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Sample records for chromosome condensation due

  1. Establishment of a mouse model with misregulated chromosome condensation due to defective Mcph1 function.

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    Marc Trimborn

    Full Text Available Mutations in the human gene MCPH1 cause primary microcephaly associated with a unique cellular phenotype with premature chromosome condensation (PCC in early G2 phase and delayed decondensation post-mitosis (PCC syndrome. The gene encodes the BRCT-domain containing protein microcephalin/BRIT1. Apart from its role in the regulation of chromosome condensation, the protein is involved in the cellular response to DNA damage. We report here on the first mouse model of impaired Mcph1-function. The model was established based on an embryonic stem cell line from BayGenomics (RR0608 containing a gene trap in intron 12 of the Mcph1 gene deleting the C-terminal BRCT-domain of the protein. Although residual wild type allele can be detected by quantitative real-time PCR cell cultures generated from mouse tissues bearing the homozygous gene trap mutation display the cellular phenotype of misregulated chromosome condensation that is characteristic for the human disorder, confirming defective Mcph1 function due to the gene trap mutation. While surprisingly the DNA damage response (formation of repair foci, chromosomal breakage, and G2/M checkpoint function after irradiation appears to be largely normal in cell cultures derived from Mcph1(gt/gt mice, the overall survival rates of the Mcph1(gt/gt animals are significantly reduced compared to wild type and heterozygous mice. However, we could not detect clear signs of premature malignant disease development due to the perturbed Mcph1 function. Moreover, the animals show no obvious physical phenotype and no reduced fertility. Body and brain size are within the range of wild type controls. Gene expression on RNA and protein level did not reveal any specific pattern of differentially regulated genes. To the best of our knowledge this represents the first mammalian transgenic model displaying a defect in mitotic chromosome condensation and is also the first mouse model for impaired Mcph1-function.

  2. Mitotic chromosome condensation in vertebrates

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    Vagnarelli, Paola, E-mail: P.Vagnarelli@ed.ac.uk

    2012-07-15

    Work from several laboratories over the past 10-15 years has revealed that, within the interphase nucleus, chromosomes are organized into spatially distinct territories [T. Cremer, C. Cremer, Chromosome territories, nuclear architecture and gene regulation in mammalian cells, Nat. Rev. Genet. 2 (2001) 292-301 and T. Cremer, M. Cremer, S. Dietzel, S. Muller, I. Solovei, S. Fakan, Chromosome territories-a functional nuclear landscape, Curr. Opin. Cell Biol. 18 (2006) 307-316]. The overall compaction level and intranuclear location varies as a function of gene density for both entire chromosomes [J.A. Croft, J.M. Bridger, S. Boyle, P. Perry, P. Teague,W.A. Bickmore, Differences in the localization and morphology of chromosomes in the human nucleus, J. Cell Biol. 145 (1999) 1119-1131] and specific chromosomal regions [N.L. Mahy, P.E. Perry, S. Gilchrist, R.A. Baldock, W.A. Bickmore, Spatial organization of active and inactive genes and noncoding DNA within chromosome territories, J. Cell Biol. 157 (2002) 579-589] (Fig. 1A, A'). In prophase, when cyclin B activity reaches a high threshold, chromosome condensation occurs followed by Nuclear Envelope Breakdown (NEB) [1]. At this point vertebrate chromosomes appear as compact structures harboring an attachment point for the spindle microtubules physically recognizable as a primary constriction where the two sister chromatids are held together. The transition from an unshaped interphase chromosome to the highly structured mitotic chromosome (compare Figs. 1A and B) has fascinated researchers for several decades now; however a definite picture of how this process is achieved and regulated is not yet in our hands and it will require more investigation to comprehend the complete process. From a biochemical point of view a vertebrate mitotic chromosomes is composed of DNA, histone proteins (60%) and non-histone proteins (40%) [6]. I will discuss below what is known to date on the contribution of these two different classes

  3. SMC complexes in bacterial chromosome condensation and segregation.

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    Strunnikov, Alexander V

    2006-03-01

    Bacterial chromosomes segregate via a partition apparatus that employs a score of specialized proteins. The SMC complexes play a crucial role in the chromosome partitioning process by organizing bacterial chromosomes through their ATP-dependent chromatin-compacting activity. Recent progress in the composition of these complexes and elucidation of their structural and enzymatic properties has advanced our comprehension of chromosome condensation and segregation mechanics in bacteria.

  4. SMC complexes in bacterial chromosome condensation and segregation

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    Strunnikov, Alexander V.

    2005-01-01

    Bacterial chromosomes segregate via a partition apparatus that employs a score of specialized proteins. The SMC complexes play a crucial role in the chromosome partitioning process by organizing bacterial chromosomes through their ATP-dependent chromatin-compacting activity. Recent progress in the composition of these complexes and elucidation of their structural and enzymatic properties has advanced our comprehension of chromosome condensation and segregation mechanics in bacteria.

  5. Chromosome condensation: weaving an untangled web.

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    Thadani, Rahul; Uhlmann, Frank

    2015-08-03

    The compaction of diffuse interphase chromatin into stable mitotic chromosomes enables the segregation of replicated DNA to daughter cells. Two new studies characterise, both in vivo and in vitro, the essential contribution of the vertebrate condensin complex to chromosome organisation.

  6. Subjeans Condensations due to a Thermal Instability

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    Opher, R.; Valio, A.

    1990-11-01

    RESUMEN. Las observaciones recientes muestran que las nubes moleculares no son homogeneas, sino que tienen condensaciones. Se observa que estas condensaciones estan libres gravitacionalmente. C6mo se forman estas condensaciones? Sugerimos explicar estas conden sac jones como debidas a que la inestabilidad termica ayuda a la gravedad. Se estudi6 una funci5n de enfriamiento por gramo de la forma general A p T , en donde p y T son la densidad y la temperatura. Estamos interesados en el valor maximo de para la cual el colapso ocurre. Se estudiaron varios mode- los. Nuestros resultados indican que los valores de comparables con aquellos sugeridos por la literatura (1 < son suficientes para provocar el colapso de masas inferiores a la masa de Jeans por medio de inestabilidad termica, ayudada por gravedad y asi se forman las condensaciones libres gravitacionalmente. ABSTRACT: Recent observations show that molecular clouds are not homogeneous, but clumpy. Some clumps are observed to be gravitationally unbound. How did these clumps then form? We suggest explaining these condensation as due to thermal instability aiding gravit y The cooling function per gram studied is of the general form A p T,where pand T are the density and temperature, respectively. We are interested in the maximum value of for which collapse still occurs. Various models are studied. Our results indicate that values comparable to those suggested in the literature (1 < %< 2) are sufficient to trigger the collapse of subjeans masses by thermal instability, when aided by gravity, and form the observed gravitationally unbound clumps. Keq o : HYDRODYNAMICS - INTERSTELLAR CLOUDS

  7. Preleptotene chromosome condensation stage in human foetal and neonatal testes.

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    Luciani, J M; Devictor, M; Stahl, A

    1977-04-01

    A preleptotene stage of chromosome condensation analogous to that already described in various plants and in the oocytes of several animal species has been observed in the human foetal testis. Contrary to what has been previously described, this stage in the testis is not followed by decondensation leading to leptotene filaments. This observation underlines the problem of the precise significance of this stage and its relation to initiation of meiosis. It is suggested that meiosis may be initiated during this condensation phase and that the male germ cell, despite its XY chromosome constitution, tends to evolve towards meiosis. This proposal pleads in favour of both the role of somatic cells in the inhibition of meiosis in the male foetus and the role of environmental factors rather than genetic constitution of the germ cell in meiotic induction.

  8. Drug-induced premature chromosome condensation (PCC) protocols: cytogenetic approaches in mitotic chromosome and interphase chromatin.

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    Gotoh, Eisuke

    2015-01-01

    Chromosome analysis is a fundamental technique which is used in wide areas of cytogenetic study including karyotyping species, hereditary diseases diagnosis, or chromosome biology study. Chromosomes are usually prepared from mitotic cells arrested by colcemid block protocol. However, obtaining mitotic chromosomes is often hampered under several circumstances. As a result, cytogenetic analysis will be sometimes difficult or even impossible in such cases. Premature chromosome condensation (PCC) (see Note 1) is an alternative method that has proved to be a unique and useful way in chromosome analysis. Former, PCC has been achieved following cell fusion method (cell-fusion PCC) mediated either by fusogenic viruses (e.g., Sendai virus) or cell fusion chemicals (e.g., polyethylene glycol), but the cell fusion PCC has several drawbacks. The novel drug-induced PCC using protein phosphatase inhibitors was introduced about 20 years ago. This method is much simpler and easier even than the conventional mitotic chromosome preparation protocol use with colcemid block and furthermore obtained PCC index (equivalent to mitotic index for metaphase chromosome) is usually much higher than colcemid block method. Moreover, this method allows the interphase chromatin to be condensed to visualize like mitotic chromosomes. Therefore drug-induced PCC has opened the way for chromosome analysis not only in metaphase chromosomes but also in interphase chromatin. The drug-induced PCC has thus proven the usefulness in cytogenetics and other cell biology fields. For this second edition version, updated modifications/changes are supplemented in Subheadings 2, 3, and 4, and a new section describing the application of PCC in chromosome science fields is added with citation of updated references.

  9. Generation of Overpressure due to Condensation in Moist Air Jet

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yumiko OTOBE; Hideo KASHIMURA; Shigeru MATSUO; Masanori TANAKA; Toshiaki SETOGUCHI

    2007-01-01

    In the present study, a computational fluid dynamics method has been applied to investigate the effects of initial degree of supersaturation at reservoir condition on under-expanded sonic jet structures, such as Mach disk location and diameter, barrel shock wave and jet boundary. The axisymmetric nozzle geometry investigated was a converging nozzle with straight part. As a result, it was found that the overpressures due to condensation generate and the characteristics of flow with generation of overpressure due to condensation in the jet were different from those without condensation.

  10. Mammalian chromosomes contain cis-acting elements that control replication timing, mitotic condensation, and stability of entire chromosomes.

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    Thayer, Mathew J

    2012-09-01

    Recent studies indicate that mammalian chromosomes contain discrete cis-acting loci that control replication timing, mitotic condensation, and stability of entire chromosomes. Disruption of the large non-coding RNA gene ASAR6 results in late replication, an under-condensed appearance during mitosis, and structural instability of human chromosome 6. Similarly, disruption of the mouse Xist gene in adult somatic cells results in a late replication and instability phenotype on the X chromosome. ASAR6 shares many characteristics with Xist, including random mono-allelic expression and asynchronous replication timing. Additional "chromosome engineering" studies indicate that certain chromosome rearrangements affecting many different chromosomes display this abnormal replication and instability phenotype. These observations suggest that all mammalian chromosomes contain "inactivation/stability centers" that control proper replication, condensation, and stability of individual chromosomes. Therefore, mammalian chromosomes contain four types of cis-acting elements, origins, telomeres, centromeres, and "inactivation/stability centers", all functioning to ensure proper replication, condensation, segregation, and stability of individual chromosomes.

  11. Both Chromosome Decondensation and Condensation Are Dependent on DNA Replication in C. elegans Embryos.

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    Sonneville, Remi; Craig, Gillian; Labib, Karim; Gartner, Anton; Blow, J Julian

    2015-07-21

    During cell division, chromatin alternates between a condensed state to facilitate chromosome segregation and a decondensed form when DNA replicates. In most tissues, S phase and mitosis are separated by defined G1 and G2 gap phases, but early embryogenesis involves rapid oscillations between replication and mitosis. Using Caenorhabditis elegans embryos as a model system, we show that chromosome condensation and condensin II concentration on chromosomal axes require replicated DNA. In addition, we found that, during late telophase, replication initiates on condensed chromosomes and promotes the rapid decondensation of the chromatin. Upon replication initiation, the CDC-45-MCM-GINS (CMG) DNA helicase drives the release of condensin I complexes from chromatin and the activation or displacement of inactive MCM-2-7 complexes, which together with the nucleoporin MEL-28/ELYS tethers condensed chromatin to the nuclear envelope, thereby promoting chromatin decondensation. Our results show how, in an early embryo, the chromosome-condensation cycle is functionally linked with DNA replication.

  12. Both Chromosome Decondensation and Condensation Are Dependent on DNA Replication in C. elegans Embryos

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    Remi Sonneville

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available During cell division, chromatin alternates between a condensed state to facilitate chromosome segregation and a decondensed form when DNA replicates. In most tissues, S phase and mitosis are separated by defined G1 and G2 gap phases, but early embryogenesis involves rapid oscillations between replication and mitosis. Using Caenorhabditis elegans embryos as a model system, we show that chromosome condensation and condensin II concentration on chromosomal axes require replicated DNA. In addition, we found that, during late telophase, replication initiates on condensed chromosomes and promotes the rapid decondensation of the chromatin. Upon replication initiation, the CDC-45-MCM-GINS (CMG DNA helicase drives the release of condensin I complexes from chromatin and the activation or displacement of inactive MCM-2–7 complexes, which together with the nucleoporin MEL-28/ELYS tethers condensed chromatin to the nuclear envelope, thereby promoting chromatin decondensation. Our results show how, in an early embryo, the chromosome-condensation cycle is functionally linked with DNA replication.

  13. The antimicrobial polymer PHMB enters cells and selectively condenses bacterial chromosomes

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    Chindera, Kantaraja; Mahato, Manohar; Sharma, Ashwani Kumar

    2016-01-01

    To combat infection and antimicrobial resistance, it is helpful to elucidate drug mechanism(s) of action. Here we examined how the widely used antimicrobial polyhexamethylene biguanide (PHMB) kills bacteria selectively over host cells. Contrary to the accepted model of microbial membrane disruption...... by PHMB, we observed cell entry into a range of bacterial species, and treated bacteria displayed cell division arrest and chromosome condensation, suggesting DNA binding as an alternative antimicrobial mechanism. A DNA-level mechanism was confirmed by observations that PHMB formed nanoparticles when...... to bacterial and mammalian cellular DNA and selectively binds and condenses bacterial chromosomes. Because acquired resistance to PHMB has not been reported, selective chromosome condensation provides an unanticipated paradigm for antimicrobial action that may not succumb to resistance....

  14. The use of DAPI fluorescence lifetime imaging for investigating chromatin condensation in human chromosomes.

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    Estandarte, Ana Katrina; Botchway, Stanley; Lynch, Christophe; Yusuf, Mohammed; Robinson, Ian

    2016-08-16

    Chromatin undergoes dramatic condensation and decondensation as cells transition between the different phases of the cell cycle. The organization of chromatin in chromosomes is still one of the key challenges in structural biology. Fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM), a technique which utilizes a fluorophore's fluorescence lifetime to probe changes in its environment, was used to investigate variations in chromatin compaction in fixed human chromosomes. Fixed human metaphase and interphase chromosomes were labeled with the DNA minor groove binder, DAPI, followed by measurement and imaging of the fluorescence lifetime using multiphoton excitation. DAPI lifetime variations in metaphase chromosome spreads allowed mapping of the differentially compacted regions of chromatin along the length of the chromosomes. The heteromorphic regions of chromosomes 1, 9, 15, 16, and Y, which consist of highly condensed constitutive heterochromatin, showed statistically significant shorter DAPI lifetime values than the rest of the chromosomes. Differences in the DAPI lifetimes for the heteromorphic regions suggest differences in the structures of these regions. DAPI lifetime variations across interphase nuclei showed variation in chromatin compaction in interphase and the formation of chromosome territories. The successful probing of differences in chromatin compaction suggests that FLIM has enormous potential for application in structural and diagnostic studies.

  15. Detection and Automated Scoring of Dicentric Chromosomes in Nonstimulated Lymphocyte Prematurely Condensed Chromosomes After Telomere and Centromere Staining

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    M' kacher, Radhia [Laboratoire de Radiobiologie et Oncologie, Commissariat à l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); El Maalouf, Elie [Laboratoire de Radiobiologie et Oncologie, Commissariat à l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Laboratoire Modélisation Intelligence Processus Systèmes (MIPS)–Groupe TIIM3D, Université de Haute-Alsace, Mulhouse (France); Terzoudi, Georgia [Laboratory of Radiobiology & Biodosimetry, National Center for Scientific Research Demokritos, Athens (Greece); Ricoul, Michelle [Laboratoire de Radiobiologie et Oncologie, Commissariat à l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Heidingsfelder, Leonhard [MetaSystems, Altlussheim (Germany); Karachristou, Ionna [Laboratory of Radiobiology & Biodosimetry, National Center for Scientific Research Demokritos, Athens (Greece); Laplagne, Eric [Pole Concept, Paris (France); Hempel, William M. [Laboratoire de Radiobiologie et Oncologie, Commissariat à l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Colicchio, Bruno; Dieterlen, Alain [Laboratoire Modélisation Intelligence Processus Systèmes (MIPS)–Groupe TIIM3D, Université de Haute-Alsace, Mulhouse (France); Pantelias, Gabriel [Laboratory of Radiobiology & Biodosimetry, National Center for Scientific Research Demokritos, Athens (Greece); Sabatier, Laure, E-mail: laure.sabatier@cea.fr [Laboratoire de Radiobiologie et Oncologie, Commissariat à l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France)

    2015-03-01

    Purpose: To combine telomere and centromere (TC) staining of premature chromosome condensation (PCC) fusions to identify dicentrics, centric rings, and acentric chromosomes, making possible the realization of a dose–response curve and automation of the process. Methods and Materials: Blood samples from healthy donors were exposed to {sup 60}Co irradiation at varying doses up to 8 Gy, followed by a repair period of 8 hours. Premature chromosome condensation fusions were carried out, and TC staining using peptide nucleic acid probes was performed. Chromosomal aberration (CA) scoring was carried out manually and automatically using PCC-TCScore software, developed in our laboratory. Results: We successfully optimized the hybridization conditions and image capture parameters, to increase the sensitivity and effectiveness of CA scoring. Dicentrics, centric rings, and acentric chromosomes were rapidly and accurately detected, leading to a linear-quadratic dose–response curve by manual scoring at up to 8 Gy. Using PCC-TCScore software for automatic scoring, we were able to detect 95% of dicentrics and centric rings. Conclusion: The introduction of TC staining to the PCC fusion technique has made possible the rapid scoring of unstable CAs, including dicentrics, with a level of accuracy and ease not previously possible. This new approach can be used for biological dosimetry in radiation emergency medicine, where the rapid and accurate detection of dicentrics is a high priority using automated scoring. Because there is no culture time, this new approach can also be used for the follow-up of patients treated by genotoxic therapy, creating the possibility to perform the estimation of induced chromosomal aberrations immediately after the blood draw.

  16. The antimicrobial polymer PHMB enters cells and selectively condenses bacterial chromosomes.

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    Chindera, Kantaraja; Mahato, Manohar; Sharma, Ashwani Kumar; Horsley, Harry; Kloc-Muniak, Klaudia; Kamaruzzaman, Nor Fadhilah; Kumar, Satish; McFarlane, Alexander; Stach, Jem; Bentin, Thomas; Good, Liam

    2016-03-21

    To combat infection and antimicrobial resistance, it is helpful to elucidate drug mechanism(s) of action. Here we examined how the widely used antimicrobial polyhexamethylene biguanide (PHMB) kills bacteria selectively over host cells. Contrary to the accepted model of microbial membrane disruption by PHMB, we observed cell entry into a range of bacterial species, and treated bacteria displayed cell division arrest and chromosome condensation, suggesting DNA binding as an alternative antimicrobial mechanism. A DNA-level mechanism was confirmed by observations that PHMB formed nanoparticles when mixed with isolated bacterial chromosomal DNA and its effects on growth were suppressed by pairwise combination with the DNA binding ligand Hoechst 33258. PHMB also entered mammalian cells, but was trapped within endosomes and excluded from nuclei. Therefore, PHMB displays differential access to bacterial and mammalian cellular DNA and selectively binds and condenses bacterial chromosomes. Because acquired resistance to PHMB has not been reported, selective chromosome condensation provides an unanticipated paradigm for antimicrobial action that may not succumb to resistance.

  17. Assessing the applicability of FISH-based prematurely condensed dicentric chromosome assay in triage biodosimetry.

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    Suto, Yumiko; Gotoh, Takaya; Noda, Takashi; Akiyama, Miho; Owaki, Makiko; Darroudi, Firouz; Hirai, Momoki

    2015-03-01

    The dicentric chromosome assay (DCA) has been regarded as the gold standard of radiation biodosimetry. The assay, however, requires a 2-d peripheral blood lymphocyte culture before starting metaphase chromosome analyses to estimate biological doses. Other biological assays also have drawbacks with respect to the time needed to obtain dose estimates for rapid decision on the correct line of medical treatment. Therefore, alternative technologies that suit requirements for triage biodosimetry are needed. Radiation-induced DNA double strand breaks in G0 lymphocytes can be detected as interphase chromosome aberrations by the cell fusion-mediated premature chromosome condensation (PCC) method. The method, in combination with fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) techniques, has been proposed in early studies as a powerful tool for obtaining biological dose estimates without 2-d lymphocyte culture procedures. The present work assesses the applicability of FISH-based PCC techniques using pan-centromeric and telomeric peptide nucleic acid (PNA) probes in triage mode biodosimetry and demonstrates that an improved rapid procedure of the prematurely condensed dicentric chromosome (PCDC) assay has the potential for evaluating exposed radiation doses in as short as 6 h after the collection of peripheral blood specimens.

  18. DOSE RESPONSE CURVE OF 60Co FOR PREMATURE CONDENSED CHROMOSOME FRAGMENTS OF HUMAN LYMPHOCYTES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高锦声; 郑斯英; 等

    1995-01-01

    The dose-response curves obtained by premature condensed chromosome(PCC) and conventional cellular genetic methods can be represented by two linear equations.The ratio of the slopes,KPCC/KM1,is about 28,In compartison to the conventional method.The PCC method has many advantages;e.g.it is faster,simopler,more sensitive and accurate.Its significance in the study of radiation damage is also discussed.

  19. Tachyon condensation due to domain-wall annihilation in Bose-Einstein condensates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Hiromitsu; Kasamatsu, Kenichi; Tsubota, Makoto; Nitta, Muneto

    2012-12-14

    We show theoretically that a domain-wall annihilation in two-component Bose-Einstein condensates causes tachyon condensation accompanied by spontaneous symmetry breaking in a two-dimensional subspace. Three-dimensional vortex formation from domain-wall annihilations is considered a kink formation in subspace. Numerical experiments reveal that the subspatial dynamics obey the dynamic scaling law of phase-ordering kinetics. This model is experimentally feasible and provides insights into how the extra dimensions influence subspatial phase transition in higher-dimensional space.

