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Sample records for chromosome image analysis

  1. Research on automatic human chromosome image analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ming, Delie; Tian, Jinwen; Liu, Jian

    2007-11-01

    Human chromosome karyotyping is one of the essential tasks in cytogenetics, especially in genetic syndrome diagnoses. In this thesis, an automatic procedure is introduced for human chromosome image analysis. According to different status of touching and overlapping chromosomes, several segmentation methods are proposed to achieve the best results. Medial axis is extracted by the middle point algorithm. Chromosome band is enhanced by the algorithm based on multiscale B-spline wavelets, extracted by average gray profile, gradient profile and shape profile, and calculated by the WDD (Weighted Density Distribution) descriptors. The multilayer classifier is used in classification. Experiment results demonstrate that the algorithms perform well.

  2. Analysis of chromosome damage for biodosimetry using imaging flow cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaton, L A; Ferrarotto, C; Kutzner, B C; McNamee, J P; Bellier, P V; Wilkins, R C

    2013-08-30

    The dicentric chromosome assay (DCA), which involves counting the frequency of dicentric chromosomes in mitotic lymphocytes and converting it to a dose-estimation for ionizing radiation exposure, is considered to be the gold standard for radiation biodosimetry. Furthermore, for emergency response, the DCA has been adapted for triage by simplifying the scoring method [1]. With the development of new technologies such as the imaging flow cytometer, it may now be possible to adapt this microscope-based method to an automated cytometry method. This technology allows the sensitivity of microscopy to be maintained while adding the increased throughput of flow cytometry. A new protocol is being developed to adapt the DCA to the imaging cytometer in order to further increase the rapid determination of a biological dose. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were isolated from ex vivo irradiated whole blood samples using a density gradient separation method and cultured with PHA and Colcemid. After 48h incubation, the chromosomes were isolated, stained for DNA content with propidium iodide (PI) and labelled with a centromere marker. Stained chromosomes were then analyzed on the ImageStream(×) (EMD-Millipore, Billerica, MA). Preliminary results indicate that individual chromosomes can be identified and mono- and dicentric chromosomes can be differentiated by imaging cytometry. A dose response curve was generated using this technology. The details of the method and the dose response curve are presented and compared to traditional microscope scoring. Imaging cytometry is a new technology which enables the rapid, automated analysis of fluorescently labelled chromosomes. Adapting the dicentric assay to this technology has the potential for high throughput analysis for mass casualty events.

  3. Chromosome Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    Perceptive Scientific Instruments, Inc., provides the foundation for the Powergene line of chromosome analysis and molecular genetic instrumentation. This product employs image processing technology from NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory and image enhancement techniques from Johnson Space Center. Originally developed to send pictures back to earth from space probes, digital imaging techniques have been developed and refined for use in a variety of medical applications, including diagnosis of disease.

  4. Cytogenetic analysis of quinoa chromosomes using nanoscale imaging and spectroscopy techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yangquanwei, Zhong; Neethirajan, Suresh; Karunakaran, Chithra

    2013-11-01

    Here we present a high-resolution chromosomal spectral map derived from synchrotron-based soft X-ray spectromicroscopy applied to quinoa species. The label-free characterization of quinoa metaphase chromosomes shows that it consists of organized substructures of DNA-protein complex. The analysis of spectra of chromosomes using the scanning transmission X-ray microscope (STXM) and its superposition of the pattern with the atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images proves that it is possible to precisely locate the gene loci and the DNA packaging inside the chromosomes. STXM has been successfully used to distinguish and quantify the DNA and protein components inside the quinoa chromosomes by visualizing the interphase at up to 30-nm spatial resolution. Our study represents the successful attempt of non-intrusive interrogation and integrating imaging techniques of chromosomes using synchrotron STXM and AFM techniques. The methodology developed for 3-D imaging of chromosomes with chemical specificity and temporal resolution will allow the nanoscale imaging tools to emerge from scientific research and development into broad practical applications such as gene loci tools and biomarker libraries.

  5. Cytogenetic analysis of quinoa chromosomes using nanoscale imaging and spectroscopy techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yangquanwei, Zhong; Neethirajan, Suresh; Karunakaran, Chithra

    2013-01-01

    Here we present a high-resolution chromosomal spectral map derived from synchrotron-based soft X-ray spectromicroscopy applied to quinoa species. The label-free characterization of quinoa metaphase chromosomes shows that it consists of organized substructures of DNA-protein complex. The analysis of spectra of chromosomes using the scanning transmission X-ray microscope (STXM) and its superposition of the pattern with the atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images proves that it is possible to precisely locate the gene loci and the DNA packaging inside the chromosomes. STXM has been successfully used to distinguish and quantify the DNA and protein components inside the quinoa chromosomes by visualizing the interphase at up to 30-nm spatial resolution. Our study represents the successful attempt of non-intrusive interrogation and integrating imaging techniques of chromosomes using synchrotron STXM and AFM techniques. The methodology developed for 3-D imaging of chromosomes with chemical specificity and temporal resolution will allow the nanoscale imaging tools to emerge from scientific research and development into broad practical applications such as gene loci tools and biomarker libraries.

  6. A new chromosome fluorescence banding technique combining DAPI staining with image analysis in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jing Yu; She, Chao Wen; Hu, Zhong Li; Xiong, Zhi Yong; Liu, Li Hua; Song, Yun Chun

    2004-08-01

    In this study, a new chromosome fluorescence banding technique was developed in plants. The technique combined 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) staining with software analysis including three-dimensional imaging after deconvolution. Clear multiple and adjacent DAPI bands like G-bands were obtained by this technique in the tested species including Hordeum vulgare L., Oryza officinalis, Wall & Watt, Triticum aestivum L., Lilium brownii, Brown, and Vicia faba L. During mitotic metaphase, the numbers of bands for the haploid genomes of these species were about 185, 141, 309, 456 and 194, respectively. Reproducibility analysis demonstrated that banding patterns within a species were stable at the same mitotic stage and they could be used for identifying specific chromosomes and chromosome regions. The band number fluctuated: the earlier the mitotic stage, the greater the number of bands. The technique enables genes to be mapped onto specific band regions of the chromosomes by only one fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) step with no chemical banding treatments. In this study, the 45S and 5S rDNAs of some tested species were located on specific band regions of specific chromosomes and they were all positioned at the interbands with the new technique. Because no chemical banding treatment was used, the banding patterns displayed by the technique should reflect the natural conformational features of chromatin. Thus it could be expected that this technique should be suitable for all eukaryotes and would have widespread utility in chromosomal structure analysis and physical mapping of genes.

  7. Fluorescence imaging of chromosomal DNA using click chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishizuka, Takumi; Liu, Hong Shan; Ito, Kenichiro; Xu, Yan

    2016-09-01

    Chromosome visualization is essential for chromosome analysis and genetic diagnostics. Here, we developed a click chemistry approach for multicolor imaging of chromosomal DNA instead of the traditional dye method. We first demonstrated that the commercially available reagents allow for the multicolor staining of chromosomes. We then prepared two pro-fluorophore moieties that served as light-up reporters to stain chromosomal DNA based on click reaction and visualized the clear chromosomes in multicolor. We applied this strategy in fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and identified, with high sensitivity and specificity, telomere DNA at the end of the chromosome. We further extended this approach to observe several basic stages of cell division. We found that the click reaction enables direct visualization of the chromosome behavior in cell division. These results suggest that the technique can be broadly used for imaging chromosomes and may serve as a new approach for chromosome analysis and genetic diagnostics.

  8. Fluorescence imaging of chromosomal DNA using click chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishizuka, Takumi; Liu, Hong Shan; Ito, Kenichiro; Xu, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Chromosome visualization is essential for chromosome analysis and genetic diagnostics. Here, we developed a click chemistry approach for multicolor imaging of chromosomal DNA instead of the traditional dye method. We first demonstrated that the commercially available reagents allow for the multicolor staining of chromosomes. We then prepared two pro-fluorophore moieties that served as light-up reporters to stain chromosomal DNA based on click reaction and visualized the clear chromosomes in multicolor. We applied this strategy in fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and identified, with high sensitivity and specificity, telomere DNA at the end of the chromosome. We further extended this approach to observe several basic stages of cell division. We found that the click reaction enables direct visualization of the chromosome behavior in cell division. These results suggest that the technique can be broadly used for imaging chromosomes and may serve as a new approach for chromosome analysis and genetic diagnostics. PMID:27620982

  9. Fast-FISH Detection and Semi-Automated Image Analysis of Numerical Chromosome Aberrations in Hematological Malignancies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arif Esa

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available A new fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH technique called Fast-FISH in combination with semi-automated image analysis was applied to detect numerical aberrations of chromosomes 8 and 12 in interphase nuclei of peripheral blood lymphocytes and bone marrow cells from patients with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML and chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL. Commercially available α-satellite DNA probes specific for the centromere regions of chromosome 8 and chromosome 12, respectively, were used. After application of the Fast-FISH protocol, the microscopic images of the fluorescence-labelled cell nuclei were recorded by the true color CCD camera Kappa CF 15 MC and evaluated quantitatively by computer analysis on a PC. These results were compared to results obtained from the same type of specimens using the same analysis system but with a standard FISH protocol. In addition, automated spot counting after both FISH techniques was compared to visual spot counting after standard FISH. A total number of about 3,000 cell nuclei was evaluated. For quantitative brightness parameters, a good correlation between standard FISH labelling and Fast-FISH was found. Automated spot counting after Fast-FISH coincided within a few percent to automated and visual spot counting after standard FISH. The examples shown indicate the reliability and reproducibility of Fast-FISH and its potential for automatized interphase cell diagnostics of numerical chromosome aberrations. Since the Fast-FISH technique requires a hybridization time as low as 1/20 of established standard FISH techniques, omitting most of the time consuming working steps in the protocol, it may contribute considerably to clinical diagnostics. This may especially be interesting in cases where an accurate result is required within a few hours.

  10. Fetal chromosome analysis: screening for chromosome disease?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Philip, J; Tabor, Ann; Bang, J

    1983-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the rationale of the current indications for fetal chromosome analysis. 5372 women had 5423 amniocentesis performed, this group constituting a consecutive sample at the chromosome laboratory, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen from March 1973 to September 1980 (Group...... to women having amniocentesis, although considered not to have any increased risk of fetal chromosome abnormality (1390 pregnancies, group B). They were also compared with 750 consecutive pregnancies in women 25-34 years of age, in whom all heritable diseases were excluded (group C). The risk of unbalanced...... with women without elevated risk. Spontaneous abortion rate and prematurity rate did not differ from rates expected without amniocentesis. It is concluded that current indications may be characterized as a mixture of evident high risk factors and factors with only a minor influence on risk. Indications...

  11. Morphological images analysis and chromosomic aberrations classification based on fuzzy logic; Analise morfologica de imagens e classificacao de aberracoes cromossomicas por meio de logica fuzzy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, Leonardo Peres

    2011-07-01

    This work has implemented a methodology for automation of images analysis of chromosomes of human cells irradiated at IEA-R1 nuclear reactor (located at IPEN, Sao Paulo, Brazil), and therefore subject to morphological aberrations. This methodology intends to be a tool for helping cytogeneticists on identification, characterization and classification of chromosomal metaphasic analysis. The methodology development has included the creation of a software application based on artificial intelligence techniques using Fuzzy Logic combined with image processing techniques. The developed application was named CHRIMAN and is composed of modules that contain the methodological steps which are important requirements in order to achieve an automated analysis. The first step is the standardization of the bi-dimensional digital image acquisition procedure through coupling a simple digital camera to the ocular of the conventional metaphasic analysis microscope. Second step is related to the image treatment achieved through digital filters application; storing and organization of information obtained both from image content itself, and from selected extracted features, for further use on pattern recognition algorithms. The third step consists on characterizing, counting and classification of stored digital images and extracted features information. The accuracy in the recognition of chromosome images is 93.9%. This classification is based on classical standards obtained at Buckton [1973], and enables support to geneticist on chromosomic analysis procedure, decreasing analysis time, and creating conditions to include this method on a broader evaluation system on human cell damage due to ionizing radiation exposure. (author)

  12. New image analysis methods for 3D visualization and assessment of mapping distance for chromosomes in interphase nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikizyan, I.; Burde, S.; Leary, J.F. (Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States))

    1993-01-01

    Confocal microscopy (Meridian Instruments, Inc.) images of interphase nuclei with portions or entire chromosomes singley- or doubly-labeled by fluorescence in situ hybridization were analyzed with newly-developed software on an 80486 PC equipped with an autostereoscopic display (Dimension Technologies, Inc.). The computer display is hologram-like with the ability to address points in 3D space using the associated mouse. Software was developed which allowed for reduction of background by a 19 voxel (3x3x3 voxel cube without corner voxels) median filtering algorithm followed by rendering of a 3D surface and skeleton figure of a chromosome. Visualization at multiple viewing angles by animation allows approximate coordinate locations to be obtained with a 3D mouse to guide the process thereby reducing significantly the required calculation times. Two biological applications under development include (1) correct counting of a given chromosome's copy number using centromere/chromosome-specific probes, and (2) visualization of painted chromosomes and subregion-specific probes at different locations on that chromosome for physical mapping. In either application, real-world distances within each confocal plane and between planes are calculable to give physical mapping distances in three dimensions and along the chromosome.

  13. A review of metaphase chromosome image selection techniques for automatic karyotype generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Tanvi; Dhir, Renu

    2016-08-01

    The karyotype is analyzed to detect the genetic abnormalities. It is generated by arranging the chromosomes after extracting them from the metaphase chromosome images. The chromosomes are non-rigid bodies that contain the genetic information of an individual. The metaphase chromosome image spread contains the chromosomes, but these chromosomes are not distinct bodies; they can either be individual chromosomes or be touching one another; they may be bent or even may be overlapping and thus forming a cluster of chromosomes. The extraction of chromosomes from these touching and overlapping chromosomes is a very tedious process. The segmentation of a random metaphase chromosome image may not give us correct and accurate results. Therefore, before taking up a metaphase chromosome image for analysis, it must be analyzed for the orientation of the chromosomes it contains. The various reported methods for metaphase chromosome image selection for automatic karyotype generation are compared in this paper. After analysis, it has been concluded that each metaphase chromosome image selection method has its advantages and disadvantages.

  14. Computerized prototypes of DAPI-stained chromosomes for FISH analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baldini, A.; Smith, L.C.; Knapp, R.D. [Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States)

    1994-09-01

    DAPI is fluorescent dye widely used in chromosome counterstaining for fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) experiments. It produces a Q-banding pattern that allows chromosomes to be identified and permits molecular probes to be assigned to specific cytogenetic bands. Using a statistical procedure based on eigenanalysis, we have extracted features from digital images of DAPI-stained chromosomes and constructed prototypes of each of the 24 human chromosomes. The features of prototypes are directly proportional, in intensity profile and band location, to those of real chromosomes. The prototype`s intensity profile can be translated into cytogenetic bands to provide a computer-based strategy for chromosome mapping and analysis amenable to automation. Data have been obtained using images from the 24 human chromosomes and mouse X chromosome. Moreover, the same procedure is general and can be used for the analysis of chromosomes from other species, as well as with banding techniques other than those using DAPI. Images of hybridization patterns produced by complex probes are also suitable for this analysis. The speed and flexibility of the procedure opens the way to application so far unexplored, such as computer-assisted chromosome band assignment of probe; combined analysis of multiple, geometrically distorted chromosomes; and the direct comparison of raw data from different experiments. The applications will not be limited to mapping experiments but will include analysis of chromosome structure, variability and analysis of the pattern of chromosome distribution of repetitive sequences. The results from such analysis is suitable for objective statistical evaluation and, eventually, for autonomous machine interpretation.

  15. Recovery and Visualization of 3D Structure of Chromosomes from Tomographic Reconstruction Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsap Leonid V

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this work include automatic recovery and visualization of a 3D chromosome structure from a sequence of 2D tomographic reconstruction images taken through the nucleus of a cell. Structure is very important for biologists as it affects chromosome functions, behavior of the cell, and its state. Analysis of chromosome structure is significant in the detection of diseases, identification of chromosomal abnormalities, study of DNA structural conformation, in-depth study of chromosomal surface morphology, observation of in vivo behavior of the chromosomes over time, and in monitoring environmental gene mutations. The methodology incorporates thresholding based on a histogram analysis with a polyline splitting algorithm, contour extraction via active contours, and detection of the 3D chromosome structure by establishing corresponding regions throughout the slices. Visualization using point cloud meshing generates a 3D surface. The 3D triangular mesh of the chromosomes provides surface detail and allows a user to interactively analyze chromosomes using visualization software.

  16. Transillumination spatially modulated illumination microscopy for human chromosome imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitris, Costas; Heracleous, Peter; Patsalis, Philippos

    2005-03-01

    Human chromosome analysis is an essential task in cytogenetics, especially in prenatal screening, genetic syndrome diagnosis, cancer pathology research and mutagen dosimetry. Chromosomal analysis begins with the creation of a karyotype, which is a layout of chromosome images organized by decreasing size in pairs. Both manual and automatic classification of chromosomes are limited by the resolution of the microscope and imaging system used. One way to improve the results of classification and even detect subtleties now remaining undetected, is to enhance the resolution of the images. It is possible to achieve lateral resolution beyond the classical limit, by using spatially modulated illumination (SMI) in a wide-field, non-confocal microscope. In this case, the sample is illuminated with spatially modulated light, which makes normally inaccessible high-resolution information visible in the observed image by shifting higher frequencies within the OTF limits of the microscope. Although, SMI microscopes have been reported in the past, this manuscript reports the development of a transillumination microscope for opaque, non-fluorescent samples. The illumination path consisted of a light source illuminating a ruled grating which was subsequently imaged on the sample. The grating was mounted on a rotating and translating stage so that the magnification and rotation of the pattern could be adjusted. The imaging lens was a 1.25 NA oil immersion objective. Test samples showed resolution improvement, as judged from a comparison of the experimentally obtained FWHM. Further studies using smaller fringe distance or laser interference pattern illumination will be evaluated to further optimize the SMI results.

  17. [DNA image-fluorimetry of individual human chromosomes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agafonova, N A; Sakuta, G A; Rozanov, Iu M; Shteĭn, G I; Kudriavtsev, B N

    2013-01-01

    Mucrofluorimetric method for the determination of DNA content in individual human chromosomes has been developed. The method is based on a preliminary identification of chromosomes with Hoechst 33258, followed by staining of the chromosomes with Feulgen reaction using Schiffs reagent type ethidium bromide-SO2, then measuring the fluorescence intensity of the chromosomes using an image analyzer. The method allows to determine the DNA content of individual chromosomes with accuracy up to 4.5 fg. DNA content of individual human chromosomes, their p-and q-arms as well as homologous chromosomes were measured using the developed method. It has been shown that the DNA content in the chromosomes of normal human karyotype is unstable. Fluctuations in the DNA content in some chromosomes can vary 35-40 fg.

  18. Chromosome analysis of arsenic affected cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Shekhar

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim was to study the chromosome analysis of arsenic affected cattle. Materials and Methods: 27 female cattle (21 arsenic affected and 6 normal were selected for cytogenetical study. The blood samples were collected, incubated, and cultured using appropriate media and specific methods. The samples were analyzed for chromosome number and morphology, relative length of the chromosome, arm ratio, and centromere index of X chromosome and chromosomal abnormalities in arsenic affected cattle to that of normal ones. Results: The diploid number of metaphase chromosomes in arsenic affected cattle as well as in normal cattle were all 2n=60, 58 being autosomes and 2 being sex chromosomes. From the centromeric position, karyotyping studies revealed that all the 29 pair of autosomes was found to be acrocentric or telocentric, and the sex chromosomes (XX were submetacentric in both normal and arsenic affected cattle. The relative length of all the autosome pairs and sex chrosomosome pair was found to be higher in normal than that of arsenic affected cattle. The mean arm ratio of X-chromosome was higher in normal than that of arsenic affected cattle, but it is reverse in case of centromere index value of X-chromosome. There was no significant difference of arm ratio and centromere index of X-chromosomes between arsenic affected and normal cattle. No chromosomal abnormalities were found in arsenic affected cattle. Conclusion: The chromosome analysis of arsenic affected cattle in West Bengal reported for the first time in this present study which may serve as a guideline for future studies in other species. These reference values will also help in comparison of cytological studies of arsenic affected cattle to that of various toxicants.

  19. Inherited unbalanced structural chromosome abnormalities at prenatal chromosome analysis are rarely ascertained through recurrent miscarriage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franssen, M. T. M.; Korevaar, J. C.; Tjoa, W. M.; Leschot, N. J.; Bossuyt, P. M. M.; Knegt, A. C.; Suykerbuyk, R. F.; Hochstenbach, R.; van der Veen, F.; Goddijn, M.

    2008-01-01

    Objective To determine the mode of ascertainment of inherited unbalanced structural chromosome abnormalities detected at prenatal chromosome analysis. Methods From the databases of three centres for clinical genetics in the Netherlands, all cases of inherited unbalanced structural chromosome abnorma

  20. Analysis of plant meiotic chromosomes by chromosome painting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lysak, Martin A; Mandáková, Terezie

    2013-01-01

    Chromosome painting (CP) refers to visualization of large chromosome regions, entire chromosome arms, or entire chromosomes via fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). For CP in plants, contigs of chromosome-specific bacterial artificial chromosomes (BAC) from the target species or from a closely related species (comparative chromosome painting, CCP) are typically applied as painting probes. Extended pachytene chromosomes provide the highest resolution of CP in plants. CP enables identification and tracing of particular chromosome regions and/or entire chromosomes throughout all meiotic stages as well as corresponding chromosome territories in premeiotic interphase nuclei. Meiotic pairing and structural chromosome rearrangements (typically inversions and translocations) can be identified by CP. Here, we describe step-by-step protocols of CP and CCP in plant species including chromosome preparation, BAC DNA labeling, and multicolor FISH.

  1. Foundations of identifying individual chromosomes by imaging flow cytometry with applications in radiation biodosimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaton-Green, Lindsay A; Rodrigues, Matthew A; Lachapelle, Sylvie; Wilkins, Ruth C

    2017-01-01

    Biodosimetry is an important tool for triage in the case of large-scale radiological or nuclear emergencies, but traditional microscope-based methods can be tedious and prone to scorer fatigue. While the dicentric chromosome assay (DCA) has been adapted for use in triage situations, it is still time-consuming to create and score slides. Recent adaptations of traditional biodosimetry assays to imaging flow cytometry (IFC) methods have dramatically increased throughput. Additionally, recent improvements in image analysis algorithms in the IFC software have resulted in improved specificity for spot counting of small events. In the IFC method for the dicentric chromosome analysis (FDCA), lymphocytes isolated from whole blood samples are cultured with PHA and Colcemid. After incubation, lymphocytes are treated with a hypotonic solution and chromosomes are isolated in suspension, labelled with a centromere marker and stained for DNA content with DRAQ5. Stained individual chromosomes are analyzed on the ImageStream®(X) (EMD-Millipore, Billerica, MA) and mono- and dicentric chromosome populations are identified and enumerated using advanced image processing techniques. Both the preparation of the isolated chromosome suspensions as well as the image analysis methods were fine-tuned in order to optimize the FDCA. In this paper we describe the method to identify and score centromeres in individual chromosomes by IFC and show that the FDCA method may further improve throughput for triage biodosimetry in the case of large-scale radiological or nuclear emergencies.

  2. Recovery and Visualization of 3D Structure of Chromosomes from Tomographic Reconstruction Images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Babu, S; Liao, P; Shin, M C; Tsap, L V

    2004-04-28

    The objectives of this work include automatic recovery and visualization of a 3D chromosome structure from a sequence of 2D tomographic reconstruction images taken through the nucleus of a cell. Structure is very important for biologists as it affects chromosome functions, behavior of the cell and its state. Chromosome analysis is significant in the detection of deceases and in monitoring environmental gene mutations. The algorithm incorporates thresholding based on a histogram analysis with a polyline splitting algorithm, contour extraction via active contours, and detection of the 3D chromosome structure by establishing corresponding regions throughout the slices. Visualization using point cloud meshing generates a 3D surface. The 3D triangular mesh of the chromosomes provides surface detail and allows a user to interactively analyze chromosomes using visualization software.

  3. IMACULAT - an open access package for the quantitative analysis of chromosome localization in the nucleus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ishita Mehta

    Full Text Available The alteration in the location of the chromosomes within the nucleus upon action of internal or external stimuli has been implicated in altering genome function. The effect of stimuli at a whole genome level is studied by using two-dimensional fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH to delineate whole chromosome territories within a cell nucleus, followed by a quantitative analysis of the spatial distribution of the chromosome. However, to the best of our knowledge, open access software capable of quantifying spatial distribution of whole chromosomes within cell nucleus is not available. In the current work, we present a software package that computes localization of whole chromosomes - Image Analysis of Chromosomes for computing localization (IMACULAT. We partition the nucleus into concentric elliptical compartments of equal area and the variance in the quantity of any chromosome in these shells is used to determine its localization in the nucleus. The images are pre-processed to remove the smudges outside the cell boundary. Automation allows high throughput analysis for deriving statistics. Proliferating normal human dermal fibroblasts were subjected to standard a two-dimensional FISH to delineate territories for all human chromosomes. Approximately 100 images from each chromosome were analyzed using IMACULAT. The analysis corroborated that these chromosome territories have non-random gene density based organization within the interphase nuclei of human fibroblasts. The ImageMagick Perl API has been used for pre-processing the images. The source code is made available at www.sanchak.com/imaculat.html.

  4. Chromosome-specific segmentation revealed by structural analysis of individually isolated chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitada, Kunio; Taima, Akira; Ogasawara, Kiyomoto; Metsugi, Shouichi; Aikawa, Satoko

    2011-04-01

    Analysis of structural rearrangements at the individual chromosomal level is still technologically challenging. Here we optimized a chromosome isolation method using fluorescent marker-assisted laser-capture and laser-beam microdissection and applied it to structural analysis of two aberrant chromosomes found in a lung cancer cell line. A high-density array-comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH) analysis of DNA samples prepared from each of the chromosomes revealed that these two chromosomes contained 296 and 263 segments, respectively, ranging from 1.5 kb to 784.3 kb in size, derived from different portions of chromosome 8. Among these segments, 242 were common in both aberrant chromosomes, but 75 were found to be chromosome-specific. Sequences of 263 junction sites connecting the ends of segments were determined using a PCR/Sanger-sequencing procedure. Overlapping microhomologies were found at 169 junction sites. Junction partners came from various portions of chromosome 8 and no biased pattern in the positional distribution of junction partners was detected. These structural characteristics suggested the occurrence of random fragmentation of the entire chromosome 8 followed by random rejoining of these fragments. Based on that, we proposed a model to explain how these aberrant chromosomes are formed. Through these structural analyses, it was demonstrated that the optimized chromosome isolation method described here can provide high-quality chromosomal DNA for high resolution array-CGH analysis and probably for massively parallel sequencing analysis.

  5. Chromosome analysis and sorting using flow cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doležel, Jaroslav; Kubaláková, Marie; Cíhalíková, Jarmila; Suchánková, Pavla; Simková, Hana

    2011-01-01

    Chromosome analysis and sorting using flow cytometry (flow cytogenetics) is an attractive tool for fractionating plant genomes to small parts. The reduction of complexity greatly simplifies genetics and genomics in plant species with large genomes. However, as flow cytometry requires liquid suspensions of particles, the lack of suitable protocols for preparation of solutions of intact chromosomes delayed the application of flow cytogenetics in plants. This chapter outlines a high-yielding procedure for preparation of solutions of intact mitotic chromosomes from root tips of young seedlings and for their analysis using flow cytometry and sorting. Root tips accumulated at metaphase are mildly fixed with formaldehyde, and solutions of intact chromosomes are prepared by mechanical homogenization. The advantages of the present approach include the use of seedlings, which are easy to handle, and the karyological stability of root meristems, which can be induced to high degree of metaphase synchrony. Chromosomes isolated according to this protocol have well-preserved morphology, withstand shearing forces during sorting, and their DNA is intact and suitable for a range of applications.

  6. Multimodality hard-x-ray imaging of a chromosome with nanoscale spatial resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Hanfei; Nazaretski, Evgeny; Lauer, Kenneth; Huang, Xiaojing; Wagner, Ulrich; Rau, Christoph; Yusuf, Mohammed; Robinson, Ian; Kalbfleisch, Sebastian; Li, Li; Bouet, Nathalie; Zhou, Juan; Conley, Ray; Chu, Yong S.

    2016-02-01

    We developed a scanning hard x-ray microscope using a new class of x-ray nano-focusing optic called a multilayer Laue lens and imaged a chromosome with nanoscale spatial resolution. The combination of the hard x-ray’s superior penetration power, high sensitivity to elemental composition, high spatial-resolution and quantitative analysis creates a unique tool with capabilities that other microscopy techniques cannot provide. Using this microscope, we simultaneously obtained absorption-, phase-, and fluorescence-contrast images of Pt-stained human chromosome samples. The high spatial-resolution of the microscope and its multi-modality imaging capabilities enabled us to observe the internal ultra-structures of a thick chromosome without sectioning it.

  7. DETECTION OF CHROMOSOME ABERRATIONS IN TWELVE PRIMARY GASTRIC CANCERS BY DIRECT CHROMOSOME ANALYSIS AND FISH

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    Direct chromosome analysis and FISH were performed on twelve primary gastric carcinomas. Two of them had simple chromosome changes: 48,XX, +8, +20, and 49, XY, +2, +8, +9, and the others had complicated chromosome changes, which includes much more numerical and structural chromosome aberrations. Frequent structural changes in the complicated types involved chromosome 7, 3, 1, 5 and 12 etc. The del 7q was noted in eight cases. The del (3p) and del (1p) were noted in six and five cases, respectively. The results provide some important clues for isolation of the genes related to gastric cancer.

  8. Image Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    The 19th Scandinavian Conference on Image Analysis was held at the IT University of Copenhagen in Denmark during June 15-17, 2015. The SCIA conference series has been an ongoing biannual event for more than 30 years and over the years it has nurtured a world-class regional research and development....... The topics of the accepted papers range from novel applications of vision systems, pattern recognition, machine learning, feature extraction, segmentation, 3D vision, to medical and biomedical image analysis. The papers originate from all the Scandinavian countries and several other European countries...

  9. Chromosome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chromosomes are structures found in the center (nucleus) of cells that carry long pieces of DNA. DNA ... is the building block of the human body. Chromosomes also contain proteins that help DNA exist in ...

  10. Chromosomes in the flow to simplify genome analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doležel, Jaroslav; Vrána, Jan; Safář, Jan; Bartoš, Jan; Kubaláková, Marie; Simková, Hana

    2012-08-01

    Nuclear genomes of human, animals, and plants are organized into subunits called chromosomes. When isolated into aqueous suspension, mitotic chromosomes can be classified using flow cytometry according to light scatter and fluorescence parameters. Chromosomes of interest can be purified by flow sorting if they can be resolved from other chromosomes in a karyotype. The analysis and sorting are carried out at rates of 10(2)-10(4) chromosomes per second, and for complex genomes such as wheat the flow sorting technology has been ground-breaking in reducing genome complexity for genome sequencing. The high sample rate provides an attractive approach for karyotype analysis (flow karyotyping) and the purification of chromosomes in large numbers. In characterizing the chromosome complement of an organism, the high number that can be studied using flow cytometry allows for a statistically accurate analysis. Chromosome sorting plays a particularly important role in the analysis of nuclear genome structure and the analysis of particular and aberrant chromosomes. Other attractive but not well-explored features include the analysis of chromosomal proteins, chromosome ultrastructure, and high-resolution mapping using FISH. Recent results demonstrate that chromosome flow sorting can be coupled seamlessly with DNA array and next-generation sequencing technologies for high-throughput analyses. The main advantages are targeting the analysis to a genome region of interest and a significant reduction in sample complexity. As flow sorters can also sort single copies of chromosomes, shotgun sequencing DNA amplified from them enables the production of haplotype-resolved genome sequences. This review explains the principles of flow cytometric chromosome analysis and sorting (flow cytogenetics), discusses the major uses of this technology in genome analysis, and outlines future directions.

  11. Chromosome analysis of three species of Myoxidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Vittoria Civitelli

    1995-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Karyotype analysis was carried out on three species of dormice: Myoxus glis, 4 populations from Northern and Southern Italy and from Turkey; Dryomys nitedula, 4 populations from Northern and Southern Italy, from Israel and from Turkey; Myomimus roachi, 1 specimen from Turkey. Myoxus glis shows 2n=62; comparison of our specimens from different localities shows complete correspondence between karyotypes, both for the autosomes and the heterochromosomes. Dryomys nitedula shows 2n=48. All populations we studied, show the same karyotypic pattern, except for the NOR-bearing chromosomes. Myomimus roachi, here studied for the first time, shows 2n=44. All the autosomes are biarmed of decreasing size. The X-chromosome is a medium size metacentric, while the Y-chromosome is the smallest one. All the three species we studied, show one pair of NOR-bearing chromosomes, Ag-NORs always correspond to the secondary constriction. Differences in the fundamental number and in heterochromosome morphology, have been observed by other authors, in different European populations. This variability is analysed and discussed. Riassunto Analisi cromosomica in tre specie di Myoxidae - L'analisi cromosomica è stata condotta su popolazioni europee di tre specie di Myoxidae: Myoxus glis, 4 popolazioni provenienti dal Nord e Sud Italia, e dalla Turchia; Dryomys nitedula, 4 popolazioni provenienti dal Nord e Sud Italia, da Israele e dalla Turchia; Myomimus roachi, 1 esemplare, proveniente dalla Turchia. Myoxus glis presenta 2n=62. Gli esemplari, provenienti dalle diverse popolazioni, mostrano corrispondenza nella morfologia sia degli autosomi che degli eterocromosomi. Dryomys nitedula presenta 2n=48. La morfologia dei cromosomi nei cariotipi appare corrispondente mentre diversa è la localizzazione degli Ag-NOR.

  12. Cytogenetic analysis of chromosomal abnormalities in Sri Lankan children

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Colombo; Sri Lanka

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cytogenetic analysis is a valuable investigation in the diagnostic work up of children with suspected chromosomal disorders. The objective of this study was to describe the prevalence of various types of chromosomal abnormalities in Sri Lankan children undergoing cytogenetic analysis. Methods: Cytogenetic reports of 1554 consecutive children with suspected chromosomal disorders who underwent karyotyping in two genetic centers in Sri Lanka from January 2006 to December 2011 were reviewed retrospectively. Results: A total of 1548 children were successfully karyotyped. Abnormal karyotypes were found in 783 (50.6%) children. Numerical and structural abnormalities accounted for 90.8% and 9.2%, respectively. Down syndrome was the commonest aneuploidy identifi ed. Other various autosomal and sex chromosomal aneuploidies as well as micro-deletion syndromes were also detected. Conclusions: The prevalence of chromosomal abnormalities in Sri Lankan children undergoing cytogenetic analysis for suspected chromosomal disorders was relatively higher than that in Caucasian and other Asian populations.

  13. Uniparental disomy analysis in carriers of balanced chromosome rearrangements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    May, K.M.; Pettay, D.; Muralidharan, K. [Emory Univ. School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Although most individuals who carry a balanced familial chromosome rearrangement are phenotypically normal, those who are clinically abnormal raise the question of whether or not the rearrangement plays a causative role. One possible mechanism involves meiotic segregation of a normal homolog along with the rearranged chromosome(s) such that a trisomic conception occurs. Subsequent loss by mitotic nondisjunction of the structurally normal chromosome contributed by the non-carrier parent would then result in uniparental disomy (UPD) in a conceptus carrying a balanced rearrangement. UPD for chromosomes 14 and 15 has been demonstrated in several clinically abnormal individuals who carry a familial Robertsonian translocation. We have extended this type of analysis to include other forms of balanced chromosome rearrangements. We report the results of UPD analysis of 14 families who have a phenotypically abnormal child with an apparently balanced rearrangement. The series includes 4 reciprocal translocations, 4 Robertsonian translocations, 2 X;autosome translocations, and 4 inversions. High resolution chromosomes were used to compare breakpoints between parent and offspring to exclude the possibility of further rearrangements. Parental origin of the chromosome(s) involved was determined by DNA polymorphism analysis using PCR or Southern blotting techniques. We found no evidence of UPD in any of the 14 cases. Our data suggest that UPD is not a common explanation for phenotypically abnormal carriers of balanced chromosome rearrangements.

  14. Cytogenetic Analysis for Suspected Chromosomal Abnormalities; A Five Years Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karra, Vijay Kumar; Jindal, Ankur; Puppala, Madhavi; Singh, Pratiksha; Rawat, Kanchan; Kapoor, Seema

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Chromosomal abnormalities are the results of alterations in the number or structure of chromosomes causing significant human morbidity and mortality. They are responsible for a large proportion of miscarriages, developmental delay, disorders of sexual development, congenital malformations and mental retardation. Aim The aim of this study was to describe the prevalence of different chromosomal abnormalities in North Indian patients referred for cytogenetic analysis. Materials and Methods Total of 859 patients ranging from newborn to 37 years of age were referred to the division of genetics, Department of Paediatrics between 2010 and 2015, with a variety of clinical disorders; Down syndrome (DS), Turner’s syndrome (TS) and Klinefelter syndrome; amenorrhea; ambiguous sex and multiple congenital malformations. Chromosomal analysis was performed on lymphocyte culture according to standard methods. Results Of the 859 cases studied, 371 (43.1%) had chromosomal abnormalities. The most common autosomal abnormalities were DS 302 (81.4%) and sex chromosomal abnormalities were TS 51 (13.7%). Numerical abnormalities were accounted for 353 (41.0%) and structural abnormalities 18 (2.0%), respectively. Various other chromosomal anomalies were also reported. Conclusion We have reviewed the incidence and distribution of chromosomal abnormalities and found higher rate of chromosomal abnormalities 43.1% in the referred cases. Our data suggest that chromosomal analysis is important tool in the evaluation of genetic disorders and helps clinicians to provide accurate diagnosis and proper genetic counselling. PMID:27790464

  15. Techniques for imaging human metaphase chromosomes in liquid conditions by atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ushiki, Tatsuo; Shigeno, Masatsugu; Hoshi, Osamu

    2008-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to obtain three-dimensional images of wet chromosomes by atomic force microscopy (AFM) in liquid conditions. Human metaphase chromosomes—obtained either by chromosome spreads or by an isolation technique—were observed in a dynamic mode by AFM in a buffer solution. Under suitable operating conditions with a soft triangular cantilever (with the spring constant of 0.08-0.4 N m-1), clear images of fixed chromosomes in the chromosome spread were obtained by AFM. For imaging isolated chromosomes with the height of more than 400 nm, a cantilever with a high aspect ratio probing tip was required. The combination of a Q-control system and the sampling intelligent scan (SIS) system in dynamic force mode AFM was useful for obtaining high-quality images of the isolated chromosomes, in which globular or cord-like structures about 50 nm thick were clearly observed on the surface of each chromatid.

  16. The DNA sequence, annotation and analysis of human chromosome 3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muzny, Donna M; Scherer, Steven E; Kaul, Rajinder

    2006-01-01

    After the completion of a draft human genome sequence, the International Human Genome Sequencing Consortium has proceeded to finish and annotate each of the 24 chromosomes comprising the human genome. Here we describe the sequencing and analysis of human chromosome 3, one of the largest human chr...

  17. Should the indications for prenatal chromosome analysis be changed?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Philip, J; Bang, J; Madsen, Mette

    1977-01-01

    Amniocentesis for chromosome analysis was performed in 1086 pergnant women, 739 of whom had an increased risk of giving birth to a child with chromosome abnormalities. Such abnormalities were found in almost identical proportions among the fetuses with an increased risk (1.2%) and among those...

  18. Quickscan dicentric chromosome analysis for radiation biodosimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flegal, F N; Devantier, Y; McNamee, J P; Wilkins, R C

    2010-02-01

    The dicentric chromosome assay (DCA) is the gold-standard assay for accurately estimating unknown radiological doses to individuals following radiological or nuclear accidents. However in a mass-casualty scenario, this assay is not well suited for providing timely dose estimates due to its time- and expertise-intensive nature. In Canada, two approaches are being developed in an attempt to increase triage-quality biological dosimetry throughput. These are 1) increasing the number of trained personnel capable of conducting the DCA, and 2) evaluating alternative biodosimetry approaches or DCA variations. In a recent exercise, a new scoring technique (termed DCA QuickScan) was evaluated as an alternative rapid-scoring approach. Triage-quality conventional DCA and DCA QuickScan analysis were based upon scoring a minimum of 50 metaphase cells or 30 dicentrics by 9-15 scorers across four laboratories. Dose estimates for the conventional DCA were found to be within 0.5 Gy of the actual dose for 83% of the unknown samples, while DCA QuickScan dose estimates were within 0.5 Gy for 80% of the samples. Of the dose estimates falling 0.5 Gy or more outside the actual dose, the majority were dose over-estimates. It was concluded that the DCA QuickScan approach can provide critical dose information at a much faster rate than the conventional DCA without sacrificing accuracy. Future studies will further evaluate the accuracy of the DCA QuickScan method.

  19. Spinal imaging and image analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Yao, Jianhua

    2015-01-01

    This book is instrumental to building a bridge between scientists and clinicians in the field of spine imaging by introducing state-of-the-art computational methods in the context of clinical applications.  Spine imaging via computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and other radiologic imaging modalities, is essential for noninvasively visualizing and assessing spinal pathology. Computational methods support and enhance the physician’s ability to utilize these imaging techniques for diagnosis, non-invasive treatment, and intervention in clinical practice. Chapters cover a broad range of topics encompassing radiological imaging modalities, clinical imaging applications for common spine diseases, image processing, computer-aided diagnosis, quantitative analysis, data reconstruction and visualization, statistical modeling, image-guided spine intervention, and robotic surgery. This volume serves a broad audience as  contributions were written by both clinicians and researchers, which reflects the inte...

  20. Interlaboratory comparison of dicentric chromosome assay using electronically transmitted images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, O; Di Giorgio, M; Vallerga, M B; Radl, A; Taja, M R; Seoane, A; De Luca, J; Stuck Oliveira, M; Valdivia, P; Lamadrid, A I; González, J E; Romero, I; Mandina, T; Pantelias, G; Terzoudi, G; Guerrero-Carbajal, C; Arceo Maldonado, C; Espinoza, M; Oliveros, N; Martínez-López, W; Di Tomaso, M V; Méndez-Acuña, L; Puig, R; Roy, L; Barquinero, J F

    2013-04-01

    The bottleneck in data acquisition during biological dosimetry based on a dicentric assay is the need to score dicentrics in a large number of lymphocytes. One way to increase the capacity of a given laboratory is to use the ability of skilled operators from other laboratories. This can be done using image analysis systems and distributing images all around the world. Two exercises were conducted to test the efficiency of such an approach involving 10 laboratories. During the first exercise (E1), the participant laboratories analysed the same images derived from cells exposed to 0.5 and 3 Gy; 100 images were sent to all participants for both doses. Whatever the dose, only about half of the cells were complete with well-spread metaphases suitable for analysis. A coefficient of variation (CV) on the standard deviation of ∼15 % was obtained for both doses. The trueness was better for 3 Gy (0.6 %) than for 0.5 Gy (37.8 %). The number of estimated doses classified as satisfactory according to the z-score was 3 at 0.5 Gy and 8 at 3 Gy for 10 dose estimations. In the second exercise, an emergency situation was tested, each laboratory was required to score a different set of 50 images in 2 d extracted from 500 downloaded images derived from cells exposed to 0.5 Gy. Then the remaining 450 images had to be scored within a week. Using 50 different images, the CV on the estimated doses (79.2 %) was not as good as in E1, probably associated to a lower number of cells analysed (50 vs. 100) or from the fact that laboratories analysed a different set of images. The trueness for the dose was better after scoring 500 cells (22.5 %) than after 50 cells (26.8 %). For the 10 dose estimations, the number of doses classified as satisfactory according to the z-score was 9, for both 50 and 500 cells. Overall, the results obtained support the feasibility of networking using electronically transmitted images. However, before its implementation some issues should be elucidated, such as the

  1. "Chromosome": a knowledge-based system for the chromosome classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramstein, G; Bernadet, M

    1993-01-01

    Chromosome, a knowledge-based analysis system has been designed for the classification of human chromosomes. Its aim is to perform an optimal classification by driving a tool box containing the procedures of image processing, pattern recognition and classification. This paper presents the general architecture of Chromosome, based on a multiagent system generator. The image processing tool box is described from the met aphasic enhancement to the fine classification. Emphasis is then put on the knowledge base intended for the chromosome recognition. The global classification process is also presented, showing how Chromosome proceeds to classify a given chromosome. Finally, we discuss further extensions of the system for the karyotype building.

  2. Human oocyte chromosome analysis: complicated cases and major pitfalls

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Bernd Rosenbusch; Michael Schneider; Hans Wilhelm Michelmann

    2008-08-01

    Human oocytes that remained unfertilized in programmes of assisted reproduction have been analysed cytogenetically for more than 20 years to assess the incidence of aneuploidy in female gametes. However, the results obtained so far are not indisputable as a consequence of difficulties in evaluating oocyte chromosome preparations. Because of the lack of guidelines, we decided to summarize for the first time, the possible pitfalls in human oocyte chromosome analysis. Therefore, we screened the material from our previous studies and compiled representative, complicated cases with recommendations for their cytogenetic classification. We point out that maturity and size of the oocyte are important parameters and that fixation artefacts, as well as the particular structure of oocyte chromosomes, may predispose one to misinterpretations. Moreover, phenomena related to oocyte activation and fertilization are illustrated and explained. This compilation may help to avoid major problems in future studies and contribute to a more precise, and uniform assessment of human oocyte chromosomes.

  3. Retinal imaging and image analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abramoff, M.D.; Garvin, Mona K.; Sonka, Milan

    2010-01-01

    Many important eye diseases as well as systemic diseases manifest themselves in the retina. While a number of other anatomical structures contribute to the process of vision, this review focuses on retinal imaging and image analysis. Following a brief overview of the most prevalent causes of blindne

  4. The use of DAPI fluorescence lifetime imaging for investigating chromatin condensation in human chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estandarte, Ana Katrina; Botchway, Stanley; Lynch, Christophe; Yusuf, Mohammed; Robinson, Ian

    2016-08-16

    Chromatin undergoes dramatic condensation and decondensation as cells transition between the different phases of the cell cycle. The organization of chromatin in chromosomes is still one of the key challenges in structural biology. Fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM), a technique which utilizes a fluorophore's fluorescence lifetime to probe changes in its environment, was used to investigate variations in chromatin compaction in fixed human chromosomes. Fixed human metaphase and interphase chromosomes were labeled with the DNA minor groove binder, DAPI, followed by measurement and imaging of the fluorescence lifetime using multiphoton excitation. DAPI lifetime variations in metaphase chromosome spreads allowed mapping of the differentially compacted regions of chromatin along the length of the chromosomes. The heteromorphic regions of chromosomes 1, 9, 15, 16, and Y, which consist of highly condensed constitutive heterochromatin, showed statistically significant shorter DAPI lifetime values than the rest of the chromosomes. Differences in the DAPI lifetimes for the heteromorphic regions suggest differences in the structures of these regions. DAPI lifetime variations across interphase nuclei showed variation in chromatin compaction in interphase and the formation of chromosome territories. The successful probing of differences in chromatin compaction suggests that FLIM has enormous potential for application in structural and diagnostic studies.

  5. Genomic analysis of plant chromosomes based on meiotic pairing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisete Chamma Davide

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available This review presents the principles and applications of classical genomic analysis, with emphasis on plant breeding. The main mathematical models used to estimate the preferential chromosome pairing in diploid or polyploid, interspecific or intergenera hybrids are presented and discussed, with special reference to the applications and studies for the definition of genome relationships among species of the Poaceae family.

  6. Comparative analysis of clastogen-induced chromosome aberrations observed with light microscopy and by means of atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koleva, Vanya Petrova; Dragoeva, Asya Pencheva; Andreeva, Andreana Ivanova; Burova, Marina Todorova; Georgiev, Sevdalin; Enchev, Dobromir Dimitrov

    2013-04-30

    Different types of chromosome aberration were observed in mouse bone-marrow cells after treatment with 4-bromo-N,N-diethyl-5,5-dimethyl-2,5-dihydro-1,2-oxaphosphol-2-amine 2-oxide (Br-oxaphosphole, Br-oxph) in a previous study. The aim of the present study is to perform a comparative analysis of these chromosomal damages observed with light microscopy (LM) and by means of atomic force microscopy (AFM). The kinds of aberrations scored by LM were substantially corrected by images at the ultrastructural level. The AFM analysis excluded 29.0% of gaps and 33.3% of fusion-type aberrations. On the other hand, AFM revealed the presence of aberrations that were not visible under the LM. This indicates that only AFM images would provide precise information about the real nature of chromosomal damages. The results of our study revealed that the 'real gaps' represented about 50% of all the gaps visible under LM. Excluded 'false gaps' were detected via AFM as breaks or decondensed chromosome regions. These results would support the statement that gaps must be included when testing genotoxicity. The ultrastructural analysis also confirmed the validity of using LM in the mouse bone-marrow chromosome aberration test, as a tool for detecting genotoxicity of chemicals in routine studies. When there is a need for precise evaluation of chromosome damage, only AFM images can provide information on specific genotoxic effects.

  7. Color Medical Image Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Schaefer, Gerald

    2013-01-01

    Since the early 20th century, medical imaging has been dominated by monochrome imaging modalities such as x-ray, computed tomography, ultrasound, and magnetic resonance imaging. As a result, color information has been overlooked in medical image analysis applications. Recently, various medical imaging modalities that involve color information have been introduced. These include cervicography, dermoscopy, fundus photography, gastrointestinal endoscopy, microscopy, and wound photography. However, in comparison to monochrome images, the analysis of color images is a relatively unexplored area. The multivariate nature of color image data presents new challenges for researchers and practitioners as the numerous methods developed for monochrome images are often not directly applicable to multichannel images. The goal of this volume is to summarize the state-of-the-art in the utilization of color information in medical image analysis.

  8. Morphological image analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Michielsen, K.; Raedt, H. De; Kawakatsu, T.

    2000-01-01

    We describe a morphological image analysis method to characterize images in terms of geometry and topology. We present a method to compute the morphological properties of the objects building up the image and apply the method to triply periodic minimal surfaces and to images taken from polymer chemi

  9. Morphological image analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Michielsen, K; De Raedt, H; Kawakatsu, T; Landau, DP; Lewis, SP; Schuttler, HB

    2001-01-01

    We describe a morphological image analysis method to characterize images in terms of geometry and topology. We present a method to compute the morphological properties of the objects building up the image and apply the method to triply periodic minimal surfaces and to images taken from polymer chemi

  10. Major factors influencing linkage disequilibrium by analysis of different chromosome regions in distinct populations: demography, chromosome recombination frequency and selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavattari, P; Deidda, E; Whalen, M; Lampis, R; Mulargia, A; Loddo, M; Eaves, I; Mastio, G; Todd, J A; Cucca, F

    2000-12-12

    Linkage disequilibrium (LD) mapping of disease genes is complicated by population- and chromosome-region-specific factors. We have analysed demographic factors by contrasting intermarker LD results obtained in a large cosmopolitan population (UK), a large genetic isolate (Sardinia) and a subisolate (village of Gavoi) for two regions of the X chromosome. A dramatic increase of LD was found in the subisolate. Demographic history of populations therefore influences LD. Chromosome-region-specific effects, namely the pattern and frequency of homologous recombination, were next delineated by the analysis of chromosome 6p21, including the HLA region. Patterns of global LD in this region were very similar in the UK and Sardinian populations despite their entirely distinct demographies, and correlate well with the pattern of recombinations. Nevertheless, haplotypes extend across recombination hot spots indicative of selection of certain haplotypes. Subisolate aside, chromosome-region-specific differences in LD patterns appear to be more important than the differences in intermarker LD between distinct populations.

  11. Construction of BAC-based physical map and analysis of chromosome rearrangement in Chinese hamster ovary cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yihua; Kimura, Shuichi; Itoi, Takayuki; Honda, Kohsuke; Ohtake, Hisao; Omasa, Takeshi

    2012-06-01

    Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells have frequently been used in biotechnology for many years as a mammalian host cell platform for cloning and expressing genes of interest. A detailed physical chromosomal map of the CHO DG44 cell line was constructed by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) imaging using randomly selected 303 BAC clones as hybridization probes (BAC-FISH). The two longest chromosomes were completely paired chromosomes; other chromosomes were partly deleted or rearranged. The end sequences of 624 BAC clones, including 287 mapped BAC clones, were analyzed and 1,119 informative BAC end sequences were obtained. Among 303 mapped BAC clones, 185 clones were used for BAC-FISH analysis of CHO K1 chromosomes and 94 clones for primary Chinese hamster lung cells. Based on this constructed physical map and end sequences, the chromosome rearrangements between CHO DG44, CHO K1, and primary Chinese hamster cells were investigated. Among 20 CHO chromosomes, eight were conserved without large rearrangement in CHO DG44, CHO K1, and primary Chinese hamster cells. This result suggested that these chromosomes were stable and essential in CHO cells and supposedly conserved in other CHO cell lines.

  12. Comparative analysis by chromosome painting of the sex chromosomes in arvicolid rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acosta, M J; Romero-Fernández, I; Sánchez, A; Marchal, J A

    2011-01-01

    Sex chromosome evolution in mammals has been extensively investigated through chromosome-painting analyses. In some rodent species from the subfamily Arvicolinae the sex chromosomes contain remarkable features such as giant size, a consequence of heterochromatic enlargement, or asynaptic behaviour during male meiosis. Here, we have made a comparative study of the sex chromosomes in 6 arvicolid species using different probes from the X and Y chromosomes of 3 species, in order to gain knowledge about intra- or interspecific preservation of euchromatic regions. Our results clearly reveal poor conservation of the euchromatic region of the Y chromosome within these species, while the euchromatin on the X chromosome is extremely well preserved. Furthermore, we detected no clear correlation between the synaptic/asynaptic behaviour of the sex chromosomes, and the presence or absence of sequence homology within their euchromatic regions. Notably, our study has shown a new relationship between the giant sex chromosomes of 2 species, Microtus agrestis and Microtus cabrerae, that is, both X and Y share a novel region of common sequences in the euchromatin that is not present in the other species analysed. This interspecific euchromatic conservation, limited to the giant sex chromosomes, could point towards a common evolutionary origin for the heterochromatic enlargement process that has characterized the evolution of the sex chromosomes in some arvicolid species.

  13. Automated discrimination of dicentric and monocentric chromosomes by machine learning-based image processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanxin; Knoll, Joan H; Wilkins, Ruth C; Flegal, Farrah N; Rogan, Peter K

    2016-05-01

    Dose from radiation exposure can be estimated from dicentric chromosome (DC) frequencies in metaphase cells of peripheral blood lymphocytes. We automated DC detection by extracting features in Giemsa-stained metaphase chromosome images and classifying objects by machine learning (ML). DC detection involves (i) intensity thresholded segmentation of metaphase objects, (ii) chromosome separation by watershed transformation and elimination of inseparable chromosome clusters, fragments and staining debris using a morphological decision tree filter, (iii) determination of chromosome width and centreline, (iv) derivation of centromere candidates, and (v) distinction of DCs from monocentric chromosomes (MC) by ML. Centromere candidates are inferred from 14 image features input to a Support Vector Machine (SVM). Sixteen features derived from these candidates are then supplied to a Boosting classifier and a second SVM which determines whether a chromosome is either a DC or MC. The SVM was trained with 292 DCs and 3135 MCs, and then tested with cells exposed to either low (1 Gy) or high (2-4 Gy) radiation dose. Results were then compared with those of 3 experts. True positive rates (TPR) and positive predictive values (PPV) were determined for the tuning parameter, σ. At larger σ, PPV decreases and TPR increases. At high dose, for σ = 1.3, TPR = 0.52 and PPV = 0.83, while at σ = 1.6, the TPR = 0.65 and PPV = 0.72. At low dose and σ = 1.3, TPR = 0.67 and PPV = 0.26. The algorithm differentiates DCs from MCs, overlapped chromosomes and other objects with acceptable accuracy over a wide range of radiation exposures.

  14. Mouse Karyotype Obtained by Combining DAPI Staining with Image Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    In this study, mitotic metaphase chromosomes in mouse were identified by a new chromosome fluorescence banding technique combining DAPI staining with image analysis. Clear 4', 6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) multiple bands like G-bands could be produced in mouse. The MetaMorph software was then used to generate linescans of pixel intensity for the banded chromosomes from short arm to long arm. These linescans were sufficient not only to identify each individual chromosome but also analyze the physical sites of bands in chromosome. Based on the results, the clear and accurate karyotype of mouse metaphase chromosomes was established. The technique is therefore considered to be a new method for cytological studies of mouse.

  15. Delimiting the origin of a B chromosome by FISH mapping, chromosome painting and DNA sequence analysis in Astyanax paranae (Teleostei, Characiformes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Duílio M Z de A; Pansonato-Alves, José Carlos; Utsunomia, Ricardo; Araya-Jaime, Cristian; Ruiz-Ruano, Francisco J; Daniel, Sandro Natal; Hashimoto, Diogo Teruo; Oliveira, Cláudio; Camacho, Juan Pedro M; Porto-Foresti, Fábio; Foresti, Fausto

    2014-01-01

    Supernumerary (B) chromosomes have been shown to contain a wide variety of repetitive sequences. For this reason, fluorescent in situ hybridisation (FISH) is a useful tool for ascertaining the origin of these genomic elements, especially when combined with painting from microdissected B chromosomes. In order to investigate the origin of B chromosomes in the fish species Astyanax paranae, these two approaches were used along with PCR amplification of specific DNA sequences obtained from the B chromosomes and its comparison with those residing in the A chromosomes. Remarkably, chromosome painting with the one-arm metacentric B chromosome probe showed hybridization signals on entire B chromosome, while FISH mapping revealed the presence of H1 histone and 18S rDNA genes symmetrically placed in both arms of the B chromosome. These results support the hypothesis that the B chromosome of A. paranae is an isochromosome. Additionally, the chromosome pairs Nos. 2 or 23 are considered the possible B chromosome ancestors since both contain syntenic H1 and 18S rRNA sequences. The analysis of DNA sequence fragments of the histone and rRNA genes obtained from the microdissected B chromosomes showed high similarity with those obtained from 0B individuals, which supports the intraspecific origin of B chromosomes in A. paranae. Finally, the population hereby analysed showed a female-biased B chromosome presence suggesting that B chromosomes in this species could influence sex determinism.

  16. Analysis of chromosome conservation in Lemur catta studied by chromosome paints and BAC/PAC probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardone, Maria Francesca; Ventura, Mario; Tempesta, Sergio; Rocchi, Mariano; Archidiacono, Nicoletta

    2002-12-01

    A panel of human chromosome painting probes and bacterial and P1 artificial chromosome (BAC/PAC) clones were used in fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) experiments to investigate the chromosome conservation of the ring-tailed lemur (Lemur catta, LCA) with respect to human. Whole chromosome paints specific for human chromosomes 7, 9, 11, 13, 14, 17, 18, 20, 21, and X were found to identify a single chromosome or an uninterrupted chromosomal region in LCA. A large set of partial chromosome paints and BAC/PAC probes were then used to refine the characterization of the rearrangements differentiating the two karyotypes. The results were also used to reconstruct the ancestral Lemuridae karyotype. Lemur catta, indeed, can be used as an outgroup, allowing symplesiomorphic (ancestral) rearrangements to be distinguished from apomorphic (derived) rearrangements in lemurs. Some LCA chromosomes are difficult to distinguish morphologically. The 'anchorage' of most LCA chromosomes to specific probes will contribute to the standardization of the karyotype of this species.

  17. In situ hybridization analysis of isodicentric X-chromosomes with short arm fusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, J E; Kølvraa, S; Hertz, Jens Michael;

    1990-01-01

    We present here an alternative approach to the study of mosaic cell lines containing dicentric chromosomes. The approach is based on chromosome-specific non-radioactive in situ hybridization with centromere (alpha satellite DNA) probes. The hybridization analysis may be used as an alternative...... it for the analysis of two cases of isodicentric X-chromosomes. The approach is expected to be generally applicable, so that it may be applied to the scoring of other types of chromosomal mosaicism as well....

  18. High-Throughput Live-Cell Microscopy Analysis of Association Between Chromosome Domains and the Nucleolus in S. cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Renjie; Normand, Christophe; Gadal, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Spatial organization of the genome has important impacts on all aspects of chromosome biology, including transcription, replication, and DNA repair. Frequent interactions of some chromosome domains with specific nuclear compartments, such as the nucleolus, are now well documented using genome-scale methods. However, direct measurement of distance and interaction frequency between loci requires microscopic observation of specific genomic domains and the nucleolus, followed by image analysis to allow quantification. The fluorescent repressor operator system (FROS) is an invaluable method to fluorescently tag DNA sequences and investigate chromosome position and dynamics in living cells. This chapter describes a combination of methods to define motion and region of confinement of a locus relative to the nucleolus in cell's nucleus, from fluorescence acquisition to automated image analysis using two dedicated pipelines.

  19. Molecular-Cytological Identification and Chromosome Behavior Analysis of Telotetrasomic in Rice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GONG Zhi-yun; GAO Qing-song; YU Heng-xiu; YI Chuan-deng; GU Ming-hong

    2008-01-01

    From the progenies of a telotrisomic of chromosome 9 short arm of an indica rice variety, Zhongxian 3037, a phenotypical variant was selected. The variant plant had rolled leaves, dispersed plant type, as well as a low seed-setting rate. Cytological and molecular cytological investigations revealed two extra chromosomes, which were the shortest in somatic cells of the variant. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis using a rice centromere specific DNA (RCS2) and a DNA sequence specific for chromosome 9 on premetaphase and pachytene chromosomes showed that these two chromosomes were the short arms of chromosome 9. That is to say, the variant was a telotetrasomic of chromosome 9. Among the 25 pachytene cells, the two telosomic chromosomes paired each other to form a bivalent and didn't pair with other normal chromosome 9 as multivalents in 96% cells. However, the bivalent was easy to disassociate in advance.

  20. Atomic force microscopy for analyzing metaphase chromosomes: comparison of AFM images with fluorescence labeling images of banding patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoshi, Osamu; Ushiki, Tatsuo

    2014-01-01

    The combined use of fluorescence microscopy with atomic force microscopy (AFM) has been introduced to analyze the replication-banding patterns of human chromosomes. Human lymphocytes synchronized with excess thymidine are treated with 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU) during the late S phase. EdU-labeled DNA is detected in metaphase chromosomes using Alexa Fluor 488(®) azide, through the 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reaction of organic azides with the terminal acetylene group of EdU. Chromosomes with EdU incorporated during the late S phase show a banding pattern similar to the G-banding pattern of normal human chromosomes. The comparison between the fluorescence and AFM image of the same chromosome indicates the presence of ridges and grooves in the chromatid arms, which correspond to G-positive and G-negative bands, respectively. This technique of EdU-labeled replication bands combined with AFM is useful to analyze the structure of chromosomes in relation to the banding pattern.

  1. [Intensity loss of two-photon excitation fluorescence microscopy images of mouse oocyte chromosomes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Feng-Ying; Wu, Hong-Xin; Chen, Die-Yan; Ma, Wan-Yun

    2014-07-01

    As an optical microscope with high resolution, two-photon excitation (TPE) fluorescence microscope is widely used in noninvasive 3D optical imaging of biological samples. Compared with confocal laser scanning microscope, TPE fluorescence microscope provides a deeper detecting depth. In spite of that, the image quality of sample always declines as the detecting depth increases when a noninvasive 3D optical imaging of thicker samples is performed. Mouse oocytes with a large diameter, which play an important role in clinical and biological fields, have obvious absorption and scattering effects. In the present paper, we performed compensation for two-photon fluorescence images of mouse oocyte chromosomes. Using volume as a parameter, the attenuation degree of these chromosomes was also studied. The result of our data suggested that there exists a severe axial intensity loss in two-photon microscopic images of mouse oocytes due to the absorption and scattering effects. It is necessary to make compensation for these images of mouse oocyte chromosomes obtained from two-photon microscopic system. It will be specially needed in studying the quantitative three-dimensional information of mouse oocytes.

  2. Analysis of repetitive DNA in chromosomes by flow cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brind'Amour, Julie; Lansdorp, Peter M

    2011-06-01

    We developed a flow cytometry method, chromosome flow fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), called CFF, to analyze repetitive DNA in chromosomes using FISH with directly labeled peptide nucleic acid (PNA) probes. We used CFF to measure the abundance of interstitial telomeric sequences in Chinese hamster chromosomes and major satellite sequences in mouse chromosomes. Using CFF we also identified parental homologs of human chromosome 18 with different amounts of repetitive DNA.

  3. Towards single particle imaging of human chromosomes at SACLA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Ian; Schwenke, Joerg; Yusuf, Mohammed; Estandarte, Ana; Zhang, Fucai; Chen, Bo; Clark, Jesse; Song, Changyong; Nam, Daewoong; Joti, Yasumasa; Tono, Kensuke; Yabashi, Makina; Ratnasari, Gina; Kaneyoshi, Kohei; Takata, Hideaki; Fukui, Kiichi

    2015-12-01

    Single particle imaging (SPI) is one of the front-page opportunities which were used to motivate the construction of the first x-ray free electron lasers (XFELs). SPI’s big advantage is that it avoids radiation damage to biological samples because the diffraction takes place in femtosecond single shots before any atomic motion can take place in the sample, hence before the onset of radiation damage. This is the ‘diffract before destruction’ theme, destruction being assured from the high x-ray doses used. This article reports our collaboration’s first attempt at SPI using the SACLA XFEL facility in June 2015. The report is limited to experience with the instrumentation and examples of data because we have not yet had time to invert them to images.

  4. Transcript analysis of 250 novel yeast genes from chromosome XIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planta, R J; Brown, A J; Cadahia, J L; Cerdan, M E; de Jonge, M; Gent, M E; Hayes, A; Kolen, C P; Lombardia, L J; Sefton, M; Oliver, S G; Thevelein, J; Tournu, H; van Delft, Y J; Verbart, D J; Winderickx, J

    1999-03-15

    The European Functional Analysis Network (EUROFAN) is systematically analysing the function of novel Saccharomyces cerevisiae genes revealed by genome sequencing. As part of this effort our consortium has performed a detailed transcript analysis for 250 novel ORFs on chromosome XIV. All transcripts were quantified by Northern analysis under three quasi-steady-state conditions (exponential growth on rich fermentative, rich non-fermentative, and minimal fermentative media) and eight transient conditions (glucose derepression, glucose upshift, stationary phase, nitrogen starvation, osmo-stress, heat-shock, and two control conditions). Transcripts were detected for 82% of the 250 ORFs, and only one ORF did not yield a transcript of the expected length (YNL285w). Transcripts ranged from low (62%), moderate (16%) to high abundance (2%) relative to the ACT1 mRNA. The levels of 73% of the 206 chromosome XIV transcripts detected fluctuated in response to the transient states tested. However, only a small number responded strongly to the transients: eight ORFs were induced upon glucose upshift; five were repressed by glucose; six were induced in response to nitrogen starvation; three were induced in stationary phase; five were induced by osmo-stress; four were induced by heat-shock. These data provide useful clues about the general function of these ORFs and add to our understanding of gene regulation on a genome-wide basis.

  5. Applying deep learning technology to automatically identify metaphase chromosomes using scanning microscopic images: an initial investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Yuchen; Lu, Xianglan; Yan, Shiju; Tan, Maxine; Cheng, Samuel; Li, Shibo; Liu, Hong; Zheng, Bin

    2016-03-01

    Automated high throughput scanning microscopy is a fast developing screening technology used in cytogenetic laboratories for the diagnosis of leukemia or other genetic diseases. However, one of the major challenges of using this new technology is how to efficiently detect the analyzable metaphase chromosomes during the scanning process. The purpose of this investigation is to develop a computer aided detection (CAD) scheme based on deep learning technology, which can identify the metaphase chromosomes with high accuracy. The CAD scheme includes an eight layer neural network. The first six layers compose of an automatic feature extraction module, which has an architecture of three convolution-max-pooling layer pairs. The 1st, 2nd and 3rd pair contains 30, 20, 20 feature maps, respectively. The seventh and eighth layers compose of a multiple layer perception (MLP) based classifier, which is used to identify the analyzable metaphase chromosomes. The performance of new CAD scheme was assessed by receiver operation characteristic (ROC) method. A number of 150 regions of interest (ROIs) were selected to test the performance of our new CAD scheme. Each ROI contains either interphase cell or metaphase chromosomes. The results indicate that new scheme is able to achieve an area under the ROC curve (AUC) of 0.886+/-0.043. This investigation demonstrates that applying a deep learning technique may enable to significantly improve the accuracy of the metaphase chromosome detection using a scanning microscopic imaging technology in the future.

  6. Super-resolution fluorescence imaging of chromosomal DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zessin, Patrick J M; Finan, Kieran; Heilemann, Mike

    2012-02-01

    Super-resolution microscopy is a powerful tool for understanding cellular function. However one of the most important biomolecules - DNA - remains somewhat inaccessible because it cannot be effectively and appropriately labeled. Here, we demonstrate that robust and detailed super-resolution images of DNA can be produced by combining 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU) labeling using the 'click chemistry' approach and direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (dSTORM). This method can resolve fine chromatin structure, and - when used in conjunction with pulse labeling - can reveal the paths taken by individual fibers through the nucleus. This technique should provide a useful tool for the study of nuclear structure and function.

