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Sample records for chromosome condensation due

  1. Chromosome condensation and segmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some aspects of chromosome condensation in mammalians -humans especially- were studied by means of cytogenetic techniques of chromosome banding. Two further approaches were adopted: a study of normal condensation as early as prophase, and an analysis of chromosome segmentation induced by physical (temperature and γ-rays) or chemical agents (base analogues, antibiotics, ...) in order to show out the factors liable to affect condensation. Here 'segmentation' means an abnormal chromosome condensation appearing systematically and being reproducible. The study of normal condensation was made possible by the development of a technique based on cell synchronization by thymidine and giving prophasic and prometaphasic cells. Besides, the possibility of inducing R-banding segmentations on these cells by BrdU (5-bromodeoxyuridine) allowed a much finer analysis of karyotypes. Another technique was developed using 5-ACR (5-azacytidine), it allowed to induce a segmentation similar to the one obtained using BrdU and identify heterochromatic areas rich in G-C bases pairs

  2. Mitotic chromosome condensation in vertebrates

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    Vagnarelli, Paola, E-mail: P.Vagnarelli@ed.ac.uk

    2012-07-15

    Work from several laboratories over the past 10-15 years has revealed that, within the interphase nucleus, chromosomes are organized into spatially distinct territories [T. Cremer, C. Cremer, Chromosome territories, nuclear architecture and gene regulation in mammalian cells, Nat. Rev. Genet. 2 (2001) 292-301 and T. Cremer, M. Cremer, S. Dietzel, S. Muller, I. Solovei, S. Fakan, Chromosome territories-a functional nuclear landscape, Curr. Opin. Cell Biol. 18 (2006) 307-316]. The overall compaction level and intranuclear location varies as a function of gene density for both entire chromosomes [J.A. Croft, J.M. Bridger, S. Boyle, P. Perry, P. Teague,W.A. Bickmore, Differences in the localization and morphology of chromosomes in the human nucleus, J. Cell Biol. 145 (1999) 1119-1131] and specific chromosomal regions [N.L. Mahy, P.E. Perry, S. Gilchrist, R.A. Baldock, W.A. Bickmore, Spatial organization of active and inactive genes and noncoding DNA within chromosome territories, J. Cell Biol. 157 (2002) 579-589] (Fig. 1A, A'). In prophase, when cyclin B activity reaches a high threshold, chromosome condensation occurs followed by Nuclear Envelope Breakdown (NEB) [1]. At this point vertebrate chromosomes appear as compact structures harboring an attachment point for the spindle microtubules physically recognizable as a primary constriction where the two sister chromatids are held together. The transition from an unshaped interphase chromosome to the highly structured mitotic chromosome (compare Figs. 1A and B) has fascinated researchers for several decades now; however a definite picture of how this process is achieved and regulated is not yet in our hands and it will require more investigation to comprehend the complete process. From a biochemical point of view a vertebrate mitotic chromosomes is composed of DNA, histone proteins (60%) and non-histone proteins (40%) [6]. I will discuss below what is known to date on the contribution of these two different classes

  3. Mitotic chromosome condensation in vertebrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Work from several laboratories over the past 10–15 years has revealed that, within the interphase nucleus, chromosomes are organized into spatially distinct territories [T. Cremer, C. Cremer, Chromosome territories, nuclear architecture and gene regulation in mammalian cells, Nat. Rev. Genet. 2 (2001) 292–301 and T. Cremer, M. Cremer, S. Dietzel, S. Muller, I. Solovei, S. Fakan, Chromosome territories—a functional nuclear landscape, Curr. Opin. Cell Biol. 18 (2006) 307–316]. The overall compaction level and intranuclear location varies as a function of gene density for both entire chromosomes [J.A. Croft, J.M. Bridger, S. Boyle, P. Perry, P. Teague,W.A. Bickmore, Differences in the localization and morphology of chromosomes in the human nucleus, J. Cell Biol. 145 (1999) 1119–1131] and specific chromosomal regions [N.L. Mahy, P.E. Perry, S. Gilchrist, R.A. Baldock, W.A. Bickmore, Spatial organization of active and inactive genes and noncoding DNA within chromosome territories, J. Cell Biol. 157 (2002) 579–589] (Fig. 1A, A'). In prophase, when cyclin B activity reaches a high threshold, chromosome condensation occurs followed by Nuclear Envelope Breakdown (NEB) [1]. At this point vertebrate chromosomes appear as compact structures harboring an attachment point for the spindle microtubules physically recognizable as a primary constriction where the two sister chromatids are held together. The transition from an unshaped interphase chromosome to the highly structured mitotic chromosome (compare Figs. 1A and B) has fascinated researchers for several decades now; however a definite picture of how this process is achieved and regulated is not yet in our hands and it will require more investigation to comprehend the complete process. From a biochemical point of view a vertebrate mitotic chromosomes is composed of DNA, histone proteins (60%) and non-histone proteins (40%) [6]. I will discuss below what is known to date on the contribution of these two different

  4. Novel insights into mitotic chromosome condensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piskadlo, Ewa; Oliveira, Raquel A.

    2016-01-01

    The fidelity of mitosis is essential for life, and successful completion of this process relies on drastic changes in chromosome organization at the onset of nuclear division. The mechanisms that govern chromosome compaction at every cell division cycle are still far from full comprehension, yet recent studies provide novel insights into this problem, challenging classical views on mitotic chromosome assembly. Here, we briefly introduce various models for chromosome assembly and known factors involved in the condensation process (e.g. condensin complexes and topoisomerase II). We will then focus on a few selected studies that have recently brought novel insights into the mysterious way chromosomes are condensed during nuclear division.

  5. Ultrastructural organization of replicating chromatin in prematurely condensed chromosomes

    OpenAIRE

    Arifulin E. A.

    2015-01-01

    Aim. The ultrastructural aspect of replicating chromatin organization is a matter of dispute. Here, we have analyzed the ultrastructural organization of replication foci using prematurely condensed chromosomes (PCC). Methods. To investigate the ultrastructure of replicating chromatin, we have used correlative light and electron microscopy as well as immunogold staining. Results. Replication in PCC occurs in the gaps between condensed chromatin domains. Using correlative light and electron mic...

  6. Ultrastructural organization of replicating chromatin in prematurely condensed chromosomes

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    Arifulin E. A.

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Aim. The ultrastructural aspect of replicating chromatin organization is a matter of dispute. Here, we have analyzed the ultrastructural organization of replication foci using prematurely condensed chromosomes (PCC. Methods. To investigate the ultrastructure of replicating chromatin, we have used correlative light and electron microscopy as well as immunogold staining. Results. Replication in PCC occurs in the gaps between condensed chromatin domains. Using correlative light and electron microscopy, we observed that the replication foci contain decondensed chromatin as well as 80 and 130 nm globules, those were also found in condensed non-replicating chromatin domains. Using immunogolding, we demonstrated that DNA replication in S-phase PCC occurs in loose chromatin on the periphery of dense chromatin domains. Conclusion. Replication in PCC occurred in the decondensed chromatin neighboring the condensed chromatin without formation of special structures.

  7. Premature chromosome condensation: A novel method for biological dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, we have investigated the utility of different test systems for biological dosimetry and possible their application for therapy regime. Human peripheral blood lymphocytes were X-irradiated and mixed in different proportions with unirradiated lymphocytes. The frequencies of chromosomal aberrations were determined by the formation of dicentrics, excess of premature chromosome condensation fragments and micronuclie in cytochalasin B-blocked binucleated cells. These responses were with regard to estimate the dose received and to determine the population of unexposed cells (useful for the purpose of therapy) are discussed. 6 refs, 3 figs, 3 tabs

  8. Holoprosencephaly due to numeric chromosome abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Benjamin D; Rosenbaum, Kenneth N; Meck, Jeanne M; Muenke, Maximilian

    2010-02-15

    Holoprosencephaly (HPE) is the most common malformation of the human forebrain. When a clinician identifies a patient with HPE, a routine chromosome analysis is often the first genetic test sent for laboratory analysis in order to assess for a structural or numerical chromosome anomaly. An abnormality of chromosome number is overall the most frequently identified etiology in a patient with HPE. These abnormalities include trisomy 13, trisomy 18, and triploidy, though several others have been reported. Such chromosome number abnormalities are almost universally fatal early in gestation or in infancy. Clinical features of specific chromosome number abnormalities may be recognized by phenotypic manifestations in addition to the HPE. PMID:20104610

  9. Holoprosencephaly due to Numeric Chromosome Abnormalities

    OpenAIRE

    Solomon, Benjamin D.; Rosenbaum, Kenneth N.; Meck, Jeanne M.; Muenke, Maximilian

    2010-01-01

    Holoprosencephaly (HPE) is the most common malformation of the human forebrain. When a clinician identifies a patient with HPE, a routine chromosome analysis is often the first genetic test sent for laboratory analysis in order to assess for a structural or numerical chromosome anomaly. An abnormality of chromosome number is overall the most frequently identified etiology in a patient with HPE. These abnormalities include trisomy 13, trisomy 18, and triploidy, though several others have been ...

  10. Rejoining of prematurely condensed chromosomes in radiosensitive xrs-5 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xrs-5 cells, a radiosensitive, DNA double strand break repair deficient mutant of CHO cells have been studied with the premature chromosome condensation (PCC) technique. This mutant displayed a higher number of initial chromosome breaks with x-ray treatment as well as partial deficiency in the rejoining of interphase chromosome breaks with the standard PCC protocol. Moreover, hypertonic treatment during the incubation period which allowed for PCC did not change the yield of PCC breaks in x-irradiated xrs-5 cells. Notably the number of PCC breaks after treatment with hypertonic media is similar in CHO and xrs-5 cells. Recently, a gene product responsible for the xrs phenotype was identified as a Ku-like DNA end binding protein. The present paper summarizes completed information regarding the induction and repair of the α- and β-forms of PCC breaks in xrs-5 cells and demonstrates that this gene product predominantly affects the fast form (β-form) of interphase chromosome breaks

  11. Prematurely condensed chromosome rings after neutron irradiation of human lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calibration curves for fission spectrum neutrons and other high linear energy transfer (LET) radiations are scarce in cytogenetic dosimetry and particularly for Prematurely Condensed Chromosome Rings (PCC-ring). Here we analyzed the behavior of the PCC-ring frequency and PCC index after neutron irradiation in a broad dose interval from 1 to 26 Gy. PCC-rings were induced in lymphocytes with Calyculin A. 6455 PCC cells in G1, G2/M and M/A stages were analyzed. The best fitting between the frequency of PCC ring (Y) and the Dose (D) was obtained with the equation Y= (0.059±0.003) D. The saturation of the PCC-ring was observed after around 4 Gy, but it was still possible to analyze cells exposed up to 26 Gy. The distribution of rings by cell follows Poisson or Neyman type distribution for all doses. This PCC-ring dose effect curve can be used in case of accidental overexposure to neutron radiation, allowing a dose assessment in a reliable way. Additionally, the PCC index seems to be well correlated with radiation dose and decrease in a dose dependent manner from 13% in non exposed sample down to 0.2%. This observation allows the possibility to perform a quick classification of victims exposed to high doses of both gamma and neutron radiations. The PCC assay can then be used for both neutron dose estimation up to 4 Gy and for the rapid classification of victims exposed to higher doses. This assay could be included in the multiparametric approach developed to optimize the medical treatment of radiation victims. (author)

  12. Frequency of primary amenorrhea due to chromosomal aberration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To find out the frequency of primary amenorrhea due to chromosomal aberration and the different options available for management. Subjects and Methods: All patients with primary amenorrhea due to chromosomal aberrations were included in study. Patient's detailed history, general physical examination, presence or absence of secondary sexual characteristics, abdominal and pelvic examination finding were noted. Targeted investigations, including ultrasound, hormonal assay, buccal smear and karyotyping results were recorded. The management options were individually tailored with focus n psychological management. Results: Eighteen patients out of 30,000 patients were diagnosed as having primary amenorrhea. Six had primary amenorrhea due to chromosomal aberrations with the frequency of 0.02%. The age at presentation was 20 years and above in 50%. The most common cause was Turner's syndrome seen in 4 out of 6. The presenting symptoms were delay in onset of menstruation in 05 patients and primary infertility in 01 patient. Conclusion: Primary amenorrhea due to chromosomal aberration is an uncommon condition requiring an early and accurate diagnosis. Turner's syndrome is a relatively common cause of this condition. Management should be multi-disciplinary and individualized according to the patient's age and symptom at presentation. Psychological management is very important and counselling throughout treatment is recommended. (author)

  13. Replication asynchrony and differential condensation of X chromosomes in female platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Kristen K K; Deakin, Janine E; Wright, Megan L; Graves, Jennifer A Marshall; Grützner, Frank

    2009-01-01

    A common theme in the evolution of sex chromosomes is the massive loss of genes on the sex-specific chromosome (Y or W), leading to a gene imbalance between males (XY) and females (XX) in a male heterogametic species, or between ZZ and ZW in a female heterogametic species. Different mechanisms have evolved to compensate for this difference in dosage of X-borne genes between sexes. In therian mammals, one of the X chromosomes is inactivated, whereas bird dosage compensation is partial and gene-specific. In therian mammals, hallmarks of the inactive X are monoallelic gene expression, late DNA replication and chromatin condensation. Platypuses have five pairs of X chromosomes in females and five X and five Y chromosomes in males. Gene expression analysis suggests a more bird-like partial and gene-specific dosage compensation mechanism. We investigated replication timing and chromosome condensation of three of the five X chromosomes in female platypus. Our data suggest asynchronous replication of X-specific regions on X(1), X(3) and X(5) but show significantly different condensation between homologues for X(3) only, and not for X(1) or X(5). We discuss these results in relation to recent gene expression analysis of X-linked genes, which together give us insights into possible mechanisms of dosage compensation in platypus. PMID:19874719

  14. Heavy ion-induced chromosome breakage studied by premature chromosome condensation (PCC) in Syrian hamster embryo cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors studied induction and repair of chromosome damage induced by high linear energy transfer (LET) heavy ions in G1/Go interphase Syrian golden hamster embryo (SHE) cells as revealed by the premature chromosome condensation (PCC) technique. The number of chromosome breaks in condensed chromosomes induced by high LET heavy ions was higher than those induced by 137Cs gamma-rays. Compared with 137 Cs gamma rays, the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for PCC breaks was 1.5 for 35 keV/μm, 4He ions, 1.9 for 77 keV/μm 4He ions, and 2.5 for 530 keV/μm 14N ions. Although 95% of PCC breaks induced by gamma-rays rejoined during 8 h post-irradiation incubation, only 35-45% of fragments induced by high LET radiations rejoined in the same time. Results suggest that there is a difference, spatial or qualitative in the initial chromosome damage produced by high and low LET radiations. (Author)

  15. Detection and Automated Scoring of Dicentric Chromosomes in Nonstimulated Lymphocyte Prematurely Condensed Chromosomes After Telomere and Centromere Staining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To combine telomere and centromere (TC) staining of premature chromosome condensation (PCC) fusions to identify dicentrics, centric rings, and acentric chromosomes, making possible the realization of a dose–response curve and automation of the process. Methods and Materials: Blood samples from healthy donors were exposed to 60Co irradiation at varying doses up to 8 Gy, followed by a repair period of 8 hours. Premature chromosome condensation fusions were carried out, and TC staining using peptide nucleic acid probes was performed. Chromosomal aberration (CA) scoring was carried out manually and automatically using PCC-TCScore software, developed in our laboratory. Results: We successfully optimized the hybridization conditions and image capture parameters, to increase the sensitivity and effectiveness of CA scoring. Dicentrics, centric rings, and acentric chromosomes were rapidly and accurately detected, leading to a linear-quadratic dose–response curve by manual scoring at up to 8 Gy. Using PCC-TCScore software for automatic scoring, we were able to detect 95% of dicentrics and centric rings. Conclusion: The introduction of TC staining to the PCC fusion technique has made possible the rapid scoring of unstable CAs, including dicentrics, with a level of accuracy and ease not previously possible. This new approach can be used for biological dosimetry in radiation emergency medicine, where the rapid and accurate detection of dicentrics is a high priority using automated scoring. Because there is no culture time, this new approach can also be used for the follow-up of patients treated by genotoxic therapy, creating the possibility to perform the estimation of induced chromosomal aberrations immediately after the blood draw

  16. Detection and Automated Scoring of Dicentric Chromosomes in Nonstimulated Lymphocyte Prematurely Condensed Chromosomes After Telomere and Centromere Staining

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M' kacher, Radhia [Laboratoire de Radiobiologie et Oncologie, Commissariat à l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); El Maalouf, Elie [Laboratoire de Radiobiologie et Oncologie, Commissariat à l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Laboratoire Modélisation Intelligence Processus Systèmes (MIPS)–Groupe TIIM3D, Université de Haute-Alsace, Mulhouse (France); Terzoudi, Georgia [Laboratory of Radiobiology & Biodosimetry, National Center for Scientific Research Demokritos, Athens (Greece); Ricoul, Michelle [Laboratoire de Radiobiologie et Oncologie, Commissariat à l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Heidingsfelder, Leonhard [MetaSystems, Altlussheim (Germany); Karachristou, Ionna [Laboratory of Radiobiology & Biodosimetry, National Center for Scientific Research Demokritos, Athens (Greece); Laplagne, Eric [Pole Concept, Paris (France); Hempel, William M. [Laboratoire de Radiobiologie et Oncologie, Commissariat à l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Colicchio, Bruno; Dieterlen, Alain [Laboratoire Modélisation Intelligence Processus Systèmes (MIPS)–Groupe TIIM3D, Université de Haute-Alsace, Mulhouse (France); Pantelias, Gabriel [Laboratory of Radiobiology & Biodosimetry, National Center for Scientific Research Demokritos, Athens (Greece); Sabatier, Laure, E-mail: laure.sabatier@cea.fr [Laboratoire de Radiobiologie et Oncologie, Commissariat à l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France)

    2015-03-01

    Purpose: To combine telomere and centromere (TC) staining of premature chromosome condensation (PCC) fusions to identify dicentrics, centric rings, and acentric chromosomes, making possible the realization of a dose–response curve and automation of the process. Methods and Materials: Blood samples from healthy donors were exposed to {sup 60}Co irradiation at varying doses up to 8 Gy, followed by a repair period of 8 hours. Premature chromosome condensation fusions were carried out, and TC staining using peptide nucleic acid probes was performed. Chromosomal aberration (CA) scoring was carried out manually and automatically using PCC-TCScore software, developed in our laboratory. Results: We successfully optimized the hybridization conditions and image capture parameters, to increase the sensitivity and effectiveness of CA scoring. Dicentrics, centric rings, and acentric chromosomes were rapidly and accurately detected, leading to a linear-quadratic dose–response curve by manual scoring at up to 8 Gy. Using PCC-TCScore software for automatic scoring, we were able to detect 95% of dicentrics and centric rings. Conclusion: The introduction of TC staining to the PCC fusion technique has made possible the rapid scoring of unstable CAs, including dicentrics, with a level of accuracy and ease not previously possible. This new approach can be used for biological dosimetry in radiation emergency medicine, where the rapid and accurate detection of dicentrics is a high priority using automated scoring. Because there is no culture time, this new approach can also be used for the follow-up of patients treated by genotoxic therapy, creating the possibility to perform the estimation of induced chromosomal aberrations immediately after the blood draw.

  17. A novel MCPH1 isoform complements the defective chromosome condensation of human MCPH1-deficient cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioannis Gavvovidis

    Full Text Available Biallelic mutations in MCPH1 cause primary microcephaly (MCPH with the cellular phenotype of defective chromosome condensation. MCPH1 encodes a multifunctional protein that notably is involved in brain development, regulation of chromosome condensation, and DNA damage response. In the present studies, we detected that MCPH1 encodes several distinct transcripts, including two major forms: full-length MCPH1 (MCPH1-FL and a second transcript lacking the six 3' exons (MCPH1Δe9-14. Both variants show comparable tissue-specific expression patterns, demonstrate nuclear localization that is mediated independently via separate NLS motifs, and are more abundant in certain fetal than adult organs. In addition, the expression of either isoform complements the chromosome condensation defect found in genetically MCPH1-deficient or MCPH1 siRNA-depleted cells, demonstrating a redundancy of both MCPH1 isoforms for the regulation of chromosome condensation. Strikingly however, both transcripts are regulated antagonistically during cell-cycle progression and there are functional differences between the isoforms with regard to the DNA damage response; MCPH1-FL localizes to phosphorylated H2AX repair foci following ionizing irradiation, while MCPH1Δe9-14 was evenly distributed in the nucleus. In summary, our results demonstrate here that MCPH1 encodes different isoforms that are differentially regulated at the transcript level and have different functions at the protein level.

  18. Mechanisms involved in the formation of mutagen-induced chromosome aberrations as determined by premature chromosome condensation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In conventional studies of cytogenetic damage induced by mutagenic carcinogens, chromosomes are examined only when they become visible at metaphase, which often is many hours after exposure. Because many events can occur between the initial exposure and the final appearance of the damaged chromosomes at metaphase, the authors have now turned to the use of prematurely condensed chromosomes (PCCs) in which it is possible to observe interphase chromosomes shortly after exposure without allowing the cells to proceed to metaphase. Such a procedure, which eliminates the long delays between the introduction of the initial damage and its visualization, gives initial insights to the possible mechanisms involved in the production of genetic damage by mutagenic carcinogens. They used the method to study the effect of the pyrimidine nucleoside analogue cytosine arabinoside (ara-C), an inhibitor of DNA synthesis and chemotherapeutic agent that kills S phase cells and blocks the progression of cells from G1 into S phase. The authors now used a simple method for polyethylene-glycol-mediated cell fusion and PCC induction to analyze the effects of ara-C on G0 human lymphocytes. The PCC technique is a far more sensitive method for detecting damage than are the conventional metaphase techniques. Moreover, because only limited information is available on the repair of radiation damage in lymphocytes in the presence of DNA synthesis inhibitors, the technique was also used study the effect of ara-C on the repair of X-ray-induced chromosome breakage in unstimulated lymphocytes

  19. Study on the dose-response relation of premature chromosome condensation induced by Okadaic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to study the effect-dosage relationship between the PCC induced by Okadaic acid and the IR dosages, human peripheral blood in vitro was irradiated by X-rays at different doses (0, 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, 3.0, 5.0Gy) cultivated for 48 hours and added with Okadaic acid two hours before the end of culture. Chromosome aberrations frequencies was analyzed and compared with that induced by the conventional chromosome assay and their dose-response curves were fitted. The results show that the mitotic index of the PCC induced by Okadaic acid is higher than that of the conventional chromosome assay. And the fragment rate of chromosome condensation induced by Okadaic acid has a favorable linearity relationship with external radiation doses. (authors)

  20. Damping of condensate collective modes due to equilibration with the non-condensate

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, J. E.; Griffin, A.

    2000-01-01

    We consider the damping of condensate collective modes at finite temperatures arising from lack of equilibrium between the condensate and the non-condensate atoms, an effect that is ignored in the usual discussion of the collisionless region. As a first approximation, we ignore the dynamics of the thermal cloud. Our calculations should be applicable to collective modes of the condensate which are oscillating out-of-phase with the thermal cloud. We obtain a generalized Stringari equation of mo...

  1. Chromosome painting and prematurely condensed chromosomes (PCC) - new methods of biological dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Classic methods of biological dosimetry - micronucleus and dicentric assay pose several problems. In the case of micronucleus there is a wide range of spontaneous frequencies and smoking and age are powerfull contributing factors. In the case of dicentrics - low mitotic index in some individuals especially in the elderly or accidentally exposed to high radiation doses. So, there are 2 quite new molecular techniques which at least in part solve these problems: chromosome painting and PCC. Chromosome painting by employing chromosome-specific DNA probes allow easy identification and quantification of translocations. recently, it was shown that calyculin A or okadaic acid, inhibitors of 1 and 2A protein phosphatases, induce PCC in peripheral blood cells. This is an easy biodosimetric method with a high PCC index and independent of the ability of cells to divide e.g. after high (20 Gy) doses when the mitotic index is extremely low. (author)

  2. Dose response curve of 60Co for premature condensed chromosome fragments of human lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dose-response curves obtained by premature condensed chromosome (PCC) and conventional cellular genetic methods can be represented by two linear equations. The ratio of the slopes, KPCC/KM1, is about 28. In comparison to the conventional method, the PCC method has many advantages; e.g. it is faster, simpler, more sensitive and accurate. Its significance in the study of radiation damage is also discussed

  3. Method of heating regime change calculation due to the pollution of TPP surface condensers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method for defining the heating regime change of TPP condensers due to the scale formation on cooling its surfaces is proposed. The cooling water velocity change and its influence on condensers heat transfer coefficient is calculated. The calculation of the K-200-130 TPP condenser is realized. As a result of it the change of electric power due to the thickness of scale formation and the primary temperature of cooling water is determined

  4. Casimir force due to condensed vortices in a plane

    CERN Document Server

    Neto, J F de Medeiros; Santos, Carlos Rafael M

    2012-01-01

    The Casimir force between parallel lines in a theory describing condensed vortices in a plane is determined. We make use of the relation between a Chern-Simons-Higgs model and its dualized version, which is expressed in terms of a dual gauge field and a vortex field. The dual model can have a phase of condensed vortices and, in this phase, there is a mapping to a model of two non-interacting massive scalar fields from which the Casimir force can readily be obtained. The choice of boundary conditions required for the mapped scalar fields and their association with those for the vectorial field and the issues involved are discussed. We also briefly discuss the implications of our results for experiments related to the Casimir effect when vortices can be present.

  5. X-ray-related potentially lethal damage expressed by chromosome condensation and the influence of caffeine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caffeine has been reported to induce premature chromosome condensation (PCC) in S-phase cells in the presence of an inhibitor of DNA synthesis. We found that when S-phase cells are treated with caffeine and hydroxyurea after X irradiation, substantially more potentially lethal damage (PLD) is expressed, but the addition of cycloheximide, which inhibits PCC induction in S-phase cells, in the presence of caffeine and hydroxyurea reduces the expression of PLD to the same level as seen with caffeine alone. This can be interpreted to mean that the expression of PLD seen with caffeine in the absence of an inhibitor of DNA synthesis is not associated with chromosome condensation. Evidence that PCC induction in S-phase cells and the influence of caffeine on PLD expression were suppressed by incubation at 40 degrees C of tsBN75 cells with a ts defect in ubiquitin-activating enzyme indicates the involvement of ubiquitin in these two processes. These observations as well as previous findings on ubiquitin suggest to us that caffeine induces changes in DNA-chromatin conformation, which are caused by induction of PCC or ubiquitination of chromosomal protein. Such changes occurring postirradiation would favor expression of PLD

  6. Estimation of high radiation dose during accidental exposure using Calyculin - an induced premature chromosome condensation assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The conventional cytogenetic dosimetry, the gold standard chromosomal aberration assay fails to estimate high radiation dose exposure due to mitotic delay and severe leukopenia. Hence, there is a need to establish reliable, easier and quicker methods for biodosimetry. The Calyculin-A induced premature chromosome condensation (PCC) assay is being recommended as a rapid method for biodosimetry. The calyculin-A is a strong inhibitor of both PP1 and PP2A phosphoprotein phosphatases and therefore, has been suggested to be a more potent inducer of PCC compared to other protein phosphatases inhibitor okadaic acid and fostriecin. In the present study, we have estimated coefficients of dose response curves for three PCC aberrations using Calyculin-A for biodosimetry purpose. The modified method outlined by Roser Puig et al 2013 was used to conduct Calyculin-A induced PCC assay in human blood lymphocytes. Calyculin A treatment was given for last 1 hr of the 48 hr culture. Final concentration of the Calyculin A was 50 nM and the study was carried out in the dose range 2.5-20 Gy using 60Co gamma rays. The centric rings, acentric rings and fragments are separately analyzed. Results show a linear dose dependent increase with a slope of 0.047±0.001 Gy-1 (R2=0.99 and P<0.0001) for centric rings and 0.07±0.002 (R2=0.99 and P<0.0001) for centric rings combined with acentric rings. The dose response of excess PCC fragments shows a linear quadratic response up to 15 Gy and thereafter it saturated. The linear and quadratic coefficients for fragments are 0.089 ± 0.04 Gy-1 and 0.0173 ± 0.003 Gy-2 (with R2=0.99 and P=3.5184E-4) respectively. The PCC index was 62% for 0 Gy, 56% for 2.5 Gy, 69% for 5 Gy, 73% for 7.5 Gy, 64% for 10 Gy, 55% for 15 Gy and 43% for 20 Gy. Results indicate that Calyculin-A induced PCC assay provides very high PCC index compared to okadaic acid and gives valuable biodosimetric information in the case of high dose accidental exposure. (author)

  7. The usefulness of premature chromosome condensation (PCC) technique in estimating radiation exposure and in cancer treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In bio dosimetry, cytogenetic methods are useful to assess the absorbed dose of ionizing radiation and to evaluate the induced damage. Analysis of dicentrics frequencies (DC), translocations by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) and micronuclei (MN) in cytokinesis blocked lymphocytes are the commonly used cytogenetic endpoints. These techniques consume 3-4 days for a sample. The absorbed doses in the range of 100mGy to 6Gy can be detected. As compared to these, premature chromosome condensation (PCC) has less artifacts, retains maximum damage and offers a broad dose-estimate-window ranging 0.03 Gy to 20 Gy. Besides, it facilitates the visualization of the damaged chromosomes in just 4 hours in cells from any part of the body. During accidental- or medical- exposure, the rapidity and sensitivity of PCC commands supremacy over other techniques. Furthermore, a wider dose detection range is an additional advantage. Cell cycle position of the sample can also be understood. PCC is employed to understand the mechanism of DNA repair and the induction of chromosomal aberrations. It has a potential application in diagnosis of genetic defects including ataxia telangiectasia(AT) and genetic disorders involving DNA repair deficiency. The effectiveness of various drugs in treatment of cancer and prognosis can also be assessed by this method. Integrating PCC with FISH, there could be an opportunity of discerning mixed radiation exposure in accident situations. (author)

  8. A small (sSMC) chromosome 22 due to a maternal translocation between chromosomes 8 and 22: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundhofir, F E P; Kooper, A J A; Winarni, T I; Smits, A P T; Faradz, S M H; Hamel, B C J

    2010-01-01

    We report on a boy with partial trisomies for chromosomes 8 and 22 caused by the presence of a small supernumerary marker chromosome (sSMC), a der(22)t(8;22)(p22;q11.21), inherited from a t(8;22)(p22;q11.21) translocation carrier mother. He has mild mental retardation, unability to speak distinct words and several minor anomalies i.e. high forehead and hairline, telecanthus, upslanting palpebral fissures, depressed nasal bridge, nail hypoplasia, toe position anomaly and 5th finger clinodactyly. He has two maternal uncles and one maternal aunt with mental retardation. G-banding technique showed 47,XY,+mar whilst his mother's karyotype showed a balanced reciprocal translocation between the chromosomes 8 and 22. Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization (FISH) technique with probes for centromere 22 and 8pter were used to detect the origin of marker chromosome and confirmed the marker chromosome in the proband showing to be extra chromosomal material originated from chromosome 8 and 22. Additional genome wide microarray analysis, using the Affymetrix Nspl 250K SNP array platform was performed to further characterize the marker chromosome and resulted in a der(22)t(8;22)(p22;q11.21). Furthermore, cytogenetic analysis of three affected family members showed the same unbalanced translocation, due to 3:1 meiotic segregation. This indicated the viability of this unbalanced pattern and combined with the recurrent miscarriages by the proband's mother, the mechanism of transmitting extrachromosomal material is probably not a random process. Since, there is no similar translocation (8p;22q) reported and the chromosomal translocation largely exists of additional 8p22-8pter we compare the clinical outcomes with reported cases of 8p22-8pter triplication, although there is a part of genetic material derived from chromosome 22 present. This unique familial chromosome translocation case from Indonesia will give insight in the underlying mechanism of this recurrent chromosomal abnormality

  9. MCPH1 deletion in a newborn with severe microcephaly and premature chromosome condensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfau, Ruthann B; Thrush, Devon Lamb; Hamelberg, Elizabeth; Bartholomew, Dennis; Botes, Shaun; Pastore, Matthew; Tan, Christopher; del Gaudio, Daniela; Gastier-Foster, Julie M; Astbury, Caroline

    2013-11-01

    A newborn with severe microcephaly and a history of parental consanguinity was referred for cytogenetic analysis and subsequently for genetic evaluation. While a 46,XY karyotype was eventually obtained, premature chromosome condensation was observed. A head MRI confirmed primary microcephaly. This combination of features focused clinical interest on the MCPH1 gene and directed genetic testing by sequence analysis and duplication/deletion studies disclosed a homozygous deletion of exons 1-11 of the MCPH1 gene. This case illustrates a strength of standard cytogenetic evaluation in directing molecular testing to a single target gene in this disorder, allowing much more rapid diagnosis at a substantial cost savings for this family. PMID:24080358

  10. Premature chromosome condensation and cell separation studies in biopsies from head and neck tumors for radiosensitivity prediction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: Intrinsic radiosensitivity of tumor cells from biopsies, assayed by colony formation after in vitro irradiation, has shown significant correlations with outcome after radiotherapy. Alternatives to the colony assay have been sought due to its long and cumbersome nature. We have previously shown good correlations between colony formation and radiation-induced chromosome aberrations in human tumor cell lines. In addition, we and others have shown on cell lines that premature chromosome condensation (PCC) induced with phosphatase inhibitors can be used to aid rapid assessment of aberrations in interphase cells, reducing the selection problem with metaphases. The purpose of this study was to translate the in vitro results to human cancer, with the aim of developing a rapid assay for intrinsic radiosensitivity. Methods and results: The problem of admixtures of normal and malignant cells in biopsies was addressed using magnetic bead separation (MACS) employing antibodies to human fibroblasts. This proved to be a reliable and efficient method, enriching mean tumor cell fractions from 20 to almost 80%. PCC could be induced in human normal and tumor cell lines, and in sorted or unsorted suspensions from biopsies, with the phosphatase inhibitor calyculin A. Maximum PCCs were achieved after 1-week culture of biopsy-derived cells. Mean fractions of aneuploid tumor cell PCCs were, however, less than 1%. PCCs were predominantly from S and G2 phase, of which only G2 were scorable for aberrations. Almost no G1 PCCs were found. More scorable PCCs were found after 1 h of calyculin A than metaphases after 5 h of colcemid, but these were calculated to be too few to yield reliable estimates of chromosome damage after radiation. Conlcusions: Tumor cells can be satisfactorily separated from fibroblasts in fresh suspensions from cancer biopsies, but poor growth of tumor cells in short term culture and low yields of PCCs combine to prevent the routine use of such

  11. Mesoscopic structure formation in condensed matter due to vacuum fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Siddhartha; Gupta, Kumar S.; Coey, J. M. D.

    2015-10-01

    An observable influence of zero-point fluctuations of the vacuum electromagnetic field on bound electrons is well known in the hydrogen atom, where it produces the Lamb shift. Here, we adapt an approach used to explain the Lamb shift in terms of a slight expansion of the orbits due to interaction with the zero-point field and apply it to assemblies of N electrons that are modeled as independent atomically bound two-level systems. The effect is to stabilize a collective ground-state energy, which leads to a prediction of novel effects at room temperature for quasi-two-dimensional systems over a range of parameters in the model, namely, N , the two-level excitation energy ℏ ω and the ionization energy ℏ ω +ɛ . Some mesoscopic systems where these effects may be observable include water sheaths on protein or DNA, surfaces of gaseous nanobubbles, and the magnetic response of inhomogeneous, electronically dilute oxides. No such effects are envisaged for uniform three-dimensional systems.

  12. Prediction of human cell radiosensitivity: Comparison of clonogenic assay with chromosome aberrations scored using premature chromosome condensation with fluorescence in situ hybridization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the present investigation was to determine whether chromosome aberrations scored by premature chromosome condensation (PCC) and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) can predict the radiosensitivity of human cell lines, thereby providing a possible means of assessing the in situ radiosensitivity of normal tissues and the radiocurability of individual human cancers. We used four cells lines of different radiosensitivity: normal human fibroblasts (AG1522), ataxia-telangiectasia fibroblasts (AT2052), a human fibrosarcoma cell line (HT1080), and a human melanoma cell line (melanoma 903). These were irradiated in plateau phase with a range of doses and assessed both for clonogenic cell survival and for aberrations in a single chromosome (number 4) immediately after, and 24 h after irradiation. The initial number of breaks in chromosome 4 was proportional to irradiation dose and was identical for all the different human cell lines, irrespective of radiosensitivity. On the other hand, the number of chromosome 4 breaks remaining 24 h after irradiation reflected the radiosensitivity of the cells such that the relationship between residual chromosome aberrations and cell survival was the same for the different cell lines. These results suggest that the scoring of chromosome aberrations in interphase using FISH with PCC holds considerable promise for predicting the radiosensitivity of normal and tumor tissues in situ. 28 refs., 4 figs

  13. Evaluation of the prematurely condensed chromosome technique for biological dosimetry purposes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unstable chromosome aberrations in mitogen-stimulated peripheral blood lymphocytes are usually scored in biological dosimetry following ionising radiation exposure. Prematurely Condensed Chromosome (PCC) technique, on the other hand, allows the direct observation of chromosomal damage so overcoming the problem of cell culture. Although most often used to study repair mechanisms, il appears a possible alternative for biological dosimetry purposes. This study presents an adaptation of the PCC technique, for the problem of radiological accident. Human blood samples were exposed in vitro to cobalt-60 (O.5 Gy.min-1) between 0 and 4 Gy and excess PCC fragments in lymphocytes were scored at different post-irradiation time of 0,4, and 24 h. As expected, linear dose-effect relationships were obtained for each experimental condition. The excess PCC fragments yield is progressively reduced up to 80 % after one day. These consequences of repair phenomena are crucial in biological expertise, because in our experience blood samples are received at least on day after suspicion of overexposure. As well as conventional cyto-genetics, technique precision depends on the number of scored cells and the range of dose irradiation: 95 % confidence limits interval varies from 0.58 Gy (for a dose assessment of 1 Gy) to 1.02 Gy (for a dose assessment of 4 Gy) when 150 cells are observed after 24 hours repair. Because the time delay needed to obtain preparations to analyse is shorter, PCC technique appears quicker than conventional cyto-genetics. So, we propose this adapted protocol to use PCC fragment yield as biological indicator for assessment of irradiation dose when the date of blood sampling is known and does not exceed 24 h. (authors)

  14. Compressible Heating in the Condense Phase due to Pore Collapse in HMX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ju; Jackson, Thomas

    Axisymmetric pore collapse in HMX is studied numerically by solving multi-phase reactive Euler equations. The generation of hot spots in the condense phase due to compressible heating is examined. The motivation is to improve the understanding of the role of embedded cavities in the initiation of reaction in explosives, and to investigate the effect of hot spots in the condense phase due to compressible heating alone, complementing previous study on hot spots due to the reaction in the gas phase and at the interface. It is found that the shock-cavity interaction results in pressures and thus temperatures that are substantially higher than the post-shock values in the condense phase. However, these hot spots in the condense phase due to compressible heating alone do not seem to be sufficiently hot to lead to ignition at shock pressures of 1-3 GPa. Thus, compressible heating in the condense phase may be excluded as a mechanism for initiation of explosives. It should be pointed out that the ignition threshold for the temperature, the so-called ``switch-on'' temperature, of hot spots depend on chemistry kinetics parameters. Switch-on temperature is lower for faster reaction rate. The current chemistry kinetics parameters are based on previous experimental work. This work was supported in part by the Defense Threat Reduction Agency and by the U.S. Department of Energy.

  15. Improvement of method for the technology of premature chromosome condensation in nuclear accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To study the improvement of method for the technology of premature chromosome condensation (PCC), and provide a good specimen for quickly estimating radiation dose in nuclear and ionizing accident emergency. Methods: The conventional PCC method was used to study the morphology and length of PCC with chemical inducer and mitosis blocker, calyculin A (CA) and colchicines. Improved the dialysis method for harvesting a good morphology of PCC. 2 kinds of cell proliferation promoting agents were added after high dose ionizing radiation with 60Co γ-ray, amygdalin and Cyt-B, to promote the proliferation effects of human peripheral blood lymphocytes. Results: (1) CA (35 nmol/L) and colchicines (30 nmol/L) were added and cultivated for 50 hours. The PCC with best morphology and structure could be harvested. The cell rate of suitable length vs width was highest (47.4%). (2) The dose of hypotonic solution was increased, cultivated in 37 degree C water bath and the ratio of fixing solution was changed. The PCC with good specimen could be harvested. (3) After being irradiated by 0-20.0 Gy 60Co γ-ray, and the cells were cultivated for 50 hours with amygdalin (150 mg/L) and Cyt-B (0.2 mg/L). The cell proliferation rate was the highest, while the rate in conventional method was lowest. Conclusion: The improvement of method could rapidly harvest the good specimen of PCC, it is satiable for quick evaluation of biological dose when ionizing radiation accident occurred. (authors)

  16. Nonlinear Zeno dynamics due to atomic interactions in Bose–Einstein condensate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We show that nonlinear interactions induce both the Zeno and anti-Zeno effects in the generalized Bose–Josephson model (with the on-site interactions and the second-order tunneling) describing Bose–Einstein condensate in double-well trap subject to particle removal from one of the wells. We find that the on-site interactions induce only the Zeno effect, which appears at long evolution times, whereas the second-order tunneling leads to a strong decay of the atomic population at short evolution times, reminiscent of the anti-Zeno effect, and destroys the nonlinear Zeno effect due to the on-site interactions at long times

  17. Nonlinear Zeno dynamics due to atomic interactions in Bose–Einstein condensate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Navarro, V.G.; Shchesnovich, V.S., E-mail: valery@ufabc.edu.br

    2014-12-01

    We show that nonlinear interactions induce both the Zeno and anti-Zeno effects in the generalized Bose–Josephson model (with the on-site interactions and the second-order tunneling) describing Bose–Einstein condensate in double-well trap subject to particle removal from one of the wells. We find that the on-site interactions induce only the Zeno effect, which appears at long evolution times, whereas the second-order tunneling leads to a strong decay of the atomic population at short evolution times, reminiscent of the anti-Zeno effect, and destroys the nonlinear Zeno effect due to the on-site interactions at long times.

  18. Maternal uniparental disomy for human chromosome 14, due to loss of a chromosome 14 from somatic cells with t(13; 14) trisomy 14

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antonarakis, S.E.; Blouin, J.L.; Maher, J.; Avramopoulos, D.; Thomas, G.; Talbot, C.C. Jr. (Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore (United States))

    1993-06-01

    Uniparental disomy (UPD) for particular chromosomes is increasingly recognized as a cause of abnormal phenotypes in humans. The authors recently studied a 9-year-old female with a de novo Robertsonian translocation t(13;14), short stature, mild developmental delay, scoliosis, hyperextensible joints, hydrocephalus that resolved spontaneously during the first year of life, and hyperchloesterolemia. To determine the parental origin of chromosomes 13 and 14 in the proband, they have studied the genotypes of DNA polymorphic markers due to (GT)n repeats in the patient and her parents' blood DNA. The genotypes of markers D14S43, D14S45, D14S49, and D14S54 indicated maternal UPD for chromosome 14. There was isodisomy for proximal markers and heterodisomy for distal markers, suggesting a recombination event on maternal chromosomes 14. In addition, DNA analysis first revealed -- and subsequent cytogenetic analysis confirmed -- that there was mosaic trisomy 14 in 5% of blood lymphocytes. There was normal (biparental) inheritance for chromosome 13, and there was no evidence of false paternity in genotypes of 11 highly polymorphic markers on human chromosome 21. Two cases of maternal UPD for chromosome 14 have previously been reported, one with a familial rob t(13;14) and the other with a t(14;14). There are several similarities among these patients, and a [open quotes]maternal UPD chromosome 14 syndrome[close quotes] is emerging; however, the contribution of the mosaic trisomy 14 to the phenotype cannot be evaluated. The study of de novo Robertsonian translocations of the type reported here should reveal both the extent of UPD in these events and the contribution of particular chromosomes involved in certain phenotypes. 33 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  19. PTP-S2, a nuclear tyrosine phosphatase, is phosphorylated and excluded from condensed chromosomes during mitosis

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sundaram Nambirajan; Vegesna Radha; Shubhangi Kamatkar; Ghanshyam Swarup

    2000-03-01

    PTP-S2 is a tyrosine specific protein phosphatase that binds to DNA and is localized to the nucleus in association with chromatin. It plays a role in the regulation of cell proliferation. Here we show that the subcellular distribution of this protein changes during cell division. While PTP-S2 was localized exclusively to the nucleus in interphase cells, during metaphase and anaphase it was distributed throughout the cytoplasm and excluded from condensed chromosomes. At telophase PTP-S2 began to associate with chromosomes and at cytokinesis it was associated with chromatin in the newly formed nucleus. It was hyperphosphorylated and showed retarded mobility in cells arrested in metaphase. In vitro experiments showed that it was phosphorylated by CK2 resulting in mobility shift. Using a deletion mutant we found that CK2 phosphorylated PTP-S2 in the C-terminal non-catalytic domain. A heparin sensitive kinase from mitotic cell extracts phosphorylated PTP-S2 resulting in mobility shift. These results are consistent with the suggestion that during metaphase PTP-S2 is phosphorylated (possibly by CK2 or a CK2-like enzyme), resulting in its dissociation from chromatin.

  20. Integration of biological data by kernels on graph nodes allows prediction of new genes involved in mitotic chromosome condensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hériché, Jean-Karim; Lees, Jon G; Morilla, Ian; Walter, Thomas; Petrova, Boryana; Roberti, M Julia; Hossain, M Julius; Adler, Priit; Fernández, José M; Krallinger, Martin; Haering, Christian H; Vilo, Jaak; Valencia, Alfonso; Ranea, Juan A; Orengo, Christine; Ellenberg, Jan

    2014-08-15

    The advent of genome-wide RNA interference (RNAi)-based screens puts us in the position to identify genes for all functions human cells carry out. However, for many functions, assay complexity and cost make genome-scale knockdown experiments impossible. Methods to predict genes required for cell functions are therefore needed to focus RNAi screens from the whole genome on the most likely candidates. Although different bioinformatics tools for gene function prediction exist, they lack experimental validation and are therefore rarely used by experimentalists. To address this, we developed an effective computational gene selection strategy that represents public data about genes as graphs and then analyzes these graphs using kernels on graph nodes to predict functional relationships. To demonstrate its performance, we predicted human genes required for a poorly understood cellular function-mitotic chromosome condensation-and experimentally validated the top 100 candidates with a focused RNAi screen by automated microscopy. Quantitative analysis of the images demonstrated that the candidates were indeed strongly enriched in condensation genes, including the discovery of several new factors. By combining bioinformatics prediction with experimental validation, our study shows that kernels on graph nodes are powerful tools to integrate public biological data and predict genes involved in cellular functions of interest. PMID:24943848

  1. Activation of RAF1 (c-RAF by the Marine Alkaloid Lasonolide A Induces Rapid Premature Chromosome Condensation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rozenn Jossé

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Lasonolide A (LSA, a potent antitumor polyketide from the marine sponge, Forcepia sp., induces rapid and reversible protein hyperphosphorylation and premature chromosome condensation (PCC at nanomolar concentrations independent of cyclin-dependent kinases. To identify cellular targets of LSA, we screened 2951 shRNAs targeting a pool of human kinases and phosphatases (1140 RefSeqs to identify genes that modulate PCC in response to LSA. This led to the identification of RAF1 (C-RAF as a mediator of LSA-induced PCC, as shRNAs against RAF1 conferred resistance to LSA. We found that LSA induced RAF1 phosphorylation on Serine 338 within minutes in human colorectal carcinoma HCT-116, ovarian carcinoma OVCAR-8, and Burkitt’s lymphoma CA46 cell lines. RAF1 depletion by siRNAs attenuated LSA-induced PCC in HCT-116 and OVCAR-8 cells. Furthermore, mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEF with homozygous deletion in Raf1, but not deletion in the related kinase Braf, were resistant to LSA-induced PCC. Complementation of Raf1−/− MEFs with wild-type human RAF1, but not with kinase-dead RAF1 mutant, restored LSA-induced PCC. Finally, the Raf inhibitor sorafenib, but not the MEK inhibitor AZD6244, effectively suppressed LSA-induced PCC. Our findings implicate a previously unknown, MAPK-independent role of RAF1 in chromatin condensation and potent activation of this pathway by LSA.

  2. A novel parameter, cell-cycle progression index, for radiation dose absorbed estimation in the premature chromosome condensation assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The calyculin A-induced premature chromosome condensation (PCC) assay is a simple and useful method for assessing the cell-cycle distribution in cells, since calyculin A induces chromosome condensation in various phases of the cell cycle. In this study, a novel parameter, the cell-cycle progression index (CPI), in the PCC assay was validated as a novel bio-marker for bio-dosimetry. Peripheral blood was drawn from healthy donors after informed consent was obtained. CPI was investigated using a human peripheral blood lymphocyte (PBL) ex vivo irradiation (60Co-gamma rays: ∼0.6 Gy min-1, or X ray: 1.0 Gy min-1; 0-10 Gy) model. The calyculin A-induced PCC assay was performed for chromosome preparation. PCC cells were divided into the following five categories according to cell-cycle stage: non-PCC, G1-PCC, S-PCC, G2/M-PCC and M/A-PCC cells. CPI was calculated as the ratio of G2/M-PCC cells to G1-PCC cells. The PCC-stage distribution varied markedly with irradiation doses. The G1-PCC cell fraction was significantly reduced, and the G2/M-PCC cell fraction increased, in 10-Gy-irradiated PBL after 48 h of culture. CPI levels were fitted to an exponential dose-response curve with gamma-ray irradiation [y = 0.6729 + 0.3934 exp(0.5685D), r = 1.0000, p < 0.0001] and X-ray irradiation [y = -0.3743 + 0.9744 exp(0.3321D), r = 0.9999, p < 0.0001]. There were no significant individual (p = 0.853) or gender effects (p = 0.951) on the CPI in the human peripheral blood ex vivo irradiation model. Furthermore, CPI measurements are rapid (< 15 min per case). These results suggest that the CPI is a useful screening tool for the assessment of radiation doses received ranging from 0 to 10 Gy in radiation exposure early after a radiation event, especially after a mass-casualty radiological incident. (authors)

  3. Flows of a Vapor due to Phase Change Processes at the Condensed Phases with Temperature Fields as their Internal Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onishi, Yoshimoto; Takeshi, Ooshida

    2005-05-01

    Transient to steady motions of a vapor caused by the evaporation and condensation processes occurring at the condensed phases placed in parallel have been studied based on the Boltzmann equation of BGK type. As the internal structures of the condensed phases, the temperature fields are taken into account. Because of this, the temperatures of the interfaces become unknown parameters and, therefore, the condition of the continuity of energy flow across the interface has to be imposed simultaneously with the conditions so far used for the cases with no internal structures. This extra condition gives great difficulty in the numerical simulations but this has been surmounted by a simple method developed earlier in our laboratory. The present analysis has also incorporated a certain kind of imperfectness of the interface in the boundary conditions by the introduction of a simple parameter, called the imperfectness parameter here, first proposed by Wortberg and his colleague. The results obtained describe appropriately the development of the transient flow fields due to the processes of evaporation and condensation at the interfaces across which the continuous energy flows are taking place. Some of the features worth to be mentioned are that 1) a certain value of the latent heat parameter gives the maxima of the mass and energy flows. This fact, which is newly found here, is due to the coupling effects of the latent heat parameter and the existence of the internal structures of the condensed phases; 2) the negative temperature gradient phenomenon, a well-known phenomenon at steady state in weak evaporation and condensation problems between the two condensed phases having no internal structures, seems to be non-existent in the present case with internal structures; 3) the negative mass flow phenomenon, first noticed and discussed by Sone and Onishi, seems to be non-existent at steady state but this surely manifests itself in a short period of time during the transitional

  4. Premature chromosome condensation associated with fluorescence in situ hybridisation detects cytogenic abnormalities after a CT scan: Evaluation of the low-dose effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to assess the cytogenetic effects of the X ray irradiation used during an CT scan in order to estimate the mean absorbed dose in circulating lymphocytes. Chromosomal aberrations were scored in blood lymphocytes of ten patients undergoing CT scans, by applying fluorescence in situ hybridisation to metaphase cells and premature chromosome condensation (PCC) with chromosomes 1, 3 and 4 painting probes immediately after exposure. This generated a dosimetric index that reflects the dose to the circulating lymphocytes. By using PCC a significant increase in the frequency of chromosomal fragments was observed immediately after an CT scan. However, no significant increase in chromosomal aberration was detected in metaphase cells. The mean dosimetric index immediately after exposure was 0.057 Gy (95% CI: 0.052-0.082 Gy). This dosimetric index depends essentially on the size of the examined and exposed blood volumes. This dose is in close agreement with the dose length product (DLP) (Gy cm) (R=0.80). It should be kept in mind when justifying requests for diagnostic CT scans especially in young patients. The presence of chromosomal fragments after a CT scan indicated the cytogenetic effect of a low dose. PCC associated with chromosome painting is a method for detecting the cytogenetic effect of a low dose immediately after exposure. (author)

  5. The Utility of Lymphocyte Premature Chromosome Condensation Analysis for Biological Dosimetry Following Accidental Overexposure to Ionising Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Premature chromosome condensation (PCC) appears to have a possible utility for biological dosimetry purposes. The PCC technique may be adapted for cases of suspicion of overexposure where sampling is performed at least one day after an accident. For this purpose, human blood samples were exposed in vitro to 60Co (0.5 Gy.min-1) up to 4 Gy and the PCC technique was performed after 24 h, 48 h, and 72 h of DNA repair at 37 deg. C. Analysis of excess PCC fragments distribution showed an overdispersion and the dose-effect relationship was best characterised by linear regression. Radiation-induced damage was reduced to 32% between the first and the second day of repair and to 42% the following day. Statistical precision of the dose was found to be dependent on the irradiation dose and on the number of cells examined. The necessity to establish dose-response relationships after different periods of DNA repair is demonstrated, and the use of PCC excess fragments yield as a bioindicator should take this fact into account. (author)

  6. Techniques for induction of premature chromosome condensation (PCC) by Calyculin-A and micronucleus assay for biodosimetry in Vietnam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and World Health Organization are interested in biological dosimetry method for radiation emergency medicine currently. Some cytogenetic techniques such as premature chromosome condensation (PCC) induced by Calyculin-A and micronucleus (MN) assay are necessary to develop biodosimetry in Vietnam. In this study, we optimized the condition for MN assay with 6 µg/ml Cytochalasin-B concentration and 72.5 hours for peripheral lymphocyte blood culture. The optimization for PCC method is 50 nM Calyculin-A concentration for 45 minutes peripheral lymphocyte blood treatment. For samples exposed to 3.0 Gy gamma 60Co (dose rate 0.0916 Gy/s), the frequency of MN is 19.02 ± 0.38%, NBP is 1.95 ± 0.28%, dicentric and ring is 41.43 ± 8.12% and frag and min is 63.33 ± 5.16%. For samples exposed to 6.0 Gy gamma 60Co (dose rate 0.0916 Gy/s), the frequency of ring-PCC is 17.73 ± 2.46%, extra unite is 218.91± 7.58%, dicentric is 83.81 ± 1.09%, ring is 10.75 ± 1.74%, fragment and minute is 193.17 ± 13.10%. MN and ring-PCC are specific marker applying for biodosimetry. (author)

  7. Establishment of the dose-effect curve between Calyculin A induced premature chromosome condensation ring and exposed dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to explore the probability of PCC-ring (PCC-R) in G2/M-PCC cells could be used to quantify the extent of ionizing radiation damage, premature chromosome condensation (PCC) induced by Calyculin A was analyzed. Peripheral blood samples were irradiated with 0, 4, 8, 12, 16 and 20 Gy 60Co γ-rays. The PCC-R, which was induced by Calyculin A after culture of 48 h, was observed in the samples exposed to different dose of 60Co γ-rays. The G2/M-PCC index and the distribution of PCC-R were calculated; the dose-response curves between the frequency of PCC-R and exposed dose level were established. The results showed that PCC was successfully induced by Calyculin A. The G2/M-PCC index decreased with exposed dose level. The PCC-R distribution followed a Poisson law for most of dose levels except 20 Gy. The frequency of PCC-R increased with the exposed dose level. And the dose-effect curve between the frequency of hollow-, kidney-shape ring and exposed dose level was fitted with two models, a linear model y=0.0128x-0.0104 R2=0.9898 and a non-linear model y=0.00002x2+0.0085x+0.0011 R2=0.9996. The frequency of PCC-R in peripheral blood lymphocyte G2/M-PCC cells induced by Calyculin A could be used to quantify the extent of ionizing radiation damage. (authors)

  8. Effects of different premature chromosome condensation method on dose-curve of 60Co γ-ray

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To study the effect of traditional method and improved method of the premature chromosome condensation (PCC) on the dose-effect curve of 60Co γ ray, for choosing the rapid and accurate biological dose estimating method for the accident emergency. Methods: Collected 3 healthy male cubits venous blood (23 to 28 years old), and irradiated by 0, 1.0, 5.0, 10.0, 15.0, 20.0 Gy 60Co γ ray (absorbed dose rate: 0.635 Gy/min). Observed the relation of dose-effect curve in the 2 incubation time (50 hours and 60 hours) of the traditional method and improved method. Used the dose-effect curve to verify the exposure of 10.0 Gy (absorbed dose rate: 0.670 Gy/min). Results: (1) In the traditional method of 50-hour culture, the PCC cell count in 15.0 Gy and 20.0 Gy was of no statistical significance. But there were statistical significance in the traditional method of 60-hours culture and improved method (50-hour culture and 60-hour culture). Used the last 3 culture methods to make dose curve. (2) In the above 3 culture methods, the related coefficient between PCC ring and exposure dose was quite close (all of more than 0.996, P0.05), the morphology of regression straight lines almost overlap. (3) Used the above 3 dose-effect curves to estimate the irradiation results (10.0 Gy), the error was less than or equal to 8%, all of them were within the allowable range of the biological experiment (15%). Conclusion: The 3 dose-effect curves of the above 3 culture methods can apply to biological dose estimating of large doses of ionizing radiation damage. Especially the improved method of 50-hour culture,it is much faster to estimate and it should be regarded as the first choice in accident emergency. (authors)

  9. Hydrogen embrittlement of 4340 steel due to condensation during vaporized hydrogen peroxide treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research highlights: → Exposure of low-alloy, high strength 4340 steel to water vapor with 500 or 1000 ppm hydrogen peroxide for 4.8 h does not lead to hydrogen embrittlement per ASTM 519E-06. → Exposure of low-alloy, high strength 4340 steel to 35 wt.% H2O2 in water for 4.8 h does not lead to hydrogen embrittlement per ASTM 519E-06. → Operation of vaporized hydrogen peroxide decontamination chambers at 1300 or 1600 ppm hydrogen peroxide concentration can lead to significant condensation with very high concentrations of H2O2 (50-75 wt.% H2O2) in the condensed liquid → Exposure of low-alloy, high strength 4340 steel to vaporized hydrogen peroxide treatments at 1300 or 1600 ppm hydrogen peroxide concentration for 4.8 h led to extensive condensation of high H2O2 concentration (∼64 wt.% H2O2) in the process chamber and hydrogen embrittlement of the steel per ASTM 519E-06. - Abstract: Hydrogen peroxide vapor has been proposed as a sterilant/decontaminant for usage in buildings and transportation vehicles including emergency vehicles, buses, trains and aircraft. Although the efficacy of the process has been demonstrated, questions regarding the compatibility of vaporized hydrogen peroxide treatments with the many diverse materials of construction have been raised. This paper presents results on the embrittlement of high strength AISI 4340 steel as a result of condensation of the vapor during exposure to vaporized hydrogen peroxide. Notched four point bending samples of AISI 4340 steel were tested using the standard test methods of ASTM F519-06 to quantify susceptibility to hydrogen embrittlement in this aggressive service environment. No embrittlement effects were observed for samples exposed to strictly vapor phase hydrogen peroxide for concentrations up to 1000 ppm H2O2 and exposure times of 4.8 h. Higher concentrations of 1300 and 1600 ppm H2O2 led to the condensation of the vapor throughout the process chamber and brittle fracture of samples. These results

  10. Continuous growth of droplet size variance due to condensation in turbulent clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Sardina, Gaetano; Brandt, Luca; Caballero, Rodrigo

    2015-01-01

    We use a stochastic model and direct numerical simulation to study the impact of turbulence on cloud droplet growth by condensation. We show that the variance of the droplet size distribution increases in time as $t^{1/2}$, with growth rate proportional the large-to-small turbulent scale separation and to the turbulence integral scales but independent of the smallest turbulence scale. Direct numerical simulations confirm this result and produce realistically broad droplet size spectra over time intervals of 20 minutes, comparable with the time of rain formation.