  20. Biodosimetry of ionizing radiation by selective painting of prematurely condensed chromosomes in human lymphocytes

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    Durante, M.; George, K.; Yang, T. C.

    1997-01-01

    Painting of interphase chromosomes can be useful for biodosimetric purposes in particular cases such as radiation therapy, accidental exposure to very high radiation doses and exposure to densely ionizing radiation, for example during space missions. Biodosimetry of charged-particle radiation is analyzed in the present paper. Target cells were human peripheral blood lymphocytes irradiated in vitro with gamma rays, protons and iron ions. After exposure, lymphocytes were incubated for different times to allow repair of radiation-induced damage and then fused to mitotic hamster cells to promote premature condensation in the interphase chromosomes. Chromosome spreads were then hybridized with whole-chromosome DNA probes labeled with fluorescent stains. Dose-response curves for the induction of chromatin fragments shortly after exposure, as well as the kinetics of rejoining and misrejoining, were not markedly dependent on linear energy transfer. However, after exposure to heavy ions, more aberrations were scored in the interphase cells after incubation for repair than in metaphase samples harvested at the first postirradiation mitosis. On the other hand, no significant differences were observed in the two samples after exposure to sparsely ionizing radiation. These results suggest that interphase chromosome painting can be a useful tool for biodosimetry of particle radiation.

  1. A model for the condensation of the bacterial chromosome by the partitioning protein ParB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broedersz, Chase; Wingreen, Ned

    2013-03-01

    The molecular machinery responsible for faithful segregation of the chromosome in bacteria such as Caulobacter crescentus and Bacillus subtilis includes the ParABS a.k.a. Spo0J/Soj partitioning system. In Caulobacter, prior to division, hundreds of ParB proteins bind to the DNA near the origin of replication, and localize to one pole of the cell. Subsequently, the ParB-DNA complex is translocated to the far pole by the binding and retraction of the ParA spindle-like apparatus. Remarkably, the localization of ParB proteins to specific regions of the chromosome appears to be controlled by only a few centromeric parS binding sites. Although lateral interactions between DNA-bound ParB are likely to be important for their localization, the long-range order of ParB domains on the chromosome appears to be inconsistent with a picture in which protein-protein interactions are limited to neighboring DNA-bound proteins. We developed a coarse-grained Brownian dynamics model that allows for lateral and 3D protein-protein interactions among bound ParB proteins. Our model shows how such interactions can condense and organize the DNA spatially, and can control the localization and the long-range order of the DNA-bound proteins.

  2. Condensation and localization of the partitioning protein ParB on the bacterial chromosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broedersz, Chase P; Wang, Xindan; Meir, Yigal; Loparo, Joseph J; Rudner, David Z; Wingreen, Ned S

    2014-06-17

    The ParABS system mediates chromosome segregation and plasmid partitioning in many bacteria. As part of the partitioning mechanism, ParB proteins form a nucleoprotein complex at parS sites. The biophysical basis underlying ParB-DNA complex formation and localization remains elusive. Specifically, it is unclear whether ParB spreads in 1D along DNA or assembles into a 3D protein-DNA complex. We show that a combination of 1D spreading bonds and a single 3D bridging bond between ParB proteins constitutes a minimal model for a condensed ParB-DNA complex. This model implies a scaling behavior for ParB-mediated silencing of parS-flanking genes, which we confirm to be satisfied by experimental data from P1 plasmids. Furthermore, this model is consistent with experiments on the effects of DNA roadblocks on ParB localization. Finally, we show experimentally that a single parS site is necessary and sufficient for ParB-DNA complex formation in vivo. Together with our model, this suggests that ParB binding to parS triggers a conformational switch in ParB that overcomes a nucleation barrier. Conceptually, the combination of spreading and bridging bonds in our model provides a surface tension ensuring the condensation of the ParB-DNA complex, with analogies to liquid-like compartments such as nucleoli in eukaryotes.

  3. Truly incomplete and complex exchanges in prematurely condensed chromosomes of human fibroblasts exposed in vitro to energetic heavy ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Honglu; Durante, Marco; Furusawa, Yoshiya; George, Kerry; Kawata, Tetsuya; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2003-01-01

    Confluent human fibroblast cells (AG1522) were irradiated with gamma rays, 490 MeV/nucleon silicon ions, or iron ions at either 200 or 500 MeV/nucleon. The cells were allowed to repair at 37 degrees C for 24 h after exposure, and a chemically induced premature chromosome condensation (PCC) technique was used to condense chromosomes in the G2 phase of the cell cycle. Incomplete and complex exchanges were analyzed in the irradiated samples. To verify that chromosomal breaks were truly unrejoined, chromosome aberrations were analyzed using a combination of whole-chromosome specific probes and probes specific for the telomere region of the chromosome. Results showed that the frequency of unrejoined chromosome breaks was higher after irradiation with the heavy ions of high LET, and consequently the ratio of incomplete to complete exchanges increased steadily with LET up to 440 keV/microm, the highest LET included in the present study. For samples exposed to 200 MeV/nucleon iron ions, chromosome aberrations were analyzed using the multicolor FISH (mFISH) technique, which allows identification of both complex and truly incomplete exchanges. Results of the mFISH study showed that 0.7 and 3 Gy iron ions produced similar ratios of complex to simple exchanges and incomplete to complete exchanges; these ratios were higher than those obtained after exposure to 6 Gy gamma rays. After 0.7 Gy of iron ions, most complex aberrations were found to involve three or four chromosomes, which is a likely indication of the maximum number of chromosome domains traversed by a single iron-ion track.

  4. High-LET radiation-induced aberrations in prematurely condensed G2 chromosomes of human fibroblasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawata, T.; Gotoh, E.; Durante, M.; Wu, H.; George, K.; Furusawa, Y.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Dicello, J. F. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    PURPOSE: To determine the number of initial chromatid breaks induced by low- or high-LET irradiations, and to compare the kinetics of chromatid break rejoining for radiations of different quality. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Exponentially growing human fibroblast cells AG1522 were irradiated with gamma-rays, energetic carbon (290MeV/u), silicon (490MeV/u) and iron (200 and 600 MeV/u). Chromosomes were prematurely condensed using calyculin A. Chromatid breaks and exchanges in G2 cells were scored. PCC were collected after several post-irradiation incubation times, ranging from 5 to 600 min. RESULTS: The kinetics of chromatid break rejoining following low- or high-LET irradiation consisted of two exponential components representing a rapid and a slow time constant. Chromatid breaks decreased rapidly during the first 10min after exposure, then continued to decrease at a slower rate. The rejoining kinetics were similar for exposure to each type of radiation. Chromatid exchanges were also formed quickly. Compared to low-LET radiation, isochromatid breaks were produced more frequently and the proportion of unrejoined breaks was higher for high-LET radiation. CONCLUSIONS: Compared with gamma-rays, isochromatid breaks were observed more frequently in high-LET irradiated samples, suggesting that an increase in isochromatid breaks is a signature of high-LET radiation exposure.

  5. Comparison of clonogenic assay with premature chromosome condensation assay in prediction of human cell radiosensitivity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhuan-Zi Wang; Wen-Jian Li; Hong Zhang; Jian-She Yang; Rong Qiu; Xiao Wang

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To determine whether the number of non-rejoining G2-chromatid breaks can predict the radiosensitivity of human cell lines.METHODS: Cell lines of human ovary carcinoma cells (HO8910), human hepatoma cells (HepG2) and liver cells (L02) were irradiated with a range of doses and assessed both of cell survival and non-rejoining G2-chromatid breaks at 24 h after irradiation. Cell survival was documented by a colony assay. Non-rejoining G2-chromatid breaks were measured by counting the number of non-rejoining G2 chromatid breaks at 24 h after irradiation, detected by the prematurely chromosome condensed (PCC) technique.RESULTS: A linear-quadratic survival curve was observed in three cell lines, and HepG2 was the most sensitive to y-radiation. A dose-dependent linear increase was observed in radiation-induced non-rejoining G2-PCC breaks measured at 24 h after irradiation in all cell lines, and HepG2 was the most susceptible to induction of non-rejoining G2-PCC breaks. A close correlation was found between the clonogenic radiosensitivity and the radiation-induced non-rejoining G2-PCC breaks (r= 0.923). Furthermore, survival-aberration correlations for two or more than two doses lever were also significant.CONCLUSION: The number of non-rejoining G2 PCC breaks holds considerable promise for predicting the radiosensitivity of normal and tumor cells when two or more than two doses lever is tested.

  6. Rapid assessment of high-dose radiation exposures through scoring of cell-fusion-induced premature chromosome condensation and ring chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamadrid Boada, A I; Romero Aguilera, I; Terzoudi, G I; González Mesa, J E; Pantelias, G; García, O

    2013-09-18

    Analysis of premature chromosome condensation (PCC) mediated by fusion of G0-lymphocytes with mitotic CHO cells in combination with rapid visualization and quantification of rings (PCC-Rf) is proposed as an alternative technique for dose assessment of radiation-exposed individuals. Isolated lymphocytes or whole blood from six individuals were γ-irradiated with 5, 10, 15 and 20Gy at a dose rate of 0.5Gy/min. Following either 8- or 24-h post-exposure incubation of irradiated samples at 37°C, chromosome spreads were prepared by standard PCC cytogenetic procedures. The protocol for PCC fusion proved to be effective at doses as high as 20Gy, enabling the analysis of ring chromosomes and excess PCC fragments. The ring frequencies remained constant during the 8-24-h repair time; the pooled dose relationship between ring frequency (Y) and dose (D) was linear: Y=(0.088±0.005)×D. During the repair time, excess fragments decreased from 0.91 to 0.59 chromatid pieces per Gy, revealing the importance of information about the exact time of exposure for dose assessment on the basis of fragments. Compared with other cytogenetic assays to estimate radiation dose, the PCC-Rf method has the following benefits: a 48-h culture time is not required, allowing a much faster assessment of dose in comparison with conventional scoring of dicentrics and rings in assays for chemically-induced premature chromosome condensation (PCC-Rch), and it allows the analysis of heavily irradiated lymphocytes that are delayed or never reach mitosis, thus avoiding the problem of saturation at high doses. In conclusion, the use of the PCC fusion assay in conjunction with scoring of rings in G0-lymphocytes offers a suitable alternative for fast dose estimation following accidental exposure to high radiation doses.

  7. Nonlinear Zeno dynamics due to atomic interactions in Bose–Einstein condensate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Navarro, V.G.; Shchesnovich, V.S., E-mail: valery@ufabc.edu.br

    2014-12-01

    We show that nonlinear interactions induce both the Zeno and anti-Zeno effects in the generalized Bose–Josephson model (with the on-site interactions and the second-order tunneling) describing Bose–Einstein condensate in double-well trap subject to particle removal from one of the wells. We find that the on-site interactions induce only the Zeno effect, which appears at long evolution times, whereas the second-order tunneling leads to a strong decay of the atomic population at short evolution times, reminiscent of the anti-Zeno effect, and destroys the nonlinear Zeno effect due to the on-site interactions at long times.

  8. Stress induced by premature chromatin condensation triggers chromosome shattering and chromothripsis at DNA sites still replicating in micronuclei or multinucleate cells when primary nuclei enter mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terzoudi, Georgia I; Karakosta, Maria; Pantelias, Antonio; Hatzi, Vasiliki I; Karachristou, Ioanna; Pantelias, Gabriel

    2015-11-01

    Combination of next-generation DNA sequencing, single nucleotide polymorphism array analyses and bioinformatics has revealed the striking phenomenon of chromothripsis, described as complex genomic rearrangements acquired in a single catastrophic event affecting one or a few chromosomes. Via an unproven mechanism, it is postulated that mechanical stress causes chromosome shattering into small lengths of DNA, which are then randomly reassembled by DNA repair machinery. Chromothripsis is currently examined as an alternative mechanism of oncogenesis, in contrast to the present paradigm that considers a stepwise development of cancer. While evidence for the mechanism(s) underlying chromosome shattering during cancer development remains elusive, a number of hypotheses have been proposed to explain chromothripsis, including ionizing radiation, DNA replication stress, breakage-fusion-bridge cycles, micronuclei formation and premature chromosome compaction. In the present work, we provide experimental evidence on the mechanistic basis of chromothripsis and on how chromosomes can get locally shattered in a single catastrophic event. Considering the dynamic nature of chromatin nucleoprotein complex, capable of rapid unfolding, disassembling, assembling and refolding, we first show that chromatin condensation at repairing or replicating DNA sites induces the mechanical stress needed for chromosome shattering to ensue. Premature chromosome condensation is then used to visualize the dynamic nature of interphase chromatin and demonstrate that such mechanical stress and chromosome shattering can also occur in chromosomes within micronuclei or asynchronous multinucleate cells when primary nuclei enter mitosis. Following an aberrant mitosis, chromosomes could find themselves in the wrong place at the wrong time so that they may undergo massive DNA breakage and rearrangement in a single catastrophic event. Specifically, our results support the hypothesis that premature chromosome

  9. Further patient with Angelman syndrome due to paternal disomy of chromosome 15 and a milder phenotype

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gillessen-Kaesbach, G.; Passarge, E.; Horsthemke, B. [Institut fuer Humangenetik, Essen (Germany)

    1995-04-10

    This {open_quotes}Letter to the Editor{close_quotes} decribes a patient with Angelman syndrome due to paternal uniparental disomy of chromosome 15 and a milder phenotype compared to Angelman syndrome patients with a 15q deletion. 10 refs., 1 fig.

  10. Establishment of Dose-response Curves for Dicentrics and Premature Chromosome Condensation for Radiological Emergency Preparedness in Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rungsimaphorn, Benchawan; Rerkamnuaychoke, Budsaba; Sudprasert, Wanwisa

    2016-01-01

    The in vitro dose calibration curves using conventional biological dosimetry – dicentric chromosome assay (DCA) and premature chromosome condensation (PCC) assay – were performed for the first time in Thailand for reconstruction of radiation dose in the exposed individuals. The peripheral blood lymphocyte samples from healthy donors were irradiated with 137Cs source at a dose rate of 0.652 Gy/min to doses of 0.1, 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 Gy for DCA technique, and 5, 10, 15, 20, and 25 Gy for PCC technique. The blood samples were cultured and processed following the standard procedure as prescribed in the International Atomic Energy Agency report with slight modifications. The yield of dicentrics with dose from at least 1000 metaphases or 100 dicentrics was fitted to a linear quadratic model using Chromosome Aberration Calculation Software (CABAS, version 2.0) whereas those of PCC rings with dose from 100 rings was fitted to a linear quadratic equation at doses from 0 to 15 Gy. These curves will be useful for in vitro dose reconstruction and can support the preparedness for overexposure to radiation among public or occupational workers and eventual radiological accident in Thailand. PMID:28217284

  11. Chromosome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chromosomes are structures found in the center (nucleus) of cells that carry long pieces of DNA. DNA ... is the building block of the human body. Chromosomes also contain proteins that help DNA exist in ...

  12. Resistance to β-Lactams in Neisseria ssp Due to Chromosomally Encoded Penicillin-Binding Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Zapun

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Neisseria meningitidis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae are human pathogens that cause a variety of life-threatening systemic and local infections, such as meningitis or gonorrhoea. The treatment of such infection is becoming more difficult due to antibiotic resistance. The focus of this review is on the mechanism of reduced susceptibility to penicillin and other β-lactams due to the modification of chromosomally encoded penicillin-binding proteins (PBP, in particular PBP2 encoded by the penA gene. The variety of penA alleles and resulting variant PBP2 enzymes is described and the important amino acid substitutions are presented and discussed in a structural context.

  13. PTP-S2, a nuclear tyrosine phosphatase, is phosphorylated and excluded from condensed chromosomes during mitosis

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sundaram Nambirajan; Vegesna Radha; Shubhangi Kamatkar; Ghanshyam Swarup

    2000-03-01

    PTP-S2 is a tyrosine specific protein phosphatase that binds to DNA and is localized to the nucleus in association with chromatin. It plays a role in the regulation of cell proliferation. Here we show that the subcellular distribution of this protein changes during cell division. While PTP-S2 was localized exclusively to the nucleus in interphase cells, during metaphase and anaphase it was distributed throughout the cytoplasm and excluded from condensed chromosomes. At telophase PTP-S2 began to associate with chromosomes and at cytokinesis it was associated with chromatin in the newly formed nucleus. It was hyperphosphorylated and showed retarded mobility in cells arrested in metaphase. In vitro experiments showed that it was phosphorylated by CK2 resulting in mobility shift. Using a deletion mutant we found that CK2 phosphorylated PTP-S2 in the C-terminal non-catalytic domain. A heparin sensitive kinase from mitotic cell extracts phosphorylated PTP-S2 resulting in mobility shift. These results are consistent with the suggestion that during metaphase PTP-S2 is phosphorylated (possibly by CK2 or a CK2-like enzyme), resulting in its dissociation from chromatin.

  14. Angelman syndrome due to paternal uniparental disomy of chromosome 15: A milder phenotype?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bottani, A.; Robinson, W.P.; DeLoizer-Blanchet, C.D.; Engel, E.; Morris, M.A.; Schmitt, Thun-Hohenstein, L.; Schinzel, A. [Univ. of Zuerich (Switzerland)

    1994-05-15

    The Angelman syndrome (AS) is a neurological disorder characterized by severe mental retardation, absent speech, seizures, gait disturbances, and a typical age-dependent facial phenotype. Most cases are due to an interstitial deletion on the maternally inherited chromosome 15, in the critical region q11-q13. Rare cases also result from paternal uniparental disomy of chromosome 15. In a group of 14 patients with sporadic AS diagnosed in Switzerland, we found 2 unrelated females with paternal isodisomy for the entire chromosome 15. Their phenotypes were milder than usually seen in this syndrome: one girl did not show the typical AS facial changes; both patients had late-onset mild seizures; as they grow older, they had largely undisturbed gross motor functions, in particular no severe ataxia. Both girls were born to older fathers (45 and 43 years old, respectively). The apparent association of a relatively milder phenotype in AS with paternal uniparental disomy will have to be confirmed by detailed clinical descriptions of further patients. 25 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Condensin- and Replication-Mediated Bacterial Chromosome Folding and Origin Condensation Revealed by Hi-C and Super-resolution Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marbouty, Martial; Le Gall, Antoine; Cattoni, Diego I; Cournac, Axel; Koh, Alan; Fiche, Jean-Bernard; Mozziconacci, Julien; Murray, Heath; Koszul, Romain; Nollmann, Marcelo

    2015-08-20

    Chromosomes of a broad range of species, from bacteria to mammals, are structured by large topological domains whose precise functional roles and regulatory mechanisms remain elusive. Here, we combine super-resolution microscopies and chromosome-capture technologies to unravel the higher-order organization of the Bacillus subtilis chromosome and its dynamic rearrangements during the cell cycle. We decipher the fine 3D architecture of the origin domain, revealing folding motifs regulated by condensin-like complexes. This organization, along with global folding throughout the genome, is present before replication, disrupted by active DNA replication, and re-established thereafter. Single-cell analysis revealed a strict correspondence between sub-cellular localization of origin domains and their condensation state. Our results suggest that the precise 3D folding pattern of the origin domain plays a role in the regulation of replication initiation, chromosome organization, and DNA segregation.

  16. Maternal uniparental disomy for human chromosome 14, due to loss of a chromosome 14 from somatic cells with t(13;14) trisomy 14.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonarakis, S E; Blouin, J L; Maher, J; Avramopoulos, D; Thomas, G; Talbot, C C

    1993-06-01

    Uniparental disomy (UPD) for particular chromosomes is increasingly recognized as a cause of abnormal phenotypes in humans. We recently studied a 9-year-old female with a de novo Robertsonian translocation t(13;14), short stature, mild developmental delay, scoliosis, hyperextensible joints, hydrocephalus that resolved spontaneously during the first year of life, and hypercholesterolemia. To determine the parental origin of chromosomes 13 and 14 in the proband, we have studied the genotypes of DNA polymorphic markers due to (GT)n repeats in the patient and her parents' blood DNA. The genotypes of markers D14S43, D14S45, D14S49, and D14S54 indicated maternal UPD for chromosome 14. There was isodisomy for proximal markers and heterodisomy for distal markers, suggesting a recombination event on maternal chromosomes 14. In addition, DNA analysis first revealed--and subsequent cytogenetic analysis confirmed--that there was mosaic trisomy 14 in 5% of blood lymphocytes. There was normal (biparental) inheritance for chromosome 13, and there was no evidence of false paternity in genotypes of 11 highly polymorphic markers on human chromosome 21. Two cases of maternal UPD for chromosome 14 have previously been reported, one with a familial rob t(13;14) and the other with a t(14;14). There are several similarities among these patients, and a "maternal UPD chromosome 14 syndrome" is emerging; however, the contribution of the mosaic trisomy 14 to the phenotype cannot be evaluated. The study of de novo Robertsonian translocations of the type reported here should reveal both the extent of UPD in these events and the contribution of particular chromosomes involved in certain phenotypes.

