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Sample records for chromosome pairing

  1. Excluded volume effect enhances the homology pairing of model chromosomes

    CERN Document Server

    Takamiya, Kazunori; Isami, Shuhei; Nishimori, Hiraku; Awazu, Akinori

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the structural dynamics of the homology pairing of polymers, we mod- eled the scenario of homologous chromosome pairings during meiosis in Schizosaccharomyces pombe, one of the simplest model organisms of eukaryotes. We consider a simple model consist- ing of pairs of homologous polymers with the same structures that are confined in a cylindrical container, which represents the local parts of chromosomes contained in an elongated nucleus of S. pombe. Brownian dynamics simulations of this model showed that the excluded volume effects among non-homological chromosomes and the transitional dynamics of nuclear shape serve to enhance the pairing of homologous chromosomes.

  2. A novel metric for bone marrow cells chromosome pairing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khmelinskii, Artem; Ventura, Rodrigo; Sanches, João

    2010-06-01

    Karyotyping is a set of procedures, in the scope of the cytogenetics, that produces a visual representation of the 46 chromosomes observed during the metaphase step of the cellular division, called mitosis, paired and arranged in decreasing order of size. Automatic pairing of bone marrow cells is a difficult task because these chromosomes appear distorted, overlapped, and their images are usually blurred with undefined edges and low level of detail. In this paper, a new metric is proposed to compare this type of chromosome images toward the design of an automatic pairing algorithm for leukemia diagnostic purposes. Besides the features used in the traditional karyotyping procedures, a new feature, based on mutual information , is proposed to increase the discriminate power of the G-banding pattern dissimilarity between chromosomes and improve the performance of the classifier. The pairing algorithm is formulated as a combinatorial optimization problem where the distances between homologous chromosomes are minimized and the distances between nonhomologous ones are maximized. The optimization task is solved by using an integer programming approach. A new bone marrow chromosome dataset--Lisbon-K1 (LK1) chromosome dataset with 9200 chromosomes---was build for this study. These chromosomes have much lower quality than the classic Copenhagen, Edinburgh, and Philadelphia datasets, and its classification and pairing is therefore more difficult. Experiments using real images from the LK(1) and Grisan et al. datasets based on a leave-one-out cross-validation strategy are performed to test and validate the pairing algorithm. PMID:20172790

  3. The Program of Sex Chromosome Pairing in Meiosis Is Highly Conserved Across Marsupial Species: Implications for Sex Chromosome Evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Page, Jesús; Berríos, Soledad; Parra, María Teresa; Viera, Alberto; Suja, José Ángel; Prieto, Ignacio; Barbero, José Luis; Rufas, Julio S; Fernández-Donoso, Raúl

    2005-01-01

    Marsupials present a series of genetic and chromosomal features that are highly conserved in very distant species. One of these features is the absence of a homologous region between X and Y chromosomes. According to this genetic differentiation, sex chromosomes do not synapse during the first meiotic prophase in males, and a special structure, the dense plate, maintains sex chromosome association. In this report we present results on the process of meiotic sex chromosome pairing obtained fro...

  4. A cohesin-based structural platform supporting homologous chromosome pairing in meiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Da-Qiao; Haraguchi, Tokuko; Hiraoka, Yasushi

    2016-08-01

    The pairing and recombination of homologous chromosomes during the meiotic prophase is necessary for the accurate segregation of chromosomes in meiosis. However, the mechanism by which homologous chromosomes achieve this pairing has remained an open question. Meiotic cohesins have been shown to affect chromatin compaction; however, the impact of meiotic cohesins on homologous pairing and the fine structures of cohesion-based chromatin remain to be determined. A recent report using live-cell imaging and super-resolution microscopy demonstrated that the lack of meiotic cohesins alters the chromosome axis structures and impairs the pairing of homologous chromosomes. These results suggest that meiotic cohesin-based chromosome axis structures are crucial for the pairing of homologous chromosomes. PMID:26856595

  5. An Asymmetric Chromosome Pair Undergoes Synaptic Adjustment and Crossover Redistribution During Caenorhabditis elegans Meiosis: Implications for Sex Chromosome Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henzel, Jonathan V.; Nabeshima, Kentaro; Schvarzstein, Mara; Turner, B. Elizabeth; Villeneuve, Anne M.; Hillers, Kenneth J.

    2011-01-01

    Heteromorphic sex chromosomes, such as the X/Y pair in mammals, differ in size and DNA sequence yet function as homologs during meiosis; this bivalent asymmetry presents special challenges for meiotic completion. In Caenorhabditis elegans males carrying mnT12, an X;IV fusion chromosome, mnT12 and IV form an asymmetric bivalent: chromosome IV sequences are capable of pairing and synapsis, while the contiguous X portion of mnT12 lacks a homologous pairing partner. Here, we investigate the meiotic behavior of this asymmetric neo-X/Y chromosome pair in C. elegans. Through immunolocalization of the axis component HIM-3, we demonstrate that the unpaired X axis has a distinct, coiled morphology while synapsed axes are linear and extended. By showing that loci at the fusion-proximal end of IV become unpaired while remaining synapsed as pachytene progresses, we directly demonstrate the occurrence of synaptic adjustment in this organism. We further demonstrate that meiotic crossover distribution is markedly altered in males with the asymmetric mnT12/+ bivalent relative to controls, resulting in greatly reduced crossover formation near the X;IV fusion point and elevated crossovers at the distal end of the bivalent. In effect, the distal end of the bivalent acts as a neo-pseudoautosomal region in these males. We discuss implications of these findings for mechanisms that ensure crossover formation during meiosis. Furthermore, we propose that redistribution of crossovers triggered by bivalent asymmetry may be an important driving force in sex chromosome evolution. PMID:21212235

  6. Modeling meiotic chromosome pairing: nuclear envelope attachment, telomere-led active random motion, and anomalous diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Wallace F.; Fung, Jennifer C.

    2016-04-01

    The recognition and pairing of homologous chromosomes during meiosis is a complex physical and molecular process involving a combination of polymer dynamics and molecular recognition events. Two highly conserved features of meiotic chromosome behavior are the attachment of telomeres to the nuclear envelope and the active random motion of telomeres driven by their interaction with cytoskeletal motor proteins. Both of these features have been proposed to facilitate the process of homolog pairing, but exactly what role these features play in meiosis remains poorly understood. Here we investigate the roles of active motion and nuclear envelope tethering using a Brownian dynamics simulation in which meiotic chromosomes are represented by a Rouse polymer model subjected to tethering and active forces at the telomeres. We find that tethering telomeres to the nuclear envelope slows down pairing relative to the rates achieved by unattached chromosomes, but that randomly directed active forces applied to the telomeres speed up pairing dramatically in a manner that depends on the statistical properties of the telomere force fluctuations. The increased rate of initial pairing cannot be explained by stretching out of the chromosome conformation but instead seems to correlate with anomalous diffusion of sub-telomeric regions.

  7. Experimental approach to prezygotic chromosome screening using only a single pair of gametes in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Hiroyuki; Kohda, Atsushi; Tateno, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    During in vitro embryo production, chromosome screening is essential to prevent pregnancy losses caused by embryonic chromosome aberrations. When the chromosome screening is completed before fertilization, gametes are effectively utilized as genetic resources. The aim of this study was to investigate whether chromosome screening of gametes accompanied by fertilization would be feasible using a single mouse spermatozoon and oocyte. Metaphase II oocytes were divided into a cytoplast and a karyoplast. For genome cloning of the gametes, androgenic and gynogenic embryos were produced by microinjection of sperm into cytoplasts and parthenogenetic activation of karyoplasts, respectively. Pairs of blastomeres from androgenic and gynogenic embryos were fused electrically to produce diploid embryos, which were transferred into pseudopregnant surrogate mothers to examine fetal development. Blastomeres from androgenic and gynogenic embryos were individually treated with calyculin A-a specific inhibitor of type 1 and 2A protein phosphatases-for 2 h to induce premature chromosome condensation. Thereafter, chromosome analysis of blastomeres, reflecting the genetic constitution of individual spermatozoa and oocytes, was performed, and we confirmed that most of the androgenic and gynogenic 2-cell embryos had a haploid set of chromosomes in their sister blastomeres. The reconstructed embryos from blastomeres of androgenic and gynogenic 2-cell embryos could be implanted and develop into live fetuses, albeit at low efficiency. This study indicates that prezygotic chromosome screening and embryo production using a single pair of gametes may be practicable. PMID:26234555

  8. Somatic pairing, endomitosis and chromosome aberrations in snakes (Viperidae and Colubridae

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    Beçak Maria Luiza

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The positioning of macrochromosomes of Bothrops jararaca and Bothrops insularis (Viperidae was studied in undistorted radial metaphases of uncultured cells (spermatogonia and oogonia not subjected to spindle inhibitors. Colchicinized metaphases from uncultured (spleen and intestine and cultured tissues (blood were also analyzed. We report two antagonic non-random chromosome arrangements in untreated premeiotic cells: the parallel configuration with homologue chromosomes associated side by side in the metaphase plate and the antiparallel configuration having homologue chromosomes with antipolar distribution in the metaphase ring. The antiparallel aspect also appeared in colchicinized cells. The spatial chromosome arrangement in both configurations is groupal size-dependent and maintained through meiosis. We also describe, in untreated gonia cells, endomitosis followed by reductional mitosis which restores the diploid number. In B. jararaca males we observed that some gonad regions present changes in the meiotic mechanism. In this case, endoreduplicated cells segregate the diplochromosomes to opposite poles forming directly endoreduplicated second metaphases of meiosis with the suppression of first meiosis. By a successive division, these cells form nuclei with one set of chromosomes. Chromosome doubling in oogonia is known in hybrid species and in parthenogenetic salamanders and lizards. This species also presented chromosome rearrangements leading to aneuploidies in mitosis and meiosis. It is suggested that somatic pairing, endomitosis, meiotic alterations, and chromosomal aberrations can be correlated processes. Similar aspects of nuclei configurations, endomitosis and reductional mitosis were found in other Viperidae and Colubridae species.

  9. Seventy Million Years of Concerted Evolution of a Homoeologous Chromosome Pair, in Parallel, in Major Poaceae Lineages[W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiyin; Tang, Haibao; Paterson, Andrew H.

    2011-01-01

    Whole genome duplication ~70 million years ago provided raw material for Poaceae (grass) diversification. Comparison of rice (Oryza sativa), sorghum (Sorghum bicolor), maize (Zea mays), and Brachypodium distachyon genomes revealed that one paleo-duplicated chromosome pair has experienced very different evolution than all the others. For tens of millions of years, the two chromosomes have experienced illegitimate recombination that has been temporally restricted in a stepwise manner, producing structural stratification in the chromosomes. These strata formed independently in different grass lineages, with their similarities (low sequence divergence between paleo-duplicated genes) preserved in parallel for millions of years since the divergence of these lineages. The pericentromeric region of this homeologous chromosome pair accounts for two-thirds of the gene content differences between the modern chromosomes. Both intriguing and perplexing is a distal chromosomal region with the greatest DNA similarity between surviving duplicated genes but also with the highest concentration of lineage-specific gene pairs found anywhere in these genomes and with a significantly elevated gene evolutionary rate. Intragenomic similarity near this chromosomal terminus may be important in hom(e)ologous chromosome pairing. Chromosome structural stratification, together with enrichment of autoimmune response–related (nucleotide binding site–leucine-rich repeat) genes and accelerated DNA rearrangement and gene loss, confer a striking resemblance of this grass chromosome pair to the sex chromosomes of other taxa. PMID:21266659

  10. Platypus chain reaction: directional and ordered meiotic pairing of the multiple sex chromosome chain in Ornithorhynchus anatinus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daish, Tasman; Casey, Aaron; Grützner, Frank

    2009-01-01

    Monotremes are phylogenetically and phenotypically unique animals with an unusually complex sex chromosome system that is composed of ten chromosomes in platypus and nine in echidna. These chromosomes are alternately linked (X1Y1, X2Y2, ...) at meiosis via pseudoautosomal regions and segregate to form spermatozoa containing either X or Y chromosomes. The physical and epigenetic mechanisms involved in pairing and assembly of the complex sex chromosome chain in early meiotic prophase I are completely unknown. We have analysed the pairing dynamics of specific sex chromosome pseudoautosomal regions in platypus spermatocytes during prophase of meiosis I. Our data show a highly coordinated pairing process that begins at the terminal Y5 chromosome and completes with the union of sex chromosomes X1Y1. The consistency of this ordered assembly of the chain is remarkable and raises questions about the mechanisms and factors that regulate the differential pairing of sex chromosomes and how this relates to potential meiotic silencing mechanisms and alternate segregation. PMID:19874721

  11. Derivative chromosome 1 and GLUT1 deficiency syndrome in a sibling pair

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    Akarsu Nurten

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genomic imbalances constitute a major cause of congenital and developmental abnormalities. GLUT1 deficiency syndrome is caused by various de novo mutations in the facilitated human glucose transporter 1 gene (1p34.2 and patients with this syndrome have been diagnosed with hypoglycorrhachia, mental and developmental delay, microcephaly and seizures. Furthermore, 1q terminal deletions have been submitted in the recent reports and the absence of corpus callosum has been related to the deletion between C1orf100 and C1orf121 in 1q44. Results This study reports on a sibling pair with developmental delay, mental retardation, microcephaly, hypotonia, epilepsy, facial dysmorphism, ataxia and impaired speech. Chromosome analysis revealed a derivative chromosome 1 in both patients. FISH and MCB analysis showed two interstitial deletions at 1p34.2 and 1q44. SNP array and array-CGH analysis also determined the sizes of deletions detailed. The deleted region on 1p34.2 encompasses 33 genes, among which is GLUT1 gene (SLC2A1. However, the deleted region on 1q44 includes 59 genes and distal-proximal breakpoints were located in the ZNF672 gene and SMYD3 gene, respectively. Conclusion Haploinsufficiency of GLUT1 leads to GLUT1 deficiency syndrome, consistent with the phenotype in patients of this study. Conversely, in the deleted region on 1q44, none of the genes are related to findings in these patients. Additionally, the results confirm previous reports on that corpus callosal development may depend on the critical gene(s lying in 1q44 proximal to the SMYD3 gene.

  12. X-chromosome inactivation patterns in monozygotic twins and sib pairs discordant for nonsyndromic cleft lip and/or palate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kimani, Jane W; Shi, Min; Daack-Hirsch, Sandra;

    2007-01-01

    Nonsyndromic clefts of the lip and/or palate are common birth defects with a strong genetic component. Based on unequal gender ratios for clefting phenotypes, evidence for linkage to the X chromosome and the occurrence of several X-linked clefting syndromes, we investigated the role of skewed X...... XCI was defined as the deviation in inactivation pattern from a 50:50 ratio. Our analysis revealed no significant difference in the degree of skewing between twin pairs (P = 0.3). However, borderline significant differences were observed in the sister pairs (P = 0.02), with the cleft lip with cleft......, particularly cleft lip and palate....

  13. Over half of breakpoints in gene pairs involved in cancer-specific recurrent translocations are mapped to human chromosomal fragile sites

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    Pierce Levi CT

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene rearrangements such as chromosomal translocations have been shown to contribute to cancer development. Human chromosomal fragile sites are regions of the genome especially prone to breakage, and have been implicated in various chromosome abnormalities found in cancer. However, there has been no comprehensive and quantitative examination of the location of fragile sites in relation to all chromosomal aberrations. Results Using up-to-date databases containing all cancer-specific recurrent translocations, we have examined 444 unique pairs of genes involved in these translocations to determine the correlation of translocation breakpoints and fragile sites in the gene pairs. We found that over half (52% of translocation breakpoints in at least one gene of these gene pairs are mapped to fragile sites. Among these, we examined the DNA sequences within and flanking three randomly selected pairs of translocation-prone genes, and found that they exhibit characteristic features of fragile DNA, with frequent AT-rich flexibility islands and the potential of forming highly stable secondary structures. Conclusion Our study is the first to examine gene pairs involved in all recurrent chromosomal translocations observed in tumor cells, and to correlate the location of more than half of breakpoints to positions of known fragile sites. These results provide strong evidence to support a causative role for fragile sites in the generation of cancer-specific chromosomal rearrangements.

  14. TMPRSS2-ERG Gene Fusion Causing ERG Overexpression Precedes Chromosome Copy Number Changes in Prostate Carcinomas, Paired HGPIN Lesions

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    Nuno Cerveira

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available TMPRSS2-ETS gene fusions have been found recurrently in prostate carcinomas, but not in the presumed precursor lesion, high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (HGPIN. However, HGPIN lesions may share chromosomal changes with prostate cancer. To determine the relative order of genetic events in prostate carcinogenesis, we have analyzed 34 prostate carcinomas, 19 paired HGPIN lesions, 14 benign prostate hyperplasias, 11 morphologically normal prostatic tissues for TMPRSS2-ERG, TMPRSS2-ETV1 rearrangements, genomic imbalances. TMPRSS2 exon 1 was fused in-frame with ERG exon 4 in 17 of 34 (50% prostate carcinomas, in 4 of 19 (21% HGPIN lesions, but in none of controls. The findings were further validated by sequencing analysis, by the real-time polymerase chain reaction quantification of TMPRSS2-ERG fusion transcript, the ERG exons 5/6:exons 1/2 expression ratio. Chromosome copy number changes were detected by comparative genomic hybridization in 42% of clinically confined carcinomas, in none of the 16 HGPIN lesions analyzed. We demonstrate for the first time that the TMPRSS2-ERG fusion gene can be detected in a proportion of HGPIN lesions, that this molecular rearrangement is an early event that may precede chromosome-level alterations in prostate carcinogenesis.

  15. Mammalian E-type cyclins control chromosome pairing, telomere stability and CDK2 localization in male meiosis.

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    Laetitia Martinerie

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Loss of function of cyclin E1 or E2, important regulators of the mitotic cell cycle, yields viable mice, but E2-deficient males display reduced fertility. To elucidate the role of E-type cyclins during spermatogenesis, we characterized their expression patterns and produced additional deletions of Ccne1 and Ccne2 alleles in the germline, revealing unexpected meiotic functions. While Ccne2 mRNA and protein are abundantly expressed in spermatocytes, Ccne1 mRNA is present but its protein is detected only at low levels. However, abundant levels of cyclin E1 protein are detected in spermatocytes deficient in cyclin E2 protein. Additional depletion of E-type cyclins in the germline resulted in increasingly enhanced spermatogenic abnormalities and corresponding decreased fertility and loss of germ cells by apoptosis. Profound meiotic defects were observed in spermatocytes, including abnormal pairing and synapsis of homologous chromosomes, heterologous chromosome associations, unrepaired double-strand DNA breaks, disruptions in telomeric structure and defects in cyclin-dependent-kinase 2 localization. These results highlight a new role for E-type cyclins as important regulators of male meiosis.

  16. Active vibration reduction of a flexible structure bonded with optimised piezoelectric pairs using half and quarter chromosomes in genetic algorithms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The optimal placement of sensors and actuators in active vibration control is limited by the number of candidates in the search space. The search space of a small structure discretized to one hundred elements for optimising the location of ten actuators gives 1.73 × 1013 possible solutions, one of which is the global optimum. In this work, a new quarter and half chromosome technique based on symmetry is developed, by which the search space for optimisation of sensor/actuator locations in active vibration control of flexible structures may be greatly reduced. The technique is applied to the optimisation for eight and ten actuators located on a 500×500mm square plate, in which the search space is reduced by up to 99.99%. This technique helps for updating genetic algorithm program by updating natural frequencies and mode shapes in each generation to find the global optimal solution in a greatly reduced number of generations. An isotropic plate with piezoelectric sensor/actuator pairs bonded to its surface was investigated using the finite element method and Hamilton's principle based on first order shear deformation theory. The placement and feedback gain of ten and eight sensor/actuator pairs was optimised for a cantilever and clamped-clamped plate to attenuate the first six modes of vibration, using minimization of linear quadratic index as an objective function.

  17. A Family of Zinc Finger Proteins Is Required forChromosome-specific Pairing and Synapsis during Meiosis in C.elegans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, Carolyn M.; Dernburg, Abby F.

    2006-06-07

    Homologous chromosome pairing and synapsis are prerequisitefor accurate chromosome segregation during meiosis. Here, we show that afamily of four related C2H2 zinc-finger proteins plays a central role inthese events in C. elegans. These proteins are encoded within a tandemgene cluster. In addition to the X-specific HIM-8 protein, threeadditional paralogs collectively mediate the behavior of the fiveautosomes. Each chromosome relies on a specific member of the family topair and synapse with its homolog. These "ZIM" proteins concentrate atspecial regions called meiotic pairing centers on the correspondingchromosomes. These sites are dispersed along the nuclear envelope duringearly meiotic prophase, suggesting a role analogous to thetelomere-mediated meiotic bouquet in other organisms. To gain insightinto the evolution of these components, wecharacterized homologs in C.briggsae and C. remanei, which revealed changes in copy number of thisgene family within the nematode lineage.

  18. Evolution of homologous sequences on the human X and Y chromosomes, outside of the meiotic pairing segment.

    OpenAIRE

    Bickmore, W A; Cooke, H. J.

    1987-01-01

    A sequence isolated from the long arm of the human Y chromosome detects a highly homologous locus on the X. This homology extends over at least 50 kb of DNA and is postulated to be the result of a transposition event between the X and Y chromosomes during recent human evolution, since homologous sequences are shown to be present on the X chromosome alone in the chimpanzee and gorilla.

  19. Non-random X chromosome inactivation in an affected twin in a monozygotic twin pair discordant for Wiedemann-Beckwith syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oestavik, R.E.; Eiklid, K.; Oerstavik, K.H. [Ulleval Univ. Hospital, Oslo (Norway)] [and others

    1995-03-27

    Wiedemann-Beckwith syndrome (WBS) is a syndrome including exomphalos, macroglossia, and generalized overgrowth. The locus has been assigned to 11p15, and genomic imprinting may play a part in the expression of one or more genes involved. Most cases are sporadic. An excess of female monozygotic twins discordant for WBS have been reported, and it has been proposed that this excess could be related to the process of X chromosome inactivation. We have therefore studied X chromosome inactivation in 13-year-old monozygotic twin girls who were discordant for WBS. In addition, both twins had Tourette syndrome. The twins were monochorionic and therefore the result of a late twinning process. This has also been the case in previously reported discordant twin pairs with information on placentation. X chromosome inactivation was determined in DNA from peripheral blood cells by PCR analysis at the androgen receptor locus. The affected twin had a completely skewed X inactivation, where the paternal allele was on the active X chromosome in all cells. The unaffected twin had a moderately skewed X inactivation in the same direction, whereas the mother had a random pattern. Further studies are necessary to establish a possible association between the expression of WBS and X chromosome inactivation. 18 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Chromosome studies of European cyprinid fishes: Interspecific homology of leuciscine cytotaxonomic marker - the largest subtelocentric chromosome pair as revealed by cross-species painting

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ráb, Petr; Rábová, Marie; Pereira, C. S.; Collares-Pereira, M. J.; Pelikánová, Šárka

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 16, č. 6 (2008), s. 863-873. ISSN 0967-3849 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA6045405; GA MŠk LC06073 Grant ostatní: FCT Portugal (PT) 57085/2004 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50450515 Keywords : chromosome painting * fish cytogenetics * karyotype uniformity Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.405, year: 2008

  1. The association between male infertility and sperm disomy: Evidence for variation in disomy levels among individuals and a correlation between particular semen parameters and disomy of specific chromosome pairs

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    Wright David

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The association between infertility and sperm disomy is well documented. Results vary but most report that men with severely compromised semen parameters have a significantly elevated proportion of disomic sperm. The relationship between individual semen parameters and segregation of specific chromosome pairs is however less well reported as is the variation of disomy levels in individual men. Methods In order to address these questions the technique of fluorescent in-situ hybridisation (FISH was utilised to determine the disomy levels of chromosomes X, Y and 21 in 43 sperm samples from 19 infertile males. The results generated from this study were analysed using logistic regression. Results In this study we compared levels of sperm concentration, motility and morphology with levels of sperm disomy for chromosome 21 and the sex chromosomes. Our results suggest that there is considerable variation in disomy levels for certain men. They also suggest that oligozoospermic males have significantly elevated levels of sex chromosome disomy but not disomy 21; they suggest that severe asthenozoospermic males have significantly elevated levels of disomy 21 but not sex chromosome disomy. Surprisingly, severe teratozoopsermic males appeared to have significantly lower levels of sperm disomy for both the sex chromosomes and chromosome 21. Conclusion We suggest that the association between sex chromosome disomy and oligozoospermia may be due to reduced recombination in the XY pairing region and discuss the relevance of our findings for the correlations between sperm disomy and sperm motility and morphology.

  2. Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum has a single, circular chromosome with a size of approximately 900 kilobase pairs.

    OpenAIRE

    Walker, E M; Arnett, J K; Heath, J D; Norris, S J

    1991-01-01

    The genome size and chromosome conformation of Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum, Nichols strain, were determined by contour-clamped homogeneous electric field electrophoresis, a pulsed-field gel electrophoresis technique. Digestion of T. pallidum subsp. pallidum DNA with the restriction endonucleases NotI and SpeI produced 12 and 26 fragments, respectively. Summation of the physical lengths of the fragments produced by NotI and SpeI cleavage yielded average sizes of 900 and 913 kbp, respect...

  3. Mating pair formation homologue TraG is a variable membrane protein essential for contact-independent type IV secretion of chromosomal DNA by Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Petra L; Chan, Yolande A; Hackett, Kathleen T; Turner, Nicholas; Hamilton, Holly L; Cloud-Hansen, Karen A; Dillard, Joseph P

    2013-04-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae uses a type IV secretion system (T4SS) to secrete chromosomal DNA into the surrounding milieu. The DNA is effective in transforming gonococci in the population, and this mechanism of DNA donation may contribute to the high degree of genetic diversity in this species. Similar to other F-like T4SSs, the gonococcal T4SS requires a putative membrane protein, TraG, for DNA transfer. In F-plasmid and related systems, the homologous protein acts in pilus production, mating pair stabilization, and entry exclusion. We characterized the localization, membrane topology, and variation of TraG in N. gonorrhoeae. TraG was found to be an inner-membrane protein with one large periplasmic region and one large cytoplasmic region. Each gonococcal strain carried one of three different alleles of traG. Strains that carried the smallest allele of traG were found to lack the peptidoglycanase gene atlA but carried a peptidoglycan endopeptidase gene in place of atlA. The purified endopeptidase degraded gonococcal peptidoglycan in vitro, cutting the peptide cross-links. Although the other two traG alleles functioned for DNA secretion in strain MS11, the smallest traG did not support DNA secretion. Despite the requirement for a mating pair stabilization homologue, static coculture transformation experiments demonstrated that DNA transfer was nuclease sensitive and required active uptake by the recipient, thus demonstrating that transfer occurred by transformation and not conjugation. Together, these results demonstrate the TraG acts in a process of DNA export not specific to conjugation and that different forms of TraG affect what substrates can be transported. PMID:23378511

  4. Over half of breakpoints in gene pairs involved in cancer-specific recurrent translocations are mapped to human chromosomal fragile sites

    OpenAIRE

    Pierce Levi CT; Williams Laura E; Burrow Allison A; Wang Yuh-Hwa

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Gene rearrangements such as chromosomal translocations have been shown to contribute to cancer development. Human chromosomal fragile sites are regions of the genome especially prone to breakage, and have been implicated in various chromosome abnormalities found in cancer. However, there has been no comprehensive and quantitative examination of the location of fragile sites in relation to all chromosomal aberrations. Results Using up-to-date databases containing all cancer...

  5. Affected-sib-pair mapping of a novel susceptibility gene to insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM8) on chromosome 6q25-q27

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, D.F.; Bui, M.M.; Muir, A. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)] [and others

    1995-10-01

    Affected-sib-pair analyses were performed using 104 Caucasian families to map genes that predispose to insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM). We have obtained linkage evidence for D6S446 (maximum lod score [MLS] = 2.8) and for D6S264 (MLS = 2.0) on 6q25q27. Together with a previously reported data set, linkage can be firmly established (MLS = 3.4 for D6S264), and the disease locus has been designated IDDM8. With analysis of independent families, we confirmed linkage evidence for the previously identified IDDM3 (15q) and DDM7 (2q). We also typed additional markers in the regions containing IDDM3, IDDM4, IDDM5, and IDDM8. Preliminary linkage evidence for a novel region on chromosome 4q (D4S1566) has been found in 47 Florida families (P < .03). We also found evidence of linkage for two regions previously identified as potential linkages in the Florida subset: D3S1303 on 3q (P < .04) and D7S486 on 7q (P < .03). We could not confirm linkage with eight other regions (D1S191, D1S412, D4S1604, D8S264, D8S556, D1OS193, D13S158, and D18S64) previously identified as potential linkages. 26 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  6. Homoeologous chromosome pairing in the distant hybrid Alstroemeria aurea x A. inodora and the genome composition of its backcross derivatives determined by fluorescence in situ hybridization with species-specific probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamstra, S A; Ramanna, M S; de Jeu, M J; Kuipers, A G; Jacobsen, E

    1999-01-01

    A distant hybrid between two diploid species (2n = 2x = 16), Alstroemeria aurea and A. inodora, was investigated for homoeologous chromosome pairing, crossability with A. inodora and chromosome transmission to its BC1 offspring. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with two species-specific probes, A001-I (A. aurea specific) and D32-13 (A. inodora specific), was used to analyse chromosome pairing in the hybrid and the genome constitution of its BC1 progeny plants. High frequencies of associated chromosomes were observed in both genotypes of the F1 hybrid, A1P2-2 and A1P4. In the former, both univalents and bivalents were found at metaphase I, whereas the latter plant also showed tri- and quadrivalents. Based on the hybridization sites of DNA probes on the chromosomes of both parental species, it was established that hybrid A1P4 contains a reciprocal translocation between the short arm of chromosome 1 and the long arm of chromosome 8 of A. inodora. Despite regular homoeologous chromosome pairing in 30% of the pollen mother cells, both hybrids were highly sterile. They were backcrossed reciprocally with one of the parental species, A. inodora. Two days after pollination, embryo rescue was applied and, eventually, six BC1 progeny plants were obtained. Among these, two were aneuploids (2n = 2x + 1 = 17) and four were triploids (2n = 3x = 24). The aneuploid plants had originated when the interspecific hybrid was used as a female parent, indicating that n eggs were functional in the hybrid. In addition, 2n gametes were also functional in the hybrid, resulting in the four triploid BC1 plants. Of these four plants, three had received 2n pollen grains from the hybrid and one a 2n egg. Using FISH, homoeologous crossing over between the chromosomes of the two parental species in the hybrid was clearly detected in all BC1 plants. The relevance of these results for the process of introgression and the origin of n and 2n gametes are discussed. PMID:10087627

  7. A comparative analysis of chromosome pairing at metaphase I in interspecific hybrids between durum wheat (Triticum turgidum L.) and the most widespread Aegilops species.

    OpenAIRE

    Benavente Barzana, M. Elena; Garcia Agüero, V.; Cifuentes Ochoa, Marta

    2010-01-01

    Homoeologous metaphase I (MI) associations in hybrids between durum wheat and its wild allotetraploid relatives Aegilops neglecta, Ae. triuncialis and Ae. ventricosa have been characterized by a genomic in situ hybridization procedure that allows simultaneous discrimination of A, B and wild species genomes. Earlier results in equivalent hybrids with the wild species Ae. cylindrica and Ae. geniculata have also been considered to comparatively assay the MI pairing pattern of the durum wheat × A...

  8. Reference-assisted chromosome assembly

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Jaebum; Larkin, Denis M; Cai, Qingle; Asan,; Zhang, Yongfen; Ge, Ri-Li; Auvil, Loretta; Capitanu, Boris; Zhang, Guojie; Lewin, Harris A.; Ma, Jian

    2013-01-01

    One of the most difficult problems in modern genomics is the assembly of full-length chromosomes using next generation sequencing (NGS) data. To address this problem, we developed “reference-assisted chromosome assembly” (RACA), an algorithm to reliably order and orient sequence scaffolds generated by NGS and assemblers into longer chromosomal fragments using comparative genome information and paired-end reads. Evaluation of results using simulated and real genome assemblies indicates that ou...

  9. Chromosome condensation and segmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some aspects of chromosome condensation in mammalians -humans especially- were studied by means of cytogenetic techniques of chromosome banding. Two further approaches were adopted: a study of normal condensation as early as prophase, and an analysis of chromosome segmentation induced by physical (temperature and γ-rays) or chemical agents (base analogues, antibiotics, ...) in order to show out the factors liable to affect condensation. Here 'segmentation' means an abnormal chromosome condensation appearing systematically and being reproducible. The study of normal condensation was made possible by the development of a technique based on cell synchronization by thymidine and giving prophasic and prometaphasic cells. Besides, the possibility of inducing R-banding segmentations on these cells by BrdU (5-bromodeoxyuridine) allowed a much finer analysis of karyotypes. Another technique was developed using 5-ACR (5-azacytidine), it allowed to induce a segmentation similar to the one obtained using BrdU and identify heterochromatic areas rich in G-C bases pairs

  10. Characterization of chromosome structures of Falconinae (Falconidae, Falconiformes, Aves) by chromosome painting and delineation of chromosome rearrangements during their differentiation

    OpenAIRE

    Nishida, Chizuko; Ishijima, Junko; KOSAKA, Ayumi; Tanabe, Hideyuki; Habermann, Felix A.; Griffin, Darren K.; MATSHUDA, Yoichi; 秀之, 田辺

    2008-01-01

    Karyotypes of most bird species are characterized by around 2n = 80 chromosomes, comprising 7–10 pairs of large- and medium-sized macrochromosomes including sex chromosomes and numerous morphologically indistinguishable microchromosomes. The Falconinae of the Falconiformes has a different karyotype from the typical avian karyotype in low chromosome numbers, little size difference between macrochromosomes and a smaller number of microchromosomes. To characterize chromosome structures of Falcon...

  11. Characterization of chromosome structures of Falconinae (Falconidae, Falconiformes, Aves) by chromosome painting and delineation of chromosome rearrangements during their differentiation

    OpenAIRE

    Nishida, Chizuko; Ishijima, Junko; KOSAKA, Ayumi; Tanabe, Hideyuki; Habermann, Felix A.; Griffin, Darren K.; Matsuda, Yoichi

    2008-01-01

    Karyotypes of most bird species are characterized by around 2n = 80 chromosomes, comprising 7Y10 pairs of large- and medium-sized macrochromosomes including sex chromosomes and numerous morphologically indistinguishable microchromosomes. The Falconinae of the Falconiformes has a different karyotype from the typical avian karyotype in low chromosome numbers, little size difference between macrochromosomes and a smaller number of microchromosomes. To characterize chromosome structures of Falcon...

  12. Pair Frames

    OpenAIRE

    Fereydooni, Abolhassan; Safapour, Ahmad

    2011-01-01

    In this paper a new concept related to the frame theory is introduced; the notion of pair frame. By investigating some properties of such frames, it is shown that pair frames are a generalization of ordinary frames. Some classes of of them are introduced such as (p, q)-pair frames and near identity pair frames.

  13. Sex Chromosome Evolution in Amniotes: Applications for Bacterial Artificial Chromosome Libraries

    OpenAIRE

    Janes, Daniel E.; Nicole Valenzuela; Tariq Ezaz; Chris Amemiya; Edwards, Scott V.

    2011-01-01

    Variability among sex chromosome pairs in amniotes denotes a dynamic history. Since amniotes diverged from a common ancestor, their sex chromosome pairs and, more broadly, sex-determining mechanisms have changed reversibly and frequently. These changes have been studied and characterized through the use of many tools and experimental approaches but perhaps most effectively through applications for bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) libraries. Individual BAC clones carry 100–200 kb of seque...

  14. Study on Homoeologous Chromosome Pairing and Translocation Induced by 5A/5R×6A/6R Wheat-Rye Substitution Lines%小麦-黑麦代换系5A/5R与6A/6R杂交诱导同祖染色体配对与易位的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李集临; 王晓萍; 钟丽; 徐香玲

    2006-01-01

    利用两个小麦-黑麦异源双代换系DS 5A/5R与DS 6A/6R杂交,探讨同祖染色体配对的可能性与创制小麦黑麦异源易位系.在方法上对杂种F1的减数分裂行为进行研究,观察5R与5A、6R与6A配对频率,探讨同祖染色体配对规律.实验结果看到:杂交F1减数分裂中有22.91%的花粉母细胞有小麦染色体(ABD组)与黑麦染色体(R组)发生同祖配对.在F2及以后世代,通过染色体C分带、原位杂交检测,选择小麦-黑麦易位系.在F2代的45株中检测到9株有易位,易位频率为20%,是目前小麦-黑麦染色体易位频率最高的.染色体易位有的来源于同祖配对的交换,有的来源于单价体错分裂或断裂的重建.%This article aims to study the homoeologous chromosome pairing and translocation induced by 5A/5R×6A/6R wheat-rye substitution lines. To clarify the mechanism of homoeologous chromosome pairing and create wheat-rye translocation lines, two wheat-rye substitution lines, 5A/5R and 6A/6R were crossed. The chromosome behavior of pollen mother cells (PMCs) in meiosis was investigated in hybrid F1. Homoeologous chromosome pairing between wheat and rye occurred in 22.9 1% of PMC. Wheat-rye translocation lines were identified via C-banding and in situ hybridization (GISH) in hybrid F2 and later generations. In F2 generation, translocations happened in 9 of 45 plants, reached to 20%. These translocation lines were generated from homoeologous chromosome pairing, or mis-division and reconstruction of univalent chromosomes.

  15. Evolution of sex chromosomes ZW of Schistosoma mansoni inferred from chromosome paint and BAC mapping analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirai, Hirohisa; Hirai, Yuriko; LoVerde, Philip T

    2012-12-01

    Chromosomes of schistosome parasites among digenetic flukes have a unique evolution because they exhibit the sex chromosomes ZW, which are not found in the other groups of flukes that are hermaphrodites. We conducted molecular cytogenetic analyses for investigating the sex chromosome evolution using chromosome paint analysis and BAC clones mapping. To carry this out, we developed a technique for making paint probes of genomic DNA from a single scraped chromosome segment using a chromosome microdissection system, and a FISH mapping technique for BAC clones. Paint probes clearly identified each of the 8 pairs of chromosomes by a different fluorochrome color. Combination analysis of chromosome paint analysis with Z/W probes and chromosome mapping with 93 BAC clones revealed that the W chromosome of Schistosoma mansoni has evolved by at least four inversion events and heterochromatinization. Nine of 93 BAC clones hybridized with both the Z and W chromosomes, but the locations were different between Z and W chromosomes. The homologous regions were estimated to have moved from the original Z chromosome to the differentiated W chromosome by three inversions events that occurred before W heterohcromatinization. An inversion that was observed in the heterochromatic region of the W chromosome likely occurred after W heterochromatinization. These inversions and heterochromatinization are hypothesized to be the key factors that promoted the evolution of the W chromosome of S. mansoni. PMID:22831897

  16. Mathematical glimpse on the Y chromosome degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobo, M. P.

    2006-04-01

    The Y chromosomes are genetically degenerate and do not recombine with their matching partners X. Non-recombination of XY pairs has been pointed out as the key factor for the degeneration of the Y chromosome. The aim here is to show that there is a mathematical asymmetry in sex chromosomes which leads to the degeneration of Y chromosomes even in the absence of XX and XY recombination. A model for sex-chromosome evolution in a stationary regime is proposed. The consequences of their asymmetry are analyzed and lead us to a couple of conclusions. First, Y chromosome degeneration shows up sqrt{2} more often than X chromosome degeneration. Second, if nature prohibits female mortalities from beeing exactly 50%, then Y chromosome degeneration is inevitable.

  17. Degeneration of the Y chromosome in evolutionary aging models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobo, M. P.; Onody, R. N.

    2005-06-01

    The Y chromosomes are genetically degenerated and do not recombine with their matching partners X. Recombination of XX pairs is pointed out as the key factor for the Y chromosome degeneration. However, there is an additional evolutionary force driving sex-chromosomes evolution. Here we show this mechanism by means of two different evolutionary models, in which sex chromosomes with non-recombining XX and XY pairs of chromosomes is considered. Our results show three curious effects. First, we observed that even when both XX and XY pairs of chromosomes do not recombine, the Y chromosomes still degenerate. Second, the accumulation of mutations on Y chromosomes followed a completely different pattern then those accumulated on X chromosomes. And third, the models may differ with respect to sexual proportion. These findings suggest that a more primeval mechanism rules the evolution of Y chromosomes due exclusively to the sex-chromosomes asymmetry itself, i.e., the fact that Y chromosomes never experience female bodies. Over aeons, natural selection favored X chromosomes spontaneously, even if at the very beginning of evolution, both XX and XY pairs of chromosomes did not recombine.

  18. Chromosome Pairing Analysis in the PMCs of F1 Hybrids between Triticum Durum Dasypyrum Villosum Amphiploid and Common Wheats%硬粒小麦-簇毛麦双二倍体与普通小麦杂种F1的花粉母细胞减数分裂行为的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    傅体华; 任正隆

    2000-01-01

    The Meiotic behavior of T. durum-D. villosum amphiploid with three bread wheat varieties (lines) was employed by acetocarmine and C- banding staining of PMCs at first metaphase to reveal homoeologous pair ing between wheat and D. villosum chromosomes. The results indicated that the chromosome pairings more than expected in hybrid cell were homoeologous pairings either of wheat-D. villosum chromosomes or of wheat wheat chromosomes. On the other hand, the pairings less than expected in a hybrid cell should be considered as homologous pairings of A- A or B- B chromosomes according to traditional Feulgen stained method, in fact, a few bivalents between wheat and D. villosum chromosomes in those cell with bivalents less than 14 were also observed, which reflected that estimation of homoeologous pairing between wheat and alien species genome chro mosomes by standard Feulgen staining technique in AABBDV hybrid was non-accurate. The difficulties to obtain wheat lines which carried desirable genes from D. villosum through homoeologous pairing and recombination were also discussed.%用普通小麦与硬粒小麦-簇毛麦双二倍体杂交,对其杂种F1的花粉母细胞中期的染色体配对进行了洋红染色和Giemsa-C带染色观察。结果表明虽然簇毛麦染色体在中期主要以单价体存在,但也有少量的小麦簇毛染色体配对(平均每细胞为1.1%左右),可以通过遗传重组转移簇毛麦的有利基因。这些小麦簇毛麦染色体配对,既分布在超过理论配对数的细胞中,也存在于少于理论配对数的细胞中;相反,超过理论配对数的染色体对不一定就是小麦簇毛麦染色体之间的配对,在少于理论配对数的细胞中,也不一定仅是小麦同源染色体的配对,同样包含有少量的小麦-簇毛麦染色体配对。因而,用传统的染色法对外源物种与小麦染色体之间的配对数的估计,既有夸大一部分信息,又有掩盖一些有

  19. Characterizing the chromosomes of the platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMillan, Daniel; Miethke, Pat; Alsop, Amber E; Rens, Willem; O'Brien, Patricia; Trifonov, Vladimir; Veyrunes, Frederic; Schatzkamer, Kyriena; Kremitzki, Colin L; Graves, Tina; Warren, Wesley; Grützner, Frank; Ferguson-Smith, Malcolm A; Graves, Jennifer A Marshall

    2007-01-01

    Like the unique platypus itself, the platypus genome is extraordinary because of its complex sex chromosome system, and is controversial because of difficulties in identification of small autosomes and sex chromosomes. A 6-fold shotgun sequence of the platypus genome is now available and is being assembled with the help of physical mapping. It is therefore essential to characterize the chromosomes and resolve the ambiguities and inconsistencies in identifying autosomes and sex chromosomes. We have used chromosome paints and DAPI banding to identify and classify pairs of autosomes and sex chromosomes. We have established an agreed nomenclature and identified anchor BAC clones for each chromosome that will ensure unambiguous gene localizations. PMID:18185982

  20. Chromosome analysis of arsenic affected cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Shekhar

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim was to study the chromosome analysis of arsenic affected cattle. Materials and Methods: 27 female cattle (21 arsenic affected and 6 normal were selected for cytogenetical study. The blood samples were collected, incubated, and cultured using appropriate media and specific methods. The samples were analyzed for chromosome number and morphology, relative length of the chromosome, arm ratio, and centromere index of X chromosome and chromosomal abnormalities in arsenic affected cattle to that of normal ones. Results: The diploid number of metaphase chromosomes in arsenic affected cattle as well as in normal cattle were all 2n=60, 58 being autosomes and 2 being sex chromosomes. From the centromeric position, karyotyping studies revealed that all the 29 pair of autosomes was found to be acrocentric or telocentric, and the sex chromosomes (XX were submetacentric in both normal and arsenic affected cattle. The relative length of all the autosome pairs and sex chrosomosome pair was found to be higher in normal than that of arsenic affected cattle. The mean arm ratio of X-chromosome was higher in normal than that of arsenic affected cattle, but it is reverse in case of centromere index value of X-chromosome. There was no significant difference of arm ratio and centromere index of X-chromosomes between arsenic affected and normal cattle. No chromosomal abnormalities were found in arsenic affected cattle. Conclusion: The chromosome analysis of arsenic affected cattle in West Bengal reported for the first time in this present study which may serve as a guideline for future studies in other species. These reference values will also help in comparison of cytological studies of arsenic affected cattle to that of various toxicants.

  1. Chromosomal aberration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chromosomal aberrations are classified into two types, chromosome-type and chromatid-type. Chromosom-type aberrations include terminal deletion, dicentric, ring and interstitial deletion, and chromatid-type aberrations include achromatic lesion, chromatid deletion, isochromatid deletion and chromatid exchange. Clastogens which induce chromosomal aberration are divided into ''S-dependent'' agents and ''S-independent''. It might mean whether they can induce double strand breaks independent of the S phase or not. Double strand breaks may be the ultimate lesions to induce chromosomal aberrations. Caffeine added even in the G2 phase appeared to modify the frequency of chromatid aberrations induced by X-rays and mitomycin C. Those might suggest that the G2 phase involves in the chromatid aberration formation. The double strand breaks might be repaired by ''G2 repair system'', the error of which might yield breakage types of chromatid aberrations and the by-pass of which might yield chromatid exchanges. Chromosome-type aberrations might be formed in the G1 phase. (author)

  2. Chromosomal divergence and evolutionary inferences in Rhodniini based on the chromosomal location of ribosomal genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Pita

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we used fluorescence in situ hybridisation to determine the chromosomal location of 45S rDNA clusters in 10 species of the tribe Rhodniini (Hemiptera: Reduviidae: Triatominae. The results showed striking inter and intraspecific variability, with the location of the rDNA clusters restricted to sex chromosomes with two patterns: either on one (X chromosome or both sex chromosomes (X and Y chromosomes. This variation occurs within a genus that has an unchanging diploid chromosome number (2n = 22, including 20 autosomes and 2 sex chromosomes and a similar chromosome size and genomic DNA content, reflecting a genome dynamic not revealed by these chromosome traits. The rDNA variation in closely related species and the intraspecific polymorphism in Rhodnius ecuadoriensis suggested that the chromosomal position of rDNA clusters might be a useful marker to identify recently diverged species or populations. We discuss the ancestral position of ribosomal genes in the tribe Rhodniini and the possible mechanisms involved in the variation of the rDNA clusters, including the loss of rDNA loci on the Y chromosome, transposition and ectopic pairing. The last two processes involve chromosomal exchanges between both sex chromosomes, in contrast to the widely accepted idea that the achiasmatic sex chromosomes of Heteroptera do not interchange sequences.

  3. Chromosome banding in Amphibia. XXIV. The B chromosomes of Gastrotheca espeletia (Anura, Hylidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, M; Ziegler, C G; Steinlein, C; Nanda, I; Haaf, T

    2002-01-01

    The mitotic chromosomes of an Ecuadorian population of the marsupial frog Gastrotheca espeletia were analyzed by means of banding techniques and fluorescence in situ hybridization. This species is characterized by unusual supernumerary (B) chromosomes. The maximum number of B chromosomes is 9 and they occur in three different morphological types. Banding analyses show that the B chromosomes are completely heterochromatic, consist of AT base pair-rich repeated DNA sequences, replicate their DNA in very late S-phase of the cell cycle, and are probably derived from a centromeric or paracentromeric region of a standard (A) chromosome. Exceptionally, the B chromosomes carry 18S + 28S ribosomal RNA genes and the conserved vertebrate telomeric DNA sequence appears to be underrepresented. Flow cytometric measurements of the nuclear DNA content differentiate between individuals with different numbers of B chromosomes. Significantly more B chromosomes are present in female than in male animals. PMID:12438715

  4. Synthetic chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindler, Daniel; Waldminghaus, Torsten

    2015-11-01

    What a living organism looks like and how it works and what are its components-all this is encoded on DNA, the genetic blueprint. Consequently, the way to change an organism is to change its genetic information. Since the first pieces of recombinant DNA have been used to transform cells in the 1970s, this approach has been enormously extended. Bigger and bigger parts of the genetic information have been exchanged or added over the years. Now we are at a point where the construction of entire chromosomes becomes a reachable goal and first examples appear. This development leads to fundamental new questions, for example, about what is possible and desirable to build or what construction rules one needs to follow when building synthetic chromosomes. Here we review the recent progress in the field, discuss current challenges and speculate on the appearance of future synthetic chromosomes. PMID:26111960

  5. Homologue pairing, recombination and segregation in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zetka, M

    2009-01-01

    Meiosis in the free-living, hermaphroditic nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is marked by the same highly conserved features observed in other sexually reproducing systems. Accurate chromosome segregation at the meiotic divisions depends on earlier landmark events of meiotic prophase, including the pairing of homologous chromosomes, synapsis between them, and the formation of crossovers. Dissection of these processes has revealed a unique simplification of meiotic mechanisms that impact the interpretation of meiotic chromosome behaviour in more complex systems. Chromosome sites required for chromosome pairing are consolidated to one end of each chromosome, the many sites of recombination initiation are resolved into a single crossover for each chromosome pair, and the diffuse (holocentric) kinetic activity that extends along the length of the mitotic chromosomes is reduced to a single end of each meiotic chromosome. Consequently, studies from the nematode have illuminated and challenged long-standing concepts of homologue pairing mechanisms, crossover interference, and kinetochore structure. Because chromosome pairing, synapsis, and recombination can proceed independently of one another, C. elegans has provided a simplified system for studying these processes and the mechanisms mediating their coordination during meiosis. This review covers the major features of C. elegans meiosis with emphasis on its contributions to understanding essential meiotic processes. PMID:18948706

  6. Chromosomal profile of indigenous pig (Sus scrofa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Guru Vishnu

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The objective of this study was to investigate the chromosomal profile of indigenous pigs by computing morphometric measurements. Materials and Methods: A cytogenetic study was carried out in 60 indigenous pigs to analyze the chromosomal profile by employing the short term peripheral blood lymphocyte culture technique. Results: The modal chromosome number (2n in indigenous pigs was found to be 38 and a fundamental number of 64 as in the exotic. First chromosome was the longest pair, and thirteenth pair was the second largest while Y-chromosome was the smallest in the karyotype of the pig. The mean relative length, arm ratio, centromeric indices and morphological indices of chromosomes varied from 1.99±0.01 to 11.23±0.09, 1.04±0.05 to 2.95±0.02, 0.51±0.14 to 0.75±0.09 and 2.08±0.07 to 8.08±0.15%, respectively in indigenous pigs. Sex had no significant effect (p>0.05 on all the morphometric measurements studied. Conclusion: The present study revealed that among autosomes first five pairs were sub metacentric, next two pairs were sub telocentric (6-7, subsequent five pairs were metacentric (8-12 and remaining six pairs were telocentric (13-18, while both allosomes were metacentric. The chromosomal number, morphology and various morphometric measurements of the chromosomes of the indigenous pigs were almost similar to those established breeds reported in the literature.

  7. Chromosomal painting and ZW sex chromosomes differentiation in Characidium (Characiformes, Crenuchidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artoni Roberto F

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Characidium (a Neotropical fish group have a conserved diploid number (2n = 50, but show remarkable differences among species and populations in relation to sex chromosome systems and location of nucleolus organizer regions (NOR. In this study, we isolated a W-specific probe for the Characidium and characterized six Characidium species/populations using cytogenetic procedures. We analyzed the origin and differentiation of sex and NOR-bearing chromosomes by chromosome painting in populations of Characidium to reveal their evolution, phylogeny, and biogeography. Results A W-specific probe for efficient chromosome painting was isolated by microdissection and degenerate oligonucleotide primed-polymerase chain reaction (DOP-PCR amplification of W chromosomes from C. gomesi. The W probe generated weak signals dispersed on the proto sex chromosomes in C. zebra, dispersed signals in both W and Z chromosomes in C. lauroi and, in C. gomesi populations revealed a proximal site on the long arms of the Z chromosome and the entire W chromosome. All populations showed small terminal W probe sites in some autosomes. The 18S rDNA revealed distinctive patterns for each analyzed species/population with regard to proto sex chromosome, sex chromosome pair, and autosome location. Conclusions The results from dual-color fluorescence in situ hybridization (dual-color FISH using W and 18S rDNA probes allowed us to infer the putative evolutionary pathways for the differentiation of sex chromosomes and NORs, from structural rearrangements in a sex proto-chromosome, followed by gene erosion and heterochromatin amplification, morphological differentiation of the sex chromosomal pair, and NOR transposition, giving rise to the distinctive patterns observed among species/populations of Characidium. Biogeographic isolation and differentiation of sex chromosomes seem to have played a major role in the speciation process in this group of fish.

  8. Chromosomal painting and ZW sex chromosomes differentiation in Characidium (Characiformes, Crenuchidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background The Characidium (a Neotropical fish group) have a conserved diploid number (2n = 50), but show remarkable differences among species and populations in relation to sex chromosome systems and location of nucleolus organizer regions (NOR). In this study, we isolated a W-specific probe for the Characidium and characterized six Characidium species/populations using cytogenetic procedures. We analyzed the origin and differentiation of sex and NOR-bearing chromosomes by chromosome painting in populations of Characidium to reveal their evolution, phylogeny, and biogeography. Results A W-specific probe for efficient chromosome painting was isolated by microdissection and degenerate oligonucleotide primed-polymerase chain reaction (DOP-PCR) amplification of W chromosomes from C. gomesi. The W probe generated weak signals dispersed on the proto sex chromosomes in C. zebra, dispersed signals in both W and Z chromosomes in C. lauroi and, in C. gomesi populations revealed a proximal site on the long arms of the Z chromosome and the entire W chromosome. All populations showed small terminal W probe sites in some autosomes. The 18S rDNA revealed distinctive patterns for each analyzed species/population with regard to proto sex chromosome, sex chromosome pair, and autosome location. Conclusions The results from dual-color fluorescence in situ hybridization (dual-color FISH) using W and 18S rDNA probes allowed us to infer the putative evolutionary pathways for the differentiation of sex chromosomes and NORs, from structural rearrangements in a sex proto-chromosome, followed by gene erosion and heterochromatin amplification, morphological differentiation of the sex chromosomal pair, and NOR transposition, giving rise to the distinctive patterns observed among species/populations of Characidium. Biogeographic isolation and differentiation of sex chromosomes seem to have played a major role in the speciation process in this group of fish. PMID:21787398

  9. Meiosis and chromosome painting of sex chromosome systems in Ceboidea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudry, M D; Rahn, I M; Solari, A J

    2001-06-01

    The identity of the chromosomes involved in the multiple sex system of Alouatta caraya (Aca) and the possible distribution of this system among other Ceboidea were investigated by chromosome painting of mitotic cells from five species and by analysis of meiosis at pachytene in two species. The identity of the autosome #7 (X2) involved in the multiple system of Aca and its breakage points were demonstrated by both meiosis and chromosome painting. These features are identical to those described by Consigliere et al. [1996] in Alouatta seniculus sara (Assa) and Alouatta seniculus arctoidea (Asar). This multiple system was absent in the other four Ceboidea species studied here. However, data from the literature strongly suggest the presence of this multiple in other members of this genus. The presence of this multiple system among several species and subspecies that show high levels of chromosome rearrangements may suggest a special selective value of this multiple. The meiotic features of the sex systems of Aca and Cebus apella paraguayanus (Cap) are strikingly different at pachytene, as the latter system is similar to the sex pair of man and other primates. The relatively large genetic distances between species presently showing this multiple system suggest that its origin is not recent. Other members of the same genus should be investigated at meiosis and by chromosome painting in order to know the extent and distribution of this complex sex-chromosome system. PMID:11376445

  10. Deciphering evolutionary strata on plant sex chromosomes and fungal mating-type chromosomes through compositional segmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Ravi S; Azad, Rajeev K

    2016-03-01

    Sex chromosomes have evolved from a pair of homologous autosomes which differentiated into sex determination systems, such as XY or ZW system, as a consequence of successive recombination suppression between the gametologous chromosomes. Identifying the regions of recombination suppression, namely, the "evolutionary strata", is central to understanding the history and dynamics of sex chromosome evolution. Evolution of sex chromosomes as a consequence of serial recombination suppressions is well-studied for mammals and birds, but not for plants, although 48 dioecious plants have already been reported. Only two plants Silene latifolia and papaya have been studied until now for the presence of evolutionary strata on their X chromosomes, made possible by the sequencing of sex-linked genes on both the X and Y chromosomes, which is a requirement of all current methods that determine stratum structure based on the comparison of gametologous sex chromosomes. To circumvent this limitation and detect strata even if only the sequence of sex chromosome in the homogametic sex (i.e. X or Z chromosome) is available, we have developed an integrated segmentation and clustering method. In application to gene sequences on the papaya X chromosome and protein-coding sequences on the S. latifolia X chromosome, our method could decipher all known evolutionary strata, as reported by previous studies. Our method, after validating on known strata on the papaya and S. latifolia X chromosome, was applied to the chromosome 19 of Populus trichocarpa, an incipient sex chromosome, deciphering two, yet unknown, evolutionary strata. In addition, we applied this approach to the recently sequenced sex chromosome V of the brown alga Ectocarpus sp. that has a haploid sex determination system (UV system) recovering the sex determining and pseudoautosomal regions, and then to the mating-type chromosomes of an anther-smut fungus Microbotryum lychnidis-dioicae predicting five strata in the non

  11. New Y chromosomes and early stages of sex chromosome differentiation: sex determination in Megaselia

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Walther Traut

    2010-09-01

    The phorid fly Megaselia scalaris is a laboratory model for the turnover and early differentiation of sex chromosomes. Isolates from the field have an XY sex-determining mechanism with chromosome pair 2 acting as X and Y chromosomes. The sex chromosomes are homomorphic but display early signs of sex chromosome differentiation: a low level of molecular differences between X and Y. The male-determining function $(M)$, maps to the distal part of the Y chromosome’s short arm. In laboratory cultures, new Y chromosomes with no signs of a molecular differentiation arise at a low rate, probably by transposition of to these chromosomes. Downstream of the primary signal, the homologue of the Drosophila doublesex (dsx) is part of the sex-determining pathway while Sex-lethal (Sxl), though structurally conserved, is not.

  12. Dinoponera lucida Emery (Formicidae: Ponerinae): the highest number of chromosomes known in Hymenoptera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariano, C. S. F.; Delabie, J. H. C.; Ramos, L. S.; Lacau, S.; Pompolo, S. G.

    We report the remarkable karyotype of Dinoponera lucida, a Brazilian endemic ponerine ant. Its chromosome number is 2n=106, most of the chromosomes are acrocentric and of very small size, and the karyotype formula is 88A+18M. A chromosome pair of the AMt type is reported. This is the largest number of chromosomes reported for the Hymenoptera order until now.

  13. Genetic control of chromosome behaviour: Implications in evolution, crop improvement, and human biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chromosomes and chromosome pairing are pivotal to all biological sciences. The study of chromosomes helps unravel several aspects of an organism. Although the foundation of genetics occurred with the formulation of the laws of heredity in 1865, long before the discovery of chromosomes, their subsequ...

  14. Chromosome Microarray.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Sharon

    2016-01-01

    Over the last half century, knowledge about genetics, genetic testing, and its complexity has flourished. Completion of the Human Genome Project provided a foundation upon which the accuracy of genetics, genomics, and integration of bioinformatics knowledge and testing has grown exponentially. What is lagging, however, are efforts to reach and engage nurses about this rapidly changing field. The purpose of this article is to familiarize nurses with several frequently ordered genetic tests including chromosomes and fluorescence in situ hybridization followed by a comprehensive review of chromosome microarray. It shares the complexity of microarray including how testing is performed and results analyzed. A case report demonstrates how this technology is applied in clinical practice and reveals benefits and limitations of this scientific and bioinformatics genetic technology. Clinical implications for maternal-child nurses across practice levels are discussed. PMID:27276104

  15. Comparison of the Giemsa C-banded karyotypes of the three subspecies of Psathyrostachys fragilis, subspp. villosus (2x), secaliformis (2x, 4x), and fragilis (2x) (Poaceae), with notes on chromosome pairing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linde-Laursen, I.; Baden, C.

    1994-01-01

    The karyotypes of diploid P. fragilis subsp. villosus (2n = 2x = 14) and tetraploid subsp. secaliformis (2n = 4x = 28) were studied by Giemsa C- and N-banding, and AgNO3 staining and compared with the karyotype of subsp. fragilis (2x). The complements of subsp. villosus and subsp. fragilis were...... metacentrics. Chromocentres were very small and the amount of constitutive heterochromatin was low. N-banding stained chromosomes uniformly. The basic karyotypes of the P. fragilis taxa were similar to those of P. juncea, P. lanuginosa, and P. stoloniformis supporting a close relationship and the presence of a...

  16. Sex Chromosome Evolution in Amniotes: Applications for Bacterial Artificial Chromosome Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janes, Daniel E.; Valenzuela, Nicole; Ezaz, Tariq; Amemiya, Chris; Edwards, Scott V.

    2011-01-01

    Variability among sex chromosome pairs in amniotes denotes a dynamic history. Since amniotes diverged from a common ancestor, their sex chromosome pairs and, more broadly, sex-determining mechanisms have changed reversibly and frequently. These changes have been studied and characterized through the use of many tools and experimental approaches but perhaps most effectively through applications for bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) libraries. Individual BAC clones carry 100–200 kb of sequence from one individual of a target species that can be isolated by screening, mapped onto karyotypes, and sequenced. With these techniques, researchers have identified differences and similarities in sex chromosome content and organization across amniotes and have addressed hypotheses regarding the frequency and direction of past changes. Here, we review studies of sex chromosome evolution in amniotes and the ways in which the field of research has been affected by the advent of BAC libraries. PMID:20981143

  17. Chromosome Painting Reveals Asynaptic Full Alignment of Homologs and HIM-8–Dependent Remodeling of X Chromosome Territories during Caenorhabditis elegans Meiosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabeshima, Kentaro; Mlynarczyk-Evans, Susanna; Villeneuve, Anne M.