  11. One-dimensional analysis of unsteady flows due to supercritical heat addition in high speed condensing steam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unsteadiness in supersonic flow in nozzles can be generated by the release of heat due to spontaneous condensation. The heat released is termed 'supercritical' and may be responsible for turbine blades failure in turbine cascade as it causes a supersonic flow to decelerate. When the Mach number is reduced to unity, the flow can no longer sustain the additional heat and becomes unstable. This paper aims to numerically investigate the unsteadiness caused by supercritical heat addition in one-dimensional condensing flows. The governing equations for mass, momentum and energy, coupled with the equations describing the wetness fraction and droplet growth are integrated and solved iteratively to reveal the final solution. Comparison is made with well-established experimental and numerical solution done by previous researchers that shows similar phenomena.

  12. Force on a slow moving impurity due to thermal and quantum fluctuations in a 1D Bose-Einstein condensate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sykes, Andrew [UNIV OF QUEENSLAND

    2009-01-01

    We study the drag force acting on an impurity moving through a 1D Bose-Einstein condensate in the presence of both quantum and thermal fluctuations. We are able to find exact analytical solutions of the partial differential equations to the level of the Bogoliubov approximation. At zero temperature, we find a nonzero force is exerted on the impurity at subcritical velocities, due to the scattering of quantum fluctuations. We make the following explicit assumptions: far from the impurity the system is in a quantum state given by that of a zero (or finite) temperature Bose-Einstein condensate, and the scattering process generates only causally related reflection/transmission. The results raise unanswered questions in the quantum dynamics associated with the formation of persistent currents.

  13. Characterization of partial trisomy 9p due to insertional translocation by chromosomal (micro)FISH

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Pater, JM; Ippel, PF; van Dam, WM; Loneus, WH; Engelen, JJM

    2002-01-01

    We describe a family with an insertion 12;9 translocation occurring in a balanced form in a mother and two sons, but in an unbalanced form in the proband, resulting in trisomy of chromosome region 9p22-->9p24. The proband manifests typical features of trisomy 9p; the clinical signs were mental and g

  14. A Fetus with Hb Bart's Disease Due to Maternal Uniparental Disomy for Chromosome 16.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Au, Patrick K C; Kan, Anita S Y; Tang, Mary H Y; Leung, Kwok Y; Chan, Kelvin Y K; Tang, Tommy W F; Lau, Elizabeth T

    2016-01-01

    We here report an unusual case of Hb Bart's (γ4) disease. Thalassemia screening of a couple showed that the wife was an α(0)-thalassemia (α(0)-thal) carrier and her husband's mean corpuscular volume (MCV) was normal. Chorionic villus sampling (CVS) was performed at 13 weeks' gestation for positive Down syndrome screening and chromosomal study of the cultured CVS showed a normal karyotype. Ultrasound examination at 22 weeks' gestation showed fetal cardiomegaly and raised middle cerebral artery peak systolic velocity. Cordocentesis confirmed fetal anemia and showed Hb Bart's disease. Multiplex gap-polymerase chain reaction (gap-PCR) for α-thal deletions on DNA extracted from the CVS showed the presence of a homozygous α(0)-thal - -(SEA) (Southeast Asian) deletion. The husband was found to be a carrier of the α(+)-thal -α(3.7) (rightward) deletion. Non paternity was excluded by fluorescent PCR using short tandem repeat (STR) markers on chromosomes 13, 18 and 21. A de novo terminal deletion of chromosome 16 was excluded by array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH). Detection of uniparental disomy (UPD), using STR markers on chromosome 16 showed maternal uniparental isodisomy from 16pter to 16p13.2, and uniparental heterodisomy from 16p13.13 to 16qter. PMID:26574185

  15. Superconductivity due to Condensation of Monopoles around RCD Strings in SU(2 Gauge Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. S. Rajput

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The study of the condensation of monopoles and the resulting chromomagnetic superconductivity have been undertaken in restricted chromodynamics of SU(2 gauge theory. Constructing the RCD Lagrangian and the partition function for monopoles in terms of string action and the action of the current around the strings, the monopole current in RCD chromo magnetic superconductor has been derived and it has shown that in London' limit the penetration length governs the monopole density around RCD string in chromo magnetic superconductors while with finite (nonzero coherence length the leading behavior of the monopole density at large distances from the string is controlled by the coherence length and not by the penetration length.

  16. Biodosimetry estimation using the ratio of the longest: shortest length in the premature chromosome condensation (PCC) method applying autocapture and automatic image analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The combination of automatic image acquisition and automatic image analysis of premature chromosome condensation (PCC) spreads was tested as a rapid biodosimeter protocol. Human peripheral lymphocytes were irradiated with 60Co gamma rays in a single dose of between 1 and 20 Gy, stimulated with phytohaemaglutinin and incubated for 48 h, division blocked with Colcemid, and PCC-induced by Calyculin A. Images of chromosome spreads were captured and analysed automatically by combining the Metafer 4 and CellProfiler platforms. Automatic measurement of chromosome lengths allows the calculation of the length ratio (LR) of the longest and the shortest piece that can be used for dose estimation since this ratio is correlated with ionizing radiation dose. The LR of the longest and the shortest chromosome pieces showed the best goodness-of-fit to a linear model in the dose interval tested. The application of the automatic analysis increases the potential use of the PCC method for triage in the event of massive radiation causalities. (author)

  17. Normal newborn with prenatal suspicion of X chromosome monosomy due to confined placental mosaicism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serapinas, Danielius; Bartkeviciene, Daiva; Valantinaviciene, Emilija; Machtejeviene, Egle

    2016-10-01

    The recent introduction of cell-free DNA (cfDNA)-based noninvasive prenatal testing (NIPT) offers pregnant women a more accurate method than traditional serum screening methods for detecting fetal aneuploidies. Clinical trials have demonstrated the efficacy of NIPT for Down, Edwards and Patau syndromes. However NIPT approaches that take advantage of single-nucelotide polymorphism (SNP) information potentially allow the identification of triploidy, chromosomal microdeletion syndromes and other unusual genetic variants. To highlight this approach of NIPT we present a rare case of confined placental X chromosome monosomy mosaicism that was prenatally suspected with a single-nucleotide polymorphism-based noninvasive prenatal test. The results of invasive tests (amniocentesis) showed small proportion of X chromosome mosaicism (45, X[5]/46, XX[95]). After birth karyotype of the girl revealed no abnormalities (46 XX), confirming that mosaicism was limited to the placenta. These results highlight the need of patient's informed consent and thorough pretest and postest counseling to ensure that they understand the limitations and advantages of the tests and the implications of the resultss. PMID:27606664

  18. Caffeine-Induced Premature Chromosome Condensation Results in the Apoptosis-Like Programmed Cell Death in Root Meristems of Vicia faba.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorota Rybaczek

    Full Text Available We have demonstrated that the activation of apoptosis-like programmed cell death (AL-PCD was a secondary result of caffeine (CF induced premature chromosome condensation (PCC in hydroxyurea-synchronized Vicia faba root meristem cells. Initiation of the apoptotic-like cell degradation pathway seemed to be the result of DNA damage generated by treatment with hydroxyurea (HU [double-stranded breaks (DSBs mostly] and co-treatment with HU/CF [single-stranded breaks (SSBs mainly]. A single chromosome comet assay was successfully used to study different types of DNA damage (neutral variant-DSBs versus alkaline-DSBs or SSBs. The immunocytochemical detection of H2AXS139Ph and PARP-2 were used as markers for DSBs and SSBs, respectively. Acridine orange and ethidium bromide (AO/EB were applied for quantitative immunofluorescence measurements of dead, dying and living cells. Apoptotic-type DNA fragmentation and positive TUNEL reaction finally proved that CF triggers AL-PCD in stressed V. faba root meristem cells. In addition, the results obtained under transmission electron microscopy (TEM further revealed apoptotic-like features at the ultrastructural level of PCC-type cells: (i extensive vacuolization; (ii abnormal chromatin condensation, its marginalization and concomitant degradation; (iii formation of autophagy-like vesicles (iv protoplast shrinkage (v fragmentation of cell nuclei and (vi extensive degeneration of the cells. The results obtained have been discussed with respect to the vacuolar/autolytic type of plant-specific AL-PCD.

  19. On breathing in temperature in flows of a vapor due to evaporation from its spherical condensed phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onishi, Yoshimoto; Fuji, Takahiro

    2008-06-01

    One of the features in evaporation flows from a condensed phase of finite size placed in an infinite expanse of its vapor in three-dimensional space would be the existence of the so-called breathing phenomenon of temperature in its course to approach the state at infinity. The pressure of the gas, as one might expect, approaches uniformly the state specified at infinity, whereas the temperature does not but seems to take some rest for a while on its way and then starts again to approach slowly and monotonically the specified state at infinity. This is what we call breathing in temperature. This phenomenon was pointed out by Takeuchi and Onishi [Rarefied Gas Dynamics, edited by C. Shen (Pekin University Press, Beijing, 1996), pp. 887-882] in their weakly nonlinear asymptotic analysis based on the kinetic equation on steady evaporation flows from a spherical condensed phase placed in a mixture of its vapor and a noncondensable gas. The detailed discussion on this phenomenon, however, is not yet given; particularly, the reason why the temperature seems to take some rest and what originates this are not known. The present study aims to clarify the phenomenon, paying particular attention to its origin and pursuing what it is. In so doing, we have made a certain conjecture on the origin and, to show this to be true, we have taken up a simple initial and boundary-value problem of evaporation from a spherical condensed phase immersed in an infinite expanse of its vapor. Starting from a simple initial state, we followed in a numerical simulation how the flow field developed in time, getting finally a conclusion that the contact region produced initially by the evaporation process which occurs at the interface of the condensed phase is the cause; the contact region remains left undiffused at a finite distance from the interface in the flow field even at the steady state due to the counterbalance between the convection ability of the flow in the radial direction and the

  20. Reciprocal white matter alterations due to 16p11.2 chromosomal deletions versus duplications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yi Shin; Owen, Julia P; Pojman, Nicholas J; Thieu, Tony; Bukshpun, Polina; Wakahiro, Mari L J; Marco, Elysa J; Berman, Jeffrey I; Spiro, John E; Chung, Wendy K; Buckner, Randy L; Roberts, Timothy P L; Nagarajan, Srikantan S; Sherr, Elliott H; Mukherjee, Pratik

    2016-08-01

    Copy number variants at the 16p11.2 chromosomal locus are associated with several neuropsychiatric disorders, including autism, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, and speech and language disorders. A gene dosage dependence has been suggested, with 16p11.2 deletion carriers demonstrating higher body mass index and head circumference, and 16p11.2 duplication carriers demonstrating lower body mass index and head circumference. Here, we use diffusion tensor imaging to elucidate this reciprocal relationship in white matter organization, showing widespread increases of fractional anisotropy throughout the supratentorial white matter in pediatric deletion carriers and, in contrast, extensive decreases of white matter fractional anisotropy in pediatric and adult duplication carriers. We find associations of these white matter alterations with cognitive and behavioral impairments. We further demonstrate the value of imaging metrics for characterizing the copy number variant phenotype by employing linear discriminant analysis to predict the gene dosage status of the study subjects. These results show an effect of 16p11.2 gene dosage on white matter microstructure, and further suggest that opposite changes in diffusion tensor imaging metrics can lead to similar cognitive and behavioral deficits. Given the large effect sizes found in this study, our results support the view that specific genetic variations are more strongly associated with specific brain alterations than are shared neuropsychiatric diagnoses. Hum Brain Mapp 37:2833-2848, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27219475

  1. Effects of inhibitors of DNA, RNA, and protein synthesis on frequencies and types of premature chromosome condensation from x-ray induced micronuclei. [Cytosine arabinoside, azathioprine, thymidine, trenimon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madle, S.; Nowak, J.; Obe, G.

    1976-10-28

    Cells containing x-ray induced micronuclei were treated for a few hours before fixation with inhibitors of DNA synthesis (cytosine arabinoside; azathioprine; thymidine; trenimon), of RNA synthesis (actinomycin D; ethidium bromide), and of protein synthesis (puromycin). Only the inhibitors of DNA synthesis lead to a significant suppression of the frequencies of mitoses with micronucleus derived premature chromosome condensation (PCC). We tend to interpret the result as follows: Micronuclei that are in the G1 phase of their cell cycles are accumulated at the G1/S border or in the early S phase of their cell cycles under the influence of the inhibitors of the DNA synthesis. Micronuclei blocked in this way cannot be induced to undergo PCC and seem to disappear from the cells.

  2. Kinetics of the formation of chromosome aberrations in x-irradiated human lymphocytes: Analysis by premature chromosome condensation with delayed fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Human lymphocytes irradiated with graded doses of up to 5 Gy of 150 kV X rays were fused with mitotic CHO cells after delay times ranging from 0 to 14 h after irradiation. The yields of dicentrics seen under PCC conditions, using C-banding for centromere detection, and of excess acentric fragments observed in the PCC experiment were determined by image analysis. At 4 Gy the time course of the yield of dicentrics shows an early plateau for delay times up to 2 h, then an S-shaped rise and a final plateau which is reached after a delay time of about 8 to 10 h. Whereas the dose-yield curve measured at zero delay time is strictly linear, the shape of the curve obtained for 8 h delay time is linear-quadratic. The linear yield component, αD is formed entirely in the fast process manifested in the early plateau, while component βD2 is developed slowly in the subsequent hours. Analysis of the kinetics of the rise of the S-shaped curve for yield as a function of time leads to the postulate of an open-quotes intermediate productclose quotes of pairwise DNA lesion interaction, still fragile when subjected to the stress of PCC, but gradually processed into a stable dicentric chromosome. It is concluded that the observed difference in the kinetics of the α and β components explains a number of earlier results, especially the disappearance of the β component at high LET, and opens possibilities for chemical and physical modification of the β component during the extended formation process after irradiation observed here. 22 refs., 4 figs

  3. Chromosome anomalies in bone marrow as primary cause of aplastic or hypoplastic conditions and peripheral cytopenia: disorders due to secondary impairment of RUNX1 and MPL genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marletta Cristina

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chromosome changes in the bone marrow (BM of patients with persistent cytopenia are often considered diagnostic for a myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS. Comprehensive cytogenetic evaluations may give evidence of the real pathogenetic role of these changes in cases with cytopenia without morphological signs of MDS. Results Chromosome anomalies were found in the BM of three patients, without any morphological evidence of MDS: 1 an acquired complex rearrangement of chromosome 21 in a boy with severe aplastic anaemia (SAA; the rearrangement caused the loss of exons 2–8 of the RUNX1 gene with subsequent hypoexpression. 2 a constitutional complex rearrangement of chromosome 21 in a girl with congenital thrombocytopenia; the rearrangement led to RUNX1 disruption and hypoexpression. 3 an acquired paracentric inversion of chromosome 1, in which two regions at the breakpoints were shown to be lost, in a boy with aplastic anaemia; the MPL gene, localized in chromosome 1 short arms was not mutated neither disrupted, but its expression was severely reduced: we postulate that the aplastic anaemia was due to position effects acting both in cis and in trans, and causing Congenital Amegakaryocytic Thrombocytopenia (CAMT. Conclusions A clonal anomaly in BM does not imply per se a diagnosis of MDS: a subgroup of BM hypoplastic disorders is directly due to chromosome structural anomalies with effects on specific genes, as was the case of RUNX1 and MPL in the patients here reported with diagnosis of SAA, thrombocytopenia, and CAMT. The anomaly may be either acquired or constitutional, and it may act by deletion/disruption of the gene, or by position effects. Full cytogenetic investigations, including a-CGH, should always be part of the diagnostic evaluation of patients with BM aplasia/hypoplasia and peripheral cytopenias.

  4. Linkage disequilibrium, SNP frequency change due to selection, and association mapping in popcorn chromosome regions containing QTLs for quality traits

    OpenAIRE

    Geísa Pinheiro Paes; José Marcelo Soriano Viana; Fabyano Fonseca e Silva; Gabriel Borges Mundim

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The objectives of this study were to assess linkage disequilibrium (LD) and selection-induced changes in single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) frequency, and to perform association mapping in popcorn chromosome regions containing quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for quality traits. Seven tropical and two temperate popcorn populations were genotyped for 96 SNPs chosen in chromosome regions containing QTLs for quality traits. The populations were phenotyped for expansion volume, 100-kerne...

  5. The effect on lymphocyte chromosomes of additional radiation burden due to fallout in Salzburg (Austria) from the Chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An investigation has been carried out to determine whether chromosome aberrations in peripheral blood lymphocytes reflect the elevated environmental dose of low-LET ionising radiation, mainly due to radiocesium from Chernobyl fallout, to the population living in Salzburg city. Sixteen volunteers were sampled 1 year after the Chernobyl accident. Two of these persons were also sampled before the accident, and then in 1988 and 1990. The radioactive environment of Salzburg city and the radiation burden of its inhabitants have been frequently determined before and after the accident. The Cs-137 content of the volunteers was measured by whole-body counting. The additional external plus internal radiation doses in the year 1987 to the tested individuals ranged between 15 and 68% of the former normal environmental burden. The aberration frequencies showed a sharp increase of about a factor 6 from the pre-Chernobyl dose rate (0.9. mGy/year) to the post-Chernobyl dose rate (about 2 mGy/year total) but then decreased again with higher additional dose. In the two persons analysed before and up to 4 years after the accident the aberration yield showed a significant increase from 1984/85 to 1987, a decrease in 1988 and a further decrease in 1990. If these last 2 values are plotted against additional dose they fit the curve of the pooled 1987 values. The dose-effect curves revealed the same tendency as we found in various previous investigations and support the assumption that repair enzymes could be triggered by a certain amount of damage to the DNA

  6. Charged Condensation

    CERN Document Server

    Gabadadze, Gregory

    2008-01-01

    We consider Bose-Einstein condensation of massive electrically charged scalars in a uniform background of charged fermions. We focus on the case when the scalar condensate screens the background charge, while the net charge of the system resides on its boundary surface. A distinctive signature of this substance is that the photon acquires a Lorentz-violating mass in the bulk of the condensate. Due to this mass, the transverse and longitudinal gauge modes propagate with different group velocities. We give qualitative arguments that at high enough densities and low temperatures a charged system of electrons and helium-4 nuclei, if held together by laboratory devices or by force of gravity, can form such a substance. We briefly discuss possible manifestations of the charged condensate in compact astrophysical objects.

  7. Diagnosis of Familial Wolf-Hirschhorn Syndrome due to a Paternal Cryptic Chromosomal Rearrangement by Conventional and Molecular Cytogenetic Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venegas-Vega, Carlos A.; Zepeda, Luis M.; Garduño-Zarazúa, Luz M.; Berumen, Jaime; Kofman, Susana; Cervantes, Alicia

    2013-01-01

    The use of conventional cytogenetic techniques in combination with fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) and single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) microarrays is necessary for the identification of cryptic rearrangements in the diagnosis of chromosomal syndromes. We report two siblings, a boy of 9 years and 9 months of age and his 7-years- and 5-month-old sister, with the classic Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome (WHS) phenotype. Using high-resolution GTG- and NOR-banding karyotypes, as well as FISH analysis, we characterized a pure 4p deletion in both sibs and a balanced rearrangement in their father, consisting in an insertion of 4p material within a nucleolar organizing region of chromosome 15. Copy number variant (CNV) analysis using SNP arrays showed that both siblings have a similar size of 4p deletion (~6.5 Mb). Our results strongly support the need for conventional cytogenetic and FISH analysis, as well as high-density microarray mapping for the optimal characterization of the genetic imbalance in patients with WHS; parents must always be studied for recognizing cryptic balanced chromosomal rearrangements for an adequate genetic counseling. PMID:23484094

  8. Down syndrome due to a recombination of a chromosome 21 paracentric inversion in 1 of 2 cases with a review of paracentric recombinants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jewett, T.; Rao, P.N.; Berry, M. [Wake Forest Univ., Winston-Salem, NC (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    We recently identified 2 paracentric inversions (PAI) of chromosome 21. Case 1 was identified prenatally and paternally inherited: 46,XY,inv(21)(q21.2q22.13). The outcome is pending. Case 2 was a newborn male infant with clinical features of Down syndrome and an apparent inversion-duplication within chromosome 21. Parental chromosome analysis showed a maternal PAI: 46,XX,inv(21)(q21.2q22.3). The resulting child`s karyotype was: 46,XY,rec(21)(pter{yields}q21.2::q22.3{yields}q21.2::q22.3{yields}pter). Duplication of chromosome region q22.3{yields}qter was confirmed by FISH using a Down syndrome region specific probe (Cambio). Cytologically, the cornerstone of meiotic recombination from a paracentric inversion is the {open_quotes}reverse loop{close_quotes} model. In this model, a crossover event in the inversion loop results in the formation of gametes carrying either a dicentric chromatid, an acentric fragment, a normal chromatid or a chromatid with an inversion. However, a literature review of 326 PAI identified only 2 dicentrics and 15 other recombinants: 1 duplication/deletion; 6 deletions; 8 duplications. A U-type exchange model during meiosis within the inversion loop may best account for duplication/deletion recombinants. In contrast, the recombination in our case 2 would have occurred outside the loop. It is possible that no single explanation for PAI recombination may account for all outcomes. Alternative models of PAI recominational events will be presented. The literature suggests a low risk for prenatal loss due to abnormal PAI recombinants. In our review, viable offspring with recombinant chromosomes occurred in 3.8% of the PAI. Considering the potential for an increased incidence of recombination, prenatal diagnosis for all PAI carriers is warranted.

  9. Fragmentation and desorption from condensed alcohols due to soft X-rays: relevance to solid state astrochemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Methanol and ethanol, the simplest organic alcohols, are important precursors of more complex prebiotic species and are found abundantly in icy mantles on interstellar and protostellar dust. These molecules have been detected through infrared spectroscopy in some low- and high-mass protostars, such as W33A and RAFGL 7009, and also in comets, as Hale-Bopp and other Solar system bodies, such as the Centaur 5145 Pholus grains. All of these astronomical environments are subjected to some kind of ionizing agents, such as cosmic rays, electrons and photons (e.g. stellar radiation field). The aim of this work is to experimentally study the ionization, dissociation and ion desorption processes induced by photons and electrons on alcohols, CH3OH and CH3CH2OH, as part of a systematic experimental study of condensed (ice phase) prebiotic molecules. We have employed soft X-ray photons at the oxygen K edge and variable electron energies to simulate the effects of stellar radiation field on the astrophysics ices. These results were also compared with effects produced by charged particles from cosmic rays. Ion photodesorption experiments on the icy surface were carried out at the Brazilian Synchrotron Light Source (LNLS), using the Spherical Grating Monochromator (SGM) beam line, operated in the single-bunch mode of the storage ring, with a period of 311 ns and bunch width of 60ps. Several fragments such as CH2+, O+, H+ and H3+ have been identified and their desorption rates per impact were determined and compared with previous results obtained using different ionization agents, such as electrons, heavy ions and photons at different energies in order to provide data to astrochemical models. (author)

  10. Fragmentation and desorption from condensed alcohols due to soft X-rays: relevance to solid state astrochemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almeida, G.C.; Rocco, M.L.M.; Boechat-Roberty, H.M.; Nazareth, A.M.; Amaral, L. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil); Andrade, D.P.P.; Bergantini, A. [Universidade do Vale do Paraiba (UNIVAP), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    Full text: Methanol and ethanol, the simplest organic alcohols, are important precursors of more complex prebiotic species and are found abundantly in icy mantles on interstellar and protostellar dust. These molecules have been detected through infrared spectroscopy in some low- and high-mass protostars, such as W33A and RAFGL 7009, and also in comets, as Hale-Bopp and other Solar system bodies, such as the Centaur 5145 Pholus grains. All of these astronomical environments are subjected to some kind of ionizing agents, such as cosmic rays, electrons and photons (e.g. stellar radiation field). The aim of this work is to experimentally study the ionization, dissociation and ion desorption processes induced by photons and electrons on alcohols, CH{sub 3}OH and CH{sub 3}CH{sub 2}OH, as part of a systematic experimental study of condensed (ice phase) prebiotic molecules. We have employed soft X-ray photons at the oxygen K edge and variable electron energies to simulate the effects of stellar radiation field on the astrophysics ices. These results were also compared with effects produced by charged particles from cosmic rays. Ion photodesorption experiments on the icy surface were carried out at the Brazilian Synchrotron Light Source (LNLS), using the Spherical Grating Monochromator (SGM) beam line, operated in the single-bunch mode of the storage ring, with a period of 311 ns and bunch width of 60ps. Several fragments such as CH{sub 2}{sup +}, O{sup +}, H{sup +} and H{sub 3}{sup +} have been identified and their desorption rates per impact were determined and compared with previous results obtained using different ionization agents, such as electrons, heavy ions and photons at different energies in order to provide data to astrochemical models. (author)

  11. A comparative analysis of chromosomal aberrations in cultured human lymphocytes due to fluoroquinolone drugs at different expression periods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anupama, M; Seiler, J P; Murthy, P B

    2010-05-01

    Fluoroquinolones (FQ) are broad-spectrum antibacterial agents widely used for the treatment of infections with various types of gram negative and gram positive bacteria. Specifically, gatifloxacin (GFX) is under development as a component in a new antituberculosis fixed-dose drug combination. In the context of this project, GFX was also tested for genotoxic activity in human peripheral lymphocytes, and the induction of chromosomal aberrations by GFX in PHA-M stimulated cultured human lymphocytes, investigated under conditions of conventional and increased expression times, was further compared to the analogous effects induced by some other second- and third-generation FQ antibacterial agents, namely ofloxacin (OFX), ciprofloxacin (CFX) and sparfloxacin (SFX). OFX did not induce any significant chromosomal aberrations in human lymphocytes. CFX and SFX exhibited slight to moderate clastogenic potential at cytotoxic concentrations (150, 175, 200 and 225 microg/ml), and GFX, a third-generation FQ, induced a clear, concentration-dependent increase in the frequency of chromosomal aberrations at cytotoxic concentrations (150, 200 and 250 microg/ml). These effects were not apparent when metaphases were analysed at the conventionally used sampling time of 24 h, but only after prolongation of the expression time between treatment and harvesting to a sampling time of 36 h (4 h exposure and 32 h expression period). Also, an increased incidence of numerical aberrations (polyploidy and endoreduplication) was seen with GFX at non-cytotoxic concentrations (12.5, 25, 50 and 75 microg/ml). These effects can be attributed to the slight cross-reactivity of FQs between their inhibitory activity towards their intended targets, the prokaryotic type II topoisomerase enzymes DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV, and the analogous mammalian enzyme topoisomerase II. We have also observed the formation of polycentrics, i.e., chromosomes with five to six centromeres, a rarely reported structural

  12. Linkage disequilibrium, SNP frequency change due to selection, and association mapping in popcorn chromosome regions containing QTLs for quality traits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paes, Geísa Pinheiro; Viana, José Marcelo Soriano; Silva, Fabyano Fonseca e; Mundim, Gabriel Borges

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The objectives of this study were to assess linkage disequilibrium (LD) and selection-induced changes in single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) frequency, and to perform association mapping in popcorn chromosome regions containing quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for quality traits. Seven tropical and two temperate popcorn populations were genotyped for 96 SNPs chosen in chromosome regions containing QTLs for quality traits. The populations were phenotyped for expansion volume, 100-kernel weight, kernel sphericity, and kernel density. The LD statistics were the difference between the observed and expected haplotype frequencies (D), the proportion of D relative to the expected maximum value in the population, and the square of the correlation between the values of alleles at two loci. Association mapping was based on least squares and Bayesian approaches. In the tropical populations, D-values greater than 0.10 were observed for SNPs separated by 100-150 Mb, while most of the D-values in the temperate populations were less than 0.05. Selection for expansion volume indirectly led to increase in LD values, population differentiation, and significant changes in SNP frequency. Some associations were observed for expansion volume and the other quality traits. The candidate genes are involved with starch, storage protein, lipid, and cell wall polysaccharides synthesis. PMID:27007903

  13. Linkage disequilibrium, SNP frequency change due to selection, and association mapping in popcorn chromosome regions containing QTLs for quality traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paes, Geísa Pinheiro; Viana, José Marcelo Soriano; Silva, Fabyano Fonseca E; Mundim, Gabriel Borges

    2016-03-01

    The objectives of this study were to assess linkage disequilibrium (LD) and selection-induced changes in single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) frequency, and to perform association mapping in popcorn chromosome regions containing quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for quality traits. Seven tropical and two temperate popcorn populations were genotyped for 96 SNPs chosen in chromosome regions containing QTLs for quality traits. The populations were phenotyped for expansion volume, 100-kernel weight, kernel sphericity, and kernel density. The LD statistics were the difference between the observed and expected haplotype frequencies (D), the proportion of D relative to the expected maximum value in the population, and the square of the correlation between the values of alleles at two loci. Association mapping was based on least squares and Bayesian approaches. In the tropical populations, D-values greater than 0.10 were observed for SNPs separated by 100-150 Mb, while most of the D-values in the temperate populations were less than 0.05. Selection for expansion volume indirectly led to increase in LD values, population differentiation, and significant changes in SNP frequency. Some associations were observed for expansion volume and the other quality traits. The candidate genes are involved with starch, storage protein, lipid, and cell wall polysaccharides synthesis. PMID:27007903

  14. Linkage disequilibrium, SNP frequency change due to selection, and association mapping in popcorn chromosome regions containing QTLs for quality traits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geísa Pinheiro Paes

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The objectives of this study were to assess linkage disequilibrium (LD and selection-induced changes in single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP frequency, and to perform association mapping in popcorn chromosome regions containing quantitative trait loci (QTLs for quality traits. Seven tropical and two temperate popcorn populations were genotyped for 96 SNPs chosen in chromosome regions containing QTLs for quality traits. The populations were phenotyped for expansion volume, 100-kernel weight, kernel sphericity, and kernel density. The LD statistics were the difference between the observed and expected haplotype frequencies (D, the proportion of D relative to the expected maximum value in the population, and the square of the correlation between the values of alleles at two loci. Association mapping was based on least squares and Bayesian approaches. In the tropical populations, D-values greater than 0.10 were observed for SNPs separated by 100-150 Mb, while most of the D-values in the temperate populations were less than 0.05. Selection for expansion volume indirectly led to increase in LD values, population differentiation, and significant changes in SNP frequency. Some associations were observed for expansion volume and the other quality traits. The candidate genes are involved with starch, storage protein, lipid, and cell wall polysaccharides synthesis.

  15. LPIN1 deficiency with severe recurrent rhabdomyolysis and persistent elevation of creatine kinase levels due to chromosome 2 maternal isodisomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.A. Meijer

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Fatty acid oxidation disorders and lipin-1 deficiency are the commonest genetic causes of rhabdomyolysis in children. We describe a lipin-1-deficient boy with recurrent, severe rhabdomyolytic episodes from the age of 4 years. Analysis of the LPIN1 gene that encodes lipin-1 revealed a novel homozygous frameshift mutation in exon 9, c.1381delC (p.Leu461SerfsX47, and complete uniparental isodisomy of maternal chromosome 2. This mutation is predicted to cause complete lipin-1 deficiency. The patient had six rhabdomyolytic crises, with creatine kinase (CK levels up to 300,000 U/L (normal, 30 to 200. Plasma CK remained elevated between crises. A treatment protocol was instituted, with early aggressive monitoring, hydration, electrolyte replacement and high caloric, high carbohydrate intake. The patient received dexamethasone during two crises, which was well-tolerated and in these episodes, peak CK values were lower than in preceding episodes. Studies of anti-inflammatory therapy may be indicated in lipin-1 deficiency.

  16. Rapid development in vitro and in vivo of resistance to ceftazidime in biofilm-growing Pseudomonas aeruginosa due to chromosomal beta-lactamase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagge, N; Ciofu, O; Skovgaard, L T; Høiby, N

    2000-01-01

    isolated from the lungs of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients (MICceftazidime-basal/induced beta-lactamase activity: PAO 579= 0.8 mg/l-19/550 milliunits, 19676A=50 mg/l-38/957 milliunits, 17107B=100 mg/l-504/947 milliunits) were studied. After 1 or 2 weeks of continuous or intermittent (4 h/day) administration......(-1) compared to 6.0-10(-5) in the control biofilm. The same trend was observed after continuous administration of ceftazidime. MICceftazidime of the more resistant variants was increased 500-fold for PAO 579 and 8-fold for 19676A, and the specific basal beta-lactamase activities from 19 to 1,400 units for PAO......,300 units for 17107B. It was shown that, during treatment with ceftazidime, biofilm-growing P. aeruginosa had the capacity to develop resistance due to the production of chromosomal beta-lactamase....

  17. Condensate cleaning systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To decrease the frequency for the backwash and regeneration operations due to the increase in the differential pressure resulted from claddings captured in a mixed floor type desalter, and decrease the amount of radioactive liquid wastes of claddings from the condensate systems by removing claddings with electromagnetic filters. Constitution: In an existent plant, a valves is disposed between a condensate pump and a mixed floor type desalter. A pipeway is branched from a condensate pipe between the condensate pipe and the valve, through which condensates are transferred by a pump to an electromagnetic filter such as of a high gradient type electromagntic filter to remove claddings, then returned to a condensate pipe between the valve and the mixed floor type desalter and, thereafter, are removed with ionic components in the mixed floor type desalter and fed to the reactor. (Yoshino, Y.)

  18. Induction of foci of phosphorylated H2AX histones and premature chromosome condensation after DNA damage in Vicia faba root meristem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Immunocytochemical analysis using antibody raised against human H2AX histones phosphorylated at serine 139 (gamma-H2AX) demonstrates that root meristem cells of Vicia faba exposed to UV-radiation or incubated with hydroxyurea (HU) reveal discrete foci at the border of the nucleolus and perinucleolar chromatin or scattered over the whole area of cell nucleus. Western blots detected only one protein band at the position expected for the phosphorylated form of H2AX. The dose-effect relationship was demonstrated following treatment with 2.5 and 10 mM HU. Proteins extracted from root meristems incubated for 2 h either with HU and caffeine or with HU and sodium metavanadate showed unchanged amounts of bound gamma-H2AX antibodies as compared to root meristems treated with 2.5 mM HU. Higher quantities of phosphorylated H2AX histones were detected in proteins extracted from roots treated with HU and 2-aminopurine. All treatments were effective in producing evident aberrations of premature mitosis: broken and lagging chromatids, acentric fragments, chromosomal bridges and micronuclei. Our results show that phosphorylation of H2AX at the carboxy-terminal Ser-Gln-Glu sequence is among the earliest responses to double-strand breaks and, presumably, one of the key ATM/ATR-dependent signals indispensable for the repair of spontaneous and induced DNA damage in plant cells

  19. Ultrastructural characterization of the sex chromosomes during spermatogenesis of spiders having holocentric chromosomes and a long diffuse stage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benavente, R; Wettstein, R

    1980-01-01

    An ultrastructural study has been made of spermatogenesis in two species of primitive spiders having holocentric chromosomes (Dysdera crocata, male X0 and Sergestria florentia X1X2O). Analysis of the meiotic prophase shows a scarcity or absence of typical leptotene to pachytene stages. Only in D. crocata have synaptonemal complex (SC) remnants been seen, and these occurred in nuclei with an extreme chromatin decondensation. In both species typical early prophase stages have been replaced by nuclei lacking SC and with their chromatin almost completely decondensed, constituting a long and well-defined diffuse stage. Only nucleoli and the condensed sex chromosomes can be identified. - In S. florentina paired non-homologous sex chromosomes lack a junction lamina and thus clearly differ from the sex chromosomes of more evolved spiders with an X1X20 male sex determination mechanism. In the same species, sex chromosomes can be recognized during metaphase I due to their special structural details, while in D. crocata the X chromosome is not distinguishable from the autosomes at this stage. - The diffuse stage and particularly the structural characteristics of the sex chromosomes during meiotic prophase are reviewed and discussed in relation to the meiotic process in other arachnid goups. PMID:7371451

  20. Water Condensation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kasper Risgaard; Fojan, Peter; Jensen, Rasmus Lund;

    2014-01-01

    The condensation of water is a phenomenon occurring in multiple situations in everyday life, e.g., when fog is formed or when dew forms on the grass or on windows. This means that this phenomenon plays an important role within the different fields of science including meteorology, building physics......, and chemistry. In this review we address condensation models and simulations with the main focus on heterogeneous condensation of water. The condensation process is, at first, described from a thermodynamic viewpoint where the nucleation step is described by the classical nucleation theory. Further, we address...

  1. Highly distinct chromosomal structures in cowpea (Vigna unguiculata), as revealed by molecular cytogenetic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwata-Otsubo, Aiko; Lin, Jer-Young; Gill, Navdeep; Jackson, Scott A

    2016-05-01

    Cowpea (Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp) is an important legume, particularly in developing countries. However, little is known about its genome or chromosome structure. We used molecular cytogenetics to characterize the structure of pachytene chromosomes to advance our knowledge of chromosome and genome organization of cowpea. Our data showed that cowpea has highly distinct chromosomal structures that are cytologically visible as brightly DAPI-stained heterochromatic regions. Analysis of the repetitive fraction of the cowpea genome present at centromeric and pericentromeric regions confirmed that two retrotransposons are major components of pericentromeric regions and that a 455-bp tandem repeat is found at seven out of 11 centromere pairs in cowpea. These repeats likely evolved after the divergence of cowpea from common bean and form chromosomal structure unique to cowpea. The integration of cowpea genetic and physical chromosome maps reveals potential regions of suppressed recombination due to condensed heterochromatin and a lack of pairing in a few chromosomal termini. This study provides fundamental knowledge on cowpea chromosome structure and molecular cytogenetics tools for further chromosome studies. PMID:26758200

  2. [Chromosomal organization of the genomes of small-chromosome plants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muravenko, O V; Zelenin, A V

    2009-11-01

    An effective approach to study the chromosome organization in genomes of plants with small chromosomes and/or with low-informative C-banding patterns was developed in the course of investigation of the karyotypes of cotton plant, camomile, flax, and pea. To increase the resolving power of chromosome analysis, methods were worked out for revealing early replication patterns on chromosomes and for artificial impairment of mitotic chromosome condensation with the use of a DNA intercalator, 9-aminoacridine (9-AMA). To estimate polymorphism of the patterns of C-banding of small chromosomes on preparations obtained with the use of 9-AMA, it is necessary to choose a length interval that must not exceed three average sizes of metaphase chromosomes without the intercalator. The use of 9-AMA increases the resolution of differential C- and OR-banding and the precision of physical chromosome mapping by the FISH method. Of particular importance in studying small chromosomes is optimization of the computer-aided methods used to obtain and process chromosome images. The complex approach developed for analysis of the chromosome organization in plant genomes was used to study the karyotypes of 24 species of the genus Linum L. It permitted their chromosomes to be identified for the first time, and, in addition, B chromosomes were discovered and studied in the karyotypes of the species of the section Syllinum. By similarity of the karyotypes, the studied flax species were distributed in eight groups in agreement with the clusterization of these species according to the results of RAPD analysis performed in parallel. Systematic positions and phylogenetic relationships of the studied flax species were verified. Out results can serve as an important argument in favour of the proposal to develop a special program for sequencing the genome of cultivated flax (L. usitatissimum L.), which is a major representative of small-chromosome species. PMID:20058798

  3. Report of a female patient with mental retardation and tall stature due to a chromosomal rearrangement disrupting the OPHN1 gene on Xq12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menten, Björn; Buysse, Karen; Vermeulen, Stefan; Meersschaut, Valerie; Vandesompele, Jo; Ng, Bee L.; P.Carter, Nigel; Mortier, Geert R.; Speleman, Frank

    2009-01-01

    We report on a patient with mental retardation, seizures and tall stature with advanced bone age in whom a de novo apparently balanced chromosomal rearrangement 46,XX,t(X;9)(q12;p13.3) was identified. Using array CGH on flow-sorted derivative chromosomes (array painting) and subsequent FISH and qPCR analysis, we mapped and sequenced both breakpoints. The Xq12 breakpoint was located within the gene coding for oligophrenin 1 (OPHN1) whereas the 9p13.3 breakpoint was assigned to a non-coding segment within a gene dense region. Disruption of OPHN1 by the Xq12 breakpoint was considered the major cause of the abnormal phenotype observed in the proband. PMID:17845870

  4. Tetrasomy 3q26.32-q29 due to a supernumerary marker chromosome in a child with pigmentary mosaicism of Ito.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha, Karina S; Simioni, Milena; Vieira, Tarsis P; Gil-da-Silva-Lopes, Vera L; Puzzi, Maria B; Steiner, Carlos E

    2016-03-01

    Pigmentary mosaicism of Ito (PMI) is a skin abnormality often characterized by hypopigmentation of skin, following, in most cases, the Blaschko lines, usually associated with extracutaneous abnormalities, especially abnormalities of the central nervous system (CNS). It is suggested that this pattern arises from the presence and migration of two cell lineages in the ectoderm layer during the embryonic period and embryonic cell migration, with different gene expression profiles associated with pigmentation. Several types of chromosomal aberrations, with or without mosaicism, have been associated with this disorder. This study comprised clinical description and cytogenetic analysis of a child with PMI. The G-banded karyotype analysis revealed a supernumerary marker chromosome in 76% of the analyzed metaphases from peripheral blood lymphocytes. Array genomic hybridization analysis showed a copy number gain between 3q26.32-3q29, of approximately 20.5 Mb. Karyotype was defined as 47,XX,+mar[38]/46,XX[12].arr 3q26.32-3q29(177,682,859- 198,043,720)x4 dn. Genes mapped in the overlapping region among this patient and three other cases described prior to this study were listed and their possible involvement on PMI pathogenesis is discussed. PMID:27007896

  5. Condensate - undervalued

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A recent study of resource exploitation in the Middle East, Asia, Australia and New Zealand is reported, which shows that the economics of many gas fields could be enhanced by exploiting their gas condensate resources. Condensates, a range of gas-derived liquids heavier than Liquefied Petroleum Gas, are, as yet, under-exploited. The author argues that these valuable resources should be exploited to the benefit of the industry and the consumer, though some technological difficulties still need to be overcome. (UK)

  6. Bias in peak clad temperature predictions due to uncertainties in modeling of ECC bypass and dissolved non-condensable gas phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes a general method for estimating the effect on the Reflood Phase PCT from systematic errors (biases) associated with the modelling of the ECCS and dissolved nitrogen, and the application of this method in estimating biases in the Reflood Phase PCT (second PCT) predicted by the TRAC/PF1/MOD1, Version 14.3. The bias in the second PCT due to the uncertainty in the existing code models for ECCS related phenomena is -19 degree K (-34 degree F). The negative bias implies that the code models for this phenomena are conservative. The bias in the second PCT due to the lack of modelling of dissolved N2 in the code is estimated to be 9.9 degree K (17.8 degree F). The positive bias implies that the absence of dissolved N2 model makes the code prediction of PCT non-conservative. The bias estimation in this report is a major exception among all other uncertainty and bias assessments performed in conjunction with the CSAU methodology demonstration, because this bias estimation benefitted from using full-scale test data from the full-scale Upper Plenum Test Facility (UPTF). Thus, the bias estimates presented here are unaffected by scale distortions in test facilities. Data from small size facilities were also available and an estimate of bias based on these data will be conservative. 35 refs., 18 figs., 5 tabs

  7. Bias in peak clad temperature predictions due to uncertainties in modeling of ECC bypass and dissolved non-condensable gas phenomena

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rohatgi, U.S.; Neymotin, L.Y.; Jo, J.; Wulff, W. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (USA))

    1990-09-01

    This report describes a general method for estimating the effect on the Reflood Phase PCT from systematic errors (biases) associated with the modelling of the ECCS and dissolved nitrogen, and the application of this method in estimating biases in the Reflood Phase PCT (second PCT) predicted by the TRAC/PF1/MOD1, Version 14.3. The bias in the second PCT due to the uncertainty in the existing code models for ECCS related phenomena is {minus}19{degree}K ({minus}34{degree}F). The negative bias implies that the code models for this phenomena are conservative. The bias in the second PCT due to the lack of modelling of dissolved N{sub 2} in the code is estimated to be 9.9{degree}K (17.8{degree}F). The positive bias implies that the absence of dissolved N{sub 2} model makes the code prediction of PCT non-conservative. The bias estimation in this report is a major exception among all other uncertainty and bias assessments performed in conjunction with the CSAU methodology demonstration, because this bias estimation benefitted from using full-scale test data from the full-scale Upper Plenum Test Facility (UPTF). Thus, the bias estimates presented here are unaffected by scale distortions in test facilities. Data from small size facilities were also available and an estimate of bias based on these data will be conservative. 35 refs., 18 figs., 5 tabs.

  8. Telomere dysfunction and chromosome instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murnane, John P., E-mail: jmurnane@radonc.ucsf.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California San Francisco, 2340 Sutter Street, San Francisco, CA 94143-1331 (United States)

    2012-02-01

    The ends of chromosomes are composed of a short repeat sequence and associated proteins that together form a cap, called a telomere, that keeps the ends from appearing as double-strand breaks (DSBs) and prevents chromosome fusion. The loss of telomeric repeat sequences or deficiencies in telomeric proteins can result in chromosome fusion and lead to chromosome instability. The similarity between chromosome rearrangements resulting from telomere loss and those found in cancer cells implicates telomere loss as an important mechanism for the chromosome instability contributing to human cancer. Telomere loss in cancer cells can occur through gradual shortening due to insufficient telomerase, the protein that maintains telomeres. However, cancer cells often have a high rate of spontaneous telomere loss despite the expression of telomerase, which has been proposed to result from a combination of oncogene-mediated replication stress and a deficiency in DSB repair in telomeric regions. Chromosome fusion in mammalian cells primarily involves nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ), which is the major form of DSB repair. Chromosome fusion initiates chromosome instability involving breakage-fusion-bridge (B/F/B) cycles, in which dicentric chromosomes form bridges and break as the cell attempts to divide, repeating the process in subsequent cell cycles. Fusion between sister chromatids results in large inverted repeats on the end of the chromosome, which amplify further following additional B/F/B cycles. B/F/B cycles continue until the chromosome acquires a new telomere, most often by translocation of the end of another chromosome. The instability is not confined to a chromosome that loses its telomere, because the instability is transferred to the chromosome donating a translocation. Moreover, the amplified regions are unstable and form extrachromosomal DNA that can reintegrate at new locations. Knowledge concerning the factors promoting telomere loss and its consequences is

  9. Altered metaphase chromosome structure in xrs-5 cells is not related to its radiation sensitivity or defective DNA break rejoining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell line xrs-5 is a radiation-sensitive derivative of CHO-K1 cells. The xrs-5 cells have a defect in DNA double-strand break rejoining and show alterations in chromosome structure and nuclear morphology. The relationship between radiation sensitivity and metaphase chromosome morphology was examined in 12 'revertant' xrs-5 clones isolated following treatment with 5-azacytidine. Nine of the clones were radioresistant while the other three retained xrs-5-like radiation sensitivity. Chromosome morphology reverted to CHO-K1-like characteristics in three of the radioresistant clones and one of the radiosensitive clones suggesting that the over-condensed metaphase chromosome morphology of xrs-5 cells does not underlie its radiation sensitivity. Radiation sensitivity did correlate with DNA double-strand break rejoining ability. The radioresistant clones showing the over-condensed xrs-5-like chromosome morphology were also slightly more sensitive to the topoisomerase II inhibitor etoposide (VP-16) than CHO-K1, suggesting that the over-condensed morphology might be due to alterations in the phosphorylation of chromatin proteins

  10. X-Chromosome dosage compensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Barbara J

    2005-01-01

    In mammals, flies, and worms, sex is determined by distinctive regulatory mechanisms that cause males (XO or XY) and females (XX) to differ in their dose of X chromosomes. In each species, an essential X chromosome-wide process called dosage compensation ensures that somatic cells of either sex express equal levels of X-linked gene products. The strategies used to achieve dosage compensation are diverse, but in all cases, specialized complexes are targeted specifically to the X chromosome(s) of only one sex to regulate transcript levels. In C. elegans, this sex-specific targeting of the dosage compensation complex (DCC) is controlled by the same developmental signal that establishes sex, the ratio of X chromosomes to sets of autosomes (X:A signal). Molecular components of this chromosome counting process have been defined. Following a common step of regulation, sex determination and dosage compensation are controlled by distinct genetic pathways. C. elegans dosage compensation is implemented by a protein complex that binds both X chromosomes of hermaphrodites to reduce transcript levels by one-half. The dosage compensation complex resembles the conserved 13S condensin complex required for both mitotic and meiotic chromosome resolution and condensation, implying the recruitment of ancient proteins to the new task of regulating gene expression. Within each C. elegans somatic cell, one of the DCC components also participates in the separate mitotic/meiotic condensin complex. Other DCC components play pivotal roles in regulating the number and distribution of crossovers during meiosis. The strategy by which C. elegans X chromosomes attract the condensin-like DCC is known. Small, well-dispersed X-recognition elements act as entry sites to recruit the dosage compensation complex and to nucleate spreading of the complex to X regions that lack recruitment sites. In this manner, a repressed chromatin state is spread in cis over short or long distances, thus establishing the

  11. Chromosomal aberration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chromosomal aberrations are classified into two types, chromosome-type and chromatid-type. Chromosom-type aberrations include terminal deletion, dicentric, ring and interstitial deletion, and chromatid-type aberrations include achromatic lesion, chromatid deletion, isochromatid deletion and chromatid exchange. Clastogens which induce chromosomal aberration are divided into ''S-dependent'' agents and ''S-independent''. It might mean whether they can induce double strand breaks independent of the S phase or not. Double strand breaks may be the ultimate lesions to induce chromosomal aberrations. Caffeine added even in the G2 phase appeared to modify the frequency of chromatid aberrations induced by X-rays and mitomycin C. Those might suggest that the G2 phase involves in the chromatid aberration formation. The double strand breaks might be repaired by ''G2 repair system'', the error of which might yield breakage types of chromatid aberrations and the by-pass of which might yield chromatid exchanges. Chromosome-type aberrations might be formed in the G1 phase. (author)

  12. Male-biased aganglionic megacolon in the TashT mouse line due to perturbation of silencer elements in a large gene desert of chromosome 10.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karl-F Bergeron

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Neural crest cells (NCC are a transient migratory cell population that generates diverse cell types such as neurons and glia of the enteric nervous system (ENS. Via an insertional mutation screen for loci affecting NCC development in mice, we identified one line-named TashT-that displays a partially penetrant aganglionic megacolon phenotype in a strong male-biased manner. Interestingly, this phenotype is highly reminiscent of human Hirschsprung's disease, a neurocristopathy with a still unexplained male sex bias. In contrast to the megacolon phenotype, colonic aganglionosis is almost fully penetrant in homozygous TashT animals. The sex bias in megacolon expressivity can be explained by the fact that the male ENS ends, on average, around a "tipping point" of minimal colonic ganglionosis while the female ENS ends, on average, just beyond it. Detailed analysis of embryonic intestines revealed that aganglionosis in homozygous TashT animals is due to slower migration of enteric NCC. The TashT insertional mutation is localized in a gene desert containing multiple highly conserved elements that exhibit repressive activity in reporter assays. RNAseq analyses and 3C assays revealed that the TashT insertion results, at least in part, in NCC-specific relief of repression of the uncharacterized gene Fam162b; an outcome independently confirmed via transient transgenesis. The transcriptional signature of enteric NCC from homozygous TashT embryos is also characterized by the deregulation of genes encoding members of the most important signaling pathways for ENS formation-Gdnf/Ret and Edn3/Ednrb-and, intriguingly, the downregulation of specific subsets of X-linked genes. In conclusion, this study not only allowed the identification of Fam162b coding and regulatory sequences as novel candidate loci for Hirschsprung's disease but also provides important new insights into its male sex bias.

  13. Synthetic chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindler, Daniel; Waldminghaus, Torsten

    2015-11-01

    What a living organism looks like and how it works and what are its components-all this is encoded on DNA, the genetic blueprint. Consequently, the way to change an organism is to change its genetic information. Since the first pieces of recombinant DNA have been used to transform cells in the 1970s, this approach has been enormously extended. Bigger and bigger parts of the genetic information have been exchanged or added over the years. Now we are at a point where the construction of entire chromosomes becomes a reachable goal and first examples appear. This development leads to fundamental new questions, for example, about what is possible and desirable to build or what construction rules one needs to follow when building synthetic chromosomes. Here we review the recent progress in the field, discuss current challenges and speculate on the appearance of future synthetic chromosomes. PMID:26111960

  14. CHROMOSOMAL ABNORMALITIES IN PATIENTS WITH SPERM DISORDERS

    OpenAIRE

    L. Y. Pylyp; L. A. Spinenko; V. D. Zukin; N. M. Bilko

    2013-01-01

    Chromosomal abnormalities are among the most common genetic causes of spermatogenic disruptions. Carriers of chromosomal abnormalities are at increased risk of infertility, miscarriage or birth of a child with unbalanced karyotype due to the production of unbalanced gametes. The natural selection against chromosomally abnormal sperm usually prevents fertilization with sperm barring in cases of serious chromosomal abnormalities. However, assisted reproductive technologies in general and intrac...

  15. ADN et chromosomes

    OpenAIRE

    Hayes, Hélène

    2000-01-01

    Chaque chromosome contient une seule molécule d’ADN. L’ADN déroulé d’un noyau de cellule humaine mesurerait environ 1,8 m : chaque molécule d’ADN est enroulée et compactée en plusieurs étapes, grâce à l’association de différentes protéines, et loge dans le noyau de 6 µm de diamètre. Le degré de condensation de l’ADN est variable selon les régions chromosomiques et les régions les moins condensées sont les plus riches en gènes. L’ADN est composé d’une variété de séquences codantes ou non et ré...

  16. Ghost condensate and generalized second law

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubovsky and Sibiryakov recently proposed a scenario in which particles of different species propagate with different speeds due to their direct couplings to ghost condensate. It was argued that this extended version of ghost condensate allows a gedanken experiment leading to violation of the generalized second law. However, in the original ghost condensate scenario, difference in propagation speeds is suppressed by M2/MPl2, where M is the order parameter of spontaneous Lorentz breaking and MPl is the Planck scale. In this case the energy transfer necessary for the gedanken experiment is so slow that the timescale of decrease of entropy, if any, is always longer than the Jeans timescale of ghost condensate. Hence the generalized second law is not violated by the gedanken experiment in the original ghost condensate scenario. This conclusion trivially extends to gauged ghost condensation by taking into account accretion of gauged ghost condensate into a black hole.

  17. Monopole condensation and confinement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To understand the mechanism of confinement is important in order to explain hadron physics out of QCD. After the abelian projection, QCD can be regarded as an abelian theory with electric charges and monopoles. If the monopoles make Bose condensation, charged quarks and gluons are confined due to the dual Meissner effect. Monte Carlo simulation was performed to test whether the conjecture is true or not at least on lattices. The results in 1995 were reported in three papers. In three topics of monopole dynamics in abelian projected QCD, the detailed analysis of SU(2) monopole action obtained after the block-spin transformation on the dual lattice, the results of SU(3) monopole action and the new gauges showing abelian and monopole dominances are reported. In monopole condensation and Polyakov loop in finite-temperature pure QCD, the relation between the abelian monopole condensation and the deconfinement phase transition of the finite temperature pure QCD is reported, and the boundary conditions and the cases of SU(2) and SU(3) are described. In disorder parameter of confinement, the disorder parameter in SU(2) QCD and the numerical simulation in finite temperature SU(2) QCD are reported. (K.I.)

  18. Chromosome Microarray.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Sharon

    2016-01-01

    Over the last half century, knowledge about genetics, genetic testing, and its complexity has flourished. Completion of the Human Genome Project provided a foundation upon which the accuracy of genetics, genomics, and integration of bioinformatics knowledge and testing has grown exponentially. What is lagging, however, are efforts to reach and engage nurses about this rapidly changing field. The purpose of this article is to familiarize nurses with several frequently ordered genetic tests including chromosomes and fluorescence in situ hybridization followed by a comprehensive review of chromosome microarray. It shares the complexity of microarray including how testing is performed and results analyzed. A case report demonstrates how this technology is applied in clinical practice and reveals benefits and limitations of this scientific and bioinformatics genetic technology. Clinical implications for maternal-child nurses across practice levels are discussed. PMID:27276104

  19. Temporal genomic evolution of bird sex chromosomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Zongji; Zhang, Jilin; Yang, Wei;

    2014-01-01

    driving forces of Z chromosome evolution, we analyze here 45 newly available bird genomes and four species' transcriptomes, over their course of recombination loss between the sex chromosomes. RESULTS: We show Z chromosomes in general have a significantly higher substitution rate in introns and synonymous...... evolved very recently. CONCLUSIONS: In conclusion, we uncover that the sequence and expression patterns of Z chromosome genes covary with their ages of becoming Z-linked. In contrast to the mammalian X chromosomes, such patterns are mainly driven by mutational bias and genetic drift in birds, due...... to the opposite sex-biased inheritance of Z vs. X....