  17. Maternal uniparental disomy for human chromosome 14, due to loss of a chromosome 14 from somatic cells with t(13; 14) trisomy 14

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antonarakis, S.E.; Blouin, J.L.; Maher, J.; Avramopoulos, D.; Thomas, G.; Talbot, C.C. Jr. (Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore (United States))

    1993-06-01

    Uniparental disomy (UPD) for particular chromosomes is increasingly recognized as a cause of abnormal phenotypes in humans. The authors recently studied a 9-year-old female with a de novo Robertsonian translocation t(13;14), short stature, mild developmental delay, scoliosis, hyperextensible joints, hydrocephalus that resolved spontaneously during the first year of life, and hyperchloesterolemia. To determine the parental origin of chromosomes 13 and 14 in the proband, they have studied the genotypes of DNA polymorphic markers due to (GT)n repeats in the patient and her parents' blood DNA. The genotypes of markers D14S43, D14S45, D14S49, and D14S54 indicated maternal UPD for chromosome 14. There was isodisomy for proximal markers and heterodisomy for distal markers, suggesting a recombination event on maternal chromosomes 14. In addition, DNA analysis first revealed -- and subsequent cytogenetic analysis confirmed -- that there was mosaic trisomy 14 in 5% of blood lymphocytes. There was normal (biparental) inheritance for chromosome 13, and there was no evidence of false paternity in genotypes of 11 highly polymorphic markers on human chromosome 21. Two cases of maternal UPD for chromosome 14 have previously been reported, one with a familial rob t(13;14) and the other with a t(14;14). There are several similarities among these patients, and a [open quotes]maternal UPD chromosome 14 syndrome[close quotes] is emerging; however, the contribution of the mosaic trisomy 14 to the phenotype cannot be evaluated. The study of de novo Robertsonian translocations of the type reported here should reveal both the extent of UPD in these events and the contribution of particular chromosomes involved in certain phenotypes. 33 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Dynamic characteristics of the steam condensation due to a multi-hole sparger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Xiangbin [North China Electric Power Univ., Beijing (China). School of Nuclear Science and Engineering; Beijing Key Laboratory of Passive Safety Technology for Nuclear Energy (China); Li, Nan [Beijing Key Laboratory of Passive Safety Technology for Nuclear Energy (China); Zhang, Mengchao [China Power Engineering Consulting (Group) Investment Co. LTD, Beijing (China)

    2016-06-15

    In order to deeply understand the mechanism of the steam jet with a multi-hole sparger, the dynamic characteristics of direct contact condensation of the steam submerged in a subcooled water pool are simulated by means of commercial software. The jet shapes are compared with experimental results. It is found that the numerical results were in good agreement with the experimental ones.

  19. Gravitational Lamb Shift of Bose-Einstein Condensates due to Spacetime Fluctuations

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Charles H -T; Mendonca, J Tito

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the oscillation of the center of mass of trapped Bose-Einstein condensates coupled to the zero-point fluctuations of the gravitational field. A semiclassical analysis is performed that allows to calculate the mean square amplitude of the oscillation. In analogy with the Lamb shift in quantum electrodynamics, this gives rise to an upshift of the energy of the trapped condensates. We show that for an elongated trap, the energy shift scales quadratically with the length as well as cubically with the total number of atoms, leading to an energy increase of 1 % using a 5 cm long trap with 10^8 rubidium atoms. This could potentially lead to the first observable effect of low energy quantum gravity.

  20. Thermal structures of accreting neutron stars with neutrino losses due to strong pion condensations

    CERN Document Server

    Matsuo, Yasuhide; Hayashida, Koutarou; Liu, Helei; Noda, Tsuneo; Fujimoto, Masayuki Y

    2016-01-01

    Quiescent X-ray luminosities are presented in low mass X-ray binaries with use of evolutionary calculations. The calculated luminosities are compared with observed ones in terms of timeaveraged mass accretion rate. It is shown that neutrino emission by strong pion condensation can explain quiescent X-ray luminosity of SAX J1808.4-3658 and we do not need direct Urca processes concerning nucleons and/or hyperons.

  1. Are the Angular Correlations in pA Collisions due to a Glasmion or Bose Condensation ?

    CERN Document Server

    Dumitru, Adrian; McLerran, Larry

    2014-01-01

    Experiments at the LHC have recently reported results on the angular asymmetry coefficients $v_n[m]$, for various angular moments $n$ and orders of cumulants $m$, in high multiplicity p+Pb collisions. These coefficients are large, and have both even and odd moments. We discuss here some of the implications of these results for our understanding of the initial state of the collision (Color Glass Condensate) and for the evolution in the final state (Glasma and thermalized Quark Gluon Plasma). We show the Color Glass Condensate predicts large even moments, $v_n$ with $n$ an even integer. Odd moments are generated by final state interactions or fragmentation. For a multi-particle determination of $v_2[m]$, where m is the number of particles used to determine the correlation, we argue that if these coefficients approach equality for large $m$ in high multiplicity events, this may imply the existence of either solitonic solutions or Bose condensation either for the JIMWLK action that describes the CGC, or for the G...

  2. Premature chromosome condensation (PCC) assay for dose assessment in mass casualty accidents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindholm, Carita; Stricklin, Daniela; Jaworska, Alicja; Koivistoinen, Armi; Paile, Wendla; Arvidsson, Eva; Deperas-Standylo, Joanna; Wojcik, Andrzej

    2010-01-01

    The study was undertaken to establish a dose calibration curve for a practical PCC ring assay and to apply it in a simulated mass casualty accident. The PCC assay was validated against the conventional dicentric assay. A linear relationship was established for PCC rings after (60)Co gamma irradiation with doses up to 20 Gy. In the simulated accident experiment, 62 blood samples were analyzed with both the PCC ring assay and the conventional dicentric assay, applying a triage approach. Samples received various uniform and non-uniform (10-40% partial-body) irradiations up to doses of 13 Gy. The results indicated that both assays yielded good dose estimates for the whole-body exposure scenario, although in the lower-dose range (0-6 Gy) dicentric scoring resulted in more accurate whole-body estimates, whereas PCC rings were better in the high-dose range (>6 Gy). Neither assay was successful in identifying partial-body exposures, most likely due to the low numbers of cells scored in the triage mode. In conclusion, the study confirmed that the PCC ring assay is suitable for use as a biodosimeter after whole-body exposure to high doses of radiation. However, there are limitations for its use in the triage of people exposed to high, partial-body doses.

  3. Force on a slow moving impurity due to thermal and quantum fluctuations in a 1D Bose-Einstein condensate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sykes, Andrew [UNIV OF QUEENSLAND

    2009-01-01

    We study the drag force acting on an impurity moving through a 1D Bose-Einstein condensate in the presence of both quantum and thermal fluctuations. We are able to find exact analytical solutions of the partial differential equations to the level of the Bogoliubov approximation. At zero temperature, we find a nonzero force is exerted on the impurity at subcritical velocities, due to the scattering of quantum fluctuations. We make the following explicit assumptions: far from the impurity the system is in a quantum state given by that of a zero (or finite) temperature Bose-Einstein condensate, and the scattering process generates only causally related reflection/transmission. The results raise unanswered questions in the quantum dynamics associated with the formation of persistent currents.

  4. Superconductivity due to Condensation of Monopoles around RCD Strings in SU(2 Gauge Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. S. Rajput

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The study of the condensation of monopoles and the resulting chromomagnetic superconductivity have been undertaken in restricted chromodynamics of SU(2 gauge theory. Constructing the RCD Lagrangian and the partition function for monopoles in terms of string action and the action of the current around the strings, the monopole current in RCD chromo magnetic superconductor has been derived and it has shown that in London' limit the penetration length governs the monopole density around RCD string in chromo magnetic superconductors while with finite (nonzero coherence length the leading behavior of the monopole density at large distances from the string is controlled by the coherence length and not by the penetration length.

  5. Uniparental disomy of chromosome 2 resulting in lethal trifunctional protein deficiency due to homozygous alpha-subunit mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiekerkoetter, Ute; Eeds, Angela; Yue, Zou; Haines, Jonathan; Strauss, Arnold W; Summar, Marshall

    2002-12-01

    The mitochondrial trifunctional protein (TFP) is an enzyme complex of the fatty acid beta-oxidation cycle composed of an alpha- and a beta-subunit. The two encoding genes are located in the same region on chromosome 2 (2p23). TFP deficiency due to either alpha- or beta-subunit mutations is characterized by mutational and phenotypic heterogeneity with severe, early-onset, cardiac forms and milder, later-onset, myopathic phenotypes. In two unrelated patients with lethal TFP deficiency, we delineated apparently homozygous alpha-subunit mutations that were present in heterozygous form in both mothers, but not in either biological father. We performed a microsatellite repeat analysis of both patients and their parents using seven chromosome 2-specific polymorphic DNA markers and four nonchromosome 2 markers. In both patients, two chromosome 2-specific markers demonstrated maternal isodisomy of chromosome 2. The other five chromosome 2-specific markers were noninformative in each patient. Inheritance of alleles from chromosomes 4, 5, and 7 was consistent with paternity. These results explain the apparently anomalous pattern of transmission. Six of our 12 known TFP-deficient patients with alpha-subunit mutations have disease due to homozygous changes and two of them via the mechanism of uniparental disomy (UPD) (16.7%). For very rare autosomal recessive diseases, UPD may represent a common mechanism. This study emphasizes the need to confirm mutations in parents whenever possible. TFP deficiency is another disorder that has become manifest due to isodisomy of chromosome 2. This information will impact genetic counseling for these families, reducing greatly the 25% risk normally used for recessive disorders.

  6. Caffeine-Induced Premature Chromosome Condensation Results in the Apoptosis-Like Programmed Cell Death in Root Meristems of Vicia faba.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorota Rybaczek

    Full Text Available We have demonstrated that the activation of apoptosis-like programmed cell death (AL-PCD was a secondary result of caffeine (CF induced premature chromosome condensation (PCC in hydroxyurea-synchronized Vicia faba root meristem cells. Initiation of the apoptotic-like cell degradation pathway seemed to be the result of DNA damage generated by treatment with hydroxyurea (HU [double-stranded breaks (DSBs mostly] and co-treatment with HU/CF [single-stranded breaks (SSBs mainly]. A single chromosome comet assay was successfully used to study different types of DNA damage (neutral variant-DSBs versus alkaline-DSBs or SSBs. The immunocytochemical detection of H2AXS139Ph and PARP-2 were used as markers for DSBs and SSBs, respectively. Acridine orange and ethidium bromide (AO/EB were applied for quantitative immunofluorescence measurements of dead, dying and living cells. Apoptotic-type DNA fragmentation and positive TUNEL reaction finally proved that CF triggers AL-PCD in stressed V. faba root meristem cells. In addition, the results obtained under transmission electron microscopy (TEM further revealed apoptotic-like features at the ultrastructural level of PCC-type cells: (i extensive vacuolization; (ii abnormal chromatin condensation, its marginalization and concomitant degradation; (iii formation of autophagy-like vesicles (iv protoplast shrinkage (v fragmentation of cell nuclei and (vi extensive degeneration of the cells. The results obtained have been discussed with respect to the vacuolar/autolytic type of plant-specific AL-PCD.

  7. Characterization of partial trisomy 9p due to insertional translocation by chromosomal (micro)FISH

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Pater, JM; Ippel, PF; van Dam, WM; Loneus, WH; Engelen, JJM

    2002-01-01

    We describe a family with an insertion 12;9 translocation occurring in a balanced form in a mother and two sons, but in an unbalanced form in the proband, resulting in trisomy of chromosome region 9p22-->9p24. The proband manifests typical features of trisomy 9p; the clinical signs were mental and g

  8. A Fetus with Hb Bart's Disease Due to Maternal Uniparental Disomy for Chromosome 16.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Au, Patrick K C; Kan, Anita S Y; Tang, Mary H Y; Leung, Kwok Y; Chan, Kelvin Y K; Tang, Tommy W F; Lau, Elizabeth T

    2016-01-01

    We here report an unusual case of Hb Bart's (γ4) disease. Thalassemia screening of a couple showed that the wife was an α(0)-thalassemia (α(0)-thal) carrier and her husband's mean corpuscular volume (MCV) was normal. Chorionic villus sampling (CVS) was performed at 13 weeks' gestation for positive Down syndrome screening and chromosomal study of the cultured CVS showed a normal karyotype. Ultrasound examination at 22 weeks' gestation showed fetal cardiomegaly and raised middle cerebral artery peak systolic velocity. Cordocentesis confirmed fetal anemia and showed Hb Bart's disease. Multiplex gap-polymerase chain reaction (gap-PCR) for α-thal deletions on DNA extracted from the CVS showed the presence of a homozygous α(0)-thal - -(SEA) (Southeast Asian) deletion. The husband was found to be a carrier of the α(+)-thal -α(3.7) (rightward) deletion. Non paternity was excluded by fluorescent PCR using short tandem repeat (STR) markers on chromosomes 13, 18 and 21. A de novo terminal deletion of chromosome 16 was excluded by array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH). Detection of uniparental disomy (UPD), using STR markers on chromosome 16 showed maternal uniparental isodisomy from 16pter to 16p13.2, and uniparental heterodisomy from 16p13.13 to 16qter.

  9. ATR-16 due to a de novo complex rearrangement of chromosome 16.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallego, Marta S; Zelaya, Gabriela; Feliu, Aurora S; Rossetti, Liliana; Shaffer, Lisa G; Bailey, Kristen A; Bacino, Carlos A; Barreiro, Cristina Z

    2005-01-01

    We describe a child with ATR-16 [alpha-thalassemia (thal)/mental retardation], who was referred for genetic evaluation because of minor anomalies and developmental delay. Cytogenetic analysis demonstrated a de novo complex rearrangement of chromosome 16. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis, using chromosome 16 subtelomeric probes, showed that this patient had a deletion of the distal short arm of chromosome 16 that contains the alpha-globin genes and a duplication of 16q. Analysis of the alpha-globin locus by Southern blot showed a half normal dose of the alpha-globin gene. Microsatellite marker studies revealed that the duplicated 16q region was maternal in origin. Hematological studies revealed anemia, hypochromia and occasional cells with Hb H inclusion bodies. A hematological screening for alpha-thal should be considered in patients with mild developmental delay and a suggestive phenotype of ATR-16 with microcytic hypochromic anemia and normal iron status. The stellate pattern of the iris, a new finding in our patient, may contribute to a better clinical delineation of both syndromes, ATR-16 and/or duplication of 16qter.

  10. Normal newborn with prenatal suspicion of X chromosome monosomy due to confined placental mosaicism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serapinas, Danielius; Bartkeviciene, Daiva; Valantinaviciene, Emilija; Machtejeviene, Egle

    2016-10-01

    The recent introduction of cell-free DNA (cfDNA)-based noninvasive prenatal testing (NIPT) offers pregnant women a more accurate method than traditional serum screening methods for detecting fetal aneuploidies. Clinical trials have demonstrated the efficacy of NIPT for Down, Edwards and Patau syndromes. However NIPT approaches that take advantage of single-nucelotide polymorphism (SNP) information potentially allow the identification of triploidy, chromosomal microdeletion syndromes and other unusual genetic variants. To highlight this approach of NIPT we present a rare case of confined placental X chromosome monosomy mosaicism that was prenatally suspected with a single-nucleotide polymorphism-based noninvasive prenatal test. The results of invasive tests (amniocentesis) showed small proportion of X chromosome mosaicism (45, X[5]/46, XX[95]). After birth karyotype of the girl revealed no abnormalities (46 XX), confirming that mosaicism was limited to the placenta. These results highlight the need of patient's informed consent and thorough pretest and postest counseling to ensure that they understand the limitations and advantages of the tests and the implications of the resultss.

  11. Dose response of multiple parameters for calyculin A-induced premature chromosome condensation in human peripheral blood lymphocytes exposed to high doses of cobalt-60 gamma-rays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xue; Zhao, Hua; Feng, Jiang-Bin; Zhao, Xiao-Tao; Chen, De-Qing; Liu, Qing-Jie

    2016-09-01

    Many studies have investigated exposure biomarkers for high dose radiation. However, no systematic study on which biomarkers can be used in dose estimation through premature chromosome condensation (PCC) analysis has been conducted. The present study aims to screen the high-dose radiation exposure indicator in calyculin A-induced PCC. The dose response of multiple biological endpoints, including G2/A-PCC (G2/M and M/A-PCC) index, PCC ring (PCC-R), ratio of the longest/shortest length (L/L ratio), and length and width ratio of the longest chromosome (L/B ratio), were investigated in calyculin A-induced G2/A-PCC spreads in human peripheral blood lymphocytes exposed to 0-20Gy (dose-rate of 1Gy/min) cobalt-60 gamma-rays. The G2/A-PCC index was decreased with enhanced absorbed doses of 4-20Gy gamma-rays. The G2/A PCC-R at 0-12Gy gamma-rays conformed to Poisson distribution. Three types of PCC-R were scored according to their shape and their solidity or hollowness. The frequencies of hollow PCC-R and PCC-R including or excluding solid ring in G2/A-PCC spreads were enhanced with increased doses. The length and width of the longest chromosome, as well as the length of the shortest chromosome in each G2/M-PCC or M/A-PCC spread, were measured. All L/L or L/B ratios in G2/M-PCC or M/A-PCC spread increased with enhanced doses. A blind test with two new irradiated doses was conducted to validate which biomarker could be used in dose estimation. Results showed that hollow PCC-R and PCC-R including solid ring can be utilized for accurate dose estimation, and that hollow PCC-R was optimal for practical application.

  12. Simple biodosimetry method for cases of high-dose radiation exposure using the ratio of the longest/shortest length of Giemsa-stained drug-induced prematurely condensed chromosomes (PCC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotoh, E; Tanno, Y

    2005-05-01

    The aim was to develop a simple biodosimetry method for as rapid as possible estimation of absorbed radiation doses in victims of radiation accidents, in particular after high-dose exposure. Human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) were gamma-irradiated in vitro with several doses up to 40 Gy stimulated with phytohaemagglutinin-P (PHA-P) for 2 days and their chromosomes condensed prematurely using 50 nm calyculin A. Chromosome lengths of Giemsa-stained G2 prematurely condensed chromosomes (PCC) were measured using image analysing software and the ratio of the longest/shortest chromosome length was calculated. The length ratio (LR) of the longest/shortest Giemsa-stained chromosome s increased with a good correlation to the square root of the radiation dose (D) up to 40 Gy, i.e. LR = (4.90 x D0.5) + 2.14. The LR of the longest/shortest chromosome might be used as an index for estimating the radiation dose. The blood samples should not be cooled until the start of separation/stimulation of the lymphocytes. A rapid and easy estimation of large doses after whole-body exposure was identified by measuring the ratio of the longest/shortest length of Giemsa-stained G2-PCC induced by calyculin A. This simple protocol will be particularly useful for making therapy decisions for victims of ionizing radiation exposure and has potential for use as a biodosimeter for partial-body exposure accidents.

  13. NO-sensitive guanylyl cyclase beta1 subunit is peripherally associated to chromosomes during mitosis. Novel role in chromatin condensation and cell cycle progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pifarré, Paula; Baltrons, María Antonia; Földi, Istvan; García, Agustina

    2009-01-01

    NO-sensitive guanylyl cyclase (GC(NO)), the major NO target, is involved in important regulatory functions in the cardiovascular, gastrointestinal and central nervous systems. GC(NO) exists as heterodimers of alpha(1/2) and beta1 subunits. Deletion of the obligate beta1 dimerizing partner abrogates NO/cGMP signaling and shortens the life span of KO mice. Localization studies in the CNS have shown that beta1 is more widespread than alpha subunits and in some areas is the only GC(NO) subunit expressed, suggesting that beta1 may have GC(NO)-independent functions. GC(NO) is predominantly cytosolic, but association to membranes and other intracellular structures has been described. Here, we show localization of beta1 in cytoplasm and nucleus of cells expressing alpha subunits and GC(NO) activity (astrocytes, C6 cells), as well as in cells devoid of alpha subunits and GC(NO) activity (microglia). In both cell types beta1 associates peripherally to chromosomes in all phases of mitosis. Immunodepletion of beta1 in C6 cells enhances chromatin condensation in an in vitro assay. Moreover, silencing beta1 by siRNA induces cell cycle re-entry as determined by flow cytometry, and increases proliferation rate in a MTT-assay, whereas infection with beta1-containing adenovirus has the opposite effect. These actions are independent of cGMP formation. We postulate that beta1 is a multifunctional protein that regulates chromatin condensation and cell cycle progression, in addition to being an obligate monomer in functional GC(NO) heterodimers.

  14. Maternal uniparental disomy for human chromosome 14, due to loss of a chromosome 14 from somatic cells with t(13;14) trisomy 14.

    OpenAIRE

    Antonarakis, S E; Blouin, J L; Maher, J; Avramopoulos, D; Thomas, G.; Talbot, C C

    1993-01-01

    Uniparental disomy (UPD) for particular chromosomes is increasingly recognized as a cause of abnormal phenotypes in humans. We recently studied a 9-year-old female with a de novo Robertsonian translocation t(13;14), short stature, mild developmental delay, scoliosis, hyperextensible joints, hydrocephalus that resolved spontaneously during the first year of life, and hypercholesterolemia. To determine the parental origin of chromosomes 13 and 14 in the proband, we have studied the genotypes of...

  15. Vanadate triggers the transition from chromosome condensation to decondensation in a mitotic mutant (tsTM13) inactivation of p34cdc2/H1 kinase and dephosphorylation of mitosis-specific histone H3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajiro, K; Yasuda, H; Tsuji, H

    1996-11-01

    At the nonpermissive temperature (39 degrees C), chromosomes remain condensed in a temperature-sensitive cell mutant (tsTM13) arrested in the late stage of mitosis. Highly increased activity of histone H1 kinase, hyperphosphorylation of histone H1, and mitosis-specific histone H3 phosphorylation are maintained, even in telophase. In the present study, the defect of chromosome decondensation in tsTM13 cells was found to be partially normalized by a tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor, vanadate, with induction of chromosome decondensation and the formation of multinucleated cells. In the presence of vanadate, the H1 kinase activity dropped to near normal levels and the amount of the inactive from of p34cdc2 protein phosphorylated at a tyrosine residue was increased. H1 and H3 were also extensively de- phosphorylated, the latter being tightly associated with chromosome decondensation. Serine/threonine-protein phosphatase in late mitosis of the mutant works normally at 39 degrees C. The results indicate that (a) the genetic defect in the mutant may be involved in the control mechanism of the p34cdc2/H1 kinase activity in the late M phase rather than the phosphatase, (b) normalization of the defect of the mutant by vanadate results from inactivation of H1 kinase, and (c) late mitosis-specific events (p34cdc2/H1 kinase inactivation, mitosis-specific dephosphorylation of histone H1 and H3) are closely operating with chromosome decondensation.

