structural components of polycrystalline materials used in the vast majority of technical applications. Because grain boundaries form a continuous network throughout such materials, their properties may limit their practical use. One of the serious phenomena which evoke these limitations is the grain boundary segregation of impurities. It results in the loss of grain boundary cohesion and consequently, in brittle fracture of the materials. The current book deals with fundamentals of grain boundary segregation in metallic materials and its relationship to the grain boundary structure, classification and other materials properties.

  10. Chromosome polymorphism in a population of ceratitis capitata

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A morphological chromosomal polymorphism along with the observation of B chromosomes in a natural population of Ceratitis capitata is reported. A variability affecting the centromere size of chromosome 3 is described. The observed B chromosome is minute, heterochromatic and telocentric. The B chromosome was found in the male and female germ cells and it exhibited, in the males, intra-individual numerical variation with OB and IB cells, which suggested a mitotic instability. It was also found, in both sexes, in somatic cells (cerebral ganglia tissue). Only males transmitted the B chromosomes to the progeny. The high rate of transmission suggested a differential utilization of the sperm carrying the B chromosomes or a preferential segregation into secondary spermatocytes. Previously reported linkage relationship between a pupal esterase gene (Est-1) and a pupa colour mutant (nig) has been extended to a line carrying a Y-chromosome (Y,B) shorter than the one previously studied (Y,A). Furthermore, an elaborate crossing scheme has been devised in order to estimate the recombination distances between these two genes and a third one affecting pupal length (lp-1). It is concluded that all three genes are in the same linkage group but Est-1 is far from the other two. In turn, nig and lp-1 are separated by 14.9 map units. It is confirmed that genetic recombination does not regularly occur at high frequency in the male and this frequency is not increased by the varying length of the Y-chromosome. Refs, figs, tabs

  11. Natural Selection with Nuclear and Cytoplasmic Transmission. III. Joint Analysis of Segregation and Mtdna in Drosophila Melanogaster

    OpenAIRE

    Clark, A. G.; Lyckegaard, EMS.

    1988-01-01

    Despite the widespread use of mitochondrial DNA by evolutionary geneticists, relatively little effort has been spent assessing the magnitude of forces maintaining mtDNA sequence diversity. In this study the influence of cytoplasmic variation on viability in Drosophila was examined by analysis of second chromosome segregation. A factorial experiment with balancer chromosomes permitted the effects of cytoplasm and reciprocal crosses to be individually distinguished. The first test used six line...

  12. Linking Dichotomous Segregation with Multi-group Segregation: Weighted Segregation Ratios in Selected U. S. Metropolitan Areas

    OpenAIRE

    Hao, Lingxin; Fong, Eric

    2011-01-01

    The U. S. residential landscape is increasingly multi-racial and multi-ethnic, giving rise to the question of how to compare dichotomous segregation among multiple groups living in the same area. To address the problem in the existing dichotomous approach, which offers no common basis for comparing dichotomous segregation among multiple groups, this paper develops a weighted segregation ratio approach based on Theil's segregation index and its additive decomposability. This approach can be us...

  13. Sexual orientation, prejudice and segregation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Plug; D. Webbink; N. Martin

    2014-01-01

    This article examines whether gay and lesbian workers sort into tolerant occupations. With information on sexual orientation, prejudice, and occupational choice taken from Australian Twin Registers, we find that gays and lesbians shy away from prejudiced occupations. We show that our segregation res

  14. Nonequilibrium Segregation in Petroleum Reservoirs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shapiro, Alexander; Stenby, Erling Halfdan

    1999-01-01

    We analyse adsorption of a multicomponent mixture at high pressure on the basis of the potential theory of adsorption. The adsorbate is considered as a segregated mixture in the external field produced by a solid adsorbent. we derive an analytical equation for the thickness of a multicomponent fi...

  15. Why Our Schools Are Segregated

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothstein, Richard

    2013-01-01

    "Residential segregation's causes are both knowable and known," writes Richard Rothstein. According to Rothstein, those causes are "20th century federal, state, and local policies explicitly designed to separate the races." Even seasoned policymakers are convinced that the residential isolation of low-income black children…

  16. Linking integration and residential segregation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bolt, G.S.; Özüekren, A.S.; Phillips, Deborah

    2010-01-01

    In the introduction to this special issue of JEMS, we question the strong link which is often made between the integration of minority ethnic groups and their residential segregation. In the literature on neighbourhood effects, the residential concentration of minorities is seen as a major obstacle

  17. Gender Segregation: Separate but Effective?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holthouse, David

    2010-01-01

    In 2002, only 11 public schools in the United States had gender-segregated classrooms. As of December 2009, there were more than 550. The movement is based on the hypothesis that hard-wired differences in the ways that male and female brains develop and function in childhood through adolescence require classrooms in which boys and girls are not…

  18. Fetal chromosome analysis: screening for chromosome disease?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Philip, J; Tabor, Ann; Bang, J;

    1983-01-01

    A + B). Pregnant women 35 years of age, women who previously had a chromosomally abnormal child, families with translocation carriers or other heritable chromosomal disease, families where the father was 50 years or more and women in families with a history of Down's syndrome (group A), were...... unbalanced chromosome abnormality in group A (women with elevated risk) is significantly higher than in group B + C (women without elevated risk) (relative risk 2.4). Women with a known familial translocation and women 40 years or more have a relative risk of 5.7 of having an unbalanced chromosome......The aim of the study was to investigate the rationale of the current indications for fetal chromosome analysis. 5372 women had 5423 amniocentesis performed, this group constituting a consecutive sample at the chromosome laboratory, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen from March 1973 to September 1980 (Group...

  19. Stretching the rules: monocentric chromosomes with multiple centromere domains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel Neumann

    Full Text Available The centromere is a functional chromosome domain that is essential for faithful chromosome segregation during cell division and that can be reliably identified by the presence of the centromere-specific histone H3 variant CenH3. In monocentric chromosomes, the centromere is characterized by a single CenH3-containing region within a morphologically distinct primary constriction. This region usually spans up to a few Mbp composed mainly of centromere-specific satellite DNA common to all chromosomes of a given species. In holocentric chromosomes, there is no primary constriction; the centromere is composed of many CenH3 loci distributed along the entire length of a chromosome. Using correlative fluorescence light microscopy and high-resolution electron microscopy, we show that pea (Pisum sativum chromosomes exhibit remarkably long primary constrictions that contain 3-5 explicit CenH3-containing regions, a novelty in centromere organization. In addition, we estimate that the size of the chromosome segment delimited by two outermost domains varies between 69 Mbp and 107 Mbp, several factors larger than any known centromere length. These domains are almost entirely composed of repetitive DNA sequences belonging to 13 distinct families of satellite DNA and one family of centromeric retrotransposons, all of which are unevenly distributed among pea chromosomes. We present the centromeres of Pisum as novel "meta-polycentric" functional domains. Our results demonstrate that the organization and DNA composition of functional centromere domains can be far more complex than previously thought, do not require single repetitive elements, and do not require single centromere domains in order to segregate properly. Based on these findings, we propose Pisum as a useful model for investigation of centromere architecture and the still poorly understood role of repetitive DNA in centromere evolution, determination, and function.

  20. Stretching the rules: monocentric chromosomes with multiple centromere domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Pavel; Navrátilová, Alice; Schroeder-Reiter, Elizabeth; Koblížková, Andrea; Steinbauerová, Veronika; Chocholová, Eva; Novák, Petr; Wanner, Gerhard; Macas, Jiří

    2012-01-01

    The centromere is a functional chromosome domain that is essential for faithful chromosome segregation during cell division and that can be reliably identified by the presence of the centromere-specific histone H3 variant CenH3. In monocentric chromosomes, the centromere is characterized by a single CenH3-containing region within a morphologically distinct primary constriction. This region usually spans up to a few Mbp composed mainly of centromere-specific satellite DNA common to all chromosomes of a given species. In holocentric chromosomes, there is no primary constriction; the centromere is composed of many CenH3 loci distributed along the entire length of a chromosome. Using correlative fluorescence light microscopy and high-resolution electron microscopy, we show that pea (Pisum sativum) chromosomes exhibit remarkably long primary constrictions that contain 3-5 explicit CenH3-containing regions, a novelty in centromere organization. In addition, we estimate that the size of the chromosome segment delimited by two outermost domains varies between 69 Mbp and 107 Mbp, several factors larger than any known centromere length. These domains are almost entirely composed of repetitive DNA sequences belonging to 13 distinct families of satellite DNA and one family of centromeric retrotransposons, all of which are unevenly distributed among pea chromosomes. We present the centromeres of Pisum as novel "meta-polycentric" functional domains. Our results demonstrate that the organization and DNA composition of functional centromere domains can be far more complex than previously thought, do not require single repetitive elements, and do not require single centromere domains in order to segregate properly. Based on these findings, we propose Pisum as a useful model for investigation of centromere architecture and the still poorly understood role of repetitive DNA in centromere evolution, determination, and function. PMID:22737088

  1. Spatial Stream Segregation by Cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javier, Lauren K; McGuire, Elizabeth A; Middlebrooks, John C

    2016-06-01

    Listeners can perceive interleaved sequences of sounds from two or more sources as segregated streams. In humans, physical separation of sound sources is a major factor enabling such stream segregation. Here, we examine spatial stream segregation with a psychophysical measure in domestic cats. Cats depressed a pedal to initiate a target sequence of brief sound bursts in a particular rhythm and then released the pedal when the rhythm changed. The target bursts were interleaved with a competing sequence of bursts that could differ in source location but otherwise were identical to the target bursts. This task was possible only when the sources were heard as segregated streams. When the sound bursts had broad spectra, cats could detect the rhythm change when target and competing sources were separated by as little as 9.4°. Essentially equal levels of performance were observed when frequencies were restricted to a high, 4-to-25-kHz, band in which the principal spatial cues presumably were related to sound levels. When the stimulus band was restricted from 0.4 to 1.6 kHz, leaving interaural time differences as the principal spatial cue, performance was severely degraded. The frequency sensitivity of cats in this task contrasts with that of humans, who show better spatial stream segregation with low- than with high-frequency sounds. Possible explanations for the species difference includes the smaller interaural delays available to cats due to smaller sizes of their heads and the potentially greater sound-level cues available due to the cat's frontally directed pinnae and higher audible frequency range. PMID:26993807

  2. The Geographic Scale of Metropolitan Racial Segregation

    OpenAIRE

    Reardon, Sean F.; Matthews, Stephen A.; O’Sullivan, David; Lee, Barrett A.; Firebaugh, Glenn; Farrell, Chad R.; BISCHOFF, KENDRA

    2008-01-01

    This article addresses an aspect of racial residential segregation that has been largely ignored in prior work: the issue of geographic scale. In some metropolitan areas, racial groups are segregated over large regions, with predominately white regions, predominately black regions, and so on, whereas in other areas, the separation of racial groups occurs over much shorter distances. Here we develop an approach—featuring the segregation profile and the corresponding macro/micro segregation rat...

  3. Measuring segregation: an activity space approach

    OpenAIRE

    Wong, David W. S.; Shaw, Shih-Lung

    2011-01-01

    While the literature clearly acknowledges that individuals may experience different levels of segregation across their various socio-geographical spaces, most measures of segregation are intended to be used in the residential space. Using spatially aggregated data to evaluate segregation in the residential space has been the norm and thus individual’s segregation experiences in other socio-geographical spaces are often de-emphasized or ignored. This paper attempts to provide a more comprehens...

  4. Is Segregation Bad for Your Health?

    OpenAIRE

    Kramer, Michael R; Hogue, Carol R.

    2009-01-01

    For decades, racial residential segregation has been observed to vary with health outcomes for African Americans, although only recently has interest increased in the public health literature. Utilizing a systematic review of the health and social science literature, the authors consider the segregation-health association through the lens of 4 questions of interest to epidemiologists: How is segregation best measured? Is the segregation-health association socially or biologically plausible? W...

  5. Chromosomal duplication strains of Aspergillus nidulans and their instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strains of Aspergillus nidulans with chromosomal duplication were obtained after gamma irradiation followed by crossing of the translocated strains with normal strains. From 20 analysed colonies, 12 have shown translocations induced by irradiation. Segregants from four of these translocation strains crossed to normal strains have shown to be unstable although presenting normal morphology. Two segregants were genetically analysed. The first one has shown a duplication of part of linkage groups VIII and the second one presented a duplication of a segment of linkage group V. These new duplication strains in A. nidulans open new perspectives of a more detailed study of the instability phenomenon in this fungus. (Author)

  6. 18 CFR 401.113 - Segregable materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Segregable materials. 401.113 Section 401.113 Conservation of Power and Water Resources DELAWARE RIVER BASIN COMMISSION... Segregable materials. Any reasonably segregable portion of a record shall be provided to any...

  7. 17 CFR 31.12 - Segregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Segregation. 31.12 Section 31....12 Segregation. (a) Any person that accepts leverage customer funds from a leverage customer to enter.... Notwithstanding the foregoing, a leverage transaction merchant may exclude from its segregation...

  8. A cohesin-based structural platform supporting homologous chromosome pairing in meiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Da-Qiao; Haraguchi, Tokuko; Hiraoka, Yasushi

    2016-08-01

    The pairing and recombination of homologous chromosomes during the meiotic prophase is necessary for the accurate segregation of chromosomes in meiosis. However, the mechanism by which homologous chromosomes achieve this pairing has remained an open question. Meiotic cohesins have been shown to affect chromatin compaction; however, the impact of meiotic cohesins on homologous pairing and the fine structures of cohesion-based chromatin remain to be determined. A recent report using live-cell imaging and super-resolution microscopy demonstrated that the lack of meiotic cohesins alters the chromosome axis structures and impairs the pairing of homologous chromosomes. These results suggest that meiotic cohesin-based chromosome axis structures are crucial for the pairing of homologous chromosomes. PMID:26856595

  9. Filament depolymerization can pull a chromosome during bacterial mitosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banigan, Edward; Gelbart, Michael; Gitai, Zemer; Liu, Andrea; Wingreen, Ned

    2011-03-01

    Chromosome segregation is fundamental to all cells, but the force-generating mechanisms underlying chromosome translocation in bacteria remain mysterious. Caulobacter crescentus utilizes a depolymerization-driven process in which a ParA protein structure elongates from the new cell pole and binds to a ParB-decorated chromosome, and then retracts via disassembly, thus pulling the chromosome across the cell. This poses the question of how a depolymerizing structure can robustly pull the chromosome that is disassembling it. We perform Brownian dynamics simulations with a simple and physically consistent model of the ParABS system. The simulations suggest that the mechanism of translocation is ``self-diffusiophoretic'': by disassembling ParA, ParB generates a ParA concentration gradient so that the concentration of ParA is higher in front of the chromosome than behind it. Since the chromosome is attracted to ParA via ParB, it moves up the ParA gradient and across the cell. We find that translocation is controlled by the product of an effective relaxation time for the chromosome and the rate of ParA disassembly. Our results provide a physical explanation of the mechanism of depolymerization-driven translocation and suggest physical explanations for recent experimental observations.

  10. Development of a novel HAC-based "gain of signal" quantitative assay for measuring chromosome instability (CIN) in cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Jung Hyun; Lee, Hee Sheung; Lee, Nicholas C.O.; Goncharov, Nikolay V.; Kumeiko, Vadim; Masumoto, Hiroshi; Earnshaw, William C.; Kouprina, Natalay; Larionov, Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating data indicates that chromosome instability (CIN) common to cancer cells can be used as a target for cancer therapy. At present the rate of chromosome mis-segregation is quantified by laborious techniques such as coupling clonal cell analysis with karyotyping or fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Recently, a novel assay was developed based on the loss of a non-essential human artificial chromosome (HAC) carrying a constitutively expressed EGFP transgene ("loss of signal" a...

  11. Sgo1 Regulates Both Condensin and Ipl1/Aurora B to Promote Chromosome Biorientation

    OpenAIRE

    Peplowska, K.; Wallek, A.; Storchova, Z.

    2014-01-01

    Correct chromosome segregation is essential in order to prevent aneuploidy. To segregate sister chromatids equally to daughter cells, the sisters must attach to microtubules emanating from opposite spindle poles. This so-called biorientation manifests itself by increased tension and conformational changes across kinetochores and pericentric chromatin. Tensionless attachments are dissolved by the activity of the conserved mitotic kinase Aurora B/Ipl1, thereby promoting the formation of correct...

  12. On the dynamics of segregation

    OpenAIRE

    Jofre-Monseny, Jordi; Dahlberg, Matz; Fredriksson, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Card et al (2008a) formalize a model of ethnic residential segregation where an ethnically mixed neighborhood is dynamically stable until its minority share reaches a threshold (the tipping point). Once the neighborhood has surpassed the tipping point, it will experience massive white flight. These authors propose methods to identify tipping points and, using population counts at the US Census tract level, find that tipping is a salient feature of neighborhood dynamics. The objective of this ...

  13. Chromosome painting in plants.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schubert, I.; Fransz, P.F.; Fuchs, J.; Jong, de J.H.

    2001-01-01

    The current 'state-of-art' as to chromosome painting in plants is reviewed. We define different situations described as painting so far: i) Genomic in situ hybridisation (GISH) with total genomic DNA to distinguish alien chromosomes on the basis of divergent dispersed repeats, ii) 'Chromosomal in si

  14. Chromosome anomalies in mouse oocytes after irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigated the cytogenetic effects of X-rays on unfertilized mouse oocytes. NMRI females received an irradiation with 0, 22.2, 66.6, 200, and 600 R during the preovulatory phase 3 hrs after HCG (human chorionic gonadotrophin). This is a stage during oogenesis in which the oocytes pass from late dictyotene to diakinesis. Chromosome anlysis was per formed after ovulation at metaphase II. From these experiments we can draw the following conclusions: X-rays induced during the preovulatory phase a high number of chromosome anomalies. Among these, structural anomalies prevail. 7 out of 144 ovulated oocytes in matched controls carried such an abnormality, whereas after irradiation we observed with 22.2, 66.6, 200, and 600 R, 11 out of 72, 34 out of 108, 89 out of 102, and 122 out of 124, respectively. Irradiation seems also to affect the chromosome segregation during the 1. meiotic division, as we observed after 22.2, 66.6 and 200 R a total of 6 oocytes out of 204 with a supernummary chromosome. In controls, however, no hyperploidy was found in 143 ova. This increase, however, was not significant. Chromosome anomalies, e.g. breaks and deletions that go back to a one-break event increased linearly with increasing dose. Exchanges, however, going back to two-break events fittet best to the linear-quadratic dose-response model. The dose of 600 R seems to represent a kind of borderline in this experiment, because nearly all (122 out 124) carried at least one structural chromosome anomaly. It is also this dose after which the highest frequency of reciprocal translocations was observed in a humpshaped slope in spermatocytes after irradiation of spermatogonia (Preston and Brewen, 1973). With an increasing dosage up to 1,200 R the frequency of translocations decrease again. The elimination of cells, crossing this borderline, might be due to genetic or non-genetic effects. (orig./GSE)

  15. Chromosome sites play dual roles to establish homologous synapsisduring meiosis in C. elegans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacQueen, Amy J.; Phillips, Carolyn M.; Bhalla, Needhi; Weiser,Pinky; Villeneuve, Anne M.; Dernburg, Abby F.

    2005-06-05

    required for accurate segregation of homologous chromosomesduring meiosisin C. elegans. We find that these sites play two distinctroles that contribute to proper segregation. Chromosomes lacking PCsusually fail to synapse and also lack a synapsis-independentstabilization activity. The presence of a PC on justone copy of achromosome pair promotes synapsis but does not supportsynapsis-independent pairing stabilization, indicating that thesefunctions are separable. Once initiated, synapsis is highly processive,even between non homologous chromosomes of disparate lengths, elucidatinghow translocations suppress meiotic recombination in C. elegans. Thesefindings suggest a multistep pathway for chromosome synapsis in which PCsimpart selectivity and efficiency through a kinetic proofreadingmechanism. We speculate that concentration of these activities at oneregion per chromosome may have co-evolved with the loss of a pointcentromere to safeguard karyotype stability.

  16. Chiasmata promote monopolar attachment of sister chromatids and their co-segregation toward the proper pole during meiosis I.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yukinobu Hirose

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The chiasma is a structure that forms between a pair of homologous chromosomes by crossover recombination and physically links the homologous chromosomes during meiosis. Chiasmata are essential for the attachment of the homologous chromosomes to opposite spindle poles (bipolar attachment and their subsequent segregation to the opposite poles during meiosis I. However, the overall function of chiasmata during meiosis is not fully understood. Here, we show that chiasmata also play a crucial role in the attachment of sister chromatids to the same spindle pole and in their co-segregation during meiosis I in fission yeast. Analysis of cells lacking chiasmata and the cohesin protector Sgo1 showed that loss of chiasmata causes frequent bipolar attachment of sister chromatids during anaphase. Furthermore, high time-resolution analysis of centromere dynamics in various types of chiasmate and achiasmate cells, including those lacking the DNA replication checkpoint factor Mrc1 or the meiotic centromere protein Moa1, showed the following three outcomes: (i during the pre-anaphase stage, the bipolar attachment of sister chromatids occurs irrespective of chiasma formation; (ii the chiasma contributes to the elimination of the pre-anaphase bipolar attachment; and (iii when the bipolar attachment remains during anaphase, the chiasmata generate a bias toward the proper pole during poleward chromosome pulling that results in appropriate chromosome segregation. Based on these results, we propose that chiasmata play a pivotal role in the selection of proper attachments and provide a backup mechanism that promotes correct chromosome segregation when improper attachments remain during anaphase I.

  17. Chimpanzee chromosome 12 is homologous to human chromosome 2q

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, N. C.; Sun, C. R.Y.; Ho, T.

    1977-01-01

    Most of the 46 human chromosomes find their counterparts in the 48 chimpanzee chromosomes except for chromosome 2 which has been hypothesized to have been derived from a centric fusion of two chimpanzee acrocentric chromosomes. These two chromosomes correspond to the human chromosomes 2p and 2g. This conclusion is based primarily on chromosome banding techniques, and the somatic cell hybridization technique has also been used. (HLW)

  18. Numerical chromosomal instability mediates susceptibility to radiation treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhoum, Samuel F.; Kabeche, Lilian; Wood, Matthew D.; Laucius, Christopher D.; Qu, Dian; Laughney, Ashley M.; Reynolds, Gloria E.; Louie, Raymond J.; Phillips, Joanna; Chan, Denise A.; Zaki, Bassem I.; Murnane, John P.; Petritsch, Claudia; Compton, Duane A.

    2015-01-01

    The exquisite sensitivity of mitotic cancer cells to ionizing radiation (IR) underlies an important rationale for the widely used fractionated radiation therapy. However, the mechanism for this cell cycle-dependent vulnerability is unknown. Here we show that treatment with IR leads to mitotic chromosome segregation errors in vivo and long-lasting aneuploidy in tumour-derived cell lines. These mitotic errors generate an abundance of micronuclei that predispose chromosomes to subsequent catastrophic pulverization thereby independently amplifying radiation-induced genome damage. Experimentally suppressing whole-chromosome missegregation reduces downstream chromosomal defects and significantly increases the viability of irradiated mitotic cells. Further, orthotopically transplanted human glioblastoma tumours in which chromosome missegregation rates have been reduced are rendered markedly more resistant to IR, exhibiting diminished markers of cell death in response to treatment. This work identifies a novel mitotic pathway for radiation-induced genome damage, which occurs outside of the primary nucleus and augments chromosomal breaks. This relationship between radiation treatment and whole-chromosome missegregation can be exploited to modulate therapeutic response in a clinically relevant manner. PMID:25606712

  19. GRAIN BOUNDARY SEGREGATIONS AND HYDROGEN EMBRITTLEMENT

    OpenAIRE

    Aucouturier, M.

    1982-01-01

    The relation between grain boundary segregation and hydrogen embrittlement of metals may be discussed from two stand points : 1°) Hydrogen has a strong tendency to segregate in structure defects, among them, in grain boundaries. Hydrogen segregation controls the properties of hydrogenated materials in many cases (hydrogen diffusion, hydrogen induced cracking, electrical properties in semiconductors, etc) and more precisely their mechanical behaviour (embrittlement itself). 2°) The occurence o...

  20. Gender segregation : from birth to occupation

    OpenAIRE

    Ruiz-Castillo, Javier; Mora, Ricardo

    2003-01-01

    Most of the existing literature studies the gender segregation induced by occupational choices in the employed population. This paper also studies the segregation induced by age/education characteristics and labor market participation decisions in the population consisting of non-students of working age. The gender segregation index used, related to the entropy notion in information theory, is additively decomposable for any partition and it has a commutability property. The em...

  1. From particle segregation to the granular clock

    OpenAIRE

    Lambiotte, R.; Salazar, J. M.; Brenig, L.

    2005-01-01

    Recently several authors studied the segregation of particles for a system composed of mono-dispersed inelastic spheres contained in a box divided by a wall in the middle. The system exhibited a symmetry breaking leading to an overpopulation of particles in one side of the box. Here we study the segregation of a mixture of particles composed of inelastic hard spheres and fluidized by a vibrating wall. Our numerical simulations show a rich phenomenology: horizontal segregation and periodic beh...

  2. Social Exclusion: Residential Segregation in Bolivian Cities

    OpenAIRE

    George Gray-Molina; Wilson Jimenez; Ernesto Perez de Rada

    2002-01-01

    This study analyzes the impact of ethnic-based residential segregation on income and education outcomes in Bolivian cities. Three results stand out in the analysis. First, we find significant and negative segregation effects on income generation in both across-city and intra-city comparisons. Second, we find individual and neighborhood-level interactions between ethnicity and segregation to be significantly and negatively correlated with income and schooling attainment. Finally, we find posit...

  3. The Spatial Context of Residential Segregation

    OpenAIRE

    Roberto, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Residential segregation is defined in a variety of ways to address a common concern: to what extent do social groups reside in separate or distinct places. The spatial pattern of segregation varies widely across cities, and distinct spatial patterns can be generated by different mechanisms and have different consequences for residents and their communities. However, the methods commonly employed to measure segregation ignore how a city is spatially organized. They do not take into account the...

  4. Segregation and Urban Unrest in Sweden

    OpenAIRE

    Malmberg, Bo; Eva, Andersson; Östh, John

    2013-01-01

    In 2009, Sweden experienced a wave of urban unrest concentrated in areas with large foreign-born populations. This episode was seen by many as reflecting a trend towards increased ethnically based residential segregation, in line with scholarly literatures that correlate inequality and rising segregation with increases in unrest or rebellion. In this paper, we analyze the empirical connection between ethnic residential segregation and episodes of urban unrest in Sweden. Unrest is measured by ...

  5. Socio-spatial lifestyles and segregation

    OpenAIRE

    Izhak, Schnell; Yoav, Benjamini

    1999-01-01

    The paper suggests an alternative index for socio-spatial segregation which emphasises agents’ segregation in everyday life. We argue that segregation should be studied for individual agents in respect to the spaces in which they perform their everyday life. The index refers both to the spatial and the social-interactive contexts of seven aspects (home, cluster of neighbouring homes, neighbourhood and city in the spatial context and friends, work and leisure activities in the social context) ...

  6. DIFFUSION AND EQUILIBRIUM SEGREGATION IN GRAIN BOUNDARIES : EFFECTS OF LARGE SEGREGATION

    OpenAIRE

    Bernardini, J.; Cabane, F.

    1985-01-01

    From recent experiments in binary and ternary solid solutions, we discuss the determination of grain boundary diffusion coefficients, some structural aspects of diffusion and segregation and the influence of segregation on impurity diffusion.

  7. From particle segregation to the granular clock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lambiotte, R. [Physique Statistique, Plasmas et Optique Non-lineaire, Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Campus Plaine, Boulevard du Triomphe, Code Postal 231, 1050 Brussels (Belgium)]. E-mail: rlambiot@ulb.ac.be; Salazar, J.M. [Universite De Bougogne-LRRS UMR-5613 CNRS, Faculte des Sciences Mirande, 9 Av. Alain Savary, 21078 Dijon Cedex (France)]. E-mail: jmarcos@u-bourgogne.fr; Brenig, L. [Physique Statistique, Plasmas et Optique Non-lineaire, Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Campus Plaine, Boulevard du Triomphe, Code Postal 231, 1050 Brussels (Belgium)]. E-mail: lbrenig@ulb.ac.be

    2005-08-01

    Recently several authors studied the segregation of particles for a system composed of mono-dispersed inelastic spheres contained in a box divided by a wall in the middle. The system exhibited a symmetry breaking leading to an overpopulation of particles in one side of the box. Here we study the segregation of a mixture of particles composed of inelastic hard spheres and fluidized by a vibrating wall. Our numerical simulations show a rich phenomenology: horizontal segregation and periodic behavior. We also propose an empirical system of ODEs representing the proportion of each type of particles and the segregation flux of particles. These equations reproduce the major features observed by the simulations.

  8. A Social Network Analysis of Occupational Segregation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buhai, Ioan Sebastian; van der Leij, Marco

    We develop a social network model of occupational segregation between different social groups, generated by the existence of positive inbreeding bias among individuals from the same group. If network referrals are important for job search, then expected homophily in the contact network structure...... social welfare optima. Surprisingly, we find that socially optimal policies involve segregation....... induces different career choices for individuals from different social groups. This further translates into stable occupational segregation equilibria in the labor market. We derive the conditions for wage and unemployment inequality in the segregation equilibria and characterize first and second best...

  9. From particle segregation to the granular clock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently several authors studied the segregation of particles for a system composed of mono-dispersed inelastic spheres contained in a box divided by a wall in the middle. The system exhibited a symmetry breaking leading to an overpopulation of particles in one side of the box. Here we study the segregation of a mixture of particles composed of inelastic hard spheres and fluidized by a vibrating wall. Our numerical simulations show a rich phenomenology: horizontal segregation and periodic behavior. We also propose an empirical system of ODEs representing the proportion of each type of particles and the segregation flux of particles. These equations reproduce the major features observed by the simulations

  10. Housing Systems and Ethnic Spatial Segregation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Hans Skifter; Andersson, Roger; Wessel, Terje;

    Residential spatial segregation is related to housing markets and housing policies. In this paper, ethnic segregation is compared across four Nordic capitals and explanations for the differences are examined by comparing the housing markets and housing policies of the countries. The housing markets...... composition of neighbourhoods. Ethnic segmentation of housing tenures thus contributes to segregation, but the effect is much dependent on how tenures are distributed across space. In one of the cities, the policy of neighbourhood tenure mix has resulted in a relatively low degree of segregation in spite of...

  11. Embryonic hybrid cells: a powerful tool for studying pluripotency and reprogramming of the differentiated cell chromosomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SEROV OLEG

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The properties of embryonic hybrid cells obtained by fusion of embryonic stem (ES or teratocarcinoma (TC cells with differentiated cells are reviewed. Usually, ES-somatic or TC-somatic hybrids retain pluripotent capacity at high levels quite comparable or nearly identical with those of the pluripotent partner. When cultured in vitro, ES-somatic- and TC-somatic hybrid cell clones, as a rule, lose the chromosomes derived from the somatic partner; however, in some clones the autosomes from the ES cell partner were also eliminated, i.e. the parental chromosomes segregated bilaterally in the ES-somatic cell hybrids. This opens up ways for searching correlation between the pluripotent status of the hybrid cells and chromosome segregation patterns and therefore for identifying the particular chromosomes involved in the maintenance of pluripotency. Use of selective medium allows to isolate in vitro the clones of ES-somatic hybrid cells in which "the pluripotent" chromosome can be replaced by "the somatic" counterpart carrying the selectable gene. Unlike the TC-somatic cell hybrids, the ES-somatic hybrids with a near-diploid complement of chromosomes are able to contribute to various tissues of chimeric animals after injection into the blastocoel cavity. Analysis of the chimeric animals showed that the "somatic" chromosome undergoes reprogramming during development. The prospects for the identification of the chromosomes that are involved in the maintenance of pluripotency and its cis- and trans-regulation in the hybrid cell genome are discussed.

  12. Phosphorylation of chromosome core components may serve as axis marks for the status of chromosomal events during mammalian meiosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoyuki Fukuda

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Meiotic recombination and chromosome synapsis between homologous chromosomes are essential for proper chromosome segregation at the first meiotic division. While recombination and synapsis, as well as checkpoints that monitor these two events, take place in the context of a prophase I-specific axial chromosome structure, it remains unclear how chromosome axis components contribute to these processes. We show here that many protein components of the meiotic chromosome axis, including SYCP2, SYCP3, HORMAD1, HORMAD2, SMC3, STAG3, and REC8, become post-translationally modified by phosphorylation during the prophase I stage. We found that HORMAD1 and SMC3 are phosphorylated at a consensus site for the ATM/ATR checkpoint kinase and that the phosphorylated forms of HORMAD1 and SMC3 localize preferentially to unsynapsed chromosomal regions where synapsis has not yet occurred, but not to synapsed or desynapsed regions. We investigated the genetic requirements for the phosphorylation events and revealed that the phosphorylation levels of HORMAD1, HORMAD2, and SMC3 are dramatically reduced in the absence of initiation of meiotic recombination, whereas BRCA1 and SYCP3 are required for normal levels of phosphorylation of HORMAD1 and HORMAD2, but not of SMC3. Interestingly, reduced HORMAD1 and HORMAD2 phosphorylation is associated with impaired targeting of the MSUC (meiotic silencing of unsynapsed chromatin machinery to unsynapsed chromosomes, suggesting that these post-translational events contribute to the regulation of the synapsis surveillance system. We propose that modifications of chromosome axis components serve as signals that facilitate chromosomal events including recombination, checkpoint control, transcription, and synapsis regulation.