  20. Dual approaches for defects condensation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text. Due to the fact that the QCD running coupling constant becomes larger as we go into the low energy (or large distance) limit of the theory, a perturbative treatment of its infrared (IR) region is impossible. In particular, a formal mathematical demonstration of color confinement and a complete physical understanding of the exact mechanism that confines quarks and gluons are two missing points in our current knowledge of the IR-QCD. It was known that due to the Meissner effect of expulsion of magnetic fields in a electric condensate that usual superconductors should confine magnetic monopoles. That point led to the conjecture that the QCD vacuum could be a condensate of chromomagnetic monopoles, a dual superconductor (DSC). Such a chromomagnetic condensate should be responsible for the dual Meissner effect which is expected to lead to the confinement of color charges immersed in this medium. In dual superconductor models of color confinement, magnetic monopoles appear as topological defects in points of the space where the abelian projection becomes singular. Also, condensation of other kinds of defects such as vortices in superfluids and line-like defects in solids are responsible for a great variety of phase transitions, which once more proves the relevance of the subject. In the present work we review two methods that allow us to approach the condensation of defects: the Kleinert Mechanism (KM) and the Julia-Toulouse Mechanism (JTM). We show that in the limit where the vortex gauge field goes to zero, which we identify as the signature of the condensation of defects in the dual picture, these are two equivalent dual prescriptions for obtaining an effective theory for a phase where defects are condensed, starting from the fundamental theory defined in the normal phase where defects are diluted. (author)

  1. Direct condensation by jet condensers. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The project work reported encompasses experiments for investigation of the direct condensation of steam/gas mixtures in jet condensers under emergency conditions. A task of main interest was to establish the database for the dimensioning of an industrial-scale system and the description of processes such as the flow of the steam/gas mixture in the blow-down pipe, the independent suction of cooling water by the jet condenser, and the overall condensation efficiency of these components. Experiments also covered unfavorable conditions of condensation, as e.g. a high amount of non-condensable gases in the mixture, or a low-entrainment temperature difference. In an engineering development system, preliminary tests were made with various commercial jet condensers, such as steam jet liquid pumps or steam jet superheaters in order to evaluate their condensation efficiency. Steam jet liquid pumps are of restricted applicability in safety-conscious systems, as the independent suction of cooling water is strongly limited or even inhibited already at low amounts of inert gas in the mixture, preventing sufficient flow of cooling water. The cooling water flow likewise is reduced by inert gas in the steam jet superheaters, but this reduction stops at a level still allowing almost complete condensation. (orig.)

  2. Bose condensation in topologically ordered quantum liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neupert, Titus; He, Huan; von Keyserlingk, Curt; Sierra, German; Bernevig, Andrei

    The condensation of bosons can induce transitions between topological quantum field theories (TQFTs). This as been previously investigated through the formalism of Frobenius algebras and with the use of Vertex lifting coefficients. We discuss an alternative, algebraic approach to boson condensation in TQFTs that is physically motivated and computationally efficient. With a minimal set of assumptions, such as commutativity of the condensation with the fusion of anyons, we can prove a number of theorems linking boson condensation in TQFTs with algebra extensions in conformal field theories and with the problem of factorization of completely positive matrices over the positive integers. We propose an algorithm for obtaining a condensed theory fusion algebra and its modular matrices. For example, this formalism can be used to build multi-layer TQFTs which could be a starting point to build three-dimensional topologically ordered phases. Using this formalism, we also give examples of bosons that cannot undergo a condensation transition due to topological obstructions.

  3. Meiotic chromosomal variation resulting from irradiation of pollen in maize

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this study was to standardize an induction strategy of chromosome aberrations in maize inbred line L-869. Pollen grains irradiated with 0, 36 and 72 Gy were used for fertilization. Resulting seeds were planted in a greenhouse to assess the number of abnormal meiotic cells. Germination, height, sterility and mortality were verified. Cells with delayed separation of chromosomes, translocation, deficiency, abnormal pairing, later condensation and anaphase bridges were observed. The number of abnormalities increased as the dosage increased but chromosome aberration types were the same regardless of the dosages used. Various chromosome-altered plants were obtained without viability loss. (author)

  4. Modified C-band technique for the analysis of chromosome abnormalities in irradiated human lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A modified C-band technique was developed in order to analyze more accurately dicentric, tricentric, and ring chromosomes in irradiated human peripheral lymphocytes. Instead of the original method relying on treatment with barium hydroxide Ba(OH)2, C-bands were obtained using a modified form of heat treatment in formamide followed with DAPI staining. This method was tentatively applied to the analysis of dicentric chromosomes in irradiated human lymphocytes to examine its availability. The frequency of dicentric chromosome was almost the same with conventional Giemsa staining and the modified C-band technique. In the analysis using Giemsa staining, it is relatively difficult to identify the centromere on the elongated chromosomes, over-condensed chromosomes, fragment, and acentric ring. However, the modified C-band method used in this study makes it easier to identify the centromere on such chromosomes than with the use of Giemsa staining alone. Thus, the modified C-band method may give more information about the location of the centromere. Therefore, this method may be available and more useful for biological dose estimation due to the analysis of the dicentric chromosome in human lymphocytes exposed to the radiation. Furthermore, this method is simpler and faster than the original C-band protocol and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) method with the centromeric DNA probe. - Highlights: → The dicentric (dic) assay is the most effective for the radiation biodosimetry. → It is important to recognize the centromere of the dic. → We improved a C-band technique based on heat denaturation. → This technique enables the accurate detection of a centromere. → This method may be available and more useful for biological dose estimation.

  5. Condensation heat transfer in rotating heat pipes in the presence of a non-condensable gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, T. C.; Medwell, J. O.; Williams, R. J.

    1977-01-01

    An analysis of condensation problems in rotating heat pipes containing vapors with different concentrations of non-condensable gases is given. In situations such as this, temperature and concentration gradients are set up in the vapor-gas mixture. There is a transport of mass due to temperature gradients accompanied by an energy transport phenomena due to a concentration gradient. A Nusselt type analysis is not suited to this type of problem; however, a boundary layer type approach has successfully been used to analyze stationary condensation systems with non-condensable gases present. The present boundary layer analysis is presented for condensation processes on the inside of a rotating heat pipe in the presence of non-condensable gases.

  6. Novel Gene Acquisition on Carnivore Y Chromosomes

    OpenAIRE

    Murphy, William J.; A J Pearks Wilkerson; Terje Raudsepp; Richa Agarwala; Schäffer, Alejandro A.; Roscoe Stanyon; Chowdhary, Bhanu P

    2006-01-01

    Despite its importance in harboring genes critical for spermatogenesis and male-specific functions, the Y chromosome has been largely excluded as a priority in recent mammalian genome sequencing projects. Only the human and chimpanzee Y chromosomes have been well characterized at the sequence level. This is primarily due to the presumed low overall gene content and highly repetitive nature of the Y chromosome and the ensuing difficulties using a shotgun sequence approach for assembly. Here we...

  7. Studies on the mitotic chromosome scaffold of Allium sativum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAOJIAN; SHAOBOJIN; 等

    1995-01-01

    An argentophilic structure is present in the metaphase chromosomes of garlic(Allium sativum),Cytochemical studies indicate that the main component of the structure is non-histone proteins(NHPs).The results of light and electron microscopic observations reveal that the chromosme NHP scaffold is a network which is composed of fibres and granules and distributed throughout the chromosomes.In the NHP network,there are many condensed regions that are connected by redlatively looser regions.The distribution of the condensed regions varies in individual chromosomes.In some of the chromosomes the condensed regions are lognitudinally situsted in the central part of a chromatid while in others these regions appear as coillike transverse bands.At early metaphase.scaffolds of the sister chromatids of a chromosome are linked to each other in the centromeric region,meanwhile,they are connected by scafold materials along the whole length of the chromosome.At late metaphase,however,the connective scaffold materials between the two sister chromatids disappear gradually and the chromatids begin to separate from one another at their ends.but the chromatids are linked together in the centromeric region until anaphase.This connection seems to be related to the special structure of the NHP scaffold formed in the centromeric region.The morphological features and dynamic changes of the chromosome scaffold are discussed.

  8. Condensation in insulated homes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiley, R A

    1978-05-28

    A research proposal on condensation in insulated homes is presented. Information is provided on: justification for condensation control; previous work and present outlook (good vapor barrier, condensation and retrofit insulation, vapor barrier decreases condensation, brick-veneer walls, condensation in stress-skin panels, air-conditioned buildings, retrofitting for conservation, study on mobile homes, high indoor relative humidity, report on various homes); and procedure (after funding has been secured). Measures are briefly described on opening walls, testing measures, and retrofitting procedures. An extensive bibliography and additional informative citations are included. (MCW)

  9. Modelling of condensation phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Condensation occurs when vapor is cooled sufficiently below the saturation temperature to induce the nucleation of droplets. Such nucleation may occur homogeneously within the vapor or heterogeneously on entrained particular matter. Heterogeneous nucleation may occur on the walls of the system, where the temperature is below the saturation temperature. There are two forms of heterogeneous condensation, drop-wise and film-wise. Another form of condensation occurs when vapor directly contacts to subcooled liquid. In nuclear power plant systems, all forms of condensation may occur during normal operation or accident conditions. In this work the modelling of condensation is surveyed, including the Nusselts' laminar film condensation theory in 1916, Rohsenow's turbulent film condensation model in 1950s, and Chen's models in 1987. Major attention is paid on the film condensation models among various research results because of its importance in engineering applications. It is found that theory, experiment, and empirical correlations for film condensation are well established, but research for drop-wise and direct-contact condensation are not sufficient yet. Condensation models in the best-estimate system codes such as RELAP5/MOD3 and CATHARE2 are also investigated. 3 tabs., 11 figs., 36 refs. (Author)

  10. Mitotic chromosome structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mounting evidence is compiling linking the physical organizational structure of chromosomes and the nuclear structure to biological function. At the base of the physical organizational structure of both is the concept of loop formation. This implies that physical proximity within chromosomes is provided for otherwise distal genomic regions and thus hierarchically organizing the chromosomes. Together with entropy many experimental observations can be explained with these two concepts. Among the observations that can be explained are the measured physical extent of the chromosomes, their shape, mechanical behavior, the segregation into territories (chromosomal and territories within chromosomes), the results from chromosome conformation capture experiments, as well as linking gene expression to structural organization.

  11. Chromatin structure and ionizing-radiation-induced chromosome aberrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The possible influence of chromatic structure or activity on chromosomal radiosensitivity was studied. A cell line was isolated which contained some 105 copies of an amplified plasmid in a single large mosquito artificial chromosome (MAC). This chromosome was hypersensitive to DNase I. Its radiosensitivity was some three fold greater than normal mosquito chromosomes in the same cell. In cultured human cells irradiated during G0, the initial breakage frequency in chromosome 4, 19 and the euchromatic and heterochromatic portions of the Y chromosome were measured over a wide range of doses by inducing Premature Chromosome Condensation (PCC) immediately after irradiation with Cs-137 gamma rays. No evidence was seen that Y heterochromatin or large fragments of it remained unbroken. The only significant deviation from the expected initial breakage frequency per Gy per unit length of chromosome was that observed for the euchromatic portion of the Y chromosome, with breakage nearly twice that expected. The development of aberrations involving X and Y chromosomes at the first mitosis after irradation was also studied. Normal female cells sustained about twice the frequency of aberrations involving X chromosomes for a dose of 7.3 Gy than the corresponding male cells. Fibroblasts from individuals with supernumerary X chromosomes did not show any further increase in X aberrations for this dos. The frequency of aberrations involving the heterochromatic portion of the long arm of the Y chromosome was about what would be expected for a similar length of autosome, but the euchromatic portion of the Y was about 3 times more radiosensitive per unit length. 5-Azacytidine treatment of cultured human female fibroblasts or fibroblasts from a 49,XXXXY individual, reduced the methylation of cytosine residues in DNA, and resulted in an increased chromosomal radiosensitivity in general, but it did not increase the frequency of aberrations involving the X chromosomes

  12. Radiation induced chromosome instability in human fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evidence has been arising that some biological effects can manifest many cell divisions after irradiation. We have demonstrated that de novo chromosome instability can be detected 10- 15 mean population doubling after heavy ion irradiations. This chromosome instability is characterized by end to end fusions between specific chromosomes. The specificity of the instability may differ from one donor to another but for the same donor, the same instability should be observed after irradiation, during the senescence process and after SV40 transfection (before crisis). In irradiated primary culture fibroblasts, the expression of the delayed chromosomal instability lasts for several cell divisions without inducing cell death. Several rounds of fusions- breakage-fusions can be performed and unbalanced clones emerge (gain or loss of chromosomes with the shorter telomeres would become unstable first.. The difference in the chromosomal instability among donors could be due to a polymorphism in telomere lengths. This could induce large variation in long term response to irradiation among individuals. (author)

  13. Multistep assembly of DNA condensation clusters by SMC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, HyeongJun; Loparo, Joseph J

    2016-01-01

    SMC (structural maintenance of chromosomes) family members play essential roles in chromosome condensation, sister chromatid cohesion and DNA repair. It remains unclear how SMCs structure chromosomes and how their mechanochemical cycle regulates their interactions with DNA. Here we used single-molecule fluorescence microscopy to visualize how Bacillus subtilis SMC (BsSMC) interacts with flow-stretched DNAs. We report that BsSMC can slide on DNA, switching between static binding and diffusion. At higher concentrations, BsSMCs form clusters that condense DNA in a weakly ATP-dependent manner. ATP increases the apparent cooperativity of DNA condensation, demonstrating that BsSMC can interact cooperatively through their ATPase head domains. Consistent with these results, ATPase mutants compact DNA more slowly than wild-type BsSMC in the presence of ATP. Our results suggest that transiently static BsSMC molecules can nucleate the formation of clusters that act to locally condense the chromosome while forming long-range DNA bridges. PMID:26725510

  14. Pool boiling and condensation analysis for a vertical tube bundle condenser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An experimental and theoretical study is performed for the steam condensation in a vertical tube bundle passive condenser simulating PCCS condenser in the ESBWR. Four condenser tubes are submerged in a water pool where the heat from the condenser tube is removed through boiling heat transfer. Condenser tubes with a full length/diameter scale are used to obtain the condensation data with various process parameters. The comparison of tube bundle experimental data with the single tube data by both the experiments and models shows that the single tube secondary heat transfer coefficient (HTC) is between 25% - 35% less than what was recorded for the tube bundle, and the tube bundle condensation rates are slightly higher than the data from the single tube test sections due to turbulent mixing effect which increases the condensation heat removal. The turbulent mixing on the secondary side decreases the DT between pool water and condenser tube outer wall, causing an increase in secondary HTC. This increase in secondary HTC thus results in higher condensate mass flow rates. Tube bundle boundary layer model and heat and mass analogy model were then developed for the prediction of the filmwise steam condensation with noncondensable (NC) gas in a vertical tube bundle. The predictions from the models are compared with the experimental data for various complete condensation and through flow conditions and the agreement is satisfactory. The local parameters predicted by the boundary layer model and heat and mass analogy model with tube bundle pool boiling can also be predicted with the axial distance from entrance for different NC gas fractions and system pressures. (author)

  15. Fetal chromosome analysis: screening for chromosome disease?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Philip, J; Tabor, Ann; Bang, J;

    1983-01-01

    A + B). Pregnant women 35 years of age, women who previously had a chromosomally abnormal child, families with translocation carriers or other heritable chromosomal disease, families where the father was 50 years or more and women in families with a history of Down's syndrome (group A), were...... unbalanced chromosome abnormality in group A (women with elevated risk) is significantly higher than in group B + C (women without elevated risk) (relative risk 2.4). Women with a known familial translocation and women 40 years or more have a relative risk of 5.7 of having an unbalanced chromosome......The aim of the study was to investigate the rationale of the current indications for fetal chromosome analysis. 5372 women had 5423 amniocentesis performed, this group constituting a consecutive sample at the chromosome laboratory, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen from March 1973 to September 1980 (Group...

  16. Of Matters Condensed

    CERN Document Server

    Shulman, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The American Physical Society (APS) March Meeting of condensed matter physics has grown to nearly 10,000 participants, comprises 23 individual APS groups, and even warrants its own hashtag (#apsmarch). Here we analyze the text and data from March Meeting abstracts of the past nine years and discuss trends in condensed matter physics over this time period. We find that in comparison to atomic, molecular, and optical physics, condensed matter changes rapidly, and that condensed matter appears to be moving increasingly toward subject matter that is traditionally in materials science and engineering.

  17. Bleed condenser tube failure in KAPP-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bleed condenser, a vertical, tube and shell type heat exchanger employed in bleed circuit of primary heat transport system of PHWR is used for condensing the flashing bleed (heavy water) on shell side and cold heavy water on the tubes side. Examinations conducted at various places indicate failure due to inadequate tube expansion (hydraulic expansion) followed by crevice corrosion. Mechanical rolling of tubes to larger extent (3 to 6% wall thinning) have been specified for this particular type of service in all bleed condensers for subsequent projects. 1 tab., 4 figs

  18. Exceptional Complex Chromosomal Rearrangements in Three Generations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannie Kartapradja

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We report an exceptional complex chromosomal rearrangement (CCR found in three individuals in a family that involves 4 chromosomes with 5 breakpoints. The CCR was ascertained in a phenotypically abnormal newborn with additional chromosomal material on the short arm of chromosome 4. Maternal karyotyping indicated that the mother carried an apparently balanced CCR involving chromosomes 4, 6, 11, and 18. Maternal transmission of the derivative chromosome 4 resulted in partial trisomy for chromosomes 6q and 18q and a partial monosomy of chromosome 4p in the proband. Further family studies found that the maternal grandmother carried the same apparently balanced CCR as the proband’s mother, which was confirmed using the whole chromosome painting (WCP FISH. High resolution whole genome microarray analysis of DNA from the proband’s mother found no evidence for copy number imbalance in the vicinity of the CCR translocation breakpoints, or elsewhere in the genome, providing evidence that the mother’s and grandmother’s CCRs were balanced at a molecular level. This structural rearrangement can be categorized as an exceptional CCR due to its complexity and is a rare example of an exceptional CCR being transmitted in balanced and/or unbalanced form across three generations.

  19. Degeneration of the Y chromosome in evolutionary aging models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobo, M. P.; Onody, R. N.

    2005-06-01

    The Y chromosomes are genetically degenerated and do not recombine with their matching partners X. Recombination of XX pairs is pointed out as the key factor for the Y chromosome degeneration. However, there is an additional evolutionary force driving sex-chromosomes evolution. Here we show this mechanism by means of two different evolutionary models, in which sex chromosomes with non-recombining XX and XY pairs of chromosomes is considered. Our results show three curious effects. First, we observed that even when both XX and XY pairs of chromosomes do not recombine, the Y chromosomes still degenerate. Second, the accumulation of mutations on Y chromosomes followed a completely different pattern then those accumulated on X chromosomes. And third, the models may differ with respect to sexual proportion. These findings suggest that a more primeval mechanism rules the evolution of Y chromosomes due exclusively to the sex-chromosomes asymmetry itself, i.e., the fact that Y chromosomes never experience female bodies. Over aeons, natural selection favored X chromosomes spontaneously, even if at the very beginning of evolution, both XX and XY pairs of chromosomes did not recombine.

  20. Non-SMC condensin I complex proteins control chromosome segregation and survival of proliferating cells in the zebrafish neural retina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harris William A

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The condensation of chromosomes and correct sister chromatid segregation during cell division is an essential feature of all proliferative cells. Structural maintenance of chromosomes (SMC and non-SMC proteins form the condensin I complex and regulate chromosome condensation and segregation during mitosis. However, due to the lack of appropriate mutants, the function of the condensin I complex during vertebrate development has not been described. Results Here, we report the positional cloning and detailed characterization of retinal phenotypes of a zebrafish mutation at the cap-g locus. High resolution live imaging reveals that the progression of mitosis between prometa- to telophase is delayed and that sister chromatid segregation is impaired upon loss of CAP-G. CAP-G associates with chromosomes between prometa- and telophase of the cell cycle. Loss of the interaction partners CAP-H and CAP-D2 causes cytoplasmic mislocalization of CAP-G throughout mitosis. DNA content analysis reveals increased genomic imbalances upon loss of non-SMC condensin I subunits. Within the retina, loss of condensin I function causes increased rates of apoptosis among cells within the proliferative ciliary marginal zone (CMZ whereas postmitotic retinal cells are viable. Inhibition of p53-mediated apoptosis partially rescues cell numbers in cap-g mutant retinae and allows normal layering of retinal cell types without alleviating their aberrant nuclear sizes. Conclusion Our findings indicate that the condensin I complex is particularly important within rapidly amplifying progenitor cell populations to ensure faithful chromosome segregation. In contrast, differentiation of postmitotic retinal cells is not impaired upon polyploidization.

  1. Heat Transfer in Flue Gas with Vapor Condensation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贾力; 彭晓峰

    2002-01-01

    This paper combines the film model with Nusselt's condensation theory to analyze the effects of water vapor condensation on the heat transfer performance of flue gas flowing through a vertical tube. The analysis compares the condensation and convective heat transfer rates. For the concentration range investigated, the water vapor condensation transfers more energy than the flue gas convection, but the convective heat transfer can not be neglected. The heat transfer intensification due to the condensation increased as the water vapor fraction increased. The theoretical results compared well with experimental data.

  2. Film condensation of mercury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measurements of vapour-to-surface temperature difference and heat flux for film condensation of mercury on a vertical plane square (side 40 mm) nickel plated copper surface are reported. Thermocouples, accurately located and spaced through the copper condensing block served to measure, by extrapolation, the temperature at the copper-nickel interface and from the temperature gradient, the heat flux. Special care was taken to ensure that the results were not vitiated by the presence in the vapour of non-condensing gases. The results have higher relative precision than other recent heat-transfer measurements for condensation of metals since the present observations were made under conditions (metal used, vapour temperature and condensation rate) for which the vapour-to-surface temperature difference was larger than in the earlier work. The observed vapour-to-surface temperature differences are substantially greater than those given by the Nusselt theory of film condensation. By attributing the excess temperature drop to the vapour-liquid interface, the results are compared with theoretical expressions for interphase matter transfer. As in other recent work, values for the correction factor (or apparent 'condensation coefficient') varied from near unity down to about 0.6. The precision of the present results is such as to reveal a dependence of the correction factor on the condensation rate as well as on the vapour pressure. It was found that both could be satisfactorily correlated by a single dimensionless variable. (author)

  3. Systematic text condensation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malterud, Kirsti

    2012-01-01

    To present background, principles, and procedures for a strategy for qualitative analysis called systematic text condensation and discuss this approach compared with related strategies.......To present background, principles, and procedures for a strategy for qualitative analysis called systematic text condensation and discuss this approach compared with related strategies....

  4. Measure Guideline: Evaporative Condensers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    German, A [Alliance for Residential Building Innovation (ARBI), Davis, CA (United States); Dakin, B. [Alliance for Residential Building Innovation (ARBI), Davis, CA (United States); Hoeschele, M. [Alliance for Residential Building Innovation (ARBI), Davis, CA (United States)

    2012-03-01

    This measure guideline on evaporative condensers provides information on properly designing, installing, and maintaining evaporative condenser systems as well as understanding the benefits, costs, and tradeoffs. This is a prescriptive approach that outlines selection criteria, design and installation procedures, and operation and maintenance best practices.

  5. A multi-field approach to DNA condensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ran, Shi-Yong; Jia, Jun-Li

    2015-12-01

    DNA condensation is an important process in many fields including life sciences, polymer physics, and applied technology. In the nucleus, DNA is condensed into chromosomes. In polymer physics, DNA is treated as a semi-flexible molecule and a polyelectrolyte. Many agents, including multi-valent cations, surfactants, and neutral poor solvents, can cause DNA condensation, also referred to as coil-globule transition. Moreover, DNA condensation has been used for extraction and gene delivery in applied technology. Many physical theories have been presented to elucidate the mechanism underlying DNA condensation, including the counterion correlation theory, the electrostatic zipper theory, and the hydration force theory. Recently several single-molecule studies have focused on DNA condensation, shedding new light on old concepts. In this document, the multi-field concepts and theories related to DNA condensation are introduced and clarified as well as the advances and considerations of single-molecule DNA condensation experiments are introduced. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 21204065 and 20934004) and the Natural Science Foundation of Zhejiang Province, China (Grant No. Y4110357).

  6. Chromosome painting in plants.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schubert, I.; Fransz, P.F.; Fuchs, J.; Jong, de J.H.

    2001-01-01

    The current 'state-of-art' as to chromosome painting in plants is reviewed. We define different situations described as painting so far: i) Genomic in situ hybridisation (GISH) with total genomic DNA to distinguish alien chromosomes on the basis of divergent dispersed repeats, ii) 'Chromosomal in si

  7. Ordered tandem arrangement of chromosomes in the sperm heads of monotreme mammals.

    OpenAIRE

    Watson, J M; Meyne, J; Graves, J.A.

    1996-01-01

    A very old unanswered question in classical cytology is whether chromosomes are arranged randomly in sperm or whether they occupy specific positions. Even with modern methods of chromosome painting, it is difficult to resolve this question for the very condensed and almost spherical sperm head of most mammals. We have taken advantage of the unusual fibrillar sperm head of monotreme mammals (echidna and platypus) to examine the position of chromosome landmarks in a two-dimensional array. We us...

  8. Membrane-mediated changes in the structure of chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belyaev, N D; Budker, V G; Dubrovskaya, V A; Khristoljubova, N B; Kiseleva, E V; Matveeva, N M; Sukojan, M A

    1985-01-01

    In the present paper the interaction of metaphase chromosomes and chromatin with model and natural lipid membranes was studied. It was shown that chromatin and chromosomes are able to form complexes with membranes in the presence of divalent cations. In such complexes, the typical structure of chromosomes is altered. The character of this alteration in chromosomal structure was investigated with the use of electron microscopy and chemical modification with dimethylsulphate (DMS). The latter is possible because, according to the presented data, the condensation of chromatin into chromosomes is associated with a decrease in accessibility of N-3 in adenine (the protection of the minor groove of DNA) to modifications, and with an increased methylation of N-1 in adenine (the disarrangement of the secondary structure of DNA). It was shown that the interaction of chromosomes with liposomes provides various levels of unfolding up to the appearance of chromatin-like structures. The secondary DNA structure of decondensed chromosomes coincides with the secondary structure of chromosomal but not chromatin DNA, whereas the extent of shielding of the minor groove of DNA in such decondensed structures typical for chromatin DNA. It is possible to suggest that the chromosomal decondensation in telophase of mitosis is initiated by the action of a membrane component of the developing nuclear envelope. PMID:3926416

  9. Retrospective dosimetry using chromosome painting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    have performed our own dose response relationship, based on the frequency of stable chromosome aberrations detected by Chromosome Painting for Co60 γ-rays, with doses ranging from 0 Gy to 3 Gy delivered at a 0.4 Gy/min dose rate and painting chromosomes 1, 2 and 4, which represent 22% of the genome. We have scored reciprocal and non-reciprocal translocations, excess of painted acentrics, insertions, dicentrics and centric rings. After extrapolating the obtained frequencies to the full genome, the corresponding data set agree well with our previous results of dicentrics and centric rings and reciprocal and non reciprocal translocations, obtained using the same in vitro irradiation protocol. In order to collect information about the stability and the cumulative behavior of stable chromosome aberrations, we have retrospectively evaluated, using the Chromosome Painting calibration curve, a nuclear power plant worker sample with doses ranging from 500 mSv to 800 mSv. As a whole, the observed frequencies do not differ significantly from the expected frequencies obtained applying the calibration curve α coefficient. Some workers of this samples were previously evaluated using G-banding in 1995 and the present results agree well with the expected frequencies due to the accumulated during the last four years. (author)

  10. Assembly and disassembly of mammalian chromosome pellicle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NIZUMEI; JELITTLE; 等

    1992-01-01

    By means of indirect double immunofluorescent staining,the coordination of PI antigen and perichromonucleolin(PCN),the constituent of nuclear periphery and nucleolus respectively,in the assembly and disassembly of chromosome pellicle during mitosis was studied.It was found that in 3T3 cells,during mitosis PI antigen began to coat the condensing chromosome surface earlier than PCN did.However,both of them completed their coating on chromosome at approximately the same stage of mitosis,prometaphase metaphase,The dissociation of mitosis,Prometaphase metaphase.The dissociation of PI antigen from chromosome pellicle to participate the formation of nuclear periphery took place also ahead of that of PCN,At early telophase PI antigen had been extensively involved in the formation of nuclear periphery,while PCN remained in association with the surface of decondensing chromosomes.At late telophase,when PI antigen was localized in an fairly well formed nuclear periphery,PCN was in a stage of forming prenucleolar bodies.

  11. Condensation in steam turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    St' astny, M. [SKODA ENERGO zavod TURBINY, Plzen (Czech Republic); Sejna, M. [PC Progress, Praha (Czech Republic)

    1999-07-01

    A new theoretical model has been developed for the computation of a transonic flow of wet-steam through a turbine cascade with consideration of the condensation, completed by investigation of the solubility of NaCl impurity and its concentration in condensation droplets in the flow field. The system of governing equations consists of the 2D Euler Equations linked with other equations for homogeneous condensation, phase exchanges and transport of the liquid phase. The parallel heterogeneous condensation is evaluated on the assumption that, at the saturation line, are present droplets, that originate by the nucleation in the salt solution zone. The flow field with condensation in a typical turbine cascade is discussed. The heterogeneous condensation effect is also tested. The NaCl solubility falls rapidly to zero near the saturation line. The concentration of the NaCl in the droplets of condensation indicates the origin of the salt solution zone for transonic flow. They are analysed the conditions at the profile surface and in the blade boundary layers and the conclusions for the deposit creation and blade surface corrosion are derived. The conclusions are in agreement with the findings on the blades of actual steam turbines. (orig.)

  12. Dual condensates at finite isospin chemical potential

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Zhao

    2015-01-01

    The dual observables as order parameters for center symmetry are tested at finite isospin chemical potential $\\mu_I$ in a Polyakov-loop enhanced chiral model of QCD with physical quark masses. As a counterpart of the dressed Polyakov-loop, the first Fourier moment of pion condensate is introduced for $\\mu_I>{m_\\pi}/{2}$ under the temporal twisted boundary conditions for quarks. We demonstrate that this dual condensate exhibits the similar temperature dependence as the conventional Polyakov-loop. We confirm that its rapid increase with $T$ is driven by the evaporating of pion condensation. On the other hand, the dressed Polyakov-loop shows abnormal thermal behavior, which even decreases with $T$ at low temperatures due to the influence of pion condensate. We thus argue that in QCD the critical temperature extracting from a dual observable may have nothing to do with the quark confinement-deconfinement transition if the quark mass is very small.

  13. Physics of condensed matter

    CERN Document Server

    Misra, Prasanta K

    2012-01-01

    Physics of Condensed Matter is designed for a two-semester graduate course on condensed matter physics for students in physics and materials science. While the book offers fundamental ideas and topic areas of condensed matter physics, it also includes many recent topics of interest on which graduate students may choose to do further research. The text can also be used as a one-semester course for advanced undergraduate majors in physics, materials science, solid state chemistry, and electrical engineering, because it offers a breadth of topics applicable to these majors. The book be

  14. THE COLOR GLASS CONDENSATE.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MCLERRAN,L.

    2001-08-26

    The Color Glass Condensate is a state of high density gluonic matter which controls the high energy limit of hadronic interactions. Its properties are important for the initial conditions for matter produced at RHIC.

  15. Chimpanzee chromosome 12 is homologous to human chromosome 2q

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, N. C.; Sun, C. R.Y.; Ho, T.

    1977-01-01

    Most of the 46 human chromosomes find their counterparts in the 48 chimpanzee chromosomes except for chromosome 2 which has been hypothesized to have been derived from a centric fusion of two chimpanzee acrocentric chromosomes. These two chromosomes correspond to the human chromosomes 2p and 2g. This conclusion is based primarily on chromosome banding techniques, and the somatic cell hybridization technique has also been used. (HLW)

  16. Measure Guideline: Evaporative Condensers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    German, A.; Dakin, B.; Hoeschele, M.

    2012-03-01

    The purpose of this measure guideline on evaporative condensers is to provide information on a cost-effective solution for energy and demand savings in homes with cooling loads. This is a prescriptive approach that outlines selection criteria, design and installation procedures, and operation and maintenance best practices. This document has been prepared to provide a process for properly designing, installing, and maintaining evaporative condenser systems as well as understanding the benefits, costs, and tradeoffs.

  17. Boilers, evaporators, and condensers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book reports on the boilers, evaporators and condensers that are used in power plants including nuclear power plants. Topics included are forced convection for single-phase side heat exchangers, heat exchanger fouling, industrial heat exchanger design, fossil-fuel-fired boilers, once through boilers, thermodynamic designs of fossil fuel-first boilers, evaporators and condensers in refrigeration and air conditioning systems (with respect to reducing CFC's) and nuclear steam generators

  18. MRPS18CP2 alleles and DEFA3 absence as putative chromosome 8p23.1 modifiers of hearing loss due to mtDNA mutation A1555G in the 12S rRNA gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fischel-Ghodsian Nathan

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA mutations account for at least 5% of cases of postlingual, nonsyndromic hearing impairment. Among them, mutation A1555G is frequently found associated with aminoglycoside-induced and/or nonsyndromic hearing loss in families presenting with extremely variable clinical phenotypes. Biochemical and genetic data have suggested that nuclear background is the main factor involved in modulating the phenotypic expression of mutation A1555G. However, although a major nuclear modifying locus was located on chromosome 8p23.1 and regardless intensive screening of the region, the gene involved has not been identified. Methods With the aim to gain insights into the factors that determine the phenotypic expression of A1555G mutation, we have analysed in detail different genetic and genomic elements on 8p23.1 region (DEFA3 gene absence, CLDN23 gene and MRPS18CP2 pseudogene in a group of 213 A1555G carriers. Results Family based association studies identified a positive association for a polymorphism on MRPS18CP2 and an overrepresentation of DEFA3 gene absence in the deaf group of A1555G carriers. Conclusion Although none of the factors analysed seem to have a major contribution to the phenotype, our findings provide further evidences of the involvement of 8p23.1 region as a modifying locus for A1555G 12S rRNA gene mutation.

  19. Chromosome Territory Modeller and Viewer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tkacz, Magdalena A; Chromiński, Kornel; Idziak-Helmcke, Dominika; Robaszkiewicz, Ewa; Hasterok, Robert

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents ChroTeMo, a tool for chromosome territory modelling, accompanied by ChroTeVi-a chromosome territory visualisation software that uses the data obtained by ChroTeMo. These tools have been developed in order to complement the molecular cytogenetic research of interphase nucleus structure in a model grass Brachypodium distachyon. Although the modelling tool has been initially created for one particular species, it has universal application. The proposed version of ChroTeMo allows for generating a model of chromosome territory distribution in any given plant or animal species after setting the initial, species-specific parameters. ChroTeMo has been developed as a fully probabilistic modeller. Due to this feature, the comparison between the experimental data on the structure of a nucleus and the results obtained from ChroTeMo can indicate whether the distribution of chromosomes inside a nucleus is also fully probabilistic or is subjected to certain non-random patterns. The presented tools have been written in Python, so they are multiplatform, portable and easy to read. Moreover, if necessary they can be further developed by users writing their portions of code. The source code, documentation, and wiki, as well as the issue tracker and the list of related articles that use ChroTeMo and ChroTeVi, are accessible in a public repository at Github under GPL 3.0 license. PMID:27505434

  20. Chromosome Territory Modeller and Viewer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idziak-Helmcke, Dominika; Robaszkiewicz, Ewa; Hasterok, Robert

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents ChroTeMo, a tool for chromosome territory modelling, accompanied by ChroTeVi–a chromosome territory visualisation software that uses the data obtained by ChroTeMo. These tools have been developed in order to complement the molecular cytogenetic research of interphase nucleus structure in a model grass Brachypodium distachyon. Although the modelling tool has been initially created for one particular species, it has universal application. The proposed version of ChroTeMo allows for generating a model of chromosome territory distribution in any given plant or animal species after setting the initial, species-specific parameters. ChroTeMo has been developed as a fully probabilistic modeller. Due to this feature, the comparison between the experimental data on the structure of a nucleus and the results obtained from ChroTeMo can indicate whether the distribution of chromosomes inside a nucleus is also fully probabilistic or is subjected to certain non-random patterns. The presented tools have been written in Python, so they are multiplatform, portable and easy to read. Moreover, if necessary they can be further developed by users writing their portions of code. The source code, documentation, and wiki, as well as the issue tracker and the list of related articles that use ChroTeMo and ChroTeVi, are accessible in a public repository at Github under GPL 3.0 license. PMID:27505434

  1. Thin accretion disks around cold Bose–Einstein condensate stars

    OpenAIRE

    Dănilă, Bogdan; Harko, Tiberiu; Kovács, Zoltán

    2015-01-01

    Due to their superfluid properties some compact astrophysical objects, like neutron or quark stars, may contain a significant part of their matter in the form of a Bose-Einstein Condensate. Observationally distinguishing between neutron/quark stars and Bose-Einstein Condensate stars is a major challenge for this latter theoretical model. An observational possibility of indirectly distinguishing Bose-Einstein Condensate stars from neutron/quark stars is through the study of the thin accretion ...

  2. Phase diffusion in a Bose-Einstein condensate of light

    OpenAIRE

    de Leeuw, A.W.; van der Wurff, E. C. I.; Duine, R. A.; Stoof, H.T.C.

    2014-01-01

    We study phase diffusion in a Bose-Einstein condensate of light in a dye-filled optical microcavity, i.e., the spreading of the probability distribution for the condensate phase. To observe this phenomenon, we propose an interference experiment between the condensed photons and an external laser. We determine the average interference patterns, considering quantum and thermal fluctuations as well as dissipative effects due to the dye. Moreover, we show that a representative outcome of individu...

  3. Novel gene acquisition on carnivore Y chromosomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Despite its importance in harboring genes critical for spermatogenesis and male-specific functions, the Y chromosome has been largely excluded as a priority in recent mammalian genome sequencing projects. Only the human and chimpanzee Y chromosomes have been well characterized at the sequence level. This is primarily due to the presumed low overall gene content and highly repetitive nature of the Y chromosome and the ensuing difficulties using a shotgun sequence approach for assembly. Here we used direct cDNA selection to isolate and evaluate the extent of novel Y chromosome gene acquisition in the genome of the domestic cat, a species from a different mammalian superorder than human, chimpanzee, and mouse (currently being sequenced. We discovered four novel Y chromosome genes that do not have functional copies in the finished human male-specific region of the Y or on other mammalian Y chromosomes explored thus far. Two genes are derived from putative autosomal progenitors, and the other two have X chromosome homologs from different evolutionary strata. All four genes were shown to be multicopy and expressed predominantly or exclusively in testes, suggesting that their duplication and specialization for testis function were selected for because they enhance spermatogenesis. Two of these genes have testis-expressed, Y-borne copies in the dog genome as well. The absence of the four newly described genes on other characterized mammalian Y chromosomes demonstrates the gene novelty on this chromosome between mammalian orders, suggesting it harbors many lineage-specific genes that may go undetected by traditional comparative genomic approaches. Specific plans to identify the male-specific genes encoded in the Y chromosome of mammals should be a priority.

  4. Dual condensates at finite isospin chemical potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Zhang

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The dual observables as order parameters for center symmetry are tested at finite isospin chemical potential μI in a Polyakov-loop enhanced chiral model of QCD with physical quark masses. As a counterpart of the dressed Polyakov-loop, the first Fourier moment of pion condensate is introduced for μI>mπ/2 under the temporal twisted boundary conditions for quarks. We demonstrate that this dual condensate exhibits the similar temperature dependence as the conventional Polyakov-loop. We confirm that its rapid increase with T is driven by the evaporating of pion condensation. On the other hand, the dressed Polyakov-loop shows abnormal thermal behavior, which even decreases with T at low temperatures due to the influence of pion condensate. We also find that the dressed Polyakov-loop always rises most steeply at the chiral transition temperature, which is consistent with the previous results in Nambu–Jona-Lasinio (NJL model and its variants without considering the center symmetry. Since both quantities are strongly affected by the chiral symmetry and pion condensation, we conclude that it is difficult to clarify the deconfinement transition from the dual condensates in this situation within this model.

  5. Dual condensates at finite isospin chemical potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhao; Miao, Qing

    2016-02-01

    The dual observables as order parameters for center symmetry are tested at finite isospin chemical potential μI in a Polyakov-loop enhanced chiral model of QCD with physical quark masses. As a counterpart of the dressed Polyakov-loop, the first Fourier moment of pion condensate is introduced for μI >mπ / 2 under the temporal twisted boundary conditions for quarks. We demonstrate that this dual condensate exhibits the similar temperature dependence as the conventional Polyakov-loop. We confirm that its rapid increase with T is driven by the evaporating of pion condensation. On the other hand, the dressed Polyakov-loop shows abnormal thermal behavior, which even decreases with T at low temperatures due to the influence of pion condensate. We also find that the dressed Polyakov-loop always rises most steeply at the chiral transition temperature, which is consistent with the previous results in Nambu-Jona-Lasinio (NJL) model and its variants without considering the center symmetry. Since both quantities are strongly affected by the chiral symmetry and pion condensation, we conclude that it is difficult to clarify the deconfinement transition from the dual condensates in this situation within this model.

  6. Localization of latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA) on mitotic chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahayu, Retno; Ohsaki, Eriko; Omori, Hiroko; Ueda, Keiji

    2016-09-01

    In latent infection of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), viral gene expression is extremely limited and copy numbers of viral genomes remain constant. Latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA) is known to have a role in maintaining viral genome copy numbers in growing cells. Several studies have shown that LANA is localized in particular regions on mitotic chromosomes, such as centromeres/pericentromeres. We independently examined the distinct localization of LANA on mitotic chromosomes during mitosis, using super-resolution laser confocal microscopy and correlative fluorescence microscopy-electron microscopy (FM-EM) analyses. We found that the majority of LANA were not localized at particular regions such as telomeres/peritelomeres, centromeres/pericentromeres, and cohesion sites, but at the bodies of condensed chromosomes. Thus, LANA may undergo various interactions with the host factors on the condensed chromosomes in order to tether the viral genome to mitotic chromosomes and realize faithful viral genome segregation during cell division. PMID:27254595

  7. The Effect of Capillary Number on a Condensate Blockage in Gas Condensate Reservoirs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saifon DAUNGKAEW

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available In the petroleum industry, gas condensate reservoirs are becoming more common as exploration targets. However, there is a lack of knowledge of the reservoir behaviour mainly due to its complexity in the near wellbore region, where two phases, i.e. reservoir gas and condensate coexist when the wellbore pressure drops below the dew point pressure. The condensation process causes a reduction of the gas productivity (1. It has been reported in the literature that there is an increasing gas mobility zone due to a capillary number effect in the immediate vicinity of the wellbore in gas condensate reservoirs (2. This zone, called “velocitystripping zone”, compensates the well productivity loss due to the condensate drop-out. However, existence of this zone has just been recently found in an actual well test data (3,4. There is no conclusive study of this velocity-stripping zone in this type of reservoir. The objective of this study was to gain a better understanding of near wellbore effects in gas condensate reservoirs under production and well testing.

  8. Titanium condenser tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The corrosion resistance of titanium in sea water is extremely excellent, but titanium tubes are expensive, and the copper alloy tubes resistant in polluted sea water were developed, therefore they were not used practically. In 1970, ammonia attack was found on the copper alloy tubes in the air-cooled portion of condensers, and titanium tubes have been used as the countermeasure. As the result of the use, the galvanic attack an copper alloy tube plates with titanium tubes as cathode and the hydrogen absorption at titanium tube ends owing to excess electrolytic protection were observed, but the corrosion resistance of titanium tubes was perfect. These problems can be controlled by the application of proper electrolytic protection. The condensers with all titanium tubes adopted recently in USA are intended to realize perfectly no-leak condensers as the countermeasure to the corrosion in steam generators of PWR plants. Regarding large condensers of nowadays, three problems are pointed out, namely the vibration of condenser tubes, the method of joining tubes and tube plates, and the tubes of no coolant leak. These three problems in case of titanium tubes were studied, and the problem of the fouling of tubes was also examined. The intervals of supporting plates for titanium tubes should be narrowed. The joining of titanium tubes and titanium tube plates by welding is feasible and promising. The cleaning with sponge balls is effective to control fouling. (Kako, I.)

  9. X Chromosome and Autosome Dosage Responses in Drosophila melanogaster Heads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhen-Xia; Oliver, Brian

    2015-06-01

    X chromosome dosage compensation is required for male viability in Drosophila. Dosage compensation relative to autosomes is two-fold, but this is likely to be due to a combination of homeostatic gene-by-gene regulation and chromosome-wide regulation. We have baseline values for gene-by-gene dosage compensation on autosomes, but not for the X chromosome. Given the evolutionary history of sex chromosomes, these baseline values could differ. We used a series of deficiencies on the X and autosomes, along with mutations in the sex-determination gene transformer-2, to carefully measure the sex-independent X-chromosome response to gene dosage in adult heads by RNA sequencing. We observed modest and indistinguishable dosage compensation for both X chromosome and autosome genes, suggesting that the X chromosome is neither inherently more robust nor sensitive to dosage change. PMID:25850426

  10. On scalar condensate baryogenesis model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We discuss the scalar field condensate baryogenesis model, which is among the baryogenesis scenarios preferred today, compatible with inflation. According to that model a complex scalar field φ, carrying baryon charge B≠0 is generated at inflation. The baryon excess in the Universe results from the φ decay at later stages of Universe evolution (T 15 GeV). We updated the model's parameters range according to the current observational cosmological constraints and analyzed numerically φ evolution after the inflationary stage till its decay φ → qq-barlγ. During that period oscillated with a decreasing amplitude due to Universe expansion and particle production processes due to the coupling of the field to fermions gφf1f2. It was shown that particle creation processes play an essential role for evolution and its final value. It may lead to a considerable decrease of the field's amplitude for large g and/or large H values, which reflects finally into strong damping of the baryon charge carried by the condensate. The analysis suggests that for a natural range of the model's parameters the observed value of the baryon asymmetry can be obtained and the model can serve as a successful baryogenesis model, compatible with inflation. (author)

  11. Nuclear assembly of purified Crythecodinium cohnii chromosomes in cell—free extracts of Xenopus laevis eggs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIUXIAOLING; YANSHEN

    2000-01-01

    Incubation of dinoflagellate Crythecodinium cohnii chromosomes in cytoplasmic extracts of unfertilized Xenopus laevis eggs resulted in chromosomes decondensation and recondensation,nuclear envelope assembly,and nuclear reconstitution.Dinoflagellate Crythecodinium cohnii is a kind of primitive eukaryote which possesses numerous permanently condensed chromosomes and discontinuous double-layered nuclear membrane throughout the cell cycle.The assembled nuclei,being surrounded by a continuous double membrane containing nuclear pores and the uniformly dispersed chromatin fibers are morphologically distinguishable from that of Dinoflagellate Crythecodinium cohnii.However,incubation of dinoflagellate Cyrthecodinium cohnii chromosomes in the extracts from dinoflagellate Crythecodinium cohnii cells does not induce nuclear reconstitution.

  12. Nuclear assembly of purified Crythecodinium cohnii chromosomes in cell-free extracts of Xenopus laevis eggs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Incubation of dinoflagellate Crythecodinium cohnii chromosomes in cytoplasmic extracts of unfertilized Xenopus laevis eggs resulted in chromosomes decondensation and recondensation, nuclear envelope assembly, and nuclear reconstitution.Dinoflagellate Crythecodinium cohnii is a kind of primitive eukaryote which possesses numerous permanently condensed chromosomes and discontinuous double-layered nuclear membrane throughout the cell cycle. The assembled nuclei, being surrounded by a continuous double membrane containing nuclear pores and the uniformly dispersed chromatin fibers are morphologically distinguishable from that of Dinoflagellate Crythecodinium cohnii. However, incubation of dinoflagellate Crythecodinium cohnii chromosomes in the extracts from dinoflagellate Crythecodinium cohnii cells does not induce nuclear reconstitution.

  13. Bright soliton trains of trapped Bose-Einstein condensates

    OpenAIRE

    Al Khawaja, U.; Stoof, H. T. C.; Hulet, R. G.; Strecker, K.E.; Patridge, G.B.

    2002-01-01

    We variationally determine the dynamics of bright soliton trains composed of harmonically trapped Bose-Einstein condensates with attractive interatomic interactions. In particular, we obtain the interaction potential between two solitons. We also discuss the formation of soliton trains due to the quantum mechanical phase fluctuations of a one-dimensional condensate.

  14. Avalanches in a Bose-Einstein condensate

    OpenAIRE

    Schuster, J; A. Marte; Amtage, S; Sang, B.; Rempe, G.; Beijerinck, HCW Herman

    2001-01-01

    Collisional avalanches are identified to be responsible for an 8-fold increase of the initial loss rate of a large 87-Rb condensate. We show that the collisional opacity of an ultra-cold gas exhibits a critical value. When exceeded, losses due to inelastic collisions are substantially enhanced. Under these circumstances, reaching the hydrodynamic regime in conventional BEC experiments is highly questionable.

  15. Condensed matter physics

    CERN Document Server

    Isihara, A

    2007-01-01

    More than a graduate text and advanced research guide on condensed matter physics, this volume is useful to plasma physicists and polymer chemists, and their students. It emphasizes applications of statistical mechanics to a variety of systems in condensed matter physics rather than theoretical derivations of the principles of statistical mechanics and techniques. Isihara addresses a dozen different subjects in separate chapters, each designed to be directly accessible and used independently of previous chapters. Topics include simple liquids, electron systems and correlations, two-dimensional

  16. Nuclear α-particle condensates: Definitions, occurrence conditions, and consequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There has been a recent flurry of interest in the possibility of condensates of α particles in nuclei. In this Rapid Communication we discuss occurrence conditions for such states. Using the quantality condition of Mottelson we show that condensates are only marginally expected in α-particle states. We proceed to demonstrate that few-body nuclear condensates are ill defined and emphasize the conflict between α-localization and α-condensate formation. We also explore the connection between Ikeda diagrams, linear chains, and Tonks-Girardeau gases. Our findings show that no new information is contained in the approximations of nuclear states as α-cluster condensates. Furthermore, condensates of more than three α particles are very unlikely to exist due to couplings to other degrees of freedom

  17. Plant sex chromosome evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlesworth, Deborah

    2013-01-01

    It is now well established that plants have an important place in studies of sex chromosome evolution because of the repeated independent evolution of separate sexes and sex chromosomes. There has been considerable recent progress in studying plant sex chromosomes. In this review, I focus on how these recent studies have helped clarify or answer several important questions about sex chromosome evolution, and I shall also try to clarify some common misconceptions. I also outline future work that will be needed to make further progress, including testing some important ideas by genetic, molecular, and developmental approaches. Systems with different ages can clearly help show the time course of events during changes from an ancestral co-sexual state (hermaphroditism or monoecy), and I will also explain how different questions can be studied in lineages whose dioecy or sex chromosomes evolved at different times in the past. PMID:23125359

  18. Chromosomal geometry in the interface from the frequency of the radiation induced chromosome aberrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionizing radiation induces DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) and their interaction and illegitimate recombination produces chromosomal aberrations. Stable chromosomal aberrations comprise inter-chromosomal events (translocations) and intra-chromosomal events (inversions). When DSBs induction and interaction is done at random, and the proximity effects are neglected, the expected relation between translocations and inversions is F=86, based on chromosome arm length. The number of translocations and inversions is analyzed by using G-banding in 16 lymphocytes cultures from blood samples acutely irradiated with γ-rays (dose range: 0,5 Gy - 3 Gy). The result obtained was: F=13,5, significantly smaller than F=86. Literature data show similar small F values, but strongly spread. The excess of inversions could be explained by a 'proximity effect', it means that more proximate DSBs have more interaction probability. Therefore, it is possible to postulate a special chromosome arrangement during irradiation and the subsequent interval. We propose a model where individual chromosomes show spherical confinement with some degree of overlapping and DSBs induction proportional to cross section. A DSBs interaction probability function with cut-off length= 1μ is assumed. According to our results, the confinement volume is ≅ 6.4% of the nuclear volume. Nevertheless, we presume that large spread in F data could be due to temporal variation in overlapping and spatial chromosomal confinement. (authors). 14 refs

  19. Sequencing papaya X and Yh chromosomes reveals molecular basis of incipient sex chromosome evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianping; Na, Jong-Kuk; Yu, Qingyi; Gschwend, Andrea R; Han, Jennifer; Zeng, Fanchang; Aryal, Rishi; VanBuren, Robert; Murray, Jan E; Zhang, Wenli; Navajas-Pérez, Rafael; Feltus, F Alex; Lemke, Cornelia; Tong, Eric J; Chen, Cuixia; Wai, Ching Man; Singh, Ratnesh; Wang, Ming-Li; Min, Xiang Jia; Alam, Maqsudul; Charlesworth, Deborah; Moore, Paul H; Jiang, Jiming; Paterson, Andrew H; Ming, Ray

    2012-08-21

    Sex determination in papaya is controlled by a recently evolved XY chromosome pair, with two slightly different Y chromosomes controlling the development of males (Y) and hermaphrodites (Y(h)). To study the events of early sex chromosome evolution, we sequenced the hermaphrodite-specific region of the Y(h) chromosome (HSY) and its X counterpart, yielding an 8.1-megabase (Mb) HSY pseudomolecule, and a 3.5-Mb sequence for the corresponding X region. The HSY is larger than the X region, mostly due to retrotransposon insertions. The papaya HSY differs from the X region by two large-scale inversions, the first of which likely caused the recombination suppression between the X and Y(h) chromosomes, followed by numerous additional chromosomal rearrangements. Altogether, including the X and/or HSY regions, 124 transcription units were annotated, including 50 functional pairs present in both the X and HSY. Ten HSY genes had functional homologs elsewhere in the papaya autosomal regions, suggesting movement of genes onto the HSY, whereas the X region had none. Sequence divergence between 70 transcripts shared by the X and HSY revealed two evolutionary strata in the X chromosome, corresponding to the two inversions on the HSY, the older of which evolved about 7.0 million years ago. Gene content differences between the HSY and X are greatest in the older stratum, whereas the gene content and order of the collinear regions are identical. Our findings support theoretical models of early sex chromosome evolution. PMID:22869747

  20. Vibrio chromosomes share common history

    OpenAIRE

    Gevers Dirk; Chang Sarah; Chang LeeAnn; Kirkup Benjamin C; Polz Martin F

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background While most gamma proteobacteria have a single circular chromosome, Vibrionales have two circular chromosomes. Horizontal gene transfer is common among Vibrios, and in light of this genetic mobility, it is an open question to what extent the two chromosomes themselves share a common history since their formation. Results Single copy genes from each chromosome (142 genes from chromosome I and 42 genes from chromosome II) were identified from 19 sequenced Vibrionales genomes ...

  1. Effects of oxaliplatin on DNA condensation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JU HaiPeng; ZHANG HongYan; LI Wei; WANG PengYe

    2014-01-01

    In this paper the interactions between DNA and anti-cancer drug oxaliplatin were investigated by using magnetic tweezers.The dynamics of DNA condensation due to oxaliplatin was traced under various forces.It is found that torsion constraint in DNA enhances the ability of oxaliplatin for shortening DNA.The transplatin helps oxaliplatin combine to DNA and increase the rate of DNA condensation.All these results are consistent to the previously proposed model and are helpful for further investigation of interaction between DNA and oxaliplatin.

  2. Charged pion condensation in the chiral limit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We examine, in the chiral limit where the up and down quark masses are vanishingly small, the stability of the pure neutron ground state to small fluctuations due to charge and baryon number conserving strong interactions. It is shown that the ground state energy density as a function of pion field expectation value is determined by Weinberg's baryon two-body potential and by a calculable neutron-proton mass difference in the medium. This provides some insight into the competing physical effects that play a role in determining whether a charged pion condensate forms in dense nuclear matter. We find that in the chiral limit these effects suppress charged pion condensation. (orig.)

  3. Analog gravity from Bose-Einstein condensates

    OpenAIRE

    Barcelo, Carlos; Liberati, Stefano; Visser, Matt

    2000-01-01

    We analyze prospects for the use of Bose-Einstein condensates as condensed-matter systems suitable for generating a generic ``effective metric'', and for mimicking kinematic aspects of general relativity. We extend the analysis due to Garay et al, [gr-qc/0002015, gr-qc/0005131]. Taking a long term view, we ask what the ultimate limits of such a system might be. To this end, we consider a very general version of the nonlinear Schrodinger equation (with a 3-tensor position-dependent mass and ar...

  4. Phenomena of flooding with condensation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The penetration of ECC water in the downcomer region of PWRs has recently been the subject of considerable research due to its importance in the safety analysis of a hypothetical LOCA. The difficulties in such analysis lie in the lack of understanding of the basic phenomena of counter-current two-phase flow, complicated also by the condensation effect and the geometry effect of a PWR. This thesis is aimed at developing an understanding of the basic phenomena of counter-current steam-water flow in a simple vertical tube geometry and the effect of condensation on the flow behavior. An experimental system with a transparent test section was designed to study the behavior of steam-water counter-current flow. Steam is injected at the bottom. Saturated or subcooled water is then injected through a weir type device at the midheight of a 3.8 cm I.D. vertical pyrex glass tube of 241 cm total height. Flow patterns of steam and water in the tube below and above the water injection level are observed visually and photographically to identify flow regimes. Analyses and correlations have been developed for predicting flow regime transitions. Water penetration rates are measured and correlated. When the steam flow is lower than the Wallis flooding limit, i.e., the lowest flow which will cause initiation of liquid upflow when the liquid is saturated, the injected liquid falls as a smooth film to the lower plenum whether the injected liquid is subcooled or not. If the injected water subcooling is more than sufficient to condense the steam completely, a liquid oscillating plug forms. Motion of the plug is analyzed and solved numerically

  5. Modular invariant gaugino condensation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The construction of effective supergravity lagrangians for gaugino condensation is reviewed and recent results are presented that are consistent with modular invariance and yield a positive definite potential of the noscale type. Possible implications for phenomenology are briefly discussed. 29 refs

  6. Bose-Einstein condensation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The notion of Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) is introduced in the simple case of a perfect gas of bosons. We show the existence of a singularity that was discovered by Einstein and that appears when the density in the phase space is above a critical value. A few years after the discovery of BEC in several gases, it is interesting to look back at some properties of superfluid helium, the author comments shortly on boiling and evaporation, then on the role of rotons and vortices in the existence of a critical velocity in superfluid helium. The author discusses also the existence of a condensate in a liquid with strong interactions and the pressure variation of its superfluid transition temperature. The discovery of BEC in dilute gases of Rb, Na and Li in magnetic traps has stimulated an enormous revival of the interest in macroscopic quantum behavior of dilute gas at low temperature. Experiments with trapped Bose condensed gases have revealed profound condensed matter behavior of these extremely dilute systems. The author describes the key features of this behavior and discusses theoretical approaches that are being used in the field of quantum gases. Methods of production and of detection of a BEC in gaseous phases are presented, the issue of the cooling of fermion gases and of Boson-fermions mixing is discussed. (A.C.)

  7. Condensed matter physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The condensed matter physics research in the Physics Department of Risoe National Laboratory is predominantly experimental utilising diffraction of neutrons and x-rays. The research topics range from studies of structure, excitations and phase transitions in model systems to studies of ion transport, texture and recrystallization kinetics with a more applied nature. (author)

  8. DROPWISE CONDENSATION ON MICRO- AND NANOSTRUCTURED SURFACES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Enright, R; Miljkovic, N; Alvarado, JL; Kim, K; Rose, JW

    2014-07-23

    In this review we cover recent developments in the area of surface-enhanced dropwise condensation against the background of earlier work. The development of fabrication techniques to create surface structures at the micro-and nanoscale using both bottom-up and top-down approaches has led to increased study of complex interfacial phenomena. In the heat transfer community, researchers have been extensively exploring the use of advanced surface structuring techniques to enhance phase-change heat transfer processes. In particular, the field of vapor-to-liquid condensation and especially that of water condensation has experienced a renaissance due to the promise of further optimizing this process at the micro-and nanoscale by exploiting advances in surface engineering developed over the last several decades.