  16. Fragmentation and desorption from condensed alcohols due to soft X-rays: relevance to solid state astrochemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almeida, G.C.; Rocco, M.L.M.; Boechat-Roberty, H.M.; Nazareth, A.M.; Amaral, L. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil); Andrade, D.P.P.; Bergantini, A. [Universidade do Vale do Paraiba (UNIVAP), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    Full text: Methanol and ethanol, the simplest organic alcohols, are important precursors of more complex prebiotic species and are found abundantly in icy mantles on interstellar and protostellar dust. These molecules have been detected through infrared spectroscopy in some low- and high-mass protostars, such as W33A and RAFGL 7009, and also in comets, as Hale-Bopp and other Solar system bodies, such as the Centaur 5145 Pholus grains. All of these astronomical environments are subjected to some kind of ionizing agents, such as cosmic rays, electrons and photons (e.g. stellar radiation field). The aim of this work is to experimentally study the ionization, dissociation and ion desorption processes induced by photons and electrons on alcohols, CH{sub 3}OH and CH{sub 3}CH{sub 2}OH, as part of a systematic experimental study of condensed (ice phase) prebiotic molecules. We have employed soft X-ray photons at the oxygen K edge and variable electron energies to simulate the effects of stellar radiation field on the astrophysics ices. These results were also compared with effects produced by charged particles from cosmic rays. Ion photodesorption experiments on the icy surface were carried out at the Brazilian Synchrotron Light Source (LNLS), using the Spherical Grating Monochromator (SGM) beam line, operated in the single-bunch mode of the storage ring, with a period of 311 ns and bunch width of 60ps. Several fragments such as CH{sub 2}{sup +}, O{sup +}, H{sup +} and H{sub 3}{sup +} have been identified and their desorption rates per impact were determined and compared with previous results obtained using different ionization agents, such as electrons, heavy ions and photons at different energies in order to provide data to astrochemical models. (author)

  17. Nano-encapsulation of a novel anti-Ran-GTPase peptide for blockade of regulator of chromosome condensation 1 (RCC1) function in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haggag, Yusuf A; Matchett, Kyle B; Dakir, El-Habib; Buchanan, Paul; Osman, Mohammed A; Elgizawy, Sanaa A; El-Tanani, Mohamed; Faheem, Ahmed M; McCarron, Paul A

    2017-02-02

    Ran is a small ras-related GTPase and is highly expressed in aggressive breast carcinoma. Overexpression induces malignant transformation and drives metastatic growth. We have designed a novel series of anti-Ran-GTPase peptides, which prevents Ran hydrolysis and activation, and although they display effectiveness in silico, peptide activity is suboptimal in vitro due to reduced bioavailability and poor delivery. To overcome this drawback, we delivered an anti-Ran-GTPase peptide using encapsulation in PLGA-based nanoparticles (NP). Formulation variables within a double emulsion solvent evaporation technique were controlled to optimise physicochemical properties. NP were spherical and negatively charged with a mean diameter of 182-277nm. Peptide integrity and stability were maintained after encapsulation and release kinetics followed a sustained profile. We were interested in the relationship between cellular uptake and poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) in the NP matrix, with results showing enhanced in vitro uptake with increasing PEG content. Peptide-loaded, pegylated (10% PEG)-PLGA NP induced significant cytotoxic and apoptotic effects in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells, with no evidence of similar effects in cells pulsed with free peptide. Western blot analysis showed that encapsulated peptide interfered with the proposed signal transduction pathway of the Ran gene. Our novel blockade peptide prevented Ran activation by blockage of regulator of chromosome condensation 1 (RCC1) following peptide release directly in the cytoplasm once endocytosis of the peptide-loaded nanoparticle has occurred. RCC1 blockage was effective only when a nanoparticulate delivery approach was adopted.

  18. Cryptic t(4;11) encoding MLL-AF4 due to insertion of 5' MLL sequences in chromosome 4

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    von Bergh, A; Gargallo, P; De Prijck, B; Vranckx, H; Marschalek, R; Larripa, I; Kluin, P; Schuuring, E; Hagemeijer, A

    2001-01-01

    The t(4;11) translocation is the cytogenetic hallmark of a subset of acute lymphoblastic leukemias characterized by pro-B immunophenotype and a dismal prognosis. This translocation fuses the MLL gene on chromosome band 11q23 and the AF4 gene on 4q21, resulting in the expression of fusion transcripts

  19. Diagnosis of familial Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome due to a paternal cryptic chromosomal rearrangement by conventional and molecular cytogenetic techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venegas-Vega, Carlos A; Fernández-Ramírez, Fernando; Zepeda, Luis M; Nieto-Martínez, Karem; Gómez-Laguna, Laura; Garduño-Zarazúa, Luz M; Berumen, Jaime; Kofman, Susana; Cervantes, Alicia

    2013-01-01

    The use of conventional cytogenetic techniques in combination with fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) and single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) microarrays is necessary for the identification of cryptic rearrangements in the diagnosis of chromosomal syndromes. We report two siblings, a boy of 9 years and 9 months of age and his 7-years- and 5-month-old sister, with the classic Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome (WHS) phenotype. Using high-resolution GTG- and NOR-banding karyotypes, as well as FISH analysis, we characterized a pure 4p deletion in both sibs and a balanced rearrangement in their father, consisting in an insertion of 4p material within a nucleolar organizing region of chromosome 15. Copy number variant (CNV) analysis using SNP arrays showed that both siblings have a similar size of 4p deletion (~6.5 Mb). Our results strongly support the need for conventional cytogenetic and FISH analysis, as well as high-density microarray mapping for the optimal characterization of the genetic imbalance in patients with WHS; parents must always be studied for recognizing cryptic balanced chromosomal rearrangements for an adequate genetic counseling.

  20. Diagnosis of Familial Wolf-Hirschhorn Syndrome due to a Paternal Cryptic Chromosomal Rearrangement by Conventional and Molecular Cytogenetic Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos A. Venegas-Vega

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of conventional cytogenetic techniques in combination with fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH and single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP microarrays is necessary for the identification of cryptic rearrangements in the diagnosis of chromosomal syndromes. We report two siblings, a boy of 9 years and 9 months of age and his 7-years- and 5-month-old sister, with the classic Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome (WHS phenotype. Using high-resolution GTG- and NOR-banding karyotypes, as well as FISH analysis, we characterized a pure 4p deletion in both sibs and a balanced rearrangement in their father, consisting in an insertion of 4p material within a nucleolar organizing region of chromosome 15. Copy number variant (CNV analysis using SNP arrays showed that both siblings have a similar size of 4p deletion (~6.5 Mb. Our results strongly support the need for conventional cytogenetic and FISH analysis, as well as high-density microarray mapping for the optimal characterization of the genetic imbalance in patients with WHS; parents must always be studied for recognizing cryptic balanced chromosomal rearrangements for an adequate genetic counseling.

  1. Fatal malonyl CoA decarboxylase deficiency due to maternal uniparental isodisomy of the telomeric end of chromosome 16.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malvagia, S; Papi, L; Morrone, A; Donati, M A; Ciani, F; Pasquini, E; la Marca, G; Scholte, H R; Genuardi, M; Zammarchi, E

    2007-11-01

    Malonic aciduria is a rare autosomal recessive disorder caused by deficiency of malonyl-CoA decarboxylase, encoded by the MLYCD gene. We report on a patient with clinical presentation in the neonatal period. Metabolic investigations led to a diagnosis of malonyl-CoA decarboxylase deficiency, confirmed by decreased activity in cultured fibroblasts. High doses of carnitine and a diet low in lipids led to a reduction in malonic acid excretion, and to an improvement in his clinical conditions, but at the age of 4 months he died suddenly and unexpectedly. No autopsy was performed. Molecular analysis of the MLYCD gene performed on the proband's RNA and genomic DNA identified a previously undescribed mutation (c.772-775delACTG) which was homozygous. This mutation was present in his mother but not in his father; paternity was confirmed by microsatellite analysis. A hypothesis of maternal uniparental disomy (UPD) was investigated using fourteen microsatellite markers on chromosome 16, and the results confirmed maternal UPD. Maternal isodisomy of the 16q24 region led to homozygosity for the MLYCD mutant allele, causing the patient's disease. These findings are relevant for genetic counselling of couples with a previously affected child, since the recurrence risk in future pregnancies is dramatically reduced by the finding of UPD. In addition, since the patient had none of the clinical manifestations previously associated with maternal UPD 16, this case provides no support for the existence of maternally imprinted genes on chromosome 16 with a major effect on phenotype.

  2. Assessment of aneuploidy in human oocytes and preimplantation embryos by chromosome painting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rougier, N.; Viegas-Pequignot, E.; Plachot, M. [Hospital Necker, Paris (France)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    The poor quality of chromosome preparations often observed after fixation of oocytes and embryos did not usually allow accurate identification of chromosomes involved in non-disjunctions. We, therefore, used chromosome painting to determine the incidence of abnormalities for chromosomes 1 and 7. A total of 50 oocytes inseminated for IVF and showing no signs of fertilization as well as 37 diploid embryos donated for research were fixed according to the Dyban`s technique. Fluorescence in situ hybridization was carried out using whole chromosome painting DNA probes specific for human chromosome 1 and 7. The incidence of aneuploidy was 28%, 10% and 60% for metaphase II, polar body and sperm chromosomes, respectively. The high incidence of aneuploidy observed in sperm prematurely condensed sperm chromosomes is due to the fact that usually far less than 23 sperm chromatids are observed, maybe as a consequence of incomplete chromosome condensation. Thirty seven embryos were analyzed with the same probes. 48% of early embryos were either monosomic 1 or 7 or mosaics comprising blastomeres with 1, 2 or 3 signals. Thus, 8 among the 11 abnormal embryos had hypodiploid cells (25 to 37 chromosomes) indicating either an artefactual loss of chromosomes or a complex anomaly of nuclear division (maltinucleated blastomeres, abnormal migration of chromosomes at anaphase). We therefore calculated a {open_quotes}corrected{close_quotes} incidence of aneuploidy for chromosomes 1 or 7 in early embryos: 18%. 86% of the blastocysts showed mosaicism 2n/3 or 4n as a consequence of the formation of the syncitiotrophoblast. To conclude, chromosome painting is an efficient method to accurately identify chromosomes involved in aneuploidy. This technique should allow us to evaluate the incidence of non-disjunction for all chromosome pairs. Our results confirm the high incidence of chromosome abnormalities occurring as a consequence of meiotic or mitotic non-disjunctions in human oocytes and embryos.

  3. LPIN1 deficiency with severe recurrent rhabdomyolysis and persistent elevation of creatine kinase levels due to chromosome 2 maternal isodisomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.A. Meijer

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Fatty acid oxidation disorders and lipin-1 deficiency are the commonest genetic causes of rhabdomyolysis in children. We describe a lipin-1-deficient boy with recurrent, severe rhabdomyolytic episodes from the age of 4 years. Analysis of the LPIN1 gene that encodes lipin-1 revealed a novel homozygous frameshift mutation in exon 9, c.1381delC (p.Leu461SerfsX47, and complete uniparental isodisomy of maternal chromosome 2. This mutation is predicted to cause complete lipin-1 deficiency. The patient had six rhabdomyolytic crises, with creatine kinase (CK levels up to 300,000 U/L (normal, 30 to 200. Plasma CK remained elevated between crises. A treatment protocol was instituted, with early aggressive monitoring, hydration, electrolyte replacement and high caloric, high carbohydrate intake. The patient received dexamethasone during two crises, which was well-tolerated and in these episodes, peak CK values were lower than in preceding episodes. Studies of anti-inflammatory therapy may be indicated in lipin-1 deficiency.

  4. Preventing freezing of condensate inside tubes of air cooled condenser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joo, Jeong A; Hwang, In Hwan; Lee, Dong Hwan [Chonbuk Nat' l Univ., Jeonju (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Young Il [Drexel Univ., Philadelphia (United States)

    2012-08-15

    An air cooled condenser is a device that is used for converting steam into condensate by using ambient air. The air cooled condenser is prone to suffer from a serious explosion when the condensate inside the tubes of a heat exchanger is frozen; in particular, tubes can break during winter. This is primarily due to the structural problem of the tube outlet of an existing conventional air cooled condenser system, which causes the backflow of residual steam and noncondensable gases. To solve the backflow problem in such condensers, such a system was simulated and a new system was designed and evaluated in this study. The experimental results using the simulated condenser showed the occurrence of freezing because of the backflow inside the tube. On the other hand, no backflow and freezing occurred in the advanced new condenser, and efficient heat exchange occurred.

  5. Water Condensation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kasper Risgaard; Fojan, Peter; Jensen, Rasmus Lund

    2014-01-01

    The condensation of water is a phenomenon occurring in multiple situations in everyday life, e.g., when fog is formed or when dew forms on the grass or on windows. This means that this phenomenon plays an important role within the different fields of science including meteorology, building physics......, and chemistry. In this review we address condensation models and simulations with the main focus on heterogeneous condensation of water. The condensation process is, at first, described from a thermodynamic viewpoint where the nucleation step is described by the classical nucleation theory. Further, we address...

  6. Lenalidomide: a review of its use in patients with transfusion-dependent anaemia due to low- or intermediate-1-risk myelodysplastic syndrome associated with 5q chromosome deletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syed, Yahiya Y; Scott, Lesley J

    2013-07-01

    Lenalidomide (Revlimid(®)), a thalidomide analogue, is an orally administered second generation immunomodulator with anti-angiogenic, antineoplastic, anti-inflammatory and pro-erythropoietic properties. It is approved for the treatment of patients with transfusion-dependent anaemia due to International Prognostic Scoring System low- or intermediate-1-risk myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) associated with either chromosome 5q deletion [del(5q)] with or without additional cytogenetic abnormalities (US, Japan and Switzerland etc.), or with an isolated del(5q) cytogenetic abnormality when other therapeutic options are insufficient or inadequate (EU) [featured indication]. In a randomized, double-blind, multicentre, registrational trial (MDS-004; n = 205) in this patient population, a significantly higher proportion of lenalidomide recipients than placebo recipients achieved red blood cell transfusion independence for ≥26 consecutive weeks (primary endpoint for efficacy) and cytogenetic responses. The erythroid response to lenalidomide was accompanied by an increase in the haemoglobin levels. These efficacy outcomes are generally consistent with those seen in an earlier noncomparative registrational trial (MDS-003; n = 148). In MDS-004, lenalidomide also significantly improved health-related quality of life compared with placebo at 12 weeks. Retrospective analyses that compared outcomes between lenalidomide-treated patients with low- or intermediate-1-risk del(5q) MDS and multicentre registry cohorts showed that lenalidomide treatment did not appear to increase the risk of progression to acute myeloid leukaemia. Lenalidomide had a manageable safety profile in the registrational trials, with ≤20 % of patients discontinuing treatment because of adverse events. The most common adverse events (incidence ≥20 %) occurring in lenalidomide recipients were thrombocytopenia and neutropenia, which were generally managed by dosage reductions and/or interruptions, and

  7. Analysis of the Fgfr2C342Y mouse model shows condensation defects due to misregulation of Sox9 expression in prechondrocytic mesenchyme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peskett, Emma; Kumar, Samin; Baird, William; Jaiswal, Janhvi; Li, Ming; Patel, Priyanca; Britto, Jonathan A.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Syndromic craniosynostosis caused by mutations in FGFR2 is characterised by developmental pathology in both endochondral and membranous skeletogenesis. Detailed phenotypic characterisation of features in the membranous calvarium, the endochondral cranial base and other structures in the axial and appendicular skeleton has not been performed at embryonic stages. We investigated bone development in the Crouzon mouse model (Fgfr2C342Y) at pre- and post-ossification stages to improve understanding of the underlying pathogenesis. Phenotypic analysis was performed by whole-mount skeletal staining (Alcian Blue/Alizarin Red) and histological staining of sections of CD1 wild-type (WT), Fgfr2C342Y/+ heterozygous (HET) and Fgfr2C342Y/C342Y homozygous (HOM) mouse embryos from embryonic day (E)12.5-E17.5 stages. Gene expression (Sox9, Shh, Fgf10 and Runx2) was studied by in situ hybridisation and protein expression (COL2A1) by immunohistochemistry. Our analysis has identified severely decreased osteogenesis in parts of the craniofacial skeleton together with increased chondrogenesis in parts of the endochondral and cartilaginous skeleton in HOM embryos. The Sox9 expression domain in tracheal and basi-cranial chondrocytic precursors at E13.5 in HOM embryos is increased and expanded, correlating with the phenotypic observations which suggest FGFR2 signalling regulates Sox9 expression. Combined with abnormal staining of type II collagen in pre-chondrocytic mesenchyme, this is indicative of a mesenchymal condensation defect. An expanded spectrum of phenotypic features observed in the Fgfr2C342Y/C342Y mouse embryo paves the way towards better understanding the clinical attributes of human Crouzon–Pfeiffer syndrome. FGFR2 mutation results in impaired skeletogenesis; however, our findings suggest that many phenotypic aberrations stem from a primary failure of pre-chondrogenic/osteogenic mesenchymal condensation and link FGFR2 to SOX9, a principal regulator of skeletogenesis

  8. [Sex chromosomes and meiosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guichaoua, M-R; Geoffroy-Siraudin, C; Tassistro, V; Ghalamoun-Slaimi, R; Perrin, J; Metzler-Guillemain, C

    2009-01-01

    Sex chromosome behaviour fundamentally differs between male and female meiosis. In oocyte, X chromosomes synapse giving a XX bivalent which is not recognizable in their morphology and behaviour from autosomal bivalents. In human male, X and Y chromosomes differ from one another in their morphology and their genetic content, leading to a limited pairing and preventing genetic recombination, excepted in homologous region PAR1. During pachytene stage of the first meiotic prophase, X and Y chromosomes undergo a progressive condensation and form a transcriptionally silenced peripheral XY body. The condensation of the XY bivalent during pachytene stage led us to describe four pachytene substages and to localize the pachytene checkpoint between substages 2 and 3. We also defined the pachytene index (PI=P1+P2/P1+P2+P3+P4) which is always less than 0.50 in normal meiosis. XY body undergoes decondensation at diplotene stage, but transcriptional inactivation of the two sex chromosomes or Meiotic Sex Chromosome Inactivation (MSCI) persists through to the end of spermatogenesis. Sex chromosome inactivation involves several proteins, some of them were now identified. Two isoforms of the HP1 protein, HP1beta and HP1gamma, are involved in the facultative heterochromatinization of the XY body, but the initiation of this process involves the phosphorylation of the protein H2AX by the kinase ATR whose recruitment depends on BRCA1. Extensive researches on the inactivation of the sex chromosomes during male meiosis will allow to a better understanding of some male infertilities.

  9. Tetrasomy 13q31.1qter due to an inverted duplicated neocentric marker chromosome in a fetus with multiple malformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddad, Véronique; Aboura, Azzedine; Tosca, Lucie; Guediche, Narjes; Mas, Anne-Elisabeth; L'Herminé, Aurore Coulomb; Druart, Luc; Picone, Olivier; Brisset, Sophie; Tachdjian, Gérard

    2012-04-01

    Small supernumerary marker chromosome (sSMC) lacking alpha satellite DNA or endogenous centromere regions are rare and contain fully functional centromeres, called neocentromeres. We report on a woman with a 14-week gestation pregnancy with a cystic hygroma and cerebellar hypoplasia at ultrasound examination. Cytogenetic studies showed a karyotype 47,XY,+mar dn. This sSMC was observed in chorionic villi, lung, and muscle tissue. Array Comparative Genomic Hybridization showed a gain from 13q31.1 to 13qter region. Fluorescent in situ hybridization with pan alpha satellite probe and probes specific for chromosome 13 showed a marker corresponding to an inversion duplication of the 13q distal chromosomal region without alpha satellite DNA sequence, suggesting the presence of a neocentromere. Examination of the fetus showed dysmorphic features, cystic cervical hygroma, postaxial polydactyly of the right hand and left foot with short fingers, malrotation of the gut, and a micropenis with hypospadias. Genotype-phenotype correlation in tetrasomy 13q is discussed according to the four 13q chromosomal breakpoints reported (13q32, 13q31, 13q21, 13q14) for chromosome 13 supernumerary markers.

  10. Highly distinct chromosomal structures in cowpea (Vigna unguiculata), as revealed by molecular cytogenetic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwata-Otsubo, Aiko; Lin, Jer-Young; Gill, Navdeep; Jackson, Scott A

    2016-05-01

    Cowpea (Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp) is an important legume, particularly in developing countries. However, little is known about its genome or chromosome structure. We used molecular cytogenetics to characterize the structure of pachytene chromosomes to advance our knowledge of chromosome and genome organization of cowpea. Our data showed that cowpea has highly distinct chromosomal structures that are cytologically visible as brightly DAPI-stained heterochromatic regions. Analysis of the repetitive fraction of the cowpea genome present at centromeric and pericentromeric regions confirmed that two retrotransposons are major components of pericentromeric regions and that a 455-bp tandem repeat is found at seven out of 11 centromere pairs in cowpea. These repeats likely evolved after the divergence of cowpea from common bean and form chromosomal structure unique to cowpea. The integration of cowpea genetic and physical chromosome maps reveals potential regions of suppressed recombination due to condensed heterochromatin and a lack of pairing in a few chromosomal termini. This study provides fundamental knowledge on cowpea chromosome structure and molecular cytogenetics tools for further chromosome studies.

  11. B chromosomes and sex in animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camacho, J P M; Schmid, M; Cabrero, J

    2011-01-01

    Supernumerary (B) chromosomes are dispensable elements found in many eukaryote genomes in addition to standard (A) chromosomes. In many respects, B chromosomes resemble sex chromosomes, so that a common ancestry for them has frequently been suggested. For instance, B chromosomes in grasshoppers, and other insects, show a pycnotic cycle of condensation-decondensation during meiosis remarkably similar to that of the X chromosome. In some cases, B chromosome size is even very similar to that of the X chromosome. These resemblances have led to suggest the X as the B ancestor in many cases. In addition, sex chromosome origin from B chromosomes has also been suggested. In this article, we review the existing evidence for both evolutionary pathways, as well as sex differences for B frequency at adult and embryo progeny levels, B chromosome effects or B chromosome transmission. In addition, we review cases found in the literature showing sex-ratio distortion associated with B chromosome presence, the most extreme case being the paternal sex ratio (PSR) chromosomes in some Hymenoptera. We finally analyse the possibility of B chromosome regularisation within the host genome and, as a consequence of it, whether B chromosomes can become regular members of the host genome.

  12. Marker chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Kiran Prabhaker; Belogolovkin, Victoria

    2013-04-01

    Marker chromosomes are a morphologically heterogeneous group of structurally abnormal chromosomes that pose a significant challenge in prenatal diagnosis. Phenotypes associated with marker chromosomes are highly variable and range from normal to severely abnormal. Clinical outcomes are very difficult to predict when marker chromosomes are detected prenatally. In this review, we outline the classification, etiology, cytogenetic characterization, and clinical consequences of marker chromosomes, as well as practical approaches to prenatal diagnosis and genetic counseling.