    2011-01-01

    During early meiotic prophase, a nucleus-wide reorganization leads to sorting of chromosomes into homologous pairs and to establishing associations between homologous chromosomes along their entire lengths. Here, we investigate global features of chromosome organization during this process, using a chromosome painting method in whole-mount Caenorhabditis elegans gonads that enables visualization of whole chromosomes along their entire lengths in the context of preserved 3D nuclear architecture. First, we show that neither spatial proximity of premeiotic chromosome territories nor chromosome-specific timing is a major factor driving homolog pairing. Second, we show that synaptonemal complex-independent associations can support full lengthwise juxtaposition of homologous chromosomes. Third, we reveal a prominent elongation of chromosome territories during meiotic prophase that initiates prior to homolog association and alignment. Mutant analysis indicates that chromosome movement mediated by association of chromosome pairing centers (PCs) with mobile patches of the nuclear envelope (NE)–spanning SUN-1/ZYG-12 protein complexes is not the primary driver of territory elongation. Moreover, we identify new roles for the X chromosome PC (X-PC) and X-PC binding protein HIM-8 in promoting elongation of X chromosome territories, separable from their role(s) in mediating local stabilization of pairing and association of X chromosomes with mobile SUN-1/ZYG-12 patches. Further, we present evidence that HIM-8 functions both at and outside of PCs to mediate chromosome territory elongation. These and other data support a model in which synapsis-independent elongation of chromosome territories, driven by PC binding proteins, enables lengthwise juxtaposition of chromosomes, thereby facilitating assessment of their suitability as potential pairing partners. PMID:21876678

  18. X-chromosome workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paterson, A D

    1998-01-01

    Researchers presented results of ongoing research to the X-chromosome workshop of the Fifth World Congress on Psychiatric Genetics, covering a wide range of disorders: X-linked infantile spasms; a complex phenotype associated with deletions of Xp11; male homosexuality; degree of handedness; bipolar affective disorder; schizophrenia; childhood onset psychosis; and autism. This report summarizes the presentations, as well as reviewing previous studies. The focus of this report is on linkage findings for schizophrenia and bipolar disorder from a number of groups. For schizophrenia, low positive lod scores were obtained for markers DXS991 and DXS993 from two studies, although the sharing of alleles was greatest from brother-brother pairs in one study, and sister-sister in the other. Data from the Irish schizophrenia study was also submitted, with no strong evidence for linkage on the X chromosome. For bipolar disease, following the report of a Finnish family linked to Xq24-q27, the Columbia group reported some positive results for this region from 57 families, however, another group found no evidence for linkage to this region. Of interest, is the clustering of low positive linkage results that point to regions for possible further study. PMID:9686435

  19. Characterization of Chenopodium quinoa chromosomes using fish and repetitive sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quinoa is one of the underestimated crops, which recently attracted attention. During last few years many efforts were done to save the natural genetic diversity of quinoa cultivars and landraces as well as to obtained new variability by mutagenesis. Plant characteristics based mainly on morphological and molecular markers. Cytogenetic analysis was not used for these studies. Quinoa is an allotetraploid species with 36 small chromosomes. To follow the chromosomal rearrangement cause by spontaneous or induced mutations it is necessary to find cytogenetics markers for chromosomes and chromosome arms. The physical mapping of repetitive DNAs by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) can provide a valuable tool in studies of genome organization and chromosome rearrangements. To characterized quinoa genome several repetitive sequences were used as DNA probes for FISH. Double FISH with rRNA genes as probes allowed to distinguished three pairs of homologue chromosomes. Telomeric repeats hybridisation signals were present only in terminal part of all chromosome arms and no intercalar position was observed. Other tandem repetitive sequence - minisatellite was characteristic for centromeric and pericentromeric region of all quinoa chromosomes although number of repeats differ between loci. It allowed to divided quinoa chromosomes into few groups. Disperse repetitive sequences such as mobile element-like sequences used in this study were detected in all eighteen chromosome pairs. Hybridization signals were characteristics for pericentromeric region of one or both chromosome arms as relatively weak but discrete signals although few chromosomes exhibited signals in intercalary position. Two others repetitive sequences also exhibited disperse organization; however they are not mobile elements. Their FISH signals were spread throughout whole chromosome arms but only one was present on all quinoa chromosomes. The other revealed hybridization signals only on the half of the

  20. Sequencing papaya X and Yh chromosomes reveals molecular basis of incipient sex chromosome evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianping; Na, Jong-Kuk; Yu, Qingyi; Gschwend, Andrea R; Han, Jennifer; Zeng, Fanchang; Aryal, Rishi; VanBuren, Robert; Murray, Jan E; Zhang, Wenli; Navajas-Pérez, Rafael; Feltus, F Alex; Lemke, Cornelia; Tong, Eric J; Chen, Cuixia; Wai, Ching Man; Singh, Ratnesh; Wang, Ming-Li; Min, Xiang Jia; Alam, Maqsudul; Charlesworth, Deborah; Moore, Paul H; Jiang, Jiming; Paterson, Andrew H; Ming, Ray

    2012-08-21

    Sex determination in papaya is controlled by a recently evolved XY chromosome pair, with two slightly different Y chromosomes controlling the development of males (Y) and hermaphrodites (Y(h)). To study the events of early sex chromosome evolution, we sequenced the hermaphrodite-specific region of the Y(h) chromosome (HSY) and its X counterpart, yielding an 8.1-megabase (Mb) HSY pseudomolecule, and a 3.5-Mb sequence for the corresponding X region. The HSY is larger than the X region, mostly due to retrotransposon insertions. The papaya HSY differs from the X region by two large-scale inversions, the first of which likely caused the recombination suppression between the X and Y(h) chromosomes, followed by numerous additional chromosomal rearrangements. Altogether, including the X and/or HSY regions, 124 transcription units were annotated, including 50 functional pairs present in both the X and HSY. Ten HSY genes had functional homologs elsewhere in the papaya autosomal regions, suggesting movement of genes onto the HSY, whereas the X region had none. Sequence divergence between 70 transcripts shared by the X and HSY revealed two evolutionary strata in the X chromosome, corresponding to the two inversions on the HSY, the older of which evolved about 7.0 million years ago. Gene content differences between the HSY and X are greatest in the older stratum, whereas the gene content and order of the collinear regions are identical. Our findings support theoretical models of early sex chromosome evolution. PMID:22869747

  1. Chromosome-Specific Painting in Cucumis Species Using Bulked Oligonucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yonghua; Zhang, Tao; Thammapichai, Paradee; Weng, Yiqun; Jiang, Jiming

    2015-07-01

    Chromosome-specific painting is a powerful technique in molecular cytogenetic and genome research. We developed an oligonucleotide (oligo)-based chromosome painting technique in cucumber (Cucumis sativus) that will be applicable in any plant species with a sequenced genome. Oligos specific to a single chromosome of cucumber were identified using a newly developed bioinformatic pipeline and then massively synthesized de novo in parallel. The synthesized oligos were amplified and labeled with biotin or digoxigenin for use in fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). We developed three different probes with each containing 23,000-27,000 oligos. These probes spanned 8.3-17 Mb of DNA on targeted cucumber chromosomes and had the densities of 1.5-3.2 oligos per kilobases. These probes produced FISH signals on a single cucumber chromosome and were used to paint homeologous chromosomes in other Cucumis species diverged from cucumber for up to 12 million years. The bulked oligo probes allowed us to track a single chromosome in early stages during meiosis. We were able to precisely map the pairing between cucumber chromosome 7 and chromosome 1 of Cucumis hystrix in a F1 hybrid. These two homeologous chromosomes paired in 71% of prophase I cells but only 25% of metaphase I cells, which may provide an explanation of the higher recombination rates compared to the chiasma frequencies between homeologous chromosomes reported in plant hybrids. PMID:25971668

  2. Female meiotic sex chromosome inactivation in chicken.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sam Schoenmakers

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available During meiotic prophase in male mammals, the heterologous X and Y chromosomes remain largely unsynapsed, and meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI leads to formation of the transcriptionally silenced XY body. In birds, the heterogametic sex is female, carrying Z and W chromosomes (ZW, whereas males have the homogametic ZZ constitution. During chicken oogenesis, the heterologous ZW pair reaches a state of complete heterologous synapsis, and this might enable maintenance of transcription of Z- and W chromosomal genes during meiotic prophase. Herein, we show that the ZW pair is transiently silenced, from early pachytene to early diplotene using immunocytochemistry and gene expression analyses. We propose that ZW inactivation is most likely achieved via spreading of heterochromatin from the W on the Z chromosome. Also, persistent meiotic DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs may contribute to silencing of Z. Surprisingly, gammaH2AX, a marker of DSBs, and also the earliest histone modification that is associated with XY body formation in mammalian and marsupial spermatocytes, does not cover the ZW during the synapsed stage. However, when the ZW pair starts to desynapse, a second wave of gammaH2AX accumulates on the unsynapsed regions of Z, which also show a reappearance of the DSB repair protein RAD51. This indicates that repair of meiotic DSBs on the heterologous part of Z is postponed until late pachytene/diplotene, possibly to avoid recombination with regions on the heterologously synapsed W chromosome. Two days after entering diplotene, the Z looses gammaH2AX and shows reactivation. This is the first report of meiotic sex chromosome inactivation in a species with female heterogamety, providing evidence that this mechanism is not specific to spermatogenesis. It also indicates the presence of an evolutionary force that drives meiotic sex chromosome inactivation independent of the final achievement of synapsis.

  3. Development and Identification of Triticum aestivum L.-Thinopyrum bessarabicum L(o)ve Chromosome Translocations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHUANG Li-fang; QI Zeng-jun; CHEN Pei-du; FENG Yi-gao; LIU Da-jun

    2004-01-01

    With ass7istance of chromosome C-banding and genomic in situ hybridization(GISH)combined with meiotic analysis,five germplasms with homozygous wheat-Th. Bessarabicum chromosome translocations were developed and identified among BC1F5 progenies of the cross between T. Aestivum cv. Chinese Spring and Chinese Spring-Th. Bessarabicum amphiploid. These lines included Tj01 and Tj02(2n=44)containing a pair of wheat-Th. Bessarabicum translocation chromosomes besides a pair of added Th. Bessarabicum chromosomes,Tj03(2n=44)with a pair of added interspecific translocation chromosomes,Tj04(2n=44)containing a pair of interspecific translocation chromosomes besides an added pair of Th. Bessarabicum chromosome arms and Tj05(2n=46)containing a pair of interspecific translocation chromosomes besides two pairs of added intact alien chromosomes. The breakpoints of all the translocations were found to be not around centromere. Meanwhile,all the lines showed normal plant growth,development and fertility,while the translocation chromosomes transmitted regularly. The obtained translocations might be of use for transferring elite genes from Th. Bessarabicum into wheat.

  4. Association Between Pachytene Chromosomes and Linkage Groups in Carrot

    Science.gov (United States)

    The genome of carrot (Daucus carota L.) consists of ~ 480 Mb/1C organized in 9 chromosome pairs. The importance of carrots in human nutrition is triggering the development of genomic resources, including carrot linkage maps, a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clone library and BAC end sequence...

  5. Independent sex chromosome evolution in lower vertebrates: a molecular cytogenetic overview in the Erythrinidae fish family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cioffi, M B; Liehr, T; Trifonov, V; Molina, W F; Bertollo, L A C

    2013-01-01

    The Erythrinidae fish family is an excellent model for analyzing the evolution of sex chromosomes. Different stages of sex chromosome differentiation from homomorphic to highly differentiated ones can be found among the species of this family. Here, whole chromosome painting, together with the cytogenetic mapping of repetitive DNAs, highlighted the evolutionary relationships of the sex chromosomes among different erythrinid species and genera. It was demonstrated that the sex chromosomes can follow distinct evolutionary pathways inside this family. Reciprocal hybridizations with whole sex chromosome probes revealed that different autosomal pairs have evolved as the sex pair, even among closely related species. In addition, distinct origins and different patterns of differentiation were found for the same type of sex chromosome system. These features expose the high plasticity of the sex chromosome evolution in lower vertebrates, in contrast to that occurring in higher ones. A possible role of this sex chromosome turnover in the speciation processes is also discussed. PMID:23919986

  6. Mitotic chromosome structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mounting evidence is compiling linking the physical organizational structure of chromosomes and the nuclear structure to biological function. At the base of the physical organizational structure of both is the concept of loop formation. This implies that physical proximity within chromosomes is provided for otherwise distal genomic regions and thus hierarchically organizing the chromosomes. Together with entropy many experimental observations can be explained with these two concepts. Among the observations that can be explained are the measured physical extent of the chromosomes, their shape, mechanical behavior, the segregation into territories (chromosomal and territories within chromosomes), the results from chromosome conformation capture experiments, as well as linking gene expression to structural organization.

  7. Y chromosome peculiarities and chromosomal G- and C-staining in Crocidura shantungensis Miller, 1901 (Soricomorpha: Soricidae)

    OpenAIRE

    Irina Kartavtseva; I-S Park

    2010-01-01

    Cytogenetical examinations of Crocidura shantungensis Miller, 1901 from small Young Island of South Korea and the mainland of Russian Far East (Vladivostok) were carried out and literature data concerning Tsushima Island of Japan and Cheju Island of Korea were considered. The chromosome sets of all investigated specimens are characterized by 2n = 40 and NFa = 46. Four pairs of biarmed autosomes, 15 pairs of acrocentrics and two sex chromosomes were identified applying G- and C-banding....

  8. Retrospective dosimetry using chromosome painting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chromosome aberration frequency measured in peripheral lymphocytes of persons exposed to ionizing radiation has been used since 1960s for dose assessment. Suspected overexposure is usually evaluated by the frequency of dicentrics and centric rings using an appropriate in vitro calibration curve. However, these chromosome aberrations are unstable with time after exposure and dose reconstruction may encounter uncertainties when the time between the exposure and the analysis is considerable or even unknown. It appears that translocations persist with time after exposure and may be used as an indication of acute past overexposures. Moreover, they appear to accumulate the cytogenetical information, which correlates with the dose received under fractionated, chronic or even occupational exposure conditions. Translocations may be detected using G-banding, which allows to score the total amount of radiation induced translocations but it is a time consuming method, or by Chromosome Painting, a method base on the Fluorescence in situ Hybridization (FISH) technique, painting only some chromosome pairs with specific whole chromosome probes and then extrapolating the observed translocation frequencies to the full genome. The latter method allows a faster aberration scoring than G-banding and appears to be the most promissory tool for biodosimetry, particularly when it is necessary to assess low doses and consequently to score a large number of metaphases, e.g. radiation workers exposed within dose limits. As with the unstable chromosome aberration, it is necessary an in vitro calibration curve based on the frequency of stable chromosome aberrations to assess doses. Our laboratory performed calibration curves for Co60 γ-rays based on the frequencies of unstable (dicentrics and centric rings detected by conventional Giemsa staining) and stable chromosome aberrations (translocations and inversions, detected by G-banding). In order to minimize the interlaboratory variability, we

  9. Chromosome Evolution and Genome Miniaturization in Minifish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shaojun; Hui, Tan Heok; Tan, Sze Ley; Hong, Yunhan

    2012-01-01

    Background Paedocypris is a newly established genus of fish in Southeast Asia. Paedocypris is characterized by several unique features, including a tiny adult size (thus named miniature fish or minifish), fragmentary habitats of acidic peat blackwater swamps, an unusual reproduction mode and truncated development. These peculiarities lend themselves excellent for studying chromosome evolution and rapid speciation in vertebrates but also make them highly controversial for the phylogenetic position. Methodology and Principal Findings We have established an organ procedure to prepare chromosome spreads from tiny organs of minifish and performed a cytogenetic study on two species of the genus Paedocypris, namely P. carbunculus (Pc) and P. sp. “Singkep” (Ps). We found 30 and 34 chromosomes in diploid cells of Pc and Ps, respectively, which are unusual in teleost fishes. The diploid metaphase has 5 pairs of metacentrics and 7 pairs of subtelocentrics in Pc compared to 3 pairs of metacentrics and 11 pairs of subtelocentrics in Ps, whereas the haploid metaphase contains 5 metacentrics and 7 subtelocentrics in Pc compared to 3 metacentrics and 11 subtelocentrics Ps. Chromosome behavior in first meiosis revealed the presence of a chromosomal ring consisting of 2 metacentrics in Pc, suggesting that centric fusion rather than fission was responsible for the karyotypic evolution from Ps to Pc. Flow cytometry revealed that Pc had a 45% nuclear staining intensity relative to medaka whose genome is 700 Mb in size and contains 0.81 pg DNA. The Pc genome should have 315 Mb in length and 0.36 pg of DNA, which represent one of the smallest values in vertebrates, suggesting genome miniaturization in this organism. Conclusions Our data demonstrate that gross chromosome rearrangements and genome miniaturization have accompanied the evolution of Paedocypris fishes. Our data also place Paedocypris outside currently described taxa of the Cypriniformes. PMID:22615970

  10. Fetal chromosome analysis: screening for chromosome disease?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Philip, J; Tabor, Ann; Bang, J;

    1983-01-01

    A + B). Pregnant women 35 years of age, women who previously had a chromosomally abnormal child, families with translocation carriers or other heritable chromosomal disease, families where the father was 50 years or more and women in families with a history of Down's syndrome (group A), were...... unbalanced chromosome abnormality in group A (women with elevated risk) is significantly higher than in group B + C (women without elevated risk) (relative risk 2.4). Women with a known familial translocation and women 40 years or more have a relative risk of 5.7 of having an unbalanced chromosome......The aim of the study was to investigate the rationale of the current indications for fetal chromosome analysis. 5372 women had 5423 amniocentesis performed, this group constituting a consecutive sample at the chromosome laboratory, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen from March 1973 to September 1980 (Group...

  11. Chromosome studies in the genus Jatropha L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.Sasikala and M.Paramathma

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The inflorescences of ten species of the genus Jatropha were fixed in Cornoy’s fluid (6:3:1. Acetocarmine stain (2% wasused for staining the pollen mother cells. Seven species exhibited 11 bivalents and 2n =22 and x=11. But the two otherspecies, J.villosa var. villosa and J.villosa var. ramnadensis showed only 10 bivalents and 2n number of 20 chromosomesand x=10. The study concluded the occurrence of two kinds of haploid chromosome numbers of n =10 and n =11. ExceptJatropha tanjorensis, cytological investigation in all species exhibited normal and complete pairing and bivalent formationin metaphase I and equal separation of chromosome in anaphase and indicated that the course of meiosis was normal.Jatropha tanjorensis did not exhibit normal course of meiosis and no proper count of chromosomes could be made. Presentchromosomal studies in Jatropha revealed the existence of two basic chromosomes numbers x = 5 and x = 6.

  12. Dysfunctional MreB inhibits chromosome segregation in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kruse, Thomas; Møller-Jensen, Jakob; Løbner-Olesen, Anders;

    2003-01-01

    cytometric and cytological analyses indicated that MreB-depleted cells segregated their chromosomes in pairs, consistent with chromosome cohesion. Overexpression of wild-type MreB inhibited cell division but did not perturb chromosome segregation. Overexpression of mutant forms of MreB inhibited cell...

  13. Structure and evolution of the Y-chromosomal and mitochondrial DNA of cattle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verkaar, Edward Louis Christian

    2004-01-01

    The research described in this thesis is focused on the structure and evolution of the bovine Y-chromosome and the use of paternal markers in molecular diagnostics. The Y-chromosome has emerged together with the X-chromosome early during the evolution of the mammals by differentiation of a pair of a

  14. Cross-species chromosome painting tracks the independent origin of multiple sex chromosomes in two cofamiliar Erythrinidae fishes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background The Erythrinidae fish family is characterized by a large variation with respect to diploid chromosome numbers and sex-determining systems among its species, including two multiple X1X2Y sex systems in Hoplias malabaricus and Erythrinus erythrinus. At first, the occurrence of a same sex chromosome system within a family suggests that the sex chromosomes are correlated and originated from ancestral XY chromosomes that were either homomorphic or at an early stage of differentiation. To identify the origin and evolution of these X1X2Y sex chromosomes, we performed reciprocal cross-species FISH experiments with two sex-chromosome-specific probes designed from microdissected X1 and Y chromosomes of H. malabaricus and E. erythrinus, respectively. Results Our results yield valuable information regarding the origin and evolution of these sex chromosome systems. Our data indicate that these sex chromosomes evolved independently in these two closed related Erythrinidae species. Different autosomes were first converted into a poorly differentiated XY sex pair in each species, and additional chromosomal rearrangements produced both X1X2Y sex systems that are currently present. Conclusions Our data provide new insights into the origin and evolution of sex chromosomes, which increases our knowledge about fish sex chromosome evolution. PMID:21718509

  15. Geant4.10 simulation of geometric model for metaphase chromosome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafat-Motavalli, L.; Miri-Hakimabad, H.; Bakhtiyari, E.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, a geometric model of metaphase chromosome is explained. The model is constructed according to the packing ratio and dimension of the structure from nucleosome up to chromosome. A B-DNA base pair is used to construct 200 base pairs of nucleosomes. Each chromatin fiber loop, which is the unit of repeat, has 49,200 bp. This geometry is entered in Geant4.10 Monte Carlo simulation toolkit and can be extended to the whole metaphase chromosomes and any application in which a DNA geometrical model is needed. The chromosome base pairs, chromosome length, and relative length of chromosomes are calculated. The calculated relative length is compared to the relative length of human chromosomes.

  16. Chromosome Aberrations by Heavy Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballarini, Francesca; Ottolenghi, Andrea

    It is well known that mammalian cells exposed to ionizing radiation can show different types of chromosome aberrations (CAs) including dicentrics, translocations, rings, deletions and complex exchanges. Chromosome aberrations are a particularly relevant endpoint in radiobiology, because they play a fundamental role in the pathways leading either to cell death, or to cell conversion to malignancy. In particular, reciprocal translocations involving pairs of specific genes are strongly correlated (and probably also causally-related) with specific tumour types; a typical example is the BCR-ABL translocation for Chronic Myeloid Leukaemia. Furthermore, aberrations can be used for applications in biodosimetry and more generally as biomarkers of exposure and risk, that is the case for cancer patients monitored during Carbon-ion therapy and astronauts exposed to space radiation. Indeed hadron therapy and astronauts' exposure to space radiation represent two of the few scenarios where human beings can be exposed to heavy ions. After a brief introduction on the main general features of chromosome aberrations, in this work we will address key aspects of the current knowledge on chromosome aberration induction, both from an experimental and from a theoretical point of view. More specifically, in vitro data will be summarized and discussed, outlining important issues such as the role of interphase death/mitotic delay and that of complex-exchange scoring. Some available in vivo data on cancer patients and astronauts will be also reported, together with possible interpretation problems. Finally, two of the few available models of chromosome aberration induction by ionizing radiation (including heavy ions) will be described and compared, focusing on the different assumptions adopted by the authors and on how these models can deal with heavy ions.

  17. Chromosome number reports in Astragalus sect. Onobrychoidei (Fabaceae from Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massoud Ranjbar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, original mitotic chromosome counts have been presented for 10 populations belonging to 6 species of Astragalus sect. Onobrychoidei: A. aduncus, A. arguricus, A. cancellatus, A. lilacinus and A. vegetus. All taxa were diploid and possessed 2n = 2x = 16 chromosome number, consistent with the proposed base number of x = 8. In addition, meiotic studies revealed chromosome number of 2n = 2x = 16 for A. aduncus21 and A. brevidens and also 2n = 4x = 32 for A. vegetus99. Although this taxon displayed regular bivalent pairing and chromosome segregation at meiosis, some abnormalities were observed.

  18. Meiotic chromosomal variation resulting from irradiation of pollen in maize

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this study was to standardize an induction strategy of chromosome aberrations in maize inbred line L-869. Pollen grains irradiated with 0, 36 and 72 Gy were used for fertilization. Resulting seeds were planted in a greenhouse to assess the number of abnormal meiotic cells. Germination, height, sterility and mortality were verified. Cells with delayed separation of chromosomes, translocation, deficiency, abnormal pairing, later condensation and anaphase bridges were observed. The number of abnormalities increased as the dosage increased but chromosome aberration types were the same regardless of the dosages used. Various chromosome-altered plants were obtained without viability loss. (author)

  19. Radiation-induced chromosome breakages in bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meiosis and pollen fertility were studied in the M2 generation in four varieties of hexaploid wheat. Meiosis was characterized by the formation of interchange configurations, such as rings and chains of four chromosomes in several cells. Chromosomal aberrations showed linear relationship with gamma irradiation; 45 kR dose induced the highest chromosomal abnormalities. Most multivalents were interchange rings of four chromosomes. Translocations involving two pairs of homologous or nonhomologous chromosomes seemed to be higher in frequency than those involving more than two pairs of chromosomes. Anaphase abnormalities, such as laggards, bridges and fragments and unequal segregation of chromosomes, were frequently observed. Pollen fertility was considerably reduced in the M2 plants arising form the treatments of higher doses of gamma rays because of the induced chromosome interchanges. (author)

  20. The X and Y chromosome in meiosis: how and why they keep silent

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Godfried W van der Heijden; Maureen Eijpe; Willy M Baarends

    2011-01-01

    The XX/XY sex chromosomal system of mammals,including human,challenges the chromosome pairing mechanism during male meiosis.Pairing and subsequent separation of homologous chromosomes generates haploid cells from diploid cells during the meiotic divisions.One of the basic requirements for recognition between homologous chromosomes is DNA sequence identity.Since the X and Y chromosome share little homology,their quest for each other is difficult,and has special characteristics.During the lengthy meiotic prophase,all autosomal chromosomes synapse,by forming a special protein structure called the synaptonemal complex,which connects the chromosomal axes.In contrast,the X and Y chromosome synapse only in the short homologous pseudoautosomal regions,and form the so-called XY body.

  1. Localization of Sry gene on Y chromosome of Muntjac munticus vaginalis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The chromosomes 1, Y1, Y2 of Muntjac munticus vaginalis were isolated by fluorescence activated chromosome sorting and amplified by degenerate oligonucleotide primed-polymerase chain reaction (DOP-PCR). A primer pair within human Sry HMG box was designed and the Sry gene of the male M. m vaginalis was amplified. The product was cloned and sequenced. The result proved that Sry is located on chromosome Y2, which is the sex-determining chromosome in the male M. m vaginalis.

  2. An approach to automated chromosome analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The methods of approach developed with a view to automatic processing of the different stages of chromosome analysis are described in this study divided into three parts. Part 1 relates the study of automated selection of metaphase spreads, which operates a decision process in order to reject ail the non-pertinent images and keep the good ones. This approach has been achieved by Computing a simulation program that has allowed to establish the proper selection algorithms in order to design a kit of electronic logical units. Part 2 deals with the automatic processing of the morphological study of the chromosome complements in a metaphase: the metaphase photographs are processed by an optical-to-digital converter which extracts the image information and writes it out as a digital data set on a magnetic tape. For one metaphase image this data set includes some 200 000 grey values, encoded according to a 16, 32 or 64 grey-level scale, and is processed by a pattern recognition program isolating the chromosomes and investigating their characteristic features (arm tips, centromere areas), in order to get measurements equivalent to the lengths of the four arms. Part 3 studies a program of automated karyotyping by optimized pairing of human chromosomes. The data are derived from direct digitizing of the arm lengths by means of a BENSON digital reader. The program supplies' 1/ a list of the pairs, 2/ a graphic representation of the pairs so constituted according to their respective lengths and centromeric indexes, and 3/ another BENSON graphic drawing according to the author's own representation of the chromosomes, i.e. crosses with orthogonal arms, each branch being the accurate measurement of the corresponding chromosome arm. This conventionalized karyotype indicates on the last line the really abnormal or non-standard images unpaired by the program, which are of special interest for the biologist. (author)

  3. Chromosome painting in plants.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schubert, I.; Fransz, P.F.; Fuchs, J.; Jong, de J.H.

    2001-01-01

    The current 'state-of-art' as to chromosome painting in plants is reviewed. We define different situations described as painting so far: i) Genomic in situ hybridisation (GISH) with total genomic DNA to distinguish alien chromosomes on the basis of divergent dispersed repeats, ii) 'Chromosomal in si

  4. Patterns of replication in the neo-sex chromosomes of Drosophila nasuta albomicans

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    G Mahesh; N B Ramachandra; H A Ranganath

    2000-09-01

    Drosophila nasuta albomicans (with 2n = 6), contains a pair of metacentric neo-sex chromosomes. Phylogenetically these are products of centric fusion between ancestral sex (X, Y) chromosomes and an autosome (chromosome 3). The polytene chromosome complement of males with a neo-X- and neo-Y-chromosomes has revealed asynchrony in replication between the two arms of the neo-sex chromosomes. The arm which represents the ancestral X-chromosome is faster replicating than the arm which represents ancestral autosome. The latter arm of the neo-sex chromosome is synchronous with other autosomes of the complement. We conclude that one arm of the neo-X/Y is still mimicking the features of an autosome while the other arm has the features of a classical X/Y-chromosome. This X-autosome translocation differs from the other evolutionary X-autosome translocations known in certain species of Drosophila.

  5. Meiotic behaviour of individual chromosomes in allotriploid Alstroemeria hybrids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamstra, S A; de Jong, J H; Jacobsen, E; Ramanna, M S; Kuipers, A G J

    2004-07-01

    Chromosome association and chiasma formation were studied in pollen mother cells at metaphase I of four allotriplod BC1 plants (2n=3x=24) obtained from the backcross of the hybrid Alstroemeria aurea x A. inodora with its parent A. inodora. We distinguished the chromosomes of both parental species by genomic in situ hybridization (GISH), whereas the individual chromosomes were identified on the basis of their multicolour FISH banding patterns obtained after a second hybridization with two species-specific satellite repeats as probes. All the four BC1 plants possessed two genomes of A. inodora and one of A. aurea. Variable numbers of recombinant chromosomes, resulting from meiotic recombination in the interspecific hybrid, were present in these plants. The homologous A. inodora chromosomes generally formed bivalents, leaving the homoeologous A. aurea chromosomes unassociated. High frequencies of trivalents were observed for the chromosome sets that contained recombinant chromosomes, even when the recombinant segments were small. Chromosome associations in the trivalents were restricted to homologous segments. The implications of the absence of homoeologous chromosome pairing on gamete constitution and prospects for introgression in Alstroemeria are discussed. PMID:15100711

  6. Roles of the Y chromosome genes in human cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatsuo Kido

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Male and female differ genetically by their respective sex chromosome composition, that is, XY as male and XX as female. Although both X and Y chromosomes evolved from the same ancestor pair of autosomes, the Y chromosome harbors male-specific genes, which play pivotal roles in male sex determination, germ cell differentiation, and masculinization of various tissues. Deletions or translocation of the sex-determining gene, SRY, from the Y chromosome causes disorders of sex development (previously termed as an intersex condition with dysgenic gonads. Failure of gonadal development results not only in infertility, but also in increased risks of germ cell tumor (GCT, such as gonadoblastoma and various types of testicular GCT. Recent studies demonstrate that either loss of Y chromosome or ectopic expression of Y chromosome genes is closely associated with various male-biased diseases, including selected somatic cancers. These observations suggest that the Y-linked genes are involved in male health and diseases in more frequently than expected. Although only a small number of protein-coding genes are present in the male-specific region of Y chromosome, the impacts of Y chromosome genes on human diseases are still largely unknown, due to lack of in vivo models and differences between the Y chromosomes of human and rodents. In this review, we highlight the involvement of selected Y chromosome genes in cancer development in men.

  7. A new derived and highly polymorphic chromosomal race of Liolaemus monticola (Iguanidae) from the 'Norte Chico' of Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamborot, M

    1998-06-01

    A multiple Robertsonian fission chromosomal race of the Liolaemus monticola complex in Chile is described and is shown to be the most derived and the most complex among the Liolaemus examined thus far. The 29 karyotyped lizards analysed from the locality of Mina Hierro Viejo, Petorca, Provincia de Valparaiso, Chile, exhibited a diploid chromosomal number ranging from 42 to 44, and several polymorphisms. The polymorphisms included: a pair 1 fission; a pair 2 fission plus a pericentric inversion in one of the fission products, which moved the NOR and satellite from the tip of the long arm of the metacentric 2 to the short arm of the fission product; a fission in pair 3; a polymorphism for an enlarged chromosome pair 6; and a polymorphism for a pericentric inversion in pair 7. This population is fixed for a fission of chromosome pair 4. A total of 76% of the lizards analysed were polymorphic for one or more pairs of chromosomes. We have compared these data with other Liolaemus monticola chromosomal races and calculated the Hardy-Weinberg ratios for the polymorphic chromosome pairs in this Multiple-Fission race. Karyotypic differences between the Northern (2n = 38-40) and the Multiple-Fission (2n = 42-44) races were attributed mainly to Robertsonian fissions, an enlarged chromosome and pericentric inversions involving the macrochromosomes and one microchromosome pair. PMID:9688513

  8. Chimpanzee chromosome 12 is homologous to human chromosome 2q

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, N. C.; Sun, C. R.Y.; Ho, T.

    1977-01-01

    Most of the 46 human chromosomes find their counterparts in the 48 chimpanzee chromosomes except for chromosome 2 which has been hypothesized to have been derived from a centric fusion of two chimpanzee acrocentric chromosomes. These two chromosomes correspond to the human chromosomes 2p and 2g. This conclusion is based primarily on chromosome banding techniques, and the somatic cell hybridization technique has also been used. (HLW)

  9. The Meiotic Behavior of an Alien Chromosome in Triticum aestivum-Haynaldia villosa Monosomic Addition Lines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Rui-fen; LIANG Hong-xia; ZHAO Mao-lin

    2002-01-01

    By the combination of cytological analysis and using genomic in situ hybridization technique to identify an alien chromosome in wheat-Haynaldia villosa monosomic addition lines, we studied the meiotic behavior of the alien chromosome. The results indicated that the frequency of bivalent pairing was lower than the value expected in PMCs of two monosomic addition lines, the frequency of wheat chromosomes unpairing increased, and the wheat homologous chromosome pairing was interfered with by the added chromosome 6V at metaphase I. The chromosome 6V lagged in 20.3% -29.3% of PMCs, sister chromatids 6V early divided in 29.0% - 34.1% of PMCs, the single chromosome 6V in 18.2% - 26.1% of PMCs went to a pole randomly,the breakage frequency of chromosome 6V was 1.2% - 2.9%. Meanwhile, it was also found that several wheat chromosomes showed earlier division, lagging and breakage in a few PMCs. It revealed that the added chromosome 6V influenced the behavior of wheat chromosomes at anaphase. It was also found that the translocation was produced between 6V and wheat chromosomes in 1.2% of PMCs. It offered evidence for translocation between wheat and Haynaldia villosa 6V chromosomes.

  10. Adjoint of Pair Frames

    OpenAIRE

    Fereydooni, Abolhassan; Safapour, Ahmad; Rahimi , Asghar

    2012-01-01

    The concept of (p,q)-pair frames is generalized to (l,l^*)-pair frames. Adjoint (conjugate) of a pair frames for dual space of a Banach space is introduced and some conditions for the existence of adjoint (conjugate) of pair frames are presented.

  11. Homologue Pairing in Flies and Mammals: Gene Regulation When Two Are Involved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manasi S. Apte

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Chromosome pairing is usually discussed in the context of meiosis. Association of homologues in germ cells enables chromosome segregation and is necessary for fertility. A few organisms, such as flies, also pair their entire genomes in somatic cells. Most others, including mammals, display little homologue pairing outside of the germline. Experimental evidence from both flies and mammals suggests that communication between homologues contributes to normal genome regulation. This paper will contrast the role of pairing in transmitting information between homologues in flies and mammals. In mammals, somatic homologue pairing is tightly regulated, occurring at specific loci and in a developmentally regulated fashion. Inappropriate pairing, or loss of normal pairing, is associated with gene misregulation in some disease states. While homologue pairing in flies is capable of influencing gene expression, the significance of this for normal expression remains unknown. The sex chromosomes pose a particularly interesting situation, as females are able to pair X chromosomes, but males cannot. The contribution of homologue pairing to the biology of the X chromosome will also be discussed.

  12. Ancient Male Recombination Shaped Genetic Diversity of Neo-Y Chromosome in Drosophila albomicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satomura, Kazuhiro; Tamura, Koichiro

    2016-02-01

    Researchers studying Y chromosome evolution have drawn attention to neo-Y chromosomes in Drosophila species due to their resembling the initial stage of Y chromosome evolution. In the studies of neo-Y chromosome of Drosophila miranda, the extremely low genetic diversity observed suggested various modes of natural selection acting on the nonrecombining genome. However, alternative possibility may come from its peculiar origin from a single chromosomal fusion event with male achiasmy, which potentially caused and maintained the low genetic diversity of the neo-Y chromosome. Here, we report a real case where a neo-Y chromosome is in transition from an autosome to a typical Y chromosome. The neo-Y chromosome of Drosophila albomicans harbored a rich genetic diversity comparable to its gametologous neo-X chromosome and an autosome in the same genome. Analyzing sequence variations in 53 genes and measuring recombination rates between pairs of loci by cross experiments, we elucidated the evolutionary scenario of the neo-Y chromosome of D. albomicans having high genetic diversity without assuming selective force, i.e., it originated from a single chromosomal fusion event, experienced meiotic recombination during the initial stage of evolution and diverged from neo-X chromosome by the suppression of recombination tens or a few hundreds of thousand years ago. Consequently, the observed high genetic diversity on the neo-Y chromosome suggested a strong effect of meiotic recombination to introduce genetic variations into the newly arisen sex chromosome. PMID:26494844

  13. The complete sequence of human chromosome 5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmutz, Jeremy; Martin, Joel; Terry, Astrid; Couronne, Olivier; Grimwood, Jane; Lowry, State; Gordon, Laurie A.; Scott, Duncan; Xie, Gary; Huang, Wayne; Hellsten, Uffe; Tran-Gyamfi, Mary; She, Xinwei; Prabhakar, Shyam; Aerts, Andrea; Altherr, Michael; Bajorek, Eva; Black, Stacey; Branscomb, Elbert; Caoile, Chenier; Challacombe, Jean F.; Chan, Yee Man; Denys, Mirian; Detter, Chris; Escobar, Julio; Flowers, Dave; Fotopulos, Dea; Glavina, Tijana; Gomez, Maria; Gonzales, Eidelyn; Goodstenin, David; Grigoriev, Igor; Groza, Matthew; Hammon, Nancy; Hawkins, Trevor; Haydu, Lauren; Israni, Sanjay; Jett, Jamie; Kadner, Kristen; Kimbal, Heather; Kobayashi, Arthur; Lopez, Frederick; Lou, Yunian; Martinez, Diego; Medina, Catherine; Morgan, Jenna; Nandkeshwar, Richard; Noonan, James P.; Pitluck, Sam; Pollard, Martin; Predki, Paul; Priest, James; Ramirez, Lucia; Rash, Sam; Retterer, James; Rodriguez, Alex; Rogers, Stephanie; Salamov, Asaf; Salazar, Angelica; Thayer, Nina; Tice, Hope; Tsai, Ming; Ustaszewska, Anna; Vo, Nu; Wheeler, Jeremy; Wu, Kevin; Yang, Joan; Dickson, Mark; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Eichler, Evan E.; Olsen, Anne; Pennacchio, Len A.; Rokhsar, Daniel S.; Richardson, Paul; Lucas, Susan M.; Myers, Richard M.; Rubin, Edward M.

    2004-04-15

    Chromosome 5 is one of the largest human chromosomes yet has one of the lowest gene densities. This is partially explained by numerous gene-poor regions that display a remarkable degree of noncoding and syntenic conservation with non-mammalian vertebrates, suggesting they are functionally constrained. In total, we compiled 177.7 million base pairs of highly accurate finished sequence containing 923 manually curated protein-encoding genes including the protocadherin and interleukin gene families and the first complete versions of each of the large chromosome 5 specific internal duplications. These duplications are very recent evolutionary events and play a likely mechanistic role, since deletions of these regions are the cause of debilitating disorders including spinal muscular atrophy (SMA).

  14. The DNA sequence of human chromosome 7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillier, Ladeana W; Fulton, Robert S; Fulton, Lucinda A; Graves, Tina A; Pepin, Kymberlie H; Wagner-McPherson, Caryn; Layman, Dan; Maas, Jason; Jaeger, Sara; Walker, Rebecca; Wylie, Kristine; Sekhon, Mandeep; Becker, Michael C; O'Laughlin, Michelle D; Schaller, Mark E; Fewell, Ginger A; Delehaunty, Kimberly D; Miner, Tracie L; Nash, William E; Cordes, Matt; Du, Hui; Sun, Hui; Edwards, Jennifer; Bradshaw-Cordum, Holland; Ali, Johar; Andrews, Stephanie; Isak, Amber; Vanbrunt, Andrew; Nguyen, Christine; Du, Feiyu; Lamar, Betty; Courtney, Laura; Kalicki, Joelle; Ozersky, Philip; Bielicki, Lauren; Scott, Kelsi; Holmes, Andrea; Harkins, Richard; Harris, Anthony; Strong, Cynthia Madsen; Hou, Shunfang; Tomlinson, Chad; Dauphin-Kohlberg, Sara; Kozlowicz-Reilly, Amy; Leonard, Shawn; Rohlfing, Theresa; Rock, Susan M; Tin-Wollam, Aye-Mon; Abbott, Amanda; Minx, Patrick; Maupin, Rachel; Strowmatt, Catrina; Latreille, Phil; Miller, Nancy; Johnson, Doug; Murray, Jennifer; Woessner, Jeffrey P; Wendl, Michael C; Yang, Shiaw-Pyng; Schultz, Brian R; Wallis, John W; Spieth, John; Bieri, Tamberlyn A; Nelson, Joanne O; Berkowicz, Nicolas; Wohldmann, Patricia E; Cook, Lisa L; Hickenbotham, Matthew T; Eldred, James; Williams, Donald; Bedell, Joseph A; Mardis, Elaine R; Clifton, Sandra W; Chissoe, Stephanie L; Marra, Marco A; Raymond, Christopher; Haugen, Eric; Gillett, Will; Zhou, Yang; James, Rose; Phelps, Karen; Iadanoto, Shawn; Bubb, Kerry; Simms, Elizabeth; Levy, Ruth; Clendenning, James; Kaul, Rajinder; Kent, W James; Furey, Terrence S; Baertsch, Robert A; Brent, Michael R; Keibler, Evan; Flicek, Paul; Bork, Peer; Suyama, Mikita; Bailey, Jeffrey A; Portnoy, Matthew E; Torrents, David; Chinwalla, Asif T; Gish, Warren R; Eddy, Sean R; McPherson, John D; Olson, Maynard V; Eichler, Evan E; Green, Eric D; Waterston, Robert H; Wilson, Richard K

    2003-07-10

    Human chromosome 7 has historically received prominent attention in the human genetics community, primarily related to the search for the cystic fibrosis gene and the frequent cytogenetic changes associated with various forms of cancer. Here we present more than 153 million base pairs representing 99.4% of the euchromatic sequence of chromosome 7, the first metacentric chromosome completed so far. The sequence has excellent concordance with previously established physical and genetic maps, and it exhibits an unusual amount of segmentally duplicated sequence (8.2%), with marked differences between the two arms. Our initial analyses have identified 1,150 protein-coding genes, 605 of which have been confirmed by complementary DNA sequences, and an additional 941 pseudogenes. Of genes confirmed by transcript sequences, some are polymorphic for mutations that disrupt the reading frame. PMID:12853948

  15. Evidence of an XX/XY sex chromosome system in the fish Dormitator maculatus (Teleostei, Eleotrididae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Oliveira

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The fish Dormitator maculatus has a chromosomes number of 2n = 46, females having a karyotype of 14 M, 28 SM, 2 ST and 2A and males 13 M, 28 SM, 3 ST and 2A. The presence of a heteromorphic pair in the males and a corresponding homomorphic pair in the females suggest the occurrence of an XX/XY sex chromosome system in D. maculatus. The putative X chromosome has a pericentromeric C-band positive segment and the putative Y chromosome a C-band positive short arm.

  16. The chromosomes of Tsing-Ling pika, Ochotona huangensis Matschie, 1908 (Lagomorpha, Ochotonidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexey Vakurin

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The karyotype of the Tsing-Ling (Huanghe pika, Ochotona huangensis Matschie, 1908 from the forest habitats of the Qinling Mountains (Shaanxi Province, China was described for the first time. The chromosome set contains 42 chromosomes (NFa=80. The autosomes are 15 meta-submetacentric pairs and 5 subtelocentric pairs. The X chromosome is a medium sized submetacentric; the Y chromosome is a small sized acrocentric. C-banding revealed a localization of heterochromatin in the pericentromeric regions of all autosomes.

  17. Nature of telomere dimers and chromosome looping in human spermatozoa

    OpenAIRE

    Solov'eva, Lyudmila; Svetlova, Maria; Bodinski, Dawn; Zalensky, Andrei O.

    2004-01-01

    Specific and well-organized chromosome architecture in human sperm cells is supported by the prominent interactions between centromeres and between telomeres. The telomere-telomere interactions result in telomere dimers that are positioned at the nuclear periphery. It is unknown whether composition of sperm telomere dimers is random or specific. We now report that telomere dimers result from specific interactions between the two ends of each chromosome. FISH using pairs of subtelomeric DNA pr...

  18. C-banding and FISH in chromosomes of the blow flies Chrysomya megacephala and Chrysomya putoria (Diptera, Calliphoridae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parise-Maltempi Patricia P

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The blow flies Chrysomya putoria and C. megacephala have 2n=12 chromosomes, five metacentric pairs of autosomes and an XX/XY sex chromosome pair. There are no substantial differences in the karyotype morphology of these two species, except for the X chromosome which is subtelocentric in C. megacephala and metacentric in C. putoria and is about 1.4 times longer in C. putoria. All autosomes were characterized by the presence of a C band in the pericentromeric region; C. putoria also has an interstitial band in pair III. The sex chromosomes of both species were heterochromatic, except for a small region at the end of the long arm of the X chromosome. Ribosomal genes were detected in meiotic chromosomes by FISH and in both species the NOR was located on the sex chromosomes. These results confirm that C. putoria was the species introduced into Brazil in 1970s, and not C. chloropyga as formerly described.

  19. Assignment of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) Linkage Groups to Specific Chromosomes: Conservation of Large Syntenic Blocks Corresponding to Whole Chromosome Arms in Rainbow Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    OpenAIRE

    Phillips, Ruth; Keatley, Kimberly; Morasch, Matthew; Ventura, Abigail; Lubieniecki, Krzysztof; Koop, Ben; Danzmann, Roy; Davidson, William

    2009-01-01

    Background: Most teleost species, especially freshwater groups such as the Esocidae which are theclosest relatives of salmonids, have a karyotype comprising 25 pairs of acrocentric chromosomes and 48–52 chromosome arms. After the common ancestor of salmonids underwent a whole genome duplication,its karyotype would have 100 chromosome arms, and this is reflected in the modal range of 96–104 seenin extant salmonids (e.g., rainbow trout). The Atlantic salmon is an exception among the salmonids a...

  20. Chromosomal organization of adrenergic receptor genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The adrenergic receptors (ARs) (subtypes α1, α2, β1, and β2) are a prototypic family of guanine nucleotide binding regulatory protein-coupled receptors that mediate the physiological effects of the hormone epinephrine and the neurotransmitter norepinephrine. The authors have previously assigned the genes for β2-and α2-AR to human chromosomes 5 and 10, respectively. By Southern analysis of somatic cell hybrids and in situ chromosomal hybridization, they have now mapped the α1-AR gene to chromosome 5q32→q34, the same position as β2-AR, and the β1-AR gene to chromosome 10q24→q26, the region where α2-AR, is located. In mouse, both α2-and β1-AR genes were assigned to chromosome 19, and the α1-AR locus was localized to chromosome 11. Pulsed field gel electrophoresis has shown that the α1-and β2-AR genes in humans are within 300 kilobases (kb) and the distance between the α2- and β1-AR genes is <225 kb. The proximity of these two pairs of AR genes and the sequence similarity that exists among all the ARs strongly suggest that they are evolutionarily related. Moreover, they likely arose from a common ancestral receptor gene and subsequently diverged through gene duplication and chromosomal duplication to perform their distinctive roles in mediation the physiological effects of catecholamines. The AR genes thus provide a paradigm for understanding the evolution of such structurally conserved yet functionally divergent families off receptor molecules

  1. The colocalization transition of homologous chromosomes at meiosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicodemi, Mario; Panning, Barbara; Prisco, Antonella

    2008-06-01

    Meiosis is the specialized cell division required in sexual reproduction. During its early stages, in the mother cell nucleus, homologous chromosomes recognize each other and colocalize in a crucial step that remains one of the most mysterious of meiosis. Starting from recent discoveries on the system molecular components and interactions, we discuss a statistical mechanics model of chromosome early pairing. Binding molecules mediate long-distance interaction of special DNA recognition sequences and, if their concentration exceeds a critical threshold, they induce a spontaneous colocalization transition of chromosomes, otherwise independently diffusing.

  2. A unique sex chromosome system in the knifefish Gymnotus bahianus with inferences about chromosomal evolution of Gymnotidae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Josivanda S; Migues, Vitor H; Diniz, Débora; Affonso, Paulo Roberto A M

    2015-01-01

    Cytogenetic studies in Neotropical electric knifefish of genus Gymnotus have shown a remarkable interspecific variability, including distinct sex chromosome systems. In this study, we present the first chromosomal data in Gymnotus bahianus from Contas River basin, northeastern South America. Based on extensive analyses, the modal diploid values were 2n = 36 (30m/sm + 6st) for females and 2n = 37 (32m/sm + 5st) for males. Therefore, a novel XX/XY1Y2 sex chromosome system is described for the genus. Single nucleolar organizer regions (NORs) interspersed to GC-rich sites were detected on a subtelocentric pair (7th) for both sexes and confirmed by fluorescent in situ hybridization with 18S rDNA probes. Heterochromatin was detected at pericentromeric regions of all chromosomes and interspersed to NORs on pair 7 and 5S rDNA cistrons on pair 9. The highly differentiated karyotype of Gymnoytus bahianus, with low diploid numbers and a unique XX/XY1Y2 system, reinforces the independent origin of sex chromosomes in Gymnotiformes and seems to reflect the particular evolutionary history of this species in a small and isolated drainage system. Moreover, in spite of morphological similarities, the present results indicate a remarkable chromosomal divergence in relation to closely related species such as G. sylvius and G. carapo. PMID:25596613

  3. Plant sex chromosome evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlesworth, Deborah

    2013-01-01

    It is now well established that plants have an important place in studies of sex chromosome evolution because of the repeated independent evolution of separate sexes and sex chromosomes. There has been considerable recent progress in studying plant sex chromosomes. In this review, I focus on how these recent studies have helped clarify or answer several important questions about sex chromosome evolution, and I shall also try to clarify some common misconceptions. I also outline future work that will be needed to make further progress, including testing some important ideas by genetic, molecular, and developmental approaches. Systems with different ages can clearly help show the time course of events during changes from an ancestral co-sexual state (hermaphroditism or monoecy), and I will also explain how different questions can be studied in lineages whose dioecy or sex chromosomes evolved at different times in the past. PMID:23125359

  4. Homologous subfamilies of human alphoid repetitive DNA on different nucleolus organizing chromosomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The organization of alphoid repeated sequences on human nucleolus-organizing (NOR) chromosomes 13, 21, and 22 has been investigated. Analysis of hybridization of alphoid DNA probes to Southern transfers of restriction enzyme-digested DNA fragments from hybrid cells containing single human chromosomes shows that chromosomes 13 and 21 share one subfamily of alphoid repeats, whereas a different subfamily may be held in common by chromosomes 13 and 22. The sequences of cloned 680-base-pair EcoRI fragments of the alphoid DNA from chromosomes 13 and 21 show that the basic unit of this subfamily is indistinguishable on each chromosome. The sequence of cloned 1020-base-pair Xba I fragments from chromosome 22 is related to, but distinguishable from, that of the 680-base-pair EcoRI alphoid subfamily of chromosomes 13 and 21. These results suggest that, at some point after they originated and were homogenized, different subfamilies of alphoid sequences must have exchanged between chromosomes 13 and 21 and separately between chromosomes 13 and 22

  5. Pairing and anti-pairing: a balancing act in the diploid genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyce, Eric F.; Erceg, Jelena; Wu, C.-ting

    2016-01-01

    The presence of maternal and paternal homologs appears to be much more than just a doubling of genetic material. We know this because genomes have evolved elaborate mechanisms that permit homologous regions to sense and then respond to each other. One way in which homologs communicate is to come into contact and, in fact, Dipteran insects such as Drosophila excel at this task, aligning all pairs of maternal and paternal chromosomes, end-to-end, in essentially all somatic tissues throughout development. Here, we reexamine the widely held tenet that extensive somatic pairing of homologous sequences cannot occur in mammals and suggest, instead, that pairing may be a widespread and significant potential that has gone unnoticed in mammals because they expend considerable effort to prevent it. We then extend this discussion to interchromosomal interactions, in general, and speculate about the potential of nuclear organization and pairing to impact inheritance. PMID:27065367

  6. Vibrio chromosomes share common history

    OpenAIRE

    Gevers Dirk; Chang Sarah; Chang LeeAnn; Kirkup Benjamin C; Polz Martin F

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background While most gamma proteobacteria have a single circular chromosome, Vibrionales have two circular chromosomes. Horizontal gene transfer is common among Vibrios, and in light of this genetic mobility, it is an open question to what extent the two chromosomes themselves share a common history since their formation. Results Single copy genes from each chromosome (142 genes from chromosome I and 42 genes from chromosome II) were identified from 19 sequenced Vibrionales genomes ...

  7. Karyological characterization of the endemic Iberian rock lizard, Iberolacerta monticola (Squamata, Lacertidae): insights into sex chromosome evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojo, V; Giovannotti, M; Naveira, H; Nisi Cerioni, P; González-Tizón, A M; Caputo Barucchi, V; Galán, P; Olmo, E; Martínez-Lage, A

    2014-01-01

    Rock lizards of the genus Iberolacerta constitute a promising model to examine the process of sex chromosome evolution, as these closely related taxa exhibit remarkable diversity in the degree of sex chromosome differentiation with no clear phylogenetic segregation, ranging from cryptic to highly heteromorphic ZW chromosomes and even multiple chromosome systems (Z1Z1Z2Z2/Z1Z2W). To gain a deeper insight into the patterns of karyotype and sex chromosome evolution, we performed a cytogenetic analysis based on conventional staining, banding techniques and fluorescence in situ hybridization in the species I. monticola, for which previous cytogenetic investigations did not detect differentiated sex chromosomes. The karyotype is composed of 2n = 36 acrocentric chromosomes. NORs and the major ribosomal genes were located in the subtelomeric region of chromosome pair 6. Hybridization signals of the telomeric sequences (TTAGGG)n were visualized at the telomeres of all chromosomes and interstitially in 5 chromosome pairs. C-banding showed constitutive heterochromatin at the centromeres of all chromosomes, as well as clear pericentromeric and light telomeric C-bands in several chromosome pairs. These results highlight some chromosomal markers which can be useful to identify species-specific diagnostic characters, although they may not accurately reflect the phylogenetic relationships among the taxa. In addition, C-banding revealed the presence of a heteromorphic ZW sex chromosome pair, where W is smaller than Z and almost completely heterochromatic. This finding sheds light on sex chromosome evolution in the genus Iberolacerta and suggests that further comparative cytogenetic analyses are needed to understand the processes underlying the origin, differentiation and plasticity of sex chromosome systems in lacertid lizards. PMID:24296524

  8. A Model of Repetitive-DNA-Organized Chromatin Network of Interphase Chromosomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shao-Jun Tang

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available During interphase, chromosomes are relatively de-condensed in the nuclear space. Interphase chromosomes are known to occupy nuclear space in a non-random manner (chromosome territory; however, their internal structures are poorly defined. In particular, little is understood about the molecular mechanisms that govern the internal organization of interphase chromosomes. The author recently proposed that pairing (or interaction of repetitive DNA-containing chromatin regions is a critical driving force that specifies the higher-order organization of eukaryotic chromosomes. Guided by this theoretical framework and published experimental data on the structure of interphase chromosomes and the spatial distribution of repetitive DNA in interphase nuclei, I postulate here a molecular structure of chromatin organization in interphase chromosomes. According to this model, an interphase chromosome is a chromatin mesh (or lattice that is formed by repeat pairing (RP. The mesh consists of two types of structural components: chromosome nodes and loose chromatin fibers. Chromosome nodes are DNA repeat assemblies (RAs that are formed via RP, while loose fibers include chromatin loops that radiate from the nodes. Different loops crosslink by RPs and form a large integrated chromatin network. I suggest that the organization of the chromatin network of a given interphase chromosome is intrinsically specified by the distribution of repetitive DNA elements on the linear chromatin. The stability of the organization is governed by the collection of RA-formed nodes, and the dynamics of the organization is driven by the assembling and disassembling of the nodes.

  9. Sequential cloning of chromosomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacks, S.A.

    1991-12-31

    A method for sequential cloning of chromosomal DNA and chromosomal DNA cloned by this method are disclosed. The method includes the selection of a target organism having a segment of chromosomal DNA to be sequentially cloned. A first DNA segment, having a first restriction enzyme site on either side. homologous to the chromosomal DNA to be sequentially cloned is isolated. A first vector product is formed by ligating the homologous segment into a suitably designed vector. The first vector product is circularly integrated into the target organism`s chromosomal DNA. The resulting integrated chromosomal DNA segment includes the homologous DNA segment at either end of the integrated vector segment. The integrated chromosomal DNA is cleaved with a second restriction enzyme and ligated to form a vector-containing plasmid, which is replicated in a host organism. The replicated plasmid is then cleaved with the first restriction enzyme. Next, a DNA segment containing the vector and a segment of DNA homologous to a distal portion of the previously isolated DNA segment is isolated. This segment is then ligated to form a plasmid which is replicated within a suitable host. This plasmid is then circularly integrated into the target chromosomal DNA. The chromosomal DNA containing the circularly integrated vector is treated with a third, retrorestriction enzyme. The cleaved DNA is ligated to give a plasmid that is used to transform a host permissive for replication of its vector. The sequential cloning process continues by repeated cycles of circular integration and excision. The excision is carried out alternately with the second and third enzymes.

  10. A new chromosome was born: comparative chromosome painting in Boechera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Marcus A

    2015-09-01

    Comparative chromosome painting is a powerful tool to study the evolution of chromosomes and genomes. Analyzing karyotype evolution in cruciferous plants highlights the origin of aberrant chromosomes in apomictic Boechera and further establishes the cruciferous plants as important model system for our understanding of plant chromosome and genome evolution. PMID:26228436

  11. Plant sex chromosomes: molecular structure and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamilena, M; Mariotti, B; Manzano, S

    2008-01-01

    Recent molecular and genomic studies carried out in a number of model dioecious plant species, including Asparagus officinalis, Carica papaya, Silene latifolia, Rumex acetosa and Marchantia polymorpha, have shed light on the molecular structure of both homomorphic and heteromorphic sex chromosomes, and also on the gene functions they have maintained since their evolution from a pair of autosomes. The molecular structure of sex chromosomes in species from different plant families represents the evolutionary pathway followed by sex chromosomes during their evolution. The degree of Y chromosome degeneration that accompanies the suppression of recombination between the Xs and Ys differs among species. The primitive Ys of A. officinalis and C. papaya have only diverged from their homomorphic Xs in a short male-specific and non-recombining region (MSY), while the heteromorphic Ys of S. latifolia, R. acetosa and M. polymorpha have diverged from their respective Xs. As in the Y chromosomes of mammals and Drosophila, the accumulation of repetitive DNA, including both transposable elements and satellite DNA, has played an important role in the divergence and size enlargement of plant Ys, and consequently in reducing gene density. Nevertheless, the degeneration process in plants does not appear to have reached the Y-linked genes. Although a low gene density has been found in the sequenced Y chromosome of M. polymorpha, most of its genes are essential and are expressed in the vegetative and reproductive organs in both male and females. Similarly, most of the Y-linked genes that have been isolated and characterized up to now in S. latifolia are housekeeping genes that have X-linked homologues, and are therefore expressed in both males and females. Only one of them seems to be degenerate with respect to its homologous region in the X. Sequence analysis of larger regions in the homomorphic X and Y chromosomes of papaya and asparagus, and also in the heteromorphic sex chromosomes

  12. The constitutional t(11;22): implications for a novel mechanism responsible for gross chromosomal rearrangements

    OpenAIRE

    Kurahashi, H; Inagaki, H; Ohye, T; Kogo, H.; Tsutsumi, M.; Kato, T.; Tong, M.; Emanuel, BS

    2010-01-01

    The constitutional t(11;22)(q23;q11) is the most common recurrent non-Robertsonian translocation in humans. The breakpoint sequences of both chromosomes are characterized by several hundred base pairs of palindromic AT-rich repeats (PATRRs). Similar PATRRs have also been identified at the breakpoints of other nonrecurrent translocations, suggesting that PATRR-mediated chromosomal translocation represents one of the universal pathways for gross chromosomal rearrangement in the human genome. We...

  13. Cloning and characterization of a dispersed, multicopy, X chromosome sequence in Drosophila melanogaster.

    OpenAIRE

    Waring, G L; Pollack, J C

    1987-01-01

    We have isolated and characterized a dispersed middle repetitive DNA sequence from Drosophila melanogaster that is concentrated on the euchromatic portion of the X chromosome. In situ hybridization of the repeat unit to salivary gland chromosomes shows the sequence is distributed among approximately 10 major and 20 minor X chromosomal sites. Based on DNA sequence analysis of homologous sequences from three different cytogenetic regions, the 372-base-pair repeat unit appears to be (A + T)-rich...

  14. Studies on chromosomal aberrations and inherited sterility in Asian corn borer, Ostrinia furnacalis (Guenee)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    F1 sterility and chromosomal aberrations in the Asian corn borer, Ostrinia furnacalis (Guenee), were induced by different doses of gamma radiation. The chromosome number of the Asian corn borer is n = 31 pairs. The results showed that chromosomal aberrations in spermatocytes of the F1 generation were directly related to high F1 sterility; however, the sterility was observed for only one generation and fertility was recovered in the next generation. (author). 6 refs, 2 figs, 4 tabs

  15. Rapid mapping of chromosomal breakpoints: from blood to BAC in 20 days

    OpenAIRE

    Mei Wang; Adolf Baumgartner; Weier, Jingly F.; Johnson Kwan; Chun-Mei Lu; Tomas Escudero; Santiago MunnĂŠ; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G.

    2009-01-01

    Structural chromosome aberrations and associated segmental or chromosomal aneusomies are major causes of reproductive failure in humans. Despite the fact that carriers of reciprocal balanced translocation often have no other clinical symptoms or disease, impaired chromosome homologue pairing in meiosis and karyokinesis errors lead to over-representation of translocations carriers in the infertile population and in recurrent pregnancy loss patients. At present, clinicians have no means to sele...

  16. Chimpanzee chromosome 13 is homologous to human chromosome 2p

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, N. C.; Sun, C. R.Y.; Ho, T.

    1977-01-01

    Similarities between human and chimpanzee chromosomes are shown by chromosome banding techniques and somatic cell hybridization techniques. Cell hybrids were obtained from the chimpanzee lymphocyte LE-7, and the Chinese hamster mutant cell, Gal-2. Experiments showed that the ACPL, MDHs, and Gal-Act genes could be assigned to chimpanzee chromosome 13, and since these genes have been assigned to human chromosme 2p, it is suggested that chimpanzee chromosome 13 is homologous to human chromosome 2p. (HLW)

  17. Chromosomal abnormalities and autism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farida El-Baz

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Chromosomal abnormalities were not detected in the studied autistic children, and so the relation between the genetics and autism still needs further work up with different study methods and techniques.

  18. Chromosome numbers in Bromeliaceae

    OpenAIRE

    2000-01-01

    The present study reports chromosome numbers of 17 species of Bromeliaceae, belonging to the genera Encholirium, Bromelia, Orthophytum, Hohenbergia, Billbergia, Neoglaziovia, Aechmea, Cryptanthus and Ananas. Most species present 2n = 50, however, Bromelia laciniosa, Orthophytum burle-marxii and O. maracasense are polyploids with 2n = 150, 2n = 100 and 2n = 150, respectively, while for Cryptanthus bahianus, 2n = 34 + 1-4B. B chromosomes were observed in Bromelia plumieri and Hohenbergia aff. u...

  19. X-ray induction of mitotic and meiotic chromosome aberrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1964 six pairs of rat kangaroo (Potorous tridactylis) were obtained from Australia. The tissues of these animals were used to initiate cell lines. Since this species has a low chromosome number of six pairs, each pair with its own distinctive morphology, it is particularly favorable for cytogenetic research. In cell cultures derived from the corneal endothelial tissues of one animal there emerged a number of haploid cells. The number of haploid cells in the cultures reached as high as 20% of the total mitotic configurations. The in vitro diploid and haploid mixture cell cultures could be a resemblance or a coincidence to the mixture existence of the diploid primary spermatocytes and the haploid secondary spermatocytes (gametes) in the in vivo testicular tissues of the male animals. It would be interesting to compare reactions of the haploid and diploid cell mixture, either in the cultures or in the testes, to x-ray exposure. Two other studies involving x-ray effects on Chinese hamster oocyte maturation and meiotic chromosomes and the x-ray induction of Chinese hamster spermatocyte meiotic chromosome aberrations have been done in this laboratory. A review of these three studies involving diploid and haploid chromosomes may lead to further research in the x-ray induction of chromosome aberrations

  20. Occurrence of differential meiotic associations and additional chromosomes in the embryo-sac mother cells of Allium roylei Stearn

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Geeta Sharma; Ravinder N. Gohil

    2011-04-01

    A small population of complex translocation heterozygote plants of Allium roylei from the Bani region of Jammu Province was studied for meiosis in the female track. This study resulted in identification of two variants, having embryo-sac mother cells (EMCs) with more than 16 chromosomes. EMCs of the remaining plants invariably had diploid $(2n = 16)$ chromosome complement. Female meiosis, in general, was found to be abnormal, with nearly 23% and 11% chromosomes associating as quadrivalents or trivalents at prophase I and at metaphase I, respectively. This was followed by irregular segregation of chromosomes at anaphase I. Amongst the variants; one had 38% EMCs with eight bivalents plus two small sized chromosomes. Their small size, dispensable nature and tendency to affect the pairing behaviour of normal complement are some of the features that latter chromosomes share with the B chromosomes. Seventeen to nineteen chromosomes were observed in 35% EMCs of other variant; the remaining cells had 16 chromosomes. Chromosomal behaviour in both kind of cells (euploid and aneuploid) was more or less similar. Unlike female meiocytes, male meiocytes analysed earlier of this strain always had 16 chromosomes which paired to form extremely complex associations involving 3–16 chromosomes. The most likely cause of this asynchrony with regards to number of chromosomes involved in multivalent formation seems to be interaction of genes controlling chiasma formation with the different physiological conditions of male and female meiocytes.

  1. Micromechanics of human mitotic chromosomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eukaryote cells dramatically reorganize their long chromosomal DNAs to facilitate their physical segregation during mitosis. The internal organization of folded mitotic chromosomes remains a basic mystery of cell biology; its understanding would likely shed light on how chromosomes are separated from one another as well as into chromosome structure between cell divisions. We report biophysical experiments on single mitotic chromosomes from human cells, where we combine micromanipulation, nano-Newton-scale force measurement and biochemical treatments to study chromosome connectivity and topology. Results are in accord with previous experiments on amphibian chromosomes and support the 'chromatin network' model of mitotic chromosome structure. Prospects for studies of chromosome-organizing proteins using siRNA expression knockdowns, as well as for differential studies of chromosomes with and without mutations associated with genetic diseases, are also discussed

  2. Vibrio chromosomes share common history

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gevers Dirk

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While most gamma proteobacteria have a single circular chromosome, Vibrionales have two circular chromosomes. Horizontal gene transfer is common among Vibrios, and in light of this genetic mobility, it is an open question to what extent the two chromosomes themselves share a common history since their formation. Results Single copy genes from each chromosome (142 genes from chromosome I and 42 genes from chromosome II were identified from 19 sequenced Vibrionales genomes and their phylogenetic comparison suggests consistent phylogenies for each chromosome. Additionally, study of the gene organization and phylogeny of the respective origins of replication confirmed the shared history. Conclusions Thus, while elements within the chromosomes may have experienced significant genetic mobility, the backbones share a common history. This allows conclusions based on multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA for one chromosome to be applied equally to both chromosomes.

  3. Chromosomes of Lepidochitona caprearum (Scacchi, 1836 (Polyplacophora, Acanthochitonina, Tonicellidae provide insights into Acanthochitonina karyological evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnese Petraccioli

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available We describe the karyotype, location of nucleolus-organizing regions (NORs and heterochromatin composition and distribution in Lepidochitona caprearum (Scacchi, 1836. The examined specimens had 2n=24 chromosomes; the elements of pairs 1 – 4 were metacentric, subtelocentric those of the fifth pair, telocentric the elements of other pairs. NOR-FISH, AG-NOR- and CMA3 banding showed NORs localized on pericentromeric regions of a medium small sized, telocentric chromosome pair. After C-banding or digestions with restriction enzyme NOR associate heterochromatin only was cytologically evident, resulting CMA3 positive. The comparison with other chitons chromosome data, other than to evidence a karyotypic similarity of L. caprearum to species of suborder Acanthochitonina, allows also to infer that chromosome evolution in the suborder mainly occurred via reduction of the number of the chromosomes by centric fusions, which took place repeatedly and independently in the different lineages of Acanthochitonina.