  9. Bose Condensate in He II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Condensate Saga, now halfway through its fifth decade, is reviewed. The recent neutron-scattering work which has at last convincingly established that there is indeed a Bose Condensate in He II is described

  10. A high-resolution physical map integrating an anchored chromosome with the BAC physical maps of wheat chromosome 6B

    OpenAIRE

    Kobayashi, F; Wu, J. Z.; Kanamori, H; Tanaka, T.; Katagiri, S.; Karasawa, W.; Kaneko, S.; Watanabe, S; Sakaguchi, T; Šafář, J. (Jan); Šimková, H. (Hana); Mukai, Y.; M. Hamada; Saito, M; Hayakawa, K

    2015-01-01

    Background: A complete genome sequence is an essential tool for the genetic improvement of wheat. Because the wheat genome is large, highly repetitive and complex due to its allohexaploid nature, the International Wheat Genome Sequencing Consortium (IWGSC) chose a strategy that involves constructing bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC)-based physical maps of individual chromosomes and performing BAC-by-BAC sequencing. Here, we report the construction of a physical map of chromosome 6B with t...

  11. Sequential cloning of chromosomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacks, S.A.

    1991-12-31

    A method for sequential cloning of chromosomal DNA and chromosomal DNA cloned by this method are disclosed. The method includes the selection of a target organism having a segment of chromosomal DNA to be sequentially cloned. A first DNA segment, having a first restriction enzyme site on either side. homologous to the chromosomal DNA to be sequentially cloned is isolated. A first vector product is formed by ligating the homologous segment into a suitably designed vector. The first vector product is circularly integrated into the target organism`s chromosomal DNA. The resulting integrated chromosomal DNA segment includes the homologous DNA segment at either end of the integrated vector segment. The integrated chromosomal DNA is cleaved with a second restriction enzyme and ligated to form a vector-containing plasmid, which is replicated in a host organism. The replicated plasmid is then cleaved with the first restriction enzyme. Next, a DNA segment containing the vector and a segment of DNA homologous to a distal portion of the previously isolated DNA segment is isolated. This segment is then ligated to form a plasmid which is replicated within a suitable host. This plasmid is then circularly integrated into the target chromosomal DNA. The chromosomal DNA containing the circularly integrated vector is treated with a third, retrorestriction enzyme. The cleaved DNA is ligated to give a plasmid that is used to transform a host permissive for replication of its vector. The sequential cloning process continues by repeated cycles of circular integration and excision. The excision is carried out alternately with the second and third enzymes.

  12. Generalized Bose-Einstein Condensation

    OpenAIRE

    Mullin, William J.; Sakhel, Asaad R.

    2010-01-01

    Generalized Bose-Einstein condensation (GBEC) involves condensates appearing simultaneously in multiple states. We review examples of the three types in an ideal Bose gas with different geometries. In Type I there is a discrete number of quantum states each having macroscopic occupation; Type II has condensation into a continuous band of states, with each state having macroscopic occupation; in Type III each state is microscopically occupied while the entire condensate band is macroscopically...

  13. A new chromosome was born: comparative chromosome painting in Boechera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Marcus A

    2015-09-01

    Comparative chromosome painting is a powerful tool to study the evolution of chromosomes and genomes. Analyzing karyotype evolution in cruciferous plants highlights the origin of aberrant chromosomes in apomictic Boechera and further establishes the cruciferous plants as important model system for our understanding of plant chromosome and genome evolution. PMID:26228436

  14. Condensed Matter Nuclear Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Akito; Ota, Ken-Ichiro; Iwamura, Yashuhiro

    Preface -- 1. General. Progress in condensed matter nuclear science / A. Takahashi. Summary of ICCF-12 / X. Z. Li. Overview of light water/hydrogen-based low-energy nuclear reactions / G. H. Miley and P. J. Shrestha -- 2. Excess heat and He detection. Development of "DS-reactor" as the practical reactor of "cold fusion" based on the "DS-cell" with "DS-cathode" / Y. Arata and Y.-C. Zhang. Progress in excess of power experiments with electrochemical loading of deuterium in palladium / V. Violante ... [et al.]. Anomalous energy generation during conventional electrolysis / T. Mizuno and Y. Toriyabe. "Excess heat" induced by deuterium flux in palladium film / B. Liu ... [et al.]. Abnormal excess heat observed during Mizuno-type experiments / J.-F. Fauvarque, P. P. Clauzon and G. J.-M. Lallevé. Seebeck envelope calorimetry with a Pd|D[symbol]O + H[symbol]SO[symbol] electrolytic cell / W.-S. Zhang, J. Dash and Q. Wang. Observation and investigation of nuclear fusion and self-induced electric discharges in liquids / A. I. Koldamasov ... [et al.]. Description of a sensitive seebeck calorimeter used for cold fusion studies / E. Storms. Some recent results at ENEA / M. Apicella ... [et al.]. Heat measurement during plasma electrolysis / K. Iizumi ... [et al.]. Effect of an additive on thermal output during electrolysis of heavy water with a palladium cathode / Q. Wang and J. Dash. Thermal analysis of calorimetric systems / L. D'Aulerio ... [et al.]. Surface plasmons and low-energy nuclear reactions triggering / E. Castagna ... [et al.]. Production method for violent TCB jet plasma from cavity / F. Amini. New results and an ongoing excess heat controversy / L. Kowalski ... [et al.] -- 3. Transmutation. Observation of surface distribution of products by X-ray fluorescence spectrometry during D[symbol] gas permeation through Pd Complexes / Y. Iwamura ... [et al.]. Discharge experiment using Pd/CaO/Pd multi-layered cathode / S. Narita ... [et al.]. Producing transmutation

  15. Chromosomal abnormalities in patients with sperm disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Y. Pylyp

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Chromosomal abnormalities are among the most common genetic causes of spermatogenic disruptions. Carriers of chromosomal abnormalities are at increased risk of infertility, miscarriage or birth of a child with unbalanced karyotype due to the production of unbalanced gametes. The natural selection against chromosomally abnormal sperm usually prevents fertilization with sperm barring in cases of serious chromosomal abnormalities. However, assisted reproductive technologies in general and intracytoplasmic sperm injection in particular, enable the transmission of chromosomal abnormalities to the progeny. Therefore, cytogenetic studies are important in patients with male factor infertility before assisted reproduction treatment. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the types and frequencies of chromosomal abnormalities in 724 patients with infertility and to estimate the risk of chromosomal abnormalities detection in subgroups of patients depending on the severity of spermatogenic disruption, aiming at identifying groups of patients in need of cytogenetic studies. Karyotype analysis was performed in 724 blood samples of men attending infertility clinic. Chromosomal preparation was performed by standard techniques. At least 20 GTG-banded metaphase plates with the resolution from 450 to 750 bands per haploid set were analysed in each case. When chromosomal mosaicism was suspected, this number was increased to 50. Abnormal karyotypes were observed in 48 (6.6% patients, including 67% of autosomal abnormalities and 33% of gonosomal abnormalities. Autosomal abnormalities were represented by structural rearrangements. Reciprocal translocations were the most common type of structural chromosomal abnormalities in the studied group, detected with the frequency of 2.6% (n = 19, followed by Robertsonian translocation, observed with the frequency of 1.2% (n = 9. The frequency of inversions was 0.6% (n = 4. Gonosomal abnormalities included 14 cases

  16. A Model of Repetitive-DNA-Organized Chromatin Network of Interphase Chromosomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shao-Jun Tang

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available During interphase, chromosomes are relatively de-condensed in the nuclear space. Interphase chromosomes are known to occupy nuclear space in a non-random manner (chromosome territory; however, their internal structures are poorly defined. In particular, little is understood about the molecular mechanisms that govern the internal organization of interphase chromosomes. The author recently proposed that pairing (or interaction of repetitive DNA-containing chromatin regions is a critical driving force that specifies the higher-order organization of eukaryotic chromosomes. Guided by this theoretical framework and published experimental data on the structure of interphase chromosomes and the spatial distribution of repetitive DNA in interphase nuclei, I postulate here a molecular structure of chromatin organization in interphase chromosomes. According to this model, an interphase chromosome is a chromatin mesh (or lattice that is formed by repeat pairing (RP. The mesh consists of two types of structural components: chromosome nodes and loose chromatin fibers. Chromosome nodes are DNA repeat assemblies (RAs that are formed via RP, while loose fibers include chromatin loops that radiate from the nodes. Different loops crosslink by RPs and form a large integrated chromatin network. I suggest that the organization of the chromatin network of a given interphase chromosome is intrinsically specified by the distribution of repetitive DNA elements on the linear chromatin. The stability of the organization is governed by the collection of RA-formed nodes, and the dynamics of the organization is driven by the assembling and disassembling of the nodes.

  17. Analysis of Chromosomal Aberrations after Low and High Dose Rate Gamma Irradiation in ATM or NBS Suppressed Human Fibroblast Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hada, M.; Huff, J. L.; Patel, Z.; Pluth, J. M.; George, K. A.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2009-01-01

    A detailed understanding of the biological effects of heavy nuclei is needed for space radiation protection and for cancer therapy. High-LET radiation produces more complex DNA lesions that may be non-repairable or that may require additional processing steps compared to endogenous DSBs, increasing the possibility of misrepair. Interplay between radiation sensitivity, dose, and radiation quality has not been studied extensively. Previously we studied chromosome aberrations induced by low- and high- LET radiation in several cell lines deficient in ATM (ataxia telangactasia mutated; product of the gene that is mutated in ataxia telangiectasia patients) or NBS (nibrin; product of the gene mutated in the Nijmegen breakage syndrome), and gliomablastoma cells that are proficient or lacking in DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) activity. We found that the yields of both simple and complex chromosomal aberrations were significantly increased in the DSB repair defective cells compared to normal cells. The increased aberrations observed for the ATM and NBS defective lines was due to a significantly larger quadratic dose-response term compared to normal fibroblasts for both simple and complex aberrations, while the linear dose-response term was significantly higher in NBS cells only for simple exchanges. These results point to the importance of the functions of ATM and NBS in chromatin modifications that function to facilitate correct DSB repair and minimize aberration formation. To further understand the sensitivity differences that were observed in ATM and NBS deficient cells, in this study, chromosomal aberration analysis was performed in normal lung fibroblast cells treated with KU-55933, a specific ATM kinase inhibitor, or Mirin, an MRN complex inhibitor involved in activation of ATM. We are also testing siRNA knockdown of these proteins. Normal and ATM or NBS suppressed cells were irradiated with gamma-rays and chromosomes were collected with a premature chromosome

  18. Incoherent scattering of light by a Bose--Einstein condensate of interacting atoms

    OpenAIRE

    Mazets, I. E.

    2000-01-01

    We demonstrate that incoherent photon scattering by a Bose-Einstein condensate of non-ideal atomic gas is enhanced due to bosonic stimulation of spontaneous emission, similarly to coherent scattering in forward direction. Necessary initial population of non-condensate states is provided by quantum depletion of a condensate caused by interatomic repulsion.

  19. Chimpanzee chromosome 13 is homologous to human chromosome 2p

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, N. C.; Sun, C. R.Y.; Ho, T.

    1977-01-01

    Similarities between human and chimpanzee chromosomes are shown by chromosome banding techniques and somatic cell hybridization techniques. Cell hybrids were obtained from the chimpanzee lymphocyte LE-7, and the Chinese hamster mutant cell, Gal-2. Experiments showed that the ACPL, MDHs, and Gal-Act genes could be assigned to chimpanzee chromosome 13, and since these genes have been assigned to human chromosme 2p, it is suggested that chimpanzee chromosome 13 is homologous to human chromosome 2p. (HLW)

  20. CW laser light condensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhurahov, Michael; Bekker, Alexander; Levit, Boris; Weill, Rafi; Fischer, Baruch

    2016-03-21

    We present a first experimental demonstration of classical CW laser light condensation (LC) in the frequency (mode) domain that verifies its prediction (Fischer and Weill, Opt. Express20, 26704 (2012)). LC is based on weighting the modes in a noisy environment in a loss-gain measure compared to an energy (frequency) scale in Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC). It is characterized by a sharp transition from multi- to single-mode oscillation, occurring when the spectral-filtering (loss-trap) has near the lowest-loss mode ("ground-state") a power-law dependence with an exponent smaller than 1. An important meaning of the many-mode LC system stems from its relation to lasing and photon-BEC. PMID:27136845

  1. Multilayer graphene condenser microphone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todorović, Dejan; Matković, Aleksandar; Milićević, Marijana; Jovanović, Djordje; Gajić, Radoš; Salom, Iva; Spasenović, Marko

    2015-12-01

    Vibrating membranes are the cornerstone of acoustic technology, forming the backbone of modern loudspeakers and microphones. Acoustic performance of a condenser microphone is derived mainly from the membrane’s size, surface mass and achievable static tension. The widely studied and available nickel has been a dominant membrane material for professional microphones for several decades. In this paper we introduce multilayer graphene as a membrane material for condenser microphones. The graphene device outperforms a high end commercial nickel-based microphone over a significant part of the audio spectrum, with a larger than 10 dB enhancement of sensitivity. Our experimental results are supported with numerical simulations, which also show that a 300 layer thick graphene membrane under maximum tension would offer excellent extension of the frequency range, up to 1 MHz.

  2. Chromosomal abnormalities and autism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farida El-Baz

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Chromosomal abnormalities were not detected in the studied autistic children, and so the relation between the genetics and autism still needs further work up with different study methods and techniques.

  3. Condensed matter physics

    CERN Document Server

    Marder, Michael P

    2010-01-01

    This Second Edition presents an updated review of the whole field of condensed matter physics. It consolidates new and classic topics from disparate sources, teaching not only about the effective masses of electrons in semiconductor crystals and band theory, but also about quasicrystals, dynamics of phase separation, why rubber is more floppy than steel, granular materials, quantum dots, Berry phases, the quantum Hall effect, and Luttinger liquids.

  4. Chromosome numbers in Bromeliaceae

    OpenAIRE

    2000-01-01

    The present study reports chromosome numbers of 17 species of Bromeliaceae, belonging to the genera Encholirium, Bromelia, Orthophytum, Hohenbergia, Billbergia, Neoglaziovia, Aechmea, Cryptanthus and Ananas. Most species present 2n = 50, however, Bromelia laciniosa, Orthophytum burle-marxii and O. maracasense are polyploids with 2n = 150, 2n = 100 and 2n = 150, respectively, while for Cryptanthus bahianus, 2n = 34 + 1-4B. B chromosomes were observed in Bromelia plumieri and Hohenbergia aff. u...

  5. Asymmetric condensed dark matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre, Anthony; Diez-Tejedor, Alberto

    2016-04-01

    We explore the viability of a boson dark matter candidate with an asymmetry between the number densities of particles and antiparticles. A simple thermal field theory analysis confirms that, under certain general conditions, this component would develop a Bose-Einstein condensate in the early universe that, for appropriate model parameters, could survive the ensuing cosmological evolution until now. The condensation of a dark matter component in equilibrium with the thermal plasma is a relativistic process, hence the amount of matter dictated by the charge asymmetry is complemented by a hot relic density frozen out at the time of decoupling. Contrary to the case of ordinary WIMPs, dark matter particles in a condensate must be lighter than a few tens of eV so that the density from thermal relics is not too large. Big-Bang nucleosynthesis constrains the temperature of decoupling to the scale of the QCD phase transition or above. This requires large dark matter-to-photon ratios and very weak interactions with standard model particles.

  6. Chaos of chiral condensate

    CERN Document Server

    Hashimoto, Koji; Yoshida, Kentaroh

    2016-01-01

    Assigning a chaos index for vacua of generic quantum field theories is a challenging problem. We find chaotic behavior of chiral condensates of a quantum gauge theory at strong coupling limit, by using the AdS/CFT correspondence. We evaluate the time evolution of homogeneous quark condensates and in an N=2 supersymmetric QCD with the SU(N_c) gauge group at large N_c and at large 't Hooft coupling lambda. At an equivalent classical gravity picture, a Lyapunov exponent is readily defined. We show that the condensates exhibit chaotic behavior for energy density E > (6x10^2) (N_c/lambda^2) (m_q)^4 where m_q is the quark mass. The energy region of the chaotic vacua of the N=2 supersymmetric QCD increases for smaller N_c or larger lambda. The Lyapunov exponent is calculated as a function of the theory (N_c,lambda,E), showing that the N=2 supersymmetric QCD is more chaotic for smaller N_c.

  7. Roles of the Y chromosome genes in human cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatsuo Kido

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Male and female differ genetically by their respective sex chromosome composition, that is, XY as male and XX as female. Although both X and Y chromosomes evolved from the same ancestor pair of autosomes, the Y chromosome harbors male-specific genes, which play pivotal roles in male sex determination, germ cell differentiation, and masculinization of various tissues. Deletions or translocation of the sex-determining gene, SRY, from the Y chromosome causes disorders of sex development (previously termed as an intersex condition with dysgenic gonads. Failure of gonadal development results not only in infertility, but also in increased risks of germ cell tumor (GCT, such as gonadoblastoma and various types of testicular GCT. Recent studies demonstrate that either loss of Y chromosome or ectopic expression of Y chromosome genes is closely associated with various male-biased diseases, including selected somatic cancers. These observations suggest that the Y-linked genes are involved in male health and diseases in more frequently than expected. Although only a small number of protein-coding genes are present in the male-specific region of Y chromosome, the impacts of Y chromosome genes on human diseases are still largely unknown, due to lack of in vivo models and differences between the Y chromosomes of human and rodents. In this review, we highlight the involvement of selected Y chromosome genes in cancer development in men.

  8. Micromechanics of human mitotic chromosomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eukaryote cells dramatically reorganize their long chromosomal DNAs to facilitate their physical segregation during mitosis. The internal organization of folded mitotic chromosomes remains a basic mystery of cell biology; its understanding would likely shed light on how chromosomes are separated from one another as well as into chromosome structure between cell divisions. We report biophysical experiments on single mitotic chromosomes from human cells, where we combine micromanipulation, nano-Newton-scale force measurement and biochemical treatments to study chromosome connectivity and topology. Results are in accord with previous experiments on amphibian chromosomes and support the 'chromatin network' model of mitotic chromosome structure. Prospects for studies of chromosome-organizing proteins using siRNA expression knockdowns, as well as for differential studies of chromosomes with and without mutations associated with genetic diseases, are also discussed

  9. Vibrio chromosomes share common history

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gevers Dirk

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While most gamma proteobacteria have a single circular chromosome, Vibrionales have two circular chromosomes. Horizontal gene transfer is common among Vibrios, and in light of this genetic mobility, it is an open question to what extent the two chromosomes themselves share a common history since their formation. Results Single copy genes from each chromosome (142 genes from chromosome I and 42 genes from chromosome II were identified from 19 sequenced Vibrionales genomes and their phylogenetic comparison suggests consistent phylogenies for each chromosome. Additionally, study of the gene organization and phylogeny of the respective origins of replication confirmed the shared history. Conclusions Thus, while elements within the chromosomes may have experienced significant genetic mobility, the backbones share a common history. This allows conclusions based on multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA for one chromosome to be applied equally to both chromosomes.

  10. Tracking chromosome evolution in southern African gerbils using flow-sorted chromosome paints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, L I; Ng, B L; Cheng, W; Fu, B; Yang, F; Rambau, R V

    2013-01-01

    Desmodillus and Gerbilliscus (formerly Tatera) comprise a monophyletic group of gerbils (subfamily Gerbillinae) which last shared an ancestor approximately 8 million years ago; diploid chromosome number variation among the species ranges from 2n = 36 to 2n = 50. In an attempt to shed more light on chromosome evolution and speciation in these rodents, we compared the karyotypes of 7 species, representing 3 genera, based on homology data revealed by chromosome painting with probes derived from flow-sorted chromosomes of the hairy footed gerbil, Gerbillurus paeba (2n = 36). The fluorescent in situ hybridization data revealed remarkable genome conservation: these species share a high proportion of conserved chromosomes, and differences are due to 10 Robertsonian (Rb) rearrangements (3 autapomorphies, 3 synapomorphies and 4 hemiplasies/homoplasies). Our data suggest that chromosome evolution in Desmodillus occurred at a rate of ~1.25 rearrangements per million years (Myr), and that the rate among Gerbilliscus over a time period spanning 8 Myr is also ~1.25 rearrangements/Myr. The recently diverged Gerbillurus (G. tytonis and G. paeba) share an identical karyotype, while Gerbilliscus kempi, G. afra and G. leucogaster differ by 6 Rb rearrangements (a rate of ~1 rearrangement/Myr). Thus, our data suggests a very slow rate of chromosomal evolution in Southern African gerbils. PMID:23652816

  11. Recondensation phenomena of a hot two-phase fluid in the presence of non condensable gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The condensation rates obtained during the expansion of a large hot bubble containing non condensable gases in its cold liquid is studied. The failure of theories derived from the Nusselt model for liquid metals led to use the kinetic theory of condensation. The additionnal resistance due to the presence of non condensable gases is expressed by the vapor diffusion through the layer of gases which accumulates at the interface. This model is then used to interprete experiments

  12. Temporal dynamics of Bose-condensed gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trujillo Martinez, Mauricio

    2014-03-19

    We perform a detailed quantum dynamical study of non-equilibrium trapped, interacting Bose-condensed gases. We investigate Josephson oscillations between interacting Bose-Einstein condensates confined in a finite size double-well trap and the non-trivial time evolution of a coherent state placed at the center of a two dimensional optical lattice. For the Josephson oscillations three time scales appear. We find that Josephson junction can sustain multiple undamped oscillations up to a characteristic time scale τ{sub c} without exciting atoms out of the condensates. Beyond the characteristic time scale τ{sub c} the dynamics of the junction are governed by fast, non-condensed particles assisted Josephson tunnelling as well as the collisions between non-condensed particles. In the non-condensed particles dominated regime we observe strong damping of the oscillations due to inelastic collisions, equilibrating the system leading to an effective loss of details of the initial conditions. In addition, we predict that an initially self-trapped BEC state will be destroyed by these fast dynamics. The time evolution of a coherent state released at the center of a two dimensional optical lattice shows a ballistic expansion with a decreasing expansion velocity for increasing two-body interactions strength and particle number. Additionally, we predict that if the two-body interactions strength exceeds a certain value, a forerunner splits up from the expanding coherent state. We also observe that this system, which is prepared far from equilibrium, can evolve to a quasistationary non-equilibrium state.

  13. Ancient Male Recombination Shaped Genetic Diversity of Neo-Y Chromosome in Drosophila albomicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satomura, Kazuhiro; Tamura, Koichiro

    2016-02-01

    Researchers studying Y chromosome evolution have drawn attention to neo-Y chromosomes in Drosophila species due to their resembling the initial stage of Y chromosome evolution. In the studies of neo-Y chromosome of Drosophila miranda, the extremely low genetic diversity observed suggested various modes of natural selection acting on the nonrecombining genome. However, alternative possibility may come from its peculiar origin from a single chromosomal fusion event with male achiasmy, which potentially caused and maintained the low genetic diversity of the neo-Y chromosome. Here, we report a real case where a neo-Y chromosome is in transition from an autosome to a typical Y chromosome. The neo-Y chromosome of Drosophila albomicans harbored a rich genetic diversity comparable to its gametologous neo-X chromosome and an autosome in the same genome. Analyzing sequence variations in 53 genes and measuring recombination rates between pairs of loci by cross experiments, we elucidated the evolutionary scenario of the neo-Y chromosome of D. albomicans having high genetic diversity without assuming selective force, i.e., it originated from a single chromosomal fusion event, experienced meiotic recombination during the initial stage of evolution and diverged from neo-X chromosome by the suppression of recombination tens or a few hundreds of thousand years ago. Consequently, the observed high genetic diversity on the neo-Y chromosome suggested a strong effect of meiotic recombination to introduce genetic variations into the newly arisen sex chromosome. PMID:26494844

  14. Dark matter as a condensate: Deduction of microscopic properties

    CERN Document Server

    Gutierrez, Sergio; Camacho, Abel

    2016-01-01

    In the present work we model dark matter as a Bose-Einstein condensate and the main goal is the deduction of the microscopic properties, namely, mass, number of particles, and scattering length, related to the particles comprised in the corresponding condensate. This task is done introducing in the corresponding model the effects of the thermal cloud of the system. Three physical conditions are imposed, i.e., mechanical equilibrium of the condensate, explanation of the rotation curves of stars belonging to dwarf galaxies, and, finally, the deflection of light due to the presence of dark matter. These three aforementioned expressions allow us to cast the features of the particles in terms of detectable astrophysical variables. Finally, the model is contrasted against observational data and in this manner we obtain values for the involved microscopic parameters of the condensate. The deduced results are compared with previous results in which dark matter has not been considered a condensate. The main conclusion...

  15. Soft Condensed Matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author states in the preface of the book that the aim is '...to give a unified overview of the various aspects of the physics of soft condensed matter'. The book succeeds in fulfilling this aim in many respects. The style is fluent and concise and gives the necessary explanations to make its content understandable to people with some knowledge of the basic principles of physics. The content of the book is complete enough to give a panoramic view of the landscape of soft condensed matter. The first two chapters give, respectively, a short introduction and a presentation of forces, energies and timescales, giving a general overview and pointing out the particular importance of different aspects such as timescales, which are much more important in soft condensed matter than in traditional or 'hard' condensed matter. The next chapter, devoted to phase transition, recalls that the equilibrium between two phases is controlled by free energy considerations. Spinodal decomposition is presented as a counterpart of nucleation and growth. Again, characteristic length scales are considered and applied to a phase separation mixture of polymers in a common solvent. The following three chapters are devoted respectively to specific topics: colloidal dispersion, polymers and gelation. The stability and phase behaviour of colloids are related to the interaction between colloidal particles. Properties of colloidal crystals as well as colloidal dispersion are depicted in terms of stabilization of crystalline colloids. The flow properties of colloidal dispersion are presented in terms of free energy minimization and the structure of the dispersion. After a brief introduction to polymer chemistry and architecture, the coil-globule transition is discussed. Viscoelasticity of polymers is described and discussed by introducing the notion of entanglement. This leads to the introduction of the tube model and the theory of reptation. The sol-gel transition is presented phenomenologically

  16. Theoretical investigation of water vapour condensation in presence of noncondensable gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steam condensation phenomenon plays an important role in many industrial applications. Especially in energy sector this process requires deep understanding. When noncondensable gases are taken into consideration description of the entire phenomenon becomes more complicated. If the surface condensation is taken into consideration this additional species accumulates and creates noncondensable layer near the surface on water vapour condenses. Due to this effect heat and mass transfer rates from gas mixture decreases. Also volume condensation (if it occurs) is affected by the presence of inert gases. Several examples where the phenomena described above are important can be taken into consideration: studies of accidents in the nuclear power plants where condensation in the volume and condensation on the cold containment's structures occurs after steam is released due to the pipe brake in the primary loop (especially this is important for PWR's containments which in normal operation conditions are filled with air or nitrogen); condensation of steam in the pipe systems of BWR reactors where some amount of hydrogen can be accumulated due to the water vapour condensation in nonvented pipes; condensation of steam in the condensers after low pressure stage turbine; etc. Also in other fields, e.g. chemistry or meteorology, the condensation of water vapour in presence of noncondensable species plays very important role. Diffusion surface condensation model and its implementation into CFX - 4 CFD code has been described in this licentiate thesis. Three different situations have been taken into account: surface condensation of water vapour in presence of air on the vertical wall (computational results have been compared with several commonly used correlations), surface condensation of water vapour in presence of air on the horizontal wall (results have been compared with experimental data), volume condensation in presence of air (known also as spontaneous condensation

  17. Chromokinesin: Kinesin superfamily regulating cell division through chromosome and spindle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Ai; Tan, Fu-Qing; Yang, Wan-Xi

    2016-09-01

    Material transportation is essential for appropriate cellular morphology and functions, especially during cell division. As a motor protein moving along microtubules, kinesin has several intracellular functions. Many kinesins play important roles in chromosome condensation and separation and spindle organization during the cell cycle. Some of them even can directly bind to chromosomes, as a result, these proteins are called chromokinesins. Kinesin-4 and kinesin-10 family are two major families of chromokinesin and many members can regulate some processes, both in mitosis and meiosis. Their functions have been widely studied. Here, we summarize current knowledge about known chromokinesins and introduce their intracellular features in accordance with different families. Furthermore, we have also introduced some new-found but unconfirmed kinesins which may have a relationship with chromosomes or the cell cycle. PMID:27196062

  18. The condensed matter physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 1988 progress report of the laboratory of the Condensed Matter Physics (Polytechnic School, France), is presented. The Laboratory activities are related to the physics of semiconductors and disordered phases. The electrical and optical properties of the semiconductors, mixed conductor, superionic conductors and ceramics, are studied. Moreover, the interfaces of those systems and the sol-gel inorganic polymerization phenomena, are investigated. The most important results obtained, concern the following investigations: the electrochemical field effect transistor, the cathodoluminescence, the low energy secondary electrons emission, the fluctuations of a two-dimensional diffused junction and the aerogels

  19. Confinement Contains Condensates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; Roberts, Craig D.; Shrock, Robert; Tandy, Peter C.

    2012-03-12

    Dynamical chiral symmetry breaking and its connection to the generation of hadron masses has historically been viewed as a vacuum phenomenon. We argue that confinement makes such a position untenable. If quark-hadron duality is a reality in QCD, then condensates, those quantities that have commonly been viewed as constant empirical mass-scales that fill all spacetime, are instead wholly contained within hadrons; i.e., they are a property of hadrons themselves and expressed, e.g., in their Bethe-Salpeter or light-front wave functions. We explain that this paradigm is consistent with empirical evidence, and incidentally expose misconceptions in a recent Comment.

  20. CONDENSATION OF WATER VAPOR IN A VERTICAL TUBE CONDENSER

    OpenAIRE

    Jan Havlík; Tomáš Dlouhý

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of heat transfer in the process of condensation of water vapor in a vertical shell-and-tube condenser. We analyze the use of the Nusselt model for calculating the condensation heat transfer coefficient (HTC) inside a vertical tube and the Kern, Bell-Delaware and Stream-flow analysis methods for calculating the shell-side HTC from tubes to cooling water. These methods are experimentally verified for a specific condenser of waste process vapor containing air. The...

  1. Spinor condensates and light scattering from Bose-Einstein condensates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    These notes discuss-two aspects of the physics of atomic Bose-Einstein condensates: optical properties and spinor condensates. The first topic includes light scattering experiments which probe the excitations of a condensate in both the free-particle and phonon regime. At higher light intensity, a new form of superradiance and phase-coherent matter wave amplification were observed. We also discuss properties of spinor condensates and describe studies of ground-state spin domain structures and dynamical studies which revealed metastable excited states and quantum tunneling. (authors)

  2. Due diligence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Occupational Health and Safety (OHS) Act requires that every employer shall ensure the health and safety of workers in the workplace. Issues regarding the practices at workplaces and how they should reflect the standards of due diligence were discussed. Due diligence was described as being the need for employers to identify hazards in the workplace and to take active steps to prevent workers from potentially dangerous incidents. The paper discussed various aspects of due diligence including policy, training, procedures, measurement and enforcement. The consequences of contravening the OHS Act were also described

  3. Modeling and Optimization of Superhydrophobic Condensation

    OpenAIRE

    Miljkovic, Nenad; Enright, Ryan; Wang, Evelyn N.

    2012-01-01

    Superhydrophobic micro/nanostructured surfaces for dropwise condensation have recently received significant attention due to their potential to enhance heat transfer performance by shedding water droplets via coalescence-induced droplet jumping at length scales below the capillary length. However, achieving optimal surface designs for such behavior requires capturing the details of transport processes that is currently lacking. While comprehensive models have been developed for flat hydrophob...

  4. Thermal condensation mode in a dusty plasma

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B P Pandey; J Vranješ; S Parhi

    2003-03-01

    In the present work, the radiative condensation instability is investigated in the presence of dust charge fluctuations. We find that the charge variability of the grain reduces the growth rate of radiative mode only for fluctuation wavelength smaller or of the order of the Debye length and this reduction is not very large. Far from the Debye sphere, radiative mode can damp due to thermal conduction of electrons and ions.

  5. Condensates in Relativistic Scalar Theories

    CERN Document Server

    Moore, Guy D

    2015-01-01

    Scalar field theory with large infrared initial occupancy develops very large deep-infrared occupancy, which locally resembles a Bose-Einstein condensate. We study the structure and spatial coherence of this condensate. The O(N) symmetric theory with N>1 is qualitatively different than N=1. We explain the thermodynamical reason why, for N>1, the condensate locally carries nearly maximal conserved charge density. We also show how this property impedes the condensate's decay, and we show that it prevents the condensate from ever becoming fully spatially homogeneous. For N <= 4 the condensate can carry topological defects, but these do not appear to control the large-k tail in its power spectrum, which is the same for N=8 where there are no topological defects.

  6. Analog gravity from Bose-Einstein condensates

    CERN Document Server

    Barcelo, C; Visser, M; Barcelo, Carlos; Liberati, Stefano; Visser, Matt

    2001-01-01

    We analyze prospects for the use of Bose-Einstein condensates as condensed-matter systems suitable for generating a generic ``effective metric'', and for mimicking kinematic aspects of general relativity. We extend the analysis due to Garay et al, [gr-qc/0002015, gr-qc/0005131]. Taking a long term view, we ask what the ultimate limits of such a system might be. To this end, we consider a very general version of the nonlinear Schrodinger equation (with a 3-tensor position-dependent mass and arbitrary nonlinearity). Such equations can be used for example in discussing Bose-Einstein condensates in heterogeneous and highly nonlinear systems. We demonstrate that at low momenta linearized excitations of the phase of the condensate wavefunction obey a (3+1)-dimensional d'Alembertian equation coupling to a (3+1)-dimensional Lorentzian-signature ``effective metric'' that is generic, and depends algebraically on the background field. Thus at low momenta this system serves as an analog for the curved spacetime of genera...

  7. Chromosome numbers in Bromeliaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cotias-de-Oliveira Ana Lúcia Pires

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study reports chromosome numbers of 17 species of Bromeliaceae, belonging to the genera Encholirium, Bromelia, Orthophytum, Hohenbergia, Billbergia, Neoglaziovia, Aechmea, Cryptanthus and Ananas. Most species present 2n = 50, however, Bromelia laciniosa, Orthophytum burle-marxii and O. maracasense are polyploids with 2n = 150, 2n = 100 and 2n = 150, respectively, while for Cryptanthus bahianus, 2n = 34 + 1-4B. B chromosomes were observed in Bromelia plumieri and Hohenbergia aff. utriculosa. The chromosome number of all species was determined for the first time, except for Billbergia chlorosticta and Cryptanthus bahianus. Our data supports the hypothesis of a basic number of x = 25 for the Bromeliaceae family and decreasing aneuploidy in the genus Cryptanthus.

  8. Those amazing dinoflagellate chromosomes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PETER J RIZZO

    2003-01-01

    Dinoflagellates are a very large and diverse group of eukaryotic algae that play a major role in aquatic food webs of both fresh water and marine habitats. Moreover, the toxic members of this group pose a health threat in the form of red tides. Finally, dinoflagellates are of great evolutionary importance,because of their taxonomic position, and their unusual chromosome structure and composition. While the cytoplasm of dinoflagellates is typically eukaryotic, the nucleus is unique when compared to the nucleus of other eukaryotes. More specifically, while the chromosomes of all other eukaryotes contain histones,dinoflagellate chromosomes lack histones completely. There are no known exceptions to this observation: all dinoflagellates lack histones, and all other eukaryotes contain histones. Nevertheless, dinoflagellates remain a relatively unstudied group of eukaryotes.

  9. Chromosomal rearrangements in cattle and pigs revealed by chromosome microdissection and chromosome painting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yerle Martine

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A pericentric inversion of chromosome 4 in a boar, as well as a case of (2q-;5p+ translocation mosaicism in a bull were analysed by chromosome painting using probes generated by conventional microdissection. For the porcine inversion, probes specific for p arms and q arms were produced and hybridised simultaneously on metaphases of a heterozygote carrier. In the case of the bovine translocation, two whole chromosome probes (chromosome 5, and derived chromosome 5 were elaborated and hybridised independently on chromosomal preparations of the bull who was a carrier of the mosaic translocation. The impossibility of differentiating chromosomes 2 and der(2 from other chromosomes of the metaphases did not allow the production of painting probes for these chromosomes. For all experiments, the quality of painting was comparable to that usually observed with probes obtained from flow-sorted chromosomes. The results obtained allowed confirmation of the interpretations proposed with G-banding karyotype analyses. In the bovine case, however, the reciprocity of the translocation could not be proven. The results presented in this paper show the usefulness of the microdissection technique for characterising chromosomal rearrangements in species for which commercial probes are not available. They also confirmed that the main limiting factor of the technique is the quality of the chromosomal preparations, which does not allow the identification of target chromosomes or chromosome fragments in all cases.

  10. Analysis of transition state theory for condensation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    By statistically analyzing the condensation process and reconsidering the transition state theory for condensation and evaporation, we first presented a completed theoretical formula of the condensation coefficient. Namely, the unknown parameters contained within the transition state theoretical calculation of the condensation coefficient are determined. The condensation coefficients calculated from this formula agree well with those from molecular dynamics simulations. With this formula, the classical expression of the condensation flux developed from the gas kinetic theory can be used to predict the condensation flux.

  11. Heavy ion-induced chromosomal aberrations analyzed by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durante, M.; Gialanella, G.; Grossi, G.; Pugliese, M. [Univ. ``Federico II``, Naples (Italy). Dept. of Physics]|[INFN, Naples (Italy); Cella, L.; Greco, O. [Univ. ``Federico II``, Naples (Italy). Dept. of Physics; Furusawa, Y. [NIRS, Chiba (Japan); George, K.; Yang, T.C. [NASA Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    1997-09-01

    We have investigated the effectiveness of heavy ions in the induction of chromosomal aberrations in mammalian cells by the recent technique of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with whole-chromosome probes. FISH-painting was used both in metaphase and interphase (prematurely condensed) chromosomes. The purpose of our experiments was to address the following problems: (a) the ratio of different types of aberrations as a function of radiation quality (search for biomarkers); (b) the ratio between aberrations scored in interphase and metaphase as a function of radiation quality (role of apoptosis); (c) differences between cytogenetic effects produced by different ions at the same LET (role of track structure). (orig./MG)

  12. Condensation induced water hammer in steam supply system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The accidental mixing of steam and water usually leads to condensation induced water hammer. THis phenomenon is not uncommon in the power and process industries, and is of particular concern due to the high energies which accompany steam transients. The paper discusses the conditions which lead to a recent condensation induced water hammer in a 150 psig steam supply header. The insuing structural damage, inspection and repairs are described. Finally, a list of design cautions are presented to help minimize the potential for condensation induced water hammer in steam lines

  13. Electromagnetic triangle anomaly and neutral pion condensation in QCD vacuum

    CERN Document Server

    Cao, Gaoqing

    2015-01-01

    We study the QCD vacuum structure under the influence of an electromagnetic field with a nonzero second Lorentz invariant $I_2=\\vec{E}\\cdot{\\vec B}$. We show that the presence of $I_2$ can induce neutral pion ($\\pi^0$) condensation in the QCD vacuum through the electromagnetic triangle anomaly. Within the frameworks of chiral perturbation theory at leading small-momenta expansion as well as the Nambu--Jona-Lasinio model at leading $1/N_c$ expansion, we quantify the dependence of the $\\pi^0$ condensate on $I_2$. The stability of the $\\pi^0$-condensed vacuum against the Schwinger charged pair production due to electric field is also discussed.

  14. Condensation Heat Transfer Performance of Nano- Engineered Cu Surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigated condensate mobility and resulting heat transfer performance on Cu based water repellent surfaces including hydrophobic, superhydrophobic and oil-infused surfaces. We observed the transient microscale condensation behaviours up to 3 hours with controlling the supersaturation level at 1.64. We experimentally characterized the nucleation density, droplet size distribution and growth rate, and then incorporated them into the developed condensation heat transfer model to compare the condensation heat transfer performance of each surface. Due to the spontaneous coalescence induced jumping, superhydrophobic surface can maintain the high heat transfer performance while other surfaces show a gradual decrease in heat transfer performance due to the increase in the thermal resistance across the growing droplets. We also quantified each thermal resistance values from the vapor to the surface through the droplets to find out the relative importance of each thermal resistance term

  15. Condensation Heat Transfer Performance of Nano- Engineered Cu Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyunsik; Nam, Youngsuk

    2014-11-01

    We investigated condensate mobility and resulting heat transfer performance on Cu based water repellent surfaces including hydrophobic, superhydrophobic and oil-infused surfaces. We observed the transient microscale condensation behaviours up to 3 hours with controlling the supersaturation level at 1.64. We experimentally characterized the nucleation density, droplet size distribution and growth rate, and then incorporated them into the developed condensation heat transfer model to compare the condensation heat transfer performance of each surface. Due to the spontaneous coalescence induced jumping, superhydrophobic surface can maintain the high heat transfer performance while other surfaces show a gradual decrease in heat transfer performance due to the increase in the thermal resistance across the growing droplets. We also quantified each thermal resistance values from the vapor to the surface through the droplets to find out the relative importance of each thermal resistance term.

  16. Chromosomal evolution among leaf-nosed nectarivorous bats – evidence from cross-species chromosome painting (Phyllostomidae, Chiroptera)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background New World leaf-nosed bats, Phyllostomidae, represent a lineage of Chiroptera marked by unprecedented morphological/ecological diversity and extensive intergeneric chromosomal reorganization. There are still disagreements regarding their systematic relationships due to morphological convergence among some groups. Their history of karyotypic evolution also remains to be documented. Results To better understand the evolutionary relationships within Phyllostomidae, we developed chromosome paints from the bat species Macrotus californicus. We tested the potential of these paints as phylogenetic tools by looking for chromosomal signatures in two lineages of nectarivorous phyllostomids whose independent origins have been statistically supported by molecular phylogenies. By examining the chromosomal homologies defined by chromosome painting among two representatives of the subfamily Glossophaginae (Glossophaga soricina and Anoura cultrata) and one species from the subfamily Lonchophyllinae (Lonchophylla concava), we found chromosomal correspondence in regions not previously detected by other comparative cytogenetic techniques. We proposed the corresponding human chromosomal segments for chromosomes of the investigated species and found two syntenic associations shared by G. soricina and A. cultrata. Conclusion Comparative painting with whole chromosome-specific paints of M. californicus demonstrates an extensive chromosomal reorganization within the two lineages of nectarivorous phyllostomids, with a large number of chromosomes shared between M. californicus and G. soricina. We show that the evolution of nectar-feeding bats occurs mainly by reshuffling of chiropteran Evolutionarily Conserved Units (ECUs). Robertsonian fusions/fissions and inversions seem to be important modifiers of phyllostomid karyotypes, and autapomorphic character states are common within species. Macrotus californicus chromosome paints will be a valuable tool for documenting the pattern of

  17. Frequency combs with weakly lasing exciton-polariton condensates

    OpenAIRE

    Rayanov, K.; Altshuler, B. L.; Rubo, Y. G.; Flach, S.

    2015-01-01

    We predict the spontaneous modulated emission from a pair of exciton-polariton condensates due to coherent (Josephson) and dissipative coupling. We show that strong polariton-polariton inter- action generates complex dynamics in the weak-lasing domain way beyond Hopf bifurcations. As a result, the exciton-polariton condensates exhibit self-induced oscillations and emit an equidistant frequency comb light spectrum. A plethora of possible emission spectra with asymmetric peak dis- tributions ap...

  18. Production of a chromium Bose-Einstein condensate

    OpenAIRE

    Griesmaier, Axel; Stuhler, Jürgen; Pfau, Tilman

    2005-01-01

    The recent achievement of Bose-Einstein condensation of chromium atoms [1] has opened longed-for experimental access to a degenerate quantum gas with long-range and anisotropic interaction. Due to the large magnetic moment of chromium atoms of 6 {$\\mu$}B, in contrast to other Bose- Einstein condensates (BECs), magnetic dipole-dipole interaction plays an important role in a chromium BEC. Many new physical properties of degenerate gases arising from these magnetic forces have been predicted in ...

  19. Ring chromosome 13

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, C A; Hertz, Jens Michael; Petersen, M B; Vogel, F; Noer, H; Mikkelsen, M

    1992-01-01

    A stillborn male child with anencephaly and multiple malformations was found to have the karyotype 46,XY,r(13) (p11q21.1). The breakpoint at 13q21.1, determined by high resolution banding, is the most proximal breakpoint ever reported in patients with ring chromosome 13. In situ hybridisation with...

  20. The Y Chromosome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Offner, Susan

    2010-01-01

    The Y chromosome is of great interest to students and can be used to teach about many important biological concepts in addition to sex determination. This paper discusses mutation, recombination, mammalian sex determination, sex determination in general, and the evolution of sex determination in mammals. It includes a student activity that…

  1. Chromosomes, cancer and radiosensitivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samouhos, E.

    1983-08-01

    Some specific chromosomal abnormalities are associated with certain cancers. The earliest description of such a specific association is the one of the Philadelphia chromosome and myelogenous leukemia (1960). Other congenital karyotype abnormalities are associated with specific cancers. Examples of these are Down's syndrome with leukemia and Klinefelter's syndrome with male breast cancer. Genetic diseases of increased chromosome breakage, or of defective chromosome repair, are associated with greatly increased cancer incidence. Three such diseases have been recognized: 1) Fanconi's anemia, associated with leukemias and lymphomas, 2) Bloom's syndrome, associated with acute leukemias and lymphosarcoma, and 3) ataxia telangiectasia, associated with Hodgkin's disease, leukemia, and lymphosarcomas. Ten percent of individuals with ataxia telangiectasia will develop one of these neoplasms. Individuals with certain of these syndromes display an unusually high radiosensitivity. Radiation therapy for cancers has been fatal in patients who received as low as 3000 rad. This remarkable radiosensitivity has been quantitated in cell cultures from such cases. Evidence suggests that the apparent sensitivity may reflect subnormal ability to repair radiation damage. The rapid proliferation of information in this field stems from the interdigitation of many disciplines and specialties, including cytogenetics, cell biology, molecular biology, epidemiology, radiobiology, and several others. This paper is intended for clinicians; it presents a structured analytic scheme for correlating and classifying this multidisciplinary information as it becomes available.

  2. Chromosomes, cancer and radiosensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some specific chromosomal abnormalities are associated with certain cancers. The earliest description of such a specific association is the one of the Philadelphia chromosome and myelogenous leukemia (1960). Other congenital karyotype abnormalities are associated with specific cancers. Examples of these are Down's syndrome with leukemia and Klinefelter's syndrome with male breast cancer. Genetic diseases of increased chromosome breakage, or of defective chromosome repair, are associated with greatly increased cancer incidence. Three such diseases have been recognized: 1) Fanconi's anemia, associated with leukemias and lymphomas, 2) Bloom's syndrome, associated with acute leukemias and lymphosarcoma, and 3) ataxia telangiectasia, associated with Hodgkin's disease, leukemia, and lymphosarcomas. Ten percent of individuals with ataxia telangiectasia will develop one of these neoplasms. Individuals with certain of these syndromes display an unusually high radiosensitivity. Radiation therapy for cancers has been fatal in patients who received as low as 3000 rad. This remarkable radiosensitivity has been quantitated in cell cultures from such cases. Evidence suggests that the apparent sensitivity may reflect subnormal ability to repair radiation damage. The rapid proliferation of information in this field stems from the interdigitation of many disciplines and specialties, including cytogenetics, cell biology, molecular biology, epidemiology, radiobiology, and several others. This paper is intended for clinicians; it presents a structured analytic scheme for correlating and classifying this multidisciplinary information as it becomes available

  3. Chromosome Morphology in Kniphofia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. J de Wet

    1960-12-01

    Full Text Available A number of species and varieties of the genus  Kniphofia (Liliaceae were studied cytologically. The somatic chromosome number is  2n = 12 in all the species. This is also true in  Notosceptrum natalense Baker.

  4. Black Hole Bose Condensation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    General consensus on the nature of the degrees of freedom responsible for the black hole entropy remains elusive despite decades of effort dedicated to the problem. Different approaches to quantum gravity disagree in their description of the microstates and, more significantly, in the statistics used to count them. In some approaches (string theory, AdS/CFT) the elementary degrees of freedom are indistinguishable, whereas they must be treated as distinguishable in other approaches to quantum gravity (eg., LQG) in order to recover the Bekenstein-Hawking area-entropy law. However, different statistics will imply different behaviors of the black hole outside the thermodynamic limit. We illustrate this point by quantizing the Bañados-Teitelboim-Zanelli (BTZ) black hole, for which we argue that Bose condensation will occur leading to a cold, stable remnant

  5. Black Hole Bose Condensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaz, Cenalo; Wijewardhana, L. C. R.

    2013-12-01

    General consensus on the nature of the degrees of freedom responsible for the black hole entropy remains elusive despite decades of effort dedicated to the problem. Different approaches to quantum gravity disagree in their description of the microstates and, more significantly, in the statistics used to count them. In some approaches (string theory, AdS/CFT) the elementary degrees of freedom are indistinguishable, whereas they must be treated as distinguishable in other approaches to quantum gravity (eg., LQG) in order to recover the Bekenstein-Hawking area-entropy law. However, different statistics will imply different behaviors of the black hole outside the thermodynamic limit. We illustrate this point by quantizing the Bañados-Teitelboim-Zanelli (BTZ) black hole, for which we argue that Bose condensation will occur leading to a "cold", stable remnant.

  6. Condensate filtering device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a condensate filtering device of a nuclear power plant, a water collecting pipe is disposed over the entire length, an end of a hollow thread is in communication with the water collecting pipe and secured. If the length of the water collecting pipe is extended, a filtering device of an optional length can be obtained irrespective of the length of the hollow thread. Therefore, since there is no need to connect units upon constituting a module, flow of cleaning gases is not restricted at connection portions. Accordingly, even if the volume of the device is increased by the extension of the module, the working life of the module is not degraded. (T.M.)

  7. Microgravity condensing heat exchanger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Christopher M. (Inventor); Ma, Yonghui (Inventor); North, Andrew (Inventor); Weislogel, Mark M. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A heat exchanger having a plurality of heat exchanging aluminum fins with hydrophilic condensing surfaces which are stacked and clamped between two cold plates. The cold plates are aligned radially along a plane extending through the axis of a cylindrical duct and hold the stacked and clamped portions of the heat exchanging fins along the axis of the cylindrical duct. The fins extend outwardly from the clamped portions along approximately radial planes. The spacing between fins is symmetric about the cold plates, and are somewhat more closely spaced as the angle they make with the cold plates approaches 90.degree.. Passageways extend through the fins between vertex spaces which provide capillary storage and communicate with passageways formed in the stacked and clamped portions of the fins, which communicate with water drains connected to a pump externally to the duct. Water with no entrained air is drawn from the capillary spaces.

  8. Organization of the bacterial chromosome.

    OpenAIRE

    Krawiec, S.; Riley, M

    1990-01-01

    Recent progress in studies on the bacterial chromosome is summarized. Although the greatest amount of information comes from studies on Escherichia coli, reports on studies of many other bacteria are also included. A compilation of the sizes of chromosomal DNAs as determined by pulsed-field electrophoresis is given, as well as a discussion of factors that affect gene dosage, including redundancy of chromosomes on the one hand and inactivation of chromosomes on the other hand. The distinction ...

  9. Condensate purification in PWR reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The recommendations made by the VGB task group on 'condensate purification for PWR reactors' 1976 are discussed in detail. Techniques and circuiting possibilities of condensate purification for BBR steam generators (forced circulation) and KWU steam generators (U tube with blow-down) are mentioned. (HP)

  10. PPOOLEX experiments on wall condensation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laine, J.; Puustinen, M. (Lappeenranta Univ. of Technology, Nuclear Safety Research Unit (Finland))

    2009-08-15

    This report summarizes the results of the wall condensation experiments carried out in December 2008 and January 2009 with the scaled down PPOOLEX test facility designed and constructed at Lappeenranta University of Technology. Steam was blown into the dry well compartment and from there through a DN200 blowdown pipe to the condensation pool. Altogether five experiments, each consisting of several blows, were carried out. The main purpose of the experiment series was to study wall condensation phenomenon inside the dry well compartment while steam is discharged through it into the condensation pool and to produce comparison data for CFD calculations at VTT. The PPOOLEX test facility is a closed stainless steel vessel divided into two compartments, dry well and wet well. For the wall condensation experiments the test facility was equipped with a system for collecting and measuring the amount of condensate from four different wall segments of the dry well compartment. A thermo graphic camera was used in a couple of experiments for filming the outside surface of the dry well wall. The effect of the initial temperature level of the dry well structures and of the steam flow rate for the accumulation of condensate was studied. The initial temperature level of the dry well structures varied from 23 to 99 deg. C. The steam flow rate varied from 90 to 690 g/s and the temperature of incoming steam from 115 to 160 deg. C. During the initial phase of steam discharge the accumulation of condensate was strongly controlled by the temperature level of the dry well structures; the lower the initial temperature level was the more condensate was accumulated. As the dry well structural temperatures increased the condensation process slowed down. Most of the condensate usually accumulated during the first 200 seconds of the discharge. However, the condensation process never completely stopped because a small temperature difference remained between the dry well atmosphere and inner wall

  11. Generalized Bose-Einstein Condensation

    CERN Document Server

    Mullin, William J

    2010-01-01

    Generalized Bose-Einstein condensation (GBEC) involves condensates appearing simultaneously in multiple states. We analyze examples of the three types in an ideal Bose gas with different geometries. In Type I there is a discrete number of quantum states each having macroscopic occupation; Type II has condensation into a continuous band of states, with each state having macroscopic occupation; in Type III each state is microscopically occupied while the entire condensate band is macroscopically occupied. We begin by discussing Type I or "normal" BEC into a single state for an isotropic harmonic oscillator potential. Other geometries and external potentials are then considered: the "channel" potential (harmonic in one dimension and hard-wall in the other), which displays Type II, the "cigar trap" (anisotropic harmonic potential), and the "Casimir prism" (an elongated box), the latter two having Type III condensations. General box geometries are considered in an appendix. We particularly focus on the cigar trap,...

  12. Off gas condenser performance modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A suite of three programmes has been developed to model the ruthenium decontamination performance of a vitrification plant off-gas condenser. The stages of the model are: condensation of water vapour, NOx absorption in the condensate, RuO4 absorption in the condensate. Juxtaposition of these stages gives a package that may be run on an IBM-compatible desktop PC. Experimental work indicates that the criterion [HNO2] > 10 [RuO4] used to determine RuO4 destruction in solution is probably realistic under condenser conditions. Vapour pressures of RuO4 over aqueous solutions at 70o-90oC are slightly lower than the values given by extrapolating the ln Kp vs. T-1 relation derived from lower temperature data. (author)

  13. Excitonic condensation in bilayer systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Jung-Jung

    Among the many examples of Bose condensation considered in physics, electron-hole-pair (exciton) condensation has maintained special interest because it has been difficult to realize experimentally, and because of controversy about condensate properties. In this thesis, we studied the various aspects of spontaneous symmetry broken state of exciton in bilayer using mean field theory. We calculated the photoluminescence of excitonic condensation created by laser. We developed a one-dimensional toy model of excitonic supercurrent using mean field theory plus non-equilibrium Green's function (NEGF) which give qualitatively consistent results with experiments. We proposed graphene bilayer as a novel system for excitonic condensation to occur and estimate it to exist even at temperature as high as room temperature.

  14. Statistical steady state in turbulent droplet condensation

    CERN Document Server

    Siewert, Christoph; Krstulovic, Giorgio

    2016-01-01

    Motivated by the early stages of clouds and other systems in which droplets grow and shrink in a turbulence-driven supersaturation field, we investigate the problem of turbulent condensation using direct numerical simulations. The turbulent fluctuations of the supersaturation field offer different conditions for the growth of droplets which evolve in time due to turbulent transport and mixing. Based on that, we propose a Lagrangian stochastic model for condensation and evaporation of small droplets in turbulent flows. It consists of a set of stochastic integro-differential equations for the joint evolution of the squared radius and the supersaturation along the droplet trajectories. The model has two parameters fixed by the total amount of water and the thermodynamic properties, as well as the Lagrangian integral timescale of the turbulent supersaturation. The model reproduces very well the droplet size distributions obtained from direct numerical simulations and their time evolution. A noticeable result is t...

  15. Performance characterization of isolation condenser of SBWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A systematic study of the performance of the Isolation Condenser (IC) for a conceptual design of SBWR is presented. The objective of the IC is to passively remove heat and control the pressure variation in the Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV). According to the observed trends, the IC cooling capacity and condensate flow can independently influence the ultimate performance of the IC. The transient pressure profile for the IC reaches different equilibrium values for each of the cases analyzed. The absolute magnitude of these values are a function of the cooling capacity and flow rates. With appropriate control of the liquid flow loss coefficients, the performance of the IC can be well predicted. Due to the lack of useful data, this study is limited to the numerical simulation of the IC

  16. Transient condensation tests on an emergency condensator - single tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report presents experiments which were aimed at studying steam condensation in horizontal respectively slightly inclined pipes at high driving temperature differences of up to 200 K. Further specifics are the detailed investigation of the transient behaviour of a non-condensable gas using a novel measuring technique as well as the evaluation of the influence of the gas upon the condensation intensity. For this purpose in the experiment a rapid transient process was realized, which was initiated by suddenly connecting a heat exchanger pipe resting in a pool of cooling water with the steam dome of a pressure vessel. In the pipe, different initial conditions were adjusted by varying the initial pressure of the non-condensable gas (air). Experiments were carried out with atmospheric pressure, with increased air pressure, but also with an evacuated pipe. The new instrumentation consists in novel needle-shaped void probes, which allow the local phase detection combined with a fast temperature measurement. This makes it possible to study the redistribution of steam, condensate and non-condensable as a function of time with a high resolution. The obtained data offer the possibility to validate the models for the prediction of the transport and the effect of non-condensable gases in thermal hydraulic system codes under transient conditions. (orig.)