  13. Orderly Replication and Segregation of the Four Replicons of Burkholderia cenocepacia J2315.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Wen-Li; Dubarry, Nelly; Passot, Fanny M; Kamgoué, Alain; Murray, Heath; Lane, David; Pasta, Franck

    2016-07-01

    Bacterial genomes typically consist of a single chromosome and, optionally, one or more plasmids. But whole-genome sequencing reveals about ten per-cent of them to be multipartite, with additional replicons which by size and indispensability are considered secondary chromosomes. This raises the questions of how their replication and partition is managed without compromising genome stability and of how such genomes arose. Vibrio cholerae, with a 1 Mb replicon in addition to its 3 Mb chromosome, is the only species for which maintenance of a multipartite genome has been investigated. In this study we have explored the more complex genome of Burkholderia cenocepacia (strain J2315). It comprises an extra replicon (c2) of 3.21 Mb, comparable in size to the3.87Mb main chromosome (c1), another extra replicon(c3) of 0.87 Mb and a plasmid of 0.09 Mb. The replication origin of c1 is typically chromosomal and those of c2 and c3 are plasmid-like; all are replicated bidirectionally. Fluorescence microscopy of tagged origins indicates that all initiate replication at mid-cell and segregate towards the cell quarter positions sequentially, c1-c2-p1/c3. c2 segregation is as well-phased with the cell cycle as c1, implying that this plasmid-like origin has become subject to regulation not typical of plasmids; in contrast, c3 segregates more randomly through the cycle. Disruption of individual Par systems by deletion of parAB or by addition of parS sites showed each Par system to govern the positioning of its own replicon only. Inactivation of c1, c2 and c3 Par systems not only reduced growth rate, generated anucleate cells and compromised viability but influenced processes beyond replicon partition, notably regulation of replication, chromosome condensation and cell size determination. In particular, the absence of the c1 ParA protein altered replication of all three chromosomes, suggesting that the partition system of the main chromosome is a major participant in the choreography of

  14. Orderly Replication and Segregation of the Four Replicons of Burkholderia cenocepacia J2315.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Li Du

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial genomes typically consist of a single chromosome and, optionally, one or more plasmids. But whole-genome sequencing reveals about ten per-cent of them to be multipartite, with additional replicons which by size and indispensability are considered secondary chromosomes. This raises the questions of how their replication and partition is managed without compromising genome stability and of how such genomes arose. Vibrio cholerae, with a 1 Mb replicon in addition to its 3 Mb chromosome, is the only species for which maintenance of a multipartite genome has been investigated. In this study we have explored the more complex genome of Burkholderia cenocepacia (strain J2315. It comprises an extra replicon (c2 of 3.21 Mb, comparable in size to the3.87Mb main chromosome (c1, another extra replicon(c3 of 0.87 Mb and a plasmid of 0.09 Mb. The replication origin of c1 is typically chromosomal and those of c2 and c3 are plasmid-like; all are replicated bidirectionally. Fluorescence microscopy of tagged origins indicates that all initiate replication at mid-cell and segregate towards the cell quarter positions sequentially, c1-c2-p1/c3. c2 segregation is as well-phased with the cell cycle as c1, implying that this plasmid-like origin has become subject to regulation not typical of plasmids; in contrast, c3 segregates more randomly through the cycle. Disruption of individual Par systems by deletion of parAB or by addition of parS sites showed each Par system to govern the positioning of its own replicon only. Inactivation of c1, c2 and c3 Par systems not only reduced growth rate, generated anucleate cells and compromised viability but influenced processes beyond replicon partition, notably regulation of replication, chromosome condensation and cell size determination. In particular, the absence of the c1 ParA protein altered replication of all three chromosomes, suggesting that the partition system of the main chromosome is a major participant in the

  15. Kaposi's sarcoma herpesvirus C-terminal LANA concentrates at pericentromeric and peri-telomeric regions of a subset of mitotic chromosomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA) tethers KSHV terminal repeat (TR) DNA to mitotic chromosomes to efficiently segregate episomes to progeny nuclei. LANA contains N- and C-terminal chromosome binding regions. We now show that C-terminal LANA preferentially concentrates to paired dots at pericentromeric and peri-telomeric regions of a subset of mitotic chromosomes through residues 996-1139. Deletions within C-terminal LANA abolished both self-association and chromosome binding, consistent with a requirement for self-association to bind chromosomes. A deletion abolishing TR DNA binding did not affect chromosome targeting, indicating LANA's localization is not due to binding its recognition sequence in chromosomal DNA. LANA distributed similarly on human and non-human mitotic chromosomes. These results are consistent with C-terminal LANA interacting with a cell factor that concentrates at pericentromeric and peri-telomeric regions of mitotic chromosomes

  16. PARTICLE SEGREGATION IN FLUIDIZED BINARY-MIXTURES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    HOFFMANN, AC; JANSSEN, LPBM

    1993-01-01

    The particle segregation in fluidised beds consisting of different types of binary mixtures is shown to be governed by the same particle transport processes. The segregation behaviour of both ''different-density mixtures'' and ''equal-density mixtures'', two types of system which until now largely h

  17. Losing Ground: School Segregation in Massachuestts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayscue, Jennifer B.; Greenberg, Alyssa

    2013-01-01

    Though once a leader in school integration, Massachusetts has regressed over the last two decades as its students of color have experienced intensifying school segregation. This report investigates trends in school segregation in Massachusetts by examining concentration, exposure, and evenness measures by both race and class. First, the report…

  18. 17 CFR 32.6 - Segregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Segregation. 32.6 Section 32.6 Commodity and Securities Exchanges COMMODITY FUTURES TRADING COMMISSION REGULATION OF COMMODITY OPTION TRANSACTIONS § 32.6 Segregation. (a) Any person which accepts money, securities, or property from an...

  19. 49 CFR 176.708 - Segregation distances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Segregation distances. 176.708 Section 176.708... Requirements for Radioactive Materials § 176.708 Segregation distances. (a) Table IV lists minimum separation... into account any relocation of cargo during the voyage. (e) Any departure from the...

  20. Ising, Schelling and Self-Organising Segregation

    CERN Document Server

    Stauffer, D

    2007-01-01

    The similarities between phase separation in physics and residential segregation by preference in the Schelling model of 1971 are reviewed. Also, new computer simulations of asymmetric interactions different from the usual Ising model are presented, showing spontaneous magnetisation (= self-organising segregation) and in one case a sharp phase transition.

  1. Measuring segregation: an activity space approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, David W. S.; Shaw, Shih-Lung

    2011-06-01

    While the literature clearly acknowledges that individuals may experience different levels of segregation across their various socio-geographical spaces, most measures of segregation are intended to be used in the residential space. Using spatially aggregated data to evaluate segregation in the residential space has been the norm and thus individual's segregation experiences in other socio-geographical spaces are often de-emphasized or ignored. This paper attempts to provide a more comprehensive approach in evaluating segregation beyond the residential space. The entire activity spaces of individuals are taken into account with individuals serving as the building blocks of the analysis. The measurement principle is based upon the exposure dimension of segregation. The proposed measure reflects the exposure of individuals of a referenced group in a neighborhood to the populations of other groups that are found within the activity spaces of individuals in the referenced group. Using the travel diary data collected from the tri-county area in southeast Florida and the imputed racial-ethnic data, this paper demonstrates how the proposed segregation measurement approach goes beyond just measuring population distribution patterns in the residential space and can provide a more comprehensive evaluation of segregation by considering various socio-geographical spaces.

  2. Residential Segregation: Challenge to White America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denton, Nancy A.

    1994-01-01

    Examines the problem of residential segregation and demonstrates that it is a problem of social structure. The author contends that residential segregation has affirmed the continued subordination of blacks in American society over the past 50 years. New leadership in the Department of Housing and Urban Development is viewed as a positive…

  3. UNUSUAL SEGREGATION BEHAVIOR OF BORON AND ITS EFFECT ON SEGREGATION OF SULFUR IN NICKEL

    OpenAIRE

    Ladna, B.; Birnbaum, H

    1988-01-01

    The co-segregation of B and S to the surface and grain boundaries of Ni was studied by SAES and SIMS. B showed an unusual segregation behavior wich resulted in the precipitation of Ni3B in the near surface layer and a continuous monolayer type B segregation at the grain boundary. The S segregation was not influenced by the presence of B and resulted in a uniform monolayer surface and grain boundary coverage. Analysis of hydrogen charged samples fractured in situ suggests that B segregated to ...

  4. PIASy Mediates SUMO-2/3 Conjugation of Poly(ADP-ribose) Polymerase 1 (PARP1) on Mitotic Chromosomes*

    OpenAIRE

    Ryu, Hyunju; Al-Ani, Gada; Deckert, Katelyn; Kirkpatrick, Donald; Gygi, Steven P.; Dasso, Mary; Azuma, Yoshiaki

    2010-01-01

    PIASy is a small ubiquitin-related modifier (SUMO) ligase that modifies chromosomal proteins in mitotic Xenopus egg extracts and plays an essential role in mitotic chromosome segregation. We have isolated a novel SUMO-2/3-modified mitotic chromosomal protein and identified it as poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1). PARP1 was robustly conjugated to SUMO-2/3 on mitotic chromosomes but not on interphase chromatin. PIASy promotes SUMOylation of PARP1 both in egg extracts and in vitro reconstitu...

  5. Cohesin SMC1 beta is required for meiotic chromosome dynamics, sister chromatid cohesion and DNA recombination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Revenkova, E.; Eijpe, M.; Heyting, C.; Hodges, C.A.; Hunt, P.A.; Liebe, B.; Scherthan, H.; Jessberger, R.

    2004-01-01

    Sister chromatid cohesion ensures the faithful segregation of chromosomes in mitosis and in both meiotic divisions1, 2, 3, 4. Meiosis-specific components of the cohesin complex, including the recently described SMC1 isoform SMC15, were suggested to be required for meiotic sister chromatid cohesion a

  6. Cosegregation of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and a fragile site on chromosome 16 in a large Italian family.

    OpenAIRE

    M. Ferraro; Scarton, G; Ambrosini, M

    1990-01-01

    We studied the karyotypes of 10 members of a family in whom hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is segregating as an autosomal dominant trait. In all those affected by the disease, a fragile site on the long arm of chromosome 16 was found, expressed with different frequencies, but the unaffected family members did not show this trait.

  7. Chromosomal mosaicism : underlying mechanisms and consequences for early human embryo development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    da Avó Ribeiro dos Santos, M.

    2013-01-01

    In humans, reproduction is considered a relatively inefficient process, when compared with other mammalian species and the chance of achieving a spontaneous pregnancy after timed intercourse is at the most 20-30%. Chromosome segregation errors are a well-known inherent feature of cell division in hu

  8. Global analysis of core histones reveals nucleosomal surfaces required for chromosome bi-orientation

    OpenAIRE

    Kawashima, Satoshi; Nakabayashi, Yu; Matsubara, Kazuko; Sano, Norihiko; Enomoto, Takemi; Tanaka, Kozo; Seki, Masayuki; Horikoshi, Masami

    2011-01-01

    Kinetochore assembly requires centromere-specific nucleosomes that contain the histone H3 variant CenH3, but less is known about the role of canonical histones in this process. This study reports on the function of histones H2A, H2B, H3, and H4 in chromosome segregation.

  9. The Spatial Context of Residential Segregation

    CERN Document Server

    Roberto, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Scholars have engaged in a longstanding debate about how best to measure residential segregation, and scores of indexes have been developed in response. However, the methods commonly employed are aspatial -- they summarize the characteristics of segregation patterns, such as concentration or clustering, but ignore their spatial features, such as how neighborhoods are spatially arranged. As a consequence, many studies find the same level of segregation whether a city has a patchwork of racial and ethnic enclaves, or is divided into large areas with little or no diversity. New methods have been developed to capture the spatial proximity of neighborhoods and the geographic scale of clustering. However, they lack a realistic measure of distance and do not accurately represent how segregation varies within cities. In this paper, I introduce a new method for studying the spatial context of residential segregation. I measure the distance between locations along city roads rather than in a straight line. Road distanc...

  10. On the Segregation of Dark Matter Substructure

    CERN Document Server

    Bosch, Frank C van den; Campbell, Duncan; Behroozi, Peter

    2015-01-01

    We present the first comprehensive analysis of the segregation of dark matter subhaloes in their host haloes. Using numerical simulations, we examine the segregation of twelve different subhalo properties with respect to both orbital energy and halo-centric radius (in real space as well as in projection). Subhaloes are strongly segregated by accretion redshift, which is an outcome of the inside-out assembly of their host haloes. Since subhaloes that were accreted earlier have experienced more tidal stripping, subhaloes that have lost a larger fraction of their mass at infall are on more bound orbits. Subhaloes are also strongly segregated in their masses and maximum circular velocities at accretion. We demonstrate that part of this segregation is already imprinted in the infall conditions. For massive subhaloes it is subsequently boosted by dynamical friction, but only during their first radial orbit. The impact of these two effects is counterbalanced, though, by the fact that subhaloes with larger accretion ...

  11. Occurrence of differential meiotic associations and additional chromosomes in the embryo-sac mother cells of Allium roylei Stearn

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Geeta Sharma; Ravinder N. Gohil

    2011-04-01

    A small population of complex translocation heterozygote plants of Allium roylei from the Bani region of Jammu Province was studied for meiosis in the female track. This study resulted in identification of two variants, having embryo-sac mother cells (EMCs) with more than 16 chromosomes. EMCs of the remaining plants invariably had diploid $(2n = 16)$ chromosome complement. Female meiosis, in general, was found to be abnormal, with nearly 23% and 11% chromosomes associating as quadrivalents or trivalents at prophase I and at metaphase I, respectively. This was followed by irregular segregation of chromosomes at anaphase I. Amongst the variants; one had 38% EMCs with eight bivalents plus two small sized chromosomes. Their small size, dispensable nature and tendency to affect the pairing behaviour of normal complement are some of the features that latter chromosomes share with the B chromosomes. Seventeen to nineteen chromosomes were observed in 35% EMCs of other variant; the remaining cells had 16 chromosomes. Chromosomal behaviour in both kind of cells (euploid and aneuploid) was more or less similar. Unlike female meiocytes, male meiocytes analysed earlier of this strain always had 16 chromosomes which paired to form extremely complex associations involving 3–16 chromosomes. The most likely cause of this asynchrony with regards to number of chromosomes involved in multivalent formation seems to be interaction of genes controlling chiasma formation with the different physiological conditions of male and female meiocytes.

  12. Simple queueing approach to segregation dynamics in Schelling model

    OpenAIRE

    Sobkowicz, Pawel

    2007-01-01

    A simple queueing approach for segregation of agents in modified one dimensional Schelling segregation model is presented. The goal is to arrive at simple formula for the number of unhappy agents remaining after the segregation.

  13. On the segregation of dark matter substructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Bosch, Frank C.; Jiang, Fangzhou; Campbell, Duncan; Behroozi, Peter

    2016-01-01

    We present the first comprehensive analysis of the segregation of dark matter subhaloes in their host haloes. Using three different numerical simulations, and two different segregation strength indicators, we examine the segregation of 12 different subhalo properties with respect to both orbital energy and halocentric radius (in real space as well as in projection). Subhaloes are strongly segregated by accretion redshift, which is an outcome of the inside-out assembly of their host haloes. Since subhaloes that were accreted earlier have experienced more tidal stripping, subhaloes that have lost a larger fraction of their mass at infall are on more bound orbits. Subhaloes are also strongly segregated in their masses and maximum circular velocities at accretion. We demonstrate that part of this segregation is already imprinted in the infall conditions. For massive subhaloes, it is subsequently boosted by dynamical friction, but only during their first radial orbit. The impact of these two effects is counterbalanced, though, by the fact that subhaloes with larger accretion masses are accreted later. Because of tidal stripping, subhaloes reveal little to no segregation by present-day mass or maximum circular velocity, while the corresponding torques cause subhaloes on more bound orbits to have smaller spin. There is a weak tendency for subhaloes that formed earlier to be segregated towards the centre of their host halo, which is an indirect consequence of the fact that (sub)halo formation time is correlated with other, strongly segregated properties. We discuss the implications of our results for the segregation of satellite galaxies in galaxy groups and clusters.

  14. Topoisomerase IIα in chromosome instability and personalized cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, T; Sun, Y; Ji, P; Kopetz, S; Zhang, W

    2015-07-30

    Genome instability is a hallmark of cancer cells. Chromosome instability (CIN), which is often mutually exclusive from hypermutation genotypes, represents a distinct subtype of genome instability. Hypermutations in cancer cells are due to defects in DNA repair genes, but the cause of CIN is still elusive. However, because of the extensive chromosomal abnormalities associated with CIN, its cause is likely a defect in a network of genes that regulate mitotic checkpoints and chromosomal organization and segregation. Emerging evidence has shown that the chromosomal decatenation checkpoint, which is critical for chromatin untangling and packing during genetic material duplication, is defective in cancer cells with CIN. The decatenation checkpoint is known to be regulated by a family of enzymes called topoisomerases. Among them, the gene encoding topoisomerase IIα (TOP2A) is commonly altered at both gene copy number and gene expression level in cancer cells. Thus, abnormal alterations of TOP2A, its interacting proteins, and its modifications may have a critical role in CIN in human cancers. Clinically, a large arsenal of topoisomerase inhibitors has been used to suppress DNA replication in cancer. However, they often lead to the secondary development of leukemia because of their effect on the chromosomal decatenation checkpoint. Therefore, topoisomerase drugs must be used judiciously and administered on an individual basis. In this review, we highlight the biological function of TOP2A in chromosome segregation and the mechanisms that regulate this enzyme's expression and activity. We also review the roles of TOP2A and related proteins in human cancers, and raise a perspective for how to target TOP2A in personalized cancer therapy. PMID:25328138

  15. Referral Hiring and Gender Segregation in the Workplace

    OpenAIRE

    Troy Tassier

    2008-01-01

    Segregation by type of work or discrimination are two common explanations for gender segregation in the workplace. A third, gender segregation due to referral hiring through segregated social networks, is less well explored. In this paper, I use an agent-based model of referral hiring to demonstrate that it could create high levels of gender segregation near those observed in data. But the model cannot account for all of the segregation observed. Eastern Economic Journal (2008) 34, 429–440. d...

  16. Plant sex chromosome evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlesworth, Deborah

    2013-01-01

    It is now well established that plants have an important place in studies of sex chromosome evolution because of the repeated independent evolution of separate sexes and sex chromosomes. There has been considerable recent progress in studying plant sex chromosomes. In this review, I focus on how these recent studies have helped clarify or answer several important questions about sex chromosome evolution, and I shall also try to clarify some common misconceptions. I also outline future work that will be needed to make further progress, including testing some important ideas by genetic, molecular, and developmental approaches. Systems with different ages can clearly help show the time course of events during changes from an ancestral co-sexual state (hermaphroditism or monoecy), and I will also explain how different questions can be studied in lineages whose dioecy or sex chromosomes evolved at different times in the past. PMID:23125359

  17. Vibrio chromosomes share common history

    OpenAIRE

    Gevers Dirk; Chang Sarah; Chang LeeAnn; Kirkup Benjamin C; Polz Martin F

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background While most gamma proteobacteria have a single circular chromosome, Vibrionales have two circular chromosomes. Horizontal gene transfer is common among Vibrios, and in light of this genetic mobility, it is an open question to what extent the two chromosomes themselves share a common history since their formation. Results Single copy genes from each chromosome (142 genes from chromosome I and 42 genes from chromosome II) were identified from 19 sequenced Vibrionales genomes ...

  18. Chromosome synapsis and recombination in simple and complex chromosomal heterozygotes of tuco-tuco (Ctenomys talarum: Rodentia: Ctenomyidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basheva, Ekaterina A; Torgasheva, Anna A; Gomez Fernandez, Maria Jimena; Boston, Emma; Mirol, Patricia; Borodin, Pavel M

    2014-09-01

    The chromosomal speciation hypothesis suggests that irregularities in synapsis, recombination, and segregation in heterozygotes for chromosome rearrangements may restrict gene flow between karyotypically distinct populations and promote speciation. Ctenomys talarum is a South American subterranean rodent inhabiting the coastal regions of Argentina, whose populations polymorphic for Robertsonian and tandem translocations seem to have a very restricted gene flow. To test if chromosomal differences are involved in isolation among its populations, we examined chromosome pairing, recombination, and meiotic silencing of unsynapsed chromatin in male meiosis of simple and complex translocation heterozygotes using immunolocalization of the MLH1 marking mature recombination nodules and phosphorylated histone γH2A.X marking unrepaired double-strand breaks. We observed small asynaptic areas labeled by γH2A.X in pericentromeric regions of the chromosomes involved in the trivalents and quadrivalents. We also observed a decrease of recombination frequency and a distalization of the crossover distribution in the heterozygotes and metacentric homozygotes compared to acrocentric homozygotes. We suggest that the asynapsis of the pericentromeric regions are unlikely to induce germ cell death and decrease fertility of the heterozygotes; however, suppressed recombination in pericentromeric areas of the multivalents may reduce gene flow between chromosomally different populations of the Talas tuco-tuco. PMID:24924853

  19. Modeling density segregation in granular flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Hongyi; Lueptow, Richard; Umbanhowar, Paul

    2015-11-01

    A recently developed continuum-based model accurately predicts segregation in flows of granular mixtures varying in particle size by considering the interplay of advection, diffusion and segregation. In this research, we extend the domain of the model to include density driven segregation. Discrete Element Method (DEM) simulations of density bidisperse flows of mono-sized particles in a quasi-2D bounded heap were performed to determine the dependence of the density driven segregation velocity on local shear rate, particle concentration, and a segregation length which scales with the particle size and the logarithm of the density ratio. With these inputs, the model yields theoretical predictions of density segregation patterns that quantitatively match the DEM simulations over a range of density ratios (1.11-3.33) and flow rates (19.2-113.6 cm3/s). Matching experiments with various combinations of glass, steel and ceramic particles were also performed which reproduced the segregation patterns obtained in both the simulations and the theory.

  20. Platypus chain reaction: directional and ordered meiotic pairing of the multiple sex chromosome chain in Ornithorhynchus anatinus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daish, Tasman; Casey, Aaron; Grützner, Frank

    2009-01-01

    Monotremes are phylogenetically and phenotypically unique animals with an unusually complex sex chromosome system that is composed of ten chromosomes in platypus and nine in echidna. These chromosomes are alternately linked (X1Y1, X2Y2, ...) at meiosis via pseudoautosomal regions and segregate to form spermatozoa containing either X or Y chromosomes. The physical and epigenetic mechanisms involved in pairing and assembly of the complex sex chromosome chain in early meiotic prophase I are completely unknown. We have analysed the pairing dynamics of specific sex chromosome pseudoautosomal regions in platypus spermatocytes during prophase of meiosis I. Our data show a highly coordinated pairing process that begins at the terminal Y5 chromosome and completes with the union of sex chromosomes X1Y1. The consistency of this ordered assembly of the chain is remarkable and raises questions about the mechanisms and factors that regulate the differential pairing of sex chromosomes and how this relates to potential meiotic silencing mechanisms and alternate segregation. PMID:19874721

  1. Quantification of segregation dynamics in ice mixtures

    OpenAIRE

    Öberg, Karin I.; Fayolle, Edith C.; Cuppen, Herma M.; van Dishoeck, Ewine F.; Linnartz, Harold

    2009-01-01

    (Abridged) The observed presence of pure CO2 ice in protostellar envelopes is attributed to thermally induced ice segregation, but a lack of quantitative experimental data has prevented its use as a temperature probe. Quantitative segregation studies are also needed to characterize diffusion in ices, which underpins all ice dynamics and ice chemistry. This study aims to quantify the segregation mechanism and barriers in different H2O:CO2 and H2O:CO ice mixtures covering a range of astrophysic...

  2. Granular size segregation in underwater sand ripples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousseaux, G; Caps, H; Wesfreid, J-E

    2004-02-01

    We report an experimental study of a binary sand bed under an oscillating water flow. The formation and evolution of ripples is observed. The appearance of a granular segregation is shown to strongly depend on the sand bed preparation. The initial wavelength of the mixture is measured. In the final steady state, a segregation in volume is observed instead of a segregation at the surface as reported before. The correlation between this phenomenon and the fluid flow is emphasised. Finally, different "exotic" patterns and their geophysical implications are presented. PMID:15052430

  3. Sequential cloning of chromosomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacks, S.A.

    1991-12-31

    A method for sequential cloning of chromosomal DNA and chromosomal DNA cloned by this method are disclosed. The method includes the selection of a target organism having a segment of chromosomal DNA to be sequentially cloned. A first DNA segment, having a first restriction enzyme site on either side. homologous to the chromosomal DNA to be sequentially cloned is isolated. A first vector product is formed by ligating the homologous segment into a suitably designed vector. The first vector product is circularly integrated into the target organism`s chromosomal DNA. The resulting integrated chromosomal DNA segment includes the homologous DNA segment at either end of the integrated vector segment. The integrated chromosomal DNA is cleaved with a second restriction enzyme and ligated to form a vector-containing plasmid, which is replicated in a host organism. The replicated plasmid is then cleaved with the first restriction enzyme. Next, a DNA segment containing the vector and a segment of DNA homologous to a distal portion of the previously isolated DNA segment is isolated. This segment is then ligated to form a plasmid which is replicated within a suitable host. This plasmid is then circularly integrated into the target chromosomal DNA. The chromosomal DNA containing the circularly integrated vector is treated with a third, retrorestriction enzyme. The cleaved DNA is ligated to give a plasmid that is used to transform a host permissive for replication of its vector. The sequential cloning process continues by repeated cycles of circular integration and excision. The excision is carried out alternately with the second and third enzymes.

  4. Localization of latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA) on mitotic chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahayu, Retno; Ohsaki, Eriko; Omori, Hiroko; Ueda, Keiji

    2016-09-01

    In latent infection of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), viral gene expression is extremely limited and copy numbers of viral genomes remain constant. Latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA) is known to have a role in maintaining viral genome copy numbers in growing cells. Several studies have shown that LANA is localized in particular regions on mitotic chromosomes, such as centromeres/pericentromeres. We independently examined the distinct localization of LANA on mitotic chromosomes during mitosis, using super-resolution laser confocal microscopy and correlative fluorescence microscopy-electron microscopy (FM-EM) analyses. We found that the majority of LANA were not localized at particular regions such as telomeres/peritelomeres, centromeres/pericentromeres, and cohesion sites, but at the bodies of condensed chromosomes. Thus, LANA may undergo various interactions with the host factors on the condensed chromosomes in order to tether the viral genome to mitotic chromosomes and realize faithful viral genome segregation during cell division. PMID:27254595

  5. PTEN regulates EG5 to control spindle architecture and chromosome congression during mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jinxue; Zhang, Zhong; Ouyang, Meng; Yang, Fan; Hao, Hongbo; Lamb, Kristy L; Yang, Jingyi; Yin, Yuxin; Shen, Wen H

    2016-01-01

    Architectural integrity of the mitotic spindle is required for efficient chromosome congression and accurate chromosome segregation to ensure mitotic fidelity. Tumour suppressor PTEN has multiple functions in maintaining genome stability. Here we report an essential role of PTEN in mitosis through regulation of the mitotic kinesin motor EG5 for proper spindle architecture and chromosome congression. PTEN depletion results in chromosome misalignment in metaphase, often leading to catastrophic mitotic failure. In addition, metaphase cells lacking PTEN exhibit defects of spindle geometry, manifested prominently by shorter spindles. PTEN is associated and co-localized with EG5 during mitosis. PTEN deficiency induces aberrant EG5 phosphorylation and abrogates EG5 recruitment to the mitotic spindle apparatus, leading to spindle disorganization. These data demonstrate the functional interplay between PTEN and EG5 in controlling mitotic spindle structure and chromosome behaviour during mitosis. We propose that PTEN functions to equilibrate mitotic phosphorylation for proper spindle formation and faithful genomic transmission. PMID:27492783

  6. Chromosome numbers and meiotic analysis in the pre-breeding of Brachiaria decumbens (Poaceae)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Gléia Cristina Laverde Ricci; Alice Maria De Souza-Kaneshima; Mariana Ferrari Felismino; Andrea Beatriz Mendes-Bonato; Maria Suely Pagliarini; Cacilda Borges Do Valle

    2011-08-01

    A total of 44 accessions of Brachiaria decumbens were analysed for chromosome count and meiotic behaviour in order to identify potential progenitors for crosses. Among them, 15 accessions presented $2n = 18$; 27 accessions, $2n = 36$; and 2 accessions, $2n = 45$ chromosomes. Among the diploid accessions, the rate of meiotic abnormalities was low, ranging from 0.82% to 7.93%. In the 27 tetraploid accessions, the rate of meiotic abnormalities ranged from 18.41% to 65.83%. The most common meiotic abnormalities were related to irregular chromosome segregation, but chromosome stickiness and abnormal cytokinesis were observed in low frequency. All abnormalities can compromise pollen viability by generating unbalanced gametes. Based on the chromosome number and meiotic stability, the present study indicates the apomictic tetraploid accessions that can act as male genitor to produce interspecific hybrids with B. ruziziensis or intraspecific hybrids with recently artificially tetraploidized accessions.

  7. A new chromosome was born: comparative chromosome painting in Boechera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Marcus A

    2015-09-01

    Comparative chromosome painting is a powerful tool to study the evolution of chromosomes and genomes. Analyzing karyotype evolution in cruciferous plants highlights the origin of aberrant chromosomes in apomictic Boechera and further establishes the cruciferous plants as important model system for our understanding of plant chromosome and genome evolution. PMID:26228436

  8. Veil: A Wall of Segregation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tayebeh Nowrouzi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Moving behind the confines of the race has been the continuous efforts of African-Americans so as to reveal and confirm their true humanity and abilities to white race as well as their own race. African-Americans, Dubois posited, are shut out of the white America, inhabiting behind a vast veil which creates a deep division between the races. Veil is made of the fabric of racism interwoven thread by thread and imposed by white world. It is thrown discourteously and forcibly to the African-Americans whom their distorted images are imposed on them and their true humanity and identity are hidden behind the veil. This study overtakes to present how Loraine Hansberry, in her first and the most outstanding drama, A Raisin in the Sun examines the world within the veil. She demonstrated that Duboisian metaphoric veil is operating in the racist American society so that not only African-Americans are segregated physically and psychologically from the rest of the world but also are inflicted with obscurity of vision that are neither able to see themselves clearly nor be seen truly. On the other hand, it presents how the veil provides blacks with the second sight to observe and comprehend the racist nature of whites which is hidden and incomprehensible for them.

  9. Matefin/SUN-1 phosphorylation is part of a surveillance mechanism to coordinate chromosome synapsis and recombination with meiotic progression and chromosome movement.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Woglar

    Full Text Available Faithful chromosome segregation during meiosis I depends on the establishment of a crossover between homologous chromosomes. This requires induction of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs, alignment of homologs, homolog association by synapsis, and repair of DSBs via homologous recombination. The success of these events requires coordination between chromosomal events and meiotic progression. The conserved SUN/KASH nuclear envelope bridge establishes transient linkages between chromosome ends and cytoskeletal forces during meiosis. In Caenorhabditis elegans, this bridge is essential for bringing homologs together and preventing nonhomologous synapsis. Chromosome movement takes place during synapsis and recombination. Concomitant with the onset of chromosome movement, SUN-1 clusters at chromosome ends associated with the nuclear envelope, and it is phosphorylated in a chk-2- and plk-2-dependent manner. Identification of all SUN-1 phosphomodifications at its nuclear N terminus allowed us to address their role in prophase I. Failures in recombination and synapsis led to persistent phosphorylations, which are required to elicit a delay in progression. Unfinished meiotic tasks elicited sustained recruitment of PLK-2 to chromosome ends in a SUN-1 phosphorylation-dependent manner that is required for continued chromosome movement and characteristic of a zygotene arrest. Furthermore, SUN-1 phosphorylation supported efficient synapsis. We propose that signals emanating from a failure to successfully finish meiotic tasks are integrated at the nuclear periphery to regulate chromosome end-led movement and meiotic progression. The single unsynapsed X chromosome in male meiosis is precluded from inducing a progression delay, and we found it was devoid of a population of phosphorylated SUN-1. This suggests that SUN-1 phosphorylation is critical to delaying meiosis in response to perturbed synapsis. SUN-1 may be an integral part of a checkpoint system to monitor

  10. Residential Segregation in Southern Cities: 1970

    Science.gov (United States)

    And Others; Roof, Wade Clark

    1976-01-01

    Based on an analysis of the age, size, percent black, and occupational income differential in 32 southern cities, the findings show that age is still the strongest predictor of residential segregation. (Author)

  11. Demographic processes and ethnic residential segregation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Itzhak Omer

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the involvement of demographic processes in the residential segregation of ethnic groups in an urban area. For this purpose, a two-part methodology has been employed. The first part comprises a conceptual framework which uses the concept of time–space resources as an analytical tool to clarify the structural constraints embedded in the changes in ethnic residential distribution. The second part comprises a simulation model of ethnic residential segregation. The model, which fits into the category of agent-based simulation models, serves as a tool for heuristic study. The methodology has been applied to examine the implications of fluctuations in ethnic group diffusion and the residential mobility rate on the majority–minority residential segregation, and on the internal ethnic segregation within the minority group.