  4. Chromosomes of Lepidochitona caprearum (Scacchi, 1836) (Polyplacophora, Acanthochitonina, Tonicellidae) provide insights into Acanthochitonina karyological evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petraccioli, Agnese; Maio, Nicola; Odierna, Gaetano

    2012-01-01

    We describe the karyotype, location of nucleolus-organizing regions (NORs) and heterochromatin composition and distribution in Lepidochitona caprearum (Scacchi, 1836). The examined specimens had 2n=24 chromosomes; the elements of pairs 1-4 were metacentric, subtelocentric those of the fifth pair, telocentric the elements of other pairs. NOR-FISH, Ag-NOR- and CMA3 banding showed NORs localized on pericentromeric regions of a medium small sized, telocentric chromosome pair. After C-banding or digestions with restriction enzyme NOR associate heterochromatin only was cytologically evident, resulting CMA3 positive. The comparison with chromosome data of other chitons, other than to evidence a karyotypic similarity of Lepidochitona caprearum to species of suborder Acanthochitonina, allows us to infer that chromosome evolution in the suborder mainly occurred via reduction of the number of the chromosomes by centric fusions, which took place repeatedly and independently in the different lineages of Acanthochitonina. PMID:24260680

  5. Correlation between embryo morphology and development and chromosomal complement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Vy Phan; Eva Littman; Dee Harris; Antoine La

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the correlation between embryo morphology and the chromosomal status using the array comparative genomic hybridization [array comparative genomic hybridization (a-CGH)] technique for screening 23 chromosome pairs in a single blastomere biopsy from Day 3 embryos. Methods: One thousand five hundred and fifty seven embryos were included from 203 cycle ICSI patients undergoing preimplantation genetic screening. The 23 chromosome pairs were analyzed by blastomere biopsy from day 3 embryos using a-CGH array method. Embryo development rate, fragmentation rate and chromosome status of the analyzed blastomeres were recorded and correlated with the aCGH results. Results: The incidence of chromosomal abnormalities was significantly higher in slow-and fast cleaving embryos at day 3 after insemination. The incidence of fragmentation and the type of fragmentation was associated with an increased incidence of chromosomal abnormalities. The symmetry of the blastomeres also correlated with the aneuploidy rates. Conclusions:Embryo development rate and morphological parameter such as degree, type of fragmentation and the symmetry of the blastomeres to a large extent reflect the cytogenetic status of the embryo and thus are important in the selection of embryos with the highest implantation potential.

  6. The sequence and analysis of duplication rich human chromosome 16

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, J; Han, C; Gordon, L A; Terry, A; Prabhakar, S; She, X; Xie, G; Hellsten, U; Chan, Y M; Altherr, M; Couronne, O; Aerts, A; Bajorek, E; Black, S; Blumer, H; Branscomb, E; Brown, N; Bruno, W J; Buckingham, J; Callen, D F; Campbell, C S; Campbell, M L; Campbell, E W; Caoile, C; Challacombe, J F; Chasteen, L A; Chertkov, O; Chi, H C; Christensen, M; Clark, L M; Cohn, J D; Denys, M; Detter, J C; Dickson, M; Dimitrijevic-Bussod, M; Escobar, J; Fawcett, J J; Flowers, D; Fotopulos, D; Glavina, T; Gomez, M; Gonzales, E; Goodstein, D; Goodwin, L A; Grady, D L; Grigoriev, I; Groza, M; Hammon, N; Hawkins, T; Haydu, L; Hildebrand, C E; Huang, W; Israni, S; Jett, J; Jewett, P B; Kadner, K; Kimball, H; Kobayashi, A; Krawczyk, M; Leyba, T; Longmire, J L; Lopez, F; Lou, Y; Lowry, S; Ludeman, T; Manohar, C F; Mark, G A; McMurray, K L; Meincke, L J; Morgan, J; Moyzis, R K; Mundt, M O; Munk, A C; Nandkeshwar, R D; Pitluck, S; Pollard, M; Predki, P; Parson-Quintana, B; Ramirez, L; Rash, S; Retterer, J; Ricke, D O; Robinson, D; Rodriguez, A; Salamov, A; Saunders, E H; Scott, D; Shough, T; Stallings, R L; Stalvey, M; Sutherland, R D; Tapia, R; Tesmer, J G; Thayer, N; Thompson, L S; Tice, H; Torney, D C; Tran-Gyamfi, M; Tsai, M; Ulanovsky, L E; Ustaszewska, A; Vo, N; White, P S; Williams, A L; Wills, P L; Wu, J; Wu, K; Yang, J; DeJong, P; Bruce, D; Doggett, N A; Deaven, L; Schmutz, J; Grimwood, J; Richardson, P; Rokhsar, D S; Eichler, E E; Gilna, P; Lucas, S M; Myers, R M; Rubin, E M; Pennacchio, L A

    2005-04-06

    Human chromosome 16 features one of the highest levels of segmentally duplicated sequence among the human autosomes. We report here the 78,884,754 base pairs of finished chromosome 16 sequence, representing over 99.9% of its euchromatin. Manual annotation revealed 880 protein-coding genes confirmed by 1,637 aligned transcripts, 19 tRNA genes, 341 pseudogenes, and 3 RNA pseudogenes. These genes include metallothionein, cadherin, and iroquois gene families, as well as the disease genes for polycystic kidney disease and acute myelomonocytic leukemia. Several large-scale structural polymorphisms spanning hundreds of kilobase pairs were identified and result in gene content differences among humans. While the segmental duplications of chromosome 16 are enriched in the relatively gene poor pericentromere of the p-arm, some are involved in recent gene duplication and conversion events likely to have had an impact on the evolution of primates and human disease susceptibility.

  7. Chromosomes and their meiotic behaviour in two species of Dieuches Dohrn, 1860 (Heteroptera: Lygaeidae: Rhyparochromini

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harbhajan Kaur

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The Lygaeidae (Heteroptera are a large and diverse family in which the male diploid chromosomal complement ranges from 10 to 30. Diploid numbers of 14 and 16 are taken as two modal numbers of the family. The Rhyparochrominae, one of the largest subfamilies of the Lygaeidae, are known to be heterogeneous both cytologically and morphologically. Available data on the tribe Rhyparochromini reveal that all species are characterized by the presence of a pair of microchromosomes (m-chromosomes and have an XY/XX (♂/♀ sex chromosome determining system. Dieuches coloratus (Distant, 1909 and D. insignis (Distant, 1918 belonging to Rhyparochromini, have 2n=14=10A+2m+XY and 2n=12=8A+2m+XY respectively. Both the species are similar inone pair of distinctly large autosomes in their chromosome complements. The metaphase plate arrangement of autosomes, sex chromosomes and m-chromosomes in D. coloratus is similar to the common condition observed in the tribe Rhyparochromini. In D. insignis, however, the arrangement is different. Here, metaphase I is usual in showing peripheral position of autosomes and central position of sex chromosomes and m-chromosomes. At metaphase II, however, autosomes, sex chromosomes and m-chromosomes are peripherally placed, an arrangement, which is not reported earlier in the tribe Rhyparochromini.

  8. SEM of canine chromosomes: normal structure and the effects of whole-body irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canine chromosomes are not only numerous (38 autosomal pairs), but they are small (compared to human chromosomes) and morphologically similar as well. Analysis of the canine karyotype by light microscopy (LM) of banded chromosomes is, thus, difficult, and the literature on the canine karyotype is scanty. In this study, we describe examination of chromosomes from normal and chronically irradiated dogs with the scanning electron microscope (SEM). Metaphase chromosomes from bone marrow aspirates were Giemsa-banded with either 0.025% trypsin alone or 0.1% trypsin preceded by 10% H2O2 and prepared for SEM. Examination of chromosomes from normal dogs revealed cylindrical chromosome profiles with well-defined chromatids and centromeres. The chromosome arms were consistently marked by periodic grooves that had complementary structures on sister chromatids and may represent the trypsin-sensitive chromatic regions. The quality of the preservation varied from preparation to preparation and depended on the concentration and time of trypsin treatment. Chromosomes from irradiated dogs revealed translocations, deletions, and gaps. We conclude that SEM produces images superior to LM images of canine chromosomes; SEM images can be used not only to identify individual chromosomes, but also to identify genetic lesions in the chromosomes of chronically irradiated dogs. We further conclude that the two Giemsa-banding protocols used in the present study produced variable results, although 0.025% trypsin alone appeared to give better and more consistent results than 0.1% trypsin preceded by 10% H2O2

  9. Secure pairing with biometrics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buhan, I.R.; Boom, B.J.; Doumen, J.M.; Hartel, P.H.; Veldhuis, R.N.J.

    2009-01-01

    Secure pairing enables two devices that share no prior context with each other to agree upon a security association, which they can use to protect their subsequent communication. Secure pairing offers guarantees of the association partner identity and it should be resistant to eavesdropping and to a

  10. Chromosome mapping of repetitive sequences in Anostomidae species: implications for genomic and sex chromosome evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    da Silva Edson Lourenço

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Members of the Anostomidae family provide an interesting model system for the study of the influence of repetitive elements on genome composition, mainly because they possess numerous heterochromatic segments and a peculiar system of female heterogamety that is restricted to a few species of the Leporinus genus. The aim of this study was to isolate and identify important new repetitive DNA elements in Anostomidae through restriction enzyme digestion, followed by cloning, characterisation and chromosome mapping of this fragment. To identify repetitive elements in other Leporinus species and expand on studies of repetitive elements in Anostomidae, hybridisation experiments were also performed using previously described probes of LeSpeI repetitive elements. Results The 628-base pair (bp LeSpeII fragment was hybridised to metaphase cells of L. elongatus individuals as well as those of L. macrocephalus, L. obtusidens, L. striatus, L. lacustris, L. friderici, Schizodon borellii and S. isognathus. In L. elongatus, both male and female cells contained small clusters of LeSpeII repetitive elements dispersed on all of the chromosomes, with enrichment near most of the terminal portions of the chromosomes. In the female sex chromosomes of L. elongatus (Z2,Z2/W1W2, however, this repeated element was absent. In the remaining species, a dispersed pattern of hybridisation was observed on all chromosomes irrespective of whether or not they were sex chromosomes. The repetitive element LeSpeI produced positive hybridisations signals only in L. elongatus, L. macrocephalus and L. obtusidens, i.e., species with differentiated sex chromosomes. In the remaining species, the LeSpeI element did not produce hybridisation signals. Conclusions Results are discussed in terms of the effects of repetitive sequences on the differentiation of the Anostomidae genome, especially with respect to sex chromosome evolution. LeSpeII showed hybridisation patterns

  11. Critical Schwinger Pair Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gies, Holger; Torgrimsson, Greger

    2016-03-01

    We investigate Schwinger pair production in spatially inhomogeneous electric backgrounds. A critical point for the onset of pair production can be approached by fields that marginally provide sufficient electrostatic energy for an off-shell long-range electron-positron fluctuation to become a real pair. Close to this critical point, we observe features of universality which are analogous to continuous phase transitions in critical phenomena with the pair-production rate serving as an order parameter: electric backgrounds can be subdivided into universality classes and the onset of pair production exhibits characteristic scaling laws. An appropriate design of the electric background field can interpolate between power-law scaling, essential Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless-type scaling, and a power-law scaling with log corrections. The corresponding critical exponents only depend on the large-scale features of the electric background, whereas the microscopic details of the background play the role of irrelevant perturbations not affecting criticality. PMID:26991162

  12. Supernovae in paired galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Nazaryan, T A; Hakobyan, A A; Adibekyan, V Zh; Kunth, D; Mamon, G A; Turatto, M; Aramyan, L S

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the influence of close neighbor galaxies on the properties of supernovae (SNe) and their host galaxies using 56 SNe located in pairs of galaxies with different levels of star formation (SF) and nuclear activity. The mean distance of type II SNe from nuclei of hosts is greater by about a factor of 2 than that of type Ibc SNe. For the first time it is shown that SNe Ibc are located in pairs with significantly smaller difference of radial velocities between components than pairs containing SNe Ia and II. We consider this as a result of higher star formation rate (SFR) of these closer systems of galaxies. SN types are not correlated with the luminosity ratio of host and neighbor galaxies in pairs. The orientation of SNe with respect to the preferred direction toward neighbor galaxy is found to be isotropic and independent of kinematical properties of the galaxy pair.

  13. Chromosomal distribution of rDNA in Pan paniscus, Gorilla gorilla beringei, and Symphalangus syndactylus: comparison to related primates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henderson, A.S.; Atwood, K.C.; Warburton, D.

    1976-01-01

    Hybridization in situ was used to identify rDNA in chromosomes of the pygmy chimpanzee, mountain gorilla, and siamang gibbon. In contrast to other Pongids, and man, the gorilla has only two pairs of rDNA-containing chromosomes. The single pair in the siamang bears no resemblance to the nucleolar chromosome of the closely related lar gibbon. Pan paniscus and P. troglodytes have the same rDNA distribution, and similar karyotypes except in the structure of chromosome 23p. Grain counts over unbanded preparations show that the human, orangutan, and both chimpanzees have about the same total rDNA multiplicity.

  14. The DNA sequence and comparative analysis of human chromosome 10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deloukas, P; Earthrowl, M E; Grafham, D V; Rubenfield, M; French, L; Steward, C A; Sims, S K; Jones, M C; Searle, S; Scott, C; Howe, K; Hunt, S E; Andrews, T D; Gilbert, J G R; Swarbreck, D; Ashurst, J L; Taylor, A; Battles, J; Bird, C P; Ainscough, R; Almeida, J P; Ashwell, R I S; Ambrose, K D; Babbage, A K; Bagguley, C L; Bailey, J; Banerjee, R; Bates, K; Beasley, H; Bray-Allen, S; Brown, A J; Brown, J Y; Burford, D C; Burrill, W; Burton, J; Cahill, P; Camire, D; Carter, N P; Chapman, J C; Clark, S Y; Clarke, G; Clee, C M; Clegg, S; Corby, N; Coulson, A; Dhami, P; Dutta, I; Dunn, M; Faulkner, L; Frankish, A; Frankland, J A; Garner, P; Garnett, J; Gribble, S; Griffiths, C; Grocock, R; Gustafson, E; Hammond, S; Harley, J L; Hart, E; Heath, P D; Ho, T P; Hopkins, B; Horne, J; Howden, P J; Huckle, E; Hynds, C; Johnson, C; Johnson, D; Kana, A; Kay, M; Kimberley, A M; Kershaw, J K; Kokkinaki, M; Laird, G K; Lawlor, S; Lee, H M; Leongamornlert, D A; Laird, G; Lloyd, C; Lloyd, D M; Loveland, J; Lovell, J; McLaren, S; McLay, K E; McMurray, A; Mashreghi-Mohammadi, M; Matthews, L; Milne, S; Nickerson, T; Nguyen, M; Overton-Larty, E; Palmer, S A; Pearce, A V; Peck, A I; Pelan, S; Phillimore, B; Porter, K; Rice, C M; Rogosin, A; Ross, M T; Sarafidou, T; Sehra, H K; Shownkeen, R; Skuce, C D; Smith, M; Standring, L; Sycamore, N; Tester, J; Thorpe, A; Torcasso, W; Tracey, A; Tromans, A; Tsolas, J; Wall, M; Walsh, J; Wang, H; Weinstock, K; West, A P; Willey, D L; Whitehead, S L; Wilming, L; Wray, P W; Young, L; Chen, Y; Lovering, R C; Moschonas, N K; Siebert, R; Fechtel, K; Bentley, D; Durbin, R; Hubbard, T; Doucette-Stamm, L; Beck, S; Smith, D R; Rogers, J

    2004-05-27

    The finished sequence of human chromosome 10 comprises a total of 131,666,441 base pairs. It represents 99.4% of the euchromatic DNA and includes one megabase of heterochromatic sequence within the pericentromeric region of the short and long arm of the chromosome. Sequence annotation revealed 1,357 genes, of which 816 are protein coding, and 430 are pseudogenes. We observed widespread occurrence of overlapping coding genes (either strand) and identified 67 antisense transcripts. Our analysis suggests that both inter- and intrachromosomal segmental duplications have impacted on the gene count on chromosome 10. Multispecies comparative analysis indicated that we can readily annotate the protein-coding genes with current resources. We estimate that over 95% of all coding exons were identified in this study. Assessment of single base changes between the human chromosome 10 and chimpanzee sequence revealed nonsense mutations in only 21 coding genes with respect to the human sequence. PMID:15164054

  15. Chromosomal analysis of Physalaemus kroyeri and Physalaemus cicada (Anura, Leptodactylidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vittorazzi, Stenio Eder; Lourenço, Luciana Bolsoni; Solé, Mirco; Faria, Renato Gomes; Recco-Pimentel, Shirlei Maria

    2016-01-01

    Abstract All the species of Physalaemus Fitzinger, 1826 karyotyped up until now have been classified as 2n = 22. The species of the Physalaemus cuvieri group analyzed by C-banding present a block of heterochromatin in the interstitial region of the short arm of pair 5. Physalaemus cicada Bokermann, 1966 has been considered to be a member of the Physalaemus cuvieri species group, although its interspecific phylogenetic relationships remain unknown. The PcP190 satellite DNA has been mapped on the chromosomes of most of the species of the Physalaemus cuvieri group. For two species, Physalaemus cicada and Physalaemus kroyeri (Reinhardt & Lütken, 1862), however, only the chromosome number and morphology are known. Given this, the objective of the present study was to analyze the chromosomes of Physalaemus cicada and Physalaemus kroyeri, primarily by C-banding and PcP190 mapping. The results indicate that Physalaemus kroyeri and Physalaemus cicada have similar karyotypes, which were typical of Physalaemus. In both species, the NORs are located on the long arm of pair 8, and the C-banding indicated that, among other features, Physalaemus kroyeri has the interstitial band on chromosome 5, which is however absent in Physalaemus cicada. Even so, a number of telomeric bands were observed in Physalaemus cicada. The mapping of the PcP190 satellite DNA highlighted areas of the centromeric region of the chromosomes of pair 1 in both species, although in Physalaemus kroyeri, heteromorphism was also observed in pair 3. The cytogenetic evidence does not support the inclusion of Physalaemus cicada in the Physalaemus cuvieri group. In the case of Physalaemus kroyeri, the interstitial band on pair 5 is consistent with the existence of a cytogenetic synapomorphy in the Physalaemus cuvieri species group. PMID:27551351

  16. Paired arrangement of kinetochores together with microtubule pivoting and dynamics drive kinetochore capture in meiosis I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cojoc, Gheorghe; Florescu, Ana-Maria; Krull, Alexander; Klemm, Anna H; Pavin, Nenad; Jülicher, Frank; Tolić, Iva M

    2016-01-01

    Kinetochores are protein complexes on the chromosomes, whose function as linkers between spindle microtubules and chromosomes is crucial for proper cell division. The mechanisms that facilitate kinetochore capture by microtubules are still unclear. In the present study, we combine experiments and theory to explore the mechanisms of kinetochore capture at the onset of meiosis I in fission yeast. We show that kinetochores on homologous chromosomes move together, microtubules are dynamic and pivot around the spindle pole, and the average capture time is 3-4 minutes. Our theory describes paired kinetochores on homologous chromosomes as a single object, as well as angular movement of microtubules and their dynamics. For the experimentally measured parameters, the model reproduces the measured capture kinetics and shows that the paired configuration of kinetochores accelerates capture, whereas microtubule pivoting and dynamics have a smaller contribution. Kinetochore pairing may be a general feature that increases capture efficiency in meiotic cells. PMID:27166749

  17. A syntenic region conserved from fish to Mammalian x chromosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Guijun; Yi, Meisheng; Kobayashi, Tohru; Hong, Yunhan; Nagahama, Yoshitaka

    2014-01-01

    Sex chromosomes bearing the sex-determining gene initiate development along the male or female pathway, no matter which sex is determined by XY male or ZW female heterogamety. Sex chromosomes originate from ancient autosomes but evolved rapidly after the acquisition of sex-determining factors which are highly divergent between species. In the heterogametic male system (XY system), the X chromosome is relatively evolutionary silent and maintains most of its ancestral genes, in contrast to its Y counterpart that has evolved rapidly and degenerated. Sex in a teleost fish, the Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus), is determined genetically via an XY system, in which an unpaired region is present in the largest chromosome pair. We defined the differences in DNA contents present in this chromosome with a two-color comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) and the random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) approach in XY males. We further identified a syntenic segment within this region that is well conserved in several teleosts. Through comparative genome analysis, this syntenic segment was also shown to be present in mammalian X chromosomes, suggesting a common ancestral origin of vertebrate sex chromosomes. PMID:25506037

  18. A Syntenic Region Conserved from Fish to Mammalian X Chromosome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guijun Guan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Sex chromosomes bearing the sex-determining gene initiate development along the male or female pathway, no matter which sex is determined by XY male or ZW female heterogamety. Sex chromosomes originate from ancient autosomes but evolved rapidly after the acquisition of sex-determining factors which are highly divergent between species. In the heterogametic male system (XY system, the X chromosome is relatively evolutionary silent and maintains most of its ancestral genes, in contrast to its Y counterpart that has evolved rapidly and degenerated. Sex in a teleost fish, the Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus, is determined genetically via an XY system, in which an unpaired region is present in the largest chromosome pair. We defined the differences in DNA contents present in this chromosome with a two-color comparative genomic hybridization (CGH and the random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD approach in XY males. We further identified a syntenic segment within this region that is well conserved in several teleosts. Through comparative genome analysis, this syntenic segment was also shown to be present in mammalian X chromosomes, suggesting a common ancestral origin of vertebrate sex chromosomes.

  19. Electron pairing without superconductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Jeremy

    Strontium titanate (SrTiO3) is the first and best known superconducting semiconductor. It exhibits an extremely low carrier density threshold for superconductivity, and possesses a phase diagram similar to that of high-temperature superconductors--two factors that suggest an unconventional pairing mechanism. Despite sustained interest for 50 years, direct experimental insight into the nature of electron pairing in SrTiO3 has remained elusive. Here we perform transport experiments with nanowire-based single-electron transistors at the interface between SrTiO3 and a thin layer of lanthanum aluminate, LaAlO3. Electrostatic gating reveals a series of two-electron conductance resonances--paired electron states--that bifurcate above a critical pairing field Bp of about 1-4 tesla, an order of magnitude larger than the superconducting critical magnetic field. For magnetic fields below Bp, these resonances are insensitive to the applied magnetic field; for fields in excess of Bp, the resonances exhibit a linear Zeeman-like energy splitting. Electron pairing is stable at temperatures as high as 900 millikelvin, well above the superconducting transition temperature (about 300 millikelvin). These experiments demonstrate the existence of a robust electronic phase in which electrons pair without forming a superconducting state. Key experimental signatures are captured by a model involving an attractive Hubbard interaction that describes real-space electron pairing as a precursor to superconductivity. Support from AFOSR, ONR, ARO, NSF, DOE and NSSEFF is gratefully acknowledged.

  20. Chromosome numbers in Bromeliaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cotias-de-Oliveira Ana Lúcia Pires

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study reports chromosome numbers of 17 species of Bromeliaceae, belonging to the genera Encholirium, Bromelia, Orthophytum, Hohenbergia, Billbergia, Neoglaziovia, Aechmea, Cryptanthus and Ananas. Most species present 2n = 50, however, Bromelia laciniosa, Orthophytum burle-marxii and O. maracasense are polyploids with 2n = 150, 2n = 100 and 2n = 150, respectively, while for Cryptanthus bahianus, 2n = 34 + 1-4B. B chromosomes were observed in Bromelia plumieri and Hohenbergia aff. utriculosa. The chromosome number of all species was determined for the first time, except for Billbergia chlorosticta and Cryptanthus bahianus. Our data supports the hypothesis of a basic number of x = 25 for the Bromeliaceae family and decreasing aneuploidy in the genus Cryptanthus.

  1. Those amazing dinoflagellate chromosomes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PETER J RIZZO

    2003-01-01

    Dinoflagellates are a very large and diverse group of eukaryotic algae that play a major role in aquatic food webs of both fresh water and marine habitats. Moreover, the toxic members of this group pose a health threat in the form of red tides. Finally, dinoflagellates are of great evolutionary importance,because of their taxonomic position, and their unusual chromosome structure and composition. While the cytoplasm of dinoflagellates is typically eukaryotic, the nucleus is unique when compared to the nucleus of other eukaryotes. More specifically, while the chromosomes of all other eukaryotes contain histones,dinoflagellate chromosomes lack histones completely. There are no known exceptions to this observation: all dinoflagellates lack histones, and all other eukaryotes contain histones. Nevertheless, dinoflagellates remain a relatively unstudied group of eukaryotes.

  2. Subradiant split Cooper pairs

    OpenAIRE

    Cottet, Audrey; Kontos, Takis; Yeyati, Alfredo Levy

    2011-01-01

    We suggest a way to characterize the coherence of the split Cooper pairs emitted by a double-quantum-dot based Cooper pair splitter (CPS), by studying the radiative response of such a CPS inside a microwave cavity. The coherence of the split pairs manifests in a strongly nonmonotonic variation of the emitted radiation as a function of the parameters controlling the coupling of the CPS to the cavity. The idea to probe the coherence of the electronic states using the tools of Cavity Quantum Ele...

  3. Ultrastructural characterization of the sex chromosomes during spermatogenesis of spiders having holocentric chromosomes and a long diffuse stage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benavente, R; Wettstein, R

    1980-01-01

    An ultrastructural study has been made of spermatogenesis in two species of primitive spiders having holocentric chromosomes (Dysdera crocata, male X0 and Sergestria florentia X1X2O). Analysis of the meiotic prophase shows a scarcity or absence of typical leptotene to pachytene stages. Only in D. crocata have synaptonemal complex (SC) remnants been seen, and these occurred in nuclei with an extreme chromatin decondensation. In both species typical early prophase stages have been replaced by nuclei lacking SC and with their chromatin almost completely decondensed, constituting a long and well-defined diffuse stage. Only nucleoli and the condensed sex chromosomes can be identified. - In S. florentina paired non-homologous sex chromosomes lack a junction lamina and thus clearly differ from the sex chromosomes of more evolved spiders with an X1X20 male sex determination mechanism. In the same species, sex chromosomes can be recognized during metaphase I due to their special structural details, while in D. crocata the X chromosome is not distinguishable from the autosomes at this stage. - The diffuse stage and particularly the structural characteristics of the sex chromosomes during meiotic prophase are reviewed and discussed in relation to the meiotic process in other arachnid goups. PMID:7371451

  4. Chromosomal rearrangements in cattle and pigs revealed by chromosome microdissection and chromosome painting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yerle Martine

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A pericentric inversion of chromosome 4 in a boar, as well as a case of (2q-;5p+ translocation mosaicism in a bull were analysed by chromosome painting using probes generated by conventional microdissection. For the porcine inversion, probes specific for p arms and q arms were produced and hybridised simultaneously on metaphases of a heterozygote carrier. In the case of the bovine translocation, two whole chromosome probes (chromosome 5, and derived chromosome 5 were elaborated and hybridised independently on chromosomal preparations of the bull who was a carrier of the mosaic translocation. The impossibility of differentiating chromosomes 2 and der(2 from other chromosomes of the metaphases did not allow the production of painting probes for these chromosomes. For all experiments, the quality of painting was comparable to that usually observed with probes obtained from flow-sorted chromosomes. The results obtained allowed confirmation of the interpretations proposed with G-banding karyotype analyses. In the bovine case, however, the reciprocity of the translocation could not be proven. The results presented in this paper show the usefulness of the microdissection technique for characterising chromosomal rearrangements in species for which commercial probes are not available. They also confirmed that the main limiting factor of the technique is the quality of the chromosomal preparations, which does not allow the identification of target chromosomes or chromosome fragments in all cases.

  5. Development of EST-PCR Markers for the Chromosome 4VofHaynaldia villosaand Their Application in Identification of 4V Chromosome Structural Aberrants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Ren-hui; WANG Hai-yan; JIA Qi; XIAO Jin; YUAN Chun-xia; ZHANG Ya-jun; HU Qing-shan; WANG Xiu-e

    2014-01-01

    EST-PCR based molecular markers speciifc for alien chromosomes are not only useful for the detection of the introgressed alien chromatin in the wheat background, but also provide evidence of the syntenic relationship between homoeologous chromosomes. In the present study, in order to develop high density and evenly distributed molecular markers on chromosome 4V ofHaynaldia villosa, a total of 607 primer pairs were designed according to the EST sequences, which were previously located in 23 different bins of wheat chromosomes 4A, 4B and 4D. By using theTriticum durum-H. villosaamphiploid and T. aestivum-H. villosa alien chromosome lines involving chromosome 4V, it was found that 9.23% of the tested primers could amplify speciifc bands for chromosome 4V. Thirty and twenty-six speciifc markers could be assigned to chromosome arms 4VS and 4VL, respectively. These 4V speciifc markers provided efifcient tools for the characterization of structural variation involving the chromosome 4V as well as for the selection of useful genes located on chromosome 4V in breeding programs.

  6. Resolution and evolution of the duck-billed platypus karyotype with an X1Y1X2Y2X3Y3X4Y4X5Y5 male sex chromosome constitution

    OpenAIRE

    Rens, Willem; Grützner, Frank; O'Brien, Patricia C. M.; Fairclough, Helen; Graves, Jennifer A.M.; Ferguson-Smith, Malcolm A

    2004-01-01

    The platypus (2n = 52) has a complex karyotype that has been controversial over the last three decades. The presence of unpaired chromosomes and an unknown sex-determining system especially has defied attempts at conventional analysis. This article reports on the preparation of chromosome-specific probes from flow-sorted chromosomes and their application in the identification and classification of all platypus chromosomes. This work reveals that the male karyotype has 21 pairs of chromosomes ...

  7. Effects of heavy-ion beams on chromosomes of common wheat, Triticum aestivum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kikuchi, Shinji; Saito, Yoshinaka [Laboratory of Plant Genetics and Breeding Science, Faculty of Agriculture, Tottori University, 4-101 Koyama-Minami, Tottori 680-8553 (Japan); Ryuto, Hiromichi; Fukunishi, Nobuhisa; Abe, Tomoko [RIKEN Nishina Center, RIKEN, Hirosawa, Wako 351-0198 (Japan); Tanaka, Hiroyuki [Laboratory of Plant Genetics and Breeding Science, Faculty of Agriculture, Tottori University, 4-101 Koyama-Minami, Tottori 680-8553 (Japan); Tsujimoto, Hisashi, E-mail: tsujim@muses.tottori-u.ac.jp [Laboratory of Plant Genetics and Breeding Science, Faculty of Agriculture, Tottori University, 4-101 Koyama-Minami, Tottori 680-8553 (Japan)

    2009-10-02

    To investigate the nature of plant chromosomes irradiated by heavy-ion beams, the effects of nitrogen (N) and neon (Ne) ion beams on hexaploid wheat chromosomes were compared with those of X-ray. Chromosome aberrations, such as short, ring and dicentric chromosomes appeared in high frequency. The average numbers of chromosome breaks at LD-50 by irradiation with X-ray, N and Ne ion beams were 32, 20 and 20, respectively. These values may be underestimated because chromosome rearrangement without change in chromosome morphology was not counted. Thus, we subsequently used a wheat line with a pair of extra chromosomes from an alien species (Leymus racemosus) and observed the fate of the irradiated marker chromosomes by genomic in situ hybridization. This analysis revealed that 50 Gy of neon beam induced about eight times more breaks than those induced by X-ray. This result suggests that heavy-ion beams induce chromosome rearrangement in high frequency rather than loss of gene function. This suggests further that most of the novel mutations produced by ion beam irradiation, which have been used in plant breeding, may not be caused by ordinary gene disruption but by chromosome rearrangements.

  8. Major Chromosomal Rearrangements Distinguish Willow and Poplar After the Ancestral "Salicoid" Genome Duplication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Jing; Ye, Ning; Dong, Zhongyuan; Lu, Mengzhu; Li, Laigeng; Yin, Tongming

    2016-01-01

    Populus (poplar) and Salix (willow) are sister genera in the Salicaceae family. In both lineages extant species are predominantly diploid. Genome analysis previously revealed that the two lineages originated from a common tetraploid ancestor. In this study, we conducted a syntenic comparison of the corresponding 19 chromosome members of the poplar and willow genomes. Our observations revealed that almost every chromosomal segment had a parallel paralogous segment elsewhere in the genomes, and the two lineages shared a similar syntenic pinwheel pattern for most of the chromosomes, which indicated that the two lineages diverged after the genome reorganization in the common progenitor. The pinwheel patterns showed distinct differences for two chromosome pairs in each lineage. Further analysis detected two major interchromosomal rearrangements that distinguished the karyotypes of willow and poplar. Chromosome I of willow was a conjunction of poplar chromosome XVI and the lower portion of poplar chromosome I, whereas willow chromosome XVI corresponded to the upper portion of poplar chromosome I. Scientists have suggested that Populus is evolutionarily more primitive than Salix. Therefore, we propose that, after the "salicoid" duplication event, fission and fusion of the ancestral chromosomes first give rise to the diploid progenitor of extant Populus species. During the evolutionary process, fission and fusion of poplar chromosomes I and XVI subsequently give rise to the progenitor of extant Salix species. This study contributes to an improved understanding of genome divergence after ancient genome duplication in closely related lineages of higher plants. PMID:27352946

  9. Major Chromosomal Rearrangements Distinguish Willow and Poplar After the Ancestral “Salicoid” Genome Duplication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Jing; Ye, Ning; Dong, Zhongyuan; Lu, Mengzhu; Li, Laigeng; Yin, Tongming

    2016-01-01

    Populus (poplar) and Salix (willow) are sister genera in the Salicaceae family. In both lineages extant species are predominantly diploid. Genome analysis previously revealed that the two lineages originated from a common tetraploid ancestor. In this study, we conducted a syntenic comparison of the corresponding 19 chromosome members of the poplar and willow genomes. Our observations revealed that almost every chromosomal segment had a parallel paralogous segment elsewhere in the genomes, and the two lineages shared a similar syntenic pinwheel pattern for most of the chromosomes, which indicated that the two lineages diverged after the genome reorganization in the common progenitor. The pinwheel patterns showed distinct differences for two chromosome pairs in each lineage. Further analysis detected two major interchromosomal rearrangements that distinguished the karyotypes of willow and poplar. Chromosome I of willow was a conjunction of poplar chromosome XVI and the lower portion of poplar chromosome I, whereas willow chromosome XVI corresponded to the upper portion of poplar chromosome I. Scientists have suggested that Populus is evolutionarily more primitive than Salix. Therefore, we propose that, after the “salicoid” duplication event, fission and fusion of the ancestral chromosomes first give rise to the diploid progenitor of extant Populus species. During the evolutionary process, fission and fusion of poplar chromosomes I and XVI subsequently give rise to the progenitor of extant Salix species. This study contributes to an improved understanding of genome divergence after ancient genome duplication in closely related lineages of higher plants. PMID:27352946

  10. Highly distinct chromosomal structures in cowpea (Vigna unguiculata), as revealed by molecular cytogenetic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwata-Otsubo, Aiko; Lin, Jer-Young; Gill, Navdeep; Jackson, Scott A

    2016-05-01

    Cowpea (Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp) is an important legume, particularly in developing countries. However, little is known about its genome or chromosome structure. We used molecular cytogenetics to characterize the structure of pachytene chromosomes to advance our knowledge of chromosome and genome organization of cowpea. Our data showed that cowpea has highly distinct chromosomal structures that are cytologically visible as brightly DAPI-stained heterochromatic regions. Analysis of the repetitive fraction of the cowpea genome present at centromeric and pericentromeric regions confirmed that two retrotransposons are major components of pericentromeric regions and that a 455-bp tandem repeat is found at seven out of 11 centromere pairs in cowpea. These repeats likely evolved after the divergence of cowpea from common bean and form chromosomal structure unique to cowpea. The integration of cowpea genetic and physical chromosome maps reveals potential regions of suppressed recombination due to condensed heterochromatin and a lack of pairing in a few chromosomal termini. This study provides fundamental knowledge on cowpea chromosome structure and molecular cytogenetics tools for further chromosome studies. PMID:26758200

  11. Supernumerary chromosomes on Southern European populations of the cockle Cerastoderma edule: Consequence of environmental pollution?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitão, Alexandra; Chaves, Raquel; Joaquim, Sandra; Matias, Domitília; Ruano, Francisco; Guedes-Pinto, Henrique

    2008-08-01

    Cerastoderma edule (Cardiidae) has a diploid chromosome number of 2 n = 38, its karyotype consisting of 12 submetacentric, 4 subtelocentric and 3 telocentric chromosome pairs. Hyperdiploid cells had previously been observed in two populations of the Northern Galician coasts (northwest of Spain). The supernumerary chromosomes being easily distinguished by their reduced differentiated size and by their intra- and inter-individual variability. After the recent observation of 35% of cells with supernumerary chromosomes in a population of the Southern Galician coasts (Vigo) and 15% of cells with supernumerary chromosomes in a population of the south of Portugal (Ria Formosa, Algarve), we attempted, in this paper, an elucidation of the nature of these supernumerary chromosomes, by differential banding technique with restriction enzymes on these hyperdiploid cells. Analysis of the restriction enzyme banding of the 2 n > 38 karyotypes led us to propose the occurrence of a chromosomal fission event involving the largest submetacentric chromosome pair. This study represents the first description of the occurrence of a possible chromosomal fission in marine bivalves. Different levels of environmental pollution are suggested as possible explanation for the differences observed on the proportion of hyperdiploid cells between the Southern Portugal population and the three Galician ones.

  12. Ring chromosome 13

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, C A; Hertz, Jens Michael; Petersen, M B; Vogel, F; Noer, H; Mikkelsen, M

    1992-01-01

    A stillborn male child with anencephaly and multiple malformations was found to have the karyotype 46,XY,r(13) (p11q21.1). The breakpoint at 13q21.1, determined by high resolution banding, is the most proximal breakpoint ever reported in patients with ring chromosome 13. In situ hybridisation with...

  13. The Y Chromosome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Offner, Susan

    2010-01-01

    The Y chromosome is of great interest to students and can be used to teach about many important biological concepts in addition to sex determination. This paper discusses mutation, recombination, mammalian sex determination, sex determination in general, and the evolution of sex determination in mammals. It includes a student activity that…

  14. Chromosomes, cancer and radiosensitivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samouhos, E.

    1983-08-01

    Some specific chromosomal abnormalities are associated with certain cancers. The earliest description of such a specific association is the one of the Philadelphia chromosome and myelogenous leukemia (1960). Other congenital karyotype abnormalities are associated with specific cancers. Examples of these are Down's syndrome with leukemia and Klinefelter's syndrome with male breast cancer. Genetic diseases of increased chromosome breakage, or of defective chromosome repair, are associated with greatly increased cancer incidence. Three such diseases have been recognized: 1) Fanconi's anemia, associated with leukemias and lymphomas, 2) Bloom's syndrome, associated with acute leukemias and lymphosarcoma, and 3) ataxia telangiectasia, associated with Hodgkin's disease, leukemia, and lymphosarcomas. Ten percent of individuals with ataxia telangiectasia will develop one of these neoplasms. Individuals with certain of these syndromes display an unusually high radiosensitivity. Radiation therapy for cancers has been fatal in patients who received as low as 3000 rad. This remarkable radiosensitivity has been quantitated in cell cultures from such cases. Evidence suggests that the apparent sensitivity may reflect subnormal ability to repair radiation damage. The rapid proliferation of information in this field stems from the interdigitation of many disciplines and specialties, including cytogenetics, cell biology, molecular biology, epidemiology, radiobiology, and several others. This paper is intended for clinicians; it presents a structured analytic scheme for correlating and classifying this multidisciplinary information as it becomes available.

  15. Chromosomes, cancer and radiosensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some specific chromosomal abnormalities are associated with certain cancers. The earliest description of such a specific association is the one of the Philadelphia chromosome and myelogenous leukemia (1960). Other congenital karyotype abnormalities are associated with specific cancers. Examples of these are Down's syndrome with leukemia and Klinefelter's syndrome with male breast cancer. Genetic diseases of increased chromosome breakage, or of defective chromosome repair, are associated with greatly increased cancer incidence. Three such diseases have been recognized: 1) Fanconi's anemia, associated with leukemias and lymphomas, 2) Bloom's syndrome, associated with acute leukemias and lymphosarcoma, and 3) ataxia telangiectasia, associated with Hodgkin's disease, leukemia, and lymphosarcomas. Ten percent of individuals with ataxia telangiectasia will develop one of these neoplasms. Individuals with certain of these syndromes display an unusually high radiosensitivity. Radiation therapy for cancers has been fatal in patients who received as low as 3000 rad. This remarkable radiosensitivity has been quantitated in cell cultures from such cases. Evidence suggests that the apparent sensitivity may reflect subnormal ability to repair radiation damage. The rapid proliferation of information in this field stems from the interdigitation of many disciplines and specialties, including cytogenetics, cell biology, molecular biology, epidemiology, radiobiology, and several others. This paper is intended for clinicians; it presents a structured analytic scheme for correlating and classifying this multidisciplinary information as it becomes available

  16. Chromosome Morphology in Kniphofia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. J de Wet

    1960-12-01

    Full Text Available A number of species and varieties of the genus  Kniphofia (Liliaceae were studied cytologically. The somatic chromosome number is  2n = 12 in all the species. This is also true in  Notosceptrum natalense Baker.

  17. Chromosome mapping of repetitive sequences in four Serrasalmidae species (Characiformes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Leila Braga; Matoso, Daniele Aparecida; Feldberg, Eliana

    2014-03-01

    The Serrasalmidae family is composed of a number of commercially interesting species, mainly in the Amazon region where most of these fishes occur. In the present study, we investigated the genomic organization of the 18S and 5S rDNA and telomeric sequences in mitotic chromosomes of four species from the basal clade of the Serrasalmidae family: Colossoma macropomum, Mylossoma aureum, M. duriventre, and Piaractus mesopotamicus, in order to understand the chromosomal evolution in the family. All the species studied had diploid numbers 2n = 54 and exclusively biarmed chromosomes, but variations of the karyotypic formulas were observed. C-banding resulted in similar patterns among the analyzed species, with heterochromatic blocks mainly present in centromeric regions. The 18S rDNA mapping of C. macropomum and P. mesopotamicus revealed multiple sites of this gene; 5S rDNA sites were detected in two chromosome pairs in all species, although not all of them were homeologs. Hybridization with a telomeric probe revealed signals in the terminal portions of chromosomes in all the species and an interstitial signal was observed in one pair of C. macropomum. PMID:24688290

  18. Chromosome mapping of repetitive sequences in four Serrasalmidae species (Characiformes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Braga Ribeiro

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The Serrasalmidae family is composed of a number of commercially interesting species, mainly in the Amazon region where most of these fishes occur. In the present study, we investigated the genomic organization of the 18S and 5S rDNA and telomeric sequences in mitotic chromosomes of four species from the basal clade of the Serrasalmidae family: Colossoma macropomum, Mylossoma aureum, M. duriventre, and Piaractus mesopotamicus, in order to understand the chromosomal evolution in the family. All the species studied had diploid numbers 2n = 54 and exclusively biarmed chromosomes, but variations of the karyotypic formulas were observed. C-banding resulted in similar patterns among the analyzed species, with heterochromatic blocks mainly present in centromeric regions. The 18S rDNA mapping of C. macropomum and P. mesopotamicus revealed multiple sites of this gene; 5S rDNA sites were detected in two chromosome pairs in all species, although not all of them were homeologs. Hybridization with a telomeric probe revealed signals in the terminal portions of chromosomes in all the species and an interstitial signal was observed in one pair of C. macropomum.

  19. Telomere dysfunction and chromosome instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murnane, John P., E-mail: jmurnane@radonc.ucsf.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California San Francisco, 2340 Sutter Street, San Francisco, CA 94143-1331 (United States)

    2012-02-01

    The ends of chromosomes are composed of a short repeat sequence and associated proteins that together form a cap, called a telomere, that keeps the ends from appearing as double-strand breaks (DSBs) and prevents chromosome fusion. The loss of telomeric repeat sequences or deficiencies in telomeric proteins can result in chromosome fusion and lead to chromosome instability. The similarity between chromosome rearrangements resulting from telomere loss and those found in cancer cells implicates telomere loss as an important mechanism for the chromosome instability contributing to human cancer. Telomere loss in cancer cells can occur through gradual shortening due to insufficient telomerase, the protein that maintains telomeres. However, cancer cells often have a high rate of spontaneous telomere loss despite the expression of telomerase, which has been proposed to result from a combination of oncogene-mediated replication stress and a deficiency in DSB repair in telomeric regions. Chromosome fusion in mammalian cells primarily involves nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ), which is the major form of DSB repair. Chromosome fusion initiates chromosome instability involving breakage-fusion-bridge (B/F/B) cycles, in which dicentric chromosomes form bridges and break as the cell attempts to divide, repeating the process in subsequent cell cycles. Fusion between sister chromatids results in large inverted repeats on the end of the chromosome, which amplify further following additional B/F/B cycles. B/F/B cycles continue until the chromosome acquires a new telomere, most often by translocation of the end of another chromosome. The instability is not confined to a chromosome that loses its telomere, because the instability is transferred to the chromosome donating a translocation. Moreover, the amplified regions are unstable and form extrachromosomal DNA that can reintegrate at new locations. Knowledge concerning the factors promoting telomere loss and its consequences is

  20. Organization of the bacterial chromosome.

    OpenAIRE

    Krawiec, S.; Riley, M

    1990-01-01

    Recent progress in studies on the bacterial chromosome is summarized. Although the greatest amount of information comes from studies on Escherichia coli, reports on studies of many other bacteria are also included. A compilation of the sizes of chromosomal DNAs as determined by pulsed-field electrophoresis is given, as well as a discussion of factors that affect gene dosage, including redundancy of chromosomes on the one hand and inactivation of chromosomes on the other hand. The distinction ...

  1. Germline progenitors escape the widespread phenomenon of homolog pairing during Drosophila development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric F Joyce

    Full Text Available Homolog pairing, which plays a critical role in meiosis, poses a potential risk if it occurs in inappropriate tissues or between nonallelic sites, as it can lead to changes in gene expression, chromosome entanglements, and loss-of-heterozygosity due to mitotic recombination. This is particularly true in Drosophila, which supports organismal-wide pairing throughout development. Discovered over a century ago, such extensive pairing has led to the perception that germline pairing in the adult gonad is an extension of the pairing established during embryogenesis and, therefore, differs from the mechanism utilized in most species to initiate pairing specifically in the germline. Here, we show that, contrary to long-standing assumptions, Drosophila meiotic pairing in the gonad is not an extension of pairing established during embryogenesis. Instead, we find that homologous chromosomes are unpaired in primordial germ cells from the moment the germline can be distinguished from the soma in the embryo and remain unpaired even in the germline stem cells of the adult gonad. We further establish that pairing originates immediately after the stem cell stage. This pairing occurs well before the initiation of meiosis and, strikingly, continues through the several mitotic divisions preceding meiosis. These discoveries indicate that the spatial organization of the Drosophila genome differs between the germline and the soma from the earliest moments of development and thus argue that homolog pairing in the germline is an active process as versus a passive continuation of pairing established during embryogenesis.

  2. Distinctiveness in chromosomal behaviour in interspecific hybrid genotypes of cotton

    OpenAIRE

    A.W. More and U.G. Kulkarni

    2010-01-01

    Cytological studies in interspecific hybrid derivatives of cotton viz., IS-244/4/1 and IS-181/7/1 obtained in BC1F8generation of trispecies cross of [ (G. hirsutum x G. barbadanse )x G. arboreum] was carried out to find out thechromosome behaviour. During the meiosis variation in chromosome no. from 26 to 31 in IS-181/7/1 and 19 to 49 inIS244/4/1 was observed against the normal choromosomal behaviour of G. arboretum (2n == 26)and G. hirsutum (2n=4x=52).Chromosome pairing revealed the presence...

  3. Capillary electrophoresis: Biotechnology for separation of DNA and chromosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, George O., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    Electrophoresis has been used for the separation of particles, ions, and molecules for a number of years. The technology for separation and detection of the results has many applications in the life sciences. One of the major goals of the scientific community is to separate DNA molecules and intact chromosomes based upon their different lengths or number of base pairs. This may be achieved by using some of the commercially available and widely used methods, but these processes require a considerable amount of time. The challenge is to achieve separation of intact chromosomes in a short time, preferably in a matter of minutes.

  4. Comparative cytogenetics of six Indo-Pacific moray eels (Anguilliformes: Muraenidae) by chromosomal banding and fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coluccia, E; Deidda, F; Cannas, R; Lobina, C; Cuccu, D; Deiana, A M; Salvadori, S

    2015-09-01

    A comparative cytogenetic analysis, using both conventional staining techniques and fluorescence in situ hybridization, of six Indo-Pacific moray eels from three different genera (Gymnothorax fimbriatus, Gymnothorax flavimarginatus, Gymnothorax javanicus, Gymnothorax undulatus, Echidna nebulosa and Gymnomuraena zebra), was carried out to investigate the chromosomal differentiation in the family Muraenidae. Four species displayed a diploid chromosome number 2n = 42, which is common among the Muraenidae. Two other species, G. javanicus and G. flavimarginatus, were characterized by different chromosome numbers (2n = 40 and 2n = 36). For most species, a large amount of constitutive heterochromatin was detected in the chromosomes, with species-specific C-banding patterns that enabled pairing of the homologous chromosomes. In all species, the major ribosomal genes were localized in the guanine-cytosine-rich region of one chromosome pair, but in different chromosomal locations. The (TTAGGG)n telomeric sequences were mapped onto chromosomal ends in all muraenid species studied. The comparison of the results derived from this study with those available in the literature confirms a substantial conservation of the diploid chromosome number in the Muraenidae and supports the hypothesis that rearrangements have occurred that have diversified their karyotypes. Furthermore, the finding of two species with different diploid chromosome numbers suggests that additional chromosomal rearrangements, such as Robertsonian fusions, have occurred in the karyotype evolution of the Muraenidae. PMID:26242690

  5. A rapid molecular approach for chromosomal phasing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John F Regan

    Full Text Available Determining the chromosomal phase of pairs of sequence variants - the arrangement of specific alleles as haplotypes - is a routine challenge in molecular genetics. Here we describe Drop-Phase, a molecular method for quickly ascertaining the phase of pairs of DNA sequence variants (separated by 1-200 kb without cloning or manual single-molecule dilution. In each Drop-Phase reaction, genomic DNA segments are isolated in tens of thousands of nanoliter-sized droplets together with allele-specific fluorescence probes, in a single reaction well. Physically linked alleles partition into the same droplets, revealing their chromosomal phase in the co-distribution of fluorophores across droplets. We demonstrated the accuracy of this method by phasing members of trios (revealing 100% concordance with inheritance information, and demonstrate a common clinical application by phasing CFTR alleles at genomic distances of 11-116 kb in the genomes of cystic fibrosis patients. Drop-Phase is rapid (requiring less than 4 hours, scalable (to hundreds of samples, and effective at long genomic distances (200 kb.

  6. [Chromosomal organization of the genomes of small-chromosome plants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muravenko, O V; Zelenin, A V

    2009-11-01

    An effective approach to study the chromosome organization in genomes of plants with small chromosomes and/or with low-informative C-banding patterns was developed in the course of investigation of the karyotypes of cotton plant, camomile, flax, and pea. To increase the resolving power of chromosome analysis, methods were worked out for revealing early replication patterns on chromosomes and for artificial impairment of mitotic chromosome condensation with the use of a DNA intercalator, 9-aminoacridine (9-AMA). To estimate polymorphism of the patterns of C-banding of small chromosomes on preparations obtained with the use of 9-AMA, it is necessary to choose a length interval that must not exceed three average sizes of metaphase chromosomes without the intercalator. The use of 9-AMA increases the resolution of differential C- and OR-banding and the precision of physical chromosome mapping by the FISH method. Of particular importance in studying small chromosomes is optimization of the computer-aided methods used to obtain and process chromosome images. The complex approach developed for analysis of the chromosome organization in plant genomes was used to study the karyotypes of 24 species of the genus Linum L. It permitted their chromosomes to be identified for the first time, and, in addition, B chromosomes were discovered and studied in the karyotypes of the species of the section Syllinum. By similarity of the karyotypes, the studied flax species were distributed in eight groups in agreement with the clusterization of these species according to the results of RAPD analysis performed in parallel. Systematic positions and phylogenetic relationships of the studied flax species were verified. Out results can serve as an important argument in favour of the proposal to develop a special program for sequencing the genome of cultivated flax (L. usitatissimum L.), which is a major representative of small-chromosome species. PMID:20058798

  7. Au pair trajectories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalgas, Karina Märcher

    2015-01-01

    workers from the global South, the first article demonstrates how Facebook can be a fruitful methodological tool in the aspiration to open up the research to new themes of inquiry. However, rather than disregarding the au pairs’ economic problems, the dissertation shows how their family participation and......Since 2000, thousands of young Filipino migrants have come to Denmark as au pairs. Officially, they are there to “broaden their cultural horizons” by living temporarily with a Danish host family, but they also conduct domestic labor in exchange for food and money, which allows them to send...... pair-sending families in the Philippines, this dissertation examines the long-term trajectories of these young Filipinas. It shows how the au pairs’ local and transnational family relations develop over time and greatly influence their life trajectories. A focal point of the study is how au pairs...

  8. Supernovae in paired galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Nazaryan, T A; Hakobyan, A A; Adibekyan, V Zh; Kunth, D; Mamon, G A; Turatto, M; Aramyan, L S

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the influence of close neighbor galaxies on the properties of supernovae (SNe) and their host galaxies using 56 SNe located in pairs of galaxies with different levels of star formation (SF) and nuclear activity. The mean distance of type II SNe from nuclei of hosts is greater by about a factor of 2 than that of type Ibc SNe. The distributions and mean distances of SNe are consistent with previous results compiled with the larger sample. For the first time it is shown that SNe Ibc are located in pairs with significantly smaller difference of radial velocities between components than pairs containing SNe Ia and II. We consider this as a result of higher star formation rate (SFR) of these closer systems of galaxies.

  9. Preparation and Fluorescent Analysis of Plant Metaphase Chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarzacher, Trude

    2016-01-01

    Good preparations are essential for informative analysis of both somatic and meiotic chromosomes, cytogenetics, and cell divisions. Fluorescent chromosome staining allows even small chromosomes to be visualized and counted, showing their morphology. Aneuploidies and polyploidies can be established for species, populations, or individuals while changes occurring in breeding lines during hybridization or tissue culture and transformation protocols can be assessed. The process of division can be followed during mitosis and meiosis including pairing and chiasma distribution, as well as DNA organization and structure during the evolution of chromosomes can be studied. This chapter presents protocols for pretreatment and fixation of material, including tips of how to grow plants to get good and healthy meristem with many divisions. The chromosome preparation technique is described using proteolytic enzymes, but acids can be used instead. Chromosome slide preparations are suitable for fluorochrome staining for fast screening (described in the chapter) or fluorescent in situ hybridization (see Schwarzacher and Heslop-Harrison, In situ hybridization. BIOS Scientific Publishers, Oxford, 2000). PMID:26659956

  10. Synaptonemal complex components persist at centromeres and are required for homologous centromere pairing in mouse spermatocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Gaston Bisig

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies in simple model organisms have shown that centromere pairing is important for ensuring high-fidelity meiotic chromosome segregation. However, this process and the mechanisms regulating it in higher eukaryotes are unknown. Here we present the first detailed study of meiotic centromere pairing in mouse spermatogenesis and link it with key events of the G2/metaphase I transition. In mouse we observed no evidence of the persistent coupling of centromeres that has been observed in several model organisms. We do however find that telomeres associate in non-homologous pairs or small groups in B type spermatogonia and pre-leptotene spermatocytes, and this association is disrupted by deletion of the synaptonemal complex component SYCP3. Intriguingly, we found that, in mid prophase, chromosome synapsis is not initiated at centromeres, and centromeric regions are the last to pair in the zygotene-pachytene transition. In late prophase, we first identified the proteins that reside at paired centromeres. We found that components of the central and lateral element and transverse filaments of the synaptonemal complex are retained at paired centromeres after disassembly of the synaptonemal complex along diplotene chromosome arms. The absence of SYCP1 prevents centromere pairing in knockout mouse spermatocytes. The localization dynamics of SYCP1 and SYCP3 suggest that they play different roles in promoting homologous centromere pairing. SYCP1 remains only at paired centromeres coincident with the time at which some kinetochore proteins begin loading at centromeres, consistent with a role in assembly of meiosis-specific kinetochores. After removal of SYCP1 from centromeres, SYCP3 then accumulates at paired centromeres where it may promote bi-orientation of homologous centromeres. We propose that, in addition to their roles as synaptonemal complex components, SYCP1 and SYCP3 act at the centromeres to promote the establishment and/or maintenance of

  11. Sequential Cross-Species Chromosome Painting among River Buffalo, Cattle, Sheep and Goat: A Useful Tool for Chromosome Abnormalities Diagnosis within the Family Bovidae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauciullo, Alfredo; Perucatti, Angela; Cosenza, Gianfranco; Iannuzzi, Alessandra; Incarnato, Domenico; Genualdo, Viviana; Di Berardino, Dino; Iannuzzi, Leopoldo

    2014-01-01

    The main goal of this study was to develop a comparative multi-colour Zoo-FISH on domestic ruminants metaphases using a combination of whole chromosome and sub-chromosomal painting probes obtained from the river buffalo species (Bubalus bubalis, 2n = 50,XY). A total of 13 DNA probes were obtained through chromosome microdissection and DOP-PCR amplification, labelled with two fluorochromes and sequentially hybridized on river buffalo, cattle (Bos taurus, 2n = 60,XY), sheep (Ovis aries, 2n = 54,XY) and goat (Capra hircus, 2n = 60,XY) metaphases. The same set of paintings were then hybridized on bovine secondary oocytes to test their potential use for aneuploidy detection during in vitro maturation. FISH showed excellent specificity on metaphases and interphase nuclei of all the investigated species. Eight pairs of chromosomes were simultaneously identified in buffalo, whereas the same set of probes covered 13 out 30 chromosome pairs in the bovine and goat karyotypes and 40% of the sheep karyotype (11 out of 27 chromosome pairs). This result allowed development of the first comparative M-FISH karyotype within the domestic ruminants. The molecular resolution of complex karyotypes by FISH is particularly useful for the small chromosomes, whose similarity in the banding patterns makes their identification very difficult. The M-FISH karyotype also represents a practical tool for structural and numerical chromosome abnormalities diagnosis. In this regard, the successful hybridization on bovine secondary oocytes confirmed the potential use of this set of probes for the simultaneous identification on the same germ cell of 12 chromosome aneuploidies. This is a fundamental result for monitoring the reproductive health of the domestic animals in relation to management errors and/or environmental hazards. PMID:25330006

  12. Chromosome 19 International Workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pericak-Vance, M.A. (Duke Univ., Durham, NC (United States). Medical Center); Ropers, H.H. (Univ. Hospital Nijmegen, (The Netherlands). Dept. of Human Genetics); Carrano, A.J. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States))

    1993-01-04

    The Second International Workshop on Human Chromosome 19 was hosted on January 25 and 26, 1992, by the Department of Human Genetics, University Hospital Nijmegen, The Netherlands, at the 'Meerdal Conference Center'. The workshop was supported by a grant from the European Community obtained through HUGO, the Dutch Research Organization (NWO) and the Muscular Dystrophy Association (MDA). Travel support for American participants was provided by the Department of Energy. The goals of this workshop were to produce genetic, physical and integrated maps of chromosome 19, to identify inconsistencies and gaps, and to discuss and exchange resources and techniques available for the completion of these maps. The second day of the meeting was largely devoted to region or disease specific efforts. In particular, the meeting served as a platform for assessing and discussing the recent progress made into the molecular elucidation of myotonic dystrophy.

  13. Differential occurrence of chromosome inversion polymorphisms among Muller's elements in three species of the tripunctata group of Drosophila, including a species with fast chromosomal evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brianti, Mitsue T; Ananina, Galina; Klaczko, Louis B

    2013-01-01

    Detailed chromosome maps with reliable homologies among chromosomes of different species are the first step to study the evolution of the genetic architecture in any set of species. Here, we present detailed photo maps of the polytene chromosomes of three closely related species of the tripunctata group (subgenus Drosophila): Drosophila mediopunctata, D. roehrae, and D. unipunctata. We identified Muller's elements in each species, using FISH, establishing reliable chromosome homologies among species and D. melanogaster. The simultaneous analysis of chromosome inversions revealed a distribution pattern for the inversion polymorphisms among Muller's elements in the three species. Element E is the most polymorphic, with many inversions in each species. Element C follows; while the least polymorphic elements are B and D. While interesting, it remains to be determined how general this pattern is among species of the tripunctata group. Despite previous studies showing that D. mediopunctata and D. unipunctata are phylogenetically closer to each other than to D. roehrae, D. unipunctata shows rare karyotypic changes. It has two chromosome fusions: an additional heterochromatic chromosome pair and a pericentric inversion in the X chromosome. This especial conformation suggests a fast chromosomal evolution that deserves further study. PMID:23379335

  14. Kaposi's sarcoma herpesvirus C-terminal LANA concentrates at pericentromeric and peri-telomeric regions of a subset of mitotic chromosomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA) tethers KSHV terminal repeat (TR) DNA to mitotic chromosomes to efficiently segregate episomes to progeny nuclei. LANA contains N- and C-terminal chromosome binding regions. We now show that C-terminal LANA preferentially concentrates to paired dots at pericentromeric and peri-telomeric regions of a subset of mitotic chromosomes through residues 996-1139. Deletions within C-terminal LANA abolished both self-association and chromosome binding, consistent with a requirement for self-association to bind chromosomes. A deletion abolishing TR DNA binding did not affect chromosome targeting, indicating LANA's localization is not due to binding its recognition sequence in chromosomal DNA. LANA distributed similarly on human and non-human mitotic chromosomes. These results are consistent with C-terminal LANA interacting with a cell factor that concentrates at pericentromeric and peri-telomeric regions of mitotic chromosomes

  15. Chromosome synapsis and recombination in simple and complex chromosomal heterozygotes of tuco-tuco (Ctenomys talarum: Rodentia: Ctenomyidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basheva, Ekaterina A; Torgasheva, Anna A; Gomez Fernandez, Maria Jimena; Boston, Emma; Mirol, Patricia; Borodin, Pavel M

    2014-09-01

    The chromosomal speciation hypothesis suggests that irregularities in synapsis, recombination, and segregation in heterozygotes for chromosome rearrangements may restrict gene flow between karyotypically distinct populations and promote speciation. Ctenomys talarum is a South American subterranean rodent inhabiting the coastal regions of Argentina, whose populations polymorphic for Robertsonian and tandem translocations seem to have a very restricted gene flow. To test if chromosomal differences are involved in isolation among its populations, we examined chromosome pairing, recombination, and meiotic silencing of unsynapsed chromatin in male meiosis of simple and complex translocation heterozygotes using immunolocalization of the MLH1 marking mature recombination nodules and phosphorylated histone γH2A.X marking unrepaired double-strand breaks. We observed small asynaptic areas labeled by γH2A.X in pericentromeric regions of the chromosomes involved in the trivalents and quadrivalents. We also observed a decrease of recombination frequency and a distalization of the crossover distribution in the heterozygotes and metacentric homozygotes compared to acrocentric homozygotes. We suggest that the asynapsis of the pericentromeric regions are unlikely to induce germ cell death and decrease fertility of the heterozygotes; however, suppressed recombination in pericentromeric areas of the multivalents may reduce gene flow between chromosomally different populations of the Talas tuco-tuco. PMID:24924853

  16. Demarcation of informative chromosomes in tropical sweet corn inbred lines using microsatellite DNA markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedram Kashiani

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A study of genetic variation among 10 pairs of chromosomes extracted from 13 tropical sweet corn inbred lines, using 99 microsatellite markers, revealed a wide range of genetic diversity. Allelic richness and the number of effective alleles per chromosome ranged from 2.78 to 4.33 and 1.96 to 3.47, respectively, with respective mean values of 3.62 and 2.73. According to the Shannon's information index (I and Nei's gene diversity coefficient (Nei, Chromosome 10 was the most informative chromosome (I = 1.311 and Nei = 0.703, while Chromosome 2 possessed the least (I = 0.762 and Nei = 0.456. Based on linkage disequilibrium (LD measurements for loci less than 50 cM apart on the same chromosome, all loci on Chromosomes 1, 6 and 7 were in equilibrium. Even so, there was a high proportion of genetic variation in Chromosomes 4, 5, 8, 9 and 10, thereby revealing their appropriateness for use in the genetic diversity investigations among tropical sweet corn lines. Chromosome 4, with the highest number of loci in linkage disequilibrium, was considered the best for marker-phenotype association and QTL mapping, followed by Chromosomes 5, 8, 9 and 10.

  17. Hadronic lepton pair production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author describes a beam dump experiment at the CERN SPS for the study of μ pair production by π+-, K+-, and p(anti p) beams on a copper target at 39.5 GeV/c. The dependence of the cross sections from various parameters is discussed. (HSI)

  18. Paired fuzzy sets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodríguez, J. Tinguaro; Franco de los Ríos, Camilo; Gómez, Daniel;

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we want to stress the relevance of paired fuzzy sets, as already proposed in previous works of the authors, as a family of fuzzy sets that offers a unifying view for different models based upon the opposition of two fuzzy sets, simply allowing the existence of different types of...

  19. Molecular fundamentals of chromosomal mutagenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Precise quantitative correlation between the yield of chromosome structure damages and the yield of DNA damages is shown when comparing data on molecular and cytogenetic investigations carried out in cultural Mammalia cells. As the chromosome structure damage is to be connected with the damage of its carcass structure, then it is natural that DNA damage in loop regions is not to affect considerably the structure, while DNA damage lying on the loop base and connected with the chromosome carcass is to play a determining role in chromosomal mutagenesis. This DNA constitutes 1-2% from the total quantity of nuclear DNA. If one accepts that damages of these regions of DNA are ''hot'' points of chromosomal mutagenesis, then it becomes clear why 1-2% of preparation damages in a cell are realized in chromosome structural damages

  20. Electochemical detection of chromosome translocation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kwasny, Dorota; Dimaki, Maria; Silahtaroglu, Asli;

    2014-01-01

    Cytogenetics is a study of the cell structure with a main focus on chromosomes content and their structure. Chromosome abnormalities, such as translocations may cause various genetic disorders and heametological malignancies. Chromosome translocations are structural rearrangements of two...... hybridization approach developed for label-free detection of the chromosome translocations. For specific translocation detection it is necessary to determine that the two DNA sequences forming a derivative chromosome are connected, which is achieved by two subsequent hybridization steps. The electrochemical...... impedance spectroscopy was selected as the sensing method on a microfabricated chip with array of 12 electrode sets. Two independent chips (Chip1 and Chip2) were used for targeting the chromosomal fragments involved in the translocation. Each chip was differentially functionalized with DNA probes matching...