  17. Chromosome anomalies in mouse oocytes after irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigated the cytogenetic effects of X-rays on unfertilized mouse oocytes. NMRI females received an irradiation with 0, 22.2, 66.6, 200, and 600 R during the preovulatory phase 3 hrs after HCG (human chorionic gonadotrophin). This is a stage during oogenesis in which the oocytes pass from late dictyotene to diakinesis. Chromosome anlysis was per formed after ovulation at metaphase II. From these experiments we can draw the following conclusions: X-rays induced during the preovulatory phase a high number of chromosome anomalies. Among these, structural anomalies prevail. 7 out of 144 ovulated oocytes in matched controls carried such an abnormality, whereas after irradiation we observed with 22.2, 66.6, 200, and 600 R, 11 out of 72, 34 out of 108, 89 out of 102, and 122 out of 124, respectively. Irradiation seems also to affect the chromosome segregation during the 1. meiotic division, as we observed after 22.2, 66.6 and 200 R a total of 6 oocytes out of 204 with a supernummary chromosome. In controls, however, no hyperploidy was found in 143 ova. This increase, however, was not significant. Chromosome anomalies, e.g. breaks and deletions that go back to a one-break event increased linearly with increasing dose. Exchanges, however, going back to two-break events fittet best to the linear-quadratic dose-response model. The dose of 600 R seems to represent a kind of borderline in this experiment, because nearly all (122 out 124) carried at least one structural chromosome anomaly. It is also this dose after which the highest frequency of reciprocal translocations was observed in a humpshaped slope in spermatocytes after irradiation of spermatogonia (Preston and Brewen, 1973). With an increasing dosage up to 1,200 R the frequency of translocations decrease again. The elimination of cells, crossing this borderline, might be due to genetic or non-genetic effects. (orig./GSE)

  18. Review of steam jet condensation in a water pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the advanced nuclear power plants including APR1400, the SDVS is adopted to increase the plant safety using the concept of feed-and-bleed operation. In the case of the TLOFW, the POSRV located at the top of the pressurizer is expected to open due to the pressurization of the reactor coolant system and discharges steam and/or water mixture into the water pool, where the mixture is condensed. During the condensation of the mixture, thermal-hydraulic loads such as pressure and temperature variations are induced to the pool structure. For the pool structure design, such thermal-hydraulic aspects should be considered. Understanding the phenomena of the submerged steam jet condensation in a water pool is helpful for system designers to design proper pool structure, sparger, and supports etc. This paper reviews and evaluates the steam jet condensation in a water pool on the physical phenomena of the steam condensation including condensation regime map, heat transfer coefficient, steam plume, steam jet condensation load, and steam jet induced flow

  19. Review of steam jet condensation in a water pool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Y. S.; Song, C. H.; Park, C. K.; Kang, H. S.; Jeon, H. G.; Yoon, Y. J. [KAERI, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-10-01

    In the advanced nuclear power plants including APR1400, the SDVS is adopted to increase the plant safety using the concept of feed-and-bleed operation. In the case of the TLOFW, the POSRV located at the top of the pressurizer is expected to open due to the pressurization of the reactor coolant system and discharges steam and/or water mixture into the water pool, where the mixture is condensed. During the condensation of the mixture, thermal-hydraulic loads such as pressure and temperature variations are induced to the pool structure. For the pool structure design, such thermal-hydraulic aspects should be considered. Understanding the phenomena of the submerged steam jet condensation in a water pool is helpful for system designers to design proper pool structure, sparger, and supports etc. This paper reviews and evaluates the steam jet condensation in a water pool on the physical phenomena of the steam condensation including condensation regime map, heat transfer coefficient, steam plume, steam jet condensation load, and steam jet induced flow.

  20. Chromosome 19 International Workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pericak-Vance, M.A. (Duke Univ., Durham, NC (United States). Medical Center); Ropers, H.H. (Univ. Hospital Nijmegen, (The Netherlands). Dept. of Human Genetics); Carrano, A.J. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States))

    1993-01-04

    The Second International Workshop on Human Chromosome 19 was hosted on January 25 and 26, 1992, by the Department of Human Genetics, University Hospital Nijmegen, The Netherlands, at the 'Meerdal Conference Center'. The workshop was supported by a grant from the European Community obtained through HUGO, the Dutch Research Organization (NWO) and the Muscular Dystrophy Association (MDA). Travel support for American participants was provided by the Department of Energy. The goals of this workshop were to produce genetic, physical and integrated maps of chromosome 19, to identify inconsistencies and gaps, and to discuss and exchange resources and techniques available for the completion of these maps. The second day of the meeting was largely devoted to region or disease specific efforts. In particular, the meeting served as a platform for assessing and discussing the recent progress made into the molecular elucidation of myotonic dystrophy.

  1. Condensation of water vapor and carbon dioxide in the jet exhausts of rocket engines: 1. Heterogeneous condensation of combustion products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platov, Yu. V.; Semenov, A. I.; Filippov, B. V.

    2014-01-01

    Condensation of water vapor and carbon dioxide in the jet exhausts of rocket engines during last stages of Proton, Molniya, and Start launchers operating in the upper atmospheric with different types of fuels is considered. Particle heating is taken into account with emission of latent heat of condensation and energy loss due to radiation and heat exchange with combustion products. Using the solution of the heat balance and condensed particle mass equations, the temporal change in the temperature and thickness of the condensate layer is obtained. Practically, no condensation of water vapor and carbon dioxide in the jet exhaust of a Start launcher occurs. In plumes of Proton and Molniya launchers, the condensation of water vapor and carbon dioxide can start at distances of 120-170 m and 450-650 m from the engine nozzle, respectively. In the course of condensation, the thickness of the "water" layer on particles can exceed 100 Å, and the thickness of carbon dioxide can exceed 60 Å.

  2. Efficient, Long-Life Biocidal Condenser Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Environmental control systems for manned lunar and planetary bases will require condensing heat exchangers to control humidity in manned modules. Condensing...

  3. Efficient, Long-Life Biocidal Condenser Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Environmental control systems for manned lunar and planetary bases will require condensing heat exchangers to control humidity. Condensing surfaces must be...

  4. Bose-Einstein condensation as an alternative to inflation

    CERN Document Server

    Das, Saurya

    2015-01-01

    It was recently shown that gravitons with a very small mass should have formed a Bose-Einstein condensate in the very early Universe, whose density and quantum potential can account for the dark matter and dark energy in the Universe respectively. Here we show that the condensation can also naturally explain the observed large scale homogeneity and isotropy of the Universe. Furthermore gravitons continue to fall into their ground state within the condensate at every epoch, accounting for the observed flatness of space at cosmological distances scales. Finally, we argue that the density perturbations due to quantum fluctuations within the condensate give rise to a scale invariant spectrum. This therefore provides a viable alternative to inflation, which is not associated with the well-known problems associated with the latter.

  5. Simulating the in situ condensation process of solar prominences

    CERN Document Server

    Xia, Chun; Antolin, Patrick; Porth, Oliver

    2014-01-01

    Prominences in the solar corona are hundredfold cooler and denser than their surroundings, with a total mass of 1.e13 up to 1.e15 g. Here we report on the first comprehensive simulations of three-dimensional, thermally and gravitationally stratified magnetic flux ropes, where in situ condensation to a prominence happens due to radiative losses. After a gradual thermodynamic adjustment, we witness a phase where runaway cooling happens while counter-streaming shearing flows drain off mass along helical field lines. After this drainage, a prominence-like condensation resides in concave upward field regions, and this prominence retains its overall characteristics for more than two hours. While condensing, the prominence establishes a prominence-corona transition region, where magnetic field-aligned thermal conduction is operative during the runaway cooling. The prominence structure represents a force-balanced state in a helical flux rope. The simulated condensation demonstrates a right-bearing barb, as a remnant ...

  6. Bose condensation in (random traps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.A. Zagrebnov

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We study a non-interacting (perfect Bose-gas in random external potentials (traps. It is shown that a generalized Bose-Einstein condensation in the random eigenstates manifests if and only if the same occurs in the one-particle kinetic-energy eigenstates, which corresponds to the generalized condensation of the free Bose-gas. Moreover, we prove that the amounts of both condensate densities are equal. This statement is relevant for justification of the Bogoliubov approximation} in the theory of disordered boson systems.

  7. Study of steady and unsteady wet steam condensing flows in a turbine stage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Objective To develop the numerical method for the steady and unsteady wet steam condensing flow in turbine stage. Methods An Eulerian/Eulerian numerical model is used to describe the spontaneous condensation flow in the steam turbine. For the steady condensing flow computations, the mixing plane model was used. For the unsteady condensing flow computations, the sliding mesh method was used to simulate the rotor-stator interactions. Results The numerical results showed the obvious differences between non-condensing and condensing flows. The results also showed the unsteadiness effect due to rotor-stator interactions had a deep influence on the formation and growth process of water droplets. Conclusion The numerical methods presented in this paper are valid for the condensing flow in the turbine stage.

  8. Effects of gamma-irradiated feeds on the macro chromosomes of chicken (Gallus Gallus F. Domesticus)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study investigated the effects of feeding irradiated feeds to chicken. The commercial animal feeds (Starter, Broiler and Finisher) were irradiated at varying doses of 0, 3, 6 and 9 kGy of γ-rays and fed to chickens for 45 days. Cytogenetic analyses of somatic cells were made using bone marrow cells and only the macro chromosomes were used as basis for chromosome analysis. One hundred mitotic metaphases were enumerated from control and experimental birds. Scoring was done only on macro-chromosomes for chromosome aberrations. The analysis failed to show any aberrant chromosomes due to feeding on irradiated feeds. (author). 12 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  9. Genomic regulatory landscapes and chromosomal rearrangements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ladegaard, Elisabete L Engenheiro

    2008-01-01

    determine the complex spatio-temporal expression of the associated trans-dev gene. Rare chromosomal breakpoints that disrupt the integrity of these regulatory landscapes may be used as a tool, not only to make genotype-phenotype associations, but also to link the associated phenotype with the position and...... of CNEs in a zebrafish assay supported the hypothesis that the disruption of the putative regulatory landscapes was responsible for the phenotypes due to long-range position effects....

  10. First trimester ultrasound screening of chromosomal abnormalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trninić-Pjević Aleksandra

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: A retrocervical subcutaneous collection of fluid at 11-14 weeks of gestation, can be visualized by ultrasound as nuchal translucency (NT. Objective. To examine the distribution of fetal nuchal translucency in low risk population, to determine the detection rate of chromosomal abnormalities in the population of interest based on maternal age and NT measurement. Method. Screening for chromosomal defects, advocated by The Fetal Medicine Foundation (FMF, was performed in 1,341 pregnancies in the period January 2000 - April 2004. Initial risk for chromosomal defects (based on maternal and gestational age and corrected risk, after the NT measurement, were calculated. Complete data were collected from 1,048 patients. Results. Out of 1,048 pregnancies followed, 8 cases of Down’s syndrome were observed, 7 were detected antenatally and 6 out of 7 were detected due to screening that combines maternal age and NT measurement. According to our results, sensitivity of the screening for aneuploidies based on maternal age alone was 12.5% and false positive rate 13.1%, showing that screening based on NT measurement is of great importance. Screening by a combination of maternal age and NT, and selecting a screening-positive group for invasive testing enabled detection of 75% of fetuses with trisomy 21. Conclusion. In screening for chromosomal abnormalities, an approach which combines maternal age and NT is effective and increases the detection rate compared to the use of any single test. .

  11. Condensed Matter Nuclear Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biberian, Jean-Paul

    2006-02-01

    1. General. A tribute to gene Mallove - the "Genie" reactor / K. Wallace and R. Stringham. An update of LENR for ICCF-11 (short course, 10/31/04) / E. Storms. New physical effects in metal deuterides / P. L. Hagelstein ... [et al.]. Reproducibility, controllability, and optimization of LENR experiments / D. J. Nagel -- 2. Experiments. Electrochemistry. Evidence of electromagnetic radiation from Ni-H systems / S. Focardi ... [et al.]. Superwave reality / I. Dardik. Excess heat in electrolysis experiments at energetics technologies / I. Dardik ... [et al.]. "Excess heat" during electrolysis in platinum/K[symbol]CO[symbol]/nickel light water system / J. Tian ... [et al.]. Innovative procedure for the, in situ, measurement of the resistive thermal coefficient of H(D)/Pd during electrolysis; cross-comparison of new elements detected in the Th-Hg-Pd-D(H) electrolytic cells / F. Celani ... [et al.]. Emergence of a high-temperature superconductivity in hydrogen cycled Pd compounds as an evidence for superstoihiometric H/D sites / A. Lipson ... [et al.]. Plasma electrolysis. Calorimetry of energy-efficient glow discharge - apparatus design and calibration / T. B. Benson and T. O. Passell. Generation of heat and products during plasma electrolysis / T. Mizuno ... [et al.]. Glow discharge. Excess heat production in Pd/D during periodic pulse discharge current in various conditions / A. B. Karabut. Beam experiments. Accelerator experiments and theoretical models for the electron screening effect in metallic environments / A. Huke, K. Czerski, and P. Heide. Evidence for a target-material dependence of the neutron-proton branching ratio in d+d reactions for deuteron energies below 20keV / A. Huke ... [et al.]. Experiments on condensed matter nuclear events in Kobe University / T. Minari ... [et al.]. Electron screening constraints for the cold fusion / K. Czerski, P. Heide, and A. Huke. Cavitation. Low mass 1.6 MHz sonofusion reactor / R. Stringham. Particle detection. Research

  12. Metal vapor condensation under high pressure (mercury vapor to 500 psia). [Heat transfer coefficients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsieh, S.; Bonilla, C.F.

    1975-01-01

    Mercury vapor up to 500 psia was condensed outside a cylindrical tube in both horizontal and vertical positions. Results show consistently low heat transfer coefficients compared to Nusselt's theory. Two auxiliary mercury vapor condensers downstream of the boiler vent were used to control and safeguard the system. Constantan wires were spot welded on the surface inside the test condenser tube. The heat flux ranged from 20,000 to 45,000 Btu/h-ft/sup 2/ and the temperature differences between vapor and condensing wall from 6 to 50/sup 0/F. The condensation heat transfer coefficients, ranging from 850 to 3,500 Btu/h-/sup 0/F-ft/sup 2/, are only about 3 to 9 percent of those predicted by Nusselt's theory. Due to the positive pressure in the system for most test runs, the chance of any in-leakage of noncondensable gases into the boiler is extremely small. Since no substantial change of heat transfer rate resulted from wide variations in the heat load on the reflux condenser at some specific heat flux on the test condenser tube, the low heat transfer rate of mercury vapor condensation was not due to the presence of any non-condensable gas. The test data for high vapor pressure up to 500 psia reveal that the heat transfer coefficient is independent of the vapor pressure level. The condensation coefficients calculated based on kinetic theory are much smaller than unity and decreasewith vapor pressure. It is hypothesized that dimer content in the metal vapor phase might behave as non-condensable or semi-condensable gas and create a diffusional barrier at the vapor-liquid interface near the condensate film. This dimer vapor could be the main cause of interfacial resistance during metal vapor condensation process. 41 figures, 7 tables, 58 references. (DLC)

  13. M-Band Analysis of Chromosome Aberrations in Human Epithelial Cells Induced By Low- and High-Let Radiations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hada, M.; Gersey, B.; Saganti, P. B.; Wilkins, R.; Gonda, S. R.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Wu, H.

    2007-01-01

    Energetic primary and secondary particles pose a health risk to astronauts in extended ISS and future Lunar and Mars missions. High-LET radiation is much more effective than low-LET radiation in the induction of various biological effects, including cell inactivation, genetic mutations, cataracts and cancer. Most of these biological endpoints are closely correlated to chromosomal damage, which can be utilized as a biomarker for radiation insult. In this study, human epithelial cells were exposed in vitro to gamma rays, 1 GeV/nucleon Fe ions and secondary neutrons whose spectrum is similar to that measured inside the Space Station. Chromosomes were condensed using a premature chromosome condensation technique and chromosome aberrations were analyzed with the multi-color banding (mBAND) technique. With this technique, individually painted chromosomal bands on one chromosome allowed the identification of both interchromosomal (translocation to unpainted chromosomes) and intrachromosomal aberrations (inversions and deletions within a single painted chromosome). Results of the study confirmed the observation of higher incidence of inversions for high-LET irradiation. However, detailed analysis of the inversion type revealed that all of the three radiation types in the study induced a low incidence of simple inversions. Half of the inversions observed in the low-LET irradiated samples were accompanied by other types of intrachromosome aberrations, but few inversions were accompanied by interchromosome aberrations. In contrast, Fe ions induced a significant fraction of inversions that involved complex rearrangements of both the inter- and intrachromosome exchanges.

  14. Laser Filament Induced Water Condensation

    OpenAIRE

    Kasparian J.; Webe K.; Vogel A; Petit Y.; Lüder J.; Hao Z.Q.; Rohwetter P.; Petrarca M.; Stelmaszczyk K.; Henin S.; Wöste L.; Wolf J.-P.

    2013-01-01

    At relative humidities above 70%, femtosecond laser filaments generate aerosol particles and water droplets in the atmosphere. The water vapour condensation and droplet stabilization are assured by soluble species produced in the laser plasma.

  15. Zeolite Catalyzed Aldol Condensation Reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adedayo I. Inegbenebor

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The review is based on the description of zeolite structure, uses, synthesis, and catalytic aldol reaction in aldol condensation. An internal aldolcondensation reaction has been achieved over ZSM-5 zeolite with high silica-alumina ratio at 350oC. It therefore follows that zeolite canfunction as a catalyst in aldol type condensation reactions and that weak acid sites as well as a small number of active sites favor the aldolcondensation reaction of carbonyl compounds. However, the mixed condensation product was found to be favored at temperatures above 300oCand the self-condensation of ethanal to crotonaldehyde was favored at temperatures below 300oC. It has also been suggested that both Brønstedand Lewis acids are involved in aldol reactions with Lewis acid sites the most probable catalytic sites. The zeolite group of minerals has founduse in many chemical and allied industries.

  16. Nonequilibrium Thermodynamics of Wealth Condensation

    CERN Document Server

    Braun, D

    2006-01-01

    We analyze wealth condensation for a wide class of stochastic economy models on the basis of the economic analog of thermodynamic potentials, termed transfer potentials. The economy model is based on three common transfers modes of wealth: random transfer, profit proportional to wealth and motivation of poor agents to work harder. The economies never reach steady state. Wealth condensation is the result of stochastic tunneling through a metastable transfer potential. In accordance with reality, both wealth and income distribution transiently show Pareto tails for high income subjects. For metastable transfer potentials, exponential wealth condensation is a robust feature. For example with 10 % annual profit 1% of the population owns 50 % of the wealth after 50 years. The time to reach such a strong wealth condensation is a hyperbolic function of the annual profit rate.

  17. Hierarchical condensation near phase equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olemskoi, A. I.; Yushchenko, O. V.; Borisyuk, V. N.; Zhilenko, T. I.; Kosminska, Yu. O.; Perekrestov, V. I.

    2012-06-01

    A novel mechanism of new phase formation is studied both experimentally and theoretically in the example of quasi-equilibrium stationary condensation in an ion-plasma sputterer. Copper condensates are obtained to demonstrate that a specific network structure is formed as a result of self-assembly in the course of deposition. The fractal pattern related is inherent in the phenomena of diffusion limited aggregation. Condensate nuclei are shown to form statistical ensemble of hierarchically subordinated objects distributed in ultrametric space. The Langevin equation and the Fokker-Planck equation related are found to describe stationary distribution of thermodynamic potential variations at condensation. Time dependence of the formation probability of branching structures is found to clarify the experimental situation.

  18. Nuclear fusion inside condense matters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Jing-tang

    2007-01-01

    This article describes in detail the nuclear fusion inside condense matters--the Fleischmann-Pons effect, the reproducibility of cold fusions, self-consistentcy of cold fusions and the possible applications.

  19. Contrasting patterns of karyotype and sex chromosome evolution in Lepidoptera

    OpenAIRE

    Šíchová, Jindra

    2016-01-01

    It is known that chromosomal rearrangements play an important role in speciation by limiting gene flow within and between species. Furthermore, this effect may be enhanced by involvement of sex chromosomes that are known to undergo fast evolution compared to autosomes and play a special role in speciation due to their engagement in postzygotic reproductive isolation. The work presented in this study uses various molecular-genetic and cytogenetic techniques to describe karyotype and sex chromo...

  20. Zeolite Catalyzed Aldol Condensation Reactions

    OpenAIRE

    Adedayo I. Inegbenebor; Raphael C. Mordi; Oluwakayode M. Ogunwole

    2015-01-01

    The review is based on the description of zeolite structure, uses, synthesis, and catalytic aldol reaction in aldol condensation. An internal aldolcondensation reaction has been achieved over ZSM-5 zeolite with high silica-alumina ratio at 350oC. It therefore follows that zeolite canfunction as a catalyst in aldol type condensation reactions and that weak acid sites as well as a small number of active sites favor the aldolcondensation reaction of carbonyl compounds. However, the mixed condens...

  1. DNA condensation in two dimensions

    OpenAIRE

    Koltover, Ilya; Wagner, Kathrin; Safinya, Cyrus R.

    2000-01-01

    We have found that divalent electrolyte counterions common in biological cells (Ca2+, Mg2+, and Mn2+ ) can condense anionic DNA molecules confined to two-dimensional cationic surfaces. DNA-condensing agents in vivo include cationic histones and polyamines spermidine and spermine with sufficiently high valence (Z) 3 or larger. In vitro studies show that electrostatic forces between DNA chains in bulk aqueous solution containing divalent counterions remain purely ...

  2. Experimental and theoretical study of reflux condensation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bakke, Knut

    1997-12-31

    This thesis studies the separation of gas mixtures in a reflux condenser. also called a dephlegmator. Reflux condensation is separation of a gas mixture, in reflux flow with condensing liquid, under continuous heat removal. A numerical model of a dephlegmator for binary mixtures was developed. The model may readily be extended to multi-component mixtures, as the solution method is based on a matrix solver. Separation of a binary mixture in a reflux condenser test rig is demonstrated. The test facility contains a single-tube test section that was designed and built as part of the project. Test mixtures of propane and n-butane were used, and a total of 15 experiments are reported. Limited degree of separation was achieved due to limited heat transfer area and narrow boiling point range of the test mixture. The numerical model reproduces the experimental data within reasonable accuracy. Deviation between calculated and measured properties is less than 6% of the measured temperature and less than 5% of the measured flow rate. The model is based on mechanistic models of physical processes and is not calibrated or tuned to fit the experimental data. The numerical model is applied to a number of separation processes. These case studies show that the required heat transfer area increases rapidly with increments in top product composition (light component). Flooding limits the amount of reflux liquid. The dephlegmator is suitable for separation of feed mixtures that are rich in light components. The gliding temperature in the dephlegmation process enables utilization of top product as refrigerant, with subsequent energy saving as a result. 61 refs., 50 figs., 34 tabs.

  3. Quantum field theory and Bose Einstein condensation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study the phenomenon of Bose-Einstein condensation in cosmological and laboratory situations. To do this we examine the extreme temperature limits of a self-interacting O(2)-invariant scalar field theory with a non-zero charge density. The transition point has been well known for a long time in the case of an interactionless theory. However, due to a combination of technical problems imposed by having interactions and finite density, the transition in the interacting theory is not well understood. Here, in order to probe the Bose-Einstein condensation transition we perform a dimensional reduction of the 4D O(2)-invariant theory to give an effective theory in 3D. After dimensional reduction we use the 3D effective theory to calculate the two-loop effective potential which is used to examine the phase structure. This is a perturbative calculation and is still inappropriate for looking at the critical temperature. To find the critical temperature we use the non-perturbative linear delta expansion on the effective 3D theory. Tins is done in both the high temperature limit appropriate to cosmological applications and the low temperature limit appropriate to laboratory experiments with atomic gases. We study the Bose-Einstein condensation transition out of equilibrium. After a sudden quench which sends the system into the critical region, we look at how the condensate originates and grows. We study the equations of motion obtained from the one-loop effective action. It is found that the magnitude of the field expectation value grows at a slower rate at higher charge densities but that charge flows into the ground state at a faster rate at higher charge densities. In order to perform most of the analytic calculations, we show how dimensional regularization and Mellin summation can be elegantly combined to give an economical method for calculating high temperature Feynman diagrams. (author)

  4. The three rows gene of Drosophila melanogaster encodes a novel protein that is required for chromosome disjunction during mitosis.

    OpenAIRE

    D'Andrea, R J; Stratmann, R.; Lehner, C F; John, U P; Saint, R

    1993-01-01

    Zygotic expression of the three rows (thr) gene of Drosophila melanogaster is required for normal cell proliferation during embryogenesis. Mitotic defects in thr mutant embryos begin during mitosis 15, and all subsequent divisions are disrupted. Chromosome disjunction and consequently cytokinesis fail during these defective mitoses, although the initial mitotic processes (chromosome condensation, spindle assembly, metaphase plate formation, and cyclin degradation) are not affected. Despite th...

  5. Dynamics of Spin-Orbit Coupled Bose-Einstein Condensates in a Random Potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mardonov, Sh; Modugno, M; Sherman, E Ya

    2015-10-30

    Disorder plays a crucial role in spin dynamics in solids and condensed matter systems. We demonstrate that for a spin-orbit coupled Bose-Einstein condensate in a random potential two mechanisms of spin evolution that can be characterized as "precessional" and "anomalous" are at work simultaneously. The precessional mechanism, typical for solids, is due to the condensate displacement. The unconventional anomalous mechanism is due to the spin-dependent velocity producing the distribution of the condensate spin polarization. The condensate expansion is accompanied by a random displacement and fragmentation, where it becomes sparse, as clearly revealed in the spin dynamics. Thus, different stages of the evolution can be characterized by looking at the condensate spin. PMID:26565441

  6. Anyon condensation and tensor categories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kong, Liang, E-mail: kong.fan.liang@gmail.com [Institute for Advanced Study (Science Hall), Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH 03824 (United States)

    2014-09-15

    Instead of studying anyon condensation in various concrete models, we take a bootstrap approach by considering an abstract situation, in which an anyon condensation happens in a 2-d topological phase with anyonic excitations given by a modular tensor category C; and the anyons in the condensed phase are given by another modular tensor category D. By a bootstrap analysis, we derive a relation between anyons in D-phase and anyons in C-phase from natural physical requirements. It turns out that the vacuum (or the tensor unit) A in D-phase is necessary to be a connected commutative separable algebra in C, and the category D is equivalent to the category of local A-modules as modular tensor categories. This condensation also produces a gapped domain wall with wall excitations given by the category of A-modules in C. A more general situation is also studied in this paper. We will also show how to determine such algebra A from the initial and final data. Multi-condensations and 1-d condensations will also be briefly discussed. Examples will be given in the toric code model, Kitaev quantum double models, Levin–Wen types of lattice models and some chiral topological phases.

  7. Anyon condensation and tensor categories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Kong

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Instead of studying anyon condensation in various concrete models, we take a bootstrap approach by considering an abstract situation, in which an anyon condensation happens in a 2-d topological phase with anyonic excitations given by a modular tensor category C; and the anyons in the condensed phase are given by another modular tensor category D. By a bootstrap analysis, we derive a relation between anyons in D-phase and anyons in C-phase from natural physical requirements. It turns out that the vacuum (or the tensor unit A in D-phase is necessary to be a connected commutative separable algebra in C, and the category D is equivalent to the category of local A-modules as modular tensor categories. This condensation also produces a gapped domain wall with wall excitations given by the category of A-modules in C. A more general situation is also studied in this paper. We will also show how to determine such algebra A from the initial and final data. Multi-condensations and 1-d condensations will also be briefly discussed. Examples will be given in the toric code model, Kitaev quantum double models, Levin–Wen types of lattice models and some chiral topological phases.

  8. Origin of uranium isotope variations in early solar nebula condensates

    OpenAIRE

    Tissot, François L. H.; Dauphas, Nicolas; Grossman, Lawrence

    2016-01-01

    High-temperature condensates found in meteorites display uranium isotopic variations (235U/238U), which complicate dating the solar system’s formation and whose origin remains mysterious. It is possible that these variations are due to the decay of the short-lived radionuclide 247Cm (t 1/2 = 15.6 My) into 235U, but they could also be due to uranium kinetic isotopic fractionation during condensation. We report uranium isotope measurements of meteoritic refractory inclusions that reveal excesse...

  9. Interactions stabilizing DNA tertiary structure in the Escherichia coli chromosome investigated with ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The structure of the bacterial chromosome was investigated after introducing breaks in the DNA with gamma irradiation. It is demonstrated that irradiation of the chromosome in the cell prior to isolation results in partial unfolding of the isolated condensed DNA, while irradiation of the chromosome after it is released from the cell has no demonstrable effect on DNA folding. The results indicate that RNA/DNA interactions which stabilize DNA folds are unstable when breaks are introduced in the DNA prior to isolation of the chromosome. It is suggested that the supercoiled state of the DNA is required for the initial stabilization of some of the critical RNA/DNA interaction in the isolated nucleoid. However, some of these interactions are not affected by irradiation of the cells. Remnant supercoiling in partially relaxed chromosomes containing a limited number of DNA breaks has the same superhelical density as the unirradiated chromosome. This suggests that restraints on rotation of the packaged DNA are formed prior to the physical unwinding which occurs at the sites of the radiation induced DNA breaks. - Analysis of the in vitro irradiated chromosomes shows that there are 100 +- 30 domains of supercoiling per genome equivalent of DNA. The introduction of up to 50 double-strand breaks per nucleoid does not influence rotor speed effects of the sedimentation coefficient of the chromosome. (orig.)

  10. Experimental approach to prezygotic chromosome screening using only a single pair of gametes in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Hiroyuki; Kohda, Atsushi; Tateno, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    During in vitro embryo production, chromosome screening is essential to prevent pregnancy losses caused by embryonic chromosome aberrations. When the chromosome screening is completed before fertilization, gametes are effectively utilized as genetic resources. The aim of this study was to investigate whether chromosome screening of gametes accompanied by fertilization would be feasible using a single mouse spermatozoon and oocyte. Metaphase II oocytes were divided into a cytoplast and a karyoplast. For genome cloning of the gametes, androgenic and gynogenic embryos were produced by microinjection of sperm into cytoplasts and parthenogenetic activation of karyoplasts, respectively. Pairs of blastomeres from androgenic and gynogenic embryos were fused electrically to produce diploid embryos, which were transferred into pseudopregnant surrogate mothers to examine fetal development. Blastomeres from androgenic and gynogenic embryos were individually treated with calyculin A-a specific inhibitor of type 1 and 2A protein phosphatases-for 2 h to induce premature chromosome condensation. Thereafter, chromosome analysis of blastomeres, reflecting the genetic constitution of individual spermatozoa and oocytes, was performed, and we confirmed that most of the androgenic and gynogenic 2-cell embryos had a haploid set of chromosomes in their sister blastomeres. The reconstructed embryos from blastomeres of androgenic and gynogenic 2-cell embryos could be implanted and develop into live fetuses, albeit at low efficiency. This study indicates that prezygotic chromosome screening and embryo production using a single pair of gametes may be practicable. PMID:26234555

  11. Molecular fundamentals of chromosomal mutagenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Precise quantitative correlation between the yield of chromosome structure damages and the yield of DNA damages is shown when comparing data on molecular and cytogenetic investigations carried out in cultural Mammalia cells. As the chromosome structure damage is to be connected with the damage of its carcass structure, then it is natural that DNA damage in loop regions is not to affect considerably the structure, while DNA damage lying on the loop base and connected with the chromosome carcass is to play a determining role in chromosomal mutagenesis. This DNA constitutes 1-2% from the total quantity of nuclear DNA. If one accepts that damages of these regions of DNA are ''hot'' points of chromosomal mutagenesis, then it becomes clear why 1-2% of preparation damages in a cell are realized in chromosome structural damages

  12. Electochemical detection of chromosome translocation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kwasny, Dorota; Dimaki, Maria; Silahtaroglu, Asli;

    2014-01-01

    Cytogenetics is a study of the cell structure with a main focus on chromosomes content and their structure. Chromosome abnormalities, such as translocations may cause various genetic disorders and heametological malignancies. Chromosome translocations are structural rearrangements of two...... hybridization approach developed for label-free detection of the chromosome translocations. For specific translocation detection it is necessary to determine that the two DNA sequences forming a derivative chromosome are connected, which is achieved by two subsequent hybridization steps. The electrochemical...... impedance spectroscopy was selected as the sensing method on a microfabricated chip with array of 12 electrode sets. Two independent chips (Chip1 and Chip2) were used for targeting the chromosomal fragments involved in the translocation. Each chip was differentially functionalized with DNA probes matching...

  13. Intraspecific chromosome variability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Dubinin

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available (Editorial preface. The publication is presented in order to remind us of one of dramatic pages of the history of genetics. It re-opens for the contemporary reader a comprehensive work marking the priority change from plant cytogenetics to animal cytogenetics led by wide population studies which were conducted on Drosophila polytene chromosomes. The year of the publication (1937 became the point of irretrievable branching between the directions of Old World and New World genetics connected with the problems of chromosome variability and its significance for the evolution of the species. The famous book of T. Dobzhansky (1937 was published by Columbia University in the US under the title “Genetics and the origin of species”, and in the shadow of this American ‘skybuilding’ all other works grew dim. It is remarkable that both Dobzhansky and Dubinin come to similar conclusions about the role of chromosomes in speciation. This is not surprising given that they both might be considered as representatives of the Russian genetic school, by their birth and education. Interestingly, Dobzhansky had never referred to the full paper of Dubinin et al. (1937, though a previous short communication in Nature (1936 was included together with all former papers on the related subject. In full, the volume of the original publication printed in the Biological Journal in Moscow comprised 47 pages, in that number 41 pages of the Russian text accompanied by 16 Figs, a table and reference list, and, above all, 6 pages of the English summary. This final part in English is now reproduced in the authors’ version with the only addition being the reference list in the originally printed form.

  14. Reference-assisted chromosome assembly

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Jaebum; Larkin, Denis M; Cai, Qingle; Asan,; Zhang, Yongfen; Ge, Ri-Li; Auvil, Loretta; Capitanu, Boris; Zhang, Guojie; Lewin, Harris A.; Ma, Jian

    2013-01-01

    One of the most difficult problems in modern genomics is the assembly of full-length chromosomes using next generation sequencing (NGS) data. To address this problem, we developed “reference-assisted chromosome assembly” (RACA), an algorithm to reliably order and orient sequence scaffolds generated by NGS and assemblers into longer chromosomal fragments using comparative genome information and paired-end reads. Evaluation of results using simulated and real genome assemblies indicates that ou...

  15. Theoretical investigation of water vapour condensation in presence of noncondensable gases

    OpenAIRE

    Karkoszka, Krzysztof

    2005-01-01

    Steam condensation phenomenon plays an important role in many industrial applications. Especially in energy sector this process requires deep understanding. When noncondensable gases are taken into consideration description of the entire phenomenon becomes more complicated. If the surface condensation is taken into consideration this additional species accumulates and creates noncondensable layer near the surface on water vapour condenses. Due to this effect heat and mass transfer rates from ...

  16. Reduced Effective Model for Condensation in Slender Tubes with Rotational Symmetry, Obtained by Generalized Dimensional Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Dziubek, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    Experimental results for condensation in compact heat exchangers show that the heat transfer due to condensation is significantly better compared to classical heat exchangers, especially when using R134a instead of water as the refrigerant. This suggests that surface tension plays a role. Using generalized dimensional analysis we derive reduced model equations and jump conditions for condensation in a vertical tube with cylindrical cross section. Based on this model we derive a single ordinar...

  17. Condenser Optimization in Steam Power Plant

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sukru Bekdemir; Recep Ozturk; Zehra Yumurtac

    2003-01-01

    In this paper the effects of the condenser design parameters (such as turbine inlet condition, turbine power and condenser pressure) on heat transfer area, cooling water flow-rate, condenser cost and specific energy generation cost are studied for surface type condenser.The results are given in the text and also shown as diagrams.

  18. Chromosomal aberrations in ISS crew members

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johannes, Christian; Goedecke, Wolfgang; Antonopoulos, Alexandra

    2012-07-01

    High energy radiation is a major risk factor in manned space missions. Astronauts and cosmonauts are exposed to ionising radiations of cosmic and solar origin, while on the Earth's surface people are well protected by the atmosphere and a deflecting magnetic field. There are now data available describing the dose and the quality of ionising radiation on-board of the International Space Station (ISS). Nonetheless, the effect of increased radiation dose on mutation rates of ISS crew members are hard to predict. Therefore, direct measurements of mutation rates are required in order to better estimate the radiation risk for longer duration missions. The analysis of chromosomal aberrations in peripheral blood lymphocytes is a well established method to measure radiation-induced mutations. We present data of chromosome aberration analyses from lymphocyte metaphase spreads of ISS crew members participating in short term (10-14 days) or long term (around 6 months) missions. From each subject we received two blood samples. The first sample was drawn about 10 days before launch and a second one within 3 days after return from flight. From lymphocyte cultures metaphase plates were prepared on glass slides. Giemsa stained and in situ hybridised metaphases were scored for chromosome changes in pre-flight and post-flight blood samples and the mutation rates were compared. Results obtained in chromosomal studies on long-term flight crew members showed pronounced inter-individual differences in the response to elevated radiation levels. Overall slight but significant elevations of typical radiation induced aberrations, i.e., dicentric chromosomes and reciprocal translocations have been observed. Our data indicate no elevation of mutation rates due to short term stays on-board the ISS.

  19. Optimization study on SBWR isolation condenser heat removal performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The isolation condenser (IC) has been considered as a promising passive containment cooling system (PCCS). The major concern for adopting IC as PCCS is the possibility of heat removal performance degradation due to non-condensable gas accumulation inside heat transfer tubes, since IC sucks in the mixture of steam and non-condensable gas from the drywell (D/W) under loss of coolant accident (LOCA) condition. The IC system configuration should be designed, considering the thermal-hydraulic behavior affected by the non-condensable gas. In order to optimize the IC heat removal performance during LOCA, sensitivity analyses were carried out using TRAC code on the effect of some key design parameters. Analysis results showed that the IC tube length could be reduced, compared with the original SBWR design. The shallow submergence of the non-condensable gas vent line provided higher venting efficiency. The non-condensable gas accumulation in the IC tubes could be mitigated by the lower vacuum breaker (V/B) location. (author)

  20. Chromosome Connections: Compelling Clues to Common Ancestry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flammer, Larry

    2013-01-01

    Students compare banding patterns on hominid chromosomes and see striking evidence of their common ancestry. To test this, human chromosome no. 2 is matched with two shorter chimpanzee chromosomes, leading to the hypothesis that human chromosome 2 resulted from the fusion of the two shorter chromosomes. Students test that hypothesis by looking for…

  1. Generalized Bose-Einstein Condensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullin, William J.; Sakhel, Asaad R.

    2012-02-01

    Generalized Bose-Einstein condensation (GBEC) involves condensates appearing simultaneously in multiple states. We review examples of the three types in an ideal Bose gas with different geometries. In Type I there is a discrete number of quantum states each having macroscopic occupation; Type II has condensation into a continuous band of states, with each state having macroscopic occupation; in Type III each state is microscopically occupied while the entire condensate band is macroscopically occupied. We begin by discussing Type I or "normal" BEC into a single state for an isotropic harmonic oscillator potential. Other geometries and external potentials are then considered: the "channel" potential (harmonic in one dimension and hard-wall in the other), which displays Type II, the "cigar trap" (anisotropic harmonic potential), and the "Casimir prism" (an elongated box), the latter two having Type III condensations. General box geometries are considered in an appendix. We particularly focus on the cigar trap, which Van Druten and Ketterle first showed had a two-step condensation: a GBEC into a band of states at a temperature T c and another "one-dimensional" transition at a lower temperature T 1 into the ground state. In a thermodynamic limit in which the ratio of the dimensions of the anisotropic harmonic trap is kept fixed, T 1 merges with the upper transition, which then becomes a normal BEC. However, in the thermodynamic limit of Beau and Zagrebnov, in which the ratio of the boundary lengths increases exponentially, T 1 becomes fixed at the temperature of a true Type I phase transition. The effects of interactions on GBEC are discussed and we show that there is evidence that Type III condensation may have been observed in the cigar trap.

  2. Chromosome aberrations in ataxia telangiectasia cells exposed to heavy ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawata, T.; Cucinotta, F.; George, K.; Wu, H.; Shigematsu, N.; Furusawa, Y.; Uno, T.; Isobe, K.; Ito, H.

    Understanding of biological effects of heavy ions is important to assess healt h risk in space. One of the most important issues may be to take into account individual susceptibility. Ataxia telangiectasia (A-T) cells are known to exhibit abnormal responses to radiations but the mechanism of hyper radiosensitivity of A-T still remains unknown. We report chromosome aberrations in normal human fibroblasts and AT fibroblasts exposed to low- and high-LET radiations. A chemical-induced premature chromosome condensation (PCC) technique combined with chromosome- painting technique was applied to score chromosome aberrations in G2/M-phase cells. Following gamma irradiation, GM02052 cells were approximately 5 times more sensitive to g-rays than AG1522 cells. GM02052 cells had a much higher frequency of deletions and misrejoining than AG1522 cells. When the frequency of complex type aberrations was compared, GM02052 cells showed more than 10 times higher frequency than AG1522 cells. The results will be compared with those obtained from high-LET irradiations.

  3. X-chromosome workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paterson, A D

    1998-01-01

    Researchers presented results of ongoing research to the X-chromosome workshop of the Fifth World Congress on Psychiatric Genetics, covering a wide range of disorders: X-linked infantile spasms; a complex phenotype associated with deletions of Xp11; male homosexuality; degree of handedness; bipolar affective disorder; schizophrenia; childhood onset psychosis; and autism. This report summarizes the presentations, as well as reviewing previous studies. The focus of this report is on linkage findings for schizophrenia and bipolar disorder from a number of groups. For schizophrenia, low positive lod scores were obtained for markers DXS991 and DXS993 from two studies, although the sharing of alleles was greatest from brother-brother pairs in one study, and sister-sister in the other. Data from the Irish schizophrenia study was also submitted, with no strong evidence for linkage on the X chromosome. For bipolar disease, following the report of a Finnish family linked to Xq24-q27, the Columbia group reported some positive results for this region from 57 families, however, another group found no evidence for linkage to this region. Of interest, is the clustering of low positive linkage results that point to regions for possible further study. PMID:9686435

  4. Chromosome analysis and sorting

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Doležel, Jaroslav; Kubaláková, Marie; Suchánková, Pavla; Kovářová, Pavlína; Bartoš, Jan; Šimková, Hana

    Weinheim : Wiley-VCH, 2007 - (Doležel, J.; Greilhuber, J.; Suda, J.), s. 373-403 ISBN 978-3-527-31487-4 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA521/04/0607; GA ČR GP521/05/P257; GA ČR GD521/05/H013; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06004 Grant ostatní: Mendelova zemědělská a lesnická univerzita v Brně / Agronomická fakulta(CZ) ME 844 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5038910 Source of funding: V - iné verejné zdroje ; V - iné verejné zdroje ; V - iné verejné zdroje ; V - iné verejné zdroje ; V - iné verejné zdroje Keywords : Plant flow cytometry * chromosome sorting * flow cytogenetics Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology http://books. google .com/books?id=3cwakORieqUC&pg=PA373&lpg=PA373&dq=Chromosome+analysis+and+sorting&source=web&ots=8IyvJlBQyq&sig=_NlXyQQgBCwpj1pTC9YITvvVZqU

  5. Restriction enzyme buffers and 5-azacytidine induce loss of protein and banding in plant metaphase chromosomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olszewska, M.J.; Gernand, D.; Luchniak, P.; Sakowicz, T. [Lodz Univ. (Poland)

    1995-12-31

    The incubation of root meristem of `Vicia faba` L. with 5-azacytidine for 72 h (5 cell cycles) resulted in shorter DNA fragments after digestion with a restriction enzyme Sau3A. under the same condition `in situ` digestion of metaphase chromosomes with Sau3A revealed a stronger banding (C-banding-like) pattern in 5-azacytidine-treated chromosomes than in the control. This difference could hardly be attributed to the euchromatin demethylation as 5-azacytidine caused a loss of chromosomal proteins; similar effect was found as a result of incubation with some restriction endonuclease buffers which did not diminish the labelling with {sup 3}H-thymidine. After 5-azacytidine administration the entrance of cells into mitosis was delayed, the metaphase chromosomes were under condensed and the pattern of DNA replication remained unchanged. (author). 27 refs, 4 figs, 2 tabs.

  6. Restriction enzyme buffers and 5-azacytidine induce loss of protein and banding in plant metaphase chromosomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The incubation of root meristem of 'Vicia faba' L. with 5-azacytidine for 72 h (5 cell cycles) resulted in shorter DNA fragments after digestion with a restriction enzyme Sau3A. under the same condition 'in situ' digestion of metaphase chromosomes with Sau3A revealed a stronger banding (C-banding-like) pattern in 5-azacytidine-treated chromosomes than in the control. This difference could hardly be attributed to the euchromatin demethylation as 5-azacytidine caused a loss of chromosomal proteins; similar effect was found as a result of incubation with some restriction endonuclease buffers which did not diminish the labelling with 3H-thymidine. After 5-azacytidine administration the entrance of cells into mitosis was delayed, the metaphase chromosomes were under condensed and the pattern of DNA replication remained unchanged. (author). 27 refs, 4 figs, 2 tabs

  7. An investigation of direct condensation of steam jet in subcooled water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The direct contact condensation phenomenon, which occurs when steam is injected into the subcooled water, has been experimentally investigated. Two plume shapes in the stable condensation regime are found to be conical and ellipsoidal shapes depending on the steam mass flux and the liquid subcooling. Divergent plumes, however, are found when the subcooling is relatively small. The measured expansion ratio of the maximum plume diameter to the injector inner diameter ranges from 1.0 to 2.3. By means of fitting a large amount of measured data, an empirical correlation is obtained to predict the steam plume length as a function of a dimensionless steam mass flux and a driving potential for the condensation process. The average heat transfer coefficient of direct contact condensation has been found to be in the range 1.0∼3.5 MW/m2 .deg. C. Present results show that the magnitude of the average condensation heat transfer coefficient depends mainly on the steam mass flux. By using dynamic pressure measurements and visual observations, six regimes of direct contact condensation have been identified on a condensation regime map, which are chugging, transition region from chugging to condensation oscillation, condensation oscillation, bubbling condensation oscillation, stable condensation, and interfacial oscillation condensation. The regime boundaries are quite clearly distinguishable except the boundaries of bubbling condensation oscillation and interfacial oscillation condensation. The measured heat transfer coefficients are compared with the several interfacial transport models, that is, the interfacial transport due to the turbulent intensity, the surface renewal, and the shear stress. The predicted value of the overall heat transfer coefficient by the one is reasonable with the experimental result. The others overestimate the experiment but within the same order of magnitude

  8. Premature Centromere Division of Metaphase Chromosomes in Peripheral Blood Lymphocytes of Alzheimer's Disease Patients: Relation to Gender and Age

    OpenAIRE

    Živković, Lada; Spremo-Potparević, Biljana; Plećaš-Solarović, Bosiljka; Djelić, Ninoslav; Ocić, Gordana; Smiljković, Predrag; Siedlak, Sandra L.; Smith, Mark A.; Bajić, Vladan

    2010-01-01

    Chromosomal alterations are a feature of both aging and Alzheimer's disease (AD). This study examined if premature centromere division (PCD), a chromosomal instability indicator increased in AD, is correlated with aging or, instead, represents a de novo chromosomal alteration due to accelerating aging in AD. PCD in peripheral blood lymphocytes was determined in sporadic AD patients and gender and age-matched unaffected controls. Metaphase nuclei were analyzed for chromosomes showing PCD, X ch...

  9. Unconventional Bose-Einstein Condensations from Spin-Orbit Coupling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Xiang-Fa; WU Cong-Jun; Ian Mondragon-Shem

    2011-01-01

    According to the "no-node" theorem, the many-body ground state wavefunctions of conventional Bose-Einstein condensations (BEC) are positive-definite, thus time-reversal symmetry cannot be spontaneously broken. We find that multi-component bosons with spin-orbit coupling provide an unconventional type of BECs beyond this paradigm. We focus on a subtle case ofisotropic Rashba spin-orbit coupling and the spin-independent interaction. In the limit of the weak confining potential, the condensate wavefunctions are frustrated at the Hartree-Fock level due to the degeneracy of the Rashba ring. Quantum zero-point energy selects the spin-spiral type condensate through the "order-from-disorder" mechanism. In a strong harmonic confining trap, the condensate spontaneously generates a half-quantum vortex combined with the skyrmion type of spin texture. In both cases, time-reversal symmetry is spontaneously broken. These phenomena can be realized in both cold atom systems with artificial spin-orbit couplings generated from atom-laser interactions and exciton condensates in semi-conductor systems.%@@ According to the"no-node"theorem,the many-body ground state wavefunctions of conventional Bose-Einstein condensations(BEC)are positive-definite,thus time-reversal symmetry cannot be spontaneously broken.We find that multi-component bosons with spin-orbit coupling provide an unconventional type of BECs beyond this paradigm.We focus on a subtle case of isotropic Rashba spin-orbit coupling and the spin-independent interaction.In the limit of the weak confining potential,the condensate wavefunctions are frustrated at the Hartree-Fork level due to the degeneracy of the Rashba ring.Quantum zero-point energy selects the spin-spiral type condensate through the"order-from-disorder"mechanism.In a strong harmonic confining trap,the condensate spontaneously generates a half-quantum vortex combined with the skyrmion type of spin texture.In both cases,time-reversal symmetry is spontaneously broken

  10. Cohesin in determining chromosome architecture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haering, Christian H., E-mail: christian.haering@embl.de [Cell Biology and Biophysics Unit, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), Heidelberg (Germany); Jessberger, Rolf, E-mail: rolf.jessberger@tu-dresden.de [Institute of Physiological Chemistry, Dresden University of Technology, Dresden (Germany)

    2012-07-15

    Cells use ring-like structured protein complexes for various tasks in DNA dynamics. The tripartite cohesin ring is particularly suited to determine chromosome architecture, for it is large and dynamic, may acquire different forms, and is involved in several distinct nuclear processes. This review focuses on cohesin's role in structuring chromosomes during mitotic and meiotic cell divisions and during interphase.

  11. Causes of oncogenic chromosomal translocation

    OpenAIRE

    Aplan, Peter D.

    2005-01-01

    Non-random chromosomal translocations are frequently associated with a variety of cancers, especially hematologic malignancies and childhood sarcomas In addition to their diagnostic utility, chromosomal translocations are increasingly being used in the clinic to guide therapeutic decisions. However, the mechanisms which cause these translocations remain poorly understood. Illegit...

  12. Experimental and numerical investigations on the air–steam mixture bubble condensation characteristics in stagnant cool water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qu, Xiao-hang; Tian, Mao-cheng, E-mail: tianmc65@sdu.edu.cn; Zhang, Guan-min; Leng, Xue-li

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: • Air–steam mixture bubble condensation behavior is studied by visual experiment. • VOF and species models are coupled to simulated mixture bubble condensation. • Condensation is model as source terms based on correlation from experiment. • Simulation results agree well with experimental results. • Steam concentration distribution in bubble is analyzed using numerical method. - Abstract: In this study, condensation of air–steam mixture bubble with mass fraction of steam above 0.5 was investigated first by a visual experiment at atmosphere. Then a 3-D numerical model based on volume of fluid (VOF) model and species model was developed to simulate the bubble condensation. In order to model steam condensation, mass and energy transfer between phases were modeled as source terms of conservation equations, using a correlation obtained from the experiment to predict the condensation heat transfer coefficient (HTC). After validation of the numerical model with the experimental results, influences of steam fraction and diameter of bubble on condensation characteristics are studied numerically. Moreover, steam concentration distribution in bubble was also analyzed along the time series of bubble condensation process. It was found that condensation HTC decreases with the increase of bubble diameter. With increase of steam fraction in bubble, the bubble volume shrinks more quickly due to the increased condensation rate, and the bubble accelerates more quickly reaching a higher terminal velocity. Aggregation of non-condensable air inside the bubble near the gas and water interface deteriorates the condensation heat and mass transfer.

  13. Experimental and numerical investigations on the air–steam mixture bubble condensation characteristics in stagnant cool water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Air–steam mixture bubble condensation behavior is studied by visual experiment. • VOF and species models are coupled to simulated mixture bubble condensation. • Condensation is model as source terms based on correlation from experiment. • Simulation results agree well with experimental results. • Steam concentration distribution in bubble is analyzed using numerical method. - Abstract: In this study, condensation of air–steam mixture bubble with mass fraction of steam above 0.5 was investigated first by a visual experiment at atmosphere. Then a 3-D numerical model based on volume of fluid (VOF) model and species model was developed to simulate the bubble condensation. In order to model steam condensation, mass and energy transfer between phases were modeled as source terms of conservation equations, using a correlation obtained from the experiment to predict the condensation heat transfer coefficient (HTC). After validation of the numerical model with the experimental results, influences of steam fraction and diameter of bubble on condensation characteristics are studied numerically. Moreover, steam concentration distribution in bubble was also analyzed along the time series of bubble condensation process. It was found that condensation HTC decreases with the increase of bubble diameter. With increase of steam fraction in bubble, the bubble volume shrinks more quickly due to the increased condensation rate, and the bubble accelerates more quickly reaching a higher terminal velocity. Aggregation of non-condensable air inside the bubble near the gas and water interface deteriorates the condensation heat and mass transfer

  14. Chemical cleaning of the condenser tubes of Baersebaeck 2 - Experiences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the summer of 1980 the condenser tubes of Barsebaeck 2 were acid cleaned due to the following reasons: 1) significant heat transfer losses 2) possible passivation of attacks filled with corrosion products 3) encouraging experiences from acid cleaning of Danish units 4) less encouraging experiences from mechanical cleaning. Prior to the acid cleaning some laboratory experiments were performed to investigate the effect of pH-value and temperature on the time required for cleaning. In spite of practical problems including loss of acid and cavitating pumps the acid cleaning was performed in less than 24 hours/condenser section. The result of the acid cleaning was better than the result of mechanical methods employed earlier. There was a significant increase in heat transfer efficiency. In two of the condenser sections the tubes were completely free of corrosion products after acid cleaning and cleaning with the Taprogge system. In the two remaining condenser sections some corrosion products were observed in a few deep attacks. This is due to a higher pH-value suring the cleaning of these two sections than during the cleaning of the two first sections. There were no indications of any acid leaking to the steam side of the condenser. (Author)

  15. The oil margins of the Karadag gas condensate deposit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melik-Pashayev, V.S.; Azhotkin, G.I.; Zhabrev, I.P.

    1983-01-01

    The results are reported of a geological and oil field analysis of the actual data from many years of development based on the subject of the behavior of the oil margins of the Karadag gas condensate and oil deposit. The conclusion about the absence of movement of the mapped stratum waters in the deposit and the oil margins into the gas condensate cap is justified. This occurs despite the fact that the current stratum pressures in the gas condensate cap have fallen further than in the oil margin. The opinion is expressed that such behavior of the oil margin is caused by the blockage of the pore channels as a result of resin and asphaltenes falling into the solid phase at the oil and condensate contact and due to the reduction in the phase penetrability for the oil due to the manifestation of a second gaseous phase with degasification of the oil margins. It is stressed that the noted behavior of the oil margin of the Karadag deposit is not necessarily repeated at other gas condensate and oil deposits, but the possibility of such behavior should be kept in mind.

  16. Genetics Home Reference: ring chromosome 20 syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 3 links) Encyclopedia: Chromosome Encyclopedia: Epilepsy Health Topic: Epilepsy Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (1 link) Ring chromosome 20 Additional NIH Resources (2 links) National Human Genome Research Institute: Chromosome Abnormalities National Institute of ...

  17. Genetics Home Reference: ring chromosome 14 syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Encyclopedia: Chromosome Health Topic: Developmental Disabilities Health Topic: Epilepsy Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (1 link) Ring chromosome 14 Additional NIH Resources (2 links) National Human Genome Research Institute: Chromosome Abnormalities National Institute of ...

  18. Condensational theory of stationary tornadoes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using the Bernoulli integral for air streamline with condensing water vapor a stationary axisymmetric tornado circulation is described. The obtained profiles of vertical, radial and tangential velocities are in agreement with observations for the Mulhall tornado, world's largest on record and longest-lived among the three tornadoes for which 3D velocity data are available. Maximum possible vortex velocities are estimated. -- Highlights: → Water vapor condensation causes a logarithmic drop of air pressure towards tornado center. → The first ever theoretical description of tornado velocities is obtained. → The maximum vortex velocity grows logarithmically with decreasing tornado eye radius. → Air motion with high velocities can only develop in sufficiently large condensation areas.

  19. Condensed hydrogen for thermonuclear fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inertial confinement fusion (ICF) power, in either pure fusion or fission-fusion hybrid reactors, is a possible solution for future world's energy demands. Formation of uniform layers of a condensed hydrogen fuel in ICF targets has been a long standing materials physics challenge. Here, we review the progress in this field. After a brief discussion of the major ICF target designs and the basic properties of condensed hydrogens, we review both liquid and solid layering methods, physical mechanisms causing layer nonuniformity, growth of hydrogen single crystals, attempts to prepare amorphous and nanostructured hydrogens, and mechanical deformation behavior. Emphasis is given to current challenges defining future research areas in the field of condensed hydrogens for fusion energy applications.

  20. Capillary Condensation in Confined Media

    CERN Document Server

    Charlaix, Elisabeth

    2009-01-01

    We review here the physics of capillary condensation of liquids in confined media, with a special regard to the application in nanotechnologies. The thermodynamics of capillary condensation and thin film adsorption are first exposed along with all the relevant notions. The focus is then shifted to the modelling of capillary forces, to their measurements techniques (including SFA, AFM and crack tips) and to their influence on AFM imaging techniques as well as on the static and dynamic friction properties of solids (including granular heaps and sliding nanocontacts). A great attention is spent in investigating the delicate role of the surface roughness and all the difficulties involved in the reduction of the probe size to nanometric dimensions. Another major consequence of capillary condensation in nanosystems is the activation of several chemical and corrosive processes that can significantly alter the surface properties, such as dissolution/redeposition of solid materials and stress-corrosion crack propagati...