  12. The Distribution of Segregation in Atlanta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meade, Anthony

    1972-01-01

    A prediction from ecological theory relating the distribution of residential segregation between inner and outer zones of a metropolitan area to conditions of population growth, expansion, etc. was tested using 1960 data on the Atlanta standard metropolitan statistical area. (JM)

  13. Possible segregation caused by centrifugal titanium casting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, K; Okawa, S; Kanatani, M; Nakano, S; Miyakawa, O; Kobayashi, M

    1996-12-01

    The possibility of the segregation under solidification process using a centrifugal casting machine was investigated using an electron probe microanalyzer with elemental distribution map, line analysis and quantitative analysis. When a very small quantity of platinum was added to local molten titanium during the casting process, macroscopic segregation was observed under conditions of density difference of 0.1 g/cm3 at the most, confirming that the centrifugal force of the casting machine is extremely strong. When a Ti-6Al-4V alloy was cast, however, no macroscopic segregation was observed. The centrifugal force of the casting machine examined in the present study hardly results in the body-force segregation in this titanium alloy. PMID:9550020

  14. Modeling size segregation of bidisperse granular flow: the roles of segregation, advection, and diffusion

    OpenAIRE

    Fan, Yi; Schlick, Conor; Isner, Austin; Ottino, Julio; Umbanhowar, Paul; Richard, Lueptow

    2014-01-01

    Segregation of granular materials composed of different-sized particles has important repercussions in various industrial processes and natural phenomena, but predicting size segregation remains a challenging problem. To address this problem, we have developed a theoretical model that captures the interplay between advection, segregation, and diffusion in size bidisperse granular materials. The fluxes associated with these three driving factors depend on the underlying kinematics, whose chara...

  15. Gender Differences in the Effect of Residential Segregation on Workplace Segregation among Newly Arrived Immigrants

    OpenAIRE

    Tammaru, Tiit; Strömgren, Magnus; van Ham, Maarten; Danzer, Alexander M.

    2015-01-01

    Contemporary cities are becoming more and more diverse in population as a result of immigration. Research also shows that within cities residential neighborhoods are becoming ethnically more diverse, but that residential segregation has remained persistently high. High levels of segregation are often seen as negative, preventing integration of immigrants in their host society and having a negative impact on people's lives. Segregation research often focuses on residential neighborhoods, but i...

  16. Chimpanzee chromosome 13 is homologous to human chromosome 2p

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, N. C.; Sun, C. R.Y.; Ho, T.

    1977-01-01

    Similarities between human and chimpanzee chromosomes are shown by chromosome banding techniques and somatic cell hybridization techniques. Cell hybrids were obtained from the chimpanzee lymphocyte LE-7, and the Chinese hamster mutant cell, Gal-2. Experiments showed that the ACPL, MDHs, and Gal-Act genes could be assigned to chimpanzee chromosome 13, and since these genes have been assigned to human chromosme 2p, it is suggested that chimpanzee chromosome 13 is homologous to human chromosome 2p. (HLW)

  17. Chromosome condensation and segmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some aspects of chromosome condensation in mammalians -humans especially- were studied by means of cytogenetic techniques of chromosome banding. Two further approaches were adopted: a study of normal condensation as early as prophase, and an analysis of chromosome segmentation induced by physical (temperature and γ-rays) or chemical agents (base analogues, antibiotics, ...) in order to show out the factors liable to affect condensation. Here 'segmentation' means an abnormal chromosome condensation appearing systematically and being reproducible. The study of normal condensation was made possible by the development of a technique based on cell synchronization by thymidine and giving prophasic and prometaphasic cells. Besides, the possibility of inducing R-banding segmentations on these cells by BrdU (5-bromodeoxyuridine) allowed a much finer analysis of karyotypes. Another technique was developed using 5-ACR (5-azacytidine), it allowed to induce a segmentation similar to the one obtained using BrdU and identify heterochromatic areas rich in G-C bases pairs

  18. Chromosomal abnormalities and autism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farida El-Baz

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Chromosomal abnormalities were not detected in the studied autistic children, and so the relation between the genetics and autism still needs further work up with different study methods and techniques.

  19. Demographic processes and ethnic residential segregation

    OpenAIRE

    Itzhak Omer

    1999-01-01

    This paper examines the involvement of demographic processes in the residential segregation of ethnic groups in an urban area. For this purpose, a two-part methodology has been employed. The first part comprises a conceptual framework which uses the concept of time–space resources as an analytical tool to clarify the structural constraints embedded in the changes in ethnic residential distribution. The second part comprises a simulation model of ethnic residential segregation. The model, whic...

  20. Decentralization as a Cause of Spatial Segregation

    OpenAIRE

    Jasarovic Ema Alihodzic; Komatina Dragan; Zaric Sanja Paunovic

    2016-01-01

    City represents an incomplete dynamic process prone to the expansion with a causal link between urban expansion and socio-spatial segregation. The socio-spatial distribution in the city is mostly related to the increased social polarization and inequality. There is a clear connection between divided society and divided city: if society is divided, urban space must be divided. It is the question of the relations between the social inequalities on one hand, and spatial segregation on the other....

  1. Chromosome numbers in Bromeliaceae

    OpenAIRE

    2000-01-01

    The present study reports chromosome numbers of 17 species of Bromeliaceae, belonging to the genera Encholirium, Bromelia, Orthophytum, Hohenbergia, Billbergia, Neoglaziovia, Aechmea, Cryptanthus and Ananas. Most species present 2n = 50, however, Bromelia laciniosa, Orthophytum burle-marxii and O. maracasense are polyploids with 2n = 150, 2n = 100 and 2n = 150, respectively, while for Cryptanthus bahianus, 2n = 34 + 1-4B. B chromosomes were observed in Bromelia plumieri and Hohenbergia aff. u...

  2. Mouse HFM1/Mer3 Is Required for Crossover Formation and Complete Synapsis of Homologous Chromosomes during Meiosis

    OpenAIRE

    Guiraldelli, Michel F.; Eyster, Craig; Wilkerson, Joseph L.; Dresser, Michael E.; Pezza, Roberto J.

    2013-01-01

    Faithful chromosome segregation during meiosis requires that homologous chromosomes associate and recombine. Chiasmata, the cytological manifestation of recombination, provide the physical link that holds the homologs together as a pair, facilitating their orientation on the spindle at meiosis I. Formation of most crossover (CO) events requires the assistance of a group of proteins collectively known as ZMM. HFM1/Mer3 is in this group of proteins and is required for normal progression of homo...

  3. Segregation isotherms at the surfaces of oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A non-Arrhenius segregation isotherm is derived which includes the change in the heat of segregation with surface coverage due to impurity-impurity interactions. It is shown that a linear dependence of log(xs) on the reciprocal temperature, where xs is the surface atomic ratio, can derive either from a constant heat of segregation, i.e., Arrhenius behavior, or from a heat of segregation that varies as xs-1. This isotherm is then used to calculate the equilibrium surface coverages of Ca at the {001} surface of MgO, Mg at the {0001} surface of α-Al2O3, Y at the {1012} and {1 bar 120} surfaces of α-Al2O3, and Na at the {111} and {110} surfaces of Li2O from the calculated heats of segregation. Where possible, comparisons are made with experiment. The more useful operational definition of the heat of segregation, namely, that derived from the measured coverage or that defined atomistically and obtained by calculation, is discussed

  4. Radiation-induced segregation in titanium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation-induced segregation (RIS) of V, Mo, Nb, Ta, Zr, and Sn in binary titanium alloys was investigated to test the solute size effect correlation in hcp alloys. Undersize Mo segregates weakly toward the sinks. Nb and Ta, which are slightly oversize in Ti, undergo little or no RIS. Oversize Zr solute in Ti segregates away from the sinks, whereas undersize Ti solute in Zr is enriched at sinks. All of these results are in accord with the solute size effect correlation. Surprisingly, Sn, which is significantly oversize in Ti, appears to segregate very little. The postirradiation annealing of Ti-3V and Ti-8Al-1V-1Mo confirmed that segregation of undersize V toward sinks is radiation-induced. Measurements of temperature and dose dependence in binary and complex alloys showed that the degree of V segregation has a maximum at proportional6000C and obeys parabolic growth kinetics in its early stages but probably saturates at a rather low dose (proportional0.8 dpa). (orig.)

  5. 28 CFR 541.21 - Conditions of disciplinary segregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Conditions of disciplinary segregation... Conditions of disciplinary segregation. (a) Disciplinary segregation is the status of confinement of an... general population. Inmates housed in disciplinary segregation have significantly fewer privileges...

  6. What Should an Index of School Segregation Measure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Rebecca; Vignoles, Anna

    2007-01-01

    The article aims to make a methodological contribution to the education segregation literature, providing a critique of previous measures of segregation used in the literature, as well as suggesting an alternative approach to measuring segregation. Specifically, the paper examines Gorard, Fitz and Taylor's finding that social segregation between…

  7. 41 CFR 109-1.5106 - Segregation of personal property.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Segregation of personal...-INTRODUCTION 1.51-Personal Property Management Standards and Practices § 109-1.5106 Segregation of personal...) The segregation of the property would materially hinder the progress of the work (i.e., segregation...

  8. Gender Segregation in the Spanish Labor Market: An Alternative Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Rio, Coral; Alonso-Villar, Olga

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to study occupational segregation by gender in Spain, which is a country where occupational segregation explains a large part of the gender wage gap. As opposed to previous studies, this paper measures not only overall segregation, but also the segregation of several population subgroups. For this purpose, this paper uses…

  9. Single-nucleotide polymorphism versus microsatellite markers in a combined linkage and segregation analysis of a quantitative trait

    OpenAIRE

    Heath Simon C; Daw E Warwick; Lu Yue

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Increasingly, single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers are being used in preference to microsatellite markers. However, methods developed for microsatellites may be problematic when applied to SNP markers. We evaluated the results of using SNPs vs. microsatellites in Monte Carlo Markov chain (MCMC) oligogenic combined segregation and linkage analysis methods. These methods were developed with microsatellite markers in mind. We selected chromosome 7 from the Collaborative Study on...

  10. Complex translocation disrupting TCF4 and altering TCF4 isoform expression segregates as mild autosomal dominant intellectual disability

    OpenAIRE

    Maduro, Valerie; Pusey, Barbara N.; Cherukuri, Praveen F.; Atkins, Paul; du Souich, Christèle; Rupps, Rosemarie; Limbos, Marjolaine; Adams, David R; Bhatt, Samarth S.; Eydoux, Patrice; Links, Amanda E.; Lehman, Anna; Malicdan, May C.; Mason, Christopher E.; Morimoto, Marie

    2016-01-01

    Background Mutations of TCF4, which encodes a basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor, cause Pitt-Hopkins syndrome (PTHS) via multiple genetic mechanisms. TCF4 is a complex locus expressing multiple transcripts by alternative splicing and use of multiple promoters. To address the relationship between mutation of these transcripts and phenotype, we report a three-generation family segregating mild intellectual disability with a chromosomal translocation disrupting TCF4. Results Using whole...

  11. Vibrio chromosomes share common history

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gevers Dirk

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While most gamma proteobacteria have a single circular chromosome, Vibrionales have two circular chromosomes. Horizontal gene transfer is common among Vibrios, and in light of this genetic mobility, it is an open question to what extent the two chromosomes themselves share a common history since their formation. Results Single copy genes from each chromosome (142 genes from chromosome I and 42 genes from chromosome II were identified from 19 sequenced Vibrionales genomes and their phylogenetic comparison suggests consistent phylogenies for each chromosome. Additionally, study of the gene organization and phylogeny of the respective origins of replication confirmed the shared history. Conclusions Thus, while elements within the chromosomes may have experienced significant genetic mobility, the backbones share a common history. This allows conclusions based on multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA for one chromosome to be applied equally to both chromosomes.

  12. A small (sSMC) chromosome 22 due to a maternal translocation between chromosomes 8 and 22: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundhofir, F E P; Kooper, A J A; Winarni, T I; Smits, A P T; Faradz, S M H; Hamel, B C J

    2010-01-01

    We report on a boy with partial trisomies for chromosomes 8 and 22 caused by the presence of a small supernumerary marker chromosome (sSMC), a der(22)t(8;22)(p22;q11.21), inherited from a t(8;22)(p22;q11.21) translocation carrier mother. He has mild mental retardation, unability to speak distinct words and several minor anomalies i.e. high forehead and hairline, telecanthus, upslanting palpebral fissures, depressed nasal bridge, nail hypoplasia, toe position anomaly and 5th finger clinodactyly. He has two maternal uncles and one maternal aunt with mental retardation. G-banding technique showed 47,XY,+mar whilst his mother's karyotype showed a balanced reciprocal translocation between the chromosomes 8 and 22. Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization (FISH) technique with probes for centromere 22 and 8pter were used to detect the origin of marker chromosome and confirmed the marker chromosome in the proband showing to be extra chromosomal material originated from chromosome 8 and 22. Additional genome wide microarray analysis, using the Affymetrix Nspl 250K SNP array platform was performed to further characterize the marker chromosome and resulted in a der(22)t(8;22)(p22;q11.21). Furthermore, cytogenetic analysis of three affected family members showed the same unbalanced translocation, due to 3:1 meiotic segregation. This indicated the viability of this unbalanced pattern and combined with the recurrent miscarriages by the proband's mother, the mechanism of transmitting extrachromosomal material is probably not a random process. Since, there is no similar translocation (8p;22q) reported and the chromosomal translocation largely exists of additional 8p22-8pter we compare the clinical outcomes with reported cases of 8p22-8pter triplication, although there is a part of genetic material derived from chromosome 22 present. This unique familial chromosome translocation case from Indonesia will give insight in the underlying mechanism of this recurrent chromosomal abnormality

  13. Physical Modeling of Dynamic Coupling between Chromosomal Loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lampo, Thomas J; Kennard, Andrew S; Spakowitz, Andrew J

    2016-01-19

    The motion of chromosomal DNA is essential to many biological processes, including segregation, transcriptional regulation, recombination, and packaging. Physical understanding of these processes would be dramatically enhanced through predictive, quantitative modeling of chromosome dynamics of multiple loci. Using a polymer dynamics framework, we develop a prediction for the correlation in the velocities of two loci on a single chromosome or otherwise connected by chromatin. These predictions reveal that the signature of correlated motion between two loci can be identified by varying the lag time between locus position measurements. In general, this theory predicts that as the lag time interval increases, the dual-loci dynamic behavior transitions from being completely uncorrelated to behaving as an effective single locus. This transition corresponds to the timescale of the stress communication between loci through the intervening segment. This relatively simple framework makes quantitative predictions based on a single timescale fit parameter that can be directly compared to the in vivo motion of fluorescently labeled chromosome loci. Furthermore, this theoretical framework enables the detection of dynamically coupled chromosome regions from the signature of their correlated motion. PMID:26789757

  14. Karyological characterization of the endemic Iberian rock lizard, Iberolacerta monticola (Squamata, Lacertidae): insights into sex chromosome evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojo, V; Giovannotti, M; Naveira, H; Nisi Cerioni, P; González-Tizón, A M; Caputo Barucchi, V; Galán, P; Olmo, E; Martínez-Lage, A

    2014-01-01

    Rock lizards of the genus Iberolacerta constitute a promising model to examine the process of sex chromosome evolution, as these closely related taxa exhibit remarkable diversity in the degree of sex chromosome differentiation with no clear phylogenetic segregation, ranging from cryptic to highly heteromorphic ZW chromosomes and even multiple chromosome systems (Z1Z1Z2Z2/Z1Z2W). To gain a deeper insight into the patterns of karyotype and sex chromosome evolution, we performed a cytogenetic analysis based on conventional staining, banding techniques and fluorescence in situ hybridization in the species I. monticola, for which previous cytogenetic investigations did not detect differentiated sex chromosomes. The karyotype is composed of 2n = 36 acrocentric chromosomes. NORs and the major ribosomal genes were located in the subtelomeric region of chromosome pair 6. Hybridization signals of the telomeric sequences (TTAGGG)n were visualized at the telomeres of all chromosomes and interstitially in 5 chromosome pairs. C-banding showed constitutive heterochromatin at the centromeres of all chromosomes, as well as clear pericentromeric and light telomeric C-bands in several chromosome pairs. These results highlight some chromosomal markers which can be useful to identify species-specific diagnostic characters, although they may not accurately reflect the phylogenetic relationships among the taxa. In addition, C-banding revealed the presence of a heteromorphic ZW sex chromosome pair, where W is smaller than Z and almost completely heterochromatic. This finding sheds light on sex chromosome evolution in the genus Iberolacerta and suggests that further comparative cytogenetic analyses are needed to understand the processes underlying the origin, differentiation and plasticity of sex chromosome systems in lacertid lizards. PMID:24296524

  15. Segregation by thermal diffusion in granular shear flows

    OpenAIRE

    Garzó, Vicente; Reyes, Francisco Vega

    2010-01-01

    Segregation by thermal diffusion of an intruder immersed in a sheared granular gas is analyzed from the (inelastic) Boltzmann equation. Segregation is induced by the presence of a temperature gradient orthogonal to the shear flow plane and parallel to gravity. We show that, like in analogous systems without shear, the segregation criterion yields a transition between upwards segregation and downwards segregation. The form of the phase diagrams is illustrated in detail showing that they depend...

  16. Measuring Segregation: Basic Concepts and Extensions to Other Domains

    OpenAIRE

    Silber, Jacques

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the main concepts used in measuring segregation. First it shows that the cardinal as well as the ordinal approach to the measurement of occupational segregation, when only two groups are considered (generally men and women), borrowed many ideas from the income inequality measurement literature. Second, it shows that more recent advances in segregation measurement, that were the consequence of an extension of segregation measures to the case of multi-group segregation and m...

  17. Industrial segregation of female and male workers in Spain

    OpenAIRE

    Olga Alonso-Villar; Coral del Río

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to study segregation in the Spanish labor market for both male and female workers, paying special attention to industrial segregation. As opposed to other studies, this article quantifies the segregation of each demographic group separately, rather than measuring overall segregation. For this purpose, it uses additively decomposable indices, together with local segregation curves, recently proposed in the literature, which allows us to go further in the empirical anal...

  18. A Measure of Segregation Based on Social Interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Echenique, Federico; Fryer, Roland

    2007-01-01

    We develop an index of segregation based on two premises: (1) a measure of segregation should disaggregate to the level of individuals, and (2) an individual is more segregated the more segregated are the agents with whom she interacts. We present an index that satisfies (1) and (2) and that is based on agents' social interactions: the extent to which blacks interact with blacks, whites with whites, etc. We use the index to measure school and residential segregation. Using detailed data on fr...

  19. Cell division licensing in the multi-chromosomal Vibrio cholerae bacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galli, Elisa; Poidevin, Mickaël; Le Bars, Romain; Desfontaines, Jean-Michel; Muresan, Leila; Paly, Evelyne; Yamaichi, Yoshiharu; Barre, François-Xavier

    2016-01-01

    Cell division must be coordinated with chromosome replication and segregation to ensure the faithful transmission of genetic information during proliferation. In most bacteria, assembly of the division apparatus, the divisome, starts with the polymerization of a tubulin homologue, FtsZ, into a ring-like structure at mid-cell, the Z-ring(1). It typically occurs at half of the cell cycle when most of the replication and segregation cycle of the unique chromosome they generally harbour is achieved(2). The chromosome itself participates in the regulation of cell division, at least in part because it serves as a scaffold to position FtsZ polymerization antagonists(3). However, about 10% of bacteria have more than one chromosome(4), which raises questions about the way they license cell division(3). For instance, the genome of Vibrio cholerae, the agent of cholera, is divided between a 3 Mbp replicon that originates from the chromosome of its mono-chromosomal ancestor, Chr1, and a 1 Mbp plasmid-derived replicon, Chr2 (ref. 5). Here, we show that Chr2 harbours binding motifs for an inhibitor of Z-ring formation, which helps accurately position the V. cholerae divisome at mid-cell and postpones its assembly to the very end of the cell cycle. PMID:27562255

  20. Kinetochore-Independent Chromosome Poleward Movement during Anaphase of Meiosis II in Mouse Eggs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Manqi; Gao, Juntao; Suraneni, Praveen; Li, Rong

    2009-01-01

    Kinetochores are considered to be the key structures that physically connect spindle microtubules to the chromosomes and play an important role in chromosome segregation during mitosis. Due to different mechanisms of spindle assembly between centrosome-containing mitotic cells and acentrosomal meiotic oocytes, it is unclear how a meiotic spindle generates the poleward forces to drive two rounds of meiotic chromosome segregation to achieve genome haploidization. We took advantage of the fact that DNA beads are able to induce bipolar spindle formation without kinetochores and studied the behavior of DNA beads in the induced spindle in mouse eggs during meiosis II. Interestingly, DNA beads underwent poleward movements that were similar in timing and speed to the meiotic chromosomes, although all the beads moved together to the same spindle pole. Disruption of dynein function abolished the poleward movements of DNA beads but not of the meiotic chromosomes, suggesting the existence of different dynein-dependent and dynein-independent force generation mechanisms for the chromosome poleward movement, and the latter may be dependent on the presence of kinetochores. Consistent with the observed DNA bead poleward movement, sperm haploid chromatin (which also induced bipolar spindle formation after injection to a metaphase egg without forming detectable kinetochore structures) also underwent similar poleward movement at anaphase as DNA beads. The results suggest that in the chromatin-induced meiotic spindles, kinetochore attachments to spindle microtubules are not absolutely required for chromatin poleward movements at anaphase. PMID:19365562

  1. Proteomics Analysis with a Nano Random Forest Approach Reveals Novel Functional Interactions Regulated by SMC Complexes on Mitotic Chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohta, Shinya; Montaño-Gutierrez, Luis F; de Lima Alves, Flavia; Ogawa, Hiromi; Toramoto, Iyo; Sato, Nobuko; Morrison, Ciaran G; Takeda, Shunichi; Hudson, Damien F; Rappsilber, Juri; Earnshaw, William C

    2016-08-01

    Packaging of DNA into condensed chromosomes during mitosis is essential for the faithful segregation of the genome into daughter nuclei. Although the structure and composition of mitotic chromosomes have been studied for over 30 years, these aspects are yet to be fully elucidated. Here, we used stable isotope labeling with amino acids in cell culture to compare the proteomes of mitotic chromosomes isolated from cell lines harboring conditional knockouts of members of the condensin (SMC2, CAP-H, CAP-D3), cohesin (Scc1/Rad21), and SMC5/6 (SMC5) complexes. Our analysis revealed that these complexes associate with chromosomes independently of each other, with the SMC5/6 complex showing no significant dependence on any other chromosomal proteins during mitosis. To identify subtle relationships between chromosomal proteins, we employed a nano Random Forest (nanoRF) approach to detect protein complexes and the relationships between them. Our nanoRF results suggested that as few as 113 of 5058 detected chromosomal proteins are functionally linked to chromosome structure and segregation. Furthermore, nanoRF data revealed 23 proteins that were not previously suspected to have functional interactions with complexes playing important roles in mitosis. Subsequent small-interfering-RNA-based validation and localization tracking by green fluorescent protein-tagging highlighted novel candidates that might play significant roles in mitotic progression. PMID:27231315

  2. Etude du système de résolution des dimères de chromosome chez Vibrio cholerae - Implication dans le contrôle de la lysogénie du phage CTXφ codant pour la toxine cholérique

    OpenAIRE

    Val, Marie-Eve

    2008-01-01

    The majority of the bacteria have a single circular chromosome. At the time of replication, chromosome dimers can be formed by homologous recombination between sister chromatides. Dimerisation of replicating chromosomes prevents the faithful segregation of genetic information between the two daughter cells. To correct this, the tyrosine recombinases, XerC and XerD, resolve dimers by adding an additional crossover at a specific site on the chromosome called dif. In Escherichia coli, the resolu...

  3. A new assay for measuring chromosome instability (CIN) and identification of drugs that elevate CIN in cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aneuploidy is a feature of most cancer cells that is often accompanied by an elevated rate of chromosome mis-segregation termed chromosome instability (CIN). While CIN can act as a driver of cancer genome evolution and tumor progression, recent findings point to the existence of a threshold level beyond which CIN becomes a barrier to tumor growth and therefore can be exploited therapeutically. Drugs known to increase CIN beyond the therapeutic threshold are currently few in number, and the clinical promise of targeting the CIN phenotype warrants new screening efforts. However, none of the existing methods, including the in vitro micronuclei (MNi) assay, developed to quantify CIN, is entirely satisfactory. We have developed a new assay for measuring CIN. This quantitative assay for chromosome mis-segregation is based on the use of a non-essential human artificial chromosome (HAC) carrying a constitutively expressed EGFP transgene. Thus, cells that inherit the HAC display green fluorescence, while cells lacking the HAC do not. This allows the measurement of HAC loss rate by routine flow cytometry. Using the HAC-based chromosome loss assay, we have analyzed several well-known anti-mitotic, spindle-targeting compounds, all of which have been reported to induce micronuclei formation and chromosome loss. For each drug, the rate of HAC loss was accurately measured by flow cytometry as a proportion of non-fluorescent cells in the cell population which was verified by FISH analysis. Based on our estimates, despite their similar cytotoxicity, the analyzed drugs affect the rates of HAC mis-segregation during mitotic divisions differently. The highest rate of HAC mis-segregation was observed for the microtubule-stabilizing drugs, taxol and peloruside A. Thus, this new and simple assay allows for a quick and efficient screen of hundreds of drugs to identify those affecting chromosome mis-segregation. It also allows ranking of compounds with the same or similar mechanism of

  4. Spatiotemporal choreography of chromosome and megaplasmids in the Sinorhizobium meliloti cell cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frage, Benjamin; Döhlemann, Johannes; Robledo, Marta; Lucena, Daniella; Sobetzko, Patrick; Graumann, Peter L; Becker, Anke

    2016-06-01

    A considerable share of bacterial species maintains multipartite genomes. Precise coordination of genome replication and segregation with cell growth and division is vital for proliferation of these bacteria. The α-proteobacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti possesses a tripartite genome composed of one chromosome and the megaplasmids pSymA and pSymB. Here, we investigated the spatiotemporal pattern of segregation of these S. meliloti replicons at single cell level. Duplication of chromosomal and megaplasmid origins of replication occurred spatially and temporally separated, and only once per cell cycle. Tracking of FROS (fluorescent repressor operator system)-labelled origins revealed a strict temporal order of segregation events commencing with the chromosome followed by pSymA and then by pSymB. The repA2B2C2 region derived from pSymA was sufficient to confer the spatiotemporal behaviour of this megaplasmid to a small plasmid. Altering activity of the ubiquitous prokaryotic replication initiator DnaA, either positively or negatively, resulted in an increase in replication initiation events or G1 arrest of the chromosome only. This suggests that interference with DnaA activity does not affect replication initiation control of the megaplasmids. PMID:26853523

  5. The role of chromosome missegregation in cancer development: a theoretical approach using agent-based modelling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arturo Araujo

    Full Text Available Many cancers are aneuploid. However, the precise role that chromosomal instability plays in the development of cancer and in the response of tumours to treatment is still hotly debated. Here, to explore this question from a theoretical standpoint we have developed an agent-based model of tissue homeostasis in which to test the likely effects of whole chromosome mis-segregation during cancer development. In stochastic simulations, chromosome mis-segregation events at cell division lead to the generation of a diverse population of aneuploid clones that over time exhibit hyperplastic growth. Significantly, the course of cancer evolution depends on genetic linkage, as the structure of chromosomes lost or gained through mis-segregation events and the level of genetic instability function in tandem to determine the trajectory of cancer evolution. As a result, simulated cancers differ in their level of genetic stability and in their growth rates. We used this system to investigate the consequences of these differences in tumour heterogeneity for anti-cancer therapies based on surgery and anti-mitotic drugs that selectively target proliferating cells. As expected, simulated treatments induce a transient delay in tumour growth, and reveal a significant difference in the efficacy of different therapy regimes in treating genetically stable and unstable tumours. These data support clinical observations in which a poor prognosis is correlated with a high level of chromosome mis-segregation. However, stochastic simulations run in parallel also exhibit a wide range of behaviours, and the response of individual simulations (equivalent to single tumours to anti-cancer therapy prove extremely variable. The model therefore highlights the difficulties of predicting the outcome of a given anti-cancer treatment, even in cases in which it is possible to determine the genotype of the entire set of cells within the developing tumour.

  6. Racial Segregation and the American Foreclosure Crisis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rugh, Jacob S; Massey, Douglas S

    2010-10-01

    Although the rise in subprime lending and the ensuing wave of foreclosures was partly a result of market forces that have been well-identified in the literature, in the United States it was also a highly racialized process. We argue that residential segregation created a unique niche of poor minority clients who were differentially marketed risky subprime loans that were in great demand for use in mortgage-backed securities that could be sold on secondary markets. We test this argument by regressing foreclosure actions in the top 100 U.S. metropolitan areas on measures of black, Hispanic, and Asian segregation while controlling for a variety of housing market conditions, including average creditworthiness, the extent of coverage under the Community Reinvestment Act, the degree of zoning regulation, and the overall rate of subprime lending. We find that black residential dissimilarity and spatial isolation are powerful predictors of foreclosures across U.S. metropolitan areas. In order to isolate subprime lending as the causal mechanism whereby segregation influences foreclosures, we estimate a two-stage least squares model that confirms the causal effect of black segregation on the number and rate of foreclosures across metropolitan areas. In the United States segregation was an important contributing cause of the foreclosure crisis, along with overbuilding, risky lending practices, lax regulation, and the bursting of the housing price bubble. PMID:25308973

  7. Chromosome numbers in Bromeliaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cotias-de-Oliveira Ana Lúcia Pires

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study reports chromosome numbers of 17 species of Bromeliaceae, belonging to the genera Encholirium, Bromelia, Orthophytum, Hohenbergia, Billbergia, Neoglaziovia, Aechmea, Cryptanthus and Ananas. Most species present 2n = 50, however, Bromelia laciniosa, Orthophytum burle-marxii and O. maracasense are polyploids with 2n = 150, 2n = 100 and 2n = 150, respectively, while for Cryptanthus bahianus, 2n = 34 + 1-4B. B chromosomes were observed in Bromelia plumieri and Hohenbergia aff. utriculosa. The chromosome number of all species was determined for the first time, except for Billbergia chlorosticta and Cryptanthus bahianus. Our data supports the hypothesis of a basic number of x = 25 for the Bromeliaceae family and decreasing aneuploidy in the genus Cryptanthus.

  8. Those amazing dinoflagellate chromosomes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PETER J RIZZO

    2003-01-01

    Dinoflagellates are a very large and diverse group of eukaryotic algae that play a major role in aquatic food webs of both fresh water and marine habitats. Moreover, the toxic members of this group pose a health threat in the form of red tides. Finally, dinoflagellates are of great evolutionary importance,because of their taxonomic position, and their unusual chromosome structure and composition. While the cytoplasm of dinoflagellates is typically eukaryotic, the nucleus is unique when compared to the nucleus of other eukaryotes. More specifically, while the chromosomes of all other eukaryotes contain histones,dinoflagellate chromosomes lack histones completely. There are no known exceptions to this observation: all dinoflagellates lack histones, and all other eukaryotes contain histones. Nevertheless, dinoflagellates remain a relatively unstudied group of eukaryotes.

  9. Chromosome numbers, meiotic behavior, and pollen viability of species of Vriesea and Aechmea genera (Bromeliaceae) native to Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palma-Silva, Clarisse; Dos Santos, Daniel G; Kaltchuk-Santos, Eliane; Bodanese-Zanettini, Maria H

    2004-06-01

    Chromosome number, meiotic behavior, and pollen viability were analyzed in 15 species of two genera, Vriesea and Aechmea, native to Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. This study is the first cytogenetic analysis of these taxa. The chromosome numbers are all n = 25, consistent with the proposed base number of x = 25 for Bromeliaceae. All examined taxa displayed regular bivalent pairing and chromosome segregation at meiosis. Observed meiotic abnormalities include univalents in metaphase I; missing or extra chromosomes and precocious division of centromeres in metaphase II; laggards in telophase I and anaphase II/telophase II. The high pollen viability (>88%) reflects a regular meiosis. PMID:21653435

  10. Chromosomal rearrangements in cattle and pigs revealed by chromosome microdissection and chromosome painting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yerle Martine

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A pericentric inversion of chromosome 4 in a boar, as well as a case of (2q-;5p+ translocation mosaicism in a bull were analysed by chromosome painting using probes generated by conventional microdissection. For the porcine inversion, probes specific for p arms and q arms were produced and hybridised simultaneously on metaphases of a heterozygote carrier. In the case of the bovine translocation, two whole chromosome probes (chromosome 5, and derived chromosome 5 were elaborated and hybridised independently on chromosomal preparations of the bull who was a carrier of the mosaic translocation. The impossibility of differentiating chromosomes 2 and der(2 from other chromosomes of the metaphases did not allow the production of painting probes for these chromosomes. For all experiments, the quality of painting was comparable to that usually observed with probes obtained from flow-sorted chromosomes. The results obtained allowed confirmation of the interpretations proposed with G-banding karyotype analyses. In the bovine case, however, the reciprocity of the translocation could not be proven. The results presented in this paper show the usefulness of the microdissection technique for characterising chromosomal rearrangements in species for which commercial probes are not available. They also confirmed that the main limiting factor of the technique is the quality of the chromosomal preparations, which does not allow the identification of target chromosomes or chromosome fragments in all cases.

  11. Mps1 and Ipl1/Aurora B Act Sequentially to Correctly Orient Chromosomes on the Meiotic Spindle of Budding Yeast

    OpenAIRE

    Meyer, Régis E; Kim, Seoyoung; Obeso, David; Straight, Paul D.; Winey, Mark; Dawson, Dean S.

    2013-01-01

    The conserved kinases Mps1 and Ipl1/Aurora B are critical for enabling chromosomes to attach to microtubules such that partner chromosomes will be segregated correctly from each other, but the precise roles of these kinases have been unclear. Here, imaging of live yeast cells was performed to elucidate the stages of chromosome-microtubule interactions, and their regulation by Ipl1 and Mps1, through meiosis I. Ipl1 was found to release kinetochore-microtubule (kMT) associations following meiot...