  1. Deciphering neo-sex and B chromosome evolution by the draft genome of Drosophila albomicans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Drosophila albomicans is a unique model organism for studying both sex chromosome and B chromosome evolution. A pair of its autosomes comprising roughly 40% of the whole genome has fused to the ancient X and Y chromosomes only about 0.12 million years ago, thereby creating the youngest and most gene-rich neo-sex system reported to date. This species also possesses recently derived B chromosomes that show non-Mendelian inheritance and significantly influence fertility. Methods We sequenced male flies with B chromosomes at 124.5-fold genome coverage using next-generation sequencing. To characterize neo-Y specific changes and B chromosome sequences, we also sequenced inbred female flies derived from the same strain but without B's at 28.5-fold. Results We assembled a female genome and placed 53% of the sequence and 85% of the annotated proteins into specific chromosomes, by comparison with the 12 Drosophila genomes. Despite its very recent origin, the non-recombining neo-Y chromosome shows various signs of degeneration, including a significant enrichment of non-functional genes compared to the neo-X, and an excess of tandem duplications relative to other chromosomes. We also characterized a B-chromosome linked scaffold that contains an actively transcribed unit and shows sequence similarity to the subcentromeric regions of both the ancient X and the neo-X chromosome. Conclusions Our results provide novel insights into the very early stages of sex chromosome evolution and B chromosome origination, and suggest an unprecedented connection between the births of these two systems in D. albomicans. PMID:22439699

  2. Deciphering neo-sex and B chromosome evolution by the draft genome of Drosophila albomicans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Qi

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Drosophila albomicans is a unique model organism for studying both sex chromosome and B chromosome evolution. A pair of its autosomes comprising roughly 40% of the whole genome has fused to the ancient X and Y chromosomes only about 0.12 million years ago, thereby creating the youngest and most gene-rich neo-sex system reported to date. This species also possesses recently derived B chromosomes that show non-Mendelian inheritance and significantly influence fertility. Methods We sequenced male flies with B chromosomes at 124.5-fold genome coverage using next-generation sequencing. To characterize neo-Y specific changes and B chromosome sequences, we also sequenced inbred female flies derived from the same strain but without B's at 28.5-fold. Results We assembled a female genome and placed 53% of the sequence and 85% of the annotated proteins into specific chromosomes, by comparison with the 12 Drosophila genomes. Despite its very recent origin, the non-recombining neo-Y chromosome shows various signs of degeneration, including a significant enrichment of non-functional genes compared to the neo-X, and an excess of tandem duplications relative to other chromosomes. We also characterized a B-chromosome linked scaffold that contains an actively transcribed unit and shows sequence similarity to the subcentromeric regions of both the ancient X and the neo-X chromosome. Conclusions Our results provide novel insights into the very early stages of sex chromosome evolution and B chromosome origination, and suggest an unprecedented connection between the births of these two systems in D. albomicans.

  3. Cytological evidence for population-specific sex chromosome heteromorphism in Palaearctic green toads (Amphibia, Anura)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    G Odierna; G Aprea; T Capriglione; S Castellano; E Balletto

    2007-06-01

    A chromosome study was carried out on a number of European and Central Asiatic diploid green toad populations by means of standard and various other chromosome banding and staining methods (Ag-NOR-, Q-, CMA3-, late replicating [LR] banding pattern, C- and sequential C-banding + CMA3 + DAPI). This study revealed the remarkable karyological uniformity of specimens from all populations, with the only exception being specimens from a Moldavian population, where one chromosome pair was heteromorphic. Though similar in shape, size and with an identical heterochromatin distribution, the difference in the heteromorphic pair was due to a large inverted segment on its long arms. This heteromorphism was restricted to females, suggesting a female heterogametic sex chromosome system of ZZ/ZW type at a very early step of differentiation.

  4. Chromosome sites play dual roles to establish homologous synapsisduring meiosis in C. elegans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacQueen, Amy J.; Phillips, Carolyn M.; Bhalla, Needhi; Weiser,Pinky; Villeneuve, Anne M.; Dernburg, Abby F.

    2005-06-05

    required for accurate segregation of homologous chromosomesduring meiosisin C. elegans. We find that these sites play two distinctroles that contribute to proper segregation. Chromosomes lacking PCsusually fail to synapse and also lack a synapsis-independentstabilization activity. The presence of a PC on justone copy of achromosome pair promotes synapsis but does not supportsynapsis-independent pairing stabilization, indicating that thesefunctions are separable. Once initiated, synapsis is highly processive,even between non homologous chromosomes of disparate lengths, elucidatinghow translocations suppress meiotic recombination in C. elegans. Thesefindings suggest a multistep pathway for chromosome synapsis in which PCsimpart selectivity and efficiency through a kinetic proofreadingmechanism. We speculate that concentration of these activities at oneregion per chromosome may have co-evolved with the loss of a pointcentromere to safeguard karyotype stability.

  5. Intraspecific chromosome variability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Dubinin

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available (Editorial preface. The publication is presented in order to remind us of one of dramatic pages of the history of genetics. It re-opens for the contemporary reader a comprehensive work marking the priority change from plant cytogenetics to animal cytogenetics led by wide population studies which were conducted on Drosophila polytene chromosomes. The year of the publication (1937 became the point of irretrievable branching between the directions of Old World and New World genetics connected with the problems of chromosome variability and its significance for the evolution of the species. The famous book of T. Dobzhansky (1937 was published by Columbia University in the US under the title “Genetics and the origin of species”, and in the shadow of this American ‘skybuilding’ all other works grew dim. It is remarkable that both Dobzhansky and Dubinin come to similar conclusions about the role of chromosomes in speciation. This is not surprising given that they both might be considered as representatives of the Russian genetic school, by their birth and education. Interestingly, Dobzhansky had never referred to the full paper of Dubinin et al. (1937, though a previous short communication in Nature (1936 was included together with all former papers on the related subject. In full, the volume of the original publication printed in the Biological Journal in Moscow comprised 47 pages, in that number 41 pages of the Russian text accompanied by 16 Figs, a table and reference list, and, above all, 6 pages of the English summary. This final part in English is now reproduced in the authors’ version with the only addition being the reference list in the originally printed form.

  6. Dual mechanisms prevent premature chromosome segregation during meiosis

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Seoyoung; Meyer, Régis; Chuong, Hoa; Dawson, Dean S.

    2013-01-01

    In meiosis I, the segregation of homologous chromosomes before pairing would be catastrophic. Kim et al. describe two mechanisms that prevent this. In early meiosis, Ipl1 triggers shedding of a kinetochore protein and prevents microtubule attachment. Ipl1 localizes to the spindle pole bodies (SPBs), where it blocks spindle assembly. These processes are reversed upon expression of Ndt80. CDK phosphorylates Ipl1, delocalizing it from SPBs and triggering spindle assembly. Ipl1 and Ntd80 coordina...

  7. Chromosome size-correlated and chromosome size-uncorrelated homogenization of centromeric repetitive sequences in New World quails.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishishita, Satoshi; Tsuruta, Yuri; Uno, Yoshinobu; Nakamura, Atsushi; Nishida, Chizuko; Griffin, Darren K; Tsudzuki, Masaoki; Ono, Tamao; Matsuda, Yoichi

    2014-04-01

    Many families of centromeric repetitive DNA sequences isolated from Struthioniformes, Galliformes, Falconiformes, and Passeriformes are localized primarily to microchromosomes. However, it is unclear whether chromosome size-correlated homogenization is a common characteristic of centromeric repetitive sequences in Aves. New World and Old World quails have the typical avian karyotype comprising chromosomes of two distinct sizes, and C-positive heterochromatin is distributed in centromeric regions of most autosomes and the whole W chromosome. We isolated six types of centromeric repetitive sequences from three New World quail species (Colinus virginianus, CVI; Callipepla californica, CCA; and Callipepla squamata, CSQ; Odontophoridae) and one Old World quail species (Alectoris chukar, ACH; Phasianidae), and characterized the sequences by nucleotide sequencing, chromosome in situ hybridization, and filter hybridization. The 385-bp CVI-MspI, 591-bp CCA-BamHI, 582-bp CSQ-BamHI, and 366-bp ACH-Sau3AI fragments exhibited tandem arrays of the monomer unit, and the 224-bp CVI-HaeIII and 135-bp CCA-HaeIII fragments were composed of minisatellite-like and microsatellite-like repeats, respectively. ACH-Sau3AI was a homolog of the chicken nuclear membrane repeat sequence, whose homologs are common in Phasianidae. CVI-MspI, CCA-BamHI, and CSQ-BamHI showed high homology and were specific to the Odontophoridae. CVI-MspI was localized to microchromosomes, whereas CVI-HaeIII, CCA-BamHI, and CSQ-BamHI were mapped to almost all chromosomes. CCA-HaeIII was localized to five pairs of macrochromosomes and most microchromosomes. ACH-Sau3AI was distributed in three pairs of macrochromosomes and all microchromosomes. Centromeric repetitive sequences may be homogenized in chromosome size-correlated and -uncorrelated manners in New World quails, although there may be a mechanism that causes homogenization of centromeric repetitive sequences primarily between microchromosomes, which is commonly

  8. Further analysis of previously implicated linkage regions for Alzheimer's disease in affected relative pairs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lannfelt Lars

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genome-wide linkage studies for Alzheimer's disease have implicated several chromosomal regions as potential loci for susceptibility genes. Methods In the present study, we have combined a selection of affected relative pairs (ARPs from the UK and the USA included in a previous linkage study by Myers et al. (Am J Med Genet, 2002, with ARPs from Sweden and Washington University. In this total sample collection of 397 ARPs, we have analyzed linkage to chromosomes 1, 9, 10, 12, 19 and 21, implicated in the previous scan. Results The analysis revealed that linkage to chromosome 19q13 close to the APOE locus increased considerably as compared to the earlier scan. However, linkage to chromosome 10q21, which provided the strongest linkage in the previous scan could not be detected. Conclusion The present investigation provides yet further evidence that 19q13 is the only chromosomal region consistently linked to Alzheimer's disease.

  9. Chromosome Connections: Compelling Clues to Common Ancestry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flammer, Larry

    2013-01-01

    Students compare banding patterns on hominid chromosomes and see striking evidence of their common ancestry. To test this, human chromosome no. 2 is matched with two shorter chimpanzee chromosomes, leading to the hypothesis that human chromosome 2 resulted from the fusion of the two shorter chromosomes. Students test that hypothesis by looking for…

  10. Possible interspecific origin of the B chromosome of Hypsiboas albopunctatus (Spix, 1824) (Anura, Hylidae), revealed by microdissection, chromosome painting, and reverse hybridisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruber, Simone Lilian; Diniz, Débora; Sobrinho-Scudeler, Patrícia Elda; Fausto Foresti; Haddad, Célio Fernando Baptista; Kasahara, Sanae

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The B chromosome in the hylid Hypsiboas albopunctatus (2n = 22 + B) is small, almost entirely composed of C-positive heterochromatin, and does not pair with any chromosome of the A complement. B probe, obtained by microdissection and DOP-PCR amplification, was used to search for homology between the B and regular chromosomes of H. albopunctatus and of the related species H. raniceps (Cope, 1862). Reverse hybridisation was also carried out in the investigation. The B probe exclusively painted the supernumerary, not hybridising any other chromosomes in H. albopunctatus, but all H. raniceps chromosomes showed small labelling signals. This result might be an indication that differences exist between the repetitive sequences of A and B chromosomes of H. albopunctatus, and that the chromosomes of H. raniceps and the heterochromatin of the B chromosome of H. albopunctatus are enriched with the same type of repetitive DNA. In meiotic preparations, the B labelled about 30% of scored spermatids, revealing a non-mendelian inheritance, and the painted B in micronucleus suggests that the supernumerary is eliminated from germ line cells. Although our results could suggest an interespecific origin of the B at first sight, further analysis on its repetitive sequences is still necessary. Nevertheless, the accumulation of repetitive sequences, detected in another species, even though closely related, remains an intriguing question. PMID:25349670

  11. Possible interspecific origin of the B chromosome of Hypsiboas albopunctatus (Spix, 1824 (Anura, Hylidae, revealed by microdissection, chromosome painting, and reverse hybridisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Gruber

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The B chromosome in the hylid Hypsiboas albopunctatus (2n = 22 + B is small, almost entirely composed of C-positive heterochromatin, and does not pair with any chromosome of the A complement. B probe, obtained by microdissection and DOP-PCR amplification, was used to search for homology between the B and regular chromosomes of H. albopunctatus and of the related species H. raniceps (Cope, 1862. Reverse hybridisation was also carried out in the investigation. The B probe exclusively painted the supernumerary, not hybridising any other chromosomes in H. albopunctatus, but all H. raniceps chromosomes showed small labelling signals. This result might be an indication that differences exist between the repetitive sequences of A and B chromosomes of H. albopunctatus, and that the chromosomes of H. raniceps and the heterochromatin of the B chromosome of H. albopunctatus are enriched with the same type of repetitive DNA. In meiotic preparations, the B labelled about 30% of scored spermatids, revealing a non-mendelian inheritance, and the painted B in micronucleus suggests that the supernumerary is eliminated from germ line cells. Although our results could suggest an interespecific origin of the B at first sight, further analysis on its repetitive sequences is still necessary. Nevertheless, the accumulation of repetitive sequences, detected in another species, even though closely related, remains an intriguing question.

  12. Chromosome analysis and sorting

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Doležel, Jaroslav; Kubaláková, Marie; Suchánková, Pavla; Kovářová, Pavlína; Bartoš, Jan; Šimková, Hana

    Weinheim : Wiley-VCH, 2007 - (Doležel, J.; Greilhuber, J.; Suda, J.), s. 373-403 ISBN 978-3-527-31487-4 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA521/04/0607; GA ČR GP521/05/P257; GA ČR GD521/05/H013; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06004 Grant ostatní: Mendelova zemědělská a lesnická univerzita v Brně / Agronomická fakulta(CZ) ME 844 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5038910 Source of funding: V - iné verejné zdroje ; V - iné verejné zdroje ; V - iné verejné zdroje ; V - iné verejné zdroje ; V - iné verejné zdroje Keywords : Plant flow cytometry * chromosome sorting * flow cytogenetics Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology http://books. google .com/books?id=3cwakORieqUC&pg=PA373&lpg=PA373&dq=Chromosome+analysis+and+sorting&source=web&ots=8IyvJlBQyq&sig=_NlXyQQgBCwpj1pTC9YITvvVZqU

  13. [Role of transposons in origin and evolution of plant XY sex chromosomes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shufen, Li; Sha, Li; Chuanliang, Deng; Longdou, Lu; Wujun, Gao

    2015-02-01

    The XY sex-determination system is crucial for plant reproduction. However, little is known about the mechanism of the origin and evolution of the XY sex chromosomes. It has been believed that a pair of autosomes is evolved to produce young sex chromosomes (neo-X chromosome and neo-Y chromosome) by loss of function or gain of function mutation, which influences the development of pistil or stamen. With the aggravation of the recombination suppression between neo-X and neo-Y and consequent expanding of the non-recombination region, the proto-sex chromosomes were finally developed to heteromorphic sex chromosomes. Accumulation of repetitive sequences and DNA methylation were probably involved in this process. Transposons, as the most abundant repetitive sequences in the genome, might be the initial motivation factors for the evolution of sex chromosome. Moreover, transposons may also increase heterochromatin expansion and recombination suppression of sex chromosome by local epigenetics modification. In this review, we summarize the function of transposon accumulation and the relationship between transposon and heterochromatization in the evolution of plant sex chromosome. PMID:25665642

  14. Distribution of Telomeric Sequences (TTAGGG)n in Rearranged Chromosomes of Phyllotine Rodents (Cricetidae, Sigmodontinae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanzone, Cecilia; Labaroni, Carolina; Suárez, Natalia; Rodríguez, Daniela; Herrera, Macarena L; Bolzán, Alejandro D

    2015-01-01

    Phyllotines are sigmodontine rodents endemic to South America with broad genetic variability, Robertsonian polymorphisms being the most frequent. Moreover, this taxon includes a species with multiple sex chromosomes, which is infrequent in mammals. However, molecular cytogenetic techniques have never been applied to phyllotines to elucidate their karyotypic evolution. We studied the chromosomes of 4 phyllotine species using FISH with a pantelomeric probe (TTAGGG)n. Graomys griseoflavus, Eligmodontia puerulus, and E. morgani are polymorphic for Robertsonian translocations, whereas Salinomys delicatus possesses XX/ XY1Y2 sex chromosomes. Telomeric signals were detected at both ends of all chromosomes of the studied species. In S. delicatus interstitial telomeric sequences (ITS) were observed in the 3 major chromosome pairs, which are equidistant from one of the telomeres in these chromosomes. These results suggest that ITS are important in the reshuffling of the highly derived karyotype of S. delicatus. Considering the phylogeny of phyllotines, the Robertsonian rearrangements of G. griseoflavus, E. puerulus, and E. morgani possibly represent chromosome fusions which have occurred independently. The pericentromeric regions of the biarmed chromosomes of these species do not contain telomeric sequences characteristic for strict fusions of recent origin, suggesting a common pattern of telomeric repeat loss during chromosomal evolution of these rodents. PMID:27035350

  15. Chromosome Evolution in African Cichlid Fish: Contributions from the Physical Mapping of Repeated DNAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, I.A.; Poletto, A.B.; Kocher, T.D.; Mota-Velasco, J.C.; Penman, D.J.; Martins, C.

    2010-01-01

    Cichlid fishes have been the subject of increasing scientific interest because of their rapid adaptive radiation that has led to extensive ecological diversity and because of their enormous importance to tropical and subtropical aquaculture. To further understanding of chromosome evolution among cichlid species, we have comparatively mapped the SATA satellite DNA, the transposable element ROn-1, and repeated sequences in the bacterial artificial chromosome clone BAC-C4E09 on the chromosomes of a range of African species of Cichlidae, using fluorescence in situ hybridization. The SATA satellite DNA was mapped in almost all the centromeres of all tilapiine and haplochromine species studied. The maintenance and centromeric distribution of the SATA satellite DNA in African cichlids suggest that this sequence plays an important role in the organization and function of the centromere in these species. Furthermore, analysis of SATA element distribution clarifies that chromosome fusions occurred independently in Oreochromis and Tilapia genera, and led to the reduced chromosome number detected in O. karongae and T. mariae. The comparative chromosome mapping of the ROn-1 SINE-like element and BAC-C4E09 shows that the repeated sequences have been maintained among tilapiine, haplochromine and hemichromine fishes and has demonstrated the homology of the largest chromosomes among these groups. Furthermore, the mapping of ROn-1 suggested that different chromosomal rearrangements could have occurred in the origin of the largest chromosome pairs of tilapiines and non-tilapiines. PMID:20606399

  16. Sex chromosomes and karyotype of the (nearly) mythical creature, the Gila monster, Heloderma suspectum (Squamata: Helodermatidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson Pokorná, Martina; Rovatsos, Michail; Kratochvíl, Lukáš

    2014-01-01

    A wide variety of sex determination systems exist among squamate reptiles. They can therefore serve as an important model for studies of evolutionary transitions among particular sex determination systems. However, we still have only a limited knowledge of sex determination in certain important lineages of squamates. In this respect, one of the most understudied groups is the family Helodermatidae (Anguimorpha) encompassing the only two venomous species of lizards which are potentially lethal to human beings. We uncovered homomorphic ZZ/ZW sex chromosomes in the Gila monster (Heloderma suspectum) with a highly heterochromatic W chromosome. The sex chromosomes are morphologically similar to the ZZ/ZW sex chromosomes of monitor lizards (Varanidae). If the sex chromosomes of helodermatids and varanids are homologous, female heterogamety may be ancestral for the whole Anguimorpha group. Moreover, we found that the karyotype of the Gila monster consists of 2n = 36 chromosomes (14 larger metacentric chromosomes and 22 acrocentric microchromosomes). 2n = 36 is the widely distributed chromosomal number among squamates. In his pioneering works representing the only previous cytogenetic examination of the family Helodermatidae, Matthey reported the karyotype as 2n = 38 and suggested a different chromosomal morphology for this species. We believe that this was probably erroneously. We also discovered a strong accumulation of telomeric sequences on several pairs of microchromosomes in the Gila monster, which is a trait documented relatively rarely in vertebrates. These new data fill an important gap in our understanding of the sex determination and karyotype evolution of squamates. PMID:25119263

  17. Sex chromosomes and karyotype of the (nearly mythical creature, the Gila monster, Heloderma suspectum (Squamata: Helodermatidae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Johnson Pokorná

    Full Text Available A wide variety of sex determination systems exist among squamate reptiles. They can therefore serve as an important model for studies of evolutionary transitions among particular sex determination systems. However, we still have only a limited knowledge of sex determination in certain important lineages of squamates. In this respect, one of the most understudied groups is the family Helodermatidae (Anguimorpha encompassing the only two venomous species of lizards which are potentially lethal to human beings. We uncovered homomorphic ZZ/ZW sex chromosomes in the Gila monster (Heloderma suspectum with a highly heterochromatic W chromosome. The sex chromosomes are morphologically similar to the ZZ/ZW sex chromosomes of monitor lizards (Varanidae. If the sex chromosomes of helodermatids and varanids are homologous, female heterogamety may be ancestral for the whole Anguimorpha group. Moreover, we found that the karyotype of the Gila monster consists of 2n = 36 chromosomes (14 larger metacentric chromosomes and 22 acrocentric microchromosomes. 2n = 36 is the widely distributed chromosomal number among squamates. In his pioneering works representing the only previous cytogenetic examination of the family Helodermatidae, Matthey reported the karyotype as 2n = 38 and suggested a different chromosomal morphology for this species. We believe that this was probably erroneously. We also discovered a strong accumulation of telomeric sequences on several pairs of microchromosomes in the Gila monster, which is a trait documented relatively rarely in vertebrates. These new data fill an important gap in our understanding of the sex determination and karyotype evolution of squamates.

  18. Banding chromosome pattern of two species of Pimelodus (Siluriformes, Pimelodidae) from the Parana River basin of Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, Lenice; Giuliano-Caetano, Lucia; Dias, Ana Lúcia

    2004-01-01

    Cytogenetic studies were carried out on seven specimens of Pimelodus heraldoi and sixteen specimens of Pimelodus sp., both from the Parana River basin. The two species had the same diploid number of 56 chromosomes: P. heraldoi with 22M+22SM+6ST+6A and FN of 106 and Pimelodus sp. with 24M+26SM+4ST+2A and FN of 110. NORs were found at the terminal position of the long arm of one pair of ST chromosomes. C-banding (CB) showed in the two species heterochromatin distributed in various chromosomes of the complement, mainly in telomeric regions and in a pair of metacentric chromosomes with strong heterochromatic staining in both telomeres. Treatment only with the fluorochrome CMA3 confirmed in Pimelodus heraldoi and Pimelodus sp. the nucleolar chromosome pair and showed other fluorescent bands. Combined treatment with CB+CMA3 enhanced fluorescent staining of chromosomes in the two fish species evidencing several bands, including in P. heraldoi a chromosome pair showing fluorescent staining in both telomeres. PMID:19058555

  19. Pairing of homologous regions in the mouse genome is associated with transcription but not imprinting status.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christel Krueger

    Full Text Available Although somatic homologous pairing is common in Drosophila it is not generally observed in mammalian cells. However, a number of regions have recently been shown to come into close proximity with their homologous allele, and it has been proposed that pairing might be involved in the establishment or maintenance of monoallelic expression. Here, we investigate the pairing properties of various imprinted and non-imprinted regions in mouse tissues and ES cells. We find by allele-specific 4C-Seq and DNA FISH that the Kcnq1 imprinted region displays frequent pairing but that this is not dependent on monoallelic expression. We demonstrate that pairing involves larger chromosomal regions and that the two chromosome territories come close together. Frequent pairing is not associated with imprinted status or DNA repair, but is influenced by chromosomal location and transcription. We propose that homologous pairing is not exclusive to specialised regions or specific functional events, and speculate that it provides the cell with the opportunity of trans-allelic effects on gene regulation.

  20. The DNA sequence and biology of human chromosome 19

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grimwood, J; Gordon, L A; Olsen, A; Terry, A; Schmutz, J; Lamerdin, J; Hellsten, U; Goodstein, D; Couronne, O; Tran-Gyamfi, M

    2004-04-06

    Chromosome 19 has the highest gene density of all human chromosomes, more than double the genome-wide average. The large clustered gene families, corresponding high GC content, CpG islands and density of repetitive DNA indicate a chromosome rich in biological and evolutionary significance. Here we describe 55.8 million base pairs of highly accurate finished sequence representing 99.9% of the euchromatin portion of the chromosome. Manual curation of gene loci reveals 1,461 protein-coding genes and 321 pseudogenes. Among these are genes directly implicated in Mendelian disorders, including familial hypercholesterolemia and insulin-resistant diabetes. Nearly one quarter of these genes belong to tandemly arranged families, encompassing more than 25% of the chromosome. Comparative analyses show a fascinating picture of conservation and divergence, revealing large blocks of gene orthology with rodents, scattered regions with more recent gene family expansions and deletions, and segments of coding and non-coding conservation with the distant fish species Takifugu.

  1. Chromosomal evolutionary dynamics of four multigene families in Coreidae and Pentatomidae (Heteroptera) true bugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardella, Vanessa Bellini; Fernandes, José Antônio Marin; Cabral-de-Mello, Diogo Cavalcanti

    2016-10-01

    Previous chromosome mapping of multigene families in Pentatomomorpha (Heteroptera) insects, which was restricted to the major rDNA, revealed remarkable conservation of number of clusters and chromosomal positions. Aiming to understand the chromosomal organization and evolutionary patterns of multigene families in karyotypes of Heteroptera, we performed a chromosomal mapping using four distinct multigene families in representatives of Coreidae (ten species) and Pentatomidae (five species). A single pair of the major rDNA cluster (18S rDNA probe) and a single pair of the minor rDNA cluster (5S rDNA probe), both terminally located were primarily observed, being, in most species, located in distinct chromosomes. However, some alternative patterns were also observed. In species in which the U2 snDNA and H4 gene clusters were mapped, they were mainly located in one autosomal pair each, wherein the H4 gene cluster was located in different positions. Our data suggest that the karyotype diversity reported in Coreidae is not reflected in the distribution diversity of multigene families. This contrasts with the data for Pentatomidae, with a conserved gross karyotype but a discrete diversity in the location of the clusters of multigene families, indicating genome dynamics for these markers. The findings are discussed to shed light on the possible causes for the conservation or variation observed and to assist in understanding the chromosomal evolutionary trends in the group. PMID:27380138

  2. Chromosome banding and DNA replication patterns in bird karyotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, M; Enderle, E; Schindler, D; Schempp, W

    1989-01-01

    The karyotypes of the domestic chicken (Gallus domesticus), Japanese quail (Coturnix coturnix), and griffon vulture (Gyps fulvus) were studied with a variety of banding techniques. The DNA replication patterns of bird chromosomes, analyzed by incorporation of 5-bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) and deoxythymidine (dT), are presented here for the first time. In particular, the time sequence of replication of the ZZ/ZW sex chromosomes throughout the S-phase was meticulously analyzed. BrdU and dT incorporation are very useful methods to identify homoeologies between karyotypes, as well as rearrangements that occurred in the macroautosomes during speciation. The Z chromosomes of the three birds displayed the same replication patterns, indicating a high degree of evolutionary conservation. In the homogametic male, BrdU and dT incorporation revealed no evidence of asynchronous replication between euchromatic bands in the ZZ pair. The same was true of the three Z chromosomes in a triploid-diploid chimeric chicken embryo. Minor replication asynchronies between the homologous ZZ or ZZZ chromosomes were restricted to heterochromatic C-bands. These results confirm that, in the ZZ male/ZW female sex-determining system of birds, dosage compensation for Z-linked genes does not occur by inactivation of one of the two Z chromosomes in the homogametic male. The heterochromatic W chromosomes of the three species showed bright labeling with distamycin A/mithramycin counterstain-enhanced fluorescence and exhibited significantly delayed DNA replication. The nucleolus organizers of birds, frequently located in microchromosomes, were also distinguished by bright distamycin A/mithramycin fluorescence. PMID:2630186

  3. First description of multivalent ring structures in eutherian mammalian meiosis: new chromosomal characterization of Cormura brevirostris (Emballonuridae, Chiroptera).

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Araújo, Ramon Everton Ferreira; Nagamachi, Cleusa Yoshiko; da Costa, Marlyson Jeremias Rodrigues; Noronha, Renata Coelho Rodrigues; Rodrigues, Luís Reginaldo Ribeiro; Pieczarka, Julio César

    2016-08-01

    Twelve specimens of the bat Cormura brevirostris (Emballonuridae: Chiroptera) were collected from four localities in the Brazilian Amazon region and analyzed by classical and molecular cytogenetics. The diploid number and autosomal fundamental number were as previously reported (2n = 22 and FNa = 40, respectively). Fluorescence in situ hybridization using rDNA probes and silver nitrate technique demonstrated the presence of two NOR sites and the presence of internal telomeric sequences at pericentromeric regions of all chromosomes with exception of Y. Based on meiotic studies and chromosome banding we suggest that the sex chromosome pair of C. brevirostris was equivocally identified as it appears in the literature. Meiotic analysis demonstrated that at diplotene-diakinesis the cells had a ring conformation involving four chromosome pairs. This suggests the occurrence of multiple reciprocal translocations among these chromosomes, which is a very rare phenomenon in vertebrates, and has never been described in Eutheria. PMID:27300547

  4. Chromosome comparison of 17 species / sub-species of African Goliathini (Coleoptera, Scarabaeidae, Cetoniinae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutrillaux, Anne-Marie; Dutrillaux, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The mitotic karyotypes of 17 species of African Goliathini (Cetoniinae) are described using various chromosome banding techniques. All but one are composed of 20 chromosomes, mostly metacentric, forming a karyotype assumed to be close to that of the Polyphaga ancestor. The most derived karyotypes are those of Goliathus goliatus Drury, 1770, with eight pairs of acrocentrics and Chlorocana africana Drury, 1773, with only14 chromosomes. In species of the genera Cyprolais Burmeister, 1842, Megalorhina Westwood, 1847, Stephanocrates Kolbe, 1894 and Stephanorrhina Burmeister, 1842, large additions of variable heterochromatin are observed on both some particular autosomes and the X chromosome. Species of the genera Eudicella White, 1839 and Dicronorrhina Burmeister, 1842 share the same sub-metacentric X. Although each species possesses its own karyotype, it remains impossible to propose robust phylogenetic relationships on the basis of chromosome data only. PMID:27551348

  5. Coulomb pair-creation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electron-positron pair production in strong Coulomb fields is outlined. It is shown that the singular behaviour of the adiabatic basis can be removed if solutions of the time dependent external field Dirac equation are used as a basis to expand the fermion field operator. This latter 'asymptotic basis' makes it possible to introduce Feynman-propagator. Applying the reduction technique, the computation of all of the basic quantities can be reduced to the solution of an integral equation. The positron spectrum for separable potential model with Lorentzian time dependence and for potential jump is analyzed in the pole approximation. (author)

  6. Information of the markers in each chromosome - RGP caps | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available s, we designed unique primer pairs for the specific amplification of genome. Then, restriction digestion was...RGP caps Information of the markers in each chromosome Data detail Data name Information of the markers in e...ach chromosome Description of data contents Information of the STS and CAPS markers in each chromosome. Data...view/rgp_caps_main#en Data acquisition method STS markers : The 161 STS markers have been developed using cl...one-specific sequences (3'end) designed from the EST sequence derived from severa

  7. Cohesin in determining chromosome architecture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haering, Christian H., E-mail: christian.haering@embl.de [Cell Biology and Biophysics Unit, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), Heidelberg (Germany); Jessberger, Rolf, E-mail: rolf.jessberger@tu-dresden.de [Institute of Physiological Chemistry, Dresden University of Technology, Dresden (Germany)

    2012-07-15

    Cells use ring-like structured protein complexes for various tasks in DNA dynamics. The tripartite cohesin ring is particularly suited to determine chromosome architecture, for it is large and dynamic, may acquire different forms, and is involved in several distinct nuclear processes. This review focuses on cohesin's role in structuring chromosomes during mitotic and meiotic cell divisions and during interphase.

  8. Causes of oncogenic chromosomal translocation

    OpenAIRE

    Aplan, Peter D.

    2005-01-01

    Non-random chromosomal translocations are frequently associated with a variety of cancers, especially hematologic malignancies and childhood sarcomas In addition to their diagnostic utility, chromosomal translocations are increasingly being used in the clinic to guide therapeutic decisions. However, the mechanisms which cause these translocations remain poorly understood. Illegit...

  9. Genetics Home Reference: ring chromosome 20 syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 3 links) Encyclopedia: Chromosome Encyclopedia: Epilepsy Health Topic: Epilepsy Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (1 link) Ring chromosome 20 Additional NIH Resources (2 links) National Human Genome Research Institute: Chromosome Abnormalities National Institute of ...

  10. Genetics Home Reference: ring chromosome 14 syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Encyclopedia: Chromosome Health Topic: Developmental Disabilities Health Topic: Epilepsy Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (1 link) Ring chromosome 14 Additional NIH Resources (2 links) National Human Genome Research Institute: Chromosome Abnormalities National Institute of ...

  11. Meiotic chromosome mobility in fission yeast is resistant to environmental stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illner, Doris; Lorenz, Alexander; Scherthan, Harry

    2016-01-01

    The formation of healthy gametes requires pairing of homologous chromosomes (homologs) as a prerequisite for their correct segregation during meiosis. Initially, homolog alignment is promoted by meiotic chromosome movements feeding into intimate homolog pairing by homologous recombination and/or synaptonemal complex formation. Meiotic chromosome movements in the fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, depend on astral microtubule dynamics that drag the nucleus through the zygote; known as horsetail movement. The response of microtubule-led meiotic chromosome movements to environmental stresses such as ionizing irradiation (IR) and associated reactive oxygen species (ROS) is not known. Here, we show that, in contrast to budding yeast, the horsetail movement is largely radiation-resistant, which is likely mediated by a potent antioxidant defense. IR exposure of sporulating S. pombe cells induced misrepair and irreparable DNA double strand breaks causing chromosome fragmentation, missegregation and gamete death. Comparing radiation outcome in fission and budding yeast, and studying meiosis with poisoned microtubules indicates that the increased gamete death after IR is innate to fission yeast. Inhibition of meiotic chromosome mobility in the face of IR failed to influence the course of DSB repair, indicating that paralysis of meiotic chromosome mobility in a genotoxic environment is not a universal response among species. PMID:27074839

  12. Meiotic chromosome mobility in fission yeast is resistant to environmental stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illner, Doris; Lorenz, Alexander; Scherthan, Harry

    2016-01-01

    The formation of healthy gametes requires pairing of homologous chromosomes (homologs) as a prerequisite for their correct segregation during meiosis. Initially, homolog alignment is promoted by meiotic chromosome movements feeding into intimate homolog pairing by homologous recombination and/or synaptonemal complex formation. Meiotic chromosome movements in the fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, depend on astral microtubule dynamics that drag the nucleus through the zygote; known as horsetail movement. The response of microtubule-led meiotic chromosome movements to environmental stresses such as ionizing irradiation (IR) and associated reactive oxygen species (ROS) is not known. Here, we show that, in contrast to budding yeast, the horsetail movement is largely radiation-resistant, which is likely mediated by a potent antioxidant defense. IR exposure of sporulating S. pombe cells induced misrepair and irreparable DNA double strand breaks causing chromosome fragmentation, missegregation and gamete death. Comparing radiation outcome in fission and budding yeast, and studying meiosis with poisoned microtubules indicates that the increased gamete death after IR is innate to fission yeast. Inhibition of meiotic chromosome mobility in the face of IR failed to influence the course of DSB repair, indicating that paralysis of meiotic chromosome mobility in a genotoxic environment is not a universal response among species. PMID:27074839

  13. Comparative Genomics of Interreplichore Translocations in Bacteria: A Measure of Chromosome Topology?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Supriya Khedkar

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Genomes evolve not only in base sequence but also in terms of their architecture, defined by gene organization and chromosome topology. Whereas genome sequence data inform us about the changes in base sequences for a large variety of organisms, the study of chromosome topology is restricted to a few model organisms studied using microscopy and chromosome conformation capture techniques. Here, we exploit whole genome sequence data to study the link between gene organization and chromosome topology in bacteria. Using comparative genomics across ∼250 pairs of closely related bacteria we show that: (a many organisms show a high degree of interreplichore translocations throughout the chromosome and not limited to the inversion-prone terminus (ter or the origin of replication (oriC; (b translocation maps may reflect chromosome topologies; and (c symmetric interreplichore translocations do not disrupt the distance of a gene from oriC or affect gene expression states or strand biases in gene densities. In summary, we suggest that translocation maps might be a first line in defining a gross chromosome topology given a pair of closely related genome sequences.

  14. Compensation of Dosage-Sensitive Genes on the Chicken Z Chromosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmer, Fabian; Harrison, Peter W; Dessimoz, Christophe; Mank, Judith E

    2016-01-01

    In many diploid species, sex determination is linked to a pair of sex chromosomes that evolved from a pair of autosomes. In these organisms, the degeneration of the sex-limited Y or W chromosome causes a reduction in gene dose in the heterogametic sex for X- or Z-linked genes. Variations in gene dose are detrimental for large chromosomal regions when they span dosage-sensitive genes, and many organisms were thought to evolve complete mechanisms of dosage compensation to mitigate this. However, the recent realization that a wide variety of organisms lack complete mechanisms of sex chromosome dosage compensation has presented a perplexing question: How do organisms with incomplete dosage compensation avoid deleterious effects of gene dose differences between the sexes? Here we use expression data from the chicken (Gallus gallus) to show that ohnologs, duplicated genes known to be dosage-sensitive, are preferentially dosage-compensated on the chicken Z chromosome. Our results indicate that even in the absence of a complete and chromosome wide dosage compensation mechanism, dosage-sensitive genes are effectively dosage compensated on the Z chromosome. PMID:27044516

  15. Molecular cytogenetic characterization of the dioecious Cannabis sativa with an XY chromosome sex determination system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikhail G Divashuk

    Full Text Available Hemp (Cannabis sativa L. was karyotyped using by DAPI/C-banding staining to provide chromosome measurements, and by fluorescence in situ hybridization with probes for 45 rDNA (pTa71, 5S rDNA (pCT4.2, a subtelomeric repeat (CS-1 and the Arabidopsis telomere probes. The karyotype has 18 autosomes plus a sex chromosome pair (XX in female and XY in male plants. The autosomes are difficult to distinguish morphologically, but three pairs could be distinguished using the probes. The Y chromosome is larger than the autosomes, and carries a fully heterochromatic DAPI positive arm and CS-1 repeats only on the less intensely DAPI-stained, euchromatic arm. The X is the largest chromosome of all, and carries CS-1 subtelomeric repeats on both arms. The meiotic configuration of the sex bivalent locates a pseudoautosomal region of the Y chromosome at the end of the euchromatic CS-1-carrying arm. Our molecular cytogenetic study of the C. sativa sex chromosomes is a starting point for helping to make C. sativa a promising model to study sex chromosome evolution.

  16. Sex chromosome diversity in Armenian toad grasshoppers (Orthoptera, Acridoidea, Pamphagidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugrov, Alexander G.; Jetybayev, Ilyas E.; Karagyan, Gayane H.; Rubtsov, Nicolay B.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Although previous cytogenetic analysis of Pamphagidae grasshoppers pointed to considerable karyotype uniformity among most of the species in the family, our study of species from Armenia has discovered other, previously unknown karyotypes, differing from the standard for Pamphagidae mainly in having unusual sets of sex chromosomes. Asiotmethis turritus (Fischer von Waldheim, 1833), Paranocaracris rubripes (Fischer von Waldheim, 1846), and Nocaracris cyanipes (Fischer von Waldheim, 1846) were found to have the karyotype 2n♂=16+neo-XY and 2n♀=16+neo-XX, the neo-X chromosome being the result of centromeric fusion of an ancient acrocentric X chromosome and a large acrocentric autosome. The karyotype of Paranothrotes opacus (Brunner von Wattenwyl, 1882) was found to be 2n♂=14+X1X2Y and 2n♀=14+X1X1X2X2., the result of an additional chromosome rearrangement involving translocation of the neo-Y and another large autosome. Furthermore, evolution of the sex chromosomes in these species has involved different variants of heterochromatinization and miniaturization of the neo-Y. The karyotype of Eremopeza festiva (Saussure, 1884), in turn, appeared to have the standard sex determination system described earlier for Pamphagidae grasshoppers, 2n♂=18+X0 and 2n♀=18+XX, but all the chromosomes of this species were found to have small second C-positive arms. Using fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) with 18S rDNA and telomeric (TTAGG)n DNA repeats to yield new data on the structural organization of chromosomes in the species studied, we found that for most of them, clusters of repeats homologous to 18S rDNA localize on two, three or four pairs of autosomes and on the X. In Eremopeza festiva, however, FISH with labelled 18S rDNA painted C-positive regions of all autosomes and the X chromosome; clusters of telomeric repeats localized primarily on the ends of the chromosome arms. Overall, we conclude that the different stages of neo-Y degradation revealed in

  17. Sex chromosome diversity in Armenian toad grasshoppers (Orthoptera, Acridoidea, Pamphagidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugrov, Alexander G; Jetybayev, Ilyas E; Karagyan, Gayane H; Rubtsov, Nicolay B

    2016-01-01

    Although previous cytogenetic analysis of Pamphagidae grasshoppers pointed to considerable karyotype uniformity among most of the species in the family, our study of species from Armenia has discovered other, previously unknown karyotypes, differing from the standard for Pamphagidae mainly in having unusual sets of sex chromosomes. Asiotmethis turritus (Fischer von Waldheim, 1833), Paranocaracris rubripes (Fischer von Waldheim, 1846), and Nocaracris cyanipes (Fischer von Waldheim, 1846) were found to have the karyotype 2n♂=16+neo-XY and 2n♀=16+neo-XX, the neo-X chromosome being the result of centromeric fusion of an ancient acrocentric X chromosome and a large acrocentric autosome. The karyotype of Paranothrotes opacus (Brunner von Wattenwyl, 1882) was found to be 2n♂=14+X1X2Y and 2n♀=14+X1X1X2X2., the result of an additional chromosome rearrangement involving translocation of the neo-Y and another large autosome. Furthermore, evolution of the sex chromosomes in these species has involved different variants of heterochromatinization and miniaturization of the neo-Y. The karyotype of Eremopeza festiva (Saussure, 1884), in turn, appeared to have the standard sex determination system described earlier for Pamphagidae grasshoppers, 2n♂=18+X0 and 2n♀=18+XX, but all the chromosomes of this species were found to have small second C-positive arms. Using fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) with 18S rDNA and telomeric (TTAGG)n DNA repeats to yield new data on the structural organization of chromosomes in the species studied, we found that for most of them, clusters of repeats homologous to 18S rDNA localize on two, three or four pairs of autosomes and on the X. In Eremopeza festiva, however, FISH with labelled 18S rDNA painted C-positive regions of all autosomes and the X chromosome; clusters of telomeric repeats localized primarily on the ends of the chromosome arms. Overall, we conclude that the different stages of neo-Y degradation revealed in the

  18. Male meiosis, heterochromatin characterization and chromosomal location of rDNA in Microtomus lunifer (Berg, 1900 (Hemiptera: Reduviidae: Hammacerinae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Poggio

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, we analysed the male meiosis, the content and distribution of heterochromatin and the number and location of nucleolus organizing regions in Microtomus lunifer (Berg, 1900 by means of standard technique, C- and fluorescent bandings, and fluorescent in situ hybridization with an 18S rDNA probe. This species is the second one cytogenetically analysed within the Hammacerinae. Its male diploid chromosome number is 31 (2n=28+X1X2Y, including a minute pair of m-chromosomes. The diploid autosomal number and the presence of m-chromosomes are similar to those reported in M. conspicillaris (Drury, 1782 (2n=28+XY. However, M. lunifer has a multiple sex chromosome system X1X2Y (male that could have originated by fragmentation of the ancestral X chromosome. Taking into account that M. conspicillaris and M. lunifer are the only two species within Reduviidae that possess m-chromosomes, the presence of this pair could be a synapomorphy for the species of this genus. C- and fluorescent bandings showed that the amount of heterochromatin in M. lunifer was small, and only a small CMA3 bright band was observed in the largest autosomal pair at one terminal region. FISH with the 18S rDNA probe demonstrated that ribosomal genes were terminally placed on the largest autosomal pair. Our present results led us to propose that the location of rDNA genes could be associated with variants  of the sex chromosome systems in relation with a kind of the sex chromosome systems within this family. Furthermore, the terminal location of NOR in the largest autosomal pair allowed us to use it as a chromosome marker and, thus, to infer that the kinetic activity of both ends is not a random process, and there is an inversion of this activity.

  19. Bacterial chromosome organization and segregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badrinarayanan, Anjana; Le, Tung B K; Laub, Michael T

    2015-01-01

    If fully stretched out, a typical bacterial chromosome would be nearly 1 mm long, approximately 1,000 times the length of a cell. Not only must cells massively compact their genetic material, but they must also organize their DNA in a manner that is compatible with a range of cellular processes, including DNA replication, DNA repair, homologous recombination, and horizontal gene transfer. Recent work, driven in part by technological advances, has begun to reveal the general principles of chromosome organization in bacteria. Here, drawing on studies of many different organisms, we review the emerging picture of how bacterial chromosomes are structured at multiple length scales, highlighting the functions of various DNA-binding proteins and the impact of physical forces. Additionally, we discuss the spatial dynamics of chromosomes, particularly during their segregation to daughter cells. Although there has been tremendous progress, we also highlight gaps that remain in understanding chromosome organization and segregation. PMID:26566111

  20. ADN et chromosomes

    OpenAIRE

    Hayes, Hélène

    2000-01-01

    Chaque chromosome contient une seule molécule d’ADN. L’ADN déroulé d’un noyau de cellule humaine mesurerait environ 1,8 m : chaque molécule d’ADN est enroulée et compactée en plusieurs étapes, grâce à l’association de différentes protéines, et loge dans le noyau de 6 µm de diamètre. Le degré de condensation de l’ADN est variable selon les régions chromosomiques et les régions les moins condensées sont les plus riches en gènes. L’ADN est composé d’une variété de séquences codantes ou non et ré...

  1. X-Chromosome dosage compensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Barbara J

    2005-01-01

    In mammals, flies, and worms, sex is determined by distinctive regulatory mechanisms that cause males (XO or XY) and females (XX) to differ in their dose of X chromosomes. In each species, an essential X chromosome-wide process called dosage compensation ensures that somatic cells of either sex express equal levels of X-linked gene products. The strategies used to achieve dosage compensation are diverse, but in all cases, specialized complexes are targeted specifically to the X chromosome(s) of only one sex to regulate transcript levels. In C. elegans, this sex-specific targeting of the dosage compensation complex (DCC) is controlled by the same developmental signal that establishes sex, the ratio of X chromosomes to sets of autosomes (X:A signal). Molecular components of this chromosome counting process have been defined. Following a common step of regulation, sex determination and dosage compensation are controlled by distinct genetic pathways. C. elegans dosage compensation is implemented by a protein complex that binds both X chromosomes of hermaphrodites to reduce transcript levels by one-half. The dosage compensation complex resembles the conserved 13S condensin complex required for both mitotic and meiotic chromosome resolution and condensation, implying the recruitment of ancient proteins to the new task of regulating gene expression. Within each C. elegans somatic cell, one of the DCC components also participates in the separate mitotic/meiotic condensin complex. Other DCC components play pivotal roles in regulating the number and distribution of crossovers during meiosis. The strategy by which C. elegans X chromosomes attract the condensin-like DCC is known. Small, well-dispersed X-recognition elements act as entry sites to recruit the dosage compensation complex and to nucleate spreading of the complex to X regions that lack recruitment sites. In this manner, a repressed chromatin state is spread in cis over short or long distances, thus establishing the

  2. Physiological aspects of paired stimulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijler, F.L.; Durrer, D.

    1965-01-01

    In this paper some physiological and clinical aspects of paired stimulation are discussed. I) The augmenting effect of paired stimulation on rnyocardial contractility is due to potentiation (increase in speed of restitution) and fusion of two contractions. 2) While using paired stimulation the oxyg

  3. Parallel computation of cryptographic pairings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The efficiency of multiprocessor systems for pairing computation has been estimated. Various schemes of efficient implementation of Miller's algorithm for computations of Weyl and Tate pairings in a multiprocessor computing system have been considered. The complexity of pairing computation in uniprocessor and multiprocessor computing systems has been theoretically estimated

  4. Chromatid Painting for Chromosomal Inversion Detection Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose the continued development of a novel approach to the detection of chromosomal inversions. Transmissible chromosome aberrations (translocations and...

  5. Chromatid Painting for Chromosomal Inversion Detection Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose a novel approach to the detection of chromosomal inversions. Transmissible chromosome aberrations (translocations and inversions) have profound genetic...

  6. Mitotic chromosome condensation in vertebrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vagnarelli, Paola, E-mail: P.Vagnarelli@ed.ac.uk

    2012-07-15

    Work from several laboratories over the past 10-15 years has revealed that, within the interphase nucleus, chromosomes are organized into spatially distinct territories [T. Cremer, C. Cremer, Chromosome territories, nuclear architecture and gene regulation in mammalian cells, Nat. Rev. Genet. 2 (2001) 292-301 and T. Cremer, M. Cremer, S. Dietzel, S. Muller, I. Solovei, S. Fakan, Chromosome territories-a functional nuclear landscape, Curr. Opin. Cell Biol. 18 (2006) 307-316]. The overall compaction level and intranuclear location varies as a function of gene density for both entire chromosomes [J.A. Croft, J.M. Bridger, S. Boyle, P. Perry, P. Teague,W.A. Bickmore, Differences in the localization and morphology of chromosomes in the human nucleus, J. Cell Biol. 145 (1999) 1119-1131] and specific chromosomal regions [N.L. Mahy, P.E. Perry, S. Gilchrist, R.A. Baldock, W.A. Bickmore, Spatial organization of active and inactive genes and noncoding DNA within chromosome territories, J. Cell Biol. 157 (2002) 579-589] (Fig. 1A, A'). In prophase, when cyclin B activity reaches a high threshold, chromosome condensation occurs followed by Nuclear Envelope Breakdown (NEB) [1]. At this point vertebrate chromosomes appear as compact structures harboring an attachment point for the spindle microtubules physically recognizable as a primary constriction where the two sister chromatids are held together. The transition from an unshaped interphase chromosome to the highly structured mitotic chromosome (compare Figs. 1A and B) has fascinated researchers for several decades now; however a definite picture of how this process is achieved and regulated is not yet in our hands and it will require more investigation to comprehend the complete process. From a biochemical point of view a vertebrate mitotic chromosomes is composed of DNA, histone proteins (60%) and non-histone proteins (40%) [6]. I will discuss below what is known to date on the contribution of these two different classes

  7. Mitotic chromosome condensation in vertebrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Work from several laboratories over the past 10–15 years has revealed that, within the interphase nucleus, chromosomes are organized into spatially distinct territories [T. Cremer, C. Cremer, Chromosome territories, nuclear architecture and gene regulation in mammalian cells, Nat. Rev. Genet. 2 (2001) 292–301 and T. Cremer, M. Cremer, S. Dietzel, S. Muller, I. Solovei, S. Fakan, Chromosome territories—a functional nuclear landscape, Curr. Opin. Cell Biol. 18 (2006) 307–316]. The overall compaction level and intranuclear location varies as a function of gene density for both entire chromosomes [J.A. Croft, J.M. Bridger, S. Boyle, P. Perry, P. Teague,W.A. Bickmore, Differences in the localization and morphology of chromosomes in the human nucleus, J. Cell Biol. 145 (1999) 1119–1131] and specific chromosomal regions [N.L. Mahy, P.E. Perry, S. Gilchrist, R.A. Baldock, W.A. Bickmore, Spatial organization of active and inactive genes and noncoding DNA within chromosome territories, J. Cell Biol. 157 (2002) 579–589] (Fig. 1A, A'). In prophase, when cyclin B activity reaches a high threshold, chromosome condensation occurs followed by Nuclear Envelope Breakdown (NEB) [1]. At this point vertebrate chromosomes appear as compact structures harboring an attachment point for the spindle microtubules physically recognizable as a primary constriction where the two sister chromatids are held together. The transition from an unshaped interphase chromosome to the highly structured mitotic chromosome (compare Figs. 1A and B) has fascinated researchers for several decades now; however a definite picture of how this process is achieved and regulated is not yet in our hands and it will require more investigation to comprehend the complete process. From a biochemical point of view a vertebrate mitotic chromosomes is composed of DNA, histone proteins (60%) and non-histone proteins (40%) [6]. I will discuss below what is known to date on the contribution of these two different

  8. Genetics of dioecy and causal sex chromosomes in plants

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sushil Kumar; Renu Kumari; Vishakha Sharma

    2014-04-01

    Dioecy (separate male and female individuals) ensures outcrossing and is more prevalent in animals than in plants. Although it is common in bryophytes and gymnosperms, only 5% of angiosperms are dioecious. In dioecious higher plants, flowers borne on male and female individuals are, respectively deficient in functional gynoecium and androecium. Dioecy is inherited via three sex chromosome systems: XX/XY, XX/X0 and WZ/ZZ, such that XX or WZ is female and XY, X0 or ZZ are males. The XX/XY system generates the rarer XX/X0 andWZ/ZZ systems. An autosome pair begets XY chromosomes. A recessive loss-of-androecium mutation (ana) creates X chromosome and a dominant gynoecium-suppressing (GYS) mutation creates Y chromosome. The ana/ANA and gys/GYS loci are in the sex-determining region (SDR) of the XY pair. Accumulation of inversions, deleterious mutations and repeat elements, especially transposons, in the SDR of Y suppresses recombination between X and Y in SDR, making Y labile and increasingly degenerate and heteromorphic from X. Continued recombination between X and Y in their pseudoautosomal region located at the ends of chromosomal arms allows survival of the degenerated Y and of the species. Dioecy is presumably a component of the evolutionary cycle for the origin of new species. Inbred hermaphrodite species assume dioecy. Later they suffer degenerate-Y-led population regression. Cross-hybridization between such extinguishing species and heterologous species, followed by genome duplication of segregants from hybrids, give rise to new species.

  9. Chromosomal rearrangement in autotetraploid plants of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, H; Maluszynska, J

    2000-01-01

    Recent development of cytogenetic techniques has facilitated significant progress in Arabidopsis thaliana karyotype studies. Double-target FISH with rRNA genes provides makers that allow individual chromosome in the genome to be distinguished. Those studies have revealed that the number and position of rDNA loci is ecotype-specific. Arabidopsis is believed to be a true diploid (x = 5) with numerous ecotypes (accessions) and only a very few natural polyploid populations reported. Few studies were undertaken to induce polyploidy in Arabidopsis, however none of those gave the cytogenetic characteristics of polyploid plants. Our analysis of chromosome pairing of colchicine-induced autotetraploid Arabidopsis (Wilna ecotype) revealed preferential bivalent pairing in PMCs (pollen mother cells). In order to attempt to explain this phenomenon, first of all more detailed cytogenetic studies of autopolyploid plants have been undertaken. The localization of 45S and 5S rDNA loci in the diploid and autotetraploid plants revealed that Wilna ecotypes belongs to the group of Arabidopsis accessions with only two 5S rDNA loci present in a genome. Furthermore, the rearrangement of 45S rDNA locus in autopolyploid, when compared to the diploid plants of the same ecotype, was revealed. These results are interesting also in the context of the recently emphasised role of polyploidy in plant evolution and speciation. Arabidopsis, despite having small chromosomes, is a good system to study chromosome behaviour in relation to diploidization of autopolyploids and to evaluate the degree of chromosomal rearrangements during this process. PMID:11433970

  10. Cotorsion Pair Extensions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    De Xu ZHOU

    2009-01-01

    Assume that S is an almost excellent extension of R. Using functors Hom R(S,-) and -(×)R S, we establish some connections between classes of modules (L)R and (L)S, cotorsion pairs ((A)R, (A)R)and ((A)S, (B)S). If (L)S is a T-extension or (and) H-extension of (L)R, we show that (L)S is a (resp., monomorphic, epimorphic, special) preenveloping class if and only if so is (L)R. If (S, S) is a TH-extension of ((A)R,(B)R), we obtain that ((A)S,(B)S) is complete (resp., of finite type, of cofinite type, hereditary, perfect, n-tilting) if and only if so is ((A)R,(B)R).

  11. Pairing in hadron structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A many-body approach to hadron structure is presented, in which we consider two parton species: spin-0 (b-partons), and spin-1/2 (f-partons). We extend a boson and a fermion pairing scheme for the b-, and f-partons respectively, into a Yang-Mills gauge theory. The main feature of this theory is that the gauge field is not identified with the usual gluon field variable in QCD. We study the confinement problem of the hadron constituents, and obtain, for low temperatures, partons that are confined by energy gaps. As the critical temperatures for the corresponding phase transitions are approached, the energy gap gradually disappears, and confinement is lost. The theory goes beyond the non-relativistic harmonic oscillator quark model, in the sense of giving physical reasons why a non-relativistic approximation is adequate in describing the internal dynamics of hadron structure. (author)

  12. Multiprocessor switch with selective pairing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gara, Alan; Gschwind, Michael K; Salapura, Valentina

    2014-03-11

    System, method and computer program product for a multiprocessing system to offer selective pairing of processor cores for increased processing reliability. A selective pairing facility is provided that selectively connects, i.e., pairs, multiple microprocessor or processor cores to provide one highly reliable thread (or thread group). Each paired microprocessor or processor cores that provide one highly reliable thread for high-reliability connect with a system components such as a memory "nest" (or memory hierarchy), an optional system controller, and optional interrupt controller, optional I/O or peripheral devices, etc. The memory nest is attached to a selective pairing facility via a switch or a bus

  13. Gametocidal chromosomes enhancing chromosome aberration in common wheat induced by 5-azacytidine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, W-Y; Cong, W-W; Shu, Y-J; Wang, D; Xu, G-H; Guo, C-H

    2013-01-01

    The gametocidal (Gc) chromosome from Aegilops spp induces chromosome mutation, which is introduced into common wheat as a tool of chromosome manipulation for genetic improvement. The Gc chromosome functions similar to a restriction-modification system in bacteria, in which DNA methylation is an important regulator. We treated root tips of wheat carrying Gc chromosomes with the hypomethylation agent 5-azacytidine; chromosome breakage and micronuclei were observed in these root tips. The frequency of aberrations differed in wheat containing different Gc chromosomes, suggesting different functions inducing chromosome breakage. Gc chromosome 3C caused the greatest degree of chromosome aberration, while Gc chromosome 3C(SAT) and 2C caused only slight chromosome aberration. Gc chromosome 3C induced different degrees of chromosome aberration in wheat varieties Triticum aestivum var. Chinese Spring and Norin 26, demonstrating an inhibition function in common wheat. PMID:23884766

  14. Multiple origins of asteroid pairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Seth A.

    2016-01-01

    Rotationally fissioned asteroids produce unbound asteroid pairs that have very similar heliocentric orbits. Backward integration of their current heliocentric orbits provides an age of closest proximity that can be used to date the rotational fission event. Most asteroid pairs follow a predicted theoretical relationship between the primary spin period and the mass ratio of the two pair members that is a direct consequence of the YORP-induced rotational fission hypothesis. If the progenitor asteroid has strength, asteroid pairs may have higher mass ratios or faster rotating primaries. However, the process of secondary fission leaves the originally predicted trend unaltered. We also describe the characteristics of pair members produced by four alternative routes from a rotational fission event to an asteroid pair. Unlike direct formation from the event itself, the age of closest proximity of these pairs cannot generally be used to date the rotational fission event since considerable time may have passed.

  15. Chromosome conservation in squamate reptiles revealed by comparative chromosome painting

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Giovannotti, M.; Pokorná, Martina; Kratochvíl, L.; Caputo, V.; Olmo, E.; Ferguson-Smith, M. A.; Rens, W.

    Manchester : ICCS, 2011. 78-78. [Intarnational Chromosome Conference /18./. 29.08.2011-02.09.2011, Manchester] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50450515 Keywords : squamate reptiles Subject RIV: EG - Zoology

  16. Numerous transitions of sex chromosomes in Diptera.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Vicoso

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Many species groups, including mammals and many insects, determine sex using heteromorphic sex chromosomes. Diptera flies, which include the model Drosophila melanogaster, generally have XY sex chromosomes and a conserved karyotype consisting of six chromosomal arms (five large rods and a small dot, but superficially similar karyotypes may conceal the true extent of sex chromosome variation. Here, we use whole-genome analysis in 37 fly species belonging to 22 different families of Diptera and uncover tremendous hidden diversity in sex chromosome karyotypes among flies. We identify over a dozen different sex chromosome configurations, and the small dot chromosome is repeatedly used as the sex chromosome, which presumably reflects the ancestral karyotype of higher Diptera. However, we identify species with undifferentiated sex chromosomes, others in which a different chromosome replaced the dot as a sex chromosome or in which up to three chromosomal elements became incorporated into the sex chromosomes, and others yet with female heterogamety (ZW sex chromosomes. Transcriptome analysis shows that dosage compensation has evolved multiple times in flies, consistently through up-regulation of the single X in males. However, X chromosomes generally show a deficiency of genes with male-biased expression, possibly reflecting sex-specific selective pressures. These species thus provide a rich resource to study sex chromosome biology in a comparative manner and show that similar selective forces have shaped the unique evolution of sex chromosomes in diverse fly taxa.

  17. Chromosome analysis of three species of Myoxidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Vittoria Civitelli

    1995-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Karyotype analysis was carried out on three species of dormice: Myoxus glis, 4 populations from Northern and Southern Italy and from Turkey; Dryomys nitedula, 4 populations from Northern and Southern Italy, from Israel and from Turkey; Myomimus roachi, 1 specimen from Turkey. Myoxus glis shows 2n=62; comparison of our specimens from different localities shows complete correspondence between karyotypes, both for the autosomes and the heterochromosomes. Dryomys nitedula shows 2n=48. All populations we studied, show the same karyotypic pattern, except for the NOR-bearing chromosomes. Myomimus roachi, here studied for the first time, shows 2n=44. All the autosomes are biarmed of decreasing size. The X-chromosome is a medium size metacentric, while the Y-chromosome is the smallest one. All the three species we studied, show one pair of NOR-bearing chromosomes, Ag-NORs always correspond to the secondary constriction. Differences in the fundamental number and in heterochromosome morphology, have been observed by other authors, in different European populations. This variability is analysed and discussed. Riassunto Analisi cromosomica in tre specie di Myoxidae - L'analisi cromosomica è stata condotta su popolazioni europee di tre specie di Myoxidae: Myoxus glis, 4 popolazioni provenienti dal Nord e Sud Italia, e dalla Turchia; Dryomys nitedula, 4 popolazioni provenienti dal Nord e Sud Italia, da Israele e dalla Turchia; Myomimus roachi, 1 esemplare, proveniente dalla Turchia. Myoxus glis presenta 2n=62. Gli esemplari, provenienti dalle diverse popolazioni, mostrano corrispondenza nella morfologia sia degli autosomi che degli eterocromosomi. Dryomys nitedula presenta 2n=48. La morfologia dei cromosomi nei cariotipi appare corrispondente mentre diversa è la localizzazione degli Ag-NOR.

  18. Familial transmission of a deletion of chromosome 21 derived from a translocation between chromosome 21 and an inverted chromosome 22.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aviv, H; Lieber, C; Yenamandra, A; Desposito, F

    1997-06-27

    Chromosome analysis of a newborn boy with Down syndrome resulted in the identification of a family with an unusual derivative chromosome 22. The child has 46 chromosomes, including two chromosomes 21, one normal chromosome 22, and a derivative chromosome 22. Giemsa banding and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) studies show that the derivative chromosome is chromosome 22 with evidence of both paracentric and pericentric inversions, joined to the long arm of chromosome 21 from 21q21.2 to qter. The rearrangement results in partial trisomy 21 extending from 21q21.2 to 21q terminus in the patient. The child's mother, brother, maternal aunt, and maternal grandmother are all carriers of the derivative chromosome. All have 45 chromosomes, with one normal chromosome 21, one normal chromosome 22, and the derivative chromosome 22. The rearrangement results in the absence of the short arm, the centromere, and the proximal long arm of chromosome 21 (del 21pter-21q21.2) in carriers. Carriers of the derivative chromosome in this family have normal physical appearance, mild learning disabilities and poor social adjustment. PMID:9182781

  19. Chromosomal organization of simple sequence repeats in the Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas): (GGAT)4, (GT)7 and (TA)10 chromosome patterns

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K. Bouilly; R. Chaves; A. Leitão; A. Benabdelmouna; H. Guedes-Pinto

    2008-08-01

    Chromosome identification is essential in oyster genomic research. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) offers new opportunities for the identification of oyster chromosomes. It has been used to locate satellite DNAs, telomeres or ribosomal DNA sequences. However, regarding chromosome identification, no study has been conducted with simple sequence repeats (SSRs). FISH was used to probe the physical organization of three particular SSRs, (GGAT)4, (GT)7 and (TA)10 onto metaphase chromosomes of the Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas. Hybridization signals were observed in all the SSR probes, but the distribution and intensity of signals varied according to the oligonucleotide repeat. The intercalary, centromeric and telomeric bands were observed along the chromosomes, and for each particular repeat every chromosome pair presented a similar pattern, allowing karyotypic analysis with all the SSRs tested. Our study is the first in mollusks to show the application of SSR in situ hybridization for chromosome identification and karyotyping. This technique can be a useful tool for oyster comparative studies and to understand genome organization in different oyster taxa.

  20. B chromosome in the beetle Coprophanaeus cyanescens (Scarabaeidae: emphasis in the organization of repetitive DNA sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gomes de Oliveira Sarah

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To contribute to the knowledge of coleopteran cytogenetics, especially with respect to the genomic content of B chromosomes, we analyzed the composition and organization of repetitive DNA sequences in the Coprophanaeus cyanescens karyotype. We used conventional staining and the application of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH mapping using as probes C0t-1 DNA fraction, the 18S and 5S rRNA genes, and the LOA-like non-LTR transposable element (TE. Results The conventional analysis detected 3 individuals (among 50 analyzed carrying one small metacentric and mitotically unstable B chromosome. The FISH analysis revealed a pericentromeric block of C0t-1 DNA in the B chromosome but no 18S or 5S rDNA clusters in this extra element. Using the LOA-like TE probe, the FISH analysis revealed large pericentromeric blocks in eight autosomal bivalents and in the B chromosome, and a pericentromeric block extending to the short arm in one autosomal pair. No positive hybridization signal was observed for the LOA-like element in the sex chromosomes. Conclusions The results indicate that the origin of the B chromosome is associated with the autosomal elements, as demonstrated by the hybridization with C0t-1 DNA and the LOA-like TE. The present study is the first report on the cytogenetic mapping of a TE in coleopteran chromosomes. These TEs could have been involved in the origin and evolution of the B chromosome in C. cyanescens.