  1. Bacterial chromosome organization and segregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badrinarayanan, Anjana; Le, Tung B K; Laub, Michael T

    2015-01-01

    If fully stretched out, a typical bacterial chromosome would be nearly 1 mm long, approximately 1,000 times the length of a cell. Not only must cells massively compact their genetic material, but they must also organize their DNA in a manner that is compatible with a range of cellular processes, including DNA replication, DNA repair, homologous recombination, and horizontal gene transfer. Recent work, driven in part by technological advances, has begun to reveal the general principles of chromosome organization in bacteria. Here, drawing on studies of many different organisms, we review the emerging picture of how bacterial chromosomes are structured at multiple length scales, highlighting the functions of various DNA-binding proteins and the impact of physical forces. Additionally, we discuss the spatial dynamics of chromosomes, particularly during their segregation to daughter cells. Although there has been tremendous progress, we also highlight gaps that remain in understanding chromosome organization and segregation. PMID:26566111

  2. Effect of condensate depletion on the critical velocity for vortex nucleation in quantum fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By performing numerical simulations of object motion through homogeneous dilute quantum fluids, we show that the critical velocity for vortex formation at constant average superfluid density depends on the condensate fraction. We suggest that the lower critical velocity at lower condensate fraction is due to transitions between the no-vortex and vortex states driven by density fluctuations. (letter to the editor)

  3. Principles of condensed matter physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although there are many books on solid state physics and condensed matter, I suspect very few cover the same content as that found in 'Principles of Condensed Matter Physics' by Chaikin and Lubensky. The title is rather misleading as it suggests a survey of the important concepts in condensed matter. In spite of this there is much to commend in this book. It isn't a standard text on condensed matter. Instead we have a book with topics that are of current interest. It is, therefore, a thoroughly forward-looking modern book which focuses on the ever-expanding area in between traditional condensed matter physics and statistical mechanics. For example, ideas about liquid crystals, quasi-crystals and fractal structures are introduced right at the start of the book. The next three chapters deal with some of the basic concepts of thermodynamics, statistical physics and mean field theory and are followed by a quite detailed treatment of critical phenomena and phase transitions. Much of the mystery associated with field theories is removed in this treatment making it accessible to those not well versed in these techniques. Symmetry breaking is the means by which generalized elasticity theory is introduced. This in turn allows a natural progression to a chapter on hydrodynamics. Neither of these areas are normally found in texts on condensed matter physics. I think the chapter on topological defects is particularly well written and is a good introduction for the reader to this increasingly important topic. This is a very well written text which should prove a handy reference for those working in these areas of research. Although it would be difficult to envisage the book being used as a standard text in a graduate course, it would certainly be of great value for graduate students of solid state physics to acquaint themselves with the contents of this book. (author)

  4. Noisy dynamics of a vortex in a partially Bose-Einstein condensed gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study the dynamics of a straight vortex line in a partially Bose-Einstein condensed atomic gas. Using a variational approach to the stochastic field equation that describes the dynamics of the condensate at nonzero temperature, we derive the stochastic equations of motion for the position of the vortex core. Using these results, we calculate the time it takes the vortex to spiral out of the condensate. Due to the fact that we include thermal fluctuations in our description, this lifetime of the vortex is finite even if its initial position is in the center of the condensate

  5. Topography of genetic elements of X-chromosome relative to the cell nucleus and to the chromosome X territory determined for human lymphocytes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Falk, Martin; Lukášová, Emilie; Kozubek, Stanislav; Kozubek, Michal

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 292, 1-2 (2002), s. 13-24. ISSN 0378-1119 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IBS5004010; GA MZd NC5955; GA ČR GA202/01/0197; GA ČR GA301/01/0186 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5004920 Keywords : structure of chromosome X territories * chromatin condensation * nuclear topology Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 2.778, year: 2002

  6. Activated hydrotalcites as solid base catalysts in aldol condensations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roelofs, J.C.A.A.

    2002-01-01

    The development of new catalytic materials and routes to replace environmentally unacceptable processes in the fine chemical industry is emerging due to stringent legislation. Replacement of currently applied alkali bases in liquid-phase aldol condensations can result in diminishing of waste water s

  7. Simulating coronal condensation dynamics in 3D

    CERN Document Server

    Moschou, S P; Xia, C; Fang, X

    2015-01-01

    We present numerical simulations in 3D settings where coronal rain phenomena take place in a magnetic configuration of a quadrupolar arcade system. Our simulation is a magnetohydrodynamic simulation including anisotropic thermal conduction, optically thin radiative losses, and parametrised heating as main thermodynamical features to construct a realistic arcade configuration from chromospheric to coronal heights. The plasma evaporation from chromospheric and transition region heights eventually causes localised runaway condensation events and we witness the formation of plasma blobs due to thermal instability, that evolve dynamically in the heated arcade part and move gradually downwards due to interchange type dynamics. Unlike earlier 2.5D simulations, in this case there is no large scale prominence formation observed, but a continuous coronal rain develops which shows clear indications of Rayleigh-Taylor or interchange instability, that causes the denser plasma located above the transition region to fall do...

  8. Chromatid Painting for Chromosomal Inversion Detection Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose the continued development of a novel approach to the detection of chromosomal inversions. Transmissible chromosome aberrations (translocations and...

  9. Chromatid Painting for Chromosomal Inversion Detection Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose a novel approach to the detection of chromosomal inversions. Transmissible chromosome aberrations (translocations and inversions) have profound genetic...

  10. Tissue-specific differences in the spatial interposition of X-chromosome and 3R chromosome regions in the malaria mosquito Anopheles messeae Fall.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gleb Artemov

    Full Text Available Spatial organization of a chromosome in a nucleus is very important in biology but many aspects of it are still generally unresolved. We focused on tissue-specific features of chromosome architecture in closely related malaria mosquitoes, which have essential inter-specific differences in polytene chromosome attachments in nurse cells. We showed that the region responsible for X-chromosome attachment interacts with nuclear lamina stronger in nurse cells, then in salivary glands cells in Anopheles messeae Fall. The inter-tissue differences were demonstrated more convincingly in an experiment of two distinct chromosomes interposition in the nucleus space of cells from four tissues. Microdissected DNA-probes from nurse cells X-chromosome (2BC and 3R chromosomes (32D attachment regions were hybridized with intact nuclei of nurse cells, salivary gland cells, follicle epithelium cells and imaginal disсs cells in 3D-FISH experiments. We showed that only salivary gland cells and follicle epithelium cells have no statistical differences in the interposition of 2BC and 32D. Generally, the X-chromosome and 3R chromosome are located closer to each other in cells of the somatic system in comparison with nurse cells on average. The imaginal disсs cell nuclei have an intermediate arrangement of chromosome interposition, similar to other somatic cells and nurse cells. In spite of species-specific chromosome attachments there are no differences in interposition of nurse cells chromosomes in An. messeae and An. atroparvus Thiel. Nurse cells have an unusual chromosome arrangement without a chromocenter, which could be due to the special mission of generative system cells in ontogenesis and evolution.

  11. Interspecific Y chromosome variation is sufficient to rescue hybrid male sterility and is influenced by the grandparental origin of the chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araripe, L O; Tao, Y; Lemos, B

    2016-06-01

    Y chromosomes display population variation within and between species. Co-evolution within populations is expected to produce adaptive interactions between Y chromosomes and the rest of the genome. One consequence is that Y chromosomes from disparate populations could disrupt harmonious interactions between co-evolved genetic elements and result in reduced male fertility, sterility or inviability. Here we address the contribution of 'heterospecific Y chromosomes' to fertility in hybrid males carrying a homozygous region of Drosophila mauritiana introgressed in the Drosophila simulans background. In order to detect Y chromosome-autosome interactions, which may go unnoticed in a single-species background of autosomes, we constructed hybrid genotypes involving three sister species: Drosophila simulans, D. mauritiana, and D. sechellia. These engineered strains varied due to: (i) species origin of the Y chromosome (D. simulans or D. sechellia); (ii) location of the introgressed D. mauritiana segment on the D. simulans third chromosome, and (iii) grandparental genomic background (three genotypes of D. simulans). We find complex interactions between the species origin of the Y chromosome, the identity of the D. mauritiana segment and the grandparental genetic background donating the chromosomes. Unexpectedly, the interaction of the Y chromosome and one segment of D. mauritiana drastically reduced fertility in the presence of Ysim, whereas the fertility is partially rescued by the Y chromosome of D. sechellia when it descends from a specific grandparental genotype. The restoration of fertility occurs in spite of an autosomal and X-linked genome that is mostly of D. simulans origin. These results illustrate the multifactorial basis of genetic interactions involving the Y chromosome. Our study supports the hypothesis that the Y chromosome can contribute significantly to the evolution of reproductive isolation and highlights the conditional manifestation of infertility in

  12. PRESANTATION OF A FAST TECHNICS FOR THE DESCRIPTION OF THE CHROMOSOMIC CHART OF A VEGETABLE SPECIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria ABDUL HUSSAIN

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available The caryologic technics aim to determine the level of polyploidy of a population or a species. The information brought for the knowledge of the chromosomal number of a species, is of various nature. Thus for several years the caryology has made it possible to better understand the taxonomy of a species, its tendencies evolutionary, its geographical distribution and the phenomena of its speciation [16]. Any time the chromosomal number, although being able to characterize a plant or a group of plants is not a character constant.It can vary inside a group, tribe, family or kind, and within same species[12,15,16]. The technics of identification of the most known chromosomes are: traditional technics based on the histological cut, the Technics of Feulgen which has like action to colour in purple red the DNA chromosomal [6,7,8] and technics of bands or mechanisms that it brings into play are related to the physicochemical properties of the chromatin and the condensed form of the chromosomes. To highlight the chromosomes of a species we observed somatic mitosis carried out bolsters of young roots. The principal stages of the technics has to follow are: the pretreatment, fixing, storage, the hydrolysis, colouring, the assembly and observation. All this work was completed on young roots of Solanum sodomeum L. or the number of the chromosome is still questioned.

  13. Visualization of the chromosome scaffold and intermediates of loop domain compaction in extracted mitotic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheval, Eugene V; Polyakov, Vladimir Y

    2006-12-01

    A novel extraction protocol for cells cultured on coverslips is described. Observations of the extraction process in a perfusion chamber reveal that cells of all mitotic stages are not detached from coverslips during extraction, and all stages can be recognized using phase contrast images. We studied the extracted cell morphology and distribution of a major scaffold component - topoisomerase IIalpha, in extracted metaphase and anaphase cells. An extraction using 2M NaCl leads to destruction of chromosomes at the light microscope level. Immunogold studies demonstrate that the only residual structure observed is an axial chromosome scaffold that contains topoisomerase IIalpha. In contrast, mitotic chromosomes are swelled only partially after an extraction using dextran sulphate and heparin, and it appears that this treatment does not lead to total destruction of loop domains. In this case, the chromosome scaffold and numerous structures resembling small rosettes are revealed inside extracted cells. The rosettes observed condense after addition of Mg2+-ions and do not contain topoisomerase IIalpha suggesting that these structures correspond to intermediates of loop domain compaction. We propose a model of chromosome structure in which the loop domains are condensed into highly regular structures with rosette organization. PMID:17029868

  14. Integral Reactor Containment Condensation Model and Experimental Validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Qiao [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States); Corradini, Michael [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2016-05-02

    ranging from 4 to 21 bar with three different static inventories of non-condensable gas. Condensation and heat transfer rates were evaluated employing several methods, notably from measured temperature gradients in the HTP as well as measured condensate formation rates. A detailed mass and energy accounting was used to assess the various measurement methods and to support simplifying assumptions required for the analysis. Condensation heat fluxes and heat transfer coefficients are calculated and presented as a function of pressure to satisfy the objectives of this investigation. The major conclusions for those tests are summarized below: (1) In the steam blow-down tests, the initial condensation heat transfer process involves the heating-up of the containment heat transfer plate. An inverse heat conduction model was developed to capture the rapid transient transfer characteristics, and the analysis method is applicable to SMR safety analysis. (2) The average condensation heat transfer coefficients for different pressure conditions and non-condensable gas mass fractions were obtained from the integral test facility, through the measurements of the heat conduction rate across the containment heat transfer plate, and from the water condensation rates measurement based on the total energy balance equation. 15 (3) The test results using the measured HTP wall temperatures are considerably lower than popular condensation models would predict mainly due to the side wall conduction effects in the existing MASLWR integral test facility. The data revealed the detailed heat transfer characteristics of the model containment, important to the SMR safety analysis and the validation of associated evaluation model. However this approach, unlike separate effect tests, cannot isolate the condensation heat transfer coefficient over the containment wall, and therefore is not suitable for the assessment of the condensation heat transfer coefficient against system pressure and noncondensable

  15. Evaporative Condensers in Comfortable Air Conditioning System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YIN Ying-de; ZHU Dong-sheng; DU Gui-mei; LI Yuan-xi; SUN He-jing; LIU Qing-ming

    2009-01-01

    The operating theory of an evaporative condenser was expatiated.The difference between an e-vaporative condensing refrigeration system and a general refrigeration system was analyzed.Compared with the air-cooled and the water-cooled,the virtues of energy-conservation and water-conservation of evaporative con-densers were analyzed.Some questions existing in the application of evaporative condensers were pointed out,the corresponding solving methods were analyzed accordingly,and the development trend of evaporative con-densing technique in mechanical refrigeration system field and the applied foreground of evaporative condensers in comfortable air conditioning were prospected.

  16. Immunolcocalization of actin in intact and DNA—and histone—depleted nuclei and chromosomes of allium cepa

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANLIHONG; MIAOXING

    1998-01-01

    The presence of actin in eukaryotic nuclei and chromosomes,and especially in higher plant nuclei and chromosomes,has not been well established.We detected actin in meristematic cells of Allium cepa with indirect immunofluorescence technique and observed bright fluorescence in the intact nuclei and chromosomes,indicating that actin is present in the nuclei and chromosomes of the higher plant.We labeld sections of the meristematic cells of A.cepa with immunogold technique,gold parti cles were concentrated in condensed chromatin and nucleoli,confirming the results of the immunofluoresence observations.We traeated the nuclei and chromosomes of A.cepa with DNase I and 2M NaCl and obtained DNA-and histone-depleted nuclei and chromosomes.Indirect immunofluorescence tests showed that the DNA-and histonedepleted nuclei and chromosomes reacted positively with the anti-actin antibodies.These results demonstrate that the anti-actin antibodies.These results demonstrate that actin exists not only in intact nuclei and chromosomes,but also in DNA-and histone-depleted nuclei and chrmosomes of the plant.In addition,our immuno-fluorescence tests indicate that tropomyosin is present in the nuclei and chromosomes of A.cepa.

  17. Coherently Scattering Atoms from an Excited Bose-Einstein Condensate

    OpenAIRE

    Bijlsma, M.J.; Stoof, H.T.C.

    1999-01-01

    We consider scattering atoms from a fully Bose-Einstein condensed gas. If we take these atoms to be identical to those in the Bose-Einstein condensate, this scattering process is to a large extent analogous to Andreev reflection from the interface between a superconducting and a normal metal. We determine the scattering wave function in both the absence and the presence of a vortex. Our results show a qualitative difference between these two cases that can be understood as due to an Aharonov-...

  18. Bosonic condensates in realistic supersymmetric GUT cosmic strings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allys, Erwan

    2016-04-01

    We study the realistic structure of F-term Nambu-Goto cosmic strings forming in a general supersymmetric Grand Unified Theory implementation, assuming standard hybrid inflation. Examining the symmetry breaking of the unification gauge group down to the Standard Model, we discuss the minimal field content necessary to describe abelian cosmic strings appearing at the end of inflation. We find that several fields will condense in most theories, questioning the plausible occurrence of associated currents (bosonic and fermionic). We perturbatively evaluate the modification of their energy per unit length due to the condensates. We provide a criterion for comparing the usual abelian Higgs approximation used in cosmology to realistic situations.

  19. High visibility gravimetry with a Bose-Einstein condensate

    CERN Document Server

    Debs, J E; Barter, T H; Döring, D; Dennis, G R; McDonald, G; Robins, N P; Close, J D

    2010-01-01

    We present results from an atomic gravimeter using a Bose-Einstein condensate with fringe visibility up to 85%. A direct comparison with a thermal state displays a significant increase in visibility for a condensed source. We do not observe any detrimental effects of atom-atom interactions, provided the cloud is allowed to reach the ballistic free-expansion regime. By increasing the space-time area enclosed by our interferometer using large-momentum-transfer beamsplitters, we achieve a precision of 17 ppm in a measurement of the local acceleration due to gravity.

  20. Chromatin condensation of Xist genomic loci during oogenesis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Atsushi; Mitani, Atsushi; Miyashita, Toshiyuki; Umezawa, Akihiro; Akutsu, Hidenori

    2015-12-01

    Repression of maternal Xist (Xm-Xist) during preimplantation in mouse embryos is essential for establishing imprinted X chromosome inactivation. Nuclear transplantation (NT) studies using nuclei derived from non-growing (ng) and full-grown (fg) oocytes have indicated that maternal-specific repressive modifications are imposed on Xm-Xist during oogenesis, as well as on autosomal imprinted genes. Recent studies have revealed that histone H3 lysine 9 trimethylation (H3K9me3) enrichments on Xm-Xist promoter regions are involved in silencing at the preimplantation stages. However, whether H3K9me3 is imposed on Xm-Xist during oogenesis is not known. Here, we dissected the chromatin states in ng and fg oocytes and early preimplantation stage embryos. Chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments against H3K9me3 revealed that there was no significant enrichment within the Xm-Xist region during oogenesis. However, NT embryos with ng nuclei (ngNT) showed extensive Xm-Xist derepression and H3K9me3 hypomethylation of the promoter region at the 4-cell stage, which corresponds to the onset of paternal Xist expression. We also found that the chromatin state at the Xist genomic locus became markedly condensed as oocyte growth proceeded. Although the condensed Xm-Xist genomic locus relaxed during early preimplantation phases, the extent of the relaxation across Xm-Xist loci derived from normally developed oocytes was significantly smaller than those of paternal-Xist and ngNT-Xist genomic loci. Furthermore, Xm-Xist from 2-cell metaphase nuclei became derepressed following NT. We propose that chromatin condensation is associated with imprinted Xist repression and that skipping of the condensation step by NT leads to Xist activation during the early preimplantation phase. PMID:26459223

  1. Gametocidal chromosomes enhancing chromosome aberration in common wheat induced by 5-azacytidine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, W-Y; Cong, W-W; Shu, Y-J; Wang, D; Xu, G-H; Guo, C-H

    2013-01-01

    The gametocidal (Gc) chromosome from Aegilops spp induces chromosome mutation, which is introduced into common wheat as a tool of chromosome manipulation for genetic improvement. The Gc chromosome functions similar to a restriction-modification system in bacteria, in which DNA methylation is an important regulator. We treated root tips of wheat carrying Gc chromosomes with the hypomethylation agent 5-azacytidine; chromosome breakage and micronuclei were observed in these root tips. The frequency of aberrations differed in wheat containing different Gc chromosomes, suggesting different functions inducing chromosome breakage. Gc chromosome 3C caused the greatest degree of chromosome aberration, while Gc chromosome 3C(SAT) and 2C caused only slight chromosome aberration. Gc chromosome 3C induced different degrees of chromosome aberration in wheat varieties Triticum aestivum var. Chinese Spring and Norin 26, demonstrating an inhibition function in common wheat. PMID:23884766

  2. Approaching Bose-Einstein Condensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Loris

    2011-01-01

    Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) is discussed at the level of an advanced course of statistical thermodynamics, clarifying some formal and physical aspects that are usually not covered by the standard pedagogical literature. The non-conventional approach adopted starts by showing that the continuum limit, in certain cases, cancels out the crucial…

  3. Condensational theory of stationary tornadoes

    CERN Document Server

    Makarieva, Anastassia M; Nefiodov, Andrei V; 10.1016/j.physleta.2011.04.023

    2012-01-01

    Using the Bernoulli integral for air streamline with condensing water vapor a stationary axisymmetric tornado circulation is described. The obtained profiles of vertical, radial and tangential velocities are in agreement with observations for the Mulhall tornado, world's largest on record and longest-lived among the three tornadoes for which 3D velocity data are available. Maximum possible vortex velocities are estimated.

  4. Hall Effect in spinor condensates

    OpenAIRE

    Taillefumier, Mathieu; Dahl, Eskil K.; Brataas, Arne; Hofstetter, Walter

    2009-01-01

    We consider a neutral spinor condensate moving in a periodic magnetic field. The spatially dependent magnetic field induces an effective spin dependent Lorentz force which in turn gives rise to a spin dependent Hall effect. Simulations of the Gross-Pitaevskii equation quantify the Hall effect. We discuss possible experimental realizations.

  5. Instantons and the 2> condensate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We argue that the OPE2> condensate found in the Landau gauge on lattices, when an operator product expansion of Green's functions is performed, might be explained by instantons. We use cooling to estimate the instanton contribution and extrapolate back the result to the thermalized configuration. The resulting inst2> is similar to OPE2>

  6. A ''transport'' condensed history method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper we describe a new condensed history algorithm that is a transport process. That is, the proposed new method constitutes an exact Monte Carlo simulation of a ''stretched'' Boltzmann equation. This ''stretched'' equation permits a larger mean free path - which is user-specified - and a larger scattering angle than the physical transport equation. (orig.)

  7. Rotary condenser for SC2

    CERN Multimedia

    1975-01-01

    During 1975 the SC2 performance was improved among other things by redesigning some of the elements of the ROTCO (Annual Report 1975, p. 55). The photo shows an interior wiew of the housing of the rotary condenser and of the sixteen sets of shaped stator blades.

  8. Chromosome conservation in squamate reptiles revealed by comparative chromosome painting

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Giovannotti, M.; Pokorná, Martina; Kratochvíl, L.; Caputo, V.; Olmo, E.; Ferguson-Smith, M. A.; Rens, W.

    Manchester : ICCS, 2011. 78-78. [Intarnational Chromosome Conference /18./. 29.08.2011-02.09.2011, Manchester] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50450515 Keywords : squamate reptiles Subject RIV: EG - Zoology

  9. Reactive Transport Modeling of Acid Gas Generation and Condensation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pulvirenti et al. (2004) recently conducted a laboratory evaporation/condensation experiment on a synthetic solution of primarily calcium chloride. This solution represents one potential type of evaporated pore water at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, a site proposed for geologic storage of high-level nuclear waste. These authors reported that boiling this solution to near dryness (a concentration factor >75,000 relative to actual pore waters) leads to the generation of acid condensate (pH 4.5) presumably due to volatilization of HCl (and minor HF and/or HNO3). To investigate the various processes taking place, including boiling, gas transport, and condensation, their experiment was simulated by modifying an existing multicomponent and multiphase reactive transport code (TOUGHREACT). This code was extended with a Pitzer ion-interaction model to deal with high ionic strength. The model of the experiment was set-up to capture the observed increase in boiling temperature (143 C at ∼1 bar) resulting from high concentrations of dissolved salts (up to 8 m CaCl2). The computed HCI fugacity (∼ 10-4 bars) generated by boiling under these conditions is not sufficient to lower the pH of the condensate (cooled to 80 and 25 C) down to observed values unless the H2O mass fraction in gas is reduced below ∼10%. This is because the condensate becomes progressively diluted by H2O gas condensation. However, when the system is modeled to remove water vapor, the computed pH of instantaneous condensates decreases to ∼1.7, consistent with the experiment (Figure 1). The results also show that the HCl fugacity increases, and calcite, gypsum, sylvite, halite, MgCl24H2O and CaCl2 precipitate sequentially with increasing concentration factors

  10. Numerous transitions of sex chromosomes in Diptera.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Vicoso

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Many species groups, including mammals and many insects, determine sex using heteromorphic sex chromosomes. Diptera flies, which include the model Drosophila melanogaster, generally have XY sex chromosomes and a conserved karyotype consisting of six chromosomal arms (five large rods and a small dot, but superficially similar karyotypes may conceal the true extent of sex chromosome variation. Here, we use whole-genome analysis in 37 fly species belonging to 22 different families of Diptera and uncover tremendous hidden diversity in sex chromosome karyotypes among flies. We identify over a dozen different sex chromosome configurations, and the small dot chromosome is repeatedly used as the sex chromosome, which presumably reflects the ancestral karyotype of higher Diptera. However, we identify species with undifferentiated sex chromosomes, others in which a different chromosome replaced the dot as a sex chromosome or in which up to three chromosomal elements became incorporated into the sex chromosomes, and others yet with female heterogamety (ZW sex chromosomes. Transcriptome analysis shows that dosage compensation has evolved multiple times in flies, consistently through up-regulation of the single X in males. However, X chromosomes generally show a deficiency of genes with male-biased expression, possibly reflecting sex-specific selective pressures. These species thus provide a rich resource to study sex chromosome biology in a comparative manner and show that similar selective forces have shaped the unique evolution of sex chromosomes in diverse fly taxa.

  11. Familial transmission of a deletion of chromosome 21 derived from a translocation between chromosome 21 and an inverted chromosome 22.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aviv, H; Lieber, C; Yenamandra, A; Desposito, F

    1997-06-27

    Chromosome analysis of a newborn boy with Down syndrome resulted in the identification of a family with an unusual derivative chromosome 22. The child has 46 chromosomes, including two chromosomes 21, one normal chromosome 22, and a derivative chromosome 22. Giemsa banding and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) studies show that the derivative chromosome is chromosome 22 with evidence of both paracentric and pericentric inversions, joined to the long arm of chromosome 21 from 21q21.2 to qter. The rearrangement results in partial trisomy 21 extending from 21q21.2 to 21q terminus in the patient. The child's mother, brother, maternal aunt, and maternal grandmother are all carriers of the derivative chromosome. All have 45 chromosomes, with one normal chromosome 21, one normal chromosome 22, and the derivative chromosome 22. The rearrangement results in the absence of the short arm, the centromere, and the proximal long arm of chromosome 21 (del 21pter-21q21.2) in carriers. Carriers of the derivative chromosome in this family have normal physical appearance, mild learning disabilities and poor social adjustment. PMID:9182781

  12. Bogoliubov modes of a dipolar condensate in a cylindrical trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The calculation of properties of Bose-Einstein condensates with dipolar interactions has proven a computationally intensive problem due to the long range nature of the interactions, limiting the scope of applications. In particular, the lowest lying Bogoliubov excitations in three-dimensional harmonic trap with cylindrical symmetry were so far computed in an indirect way, by Fourier analysis of time-dependent perturbations, or by approximate variational methods. We have developed a very fast and accurate numerical algorithm based on the Hankel transform for calculating properties of dipolar Bose-Einstein condensates in cylindrically symmetric traps. As an application, we are able to compute many excitation modes by directly solving the Bogoliubov-De Gennes equations. We explore the behavior of the excited modes in different trap geometries. We use these results to calculate the quantum depletion of the condensate by a combination of a computation of the exact modes and the use of a local density approximation

  13. Condensing Unit with a Scroll Compressor (UB series)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Editor [Korea Energy Management Corporation, Yongin (Korea)

    2002-05-01

    Condensing unit, which is selected as a heat reservoir of grocery store or refrigerating warehouse, has increased its electricity consumption due to high annual operating ratio and large-sized stores. As the requirement of temperature management on freezing and storage has become strict for maintenance of food quality, the number of companies that import HACCP has increased for a few years. Accordingly, the requirement of high performance and reliability on a condensing unit has also risen more than it did. To meet the requirement, Mitsubishi Electric developed and sold condensing unit UB series, which has high reliability in energy saving. The company also has a plan to sell UPB series for the substitute refrigerant gas from fall of 2001. 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Meiosis and chromosome painting of sex chromosome systems in Ceboidea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudry, M D; Rahn, I M; Solari, A J

    2001-06-01

    The identity of the chromosomes involved in the multiple sex system of Alouatta caraya (Aca) and the possible distribution of this system among other Ceboidea were investigated by chromosome painting of mitotic cells from five species and by analysis of meiosis at pachytene in two species. The identity of the autosome #7 (X2) involved in the multiple system of Aca and its breakage points were demonstrated by both meiosis and chromosome painting. These features are identical to those described by Consigliere et al. [1996] in Alouatta seniculus sara (Assa) and Alouatta seniculus arctoidea (Asar). This multiple system was absent in the other four Ceboidea species studied here. However, data from the literature strongly suggest the presence of this multiple in other members of this genus. The presence of this multiple system among several species and subspecies that show high levels of chromosome rearrangements may suggest a special selective value of this multiple. The meiotic features of the sex systems of Aca and Cebus apella paraguayanus (Cap) are strikingly different at pachytene, as the latter system is similar to the sex pair of man and other primates. The relatively large genetic distances between species presently showing this multiple system suggest that its origin is not recent. Other members of the same genus should be investigated at meiosis and by chromosome painting in order to know the extent and distribution of this complex sex-chromosome system. PMID:11376445

  15. Coherence and chaos in condensed matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper discusses the following topics: nonlinearity in condensed matter; coherence and chaos in spatially extended condensed matter systems; nonlinearity and magnetism; and solitons and conducting polymers. 52 refs., 7 figs

  16. Investigation of viscosity of whole hydrolyze sweetened condensed milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Kalinina

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Рaper is aimed at developing of low-lactose (hydrolyzed sweetened condensed milk products technology for lactose intolerant people and for the whole population. Materials and methods: Rheological characteristics were determined on a Reotest device by the 2 nd method of viscometry Results and discussion. Reasonability of ß-galactosidase use for milk lactose hydrolyze during the production of canned products with sugar was proved in the previous works. This technology gives possibility to increase the quality of condensed canned foods, to reduce sugar concentration till 50 %, to increase dietary properties. Due to the reducing of saccharose mass part till 22 and 31 % the products had a liquid consistency that’s why was a necessity to increase the viscosity properties of condensed products. One of method to increase the product viscosity is inoculation of stabilization systems. Reasonability of the usage of stabilization system Bivicioc 1L was proved. The researches of viscosity determination in whole hydrolyzed sweetened condensed milk were shown in the work. Relations of viscosity of whole hydrolyzed condensed milk to the deformation rate were presented. Conclusions Viscosity indices of experimental samples in the fresh produced products and during storage are determined and justified.

  17. Diagnosis of condensation-induced waterhammer: Methods and background

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This guidebook provides reference material and diagnostic procedures concerning condensation-induced waterhammer in nuclear power plants. Condensation-induced waterhammer is the most damaging form of waterhammer and its diagnosis is complicated by the complex nature of the underlying phenomena. In Volume 1, the guidebook groups condensation-induced waterhammers into five event classes which have similar phenomena and levels of damage. Diagnostic guidelines focus on locating the event center where condensation and slug acceleration take place. Diagnosis is described in three stages: an initial assessment, detailed evaluation and final confirmation. Graphical scoping analyses are provided to evaluate whether an event from one of the event classes could have occurred at the event center. Examples are provided for each type of waterhammer. Special instructions are provided for walking down damaged piping and evaluating damage due to waterhammer. To illustrate the diagnostic methods and document past experience, six case studies have been compiled in Volume 2. These case studies, based on actual condensation-induced waterhammer events at nuclear plants, present detailed data and work through the event diagnosis using the tools introduced in the first volume. 65 figs., 8 tabs

  18. Quantum field theory and Bose Einstein condensation

    CERN Document Server

    Bedingham, D J

    2001-01-01

    We study the phenomenon of Bose-Einstein condensation in cosmological and laboratory situations. To do this we examine the extreme temperature limits of a self-interacting O(2)-invariant scalar field theory with a non-zero charge density. The transition point has been well known for a long time in the case of an interactionless theory. However, due to a combination of technical problems imposed by having interactions and finite density, the transition in the interacting theory is not well understood. Here, in order to probe the Bose-Einstein condensation transition we perform a dimensional reduction of the 4D O(2)-invariant theory to give an effective theory in 3D. After dimensional reduction we use the 3D effective theory to calculate the two-loop effective potential which is used to examine the phase structure. This is a perturbative calculation and is still inappropriate for looking at the critical temperature. To find the critical temperature we use the non-perturbative linear delta expansion on the effec...

  19. Condensation energy of the superconducting bilayer cuprates

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Govind; Ajay; S K Joshi

    2002-05-01

    In the present work, we report the interplay of single particle and Cooper pair tunnelings on the superconducting state of layered high-c cuprate superconductors. For this we have considered a model Hamiltonian incorporating the intra-planar interactions and the contributions arising due to the coupling between the planes. The interplanar interactions include the single particle tunneling as well as the Josephson tunneling of Cooper pairs between the two layers. The expression of the out-of-plane correlation parameter which describes the hopping of a particle from one layer to another layer in the superconducting state is obtained within a Bardeen–Cooper–Schriefer (BCS) formalism using the Green’s function technique. This correlation is found to be sensitive to the various parameter of the model Hamiltonian. We have calculated the out-of-plane contribution to the superconducting condensation energy. The calculated values of condensation energy are in agreement with those obtained from the specific heat and the -axis penetration depth measurements on bilayer cuprates.

  20. The development of air cooled condensation systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    EGI - Contracting/Engineering has had experience with the development of air cooled condensing systems since the 1950's. There are two accepted types of dry cooling systems,the direct and the indirect ones. Due to the fact that the indirect system has several advantages over the direct one, EGI's purpose was to develop an economic, reliable and efficient type of indirect cooling system, both for industrial and power station applications. Apart from system development, the main components of dry cooling plant have been developed as well. These are: the water-to-air heat exchangers; the direct contact (DC, or jet) condenser; the cooling water circulating pumps and recovery turbines; and the peak cooling/preheating units. As a result of this broad development work which was connected with intensive market activity, EGI has supplied about 50% of the dry cooling plants employed for large power stations all over the world. This means that today the cumulated capacity of power units using Heller type dry cooling systems supplied and contracted by EGI is over 6000 MW

  1. Wall Condensation Modelling in Convective Flow

    OpenAIRE

    Lejon, Marcus

    2013-01-01

    Modelling condensation of water vapour is important in a number of engineering applications, such as nuclear reactor containment, rocket engine nozzles and heat exchangers. The current study investigates the possibilities of modelling condensation induced by a cold surface in a flow at high velocity and temperature. A number of non-condensable gases are present in the flow. The possibilities of condensation modelling are investigated in ANSYS CFX and ANSYS Fluent, with focus on ANSYS CFX. A c...

  2. Droplet size distribution in condensing flow

    OpenAIRE

    Sidin, Ryan Steeve Rodney

    2009-01-01

    In this thesis, the problem of predicting the droplet size distribution in condensing ow is in- vestigated numerically and analytically. The work focuses on two types of problems: one where condensation occurs during the transonic expansion of a vapor-mixture, and a second one where condensation takes place in a synthetic turbulent ow, reminiscent of atmospheric clouds. For single-component condensing nozzle ow, three master equations for the prediction of the droplet size distribution are ev...

  3. Bose-Einstein condensation at constant temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erhard, M.; Schmaljohann, H.; Kronjäger, J.; Bongs, K.; Sengstock, K.

    2004-09-01

    We present an experimental approach to Bose-Einstein condensation by increasing the particle number of the system at almost constant temperature. In particular, the emergence of a new condensate is observed in multicomponent F=1 spinor condensates of Rb87 . Furthermore, we develop a simple rate-equation model for multicomponent Bose-Einstein condensate thermodynamics at finite temperature which well reproduces the measured effects.

  4. Entangled light from Bose-Einstein condensates

    OpenAIRE

    Ng, H. T.; Bose, S.

    2008-01-01

    We propose a method to generate entangled light with a Bose-Einstein condensate trapped in a cavity, a system realized in recent experiments. The atoms of the condensate are trapped in a periodic potential generated by a cavity mode. The condensate is continuously pumped by a laser and spontaneously emits a pair of photons of different frequencies in two distinct cavity modes. In this way, the condensate mediates entanglement between two cavity modes, which leak out and can be separated and e...

  5. Condensate from a two-stage gasifier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentzen, Jens Dall; Henriksen, Ulrik Birk; Hindsgaul, Claus

    2000-01-01

    Condensate, produced when gas from downdraft biomass gasifier is cooled, contains organic compounds that inhibit nitrifiers. Treatment with activated carbon removes most of the organics and makes the condensate far less inhibitory. The condensate from an optimised two-stage gasifier is so clean...... compounds and the level of inhibition are so low that condensate from the optimised two-stage gasifier can be led to the public sewer....

  6. Pion condensation and neutron star dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The question of formation of pion condensate via a phase transition in nuclear matter, especially in the core of neutron stars is reviewed. The possible mechanisms and the theoretical restrictions of pion condensation are summarized. The effects of ultradense equation of state and density jumps on the possible condensation phase transition are investigated. The possibilities of observation of condensation process are described. (D.Gy.)

  7. Condensation coefficient of water in a weak condensation state

    OpenAIRE

    Kobayashi, Kazumichi; Watanabe, Shunsuke; Yamano, Daigo; Yano, Takeru; Fujikawa, Shigeo

    2008-01-01

    The condensation coefficient of water at a vapor-liquid interface is determined by combining shock tube experiments and numerical simulations of the Gaussian-BGK Boltzmann equation. The time evolution in thickness of a liquid film, which is formed on the shock tube endwall behind the shock wave reflected at the endwall, is measured with an optical interferometer consisting of the physical beam and the reference one. The reference beam is utilized to eliminate systematic noises ...

  8. Chromosome fragility in Freemartin cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Barbieri

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to verify chromosome fragility in freemartin cattle using chromosome aberration (CA and sister chromatid exchange (SCE tests. A total of eighteen co-twins were investigated. Fourteen animals were identified as cytogenetically chimeric (2n=60, XX/XY while 4 were classified as normal. Freemartin cattle showed a higher percentage of aneuploid cells (18.64% and highly significant statistical differences (P < 0.001 in mean values of gaps (4.53 ± 2.05, chromatid breaks (0.26 ± 0.51, and significant statistical differences (P < 0.005 in mean values of chromosome breaks (0.12 ± 0.43 when compared to 10 control animals from single births (aneuploid cells, 11.20%; gaps, 2.01 ± 1.42; chromatid breaks, 0.05 ± 0.22; chromosome breaks, 0.02 ± 0.14.

  9. Methods for chromosome-specific staining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Joe W.; Pinkel, Daniel

    1995-01-01

    Methods and compositions for chromosome-specific staining are provided. Compositions comprise heterogenous mixtures of labeled nucleic acid fragments having substantially complementary base sequences to unique sequence regions of the chromosomal DNA for which their associated staining reagent is specific. Methods include methods for making the chromosome-specific staining compositions of the invention, and methods for applying the staining compositions to chromosomes.

  10. Recombinant Chromosome 4 from a Familial Pericentric Inversion: Prenatal and Adulthood Wolf-Hirschhorn Phenotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Malvestiti

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Pericentric inversion of chromosome 4 can give rise to recombinant chromosomes by duplication or deletion of 4p. We report on a familial case of Wolf-Hirschhorn Syndrome characterized by GTG-banding karyotypes, FISH, and array CGH analysis, caused by a recombinant chromosome 4 with terminal 4p16.3 deletion and terminal 4q35.2 duplication. This is an aneusomy due to a recombination which occurred during the meiosis of heterozygote carrier of cryptic pericentric inversion. We also describe the adulthood and prenatal phenotypes associated with the recombinant chromosome 4.

  11. Chromosome Architecture and Genome Organization

    OpenAIRE

    Giorgio Bernardi

    2015-01-01

    How the same DNA sequences can function in the three-dimensional architecture of interphase nucleus, fold in the very compact structure of metaphase chromosomes and go precisely back to the original interphase architecture in the following cell cycle remains an unresolved question to this day. The strategy used to address this issue was to analyze the correlations between chromosome architecture and the compositional patterns of DNA sequences spanning a size range from a few hundreds to a few...

  12. Chromosome evolution in Neotropical butterflies

    OpenAIRE

    Saura, Anssi; Von Schoultz, Barbara; Saura, Anja O.; Brown, Keith S., Jr.

    2013-01-01

    We list the chromosome numbers for 65 species of Neotropical Hesperiidae and 104 species or subspecies of Pieridae. In Hesperiidae the tribe Pyrrhopygini have a modal n = 28, Eudaminae and Pyrgini a modal n = 31, while Hesperiinae have n = around 29. Among Pieridae, Coliadinae have a strong modal n = 31 and among Pierinae Anthocharidini are almost fixed for n = 15 while Pierini vary with n = 26 as the most common chromosome number. Dismorphiinae show wide variation. We discuss these results i...

  13. A phenomenological modeling of critical condensate saturation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, F.; Firoozabadi, A.; Abbaszadeh, M. [and others

    1996-12-31

    We have developed a phenomenological model for critical condensate saturation. This model reveals that critical condensate saturation is a function of surface tension and contact angle hysteresis. On the other hand, residual oil saturation does not have such a dependency. Consequently, the selection of fluids in laboratory measurements for gas condensate systems should be made with care.

  14. Direct, nondestructive observation of a Bose condensate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.R. Andrews; M.O. Mewes; N.J. van Druten; D.S. Durfee; D.M. Kurn; W. Ketterle

    1996-01-01

    The spatial observation of a Bose condensate is reported. Dispersive light scattering was used to observe the separation between the condensed and normal components of the Bose gas inside a magnetic trap. This technique is nondestructive, and about a hundred images of the same condensate can be take

  15. The thermalization, condensation and flickering of photons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Other than in a three-dimensional thermal photon gas as Planck's blackbody radiation, photons can exhibit Bose–Einstein condensation, if the thermalization process is restricted to two motional degrees of freedom. This self-contained tutorial describes the thermalization mechanism, the condensation process and the quantum statistics of the photon condensates in detail. (tutorial)

  16. Speeding up chromosome evolution in Phaseolus: multiple rearrangements associated with a one-step descending dysploidy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonsêca, Artur; Ferraz, Maria Eduarda; Pedrosa-Harand, Andrea

    2016-06-01

    The genus Phaseolus L. has been subject of extensive cytogenetic studies due to its global economic importance. It is considered karyotypically stable, with most of its ca. 75 species having 2n = 22 chromosomes, and only three species (Phaseolus leptostachyus, Phaseolus macvaughii, and Phaseolus micranthus), which form the Leptostachyus clade, having 2n = 20. To test whether a simple chromosomal fusion was the cause of this descending dysploidy, mitotic chromosomes of P. leptostachyus (2n = 20) were comparatively mapped by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) using bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) and ribosomal DNA (rDNA) probes. Our results corroborated the conservation of the 5S and 45S rDNA sites on ancestral chromosomes 10 and 6, respectively. The reduction from x = 11 to x = 10 was the result of the insertion of chromosome 10 into the centromeric region of chromosome 11, supporting a nested chromosome fusion (NCF) as the main cause of this dysploidy. Additionally, the terminal region of the long arm of chromosome 6 was translocated to this larger chromosome. Surprisingly, the NCF was accompanied by several additional translocations and inversions previously unknown for the genus, suggesting that the dysploidy may have been associated to a burst of genome reorganization in this otherwise stable, diploid plant genus. PMID:26490170

  17. Numerically abnormal chromosome constitutions in humans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 24, discusses numerically abnormal chromosome constitutions in humans. This involves abnormalities of human chromosome number, including polyploidy (when the number of sets of chromosomes increases) and aneuploidy (when the number of individual normal chromosomes changes). Chapter sections discuss the following chromosomal abnormalities: human triploids, imprinting and uniparental disomy, human tetraploids, hydatidiform moles, anomalies caused by chromosomal imbalance, 13 trisomy (D{sub 1} trisomy, Patau syndrome), 21 trisomy (Down syndrome), 18 trisomy syndrome (Edwards syndrome), other autosomal aneuploidy syndromes, and spontaneous abortions. The chapter concludes with remarks on the nonrandom participation of chromosomes in trisomy. 69 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  18. Chromosome evolution in Neotropical butterflies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saura, Anssi; Von Schoultz, Barbara; Saura, Anja O; Brown, Keith S

    2013-06-01

    We list the chromosome numbers for 65 species of Neotropical Hesperiidae and 104 species or subspecies of Pieridae. In Hesperiidae the tribe Pyrrhopygini have a modal n = 28, Eudaminae and Pyrgini a modal n = 31, while Hesperiinae have n = around 29. Among Pieridae, Coliadinae have a strong modal n = 31 and among Pierinae Anthocharidini are almost fixed for n = 15 while Pierini vary with n = 26 as the most common chromosome number. Dismorphiinae show wide variation. We discuss these results in the context of chromosome numbers of over 1400 Neotropical butterfly species and subspecies derived from about 3000 populations published here and in earlier papers of a series. The overall results show that many Neotropical groups are characterized by karyotype instability with several derived modal numbers or none at all, while almost all taxa of Lepidoptera studied from the other parts of the world have one of n = 29-31 as modal numbers. Possibly chromosome number changes become fixed in the course of speciation driven by biotic interactions. Population subdivision and structuring facilitate karyotype change. Factors that stabilize chromosome numbers include hybridization among species sharing the same number, migration, sexual selection and possibly the distribution of chromosomes within the nucleus. PMID:23865963

  19. Chromosome Architecture and Genome Organization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardi, Giorgio

    2015-01-01

    How the same DNA sequences can function in the three-dimensional architecture of interphase nucleus, fold in the very compact structure of metaphase chromosomes and go precisely back to the original interphase architecture in the following cell cycle remains an unresolved question to this day. The strategy used to address this issue was to analyze the correlations between chromosome architecture and the compositional patterns of DNA sequences spanning a size range from a few hundreds to a few thousands Kilobases. This is a critical range that encompasses isochores, interphase chromatin domains and boundaries, and chromosomal bands. The solution rests on the following key points: 1) the transition from the looped domains and sub-domains of interphase chromatin to the 30-nm fiber loops of early prophase chromosomes goes through the unfolding into an extended chromatin structure (probably a 10-nm “beads-on-a-string” structure); 2) the architectural proteins of interphase chromatin, such as CTCF and cohesin sub-units, are retained in mitosis and are part of the discontinuous protein scaffold of mitotic chromosomes; 3) the conservation of the link between architectural proteins and their binding sites on DNA through the cell cycle explains the “mitotic memory” of interphase architecture and the reversibility of the interphase to mitosis process. The results presented here also lead to a general conclusion which concerns the existence of correlations between the isochore organization of the genome and the architecture of chromosomes from interphase to metaphase. PMID:26619076

  20. Condensed matter analogues of cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kibble, Tom; Srivastava, Ajit

    2013-10-01

    It is always exciting when developments in one branch of physics turn out to have relevance in a quite different branch. It would be hard to find two branches farther apart in terms of energy scales than early-universe cosmology and low-temperature condensed matter physics. Nevertheless ideas about the formation of topological defects during rapid phase transitions that originated in the context of the very early universe have proved remarkably fruitful when applied to a variety of condensed matter systems. The mathematical frameworks for describing these systems can be very similar. This interconnection has led to a deeper understanding of the phenomena in condensed matter systems utilizing ideas from cosmology. At the same time, one can view these condensed matter analogues as providing, at least in a limited sense, experimental access to the phenomena of the early universe for which no direct probe is possible. As this special issue well illustrates, this remains a dynamic and exciting field. The basic idea is that when a system goes through a rapid symmetry-breaking phase transition from a symmetric phase into one with spontaneously broken symmetry, the order parameter may make different choices in different regions, creating domains that when they meet can trap defects. The scale of those domains, and hence the density of defects, is constrained by the rate at which the system goes through the transition and the speed with which order parameter information propagates. This is what has come to be known as the Kibble-Zurek mechanism. The resultant scaling laws have now been tested in a considerable variety of different systems. The earliest experiments illustrating the analogy between cosmology and condensed matter were in liquid crystals, in particular on the isotropic-to-nematic transition, primarily because it is very easy to induce the phase transition (typically at room temperature) and to image precisely what is going on. This field remains one of the

  1. Differential radio-sensitivities of human chromosomes 1 and 2 in one donor in interphase- and metaphase-spreads after 60Co γ-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation-induced chromosome aberrations lead to a plethora of detrimental effects at cellular level. Chromosome aberrations provide broad spectrum of information ranging from probability of malignant transformation to assessment of absorbed dose. Studies mapping differences in radiation sensitivities between human chromosomes are seldom undertaken. Consequently, health risk assessment based on radio-sensitivities of individual chromosomes may be erroneous. Our efforts in this article, attempt to demonstrate differences in radio-sensitivities of human chromosome-1 and/or -2, both in interphase and metaphase spreads. Upon blood collection, dosimetry and irradiation were performed. Lymphocytes were isolated after whole-blood irradiation with 60Co γ-rays in the dose range of 0–5 Gy for both interphase, and metaphase aberration studies. Induction of premature chromosome condensation in interphase cells was accomplished using a phosphatase inhibitor, calyculin-A. Metaphase spreads were harvested from short-term peripheral blood lymphocyte cultures following colcemid arrest and using an automated metaphase harvester and spreader. Aberration analysis in both interphase and metaphase spreads were done using FISH. In interphase, aberrant cell and aberration frequency involving chromosome 1 and/or 2 increased linearly with radiation dose. In metaphase, aberrations increased in a linear-quadratic manner with dose. Our studies ascertain that chromosome-2 is more radio-sensitive than chromosome-1 in both interphase and metaphase stages, albeit the DNA content of chromosome-2 is lesser than chromosome-1 by almost 10 million base pairs. Differences in radio-sensitivities of chromosomes have implications in genetic damage, chromosome organization, and chromosome function. Designing research experiments based on our vital findings may bring benefit to radiation-induced risk assessment, therapeutics and development of chromosome specific biomarkers

  2. Continuous droplet removal upon dropwise condensation of humid air on a hydrophobic micropatterned surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamuruyev, Konstantin O; Bardaweel, Hamzeh K; Carron, Christopher J; Kenyon, Nicholas J; Brand, Oliver; Delplanque, Jean-Pierre; Davis, Cristina E

    2014-08-26

    Combination of two physical phenomena, capillary pressure gradient and wettability gradient, allows a simple two-step fabrication process that yields a reliable hydrophobic self-cleaning condenser surface. The surface is fabricated with specific microscopic topography and further treatment with a chemically inert low-surface-energy material. This process does not require growth of nanofeatures (nanotubes) or hydrophilic-hydrophobic patterning of the surface. Trapezoidal geometry of the microfeatures facilitates droplet transfer from the Wenzel to the Cassie state and reduces droplet critical diameter. The geometry of the micropatterns enhances local coalescence and directional movement for droplets with diameter much smaller than the radial length of the micropatterns. The hydrophobic self-cleaning micropatterned condenser surface prevents liquid film formation and promotes continuous dropwise condensation cycle. Upon dropwise condensation, droplets follow a designed wettability gradient created with micropatterns from the most hydrophobic to the least hydrophobic end of the surface. The surface has higher condensation efficiency, due to its directional self-cleaning property, than a plain hydrophobic surface. We explain the self-actuated droplet collection mechanism on the condenser surface and demonstrate experimentally the creation of an effective wettability gradient over a 6 mm radial distance. In spite of its fabrication simplicity, the fabricated surface demonstrates self-cleaning property, enhanced condensation performance, and reliability over time. Our work enables creation of a hydrophobic condenser surface with the directional self-cleaning property that can be used for collection of biological (chemical, environmental) aerosol samples or for condensation enhancement. PMID:25073014

  3. On nitrogen condensation in hypersonic nozzle flows: Numerical method and parametric study

    KAUST Repository

    Lin, Longyuan

    2013-12-17

    A numerical method for calculating two-dimensional planar and axisymmetric hypersonic nozzle flows with nitrogen condensation is developed. The classical nucleation theory with an empirical correction function and the modified Gyarmathy model are used to describe the nucleation rate and the droplet growth, respectively. The conservation of the liquid phase is described by a finite number of moments of the size distribution function. The moment equations are then combined with the Euler equations and are solved by the finite-volume method. The numerical method is first validated by comparing its prediction with experimental results from the literature. The effects of nitrogen condensation on hypersonic nozzle flows are then numerically examined. The parameters at the nozzle exit under the conditions of condensation and no-condensation are evaluated. For the condensation case, the static pressure, the static temperature, and the amount of condensed fluid at the nozzle exit decrease with the increase of the total temperature. Compared with the no-condensation case, both the static pressure and temperature at the nozzle exit increase, and the Mach number decreases due to the nitrogen condensation. It is also indicated that preheating the nitrogen gas is necessary to avoid the nitrogen condensation even for a hypersonic nozzle with a Mach number of 5 operating at room temperatures. © 2013 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

  4. Origin of uranium isotope variations in early solar nebula condensates

    CERN Document Server

    Tissot, Francois L H; Grossman, Lawrence

    2016-01-01

    High temperature condensates found in meteorites display uranium isotopic variations (235U/238U) that complicate dating of the formation of the Solar System and whose origin remains mysterious. It is possible that these variations are due to decay of the short-lived radionuclide 247Cm (t1/2=15.6 Myr) into 235U but they could also be due to uranium kinetic isotopic fractionation during condensation. We report uranium isotope measurements of meteoritic refractory inclusions that reveal excesses of 235U reaching ~+6 % relative to average solar system composition, which can only be due to decay of 247Cm. This allows us to constrain the 247Cm/235U ratio at Solar System formation to (1.1 +- 0.3) x 10-4. This value provides new clues on the universality of nucleosynthetic r-process of rapid neutron capture.

  5. Origin of uranium isotope variations in early solar nebula condensates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tissot, François L H; Dauphas, Nicolas; Grossman, Lawrence

    2016-03-01

    High-temperature condensates found in meteorites display uranium isotopic variations ((235)U/(238)U), which complicate dating the solar system's formation and whose origin remains mysterious. It is possible that these variations are due to the decay of the short-lived radionuclide (247)Cm (t 1/2 = 15.6 My) into (235)U, but they could also be due to uranium kinetic isotopic fractionation during condensation. We report uranium isotope measurements of meteoritic refractory inclusions that reveal excesses of (235)U reaching ~+6% relative to average solar system composition, which can only be due to the decay of (247)Cm. This allows us to constrain the (247)Cm/(235)U ratio at solar system formation to (1.1 ± 0.3) × 10(-4). This value provides new clues on the universality of the nucleosynthetic r-process of rapid neutron capture. PMID:26973874

  6. Perturbing a quantum gravity condensate

    CERN Document Server

    Gielen, Steffen

    2014-01-01

    In a recent proposal using the group field theory (GFT) approach, a spatially homogeneous (generally anisotropic) universe is described as a quantum gravity condensate of 'atoms of space', which allows the derivation of an effective cosmological Friedmann equation from the microscopic quantum gravity dynamics. Here we take a first step towards the study of cosmological perturbations over the homogeneous background. We consider a state in which a single 'atom' is added to an otherwise homogeneous condensate. Backreaction of the perturbation on the background is negligible and the background dynamics can be solved separately. The dynamics for the perturbation takes the form of a quantum cosmology Hamiltonian for a 'wavefunction', depending on background and perturbations, of the product form usually assumed in a Born-Oppenheimer approximation. The perturbation we consider can then be interpreted as a spatially homogeneous metric perturbation. For this case, our results show how perturbations can be added to con...

  7. Polymer Bose–Einstein condensates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work we analyze a non-interacting one-dimensional polymer Bose–Einstein condensate in a harmonic trap within the semiclassical approximation. We use an effective Hamiltonian coming from the polymer quantization that arises in loop quantum gravity. We calculate the number of particles in order to obtain the critical temperature. The Bose–Einstein functions are replaced by series, whose high order terms are related to powers of the polymer length. It is shown that the condensation temperature presents a shift respect to the standard case, for small values of the polymer scale. In typical experimental conditions, it is possible to establish a bound for λ2 up to ≲10−16 m2. To improve this bound we should decrease the frequency of the trap and also decrease the number of particles

  8. Fundamentals of condensed matter physics

    CERN Document Server

    Cohen, Marvin L

    2016-01-01

    Based on an established course and covering the fundamentals, central areas, and contemporary topics of this diverse field, Fundamentals of Condensed Matter Physics is a much-needed textbook for graduate students. The book begins with an introduction to the modern conceptual models of a solid from the points of view of interacting atoms and elementary excitations. It then provides students with a thorough grounding in electronic structure as a starting point to understand many properties of condensed matter systems - electronic, structural, vibrational, thermal, optical, transport, magnetic and superconductivity - and methods to calculate them. Taking readers through the concepts and techniques, the text gives both theoretically and experimentally inclined students the knowledge needed for research and teaching careers in this field. It features 200 illustrations, 40 worked examples and 150 homework problems for students to test their understanding. Solutions to the problems for instructors are available at w...

  9. Compact heat exchangers modeling: Condensation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Cascales, J.R.; Vera-Garcia, F. [Technical University of Cartagena, Thermal and Fluid Engineering Department, C/Dr. Fleming, s/n 30202 Cartagena, Murcia (Spain); Gonzalvez-Macia, J.; Corberan-Salvador, J.M. [Technical University of Valencia, Applied Thermodynamic Department, Valencia (Spain); Johnson, M.W.; Kohler, G.T. [Modine Manufacturing Company, Commercial Products Group, Racine, WI (United States)

    2010-01-15

    A model for the analysis of compact heat exchangers working as either evaporators or condensers is presented. This paper will focus exclusively on condensation modeling. The model is based on cell discretization of the heat exchanger in such a way that cells are analyzed following the path imposed by the refrigerant flowing through the tubes. It has been implemented in a robust code developed for assisting with the design of compact heat exchangers and refrigeration systems. These heat exchangers consist of serpentine fins that are brazed to multi-port tubes with internal microchannels. This paper also investigates a number of correlations used for the calculation of the refrigerant side heat transfer coefficient. They are evaluated comparing the predicted data with the experimental data. The working fluids used in the experiments are R134a and R410A, and the secondary fluid is air. The experimental facility is briefly described and some conclusions are finally drawn. (author)

  10. Evolution of Sex Chromosomes in Insects

    OpenAIRE

    Kaiser, Vera B; Bachtrog, Doris

    2010-01-01

    Sex chromosomes have many unusual features relative to autosomes. Y (or W) chromosomes lack genetic recombination, are male- (female-) limited, and show an abundance of genetically inert heterochromatic DNA but contain few functional genes. X (or Z) chromosomes also show sex-biased transmission (i.e., X chromosomes show female-biased and Z-chromosomes show male-biased inheritance) and are hemizygous in the heterogametic sex. Their unusual ploidy level and pattern of inheritance imply that sex...

  11. Modelling of Condensation in Vertical Tubes for Passive Safety System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Condensation in vertical tubes plays an important role in the performance of heat exchangers in passive safety systems, widely adopted in next generation reactors. Vertical pipe condensers are implemented in the GE-SBWR1000 Isolation Condenser as well as in the Emergency Heat Removal System (EHRS) of the IRIS reactor. The transient and safety analysis is usually carried out by means of best-estimate, thermalhydraulic codes, as RELAP. Suitable heat transfer correlations are required to duly model the two-phase processes. As far as the condensation process is concerned, RELAP5/MOD3.3 adopts the Nusselt correlation to calculate the heat transfer coefficient in laminar conditions and the Shah correlation for turbulent conditions; the maximum of the predictions from laminar and turbulent regimes is used to calculate the condensation heat transfer coefficient. Shah correlation is generally considered as the best empirical correlation for turbulent annular film condensation, but suitable in proper ranges of the various parameters. Nevertheless, recent investigations have pointed out that its validity is highly questionable for high pressure and large diameter tube applications with water, as should be for the utilization for vertical tube condensers in passive safety systems. Thus, a best-estimate model, based on the theory of film condensation on a plain wall, is proposed. Condensate velocity, expressed in terms of Reynolds number, governs the development of three different regime zones: laminar, laminar wavy and turbulent. The best correlation for each regime (Nusselt's for laminar, Kutateladze's for laminar wavy and Chen's for turbulent) is considered and then implemented in RELAP code. Comparison between the Nusselt-Shah and the proposed model shows substantial differences in heat transfer coefficient prediction. Especially, a trend of increasing value of the heat transfer coefficient with tube abscissa (and quality decreasing) is predicted, when turbulence

  12. Atomistic modeling of dropwise condensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikarwar, B. S.; Singh, P. L.; Muralidhar, K.; Khandekar, S.

    2016-05-01

    The basic aim of the atomistic modeling of condensation of water is to determine the size of the stable cluster and connect phenomena occurring at atomic scale to the macroscale. In this paper, a population balance model is described in terms of the rate equations to obtain the number density distribution of the resulting clusters. The residence time is taken to be large enough so that sufficient time is available for all the adatoms existing in vapor-phase to loose their latent heat and get condensed. The simulation assumes clusters of a given size to be formed from clusters of smaller sizes, but not by the disintegration of the larger clusters. The largest stable cluster size in the number density distribution is taken to be representative of the minimum drop radius formed in a dropwise condensation process. A numerical confirmation of this result against predictions based on a thermodynamic model has been obtained. Results show that the number density distribution is sensitive to the surface diffusion coefficient and the rate of vapor flux impinging on the substrate. The minimum drop radius increases with the diffusion coefficient and the impinging vapor flux; however, the dependence is weak. The minimum drop radius predicted from thermodynamic considerations matches the prediction of the cluster model, though the former does not take into account the effect of the surface properties on the nucleation phenomena. For a chemically passive surface, the diffusion coefficient and the residence time are dependent on the surface texture via the coefficient of friction. Thus, physical texturing provides a means of changing, within limits, the minimum drop radius. The study reveals that surface texturing at the scale of the minimum drop radius does not provide controllability of the macro-scale dropwise condensation at large timescales when a dynamic steady-state is reached.