  12. Somatic pairing, endomitosis and chromosome aberrations in snakes (Viperidae and Colubridae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beçak Maria Luiza

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The positioning of macrochromosomes of Bothrops jararaca and Bothrops insularis (Viperidae was studied in undistorted radial metaphases of uncultured cells (spermatogonia and oogonia not subjected to spindle inhibitors. Colchicinized metaphases from uncultured (spleen and intestine and cultured tissues (blood were also analyzed. We report two antagonic non-random chromosome arrangements in untreated premeiotic cells: the parallel configuration with homologue chromosomes associated side by side in the metaphase plate and the antiparallel configuration having homologue chromosomes with antipolar distribution in the metaphase ring. The antiparallel aspect also appeared in colchicinized cells. The spatial chromosome arrangement in both configurations is groupal size-dependent and maintained through meiosis. We also describe, in untreated gonia cells, endomitosis followed by reductional mitosis which restores the diploid number. In B. jararaca males we observed that some gonad regions present changes in the meiotic mechanism. In this case, endoreduplicated cells segregate the diplochromosomes to opposite poles forming directly endoreduplicated second metaphases of meiosis with the suppression of first meiosis. By a successive division, these cells form nuclei with one set of chromosomes. Chromosome doubling in oogonia is known in hybrid species and in parthenogenetic salamanders and lizards. This species also presented chromosome rearrangements leading to aneuploidies in mitosis and meiosis. It is suggested that somatic pairing, endomitosis, meiotic alterations, and chromosomal aberrations can be correlated processes. Similar aspects of nuclei configurations, endomitosis and reductional mitosis were found in other Viperidae and Colubridae species.

  13. Correlation between segregation and cold cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An attempt is made to find a correlation between segregation in ferritic base metal and the occurrence of cold cracking. Besides describing the mechanical and engineering properties and chemical composition of the segregated areas, the paper discusses their behaviour when welded over. Characteristics and models of crack development are presented using cold cracking found in various components as an example. Suitable measures for limiting the risk of the occurrence of cold cracking are increasing the pre-heating temperature, use of weld filler material with optimum dryness, and heat treatment directly following welding. (author)

  14. Scaling behaviour in size segregation ("Brazil Nuts")

    OpenAIRE

    Devillard, Pierre

    1990-01-01

    Using a previously introduced Monte Carlo method, due to Rosato, Prinz, Strandburg and Swendsen, we carry out in two dimensions numerical studies of size segregation, a phenomenon which occurs when a granular medium made of particles of different sizes is shaken. We propose a new scaling law relating the segregation velocity υ to the amplitude of shaking A and to the ratio R of the diameters of the small disks to the large disks. ForA larger than a critical amplitude Ac, a scaling law holds: ...

  15. Carbon Segregation of Bearing Steel Concasting Billet

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The formation mechanism of “white band” and central carbon segregation of high-carbon Cr bearing steel concasting billets are discussed in this paper. The maximum oxygen content in the steel produced by concasting process was 13x10-6 with an average oxygen content of 9.3x 10-6.Comparison of metallurgical quality and fatigue property between the concasting steel (CC) andingot casting steel (IC) showed that the carbon segregation (C/C0) in former steel was 0.92~1.10and its fatigue life was equal to that of the latter steel.

  16. On the origin of the eukaryotic chromosome: the role of noncanonical DNA structures in telomere evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garavís, Miguel; González, Carlos; Villasante, Alfredo

    2013-01-01

    The transition of an ancestral circular genome to multiple linear chromosomes was crucial for eukaryogenesis because it allowed rapid adaptive evolution through aneuploidy. Here, we propose that the ends of nascent linear chromosomes should have had a dual function in chromosome end protection (capping) and chromosome segregation to give rise to the "proto-telomeres." Later on, proper centromeres evolved at subtelomeric regions. We also propose that both noncanonical structures based on guanine-guanine interactions and the end-protection proteins recruited by the emergent telomeric heterochromatin have been required for telomere maintenance through evolution. We further suggest that the origin of Drosophila telomeres may be reminiscent of how the first telomeres arose. PMID:23699225

  17. Ring chromosome 13

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, C A; Hertz, Jens Michael; Petersen, M B; Vogel, F; Noer, H; Mikkelsen, M

    1992-01-01

    A stillborn male child with anencephaly and multiple malformations was found to have the karyotype 46,XY,r(13) (p11q21.1). The breakpoint at 13q21.1, determined by high resolution banding, is the most proximal breakpoint ever reported in patients with ring chromosome 13. In situ hybridisation with...

  18. The Y Chromosome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Offner, Susan

    2010-01-01

    The Y chromosome is of great interest to students and can be used to teach about many important biological concepts in addition to sex determination. This paper discusses mutation, recombination, mammalian sex determination, sex determination in general, and the evolution of sex determination in mammals. It includes a student activity that…

  19. Chromosomes, cancer and radiosensitivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samouhos, E.

    1983-08-01

    Some specific chromosomal abnormalities are associated with certain cancers. The earliest description of such a specific association is the one of the Philadelphia chromosome and myelogenous leukemia (1960). Other congenital karyotype abnormalities are associated with specific cancers. Examples of these are Down's syndrome with leukemia and Klinefelter's syndrome with male breast cancer. Genetic diseases of increased chromosome breakage, or of defective chromosome repair, are associated with greatly increased cancer incidence. Three such diseases have been recognized: 1) Fanconi's anemia, associated with leukemias and lymphomas, 2) Bloom's syndrome, associated with acute leukemias and lymphosarcoma, and 3) ataxia telangiectasia, associated with Hodgkin's disease, leukemia, and lymphosarcomas. Ten percent of individuals with ataxia telangiectasia will develop one of these neoplasms. Individuals with certain of these syndromes display an unusually high radiosensitivity. Radiation therapy for cancers has been fatal in patients who received as low as 3000 rad. This remarkable radiosensitivity has been quantitated in cell cultures from such cases. Evidence suggests that the apparent sensitivity may reflect subnormal ability to repair radiation damage. The rapid proliferation of information in this field stems from the interdigitation of many disciplines and specialties, including cytogenetics, cell biology, molecular biology, epidemiology, radiobiology, and several others. This paper is intended for clinicians; it presents a structured analytic scheme for correlating and classifying this multidisciplinary information as it becomes available.

  20. Chromosomes, cancer and radiosensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some specific chromosomal abnormalities are associated with certain cancers. The earliest description of such a specific association is the one of the Philadelphia chromosome and myelogenous leukemia (1960). Other congenital karyotype abnormalities are associated with specific cancers. Examples of these are Down's syndrome with leukemia and Klinefelter's syndrome with male breast cancer. Genetic diseases of increased chromosome breakage, or of defective chromosome repair, are associated with greatly increased cancer incidence. Three such diseases have been recognized: 1) Fanconi's anemia, associated with leukemias and lymphomas, 2) Bloom's syndrome, associated with acute leukemias and lymphosarcoma, and 3) ataxia telangiectasia, associated with Hodgkin's disease, leukemia, and lymphosarcomas. Ten percent of individuals with ataxia telangiectasia will develop one of these neoplasms. Individuals with certain of these syndromes display an unusually high radiosensitivity. Radiation therapy for cancers has been fatal in patients who received as low as 3000 rad. This remarkable radiosensitivity has been quantitated in cell cultures from such cases. Evidence suggests that the apparent sensitivity may reflect subnormal ability to repair radiation damage. The rapid proliferation of information in this field stems from the interdigitation of many disciplines and specialties, including cytogenetics, cell biology, molecular biology, epidemiology, radiobiology, and several others. This paper is intended for clinicians; it presents a structured analytic scheme for correlating and classifying this multidisciplinary information as it becomes available

  1. Chromosome Morphology in Kniphofia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. J de Wet

    1960-12-01

    Full Text Available A number of species and varieties of the genus  Kniphofia (Liliaceae were studied cytologically. The somatic chromosome number is  2n = 12 in all the species. This is also true in  Notosceptrum natalense Baker.

  2. Telomere dysfunction and chromosome instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murnane, John P., E-mail: jmurnane@radonc.ucsf.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California San Francisco, 2340 Sutter Street, San Francisco, CA 94143-1331 (United States)

    2012-02-01

    The ends of chromosomes are composed of a short repeat sequence and associated proteins that together form a cap, called a telomere, that keeps the ends from appearing as double-strand breaks (DSBs) and prevents chromosome fusion. The loss of telomeric repeat sequences or deficiencies in telomeric proteins can result in chromosome fusion and lead to chromosome instability. The similarity between chromosome rearrangements resulting from telomere loss and those found in cancer cells implicates telomere loss as an important mechanism for the chromosome instability contributing to human cancer. Telomere loss in cancer cells can occur through gradual shortening due to insufficient telomerase, the protein that maintains telomeres. However, cancer cells often have a high rate of spontaneous telomere loss despite the expression of telomerase, which has been proposed to result from a combination of oncogene-mediated replication stress and a deficiency in DSB repair in telomeric regions. Chromosome fusion in mammalian cells primarily involves nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ), which is the major form of DSB repair. Chromosome fusion initiates chromosome instability involving breakage-fusion-bridge (B/F/B) cycles, in which dicentric chromosomes form bridges and break as the cell attempts to divide, repeating the process in subsequent cell cycles. Fusion between sister chromatids results in large inverted repeats on the end of the chromosome, which amplify further following additional B/F/B cycles. B/F/B cycles continue until the chromosome acquires a new telomere, most often by translocation of the end of another chromosome. The instability is not confined to a chromosome that loses its telomere, because the instability is transferred to the chromosome donating a translocation. Moreover, the amplified regions are unstable and form extrachromosomal DNA that can reintegrate at new locations. Knowledge concerning the factors promoting telomere loss and its consequences is

  3. Organization of the bacterial chromosome.

    OpenAIRE

    Krawiec, S.; Riley, M

    1990-01-01

    Recent progress in studies on the bacterial chromosome is summarized. Although the greatest amount of information comes from studies on Escherichia coli, reports on studies of many other bacteria are also included. A compilation of the sizes of chromosomal DNAs as determined by pulsed-field electrophoresis is given, as well as a discussion of factors that affect gene dosage, including redundancy of chromosomes on the one hand and inactivation of chromosomes on the other hand. The distinction ...

  4. ParABS system in chromosome partitioning in the bacterium Myxococcus xanthus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio A Iniesta

    Full Text Available Chromosome segregation is an essential cellular function in eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells. The ParABS system is a fundamental player for a mitosis-like process in chromosome partitioning in many bacterial species. This work shows that the social bacterium Myxococcus xanthus also uses the ParABS system for chromosome segregation. Its large prokaryotic genome of 9.1 Mb contains 22 parS sequences near the origin of replication, and it is shown here that M. xanthus ParB binds preferentially to a consensus parS sequence in vitro. ParB and ParA are essential for cell viability in M. xanthus as in Caulobacter crescentus, but unlike in many other bacteria. Absence of ParB results in anucleate cells, chromosome segregation defects and loss of viability. Analysis of ParA subcellular localization shows that it clusters at the poles in all cells, and in some, in the DNA-free cell division plane between two chromosomal DNA masses. This ParA localization pattern depends on ParB but not on FtsZ. ParB inhibits the nonspecific interaction of ParA with DNA, and ParA colocalizes with chromosomal DNA only when ParB is depleted. The subcellular localization of ParB suggests a single ParB-parS complex localized at the edge of the nucleoid, next to a polar ParA cluster, with a second ParB-parS complex migrating after the replication of parS takes place to the opposite nucleoid edge, next to the other polar ParA cluster.

  5. Homoploid hybrid speciation and genome evolution via chromosome sorting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukhtanov, Vladimir A; Shapoval, Nazar A; Anokhin, Boris A; Saifitdinova, Alsu F; Kuznetsova, Valentina G

    2015-05-22

    Genomes of numerous diploid plant and animal species possess traces of interspecific crosses, and many researches consider them as support for homoploid hybrid speciation (HHS), a process by which a new reproductively isolated species arises through hybridization and combination of parts of the parental genomes, but without an increase in ploidy. However, convincing evidence for a creative role of hybridization in the origin of reproductive isolation between hybrid and parental forms is extremely limited. Here, through studying Agrodiaetus butterflies, we provide proof of a previously unknown mode of HHS based on the formation of post-zygotic reproductive isolation via hybridization of chromosomally divergent parental species and subsequent fixation of a novel combination of chromosome fusions/fissions in hybrid descendants. We show that meiotic segregation, operating in the hybrid lineage, resulted in the formation of a new diploid genome, drastically rearranged in terms of chromosome number. We also demonstrate that during the heterozygous stage of the hybrid species formation, recombination was limited between rearranged chromosomes of different parental origin, representing evidence that the reproductive isolation was a direct consequence of hybridization. PMID:25925097

  6. Homoploid hybrid speciation and genome evolution via chromosome sorting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukhtanov, Vladimir A.; Shapoval, Nazar A.; Anokhin, Boris A.; Saifitdinova, Alsu F.; Kuznetsova, Valentina G.

    2015-01-01

    Genomes of numerous diploid plant and animal species possess traces of interspecific crosses, and many researches consider them as support for homoploid hybrid speciation (HHS), a process by which a new reproductively isolated species arises through hybridization and combination of parts of the parental genomes, but without an increase in ploidy. However, convincing evidence for a creative role of hybridization in the origin of reproductive isolation between hybrid and parental forms is extremely limited. Here, through studying Agrodiaetus butterflies, we provide proof of a previously unknown mode of HHS based on the formation of post-zygotic reproductive isolation via hybridization of chromosomally divergent parental species and subsequent fixation of a novel combination of chromosome fusions/fissions in hybrid descendants. We show that meiotic segregation, operating in the hybrid lineage, resulted in the formation of a new diploid genome, drastically rearranged in terms of chromosome number. We also demonstrate that during the heterozygous stage of the hybrid species formation, recombination was limited between rearranged chromosomes of different parental origin, representing evidence that the reproductive isolation was a direct consequence of hybridization. PMID:25925097

  7. Effective Formation of the Segregation-Competent Complex Determines Successful Partitioning of the Bovine Papillomavirus Genome during Cell Division ▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Silla, Toomas; Männik, Andres; Ustav, Mart

    2010-01-01

    Effective segregation of the bovine papillomavirus type 1 (BPV1), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), and Kaposi's sarcoma-associated human herpesvirus type 8 (KSHV) genomes into daughter cells is mediated by a single viral protein that tethers viral genomes to host mitotic chromosomes. The linker proteins that mediate BPV1, EBV, and KSHV segregation are E2, LANA1, and EBNA1, respectively. The N-terminal transactivation domain of BPV1 E2 is responsible for chromatin attachment and subsequent viral geno...

  8. Segregation--The Act of Sequestering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Charlotte

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author points out that there are many reasons why self-segregation takes place. For example: People with motorcycle interests may choose to hang out with other bikers. A group of bikers may have a common interest but can be as diverse as a doctor that is a biker or a janitor that is into biking. Formally educated people may…

  9. 49 CFR 176.83 - Segregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Federal Register citations affecting § 176.83, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Segregation. 176.83 Section 176.83 Transportation..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS REGULATIONS CARRIAGE BY VESSEL General...

  10. Diversity, Racial Threat and Metropolitan Housing Segregation

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeFina, Robert; Hannon, Lance

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that as the percent black or percent Hispanic grows, that group's residential segregation from whites tends to increase as well. Typically, these findings are explained in terms of white discriminatory reaction to the perceived threat associated with minority population growth. The present analysis examines whether…

  11. Is Racial Segregation Changing in Charter Schools?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jin; Lubienski, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    Charter schools embody the theoretical potential to promote integration since they can draw students from across district boundaries that often reflect segregated residential patterns. While a number of studies have examined overall racial composition of charter schools, virtually no attention has been paid to how charter school enrollment…

  12. Field induced phase segregation in ferrofluids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooij, E.S.; Galca, A.C.; Poelsema, B.

    2008-01-01

    We study the phase segregation in magnetite ferrofluids under the influence of an external magnetic field. A phase with lower nanoparticle density and corresponding higher optical transmission is formed in the bottom of a glass cell in the presence of only a very modest magnetic field gradient (smal

  13. Interfacial segregation in perovskites. Part 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on thermodynamic principles a theory for equilibrium interfacial segregation is proposed for perovskite materials, and this theory is applied to BaTiO3. An approach developed by Frenkel and refined by Kliewer and Koehler is extended to undoped ternary oxide materials such as BaTiO3. The approach uses regular solution approximations and considers space charge effects as the major driving force for segregation. The analysis based on this model indicates the presence of a negative space charge potential (-0.1 V at 800 degrees C) at the surface of pure BaTiO3. The model also predicts cation enrichment at the interface. The thickness of the space charge layer decreases with increasing temperature, and calculated values agree well with experimental results. Since both elastic and electrostatic driving forces are important for dopant/impurity segregation, an approach where the grain boundary is considered to be a two-dimensional phase, in equilibrium with the three-dimensional phase of the grain, proves useful. Solving for the impurity/dopant segregation ratio is case specific and requires knowledge of the charge neutrality conditions as well as the strain energy contribution

  14. Sex segregation in undergraduate engineering majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litzler, Elizabeth

    Gender inequality in engineering persists in spite of women reaching parity in college enrollments and degrees granted. To date, no analyses of educational sex segregation have comprehensively examined segregation within one discipline. To move beyond traditional methods of studying the long-standing stratification by field of study in higher education, I explore gender stratification within one field: engineering. This dissertation investigates why some engineering disciplines have a greater representation of women than other engineering disciplines. I assess the individual and institutional factors and conditions associated with women's representation in certain engineering departments and compare the mechanisms affecting women's and men's choice of majors. I use national data from the Engineering Workforce Commission, survey data from 21 schools in the Project to Assess Climate in Engineering study, and Carnegie Foundation classification information to study sex segregation in engineering majors from multiple perspectives: the individual, major, institution, and country. I utilize correlations, t-tests, cross-tabulations, log-linear modeling, multilevel logistic regression and weighted least squares regression to test the relative utility of alternative explanations for women's disproportionate representation across engineering majors. As a whole, the analyses illustrate the importance of context and environment for women's representation in engineering majors. Hypotheses regarding hostile climate and discrimination find wide support across different analyses, suggesting that women's under-representation in certain engineering majors is not a question of choice or ability. However, individual level factors such as having engineering coursework prior to college show an especially strong association with student choice of major. Overall, the analyses indicate that institutions matter, albeit less for women, and women's under-representation in engineering is not

  15. Measuring Trends in Segregation: Three Dimensions, Three Measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stearns, Linda Brewster; Logan, John R.

    1986-01-01

    Three commonly used measures of segregation (index of dissimilarity, p* interaction probabilities, and the correlation ratio) reflect three conceptually distinct aspects of racial residential segregation. The results of empirical studies will depend on the measure chosen. (Author/KH)

  16. Control on Housing Segregation:Housing Modes and Public Policies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    <正>1. Housing segregation:advocating or controlling?The phenomenon of housing segregation has become more and more obvious in Chinese cities in recent years; however, there is no agreement on whether it should

  17. [Chromosomal organization of the genomes of small-chromosome plants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muravenko, O V; Zelenin, A V

    2009-11-01

    An effective approach to study the chromosome organization in genomes of plants with small chromosomes and/or with low-informative C-banding patterns was developed in the course of investigation of the karyotypes of cotton plant, camomile, flax, and pea. To increase the resolving power of chromosome analysis, methods were worked out for revealing early replication patterns on chromosomes and for artificial impairment of mitotic chromosome condensation with the use of a DNA intercalator, 9-aminoacridine (9-AMA). To estimate polymorphism of the patterns of C-banding of small chromosomes on preparations obtained with the use of 9-AMA, it is necessary to choose a length interval that must not exceed three average sizes of metaphase chromosomes without the intercalator. The use of 9-AMA increases the resolution of differential C- and OR-banding and the precision of physical chromosome mapping by the FISH method. Of particular importance in studying small chromosomes is optimization of the computer-aided methods used to obtain and process chromosome images. The complex approach developed for analysis of the chromosome organization in plant genomes was used to study the karyotypes of 24 species of the genus Linum L. It permitted their chromosomes to be identified for the first time, and, in addition, B chromosomes were discovered and studied in the karyotypes of the species of the section Syllinum. By similarity of the karyotypes, the studied flax species were distributed in eight groups in agreement with the clusterization of these species according to the results of RAPD analysis performed in parallel. Systematic positions and phylogenetic relationships of the studied flax species were verified. Out results can serve as an important argument in favour of the proposal to develop a special program for sequencing the genome of cultivated flax (L. usitatissimum L.), which is a major representative of small-chromosome species. PMID:20058798

  18. Screening of medicinal plants for induction of somatic segregation activity in Aspergillus nidulans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos Ruiz, A; De la Torre, R A; Alonso, N; Villaescusa, A; Betancourt, J; Vizoso, A

    1996-07-01

    Knowledge about mutagenic properties of plants commonly used in traditional medicine is limited. A screening for genotoxic activity was carried out in aqueous or alcoholic extracts prepared from 13 medicinal plants widely used as folk medicine in Cuba: Lepidium virginicum L. (Brassicaceae): Plantago major L. and Plantago lanceolata L. (Plantaginaceae); Ortosiphon aristatus Blume, Mentha x piperita L., Melissa officinalis L. and Plectranthus amboinicus (Lour.) Spreng. (Lamiaceae); Cymbopogon citratus (DC.) Stapf (Poaceae); Passiflora incarnata L. (Passifloraceae); Zingiber officinale Roscoe (Zingiberaceae); Piper auritum HBK. (Piperaceae); Schinus terebinthifolius Raddi (Anacardeaceae) and Momordica charantia L. (Cucurbitaceae). A plate incorporation assay with Aspergillus nidulans was employed, allowing detection of somatic segregation as a result of mitotic crossing-over, chromosome malsegregation or clastogenic effects. Aspergillus nidulans D-30, a well-marked strain carrying four recessive mutations for conidial color in heterozygosity, which permitted the direct visual detection of segregants, was used throughout this study. As a result, only in the aqueous extract of one of the plants screened (Momordica charantia) a statistical significant increase in the frequency of segregant sectors per colony was observed, and consequently, a genotoxic effect is postulated. PMID:8771452

  19. Workplace Segregation in the United States: Race, Ethnicity, and Skill

    OpenAIRE

    Judith Hellerstein; David Neumark

    2005-01-01

    We study workplace segregation in the United States using a unique matched employer-employee data set that we have created. We present measures of workplace segregation by education and language, and by race and ethnicity, and ­ since skill is often correlated with race and ethnicity ­ we assess the role of education- and language-related skill differentials in generating workplace segregation by race and ethnicity. We define segregation based on the extent to which workers are more or less l...

  20. What Drives Racial Segregation? New Evidence Using Census Microdata

    OpenAIRE

    Bayer, Patrick; McMillan, Robert; Rueben, Kim

    2003-01-01

    This paper sheds new light on the forces that drive residential segregation on the basis of race, assessing the extent to which across-race differences in other household characteristics can explain a significant portion of observed racial segregation. The central contribution of the analysis is to provide a transparent new measurement framework for understanding segregation patterns. This framework allows researchers to characterize patterns of segregation, to decompose them in meaningful wa...

  1. Segregation phases in a vibrated binary granular layer

    OpenAIRE

    Reis, P. M.; Ehrhardt, G.; Mullin, T.

    2003-01-01

    We present the results of an experimental study of patterned segregation in a horizontally shaken shallow layer of a binary mixture of dry particles. As the compacity, $C$, of the mixture was increased, the evolution of three distinct phases was observed. We classify them as binary gas, segregation liquid and segregation crystal phases using macroscopic and microscopic measures. The binary gas to segregation liquid transition is consistent with a continuous phase transition and includes the c...

  2. Occupational Gender Segregation in the Czech Republic (in English)

    OpenAIRE

    Štìpán Jurajda; Michal Franta

    2007-01-01

    The authors use labor force survey data to provide a detailed description and an international comparison of the level and structure of occupational gender segregation in the Czech Republic during 1994–2004. Based on 1999 data, they find Czech occupational segregation to be close to the EU average, with the exception of young, highly educated Czech workers, who faced relatively high segregation. However, segregation has declined rapidly for young workers since 1999, mainly due to the increase...

  3. Tipping and Residential Segregation: A Unified Schelling Model

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Junfu

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a Schelling-type checkerboard model of residential segregation formulated as a spatial game. It shows that although every agent prefers to live in a mixed-race neighborhood, complete segregation is observed almost all of the time. A concept of tipping is rigorously defined, which is crucial for understanding the dynamics of segregation. Complete segregation emerges and persists in the checkerboard model precisely because tipping is less likely to occur to such residential ...

  4. Residential Segregation Effects on Poor’s Opportunities in Chile

    OpenAIRE

    Osvaldo Larrañaga Jiménez; Claudia Sanhueza Riveros

    2007-01-01

    This paper aims to identify whether or not the spatial concentration of poverty –also called economic residential segregation- affects the opportunities of the poor in Chile. Residential segregation is understood as the concentration particular population groups in determined geographical areas within cities. To identify the effects of segregation we use a panel of cross sections of the Casen household surveys, although the measures of segregation are computed from the Census data. The result...

  5. Not Just Urban Policy: Suburbs, Segregation, and Charter Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankenberg, Erica; Siegel-Hawley, Genevieve

    2012-01-01

    As the charter school sector expands rapidly with federal support amid on-going diversification and growing segregation among traditional public school students, this article examines existing patterns of segregation in charter schools. Prior research has demonstrated that charter schools are substantially more segregated than our already…

  6. 46 CFR 151.13-5 - Cargo segregation-tanks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cargo segregation-tanks. 151.13-5 Section 151.13-5... CARRYING BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Cargo Segregation § 151.13-5 Cargo segregation—tanks. (a... and list the various degrees of segregation required. Paragraphs and (2) of this section explain...

  7. Segregation of Granular Mixtures in a Rotating Drum

    OpenAIRE

    Puri, Sanjay; Hayakawa, Hisao

    1999-01-01

    We formulate a phenomenological model for the segregation of binary mixtures of rough and smooth granular materials in a rotating drum. Our model successfully replicates a range of experimental behaviours, e.g., rapid radial segregation; slow axial segregation; and nonuniform radial structure of axial bands. We present some analytical results and detailed numerical results for our model.

  8. 49 CFR 176.145 - Segregation in single hold vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Segregation in single hold vessels. 176.145 Section 176.145 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS... VESSEL Detailed Requirements for Class 1 (Explosive) Materials Segregation § 176.145 Segregation...

  9. What is the primary source of the morphological segregation?

    OpenAIRE

    Andreon, S.

    1997-01-01

    In Coma and two other clusters of galaxies the primary morphological segregation is the one with respect to a privileged direction. Only when this segregation is not considered it appears that the morphological types are segregated in density or in clustercentric distance.

  10. 27 CFR 24.27 - Segregation of operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Segregation of operations. 24.27 Section 24.27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU... Segregation of operations. The appropriate TTB officer may require the proprietor to segregate...

  11. Revisiting Residential Segregation by Income: A Monte Carlo Test

    OpenAIRE

    Junfu Zhang

    2003-01-01

    A long-standing hypothesis states that racial housing segregation in the U.S. results from the income inequalities between blacks and whites. This paper reexamines this hypothesis with a new methodology. We present a Monte Carlo study to show that segregation by income explains only a small proportion of the high level of segregation.

  12. Residential segregation of socioeconomic variables and health indices in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Saeed Hashemi Nazari

    2013-01-01

    Conclusions: Correlation of segregation of determinants of socioeconomic status with segregation of health indices is an indicator of existence of hot zones of health problems across some provinces. Further studies using multilevel modeling and individual data in health outcomes at individual level and segregation measures at appropriate geographic levels are required to confirm these relations.

  13. 26 CFR 301.7507-3 - Segregated or transferred assets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Segregated or transferred assets. 301.7507-3... States § 301.7507-3 Segregated or transferred assets. (a) In general. In a case involving segregated or transferred assets, it is not necessary, for application of section 7507, that the assets shall...

  14. A New Locus for Generalized Epilepsy with Febrile Seizures Plus Maps to Chromosome 2

    OpenAIRE

    Lopes-Cendes, I.; Scheffer, I E.; Berkovic, S F; Rousseau, M.; Andermann, E.; Rouleau, G. A.

    2000-01-01

    Generalized epilepsy with febrile seizures plus (GEFS+) is a recently recognized but relatively common form of inherited childhood-onset epilepsy with heterogeneous epilepsy phenotypes. We genotyped 41 family members, including 21 affected individuals, to localize the gene causing epilepsy in a large family segregating an autosomal dominant form of GEFS+. A genomewide search examining 197 markers identified linkage of GEFS+ to chromosome 2, on the basis of an initial positive LOD score for ma...

  15. The requirement of p53 for maintaining chromosomal stability during tetraploidization

    OpenAIRE

    Ho, Chui Chui; Hau, Pok Man; Marxer, Miriam; Poon, Randy Y. C.

    2010-01-01

    Tetraploidization is believed to promote genome instability and tumorigenesis. Whether tetraploids per se are intrinsically unstable and transforming remain incompletely understood. In this report, tetraploidization was induced with cell fusion using mouse fibroblasts. Due to the unequal segregation of chromosomes during multipolar mitosis, the majority of cells were eliminated by p53-dependent mechanisms after tetraploidization. The rare tetraploid fibroblasts that were able to undergo bipol...

  16. Chromosome 19 International Workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pericak-Vance, M.A. (Duke Univ., Durham, NC (United States). Medical Center); Ropers, H.H. (Univ. Hospital Nijmegen, (The Netherlands). Dept. of Human Genetics); Carrano, A.J. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States))

    1993-01-04

    The Second International Workshop on Human Chromosome 19 was hosted on January 25 and 26, 1992, by the Department of Human Genetics, University Hospital Nijmegen, The Netherlands, at the 'Meerdal Conference Center'. The workshop was supported by a grant from the European Community obtained through HUGO, the Dutch Research Organization (NWO) and the Muscular Dystrophy Association (MDA). Travel support for American participants was provided by the Department of Energy. The goals of this workshop were to produce genetic, physical and integrated maps of chromosome 19, to identify inconsistencies and gaps, and to discuss and exchange resources and techniques available for the completion of these maps. The second day of the meeting was largely devoted to region or disease specific efforts. In particular, the meeting served as a platform for assessing and discussing the recent progress made into the molecular elucidation of myotonic dystrophy.

  17. Generative Models of Segregation: Investigating Model-Generated Patterns of Residential Segregation by Ethnicity and Socioeconomic Status

    OpenAIRE

    Fossett, Mark

    2011-01-01

    This paper considers the potential for using agent models to explore theories of residential segregation in urban areas. Results of generative experiments conducted using an agent-based simulation of segregation dynamics document that varying a small number of model parameters representing constructs from urban-ecological theories of segregation can generate a wide range of qualitatively distinct and substantively interesting segregation patterns. The results suggest how complex, macro-level ...

  18. Autosomal dominant congenital cataract in a Libyan Jewish family: cosegregation with a reciprocal chromosomal translocation [t(3;5)(p22.3; p15.1)

    OpenAIRE

    Zafer, Emre; Meck, Jeanne; Gerrad, Liora; Pras, Elon; Frydman, Moshe; Reish, Orit; Avni, Isaac; Pras, Eran

    2008-01-01

    Purpose To describe a Jewish family of Libyan ancestry in which autosomal dominant congenital cataract segregates with an apparently balanced reciprocal chromosomal translocation. Methods Detailed family history and clinical data were recorded. Cytogenetic studies were performed on 13 family members. Results Embryonal cataracts cosegregated through three generations with a balanced chromosomal translocation [t(3;5)(p22.3; p15.1)] while the unbalanced translocation product, 46,XY,-5,+der(5)t(3...