  7. DNA Ploidy and Chromosome (FISH Pattern Analysis of Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anett Hruska

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and methods: 44 peripheral nerve sheath tumors (PNST (27 schwannomas, 9 neurofibromas and 8 malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNST were analyzed to determine DNA ploidy pattern and to clarify the conflicting data in the literature concerning this topic (whether benign PNSTs are aneuploid or not. For further insight we analyzed 6 schwannomas, one atypical neurofibroma and five MPNSTs by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH technique using centromeric chromosome probes (7, 17 and 18 and automatic image analysis station, Metafer 4. Results: Benign schwannomas (including the problematic variants as ancient, cellular, neuroblastoma like and multiplex schwannomas could be characterized by euploid‐polyploidisation and by their 4c peak height value which was usually more than 10% of total cell number measured. These characters were not found among neurofibromas and MPNST‐s. FISH analysis revealed and confirmed that the ‘normal’ euploid–polyploid cells are mainly eusomic–polysomic containing two, four, eight or sixteen signals for each chromosomes examined, but in a small proportion aneusomy was found among tumor cells of benign schwannomas (average: 2.58; range 1.33–3.44. In contrast, the atypical neurofibroma displayed marked aneusomy (18.44% but it contained normal eusomic and polysomic cells too. Two diploid MPNSTs proved to be clearly aneusomic with trisomy of chromosome 17 and monosomy of chromosome 18. Conclusions: All these data suggest that ploidy pattern determination combined with FISH analysis may be a very useful supplementary tool for making a right diagnosis (to differentiate benign versus malignant schwannomas in problematic variants and to understand better the malignant transformation in PNSTs.

  8. Gabor Analysis for Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Ole; Feichtinger, Hans G.; Paukner, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    , it characterizes a function by its transform over phase space, which is the time–frequency plane (TF-plane) in a musical context or the location–wave-number domain in the context of image processing. Since the transition from the signal domain to the phase space domain introduces an enormous amount of data...... of the generalities relevant for an understanding of Gabor analysis of functions on Rd. We pay special attention to the case d = 2, which is the most important case for image processing and image analysis applications. The chapter is organized as follows. Section 2 presents central tools from functional analysis......, the application of Gabor expansions to image representation is considered in Sect. 6....

  9. A Geometric Approach For Fully Automatic Chromosome Segmentation

    CERN Document Server

    Minaee, Shervin; Khalaj, Babak Hossein

    2011-01-01

    Chromosome segmentation is a fundamental task in human chromosome analysis. Most of previous methods for separation between touching chromosomes require human intervention. In this paper, a geometry based method is used for automatic chromosome segmentation. This method can be divided into two phases. In the first phase, chromosome clusters are detected using three geometric criteria and in the second phase chromosome clusters are separated using a proper cut line. However, most earlier methods do not work well with chromosome clusters that contain more than two chromosomes. Our method, on the other hand, has a high efficiency in separation of chromosome clusters in such scenarios. Another advantage of the proposed method is that it can easily apply to any type of images such as binary images. This is due to the fact that the proposed scheme uses the geometric features of chromosomes which are independent of the type of images. The performance of the proposed scheme is demonstrated on a database containing to...

  10. Hematoxylin: a simple, multiple-use dye for chromosome analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guerra Marcelo

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available A staining mixture of hematoxylin-iron alum combined with a strong hydrochloric hydrolysis was successfully applied for chromosome observation of several kinds of plants and some animals. Slightly different procedures were developed for different materials and objectives. For plant cells, the most important technical aspect was the use of 5 N HCl hydrolysis, which resulted in a very transparent cytoplasm, combined with an intense, specific hematoxylin stain. This technique is recommended for cytogenetical analysis in general, and it is especially indicated for practical classes, due to its simplicity and high reproducibility of results. Moreover, the deep contrast observed makes this technique very useful for sequential staining of cells previously analyzed with other stains, as well as for materials with fixation problems.

  11. Linkage analysis on chromosome 2 in essential hypotension pedigrees

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    It is a new approach to study the important genes related to the control of blood pressure by probing into hypotension and hypertension at the same time. Genome scanning on whole chromosome 2 in 8 hypotension pedigrees has been done and parameter (LOD score) and non-pa- rameter (NPL score) were used in the linkage analysis by GENEHUNTER software. The results show the evidence of linkage between D2S112 and D2S117, indicating a number of critical genes may lie in thisregion and contribute to the mechanism of blood pressure regulation. Also this region has been found in the previous study in hypertension pedigrees. These genes may play an important role in the regulation of blood pressure and can also be the important candidate genes in hypertension studies.

  12. Digital image analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riber-Hansen, Rikke; Vainer, Ben; Steiniche, Torben

    2012-01-01

    Digital image analysis (DIA) is increasingly implemented in histopathological research to facilitate truly quantitative measurements, decrease inter-observer variation and reduce hands-on time. Originally, efforts were made to enable DIA to reproduce manually obtained results on histological slides...... reproducibility, application of stereology-based quantitative measurements, time consumption, optimization of histological slides, regions of interest selection and recent developments in staining and imaging techniques....

  13. High-resolution image analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preston, K

    1986-01-01

    In many departments of cytology, cytogenetics, hematology, and pathology, research projects using high-resolution computerized microscopy are now being mounted for computation of morphometric measurements on various structural components, as well as for determination of cellular DNA content. The majority of these measurements are made in a partially automated, computer-assisted mode, wherein there is strong interaction between the user and the computerized microscope. At the same time, full automation has been accomplished for both sample preparation and sample examination for clinical determination of the white blood cell differential count. At the time of writing, approximately 1,000 robot differential counting microscopes are in the field, analyzing images of human white blood cells, red blood cells, and platelets at the overall rate of about 100,000 slides per day. This mammoth through-put represents a major accomplishment in the application of machine vision to automated microscopy for hematology. In other areas of automated high-resolution microscopy, such as cytology and cytogenetics, no commercial instruments are available (although a few metaphase-finding machines are available and other new machines have been announced during the past year). This is a disappointing product, considering the nearly half century of research effort in these areas. This paper provides examples of the state of the art in automation of cell analysis for blood smears, cervical smears, and chromosome preparations. Also treated are new developments in multi-resolution automated microscopy, where images are now being generated and analyzed by a single machine over a range of 64:1 magnification and from 10,000 X 20,000 to 500 X 500 in total picture elements (pixels). Examples of images of human lymph node and liver tissue are presented. Semi-automated systems are not treated, although there is mention of recent research in the automation of tissue analysis.

  14. Holocentric chromosomes: convergent evolution, meiotic adaptations, and genomic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melters, Daniël P; Paliulis, Leocadia V; Korf, Ian F; Chan, Simon W L

    2012-07-01

    In most eukaryotes, the kinetochore protein complex assembles at a single locus termed the centromere to attach chromosomes to spindle microtubules. Holocentric chromosomes have the unusual property of attaching to spindle microtubules along their entire length. Our mechanistic understanding of holocentric chromosome function is derived largely from studies in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, but holocentric chromosomes are found over a broad range of animal and plant species. In this review, we describe how holocentricity may be identified through cytological and molecular methods. By surveying the diversity of organisms with holocentric chromosomes, we estimate that the trait has arisen at least 13 independent times (four times in plants and at least nine times in animals). Holocentric chromosomes have inherent problems in meiosis because bivalents can attach to spindles in a random fashion. Interestingly, there are several solutions that have evolved to allow accurate meiotic segregation of holocentric chromosomes. Lastly, we describe how extensive genome sequencing and experiments in nonmodel organisms may allow holocentric chromosomes to shed light on general principles of chromosome segregation.

  15. Detection of skewed X-chromosome inactivation in Fragile X syndrome and X chromosome aneuploidy using quantitative melt analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godler, David E; Inaba, Yoshimi; Schwartz, Charles E; Bui, Quang M; Shi, Elva Z; Li, Xin; Herlihy, Amy S; Skinner, Cindy; Hagerman, Randi J; Francis, David; Amor, David J; Metcalfe, Sylvia A; Hopper, John L; Slater, Howard R

    2015-07-01

    Methylation of the fragile X mental retardation 1 (FMR1) exon 1/intron 1 boundary positioned fragile X related epigenetic element 2 (FREE2), reveals skewed X-chromosome inactivation (XCI) in fragile X syndrome full mutation (FM: CGG > 200) females. XCI skewing has been also linked to abnormal X-linked gene expression with the broader clinical impact for sex chromosome aneuploidies (SCAs). In this study, 10 FREE2 CpG sites were targeted using methylation specific quantitative melt analysis (MS-QMA), including 3 sites that could not be analysed with previously used EpiTYPER system. The method was applied for detection of skewed XCI in FM females and in different types of SCA. We tested venous blood and saliva DNA collected from 107 controls (CGG chromosome test; (ii) locus-specific XCI skewing towards the hypomethylated state in FM females; and (iii) skewed XCI towards the hypermethylated state in SCA with 3 or more X chromosomes, and in 5% of the 47,XXY individuals. MS-QMA output also showed significant correlation with the EpiTYPER reference method in FM males and females (P < 0.0001) and SCAs (P < 0.05). In conclusion, we demonstrate use of MS-QMA to quantify skewed XCI in two applications with diagnostic utility.

  16. Direct ChromOSOme Analysis and FISH Detection of Primary Gastric cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To investigate chromosome aberrations and their role in the genesis and development of primary gastric cancer. Methods: An improved, direct chromosome preparation from solid tumors was adopted for G-banding analysis followed by FISH on decolored G-banding chromosomes so that chromosome aberrations could be confirmed at DNA level. Results: A total of 28 primary gastric cancer specimens were studies. Case 1 and case 2 had simple chromosome numerical changes: 49, XY, +2, +8, +9 and 48, +8, +20, respectively. All but case 1 and 2 had complicated chromosome abnormalities. Chromosome structural of frequent occurrence involved del(7q)(21/26), del(3p)(14/26), del(lp)(l1/26) and del(17p)(10/26). The chromosome abnormalities could be simple and complicated. In former, numerical changes involving 1 to 3 chromosome could be observed. Trisomies 8 and 9 might represent a cytogenetic subgroup of primary gastric cancer. In the later, the del(7q) was the most consistent aberration. 7q32-qter was the commonly lost segment. Conclusion: Numerical and structural alterations of chromosomes are present in primary gastric cancer. Del(7q) is one of the structural change characteristic of primary gastric cancer. In the 7q32-qter fragment, a tumor suppressor gene probably exists and it may have close relation to the genesis and progression of gastric cancer.

  17. Porcine UCHL1: genomic organization, chromosome localization and expression analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Knud; Madsen, Lone Bruhn; Bendixen, Christian

    2012-01-01

    to and protection from Parkinson’s disease. Here we report cloning, characterization, expression analysis and mapping of porcine UCHL1. The UCHL1 cDNA was amplified by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) using oligonucleotide primers derived from in silico sequences. The porcine cDNA codes...... for a protein of 223 amino acids which shows a very high similarity to human (98%) and to mouse (97%) UCHL1. In addition, the genomic organization of the porcine UCHL1 gene was determined. The porcine UCHL1 gene was mapped to chromosome 8(½p21)–p23. Three SNPs were found in the porcine UCHL1 sequence....... Expression analysis by quantitative real time RT-PCR demonstrated that porcine UCHL1 mRNA is differentially expressed in various organs and tissues and similar to its human counterpart. UCHL1 transcript is most abundant in brain tissues and in the spinal cord. The UCHL1 mRNA expression was also investigated...

  18. Hyperspectral image analysis. A tutorial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amigo Rubio, Jose Manuel; Babamoradi, Hamid; Elcoroaristizabal Martin, Saioa

    2015-01-01

    This tutorial aims at providing guidelines and practical tools to assist with the analysis of hyperspectral images. Topics like hyperspectral image acquisition, image pre-processing, multivariate exploratory analysis, hyperspectral image resolution, classification and final digital image processi...... to differentiate between several types of plastics by using Near infrared hyperspectral imaging and Partial Least Squares - Discriminant Analysis. Thus, the reader is guided through every single step and oriented in order to adapt those strategies to the user's case.......This tutorial aims at providing guidelines and practical tools to assist with the analysis of hyperspectral images. Topics like hyperspectral image acquisition, image pre-processing, multivariate exploratory analysis, hyperspectral image resolution, classification and final digital image processing...

  19. Analysis of chromosome translocation frequency after a single CT scan in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Yu; Miura, Tomisato; Yoshida, Mitsuaki A; Ujiie, Risa; Kurosu, Yumiko; Kato, Nagisa; Katafuchi, Atsushi; Tsuyama, Naohiro; Kawamura, Fumihiko; Ohba, Takashi; Inamasu, Tomoko; Shishido, Fumio; Noji, Hideyoshi; Ogawa, Kazuei; Yokouchi, Hiroshi; Kanazawa, Kenya; Ishida, Takashi; Muto, Satoshi; Ohsugi, Jun; Suzuki, Hiroyuki; Ishikawa, Tetsuo; Kamiya, Kenji; Sakai, Akira

    2016-06-01

    We recently reported an increase in dicentric chromosome (DIC) formation after a single computed tomography (CT) scan (5.78-60.27 mSv: mean 24.24 mSv) and we recommended analysis of 2000 metaphase cells stained with Giemsa and centromere-FISH for dicentric chromosome assay (DCA) in cases of low-dose radiation exposure. In the present study, we analyzed the frequency of chromosome translocations using stored Carnoy's-fixed lymphocyte specimens from the previous study; these specimens were from 12 patients who were subject to chromosome painting of Chromosomes 1, 2 and 4. Chromosomes 1, 2 and 4 were analyzed in ∼5000 cells, which is equivalent to the whole-genome analysis of almost 2000 cells. The frequency of chromosome translocation was higher than the number of DICs formed, both before and after CT scanning. The frequency of chromosome translocations tended to be higher, but not significantly higher, in patients with a treatment history compared with patients without such a history. However, in contrast to the results for DIC formation, the frequency of translocations detected before and after the CT scan did not differ significantly. Therefore, analysis of chromosome translocation may not be a suitable assay for detecting chromosome aberrations in cases of low-dose radiation exposure from a CT scan. A significant increase in the frequency of chromosome translocations was not likely to be detected due to the high baseline before the CT scan; the high and variable frequency of translocations was probably due to multiple confounding factors in adults.

  20. Systematic analysis of S. cerevisiae chromosome VIII genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niedenthal, R; Riles, L; Güldener, U; Klein, S; Johnston, M; Hegemann, J H

    1999-12-01

    To begin genome-wide functional analysis, we analysed the consequences of deleting each of the 265 genes of chromosome VIII of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. For 33% of the deletion strains a growth phenotype could be detected: 18% of the genes are essential for growth on complete glucose medium, and 15% grow significantly more slowly than the wild-type strain or exhibit a conditional phenotype when incubated under one of 20 different growth conditions. Two-thirds of the mutants that exhibit conditional phenotypes are pleiotropic; about one-third of the mutants exhibit only one phenotype. We also measured the level of expression directed by the promoter of each gene. About half of the promoters direct detectable transcription in rich glucose medium, and most of these exhibited only low or medium activity. Only 1% of the genes are expressed at about the same level as ACT1. The number of active promoters increased to 76% upon growth on a non-fermentable carbon source, and to 93% in minimal glucose medium. The majority of promoters fluctuated in strength, depending on the medium.

  1. Laboratory intercomparison of the dicentric chromosome analysis assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beinke, C; Barnard, S; Boulay-Greene, H; De Amicis, A; De Sanctis, S; Herodin, F; Jones, A; Kulka, U; Lista, F; Lloyd, D; Martigne, P; Moquet, J; Oestreicher, U; Romm, H; Rothkamm, K; Valente, M; Meineke, V; Braselmann, H; Abend, M

    2013-08-01

    The study design and obtained results represent an intercomparison of various laboratories performing dose assessment using the dicentric chromosome analysis (DCA) as a diagnostic triage tool for individual radiation dose assessment. Homogenously X-irradiated (240 kVp, 1 Gy/min) blood samples for establishing calibration data (0.25-5 Gy) as well as blind samples (0.1-6.4 Gy) were sent to the participants. DCA was performed according to established protocols. The time taken to report dose estimates was documented for each laboratory. Additional information concerning laboratory organization/characteristics as well as assay performance was collected. The mean absolute difference (MAD) was calculated and radiation doses were merged into four triage categories reflecting clinical aspects to calculate accuracy, sensitivity and specificity. The earliest report time was 2.4 days after sample arrival. DCA dose estimates were reported with high and comparable accuracy, with MAD values ranging between 0.16-0.5 Gy for both manual and automated scoring. No significant differences were found for dose estimates based either on 20, 30, 40 or 50 cells, suggesting that the scored number of cells can be reduced from 50 to 20 without loss of precision of triage dose estimates, at least for homogenous exposure scenarios. Triage categories of clinical significance could be discriminated efficiently using both scoring procedures.

  2. Highly distinct chromosomal structures in cowpea (Vigna unguiculata), as revealed by molecular cytogenetic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwata-Otsubo, Aiko; Lin, Jer-Young; Gill, Navdeep; Jackson, Scott A

    2016-05-01

    Cowpea (Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp) is an important legume, particularly in developing countries. However, little is known about its genome or chromosome structure. We used molecular cytogenetics to characterize the structure of pachytene chromosomes to advance our knowledge of chromosome and genome organization of cowpea. Our data showed that cowpea has highly distinct chromosomal structures that are cytologically visible as brightly DAPI-stained heterochromatic regions. Analysis of the repetitive fraction of the cowpea genome present at centromeric and pericentromeric regions confirmed that two retrotransposons are major components of pericentromeric regions and that a 455-bp tandem repeat is found at seven out of 11 centromere pairs in cowpea. These repeats likely evolved after the divergence of cowpea from common bean and form chromosomal structure unique to cowpea. The integration of cowpea genetic and physical chromosome maps reveals potential regions of suppressed recombination due to condensed heterochromatin and a lack of pairing in a few chromosomal termini. This study provides fundamental knowledge on cowpea chromosome structure and molecular cytogenetics tools for further chromosome studies.

  3. Medical Image Analysis Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-01-01

    To improve the quality of photos sent to Earth by unmanned spacecraft. NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) developed a computerized image enhancement process that brings out detail not visible in the basic photo. JPL is now applying this technology to biomedical research in its Medical lrnage Analysis Facility, which employs computer enhancement techniques to analyze x-ray films of internal organs, such as the heart and lung. A major objective is study of the effects of I stress on persons with heart disease. In animal tests, computerized image processing is being used to study coronary artery lesions and the degree to which they reduce arterial blood flow when stress is applied. The photos illustrate the enhancement process. The upper picture is an x-ray photo in which the artery (dotted line) is barely discernible; in the post-enhancement photo at right, the whole artery and the lesions along its wall are clearly visible. The Medical lrnage Analysis Facility offers a faster means of studying the effects of complex coronary lesions in humans, and the research now being conducted on animals is expected to have important application to diagnosis and treatment of human coronary disease. Other uses of the facility's image processing capability include analysis of muscle biopsy and pap smear specimens, and study of the microscopic structure of fibroprotein in the human lung. Working with JPL on experiments are NASA's Ames Research Center, the University of Southern California School of Medicine, and Rancho Los Amigos Hospital, Downey, California.

  4. Gene expression meta-analysis identifies chromosomal regions involved in ovarian cancer survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomassen, Mads; Jochumsen, Kirsten M; Mogensen, Ole;

    2009-01-01

    the relation of gene expression and chromosomal position to identify chromosomal regions of importance for early recurrence of ovarian cancer. By use of *Gene Set Enrichment Analysis*, we have ranked chromosomal regions according to their association to survival. Over-representation analysis including 1......Ovarian cancer cells exhibit complex karyotypic alterations causing deregulation of numerous genes. Some of these genes are probably causal for cancer formation and local growth, whereas others are causal for metastasis and recurrence. By using publicly available data sets, we have investigated......-4 consecutive cytogenetic bands identified regions with increased expression for chromosome 5q12-14, and a very large region of chromosome 7 with the strongest signal at 7p15-13 among tumors from short-living patients. Reduced gene expression was identified at 4q26-32, 6p12-q15, 9p21-q32, and 11p14-11. We...

  5. CRISPR Primer Designer: Design primers for knockout and chromosome imaging CRISPR-Cas system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Meng; Zhou, Shi-Rong; Xue, Hong-Wei

    2015-07-01

    The clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-associated system enables biologists to edit genomes precisely and provides a powerful tool for perturbing endogenous gene regulation, modulation of epigenetic markers, and genome architecture. However, there are concerns about the specificity of the system, especially the usages of knocking out a gene. Previous designing tools either were mostly built-in websites or ran as command-line programs, and none of them ran locally and acquired a user-friendly interface. In addition, with the development of CRISPR-derived systems, such as chromosome imaging, there were still no tools helping users to generate specific end-user spacers. We herein present CRISPR Primer Designer for researchers to design primers for CRISPR applications. The program has a user-friendly interface, can analyze the BLAST results by using multiple parameters, score for each candidate spacer, and generate the primers when using a certain plasmid. In addition, CRISPR Primer Designer runs locally and can be used to search spacer clusters, and exports primers for the CRISPR-Cas system-based chromosome imaging system.

  6. CRISPR Primer Designer:Design primers for knockout and chromosome imaging CRISPR-Cas system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Meng Yan; Shi-Rong Zhou; Hong-Wei Xue

    2015-01-01

    The clustered regularly interspaced short palin-dromic repeats (CRISPR)-associated system enables biologists to edit genomes precisely and provides a powerful tool for perturbing endogenous gene regulation, modulation of epigenetic markers, and genome architecture. However, there are concerns about the specificity of the system, especial y the usages of knocking out a gene. Previous designing tools either were mostly built-in websites or ran as command-line programs, and none of them ran local y and acquired a user-friendly interface. In addition, with the development of CRISPR-derived systems, such as chromosome imaging, there were stil no tools helping users to generate specific end-user spacers. We herein present CRISPR Primer Designer for researchers to design primers for CRISPR applications. The program has a user-friendly interface, can analyze the BLAST results by using multiple parameters, score for each candidate spacer, and generate the primers when using a certain plasmid. In addition, CRISPR Primer Designer runs local y and can be used to search spacer clusters, and exports primers for the CRISPR-Cas system-based chromosome imaging system.

  7. Image sequence analysis

    CERN Document Server

    1981-01-01

    The processing of image sequences has a broad spectrum of important applica­ tions including target tracking, robot navigation, bandwidth compression of TV conferencing video signals, studying the motion of biological cells using microcinematography, cloud tracking, and highway traffic monitoring. Image sequence processing involves a large amount of data. However, because of the progress in computer, LSI, and VLSI technologies, we have now reached a stage when many useful processing tasks can be done in a reasonable amount of time. As a result, research and development activities in image sequence analysis have recently been growing at a rapid pace. An IEEE Computer Society Workshop on Computer Analysis of Time-Varying Imagery was held in Philadelphia, April 5-6, 1979. A related special issue of the IEEE Transactions on Pattern Anal­ ysis and Machine Intelligence was published in November 1980. The IEEE Com­ puter magazine has also published a special issue on the subject in 1981. The purpose of this book ...

  8. Chromosome arm-specific BAC end sequences permit comparative analysis of homoeologous chromosomes and genomes of polyploid wheat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sehgal Sunish K

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bread wheat, one of the world’s staple food crops, has the largest, highly repetitive and polyploid genome among the cereal crops. The wheat genome holds the key to crop genetic improvement against challenges such as climate change, environmental degradation, and water scarcity. To unravel the complex wheat genome, the International Wheat Genome Sequencing Consortium (IWGSC is pursuing a chromosome- and chromosome arm-based approach to physical mapping and sequencing. Here we report on the use of a BAC library made from flow-sorted telosomic chromosome 3A short arm (t3AS for marker development and analysis of sequence composition and comparative evolution of homoeologous genomes of hexaploid wheat. Results The end-sequencing of 9,984 random BACs from a chromosome arm 3AS-specific library (TaaCsp3AShA generated 11,014,359 bp of high quality sequence from 17,591 BAC-ends with an average length of 626 bp. The sequence represents 3.2% of t3AS with an average DNA sequence read every 19 kb. Overall, 79% of the sequence consisted of repetitive elements, 1.38% as coding regions (estimated 2,850 genes and another 19% of unknown origin. Comparative sequence analysis suggested that 70-77% of the genes present in both 3A and 3B were syntenic with model species. Among the transposable elements, gypsy/sabrina (12.4% was the most abundant repeat and was significantly more frequent in 3A compared to homoeologous chromosome 3B. Twenty novel repetitive sequences were also identified using de novo repeat identification. BESs were screened to identify simple sequence repeats (SSR and transposable element junctions. A total of 1,057 SSRs were identified with a density of one per 10.4 kb, and 7,928 junctions between transposable elements (TE and other sequences were identified with a density of one per 1.39 kb. With the objective of enhancing the marker density of chromosome 3AS, oligonucleotide primers were successfully designed from

  9. The DNA Sequence And Comparative Analysis Of Human Chromosome5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmutz, Jeremy; Martin, Joel; Terry, Astrid; Couronne, Olivier; Grimwood, Jane; Lowry, Steve; Gordon, Laurie A.; Scott, Duncan; Xie,Gary; Huang, Wayne; Hellsten, Uffe; Tran-Gyamfi, Mary; She, Xinwei; Prabhakar, Shyam; Aerts, Andrea; Altherr, Michael; Bajorek, Eva; Black,Stacey; Branscomb, Elbert; Caoile, Chenier; Challacombe, Jean F.; Chan,Yee Man; Denys, Mirian; Detter, John C.; Escobar, Julio; Flowers, Dave; Fotopulos, Dea; Glavina, Tijana; Gomez, Maria; Gonzales, Eidelyn; Goodstein, David; Grigoriev, Igor; Groza, Matthew; Hammon, Nancy; Hawkins, Trevor; Haydu, Lauren; Israni, Sanjay; Jett, Jamie; Kadner,Kristen; Kimball, Heather; Kobayashi, Arthur; Lopez, Frederick; Lou,Yunian; Martinez, Diego; Medina, Catherine; Morgan, Jenna; Nandkeshwar,Richard; Noonan, James P.; Pitluck, Sam; Pollard, Martin; Predki, Paul; Priest, James; Ramirez, Lucia; Retterer, James; Rodriguez, Alex; Rogers,Stephanie; Salamov, Asaf; Salazar, Angelica; Thayer, Nina; Tice, Hope; Tsai, Ming; Ustaszewska, Anna; Vo, Nu; Wheeler, Jeremy; Wu, Kevin; Yang,Joan; Dickson, Mark; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Eichler, Evan E.; Olsen, Anne; Pennacchio, Len A.; Rokhsar, Daniel S.; Richardson, Paul; Lucas, SusanM.; Myers, Richard M.; Rubin, Edward M.

    2004-08-01

    Chromosome 5 is one of the largest human chromosomes and contains numerous intrachromosomal duplications, yet it has one of the lowest gene densities. This is partially explained by numerous gene-poor regions that display a remarkable degree of noncoding conservation with non-mammalian vertebrates, suggesting that they are functionally constrained. In total, we compiled 177.7 million base pairs of highly accurate finished sequence containing 923 manually curated protein-coding genes including the protocadherin and interleukin gene families. We also completely sequenced versions of the large chromosome-5-specific internal duplications. These duplications are very recent evolutionary events and probably have a mechanistic role in human physiological variation, as deletions in these regions are the cause of debilitating disorders including spinal muscular atrophy.

  10. The sequence and analysis of duplication rich human chromosome 16

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, J; Han, C; Gordon, L A; Terry, A; Prabhakar, S; She, X; Xie, G; Hellsten, U; Chan, Y M; Altherr, M; Couronne, O; Aerts, A; Bajorek, E; Black, S; Blumer, H; Branscomb, E; Brown, N; Bruno, W J; Buckingham, J; Callen, D F; Campbell, C S; Campbell, M L; Campbell, E W; Caoile, C; Challacombe, J F; Chasteen, L A; Chertkov, O; Chi, H C; Christensen, M; Clark, L M; Cohn, J D; Denys, M; Detter, J C; Dickson, M; Dimitrijevic-Bussod, M; Escobar, J; Fawcett, J J; Flowers, D; Fotopulos, D; Glavina, T; Gomez, M; Gonzales, E; Goodstein, D; Goodwin, L A; Grady, D L; Grigoriev, I; Groza, M; Hammon, N; Hawkins, T; Haydu, L; Hildebrand, C E; Huang, W; Israni, S; Jett, J; Jewett, P B; Kadner, K; Kimball, H; Kobayashi, A; Krawczyk, M; Leyba, T; Longmire, J L; Lopez, F; Lou, Y; Lowry, S; Ludeman, T; Manohar, C F; Mark, G A; McMurray, K L; Meincke, L J; Morgan, J; Moyzis, R K; Mundt, M O; Munk, A C; Nandkeshwar, R D; Pitluck, S; Pollard, M; Predki, P; Parson-Quintana, B; Ramirez, L; Rash, S; Retterer, J; Ricke, D O; Robinson, D; Rodriguez, A; Salamov, A; Saunders, E H; Scott, D; Shough, T; Stallings, R L; Stalvey, M; Sutherland, R D; Tapia, R; Tesmer, J G; Thayer, N; Thompson, L S; Tice, H; Torney, D C; Tran-Gyamfi, M; Tsai, M; Ulanovsky, L E; Ustaszewska, A; Vo, N; White, P S; Williams, A L; Wills, P L; Wu, J; Wu, K; Yang, J; DeJong, P; Bruce, D; Doggett, N A; Deaven, L; Schmutz, J; Grimwood, J; Richardson, P; Rokhsar, D S; Eichler, E E; Gilna, P; Lucas, S M; Myers, R M; Rubin, E M; Pennacchio, L A

    2005-04-06

    Human chromosome 16 features one of the highest levels of segmentally duplicated sequence among the human autosomes. We report here the 78,884,754 base pairs of finished chromosome 16 sequence, representing over 99.9% of its euchromatin. Manual annotation revealed 880 protein-coding genes confirmed by 1,637 aligned transcripts, 19 tRNA genes, 341 pseudogenes, and 3 RNA pseudogenes. These genes include metallothionein, cadherin, and iroquois gene families, as well as the disease genes for polycystic kidney disease and acute myelomonocytic leukemia. Several large-scale structural polymorphisms spanning hundreds of kilobase pairs were identified and result in gene content differences among humans. While the segmental duplications of chromosome 16 are enriched in the relatively gene poor pericentromere of the p-arm, some are involved in recent gene duplication and conversion events likely to have had an impact on the evolution of primates and human disease susceptibility.

  11. Systematic analysis of human protein complexes identifies chromosome segregation proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchins, James R A; Toyoda, Yusuke; Hegemann, Björn; Poser, Ina; Hériché, Jean-Karim; Sykora, Martina M; Augsburg, Martina; Hudecz, Otto; Buschhorn, Bettina A; Bulkescher, Jutta; Conrad, Christian; Comartin, David; Schleiffer, Alexander; Sarov, Mihail; Pozniakovsky, Andrei; Slabicki, Mikolaj Michal; Schloissnig, Siegfried; Steinmacher, Ines; Leuschner, Marit; Ssykor, Andrea; Lawo, Steffen; Pelletier, Laurence; Stark, Holger; Nasmyth, Kim; Ellenberg, Jan; Durbin, Richard; Buchholz, Frank; Mechtler, Karl; Hyman, Anthony A; Peters, Jan-Michael

    2010-04-30

    Chromosome segregation and cell division are essential, highly ordered processes that depend on numerous protein complexes. Results from recent RNA interference screens indicate that the identity and composition of these protein complexes is incompletely understood. Using gene tagging on bacterial artificial chromosomes, protein localization, and tandem-affinity purification-mass spectrometry, the MitoCheck consortium has analyzed about 100 human protein complexes, many of which had not or had only incompletely been characterized. This work has led to the discovery of previously unknown, evolutionarily conserved subunits of the anaphase-promoting complex and the gamma-tubulin ring complex--large complexes that are essential for spindle assembly and chromosome segregation. The approaches we describe here are generally applicable to high-throughput follow-up analyses of phenotypic screens in mammalian cells.

  12. Chromosomal evolution in the Drosophila cardini group (Diptera: Drosophilidae): photomaps and inversion analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordeiro, Juliana; De Toni, Daniela Cristina; da Silva, Gisele de Souza; Valente, Vera Lucia da Silva

    2014-10-01

    Detailed chromosome photomaps are the first step to develop further chromosomal analysis to study the evolution of the genetic architecture in any set of species, considering that chromosomal rearrangements, such as inversions, are common features of genome evolution. In this report, we analyzed inversion polymorphisms in 25 different populations belonging to six neotropical species in the cardini group: Drosophila cardini, D. cardinoides, D. neocardini, D. neomorpha, D. parthenogenetica and D. polymorpha. Furthermore, we present the first reference photomaps for the Neotropical D. cardini and D. parthenogenetica and improved photomaps for D. cardinoides, D. neocardini and D. polymorpha. We found 19 new inversions for these species. An exhaustive pairwise comparison of the polytene chromosomes was conducted for the six species in order to understand evolutionary patterns of their chromosomes.

  13. Novel Integrated Lab-on-Chip System for Chromosome Translocations Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Winnie Edith; Lange, Jacob Moresco; Shah, Pranjul Jaykumar

    2009-01-01

    This presentation will focus on the development of a chromosome total analysis system (C-TAS) starting from the design strategy and simulations to the integration into a final monolithic plug and play device. Individual modules which perform the sample preprocessing and analysis tasks like - cell...... isolation, cell culture, cell lysing, chromosome extraction and Fluorescence In-Situ Hybridization will be presented. How we solved connecting the individual chips and adjusting the microfluidic flows, by using simulations will be discussed....

  14. Prenatal diagnosis and molecular cytogenetic analysis of a de novo isodicentric chromosome 18

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanliang; Dai, Yong; Ren, Jinghui; Wang, Linqian

    2010-01-01

    Isodicentric chromosome 18 [idic(18)] is rare structural aberration. We report on a prenatal case described by conventional and molecular cytogenetic analyses. The sonography at 24 weeks of gestation revealed multiple fetal anomalies; radial aplasia and ventricular septal defect were significant features. Routine karyotyping showed a derivative chromosome replacing one normal chromosome 18. The parental karyotypes were normal, indicating that the derivative chromosome was de novo. Array comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH) revealed 18p11.21→qter duplication and 18p11.21→pter deletion for genomic DNA of the fetus. The breakpoint was located at 18p11.21 (between 12104527 bp and 12145199 bp from the telomere of 18p). Thus, the derivative chromosome was ascertained as idic(18)(qter→p11.21::p11.21→qter). Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) confirmed that the derivative chromosome was idic(18). Our report describes a rare isodicentric chromosome 18 and demonstrates that array-CGH is a useful complementary tool to cytogenetic analysis for reliable identifying derivative chromosome. PMID:20864786

  15. Analysis of chromosome aberration data by hybrid-scale models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Indrawati, Iwiq [Research and Development on Radiation and Nuclear Biomedical Center, National Nuclear Energy Agency (Indonesia); Kumazawa, Shigeru [Nuclear Technology and Education Center, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Honkomagome, Tokyo (Japan)

    2000-02-01

    This paper presents a new methodology for analyzing data of chromosome aberrations, which is useful to understand the characteristics of dose-response relationships and to construct the calibration curves for the biological dosimetry. The hybrid scale of linear and logarithmic scales brings a particular plotting paper, where the normal section paper, two types of semi-log papers and the log-log paper are continuously connected. The hybrid-hybrid plotting paper may contain nine kinds of linear relationships, and these are conveniently called hybrid scale models. One can systematically select the best-fit model among the nine models by among the conditions for a straight line of data points. A biological interpretation is possible with some hybrid-scale models. In this report, the hybrid scale models were applied to separately reported data on chromosome aberrations in human lymphocytes as well as on chromosome breaks in Tradescantia. The results proved that the proposed models fit the data better than the linear-quadratic model, despite the demerit of the increased number of model parameters. We showed that the hybrid-hybrid model (both variables of dose and response using the hybrid scale) provides the best-fit straight lines to be used as the reliable and readable calibration curves of chromosome aberrations. (author)

  16. Molecular cytogenetic analysis of dicentric chromosomes in acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarova, Iveta; Brezinova, Jana; Zemanova, Zuzana; Ransdorfova, Sarka; Izakova, Silvia; Svobodova, Karla; Pavlistova, Lenka; Berkova, Adela; Cermak, Jaroslav; Jonasova, Anna; Siskova, Magda; Michalova, Kyra

    2016-04-01

    Dicentric chromosomes (DCs) have been described in many hematological diseases, including acute myeloid leukemia (AML). They are markers of cancer and induce chromosomal instability, leading to the formation of other chromosomal aberrations and the clonal evolution of pathological cells. Our knowledge of the roles and behavior of human DCs is often derived from studies of induced DCs and cell lines. It is difficult to identify all the DCs in the karyotypes of patients because of the limitations of metaphase cytogenetic methods. The aim of this study was to revise the karyotypes of 20 AML patients in whom DCs were found with conventional G-banding or multicolor fluorescence in situ hybridization (mFISH) with (multi)centromeric probes and to characterize the DCs at the molecular cytogenetic level. FISH analyses confirmed 23 of the 29 expected DCs in 18 of 20 patients and identified 13 others that had not been detected cytogenetically. Fourteen DCs were altered by other chromosomal changes. In conclusion, karyotypes with DCs are usually very complex, and we have shown that they often contain more than one DC, which can be missed with conventional or mFISH methods. Our study indicates an association between number of DCs in karyotype and very short survival of patients.

  17. Analysis of chromosomal alterations induced by asbestos and ceramic fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dopp, E; Schiffmann, D

    1998-08-01

    Asbestos and other mineral fibers have long been known as carcinogenic agents. However, the primary mechanisms of fiber-induced carcinogenesis still remain unclear. We have investigated mitotic disturbances caused by amosite, crocidolite, and chrysotile in Syrian hamster embryo (SHE) fibroblasts. We also analyzed micronucleus formation as a result of mitotic disturbances, and carried out a characterization of the induced micronucleus population by kinetochore staining. In addition, the spindle fiber morphology was examined. Supravital UV-microscopy was used to analyze changes in chromatin structure, impaired chromatid separation and blocked cytokinesis. All three fiber types induced micronuclei in SHE cells with a high frequency (up to 200 MN/2000 cells; dose range: 0.1-5.0 microg/cm2) in a dose-dependent manner with a maximum between 48 and 66 h. Kinetochore staining revealed that 48% of fiber-induced micronuclei reacted positively. Furthermore, spindle deformation was observed in cells with disturbed meta- and anaphases while the spindle fiber morphology appeared unchanged. Our results show that asbestos fibers may cause both loss as well as breakage of chromosomes in the absence of direct interaction with spindle fibers. In addition, we analyzed the induction of micronuclei, hyperdiploidy and chromosome breakage in human amniotic fluid cells (AFC) in vitro by amosite, chrysotile and crocidolite asbestos and ceramic fibers. The response of human (AFC) and rodent (SHE) cells to fiber treatment was compared using the micronucleus assay. AFC were much less susceptible than SHE cells to the induction of micronuclei by mineral fibers. The application of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with tandem DNA probes yielded more detailed informations about specific structural chromosome aberrations in the 1(cen-q12) and 9(cen-q12) regions and about abnormal numbers of chromosomes in interphase AFC. Using this FISH approach we found a statistically significant

  18. Image based performance analysis of thermal imagers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegner, D.; Repasi, E.

    2016-05-01

    Due to advances in technology, modern thermal imagers resemble sophisticated image processing systems in functionality. Advanced signal and image processing tools enclosed into the camera body extend the basic image capturing capability of thermal cameras. This happens in order to enhance the display presentation of the captured scene or specific scene details. Usually, the implemented methods are proprietary company expertise, distributed without extensive documentation. This makes the comparison of thermal imagers especially from different companies a difficult task (or at least a very time consuming/expensive task - e.g. requiring the execution of a field trial and/or an observer trial). For example, a thermal camera equipped with turbulence mitigation capability stands for such a closed system. The Fraunhofer IOSB has started to build up a system for testing thermal imagers by image based methods in the lab environment. This will extend our capability of measuring the classical IR-system parameters (e.g. MTF, MTDP, etc.) in the lab. The system is set up around the IR- scene projector, which is necessary for the thermal display (projection) of an image sequence for the IR-camera under test. The same set of thermal test sequences might be presented to every unit under test. For turbulence mitigation tests, this could be e.g. the same turbulence sequence. During system tests, gradual variation of input parameters (e. g. thermal contrast) can be applied. First ideas of test scenes selection and how to assembly an imaging suite (a set of image sequences) for the analysis of imaging thermal systems containing such black boxes in the image forming path is discussed.

  19. A sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) reference FISH karyotype for chromosome and chromosome-arm identification, integration of genetic linkage groups and analysis of major repeat family distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paesold, Susanne; Borchardt, Dietrich; Schmidt, Thomas; Dechyeva, Daryna

    2012-11-01

    We developed a reference karyotype for B. vulgaris which is applicable to all beet cultivars and provides a consistent numbering of chromosomes and genetic linkage groups. Linkage groups of sugar beet were assigned to physical chromosome arms by FISH (fluorescent in situ hybridization) using a set of 18 genetically anchored BAC (bacterial artificial chromosome) markers. Genetic maps of sugar beet were correlated to chromosome arms, and North-South orientation of linkage groups was established. The FISH karyotype provides a technical platform for genome studies and can be applied for numbering and identification of chromosomes in related wild beet species. The discrimination of all nine chromosomes by BAC probes enabled the study of chromosome-specific distribution of the major repetitive components of sugar beet genome comprising pericentromeric, intercalary and subtelomeric satellites and 18S-5.8S-25S and 5S rRNA gene arrays. We developed a multicolor FISH procedure allowing the identification of all nine sugar beet chromosome pairs in a single hybridization using a pool of satellite DNA probes. Fiber-FISH was applied to analyse five chromosome arms in which the furthermost genetic marker of the linkage group was mapped adjacently to terminal repetitive sequences on pachytene chromosomes. Only on two arms telomere arrays and the markers are physically linked, hence these linkage groups can be considered as terminally closed making the further identification of distal informative markers difficult. The results support genetic mapping by marker localization, the anchoring of contigs and scaffolds for the annotation of the sugar beet genome sequence and the analysis of the chromosomal distribution patterns of major families of repetitive DNA.

  20. Genomic Imbalances in Neonates With Birth Defects: High Detection Rates by Using Chromosomal Microarray Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xin-Yan; Phung, Mai T.; Shaw, Chad A.; Pham, Kim; Neil, Sarah E.; Patel, Ankita; Sahoo, Trilochan; Bacino, Carlos A.; Stankiewicz, Pawel; Lee Kang, Sung-Hae; Lalani, Seema; Chinault, A. Craig; Lupski, James R.; Cheung, Sau W.; Beaudet, Arthur L.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Our aim was to determine the frequency of genomic imbalances in neonates with birth defects by using targeted array-based comparative genomic hybridization, also known as chromosomal microarray analysis. METHODS Between March 2006 and September 2007, 638 neonates with various birth defects were referred for chromosomal microarray analysis. Three consecutive chromosomal microarray analysis versions were used: bacterial artificial chromosome-based versions V5 and V6 and bacterial artificial chromosome emulated oligonucleotide-based version V6 Oligo. Each version had targeted but increasingly extensive genomic coverage and interrogated >150 disease loci with enhanced coverage in genomic rearrangement-prone pericentromeric and subtelomeric regions. RESULTS Overall, 109 (17.1%) patients were identified with clinically significant abnormalities with detection rates of 13.7%, 16.6%, and 19.9% on V5, V6, and V6 Oligo, respectively. The majority of these abnormalities would not be defined by using karyotype analysis. The clinically significant detection rates by use of chromosomal microarray analysis for various clinical indications were 66.7% for “possible chromosomal abnormality” ± “others” (other clinical indications), 33.3% for ambiguous genitalia ± others, 27.1% for dysmorphic features + multiple congenital anomalies ± others, 24.6% for dysmorphic features ± others, 21.8% for congenital heart disease ± others, 17.9% for multiple congenital anomalies ± others, and 9.5% for the patients referred for others that were different from the groups defined. In all, 16 (2.5%) patients had chromosomal aneuploidies, and 81 (12.7%) patients had segmental aneusomies including common microdeletion or microduplication syndromes and other genomic disorders. Chromosomal mosaicism was found in 12 (1.9%) neonates. CONCLUSIONS Chromosomal microarray analysis is a valuable clinical diagnostic tool that allows precise and rapid identification of genomic imbalances

  1. Mosaic small supernumerary marker chromosome 1 at amniocentesis: prenatal diagnosis, molecular genetic analysis and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chih-Ping; Chen, Ming; Su, Yi-Ning; Huang, Jian-Pei; Chern, Schu-Rern; Wu, Peih-Shan; Su, Jun-Wei; Chang, Shun-Ping; Chen, Yu-Ting; Lee, Chen-Chi; Chen, Li-Feng; Pan, Chen-Wen; Wang, Wayseen

    2013-10-15

    We present prenatal diagnosis and molecular cytogenetic analysis of mosaic small supernumerary marker chromosome 1 [sSMC(1)]. We review the literature of sSMC(1) at amniocentesis and chromosome 1p21.1-p12 duplication syndrome. We discuss the genotype-phenotype correlation of the involved genes of ALX3, RBM15, NTNG1, SLC25A24, GPSM2, TBX15 and NOTCH2 in this case.

  2. The sequence and analysis of duplication rich human chromosome 16

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Joel; Han, Cliff; Gordon, Laurie A.; Terry, Astrid; Prabhakar, Shyam; She, Xinwei; Xie, Gary; Hellsten, Uffe; Man Chan, Yee; Altherr, Michael; Couronne, Olivier; Aerts, Andrea; Bajorek, Eva; Black, Stacey; Blumer, Heather; Branscomb, Elbert; Brown, Nancy C.; Bruno, William J.; Buckingham, Judith M.; Callen, David F.; Campbell, Connie S.; Campbell, Mary L.; Campbell, Evelyn W.; Caoile, Chenier; Challacombe, Jean F.; Chasteen, Leslie A.; Chertkov, Olga; Chi, Han C.; Christensen, Mari; Clark, Lynn M.; Cohn, Judith D.; Denys, Mirian; Detter, John C.; Dickson, Mark; Dimitrijevic-Bussod, Mira; Escobar, Julio; Fawcett, Joseph J.; Flowers, Dave; Fotopulos, Dea; Glavina, Tijana; Gomez, Maria; Gonzales, Eidelyn; Goodstein, David; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Grady, Deborah L.; Grigoriev, Igor; Groza, Matthew; Hammon, Nancy; Hawkins, Trevor; Haydu, Lauren; Hildebrand, Carl E.; Huang, Wayne; Israni, Sanjay; Jett, Jamie; Jewett, Phillip E.; Kadner, Kristen; Kimball, Heather; Kobayashi, Arthur; Krawczyk, Marie-Claude; Leyba, Tina; Longmire, Jonathan L.; Lopez, Frederick; Lou, Yunian; Lowry, Steve; Ludeman, Thom; Mark, Graham A.; Mcmurray, Kimberly L.; Meincke, Linda J.; Morgan, Jenna; Moyzis, Robert K.; Mundt, Mark O.; Munk, A. Christine; Nandkeshwar, Richard D.; Pitluck, Sam; Pollard, Martin; Predki, Paul; Parson-Quintana, Beverly; Ramirez, Lucia; Rash, Sam; Retterer, James; Ricke, Darryl O.; Robinson, Donna L.; Rodriguez, Alex; Salamov, Asaf; Saunders, Elizabeth H.; Scott, Duncan; Shough, Timothy; Stallings, Raymond L.; Stalvey, Malinda; Sutherland, Robert D.; Tapia, Roxanne; Tesmer, Judith G.; Thayer, Nina; Thompson, Linda S.; Tice, Hope; Torney, David C.; Tran-Gyamfi, Mary; Tsai, Ming; Ulanovsky, Levy E.; Ustaszewska, Anna; Vo, Nu; White, P. Scott; Williams, Albert L.; Wills, Patricia L.; Wu, Jung-Rung; Wu, Kevin; Yang, Joan; DeJong, Pieter; Bruce, David; Doggett, Norman; Deaven, Larry; Schmutz, Jeremy; Grimwood, Jane; Richardson, Paul; et al.

    2004-08-01

    We report here the 78,884,754 base pairs of finished human chromosome 16 sequence, representing over 99.9 percent of its euchromatin. Manual annotation revealed 880 protein coding genes confirmed by 1,637 aligned transcripts, 19 tRNA genes, 341 pseudogenes and 3 RNA pseudogenes. These genes include metallothionein, cadherin and iroquois gene families, as well as the disease genes for polycystic kidney disease and acute myelomonocytic leukemia. Several large-scale structural polymorphisms spanning hundreds of kilobasepairs were identified and result in gene content differences across humans. One of the unique features of chromosome 16 is its high level of segmental duplication, ranked among the highest of the human autosomes. While the segmental duplications are enriched in the relatively gene poor pericentromere of the p-arm, some are involved in recent gene duplication and conversion events which are likely to have had an impact on the evolution of primates and human disease susceptibility.

  3. Analysis of Recombination and Chromosome Structure during Yeast Meiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Börner, G Valentin; Cha, Rita S

    2015-11-02

    Meiosis is a diploid-specific differentiation program that consists of a single round of genome duplication followed by two rounds of chromosome segregation. These events result in halving of the genetic complement, which is a requirement for formation of haploid reproductive cells (i.e., spores in yeast and gametes in animals and plants). During meiosis I, homologous maternal and paternal chromosomes (homologs) pair and separate, whereas sister chromatids remain connected at the centromeres and separate during the second meiotic division. In most organisms, accurate homolog disjunction requires crossovers, which are formed as products of meiotic recombination. For the past two decades, studies of yeast meiosis have provided invaluable insights into evolutionarily conserved mechanisms of meiosis.

  4. The Sequence and Analysis of Duplication Rich Human Chromosome 16

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Joel; Han, Cliff; Gordon, Laurie A.; Terry, Astrid; Prabhakar, Shyam; She, Xinwei; Xie, Gary; Hellsten, Uffe; Man Chan, Yee; Altherr, Michael; Couronne, Olivier; Aerts, Andrea; Bajorek, Eva; Black, Stacey; Blumer, Heather; Branscomb, Elbert; Brown, Nancy C.; Bruno, William J.; Buckingham, Judith M.; Callen, David F.; Campbell, Connie S.; Campbell, Mary L.; Campbell, Evelyn W.; Caoile, Chenier; Challacombe, Jean F.; Chasteen, Leslie A.; Chertkov, Olga; Chi, Han C.; Christensen, Mari; Clark, Lynn M.; Cohn, Judith D.; Denys, Mirian; Detter, John C.; Dickson, Mark; Dimitrijevic-Bussod, Mira; Escobar, Julio; Fawcett, Joseph J.; Flowers, Dave; Fotopulos, Dea; Glavina, Tijana; Gomez, Maria; Gonzales, Eidelyn; Goodstein, David; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Grady, Deborah L.; Grigoriev, Igor; Groza, Matthew; Hammon, Nancy; Hawkins, Trevor; Haydu, Lauren; Hildebrand, Carl E.; Huang, Wayne; Israni, Sanjay; Jett, Jamie; Jewett, Phillip E.; Kadner, Kristen; Kimball, Heather; Kobayashi, Arthur; Krawczyk, Marie-Claude; Leyba, Tina; Longmire, Jonathan L.; Lopez, Frederick; Lou, Yunian; Lowry, Steve; Ludeman, Thom; Mark, Graham A.; Mcmurray, Kimberly L.; Meincke, Linda J.; Morgan, Jenna; Moyzis, Robert K.; Mundt, Mark O.; Munk, A. Christine; Nandkeshwar, Richard D.; Pitluck, Sam; Pollard, Martin; Predki, Paul; Parson-Quintana, Beverly; Ramirez, Lucia; Rash, Sam; Retterer, James; Ricke, Darryl O.; Robinson, Donna L.; Rodriguez, Alex; Salamov, Asaf; Saunders, Elizabeth H.; Scott, Duncan; Shough, Timothy; Stallings, Raymond L.; Stalvey, Malinda; Sutherland, Robert D.; Tapia, Roxanne; Tesmer, Judith G.; Thayer, Nina; Thompson, Linda S.; Tice, Hope; Torney, David C.; Tran-Gyamfi, Mary; Tsai, Ming; Ulanovsky, Levy E.; Ustaszewska, Anna; Vo, Nu; White, P. Scott; Williams, Albert L.; Wills, Patricia L.; Wu, Jung-Rung; Wu, Kevin; Yang, Joan; DeJong, Pieter; Bruce, David; Doggett, Norman; Deaven, Larry; Schmutz, Jeremy; Grimwood, Jane; Richardson, Paul; et al.

    2004-01-01

    We report here the 78,884,754 base pairs of finished human chromosome 16 sequence, representing over 99.9 percent of its euchromatin. Manual annotation revealed 880 protein coding genes confirmed by 1,637 aligned transcripts, 19 tRNA genes, 341 pseudogenes and 3 RNA pseudogenes. These genes include metallothionein, cadherin and iroquois gene families, as well as the disease genes for polycystic kidney disease and acute myelomonocytic leukemia. Several large-scale structural polymorphisms spanning hundreds of kilobasepairs were identified and result in gene content differences across humans. One of the unique features of chromosome 16 is its high level of segmental duplication, ranked among the highest of the human autosomes. While the segmental duplications are enriched in the relatively gene poor pericentromere of the p-arm, some are involved in recent gene duplication and conversion events which are likely to have had an impact on the evolution of primates and human disease susceptibility.

  5. Reflections on ultrasound image analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alison Noble, J

    2016-10-01

    Ultrasound (US) image analysis has advanced considerably in twenty years. Progress in ultrasound image analysis has always been fundamental to the advancement of image-guided interventions research due to the real-time acquisition capability of ultrasound and this has remained true over the two decades. But in quantitative ultrasound image analysis - which takes US images and turns them into more meaningful clinical information - thinking has perhaps more fundamentally changed. From roots as a poor cousin to Computed Tomography (CT) and Magnetic Resonance (MR) image analysis, both of which have richer anatomical definition and thus were better suited to the earlier eras of medical image analysis which were dominated by model-based methods, ultrasound image analysis has now entered an exciting new era, assisted by advances in machine learning and the growing clinical and commercial interest in employing low-cost portable ultrasound devices outside traditional hospital-based clinical settings. This short article provides a perspective on this change, and highlights some challenges ahead and potential opportunities in ultrasound image analysis which may both have high impact on healthcare delivery worldwide in the future but may also, perhaps, take the subject further away from CT and MR image analysis research with time.

  6. Image Analysis in CT Angiography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manniesing, R.

    2006-01-01

    In this thesis we develop and validate novel image processing techniques for the analysis of vascular structures in medical images. First a new type of filter is proposed which is capable of enhancing vascular structures while suppressing noise in the remainder of the image. This filter is based on

  7. Physical mapping, expression analysis and polymorphism survey of resistance gene analogues on chromosome 11 of rice

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Irfan A Ghazi; Prem S Srivastava; Vivek Dalal; Kishor Gaikwad; Ashok K Singh; Tilak R Sharma; Nagendra K Singh; Trilochan Mohapatra

    2009-06-01

    Rice is the first cereal genome with a finished sequence and a model crop that has important syntenic relationships with other cereal species. The objectives of our study were to identify resistance gene analogue (RGA) sequences from chromosome 11 of rice, understand their expression in other cereals and dicots by in silico analysis, determine their presence on other rice chromosomes, and evaluate the extent of polymorphism and actual expression in a set of rice genotypes. A total of 195 RGAs were predicted and physically localised. Of these, 91.79% expressed in rice, and 51.28% expressed in wheat, which was the highest among other cereals. Among monocots, sugarcane showed the highest (78.92%) expression, while among dicots, RGAs were maximally expressed in Arabidopsis (11.79%). Interestingly, two of the chromosome 11-specific RGAs were found to be expressing in all the organisms studied. Eighty RGAs of chromosome 11 had significant homology with chromosome 12, which was the maximum among all the rice chromosomes. Thirty-one per cent of the RGAs used in polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification showed polymorphism in a set of rice genotypes. Actual gene expression analysis revealed post-inoculation induction of one RGA in the rice line IRBB-4 carrying the bacterial blight resistance gene Xa-4. Our results have implications for the development of sequence-based markers and functional validation of specific RGAs in rice.

  8. Reference image selection for difference imaging analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Huckvale, Leo; Sale, Stuart E

    2014-01-01

    Difference image analysis (DIA) is an effective technique for obtaining photometry in crowded fields, relative to a chosen reference image. As yet, however, optimal reference image selection is an unsolved problem. We examine how this selection depends on the combination of seeing, background and detector pixel size. Our tests use a combination of simulated data and quality indicators from DIA of well-sampled optical data and under-sampled near-infrared data from the OGLE and VVV surveys, respectively. We search for a figure-of-merit (FoM) which could be used to select reference images for each survey. While we do not find a universally applicable FoM, survey-specific measures indicate that the effect of spatial under-sampling may require a change in strategy from the standard DIA approach, even though seeing remains the primary criterion. We find that background is not an important criterion for reference selection, at least for the dynamic range in the images we test. For our analysis of VVV data in particu...

  9. Digital Images Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    International audience; A specific field of image processing focuses on the evaluation of image quality and assessment of their authenticity. A loss of image quality may be due to the various processes by which it passes. In assessing the authenticity of the image we detect forgeries, detection of hidden messages, etc. In this work, we present an overview of these areas; these areas have in common the need to develop theories and techniques to detect changes in the image that it is not detect...

  10. Introduction to Medical Image Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paulsen, Rasmus Reinhold; Moeslund, Thomas B.

    of the book is to present the fascinating world of medical image analysis in an easy and interesting way. Compared to many standard books on image analysis, the approach we have chosen is less mathematical and more casual. Some of the key algorithms are exemplified in C-code. Please note that the code...

  11. Chromosome region-specific libraries for human genome analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kao, Fa-Ten.

    1991-01-01

    We have made important progress since the beginning of the current grant year. We have further developed the microdissection and PCR- assisted microcloning techniques using the linker-adaptor method. We have critically evaluated the microdissection libraries constructed by this microtechnology and proved that they are of high quality. We further demonstrated that these microdissection clones are useful in identifying corresponding YAC clones for a thousand-fold expansion of the genomic coverage and for contig construction. We are also improving the technique of cloning the dissected fragments in test tube by the TDT method. We are applying both of these PCR cloning technique to human chromosomes 2 and 5 to construct region-specific libraries for physical mapping purposes of LLNL and LANL. Finally, we are exploring efficient procedures to use unique sequence microclones to isolate cDNA clones from defined chromosomal regions as valuable resources for identifying expressed gene sequences in the human genome. We believe that we are making important progress under the auspices of this DOE human genome program grant and we will continue to make significant contributions in the coming year. 4 refs., 4 figs.

  12. Oncological image analysis: medical and molecular image analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Michael

    2007-03-01

    This paper summarises the work we have been doing on joint projects with GE Healthcare on colorectal and liver cancer, and with Siemens Molecular Imaging on dynamic PET. First, we recall the salient facts about cancer and oncological image analysis. Then we introduce some of the work that we have done on analysing clinical MRI images of colorectal and liver cancer, specifically the detection of lymph nodes and segmentation of the circumferential resection margin. In the second part of the paper, we shift attention to the complementary aspect of molecular image analysis, illustrating our approach with some recent work on: tumour acidosis, tumour hypoxia, and multiply drug resistant tumours.

  13. ANALYSIS OF FUNDUS IMAGES

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2000-01-01

    A method classifying objects man image as respective arterial or venous vessels comprising: identifying pixels of the said modified image which are located on a line object, determining which of the said image points is associated with crossing point or a bifurcation of the respective line object...... image into two arbitrary sets, and thereafter designating one of the sets as representing venous structure, the other of the sets as representing arterial structure, depending on one or more of the following criteria: (a) complexity of structure; (b) average density; (c) average width; (d) tortuosity...

  14. Chromosomal imbalances in nasopharyngeal carcinoma: a meta-analysis of comparative genomic hybridization results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Ping

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC is a highly prevalent disease in Southeast Asia and its prevalence is clearly affected by genetic background. Various theories have been suggested for its high incidence in this geographical region but to these days no conclusive explanation has been identified. Chromosomal imbalances identifiable through comparative genomic hybridization may shed some light on common genetic alterations that may be of relevance to the onset and progression of NPC. Review of the literature, however, reveals contradictory results among reported findings possibly related to factors associated with patient selection, stage of disease, differences in methodological details etc. To increase the power of the analysis and attempt to identify commonalities among the reported findings, we performed a meta-analysis of results described in NPC tissues based on chromosomal comparative genomic hybridization (CGH. This meta-analysis revealed consistent patters in chromosomal abnormalities that appeared to cluster in specific "hot spots" along the genome following a stage-dependent progression.

  15. Chromosomes and karyotype analysis of a liver fluke, Opisthorchis viverrini, by scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaewkong, Worasak; Choochote, Wej; Kanla, Pipatpong; Maleewong, Wanchai; Intapan, Pewpan M; Wongkham, Sopit; Wongkham, Chaisiri

    2012-09-01

    Opisthorchis viverrini, a human liver fluke, has been categorized as the carcinogenic organism according to the strong association with carcinogenesis of cholangiocarcinoma (CCA). The infection of this food-borne parasite is a major impact on the health of humans, especially CCA patients in the northeast of Thailand. Taxonomy, morphology, epidemiology and molecular study of O. viverrini have been publicized increasingly but the precise karyotypic study is still incomplete. In this study, the chromosomes of O. viverrini were prepared from the testes of adult worms retrieved from metacercariae infected-hamsters. The chromosomes of O. viverrini were identified in haploid (n=6) meiotic metaphase and in diploid (2n=12) mitotic metaphase by light microscopy. The chromosome number, length and nomenclature of each chromosome were determined by scanning electron microscopy. The six chromosomes consist of one large-sized metacentric, one medium-sized metacentric, two small-sized metacentric, one small-sized submetacentric and one small-sized acrocentric chromosomes with the lengths of 2.84±0.03, 2.12±0.10, 1.71±0.13, 1.44±0.04, 1.23±0.03 and 0.84±0.13 μm, respectively. This is the first karyotype analysis of O. viverrini with defined complete nomenclature.

  16. High-resolution mapping and transcriptional activity analysis of chicken centromere sequences on giant lampbrush chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasikova, Alla; Fukagawa, Tatsuo; Zlotina, Anna

    2012-12-01

    Exploration into morphofunctional organisation of centromere DNA sequences is important for understanding the mechanisms of kinetochore specification and assembly. In-depth epigenetic analysis of DNA fragments associated with centromeric nucleosome proteins has demonstrated unique features of centromere organisation in chicken karyotype: there are both mature centromeres, which comprise chromosome-specific homogeneous arrays of tandem repeats, and recently evolved primitive centromeres, which consist of non-tandemly organised DNA sequences. In this work, we describe the arrangement and transcriptional activity of chicken centromere repeats for Cen1, Cen2, Cen3, Cen4, Cen7, Cen8, and Cen11 and non-repetitive centromere sequences of chromosomes 5, 27, and Z using highly elongated lampbrush chromosomes, which are characteristic of the diplotene stage of oogenesis. The degree of chromatin packaging and fine spatial organisations of tandemly repetitive and non-tandemly repetitive centromeric sequences significantly differ at the lampbrush stage. Using DNA/RNA FISH, we have demonstrated that during the lampbrush stage, DNA sequences are transcribed within the centromere regions of chromosomes that lack centromere-specific tandem repeats. In contrast, chromosome-specific centromeric repeats Cen1, Cen2, Cen3, Cen4, Cen7, Cen8, and Cen11 do not demonstrate any transcriptional activity during the lampbrush stage. In addition, we found that CNM repeat cluster localises adjacent to non-repetitive centromeric sequences in chicken microchromosome 27 indicating that centromere region in this chromosome is repeat-rich. Cross-species FISH allowed localisation of the sequences homologous to centromeric DNA of chicken chromosomes 5 and 27 in centromere regions of quail orthologous chromosomes.

  17. Modified C-band technique for the analysis of chromosome abnormalities in irradiated human lymphocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakata, Akifumi; Akiyama, Miho; Yamada, Yuji [Biodosimetry Section, Department of Radiation Dosimetry, Research Center for Radiation Emergency Medicine, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Yoshida, Mitsuaki A., E-mail: myoshida@cc.hirosaki-u.ac.jp [Biodosimetry Section, Department of Radiation Dosimetry, Research Center for Radiation Emergency Medicine, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan)

    2011-10-15

    A modified C-band technique was developed in order to analyze more accurately dicentric, tricentric, and ring chromosomes in irradiated human peripheral lymphocytes. Instead of the original method relying on treatment with barium hydroxide Ba(OH){sub 2}, C-bands were obtained using a modified form of heat treatment in formamide followed with DAPI staining. This method was tentatively applied to the analysis of dicentric chromosomes in irradiated human lymphocytes to examine its availability. The frequency of dicentric chromosome was almost the same with conventional Giemsa staining and the modified C-band technique. In the analysis using Giemsa staining, it is relatively difficult to identify the centromere on the elongated chromosomes, over-condensed chromosomes, fragment, and acentric ring. However, the modified C-band method used in this study makes it easier to identify the centromere on such chromosomes than with the use of Giemsa staining alone. Thus, the modified C-band method may give more information about the location of the centromere. Therefore, this method may be available and more useful for biological dose estimation due to the analysis of the dicentric chromosome in human lymphocytes exposed to the radiation. Furthermore, this method is simpler and faster than the original C-band protocol and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) method with the centromeric DNA probe. - Highlights: > The dicentric (dic) assay is the most effective for the radiation biodosimetry. > It is important to recognize the centromere of the dic. > We improved a C-band technique based on heat denaturation. > This technique enables the accurate detection of a centromere. > This method may be available and more useful for biological dose estimation.

  18. Hyperspectral image analysis. A tutorial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amigo, José Manuel, E-mail: jmar@food.ku.dk [Spectroscopy and Chemometrics Group, Department of Food Sciences, Faculty of Science, University of Copenhagen, Rolighedsvej 30, Frederiksberg C DK–1958 (Denmark); Babamoradi, Hamid [Spectroscopy and Chemometrics Group, Department of Food Sciences, Faculty of Science, University of Copenhagen, Rolighedsvej 30, Frederiksberg C DK–1958 (Denmark); Elcoroaristizabal, Saioa [Spectroscopy and Chemometrics Group, Department of Food Sciences, Faculty of Science, University of Copenhagen, Rolighedsvej 30, Frederiksberg C DK–1958 (Denmark); Chemical and Environmental Engineering Department, School of Engineering, University of the Basque Country, Alameda de Urquijo s/n, E-48013 Bilbao (Spain)

    2015-10-08

    This tutorial aims at providing guidelines and practical tools to assist with the analysis of hyperspectral images. Topics like hyperspectral image acquisition, image pre-processing, multivariate exploratory analysis, hyperspectral image resolution, classification and final digital image processing will be exposed, and some guidelines given and discussed. Due to the broad character of current applications and the vast number of multivariate methods available, this paper has focused on an industrial chemical framework to explain, in a step-wise manner, how to develop a classification methodology to differentiate between several types of plastics by using Near infrared hyperspectral imaging and Partial Least Squares – Discriminant Analysis. Thus, the reader is guided through every single step and oriented in order to adapt those strategies to the user's case. - Highlights: • Comprehensive tutorial of Hyperspectral Image analysis. • Hierarchical discrimination of six classes of plastics containing flame retardant. • Step by step guidelines to perform class-modeling on hyperspectral images. • Fusion of multivariate data analysis and digital image processing methods. • Promising methodology for real-time detection of plastics containing flame retardant.

  19. Sequence and expression analysis of gaps in human chromosome 20

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Minocherhomji, Sheroy; Seemann, Stefan; Mang, Yuan;

    2012-01-01

    The finished human genome-assemblies comprise several hundred un-sequenced euchromatic gaps, which may be rich in long polypurine/polypyrimidine stretches. Human chromosome 20 (chr 20) currently has three unfinished gaps remaining on its q-arm. All three gaps are within gene-dense regions and....../or overlap disease-associated loci, including the DLGAP4 locus. In this study, we sequenced ~99% of all three unfinished gaps on human chr 20, determined their complete genomic sizes and assessed epigenetic profiles using a combination of Sanger sequencing, mate pair paired-end high-throughput sequencing...... and chromatin, methylation and expression analyses. We found histone 3 trimethylated at Lysine 27 to be distributed across all three gaps in immortalized B-lymphocytes. In one gap, five novel CpG islands were predominantly hypermethylated in genomic DNA from peripheral blood lymphocytes and human cerebellum...