  1. Linkage Analysis Reveals the Independent Origin of Poeciliid Sex Chromosomes and a Case of Atypical Sex Inheritance in the Guppy (Poecilia reticulata)

    OpenAIRE

    Tripathi, Namita; Hoffmann, Margarete; Weigel, Detlef; Dreyer, Christine

    2009-01-01

    Among different teleost fish species, diverse sex-determining mechanisms exist, including environmental and genetic sex determination, yet chromosomal sex determination with male heterogamety (XY) prevails. Different pairs of autosomes have evolved as sex chromosomes among species in the same genus without evidence for a master sex-determining locus being identical. Models for evolution of Y chromosomes predict that male-advantageous genes become linked to a sex-determining locus and suppress...

  2. Stereo Pair, Honolulu, Oahu

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    Honolulu, on the island of Oahu, is a large and growing urban area. This stereoscopic image pair, combining a Landsat image with topography measured by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), shows how topography controls the urban pattern. This color image can be viewed in 3-D by viewing the left image with the right eye and the right image with the left eye (cross-eyed viewing), or by downloading and printing the image pair, and viewing them with a stereoscope.Features of interest in this scene include Diamond Head (an extinct volcano near the bottom of the image), Waikiki Beach (just above Diamond Head), the Punchbowl National Cemetary (another extinct volcano, near the image center), downtown Honolulu and Honolulu harbor (image left-center), and offshore reef patterns. The slopes of the Koolau mountain range are seen in the right half of the image. Clouds commonly hang above ridges and peaks of the Hawaiian Islands, but in this synthesized stereo rendition appear draped directly on the mountains. The clouds are actually about 1000 meters (3300 feet) above sea level.This stereoscopic image pair was generated using topographic data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission, combined with a Landsat 7 Thematic Mapper image collected at the same time as the SRTM flight. The topography data were used to create two differing perspectives, one for each eye. When stereoscopically merged, the result is a vertically exaggerated view of the Earth's surface in its full three dimensions. The United States Geological Survey's Earth Resources Observations Systems (EROS) Data Center, Sioux Falls, South Dakota, provided the Landsat data.The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), launched on February 11, 2000, used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. The mission was designed to collect three-dimensional measurements of the Earth

  3. Stereo Pair, Pasadena, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    This stereoscopic image pair is a perspective view that shows the western part of the city of Pasadena, California, looking north toward the San Gabriel Mountains. Portions of the cities of Altadena and La Canada Flintridge are also shown. The cluster of large buildings left of center, at the base of the mountains, is the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. This image shows the power of combining data from different sources to create planning tools to study problems that affect large urban areas. In addition to the well-known earthquake hazards, Southern California is affected by a natural cycle of fire and mudflows. Data shown in this image can be used to predict both how wildfires spread over the terrain and how mudflows are channeled down the canyons.The image was created from three datasets: the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) supplied the elevation, U. S. Geological Survey digital aerial photography provided the image detail, and the Landsat Thematic Mapper provided the color. The United States Geological Survey's Earth Resources Observations Systems (EROS) Data Center, Sioux Falls, South Dakota, provided the Landsat data and the aerial photography. The image can be viewed in 3-D by viewing the left image with the right eye and the right image with the left eye (cross-eyed viewing), or by downloading and printing the image pair, and viewing them with a stereoscope.The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), launched on February 11, 2000, used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. The mission was designed to collect three-dimensional measurements of the Earth's surface. To collect the 3-D data, engineers added a 60-meter-long (200-foot) mast, an additional C-band imaging antenna and improved tracking and navigation devices. The mission is a cooperative project between the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA

  4. Chromosome mapping of 5S rRNA genes differentiates Brazilian populations of Leporellus vittatus (Anostomidae, Characiformes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilia Teixeira de Aguilar

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Among the anostomid fishes, the genus Leporellus is represented by only three species: L. nattereri, endemic of the Amazon River, L. retropinnis, endemic of the Piracicaba River, and L. vittatus, widely distributed in rivers from Peru, Colombia, Guianas, and different major hydrographic basins of Brazil. A cytogenetic study carried out on specimens of Leporellus vittatus from three major Brazilian hydrographic basins evidenced a karyotype of 54 metacentric and submetacentric chromosomes. C-banding analysis revealed the presence of large pericentromeric heterochromatic segments in all chromosomes and a telomeric block coincident with the NOR sites. Ag, CMA3 or MM staining, and FISH with ribosomal probes located the 45S ribosomal genes on the terminal region of the long arm of the 12th chromosome pair of all populations. Nevertheless, in the specimens from the Paraná and São Francisco Basins the 5S rDNA clusters were interstitially located by FISH on the long arm of the 2nd chromosome pair, while in the specimens from the Tocantins-Araguaia Basin these sites were observed on the long arm of the 9th chromosome pair and on the short arm of the 17th chromosome pair. These data suggest that the species currently named Leporellus vittatus may comprise a complex of cryptic species.

  5. Dynamics of rye chromosome 1R regions with high or low crossover frequency in homology search and synapsis development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nohelia T Valenzuela

    Full Text Available In many organisms, homologous pairing and synapsis depend on the meiotic recombination machinery that repairs double-strand DNA breaks (DSBs produced at the onset of meiosis. The culmination of recombination via crossover gives rise to chiasmata, which locate distally in many plant species such as rye, Secale cereale. Although, synapsis initiates close to the chromosome ends, a direct effect of regions with high crossover frequency on partner identification and synapsis initiation has not been demonstrated. Here, we analyze the dynamics of distal and proximal regions of a rye chromosome introgressed into wheat to define their role on meiotic homology search and synapsis. We have used lines with a pair of two-armed chromosome 1R of rye, or a pair of telocentrics of its long arm (1RL, which were homozygous for the standard 1RL structure, homozygous for an inversion of 1RL that changes chiasma location from distal to proximal, or heterozygous for the inversion. Physical mapping of recombination produced in the ditelocentric heterozygote (1RL/1RL(inv showed that 70% of crossovers in the arm were confined to a terminal segment representing 10% of the 1RL length. The dynamics of the arms 1RL and 1RL(inv during zygotene demonstrates that crossover-rich regions are more active in recognizing the homologous partner and developing synapsis than crossover-poor regions. When the crossover-rich regions are positioned in the vicinity of chromosome ends, their association is facilitated by telomere clustering; when they are positioned centrally in one of the two-armed chromosomes and distally in the homolog, their association is probably derived from chromosome elongation. On the other hand, chromosome movements that disassemble the bouquet may facilitate chromosome pairing correction by dissolution of improper chromosome associations. Taken together, these data support that repair of DSBs via crossover is essential in both the search of the homologous partner

  6. Use of radiation to transfer alien chromosome segments to wheat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionizing radiation can accomplish the transfer of genetic information from species so distantly related to wheat (Triticum aestivum L. em Thell.) that their chromosomes pair very little, if at all, with those of wheat, even in the absence of the homoeologous-pairing suppressor Ph1. In a successful transfer, the alien segment must almost always replace a homoeologous wheat segment, but radiation induces translocations largely at random; therefore automatic selection in favor of desirable translocations must be provided if the size of the project is to be kept within reasonable limits. Pollen selection will occur if seeds or plants monosomic for both an alien chromosome and one of its wheat homoeologues are irradiated. Making the plants also deficient for Ph1 may increase the number of suitable transfers. High-frequency occurrence of the desired alien character in M2 head-rows from plants grown from irradiated seed can identify favorable transfers with little cytological work. Irradiation of plants shortly before meiosis, using them to pollinate ditelosomics or double ditelosomics for the wheat arm or chromosome concerned, and cytologically examining offspring which have the alien character can not only identify the desirable transfers, but also reveal the lengths of the alien segments involved

  7. Chromosome fragility in Freemartin cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Barbieri

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to verify chromosome fragility in freemartin cattle using chromosome aberration (CA and sister chromatid exchange (SCE tests. A total of eighteen co-twins were investigated. Fourteen animals were identified as cytogenetically chimeric (2n=60, XX/XY while 4 were classified as normal. Freemartin cattle showed a higher percentage of aneuploid cells (18.64% and highly significant statistical differences (P < 0.001 in mean values of gaps (4.53 ± 2.05, chromatid breaks (0.26 ± 0.51, and significant statistical differences (P < 0.005 in mean values of chromosome breaks (0.12 ± 0.43 when compared to 10 control animals from single births (aneuploid cells, 11.20%; gaps, 2.01 ± 1.42; chromatid breaks, 0.05 ± 0.22; chromosome breaks, 0.02 ± 0.14.

  8. Pairing the Volcano

    CERN Document Server

    Ionica, Sorina

    2011-01-01

    Isogeny volcanoes are graphs whose vertices are elliptic curves and whose edges are $\\ell$-isogenies. Algorithms allowing to travel on these graphs were developed by Kohel in his thesis (1996) and later on, by Fouquet and Morain (2001). However, up to now, no method was known, to predict, before taking a step on the volcano, the direction of this step. Hence, in Kohel's and Fouquet-Morain algorithms, many steps are taken before choosing the right direction. In particular, ascending or horizontal isogenies are usually found using a trial-and-error approach. In this paper, we propose an alternative method that efficiently finds all points $P$ of order $\\ell$ such that the subgroup generated by $P$ is the kernel of an horizontal or an ascending isogeny. In many cases, our method is faster than previous methods. This is an extended version of a paper published in the proceedings of ANTS 2010. In addition, we treat the case of 2-isogeny volcanoes and we derive from the group structure of the curve and the pairing ...

  9. Methods for chromosome-specific staining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Joe W.; Pinkel, Daniel

    1995-01-01

    Methods and compositions for chromosome-specific staining are provided. Compositions comprise heterogenous mixtures of labeled nucleic acid fragments having substantially complementary base sequences to unique sequence regions of the chromosomal DNA for which their associated staining reagent is specific. Methods include methods for making the chromosome-specific staining compositions of the invention, and methods for applying the staining compositions to chromosomes.

  10. Chromosome Architecture and Genome Organization

    OpenAIRE

    Giorgio Bernardi

    2015-01-01

    How the same DNA sequences can function in the three-dimensional architecture of interphase nucleus, fold in the very compact structure of metaphase chromosomes and go precisely back to the original interphase architecture in the following cell cycle remains an unresolved question to this day. The strategy used to address this issue was to analyze the correlations between chromosome architecture and the compositional patterns of DNA sequences spanning a size range from a few hundreds to a few...

  11. Chromosome evolution in Neotropical butterflies

    OpenAIRE

    Saura, Anssi; Von Schoultz, Barbara; Saura, Anja O.; Brown, Keith S., Jr.

    2013-01-01

    We list the chromosome numbers for 65 species of Neotropical Hesperiidae and 104 species or subspecies of Pieridae. In Hesperiidae the tribe Pyrrhopygini have a modal n = 28, Eudaminae and Pyrgini a modal n = 31, while Hesperiinae have n = around 29. Among Pieridae, Coliadinae have a strong modal n = 31 and among Pierinae Anthocharidini are almost fixed for n = 15 while Pierini vary with n = 26 as the most common chromosome number. Dismorphiinae show wide variation. We discuss these results i...

  12. C-banding and fluorescent in situ hybridization with rDNA sequences in chromosomes of Cycloneda sanguinea Linnaeus (Coleoptera, Coccinellidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliane Mariza Dortas Maffei

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to describe mitotic and meiotic chromosomes of Cycloneda sanguinea using C-banding, fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH rDNA probes, and sequential FISH/Ag-NOR staining. The chromosome number was 2n = 18 + XX for females and 2n = 18 + Xy for males. The X chromosome was metacentric and the Y chromosome was very small. During meiosis, the karyotypic meioformula was n = 9 + Xy p, and sex chromosomes configured a parachute at metaphase I. At the beginning of pachytene, bivalents were still individualized, and sex chromosomes were associated end-to-end through the heteropycnotic region of the X chromosome. Later in pachytene, further condensation led to the formation of a pseudo-ring by the sex bivalent. All chromosomes showed pericentromeric heterochromatin. FISH and sequential FISH/Ag-NOR staining evidenced the location of the nucleolar organizer region in one pair of autosomes (at spermatogonial metaphase. During meiosis, these genes were mapped to a region outside the sex vesicle by FISH, although Xy p was deeply stained with silver at metaphase I. These results suggest that these argyrophilic substances are of a nucleolar protein nature, and seem to be synthesized by a pair of autosomes and imported during meiosis (prophase I to the sex pair, during the association of the sex chromosomes.

  13. Multiple origins of asteroid pairs

    CERN Document Server

    Jacobson, Seth A

    2015-01-01

    Rotationally fissioned asteroids produce unbound daughter asteroids that have very similar heliocentric orbits. Backward integration of their current heliocentric orbits provides an age of closest proximity that can be used to date the rotational fission event. Most asteroid pairs follow a predicted theoretical relationship between the primary spin period and the mass ratio of the two pair members that is a direct consequence of the YORP-induced rotational fission hypothesis. If the progenitor asteroid has strength, asteroid pairs may have high mass ratios with possibly fast rotating primaries. However, secondary fission leaves the originally predicted trend unaltered. We also describe the characteristics of pair members produced by four alternative routes from a rotational fission event to an asteroid pair. Unlike direct formation from the event itself, the age of closest proximity of these pairs cannot generally be used to date the rotational fission event since considerable time may have passed.

  14. Cooper pairs in atomic nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe recent efforts to study Cooper pairs in atomic nuclei. We consider a self-consistent Hartree Fock mean field for the even Sm isotopes and compare results based on three treatments of pairing correlations: a BCS treatment, a number-projected BCS treatment and an exact treatment using the Richardson Ansatz. Significant differences are seen in the pairing correlation energies. Furthermore, because it does not average over the properties of the fermion pairs, the Richardson solution permits a more meaningful definition of the Cooper wave function and of the fraction of pairs that are collective. Our results confirm that only a few pairs near the Fermi surface in realistic atomic nuclei are collective. (Author)

  15. Cooper pairs in atomic nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pittel, S. [Bartol Research Institute and Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, Newark, 19716 Delaware (United States); Dussel, G. G. [Departamento de Fisica J.J. Giambiagi, Universidad de Buenos Aires, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Dukelsky, J.; Sarriguren, P. [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, CSIC, Serrano 123, 28006 Madrid (Spain)

    2008-12-15

    We describe recent efforts to study Cooper pairs in atomic nuclei. We consider a self-consistent Hartree Fock mean field for the even Sm isotopes and compare results based on three treatments of pairing correlations: a BCS treatment, a number-projected BCS treatment and an exact treatment using the Richardson Ansatz. Significant differences are seen in the pairing correlation energies. Furthermore, because it does not average over the properties of the fermion pairs, the Richardson solution permits a more meaningful definition of the Cooper wave function and of the fraction of pairs that are collective. Our results confirm that only a few pairs near the Fermi surface in realistic atomic nuclei are collective. (Author)

  16. Numerically abnormal chromosome constitutions in humans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 24, discusses numerically abnormal chromosome constitutions in humans. This involves abnormalities of human chromosome number, including polyploidy (when the number of sets of chromosomes increases) and aneuploidy (when the number of individual normal chromosomes changes). Chapter sections discuss the following chromosomal abnormalities: human triploids, imprinting and uniparental disomy, human tetraploids, hydatidiform moles, anomalies caused by chromosomal imbalance, 13 trisomy (D{sub 1} trisomy, Patau syndrome), 21 trisomy (Down syndrome), 18 trisomy syndrome (Edwards syndrome), other autosomal aneuploidy syndromes, and spontaneous abortions. The chapter concludes with remarks on the nonrandom participation of chromosomes in trisomy. 69 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  17. Chromosome evolution in Neotropical butterflies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saura, Anssi; Von Schoultz, Barbara; Saura, Anja O; Brown, Keith S

    2013-06-01

    We list the chromosome numbers for 65 species of Neotropical Hesperiidae and 104 species or subspecies of Pieridae. In Hesperiidae the tribe Pyrrhopygini have a modal n = 28, Eudaminae and Pyrgini a modal n = 31, while Hesperiinae have n = around 29. Among Pieridae, Coliadinae have a strong modal n = 31 and among Pierinae Anthocharidini are almost fixed for n = 15 while Pierini vary with n = 26 as the most common chromosome number. Dismorphiinae show wide variation. We discuss these results in the context of chromosome numbers of over 1400 Neotropical butterfly species and subspecies derived from about 3000 populations published here and in earlier papers of a series. The overall results show that many Neotropical groups are characterized by karyotype instability with several derived modal numbers or none at all, while almost all taxa of Lepidoptera studied from the other parts of the world have one of n = 29-31 as modal numbers. Possibly chromosome number changes become fixed in the course of speciation driven by biotic interactions. Population subdivision and structuring facilitate karyotype change. Factors that stabilize chromosome numbers include hybridization among species sharing the same number, migration, sexual selection and possibly the distribution of chromosomes within the nucleus. PMID:23865963

  18. Chromosome Architecture and Genome Organization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardi, Giorgio

    2015-01-01

    How the same DNA sequences can function in the three-dimensional architecture of interphase nucleus, fold in the very compact structure of metaphase chromosomes and go precisely back to the original interphase architecture in the following cell cycle remains an unresolved question to this day. The strategy used to address this issue was to analyze the correlations between chromosome architecture and the compositional patterns of DNA sequences spanning a size range from a few hundreds to a few thousands Kilobases. This is a critical range that encompasses isochores, interphase chromatin domains and boundaries, and chromosomal bands. The solution rests on the following key points: 1) the transition from the looped domains and sub-domains of interphase chromatin to the 30-nm fiber loops of early prophase chromosomes goes through the unfolding into an extended chromatin structure (probably a 10-nm “beads-on-a-string” structure); 2) the architectural proteins of interphase chromatin, such as CTCF and cohesin sub-units, are retained in mitosis and are part of the discontinuous protein scaffold of mitotic chromosomes; 3) the conservation of the link between architectural proteins and their binding sites on DNA through the cell cycle explains the “mitotic memory” of interphase architecture and the reversibility of the interphase to mitosis process. The results presented here also lead to a general conclusion which concerns the existence of correlations between the isochore organization of the genome and the architecture of chromosomes from interphase to metaphase. PMID:26619076

  19. Sequence features contributing to chromosomal rearrangements in Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russell Spencer-Smith

    Full Text Available Through whole genome sequence alignments, breakpoints in chromosomal synteny can be identified and the sequence features associated with these determined. Alignments of the genome sequences of Neisseria gonorrhoeae strain FA1090, N.gonorrhoeae strain NCCP11945, and N. gonorrhoeae strain TCDC-NG08107 reveal chromosomal rearrangements that have occurred. Based on these alignments and dot plot pair-wise comparisons, the overall chromosomal arrangement of strain NCCP11945 and TCDC-NG08107 are very similar, with no large inversions or translocations. The insertion of the Gonococcal Genetic Island in strain NCCP11945 is the most prominent distinguishing feature differentiating these strains. When strain NCCP11945 is compared to strain FA1090, however, 14 breakpoints in chromosomal synteny are identified between these gonococcal strains. The majority of these, 11 of 14, are associated with a prophage, IS elements, or IS-like repeat enclosed elements which appear to have played a role in the rearrangements observed. Additional rearrangements of small regions of the genome are associated with pilin genes. Evidence presented here suggests that the rearrangements of blocks of sequence are mediated by activation of prophage and associated IS elements and reintegration elsewhere in the genome or by homologous recombination between IS-like elements that have generated inversions.

  20. STRUCTURAL CHROMOSOME DIVERSIFICATION IN TWO SOUTHERN ATLANTIC MARINE CATFISHES (ARIIDAE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Washington Candeia de Araújo

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Siluriforms is one of the most diverse groups of the Neotropical ichthyofauna. About 1,750 species occurs exclusively in the Americas. In view the high number of species, geographical widespread and morphological similarities, there are still many questions about the relationship among some families and species. One of the two families in this Order that inhabit the marine environment, Ariidae shows numerous taxonomic uncertainties. Cytogenetic analysis in Atlantic species are still incipient. To evaluate the karyotype diversity and infer the evolutionary history of this clade are presented here chromosomal data of species Cathorops spixii and Sciades sp. distributed in the northeastern Brazil coastline. Both species have the same diploid number 2n=56, but with marked differences between chromosomal formulas. In fact, C. spixii shows 12m+16sm+24st+4a (NF=108 and Sciades sp. presents 14m+10sm+22st+10a (NF=102. Both species have multiple NORs (nucleolar organizer regions, localized in the terminal portion of two chromosome pairs. The karyotypic patterns of these and other species of Ariidae indicates that pericentric inversion represent that the main mechanism involved in chromosomal diversity of the family. Taxonomic uncertainty in some taxa and the occurrence of interpopulational karyotypic variations in species Ariidae, raise detailed analyzes using the mapping of repetitive sequences in order to identify possible cryptic species in this family along the Brazilian coast. Keywords: Cathorops spixii, Sciades sp., pericentric inversions, fish cytogenetics, marine catfishes.

  1. Nanoampere pumping of Cooper pairs

    OpenAIRE

    Vartiainen, Juha J.; Möttönen, Mikko; Pekola, Jukka P.; Kemppinen, Antti

    2007-01-01

    The authors have employed a tunable Cooper-pair transistor, the sluice, with radio frequency control to pump current over a resistive circuit. They find that the charge transferred per pumping cycle can be controlled with the resolution of a single Cooper pair up to hundreds of pairs. The achieved nanoampere current features more than an order of magnitude improvement over the previously reported results and it is close to the theoretical maximum value for the measured sample.

  2. Nanoampere pumping of Cooper pairs

    OpenAIRE

    Vartiainen, Juha J.; Mottonen, Mikko; Pekola, Jukka; Kemppinen, Antti

    2006-01-01

    We have employed a tunable Cooper-pair transistor, the sluice, with radio frequency control to pump current over a resistive circuit. We find that the charge transferred per pumping cycle can be controlled with the resolution of a single Cooper-pair up to hundreds of pairs. The achieved nanoampere current features more than an order of magnitude improvement over the previously reported results and it is close to the theoretical maximum value for the measured sample.

  3. Controversies in kidney paired donation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentry, Sommer E; Montgomery, Robert A; Segev, Dorry L

    2012-07-01

    Kidney paired donation represented 10% of living kidney donation in the United States in 2011. National registries around the world and several separate registries in the United States arrange paired donations, although with significant variations in their practices. Concerns about ethical considerations, clinical advisability, and the quantitative effectiveness of these approaches in paired donation result in these variations. For instance, although donor travel can be burdensome and might discourage paired donation, it was nearly universal until convincing analysis showed that living donor kidneys can sustain many hours of cold ischemia time without adverse consequences. Opinions also differ about whether the last donor in a chain of paired donation transplants initiated by a nondirected donor should donate immediately to someone on the deceased donor wait-list (a domino or closed chain) or should be asked to wait some length of time and donate to start another sequence of paired donations later (an open chain); some argue that asking the donor to donate later may be coercive, and others focus on balancing the probability that the waiting donor withdraws versus the number of additional transplants if the chain can be continued. Other controversies in paired donation include simultaneous versus nonsimultaneous donor operations, whether to enroll compatible pairs, and interactions with desensitization protocols. Efforts to expand public awareness of and participation in paired donation are needed to generate more transplant opportunities. PMID:22732046

  4. Pair Production by Ultraintense Lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We consider the production of electron-positron pairs by the interaction of relativistic superthermal electrons, generated by ultraintense laser pulses, with high-Z material. We discuss the laser and target parameters required in order to optimize the pair-production rate. We explore the regime when the pairs, if sufficiently confined, can start to exponentiate in number and explore the feasibility of achieving a pair density approaching 1021cm-3 , (1) /(50) th that of solid-ion density. copyright 1998 The American Physical Society

  5. Cooper pairs in atomic nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Dussel, G G; Dukelsky, J; Sarriguren, P

    2007-01-01

    We consider the development of Cooper pairs in a self-consistent Hartree Fock mean field for the even Sm isotopes. Results are presented at the level of a BCS treatment, a number-projected BCS treatment and an exact treatment using the Richardson ansatz. While projected BCS captures much of the pairing correlation energy that is absent from BCS, it still misses a sizable correlation energy, typically of order $1 MeV$. Furthermore, because it does not average over the properties of the fermion pairs, the exact Richardson solution permits a more meaningful definition of the Cooper wave function and of the fraction of pairs that are collective.

  6. Evolution of Sex Chromosomes in Insects

    OpenAIRE

    Kaiser, Vera B; Bachtrog, Doris

    2010-01-01

    Sex chromosomes have many unusual features relative to autosomes. Y (or W) chromosomes lack genetic recombination, are male- (female-) limited, and show an abundance of genetically inert heterochromatic DNA but contain few functional genes. X (or Z) chromosomes also show sex-biased transmission (i.e., X chromosomes show female-biased and Z-chromosomes show male-biased inheritance) and are hemizygous in the heterogametic sex. Their unusual ploidy level and pattern of inheritance imply that sex...

  7. Uncovering the Ancestry of B Chromosomes in Moenkhausia sanctaefilomenae (Teleostei, Characidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utsunomia, Ricardo; Silva, Duílio Mazzoni Zerbinato de Andrade; Ruiz-Ruano, Francisco J.; Araya-Jaime, Cristian; Pansonato-Alves, José Carlos; Scacchetti, Priscilla Cardim; Hashimoto, Diogo Teruo; Oliveira, Claudio; Trifonov, Vladmir A.; Porto-Foresti, Fábio; Camacho, Juan Pedro M.; Foresti, Fausto

    2016-01-01

    B chromosomes constitute a heterogeneous mixture of genomic parasites that are sometimes derived intraspecifically from the standard genome of the host species, but result from interspecific hybridization in other cases. The mode of origin determines the DNA content, with the B chromosomes showing high similarity with the A genome in the first case, but presenting higher similarity with a different species in the second. The characid fish Moenkhausia sanctaefilomenae harbours highly invasive B chromosomes, which are present in all populations analyzed to date in the Parana and Tietê rivers. To investigate the origin of these B chromosomes, we analyzed two natural populations: one carrying B chromosomes and the other lacking them, using a combination of molecular cytogenetic techniques, nucleotide sequence analysis and high-throughput sequencing (Illumina HiSeq2000). Our results showed that i) B chromosomes have not yet reached the Paranapanema River basin; ii) B chromosomes are mitotically unstable; iii) there are two types of B chromosomes, the most frequent of which is lightly C-banded (similar to euchromatin in A chromosomes) (B1), while the other is darkly C-banded (heterochromatin-like) (B2); iv) the two B types contain the same tandem repeat DNA sequences (18S ribosomal DNA, H3 histone genes, MS3 and MS7 satellite DNA), with a higher content of 18S rDNA in the heterochromatic variant; v) all of these repetitive DNAs are present together only in the paracentromeric region of autosome pair no. 6, suggesting that the B chromosomes are derived from this A chromosome; vi) the two B chromosome variants show MS3 sequences that are highly divergent from each other and from the 0B genome, although the B2-derived sequences exhibit higher similarity with the 0B genome (this suggests an independent origin of the two B variants, with the less frequent, B2 type presumably being younger); and vii) the dN/dS ratio for the H3.2 histone gene is almost 4–6 times higher for B

  8. The Sequence and Analysis of Duplication Rich Human Chromosome 16

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Joel; Han, Cliff; Gordon, Laurie A.; Terry, Astrid; Prabhakar, Shyam; She, Xinwei; Xie, Gary; Hellsten, Uffe; Man Chan, Yee; Altherr, Michael; Couronne, Olivier; Aerts, Andrea; Bajorek, Eva; Black, Stacey; Blumer, Heather; Branscomb, Elbert; Brown, Nancy C.; Bruno, William J.; Buckingham, Judith M.; Callen, David F.; Campbell, Connie S.; Campbell, Mary L.; Campbell, Evelyn W.; Caoile, Chenier; Challacombe, Jean F.; Chasteen, Leslie A.; Chertkov, Olga; Chi, Han C.; Christensen, Mari; Clark, Lynn M.; Cohn, Judith D.; Denys, Mirian; Detter, John C.; Dickson, Mark; Dimitrijevic-Bussod, Mira; Escobar, Julio; Fawcett, Joseph J.; Flowers, Dave; Fotopulos, Dea; Glavina, Tijana; Gomez, Maria; Gonzales, Eidelyn; Goodstein, David; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Grady, Deborah L.; Grigoriev, Igor; Groza, Matthew; Hammon, Nancy; Hawkins, Trevor; Haydu, Lauren; Hildebrand, Carl E.; Huang, Wayne; Israni, Sanjay; Jett, Jamie; Jewett, Phillip E.; Kadner, Kristen; Kimball, Heather; Kobayashi, Arthur; Krawczyk, Marie-Claude; Leyba, Tina; Longmire, Jonathan L.; Lopez, Frederick; Lou, Yunian; Lowry, Steve; Ludeman, Thom; Mark, Graham A.; Mcmurray, Kimberly L.; Meincke, Linda J.; Morgan, Jenna; Moyzis, Robert K.; Mundt, Mark O.; Munk, A. Christine; Nandkeshwar, Richard D.; Pitluck, Sam; Pollard, Martin; Predki, Paul; Parson-Quintana, Beverly; Ramirez, Lucia; Rash, Sam; Retterer, James; Ricke, Darryl O.; Robinson, Donna L.; Rodriguez, Alex; Salamov, Asaf; Saunders, Elizabeth H.; Scott, Duncan; Shough, Timothy; Stallings, Raymond L.; Stalvey, Malinda; Sutherland, Robert D.; Tapia, Roxanne; Tesmer, Judith G.; Thayer, Nina; Thompson, Linda S.; Tice, Hope; Torney, David C.; Tran-Gyamfi, Mary; Tsai, Ming; Ulanovsky, Levy E.; Ustaszewska, Anna; Vo, Nu; White, P. Scott; Williams, Albert L.; Wills, Patricia L.; Wu, Jung-Rung; Wu, Kevin; Yang, Joan; DeJong, Pieter; Bruce, David; Doggett, Norman; Deaven, Larry; Schmutz, Jeremy; Grimwood, Jane; Richardson, Paul; et al.

    2004-01-01

    We report here the 78,884,754 base pairs of finished human chromosome 16 sequence, representing over 99.9 percent of its euchromatin. Manual annotation revealed 880 protein coding genes confirmed by 1,637 aligned transcripts, 19 tRNA genes, 341 pseudogenes and 3 RNA pseudogenes. These genes include metallothionein, cadherin and iroquois gene families, as well as the disease genes for polycystic kidney disease and acute myelomonocytic leukemia. Several large-scale structural polymorphisms spanning hundreds of kilobasepairs were identified and result in gene content differences across humans. One of the unique features of chromosome 16 is its high level of segmental duplication, ranked among the highest of the human autosomes. While the segmental duplications are enriched in the relatively gene poor pericentromere of the p-arm, some are involved in recent gene duplication and conversion events which are likely to have had an impact on the evolution of primates and human disease susceptibility.

  9. The sequence and analysis of duplication rich human chromosome 16

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Joel; Han, Cliff; Gordon, Laurie A.; Terry, Astrid; Prabhakar, Shyam; She, Xinwei; Xie, Gary; Hellsten, Uffe; Man Chan, Yee; Altherr, Michael; Couronne, Olivier; Aerts, Andrea; Bajorek, Eva; Black, Stacey; Blumer, Heather; Branscomb, Elbert; Brown, Nancy C.; Bruno, William J.; Buckingham, Judith M.; Callen, David F.; Campbell, Connie S.; Campbell, Mary L.; Campbell, Evelyn W.; Caoile, Chenier; Challacombe, Jean F.; Chasteen, Leslie A.; Chertkov, Olga; Chi, Han C.; Christensen, Mari; Clark, Lynn M.; Cohn, Judith D.; Denys, Mirian; Detter, John C.; Dickson, Mark; Dimitrijevic-Bussod, Mira; Escobar, Julio; Fawcett, Joseph J.; Flowers, Dave; Fotopulos, Dea; Glavina, Tijana; Gomez, Maria; Gonzales, Eidelyn; Goodstein, David; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Grady, Deborah L.; Grigoriev, Igor; Groza, Matthew; Hammon, Nancy; Hawkins, Trevor; Haydu, Lauren; Hildebrand, Carl E.; Huang, Wayne; Israni, Sanjay; Jett, Jamie; Jewett, Phillip E.; Kadner, Kristen; Kimball, Heather; Kobayashi, Arthur; Krawczyk, Marie-Claude; Leyba, Tina; Longmire, Jonathan L.; Lopez, Frederick; Lou, Yunian; Lowry, Steve; Ludeman, Thom; Mark, Graham A.; Mcmurray, Kimberly L.; Meincke, Linda J.; Morgan, Jenna; Moyzis, Robert K.; Mundt, Mark O.; Munk, A. Christine; Nandkeshwar, Richard D.; Pitluck, Sam; Pollard, Martin; Predki, Paul; Parson-Quintana, Beverly; Ramirez, Lucia; Rash, Sam; Retterer, James; Ricke, Darryl O.; Robinson, Donna L.; Rodriguez, Alex; Salamov, Asaf; Saunders, Elizabeth H.; Scott, Duncan; Shough, Timothy; Stallings, Raymond L.; Stalvey, Malinda; Sutherland, Robert D.; Tapia, Roxanne; Tesmer, Judith G.; Thayer, Nina; Thompson, Linda S.; Tice, Hope; Torney, David C.; Tran-Gyamfi, Mary; Tsai, Ming; Ulanovsky, Levy E.; Ustaszewska, Anna; Vo, Nu; White, P. Scott; Williams, Albert L.; Wills, Patricia L.; Wu, Jung-Rung; Wu, Kevin; Yang, Joan; DeJong, Pieter; Bruce, David; Doggett, Norman; Deaven, Larry; Schmutz, Jeremy; Grimwood, Jane; Richardson, Paul; et al.

    2004-08-01

    We report here the 78,884,754 base pairs of finished human chromosome 16 sequence, representing over 99.9 percent of its euchromatin. Manual annotation revealed 880 protein coding genes confirmed by 1,637 aligned transcripts, 19 tRNA genes, 341 pseudogenes and 3 RNA pseudogenes. These genes include metallothionein, cadherin and iroquois gene families, as well as the disease genes for polycystic kidney disease and acute myelomonocytic leukemia. Several large-scale structural polymorphisms spanning hundreds of kilobasepairs were identified and result in gene content differences across humans. One of the unique features of chromosome 16 is its high level of segmental duplication, ranked among the highest of the human autosomes. While the segmental duplications are enriched in the relatively gene poor pericentromere of the p-arm, some are involved in recent gene duplication and conversion events which are likely to have had an impact on the evolution of primates and human disease susceptibility.

  10. Interphase Chromosome Conformation and Chromatin-Chromatin Interactions in Human Epithelial Cells Cultured Under Different Gravity Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ye; Wong, Michael; Hada, Megumi; Wu, Honglu

    2015-01-01

    Microgravity has been shown to alter global gene expression patterns and protein levels both in cultured cells and animal models. It has been suggested that the packaging of chromatin fibers in the interphase nucleus is closely related to genome function, and the changes in transcriptional activity are tightly correlated with changes in chromatin folding. This study explores the changes of chromatin conformation and chromatin-chromatin interactions in the simulated microgravity environment, and investigates their correlation to the expression of genes located at different regions of the chromosome. To investigate the folding of chromatin in interphase under various culture conditions, human epithelial cells, fibroblasts, and lymphocytes were fixed in the G1 phase. Interphase chromosomes were hybridized with a multicolor banding in situ hybridization (mBAND) probe for chromosome 3 which distinguishes six regions of the chromosome as separate colors. After images were captured with a laser scanning confocal microscope, the 3-dimensional structure of interphase chromosome 3 was reconstructed at multi-mega base pair scale. In order to determine the effects of microgravity on chromosome conformation and orientation, measures such as distance between homologous pairs, relative orientation of chromosome arms about a shared midpoint, and orientation of arms within individual chromosomes were all considered as potentially impacted by simulated microgravity conditions. The studies revealed non-random folding of chromatin in interphase, and suggested an association of interphase chromatin folding with radiation-induced chromosome aberration hotspots. Interestingly, the distributions of genes with expression changes over chromosome 3 in cells cultured under microgravity environment are apparently clustered on specific loci and chromosomes. This data provides important insights into how mammalian cells respond to microgravity at molecular level.

  11. Hormad1 mutation disrupts synaptonemal complex formation, recombination, and chromosome segregation in mammalian meiosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-Hyun Shin

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Meiosis is unique to germ cells and essential for reproduction. During the first meiotic division, homologous chromosomes pair, recombine, and form chiasmata. The homologues connect via axial elements and numerous transverse filaments to form the synaptonemal complex. The synaptonemal complex is a critical component for chromosome pairing, segregation, and recombination. We previously identified a novel germ cell-specific HORMA domain encoding gene, Hormad1, a member of the synaptonemal complex and a mammalian counterpart to the yeast meiotic HORMA domain protein Hop1. Hormad1 is essential for mammalian gametogenesis as knockout male and female mice are infertile. Hormad1 deficient (Hormad1(-/ (- testes exhibit meiotic arrest in the early pachytene stage, and synaptonemal complexes cannot be visualized by electron microscopy. Hormad1 deficiency does not affect localization of other synaptonemal complex proteins, SYCP2 and SYCP3, but disrupts homologous chromosome pairing. Double stranded break formation and early recombination events are disrupted in Hormad1(-/ (- testes and ovaries as shown by the drastic decrease in the γH2AX, DMC1, RAD51, and RPA foci. HORMAD1 co-localizes with γH2AX to the sex body during pachytene. BRCA1, ATR, and γH2AX co-localize to the sex body and participate in meiotic sex chromosome inactivation and transcriptional silencing. Hormad1 deficiency abolishes γH2AX, ATR, and BRCA1 localization to the sex chromosomes and causes transcriptional de-repression on the X chromosome. Unlike testes, Hormad1(-/ (- ovaries have seemingly normal ovarian folliculogenesis after puberty. However, embryos generated from Hormad1(-/ (- oocytes are hyper- and hypodiploid at the 2 cell and 8 cell stage, and they arrest at the blastocyst stage. HORMAD1 is therefore a critical component of the synaptonemal complex that affects synapsis, recombination, and meiotic sex chromosome inactivation and transcriptional silencing.

  12. The Simplex in Pair Comparisons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloxom, Bruce

    1972-01-01

    Paper develops a model which expresses pair comparisons as a function of (a) affective values which form a perfect simplex, (b) systematic (constant over replications) deviations from the simplex-structured affective values, and (c) errors of measurement for the pair comparisons. (Author)

  13. Kramers Pairs in Configuration Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Avery, John Scales; Avery, James Emil

    2003-01-01

    The theory of symmetry-preserving Kramers pair creation operators is reviewed and formulas for applying these operators to configuration interaction calculations are derived. A new and more general type of symmetry-preserving pair creation operator is proposed and shown to commute with the total...

  14. Pairing anti-halo effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We discuss pairing correlations in weakly bound neutron rich nuclei, by using the coordinate-space Hartree-Fock-Bogolyubov approach which allows to take properly into account the coupling to particle continuum. We show that the additional pairing binding energy acts against a development of an infinite rms radius, even in situations when an l=0 single-particle orbital becomes unbound. (author)

  15. PERIODIC COMPLEMENTARY BINARY SEQUENCE PAIRS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XuChengqian; ZhaoXiaoqun

    2002-01-01

    A new set of binary sequences-Periodic Complementary Binary Sequence Pair (PCSP)is proposed .A new class of block design-Difference Family Pair (DFP)is also proposed .The relationship between PCSP and DFP,the properties and exising conditions of PCSP and the recursive constructions for PCSP are given.

  16. PERIODIC COMPLEMENTARY BINARY SEQUENCE PAIRS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Chengqian; Zhao Xiaoqun

    2002-01-01

    A new set of binary sequences-Periodic Complementary Binary Sequence Pair (PCSP) is proposed. A new class of block design-Difference Family Pair (DFP) is also proposed.The relationship between PCSP and DFP, the properties and existing conditions of PCSP and the recursive constructions for PCSP are given.

  17. Assessment Strategies for Pair Programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Jan Hendrik; Mentz, Elsa; Meyer, Lukas

    2009-01-01

    Although pair programming has proved its usefulness in teaching and learning programming skills, it is difficult to assess the individual roles and abilities of students whilst programming in pairs. (Note that within this manuscript, the term assessment refers to evaluating individual student performance.) Assessing only the outcomes of a pair…

  18. Development of affinity technology for isolating individual human chromosomes by third strand binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fresco, Jacques R.

    2003-06-01

    The overall goal was to explore whether nucleic acid third strands could be used to bind with very high specificity to specific targets within whole genomes. Towards this end conditions had to be found to keep erroneous binding to an absolute minimum. The goal to use third strands (linked to magnetic beads) to ''capture'' large particles such as plasmids, cosmids, and whole chromosomes from complex mixtures was partially met; their use to serve as cytogenetic probes of metaphase chromosomes and to deliver reactive reagents to unique target sites on chromosomes in vivo for the purpose of mutagenizing specific base pairs was fully met; and their use as cytogenetic probes of chromosomal DNA in sections of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue has been met since the DOE support was terminated.

  19. Shape Transitions and Chiral Symmetry Breaking in the Energy Landscape of the Mitotic Chromosome

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Bin

    2015-01-01

    We derive an unbiased information theoretic energy landscape for chromosomes at metaphase using a maximum entropy approach that accurately reproduces the details of the experimentally measured pair-wise contact probabilities between genomic loci. Dynamical simulations using this landscape lead to cylindrical, helically twisted structures reflecting liquid crystalline order. These structures are similar to those arising from a generic ideal homogenized chromosome energy landscape. The helical twist can be either right or left handed so chiral symmetry is broken spontaneously. The ideal chromosome landscape when augmented by interactions like those leading to topologically associating domain (TAD) formation in the interphase chromosome reproduces these behaviors. The phase diagram of this landscape shows the helical fiber order and the cylindrical shape persist at temperatures above the onset of chiral symmetry breaking which is limited by the TAD interaction strength.

  20. Property (RD) for Hecke Pairs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shirbisheh, Vahid, E-mail: shirbisheh@gmail.com

    2012-06-15

    As the first step towards developing noncommutative geometry over Hecke C{sup Asterisk-Operator }-algebras, we study property (RD) (Rapid Decay) for Hecke pairs. When the subgroup H in a Hecke pair (G, H) is finite, we show that the Hecke pair (G, H) has (RD) if and only if G has (RD). This provides us with a family of examples of Hecke pairs with property (RD). We also adapt Paul Jolissant's works in Jolissaint (J K-Theory 2:723-735, 1989; Trans Amer Math Soc 317(1):167-196, 1990) to the setting of Hecke C{sup Asterisk-Operator }-algebras and show that when a Hecke pair (G, H) has property (RD), the algebra of rapidly decreasing functions on the set of double cosets is closed under holomorphic functional calculus of the associated (reduced) Hecke C{sup Asterisk-Operator }-algebra. Hence they have the same K{sub 0}-groups.

  1. Property (RD) for Hecke Pairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirbisheh, Vahid

    2012-06-01

    As the first step towards developing noncommutative geometry over Hecke C ∗-algebras, we study property (RD) (Rapid Decay) for Hecke pairs. When the subgroup H in a Hecke pair ( G, H) is finite, we show that the Hecke pair ( G, H) has (RD) if and only if G has (RD). This provides us with a family of examples of Hecke pairs with property (RD). We also adapt Paul Jolissant's works in Jolissaint (J K-Theory 2:723-735, 1989; Trans Amer Math Soc 317(1):167-196, 1990) to the setting of Hecke C ∗-algebras and show that when a Hecke pair ( G, H) has property (RD), the algebra of rapidly decreasing functions on the set of double cosets is closed under holomorphic functional calculus of the associated (reduced) Hecke C ∗-algebra. Hence they have the same K 0-groups.

  2. The Reduction of Chromosome Number in Meiosis Is Determined by Properties Built into the Chromosomes

    OpenAIRE

    Paliulis, Leocadia V.; Nicklas, R. Bruce

    2000-01-01

    In meiosis I, two chromatids move to each spindle pole. Then, in meiosis II, the two are distributed, one to each future gamete. This requires that meiosis I chromosomes attach to the spindle differently than meiosis II chromosomes and that they regulate chromosome cohesion differently. We investigated whether the information that dictates the division type of the chromosome comes from the whole cell, the spindle, or the chromosome itself. Also, we determined when chromosomes can switch from ...

  3. Chromosome segregation in plant meiosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda eZamariola

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Faithful chromosome segregation in meiosis is essential for ploidy stability over sexual life cycles. In plants, defective chromosome segregation caused by gene mutations or other factors leads to the formation of unbalanced or unreduced gametes creating aneuploid or polyploid progeny, respectively. Accurate segregation requires the coordinated execution of conserved processes occurring throughout the two meiotic cell divisions. Synapsis and recombination ensure the establishment of chiasmata that hold homologous chromosomes together allowing their correct segregation in the first meiotic division, which is also tightly regulated by cell-cycle dependent release of cohesin and monopolar attachment of sister kinetochores to microtubules. In meiosis II, bi-orientation of sister kinetochores and proper spindle orientation correctly segregate chromosomes in four haploid cells. Checkpoint mechanisms acting at kinetochores control the accuracy of kinetochore-microtubule attachment, thus ensuring the completion of segregation. Here we review the current knowledge on the processes taking place during chromosome segregation in plant meiosis, focusing on the characterization of the molecular factors involved.

  4. Radiation-induced chromosomal instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ritter, S. [GSI, Biophysics, Darmstadt (Germany)

    1999-03-01

    Recent studies on radiation-induced chromosomal instability in the progeny of exposed mammalian cells were briefly described as well as other related studies. For the analysis of chromosomal damage in clones, cells were seeded directly after exposure in cell well-dish to form single cell clones and post-irradiation chromosome aberrations were scored. Both exposure to isoeffective doses of X-ray or 270 MeV/u C-ions (13 keV/{mu}m) increased the number of clones with abnormal karyotype and the increase was similar for X-ray and for C-ions. Meanwhile, in the progeny of cells for mass cultures, there was no indication of a delayed expression of chromosomal damage up to 40 population doublings after the exposure. A high number of aberrant cells were only observed directly after exposure to 10.7 MeV/u O-ions, i.e. in the first cycle cells and decreased with subsequent cell divisions. The reason for these differences in the radiation-induced chromosomal instability between clonal isolates and mass culture has not been clarified. Recent studies indicated that genomic instability occurs at a high frequency in the progeny of cells irradiated with both sparsely and densely ionizing radiation. Such genomic instability is thought likely to increase the risk of carcinogenesis, but more data are required for a well understanding of the health risks resulting from radiation-induced delayed instability. (M.N.)

  5. Dean flow fractionation of chromosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hockin, Matt; Sant, Himanshu J.; Capecchi, Mario; Gale, Bruce K.

    2016-03-01

    Efforts to transfer intact mammalian chromosomes between cells have been attempted for more than 50 years with the consistent result being transfer of sub unit length pieces regardless of method. Inertial microfluidics is a new field that has shown much promise in addressing the fractionation of particles in the 2-20 μm size range (with unknown limits) and separations are based upon particles being carried by curving confined flows (within a spiral shaped, often rectangular flow chamber) and migrating to stable "equilibrium" positions of varying distance from a chamber wall depending on the balance of dean and lift forces. We fabricated spiral channels for inertial microfluidic separations using a standard soft lithography process. The concentration of chromosomes, small contaminant DNA and large cell debris in each outlets were evaluated using microscope (60X) and a flow cytometer. Using Dean Flow Fractionation, we were able to focus 4.5 times more chromosomes in outlet 2 compared to outlet 4 where most of the large debris is found. We recover 16% of the chromosomes in outlet #1- 50% in 2, 23% in 3 and 11% in 4. It should be noted that these estimates of recovery do not capture one piece of information- it actually may be that the chromosomes at each outlet are physically different and work needs to be done to verify this potential.

  6. The first cytogenetic description of Euleptes europaea (Gené, 1839 from Northern Sardinia reveals the highest diploid chromosome number among sphaerodactylid geckos (Sphaerodactylidae, Squamata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekaterina Gornung

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The karyotype of a sphaerodactylid gecko Euleptes europaea (Gené, 1839 was assembled for the first time in this species. It is made of 2n = 42 gradually decreasing in size chromosomes, the highest chromosome number so far acknowledged in the family Sphaerodactylidae. The second chromosome pair of the karyotype appears slightly heteromorphic in the male individual. Accordingly, FISH with a telomeric probe revealed an uneven distribution of telomeric repeats on the two homologues of this pair, which may be indicative of an XY sex-determination system in the species, to be further investigated.

  7. Chromosomal rearrangement interferes with meiotic X chromosome inactivation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Homolka, David; Ivánek, Robert; Čapková, Jana; Jansa, Petr; Forejt, Jiří

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 17, č. 10 (2007), s. 1431-1437. ISSN 1088-9051 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0520; GA ČR GA301/06/1334; GA ČR GA301/07/1383 Grant ostatní: Howard Hughes Medical Institute(US) HHMI 55000306 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : chromosomal translocations * meiotic X chromosome inactivation * spermatogenesis Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 11.224, year: 2007

  8. Evolutionary trends in the family Curimatidae (Characiformes): inferences from chromosome banding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampaio, Tatiane Ramos; Pires, Larissa Bettin; Venturelli, Natália Bortolazzi; Usso, Mariana Campaner; da Rosa, Renata; Dias, Ana Lúcia

    2016-01-01

    The family Curimatidae is a fish group usually considered chromosomally conserved in their diploid number. However, some studies show small changes in the karyotype microstructure, and the presence of B chromosomes, indicating a chromosomal diversification within the group, even if structural changes in the karyotypes are not visible. Few studies associate this trait with an evolutionary pattern within the family. This study aimed to characterize the karyotype, nucleolus organizer regions (NORs), and heterochromatin distribution of six species of Curimatidae of the genera Cyphocharax Fowler, 1906 and Steindachnerina Fowler, 1906: Cyphocharax voga (Hensel, 1870), Cyphocharax spilotus (Vari, 1987), Cyphocharax saladensis (Meinken, 1933), Cyphocharax modestus (Fernández-Yépez, 1948), Steindachnerina biornata (Braga et Azpelicueta, 1987) and Steindachnerina insculpta (Fernández-Yépez, 1948) and contribute data to a better understanding of the mechanisms involved in the chromosomal evolution of this group of fish. All specimens had 2n=54, m-sm, and B microchromosomes. Five species exhibited single NORs, except for Steindachnerina biornata, which showed a multiple pattern of ribosomal sites. NORs were chromomycin A3 positive (CMA3 (+)) and 4'-6-diamino-2-phenylindole (DAPI(-)) negative, exhibiting differences in the pair and chromosomal location of each individual of the species. FISH with 5S rDNA probe revealed sites in the pericentrometic position of a pair of chromosomes of five species. However, another site was detected on a metacentric chromosome of Cyphocharax spilotus. Heterochromatin distributed both in the pericentromeric and some terminal regions was revealed to be CMA3 (+)/DAPI(-). These data associated with the previously existing ones confirm that, although Curimatidae have a very conservative karyotype macrostructure, NORs and heterochromatin variability are caused by mechanisms of chromosome alterations, such as translocations and/or inversions

  9. The X Chromosome of Hemipteran Insects: Conservation, Dosage Compensation and Sex-Biased Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Arka; Vicoso, Beatriz

    2015-12-01

    Insects of the order Hemiptera (true bugs) use a wide range of mechanisms of sex determination, including genetic sex determination, paternal genome elimination, and haplodiploidy. Genetic sex determination, the prevalent mode, is generally controlled by a pair of XY sex chromosomes or by an XX/X0 system, but different configurations that include additional sex chromosomes are also present. Although this diversity of sex determining systems has been extensively studied at the cytogenetic level, only the X chromosome of the model pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum has been analyzed at the genomic level, and little is known about X chromosome biology in the rest of the order.In this study, we take advantage of published DNA- and RNA-seq data from three additional Hemiptera species to perform a comparative analysis of the gene content and expression of the X chromosome throughout this clade. We find that, despite showing evidence of dosage compensation, the X chromosomes of these species show female-biased expression, and a deficit of male-biased genes, in direct contrast to the pea aphid X. We further detect an excess of shared gene content between these very distant species, suggesting that despite the diversity of sex determining systems, the same chromosomal element is used as the X throughout a large portion of the order. PMID:26556591

  10. Simulation of the Formation of DNA Double Strand Breaks and Chromosome Aberrations in Irradiated Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plante, Ianik; Ponomarev, Artem L.; Wu, Honglu; Blattnig, Steve; George, Kerry

    2014-01-01

    The formation of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) and chromosome aberrations is an important consequence of ionizing radiation. To simulate DNA double-strand breaks and the formation of chromosome aberrations, we have recently merged the codes RITRACKS (Relativistic Ion Tracks) and NASARTI (NASA Radiation Track Image). The program RITRACKS is a stochastic code developed to simulate detailed event-by-event radiation track structure: [1] This code is used to calculate the dose in voxels of 20 nm, in a volume containing simulated chromosomes, [2] The number of tracks in the volume is calculated for each simulation by sampling a Poisson distribution, with the distribution parameter obtained from the irradiation dose, ion type and energy. The program NASARTI generates the chromosomes present in a cell nucleus by random walks of 20 nm, corresponding to the size of the dose voxels, [3] The generated chromosomes are located within domains which may intertwine, and [4] Each segment of the random walks corresponds to approx. 2,000 DNA base pairs. NASARTI uses pre-calculated dose at each voxel to calculate the probability of DNA damage at each random walk segment. Using the location of double-strand breaks, possible rejoining between damaged segments is evaluated. This yields various types of chromosomes aberrations, including deletions, inversions, exchanges, etc. By performing the calculations using various types of radiations, it will be possible to obtain relative biological effectiveness (RBE) values for several types of chromosome aberrations.

  11. Replication asynchrony and differential condensation of X chromosomes in female platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Kristen K K; Deakin, Janine E; Wright, Megan L; Graves, Jennifer A Marshall; Grützner, Frank

    2009-01-01

    A common theme in the evolution of sex chromosomes is the massive loss of genes on the sex-specific chromosome (Y or W), leading to a gene imbalance between males (XY) and females (XX) in a male heterogametic species, or between ZZ and ZW in a female heterogametic species. Different mechanisms have evolved to compensate for this difference in dosage of X-borne genes between sexes. In therian mammals, one of the X chromosomes is inactivated, whereas bird dosage compensation is partial and gene-specific. In therian mammals, hallmarks of the inactive X are monoallelic gene expression, late DNA replication and chromatin condensation. Platypuses have five pairs of X chromosomes in females and five X and five Y chromosomes in males. Gene expression analysis suggests a more bird-like partial and gene-specific dosage compensation mechanism. We investigated replication timing and chromosome condensation of three of the five X chromosomes in female platypus. Our data suggest asynchronous replication of X-specific regions on X(1), X(3) and X(5) but show significantly different condensation between homologues for X(3) only, and not for X(1) or X(5). We discuss these results in relation to recent gene expression analysis of X-linked genes, which together give us insights into possible mechanisms of dosage compensation in platypus. PMID:19874719

  12. Fluorescence in situ hybridisation in chromosome aberration detection in subjects occupationally exposed to ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For more than two decades, chromosomal aberration analysis has been used to detect structural chromosomal aberrations as sensitive biodosimeters of occupational exposure to ionising radiation. Its use is also recommended by the World Health Organisation. Changes in chromosome structure detected by that method are considered to be early biomarkers of a possible malignant disease. Aberrations detected by the method are unstable and can be found in the lymphocytes of irradiated personnel only within a limited time after exposure. To detect stable chromosomal aberrations, which persist after exposure, multicolour fluorescent in situ hybridisation has to be used. Using DNA probes labelled with different fluorochromes, it dyes each pair of chromosomes with different colour. Due to the dynamic of unstable aberration formation, chromosomal aberration analysis is more suitable in genome damage assessment of recent exposures. On the other hand, fluorescence in situ hybridisation gives the information on chromosome instability caused by long-term occupational exposure to ionising radiation. Considering the high costs of fluorescence in situ hybridisation and the uncertainty of the result, it should be used in biodosimetry only when it is absolutely necessary.(author)

  13. Mouse HFM1/Mer3 Is Required for Crossover Formation and Complete Synapsis of Homologous Chromosomes during Meiosis

    OpenAIRE

    Guiraldelli, Michel F.; Eyster, Craig; Wilkerson, Joseph L.; Dresser, Michael E.; Pezza, Roberto J.

    2013-01-01

    Faithful chromosome segregation during meiosis requires that homologous chromosomes associate and recombine. Chiasmata, the cytological manifestation of recombination, provide the physical link that holds the homologs together as a pair, facilitating their orientation on the spindle at meiosis I. Formation of most crossover (CO) events requires the assistance of a group of proteins collectively known as ZMM. HFM1/Mer3 is in this group of proteins and is required for normal progression of homo...

  14. A monoclonal antibody to triplex DNA binds to eucaryotic chromosomes.

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, J. S.; Burkholder, G D; Latimer, L J; Haug, B L; Braun, R P

    1987-01-01

    A monoclonal antibody (Jel 318) was produced by immunizing mice with poly[d(TmC)].poly[d(GA)].poly[d(mCT) which forms a stable triplex at neutral pH. Jel 318 did not bind to calf thymus DNA or other non pyrimidine.purine DNAs such as poly[d(TG)].poly[d(CA)]. In addition the antibody did not recognize pyrimidine.purine DNAs containing mA (e.g. poly[d(TC)].poly[d(GmA)]) which cannot form a triplex since the methyl group blocks Hoogsteen base-pairing. The binding of Jel 318 to chromosomes was as...

  15. Somatic Chromosomes of the Bornean Sambar Deer and Rusa Deer Interspecific Hybrids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismail Idris

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Hybridization has potential benefits to the Malaysian farmed deer industries in terms of increased growth rate and increased proportion of muscle and an improved alignment of feed supply and annual energy requirement. Species or subspecies of different chromosome constitution could mate to produce healthy hybrid offspring in a normal ratio of males and females. If any of the hybrid offspring were sterile, the sterile offspring would be the heterogametic offspring. The study investigated the use of chromosome banding method to detect chromosomal variation and to define the chromosome homology and the possibility of the Bornean Sambar deer (Cervus unicolor brookei and Rusa deer (Cervus timorensis hybrids to reproduce. Approach: Samples were collected from the Livestock Breeding Station, Sabrang, Keningau, Sabah, East Malaysia. The animals studied consisted of two deer subspecies namely the Bornean Sambar deer, Rusa deer and their hybrids. The karyotypes of the Bornean Sambar deer, Rusa deer and their F1 hybrids have been investigated by solid giemsa staining, G-banding and Ag-NOR banding techniques. Results: Rusa and Bornean Sambar have different chromosome number; 60 and 62 respectively, but share the same fundamental number of chromosome arm, 70. The hybrids have 2n = 61, consisting of 9 metacentric to submetacentric autosomes and 24 pairs of acrocentric autosomes with two acrocentrics and one submetacentric chromosome being unpaired. The morphology of the sex chromosomes in the F1 hybrids was similar to that of the parental species. The Ag-NOR pattern and the conventional Giemsa staining of chromosomes were effective as markers in the characterization of the karyotypes of the parental lines and hybrids because of the presence of active NORs on different chromosomes of different species. G-band, in contrast, showed complete homology in the presence of euchromatic bands and heterochromatin blocks respectively on each chromosome

  16. Escape Artists of the X Chromosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaton, Bradley P; Brown, Carolyn J

    2016-06-01

    Inactivation of one X chromosome in mammalian females achieves dosage compensation between XX females and XY males; however, over 15% of human X-linked genes continue to be expressed from the inactive X chromosome. New genomic methodologies have improved our identification and characterization of these escape genes, revealing the importance of DNA sequence, chromatin structure, and chromosome ultrastructure in regulating expression from an otherwise inactive chromosome. Study of these exceptions to the rule of silencing highlights the interconnectedness of chromatin and chromosome structure in X-chromosome inactivation (XCI). Recent advances also demonstrate the importance of these genes in sexually dimorphic disease risk, particularly cancer. PMID:27103486

  17. XX/XO, a rare sex chromosome system in Potamotrygon freshwater stingray from the Amazon Basin, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza Valentim, Francisco Carlos; Porto, Jorge Ivan Rebelo; Bertollo, Luiz Antonio Carlos; Gross, Maria Claudia; Feldberg, Eliana

    2013-09-01

    Potamotrygonidae is a representative family of South American freshwater elasmobranchs. Cytogenetic studies were performed in a Potamotrygon species from the middle Negro River, Amazonas, Brazil, here named as Potamotrygon sp. C. Mitotic and meiotic chromosomes were analyzed using conventional staining techniques, C-banding, and detection of the nucleolus organizing regions (NOR) with Silver nitrate (Ag-NOR). The diploid number was distinct between sexes, with males having 2n = 67 chromosomes, karyotype formula 19m + 8sm + 10st + 30a, and fundamental number (FN) = 104, and females having 2n = 68 chromosomes, karyotype formula 20m + 8sm + 10st + 30a, and FN = 106. A large chromosome, corresponding to pair number two in the female karyotype, was missing in the male complement. Male meiotic cells had 33 bivalents plus a large univalent chromosome in metaphase I, and n = 33 and n = 34 chromosomes in metaphase II. These characteristics are consistent with a sex chromosome system of the XX/XO type. Several Ag-NOR sites were identified in both male and female karyotypes. Positive C-banding was located only in the centromeric regions of the chromosomes. This sex chromosome system, which rarely occurs in fish, is now being described for the first time among the freshwater rays of the Amazon basin. PMID:24068425

  18. Introgression of Resistance to Powdery Mildew Conferred by Chromosome 2R by Crossing Wheat Nullisomic 2D with Rye

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Using the nullisomic back-cross procedure, four wheat-rye chromosome substitution 2R (2D) lines with different agronomic performance, designated WR02-145-1, WR01-145-2, WR02-145-3, and WR02-145-4, were produced from a cross between 2D nullisomic wheat (Triticum aestivum L. cv. "Xiaoyan 6") and rye (Secale cereale L. cv. "German White"). The chromosomal constitution of 2n=42=21 in WR02-145 lines was confirmed by cytological and molecular cytogenetic methods. Using genomic in situ hybridization on root tip chromosome preparations, a pair of intact rye chromosomes was detected in the WR02-145 lines. PCR using chromosome-specific primers confirmed the presence of 2R chromosomes of rye in these wheat-rye lines, indicating that WR02-145 lines are disomic chromosome substitution lines 2R (2D). The WR02-145 lines are resistant to the powdery mildew (Erysiphe graminis DC. f. sp. tritici E. Marchal) isolates prevalent in northern China and may possess gene(s) for resistance to powdery mildew, which differ from the previously identified Pm7 gene located on chromosome 2RL. The newly developed "Xiaoyan 6"- "German White"2R (2D) chromosome substitution lines are genetically stable, show desirable agronomic traits, and are expected to be useful in wheat improvement.

  19. Pairing correlations in exotic nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Sagawa, H

    2012-01-01

    The BCS and HFB theories which can accommodate the pairing correlations in the ground states of atomic nuclei are presented. As an application of the pairing theories, we investigate the spatial extension of weakly bound Ne and C isotopes by taking into account the pairing correlation with the Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov (HFB) method and a 3-body model, respectively. We show that the odd-even staggering in the reaction cross sections of $^{30,31,32}$Ne and $^{14,15,16}$C are successfully reproduced, and thus the staggering can be attributed to the unique role of pairing correlations in nuclei far from the stability line. A correlation between a one-neutron separation energy and the anti-halo effect is demonstrated for $s$- and p-waves using the HFB wave functions. We also propose effective density-dependent pairing interactions which reproduce both the neutron-neutron ($nn$) scattering length at zero density and the neutron pairing gap in uniform matter. Then, we apply these interactions to study pairing gaps in ...