  19. Destabilized SMC5/6 complex leads to chromosome breakage syndrome with severe lung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Crabben, Saskia N; Hennus, Marije P; McGregor, Grant A; Ritter, Deborah I; Nagamani, Sandesh C S; Wells, Owen S; Harakalova, Magdalena; Chinn, Ivan K; Alt, Aaron; Vondrova, Lucie; Hochstenbach, Ron; van Montfrans, Joris M; Terheggen-Lagro, Suzanne W; van Lieshout, Stef; van Roosmalen, Markus J; Renkens, Ivo; Duran, Karen; Nijman, Isaac J; Kloosterman, Wigard P; Hennekam, Eric; Orange, Jordan S; van Hasselt, Peter M; Wheeler, David A; Palecek, Jan J; Lehmann, Alan R; Oliver, Antony W; Pearl, Laurence H; Plon, Sharon E; Murray, Johanne M; van Haaften, Gijs

    2016-08-01

    The structural maintenance of chromosomes (SMC) family of proteins supports mitotic proliferation, meiosis, and DNA repair to control genomic stability. Impairments in chromosome maintenance are linked to rare chromosome breakage disorders. Here, we have identified a chromosome breakage syndrome associated with severe lung disease in early childhood. Four children from two unrelated kindreds died of severe pulmonary disease during infancy following viral pneumonia with evidence of combined T and B cell immunodeficiency. Whole exome sequencing revealed biallelic missense mutations in the NSMCE3 (also known as NDNL2) gene, which encodes a subunit of the SMC5/6 complex that is essential for DNA damage response and chromosome segregation. The NSMCE3 mutations disrupted interactions within the SMC5/6 complex, leading to destabilization of the complex. Patient cells showed chromosome rearrangements, micronuclei, sensitivity to replication stress and DNA damage, and defective homologous recombination. This work associates missense mutations in NSMCE3 with an autosomal recessive chromosome breakage syndrome that leads to defective T and B cell function and acute respiratory distress syndrome in early childhood. PMID:27427983

  20. Meiotic chromosome mobility in fission yeast is resistant to environmental stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illner, Doris; Lorenz, Alexander; Scherthan, Harry

    2016-01-01

    The formation of healthy gametes requires pairing of homologous chromosomes (homologs) as a prerequisite for their correct segregation during meiosis. Initially, homolog alignment is promoted by meiotic chromosome movements feeding into intimate homolog pairing by homologous recombination and/or synaptonemal complex formation. Meiotic chromosome movements in the fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, depend on astral microtubule dynamics that drag the nucleus through the zygote; known as horsetail movement. The response of microtubule-led meiotic chromosome movements to environmental stresses such as ionizing irradiation (IR) and associated reactive oxygen species (ROS) is not known. Here, we show that, in contrast to budding yeast, the horsetail movement is largely radiation-resistant, which is likely mediated by a potent antioxidant defense. IR exposure of sporulating S. pombe cells induced misrepair and irreparable DNA double strand breaks causing chromosome fragmentation, missegregation and gamete death. Comparing radiation outcome in fission and budding yeast, and studying meiosis with poisoned microtubules indicates that the increased gamete death after IR is innate to fission yeast. Inhibition of meiotic chromosome mobility in the face of IR failed to influence the course of DSB repair, indicating that paralysis of meiotic chromosome mobility in a genotoxic environment is not a universal response among species. PMID:27074839

  1. Meiotic chromosome mobility in fission yeast is resistant to environmental stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illner, Doris; Lorenz, Alexander; Scherthan, Harry

    2016-01-01

    The formation of healthy gametes requires pairing of homologous chromosomes (homologs) as a prerequisite for their correct segregation during meiosis. Initially, homolog alignment is promoted by meiotic chromosome movements feeding into intimate homolog pairing by homologous recombination and/or synaptonemal complex formation. Meiotic chromosome movements in the fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, depend on astral microtubule dynamics that drag the nucleus through the zygote; known as horsetail movement. The response of microtubule-led meiotic chromosome movements to environmental stresses such as ionizing irradiation (IR) and associated reactive oxygen species (ROS) is not known. Here, we show that, in contrast to budding yeast, the horsetail movement is largely radiation-resistant, which is likely mediated by a potent antioxidant defense. IR exposure of sporulating S. pombe cells induced misrepair and irreparable DNA double strand breaks causing chromosome fragmentation, missegregation and gamete death. Comparing radiation outcome in fission and budding yeast, and studying meiosis with poisoned microtubules indicates that the increased gamete death after IR is innate to fission yeast. Inhibition of meiotic chromosome mobility in the face of IR failed to influence the course of DSB repair, indicating that paralysis of meiotic chromosome mobility in a genotoxic environment is not a universal response among species. PMID:27074839

  2. From Schelling to Schools : A comparison of a model of residential segregation with a model of school segregation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stoica, Victor; Flache, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    We address theoretically whether and under what conditions Schelling's celebrated result of 'self-organized' unintended residential segregation may also apply to school segregation. We propose here a computational model of school segregation that is aligned with a corresponding Schelling-type model

  3. Cdc37 is essential for chromosome segregation and cytokinesis in higher eukaryotes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Bodo M.H.; Rebollo, Elena; Herold, Andrea; González, Cayetano

    2002-01-01

    Cdc37 has been shown to be required for the activity and stability of protein kinases that regulate different stages of cell cycle progression. However, little is known so far regarding interactions of Cdc37 with kinases that play a role in cell division. Here we show that the loss of function of Cdc37 in Drosophila leads to defects in mitosis and male meiosis, and that these phenotypes closely resemble those brought about by the inactivation of Aurora B. We provide evidence that Aurora B interacts with and requires the Cdc37/Hsp90 complex for its stability. We conclude that the Cdc37/Hsp90 complex modulates the function of Aurora B and that most of the phenotypes brought about by the loss of Cdc37 function can be explained by the inactivation of this kinase. These observations substantiate the role of Cdc37 as an upstream regulatory element of key cell cycle kinases. PMID:12374737

  4. INVESTIGATION OF POSSIBLE AGE EFFECTS ON MEIOTIC CHROMOSOMAL RECOMBINATION AND SEGREGATION IN ARMENIAN HAMSTER SPERMATOCYTES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Male Armenian hamsters (Cricetulus migratorius; 2N:22) were evaluated for age effects upon meiotic recombination and aneuploidy incidence. Primary spermatocytes from young and old animals revealed similar chiasma frequencies. The incidence of terminal-type chiasmata in sex bivale...

  5. Human-Chromatin-Related Protein Interactions Identify a Demethylase Complex Required for Chromosome Segregation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edyta Marcon

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Chromatin regulation is driven by multicomponent protein complexes, which form functional modules. Deciphering the components of these modules and their interactions is central to understanding the molecular pathways these proteins are regulating, their functions, and their relation to both normal development and disease. We describe the use of affinity purifications of tagged human proteins coupled with mass spectrometry to generate a protein-protein interaction map encompassing known and predicted chromatin-related proteins. On the basis of 1,394 successful purifications of 293 proteins, we report a high-confidence (85% precision network involving 11,464 protein-protein interactions among 1,738 different human proteins, grouped into 164 often overlapping protein complexes with a particular focus on the family of JmjC-containing lysine demethylases, their partners, and their roles in chromatin remodeling. We show that RCCD1 is a partner of histone H3K36 demethylase KDM8 and demonstrate that both are important for cell-cycle-regulated transcriptional repression in centromeric regions and accurate mitotic division.

  6. Inheritance of a Chromosome 3 and 21 Translocation in the Fetuses, with One also Having Trisomy 21, in Three Pregnancies in One Family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazarbasi, A; Demirhan, O; Alptekin, D; Ozgunen, Ft; Ozpak, L; Yilmaz, Mb; Nazlican, E; Tanriverdi, N; Luleyap, U; Gümürdülü, D

    2013-12-01

    The majority of chromosome rearrangements are balanced reciprocal and Robertsonian translocations. It is now known that such abnormalities cause no phenotypic effect on the carrier but lead to increased risk of producing unbalanced gametes. Here, we report the inheritance of a translocation between chromosomes 3 and 21 in a family with one of two fetuses with Down Syndrome carrying the same translocation and the other also carrying the same translocation without the additional chromosome 21. Chromosomal analysis from fetal amniotic fluid and peripheral blood lymphocytes from the family were performed at the Çukurova University Hospital at Adana, Turkey. We assessed a family in which the translocation between chromosomes 3 and 21 segregates: one of the three progenies carried the 47,XX,+21,t(3;21)(q21;q22) karyotype and presented with Down Syndrome; another of the three progenies carried the 46,XX,t(3;21) (q21;q22) karyotype and the third had the 46,XY karyotype. Their mother is phenotypically normal. Apparently this rearrangement occurred due to an unbalanced chromosome segregation of the mother [t(3;21)(q21;q22)mat]. This family will enable us to explain the behavior of segregation patterns and the mechanism for each type of translocation from carrier to carrier and their effects on reproduction and numerical aberrations. These findings can be used in clinical genetics and may be used as an effective tool for reproductive guidance and genetic counseling. PMID:24778571

  7. Segregation of polymers in confined spaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigate the motion of two overlapping polymers confined in a 2D box. A statistical model is constructed using blob-free-energy arguments. We find spontaneous segregation under the condition L > R∥, and mixing under L < R∥, where L is the length of the box and R∥ is the polymer extension in an infinite slit. The segregation time (τ) is determined by solving a mean first-passage time problem and by performing Monte Carlo simulations. Both show a minimum in τ as a function of L. Although our results are restricted to 2D, the basic mechanism of competition between entropy and confinement leading to the minimum is suggestive of an evolutionary driving force for size selection. (paper)

  8. Thermal segregation beyond Navier-Stokes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A dilute suspension of impurities in a low-density gas is described by the Boltzmann and Boltzman-Lorentz kinetic theories. Scaling forms for the species distribution functions allow the determination of the space dependence of the hydrodynamic fields without restriction to small thermal gradients or Navier-Stokes hydrodynamics. The thermal diffusion factor characterizing segregation is identified in terms of collision integrals as a function of the mechanical properties of the particles and the temperature gradient. An evaluation of the collision integrals using Sonine polynomial approximations is discussed. The conditions for segregation both along and opposite to the temperature gradient are obtained and contrasted with the leading order Navier-Stokes approximation.

  9. Distribution and segregation of dissolved elements in pipeline slab

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianhua Liu; Yanping Bao; Xian Dong; Taiquan Li; Yi Ren; Shuai Zhang

    2007-01-01

    The chemical composition in a cross section of a high grade pipeline slab was measured point by point (in a scale of 1 μm)using original position statistic distribution analysis (OPA). The result indicated that negative segregation strips of Si, Mn, Mo, Ni, Cr,Nb, Cu, Ti, and V exist in the two sides 24 mm away from the central line, with a width of 8-12 mm, Negative segregation inside the central line is more severe than that outside the central line, and the highest positive segregation of the elements appears closely by the inner sides of the negative segregation strips. No obvious negative segregation strip of S and P is found. Segregation of the elements in the central area is higher than that in the outer and inner arc areas. The segregation of C, Ti, S, and P is high and that of Cr, Cu, Si, and Mn is low in the slab.

  10. Evaluating segregation in granular filters for earth dams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutherland, K. [Cambridge Univ., Cambridge (United Kingdom); Grabinsky, M. [Toronto Univ., ON (Canada)

    2003-07-01

    This paper presented some case studies to illustrate the relationship between seepage problems encountered with earth dams and segregation of the dams' granular filters during construction. A literature review of segregation mechanisms was presented along with a laboratory investigation. The case studies showed that the current understanding of the impact of a given degree of segregation is relatively poor. The literature reveals that although segregation mechanisms are identified and analyzed, very few are likely to be predominant during earth dam construction. Laboratory studies show that a mathematical relationship can be established between the filter's grain size distribution curve and the potential degree of segregation. Therefore, a mathematical relationship can also be established with the potential for adverse dam performance. The authors proposed a field procedure which allows for the monitoring of segregation during construction by contractors and engineers. It also helps in deciding whether any segregated zones require replacement. 5 refs., 7 figs.

  11. Segregation by thermal diffusion in granular shear flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Segregation by thermal diffusion of an intruder immersed in a sheared granular gas is analyzed from the (inelastic) Boltzmann equation. Segregation is induced by the presence of a temperature gradient orthogonal to the shear flow plane and parallel to gravity. We show that, like in analogous systems without shear, the segregation criterion yields a transition between upwards segregation and downwards segregation. The form of the phase diagrams is illustrated in detail showing that they depend sensitively on the value of gravity relative to the thermal gradient. Two specific situations are considered: (i) absence of gravity and (ii) homogeneous temperature. We find that both mechanisms (upwards and downwards segregation) are stronger and more clearly separated when compared with segregation criteria in systems without shear

  12. Applying Fixed Effects to Hierarchical Segregation Models

    OpenAIRE

    Dina Shatnawi; Ronald Oaxaca; Michael Ransom

    2011-01-01

    This paper expands the empirical implementation of hierarchical segregation models to allow for the use of panel methods. We use firm level data collected between 1977 and 1985 from a regional grocery store that faced a title VII class-action lawsuit over gender discrimination much the same as Wal-Mart and Costco. Special problems arise in implementing decompositions in a fixed effects and random effects setting, especially when analyzing wage-level differences. We develop a variation of wage...

  13. Functional Segregation of the Entopallium in Pigeons

    OpenAIRE

    Robert G Cook; Patton, Tadd B.; Shimizu, Toru

    2013-01-01

    In birds, the entopallium is the primary telencephalic target of the major visual ascending route called the tectofugal pathway. Often functionally compared to the primate geniculo-striate pathway and its subsequent telencephalic (cortical) regions, the latter processes visual information in a parallel fashion in terms of anatomy, physiology, and function. Little is known, however, about the exact mechanism of whether or how information is segregated or integrated in the avian tectofugal path...

  14. Segregation analysis of schizophrenia and related disorders.

    OpenAIRE

    Risch, N; Baron, M

    1984-01-01

    Segregation analysis was applied to 79 nuclear families ascertained through chronic schizophrenic probands. Analysis was performed on the diagnosis of schizophrenia alone and on schizophrenia and schizotypal personality disorder (milder phenotype) combined. The models used were the transmission probability model and the mixed model. Because the disease is associated with reduced fertility, all likelihoods were calculated conditional on parental phenotypes. However, compatibility of the mating...

  15. Biased DNA Segregation during Stem Cell Division

    OpenAIRE

    Anversa, Piero; Leri, Annarosa; Kajstura, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Adult skeletal muscle stem cells are a heterogeneous cell population characterized by a small subset of undifferentiated cells that express at high level the paired/homeodomain gene Pax7. This category of satellite cells divides predominantly by asymmetric chromatid segregation generating a daughter cell that carries the mother DNA and retains stem cell property, and a daughter cell that inherits the newly-synthesized DNA and acquires the myocyte lineage.1

  16. Segregation patterns in gas-fluidized systems

    OpenAIRE

    Gilbertson, M.A.; Eames, I

    2001-01-01

    The formation of segregation patterns in initially homogeneous, fluidized, binary mixtures of particles has been studied. The adjustment of the bed depends on the proportions of fine and coarse particles in the mixture and the gas flow rate relative to the minimum fluidization velocities of the two components. The particles are immobile until the gas flow rate is sufficiently large to fluidize the mixture of particles. When the gas how rate exceeds this critical value, alternating vertical ba...

  17. On impurity segregation on dislocations in metals

    OpenAIRE

    Netchaev, Yu.; Mukhina, L.

    1993-01-01

    Thermodynamic and crystallo-chemistry considerations are given about the possibility of existing linear distribution laws for some impurities in metals between bulk solution and near-dislocation segregation regions (NDSR) with composition and structure close to the corresponding intermetallic compound. The solutions of Fe in Al are considered. NDSR composition can be close to FeAl3. The experimental data on the solubilities are treated within the model developed to determine the effective bin...

  18. Sexual Segregation in Iberian Noctule Bats

    OpenAIRE

    Ibáñez, Carlos; Guillén, Antonio; Agirre-Mendi, Pablo T.; Juste, Javier; Schreur, Godfried; Cordero, Ana I.; Popa-Lisseanu, Ana G.

    2009-01-01

    Sexual segregation during the breeding season is common in many temperate bat species, and may be related to sex-specific thermoregulatory, microclimatic, or energetic requirements. We compiled capture data for 3 species of Nyctalus (noctule bats) obtained over .20 years to study reproductive and migratory strategies of these species in southwestern Europe. Within the Iberian Peninsula, several different strategies regarding sex distribution and migratory behavior were observed within each o...

  19. SOLID WASTE SEGREGATION BEHAVIOR AMONG URBAN WOMEN

    OpenAIRE

    P. Mohamed Nisha; Raji Sugumar

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the solid waste segregation behavior of the women of Chennai city of Tamil Nadu state. Using a structured, self-developed interview schedule, 120 women were selected randomly for the survey with equal representation from the three regions of Chennai city. Findings revealed that most of the waste that is being generated in the households of the selected samples was organic, recyclable and reusable. The sample women are not highly knowledgeable about the solid...

  20. A Spatially Extended Model for Residential Segregation

    OpenAIRE

    Antonio Aguilera; Edgardo Ugalde

    2006-01-01

    We analyze urban spatial segregation phenomenon in terms of the income distribution over a population, and an inflationary parameter weighting the evolution of housing prices. For this, we develop a discrete spatially extended model based on a multiagent approach. In our model, the mobility of socioeconomic agents is driven only by the housing prices. Agents exchange location in order to fit their status to the cost of their ...

  1. Minimization and segregation of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report will serve as one of a series of technical manuals providing reference material and direct know-how to staff in radioisotope user establishments and research centres in Member States without nuclear power and the associated range of complex waste management operations. Considerations are limited to the minimization and segregation of wastes, these being initial steps on which the efficiency of the whole waste management system depends. The minimization and segregation operations are examined in the context of the restricted quantities and predominantly shorter lived activities of wastes from nuclear research, production and usage of radioisotopes. Liquid and solid wastes only are considered in the report. Gaseous waste minimization and treatment are specialized subjects and are not examined in this document. Gaseous effluent treatment in facilities handling low and intermediate level radioactive materials has been already the subject of a detailed IAEA report. Management of spent sealed sources has specifically been covered in a previous manual. Conditioned sealed sources must be taken into account in segregation arrangements for interim storage and disposal where there are exceptional long lived highly radiotoxic isotopes, particularly radium or americium. These are unlikely ever to be suitable for shallow land burial along with the remaining wastes. 30 refs, 5 figs, 8 tabs

  2. Segregation effects in DEEP2 galaxy groups

    CERN Document Server

    Nascimento, Raquel S; Lopes, Paulo A A

    2016-01-01

    We investigate segregation phenomena in galaxy groups in the range of $0.20.6$) redshift groups. Assuming that the color index ${(U-B)_0}$ can be used as a proxy for the galaxy type, we found that the fraction of blue (star-forming) objects is higher in the high-z sample, with blue objects being dominant at $M_{B}>-19.5$ for both samples, and red objects being dominant at $M_{B}<-19.5$ only for the low-z sample. Also, the radial variation of the red fraction indicates that there are more red objects with $Rsegregation, at the 99%c.l., for the low-z sample: redder and brighter galaxies present lower velocity dispersions than bluer and fainter ones. We also find a weaker evidence for spatial segregation between red and blue objects, at the 70%c.l. The analysis of the high-z sample reveals a different result: red and blue galaxies have velocity dispersion distributions not statistically distinc...

  3. How population structure shapes neighborhood segregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruch, Elizabeth E

    2014-03-01

    This study provides a framework for understanding how population composition conditions the relationship between individuals' choices about group affiliation and aggregate patterns of social separation or integration. The substantive focus is the role of income inequality in racial residential segregation. The author identifies three population parameters--between-group inequality, within-group inequality, and relative group size--that determine how income inequality between race groups affects racial segregation. She uses data from the Panel Study of Income Dynamics to estimate models of individual-level residential mobility and incorporates these estimates into agent-based models. She then simulates segregation dynamics under alternative assumptions about (1) the relative size of minority groups and (2) the degree of correlation between race and income among individuals. The author finds that income inequality can have offsetting effects at the high and low ends of the income distribution. She demonstrates the empirical relevance of the simulation results using fixed-effects, metro-level regressions applied to 1980-2000 U.S. census data. PMID:25009360

  4. Implementing spatial segregation measures in R.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Seong-Yun; O'Sullivan, David; Sadahiro, Yukio

    2014-01-01

    Reliable and accurate estimation of residential segregation between population groups is important for understanding the extent of social cohesion and integration in our society. Although there have been considerable methodological advances in the measurement of segregation over the last several decades, the recently developed measures have not been widely used in the literature, in part due to their complex calculation. To address this problem, we have implemented several newly proposed segregation indices in R, an open source software environment for statistical computing and graphics, as a package called seg. Although there are already a few standalone applications and add-on packages that provide access to similar methods, our implementation has a number of advantages over the existing tools. First, our implementation is flexible in the sense that it provides detailed control over the calculation process with a wide range of input parameters. Most of the parameters have carefully chosen defaults, which perform acceptably in many situations, so less experienced users can also use the implemented functions without too much difficulty. Second, there is no need to export results to other software programs for further analysis. We provide coercion methods that enable the transformation of our output classes into general R classes, so the user can use thousands of standard and modern statistical techniques, which are already available in R, for the post-processing of the results. Third, our implementation does not require commercial software to operate, so it is accessible to a wider group of people. PMID:25415326

  5. A Spatially Extended Model for Residential Segregation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Aguilera

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available We analyze urban spatial segregation phenomenon in terms of the income distribution over a population, and an inflationary parameter weighting the evolution of housing prices. For this, we develop a discrete spatially extended model based on a multiagent approach. In our model, the mobility of socioeconomic agents is driven only by the housing prices. Agents exchange location in order to fit their status to the cost of their housing. On the other hand, the price of a particular house depends on the status of its tenant, and on the neighborhood mean lodging cost weighted by a control parameter. The agent's dynamics converges to a spatially organized configuration, whose regularity is measured by using an entropy-like indicator. This simple model provides a dynamical process organizing the virtual city, in a way that the population inequality and the inflationary parameter determine the degree of residential segregation in the final stage of the process, in agreement with the segregation-inequality thesis put forward by Douglas Massey.

  6. Implementing spatial segregation measures in R.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seong-Yun Hong

    Full Text Available Reliable and accurate estimation of residential segregation between population groups is important for understanding the extent of social cohesion and integration in our society. Although there have been considerable methodological advances in the measurement of segregation over the last several decades, the recently developed measures have not been widely used in the literature, in part due to their complex calculation. To address this problem, we have implemented several newly proposed segregation indices in R, an open source software environment for statistical computing and graphics, as a package called seg. Although there are already a few standalone applications and add-on packages that provide access to similar methods, our implementation has a number of advantages over the existing tools. First, our implementation is flexible in the sense that it provides detailed control over the calculation process with a wide range of input parameters. Most of the parameters have carefully chosen defaults, which perform acceptably in many situations, so less experienced users can also use the implemented functions without too much difficulty. Second, there is no need to export results to other software programs for further analysis. We provide coercion methods that enable the transformation of our output classes into general R classes, so the user can use thousands of standard and modern statistical techniques, which are already available in R, for the post-processing of the results. Third, our implementation does not require commercial software to operate, so it is accessible to a wider group of people.

  7. Integration and segregation in auditory scene analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sussman, Elyse S.

    2005-03-01

    Assessment of the neural correlates of auditory scene analysis, using an index of sound change detection that does not require the listener to attend to the sounds [a component of event-related brain potentials called the mismatch negativity (MMN)], has previously demonstrated that segregation processes can occur without attention focused on the sounds and that within-stream contextual factors influence how sound elements are integrated and represented in auditory memory. The current study investigated the relationship between the segregation and integration processes when they were called upon to function together. The pattern of MMN results showed that the integration of sound elements within a sound stream occurred after the segregation of sounds into independent streams and, further, that the individual streams were subject to contextual effects. These results are consistent with a view of auditory processing that suggests that the auditory scene is rapidly organized into distinct streams and the integration of sequential elements to perceptual units takes place on the already formed streams. This would allow for the flexibility required to identify changing within-stream sound patterns, needed to appreciate music or comprehend speech..

  8. From Schelling to Schools: A Comparison of a Model of Residential Segregation with a Model of School Segregation

    OpenAIRE

    Victor Ionut Stoica; Andreas Flache

    2014-01-01

    We address theoretically whether and under what conditions Schelling’s celebrated result of ‘self-organized’ unintended residential segregation may also apply to school segregation. We propose here a computational model of school segregation that is aligned with a corresponding Schelling-type model of residential segregation. To adapt the model for application to school segregation, we move beyond previous work by combining two preference arguments in modeling parents’ school choice, ...

  9. Molecular fundamentals of chromosomal mutagenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Precise quantitative correlation between the yield of chromosome structure damages and the yield of DNA damages is shown when comparing data on molecular and cytogenetic investigations carried out in cultural Mammalia cells. As the chromosome structure damage is to be connected with the damage of its carcass structure, then it is natural that DNA damage in loop regions is not to affect considerably the structure, while DNA damage lying on the loop base and connected with the chromosome carcass is to play a determining role in chromosomal mutagenesis. This DNA constitutes 1-2% from the total quantity of nuclear DNA. If one accepts that damages of these regions of DNA are ''hot'' points of chromosomal mutagenesis, then it becomes clear why 1-2% of preparation damages in a cell are realized in chromosome structural damages

  10. Electochemical detection of chromosome translocation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kwasny, Dorota; Dimaki, Maria; Silahtaroglu, Asli;

    2014-01-01

    Cytogenetics is a study of the cell structure with a main focus on chromosomes content and their structure. Chromosome abnormalities, such as translocations may cause various genetic disorders and heametological malignancies. Chromosome translocations are structural rearrangements of two...... hybridization approach developed for label-free detection of the chromosome translocations. For specific translocation detection it is necessary to determine that the two DNA sequences forming a derivative chromosome are connected, which is achieved by two subsequent hybridization steps. The electrochemical...... impedance spectroscopy was selected as the sensing method on a microfabricated chip with array of 12 electrode sets. Two independent chips (Chip1 and Chip2) were used for targeting the chromosomal fragments involved in the translocation. Each chip was differentially functionalized with DNA probes matching...

  11. Genetics of dioecy and causal sex chromosomes in plants

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sushil Kumar; Renu Kumari; Vishakha Sharma

    2014-04-01

    Dioecy (separate male and female individuals) ensures outcrossing and is more prevalent in animals than in plants. Although it is common in bryophytes and gymnosperms, only 5% of angiosperms are dioecious. In dioecious higher plants, flowers borne on male and female individuals are, respectively deficient in functional gynoecium and androecium. Dioecy is inherited via three sex chromosome systems: XX/XY, XX/X0 and WZ/ZZ, such that XX or WZ is female and XY, X0 or ZZ are males. The XX/XY system generates the rarer XX/X0 andWZ/ZZ systems. An autosome pair begets XY chromosomes. A recessive loss-of-androecium mutation (ana) creates X chromosome and a dominant gynoecium-suppressing (GYS) mutation creates Y chromosome. The ana/ANA and gys/GYS loci are in the sex-determining region (SDR) of the XY pair. Accumulation of inversions, deleterious mutations and repeat elements, especially transposons, in the SDR of Y suppresses recombination between X and Y in SDR, making Y labile and increasingly degenerate and heteromorphic from X. Continued recombination between X and Y in their pseudoautosomal region located at the ends of chromosomal arms allows survival of the degenerated Y and of the species. Dioecy is presumably a component of the evolutionary cycle for the origin of new species. Inbred hermaphrodite species assume dioecy. Later they suffer degenerate-Y-led population regression. Cross-hybridization between such extinguishing species and heterologous species, followed by genome duplication of segregants from hybrids, give rise to new species.

  12. Intraspecific chromosome variability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Dubinin

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available (Editorial preface. The publication is presented in order to remind us of one of dramatic pages of the history of genetics. It re-opens for the contemporary reader a comprehensive work marking the priority change from plant cytogenetics to animal cytogenetics led by wide population studies which were conducted on Drosophila polytene chromosomes. The year of the publication (1937 became the point of irretrievable branching between the directions of Old World and New World genetics connected with the problems of chromosome variability and its significance for the evolution of the species. The famous book of T. Dobzhansky (1937 was published by Columbia University in the US under the title “Genetics and the origin of species”, and in the shadow of this American ‘skybuilding’ all other works grew dim. It is remarkable that both Dobzhansky and Dubinin come to similar conclusions about the role of chromosomes in speciation. This is not surprising given that they both might be considered as representatives of the Russian genetic school, by their birth and education. Interestingly, Dobzhansky had never referred to the full paper of Dubinin et al. (1937, though a previous short communication in Nature (1936 was included together with all former papers on the related subject. In full, the volume of the original publication printed in the Biological Journal in Moscow comprised 47 pages, in that number 41 pages of the Russian text accompanied by 16 Figs, a table and reference list, and, above all, 6 pages of the English summary. This final part in English is now reproduced in the authors’ version with the only addition being the reference list in the originally printed form.

  13. Reference-assisted chromosome assembly

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Jaebum; Larkin, Denis M; Cai, Qingle; Asan,; Zhang, Yongfen; Ge, Ri-Li; Auvil, Loretta; Capitanu, Boris; Zhang, Guojie; Lewin, Harris A.; Ma, Jian

    2013-01-01

    One of the most difficult problems in modern genomics is the assembly of full-length chromosomes using next generation sequencing (NGS) data. To address this problem, we developed “reference-assisted chromosome assembly” (RACA), an algorithm to reliably order and orient sequence scaffolds generated by NGS and assemblers into longer chromosomal fragments using comparative genome information and paired-end reads. Evaluation of results using simulated and real genome assemblies indicates that ou...

  14. Detection of segregation distortion loci in triticale (x Triticosecale Wittmack based on a high-density DArT marker consensus genetic linkage map

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weissmann Elmar A

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Triticale is adapted to a wide range of abiotic stress conditions, is an important high-quality feed stock and produces similar grain yield but more biomass compared to other crops. Modern genomic approaches aimed at enhancing breeding progress in cereals require high-quality genetic linkage maps. Consensus maps are genetic maps that are created by a joint analysis of the data from several segregating populations and different approaches are available for their construction. The phenomenon that alleles at a locus deviate from the Mendelian expectation has been defined as segregation distortion. The study of segregation distortion is of particular interest in doubled haploid (DH populations due to the selection pressure exerted on the plants during the process of their establishment. Results The final consensus map, constructed out of six segregating populations derived from nine parental lines, incorporated 2555 DArT markers mapped to 2602 loci (1929 unique. The map spanned 2309.9 cM with an average number of 123.9 loci per chromosome and an average marker density of one unique locus every 1.2 cM. The R genome showed the highest marker coverage followed by the B genome and the A genome. In general, locus order was well maintained between the consensus linkage map and the component maps. However, we observed several groups of loci for which the colinearity was slightly uneven. Among the 2602 loci mapped on the consensus map, 886 showed distorted segregation in at least one of the individual mapping populations. In several DH populations derived by androgenesis, we found chromosomes (2B, 3B, 1R, 2R, 4R and 7R containing regions where markers exhibited a distorted segregation pattern. In addition, we observed evidence for segregation distortion between pairs of loci caused either by a predominance of parental or recombinant genotypes. Conclusions We have constructed a reliable, high-density DArT marker consensus genetic linkage

  15. Mutiscale Modeling of Segregation in Granular Flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin Sun

    2007-08-03

    Modeling and simulation of segregation phenomena in granular flows are investigated. Computational models at different scales ranging from particle level (microscale) to continuum level (macroscale) are employed in order to determine the important microscale physics relevant to macroscale modeling. The capability of a multi-fluid model to capture segregation caused by density difference is demonstrated by simulating grain-chaff biomass flows in a laboratory-scale air column and in a combine harvester. The multi-fluid model treats gas and solid phases as interpenetrating continua in an Eulerian frame. This model is further improved by incorporating particle rotation using kinetic theory for rapid granular flow of slightly frictional spheres. A simplified model is implemented without changing the current kinetic theory framework by introducing an effective coefficient of restitution to account for additional energy dissipation due to frictional collisions. The accuracy of predicting segregation rate in a gas-fluidized bed is improved by the implementation. This result indicates that particle rotation is important microscopic physics to be incorporated into the hydrodynamic model. Segregation of a large particle in a dense granular bed of small particles under vertical. vibration is studied using molecular dynamics simulations. Wall friction is identified as a necessary condition for the segregation. Large-scale force networks bearing larger-than-average forces are found with the presence of wall friction. The role of force networks in assisting rising of the large particle is analyzed. Single-point force distribution and two-point spatial force correlation are computed. The results show the heterogeneity of forces and a short-range correlation. The short correlation length implies that even dense granular flows may admit local constitutive relations. A modified minimum spanning tree (MST) algorithm is developed to asymptotically recover the force statistics in the

  16. Novel ATRX gene damaging missense mutation c.6740A>C segregates with profound to severe intellectual deficiency without alpha thalassaemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Habib Bouazzi

    2016-01-01

    Interpretation & conclusions: The novel mutation c.6740A>C was identified within the ATRX gene helicase domain and confirmed by Sanger sequencing in the three affected males as well as in the mother and her two daughters. This mutation was predicted to be damaging and deleterious. The novel mutation segregated with the phenotype without alpha-thalassaemia and with non-skewed X chromosome.