  20. A Semi-Closed Device for Chromosome Spreading for Cytogenetic Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kwasny, Dorota; Mednova, Olga; Vedarethinam, Indumathi;

    2014-01-01

    Metaphase chromosome spreading is the most crucial step required for successful karyotyping and FISH analysis. These two techniques are routinely used in cytogenetics to assess the chromosome abnormalities. The spreading process has been studied for years but it is still considered an art more than......, and thus allow for better quality spreads. Further cytogenetic analysis depends on the quality of the spreads, which is dependent on the skills of the personnel and is thus limited to laboratory settings. Here, we present a semi-closed microfluidic chip for preparation of the metaphase spreads on a glass...

  1. Stochastic geometry for image analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Descombes, Xavier

    2013-01-01

    This book develops the stochastic geometry framework for image analysis purpose. Two main frameworks are  described: marked point process and random closed sets models. We derive the main issues for defining an appropriate model. The algorithms for sampling and optimizing the models as well as for estimating parameters are reviewed.  Numerous applications, covering remote sensing images, biological and medical imaging, are detailed.  This book provides all the necessary tools for developing an image analysis application based on modern stochastic modeling.

  2. Gonadoblastomas in 45,X/46,XY mosaicism: analysis of Y chromosome distribution by fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iezzoni, J C; Von Kap-Herr, C; Golden, W L; Gaffey, M J

    1997-08-01

    Gonadoblastomas are composed of nests of neoplastic germ cells and sex cord derivatives surrounded by ovarian-type stroma. These tumors are found almost exclusively in persons with gonadal dysgenesis associated with a Y chromosome or Y chromosome fragment, and accordingly, the Y chromosome has been implicated in gonadoblastoma oncogenesis. To evaluate this association, we used two-color fluorescence in situ hybridization with chromosome-specific probes to determine the distribution of the X and Y chromosomes in the tumor nests and surrounding stromal cells in paraffin tissue sections of three gonadoblastomas in two patients with gonadal dysgenesis and 45,X/46,XY mosaicism. Statistical analysis of the data from the fluorescence in situ hybridization demonstrated that in all three gonadoblastomas, the proportion of nuclei with a Y chromosome signal was significantly higher in the tumor cells than in the nontumoral cells of the surrounding stroma (P<.001). These results suggest that Y chromosome material participates in gonadoblastoma tumorigenesis.

  3. Linkage analysis of chromosome 14 and essential hypertension in Chinese population

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Wei-yan; HUANG Jian-feng; GE Dong-liang; SU Shao-yong; LI Biao; GU Dong-feng

    2005-01-01

    Background Hypertension is a complex biological trait that influenced by multiple factors. The encouraging results for hypertension research showed that the linkage analysis can be used to replicate other studies and discover new genetic risk factors. Previous studies linked human chromosome 14 to essential hypertension or blood pressure traits. With a Chinese population, we tried to replicate these findings. Methods A linkage scan was performed on chromosome 14 with 14-microsatellite markers with a density of about 10 centi Morgen (cM) in 147 Chinese hypertensive nuclear families. Multipoint non-parametric linkage analysis and exclusion mapping were performed with the GENEHUNTER software, whereas quantitative analysis was performed with the variance component method integrated in the SOLAR package. Results In the qualitative analysis, the highest non-parametric linkage score is 1.0 (P=0.14) at D14S261 in the single point analysis, and no loci achieved non-parametric linkage score more than 1.0 in the multipoint analysis. Maximum-likelihood mapping showed no significant results, either. Subsequently the traditional exclusion criteria of the log-of-the-odds score-2 were adopted, and the chromosome 14 with λs≥2.4 was excluded. In the quantitative analysis of blood pressure with the SOLAR software, two-point analysis and multipoint analysis suggested no evidence for linkage occurred on chromosome 14 for systolic and diastolic blood pressure. Conclusion There was no substantial evidence to support the linkage of chromosome 14 and essential hypertension or blood pressure trait in Chinese hypertensive subjects in this study.

  4. In Vivo Enhancer Analysis Chromosome 16 Conserved NoncodingSequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pennacchio, Len A.; Ahituv, Nadav; Moses, Alan M.; Nobrega,Marcelo; Prabhakar, Shyam; Shoukry, Malak; Minovitsky, Simon; Visel,Axel; Dubchak, Inna; Holt, Amy; Lewis, Keith D.; Plajzer-Frick, Ingrid; Akiyama, Jennifer; De Val, Sarah; Afzal, Veena; Black, Brian L.; Couronne, Olivier; Eisen, Michael B.; Rubin, Edward M.

    2006-02-01

    The identification of enhancers with predicted specificitiesin vertebrate genomes remains a significant challenge that is hampered bya lack of experimentally validated training sets. In this study, weleveraged extreme evolutionary sequence conservation as a filter toidentify putative gene regulatory elements and characterized the in vivoenhancer activity of human-fish conserved and ultraconserved1 noncodingelements on human chromosome 16 as well as such elements from elsewherein the genome. We initially tested 165 of these extremely conservedsequences in a transgenic mouse enhancer assay and observed that 48percent (79/165) functioned reproducibly as tissue-specific enhancers ofgene expression at embryonic day 11.5. While driving expression in abroad range of anatomical structures in the embryo, the majority of the79 enhancers drove expression in various regions of the developingnervous system. Studying a set of DNA elements that specifically droveforebrain expression, we identified DNA signatures specifically enrichedin these elements and used these parameters to rank all ~;3,400human-fugu conserved noncoding elements in the human genome. The testingof the top predictions in transgenic mice resulted in a three-foldenrichment for sequences with forebrain enhancer activity. These datadramatically expand the catalogue of in vivo-characterized human geneenhancers and illustrate the future utility of such training sets for avariety of iological applications including decoding the regulatoryvocabulary of the human genome.

  5. Image Harvest: an open-source platform for high-throughput plant image processing and analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knecht, Avi C; Campbell, Malachy T; Caprez, Adam; Swanson, David R; Walia, Harkamal

    2016-05-01

    High-throughput plant phenotyping is an effective approach to bridge the genotype-to-phenotype gap in crops. Phenomics experiments typically result in large-scale image datasets, which are not amenable for processing on desktop computers, thus creating a bottleneck in the image-analysis pipeline. Here, we present an open-source, flexible image-analysis framework, called Image Harvest (IH), for processing images originating from high-throughput plant phenotyping platforms. Image Harvest is developed to perform parallel processing on computing grids and provides an integrated feature for metadata extraction from large-scale file organization. Moreover, the integration of IH with the Open Science Grid provides academic researchers with the computational resources required for processing large image datasets at no cost. Image Harvest also offers functionalities to extract digital traits from images to interpret plant architecture-related characteristics. To demonstrate the applications of these digital traits, a rice (Oryza sativa) diversity panel was phenotyped and genome-wide association mapping was performed using digital traits that are used to describe different plant ideotypes. Three major quantitative trait loci were identified on rice chromosomes 4 and 6, which co-localize with quantitative trait loci known to regulate agronomically important traits in rice. Image Harvest is an open-source software for high-throughput image processing that requires a minimal learning curve for plant biologists to analyzephenomics datasets.

  6. Image Analysis for Tongue Characterization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHENLansun; WEIBaoguo; CAIYiheng; ZHANGXinfeng; WANGYanqing; CHENJing; KONGLingbiao

    2003-01-01

    Tongue diagnosis is one of the essential methods in traditional Chinese medical diagnosis. The ac-curacy of tongue diagnosis can be improved by tongue char-acterization. This paper investigates the use of image anal-ysis techniques for tongue characterization by evaluating visual features obtained from images. A tongue imaging and analysis instrument (TIAI) was developed to acquire digital color tongue images. Several novel approaches are presented for color calibration, tongue area segmentation,quantitative analysis and qualitative description for the colors of tongue and its coating, the thickness and moisture of coating and quantification of the cracks of the toilgue.The overall accuracy of the automatic analysis of the colors of tongue and the thickness of tongue coating exceeds 85%.This work shows the promising future of tongue character-ization.

  7. The Utility of Chromosomal Microarray Analysis in Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaudet, Arthur L.

    2013-01-01

    Chromosomal microarray analysis (CMA) has emerged as a powerful new tool to identify genomic abnormalities associated with a wide range of developmental disabilities including congenital malformations, cognitive impairment, and behavioral abnormalities. CMA includes array comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) and single nucleotide polymorphism…

  8. Diagnostic Yield of Chromosomal Microarray Analysis in an Autism Primary Care Practice: Which Guidelines to Implement?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrew, Susan G.; Peters, Brittany R.; Crittendon, Julie A.; Veenstra-VanderWeele, Jeremy

    2012-01-01

    Genetic testing is recommended for patients with ASD; however specific recommendations vary by specialty. American Academy of Pediatrics and American Academy of Neurology guidelines recommend G-banded karyotype and Fragile X DNA. The American College of Medical Genetics recommends Chromosomal Microarray Analysis (CMA). We determined the yield of…

  9. Economic analysis of chromosome testing in couples with recurrent miscarriage to prevent handicapped offspring.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeuwen, M. van; Vansenne, F.; Korevaar, J.C.; Veen, F. van der; Goddijn, M.; Mol, B.W.J.

    2013-01-01

    Study Question: Which strategy is least expensive to prevent the birth of a handicapped child in couples with recurrent miscarriage (RM); parental chromosome analysis followed by amniocentesis in case of carrier status of one of the parents, or amniocentesis in all ongoing pregnancies without the kn

  10. 40 CFR 798.5385 - In vivo mammalian bone marrow cytogenetics tests: Chromosomal analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true In vivo mammalian bone marrow cytogenetics tests: Chromosomal analysis. 798.5385 Section 798.5385 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... used. Examples of commonly used rodent species are rats, mice, and hamsters. (ii) Age. Healthy...

  11. Flightspeed Integral Image Analysis Toolkit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, David R.

    2009-01-01

    The Flightspeed Integral Image Analysis Toolkit (FIIAT) is a C library that provides image analysis functions in a single, portable package. It provides basic low-level filtering, texture analysis, and subwindow descriptor for applications dealing with image interpretation and object recognition. Designed with spaceflight in mind, it addresses: Ease of integration (minimal external dependencies) Fast, real-time operation using integer arithmetic where possible (useful for platforms lacking a dedicated floatingpoint processor) Written entirely in C (easily modified) Mostly static memory allocation 8-bit image data The basic goal of the FIIAT library is to compute meaningful numerical descriptors for images or rectangular image regions. These n-vectors can then be used directly for novelty detection or pattern recognition, or as a feature space for higher-level pattern recognition tasks. The library provides routines for leveraging training data to derive descriptors that are most useful for a specific data set. Its runtime algorithms exploit a structure known as the "integral image." This is a caching method that permits fast summation of values within rectangular regions of an image. This integral frame facilitates a wide range of fast image-processing functions. This toolkit has applicability to a wide range of autonomous image analysis tasks in the space-flight domain, including novelty detection, object and scene classification, target detection for autonomous instrument placement, and science analysis of geomorphology. It makes real-time texture and pattern recognition possible for platforms with severe computational restraints. The software provides an order of magnitude speed increase over alternative software libraries currently in use by the research community. FIIAT can commercially support intelligent video cameras used in intelligent surveillance. It is also useful for object recognition by robots or other autonomous vehicles

  12. MMCT-mediated chromosome engineering technique applicable to functional analysis of lncRNA and nuclear dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meguro-Horike, Makiko; Horike, Shin-Ichi

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence implicated several long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) in gene expression in cis or trans through regulating the local chromosomal architecture. However, the mechanisms underlying the lncRNA mediated silencing of multiple genes remain unknown. We believe that Microcell Mediated Chromosome Transfer (MMCT) is a suitable approach for functional analysis of lncRNAs and nuclear dynamics. MMCT is a unique research technique that can be generally used to transfer a single chromosome from one mammalian cell to another. Transferred chromosomes can be stably maintained as functioning in the recipient cells. Since there is no size limit to introducing genomic locus, an approach using the chromosome transfer technique is suitable for functional analysis of a large chromosomal domain. Here we describe a general strategy of MMCT, applications of which have potential to be an alternative tool of existing gene delivery system.

  13. Transcriptomic analysis of fiber strength in upland cotton chromosome introgression lines carrying different Gossypium barbadense chromosomal segments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Fang

    Full Text Available Fiber strength is the key trait that determines fiber quality in cotton, and it is closely related to secondary cell wall synthesis. To understand the mechanism underlying fiber strength, we compared fiber transcriptomes from different G. barbadense chromosome introgression lines (CSILs that had higher fiber strengths than their recipient, G. hirsutum acc. TM-1. A total of 18,288 differentially expressed genes (DEGs were detected between CSIL-35431 and CSIL-31010, two CSILs with stronger fiber and TM-1 during secondary cell wall synthesis. Functional classification and enrichment analysis revealed that these DEGs were enriched for secondary cell wall biogenesis, glucuronoxylan biosynthesis, cellulose biosynthesis, sugar-mediated signaling pathways, and fatty acid biosynthesis. Pathway analysis showed that these DEGs participated in starch and sucrose metabolism (328 genes, glycolysis/gluconeogenesis (122 genes, phenylpropanoid biosynthesis (101 genes, and oxidative phosphorylation (87 genes, etc. Moreover, the expression of MYB- and NAC-type transcription factor genes were also dramatically different between the CSILs and TM-1. Being different to those of CSIL-31134, CSIL-35431 and CSIL-31010, there were many genes for fatty acid degradation and biosynthesis, and also for carbohydrate metabolism that were down-regulated in CSIL-35368. Metabolic pathway analysis in the CSILs showed that different pathways were changed, and some changes at the same developmental stage in some pathways. Our results extended our understanding that carbonhydrate metabolic pathway and secondary cell wall biosynthesis can affect the fiber strength and suggested more genes and/or pathways be related to complex fiber strength formation process.

  14. Transcriptomic analysis of fiber strength in upland cotton chromosome introgression lines carrying different Gossypium barbadense chromosomal segments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Lei; Tian, Ruiping; Chen, Jiedan; Wang, Sen; Li, Xinghe; Wang, Peng; Zhang, Tianzhen

    2014-01-01

    Fiber strength is the key trait that determines fiber quality in cotton, and it is closely related to secondary cell wall synthesis. To understand the mechanism underlying fiber strength, we compared fiber transcriptomes from different G. barbadense chromosome introgression lines (CSILs) that had higher fiber strengths than their recipient, G. hirsutum acc. TM-1. A total of 18,288 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were detected between CSIL-35431 and CSIL-31010, two CSILs with stronger fiber and TM-1 during secondary cell wall synthesis. Functional classification and enrichment analysis revealed that these DEGs were enriched for secondary cell wall biogenesis, glucuronoxylan biosynthesis, cellulose biosynthesis, sugar-mediated signaling pathways, and fatty acid biosynthesis. Pathway analysis showed that these DEGs participated in starch and sucrose metabolism (328 genes), glycolysis/gluconeogenesis (122 genes), phenylpropanoid biosynthesis (101 genes), and oxidative phosphorylation (87 genes), etc. Moreover, the expression of MYB- and NAC-type transcription factor genes were also dramatically different between the CSILs and TM-1. Being different to those of CSIL-31134, CSIL-35431 and CSIL-31010, there were many genes for fatty acid degradation and biosynthesis, and also for carbohydrate metabolism that were down-regulated in CSIL-35368. Metabolic pathway analysis in the CSILs showed that different pathways were changed, and some changes at the same developmental stage in some pathways. Our results extended our understanding that carbonhydrate metabolic pathway and secondary cell wall biosynthesis can affect the fiber strength and suggested more genes and/or pathways be related to complex fiber strength formation process.

  15. Analysis of the SOS response of Vibrio and other bacteria with multiple chromosomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanchez-Alberola Neus

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The SOS response is a well-known regulatory network present in most bacteria and aimed at addressing DNA damage. It has also been linked extensively to stress-induced mutagenesis, virulence and the emergence and dissemination of antibiotic resistance determinants. Recently, the SOS response has been shown to regulate the activity of integrases in the chromosomal superintegrons of the Vibrionaceae, which encompasses a wide range of pathogenic species harboring multiple chromosomes. Here we combine in silico and in vitro techniques to perform a comparative genomics analysis of the SOS regulon in the Vibrionaceae, and we extend the methodology to map this transcriptional network in other bacterial species harboring multiple chromosomes. Results Our analysis provides the first comprehensive description of the SOS response in a family (Vibrionaceae that includes major human pathogens. It also identifies several previously unreported members of the SOS transcriptional network, including two proteins of unknown function. The analysis of the SOS response in other bacterial species with multiple chromosomes uncovers additional regulon members and reveals that there is a conserved core of SOS genes, and that specialized additions to this basic network take place in different phylogenetic groups. Our results also indicate that across all groups the main elements of the SOS response are always found in the large chromosome, whereas specialized additions are found in the smaller chromosomes and plasmids. Conclusions Our findings confirm that the SOS response of the Vibrionaceae is strongly linked with pathogenicity and dissemination of antibiotic resistance, and suggest that the characterization of the newly identified members of this regulon could provide key insights into the pathogenesis of Vibrio. The persistent location of key SOS genes in the large chromosome across several bacterial groups confirms that the SOS response plays an

  16. Shape analysis in medical image analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Tavares, João

    2014-01-01

    This book contains thirteen contributions from invited experts of international recognition addressing important issues in shape analysis in medical image analysis, including techniques for image segmentation, registration, modelling and classification, and applications in biology, as well as in cardiac, brain, spine, chest, lung and clinical practice. This volume treats topics such as, anatomic and functional shape representation and matching; shape-based medical image segmentation; shape registration; statistical shape analysis; shape deformation; shape-based abnormity detection; shape tracking and longitudinal shape analysis; machine learning for shape modeling and analysis; shape-based computer-aided-diagnosis; shape-based medical navigation; benchmark and validation of shape representation, analysis and modeling algorithms. This work will be of interest to researchers, students, and manufacturers in the fields of artificial intelligence, bioengineering, biomechanics, computational mechanics, computationa...

  17. Basic image analysis and manipulation in ImageJ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartig, Sean M

    2013-01-01

    Image analysis methods have been developed to provide quantitative assessment of microscopy data. In this unit, basic aspects of image analysis are outlined, including software installation, data import, image processing functions, and analytical tools that can be used to extract information from microscopy data using ImageJ. Step-by-step protocols for analyzing objects in a fluorescence image and extracting information from two-color tissue images collected by bright-field microscopy are included.

  18. X chromosome-linked and mitochondrial gene control of Leber hereditary optic neuropathy: Evidence from segregation analysis for dependence on X chromosome inactivation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiangdong Bu; Rotter, J.I. (Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA (United States) Univ. of California, Los Angeles (United States))

    1991-09-15

    Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) has been shown to involve mutation(s) of mitochondrial DNA, yet there remain several confusing aspects of its inheritance not explained by mitochondrial inheritance alone, including male predominance, reduced penetrance, and a later age of onset in females. By extending segregation analysis methods to disorders that involve both a mitochondrial and a nuclear gene locus, the authors show that the available pedigree data for LHON are most consistent with a two-locus disorder, with one responsible gene being mitochondrial and the other nuclear and X chromosome-linked. Furthermore, they have been able to extend the two-locus analytic method and demonstrate that a proportion of affected females are likely heterozygous at the X chromosome-linked locus and are affected due to unfortunate X chromosome inactivation, thus providing an explanation for the later age of onset in females. The estimated penetrance for a heterozygous female is 0.11{plus minus}0.02. The calculated frequency of the X chromosome-linked gene for LHON is 0.l08. Among affected females, 60% are expected to be heterozygous, and the remainder are expected to be homozygous at the responsible X chromosome-linked locus.

  19. Document image analysis: A primer

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rangachar Kasturi; Lawrence O’Gorman; Venu Govindaraju

    2002-02-01

    Document image analysis refers to algorithms and techniques that are applied to images of documents to obtain a computer-readable description from pixel data. A well-known document image analysis product is the Optical Character Recognition (OCR) software that recognizes characters in a scanned document. OCR makes it possible for the user to edit or search the document’s contents. In this paper we briefly describe various components of a document analysis system. Many of these basic building blocks are found in most document analysis systems, irrespective of the particular domain or language to which they are applied. We hope that this paper will help the reader by providing the background necessary to understand the detailed descriptions of specific techniques presented in other papers in this issue.

  20. Errors from Image Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, William Monford [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-02-23

    Presenting a systematic study of the standard analysis of rod-pinch radiographs for obtaining quantitative measurements of areal mass densities, and making suggestions for improving the methodology of obtaining quantitative information from radiographed objects.

  1. Pocket pumped image analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotov, I.V., E-mail: kotov@bnl.gov [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); O' Connor, P. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Murray, N. [Centre for Electronic Imaging, Open University, Milton Keynes, MK7 6AA (United Kingdom)

    2015-07-01

    The pocket pumping technique is used to detect small electron trap sites. These traps, if present, degrade CCD charge transfer efficiency. To reveal traps in the active area, a CCD is illuminated with a flat field and, before image is read out, accumulated charges are moved back and forth number of times in parallel direction. As charges are moved over a trap, an electron is removed from the original pocket and re-emitted in the following pocket. As process repeats one pocket gets depleted and the neighboring pocket gets excess of charges. As a result a “dipole” signal appears on the otherwise flat background level. The amplitude of the dipole signal depends on the trap pumping efficiency. This paper is focused on trap identification technique and particularly on new methods developed for this purpose. The sensor with bad segments was deliberately chosen for algorithms development and to demonstrate sensitivity and power of new methods in uncovering sensor defects.

  2. Analysis and visualization of chromosomal abnormalities in SNP data with SNPscan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas George H

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A variety of diseases are caused by chromosomal abnormalities such as aneuploidies (having an abnormal number of chromosomes, microdeletions, microduplications, and uniparental disomy. High density single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP microarrays provide information on chromosomal copy number changes, as well as genotype (heterozygosity and homozygosity. SNP array studies generate multiple types of data for each SNP site, some with more than 100,000 SNPs represented on each array. The identification of different classes of anomalies within SNP data has been challenging. Results We have developed SNPscan, a web-accessible tool to analyze and visualize high density SNP data. It enables researchers (1 to visually and quantitatively assess the quality of user-generated SNP data relative to a benchmark data set derived from a control population, (2 to display SNP intensity and allelic call data in order to detect chromosomal copy number anomalies (duplications and deletions, (3 to display uniparental isodisomy based on loss of heterozygosity (LOH across genomic regions, (4 to compare paired samples (e.g. tumor and normal, and (5 to generate a file type for viewing SNP data in the University of California, Santa Cruz (UCSC Human Genome Browser. SNPscan accepts data exported from Affymetrix Copy Number Analysis Tool as its input. We validated SNPscan using data generated from patients with known deletions, duplications, and uniparental disomy. We also inspected previously generated SNP data from 90 apparently normal individuals from the Centre d'Étude du Polymorphisme Humain (CEPH collection, and identified three cases of uniparental isodisomy, four females having an apparently mosaic X chromosome, two mislabelled SNP data sets, and one microdeletion on chromosome 2 with mosaicism from an apparently normal female. These previously unrecognized abnormalities were all detected using SNPscan. The microdeletion was independently

  3. Imaging spectroscopy for scene analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Robles-Kelly, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    This book presents a detailed analysis of spectral imaging, describing how it can be used for the purposes of material identification, object recognition and scene understanding. The opportunities and challenges of combining spatial and spectral information are explored in depth, as are a wide range of applications. Features: discusses spectral image acquisition by hyperspectral cameras, and the process of spectral image formation; examines models of surface reflectance, the recovery of photometric invariants, and the estimation of the illuminant power spectrum from spectral imagery; describes

  4. Multivariate image analysis in biomedicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nattkemper, Tim W

    2004-10-01

    In recent years, multivariate imaging techniques are developed and applied in biomedical research in an increasing degree. In research projects and in clinical studies as well m-dimensional multivariate images (MVI) are recorded and stored to databases for a subsequent analysis. The complexity of the m-dimensional data and the growing number of high throughput applications call for new strategies for the application of image processing and data mining to support the direct interactive analysis by human experts. This article provides an overview of proposed approaches for MVI analysis in biomedicine. After summarizing the biomedical MVI techniques the two level framework for MVI analysis is illustrated. Following this framework, the state-of-the-art solutions from the fields of image processing and data mining are reviewed and discussed. Motivations for MVI data mining in biology and medicine are characterized, followed by an overview of graphical and auditory approaches for interactive data exploration. The paper concludes with summarizing open problems in MVI analysis and remarks upon the future development of biomedical MVI analysis.

  5. An Allometric Analysis of Sex and Sex Chromosome Dosage Effects on Subcortical Anatomy in Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reardon, Paul Kirkpatrick; Clasen, Liv; Giedd, Jay N; Blumenthal, Jonathan; Lerch, Jason P; Chakravarty, M Mallar; Raznahan, Armin

    2016-02-24

    Structural neuroimaging of humans with typical and atypical sex-chromosome complements has established the marked influence of both Yand X-/Y-chromosome dosage on total brain volume (TBV) and identified potential cortical substrates for the psychiatric phenotypes associated with sex-chromosome aneuploidy (SCA). Here, in a cohort of 354 humans with varying karyotypes (XX, XY, XXX, XXY, XYY, XXYY, XXXXY), we investigate sex and SCA effects on subcortical size and shape; focusing on the striatum, pallidum and thalamus. We find large effect-size differences in the volume and shape of all three structures as a function of sex and SCA. We correct for TBV effects with a novel allometric method harnessing normative scaling rules for subcortical size and shape in humans, which we derive here for the first time. We show that all three subcortical volumes scale sublinearly with TBV among healthy humans, mirroring known relationships between subcortical volume and TBV among species. Traditional TBV correction methods assume linear scaling and can therefore invert or exaggerate sex and SCA effects on subcortical anatomy. Allometric analysis restricts sex-differences to: (1) greater pallidal volume (PV) in males, and (2) relative caudate head expansion and ventral striatum contraction in females. Allometric analysis of SCA reveals that supernumerary X- and Y-chromosomes both cause disproportionate reductions in PV, and coordinated deformations of striatopallidal shape. Our study provides a novel understanding of sex and sex-chromosome dosage effects on subcortical organization, using an allometric approach that can be generalized to other basic and clinical structural neuroimaging settings.

  6. Chromosomal damage and apoptosis analysis in exfoliated oral epithelial cells from mouthwash and alcohol users

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Rodrigo dos Santos; Meireles, José Roberto Cardoso; de Moraes Marcílio Cerqueira, Eneida

    2014-01-01

    Chromosomal damage and apoptosis were analyzed in users of mouthwash and/or alcoholic beverages, using the micronucleus test on exfoliated oral mucosa cells. Samples from four groups of 20 individuals each were analyzed: three exposed groups (EG1, EG2 and EG3) and a control group (CG). EG1 comprised mouthwash users; EG2 comprised drinkers, and EG3 users of both mouthwashes and alcoholic beverages. Cell material was collected by gently scraping the insides of the cheeks. Then the cells were fixed in a methanol/acetic acid (3:1) solution and stained and counterstained, respectively, with Schiff reactive and fast green. Endpoints were computed on 2,000 cells in a blind test. Statistical analysis showed that chromosomal damage and apoptosis were significantly higher in individuals of groups EG1 and EG3 than in controls (p < 0.005 and p < 0.001, respectively). No significant difference in chromosomal damage and apoptosis was observed between the exposed groups. In EG2, only the occurrence of apoptosis was significantly higher than in the controls. These results suggest that mouthwashes alone or in association with alcoholic drinks induce genotoxic effects, manifested as chromosomal damage and apoptosis. They also suggest that alcoholic drinks are effective for stimulating the process of apoptosis. However, these data need to be confirmed in larger samples. PMID:25505845

  7. The scale and nature of Viking settlement in Ireland from Y-chromosome admixture analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEvoy, Brian; Brady, Claire; Moore, Laoise T; Bradley, Daniel G

    2006-12-01

    The Vikings (or Norse) played a prominent role in Irish history but, despite this, their genetic legacy in Ireland, which may provide insights into the nature and scale of their immigration, is largely unexplored. Irish surnames, some of which are thought to have Norse roots, are paternally inherited in a similar manner to Y-chromosomes. The correspondence of Scandinavian patrilineal ancestry in a cohort of Irish men bearing surnames of putative Norse origin was examined using both slow mutating unique event polymorphisms and relatively rapidly changing short tandem repeat Y-chromosome markers. Irish and Scandinavian admixture proportions were explored for both systems using six different admixture estimators, allowing a parallel investigation of the impact of method and marker type in Y-chromosome admixture analysis. Admixture proportion estimates in the putative Norse surname group were highly consistent and detected little trace of Scandinavian ancestry. In addition, there is scant evidence of Scandinavian Y-chromosome introgression in a general Irish population sample. Although conclusions are largely dependent on the accurate identification of Norse surnames, the findings are consistent with a relatively small number of Norse settlers (and descendents) migrating to Ireland during the Viking period (ca. AD 800-1200) suggesting that Norse colonial settlements might have been largely composed of indigenous Irish. This observation adds to previous genetic studies that point to a flexible Viking settlement approach across North Atlantic Europe.

  8. Molecular analysis of sex chromosome-linked mutants in the silkworm Bombyx mori

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Tsuguru Fujii; Hiroaki Abe; Toru Shimada

    2010-09-01

    In Bombyx mori, the W chromosome determines the female sex. A few W chromosome-linked mutations that cause masculinization of the female genitalia have been found. In female antennae of a recently isolated mutant, both female-type and male-type Bmdsx mRNAs were expressed, and BmOr1 (bombykol receptor) and BmOr3 (bombykal receptor), which are predominantly expressed in the antennae of male moths, were expressed about 50 times more abundantly in the antennae of mutant females than in those of normal females. These mutants are valuable resources for the molecular analysis of the sex-determination system. Besides the Fem gene, the quantitative egg size-determining gene Esd is thought to be present on the W chromosome, based on the observation that ZWW triploid moths produce larger eggs than ZZW triploids. The most recently updated B. mori genome assembly comprises 20.5 Mb of Z chromosome sequence. Using these sequence data, responsible genes or candidate genes for four Z-linked mutants have been reported. The od (distinct oily) and spli (soft and pliable) are caused by mutation in BmBLOS2 and Bmacj6, respectively. Bmap is a candidate gene for $V_g$ (vestigial). Similarly, Bmprm is a candidate gene for Md (muscle dystrophy), causing abnormal development of indirect flight muscle.

  9. Karyotype evolution in Tilapia: mitotic and meiotic chromosome analysis of Oreochromis karongae and O. niloticus x O. karongae hybrids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, S C; Campos-Ramos, R; Kennedy, D D; Ezaz, M T; Bromage, N R; Griffin, D K; Penman, D J

    2002-06-01

    The karyotype of Oreochromis species is considered to be highly conserved, with a diploid chromosome complement of 2n = 44. Here we show, by analysis of mitotic and meiotic chromosomes, that the karyotype of O. karongae, one of the Lake Malawi 'chambo' species, is 2n = 38. This difference in chromosome number does not prevent the production of inter-specific hybrids between O. niloticus (2n = 44) and O. karongae (2n = 38). Analysis of the meiotic chromosomes of the O. niloticus x O. karongae hybrids indicates that three separate chromosome fusion events have occurred in O. karongae. Comparison of the O. karongae and O. niloticus karyotypes suggests that these consist of one Robertsonian fusion and two fusions of a more complex nature.

  10. Chromosome analysis in the Kruger National Park - the chromosomes of the saddle-backed jackal Canis Mesomelas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Wallace

    1977-08-01

    Full Text Available Among the present-day members of the Canidae family are included the dogs and foxes (Wurster and Benirschke 1968. The genus Canis is represented in Africa by four species of jackal (Bigaike 1972. This paper presents the chromosome Findings in a male saddle-backed jackal Canis mesomelas studied in the Kruger National Park, Republic of South Africa.

  11. Re-analysis of the larval testis data on meiotic sex chromosome inactivation revealed evidence for tissue-specific gene expression related to the drosophila X chromosome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vibranovski Maria D

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI during spermatogenesis has been proposed as one of the evolutionary driving forces behind both the under-representation of male-biased genes on, and the gene movement out of, the X chromosome in Drosophila. However, the relevance of MSCI in shaping sex chromosome evolution is controversial. Here we examine two aspects of a recent study on testis gene expression (Mikhaylova and Nurminsky, BMC Biol 2011, 9:29 that failed to support the MSCI in Drosophila. First, Mikhaylova and Nurminsky found no differences between X-linked and autosomal genes based on the transcriptional profiling of the early testis development, and thus concluded that MSCI does not occur in D. melanogaster. Second, they also analyzed expression data from several D. melanogaster tissues and concluded that under-representation on the X chromosome is not an exclusive property of testis-biased genes, but instead, a general property of tissue-specific genes. Results By re-analyzing the Mikhaylova and Nurminsky's testis data and the expression data on several D. melanogaster tissues, we made two major findings that refuted their original claims. First, the developmental testis data has generally greater experimental error than conventional analyses, which reduced significantly the power to detect chromosomal differences in expression. Nevertheless, our re-analysis observed significantly lower expression of the X chromosome in the genomic transcriptomes of later development stages of the testis, which is consistent with the MSCI hypothesis. Second, tissue-specific genes are also in general enriched with genes more expressed in testes than in ovaries, that is testis-biased genes. By completely excluding from the analyses the testis-biased genes, which are known to be under-represented in the X, we found that all the other tissue-specific genes are randomly distributed between the X chromosome and the autosomes. Conclusions

  12. Chromosome analysis of nuclear power plant workers using fluorescence in situ hybridization and Giemsa assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hristova, Rositsa; Hadjidekova, Valeria; Grigorova, Mira; Nikolova, Teodora; Bulanova, Minka; Popova, Ljubomira; Staynova, Albena; Benova, Donka

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the genotoxic effects of ionizing radiation in vivo in exposed Bulgarian nuclear power plant workers by using classical cytogenetic and molecular cytogenetic analyses of peripheral lymphocytes. Chromosome analysis using fluorescence in situ hybrydization (FISH) and Giemsa techniques was undertaken on 63 workers and 45 administrative staff controls from the Bulgarian Nuclear Power Plant. Using the Giemsa method, the frequencies of cells studied with chromosome aberrations, dicentrics plus rings and chromosome fragments in the radiation workers were significantly higher compared with the control group (P = 0.044, P = 0.014, and P = 0.033, respectively). A significant association between frequencies of dicentrics plus rings and accumulated doses was registered (P < 0.01). In the present study, a FISH cocktail of whole chromosome paints for chromosomes 1, 4 and 11 was used. A significant association between frequency of translocations and accumulated doses was also observed (P < 0.001). Within the control group, a correlation was found between age and the spontaneous frequency of translocations. No correlation was found between smoking status and frequency of translocations. When compared with the control group, workers with accumulated doses up to 100 mSv showed no increase in genome translocation frequency, whereas workers with accumulated doses from 101 to 200 mSv showed a statistically significant doubling of genome translocation frequency (P = 0.009). Thus, in cases of chronic exposure and for purposes of retrospective dosimetry, the genome frequency of translocations is a more useful marker for evaluation of genotoxic effects than dicentric frequency.

  13. Chromosome analysis of nuclear power plant workers using fluorescence in situ hybridization and Giemsa assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hristova, Rositsa; Hadjidekova, Valeria; Grigorova, Mira; Nikolova, Teodora; Bulanova, Minka; Popova, Ljubomira; Staynova, Albena; Benova, Donka

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the genotoxic effects of ionizing radiation in vivo in exposed Bulgarian nuclear power plant workers by using classical cytogenetic and molecular cytogenetic analyses of peripheral lymphocytes. Chromosome analysis using fluorescence in situ hybrydization (FISH) and Giemsa techniques was undertaken on 63 workers and 45 administrative staff controls from the Bulgarian Nuclear Power Plant. Using the Giemsa method, the frequencies of cells studied with chromosome aberrations, dicentrics plus rings and chromosome fragments in the radiation workers were significantly higher compared with the control group (P = 0.044, P = 0.014, and P = 0.033, respectively). A significant association between frequencies of dicentrics plus rings and accumulated doses was registered (P < 0.01). In the present study, a FISH cocktail of whole chromosome paints for chromosomes 1, 4 and 11 was used. A significant association between frequency of translocations and accumulated doses was also observed (P < 0.001). Within the control group, a correlation was found between age and the spontaneous frequency of translocations. No correlation was found between smoking status and frequency of translocations. When compared with the control group, workers with accumulated doses up to 100 mSv showed no increase in genome translocation frequency, whereas workers with accumulated doses from 101 to 200 mSv showed a statistically significant doubling of genome translocation frequency (P = 0.009). Thus, in cases of chronic exposure and for purposes of retrospective dosimetry, the genome frequency of translocations is a more useful marker for evaluation of genotoxic effects than dicentric frequency. PMID:23536543

  14. Analysis of human chromosome 21 for a locus conferring susceptibility to Hirschsprung Disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolk, S.; Duggan, D.J.; Chakravarti, A. [Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States)

    1994-09-01

    It has been estimated that approximately 5% of patients diagnosed with Hirschsprung disease (HSCR), or aganglionic megacolon, have trisomy 21. Since the incidence of Hirschsprung disease is 1/5000 live births and the incidence of trisomy 21 is approximately 1/1000 live births, the observed occurrence of HSCR in trisomy 21 is fifty times higher than expected. We propose that at least one locus on chromosome 21 predisposes to HSCR. Although at fifty times elevated risk, only 1% of Down Syndrome cases have HSCR. Thus additional genes or genetic events are necessary for HSCR to manifest in patients with trisomy 21. Based on segregation analysis, Badner et al. postulated that recessive genes may be responsible for up to 80% of HSCR. We postulate that at least one such gene is on chromosome 21 and increased homozygosity for common recessive HSCR mutations may be one cause for the elevated risk of HSCR in cases of trisomy 21. To map such a chromosome 21 locus, we are searching for segments of human chromosome 21 which are identical by descent from the parent in whom non-disjunction occurred. These segments will arise either from meiosis I (followed by a crossover between the centromere and the locus) or from meiosis II (followed by no crossovers). Nine nuclear families with a proband diagnosed with HSCR and Down Syndrome have been genotyped for 18 microsatellite markers spanning human chromosome 21q. In all nine cases analyzed thus far, trisomy 21 resulted from maternal non-disjunction at meiosis I. At this point no single IBD region is apparent. Therefore, additional families are being ascertained and additional markers at high density are being genotyped to map the HSCR locus.

  15. Multi-Source Image Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-12-01

    Laboratories, Fort Belvoir, Virginia. Estes, J. E., and L. W. Senger (eds.), 1974, Remote Sensing: Techniques for environmental analysis, Hamilton, Santa ...E. and W. Senger (eds.), Remote Sensing Techniques in Environmental Analysis, Santa Barbara, California, Hamilton Publishing Co., p. 127-165. Morain...The large body of water labeled "W" on each image represents the Agua Hedionda lagoon. East of the lagoon the area is primarily agricultural with a

  16. Signal and image multiresolution analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Ouahabi, Abdelialil

    2012-01-01

    Multiresolution analysis using the wavelet transform has received considerable attention in recent years by researchers in various fields. It is a powerful tool for efficiently representing signals and images at multiple levels of detail with many inherent advantages, including compression, level-of-detail display, progressive transmission, level-of-detail editing, filtering, modeling, fractals and multifractals, etc.This book aims to provide a simple formalization and new clarity on multiresolution analysis, rendering accessible obscure techniques, and merging, unifying or completing

  17. Teaching image analysis at DIKU

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Peter

    2010-01-01

    The early development of computer vision at Department of Computer Science at University of Copenhagen (DIKU) is briefly described. The different disciplines in computer vision are introduced, and the principles for teaching two courses, an image analysis course, and a robot lab class are outlined....

  18. Genomic and expression analysis of multiple Sry loci from a single Rattus norvegicus Y chromosome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farkas Joel

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sry is a gene known to be essential for testis determination but is also transcribed in adult male tissues. The laboratory rat, Rattus norvegicus, has multiple Y chromosome copies of Sry while most mammals have only a single copy. DNA sequence comparisons with other rodents with multiple Sry copies are inconsistent in divergence patterns and functionality of the multiple copies. To address hypotheses of divergence, gene conversion and functional constraints, we sequenced Sry loci from a single R. norvegicus Y chromosome from the Spontaneously Hypertensive Rat strain (SHR and analyzed DNA sequences for homology among copies. Next, to determine whether all copies of Sry are expressed, we developed a modification of the fluorescent marked capillary electrophoresis method to generate three different sized amplification products to identify Sry copies. We applied this fragment analysis method to both genomic DNA and cDNA prepared from mRNA from testis and adrenal gland of adult male rats. Results Y chromosome fragments were amplified and sequenced using primers that included the entire Sry coding region and flanking sequences. The analysis of these sequences identified six Sry loci on the Y chromosome. These are paralogous copies consistent with a single phylogeny and the divergence between any two copies is less than 2%. All copies have a conserved reading frame and amino acid sequence consistent with function. Fragment analysis of genomic DNA showed close approximations of experimental with predicted values, validating the use of this method to identify proportions of each copy. Using the fragment analysis procedure with cDNA samples showed the Sry copies expressed were significantly different from the genomic distribution (testis p Sry transcript expression, analyzed by real-time PCR, showed significantly higher levels of Sry in testis than adrenal gland (p, 0.001. Conclusion The SHR Y chromosome contains at least 6 full length

  19. Chromosome analysis of 427 cases with primary amenorrhea%原发性闭经427例患者染色体核型分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    彭琳; 王楠; 邓东锐; 左伟; 程琛; 党静; 郝海燕; 周媛; 蒋敏; 凌霞珍

    2012-01-01

    目的 对原发性闭经患者进行细胞遗传学分析,探讨原发性闭经与染色体异常的关系,用以指导临床诊断及处理.方法 对427例原发性闭经患者进行外周血淋巴细胞培养、染色体制备及核型分析.结果 427例原发性闭经患者中共检出染色体异常核型118例,异常检出率为27.6℅﹙118∕427﹚.性染色体异常中,X染色体数目异常59例、结构异常25例、嵌合体24例,其中有单纯X染色体与常染色体平衡易位1例,合并X的部分缺失2例.常染色体结构异常10例,包括染色体倒位﹙4例﹚、平衡易位﹙4例﹚以及染色体大小异常﹙2例﹚,涉及到第6、7、9、14、15、16、22号常染色体.结论 结合临床表现、影像学检查以及染色体核型检查,可以为原发性闭经患者寻找病因提供理论依据,同时有利于处理措施的制定.%Objective To carry out chromosome analysis of patients with primary amenorrhea and investigate the relationship between primary amenorrhea and chromosome abnormalities, so as to guide clinical diagnosis and treatment. Methods Peripheral blood lymphocyte culture, chromosome preparation and karyotype analysis were done to 427 cases of patients with primary amenorrhea. Results There were 118 cases of abnormal chromosome karyotype with primary amenorrhea, and the anomaly detection rate was 27. 6% ( 118/427 ). In cases with sex chromosome abnormalities, there were 59 patients with numerical abnormalities of X chromosome, 25 patients with X chromosome structural abnormality, and 24 cases of mosaicism. Among them, there was one case of simple reciprocal translocation between X chromosome and autosome, and two cases of consolidation with terminal deletion of X chromosome. There were cases of autosomal structural abnormalities, including chromosomal inversion ( 4 cases ), balanced translocation ( 4 cases ) and abnormal chromosome size ( 2 cases ). Autosomal abnormalities happened on the sixth, seventh, ninth

  20. Cloning, sequencing, and analysis of inv8 chromosome breakpoints associated with recombinant 8 syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graw, S L; Sample, T; Bleskan, J; Sujansky, E; Patterson, D

    2000-03-01

    Rec8 syndrome (also known as "recombinant 8 syndrome" and "San Luis Valley syndrome") is a chromosomal disorder found in individuals of Hispanic descent with ancestry from the San Luis Valley of southern Colorado and northern New Mexico. Affected individuals typically have mental retardation, congenital heart defects, seizures, a characteristic facial appearance, and other manifestations. The recombinant chromosome is rec(8)dup(8q)inv(8)(p23.1q22.1), and is derived from a parental pericentric inversion, inv(8)(p23.1q22.1). Here we report on the cloning, sequencing, and characterization of the 8p23.1 and 8q22 breakpoints from the inversion 8 chromosome associated with Rec8 syndrome. Analysis of the breakpoint regions indicates that they are highly repetitive. Of 6 kb surrounding the 8p23.1 breakpoint, 75% consists of repetitive gene family members-including Alu, LINE, and LTR elements-and the inversion took place in a small single-copy region flanked by repetitive elements. Analysis of 3.7 kb surrounding the 8q22 breakpoint region reveals that it is 99% repetitive and contains multiple LTR elements, and that the 8q inversion site is within one of the LTR elements.

  1. Autosomal dominant familial spastic paraplegia; Linkage analysis and evidence for linkage to chromosome 2p

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Figlewicz, D.A. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States); Dube, M.P.; Rouleau, G.A. [McGill Univ., Montreal (Canada)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Familial spastic paraplegia (FSP) is a degenerative disorder of the motor system characterized by progressive weakness and spasticity of the lower limbs. Little is known about the pathophysiology of this disorder. FSP can be inherited as an autosomal dominant (AD), autosomal recessive, or X-linked trait. We have undertaken linkage analysis for a group of 36 AD FSP families from which we have collected blood samples from 427 individuals, including 148 affected individuals. Typing of polymorphic markers has allowed us to exclude more than 50% of the genome. Recently, linkage for AD FSP to a locus on chromosome 14q was reported. Our AD FSP kindreds were tested for linkage to markers spanning the 20 cM region between D14S69 and D14S66; however, we were not able to establish linkage for any of our families to chromosome 14. Lod scores suggestive of linkage for some AD FSP kindreds have been obtained for markers on chromosome 2p. We have tested seven polymorphic markers spanning the region between D2S405 and D2S177. Our highest aggregate lod score, including all families tested, was obtained at the locus D2S352: 2.4 at 20 cM. Results from HOMOG analysis for linkage heterogeneity will be reported.

  2. Bivariate linkage analysis of the insulin resistance syndrome phenotypes on chromosome 7q.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehman, Donna M; Arya, Rector; Blangero, John; Almasy, Laura; Puppala, Sobha; Dyer, Thomas D; Leach, Robin J; O'Connell, Peter; Stern, Michael P; Duggirala, Ravindranath

    2005-04-01

    Metabolic abnormalities of the insulin resistance syndrome (IRS) have been shown to aggregate in families and to exhibit trait-pair correlations, suggesting a common genetic component. A broad region on chromosome 7q has been implicated in several studies to contain loci that cosegregate with IRS-related traits. However, it is not clear whether such loci have any common genetic (pleiotropic) influences on the correlated traits. Also, it is not clear whether the chromosomal regions contain more than one locus influencing the IRS-related phenotypes. In this study we present evidence for linkage of five IRS-related traits [body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC), In split proinsulin (LSPI), In triglycerides (LTG), and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDLC)] to a region at 7q11.23. Subsequently, to gain further insight into the genetic component(s) mapping to this region, we explored whether linkage of these traits is due to pleiotropic effects using a bivariate linkage analytical technique, which has been shown to localize susceptibility regions with precision. Four hundred forty individuals from 27 Mexican American families living in Texas were genotyped for 19 highly polymorphic markers on chromosome 7. Multipoint variance component linkage analysis was used to identify genetic location(s) influencing IRS-related traits of obesity (BMI and WC), dyslipidemia (LTG and HDLC), and insulin levels (LSPI); the analysis identified a broad chromosomal region spanning approximately 24 cM. To gain more precision in localization, we used a bivariate linkage approach for each trait pair. These analyses suggest localization of most of these bivariate traits to an approximately 6-cM region near marker D7S653 [7q11.23, 103-109 cM; a maximum bivariate LOD of 4.51 was found for the trait pair HDLC and LSPI (the LODeq score is 3.94)]. We observed evidence of pleiotropic effects in this region on obesity and insulin-related trait pairs.

  3. Automated image analysis techniques for cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geest, Robertus Jacobus van der

    2011-01-01

    The introductory chapter provides an overview of various aspects related to quantitative analysis of cardiovascular MR (CMR) imaging studies. Subsequently, the thesis describes several automated methods for quantitative assessment of left ventricular function from CMR imaging studies. Several novel

  4. Astronomical Image and Data Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Starck, J.-L

    2006-01-01

    With information and scale as central themes, this comprehensive survey explains how to handle real problems in astronomical data analysis using a modern arsenal of powerful techniques. It treats those innovative methods of image, signal, and data processing that are proving to be both effective and widely relevant. The authors are leaders in this rapidly developing field and draw upon decades of experience. They have been playing leading roles in international projects such as the Virtual Observatory and the Grid. The book addresses not only students and professional astronomers and astrophysicists, but also serious amateur astronomers and specialists in earth observation, medical imaging, and data mining. The coverage includes chapters or appendices on: detection and filtering; image compression; multichannel, multiscale, and catalog data analytical methods; wavelets transforms, Picard iteration, and software tools. This second edition of Starck and Murtagh's highly appreciated reference again deals with to...

  5. Patterns of association in the human metaphase complement: ring analysis and estimation of associativity of specific chromosome regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodman, T C; Flehinger, B J; Squire, R D

    1978-02-23

    The pattern of metaphase chromosome association in the human complement was studied by two methods of statistical analysis of interchromosomal distances. Those methods included ring analysis in which a characteristic position of the centromere of each chromosome relative to the center of a two dimensional representation of a metaphase complement was defined, and estimation of the capacity for associativity of each of three regions of each chromosome: the centromere (c) and the ends of each arm (p, q). The following information was obtained: 1. In general, the distance from the center is directly related to chromosome size. 2. The most notable deviation from that size-related progression is displayed by the X chromosomes. The markedly peripheral position of the X is characteristic of both X's of the female and the single X of the male. 3. The relative associativity of each chromosome of the complement is, in general, inversely related to size with an additional preferential capacity of associativity displayed by the acrocentric chromosomes. Analyses of the different inter-regional classes established that the supplementary associativity factor of the acrocentric chromosomes was inherent in their pericentromeric and p-arm regions and excluded the ends of the q arms from participation in that factor. 4. Those analyses demonstrated that the specific morphology or 'geometry' of the acrocentric chromosomes contributes little to their high relative associativity. In addition to the tendency for the c/p regions of the acrocentric chromosomes to associate with each other, presumably because of their common function in nucleolar organization, those regions also displayed a propensity to associate with the distal regions of the arms of other chromosomes. A molecular basis for that propensity other than that of ribosomal DNA is postulated to be that of other fractions of highly reiterated DNA sequences. 5. Analysis of the relative associativities of each of the three regions

  6. The architecture of chicken chromosome territories changes during differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stadler Sonja

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Between cell divisions the chromatin fiber of each chromosome is restricted to a subvolume of the interphase cell nucleus called chromosome territory. The internal organization of these chromosome territories is still largely unknown. Results We compared the large-scale chromatin structure of chromosome territories between several hematopoietic chicken cell types at various differentiation stages. Chromosome territories were labeled by fluorescence in situ hybridization in structurally preserved nuclei, recorded by confocal microscopy and evaluated visually and by quantitative image analysis. Chromosome territories in multipotent myeloid precursor cells appeared homogeneously stained and compact. The inactive lysozyme gene as well as the centromere of the lysozyme gene harboring chromosome located to the interior of the chromosome territory. In further differentiated cell types such as myeloblasts, macrophages and erythroblasts chromosome territories appeared increasingly diffuse, disaggregating to separable substructures. The lysozyme gene, which is gradually activated during the differentiation to activated macrophages, as well as the centromere were relocated increasingly to more external positions. Conclusions Our results reveal a cell type specific constitution of chromosome territories. The data suggest that a repositioning of chromosomal loci during differentiation may be a consequence of general changes in chromosome territory morphology, not necessarily related to transcriptional changes.

  7. Analysis of premature centromere division (PCD) of the X chromosome in Alzheimer patients through the cell cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spremo-Potparevic, Biljana; Zivkovic, Lada; Djelic, Ninoslav; Bajic, Vladan

    2004-05-01

    Cytogenetic analysis of the X chromosome in phytohaemagglutinin stimulated peripheral blood lymphocytes was evaluated in 12 sporadic Alzheimer disease (AD) patients and in 11 healthy subjects. For chromosome analysis two methods were used: (1) standard analysis of G-banded metaphase chromosomes and; (2) fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) for the detection of the X chromosome centromeric region in interphase nuclei. Cytogenetic analysis revealed that the X chromosome expresses premature centromere division (PCD) in AD females in 10.53% of metaphase cells and in 15.22% of interphase nuclei. In AD men the percentages were 3.98 and 6.06%, respectively. X chromosome PCD in the female control group showed a percentage of 7.46% in metaphase cells and 9.35% in interphase nuclei and in male controls the percentages were 2.84% in metaphases and 5.54% in interphase nuclei. The results of FISH analysis showed that PCD could occur much earlier than metaphase of mitosis, i.e. in interphase of the cell cycle, immediately after replication. The FISH method can be used for PCD verification in all phases of the cell cycle in various disorders including AD.

  8. Molecular cytogenetic analysis of monoecious hemp (Cannabis sativa L.) cultivars reveals its karyotype variations and sex chromosomes constitution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razumova, Olga V; Alexandrov, Oleg S; Divashuk, Mikhail G; Sukhorada, Tatiana I; Karlov, Gennady I

    2016-05-01

    Hemp (Cannabis sativa L., 2n = 20) is a dioecious plant. Sex expression is controlled by an X-to-autosome balance system consisting of the heteromorphic sex chromosomes XY for males and XX for females. Genetically monoecious hemp offers several agronomic advantages compared to the dioecious cultivars that are widely used in hemp cultivation. The male or female origin of monoecious maternal plants is unknown. Additionally, the sex chromosome composition of monoecious hemp forms remains unknown. In this study, we examine the sex chromosome makeup in monoecious hemp using a cytogenetic approach. Eight monoecious and two dioecious cultivars were used. The DNA of 210 monoecious plants was used for PCR analysis with the male-associated markers MADC2 and SCAR323. All monoecious plants showed female amplification patterns. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with the subtelomeric CS-1 probe to chromosomes plates and karyotyping revealed a lack of Y chromosome and presence of XX sex chromosomes in monoecious cultivars with the chromosome number 2n = 20. There was a high level of intra- and intercultivar karyotype variation detected. The results of this study can be used for further analysis of the genetic basis of sex expression in plants.

  9. Cri-Du-Chat Syndrome: Clinical Profile and Chromosomal Microarray Analysis in Six Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Layla Damasceno Espirito Santo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cri-du-chat syndrome is a chromosomal disorder caused by a deletion of the short arm of chromosome 5. The disease severity, levels of intellectual and developmental delay, and patient prognosis have been related to the size and position of the deletion. Aiming to establish genotype-phenotype correlations, we applied array-CGH to evaluate six patients carrying cytogenetically detected deletions of the short arm of chromosome 5 who were followed at a genetics community service. The patients’ cytogenetic and clinical profiles were reevaluated. A database review was performed to predict additional genes and regulatory elements responsible for the characteristic phenotypic and behavioral traits of this disorder. Array-CGH analysis allowed for delineation of the terminal deletions, which ranged in size from approximately 11.2 Mb to 28.6 Mb, with breakpoints from 5p15.2 to 5p13. An additional dup(8(p23 (3.5 Mb, considered to be a benign copy number variation, was also observed in one patient. The correlation coefficient value (ρ=0.13 calculated indicated the presence of a weak relationship between developmental delay and deletion size. Genetic background, family history, epigenetic factors, quantitative trait locus polymorphisms, and environmental factors may also affect patient phenotype and must be taken into account in genotype-phenotype correlations.

  10. Physical mapping and YAC contig analysis of the region surrounding Xist on the mouse X chromosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heard, E; Simmler, M C; Larin, Z; Rougeulle, C; Courtier, B; Lehrach, H; Avner, P

    1993-03-01

    The Xist sequence has been proposed as a potential candidate for the X-inactivation center based both on its localization within the candidate region for the X-inactivation center in man and mouse and on its unique pattern of expression from the inactive X chromosome. We have cloned 550 kb of DNA surrounding the mouse Xist sequence in contiguously overlapping YAC clones and have developed a long-range restriction map that spans almost 1 Mb of this region and includes this YAC contig. The detailed restriction map we have established provides a framework for the identification of expressed sequences other than Xist that may equally exhibit unusual expression characteristics associated with X inactivation. The presence of possible structural or methylation differences within this region between the active and inactive X chromosomes has been investigated through comparative analysis of male and female genomic DNA, and we report here the identification of certain CpG-containing restriction sites around Xist that have an interesting differential methylation status on the inactive and active X chromosomes.

  11. The murine ufo receptor: molecular cloning, chromosomal localization and in situ expression analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faust, M; Ebensperger, C; Schulz, A S; Schleithoff, L; Hameister, H; Bartram, C R; Janssen, J W

    1992-07-01

    We have cloned the mouse homologue of the ufo oncogene. It encodes a novel tyrosine kinase receptor characterized by a unique extracellular domain containing two immunoglobulin-like and two fibronectin type III repeats. Comparison of the predicted ufo amino acid sequences of mouse and man revealed an overall identity of 87.6%. The ufo locus maps to mouse chromosome 7A3-B1 and thereby extends the known conserved linkage group between mouse chromosome 7 and human chromosome 19. RNA in situ hybridization analysis established the onset of specific ufo expression in the late embryogenesis at day 12.5 post coitum (p.c.) and localized ufo transcription to distinct substructures of a broad spectrum of developing tissues (e.g. subepidermal cells of the skin, mesenchymal cells of the periosteum). In adult animals ufo is expressed in cells forming organ capsules as well as in connective tissue structures. ufo may function as a signal transducer between specific cell types of mesodermal origin.

  12. Genetic counseling for a prenatal diagnosis of structural chromosomal abnormality with high-resolution analysis using a single nucleotide polymorphism microarray

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akiko Takashima

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available A 41-year old pregnant woman underwent amniocentesis to conduct a conventional karyotyping analysis; the analysis reported an abnormal karyotype: 46,XY,add(9(p24. Chromosomal microarray analysis (CMA is utilized in prenatal diagnoses. A single nucleotide polymorphism microarray revealed a male fetus with balanced chromosomal translocations on 9p and balanced chromosomal rearrangements, but another chromosomal abnormality was detected. The fetus had microduplication. The child was born as a phenotypically normal male. CMA is a simple and informative procedure for prenatal genetic diagnosis. CMA is the detection of chromosomal variants of unknown clinical significance; therefore, genetic counseling is important during prenatal genetic testing.

  13. Mesh Processing in Medical Image Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    The following topics are dealt with: mesh processing; medical image analysis; interactive freeform modeling; statistical shape analysis; clinical CT images; statistical surface recovery; automated segmentation; cerebral aneurysms; and real-time particle-based representation....

  14. Undetected sex chromosome aneuploidy by chromosomal microarray.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markus-Bustani, Keren; Yaron, Yuval; Goldstein, Myriam; Orr-Urtreger, Avi; Ben-Shachar, Shay

    2012-11-01

    We report on a case of a female fetus found to be mosaic for Turner syndrome (45,X) and trisomy X (47,XXX). Chromosomal microarray analysis (CMA) failed to detect the aneuploidy because of a normal average dosage of the X chromosome. This case represents an unusual instance in which CMA may not detect chromosomal aberrations. Such a possibility should be taken into consideration in similar cases where CMA is used in a clinical setting.

  15. Live cell imaging of the nascent inactive X chromosome during the early differentiation process of naive ES cells towards epiblast stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurélia Guyochin

    Full Text Available Random X-chromosome inactivation ensures dosage compensation in mammals through the transcriptional silencing of one of the two X chromosomes present in each female cell. Silencing is initiated in the differentiating epiblast of the mouse female embryos through coating of the nascent inactive X chromosome by the non-coding RNA Xist, which subsequently recruits the Polycomb Complex PRC2 leading to histone H3-K27 methylation. Here we examined in mouse ES cells the early steps of the transition from naive ES cells towards epiblast stem cells as a model for inducing X chromosome inactivation in vitro. We show that these conditions efficiently induce random XCI. Importantly, in a transient phase of this differentiation pathway, both X chromosomes are coated with Xist RNA in up to 15% of the XX cells. In an attempt to determine the dynamics of this process, we designed a strategy aimed at visualizing the nascent inactive X-chromosome in live cells. We generated transgenic female XX ES cells expressing the PRC2 component Ezh2 fused to the fluorescent protein Venus. The fluorescent fusion protein was expressed at sub-physiological levels and located in nuclei of ES cells. Upon differentiation of ES cell towards epiblast stem cell fate, Venus-fluorescent territories appearing in interphase nuclei were identified as nascent inactive X chromosomes by their association with Xist RNA. Imaging of Ezh2-Venus for up to 24 hours during the differentiation process showed survival of some cells with two fluorescent domains and a surprising dynamics of the fluorescent territories across cell division and in the course of the differentiation process. Our data reveal a strategy for visualizing the nascent inactive X chromosome and suggests the possibility for a large plasticity of the nascent inactive X chromosome.

  16. Comparative genomic hybridization analysis shows different epidemiology of chromosomal and plasmid-borne cpe-carrying Clostridium perfringens type A.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Päivi Lahti

    Full Text Available Clostridium perfringens, one of the most common causes of food poisonings, can carry the enterotoxin gene, cpe, in its chromosome or on a plasmid. C. perfringens food poisonings are more frequently caused by the chromosomal cpe-carrying strains, while the plasmid-borne cpe-positive genotypes are more commonly found in the human feces and environmental samples. Different tolerance to food processing conditions by the plasmid-borne and chromosomal cpe-carrying strains has been reported, but the reservoirs and contamination routes of enterotoxin-producing C. perfringens remain unknown. A comparative genomic hybridization (CGH analysis with a DNA microarray based on three C. perfringens type A genomes was conducted to shed light on the epidemiology of C. perfringens food poisonings caused by plasmid-borne and chromosomal cpe-carrying strains by comparing chromosomal and plasmid-borne cpe-positive and cpe-negative C. perfringens isolates from human, animal, environmental, and food samples. The chromosomal and plasmid-borne cpe-positive C. perfringens genotypes formed two distinct clusters. Variable genes were involved with myo-inositol, ethanolamine and cellobiose metabolism, suggesting a new epidemiological model for C. perfringens food poisonings. The CGH results were complemented with growth studies, which demonstrated different myo-inositol, ethanolamine, and cellobiose metabolism between the chromosomal and plasmid-borne cpe-carrying strains. These findings support a ubiquitous occurrence of the plasmid-borne cpe-positive strains and their adaptation to the mammalian intestine, whereas the chromosomal cpe-positive strains appear to have a narrow niche in environments containing degrading plant material. Thus the epidemiology of the food poisonings caused by two populations appears different, the plasmid-borne cpe-positive strains probably contaminating foods via humans and the chromosomal strains being connected to plant material.

  17. Analysis of Y chromosome microdeletions and CFTR gene mutations as genetic markers of infertility in Serbian men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinić Jelena

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Impaired fertility of a male partner is the main cause of infertility in up to one half of all infertile couples. At the genetic level, male infertility can be caused by chromosome aberrations or gene mutations. The presence and types of Y chromosome microdeletions and cystic fybrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR gene mutations as genetic cause of male infertility was tested in Serbian men. The aim of this study was to analyze CFTR gene mutations and Y chromosome microdelations as potential causes of male infertility in Serbian patients, as well as to test the hypothesis that CFTR mutations in infertile men are predominantly located in the several last exons of the gene. Methods. This study has encompassed 33 men with oligo- or azoospermia. The screening for Y chromosome microdeletions in the azoospermia factor (AZF region was performed by multiplex PCR analysis. The screening of the CFTR gene was performed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE method. Results. Deletions on Y chromosome were detected in four patients, predominantly in AZFc region (four of total six deletions. Mutations in the CFTR gene were detected on eight out of 66 analyzed chromosomes of infertile men. The most common mutation was F508del (six of total eight mutations. Conclusion. This study confirmed that both Y chromosome microdeletions and CFTR gene mutations played important role in etiology of male infertility in Serbian infertile men. Genetic testing for Y chromosome microdeletions and CFTR gene mutations has been introduced in routine diagnostics and offered to couples undergoing assisted reproduction techniques. Considering that both the type of Y chromosome microdeletion and the type of CFTR mutation have a prognostic value, it is recommended that AZF and CFTR genotyping should not only be performed in patients with reduced sperm quality before undergoing assisted reproduction, but also for the purpose of preimplantation and

  18. [The construction of the genetic map and QTL locating analysis on chromosome 2 in swine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Yan-Chun; Deng, Chang-Yan; Xiong, Yuan-Zhu; Zheng, Rong; Yu, Li; Su, Yu-Hong; Liu, Gui-Lan

    2002-01-01

    The study constructed the genetic linkage map of porcine chromosome 2 and further analysis of quantitative trait loci was conducted. The results of the study demonstrated that all 7 microsatellite loci we chose were with relatively high polymorphism, and its polymorphic information content was from 0.40182 to 0.58477. The genetic map we constructed for resource family was 152.9 cM in length, with the order of all loci highly consistent with the USDA map. All marker intervals were longer than USDA map with the interval between marker Sw2516 and Sw1201 as an exception. Furthermore, we conducted QTLs locating analysis by combining the genetic map with the phenotypic data. QTLs affecting lively estimated traits such as lean meat percentage, were located at 60-65 cM on chromosome 2, while QTLs for the height and marbling of Longissmus dorsi muscle were located at 20 cM and 55 cM, respectively Among them, QTL for estimated lean meat percentage was significant at chromosome-wise level (P < 0.01) and was responsible for 21.55% of the phenotypic variance. QTLs for the height and marbling of Longissmus dorsi muscle were responsible for 10.12% and 10.97% of the phenotypic variance, respectively. The additive and dominance effect of lively estimated traits were in the inverse tendency, while the QTL for the height of Longissmus dorsi muscle had its additive and dominance effect in the same tendency and was with advantageous allele in Large White. The QTLs we detected had relatively large effect on phenotype and built a basis for molecular marker assisted selection and breeding.

  19. Cytogenetic analysis of the Amazon stingless bee Melipona seminigra merrillae reveals different chromosome number for the genus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izaura Bezerra Francini

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Cytogenetic analysis of the Amazon stingless bee Melipona seminigra merrillae, by conventional Giemsa staining and C-banding, revealed a different chromosome number for Melipona: 2n = 22 for females and diploid drones while the haploid drones present n = 11. There is no evidence of B chromosomes. This result contrasts with previous studies, in which the chromosome number of 19 Melipona species was determined as 2n = 18 for females and n = 9 for haploid males. Based on cytogenetic information available for other Melipona species, we propose that M. s. merrillae has a more derived diploid number. This indicates that chromosome number is not a conservative characteristic within the genus as previously thought. Cytogenetic data for stingless bees are scarce, especially in Amazon region. Additional studies will be very important in order to promote Melipona karyoevolution discussion and consequently a taxonomy review.

  20. Independent clonal origin of multiple uterine leiomyomas that was determined by X chromosome inactivation and microsatellite analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Canevari, Renata A; Pontes, Anaglória; Rosa, Fabíola E;

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: In an attempt to clarify the clonality and genetic relationships that are involved in the tumorigenesis of uterine leiomyomas, we used a total of 43 multiple leiomyomas from 14 patients and analyzed the allelic status with 15 microsatellite markers and X chromosome inactivation analysis....... STUDY DESIGN: We have used a set of 15 microsatellite polymorphism markers mapped on 3q, 7p, 11, and 15q by automated analysis. The X chromosome inactivation was evaluated by the methylation status of the X-linked androgen receptor gene. RESULTS: Loss of heterozygosity analysis showed a different...... pattern in 7 of the 8 cases with allelic loss for at least 1 of 15 microsatellite markers that were analyzed. A similar loss of heterozygosity findings at 7p22-15 was detected in 3 samples from the same patient. X chromosome inactivation analysis demonstrated the same inactivated allele in all tumors...