  20. Adults with Chromosome 18 Abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soileau, Bridgette; Hasi, Minire; Sebold, Courtney; Hill, Annice; O'Donnell, Louise; Hale, Daniel E; Cody, Jannine D

    2015-08-01

    The identification of an underlying chromosome abnormality frequently marks the endpoint of a diagnostic odyssey. However, families are frequently left with more questions than answers as they consider their child's future. In the case of rare chromosome conditions, a lack of longitudinal data often makes it difficult to provide anticipatory guidance to these families. The objective of this study is to describe the lifespan, educational attainment, living situation, and behavioral phenotype of adults with chromosome 18 abnormalities. The Chromosome 18 Clinical Research Center has enrolled 483 individuals with one of the following conditions: 18q-, 18p-, Tetrasomy 18p, and Ring 18. As a part of the ongoing longitudinal study, we collect data on living arrangements, educational level attained, and employment status as well as data on executive functioning and behavioral skills on an annual basis. Within our cohort, 28 of the 483 participants have died, the majority of whom have deletions encompassing the TCF4 gene or who have unbalanced rearrangement involving other chromosomes. Data regarding the cause of and age at death are presented. We also report on the living situation, educational attainment, and behavioral phenotype of the 151 participants over the age of 18. In general, educational level is higher for people with all these conditions than implied by the early literature, including some that received post-high school education. In addition, some individuals are able to live independently, though at this point they represent a minority of patients. Data on executive function and behavioral phenotype are also presented. Taken together, these data provide insight into the long-term outcome for individuals with a chromosome 18 condition. This information is critical in counseling families on the range of potential outcomes for their child. PMID:25403900

  1. Chromosome numbers, meiotic behavior, and pollen viability of species of Vriesea and Aechmea genera (Bromeliaceae) native to Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palma-Silva, Clarisse; Dos Santos, Daniel G; Kaltchuk-Santos, Eliane; Bodanese-Zanettini, Maria H

    2004-06-01

    Chromosome number, meiotic behavior, and pollen viability were analyzed in 15 species of two genera, Vriesea and Aechmea, native to Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. This study is the first cytogenetic analysis of these taxa. The chromosome numbers are all n = 25, consistent with the proposed base number of x = 25 for Bromeliaceae. All examined taxa displayed regular bivalent pairing and chromosome segregation at meiosis. Observed meiotic abnormalities include univalents in metaphase I; missing or extra chromosomes and precocious division of centromeres in metaphase II; laggards in telophase I and anaphase II/telophase II. The high pollen viability (>88%) reflects a regular meiosis. PMID:21653435

  2. Making chromosome abnormalities treatable conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cody, Jannine DeMars; Hale, Daniel Esten

    2015-09-01

    Individuals affected by the classic chromosome deletion syndromes which were first identified at the beginning of the genetic age, are now positioned to benefit from genomic advances. This issue highlights five of these conditions (4p-, 5p-, 11q-, 18p-, and 18q-). It focuses on the increased in understanding of the molecular underpinnings and envisions how these can be transformed into effective treatments. While it is scientifically exciting to see the phenotypic manifestations of hemizygosity being increasingly understood at the molecular and cellular level, it is even more amazing to consider that we are now on the road to making chromosome abnormalities treatable conditions. PMID:26351122

  3. Viscosity coefficient with pairing interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the study of dynamic process (for example, deep-inelastic scattering of heavy ion, nuclear fission), viscosity, which describes the coupling between the intrinsic degrees of freedom and the collective one, is a basic quantity. In this paper, under BCS approximation, we derive a microscopic expression of viscosity coefficient with pairing interaction by means of a linear response theory. Taking the fission process of 236U as an example, we discuss the effect of pairing interaction on the viscosity coefficient. The results show that pairing interaction must be taken into account at lower temperature and can be neglected at a high-temperature region

  4. Using Chromosomes to Teach Evolution: Chromosomal Rearrangements in Speciation Events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Offner, Susan

    1994-01-01

    Uses diagrams to aid in discussing how the English map of the human chromosomes, published by Offner in 1993, can be used to illustrate some important questions in evolution, as well as give students a glimpse into some of the mechanisms underlying evolutionary change. (ZWH)

  5. Molecular analysis of the distribution of chromosomal breakpoints: characterization of a 'hot' region for breaks in human chromosome 11

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Ionizing radiation randomly damages DNA and chromosomes whereas subsequent chromosome breaks are non-random. Assuming, as an ideal and naive but useful proposition, that breaks are equally likely anywhere in the chromosome and that a deletion always occurs between two breaks, the frequency of fragments would decrease linearly with increasing fragment size. This simple distribution is not, however, observed. To shed light on the 'real' situation of break formation we mapped breakpoints in the human chromosome no. 11 of 353 independent CD59- mutants isolated from human/hamster hybrid AL cells exposed to radiations (high and low dose-rate gamma rays, high LET carbon or nitrogen ions, protons) or chemicals (arsenic or irradiated, mutagenic histidine) or unexposed. The number of breaks per unit length of DNA differed significantly in different regions of chromosome 11.The highest level of breaks (140/mbp) were in the 0.8 mbp segment between CD59 and Catalase (CAT). Finer mapping of break points was carried out using 26 PCR primer pairs spread across this interval in 15 independent mutants. In two mutants, the break point was in a 107 bp fragment; in the other 13 the breaks were in a single 35 mbp fragment, but not all were at exactly the same site; 4 of 13 occurred in 3 different 3 mbp sub-segments. We are sequencing these fragments to look for such features as repeats: 'colder' regions like that between CD59 and WT will also be analyzed. But, since at least some breaks occurred at different sites and the frequency and distribution of breaks was about the same for all treatments, our we postulate that hot (and cold spots) may be due more to structural features or specific repair than to sequence or type of damage

  6. Chromosomal evolution in Gekkonidae. I. Chromosome painting between Gekko and Hemidactylus species reveals phylogenetic relationships within the group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trifonov, Vladimir A; Giovannotti, Massimo; O'Brien, Patricia C M; Wallduck, Margaret; Lovell, Frances; Rens, Willem; Parise-Maltempi, Patricia P; Caputo, Vincenzo; Ferguson-Smith, Malcolm A

    2011-10-01

    Geckos are a large group of lizards characterized by a rich variety of species, different modes of sex determination and diverse karyotypes. In spite of many unresolved questions on lizards' phylogeny and taxonomy, the karyotypes of most geckos have been studied by conventional cytogenetic methods only. We used flow-sorted chromosome-specific painting probes of Japanese gecko (Gekko japonicus), Mediterranean house gecko (Hemidactylus turcicus) and flat-tailed house gecko (Hemidactylus platyurus) to reveal homologous regions and to study karyotype evolution in seven gecko species (Gekko gecko, G. japonicus, G. ulikovskii, G. vittatus, Hemidactylus frenatus, H. platyurus and H. turcicus). Generally, the karyotypes of geckos were found to be conserved, but we revealed some characteristic rearrangements including both fissions and fusions in Hemidactylus. The karyotype of H. platyurus contained a heteromorphic pair in all female individuals, where one of the homologues had a terminal DAPI-negative and C-positive heterochromatic block that might indicate a putative sex chromosome. Among two male individuals studied, only one carried such a polymorphism, and the second one had none, suggesting a possible ZZ/ZW sex determination in some populations of this species. We found that all Gekko species have retained the putative ancestral karyotype, whilst the fission of the largest ancestral chromosome occurred in the ancestor of modern Hemidactylus species. Three common fissions occurred in the ancestor of Mediterranean house and flat-tailed house geckos, suggesting their sister group relationships. PCR-assisted mapping on flow-sorted chromosome libraries with conserved DMRT1 gene primers in G. japonicus indicates the localization of DMRT1 gene on chromosome 6. PMID:21987185

  7. ZZ/ZW sex chromosome system in the endangered fish Lignobrycon myersi Miranda-Ribeiro, 1956 (Teleostei, Characiformes, Triportheidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Alexandre dos Santos; Medrado, Aline Souza; Diniz, Débora; Oliveira, Claudio; Affonso, Paulo Roberto Antunes de Mello

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Lignobrycon myersi is an endemic fish species from a few coastal rivers in northeastern Brazil. Based on molecular evidence, Lignobrycon myersi and genera Triportheus Cope, 1872, Agoniates Müller & Troschel, 1845, Clupeacharax Pearson, 1924 and Engraulisoma Castro, 1981 were placed in the family Triportheidae. In the present work, we report the first cytogenetic data for Lignobrycon myersi to test the hypothesis that Lignobrycon and Triportheus are closely related. Studied specimens presented 2n=52 with 28 metacentric (m), 18 submetacentric (sm) and six subtelocentric (st) chromosomes for males and 27 m, 19 sm and 6 st for females, characterizing a ZZ/ZW sex chromosome system. The Z chromosome corresponds to the largest chromosome in karyotype while the W is about 50% smaller than the Z and largely heterochromatic. Terminal nucleolus organizer regions, GC-rich sites and 18S rDNA signals were detected on pair 14. However, additional 18S rDNA sites were observed in the W chromosome. The 5S rDNA was mainly detected on long arms of pair 7. The apparent synapomorphic chromosomal traits of Triportheus and Lignobrycon myersi reinforce their close phylogenetic relationship, suggesting that the ZZ/ZW chromosome system in both genera has arisen before cladogenic events. PMID:27551346

  8. Comparative study of mitotic chromosomes in two blowflies, Lucilia sericata and L. cluvia (Diptera, Calliphoridae, by C- and G-like banding patterns and rRNA loci, and implications for karyotype evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mónica G. Chirino

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The karyotypes of Lucilia cluvia (Walker, 1849 and L. sericata (Meigen, 1826 from Argentina were characterized using conventional staining and the C- and G-like banding techniques. Besides, nucleolus organizer regions (NORs were detected by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH and silver staining technique. The chromosome complement of these species comprises five pairs of autosomes and a pair of sex chromosomes (XX/XY, female/male. The autosomes of both species have the same size and morphology, as well as C- and G-like banding patterns. The X and Y chromosomes of L. cluvia are subtelocentric and easily identified due to their very small size. In L. sericata, the X chromosome is metacentric and the largest of the complement, showing a secondary constriction in its short arm, whereas the Y is submetacentric and smaller than the X. The C-banding patterns reflect differences in chromatin structure and composition between the subtelocentric X and Y chromosomes of L. cluvia and the biarmed sex chromosomes of L. sericata. These differences in the sex chromosomes may be due to distinct amounts of constitutive heterochromatin. In L. cluvia, the NORs are placed at one end of the long-X and of the long-Y chromosome arms, whereas one of the NORs is disposed in the secondary constriction of the short-X chromosome arm and the other on the long-Y chromosome arm in L. sericata. Although the G-like banding technique does not yield G-bands like those in mammalian chromosomes, it shows a high degree chromosomal homology in both species because each pair of autosomes was correctly paired. This chromosome similarity suggests the absence of autosomal rearrangements during karyotype evolution in the two species studied.

  9. Genome differentiation in Magonoliaceae as revealed from meiotic pairing in interspecific and intergeneric hybrids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shou-Zhou ZHANG; Ya-Ling WANG; Zi-Can HE; Erland EJDER

    2011-01-01

    The cross compatibility within and between Yulania Spach and Michelia L.(Magnoliaceae) is relatively good and various such hybrids,obtained by conventional artificial hybridization,are available.The aim of the present study was to determine the extent of genome differentiation between the species involved in these crosses through the observation of chromosome pairing during meiosis in pollen mother cells (PMCs) of the hybrids.Chromosome pairing behavior was studied in five species (2n =38) and two interspecific hybrids of Michelia,eight species (2n =38,76 and 114) and 10 interspecific hybrids of Yulania,and three intergeneric hybrids between Michelia and Yulania.The results showed that chromosome pairing was normal with bivalent formation in diploid parental species and in interspecific hybrids.In addition to bivalents,multivalents were encountered in polyploid parental species and polyploid interspecific hybrids.In the intergeneric hybrids between a tetraploid Yulania and two diploid Michelia,19 chromosomes,most likely originating from Michelia,were unable to synapse from zygotene to metaphase I.Meiotic chromosome pairing indicated a high degree of homology between species within Michelia and Yulania and less homology between the genomes of these two genera.The differentiation of morphological characters and the distinctness of natural distribution also support the conclusion that these two genera are likely independent monophyletic groups.This suggests that the two genera were split at early evolution of Magnoliaceae and the overlapping characteristics in external morphology and internal structures of the two genera may be the result of parallel evolution or ancient common ancestry.

  10. Pairing mechanisms for binary stars

    CERN Document Server

    Kouwenhoven, M B N; Goodwin, S P; Zwart, S F Portegies; Kaper, L; 10.1002/asna.200811061

    2008-01-01

    Knowledge of the binary population in stellar groupings provides important information about the outcome of the star forming process in different environments. Binarity is also a key ingredient in stellar population studies and is a prerequisite to calibrate the binary evolution channels. In these proceedings we present an overview of several commonly used methods to pair individual stars into binary systems, which we refer to as the pairing function. Many pairing functions are frequently used by observers and computational astronomers, either for the mathematical convenience, or because they roughly describe the expected outcome of the star forming process. We discuss the consequences of each pairing function for the interpretation of observations and numerical simulations. The binary fraction and mass ratio distribution generally depend strongly on the selection of the range in primary spectral type in a sample. These quantities, when derived from a binary survey with a mass-limited sample of target stars, ...

  11. Pairing effects in Sn isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An extensive study of pairing effects in the Sn isotopes is carried out. The pairing Hamiltonian is treated by the chain-calculation method which provides practically exact solutions while involving less computational work than a complete-basis diagonalization. The coupling strength is fixed by reproducing the energy of the 9- state in 116Sn, while the single-particle energies have been determined by an analysis of the experimental low-energy spectra of the odd-A isotopes. A detailed comparison of the calculated results with experimental data evidences the importance of neutron pairing correlations in the 50-82 shell. The results of this paper complement those of our previous study of the N=82 isotones. It turns out that the role of pairing correlations is similar to a large extent in both cases. (orig.)

  12. Pairing effects in Sn isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreozzi, F. [Naples Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Scienze Fisiche]|[Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Naples (Italy); Coraggio, L. [Naples Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Scienze Fisiche]|[Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Naples (Italy); Covello, A. [Naples Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Scienze Fisiche]|[Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Naples (Italy); Gargano, A. [Naples Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Scienze Fisiche]|[Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Naples (Italy); Porrino, A. [Naples Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Scienze Fisiche]|[Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Naples (Italy)

    1996-04-01

    An extensive study of pairing effects in the Sn isotopes is carried out. The pairing Hamiltonian is treated by the chain-calculation method which provides practically exact solutions while involving less computational work than a complete-basis diagonalization. The coupling strength is fixed by reproducing the energy of the 9{sup -} state in {sup 116}Sn, while the single-particle energies have been determined by an analysis of the experimental low-energy spectra of the odd-A isotopes. A detailed comparison of the calculated results with experimental data evidences the importance of neutron pairing correlations in the 50-82 shell. The results of this paper complement those of our previous study of the N=82 isotones. It turns out that the role of pairing correlations is similar to a large extent in both cases. (orig.)

  13. Pseudogap associated with precursor pairing

    OpenAIRE

    De Cao, Tian

    2009-01-01

    This work argues that the off-diagonal long range order (ODLRO) is not necessary for showing superconductivity while the electron pairing around Fermi surface is sufficient for superconductivity. It is shown that there exists the pseudogap state associated with the electron pairing in real space and the high temperature superconductivity could be only found in the metallic region near the Mott metal insulator transition (MIT).

  14. Pair programming: more than just working together in pairs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elsa Mentz

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Pair programming originated in the industry where focus is placed on the development of a programme at the most costand time-effective manner, and within the parameters of quality. In this context, a specific programming code is not developed individually; rather, two people work together in order to ensure a higher quality programming code and to motivate each other to work at a faster pace. The problem with this approach was that novice programmers lacked the social skills to work in pairs as they had not been exposed to this sufficiently at tertiary level. The demand of the industry, especially in terms of programmers needing to be able to programme together, led to the incorporation of pair programming at tertiary level in the late nineties. The pedagogical principles on which any teaching-learning strategy should be built were, however, largely overlooked during this process. This article firstly looks into the semantic and ontological differences between co-operative and collaborative learning and secondly argues that pair programming, within the context of a social constructivist approach to teaching and learning, can be seen as a co-operative teaching-learning strategy. Pair programming is more than just allowing two students to work together on a programming task. The more structured way, in which pair programming needs to be implemented, concur with the principles of co-operative learning. The article concludes that the correct pedagogical application of pair programming as a co-operative teaching-learning strategy in tertiary education will result in improved learning capital.

  15. CHROMOSOMAL MULTIPLICITY IN BURKHOLDERIA CEPACIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    We have used CHEF gel electrophoresis to screen preparations of large DNA from different Burkholderia cepacia isolates for the presence of DNA species corresponding to the linearized forms of the three chromosomes of 3.4,2.5, and 0.9 Mb identified in B. cepacia strain 17616. DNA ...

  16. Vibrio chromosome-specific families

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lukjancenko, Oksana; Ussery, David

    2014-01-01

    We have compared chromosome-specific genes in a set of 18 finished Vibrio genomes, and, in addition, also calculated the pan- and core-genomes from a data set of more than 250 draft Vibrio genome sequences. These genomes come from 9 known species and 2 unknown species. Within the finished...

  17. Chromosome Territory Modeller and Viewer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tkacz, Magdalena A; Chromiński, Kornel; Idziak-Helmcke, Dominika; Robaszkiewicz, Ewa; Hasterok, Robert

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents ChroTeMo, a tool for chromosome territory modelling, accompanied by ChroTeVi-a chromosome territory visualisation software that uses the data obtained by ChroTeMo. These tools have been developed in order to complement the molecular cytogenetic research of interphase nucleus structure in a model grass Brachypodium distachyon. Although the modelling tool has been initially created for one particular species, it has universal application. The proposed version of ChroTeMo allows for generating a model of chromosome territory distribution in any given plant or animal species after setting the initial, species-specific parameters. ChroTeMo has been developed as a fully probabilistic modeller. Due to this feature, the comparison between the experimental data on the structure of a nucleus and the results obtained from ChroTeMo can indicate whether the distribution of chromosomes inside a nucleus is also fully probabilistic or is subjected to certain non-random patterns. The presented tools have been written in Python, so they are multiplatform, portable and easy to read. Moreover, if necessary they can be further developed by users writing their portions of code. The source code, documentation, and wiki, as well as the issue tracker and the list of related articles that use ChroTeMo and ChroTeVi, are accessible in a public repository at Github under GPL 3.0 license. PMID:27505434

  18. Chromosome Territory Modeller and Viewer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idziak-Helmcke, Dominika; Robaszkiewicz, Ewa; Hasterok, Robert

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents ChroTeMo, a tool for chromosome territory modelling, accompanied by ChroTeVi–a chromosome territory visualisation software that uses the data obtained by ChroTeMo. These tools have been developed in order to complement the molecular cytogenetic research of interphase nucleus structure in a model grass Brachypodium distachyon. Although the modelling tool has been initially created for one particular species, it has universal application. The proposed version of ChroTeMo allows for generating a model of chromosome territory distribution in any given plant or animal species after setting the initial, species-specific parameters. ChroTeMo has been developed as a fully probabilistic modeller. Due to this feature, the comparison between the experimental data on the structure of a nucleus and the results obtained from ChroTeMo can indicate whether the distribution of chromosomes inside a nucleus is also fully probabilistic or is subjected to certain non-random patterns. The presented tools have been written in Python, so they are multiplatform, portable and easy to read. Moreover, if necessary they can be further developed by users writing their portions of code. The source code, documentation, and wiki, as well as the issue tracker and the list of related articles that use ChroTeMo and ChroTeVi, are accessible in a public repository at Github under GPL 3.0 license. PMID:27505434

  19. Analysis of the karyotype and G banding of chromosomes in Microtus limnophilus%经营田鼠染色体核型与G带分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵淑娟; 孙平; 庞有志; 刘喜可; 许艳利; 訾营磊; 徐国旗

    2012-01-01

    采用骨髓法制备经营田鼠染色体标本片,并对其染色体核型和G带进行分析。结果表明,经营田鼠体细胞染色体数为2n=38,雄性染色体核型由18对常染色体和1对异配型性染色体XY组成,雌性为18对常染色体和1对同配型性染色体XX组成。1~9号为端着丝粒(t)染色体(包括Y染色体),10号为近端着丝粒(st)染色体,11~18号为中央着丝粒(m)染色体(包括X色体)。19对染色体共分布有370条G带(雄性365条),其中深带190条,浅带180条。因此,经营田鼠的染色体数目、G带具有明显种的特征,与其他鼠类不同。%The research is to study the karyotype and G-banding pattern of the chromosomes in Microtus limnophi- lus. The Microtus limnophilus chromosome samples were prepared by the use of bone marrow method test,and the karyotype and G band patterns were analyzed after being dyed. The current results show that the number of chromo- somes in Microtus limnophilus is 2n--38. Male's karyotype is consist of 18 pairs of chromosomes and one pair of heterogametic sex chromosomes XY, and female's karyotype is consist of 18 pairs of chromosomes and one pair of homogametic sex chromosomes XX. No. 1-9 and Y chromosomes are the telocentrics chromosomes in Microtus lim- nophilus. No. 10 chromosome is subtelocentrics (st) chromosome. No. 11-18 and X chromosomes are metacentrics (m) chromosomes. The 19 pairs of chromosomes have 370 G-bands (male~365) totally. The number of the chromosomes on Microtus limnophilus and the G banding patterns are different from other breeds.

  20. Chromosomal variation and constitutive heterochromatin in three porpoise species (genus Stenella).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stock, A D

    1981-01-01

    Chromosomes from cultured fibroblasts of two Pacific porpoise species, Stenella attenuata and S. longirostris, and one Atlantic species, S. dubia, were compared to test the feasibility of using variation in constitutive heterochromatin and other chromosomal characteristics for analyses of population relationships and defining stocks of endangered porpoises. The G-band karyotypes of the three species were identical except for minor band differences resulting from heterochromatin variation. The nucleolar organizer regions (NORs) were located on the same two pairs of acrocentric chromosomes in all three species, although individual variation occurred in the number of active NORs present. Differences in the distribution and amount of C-band heterochromatin were observed between the three species. Stenella attenuata and S. dubia were very similar in C-band pattern, while S. longirostris was distinctly different. Conspicuous heteromorphism between the C-heterochromatin of the homologs of several pairs of chromosomes was noted in all individuals examined. In addition, variation in the amount of heterochromatin was observed between the four S.attenuata individuals studied. Of the chromosomal characteristics studied, only C-heterochromatin variation holds promise for distinguishing interspecific populations of porpoises. The final decision regarding the feasibility of using C-band heterochromatin to distinguish interspecific populations of porpoises must await comparison of morphologically differing populations within what is currently regarded as a single species. PMID:7307585

  1. Differential radio-sensitivities of human chromosomes 1 and 2 in one donor in interphase- and metaphase-spreads after 60Co γ-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation-induced chromosome aberrations lead to a plethora of detrimental effects at cellular level. Chromosome aberrations provide broad spectrum of information ranging from probability of malignant transformation to assessment of absorbed dose. Studies mapping differences in radiation sensitivities between human chromosomes are seldom undertaken. Consequently, health risk assessment based on radio-sensitivities of individual chromosomes may be erroneous. Our efforts in this article, attempt to demonstrate differences in radio-sensitivities of human chromosome-1 and/or -2, both in interphase and metaphase spreads. Upon blood collection, dosimetry and irradiation were performed. Lymphocytes were isolated after whole-blood irradiation with 60Co γ-rays in the dose range of 0–5 Gy for both interphase, and metaphase aberration studies. Induction of premature chromosome condensation in interphase cells was accomplished using a phosphatase inhibitor, calyculin-A. Metaphase spreads were harvested from short-term peripheral blood lymphocyte cultures following colcemid arrest and using an automated metaphase harvester and spreader. Aberration analysis in both interphase and metaphase spreads were done using FISH. In interphase, aberrant cell and aberration frequency involving chromosome 1 and/or 2 increased linearly with radiation dose. In metaphase, aberrations increased in a linear-quadratic manner with dose. Our studies ascertain that chromosome-2 is more radio-sensitive than chromosome-1 in both interphase and metaphase stages, albeit the DNA content of chromosome-2 is lesser than chromosome-1 by almost 10 million base pairs. Differences in radio-sensitivities of chromosomes have implications in genetic damage, chromosome organization, and chromosome function. Designing research experiments based on our vital findings may bring benefit to radiation-induced risk assessment, therapeutics and development of chromosome specific biomarkers

  2. Multicolor spectral karyotyping of human chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröck, E; du Manoir, S; Veldman, T; Schoell, B; Wienberg, J; Ferguson-Smith, M A; Ning, Y; Ledbetter, D H; Bar-Am, I; Soenksen, D; Garini, Y; Ried, T

    1996-07-26

    The simultaneous and unequivocal discernment of all human chromosomes in different colors would be of significant clinical and biologic importance. Whole-genome scanning by spectral karyotyping allowed instantaneous visualization of defined emission spectra for each human chromosome after fluorescence in situ hybridization. By means of computer separation (classification) of spectra, spectrally overlapping chromosome-specific DNA probes could be resolved, and all human chromosomes were simultaneously identified. PMID:8662537

  3. CHROMOSOMAL ABNORMALITIES IN PATIENTS WITH SPERM DISORDERS

    OpenAIRE

    L. Y. Pylyp; L. A. Spinenko; V. D. Zukin; N. M. Bilko

    2013-01-01

    Chromosomal abnormalities are among the most common genetic causes of spermatogenic disruptions. Carriers of chromosomal abnormalities are at increased risk of infertility, miscarriage or birth of a child with unbalanced karyotype due to the production of unbalanced gametes. The natural selection against chromosomally abnormal sperm usually prevents fertilization with sperm barring in cases of serious chromosomal abnormalities. However, assisted reproductive technologies in general and intrac...

  4. Chromosomal Behavior during Meiosis in the Progeny of Triticum timopheevii × Hexaploid Wild Oat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongzhou An

    Full Text Available The meiotic behavior of pollen mother cells (PMCs of the F2 and F3 progeny from Triticum timopheevii × hexaploid wild oat was investigated by cytological analysis and sequential C-banding-genomic in situ hybridization (GISH in the present study. A cytological analysis showed that the chromosome numbers of the F2 and F3 progeny ranged from 28 to 41. A large number of univalents, lagging chromosomes, chromosome bridges and micronuclei were found at the metaphase I, anaphase I, anaphase II and tetrad stages in the F2 and F3 progeny. The averages of univalents were 3.50 and 2.73 per cell, and those of lagging chromosomes were 3.37 and 1.87 in the F2 and F3 progeny, respectively. The PMC meiotic indices of the F2 and F3 progeny were 12.22 and 20.34, respectively, indicating considerable genetic instability. A sequential C-banding-GISH analysis revealed that some chromosomes and fragments from the hexaploid wild oat were detected at metaphase I and anaphase I in the progeny, showing that the progeny were of true intergeneric hybrid origin. The alien chromosomes 6A, 7A, 3C and 2D were lost during transmission from F2 to F3. In addition, partial T. timopheevii chromosomes appeared in the form of univalents or lagging chromosomes, which might result from large genome differences between the parents, and the wild oat chromosome introgression interfered with the wheat homologues' normally pairing.

  5. Chromosomal Behavior during Meiosis in the Progeny of Triticum timopheevii × Hexaploid Wild Oat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Hongzhou; Hu, Mei; Li, Pengfei; Geng, Guangdong; Zhang, Qingqin; Zhang, Suqin

    2015-01-01

    The meiotic behavior of pollen mother cells (PMCs) of the F2 and F3 progeny from Triticum timopheevii × hexaploid wild oat was investigated by cytological analysis and sequential C-banding-genomic in situ hybridization (GISH) in the present study. A cytological analysis showed that the chromosome numbers of the F2 and F3 progeny ranged from 28 to 41. A large number of univalents, lagging chromosomes, chromosome bridges and micronuclei were found at the metaphase I, anaphase I, anaphase II and tetrad stages in the F2 and F3 progeny. The averages of univalents were 3.50 and 2.73 per cell, and those of lagging chromosomes were 3.37 and 1.87 in the F2 and F3 progeny, respectively. The PMC meiotic indices of the F2 and F3 progeny were 12.22 and 20.34, respectively, indicating considerable genetic instability. A sequential C-banding-GISH analysis revealed that some chromosomes and fragments from the hexaploid wild oat were detected at metaphase I and anaphase I in the progeny, showing that the progeny were of true intergeneric hybrid origin. The alien chromosomes 6A, 7A, 3C and 2D were lost during transmission from F2 to F3. In addition, partial T. timopheevii chromosomes appeared in the form of univalents or lagging chromosomes, which might result from large genome differences between the parents, and the wild oat chromosome introgression interfered with the wheat homologues' normally pairing. PMID:25950431

  6. A case of trisomy of chromosome 15

    OpenAIRE

    Coldwell, S; Fitzgerald, B.; Semmens, J.M.; Ede, R; Bateman, C

    1981-01-01

    We describe a case of trisomy of chromosome 15 in an infant who presented at birth with numerous abnormalities. As far as we are aware this chromosomal abnormality has not been described before. On the basis of this one case there appear to be no features which are specific to this chromosomal abnormality.

  7. The actions of restriction endonucleases on lampbrush chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, D C; Callan, H G; Thomas, C A

    1976-07-01

    Lampbrush chromosomes from oocytes of Notophthalmus viridescens were dispersed in media containing restriction endonucleases isolated from Haemophilus and E. coli. These endonucleases cleave duplex DNAs at specific palindromic sequences of nucleotides, and several sensitive sites occur per micron of DNA. The overwhelming majority of the lateral loops of lampbrush chromosomes are extensively fragmented by these endonucleases, but an occasional pair of loops is refractory. A notable example of loops showing this refractory property are the giant loops on chromosome II in the presence of Hae. These loops, whose DNA-containing axes are several hundred micra long, are sensitive to other nucleases such as EcoB, endonuclease I and pancreatic DNase I; their refractory behavior towards Hae therefore indicates that the sequence sensitive to this particular endonuclease is systematically absent. This anomalous property can be comprehended if it be assumed that the axial DNA of the giant loops consists of tandem repeats of a sequence which happens not to include the sensitive site. PMID:987047

  8. Genetic variation of goat Y chromosome in the Sardinian population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonello Carta

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Sardinian goat population is commonly considered a crossbred of autochthonous animals with improved Mediterranean breeds, mainly the Maltese. It has been demonstrated by using autosomal microsatellites that the Sardinian goats can be divided into three subpopulations: Sardinian, crossbred with Maltese, and Maltese. The aim of this study was to evaluate sequence variation at Y chromosome in Sardinian bucks and to integrate autosomal microsatellites data. Blood from 190 bucks from 68 farms spread in the main Sardinian goat farming areas was sampled. Three ECONOGENE project primer pairs plus an additional one corresponding to a total of 7 SNPs were used. For all common SNPs, the most frequent allele corresponded to the ECONOGENE one. The additional analysed SNP showed allelic frequencies similar to the other markers. The comparison with haplotypes based on the 6 common SNPs showed that the Sardinian most frequent haplotype corresponded to the predominant one in Central Europe. Results of this study showed that the Sardinian goat population has 8 haplotypes resulting in a large diversity of paternal lineages. The next step will be linking autosomal information to Y chromosome data. In fact, up to date, it seems unfeasible to detect recent upgrading breeds by using Y chromosome variation only.

  9. Study on karyotype and occurrence of B chromosomes in two endemic species of the genus Pimelodus (Siluriformes, Pimelodidae) from the river Iguaçu.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borin, Luciana Andreia; Martins-Santos, Isabel Cristina

    2004-01-01

    The current work describes, for the first time, the occurrence of B chromosomes in the genus Pimelodus. Cytogenetic analysis in P. ortmanni and Pimelodus sp., from the river Iguaçu basin, revealed a diploid number of 56 chromosomes. Whereas distribution pattern of C-banding in Pimelodus sp. showed predominance of heterochromatin at the two extremities of several pairs of chromosomes, centromere markings predominated in P. ortmanni. Additional chromosomes in the two species were observed with numerical intra-individual variations between zero and four B, together with interspecies differences in their frequency. In Giemsa-stained metaphases two distinct morphological types of B chromosomes were identified: Bm (B metacentric) and Ba (B acrocentric). In P. ortmanni both types of B chromosomes were totally heterochromatic; the Bm type in Pimelodus sp. had heterochromatin throughout its entire extension; the Ba type was partially heterochromatic with telomere markings on the long arm. PMID:15198710

  10. Chromosomal instability in Streptomyces avermitilis: major deletion in the central region and stable circularized chromosome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen Ying

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The chromosome of Streptomyces has been shown to be unstable, frequently undergoing gross chromosomal rearrangements. However, the mechanisms underlying this phenomenon remain unclear, with previous studies focused on two chromosomal ends as targets for rearrangements. Here we investigated chromosomal instability of Streptomyces avermitilis, an important producer of avermectins, and characterized four gross chromosomal rearrangement events, including a major deletion in the central region. The present findings provide a valuable contribution to the mechanistic study of genetic instability in Streptomyces. Results Thirty randomly-selected "bald" mutants derived from the wild-type strain all contained gross chromosomal rearrangements of various types. One of the bald mutants, SA1-8, had the same linear chromosomal structure as the high avermectin-producing mutant 76-9. Chromosomes of both strains displayed at least three independent chromosomal rearrangements, including chromosomal arm replacement to form new 88-kb terminal inverted repeats (TIRs, and two major deletions. One of the deletions eliminated the 36-kb central region of the chromosome, but surprisingly did not affect viability of the cells. The other deletion (74-kb was internal to the right chromosomal arm. The chromosome of another bald mutant, SA1-6, was circularized with deletions at both ends. No obvious homology was found in all fusion sequences. Generational stability analysis showed that the chromosomal structure of SA1-8 and SA1-6 was stable. Conclusions Various chromosomal rearrangements, including chromosomal arm replacement, interstitial deletions and chromosomal circularization, occurred in S. avermitilis by non-homologous recombination. The finding of an inner deletion involving in the central region of S. avermitilis chromosome suggests that the entire Streptomyces chromosome may be the target for rearrangements, which are not limited, as previously

  11. The origin of human chromosome 2 analyzed by comparative chromosome mapping with a DNA microlibrary

    OpenAIRE

    Wienberg, Johannes; Jauch, Anna; Lüdecke, H J; Senger, G; Horsthemke, B; Claussen, U; Cremer, Thomas; Arnold, N.; Lengauer, Christoph

    1994-01-01

    Fluorescencein situ hybridization (FISH) of microlibraries established from distinct chromosome subregions can test the evolutionary conservation of chromosome bands as well as chromosomal rearrangements that occurred during primate evolution and will help to clarify phylogenetic relationships. We used a DNA library established by microdissection and microcloning from the entire long arm of human chromosome 2 for fluorescencein situ hybridization and comparative mapping of the chromosomes of ...

  12. Constructing Molecular Marker Linkage Maps of Chromosome 14Sh and 22Sh and QTL Mapping for Major Traits by Use of Substitution Lines of Gossypium hirsutum L.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Xiang-mo; LUAN Ming-bao; SAHA Sukumar; JENKINS Johnie N

    2008-01-01

    @@ CSB14Sh,which is isogenic for its recurrent parent TM-1 except for chromosome 14 short arm,was crossed with TM-1,and the F2 population was produced.A total of 3800 SSR primer pairs covering the whole genome were used to screen polymorphism among two parents,TM-1 and CSB14Sh,and their F1 progeny,which resulted in 15 polymorphic primer pairs.The 15 polymorphic primer pairs amplified 23 marker loci.

  13. Pair extended coupled cluster doubles

    CERN Document Server

    Henderson, Thomas M; Scuseria, Gustavo E

    2015-01-01

    The accurate and efficient description of strongly correlated systems remains an important challenge for computational methods. Doubly occupied configuration interaction (DOCI), in which all electrons are paired and no correlations which break these pairs are permitted, can in many cases provide an accurate account of strong correlations, albeit at combinatorial computational cost. Recently, there has been significant interest in a method we refer to as pair coupled cluster doubles (pCCD), a variant of coupled cluster doubles in which the electrons are paired. This is simply because pCCD provides energies nearly identical to those of DOCI, but at mean-field computational cost (disregarding the cost of the two-electron integral transformation). Here, we introduce the more complete pair extended coupled cluster doubles (pECCD) approach which, like pCCD, has mean-field cost and reproduces DOCI energetically. We show that unlike pCCD, pECCD also reproduces the DOCI wave function with high accuracy. Moreoever, pEC...

  14. Temporal genomic evolution of bird sex chromosomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Zongji; Zhang, Jilin; Yang, Wei;

    2014-01-01

    driving forces of Z chromosome evolution, we analyze here 45 newly available bird genomes and four species' transcriptomes, over their course of recombination loss between the sex chromosomes. RESULTS: We show Z chromosomes in general have a significantly higher substitution rate in introns and synonymous...... evolved very recently. CONCLUSIONS: In conclusion, we uncover that the sequence and expression patterns of Z chromosome genes covary with their ages of becoming Z-linked. In contrast to the mammalian X chromosomes, such patterns are mainly driven by mutational bias and genetic drift in birds, due...... to the opposite sex-biased inheritance of Z vs. X....

  15. Holoprosencephaly due to numeric chromosome abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Benjamin D; Rosenbaum, Kenneth N; Meck, Jeanne M; Muenke, Maximilian

    2010-02-15

    Holoprosencephaly (HPE) is the most common malformation of the human forebrain. When a clinician identifies a patient with HPE, a routine chromosome analysis is often the first genetic test sent for laboratory analysis in order to assess for a structural or numerical chromosome anomaly. An abnormality of chromosome number is overall the most frequently identified etiology in a patient with HPE. These abnormalities include trisomy 13, trisomy 18, and triploidy, though several others have been reported. Such chromosome number abnormalities are almost universally fatal early in gestation or in infancy. Clinical features of specific chromosome number abnormalities may be recognized by phenotypic manifestations in addition to the HPE. PMID:20104610

  16. Novel insights into mitotic chromosome condensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piskadlo, Ewa; Oliveira, Raquel A.

    2016-01-01

    The fidelity of mitosis is essential for life, and successful completion of this process relies on drastic changes in chromosome organization at the onset of nuclear division. The mechanisms that govern chromosome compaction at every cell division cycle are still far from full comprehension, yet recent studies provide novel insights into this problem, challenging classical views on mitotic chromosome assembly. Here, we briefly introduce various models for chromosome assembly and known factors involved in the condensation process (e.g. condensin complexes and topoisomerase II). We will then focus on a few selected studies that have recently brought novel insights into the mysterious way chromosomes are condensed during nuclear division.

  17. Karyotyping and identifying all of the chromosomes of allopolyploid Brassica juncea using multicolor FISH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhijun Xu

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Chromosome identification and karyotype using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH provides a technical platform for genome and cytogenetic studies. Brassica juncea (brown mustard, 2n = 4 × = 36; genome AABB is an allopolyploid species that originated from a spontaneous hybridization of Brassica rapa and Brassica nigra and contains many valuable traits. In this study, a multicolor FISH procedure allowing the identification of all 18 chromosomal pairs was developed by two-step hybridizations with probes on the same metaphase chromosomes. The distribution patterns and chromosomal localizations of six repeat sequences (satellite repeat pBrSTR, 5S rDNA, 45S rDNA, B genome-specific repeat pBNBH35, and centromeric satellite repeats CentBr1 and CentBr2 on B. juncea chromosomes were characterized. Comparative karyotype analyses showed that the genome is relatively stable in comparison with its diploid progenitor species and revealed intraspecific karyotypic diversity among three accessions of B. juncea. This study provides valuable information about the genome evolution of B. juncea and a toolkit that will be helpful for chromosome identification.

  18. Three-dimensional genome architecture influences partner selection for chromosomal translocations in human disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesse M Engreitz

    Full Text Available Chromosomal translocations are frequent features of cancer genomes that contribute to disease progression. These rearrangements result from formation and illegitimate repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs, a process that requires spatial colocalization of chromosomal breakpoints. The "contact first" hypothesis suggests that translocation partners colocalize in the nuclei of normal cells, prior to rearrangement. It is unclear, however, the extent to which spatial interactions based on three-dimensional genome architecture contribute to chromosomal rearrangements in human disease. Here we intersect Hi-C maps of three-dimensional chromosome conformation with collections of 1,533 chromosomal translocations from cancer and germline genomes. We show that many translocation-prone pairs of regions genome-wide, including the cancer translocation partners BCR-ABL and MYC-IGH, display elevated Hi-C contact frequencies in normal human cells. Considering tissue specificity, we find that translocation breakpoints reported in human hematologic malignancies have higher Hi-C contact frequencies in lymphoid cells than those reported in sarcomas and epithelial tumors. However, translocations from multiple tissue types show significant correlation with Hi-C contact frequencies, suggesting that both tissue-specific and universal features of chromatin structure contribute to chromosomal alterations. Our results demonstrate that three-dimensional genome architecture shapes the landscape of rearrangements directly observed in human disease and establish Hi-C as a key method for dissecting these effects.

  19. Automatic aberration scoring using whole chromosome F.I.S.H

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A radiation-induced rearrangement involving a painted and a non-painted chromosome will usually result in two partly-painted chromosomes, typically either a dicentric chromosome and associated fragment, or a reciprocal translocation pair. A consequence of such a rearrangement is that the number of painted image regions in the metaphase is increased by one, and their size distribution is altered. More complex rearrangements are uncommon, particularly at low doses. A high proportion of damaged cells can therefore be registered simply by detecting when the distribution of painted components differs from the expected number and size. A system has been constructed to pre-screen for damaged cells. It comprises automatic fluorescence metaphase finding followed by relocation and digitization of probe and counterstain channels at high resolution. Fully automatic segmentation in counterstain discriminates chromosomes from interphase nuclei and determines whether a metaphase is approximately diploid. The painted regions are segmented and their relative sizes estimated. Rules are applied which reduce the false positives due to artifacts such as overlapped painted chromosomes. More than 70% of cells with radiation damage involving painted and unpainted chromosomes were detected in a preliminary experiment using a small data set, with a low false positive rate. Results from a larger experiment in progress are presented

  20. Hierarchical multifractal representation of symbolic sequences and application to human chromosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provata, A.; Katsaloulis, P.

    2010-02-01

    The two-dimensional density correlation matrix is constructed for symbolic sequences using contiguous segments of arbitrary size. The multifractal spectrum obtained from this matrix motif is shown to characterize the correlations in the symbolic sequences. This method is applied to entire human chromosomes, shuffled human chromosomes, reconstructed human genomic sequences and to artificial random sequences. It is shown that all human chromosomes have common characteristics in their multifractal spectrum and deviate substantially from random and uncorrelated sequences of the same size. Small deviations are observed between the longer and the shorter chromosomes, especially for the higher (in absolute values) statistical moments. The correlations are crucial for the form of the multifractal spectrum; surrogate shuffled chromosomes present randomlike spectrum, distinctly different from the actual chromosomes. Analytical approaches based on hierarchical superposition of tensor products show that retaining pair correlations in the sequences leads to a closer representation of the genomic multifractal spectra, especially in the region of negative exponents, due to the underrepresentation of various functional units (such as the cytosine-guanine CG combination and its complementary GC complex). Retaining higher-order correlations in the construction of the tensor products is a way to approach closer the structure of the multifractal spectra of the actual genomic sequences. This hierarchical approach is generic and is applicable to other correlated symbolic sequences.

  1. Pairing effects in nuclear dynamic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacroix, Denis; Scamps, Guillaume; Tanimura, Yusuke

    2016-05-01

    In recent years, efforts have been made to account for super-fluidity in time-dependent mean-field description of nuclear dynamic [1-5]. Inclusion of pairing is important to achieve a realistic description of static properties of nuclei. Here,we show that pairing can also affect the nuclear motion. State of the art TDHF approach can describe from small to large amplitude collective motion as well as the collision between nuclei. Very recently, this microscopic approach has been improved to include pairing either in the BCS or HFB framework. Recent applications of the 3D TDHF + BCS (TDHF+BCS) model introduced in [4] will be presented. The role of super-fluidity on collective motion [6, 7], on one- and two-particle transfer [8] and on fission [9, 10] will be illustrated.

  2. Paired structures in knowledge representation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montero, J.; Bustince, H.; Franco de los Ríos, Camilo;

    2016-01-01

    In this position paper we propose a consistent and unifying view to all those basic knowledge representation models that are based on the existence of two somehow opposite fuzzy concepts. A number of these basic models can be found in fuzzy logic and multi-valued logic literature. Here it is...... paired structures, generated from two paired concepts together with their associated neutrality, all of them to be modeled as fuzzy sets. In this way, paired structures can be viewed as a standard basic model from which different models arise. This unifying view should therefore allow a deeper analysis...... of the relationships between several existing knowledge representation formalisms, providing a basis from which more expressive models can be later developed....

  3. Nuclear Scissors Mode with Pairing

    CERN Document Server

    Balbutsev, E B; Urban, M; Vinyes, X

    2007-01-01

    The coupled dynamics of the scissors mode and isovector giant quadrupole resonance are studied using a generalized Wigner function moments method taking into account the pair correlations. Equations of motion for angular momentum, quadrupole moment and other relevant collective variables are derived on the basis of the time dependent Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov equations. Analytical expressions for energy centroids and transitions probabilities are found for the harmonic oscillator model with the quadrupole-quadrupole residual interaction and monopole pairing force. Deformation dependences of energies and $B(M1)$ values are correctly reproduced. The inclusion of pair correlations leads to a drastic improvement in the description of qualitative and quantitative characteristics of the scissors mode.

  4. Transient Microgeographic Clines during B Chromosome Invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camacho, Juan Pedro M; Shaw, Michael W; Cabrero, Josefa; Bakkali, Mohammed; Ruíz-Estévez, Mercedes; Ruíz-Ruano, Francisco J; Martín-Blázquez, Rubén; López-León, María Dolores

    2015-11-01

    The near-neutral model of B chromosome evolution predicts that the invasion of a new population should last some tens of generations, but the details on how it proceeds in real populations are mostly unknown. Trying to fill this gap, we analyze here a natural population of the grasshopper Eyprepocnemis plorans at three time points during the last 35 years. Our results show that B chromosome frequency increased significantly during this period and that a cline observed in 1992 had disappeared in 2012 once B chromosome frequency reached an upper limit at all sites sampled. This indicates that, during B chromosome invasion, transient clines for B chromosome frequency are formed at the invasion front on a microgeographic scale. Computer simulation experiments showed that the pattern of change observed for genotypic frequencies is consistent with the existence of B chromosome drive through females and selection against individuals with a high number of B chromosomes. PMID:26655780

  5. Mitosis. Microtubule detyrosination guides chromosomes during mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barisic, Marin; Silva e Sousa, Ricardo; Tripathy, Suvranta K; Magiera, Maria M; Zaytsev, Anatoly V; Pereira, Ana L; Janke, Carsten; Grishchuk, Ekaterina L; Maiato, Helder

    2015-05-15

    Before chromosomes segregate into daughter cells, they align at the mitotic spindle equator, a process known as chromosome congression. Centromere-associated protein E (CENP-E)/Kinesin-7 is a microtubule plus-end-directed kinetochore motor required for congression of pole-proximal chromosomes. Because the plus-ends of many astral microtubules in the spindle point to the cell cortex, it remains unknown how CENP-E guides pole-proximal chromosomes specifically toward the equator. We found that congression of pole-proximal chromosomes depended on specific posttranslational detyrosination of spindle microtubules that point to the equator. In vitro reconstitution experiments demonstrated that CENP-E-dependent transport was strongly enhanced on detyrosinated microtubules. Blocking tubulin tyrosination in cells caused ubiquitous detyrosination of spindle microtubules, and CENP-E transported chromosomes away from spindle poles in random directions. Thus, CENP-E-driven chromosome congression is guided by microtubule detyrosination. PMID:25908662

  6. CHROMOSOMAL ABNORMALITIES IN PATIENTS WITH RECURRENT MISCARRIAGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Mierla

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Chromosomal abnormalities are involved in the etiology of recurrent spontaneous pregnancy loss and sub-fertility. The purpose of this study was to determine the frequency and contribution of chromosomal abnormalities in recurrent miscarriages. The results obtained and literature review are helpful in understanding the importance of cytogenetics analysis of female infertility. To investigate the distribution of chromosomal abnormalities in the Romanian population with recurrent miscarriage, karyotype analysis by G-banding was performed from peripheral blood in 967 women infertility. Results: Chromosomal abnormalities were found to 79 women (8,17%. The percentage of chromosomal abnormalities in the studied population correlates with the data in the literature. Chromosomal abnormalities could play the important role in etiology of infertility and are more frequently detected in this group of patients compared to general population. In the infertile couples balanced chromosomal abnormalities are the main cause of spontaneous abortions.

  7. [The evolution of human Y chromosome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xianrong; Wang, Meiqin; Li, Shaohua

    2014-09-01

    The human Y chromosome is always intriguing for researchers, because of its role in gender determination and its unusual evolutionary history. The Y chromosome evolves from an autosome, and its evolution has been characterized by massive gene decay. The lack of recombination and protein-coding genes and high content of repetitive sequences have hindered the progress in our understanding of the Y chromosome biology. Recently, with the advances in comparative genomics and sequencing technology, the research on Y chromosome has become a hotspot, with an intensified debate about Y-chromosome final destination resulting from degeneration. This review focuses on the structure, inheritance characteristics, gene content, and the origin and evolution of Y chromosome. We also discuss the long-term destiny of Y chromosome. PMID:25252301

  8. Dynamics of chromosome segregation in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Henrik Jørck

    2007-01-01

    Since the 1960’es the conformation and segregation of the chromosome in Escherichia coli has been a subject of interest for many scientists. However, after 40 years of research, we still know incredibly little about how the chromosome is organized inside the cell, how it manages to duplicate this...... and reliable method enabled us to start the analysis on the distribution of various chromosomal loci inside slowly growing cells. With the actual counting and measuring no longer being any problem we could easily analyze 14 loci distributed on the E.coli chromosome. More than 15.000 cells were...... on the P1 par system. Using the new system, which is based on the pMT1 par system from Yersenia pestis, we labeled loci on opposite sides of the E.coli chromosome simultaneously and were able to show that the E.coli chromosome is organized with one chromosomal arm in each cell half. This astounding...

  9. Microdissection and chromosome painting of the alien chromosome in an addition line of wheat-Thinopyrum intermedium

    Science.gov (United States)

    The chromosome painting is an efficient tool for chromosome research. However, plant chromosome painting is relatively underdeveloped. In this study, chromosome painting was developed and used to identify alien chromosomes in TAi-27, a wheat-Thinopyrum intermedium addition line, and chromosomes of...

  10. International workshop of chromosome 19

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pericak-Vance, M.A. (Duke Univ. Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States). Div. of Neurology); Carrano, A.J. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States))

    1991-09-16

    This document summarizes the workshop on physical and genetic mapping of chromosome 19. The first session discussed the major disease loci found on the chromosome. The second session concentrated on reference families, markers and linkage maps. The third session concentrated on radiation hybrid mapping, somatic cell hybrid panels, macro restriction maps and YACs, followed by cDNA and long range physical maps. The fourth session concentrated on compiling consensus genetic and physical maps as well as discussing regions of conflict. The final session dealt with the LLNL cosmid contig database and comparative mapping of homologous regions of the human and mouse genomes, and ended with a discussion of resource sharing. 18 refs., 2 figs. (MHB)

  11. Orbiting pairs of walking droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siefert, Emmanuel; Bush, John W. M.; Oza, Anand

    2015-11-01

    Droplets may self-propel on the surface of a vibrating fluid bath, pushed forward by their own Faraday pilot-wave field. We present the results of a combined experimental and theoretical investigation of the interaction of pairs of such droplets. Particular attention is given to characterizing the system's dependence on the vibrational forcing of the bath and the impact parameter of the walking droplets. Observed criteria for the capture and stability of orbital pairs are rationalized by accompanying theoretical developments. Thanks to the NSF.

  12. Instantons in lepton pair production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We consider QCD instanton-induced contributions to lepton pair production in hadron-hadron collisions. We relate these contributions to those known from deep inelastic scattering and demonstrate that they can be calculated reliably for sufficiently large momentum transfer. We observe that the instanton contribution to the angular distribution of the lepton pairs at finite momentum transfer strongly violates the Lam-Tung relation - a relation between coefficient functions of the angular distribution which is valid within the framework of ordinary perturbation theory. The drastic violation of this relation, as seen in experimental data, might be related to such instanton-induced effects. (Orig.)

  13. Molecular cytogenetic analysis of the Appenine endemic cyprinid fish Squalius lucumonis and three other Italian leuciscines using chromosome banding and FISH with rDNA probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Anna Rita; Milana, Valentina; Hett, Anne Kathrin; Tancioni, Lorenzo

    2012-12-01

    Karyotype and other chromosomal characteristics of the Appenine endemic cyprinid fish, Toscana stream chub Squalius lucumonis, were analysed using conventional banding and FISH with 45S and 5S rDNA probes. The diploid chromosome number (2n = 50) and karyotype characteristics including pericentromeric heterochromatic blocks and GC-rich CMA(3)-positive sites corresponding to both positive Ag-NORs and 45S rDNA loci on the short arms of a single medium-sized submetacentric chromosome pair were consistent with those found in most European leuciscine cyprinids. On other hand, 5S rDNA FISH in the Toscana stream chub and three other Italian leuciscines, S. squalus, Rutilus rubilio and Telestes muticellus, revealed a species-specific hybridization pattern, i.e. signals on four (S. lucumonis), three (S. squalus and R. rubilio) and two (T. muticellus) chromosome pairs. Whereas all the species shared the 5S rDNA loci on the largest subtelocentric chromosome pair, a "leuciscine" cytotaxonomic marker, S. lucumonis showed both classes of rDNA loci tandem aligned on the short arms of chromosome pair No. 12. The present findings suggest that the observed high variability of 5S rDNA loci provides a powerful tool for investigation of karyotype differentiation in karyologically conservative leuciscine fishes. PMID:23238894

  14. Mechanism of the t(14;18) chromosomal translocation: structural analysis of both derivative 14 and 18 reciprocal partners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To elucidate the mechanism of the t(14;18)(q32;q21) chromosomal translocation found in follicular lymphoma, the authors examined the structure of both derivative (der) chromosomal breakpoints as well as their germ-line predecessors. They noted that chromosome segment 18q21 was juxtaposed with immunoglobulin heavy (H) chain gene diversity (D/sub H/) regions on all five der(18) chromosomes they examined, and they confirmed the juncture with immunoglobulin H-chain gene joining (J/sub H/) regions on the der(14) chromosome. However, the t(14;18) was not fully reciprocal in that chromosome 14 DNA between the D/sub H/ and J/sub H/ regions was deleted. Furthermore, extra nucleotides, reminiscent of N segments, were present at the der(14) and possibly der(18) junctions. This indicates that despite the mature B-cell phenotype of follicular lymphoma, the t(14;18) occurs during attempted D/sub H/-J/sub H/ joining, the earliest event in immunoglobulin rearrangement in a pre-B-cell. The detailed analysis of the germ-line 18q21 region indicated that most breakpoints clustered within a 150-base-pair major breakpoint region. A direct repeat duplication of chromosome 18 sequences was discovered at both chromosomal junctures, typical of the repair of a naturally occurring staggered double-stranded DNA break. These results prompt a translocation model with illegitimate pairing of a staggered double-stranded DNA break at 18q21 and an immunoglobulin endonuclease-mediated break at 14q32 and with N-segment addition, repair, and ligation to generate der(14) and der(18) chromosomes

  15. Mechanism of the t(14; 18) chromosomal translocation: structural analysis of both derivative 14 and 18 reciprocal partners

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bakhshi, A.; Wright, J.J.; Graninger, W.; Seto, M.; Owens, J.; Cossman, J.; Jensen, J.P.; Goldman, P.; Korsmeyer, S.J.

    1987-04-01

    To elucidate the mechanism of the t(14;18)(q32;q21) chromosomal translocation found in follicular lymphoma, the authors examined the structure of both derivative (der) chromosomal breakpoints as well as their germ-line predecessors. They noted that chromosome segment 18q21 was juxtaposed with immunoglobulin heavy (H) chain gene diversity (D/sub H/) regions on all five der(18) chromosomes they examined, and they confirmed the juncture with immunoglobulin H-chain gene joining (J/sub H/) regions on the der(14) chromosome. However, the t(14;18) was not fully reciprocal in that chromosome 14 DNA between the D/sub H/ and J/sub H/ regions was deleted. Furthermore, extra nucleotides, reminiscent of N segments, were present at the der(14) and possibly der(18) junctions. This indicates that despite the mature B-cell phenotype of follicular lymphoma, the t(14;18) occurs during attempted D/sub H/-J/sub H/ joining, the earliest event in immunoglobulin rearrangement in a pre-B-cell. The detailed analysis of the germ-line 18q21 region indicated that most breakpoints clustered within a 150-base-pair major breakpoint region. A direct repeat duplication of chromosome 18 sequences was discovered at both chromosomal junctures, typical of the repair of a naturally occurring staggered double-stranded DNA break. These results prompt a translocation model with illegitimate pairing of a staggered double-stranded DNA break at 18q21 and an immunoglobulin endonuclease-mediated break at 14q32 and with N-segment addition, repair, and ligation to generate der(14) and der(18) chromosomes.

  16. Baseline chromosome aberrations in children

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Merlo, D.F.; Ceppi, M.; Stagi, E.; Bocchini, V.; Šrám, Radim; Rössner st., Pavel

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 172, - (2007), s. 60-67. ISSN 0378-4274 Grant ostatní: EU(EU) 2002-02198; EU(EU) 2005-016320 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390512 Source of funding: R - rámcový projekt EK ; R - rámcový projekt EK Keywords : chromosome aberrations * children * molecular epidemiology Subject RIV: DN - Health Impact of the Environment Quality Impact factor: 2.826, year: 2007

  17. Clonality - X Chromosome Inactivation Assay

    OpenAIRE

    sprotocols

    2014-01-01

    Author: Molecular Profiling Initiative, NCI This method was successful in our lab using prostate tissue and for our specific objectives. Investigators must be aware that they will need to tailor the following protocol for their own research objectives and tissue under study. Investigators can utilize X chromosome inactivation (methylation) to determine the clonality status of a tumor or premalignant lesion in females. The technique is based on a methylation-sensitive restriction enzym...

  18. Hobo transposons causing chromosomal breakpoints.

    OpenAIRE

    Ladevèze, V; Aulard, S.; Chaminade, N; Périquet, G; Lemeunier, F

    1998-01-01

    Several laboratory surveys have shown that transposable elements (TEs) can cause chromosomal breaks and lead to inversions, as in dysgenic crosses involving P-elements. However, it is not presently clear what causes inversions in natural populations of Drosophila. The only direct molecular studies must be taken as evidence against the involvement of mobile elements. Here, in Drosophila lines transformed with the hobo transposable element, and followed for 100 generations, we show the appearan...

  19. Chromosomal instability determines taxane response

    OpenAIRE

    Swanton, Charles; Nicke, Barbara; Schuett, Marion; Eklund, Aron C.; Ng, Charlotte; Li, Qiyuan; Hardcastle, Thomas; Lee, Alvin; Roy, Rajat; East, Philip; Kschischo, Maik; Endesfelder, David; Wylie, Paul; Kim, Se Nyun; Chen, Jie-Guang

    2009-01-01

    Microtubule-stabilizing (MTS) agents, such as taxanes, are important chemotherapeutics with a poorly understood mechanism of action. We identified a set of genes repressed in multiple cell lines in response to MTS agents and observed that these genes are overexpressed in tumors exhibiting chromosomal instability (CIN). Silencing 22/50 of these genes, many of which are involved in DNA repair, caused cancer cell death, suggesting that these genes are involved in the survival of aneuploid cells....

  20. Transillumination spatially modulated illumination microscopy for human chromosome imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitris, Costas; Heracleous, Peter; Patsalis, Philippos

    2005-03-01

    Human chromosome analysis is an essential task in cytogenetics, especially in prenatal screening, genetic syndrome diagnosis, cancer pathology research and mutagen dosimetry. Chromosomal analysis begins with the creation of a karyotype, which is a layout of chromosome images organized by decreasing size in pairs. Both manual and automatic classification of chromosomes are limited by the resolution of the microscope and imaging system used. One way to improve the results of classification and even detect subtleties now remaining undetected, is to enhance the resolution of the images. It is possible to achieve lateral resolution beyond the classical limit, by using spatially modulated illumination (SMI) in a wide-field, non-confocal microscope. In this case, the sample is illuminated with spatially modulated light, which makes normally inaccessible high-resolution information visible in the observed image by shifting higher frequencies within the OTF limits of the microscope. Although, SMI microscopes have been reported in the past, this manuscript reports the development of a transillumination microscope for opaque, non-fluorescent samples. The illumination path consisted of a light source illuminating a ruled grating which was subsequently imaged on the sample. The grating was mounted on a rotating and translating stage so that the magnification and rotation of the pattern could be adjusted. The imaging lens was a 1.25 NA oil immersion objective. Test samples showed resolution improvement, as judged from a comparison of the experimentally obtained FWHM. Further studies using smaller fringe distance or laser interference pattern illumination will be evaluated to further optimize the SMI results.

  1. Y Chromosome Microdeletions in Idiopathic Infertile Men from West Azarbaijan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiarash Attar

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Although assisted reproduction techniques are used extensively in Iran, screening for Y chromosome microdeletions before intracytoplasmic sperm injection is often undervalued. Our aim was to investigate Y chromosome microdeletions in men with idiopathic azoospermia or severe oligospermia.Materials and Methods: In 99 selected patients with azoospermia or severe oligospermia and elevated levels of follicle-stimulating hormone and luteinizing hormone in combination with low serum testosterone levels, 20 pairs of sequence-tagged site-based primer sets specific for the Y microdeletion loci were analyzed. Primers were chosen to cover azoospermia factor (AZF regions as well as deleted in azoospermia (DAZ and the sex-determining region on Y chromosome (SRY genes. Also, 100 healthy men served as a control group.Results: Twenty-four patients (24.2% had microdeletions in AZF genes, but no microdeletions were found in men in the control group. In 15 patients (62.5%, 1 deletion was found. Six patients (25% had 2, and 3 (12.5% had 3 deletions. The deletions mainly comprised the AZFc region (in 21 of 24 patients; 87.5%, which corresponds to the DAZ gene. Deletions in AZFb were found in 7 patients (29.2%, and 4 (16.7% had deletions in the proximal part of AZF regions near SRY gene. No microdeletions were seen in the AZFa or SRY gene. Conclusion: Our results emphasize that Y chromosome microdeletion analysis should be carried out in all patients with idiopathic azoospermia or severe oligospermia who are candidates for intracytoplasmic sperm injection.

  2. Chromosome aberration assays in Allium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grant, W.F.

    1982-01-01

    The common onion (Allium cepa) is an excellent plant for the assay of chromosome aberrations after chemical treatment. Other species of Allium (A. cepa var. proliferum, A. carinatum, A. fistulosum and A. sativum) have also been used but to a much lesser extent. Protocols have been given for using root tips from either bulbs or seeds of Allium cepa to study the cytological end-points, such as chromosome breaks and exchanges, which follow the testing of chemicals in somatic cells. It is considered that both mitotic and meiotic end-points should be used to a greater extent in assaying the cytogenetic effects of a chemical. From a literature survey, 148 chemicals are tabulated that have been assayed in 164 Allium tests for their clastogenic effect. Of the 164 assays which have been carried out, 75 are reported as giving a positive reaction, 49 positive and with a dose response, 1 positive and temperature-related, 9 borderline positive, and 30 negative; 76% of the chemicals gave a definite positive response. It is proposed that the Allium test be included among those tests routinely used for assessing chromosomal damage induced by chemicals.

  3. Chromosome rearrangements and transposable elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lonnig, Wolf-Ekkehard; Saedler, Heinz

    2002-01-01

    There has been limited corroboration to date for McClintock's vision of gene regulation by transposable elements (TEs), although her proposition on the origin of species by TE-induced complex chromosome reorganizations in combination with gene mutations, i.e., the involvement of both factors in relatively sudden formations of species in many plant and animal genera, has been more promising. Moreover, resolution is in sight for several seemingly contradictory phenomena such as the endless reshuffling of chromosome structures and gene sequences versus synteny and the constancy of living fossils (or stasis in general). Recent wide-ranging investigations have confirmed and enlarged the number of earlier cases of TE target site selection (hot spots for TE integration), implying preestablished rather than accidental chromosome rearrangements for nonhomologous recombination of host DNA. The possibility of a partly predetermined generation of biodiversity and new species is discussed. The views of several leading transposon experts on the rather abrupt origin of new species have not been synthesized into the macroevolutionary theory of the punctuated equilibrium school of paleontology inferred from thoroughly consistent features of the fossil record. PMID:12429698

  4. Global haplotype partitioning for maximal associated SNP pairs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pezeshk Hamid

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Global partitioning based on pairwise associations of SNPs has not previously been used to define haplotype blocks within genomes. Here, we define an association index based on LD between SNP pairs. We use the Fisher's exact test to assess the statistical significance of the LD estimator. By this test, each SNP pair is characterized as associated, independent, or not-statistically-significant. We set limits on the maximum acceptable proportion of independent pairs within all blocks and search for the partitioning with maximal proportion of associated SNP pairs. Essentially, this model is reduced to a constrained optimization problem, the solution of which is obtained by iterating a dynamic programming algorithm. Results In comparison with other methods, our algorithm reports blocks of larger average size. Nevertheless, the haplotype diversity within the blocks is captured by a small number of tagSNPs. Resampling HapMap haplotypes under a block-based model of recombination showed that our algorithm is robust in reproducing the same partitioning for recombinant samples. Our algorithm performed better than previously reported models in a case-control association study aimed at mapping a single locus trait, based on simulation results that were evaluated by a block-based statistical test. Compared to methods of haplotype block partitioning, we performed best on detection of recombination hotspots. Conclusion Our proposed method divides chromosomes into the regions within which allelic associations of SNP pairs are maximized. This approach presents a native design for dimension reduction in genome-wide association studies. Our results show that the pairwise allelic association of SNPs can describe various features of genomic variation, in particular recombination hotspots.

  5. X1X1X2X2/X1X2Y sex chromosome systems in the Neotropical Gymnotiformes electric fish of the genus Brachyhypopomus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adauto Lima Cardoso

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Several types of sex chromosome systems have been recorded among Gymnotiformes, including male and female heterogamety, simple and multiple sex chromosomes, and different mechanisms of origin and evolution. The X1X1X2X2/X1X2Y systems identified in three species of this order are considered homoplasic for the group. In the genus Brachyhypopomus, only B. gauderio presented this type of system. Herein we describe the karyotypes of Brachyhypopomus pinnicaudatus and B. n. sp. FLAV, which have an X1X1X2X2/X1X2Y sex chromosome system that evolved via fusion between an autosome and the Y chromosome. The morphology of the chromosomes and the meiotic pairing suggest that the sex chromosomes of B. gauderio and B. pinnicaudatus have a common origin, whereas in B . n. sp. FLAV the sex chromosome system evolved independently. However, we cannot discard the possibility of common origin followed by distinct processes of differentiation. The identification of two new karyotypes with an X1X1X2X2/X1X2Y sex chromosome system in Gymnotiformes makes it the most common among the karyotyped species of the group. Comparisons of these karyotypes and the evolutionary history of the taxa indicate independent origins for their sex chromosomes systems. The recurrent emergence of the X1X1X2X2/X1X2Y system may represent sex chromosomes turnover events in Gymnotiformes.