  17. Familial predisposition to Wilms' tumour does not map to the short arm of chromosome 11.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grundy, P; Koufos, A; Morgan, K; Li, F P; Meadows, A T; Cavenee, W K

    1988-11-24

    Wilms' tumour of the kidney usually occurs sporadically, but can also segregate as an autosomal dominant trait with incomplete penetrance. Patients with the WAGR syndrome of aniridia, genitourinary anomalies, mental retardation and high risk of Wilms' tumour have overlapping deletions of chromosome 11p13 which has suggested a possible location for a Wilms' tumour locus. Moreover, many sporadic tumours have lost a portion of chromosome 11p. A second locus at 11p15 is implicated by association of the tumour with the Wiedemann-Beckwith syndrome and by tumour-specific losses of chromosome 11 confined to 11p15. Here we report a multipoint linkage analysis of a family segregating for Wilms' tumour, using polymorphic DNA markers mapped to chromosome 11p. The results exclude the predisposing mutation from both locations. In a second family, the 11p15 alleles lost in the tumour were derived from the affected parent, thus precluding this region as the location of the inherited mutation. These findings imply an aetiological heterogeneity for Wilms' tumour and raise questions concerning the general applicability of the carcinogenesis model that has been useful in the understanding of retinoblastoma. PMID:2848199

  18. Chromosome Connections: Compelling Clues to Common Ancestry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flammer, Larry

    2013-01-01

    Students compare banding patterns on hominid chromosomes and see striking evidence of their common ancestry. To test this, human chromosome no. 2 is matched with two shorter chimpanzee chromosomes, leading to the hypothesis that human chromosome 2 resulted from the fusion of the two shorter chromosomes. Students test that hypothesis by looking for…

  19. X-chromosome workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paterson, A D

    1998-01-01

    Researchers presented results of ongoing research to the X-chromosome workshop of the Fifth World Congress on Psychiatric Genetics, covering a wide range of disorders: X-linked infantile spasms; a complex phenotype associated with deletions of Xp11; male homosexuality; degree of handedness; bipolar affective disorder; schizophrenia; childhood onset psychosis; and autism. This report summarizes the presentations, as well as reviewing previous studies. The focus of this report is on linkage findings for schizophrenia and bipolar disorder from a number of groups. For schizophrenia, low positive lod scores were obtained for markers DXS991 and DXS993 from two studies, although the sharing of alleles was greatest from brother-brother pairs in one study, and sister-sister in the other. Data from the Irish schizophrenia study was also submitted, with no strong evidence for linkage on the X chromosome. For bipolar disease, following the report of a Finnish family linked to Xq24-q27, the Columbia group reported some positive results for this region from 57 families, however, another group found no evidence for linkage to this region. Of interest, is the clustering of low positive linkage results that point to regions for possible further study. PMID:9686435

  20. Chromosome analysis and sorting

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Doležel, Jaroslav; Kubaláková, Marie; Suchánková, Pavla; Kovářová, Pavlína; Bartoš, Jan; Šimková, Hana

    Weinheim : Wiley-VCH, 2007 - (Doležel, J.; Greilhuber, J.; Suda, J.), s. 373-403 ISBN 978-3-527-31487-4 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA521/04/0607; GA ČR GP521/05/P257; GA ČR GD521/05/H013; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06004 Grant ostatní: Mendelova zemědělská a lesnická univerzita v Brně / Agronomická fakulta(CZ) ME 844 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5038910 Source of funding: V - iné verejné zdroje ; V - iné verejné zdroje ; V - iné verejné zdroje ; V - iné verejné zdroje ; V - iné verejné zdroje Keywords : Plant flow cytometry * chromosome sorting * flow cytogenetics Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology http://books. google .com/books?id=3cwakORieqUC&pg=PA373&lpg=PA373&dq=Chromosome+analysis+and+sorting&source=web&ots=8IyvJlBQyq&sig=_NlXyQQgBCwpj1pTC9YITvvVZqU

  1. The Aurora B kinase in chromosome biorientation and spindle checkpoint signalling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronica eKrenn

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Aurora B, a member of the Aurora family of serine/threonine protein kinases, is a key player in chromosome segregation. As part of a macromolecular complex known as the chromosome passenger complex, Aurora B concentrates early during mitosis in the proximity of centromeres and kinetochores, the sites of attachment of chromosomes to spindle microtubules. There, it contributes to a number of processes that impart fidelity to cell division, including kinetochore stabilization, kinetochore-microtubule attachment, and the regulation of a surveillance mechanism named the spindle assembly checkpoint. In the regulation of these processes, Aurora B is the fulcrum of a remarkably complex network of interactions that feed back on its localization and activation state. In this review we discuss the multiple roles of Aurora B during mitosis, focusing in particular on its role at centromeres and kinetochores. Many details of the network of interactions at these locations remain poorly understood, and we focus here on several crucial outstanding questions.

  2. Clinical features of early onset, familial Alzheimer`s disease linked to chromosome 14

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mullan, M.; Bennett, C.; Figueredo, C.; Crawford, F. [Univ. of South Florida, Tampa, FL (United States)] [and others

    1995-02-27

    Early onset familial Alzheimer`s disease (AD) has an autosomal dominant mode of inheritance. Two genes are responsible for the majority of cases of this subtype of AD. Mutations in the {beta}-amyloid precursor protein ({beta}APP) gene on chromosome 21 have been shown to completely cosegregate with the disease. We and others have previously described the clinical features of families with {beta}APP mutations at the codon 717 locus in an attempt to define the phenotype associated with a valine to isoleucine (Val {r_arrow} Ile) or a valine to glycine (Val {r_arrow} Gly) change. More recently, a second locus for very early onset disease has been localized to chromosome 14. The results of linkage studies in some families suggesting linkage to both chromosomes have been explained by the suggestion of a second (centromeric) locus on chromosome 21. Here we report the clinical features and genetic analysis of a British pedigree (F74) with early onset AD in which neither the {beta}APP locus nor any other chromosome 21 locus segregates with the disease, but in which good evidence is seen for linkage on the long arm of chromosome 14. In particular we report marker data suggesting that the chromosome 14 disease locus is close to D14S43 and D14S77. Given the likelihood that F74 represents a chromosome 14 linked family, we describe the clinical features and make a limited clinical comparison with the {beta}APP717 Val {r_arrow} Ile and {beta}APP717 Val {r_arrow} Gly encoded families that have been previously described. We conclude that although several previously reported clinical features occur to excess in early onset familial AD, no single clinical feature demarcates either the chromosome 14 or {beta}APP codon 717 mutated families except mean age of onset. 52 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

  3. Epigenetic Histone Marks of Extended Meta-Polycentric Centromeres of Lathyrus and Pisum Chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Pavel; Schubert, Veit; Fuková, Iva; Manning, Jasper E; Houben, Andreas; Macas, Jiří

    2016-01-01

    Species of the legume genera Lathyrus and Pisum possess chromosomes that exhibit a unique structure of their centromeric regions, which is clearly apparent during metaphase by the formation of extended primary constrictions which span up to a third of the length of the chromosome. In addition, these species express two different variants of the CenH3 protein which are co-localized in multiple domains along the poleward surface of the primary constrictions. Here, we show that the constrictions represent a distinct type of chromatin differing from the chromosome arms. In metaphase, histone phosphorylation patterns including H3S10ph, H3S28ph, and H3T3ph were observed along the entire constriction, in a way similar to holocentric chromosomes. On the other hand, distribution of phosphorylated H2AT120 was different from that previously reported from either, holocentric and monocentric chromosomes, occurring at chromatin surrounding but not overlapping CenH3 domains. Since some of these phosphorylations play a role in chromatid cohesion, it can be assumed that they facilitate correct chromosome segregation by ensuring that multiple separate CenH3 domains present on the same chromatid are oriented toward the same pole. The constrictions also displayed distinct patterns of histone methylation marks, being enriched in H3K9me2 and depleted in H3K4me3 and H3K27me2 compared to the chromosome arms. Super-resolution fluorescence microscopy revealed that although both CenH3 protein variants are present in all CenH3 domains detected on metaphase chromosomes, they are only partially co-localized while there are chromatin subdomains which are mostly made of only one CenH3 variant. Taken together, these data revealed specific features of extended primary constrictions of Lathyrus and Pisum and support the idea that they may represent an intermediate stage between monocentric and holocentric chromosomes. PMID:26973677

  4. Epigenetic histone marks of extended meta-polycentric centromeres of Lathyrus and Pisum chromosomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel eNeumann

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Species of the legume genera Lathyrus and Pisum possess chromosomes that exhibit a unique structure of their centromeric regions, which is clearly apparent during metaphase by the formation of extended primary constrictions which span up to a third of the length of the chromosome. In addition, these species express two different variants of the CenH3 protein which are co-localized in multiple domains along the poleward surface of the primary constrictions. Here we show that the constrictions represent a distinct type of chromatin differing from the chromosome arms. In metaphase, histone phosphorylation patterns including H3S10ph, H3S28ph and H3T3ph were observed along the entire constriction, in a way similar to holocentric chromosomes. On the other hand, distribution of phosphorylated H2AT120 was different from that previously reported from either, holocentric and monocentric chromosomes, occurring at chromatin surrounding but not overlapping CenH3 domains. Since some of these phosphorylations play a role in chromatid cohesion, it can be assumed that they facilitate correct chromosome segregation by ensuring that multiple separate CenH3 domains present on the same chromatid are oriented towards the same pole. The constrictions also displayed distinct patterns of histone methylation marks, being enriched in H3K9me2 and depleted in H3K4me3 and H3K27me2 compared to the chromosome arms. High resolution fluorescence microscopy revealed that although both CenH3 protein variants are present in all CenH3 domains detected on metaphase chromosomes, they are only partially co-localized while there are chromatin subdomains which are mostly made of only one CenH3 variant. Taken together, these data revealed specific features of extended primary constrictions of Lathyrus and Pisum and support the idea that they may represent an intermediate stage between monocentric and holocentric chromosomes.

  5. Cohesin in determining chromosome architecture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haering, Christian H., E-mail: christian.haering@embl.de [Cell Biology and Biophysics Unit, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), Heidelberg (Germany); Jessberger, Rolf, E-mail: rolf.jessberger@tu-dresden.de [Institute of Physiological Chemistry, Dresden University of Technology, Dresden (Germany)

    2012-07-15

    Cells use ring-like structured protein complexes for various tasks in DNA dynamics. The tripartite cohesin ring is particularly suited to determine chromosome architecture, for it is large and dynamic, may acquire different forms, and is involved in several distinct nuclear processes. This review focuses on cohesin's role in structuring chromosomes during mitotic and meiotic cell divisions and during interphase.

  6. Causes of oncogenic chromosomal translocation

    OpenAIRE

    Aplan, Peter D.

    2005-01-01

    Non-random chromosomal translocations are frequently associated with a variety of cancers, especially hematologic malignancies and childhood sarcomas In addition to their diagnostic utility, chromosomal translocations are increasingly being used in the clinic to guide therapeutic decisions. However, the mechanisms which cause these translocations remain poorly understood. Illegit...

  7. Three decades of studies on chromosomal polymorphism of Drosophila willistoni and description of fifty different rearrangements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Rohde

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Drosophila willistoni (Insecta, Diptera is considered a paradigm for evolutionary studies. Their chromosomes are characterized by multiple paracentric inversions that make it hard to identify and describe chromosomal poly-morphisms. In the present report we attempted to systematize the description of all the 50 inversions found in the last three decades, since we have been studying the chromosomes of several individuals of 30 different populations, including the one used in the genome sequencing project (Gd-H4-1. We present the photographic register of 11 arrangements in the left arm of the X chromosome (XL, eight in the right arm (XR, 10 in the left arm of chromosome II (IIL, eight in its right arm (IIR and 13 in chromosome III. This information also includes their breakpoints on the reference photomap. A clear geographic difference was detected in XL and XR, with different fixed arrangements depending on the origin of the population studied. Through the comparison of all X arrangements it was possible to infer the putative ancestral arrangements, i.e., those related to all the remaining arrangements through the small number of inversions that occurred in the past, which we will call XL-A and XR-A. In the autosomes (IIL/IIR and III, fixed inversions were detected, but most are segregating in different frequencies along the geographical distribution of the D. willistoni populations.

  8. Genetics Home Reference: ring chromosome 20 syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 3 links) Encyclopedia: Chromosome Encyclopedia: Epilepsy Health Topic: Epilepsy Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (1 link) Ring chromosome 20 Additional NIH Resources (2 links) National Human Genome Research Institute: Chromosome Abnormalities National Institute of ...

  9. Genetics Home Reference: ring chromosome 14 syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Encyclopedia: Chromosome Health Topic: Developmental Disabilities Health Topic: Epilepsy Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (1 link) Ring chromosome 14 Additional NIH Resources (2 links) National Human Genome Research Institute: Chromosome Abnormalities National Institute of ...

  10. Vapor segregation and loss in basaltic melts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmonds, M.; Gerlach, T.M.

    2007-01-01

    Measurements of volcanic gases at Pu'u'O??'o??, Kilauea Volcano, Hawai'i, reveal distinct degassing regimes with respect to vapor segregation and loss during effusive activity in 2004-2005. Three styles of vapor loss are distinguished by the chemical character of the emitted volcanic gases, measured by open path Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy: 1 persistent continuous gas emission, 2 gas piston events, and 3 lava spattering. Persistent continuous gas emission is associated with magma ascent and degassing beneath the crater vents, then eruption of the degassed magma from flank vents. Gas piston events are the result of static gas accumulation at depths of 400-900 m beneath Pu'u'O??'o??. A CO2-rich gas slug travels up the conduit at a few meters per second, displacing magma as it expands. Lava spattering occurs due to dynamic bubble coalescence in a column of relatively stagnant magma. The Large gas bubbles are H2O rich and are generated by open-system degassing at depths of segregation in basaltic melts, but their implications differ. Accumulation and segregation of CO2-rich vapor at depth does not deplete the melt of H2O (required to drive lava fountains near to the surface) and therefore gas piston events can occur interspersed with lava fountaining activity. Lava spattering, however, efficiently strips H2O-rich vapor from magma beneath the crater vents; the magma must then erupt effusively from vents on the flank of the cone. ?? 2007 The Geological Society of America.

  11. Surface segregation in HAYNES 230 alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The surface segregation in the Ni-based alloy HAYNES 230 was studied by Auger Electron Spectroscopy and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy between 400 and 1100 deg. C. The qualitative variations of the surface contents of S, P, W, Mo, N, Si, and Mn were determined as a function of annealing temperature and time. It was found that at 925 deg. C the maximum coverage of sulphur at the alloy surface is in the range 0.06-0.15 monolayers. Chromium evaporation from the HAYNES 230 surface under UHV conditions is clearly evidenced for annealing at 1100 deg. C

  12. Surface segregation in HAYNES 230 alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pop, D.; Wolski, K.

    2006-12-01

    The surface segregation in the Ni-based alloy HAYNES 230 was studied by Auger Electron Spectroscopy and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy between 400 and 1100 °C. The qualitative variations of the surface contents of S, P, W, Mo, N, Si, and Mn were determined as a function of annealing temperature and time. It was found that at 925 °C the maximum coverage of sulphur at the alloy surface is in the range 0.06-0.15 monolayers. Chromium evaporation from the HAYNES 230 surface under UHV conditions is clearly evidenced for annealing at 1100 °C.

  13. Racial Segregation and the American Foreclosure Crisis

    OpenAIRE

    Rugh, Jacob S.; Massey, Douglas S.

    2010-01-01

    Although the rise in subprime lending and the ensuing wave of foreclosures was partly a result of market forces that have been well-identified in the literature, in the United States it was also a highly racialized process. We argue that residential segregation created a unique niche of poor minority clients who were differentially marketed risky subprime loans that were in great demand for use in mortgage-backed securities that could be sold on secondary markets. We test this argument by reg...

  14. Potential donor segregation to promote blood donation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Santana, Josefa D; Beerli-Palacio, Asunción

    2008-04-01

    This work is set in the field of social marketing and more specifically in the context of blood donation. Its principal objective focuses on segregating potential donors by using the inhibitors or barriers to a blood donation behaviour as criteria. Moreover, an analysis of the predisposition to donate blood, the intrinsic and extrinsic motivations for donating blood, and the incentives that may stimulate their donation conduct was conducted for each of the four identified groups. The results reveal that the four segments differ significantly in their predisposition to donate, in their motivations and in the incentives that encourage them to donate blood. PMID:18343199

  15. ADN et chromosomes

    OpenAIRE

    Hayes, Hélène

    2000-01-01

    Chaque chromosome contient une seule molécule d’ADN. L’ADN déroulé d’un noyau de cellule humaine mesurerait environ 1,8 m : chaque molécule d’ADN est enroulée et compactée en plusieurs étapes, grâce à l’association de différentes protéines, et loge dans le noyau de 6 µm de diamètre. Le degré de condensation de l’ADN est variable selon les régions chromosomiques et les régions les moins condensées sont les plus riches en gènes. L’ADN est composé d’une variété de séquences codantes ou non et ré...

  16. X-Chromosome dosage compensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Barbara J

    2005-01-01

    In mammals, flies, and worms, sex is determined by distinctive regulatory mechanisms that cause males (XO or XY) and females (XX) to differ in their dose of X chromosomes. In each species, an essential X chromosome-wide process called dosage compensation ensures that somatic cells of either sex express equal levels of X-linked gene products. The strategies used to achieve dosage compensation are diverse, but in all cases, specialized complexes are targeted specifically to the X chromosome(s) of only one sex to regulate transcript levels. In C. elegans, this sex-specific targeting of the dosage compensation complex (DCC) is controlled by the same developmental signal that establishes sex, the ratio of X chromosomes to sets of autosomes (X:A signal). Molecular components of this chromosome counting process have been defined. Following a common step of regulation, sex determination and dosage compensation are controlled by distinct genetic pathways. C. elegans dosage compensation is implemented by a protein complex that binds both X chromosomes of hermaphrodites to reduce transcript levels by one-half. The dosage compensation complex resembles the conserved 13S condensin complex required for both mitotic and meiotic chromosome resolution and condensation, implying the recruitment of ancient proteins to the new task of regulating gene expression. Within each C. elegans somatic cell, one of the DCC components also participates in the separate mitotic/meiotic condensin complex. Other DCC components play pivotal roles in regulating the number and distribution of crossovers during meiosis. The strategy by which C. elegans X chromosomes attract the condensin-like DCC is known. Small, well-dispersed X-recognition elements act as entry sites to recruit the dosage compensation complex and to nucleate spreading of the complex to X regions that lack recruitment sites. In this manner, a repressed chromatin state is spread in cis over short or long distances, thus establishing the

  17. Gender-based Segregation before and after the Great Recession

    OpenAIRE

    Stephan HUMPERT

    2015-01-01

    Pooled international survey data is used to analyze occupational segregation in times of the great recession. Observing over 30 European economies and the United States over a time span of 10 years, I present evidence of a somehow surprising crisis effect on gender-based segregation. While all economies differ in their general magnitudes, the economic downturn affects a temporary reduction of segregation in terms of two dissimilarity measures.

  18. Segregation and sporadic cases in families with Hunter's syndrome.

    OpenAIRE

    Machill, G; Barbujani, G.; Danieli, G A; Herrmann, F H

    1991-01-01

    Segregation analysis on five samples of families with Hunter's syndrome (158 cases overall) shows that the mutant allele segregates in agreement with Mendelian expectations for an X linked recessive disease, but the proportion of sporadic cases is significantly lower than expected under mutation-selection equilibrium. Heterogeneity among the samples is apparent, but it is caused entirely by a sample of Ashkenazi families, whose segregation pattern has previously been interpreted as supporting...

  19. Occupational Sex Segregation and Working Time: Regional Evidence from Germany

    OpenAIRE

    Humpert Stephan

    2014-01-01

    This paper provides descriptive evidence for declining occupational sex segregation on the German labor market, especially concerning the regional differences between the former East and West Germany. I use segregation measures and long-run social security data for the decade of 1992 to 2004. While segregation has declined over time, it remains higher for the eastern part of Germany. Although this finding is observable for full-time and part-time work, segr...

  20. Segregation in Vertically Vibrated Binary Granular Mixtures with Same Size

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Qing-Fan; SUN Gang; HOU Mei-Ying; LU Kun-Quan

    2006-01-01

    @@ Segregation in vertically vibrated binary granular mixtures with same size is studied experimentally. A new partial segregated state is found in this system. This state exists between the completely mixed state and the pure segregated state, and has the characteristic that the lighter particles tend to rise and form a pure layer on the top of the system while the heavier particles and some of the lighter ones stay at the bottom and form a mixed layer.

  1. Metropolitan Racial Residential Segregation and Cardiovascular Mortality: Exploring Pathways

    OpenAIRE

    Greer, Sophia; Kramer, Michael R; Cook-Smith, Jessica N.; Casper, Michele L.

    2013-01-01

    Racial residential segregation has been associated with an increased risk for heart disease and stroke deaths. However, there has been little research into the role that candidate mediating pathways may play in the relationship between segregation and heart disease or stroke deaths. In this study, we examined the relationship between metropolitan statistical area (MSA)-level segregation and heart disease and stroke mortality rates, by age and race, and also estimated the effects of various ed...

  2. Gender essentialism and occupational segregation in insolvency practice

    OpenAIRE

    Joyce, Yvonne; Walker, Stephen P.

    2015-01-01

    Advances towards egalitarianism in professional recruitment may be offset by processes of occupational re-segregation. Drawing on gender theory this paper investigates horizontal segregation in the UK insolvency profession, as revealed through the lived experiences of female and male practitioners. It is shown that horizontal segregation pervades at different levels of practice and is undergirded by various elements of gender essentialism. Physical essentialism explains why insolvency practic...

  3. The impact of fiscal decentralization on income segregation

    OpenAIRE

    Francisco Martínez Mora

    2004-01-01

    We investigate how decentralizing the provision and funding of a publicly provided good from central (or regional) to local governments affects income segregation in an urban area. As the previous theoretical literature suggests, local provision and funding of a publicly provided good by itself generates incentives for income segregation. However, other segregating forces such as local amenities are also at work in urban areas. We show that, once this important feature of urban economies is c...

  4. 49 CFR 174.81 - Segregation of hazardous materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Segregation of hazardous materials. 174.81 Section... General Handling and Loading Requirements § 174.81 Segregation of hazardous materials. (a) This section... section: Segregation Table for Hazardous Materials Class or Division Notes 1.1, 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5 1.6 2.1...

  5. Housing Tenure and Residential Segregation in Metropolitan America

    OpenAIRE

    Friedman, Samantha; Tsao, Hui-shien; Chen, Cheng

    2013-01-01

    Homeownership, a symbol of the American dream, is one of the primary ways through which families accumulate wealth, particularly for blacks and Hispanics. Surprisingly, no study has explicitly documented the segregation of minority owners and renters from whites. Using data from Census 2000, this study aims to fill this gap. Analyses here reveal that the segregation of black renters relative to whites is significantly lower than the segregation of black owners from whites, controlling for rel...

  6. Racial/ethnic residential segregation and cardiovascular disease risk

    OpenAIRE

    Kershaw, Kiarri N.; Albrecht, Sandra S.

    2015-01-01

    A growing body of research has examined whether racial/ethnic residential segregation contributes to health disparities, but recent findings in the literature, particularly with respect to cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk, have not been summarized. This review provides an overview of findings from studies of racial/ethnic residential segregation of non-Hispanic blacks and Hispanics with CVD risk published between January 2011 and July 2014. The majority of studies of black segregation showed...

  7. Residential Segregation and Immigrants' Satisfaction with the Neighborhood in Germany

    OpenAIRE

    Dill, Verena; Jirjahn, Uwe; Tsertsvadze, Georgi

    2011-01-01

    Using data from the German Socio-Economic Panel, this study examines the relationship between immigrant residential segregation and immigrants' satisfaction with the neighborhood. The estimates show that immigrants living in segregated areas are less satisfied with the neighborhood. This is consistent with the hypothesis that housing discrimination rather than self-selection plays an important role in immigrant residential segregation. Our result holds true even when controlling for other inf...

  8. Residential Segregation of Socioeconomic Variables and Health Indices in Iran

    OpenAIRE

    Seyed Saeed Hashemi Nazari; Mahmood Mahmoodi; Kourosh Holakouie Naieni

    2013-01-01

    Background: Measures of segregation are essential tools for evaluation of social equality. They describe complex structural patterns by single quantities and allow the comparison of inequalities over time or between residential places. In many countries, patterns of residential segregation are well described (e.g., South Africa, Great Britain, United States of America). In this study, for the first time in Iran, we measured residential segregation for some socioeconomic and health variables a...

  9. Segregation or Integration? Immigrant Self-Employment in Switzerland

    OpenAIRE

    Juhasz Liebermann, Anne; Suter, Christian; Iglesias, Katia

    2016-01-01

    This article investigates whether immigrant self-employment is related more to segregation in the labour market than work as an employee (making it justifiable to speak of ethnic business) or whether, on the contrary, it reflects equality with the self-employment by the Swiss. The distinctive features of this research design are the comparison of ethnic segregation in the labour market with gender-specific segregation and the fact that, apart from migrants of the first generation, members of ...

  10. Factors Influencing Occupational Segregation by Gender in Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Noor Rahamah Abu Bakar

    2014-01-01

    In many developing countries, occupational segregation by gender is a topic that is much discussed but very few researches had been carried out. In Malaysia, secondary sources of data, such as the Population and Housing Census reports and Social Statistics Bulletins of the Malaysian Statistics Department do show that there have been some changes in the general trends of occupational segregation in the country but factual details of occupational segregation based on gender are rather scanty. T...

  11. Evaluating segregation in HSLA steels using computational thermodynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Meire Guimarães Lage; André Luiz Vasconcellos da Costa e Silva

    2015-01-01

    A low level of segregation in high strength steel plates used to manufacture large diameter pipes is important for the performance of these materials in sour environments. In this work, the level of segregation of different HSLA steels was assessed by computational thermodynamics to identify the most promising compositions. Equilibrium phase diagrams and mass fraction of solid phase diagrams were used to quantify the segregation at the end of solidification. It was verified from the results t...

  12. Mapping School Segregation: Using GIS to Explore Racial Segregation between Schools and Their Corresponding Attendance Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohoni, Deenesh; Saporito, Salvatore

    2009-01-01

    We examine whether student enrollment in nonneighborhood schools changes levels of racial segregation in public schools across urban school districts by comparing the racial composition of schools and their corresponding attendance area. This comparison was made possible by using geographic information systems (GIS) to link maps of elementary,…

  13. Causes of Educational Segregation in Sweden--School Choice or Residential Segregation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang Hansen, Kajsa; Gustafsson, Jan-Eric

    2016-01-01

    The aims of the study were to examine changes in school segregation across different types of municipalities between 1998 and 2011 in Sweden, and to explore the extent to which these changes are the consequences of school choice. Multilevel models were applied to register data using a counterfactual approach. The results showed that school…

  14. Chromatid Painting for Chromosomal Inversion Detection Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose the continued development of a novel approach to the detection of chromosomal inversions. Transmissible chromosome aberrations (translocations and...

  15. Chromatid Painting for Chromosomal Inversion Detection Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose a novel approach to the detection of chromosomal inversions. Transmissible chromosome aberrations (translocations and inversions) have profound genetic...

  16. Occupational sex segregation and working time: Regional evidence from Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Humpert Stephan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides descriptive evidence for declining occupational sex segregation on the German labor market, especially concerning the regional differences between the former East and West Germany. I use segregation measures and long-run social security data for the decade of 1992 to 2004. While segregation has declined over time, it remains higher for the eastern part of Germany. Although this finding is observable for full-time and part-time work, segregation is always lower in part-time employment.

  17. Chloroplast genetics of chlamydomonas. I. Allelic segregation ratios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents allelic segregation data from a series of 16 crosses segregated for nuclear and chloroplast genes. By means of pedigree analysis, segregants of chloroplast genes. By means of pedigree analysis, segregants of chloroplast markers occurring in the zygote have been distinguished from those occurring in zoospore clones. The genes ac1, ac2, and tm1 showed little if any deviation from 1:1 either in zygotic segregation or in zoospore clones. The genes sm2, ery, and spc showed a significant excess of the allele from the mt+ parent in zygotes. However, in zoospores, mt+ excess was seen only when the allele was the mutant (resistant) form but not when it was wild type (sensitive). These results show that the extent of preferential segregation differs in zygotes and in zoospores, and that preferential segregation is influenced by map location and by allele specificity. A comparison of progeny from zygotes mated after 0, 15'', 30'', and 50'' uv irradiation of the mt+ gametes demonstrated the lack of an effect of uv upon allelic segregation ratios. In total, these results exclude the multi-copy model of chloroplast genome segregation suggested by Gillham. Boynton and Lee (1974) and support the diploid model we have previously proposed

  18. Chloroplast genetics of chlamydomonas. I. Allelic segregation ratios. [UV radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sager, R.; Ramanis, Z.

    1976-06-01

    This paper presents allelic segregation data from a series of 16 crosses segregated for nuclear and chloroplast genes. By means of pedigree analysis, segregants of chloroplast genes. By means of pedigree analysis, segregants of chloroplast markers occurring in the zygote have been distinguished from those occurring in zoospore clones. The genes ac1, ac2, and tm1 showed little if any deviation from 1:1 either in zygotic segregation or in zoospore clones. The genes sm2, ery, and spc showed a significant excess of the allele from the mt+ parent in zygotes. However, in zoospores, mt+ excess was seen only when the allele was the mutant (resistant) form but not when it was wild type (sensitive). These results show that the extent of preferential segregation differs in zygotes and in zoospores, and that preferential segregation is influenced by map location and by allele specificity. A comparison of progeny from zygotes mated after 0, 15'', 30'', and 50'' uv irradiation of the mt+ gametes demonstrated the lack of an effect of uv upon allelic segregation ratios. In total, these results exclude the multi-copy model of chloroplast genome segregation suggested by Gillham. Boynton and Lee (1974) and support the diploid model we have previously proposed.

  19. Grain boundary segregation and intergranular fracture in molybdenum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present paper reports results from a systematic study of segregation and intergranular embrittlement in binary molybdenum-oxygen and ternary molybdenum-oxygen-carbon alloys. The experiments were carried out on 'bamboo' specimens containing a series of identical single grain boundaries traversing their cross-sections. Measurements have been made of the activation energy for oxygen segregation to grain boundaries in the binary alloys. The influence of carbon additions on the level of oxygen segregation and the influence of oxygen segregation on the energy to fracture have been studied. Results from metallographic studies show the effects of segregation on fracture surface topography and dislocation surfaces immediately adjacent to the fracture surfaces. The thermodynamics of oxygen segregation to grain boundaries is considered and the role played by carbon in inhibiting segregation. The influence of segregation on the work of fracture is also considered and it is shown that the reduction in oxygen segregation resulting from the addition of carbon produces small increases in fracture energy. This increases the local stress to propagate a crack sufficiently to promote plastic deformation which blunts the crack tip; this reduces the stress concentration at the crack tip and the applied fracture stress and the work to fracture is thus increased. (author)

  20. Economic Residential Segregation and Educational Achievements: Evidence from Chile

    OpenAIRE

    Román, Miguel Vargas

    2012-01-01

    Using a database from Chile, we have tested empirically the effects of economic residential segregation on educational achievements. Our hypothesis is based on literature’s findings about segregation’s negative impact on individuals’ well being. We found that segregation has negative impacts. This result would have interesting policy implications and goes in the opposite directions of those investigations’ findings, which indicate that segregation has just negligible effects. Keywords...

  1. Mitotic chromosome condensation in vertebrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vagnarelli, Paola, E-mail: P.Vagnarelli@ed.ac.uk

    2012-07-15

    Work from several laboratories over the past 10-15 years has revealed that, within the interphase nucleus, chromosomes are organized into spatially distinct territories [T. Cremer, C. Cremer, Chromosome territories, nuclear architecture and gene regulation in mammalian cells, Nat. Rev. Genet. 2 (2001) 292-301 and T. Cremer, M. Cremer, S. Dietzel, S. Muller, I. Solovei, S. Fakan, Chromosome territories-a functional nuclear landscape, Curr. Opin. Cell Biol. 18 (2006) 307-316]. The overall compaction level and intranuclear location varies as a function of gene density for both entire chromosomes [J.A. Croft, J.M. Bridger, S. Boyle, P. Perry, P. Teague,W.A. Bickmore, Differences in the localization and morphology of chromosomes in the human nucleus, J. Cell Biol. 145 (1999) 1119-1131] and specific chromosomal regions [N.L. Mahy, P.E. Perry, S. Gilchrist, R.A. Baldock, W.A. Bickmore, Spatial organization of active and inactive genes and noncoding DNA within chromosome territories, J. Cell Biol. 157 (2002) 579-589] (Fig. 1A, A'). In prophase, when cyclin B activity reaches a high threshold, chromosome condensation occurs followed by Nuclear Envelope Breakdown (NEB) [1]. At this point vertebrate chromosomes appear as compact structures harboring an attachment point for the spindle microtubules physically recognizable as a primary constriction where the two sister chromatids are held together. The transition from an unshaped interphase chromosome to the highly structured mitotic chromosome (compare Figs. 1A and B) has fascinated researchers for several decades now; however a definite picture of how this process is achieved and regulated is not yet in our hands and it will require more investigation to comprehend the complete process. From a biochemical point of view a vertebrate mitotic chromosomes is composed of DNA, histone proteins (60%) and non-histone proteins (40%) [6]. I will discuss below what is known to date on the contribution of these two different classes

  2. Mitotic chromosome condensation in vertebrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Work from several laboratories over the past 10–15 years has revealed that, within the interphase nucleus, chromosomes are organized into spatially distinct territories [T. Cremer, C. Cremer, Chromosome territories, nuclear architecture and gene regulation in mammalian cells, Nat. Rev. Genet. 2 (2001) 292–301 and T. Cremer, M. Cremer, S. Dietzel, S. Muller, I. Solovei, S. Fakan, Chromosome territories—a functional nuclear landscape, Curr. Opin. Cell Biol. 18 (2006) 307–316]. The overall compaction level and intranuclear location varies as a function of gene density for both entire chromosomes [J.A. Croft, J.M. Bridger, S. Boyle, P. Perry, P. Teague,W.A. Bickmore, Differences in the localization and morphology of chromosomes in the human nucleus, J. Cell Biol. 145 (1999) 1119–1131] and specific chromosomal regions [N.L. Mahy, P.E. Perry, S. Gilchrist, R.A. Baldock, W.A. Bickmore, Spatial organization of active and inactive genes and noncoding DNA within chromosome territories, J. Cell Biol. 157 (2002) 579–589] (Fig. 1A, A'). In prophase, when cyclin B activity reaches a high threshold, chromosome condensation occurs followed by Nuclear Envelope Breakdown (NEB) [1]. At this point vertebrate chromosomes appear as compact structures harboring an attachment point for the spindle microtubules physically recognizable as a primary constriction where the two sister chromatids are held together. The transition from an unshaped interphase chromosome to the highly structured mitotic chromosome (compare Figs. 1A and B) has fascinated researchers for several decades now; however a definite picture of how this process is achieved and regulated is not yet in our hands and it will require more investigation to comprehend the complete process. From a biochemical point of view a vertebrate mitotic chromosomes is composed of DNA, histone proteins (60%) and non-histone proteins (40%) [6]. I will discuss below what is known to date on the contribution of these two different

  3. Wilhelm Weinberg's early contribution to segregation analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Alan; Seneta, Eugene

    2013-09-01

    Wilhelm Weinberg (1862-1937) is a largely forgotten pioneer of human and medical genetics. His name is linked with that of the English mathematician G. H. Hardy in the Hardy-Weinberg law, pervasive in textbooks on population genetics since it expresses stability over generations of zygote frequencies AA, Aa, aa under random mating. One of Weinberg's signal contributions, in an article whose centenary we celebrate, was to verify that Mendel's segregation law still held in the setting of human heredity, contrary to the then-prevailing view of William Bateson (1861-1926), the leading Mendelian geneticist of the time. Specifically, Weinberg verified that the proportion of recessive offspring genotypes aa in human parental crossings Aa × Aa (that is, the segregation ratio for such a setting) was indeed p=1/4. We focus in a nontechnical way on his procedure, called the simple sib method, and on the heated controversy with Felix Bernstein (1878-1956) in the 1920s and 1930s over work stimulated by Weinberg's article. PMID:24018765

  4. SOCIAL POLARIZATION AND SEGREGATION IN BEIJING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The biggest change in Beijing during the last decade has been in its social structure. This transition is changing the existing situation of social "equality", and leads to polarization both in individual communities and in society as a whole. As a result, social variations and conflicting interest are growing, and some new social groups are emerging. In this paper we seek to explore a new urban phenomenon in post-1984 Beijing: social polarization and segregation. At first, we will discuss some elements explaining social polarization. The elements and the processes can be traced back to two main aspects of the economic reforms, namely the internal reforms unleashing a huge rural exodus and the open door policy. Special attention will be paid to the new lower end of the social ladder, which is made up largely by rural migrantsthat make up the so-called floating population.Finally we will explore how these social changes translate into urban segregation, with some consideration for future develop-ments.