  13. Bias in peak clad temperature predictions due to uncertainties in modeling of ECC bypass and dissolved non-condensable gas phenomena

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rohatgi, U.S.; Neymotin, L.Y.; Jo, J.; Wulff, W. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (USA))

    1990-09-01

    This report describes a general method for estimating the effect on the Reflood Phase PCT from systematic errors (biases) associated with the modelling of the ECCS and dissolved nitrogen, and the application of this method in estimating biases in the Reflood Phase PCT (second PCT) predicted by the TRAC/PF1/MOD1, Version 14.3. The bias in the second PCT due to the uncertainty in the existing code models for ECCS related phenomena is {minus}19{degree}K ({minus}34{degree}F). The negative bias implies that the code models for this phenomena are conservative. The bias in the second PCT due to the lack of modelling of dissolved N{sub 2} in the code is estimated to be 9.9{degree}K (17.8{degree}F). The positive bias implies that the absence of dissolved N{sub 2} model makes the code prediction of PCT non-conservative. The bias estimation in this report is a major exception among all other uncertainty and bias assessments performed in conjunction with the CSAU methodology demonstration, because this bias estimation benefitted from using full-scale test data from the full-scale Upper Plenum Test Facility (UPTF). Thus, the bias estimates presented here are unaffected by scale distortions in test facilities. Data from small size facilities were also available and an estimate of bias based on these data will be conservative. 35 refs., 18 figs., 5 tabs.

  14. Duplication of the segment q12.2 leads to qter of chromosome 22 due to paternal inversion 22(p13q12.2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimoto, A; Wilson, M G; Towner, J W

    1983-01-01

    A 1730-g male infant, born at 37 weeks gestation, had multiple congenital anomalies, consisting of microcephaly, hypertelorism, bilateral cleft lip and palate, micrognathia, low-set ears, and cryptorchidism. Chromosome analysis showed a recombinant 22 derived from the paternal inversion (22)(p13q12.2). The proband's karyotype is 46,XY,rec(22),dup q,inv(22)(p13q12.2)pat, which has a duplication of q12.2 leads to qter. An identical recombinant has been reported in a female infant in Mexico whose mother was a carrier of the inversion. Similar congenital anomalies present in these two patients demonstrate the phenotype of duplication of the distal long arm 22. This report also documents the occurrence of an identical inversion in two apparently unrelated Mexican families.

  15. Condensation heat transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, J. W.

    The paper gives a brief description of some of the better understood aspects of condensation heat transfer and includes discussion of the liquid-vapour interface, natural and forced convection laminar film condensation and dropwise condensation.

  16. Telomere dysfunction and chromosome instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murnane, John P., E-mail: jmurnane@radonc.ucsf.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California San Francisco, 2340 Sutter Street, San Francisco, CA 94143-1331 (United States)

    2012-02-01

    The ends of chromosomes are composed of a short repeat sequence and associated proteins that together form a cap, called a telomere, that keeps the ends from appearing as double-strand breaks (DSBs) and prevents chromosome fusion. The loss of telomeric repeat sequences or deficiencies in telomeric proteins can result in chromosome fusion and lead to chromosome instability. The similarity between chromosome rearrangements resulting from telomere loss and those found in cancer cells implicates telomere loss as an important mechanism for the chromosome instability contributing to human cancer. Telomere loss in cancer cells can occur through gradual shortening due to insufficient telomerase, the protein that maintains telomeres. However, cancer cells often have a high rate of spontaneous telomere loss despite the expression of telomerase, which has been proposed to result from a combination of oncogene-mediated replication stress and a deficiency in DSB repair in telomeric regions. Chromosome fusion in mammalian cells primarily involves nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ), which is the major form of DSB repair. Chromosome fusion initiates chromosome instability involving breakage-fusion-bridge (B/F/B) cycles, in which dicentric chromosomes form bridges and break as the cell attempts to divide, repeating the process in subsequent cell cycles. Fusion between sister chromatids results in large inverted repeats on the end of the chromosome, which amplify further following additional B/F/B cycles. B/F/B cycles continue until the chromosome acquires a new telomere, most often by translocation of the end of another chromosome. The instability is not confined to a chromosome that loses its telomere, because the instability is transferred to the chromosome donating a translocation. Moreover, the amplified regions are unstable and form extrachromosomal DNA that can reintegrate at new locations. Knowledge concerning the factors promoting telomere loss and its consequences is

  17. Chromosomal mosaicism goes global

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yurov Yuri B

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Intercellular differences of chromosomal content in the same individual are defined as chromosomal mosaicism (alias intercellular or somatic genomic variations or, in a number of publications, mosaic aneuploidy. It has long been suggested that this phenomenon poorly contributes both to intercellular (interindividual diversity and to human disease. However, our views have recently become to change due to a series of communications demonstrated a higher incidence of chromosomal mosaicism in diseased individuals (major psychiatric disorders and autoimmune diseases as well as depicted chromosomal mosaicism contribution to genetic diversity, the central nervous system development, and aging. The later has been produced by significant achievements in the field of molecular cytogenetics. Recently, Molecular Cytogenetics has published an article by Maj Hulten and colleagues that has provided evidences for chromosomal mosaicism to underlie formation of germline aneuploidy in human female gametes using trisomy 21 (Down syndrome as a model. Since meiotic aneuploidy is suggested to be the leading genetic cause of human prenatal mortality and postnatal morbidity, these data together with previous findings define chromosomal mosaicism not as a casual finding during cytogenetic analyses but as a more significant biological phenomenon than previously recognized. Finally, the significance of chromosomal mosaicism can be drawn from the fact, that this phenomenon is involved in genetic diversity, normal and abnormal prenatal development, human diseases, aging, and meiotic aneuploidy, the intrinsic cause of which remains, as yet, unknown.

  18. Quantification of chromatin condensation level by image processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irianto, Jerome; Lee, David A; Knight, Martin M

    2014-03-01

    The level of chromatin condensation is related to the silencing/activation of chromosomal territories and therefore impacts on gene expression. Chromatin condensation changes during cell cycle, progression and differentiation, and is influenced by various physicochemical and epigenetic factors. This study describes a validated experimental technique to quantify chromatin condensation. A novel image processing procedure is developed using Sobel edge detection to quantify the level of chromatin condensation from nuclei images taken by confocal microscopy. The algorithm was developed in MATLAB and used to quantify different levels of chromatin condensation in chondrocyte nuclei achieved through alteration in osmotic pressure. The resulting chromatin condensation parameter (CCP) is in good agreement with independent multi-observer qualitative visual assessment. This image processing technique thereby provides a validated unbiased parameter for rapid and highly reproducible quantification of the level of chromatin condensation.

  19. 肺癌患者呼出气冷凝液中基因微卫星改变和p53基因变异的检测及其意义%Significance of detection of chromosome microsatellite alterations and p53 gene mutation in exhaled breath condensate of lung cancer patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯哲敏; 陈建荣; 蔡映云

    2009-01-01

    呼出气冷凝液(exhaled breath condensate,EBC)检测是一种新的肺部病变诊断技术.通过检测EBC中相关基因.从而寻找早期诊断肺癌的新方法是目前肺癌研究的热点.采用聚合酶链式反应,对肺癌患者EBC中3号染色体短臂上基因的微卫星异常以及p53基因变异进行检测,结果发现肺癌患者EBC中基因微卫星改变和p53基因变异较正常对照者阳性率明显为高.目前对于EBC基因检测尚属探索阶段,但随着检测技术的不断完善,检测EBC中肺癌的基因标志物是一个较为有希望提高肺癌早期诊断率的方法.%Detection of the exhaled breath condensate(EBC) is a new diagnosis for lung disease.Detecting gene mutation in EBC of lung cancer patients as a potential method of diagnosing lung cancer in early period has become a hot spot in lung cancer research. Some researches, which detect gene mutation in EBC by using polymerase chain reaction, demonstrate that positive rates of p53 gene mutation and chromosome microsatellite alterations in chromosomal region 3p of lung cancer patients are higher than those of healthy peoples. Detecting gene mutation in EBC is still in research stage. However, as the continual development of detecting technique,it is expected to raise the early diagnosis of lung carcinoma.

  20. Modeling Chromosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Carol

    2016-01-01

    Learning about chromosomes is standard fare in biology classrooms today. However, students may find it difficult to understand the relationships among the "genome", "chromosomes", "genes", a "gene locus", and "alleles". In the simple activity described in this article, which follows the 5E approach…

  1. Superfluidity in polariton condensates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amo, A; Lefrere, J; Adrados, C; Giacobino, E; Bramati, A [Laboratoire Kastler Brossel, UPMC, ENS and CNRS, 75005 Paris (France); Sanvitto, D; Laussy, F P; Ballarini, D; Valle, E del; MartIn, M D; Tejedor, C; Vina, L [SEMICUAM, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Pigeon, S; Ciuti, C [Laboratoire Materiaux et Phenomenes Quantiques, UMR 7162, Universite Paris Diderot-Paris 7 and CNRS, 75013 Paris (France); Carusotto, I [BEC-CNR-INFM and Dip. di Fisica, Universita di Trento, I-38050 Povo (Italy); Houdre, R [Institut de Photonique et d' Electronique Quantique, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, Station 3, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); LemaItre, A; Bloch, J [Laboratoire de Photonique et de Nanostructures, CNRS, Route de Nozay, 91460 Marcoussis (France); Krizhanovskii, D N; Skolnick, M S, E-mail: alberto.amo@spectro.jussieu.f [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Sheffield, S3 7RH, Sheffield (United Kingdom)

    2010-02-01

    Exciton-polaritons, two-dimensional composite bosons arising from the quantum mixture of excitons and photons, can manifest many-body quantum effects at liquid He temperatures (4 K). Interestingly, polaritons are predicted to behave as particular quantum fluids due to their out of equilibrium character, arising from their reduced lifetime (shorter than their thermalization time). Here we report the observation of superfluid motion of polaritons in semiconductor microcavities both under cw and pulsed excitation. Among other signatures, superfluidity is manifested via the absence of scattering of the polariton condensates when encountering a localized defect in their flow path.

  2. Effect of Non-Condensable Gas Mass Fraction on Condensation Heat Transfer for Water-Ethanol Vapor Mixture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shixue; Utaka, Yoshio

    The condensation heat transfer characteristic curves for a ternary vapor mixture of water, ethanol and air (or nitrogen) under several ethanol concentrations and relatively low concentrations of air (or nitrogen) were measured. The effect of non-condensable gas on several different domains in the condensation curves was discussed. The effect of non-condensable gas in the domains controlled by the diffusion resistance and the filmwise condensation was not notable; whereas that in the domain dominated by the condensate resistance of dropwise mode was remarkable. Moreover, variations due to changes in non-condensable gas concentration of several characteristic points representing the curves were discussed.

  3. Building bridges within the bacterial chromosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Dan; Loparo, Joseph J

    2015-03-01

    All organisms must dramatically compact their genomes to accommodate DNA within the cell. Bacteria use a set of DNA-binding proteins with low sequence specificity called nucleoid-associated proteins (NAPs) to assist in chromosome condensation and organization. By bending or bridging DNA, NAPs also facilitate chromosome segregation and regulate gene expression. Over the past decade, emerging single-molecule and chromosome conformation capture techniques have investigated the molecular mechanisms by which NAPs remodel and organize the bacterial chromosome. In this review we describe how such approaches reveal the biochemical mechanisms of three NAPs that are believed to facilitate DNA bridging: histone-like nucleoid structuring protein (H-NS), ParB, and structural maintenance of chromosomes (SMC). These three proteins form qualitatively different DNA bridges, leading to varied effects on transcription and chromosome segregation.

  4. Male-biased aganglionic megacolon in the TashT mouse line due to perturbation of silencer elements in a large gene desert of chromosome 10.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karl-F Bergeron

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Neural crest cells (NCC are a transient migratory cell population that generates diverse cell types such as neurons and glia of the enteric nervous system (ENS. Via an insertional mutation screen for loci affecting NCC development in mice, we identified one line-named TashT-that displays a partially penetrant aganglionic megacolon phenotype in a strong male-biased manner. Interestingly, this phenotype is highly reminiscent of human Hirschsprung's disease, a neurocristopathy with a still unexplained male sex bias. In contrast to the megacolon phenotype, colonic aganglionosis is almost fully penetrant in homozygous TashT animals. The sex bias in megacolon expressivity can be explained by the fact that the male ENS ends, on average, around a "tipping point" of minimal colonic ganglionosis while the female ENS ends, on average, just beyond it. Detailed analysis of embryonic intestines revealed that aganglionosis in homozygous TashT animals is due to slower migration of enteric NCC. The TashT insertional mutation is localized in a gene desert containing multiple highly conserved elements that exhibit repressive activity in reporter assays. RNAseq analyses and 3C assays revealed that the TashT insertion results, at least in part, in NCC-specific relief of repression of the uncharacterized gene Fam162b; an outcome independently confirmed via transient transgenesis. The transcriptional signature of enteric NCC from homozygous TashT embryos is also characterized by the deregulation of genes encoding members of the most important signaling pathways for ENS formation-Gdnf/Ret and Edn3/Ednrb-and, intriguingly, the downregulation of specific subsets of X-linked genes. In conclusion, this study not only allowed the identification of Fam162b coding and regulatory sequences as novel candidate loci for Hirschsprung's disease but also provides important new insights into its male sex bias.

  5. Phase contrast imaging of Bose condensed clouds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meppelink, R; Rozendaal, R.A.; Koller, S.B.; Vogels, J.M.; van der Straten, P.

    2010-01-01

    Phase contrast imaging is used to observe Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) at finite temperature in situ. The imaging technique is used to accurately derive the absolute phase shift of a probe laser beam due to both the condensate and the thermal cloud. The accuracy of the method is enhanced by usin

  6. Chromosome therapy. Correction of large chromosomal aberrations by inducing ring chromosomes in induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Taehyun; Bershteyn, Marina; Wynshaw-Boris, Anthony

    2014-01-01

    The fusion of the short (p) and long (q) arms of a chromosome is referred to as a "ring chromosome." Ring chromosome disorders occur in approximately 1 in 50,000-100,000 patients. Ring chromosomes can result in birth defects, mental disabilities, and growth retardation if additional genes are deleted during the formation of the ring. Due to the severity of these large-scale aberrations affecting multiple contiguous genes, no possible therapeutic strategies for ring chromosome disorders have so far been proposed. Our recent study (Bershteyn et al.) using patient-derived fibroblast lines containing ring chromosomes, found that cellular reprogramming of these fibroblasts into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) resulted in the cell-autonomous correction of the ring chromosomal aberration via compensatory uniparental disomy (UPD). These observations have important implications for studying the mechanism of chromosomal number control and may lead to the development of effective therapies for other, more common, chromosomal aberrations.

  7. A three-generation family with terminal microdeletion involving 5p15.33-32 due to a whole-arm 5;15 chromosomal translocation with a steady phenotype of atypical cri du chat syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmakky, Amira; Carli, Diana; Lugli, Licia; Torelli, Paola; Guidi, Battista; Falcinelli, Cristina; Fini, Sergio; Ferrari, Fabrizio; Percesepe, Antonio

    2014-03-01

    Cri du chat syndrome is characterized by cat-like cry, facial dysmorphisms, microcephaly, speech delay, intellectual disability and slow growth rate, which are present with variable frequency. The typical cri du chat syndrome, due to 5p15.2 deletion, includes severe intellectual disability, facial dysmorphisms, neonatal hypotonia and pre- and post-natal growth retardation, whereas more distal deletions in 5p15.3 lead to cat-like cry and speech delay and produce the clinical picture of the atypical cri du chat syndrome, with minimal or absent intellectual impairment. In this article we report a three-generation family with an unbalanced whole arm translocation between chromosome 5 and 15 and a microdeletion of 5.5 Mb involving 5p15.33-32. By reporting the smallest terminal deletion of 5p15.3 described so far and by reviewing the literature we discuss the genotype/phenotype correlations of the distal region of the cri du chat syndrome. The previously described critical region for the speech delay may be narrowed down and microcephaly, growth retardation and dysmorphic facial features can be included in the phenotypic expression of the atypical cri du chat syndrome due to 5p15.3 deletions.

  8. Condensation heat transfer on two-tier superhydrophobic surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jiangtao; Vandadi, Aref; Chen, Chung-Lung

    2012-09-01

    We investigated water vapor condensation on a two-tier superhydrophobic surface in an environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM) and in a customer-designed vapor chamber. We have observed continuous dropwise condensation (DWC) on the textured surface in ESEM. However, a film layer of condensate was formed on the multiscale texture in the vapor chamber. Due to the filmwise condensation, the condensation heat transfer coefficient of the superhydrophobic surface is lower than that of a flat hydrophobic surface especially under high heat flux situations. Our studies indicate that adaptive and prompt condensate droplet purging is the dominant factor for sustaining long-term DWC.

  9. Synthetic chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindler, Daniel; Waldminghaus, Torsten

    2015-11-01

    What a living organism looks like and how it works and what are its components-all this is encoded on DNA, the genetic blueprint. Consequently, the way to change an organism is to change its genetic information. Since the first pieces of recombinant DNA have been used to transform cells in the 1970s, this approach has been enormously extended. Bigger and bigger parts of the genetic information have been exchanged or added over the years. Now we are at a point where the construction of entire chromosomes becomes a reachable goal and first examples appear. This development leads to fundamental new questions, for example, about what is possible and desirable to build or what construction rules one needs to follow when building synthetic chromosomes. Here we review the recent progress in the field, discuss current challenges and speculate on the appearance of future synthetic chromosomes.

  10. Condensation in insulated homes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiley, R A

    1978-05-28

    A research proposal on condensation in insulated homes is presented. Information is provided on: justification for condensation control; previous work and present outlook (good vapor barrier, condensation and retrofit insulation, vapor barrier decreases condensation, brick-veneer walls, condensation in stress-skin panels, air-conditioned buildings, retrofitting for conservation, study on mobile homes, high indoor relative humidity, report on various homes); and procedure (after funding has been secured). Measures are briefly described on opening walls, testing measures, and retrofitting procedures. An extensive bibliography and additional informative citations are included. (MCW)

  11. Shaping mitotic chromosomes: From classical concepts to molecular mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kschonsak, Marc; Haering, Christian H

    2015-07-01

    How eukaryotic genomes are packaged into compact cylindrical chromosomes in preparation for cell divisions has remained one of the major unsolved questions of cell biology. Novel approaches to study the topology of DNA helices inside the nuclei of intact cells, paired with computational modeling and precise biomechanical measurements of isolated chromosomes, have advanced our understanding of mitotic chromosome architecture. In this Review Essay, we discuss - in light of these recent insights - the role of chromatin architecture and the functions and possible mechanisms of SMC protein complexes and other molecular machines in the formation of mitotic chromosomes. Based on the information available, we propose a stepwise model of mitotic chromosome condensation that envisions the sequential generation of intra-chromosomal linkages by condensin complexes in the context of cohesin-mediated inter-chromosomal linkages, assisted by topoisomerase II. The described scenario results in rod-shaped metaphase chromosomes ready for their segregation to the cell poles.

  12. Condensin-mediated chromosome organization and gene regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alyssa Christine Lau

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In many organisms sexual fate is determined by a chromosome-based method which entails a difference in sex chromosome-linked gene dosage. Consequently, a gene regulatory mechanism called dosage compensation equalizes X-linked gene expression between the sexes. Dosage compensation initiates as cells transition from pluripotency to differentiation. In C. elegans, dosage compensation is achieved by the dosage compensation complex (DCC binding to both X chromosomes in hermaphrodites to downregulate gene expression by two fold. The DCC contains a subcomplex (condensin IDC similar to the evolutionarily conserved condensin complexes which play a fundamental role in chromosome dynamics during mitosis. Therefore, mechanisms related to mitotic chromosome condensation are hypothesized to mediate dosage compensation. Consistent with this hypothesis, monomethylation of histone H4 lysine 20 (H4K20 is increased, whereas acetylation of histone H4 lysine 16 (H4K16 is decreased, both on mitotic chromosomes and on interphase dosage compensated X chromosomes in worms. These observations suggest that interphase dosage compensated X chromosomes maintain some characteristics associated with condensed mitotic chromosome. This chromosome state is stably propagated from one cell generation to the next. In this review we will speculate on how the biochemical activities of condensin can achieve both mitotic chromosome compaction and gene repression.

  13. Sub-micrometer 20MeV protons or 45MeV lithium spot irradiation enhances yields of dicentric chromosomes due to clustering of DNA double-strand breaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, T E; Friedland, W; Greubel, C; Girst, S; Reindl, J; Siebenwirth, C; Ilicic, K; Schmid, E; Multhoff, G; Schmitt, E; Kundrát, P; Dollinger, G

    2015-11-01

    In conventional experiments on biological effects of radiation types of diverse quality, micrometer-scale double-strand break (DSB) clustering is inherently interlinked with clustering of energy deposition events on nanometer scale relevant for DSB induction. Due to this limitation, the role of the micrometer and nanometer scales in diverse biological endpoints cannot be fully separated. To address this issue, hybrid human-hamster AL cells have been irradiated with 45MeV (60keV/μm) lithium ions or 20MeV (2.6keV/μm) protons quasi-homogeneously distributed or focused to 0.5×1μm(2) spots on regular matrix patterns (point distances up to 10.6×10.6μm), with pre-defined particle numbers per spot to provide the same mean dose of 1.7Gy. The yields of dicentrics and their distribution among cells have been scored. In parallel, track-structure based simulations of DSB induction and chromosome aberration formation with PARTRAC have been performed. The results show that the sub-micrometer beam focusing does not enhance DSB yields, but significantly affects the DSB distribution within the nucleus and increases the chance to form DSB pairs in close proximity, which may lead to increased yields of chromosome aberrations. Indeed, the experiments show that focusing 20 lithium ions or 451 protons per spot on a 10.6μm grid induces two or three times more dicentrics, respectively, than a quasi-homogenous irradiation. The simulations reproduce the data in part, but in part suggest more complex behavior such as saturation or overkill not seen in the experiments. The direct experimental demonstration that sub-micrometer clustering of DSB plays a critical role in the induction of dicentrics improves the knowledge on the mechanisms by which these lethal lesions arise, and indicates how the assumptions of the biophysical model could be improved. It also provides a better understanding of the increased biological effectiveness of high-LET radiation.