  13. Advances in condensed matter optics

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Liangyao; Jiang, Xunya; Jin, Kuijuan; Liu, Hui; Zhao, Haibin

    2015-01-01

    This book describes some of the more recent progresses and developmentsin the study of condensed matter optics in both theoretic and experimental fields.It will help readers, especially graduate students and scientists who are studying and working in the nano-photonic field, to understand more deeply the characteristics of light waves propagated in nano-structure-based materials with potential applications in the future.

  14. Radiative corrections to Bose condensation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez, A. (Academia de Ciencias de Cuba, La Habana. Inst. de Matematica, Cibernetica y Computacion)

    1985-04-01

    The Bose condensation of the scalar field in a theory behaving in the Coleman-Weinberg mode is considered. The effective potential of the model is computed within the semiclassical approximation in a dimensional regularization scheme. Radiative corrections are shown to introduce certain ..mu..-dependent ultraviolet divergences in the effective potential coming from the Many-Particle theory. The weight of radiative corrections in the dynamics of the system is strongly modified by the charge density.

  15. Spacetime geometry from graviton condensation

    OpenAIRE

    Zielinski, Sophia

    2016-01-01

    In this thesis we introduce a novel approach viewing spacetime geometry as an emergent phenomenon based on the condensation of a large number of quanta on a distinguished flat background. We advertise this idea with regard to investigations of spacetime singularities within a quantum field theoretical framework and semiclassical considerations of black holes. Given that in any physical theory apart from General Relativity the metric background is determined in advance, singu...

  16. Cavitation performance evaluation for a condensate pump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cavitation in a condensate pump with specific speed of 95 m·m3s−1·min−1 was treated in this study. Cavitation performance for the pump was tested experimentally, and the steady state cavitating flows in the pump impeller were simulated by RANS method as well as a homogeneous cavitation model. It is noted that cavitating flow simulation reasonably depicted cavitation development in the pump. Compared to the tested results, the numerical simulation basically predicted later performance drops due to cavitation. Unfortunately, the cavitation simulation at the operation condition of 50% best efficiency point could not predict the head drop up to 3%. By applying the concept of relative cavity length cavitation performance evaluation is achieved. For better application, future study is necessary to establish the relation between relative cavity length and performance drop

  17. Theory of laminar film condensation

    CERN Document Server

    Fujii, Tetsu

    1991-01-01

    Since the petroleum crisis in the 1970s, a lot of effort to save energy was made in industry, and remarkable achievements have been made. In the research and development concerning thermal energy, however, it was clar­ ified that one of the most important problems was manufacturing con­ densing systems with smaller size and higher performance. To solve this problem we need a method which synthesizes selections_ of the type of con­ denser, cooling tube and its arrangement, assessment of fouling on the cooling surfaces, consideration of transient characteristics of a condenser, etc. The majority of effort, however, has been to devise a surface element which enhances the heat transfer coefficient in condensation of a single or multicomponent vapor. Condensation phenomena are complexly affected by a lot of physical property values, and accordingly the results of theo­ retical research are expressed with several dimensionless parameters. On the other hand, the experimental research is limited to those with som...

  18. Principles of condensed matter physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is an advanced level text and reference book on the physics of condensed matter systems. Assuming a familiarity with the basics of quantum mechanics and statistical mechanics, the book establishes a general framework, based on symmetries and conservation laws, for describing condensed phases of matter. After surveying the structure and properties of materials with different symmetries, it explores the role of spatial dimensionality and microscopic interactions in determining the nature of phase transitions. Particular attention is given to critical phenomena and renormalization group methods. The properties of liquids, liquid crystals, incommensurate crystals, quasicrystals, crystalline solids, magnetically ordered systems and amorphous solids are investigated in terms of their symmetry, generalized rigidity, hydrodynamics and topological defect structure. The book is written in a clear pedagogic style with extensive examples of real-world systems. Over 250 diagrams illustrate key points, and many exercises are included. The volume contains a bibliography, a detailed glossary, and an index. In addition to use as a course text, this book will be an essential reference to students and researchers in physics, applied physics, chemistry, materials science, chemical engineering and electrical engineering who are interested in modern condensed matter physics

  19. Quality factors to consider in condensate selection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lywood, B. [Crude Quality Inc., Edmonton, AB (Canada)

    2009-07-01

    Many factors must be considered when assessing the feasibility of using condensates as a diluent for bitumen or heavy crude production blending. In addition to commercial issues, the effect of condensate quality is a key consideration. In general, condensate quality refers to density and viscosity. However, valuation decisions could be enhanced through the expansion of quality definitions and understanding. This presentation focused on the parameters that are important in choosing a diluent grade product. It also reviewed pipeline and industry specifications and provided additional information regarding general properties for bitumen and condensate compatibility; sampling and quality testing needs; and existing sources of information regarding condensate quality. tabs., figs.

  20. Spatial coherence of a polariton condensate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Hui; Solomon, Glenn S; Hey, Rudolf; Ploog, Klaus H; Yamamoto, Yoshihisa

    2007-09-21

    We perform Young's double-slit experiment to study the spatial coherence properties of a two-dimensional dynamic condensate of semiconductor microcavity polaritons. The coherence length of the system is measured as a function of the pump rate, which confirms a spontaneous buildup of macroscopic coherence in the condensed phase. An independent measurement reveals that the position and momentum uncertainty product of the condensate is close to the Heisenberg limit. An experimental realization of such a minimum uncertainty wave packet of the polariton condensate opens a door to coherent matter-wave phenomena such as Josephson oscillation, superfluidity, and solitons in solid state condensate systems. PMID:17930529

  1. Bose-Einstein Condensation of Atomic Hydrogen

    OpenAIRE

    Fried, Dale G.

    1999-01-01

    This thesis describes the observation and study of Bose-Einstein condensation of a trapped, dilute gas of atomic hydrogen. The condensate and normal gas are studied by two-photon spectroscopy of the 1S-2S transition. We condense over 10^9 atoms per second for several seconds, and the peak condensate density is around 5x10^15 cm^-3. Topics covered in the thesis include a theoretical analysis of Bose-condensed hydrogen, a description of the cryogenic trapping cell and the evaporative cooling te...

  2. Condensation of the air-steam mixture in a vertical tube condenser

    OpenAIRE

    Havlík Jan; Dlouhý Tomáš

    2016-01-01

    This paper deals with the condensation of water vapour in the presence of non-condensable air. Experimental and theoretical solutions of this problem are presented here. A heat exchanger for the condensation of industrial waste steam containing infiltrated air was designed. The condenser consists of a bundle of vertical tubes in which the steam condenses as it flows downwards with cooling water flowing outside the tubes in the opposite direction. Experiments with pure steam and with mixtures ...

  3. Identification of DNA double strand breaks at chromosome boundaries along the track of particle irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niimi, Atsuko; Yamauchi, Motohiro; Limsirichaikul, Siripan; Sekine, Ryota; Oike, Takahiro; Sato, Hiro; Suzuki, Keiji; Held, Kathryn D; Nakano, Takashi; Shibata, Atsushi

    2016-08-01

    Chromosomal translocations arise from misrejoining of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) between loci located on two chromosomes. One current model suggests that spatial proximity of potential chromosomal translocation partners influences translocation probability. Ionizing radiation (IR) is a potent inducer of translocations. Accumulating evidence demonstrates that particle irradiation more frequently causes translocations compared with X-ray irradiation. This observation has led to the hypothesis that the high frequency of translocations after particle irradiation may be due to the formation of DSBs at chromosome boundaries along the particle track, because such DSBs can be misrejoined between distinct chromosomes. In this study, we simultaneously visualized the site of IR-induced DSBs and chromosome position by combining Immunofluorescence and fluorescence in situ hybridization. Importantly, the frequency of γH2AX foci at the chromosome boundary of chromosome 1 after carbon-ion irradiation was >4-fold higher than that after X-ray irradiation. This observation is consistent with the idea that particle irradiation generates DSBs at the boundaries of two chromosomes along the track. Further, we showed that resolution of γH2AX foci at chromosome boundaries is prevented by inhibition of DNA-PKcs activity, indicating that the DSB repair is NHEJ-dependent. Finally, we found that γH2AX foci at chromosome boundaries after carbon-ion irradiation contain DSBs undergoing DNA-end resection, which promotes repair utilizing microhomology mediated end-joining during translocation. Taken together, our study suggests that the frequency of DSB formation at chromosome boundaries is associated with the incidence of chromosomal translocations, supporting the notion that the spatial proximity between breaks is an important factor in translocation formation. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27113385

  4. Role of antikaon condensation in r-mode instability

    CERN Document Server

    Chatterjee, Debarati

    2007-01-01

    We investigate the effect of antikaon condensed matter on bulk viscosity in rotating neutron stars. We use relativistic field theoretical models to construct the equation of state of neutron stars with the condensate, where the phase transition from nucleonic to $K^-$ condensed phase is assumed to be of first order. We calculate the coefficient of bulk viscosity due to the non-leptonic weak interaction n --> p + K^-. The influence of antikaon bulk viscosity on the gravitational radiation reaction driven instability in the r-modes is investigated. We compare our results with the previously studied non-leptonic weak interaction $n + p --> p + \\Lambda$ involving hyperons on the damping of the r-mode oscillations. We find that the bulk viscosity coefficient due to the non-leptonic weak process involving the condensate is suppressed by several orders of magnitude in comparison with the non-superfluid hyperon bulk viscosity coefficient. Consequently, the antikaon bulk viscosity may not be able to damp the r-mode in...

  5. Chiral Condensate and Mott-Anderson Freeze-Out

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present the idea of a Mott-Anderson freeze-out that suggests a key role of the localization of the hadron wave functions when traversing the hadronization transition. The extension of hadron wave functions in dense matter is governed by the behavior of the chiral quark condensate such that its melting at finite temperatures and chemical potentials entails an increase of the size of hadrons and thus their geometrical strong interaction cross sections. It is demonstrated within a schematic resonance gas model, that a kinetic freeze-out condition reveals a correlation with the reduction of the chiral condensate in the phase diagram up to 50% of its vacuum value. Generalizing the description of the chiral condensate by taking into account a full hadron resonance gas such correlation gets distorted. We discuss, that this may be due to our approximations in calculating the chiral condensate which disregard both, in-medium effects on hadron masses and hadron-hadron interactions. The latter, in particular due to quark exchange reactions, could lead to a delocalization of the hadron wave functions in accordance with the picture of a Mott-Anderson transition. (author)

  6. Localization of an EGF receptor in purified chromosomes from A431 and lymphoblast cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Condensed chromosomes from mitotic cells of A431 and lymphoblast GM131 cells were purified by a flow cytometric sorting and collected directly onto nitrocellulose discs. The blots containing purified chromosomes from A431 cells were then hybridized against iodinated protein ligands. Positive autoradiographic signals were obtained from 125I-epidermal growth factor (EGF), 125I-calmodulin(CAM)-IgG and 125I-number528 monoclonal IgG against EGF receptor, but not from 125I-CAM. Binding of 125I-EGF to the purified chromosomes on the nitrocellulose was specific and reversible upon the addition of excess unlabeled EGF to the hybridization solutions. Blots containing the purified chromosomes of lymphoblast cells gave positive signals for 125I-CAM-IgG, while 125I-CAM signals were not detected. Control experiments showed no detectable contamination from A431 membrane EGF receptor in the purified chromosomal fraction, as demonstrated by the absence of EGF receptor autophosphorylation and the absence of a 125I-EGF hybridization signal in the supernatant solution of the purified chromosomal preparation

  7. Proteomics Analysis with a Nano Random Forest Approach Reveals Novel Functional Interactions Regulated by SMC Complexes on Mitotic Chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohta, Shinya; Montaño-Gutierrez, Luis F; de Lima Alves, Flavia; Ogawa, Hiromi; Toramoto, Iyo; Sato, Nobuko; Morrison, Ciaran G; Takeda, Shunichi; Hudson, Damien F; Rappsilber, Juri; Earnshaw, William C

    2016-08-01

    Packaging of DNA into condensed chromosomes during mitosis is essential for the faithful segregation of the genome into daughter nuclei. Although the structure and composition of mitotic chromosomes have been studied for over 30 years, these aspects are yet to be fully elucidated. Here, we used stable isotope labeling with amino acids in cell culture to compare the proteomes of mitotic chromosomes isolated from cell lines harboring conditional knockouts of members of the condensin (SMC2, CAP-H, CAP-D3), cohesin (Scc1/Rad21), and SMC5/6 (SMC5) complexes. Our analysis revealed that these complexes associate with chromosomes independently of each other, with the SMC5/6 complex showing no significant dependence on any other chromosomal proteins during mitosis. To identify subtle relationships between chromosomal proteins, we employed a nano Random Forest (nanoRF) approach to detect protein complexes and the relationships between them. Our nanoRF results suggested that as few as 113 of 5058 detected chromosomal proteins are functionally linked to chromosome structure and segregation. Furthermore, nanoRF data revealed 23 proteins that were not previously suspected to have functional interactions with complexes playing important roles in mitosis. Subsequent small-interfering-RNA-based validation and localization tracking by green fluorescent protein-tagging highlighted novel candidates that might play significant roles in mitotic progression. PMID:27231315

  8. Kaposi's sarcoma herpesvirus C-terminal LANA concentrates at pericentromeric and peri-telomeric regions of a subset of mitotic chromosomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA) tethers KSHV terminal repeat (TR) DNA to mitotic chromosomes to efficiently segregate episomes to progeny nuclei. LANA contains N- and C-terminal chromosome binding regions. We now show that C-terminal LANA preferentially concentrates to paired dots at pericentromeric and peri-telomeric regions of a subset of mitotic chromosomes through residues 996-1139. Deletions within C-terminal LANA abolished both self-association and chromosome binding, consistent with a requirement for self-association to bind chromosomes. A deletion abolishing TR DNA binding did not affect chromosome targeting, indicating LANA's localization is not due to binding its recognition sequence in chromosomal DNA. LANA distributed similarly on human and non-human mitotic chromosomes. These results are consistent with C-terminal LANA interacting with a cell factor that concentrates at pericentromeric and peri-telomeric regions of mitotic chromosomes

  9. Experiences on condenser cooling water treatment programme at NAPS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Narora Atomic Power Station has twin units of 220 MWe pressurized heavy water reactors, situated at the banks of river Ganges in Bulandshahr District of Uttar Pradesh. The plant cooling water takes the make up water supply from river Ganges after pretreatment using polyelectrolyte at two number of clariflocculators. The condenser cooling water system of the station is of open recirculating type and the clarified raw water used as a cooling medium is having a concentration cycle of cooling about 2.0. The calcium concentration in recirculating water is around 160 mg/litre as CaCO3 at full power of the unit. The Langelier Saturation Index of the recirculating water is observed to be in the range + 1.2 to + 1.8, indicating moderately high tendency, towards scale formation on heat transfer surfaces, such as condenser tubes, Turbine lubricating oil coolers and other associated heat exchangers. The condenser cooling water treatment was not envisaged in the original design. Therefore untreated surface water resulting in scale formation (0.3 to 0.5 mm thickness) due to deposition of calcium carbonate was observed in the condenser tubes of NAPS Unit 1 and 2 during initial period of operation (1989 to 1992). It was observed that the scaling on condenser tube surfaces caused increase in terminal temperature difference (TTD) from a design value of 5.5 degC to 13.0 degC. In addition to this a substantial drop in heat transfer coefficient from a value of about 2000 kcal/hr/m2/degC to 1200 kcal/hr/m2/degC occurred. On thorough review actions were initiated at NAPS to restore the heat transfer through condensers. The present paper highlights the experiences on the treatment of cooling water

  10. Chromosomal evolution among leaf-nosed nectarivorous bats – evidence from cross-species chromosome painting (Phyllostomidae, Chiroptera)

    OpenAIRE

    Sotero-Caio, Cibele G.; Volleth, Marianne; Gollahon, Lauren S; Fu, Beiyuan; Cheng, William; Ng, Bee L.; Yang, Fengtang; Baker, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    Background New World leaf-nosed bats, Phyllostomidae, represent a lineage of Chiroptera marked by unprecedented morphological/ecological diversity and extensive intergeneric chromosomal reorganization. There are still disagreements regarding their systematic relationships due to morphological convergence among some groups. Their history of karyotypic evolution also remains to be documented. Results To better understand the evolutionary relationships within Phyllostomidae, we developed chromos...

  11. The Reduction of Chromosome Number in Meiosis Is Determined by Properties Built into the Chromosomes

    OpenAIRE

    Paliulis, Leocadia V.; Nicklas, R. Bruce

    2000-01-01

    In meiosis I, two chromatids move to each spindle pole. Then, in meiosis II, the two are distributed, one to each future gamete. This requires that meiosis I chromosomes attach to the spindle differently than meiosis II chromosomes and that they regulate chromosome cohesion differently. We investigated whether the information that dictates the division type of the chromosome comes from the whole cell, the spindle, or the chromosome itself. Also, we determined when chromosomes can switch from ...

  12. Chromosome segregation in plant meiosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda eZamariola

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Faithful chromosome segregation in meiosis is essential for ploidy stability over sexual life cycles. In plants, defective chromosome segregation caused by gene mutations or other factors leads to the formation of unbalanced or unreduced gametes creating aneuploid or polyploid progeny, respectively. Accurate segregation requires the coordinated execution of conserved processes occurring throughout the two meiotic cell divisions. Synapsis and recombination ensure the establishment of chiasmata that hold homologous chromosomes together allowing their correct segregation in the first meiotic division, which is also tightly regulated by cell-cycle dependent release of cohesin and monopolar attachment of sister kinetochores to microtubules. In meiosis II, bi-orientation of sister kinetochores and proper spindle orientation correctly segregate chromosomes in four haploid cells. Checkpoint mechanisms acting at kinetochores control the accuracy of kinetochore-microtubule attachment, thus ensuring the completion of segregation. Here we review the current knowledge on the processes taking place during chromosome segregation in plant meiosis, focusing on the characterization of the molecular factors involved.

  13. Radiation-induced chromosomal instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ritter, S. [GSI, Biophysics, Darmstadt (Germany)

    1999-03-01

    Recent studies on radiation-induced chromosomal instability in the progeny of exposed mammalian cells were briefly described as well as other related studies. For the analysis of chromosomal damage in clones, cells were seeded directly after exposure in cell well-dish to form single cell clones and post-irradiation chromosome aberrations were scored. Both exposure to isoeffective doses of X-ray or 270 MeV/u C-ions (13 keV/{mu}m) increased the number of clones with abnormal karyotype and the increase was similar for X-ray and for C-ions. Meanwhile, in the progeny of cells for mass cultures, there was no indication of a delayed expression of chromosomal damage up to 40 population doublings after the exposure. A high number of aberrant cells were only observed directly after exposure to 10.7 MeV/u O-ions, i.e. in the first cycle cells and decreased with subsequent cell divisions. The reason for these differences in the radiation-induced chromosomal instability between clonal isolates and mass culture has not been clarified. Recent studies indicated that genomic instability occurs at a high frequency in the progeny of cells irradiated with both sparsely and densely ionizing radiation. Such genomic instability is thought likely to increase the risk of carcinogenesis, but more data are required for a well understanding of the health risks resulting from radiation-induced delayed instability. (M.N.)

  14. Dean flow fractionation of chromosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hockin, Matt; Sant, Himanshu J.; Capecchi, Mario; Gale, Bruce K.

    2016-03-01

    Efforts to transfer intact mammalian chromosomes between cells have been attempted for more than 50 years with the consistent result being transfer of sub unit length pieces regardless of method. Inertial microfluidics is a new field that has shown much promise in addressing the fractionation of particles in the 2-20 μm size range (with unknown limits) and separations are based upon particles being carried by curving confined flows (within a spiral shaped, often rectangular flow chamber) and migrating to stable "equilibrium" positions of varying distance from a chamber wall depending on the balance of dean and lift forces. We fabricated spiral channels for inertial microfluidic separations using a standard soft lithography process. The concentration of chromosomes, small contaminant DNA and large cell debris in each outlets were evaluated using microscope (60X) and a flow cytometer. Using Dean Flow Fractionation, we were able to focus 4.5 times more chromosomes in outlet 2 compared to outlet 4 where most of the large debris is found. We recover 16% of the chromosomes in outlet #1- 50% in 2, 23% in 3 and 11% in 4. It should be noted that these estimates of recovery do not capture one piece of information- it actually may be that the chromosomes at each outlet are physically different and work needs to be done to verify this potential.

  15. Chromosomal rearrangement interferes with meiotic X chromosome inactivation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Homolka, David; Ivánek, Robert; Čapková, Jana; Jansa, Petr; Forejt, Jiří

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 17, č. 10 (2007), s. 1431-1437. ISSN 1088-9051 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0520; GA ČR GA301/06/1334; GA ČR GA301/07/1383 Grant ostatní: Howard Hughes Medical Institute(US) HHMI 55000306 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : chromosomal translocations * meiotic X chromosome inactivation * spermatogenesis Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 11.224, year: 2007

  16. Failure of Titanium Condenser Tubes after 24 Years Power Plant Service

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montgomery, Melanie; Enemark, Allan; Hangaard, Anders

    2014-01-01

    The titanium condenser has been in operation for 24 years at Amager unit 3 power plant. In February 2012, the plant was contaminated by seawater due to a failed condenser tube and some tubes were plugged. A month later, the plant tripped again. Small leaks were found again and finally approx. 200...... tubes were plugged before the condenser was in service again. A series of inspections, NDT, and destructive examinations were conducted to try and understand the cause of failure in the tubes within the condenser. After such investigations, degradation mechanisms such as inner fouling, steam impingement......, and fretting/erosion around the supports could be discounted. Ductile cracks were found in the tube within the tubesheet. From circumstantial evidence, it was concluded that failure was caused by a semi-filled condenser which led to a mismatch in expansion coefficients of filled tubes and unfilled...

  17. Mixed heavy-quark-gluon condensate in the stochastic vacuum model and dual superconductor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The world-line formalism is used for the evaluation of the mixed heavy-quark-gluon condensate in two models of QCD - the stochastic vacuum model and the dual superconductor one. Calculations are performed for an arbitrary dimensionality of space-time d ≥ 2. While in the stochastic vacuum model, the condensate is UV finite up to d = 8, in the dual superconductor model it is UV divergent at any d ≥ 2. A regularization of this divergence is proposed, which makes quantitative the condition of the type-II dual superconductor. The obtained results are generalized to the case of finite temperatures. Corrections to the both, mixed and standard, heavy-quark condensates, which appear due to the variation of the gauge field at the scale of the vacuum correlation length, are evaluated within the stochastic vacuum model. These corrections diminish the absolute values of the condensates, as well as the ratio of the mixed condensate to the standard one

  18. CDW-Exciton Condensate Competition and a Condensate Driven Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özgün, Ege; Hakioğlu, Tuğrul

    2016-08-01

    We examine the competition between the charge-density wave (CDW) instability and the excitonic condensate (EC) in spatially separated layers of electrons and holes. The CDW and the EC order parameters (OPs), described by two different mechanisms and hence two different transition temperatures TcCDW and TcEC, are self-consistently coupled by a microscopic mean field theory. We discuss the results in our model specifically focusing on the transition-metal dichalcogenides which are considered as the most typical examples of strongly coupled CDW/EC systems with atomic layer separations where the electronic energy scales are large with the critical temperatures in the range TcEC ˜ TcCDW ˜ 100-200 K. An important consequence of this is that the excitonic energy gap, hence the condensed free energy, vary with the layer separation resulting in a new type of force FEC. We discuss the possibility of this force as the possible driver of the structural lattice deformation observed in some TMDCs with a particular attention on the 1T-TiSe2 below 200 K.

  19. Condensation on slippery asymmetric bumps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kyoo-Chul; Kim, Philseok; Grinthal, Alison; He, Neil; Fox, David; Weaver, James C; Aizenberg, Joanna

    2016-03-01

    Controlling dropwise condensation is fundamental to water-harvesting systems, desalination, thermal power generation, air conditioning, distillation towers, and numerous other applications. For any of these, it is essential to design surfaces that enable droplets to grow rapidly and to be shed as quickly as possible. However, approaches based on microscale, nanoscale or molecular-scale textures suffer from intrinsic trade-offs that make it difficult to optimize both growth and transport at once. Here we present a conceptually different design approach--based on principles derived from Namib desert beetles, cacti, and pitcher plants--that synergistically combines these aspects of condensation and substantially outperforms other synthetic surfaces. Inspired by an unconventional interpretation of the role of the beetle's bumpy surface geometry in promoting condensation, and using theoretical modelling, we show how to maximize vapour diffusion fluxat the apex of convex millimetric bumps by optimizing the radius of curvature and cross-sectional shape. Integrating this apex geometry with a widening slope, analogous to cactus spines, directly couples facilitated droplet growth with fast directional transport, by creating a free-energy profile that drives the droplet down the slope before its growth rate can decrease. This coupling is further enhanced by a slippery, pitcher-plant-inspired nanocoating that facilitates feedback between coalescence-driven growth and capillary-driven motion on the way down. Bumps that are rationally designed to integrate these mechanisms are able to grow and transport large droplets even against gravity and overcome the effect of an unfavourable temperature gradient. We further observe an unprecedented sixfold-higher exponent of growth rate, faster onset, higher steady-state turnover rate, and a greater volume of water collected compared to other surfaces. We envision that this fundamental understanding and rational design strategy can be

  20. Condensation on slippery asymmetric bumps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kyoo-Chul; Kim, Philseok; Grinthal, Alison; He, Neil; Fox, David; Weaver, James C.; Aizenberg, Joanna

    2016-03-01

    Controlling dropwise condensation is fundamental to water-harvesting systems, desalination, thermal power generation, air conditioning, distillation towers, and numerous other applications. For any of these, it is essential to design surfaces that enable droplets to grow rapidly and to be shed as quickly as possible. However, approaches based on microscale, nanoscale or molecular-scale textures suffer from intrinsic trade-offs that make it difficult to optimize both growth and transport at once. Here we present a conceptually different design approach—based on principles derived from Namib desert beetles, cacti, and pitcher plants—that synergistically combines these aspects of condensation and substantially outperforms other synthetic surfaces. Inspired by an unconventional interpretation of the role of the beetle’s bumpy surface geometry in promoting condensation, and using theoretical modelling, we show how to maximize vapour diffusion fluxat the apex of convex millimetric bumps by optimizing the radius of curvature and cross-sectional shape. Integrating this apex geometry with a widening slope, analogous to cactus spines, directly couples facilitated droplet growth with fast directional transport, by creating a free-energy profile that drives the droplet down the slope before its growth rate can decrease. This coupling is further enhanced by a slippery, pitcher-plant-inspired nanocoating that facilitates feedback between coalescence-driven growth and capillary-driven motion on the way down. Bumps that are rationally designed to integrate these mechanisms are able to grow and transport large droplets even against gravity and overcome the effect of an unfavourable temperature gradient. We further observe an unprecedented sixfold-higher exponent of growth rate, faster onset, higher steady-state turnover rate, and a greater volume of water collected compared to other surfaces. We envision that this fundamental understanding and rational design strategy can be

  1. Escape Artists of the X Chromosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaton, Bradley P; Brown, Carolyn J

    2016-06-01

    Inactivation of one X chromosome in mammalian females achieves dosage compensation between XX females and XY males; however, over 15% of human X-linked genes continue to be expressed from the inactive X chromosome. New genomic methodologies have improved our identification and characterization of these escape genes, revealing the importance of DNA sequence, chromatin structure, and chromosome ultrastructure in regulating expression from an otherwise inactive chromosome. Study of these exceptions to the rule of silencing highlights the interconnectedness of chromatin and chromosome structure in X-chromosome inactivation (XCI). Recent advances also demonstrate the importance of these genes in sexually dimorphic disease risk, particularly cancer. PMID:27103486

  2. No neocentric activity on Aegilops markgrafii chromosome E.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, V

    2011-01-01

    Classical neocentromeres, proven mainly in Poaceae species, cause meiotic drive in higher plants. Here I present data indicating that the morphological stretching of a chromatin domain at the long arm of Aegilops markgrafii chromosome E during meiosis is not due to a supposed neocentric activity. The stretching is visible at the alien univalent in metaphase I and anaphase I pollen mother cells of Triticum aestivum--Ae. markgrafii monosomic addition line E and at one univalent of the 49-chromosome-containing plants containing the haploid Ae. markgrafii genome added to wheat. The absence of both centromeric histone variant CENH3 and attachment of spindle fibers, proven by immunostaining with antibodies against CENH3 and tubulin, respectively, revealed that the univalent elongation of chromosome E is not caused by a classical plant neocentromere. PMID:20720397

  3. Condensation of steam bubbles injected into sub-cooled water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bubble condensation plays an important role e.g. in sub-cooled boiling or steam injection into pools. Since the condensation rate is proportional to the interfacial area density, bubble size distributions have to be considered in an adequate modeling of the condensation process. The effect of bubble sizes was clearly shown in experimental investigations done previously at the TOPFLOW facility of FZD. Steam bubbles were injected into a sub-cooled upward pipe flow via orifices in the pipe wall located at different distances from measuring plane. 1 mm and 4 mm injection orifices were used to vary the initial bubble size distribution. Measurements were done using a wire-mesh sensor. Condensation is clearly faster in case of the injection via the smaller orifices, i.e. in case of smaller bubble sizes. In a previous work a simplified test solver, developed especially to test models for vertical pipe flow was used to simulate these effects. Now the results will be transferred to the CFD code CFX from ANSYS. Recently the Inhomogeneous MUSIG model was implemented into the code enabling the simulation of poly-dispersed flows including the effects of separation of small and large bubbles due to bubble size dependent lift force inversion. It allows to divide the dispersed phase into size classes regarding the mass as well as regarding the momentum balance. Up to now transfers between the classes in the mass balance can be considered only by bubble coalescence and breakup (population balance). Now an extension of the model is proposed to include the effects due to phase transfer. The paper focuses on the derivation of equations for the extension of the Inhomogeneous MUSIG model and presents a new experimental setup for the investigation on steam bubble condensation. (author)

  4. Extension of the inhomogeneous MUSIG model for bubble condensation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► The inhomogenous MUSIG model allows 3D simulations for poly-dispersed bubbly flows. ► The model is now extended to consider flows with phase transfer. ► Experimental data for the condensation of steam bubbles in sub-cooled vertical pipe flow are used for validation. ► There is a good agreement between experimental data and CFD simulations with the ANSYS-CFX code. - Abstract: Bubble condensation plays an important role, e.g. in sub-cooled boiling or steam injection into pools. Since the condensation rate is proportional to the interfacial area density, bubble size distributions have to be considered in an adequate modeling of the condensation process. The effect of bubble sizes was clearly shown in experimental investigations done previously at the TOPFLOW facility of FZD. Steam bubbles were injected into a sub-cooled upward pipe flow via orifices in the pipe wall located at different distances from measuring plane. 1 mm and 4 mm injection orifices were used to vary the initial bubble size distribution. Measurements were done using a wire-mesh sensor. Condensation is clearly faster in case of the injection via the smaller orifices, i.e. in case of smaller bubble sizes. Recently the Inhomogeneous MUSIG model was implemented into the CFD code CFX from ANSYS enabling the simulation of poly-dispersed flows including the effects of separation of small and large bubbles due to bubble size dependent lift force inversion. It allows to divide the dispersed phase into size classes regarding the mass as well as regarding the momentum balance. Up to now transfers between the classes in the mass balance can be considered only by bubble coalescence and breakup (population balance). Here an extension of the model is proposed to include the effects due to phase transfer. The paper focuses on the derivation of equations for the extension of the Inhomogeneous MUSIG model and presents some first results for verification and validation.

  5. Adults with Chromosome 18 Abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soileau, Bridgette; Hasi, Minire; Sebold, Courtney; Hill, Annice; O'Donnell, Louise; Hale, Daniel E; Cody, Jannine D

    2015-08-01

    The identification of an underlying chromosome abnormality frequently marks the endpoint of a diagnostic odyssey. However, families are frequently left with more questions than answers as they consider their child's future. In the case of rare chromosome conditions, a lack of longitudinal data often makes it difficult to provide anticipatory guidance to these families. The objective of this study is to describe the lifespan, educational attainment, living situation, and behavioral phenotype of adults with chromosome 18 abnormalities. The Chromosome 18 Clinical Research Center has enrolled 483 individuals with one of the following conditions: 18q-, 18p-, Tetrasomy 18p, and Ring 18. As a part of the ongoing longitudinal study, we collect data on living arrangements, educational level attained, and employment status as well as data on executive functioning and behavioral skills on an annual basis. Within our cohort, 28 of the 483 participants have died, the majority of whom have deletions encompassing the TCF4 gene or who have unbalanced rearrangement involving other chromosomes. Data regarding the cause of and age at death are presented. We also report on the living situation, educational attainment, and behavioral phenotype of the 151 participants over the age of 18. In general, educational level is higher for people with all these conditions than implied by the early literature, including some that received post-high school education. In addition, some individuals are able to live independently, though at this point they represent a minority of patients. Data on executive function and behavioral phenotype are also presented. Taken together, these data provide insight into the long-term outcome for individuals with a chromosome 18 condition. This information is critical in counseling families on the range of potential outcomes for their child. PMID:25403900

  6. Quantum tunnelling in condensed media

    CERN Document Server

    Kagan, Yu

    1992-01-01

    The essays in this book deal with of the problem of quantum tunnelling and related behavior of a microscopic or macroscopic system, which interacts strongly with an ""environment"" - this being some form of condensed matter. The ""system"" in question need not be physically distinct from its environment, but could, for example, be one particular degree of freedom on which attention is focussed, as in the case of the Josephson junction studied in several of the papers. This general problem has been studied in many hundreds, if not thousands, of articles in the literature, in contexts as diverse

  7. Velocity condensation for magnetotactic bacteria

    CERN Document Server

    Rupprecht, Jean-Francois; Bocquet, Lydéric

    2015-01-01

    Magnetotactic swimmers tend to align along magnetic field lines against stochastic reorientations. We show that the swimming strategy, e.g. active Brownian motion versus run-and-tumble dynamics, strongly affects the orientation statistics. The latter can exhibit a velocity condensation whereby the alignment probability density diverges. As a consequence, we find that the swimming strategy affects the nature of the phase transition to collective motion, indicating that L\\'evy run-and-tumble walks can outperform active Brownian processes as strategies to trigger collective behavior.

  8. Velocity Condensation for Magnetotactic Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupprecht, Jean-François; Waisbord, Nicolas; Ybert, Christophe; Cottin-Bizonne, Cécile; Bocquet, Lydéric

    2016-04-22

    Magnetotactic swimmers tend to align along magnetic field lines against stochastic reorientations. We show that the swimming strategy, e.g., active Brownian motion versus run-and-tumble dynamics, strongly affects the orientation statistics. The latter can exhibit a velocity condensation whereby the alignment probability density diverges. As a consequence, we find that the swimming strategy affects the nature of the phase transition to collective motion, indicating that Lévy run-and-tumble walks can outperform active Brownian processes as strategies to trigger collective behavior. PMID:27152825

  9. Dropwise Condensation on Hydrophobic Cylinders

    CERN Document Server

    Park, Kyoo-Chul; Hoang, Michelle; McManus, Brendan; Aizenberg, Joanna

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we studied the effect of the diameter of horizontal hydrophobic cylinders on droplet growth. We postulate that the concentration gradient created by natural convection around a horizontal circular cylinder is related to the droplet growth on the cylinder by condensation. We derive a simple scaling law of droplet growth and compare it with experimental results. The predicted negative exponent of drop diameter (d) as a function of cylinder diameter (D) at different time points is similar to the general trend of experimental data. Further, this effect of cylinder diameter on droplet growth is observed to be stronger than the supersaturation conditions created by different surface temperatures.

  10. Spinor Bose–Einstein condensates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An overview of the physics of spinor and dipolar Bose–Einstein condensates (BECs) is given. Mean-field ground states, Bogoliubov spectra, and many-body ground and excited states of spinor BECs are discussed. Properties of spin-polarized dipolar BECs and those of spinor–dipolar BECs are reviewed. Some of the unique features of the vortices in spinor BECs such as fractional vortices and non-Abelian vortices are delineated. The symmetry of the order parameter is classified using group theory, and various topological excitations are investigated based on homotopy theory. Some of the more recent developments in a spinor BEC are discussed.

  11. Tachyon Condensation on Noncommutative Torus

    CERN Document Server

    Bars, Itzhak; Matsuo, Y; Takayanagi, T

    2001-01-01

    We discuss noncommutative solitons on a noncommutative torus and their application to tachyon condensation. In the large B limit, they can be exactly described by the Powers-Rieffel projection operators known in the mathematical literature. The resulting soliton spectrum is consistent with T-duality and is surprisingly interesting. It is shown that an instability arises for any D-branes, leading to the decay into many smaller D-branes. This phenomenon is the consequence of the fact that K-homology for type II von Neumann factor is labeled by R.

  12. Spinor Bose–Einstein condensates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawaguchi, Yuki, E-mail: kawaguchi@ap.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Physics, University of Tokyo, Hongo 7-3-1, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Ueda, Masahito, E-mail: ueda@phys.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Physics, University of Tokyo, Hongo 7-3-1, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); ERATO Macroscopic Quantum Control Project, JST, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan)

    2012-11-01

    An overview of the physics of spinor and dipolar Bose–Einstein condensates (BECs) is given. Mean-field ground states, Bogoliubov spectra, and many-body ground and excited states of spinor BECs are discussed. Properties of spin-polarized dipolar BECs and those of spinor–dipolar BECs are reviewed. Some of the unique features of the vortices in spinor BECs such as fractional vortices and non-Abelian vortices are delineated. The symmetry of the order parameter is classified using group theory, and various topological excitations are investigated based on homotopy theory. Some of the more recent developments in a spinor BEC are discussed.

  13. Velocity Condensation for Magnetotactic Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupprecht, Jean-François; Waisbord, Nicolas; Ybert, Christophe; Cottin-Bizonne, Cécile; Bocquet, Lydéric

    2016-04-01

    Magnetotactic swimmers tend to align along magnetic field lines against stochastic reorientations. We show that the swimming strategy, e.g., active Brownian motion versus run-and-tumble dynamics, strongly affects the orientation statistics. The latter can exhibit a velocity condensation whereby the alignment probability density diverges. As a consequence, we find that the swimming strategy affects the nature of the phase transition to collective motion, indicating that Lévy run-and-tumble walks can outperform active Brownian processes as strategies to trigger collective behavior.

  14. Spontaneous and Stimulated Leukaemogenesis in Mice of the AKR Strain with 38 or 40 Chromosomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At the present time the precise role of chromosome anomalies in the development of cancers is still the subject of controversy in many respects. Some authorities regard chromosome anomalies as the result of the occurrence of tumours, while those subscribing to the theory of somatic mutations regard them as being the first stage thereof. An increased incidence of leukaemias has in fact been observed in people with various chromosome anomalies, such as trisomy 21. The part played by these chromosome anomalies has been studied in the development of spontaneous leukaemias or leukaemias stimulated by exposure to ionizing radiations, as observed in mice of the AKR strain. Mice of this strain normally have 40 chromosomes. The authors were able, some time ago, to isolate a substrain which only has 38 chromosomes (AKR/Tl Ald) due to centromeric fusion of two acrocentric chromosomes. The possible effect of this chromosome change has been studied by comparing, in the two cases, the incidence of lymphoid leukaemias and their period of latency in irradiated and non-irradiated individuals. To stimulate leukaemogenesis the authors adopted the technique of Professor Duplan in which a whole-body dose of 175 R was administered to 30-day-old mice four times at seven-day intervals. The leukaemia diagnosis was established by dissection carried out immediately after death, and in doubtful cases by a histological study. The results obtained are discussed in relation to the theories on the role of chromosome anomalies in carcinogenesis. (author)

  15. Sex chromosome aneuploidy in cytogenetic findings of referral patients from south of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Najmeh Jouyan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chromosome abnormality (CA including Sex chromosomes abnormality (SCAs is one of the most important causes of disordered sexual development and infertility. SCAs formed by numerical or structural alteration in X and Y chromosomes, are the most frequently CA encountered at both prenatal diagnosis and at birth. Objective: This study describes cytogenetic findings of cases suspected with CA referred for cytogenetic study. Materials and Methods: Blood samples of 4151 patients referred for cytogenetic analysis were cultured for chromosome preparation. Karyotypes were prepared for all samples and G-Banded chromosomes were analyzed using x100 objective lens. Sex chromosome aneuploidy cases were analyzed and categorized in two groups of Turners and Klinefelter’s syndrome (KFS. Results: Out of 230 (5.54% cases with chromosomally abnormal karyotype, 122 (30% cases suspected of sexual disorder showed SCA including 46% Turner’s syndrome, 46% KFS and the remaining other sex chromosome abnormalities. The frequency of classic and mosaic form of Turner’s syndrome was 33% and 67%, this was 55% and 45% for KFS, respectively. Conclusion: This study shows a relatively high sex chromosome abnormality in this region and provides cytogenetic data to assist clinicians and genetic counselors to determine the priority of requesting cytogenetic study. Differences between results from various reports can be due to different genetic background or ethnicity.

  16. Chromosomal abnormalities among children born with conotruncal cardiac defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lammer, Edward J.; Chak, Jacqueline S.; Iovannisci, David M.; Schultz, Kathleen; Osoegawa, Kazutoyo; Yang, Wei; Carmichael, Suzan L.; Shaw, Gary M.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND Conotruncal heart defects comprise 25%-30% of non-syndromic congenital heart defects. This study describes the frequency of chromosome abnormalities and microdeletion 22q11 associated with conotruncal heart malformations. METHODS From a population base of 974,579 infants/fetuses delivered, 622 Californian infants/fetuses were ascertained with a defect of aortico-pulmonary septation. Infants whose primary cardiac defect was tetralogy of Fallot (n=296) or D-transposition of the great vessels (n=189) were screened for microdeletions of 22q11. RESULTS Fourteen (2.3%) of the 622 infants/fetuses had chromosomal abnormalities. Thirty infants, 10% of those whose primary defect was tetralogy of Fallot, had chromosome 22q11 microdeletions. Right aortic arch, abnormal branching patterns of the major arteries arising from the thoracic aorta, and pulmonary artery abnormalities were observed more frequently in these children. CONCLUSIONS We found an unusual number of infants with an extra sex chromosome and a conotruncal defect. Infants with tetralogy of Fallot due to 22q11 microdeletion showed more associated vascular anomalies than infants with tetralogy but no 22q11 microdeletion. Although these associated vascular anomalies provide clues as to which infants with tetralogy of Fallot are more likely to carry the microdeletion, the overall risk of 10% among all infants with tetralogy of Fallot warrants chromosome analysis and FISH testing routinely. PMID:19067405

  17. Recombination of an intrachromosomal paracentric insertion of chromosome 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Best, R.G.; Burnett, W.J.; Brock, J.K. [Univ. of South Carolina School of Medicine, Columbia, SC (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Cytogenetic studies were initiated on a newborn female due to multiple congenital anomalies including microcephaly, clinodactyly, abnormal positioning of hands, left facial palsy, heart defect, sacral dimple, and facial dysmorphic features. Facial features were described as low set rotated ears, nystagmus, and a small, flattened nose. A structural rearrangement of the long arm of chromosome 3 was observed with a complex banding pattern. Study of parental chromosomes revealed a normal male pattern for the father, and an intrachromosomal insertion on the long arm of chromosome 3 for the mother described as 46,XX,dir ins(3)(q21q23q26.2). Further characterization of the proband`s structurally abnormal chromosome 3 revealed a karyotype best described as: 46,XX,rec(3),dupq23{r_arrow}q26.2::q21{r_arrow}q23,dir ins(3)(q21q23q26.2), which is a partial duplication of both the inserted segment as well as the intervening segment between the inserted segment and the insertion site. This would appear to be the result of a three-strand double cross-over within the insertion loop. Molecular cytogenetic studies are presently underway to further elucidate chromosome structure of the proband and her mother.

  18. Making chromosome abnormalities treatable conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cody, Jannine DeMars; Hale, Daniel Esten

    2015-09-01

    Individuals affected by the classic chromosome deletion syndromes which were first identified at the beginning of the genetic age, are now positioned to benefit from genomic advances. This issue highlights five of these conditions (4p-, 5p-, 11q-, 18p-, and 18q-). It focuses on the increased in understanding of the molecular underpinnings and envisions how these can be transformed into effective treatments. While it is scientifically exciting to see the phenotypic manifestations of hemizygosity being increasingly understood at the molecular and cellular level, it is even more amazing to consider that we are now on the road to making chromosome abnormalities treatable conditions. PMID:26351122

  19. Sex ratio in normal and disomic sperm: Evidence that the extra chromosome 21 preferentially segregates with the Y chromosome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffin, D.K.; Millie, E.A.; Hassold, T.J. [Case Western Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States)]|[Univ. Hospitals of Cleveland, OH (United States)] [and others

    1996-11-01

    In humans, deviations from a 1:1 male:female ratio have been identified in both chromosomally normal and trisomic live births: among normal newborns there is a slight excess of males, among trisomy 18 live borns a large excess of females, and among trisomy 21 live borns an excess of males. These differences could arise from differential production of or fertilization by Y- or X-bearing sperm or from selection against male or female conceptions. To examine the proportion of Y- and X- bearing sperm in normal sperm and in sperm disomic for chromosomes 18 or 21, we used three-color FISH (to the X and Y and either chromosome 18 or chromosome 21) to analyze > 300,000 sperm from 24 men. In apparently normal sperm, the sex ratio was nearly 1:1 (148,074 Y-bearing to 148,657 X-bearing sperm), and the value was not affected by the age of the donor. Certain of the donors, however, had significant excesses of Y- or X-bearing sperm. In disomy 18 sperm, there were virtually identical numbers of Y- and X-bearing sperm; thus, the excess of females in trisomy 18 presumably is due to selection against male trisomic conceptions. In contrast, we observed 69 Y-bearing and 44 X-bearing sperm disomic for chromosome 21. This is consistent with previous molecular studies, which have identified an excess of males among paternally derived cases of trisomy 21, and suggests that some of the excess of males among Down syndrome individuals is attributable to a nondisjunctional mechanism in which the extra chromosome 21 preferentially segregates with the Y chromosome. 17 refs., 2 tabs.

  20. Afghanistan from a Y-chromosome perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacau, Harlette; Gayden, Tenzin; Regueiro, Maria; Chennakrishnaiah, Shilpa; Bukhari, Areej; Underhill, Peter A; Garcia-Bertrand, Ralph L; Herrera, Rene J

    2012-10-01

    Central Asia has served as a corridor for human migrations providing trading routes since ancient times. It has functioned as a conduit connecting Europe and the Middle East with South Asia and far Eastern civilizations. Therefore, the study of populations in this region is essential for a comprehensive understanding of early human dispersal on the Eurasian continent. Although Y- chromosome distributions in Central Asia have been widely surveyed, present-day Afghanistan remains poorly characterized genetically. The present study addresses this lacuna by analyzing 190 Pathan males from Afghanistan using high-resolution Y-chromosome binary markers. In addition, haplotype diversity for its most common lineages (haplogroups R1a1a*-M198 and L3-M357) was estimated using a set of 15 Y-specific STR loci. The observed haplogroup distribution suggests some degree of genetic isolation of the northern population, likely due to the Hindu Kush mountain range separating it from the southern Afghans who have had greater contact with neighboring Pathans from Pakistan and migrations from the Indian subcontinent. Our study demonstrates genetic similarities between Pathans from Afghanistan and Pakistan, both of which are characterized by the predominance of haplogroup R1a1a*-M198 (>50%) and the sharing of the same modal haplotype. Furthermore, the high frequencies of R1a1a-M198 and the presence of G2c-M377 chromosomes in Pathans might represent phylogenetic signals from Khazars, a common link between Pathans and Ashkenazi groups, whereas the absence of E1b1b1a2-V13 lineage does not support their professed Greek ancestry. PMID:22510847

  1. Using Chromosomes to Teach Evolution: Chromosomal Rearrangements in Speciation Events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Offner, Susan

    1994-01-01

    Uses diagrams to aid in discussing how the English map of the human chromosomes, published by Offner in 1993, can be used to illustrate some important questions in evolution, as well as give students a glimpse into some of the mechanisms underlying evolutionary change. (ZWH)

  2. ON DAMPING COEFFICIENT DUE TO PHASE TRANSFORMATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Din-YuHSIEH

    2003-01-01

    The damping coefficient of capillary waves due to the evaporation-condensation process at the interface of the two phases of a fluid is evaluated. To highlight the mechanism of the effect of heat and mass transfer across the interface between regions of liquid and vapor, potential flow of incompressible fluids are assumed. Thus other mechanisms of damping are neglected. To fascilitate the analysis, the method of multiple-scale is employed in the analysis, even though the problem is linear.

  3. Chromosomal abnormalities in spontaneous abortion after assisted reproductive treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim You

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We evaluated cytogenetic results occurring with first trimester pregnancy loss, and assessed the type and frequency of chromosomal abnormalities after assisted reproductive treatment (ART and compared them with a control group. We also compared the rate of chromosomal abnormalities according to infertility causes in ICSI group. Methods A retrospective cohort analysis was made of all patients who were referred to the Genetics Laboratory of Fertility Center of CHA Gangnam Medical Center from 2005 to 2009 because of clinical abortion with a subsequent dilation and evacuation (D&E performed, and patients were grouped by type of conception as follows: conventional IVF (in vitro fertilization (n = 114, ICSI (intracytoplasmic sperm injection (n = 140, and control (natural conception or intrauterine insemination [IUI] (n = 128. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS software. Results A total 406 specimens were referred to laboratory, ten abortuses were excluded, and in 14 cases, we did not get any spontaneous metaphase, chromosomal constitutions of 382 specimens were successfully obtained with conventional cytogenetic methods. Overall, 52.62% of the miscarriages were found to be cytogenetically abnormal among all patients, the frequency was 48.4% in the control group, 54.3% of miscarriages after ICSI and 55.3% after conventional IVF (p = 0.503. The most prevalent abnormalities were autosomal trisomy, however, nine (11.69% sex chromosome aneuploidy were noted in the ICSI group vs. four (6.45% and two (3.23% cases in the conventional IVF group and control group. We compared chromosomal abnormalities of miscarriages after ICSI according to infertility factor. 55.71% underwent ICSI due to male factors, 44.29% due to non-male factors. ICSI group having male factors showed significantly higher risk of chromosomal abnormalities than ICSI group having non-male factors (65.8% vs. 34.2%, p = 0.009, odds ratio = 1.529, 95% CI = 1

  4. Numerical simulation of condensation phase change flow in an inclined tube with bend

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jo, Jong Chull; Shin, Byung Soo; Do, Kyu Sik [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Yong Kap [Anflux Co., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-15

    The new PWR design named APR+ incorporates a passive auxiliary feedwater system (PAFS) as shown in Fig.1. The PAFS consists of two separate divisions. Each division is equipped with one passive condensation heat exchanger (PCHX), isolation or drain or vent valves, check valves, instrumentation and control, and pipes. It is aligned to feed condensed water to its corresponding steam generator (SG). During the PAFS normal operation, steam being produced in the SG secondary side by the residual heat moves up due to buoyancy force and then flows into the PCHX where steam is condensed on the inner surface of the tubes of which the outer surfaces are cooled by the water stored in the passive condensation cooling tank (PCCT). The condensate is passively fed into the SG economizer by gravity. Because the thermal hydraulic characteristics in the PCHT determine the condensation mass rate and the possibility of system instability and water hammer, it is important to understand the condensation phase change flow in the PCHT. This paper presents a numerical simulation of the condensation phase change flow in the PCHX adopted for the APR+ PAFS.

  5. An Experimental Study of the Dropwise Condensation on Physically Processed Surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent research by Kawakubo et al. derived empirical condensation heat transfer correlation suitable for wider range of operating condition in presence of non-condensable gas. However, their proposals of PCCS are focused on plane tube surface. To design better PCCS heat exchanger with high heat transfer coefficient new treatment on condensation surface can be considered in order to maintain dropwise condensation, the heat transfer coefficient of which has an order of magnitude larger than those of film condensation. Advanced research measure dropwise condensation heat transfer coefficient of Au and Cr coated surface based on number of droplet and droplet growth rate. However, coated surface is not desirable in power plant due to its duration of few years. On the other hand, physical processing (micro holes and patterns) on stainless steel and titanium surface is expected to perform better heat transfer, also is durable for the whole reactor lifetime. Since there is no published research about dropwise condensation for physically processed surface on SUS and Ti, the purposes of this research are to measure the condensation heat transfer coefficient and analyze its mechanism of enhanced heat transfer of treated SUS and Ti commonly used to nuclear plant. In the comparison of theoretical equation and experiment, it shows same result that heat transfer coefficient is proportional to maximum droplet diameter power to -0.321. Moreover, in the comparison of bare and processed surface, heat transfer coefficient decreases in processed surface

  6. Experimental and analytical investigations of the effectiveness of the building condenser of the SWR 1000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Within the frame of this work, the thermalhydraulic behaviour of the building condenser was investigated experimentally and analytically under the boundary conditions during accidents using conservative assumptions. A total of 81 steady-state experiments were performed in the NOKO test facility at the Institute for Safety Research and Reactor Technology (ISR) at the Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH. NOKO was especially constructed for the investigation of the effectiveness of passive safety systems. In the tests, the heat transfer at the finned tubes of the building condenser due to condensation of steam was investigated. The influence of the non-condensable gases oxygen and helium and their concentration was examined for two different designs of the condenser (with/without trough and with/without fall pipe). An empirical correlation was developed using the experimental data to be able to calculate the capacity of the condenser bundle as a function of the total pressure and the mass or volumetric fraction of the non-condensable gases oxygen and helium in the gas mixture which flows to the condenser. (orig./GL)

  7. Numerical simulation of condensation phase change flow in an inclined tube with bend

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The new PWR design named APR+ incorporates a passive auxiliary feedwater system (PAFS) as shown in Fig.1. The PAFS consists of two separate divisions. Each division is equipped with one passive condensation heat exchanger (PCHX), isolation or drain or vent valves, check valves, instrumentation and control, and pipes. It is aligned to feed condensed water to its corresponding steam generator (SG). During the PAFS normal operation, steam being produced in the SG secondary side by the residual heat moves up due to buoyancy force and then flows into the PCHX where steam is condensed on the inner surface of the tubes of which the outer surfaces are cooled by the water stored in the passive condensation cooling tank (PCCT). The condensate is passively fed into the SG economizer by gravity. Because the thermal hydraulic characteristics in the PCHT determine the condensation mass rate and the possibility of system instability and water hammer, it is important to understand the condensation phase change flow in the PCHT. This paper presents a numerical simulation of the condensation phase change flow in the PCHX adopted for the APR+ PAFS

  8. Activated hydrotalcites as solid base catalysts in aldol condensations

    OpenAIRE

    Roelofs, J.C.A.A.

    2002-01-01

    The development of new catalytic materials and routes to replace environmentally unacceptable processes in the fine chemical industry is emerging due to stringent legislation. Replacement of currently applied alkali bases in liquid-phase aldol condensations can result in diminishing of waste water streams, less corrosion and catalyst re-use. The chosen candidate for this is the anionic clay hydrotalcite (HT), which shows promising results after activation. However, why a treated HT is catalyt...

  9. Calculation in Orifice Plate of CEFR Condensate Water Recycling System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG; Yi-min

    2012-01-01

    <正>In order to avoid condensation water pump occurring cavitation due to the flow is too small and affect the normal operation of pump when the startup or shutdown in the unit, low load or accident under empty load operation, recirculation loop should maintain a certain flow, to ensure that the shaft seal heater has enough cooling water, recirculation flow is not less than 20 t/h.

  10. Spin-Mixing Interferometry with Bose-Einstein Condensates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabbrielli, Marco; Pezzè, Luca; Smerzi, Augusto

    2015-10-16

    Unstable spinor Bose-Einstein condensates are ideal candidates to create nonlinear three-mode interferometers. Our analysis goes beyond the standard SU(1,1) parametric approach and therefore provides the regime of parameters where sub-shot-noise sensitivities can be reached with respect to the input total average number of particles. Decoherence due to particle losses and finite detection efficiency are also considered. PMID:26550872

  11. Condensation of interphase chromatin in nuclei of synchronized chinese hamster ovary (CHO-K1) cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gacsi, Mariann; Nagy, Gabor; Pinter, Gabor; Basnakian, Alexei G; Banfalvi, Gaspar

    2005-01-01

    Reversibly permeabilized cells have been used to visualize interphase chromatin structures in the presence and absence of biotinylated nucleotides. By reversing permeabilization, it was possible to confirm the existence of a flexible chromatin folding pattern through a series of transient geometric forms such as supercoiled, circular forms, chromatin bodies, thin and thick fibers, and elongated chromosomes. Our results show that the incorporation of biotin-11-dUTP interferes with chromatin condensation, leading to the accumulation of decondensed chromatin structures. Chromatin condensation without nucleotide incorporation was also studied in cell populations synchronized by centrifugal elutriation. After reversal of permeabilization, nuclei were isolated and chromatin structures were visualized after DAPI staining by fluorescent microscopy. Decondensed veil-like structures were observed in the early S phase (at an average C-value of 2.21), supercoiled chromatin later in the early S (2, 55 C), fibrous structures in the early mid S phase (2, 76 C), ribboned structures in the mid-S phase (2, 98 C), continuous chromatin strings later in the mid-S phase (3,28), elongated prechromosomes in the late S-phase (3, 72 C), precondensed chromosomes at the end and after the S phase (3, 99 C). Fluorescent microscopy revealed that neither interphase nor metaphase chromosomes are separate entities but form a linear array arranged in a semicircle. Linear arrangement was confirmed by computer image analysis. PMID:15684719

  12. Characterization of chromosome structures of Falconinae (Falconidae, Falconiformes, Aves) by chromosome painting and delineation of chromosome rearrangements during their differentiation

    OpenAIRE

    Nishida, Chizuko; Ishijima, Junko; KOSAKA, Ayumi; Tanabe, Hideyuki; Habermann, Felix A.; Griffin, Darren K.; MATSHUDA, Yoichi; 秀之, 田辺

    2008-01-01

    Karyotypes of most bird species are characterized by around 2n = 80 chromosomes, comprising 7–10 pairs of large- and medium-sized macrochromosomes including sex chromosomes and numerous morphologically indistinguishable microchromosomes. The Falconinae of the Falconiformes has a different karyotype from the typical avian karyotype in low chromosome numbers, little size difference between macrochromosomes and a smaller number of microchromosomes. To characterize chromosome structures of Falcon...