  5. Decentralization as a Cause of Spatial Segregation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasarovic Ema Alihodzic

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available City represents an incomplete dynamic process prone to the expansion with a causal link between urban expansion and socio-spatial segregation. The socio-spatial distribution in the city is mostly related to the increased social polarization and inequality. There is a clear connection between divided society and divided city: if society is divided, urban space must be divided. It is the question of the relations between the social inequalities on one hand, and spatial segregation on the other. In the last 10 years, Podgorica is the city that shows alarming statistic values when it comes to demographic trends and the influx of the residents from the northern municipalities, which necessarily causes the city sprawl. Past experiences show that city is unevenly expanding, creating new functions and zones expressed by socio-spatial differences. The beginning of this process lies in modernist conception of the city, by which city was mostly developed, while the current functional organization is based on the same concept. With the first urban plans, which carried similarproblems mentioned in previous section, Podgorica was divided into three clearly differentiated zones: Stara Varoš, Nova Varoš and Novi grad, which became a platform for hierarchical divisions within the space, reflecting them in the society.

  6. A germline chromothripsis event stably segregating in 11 individuals through three generations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertelsen, Birgitte; Nazaryan-Petersen, Lusine; Sun, Wei;

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: Parentally transmitted germ-line chromothripsis (G-CTH) has been identified in only a few cases. Most of these rearrangements were stably transmitted, in an unbalanced form, from a healthy mother to her child with congenital abnormalities probably caused by de novo copy-number changes of...... dosage sensitive genes. We describe a G-CTH transmitted through three generations in 11 healthy carriers. METHODS: Conventional cytogenetic analysis, mate-pair sequencing, and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) were used to identify the chromosome rearrangement and characterize the breakpoints in all three...... generations. RESULTS: We identified an apparently balanced translocation t(3;5), later shown to be a G-CTH, in all individuals of a three-generation family. The G-CTH stably segregated without occurrence of additional rearrangements; however, several spontaneous abortions were reported, possibly due to...

  7. Using Fluorescence Recovery After Photobleaching (FRAP) to study dynamics of the Structural Maintenance of Chromosome (SMC) complex in vivo

    CERN Document Server

    Badrinarayanan, Anjana

    2016-01-01

    The SMC complex, MukBEF, is important for chromosome organization and segregation in Escherichia coli. Fluorescently tagged MukBEF forms distinct spots (or 'foci') in the cell, where it is thought to carry out most of its chromosome associated activities. This chapter outlines the technique of Fluorescence Recovery After Photobleaching (FRAP) as a method to study the properties of YFP-tagged MukB in fluorescent foci. This method can provide important insight into the dynamics of MukB on DNA and be used to study its biochemical properties in vivo.

  8. Gametocidal chromosomes enhancing chromosome aberration in common wheat induced by 5-azacytidine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, W-Y; Cong, W-W; Shu, Y-J; Wang, D; Xu, G-H; Guo, C-H

    2013-01-01

    The gametocidal (Gc) chromosome from Aegilops spp induces chromosome mutation, which is introduced into common wheat as a tool of chromosome manipulation for genetic improvement. The Gc chromosome functions similar to a restriction-modification system in bacteria, in which DNA methylation is an important regulator. We treated root tips of wheat carrying Gc chromosomes with the hypomethylation agent 5-azacytidine; chromosome breakage and micronuclei were observed in these root tips. The frequency of aberrations differed in wheat containing different Gc chromosomes, suggesting different functions inducing chromosome breakage. Gc chromosome 3C caused the greatest degree of chromosome aberration, while Gc chromosome 3C(SAT) and 2C caused only slight chromosome aberration. Gc chromosome 3C induced different degrees of chromosome aberration in wheat varieties Triticum aestivum var. Chinese Spring and Norin 26, demonstrating an inhibition function in common wheat. PMID:23884766

  9. Chromosome conservation in squamate reptiles revealed by comparative chromosome painting

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Giovannotti, M.; Pokorná, Martina; Kratochvíl, L.; Caputo, V.; Olmo, E.; Ferguson-Smith, M. A.; Rens, W.

    Manchester : ICCS, 2011. 78-78. [Intarnational Chromosome Conference /18./. 29.08.2011-02.09.2011, Manchester] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50450515 Keywords : squamate reptiles Subject RIV: EG - Zoology

  10. Numerous transitions of sex chromosomes in Diptera.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Vicoso

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Many species groups, including mammals and many insects, determine sex using heteromorphic sex chromosomes. Diptera flies, which include the model Drosophila melanogaster, generally have XY sex chromosomes and a conserved karyotype consisting of six chromosomal arms (five large rods and a small dot, but superficially similar karyotypes may conceal the true extent of sex chromosome variation. Here, we use whole-genome analysis in 37 fly species belonging to 22 different families of Diptera and uncover tremendous hidden diversity in sex chromosome karyotypes among flies. We identify over a dozen different sex chromosome configurations, and the small dot chromosome is repeatedly used as the sex chromosome, which presumably reflects the ancestral karyotype of higher Diptera. However, we identify species with undifferentiated sex chromosomes, others in which a different chromosome replaced the dot as a sex chromosome or in which up to three chromosomal elements became incorporated into the sex chromosomes, and others yet with female heterogamety (ZW sex chromosomes. Transcriptome analysis shows that dosage compensation has evolved multiple times in flies, consistently through up-regulation of the single X in males. However, X chromosomes generally show a deficiency of genes with male-biased expression, possibly reflecting sex-specific selective pressures. These species thus provide a rich resource to study sex chromosome biology in a comparative manner and show that similar selective forces have shaped the unique evolution of sex chromosomes in diverse fly taxa.

  11. Hybridization, transgressive segregation and evolution of new genetic systems in Drosophila

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    H. A. Ranganath; S. Aruna

    2003-12-01

    Introgressive hybridization facilitates incorporation of genes from one species into the gene pool of another. Studies on long-term effects of introgressive hybridization in animal systems are sparse. Drosophila nasuta ($2n = 8$) and D. albomicans ($2n = 6$)—a pair of allopatric, morphologically almost identical, cross-fertile members of the nasuta subgroup of the immigrans species group—constitute an excellent system to analyse the impact of hybridization followed by transgressive segregation of parental characters in the hybrid progeny. Hybrid populations of D. nasuta and D. albomicans maintained for over 500 generations in the laboratory constitute new recombinant hybrid genomes, here termed cytoraces. The impact of hybridization, followed by introgression and transgressive segregation, on chromosomal constitution and karyotypes, some fitness parameters, isozymes, components of mating behaviour and mating preference reveals a complex pattern of interracial divergence among parental species and cytoraces. This assemblage of characters in different combinations in a laboratory hybrid zone allows us to study the emergence of new genetic systems. Here, we summarize results from our ongoing studies comparing these hybrid cytoraces with the parental species, and discuss the implications of these findings for our understanding of the evolution of new genetic systems.

  12. Familial transmission of a deletion of chromosome 21 derived from a translocation between chromosome 21 and an inverted chromosome 22.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aviv, H; Lieber, C; Yenamandra, A; Desposito, F

    1997-06-27

    Chromosome analysis of a newborn boy with Down syndrome resulted in the identification of a family with an unusual derivative chromosome 22. The child has 46 chromosomes, including two chromosomes 21, one normal chromosome 22, and a derivative chromosome 22. Giemsa banding and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) studies show that the derivative chromosome is chromosome 22 with evidence of both paracentric and pericentric inversions, joined to the long arm of chromosome 21 from 21q21.2 to qter. The rearrangement results in partial trisomy 21 extending from 21q21.2 to 21q terminus in the patient. The child's mother, brother, maternal aunt, and maternal grandmother are all carriers of the derivative chromosome. All have 45 chromosomes, with one normal chromosome 21, one normal chromosome 22, and the derivative chromosome 22. The rearrangement results in the absence of the short arm, the centromere, and the proximal long arm of chromosome 21 (del 21pter-21q21.2) in carriers. Carriers of the derivative chromosome in this family have normal physical appearance, mild learning disabilities and poor social adjustment. PMID:9182781

  13. Meiosis and chromosome painting of sex chromosome systems in Ceboidea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudry, M D; Rahn, I M; Solari, A J

    2001-06-01

    The identity of the chromosomes involved in the multiple sex system of Alouatta caraya (Aca) and the possible distribution of this system among other Ceboidea were investigated by chromosome painting of mitotic cells from five species and by analysis of meiosis at pachytene in two species. The identity of the autosome #7 (X2) involved in the multiple system of Aca and its breakage points were demonstrated by both meiosis and chromosome painting. These features are identical to those described by Consigliere et al. [1996] in Alouatta seniculus sara (Assa) and Alouatta seniculus arctoidea (Asar). This multiple system was absent in the other four Ceboidea species studied here. However, data from the literature strongly suggest the presence of this multiple in other members of this genus. The presence of this multiple system among several species and subspecies that show high levels of chromosome rearrangements may suggest a special selective value of this multiple. The meiotic features of the sex systems of Aca and Cebus apella paraguayanus (Cap) are strikingly different at pachytene, as the latter system is similar to the sex pair of man and other primates. The relatively large genetic distances between species presently showing this multiple system suggest that its origin is not recent. Other members of the same genus should be investigated at meiosis and by chromosome painting in order to know the extent and distribution of this complex sex-chromosome system. PMID:11376445

  14. Algorithms for physical segregation of coal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganguli, Rajive

    The capability for on-line measurement of the quality characteristics of conveyed coal now enables mine operators to take advantage of the inherent heterogeneity of those streams and split them into wash and no-wash stocks. Relative to processing the entire stream, this reduces the amount of coal that must be washed at the mine and thereby reduces processing costs, recovery losses, and refuse generation levels. In this dissertation, two classes of segregation algorithms, using time series models and moving windows are developed and demonstrated using field and simulated data. In all of the developed segregation algorithms, a "cut-off" ash value was computed for coal scanned on the running conveyor belt by the ash analyzer. It determined if the coal was sent to the wash pile or to the nowash pile. Forecasts from time series models, at various lead times ahead, were used in one class of the developed algorithms, to determine the cut-off ash levels. The time series models were updated from time to time to reflect changes in process. Statistical Process Control (SPC) techniques were used to determine if an update was necessary at a given time. When an update was deemed necessary, optimization techniques were used to determine the next best set of model parameters. In the other class of segregation algorithms, "few" of the immediate past observations were used to determine the cut-off ash value. These "few" observations were called the window width . The window width was kept constant in some variants of this class of algorithms. The other variants of this class were an improvement over the fixed window width algorithms. Here, the window widths were varied rather than kept constant. In these cases, SPC was used to determine the window width at any instant. Statistics of the empirical distribution and the normal distribution were used in computation of the cut-off ash value in all the variants of this class of algorithms. The good performance of the developed algorithms

  15. Park7, a novel locus for autosomal recessive early-onset parkinsonism, on chromosome 1p36

    OpenAIRE

    Duijn, Cock; Breedveld, Guido; Horstink, Marten; Sandkuijl, Lodewijk; Oostra, Ben; Swieten, J. C.; Bonifati, Vincenzo; Galjaard, Robert-Jan; Houwing-Duistermaat, Jeanine; Testers, L.; Dekker, Marieke; Snijders, Pieter; Heutink, Peter

    2001-01-01

    textabstractAlthough the role of genetic factors in the origin of Parkinson disease has long been disputed, several genes involved in autosomal dominant and recessive forms of the disease have been localized. Mutations associated with early-onset autosomal recessive parkinsonism have been identified in the Parkin gene, and recently a second gene, PARK6, involved in early-onset recessive parkinsonism was localized on chromosome 1p35-36. We identified a family segregating early-onset parkinsoni...

  16. On the Origin of Mass Segregation in NGC 3603

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Xiaoying; Grebel, Eva K.; Allison, Richard J.; Goodwin, Simon P.; Altmann, Martin; Harbeck, Daniel; Moffat, Anthony F. J.; Drissen, Laurent

    2013-02-01

    We present deep Hubble Space Telescope/Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 photometry of the young HD 97950 star cluster in the giant H II region NGC 3603. The data were obtained in 1997 and 2007 permitting us to derive membership based on proper motions of the stars. Our data are consistent with an age of 1 Myr for the HD 97950 cluster. A possible age spread, if present in the cluster, appears to be small. The global slope of the incompleteness-corrected mass function for member stars within 60'' is Γ = -0.88 ± 0.15, which is flatter than the value of a Salpeter slope of -1.35. The radially varying mass function shows pronounced mass segregation ranging from slopes of -0.26 ± 0.32 in the inner 5'' to -0.94 ± 0.36 in the outermost annulus (40''-60''). Stars more massive than 50 M ⊙ are found only in the cluster center. The Λ minimum spanning tree technique confirms significant mass segregation down to 30 M ⊙. The dependence of Λ on mass, i.e., that high-mass stars are more segregated than low-mass stars, and the (weak) dependence of the velocity dispersion on stellar mass might imply that the mass segregation is dynamical in origin. While primordial segregation cannot be excluded, the properties of the mass segregation indicate that dynamical mass segregation may have been the dominant process for segregation of high-mass stars.

  17. Coleman Revisited: School Segregation, Peers, and Frog Ponds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldsmith, Pat Rubio

    2011-01-01

    Students from minority segregated schools tend to achieve and attain less than similar students from White segregated schools. This study examines whether peer effects can explain this relationship using normative models and frog-pond models. Normative models (where peers become alike) suggest that minority schoolmates are a liability. Frog-pond…

  18. 46 CFR 111.60-9 - Segregation of vital circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Segregation of vital circuits. 111.60-9 Section 111.60-9 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING ELECTRIC SYSTEMS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS Wiring Materials and Methods § 111.60-9 Segregation of vital circuits. (a) General....

  19. 7 CFR 58.332 - Segregation of raw material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Segregation of raw material. 58.332 Section 58.332 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... Procedures § 58.332 Segregation of raw material. The milk and cream received at the dairy plant shall...

  20. Deconstructing Systems of Segregation: Leadership Challenges in an Urban School

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMatthews, David

    2014-01-01

    Special education policies can create structures of segregation and inequality. School leaders are often tasked with dismantling these structures while meeting expectations related to accountability policies. This case study involves a new principal at an urban school in a district with a long history of segregation reassigned to work at one of…

  1. 7 CFR 3015.10 - Physical segregation and eligibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Physical segregation and eligibility. 3015.10 Section 3015.10 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) OFFICE OF THE CHIEF....10 Physical segregation and eligibility. Except as provided in § 3015.11, awarding agencies shall...

  2. 27 CFR 24.191 - Segregation of operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Segregation of operations. 24.191 Section 24.191 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS WINE Production of Effervescent Wine § 24.191 Segregation of...

  3. Pre-Hire Factors and Workplace Ethnic Segregation (discussion paper)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stromgren, M.; Tammaru, T.; Van Ham, M.; Marcinzak, S.; Stjernstrom, O.; Lindgren, U.

    2011-01-01

    In addition to neighbourhoods of residence, family and places of work play important roles in producing and reproducing ethnic segregation. Therefore, recent research on ethnic segregation and contact is increasingly turning its attention from residential areas towards other important domains of dai

  4. Residential Segregation in United States Cities: A Causal Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Harvey; Jiobu, Robert

    1975-01-01

    Using the technique of path analysis and cities as units of analysis, this study investigates the causes of black residential segregation. The data suggest that the relative socioeconomic status of blacks and black population size are important determinants of segregation. Also relevant are percent black and the relative growth rates of the white…

  5. Black Residential Segregation since the 1948 "Shelley v. Kraemer" Decision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darden, Joe T.

    1995-01-01

    Assesses the state of black residential segregation since the court case "Shelley v. Kraemer." Focus is placed on metropolitan areas generally and on St. Louis and Detroit, in particular. It is concluded that blacks have made little progress in reducing segregation in housing since the 1948 court case that outlawed restrictive covenants on the…

  6. Measuring Residential Segregation: An Application of Trend Surface Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spriggs, William

    1984-01-01

    Presents a measure of racial residential segregation which conforms to the traditional attributes of segregation indices, but includes sensitivity to the spatial patterns of White and non-White residence in a city. Reviews earlier measures, describes the new one, and applies it to racial housing patterns in Norfolk, Virginia, in 1890. (KH)

  7. Patterns of Interethnic Residential Segregation in the Urban Southwest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Manual Mariano

    1981-01-01

    Compares patterns of residential segregation among Mexican Americans, Blacks, and Anglos for 1960 and 1970 and finds that, in spite of a striking similarity in the overall pattern, there have been some important changes. Further, city characteristics found to be good predictors of segregation for 1960 fail to adequately account for the same types…

  8. "Brown" at 62: School Segregation by Race, Poverty and State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orfield, Gary; Ee, Jongyeon; Frankenberg, Erica; Siegel-Hawley, Genevieve

    2016-01-01

    As the anniversary of "Brown v. Board of Education" decision arrives again without any major initiatives to mitigate spreading and deepening segregation in the nation's schools, the Civil Rights Project adds to a growing national discussion with a research brief drawn from a much broader study of school segregation to be published in…

  9. Campland: Racial Segregation of Roma in Italy. Country Reports Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahn, Claude; Carlisle, Kathryn D.; Fregoli, Claudia; Kiuranov, Deyan; Petrova, Dimitrina

    This report addresses racial segregation and human rights abuses against Roma in Italy, focusing on: "Anti-Gypsyism in Italy"; "Roma in Italy: Racial Segregation"; "Abuses by Police and Judicial Authorities" (e.g., abusive raids and evictions, abusive use of firearms, torture and physical abuse, discriminatory targeting of Roma by police, theft by…

  10. Using the minimum spanning tree to trace mass segregation

    CERN Document Server

    Allison, Richard J; Parker, Richard J; Zwart, Simon F Portegies; de Grijs, Richard; Kouwenhoven, M B N

    2009-01-01

    We present a new method to detect and quantify mass segregation in star clusters. It compares the minimum spanning tree (MST) of massive stars with that of random stars. If mass segregation is present, the MST length of the most massive stars will be shorter than that of random stars. This difference can be quantified (with an associated significance) to measure the degree of mass segregation. We test the method on simulated clusters in both 2D and 3D and show that the method works as expected. We apply the method to the Orion Nebula Cluster (ONC) and show that the method is able to detect the mass segregation in the Trapezium with a `mass segregation ratio' \\Lambda_{MSR}=8.0 \\pm 3.5 (where \\Lambda_{MSR}=1 is no mass segregation) down to 16 \\Msun, and also that the ONC is mass segregated at a lower level (~2.0 \\pm 0.5) down to 5 \\Msun. Below 5 \\Msun we find no evidence for any further mass segregation in the ONC.

  11. Chromosome fragility in Freemartin cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Barbieri

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to verify chromosome fragility in freemartin cattle using chromosome aberration (CA and sister chromatid exchange (SCE tests. A total of eighteen co-twins were investigated. Fourteen animals were identified as cytogenetically chimeric (2n=60, XX/XY while 4 were classified as normal. Freemartin cattle showed a higher percentage of aneuploid cells (18.64% and highly significant statistical differences (P < 0.001 in mean values of gaps (4.53 ± 2.05, chromatid breaks (0.26 ± 0.51, and significant statistical differences (P < 0.005 in mean values of chromosome breaks (0.12 ± 0.43 when compared to 10 control animals from single births (aneuploid cells, 11.20%; gaps, 2.01 ± 1.42; chromatid breaks, 0.05 ± 0.22; chromosome breaks, 0.02 ± 0.14.

  12. Methods for chromosome-specific staining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Joe W.; Pinkel, Daniel

    1995-01-01

    Methods and compositions for chromosome-specific staining are provided. Compositions comprise heterogenous mixtures of labeled nucleic acid fragments having substantially complementary base sequences to unique sequence regions of the chromosomal DNA for which their associated staining reagent is specific. Methods include methods for making the chromosome-specific staining compositions of the invention, and methods for applying the staining compositions to chromosomes.

  13. Heider balance, asymmetric ties, and gender segregation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krawczyk, Małgorzata J.; del Castillo-Mussot, Marcelo; Hernández-Ramírez, Eric; Naumis, Gerardo G.; Kułakowski, Krzysztof

    2015-12-01

    To remove a cognitive dissonance in interpersonal relations, people tend to divide their acquaintances into friendly and hostile parts, both groups internally friendly and mutually hostile. This process is modeled as an evolution toward the Heider balance. A set of differential equations have been proposed and validated (Kułakowski et al., 2005) to model the Heider dynamics of this social and psychological process. Here we generalize the model by including the initial asymmetry of the interpersonal relations and the direct reciprocity effect which removes this asymmetry. Our model is applied to the data on enmity and friendship in 37 school classes and 4 groups of teachers in México. For each class, a stable balanced partition is obtained into two groups. The gender structure of the groups reveals stronger gender segregation in younger classes, i.e. of age below 12 years, a fact consistent with other general empirical results.

  14. Heider balance, asymmetric ties, and gender segregation

    CERN Document Server

    Krawczyk, Małgorzata J; Hernández-Ramirez, Eric; Naumis, Gerardo G; Kułakowski, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    To remove a cognitive dissonance in interpersonal relations, people tend to divide our acquaintances into friendly and hostile parts, both groups internally friendly and mutually hostile. This process is modeled as an evolution towards the Heider balance. A set of differential equations have been proposed and validated (Kulakowski {\\it et al}, IJMPC 16 (2005) 707) to model the Heider dynamics of this social and psychological process. Here we generalize the model by including the initial asymmetry of the interprersonal relations and the direct reciprocity effect which removes this asymmetry. Our model is applied to the data on enmity and friendship in 37 school classes and 4 groups of teachers in M\\'exico. For each class, a stable balanced partition is obtained into two groups. The gender structure of the groups reveals stronger gender segregation in younger classes, i.e. of age below 12 years, a fact consistent with other general empirical results.

  15. Chromosome Architecture and Genome Organization

    OpenAIRE

    Giorgio Bernardi

    2015-01-01

    How the same DNA sequences can function in the three-dimensional architecture of interphase nucleus, fold in the very compact structure of metaphase chromosomes and go precisely back to the original interphase architecture in the following cell cycle remains an unresolved question to this day. The strategy used to address this issue was to analyze the correlations between chromosome architecture and the compositional patterns of DNA sequences spanning a size range from a few hundreds to a few...

  16. Chromosome evolution in Neotropical butterflies

    OpenAIRE

    Saura, Anssi; Von Schoultz, Barbara; Saura, Anja O.; Brown, Keith S., Jr.

    2013-01-01

    We list the chromosome numbers for 65 species of Neotropical Hesperiidae and 104 species or subspecies of Pieridae. In Hesperiidae the tribe Pyrrhopygini have a modal n = 28, Eudaminae and Pyrgini a modal n = 31, while Hesperiinae have n = around 29. Among Pieridae, Coliadinae have a strong modal n = 31 and among Pierinae Anthocharidini are almost fixed for n = 15 while Pierini vary with n = 26 as the most common chromosome number. Dismorphiinae show wide variation. We discuss these results i...

  17. Chromosome replication, cell growth, division and shape: a personal perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaritsky, Arieh; Woldringh, Conrad L

    2015-01-01

    The origins of Molecular Biology and Bacterial Physiology are reviewed, from our personal standpoints, emphasizing the coupling between bacterial growth, chromosome replication and cell division, dimensions and shape. Current knowledge is discussed with historical perspective, summarizing past and present achievements and enlightening ideas for future studies. An interactive simulation program of the bacterial cell division cycle (BCD), described as "The Central Dogma in Bacteriology," is briefly represented. The coupled process of transcription/translation of genes encoding membrane proteins and insertion into the membrane (so-called transertion) is invoked as the functional relationship between the only two unique macromolecules in the cell, DNA and peptidoglycan embodying the nucleoid and the sacculus respectively. We envision that the total amount of DNA associated with the replication terminus, so called "nucleoid complexity," is directly related to cell size and shape through the transertion process. Accordingly, the primary signal for cell division transmitted by DNA dynamics (replication, transcription and segregation) to the peptidoglycan biosynthetic machinery is of a physico-chemical nature, e.g., stress in the plasma membrane, relieving nucleoid occlusion in the cell's center hence enabling the divisome to assemble and function between segregated daughter nucleoids. PMID:26284044

  18. Uncovering Mass Segregation with Galaxy Analogues in Dark Matter Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Joshi, Gandhali D; Wadsley, James

    2016-01-01

    We investigate mass segregation in group and cluster environments by identifying galaxy analogues in high-resolution dark matter simulations. Subhalos identified by the AHF and ROCKSTAR halo finders have similar mass functions, independent of resolution, but different radial distributions due to significantly different subhalo hierarchies. We propose a simple way to classify subhalos as galaxy analogues. The radial distributions of galaxy analogues agree well at large halo-centric radii for both AHF and ROCKSTAR but disagree near parent halo centres where the phase-space information used by ROCKSTAR is essential. We see clear mass segregation at small radii (within $0.5\\,r_{vir}$) with average galaxy analogue mass decreasing with radius. Beyond the virial radius, we find a mild trend where the average galaxy analogue mass increases with radius. These mass segregation trends are strongest in small groups and dominated by the segregation of low mass analogues. The lack of mass segregation in massive galaxy anal...

  19. Experimental determination of the segregation process using computer tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantin Beckmann

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Modelling methods such as DEM and CFD are increasingly used for developing high efficient combine cleaning systems. For this purpose it is necessary to verify the complex segregation and separation processes in the combine cleaning system. One way is to determine the segregation and separation function using 3D computer tomography (CT. This method makes it possible to visualize and analyse the movement behaviour of the components of the mixture during the segregation and separation process as well as the derivation of descriptive process parameters. A mechanically excited miniature test rig was designed and built at the company CLAAS Selbstfahrende Erntemaschinen GmbH to achieve this aim. The investigations were carried out at the Fraunhofer Institute for Integrated Circuits IIS. Through the evaluation of the recorded images the segregation process is described visually. A more detailed analysis enabled the development of segregation and separation function based on the different densities of grain and material other than grain.

  20. Atomically ordered solute segregation behaviour in an oxide grain boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Bin; Yokoi, Tatsuya; Kumamoto, Akihito; Yoshiya, Masato; Ikuhara, Yuichi; Shibata, Naoya

    2016-01-01

    Grain boundary segregation is a critical issue in materials science because it determines the properties of individual grain boundaries and thus governs the macroscopic properties of materials. Recent progress in electron microscopy has greatly improved our understanding of grain boundary segregation phenomena down to atomistic dimensions, but solute segregation is still extremely challenging to experimentally identify at the atomic scale. Here, we report direct observations of atomic-scale yttrium solute segregation behaviours in an yttria-stabilized-zirconia grain boundary using atomic-resolution energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy analysis. We found that yttrium solute atoms preferentially segregate to specific atomic sites at the core of the grain boundary, forming a unique chemically-ordered structure across the grain boundary. PMID:27004614

  1. Atomically ordered solute segregation behaviour in an oxide grain boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Bin; Yokoi, Tatsuya; Kumamoto, Akihito; Yoshiya, Masato; Ikuhara, Yuichi; Shibata, Naoya

    2016-03-01

    Grain boundary segregation is a critical issue in materials science because it determines the properties of individual grain boundaries and thus governs the macroscopic properties of materials. Recent progress in electron microscopy has greatly improved our understanding of grain boundary segregation phenomena down to atomistic dimensions, but solute segregation is still extremely challenging to experimentally identify at the atomic scale. Here, we report direct observations of atomic-scale yttrium solute segregation behaviours in an yttria-stabilized-zirconia grain boundary using atomic-resolution energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy analysis. We found that yttrium solute atoms preferentially segregate to specific atomic sites at the core of the grain boundary, forming a unique chemically-ordered structure across the grain boundary.

  2. Rapid dynamical mass segregation and properties of fractal star clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Jincheng; Chen, Li

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the evolution of young star clusters using N-body simulations. We confirm that subvirial and fractal-structured clusters will dynamically mass segregate on a short timescale (within 0.5 Myr). We adopt a modified minimum-spanning-tree (MST) method to measure the degree of mass segregation, demonstrating that the stars escaping from a cluster's potential are important for the temporal dependence of mass segregation in the cluster. The form of the initial velocity distribution will also affect the degree of mass segregation. If it depends on radius, the outer parts of the cluster would expand without undergoing collapse. In velocity space, we find 'inverse mass segregation,' which indicates that massive stars have higher velocity dispersions than their lower-mass counterparts.

  3. Bombardment-induced segregation and redistribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During ion bombardment, a number of processes can alter the compositional distribution and microstructure in near-surface regions of alloys. The relative importance of each process depends principally on the target composition, temperature, and ion characteristics. In addition to displacement mixing leading to a randomization of atomic locations, and preferential loss of alloying elements by sputtering, which are dominant at relatively low temperatures, several thermally-activated processes, including radiation-enhanced diffusion, radiation-induced segregation and Gibbsian adsorption, also play important roles. At elevated temperatures, nonequilibrium point defects induced by ion impacts become mobile and tend to anneal out by recombination and diffusion to extended sinks, such as dislocations, grain boundaries and free surfaces. The high defect concentrations, far exceeding the thermodynamic equilbrium values, can enhance diffusion-controlled processes, while persistent defect fluxes, originating from the spatial non-uniformity in defect production and annihilation, give rise to local redistribution of alloy constituents because of radiation-induced segregation. Moreover, when the alloy is maintained at high temperature, Gibbsian adsorption, driven by the reduction in free energy of the system, occurs even without irradiation; it involves a compositional perturbation in a few atom layers near the alloy surface. The combination of these processes leads to the complex development of a compositionally-modified layer in the subsurface region. In the present paper, selected examples of these different phenomena and their synergistic effects on the evolution of the near-surface compositions of alloys during sputtering and ion implantation at elevated temperatures are discussed. 74 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab

  4. Numerically abnormal chromosome constitutions in humans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 24, discusses numerically abnormal chromosome constitutions in humans. This involves abnormalities of human chromosome number, including polyploidy (when the number of sets of chromosomes increases) and aneuploidy (when the number of individual normal chromosomes changes). Chapter sections discuss the following chromosomal abnormalities: human triploids, imprinting and uniparental disomy, human tetraploids, hydatidiform moles, anomalies caused by chromosomal imbalance, 13 trisomy (D{sub 1} trisomy, Patau syndrome), 21 trisomy (Down syndrome), 18 trisomy syndrome (Edwards syndrome), other autosomal aneuploidy syndromes, and spontaneous abortions. The chapter concludes with remarks on the nonrandom participation of chromosomes in trisomy. 69 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  5. Chromosome evolution in Neotropical butterflies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saura, Anssi; Von Schoultz, Barbara; Saura, Anja O; Brown, Keith S

    2013-06-01

    We list the chromosome numbers for 65 species of Neotropical Hesperiidae and 104 species or subspecies of Pieridae. In Hesperiidae the tribe Pyrrhopygini have a modal n = 28, Eudaminae and Pyrgini a modal n = 31, while Hesperiinae have n = around 29. Among Pieridae, Coliadinae have a strong modal n = 31 and among Pierinae Anthocharidini are almost fixed for n = 15 while Pierini vary with n = 26 as the most common chromosome number. Dismorphiinae show wide variation. We discuss these results in the context of chromosome numbers of over 1400 Neotropical butterfly species and subspecies derived from about 3000 populations published here and in earlier papers of a series. The overall results show that many Neotropical groups are characterized by karyotype instability with several derived modal numbers or none at all, while almost all taxa of Lepidoptera studied from the other parts of the world have one of n = 29-31 as modal numbers. Possibly chromosome number changes become fixed in the course of speciation driven by biotic interactions. Population subdivision and structuring facilitate karyotype change. Factors that stabilize chromosome numbers include hybridization among species sharing the same number, migration, sexual selection and possibly the distribution of chromosomes within the nucleus. PMID:23865963

  6. Chromosome Architecture and Genome Organization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardi, Giorgio

    2015-01-01

    How the same DNA sequences can function in the three-dimensional architecture of interphase nucleus, fold in the very compact structure of metaphase chromosomes and go precisely back to the original interphase architecture in the following cell cycle remains an unresolved question to this day. The strategy used to address this issue was to analyze the correlations between chromosome architecture and the compositional patterns of DNA sequences spanning a size range from a few hundreds to a few thousands Kilobases. This is a critical range that encompasses isochores, interphase chromatin domains and boundaries, and chromosomal bands. The solution rests on the following key points: 1) the transition from the looped domains and sub-domains of interphase chromatin to the 30-nm fiber loops of early prophase chromosomes goes through the unfolding into an extended chromatin structure (probably a 10-nm “beads-on-a-string” structure); 2) the architectural proteins of interphase chromatin, such as CTCF and cohesin sub-units, are retained in mitosis and are part of the discontinuous protein scaffold of mitotic chromosomes; 3) the conservation of the link between architectural proteins and their binding sites on DNA through the cell cycle explains the “mitotic memory” of interphase architecture and the reversibility of the interphase to mitosis process. The results presented here also lead to a general conclusion which concerns the existence of correlations between the isochore organization of the genome and the architecture of chromosomes from interphase to metaphase. PMID:26619076

  7. Racial segregation and maternal smoking during pregnancy: a multilevel analysis using the racial segregation interaction index

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Tse-Chuan; Shoff, Carla; Aggie J. Noah; Black, Nyesha; Sparks, Corey S.