  14. Pool boiling and condensation analysis for a vertical tube bundle condenser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, W.; Wolf, B., E-mail: zhouw@purdue.edu [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, Indiana (United States); Revankar, S.T., E-mail: shripad@ecn.purdue.edu [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, Indiana (United States); POSTECH, Pohang (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-07-01

    An experimental and theoretical study is performed for the steam condensation in a vertical tube bundle passive condenser simulating PCCS condenser in the ESBWR. Four condenser tubes are submerged in a water pool where the heat from the condenser tube is removed through boiling heat transfer. Condenser tubes with a full length/diameter scale are used to obtain the condensation data with various process parameters. The comparison of tube bundle experimental data with the single tube data by both the experiments and models shows that the single tube secondary heat transfer coefficient (HTC) is between 25% - 35% less than what was recorded for the tube bundle, and the tube bundle condensation rates are slightly higher than the data from the single tube test sections due to turbulent mixing effect which increases the condensation heat removal. The turbulent mixing on the secondary side decreases the DT between pool water and condenser tube outer wall, causing an increase in secondary HTC. This increase in secondary HTC thus results in higher condensate mass flow rates. Tube bundle boundary layer model and heat and mass analogy model were then developed for the prediction of the filmwise steam condensation with noncondensable (NC) gas in a vertical tube bundle. The predictions from the models are compared with the experimental data for various complete condensation and through flow conditions and the agreement is satisfactory. The local parameters predicted by the boundary layer model and heat and mass analogy model with tube bundle pool boiling can also be predicted with the axial distance from entrance for different NC gas fractions and system pressures. (author)

  15. Chromosome Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    Perceptive Scientific Instruments, Inc., provides the foundation for the Powergene line of chromosome analysis and molecular genetic instrumentation. This product employs image processing technology from NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory and image enhancement techniques from Johnson Space Center. Originally developed to send pictures back to earth from space probes, digital imaging techniques have been developed and refined for use in a variety of medical applications, including diagnosis of disease.

  16. Condensation Energy of a Spacetime Condensate

    CERN Document Server

    de Matos, Clovis Jacinto

    2010-01-01

    Starting from an analogy between the Planck-Einstein scale and the dual length scales in Ginzburg-Landau theory of superconductivity, and assuming that space-time is a condensate of neutral fermionic particles with Planck mass, we derive the baryonic mass of the universe. In that theoretical framework baryonic matter appears to be associated with the condensation energy gained by spacetime in the transition from its normal (symetric) to its (less symetric) superconducting-like phase. It is shown however that the critical transition temperature cannot be the Planck temperature. Thus leaving open the enigma of the microscopic description of spacetime at quantum level.

  17. Measure Guideline: Evaporative Condensers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    German, A [Alliance for Residential Building Innovation (ARBI), Davis, CA (United States); Dakin, B. [Alliance for Residential Building Innovation (ARBI), Davis, CA (United States); Hoeschele, M. [Alliance for Residential Building Innovation (ARBI), Davis, CA (United States)

    2012-03-01

    This measure guideline on evaporative condensers provides information on properly designing, installing, and maintaining evaporative condenser systems as well as understanding the benefits, costs, and tradeoffs. This is a prescriptive approach that outlines selection criteria, design and installation procedures, and operation and maintenance best practices.

  18. Systematic text condensation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malterud, Kirsti

    2012-01-01

    To present background, principles, and procedures for a strategy for qualitative analysis called systematic text condensation and discuss this approach compared with related strategies.......To present background, principles, and procedures for a strategy for qualitative analysis called systematic text condensation and discuss this approach compared with related strategies....

  19. Competition between Bose-Einstein Condensation and Spin Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naylor, B; Brewczyk, M; Gajda, M; Gorceix, O; Maréchal, E; Vernac, L; Laburthe-Tolra, B

    2016-10-28

    We study the impact of spin-exchange collisions on the dynamics of Bose-Einstein condensation by rapidly cooling a chromium multicomponent Bose gas. Despite relatively strong spin-dependent interactions, the critical temperature for Bose-Einstein condensation is reached before the spin degrees of freedom fully thermalize. The increase in density due to Bose-Einstein condensation then triggers spin dynamics, hampering the formation of condensates in spin-excited states. Small metastable spinor condensates are, nevertheless, produced, and they manifest in strong spin fluctuations.

  20. Heat Transfer in Flue Gas with Vapor Condensation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贾力; 彭晓峰

    2002-01-01

    This paper combines the film model with Nusselt's condensation theory to analyze the effects of water vapor condensation on the heat transfer performance of flue gas flowing through a vertical tube. The analysis compares the condensation and convective heat transfer rates. For the concentration range investigated, the water vapor condensation transfers more energy than the flue gas convection, but the convective heat transfer can not be neglected. The heat transfer intensification due to the condensation increased as the water vapor fraction increased. The theoretical results compared well with experimental data.

  1. Modified C-band technique for the analysis of chromosome abnormalities in irradiated human lymphocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakata, Akifumi; Akiyama, Miho; Yamada, Yuji [Biodosimetry Section, Department of Radiation Dosimetry, Research Center for Radiation Emergency Medicine, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Yoshida, Mitsuaki A., E-mail: myoshida@cc.hirosaki-u.ac.jp [Biodosimetry Section, Department of Radiation Dosimetry, Research Center for Radiation Emergency Medicine, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan)

    2011-10-15

    A modified C-band technique was developed in order to analyze more accurately dicentric, tricentric, and ring chromosomes in irradiated human peripheral lymphocytes. Instead of the original method relying on treatment with barium hydroxide Ba(OH){sub 2}, C-bands were obtained using a modified form of heat treatment in formamide followed with DAPI staining. This method was tentatively applied to the analysis of dicentric chromosomes in irradiated human lymphocytes to examine its availability. The frequency of dicentric chromosome was almost the same with conventional Giemsa staining and the modified C-band technique. In the analysis using Giemsa staining, it is relatively difficult to identify the centromere on the elongated chromosomes, over-condensed chromosomes, fragment, and acentric ring. However, the modified C-band method used in this study makes it easier to identify the centromere on such chromosomes than with the use of Giemsa staining alone. Thus, the modified C-band method may give more information about the location of the centromere. Therefore, this method may be available and more useful for biological dose estimation due to the analysis of the dicentric chromosome in human lymphocytes exposed to the radiation. Furthermore, this method is simpler and faster than the original C-band protocol and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) method with the centromeric DNA probe. - Highlights: > The dicentric (dic) assay is the most effective for the radiation biodosimetry. > It is important to recognize the centromere of the dic. > We improved a C-band technique based on heat denaturation. > This technique enables the accurate detection of a centromere. > This method may be available and more useful for biological dose estimation.

  2. Electric field enhanced dropwise condensation on hydrophobic surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baratian, Davood; Hoek, Harmen; van den Ende, Dirk; Mugele, Frieder; Physics of Complex Fluids Team

    2016-11-01

    Dropwise condensation occurs when vapor condenses on a low surface energy surface, and the substrate is just partially wetted by the condensate. Dropwise condensation has attracted significant attention due to its reported superior heat transfer performance compared to filmwise condensation. Extensive research efforts are focused on how to promote, and enhance dropwise condensation by considering both physical and chemical factors. We have studied electrowetting-actuated condensation on hydrophobic surfaces, aiming for enhancement of heat transfer in dropwise condensation. The idea is to use suitably structured patterns of micro-electrodes that generate a heterogeneous electric field at the interface and thereby promote both the condensation itself and the shedding of condensed drops. Comforting the shedding of droplets on electrowetting-functionalized surfaces allows more condensing surface area for re-nucleation of small droplets, leading to higher condensation rates. Possible applications of this innovative concept include heat pipes for (micro) coolers in electronics as well as in more efficient heat exchangers. We acknowledge financial support by the Dutch Technology Foundation STW, which is part of the Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research (NWO), within the VICI program.

  3. In situ hybridization to somatic chromosomes in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dernburg, Abby F

    2011-09-01

    In situ hybridization was originally developed as a technique for visualizing and physically mapping specific sequences on Drosophila melanogaster polytene chromosomes. Hybridization techniques can also be used to localize sequences on smaller, diploid chromosomes, such as condensed mitotic chromosomes. Variations of the method also allow the hybridization of probes to chromosomes within intact cells and tissues, rather than to chromosomes isolated from their cellular context and flattened on slides. This article presents methods for hybridizing fluorescent probes to chromosomes in whole-mount Drosophila tissues. These methods allow the investigation of nuclear organization even at stages where chromosomes are decondensed (as in interphase) or, for other reasons, cannot be discriminated in the light microscope. Consequently, they are useful for addressing a variety of cell biological questions. In addition to enhancing our understanding of somatic chromosome organization, this experimental approach has also revealed interactions among meiotic chromosomes in Drosophila females, which spend much of meiosis in a compact ball called the karyosome. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) methods can also be used to karyotype individual nuclei using chromosome-specific markers. With appropriate fixation conditions, hybridization to chromosomal DNA can be performed in conjunction with immunostaining, allowing the colocalization of cellular or chromosomal proteins.

  4. Visualization of chromosomes in the binucleate intestinal parasite Giardia lamblia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Hai E; Cao, Lei; Li, Ji; Tian, Xi Feng; Yang, Zhi Hong; Wang, Yue; Tian, Yu Na; Lu, Si Qi

    2011-11-01

    Mitosis of Giardia lamblia is a complex and rapid event that is poorly understood at the cellular and molecular levels. Therefore, we conducted this study to determine (1) whether the two nuclei have similar or different chromosomes, (2) the number of chromosomes of G. lamblia, and (3) the morphology and karyotype of the chromosomes. Trophozoites of the C2 and WB strains of G. lamblia were grown in modified TYI-S-33 medium at 37°C. The trophozoites were collected, and sample slides were prepared for conventional light and scanning electron microscopy. Light microscopy revealed five pairs of chromosomes. The chromosomes were approximately 0.64-0.94 μm long with a short rod-like shape and were usually arranged in pairs. Scanning electron microscopy yielded similar findings, and 10 chromosomes could be seen in each nucleus. Thus, the chromosome number of G. lamblia is 2n = 10. Chromosomes in pair 1 are submetacentric chromosomes, while pairs 2-5 are telocentric chromosomes. The present study shows that G. lamblia trophozoites have typical condensed chromosomes during mitosis and contains five pairs of chromosomes. The karyogram shows good fit to the formula 2n = 10 = 2sm + 8t revealed by scanning electron microscopy.

  5. Chromosomes of Protists: The crucible of evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soyer-Gobillard, Marie-Odile; Dolan, Michael F

    2015-12-01

    As early as 1925, the great protozoologist Edouard Chatton classified microorganisms into two categories, the prokaryotic and the eukaryotic microbes, based on light microscopical observation of their nuclear organization. Now, by means of transmission electron microscopy, we know that prokaryotic microbes are characterized by the absence of nuclear envelope surrounding the bacterial chromosome, which is more or less condensed and whose chromatin is deprived of histone proteins but presents specific basic proteins. Eukaryotic microbes, the protists, have nuclei surrounded by a nuclear envelope and have chromosomes more or less condensed, with chromatin-containing histone proteins organized into nucleosomes. The extraordinary diversity of mitotic systems presented by the 36 phyla of protists (according to Margulis et al., Handbook of Protoctista, 1990) is in contrast to the relative homogeneity of their chromosome structure and chromatin components. Dinoflagellates are the exception to this pattern. The phylum is composed of around 2000 species, and characterized by unique features including their nucleus (dinokaryon), dinomitosis, chromosome organization and chromatin composition. Although their DNA synthesis is typically eukaryotic, dinoflagellates are the only eukaryotes in which the chromatin, organized into quasi-permanently condensed chromosomes, is in some species devoid of histones and nucleosomes. In these cases, their chromatin contains specific DNA-binding basic proteins. The permanent compaction of their chromosomes throughout the cell cycle raises the question of the modalities of their division and their transcription. Successful in vitro reconstitution of nucleosomes using dinoflagellate DNA and heterologous corn histones raises questions about dinoflagellate evolution and phylogeny. [Int Microbiol 18(4):209-216 (2015)].

  6. Sedimentary condensation and authigenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Föllmi, Karl

    2016-04-01

    Most marine authigenic minerals form in sediments, which are subjected to condensation. Condensation processes lead to the formation of well individualized, extremely thin ( 100ky), and which experienced authigenesis and the precipitation of glaucony, verdine, phosphate, iron and manganese oxyhydroxides, iron sulfide, carbonate and/or silica. They usually show complex internal stratigraphies, which result from an interplay of sediment accumulation, halts in sedimentation, sediment winnowing, erosion, reworking and bypass. They may include amalgamated faunas of different origin and age. Hardgrounds may be part of condensed beds and may embody strongly condensed beds by themselves. Sedimentary condensation is the result of a hydrodynamically active depositional regime, in which sediment accumulation, winnowing, erosion, reworking and bypass are processes, which alternate as a function of changes in the location and intensity of currents, and/or as the result of episodic high-energy events engendered by storms and gravity flow. Sedimentary condensation has been and still is a widespread phenomenon in past and present-day oceans. The present-day distribution of glaucony and verdine-rich sediments on shelves and upper slopes, phosphate-rich sediments and phosphorite on outer shelves and upper slopes, ferromanganese crusts on slopes, seamounts and submarine plateaus, and ferromanganese nodules on abyssal seafloors is a good indication of the importance of condensation processes today. In the past, we may add the occurrence of oolitic ironstone, carbonate hardgrounds, and eventually also silica layers in banded iron formations as indicators of the importance of condensation processes. Besides their economic value, condensed sediments are useful both as a carrier of geochemical proxies of paleoceanographic and paleoenvironmental change, as well as the product of episodes of paleoceanographic and paleoenvironmental change themselves.

  7. Studies on the mitotic chromosome scaffold of Allium sativum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAOJIAN; SHAOBOJIN; 等

    1995-01-01

    An argentophilic structure is present in the metaphase chromosomes of garlic(Allium sativum),Cytochemical studies indicate that the main component of the structure is non-histone proteins(NHPs).The results of light and electron microscopic observations reveal that the chromosme NHP scaffold is a network which is composed of fibres and granules and distributed throughout the chromosomes.In the NHP network,there are many condensed regions that are connected by redlatively looser regions.The distribution of the condensed regions varies in individual chromosomes.In some of the chromosomes the condensed regions are lognitudinally situsted in the central part of a chromatid while in others these regions appear as coillike transverse bands.At early metaphase.scaffolds of the sister chromatids of a chromosome are linked to each other in the centromeric region,meanwhile,they are connected by scafold materials along the whole length of the chromosome.At late metaphase,however,the connective scaffold materials between the two sister chromatids disappear gradually and the chromatids begin to separate from one another at their ends.but the chromatids are linked together in the centromeric region until anaphase.This connection seems to be related to the special structure of the NHP scaffold formed in the centromeric region.The morphological features and dynamic changes of the chromosome scaffold are discussed.

  8. Physics of condensed matter

    CERN Document Server

    Misra, Prasanta K

    2012-01-01

    Physics of Condensed Matter is designed for a two-semester graduate course on condensed matter physics for students in physics and materials science. While the book offers fundamental ideas and topic areas of condensed matter physics, it also includes many recent topics of interest on which graduate students may choose to do further research. The text can also be used as a one-semester course for advanced undergraduate majors in physics, materials science, solid state chemistry, and electrical engineering, because it offers a breadth of topics applicable to these majors. The book be

  9. Dual condensates at finite isospin chemical potential

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Zhao

    2015-01-01

    The dual observables as order parameters for center symmetry are tested at finite isospin chemical potential $\\mu_I$ in a Polyakov-loop enhanced chiral model of QCD with physical quark masses. As a counterpart of the dressed Polyakov-loop, the first Fourier moment of pion condensate is introduced for $\\mu_I>{m_\\pi}/{2}$ under the temporal twisted boundary conditions for quarks. We demonstrate that this dual condensate exhibits the similar temperature dependence as the conventional Polyakov-loop. We confirm that its rapid increase with $T$ is driven by the evaporating of pion condensation. On the other hand, the dressed Polyakov-loop shows abnormal thermal behavior, which even decreases with $T$ at low temperatures due to the influence of pion condensate. We thus argue that in QCD the critical temperature extracting from a dual observable may have nothing to do with the quark confinement-deconfinement transition if the quark mass is very small.

  10. Scalable graphene coatings for enhanced condensation heat transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preston, Daniel J; Mafra, Daniela L; Miljkovic, Nenad; Kong, Jing; Wang, Evelyn N

    2015-05-13

    Water vapor condensation is commonly observed in nature and routinely used as an effective means of transferring heat with dropwise condensation on nonwetting surfaces exhibiting heat transfer improvement compared to filmwise condensation on wetting surfaces. However, state-of-the-art techniques to promote dropwise condensation rely on functional hydrophobic coatings that either have challenges with chemical stability or are so thick that any potential heat transfer improvement is negated due to the added thermal resistance of the coating. In this work, we show the effectiveness of ultrathin scalable chemical vapor deposited (CVD) graphene coatings to promote dropwise condensation while offering robust chemical stability and maintaining low thermal resistance. Heat transfer enhancements of 4× were demonstrated compared to filmwise condensation, and the robustness of these CVD coatings was superior to typical hydrophobic monolayer coatings. Our results indicate that graphene is a promising surface coating to promote dropwise condensation of water in industrial conditions with the potential for scalable application via CVD.

  11. Measure Guideline: Evaporative Condensers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    German, A.; Dakin, B.; Hoeschele, M.

    2012-03-01

    The purpose of this measure guideline on evaporative condensers is to provide information on a cost-effective solution for energy and demand savings in homes with cooling loads. This is a prescriptive approach that outlines selection criteria, design and installation procedures, and operation and maintenance best practices. This document has been prepared to provide a process for properly designing, installing, and maintaining evaporative condenser systems as well as understanding the benefits, costs, and tradeoffs.

  12. A Geometric Approach For Fully Automatic Chromosome Segmentation

    CERN Document Server

    Minaee, Shervin; Khalaj, Babak Hossein

    2011-01-01

    Chromosome segmentation is a fundamental task in human chromosome analysis. Most of previous methods for separation between touching chromosomes require human intervention. In this paper, a geometry based method is used for automatic chromosome segmentation. This method can be divided into two phases. In the first phase, chromosome clusters are detected using three geometric criteria and in the second phase chromosome clusters are separated using a proper cut line. However, most earlier methods do not work well with chromosome clusters that contain more than two chromosomes. Our method, on the other hand, has a high efficiency in separation of chromosome clusters in such scenarios. Another advantage of the proposed method is that it can easily apply to any type of images such as binary images. This is due to the fact that the proposed scheme uses the geometric features of chromosomes which are independent of the type of images. The performance of the proposed scheme is demonstrated on a database containing to...

  13. Dropwise condensation dynamics in humid air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo Chacon, Julian Eduardo

    Dropwise condensation of atmospheric water vapor is important in multiple practical engineering applications. The roles of environmental factors and surface morphology/chemistry on the condensation dynamics need to be better understood to enable efficient water-harvesting, dehumidication, and other psychrometric processes. Systems and surfaces that promote faster condensation rates and self-shedding of condensate droplets could lead to improved mass transfer rates and higher water yields in harvesting applications. The thesis presents the design and construction of an experimental facility that allows visualization of the condensation process as a function of relative humidity. Dropwise condensation experiments are performed on a vertically oriented, hydrophobic surface at a controlled relative humidity and surface subcooling temperature. The distribution and growth of water droplets are monitored across the surface at different relative humidities (45%, 50%, 55%, and 70%) at a constant surface subcooling temperature of 15 °C below the ambient temperature. The droplet growth dynamics exhibits a strong dependency on relative humidity in the early stages during which there is a large population of small droplets on the surface and single droplet growth dominates over coalescence effects. At later stages, the dynamics of droplet growth is insensitive to relative humidity due to the dominance of coalescence effects. The overall volumetric rate of condensation on the surface is also assessed as a function of time and ambient relative humidity. Low relative humidity conditions not only slow the absolute rate of condensation, but also prolong an initial transient regime over which the condensation rate remains significantly below the steady-state value. The current state-of-the-art in dropwise condensation research indicates the need for systematic experimental investigations as a function of relative humidity. The improved understanding of the relative humidity

  14. Sexual maldevelopment and sex reversal, chromosomal causes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magenis, R Ellen

    2006-01-01

    The SRY gene on the Y chromosome is the testis determining factor (TDF). It is therefore the initial male determining factor. However, phenotypic sex determination includes a cascade of genes located on autosomes as well as sex chromosomes. Aberrations of these genes may cause sexual maldevelopment or sex reversal. Abnormalities may include single gene mutations and gene loss or gain-changes may involve only sex organs or may be part of syndromes. These changes may also arise as chromosome abnormalities involving contiguous genes. Eight cases with chromosomal abnormalities involving different causative mechanisms are described herein. The most common cause is nondisjunction, including loss or gain of sex chromosomes. Less common causes are mispairing and crossing over in meiosis, chromosome breaks with repair, nonhomologous pairing due to low copy repeats and crossing over, and translocation (familial or de novo) with segregation. Cases include: [see: text].

  15. CONDENSATION OF WATER VAPOR IN A VERTICAL TUBE CONDENSER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Havlík

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an analysis of heat transfer in the process of condensation of water vapor in a vertical shell-and-tube condenser. We analyze the use of the Nusselt model for calculating the condensation heat transfer coefficient (HTC inside a vertical tube and the Kern, Bell-Delaware and Stream-flow analysis methods for calculating the shell-side HTC from tubes to cooling water. These methods are experimentally verified for a specific condenser of waste process vapor containing air. The operating conditions of the condenser may be different from the assumptions adopted in the basic Nusselt theory. Modifications to the Nusselt condensation model are theoretically analyzed.