  6. Comparative analysis of sex chromosomes in Leporinus species (Teleostei, Characiformes) using chromosome painting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background The Leporinus genus, belonging to the Anostomidae family, is an interesting model for studies of sex chromosome evolution in fish, particularly because of the presence of heteromorphic sex chromosomes only in some species of the genus. In this study we used W chromosome-derived probes in a series of cross species chromosome painting experiments to try to understand events of sex chromosome evolution in this family. Results W chromosome painting probes from Leporinus elongatus, L. macrocephalus and L. obtusidens were hybridized to each others chromosomes. The results showed signals along their W chromosomes and the use of L. elongatus W probe against L. macrocephalus and L. obtusidens also showed signals over the Z chromosome. No signals were observed when the later aforementioned probe was used in hybridization procedures against other four Anostomidae species without sex chromosomes. Conclusions Our results demonstrate a common origin of sex chromosomes in L. elongatus, L. macrocephalus and L. obtusidens but suggest that the L. elongatus chromosome system is at a different evolutionary stage. The absence of signals in the species without differentiated sex chromosomes does not exclude the possibility of cryptic sex chromosomes, but they must contain other Leporinus W sequences than those described here. PMID:23822802

  7. Whole chromosome painting of B chromosomes of the red-eye tetra Moenkhausia sanctaefilomenae (Teleostei, Characidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scudeler, Patricia Elda Sobrinho; Diniz, Débora; Wasko, Adriane Pinto; Oliveira, Claudio; Foresti, Fausto

    2015-01-01

    Abstract B chromosomes are dispensable genomic elements found in different groups of animals and plants. In the present study, a whole chromosome probe was generated from a specific heterochromatic B chromosome occurring in cells of the characidae fish Moenkhausia sanctaefilomenae (Steindachner, 1907). The chromosome painting probes were used in fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) experiments for the assessment of metaphase chromosomes obtained from individuals from three populations of Moenkhausia sanctaefilomenae. The results revealed that DNA sequences were shared between a specific B chromosome and many chromosomes of the A complement in all populations analyzed, suggesting a possible intra-specific origin of these B chromosomes. However, no hybridization signals were observed in other B chromosomes found in the same individuals, implying a possible independent origin of B chromosome variants in this species. FISH experiments using 18S rDNA probes revealed the presence of non-active ribosomal genes in some B chromosomes and in some chromosomes of the A complement, suggesting that at least two types of B chromosomes had an independent origin. The role of heterochromatic segments and ribosomal sequences in the origin of B chromosomes were discussed. PMID:26753081

  8. An alignment-free method to find and visualise rearrangements between pairs of DNA sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratas, Diogo; Silva, Raquel M; Pinho, Armando J; Ferreira, Paulo J S G

    2015-01-01

    Species evolution is indirectly registered in their genomic structure. The emergence and advances in sequencing technology provided a way to access genome information, namely to identify and study evolutionary macro-events, as well as chromosome alterations for clinical purposes. This paper describes a completely alignment-free computational method, based on a blind unsupervised approach, to detect large-scale and small-scale genomic rearrangements between pairs of DNA sequences. To illustrate the power and usefulness of the method we give complete chromosomal information maps for the pairs human-chimpanzee and human-orangutan. The tool by means of which these results were obtained has been made publicly available and is described in detail. PMID:25984837

  9. Introgression of chromosome 3Ns from Psathyrostachys huashanica into wheat specifying resistance to stripe rust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Houyang; Wang, Yi; Fedak, George; Cao, Wenguang; Zhang, Haiqin; Fan, Xing; Sha, Lina; Xu, Lili; Zheng, Youliang; Zhou, Yonghong

    2011-01-01

    Wheat stripe rust is a destructive disease in the cool and humid wheat-growing areas of the world. Finding diverse sources of stripe rust resistance is critical for increasing genetic diversity of resistance for wheat breeding programs. Stripe rust resistance was identified in the alien species Psathyrostachys huashanica, and a wheat-P. huashanica amphiploid line (PHW-SA) with stripe rust resistance was reported previously. In this study, a P. huashanica 3Ns monosomic addition line (PW11) with superior resistance to stripe rust was developed, which was derived from the cross between PHW-SA and wheat J-11. We evaluated the alien introgressions PW11-2, PW11-5 and PW11-8 which were derived from line PW11 for reaction to new Pst race CYR32, and used molecular and cytogenetic tools to characterize these lines. The introgressions were remarkably resistant to CYR32, suggesting that the resistance to stripe rust of the introgressions thus was controlled by gene(s) located on P. huashanica chromosome 3Ns. All derived lines were cytologically stable in term of meiotic chromosome behavior. Two 3Ns chromosomes of P. huashanica were detected in the disomic addition line PW11-2. Chromosomes 1B of substitution line PW11-5 had been replaced by a pair of P. huashanica 3Ns chromosomes. In PW11-8, a small terminal segment from P. huashanica chromosome arm 3NsS was translocated to the terminal region of wheat chromosomes 3BL. Thus, this translocated chromosome is designated T3BL-3NsS. These conclusions were further confirmed by SSR analyses. Two 3Ns-specific markers Xgwm181 and Xgwm161 will be useful to rapidly identify and trace the translocated fragments. These introgressions, which had significant characteristics of resistance to stripe rust, could be utilized as novel germplasms for wheat breeding. PMID:21760909

  10. Paired Reading: Psycholinguistics in Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, James Martin

    1987-01-01

    Contends that children need to learn phonic skills, not necessarily through early direct teaching, but through reading experience. Suggests using Paired Reading, which is validated by psycholinguistic reading theory and provides opportunities to learn to read from context and use innate syntactic and semantic knowledge. (SKC)

  11. Direct-photon pair production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper recalls some general aspects of direct-photon pair production at large Psub(T) in hadron collisions: The basic process qantiq→γγ; contributions from gg→γγ (via the quark box); possible resonant contributions; background problems due to indirect photons. A recent experiment performed at the ISR is finally described

  12. Calculation of two Belyi pairs

    OpenAIRE

    Dremov, V. A.

    2008-01-01

    We calculate two Belyi pairs using the properties of Mulase-Penkava differential. Details are provided including accurate construction of coordinates, variables and equations. The calculation is a part of the work which results in a catalogue arXiv:0710.2658

  13. Pairs of dual periodic frames

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Ole; Goh, Say Song

    2012-01-01

    needed. The purpose of the present paper is to provide constructions of dual pairs of frames in the setting of the Hilbert space of periodic functions L2(0,2π). The frames constructed are given explicitly as trigonometric polynomials, which allows for an efficient calculation of the coefficients in the...

  14. 1993 Waterfowl Breeding Pair Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Refuge breeding pair survey was conducted on the evening of April 29 from 5:40 pm until sunset at 7:40 pm. Weather consisted of clear skies, cool temperatures,...

  15. Pairing Linguistic and Music Intelligences

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiEdwardo, MaryAnn Pasda

    2005-01-01

    This article describes how music in the language classroom setting can be a catalyst for developing reading, writing, and understanding skills. Studies suggest that pairing music and linguistic intelligences in the college classroom improves students' grades and abilities to compose theses statements for research papers in courses that emphasize…

  16. Guanidinium Pairing Facilitates Membrane Translocation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Allolio, Christoph; Baxová, Katarína; Vazdar, M.; Jungwirth, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 120, č. 1 (2016), s. 143-153. ISSN 1520-6106 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-06181S Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : ab initio molecular dynamics * guanidinium * like charge pairing * membrane Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.302, year: 2014

  17. Pairing interaction and Galilei invariance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The relation between Galilei invariance and the energy weighted sum rule for a mass dipole operator is discussed using a monopole pairing interaction. It is found that the energy weighted sum rule for the mass dipole operator changes as much as 18% in medium and heavy nuclei. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  18. Sex chromosome pairing and extensive NOR polymorphism in Wadicosa fidelis (Araneae: Lycosidae)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Forman, M.; Nguyen, Petr; Hůla, V.; Král, J.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 141, č. 1 (2013), s. 43-49. ISSN 1424-8581 Grant ostatní: AV ČR(CZ) IAA601110808; MSM ČR(CZ) LA10036; MSM ČR(CZ) SVV 2013-267205; GA JU(CZ) 137/2010/P; GA JU(CZ) 059/2010/P Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : arachnid * ectopic recombination * facultative Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 1.905, year: 2013

  19. Synthesis of an FHB-Resistant Durum Alien Addition Line with a Pair of Grass Chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durum wheat (Triticum turgidum L., 2n = 4x = 28; AABB genomes) is an important cereal crop widely used for human consumption. Fusarium head blight (FHB), or scab, caused by the fungus Fusarium graminearum Schwabe, is a serious disease of durum wheat. Current durum cultivars have very little or no F...

  20. The peripheral chromosome scaffold, a novel structural component of mitotic chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheval, Eugene V; Polyakov, Vladimir Y

    2008-06-01

    Using an original high-salt extraction protocol, we observed a novel chromosome substructure, referred to as the peripheral chromosome scaffold. This chromosome domain contained the perichromosomal layer proteins pKi-67, B23/nucleophosmin and fibrillarin, but no DNA fragments (i.e., the loop domain bases were not associated with the peripheral scaffold). Modern models of chromosome organization do not predict the existence of a peripheral chromosome scaffold domain, and thus our observations have conceptual implications for understanding chromosome architecture. PMID:18337132

  1. An alignment-free method to find and visualise rearrangements between pairs of DNA sequences

    OpenAIRE

    Pratas, Diogo; Silva, Raquel M; Pinho, Armando J.; Ferreira, Paulo J.S.G.

    2015-01-01

    Species evolution is indirectly registered in their genomic structure. The emergence and advances in sequencing technology provided a way to access genome information, namely to identify and study evolutionary macro-events, as well as chromosome alterations for clinical purposes. This paper describes a completely alignment-free computational method, based on a blind unsupervised approach, to detect large-scale and small-scale genomic rearrangements between pairs of DNA sequences. To illustrat...

  2. Examination of pairs in neutrino mixing matrix

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Dianjing

    2015-01-01

    We exam the pairs of neutrino mixing matrix and suggest pairs that can be used in the construction of new mixing patterns, with "pair" denoting the equality of the modulus of a pair of matrix elements. The results show that the tri-maximal mixing in $\

  3. Chromosome engineering: power tools for plant genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Simon W L

    2010-12-01

    The term "chromosome engineering" describes technologies in which chromosomes are manipulated to change their mode of genetic inheritance. This review examines recent innovations in chromosome engineering that promise to greatly increase the efficiency of plant breeding. Haploid Arabidopsis thaliana have been produced by altering the kinetochore protein CENH3, yielding instant homozygous lines. Haploid production will facilitate reverse breeding, a method that downregulates recombination to ensure progeny contain intact parental chromosomes. Another chromosome engineering success is the conversion of meiosis into mitosis, which produces diploid gametes that are clones of the parent plant. This is a key step in apomixis (asexual reproduction through seeds) and could help to preserve hybrid vigor in the future. New homologous recombination methods in plants will potentiate many chromosome engineering applications. PMID:20933291

  4. Radiation induced chromosome instability in human fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evidence has been arising that some biological effects can manifest many cell divisions after irradiation. We have demonstrated that de novo chromosome instability can be detected 10- 15 mean population doubling after heavy ion irradiations. This chromosome instability is characterized by end to end fusions between specific chromosomes. The specificity of the instability may differ from one donor to another but for the same donor, the same instability should be observed after irradiation, during the senescence process and after SV40 transfection (before crisis). In irradiated primary culture fibroblasts, the expression of the delayed chromosomal instability lasts for several cell divisions without inducing cell death. Several rounds of fusions- breakage-fusions can be performed and unbalanced clones emerge (gain or loss of chromosomes with the shorter telomeres would become unstable first.. The difference in the chromosomal instability among donors could be due to a polymorphism in telomere lengths. This could induce large variation in long term response to irradiation among individuals. (author)

  5. How to motivate developers to pair program?

    OpenAIRE

    Haara, Johanna

    2016-01-01

    Many developers are needed to develop large software. Successful development demands communication and teamwork and pair programming improves them. One practice of Extreme Programming is pair programming, which means that developers work together a task. This case study studied how to motivate developers to pair program. The benefits, cost and ways to pair program were studied. In addition, affect of general motivation and Belbin’s team roles to pair programming were studied. The study w...

  6. Evolutionary history of novel genes on the tammar wallaby Y chromosome: Implications for sex chromosome evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murtagh, Veronica J; O'Meally, Denis; Sankovic, Natasha; Delbridge, Margaret L; Kuroki, Yoko; Boore, Jeffrey L; Toyoda, Atsushi; Jordan, Kristen S; Pask, Andrew J; Renfree, Marilyn B; Fujiyama, Asao; Graves, Jennifer A Marshall; Waters, Paul D

    2012-03-01

    We report here the isolation and sequencing of 10 Y-specific tammar wallaby (Macropus eugenii) BAC clones, revealing five hitherto undescribed tammar wallaby Y genes (in addition to the five genes already described) and several pseudogenes. Some genes on the wallaby Y display testis-specific expression, but most have low widespread expression. All have partners on the tammar X, along with homologs on the human X. Nonsynonymous and synonymous substitution ratios for nine of the tammar XY gene pairs indicate that they are each under purifying selection. All 10 were also identified as being on the Y in Tasmanian devil (Sarcophilus harrisii; a distantly related Australian marsupial); however, seven have been lost from the human Y. Maximum likelihood phylogenetic analyses of the wallaby YX genes, with respective homologs from other vertebrate representatives, revealed that three marsupial Y genes (HCFC1X/Y, MECP2X/Y, and HUWE1X/Y) were members of the ancestral therian pseudoautosomal region (PAR) at the time of the marsupial/eutherian split; three XY pairs (SOX3/SRY, RBMX/Y, and ATRX/Y) were isolated from each other before the marsupial/eutherian split, and the remaining three (RPL10X/Y, PHF6X/Y, and UBA1/UBE1Y) have a more complex evolutionary history. Thus, the small marsupial Y chromosome is surprisingly rich in ancient genes that are retained in at least Australian marsupials and evolved from testis-brain expressed genes on the X. PMID:22128133

  7. Evolutionary history of novel genes on the tammar wallaby Y chromosome: Implications for sex chromosome evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murtagh, Veronica J.; O'Meally, Denis; Sankovic, Natasha; Delbridge, Margaret L.; Kuroki, Yoko; Boore, Jeffrey L.; Toyoda, Atsushi; Jordan, Kristen S.; Pask, Andrew J.; Renfree, Marilyn B.; Fujiyama, Asao; Graves, Jennifer A. Marshall; Waters, Paul D.

    2012-01-01

    We report here the isolation and sequencing of 10 Y-specific tammar wallaby (Macropus eugenii) BAC clones, revealing five hitherto undescribed tammar wallaby Y genes (in addition to the five genes already described) and several pseudogenes. Some genes on the wallaby Y display testis-specific expression, but most have low widespread expression. All have partners on the tammar X, along with homologs on the human X. Nonsynonymous and synonymous substitution ratios for nine of the tammar XY gene pairs indicate that they are each under purifying selection. All 10 were also identified as being on the Y in Tasmanian devil (Sarcophilus harrisii; a distantly related Australian marsupial); however, seven have been lost from the human Y. Maximum likelihood phylogenetic analyses of the wallaby YX genes, with respective homologs from other vertebrate representatives, revealed that three marsupial Y genes (HCFC1X/Y, MECP2X/Y, and HUWE1X/Y) were members of the ancestral therian pseudoautosomal region (PAR) at the time of the marsupial/eutherian split; three XY pairs (SOX3/SRY, RBMX/Y, and ATRX/Y) were isolated from each other before the marsupial/eutherian split, and the remaining three (RPL10X/Y, PHF6X/Y, and UBA1/UBE1Y) have a more complex evolutionary history. Thus, the small marsupial Y chromosome is surprisingly rich in ancient genes that are retained in at least Australian marsupials and evolved from testis–brain expressed genes on the X. PMID:22128133

  8. Comparison of genomes of eight species of sections Linum and Adenolinum from the genus Linum based on chromosome banding, molecular markers and RAPD analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muravenko, Olga V; Yurkevich, Olga Yu; Bolsheva, Nadezhda L; Samatadze, Tatiana E; Nosova, Inna V; Zelenina, Daria A; Volkov, Alexander A; Popov, Konstantin V; Zelenin, Alexander V

    2009-03-01

    Karyotypes of species sects. Linum and Adenolinum have been studied using C/DAPI-banding, Ag-NOR staining, FISH with 5S and 26S rDNA and RAPD analysis. C/DAPI-banding patterns enabled identification of all homologous chromosome pairs in the studied karyotypes. The revealed high similarity between species L. grandiflorum (2n = 16) and L. decumbens by chromosome and molecular markers proved their close genome relationship and identified the chromosome number in L. decumbens as 2n = 16. The similarity found for C/DAPI-banding patterns between species with the same chromosome numbers corresponds with the results obtained by RAPD-analysis, showing clusterization of 16-, 18- and 30-chromosome species into three separate groups. 5S rDNA and 26S rDNA were co-localized in NOR-chromosome 1 in the genomes of all species investigated. In 30-chromosome species, there were three separate 5S rDNA sites in chromosomes 3, 8 and 13. In 16-chromosome species, a separate 5S rDNA site was also located in chromosome 3, whereas in 18-chromosome species it was found in the long arm of NOR-chromosome 1. Thus, the difference in localization of rDNA sites in species with 2n = 16, 2n = 30 and 2n = 18 confirms taxonomists opinion, who attributed these species to different sects. Linum and Adenolinum, respectively. The obtained results suggest that species with 2n = 16, 2n = 18 and 2n = 30 originated from a 16-chromosome ancestor. PMID:18500654

  9. The first cytogenetic data on Strumigenys louisianae Roger, 1863 (Formicidae: Myrmicinae: Dacetini: the lowest chromosome number in the Hymenoptera of the neotropical region.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Alves-Silva

    Full Text Available In the present study, the first cytogenetic data was obtained for the ant species Strumigenys louisianae, from a genus possessing no previous cytogenetic data for the Neotropical region. The chromosome number observed was 2n = 4, all possessing metacentric morphology. Blocks rich in GC base pairs were observed in the interstitial region of the short arm of the largest chromosome pair, which may indicate that this region corresponds to the NORs. The referred species presented the lowest chromosome number observed for the subfamily Myrmicinae and for the Hymenoptera found in the Neotropical region. Observation of a low chromosome number karyotype has been described in Myrmecia croslandi, in which the occurrence of tandem fusions accounts for the most probable rearrangement for its formation. The accumulation of cytogenetic data may carry crucial information to ensure deeper understanding of the systematics of the tribe Dacetini.

  10. Mediterranean Species of the Spittlebug Genus Philaenus: Modes of Chromosome Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maryańska-Nadachowska, Anna; Kuznetsova, Valentina G.; Lachowska, Dorota; Drosopoulos, Sakis

    2012-01-01

    The evolution of karyotypes and sex determination system of Philaenus Stål (Auchenorrhyncha: Aphrophoridae) species is studied here in detail. The most plausible scenario of chromosomal rearrangements accompanying phylogenetic differentiation in Philaenus is advanced. It is postulated that the ancestral karyotype of Philaenus was 2n = 24 + X0. Karyotype changes occurred several times independently in the genus. The karyotype of 2n = 22 + X0 (P. spumarius and P. tesselatus) originated from 2n = 24 + X0 by fusion between two autosomal pairs. The neo—XY system (P. arslani, P. loukasi, P. signatus, P. maghresignus, and P. tarifa) also originated from the 24 + X0 karyotype by means of independent fusions between autosomes and the original X chromosome. The neo—X1X2Y system (P. italosignus) evolved from the 2n = 22 + neo—XY karyotype by an additional fusion between the Y chromosome and one more autosomal pair. The neo—XnY system of P. italosignus is the first reported case of an evolutionarily fixed multiple sex chromosome system in Auchenorrhyncha. PMID:22963598

  11. Karyotype characterization of Trigona fulviventris Guérin, 1835 (Hymenoptera, Meliponini by C banding and fluorochrome staining: report of a new chromosome number in the genus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domingues Alayne Magalhães Trindade

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Although many species of the genus Trigona have been taxonomically described, cytogenetic studies of these species are still rare. The aim of the present study was to obtain cytogenetic data by conventional staining, C banding and fluorochrome staining for the karyotype characterization of the species Trigona fulviventris. Cytogenetic analysis revealed that this species possesses a diploid chromosome number of 2n = 32, different from most other species of this genus studied so far. This variation was probably due to the centric fusion in a higher numbered ancestral karyotype, this fusion producing the large metacentric chromosome pair and the lower chromosome number observed in Trigona fulviventris. Heterochromatin was detected in the pericentromeric region of the first chromosome pair and in one of the arms of the remaining pairs. Base-specific fluorochrome staining with 4'-6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI showed that the heterochromatin was rich in AT base pairs (DAPI+ except for pair 13, which was chromomycin A3 (CMA3 positive indicating an excess of GC base pairs. Our data also suggests that there was variation in heterochromatin base composition.

  12. Meiosis I: When Chromosomes Undergo Extreme Makeover

    OpenAIRE

    Miller, Matthew P.; Amon, Angelika; Ünal, Elçin

    2013-01-01

    The ultimate success of cell division relies on the accurate partitioning of the genetic material. Errors in this process occur in nearly all tumors and are the leading cause of miscarriages and congenital birth defects in humans. Two cell divisions, mitosis and meiosis, use common as well as unique mechanisms to ensure faithful chromosome segregation. In mitosis, alternating rounds of DNA replication and chromosome segregation preserves the chromosome complement of the progenitor cell. In co...

  13. Novel Gene Acquisition on Carnivore Y Chromosomes

    OpenAIRE

    Murphy, William J.; A J Pearks Wilkerson; Terje Raudsepp; Richa Agarwala; Schäffer, Alejandro A.; Roscoe Stanyon; Chowdhary, Bhanu P

    2006-01-01

    Despite its importance in harboring genes critical for spermatogenesis and male-specific functions, the Y chromosome has been largely excluded as a priority in recent mammalian genome sequencing projects. Only the human and chimpanzee Y chromosomes have been well characterized at the sequence level. This is primarily due to the presumed low overall gene content and highly repetitive nature of the Y chromosome and the ensuing difficulties using a shotgun sequence approach for assembly. Here we...

  14. Identification of bacterial cells by chromosomal painting.

    OpenAIRE

    Lanoil, B. D.; Giovannoni, S J

    1997-01-01

    Chromosomal painting is a technique for the microscopic localization of genetic material. It has been applied at the subcellular level to identify regions of eukaryotic chromosomes. Here we describe the development of bacterial chromosomal painting (BCP), a related technology for the identification of bacterial cells. Purified genomic DNAs from six bacterial strains were labeled by nick translation with the fluorochrome Fluor-X, Cy3, or Cy5. The average size of the labeled fragments was ca. 5...

  15. Holoprosencephaly due to Numeric Chromosome Abnormalities

    OpenAIRE

    Solomon, Benjamin D.; Rosenbaum, Kenneth N.; Meck, Jeanne M.; Muenke, Maximilian

    2010-01-01

    Holoprosencephaly (HPE) is the most common malformation of the human forebrain. When a clinician identifies a patient with HPE, a routine chromosome analysis is often the first genetic test sent for laboratory analysis in order to assess for a structural or numerical chromosome anomaly. An abnormality of chromosome number is overall the most frequently identified etiology in a patient with HPE. These abnormalities include trisomy 13, trisomy 18, and triploidy, though several others have been ...

  16. CHROMOSOMAL ABNORMALITIES IN PATIENTS WITH RECURRENT MISCARRIAGE

    OpenAIRE

    Daniela Mierla; Viorica Radoi; Veronica Stoian

    2012-01-01

    Chromosomal abnormalities are involved in the etiology of recurrent spontaneous pregnancy loss and sub-fertility. The purpose of this study was to determine the frequency and contribution of chromosomal abnormalities in recurrent miscarriages. The results obtained and literature review are helpful in understanding the importance of cytogenetics analysis of female infertility. To investigate the distribution of chromosomal abnormalities in the Romanian population with recurrent miscarriage, ka...

  17. How does DNA break during chromosomal translocations?

    OpenAIRE

    Nambiar, Mridula; Raghavan, Sathees C.

    2011-01-01

    Chromosomal translocations are one of the most common types of genetic rearrangements and are molecular signatures for many types of cancers. They are considered as primary causes for cancers, especially lymphoma and leukemia. Although many translocations have been reported in the last four decades, the mechanism by which chromosomes break during a translocation remains largely unknown. In this review, we summarize recent advances made in understanding the molecular mechanism of chromosomal t...

  18. Interchanges in popcorn (Zea mays L.) involving the nucleolus organizer chromosome

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Suely Pagliarini; Gléia Laverde Ricci; Neide da Silva; Carlos Alberto Scapim

    2006-01-01

    The analysis of microsporogenesis in endogamous plants of popcorn (S5 to S7) showed several and distinctinterchanges which involve the nucleolus organizer (chromosome 6). The detection of cells with interchanges was facilitatedby the presence of two nucleoli of different sizes in contrast to normal ones with a single big nucleolus. Interchange points donot always seem to be at the same place. Whereas in several situations the interchange point clearly involved more than twochromosome pairs, a...

  19. A Whole Genome Linkage Scan Identifies Multiple Chromosomal Regions Influencing Adiposity-Related Traits among Samoans

    OpenAIRE

    Dai, F.; Sun, G.; Åberg, K.; Keighley, E.D.; Indugula, S.R.; Roberts, S. T.; Smelser, D.; Viali, S.; Jin, L.; Deka, R.; Weeks, D.E.; McGarvey, S T

    2008-01-01

    We conducted a genome-wide scan in 46 pedigrees, with 671 phenotyped adults, from the independent nation of Samoa to map quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for adiposity-related phenotypes, including body mass index (BMI), abdominal circumference (ABDCIR), percent body fat (%BFAT), and fasting serum leptin and adiponectin. A set of 378 autosomal and 14 X chromosomal microsatellite markers were genotyped in 572 of the adults. Significant genetic correlations (0.82–0.96) were detected between pairs...

  20. Chromosomal clustering of a human transcriptome reveals regulatory background

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Purmann Antje

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There has been much evidence recently for a link between transcriptional regulation and chromosomal gene order, but the relationship between genomic organization, regulation and gene function in higher eukaryotes remains to be precisely defined. Results Here, we present evidence for organization of a large proportion of a human transcriptome into gene clusters throughout the genome, which are partly regulated by the same transcription factors, share biological functions and are characterized by non-housekeeping genes. This analysis was based on the cardiac transcriptome identified by our genome-wide array analysis of 55 human heart samples. We found 37% of these genes to be arranged mainly in adjacent pairs or triplets. A significant number of pairs of adjacent genes are putatively regulated by common transcription factors (p = 0.02. Furthermore, these gene pairs share a significant number of GO functional classification terms. We show that the human cardiac transcriptome is organized into many small clusters across the whole genome, rather than being concentrated in a few larger clusters. Conclusion Our findings suggest that genes expressed in concert are organized in a linear arrangement for coordinated regulation. Determining the relationship between gene arrangement, regulation and nuclear organization as well as gene function will have broad biological implications.

  1. Pairing theory of striped superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Striped high-Tc superconductors such as La7/8Ba1/8CuO4 show a fascinating competition between spin and charge order on the one hand and superconductivity on the other. A theory for these systems therefore has to capture both the spin correlations in an antiferromagnet and the pair-correlation of a superconductor. For this purpose we have developed an effective Hartree-Fock theory by merging electron pairing with finite center-of-mass momentum and antiferromagnetism. We show that this theory reproduces the key experimental features such as the formation of the antiferromagnetic stripe patterns at 7/8 band filling or the quasi one-dimensional electronic structure observed by photoemission spectroscopy.

  2. Advances in plant chromosome genomics

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Doležel, Jaroslav; Vrána, Jan; Cápal, Petr; Kubaláková, Marie; Burešová, Veronika; Šimková, Hana

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 32, č. 1 (2014), s. 122-136. ISSN 0734-9750 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP501/10/1740; GA ČR GAP501/10/1778; GA ČR GBP501/12/G090; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1204 Grant ostatní: GA MŠk(CZ) ED0007/01/01 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : BAC library * Chromosome sorting * Cytogenetics Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 9.015, year: 2014

  3. Multiple chromosomes of Azotobacter vinelandii.

    OpenAIRE

    1989-01-01

    The number of copies of the genes leuB, nifH, nifD, and nifK per cell of Azotobacter vinelandii has been determined to be about 80. A beta-lactamase gene was integrated into the A. vinelandii chromosome by single-point crossover. Subsequently, we have been able to detect nearly 80 copies of this beta-lactamase gene per cell of A. vinelandii when cultured for a large number of generations in the presence of ampicillin. The multiple copies of the beta-lactamase gene do not seem to be present on...

  4. Giemsa C-banding of Barley Chromosomes. IV. Chromosomal Constitution of Autotetraploid Barley

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linde-Laursen, Ib

    1984-01-01

    homologues of each of the chromosomes. The aneuploid C2--seedlings were fairly equally distributed on hypo-and hyperploids, and on the seven chromosome groups. This suggests that a particular chromosome is lost or gained at random in gametes and embryos. The 11 C3--seedlings comprised seven true euploids......The progeny of an autotetraploid barley plant (C1) consisted of 45 tetraploids and 33 aneuploids. Giemsa C-banding was used to identify each of the chromosomes in 20 euploid and 31 aneuploid C2--seedlings, and in 11 C3--offspring of aneuploid C2--plants. The euploid C2--seedlings all had four......, one seedling with 2n=28 having an extra chromosome 6 and missing one chromosome 3, and three seedlings with 2n=29. The chromosomal composition of aneuploid C3--seedlings did not reflect that of their aneuploid C2--parents with respect to missing or extra chromosomes. Two hypohexaploid C2--seedlings...

  5. Klt singularities of horospherical pairs

    OpenAIRE

    Pasquier, Boris

    2015-01-01

    Let $X$ be a horospherical $G$-variety and let $D$ be an effective $\\mathbb{Q}$-divisor of $X$ that is stable under the action of a Borel subgroup $B$ of $G$ and such that $D+K\\_X$ is $\\mathbb{Q}$-Cartier. We prove, using Bott-Samelson resolutions, that the pair $(X,D)$ is klt if and only if $\\lfloor D\\rfloor=0$

  6. Differential Bloch Oscillating Transistor Pair

    OpenAIRE

    Sarkar, Jayanta; Puska, Antti; Hassel, Juha; Hakonen, Pertti J.

    2013-01-01

    We examine a Bloch Oscillating Transistor pair as a differential stage for cryogenic low-noise measurements. Using two oppositely biased, nearly symmetric Bloch Oscillating Transistors, we measured the sum and difference signals in the current gain and transconductance modes while changing the common mode signal, either voltage or current. From the common mode rejection ratio we find values $\\sim 20$ dB even under non-optimal conditions. We also characterize the noise properties and obtain ex...

  7. Microtubule detyrosination guides chromosomes during mitosis

    OpenAIRE

    Barisic, Marin; Silva e Sousa, Ricardo; Tripathy, Suvranta K.; Magiera, Maria M.; Zaytsev, Anatoly V.; Pereira, Ana L.; Janke, Carsten; Grishchuk, Ekaterina L.; Maiato, Helder

    2015-01-01

    Before chromosomes segregate into daughter cells they align at the mitotic spindle equator, a process known as chromosome congression. CENP-E/Kinesin-7 is a microtubule plus-end-directed kinetochore motor required for congression of pole-proximal chromosomes. Because the plus-ends of many astral microtubules in the spindle point to the cell cortex, it remains unknown how CENP-E guides pole-proximal chromosomes specifically towards the equator. Here we found that congression of pole-proximal c...

  8. Exceptional Complex Chromosomal Rearrangements in Three Generations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannie Kartapradja

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We report an exceptional complex chromosomal rearrangement (CCR found in three individuals in a family that involves 4 chromosomes with 5 breakpoints. The CCR was ascertained in a phenotypically abnormal newborn with additional chromosomal material on the short arm of chromosome 4. Maternal karyotyping indicated that the mother carried an apparently balanced CCR involving chromosomes 4, 6, 11, and 18. Maternal transmission of the derivative chromosome 4 resulted in partial trisomy for chromosomes 6q and 18q and a partial monosomy of chromosome 4p in the proband. Further family studies found that the maternal grandmother carried the same apparently balanced CCR as the proband’s mother, which was confirmed using the whole chromosome painting (WCP FISH. High resolution whole genome microarray analysis of DNA from the proband’s mother found no evidence for copy number imbalance in the vicinity of the CCR translocation breakpoints, or elsewhere in the genome, providing evidence that the mother’s and grandmother’s CCRs were balanced at a molecular level. This structural rearrangement can be categorized as an exceptional CCR due to its complexity and is a rare example of an exceptional CCR being transmitted in balanced and/or unbalanced form across three generations.

  9. Chromosome heteromorphisms in the Japanese, 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The type and frequency of chromosome variants detected by the C-staining method were ascertained in 1,857 individuals residing in Hiroshima. The most frequent heteromorphic variant was the total inversion of the C-band in chromosome 9 found in 27 individuals (1.45%). The total inversion of the C-band in chromosome 1 was not seen in this sample, but the partial inversion of the C-band in chromosome 1 was found in 18 persons (0.97%). Partial inversion was also detected in the C-band in chromosome 9 in 22 individuals (1.18%). In chromosome 16, neither total nor partial inversion of the C-band was observed in the present study. The frequencies of chromosomes 1, 9, and 16 with a very large C-band were 0.70%, 0.22%, and 0.54%, respectively. Aside from these (1, 9, and 16) a very large C-band was found occasionally in chromosomes 4, 5, 6, 11, 12, 14, and 15, and an unusual insertion of the Y chromosome was observed. A total of 128 C-band variants (6.89%) was found in the 1,857 Hiroshima residents. (author)

  10. Cognitive and medical features of chromosomal aneuploidy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutaff-Lee, Christa; Cordeiro, Lisa; Tartaglia, Nicole

    2013-01-01

    This chapter describes the physical characteristics, medical complications, and cognitive and psychological profiles that are associated with chromosomal aneuploidy conditions, a group of conditions in which individuals are born with one or more additional chromosome. Overall, chromosomal aneuploidy conditions occur in approximately 1 in 250 children. Information regarding autosomal disorders including trisomy 21 (Down syndrome), trisomy 13 (Patau syndrome), and trisomy 18 (Edward syndrome) are presented. Sex chromosome aneuploidy conditions such as Klinefelter syndrome (47,XXY), XYY, trisomy X, and Turner syndrome (45,X), in addition to less frequently occurring tetrasomy and pentasomy conditions are also covered. Treatment recommendations and suggestions for future research directions are discussed. PMID:23622175

  11. Chromosomal aberrations in ore miners of Slovakia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A pilot study was performed in which the incidence of chromosomal aberrations in lymphocytes of miners in ore mines located in Central Slovakia was monitored and related to lifetime underground radon exposure and to lifetime smoking. The conclusions drawn from the results of the study were as follows: the counts of chromosomal aberrations in lymphocytes of miners were significantly higher than in an age matched control group of white-collar staff; the higher counts of chromosomal aberrations could be ascribed to underground exposure of miners and to smoking; a dependence of chromosomal aberration counts on the exposure to radon could not be assessed. (A.K.)

  12. One-dimensional Cooper pairing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Exact solutions for electron pairing in a 1D Fermi gas under different separable interactions. Energy dispersion relations for arbitrary values of center-of-mass momenta and interaction strengths. Results reveal linear and roton-like modes. Effects due to finite range parameters in the interaction. We study electron pairing in a one-dimensional (1D) fermion gas at zero temperature under zero- and finite-range, attractive, two-body interactions. The binding energy of Cooper pairs (CPs) with zero total or center-of-mass momentum (CMM) increases with attraction strength and decreases with interaction range for fixed strength. The excitation energy of 1D CPs with nonzero CMM display novel, unique properties. It satisfies a dispersion relation with two branches: a phonon-like linear excitation for small CP CMM; this is followed by roton-like quadratic excitation minimum for CMM greater than twice the Fermi wavenumber, but only above a minimum threshold attraction strength. The expected quadratic-in-CMM dispersion in vacuo when the Fermi wavenumber is set to zero is recovered for any coupling. This paper completes a three-part exploration initiated in 2D and continued in 3D.

  13. Intra- and interspecific chromosome polymorphisms in cultivated Cichorium L. species (Asteraceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebenézer C.S. Bernardes

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Endive (Cichorium endivia L. and chicory (C. intybus L. both have 2n = 18, but until now, there has been no detailed karyomorphological characterization. The present work evaluated five accessions of each species using FISH with rDNA probes and fluorochrome staining with CMA and DAPI. Both species presented distinct banding patterns after fluorochrome staining: while endive had proximal CMA++/DAPI- bands in the short arms of pairs 1, 2 and 3, chicory had proximal CMA-positive bands in chromosomes 1 and 3 and interstitial in the short arm of chromosome 8. Among endive accessions, FISH procedures revealed conserved position and number of 5S and 45S rDNA sites (two and three pairs, respectively, associated with the CMA-positive bands. Notwithstanding, polymorphisms were detected within chicory accessions regarding the number and the distribution of rDNA sites in relation to the most frequent karyotype (two pairs with 45S and one with 5S rDNA. The karyological markers developed allowed karyotypic differentiation between both species, uncovering peculiarities in the number and position of rDNA sites, which suggest chromosome rearrangements, such as translocations in chicory cultivars. The interspecific and intraspecific polymorphisms observed emphasize the potential of karyomorphological evaluations, helping our understanding of the relationships and evolution of the group.

  14. Intra- and interspecific chromosome polymorphisms in cultivated Cichorium L. species (Asteraceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardes, Ebenézer C S; Benko-Iseppon, Ana M; Vasconcelos, Santelmo; Carvalho, Reginaldo; Brasileiro-Vidal, Ana C

    2013-09-01

    Endive (Cichorium endivia L.) and chicory (C. intybus L.) both have 2n = 18, but until now, there has been no detailed karyomorphological characterization. The present work evaluated five accessions of each species using FISH with rDNA probes and fluorochrome staining with CMA and DAPI. Both species presented distinct banding patterns after fluorochrome staining: while endive had proximal CMA(++)/DAPI(-) bands in the short arms of pairs 1, 2 and 3, chicory had proximal CMA-positive bands in chromosomes 1 and 3 and interstitial in the short arm of chromosome 8. Among endive accessions, FISH procedures revealed conserved position and number of 5S and 45S rDNA sites (two and three pairs, respectively), associated with the CMA-positive bands. Notwithstanding, polymorphisms were detected within chicory accessions regarding the number and the distribution of rDNA sites in relation to the most frequent karyotype (two pairs with 45S and one with 5S rDNA). The karyological markers developed allowed karyotypic differentiation between both species, uncovering peculiarities in the number and position of rDNA sites, which suggest chromosome rearrangements, such as translocations in chicory cultivars. The interspecific and intraspecific polymorphisms observed emphasize the potential of karyomorphological evaluations, helping our understanding of the relationships and evolution of the group. PMID:24130443

  15. Molecular analysis of recombination in a family with Duchenne muscular dystrophy and a large pericentric X chromosome inversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shashi, V.; Golden, W.L.; Allinson, P.S. [Univ. of Virginia Health Sciences Center, Charlottesville, VA (United States)] [and others

    1996-06-01

    It has been demonstrated in animal studies that, in animals heterozygous for pericentric chromosomal inversions, loop formation is greatly reduced during meiosis. This results in absence of recombination within the inverted segment, with recombination seen only outside the inversion. A recent study in yeast has shown that telomeres, rather than centromeres, lead in chromosome movement just prior to meiosis and may be involved in promoting recombination. We studied by cytogenetic analysis and DNA polymorphisms the nature of meiotic recombination in a three-generation family with a large pericentric X chromosome inversion, inv(X)(p21.1q26), in which Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) was cosegregating with the inversion. On DNA analysis there was no evidence of meiotic recombination between the inverted and normal X chromosomes in the inverted segment. Recombination was seen at the telomeric regions, Xp22 and Xq27-28. No deletion or point mutation was found on analysis of the DMD gene. On the basis of the FISH results, we believe that the X inversion is the mutation responsible for DMD in this family. Our results indicate that (1) pericentric X chromosome inversions result in reduction of recombination between the normal and inverted X chromosomes; (2) meiotic X chromosome pairing in these individuals is likely initiated at the telomeres; and (3) in this family DMD is caused by the pericentric inversion. 50 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Fusion of nearby inverted repeats by a replication-based mechanism leads to formation of dicentric and acentric chromosomes that cause genome instability in budding yeast

    OpenAIRE

    Paek, Andrew L.; Kaochar, Salma; Jones, Hope; Elezaby, Aly; Shanks, Lisa; Weinert, Ted

    2009-01-01

    Large-scale changes (gross chromosomal rearrangements [GCRs]) are common in genomes, and are often associated with pathological disorders. We report here that a specific pair of nearby inverted repeats in budding yeast fuse to form a dicentric chromosome intermediate, which then rearranges to form a translocation and other GCRs. We next show that fusion of nearby inverted repeats is general; we found that many nearby inverted repeats that are present in the yeast genome also fuse, as does a p...

  17. Convenient and reversible site-specific targeting of exogenous DNA into a bacterial chromosome by use of the FLP recombinase: the FLIRT system.

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, L C; Wood, E. A.; Cox, M M

    1997-01-01

    We have created a system that utilizes the FLP recombinase of yeast to introduce exogenous cloned DNA reversibly at defined locations in the Escherichia coli chromosome. Recombination target (FRT) sites can be introduced permanently at random locations in the chromosome on a modified Tn5 transposon, now designed so that the inserted FRT can be detected and its location mapped with base pair resolution. FLP recombinase is provided as needed through the regulated expression of its gene on a pla...

  18. Compton Scattering, Pair Annihilation and Pair Production in a Plasma

    OpenAIRE

    Krishan, Vinod

    1999-01-01

    The square of the four momentum of a photon in vacuum is zero. However, in an unmagnetized plasma it is equal to the square of the plasma frequency. Further, the electron-photon coupling vertex is modified in a plasma to include the effect of the plasma medium. I calculate the cross sections of the three processes - the Compton scattering, electron-positron pair annihilation and production in a plasma. At high plasma densities, the cross sections are found to change significantly. Such high p...

  19. Interspecific chromosomal divergences in the genus Characidium (Teleostei: Characiformes: Crenuchidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Carlos Pansonato Alves

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Karyotypes of seven fish species of the genus Characidium, three of them studied for the first time, were characterized using conventional cytogenetic techniques (Giemsa staining, Ag-NOR, and C-banding. All species presented a diploid number of 2n=50, with only metacentric and submetacentric chromosomes, as observed in all Characidium species studied. In two species cells with one to three B chromosomes were observed. All species analyzed have a single NOR-bearing chromosome pair with morphological differences among them. Characidium cf. zebra shows heterochromatic blocks restricted to the pericentromeric regions of all chromosomes denoting the absence of a sex chromosome system. On the other hand, the species Characidium lanei, C. pterostictum, C. lauroi, C. oiticicai, C. schubarti, and Characidium sp., besides presenting pericentromeric heterochromatic blocks, exhibited large interstitial and/or terminal heterochromatic blocks, and a ZZ/ZW sex chromosome system. The constitutive heterochromatin seems to play a relevant role in the chromosome differentiation process of the studied species, mainly in relation to the sex chromosomes. The geographical isolation of the rivers in which the species were sampled, associated with their way of life restricted to headwaters environments, may have favored the process of fixation of different karyotypes found in each of the analyzed species.Os cariótipos de sete espécies de peixes do gênero Characidium, três estudadas pela primeira vez, foram caracterizados com o uso das técnicas citogenéticas convencionais (Giemsa, Ag-RONs e bandamento-C. Todas as espécies apresentaram número diplóide de 2n=50 cromossomos, com predominância de cromossomos dos tipos meta e submetacêntricos. Nesse estudo foi também observada a presença de até três cromossomos B em células de duas espécies, C. oiticicai e C. pterostictum. O bandamento C e o tratamento com nitrato de prata revelaram significativas diferen

  20. Chromosomal replicons of higher plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van' t Hof, J.

    1987-03-16

    This brief discussion of replicons of higher plants offers a glimpse into the properties of chromosomal DNA replication. It gives evidence that the S phase of unrelated plant species is comprised of temporally ordered replicon families that increase in number with genome size. This orderly process, which assures a normal inheritance of genetic material to recipient daughter cells, is maintained at the level of replicon clusters by two mutually exclusive mechanisms, one involving the rate at which single replicons replicate their allotment of DNA, and another by means of the tempo-pause. The same two mechanisms are used by cells to alter the pattern of chromosomal DNA replication just prior to and during normal development. Both mechanisms are genetically determined and produce genetic effects when disturbed of disrupted by additional non-conforming DNAs. Further insight into how these two mechanisms operate requires more molecular information about the nature of replicons and the factors that govern when a replicon family replicates. Plant material is a rich and ideal source for this information just awaiting exploitation. 63 refs.

  1. Increased chromosome radiosensitivity during pregnancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It was necessary to consider the risks of exposure of pregnant women, not only in relation to the child, but also in relation to their own hypersensitivity. We have demonstrated that pregnancy increases radiosensitivity of chromosome in the mouse at the end of gestation. This is of importance since it may have implications on radioprotection of pregnant women and give experimental guidelines to the problems of hypersensitivity to drugs and cancer aggravation during pregnancy. Blood obtained from women at various times of pregnancy was exposed to ionizing radiations. By comparison to non-pregnant women, an increase in chromosome breakage was observed in metaphases from lymphocytes, after short-term culture in the presence of the serum of the same donor. Immediately after delivery, this increase in radiosensitivity disappeared. In a prospective study, serial analyses showed a very strong correlation between the amount of pregnancy hormones, progesterone in particular, and the increase in radiosensitivity. Pregnant women may have an increased sensitivity to ionizing radiation during the second half of their pregnancy. This study provides the first evidence in human that radiosensitivity may vary in relation to physiological conditions

  2. Retrospective dosimetry by chromosomal analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The joint EU/CIS project ECP-6, was set up to examine whether cytogenetic dosimetry is possible for persons irradiated years previously at Chernobyl. The paper describes the possibility of achieving this by the examination of blood lymphocytes for unstable and stable chromosome aberrations; dicentrics and translocations. Emphasis was placed on the relatively new fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) method for rapid screening for stable translocations. In a collaborative experiment in vitro dose response calibration curves for dicentrics and FISH were produced with gamma radiation over the range 0-1.0 Gy. A pilot study of about 60 liquidators with registered doses ranging from 0-300 mSv was undertaken to determine whether the chromosomal methods may verify the recorded doses. It was concluded that the dicentric is no longer valid as a measured endpoint. Translocations may be used to verify early dosimetry carried out on highly irradiated persons. For the vast majority of lesser exposed subjects FISH is impractical as an individual dosimeter; it may have some value for comparing groups of subjects

  3. Chromosomal instability determines taxane response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanton, Charles; Nicke, Barbara; Schuett, Marion; Eklund, Aron C; Ng, Charlotte; Li, Qiyuan; Hardcastle, Thomas; Lee, Alvin; Roy, Rajat; East, Philip; Kschischo, Maik; Endesfelder, David; Wylie, Paul; Kim, Se Nyun; Chen, Jie-Guang; Howell, Michael; Ried, Thomas; Habermann, Jens K; Auer, Gert; Brenton, James D; Szallasi, Zoltan; Downward, Julian

    2009-05-26

    Microtubule-stabilizing (MTS) agents, such as taxanes, are important chemotherapeutics with a poorly understood mechanism of action. We identified a set of genes repressed in multiple cell lines in response to MTS agents and observed that these genes are overexpressed in tumors exhibiting chromosomal instability (CIN). Silencing 22/50 of these genes, many of which are involved in DNA repair, caused cancer cell death, suggesting that these genes are involved in the survival of aneuploid cells. Overexpression of these "CIN-survival" genes is associated with poor outcome in estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer and occurs frequently in basal-like and Her2-positive cases. In diploid cells, but not in chromosomally unstable cells, paclitaxel causes repression of CIN-survival genes, followed by cell death. In the OV01 ovarian cancer clinical trial, a high level of CIN was associated with taxane resistance but carboplatin sensitivity, indicating that CIN may determine MTS response in vivo. Thus, pretherapeutic assessment of CIN may optimize treatment stratification and clinical trial design using these agents. PMID:19458043

  4. Chromosomal replicons of higher plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This brief discussion of replicons of higher plants offers a glimpse into the properties of chromosomal DNA replication. It gives evidence that the S phase of unrelated plant species is comprised of temporally ordered replicon families that increase in number with genome size. This orderly process, which assures a normal inheritance of genetic material to recipient daughter cells, is maintained at the level of replicon clusters by two mutually exclusive mechanisms, one involving the rate at which single replicons replicate their allotment of DNA, and another by means of the tempo-pause. The same two mechanisms are used by cells to alter the pattern of chromosomal DNA replication just prior to and during normal development. Both mechanisms are genetically determined and produce genetic effects when disturbed of disrupted by additional non-conforming DNAs. Further insight into how these two mechanisms operate requires more molecular information about the nature of replicons and the factors that govern when a replicon family replicates. Plant material is a rich and ideal source for this information just awaiting exploitation. 63 refs

  5. The X chromosome of monotremes shares a highly conserved region with the eutherian and marsupial X chromosomes despite the absence of X chromosome inactivation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watson, J.M.; Spencer, J.A.; Graves, J.A.M. (La Trobe Univ., Bundoora, Victoria (Australia)); Riggs, A.D. (Beckman Inst., Duarte, CA (USA))

    1990-09-01

    Eight genes, located on the long arm of the human X chromosome and present on the marsupial X chromosome, were mapped by in situ hybridization to the chromosomes of the platypus Ornithorhynchus anatinus, one of the three species of monotreme mammals. All were located on the X chromosome. The authors conclude that the long arm of the human X chromosome represents a highly conserved region that formed part of the X chromosome in a mammalian ancestor at least 150 million years ago. Since three of these genes are located on the long arm of the platypus X chromosome, which is G-band homologous to the Y chromosome and apparently exempt from X chromosome inactivation, the conservation of this region has evidently not depended on isolation by X-Y chromosome differentiation and X chromosome inactivation.

  6. Deletion of DXZ4 on the human inactive X chromosome alters higher-order genome architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darrow, Emily M; Huntley, Miriam H; Dudchenko, Olga; Stamenova, Elena K; Durand, Neva C; Sun, Zhuo; Huang, Su-Chen; Sanborn, Adrian L; Machol, Ido; Shamim, Muhammad; Seberg, Andrew P; Lander, Eric S; Chadwick, Brian P; Aiden, Erez Lieberman

    2016-08-01

    During interphase, the inactive X chromosome (Xi) is largely transcriptionally silent and adopts an unusual 3D configuration known as the "Barr body." Despite the importance of X chromosome inactivation, little is known about this 3D conformation. We recently showed that in humans the Xi chromosome exhibits three structural features, two of which are not shared by other chromosomes. First, like the chromosomes of many species, Xi forms compartments. Second, Xi is partitioned into two huge intervals, called "superdomains," such that pairs of loci in the same superdomain tend to colocalize. The boundary between the superdomains lies near DXZ4, a macrosatellite repeat whose Xi allele extensively binds the protein CCCTC-binding factor. Third, Xi exhibits extremely large loops, up to 77 megabases long, called "superloops." DXZ4 lies at the anchor of several superloops. Here, we combine 3D mapping, microscopy, and genome editing to study the structure of Xi, focusing on the role of DXZ4 We show that superloops and superdomains are conserved across eutherian mammals. By analyzing ligation events involving three or more loci, we demonstrate that DXZ4 and other superloop anchors tend to colocate simultaneously. Finally, we show that deleting DXZ4 on Xi leads to the disappearance of superdomains and superloops, changes in compartmentalization patterns, and changes in the distribution of chromatin marks. Thus, DXZ4 is essential for proper Xi packaging. PMID:27432957

  7. Deletion of DXZ4 on the human inactive X chromosome alters higher-order genome architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darrow, Emily M.; Huntley, Miriam H.; Dudchenko, Olga; Stamenova, Elena K.; Durand, Neva C.; Sun, Zhuo; Huang, Su-Chen; Sanborn, Adrian L.; Machol, Ido; Shamim, Muhammad; Seberg, Andrew P.; Lander, Eric S.; Chadwick, Brian P.; Aiden, Erez Lieberman

    2016-01-01

    During interphase, the inactive X chromosome (Xi) is largely transcriptionally silent and adopts an unusual 3D configuration known as the “Barr body.” Despite the importance of X chromosome inactivation, little is known about this 3D conformation. We recently showed that in humans the Xi chromosome exhibits three structural features, two of which are not shared by other chromosomes. First, like the chromosomes of many species, Xi forms compartments. Second, Xi is partitioned into two huge intervals, called “superdomains,” such that pairs of loci in the same superdomain tend to colocalize. The boundary between the superdomains lies near DXZ4, a macrosatellite repeat whose Xi allele extensively binds the protein CCCTC-binding factor. Third, Xi exhibits extremely large loops, up to 77 megabases long, called “superloops.” DXZ4 lies at the anchor of several superloops. Here, we combine 3D mapping, microscopy, and genome editing to study the structure of Xi, focusing on the role of DXZ4. We show that superloops and superdomains are conserved across eutherian mammals. By analyzing ligation events involving three or more loci, we demonstrate that DXZ4 and other superloop anchors tend to colocate simultaneously. Finally, we show that deleting DXZ4 on Xi leads to the disappearance of superdomains and superloops, changes in compartmentalization patterns, and changes in the distribution of chromatin marks. Thus, DXZ4 is essential for proper Xi packaging. PMID:27432957

  8. Prenatal detection of aneuploidy and imbalanced chromosomal arrangements by massively parallel sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shan Dan

    Full Text Available Fetal chromosomal abnormalities are the most common reasons for invasive prenatal testing. Currently, G-band karyotyping and several molecular genetic methods have been established for diagnosis of chromosomal abnormalities. Although these testing methods are highly reliable, the major limitation remains restricted resolutions or can only achieve limited coverage on the human genome at one time. The massively parallel sequencing (MPS technologies which can reach single base pair resolution allows detection of genome-wide intragenic deletions and duplication challenging karyotyping and microarrays as the tool for prenatal diagnosis. Here we reported a novel and robust MPS-based method to detect aneuploidy and imbalanced chromosomal arrangements in amniotic fluid (AF samples. We sequenced 62 AF samples on Illumina GAIIx platform and with averagely 0.01× whole genome sequencing data we detected 13 samples with numerical chromosomal abnormalities by z-test. With up to 2× whole genome sequencing data we were able to detect microdeletion/microduplication (ranged from 1.4 Mb to 37.3 Mb of 5 samples from chorionic villus sampling (CVS using SeqSeq algorithm. Our work demonstrated MPS is a robust and accurate approach to detect aneuploidy and imbalanced chromosomal arrangements in prenatal samples.

  9. Karyotype and NOR-banding of mitotic chromosomes of some Vitis L. species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neiva Izabel Pierozzi

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Chromosome studies were performed in V. champinii, V. cinerea, V. girdiana, V. labrusca, V. rotundifolia, V. rupestris and V. vinifera with the purpose of species characterization using chromosome morphometric data and NOR banding. A median ideogram was obtained for each species. The karyotype formula obtained varied from 7m + 12sm to 9m + 11sm. The species showed moderate chromosome asymmetry values according to TF% form, Stebbins, Romero Zarco and Paszko indices. V. champinii and V. girdiana were apart from the other species by CVcl and CVci graphic representation and also formed a group apart in the dendrogram based on Euclidian distances. The chromosome pair number 3 harbors the secondary constriction and a satellite segment in all species analyzed with Giemsa staining and it may be the same observed after NOR banding technique. It seems that the process of speciation in the North American Euvitis species studied involved some discrete changes in chromosome morphometry which have been reflected in the asymmetry index.

  10. Karyotype evolution in monitor lizards: cross-species chromosome mapping of cDNA reveals highly conserved synteny and gene order in the Toxicofera clade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srikulnath, Kornsorn; Uno, Yoshinobu; Nishida, Chizuko; Matsuda, Yoichi

    2013-12-01

    The water monitor lizard (Varanus salvator macromaculatus (VSA), Platynota) has a chromosome number of 2n = 40: its karyotype consists of 16 macrochromosomes and 24 microchromosomes. To delineate the process of karyotype evolution in V. salvator macromaculatus, we constructed a cytogenetic map with 86 functional genes and compared it with those of the butterfly lizard (Leiolepis reevesii rubritaeniata (LRE); 2n = 36) and Japanese four-striped rat snake (Elaphe quadrivirgata (EQU); 2n = 36), members of the Toxicofera clade. The syntenies and gene orders of macrochromosomes were highly conserved between these species except for several chromosomal rearrangements: eight pairs of VSA macrochromosomes and/or chromosome arms exhibited homology with six pairs of LRE macrochromosomes and eight pairs of EQU macrochromosomes. Furthermore, the genes mapped to microchromosomes of three species were all located on chicken microchromosomes or chromosome 4p. No reciprocal translocations were found in the species, and their karyotypic differences were caused by: low frequencies of interchromosomal rearrangements, such as tandem fusions, or centric fissions/fusions between macrochromosomes and between macro- and microchromosomes; and intrachromosomal rearrangements, such as paracentric inversions or centromere repositioning. The chromosomal rearrangements that occurred in macrochromosomes of the Varanus lineage were also identified through comparative cytogenetic mapping of V. salvator macromaculatus and V. exanthematicus. Morphologic differences in chromosomes 6-8 between the two species could have resulted from pericentric inversion or centromere repositioning. PMID:24343421

  11. The status of dosage compensation in the multiple X chromosomes of the platypus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janine E Deakin

    Full Text Available Dosage compensation has been thought to be a ubiquitous property of sex chromosomes that are represented differently in males and females. The expression of most X-borne genes is equalized between XX females and XY males in therian mammals (marsupials and "placentals" by inactivating one X chromosome in female somatic cells. However, compensation seems not to be strictly required to equalize the expression of most Z-borne genes between ZZ male and ZW female birds. Whether dosage compensation operates in the third mammal lineage, the egg-laying monotremes, is of considerable interest, since the platypus has a complex sex chromosome system in which five X and five Y chromosomes share considerable genetic homology with the chicken ZW sex chromosome pair, but not with therian XY chromosomes. The assignment of genes to four platypus X chromosomes allowed us to examine X dosage compensation in this unique species. Quantitative PCR showed a range of compensation, but SNP analysis of several X-borne genes showed that both alleles are transcribed in a heterozygous female. Transcription of 14 BACs representing 19 X-borne genes was examined by RNA-FISH in female and male fibroblasts. An autosomal control gene was expressed from both alleles in nearly all nuclei, and four pseudoautosomal BACs were usually expressed from both alleles in male as well as female nuclei, showing that their Y loci are active. However, nine X-specific BACs were usually transcribed from only one allele. This suggests that while some genes on the platypus X are not dosage compensated, other genes do show some form of compensation via stochastic transcriptional inhibition, perhaps representing an ancestral system that evolved to be more tightly controlled in placental mammals such as human and mouse.

  12. Evidence for linkage of bipolar disorder to chromosome 18 with a parent-of-origin effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stine, O.C.; Xu, Jianfeng; McMahon, F.J. [Johns Hopkins Univ. School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-01

    A susceptibility gene on chromosome18 and a parent-of-origin effect have been suggested for bipolar affective disorder (BPAD). We have studied 28 nuclear families selected for apparent unilineal transmission of the BPAD phenotype, by using 31 polymorphic markers spanning chromosome 18. Evidence for linkage was tested with affected-sib-pair and LOD score methods under two definitions of the affected phenotype. The affected-sib-pair analyses indicated excess allele sharing for markers on 18p within the region reported previously. The greatest sharing was at D18S37: 64% in bipolar and recurrent unipolar (RUP) sib pairs (P = .0006). In addition, excess sharing of the paternally, but not maternally, transmitted alleles was observed at three markers on 18q: at D18S41, 51 bipolar and RUP sib pairs were concordant for paternally transmitted alleles, and 21 pairs were discordant (P = .0004). The evidence for linkage to loci on both 18p and 18q was strongest in the 11 paternal pedigrees, i.e., those in which the father or one of the father`s sibs is affected. In these pedigrees, the greatest allele sharing (81%; P = .00002) and the highest LOD score (3.51; {theta} = 0.0) were observed at D18S41. Our results provide further support for linkage of BPAD to chromosome 18 and the first molecular evidence for a parent-of-origin effect operating in this disorder. The number of loci involved, and their precise location, require further study. 49 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

  13. Non-disjunction of chromosome 13

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bugge, Merete; Collins, Andrew; Hertz, Jens Michael;

    2007-01-01

    recombination in both maternal MI and MII errors and the former is associated with a significant number of tetrads (33%) that are nullichiasmate, which do not appear to be a feature of normal chromosome 13 meiosis. This study supports the evidence for subtle chromosome-specific influences on the mechanisms that...

  14. Chromosome number9 specific repetitive DNA sequence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Human repetitive DNA libraries have been constructed and various recombinant DNA clones isolated that are likely candidates for chromosome specific sequences. The first clone tested (pHuR 98; plasmid human repeat 98) was biotinylated and hybridized to human chromosomes in situ. The hybridized recombinant probe was detected with fluoresceinated avidin, and chromosomes were counter-stained with either propidium iodide or distamycin-DAPI. Specific hybridization to chromosome band 9q1 was obtained. The localization was confirmed by hybridizing radiolabeled pHuR 98 DNA to human chromosomes sorted by flow cytometry. Various methods, including orthogonal field pulsed gel electrophoresis analysis indicate that 75 kilobase blocks of this sequence are interspersed with other repetitive DNA sequences in this chromosome band. This study is the first to report a human repetitive DNA sequence uniquely localized to a specific chromosome. This clone provides an easily detected and highly specific chromosomal marker for molecular cytogenetic analyses in numerous basic research and clinical studies

  15. Chromosomal characterization of Pseudonannolene strinatii (Spirostreptida, Pseudonannolenidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kleber Agari Campos

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available The chromosomes of the cave millipede Pseudonannolene strinatii Mauriès, 1974 were investigated. The diploid chromosome number was found to be 2n=16, XX/XY; the C-banding technique revealed a large amount of heterochromatin while the silver staining technique (Ag-NOR evidenced the presence of heteromorphism of the NORs in some cells.

  16. Chromosomal Aneuploidies and Early Embryonic Developmental Arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Maurer

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Selecting the best embryo for transfer, with the highest chance of achieving a vital pregnancy, is a major goal in current in vitro fertilization (IVF technology. The high rate of embryonic developmental arrest during IVF treatment is one of the limitations in achieving this goal. Chromosomal abnormalities are possibly linked with chromosomal arrest and selection against abnormal fertilization products. The objective of this study was to evaluate the frequency and type of chromosomal abnormalities in preimplantation embryos with developmental arrest. Materials and Methods: This cohort study included blastomeres of embryos with early developmental arrest that were biopsied and analyzed by fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH with probes for chromosomes 13, 16, 18, 21 and 22. Forty-five couples undergoing IVF treatment were included, and 119 arrested embryos were biopsied. All probes were obtained from the Kinderwunsch Zentrum, Linz, Austria, between August 2009 and August 2011. Results: Of these embryos, 31.6% were normal for all chromosomes tested, and 68.4% were abnormal. Eleven embryos were uniformly aneuploid, 20 were polyploid, 3 were haploid, 11 displayed mosaicism and 22 embryos exhibited chaotic chromosomal complement. Conclusion: Nearly 70% of arrested embryos exhibit chromosomal errors, making chromosomal abnormalities a major cause of embryonic arrest and may be a further explanation for the high developmental failure rates during culture of the embryos in the IVF setting.

  17. Mechanisms of Chromosome Number Evolution in Yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Jonathan L.; Byrne, Kevin P.; Wolfe, Kenneth H.

    2011-01-01

    The whole-genome duplication (WGD) that occurred during yeast evolution changed the basal number of chromosomes from 8 to 16. However, the number of chromosomes in post-WGD species now ranges between 10 and 16, and the number in non-WGD species (Zygosaccharomyces, Kluyveromyces, Lachancea, and Ashbya) ranges between 6 and 8. To study the mechanism by which chromosome number changes, we traced the ancestry of centromeres and telomeres in each species. We observe only two mechanisms by which the number of chromosomes has decreased, as indicated by the loss of a centromere. The most frequent mechanism, seen 8 times, is telomere-to-telomere fusion between two chromosomes with the concomitant death of one centromere. The other mechanism, seen once, involves the breakage of a chromosome at its centromere, followed by the fusion of the two arms to the telomeres of two other chromosomes. The only mechanism by which chromosome number has increased in these species is WGD. Translocations and inversions have cycled telomere locations, internalizing some previously telomeric genes and creating novel telomeric locations. Comparison of centromere structures shows that the length of the CDEII region is variable between species but uniform within species. We trace the complete rearrangement history of the Lachancea kluyveri genome since its common ancestor with Saccharomyces and propose that its exceptionally low level of rearrangement is a consequence of the loss of the non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) DNA repair pathway in this species. PMID:21811419

  18. Genomic Dark Matter Illuminated: Anopheles Y Chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redmond, Seth N; Neafsey, Daniel E

    2016-08-01

    Hall et al. have strategically used long-read sequencing technology to characterize the structure and highly repetitive content of the Y chromosome in Anopheles malaria mosquitoes. Their work confirms that this important but elusive heterochromatic sex chromosome is evolving extremely rapidly and harbors a remarkably small number of genes. PMID:27263828

  19. Physical map of the Bacillus cereus chromosome.

    OpenAIRE

    Kolstø, A B; Grønstad, A; Oppegaard, H

    1990-01-01

    A physical map of the Bacillus cereus chromosome has been constructed by aligning 11 NotI fragments, ranging in size from 200 to 1,300 kilobases. The size of the chromosome is about 5.7 megabases. This is the first Bacillus genome of which a complete physical map has been described.

  20. Compositions for chromosome-specific staining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Joe W.; Pinkel, Daniel

    1998-01-01

    Methods and compositions for staining based upon nucleic acid sequence that employ nucleic acid probes are provided. Said methods produce staining patterns that can be tailored for specific cytogenetic analyses. Said probes are appropriate for in situ hybridization and stain both interphase and metaphase chromosomal material with reliable signals. The nucleic acid probes are typically of a complexity greater than 50 kb, the complexity depending upon the cytogenetic application. Methods are provided to disable the hybridization capacity of shared, high copy repetitive sequences and/or remove such sequences to provide for useful contrast. Still further methods are provided to produce chromosome-specific staining reagents which are made specific to the targeted chromosomal material, which can be one or more whole chromosomes, one or more regions on one or more chromosomes, subsets of chromosomes and/or the entire genome. Probes and test kits are provided for use in tumor cytogenetics, in the detection of disease related loci, in analysis of structural abnormalities, such as translocations, and for biological dosimetry. Further, methods and prenatal test kits are provided to stain targeted chromosomal material of fetal cells, including fetal cells obtained from maternal blood. Still further, the invention provides for automated means to detect and analyse chromosomal abnormalities.

  1. Neutron-Proton pairing revisited

    OpenAIRE

    Friedman, W. A.; Bertsch, G. F.

    2007-01-01

    We reexamine neutron-proton pairing as a phenomenon that should be explanable in a microscopic theory of nuclear binding energies. Empirically, there is an increased separation energy when both neutron and proton numbers are even or if they are both odd. The enhancement is present at some level in nearly all nuclei: the separation energy difference has the opposite sign in less than 1% of the cases in which sufficient data exist. We discuss the possible origin of the effect in the context of ...

  2. Working pairs for resorption refrigerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The performances of three chemisorption working pairs operating under the resorption cycle were studied gravimetrically by comparing the desorbed and adsorbed mass of refrigerant in different operation conditions. All pairs used NH3 as refrigerant and MnCl2 in the main reactor, but each one used a different salt for the cooling effect production in the secondary reactor. These salts were NH4Cl or NaBr or BaCl2. The experimental results indicated that the degree of conversion in reaction between the NH3 and BaCl2 was inferior to 25% during cooling production at 0 oC or below, whereas the reactions with the other salts had conversions of at least 80%. When the systems operated with heat source temperature for the main reactor at 155 oC, heat sink temperature for both reactors at 30 oC, and cooling effect production temperature at 0 oC the coefficient of performance (COP) of the system using NH4Cl and the system using NaBr were similar and around 0.30; however, the former system had a specific cooling power (SCP) 5% higher than that of the latter system. Because the reaction in the system with NH4Cl was practically halted in a period much shorter than that used in the experiments, it is possible to expect that if the period of the cooling period was shortened, the difference between the SCP of those systems would be much higher. - Highlights: → The comparison of three different working pairs operating under resorption cycle was conducted. → The three working pairs were NH4Cl/MnCl2, NaBr/MnCl2, BaCl2/MnCl2, respectively. → The mass of refrigerant reacted in different situations were measured and compared. → Among the LTS studied, NH4Cl is the most suitable to be used in a resorption machine at 0 or below 0 oC.