    2014-01-01

    Drawing from both the place stratification and ethnic enclave perspectives, we use multilevel modeling to investigate the relationships between women’s race/ethnicity (i.e., non-Hispanic white, non-Hispanic black, Asian, and Hispanic) and maternal smoking during pregnancy; and examine if these relationships are moderated by racial segregation in the continental United States. The results show that increased interaction with whites is associated with increased probability of maternal smoking d...

  8. Distinct Patterns of Structural and Numerical Chromosomal Instability Characterize Sporadic Ovarian Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane Bayani

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Sporadic ovarian cancer is a particularly aggressive tumor characterized by highly abnormal karyotypes exhibiting many features of genomic instability. More complex genomic changes in tumors arise as a consequence of chromosomal instability (CIN, which can generate both numerical [(N-CIN] and structural chromosomal instability [(S-CIN]. In this study, molecular cytogenetic analysis was used to evaluate the relative levels of both (N-CIN and (S-CIN. Six tumors had a near-diploid chromosome number, two were near-tetraploid, and two were near-triploid. (N-CIN levels increased as a function of overall tumor genomic content, with near-diploid tumors exhibiting numerical instability indices ranging from 7.0 to 21.0 and near-tetraploid and triploid tumors exhibiting instability indices ranging from 24.9 to 54.9. In contrast, the extent of (S-CIN was generally more evident in the diploid tumors compared with the near-tetraploid tumors. To determine whether the associated chromosomal constitution and/or ploidy changes were influenced by mitotic segregation errors, centrosome analyses were performed on all 10 tumors. The near-diploid tumors, with the lowest numerical change, were observed to possess fewer cells with centrosome abnormalities (5.5% to 14.0%, whereas the near-tetraploid tumors possessed much higher levels of (N-CIN and were characterized by a trend of elevating percentages of cells with abnormal centrosomes (16.0% to 20.5%. These observations suggest that two distinct processes governing genome stability may be disrupted in ovarian cancer: those that impact on numerical segregation and ploidy of chromosomes and those that affect the fidelity of DNA repair and lead to structural aberrations.

  9. A linkage and physical map of chromosome 22, and some applications to gene mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julier, C; Lathrop, G M; Reghis, A; Szajnert, M F; Lalouel, J M; Kaplan, J C

    1988-02-01

    A genetic map of human chromosome 22 has been derived from physical assignments and multilocus linkage analysis. It consists of the loci for the immunoglobulin lambda light-chain variable (IGLV) and immunoglobulin lambda light-chain constant (IGLC) regions, myoglobin (MB), the sis proto-oncogene (SIS), and an arbitrary probe (D22S1). The first RFLPs at the loci for SIS, IGLV, and MB are described. The most likely gene order on the basis of multilocus analysis was cen-(IGLV-IGLC)-D22S1-MB-SIS. This map provides further evidence for localization of the P1 polymorphism of the P blood group to chromosome 22, close to the SIS locus. Analysis of families segregating recessive congenital methemoglobinemia (RCM), a disease in which the cytochrome b5 reductase is defective, as well as of families with cases of hereditary low levels of cytochrome b5 reductase activity, confirmed that the locus responsible for RCM is on chromosome 22. Biochemical studies had already suggested that mutation at the cytochrome b5 reductase locus (DIA1) is responsible for RCM. We found no evidence of genetic heterogeneity between the families segregating RCM and the families exhibiting cases of low cytochrome b5 reductase activity. Linkage analysis indicated that the most probable location of DIA1 lies between MB and SIS. PMID:2893546

  10. Mitotic segregation in intergeneric hybrids of yeast to give novel genetic segregants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two strains of yeast, Yarrowia lipolytica and Saccharomycopsis fibuligera, have a filamentous growth form in addition to budding cells. Y. lipolytica produces lipases and is used in the production of citric acid while W. fibuligera produces amylases and is used in the production of rice wine. In the present report, we made a study of the following: (i) karyotypes of the two yeast strains to obtain a better understanding of their genetic relatedness, (ii) genetic crosses between the two strains to produce intergeneric hybrids, and (iii) pattern of genetic segregation of the intergeneric hybrids via the mitotic process. The results of our studies showed that the two yeast strains were genetically related and that putative intergeneric hybrids were obtained by a genetic crossing of the strains. The hybrids were relatively stable in mitosis as compared to their parent strains. However, in prolonged vegetative propagation, the hybrids gave rise to genetic segregants, most of which were of either of the two parent phenotypes. A number of the segregants had phenotypes which combined those of the parental types. Of considerable significance was that yet a few others were novel as they exhibited phenotypes not hitherto seen for both parent strains. (author). 9 refs, 5 tabs

  11. Microtubule flux mediates poleward motion of acentric chromosome fragments during meiosis in insect spermatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaFountain, J R; Oldenbourg, R; Cole, R W; Rieder, C L

    2001-12-01

    We applied a combination of laser microsurgery and quantitative polarization microscopy to study kinetochore-independent forces that act on chromosome arms during meiosis in crane fly spermatocytes. When chromosome arms located within one of the half-spindles during prometa- or metaphase were cut with the laser, the acentric fragments (lacking kinetochores) that were generated moved poleward with velocities similar to those of anaphase chromosomes (approximately 0.5 microm/min). To determine the mechanism underlying this poleward motion of detached arms, we treated spermatocytes with the microtubule-stabilizing drug taxol. Spindles in taxol-treated cells were noticeably short, yet with polarized light, the distribution and densities of microtubules in domains where fragment movement occurred were not different from those in control cells. When acentric fragments were generated in taxol-treated spermatocytes, 22 of 24 fragments failed to exhibit poleward motion, and the two that did move had velocities attenuated by 80% (to approximately 0.1 microm/min). In these cells, taxol did not inhibit the disjunction of chromosomes nor prevent their poleward segregation during anaphase, but the velocity of anaphase was also decreased 80% (approximately 0.1 microm/min) relative to untreated controls. Together, these data reveal that microtubule flux exerts pole-directed forces on chromosome arms during meiosis in crane fly spermatocytes and strongly suggest that the mechanism underlying microtubule flux also is used in the anaphase motion of kinetochores in these cells. PMID:11739800

  12. Evolution of Sex Chromosomes in Insects

    OpenAIRE

    Kaiser, Vera B; Bachtrog, Doris

    2010-01-01

    Sex chromosomes have many unusual features relative to autosomes. Y (or W) chromosomes lack genetic recombination, are male- (female-) limited, and show an abundance of genetically inert heterochromatic DNA but contain few functional genes. X (or Z) chromosomes also show sex-biased transmission (i.e., X chromosomes show female-biased and Z-chromosomes show male-biased inheritance) and are hemizygous in the heterogametic sex. Their unusual ploidy level and pattern of inheritance imply that sex...

  13. A dominant negative mutant of TLK1 causes chromosome missegregation and aneuploidy in normal breast epithelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Williams Briana

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Arabidopsis thaliana, the gene Tousled encodes a protein kinase of unknown function, but mutations in the gene lead to flowering and leaf morphology defects. We have recently cloned a mammalian Tousled-Like Kinase (TLK1B and found that it phosphorylates specifically histone H3, in vitro and in vivo. We now report the effects that overexpression of a kinase-dead mutant of TLK1B mediates in a normal diploid cell line. Results Expression of a kinase-dead mutant resulted in reduction of phosphorylated histone H3, which could have consequences in mitotic segregation of chromosomes. When analyzed by FACS and microscopy, these cells displayed high chromosome number instability and aneuploidy. This phenomenon was accompanied by less condensed chromosomes at mitosis; failure of a number of chromosomes to align properly on the metaphase plate; failure of some chromosomes to attach to microtubules; and the occasional presentation of two bipolar spindles. We also used a different method (siRNA to reduce the level of endogenous TLK1, but in this case, the main result was a strong block of cell cycle progression suggesting that TLK1 may also play a role in progression from G1. This block in S phase progression could also offer a different explanation of some of the later mitotic defects. Conclusions TLK1 has a function important for proper chromosome segregation and maintenance of diploid cells at mitosis in mammalian cells that could be mediated by reduced phosphorylation of histone H3 and condensation of chromosomes, although other explanations to the phenotype are possible.

  14. Taylor revisited: Gender segregation and division of labour in the ICT - sector (information and communication technology)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nygaard, Else

    2001-01-01

    Information and communication technology, division of labour, gender segregation, working conditions......Information and communication technology, division of labour, gender segregation, working conditions...

  15. Element segregation on the surfaces of pure aluminum foils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The surface segregation trend of trace elements in pure aluminum foils was investigated by density functional theory. The model of nine-layer Al(1 0 0) slab substituted partially by trace element atoms was proposed for calculating surface segregation energy. The calculating results show that (i) B, Mg, Si, Ga, Ge, Y, In, Sn, Sb, Pb and Bi exhibit negative segregation energy and possibly move to the surface, while Be, Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu and Zr exhibit positive segregation energies and migrated into the bulk; (ii) the segregation energy was found to be related with the covalent radius, the relaxed position at the surface of the substituting atom and the surface energy; (iii) the segregation behavior of trace element generates lots of defects and dislocation, which can increase the initial pitting nucleation sites in the surface of aluminum foils; (iv) the impurity atom concentration was tested with Pb-doped surfaces, the calculated negative segregation energies in all coverage increases rapidly with the Pb coverage. These conclusions are helpful for designing of the chemical composition and to advance the tunnel etching of aluminum foils.

  16. Factors shaping workplace segregation between natives and immigrants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strömgren, Magnus; Tammaru, Tiit; Danzer, Alexander M; van Ham, Maarten; Marcińczak, Szymon; Stjernström, Olof; Lindgren, Urban

    2014-04-01

    Research on segregation of immigrant groups is increasingly turning its attention from residential areas toward other important places, such as the workplace, where immigrants can meet and interact with members of the native population. This article examines workplace segregation of immigrants. We use longitudinal, georeferenced Swedish population register data, which enables us to observe all immigrants in Sweden for the period 1990-2005 on an annual basis. We compare estimates from ordinary least squares with fixed-effects regressions to quantify the extent of immigrants' self-selection into specific workplaces, neighborhoods, and partnerships, which may bias more naïve ordinary least squares results. In line with previous research, we find lower levels of workplace segregation than residential segregation. The main finding is that low levels of residential segregation reduce workplace segregation, even after we take into account intermarriage with natives as well as unobserved characteristics of immigrants' such as willingness and ability to integrate into the host society. Being intermarried with a native reduces workplace segregation for immigrant men but not for immigrant women. PMID:24399142

  17. Chromosomal duplications and cointegrates generated by the bacteriophage lamdba Red system in Escherichia coli K-12

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadkarni Ashwini

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An Escherichia coli strain in which RecBCD has been genetically replaced by the bacteriophage λ Red system engages in efficient recombination between its chromosome and linear double-stranded DNA species sharing sequences with the chromosome. Previous studies of this experimental system have focused on a gene replacement-type event, in which a 3.5 kbp dsDNA consisting of the cat gene and flanking lac operon sequences recombines with the E. coli chromosome to generate a chloramphenicol-resistant Lac- recombinant. The dsDNA was delivered into the cell as part of the chromosome of a non-replicating λ vector, from which it was released by the action of a restriction endonuclease in the infected cell. This study characterizes the genetic requirements and outcomes of a variety of additional Red-promoted homologous recombination events producing Lac+ recombinants. Results A number of observations concerning recombination events between the chromosome and linear DNAs were made: (1 Formation of Lac+ and Lac- recombinants depended upon the same recombination functions. (2 High multiplicity and high chromosome copy number favored Lac+ recombinant formation. (3 The Lac+ recombinants were unstable, segregating Lac- progeny. (4 A tetracycline-resistance marker in a site of the phage chromosome distant from cat was not frequently co-inherited with cat. (5 Recombination between phage sequences in the linear DNA and cryptic prophages in the chromosome was responsible for most of the observed Lac+ recombinants. In addition, observations were made concerning recombination events between the chromosome and circular DNAs: (6 Formation of recombinants depended upon both RecA and, to a lesser extent, Red. (7 The linked tetracycline-resistance marker was frequently co-inherited in this case. Conclusions The Lac+ recombinants arise from events in which homologous recombination between the incoming linear DNA and both lac and cryptic prophage

  18. The double par locus of virulence factor pB171: DNA segregation is correlated with oscillation of ParA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebersbach, G; Gerdes, K; Charbon, Gitte Ebersbach

    2001-01-01

    Prokaryotic plasmids and chromosomes encode partitioning (par) loci that segregate DNA to daughter cells before cell division. Recent database analyses showed that almost all known par loci encode an ATPase and a DNA-binding protein, and one or more cis-acting regions where the proteins act. All ...... simultaneously abolished plasmid stabilization and ParA-Gfp oscillation. These observations raise the possibility that ParA oscillation is prerequisite for active plasmid segregation.......Prokaryotic plasmids and chromosomes encode partitioning (par) loci that segregate DNA to daughter cells before cell division. Recent database analyses showed that almost all known par loci encode an ATPase and a DNA-binding protein, and one or more cis-acting regions where the proteins act. All...... Type II locus. Separately, each locus stabilized a test-plasmid efficiently. Together, the two loci mediated even more efficient plasmid stabilization. The par loci have a unique genetic organization in that they share a common central region at which the two different DNA-binding proteins probably act...

  19. Metropolitan racial residential segregation and cardiovascular mortality: exploring pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greer, Sophia; Kramer, Michael R; Cook-Smith, Jessica N; Casper, Michele L

    2014-06-01

    Racial residential segregation has been associated with an increased risk for heart disease and stroke deaths. However, there has been little research into the role that candidate mediating pathways may play in the relationship between segregation and heart disease or stroke deaths. In this study, we examined the relationship between metropolitan statistical area (MSA)-level segregation and heart disease and stroke mortality rates, by age and race, and also estimated the effects of various educational, economic, social, and health-care indicators (which we refer to as pathways) on this relationship. We used Poisson mixed models to assess the relationship between the isolation index in 265 U.S. MSAs and county-level (heart disease, stroke) mortality rates. All models were stratified by race (non-Hispanic black, non-Hispanic white), age group (35-64 years, ≥ 65 years), and cause of death (heart disease, stroke). We included each potential pathway in the model separately to evaluate its effect on the segregation-mortality association. Among blacks, segregation was positively associated with heart disease mortality rates in both age groups but only with stroke mortality rates in the older age group. Among whites, segregation was marginally associated with heart disease mortality rates in the younger age group and was positively associated with heart disease mortality rates in the older age group. Three of the potential pathways we explored attenuated relationships between segregation and mortality rates among both blacks and whites: percentage of female-headed households, percentage of residents living in poverty, and median household income. Because the percentage of female-headed households can be seen as a proxy for the extent of social disorganization, our finding that it has the greatest attenuating effect on the relationship between racial segregation and heart disease and stroke mortality rates suggests that social disorganization may play a strong role in the

  20. Retrospective dosimetry using chromosome painting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chromosome aberration frequency measured in peripheral lymphocytes of persons exposed to ionizing radiation has been used since 1960s for dose assessment. Suspected overexposure is usually evaluated by the frequency of dicentrics and centric rings using an appropriate in vitro calibration curve. However, these chromosome aberrations are unstable with time after exposure and dose reconstruction may encounter uncertainties when the time between the exposure and the analysis is considerable or even unknown. It appears that translocations persist with time after exposure and may be used as an indication of acute past overexposures. Moreover, they appear to accumulate the cytogenetical information, which correlates with the dose received under fractionated, chronic or even occupational exposure conditions. Translocations may be detected using G-banding, which allows to score the total amount of radiation induced translocations but it is a time consuming method, or by Chromosome Painting, a method base on the Fluorescence in situ Hybridization (FISH) technique, painting only some chromosome pairs with specific whole chromosome probes and then extrapolating the observed translocation frequencies to the full genome. The latter method allows a faster aberration scoring than G-banding and appears to be the most promissory tool for biodosimetry, particularly when it is necessary to assess low doses and consequently to score a large number of metaphases, e.g. radiation workers exposed within dose limits. As with the unstable chromosome aberration, it is necessary an in vitro calibration curve based on the frequency of stable chromosome aberrations to assess doses. Our laboratory performed calibration curves for Co60 γ-rays based on the frequencies of unstable (dicentrics and centric rings detected by conventional Giemsa staining) and stable chromosome aberrations (translocations and inversions, detected by G-banding). In order to minimize the interlaboratory variability, we

  1. The Reduction of Chromosome Number in Meiosis Is Determined by Properties Built into the Chromosomes

    OpenAIRE

    Paliulis, Leocadia V.; Nicklas, R. Bruce

    2000-01-01

    In meiosis I, two chromatids move to each spindle pole. Then, in meiosis II, the two are distributed, one to each future gamete. This requires that meiosis I chromosomes attach to the spindle differently than meiosis II chromosomes and that they regulate chromosome cohesion differently. We investigated whether the information that dictates the division type of the chromosome comes from the whole cell, the spindle, or the chromosome itself. Also, we determined when chromosomes can switch from ...

  2. Radiation-induced chromosomal instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ritter, S. [GSI, Biophysics, Darmstadt (Germany)

    1999-03-01

    Recent studies on radiation-induced chromosomal instability in the progeny of exposed mammalian cells were briefly described as well as other related studies. For the analysis of chromosomal damage in clones, cells were seeded directly after exposure in cell well-dish to form single cell clones and post-irradiation chromosome aberrations were scored. Both exposure to isoeffective doses of X-ray or 270 MeV/u C-ions (13 keV/{mu}m) increased the number of clones with abnormal karyotype and the increase was similar for X-ray and for C-ions. Meanwhile, in the progeny of cells for mass cultures, there was no indication of a delayed expression of chromosomal damage up to 40 population doublings after the exposure. A high number of aberrant cells were only observed directly after exposure to 10.7 MeV/u O-ions, i.e. in the first cycle cells and decreased with subsequent cell divisions. The reason for these differences in the radiation-induced chromosomal instability between clonal isolates and mass culture has not been clarified. Recent studies indicated that genomic instability occurs at a high frequency in the progeny of cells irradiated with both sparsely and densely ionizing radiation. Such genomic instability is thought likely to increase the risk of carcinogenesis, but more data are required for a well understanding of the health risks resulting from radiation-induced delayed instability. (M.N.)

  3. Dean flow fractionation of chromosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hockin, Matt; Sant, Himanshu J.; Capecchi, Mario; Gale, Bruce K.

    2016-03-01

    Efforts to transfer intact mammalian chromosomes between cells have been attempted for more than 50 years with the consistent result being transfer of sub unit length pieces regardless of method. Inertial microfluidics is a new field that has shown much promise in addressing the fractionation of particles in the 2-20 μm size range (with unknown limits) and separations are based upon particles being carried by curving confined flows (within a spiral shaped, often rectangular flow chamber) and migrating to stable "equilibrium" positions of varying distance from a chamber wall depending on the balance of dean and lift forces. We fabricated spiral channels for inertial microfluidic separations using a standard soft lithography process. The concentration of chromosomes, small contaminant DNA and large cell debris in each outlets were evaluated using microscope (60X) and a flow cytometer. Using Dean Flow Fractionation, we were able to focus 4.5 times more chromosomes in outlet 2 compared to outlet 4 where most of the large debris is found. We recover 16% of the chromosomes in outlet #1- 50% in 2, 23% in 3 and 11% in 4. It should be noted that these estimates of recovery do not capture one piece of information- it actually may be that the chromosomes at each outlet are physically different and work needs to be done to verify this potential.

  4. Chromosomal rearrangement interferes with meiotic X chromosome inactivation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Homolka, David; Ivánek, Robert; Čapková, Jana; Jansa, Petr; Forejt, Jiří

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 17, č. 10 (2007), s. 1431-1437. ISSN 1088-9051 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0520; GA ČR GA301/06/1334; GA ČR GA301/07/1383 Grant ostatní: Howard Hughes Medical Institute(US) HHMI 55000306 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : chromosomal translocations * meiotic X chromosome inactivation * spermatogenesis Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 11.224, year: 2007

  5. The socioeconomic and ethnic segregation of living conditions in Copenhagen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Iver Hornemann; Larsen, Jørgen Elm

    2015-01-01

    . Differences in income have increased spatial segregation in Copenhagen in terms of housing and education. This segregation is most visible in relation to highly educated Danes and immigrants from non-Western countries. The article first examines poverty at household level and its spatial dimensions. Secondly......The aim of this article is to analyze the discrepancies between certain aspects of living conditions of ethnic Danes and immigrants in Copenhagen. Copenhagen is quite prosperous and fares well in the globalized economy but is at the same time experiencing increasing poverty and ethnic segregation...

  6. The Socioeconomic and Ethnic Segregation of Living Conditions in Copenhagen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Iver Hornemann; Larsen, Jørgen Elm

    The aim of this article is to analyze the discrepancies between certain aspects of living conditions of ethnic Danes and immigrants in Copenhagen. Copenhagen is quite prosperous and fares well in the globalized economy but is at the same time experiencing increasing poverty and ethnic segregation....... Differences in income have increased spatial segregation in Copenhagen in terms of housing and education. This segregation is most visible in relation to highly educated Danes and immigrants from non-Western countries. The article first examines poverty at household level and its spatial dimensions. Secondly...

  7. The Socioeconomic and Ethnic Segregation of Living Conditions in Copenhagen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Iver Hornemann; Larsen, Jørgen Elm

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this article is to analyze the discrepancies between certain aspects of living conditions of ethnic Danes and immigrants in Copenhagen. Copenhagen is quite prosperous and fares well in the globalized economy but is at the same time experiencing increasing poverty and ethnic segregation....... Differences in income have increased spatial segregation in Copenhagen in terms of housing and education. This segregation is most visible in relation to highly educated Danes and immigrants from non-Western countries. The article first examines poverty at household level and its spatial dimensions. Secondly...

  8. Analysis of IFT74 as a candidate gene for chromosome 9p-linked ALS-FTD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogaeva Ekaterina

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A new locus for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis – frontotemporal dementia (ALS-FTD has recently been ascribed to chromosome 9p. Methods We identified chromosome 9p segregating haplotypes within two families with ALS-FTD (F476 and F2 and undertook mutational screening of candidate genes within this locus. Results Candidate gene sequencing at this locus revealed the presence of a disease segregating stop mutation (Q342X in the intraflagellar transport 74 (IFT74 gene in family 476 (F476, but no mutation was detected within IFT74 in family 2 (F2. While neither family was sufficiently informative to definitively implicate or exclude IFT74 mutations as a cause of chromosome 9-linked ALS-FTD, the nature of the mutation observed within F476 (predicted to truncate the protein by 258 amino acids led us to sequence the open reading frame of this gene in a large number of ALS and FTD cases (n = 420. An additional sequence variant (G58D was found in a case of sporadic semantic dementia. I55L sequence variants were found in three other unrelated affected individuals, but this was also found in a single individual among 800 Human Diversity Gene Panel samples. Conclusion Confirmation of the pathogenicity of IFT74 sequence variants will require screening of other chromosome 9p-linked families.

  9. Gene organization in the region containing a new gene involved in chromosome partition in Escherichia coli.

    OpenAIRE

    Kato, J; Nishimura, Y.; Yamada, M.; Suzuki, H.; Hirota, Y

    1988-01-01

    A new mutation, parC, causing abnormal chromosome segregation was identified in two thermosensitive mutants of Escherichia coli. The thermosensitive growth of the mutants was corrected by pLC4-14 in the Clarke-Carbon collection. This plasmid carries a putative gene which can suppress the cell division defect due to ftsI (pbpB) and has hence been termed sufI (sui). The nearness of parC to metC was confirmed, and cotransduction frequency of parC was 59% with metC and 20% with glc. The parC-sufI...

  10. Experience on domestic waste segregation in Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osei Bonsu Patterson

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Pollution from domestic wastes is a major environmental challenge in Ghana and many developing countries. Most of these countries depend almost entirely on landfills for waste management, which has proved to be expensive, inefficient and unsustainable. A sustainable solution to this problem is productive use of waste such as recycling. The main challenge that may limit recycling in Ghana and some of these countries is that a chunk of the wastes are littered on the environment, and the rest is collected in bulk in the same waste bin, thereby mixing them. The cost of collecting littered wastes, or separating mixed wastes could be prohibitive, making recycling uneconomical. In order to productively utilize wastes, adequate and separate waste bins must be provided for collecting the different components of wastes. However, budgetary constraints may not allow many countries to purchase expansive waste bins for the different components of wastes. Consequently, a simple waste bin, comprising a metal frame on which polypropylene sack (pp-sack can be hanged to collect inorganic wastes has been developed by the author. The waste bin (new bin can be manufactured industrially using plastic or fabricated by local artisans at an affordable price. This document describes the new bin. Experience in collecting organic and inorganic wastes generated in a house in separate waste bins (waste segregation for the past 16 years is also highlighted.

  11. Segregation patterns in gas-fluidized systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbertson, M. A.; Eames, I.

    2001-04-01

    The formation of segregation patterns in initially homogeneous, fluidized, binary mixtures of particles has been studied. The adjustment of the bed depends on the proportions of fine and coarse particles in the mixture and the gas flow rate relative to the minimum fluidization velocities of the two components. The particles are immobile until the gas flow rate is sufficiently large to fluidize the mixture of particles. When the gas flow rate exceeds this critical value, alternating vertical bands of coarse and fine particles form. At a second critical gas velocity this pattern breaks down and the more familiar pattern of a mixed horizontal band on top of a layer of coarse particles forms. A phase diagram, constructed from experimental observations, shows the conditions for which each of these regimes exists. Its structure is explained in terms of the fluidization and consequent mobility of the mixture components. When horizontal bands are present, the thickness of the lower layer of coarse particles decreases with increasing gas flow rate depending on the proportion of fine particles in the bed. This, and its development, can be understood by analogy with the sedimentation of particles through a turbulent fluid. The experiments imply that the efficiency of mixing by the bubbles in the fluidized bed is very much less than that expected from gas bubbles in a liquid.

  12. New segregation analysis of panic disorder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vieland, V.J.; Fyer, A.J.; Chapman, T. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States)] [and others

    1996-04-09

    We performed simple segregation analyses of panic disorder using 126 families of probands with DSM-III-R panic disorder who were ascertained for a family study of anxiety disorders at an anxiety disorders research clinic. We present parameter estimates for dominant, recessive, and arbitrary single major locus models without sex effects, as well as for a nongenetic transmission model, and compare these models to each other and to models obtained by other investigators. We rejected the nongenetic transmission model when comparing it to the recessive model. Consistent with some previous reports, we find comparable support for dominant and recessive models, and in both cases estimate nonzero phenocopy rates. The effect of restricting the analysis to families of probands without any lifetime history of comorbid major depression (MDD) was also examined. No notable differences in parameter estimates were found in that subsample, although the power of that analysis was low. Consistency between the findings in our sample and in another independently collected sample suggests the possibility of pooling such samples in the future in order to achieve the necessary power for more complex analyses. 32 refs., 4 tabs.

  13. Escape Artists of the X Chromosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaton, Bradley P; Brown, Carolyn J

    2016-06-01

    Inactivation of one X chromosome in mammalian females achieves dosage compensation between XX females and XY males; however, over 15% of human X-linked genes continue to be expressed from the inactive X chromosome. New genomic methodologies have improved our identification and characterization of these escape genes, revealing the importance of DNA sequence, chromatin structure, and chromosome ultrastructure in regulating expression from an otherwise inactive chromosome. Study of these exceptions to the rule of silencing highlights the interconnectedness of chromatin and chromosome structure in X-chromosome inactivation (XCI). Recent advances also demonstrate the importance of these genes in sexually dimorphic disease risk, particularly cancer. PMID:27103486

  14. Adults with Chromosome 18 Abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soileau, Bridgette; Hasi, Minire; Sebold, Courtney; Hill, Annice; O'Donnell, Louise; Hale, Daniel E; Cody, Jannine D

    2015-08-01

    The identification of an underlying chromosome abnormality frequently marks the endpoint of a diagnostic odyssey. However, families are frequently left with more questions than answers as they consider their child's future. In the case of rare chromosome conditions, a lack of longitudinal data often makes it difficult to provide anticipatory guidance to these families. The objective of this study is to describe the lifespan, educational attainment, living situation, and behavioral phenotype of adults with chromosome 18 abnormalities. The Chromosome 18 Clinical Research Center has enrolled 483 individuals with one of the following conditions: 18q-, 18p-, Tetrasomy 18p, and Ring 18. As a part of the ongoing longitudinal study, we collect data on living arrangements, educational level attained, and employment status as well as data on executive functioning and behavioral skills on an annual basis. Within our cohort, 28 of the 483 participants have died, the majority of whom have deletions encompassing the TCF4 gene or who have unbalanced rearrangement involving other chromosomes. Data regarding the cause of and age at death are presented. We also report on the living situation, educational attainment, and behavioral phenotype of the 151 participants over the age of 18. In general, educational level is higher for people with all these conditions than implied by the early literature, including some that received post-high school education. In addition, some individuals are able to live independently, though at this point they represent a minority of patients. Data on executive function and behavioral phenotype are also presented. Taken together, these data provide insight into the long-term outcome for individuals with a chromosome 18 condition. This information is critical in counseling families on the range of potential outcomes for their child. PMID:25403900

  15. Why calculated energies of grain boundary segregation are unreliable when segregant solubility is low

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lejček, Pavel; Šob, Mojmír; Paidar, Václav; Vítek, V.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 68, č. 6 (2013), s. 547-550. ISSN 1359-6462 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP108/12/0144; GA ČR(CZ) GAP108/12/0311; GA AV ČR IAA100100920 Grant ostatní: CEITEC(XE) CZ.1.05/1.1.00/02.0068 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 ; RVO:68081723 Keywords : Interface segregation * grain boundary embrittlement * solid solubilitys * DFT Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.968, year: 2013

  16. Making chromosome abnormalities treatable conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cody, Jannine DeMars; Hale, Daniel Esten

    2015-09-01

    Individuals affected by the classic chromosome deletion syndromes which were first identified at the beginning of the genetic age, are now positioned to benefit from genomic advances. This issue highlights five of these conditions (4p-, 5p-, 11q-, 18p-, and 18q-). It focuses on the increased in understanding of the molecular underpinnings and envisions how these can be transformed into effective treatments. While it is scientifically exciting to see the phenotypic manifestations of hemizygosity being increasingly understood at the molecular and cellular level, it is even more amazing to consider that we are now on the road to making chromosome abnormalities treatable conditions. PMID:26351122

  17. Using Chromosomes to Teach Evolution: Chromosomal Rearrangements in Speciation Events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Offner, Susan

    1994-01-01

    Uses diagrams to aid in discussing how the English map of the human chromosomes, published by Offner in 1993, can be used to illustrate some important questions in evolution, as well as give students a glimpse into some of the mechanisms underlying evolutionary change. (ZWH)

  18. Use of segregation techniques to reduce stored low level waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the use of segregation techniques in reducing the stored Low Level Waste on Intermediate Waste Repository 1, at Angra Nuclear Power Plant Site, from 1701 to 425 drums of compacted waste. (author)

  19. Dynamics of Transformation from Segregation to Mixed Wealth Cities

    CERN Document Server

    Sahasranaman, Anand

    2016-01-01

    We model the dynamics of the Schelling model for agents described simply by a continuously distributed variable - wealth. Agents move to neighborhoods where their wealth is not lesser than that of some proportion of their neighbors, the threshold level. As in the case of the classic Schelling model where segregation obtains between two races, we find here that wealth-based segregation occurs and persists. However, introducing uncertainty into the decision to move - that is, with some probability, if agents are allowed to move even though the threshold level condition is contravened - we find that even for small proportions of such disallowed moves, the dynamics no longer yield segregation but instead sharply transition into a persistent mixed wealth distribution. We investigate the nature of this sharp transformation between segregated and mixed states, and find that it is because of a non-linear relationship between allowed moves and disallowed moves. For small increases in disallowed moves, there is a rapid...

  20. Phase-oriented surface segregation in an aluminium casting alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There have been many reports of the surface segregation of minor elements, especially Mg, into surface layers and oxide films on the surface of Al alloys. LM6 casting alloy (Al-12%Si) represents a challenging system to examine such segregation as the alloy features a particularly inhomogeneous phase structure. The very low but mobile Mg content (approximately 0.001 wt.%), and the surface segregation of modifiers such as Na, mean the surface composition responds in a complex manner to thermal treatment conditions. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) has been used to determine the distribution of these elements within the oxide film. Further investigation by dynamic secondary ion mass spectrometry (DSIMS) confirmed a strong alignment of segregated Na and Mg into distinct phases of the structure.