  1. An Extensive Analysis of Y-Chromosomal Microsatellite Haplotypes in Globally Dispersed Human Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayser, Manfred; Krawczak, Michael; Excoffier, Laurent; Dieltjes, Patrick; Corach, Daniel; Pascali, Vincente; Gehrig, Christian; Bernini, Luigi F.; Jespersen, Jørgen; Bakker, Egbert; Roewer, Lutz; de Knijff, Peter

    2001-01-01

    The genetic variance at seven Y-chromosomal microsatellite loci (or short tandem repeats [STRs]) was studied among 986 male individuals from 20 globally dispersed human populations. A total of 598 different haplotypes were observed, of which 437 (73.1%) were each found in a single male only. Population-specific haplotype-diversity values were .86–.99. Analyses of haplotype diversity and population-specific haplotypes revealed marked population-structure differences between more-isolated indigenous populations (e.g., Central African Pygmies or Greenland Inuit) and more-admixed populations (e.g., Europeans or Surinamese). Furthermore, male individuals from isolated indigenous populations shared haplotypes mainly with male individuals from their own population. By analysis of molecular variance, we found that 76.8% of the total genetic variance present among these male individuals could be attributed to genetic differences between male individuals who were members of the same population. Haplotype sharing between populations, ΦST statistics, and phylogenetic analysis identified close genetic affinities among European populations and among New Guinean populations. Our data illustrate that Y-chromosomal STR haplotypes are an ideal tool for the study of the genetic affinities between groups of male subjects and for detection of population structure. PMID:11254455

  2. [CHL15--a new gene controlling the replication of chromosomes in saccharomycetes yeast: cloning, physical mapping, sequencing, and sequence analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuprina, N Iu; Krol', E S; Koriabin, M Iu; Shestopalov, B V; Bliskovskiĭ, V V; Bannikov, V M; Gizatullin, R Z; Kirillov, A V; Kravtsov, V Iu; Zakhar'ev, V M

    1993-01-01

    We have analyzed the CHL15 gene, earlier identified in a screen for yeast mutants with increased loss of chromosome III and artificial circular and linear chromosomes in mitosis. Mutations in the CHL15 gene lead to a 100-fold increase in the rate of chromosome III loss per cell division and a 200-fold increase in the rate of marker homozygosis on this chromosome by mitotic recombination. Analysis of segregation of artificial circular minichromosome and artificially generated nonessential marker chromosome fragment indicated that sister chromatid loss (1:0 segregation) is a main reason of chromosome destabilization in the chl15-1 mutant. A genomic clone of CHL15 was isolated and used to map its physical position on chromosome XVI. Nucleotide sequence analysis of CHL15 revealed a 2.8-kb open reading frame with a 105-kD predicted protein sequence. At the N-terminal region of the protein sequences potentially able to form DNA-binding domains defined as zinc-fingers were found. The C-terminal region of the predicted protein displayed a similarity to sequence of regulatory proteins known as the helix-loop-helix (HLH) proteins. Data on partial deletion analysis suggest that the HLH domain is essential for the function of the CHL15 gene product. Analysis of the upstream untranslated region of CHL15 revealed the presence of the hexamer element, ACGCGT (an MluI restriction site) controlling both the periodic expression and coordinate regulation of the DNA synthesis genes in budding yeast. Deletion in the RAD52 gene, the product of which is involved in double-strand break/recombination repair and replication, leads to a considerable decrease in the growth rate of the chl15 mutant. We suggest that CHL15 is a new DNA synthesis gene in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

  3. Proteomic analysis of human metaphase chromosomes reveals Topoisomerase II alpha as an Aurora B substrate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morrison, Ciaran; Henzing, Alexander J; Jensen, Ole Nørregaard;

    2002-01-01

    The essential Aurora B kinase is a chromosomal passenger protein that is required for mitotic chromosome alignment and segregation. Aurora B function is dependent on the chromosome passenger, INCENP. INCENP, in turn, requires sister chromatid cohesion for its appropriate behaviour. Relatively few...

  4. Analysis of the terminus region of the Caulobacter crescentus chromosome and identification of the dif site

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Rasmus Bugge

    2006-01-01

    The terminus region of the Caulobacter crescentus chromosome and the dif chromosome dimer resolution site were characterized. The Caulobacter genome contains skewed sequences that abruptly switch strands at dif and may have roles in chromosome maintenance and segregation. Absence of dif or the Xer...

  5. Chromosomal microarray analysis as a first-tier clinical diagnostic test: Estonian experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zilina, Olga; Teek, Rita; Tammur, Pille; Kuuse, Kati; Yakoreva, Maria; Vaidla, Eve; Mölter-Väär, Triin; Reimand, Tiia; Kurg, Ants; Ounap, Katrin

    2014-03-01

    Chromosomal microarray analysis (CMA) is now established as the first-tier cytogenetic diagnostic test for fast and accurate detection of chromosomal abnormalities in patients with developmental delay/intellectual disability (DD/ID), multiple congenital anomalies (MCA), and autism spectrum disorders (ASD). We present our experience with using CMA for postnatal and prenatal diagnosis in Estonian patients during 2009-2012. Since 2011, CMA is on the official service list of the Estonian Health Insurance Fund and is performed as the first-tier cytogenetic test for patients with DD/ID, MCA or ASD. A total of 1191 patients were analyzed, including postnatal (1072 [90%] patients and 59 [5%] family members) and prenatal referrals (60 [5%] fetuses). Abnormal results were reported in 298 (25%) patients, with a total of 351 findings (1-3 per individual): 147 (42%) deletions, 106 (30%) duplications, 89 (25%) long contiguous stretches of homozygosity (LCSH) events (>5 Mb), and nine (3%) aneuploidies. Of all findings, 143 (41%) were defined as pathogenic or likely pathogenic; for another 143 findings (41%), most of which were LCSH, the clinical significance remained unknown, while 61 (18%) reported findings can now be reclassified as benign or likely benign. Clinically relevant findings were detected in 126 (11%) patients. However, the proportion of variants of unknown clinical significance was quite high (41% of all findings). It seems that our ability to detect chromosomal abnormalities has far outpaced our ability to understand their role in disease. Thus, the interpretation of CMA findings remains a rather difficult task requiring a close collaboration between clinicians and cytogeneticists.

  6. Karyotyping human and mouse cells using probes from single-sorted chromosomes and open source software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potapova, Tamara A; Unruh, Jay R; Box, Andrew C; Bradford, William D; Seidel, Christopher W; Slaughter, Brian D; Sivagnanam, Shamilene; Wu, Yuping; Li, Rong

    2015-12-01

    Multispectral karyotyping analyzes all chromosomes in a single cell by labeling them with chromosome-specific probes conjugated to unique combinations of fluorophores. Currently available multispectral karyotyping systems require the purchase of specialized equipment and reagents. However, conventional laser scanning confocal microscopes that are capable of separating multiple overlapping emission spectra through spectral imaging and linear unmixing can be utilized for classifying chromosomes painted with multicolor probes. Here, we generated multicolor chromosome paints from single-sorted human and mouse chromosomes and developed the Karyotype Identification via Spectral Separation (KISS) analysis package, a set of freely available open source ImageJ tools for spectral unmixing and karyotyping. Chromosome spreads painted with our multispectral probe sets can be imaged on widely available spectral laser scanning confocal microscopes and analyzed using our ImageJ tools. Together, our probes and software enable academic labs with access to a laser-scanning spectral microscope to perform multicolor karyotyping in a cost-effective manner.

  7. Characterization of a new aberration of the human Y chromosome by banding methods and DNA restriction endonuclease analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, M; Gall, H; Schempp, W; Weber, L; Schmidtke, J

    1981-01-01

    Comparative cytogenetic analyses were performed with ten different banding methods on a previously undescribed, inherited structural aberration of a Y chromosome, and the results compared with those of normal Y chromosomes occurring in the same family. The value of the individual staining techniques in investigations of Y chromosomal aberrations is emphasized. The aberrant Y chromosome analyzed can be formally derived from an isodicentric Y chromosome for the short arm with a very terminal long-arm breakpoint, in which the centromere, an entire short arm, and the proximal region on one long arm was lost. This interpretation was confirmed by determining the amount of the two Y-specific DNA sequences (2.1 and 3.4 kb in length) by means of Hae III restriction endonuclease analysis. The karyotype-phenotype correlations in the men with this aberrant Y chromosome, especially the fertility dysfunctions (oligoasthenoteratozoospermia, cryptozoospermia), are discussed. The possibility of the existence of fertility factors involved in the control of spermatogenesis within the quinacrine-bright heterochromatic region of the Y long arm is presented.

  8. mBAND Analysis of Late Chromosome Aberrations in Human Lymphocytes Induced by Gamma Rays and Fe Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunagawa, Mayumi; Zhang, Ye; Yeshitla, Samrawit; Kadhim, Munira; Wilson, Bobby; Wu, Honglu

    2014-01-01

    Chromosomal translocations and inversions are considered stable, and cells containing these types of chromosome aberrations can survive multiple cell divisions. An efficient method to detect an inversion is multi-color banding fluorescent in situ hybridization (mBAND) which allows identification of both inter- and intrachromosome aberrations simultaneously. Post irradiation, chromosome aberrations may also arise after multiple cell divisions as a result of genomic instability. To investigate the stable or late-arising chromosome aberrations induced after radiation exposure, we exposed human lymphocytes to gamma rays and Fe ions ex vivo, and cultured the cells for multiple generations. Chromosome aberrations were analyzed in cells collected at first mitosis and at several time intervals during the culture period post irradiation. With gamma irradiation, about half of the damages observed at first mitosis remained after 7 day- and 14 day- culture, suggesting the transmissibility of damages to the surviving progeny. Detailed analysis of chromosome break ends participating in exchanges revealed a greater fraction of break ends involved in intrachromosome aberrations in the 7- and 14-day samples in comparison to the fraction at first mitosis. In particular, simple inversions were found at 7 and 14 days, but not at the first mitosis, suggesting that some of the aberrations might be formed days post irradiation. In contrast, at the doses that produced similar frequencies of gamma-induced chromosome aberrations as observed at first mitosis, a significantly lower yield of aberrations remained at the same population doublings after Fe ion exposure. At these equitoxic doses, more complex type aberrations were observed for Fe ions, indicating that Fe ion-induced initial chromosome damages are more severe and may lead to cell death. Comparison between low and high doses of Fe ion irradiation in the induction of late damages will also be discussed.

  9. Chromosome segregation analysis in human embryos obtained from couples involving male carriers of reciprocal or Robertsonian translocation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Yilmaz

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to investigate the frequency and type of chromosome segregation patterns in cleavage stage embryos obtained from male carriers of Robertsonian (ROB and reciprocal (REC translocations undergoing preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD at our reproductive center. We used FISH to analyze chromosome segregation in 308 day 3 cleavage stage embryos obtained from 26 patients. The percentage of embryos consistent with normal or balanced segregation (55.1% vs. 27.1% and clinical pregnancy (62.5% vs. 19.2% rates were higher in ROB than the REC translocation carriers. Involvement of non-acrocentric chromosome(s or terminal breakpoint(s in reciprocal translocations was associated with an increase in the percent of embryos consistent with adjacent 1 but with a decrease in 3∶1 segregation. Similar results were obtained in the analysis of nontransferred embryos donated for research. 3∶1 segregation was the most frequent segregation type in both day 3 (31% and spare (35% embryos obtained from carriers of t(11;22(q23;q11, the only non-random REC with the same breakpoint reported in a large number of unrelated families mainly identified by the birth of a child with derivative chromosome 22. These results suggest that chromosome segregation patterns in day 3 and nontransferred embryos obtained from male translocation carriers vary with the type of translocation and involvement of acrocentric chromosome(s or terminal breakpoint(s. These results should be helpful in estimating reproductive success in translocation carriers undergoing PGD.

  10. A reasoning system for image analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gao Jin Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available For image analysis in computer, the traditional approach is extracting and transcoding features after image segmentation. However, in this paper, we present a different way to analyze image. We adopt spatial logic technology to establish a reasoning system with corresponding semantic model, and prove its soundness and completeness, and then realize the image analysis in formal way. And it can be applied in artificial intelligence. This is a new attempt and also a challenging approach.

  11. Condensin- and Replication-Mediated Bacterial Chromosome Folding and Origin Condensation Revealed by Hi-C and Super-resolution Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marbouty, Martial; Le Gall, Antoine; Cattoni, Diego I; Cournac, Axel; Koh, Alan; Fiche, Jean-Bernard; Mozziconacci, Julien; Murray, Heath; Koszul, Romain; Nollmann, Marcelo

    2015-08-20

    Chromosomes of a broad range of species, from bacteria to mammals, are structured by large topological domains whose precise functional roles and regulatory mechanisms remain elusive. Here, we combine super-resolution microscopies and chromosome-capture technologies to unravel the higher-order organization of the Bacillus subtilis chromosome and its dynamic rearrangements during the cell cycle. We decipher the fine 3D architecture of the origin domain, revealing folding motifs regulated by condensin-like complexes. This organization, along with global folding throughout the genome, is present before replication, disrupted by active DNA replication, and re-established thereafter. Single-cell analysis revealed a strict correspondence between sub-cellular localization of origin domains and their condensation state. Our results suggest that the precise 3D folding pattern of the origin domain plays a role in the regulation of replication initiation, chromosome organization, and DNA segregation.

  12. Chromosome Aberrations in Human Epithelial Cells Exposed Los Alamos High-Energy Secondary Neutrons: M-BAND Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hada, M.; Saganti, P. B.; Gersey, B.; Wilkins, R.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Wu, H.

    2007-01-01

    High-energy secondary neutrons, produced by the interaction of galactic cosmic rays (GCR) with the atmosphere, spacecraft structure and planetary surfaces, contribute a significant fraction to the dose equivalent radiation measurement in crew members and passengers of commercial aviation travel as well as astronauts in space missions. The Los Alamos Nuclear Science Center (LANSCE) neutron facility's 30L beam line (4FP30L-A/ICE House) is known to generate neutrons that simulate the secondary neutron spectrum of the Earth's atmosphere at high altitude. The neutron spectrum is also similar to that measured onboard spacecrafts like the MIR and the International Space Station (ISS). To evaluate the biological damage, we exposed human epithelial cells in vitro to the LANSCE neutron beams with an entrance dose rate of 2.5 cGy/hr, and studied the induction of chromosome aberrations that were identified with multicolor-banding in situ hybridization (mBAND) technique. With this technique, individually painted chromosomal bands on one chromosome allowed the identification of inter-chromosomal aberrations (translocation to unpainted chromosomes) and intra-chromosomal aberrations (inversions and deletions within a single painted chromosome). Compared to our previous results with gamma-rays and 600 MeV/nucleon Fe ions of high dose rate at NSRL (NASA Space Radiation Laboratory at Brookhaven National Laboratory), the neutron data from the LANSCE experiments showed significantly higher frequency of chromosome aberrations. However, detailed analysis of the inversion type revealed that all of the three radiation types in the study induced a low incidence of simple inversions. Most of the inversions in gamma-ray irradiated samples were accompanied by other types of intrachromosomal aberrations but few inversions were accompanied by interchromosomal aberrations. In contrast, neutrons and Fe ions induced a significant fraction of inversions that involved complex rearrangements of both

  13. Analysis of the Trojan Y-Chromosome eradication strategy for an invasive species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xueying; Walton, Jay R; Parshad, Rana D; Storey, Katie; Boggess, May

    2014-06-01

    The Trojan Y-Chromosome (TYC) strategy, an autocidal genetic biocontrol method, has been proposed to eliminate invasive alien species. In this work, we analyze the dynamical system model of the TYC strategy, with the aim of studying the viability of the TYC eradication and control strategy of an invasive species. In particular, because the constant introduction of sex-reversed trojan females for all time is not possible in practice, there arises the question: What happens if this injection is stopped after some time? Can the invasive species recover? To answer that question, we perform a rigorous bifurcation analysis and study the basin of attraction of the recovery state and the extinction state in both the full model and a certain reduced model. In particular, we find a theoretical condition for the eradication strategy to work. Additionally, the consideration of an Allee effect and the possibility of a Turing instability are also studied in this work. Our results show that: (1) with the inclusion of an Allee effect, the number of the invasive females is not required to be very low when the introduction of the sex-reversed trojan females is stopped, and the remaining Trojan Y-Chromosome population is sufficient to induce extinction of the invasive females; (2) incorporating diffusive spatial spread does not produce a Turing instability, which would have suggested that the TYC eradication strategy might be only partially effective, leaving a patchy distribution of the invasive species.

  14. Analysis of the Trojan Y-Chromosome eradication strategy for an invasive species

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Xueying

    2013-05-24

    The Trojan Y-Chromosome (TYC) strategy, an autocidal genetic biocontrol method, has been proposed to eliminate invasive alien species. In this work, we analyze the dynamical system model of the TYC strategy, with the aim of studying the viability of the TYC eradication and control strategy of an invasive species. In particular, because the constant introduction of sex-reversed trojan females for all time is not possible in practice, there arises the question: What happens if this injection is stopped after some time? Can the invasive species recover? To answer that question, we perform a rigorous bifurcation analysis and study the basin of attraction of the recovery state and the extinction state in both the full model and a certain reduced model. In particular, we find a theoretical condition for the eradication strategy to work. Additionally, the consideration of an Allee effect and the possibility of a Turing instability are also studied in this work. Our results show that: (1) with the inclusion of an Allee effect, the number of the invasive females is not required to be very low when the introduction of the sex-reversed trojan females is stopped, and the remaining Trojan Y-Chromosome population is sufficient to induce extinction of the invasive females; (2) incorporating diffusive spatial spread does not produce a Turing instability, which would have suggested that the TYC eradication strategy might be only partially effective, leaving a patchy distribution of the invasive species. © 2013 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

  15. [Analysis of chromosome composition in interspecific embryonic stem hybrid cells of mice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pristiazhniuk, I E; Matveeva, N M; Grafodatskiĭ, A S; Serdiukova, N A; Serov, O L

    2010-01-01

    Chromosome complements of twenty hybrid clones obtained by fusion of Mus musculus embryonic stem cells (ESC) and M. caroli splenocytes were studied. Using of double-color in situ hybridization with chromosome- and species-specific probes we were able to detect the parental origin for each chromosome in hybrid cells. Based on parental chromosome ratio, all 20 hybrid clones were separated in some different groups: from the group containing practically tetraploid M. musculus genome with single M. caroli chromosomes to hybrids with dominance of M. caroli chromosome homologues. In 8 hybrid cells clones we observed prevalence of chromosomes originated from ESC in ratio from 5:1 to 3:1. Another hybrid cells clones have either equal (1:1, 1:2) ratio of M. musculus to M. caroli chromosomes or with the prevalence of ESC- (2:1) or splenocyte- (1:2) originated parental chromosome homologues. In 3 hybrid cells clones, we observed preferable segregation of ESC-originated pluripotent chromosomes. This phenomenon was found for the first time and it possibly indicates compensation of the epigenetic differences between parental chromosomes of ESC- and splenocyte-origination.

  16. Image analysis: a consumer's guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, F

    1983-01-01

    The last years have seen an explosion of systems in image analysis. It is hard for the pathologist or the cytologist to make the right choice of equipment. All machines are stupid, and the only valuable thing is the human work put into it. So make your benefit of the work other people have done for you. Chose a method largely used on many systems and which has proved fertile in many domains and not only for your specific to day's application: Mathematical Morphology, to which are to be added the linear convolutions present on all machines is a strong candidate for becoming such a method. The paper illustrates a working day of an ideal system: research and diagnostic directed work during the working hours, automatic screening of cervical (or other) smears during night.

  17. Chromosome Mapping, Expression and Polymorphism Analysis of CRABP1 Gene in Pigs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Shuan-ping; TANG Zhong-lin; ZHOU Rong; QU Chang-qing; ZHENG Jian-wei; LI Kui

    2014-01-01

    Cellular retinoic acid-binding protein 1 (CRABP1) is a well-conserved member of cytosolic lipid-binding protein family. It is an important modulator of retinoic acid signaling. Long serial analysis of gene expression (LongSAGE) analysis suggested that CRABP1 gene was differentially expressed during prenatal skeletal muscle development in porcine. Here, we obtained the full-length coding region sequence and genomic sequence of the porcine CRABP1 gene and analyzed its genomic structures. Subsequently, we examined CRABP1 chromosome assignment using INRA-University of Minnesota 7 000 porcine radiation hybrid panel (IMpRH) and explored its tissue distribution in adult Tongcheng pigs and dynamical expression proifles in prenatal skeletal muscle (33, 65 and 90 days post coitus, dpc) from Landrace (lean-type) (described as L33, L65 and L90) and Tongcheng pigs (obese-type) (described as T33, T65 and T90). The CRABP1 gene was mapped to chromosome 7q11-q23 and closely linked to the microsatellite marker SWR1928. Quantitative real-time PCR showed that CRABP1 mRNA was highly expressed in lung and stomach, moderately expressed in placenta and uterus, and weakly expressed in other tissues. Moreover, CRABP1 gene was down-regulated during prenatal skeletal muscle development in both Landrace and Tongcheng pigs and it was expressed much higher in T33 than L33. Two single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were detected by sequencing and mass spectrometry methods, allele frequency analysis indicated that g. 281 (G>A) and g. 2992 (G>A) were deviated from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium in the Landrace and DLY (Duroc×(Landrace×Yorkshire)) pig breeds.

  18. Complete kinetochore tracking reveals error-prone homologous chromosome biorientation in mammalian oocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitajima, Tomoya S; Ohsugi, Miho; Ellenberg, Jan

    2011-08-19

    Chromosomes must establish stable biorientation prior to anaphase to achieve faithful segregation during cell division. The detailed process by which chromosomes are bioriented and how biorientation is coordinated with spindle assembly and chromosome congression remain unclear. Here, we provide complete 3D kinetochore-tracking datasets throughout cell division by high-resolution imaging of meiosis I in live mouse oocytes. We show that in acentrosomal oocytes, chromosome congression forms an intermediate chromosome configuration, the prometaphase belt, which precedes biorientation. Chromosomes then invade the elongating spindle center to form the metaphase plate and start biorienting. Close to 90% of all chromosomes undergo one or more rounds of error correction of their kinetochore-microtubule attachments before achieving correct biorientation. This process depends on Aurora kinase activity. Our analysis reveals the error-prone nature of homologous chromosome biorientation, providing a possible explanation for the high incidence of aneuploid eggs observed in mammals, including humans.

  19. Chromosome region-specific libraries for human genome analysis. Final progress report, 1 March 1991--28 February 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kao, F.T.

    1994-04-01

    The objectives of this grant proposal include (1) development of a chromosome microdissection and PCR-mediated microcloning technology, (2) application of this microtechnology to the construction of region-specific libraries for human genome analysis. During this grant period, the authors have successfully developed this microtechnology and have applied it to the construction of microdissection libraries for the following chromosome regions: a whole chromosome 21 (21E), 2 region-specific libraries for the long arm of chromosome 2, 2q35-q37 (2Q1) and 2q33-q35 (2Q2), and 4 region-specific libraries for the entire short arm of chromosome 2, 2p23-p25 (2P1), 2p21-p23 (2P2), 2p14-p16 (wP3) and 2p11-p13 (2P4). In addition, 20--40 unique sequence microclones have been isolated and characterized for genomic studies. These region-specific libraries and the single-copy microclones from the library have been used as valuable resources for (1) isolating microsatellite probes in linkage analysis to further refine the disease locus; (2) isolating corresponding clones with large inserts, e.g. YAC, BAC, P1, cosmid and phage, to facilitate construction of contigs for high resolution physical mapping; and (3) isolating region-specific cDNA clones for use as candidate genes. These libraries are being deposited in the American Type Culture Collection (ATCC) for general distribution.

  20. Analysis of Dynamic Brain Imaging Data

    CERN Document Server

    Mitra, P

    1998-01-01

    Modern imaging techniques for probing brain function, including functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging, intrinsic and extrinsic contrast optical imaging, and magnetoencephalography, generate large data sets with complex content. In this paper we develop appropriate techniques of analysis and visualization of such imaging data, in order to separate the signal from the noise, as well as to characterize the signal. The techniques developed fall into the general category of multivariate time series analysis, and in particular we extensively use the multitaper framework of spectral analysis. We develop specific protocols for the analysis of fMRI, optical imaging and MEG data, and illustrate the techniques by applications to real data sets generated by these imaging modalities. In general, the analysis protocols involve two distinct stages: `noise' characterization and suppression, and `signal' characterization and visualization. An important general conclusion of our study is the utility of a frequency-based repres...

  1. Digital-image processing and image analysis of glacier ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, Joan J.

    2013-01-01

    This document provides a methodology for extracting grain statistics from 8-bit color and grayscale images of thin sections of glacier ice—a subset of physical properties measurements typically performed on ice cores. This type of analysis is most commonly used to characterize the evolution of ice-crystal size, shape, and intercrystalline spatial relations within a large body of ice sampled by deep ice-coring projects from which paleoclimate records will be developed. However, such information is equally useful for investigating the stress state and physical responses of ice to stresses within a glacier. The methods of analysis presented here go hand-in-hand with the analysis of ice fabrics (aggregate crystal orientations) and, when combined with fabric analysis, provide a powerful method for investigating the dynamic recrystallization and deformation behaviors of bodies of ice in motion. The procedures described in this document compose a step-by-step handbook for a specific image acquisition and data reduction system built in support of U.S. Geological Survey ice analysis projects, but the general methodology can be used with any combination of image processing and analysis software. The specific approaches in this document use the FoveaPro 4 plug-in toolset to Adobe Photoshop CS5 Extended but it can be carried out equally well, though somewhat less conveniently, with software such as the image processing toolbox in MATLAB, Image-Pro Plus, or ImageJ.

  2. Vibrio chromosomes share common history

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gevers Dirk

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While most gamma proteobacteria have a single circular chromosome, Vibrionales have two circular chromosomes. Horizontal gene transfer is common among Vibrios, and in light of this genetic mobility, it is an open question to what extent the two chromosomes themselves share a common history since their formation. Results Single copy genes from each chromosome (142 genes from chromosome I and 42 genes from chromosome II were identified from 19 sequenced Vibrionales genomes and their phylogenetic comparison suggests consistent phylogenies for each chromosome. Additionally, study of the gene organization and phylogeny of the respective origins of replication confirmed the shared history. Conclusions Thus, while elements within the chromosomes may have experienced significant genetic mobility, the backbones share a common history. This allows conclusions based on multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA for one chromosome to be applied equally to both chromosomes.

  3. Marker chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Kiran Prabhaker; Belogolovkin, Victoria

    2013-04-01

    Marker chromosomes are a morphologically heterogeneous group of structurally abnormal chromosomes that pose a significant challenge in prenatal diagnosis. Phenotypes associated with marker chromosomes are highly variable and range from normal to severely abnormal. Clinical outcomes are very difficult to predict when marker chromosomes are detected prenatally. In this review, we outline the classification, etiology, cytogenetic characterization, and clinical consequences of marker chromosomes, as well as practical approaches to prenatal diagnosis and genetic counseling.

  4. Clinical implementation of chromosomal microarray analysis: summary of 2513 postnatal cases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinyan Lu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Array Comparative Genomic Hybridization (a-CGH is a powerful molecular cytogenetic tool to detect genomic imbalances and study disease mechanism and pathogenesis. We report our experience with the clinical implementation of this high resolution human genome analysis, referred to as Chromosomal Microarray Analysis (CMA. METHODS AND FINDINGS: CMA was performed clinically on 2513 postnatal samples from patients referred with a variety of clinical phenotypes. The initial 775 samples were studied using CMA array version 4 and the remaining 1738 samples were analyzed with CMA version 5 containing expanded genomic coverage. Overall, CMA identified clinically relevant genomic imbalances in 8.5% of patients: 7.6% using V4 and 8.9% using V5. Among 117 cases referred for additional investigation of a known cytogenetically detectable rearrangement, CMA identified the majority (92.5% of the genomic imbalances. Importantly, abnormal CMA findings were observed in 5.2% of patients (98/1872 with normal karyotypes/FISH results, and V5, with expanded genomic coverage, enabled a higher detection rate in this category than V4. For cases without cytogenetic results available, 8.0% (42/524 abnormal CMA results were detected; again, V5 demonstrated an increased ability to detect abnormality. Improved diagnostic potential of CMA is illustrated by 90 cases identified with 51 cryptic microdeletions and 39 predicted apparent reciprocal microduplications in 13 specific chromosomal regions associated with 11 known genomic disorders. In addition, CMA identified copy number variations (CNVs of uncertain significance in 262 probands; however, parental studies usually facilitated clinical interpretation. Of these, 217 were interpreted as familial variants and 11 were determined to be de novo; the remaining 34 await parental studies to resolve the clinical significance. CONCLUSIONS: This large set of clinical results demonstrates the significantly improved sensitivity

  5. Measurement of Nuchal Translucency Thickness for Detection of Chromosomal Abnormalities using First Trimester Ultrasound Fetal Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Nirmala

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The Nuchal Translucency thickness measurement is made to identify the Down Syndrome in screening first trimester fetus and presented in this paper. The mean shift analysis and canny operators are utilized for segmenting the nuchal translucency region and the exact thickness has been estimated using Blob analysis. It is observed from the results that the fetus in the 14th week of Gestation is expected to have a nuchal translucency thickness of 1.87±0.25mm.Keywords- Down syndrome; Nuchal translucency thickness; Mean Shift Analysis; Blob analysis;

  6. Image registration with uncertainty analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonson, Katherine M.

    2011-03-22

    In an image registration method, edges are detected in a first image and a second image. A percentage of edge pixels in a subset of the second image that are also edges in the first image shifted by a translation is calculated. A best registration point is calculated based on a maximum percentage of edges matched. In a predefined search region, all registration points other than the best registration point are identified that are not significantly worse than the best registration point according to a predetermined statistical criterion.

  7. Meta-analysis of results from quantitative trait loci mapping studies on pig chromosome 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, K M; Bastiaansen, J W M; Knol, E F; Merks, J W M; Lopes, P S; Guimarães, S E F; van Arendonk, J A M

    2011-06-01

    Meta-analysis of results from multiple studies could lead to more precise quantitative trait loci (QTL) position estimates compared to the individual experiments. As the raw data from many different studies are not readily available, the use of results from published articles may be helpful. In this study, we performed a meta-analysis of QTL on chromosome 4 in pig, using data from 25 separate experiments. First, a meta-analysis was performed for individual traits: average daily gain and backfat thickness. Second, a meta-analysis was performed for the QTL of three traits affecting loin yield: loin eye area, carcass length and loin meat weight. Third, 78 QTL were selected from 20 traits that could be assigned to one of three broad categories: carcass, fatness or growth traits. For each analysis, the number of identified meta-QTL was smaller than the number of initial QTL. The reduction in the number of QTL ranged from 71% to 86% compared to the total number before the meta-analysis. In addition, the meta-analysis reduced the QTL confidence intervals by as much as 85% compared to individual QTL estimates. The reduction in the confidence interval was greater when a large number of independent QTL was included in the meta-analysis. Meta-QTL related to growth and fatness were found in the same region as the FAT1 region. Results indicate that the meta-analysis is an efficient strategy to estimate the number and refine the positions of QTL when QTL estimates are available from multiple populations and experiments. This strategy can be used to better target further studies such as the selection of candidate genes related to trait variation.

  8. Hyperspectral image classification using functional data analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hong; Xiao, Guangrun; Xia, Tian; Tang, Y Y; Li, Luoqing

    2014-09-01

    The large number of spectral bands acquired by hyperspectral imaging sensors allows us to better distinguish many subtle objects and materials. Unlike other classical hyperspectral image classification methods in the multivariate analysis framework, in this paper, a novel method using functional data analysis (FDA) for accurate classification of hyperspectral images has been proposed. The central idea of FDA is to treat multivariate data as continuous functions. From this perspective, the spectral curve of each pixel in the hyperspectral images is naturally viewed as a function. This can be beneficial for making full use of the abundant spectral information. The relevance between adjacent pixel elements in the hyperspectral images can also be utilized reasonably. Functional principal component analysis is applied to solve the classification problem of these functions. Experimental results on three hyperspectral images show that the proposed method can achieve higher classification accuracies in comparison to some state-of-the-art hyperspectral image classification methods.

  9. A Bayesian analysis of the chromosome architecture of human disorders by integrating reductionist data

    OpenAIRE

    Emmert-Streib, Frank; de Matos Simoes, Ricardo; Tripathi, Shailesh; Glazko, Galina V.; Dehmer, Matthias

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we present a Bayesian approach to estimate a chromosome and a disorder network from the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) database. In contrast to other approaches, we obtain statistic rather than deterministic networks enabling a parametric control in the uncertainty of the underlying disorder-disease gene associations contained in the OMIM, on which the networks are based. From a structural investigation of the chromosome network, we identify three chromosome subgrou...

  10. Fractal methods in image analysis and coding

    OpenAIRE

    Neary, David

    2001-01-01

    In this thesis we present an overview of image processing techniques which use fractal methods in some way. We show how these fields relate to each other, and examine various aspects of fractal methods in each area. The three principal fields of image processing and analysis th a t we examine are texture classification, image segmentation and image coding. In the area of texture classification, we examine fractal dimension estimators, comparing these methods to other methods in use, a...

  11. High level of male-biased Scandinavian admixture in Greenlandic Inuit shown by Y-chromosomal analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bosch, Elena; Calafell, Francesc; Rosser, Zoë H;

    2003-01-01

    settlers from Iceland, who may have been assimilated 500 years ago, and the Danish-Norwegian colonists of the eighteenth century. Insufficient differentiation between modern Icelandic and Danish Y chromosomes means that a choice between these cannot be made on the basis of diversity analysis. However...

  12. Clinical utility of chromosomal microarray analysis of DNA from buccal cells: detection of mosaicism in three patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sdano, Mallory R; Vanzo, Rena J; Martin, Megan M; Baldwin, Erin E; South, Sarah T; Rope, Alan F; Allen, William P; Kearney, Hutton

    2014-12-01

    Mosaic chromosomal abnormalities are relatively common. However, mosaicism may be missed due to multiple factors including failure to recognize clinical indications and order appropriate testing, technical limitations of diagnostic assays, or sampling tissue (s) in which mosaicism is either not present, or present at very low levels. Blood leukocytes have long been the "gold standard" sample for cytogenetic analysis; however, the culturing process for routine chromosome analysis can complicate detection of mosaicism since the normal cell line may have a growth advantage in culture, or may not be present in the cells that produce metaphases (the lymphocytes). Buccal cells are becoming increasingly utilized for clinical analyses and are proving to have many advantages. Buccal swabs allow for simple and noninvasive DNA collection. When coupled with a chromosomal microarray that contains single nucleotide polymorphic probes, analysis of buccal cells can maximize a clinician's opportunity to detect cytogenetic mosaicism. We present three cases of improved diagnosis of mosaic aberrations using buccal specimens for chromosomal microarray analysis. In each case, the aberration was either undetectable in blood or present at such a low level it likely could have gone undetected. These cases highlight the limitations of certain laboratory methodologies for identifying mosaicism. We also present practice implications for genetic counselors, including clinic workflow changes and counseling approaches based on increasing use of buccal samples.

  13. Amplification, analysis and chromosome mapping of novel homeobox-containing and homeobox-flanking sequences in rice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘国振; 严长杰; 翟文学; 何平; 杨江; 李小兵; 朱立煌

    1999-01-01

    Homeobox genes, widely distributed among animal and plant kingdoms, play an important role in developmental process. Several homeobox conserved fragments were amplified by PCR and the flanking regions were also obtained by an LM-PCR procedure. Sequencing and Southern analysis showed that they belong to a homeobox gene family of rice. Six homeobox-containing fragments were mapped on the molecular linkage map of rice. They were located on chromosomes 3, 4 and 7 respectively. It is noteworthy that there are 4 homeobox fragments located on rice chromosome 3 and the result is also consistent with the comparative genomics between rice and maize.

  14. Clastogenic effects of known and suspect spindle poisons studied by chromosome analysis in mouse bone marrow cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, W; Adler, I D

    1990-07-01

    The present study was performed within the project 'Genomic Mutations' (sponsored by the Commission of the European Communities) in order to gather all possible experimental information on 10 chemicals selected on the basis of their possible capacity to induce aneuploidy. An analysis of chromosomal aberrations was carried out in bone marrow cells of mice with the first five chemicals: colchicine (COL), econazole (EZ), chloralhydrate (CH), hydroquinone (HQ) and diazepam (DIAZ). The experiments were performed in parallel to micronucleus tests with the objective to distinguish a positive micronucleus response due to chromosomal breakage from that obtained by lagging chromosomes. The results of the micronucleus tests will be reported elsewhere. COL, CH, EZ and DIAZ showed no clastogenic effects in mouse bone marrow cells after single intraperitoneal injection. Polyploid cells were significantly more frequent after COL treatment. HQ showed a dose-dependent induction of chromosomal aberrations at 6 and 24 h after treatment. After 24 h, cells with multiple aberrations up to complete chromosome fragmentation were frequently observed. They indicate that a small fraction of the cell population, probably related to a specific stage of the cell cycle, was particularly sensitive to HQ. A sex difference in clastogenic response to HQ was not observed. It is concluded that of the five chemicals tested only HQ was clastogenic in mouse bone marrow cells under the present experimental conditions.

  15. Measurement of Nuchal Translucency Thickness for Detection of Chromosomal Abnormalities using First Trimester Ultrasound Fetal Images

    CERN Document Server

    Nirmala, S

    2010-01-01

    The Nuchal Translucency thickness measurement is made to identify the Down Syndrome in screening first trimester fetus and presented in this paper. The mean shift analysis and canny operators are utilized for segmenting the nuchal translucency region and the exact thickness has been estimated using Blob analysis. It is observed from the results that the fetus in the 14th week of Gestation is expected to have a nuchal translucency thickness of 1.87 plus or minus 0.25mm.

  16. Chromosomal instability in meningiomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Tilborg, Angela A G; Al Allak, Bushra; Velthuizen, Sandra C J M; de Vries, Annie; Kros, Johan M; Avezaat, Cees J J; de Klein, Annelies; Beverloo, H Berna; Zwarthoff, Ellen C

    2005-04-01

    Approximately 60% of sporadic meningiomas are caused by inactivation of the NF2 tumor suppressor gene on chromosome 22. No causative gene is known for the remaining 40%. Cytogenetic analysis shows that meningiomas caused by inactivation of the NF2 gene can be divided into tumors that show monosomy 22 as the sole abnormality and tumors with a more complex karyotype. Meningiomas not caused by the NF2 gene usually have a diploid karyotype. Here we report that, besides the clonal chromosomal aberrations, the chromosome numbers in many meningiomas varied from one metaphase spread to the other, a feature that is indicative of chromosomal instability. Unexpectedly and regardless of genotype, a subgroup of tumors was observed with an average number of 44.9 chromosomes and little variation in the number of chromosomes per metaphase spread. In addition, a second subgroup was recognized with a hyperdiploid number of chromosomes (average 48.5) and considerable variation in numbers per metaphase. However, this numerical instability resulted in a clonal karyotype with chromosomal gains and losses in addition to loss of chromosome 22 only in meningiomas caused by inactivation of the NF2 gene. In cultured cells of all tumor groups, bi- and multinucleated cells were seen, as well as anaphase bridges, residual chromatid strings, multiple spindle poles, and unseparated chromatids, suggesting defects in the mitotic apparatus or kinetochore. Thus, we conclude that even a benign and slow-growing tumor like a meningioma displays chromosomal instability.

  17. High resolution chromosome analysis and fluorescence in situ hybridization in patients referred for Prader-Willi or Angelman syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-05-08

    Laboratory testing is helpful in the evaluation of patients suspected to have either Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) or Angelman syndrome (AS) because most of the patients have recognizable cytogenetic deletions of 15q11q13. Maternal uniparental disomy of chromosome 15, identified by molecular genetic techniques, is found in about 20 to 25% of PWS patients. Paternal uniparental disomy of chromosome 15 is seen in 2 to 3% of AS patients. Thus, PWS and AS represent the first examples in humans of genetic imprinting or the differential expression of genetic information depending on the parental origin. Herein, I report our experience with FISH and high resolution chromosome analysis in patients referred to confirm or rule out PWS or AS. 10 refs., 1 tab.

  18. Analysis of the sex-chromosome constitution of digynic triploid mouse embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speirs, S; Kaufman, M H

    1989-01-01

    LT/Sv strain mice regularly ovulate up to 50% of their eggs as primary oocytes, which are fertilisable and give rise to digynic triploid embryos. A similar number of eggs are ovulated as secondary oocytes and, following fertilisation, give rise to normal diploid embryos. Pregnant LT/Sv females were autopsied at about midday on day 10 of gestation, when normal diploid embryos would be expected to possess between 25 and 30 pairs of somites. While a few of the triploid embryos either consisted of disorganised embryonic masses or were resorbing, most were at readily recognisable embryonic stages. Just over half of the embryos recovered were "unturned," while the remainder had "turned" and possessed between 15 and 25 pairs of somites. The triploids were usually readily recognised, owing to their small size and because they often displayed neural tube and cardiac defects. All of the embryos recovered were analysed cytogenetically by G-banding to establish their ploidy and sex-chromosome constitution. The XY:XX sex ratio of the 105 diploid embryos recovered, all of which had "turned," was 1.06:1, while the overall XXY:XXX sex ratio of the 120 triploids was 1:1. Analysis of only the developmentally most advanced triploid embryos (i.e., the 49 that had "turned") revealed that the XXY:XXX sex ratio in this group was 1.13:1, which was not significantly different from the expected ratio of 1:1. The crown-rump lengths of the XY and XX "turned" embryos were almost identical, as were those of the XXY and XXX "turned" embryos, although the triploids were significantly smaller than the diploids. No obvious effect of sex-chromosome constitution on developmental potential was therefore observed in this study in relation to either the digynic triploid or the control diploid embryos.

  19. Molecular cytogenetic analysis and clinical manifestations of a case with de novo mosaic ring chromosome 7

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Jye-Siung

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Aim Clinical and molecular cytogenetic investigations of a newborn girl exhibiting facial dysmorphism with developmental delay. Methods Phenotypic evaluation was first applied to examine the proband's developmental status. Computed tomography and colour transcranial Doppler were used then to investigate her brain structure and function. Subsequently, chromosomal abnormalities were examined by karyotyping and fluorescent in situ hybridization was performed to investigate size of fragments lost at the two distal ends of the ring chromosome 7. In addition, multicolour banding was applied to rule out structural rearrangement occurs in between the ring chromosome 7. Results The proband was born with mosaic supernumerary ring chromosome 7, without a normal karyotype detected in the peripheral blood lymphocytes. The distal arm of chromosome 7p (at least 255 kb from the telomere was part of an extra ring chromosome 7. In addition, the distal arm of 7q, at least 8 kb from the telomere, was missing. There was no other chromosomal rearrangement detected by multicolour banding. Interpretation This is the 19th reported case of complete ring chromosome 7 mosaicism and the first survived case with mosaic supernumerary ring 7 without a normal karyotype detected in the peripheral lymphocytes.

  20. A System To Generate Chromosomal Mutations in Lactococcus lactis Which Allows Fast Analysis of Targeted Genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Law, Jean; Buist, Girbe; Haandrikman, Alfred; Kok, Jan; Venema, Gerhardus; Leenhouts, Kees

    1995-01-01

    A system for generating chromosomal insertions in lactococci is described. It is based on the conditional replication of lactococcal pWV01-derived Ori+ RepA- vector pORI19, containing lacZα and the multiple cloning site of pUC19. Chromosomal AluI fragments of Lactococcus lactis were cloned in pORI19

  1. A global analysis of Y-chromosomal haplotype diversity for 23 STR loci

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Purps, Josephine; Siegert, Sabine; Willuweit, Sascha

    2014-01-01

    In a worldwide collaborative effort, 19,630 Y-chromosomes were sampled from 129 different populations in 51 countries. These chromosomes were typed for 23 short-tandem repeat (STR) loci (DYS19, DYS389I, DYS389II, DYS390, DYS391, DYS392, DYS393, DYS385ab, DYS437, DYS438, DYS439, DYS448, DYS456, DY...

  2. Chromosome oscillations in mitosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campas, Otger

    2008-03-01

    Successful cell division necessitates a tight regulation of chromosome movement via the activity of molecular motors. Many of the key players at the origin of the forces generating the motion have been identified, but their spatial and temporal organization remains elusive. In animal cells, chromosomes periodically switch between phases of movement towards and away from the pole. This characteristic oscillatory behaviour cannot be explained by the current models of chromosome positioning and congression. We perform a self-contained theoretical analysis in which the motion of mono-oriented chromosomes results from the competition between the activity of the kinetochore and chromokinesin motors on the chromosome arms. Our analysis, consistent with the available experimental data, proposes that the interplay between the aster-like morphology of the spindle and the collective kinetics of molecular motors is at the origin of chromosome oscillations, positioning and congression. It provides a natural explanation for the so-called chromosome directional instability and for the mechanism by which chromosomes sense their position in space. In addition, we estimate the in vivo velocity of chromokinesins at vanishing load and propose new experiments to assess the mechanism at the origin of chromosome movement in cell division.

  3. Chromosome numbers and meiotic analysis in the pre-breeding of Brachiaria decumbens (Poaceae)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Gléia Cristina Laverde Ricci; Alice Maria De Souza-Kaneshima; Mariana Ferrari Felismino; Andrea Beatriz Mendes-Bonato; Maria Suely Pagliarini; Cacilda Borges Do Valle

    2011-08-01

    A total of 44 accessions of Brachiaria decumbens were analysed for chromosome count and meiotic behaviour in order to identify potential progenitors for crosses. Among them, 15 accessions presented $2n = 18$; 27 accessions, $2n = 36$; and 2 accessions, $2n = 45$ chromosomes. Among the diploid accessions, the rate of meiotic abnormalities was low, ranging from 0.82% to 7.93%. In the 27 tetraploid accessions, the rate of meiotic abnormalities ranged from 18.41% to 65.83%. The most common meiotic abnormalities were related to irregular chromosome segregation, but chromosome stickiness and abnormal cytokinesis were observed in low frequency. All abnormalities can compromise pollen viability by generating unbalanced gametes. Based on the chromosome number and meiotic stability, the present study indicates the apomictic tetraploid accessions that can act as male genitor to produce interspecific hybrids with B. ruziziensis or intraspecific hybrids with recently artificially tetraploidized accessions.

  4. Chromosome numbers and meiotic analysis in the pre-breeding of Brachiaria decumbens (Poaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricci, Gléia Cristina Laverde; De Souza-Kaneshima, Alice Maria; Felismino, Mariana Ferrari; Mendes-Bonato, Andrea Beatriz; Pagliarini, Maria Suely; Do Valle, Cacilda Borges

    2011-08-01

    A total of 44 accessions of Brachiaria decumbens were analysed for chromosome count and meiotic behaviour in order to identify potential progenitors for crosses. Among them, 15 accessions presented 2n = 18; 27 accessions, 2n = 36; and 2 accessions, 2n = 45 chromosomes. Among the diploid accessions, the rate of meiotic abnormalities was low, ranging from 0.82% to 7.93%. In the 27 tetraploid accessions, the rate of meiotic abnormalities ranged from 18.41% to 65.83%. The most common meiotic abnormalities were related to irregular chromosome segregation, but chromosome stickiness and abnormal cytokinesis were observed in low frequency. All abnormalities can compromise pollen viability by generating unbalanced gametes. Based on the chromosome number and meiotic stability, the present study indicates the apomictic tetraploid accessions that can act as male genitor to produce interspecific hybrids with B. ruziziensis or intraspecific hybrids with recently artificially tetraploidized accessions.

  5. Rapid cloning and bioinformatic analysis of spinach Y chromosome-specific EST sequences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Chuan-Liang Deng; Wei-Li Zhang; Ying Cao; Shao-Jing Wang; Shu-Fen Li; Wu-Jun Gao; Long-Dou Lu

    2015-12-01

    The genome of spinach single chromosome complement is about 1000 Mbp, which is the model material to study the molecular mechanisms of plant sex differentiation. The cytological study showed that the biggest spinach chromosome (chromosome 1) was taken as spinach sex chromosome. It had three alleles of sex-related , m and . Many researchers have been trying to clone the sex-determining genes and investigated the molecular mechanism of spinach sex differentiation. However, there are no successful cloned reports about these genes. A new technology combining chromosome microdissection with hybridization-specific amplification (HSA) was adopted. The spinach Y chromosome degenerate oligonucleotide primed-PCR (DOP-PCR) products were hybridized with cDNA of the male spinach flowers in florescence. The female spinach genome was taken as blocker and cDNA library specifically expressed in Y chromosome was constructed. Moreover, expressed sequence tag (EST) sequences in cDNA library were cloned, sequenced and bioinformatics was analysed. There were 63 valid EST sequences obtained in this study. The fragment size was between 53 and 486 bp. BLASTn homologous alignment indicated that 12 EST sequences had homologous sequences of nucleic acids, the rest were new sequences. BLASTx homologous alignment indicated that 16 EST sequences had homologous protein-encoding nucleic acid sequence. The spinach Y chromosome-specific EST sequences laid the foundation for cloning the functional genes, specifically expressed in spinach Y chromosome. Meanwhile, the establishment of the technology system in the research provided a reference for rapid cloning of other biological sex chromosome-specific EST sequences.

  6. Multispectral Image Analysis for Astaxanthin Coating Classification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ljungqvist, Martin Georg; Ersbøll, Bjarne Kjær; Nielsen, Michael Engelbrecht

    2012-01-01

    only with fish oil. In this study, multispectral image analysis of pellets captured reflection in 20 wavelengths (385–1050 nm). Linear discriminant analysis (LDA), principal component analysis, and support vector machine were used as statistical analysis. The features extracted from the multispectral...

  7. Spectral Karyotyping for identification of constitutional chromosomal abnormalities at a national reference laboratory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anguiano Arturo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Spectral karyotyping is a diagnostic tool that allows visualization of chromosomes in different colors using the FISH technology and a spectral imaging system. To assess the value of spectral karyotyping analysis for identifying constitutional supernumerary marker chromosomes or derivative chromosomes at a national reference laboratory, we reviewed the results of 179 consecutive clinical samples (31 prenatal and 148 postnatal submitted for spectral karyotyping. Over 90% of the cases were requested to identify either small supernumerary marker chromosomes (sSMCs or chromosomal exchange material detected by G-banded chromosome analysis. We also reviewed clinical indications of those cases with marker chromosomes in which chromosomal origin was identified by spectral karyotyping. Our results showed that spectral karyotyping identified the chromosomal origin of marker chromosomes or the source of derivative chromosomal material in 158 (88% of the 179 clinical cases; the identification rate was slightly higher for postnatal (89% compared to prenatal (84% cases. Cases in which the origin could not be identified had either a small marker chromosome present at a very low level of mosaicism (

  8. Analysis of Chromosomal Aberrations after Low and High Dose Rate Gamma Irradiation in ATM or NBS Suppressed Human Fibroblast Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hada, M.; Huff, J. L.; Patel, Z.; Pluth, J. M.; George, K. A.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2009-01-01

    A detailed understanding of the biological effects of heavy nuclei is needed for space radiation protection and for cancer therapy. High-LET radiation produces more complex DNA lesions that may be non-repairable or that may require additional processing steps compared to endogenous DSBs, increasing the possibility of misrepair. Interplay between radiation sensitivity, dose, and radiation quality has not been studied extensively. Previously we studied chromosome aberrations induced by low- and high- LET radiation in several cell lines deficient in ATM (ataxia telangactasia mutated; product of the gene that is mutated in ataxia telangiectasia patients) or NBS (nibrin; product of the gene mutated in the Nijmegen breakage syndrome), and gliomablastoma cells that are proficient or lacking in DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) activity. We found that the yields of both simple and complex chromosomal aberrations were significantly increased in the DSB repair defective cells compared to normal cells. The increased aberrations observed for the ATM and NBS defective lines was due to a significantly larger quadratic dose-response term compared to normal fibroblasts for both simple and complex aberrations, while the linear dose-response term was significantly higher in NBS cells only for simple exchanges. These results point to the importance of the functions of ATM and NBS in chromatin modifications that function to facilitate correct DSB repair and minimize aberration formation. To further understand the sensitivity differences that were observed in ATM and NBS deficient cells, in this study, chromosomal aberration analysis was performed in normal lung fibroblast cells treated with KU-55933, a specific ATM kinase inhibitor, or Mirin, an MRN complex inhibitor involved in activation of ATM. We are also testing siRNA knockdown of these proteins. Normal and ATM or NBS suppressed cells were irradiated with gamma-rays and chromosomes were collected with a premature chromosome

  9. Validation of QuickScan dicentric chromosome analysis for high throughput radiation biological dosimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flegal, F N; Devantier, Y; Marro, L; Wilkins, R C

    2012-02-01

    Currently, the dicentric chromosome assay (DCA) is used to estimate radiation doses to individuals following accidental radiological and nuclear overexposures when traditional dosimetry methods are not available. While being an exceptionally sensitive method for estimating doses by radiation, conventional DCA is time-intensive and requires highly trained expertise for analysis. For this reason, in a mass casualty situation, triage-quality conventional DCA struggles to provide dose estimations in a timely manner for triage purposes. In Canada, a new scoring technique, termed DCA QuickScan, has been devised to increase the throughput of this assay. DCA QuickScan uses traditional DCA sample preparation methods while adapting a rapid scoring approach. In this study, both conventional and QuickScan methods of scoring the DCA assay were compared for accuracy and sensitivity. Dose response curves were completed on four different donors based on the analysis of 1,000 metaphases or 200 events at eight to nine dose points by eight different scorers across two laboratories. Statistical analysis was performed on the data to compare the two methods within and across the laboratories and to test their respective sensitivities for dose estimation. This study demonstrated that QuickScan is statistically similar to conventional DCA analysis and is capable of producing dose estimates as low as 0.1 Gy but up to six times faster. Therefore, DCA QuickScan analysis can be used as a sensitive and accurate method for scoring samples for radiological biodosimetry in mass casualty situations or where faster dose assessment is required.

  10. Solar Image Analysis and Visualization

    CERN Document Server

    Ireland, J

    2009-01-01

    This volume presents a selection of papers on the state of the art of image enhancement, automated feature detection, machine learning, and visualization tools in support of solar physics that focus on the challenges presented by new ground-based and space-based instrumentation. The articles and topics were inspired by the Third Solar Image Processing Workshop, held at Trinity College Dublin, Ireland but contributions from other experts have been included as well. This book is mainly aimed at researchers and graduate students working on image processing and compter vision in astronomy and solar physics.

  11. Natural user interfaces in medical image analysis cognitive analysis of brain and carotid artery images

    CERN Document Server

    Ogiela, Marek R

    2014-01-01

    This unique text/reference highlights a selection of practical applications of advanced image analysis methods for medical images. The book covers the complete methodology for processing, analysing and interpreting diagnostic results of sample CT images. The text also presents significant problems related to new approaches and paradigms in image understanding and semantic image analysis. To further engage the reader, example source code is provided for the implemented algorithms in the described solutions. Features: describes the most important methods and algorithms used for image analysis; e

  12. Analysis of Y-chromosome STRs in Chile confirms an extensive introgression of European male lineages in urban populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toscanini, Ulises; Brisighelli, Francesca; Moreno, Fabián; Pantoja-Astudillo, Jaime A; Morales, Eugenia Aguirre; Bustos, Patricio; Pardo-Seco, Jacobo; Salas, Antonio

    2016-03-01

    We analyzed the Y chromosome haplotypes (Yfiler) of 978 non-related Chilean males grouped in five sampling regions (Iquique, Santiago de Chile, Concepción, Temuco and Punta Arenas) covering main geo-political regions. Overall, 803 different haplotypes and 688 singletons were observed. Molecular diversity was moderately lower than in other neighboring countries (e.g. Argentina); and AMOVA analysis on Y-STR haplotypes showed that among variation within Chile accounted for only 0.25% of the total variation. Punta Arenas, in the southern cone, showed the lowest haplotype diversity, and discrimination capacity, and also the highest matching probability of the five Chilean samples, probably reflecting its more marked geographic isolation compared to the other regions. Multidimensional scaling (MDS) analysis based on RST genetic distances suggested a close proximity of Chilean Y-chromosome profiles to European ones. Consistently, haplogroups inferred from Y-STR profiles revealed that the Native American component constituted only 8% of all the haplotypes, and this component ranged from 5% in the Centre of the country to 9-10% in the South and 13% in the North, which is in good agreement with the distribution of Native American communities in these regions. AMOVA computed on inferred haplogroups confirmed the very low among variation observed in Chilean populations. The present project provides the first Chilean dataset to the international Y-chromosome STR Haplotype Reference Database (YHRD) and it is also the first reference database for Y-chromosome forensic casework of the country.

  13. Chromosomal Analysis of Couples with Repeated Spontaneous Abortions in Northeastern Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeedeh Ghazaey

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cytogenetic study of reproductive wastage is an important aspect in determining the genetic background of early embryogenesis. Approximately 15 to 20% of all pregnancies in humans are terminated as recurrent spontaneous abortions (RSAs. The aim of this study was to detect chromosome abnormalities in couples with RSAs and to compare our results with those reported previously. Materials and Methods: In this retrospective study, the pattern of chromosomal aberrations was evaluated during a six-year period from 2005 to 2011. The population under study was 728 couples who attended genetic counseling services for their RSAs at Pardis Clinical and Genetics Laboratory, Mashhad, Iran. Results: In this study, about 11.7% of couples were carriers of chromosomal aberrations. The majority of abnormalities were found in couples with history of abortion, without stillbirth or livebirth. Balanced reciprocal translocations, Robertsonian translocations, inversions and sex chromosome aneuploidy were seen in these cases. Balanced reciprocal translocations were the most frequent chromosomal anomalies (62.7% detected in current study. Conclusion: These findings suggest that chromosomal abnormalities can be one of the important causes of RSAs. In addition, cytogenetic study of families who experienced RSAs may prevent unnecessary treatment if RSA are caused by chromosomal abnormalities. The results of cytogenetic studies of RSA cases will provide a standard protocol for the genetic counselors in order to follow up and to help these families.

  14. Cytogenetic analysis of Aegilops chromosomes, potentially usable in triticale (X Triticosecale Witt.) breeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwiatek, M; Wiśniewska, H; Apolinarska, B

    2013-05-01

    Chromosome identification using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is widely used in cytogenetic research. It is a diagnostic tool helpful in chromosome identification. It can also be used to characterize alien introgressions, when exercised in a combination with genomic in situ hybridization (GISH). This work aims to find chromosome identification of Aegilops species and Aegilops × Secale amphiploids, which can be used in cereal breeding as a source of favourable agronomic traits. Four diploid and two tetraploid Aegilops species and three Aegilops × Secale hybrids were analysed using FISH with pSc119.2, pAs1, 5S rDNA and 25S rDNA clones to differentiate the U-, M-, S(sh)- and D-subgenome chromosomes of Aegilops genus. Additionally, GISH for chromosome categorization was carried out. Differences in the hybridization patterns allowed to identify all U-, M-, S(sh)- and D-subgenome chromosomes. Some differences in localization of the rDNA, pSc119.2 and pAs1 sequences between analogue subgenomes in diploid and tetraploid species and Aegilops × Secale hybrids were detected. The hybridization pattern of the M and S genome was more variable than that of the U and D genome. An importance of the cytogenetic markers in plant breeding and their possible role in chromosome structure, function and evolution is discussed.

  15. Quantified effects of chromosome-nuclear envelope attachments on 3D organization of chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinney, Nicholas Allen; Onufriev, Alexey V; Sharakhov, Igor V

    2015-01-01

    We use a combined experimental and computational approach to study the effects of chromosome-nuclear envelope (Chr-NE) attachments on the 3D genome organization of Drosophila melanogaster (fruit fly) salivary gland nuclei. We consider 3 distinct models: a Null model - without specific Chr-NE attachments, a 15-attachment model - with 15 previously known Chr-NE attachments, and a 48-attachment model - with 15 original and 33 recently identified Chr-NE attachments. The radial densities of chromosomes in the models are compared to the densities observed in 100 experimental images of optically sectioned salivary gland nuclei forming "z-stacks." Most of the experimental z-stacks support the Chr-NE 48-attachment model suggesting that as many as 48 chromosome loci with appreciable affinity for the NE are necessary to reproduce the experimentally observed distribution of chromosome density in fruit fly nuclei. Next, we investigate if and how the presence and the number of Chr-NE attachments affect several key characteristics of 3D genome organization: chromosome territories and gene-gene contacts. This analysis leads to novel insight about the possible role of Chr-NE attachments in regulating the genome architecture. Specifically, we find that model nuclei with more numerous Chr-NE attachments form more distinct chromosome territories and their chromosomes intertwine less frequently. Intra-chromosome and intra-arm contacts are more common in model nuclei with Chr-NE attachments compared to the Null model (no specific attachments), while inter-chromosome and inter-arm contacts are less common in nuclei with Chr-NE attachments. We demonstrate that Chr-NE attachments increase the specificity of long-range inter-chromosome and inter-arm contacts. The predicted effects of Chr-NE attachments are rationalized by intuitive volume vs. surface accessibility arguments.

  16. Imaging flow cytometry for phytoplankton analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dashkova, Veronika; Malashenkov, Dmitry; Poulton, Nicole; Vorobjev, Ivan; Barteneva, Natasha S

    2017-01-01

    This review highlights the concepts and instrumentation of imaging flow cytometry technology and in particular its use for phytoplankton analysis. Imaging flow cytometry, a hybrid technology combining speed and statistical capabilities of flow cytometry with imaging features of microscopy, is rapidly advancing as a cell imaging platform that overcomes many of the limitations of current techniques and contributed significantly to the advancement of phytoplankton analysis in recent years. This review presents the various instrumentation relevant to the field and currently used for assessment of complex phytoplankton communities' composition and abundance, size structure determination, biovolume estimation, detection of harmful algal bloom species, evaluation of viability and metabolic activity and other applications. Also we present our data on viability and metabolic assessment of Aphanizomenon sp. cyanobacteria using Imagestream X Mark II imaging cytometer. Herein, we highlight the immense potential of imaging flow cytometry for microalgal research, but also discuss limitations and future developments.

  17. Digital Image Analysis for Detechip Code Determination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus Lyon

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available DETECHIP® is a molecular sensing array used for identification of a large variety of substances. Previous methodology for the analysis of DETECHIP® used human vision to distinguish color changes induced by the presence of the analyte of interest. This paper describes several analysis techniques using digital images of DETECHIP® . Both a digital camera and flatbed desktop photo scanner were used to obtain Jpeg images. Color information within these digital images was obtained through the measurement of redgreen-blue (RGB values using software such as GIMP, Photoshop and ImageJ. Several different techniques were used to evaluate these color changes. It was determined that the flatbed scanner produced in the clearest and more reproducible images. Furthermore, codes obtained using a macro written for use within ImageJ showed improved consistency versus pervious methods.

  18. A chromosomal analysis of four species of Chilean Chrysomelinae (Coleoptera, Chrysomelidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduard Petitpierre

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Four species of Chilean leaf beetles in the subfamily Chrysomelinae have been cytogenetically analyzed, Blaptea elguetai Petitpierre, 2011, Henicotherus porteri Bréthes, 1929 and Jolivetia obscura (Philippi, 1864 show 2n = 28 chromosomes and a 13 + Xyp male meioformula, and Pataya nitida (Philippi, 1864 has the highest number of 2n = 38 chromosomes. The karyotype of H. porteri is made of mostly small meta/submetacentric chromosomes, and that of Jolivetia obscura displays striking procentric blocks of heterochromatin at pachytene autosomic bivalents using conventional staining. These findings are discussed in relation to previous cytogenetic data and current taxonomy of the subfamily.

  19. NIH Image to ImageJ: 25 years of image analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Caroline A; Rasband, Wayne S; Eliceiri, Kevin W

    2012-07-01

    For the past 25 years NIH Image and ImageJ software have been pioneers as open tools for the analysis of scientific images. We discuss the origins, challenges and solutions of these two programs, and how their history can serve to advise and inform other software projects.

  20. [Fluorescence in situ hybridization with DNA probes derived from individual chromosomes and chromosome regions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogomolov, A G; Karamysheva, T V; Rubtsov, N B

    2014-01-01

    A significant part of the eukaryotic genomes consists of repetitive DNA, which can form large clusters or distributed along euchromatic chromosome regions. Repeats located in chromosomal regions make a problem in analysis and identification of the chromosomal material with fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). In most cases, the identification of chromosome regions using FISH requires detection of the signal produced with unique sequences. The feasibility, advantages and disadvantages of traditional methods of suppression of repetitive DNA hybridization, methods of repeats-free probe construction and methods of chromosome-specific DNA sequences visualization using image processing of multicolor FISH results are considered in the paper. The efficiency of different techniques for DNA probe generation, different FISH protocols, and image processing of obtained microscopic images depends on the genomic size and structure of analyzing species. This problem was discussed and different approaches were considered for the analysis of the species with very large genome, rare species and species which specimens are too small in size to obtain the amount of genomic and Cot-1 DNA required for suppression of repetitive DNA hybridization.

  1. Theory of Image Analysis and Recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-24

    Narendra Ahuja Image models Ramalingam Chellappa Image models Matti Pietikainen * Texture analysis b David G. Morgenthaler’ 3D digital geometry c Angela Y. Wu...Restoration Parameter Choice A Quantitative Guide," TR-965, October 1980. 70. Matti Pietikainen , "On the Use of Hierarchically Computed ’Mexican Hat...81. Matti Pietikainen and Azriel Rosenfeld, "Image Segmenta- tion by Texture Using Pyramid Node Linking," TR-1008, February 1981. 82. David G. 1

  2. Statistical Smoothing Methods and Image Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-12-01

    83 - 111. Rosenfeld, A. and Kak, A.C. (1982). Digital Picture Processing. Academic Press,Qrlando. Serra, J. (1982). Image Analysis and Mat hematical ...hypothesis testing. IEEE Trans. Med. Imaging, MI-6, 313-319. Wicksell, S.D. (1925) The corpuscle problem. A mathematical study of a biometric problem

  3. A Regulatory Switch Alters Chromosome Motions at the Metaphase-to-Anaphase Transition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuan-Chung Su

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available To achieve chromosome segregation during mitosis, sister chromatids must undergo a dramatic change in their behavior to switch from balanced oscillations at the metaphase plate to directed poleward motion during anaphase. However, the factors that alter chromosome behavior at the metaphase-to-anaphase transition remain incompletely understood. Here, we perform time-lapse imaging to analyze anaphase chromosome dynamics in human cells. Using multiple directed biochemical, genetic, and physical perturbations, our results demonstrate that differences in the global phosphorylation states between metaphase and anaphase are the major determinant of chromosome motion dynamics. Indeed, causing a mitotic phosphorylation state to persist into anaphase produces dramatic metaphase-like oscillations. These induced oscillations depend on both kinetochore-derived and polar ejection forces that oppose poleward motion. Thus, our analysis of anaphase chromosome motion reveals that dephosphorylation of multiple mitotic substrates is required to suppress metaphase chromosome oscillatory motions and achieve directed poleward motion for successful chromosome segregation.

  4. Systematic Triple-Mutant Analysis Uncovers Functional Connectivity between Pathways Involved in Chromosome Regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James E. Haber

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Genetic interactions reveal the functional relationships between pairs of genes. In this study, we describe a method for the systematic generation and quantitation of triple mutants, termed triple-mutant analysis (TMA. We have used this approach to interrogate partially redundant pairs of genes in S. cerevisiae, including ASF1 and CAC1, two histone chaperones. After subjecting asf1Δ cac1Δ to TMA, we found that the Swi/Snf Rdh54 protein compensates for the absence of Asf1 and Cac1. Rdh54 more strongly associates with the chromatin apparatus and the pericentromeric region in the double mutant. Moreover, Asf1 is responsible for the synthetic lethality observed in cac1Δ strains lacking the HIRA-like proteins. A similar TMA was carried out after deleting both CLB5 and CLB6, cyclins that regulate DNA replication, revealing a strong functional connection to chromosome segregation. This approach can reveal functional redundancies that cannot be uncovered through traditional double-mutant analyses.

  5. Forensic analysis of polymorphism and regional stratification of Y-chromosomal microsatellites in Belarus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebała, Krzysztof; Tsybovsky, Iosif S; Bogacheva, Anna V; Kotova, Svetlana A; Mikulich, Alexei I; Szczerkowska, Zofia

    2011-01-01

    Nine loci defining minimal haplotypes and four other Y-chromosomal short tandem repeats (Y-STRs) DYS437, DYS438, DYS439 and GATA H4.1 were analysed in 414 unrelated males residing in four regions of Belarus. Haplotypes of 328 males were further extended by 7 additional Y-STRs: DYS388, DYS426, DYS448, DYS456, DYS458, DYS460 and DYS635. The 13-locus haplotype diversity was 0.9978 and discrimination capacity was 78.7%, indicating presence of identical haplotypes among unrelated males. Seven additional Y-STRs enabled almost complete discrimination of undifferentiated 13-locus haplotypes, increasing haplotype diversity to 0.9998 and discrimination capacity to 97.9%. Analysis of molecular variance of minimal haplotypes excluded the use of a Y-STR database for Belarusians residing in northeastern Poland as representative for the Belarusian population in forensic practice, and revealed regional stratification within the country. However, four additional markers (DYS437, DYS438, DYS439 and GATA H4.1) were shown to eliminate the observed geographical substructure among Belarusian males. The results imply that in case of minimal and PowerPlex Y haplotypes, a separate frequency database should be used for northern Belarus to estimate Y-STR profile frequencies in forensic casework. In case of Yfiler haplotypes, regional stratification within Belarus may be neglected.

  6. Sequence analysis of 21 genes located in the Kartagener syndrome linkage region on chromosome 15q.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geremek, Maciej; Schoenmaker, Frederieke; Zietkiewicz, Ewa; Pogorzelski, Andrzej; Diehl, Scott; Wijmenga, Cisca; Witt, Michal

    2008-06-01

    Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is a rare genetic disorder, which shows extensive genetic heterogeneity and is mostly inherited in an autosomal recessive fashion. There are four genes with a proven pathogenetic role in PCD. DNAH5 and DNAI1 are involved in 28 and 10% of PCD cases, respectively, while two other genes, DNAH11 and TXNDC3, have been identified as causal in one PCD family each. We have previously identified a 3.5 cM (2.82 Mb) region on chromosome 15q linked to Kartagener syndrome (KS), a subtype of PCD characterized by the randomization of body organ positioning. We have now refined the KS candidate region to a 1.8 Mb segment containing 18 known genes. The coding regions of these genes and three neighboring genes were subjected to sequence analysis in seven KS probands, and we were able to identify 60 single nucleotide sequence variants, 35 of which resided in mRNA coding sequences. However, none of the variations alone could explain the occurrence of the disease in these patients.