  3. Frequent gene conversion events between the X and Y homologous chromosomal regions in primates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirai Hirohisa

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mammalian sex-chromosomes originated from a pair of autosomes. A step-wise cessation of recombination is necessary for the proper maintenance of sex-determination and, consequently, generates a four strata structure on the X chromosome. Each stratum shows a specific per-site nucleotide sequence difference (p-distance between the X and Y chromosomes, depending on the time of recombination arrest. Stratum 4 covers the distal half of the human X chromosome short arm and the p-distance of the stratum is ~10%, on average. However, a 100-kb region, which includes KALX and VCX, in the middle of stratum 4 shows a significantly lower p-distance (1-5%, suggesting frequent sequence exchanges or gene conversions between the X and Y chromosomes in humans. To examine the evolutionary mechanism for this low p-distance region, sequences of a corresponding region including KALX/Y from seven species of non-human primates were analyzed. Results Phylogenetic analysis of this low p-distance region in humans and non-human primate species revealed that gene conversion like events have taken place at least ten times after the divergence of New World monkeys and Catarrhini (i.e., Old World monkeys and hominoids. A KALY-converted KALX allele in white-handed gibbons also suggests a possible recent gene conversion between the X and Y chromosomes. In these primate sequences, the proximal boundary of this low p-distance region is located in a LINE element shared between the X and Y chromosomes, suggesting the involvement of this element in frequent gene conversions. Together with a palindrome on the Y chromosome, a segmental palindrome structure on the X chromosome at the distal boundary near VCX, in humans and chimpanzees, may mediate frequent sequence exchanges between X and Y chromosomes. Conclusion Gene conversion events between the X and Y homologous regions have been suggested, mainly in humans. Here, we found frequent gene conversions in the

  4. Mapping of human chromosomal regions related to neoplasia: evidence from chromosomes 1 and 17

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowley, J.D.

    1977-12-01

    In clonal aberrations leading to an excess or partial excess of chromosome I, trisomy for bands 1q25-1q32 was noted in the myeloid cells from all of 34 patients who had various disorders such as acute leukemia, polycythemia vera, and myelofibrosis. This was not the result of a particularly fragile site in that region of the chromosome because the break points in reciprocal translocations that involve it occurred almost exclusively in the short arm. Two consistent rearrangements that have been observed in chromosome 17 produced either duplication of the entire long arm or a translocation of the distal portion of the long arm to chromosome 15. The nonrandom chromosomal changes found in hematologic disorders can now be correlated with the gene loci on these chromosomes or chromosomal segments. Seventy-five genes related to various metabolic enzymes have been mapped; it may be significant that chromosomes carrying gene loci related to nucleic acid metabolism are more frequently involved in hematologic disorders (and other malignancies as well) than are gene loci related to intermediary or carbohydrate metabolism. Furthermore, the known virus-human chromosome associations are closely correlated with the chromosomes affected in hematologic disorders. If one of the effects of carcinogens (including viruses) is to activate genes that regulate host cell DNA synthesis, and if translocations or duplications of specific chromosomal segments produce the same effect, then either of these mechanisms might provide the affected cell with a proliferative advantage.

  5. Review of the Y chromosome and hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Ely

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available The Y chromosome from spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR has a locus that raises blood pressure 20-25 mmHg. Associated with the SHR Y chromosome effect is a 4-week earlier pubertal rise of testosterone and dependence upon the androgen receptor for the full blood pressure effect. Several indices of enhanced sympathetic nervous system (SNS activity are also associated with the SHR Y chromosome. Blockade of SNS outflow reduced the blood pressure effect. Salt sensitivity was increased by the Y chromosome as was salt appetite which was SNS dependent. A strong correlation (r = 0.57, P<0.001 was demonstrable between plasma testosterone and angiotensin II. Coronary collagen increased with blood pressure and the presence of the SHR Y chromosome. A promising candidate gene for the Y effect is the Sry locus (testis determining factor, a transcription factor which may also have other functions.

  6. Genetic conflict and sex chromosome evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meiklejohn, Colin D; Tao, Yun

    2009-01-01

    Chromosomal sex determination systems create the opportunity for the evolution of selfish genetic elements that increase the transmission of one sex chromosome at the expense of its homolog. Because such selfish elements on sex chromosomes can reduce fertility and distort the sex ratio of progeny, unlinked suppressors are expected to evolve, bringing different regions of the genome into conflict over the meiotic transmission of the sex chromosomes. Here we argue that recurrent genetic conflict over sex chromosome transmission is an important evolutionary force that has shaped a wide range of seemingly disparate phenomena including the epigenetic regulation of genes expressed in the germline, the distribution of genes in the genome, and the evolution of hybrid sterility between species. PMID:19931208

  7. Advances in understanding paternally transmitted Chromosomal Abnormalities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchetti, F; Sloter, E; Wyrobek, A J

    2001-03-01

    Multicolor FISH has been adapted for detecting the major types of chromosomal abnormalities in human sperm including aneuploidies for clinically-relevant chromosomes, chromosomal aberrations including breaks and rearrangements, and other numerical abnormalities. The various sperm FISH assays have been used to evaluate healthy men, men of advanced age, and men who have received mutagenic cancer therapy. The mouse has also been used as a model to investigate the mechanism of paternally transmitted genetic damage. Sperm FISH for the mouse has been used to detect chromosomally abnormal mouse sperm, while the PAINT/DAPI analysis of mouse zygotes has been used to evaluate the types of chromosomal defects that can be paternally transmitted to the embryo and their effects on embryonic development.

  8. Y-chromosome evolution: emerging insights into processes of Y-chromosome degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachtrog, Doris

    2013-02-01

    The human Y chromosome is intriguing not only because it harbours the master-switch gene that determines gender but also because of its unusual evolutionary history. The Y chromosome evolved from an autosome, and its evolution has been characterized by massive gene decay. Recent whole-genome and transcriptome analyses of Y chromosomes in humans and other primates, in Drosophila species and in plants have shed light on the current gene content of the Y chromosome, its origins and its long-term fate. Furthermore, comparative analysis of young and old Y chromosomes has given further insights into the evolutionary and molecular forces triggering Y-chromosome degeneration and into the evolutionary destiny of the Y chromosome. PMID:23329112

  9. Nowitna NWR breeding pair survey, 1988

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes the results of a waterfowl breeding pair survey taken on Nowitna National Wildlife Refuge in 1988. The breeding pair survey was conducted 31...

  10. Novel gene acquisition on carnivore Y chromosomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Despite its importance in harboring genes critical for spermatogenesis and male-specific functions, the Y chromosome has been largely excluded as a priority in recent mammalian genome sequencing projects. Only the human and chimpanzee Y chromosomes have been well characterized at the sequence level. This is primarily due to the presumed low overall gene content and highly repetitive nature of the Y chromosome and the ensuing difficulties using a shotgun sequence approach for assembly. Here we used direct cDNA selection to isolate and evaluate the extent of novel Y chromosome gene acquisition in the genome of the domestic cat, a species from a different mammalian superorder than human, chimpanzee, and mouse (currently being sequenced. We discovered four novel Y chromosome genes that do not have functional copies in the finished human male-specific region of the Y or on other mammalian Y chromosomes explored thus far. Two genes are derived from putative autosomal progenitors, and the other two have X chromosome homologs from different evolutionary strata. All four genes were shown to be multicopy and expressed predominantly or exclusively in testes, suggesting that their duplication and specialization for testis function were selected for because they enhance spermatogenesis. Two of these genes have testis-expressed, Y-borne copies in the dog genome as well. The absence of the four newly described genes on other characterized mammalian Y chromosomes demonstrates the gene novelty on this chromosome between mammalian orders, suggesting it harbors many lineage-specific genes that may go undetected by traditional comparative genomic approaches. Specific plans to identify the male-specific genes encoded in the Y chromosome of mammals should be a priority.

  11. Chromosome differentiation patterns during cichlid fish evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nirchio Mauro

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cichlid fishes have been the subject of increasing scientific interest because of their rapid adaptive radiation which has led to an extensive ecological diversity and their enormous importance to tropical and subtropical aquaculture. To increase our understanding of chromosome evolution among cichlid species, karyotypes of one Asian, 22 African, and 30 South American cichlid species were investigated, and chromosomal data of the family was reviewed. Results Although there is extensive variation in the karyotypes of cichlid fishes (from 2n = 32 to 2n = 60 chromosomes, the modal chromosome number for South American species was 2n = 48 and the modal number for the African ones was 2n = 44. The only Asian species analyzed, Etroplus maculatus, was observed to have 46 chromosomes. The presence of one or two macro B chromosomes was detected in two African species. The cytogenetic mapping of 18S ribosomal RNA (18S rRNA gene revealed a variable number of clusters among species varying from two to six. Conclusions The karyotype diversification of cichlids seems to have occurred through several chromosomal rearrangements involving fissions, fusions and inversions. It was possible to identify karyotype markers for the subfamilies Pseudocrenilabrinae (African and Cichlinae (American. The karyotype analyses did not clarify the phylogenetic relationship among the Cichlinae tribes. On the other hand, the two major groups of Pseudocrenilabrinae (tilapiine and haplochromine were clearly discriminated based on the characteristics of their karyotypes. The cytogenetic mapping of 18S ribosomal RNA (18S rRNA gene did not follow the chromosome diversification in the family. The dynamic evolution of the repeated units of rRNA genes generates patterns of chromosomal distribution that do not help follows the phylogenetic relationships among taxa. The presence of B chromosomes in cichlids is of particular interest because they may not be represented in

  12. Stability theorems for symplectic and contact pairs

    OpenAIRE

    Bande, G.; Ghiggini, P.; Kotschick, D.

    2004-01-01

    We prove Gray--Moser stability theorems for complementary pairs of forms of constant class defining symplectic pairs, contact-symplectic pairs and contact pairs. We also consider the case of contact-symplectic and contact-contact structures, in which the constant class condition on a one-form is replaced by the condition that its kernel hyperplane distribution have constant class in the sense of E. Cartan.

  13. Pair bonds: arrival synchrony in migratory birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunnarsson, T G; Gill, J A; Sigurbjörnsson, T; Sutherland, W J

    2004-10-01

    Synchronous arrival of pairs of migratory birds at their breeding grounds is important for maintaining pair bonds and is achieved by pairs that remain together all year round. Here we show that arrival is also synchronized in paired individuals of a migratory shorebird, the black-tailed godwit (Limosa limosa islandica), even though they winter hundreds of kilometres apart and do not migrate together. The mechanisms required to achieve this synchrony and prevent 'divorce' illustrate the complexity of migratory systems. PMID:15470417

  14. Properties of isocalar-pair condensates

    CERN Document Server

    Van Isacker, P; Fallon, P; Zerguine, S

    2016-01-01

    It is pointed out that the ground state of n neutrons and n protons in a single-j shell, interacting through an isoscalar (T=0) pairing force, is not paired, J=0, but rather spin-aligned, J=n. This observation is explained in the context of a model of isoscalar P (J=1) pairs, which is mapped onto a system of p bosons, leading to an approximate analytic solution of the isoscalar-pairing limit in jj coupling.

  15. Drift wave in pair-ion plasma

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Samiran Ghosh; Nikhil Chakrabarti; Manoranjan Khan; M R Gupta

    2013-02-01

    The conditions for the existence of low-frequency electrostatic drift wave in pair-ion plasma are discussed. It is shown that the temperature and/or mass difference of both species could produce drift wave in a pair-ion plasma. The results are discussed in the context of the fullerene pair-ion plasma experiment.

  16. On one-sided torsion pair

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Motivated by the concept of a torsion pair in a pre-triangulated category induced by Beligiannis and Reiten, the notion of a left (right) torsion pair in the left (right) triangulated category is introduced and investigated. We provide new connections between different aspects of torsion pairs in one-sided triangulated categories, pre-triangulated categories, stable categories and derived categories.

  17. Angular momentum decomposition of Richardson's pairs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The angular momentum decomposition of pairs obtained using Richardson's exact solution of the pairing Hamiltonian for the deformed 174Yb nucleus are displayed. The probabilities for low angular momenta of the collective pairs are strikingly different from the ones obtained in the BCS ground state

  18. Chromosomal rearrangements in cattle and pigs revealed by chromosome microdissection and chromosome painting

    OpenAIRE

    Yerle Martine; Ducos Alain; Pinton Alain

    2003-01-01

    Abstract A pericentric inversion of chromosome 4 in a boar, as well as a case of (2q-;5p+) translocation mosaicism in a bull were analysed by chromosome painting using probes generated by conventional microdissection. For the porcine inversion, probes specific for p arms and q arms were produced and hybridised simultaneously on metaphases of a heterozygote carrier. In the case of the bovine translocation, two whole chromosome probes (chromosome 5, and derived chromosome 5) were elaborated and...

  19. Sex chromosome evolution: platypus gene mapping suggests that part of the human X chromosome was originally autosomal.

    OpenAIRE

    Watson, J M; Spencer, J. A.; Riggs, A D; Graves, J.A.

    1991-01-01

    To investigate the evolution of the mammalian sex chromosomes, we have compared the gene content of the X chromosomes in the mammalian groups most distantly related to man (marsupials and monotremes). Previous work established that genes on the long arm of the human X chromosome are conserved on the X chromosomes in all mammals, revealing that this region was part of an ancient mammalian X chromosome. However, we now report that several genes located on the short arm of the human X chromosome...

  20. Multiple rearrangements in cryptic species of electric knifefish, Gymnotus carapo (Gymnotidae, Gymnotiformes revealed by chromosome painting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O'Brien Patricia CM

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gymnotus (Gymnotidae, Gymnotiformes is the Neotropical electric fish genus with the largest geographic distribution and the largest number of species, 33 of which have been validated. The diploid number varies from 2n = 39-40 to 2n = 54. Recently we studied the karyotype of morphologically indistinguishable samples from five populations of G. carapo sensu stricto from the Eastern Amazon of Brazil. We found two cytotypes, 2n = 42 (30 M/SM + 12 ST/A and 2n = 40 (34 M/SM + 6 ST/A and we concluded that the differences between the two cryptic species are due to pericentric inversions and one tandem fusion. Results In this study we use for the first time, whole chromosome probes prepared by FACS of the Gymnotus carapo sensu strictu species, cytotype with 2n = 42. Using two color hybridizations we were able to distinguish pairs 1, 2, 3, 7, 9, 14, 16, 18, 19, 20 and 21. It was not possible to separate by FACS and distinguish each of the following chromosome pairs even with dual color FISH: {4,8}; {10,11}; {5,6,17}; {12,13,15}. The FISH probes were then used in chromosome painting experiments on metaphases of the 2n = 40 cytotype. While some chromosomes show conserved synteny, others are rearranged in different chromosomes. Eight syntenic associations were found. Conclusions These results show that the karyotype differences between these cryptic species are greater than assumed by classical cytogenetics. These data reinforce the previous supposition that these two cytotypes are different species, despite the absence of morphological differences. Additionally, the homology of repetitive DNA between the two provides evidence of recent speciation.

  1. Multiple rearrangements in cryptic species of electric knifefish, Gymnotus carapo (Gymnotidae, Gymnotiformes) revealed by chromosome painting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Gymnotus (Gymnotidae, Gymnotiformes) is the Neotropical electric fish genus with the largest geographic distribution and the largest number of species, 33 of which have been validated. The diploid number varies from 2n = 39-40 to 2n = 54. Recently we studied the karyotype of morphologically indistinguishable samples from five populations of G. carapo sensu stricto from the Eastern Amazon of Brazil. We found two cytotypes, 2n = 42 (30 M/SM + 12 ST/A) and 2n = 40 (34 M/SM + 6 ST/A) and we concluded that the differences between the two cryptic species are due to pericentric inversions and one tandem fusion. Results In this study we use for the first time, whole chromosome probes prepared by FACS of the Gymnotus carapo sensu strictu species, cytotype with 2n = 42. Using two color hybridizations we were able to distinguish pairs 1, 2, 3, 7, 9, 14, 16, 18, 19, 20 and 21. It was not possible to separate by FACS and distinguish each of the following chromosome pairs even with dual color FISH: {4,8}; {10,11}; {5,6,17}; {12,13,15}. The FISH probes were then used in chromosome painting experiments on metaphases of the 2n = 40 cytotype. While some chromosomes show conserved synteny, others are rearranged in different chromosomes. Eight syntenic associations were found. Conclusions These results show that the karyotype differences between these cryptic species are greater than assumed by classical cytogenetics. These data reinforce the previous supposition that these two cytotypes are different species, despite the absence of morphological differences. Additionally, the homology of repetitive DNA between the two provides evidence of recent speciation. PMID:20420709

  2. Cell division patterns and chromosomal segregation defects in oral cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaseb, Hatem O; Lewis, Dale W; Saunders, William S; Gollin, Susanne M

    2016-09-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is a serious public health problem caused primarily by smoking and alcohol consumption or human papillomavirus. The cancer stem cell (CSC) theory posits that CSCs show unique characteristics, including self-renewal and therapeutic resistance. Examining biomarkers and other features of CSCs is critical to better understanding their biology. To this end, the results show that cellular SOX2 immunostaining correlates with other CSC biomarkers in OSCC cell lines and marks the rare CSC population. To assess whether CSC division patterns are symmetrical, resulting in two CSC, or asymmetrical, leading to one CSC and one cancer cell, cell size and fluorescence intensity of mitotic cells stained with SOX2 were analyzed. Asymmetrical SOX2 distribution in ≈25% of the mitoses analyzed was detected. Chromosomal instability, some of which is caused by chromosome segregation defects (CSDs), is a feature of cancer cells that leads to altered gene copy numbers. We compare chromosomal instability (as measured by CSDs) between CSCs (SOX2+) and non-CSCs (SOX2-) from the same OSCC cell lines. CSDs were more common in non-CSCs (SOX2-) than CSCs (SOX2+) and in symmetrical CSC (SOX2+) mitotic pairs than asymmetrical CSC (SOX2+/SOX2-) mitotic pairs. CSCs showed fewer and different types of CSDs after ionizing radiation treatment than non-CSCs. Overall, these data are the first to demonstrate both symmetrical and asymmetrical cell divisions with CSDs in OSCC CSC. Further, the results suggest that CSCs may undergo altered behavior, including therapeutic resistance as a result of chromosomal instability due to chromosome segregation defects. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27123539

  3. Chromosome studies in the red howler monkey, Alouatta seniculus stramineus (Platyrrhini, Primates): description of an X1X2Y1Y2/X1X1X2X2 sex-chromosome system and karyological comparisons with other subspecies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, M M; Seuánez, H N

    1991-01-01

    In the red howler monkey, Alouatta seniculus stramineus (2n = 47, 48, or 49), variations in diploid chromosome number are due to different numbers of microchromosomes. Males exhibit a Y;autosome translocation involving the short arm of an individual biarmed autosome. Consequently, the sex-chromosome constitution in the male is X1X2Y1Y2, with X1 representing the original X chromosome, X2 the biarmed autosome (No. 7), Y1 the Y;7p translocation product, and Y2 the acrocentric homolog of 7q. In the first meiotic division, a quadrivalent with a chain configuration can be observed in spermatocytes. Females have an X1X1X2X2 sex-chromosome constitution. Chromosome heteromorphisms were observed in pair 13, due to a pericentric inversion, and pair 19, due to the presence of constitutive heterochromatin. Microchromosomes, which varied in number between individuals, were also heterochromatic. NOR-staining was observed at two separate sites on a single chromosome pair (No. 10). A comparison of A.s. stramineus with A.s. macconnelli shows that these two subspecies have identical diploid chromosome numbers (47, 48, or 49), again due to a varying number of microchromosomes, and that they share a similar sex-chromosome constitution. Their karyotypes, however, are not identical, but can be derived from each other by a reciprocal translocation. Further comparisons with other A. seniculus subspecies reported in the literature indicate that this taxon is not karyologically uniform and that substantial chromosome shuffling has occurred between populations that have been considered to be subspecies by taxonomic criteria based on their morphometric attributes. PMID:1914523

  4. Regulation of heterochromatin assembly on unpaired chromosomes during Caenorhabditis elegans meiosis by components of a small RNA-mediated pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingyu She

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Many organisms have a mechanism for down regulating the expression of non-synapsed chromosomes and chromosomal regions during meiosis. This phenomenon is thought to function in genome defense. During early meiosis in Caenorhabditis elegans, unpaired chromosomes (e.g., the male X chromosome become enriched for a modification associated with heterochromatin and transcriptional repression, dimethylation of histone H3 on lysine 9 (H3K9me2. This enrichment requires activity of the cellular RNA-directed RNA polymerase, EGO-1. Here we use genetic mutation, RNA interference, immunofluorescence microscopy, fluorescence in situ hybridization, and molecular cloning methods to identify and analyze three additional regulators of meiotic H3K9me2 distribution: CSR-1 (a Piwi/PAZ/Argonaute protein, EKL-1 (a Tudor domain protein, and DRH-3 (a DEAH/D-box helicase. In csr-1, ekl-1, and drh-3 mutant males, we observed a reduction in H3K9me2 accumulation on the unpaired X chromosome and an increase in H3K9me2 accumulation on paired autosomes relative to controls. We observed a similar shift in H3K9me2 pattern in hermaphrodites that carry unpaired chromosomes. Based on several assays, we conclude that ectopic H3K9me2 accumulates on paired and synapsed chromosomes in these mutants. We propose alternative models for how a small RNA-mediated pathway may regulate H3K9me2 accumulation during meiosis. We also describe the germline phenotypes of csr-1, ekl-1, and drh-3 mutants. Our genetic data suggest that these factors, together with EGO-1, participate in a regulatory network to promote diverse aspects of development.

  5. Chromosomal localization of the human placental lactogen-growth hormone gene cluster to 17q22-24.

    OpenAIRE

    Harper, M E; Barrera-Saldaña, H A; Saunders, G F

    1982-01-01

    Recombinant plasmid HCS-pBR322 containing a 550-base-pair (bp) insert of cDNA to human placental lactogen (hPL) mRNA was 3H-labeled by nick translation and hybridized in situ to human chromosome preparations in the presence of 10% dextran sulfate. A high percentage of cells (80%) were found to exhibit label on the distal end of the long arm of chromosome 17. Silver grains on this region constituted 25.5% of all labeled sites, allowing assignment of the hPL and growth hormone (hGH) genes, whic...

  6. Nonrandom chromosomal changes in human malignant cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowley, J D

    1977-01-01

    The role of chromosomal changes in human malignant cells has been the subject of much debate. The observation of nonrandom chromosomal changes has become well recognized in chronic myelogenous leukemia, and more recently in acute myelogenous leukemia. In the present report, data are presented on the sites of duplication of chromosome No. 1 in hematologic disorders. Trisomy for region lq25 to lq32 was observed in every one of 34 patients whose cells showed duplication of some part of chromosome No. 1. Adjacent regions lq21 to lq25, and lq32 to lqter, also were trisomic in the majority of patients. Two patients had deletions, one of lq32 to qter, and the other, of lp32 to pter. The sites of chromosomal breaks leading to trisomy differ from those involved in balanced reciprocal translocations. Some of these sites are sometimes, but not always, vulnerable in constitutional chromosomal abnormalities. The nature of the proliferative advantage conferred on myeloid cells by these chromosomal changes is unknown.

  7. Chromosome number evolution in skippers (Lepidoptera, Hesperiidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukhtanov, Vladimir A

    2014-01-01

    Lepidoptera (butterflies and moths), as many other groups of animals and plants, simultaneously represent preservation of ancestral karyotype in the majority of families with a high degree of chromosome number instability in numerous independently evolved phylogenetic lineages. However, the pattern and trends of karyotype evolution in some Lepidoptera families are poorly studied. Here I provide a survey of chromosome numbers in skippers (family Hesperiidae) based on intensive search and analysis of published data. I demonstrate that the majority of skippers preserve the haploid chromosome number n=31 that seems to be an ancestral number for the Hesperiidae and the order Lepidoptera at whole. However, in the tribe Baorini the derived number n=16 is the most typical state which can be used as a (syn)apomorphic character in further phylogenetic investigations. Several groups of skippers display extreme chromosome number variations on within-species (e.g. the representatives of the genus Carcharodus Hübner, [1819]) and between-species (e.g. the genus Agathymus Freeman, 1959) levels. Thus, these groups can be used as model systems for future analysis of the phenomenon of chromosome instability. Interspecific chromosomal differences are also shown to be useful for discovering and describing new cryptic species of Hesperiidae representing in such a way a powerful tool in biodiversity research. Generally, the skipper butterflies promise to be an exciting group that will significantly contribute to the growing knowledge of patterns and processes of chromosome evolution. PMID:25610542

  8. Chromosome number evolution in skippers (Lepidoptera, Hesperiidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Lukhtanov

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Lepidoptera (butterflies and moths, as many other groups of animals and plants, simultaneously represent preservation of ancestral karyotype in the majority of families with a high degree of chromosome number instability in numerous independently evolved phylogenetic lineages. However, the pattern and trends of karyotype evolution in some Lepidoptera families are poorly studied. Here I provide a survey of chromosome numbers in skippers (family Hesperiidae based on intensive search and analysis of published data. I demonstrate that the majority of skippers preserve the haploid chromosome number n=31 that seems to be an ancestral number for the Hesperiidae and the order Lepidoptera at whole. However, in the tribe Baorini the derived number n=16 is the most typical state which can be used as a (synapomorphic character in further phylogenetic investigations. Several groups of skippers display extreme chromosome number variations on within-species (e.g. the representatives of the genus Carcharodus Hübner, [1819] and between-species (e.g. the genus Agathymus Freeman, 1959 levels. Thus, these groups can be used as model systems for future analysis of the phenomenon of chromosome instability. Interspecific chromosomal differences are also shown to be useful for discovering and describing new cryptic species of Hesperiidae representing in such a way a powerful tool in biodiversity research. Generally, the skipper butterflies promise to be an exciting group that will significantly contribute to the growing knowledge of patterns and processes of chromosome evolution.

  9. Direct-photon pair production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Direct-photon pair production in high-energy hadron collisions is considered. After discussing general aspects of such reactions and giving a brief historical survey of that subject, we present some calculations on the contributions from q anti-q and g g collisions (the latter via the quark box) to the γγ continuum, and on possible resonant contributions. Finally, an estimation of the indirect-photon background (mainly due to π0 and eta decay, and to quark bremsstrahlung) is given for colliding-beam conditions at high energy; assuming both photons to be measured at 900 with equal and opposite momenta, and (within experimental limits) unaccompanied by any hadrons or additional photons, it is shown that this background can be sharply reduced

  10. Perturbations of vortex ring pairs

    CERN Document Server

    Gubser, Steven S; Parikh, Sarthak

    2015-01-01

    We study pairs of co-axial vortex rings starting from the action for a classical bosonic string in a three-form background. We complete earlier work on the phase diagram of classical orbits by explicitly considering the case where the circulations of the two vortex rings are equal and opposite. We then go on to study perturbations, focusing on cases where the relevant four-dimensional transfer matrix splits into two-dimensional blocks. When the circulations of the rings have the same sign, instabilities are mostly limited to wavelengths smaller than a dynamically generated length scale at which single-ring instabilities occur. When the circulations have the opposite sign, larger wavelength instabilities can occur.

  11. Perturbations of vortex ring pairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gubser, Steven S.; Horn, Bart; Parikh, Sarthak

    2016-02-01

    We study pairs of coaxial vortex rings starting from the action for a classical bosonic string in a three-form background. We complete earlier work on the phase diagram of classical orbits by explicitly considering the case where the circulations of the two vortex rings are equal and opposite. We then go on to study perturbations, focusing on cases where the relevant four-dimensional transfer matrix splits into two-dimensional blocks. When the circulations of the rings have the same sign, instabilities are mostly limited to wavelengths smaller than a dynamically generated length scale at which single-ring instabilities occur. When the circulations have the opposite sign, larger wavelength instabilities can occur.

  12. QUANTUM CRYPTOGRAPHY WITH PHOTON PAIRS

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    Anand Sharma,

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Quantum cryptographic systems use quantum mechanical concepts that are based on qubit superposition of states, and on the no cloning or no copying theorem to establish unbreakable cipher keys. The basic idea of quantum cryptography is to send the key in the form of photons over a public channel, encoding the zeros and one on quantum states in such a way that any eavesdropping attempt can be detected. Using optical communications the most commonly quantum mechanical property used is the polarization state of photon. However, in most quantum cryptographic algorithms a random polarization state is required. The photons are ideal for low loss transport, either in free space or in optical fibers, i.e. we have the full arsenal of fiber optic technology at our disposal. In this paper we are describing the process of quantum cryptography with photon pairs.

  13. Group 3 chromosome bin maps of wheat and their relationship to rice chromosome 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munkvold, J D; Greene, R A; Bermudez-Kandianis, C E; La Rota, C M; Edwards, H; Sorrells, S F; Dake, T; Benscher, D; Kantety, R; Linkiewicz, A M; Dubcovsky, J; Akhunov, E D; Dvorák, J; Miftahudin; Gustafson, J P; Pathan, M S; Nguyen, H T; Matthews, D E; Chao, S; Lazo, G R; Hummel, D D; Anderson, O D; Anderson, J A; Gonzalez-Hernandez, J L; Peng, J H; Lapitan, N; Qi, L L; Echalier, B; Gill, B S; Hossain, K G; Kalavacharla, V; Kianian, S F; Sandhu, D; Erayman, M; Gill, K S; McGuire, P E; Qualset, C O; Sorrells, M E

    2004-10-01

    The focus of this study was to analyze the content, distribution, and comparative genome relationships of 996 chromosome bin-mapped expressed sequence tags (ESTs) accounting for 2266 restriction fragments (loci) on the homoeologous group 3 chromosomes of hexaploid wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). Of these loci, 634, 884, and 748 were mapped on chromosomes 3A, 3B, and 3D, respectively. The individual chromosome bin maps revealed bins with a high density of mapped ESTs in the distal region and bins of low density in the proximal region of the chromosome arms, with the exception of 3DS and 3DL. These distributions were more localized on the higher-resolution group 3 consensus map with intermediate regions of high-mapped-EST density on both chromosome arms. Gene ontology (GO) classification of mapped ESTs was not significantly different for homoeologous group 3 chromosomes compared to the other groups. A combined analysis of the individual bin maps using 537 of the mapped ESTs revealed rearrangements between the group 3 chromosomes. Approximately 232 (44%) of the consensus mapped ESTs matched sequences on rice chromosome 1 and revealed large- and small-scale differences in gene order. Of the group 3 mapped EST unigenes approximately 21 and 32% matched the Arabidopsis coding regions and proteins, respectively, but no chromosome-level gene order conservation was detected. PMID:15514041

  14. Chromosome arm-specific BAC end sequences permit comparative analysis of homoeologous chromosomes and genomes of polyploid wheat

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    Sehgal Sunish K

    2012-05-01

    758 SSRs and 695 Insertion Site Based Polymorphisms (ISBPs. Of the 96 ISBP primer pairs tested, 28 (29% were 3A-specific and compared to 17 (18% for 96 SSRs. Conclusion This work reports on the use of wheat chromosome arm 3AS-specific BAC library for the targeted generation of sequence data from a particular region of the huge genome of wheat. A large quantity of sequences were generated from the A genome of hexaploid wheat for comparative genome analysis with homoeologous B and D genomes and other model grass genomes. Hundreds of molecular markers were developed from the 3AS arm-specific sequences; these and other sequences will be useful in gene discovery and physical mapping.

  15. Characterization of Thinopyrum intermedium Alien Chromosomes and Their Translocations in Wheat Derivatives of Zhong 5 by Multicolor Fluorescence in situ Hybridization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Z1, Z2, Z3, Z4, Z5 and Z6 are alien addition lines to wheat involving Thinopyrum intermedium chromosomes. We have characterized the Thinopyrum intermedium chromosomes or segments in these lines using multi-color florescence in situ hybridization. The probes used included total genomic DNA of Pseudoroegneria stipfolia (St) and cloned probes of highly tandem repetitive DNA pSc119. 2 and pAs1. Disomic addition lines Z1, Z2 and Z6 have the same single pair of alien chromo-somes carrying the resistant gene(s) to barley yellow dwarf virus (BYDV). This alien chromosome is a St/E translocation; within the long arm, there is a big insertion of an E-genome chromosomalsegment (30%). Disomic addition line Z3 carries one pair of St/E Robertsonian translocation chromosomes ; on the short arm (E) there is a nuclear organizer region, which expresses in some cells. In Z5, the added chromosome is one pair of translocated chromosomes. Chromosomes 2D, 3D and 3Stwere involved in the translocation with great possibility[2IS · 3DL (0. 47) - 3StL (0. 53)]. The St segment is responsible for resistance to leaf and stem rusts. Addition line Z4 also carries the translo cated chromosome found in Z5, but in addition carries one pair of 7AS (0. 64) - 7StS (0. 36) · 7StL translocation chromosomes. The 7St fragment bears the stripe rust resistance, and replaces the normal 7A. All of the translocations in Z1, Z2, Z6 and Z3 existed in one of their parents, the wheat Th. intermedium partial amphiploid, Zhong 5. The two wheat-Th. intermedium translocations in Z4 and Z5 occurred during the backcrossing of Zhong 5 to the other wheat varieties in the development of the addition lines. Spontaneous homoeologous translocations showed a close genome relationship between wheat and Th. intermedium. This paper also demonstrated the potential of highly repetitive sequences DNA in verification and characterization of translocation chromosomes.

  16. Characterization of Thinopyrum intermedium Alien Chromosomes and Their Translocations in Wheat Derivatives of Zhong 5 by Multicolor Fluorescence in situ Hybridization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Xueyong; Phillip M Banks; P.J. Larkin

    2000-01-01

    Z1, Z2, Z3, Z4, Z5 and Z6 are alien addition lines to wheat involving Thinopyrum intermedium chromosomes. We have characterized the Thinopyrum intermedium chromosomes or segments in these lines using multi-color florescence in situ hybridization. The probes used included total genomic DNA of Pseudoroegneria stipfolia (St) and cloned probes of highly tandem repetitive DNA pSc119. 2 and pAs1. Disomic addition lines Z1, Z2 and Z6 have the same single pair of alien chromo-somes carrying the resistant gene(s) to barley yellow dwarf virus (BYDV). This alien chromosome is a St/E translocation; within the long arm, there is a big insertion of an E-genome chromosomalsegment (30%). Disomic addition line Z3 carries one pair of St/E Robertsonian translocation chromosomes ; on the short arm (E) there is a nuclear organizer region, which expresses in some cells. In Z5, the added chromosome is one pair of translocated chromosomes. Chromosomes 2D, 3D and 3Stwere involved in the translocation with great possibility〔2IS · 3DL (0. 47) - 3StL (0. 53)〕. The St segment is responsible for resistance to leaf and stem rusts. Addition line Z4 also carries the translo cated chromosome found in Z5, but in addition carries one pair of 7AS (0. 64) - 7StS (0. 36) · 7StL translocation chromosomes. The 7St fragment bears the stripe rust resistance, and replaces the normal 7A. All of the translocations in Z1, Z2, Z6 and Z3 existed in one of their parents, the wheat Th. intermedium partial amphiploid, Zhong 5. The two wheat-Th. intermedium translocations in Z4 and Z5 occurred during the backcrossing of Zhong 5 to the other wheat varieties in the development of the addition lines. Spontaneous homoeologous translocations showed a close genome relationship between wheat and Th. intermedium. This paper also demonstrated the potential of highly repetitive sequences DNA in verification and characterization of translocation chromosomes.

  17. Analysis of a valuable chromosome rearrangement induced by ionizing radiations in a cultivated chili pepper line (Capsicum baccatum var. Pendulum - solanaceae)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capsicum (chili peppers) is an important genus including five crop species consumed by man as spice and food. Most contributions about induced mutagenesis in Capsicum refer to gene mutations while induced changes at chromosome level are scarce. We started a program to achieve chromosome rearrangements by ionizing radiations in C. baccatum variety pendulum cultivar 'cayenne', which has a karyotype with 2n=2x=24, 11 metacentrics + 1 subtelocentric pairs, 4 pairs (1, 3, 10, 12) carrying nucleolar organizing regions (NORs) and associated satellites in short arm. Seeds were treated with different acute doses of X-rays developing M1-4 generations. A rearranged chromosome carrying NORs in both arms was found in M2 seedlings from the only surviving M1 plant after a 300 Gy treatment. The structural change was analyzed by: 1) Feulgen's staining to observe chromosome number, size and shape; 2) silver impregnation to detect active NORs; 3) fluorescent chromosome banding to reveal type and position of constitutive heterochromatic regions [triple staining with chromomycin/distamycin/4-6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (CMA/DA/DAPI)]; 4) fluorescent in situ hybridization with 18S- 25S rDNA repeated sequence as probe. A reciprocal translocation between two NOR-bearing chromosomes in the M1 plant has occurred, which gave viable progeny carrying the chromosomal interchange without any deviating phenotype after four generations, nor in heterozygous neither in homozygous condition. The lack of chromosome instability suggests a small reciprocal interchange between a member of pair 1 and of 3, both carrying active NORs in shorts arms. The results of this rearrangement were two chromosomes with little change in size, one of them easily recognized by the presence of NORs and associated CMA+/DAPI- heterochromatin in both arms. As the translocation here reported produced a conspicuous rearranged marker chromosome, the obtained plant line is considered very valuable for studies on chromosome

  18. Asynchronous replication and autosome-pair non-equivalence in human embryonic stem cells.

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    Devkanya Dutta

    Full Text Available A number of mammalian genes exhibit the unusual properties of random monoallelic expression and random asynchronous replication. Such exceptional genes include genes subject to X inactivation and autosomal genes including odorant receptors, immunoglobulins, interleukins, pheromone receptors, and p120 catenin. In differentiated cells, random asynchronous replication of interspersed autosomal genes is coordinated at the whole chromosome level, indicative of chromosome-pair non-equivalence. Here we have investigated the replication pattern of the random asynchronously replicating genes in undifferentiated human embryonic stem cells, using fluorescence in situ hybridization based assay. We show that allele-specific replication of X-linked genes and random monoallelic autosomal genes occur in human embryonic stem cells. The direction of replication is coordinated at the whole chromosome level and can cross the centromere, indicating the existence of autosome-pair non-equivalence in human embryonic stem cells. These results suggest that epigenetic mechanism(s that randomly distinguish between two parental alleles are emerging in the cells of the inner cell mass, the source of human embryonic stem cells.

  19. Chromosome heteromorphism quantified by high-resolution bivariate flow karyotyping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trask, B; van den Engh, G; Mayall, B; Gray, J W

    1989-11-01

    Maternal and paternal homologues of many chromosome types can be differentiated on the basis of their peak position in Hoechst 33258 versus chromomycin A3 bivariate flow karyotypes. We demonstrate here the magnitude of DNA content differences among normal chromosomes of the same type. Significant peak-position differences between homologues were observed for an average of four chromosome types in each of the karyotypes of 98 different individuals. The frequency of individuals with differences in homologue peak positions varied among chromosome types: e.g., chromosome 15, 61%; chromosome 3, 4%. Flow karyotypes of 33 unrelated individuals were compared to determine the range of peak position among normal chromosomes. Chromosomes Y, 21, 22, 15, 16, 13, 14, and 19 were most heteromorphic, and chromosomes 2-8 and X were least heteromorphic. The largest chromosome 21 was 45% larger than the smallest 21 chromosome observed. The base composition of the variable regions differed among chromosome types. DNA contents of chromosome variants determined from flow karyotypes were closely correlated to measurements of DNA content made of gallocyanin chrome alum-stained metaphase chromosomes on slides. Fluorescence in situ hybridization with chromosome-specific repetitive sequences indicated that variability in their copy number is partly responsible for peak-position variability in some chromosomes. Heteromorphic chromosomes are identified for which parental flow karyotype information will be essential if de novo rearrangements resulting in small DNA content changes are to be detected with flow karyotyping. PMID:2479266

  20. Factors affecting home range of mallard pairs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riechmann, J.H.

    1976-06-01

    Certain habitat and social factors were investigated for their effect on home range size of mallard (Anas platyhynchos) pairs breeding in a forested region of north-central Minnesota during the spring of 1971--72. Data from 31 radio-marked hens and drakes were used, but primary emphasis was placed on 8 pairs (5 with both members of the pair marked). Pairs were radio-tracked on river marsh areas, river channels, and large sand lakes to provide comparative data for evaluating home range size differences. Home ranges varied from an average of 53 ha for pairs using primarily river habitat to 871 ha for pairs using only large sand lakes. River and lake shorelines varied considerably in species and density of vegetation. Interaction between pairs as well as density of flocked males appeared to be influenced by these habitat differences with resultant effects on home range sizes.

  1. On Minus Paired-Domination in Graphs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邢化明; 孙良

    2003-01-01

    The study of minus paired-domination of a graph G=(V,E) is initiated. Let SV be any paired-dominating set of G, a minus paired-dominating function is a function of the form f∶V→{-1,0,1} such that f(v)=1 for v∈S, f(v)≤0 for v∈V-S, and f(N[v])≥1 for all v∈V. The weight of a minus paired-dominating function f is w(f)=∑f(v), over all vertices v∈V. The minus paired-domination number of a graph G is γ-p(G)=min{w(f)|f is a minus paired-dominating function of G}. On the basis of the minus paired-domination number of a graph G defined, some of its properties are discussed.

  2. Adaptation through chromosomal inversions in Anopheles

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    Diego eAyala

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Chromosomal inversions have been repeatedly involved in local adaptation in a large number of animals and plants. The ecological and behavioral plasticity of Anopheles species - human malaria vectors - is mirrored by high amounts of polymorphic inversions. The adaptive significance of chromosomal inversions has been consistently attested by strong and significant correlations between their frequencies and a number of phenotypic traits. Here, we provide an extensive literature review of the different adaptive traits associated with chromosomal inversions in the genus Anopheles. Traits having important consequences for the success of present and future vector control measures, such as insecticide resistance and behavioral changes, are discussed.

  3. Arm-specific dynamics of chromosome evolution in malaria mosquitoes

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    Xia Ai

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The malaria mosquito species of subgenus Cellia have rich inversion polymorphisms that correlate with environmental variables. Polymorphic inversions tend to cluster on the chromosomal arms 2R and 2L but not on X, 3R and 3L in Anopheles gambiae and homologous arms in other species. However, it is unknown whether polymorphic inversions on homologous chromosomal arms of distantly related species from subgenus Cellia nonrandomly share similar sets of genes. It is also unclear if the evolutionary breakage of inversion-poor chromosomal arms is under constraints. Results To gain a better understanding of the arm-specific differences in the rates of genome rearrangements, we compared gene orders and established syntenic relationships among Anopheles gambiae, Anopheles funestus, and Anopheles stephensi. We provided evidence that polymorphic inversions on the 2R arms in these three species nonrandomly captured similar sets of genes. This nonrandom distribution of genes was not only a result of preservation of ancestral gene order but also an outcome of extensive reshuffling of gene orders that created new combinations of homologous genes within independently originated polymorphic inversions. The statistical analysis of distribution of conserved gene orders demonstrated that the autosomal arms differ in their tolerance to generating evolutionary breakpoints. The fastest evolving 2R autosomal arm was enriched with gene blocks conserved between only a pair of species. In contrast, all identified syntenic blocks were preserved on the slowly evolving 3R arm of An. gambiae and on the homologous arms of An. funestus and An. stephensi. Conclusions Our results suggest that natural selection favors specific gene combinations within polymorphic inversions when distant species are exposed to similar environmental pressures. This knowledge could be useful for the discovery of genes responsible for an association of inversion polymorphisms with

  4. Arm-specific dynamics of chromosome evolution in malaria mosquitoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background The malaria mosquito species of subgenus Cellia have rich inversion polymorphisms that correlate with environmental variables. Polymorphic inversions tend to cluster on the chromosomal arms 2R and 2L but not on X, 3R and 3L in Anopheles gambiae and homologous arms in other species. However, it is unknown whether polymorphic inversions on homologous chromosomal arms of distantly related species from subgenus Cellia nonrandomly share similar sets of genes. It is also unclear if the evolutionary breakage of inversion-poor chromosomal arms is under constraints. Results To gain a better understanding of the arm-specific differences in the rates of genome rearrangements, we compared gene orders and established syntenic relationships among Anopheles gambiae, Anopheles funestus, and Anopheles stephensi. We provided evidence that polymorphic inversions on the 2R arms in these three species nonrandomly captured similar sets of genes. This nonrandom distribution of genes was not only a result of preservation of ancestral gene order but also an outcome of extensive reshuffling of gene orders that created new combinations of homologous genes within independently originated polymorphic inversions. The statistical analysis of distribution of conserved gene orders demonstrated that the autosomal arms differ in their tolerance to generating evolutionary breakpoints. The fastest evolving 2R autosomal arm was enriched with gene blocks conserved between only a pair of species. In contrast, all identified syntenic blocks were preserved on the slowly evolving 3R arm of An. gambiae and on the homologous arms of An. funestus and An. stephensi. Conclusions Our results suggest that natural selection favors specific gene combinations within polymorphic inversions when distant species are exposed to similar environmental pressures. This knowledge could be useful for the discovery of genes responsible for an association of inversion polymorphisms with phenotypic variations in

  5. Chromosomal abnormalities in patients with sperm disorders

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    L. Y. Pylyp

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Chromosomal abnormalities are among the most common genetic causes of spermatogenic disruptions. Carriers of chromosomal abnormalities are at increased risk of infertility, miscarriage or birth of a child with unbalanced karyotype due to the production of unbalanced gametes. The natural selection against chromosomally abnormal sperm usually prevents fertilization with sperm barring in cases of serious chromosomal abnormalities. However, assisted reproductive technologies in general and intracytoplasmic sperm injection in particular, enable the transmission of chromosomal abnormalities to the progeny. Therefore, cytogenetic studies are important in patients with male factor infertility before assisted reproduction treatment. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the types and frequencies of chromosomal abnormalities in 724 patients with infertility and to estimate the risk of chromosomal abnormalities detection in subgroups of patients depending on the severity of spermatogenic disruption, aiming at identifying groups of patients in need of cytogenetic studies. Karyotype analysis was performed in 724 blood samples of men attending infertility clinic. Chromosomal preparation was performed by standard techniques. At least 20 GTG-banded metaphase plates with the resolution from 450 to 750 bands per haploid set were analysed in each case. When chromosomal mosaicism was suspected, this number was increased to 50. Abnormal karyotypes were observed in 48 (6.6% patients, including 67% of autosomal abnormalities and 33% of gonosomal abnormalities. Autosomal abnormalities were represented by structural rearrangements. Reciprocal translocations were the most common type of structural chromosomal abnormalities in the studied group, detected with the frequency of 2.6% (n = 19, followed by Robertsonian translocation, observed with the frequency of 1.2% (n = 9. The frequency of inversions was 0.6% (n = 4. Gonosomal abnormalities included 14 cases

  6. Autosomal location of genes from the conserved mammalian X in the platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus): implications for mammalian sex chromosome evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, Paul D; Delbridge, Margaret L; Deakin, Janine E; El-Mogharbel, Nisrine; Kirby, Patrick J; Carvalho-Silva, Denise R; Graves, Jennifer A Marshall

    2005-01-01

    Mammalian sex chromosomes evolved from an ancient autosomal pair. Mapping of human X- and Y-borne genes in distantly related mammals and non-mammalian vertebrates has proved valuable to help deduce the evolution of this unique part of the genome. The platypus, a monotreme mammal distantly related to eutherians and marsupials, has an extraordinary sex chromosome system comprising five X and five Y chromosomes that form a translocation chain at male meiosis. The largest X chromosome (X1), which lies at one end of the chain, has considerable homology to the human X. Using comparative mapping and the emerging chicken database, we demonstrate that part of the therian X chromosome, previously thought to be conserved across all mammals, was lost from the platypus X1 to an autosome. This region included genes flanking the XIST locus, and also genes with Y-linked homologues that are important to male reproduction in therians. Since these genes lie on the X in marsupials and eutherians, and also on the homologous region of chicken chromosome 4, this represents a loss from the monotreme X rather than an additional evolutionary stratum of the human X. PMID:15973504

  7. Construction of physical maps for the sex-specific regions of papaya sex chromosomes

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    Na Jong-Kuk

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Papaya is a major fruit crop in tropical and subtropical regions worldwide. It is trioecious with three sex forms: male, female, and hermaphrodite. Sex determination is controlled by a pair of nascent sex chromosomes with two slightly different Y chromosomes, Y for male and Yh for hermaphrodite. The sex chromosome genotypes are XY (male, XYh (hermaphrodite, and XX (female. The papaya hermaphrodite-specific Yh chromosome region (HSY is pericentromeric and heterochromatic. Physical mapping of HSY and its X counterpart is essential for sequencing these regions and uncovering the early events of sex chromosome evolution and to identify the sex determination genes for crop improvement. Results A reiterate chromosome walking strategy was applied to construct the two physical maps with three bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC libraries. The HSY physical map consists of 68 overlapped BACs on the minimum tiling path, and covers all four HSY-specific Knobs. One gap remained in the region of Knob 1, the only knob structure shared between HSY and X, due to the lack of HSY-specific sequences. This gap was filled on the physical map of the HSY corresponding region in the X chromosome. The X physical map consists of 44 BACs on the minimum tiling path with one gap remaining in the middle, due to the nature of highly repetitive sequences. This gap was filled on the HSY physical map. The borders of the non-recombining HSY were defined genetically by fine mapping using 1460 F2 individuals. The genetically defined HSY spanned approximately 8.5 Mb, whereas its X counterpart extended about 5.4 Mb including a 900 Kb region containing the Knob 1 shared by the HSY and X. The 8.5 Mb HSY corresponds to 4.5 Mb of its X counterpart, showing 4 Mb (89% DNA sequence expansion. Conclusion The 89% increase of DNA sequence in HSY indicates rapid expansion of the Yh chromosome after genetic recombination was suppressed 2–3 million years ago. The

  8. Chromosomal characterization of cultured populations of Chilean coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kistuch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson Colihueque V.

    1999-03-01

    Full Text Available Chromosomal characterization of coho salmon samples from three fish farms in southern Chile (Polcura, Castro and Coyhaique was carried out in order to compare their chromosome constitutions. All populations had a 2n = 60; however, Polcura and Coyhaique had a different chromosome arm number (NF = 110; 40m + 10sm + 10st/t than Castro (NF = 108; 40m + 8sm + 12st/t. Variation in NF was due to chromosome pair 25, which was submetacentric in Coyhaique and Polcura, but subtelocentric in Castro. In all karyotypes, a large submetacentric chromosome pair exhibited an interstitial secondary constriction in the short arm. The observed variability in chromosome arm number agrees with previous reports for O. kisutch, and in this particular case it seemed to be caused by a pericentric inversion of pair 25. Cultured populations of Chilean coho salmon are, therefore, likely to be cytogenetically variable.A caracterização cromossômica de amostras de salmon tipo coho de três criações de peixes do sul do Chile (Polcura, Castro e Coyhaique foi feita com a intenção de comparar suas constituições cromossômicas. Todas as populações apresentaram 2n = 60; contudo, Polcura e Coyhaique tiveram um número de braços cromossômicos (NF = 110; 40m + 10sm + 10st/t diferente de Castro (NF = 108; 40m + 8sm + 12st/t. A variação no NF deveu-se ao par cromossômico 25, que era submetacêntrico em Coyhaique e Polcura e subtelocêntrico em Castro. Em todos os cariótipos, um grande par cromossômico submetacêntrico exibiu uma constrição secundária intersticial no braço curto. A variabilidade observada no número de braços cromossômicos concorda com relatos prévios para O. kisutch e, neste caso particular, parece ter sido causada por uma inversão pericêntrica no par 25. Portanto, populações cultivadas de salmão chileno do tipo coho provavelmente são citogeneticamente variáveis.

  9. ATM promotes the obligate XY crossover and both crossover control and chromosome axis integrity on autosomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Barchi

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available During meiosis in most sexually reproducing organisms, recombination forms crossovers between homologous maternal and paternal chromosomes and thereby promotes proper chromosome segregation at the first meiotic division. The number and distribution of crossovers are tightly controlled, but the factors that contribute to this control are poorly understood in most organisms, including mammals. Here we provide evidence that the ATM kinase or protein is essential for proper crossover formation in mouse spermatocytes. ATM deficiency causes multiple phenotypes in humans and mice, including gonadal atrophy. Mouse Atm-/- spermatocytes undergo apoptosis at mid-prophase of meiosis I, but Atm(-/- meiotic phenotypes are partially rescued by Spo11 heterozygosity, such that ATM-deficient spermatocytes progress to meiotic metaphase I. Strikingly, Spo11+/-Atm-/- spermatocytes are defective in forming the obligate crossover on the sex chromosomes, even though the XY pair is usually incorporated in a sex body and is transcriptionally inactivated as in normal spermatocytes. The XY crossover defect correlates with the appearance of lagging chromosomes at metaphase I, which may trigger the extensive metaphase apoptosis that is observed in these cells. In addition, control of the number and distribution of crossovers on autosomes appears to be defective in the absence of ATM because there is an increase in the total number of MLH1 foci, which mark the sites of eventual crossover formation, and because interference between MLH1 foci is perturbed. The axes of autosomes exhibit structural defects that correlate with the positions of ongoing recombination. Together, these findings indicate that ATM plays a role in both crossover control and chromosome axis integrity and further suggests that ATM is important for coordinating these features of meiotic chromosome dynamics.

  10. Chromosomal variation, macroevolution and possible parapatric speciation in Mepraia spinolai (Porter (Hemiptera: Reduviidae

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    Frias Daniel

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Mepraia spinolai is an endemic species in Chile that lives in wild and domestic habitats. It is the only species of the Reduviidae family that shows alate polymorphism; females are always wingless, but males can be found with and without wings. The M. spinolai karyotype consists of 10 pairs of autosomes and a complex sex determination system. Males from the northernmost regions I and II (latitude 18°-26° South are always winged (braquipterous and are X1X2Y, with a large Y chromosome. From region III to the metropolitan region (latitude 26°-33° South, males may be either winged or wingless but appear to be polymorphic for a small neo-Y chromosome, which may have originated by fracture of the large holocentric Y chromosome found in populations from farther north. Experimental crosses suggest that the genes for wings are linked in the Y chromosome and also that there are two cytologically indistinguishable types of neo-Y chromosomes. One form (Y1 bears a gene or genes for wings while the other (Y2 lacks such genes. Males that are X1X2Y1, X1X2Y1Y1 and X1X2Y1Y2 are winged, while the absence of Y1 (X1X2Y2 and X1X2Y2Y2 results in a wingless male. These chromosomes and morphological changes are correlated with a shift of the southern population into more arid habitats of the interior in the metropolitan region and region III.

  11. Chromosomal Rainbows detect Oncogenic Rearrangements of Signaling Molecules in Thyroid Tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Brien, Benjamin; Jossart, Gregg H.; Ito, Yuko; Greulich-Bode, Karin M.; Weier, Jingly F.; Munne, Santiago; Clark, Orlo H.; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G.

    2010-08-19

    Altered signal transduction can be considered a hallmark of many solid tumors. In thyroid cancers the receptor tyrosine kinase (rtk) genes NTRK1 (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man = OMIM *191315, also known as 'TRKA'), RET ('Rearranged during Transfection protooncogene', OMIM *164761) and MET (OMIM *164860) have been reported as activated, rearranged or overexpressed. In many cases, a combination of cytogenetic and molecular techniques allows elucidation of cellular changes that initiate tumor development and progression. While the mechanisms leading to overexpression of the rtk MET gene remain largely unknown, a variety of chromosomal rearrangements of the RET or NTKR1 gene could be demonstrated in thyroid cancer. Abnormal expressions in these tumors seem to follow a similar pattern: the rearrangement translocates the 3'-end of the rtk gene including the entire catalytic domain to an expressed gene leading to a chimeric RNA and protein with kinase activity. Our research was prompted by an increasing number of reports describing translocations involving ret and previously unknown translocation partners. We developed a high resolution technique based on fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) to allow rapid screening for cytogenetic rearrangements which complements conventional chromosome banding analysis. Our technique applies simultaneous hybridization of numerous probes labeled with different reporter molecules which are distributed along the target chromosome allowing the detection of cytogenetic changes at near megabase-pair (Mbp) resolution. Here, we report our results using a probe set specific for human chromosome 10, which is altered in a significant portion of human thyroid cancers (TC's). While rendering accurate information about the cytogenetic location of rearranged elements, our multi-locus, multi-color analysis was developed primarily to overcome limitations of whole chromosome painting (WCP) and chromosome banding

  12. Exploring the tertiary gene pool of bread wheat: sequence assembly and analysis of chromosome 5M(g) of Aegilops geniculata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Vijay K; Wang, Shichen; Danilova, Tatiana; Koo, Dal Hoe; Vrána, Jan; Kubaláková, Marie; Hribova, Eva; Rawat, Nidhi; Kalia, Bhanu; Singh, Narinder; Friebe, Bernd; Doležel, Jaroslav; Akhunov, Eduard; Poland, Jesse; Sabir, Jamal S M; Gill, Bikram S

    2015-11-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) provides a powerful tool for the discovery of important genes and alleles in crop plants and their wild relatives. Despite great advances in NGS technologies, whole-genome shotgun sequencing is cost-prohibitive for species with complex genomes. An attractive option is to reduce genome complexity to a single chromosome prior to sequencing. This work describes a strategy for studying the genomes of distant wild relatives of wheat by isolating single chromosomes from addition or substitution lines, followed by chromosome sorting using flow cytometry and sequencing of chromosomal DNA by NGS technology. We flow-sorted chromosome 5M(g) from a wheat/Aegilops geniculata disomic substitution line [DS5M(g) (5D)] and sequenced it using an Illumina HiSeq 2000 system at approximately 50 × coverage. Paired-end sequences were assembled and used for structural and functional annotation. A total of 4236 genes were annotated on 5M(g) , in close agreement with the predicted number of genes on wheat chromosome 5D (4286). Single-gene FISH indicated no major chromosomal rearrangements between chromosomes 5M(g) and 5D. Comparing chromosome 5M(g) with model grass genomes identified synteny blocks in Brachypodium distachyon, rice (Oryza sativa), sorghum (Sorghum bicolor) and barley (Hordeum vulgare). Chromosome 5M(g) -specific SNPs and cytogenetic probe-based resources were developed and validated. Deletion bin-mapped and ordered 5M(g) SNP markers will be useful to track 5M-specific introgressions and translocations. This study provides a detailed sequence-based analysis of the composition of a chromosome from a distant wild relative of bread wheat, and opens up opportunities to develop genomic resources for wild germplasm to facilitate crop improvement. PMID:26408103

  13. Chromosome landmarks and autosome-sex chromosome translocations in Rumex hastatulus, a plant with XX/XY1Y2 sex chromosome system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabowska-Joachimiak, Aleksandra; Kula, Adam; Książczyk, Tomasz; Chojnicka, Joanna; Sliwinska, Elwira; Joachimiak, Andrzej J

    2015-06-01

    Rumex hastatulus is the North American endemic dioecious plant with heteromorphic sex chromosomes. It is differentiated into two chromosomal races: Texas (T) race characterised by a simple XX/XY sex chromosome system and North Carolina (NC) race with a polymorphic XX/XY1Y2 sex chromosome system. The gross karyotype morphology in NC race resembles the derived type, but chromosomal changes that occurred during its evolution are poorly understood. Our C-banding/DAPI and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) experiments demonstrated that Y chromosomes of both races are enriched in DAPI-positive sequences and that the emergence of polymorphic sex chromosome system was accompanied by the break of ancestral Y chromosome and switch in the localization of 5S rDNA, from autosomes to sex chromosomes (X and Y2). Two contrasting domains were detected within North Carolina Y chromosomes: the older, highly heterochromatinised, inherited from the original Y chromosome and the younger, euchromatic, representing translocated autosomal material. The flow-cytometric DNA estimation showed ∼3.5 % genome downsizing in the North Carolina race. Our results are in contradiction to earlier reports on the lack of heterochromatin within Y chromosomes of this species and enable unambiguous identification of autosomes involved in the autosome-heterosome translocation, providing useful chromosome landmarks for further studies on the karyotype and sex chromosome differentiation in this species. PMID:25394583

  14. Visualization of yeast chromosomal DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubega, Seth

    1990-01-01

    The DNA molecule is the most significant life molecule since it codes the blue print for other structural and functional molecules of all living organisms. Agarose gel electrophoresis is now being widely used to separate DNA of virus, bacteria, and lower eukaryotes. The task was undertaken of reviewing the existing methods of DNA fractionation and microscopic visualization of individual chromosonal DNA molecules by gel electrophoresis as a basis for a proposed study to investigate the feasibility of separating DNA molecules in free fluids as an alternative to gel electrophoresis. Various techniques were studied. On the molecular level, agarose gel electrophoresis is being widely used to separate chromosomal DNA according to molecular weight. Carl and Olson separate and characterized the entire karyotype of a lab strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Smith et al. and Schwartz and Koval independently reported the visualization of individual DNA molecules migrating through agarose gel matrix during electrophoresis. The techniques used by these researchers are being reviewed in the lab as a basis for the proposed studies.

  15. Dynamic changes in paternal X-chromosome activity during imprinted X-chromosome inactivation in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Patrat, Catherine; Okamoto, Ikuhiro; Diabangouaya, Patricia; Vialon, Vivian; Le Baccon, Patricia; Chow, Jennifer; Heard, Edith

    2009-01-01

    In mammals, X-chromosome dosage compensation is achieved by inactivating one of the two X chromosomes in females. In mice, X inactivation is initially imprinted, with inactivation of the paternal X (Xp) chromosome occurring during preimplantation development. One theory is that the Xp is preinactivated in female embryos, because of its previous silence during meiosis in the male germ line. The extent to which the Xp is active after fertilization and the exact time of onset of X-linked gene si...

  16. Tracking Chromosome Evolution in Southern African Gerbils Using Flow-Sorted Chromosome Paints

    OpenAIRE

    Knight, L.I.; Ng, B. L.; Cheng, W; Fu, B.; Yang, F.; Rambau, R V

    2013-01-01

    Desmodillus and Gerbilliscus (formerly Tatera) comprise a monophyletic group of gerbils (subfamily Gerbillinae) which last shared an ancestor approximately 8 million years ago; diploid chromosome number variation among the species ranges from 2n = 36 to 2n = 50. In an attempt to shed more light on chromosome evolution and speciation in these rodents, we compared the karyotypes of 7 species, representing 3 genera, based on homology data revealed by chromosome painting with probes derived from ...

  17. Chromosomal characterization in two species of an Astyanax bimaculatus complex (Characidae, Characiformes) using different techniques of chromosome banding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da Silva, Laura L L; Dos Santos, Angélica R; Giuliano-Caetano, Lucia; Dias, Ana L

    2016-08-01

    Astyanax has been the subject of extensive cytogenetic studies due to its wide karyotypic diversity. This genus comprises species complexes, namely groups of fish of difficult morphological differentiation, such as the bimaculatus complex, which includes the characids with a rounded humeral spot. Thence, the present study proposed to accomplish a cytogenetic characterization of two species of this complex: A. asuncionensis and A. altiparanae, aiming to find chromosomal markers that differentiate these species, as well as achieve a better understanding of the karyotype evolution in the genus. For this we used different techniques of chromosome banding as C-banding, impregnation by silver nitrate, fluorochrome staining and FISH with 18S rDNA probe. This is the first cytogenetic study in A. asuncionensis, from Miranda river, which presented 2n = 50 and 18 m + 22sm + 6st + 4a (FN = 96) and single NORs. The populations of A. altiparanae also presented 2n = 50, but with different karyotypic formulae: the population of the Quexada river presented 16 m + 24sm + 4st + 6a (FN = 94) and the Esperança stream and Jacutinga river showed 16 m + 20sm + 4st + 10a (FN = 90). All analyzed populations showed an interindividual variation in the number and location of the nucleolar organizer regions (NORs). Single and multiple NORs were detected either by impregnation with silver nitrate or by FISH with 18S rDNA probe. After C-banding, the two species differed in relation to the composition and heterochromatin distribution. The meiotic cells of A. altiparanae male individuals were also analyzed, showing that, despite the high karyotype variability, chromosome pairing occurs normally. The data show that A. altiparanae and A. asuncionensis share some characteristics with other species of the bimaculatus complex, suggesting a close phylogenetic relationship among those species. However, some features can be used as differentiation chromosomal markers in

  18. Gene Duplication, Gene Conversion and the Evolution of the Y Chromosome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connallon, Tim; Clark, Andrew G.

    2010-01-01

    Nonrecombining chromosomes, such as the Y, are expected to degenerate over time due to reduced efficacy of natural selection compared to chromosomes that recombine. However, gene duplication, coupled with gene conversion between duplicate pairs, can potentially counteract forces of evolutionary decay that accompany asexual reproduction. Using a combination of analytical and computer simulation methods, we explicitly show that, although gene conversion has little impact on the probability that duplicates become fixed within a population, conversion can be effective at maintaining the functionality of Y-linked duplicates that have already become fixed. The coupling of Y-linked gene duplication and gene conversion between paralogs can also prove costly by increasing the rate of nonhomologous crossovers between duplicate pairs. Such crossovers can generate an abnormal Y chromosome, as was recently shown to reduce male fertility in humans. The results represent a step toward explaining some of the more peculiar attributes of the human Y as well as preliminary Y-linked sequence data from other mammals and Drosophila. The results may also be applicable to the recently observed pattern of tetraploidy and gene conversion in asexual, bdelloid rotifers. PMID:20551442

  19. Haploidization via Chromosome Elimination: Means and Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Takayoshi; Karimi-Ashtiyani, Raheleh; Houben, Andreas

    2016-04-29

    The ability to generate haploids and subsequently induce chromosome doubling significantly accelerates the crop breeding process. Haploids have been induced through the generation of plants from haploid tissues (in situ gynogenesis and androgenesis) and through the selective loss of a parental chromosome set via inter- or intraspecific hybridization. Here, we focus on the mechanisms responsible for this selective chromosome elimination. CENH3, a variant of the centromere-specific histone H3, has been exploited to create an efficient method of haploid induction, and we discuss this approach in some detail. Parallels have been drawn with chromosome-specific elimination, which occurs as a normal part of differentiation and sex determination in many plant and animal systems. PMID:26772657

  20. Cancer chromosomal instability: therapeutic and diagnostic challenges

    OpenAIRE

    McGranahan, Nicholas; Burrell, Rebecca A.; Endesfelder, David; Novelli, Marco R; Swanton, Charles

    2012-01-01

    This review provides a much-needed translational perspective into the issue of aneuploidy and chromosomal instability, discussing the prognostic value of CIN assessment in human tumours, methods to analyze it and how it could be therapeutically targeted.