  13. Characterization of chromosome structures of Falconinae (Falconidae, Falconiformes, Aves) by chromosome painting and delineation of chromosome rearrangements during their differentiation

    OpenAIRE

    Nishida, Chizuko; Ishijima, Junko; KOSAKA, Ayumi; Tanabe, Hideyuki; Habermann, Felix A.; Griffin, Darren K.; Matsuda, Yoichi

    2008-01-01

    Karyotypes of most bird species are characterized by around 2n = 80 chromosomes, comprising 7Y10 pairs of large- and medium-sized macrochromosomes including sex chromosomes and numerous morphologically indistinguishable microchromosomes. The Falconinae of the Falconiformes has a different karyotype from the typical avian karyotype in low chromosome numbers, little size difference between macrochromosomes and a smaller number of microchromosomes. To characterize chromosome structures of Falcon...

  14. Dynamics of vertebrate sex chromosome evolution: from equal size to giants and dwarfs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schartl, Manfred; Schmid, Michael; Nanda, Indrajit

    2016-06-01

    The Y and W chromosomes of mammals and birds are known to be small because most of their genetic content degenerated and were lost due to absence of recombination with the X or Z, respectively. Thus, a picture has emerged of ever-shrinking Ys and Ws that may finally even fade into disappearance. We review here the large amount of literature on sex chromosomes in vertebrate species and find by taking a closer look, particularly at the sex chromosomes of fishes, amphibians and reptiles where several groups have evolutionary younger chromosomes than those of mammals and birds, that the perception of sex chromosomes being doomed to size reduction is incomplete. Here, sex-determining mechanisms show a high turnover and new sex chromosomes appear repeatedly. In many species, Ys and Ws are larger than their X and Z counterparts. This brings up intriguing perspectives regarding the evolutionary dynamics of sex chromosomes. It can be concluded that, due to accumulation of repetitive DNA and transposons, the Y and W chromosomes can increase in size during the initial phase of their differentiation. PMID:26715206

  15. Steam condensation systems in reactor isolation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To enable stabilized operation of the steam condensating system in a BWR type nuclear power plant by the control of the water level in a residual heat removing heat exchanger. Constitution: In a steam condensating system comprising a residual heat removing heat exchanger (RHRHX) for receiving steams upon rapid stop of a main turbine, a cooling turbine in reactor isolation (RCIC turbine), and a cooling pump sucking condensated water from RHRHX and condensates from the RCIC turbine and recycling them to a reactor container, the water level in RHRHX is controlled by the pressure signal from a suction pipeway of the cooling pump and the water from the condensator that condensates steams from the gland of the RCIC turbine is fed to the locations other than the suction pipe, for example, to a pressure suppression chamber by a drain pump. (Furukawa, Y.)

  16. Condensing Heat Recovery of Centrifugal Chiller

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GONG Guang-cai; JIAO Jun-jun; WANG Li-ping; ZENG Wei

    2009-01-01

    To a kind of centrifugal water chiUer with R22 and about 1745 kW of cooling capacity.a heat exchanger was added between the outlet of compressor and original condenser to get part of or all the condensing heat.Condensing heat can be recovered by compound condensing method,which adopts air-cooling model+wa-ter-cooling model or water-cooling model+water-cooling model at the condensing side of the system.By exergy analysis and experiment research on compound condensing heat recovery of centrifugal chiller,the results are ob-tained that the capability of the whole system increases,the energy efficiency ratio (EER) becomes 3.2~5.0 from 2.2~3.4, which implies the EER increases about 1.0~1.5,the exergy efficiency increases about 10%,and the chiller runs more stably after reformation.

  17. The physics of exciton-polariton condensates

    CERN Document Server

    Lagoudakis, Konstantinos

    2013-01-01

    In 2006 researchers created the first polariton Bose-Einstein condensate at 19K in the solid state. Being inherently open quantum systems, polariton condensates open a window into the unpredictable world of physics beyond the “fifth state of matter”: the limited lifetime of polaritons renders polariton condensates out-of-equilibrium and provides a fertile test-bed for non-equilibrium physics. This book presents an experimental investigation into exciting features arising from this non-equilibrium behavior. Through careful experimentation, the author demonstrates the ability of polaritons to synchronize and create a single energy delocalized condensate. Under certain disorder and excitation conditions the complete opposite case of coexisting spatially overlapping condensates may be observed. The author provides the first demonstration of quantized vortices in polariton condensates and the first observation of fractional vortices with full phase and amplitude characterization. Finally, this book investigate...

  18. Bio-oil fractionation and condensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Robert C; Jones, Samuel T; Pollard, Anthony

    2013-07-02

    A method of fractionating bio-oil vapors which involves providing bio-oil vapors comprising bio-oil constituents is described. The bio-oil vapors are cooled in a first stage which comprises a condenser having passages for the bio-oil separated by a heat conducting wall from passages for a coolant. The coolant in the condenser of the first stage is maintained at a substantially constant temperature, set at a temperature in the range of 75 to 100.degree. C., to condense a first liquid fraction of liquefied bio-oil constituents in the condenser of the first stage. The first liquid fraction of liquified bio-oil constituents from the condenser in the first stage is collected. Also described are steps for subsequently recovering further liquid fractions of liquefied bio-oil constituents. Particular compositions of bio-oil condensation products are also described.

  19. Contribution of cloud condensate to surface rainfall process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Yushu; CUI Xiaopeng; LI Xiaofan

    2006-01-01

    Contribution of cloud condensate to surface rainfall processes is investigated in a life span of tropical convection based on hourly data from a two-dimensional cloud resolving simulation. The model is forced by the large-scale vertical velocity, zonal wind and horizontal advections obtained from tropical ocean global atmosphere coupled ocean-atmosphere response experiment (TOGA COARE). The results show that during the genesis, development, and decay of tropical convection, calculations with water vapor overestimate surface rain rate, and cloud condensate plays an important role in correcting overestimation in surface rain rates. The analysis is carried out in deep convective clouds and anvil clouds during the development of tropical convection. The surface rain rates calculated with water vapor in deep convective clouds and anvil clouds have similar magnitudes, the large surface rain rate appears in deep convective clouds due to the consumption of water hydrorneteors whereas the small surface rain rate occurs in anvil clouds because of the gain of ice hydrometeors. Further analysis of the grid data shows that the surface rain rates calculated with water vapor and with cloud condensate are negatively correlated with the correlation coefficient of - 0.85, and the surface rain rate calculated with cloud condensate is mainly contributed to the water hydrometeors in the tropical deep convective regime.

  20. Condensate cleaning-up method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Upon cleaning-up condensates by filtration through thread-like hollow porous membranes in BWR type reactors, the thread-like hollow porous membranes used have average pore size of 0.01 - 1 μm and porosity of 40 to 80 % , having ionic exchange capacity corresponding to 0.05 to 2 meq of sulfonic groups introduced per one gram of the thread-like hollow porous membranes, in which the sulfonic groups at the outer surface are in the form of salts of non-dissociating metals. By using the thread-like hollow porous membranes capable of satisfying such conditions, it is possible to prevent the formation of solid-like iron deposited to the inner and the outer surfaces of the thread-like hollow membranes even when the condensates in a nuclear power plant are filtered for a long period of time. Further, since there is no scarce reduction in the water permeation rate, stable operation is possible. (T.M.)

  1. Muonic Chemistry in Condensed Matter

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    When polarized muons (@m|+) stop in condensed matter, muonic atoms are formed in the final part of their range, and direct measurements of the @m|+-spin polarization are possible via the asymmetric decay into positrons. The hyperfine interaction determines the characteristic precession frequencies of the @m|+ spin in muonium, @w(Mu). Such frequencies can be altered by the interactions of the muonium's electron spin with the surrounding medium. The measurement of @w(Mu) in a condensed system is known often to provide unique information regarding the system. \\\\ \\\\ In particular, the use of muonium atoms as a light isotope of the simple reactive radical H|0 allows the investigation of fast reactions of radicals over a typical time scale 10|-|9~@$<$~t~@$<$~10|-|5~sec, which is determined by the instrumental resolution at one end and by the @m|+ lifetime at the other. \\\\ \\\\ In biological macromolecules transient radicals, such as the constituents of DNA itself, exist on a time scale of sub-microseconds, acco...

  2. Condensation induced water hammer safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Condensation induced water hammer events in piping systems can cause catastrophic steam system failures which can result in equipment damage, personal injury, and even death. As an industry, we have learned to become accustomed to the ''banging'' that we often hear in our steam piping systems, and complacent in our actions to prevent it. It is unfortunate that lives are lost needlessly, as this type of water hammer event is preventable if one only applies some basic principles when operating and maintaining their steam systems. At the U. S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site where I work, there was one such accident that occurred in 1993 which took the life of a former co-worker and friend of mine. Hanford was established as part of the Manhattan Project during World War II. it is a 560 square mile complex located along the banks of the Columbia River in Southeastern Washington State. For almost 45 years, hanford's mission was to produce weapons grade plutonium for our nations defense programs. Today, Hanford no longer produces plutonium, but is focused on site clean-up and economic diversification. Hanford still uses steam for heating and processing activities, utilizing over 20 miles of piping distribution systems similar to those found in industry. Although these aging systems are still sound, they cannot stand up to the extreme pressure pulses developed by a condensation induced water hammer

  3. Active condensation of water by plants

    OpenAIRE

    Prokhorov Alexey Anatolievich

    2013-01-01

    This paper is devoted to some peculiarities of water condensation on the surface of plants . Arguments in support of the hypothesis that in decreasing temperature of leaves and shoots below the dew point, the plant can actively condense moisture from the air, increasing the duration of dewfall are presented. Evening dewfall on plant surfaces begins before starting the formation of fog. Morning condensation continues for some time after the air temperature exceeds the dew point . The phenomen...

  4. Droplet condensation on polymer surfaces: a review

    OpenAIRE

    UÇAR, İkrime Orkan; ERBİL, Hüsnü Yıldırım

    2013-01-01

    Dropwise condensation on substrates is an important topic of interest because it plays a crucial role in many scientific applications such as heat transfer, water harvesting from the humid atmosphere, and polymer templating. We focused on droplet condensation on polymer surfaces and briefly summarized the drop condensation studies reported in the last 2 decades and their potential applications. The main topics discussed in this review are water harvesting from dew using radiative ...

  5. Dual quark condensate and dressed Polyakov loops

    OpenAIRE

    Bilgici, Erek; Bruckmann, Falk; Gattringer, Christof; Hagen, Christian

    2008-01-01

    We construct a new order parameter for finite temperature QCD by considering the quark condensate for U(1)-valued temporal boundary conditions for the fermions. Fourier transformation with respect to the boundary condition defines the dual condensate. This quantity corresponds to an equivalence class of Polyakov loops, thereby being an order parameter for the center symmetry. We explore the duality relation between the quark condensate and these dressed Polyakov loops numerically, using quenc...

  6. Thermodynamics of Bose-Condensed Atomic Hydrogen

    OpenAIRE

    B. Pozzi; Salasnich, L.; A. Parola; Reatto, L.

    2000-01-01

    We study the thermodynamics of the Bose-condensed atomic hydrogen confined in the Ioffe-Pritchard potential. Such a trapping potential, that models the magnetic trap used in recent experiments with hydrogen, is anharmonic and strongly anisotropic. We calculate the ground-state properties, the condensed and non-condensed fraction and the Bose-Einstein transition temperature. The thermodynamics of the system is strongly affected by the anharmonicity of this external trap. Finally, we consider t...

  7. Non nodal condensation of eigenvalue problems

    OpenAIRE

    Mackens, Wolfgang; Voss, Heinrich

    1997-01-01

    We generalize the Guyan condensation of large symmetric eigenvalue problems to allow general degrees of freedom to be master variables. On one hand useful information from other condensation methods (such as Component Mode Synthesis) thus can be incorporated into the method. On the other hand this opens the way to iterative refinement of eigenvector approximations. Convergence of such a procedure follows from the result, that one step of (static) condensation is equivalent to one step of inve...

  8. Structure of Nonlocal Vacuum Condensate of Quarks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周丽娟; 马维兴

    2003-01-01

    The Dyson-Schwinger formalism is used to derive a fully dressed quark propagator. By use of the derived form of the quark propagator, the structure of non-local quark vacuum condensate is studied, and the values of local quark vacuum condensate as well as quark gluon mixed condensate are calculated. The theoretical predictions are in good agreement with the empirical one used commonly in the literature.

  9. Polyelectrolyte Condensation Induced by Linear Cations

    OpenAIRE

    Guáqueta, Camilo; Luijten, Erik

    2007-01-01

    We examine the role of the condensing agent in the formation of polyelectrolyte bundles, via grand-canonical Monte Carlo simulations. Following recent experiments we use linear, rigid divalent cations of various lengths to induce condensation. Our results clarify and explain the experimental results for short cations. For longer cations we observe novel condensation behavior owing to alignment of the cations. We also study the role of the polyelectrolyte surface charge density, and find a non...

  10. Bose-Einstein condensation of 84Sr.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez de Escobar, Y N; Mickelson, P G; Yan, M; DeSalvo, B J; Nagel, S B; Killian, T C

    2009-11-13

    We report Bose-Einstein condensation of (84)Sr in an optical dipole trap. Efficient laser cooling on the narrow intercombination line and an ideal s-wave scattering length allow the creation of large condensates (N(0) approximately 3 x 10(5)) even though the natural abundance of this isotope is only 0.6%. Condensation is heralded by the emergence of a low-velocity component in time-of-flight images. PMID:20365965

  11. Bose-Einstein Condensation of 84-Sr

    OpenAIRE

    de Escobar, Y. N. Martinez; Mickelson, P. G.; Yan, M; DeSalvo, B. J.; Nagel, S. B.; Killian, T. C.

    2009-01-01

    We report Bose-Einstein condensation of 84-Sr in an optical dipole trap. Efficient laser cooling on the narrow intercombination line and an ideal s-wave scattering length allow creation of large condensates (N0 ~ 3x10^5) even though the natural abundance of this isotope is only 0.6%. Condensation is heralded by the emergence of a low-velocity component in time-of-flight images.

  12. Mathematical glimpse on the Y chromosome degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobo, M. P.

    2006-04-01

    The Y chromosomes are genetically degenerate and do not recombine with their matching partners X. Non-recombination of XY pairs has been pointed out as the key factor for the degeneration of the Y chromosome. The aim here is to show that there is a mathematical asymmetry in sex chromosomes which leads to the degeneration of Y chromosomes even in the absence of XX and XY recombination. A model for sex-chromosome evolution in a stationary regime is proposed. The consequences of their asymmetry are analyzed and lead us to a couple of conclusions. First, Y chromosome degeneration shows up sqrt{2} more often than X chromosome degeneration. Second, if nature prohibits female mortalities from beeing exactly 50%, then Y chromosome degeneration is inevitable.

  13. Condensator cleaning device and operation method therefor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a BWR type power generating facility, an iodine removing filter is disposed to the exhaustion side of a condensator vacuum pump for exhausting gases in a turbine condensator. After shutting down a plant, a condensator vacuum breakable valve is opened, and air is supplied to the condensator to reach atmospheric pressure. Then, the vacuum breakable valve is closed, a vacuum pump is operated to evacuate the inside of the condensator. The air at the top end of a secondary pipeline and equipments expands in association with the pressure reduction, so that radioactive iodine in the pipelines and equipments flows out to a gas phase of the condensator. During evacuating operation of the condensator, predetermined valves are operated so that exhausted gases from the vacuum pump pass through the iodine removing filter. The radioactive iodine discharged from the condensator is adsorbed to the iodine removing filter, and then it is released from an exhaustion pipe. Then, the vacuum breakable valve is opened again, and the condensator and equipments of the secondary pipeline are brought to the state of atmospheric pressure. (I.N.)

  14. Advances in modelling of condensation phenomena

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, W.S.; Zaltsgendler, E. [Ontario Hydro Nuclear, Toronto (Canada); Hanna, B. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Pinawa, Manitoba (Canada)

    1997-07-01

    The physical parameters in the modelling of condensation phenomena in the CANDU reactor system codes are discussed. The experimental programs used for thermal-hydraulic code validation in the Canadian nuclear industry are briefly described. The modelling of vapour generation and in particular condensation plays a key role in modelling of postulated reactor transients. The condensation models adopted in the current state-of-the-art two-fluid CANDU reactor thermal-hydraulic system codes (CATHENA and TUF) are described. As examples of the modelling challenges faced, the simulation of a cold water injection experiment by CATHENA and the simulation of a condensation induced water hammer experiment by TUF are described.

  15. CHROMOSOMAL MULTIPLICITY IN BURKHOLDERIA CEPACIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    We have used CHEF gel electrophoresis to screen preparations of large DNA from different Burkholderia cepacia isolates for the presence of DNA species corresponding to the linearized forms of the three chromosomes of 3.4,2.5, and 0.9 Mb identified in B. cepacia strain 17616. DNA ...

  16. Vibrio chromosome-specific families

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lukjancenko, Oksana; Ussery, David

    2014-01-01

    We have compared chromosome-specific genes in a set of 18 finished Vibrio genomes, and, in addition, also calculated the pan- and core-genomes from a data set of more than 250 draft Vibrio genome sequences. These genomes come from 9 known species and 2 unknown species. Within the finished...

  17. Radiotherapeutical chromosomal aberrations in laryngeal cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stošić-Divjak Svetlana L.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The authors present the results of cytogenetic analysis of 21 patients with laryngeal carcinomas diagnosed and treated in the period 1995-2000 at the Institute of Otorhinolaryngology and Maxillofacial Surgery, Clinical Center of Serbia and Clinical Center of Novi Sad. Material and methods. The patients were specially monitored and the material was analyzed at the Institute of Human Genetics of the School of Medicine in Belgrade as well as in the Laboratory for Radiological Protection of the Institute of Occupational and Radiological Health 'Dr Dragomir Karajovic' in Belgrade. Results. The incidence of chromosomal aberrations and incidence of exchange of material between sister chromatids were observed in the preparation of the metaphasic lymphocyte chromosomes of the peripheral blood obtained in the culture. Structural aberrations were found on the chromosomes in the form of breakups, rings, translocations and dicentrics as early as after a single exposure of patients to tumor radiation dose of 2 Gy in the field sized 5x7. Out of the total number of 35 cultivated blood samples obtained from 13 patients, 21 were successfully cultivated and they were proved to contain chromosomal aberrations. Some of the peripheral blood samples failed to show cell growth in vitro due to the lethal cell damages in vivo. Discussion.. We have consluded that the number of structural aberrations cannot be used as a biological measure of the absorbed ionizing radiation dose. The presence of aberrations per se is indicative of the mutagenic effect of the ionizing radiation, which was also confirmed in our series on the original model by cultivation of the peripheral blood lymphocytes in the culture of the cells of the volunteer donors upon in vitro radiation. Using the method of bromdeoxyuridylreductase, the increased incidence of SCE as a mutagenic effect was registered. Conclusion. It has been concluded that the increase of absorbed radiation dose in

  18. A condensed global photochemical mechanism for two-dimensional atmospheric models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamaresis, J.; Kinnison, D.E.; Wuebbles, D.J.

    1991-01-01

    A condensed chemical mechanism that represents the reactions of organic compounds in the atmosphere is developed and tested using a one-dimensional model. Due to the differences between the full and condensed mechanisms, the reduced version cannot be considered an accurate predictor of globally important trace species concentrations. The condensed mechanism must be improved before it can be used with confidence in two-dimensional models. Appendix contains both full and reduced mechanisms of photolysis and thermal reactions as well as species profile comparisons. 3 refs., 8 figs.

  19. Quantum threshold for optomechanical self-structuring in a Bose-Einstein condensate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robb, G R M; Tesio, E; Oppo, G-L; Firth, W J; Ackemann, T; Bonifacio, R

    2015-05-01

    Theoretical analysis of the optomechanics of degenerate bosonic atoms with a single feedback mirror shows that self-structuring occurs only above an input threshold that is quantum mechanical in origin. This threshold also implies a lower limit to the size (period) of patterns that can be produced in a condensate for a given pump intensity. These thresholds are interpreted as due to the quantum rigidity of Bose-Einstein condensates, which has no classical counterpart. Above the threshold, the condensate self-organizes into an ordered supersolid state with a spatial period self-selected by optical diffraction. PMID:25978236

  20. Spin Polarized versus Chiral Condensate in Quark Matter at Finite Temperature and Density

    CERN Document Server

    Matsuoka, H; da Providencia, J; Providencia, C; Yamamura, M; Bohr, H

    2016-01-01

    It is shown that the spin polarized condensate appears in quark matter at high baryon density and low temperature due to the tensor-type four-point interaction in the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio-type model as a low energy effective theory of quantum chromodynamics. It is indicated within this low energy effective model that the chiral symmetry is broken again by the spin polarized condensate as increasing the quark number density, while the chiral symmetry restoration occurs in which the chiral condensate disappears at a certain density.

  1. Depletion of superfluidity in a disordered non-equilibrium quantum condensate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janot, Alexander; Rosenow, Bernd [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Universitaet Leipzig, 04009 Leipzig (Germany); Hyart, Timo [Institute of Physics, Leiden University, Niels Bohrweg 2, 2333 CA Leiden (Netherlands); Eastham, Paul [School of Physics, Trinity College, Dublin 2 (Ireland)

    2013-07-01

    Observations of quantum coherence in driven systems, e.g. polariton condensates, have strongly stimulated experimental as well as theoretical efforts during the last decade. We analyze the superfluid stiffness of a non-equilibrium quantum-condensate in a disordered environment taking gain and loss of particles into account. To this end a modified effective Gross-Pitaevskii equation is employed. We find that the disorder-driven depletion of superfluidity is strongly enhanced due to the gain-loss mechanism. It turns out that the condensate remains stiff at finite length scales only.

  2. Stability of magnetic condensation and mass generation for confinement in SU(2) Yang-Mills theory

    CERN Document Server

    Kondo, Kei-Ichi

    2013-01-01

    In the framework of the functional renormalization group, we reexamine the stability of the Yang-Mills vacuum with a chromomagnetic condensation. We show that the Nielsen-Olesen instability of the Savvidy vacuum with a homogeneous chromomagnetic condensation disappears in the $SU(2)$ Yang-Mills theory. As a physical mechanism for maintaining the stability even for the small infrared cutoff, we argue that dynamical gluon mass generation occurs due to a BRST-invariant vacuum condensate of mass dimension-two, which is related to two-gluon bound states identified with glueballs. These results support the dual superconductor picture for quark confinement.

  3. Multicolor spectral karyotyping of human chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröck, E; du Manoir, S; Veldman, T; Schoell, B; Wienberg, J; Ferguson-Smith, M A; Ning, Y; Ledbetter, D H; Bar-Am, I; Soenksen, D; Garini, Y; Ried, T

    1996-07-26

    The simultaneous and unequivocal discernment of all human chromosomes in different colors would be of significant clinical and biologic importance. Whole-genome scanning by spectral karyotyping allowed instantaneous visualization of defined emission spectra for each human chromosome after fluorescence in situ hybridization. By means of computer separation (classification) of spectra, spectrally overlapping chromosome-specific DNA probes could be resolved, and all human chromosomes were simultaneously identified. PMID:8662537

  4. Mechanisms of ring chromosome formation, ring instability and clinical consequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme Roberta S

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The breakpoints and mechanisms of ring chromosome formation were studied and mapped in 14 patients. Methods Several techniques were performed such as genome-wide array, MLPA (Multiplex Ligation-Dependent Probe Amplification and FISH (Fluorescent in situ Hybridization. Results The ring chromosomes of patients I to XIV were determined to be, respectively: r(3(p26.1q29, r(4(p16.3q35.2, r(10(p15.3q26.2, r(10(p15.3q26.13, r(13(p13q31.1, r(13(p13q34, r(14(p13q32.33, r(15(p13q26.2, r(18(p11.32q22.2, r(18(p11.32q21.33, r(18(p11.21q23, r(22(p13q13.33, r(22(p13q13.2, and r(22(p13q13.2. These rings were found to have been formed by different mechanisms, such as: breaks in both chromosome arms followed by end-to-end reunion (patients IV, VIII, IX, XI, XIII and XIV; a break in one chromosome arm followed by fusion with the subtelomeric region of the other (patients I and II; a break in one chromosome arm followed by fusion with the opposite telomeric region (patients III and X; fusion of two subtelomeric regions (patient VII; and telomere-telomere fusion (patient XII. Thus, the r(14 and one r(22 can be considered complete rings, since there was no loss of relevant genetic material. Two patients (V and VI with r(13 showed duplication along with terminal deletion of 13q, one of them proved to be inverted, a mechanism known as inv-dup-del. Ring instability was detected by ring loss and secondary aberrations in all but three patients, who presented stable ring chromosomes (II, XIII and XIV. Conclusions We concluded that the clinical phenotype of patients with ring chromosomes may be related with different factors, including gene haploinsufficiency, gene duplications and ring instability. Epigenetic factors due to the circular architecture of ring chromosomes must also be considered, since even complete ring chromosomes can result in phenotypic alterations, as observed in our patients with complete r(14 and r(22.

  5. Acoustic radiation from vortex–barrier interaction in atomic Bose–Einstein condensate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We examine the dynamics of a vortex dipole in the Bose–Einstein condensates of trapped dilute atomic gases at zero temperature in the presence of a Gaussian barrier potential. The density anisotropy induced by the barrier enhances the acoustic radiation from the vortex dipole. This is due to the deviation of the condensate density from the equipotential curves and variation in the curvature of the vortex dipole trajectory. Due to the acoustic radiation, the vortex dipole dissipates energy and spirals towards the edge of the condensate. As a result, we observe an increase in the vortex–antivortex annihilation events. To examine the effect of the Gaussian barrier, we estimate the correction to the Thomas–Fermi condensate density using the perturbation expansion method and the results are in very good agreement with the numerical results. (paper)

  6. Evolution of sex chromosomes ZW of Schistosoma mansoni inferred from chromosome paint and BAC mapping analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirai, Hirohisa; Hirai, Yuriko; LoVerde, Philip T

    2012-12-01

    Chromosomes of schistosome parasites among digenetic flukes have a unique evolution because they exhibit the sex chromosomes ZW, which are not found in the other groups of flukes that are hermaphrodites. We conducted molecular cytogenetic analyses for investigating the sex chromosome evolution using chromosome paint analysis and BAC clones mapping. To carry this out, we developed a technique for making paint probes of genomic DNA from a single scraped chromosome segment using a chromosome microdissection system, and a FISH mapping technique for BAC clones. Paint probes clearly identified each of the 8 pairs of chromosomes by a different fluorochrome color. Combination analysis of chromosome paint analysis with Z/W probes and chromosome mapping with 93 BAC clones revealed that the W chromosome of Schistosoma mansoni has evolved by at least four inversion events and heterochromatinization. Nine of 93 BAC clones hybridized with both the Z and W chromosomes, but the locations were different between Z and W chromosomes. The homologous regions were estimated to have moved from the original Z chromosome to the differentiated W chromosome by three inversions events that occurred before W heterohcromatinization. An inversion that was observed in the heterochromatic region of the W chromosome likely occurred after W heterochromatinization. These inversions and heterochromatinization are hypothesized to be the key factors that promoted the evolution of the W chromosome of S. mansoni. PMID:22831897

  7. Chromosome Aberrations by Heavy Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballarini, Francesca; Ottolenghi, Andrea

    It is well known that mammalian cells exposed to ionizing radiation can show different types of chromosome aberrations (CAs) including dicentrics, translocations, rings, deletions and complex exchanges. Chromosome aberrations are a particularly relevant endpoint in radiobiology, because they play a fundamental role in the pathways leading either to cell death, or to cell conversion to malignancy. In particular, reciprocal translocations involving pairs of specific genes are strongly correlated (and probably also causally-related) with specific tumour types; a typical example is the BCR-ABL translocation for Chronic Myeloid Leukaemia. Furthermore, aberrations can be used for applications in biodosimetry and more generally as biomarkers of exposure and risk, that is the case for cancer patients monitored during Carbon-ion therapy and astronauts exposed to space radiation. Indeed hadron therapy and astronauts' exposure to space radiation represent two of the few scenarios where human beings can be exposed to heavy ions. After a brief introduction on the main general features of chromosome aberrations, in this work we will address key aspects of the current knowledge on chromosome aberration induction, both from an experimental and from a theoretical point of view. More specifically, in vitro data will be summarized and discussed, outlining important issues such as the role of interphase death/mitotic delay and that of complex-exchange scoring. Some available in vivo data on cancer patients and astronauts will be also reported, together with possible interpretation problems. Finally, two of the few available models of chromosome aberration induction by ionizing radiation (including heavy ions) will be described and compared, focusing on the different assumptions adopted by the authors and on how these models can deal with heavy ions.

  8. Coupling of pion condensate, chiral condensate and Polyakov loop in an extended NJL model

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Zhao; Liu, Yu-Xin

    2006-01-01

    The Nambu Jona-Lasinio model with a Polyakov loop is extended to finite isospin chemical potential case, which is characterized by simultaneous coupling of pion condensate, chiral condensate and Polyakov loop. The pion condensate, chiral condensate and the Polyakov loop as functions of temperature and isospin chemical potential are investigated by minimizing the thermodynamic potential of the system. The resulting $(T,\\mu_I)$ phase diagram is studied with emphasis on the critical point and Po...

  9. A case of trisomy of chromosome 15

    OpenAIRE

    Coldwell, S; Fitzgerald, B.; Semmens, J.M.; Ede, R; Bateman, C

    1981-01-01

    We describe a case of trisomy of chromosome 15 in an infant who presented at birth with numerous abnormalities. As far as we are aware this chromosomal abnormality has not been described before. On the basis of this one case there appear to be no features which are specific to this chromosomal abnormality.

  10. Response of Cloud Condensation Nuclei (> 50 nm) to changes in ion-nucleation

    OpenAIRE

    Svensmark, Henrik; Enghoff, Martin B.; Pedersen, Jens Olaf Pepke

    2013-01-01

    In experiments where ultraviolet light produces aerosols from trace amounts of ozone, sulphur dioxide, and water vapour, the number of additional small particles produced by ionization by gamma sources all grow up to diameters larger than 50 nm, appropriate for cloud condensation nuclei. This result contradicts both ion-free control experiments and also theoretical models that predict a decline in the response of larger particles due to an insufficiency of condensable gases (which leads to sl...

  11. Development of the Prediction System of Condensation Based on Wireless Communications

    OpenAIRE

    Shin-Hyeong Choi

    2013-01-01

    Due to advances in microelectromechanical system (MEMS), many smart sensors have been developed. A large number of sensors build a wireless sensor network and can communicate with each other. Wireless sensor networks help monitor objects in our environment, and many researches about this technology are in progress. Condensation is a phenomenon that water vapor contained in the air condenses and makes water droplets. This is caused by the complex action of a variety of factors, including the t...

  12. Improvement of the technology of the gas treatment by the condensation method

    OpenAIRE

    Летюк, Євген Олександрович

    2014-01-01

    Natural gas treatment for transport using the condensation method is considered in the paper. The main objective of the study is to examine the possibilities of decreasing the amount of low-pressure gases, produced when reducing hydrocarbon condensate, separated from natural gas, to the standard conditions. Decreasing the amount of these gases becomes possible due to introducing a portion of the treated natural gas in a gas-liquid flow before the final stage separator in the gas treatment pla...

  13. Dynamics of bright matter-wave solitons in inhomogeneous cigar-type Bose-Einstein condensate

    OpenAIRE

    Abdullaev, F. Kh.; Gammal, A.; Tomio, L.

    2002-01-01

    We discuss the possible observation of a new type of standing nonlinear atomic matter wave in the condensate: the nonlinear impurity mode. It is investigated dynamical effects of a bright soliton in Bose-Einstein-condensed (BEC) systems with local space variations of the two-body atomic scattering length. A rich dynamics is observed in the interaction between the soliton and an inhomogeneity. Processes as trapping, reflection and transmission of the bright matter soliton due to the impurity a...

  14. Superfluid properties of a Bose-Einstein condensate in an optical lattice confined in a cavity

    OpenAIRE

    Bhattacherjee, A. B.

    2007-01-01

    We study the effect of a one dimensional optical lattice in a cavity field with quantum properties on the superfluid dynamics of a Bose-Einstein condensate(BEC). In the cavity the influence of atomic backaction and the external driving pump become important and strongly modify the optical potential. Due to the strong coupling between the condensate wavefunction and the cavity modes, the cavity light field develops a band structure. This study reveals that the pump and the cavity emerges as a ...

  15. External Water Condensation and Angular Solar Absorptance : Theoretical Analysis and Practical Experience of Modern Windows

    OpenAIRE

    Werner, Anna

    2007-01-01

    Part I of this thesis is a theoretical background to parts II and III. Part II treats the phenomenon of decreased visibility through a glazing due to external water condensation, dew, on the external surface. Some simulations are presented where it is shown that under certain circumstances condensation can be expected. A combination of coatings on the external surface is suggested to overcome the problem of external condesation. It consists of both a coating which decreases the emissivity of ...

  16. New Technology-Driven Approaches in the Design of Preamplifiers for Condenser Microphones

    OpenAIRE

    Haas-Christensen, Jelena; Bruun, Erik; Andreani, Pietro; Stenberg, Lars J.; Rombach, Pirmin

    2009-01-01

    The topic of this thesis is the design of CMOS preamplifiers for condenser microphones. Increasingly popular type of condenser microphones are MEMS (micro-electro-mechanical) microphones which pose a stringent requirements to the design of interface electronics among other due to their increased noise. Besides that, as MEMS microphones are easy to integrate with CMOS circuitry, CMOS circuit design gains importance because it can contribute to the overall improved performance of the system by ...

  17. C-banding and fluorescent in situ hybridization with rDNA sequences in chromosomes of Cycloneda sanguinea Linnaeus (Coleoptera, Coccinellidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliane Mariza Dortas Maffei

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to describe mitotic and meiotic chromosomes of Cycloneda sanguinea using C-banding, fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH rDNA probes, and sequential FISH/Ag-NOR staining. The chromosome number was 2n = 18 + XX for females and 2n = 18 + Xy for males. The X chromosome was metacentric and the Y chromosome was very small. During meiosis, the karyotypic meioformula was n = 9 + Xy p, and sex chromosomes configured a parachute at metaphase I. At the beginning of pachytene, bivalents were still individualized, and sex chromosomes were associated end-to-end through the heteropycnotic region of the X chromosome. Later in pachytene, further condensation led to the formation of a pseudo-ring by the sex bivalent. All chromosomes showed pericentromeric heterochromatin. FISH and sequential FISH/Ag-NOR staining evidenced the location of the nucleolar organizer region in one pair of autosomes (at spermatogonial metaphase. During meiosis, these genes were mapped to a region outside the sex vesicle by FISH, although Xy p was deeply stained with silver at metaphase I. These results suggest that these argyrophilic substances are of a nucleolar protein nature, and seem to be synthesized by a pair of autosomes and imported during meiosis (prophase I to the sex pair, during the association of the sex chromosomes.

  18. Detection of dinoflagellates by the light scattering properties of the chiral structure of their chromosomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the most prominent properties of dinoflagellates is their large sized and highly chromosome-laden nucleus, which contains dozens of cylindrically shaped chromosomes. With such high chromatic concentration, these chromosomes condense into ordered helical structures and were claimed to be responsible for the large circular polarization effects observed in the light scattering from dinoflagellates. In previous research, a thin helix model of a chromosome was used to compare the Discrete Dipole Approximation (DDA) and the analytical Born approximation calculations. However, for such a simplified model only modest qualitative agreements with experimental measurements were achieved. Moreover, only one chromosome in one nucleus was simulated, overlooking the effects of interactions between chromosomes. In this work, we adopt the helical plywood liquid crystal model with a capsule shape, in which parallel fibrils lie in plains perpendicular to the helix axis and the orientations of these fibrils twist at a constant angle between two neighboring layers. The ADDA code is applied to calculate the 16 Mueller matrix elements of light scattering from a single chromosome and from the nucleus, which is composed of a collection of randomly positioned and randomly orientated chromosomes. Special attention is paid to the S14 Mueller matrix element, which describes the ability of differentiating left and right circularly polarized light. Our results show that large S14 back scattering signals from the dinoflagellate nucleus results from the underlying helical structures of its chromosomes. These signals are sensitive to the light wavelength and pitch of the chromatic helix, the latter of which is species specific. Therefore, detecting back scattering S14 signal could be a promising method to monitor dinoflagellates such as Karenia brevis, the causal agent of the Florida red tide. -- Highlights: ► The nucleus of dinoflagellate is modeled by using the Plywood cholesteric model

  19. Homologous recombination, sister chromatid cohesion, and chromosome condensation in mammalian meiosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eijpe, M.

    2002-01-01

    In the life cycle of sexually reproducing eukaryotes, haploid and diploid generations of cells alternate. Two types of cell division occur in such a life cycle: mitosis and meiosis. They are compared in chapter 1 . Haploid and diploid cells can multiply by mitoses.

  20. A Physical Model for the Condensation and Decondensation of Eukaryotic Chromosomes

    OpenAIRE

    Mozziconacci, Julien; Lavelle, Christophe; Barbi, Maria; Lesne, Annick; Victor, Jean-Marc

    2005-01-01

    During the eukaryotic cell cycle, chromatin undergoes several conformational changes, which are believed to play key roles in gene expression regulation during interphase, and in genome replication and division during mitosis. In this paper, we propose a scenario for chromatin structural reorganization during mitosis, which bridges all the different scales involved in chromatin architecture, from nucleosomes to chromatin loops. We build a model for chromatin, based on available data, taking i...

  1. Instanton, monopole condensation and confinement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The confinement mechanism in the nonperturbative QCD is studied in terms of topological excitation as QCD-monopoles and instantons. In the 't Hooft abelian gauge, QCD is reduced into an abelian gauge theory with monopoles, and the QCD vacuum can be regarded as the dual superconductor with monopole condensation, which leads to the dual Higgs mechanism. The monopole-current theory extracted from QCD is found to have essential features of confinement. We find also close relation between monopoles and instantons using the lattice QCD. In this framework, the lowest 0++ glueball (1.5∝1.7 GeV) can be identified as the QCD-monopole or the dual Higgs particle. (orig.)

  2. Kaon Condensation in Dense Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Carlson, J; Pandharipande, V R

    2001-01-01

    The kaon energy in neutron matter is calculated analytically with the Klein-Gordon equation, by making a Wigner-Seitz cell approximation and employing a $K^-N$ square well potential. The transition from the low density Lenz potential, proportional to scattering length, to the high density Hartree potential is found to begin at fairly low densities. Exact non-relativistic calculations of the kaon energy in a simple cubic crystal of neutrons are used to test the Wigner-Seitz and the Ericson-Ericson approximation methods. All the calculations indicate that by $\\sim 4$ times nuclear matter density the Hartree limit is reached, and as the Hartree potential is less attractive, the density for kaon condensation appears to higher than previously estimated. Effects of a hypothetical repulsive core in the $K^-N$ potential are also studied.

  3. Simple approximations for condensational growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kostinski, A B [Michigan Technological University, 1400 Townsend Drive, Houghton, MI 49931-1200 (United States)], E-mail: alex.kostinski@mtu.edu

    2009-01-15

    A simple geometric argument relating to the liquid water content of clouds is given. The phase relaxation time and the nature of the quasi-steady approximation for the diffusional growth of cloud drops are elucidated directly in terms of water vapor concentration. Spatial gradients of vapor concentration, inherent in the notion of quasi-steady growth, are discussed and we argue for an occasional reversal of the traditional point of view: rather than a drop growing in response to a given supersaturation, the observed values of the supersaturation in clouds are the result of a vapor field adjusting to droplet growth. Our perspective is illustrated by comparing the exponential decay of condensation trails with a quasi-steady regime of cirrus clouds. The role of aerosol loading in decreasing relaxation times and increasing the rate of growth of the liquid water content is also discussed.

  4. DEHYDRATION CONDENSATION IN AQUEOUS SOLUTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinman, Gary; Kenyon, Dean H.; Calvin, Melvin

    1965-04-01

    EARLIER investigations have demonstrated that di-cyandiamide (DCDA), the dimer of cyanamide, can successfully promote the dehydration condensation of: (1) glucose and orthophosphate to give glucose-6-phosphate; (2) adenosine and orthophosphate to give adenosine-5'-monophosphate; (3) orthophosphate to give pyrophosphate; (4) alanine to give alanylalanine and alanylalanylalanine. These reactions were carried out in dilute aqueous solutions in the dark. (It was also demonstrated that the combination of ultra-violet light and dicyandiamide could promote the synthesis of dipeptides. This observation has since been confirmed by other investigators.) These experiments were designed to demonstrate one possible means by which such compounds could have been formed on the prebiotic Earth, thus providing materials needed for the origin of living systems. Dicyandiamide itself could have been, present on the primitive Earth as was demonstrated with the ultra-violet irradiation of cyanide solution.

  5. Condensation on Slippery Asymmetric Bumps

    CERN Document Server

    Park, Kyoo-Chul; He, Neil; Aizenberg, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    Bumps are omnipresent from human skin to the geological structures on planets, which offer distinct advantages in numerous phenomena including structural color, drag reduction, and extreme wettability. Although the topographical parameters of bumps such as radius of curvature of convex regions significantly influence various phenomena including anti-reflective structures and contact time of impacting droplets, the effect of the detailed bump topography on growth and transport of condensates have not been clearly understood. Inspired by the millimetric bumps of the Namib Desert beetle, here we report the identified role of radius of curvature and width of bumps with homogeneous surface wettability in growth rate, coalescence and transport of water droplets. Further rational design of asymmetric convex topography and synergetic combination with slippery coating simultaneously enable self-transport, leading to unseen five-fold higher growth rate and an order of magnitude faster shedding time of droplets compared...

  6. Fermion Condensate as Higgs substitute

    CERN Document Server

    Cynolter, G

    2011-01-01

    A dynamical symmetry breaking model of electroweak interactions is investigated based on strongly interacting fermions. Vector-like fermions of different representations of the weak SU(2) form a symmetry breaking condensate and generate the lepton and quark masses. The weak gauge bosons get their usual standard model masses from a gauge invariant effective Lagrangian of a doublet scalar field composed of the new fermion fields. Gap equations are derived and the conditions for finding a symmetry breaking solution are presented. The parameters of the model are constrained further by perturbative unitarity. The oblique electroweak corrections only slightly constrain the model. It is shown that the new charged fermions are produced at the next linear colliders in large number and the cross section for the LHC is presented.

  7. Nucleation and condensation model development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fry, H.; Lyman, J.; Breshears, D.; Zerkle, D.; Wilson, C.; Hewitt, C.; Gallegos, D.

    1996-09-01

    This is a final report of a one-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The purpose of this project was to bring to maturity a theoretical and experimental capability of the Laboratory to perform basic research in nucleation and condensation of water vapor. This report provides a general description of this capability and summarizes specific work in two areas: development and use of a combustive flow facility (CFF) to measure water monomer depletion in a supersonic nozzle and nucleation pulse experiments for investigation of transport effects on water droplet growth dynamics. The later work was performed in collaboration with Dr. Wehrner Strey in Goettingen, Germany. Preliminary water absorption data from the CFF experiment are presented. The nucleation pulse data is described along with an analysis that shows under the condition of the experiment the growth rate of water droplets is limited by monomer diffusion.

  8. Positronium formation in condensed matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AMOC (age-momentum correlation) studies of the slowing-down of positronium in condensed matter have demonstrated that positronium formation does not require special sites (e.g., 'free volumes') and diffusion of thermalized e+ to these sites. The differences in the energies E0 at which ps becomes 'permanent' (i.e., does no longer break up into its constituents) between disordered (e.g., organic liquids) and highly ordered (e.g., rare-gas crystals) Ps-formers are explained by the different character of the forces acting on the constituents. It is proposed that information on the break-up may be obtained from the relaxation of the positron spin polarization and that very long slowing-down times may be investigated by ACAR-based AMOC measurements. (orig.)

  9. Sex chromosome complement influences operant responding for a palatable food in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seu, E; Groman, S M; Arnold, A P; Jentsch, J D

    2014-07-01

    The procurement and consumption of palatable, calorie-dense foods is influenced by the nutritional and hedonic value of foods. Although many factors can influence the control over behavior by foods rich in sugar and fat, emerging evidence indicates that biological sex may play a particularly crucial role in the types of foods individuals seek out, as well as the level of motivation individuals will exert to obtain those foods. However, a systematic investigation of food-seeking and consumption that disentangles the effects of the major sex-biasing factors, including sex chromosome complement and organizational and activational effects of sex hormones, has yet to be conducted. Using the four core genotypes mouse model system, we separated and quantified the effects of sex chromosome complement and gonadal sex on consumption of and motivation to obtain a highly palatable solution [sweetened condensed milk (SCM)]. Gonadectomized mice with an XY sex chromosome complement, compared with those with two X chromosomes, independent of gonadal sex, appeared to be more sensitive to the reward value of the SCM solution and were more motivated to expend effort to obtain it, as evidenced by their dramatically greater expended effort in an instrumental task with progressively larger response-to-reward ratios. Gonadal sex independently affected free consumption of the solution but not motivation to obtain it. These data indicate that gonadal and chromosomal sex effects independently influence reward-related behaviors, contributing to sexually dimorphic patterns of behavior related to the pursuit and consumption of rewards. PMID:24861924

  10. Metaphase chromosome and nucleoid differences between CHO-K1 and its radiosensitive derivative xrs-5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell line xrs-5 is a radiation-sensitive mutant isolated from CHO-K1 cells. The radiation sensitivity is associated with a defect in DNA double-strand break rejoining. Chromatin structure also appears altered in xrs-5 cells compared to the parental CHO-K1 cells. Metaphase chromosomes from xrs-5 are more condensed in appearance than CHO-K1 chromosomes. The overcondensed look is not the result of colcemid sensitivity. Electron microscopy studies suggest that xrs-5 metaphase chromosomes have larger loops of chromatin extending out from the chromosome core. There are also differences between CHO-K1 and xrs-5 cells in the size and fluorescence pattern of ethidium bromide-stained nucleoid preparations. These results suggest that there is a fundamental difference between CHO-K1 and xrs-5 in either the organization of the supercoiled loops of DNA attached to the nuclear matrix or in the nature of the proteins that attach the DNA to the matrix. These alterations in chromosome structure may underlie, in part, the radiation sensitivity of xrs-5 cells

  11. Direct preparation protocol to obtain mitotic chromosomes from canine mammary tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morais, C S D; Affonso, P R A M; Bitencourt, J A; Wenceslau, A A

    2015-01-01

    Currently, mammary neoplasms in female canines are a serious problem in veterinary clinics. In addition, the canine species is an excellent disease model for human oncology because of the biological and genetic similarities between the species. Cytogenetics has allowed further study of the characterization of neoplasms in canines. We hypothesized that the use of a direct preparation protocol for mitotic chromosome analysis would provide a simple and low cost protocol for use in all laboratories. The objective of this method is to display in a few hours of dividing cells just like the time of collection since cell division in tissue can be obtained. Ten female canines with the spontaneous occurrence of mammary neoplasia were used to test a pioneering direct preparation protocol to obtain mitotic chromosomes. The excised breast tumor tissue fragments were subjected to the protocol consisting of treatment with colchicine, treatment with hypotonic solution, and fixation. Mitotic chromosomes were absent in cell suspensions of only two samples among the 10 materials analyzed, based on the analysis of five blades for each preparation obtained. So, the cell suspension obtained allowed for the observation of eight tissue samples viable for cytogenetic analysis, five of which had excellent numbers of mitotic chromosomes. However, the technique was unsuccessful in producing high-quality cell suspensions because of inadequate condensation and scattering of chromosomes. While adjustments to methodological procedures are needed, this protocol represents a low cost and simplified method to study the cytogenetics of canine tumors. PMID:26782592

  12. A Comprehensive Model of Electric-Field-Enhanced Jumping-Droplet Condensation on Superhydrophobic Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birbarah, Patrick; Li, Zhaoer; Pauls, Alexander; Miljkovic, Nenad

    2015-07-21

    Superhydrophobic micro/nanostructured surfaces for dropwise condensation have recently received significant attention due to their potential to enhance heat transfer performance by shedding positively charged water droplets via coalescence-induced droplet jumping at length scales below the capillary length and allowing the use of external electric fields to enhance droplet removal and heat transfer, in what has been termed electric-field-enhanced (EFE) jumping-droplet condensation. However, achieving optimal EFE conditions for enhanced heat transfer requires capturing the details of transport processes that is currently lacking. While a comprehensive model has been developed for condensation on micro/nanostructured surfaces, it cannot be applied for EFE condensation due to the dynamic droplet-vapor-electric field interactions. In this work, we developed a comprehensive physical model for EFE condensation on superhydrophobic surfaces by incorporating individual droplet motion, electrode geometry, jumping frequency, field strength, and condensate vapor-flow dynamics. As a first step toward our model, we simulated jumping droplet motion with no external electric field and validated our theoretical droplet trajectories to experimentally obtained trajectories, showing excellent temporal and spatial agreement. We then incorporated the external electric field into our model and considered the effects of jumping droplet size, electrode size and geometry, condensation heat flux, and droplet jumping direction. Our model suggests that smaller jumping droplet sizes and condensation heat fluxes require less work input to be removed by the external fields. Furthermore, the results suggest that EFE electrodes can be optimized such that the work input is minimized depending on the condensation heat flux. To analyze overall efficiency, we defined an incremental coefficient of performance and showed that it is very high (∼10(6)) for EFE condensation. We finally proposed mechanisms

  13. Statistical physics and condensed matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document is divided into 4 sections: 1) General aspects of statistical physics. The themes include: possible geometrical structures of thermodynamics, the thermodynamical foundation of quantum measurement, transport phenomena (kinetic theory, hydrodynamics and turbulence) and out of equilibrium systems (stochastic dynamics and turbulence). The techniques involved here are typical of applied analysis: stability criteria, mode decomposition, shocks and stochastic equations. 2) Disordered, glassy and granular systems: statics and dynamics. The complexity of the systems can be studied through the structure of their phase space. The geometry of this phase space is studied in several works: the overlap distribution can now be computed with a very high precision; the boundary energy between low lying states does not behave like in ordinary systems; and the Edward's hypothesis of equi-probability of low lying metastable states is invalidated. The phenomenon of aging, characteristic of glassy dynamics, is studied in several models. Dynamics of biological systems or of fracture is shown to bear some resemblance with that of disordered systems. 3) Quantum systems. The themes include: mesoscopic superconductors, supersymmetric approach to strongly correlated electrons, quantum criticality and heavy fermion compounds, optical sum rule violation in the cuprates, heat capacity of lattice spin models from high-temperature series expansion, Lieb-Schultz-Mattis theorem in dimension larger than one, quantum Hall effect, Bose-Einstein condensation and multiple-spin exchange model on the triangular lattice. 4) Soft condensed matter and biological systems. Path integral representations are invaluable to describe polymers, proteins and self-avoiding membranes. Using these methods, problems as diverse as the titration of a weak poly-acid by a strong base, the denaturation transition of DNA or bridge-hopping in conducting polymers have been addressed. The problems of RNA folding has

  14. Statistical physics and condensed matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-07-01

    This document is divided into 4 sections: 1) General aspects of statistical physics. The themes include: possible geometrical structures of thermodynamics, the thermodynamical foundation of quantum measurement, transport phenomena (kinetic theory, hydrodynamics and turbulence) and out of equilibrium systems (stochastic dynamics and turbulence). The techniques involved here are typical of applied analysis: stability criteria, mode decomposition, shocks and stochastic equations. 2) Disordered, glassy and granular systems: statics and dynamics. The complexity of the systems can be studied through the structure of their phase space. The geometry of this phase space is studied in several works: the overlap distribution can now be computed with a very high precision; the boundary energy between low lying states does not behave like in ordinary systems; and the Edward's hypothesis of equi-probability of low lying metastable states is invalidated. The phenomenon of aging, characteristic of glassy dynamics, is studied in several models. Dynamics of biological systems or of fracture is shown to bear some resemblance with that of disordered systems. 3) Quantum systems. The themes include: mesoscopic superconductors, supersymmetric approach to strongly correlated electrons, quantum criticality and heavy fermion compounds, optical sum rule violation in the cuprates, heat capacity of lattice spin models from high-temperature series expansion, Lieb-Schultz-Mattis theorem in dimension larger than one, quantum Hall effect, Bose-Einstein condensation and multiple-spin exchange model on the triangular lattice. 4) Soft condensed matter and biological systems. Path integral representations are invaluable to describe polymers, proteins and self-avoiding membranes. Using these methods, problems as diverse as the titration of a weak poly-acid by a strong base, the denaturation transition of DNA or bridge-hopping in conducting polymers have been addressed. The problems of RNA folding

  15. CFD simulation of water vapour condensation in the presence of non-condensable gas in vertical cylindrical condensers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun-De

    2013-02-01

    This paper presents the simulation of the condensation of water vapour in the presence of non-condensable gas using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) for turbulent flows in a vertical cylindrical condenser tube. The simulation accounts for the turbulent flow of the gas mixture, the condenser wall and the turbulent flow of the coolant in the annular channel with no assumptions of constant wall temperature or heat flux. The condensate film is assumed to occupy a negligible volume and its effect on the condensation of the water vapour has been taken into account by imposing a set of boundary conditions. A new strategy is used to overcome the limitation of the currently available commercial CFD package to solve the simultaneous simulation of flows involving multispecies and fluids of gas and liquid in separate channels. The results from the CFD simulations are compared with the experimental results from the literature for the condensation of water vapour with air as the non-condensable gas and for inlet mass fraction of the water vapour from 0.66 to 0.98. The CFD simulation results in general agree well with the directly measured quantities and it is found that the variation of heat flux in the condenser tube is more complex than a simple polynomial curve fit. The CFD results also show that, at least for flows involving high water vapour content, the axial velocity of the gas mixture at the interface between the gas mixture and the condensate film is in general not small and cannot be neglected. PMID:24850953

  16. Chromosomal instability in Streptomyces avermitilis: major deletion in the central region and stable circularized chromosome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen Ying

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The chromosome of Streptomyces has been shown to be unstable, frequently undergoing gross chromosomal rearrangements. However, the mechanisms underlying this phenomenon remain unclear, with previous studies focused on two chromosomal ends as targets for rearrangements. Here we investigated chromosomal instability of Streptomyces avermitilis, an important producer of avermectins, and characterized four gross chromosomal rearrangement events, including a major deletion in the central region. The present findings provide a valuable contribution to the mechanistic study of genetic instability in Streptomyces. Results Thirty randomly-selected "bald" mutants derived from the wild-type strain all contained gross chromosomal rearrangements of various types. One of the bald mutants, SA1-8, had the same linear chromosomal structure as the high avermectin-producing mutant 76-9. Chromosomes of both strains displayed at least three independent chromosomal rearrangements, including chromosomal arm replacement to form new 88-kb terminal inverted repeats (TIRs, and two major deletions. One of the deletions eliminated the 36-kb central region of the chromosome, but surprisingly did not affect viability of the cells. The other deletion (74-kb was internal to the right chromosomal arm. The chromosome of another bald mutant, SA1-6, was circularized with deletions at both ends. No obvious homology was found in all fusion sequences. Generational stability analysis showed that the chromosomal structure of SA1-8 and SA1-6 was stable. Conclusions Various chromosomal rearrangements, including chromosomal arm replacement, interstitial deletions and chromosomal circularization, occurred in S. avermitilis by non-homologous recombination. The finding of an inner deletion involving in the central region of S. avermitilis chromosome suggests that the entire Streptomyces chromosome may be the target for rearrangements, which are not limited, as previously

  17. The origin of human chromosome 2 analyzed by comparative chromosome mapping with a DNA microlibrary

    OpenAIRE

    Wienberg, Johannes; Jauch, Anna; Lüdecke, H J; Senger, G; Horsthemke, B; Claussen, U; Cremer, Thomas; Arnold, N.; Lengauer, Christoph

    1994-01-01

    Fluorescencein situ hybridization (FISH) of microlibraries established from distinct chromosome subregions can test the evolutionary conservation of chromosome bands as well as chromosomal rearrangements that occurred during primate evolution and will help to clarify phylogenetic relationships. We used a DNA library established by microdissection and microcloning from the entire long arm of human chromosome 2 for fluorescencein situ hybridization and comparative mapping of the chromosomes of ...

  18. Condensed Matter Theories - Volume 22

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinholz, Heidi; Röpke, Gerd; de Llano, Manuel

    2007-09-01

    pt. A. Fermi liquids. Pressure comparison between the spherical cellular model and the Thomas-Fermi model / G.A. Baker, Jr. Pair excitations and vertex corrections in Fermi fluids and the dynamic structure function of two-dimension 3He / H.M. Böhm, H. Godfrin, E. Krotscheck, H.J. Lauter, M. Meschke and M. Panholzer. Condensation of helium in wedges / E.S. Hernádez ... [et al.]. Non-Fermi liquid behavior from the Fermi-liquid approach / V.A. Khodel ... [et al.]. Theory of third sound and stability of thin 3He-4He superfluid films / E. Krotscheck and M.D. Miller. Pairing in asymmetrical Fermi systems / K.F. Quader and R. Liao. Ground-state properties of small 3He drops from quantum Monte Carlo simulations / E. Sola, J. Casulleras and J. Boronat. Ground-state energy and compressibility of a disordered two-dimensional electron gas / Tanatar ... [et al.]. Quasiexcitons in photoluminescence of incompressible quantum liquids / A. Wójs, A.G ladysiewicz and J.J. Quinn -- pt. B. Bose liquids. Quantum Boltzmann liquids / K.A. Gernoth, M L. Ristig and T. Lindenau. Condensate fraction in the dynamic structure function of Bose fluids / M. Saarela, F. Mazzanti and V. Apaja -- pt. C. Strongly-correlated electronic systems. Electron gas in high-field nanoscopic transport: metallic carbon nanotubes / F. Green and D. Neilson. Evolution and destruction of the Kondo effect in a capacitively coupled double dot system / D.E. Logan and M.R. Galpin. The method of increments-a wavefunction-based Ab-Initio correlation method for solids / B. Paulus. Fractionally charged excitations on frustrated lattices / E. Runge, F. Pollmann and P. Fulde. 5f Electrons in actinides: dual nature and photoemission spectra / G. Zwicknagl -- pt. D. Magnetism. Magnetism in disordered two-dimensional Kondo-Necklace / W. Brenig. On the de Haas-can Alphen oscillation in 2D / S. Fujita and D.L. Morabito. Dynamics in one-dimensional spin systems-density matrix reformalization group study / S. Nishimoto and M

  19. Confinement and flavor symmetry breaking via monopole condensation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We discuss dynamics of N=2 supersymmetric SU (nc) gauge theories with nf quark hypermultiplets. Upon N=1 perturbation of introducing a finite mass for the adjoint chiral multiplet, we show that the flavor U(nf) symmetry is dynamically broken to U(r) x U(nf - r), where r ≤ [nf/2] is an integer. This flavor symmetry breaking occurs due to the condensates of magnetic degrees of freedom which acquire flavor quantum numbers due to the quark zero modes. We briefly comment on the U Sp(2nc) gauge theories. This talk is based on works with Giuseppe Carlino and Ken Konishi. (author)

  20. COMBINED COOLING OF CONDENSATION UNIT OF VAPOR COMPRESSION REFRIGERATION STATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maksimenko V.A.

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In large refrigeration systems it is used to compose condensation node with water-cooled condensers. In actual conditions of deficit and increase of cooling water price it is appropriate combined cooling of condensation unit on existing and developed large refrigeration facilities. Combined cooling of condensation unit allows stabilizing the condensing pressure and significantly reducing the consumption of cooling water.