  7. Y-chromosomal STR analysis in the Pashtun population of Southern Afghanistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achakzai, Niaz M; Rahman, Z; Shahzad, M S; Daud, S; Zar, M S; Israr, M; Husnain, T; Willuweit, Sascha; Roewer, Lutz

    2012-07-01

    Afghanistan is a landlocked country in the heart of Asia and since the dawn of humankind Afghanistan has faced centuries of turmoil, strife, conflict, warfare, distress, social unrest, difficult climate, harsh terrain and due to its unique geostrategic position in Eurasia which has historically attracted commerce and conflict. It is an important stop along the Silk Road, connecting the far eastern civilizations to the western world. A 5000-year history of constant invasion. Afghanistan has been repeatedly invaded and conquered by rulers and super powers, neighboring interference in this conflict-tattered land for centuries yet rarely leading to the conquest of this rugged and challenging terrain nation. Afghans are not only shepherds, farmers and nomads but also intense fighters and fierce warriors. Currently very limited genetic studies have been performed in Afghan populations. 17 Y chromosomal short tandem repeats (Y-STRs) were analyzed in 125 unrelated Pashtun (in hindi: Pathan) males residing in the Kandahar region of Southern Afghanistan. A total of 92 unique haplotypes were observed. The predominant haplotype reached a frequency of 9.6%. The haplotype diversity was 0.987 and the discrimination capacity 73.6%. Analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) reveals a considerable regional stratification within the country as well as between different Pashtun (Pathan) groups from Afghanistan, Pakistan and India.

  8. Chromosomal and Genetic Analysis of a Human Lung Adenocarcinoma Cell Line OM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong-Wu Li; Lin Bai; Lyu-Xia Dai; Xu He; Xian-Ping Zhou

    2016-01-01

    Background: Lung cancer has become the leading cause of death in many regions.Carcinogenesis is caused by the stepwise accumulation of genetic and chromosomal changes.The aim of this study was to investigate the chromosome and gene alterations in the human lung adenocarcinoma cell line OM.Methods: We used Giemsa banding and multiplex fluorescence in situ hybridization focusing on the human lung adenocarcinoma cell line OM to analyze its chromosome alterations.In addition, the gains and losses in the specific chromosome regions were identified by comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) and the amplifications of cancer-related genes were also detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR).Results: We identified a large number of chromosomal numerical alterations on all chromosomes except chromosome X and 19.Chromosome 10 is the most frequently involved in translocations with six different interchromosomal translocations.CGH revealed the gains on chromosome regions of 3q25.3-28, 5p13, 12q22-23.24, and the losses on 3p25-26, 6p25, 6q26-27, 7q34-36, 8p22-23, 9p21-24, 10q25-26.3, 12p 13.31-13.33 and 17p 13.1-13.3.And PCR showed the amplification of genes: Membrane metalloendopeptidase (MME), sucrase-isomaltase (SI), butyrylcholinesterase (BCHE), and kininogen (KNG).Conclusions: The lung adenocarcinoma cell line OM exhibited multiple complex karyotypes, and chromosome 10 was frequently involved in chromosomal translocation, which may play key roles in tumorigenesis.We speculated that the oncogenes may be located at 3q25.3-28, 5p13, 12q22-23.24, while tumor suppressor genes may exist in 3p25-26, 6p25, 6q26-27, 7q34-36, 8p22-23, 9p21-24, 10q25-26.3, 12p 13.31-13.33, and 17p 13.1-13.3.Moreover, at least four genes (MME, SI, BCHE, and KNG) may be involved in the human lung adenocarcinoma cell line OM.

  9. Malware Analysis Using Visualized Image Matrices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KyoungSoo Han

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a novel malware visual analysis method that contains not only a visualization method to convert binary files into images, but also a similarity calculation method between these images. The proposed method generates RGB-colored pixels on image matrices using the opcode sequences extracted from malware samples and calculates the similarities for the image matrices. Particularly, our proposed methods are available for packed malware samples by applying them to the execution traces extracted through dynamic analysis. When the images are generated, we can reduce the overheads by extracting the opcode sequences only from the blocks that include the instructions related to staple behaviors such as functions and application programming interface (API calls. In addition, we propose a technique that generates a representative image for each malware family in order to reduce the number of comparisons for the classification of unknown samples and the colored pixel information in the image matrices is used to calculate the similarities between the images. Our experimental results show that the image matrices of malware can effectively be used to classify malware families both statically and dynamically with accuracy of 0.9896 and 0.9732, respectively.

  10. Scale-Specific Multifractal Medical Image Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boris Braverman

    2013-01-01

    irregular complex tissue structures that do not lend themselves to straightforward analysis with traditional Euclidean geometry. In this study, we treat the nonfractal behaviour of medical images over large-scale ranges by considering their box-counting fractal dimension as a scale-dependent parameter rather than a single number. We describe this approach in the context of the more generalized Rényi entropy, in which we can also compute the information and correlation dimensions of images. In addition, we describe and validate a computational improvement to box-counting fractal analysis. This improvement is based on integral images, which allows the speedup of any box-counting or similar fractal analysis algorithm, including estimation of scale-dependent dimensions. Finally, we applied our technique to images of invasive breast cancer tissue from 157 patients to show a relationship between the fractal analysis of these images over certain scale ranges and pathologic tumour grade (a standard prognosticator for breast cancer. Our approach is general and can be applied to any medical imaging application in which the complexity of pathological image structures may have clinical value.

  11. Molecular cytogenetic analysis of human blastocysts andcytotrophoblasts by multi-color FISH and Spectra Imaging analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weier, Jingly F.; Ferlatte, Christy; Baumgartner, Adolf; Jung,Christine J.; Nguyen, Ha-Nam; Chu, Lisa W.; Pedersen, Roger A.; Fisher,Susan J.; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G.

    2006-02-08

    Numerical chromosome aberrations in gametes typically lead to failed fertilization, spontaneous abortion or a chromosomally abnormal fetus. By means of preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD), we now can screen human embryos in vitro for aneuploidy before transferring the embryos to the uterus. PGD allows us to select unaffected embryos for transfer and increases the implantation rate in in vitro fertilization programs. Molecular cytogenetic analyses using multi-color fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) of blastomeres have become the major tool for preimplantation genetic screening of aneuploidy. However, current FISH technology can test for only a small number of chromosome abnormalities and hitherto failed to increase the pregnancy rates as expected. We are in the process of developing technologies to score all 24 chromosomes in single cells within a 3 day time limit, which we believe is vital to the clinical setting. Also, human placental cytotrophoblasts (CTBs) at the fetal-maternal interface acquire aneuploidies as they differentiate to an invasive phenotype. About 20-50% of invasive CTB cells from uncomplicated pregnancies were found aneuploidy, suggesting that the acquisition of aneuploidy is an important component of normal placentation, perhaps limiting the proliferative and invasive potential of CTBs. Since most invasive CTBs are interphase cells and possess extreme heterogeneity, we applied multi-color FISH and repeated hybridizations to investigate individual CTBs. In summary, this study demonstrates the strength of Spectral Imaging analysis and repeated hybridizations, which provides a basis for full karyotype analysis of single interphase cells.

  12. Y-chromosome analysis reveals genetic divergence and new founding native lineages in Athapaskan- and Eskimoan-speaking populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulik, Matthew C.; Owings, Amanda C.; Gaieski, Jill B.; Vilar, Miguel G.; Andre, Alestine; Lennie, Crystal; Mackenzie, Mary Adele; Kritsch, Ingrid; Snowshoe, Sharon; Wright, Ruth; Martin, James; Gibson, Nancy; Andrews, Thomas D.; Schurr, Theodore G.; Adhikarla, Syama; Adler, Christina J.; Balanovska, Elena; Balanovsky, Oleg; Bertranpetit, Jaume; Clarke, Andrew C.; Comas, David; Cooper, Alan; Der Sarkissian, Clio S. I.; GaneshPrasad, ArunKumar; Haak, Wolfgang; Haber, Marc; Hobbs, Angela; Javed, Asif; Jin, Li; Kaplan, Matthew E.; Li, Shilin; Martínez-Cruz, Begoña; Matisoo-Smith, Elizabeth A.; Melé, Marta; Merchant, Nirav C.; Mitchell, R. John; Parida, Laxmi; Pitchappan, Ramasamy; Platt, Daniel E.; Quintana-Murci, Lluis; Renfrew, Colin; Lacerda, Daniela R.; Royyuru, Ajay K.; Santos, Fabrício R.; Soodyall, Himla; Soria Hernanz, David F.; Swamikrishnan, Pandikumar; Tyler-Smith, Chris; Santhakumari, Arun Varatharajan; Vieira, Pedro Paulo; Wells, R. Spencer; Zalloua, Pierre A.; Ziegle, Janet S.

    2012-01-01

    For decades, the peopling of the Americas has been explored through the analysis of uniparentally inherited genetic systems in Native American populations and the comparison of these genetic data with current linguistic groupings. In northern North America, two language families predominate: Eskimo-Aleut and Na-Dene. Although the genetic evidence from nuclear and mtDNA loci suggest that speakers of these language families share a distinct biological origin, this model has not been examined using data from paternally inherited Y chromosomes. To test this hypothesis and elucidate the migration histories of Eskimoan- and Athapaskan-speaking populations, we analyzed Y-chromosomal data from Inuvialuit, Gwich’in, and Tłįchǫ populations living in the Northwest Territories of Canada. Over 100 biallelic markers and 19 chromosome short tandem repeats (STRs) were genotyped to produce a high-resolution dataset of Y chromosomes from these groups. Among these markers is an SNP discovered in the Inuvialuit that differentiates them from other Aboriginal and Native American populations. The data suggest that Canadian Eskimoan- and Athapaskan-speaking populations are genetically distinct from one another and that the formation of these groups was the result of two population expansions that occurred after the initial movement of people into the Americas. In addition, the population history of Athapaskan speakers is complex, with the Tłįchǫ being distinct from other Athapaskan groups. The high-resolution biallelic data also make clear that Y-chromosomal diversity among the first Native Americans was greater than previously recognized. PMID:22586127

  13. Chromosomal microarray analysis of consecutive individuals with autism spectrum disorders or learning disability presenting for genetic services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Jennifer L; Hovanes, Karine; Dasouki, Majed; Manzardo, Ann M; Butler, Merlin G

    2014-02-01

    Chromosomal microarray analysis is now commonly used in clinical practice to identify copy number variants (CNVs) in the human genome. We report our experience with the use of the 105 K and 180K oligonucleotide microarrays in 215 consecutive patients referred with either autism or autism spectrum disorders (ASD) or developmental delay/learning disability for genetic services at the University of Kansas Medical Center during the past 4 years (2009-2012). Of the 215 patients [140 males and 75 females (male/female ratio=1.87); 65 with ASD and 150 with learning disability], abnormal microarray results were seen in 45 individuals (21%) with a total of 49 CNVs. Of these findings, 32 represented a known diagnostic CNV contributing to the clinical presentation and 17 represented non-diagnostic CNVs (variants of unknown significance). Thirteen patients with ASD had a total of 14 CNVs, 6 CNVs recognized as diagnostic and 8 as non-diagnostic. The most common chromosome involved in the ASD group was chromosome 15. For those with a learning disability, 32 patients had a total of 35 CNVs. Twenty-six of the 35 CNVs were classified as a known diagnostic CNV, usually a deletion (n=20). Nine CNVs were classified as an unknown non-diagnostic CNV, usually a duplication (n=8). For the learning disability subgroup, chromosomes 2 and 22 were most involved. Thirteen out of 65 patients (20%) with ASD had a CNV compared with 32 out of 150 patients (21%) with a learning disability. The frequency of chromosomal microarray abnormalities compared by subject group or gender was not statistically different. A higher percentage of individuals with a learning disability had clinical findings of seizures, dysmorphic features and microcephaly, but not statistically significant. While both groups contained more males than females, a significantly higher percentage of males were present in the ASD group.

  14. Examination of X chromosome markers in Rett syndrome: Exclusion mapping with a novel variation on multilocus linkage analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellison, K.A.; Fill, C.P. (Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States)); Terwililger, J.; Percy, A.K.; Zobhbi, H. (Columbia University, NY (United States)); DeGennaro, L.J.; Ott, J. (University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester (United States)); Anvret, M.; Martin-Gallardo, A. (National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States))

    1992-02-01

    Rett syndrome is a neurologic disorder characterized by early normal development followed by regression, acquired deceleration of head growth, autism, ataxia, and sterotypic hand movements. The exclusive occurrence of the syndrome in females and the occurrence of a few familial cases with inheritance through maternal lines suggest that this disorder is most likely secondary to a mutation on the X chromosome. To address this hypothesis and to identify candidate regions for the Rett syndrome gene locus, genotypic analysis was performed in two families with maternally related affected half-sisters by using 63 DNA markers from the X chromosome. Nineteen of the loci studied were chosen for multipoint linkage analysis because they have been previously genetically mapped using a large number of meioses from reference families. Using the exclusion criterion of a lod score less than [minus]2, the authors were able to exclude the region between the Duchenne muscular dystrophy locus and the DXS456 locus. This region extends from Xp21.2 to Xq21-q23. The use of the multipoint linkage analysis approach outlined in this study should allow the exclusion of additional regions of the X chromosome as new markers are analyzed.

  15. Haplotype analysis of DNA microsatellites tightly linked to the locus of Usher syndrome type I on chromosome 11q

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korostishevsky, M.; Kalinsky, H.; Seroussi, E. [Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Ramat-Aviv (Israel)] [and other

    1994-09-01

    Usher syndrome type I (USHI), an autosomal recessive disorder associated with congenital sensorineural deafness and progressive visual loss, is closely linked to the D11S533 locus. The availability of 7 other polymorphic markers within few centimorgans spanning the disease locus allowed us to identify a unique and single haplotype among all carriers of USHI gene in the Samaritan kindred. Occurrence of recombination in this small chromosomal interval is rare, hindering the detection of the mitotic recombination events needed for analysis by traditional linkage methods. Attempts to order the eight loci by linkage disequilibrium models proved to be problematic. However, our haplotype analysis implied that recombinations which had arisen in past generations may be utilized in fine mapping of the USHI gene and in resolving the conflicting linkage maps previously obtained for this region. We have developed a simple algorithm for predicting the order of the microsatellites on the basis of haplotype resemblance. The following chromosomal map in which the USHI gene is closest to D11S533 (location score of 31.0 by multipoint analysis) is suggested: D11S916, GARP, D11S527, D11S533, OMP, D11S906, D11S911, D11S937. Physical mapping efforts are currently directed to verify and to detail the map of this chromosomal region.

  16. Chromosomal Microarray Analysis of Consecutive Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorders Using an Ultra-High Resolution Chromosomal Microarray Optimized for Neurodevelopmental Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen S. Ho

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Copy number variants (CNVs detected by chromosomal microarray analysis (CMA significantly contribute to understanding the etiology of autism spectrum disorder (ASD and other related conditions. In recognition of the value of CMA testing and its impact on medical management, CMA is in medical guidelines as a first-tier test in the evaluation of children with these disorders. As CMA becomes adopted into routine care for these patients, it becomes increasingly important to report these clinical findings. This study summarizes the results of over 4 years of CMA testing by a CLIA-certified clinical testing laboratory. Using a 2.8 million probe microarray optimized for the detection of CNVs associated with neurodevelopmental disorders, we report an overall CNV detection rate of 28.1% in 10,351 consecutive patients, which rises to nearly 33% in cases without ASD, with only developmental delay/intellectual disability (DD/ID and/or multiple congenital anomalies (MCA. The overall detection rate for individuals with ASD is also significant at 24.4%. The detection rate and pathogenic yield of CMA vary significantly with the indications for testing, age, and gender, as well as the specialty of the ordering doctor. We note discrete differences in the most common recurrent CNVs found in individuals with or without a diagnosis of ASD.

  17. Basic functional analysis of six unknown open reading frames from Saccharomyces cerevisiae: four from chromosome VII and two from chromosome XV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Bruce M; Schweizer, Michael

    2002-01-30

    Six open reading frames (ORFs) of unknown function from Saccharomyces cerevisiae from the left arms of chromosomes VII and XV were disrupted by the short-flanking homology method in the diploid strains FY1679 and CENPK2. In each case, the entire ORF, with the exception of the first nucleotide of the start codon, was eliminated and replaced by the kanMX4 cassette. Correct integration of the disrupting marker was checked by colony PCR of the geneticin (G418)-resistant transformants. Sporulation followed by tetrad dissection of the diploids revealed that none of the ORFs encoded a product essential for the viability of either yeast strain. The neutral effect of these disruptions extended to mating and sporulation, since it was possible to create homozygous diploid disruptants that were capable of sporulation. Basic phenotypic analysis was carried out on all strains by growing them on three different media at three different temperatures and revealed no significant differences between disruptants and the parental strains. A cognate clone and a kanMX4 disruption cassette were created for five of the six ORFs by gap repair with specific long-flanking homology cassettes. For experimental reasons, the cognate clone and disruption cassette corresponding to the sixth ORF (YGL161w) had to be created by PCR.

  18. [Analysis of fragments of intergenome spacers of human body observed in chromosomes containing no nuclear organization].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupriyanova, N S; Nechvolodov, K K; Korsunenko, A V

    2014-01-01

    Tandem repetitions of rDNA provide so-called nuclear organizations (NOR). On the other hand, rDNA-structures are observed in some NOR chromosomes. It was demonstrated that, in addition to ribosome biogenesis, nucleoli provided a number of functions: cell cycle regulation, stress-induced response, transcription regulation, which often induced cell cascades. The mechanisms of the induction of rDNA segments in NOR chromosomes are obscure and require further research. About 1/3 repetitions are associated with nucleoli and SINE/Alu repetitions, homogeneous repetition, and tandem repetition. Perhaps, relative position of nucleoli and chromosomes may facilitate/prevent interaction of chromosomes with rDNA clusters. The variability of two larger repetitions in the central part of rMGS, LR1, and LR2 similar by -90% and separated by several hundred pairs of bases from each other was studied in our previous works. This work was devoted to the search for the LR1-LR2 segments in other chromosomes, characterization of their terminal tips at rupture points and genome areas of incorporation of the LR1-LR2 segments.

  19. A genome-wide association analysis of chromosomal aberrations and Hirschsprung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Joon Seol; Koh, InSong; Cheong, Hyun Sub; Seo, Jeong-Meen; Kim, Dae-Yeon; Oh, Jung-Tak; Kim, Hyun-Young; Jung, Kyuwhan; Sul, Jae Hoon; Park, Woong-Yang; Kim, Jeong-Hyun; Shin, Hyoung Doo

    2016-11-01

    Hirschsprung disease (HSCR) is a neurocristopathy characterized by the absence of intramural ganglion cells along variable lengths of the gastrointestinal tract. Although the RET proto-oncogene is considered to be the main risk factor for HSCR, only about 30% of the HSCR cases can be explained by variations in previously known genes including RET. Recently, copy number variation (CNV) and loss of heterozygosity (LOH) have emerged as new ways to understand human genomic variation. The goal of this present study is to identify new HSCR genetic factors related to CNV in Korean patients. In the genome-wide genotyping, using Illumina's HumanOmni1-Quad BeadChip (1,140,419 markers), of 123 HSCR patients and 432 unaffected subjects (total n = 555), a total of 8,188 CNVs (1 kb ∼ 1 mb) were identified by CNVpartition. As a result, 16 CNV regions and 13 LOH regions were identified as associated with HSCR (minimum P = 0.0005). Two top CNV regions (deletions at chr6:32675155-32680480 and chr22:20733495-21607293) were successfully validated by additional real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis. In addition, 2 CNV regions (6p21.32 and 22q11.21) and 2 LOH regions (3p22.2 and 14q23.3) were discovered to be unique to the HSCR patients group. Regarding the large-scale chromosomal aberrations (>1 mb), 11 large aberrations in the HSCR patients group were identified, which suggests that they may be a risk factor for HSCR. Although further replication in a larger cohort is needed, our findings may contribute to the understanding of the etiology of HSCR.

  20. Demographic estimates from Y chromosome microsatellite polymorphisms: Analysis of a worldwide sample

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Macpherson J

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Polymorphisms in microsatellites on the human Y chromosome have been used to estimate important demographic parameters of human history. We compare two coalescent-based statistical methods that give estimates for a number of demographic parameters using the seven Y chromosome polymorphisms in the HGDP-CEPH Cell Line Panel, a collection of samples from 52 worldwide populations. The estimates for the time to the most recent common ancestor vary according to the method used and the assumptions about the prior distributions of model parameters, but are generally consistent with other global Y chromosome studies. We explore the sensitivity of these results to assumptions about the prior distributions and the evolutionary models themselves.

  1. The sequence and analysis of duplication-rich human chromosome 16.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Joel; Han, Cliff; Gordon, Laurie A; Terry, Astrid; Prabhakar, Shyam; She, Xinwei; Xie, Gary; Hellsten, Uffe; Chan, Yee Man; Altherr, Michael; Couronne, Olivier; Aerts, Andrea; Bajorek, Eva; Black, Stacey; Blumer, Heather; Branscomb, Elbert; Brown, Nancy C; Bruno, William J; Buckingham, Judith M; Callen, David F; Campbell, Connie S; Campbell, Mary L; Campbell, Evelyn W; Caoile, Chenier; Challacombe, Jean F; Chasteen, Leslie A; Chertkov, Olga; Chi, Han C; Christensen, Mari; Clark, Lynn M; Cohn, Judith D; Denys, Mirian; Detter, John C; Dickson, Mark; Dimitrijevic-Bussod, Mira; Escobar, Julio; Fawcett, Joseph J; Flowers, Dave; Fotopulos, Dea; Glavina, Tijana; Gomez, Maria; Gonzales, Eidelyn; Goodstein, David; Goodwin, Lynne A; Grady, Deborah L; Grigoriev, Igor; Groza, Matthew; Hammon, Nancy; Hawkins, Trevor; Haydu, Lauren; Hildebrand, Carl E; Huang, Wayne; Israni, Sanjay; Jett, Jamie; Jewett, Phillip B; Kadner, Kristen; Kimball, Heather; Kobayashi, Arthur; Krawczyk, Marie-Claude; Leyba, Tina; Longmire, Jonathan L; Lopez, Frederick; Lou, Yunian; Lowry, Steve; Ludeman, Thom; Manohar, Chitra F; Mark, Graham A; McMurray, Kimberly L; Meincke, Linda J; Morgan, Jenna; Moyzis, Robert K; Mundt, Mark O; Munk, A Christine; Nandkeshwar, Richard D; Pitluck, Sam; Pollard, Martin; Predki, Paul; Parson-Quintana, Beverly; Ramirez, Lucia; Rash, Sam; Retterer, James; Ricke, Darryl O; Robinson, Donna L; Rodriguez, Alex; Salamov, Asaf; Saunders, Elizabeth H; Scott, Duncan; Shough, Timothy; Stallings, Raymond L; Stalvey, Malinda; Sutherland, Robert D; Tapia, Roxanne; Tesmer, Judith G; Thayer, Nina; Thompson, Linda S; Tice, Hope; Torney, David C; Tran-Gyamfi, Mary; Tsai, Ming; Ulanovsky, Levy E; Ustaszewska, Anna; Vo, Nu; White, P Scott; Williams, Albert L; Wills, Patricia L; Wu, Jung-Rung; Wu, Kevin; Yang, Joan; Dejong, Pieter; Bruce, David; Doggett, Norman A; Deaven, Larry; Schmutz, Jeremy; Grimwood, Jane; Richardson, Paul; Rokhsar, Daniel S; Eichler, Evan E; Gilna, Paul; Lucas, Susan M; Myers, Richard M; Rubin, Edward M; Pennacchio, Len A

    2004-12-23

    Human chromosome 16 features one of the highest levels of segmentally duplicated sequence among the human autosomes. We report here the 78,884,754 base pairs of finished chromosome 16 sequence, representing over 99.9% of its euchromatin. Manual annotation revealed 880 protein-coding genes confirmed by 1,670 aligned transcripts, 19 transfer RNA genes, 341 pseudogenes and three RNA pseudogenes. These genes include metallothionein, cadherin and iroquois gene families, as well as the disease genes for polycystic kidney disease and acute myelomonocytic leukaemia. Several large-scale structural polymorphisms spanning hundreds of kilobase pairs were identified and result in gene content differences among humans. Whereas the segmental duplications of chromosome 16 are enriched in the relatively gene-poor pericentromere of the p arm, some are involved in recent gene duplication and conversion events that are likely to have had an impact on the evolution of primates and human disease susceptibility.

  2. Morphometric Analysis of Recognized Genes for Autism Spectrum Disorders and Obesity in Relationship to the Distribution of Protein-Coding Genes on Human Chromosomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Austen B. McGuire

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Mammalian chromosomes are comprised of complex chromatin architecture with the specific assembly and configuration of each chromosome influencing gene expression and function in yet undefined ways by varying degrees of heterochromatinization that result in Giemsa (G negative euchromatic (light bands and G-positive heterochromatic (dark bands. We carried out morphometric measurements of high-resolution chromosome ideograms for the first time to characterize the total euchromatic and heterochromatic chromosome band length, distribution and localization of 20,145 known protein-coding genes, 790 recognized autism spectrum disorder (ASD genes and 365 obesity genes. The individual lengths of G-negative euchromatin and G-positive heterochromatin chromosome bands were measured in millimeters and recorded from scaled and stacked digital images of 850-band high-resolution ideograms supplied by the International Society of Chromosome Nomenclature (ISCN 2013. Our overall measurements followed established banding patterns based on chromosome size. G-negative euchromatic band regions contained 60% of protein-coding genes while the remaining 40% were distributed across the four heterochromatic dark band sub-types. ASD genes were disproportionately overrepresented in the darker heterochromatic sub-bands, while the obesity gene distribution pattern did not significantly differ from protein-coding genes. Our study supports recent trends implicating genes located in heterochromatin regions playing a role in biological processes including neurodevelopment and function, specifically genes associated with ASD.

  3. Morphometric Analysis of Recognized Genes for Autism Spectrum Disorders and Obesity in Relationship to the Distribution of Protein-Coding Genes on Human Chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuire, Austen B; Rafi, Syed K; Manzardo, Ann M; Butler, Merlin G

    2016-05-05

    Mammalian chromosomes are comprised of complex chromatin architecture with the specific assembly and configuration of each chromosome influencing gene expression and function in yet undefined ways by varying degrees of heterochromatinization that result in Giemsa (G) negative euchromatic (light) bands and G-positive heterochromatic (dark) bands. We carried out morphometric measurements of high-resolution chromosome ideograms for the first time to characterize the total euchromatic and heterochromatic chromosome band length, distribution and localization of 20,145 known protein-coding genes, 790 recognized autism spectrum disorder (ASD) genes and 365 obesity genes. The individual lengths of G-negative euchromatin and G-positive heterochromatin chromosome bands were measured in millimeters and recorded from scaled and stacked digital images of 850-band high-resolution ideograms supplied by the International Society of Chromosome Nomenclature (ISCN) 2013. Our overall measurements followed established banding patterns based on chromosome size. G-negative euchromatic band regions contained 60% of protein-coding genes while the remaining 40% were distributed across the four heterochromatic dark band sub-types. ASD genes were disproportionately overrepresented in the darker heterochromatic sub-bands, while the obesity gene distribution pattern did not significantly differ from protein-coding genes. Our study supports recent trends implicating genes located in heterochromatin regions playing a role in biological processes including neurodevelopment and function, specifically genes associated with ASD.

  4. Relationship of Extreme Chromosomal Instability with Long-term Survival in a Retrospective Analysis of Primary Breast Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roylance, Rebecca; Endesfelder, David; Gorman, Patricia

    2011-01-01

    methods, such as centromeric FISH, aimed at determining the variation around the modal number of two or more chromosomes within individual tumor nuclei. Here, we document the frequency of tumor CIN by dual centromeric FISH analysis in a retrospective primary breast cancer cohort of 246 patients...... with survival outcome. Results: There was increased CIN and clonal eterogeneity in ER-negative compared with ER-positive breast cancer. Consistent with a negative impact of CIN on cellular fitness, extreme CIN in ER-negative breast cancer was an independent variable associated with improved long-term survival......Background: Chromosomal instability (CIN) is thought to be associated with poor prognosis in solid tumors; however, evidence from preclinical and mouse tumor models suggest that CIN may paradoxically enhance or impair cancer cell fitness. Breast cancer prognostic expression signature sets, which...

  5. Chromosome Mapping of 18S Ribosomal RNA Genes in Eleven Hypostomus Species (Siluriformes, Loricariidae): Diversity Analysis of the Sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubert, Marceléia; da Rosa, Renata; Zawadzki, Claudio H; Mariotto, Sandra; Moreira-Filho, Orlando; Giuliano-Caetano, Lucia

    2016-08-01

    We investigated the chromosomal distribution of 18S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) in different populations of 11 species of Hypostomus collected in important Brazilian basins, namely South Atlantic, Upper Paraná, and Paraguay applying the fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Hypostomus cochliodon, Hypostomus commersoni, Hypostomus hermanni, Hypostomus regani, Hypostomus albopunctatus, Hypostomus paulinus, Hypostomus aff. paulinus, Hypostomus iheringii, and Hypostomus mutucae presented multiple 18S rDNA sites while Hypostomus strigaticeps and Hypostomus nigromaculatus exhibited a single pair of chromosomes with 18S rDNA sites. The studied species presented variations in the number and position of these sites. The results accomplished were similar to those obtained by the analysis of AgNORs, revealing the same interspecific variability. Each species exhibited distinctive patterns of AgNOR and 18S rDNA distribution, which can be considered cytogenetic markers in each species of the genus and help improve the discussions on the phylogeny of the group.

  6. A global analysis of Y-chromosomal haplotype diversity for 23 STR loci

    OpenAIRE

    Purps, J.; Siegert, S.; Willuweit, S.; Nagy, M.; C. Alves; Salazar, R.; Angustia, S.M.T.; Santos,L.H.; Anslinger, K.; Bayer, B.; Ayub, Q.; Wei, W; Xue, Y.; Tyler-Smith, C; Bafalluy, M.B.

    2014-01-01

    In a worldwide collaborative effort, 19,630 Y-chromosomes were sampled from 129 different\\ud populations in 51 countries. These chromosomes were typed for 23 short-tandem repeat (STR) loci\\ud (DYS19, DYS389I, DYS389II, DYS390, DYS391, DYS392, DYS393, DYS385ab, DYS437, DYS438, DYS439,\\ud DYS448, DYS456, DYS458, DYS635, GATAH4, DYS481, DYS533, DYS549, DYS570, DYS576, and DYS643)\\ud and using the PowerPlex Y23 System (PPY23, Promega Corporation, Madison, WI). Locus-specific allelic\\ud spectra of...

  7. Quantitative analysis of qualitative images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hockney, David; Falco, Charles M.

    2005-03-01

    We show optical evidence that demonstrates artists as early as Jan van Eyck and Robert Campin (c1425) used optical projections as aids for producing their paintings. We also have found optical evidence within works by later artists, including Bermejo (c1475), Lotto (c1525), Caravaggio (c1600), de la Tour (c1650), Chardin (c1750) and Ingres (c1825), demonstrating a continuum in the use of optical projections by artists, along with an evolution in the sophistication of that use. However, even for paintings where we have been able to extract unambiguous, quantitative evidence of the direct use of optical projections for producing certain of the features, this does not mean that paintings are effectively photographs. Because the hand and mind of the artist are intimately involved in the creation process, understanding these complex images requires more than can be obtained from only applying the equations of geometrical optics.

  8. A feasibility assessment of automated FISH image and signal analysis to assist cervical cancer detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xingwei; Li, Yuhua; Liu, Hong; Li, Shibo; Zhang, Roy R.; Zheng, Bin

    2012-02-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technology provides a promising molecular imaging tool to detect cervical cancer. Since manual FISH analysis is difficult, time-consuming, and inconsistent, the automated FISH image scanning systems have been developed. Due to limited focal depth of scanned microscopic image, a FISH-probed specimen needs to be scanned in multiple layers that generate huge image data. To improve diagnostic efficiency of using automated FISH image analysis, we developed a computer-aided detection (CAD) scheme. In this experiment, four pap-smear specimen slides were scanned by a dual-detector fluorescence image scanning system that acquired two spectrum images simultaneously, which represent images of interphase cells and FISH-probed chromosome X. During image scanning, once detecting a cell signal, system captured nine image slides by automatically adjusting optical focus. Based on the sharpness index and maximum intensity measurement, cells and FISH signals distributed in 3-D space were projected into a 2-D con-focal image. CAD scheme was applied to each con-focal image to detect analyzable interphase cells using an adaptive multiple-threshold algorithm and detect FISH-probed signals using a top-hat transform. The ratio of abnormal cells was calculated to detect positive cases. In four scanned specimen slides, CAD generated 1676 con-focal images that depicted analyzable cells. FISH-probed signals were independently detected by our CAD algorithm and an observer. The Kappa coefficients for agreement between CAD and observer ranged from 0.69 to 1.0 in detecting/counting FISH signal spots. The study demonstrated the feasibility of applying automated FISH image and signal analysis to assist cyto-geneticists in detecting cervical cancers.

  9. Identification and Preliminary Analysis of Several Centromere-associated Bacterial Artificial Chromosome Clones from a Diploid Wheat Library

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Although the centromeres of some plants have been investigated previously, our knowledge of the wheat centromere is still very limited. To understand the structure and function of the wheat centromere, we used two centromeric repeats (RCS1 and CCS1-5ab) to obtain some centromere-associated bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones in 32 RCS1-related BAC clones that had been screened out from a diploid wheat (Triticum boeoticum Boiss.; 2n=2x=14) BAC library. Southern hybridization results indicated that, of the 32 candidates,there were 28 RCS1-positive clones. Based on gel blot patterns, the frequency of RCS1 was approximately one copy every 69.4 kb in these 28 RCS1-positive BAC clones. More bands were detected when the same filter was probed with CCS1-5ab. Furthermore, the CCS1 bands covered all the bands detected by RCS1, which suggests that some CCS1 repeats were distributed together with RCS1. The frequency of CCS1 families was once every 35.8 kb, nearly twice that of RCS1. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis indicated that the five BAC clones containing RCS1 and CCS1 sequences all detected signals at the centromeric regions in hexaploid wheat, but the signal intensities on the A-genome chromosomes were stronger than those on the B- and/or D-genome chromosomes. The FISH analysis among nine Triticeae cereals indicated that there were A-genomespecific (or rich) sequences dispersing on chromosome arms in the BAC clone TbBAC5. In addition, at the interphase cells, the centromeres of diploid species usually clustered at one pole and formed a ring-like allocation in the period before metaphase.

  10. Design Criteria For Networked Image Analysis System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reader, Cliff; Nitteberg, Alan

    1982-01-01

    Image systems design is currently undergoing a metamorphosis from the conventional computing systems of the past into a new generation of special purpose designs. This change is motivated by several factors, notably among which is the increased opportunity for high performance with low cost offered by advances in semiconductor technology. Another key issue is a maturing in understanding of problems and the applicability of digital processing techniques. These factors allow the design of cost-effective systems that are functionally dedicated to specific applications and used in a utilitarian fashion. Following an overview of the above stated issues, the paper presents a top-down approach to the design of networked image analysis systems. The requirements for such a system are presented, with orientation toward the hospital environment. The three main areas are image data base management, viewing of image data and image data processing. This is followed by a survey of the current state of the art, covering image display systems, data base techniques, communications networks and software systems control. The paper concludes with a description of the functional subystems and architectural framework for networked image analysis in a production environment.

  11. 染色体核型异常患者全基因组芯片扫描结果分析%Analysis on the results of chromosomal microarray in patients with chromosome abnormality

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚如恩; 傅启华; 余永国

    2014-01-01

    目的:利用全基因组芯片扫描技术对染色体核型检测结果异常的患者样本进行重复检测分析,验证并确认患者染色体的具体核型。方法利用基因分型芯片技术对9例临床表型皆为智力落后合并多发畸形,且核型结果异常的样本进行检测分析,比较两种技术之间结果相符程度,通过芯片平台结果来验证染色体核型技术的准确性,同时分析其临床适用性。结果染色体核型结果和全基因组芯片分析技术的结果完全符合的为2例Turner综合征患者,均为嵌合型;3例染色体核型结果阳性患者,全基因组芯片分析结果为阴性,其中2例为随体增加,1例为染色体内倒位;4例涉及染色体片段大小不同的缺失和复制的患者,核型结果和全基因组芯片结果差异较大,并且核型检测结果与患者实际核型相差较大。结论染色体核型技术在用于以往认定的适应症如智力落后、多发畸形的检测中,检测的准确性相对全基因组芯片技术较低,在明确定位染色体缺失和复制大小及位置的能力上有明显的不足,但对于检测染色体平衡性结构性变化的作用不能被芯片所取代。%Objective To analyze the results of patients with chromosome abnormality by chromosomal microarray, and validate and depict patient′s karyotype.Methods Genotyping array was applied to assess in 9 patients with hypophrenia and deformity.The samples with karyotype analysis abnormality were determined.Comparison between karyotyping and microarray analysis was considered to validate the clinical utility of chromosomal microarray analysis. Results Two Turner syndrome patients had completely concordant results from karyotype analysis and chromosomal microarray.Three patients showed abnormal karyotyping results (2 patients with excess trabant and 1 patients with chromosomal inversion) were detected negative with chromosomal microarray

  12. Cancer detection by quantitative fluorescence image analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parry, W L; Hemstreet, G P

    1988-02-01

    Quantitative fluorescence image analysis is a rapidly evolving biophysical cytochemical technology with the potential for multiple clinical and basic research applications. We report the application of this technique for bladder cancer detection and discuss its potential usefulness as an adjunct to methods used currently by urologists for the diagnosis and management of bladder cancer. Quantitative fluorescence image analysis is a cytological method that incorporates 2 diagnostic techniques, quantitation of nuclear deoxyribonucleic acid and morphometric analysis, in a single semiautomated system to facilitate the identification of rare events, that is individual cancer cells. When compared to routine cytopathology for detection of bladder cancer in symptomatic patients, quantitative fluorescence image analysis demonstrated greater sensitivity (76 versus 33 per cent) for the detection of low grade transitional cell carcinoma. The specificity of quantitative fluorescence image analysis in a small control group was 94 per cent and with the manual method for quantitation of absolute nuclear fluorescence intensity in the screening of high risk asymptomatic subjects the specificity was 96.7 per cent. The more familiar flow cytometry is another fluorescence technique for measurement of nuclear deoxyribonucleic acid. However, rather than identifying individual cancer cells, flow cytometry identifies cellular pattern distributions, that is the ratio of normal to abnormal cells. Numerous studies by others have shown that flow cytometry is a sensitive method to monitor patients with diagnosed urological disease. Based upon results in separate quantitative fluorescence image analysis and flow cytometry studies, it appears that these 2 fluorescence techniques may be complementary tools for urological screening, diagnosis and management, and that they also may be useful separately or in combination to elucidate the oncogenic process, determine the biological potential of tumors

  13. Fetal male lineage determination by analysis of Y-chromosome STR haplotype in maternal plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barra, Gustavo Barcelos; Santa Rita, Ticiane Henriques; Chianca, Camilla Figueiredo; Velasco, Lara Francielle Ribeiro; de Sousa, Claudia Ferreira; Nery, Lídia Freire Abdalla; Costa, Sandra Santana Soares

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the fetus Y-STR haplotype in maternal plasma during pregnancy and estimate, non-invasively, if the alleged father and fetus belong to the same male lineage. The study enrolled couples with singleton pregnancies and known paternity. All participants signed informed consent and the local ethics committee approved the study. Peripheral blood was collected in EDTA tubes (mother) and in FTA paper (father). Maternal plasma DNA was extracted by using NucliSens EasyMAG. Fetal gender was determined by qPCR targeting DYS-14 in maternal plasma and it was also confirmed after the delivery. From all included volunteers, the first consecutive 20 mothers bearing male fetuses and 10 mothers bearing female fetuses were selected for the Y-STR analysis. The median gestational age was 12 weeks (range 12-36). All DNA samples were subjected to PCR amplification by PowerPlex Y23, ampFLSTR Yfiler, and two in-house multiplexes, which together accounts for 27 different Y-STR. The PCR products were detected with 3500 Genetic Analyzer and they were analyzed using GeneMapper-IDX. Fetuses' haplotypes (Yfiler format) were compared to other 5328 Brazilian haplotypes available on Y-chromosome haplotypes reference database (YHRD). As a result, between 22 and 27 loci were successfully amplified from maternal plasma in all 20 cases of male fetuses. None of the women bearing female fetuses had a falsely amplified Y-STR haplotype. The haplotype detected in maternal plasma completely matched the alleged father haplotype in 16 out of the 20 cases. Four cases showed single mismatches and they did not configure exclusions; 1 case showed a mutation in the DYS 458 locus due to the loss of one repeat unit and 3 cases showed one DYS 385I/II locus dropout. All mismatches were confirmed after the delivery. Seventeen fetuses' haplotypes were not found in YHRD and one of them had a mutation, which corresponded to the paternity probability of 99.9812% and 95.7028%, respectively

  14. Modeling Chromosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Carol

    2016-01-01

    Learning about chromosomes is standard fare in biology classrooms today. However, students may find it difficult to understand the relationships among the "genome", "chromosomes", "genes", a "gene locus", and "alleles". In the simple activity described in this article, which follows the 5E approach…

  15. Mutation screening and association analysis of six candidate genes for autism on chromosome 7q

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonora, Elena; Lamb, Janine A; Barnby, Gabrielle;

    2005-01-01

    Genetic studies have provided evidence for an autism susceptibility locus (AUTS1) on chromosome 7q. Screening for mutations in six genes mapping to 7q, CUTL1, SRPK2, SYPL, LAMB1, NRCAM and PTPRZ1 in 48 unrelated individuals with autism led to the identification of several new coding variants...

  16. Cytogenetic Mapping of Disease Resistance Genes and Analysis of Their Distribution Features on Chromosomes in Maize

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LiLi-jia; SongYun-chun

    2003-01-01

    Cytogenetic maps of four clusters of disease resistance genes were generated by ISH of the two RFLP markers tightly linked to and flanking each of maize resistance genes and the cloned resistance genes from other plant species onto maize chromosomes, combining with data published before. These genes include Helminthosporium turcium Pass resistance genes Htl, Htnl and Ht2, Helminthosporium maydis Nisik resistance genes Rhml and Rhm2,maize dwarf mosaic virus resistance gene Mdml, wheat streak mosaic virus resistance gene Wsml, Helminthosporium carbonum ULLstrup resistance gene Hml and the cloned Xanthomonas oryzae pv. Oryzae resistance gene Xa21 of rice, Cladosporium fulvum resistance genes Cf-9 and Cf-2. 1 of tomato, and Pseudomonas syringae resistance gene RPS2 of Arabidopsis. Most of the tested disease resistance genes located on the four chromosomes, i. e. , chromosomesl, 3, 6 and 8, and they closely distributed at the interstitial regions of these chromosomal long arms with percentage distances ranging 31.44(±3.72)-72.40(±3. 25) except for genes Rhml, Rhm2, Mdml and Wsml which mapped on the satellites of the short arms of chromosome6. It showed that the tested RFLP markers and genes were duplicated or triplicated in maize genome. Homology and conservation of disease resistance genes among species, and relationship between distribution features and functions of the genes were discussed. The results provide important scientific basis for deeply understanding structure and function of disease resistance genes and breeding in maize.

  17. Analysis of the Ambient Particulate Matter-induced Chromosomal Aberrations Using an In Vitro System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miousse, Isabelle R; Koturbash, Igor; Chalbot, Marie-Cécile; Hauer-Jensen, Martin; Kavouras, Ilias; Pathak, Rupak

    2016-12-21

    Exposure to particulate matter (PM) is a major world health concern, which may damage various cellular components, including the nuclear genetic material. To assess the impact of PM on nuclear genetic integrity, structural chromosomal aberrations are scored in the metaphase spreads of mouse RAW264.7 macrophage cells. PM is collected from ambient air with a high volume total suspended particles sampler. The collected material is solubilized and filtered to retain the water-soluble, fine portion. The particles are characterized for chemical composition by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Different concentrations of particle suspension are added onto an in vitro culture of RAW264.7 mouse macrophages for a total exposure time of 72 hr, along with untreated control cells. At the end of exposure, the culture is treated with colcemid to arrest cells in metaphase. Cells are then harvested, treated with hypotonic solution, fixed in acetomethanol, dropped onto glass slides and finally stained with Giemsa solution. Slides are examined to assess the structural chromosomal aberrations (CAs) in metaphase spreads at 1,000X magnification using a bright-field microscope. 50 to 100 metaphase spread are scored for each treatment group. This technique is adapted for the detection of structural chromosomal aberrations (CAs), such as chromatid-type breaks, chromatid-type exchanges, acentric fragments, dicentric and ring chromosomes, double minutes, endoreduplication, and Robertsonian translocations in vitro after exposure to PM. It is a powerful method to associate a well-established cytogenetic endpoint to epigenetic alterations.

  18. Karyotype analysis of Lilium longiflorum and Lilium rubellum by chromosome banding and fluorescence in situ hybridisation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lim, K.B.; Wennekes, J.; Jong, de J.H.S.G.M.; Jacobsen, E.; Tuyl, van J.M.

    2001-01-01

    Detailed karyotypes of Lilium longiflorum and L. rubellum were constructed on the basis of chromosome arm lengths, C-banding, AgNO3 staining, and PI-DAPI banding, together with fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) with the 5S and 45S rDNA sequences as probes. The C-banding patterns that were ob

  19. Comparative analysis of chromosome counts infers three paleopolyploidies in the mollusca.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallinan, Nathaniel M; Lindberg, David R

    2011-01-01

    The study of paleopolyploidies requires the comparison of multiple whole genome sequences. If the branches of a phylogeny on which a whole-genome duplication (WGD) occurred could be identified before genome sequencing, taxa could be selected that provided a better assessment of that genome duplication. Here, we describe a likelihood model in which the number of chromosomes in a genome evolves according to a Markov process with one rate of chromosome duplication and loss that is proportional to the number of chromosomes in the genome and another stochastic rate at which every chromosome in the genome could duplicate in a single event. We compare the maximum likelihoods of a model in which the genome duplication rate varies to one in which it is fixed at zero using the Akaike information criterion, to determine if a model with WGDs is a good fit for the data. Once it has been determined that the data does fit the WGD model, we infer the phylogenetic position of paleopolyploidies by calculating the posterior probability that a WGD occurred on each branch of the taxon tree. Here, we apply this model to a molluscan tree represented by 124 taxa and infer three putative WGD events. In the Gastropoda, we identify a single branch within the Hypsogastropoda and one of two branches at the base of the Stylommatophora. We also identify one or two branches near the base of the Cephalopoda.

  20. Array comparative genomic hybridization analysis of small supernumerary marker chromosomes in human infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guediche, N; Tosca, L; Kara Terki, A; Bas, C; Lecerf, L; Young, J; Briand-Suleau, A; Tou, B; Bouligand, J; Brisset, S; Misrahi, M; Guiochon-Mantel, A; Goossens, M; Tachdjian, G

    2012-01-01

    Small supernumerary marker chromosomes (sSMC) are structurally abnormal chromosomes that cannot be unambiguously identified by conventional banding cytogenetics. This study describes four patients with sSMC in relation with infertility. Patient 1 had primary infertility. His brother, fertile, carried the same sSMC (patient 2). Patient 3 presented polycystic ovary syndrome and patient 4 primary ovarian insufficiency. Cytogenetic studies, array comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) and sperm analyses were compared with cases previously reported. sSMC corresponded to the 15q11.2 region (patients 1 and 2), the centromeric chromosome 15 region (patient 3) and the 21p11.2 region (patient 4). Array CGH showed 3.6-Mb gain for patients 1 and 2 and 0.266-Mb gain for patient 4. Sperm fluorescent in-situ hybridization analyses found ratios of 0.37 and 0.30 of sperm nuclei with sSMC(15) for patients 1 and 2, respectively (P < 0.001). An increase of sperm nuclei with disomy X, Y and 18 was noted for patient 1 compared with control and patient 2 (P < 0.001). Among the genes mapped in the unbalanced chromosomal regions, POTE B and BAGE are related to the testis and ovary, respectively. The implication of sSMC in infertility could be due to duplication, but also to mechanical effects perturbing meiosis.

  1. Selective chromosome analysis in couples with two or more miscarriages : case-control study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franssen, MTM; Korevaar, JC; Leschot, NJ; Bossuyt, PMM; Knegt, AC; Gerssen-Schoorl, KBJ; Wouters, CH; Hansson, KBM; Hochstenbach, R; Madan, K; van der Veen, F; Goddijn, M

    2005-01-01

    Objective To identify additional factors, such as maternal age or factors related to previous reproductive outcome or family history, and the corresponding probability of carrying a chromosome abnormality in couples with two or more miscarriages. Design Nested case-control study. Setting Six centres

  2. Population Genetics of a Parasitic Chromosome : Theoretical Analysis of PSR in Subdivided Populations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Werren, John H.; Beukeboom, Leo W.; Wu, Chung-I

    1993-01-01

    An assemblage of non-Mendelian sex ratio elements occurs in natural populations of the parasitoid wasp Nasonia vitripennis. These include Maternal Sex Ratio (MSR), a cytoplasmic element that causes nearly all-female families, and Paternal Sex Ratio (PSR), a B chromosome that causes all-male families

  3. Population Genetics of a Parasitic Chromosome : Experimental Analysis of PSR in Subdivided Populations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beukeboom, Leo W.; Werren, John H.; Charlesworth, B.

    1992-01-01

    Nasonia vitripennis is a parasitoid wasp that harbors several non-Mendelian sex-ratio distorters. These include MSR (Maternal Sex Ratio), a cytoplasmic element that causes nearly all-female families, and PSR (Paternal Sex Ratio), a supernumerary chromosome that causes all-male families. As in other

  4. Mutation screening and association analysis of six candidate genes for autism on chromosome 7q

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonora, E.; Lamb, J.A.; Barnby, G.;

    2005-01-01

    Genetic studies have provided evidence for an autism susceptibility locus (AUTS1) on chromosome 7q. Screening for mutations in six genes mapping to 7q, CUTL1, SRPK2, SYPL, LAMB1, NRCAM and PTPRZ1 in 48 unrelated individuals with autism led to the identification of several new coding variants in t...

  5. Image analysis of insulation mineral fibres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talbot, H; Lee, T; Jeulin, D; Hanton, D; Hobbs, L W

    2000-12-01

    We present two methods for measuring the diameter and length of man-made vitreous fibres based on the automated image analysis of scanning electron microscopy images. The fibres we want to measure are used in materials such as glass wool, which in turn are used for thermal and acoustic insulation. The measurement of the diameters and lengths of these fibres is used by the glass wool industry for quality control purposes. To obtain reliable quality estimators, the measurement of several hundred images is necessary. These measurements are usually obtained manually by operators. Manual measurements, although reliable when performed by skilled operators, are slow due to the need for the operators to rest often to retain their ability to spot faint fibres on noisy backgrounds. Moreover, the task of measuring thousands of fibres every day, even with the help of semi-automated image analysis systems, is dull and repetitive. The need for an automated procedure which could replace manual measurements is quite real. For each of the two methods that we propose to accomplish this task, we present the sample preparation, the microscope setting and the image analysis algorithms used for the segmentation of the fibres and for their measurement. We also show how a statistical analysis of the results can alleviate most measurement biases, and how we can estimate the true distribution of fibre lengths by diameter class by measuring only the lengths of the fibres visible in the field of view.

  6. Numerous transitions of sex chromosomes in Diptera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicoso, Beatriz; Bachtrog, Doris

    2015-04-01

    Many species groups, including mammals and many insects, determine sex using heteromorphic sex chromosomes. Diptera flies, which include the model Drosophila melanogaster, generally have XY sex chromosomes and a conserved karyotype consisting of six chromosomal arms (five large rods and a small dot), but superficially similar karyotypes may conceal the true extent of sex chromosome variation. Here, we use whole-genome analysis in 37 fly species belonging to 22 different families of Diptera and uncover tremendous hidden diversity in sex chromosome karyotypes among flies. We identify over a dozen different sex chromosome configurations, and the small dot chromosome is repeatedly used as the sex chromosome, which presumably reflects the ancestral karyotype of higher Diptera. However, we identify species with undifferentiated sex chromosomes, others in which a different chromosome replaced the dot as a sex chromosome or in which up to three chromosomal elements became incorporated into the sex chromosomes, and others yet with female heterogamety (ZW sex chromosomes). Transcriptome analysis shows that dosage compensation has evolved multiple times in flies, consistently through up-regulation of the single X in males. However, X chromosomes generally show a deficiency of genes with male-biased expression, possibly reflecting sex-specific selective pressures. These species thus provide a rich resource to study sex chromosome biology in a comparative manner and show that similar selective forces have shaped the unique evolution of sex chromosomes in diverse fly taxa.

  7. Cytogenetic Mapping of Disease Resistance Genes and Analysis of Their Distribution Features on Chromosomes in Maize

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Li-jia; Song Yun-chun

    2003-01-01

    Cytogenetic maps of four clusters of disease resistance genes were generated by ISH of the two RFLP markers tightly linked to and flanking each of maize resistance genes and the cloned resistance genes from other plant species onto maize chromosomes, combining with data published before. These genes include Helminthosporium turcium Pass resistance genes Ht1, Htn1 and Ht2, Helminthosporium maydis Nisik resistance genes Rhm1 and Rhm2, maize dwarf mosaic virus resistance gene Mdm1, wheat streak mosaic virus resistance gene Wsm1, Helminthosporium carbonum ULLstrup resistance gene Hml and the cloned Xanthomonas oryzae pv. Oryzae resistance gene Xa21 of rice, Cladosporium fulvum resistance genes Cf-9 and Cf-2.1 of tomato,and Pseudomonas syringae resistance gene RPS2 of Arabidopsis. Most of the tested disease resistance genes located on the four chromosomes, i.e., chromosomes1, 3, 6 and 8, and they closely distributed at the interstitial regions of these chromosomal long arms with percentage distances ranging 31.44(±3.72)-72.40(±3.25) except for genes Rhm1, Rhm2, Mdm1 and Wsm1 which mapped on the satellites of the short arms of chromosome6. It showed that the tested RFLP markers and genes were duplicated or triplicated in maize genome. Homology and conservation of disease resistance genes among species, and relationship between distribution features and functions of the genes were discussed. The results provide important scientific basis for deeply understanding structure and function of disease resistance genes and breeding in maize.

  8. Polymorphism analysis of microsatellites and construction of linkage map in part regions of four chromosomes in chicken

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Shouzhi; LI Hui; LI Ning; GAO Yu; DU Zhiqiang; GU Zhiliang; WANG Qigui; LI Zhihui; WANG Ying

    2007-01-01

    Based on chicken' consensus map issued in 2000, 17 microsatellites near 4 candidate genes such as IGF2, OBR, GDFS and APOA1 in 4 chromosomes (chromosome 5, 7, 8 and 24) were chosen for polymorphism analysis and construction of linkage map. Combining the technique of PCR and the fluorescent semi-automated detection, genome scanning was performed for 440 chickens, which was derived from China Agricultural University chicken resource families within three generations. The individuals of this resource families were genotyped. The results showed that the number of alleles ranged from 4 to 14; heterozygosity (H) of markers was between 0.3116 and 0.9148. Polymorphic information content (PIC) varied from 0.2672 to 0.8679. Microsatellites along with above-mentioned 4 candidate genes doing as general markers were used to construct linkage map. The spans of 4 linkage maps constructed in the part region of chromosome 5, 7, 8 and 24 were 263.5, 79.9, 206.2 and 104.2 cM, respectively. The order of markers was consistent with that of counterpart of reported consensus map. However, The spans of linkage map were larger than that of consensus map. The constructed linkage maps laid the foundation for mapping quantitative trait loci (QTL) responsible for economically important traits in chicken.

  9. Genetic Alterations in Pesticide Exposed Bolivian Farmers: An evaluation by analysis of chromosomal aberrations and the comet assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik Jørs

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pesticides are of concern in Bolivia because of increasing use. Frequent intoxications have been demonstrated due to use of very toxic pesticides, insufficient control of distribution and sale and little knowledge among farmers of protective measures and hygienic procedures.Method: Questionnaires were applied and blood tests taken from 81 volunteers from La Paz County, of whom 48 were pesticide exposed farmers and 33 non-exposed controls. Sixty males and 21 females participated with a mean age of 37.3 years (range 17–76. Data of exposure and possible genetic damage were collected and evaluated by well known statistical methods, controlling for relevant confounders. To measure genetic damage chromosomal aberrations and the comet assay analysis were performed.Results: Pesticide exposed farmers had a higher degree of genetic damage compared to the control group. The number of chromosomal aberrations increased with the intensity of pesticide exposure. Females had a lower number of chromosomal aberrations than males, and people living at altitudes above 2500 metres seemed to exhibit more DNA damage measured by the comet assay.Conclusions: Bolivian farmers showed signs of genotoxic damage, probably related to exposure to pesticides. Due to the potentially negative long term health effects of genetic damage on reproduction and the development of cancer, preventive measures are recommended. Effective control with imports and sales, banning of the most toxic pesticides, education and information are possible measures, which could help preventing the negative effects of pesticides on human health and the environment.

  10. A one-step real-time multiplex PCR for screening Y-chromosomal microdeletions without downstream amplicon size analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviana Kozina

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Y-chromosomal microdeletions (YCMD are one of the major genetic causes for non-obstructive azoospermia. Genetic testing for YCMD by multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR is an established method for quick and robust screening of deletions in the AZF regions of the Y-chromosome. Multiplex PCRs have the advantage of including a control gene in every reaction and significantly reducing the number of reactions needed to screen the relevant genomic markers. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The widely established "EAA/EMQN best practice guidelines for molecular diagnosis of Y-chromosomal microdeletions (2004" were used as a basis for designing a real-time multiplex PCR system, in which the YCMD can simply be identified by their melting points. For this reason, some AZF primers were substituted by primers for regions in their genomic proximity, and the ZFX/ZFY control primer was exchanged by the AMELX/AMELY control primer. Furthermore, we substituted the classical SybrGreen I dye by the novel and high-performing DNA-binding dye EvaGreen™ and put substantial effort in titrating the primer combinations in respect to optimal melting peak separation and peak size. SIGNIFICANCE: With these changes, we were able to develop a platform-independent and robust real-time based multiplex PCR, which makes the need for amplicon identification by electrophoretic sizing expendable. By using an open-source system for real-time PCR analysis, we further demonstrate the applicability of automated melting point and YCMD detection.

  11. Antenatal screening combined with chromosome analysis to prevent fetus birth with chromosome disease%产前筛查并染色体分析预防染色体病胎儿出生

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王宏; 陈武斌

    2011-01-01

    目的 对产前筛查和染色体分析预防染色体病胎儿出生的工作进行回顾性的总结,为今后减少出生缺陷提供指导.方法 通过对优生咨询、血清筛查检出的高风险孕妇和超声筛查怀疑胎儿有染色体病的孕妇进行胎儿染色体分析,核型严重异常者终止妊娠.结果 ①优生咨询筛查出的高风险孕妇中接受染色体分析者372例,染色体异常检出率为4.57%(17/372),终止妊娠5例;②血清筛查孕妇共32 848例,高风险2 085例,筛查阳性率6.35%;染色体分析740例,染色体异常检出率为4.59%(34/740),终止妊娠18例;③超声筛查异常进行染色体分析177例,异常检出率为19.77%(35/177),终止妊娠32例;④染色体分析共1 289例,异常检出率为6.67%(86/1 289),数目异常50例全部终止妊娠,结构异常36例中有5例终止妊娠,终止妊娠率为4.27%(55/1 289).结论 优生咨询、血清筛查、超声筛查组成的筛查体系结合染色体分析可提高染色体病的检出率,超声筛查的检出率最高;每位孕妇都应接受系统的产前筛查,高危孕妇应接受染色体分析,最大限度地避免染色体病胎儿出生.%Objective To retrospectively analyze the results of antenatal screening and chromosome analysis on the prevalence of fetus birth with chromosome disease so as to provide guidance for reducing birth defects in the future. Methods Fetal chromosomal analysis was done for high-risk pregnant women screened by eugenic consulation and serum screening and for those whose fetus were suspected to have chromosomal abnormalities detected by ultrasonography. Termination of pregnancy ( TOP ) was given to severe abnormal karyotype. Results Among the high-risk pregnant women screened by eugenic consulation, 372 cases received chromosome analysis, and the detection rate of chromosomal abnormality was 4. 57% ( 17/372 ). Five cases accepted TOP. There were 2 085 cases with high risk among 32 848 pregnant women receiving serum

  12. Principal Components Analysis In Medical Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, J. B.; Huddleston, A. L.

    1986-06-01

    Principal components analysis, PCA, is basically a data reduction technique. PCA has been used in several problems in diagnostic radiology: processing radioisotope brain scans (Ref.1), automatic alignment of radionuclide images (Ref. 2), processing MRI images (Ref. 3,4), analyzing first-pass cardiac studies (Ref. 5) correcting for attenuation in bone mineral measurements (Ref. 6) and in dual energy x-ray imaging (Ref. 6,7). This paper will progress as follows; a brief introduction to the mathematics of PCA will be followed by two brief examples of how PCA has been used in the literature. Finally my own experience with PCA in dual-energy x-ray imaging will be given.

  13. Deep Learning in Medical Image Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Dinggang; Wu, Guorong; Suk, Heung-Il

    2017-03-09

    This review covers computer-assisted analysis of images in the field of medical imaging. Recent advances in machine learning, especially with regard to deep learning, are helping to identify, classify, and quantify patterns in medical images. At the core of these advances is the ability to exploit hierarchical feature representations learned solely from data, instead of features designed by hand according to domain-specific knowledge. Deep learning is rapidly becoming the state of the art, leading to enhanced performance in various medical applications. We introduce the fundamentals of deep learning methods and review their successes in image registration, detection of anatomical and cellular structures, tissue segmentation, computer-aided disease diagnosis and prognosis, and so on. We conclude by discussing research issues and suggesting future directions for further improvement. Expected final online publication date for the Annual Review of Biomedical Engineering Volume 19 is June 4, 2017. Please see http://www.annualreviews.org/page/journal/pubdates for revised estimates.

  14. Fourier analysis: from cloaking to imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Kedi; Cheng, Qiluan; Wang, Guo Ping

    2016-04-01

    Regarding invisibility cloaks as an optical imaging system, we present a Fourier approach to analytically unify both Pendry cloaks and complementary media-based invisibility cloaks into one kind of cloak. By synthesizing different transfer functions, we can construct different devices to realize a series of interesting functions such as hiding objects (events), creating illusions, and performing perfect imaging. In this article, we give a brief review on recent works of applying Fourier approach to analysis invisibility cloaks and optical imaging through scattering layers. We show that, to construct devices to conceal an object, no constructive materials with extreme properties are required, making most, if not all, of the above functions realizable by using naturally occurring materials. As instances, we experimentally verify a method of directionally hiding distant objects and create illusions by using all-dielectric materials, and further demonstrate a non-invasive method of imaging objects completely hidden by scattering layers.

  15. Experimental Researches on Carcinogenesis or Tumorigenicity of MDCK Canine Kidney Cell(CKC) Lines and Analysis of Their Chromosome Karyotypes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG De-li; FANG Fu-de; LI Liu-jin; XIA Geng-tian; HE Xu-yu; GAO Bu-xian; BAI Xiao-hong; HUANG Gao-sheng; LIU Shang-gao; YAN Long-fei

    2002-01-01

    The chromosomal number variations & structural aberrations of the MDCK cell line, primary feline or canine kidney cell(FKC or CKC) and Hela cell line were investigated and their karyotypes of conventional chromosome bands were analyzed. The carcinogenesis or tumorigenicity testing of these cell lines in about 232 nude mice and for colony formation in soft agarose and for haemagglutination under different concentration of plant lectins of these cells were carried out. Under the prerequisite that the incidence of cancer or tumor in negative-control nude mice inoculated subcutaneously with primary feline or canine kidney cell cultures purified in vitro at passage 3 was 0 (0/22) and 0 (0/10), respectively. The incidence of the progressively-growing malignant tumor(MT) in positive-control nude mice inoculated subcutaneously with Hela cell cultures of KB, X, or NM20/X strain was 10/10, 25/25 and 5/51, respectively. The results showed that the incidence of tumor in nude mice with tetrapioid YA strain of MDCK cell during 20 - 45 passages, with hypodiploid JB strain of MDCK cell on passage 25, with di-and hypoploid JC strain of MDCK cell during 2 - 15passages or with hypoploid M strain of MDCK cell during 9 - 27 passages was 28/58, 1/5, 4/18 and 0/31,respectively. The chromosomal analysis results showed that the ratio of difference in the rate of modal chromosome number between high (mcs + n) and lowest (mcs)passages was not more than 5 % - 15 % and the structure aberrations was generally 0 - 3%. These results proved that the genetic characteristics of chromosomal number of cell lines determines their tumorigenicity, but it is species-specific. MDCK line has tumorigenicity no matter what its chromosome karyotype is, at least it has very low tumorigenicity even when its modal chromosome number is hypoploid. The repeatedly frozen, thawed and split controls of tumorigenicity-positive cell lines(X strain of Hela, M strain of BHK-21, JA strain of Vero, YA strain of MDCK) have

  16. Measuring toothbrush interproximal penetration using image analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayworth, Mark S.; Lyons, Elizabeth K.

    1994-09-01

    An image analysis method of measuring the effectiveness of a toothbrush in reaching the interproximal spaces of teeth is described. Artificial teeth are coated with a stain that approximates real plaque and then brushed with a toothbrush on a brushing machine. The teeth are then removed and turned sideways so that the interproximal surfaces can be imaged. The areas of stain that have been removed within masked regions that define the interproximal regions are measured and reported. These areas correspond to the interproximal areas of the tooth reached by the toothbrush bristles. The image analysis method produces more precise results (10-fold decrease in standard deviation) in a fraction (22%) of the time as compared to our prior visual grading method.

  17. Unsupervised hyperspectral image analysis using independent component analysis (ICA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. S. Chiang; I. W. Ginsberg

    2000-06-30

    In this paper, an ICA-based approach is proposed for hyperspectral image analysis. It can be viewed as a random version of the commonly used linear spectral mixture analysis, in which the abundance fractions in a linear mixture model are considered to be unknown independent signal sources. It does not require the full rank of the separating matrix or orthogonality as most ICA methods do. More importantly, the learning algorithm is designed based on the independency of the material abundance vector rather than the independency of the separating matrix generally used to constrain the standard ICA. As a result, the designed learning algorithm is able to converge to non-orthogonal independent components. This is particularly useful in hyperspectral image analysis since many materials extracted from a hyperspectral image may have similar spectral signatures and may not be orthogonal. The AVIRIS experiments have demonstrated that the proposed ICA provides an effective unsupervised technique for hyperspectral image classification.

  18. An image processing analysis of skin textures

    CERN Document Server

    Sparavigna, A

    2008-01-01

    Colour and coarseness of skin are visually different. When image processing is involved in the skin analysis, it is important to quantitatively evaluate such differences using texture features. In this paper, we discuss a texture analysis and measurements based on a statistical approach to the pattern recognition. Grain size and anisotropy are evaluated with proper diagrams. The possibility to determine the presence of pattern defects is also discussed.

  19. IMAGES AND SOCIAL REPRESENTATION: SEMIOTIC ANALYSIS CONTRIBUTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izabela Gonçalves Terra

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The common sense knowledge formation is object of study of the Social Representation Theory, which highlights the role of communication in the production of comprehension by the subjects. The visual images favor the socialization of meanings and are active elements in the formation of social representations. Given the expressive role of the images in the formation of representational contents, this paper aims to present a semiotics analysis method for researches on social representations. The semiotic analysis of images was selected as a theoretical and methodological basis, for offering the means required for guidance for an effective research method to identify the social representations of socially shared iconic signs. The analysis method was explored by means of analytical procedures, employed for the apprehension of social representations of the feminine in posters for Brazilian Ministry of Health campaigns, which allowed access to the network of meanings associated with the analyzed visual image. It should be emphasized that the relevance of the use of semiotic analysis to analyze social representations, which presents itself as a fertile perspective for further studies expanding the possibilities of exploitation of visual content.

  20. Scanning transmission electron microscopy imaging and analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Pennycook, Stephen J

    2011-01-01

    Provides the first comprehensive treatment of the physics and applications of this mainstream technique for imaging and analysis at the atomic level Presents applications of STEM in condensed matter physics, materials science, catalysis, and nanoscience Suitable for graduate students learning microscopy, researchers wishing to utilize STEM, as well as for specialists in other areas of microscopy Edited and written by leading researchers and practitioners

  1. Visualization of Parameter Space for Image Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pretorius, A. Johannes; Bray, Mark-Anthony P.; Carpenter, Anne E.; Ruddle, Roy A.