  16. Condensed matter physics

    CERN Document Server

    Isihara, A

    2007-01-01

    More than a graduate text and advanced research guide on condensed matter physics, this volume is useful to plasma physicists and polymer chemists, and their students. It emphasizes applications of statistical mechanics to a variety of systems in condensed matter physics rather than theoretical derivations of the principles of statistical mechanics and techniques. Isihara addresses a dozen different subjects in separate chapters, each designed to be directly accessible and used independently of previous chapters. Topics include simple liquids, electron systems and correlations, two-dimensional

  17. Non-SMC condensin I complex proteins control chromosome segregation and survival of proliferating cells in the zebrafish neural retina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harris William A

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The condensation of chromosomes and correct sister chromatid segregation during cell division is an essential feature of all proliferative cells. Structural maintenance of chromosomes (SMC and non-SMC proteins form the condensin I complex and regulate chromosome condensation and segregation during mitosis. However, due to the lack of appropriate mutants, the function of the condensin I complex during vertebrate development has not been described. Results Here, we report the positional cloning and detailed characterization of retinal phenotypes of a zebrafish mutation at the cap-g locus. High resolution live imaging reveals that the progression of mitosis between prometa- to telophase is delayed and that sister chromatid segregation is impaired upon loss of CAP-G. CAP-G associates with chromosomes between prometa- and telophase of the cell cycle. Loss of the interaction partners CAP-H and CAP-D2 causes cytoplasmic mislocalization of CAP-G throughout mitosis. DNA content analysis reveals increased genomic imbalances upon loss of non-SMC condensin I subunits. Within the retina, loss of condensin I function causes increased rates of apoptosis among cells within the proliferative ciliary marginal zone (CMZ whereas postmitotic retinal cells are viable. Inhibition of p53-mediated apoptosis partially rescues cell numbers in cap-g mutant retinae and allows normal layering of retinal cell types without alleviating their aberrant nuclear sizes. Conclusion Our findings indicate that the condensin I complex is particularly important within rapidly amplifying progenitor cell populations to ensure faithful chromosome segregation. In contrast, differentiation of postmitotic retinal cells is not impaired upon polyploidization.

  18. Undetected sex chromosome aneuploidy by chromosomal microarray.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markus-Bustani, Keren; Yaron, Yuval; Goldstein, Myriam; Orr-Urtreger, Avi; Ben-Shachar, Shay

    2012-11-01

    We report on a case of a female fetus found to be mosaic for Turner syndrome (45,X) and trisomy X (47,XXX). Chromosomal microarray analysis (CMA) failed to detect the aneuploidy because of a normal average dosage of the X chromosome. This case represents an unusual instance in which CMA may not detect chromosomal aberrations. Such a possibility should be taken into consideration in similar cases where CMA is used in a clinical setting.

  19. Nonresonant optical control of a spinor polariton condensate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askitopoulos, A.; Kalinin, K.; Liew, T. C. H.; Cilibrizzi, P.; Hatzopoulos, Z.; Savvidis, P. G.; Berloff, N. G.; Lagoudakis, P. G.

    2016-05-01

    We investigate the spin dynamics of polariton condensates spatially separated from and effectively confined by the pumping exciton reservoir. We obtain a strong correlation between the ellipticity of the nonresonant optical pump and the degree of circular polarization (DCP) of the condensate at the onset of condensation. With increasing excitation density we observe a reversal of the DCP. The spin dynamics of the trapped condensate are described within the framework of the spinor complex Ginzburg-Landau equations in the Josephson regime, where the dynamics of the system are reduced to a current-driven Josephson junction. We show that the observed spin reversal is due to the interplay between an internal Josephson coupling effect and the detuning of the two projections of the spinor condensate via transition from a synchronized to a desynchronized regime. These results suggest that spinor polariton condensates can be controlled by tuning the nonresonant excitation density offering applications in electrically pumped polariton spin switches.

  20. Electric-Field-Enhanced Jumping-Droplet Condensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miljkovic, Nenad; Preston, Daniel; Enright, Ryan; Limia, Alexander; Wang, Evelyn

    2013-11-01

    When condensed droplets coalesce on a superhydrophobic surface, the resulting droplet can jump due to the conversion of surface energy into kinetic energy. This frequent out-of-plane droplet jumping has the potential to enhance condensation heat and mass transfer. In this work, we demonstrated that these jumping droplets accumulate positive charge that can be used to further increase condensation heat transfer via electric fields. We studied droplet jumping dynamics on silanized nanostructured copper oxide surfaces. By characterizing the droplet trajectories under various applied external electric fields (0 - 50 V/cm), we show that condensation on superhydrophobic surfaces results in a buildup of negative surface charge (OH-) due to dissociated water ion adsorption on the superhydrophobic coating. Consequently, the opposite charge (H3O +) accumulates on the coalesced jumping droplet. Using this knowledge, we demonstrate electric-field-enhanced jumping droplet condensation whereby an external electric field opposes the droplet vapor flow entrainment towards the condensing surface to increase the droplet removal rate and overall surface heat transfer by 100% when compared to state-of-the-art dropwise condensing surfaces. This work not only shows significant condensation heat transfer enhancement through the passive charging of condensed droplets, but promises a low cost approach to increase efficiency for applications such as atmospheric water harvesting and dehumidification.

  1. ASAR15, A cis-acting locus that controls chromosome-wide replication timing and stability of human chromosome 15.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan Donley

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available DNA replication initiates at multiple sites along each mammalian chromosome at different times during each S phase, following a temporal replication program. We have used a Cre/loxP-based strategy to identify cis-acting elements that control this replication-timing program on individual human chromosomes. In this report, we show that rearrangements at a complex locus at chromosome 15q24.3 result in delayed replication and structural instability of human chromosome 15. Characterization of this locus identified long, RNA transcripts that are retained in the nucleus and form a "cloud" on one homolog of chromosome 15. We also found that this locus displays asynchronous replication that is coordinated with other random monoallelic genes on chromosome 15. We have named this locus ASynchronous replication and Autosomal RNA on chromosome 15, or ASAR15. Previously, we found that disruption of the ASAR6 lincRNA gene results in delayed replication, delayed mitotic condensation and structural instability of human chromosome 6. Previous studies in the mouse found that deletion of the Xist gene, from the X chromosome in adult somatic cells, results in a delayed replication and instability phenotype that is indistinguishable from the phenotype caused by disruption of either ASAR6 or ASAR15. In addition, delayed replication and chromosome instability were detected following structural rearrangement of many different human or mouse chromosomes. These observations suggest that all mammalian chromosomes contain similar cis-acting loci. Thus, under this scenario, all mammalian chromosomes contain four distinct types of essential cis-acting elements: origins, telomeres, centromeres and "inactivation/stability centers", all functioning to promote proper replication, segregation and structural stability of each chromosome.

  2. Soft condensed matter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frenkel, D.

    2002-01-01

    These lectures illustrate some of the concepts of soft-condensed matter physics, taking examples from colloid physics. Many of the theoretical concepts will be illustrated with the results of computer simulations. After a brief introduction describing interactions between colloids, the paper focuses

  3. Condensed Matter Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marder, Michael P.

    2000-01-01

    A modern, unified treatment of condensed matter physics This new work presents for the first time in decades a sweeping review of the whole field of condensed matter physics. It consolidates new and classic topics from disparate sources, teaching "not only about the effective masses of electrons in semiconductor crystals and band theory, but also about quasicrystals, dynamics of phase separation, why rubber is more floppy than steel, electron interference in nanometer-sized channels, and the quantum Hall effect." Six major areas are covered---atomic structure, electronic structure, mechanical properties, electron transport, optical properties, and magnetism. But rather than defining the field in terms of particular materials, the author focuses on the way condensed matter physicists approach physical problems, combining phenomenology and microscopic arguments with information from experiments. For graduate students and professionals, researchers and engineers, applied mathematicians and materials scientists, Condensed Matter Physics provides: * An exciting collection of new topics from the past two decades. * A thorough treatment of classic topics, including band theory, transport theory, and semiconductor physics. * Over 300 figures, incorporating many images from experiments. * Frequent comparison of theory and experiment, both when they agree and when problems are still unsolved. * More than 50 tables of data and a detailed index. * Ample end-of-chapter problems, including computational exercises. * Over 1000 references, both recent and historically significant.

  4. 早熟凝集染色体环法在山西太原事故受照射者生物剂量估算中的应用%Biological dose estimation by prematurely condensed chromosomes ring assay for five victims in Shanxi Taiyuan radiation accident

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚波; 艾辉胜; 李玉芳; 白娟; 周振山; 王军良; 满秋红; 邱丽娟; 刘广贤; 郭梅

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the value of prematurely drug induced condensed chromosomes ring (PCC-R) assay in estimating the biological doses in the victims of radiation accident. METHODS:Samples of peripheral blood were collected from the five victims (subjects 1-5) of the radiation accident of Taiyuan,Shanxi,16 hours after the accident. Bone marrow samples were collected 23 h after and peripheral blood sample 24 h after the accident from subject 1. The frequencies of PCC-R in PCC cells obtained by Okadaic acid (OA) induction were counted. A biological dose estimation was performed by a dose-effect curve of PCC-R (1-20 Gy). The frequencies of the PCC-R for the 4 victims (subjects 2-5) were analyzed 31 days after the accident. The results from PCC-R assay were verified by dicentrics plus centric rings (dic+r),Cytokinesis-block micronuclei (CBMN) assay and physical method. RESULTS:No or rare PCC cells were observed in the peripheral blood cultures from subject 1. However,PCC cells were obtained from bone marrow cultures in subject 1 and in peripheral blood cultures from subject 2-5. The doses estimated for subject 1-5 were 12.4,3.6,3.2,1.7 and 1.5 Gy, respectively. A decrease of PCC-R frequencies were observed 31 days after the accident,and the extent of the decrease were 51%,69%,69% and 44% for the subjects 2-5,respectively,compared with the data 16 h after the accident. The estimated doses were in accordance with those doses estimated by dic+r,CBMN assay,physical method and clinical symptoms. CONCLUSION:Drug induced PCC-R assay is convenient and rapid,and the new curve of PCC-R is accurate and reliable. It is especially suitable for estimating higher dose of irradiation. However,blood samples should be collected as soon as possible and should be done within one month after the accident.%目的:探讨药物诱导的早熟凝集染色体环 (prematurely condensed chromosomes ring,PCC-R)分析方法在辐射事故受照射者生

  5. Effects of oxaliplatin on DNA condensation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JU HaiPeng; ZHANG HongYan; LI Wei; WANG PengYe

    2014-01-01

    In this paper the interactions between DNA and anti-cancer drug oxaliplatin were investigated by using magnetic tweezers.The dynamics of DNA condensation due to oxaliplatin was traced under various forces.It is found that torsion constraint in DNA enhances the ability of oxaliplatin for shortening DNA.The transplatin helps oxaliplatin combine to DNA and increase the rate of DNA condensation.All these results are consistent to the previously proposed model and are helpful for further investigation of interaction between DNA and oxaliplatin.

  6. Guarding chromosomes from oxidative DNA damage to the very end

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rong Tan; Li Lan

    2016-01-01

    The ends of each chromosome are capped by the telomere assembly to protect chromosomal integrity from telomere attrition and DNA damage.In response to DNA damage,DNA repair factors are enriched at damage sites by a sophisticated signaling and recruitment cascade.However,DNA damage response at telomeres is different from non-telomeric region of genomic DNA due to specialized sequences and structures of the telomeres.In the course of normal DNA replication or DNA damage repair,both the telomere shelterin protein complex and the condensed telomeric chromatin structure in mammalian cells are modified to protect telomeres from exposing free DNA ends which are subject to both telemere shortening and chromosome end fusion.Initiation of either homologous recombination or non-homologous end joint repair at telomeres requires disassembling andaor post-translational modifications of the shelterin complex and telomeric chromatin.In addition,cancer cells utilize distinct mechanisms to maintain telomere length and cell survival upon damage.In this review,we summarize current studies that focus on telomere end protection and telomere DNA repair using different methodologies to model telomere DNA damage and disruption.These include genetic ablation of sheltering proteins,targeting endonuclease to telomeres,and delivering oxidative damage directly.These different approaches,when combined,offer better understanding of the mechanistic differences in DNA damage response between telomeric and genomic DNA,which will provide new hope to identify potential cancer therapeutic targets to curtail cancer cell proliferation via induction of telomere dysfunctions.

  7. Domains of Disoriented Chiral Condensate

    CERN Document Server

    Amado, R D; Lu, Yang

    1996-01-01

    The probability distribution of neutral pion fraction from independent domains of disoriented chiral condensate is characterized. The signal for the condensate is clear for a small number of domains but is greatly reduced for more than three.

  8. DROPWISE CONDENSATION ON MICRO- AND NANOSTRUCTURED SURFACES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Enright, R; Miljkovic, N; Alvarado, JL; Kim, K; Rose, JW

    2014-07-23

    In this review we cover recent developments in the area of surface-enhanced dropwise condensation against the background of earlier work. The development of fabrication techniques to create surface structures at the micro-and nanoscale using both bottom-up and top-down approaches has led to increased study of complex interfacial phenomena. In the heat transfer community, researchers have been extensively exploring the use of advanced surface structuring techniques to enhance phase-change heat transfer processes. In particular, the field of vapor-to-liquid condensation and especially that of water condensation has experienced a renaissance due to the promise of further optimizing this process at the micro-and nanoscale by exploiting advances in surface engineering developed over the last several decades.

  9. Condensation heat transfer coefficient versus wettability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roudgar, M.; De Coninck, J.

    2015-05-01

    In this paper we show how condensation on substrates can induce wetting behavior that is quite different from that of deposited or impinging drops. We describe surfaces with the same wettability in ambient conditions presenting different wetting behavior and growth of droplets in condensation. The experimental results show a rapid spread of droplets and formation of the film on the copper surface, while droplets on SU-8 surface remains on the regular shape while they grow within the time, without coalescence, as observed for Cu. Although the heat conductivity of SU-8 is much lower, due to a difference in wetting behavior, the heat transfer coefficient (h) is higher for dropwise condensation on Cu with a thin layer of SU-8 than filmwise on the bare copper.

  10. Chromosome Disorder Outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... BLOG Join Us Donate You are not alone. Chromosome Disorder Outreach, Inc. is a non-profit organization, ... Support For all those diagnosed with any rare chromosome disorder. Since 1992, CDO has supported the parents ...

  11. Assembly and disassembly of mammalian chromosome pellicle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NIZUMEI; JELITTLE; 等

    1992-01-01

    By means of indirect double immunofluorescent staining,the coordination of PI antigen and perichromonucleolin(PCN),the constituent of nuclear periphery and nucleolus respectively,in the assembly and disassembly of chromosome pellicle during mitosis was studied.It was found that in 3T3 cells,during mitosis PI antigen began to coat the condensing chromosome surface earlier than PCN did.However,both of them completed their coating on chromosome at approximately the same stage of mitosis,prometaphase metaphase,The dissociation of mitosis,Prometaphase metaphase.The dissociation of PI antigen from chromosome pellicle to participate the formation of nuclear periphery took place also ahead of that of PCN,At early telophase PI antigen had been extensively involved in the formation of nuclear periphery,while PCN remained in association with the surface of decondensing chromosomes.At late telophase,when PI antigen was localized in an fairly well formed nuclear periphery,PCN was in a stage of forming prenucleolar bodies.

  12. Photon condensation: A new paradigm for Bose-Einstein condensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajan, Renju; Ramesh Babu, P.; Senthilnathan, K.

    2016-10-01

    Bose-Einstein condensation is a state of matter known to be responsible for peculiar properties exhibited by superfluid Helium-4 and superconductors. Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) in its pure form is realizable with alkali atoms under ultra-cold temperatures. In this paper, we review the experimental scheme that demonstrates the atomic Bose-Einstein condensate. We also elaborate on the theoretical framework for atomic Bose-Einstein condensation, which includes statistical mechanics and the Gross-Pitaevskii equation. As an extension, we discuss Bose-Einstein condensation of photons realized in a fluorescent dye filled optical microcavity. We analyze this phenomenon based on the generalized Planck's law in statistical mechanics. Further, a comparison is made between photon condensate and laser. We describe how photon condensate may be a possible alternative for lasers since it does not require an energy consuming population inversion process.

  13. Chromosome painting in plants.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schubert, I.; Fransz, P.F.; Fuchs, J.; Jong, de J.H.

    2001-01-01

    The current 'state-of-art' as to chromosome painting in plants is reviewed. We define different situations described as painting so far: i) Genomic in situ hybridisation (GISH) with total genomic DNA to distinguish alien chromosomes on the basis of divergent dispersed repeats, ii) 'Chromosomal in si

  14. ZEBRAFISH CHROMOSOME-BANDING

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    PIJNACKER, LP; FERWERDA, MA

    1995-01-01

    Banding techniques were carried out on metaphase chromosomes of zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos. The karyotypes with the longest chromosomes consist of 12 metacentrics, 26 submetacentrics, and 12 subtelocentrics (2n = 50). All centromeres are C-band positive. Eight chromosomes have a pericentric C-b

  15. Condenser Design for the Proposed AM600 NPP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahman, Md. Mizanur; Abdallah, Khaled Atya Ahmed; Field, Robert M. [KEPCO International Nuclear Graduate School, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    The design goals are to make the condenser more robust and compact with a reduced component count. The AM600 condenser design also has new features as described below. Considering that the minimum heat sink temperature for potentially emergent nuclear countries is on the order of 21.deg. C or higher, a turbine design with a single low pressure rotor can be considered without sacrificing thermal efficiency. The condenser back pressure range for the considered markets is on the order of 2 to 3 in-HgA. With these boundary conditions, the AM600 condenser duty can be met with a single pressure zone design with a total of eight (8) titanium tube bundles (four (4) per pass) divided into four isolable sections. Due to the compact design (i.e., accepting exhaust from only one low pressure cylinder), both axial ends of the condenser are unobstructed and available for attachment of extended flash chambers, diverting inflows away from the tube bundles. The single shell design of this condenser then allows for an innovative design feature, namely the extended flash chambers. This permits the routing of dump, drain, vent, and bypass flows directly to these chambers, bypassing the condenser shell. Within the condenser shell, this design eliminates impingement plates, impingement boxes, and spargers. Failure of these components represents an ongoing source of condenser tube damage in operating nuclear units, requiring significant resources for outage inspections. The extended flash chamber approach also has a number of other advantages as delineated above.

  16. Condensed matter physics

    CERN Document Server

    Marder, Michael P

    2010-01-01

    This Second Edition presents an updated review of the whole field of condensed matter physics. It consolidates new and classic topics from disparate sources, teaching not only about the effective masses of electrons in semiconductor crystals and band theory, but also about quasicrystals, dynamics of phase separation, why rubber is more floppy than steel, granular materials, quantum dots, Berry phases, the quantum Hall effect, and Luttinger liquids.

  17. Asymmetric condensed dark matter

    CERN Document Server

    Aguirre, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    We explore the viability of a boson dark matter candidate with an asymmetry between the number densities of particles and antiparticles. A simple thermal field theory analysis confirms that, under certain general conditions, this component would develop a Bose-Einstein condensate in the early universe that, for appropriate model parameters, could survive the ensuing cosmological evolution until now. The condensation of a dark matter component in equilibrium with the thermal plasma is a relativistic process, hence the amount of matter dictated by the charge asymmetry is complemented by a hot relic density frozen out at the time of decoupling. Contrary to the case of ordinary WIMPs, dark matter particles in a condensate can be very light, $10^{-22}\\,{\\rm eV} \\lesssim m \\lesssim 10^2\\,{\\rm eV}$; the lower limit arises from constraints on small-scale structure formation, while the upper bound ensures that the density from thermal relics is not too large. Big-Bang nucleosynthesis constrains the temperature of deco...

  18. Asymmetric condensed dark matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre, Anthony; Diez-Tejedor, Alberto

    2016-04-01

    We explore the viability of a boson dark matter candidate with an asymmetry between the number densities of particles and antiparticles. A simple thermal field theory analysis confirms that, under certain general conditions, this component would develop a Bose-Einstein condensate in the early universe that, for appropriate model parameters, could survive the ensuing cosmological evolution until now. The condensation of a dark matter component in equilibrium with the thermal plasma is a relativistic process, hence the amount of matter dictated by the charge asymmetry is complemented by a hot relic density frozen out at the time of decoupling. Contrary to the case of ordinary WIMPs, dark matter particles in a condensate must be lighter than a few tens of eV so that the density from thermal relics is not too large. Big-Bang nucleosynthesis constrains the temperature of decoupling to the scale of the QCD phase transition or above. This requires large dark matter-to-photon ratios and very weak interactions with standard model particles.

  19. Chaos of chiral condensate

    CERN Document Server

    Hashimoto, Koji; Yoshida, Kentaroh

    2016-01-01

    Assigning a chaos index for vacua of generic quantum field theories is a challenging problem. We find chaotic behavior of chiral condensates of a quantum gauge theory at strong coupling limit, by using the AdS/CFT correspondence. We evaluate the time evolution of homogeneous quark condensates and in an N=2 supersymmetric QCD with the SU(N_c) gauge group at large N_c and at large 't Hooft coupling lambda. At an equivalent classical gravity picture, a Lyapunov exponent is readily defined. We show that the condensates exhibit chaotic behavior for energy density E > (6x10^2) (N_c/lambda^2) (m_q)^4 where m_q is the quark mass. The energy region of the chaotic vacua of the N=2 supersymmetric QCD increases for smaller N_c or larger lambda. The Lyapunov exponent is calculated as a function of the theory (N_c,lambda,E), showing that the N=2 supersymmetric QCD is more chaotic for smaller N_c.

  20. Schizophrenia and chromosomal deletions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindsay, E.A.; Baldini, A. [Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States); Morris, M. A. [Univ. of Geneva School of Medicine, NY (United States)] [and others

    1995-06-01

    Recent genetic linkage analysis studies have suggested the presence of a schizophrenia locus on the chromosomal region 22q11-q13. Schizophrenia has also been frequently observed in patients affected with velo-cardio-facial syndrome (VCFS), a disorder frequently associated with deletions within 22q11.1. It has been hypothesized that psychosis in VCFS may be due to deletion of the catechol-o-methyl transferase gene. Prompted by these observations, we screened for 22q11 deletions in a population of 100 schizophrenics selected from the Maryland Epidemiological Sample. Our results show that there are schizophrenic patients carrying a deletion of 22q11.1 and a mild VCFS phenotype that might remain unrecognized. These findings should encourage a search for a schizophrenia-susceptibility gene within the deleted region and alert those in clinical practice to the possible presence of a mild VCFS phenotype associated with schizophrenia. 9 refs.