    2013-01-01

    Image analysis algorithms are often highly parameterized and much human input is needed to optimize parameter settings. This incurs a time cost of up to several days. We analyze and characterize the conventional parameter optimization process for image analysis and formulate user requirements. With this as input, we propose a change in paradigm by optimizing parameters based on parameter sampling and interactive visual exploration. To save time and reduce memory load, users are only involved in the first step - initialization of sampling - and the last step - visual analysis of output. This helps users to more thoroughly explore the parameter space and produce higher quality results. We describe a custom sampling plug-in we developed for CellProfiler - a popular biomedical image analysis framework. Our main focus is the development of an interactive visualization technique that enables users to analyze the relationships between sampled input parameters and corresponding output. We implemented this in a prototype called Paramorama. It provides users with a visual overview of parameters and their sampled values. User-defined areas of interest are presented in a structured way that includes image-based output and a novel layout algorithm. To find optimal parameter settings, users can tag high- and low-quality results to refine their search. We include two case studies to illustrate the utility of this approach. PMID:22034361

  2. Linkage analysis of 19 French breast cancer families, with five chromosome 17q markers.

    OpenAIRE

    Mazoyer, S; Lalle, P.; Narod, S. A.; Bignon, Y J; Courjal, F; Jamot, B.; Dutrillaux, B.; Stoppa-Lyonnett, D; Sobol, H

    1993-01-01

    Nineteen French breast and breast-ovarian cancer families were tested for linkage with five chromosome 17q markers. The five breast-ovarian cancer families as a group give positive evidence for linkage, whereas the 14 breast cancer-only families do not. Heterogeneity of linkage of breast and breast-ovarian cancers is significant in France and supports the existence of more than one susceptibility gene.

  3. [Analysis of DNA and chromosome damage by the methods of molecular cytogenetics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arutiunian, R M; Oganesian, G G

    2011-01-01

    The main hybrid techniques of molecular cytogenetics are described. Methodological aspects of combination of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with the comet assay and micronuclei (MN) test are discussed along with results of their application to evaluate and locate DNA and chromosome damage in the genome. The experience of the authors with the application of FISH in combination with the comet assay and MN test are reported.

  4. Web Based Distributed Coastal Image Analysis System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This project develops Web based distributed image analysis system processing the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) data to provide decision...

  5. A phylogenetic analysis using multidirectional chromosome painting of three species (Uroderma magnirostrum, U. bilobatum and Artibeus obscurus) of subfamily Stenodermatinae (Chiroptera-Phyllostomidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieczarka, J C; Gomes, A J B; Nagamachi, C Y; Rocha, D C C; Rissino, J D; O'Brien, P C M; Yang, F; Ferguson-Smith, M A

    2013-07-01

    The species of genera Uroderma and Artibeus are medium-sized bats belonging to the family Phyllostomidae and subfamily Stenodermatinae (Mammalia, Chiroptera) from South America. They have a wide distribution in the Neotropical region, with two currently recognized species in Uroderma and approximately 20 species in Artibeus. These two genera have different rates of chromosome evolution, with Artibeus probably having retained the ancestral karyotype for the subfamily. We used whole chromosome paint probe sets from Carollia brevicauda and Phyllostomus hastatus on Uroderma magnirostrum, Uroderma bilobatum, and Artibeus obscurus. With the aim of testing the previous phylogenies of these bats using cytogenetics, we compared these results with published painting maps on Phyllostomidae. The genome-wide comparative maps based on chromosome painting and chromosome banding reveal the chromosome forms that characterize each taxonomic level within the Phyllostomidae and show the chromosome evolution of this family. Based on this, we are able to suggest an ancestral karyotype for Phyllostomidae. Our cladistic analysis is an independent confirmation using multidirectional chromosome painting of the previous Phyllostomidae phylogenies.

  6. Detection and analysis of chromosomal arsenic resistance in Pseudomonas fluorescens strain MSP3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prithivirajsingh, S; Mishra, S K; Mahadevan, A

    2001-02-09

    Pseudomonas fluorescens MSP3 isolated from sea water was resistant to arsenate. This bacterium harbored no plasmids, indicating that arsenic resistance was chromosomally encoded. The chromosomal DNA from MSP3 when transformed onto Escherichia coli DH5alpha using pBluescript exhibited resistance to sodium arsenate and sodium arsenite. Three clones MSA1, MSA2, and MSI3 containing the ars genes were obtained and further subcloning resulted in three fragments of size 2.2, 2.6, and 2.1 kb for pMSA11, pMSA12, and pMSI13, respectively, which contained the genes arsRBC of the arsenic operon. An efflux mechanism of detoxification was observed which was ATP dependent. The resistance mechanism was encoded from a single operon which consisted of an arsenite inducible repressor that regulates the expression of arsenate reductase (ars C) and inner membrane associated arsenite export system encoded by ars B. The chromosomal operon was cloned, sequenced, and found to consist of three cistrons, named as ars R, ars B, and ars C. Southern hybridization and mating experiments confirmed the functioning of the ars genes in the operon, thereby conferring increased resistance to sodium arsenate and sodium arsenite.

  7. Molecular cloning and analysis of breakpoints on ring chromosome 17 in a patient with autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazna, Alzbeta; Havlovicova, Marketa; Sedlacek, Zdenek

    2008-01-15

    The breakpoint junction on a ring chromosome 17 in a girl with autism, mental retardation, mild dysmorphism and neurofibromatosis was identified and analysed at the nucleotide level. The extent of the deleted segments was about 1.9 Mb on 17p and about 1.0 Mb on 17q. The structure of the junction between the 17p and 17q arms, especially the lack of significant homology between the juxtaposed genomic regions and the presence of short microhomology at the junction site, indicated non-homologous end joining as the most likely mechanism leading to the rearrangement. In addition to the 17p-17q junction itself, a de novo 1 kb deletion in a distance of 400 bp from the junction was identified, which arose most likely as a part of the rearrangement. The defect directly inactivated 3 genes, and the deleted terminal chromosome segments harboured 27 and 14 protein-coding genes from 17p and 17q, respectively. Several of the genes affected by the rearrangement are candidates for the symptoms observed in the patient. Additional rearrangements similar to the 1 kb deletion observed in our patient may remain undetected but can participate in the phenotype of patients with chromosomal aberrations. They can also be the reason for repeated failures to clone breakpoint junctions in other patients described in the literature.

  8. Genomic imbalances in 5918 malignant epithelial tumors: an explorative meta-analysis of chromosomal CGH data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baudis Michael

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chromosomal abnormalities have been associated with most human malignancies, with gains and losses on some genomic regions associated with particular entities. Methods Of the 15429 cases collected for the Progenetix molecular-cytogenetic database, 5918 malignant epithelial neoplasias analyzed by chromosomal Comparative Genomic Hybridization (CGH were selected for further evaluation. For the 22 clinico-pathological entities with more than 50 cases, summary profiles for genomic imbalances were generated from case specific data and analyzed. Results With large variation in overall genomic instability, recurring genomic gains and losses were prominent. Most entities showed frequent gains involving 8q2, while gains on 20q, 1q, 3q, 5p, 7q and 17q were frequent in different entities. Loss "hot spots" included 3p, 4q, 13q, 17p and 18q among others. Related average imbalance patterns were found for clinically distinct entities, e.g. hepatocellular carcinomas (ca. and ductal breast ca., as well as for histologically related entities (squamous cell ca. of different sites. Conclusion Although considerable case-by-case variation of genomic profiles can be found by CGH in epithelial malignancies, a limited set of variously combined chromosomal imbalances may be typical for carcinogenesis. Focus on the respective regions should aid in target gene detection and pathway deduction.

  9. An analysis of meiotic impairment and of sex chromosome associations throughout meiosis in XYY mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahadevaiah, S K; Evans, E P; Burgoyne, P S

    2000-01-01

    The existing XYY meiotic data for mice present a very heterogeneous picture with respect to the relative frequencies of different sex chromosome associations, both at pachytene and diakinesis/metaphase I. Furthermore, where both pachytene and diakinesis/MI data are available for the same males, the frequencies of the different configurations at the two stages are very different. In the present paper we utilise "XYY" and "XY/XYY" mosaic mice with cytologically distinguishable Y chromosomes to investigate the factors responsible for this heterogeneity between different males and between the two meiotic stages. It is concluded (1) that the initial pattern of synapsis is driven by the relatedness of the three pseudoautosomal regions (PARs); (2) that the order and extent of PAR synapsis within radial trivalents are also affected by PAR relatedness and that this leads to chiasmata being preferentially formed between closely related PARs; (3) that trivalents with a single chiasma resolve into a bivalent + univalent by the diakinesis stage; (4) that although many spermatocytes with asynapsed sex chromosomes are eliminated between pachytene and diakinesis, those that survive this phase of elimination progress to the first meiotic metaphase (MI) and accumulate in large numbers, leading to an over-representation of those with univalents as compared to radial trivalents; and (5) that the arrested MI cells are eventually eliminated, so that very few "XYY" cells contribute products to MII.

  10. Generation and Analysis of Transposon Ac/Ds-Induced Chromosomal Rearrangements in Rice Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xuan, Yuan Hu; Peterson, Thomas; Han, Chang-Deok

    2016-01-01

    Closely-located transposable elements (TEs) have been known to induce chromosomal breakage and rearrangements via alternative transposition. To study genome rearrangements in rice, an Ac/Ds system has been employed. This system comprises an immobile Ac element expressed under the control of CaMV 35S promoter, and a modified Ds element. A starter line carried Ac and a single copy of Ds at the OsRLG5 (Oryza sativa receptor-like gene 5). To enhance the transpositional activity, seed-derived calli were cultured and regenerated into plants. Among 270 lines regenerated from the starter, one line was selected that contained a pair of inversely-oriented Ds elements at the OsRLG5 (Oryza sativa receptor-like gene 5). The selected line was again subjected to tissue culture to obtain a regenerant population. Among 300 regenerated plants, 107 (36 %) contained chromosomal rearrangements including deletions, duplications, and inversions of various sizes. From 34 plants, transposition mechanisms leading to such genomic rearrangements were analyzed. The rearrangements were induced by sister chromatid transposition (SCT), homologous recombination (HR), and single chromatid transposition (SLCT). Among them, 22 events (65 %) were found to be transmitted to the next generation. These results demonstrate a great potential of tissue culture regeneration and the Ac/Ds system in understanding alternative transposition mechanisms and in developing chromosome engineering in plants.

  11. A time stamp comparative analysis of frequent chromosomal abnormalities in Romanian patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suciu, Nicolae; Plaiasu, Vasilica

    2014-01-01

    Chromosome abnormalities represent the leading cause in many human genetic disorders. Gain or loss of genetic material can disrupt the normal expression of genes important in fetal development and result in abnormal phenotypes. Approximately 60% of first-trimester spontaneous abortions exhibit karyotype abnormalities. The majority of these abnormalities consist of numerical chromosomal changes, such as autosomal trisomy, monosomy X and polyploidy. In our current study, 411 cases were analyzed over a period of 5 years, which reflected the incidence of cytogenetic abnormalities in Romania. Down syndrome showed the highest frequency at 79%. At 2.6% structural chromosome abnormality syndromes and Turner syndrome followed suit. Next were the Edwards and Patau syndromes with an incidence of 1.2%. Klinefelter, Cri du chat and Wolf-Hirschhorn syndromes all had an incidence of 0.7%. Finally, the lowest frequencies were shown by Williams at 0.4% and only one case of Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome with abnormal karyotype. The average maternal age at childbirth was 31.15 years (SD = 6.96) and the average paternal age was 33.41 years (SD = 7.17).

  12. Chromosome analysis of five Brazilian species of poison frogs (Anura: Dendrobatidae)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Paula Camargo Rodrigues; Odair Aguiar; Flávia Serpieri; Albertina Pimentel Lima; Masao Uetanebaro; Shirlei Maria Recco-Pimentel

    2011-04-01

    Dendrobatid frogs have undergone an extensive systematic reorganization based on recent molecular findings. The present work describes karyotypes of the Brazilian species Adelphobates castaneoticus, A. quinquevittatus, Ameerega picta, A. galactonotus and Dendrobates tinctorius which were compared to each other and with previously described related species. All karyotypes consisted of $2n = 18$ chromosomes, except for A. picta which had $2n = 24$. The karyotypes of the Adelphobates and D. tinctorius species were highly similar to each other and to the other $2n = 18$ previously studied species, revealing conserved karyotypic characteristics in both genera. In recent phylogenetic studies, all Adelphobates species were grouped in a clade separated from the Dendrobates species. Thus, we hypothesized that their common karyotypic traits may have a distinct origin by chromosome rearrangements and mutations. In A. picta, with $2n = 24$, chromosome features of pairs from 1 to 8 are shared with other previously karyotyped species within this genus. Hence, the A. picta data reinforced that the C-banding pattern and the NOR location are species-specific traits in the genus Ameerega. Moreover, the Ameerega monophyletism proposed by previous phylogenetic studies indicates that the karyotypic differences among species in this genus result from a long divergence time.

  13. Image analysis for ophthalmological diagnosis image processing of Corvis ST images using Matlab

    CERN Document Server

    Koprowski, Robert

    2016-01-01

    This monograph focuses on the use of analysis and processing methods for images from the Corvis® ST tonometer. The presented analysis is associated with the quantitative, repeatable and fully automatic evaluation of the response of the eye, eyeball and cornea to an air-puff. All the described algorithms were practically implemented in MATLAB®. The monograph also describes and provides the full source code designed to perform the discussed calculations. As a result, this monograph is intended for scientists, graduate students and students of computer science and bioengineering as well as doctors wishing to expand their knowledge of modern diagnostic methods assisted by various image analysis and processing methods.

  14. Digital image sequence processing, compression, and analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Reed, Todd R

    2004-01-01

    IntroductionTodd R. ReedCONTENT-BASED IMAGE SEQUENCE REPRESENTATIONPedro M. Q. Aguiar, Radu S. Jasinschi, José M. F. Moura, andCharnchai PluempitiwiriyawejTHE COMPUTATION OF MOTIONChristoph Stiller, Sören Kammel, Jan Horn, and Thao DangMOTION ANALYSIS AND DISPLACEMENT ESTIMATION IN THE FREQUENCY DOMAINLuca Lucchese and Guido Maria CortelazzoQUALITY OF SERVICE ASSESSMENT IN NEW GENERATION WIRELESS VIDEO COMMUNICATIONSGaetano GiuntaERROR CONCEALMENT IN DIGITAL VIDEOFrancesco G.B. De NataleIMAGE SEQUENCE RESTORATION: A WIDER PERSPECTIVEAnil KokaramVIDEO SUMMARIZATIONCuneyt M. Taskiran and Edward

  15. Recent Advances in Morphological Cell Image Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengyong Chen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper summarizes the recent advances in image processing methods for morphological cell analysis. The topic of morphological analysis has received much attention with the increasing demands in both bioinformatics and biomedical applications. Among many factors that affect the diagnosis of a disease, morphological cell analysis and statistics have made great contributions to results and effects for a doctor. Morphological cell analysis finds the cellar shape, cellar regularity, classification, statistics, diagnosis, and so forth. In the last 20 years, about 1000 publications have reported the use of morphological cell analysis in biomedical research. Relevant solutions encompass a rather wide application area, such as cell clumps segmentation, morphological characteristics extraction, 3D reconstruction, abnormal cells identification, and statistical analysis. These reports are summarized in this paper to enable easy referral to suitable methods for practical solutions. Representative contributions and future research trends are also addressed.

  16. Affected kindred analysis of human X chromosome exomes to identify novel X-linked intellectual disability genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tejasvi S Niranjan

    Full Text Available X-linked Intellectual Disability (XLID is a group of genetically heterogeneous disorders caused by mutations in genes on the X chromosome. Deleterious mutations in ~10% of X chromosome genes are implicated in causing XLID disorders in ~50% of known and suspected XLID families. The remaining XLID genes are expected to be rare and even private to individual families. To systematically identify these XLID genes, we sequenced the X chromosome exome (X-exome in 56 well-established XLID families (a single affected male from 30 families and two affected males from 26 families using an Agilent SureSelect X-exome kit and the Illumina HiSeq 2000 platform. To enrich for disease-causing mutations, we first utilized variant filters based on dbSNP, the male-restricted portions of the 1000 Genomes Project, or the Exome Variant Server datasets. However, these databases present limitations as automatic filters for enrichment of XLID genes. We therefore developed and optimized a strategy that uses a cohort of affected male kindred pairs and an additional small cohort of affected unrelated males to enrich for potentially pathological variants and to remove neutral variants. This strategy, which we refer to as Affected Kindred/Cross-Cohort Analysis, achieves a substantial enrichment for potentially pathological variants in known XLID genes compared to variant filters from public reference databases, and it has identified novel XLID candidate genes. We conclude that Affected Kindred/Cross-Cohort Analysis can effectively enrich for disease-causing genes in rare, Mendelian disorders, and that public reference databases can be used effectively, but cautiously, as automatic filters for X-linked disorders.

  17. Affected kindred analysis of human X chromosome exomes to identify novel X-linked intellectual disability genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niranjan, Tejasvi S; Skinner, Cindy; May, Melanie; Turner, Tychele; Rose, Rebecca; Stevenson, Roger; Schwartz, Charles E; Wang, Tao

    2015-01-01

    X-linked Intellectual Disability (XLID) is a group of genetically heterogeneous disorders caused by mutations in genes on the X chromosome. Deleterious mutations in ~10% of X chromosome genes are implicated in causing XLID disorders in ~50% of known and suspected XLID families. The remaining XLID genes are expected to be rare and even private to individual families. To systematically identify these XLID genes, we sequenced the X chromosome exome (X-exome) in 56 well-established XLID families (a single affected male from 30 families and two affected males from 26 families) using an Agilent SureSelect X-exome kit and the Illumina HiSeq 2000 platform. To enrich for disease-causing mutations, we first utilized variant filters based on dbSNP, the male-restricted portions of the 1000 Genomes Project, or the Exome Variant Server datasets. However, these databases present limitations as automatic filters for enrichment of XLID genes. We therefore developed and optimized a strategy that uses a cohort of affected male kindred pairs and an additional small cohort of affected unrelated males to enrich for potentially pathological variants and to remove neutral variants. This strategy, which we refer to as Affected Kindred/Cross-Cohort Analysis, achieves a substantial enrichment for potentially pathological variants in known XLID genes compared to variant filters from public reference databases, and it has identified novel XLID candidate genes. We conclude that Affected Kindred/Cross-Cohort Analysis can effectively enrich for disease-causing genes in rare, Mendelian disorders, and that public reference databases can be used effectively, but cautiously, as automatic filters for X-linked disorders.

  18. Quantitative Analysis in Nuclear Medicine Imaging

    CERN Document Server

    2006-01-01

    This book provides a review of image analysis techniques as they are applied in the field of diagnostic and therapeutic nuclear medicine. Driven in part by the remarkable increase in computing power and its ready and inexpensive availability, this is a relatively new yet rapidly expanding field. Likewise, although the use of radionuclides for diagnosis and therapy has origins dating back almost to the discovery of natural radioactivity itself, radionuclide therapy and, in particular, targeted radionuclide therapy has only recently emerged as a promising approach for therapy of cancer and, to a lesser extent, other diseases. As effort has, therefore, been made to place the reviews provided in this book in a broader context. The effort to do this is reflected by the inclusion of introductory chapters that address basic principles of nuclear medicine imaging, followed by overview of issues that are closely related to quantitative nuclear imaging and its potential role in diagnostic and therapeutic applications. ...

  19. Flow karyotyping and sorting of human chromosomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, J.W.; Lucas, J.; Peters, D.; Pinkel, D.; Trask, B.; van den Engh, G.; Van Dilla, M.A.

    1986-07-16

    Flow cytometry and sorting are becoming increasingly useful as tools for chromosome classfication and for the detection of numerical and structural chromosome aberrations. Chromosomes of a single type can be purified with these tools to facilitate gene mapping or production of chromosome specific recombinant DNA libraries. For analysis of chromosomes with flow cytometry, the chromosomes are extracted from mitotic cells, stained with one or more fluorescent dyes and classified one-by-one according to their dye content(s). Thus, the flow approach is fundamentally different than conventional karyotyping where chromosomes are classified within the context of a metaphase spread. Flow sorting allows purification of chromosomes that can be distinguished flow cytometrically. The authors describe the basic principles of flow cytometric chromosome classification i.e. flow karyotyping, and chromosome sorting and describe several applications. 30 refs., 8 figs.

  20. mBAND Analysis of Early and Late Damages in the Chromosome of Human Lymphocytes after Exposures to Gamma Rays and Fe Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunagawa, Mayumi; Zhang, Ye; Yeshitla, Samrawit; Kadhim, Munira; Wilson, Bobby; Wu, Honglu

    2013-01-01

    Stable type chromosome aberrations that survive multiple generations of cell division include translocation and inversions. An efficient method to detect an inversion is multi-color banding fluorescent in situ hybridization (mBAND) which allows identification of both inter- and intrachromosome aberrations simultaneously. Post irradiation, chromosome aberrations may also arise after multiple cell divisions as a result of genomic instability. To investigate the stable or late-arising chromosome aberrations induced after radiation exposure, we exposed human lymphocytes to gamma rays and Fe ions ex vivo, and cultured the cells for multiple generations. Chromosome aberrations were analyzed in cells collected at first mitosis and at several time intervals during the culture period post irradiation. With gamma irradiation, about half of the damages observed at first mitosis remained after 7 day- and 14 day- culture, suggesting the transmissibility of damages to the surviving progeny. At the doses that produced similar frequencies of gamma-induced chromosome aberrations as observed at first mitosis, a significantly lower yield of aberrations remained at the same population doublings after Fe ion exposure. At these equitoxic doses, more complex type aberrations were observed for Fe ions, indicating that Fe ion-induced initial chromosome damages are more severe and may lead to cell death. Detailed analysis of breaks participating in total chromosome exchanges within the first cell cycle post irradiation revealed a common hotspot located in the 3p21 region, which is a known fragile site corresponding to the band 6 in the mBand analysis. The breakpoint distribution in chromosomes collected at 7 days, but not at 14 days, post irradiation appeared similar to the distribution in cells collected within the first cell cycle post irradiation. The breakpoint distribution for human lymphocytes after radiation exposure was different from the previously published distribution for human

  1. Analysis of chromosome 22 deletions in neurofibromatosis type 2-related tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolff, R.K.; Frazer, K.A.; Jackler, R.K.; Lanser, M.J.; Pitts, L.H.; Cox, D.R. (Univ. of California, San Francisco, CA (United States))

    1992-09-01

    The neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2) gene has been hypothesized to be a recessive tumor suppressor, with mutations at the same locus on chromosome 22 that lead to NF2 also leading to sporadic tumors of the types seen in NF2. Flanking markers for this gene have previously been defined as D22S1 centromeric and D22S28 telomeric. Identification of subregions of this interval that are consistently rearranged in the NF2-related tumors would aid in better defining the disease locus. To this end, the authors have compared tumor and constitutional DNAs, isolated from 39 unrelated patients with sporadic and NF2-associated acoustic neuromas, meningiomas, schwannomas, and ependymomas, at eight polymorphic loci on chromosome 22. Two of the tumors studied revealed loss-of-heterozygosity patterns, which is consistent with the presence of chromosome 22 terminal deletions. By using additional polymorphic markers, the terminal deletion breakpoint found in one of the tumors, an acoustic neuroma from an NF2 patient, was mapped within the previously defined NF2 region. The breakpoint occurred between the haplotyped markers D22S41/D22S46 and D22S56. This finding redefines the proximal flanking marker and localizes the NF2 gene between markers D22S41/D22S46 and D22S28. In addition, the authors identified a sporadic acoustic neuroma that reveals a loss-of-heterozygosity pattern consistent with mitotic recombination or deletion and reduplication, which are mechanisms not previously seen in studies of these tumors. This finding, while inconsistent with models of tumorigenesis that invoke single deletions and their gene-dosage effects, lends further support to the recessive tumor-suppressor model. 33 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Identification of Chromosome Abnormalities in Subtelomeric Regions by Microarray Analysis: A Study of 5,380 Cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Lina; Shaw, Chad A.; Lu, Xin-Yan; Sahoo, Trilochan; Bacino, Carlos A.; Lalani, Seema R.; Stankiewicz, Pawel; Yatsenko, Svetlana A.; Li, Yinfeng; Neill, Sarah; Pursley, Amber N.; Chinault, A. Craig; Patel, Ankita; Beaudet, Arthur L.; Lupski, James R.; Cheung, Sau W.

    2009-01-01

    Subtelomeric imbalances are a significant cause of congenital disorders. Screening for these abnormalities has traditionally utilized GTG-banding analysis, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) assays, and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification. Microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH) is a relatively new technology that can identify microscopic and submicroscopic chromosomal imbalances. It has been proposed that an array with extended coverage at subtelomeric regions could characterize subtelomeric aberrations more efficiently in a single experiment. The targeted arrays for chromosome microarray analysis (CMA), developed by Baylor College of Medicine, have on average 12 BAC/PAC clones covering 10 Mb of each of the 41 subtelomeric regions. We screened 5,380 consecutive clinical patients using CMA. The most common reasons for referral included developmental delay (DD), and/or mental retardation (MR), dysmorphic features (DF), multiple congenital anomalies (MCA), seizure disorders (SD), and autistic, or other behavioral abnormalities. We found pathogenic rearrangements at subtelomeric regions in 236 patients (4.4%). Among these patients, 103 had a deletion, 58 had a duplication, 44 had an unbalanced translocation, and 31 had a complex rearrangement. The detection rates varied among patients with a normal karyotype analysis (2.98%), with an abnormal karyotype analysis (43.4%), and with an unavailable or no karyotype analysis (3.16%). Six patients out of 278 with a prior normal subtelomere-FISH analysis showed an abnormality including an interstitial deletion, two terminal deletions, two interstitial duplications, and a terminal duplication. In conclusion, genomic imbalances at subtelomeric regions contribute significantly to congenital disorders. Targeted array-CGH with extended coverage (up to 10 Mb) of subtelomeric regions will enhance the detection of subtelomeric imbalances, especially for submicroscopic imbalances. PMID

  3. Analysis of two novel cDNAs from the Smith-Magenis syndrome region on chromosome 17

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Z.Y.; Lee, C.C.; Jiralerspong, S. [Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS) is a clinically recognizable multiple congenital anomaly/mental retardation syndrome associated with deletion of chromosome 17p11.2. To date, only one gene encoding snRNA U3 has been mapped to this region. Here we report the identification of two novel genes, designated 463 and B9, which have been mapped to the SMS region. A full-length cDNA corresponding to each of these genes has been cloned and sequenced. Deletion analysis has been conducted on somatic cell hybrids retaining the del(17)(p11.2) chromosome from each of 15 SMS patients by PCR of sequence tagged sites for the cDNAs and confirmed by Southern analysis. The gene 463 is deleted in 15/15 patients analyzed to date, whereas the gene B9 is deleted in 10/15 of the patients analyzed. Fluorescence in situ hybridization is used to analyze additional SMS patients for hemizygosity at these loci. A physical map of the region is being constructed to determine the relative location of these cDNAs within 17p11.2. Our studies to date, thus, suggest that although both genes 463 and B9 are located within 17p11.2, gene 463 is more likely to be associated with SMS. Complete and exhaustive definition of the critical interval is required to demonstrate the role and importance of gene 463 in SMS.

  4. A method for the analysis of 32 X chromosome insertion deletion polymorphisms in a single PCR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pereira, Rui; Pereira, Vania; Gomes, Iva;

    2012-01-01

    , given its special transmission pattern. The X chromosome markers brought new insights into the history of modern human populations and also proved useful in forensic kinship investigations, namely in deficient relationship cases and in cases where autosomes are uninformative. This work describes an X......-Indel multiplex system amplifying 32 biallelic markers in one single PCR. The multiplex includes X-Indels shown to be polymorphic in the major human population groups and follows a short amplicon strategy. The set was applied in the genetic characterization of sub-Saharan African, European and East Asian...

  5. Image Processing and Analysis for DTMRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kondapalli Srinivasa Vara Prasad

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes image processing techniques for Diffusion Tensor Magnetic Resonance. In Diffusion Tensor MRI, a tensor describing local water diffusion is acquired for each voxel. The geometric nature of the diffusion tensors can quantitatively characterize the local structure in tissues such as bone, muscles, and white matter of the brain. The close relationship between local image structure and apparent diffusion makes this image modality very interesting for medical image analysis. We present a decomposition of the diffusion tensor based on its symmetry properties resulting in useful measures describing the geometry of the diffusion ellipsoid. A simple anisotropy measure follows naturally from this analysis. We describe how the geometry, or shape, of the tensor can be visualized using a coloring scheme based on the derived shape measures. We show how filtering of the tensor data of a human brain can provide a description of macro structural diffusion which can be used for measures of fiber-tract organization. We also describe how tracking of white matter tracts can be implemented using the introduced methods. These methods offers unique tools for the in vivo demonstration of neural connectivity in healthy and diseased brain tissue.

  6. Pain related inflammation analysis using infrared images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhowmik, Mrinal Kanti; Bardhan, Shawli; Das, Kakali; Bhattacharjee, Debotosh; Nath, Satyabrata

    2016-05-01

    Medical Infrared Thermography (MIT) offers a potential non-invasive, non-contact and radiation free imaging modality for assessment of abnormal inflammation having pain in the human body. The assessment of inflammation mainly depends on the emission of heat from the skin surface. Arthritis is a disease of joint damage that generates inflammation in one or more anatomical joints of the body. Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most frequent appearing form of arthritis, and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is the most threatening form of them. In this study, the inflammatory analysis has been performed on the infrared images of patients suffering from RA and OA. For the analysis, a dataset of 30 bilateral knee thermograms has been captured from the patient of RA and OA by following a thermogram acquisition standard. The thermograms are pre-processed, and areas of interest are extracted for further processing. The investigation of the spread of inflammation is performed along with the statistical analysis of the pre-processed thermograms. The objectives of the study include: i) Generation of a novel thermogram acquisition standard for inflammatory pain disease ii) Analysis of the spread of the inflammation related to RA and OA using K-means clustering. iii) First and second order statistical analysis of pre-processed thermograms. The conclusion reflects that, in most of the cases, RA oriented inflammation affects bilateral knees whereas inflammation related to OA present in the unilateral knee. Also due to the spread of inflammation in OA, contralateral asymmetries are detected through the statistical analysis.

  7. Biomedical Image Analysis by Program "Vision Assistant" and "Labview"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Izak

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces application in image analysis of biomedical images. General task is focused on analysis and diagnosis biomedical images obtained from program ImageJ. There are described methods which can be used for images in biomedical application. The main idea is based on particle analysis, pattern matching techniques. For this task was chosensophistication method by program Vision Assistant, which is a part of program LabVIEW.

  8. Quantitative image analysis of celiac disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciaccio, Edward J; Bhagat, Govind; Lewis, Suzanne K; Green, Peter H

    2015-01-01

    We outline the use of quantitative techniques that are currently used for analysis of celiac disease. Image processing techniques can be useful to statistically analyze the pixular data of endoscopic images that is acquired with standard or videocapsule endoscopy. It is shown how current techniques have evolved to become more useful for gastroenterologists who seek to understand celiac disease and to screen for it in suspected patients. New directions for focus in the development of methodology for diagnosis and treatment of this disease are suggested. It is evident that there are yet broad areas where there is potential to expand the use of quantitative techniques for improved analysis in suspected or known celiac disease patients. PMID:25759524

  9. Morphometric image analysis of giant vesicles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Husen, Peter Rasmussen; Arriaga, Laura; Monroy, Francisco;

    2012-01-01

    (GUVs), a dedicated 3D-image analysis, and a quantitative analysis based in equilibrium thermodynamic considerations. This approach was tested in GUVs composed of 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine/1,2-palmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine/cholesterol. In general, our results show a reasonable......We have developed a strategy to determine lengths and orientations of tie lines in the coexistence region of liquid-ordered and liquid-disordered phases of cholesterol containing ternary lipid mixtures. The method combines confocal-fluorescence-microscopy image stacks of giant unilamellar vesicles...... agreement with previously reported data obtained by other methods. For example, our computed tie lines were found to be nonhorizontal, indicating a difference in cholesterol content in the coexisting phases. This new, to our knowledge, analytical strategy offers a way to further exploit fluorescence...

  10. Quantitative image analysis of celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciaccio, Edward J; Bhagat, Govind; Lewis, Suzanne K; Green, Peter H

    2015-03-07

    We outline the use of quantitative techniques that are currently used for analysis of celiac disease. Image processing techniques can be useful to statistically analyze the pixular data of endoscopic images that is acquired with standard or videocapsule endoscopy. It is shown how current techniques have evolved to become more useful for gastroenterologists who seek to understand celiac disease and to screen for it in suspected patients. New directions for focus in the development of methodology for diagnosis and treatment of this disease are suggested. It is evident that there are yet broad areas where there is potential to expand the use of quantitative techniques for improved analysis in suspected or known celiac disease patients.

  11. Machine learning for medical images analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Criminisi, A

    2016-10-01

    This article discusses the application of machine learning for the analysis of medical images. Specifically: (i) We show how a special type of learning models can be thought of as automatically optimized, hierarchically-structured, rule-based algorithms, and (ii) We discuss how the issue of collecting large labelled datasets applies to both conventional algorithms as well as machine learning techniques. The size of the training database is a function of model complexity rather than a characteristic of machine learning methods.

  12. Characterization of some Indian Himalayan Capsicums through floral morphology and EMA-based chromosome analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Timir Baran; Saha, Partha Sarathi

    2017-03-01

    The North Eastern Himalayan (NEH) regions of India are considered as one of the major repositories of the "Capsicum annuum complex" which comprises of three cultivated species namely C. annuum, C. frutescens, and C. chinense. The interspecific delimitation within this large complex is ill-defined due to poorly developed crossing barriers and lack of discontinuous morphological characters. The present study elucidates the relationship among nine different cultivars of three Capsicum species on the basis of floral morphology and karyological parameters for the first time. Different floral characteristics such as margins and constrictions of calyx, type of pedicel, flower size, and color were found to have paramount importance in the species delimitation within the studied members of "C. annuum complex." The present karyomorphometric study explicitly revealed differences between the observed chromosomal data such as karyotype formulae, ordering of satellite bearing chromosome pairs and total diploid chromatin length which aid in resolving interspecific relationship among the studied cultivars of Capsicum. The present analyses unambiguously distinguished all cultivars of C. annuum from the members of C. frutescens and C. chinense and also proposed that among the five cultivars of C. annuum, Ghee lanka was comparatively distant from the other four cultivars on the basis of their karyomorphological characteristics. For the first time karyotype of hottest Indian chili is included in this paper. Comprehensive knowledge on floral morphology and karyotypes of some Himalayan Capsicums not only help to conserve genetic diversity but also help capsicum breeders for their basic and applied research.

  13. A global analysis of Y-chromosomal haplotype diversity for 23 STR loci

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purps, Josephine; Siegert, Sabine; Willuweit, Sascha; Nagy, Marion; Alves, Cíntia; Salazar, Renato; Angustia, Sheila M.T.; Santos, Lorna H.; Anslinger, Katja; Bayer, Birgit; Ayub, Qasim; Wei, Wei; Xue, Yali; Tyler-Smith, Chris; Bafalluy, Miriam Baeta; Martínez-Jarreta, Begoña; Egyed, Balazs; Balitzki, Beate; Tschumi, Sibylle; Ballard, David; Court, Denise Syndercombe; Barrantes, Xinia; Bäßler, Gerhard; Wiest, Tina; Berger, Burkhard; Niederstätter, Harald; Parson, Walther; Davis, Carey; Budowle, Bruce; Burri, Helen; Borer, Urs; Koller, Christoph; Carvalho, Elizeu F.; Domingues, Patricia M.; Chamoun, Wafaa Takash; Coble, Michael D.; Hill, Carolyn R.; Corach, Daniel; Caputo, Mariela; D’Amato, Maria E.; Davison, Sean; Decorte, Ronny; Larmuseau, Maarten H.D.; Ottoni, Claudio; Rickards, Olga; Lu, Di; Jiang, Chengtao; Dobosz, Tadeusz; Jonkisz, Anna; Frank, William E.; Furac, Ivana; Gehrig, Christian; Castella, Vincent; Grskovic, Branka; Haas, Cordula; Wobst, Jana; Hadzic, Gavrilo; Drobnic, Katja; Honda, Katsuya; Hou, Yiping; Zhou, Di; Li, Yan; Hu, Shengping; Chen, Shenglan; Immel, Uta-Dorothee; Lessig, Rüdiger; Jakovski, Zlatko; Ilievska, Tanja; Klann, Anja E.; García, Cristina Cano; de Knijff, Peter; Kraaijenbrink, Thirsa; Kondili, Aikaterini; Miniati, Penelope; Vouropoulou, Maria; Kovacevic, Lejla; Marjanovic, Damir; Lindner, Iris; Mansour, Issam; Al-Azem, Mouayyad; Andari, Ansar El; Marino, Miguel; Furfuro, Sandra; Locarno, Laura; Martín, Pablo; Luque, Gracia M.; Alonso, Antonio; Miranda, Luís Souto; Moreira, Helena; Mizuno, Natsuko; Iwashima, Yasuki; Neto, Rodrigo S. Moura; Nogueira, Tatiana L.S.; Silva, Rosane; Nastainczyk-Wulf, Marina; Edelmann, Jeanett; Kohl, Michael; Nie, Shengjie; Wang, Xianping; Cheng, Baowen; Núñez, Carolina; Pancorbo, Marian Martínez de; Olofsson, Jill K.; Morling, Niels; Onofri, Valerio; Tagliabracci, Adriano; Pamjav, Horolma; Volgyi, Antonia; Barany, Gusztav; Pawlowski, Ryszard; Maciejewska, Agnieszka; Pelotti, Susi; Pepinski, Witold; Abreu-Glowacka, Monica; Phillips, Christopher; Cárdenas, Jorge; Rey-Gonzalez, Danel; Salas, Antonio; Brisighelli, Francesca; Capelli, Cristian; Toscanini, Ulises; Piccinini, Andrea; Piglionica, Marilidia; Baldassarra, Stefania L.; Ploski, Rafal; Konarzewska, Magdalena; Jastrzebska, Emila; Robino, Carlo; Sajantila, Antti; Palo, Jukka U.; Guevara, Evelyn; Salvador, Jazelyn; Ungria, Maria Corazon De; Rodriguez, Jae Joseph Russell; Schmidt, Ulrike; Schlauderer, Nicola; Saukko, Pekka; Schneider, Peter M.; Sirker, Miriam; Shin, Kyoung-Jin; Oh, Yu Na; Skitsa, Iulia; Ampati, Alexandra; Smith, Tobi-Gail; Calvit, Lina Solis de; Stenzl, Vlastimil; Capal, Thomas; Tillmar, Andreas; Nilsson, Helena; Turrina, Stefania; De Leo, Domenico; Verzeletti, Andrea; Cortellini, Venusia; Wetton, Jon H.; Gwynne, Gareth M.; Jobling, Mark A.; Whittle, Martin R.; Sumita, Denilce R.; Wolańska-Nowak, Paulina; Yong, Rita Y.Y.; Krawczak, Michael; Nothnagel, Michael; Roewer, Lutz

    2014-01-01

    In a worldwide collaborative effort, 19,630 Y-chromosomes were sampled from 129 different populations in 51 countries. These chromosomes were typed for 23 short-tandem repeat (STR) loci (DYS19, DYS389I, DYS389II, DYS390, DYS391, DYS392, DYS393, DYS385ab, DYS437, DYS438, DYS439, DYS448, DYS456, DYS458, DYS635, GATAH4, DYS481, DYS533, DYS549, DYS570, DYS576, and DYS643) and using the PowerPlex Y23 System (PPY23, Promega Corporation, Madison, WI). Locus-specific allelic spectra of these markers were determined and a consistently high level of allelic diversity was observed. A considerable number of null, duplicate and off-ladder alleles were revealed. Standard single-locus and haplotype-based parameters were calculated and compared between subsets of Y-STR markers established for forensic casework. The PPY23 marker set provides substantially stronger discriminatory power than other available kits but at the same time reveals the same general patterns of population structure as other marker sets. A strong correlation was observed between the number of Y-STRs included in a marker set and some of the forensic parameters under study. Interestingly a weak but consistent trend toward smaller genetic distances resulting from larger numbers of markers became apparent. PMID:24854874

  14. A simple and rapid fluorescence in situ hybridization microwave protocol for reliable dicentric chromosome analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartwright, Ian M; Genet, Matthew D; Kato, Takamitsu A

    2013-03-01

    Fluorescence in situhybridization (FISH) is an extremely effective and sensitive approach to analyzing chromosome aberrations. Until recently, this procedure has taken multiple days to complete. The introduction of telomeric and centromeric peptide nucleic acid (PNA) probes has reduced the procedure's duration to several hours, but the protocols still call for a high temperature (80-90°C) step followed by 1-3 h of hybridization. The newest method to speed up the FISH protocol is the use of a microwave to shorten the heating element to less than a minute; however this protocol still calls for a 1-h hybridization period. We have utilized PNA centromere/telomere probes in conjunction with a microwave oven to show telomere and centromere staining in as little as 30 s. We have optimized the hybridization conditions to increase the sensitivity and effectiveness of the new protocol and can effectively stain chromosomes in 2 min and 30 s of incubation. We have found that our new approach to FISH produces extremely clear and distinct signals. Radiation-induced dicentric formation in mouse and human fibroblast cells was analyzed by two individual scorers and the observed dicentrics matched very well.

  15. Analysis of Unstable Chromosome Aberrations for Partial Body Exposures with Gamma Rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Syaifudin, Mukh [Center for Technology of Radiation Safety and Metrology, National Nuclear Energy Agency, Jakarta (Indonesia); Yun, Hyun Jin; Kim, Eun Ju; Kang, Chang Mo [Laboratory of Cytogenetics and Tissue Regeneration, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-04-15

    Scoring of unstable chromosome aberrations (dicentrics, rings and fragments) in circulating lymphocytes are the most extensively studied biological means for estimating individual exposure to ionizing radiation. The effects of radiation, however, can be significantly different when only portions of the body or an individual organ system are irradiated, such as might occur during the use of radiation for medical treatment, where some problems can arise especially to quantify the fraction of body irradiated. After partial-body exposure, peripheral blood samples contain a mixture of exposed and unexposed lymphocytes, which render the interpretation of the overall aberration frequencies more difficult. In this experiment, peripheral blood samples from four volunteers (two Indonesian and two Korean) were irradiated with 2.0 Gy of gamma rays for simulation of partial-body exposure by mixing irradiated and non-irradiated blood from the same volunteers in proportions of 10-100%. Dose estimates are crucial for risk assessment as well as for clinical planning of treatment of highly exposed victims. The results presented in this experiment concluded that the scoring of chromosome aberration is reliable methodology for investigating exposure to ionizing irradiation, such as partial-body ones. This study constitutes a preliminary step in our process of defining the possibilities of cytological technique for biological dosimetry expertise. Because of the limitations of a number of cases, no clear conclusion could be reached.

  16. Image analysis of blood platelets adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krízová, P; Rysavá, J; Vanícková, M; Cieslar, P; Dyr, J E

    2003-01-01

    Adhesion of blood platelets is one of the major events in haemostatic and thrombotic processes. We studied adhesion of blood platelets on fibrinogen and fibrin dimer sorbed on solid support material (glass, polystyrene). Adhesion was carried on under static and dynamic conditions and measured as percentage of the surface covered with platelets. Within a range of platelet counts in normal and in thrombocytopenic blood we observed a very significant decrease in platelet adhesion on fibrin dimer with bounded active thrombin with decreasing platelet count. Our results show the imperative use of platelet poor blood preparations as control samples in experiments with thrombocytopenic blood. Experiments carried on adhesive surfaces sorbed on polystyrene showed lower relative inaccuracy than on glass. Markedly different behaviour of platelets adhered on the same adhesive surface, which differed only in support material (glass or polystyrene) suggest that adhesion and mainly spreading of platelets depends on physical quality of the surface. While on polystyrene there were no significant differences between fibrin dimer and fibrinogen, adhesion measured on glass support material markedly differed between fibrin dimer and fibrinogen. We compared two methods of thresholding in image analysis of adhered platelets. Results obtained by image analysis of spreaded platelets showed higher relative inaccuracy than results obtained by image analysis of platelets centres and aggregates.

  17. Linkage between stature and a region on chromosome 20 and analysis of a candidate gene, bone morphogenetic protein 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, D.B.; Ossowski, V.; Janssen, R.C.; Knowler, W.C.; Bogardus, C. [National Inst. of Health, Phoenix, AZ (United States)

    1995-12-04

    Sib-pair linkage analysis of the quantitative trait, stature, in over 500 Pima Indians indicates that a genetic determinant of governing stature is located on chromosome 20. Analysis of 10 short tandem repeat polymorphisms localized this linkage to a 3. cM region that includes D20S98 and D20S66. Using all possible sib-pair combinations, linkage was detected to both stature (P = 0.0001) and to leg length (P = 0.001), but not to sitting height. Single-strand conformational polymorphism analysis of exon 3 of the bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2) gene, a candidate gene in this region, in genomic DNA of 20 of the tallest and 20 of the shortest individuals did not show any consistent differences associated with leg length or height. Sequence analysis of the region encoding the mature protein revealed a single nucleotide substitution, a T to G transversion, not detected by single-strand conformational polymorphism (SSCP) analysis. This transversion results in a conservative amino acid substitution of glycine for valine at codon 80 of BMP2. The frequency of this allele was 0.23 in the sample. No significant differences in height were noted in persons carrying either allele. This indicates that this structural alteration in the mature BMP2 protein does not contribute to the differences in stature observed in the Pima Indians, nor is this structural change in the mature protein likely to be responsible for the linkage observed with stature on chromosome 20. 33 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. The analysis of mutant alleles of different strength reveals multiple functions of topoisomerase 2 in regulation of Drosophila chromosome structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mengoli, Valentina; Bucciarelli, Elisabetta; Lattao, Ramona; Piergentili, Roberto; Gatti, Maurizio; Bonaccorsi, Silvia

    2014-10-01

    Topoisomerase II is a major component of mitotic chromosomes but its role in the assembly and structural maintenance of chromosomes is rather controversial, as different chromosomal phenotypes have been observed in various organisms and in different studies on the same organism. In contrast to vertebrates that harbor two partially redundant Topo II isoforms, Drosophila and yeasts have a single Topo II enzyme. In addition, fly chromosomes, unlike those of yeast, are morphologically comparable to vertebrate chromosomes. Thus, Drosophila is a highly suitable system to address the role of Topo II in the assembly and structural maintenance of chromosomes. Here we show that modulation of Top2 function in living flies by means of mutant alleles of different strength and in vivo RNAi results in multiple cytological phenotypes. In weak Top2 mutants, meiotic chromosomes of males exhibit strong morphological abnormalities and dramatic segregation defects, while mitotic chromosomes of larval brain cells are not affected. In mutants of moderate strength, mitotic chromosome organization is normal, but anaphases display frequent chromatin bridges that result in chromosome breaks and rearrangements involving specific regions of the Y chromosome and 3L heterochromatin. Severe Top2 depletion resulted in many aneuploid and polyploid mitotic metaphases with poorly condensed heterochromatin and broken chromosomes. Finally, in the almost complete absence of Top2, mitosis in larval brains was virtually suppressed and in the rare mitotic figures observed chromosome morphology was disrupted. These results indicate that different residual levels of Top2 in mutant cells can result in different chromosomal phenotypes, and that the effect of a strong Top2 depletion can mask the effects of milder Top2 reductions. Thus, our results suggest that the previously observed discrepancies in the chromosomal phenotypes elicited by Topo II downregulation in vertebrates might depend on slight differences

  19. The analysis of mutant alleles of different strength reveals multiple functions of topoisomerase 2 in regulation of Drosophila chromosome structure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Mengoli

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Topoisomerase II is a major component of mitotic chromosomes but its role in the assembly and structural maintenance of chromosomes is rather controversial, as different chromosomal phenotypes have been observed in various organisms and in different studies on the same organism. In contrast to vertebrates that harbor two partially redundant Topo II isoforms, Drosophila and yeasts have a single Topo II enzyme. In addition, fly chromosomes, unlike those of yeast, are morphologically comparable to vertebrate chromosomes. Thus, Drosophila is a highly suitable system to address the role of Topo II in the assembly and structural maintenance of chromosomes. Here we show that modulation of Top2 function in living flies by means of mutant alleles of different strength and in vivo RNAi results in multiple cytological phenotypes. In weak Top2 mutants, meiotic chromosomes of males exhibit strong morphological abnormalities and dramatic segregation defects, while mitotic chromosomes of larval brain cells are not affected. In mutants of moderate strength, mitotic chromosome organization is normal, but anaphases display frequent chromatin bridges that result in chromosome breaks and rearrangements involving specific regions of the Y chromosome and 3L heterochromatin. Severe Top2 depletion resulted in many aneuploid and polyploid mitotic metaphases with poorly condensed heterochromatin and broken chromosomes. Finally, in the almost complete absence of Top2, mitosis in larval brains was virtually suppressed and in the rare mitotic figures observed chromosome morphology was disrupted. These results indicate that different residual levels of Top2 in mutant cells can result in different chromosomal phenotypes, and that the effect of a strong Top2 depletion can mask the effects of milder Top2 reductions. Thus, our results suggest that the previously observed discrepancies in the chromosomal phenotypes elicited by Topo II downregulation in vertebrates might depend on

  20. Synthetic chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindler, Daniel; Waldminghaus, Torsten

    2015-11-01

    What a living organism looks like and how it works and what are its components-all this is encoded on DNA, the genetic blueprint. Consequently, the way to change an organism is to change its genetic information. Since the first pieces of recombinant DNA have been used to transform cells in the 1970s, this approach has been enormously extended. Bigger and bigger parts of the genetic information have been exchanged or added over the years. Now we are at a point where the construction of entire chromosomes becomes a reachable goal and first examples appear. This development leads to fundamental new questions, for example, about what is possible and desirable to build or what construction rules one needs to follow when building synthetic chromosomes. Here we review the recent progress in the field, discuss current challenges and speculate on the appearance of future synthetic chromosomes.

  1. Karyotype analysis of the Russian wheat aphid, Diuraphis noxia (Kurdjumov) (Hemiptera: Aphididae) reveals a large X chromosome with rRNA and histone gene families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novotná, Jana; Havelka, Jan; Starý, Petr; Koutecký, Petr; Vítková, Magda

    2011-03-01

    The Russsian wheat aphid (RWA), Diuraphis noxia (Kurdjumov), is a worldwide pest of cereals. Despite its economic importance, little is known about its genome. Here we investigated physical genomic features in RWA by karyotype analysis using differential staining with AgNO(3), CMA(3), and DAPI, by chromosomal localization of ribosomal DNA (rDNA), H3 and H4 histone genes, and the "arthropod" telomeric sequence (TTAGG)(n) using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), and by measuring the RWA genome size using flow cytometry. The female karyotype, 2n = 10, is composed of four autosome pairs and a pair of X chromosomes, whereas the male karyotype, 2n = 9, has a single X. The X chromosome is the largest element in the karyotype. All three molecular markers used, i.e., 18S rRNA and both H3 and H4 probes are co-localized at one end of the X chromosome. The FISH probes revealed that the AgNO(3)-positive bridge between two prometaphase X chromosomes of females, which is believed to be responsible for the elimination of one X chromosome in aphid oocytes determined to undergo male development, contains clusters of both histone genes, in addition to an rDNA cluster. Interestingly, RWA lacks the (TTAGG)(n) telomeric sequence in its genome, in contrast to several previously investigated aphid species. Additionally, we compared female and male genome sizes. The female genome size is 2C = 0.86 pg, whereas the male genome size is 2C = 0.70 pg. The difference between the DNA content in the two genders suggests that the RWA X chromosome occupies about 35% of the female haploid genome (1C = 0.43 pg), which makes it one of the largest sex chromosomes in the animal kingdom.

  2. 羊水细胞染色体分析在产前的应用%Amniotic fluid cel chromosome analysis in prenatal application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王亚群; 童克婷

    2013-01-01

    Objective Study amniotic fluid cel chromosome usefulness in clinical prenatal diagnosis and in the diagnosis of chromosomal disorders. Methods Puncture indications of second trimester amniotic fluid cel culture and chromosome analysis detected abnormal karyotype types and statistics. Results 474 cases were successfuly cultured amniotic fluid detection of abnormal karyotype 22 cases, autosomal abnormal number of 15 cases, the sex chromosome abnormalities, six cases of chromosome structural abnormalities, abnormal detection rate of 4.64%, chromosome polymorphismThe karyotype 22 cases. A conclusion Second trimester amniotic fluid chromosome chromosome-risk pregnant woman is an important means of prenatal diagnosis.%  目的研究羊水细胞染色体检查在临床产前诊断中的实用性和在染色体疾病诊断中的意义.方法对孕中期有穿刺指征的孕妇羊水细胞培养并进行染色体分析,检出异常核型及类型并统计.结果在成功培养的474例羊水中,检出异常核型22例,其中常染色体数目异常15例,性染色体数目异常1例,染色体结构异常6例,异常检出率为4.64%,染色体多态性核型22例.结论孕中期对染色体高危孕妇进行羊水染色体检查是产前诊断的重要手段.

  3. Reticle defect sizing of optical proximity correction defects using SEM imaging and image analysis techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zurbrick, Larry S.; Wang, Lantian; Konicek, Paul; Laird, Ellen R.

    2000-07-01

    Sizing of programmed defects on optical proximity correction (OPC) feature sis addressed using high resolution scanning electron microscope (SEM) images and image analysis techniques. A comparison and analysis of different sizing methods is made. This paper addresses the issues of OPC defect definition and discusses the experimental measurement results obtained by SEM in combination with image analysis techniques.

  4. Analysis of root-knot nematode and fusarium wilt disease resistance in cotton (Gossypium spp.) using chromosome substitution lines from two alien species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulloa, M; Wang, C; Saha, S; Hutmacher, R B; Stelly, D M; Jenkins, J N; Burke, J; Roberts, P A

    2016-04-01

    Chromosome substitution (CS) lines in plants are a powerful genetic resource for analyzing the contribution of chromosome segments to phenotypic variance. In this study, a series of interspecific cotton (Gossypium spp.) CS lines were used to identify a new germplasm resource, and to validate chromosomal regions and favorable alleles associated with nematode or fungal disease resistance traits. The CS lines were developed in the G. hirsutum L. TM-1 background with chromosome or chromosome segment substitutions from G. barbadense L. Pima 3-79 or G. tomentosum. Root-knot nematode (Meloidogyne incognita) and fusarium wilt (Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. vasinfectum) (races 1 and 4) resistance alleles and quantitative trait loci (QTL) previously placed on cotton chromosomes using SSR markers in two interspecific recombinant inbred line populations were chosen for testing. Phenotypic responses of increased resistance or susceptibility in controlled inoculation and infested field assays confirmed the resistance QTLs, based on substitution with the positive or negative allele for resistance. Lines CS-B22Lo, CS-B04, and CS-B18 showed high resistance to nematode root-galling, confirming QTLs on chromosomes 4 and 22 (long arm) with resistance alleles from Pima 3-79. Line CS-B16 had less fusarium race 1-induced vascular root staining and higher percent survival than the TM-1 parent, confirming a major resistance QTL on chromosome 16. Lines CS-B(17-11) and CS-B17 had high fusarium race 4 vascular symptoms and low survival due to susceptible alleles introgressed from Pima 3-79, confirming the localization on chromosome 17 of an identified QTL with resistance alleles from TM1 and other resistant lines. Analyses validated regions on chromosomes 11, 16, and 17 harboring nematode and fusarium wilt resistance genes and demonstrated the value of CS lines as both a germplasm resource for breeding programs and as a powerful genetic analysis tool for determining QTL effects for disease

  5. Comparative genomics analysis of rice and pineapple contributes to understand the chromosome number reduction and genomic changes in grasses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinpeng Wang

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Rice is one of the most researched model plant, and has a genome structure most resembling that of the grass common ancestor after a grass common tetraploidization ~100 million years ago. There has been a standing controversy whether there had been 5 or 7 basic chromosomes, before the tetraploidization, which were tackled but could not be well solved for the lacking of a sequenced and assembled outgroup plant to have a conservative genome structure. Recently, the availability of pineapple genome, which has not been subjected to the grass-common tetraploidization, provides a precious opportunity to solve the above controversy and to research into genome changes of rice and other grasses. Here, we performed a comparative genomics analysis of pineapple and rice, and found solid evidence that grass-common ancestor had 2n =2x =14 basic chromosomes before the tetraploidization and duplicated to 2n = 4x = 28 after the event. Moreover, we proposed that enormous gene missing from duplicated regions in rice should be explained by an allotetraploid produced by prominently divergent parental lines, rather than gene losses after their divergence. This means that genome fractionation might have occurred before the formation of the allotetraploid grass ancestor.

  6. Image analysis of Renaissance copperplate prints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedges, S. Blair

    2008-02-01

    From the fifteenth to the nineteenth centuries, prints were a common form of visual communication, analogous to photographs. Copperplate prints have many finely engraved black lines which were used to create the illusion of continuous tone. Line densities generally are 100-2000 lines per square centimeter and a print can contain more than a million total engraved lines 20-300 micrometers in width. Because hundreds to thousands of prints were made from a single copperplate over decades, variation among prints can have historical value. The largest variation is plate-related, which is the thinning of lines over successive editions as a result of plate polishing to remove time-accumulated corrosion. Thinning can be quantified with image analysis and used to date undated prints and books containing prints. Print-related variation, such as over-inking of the print, is a smaller but significant source. Image-related variation can introduce bias if images were differentially illuminated or not in focus, but improved imaging technology can limit this variation. The Print Index, the percentage of an area composed of lines, is proposed as a primary measure of variation. Statistical methods also are proposed for comparing and identifying prints in the context of a print database.

  7. Multispectral laser imaging for advanced food analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senni, L.; Burrascano, P.; Ricci, M.

    2016-07-01

    A hardware-software apparatus for food inspection capable of realizing multispectral NIR laser imaging at four different wavelengths is herein discussed. The system was designed to operate in a through-transmission configuration to detect the presence of unwanted foreign bodies inside samples, whether packed or unpacked. A modified Lock-In technique was employed to counterbalance the significant signal intensity attenuation due to transmission across the sample and to extract the multispectral information more efficiently. The NIR laser wavelengths used to acquire the multispectral images can be varied to deal with different materials and to focus on specific aspects. In the present work the wavelengths were selected after a preliminary analysis to enhance the image contrast between foreign bodies and food in the sample, thus identifying the location and nature of the defects. Experimental results obtained from several specimens, with and without packaging, are presented and the multispectral image processing as well as the achievable spatial resolution of the system are discussed.

  8. Remote Sensing Digital Image Analysis An Introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Richards, John A

    2013-01-01

    Remote Sensing Digital Image Analysis provides the non-specialist with a treatment of the quantitative analysis of satellite and aircraft derived remotely sensed data. Since the first edition of the book there have been significant developments in the algorithms used for the processing and analysis of remote sensing imagery; nevertheless many of the fundamentals have substantially remained the same.  This new edition presents material that has retained value since those early days, along with new techniques that can be incorporated into an operational framework for the analysis of remote sensing data. The book is designed as a teaching text for the senior undergraduate and postgraduate student, and as a fundamental treatment for those engaged in research using digital image processing in remote sensing.  The presentation level is for the mathematical non-specialist.  Since the very great number of operational users of remote sensing come from the earth sciences communities, the text is pitched at a leve...

  9. Simple Low Level Features for Image Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falcoz, Paolo

    As human beings, we perceive the world around us mainly through our eyes, and give what we see the status of “reality”; as such we historically tried to create ways of recording this reality so we could augment or extend our memory. From early attempts in photography like the image produced in 1826 by the French inventor Nicéphore Niépce (Figure 2.1) to the latest high definition camcorders, the number of recorded pieces of reality increased exponentially, posing the problem of managing all that information. Most of the raw video material produced today has lost its memory augmentation function, as it will hardly ever be viewed by any human; pervasive CCTVs are an example. They generate an enormous amount of data each day, but there is not enough “human processing power” to view them. Therefore the need for effective automatic image analysis tools is great, and a lot effort has been put in it, both from the academia and the industry. In this chapter, a review of some of the most important image analysis tools are presented.

  10. Nursing image: an evolutionary concept analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaei-Adaryani, Morteza; Salsali, Mahvash; Mohammadi, Eesa

    2012-12-01

    A long-term challenge to the nursing profession is the concept of image. In this study, we used the Rodgers' evolutionary concept analysis approach to analyze the concept of nursing image (NI). The aim of this concept analysis was to clarify the attributes, antecedents, consequences, and implications associated with the concept. We performed an integrative internet-based literature review to retrieve English literature published from 1980-2011. Findings showed that NI is a multidimensional, all-inclusive, paradoxical, dynamic, and complex concept. The media, invisibility, clothing style, nurses' behaviors, gender issues, and professional organizations are the most important antecedents of the concept. We found that NI is pivotal in staff recruitment and nursing shortage, resource allocation to nursing, nurses' job performance, workload, burnout and job dissatisfaction, violence against nurses, public trust, and salaries available to nurses. An in-depth understanding of the NI concept would assist nurses to eliminate negative stereotypes and build a more professional image for the nurse and the profession.

  11. Analysis on enhanced depth of field for integral imaging microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Young-Tae; Park, Jae-Hyeung; Kwon, Ki-Chul; Kim, Nam

    2012-10-08

    Depth of field of the integral imaging microscope is studied. In the integral imaging microscope, 3-D information is encoded as a form of elemental images Distance between intermediate plane and object point decides the number of elemental image and depth of field of integral imaging microscope. From the analysis, it is found that depth of field of the reconstructed depth plane image by computational integral imaging reconstruction is longer than depth of field of optical microscope. From analyzed relationship, experiment using integral imaging microscopy and conventional microscopy is also performed to confirm enhanced depth of field of integral imaging microscopy.

  12. Construction and analysis of tree models for chromosomal classification of diffuse large B-cell lymphomas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hui-Yong Jiang; Zhong-Xi Huang; Xue-Feng Zhang; Richard Desper; Tong Zhao

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To construct tree models for classification of diffuse large B-cell lymphomas (DLBCL) by chromosome copy numbers, to compare them with cDNA microarray classification, and to explore models of multi-gene, multi-step and multi-pathway processes of DLBCL tumorigenesis.METHODS: Maximum-weight branching and distance based models were constructed based on the comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) data of 123 DLBCL samples using the established methods and software of Desper et al. A maximum likelihood tree model was also used to analyze the data. By comparing with the results reported in literature, values of tree models in the classification of DLBCL were elucidated.RESULTS: Both the branching and the distance-based trees classified DLBCL into three groups. We combined the classification methods of the two models and classified DLBCL into three categories according to their characteristics. The first group was marked by +Xq, +Xp, -17p and +13q; the second group by +3q, +18q and +18p; and the third group was marked by -6q and +6p. This chromosomal classification was consistent with cDNA classification. It indicated that -6q and +3q were two main events in the tumorigenesis of lymphoma.CONCLUSION: Tree models of lymphoma established from CGH data can be used in the classification of DLBCL. These models can suggest multi-gene, multi-step and multi-pathway processes of tumorigenesis.Two pathways, -6q preceding +6q and +3q preceding +18q, may be important in understanding tumorigenesis of DLBCL. The pathway, -6q preceding +6q, may have a close relationship with the tumorigenesis of non-GCB DLBCL.

  13. An integrated approach of comparative genomics and heritability analysis of pig and human on obesity trait: evidence for candidate genes on human chromosome 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Traditional candidate gene approach has been widely used for the study of complex diseases including obesity. However, this approach is largely limited by its dependence on existing knowledge of presumed biology of the phenotype under investigation. Our combined strategy of comparative genomics and chromosomal heritability estimate analysis of obesity traits, subscapular skinfold thickness and back-fat thickness in Korean cohorts and pig (Sus scrofa), may overcome the limitations of candidate gene analysis and allow us to better understand genetic predisposition to human obesity. Results We found common genes including FTO, the fat mass and obesity associated gene, identified from significant SNPs by association studies of each trait. These common genes were related to blood pressure and arterial stiffness (P = 1.65E-05) and type 2 diabetes (P = 0.00578). Through the estimation of variance of genetic component (heritability) for each chromosome by SNPs, we observed a significant positive correlation (r = 0.479) between genetic contributions of human and pig to obesity traits. Furthermore, we noted that human chromosome 2 (syntenic to pig chromosomes 3 and 15) was most important in explaining the phenotypic variance for obesity. Conclusions Obesity genetics still awaits further discovery. Navigating syntenic regions suggests obesity candidate genes on chromosome 2 that are previously known to be associated with obesity-related diseases: MRPL33, PARD3B, ERBB4, STK39, and ZNF385B. PMID:23253381

  14. An integrated approach of comparative genomics and heritability analysis of pig and human on obesity trait: evidence for candidate genes on human chromosome 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Jaemin

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Traditional candidate gene approach has been widely used for the study of complex diseases including obesity. However, this approach is largely limited by its dependence on existing knowledge of presumed biology of the phenotype under investigation. Our combined strategy of comparative genomics and chromosomal heritability estimate analysis of obesity traits, subscapular skinfold thickness and back-fat thickness in Korean cohorts and pig (Sus scrofa, may overcome the limitations of candidate gene analysis and allow us to better understand genetic predisposition to human obesity. Results We found common genes including FTO, the fat mass and obesity associated gene, identified from significant SNPs by association studies of each trait. These common genes were related to blood pressure and arterial stiffness (P = 1.65E-05 and type 2 diabetes (P = 0.00578. Through the estimation of variance of genetic component (heritability for each chromosome by SNPs, we observed a significant positive correlation (r = 0.479 between genetic contributions of human and pig to obesity traits. Furthermore, we noted that human chromosome 2 (syntenic to pig chromosomes 3 and 15 was most important in explaining the phenotypic variance for obesity. Conclusions Obesity genetics still awaits further discovery. Navigating syntenic regions suggests obesity candidate genes on chromosome 2 that are previously known to be associated with obesity-related diseases: MRPL33, PARD3B, ERBB4, STK39, and ZNF385B.

  15. Replication Banding Patterns in Human Chromosomes Detected Using 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine Incorporation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoshi, Osamu; Ushiki, Tatsuo

    2011-10-26

    A novel technique using the incorporation of 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU) into replicating DNA is described for the analysis of replicating banding patterns of human metaphase chromosomes. Human lymphocytes were synchronized with excess thymidine and treated with EdU during the late S phase of the cell cycle. The incorporated EdU was then detected in metaphase chromosomes using Alexa Fluor® 488 azides, through the 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reaction of organic azides with the terminal acetylene group of EdU. Chromosomes with incorporated EdU showed a banding pattern similar to G-banding of normal human chromosomes. Imaging by atomic force microscopy (AFM) in liquid conditions showed that the structure of the chromosomes was well preserved even after EdU treatment. Comparison between fluorescence microscopy and AFM images of the same chromosome 1 indicated the presence of ridges and grooves in the chromatid arm, features that have been previously reported in relation to G-banding. These results suggest an intimate relationship between EdU-induced replication bands and G- or R-bands in human chromosomes. This technique is thus useful for analyzing the structure of chromosomes in relation to their banding patterns following DNA replication in the S phase.

  16. Rapid spectral analysis for spectral imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacques, Steven L; Samatham, Ravikant; Choudhury, Niloy

    2010-07-15

    Spectral imaging requires rapid analysis of spectra associated with each pixel. A rapid algorithm has been developed that uses iterative matrix inversions to solve for the absorption spectra of a tissue using a lookup table for photon pathlength based on numerical simulations. The algorithm uses tissue water content as an internal standard to specify the strength of optical scattering. An experimental example is presented on the spectroscopy of portwine stain lesions. When implemented in MATLAB, the method is ~100-fold faster than using fminsearch().

  17. ImageJ-MATLAB: a bidirectional framework for scientific image analysis interoperability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiner, Mark C; Rueden, Curtis T; Eliceiri, Kevin W

    2016-10-26

    ImageJ-MATLAB is a lightweight Java library facilitating bi-directional interoperability between MATLAB and ImageJ. By defining a standard for translation between matrix and image data structures, researchers are empowered to select the best tool for their image-analysis tasks.

  18. Motion as a phenotype: the use of live-cell imaging and machine visual screening to characterize transcription-dependent chromosome dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silver Pamela A

    2006-04-01

    the analysis of chromosome motion a machine visual screening approach that used unbiased visual data rather than segmented geometric data. This novel analytical approach will allow for high-throughput study of processes that can be monitored via alterations in chromosome motion and connectivity with the nuclear periphery.

  19. Characterization of X chromosome inactivation using integrated analysis of whole-exome and mRNA sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szabolcs Szelinger

    Full Text Available In females, X chromosome inactivation (XCI is an epigenetic, gene dosage compensatory mechanism by inactivation of one copy of X in cells. Random XCI of one of the parental chromosomes results in an approximately equal proportion of cells expressing alleles from either the maternally or paternally inherited active X, and is defined by the XCI ratio. Skewed XCI ratio is suggestive of non-random inactivation, which can play an important role in X-linked genetic conditions. Current methods rely on indirect, semi-quantitative DNA methylation-based assay to estimate XCI ratio. Here we report a direct approach to estimate XCI ratio by integrated, family-trio based whole-exome and mRNA sequencing using phase-by-transmission of alleles coupled with allele-specific expression analysis. We applied this method to in silico data and to a clinical patient with mild cognitive impairment but no clear diagnosis or understanding molecular mechanism underlying the phenotype. Simulation showed that phased and unphased heterozygous allele expression can be used to estimate XCI ratio. Segregation analysis of the patient's exome uncovered a de novo, interstitial, 1.7 Mb deletion on Xp22.31 that originated on the paternally inherited X and previously been associated with heterogeneous, neurological phenotype. Phased, allelic expression data suggested an 83∶20 moderately skewed XCI that favored the expression of the maternally inherited, cytogenetically normal X and suggested that the deleterious affect of the de novo event on the paternal copy may be offset by skewed XCI that favors expression of the wild-type X. This study shows the utility of integrated sequencing approach in XCI ratio estimation.

  20. DNA methylation analysis of chromosome 21 gene promoters at single base pair and single allele resolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingying Zhang

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Differential DNA methylation is an essential epigenetic signal for gene regulation, development, and disease processes. We mapped DNA methylation patterns of 190 gene promoter regions on chromosome 21 using bisulfite conversion and subclone sequencing in five human cell types. A total of 28,626 subclones were sequenced at high accuracy using (long-read Sanger sequencing resulting in the measurement of the DNA methylation state of 580427 CpG sites. Our results show that average DNA methylation levels are distributed bimodally with enrichment of highly methylated and unmethylated sequences, both for amplicons and individual subclones, which represent single alleles from individual cells. Within CpG-rich sequences, DNA methylation was found to be anti-correlated with CpG dinucleotide density and GC content, and methylated CpGs are more likely to be flanked by AT-rich sequences. We observed over-representation of CpG sites in distances of 9, 18, and 27 bps in highly methylated amplicons. However, DNA sequence alone is not sufficient to predict an amplicon's DNA methylation status, since 43% of all amplicons are differentially methylated between the cell types studied here. DNA methylation in promoter regions is strongly correlated with the absence of gene expression and low levels of activating epigenetic marks like H3K4 methylation and H3K9 and K14 acetylation. Utilizing the single base pair and single allele resolution of our data, we found that i amplicons from different parts of a CpG island frequently differ in their DNA methylation level, ii methylation levels of individual cells in one tissue are very similar, and iii methylation patterns follow a relaxed site-specific distribution. Furthermore, iv we identified three cases of allele-specific DNA methylation on chromosome 21. Our data shed new light on the nature of methylation patterns in human cells, the sequence dependence of DNA methylation, and its function as epigenetic signal in gene

  1. Digital image analysis of palaeoenvironmental records and applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Environmental change signals in geological or biological records are commonly reflected on their reflecting or transmitting images. These environmental signals can be extracted through digital image analysis. The analysis principle involves section line selection, color value reading and calculating environmental proxy index along the section lines, layer identification, auto-chronology and investigation of structure evolution of growth bands. On detailed illustrations of the image technique, this note provides image analyzing procedures of coral, tree-ring and stalagmite records. The environmental implications of the proxy index from image analysis are accordingly given through application demonstration of the image technique.

  2. A device for extraction, manipulation and stretching of DNA from single human chromosomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Kristian Hagsted; Marie, Rodolphe; Moresco, Jacob Lange

    2011-01-01

    by time-lapse imaging; pressure-driven flow was then used to shunt the chromosomal DNA package into a nanoslit. A long linear DNA strand (>1.3 Mbp) was seen to stretch out from the DNA package and along the length of the nanoslit. Delivery of DNA in its native metaphase chromosome package as well...... as the microfluidic environment prevented DNA from shearing and will be important for preparing ultra-long lengths of DNA for nanofluidic analysis....

  3. Comparative Analysis of Various Image Fusion Techniques For Biomedical Images: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nayera Nahvi,

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Image Fusion is a process of combining the relevant information from a set of images, into a single image, wherein the resultant fused image will be more informative and complete than any of the input images. This paper discusses implementation of DWT technique on different images to make a fused image having more information content. As DWT is the latest technique for image fusion as compared to simple image fusion and pyramid based image fusion, so we are going to implement DWT as the image fusion technique in our paper. Other methods such as Principal Component Analysis (PCA based fusion, Intensity hue Saturation (IHS Transform based fusion and high pass filtering methods are also discussed. A new algorithm is proposed using Discrete Wavelet transform and different fusion techniques including pixel averaging, min-max and max-min methods for medical image fusion. KEYWORDS:

  4. Wavelet Analysis of Space Solar Telescope Images

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xi-An Zhu; Sheng-Zhen Jin; Jing-Yu Wang; Shu-Nian Ning

    2003-01-01

    The scientific satellite SST (Space Solar Telescope) is an important research project strongly supported by the Chinese Academy of Sciences. Every day,SST acquires 50 GB of data (after processing) but only 10GB can be transmitted to the ground because of limited time of satellite passage and limited channel volume.Therefore, the data must be compressed before transmission. Wavelets analysis is a new technique developed over the last 10 years, with great potential of application.We start with a brief introduction to the essential principles of wavelet analysis,and then describe the main idea of embedded zerotree wavelet coding, used for compressing the SST images. The results show that this coding is adequate for the job.

  5. cDNA cloning, sequence analysis, and chromosomal localization of the gene for human carnitine palmitoyltransferase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finocchiaro, G.; Taroni, F.; Martin, A.L.; Colombo, I.; Tarelli, G.T.; DiDonato, S. (Istituto Nazionale Neurologico C. Besta, Milan (Italy)); Rocchi, M. (Istituto G. Gaslini, Genoa (Italy))

    1991-01-15

    The authors have cloned and sequenced a cDNA encoding human liver carnitine palmitoyltransferase an inner mitochondrial membrane enzyme that plays a major role in the fatty acid oxidation pathway. Mixed oligonucleotide primers whose sequences were deduced from one tryptic peptide obtained from purified CPTase were used in a polymerase chain reaction, allowing the amplification of a 0.12-kilobase fragment of human genomic DNA encoding such a peptide. A 60-base-pair (bp) oligonucleotide synthesized on the basis of the sequence from this fragment was used for the screening of a cDNA library from human liver and hybridized to a cDNA insert of 2255 bp. This cDNA contains an open reading frame of 1974 bp that encodes a protein of 658 amino acid residues including 25 residues of an NH{sub 2}-terminal leader peptide. The assignment of this open reading frame to human liver CPTase is confirmed by matches to seven different amino acid sequences of tryptic peptides derived from pure human CPTase and by the 82.2% homology with the amino acid sequence of rat CPTase. The NH{sub 2}-terminal region of CPTase contains a leucine-proline motif that is shared by carnitine acetyl- and octanoyltransferases and by choline acetyltransferase. The gene encoding CPTase was assigned to human chromosome 1, region 1q12-1pter, by hybridization of CPTase cDNA with a DNA panel of 19 human-hanster somatic cell hybrids.

  6. ANALYSIS ON GENETIC POLYMORPHISM OF 6 STR LOCI ON CHROMOSOME 12 IN CHINESE HAN POPULATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Objective To analyze the genetic polymorphism of 6 STR loci (D12S358, D12S1675, D12S1663, D12S1697, D12S1725 and D12S1613) on chromosome 12 in Chinese Han population. Methods EDTA-blood specimens were collected from 153 unrelated individuals of Chinese Han population in Shaanxi province. Allele and genotype frequencies for the 6 STR loci were estimated and statistical parameters of polymorphism were calculated. Results 8 alleles and 18 genotypes, 10 alleles and 17 genotypes, 9 alleles and 15 genotypes, 12alleles and 29 genotypes, 12 alleles and 31 genotypes, 8 alleles and 11 genotypes were observed at D12S358, D12S1675, D12S1663, D12S1697, D12S1725 and D12S1613, respectively. No deviations of the observed allele frequency from Hardy-weinberg equilibrium expectations were found for any of these loci. The Heterozygotes of these 6 loci were 78.89%, 66.10%, 54.95%, 79.10%, 71.98% and 59.48%, respectively. It indicated the high genetic polymorphism of the loci in Chinese Han population. Conclusion The 6 STR loci belonged to the genetic marker system of high discriminutesation and high information in Chinese Han population and can be used in the study of gene-related diseases.

  7. Loss of Heterozygosity Analysis on the Long Arm of Chromosome 7 in Gastric Carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JinlianLi; ShijuanMai; BingjianFeng; QishengFeng; LixiHuang; XingiuanYu; ZhizhongPan; YouqingZhon; JianchuanXia

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE In order to define the common deleted region related to primary gastric carcinomas in Chinese, the frequency of loss of heterozygosit (LOH) on human chromosome 7q and its clinical significance were investigated. METHODS A set of 9 microsatellite markers on 7q with an average genetic distance of 10cM were used to identify LOH by multi-PCR amplification of matched tumor and non-tumor DNAs from 70 patients with primary gastric carcinoma. The PCR products were separated by electrophoresis in polyacrylamide gels and analysed for LOH by using Genescan and Genotyper software. RESULTS The total frequency of LOH at any locus on 7q was 34.3% (24/70) in the tumors. Compared to non-tumor DNA, LOH at D7S486 and D7S798 loci were higher, 24.0%(12/50) and 19.2%(5/26), respectively. The total frequency of LOH on 7q was markedly higher with an increase in the clinical stage (P<0.05). The frequency of LOH at D7S486 in cases with lymph node metastasis was significanty higher than in cases without lymph node metastasis, P=0.015. CONCLUSION The higher incidence of LOH at D7S486 and D7S798 inprimary gastric carcinoma compared to normal tissue suggests that the potential tumor suppressor genes (TSGs) involved in the progression of gastric carcinoma might be nearby these 2 loci.

  8. The Scientific Image in Behavior Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keenan, Mickey

    2016-05-01

    Throughout the history of science, the scientific image has played a significant role in communication. With recent developments in computing technology, there has been an increase in the kinds of opportunities now available for scientists to communicate in more sophisticated ways. Within behavior analysis, though, we are only just beginning to appreciate the importance of going beyond the printing press to elucidate basic principles of behavior. The aim of this manuscript is to stimulate appreciation of both the role of the scientific image and the opportunities provided by a quick response code (QR code) for enhancing the functionality of the printed page. I discuss the limitations of imagery in behavior analysis ("Introduction"), and I show examples of what can be done with animations and multimedia for teaching philosophical issues that arise when teaching about private events ("Private Events 1 and 2"). Animations are also useful for bypassing ethical issues when showing examples of challenging behavior ("Challenging Behavior"). Each of these topics can be accessed only by scanning the QR code provided. This contingency has been arranged to help the reader embrace this new technology. In so doing, I hope to show its potential for going beyond the limitations of the printing press.

  9. Percent area coverage through image analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Chung M.; Hong, Sung M.; Liu, De-Ling

    2016-09-01

    The notion of percent area coverage (PAC) has been used to characterize surface cleanliness levels in the spacecraft contamination control community. Due to the lack of detailed particle data, PAC has been conventionally calculated by multiplying the particle surface density in predetermined particle size bins by a set of coefficients per MIL-STD-1246C. In deriving the set of coefficients, the surface particle size distribution is assumed to follow a log-normal relation between particle density and particle size, while the cross-sectional area function is given as a combination of regular geometric shapes. For particles with irregular shapes, the cross-sectional area function cannot describe the true particle area and, therefore, may introduce error in the PAC calculation. Other errors may also be introduced by using the lognormal surface particle size distribution function that highly depends on the environmental cleanliness and cleaning process. In this paper, we present PAC measurements from silicon witness wafers that collected fallouts from a fabric material after vibration testing. PAC calculations were performed through analysis of microscope images and compare them to values derived through the MIL-STD-1246C method. Our results showed that the MIL-STD-1246C method does provide a reasonable upper bound to the PAC values determined through image analysis, in particular for PAC values below 0.1.

  10. From Pixels to Geographic Objects in Remote Sensing Image Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Addink, E.A.; Van Coillie, Frieke M.B.; Jong, Steven M. de

    2012-01-01

    Traditional image analysis methods are mostly pixel-based and use the spectral differences of landscape elements at the Earth surface to classify these elements or to extract element properties from the Earth Observation image. Geographic object-based image analysis (GEOBIA) has received considerabl

  11. Image analysis and platform development for automated phenotyping in cytomics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yan, Kuan

    2013-01-01

    This thesis is dedicated to the empirical study of image analysis in HT/HC screen study. Often a HT/HC screening produces extensive amounts that cannot be manually analyzed. Thus, an automated image analysis solution is prior to an objective understanding of the raw image data. Compared to general a

  12. Machine learning approaches in medical image analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Bruijne, Marleen

    2016-01-01

    Machine learning approaches are increasingly successful in image-based diagnosis, disease prognosis, and risk assessment. This paper highlights new research directions and discusses three main challenges related to machine learning in medical imaging: coping with variation in imaging protocols...

  13. Genome-wide analysis of host-chromosome binding sites for Epstein-Barr Virus Nuclear Antigen 1 (EBNA1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Pu

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV Nuclear Antigen 1 (EBNA1 protein is required for the establishment of EBV latent infection in proliferating B-lymphocytes. EBNA1 is a multifunctional DNA-binding protein that stimulates DNA replication at the viral origin of plasmid replication (OriP, regulates transcription of viral and cellular genes, and tethers the viral episome to the cellular chromosome. EBNA1 also provides a survival function to B-lymphocytes, potentially through its ability to alter cellular gene expression. To better understand these various functions of EBNA1, we performed a genome-wide analysis of the viral and cellular DNA sites associated with EBNA1 protein in a latently infected Burkitt lymphoma B-cell line. Chromatin-immunoprecipitation (ChIP combined with massively parallel deep-sequencing (ChIP-Seq was used to identify cellular sites bound by EBNA1. Sites identified by ChIP-Seq were validated by conventional real-time PCR, and ChIP-Seq provided quantitative, high-resolution detection of the known EBNA1 binding sites on the EBV genome at OriP and Qp. We identified at least one cluster of unusually high-affinity EBNA1 binding sites on chromosome 11, between the divergent FAM55 D and FAM55B genes. A consensus for all cellular EBNA1 binding sites is distinct from those derived from the known viral binding sites, suggesting that some of these sites are indirectly bound by EBNA1. EBNA1 also bound close to the transcriptional start sites of a large number of cellular genes, including HDAC3, CDC7, and MAP3K1, which we show are positively regulated by EBNA1. EBNA1 binding sites were enriched in some repetitive elements, especially LINE 1 retrotransposons, and had weak correlations with histone modifications and ORC binding. We conclude that EBNA1 can interact with a large number of cellular genes and chromosomal loci in latently infected cells, but that these sites are likely to represent a complex ensemble of direct and indirect EBNA

  14. A breast cancer meta-analysis of two expression measures of chromosomal instability reveals a relationship with younger age at diagnosis and high risk histopathological variables

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Endesfelder, David; McGranahan, Nicholas; Birkbak, Nicolai Juul;

    2011-01-01

    . In a breast cancer meta-analysis of 2423 patients we examine the relationship between clinicopathological parameters and two distinct chromosomal instability gene expression signatures in order to address whether younger age at diagnosis is associated with increased tumour genome instability. We find that CIN......, assessed by the two independently derived CIN expression signatures, is significantly associated with increased tumour size, ER negative or HER2 positive disease, higher tumour grade and younger age at diagnosis in ER negative breast cancer. These data support the hypothesis that chromosomal instability...

  15. The influence of sex chromosome aneuploidy on brain asymmetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaie, Roozbeh; Daly, Eileen M; Cutter, William J; Murphy, Declan G M; Robertson, Dene M W; DeLisi, Lynn E; Mackay, Clare E; Barrick, Thomas R; Crow, Timothy J; Roberts, Neil

    2009-01-05

    The cognitive deficits present in individuals with sex chromosome aneuploidies suggest that hemispheric differentiation of function is determined by an X-Y homologous gene [Crow (1993); Lancet 342:594-598]. In particular, females with Turner's syndrome (TS) who have only one X-chromosome exhibit deficits of spatial ability whereas males with Klinefelter's syndrome (KS) who possess a supernumerary X-chromosome are delayed in acquiring words. Since spatial and verbal abilities are generally associated with right and left hemispheric function, such deficits may relate to anomalies of cerebral asymmetry. We therefore applied a novel image analysis technique to investigate the relationship between sex chromosome dosage and structural brain asymmetry. Specifically, we tested Crow's prediction that the magnitude of the brain torque (i.e., a combination of rightward frontal and leftward occipital asymmetry) would, as a function of sex chromosome dosage, be respectively decreased in TS women and increased in KS men, relative to genotypically normal controls. We found that brain torque was not significantly different in TS women and KS men, in comparison to controls. However, TS women exhibited significantly increased leftward brain asymmetry, restricted to the posterior of the brain and focused on the superior temporal and parietal-occipital association cortex, while KS men showed a trend for decreased brain asymmetry throughout the frontal lobes. The findings suggest that the number of sex chromosomes influences the development of brain asymmetry not simply to modify the torque but in a complex pattern along the antero-posterior axis.

  16. Cbx2 stably associates with mitotic chromosomes via a PRC2- or PRC1-independent mechanism and is needed for recruiting PRC1 complex to mitotic chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhen, Chao Yu; Duc, Huy Nguyen; Kokotovic, Marko; Phiel, Christopher J; Ren, Xiaojun

    2014-11-15

    Polycomb group (PcG) proteins are epigenetic transcriptional factors that repress key developmental regulators and maintain cellular identity through mitosis via a poorly understood mechanism. Using quantitative live-cell imaging in mouse ES cells and tumor cells, we demonstrate that, although Polycomb repressive complex (PRC) 1 proteins (Cbx-family proteins, Ring1b, Mel18, and Phc1) exhibit variable capacities of association with mitotic chromosomes, Cbx2 overwhelmingly binds to mitotic chromosomes. The recruitment of Cbx2 to mitotic chromosomes is independent of PRC1 or PRC2, and Cbx2 is needed to recruit PRC1 complex to mitotic chromosomes. Quantitative fluorescence recovery after photobleaching analysis indicates that PRC1 proteins rapidly exchange at interphasic chromatin. On entry into mitosis, Cbx2, Ring1b, Mel18, and Phc1 proteins become immobilized at mitotic chromosomes, whereas other Cbx-family proteins dynamically bind to mitotic chromosomes. Depletion of PRC1 or PRC2 protein has no effect on the immobilization of Cbx2 on mitotic chromosomes. We find that the N-terminus of Cbx2 is needed for its recruitment to mitotic chromosomes, whereas the C-terminus is required for its immobilization. Thus these results provide fundamental insights into the molecular mechanisms of epigenetic inheritance.

  17. Biological dosimetry of ionizing radiation by chromosomal aberration analysis; Dosimetria biologica de las radiaciones ionizantes mediante el analisis de aberraciones cromosomicas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez-Castano, S.; Silva, A.; Navlet, J.

    1990-07-01

    Biological dosimetry consists of estimating absorbed doses for people exposed to radiation by mean biological methods. Several indicators used are based in haematological, biochemical, and cytogenetic data, although nowadays without doubt, the cytogenetic method is considered to be the most reliable. In this case, the study ol chromosomal aberrations, normally dicentric chromosomes, in peripheral lymphocytes can be related to absorbed dose through an experimental calibration curve. An experimental dose-response curve, using dicentric chromosomes analysis, X-rays at 300 kVp, 114 rad/min and temperature 37 degree celsius has been produced. Experimental data is fitted to model Y ={alpha} + {beta}{sub 1}D + {beta}{sub 2}D 2 , where Y is the number of dicentrics per cell and D the dose. The curve is compared with those produced elsewhere. (Author) 14 refs.

  18. Evidence from Y-chromosome analysis for a late exclusively eastern expansion of the Bantu-speaking people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari Pour, Naser; Plaster, Christopher A; Bradman, Neil

    2013-04-01

    The expansion of the Bantu-speaking people (EBSP) during the past 3000-5000 years is an event of great importance in the history of humanity. Anthropology, archaeology, linguistics and, in recent decades, genetics have been used to elucidate some of the events and processes involved. Although it is generally accepted that the EBSP has its origin in the so-called Bantu Homeland situated in the area of the border between Nigeria and the Grassfields of Cameroon, and that it followed both western and eastern routes, much less is known about the number and dates of those expansions, if more than one. Mitochondrial, Y-chromosome and autosomal DNA analyses have been carried out in attempts to understand the demographic events that have taken place. There is an increasing evidence that the expansion was a more complex process than originally thought and that neither a single demographic event nor an early split between western and eastern groups occurred. In this study, we analysed unique event polymorphism and short tandem repeat variation in non-recombining Y-chromosome haplogroups contained within the E1b1a haplogroup, which is exclusive to individuals of recent African ancestry, in a large, geographically widely distributed, set of sub-Saharan Africans (groups=43, n=2757), all of whom, except one Nilo-Saharan-speaking group, spoke a Niger-Congo language and most a Bantu tongue. Analysis of diversity and rough estimates of times to the most recent common ancestors of haplogroups provide evidence of multiple expansions along eastern and western routes and a late, exclusively eastern route, expansion.

  19. 4p16.3 microdeletions and microduplications detected by chromosomal microarray analysis: New insights into mechanisms and critical regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Weimin; Cheung, Sau-Wai; Breman, Amy M; Bacino, Carlos A

    2016-10-01

    Deletions in the 4p16.3 region cause Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome, a well known contiguous microdeletion syndrome with the critical region for common phenotype mapped in WHSCR2. Recently, duplications in 4p16.3 were reported in three patients with developmental delay and dysmorphic features. Through chromosomal microarray analysis, we identified 156 patients with a deletion (n = 109) or duplication (n = 47) in 4p16.3 out of approximately 60,000 patients analyzed by Baylor Miraca Genetics Laboratories. Seventy-five of the postnatally detected deletions encompassed the entire critical region, 32 (43%) of which were associated with other chromosome rearrangements, including six patients (8%) that had a duplication adjacent to the terminal deletion. Our data indicate that Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome deletions with an adjacent duplication occur at a higher frequency than previously appreciated. Pure deletions (n = 14) or duplications (n = 15) without other copy number changes distal to or inside the WHSCR2 were identified for mapping of critical regions. Our data suggest that deletion of the segment from 0.6 to 0.9 Mb from the terminus of 4p causes a seizure phenotype and duplications of a region distal to the previously defined smallest region of overlap for 4p16.3 microduplication syndrome are associated with neurodevelopmental problems. We detected seven Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome deletions and one 4p16.3 duplication prenatally; all of the seven are either >8 Mb in size and/or associated with large duplications. In conclusion, our study provides deeper insight into the molecular mechanisms, the critical regions and effective prenatal diagnosis for 4p16.3 deletions/ duplications. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. New Lesions Detected by Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Array–Based Chromosomal Analysis Have Important Clinical Impact in Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiu, Ramon V.; Gondek, Lukasz P.; O'Keefe, Christine L.; Huh, Jungwon; Sekeres, Mikkael A.; Elson, Paul; McDevitt, Michael A.; Wang, Xiao Fei; Levis, Mark J.; Karp, Judith E.; Advani, Anjali S.; Maciejewski, Jaroslaw P.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Cytogenetics is the primary outcome predictor in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Metaphase cytogenetics (MC) detects an abnormal karyotype in only half of patients with AML, however. Single nucleotide polymorphism arrays (SNP-A) can detect acquired somatic uniparental disomy (UPD) and other cryptic defects, even in samples deemed normal by MC. We hypothesized that SNP-A will improve detection of chromosomal defects in AML and that this would enhance the prognostic value of MC. Patients and Methods We performed 250K and 6.0 SNP-A analyses on 140 patients with primary (p) and secondary (s) AML and correlated the results with clinical outcomes and Flt-3/nucleophosmin (NPM-1) status. Results SNP-A is more sensitive than MC in detecting unbalanced lesions (pAML, 65% v 39%, P = .002; and sAML, 78% v 51%, P = .003). Acquired somatic UPD, not detectable by MC, was common in our AML cohort (29% in pAML and 35% in sAML). Patients with SNP-A lesions including acquired somatic UPD exhibited worse overall survival (OS) and event-free survival (EFS) in pAML with normal MC and in pAML/sAML with abnormal MC. SNP-A improved the predictive value of Flt-3 internal tandem duplication/NPM-1 status, with inferior survival seen in patients with additional SNP-A defects. Multivariate analyses confirmed the independent predictive value of SNP-A defects for OS (hazard ratio [HR] = 2.52; 95% CI, 1.29 to 5.22; P = .006) and EFS (HR = 1.72; 95% CI, 1.12 to 3.48; P = .04). Conclusion SNP-A analysis allows enhanced detection of chromosomal abnormalities and provides important prognostic impact in AML. PMID:19770377

  1. A potential novel spontaneous preterm birth gene, AR, identified by linkage and association analysis of X chromosomal markers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minna K Karjalainen

    Full Text Available Preterm birth is the major cause of neonatal mortality and morbidity. In many cases, it has severe life-long consequences for the health and neurological development of the newborn child. More than 50% of all preterm births are spontaneous, and currently there is no effective prevention. Several studies suggest that genetic factors play a role in spontaneous preterm birth (SPTB. However, its genetic background is insufficiently characterized. The aim of the present study was to perform a linkage analysis of X chromosomal markers in SPTB in large northern Finnish families with recurrent SPTBs. We found a significant linkage signal (HLOD = 3.72 on chromosome locus Xq13.1 when the studied phenotype was being born preterm. There were no significant linkage signals when the studied phenotype was giving preterm deliveries. Two functional candidate genes, those encoding the androgen receptor (AR and the interleukin-2 receptor gamma subunit (IL2RG, located near this locus were analyzed as candidates for SPTB in subsequent case-control association analyses. Nine single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs within these genes and an AR exon-1 CAG repeat, which was previously demonstrated to be functionally significant, were analyzed in mothers with preterm delivery (n = 272 and their offspring (n = 269, and in mothers with exclusively term deliveries (n = 201 and their offspring (n = 199, all originating from northern Finland. A replication study population consisting of individuals born preterm (n = 111 and term (n = 197 from southern Finland was also analyzed. Long AR CAG repeats (≥ 26 were overrepresented and short repeats (≤ 19 underrepresented in individuals born preterm compared to those born at term. Thus, our linkage and association results emphasize the role of the fetal genome in genetic predisposition to SPTB and implicate AR as a potential novel fetal susceptibility gene for SPTB.

  2. Human Y chromosome microdeletion analysis by PCR multiplex protocols identifying only clinically relevant AZF microdeletions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, Peter H; Bender, Ulrike

    2013-01-01

    PCR multiplex assays are the method of choice for quickly revealing genomic microdeletions in the large repetitive genomic sequence blocks on the long arm of the human Y chromosome. They harbor the Azoospermia Factor (AZF) genes, which cause male infertility when functionally disrupted. These protein encoding Y genes are expressed exclusively or predominantly during male germ cell development, i.e., at different phases of human spermatogenesis. They are located in three distinct genomic sequence regions designated AZFa, AZFb, and AZFc, respectively. Complete deletion of an AZF region, also called "classical" AZF microdeletion, is always associated with male infertility and a distinct testicular pathology. Partial AZF deletions including single AZF Y genes can cause the same testicular pathology as the corresponding complete deletion (e.g., DDX3Y gene deletions in AZFa), or might not be associated with male infertility at all (e.g., some BPY2, CDY1, DAZ gene deletions in AZFc). We therefore propose that a PCR multiplex assay aimed to reduce only those AZF microdeletions causing a specific testicular pathology-thus relevant for clinical applications. It only includes Sequence Tagged Site (STS) deletion markers inside the exon structures of the Y genes known to be expressed in male germ cells and located in the three AZF regions. They were integrated in a robust standard protocol for four PCR multiplex mixtures which also include the basic principles of quality control according to the strict guidelines of the European Molecular Genetics Quality Network (EMQN: http://www.emqn.org). In case all Y genes of one AZF region are deleted the molecular extension of this AZF microdeletion is diagnosed to be yes or no comparable to that of the "classical" AZF microdeletion by an additional PCR multiplex assay analyzing the putative AZF breakpoint borderlines.

  3. Blind Analysis of CT Image Noise Using Residual Denoised Images

    CERN Document Server

    Roychowdhury, Sohini; Alessio, Adam

    2016-01-01

    CT protocol design and quality control would benefit from automated tools to estimate the quality of generated CT images. These tools could be used to identify erroneous CT acquisitions or refine protocols to achieve certain signal to noise characteristics. This paper investigates blind estimation methods to determine global signal strength and noise levels in chest CT images. Methods: We propose novel performance metrics corresponding to the accuracy of noise and signal estimation. We implement and evaluate the noise estimation performance of six spatial- and frequency- based methods, derived from conventional image filtering algorithms. Algorithms were tested on patient data sets from whole-body repeat CT acquisitions performed with a higher and lower dose technique over the same scan region. Results: The proposed performance metrics can evaluate the relative tradeoff of filter parameters and noise estimation performance. The proposed automated methods tend to underestimate CT image noise at low-flux levels...

  4. 3-dimensional terahertz imaging and analysis of historical art pieces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dandolo, Corinna Ludovica Koch; Jepsen, Peter Uhd

    Imaging with terahertz (THz) waves offers the capability of seeing through traditionally opaque materials, with maintaining a spatial resolution comparable to that of the naked eye. The use of ultrashort THz pulses allow for depth resolved imaging by time-of-flight analysis of reflected signals f...... such as x-ray radiography and infrared imaging. Here we present comprehensive, fully depth-resolved imaging and analysis of a historical wall painting, an easel painting and a gilded panel....

  5. Retrospective analysis of fetal sex chromosome abnormalities%胎儿性染色体异常的回顾性分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    欧德明; 董兴盛; 江陵; 陆林苑; 王德刚

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the incidence of fetal sex chromosomal abnormalities, the distribution of various sex chromosome abnormal karyotypes and the outcomes of pregnancy, in order to provide more evidences for genetic counseling. Methods The cytogenetic analysis results of 8 864 pregnant women underwent prenatal diagnosis in Zhongshan Fraternity Hospital Prenatal Diagnosis Centre during 2009~2013 were retrospectively analyzed. The results of fetal sex chromosome abnormalities and pregnancy outcomes were summarized. Results Among the 57 cases(0. 64 %) with sex chromosomal abnormalities, there were 53 cases were chromosome number abnormalities(0. 60 %), 37 cases were simple type, 16 cases were mosaicism, in which 29 cases were Turner syndrome, 4 cases were XYY syndrome, 11 cases were XXX syndrome,9 cases were XXY syndrome, and 4 cases were chromosomal structural abnormalities ( 0. 05 %) . Conclusion Invasive prenatal diagnosis has an important role for determining fetal sex chromosome abnormalities, and serological screening and B-ultrasound has an important value for fetal sex chromosome abnormalities. The pregnancy outcome and ethical issues related guidelines of fetal sex chromosomal abnormalities need to be developed.%目的 探讨胎儿性染色体异常的发生率、常见分布情况及妊娠结局,为遗传咨询提供更多信息. 方法 回顾性分析2009~2013年中山市博爱医院产前诊断中心8 864 例孕妇产前诊断的染色体检验结果,总结性染色体异常发生情况及妊娠结局. 结果 共检出性染色体异常胎儿57例(0. 64 %). 性染色体异常中,染色体数目异常53例(0. 60%),单纯型37例,嵌合型16例,其中Turner综合征29例,XYY综合征4例,XXX综合征11例,XXY综合征9例;性染色体结构异常4例( 0. 05 %). 结论 介入性产前诊断对确定胎儿性染色体异常具有重要作用. 性染色体异常胎儿的妊娠结局及伦理问题需要国家层面制定相关指南.

  6. Localization, by linkage analysis, of the cystinuria type III gene to chromosome 19q13.1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bisceglia, L.; Totaro, A.; Melchionda, S. [and others

    1997-03-01

    Cystinuria is an autosomal recessive aminoaciduria in which three urinary phenotypes (I, II, and III) have been described. An amino acid transporter gene, SLC3A1 (formerly rBAT), was found to be responsible for this disorder. Mutational and linkage analysis demonstrated the presence of genetic heterogeneity in which the SLC3A1 gene is responsible for type I cystinuria but not for type II or type III. In this study, we report the identification of the cystinuria type III locus on the long arm of chromosome 19 (19q13.1), obtained after a genomewide search. Pairwise linkage analysis in a series of type III or type II families previously excluded from linkage to the cystinuria type I locus (SLC3A1 gene) revealed a significant maximum LOD score (Z{sub max}) of 13.11 at a maximum recombination fraction ({theta}{sub max}) of .00, with marker D19S225. Multipoint linkage analysis performed with the use of additional markers from the region placed the cystinuria type III locus between D19S414 and D19S220. Preliminary data on type II families also seem to place the disease locus for this rare type of cystinuria at 19q13.1 (significant Z{sub max} = 3.11 at {theta}{sub max} of .00, with marker D19S225). 33 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Chromosome analysis in the Kruger National Park: Mitotic and meiotic studies in the African elephant loxodonta africana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Wallace

    1978-09-01

    Full Text Available The present report is published because of the paucity of publication on the mitotic chromosomes of the African elephant Loxodonta africana, and because it is the fisrt study in which the meiotic chromosomes of the species are described.

  8. Chromosomal instability in Streptomyces avermitilis: major deletion in the central region and stable circularized chromosome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen Ying

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The chromosome of Streptomyces has been shown to be unstable, frequently undergoing gross chromosomal rearrangements. However, the mechanisms underlying this phenomenon remain unclear, with previous studies focused on two chromosomal ends as targets for rearrangements. Here we investigated chromosomal instability of Streptomyces avermitilis, an important producer of avermectins, and characterized four gross chromosomal rearrangement events, including a major deletion in the central region. The present findings provide a valuable contribution to the mechanistic study of genetic instability in Streptomyces. Results Thirty randomly-selected "bald" mutants derived from the wild-type strain all contained gross chromosomal rearrangements of various types. One of the bald mutants, SA1-8, had the same linear chromosomal structure as the high avermectin-producing mutant 76-9. Chromosomes of both strains displayed at least three independent chromosomal rearrangements, including chromosomal arm replacement to form new 88-kb terminal inverted repeats (TIRs, and two major deletions. One of the deletions eliminated the 36-kb central region of the chromosome, but surprisingly did not affect viability of the cells. The other deletion (74-kb was internal to the right chromosomal arm. The chromosome of another bald mutant, SA1-6, was circularized with deletions at both ends. No obvious homology was found in all fusion sequences. Generational stability analysis showed that the chromosomal structure of SA1-8 and SA1-6 was stable. Conclusions Various chromosomal rearrangements, including chromosomal arm replacement, interstitial deletions and chromosomal circularization, occurred in S. avermitilis by non-homologous recombination. The finding of an inner deletion involving in the central region of S. avermitilis chromosome suggests that the entire Streptomyces chromosome may be the target for rearrangements, which are not limited, as previously

  9. Direct identification of fungi using image analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dørge, Thorsten Carlheim; Carstensen, Jens Michael; Frisvad, Jens Christian

    1999-01-01

    Filamentous fungi have often been characterized, classified or identified with a major emphasis on macromorphological characters, i.e. the size, texture and color of fungal colonies grown on one or more identification media. This approach has been rejcted by several taxonomists because of the sub......Filamentous fungi have often been characterized, classified or identified with a major emphasis on macromorphological characters, i.e. the size, texture and color of fungal colonies grown on one or more identification media. This approach has been rejcted by several taxonomists because...... of the subjectivity in the visual evaluation and quantification (if any)of such characters and the apparent large variability of the features. We present an image analysis approach for objective identification and classification of fungi. The approach is exemplified by several isolates of nine different species...... of the genus Penicillium, known to be very difficult to identify correctly. The fungi were incubated on YES and CYA for one week at 25 C (3 point inoculation) in 9 cm Petri dishes. The cultures are placed under a camera where a digital image of the front of the colonies is acquired under optimal illumination...

  10. MORPHOLOGICAL GRANULOMETRIC ANALYSIS OF SEDIMENT IMAGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoganand Balagurunathan

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Sediments are routinely analyzed in terms of the sizing characteristics of the grains of which they are composed. Via sieving methods, the grains are separated and a weight-based size distribution constructed. Various moment parameters are computed from the size distribution and these serve as sediment characteristics. This paper examines the feasibility of a fully electronic granularity analysis using digital image processing. The study uses a random model of three-dimensional grains in conjunction with the morphological method of granulometric size distributions. The random model is constructed to simulate sand, silt, and clay particle distributions. Owing to the impossibility of perfectly sifting small grains so that they do not touch, the model is used in both disjoint and non-disjoint modes, and watershed segmentation is applied in the non-disjoint model. The image-based granulometric size distributions are transformed so that they take into account the necessity to view sediment fractions at different magnifications and in different frames. Gray-scale granulometric moments are then computed using both ordinary and reconstructive granulometries. The resulting moments are then compared to moments found from real grains in seven different sediments using standard weight-based size distributions.

  11. Some selected quantitative methods of thermal image analysis in Matlab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koprowski, Robert

    2016-05-01

    The paper presents a new algorithm based on some selected automatic quantitative methods for analysing thermal images. It shows the practical implementation of these image analysis methods in Matlab. It enables to perform fully automated and reproducible measurements of selected parameters in thermal images. The paper also shows two examples of the use of the proposed image analysis methods for the area of ​​the skin of a human foot and face. The full source code of the developed application is also provided as an attachment. The main window of the program during dynamic analysis of the foot thermal image.

  12. Image processing and analysis with graphs theory and practice

    CERN Document Server

    Lézoray, Olivier

    2012-01-01

    Covering the theoretical aspects of image processing and analysis through the use of graphs in the representation and analysis of objects, Image Processing and Analysis with Graphs: Theory and Practice also demonstrates how these concepts are indispensible for the design of cutting-edge solutions for real-world applications. Explores new applications in computational photography, image and video processing, computer graphics, recognition, medical and biomedical imaging With the explosive growth in image production, in everything from digital photographs to medical scans, there has been a drast

  13. A comparative chromosome analysis of Thai wild boar (Sus scrofa jubatus and relationship to domestic pig (S. s. domestica by conventional staining, G-banding and high-resolution technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pornnarong Siripiyasing

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This research is the first comparative chromosome analysis report of Thai wild boar (Sus scrofa jubatus and its relationship to domestic pig (S. s. domestica by conventional staining, G-banding and high-resolution technique. Blood samples of the Thai wild boar were taken from two males and two females kept in Nakhon Ratchasima Zoo. After standard whole blood lymphocyte culture at 37 oC for 72 hr. in the presence of colchicine, the metaphase spreads were performed on microscopic slides and airdried. Conventional staining, G-banding and high-resolution technique were applied to stain the chromosomes. The results showed that the number of diploid chromosomes of Thai wild boar was 2n (diploid = 38, and the fundamental numbers (NF were 62 in the male and female. The type of autosomes were 12 metacentric, 14 submetacentric, 4 acrocentric and 6 telocentric chromosomes, with X and Y chromosomes being metacentric chromosomes. We found that chromosomes 1, 5, 7, 8, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 16, 17, 18, X and Y had the same Gbanding and high-resolution technique patterns as those of domestic pig chromosomes. Chromosomes 2, 3, 4, 6, 9 and 15 are similar to those of domestic pig chromosomes. These results show the evolutionary relationship between the Thai wild boar and the domestic pig.

  14. Image analysis and microscopy: a useful combination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinotti L.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The TSE Roadmap published in 2005 (DG for Health and Consumer Protection, 2005 suggests that short and medium term (2005-2009 amendments to control BSE policy should include “a relaxation of certain measures of the current total feed ban when certain conditions are met”. The same document noted “the starting point when revising the current feed ban provisions should be risk-based but at the same time taking into account the control tools in place to evaluate and ensure the proper implementation of this feed ban”. The clear implication is that adequate analytical methods to detect constituents of animal origin in feedstuffs are required. The official analytical method for the detection of constituents of animal origin in feedstuffs is the microscopic examination technique as described in Commission Directive 2003/126/EC of 23 December 2003 [OJ L 339, 24.12.2003, 78]. Although the microscopic method is usually able to distinguish fish from land animal material, it is often unable to distinguish between different terrestrial animals. Fulfillments of the requirements of Regulation 1774/2002/EC laying down health rules concerning animal by-products not intended for human consumption, clearly implies that it must be possible to identify the origin animal materials, at higher taxonomic levels than in the past. Thus improvements in all methods of detecting constituents of animal origin are required, including the microscopic method. This article will examine the problem of meat and bone meal in animal feeds, and the use of microscopic methods in association with computer image analysis to identify the source species of these feedstuff contaminants. Image processing, integrated with morphometric measurements can provide accurate and reliable results and can be a very useful aid to the analyst in the characterization, analysis and control of feedstuffs.

  15. Dynamic Chest Image Analysis: Model-Based Perfusion Analysis in Dynamic Pulmonary Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiuru Aaro

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The "Dynamic Chest Image Analysis" project aims to develop model-based computer analysis and visualization methods for showing focal and general abnormalities of lung ventilation and perfusion based on a sequence of digital chest fluoroscopy frames collected with the dynamic pulmonary imaging technique. We have proposed and evaluated a multiresolutional method with an explicit ventilation model for ventilation analysis. This paper presents a new model-based method for pulmonary perfusion analysis. According to perfusion properties, we first devise a novel mathematical function to form a perfusion model. A simple yet accurate approach is further introduced to extract cardiac systolic and diastolic phases from the heart, so that this cardiac information may be utilized to accelerate the perfusion analysis and improve its sensitivity in detecting pulmonary perfusion abnormalities. This makes perfusion analysis not only fast but also robust in computation; consequently, perfusion analysis becomes computationally feasible without using contrast media. Our clinical case studies with 52 patients show that this technique is effective for pulmonary embolism even without using contrast media, demonstrating consistent correlations with computed tomography (CT and nuclear medicine (NM studies. This fluoroscopical examination takes only about 2 seconds for perfusion study with only low radiation dose to patient, involving no preparation, no radioactive isotopes, and no contrast media.

  16. An application of image processing techniques in computed tomography image analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McEvoy, Fintan

    2007-01-01

    number of animals and image slices, automation of the process was desirable. The open-source and free image analysis program ImageJ was used. A macro procedure was created that provided the required functionality. The macro performs a number of basic image processing procedures. These include an initial...... process designed to remove the scanning table from the image and to center the animal in the image. This is followed by placement of a vertical line segment from the mid point of the upper border of the image to the image center. Measurements are made between automatically detected outer and inner...... boundaries of subcutaneous adipose tissue along this line segment. This process was repeated as the image was rotated (with the line position remaining unchanged) so that measurements around the complete circumference were obtained. Additionally, an image was created showing all detected boundary points so...

  17. Personalised pathway analysis reveals association between DNA repair pathway dysregulation and chromosomal instability in sporadic breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chao; Srihari, Sriganesh; Lal, Samir; Gautier, Benoît; Simpson, Peter T; Khanna, Kum Kum; Ragan, Mark A; Lê Cao, Kim-Anh

    2016-01-01

    The Homologous Recombination (HR) pathway is crucial for the repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) generated during DNA replication. Defects in HR repair have been linked to the initiation and development of a wide variety of human malignancies, and exploited in chemical, radiological and targeted therapies. In this study, we performed a personalised pathway analysis independently for four large sporadic breast cancer cohorts to investigate the status of HR pathway dysregulation in individual sporadic breast tumours, its association with HR repair deficiency and its impact on tumour characteristics. Specifically, we first manually curated a list of HR genes according to our recent review on this pathway (Liu et al., 2014), and then applied a personalised pathway analysis method named Pathifier (Drier et al., 2013) on the expression levels of the curated genes to obtain an HR score quantifying HR pathway dysregulation in individual tumours. Based on the score, we observed a great diversity in HR dysregulation between and within gene expression-based breast cancer subtypes, and by using two published HR-defect signatures, we found HR pathway dysregulation reflects HR repair deficiency. Furthermore, we identified a novel association between HR pathway dysregulation and chromosomal instability (CIN) in sporadic breast cancer. Although CIN has long been considered as a hallmark of most solid tumours, with recent extensive studies highlighting its importance in tumour evolution and drug resistance, the molecular basis of CIN in sporadic cancers remains poorly understood. Our results imply that HR pathway dysregulation might contribute to CIN in sporadic breast cancer.

  18. Assignment of human sprouty 4 gene to chromosome segment 5q32∼33 and analysis of its pattern of expression

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Hua Liu; Jin-Zhong Chen; Shao-Hua Gu; Jian-Liang Dai; En-Pang Zhao; Lu Huang; Wang-Xiang Xu; Yi Xie; Yu-Min Mao

    2003-04-01

    The human sprouty 4 (SPYR4) gene was localized to chromosome band 5q32∼33 by screening the Stanford radiation hybrid G3 panel using a SPRY4-specific primer pair for PCR. Northern blot analysis revealed two different mRNAs (5 kb and 2 kb) in liver, skeletal muscle, heart, lung, kidney, spleen, placenta and small intestine. Reverse transcriptase-PCR analysis showed that SPYR4 was expressed in all tested tissues to different levels.

  19. High frequency of submicroscopic chromosomal imbalances in patients with syndromic craniosynostosis detected by a combined approach of microsatellite segregation analysis, multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification and array-based comparative genome hybridisation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jehee, F.S.; Krepischi-Santos, A.C.; Rocha, K.M.; Cavalcanti, D.P.; Kim, C.A.; Bertola, D.R.; Alonso, L.G.; D'Angelo, C.S.; Mazzeu, J.F.; Froyen, G.; Lugtenberg, D.; Vianna-Morgante, A.M.; Rosenberg, C.; Passos-Bueno, M.R.

    2008-01-01

    We present the first comprehensive study, to our knowledge, on genomic chromosomal analysis in syndromic craniosynostosis. In total, 45 patients with craniosynostotic disorders were screened with a variety of methods including conventional karyotype, microsatellite segregation analysis, subtelomeric

  20. Analysis of complex-type chromosome exchanges in astronauts' lymphocytes after space flight as a biomarker of high-LET exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Kerry; Wu, Honglu; Willingham, Veronica; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2002-01-01

    High-LET radiation is more efficient in producing complex-type chromosome exchanges than sparsely ionizing radiation, and this can potentially be used as a biomarker of radiation quality. To investigate if complex chromosome exchanges are induced by the high-LET component of space radiation exposure, damage was assessed in astronauts' blood lymphocytes before and after long duration missions of 3-4 months. The frequency of simple translocations increased significantly for most of the crewmembers studied. However, there were few complex exchanges detected and only one crewmember had a significant increase after flight. It has been suggested that the yield of complex chromosome damage could be underestimated when analyzing metaphase cells collected at one time point after irradiation, and analysis of chemically-induced PCC may be more accurate since problems with complicated cell-cycle delays are avoided. However, in this case the yields of chromosome damage were similar for metaphase and PCC analysis of astronauts' lymphocytes. It appears that the use of complex-type exchanges as biomarker of radiation quality in vivo after low-dose chronic exposure in mixed radiation fields is hampered by statistical uncertainties.

  1. Three modality image registration of brain SPECT/CT and MR images for quantitative analysis of dopamine transporter imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Yuzuho; Takeda, Yuta; Hara, Takeshi; Zhou, Xiangrong; Matsusako, Masaki; Tanaka, Yuki; Hosoya, Kazuhiko; Nihei, Tsutomu; Katafuchi, Tetsuro; Fujita, Hiroshi

    2016-03-01

    Important features in Parkinson's disease (PD) are degenerations and losses of dopamine neurons in corpus striatum. 123I-FP-CIT can visualize activities of the dopamine neurons. The activity radio of background to corpus striatum is used for diagnosis of PD and Dementia with Lewy Bodies (DLB). The specific activity can be observed in the corpus striatum on SPECT images, but the location and the shape of the corpus striatum on SPECT images only are often lost because of the low uptake. In contrast, MR images can visualize the locations of the corpus striatum. The purpose of this study was to realize a quantitative image analysis for the SPECT images by using image registration technique with brain MR images that can determine the region of corpus striatum. In this study, the image fusion technique was used to fuse SPECT and MR images by intervening CT image taken by SPECT/CT. The mutual information (MI) for image registration between CT and MR images was used for the registration. Six SPECT/CT and four MR scans of phantom materials are taken by changing the direction. As the results of the image registrations, 16 of 24 combinations were registered within 1.3mm. By applying the approach to 32 clinical SPECT/CT and MR cases, all of the cases were registered within 0.86mm. In conclusions, our registration method has a potential in superimposing MR images on SPECT images.

  2. Analysis of positional candidate genes in the AAA1 susceptibility locus for abdominal aortic aneurysms on chromosome 19

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferrell Robert E

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA is a complex disorder with multiple genetic risk factors. Using affected relative pair linkage analysis, we previously identified an AAA susceptibility locus on chromosome 19q13. This locus has been designated as the AAA1 susceptibility locus in the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM database. Methods Nine candidate genes were selected from the AAA1 locus based on their function, as well as mRNA expression levels in the aorta. A sample of 394 cases and 419 controls was genotyped for 41 SNPs located in or around the selected nine candidate genes using the Illumina GoldenGate platform. Single marker and haplotype analyses were performed. Three genes (CEBPG, PEPD and CD22 were selected for DNA sequencing based on the association study results, and exonic regions were analyzed. Immunohistochemical staining of aortic tissue sections from AAA and control individuals was carried out for the CD22 and PEPD proteins with specific antibodies. Results Several SNPs were nominally associated with AAA (p CEBPG, peptidase D (PEPD, and CD22. Haplotype analysis found a nominally associated 5-SNP haplotype in the CEBPG/PEPD locus, as well as a nominally associated 2-SNP haplotype in the CD22 locus. DNA sequencing of the coding regions revealed no variation in CEBPG. Seven sequence variants were identified in PEPD, including three not present in the NCBI SNP (dbSNP database. Sequencing of all 14 exons of CD22 identified 20 sequence variants, five of which were in the coding region and six were in the 3'-untranslated region. Five variants were not present in dbSNP. Immunohistochemical staining for CD22 revealed protein expression in lymphocytes present in the aneurysmal aortic wall only and no detectable expression in control aorta. PEPD protein was expressed in fibroblasts and myofibroblasts in the media-adventitia border in both aneurysmal and non-aneurysmal tissue samples. Conclusions Association testing

  3. Image Retrieval: Theoretical Analysis and Empirical User Studies on Accessing Information in Images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ornager, Susanne

    1997-01-01

    Discusses indexing and retrieval for effective searches of digitized images. Reports on an empirical study about criteria for analysis and indexing digitized images, and the different types of user queries done in newspaper image archives in Denmark. Concludes that it is necessary that the indexing represent both a factual and an expressional…

  4. Medical Image Analysis by Cognitive Information Systems - a Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogiela, Lidia; Takizawa, Makoto

    2016-10-01

    This publication presents a review of medical image analysis systems. The paradigms of cognitive information systems will be presented by examples of medical image analysis systems. The semantic processes present as it is applied to different types of medical images. Cognitive information systems were defined on the basis of methods for the semantic analysis and interpretation of information - medical images - applied to cognitive meaning of medical images contained in analyzed data sets. Semantic analysis was proposed to analyzed the meaning of data. Meaning is included in information, for example in medical images. Medical image analysis will be presented and discussed as they are applied to various types of medical images, presented selected human organs, with different pathologies. Those images were analyzed using different classes of cognitive information systems. Cognitive information systems dedicated to medical image analysis was also defined for the decision supporting tasks. This process is very important for example in diagnostic and therapy processes, in the selection of semantic aspects/features, from analyzed data sets. Those features allow to create a new way of analysis.

  5. Variation, evolution, and correlation analysis of C+G content and genome or chromosome size in different kingdoms and phyla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiu-Qing; Du, Donglei

    2014-01-01

    C+G content (GC content or G+C content) is known to be correlated with genome/chromosome size in bacteria but the relationship for other kingdoms remains unclear. This study analyzed genome size, chromosome size, and base composition in most of the available sequenced genomes in various kingdoms. Genome size tends to increase during evolution in plants and animals, and the same is likely true for bacteria. The genomic C+G contents were found to vary greatly in microorganisms but were quite similar within each animal or plant subkingdom. In animals and plants, the C+G contents are ranked as follows: monocot plants>mammals>non-mammalian animals>dicot plants. The variation in C+G content between chromosomes within species is greater in animals than in plants. The correlation between average chromosome C+G content and chromosome length was found to be positive in Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria (but not in other analyzed bacterial phyla), Ascomycota fungi, and likely also in some plants; negative in some animals, insignificant in two protist phyla, and likely very weak in Archaea. Clearly, correlations between C+G content and chromosome size can be positive, negative, or not significant depending on the kingdoms/groups or species. Different phyla or species exhibit different patterns of correlation between chromosome-size and C+G content. Most chromosomes within a species have a similar pattern of variation in C+G content but outliers are common. The data presented in this study suggest that the C+G content is under genetic control by both trans- and cis- factors and that the correlation between C+G content and chromosome length can be positive, negative, or not significant in different phyla.

  6. Analysis of Galileo Style Geostationary Satellite Imaging: Image Reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    obtained using only baselines longer than 8 m does not sample the short spacial frequencies, and the image reconstruction is not able to recover the...the long spacial frequencies sampled in a shorter baseline overlap the short spacial frequencies sampled in a longer baseline. This technique will

  7. SAR Image Texture Analysis of Oil Spill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Long; Li, Ying; Liu, Yu

    Oil spills are seriously affecting the marine ecosystem and cause political and scientific concern since they have serious affect on fragile marine and coastal ecosystem. In order to implement an emergency in case of oil spills, it is necessary to monitor oil spill using remote sensing. Spaceborne SAR is considered a promising method to monitor oil spill, which causes attention from many researchers. However, research in SAR image texture analysis of oil spill is rarely reported. On 7 December 2007, a crane-carrying barge hit the Hong Kong-registered tanker "Hebei Spirit", which released an estimated 10,500 metric tons of crude oil into the sea. The texture features on this oil spill were acquired based on extracted GLCM (Grey Level Co-occurrence Matrix) by using SAR as data source. The affected area was extracted successfully after evaluating capabilities of different texture features to monitor the oil spill. The results revealed that the texture is an important feature for oil spill monitoring. Key words: oil spill, texture analysis, SAR

  8. Analysis of physical processes via imaging vectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volovodenko, V.; Efremova, N.; Efremov, V.

    2016-06-01

    Practically, all modeling processes in one way or another are random. The foremost formulated theoretical foundation embraces Markov processes, being represented in different forms. Markov processes are characterized as a random process that undergoes transitions from one state to another on a state space, whereas the probability distribution of the next state depends only on the current state and not on the sequence of events that preceded it. In the Markov processes the proposition (model) of the future by no means changes in the event of the expansion and/or strong information progression relative to preceding time. Basically, modeling physical fields involves process changing in time, i.e. non-stationay processes. In this case, the application of Laplace transformation provides unjustified description complications. Transition to other possibilities results in explicit simplification. The method of imaging vectors renders constructive mathematical models and necessary transition in the modeling process and analysis itself. The flexibility of the model itself using polynomial basis leads to the possible rapid transition of the mathematical model and further analysis acceleration. It should be noted that the mathematical description permits operator representation. Conversely, operator representation of the structures, algorithms and data processing procedures significantly improve the flexibility of the modeling process.

  9. Link Graph Analysis for Adult Images Classification

    CERN Document Server

    Kharitonov, Evgeny; Muchnik, Ilya; Romanenko, Fedor; Belyaev, Dmitry; Kotlyarov, Dmitry

    2010-01-01

    In order to protect an image search engine's users from undesirable results adult images' classifier should be built. The information about links from websites to images is employed to create such a classifier. These links are represented as a bipartite website-image graph. Each vertex is equipped with scores of adultness and decentness. The scores for image vertexes are initialized with zero, those for website vertexes are initialized according to a text-based website classifier. An iterative algorithm that propagates scores within a website-image graph is described. The scores obtained are used to classify images by choosing an appropriate threshold. The experiments on Internet-scale data have shown that the algorithm under consideration increases classification recall by 17% in comparison with a simple algorithm which classifies an image as adult if it is connected with at least one adult site (at the same precision level).

  10. Comprehensive analysis on 486 fetuses with abnormal chromosomal karyotypes%486例异常胎儿染色体核型综合分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵春荣

    2012-01-01

    目的:通过对产前彩超检查出的异常胎儿进行脐血染色体分析,了解胎儿异常与染色体异常的关系.方法:选择2006年1月~2010年1月在临沂市沂水中心医院产前检查的孕妇,行彩超检查出异常胎儿行引产或分娩,引产前或分娩后抽羊水和脐带血行染色体检查,在显微镜下观察染色体的结构和数量.共486例培养成功,记录染色体异常胎儿的发病时间.结果:486例异常胎儿共查出染色体异常65例,39例数目异常,26例结构异常.65例中21-三体占多数,胎儿染色体异常的发生率与孕妇年龄呈正相关.B超显示轻度畸形,染色体检查确认为21-三体.结论:随着孕妇年龄的增长,胎儿异常及胎儿染色体异常发生率逐渐增加.判定胎儿畸形与染色体异常是否有联系时,畸形的数量、类别、严重程度,胎儿能被超声检查出的时间是重要的参考依据.当临床上B超显示轻度畸形应采集脐血检查排除21-三体.%Objective: To understand the relationship between fetal abnormality and chromosomal abnormality by conducting chromosomal analysis of umbilical cord blood in abnormal fetuses found by prenatal ultrasonography. Methods: The pregnant women who received prenatal examination in the hospital from January 2006 to January 2010 were selected, then the abnormal fetuses detected by color ultrasonography underwent induced abortion or delivery, amniotic fluid samples and umbilical cord samples were obtained before induced abortion or after delivery for chromosomal examination, chromosomal structure and number were observed under microscope. A total of 486 cases were cultured successfully, the onset times of fetuses with chromosomal abnormality was recorded. Results; Among 486 abnormal fetuses, 65 fetuses were found with chromosomal abnormality, including 39 fetuses with chromosomal numerical abnormality and 26 fetuses with chromosomal structural abnormality. The fetuses with trisomy 21 were in the

  11. Dynamic chest image analysis: model-based pulmonary perfusion analysis with pyramid images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Jianming; Haapanen, Arto; Jaervi, Timo; Kiuru, Aaro J.; Kormano, Martti; Svedstrom, Erkki; Virkki, Raimo

    1998-07-01

    The aim of the study 'Dynamic Chest Image Analysis' is to develop computer analysis and visualization methods for showing focal and general abnormalities of lung ventilation and perfusion based on a sequence of digital chest fluoroscopy frames collected at different phases of the respiratory/cardiac cycles in a short period of time. We have proposed a framework for ventilation study with an explicit ventilation model based on pyramid images. In this paper, we extend the framework to pulmonary perfusion study. A perfusion model and the truncated pyramid are introduced. The perfusion model aims at extracting accurate, geographic perfusion parameters, and the truncated pyramid helps in understanding perfusion at multiple resolutions and speeding up the convergence process in optimization. Three cases are included to illustrate the experimental results.

  12. Similarity analysis between chromosomes of Homo sapiens and monkeys with correlation coefficient, rank correlation coefficient and cosine similarity measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Someswara Rao, Chinta; Viswanadha Raju, S

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we consider correlation coefficient, rank correlation coefficient and cosine similarity measures for evaluating similarity between Homo sapiens and monkeys. We used DNA chromosomes of genome wide genes to determine the correlation between the chromosomal content and evolutionary relationship. The similarity among the H. sapiens and monkeys is measured for a total of 210 chromosomes related to 10 species. The similarity measures of these different species show the relationship between the H. sapiens and monkey. This similarity will be helpful at theft identification, maternity identification, disease identification, etc.

  13. Principal component analysis of psoriasis lesions images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maletti, Gabriela Mariel; Ersbøll, Bjarne Kjær

    2003-01-01

    A set of RGB images of psoriasis lesions is used. By visual examination of these images, there seem to be no common pattern that could be used to find and align the lesions within and between sessions. It is expected that the principal components of the original images could be useful during future...

  14. Mesh Processing in Medical-Image Analysis-a Tutorial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levine, Joshua A.; Paulsen, Rasmus Reinhold; Zhang, Yongjie

    2012-01-01

    Medical-image analysis requires an understanding of sophisticated scanning modalities, constructing geometric models, building meshes to represent domains, and downstream biological applications. These four steps form an image-to-mesh pipeline. For research in this field to progress, the imaging...

  15. Subsurface offset behaviour in velocity analysis with extended reflectivity images

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder, W.A.

    2013-01-01

    Migration velocity analysis with the constant-density acoustic wave equation can be accomplished by the focusing of extended migration images, obtained by introducing a subsurface shift in the imaging condition. A reflector in a wrong velocity model will show up as a curve in the extended image. In

  16. Automatic quantitative analysis of cardiac MR perfusion images

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breeuwer, Marcel; Spreeuwers, Luuk; Quist, Marcel

    2001-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a powerful technique for imaging cardiovascular diseases. The introduction of cardiovascular MRI into clinical practice is however hampered by the lack of efficient and accurate image analysis methods. This paper focuses on the evaluation of blood perfusion in the

  17. Live imaging of X chromosome reactivation dynamics in early mouse development can discriminate naïve from primed pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Shin; Hosoi, Yusuke; Shiura, Hirosuke; Yamagata, Kazuo; Takahashi, Saori; Fujihara, Yoshitaka; Kohda, Takashi; Okabe, Masaru; Ishino, Fumitoshi

    2016-08-15

    Pluripotent stem cells can be classified into two distinct states, naïve and primed, which show different degrees of potency. One difficulty in stem cell research is the inability to distinguish these states in live cells. Studies on female mice have shown that reactivation of inactive X chromosomes occurs in the naïve state, while one of the X chromosomes is inactivated in the primed state. Therefore, we aimed to distinguish the two states by monitoring X chromosome reactivation. Thus far, X chromosome reactivation has been analysed using fixed cells; here, we inserted different fluorescent reporter gene cassettes (mCherry and eGFP) into each X chromosome. Using these knock-in 'Momiji' mice, we detected X chromosome reactivation accurately in live embryos, and confirmed that the pluripotent states of embryos were stable ex vivo, as represented by embryonic and epiblast stem cells in terms of X chromosome reactivation. Thus, Momiji mice provide a simple and accurate method for identifying stem cell status based on X chromosome reactivation.

  18. CMOS Image Sensor with On-Chip Image Compression: A Review and Performance Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milin Zhang

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Demand for high-resolution, low-power sensing devices with integrated image processing capabilities, especially compression capability, is increasing. CMOS technology enables the integration of image sensing and image processing, making it possible to improve the overall system performance. This paper reviews the current state of the art in CMOS image sensors featuring on-chip image compression. Firstly, typical sensing systems consisting of separate image-capturing unit and image-compression processing unit are reviewed, followed by systems that integrate focal-plane compression. The paper also provides a thorough review of a new design paradigm, in which image compression is performed during the image-capture phase prior to storage, referred to as compressive acquisition. High-performance sensor systems reported in recent years are also introduced. Performance analysis and comparison of the reported designs using different design paradigm are presented at the end.

  19. Image analysis for dental bone quality assessment using CBCT imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suprijanto; Epsilawati, L.; Hajarini, M. S.; Juliastuti, E.; Susanti, H.

    2016-03-01

    Cone beam computerized tomography (CBCT) is one of X-ray imaging modalities that are applied in dentistry. Its modality can visualize the oral region in 3D and in a high resolution. CBCT jaw image has potential information for the assessment of bone quality that often used for pre-operative implant planning. We propose comparison method based on normalized histogram (NH) on the region of inter-dental septum and premolar teeth. Furthermore, the NH characteristic from normal and abnormal bone condition are compared and analyzed. Four test parameters are proposed, i.e. the difference between teeth and bone average intensity (s), the ratio between bone and teeth average intensity (n) of NH, the difference between teeth and bone peak value (Δp) of NH, and the ratio between teeth and bone of NH range (r). The results showed that n, s, and Δp have potential to be the classification parameters of dental calcium density.

  20. Cluster analysis of European Y-chromosomal STR haplotypes using the discrete Laplace method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mikkel Meyer; Eriksen, Poul Svante; Morling, Niels

    2014-01-01

    method can be used for cluster analysis to further validate the discrete Laplace method. A very important practical fact is that the calculations can be performed on a normal computer. We identified two sub-clusters of the Eastern and Western European Y-STR haplotypes similar to results of previous...

  1. Meta-Analysis of Results from Quantitative Trait Loci Mapping Studies on Pig Chromosome 4

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moraes Silva, De K.M.; Bastiaansen, J.W.M.; Knol, E.F.; Merks, J.W.M.; Lopes, P.S.; Guimaraes, R.M.; Arendonk, van J.A.M.

    2011-01-01

    Meta-analysis of results from multiple studies could lead to more precise quantitative trait loci (QTL) position estimates compared to the individual experiments. As the raw data from many different studies are not readily available, the use of results from published articles may be helpful. In this

  2. The Chromosomes of Birds during Meiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pigozzi, María I

    2016-01-01

    The cytological analysis of meiotic chromosomes is an exceptional tool to approach complex processes such as synapsis and recombination during the division. Chromosome studies of meiosis have been especially valuable in birds, where naturally occurring mutants or experimental knock-out animals are not available to fully investigate the basic mechanisms of major meiotic events. This review highlights the main contributions of synaptonemal complex and lampbrush chromosome research to the current knowledge of avian meiosis, with special emphasis on the organization of chromosomes during prophase I, the impact of chromosome rearrangements during meiosis, and distinctive features of the ZW pair.

  3. Chromosome aberration analysis in persons exposed to low-level radiation from the JCO criticality accident in Tokai-mura.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, M S; Hayata, I; Kamada, N; Kodama, Y; Kodama, S

    2001-09-01

    Chromosome aberrations were studied in peripheral blood lymphocytes of 43 persons who were exposed to low-level radiation of mixed neutrons and gamma-rays resulting from the JCO criticality accident. When the age-adjusted frequencies of dicentric and ring chromosomes were compared with the dose calibration curve established in vitro for 60Co gamma-rays as a reference radiation, a significant correlation was observed between the chromosomally estimated doses and the documented doses evaluated by physical means. The regression coefficient of the chromosomal doses against the documented doses, 1.47 +/- 0.33, indicates that the relative biological effectiveness of fission neutrons at low doses is considerably higher than that currently adopted in the radiation protection standard.

  4. Introgression of tomato chromosomes into the potato genome: an analysis through molecular marker and in situ hybridisation techniques.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Calderé, F.G.

    1998-01-01

    Transfer of alien chromosomes and genes across intergeneric boundaries can be useful not only for the introgression of desirable characters but also for fundamental genetic studies. The successful demonstration of hybridisation of potato ( Solanum tuberosum ) and tomato ( Lycopersicon esculentum ) t

  5. The proximal chromosome 14q microdeletion syndrome: delineation of the phenotype using high resolution SNP oligonucleotide microarray analysis (SOMA) and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torgyekes, Edina; Shanske, Alan L; Anyane-Yeboa, Kwame; Nahum, Odelia; Pirzadeh, Sara; Blumfield, Einat; Jobanputra, Vaidehi; Warburton, Dorothy; Levy, Brynn

    2011-08-01

    We report on two patients with overlapping small interstitial deletions involving regions 14q12 to 14q13.1. Both children had severe developmental delay, failure to thrive, microcephaly, and distinctive facial features, including abnormal spacing of the eyes, epicanthal folds, sloping forehead, low-set ears, rounded eyebrows with triangular media aspect and outer tapering, depressed and broad nasal bridge, small mouth, a long philtrum, and a prominent Cupid's bow. Brain MRI of both children showed partial agenesis of the corpus callosum. Our first patient had bilateral hypoplastic optic nerves causing blindness, mild hearing impairment, sinus arrhythmia, abnormal temperature regulation, frequent apneic episodes, myoclonic jerks, and opisthotonus. Our second patient had a seizure disorder confirmed by EEG, sleep apnea, chronic interstitial lung disease, and several episodes of pneumonia and gastroenteritis. Cytogenetic analysis showed a normal karyotype in Patient 1 and a unique apparently balanced three-way translocation in Patient 2 involving chromosomes 4, 14, and 11. High resolution SNP Oligonucleotide Microarray Analysis (SOMA) revealed a deletion in the proximal region of chromosome 14q overlapping with the deletion of our first patient, and no copy number changes in chromosomes 4 and 11. Here, we review and compare published cases with a deletion involving the 14q12-22.1 chromosomal region in an effort to correlate phenotype and genotype. We also examine the underlying genomic architecture to identify the possible mechanism of the chromosomal abnormality. Our review found a patient with a mirror duplication of our first patient's deletion, confirming the existence of an underlying genomic structural instability in the region. © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  6. Technique of Hadamard transform microscope fluorescence image analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梅二文; 顾文芳; 曾晓斌; 陈观铨; 曾云鹗

    1995-01-01

    Hadamard transform spatial multiplexed imaging technique is combined with fluorescence microscope and an instrument of Hadamard transform microscope fluorescence image analysis is developed. Images acquired by this instrument can provide a lot of useful information simultaneously, including three-dimensional Hadamard transform microscope cell fluorescence image, the fluorescence intensity and fluorescence distribution of a cell, the background signal intensity and the signal/noise ratio, etc.

  7. Comparative analysis of chicken chromosome 28 provides new clues to the evolutionary fragility of gene-rich vertebrate regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Laurie; Yang, Shan; Tran-Gyamfi, Mary; Baggott, Dan; Christensen, Mari; Hamilton, Aaron; Crooijmans, Richard; Groenen, Martien; Lucas, Susan; Ovcharenko, Ivan; Stubbs, Lisa

    2007-11-01

    The chicken genome draft sequence has provided a valuable resource for studies of an important agricultural and experimental model species and an important data set for comparative analysis. However, some of the most gene-rich segments are missing from chicken genome draft assemblies, limiting the analysis of a substantial number of genes and preventing a closer look at regions that are especially prone to syntenic rearrangements. To facilitate the functional and evolutionary analysis of one especially gene-rich, rearrangement-prone genomic region, we analyzed sequence from BAC clones spanning chicken microchromosome GGA28; as a complement we also analyzed a gene-sparse, stable region from GGA11. In these two regions we documented the conservation and lineage-specific gain and loss of protein-coding genes and precisely mapped the locations of 31 major human-chicken syntenic breakpoints. Altogether, we identified 72 lineage-specific genes, many of which are found at or near syntenic breaks, implicating evolutionary breakpoint regions as major sites of genetic innovation and change. Twenty-two of the 31 breakpoint regions have been reused repeatedly as rearrangement breakpoints in vertebrate evolution. Compared with stable GC-matched regions, GGA28 is highly enriched in CpG islands, as are break-prone intervals identified elsewhere in the chicken genome; evolutionary breakpoints are further enriched in GC content and CpG islands, highlighting a potential role for these features in genome instability. These data support the hypothesis that chromosome rearrangements have not occurred randomly over the course of vertebrate evolution but are focused preferentially within "fragile" regions with unusual DNA sequence characteristics.

  8. A Comparative Analysis of B Chromosomes and Genetic Diversity in Maize (Zea mays L.) Landraces from Southwest China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAO Qi-lun; YANG Ke-cheng; PAN Guang-tang; RONG Ting-zhao

    2007-01-01

    The number of B chromosomes (Bs) in 54 maize landraces from Southwest China was tested by means of cytological observations. Nine landraces with Bs were observed. A map, showing the geographic distribution of the landraces with Bs, was plotted. It was found that southeastern Sichuan Province in China was the main distribution area of the landraces with Bs in Southwest China. In order to obtain information on relationships between Bs and genetic variation, genetic diversity both among and within 11 landraces was evaluated. For each SSR marker, the number of alleles ranged from 3 to 12 with an average of 7.86, which revealed a high level of genetic diversity among maize landraces in Southwest China.Based on SSRs data, higher genetic variation was found in the landraces with 2B, and the genetic distance between the landraces with and without Bs was higher. The results together with the principal component analysis (PCA) supported the hypothesis that maize landraces in Southwest China were first introduced to the middle part of southwest Sichuan, China. At the same time, the effect of Bs on genetic variation was discussed.

  9. The promoter analysis of the human C17orf25 gene, a novel chromosome 17p13.3 gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The human C17orf25 gene (Accession No. AF177342) is one of thirteen genes cloned from a regiondisplaying a high score of loss of heterozygosity within chromosome 17p13.3 in human hepatocellular car-cinoma in China[1]. To unveil the underlying mechanisms for the transcription regulation of this gene andunderstand its implication to the hepatocellular carcinogenesis, we looked into the relevant aspects by bothbioinformatic and experimental executions. We found: 1, The abundant expression of the C17orf25 genewas evident in all the cell lines and tissue samples tested, showing little hepatoma-selectivity; 2, Its tran-scription starts at a single site, locating at -60 from the translation initiation codon; 3, A 58 bp fragmentcontaining the transcription start, extending from -112 to -55, represents the minimal promoter; 4, Theconsensus sequence within this fragment recognized by SP1 contributes predominantly to the activity of theminimal promoter; 5, The bioinformatic analysis suggests that the C17orf25 gene may encode a protein inthe family of the glyoxalase. Our data has provided some deep insight into both function and regulation ofthe C17orf25 gene in the context of the normal liver and hepatocellular carcinoma.

  10. Molecular cloning, expression analysis and chromosomal mapping of salt-responsive cDNAs in rice ( Oryza sativa L.)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李子银; 张劲松; 陈受宜

    1999-01-01

    By using differential display PCR (DD-PCR) technique, two salt-inducible and one salt-repressed cDNA fragments were isolated from rice. The three eDNA fragments were characterized respectively as partial sequence of rice S-adenosylmethionine deearboxylase (SAMDC) gene, a new member of translation elongation factor 1A gene (named REF1A ), and a novel gene whose function is unknown (named SRG1). The full-length cDNA of SAMDC gene (named SAMDC1) was further isolated by RT-PCR approach and the deduced polypeptide was found to be homologous to SAMDC proteins of other plants, yeast and human. Northern hybridization revealed that expression of SAMDC1 and REF1A was induced, while SRG1 was dramatically repressed, by salinity stress. Southern blot analysis demonstrated that SAMDC1 and SRG1 were present as a single copy gene in rice genome, whereas rice REF1A gene was organized as a gene family. The REF1A, SAMDC1, and SRG1 genes were located on chromosome 3, 4, and 6 respectively by RFLP mapping approach using ZYQ

  11. Comparing seven mitogens with PHA-M for improved lymphocyte stimulation in dicentric chromosome analysis for biodosimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beinke, C; Port, M; Lamkowski, A; Abend, M

    2016-02-01

    Dicentric chromosome analysis (DCA) is the gold standard for individual radiation dose estimation. Two limiting factors of DCA are the time-consuming lymphocyte stimulation and proliferation using the lectin PHA-M and the upper dose limit of individual dose assessment of ∼4 Gy. By measuring the mitotic index (MI), the authors investigated systematically whether the stimulation of lymphocytes can be improved after administration of alternative (and combined) mitogens. The authors compared the lymphocyte stimulation effectiveness of the traditionally used PHA-M (from Phaseolus vulgaris) with seven cited mitogens by determination of MIs: five lectins namely CNA (concanavalin A), PW (pokeweed), LMA (Maackia amurensis), LTV (T. vulgaris), PHA-L (P. vulgaris) as well as LPS (lipopolysaccharide, Escherichia coli) and SLO (streptolysine O, Streptococcus pyogenes) were applied. The conventional protocol using PHA-M for lymphocyte stimulation proved to be superior over lower/higher PHA-M concentrations as well as seven other mitogens administered either alone or combined with SLO or LPS.

  12. Molecular analysis of chromosome 21 in a patient with a phenotype of down syndrome and apparently normal karyotype

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahlbom, B.E.; Wadelius, C.; Zech, L.; Anneren, G. [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden)] [and others

    1996-06-28

    Down syndrome (DS) is caused in most cases by the presence of an extra chromosome 21. It has been shown that the DS phenotype is produced by duplication of only a small part of the long arm of chromosome 21, the 21q22 region, including and distal to locus D21S55. We present molecular investigations on a woman with clinically typical DS but apparently normal chromosomes. Her parents were consanguineous and she had a sister with a DS phenotype, who died at the age of 15 days. Repeated cytogenetic investigations (G-banding and high resolution banding) on the patient and her parents showed apparently normal chromosomes. Autoradiographs of quantitative Southern blots of DNAs from the patient, her parents, trisomy 21 patients, and normal controls were analyzed after hybridization with unique DNA sequences regionally mapped on chromosome 21. Sequences D21S59, D21S1, D21S11, D21S8, D21S17, D21S55, ERG, D21S15, D21S112, and COL6A1 were all found in two copies. Fluorescent in situ hybridization with a chromosome 21-specific genomic library showed no abnormalities and only two copies of chromosome 21 were detected. Nineteen markers from the critical region studied with polymerase chain reaction amplification of di- and tetranucleotide repeats did not indicate any partial trisomy 21. From his study we conclude that the patient does not have any partial submicroscopic trisomy for any segment of chromosome 21. It seems reasonable to assume that she suffers from an autosomal recessive disorder which is phenotypically indistinguishable from DS. 23 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. Analysis of morphine responses in mice reveals a QTL on Chromosome 7 [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wim E. Crusio

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study we identified a quantitative trait locus (QTL on mouse Chromosome 7 associated with locomotor activity and rearing post morphine treatment. This QTL was revealed after correcting for the effects of another QTL peak on Chromosome 10 using composite interval mapping. The positional candidate genes are Syt9 and Ppfibp2. Several other genes within the interval are linked to neural processes, locomotor activity, and the defensive response to harmful stimuli.

  14. Analysis of morphine responses in mice reveals a QTL on Chromosome 7 [version 2; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wim E. Crusio

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In this study we identified a quantitative trait locus (QTL on mouse Chromosome 7 associated with locomotor activity and rearing post morphine treatment. This QTL was revealed after correcting for the effects of another QTL peak on Chromosome 10 using composite interval mapping. The positional candidate genes are Syt9 and Ppfibp2. Several other genes within the interval are linked to neural processes, locomotor activity, and the defensive response to harmful stimuli.

  15. Analysis of engineering drawings and raster map images

    CERN Document Server

    Henderson, Thomas C

    2013-01-01

    Presents up-to-date methods and algorithms for the automated analysis of engineering drawings and digital cartographic maps Discusses automatic engineering drawing and map analysis techniques Covers detailed accounts of the use of unsupervised segmentation algorithms to map images

  16. New approaches in intelligent image analysis techniques, methodologies and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Nakamatsu, Kazumi

    2016-01-01

    This book presents an Introduction and 11 independent chapters, which are devoted to various new approaches of intelligent image processing and analysis. The book also presents new methods, algorithms and applied systems for intelligent image processing, on the following basic topics: Methods for Hierarchical Image Decomposition; Intelligent Digital Signal Processing and Feature Extraction; Data Clustering and Visualization via Echo State Networks; Clustering of Natural Images in Automatic Image Annotation Systems; Control System for Remote Sensing Image Processing; Tissue Segmentation of MR Brain Images Sequence; Kidney Cysts Segmentation in CT Images; Audio Visual Attention Models in Mobile Robots Navigation; Local Adaptive Image Processing; Learning Techniques for Intelligent Access Control; Resolution Improvement in Acoustic Maps. Each chapter is self-contained with its own references. Some of the chapters are devoted to the theoretical aspects while the others are presenting the practical aspects and the...

  17. Recent Male-Mediated Gene Flow over a Linguistic Barrier in Iberia, Suggested by Analysis of a Y-Chromosomal DNA Polymorphism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurles, Matthew E.; Veitia, Reiner; Arroyo, Eduardo; Armenteros, Manuel; Bertranpetit, Jaume; Pérez-Lezaun, Anna; Bosch, Elena; Shlumukova, Maria; Cambon-Thomsen, Anne; McElreavey, Ken; López de Munain, Adolfo; Röhl, Arne; Wilson, Ian J.; Singh, Lalji; Pandya, Arpita; Santos, Fabrício R.; Tyler-Smith, Chris; Jobling, Mark A.

    1999-01-01

    Summary We have examined the worldwide distribution of a Y-chromosomal base-substitution polymorphism, the T/C transition at SRY-2627, where the T allele defines haplogroup 22; sequencing of primate homologues shows that the ancestral state cannot be determined unambiguously but is probably the C allele. Of 1,191 human Y chromosomes analyzed, 33 belong to haplogroup 22. Twenty-nine come from Iberia, and the highest frequencies are in Basques (11%; n=117) and Catalans (22%; n=32). Microsatellite and minisatellite (MSY1) diversity analysis shows that non-Iberian haplogroup-22 chromosomes are not significantly different from Iberian ones. The simplest interpretation of these data is that haplogroup 22 arose in Iberia and that non-Iberian cases reflect Iberian emigrants. Several different methods were used to date the origin of the polymorphism: microsatellite data gave ages of 1,650, 2,700, 3,100, or 3,450 years, and MSY1 gave ages of 1,000, 2,300, or 2,650 years, although 95% confidence intervals on all of these figures are wide. The age of the split between Basque and Catalan haplogroup-22 chromosomes was calculated as only 20% of the age of the lineage as a whole. This study thus provides evidence for direct or indirect gene flow over the substantial linguistic barrier between the Indo-European and non–Indo-European–speaking populations of the Catalans and the Basques, during the past few thousand years. PMID:10521311

  18. Slide Set: Reproducible image analysis and batch processing with ImageJ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanes, Benjamin A

    2015-11-01

    Most imaging studies in the biological sciences rely on analyses that are relatively simple. However, manual repetition of analysis tasks across multiple regions in many images can complicate even the simplest analysis, making record keeping difficult, increasing the potential for error, and limiting reproducibility. While fully automated solutions are necessary for very large data sets, they are sometimes impractical for the small- and medium-sized data sets common in biology. Here we present the Slide Set plugin for ImageJ, which provides a framework for reproducible image analysis and batch processing. Slide Set organizes data into tables, associating image files with regions of interest and other relevant information. Analysis commands are automatically repeated over each image in the data set, and multiple commands can be chained together for more complex analysis tasks. All analysis parameters are saved, ensuring transparency and reproducibility. Slide Set includes a variety of built-in analysis commands and can be easily extended to automate other ImageJ plugins, reducing the manual repetition of image analysis without the set-up effort or programming expertise required for a fully automated solution.

  19. CAPER 3.0: A Scalable Cloud-Based System for Data-Intensive Analysis of Chromosome-Centric Human Proteome Project Data Sets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shuai; Zhang, Xinlei; Diao, Lihong; Guo, Feifei; Wang, Dan; Liu, Zhongyang; Li, Honglei; Zheng, Junjie; Pan, Jingshan; Nice, Edouard C; Li, Dong; He, Fuchu

    2015-09-01

    The Chromosome-centric Human Proteome Project (C-HPP) aims to catalog genome-encoded proteins using a chromosome-by-chromosome strategy. As the C-HPP proceeds, the increasing requirement for data-intensive analysis of the MS/MS data poses a challenge to the proteomic community, especially small laboratories lacking computational infrastructure. To address this challenge, we have updated the previous CAPER browser into a higher version, CAPER 3.0, which is a scalable cloud-based system for data-intensive analysis of C-HPP data sets. CAPER 3.0 uses cloud computing technology to facilitate MS/MS-based peptide identification. In particular, it can use both public and private cloud, facilitating the analysis of C-HPP data sets. CAPER 3.0 provides a graphical user interface (GUI) to help users transfer data, configure jobs, track progress, and visualize the results comprehensively. These features enable users without programming expertise to easily conduct data-intensive analysis using CAPER 3.0. Here, we illustrate the usage of CAPER 3.0 with four specific mass spectral data-intensive problems: detecting novel peptides, identifying single amino acid variants (SAVs) derived from known missense mutations, identifying sample-specific SAVs, and identifying exon-skipping events. CAPER 3.0 is available at http://prodigy.bprc.ac.cn/caper3.

  20. Multi-spectral Image Analysis for Astaxanthin Coating Classification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ljungqvist, Martin Georg; Ersbøll, Bjarne Kjær; Nielsen, Michael Engelbrecht

    2011-01-01

    Industrial quality inspection using image analysis on astaxanthin coating in aquaculture feed pellets is of great importance for automatic production control. In this study multi-spectral image analysis of pellets was performed using LDA, QDA, SNV and PCA on pixel level and mean value of pixels f...

  1. Geographic Object-Based Image Analysis: Towards a new paradigm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blaschke, T.; Hay, G.J.; Kelly, M.; Lang, S.; Hofmann, P.; Addink, E.A.; Queiroz Feitosa, R.; van der Meer, F.D.; van der Werff, H.M.A.; van Coillie, F.; Tiede, A.

    2014-01-01

    The amount of scientific literature on (Geographic) Object-based Image Analysis – GEOBIA has been and still is sharply increasing. These approaches to analysing imagery have antecedents in earlier research on image segmentation and use GIS-like spatial analysis within classification and feature extr

  2. Facial Image Analysis Based on Local Binary Patterns: A Survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huang, D.; Shan, C.; Ardebilian, M.; Chen, L.

    2011-01-01

    Facial image analysis, including face detection, face recognition,facial expression analysis, facial demographic classification, and so on, is an important and interesting research topic in the computervision and image processing area, which has many important applications such as human-computer

  3. IMAGE ANALYSIS FOR MODELLING SHEAR BEHAVIOUR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe Lopez

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Through laboratory research performed over the past ten years, many of the critical links between fracture characteristics and hydromechanical and mechanical behaviour have been made for individual fractures. One of the remaining challenges at the laboratory scale is to directly link fracture morphology of shear behaviour with changes in stress and shear direction. A series of laboratory experiments were performed on cement mortar replicas of a granite sample with a natural fracture perpendicular to the axis of the core. Results show that there is a strong relationship between the fracture's geometry and its mechanical behaviour under shear stress and the resulting damage. Image analysis, geostatistical, stereological and directional data techniques are applied in combination to experimental data. The results highlight the role of geometric characteristics of the fracture surfaces (surface roughness, size, shape, locations and orientations of asperities to be damaged in shear behaviour. A notable improvement in shear understanding is that shear behaviour is controlled by the apparent dip in the shear direction of elementary facets forming the fracture.

  4. Hierarchical manifold learning for regional image analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, Kanwal K; Rao, Anil; Price, Anthony N; Wolz, Robin; Hajnal, Joseph V; Rueckert, Daniel

    2014-02-01

    We present a novel method of hierarchical manifold learning which aims to automatically discover regional properties of image datasets. While traditional manifold learning methods have become widely used for dimensionality reduction in medical imaging, they suffer from only being able to consider whole images as single data points. We extend conventional techniques by additionally examining local variations, in order to produce spatially-varying manifold embeddings that characterize a given dataset. This involves constructing manifolds in a hierarchy of image patches of increasing granularity, while ensuring consistency between hierarchy levels. We demonstrate the utility of our method in two very different settings: 1) to learn the regional correlations in motion within a sequence of time-resolved MR images of the thoracic cavity; 2) to find discriminative regions of 3-D brain MR images associated with neurodegenerative disease.

  5. Digital image processing and analysis for activated sludge wastewater treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Muhammad Burhan; Lee, Xue Yong; Nisar, Humaira; Ng, Choon Aun; Yeap, Kim Ho; Malik, Aamir Saeed

    2015-01-01

    Activated sludge system is generally used in wastewater treatment plants for processing domestic influent. Conventionally the activated sludge wastewater treatment is monitored by measuring physico-chemical parameters like total suspended solids (TSSol), sludge volume index (SVI) and chemical oxygen demand (COD) etc. For the measurement, tests are conducted in the laboratory, which take many hours to give the final measurement. Digital image processing and analysis offers a better alternative not only to monitor and characterize the current state of activated sludge but also to predict the future state. The characterization by image processing and analysis is done by correlating the time evolution of parameters extracted by image analysis of floc and filaments with the physico-chemical parameters. This chapter briefly reviews the activated sludge wastewater treatment; and, procedures of image acquisition, preprocessing, segmentation and analysis in the specific context of activated sludge wastewater treatment. In the latter part additional procedures like z-stacking, image stitching are introduced for wastewater image preprocessing, which are not previously used in the context of activated sludge. Different preprocessing and segmentation techniques are proposed, along with the survey of imaging procedures reported in the literature. Finally the image analysis based morphological parameters and correlation of the parameters with regard to monitoring and prediction of activated sludge are discussed. Hence it is observed that image analysis can play a very useful role in the monitoring of activated sludge wastewater treatment plants.

  6. Some developments in multivariate image analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kucheryavskiy, Sergey

    and classification. MIA considers all image pixels as objects and their color values (or spectrum in the case of hyperspectral images) as variables. So it gives data matrices with hundreds of thousands samples in the case of laboratory scale images and even more for aerial photos, where the number of pixels could...... subspace have been considered in respect to MIA purposes. First of all, Robust PCA has been applied to several images with and without outliers. Being proposed as a method to deal with high-dimensional data, it suits the needs of MIA very well. Also several non-linear methods have been tried, including...

  7. Multimodal digital color imaging system for facial skin lesion analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Youngwoo; Lee, Youn-Heum; Jung, Byungjo

    2008-02-01

    In dermatology, various digital imaging modalities have been used as an important tool to quantitatively evaluate the treatment effect of skin lesions. Cross-polarization color image was used to evaluate skin chromophores (melanin and hemoglobin) information and parallel-polarization image to evaluate skin texture information. In addition, UV-A induced fluorescent image has been widely used to evaluate various skin conditions such as sebum, keratosis, sun damages, and vitiligo. In order to maximize the evaluation efficacy of various skin lesions, it is necessary to integrate various imaging modalities into an imaging system. In this study, we propose a multimodal digital color imaging system, which provides four different digital color images of standard color image, parallel and cross-polarization color image, and UV-A induced fluorescent color image. Herein, we describe the imaging system and present the examples of image analysis. By analyzing the color information and morphological features of facial skin lesions, we are able to comparably and simultaneously evaluate various skin lesions. In conclusion, we are sure that the multimodal color imaging system can be utilized as an important assistant tool in dermatology.

  8. Development of a two-parameter slit-scan flow cytometer for screening of normal and aberrant chromosomes: application to a karyotype of Sus scrofa domestica (pig)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hausmann, Michael; Doelle, Juergen; Arnold, Armin; Stepanow, Boris; Wickert, Burkhard; Boscher, Jeannine; Popescu, Paul C.; Cremer, Christoph

    1992-07-01

    Laser fluorescence activated slit-scan flow cytometry offers an approach to a fast, quantitative characterization of chromosomes due to morphological features. It can be applied for screening of chromosomal abnormalities. We give a preliminary report on the development of the Heidelberg slit-scan flow cytometer. Time-resolved measurement of the fluorescence intensity along the chromosome axis can be registered simultaneously for two parameters when the chromosome axis can be registered simultaneously for two parameters when the chromosome passes perpendicularly through a narrowly focused laser beam combined by a detection slit in the image plane. So far automated data analysis has been performed off-line on a PC. In its final performance, the Heidelberg slit-scan flow cytometer will achieve on-line data analysis that allows an electro-acoustical sorting of chromosomes of interest. Interest is high in the agriculture field to study chromosome aberrations that influence the size of litters in pig (Sus scrofa domestica) breeding. Slit-scan measurements have been performed to characterize chromosomes of pigs; we present results for chromosome 1 and a translocation chromosome 6/15.

  9. Cloning, chromosomal localization, SNP detection and association analysis of the porcine IRS-1 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, P-X; Huang, Z; Li, C-C; Fan, B; Li, K; Liu, B; Yu, M; Zhao, S-H

    2009-11-01

    Insulin receptor substrate-1(IRS-1) gene is one member of the Insulin receptor substrate (IRS) gene family, which plays an important role in mediating the growth of skeletal muscle and the molecular metabolism of type 2 diabetes. Here, we cloned a 3,573 bp fragment of the partial CDS sequence of porcine IRS-1 gene by in silicon cloning strategy and RT-PCR method. The porcine IRS-1 gene was assigned to SSC15q25 by using IMpRH. Sequencing of PCR products from Duroc and Tibetan pig breeds identified one SNP in exon 1 of porcine IRS-1 gene (C3257A polymorphisms). Association analysis of genotypes with the growth traits, anatomy traits, meat quality traits and physiological biochemical indexes traits showed that different genotypes at locus 3,257 of IRS-1 have significant differences in carcass straight length in pigs (P = 0.0102 \\ 0.05).

  10. Porcine gamma-synuclein: molecular cloning, expression analysis, chromosomal localization and functional expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Pernille Munk; Madsen, Lone Bruhn; Bendixen, Christian

    2009-01-01

    which shows a high similarity to bovine (90%), human (87%) and mouse (83%) γ-synuclein. A genomic clone containing the entire porcine SNCG gene was isolated and its genomic organization determined. The gene is composed of five exons, the general structure being observed to be very similar...... reports the cloning and characterization of the porcine (Sus scrofa) γ-synuclein cDNA (SNCG). The SNCG cDNA was amplified by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) using oligonucleotide primers derived from in silico sequences. The porcine SNCG cDNA codes for a protein of 126 amino acids...... to that of the human SNCG gene. Expression analysis by quantitative real-time RT-PCR revealed the presence of SNCG transcripts in all examined organs and tissues. Differential expression was observed, with very high levels of SNCG mRNA in fat tissue and high expression levels in spleen, cerebellum, frontal cortex...

  11. PIZZARO: Forensic analysis and restoration of image and video data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamenicky, Jan; Bartos, Michal; Flusser, Jan; Mahdian, Babak; Kotera, Jan; Novozamsky, Adam; Saic, Stanislav; Sroubek, Filip; Sorel, Michal; Zita, Ales; Zitova, Barbara; Sima, Zdenek; Svarc, Petr; Horinek, Jan

    2016-07-01

    This paper introduces a set of methods for image and video forensic analysis. They were designed to help to assess image and video credibility and origin and to restore and increase image quality by diminishing unwanted blur, noise, and other possible artifacts. The motivation came from the best practices used in the criminal investigation utilizing images and/or videos. The determination of the image source, the verification of the image content, and image restoration were identified as the most important issues of which automation can facilitate criminalists work. Novel theoretical results complemented with existing approaches (LCD re-capture detection and denoising) were implemented in the PIZZARO software tool, which consists of the image processing functionality as well as of reporting and archiving functions to ensure the repeatability of image analysis procedures and thus fulfills formal aspects of the image/video analysis work. Comparison of new proposed methods with the state of the art approaches is shown. Real use cases are presented, which illustrate the functionality of the developed methods and demonstrate their applicability in different situations. The use cases as well as the method design were solved in tight cooperation of scientists from the Institute of Criminalistics, National Drug Headquarters of the Criminal Police and Investigation Service of the Police of the Czech Republic, and image processing experts from the Czech Academy of Sciences.

  12. 2068例胎儿染色体产前诊断结果分析%Analysis on prenatal diagnostic results of chromosome karyotypes in 2 068 fetuses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王岳平; 姜卫华; 郝明革; 任彦; 李诗强; 齐漫龙

    2009-01-01

    To explore the incidence of chromosomal diseases in fetuses by analyzing chromosome karyotypes on the high risk population of chromosomal diseases. Methods: 2 068 pregnant women with high risk of chromosomal diseases in their fetuses un-derwent amniocentesis or percutaneous umbilical blood sampling from September 2003 to September 2008, then karyotypes of their fetuses were analysed. Results: 68 fetuses were found chromosome abnormalities, the rate was 3.29%, including 44 fetuses of numerical abnor-mality and 19 fetuses of structural abnormality. Conclusion: Chromosomal karyotypos analysis on high risk population in the mid trimester of pregnancy is an important prenatal diagnosis method. Serum screening, B ultrasound screening and advanced maternal age are important measures to find fetus with chromosomal diseases.%目的:通过对妊娠中期染色体病高危胎儿进行染色体核型分析,对染色体病所致的畸形儿进行产前诊断,探讨胎儿染色体病的发生情况.方法:对2003年9月~2008年9月中国医科大学附属盛京医院2 068例染色体病高危孕妇进行羊膜腔穿刺或胎儿脐静脉穿刺,采取细胞培养,制备中期染色体,分析胎儿核型,进行产前诊断.结果:在2 068例胎儿染色体核型中,发现染色体异常68例,异常率为3.29%,其中数目异常41例,结构异常27例.结论:妊娠中期对染色体病高危胎儿进行羊水或脐血染色体核型分析是产前诊断的重要方法,孕母血清筛查、B超检查并结合孕妇高龄等是发现染色体病胎儿的重要措施.

  13. Chromosome karyotype analysis of 3 901 cases and its clinical significance%3901例外周血染色体分析及临床意义

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王翔; 李旭; 陈葳; 杨文方; 赵明刚

    2012-01-01

    To study the abnormal detection of chromosome and the relationship between abnormal karyotype of chromosome and diseases. Methods A total of 3 901 peripheral blood samples were enrolled. Karyotype was analyzed by chromosome cultivation, G-banding in all cases and C -banding or FISH in some cases if necessary. Results There were 484 cases of abnormal karyotypes with the rate of 12.41% , among which 293 cases were males and 191 cases were females. Among cases of abnormal karyotypes, 179 cases were abnormal karyotypes of euchromosome ( 4. 59% ), 168 were abnormal karyptypes of sex chromosome ( 4. 31% ) and 137 with chromosome polymorphism ( 3.51% ). Eleven cases of balanced chromosomal translocation were identified as the first reported karyotypes in the world by State Key Laboratory of Medical Genetics. A significant association between the kinds of abnormal karyotype and clinical manifestations was found ( r = 0. 013 , P = 0. 000 ). Conclusion It is important and necessary to make chromosomal analysis for patients with abnormal pregnancy history, mental retardation and disorder of sex development.%目的 研究染色体异常检出的情况及其与疾病的关系.方法 对3 901例待检者抽取外周血,采用染色体培养、G显带、C显带,必要时行荧光原位杂交技术进行核心分析.结果 3 901例受检者中共检出染色体异常核型484例,异常检出率为12.41%,异常核型中男性293例,女性191例;异常核型中常染色体异常179例,占受检者的4.59%;性染色体异常168例,占4.31%,多态性137例,占3.51%.平衡易位核型中11例为世界首报.染色体异常检出类型与临床表现有显著性相关(r=0.013,P=0.000).结论 对不良孕产史、智力低下、性分化异常的患者进行染色体核型分析具有重要的临床意义.

  14. A linear mixture analysis-based compression for hyperspectral image analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. I. Chang; I. W. Ginsberg

    2000-06-30

    In this paper, the authors present a fully constrained least squares linear spectral mixture analysis-based compression technique for hyperspectral image analysis, particularly, target detection and classification. Unlike most compression techniques that directly deal with image gray levels, the proposed compression approach generates the abundance fractional images of potential targets present in an image scene and then encodes these fractional images so as to achieve data compression. Since the vital information used for image analysis is generally preserved and retained in the abundance fractional images, the loss of information may have very little impact on image analysis. In some occasions, it even improves analysis performance. Airborne visible infrared imaging spectrometer (AVIRIS) data experiments demonstrate that it can effectively detect and classify targets while achieving very high compression ratios.

  15. Chromosomal patterns in human malignant astrocytomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey, J A; Bello, M J; de Campos, J M; Kusak, M E; Ramos, C; Benitez, J

    1987-12-01

    Cytogenetic analysis by direct and/or in vitro preparations was performed on 34 malignant astrocytomas. Thirty tumors showed near-diploid chromosome numbers, whereas, tritetraploid chromosome complements were present in four tumors. The most frequent chromosomal changes implied numerical deviations by a gain of chromosomes #7, #19, and #20, and by losses of #10, #22, and Y. Structural rearrangements were present in stem- or side lines of 24 tumors. Although no common chromosomal rearrangement seems to exist among those tumors, chromosomes #1, #6, #7, and #9 were predominantly involved. Polysomy and structural rearrangements of chromosome #7 could be related to the overexpression of epidermal growth factor gene, previously observed in some malignant gliomas.

  16. Chromosome X aneuploidy in Brazilian schizophrenic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Moraes, Leopoldo Silva; Khayat, André Salim; de Lima, Patrícia Danielle Lima; Lima, Eleonidas Moura; Pinto, Giovanny Rebouças; Leal, Mariana Ferreira; de Arruda Cardoso Smith, Marília; Burbano, Rommel Rodríguez

    2010-01-01

    The identification of cytogenetic abnormalities in schizophrenic patients may provide clues to the genes involved in this disease. For this reason, a chromosomal analysis of samples from 62 schizophrenics and 70 controls was performed with trypsin-Giemsa banding and fluorescence in situ hybridization of the X chromosome. A clonal pericentric inversion on chromosome 9 was detected in one male patient, and we also discovered mosaicism associated with X chromosome aneuploidy in female patients, primarily detected in schizophrenic and normal female controls over 40 years old. When compared with age-matched female controls, the frequency of X chromosome loss was not significantly different between schizophrenics and controls, except for the 40- to 49-year-old age group. Our findings suggest that the X chromosome loss seen in schizophrenic patients is inherent to the normal cellular aging process. However, our data also suggest that X chromosome gain may be correlated with schizophrenia in this Brazilian population.

  17. Whole-slide imaging and automated image analysis: considerations and opportunities in the practice of pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, J D; Dunstan, R W

    2014-01-01

    Digital pathology, the practice of pathology using digitized images of pathologic specimens, has been transformed in recent years by the development of whole-slide imaging systems, which allow for the evaluation and interpretation of digital images of entire histologic sections. Applications of whole-slide imaging include rapid transmission of pathologic data for consultations and collaborations, standardization and distribution of pathologic materials for education, tissue specimen archiving, and image analysis of histologic specimens. Histologic image analysis allows for the acquisition of objective measurements of histomorphologic, histochemical, and immunohistochemical properties of tissue sections, increasing both the quantity and quality of data obtained from histologic assessments. Currently, numerous histologic image analysis software solutions are commercially available. Choosing the appropriate solution is dependent on considerations of the investigative question, computer programming and image analysis expertise, and cost. However, all studies using histologic image analysis require careful consideration of preanalytical variables, such as tissue collection, fixation, and processing, and experimental design, including sample selection, controls, reference standards, and the variables being measured. The fields of digital pathology and histologic image analysis are continuing to evolve, and their potential impact on pathology is still growing. These methodologies will increasingly transform the practice of pathology, allowing it to mature toward a quantitative science. However, this maturation requires pathologists to be at the forefront of the process, ensuring their appropriate application and the validity of their results. Therefore, histologic image analysis and the field of pathology should co-evolve, creating a symbiotic relationship that results in high-quality reproducible, objective data.

  18. Genetic analysis of 19 X chromosome STR loci for forensic purposes in four Chinese ethnic groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xingyi; Zhang, Xiaofang; Zhu, Junyong; Chen, Linli; Liu, Changhui; Feng, Xingling; Chen, Ling; Wang, Huijun; Liu, Chao

    2017-02-17

    A new 19 X- short tandem repeat (STR) multiplex PCR system has recently been developed, though its applicability in forensic studies has not been thoroughly assessed. In this study, 932 unrelated individuals from four Chinese ethnic groups (Han, Tibet, Uighur and Hui) were successfully genotyped using this new multiplex PCR system. Our results showed significant linkage disequilibrium between markers DXS10103 and DXS10101 in all four ethnic groups; markers DXS10159 and DXS10162, DXS6809 and DXS6789, and HPRTB and DXS10101 in Tibetan populations; and markers DXS10074 and DXS10075 in Uighur populations. The combined powers of discrimination in males and females were calculated according to haplotype frequencies from allele distributions rather than haplotype counts in the relevant population and were high in four ethnic groups. The cumulative powers of discrimination of the tested X-STR loci were 1.000000000000000 and 0.999999999997940 in females and males, respectively. All 19 X-STR loci are highly polymorphic. The highest Reynolds genetic distances were observed for the Tibet-Uighur pairwise comparisons. This study represents an extensive report on X-STR marker variation in minor Chinese populations and a comprehensive analysis of the diversity of these 19 X STR markers in four Chinese ethnic groups.

  19. White matter microstructural abnormalities in girls with chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome, Fragile X or Turner syndrome as evidenced by diffusion tensor imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villalon, Julio; Jahanshad, Neda; Beaton, Elliott; Toga, Arthur W.; Thompson, Paul M.; Simon, Tony J.

    2014-01-01

    Children with chromosome 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome (22q11.2DS), Fragile X Syndrome (FXS), or Turner Syndrome (TS) are considered to belong to distinct genetic groups, as each disorder is caused by separate genetic alterations. Even so, they have similar cognitive and behavioral dysfunctions, particularly in visuospatial and numerical abilities. To assess evidence for common underlying neural microstructural alterations, we set out to determine whether these groups have partially overlapping white matter abnormalities, relative to typically developing controls. We scanned 101 female children between 7 and 14 years old: 25 with 22q11.2DS, 18 with FXS, 17 with TS, and 41 aged-matched controls using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). Anisotropy and diffusivity measures were calculated and all brain scans were nonlinearly aligned to population and site-specific templates. We performed voxel-based statistical comparisons of the DTI-derived metrics between each disease group and the controls, while adjusting for age. Girls with 22q11.2DS showed lower fractional anisotropy (FA) than controls in the association fibers of the superior and inferior longitudinal fasciculi, the splenium of the corpus callosum, and the corticospinal tract. FA was abnormally lower in girls with FXS in the posterior limbs of the internal capsule, posterior thalami, and precentral gyrus. Girls with TS had lower FA in the inferior longitudinal fasciculus, right internal capsule and left cerebellar peduncle. Partially overlapping neurodevelopmental anomalies were detected in all three neurogenetic disorders. Altered white matter integrity in the superior and inferior longitudinal fasciculi and thalamic to frontal tracts may contribute to the behavioral characteristics of all of these disorders. PMID:23602925

  20. Dynamic Chest Image Analysis: Evaluation of Model-Based Pulmonary Perfusion Analysis With Pyramid Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    Address(es) US Army Research, Development & Standardization Group (UK) PSC 802 Box 15 FPO AE 09499-1500 Sponsor/Monitor’s Acronym(s) Sponsor...6G O D 2 O P " GH I KJML E8 O D 83O P " (8) This naturally implies that as long as O D 2 O P KJ...A method for the solution of certain problems in least squares. Quart. Appl. Math ., 2:164–168, 1944. [8] J. Liang. Dynamic Chest Image Analysis. Turku

  1. Adaptive Local Image Registration: Analysis on Filter Size

    OpenAIRE

    Vishnukumar S; M.Wilscy

    2012-01-01

    Adaptive Local Image Registration is a Local Image Registration based on an Adaptive Filtering frame work. A filter of appropriate size convolves with reference image and gives the pixel values corresponding to the distorted image and the filter is updated in each stage of the convolution. When the filter converges to the system model, it provides the registered image. The filter size plays an important role in this method. The analysis on the filter size is done using Peak Signal-to-Noise Ra...

  2. Microdissection and chromosome painting of X and B chromosomes in Locusta migratoria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teruel, María; Cabrero, Josefa; Montiel, Eugenia E; Acosta, Manuel J; Sánchez, Antonio; Camacho, Juan Pedro M

    2009-01-01

    Acquisition of knowledge of the nature and DNA content of B chromosomes has been triggered by a collection of molecular techniques, one of which, microdissection, has provided interesting results in a number of B chromosome systems. Here we provide the first data on the molecular composition of B chromosomes in Locusta migratoria, after microdissection of the B and X chromosomes, DNA amplification by one (B) or two (X) different methods, and chromosome painting. The results showed that B chromosomes share at least two types of repetitive DNA sequences with the A chromosomes, suggesting that Bs in this species most likely arose intraspecifically. One of these repetitive DNAs is located on the heterochromatic distal half of the B chromosome and in the pericentromeric regions of about half of the A chromosomes, including the X. The other type of repetitive DNA is located interspersedly over the non-centromeric euchromatic regions of all A chromosomes and in an interstitial part of the proximal euchromatic half of the B chromosome. Chromosome painting, however, did not provide results sufficiently reliable to determine, in this species, which A chromosome gave rise to the B; this might be done by detailed analysis of the microdissected DNA sequences.

  3. The human glia maturation factor-gamma gene: genomic structure and mutation analysis in gliomas with chromosome 19q loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, N; Smith, J S; Tachibana, I; Lee, H K; Pohl, U; Portier, B P; Louis, D N; Jenkins, R B

    1999-09-01

    Human glia maturation factor-gamma (hGMF-gamma) is a recently identified gene that may be involved in glial differentiation, neural regeneration, and inhibition of tumor cell proliferation. The gene maps to the long arm of chromosome 19 at band q13.2, a region that is frequently deleted in human malignant gliomas and is thus suspected to harbor a glioma tumor suppressor gene. Given the putative role of hGMF-gamma in cell differentiation and proliferation and its localization to chromosome 19q13, this gene is an interesting candidate for the chromosome 19q glioma tumor suppressor gene. To evaluate this possibility, we determined the genomic structure of human hGMF-gamma and performed mutation screening in a series of 41 gliomas with and without allelic loss of chromosome 19q. Mutations were not detected, which suggests that hGMF-gamma is not the chromosome 19q glioma suppressor gene. However, the elucidation of the genomic structure of hGMF-gamma may prove useful in future investigations of hGMF-gamma in the normal adult and developing human nervous system.

  4. Image analysis benchmarking methods for high-content screen design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, C J; Straight, A F

    2010-05-01

    The recent development of complex chemical and small interfering RNA (siRNA) collections has enabled large-scale cell-based phenotypic screening. High-content and high-throughput imaging are widely used methods to record phenotypic data after chemical and small interfering RNA treatment, and numerous image processing and analysis methods have been used to quantify these phenotypes. Currently, there are no standardized methods for evaluating the effectiveness of new and existing image processing and analysis tools for an arbitrary screening problem. We generated a series of benchmarking images that represent commonly encountered variation in high-throughput screening data and used these image standards to evaluate the robustness of five different image analysis methods to changes in signal-to-noise ratio, focal plane, cell density and phenotype strength. The analysis methods that were most reliable, in the presence of experimental variation, required few cells to accurately distinguish phenotypic changes between control and experimental data sets. We conclude that by applying these simple benchmarking principles an a priori estimate of the image acquisition requirements for phenotypic analysis can be made before initiating an image-based screen. Application of this benchmarking methodology provides a mechanism to significantly reduce data acquisition and analysis burdens and to improve data quality and information content.

  5. Functional Analysis of the Coronary Heart Disease Risk Locus on Chromosome 21q22

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine E. Beaney

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The coronary heart disease (CHD risk locus on 21q22 (lead SNP rs9982601 lies within a “gene desert.” The aim of this study was to assess if this locus is associated with CHD risk factors and to identify the functional variant(s and gene(s involved. Methods. A phenome scan was performed with UCLEB Consortium data. Allele-specific protein binding was studied using electrophoretic mobility shift assays. Dual-reporter luciferase assays were used to assess the impact of genetic variation on expression. Expression quantitative trait analysis was performed with Advanced Study of Aortic Pathology (ASAP and Genotype-Tissue Expression (GTEx consortium data. Results. A suggestive association between QT interval and the locus was observed (rs9982601  p=0.04. One variant at the locus, rs28451064, showed allele-specific protein binding and its minor allele showed 12% higher luciferase expression (p = 4.82 × 10−3 compared to the common allele. The minor allele of rs9982601 was associated with higher expression of the closest upstream genes (SLC5A3 1.30-fold increase p = 3.98 × 10−5; MRPS6 1.15-fold increase p = 9.60 × 10−4 in aortic intima media in ASAP. Both rs9982601 and rs28451064 showed a suggestive association with MRPS6 expression in relevant tissues in the GTEx data. Conclusions. A candidate functional variant, rs28451064, was identified. Future work should focus on identifying the pathway(s involved.

  6. Multivariate image analysis for quality inspection in fish feed production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ljungqvist, Martin Georg

    , or synthesised chemically. Common for both types is that they are relatively expensive in comparison to the other feed ingredients. This thesis investigates multi-variate data collection for visual inspection and optimisation of industrial production in the fish feed industry. Quality parameters focused on here...... are: pellet size, type and concentration level of astaxanthin in pellet coating, as well as astaxanthin type detected in salmonid fish. Methods used are three different devices for multi- and hyper-spectral imaging, together with shape analysis and multi-variate statistical analysis. The results...... of the work demonstrate a high potential of image analysis and spectral imaging for assessing the product quality of fish feed pellets, astaxanthin and fish meat. We show how image analysis can be used to inspect the pellet size, and how spectral imaging can be used to inspect the surface quality...

  7. Quantitative methods for the analysis of electron microscope images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skands, Peter Ulrik Vallø

    1996-01-01

    The topic of this thesis is an general introduction to quantitative methods for the analysis of digital microscope images. The images presented are primarily been acquired from Scanning Electron Microscopes (SEM) and interfermeter microscopes (IFM). The topic is approached though several examples...... foundation of the thesis fall in the areas of: 1) Mathematical Morphology; 2) Distance transforms and applications; and 3) Fractal geometry. Image analysis opens in general the possibility of a quantitative and statistical well founded measurement of digital microscope images. Herein lies also the conditions...

  8. Theoretical analysis of radiographic images by nonstationary Poisson processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, K.; Uchida, S. (Gifu Univ. (Japan)); Yamada, I.

    1980-12-01

    This paper deals with the noise analysis of radiographic images obtained in the usual fluorescent screen-film system. The theory of nonstationary Poisson processes is applied to the analysis of the radiographic images containing the object information. The ensemble averages, the autocorrelation functions, and the Wiener spectrum densities of the light-energy distribution at the fluorescent screen and of the film optical-density distribution are obtained. The detection characteristics of the system are evaluated theoretically. Numerical examples one-dimensional image are shown and the results are compared with those obtained under the assumption that the object image is related to the background noise by the additive process.

  9. Theoretical Analysis of Radiographic Images by Nonstationary Poisson Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Kazuo; Yamada, Isao; Uchida, Suguru

    1980-12-01

    This paper deals with the noise analysis of radiographic images obtained in the usual fluorescent screen-film system. The theory of nonstationary Poisson processes is applied to the analysis of the radiographic images containing the object information. The ensemble averages, the autocorrelation functions, and the Wiener spectrum densities of the light-energy distribution at the fluorescent screen and of the film optical-density distribution are obtained. The detection characteristics of the system are evaluated theoretically. Numerical examples of the one-dimensional image are shown and the results are compared with those obtained under the assumption that the object image is related to the background noise by the additive process.

  10. Digital image processing and analysis human and computer vision applications with CVIPtools

    CERN Document Server

    Umbaugh, Scott E

    2010-01-01

    Section I Introduction to Digital Image Processing and AnalysisDigital Image Processing and AnalysisOverviewImage Analysis and Computer VisionImage Processing and Human VisionKey PointsExercisesReferencesFurther ReadingComputer Imaging SystemsImaging Systems OverviewImage Formation and SensingCVIPtools SoftwareImage RepresentationKey PointsExercisesSupplementary ExercisesReferencesFurther ReadingSection II Digital Image Analysis and Computer VisionIntroduction to Digital Image AnalysisIntroductionPreprocessingBinary Image AnalysisKey PointsExercisesSupplementary ExercisesReferencesFurther Read

  11. IMAGE ANALYSIS BASED ON EDGE DETECTION TECHNIQUES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    纳瑟; 刘重庆

    2002-01-01

    A method that incorporates edge detection technique, Markov Random field (MRF), watershed segmentation and merging techniques was presented for performing image segmentation and edge detection tasks. It first applies edge detection technique to obtain a Difference In Strength (DIS) map. An initial segmented result is obtained based on K-means clustering technique and the minimum distance. Then the region process is modeled by MRF to obtain an image that contains different intensity regions. The gradient values are calculated and then the watershed technique is used. DIS calculation is used for each pixel to define all the edges (weak or strong) in the image. The DIS map is obtained. This help as priority knowledge to know the possibility of the region segmentation by the next step (MRF), which gives an image that has all the edges and regions information. In MRF model,gray level l, at pixel location i, in an image X, depends on the gray levels of neighboring pixels. The segmentation results are improved by using watershed algorithm. After all pixels of the segmented regions are processed, a map of primitive region with edges is generated. The edge map is obtained using a merge process based on averaged intensity mean values. A common edge detectors that work on (MRF) segmented image are used and the results are compared. The segmentation and edge detection result is one closed boundary per actual region in the image.

  12. Hyperspectral Image Analysis of Food Quality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arngren, Morten

    Assessing the quality of food is a vital step in any food processing line to ensurethe best food quality and maximum profit for the farmer and food manufacturer.Traditional quality evaluation methods are often destructive and labourintensive procedures relying on wet chemistry or subjective human......, the visualisation and interpretation of hyperspectral images are discussed.A Bayesian based unmixing method is presented as a novel approachto decompose a hyperspectral image into interpretable components. Secondly,hyperspectral imaging is applied to a dedicated application of predicting the degreeof pre-germination...

  13. Electromagnetic Time Reversal Imaging: Analysis and Experimentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-26

    Biomedical Imaging: From Nano to Macro, ISBI󈧌, Paris, Friance, May 14-17, 2008 [6] Y. Jin, J. M. F. Moura, N. O’Donoughue, "Adaptive Time Reversal...Zhu, and Q. He, “Breast cancer detection by time reversal imaging,” 5th IEEE International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging: From Nano to Macro...target (a galvanized steel sheet) is surrounded by a large amount of PVC rods. Our experiments showed that the collected EM data in frequency and

  14. Exploiting multi-context analysis in semantic image classification

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TIAN Yong-hong; HUANG Tie-jun; GAO Wen

    2005-01-01

    As the popularity of digital images is rapidly increasing on the Internet, research on technologies for semantic image classification has become an important research topic. However, the well-known content-based image classification methods do not overcome the so-called semantic gap problem in which low-level visual features cannot represent the high-level semantic content of images. Image classification using visual and textual information often performs poorly since the extracted textual features are often too limited to accurately represent the images. In this paper, we propose a semantic image classification approach using multi-context analysis. For a given image, we model the relevant textual information as its multi-modal context, and regard the related images connected by hyperlinks as its link context. Two kinds of context analysis models, i.e., cross-modal correlation analysis and link-based correlation model, are used to capture the correlation among different modals of features and the topical dependency among images induced by the link structure. We propose a new collective classification model called relational support vector classifier (RSVC) based on the well-known Support Vector Machines (SVMs) and the link-based correlation model. Experiments showed that the proposed approach significantly improved classification accuracy over that of SVM classifiers using visual and/or textual features.

  15. Autonomous image data reduction by analysis and interpretation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberlein, Susan; Yates, Gigi; Ritter, Niles

    Image data is a critical component of the scientific information acquired by space missions. Compression of image data is required due to the limited bandwidth of the data transmission channel and limited memory space on the acquisition vehicle. This need becomes more pressing when dealing with multispectral data where each pixel may comprise 300 or more bytes. An autonomous, real time, on-board image analysis system for an exploratory vehicle such as a Mars Rover is developed. The completed system will be capable of interpreting image data to produce reduced representations of the image, and of making decisions regarding the importance of data based on current scientific goals. Data from multiple sources, including stereo images, color images, and multispectral data, are fused into single image representations. Analysis techniques emphasize artificial neural networks. Clusters are described by their outlines and class values. These analysis and compression techniques are coupled with decision-making capacity for determining importance of each image region. Areas determined to be noise or uninteresting can be discarded in favor of more important areas. Thus limited resources for data storage and transmission are allocated to the most significant images.

  16. Identification and Phylogenetic Analysis of a CC-NBS-LRR Encoding Gene Assigned on Chromosome 7B of Wheat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangqi Zhang

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Hexaploid wheat displays limited genetic variation. As a direct A and B genome donor of hexaploid wheat, tetraploid wheat represents an important gene pool for cultivated bread wheat. Many disease resistant genes express conserved domains of the nucleotide-binding site and leucine-rich repeats (NBS-LRR. In this study, we isolated a CC-NBS-LRR gene locating on chromosome 7B from durum wheat variety Italy 363, and designated it TdRGA-7Ba. Its open reading frame was 4014 bp, encoding a 1337 amino acid protein with a complete NBS domain and 18 LRR repeats, sharing 44.7% identity with the PM3B protein. TdRGA-7Ba expression was continuously seen at low levels and was highest in leaves. TdRGA-7Ba has another allele TdRGA-7Bb with a 4 bp deletion at position +1892 in other cultivars of tetraploid wheat. In Ae. speltoides, as a B genome progenitor, both TdRGA-7Ba and TdRGA-7Bb were detected. In all six species of hexaploid wheats (AABBDD, only TdRGA-7Bb existed. Phylogenic analysis showed that all TdRGA-7Bb type genes were grouped in one sub-branch. We speculate that TdRGA-7Bb was derived from a TdRGA-7Ba mutation, and it happened in Ae. speltoides. Both types of TdRGA-7B participated in tetraploid wheat formation. However, only the TdRGA-7Bb was retained in hexaploid wheat.

  17. BAC-pool sequencing and analysis of large segments of A12 and D12 homoeologous chromosomes in upland cotton.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramesh Buyyarapu

    Full Text Available Although new and emerging next-generation sequencing (NGS technologies have reduced sequencing costs significantly, much work remains to implement them for de novo sequencing of complex and highly repetitive genomes such as the tetraploid genome of Upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.. Herein we report the results from implementing a novel, hybrid Sanger/454-based BAC-pool sequencing strategy using minimum tiling path (MTP BACs from Ctg-3301 and Ctg-465, two large genomic segments in A12 and D12 homoeologous chromosomes (Ctg. To enable generation of longer contig sequences in assembly, we implemented a hybrid assembly method to process ~35x data from 454 technology and 2.8-3x data from Sanger method. Hybrid assemblies offered higher sequence coverage and better sequence assemblies. Homology studies revealed the presence of retrotransposon regions like Copia and Gypsy elements in these contigs and also helped in identifying new genomic SSRs. Unigenes were anchored to the sequences in Ctg-3301 and Ctg-465 to support the physical map. Gene density, gene structure and protein sequence information derived from protein prediction programs were used to obtain the functional annotation of these genes. Comparative analysis of both contigs with Arabidopsis genome exhibited synteny and microcollinearity with a conserved gene order in both genomes. This study provides insight about use of MTP-based BAC-pool sequencing approach for sequencing complex polyploid genomes with limited constraints in generating better sequence assemblies to build reference scaffold sequences. Combining the utilities of MTP-based BAC-pool sequencing with current longer and short read NGS technologies in multiplexed format would provide a new direction to cost-effectively and precisely sequence complex plant genomes.

  18. Comparative sequence analysis of Solanum and Arabidopsis in a hot spot for pathogen resistance on potato chromosome V reveals a patchwork of conserved and rapidly evolving genome segments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruggmann Rémy

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Quantitative phenotypic variation of agronomic characters in crop plants is controlled by environmental and genetic factors (quantitative trait loci = QTL. To understand the molecular basis of such QTL, the identification of the underlying genes is of primary interest and DNA sequence analysis of the genomic regions harboring QTL is a prerequisite for that. QTL mapping in potato (Solanum tuberosum has identified a region on chromosome V tagged by DNA markers GP21 and GP179, which contains a number of important QTL, among others QTL for resistance to late blight caused by the oomycete Phytophthora infestans and to root cyst nematodes. Results To obtain genomic sequence for the targeted region on chromosome V, two local BAC (bacterial artificial chromosome contigs were constructed and sequenced, which corresponded to parts of the homologous chromosomes of the diploid, heterozygous genotype P6/210. Two contiguous sequences of 417,445 and 202,781 base pairs were assembled and annotated. Gene-by-gene co-linearity was disrupted by non-allelic insertions of retrotransposon elements, stretches of diverged intergenic sequences, differences in gene content and gene order. The latter was caused by inversion of a 70 kbp genomic fragment. These features were also found in comparison to orthologous sequence contigs from three homeologous chromosomes of Solanum demissum, a wild tuber bearing species. Functional annotation of the sequence identified 48 putative open reading frames (ORF in one contig and 22 in the other, with an average of one ORF every 9 kbp. Ten ORFs were classified as resistance-gene-like, 11 as F-box-containing genes, 13 as transposable elements and three as transcription factors. Comparing potato to Arabidopsis thaliana annotated proteins revealed five micro-syntenic blocks of three to seven ORFs with A. thaliana chromosomes 1, 3 and 5. Conclusion Comparative sequence analysis revealed highly conserved collinear regions

  19. Research of second harmonic generation images based on texture analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yao; Li, Yan; Gong, Haiming; Zhu, Xiaoqin; Huang, Zufang; Chen, Guannan

    2014-09-01

    Texture analysis plays a crucial role in identifying objects or regions of interest in an image. It has been applied to a variety of medical image processing, ranging from the detection of disease and the segmentation of specific anatomical structures, to differentiation between healthy and pathological tissues. Second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy as a potential noninvasive tool for imaging biological tissues has been widely used in medicine, with reduced phototoxicity and photobleaching. In this paper, we clarified the principles of texture analysis including statistical, transform, structural and model-based methods and gave examples of its applications, reviewing studies of the technique. Moreover, we tried to apply texture analysis to the SHG images for the differentiation of human skin scar tissues. Texture analysis method based on local binary pattern (LBP) and wavelet transform was used to extract texture features of SHG images from collagen in normal and abnormal scars, and then the scar SHG images were classified into normal or abnormal ones. Compared with other texture analysis methods with respect to the receiver operating characteristic analysis, LBP combined with wavelet transform was demonstrated to achieve higher accuracy. It can provide a new way for clinical diagnosis of scar types. At last, future development of texture analysis in SHG images were discussed.

  20. Pattern recognition software and techniques for biological image analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lior Shamir

    Full Text Available The increasing prevalence of automated image acquisition systems is enabling new types of microscopy experiments that generate large image datasets. However, there is a perceived lack of robust image analysis systems required to process these diverse datasets. Most automated image analysis systems are tailored for specific types of microscopy, contrast methods, probes, and even cell types. This imposes significant constraints on experimental design, limiting their application to the narrow set of imaging methods for which they were designed. One of the approaches to address these limitations is pattern recognition, which was originally developed for remote sensing, and is increasingly being applied to the biology domain. This approach relies on training a computer to recognize patterns in images rather than developing algorithms or tuning parameters for specific image processing tasks. The generality of this approach promises to enable data mining in extensive image repositories, and provide objective and quantitative imaging assays for routine use. Here, we provide a brief overview of the technologies behind pattern recognition and its use in computer vision for biological and biomedical imaging. We list available software tools that can be used by biologists and suggest practical experimental considerations to make the best use of pattern recognition techniques for imaging assays.

  1. Pattern recognition software and techniques for biological image analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamir, Lior; Delaney, John D; Orlov, Nikita; Eckley, D Mark; Goldberg, Ilya G

    2010-11-24

    The increasing prevalence of automated image acquisition systems is enabling new types of microscopy experiments that generate large image datasets. However, there is a perceived lack of robust image analysis systems required to process these diverse datasets. Most automated image analysis systems are tailored for specific types of microscopy, contrast methods, probes, and even cell types. This imposes significant constraints on experimental design, limiting their application to the narrow set of imaging methods for which they were designed. One of the approaches to address these limitations is pattern recognition, which was originally developed for remote sensing, and is increasingly being applied to the biology domain. This approach relies on training a computer to recognize patterns in images rather than developing algorithms or tuning parameters for specific image processing tasks. The generality of this approach promises to enable data mining in extensive image repositories, and provide objective and quantitative imaging assays for routine use. Here, we provide a brief overview of the technologies behind pattern recognition and its use in computer vision for biological and biomedical imaging. We list available software tools that can be used by biologists and suggest practical experimental considerations to make the best use of pattern recognition techniques for imaging assays.

  2. Introducing PLIA: Planetary Laboratory for Image Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peralta, J.; Hueso, R.; Barrado, N.; Sánchez-Lavega, A.

    2005-08-01

    We present a graphical software tool developed under IDL software to navigate, process and analyze planetary images. The software has a complete Graphical User Interface and is cross-platform. It can also run under the IDL Virtual Machine without the need to own an IDL license. The set of tools included allow image navigation (orientation, centring and automatic limb determination), dynamical and photometric atmospheric measurements (winds and cloud albedos), cylindrical and polar projections, as well as image treatment under several procedures. Being written in IDL, it is modular and easy to modify and grow for adding new capabilities. We show several examples of the software capabilities with Galileo-Venus observations: Image navigation, photometrical corrections, wind profiles obtained by cloud tracking, cylindrical projections and cloud photometric measurements. Acknowledgements: This work has been funded by Spanish MCYT PNAYA2003-03216, fondos FEDER and Grupos UPV 15946/2004. R. Hueso acknowledges a post-doc fellowship from Gobierno Vasco.

  3. Cytogenetic analysis and chromosomal characteristics of the polymorphic 18S rDNA of Haliotis discus hannai from Fujian, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haishan; Luo, Xuan; You, Weiwei; Dong, Yunwei; Ke, Caihuan

    2015-01-01

    We report on novel chromosomal characteristics of Haliotis discus hannai from a breeding population at Fujian, China. The karyotypes of H. discus hannai we obtained from an abalone farm include a common type 2n = 36 = 10M + 8SM (82%) and two rare types 2n = 36 = 11M + 7SM (14%) and 2n = 36 = 10M + 7SM + 1ST (4%). The results of silver staining showed that the NORs of H. discus hannai were usually located terminally on the long arms of chromosome pairs 14 and 17, NORs were also sometimes located terminally on the short arms of other chromosomes, either metacentric or submetacentric pairs. The number of Ag-nucleoli ranged from 2 to 8, and the mean number was 3.61 ± 0.93. Among the scored interphase cells, 41% had 3 detectable nucleoli and 37% had 4 nucleoli. The 18S rDNA FISH result is the first report of the location of 18S rDNA genes in H. discus hannai. The 18S rDNA locations were highly polymorphic in this species. Copies of the gene were observed in the terminal of long or/and short arms of submetacentric or/and metacentric chromosomes. Using FISH with probe for vertebrate-like telomeric sequences (CCCTAA)3 displayed positive green FITC signals at telomere regions of all analyzed chromosome types. We found about 7% of chromosomes had breaks in prophase. A special form of nucleolus not previously described from H. discus hannai was observed in some interphase cells. It consists of many small silver-stained nucleoli gathered together to form a larger nucleolus and may correspond to prenucleolar bodies.

  4. Cytogenetic analysis and chromosomal characteristics of the polymorphic 18S rDNA of Haliotis discus hannai from Fujian, China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haishan Wang

    Full Text Available We report on novel chromosomal characteristics of Haliotis discus hannai from a breeding population at Fujian, China. The karyotypes of H. discus hannai we obtained from an abalone farm include a common type 2n = 36 = 10M + 8SM (82% and two rare types 2n = 36 = 11M + 7SM (14% and 2n = 36 = 10M + 7SM + 1ST (4%. The results of silver staining showed that the NORs of H. discus hannai were usually located terminally on the long arms of chromosome pairs 14 and 17, NORs were also sometimes located terminally on the short arms of other chromosomes, either metacentric or submetacentric pairs. The number of Ag-nucleoli ranged from 2 to 8, and the mean number was 3.61 ± 0.93. Among the scored interphase cells, 41% had 3 detectable nucleoli and 37% had 4 nucleoli. The 18S rDNA FISH result is the first report of the location of 18S rDNA genes in H. discus hannai. The 18S rDNA locations were highly polymorphic in this species. Copies of the gene were observed in the terminal of long or/and short arms of submetacentric or/and metacentric chromosomes. Using FISH with probe for vertebrate-like telomeric sequences (CCCTAA3 displayed positive green FITC signals at telomere regions of all analyzed chromosome types. We found about 7% of chromosomes had breaks in prophase. A special form of nucleolus not previously described from H. discus hannai was observed in some interphase cells. It consists of many small silver-stained nucleoli gathered together to form a larger nucleolus and may correspond to prenucleolar bodies.

  5. Social Media Image Analysis for Public Health

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Several projects have shown the feasibility to use textual social media data to track public health concerns, such as temporal influenza patterns or geographical obesity patterns. In this paper, we look at whether geo-tagged images from Instagram also provide a viable data source. Especially for "lifestyle" diseases, such as obesity, drinking or smoking, images of social gatherings could provide information that is not necessarily shared in, say, tweets. In this study, we explore whether (i) ...

  6. Diagnostic imaging analysis of the impacted mesiodens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noh, Jeong Jun; Choi, Bo Ram; Jeong, Hwan Seok; Huh, Kyung Hoe; Yi, Won Jin; Heo, Min Suk; Lee, Sam Sun; Choi, Soon Chul [School of Dentistry, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-06-15

    The research was performed to predict the three dimensional relationship between the impacted mesiodens and the maxillary central incisors and the proximity with the anatomic structures by comparing their panoramic images with the CT images. Among the patients visiting Seoul National University Dental Hospital from April 2003 to July 2007, those with mesiodens were selected (154 mesiodens of 120 patients). The numbers, shapes, orientation and positional relationship of mesiodens with maxillary central incisors were investigated in the panoramic images. The proximity with the anatomical structures and complications were investigated in the CT images as well. The sex ratio (M : F) was 2.28 : 1 and the mean number of mesiodens per one patient was 1.28. Conical shape was 84.4% and inverted orientation was 51.9%. There were more cases of anatomical structures encroachment, especially on the nasal floor and nasopalatine duct, when the mesiodens was not superimposed with the central incisor. There were, however, many cases of the nasopalatine duct encroachment when the mesiodens was superimpoised with the apical 1/3 of central incisor (52.6%). Delayed eruption (55.6%), crown rotation (66.7%) and crown resorption (100%) were observed when the mesiodens was superimposed with the crown of the central incisor. It is possible to predict three dimensional relationship between the impacted mesiodens and the maxillary central incisors in the panoramic images, but more details should be confirmed by the CT images when necessary.

  7. Efficiency analysis of color image filtering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Egiazarian Karen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This article addresses under which conditions filtering can visibly improve the image quality. The key points are the following. First, we analyze filtering efficiency for 25 test images, from the color image database TID2008. This database allows assessing filter efficiency for images corrupted by different noise types for several levels of noise variance. Second, the limit of filtering efficiency is determined for independent and identically distributed (i.i.d. additive noise and compared to the output mean square error of state-of-the-art filters. Third, component-wise and vector denoising is studied, where the latter approach is demonstrated to be more efficient. Fourth, using of modern visual quality metrics, we determine that for which levels of i.i.d. and spatially correlated noise the noise in original images or residual noise and distortions because of filtering in output images are practically invisible. We also demonstrate that it is possible to roughly estimate whether or not the visual quality can clearly be improved by filtering.

  8. Fine genetic mapping of the Batten disease locus (CLN3) by haplotype analysis and demonstration of allelic association with chromosome 16p microsatellite loci

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchison, H.M.; McKay, T.R. [Univ. College London Medical School (United Kingdom); Thompson, A.D.; Mulley, J.C.; Kozman, H.M.; Richards, R.I.; Callen, D.F. [Women and Children`s Hospital, Adelaide (Australia); Stallings, R.L.; Doggett, N.A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Attwood, J. [Galton Lab., London (United Kingdom)] [and others

    1993-05-01

    Batten disease, juvenile onset neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis, is an autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by accumulation of autofluorescent lipopigment in neurons and other cell types. The disease locus (CLN3) has previously been assigned to chromosome 16p. The genetic localization of CLN3 has been refined by analyzing 70 families using a high-resolution map of 15 marker loci encompassing the CLN3 region on 16p. Crossovers in three maternal meioses allowed localization of CLN3 to the interval between D16S297 and D16S57. Within that interval alleles at three highly polymorphic dinucleotide repeat loci (D16S288, D16S298, D16S299) were found to be in strong linkage disequilibrium with CLN3. Analysis of haplotypes suggests that a majority of CLN3 chromosomes have arisen from a single founder mutation. 15 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

  9. Applications of Digital Image Analysis in Experimental Mechanics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyngbye, J. : Ph.D.

    The present thesis "Application of Digital Image Analysis in Experimental Mechanics" has been prepared as a part of Janus Lyngbyes Ph.D. study during the period December 1988 to June 1992 at the Department of Building technology and Structural Engineering, University of Aalborg, Denmark....... In this thesis attention will be focused on optimal use and analysis of the information of digital images. This is realized during investigation and application of parametric methods in digital image analysis. The parametric methods will be implemented in applications representative for the area of experimental...

  10. Image analysis of moving seeds in an indented cylinder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buus, Ole; Jørgensen, Johannes Ravn

    2010-01-01

    -Spline surfaces. Using image analysis, the seeds will be tracked using a kalman filter and the 2D trajectory, length, velocity, weight, and rotation will be sampled. We expect a high correspondence between seed length and certain spatially optimal seed trajectories. This work is done in collaboration with Westrup...... work we will seek to understand more about the internal dynamics of the indented cylinder. We will apply image analysis to observe the movement of seeds in the indented cylinder. This work is laying the groundwork for future studies into the application of image analysis as a tool for autonomous...

  11. Analysis of filtering techniques and image quality in pixel duplicated images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrubeoglu, Mehrube; McLauchlan, Lifford

    2009-08-01

    When images undergo filtering operations, valuable information can be lost besides the intended noise or frequencies due to averaging of neighboring pixels. When the image is enlarged by duplicating pixels, such filtering effects can be reduced and more information retained, which could be critical when analyzing image content automatically. Analysis of retinal images could reveal many diseases at early stage as long as minor changes that depart from a normal retinal scan can be identified and enhanced. In this paper, typical filtering techniques are applied to an early stage diabetic retinopathy image which has undergone digital pixel duplication. The same techniques are applied to the original images for comparison. The effects of filtering are then demonstrated for both pixel duplicated and original images to show the information retention capability of pixel duplication. Image quality is computed based on published metrics. Our analysis shows that pixel duplication is effective in retaining information on smoothing operations such as mean filtering in the spatial domain, as well as lowpass and highpass filtering in the frequency domain, based on the filter window size. Blocking effects due to image compression and pixel duplication become apparent in frequency analysis.

  12. Basic research planning in mathematical pattern recognition and image analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, J.; Guseman, L. F., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Fundamental problems encountered while attempting to develop automated techniques for applications of remote sensing are discussed under the following categories: (1) geometric and radiometric preprocessing; (2) spatial, spectral, temporal, syntactic, and ancillary digital image representation; (3) image partitioning, proportion estimation, and error models in object scene interference; (4) parallel processing and image data structures; and (5) continuing studies in polarization; computer architectures and parallel processing; and the applicability of "expert systems" to interactive analysis.

  13. Computer Vision-Based