  1. Temporal dynamics of Bose-condensed gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trujillo Martinez, Mauricio

    2014-03-19

    We perform a detailed quantum dynamical study of non-equilibrium trapped, interacting Bose-condensed gases. We investigate Josephson oscillations between interacting Bose-Einstein condensates confined in a finite size double-well trap and the non-trivial time evolution of a coherent state placed at the center of a two dimensional optical lattice. For the Josephson oscillations three time scales appear. We find that Josephson junction can sustain multiple undamped oscillations up to a characteristic time scale τ{sub c} without exciting atoms out of the condensates. Beyond the characteristic time scale τ{sub c} the dynamics of the junction are governed by fast, non-condensed particles assisted Josephson tunnelling as well as the collisions between non-condensed particles. In the non-condensed particles dominated regime we observe strong damping of the oscillations due to inelastic collisions, equilibrating the system leading to an effective loss of details of the initial conditions. In addition, we predict that an initially self-trapped BEC state will be destroyed by these fast dynamics. The time evolution of a coherent state released at the center of a two dimensional optical lattice shows a ballistic expansion with a decreasing expansion velocity for increasing two-body interactions strength and particle number. Additionally, we predict that if the two-body interactions strength exceeds a certain value, a forerunner splits up from the expanding coherent state. We also observe that this system, which is prepared far from equilibrium, can evolve to a quasistationary non-equilibrium state.

  2. Engineered human dicentric chromosomes show centromere plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Anne W; Gustashaw, Karen M; Willard, Huntington F

    2005-01-01

    The centromere is essential for the faithful distribution of a cell's genetic material to subsequent generations. Despite intense scrutiny, the precise genetic and epigenetic basis for centromere function is still unknown. Here, we have used engineered dicentric human chromosomes to investigate mammalian centromere structure and function. We describe three classes of dicentric chromosomes isolated in different cell lines: functionally monocentric chromosomes, in which one of the two genetically identical centromeres is consistently inactivated; functionally dicentric chromosomes, in which both centromeres are consistently active; and dicentric chromosomes heterogeneous with respect to centromere activity. A study of serial single cell clones from heterogeneous cell lines revealed that while centromere activity is usually clonal, the centromere state (i.e. functionally monocentric or dicentric) in some lines can switch within a growing population of cells. Because pulsed field gel analysis indicated that the DNA at the centromeres of these chromosomes did not change detectably, this switching of the centromere state is most likely due to epigenetic changes. Inactivation of one of the two active centromeres in a functionally dicentric chromosome was observed in a percentage of cells after treatment with Trichostatin A, an inhibitor of histone deacetylation. This study provides evidence that the activity of human centromeres, while largely stable, can be subject to dynamic change, most likely due to epigenetic modification.

  3. Dark matter as a condensate: Deduction of microscopic properties

    CERN Document Server

    Gutierrez, Sergio; Camacho, Abel

    2016-01-01

    In the present work we model dark matter as a Bose-Einstein condensate and the main goal is the deduction of the microscopic properties, namely, mass, number of particles, and scattering length, related to the particles comprised in the corresponding condensate. This task is done introducing in the corresponding model the effects of the thermal cloud of the system. Three physical conditions are imposed, i.e., mechanical equilibrium of the condensate, explanation of the rotation curves of stars belonging to dwarf galaxies, and, finally, the deflection of light due to the presence of dark matter. These three aforementioned expressions allow us to cast the features of the particles in terms of detectable astrophysical variables. Finally, the model is contrasted against observational data and in this manner we obtain values for the involved microscopic parameters of the condensate. The deduced results are compared with previous results in which dark matter has not been considered a condensate. The main conclusion...

  4. Condensed Matter Nuclear Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biberian, Jean-Paul

    2006-02-01

    1. General. A tribute to gene Mallove - the "Genie" reactor / K. Wallace and R. Stringham. An update of LENR for ICCF-11 (short course, 10/31/04) / E. Storms. New physical effects in metal deuterides / P. L. Hagelstein ... [et al.]. Reproducibility, controllability, and optimization of LENR experiments / D. J. Nagel -- 2. Experiments. Electrochemistry. Evidence of electromagnetic radiation from Ni-H systems / S. Focardi ... [et al.]. Superwave reality / I. Dardik. Excess heat in electrolysis experiments at energetics technologies / I. Dardik ... [et al.]. "Excess heat" during electrolysis in platinum/K[symbol]CO[symbol]/nickel light water system / J. Tian ... [et al.]. Innovative procedure for the, in situ, measurement of the resistive thermal coefficient of H(D)/Pd during electrolysis; cross-comparison of new elements detected in the Th-Hg-Pd-D(H) electrolytic cells / F. Celani ... [et al.]. Emergence of a high-temperature superconductivity in hydrogen cycled Pd compounds as an evidence for superstoihiometric H/D sites / A. Lipson ... [et al.]. Plasma electrolysis. Calorimetry of energy-efficient glow discharge - apparatus design and calibration / T. B. Benson and T. O. Passell. Generation of heat and products during plasma electrolysis / T. Mizuno ... [et al.]. Glow discharge. Excess heat production in Pd/D during periodic pulse discharge current in various conditions / A. B. Karabut. Beam experiments. Accelerator experiments and theoretical models for the electron screening effect in metallic environments / A. Huke, K. Czerski, and P. Heide. Evidence for a target-material dependence of the neutron-proton branching ratio in d+d reactions for deuteron energies below 20keV / A. Huke ... [et al.]. Experiments on condensed matter nuclear events in Kobe University / T. Minari ... [et al.]. Electron screening constraints for the cold fusion / K. Czerski, P. Heide, and A. Huke. Cavitation. Low mass 1.6 MHz sonofusion reactor / R. Stringham. Particle detection. Research

  5. Convective condensation heat transfer in a horizontal condenser tube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarma, P.K. [College of Engineering, GITAM, Visakhapatnam (India); Sastry, C.V.N.; Rao, V.D. [Andhra Univ., College of Engineering, Visakhapatnam (India); Kakac, S.; Liu, H. [Miami Univ., College of Engineering, FL (United States)

    2002-03-01

    The purpose of this article is to solve analytically the problem of convective condensation of vapors inside a horizontal condenser tube. Homogeneous model approach is employed in the estimation of shear velocity, which is subsequently, made use of in predicting local convective condensation heat transfer coefficients. The resulting analysis of the present study is compared with some of the available equations in the literature. It is observed that the agreement is reasonably satisfactory validating the assumptions and the theory presented. (authors)

  6. Condensed landscape experience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Earon, Ofri

    2011-01-01

    demands, quality of space, mixture of functions, urban complexity, public life and cultural heritage. In order to launch such an approach, an understanding of the spatial, social and environmental significance of a radical re-thinking of relationships between architecture and landscape is necessary....... This paper addresses the question of whether the sensation of landscape can be condensed in function or to the size of an urban building. It also discusses the benefits and potentials of the amalgamate, by underlining the unique qualities of such a hybrid. In an attempt to define the experience of landscape...

  7. Galaxies as condensates

    CERN Document Server

    Bugg, D V

    2012-01-01

    A novel interpretation of MOND is presented. For galactic data, in addition to Newtonian acceleration, there is an attractive acceleration peaking at Milgrom's parameter a_0. The peak lies within experimental error where a_0 = cH_0/2\\pi and H_0 is the present-time value of the Hubble constant. This peaking may be understood in terms of quantum mechanical mixing between Newtonian gravitation and the Hubble mechanism. There are five pointers towards galaxies being Fermi-Dirac condensates.

  8. Chromosome Territory Modeller and Viewer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tkacz, Magdalena A; Chromiński, Kornel; Idziak-Helmcke, Dominika; Robaszkiewicz, Ewa; Hasterok, Robert

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents ChroTeMo, a tool for chromosome territory modelling, accompanied by ChroTeVi-a chromosome territory visualisation software that uses the data obtained by ChroTeMo. These tools have been developed in order to complement the molecular cytogenetic research of interphase nucleus structure in a model grass Brachypodium distachyon. Although the modelling tool has been initially created for one particular species, it has universal application. The proposed version of ChroTeMo allows for generating a model of chromosome territory distribution in any given plant or animal species after setting the initial, species-specific parameters. ChroTeMo has been developed as a fully probabilistic modeller. Due to this feature, the comparison between the experimental data on the structure of a nucleus and the results obtained from ChroTeMo can indicate whether the distribution of chromosomes inside a nucleus is also fully probabilistic or is subjected to certain non-random patterns. The presented tools have been written in Python, so they are multiplatform, portable and easy to read. Moreover, if necessary they can be further developed by users writing their portions of code. The source code, documentation, and wiki, as well as the issue tracker and the list of related articles that use ChroTeMo and ChroTeVi, are accessible in a public repository at Github under GPL 3.0 license.

  9. Organization and segregation of bacterial chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xindan; Montero Llopis, Paula; Rudner, David Z

    2013-03-01

    The bacterial chromosome must be compacted more than 1,000-fold to fit into the compartment in which it resides. How it is condensed, organized and ultimately segregated has been a puzzle for over half a century. Recent advances in live-cell imaging and genome-scale analyses have led to new insights into these problems. We argue that the key feature of compaction is the orderly folding of DNA along adjacent segments and that this organization provides easy and efficient access for protein-DNA transactions and has a central role in driving segregation. Similar principles and common proteins are used in eukaryotes to condense and to resolve sister chromatids at metaphase.

  10. Chromosomal instability in meningiomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Tilborg, Angela A G; Al Allak, Bushra; Velthuizen, Sandra C J M; de Vries, Annie; Kros, Johan M; Avezaat, Cees J J; de Klein, Annelies; Beverloo, H Berna; Zwarthoff, Ellen C

    2005-04-01

    Approximately 60% of sporadic meningiomas are caused by inactivation of the NF2 tumor suppressor gene on chromosome 22. No causative gene is known for the remaining 40%. Cytogenetic analysis shows that meningiomas caused by inactivation of the NF2 gene can be divided into tumors that show monosomy 22 as the sole abnormality and tumors with a more complex karyotype. Meningiomas not caused by the NF2 gene usually have a diploid karyotype. Here we report that, besides the clonal chromosomal aberrations, the chromosome numbers in many meningiomas varied from one metaphase spread to the other, a feature that is indicative of chromosomal instability. Unexpectedly and regardless of genotype, a subgroup of tumors was observed with an average number of 44.9 chromosomes and little variation in the number of chromosomes per metaphase spread. In addition, a second subgroup was recognized with a hyperdiploid number of chromosomes (average 48.5) and considerable variation in numbers per metaphase. However, this numerical instability resulted in a clonal karyotype with chromosomal gains and losses in addition to loss of chromosome 22 only in meningiomas caused by inactivation of the NF2 gene. In cultured cells of all tumor groups, bi- and multinucleated cells were seen, as well as anaphase bridges, residual chromatid strings, multiple spindle poles, and unseparated chromatids, suggesting defects in the mitotic apparatus or kinetochore. Thus, we conclude that even a benign and slow-growing tumor like a meningioma displays chromosomal instability.

  11. Novel gene acquisition on carnivore Y chromosomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William J Murphy

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Despite its importance in harboring genes critical for spermatogenesis and male-specific functions, the Y chromosome has been largely excluded as a priority in recent mammalian genome sequencing projects. Only the human and chimpanzee Y chromosomes have been well characterized at the sequence level. This is primarily due to the presumed low overall gene content and highly repetitive nature of the Y chromosome and the ensuing difficulties using a shotgun sequence approach for assembly. Here we used direct cDNA selection to isolate and evaluate the extent of novel Y chromosome gene acquisition in the genome of the domestic cat, a species from a different mammalian superorder than human, chimpanzee, and mouse (currently being sequenced. We discovered four novel Y chromosome genes that do not have functional copies in the finished human male-specific region of the Y or on other mammalian Y chromosomes explored thus far. Two genes are derived from putative autosomal progenitors, and the other two have X chromosome homologs from different evolutionary strata. All four genes were shown to be multicopy and expressed predominantly or exclusively in testes, suggesting that their duplication and specialization for testis function were selected for because they enhance spermatogenesis. Two of these genes have testis-expressed, Y-borne copies in the dog genome as well. The absence of the four newly described genes on other characterized mammalian Y chromosomes demonstrates the gene novelty on this chromosome between mammalian orders, suggesting it harbors many lineage-specific genes that may go undetected by traditional comparative genomic approaches. Specific plans to identify the male-specific genes encoded in the Y chromosome of mammals should be a priority.

  12. The X chromosome and immune associated genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, Ilaria; Lleo, Ana; Gershwin, M Eric; Invernizzi, Pietro

    2012-05-01

    The X chromosome is known to contain the largest number of immune-related genes of the whole human genome. For this reason, X chromosome has recently become subject of great interest and attention and numerous studies have been aimed at understanding the role of genes on the X chromosome in triggering and maintaining the autoimmune aggression. Autoimmune diseases are indeed a growing heath burden affecting cumulatively up to 10% of the general population. It is intriguing that most X-linked primary immune deficiencies carry significant autoimmune manifestations, thus illustrating the critical role played by products of single gene located on the X chromosome in the onset, function and homeostasis of the immune system. Again, the plethora of autoimmune stigmata observed in patients with Turner syndrome, a disease due to the lack of one X chromosome or the presence of major X chromosome deletions, indicate that X-linked genes play a unique and major role in autoimmunity. There have been several reports on a role of X chromosome gene dosage through inactivation or duplication in women with autoimmune diseases, for example through a higher rate of circulating cells with a single X chromosome (i.e. with X monosomy). Finally, a challenge for researchers in the coming years will be to dissect the role for the large number of X-linked microRNAs from the perspective of autoimmune disease development. Taken together, X chromosome might well constitute the common trait of the susceptibility to autoimmune diseases, other than to explain the female preponderance of these conditions. This review will focus on the available evidence on X chromosome changes and discuss their potential implications and limitations.

  13. Modeling and Optimization of Superhydrophobic Condensation

    OpenAIRE

    Miljkovic, Nenad; Enright, Ryan; Wang, Evelyn N.

    2012-01-01

    Superhydrophobic micro/nanostructured surfaces for dropwise condensation have recently received significant attention due to their potential to enhance heat transfer performance by shedding water droplets via coalescence-induced droplet jumping at length scales below the capillary length. However, achieving optimal surface designs for such behavior requires capturing the details of transport processes that is currently lacking. While comprehensive models have been developed for flat hydrophob...

  14. Thermal condensation mode in a dusty plasma

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B P Pandey; J Vranješ; S Parhi

    2003-03-01

    In the present work, the radiative condensation instability is investigated in the presence of dust charge fluctuations. We find that the charge variability of the grain reduces the growth rate of radiative mode only for fluctuation wavelength smaller or of the order of the Debye length and this reduction is not very large. Far from the Debye sphere, radiative mode can damp due to thermal conduction of electrons and ions.

  15. Analysis of plant meiotic chromosomes by chromosome painting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lysak, Martin A; Mandáková, Terezie

    2013-01-01

    Chromosome painting (CP) refers to visualization of large chromosome regions, entire chromosome arms, or entire chromosomes via fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). For CP in plants, contigs of chromosome-specific bacterial artificial chromosomes (BAC) from the target species or from a closely related species (comparative chromosome painting, CCP) are typically applied as painting probes. Extended pachytene chromosomes provide the highest resolution of CP in plants. CP enables identification and tracing of particular chromosome regions and/or entire chromosomes throughout all meiotic stages as well as corresponding chromosome territories in premeiotic interphase nuclei. Meiotic pairing and structural chromosome rearrangements (typically inversions and translocations) can be identified by CP. Here, we describe step-by-step protocols of CP and CCP in plant species including chromosome preparation, BAC DNA labeling, and multicolor FISH.

  16. Polariton condensates put in motion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanvitto, D; Amo, A; Vina, L [Departamento de Fisica de Materiales, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, E-28049, Madrid (Spain); Laussy, F P; Tejedor, C [Departamento de Fisica Teorica de la Materia Condensada, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, E-28049, Madrid (Spain); LemaItre, A; Bloch, J, E-mail: daniele.sanvitto@uam.es [LPN/CNRS, Route de Nozay, F-91460, Marcoussis (France)

    2010-04-02

    We present several examples of the interesting phenomenology shown by a moving polariton condensate in semiconductor microcavities. The superfluid behavior is probed by colliding the polariton condensate against physical obstacles in the form of natural defects of the sample, demonstrating a clear suppression of scattering when the speed of the flow lies below the critical velocity. At higher velocities Cerenkov-like shock waves around the defect and disruption of the condensate are also observed.

  17. Quantitative assessment of DNA condensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trubetskoy, V S; Slattum, P M; Hagstrom, J E; Wolff, J A; Budker, V G

    1999-02-15

    A fluorescent method is proposed for assessing DNA condensation in aqueous solutions with variety of condensing agents. The technique is based on the effect of concentration-dependent self-quenching of covalently bound fluorophores upon DNA collapse. The method allows a more precise determination of charge equivalency in titration experiments with various polycations. The technique's ability to determine the number of DNA molecules that are condensed together in close proximity is under further investigation.

  18. Mitotic chromosome compaction via active loop extrusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goloborodko, Anton; Imakaev, Maxim; Marko, John; Mirny, Leonid; MIT-Northwestern Team

    During cell division, two copies of each chromosome are segregated from each other and compacted more than hundred-fold into the canonical X-shaped structures. According to earlier microscopic observations and the recent Hi-C study, chromosomes are compacted into arrays of consecutive loops of ~100 kilobases. Mechanisms that lead to formation of such loop arrays are largely unknown. Here we propose that, during cell division, chromosomes can be compacted by enzymes that extrude loops on chromatin fibers. First, we use computer simulations and analytical modeling to show that a system of loop-extruding enzymes on a chromatin fiber self-organizes into an array of consecutive dynamic loops. Second, we model the process of loop extrusion in 3D and show that, coupled with the topo II strand-passing activity, it leads to robust compaction and segregation of sister chromatids. This mechanism of chromosomal condensation and segregation does not require additional proteins or specific DNA markup and is robust against variations in the number and properties of such loop extruding enzymes. Work at NU was supported by the NSF through Grants DMR-1206868 and MCB-1022117, and by the NIH through Grants GM105847 and CA193419. Work at MIT was supported by the NIH through Grants GM114190 R01HG003143.

  19. Nuclear assembly of purified Crythecodinium cohnii chromosomes in cell—free extracts of Xenopus laevis eggs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIUXIAOLING; YANSHEN

    2000-01-01

    Incubation of dinoflagellate Crythecodinium cohnii chromosomes in cytoplasmic extracts of unfertilized Xenopus laevis eggs resulted in chromosomes decondensation and recondensation,nuclear envelope assembly,and nuclear reconstitution.Dinoflagellate Crythecodinium cohnii is a kind of primitive eukaryote which possesses numerous permanently condensed chromosomes and discontinuous double-layered nuclear membrane throughout the cell cycle.The assembled nuclei,being surrounded by a continuous double membrane containing nuclear pores and the uniformly dispersed chromatin fibers are morphologically distinguishable from that of Dinoflagellate Crythecodinium cohnii.However,incubation of dinoflagellate Cyrthecodinium cohnii chromosomes in the extracts from dinoflagellate Crythecodinium cohnii cells does not induce nuclear reconstitution.

  20. Nuclear assembly of purified Crythecodinium cohnii chromosomes in cell-free extracts of Xenopus laevis eggs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Incubation of dinoflagellate Crythecodinium cohnii chromosomes in cytoplasmic extracts of unfertilized Xenopus laevis eggs resulted in chromosomes decondensation and recondensation, nuclear envelope assembly, and nuclear reconstitution.Dinoflagellate Crythecodinium cohnii is a kind of primitive eukaryote which possesses numerous permanently condensed chromosomes and discontinuous double-layered nuclear membrane throughout the cell cycle. The assembled nuclei, being surrounded by a continuous double membrane containing nuclear pores and the uniformly dispersed chromatin fibers are morphologically distinguishable from that of Dinoflagellate Crythecodinium cohnii. However, incubation of dinoflagellate Crythecodinium cohnii chromosomes in the extracts from dinoflagellate Crythecodinium cohnii cells does not induce nuclear reconstitution.

  1. Transposable elements and early evolution of sex chromosomes in fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalopin, Domitille; Volff, Jean-Nicolas; Galiana, Delphine; Anderson, Jennifer L; Schartl, Manfred

    2015-09-01

    In many organisms, the sex chromosome pair can be recognized due to heteromorphy; the Y and W chromosomes have often lost many genes due to the absence of recombination during meiosis and are frequently heterochromatic. Repetitive sequences are found at a high proportion on such heterochromatic sex chromosomes and the evolution and emergence of sex chromosomes has been connected to the dynamics of repeats and transposable elements. With an amazing plasticity of sex determination mechanisms and numerous instances of independent emergence of novel sex chromosomes, fish represent an excellent lineage to investigate the early stages of sex chromosome differentiation, where sex chromosomes often are homomorphic and not heterochromatic. We have analyzed the composition, distribution, and relative age of TEs from available sex chromosome sequences of seven teleost fish. We observed recent bursts of TEs and simple repeat accumulations around young sex determination loci. More strikingly, we detected transposable element (TE) amplifications not only on the sex determination regions of the Y and W sex chromosomes, but also on the corresponding regions of the X and Z chromosomes. In one species, we also clearly demonstrated that the observed TE-rich sex determination locus originated from a TE-poor genomic region, strengthening the link between TE accumulation and emergence of the sex determination locus. Altogether, our results highlight the role of TEs in the initial steps of differentiation and evolution of sex chromosomes.

  2. The Precarious Prokaryotic Chromosome

    OpenAIRE

    Kuzminov, Andrei

    2014-01-01

    Evolutionary selection for optimal genome preservation, replication, and expression should yield similar chromosome organizations in any type of cells. And yet, the chromosome organization is surprisingly different between eukaryotes and prokaryotes. The nuclear versus cytoplasmic accommodation of genetic material accounts for the distinct eukaryotic and prokaryotic modes of genome evolution, but it falls short of explaining the differences in the chromosome organization. I propose that the t...

  3. Mechanisms for chromosome segregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouet, Jean-Yves; Stouf, Mathieu; Lebailly, Elise; Cornet, François

    2014-12-01

    Bacteria face the problem of segregating their gigantic chromosomes without a segregation period restricted in time and space, as Eukaryotes do. Segregation thus involves multiple activities, general or specific of a chromosome region and differentially controlled. Recent advances show that these various mechanisms conform to a “pair and release” rule, which appears as a general rule in DNA segregation. We describe the latest advances in segregation of bacterial chromosomes with emphasis on the different pair and release mechanisms.

  4. Pds5 regulators segregate cohesion and condensation pathways in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Kevin; Skibbens, Robert V

    2015-06-02

    Cohesins are required both for the tethering together of sister chromatids (termed cohesion) and subsequent condensation into discrete structures-processes fundamental for faithful chromosome segregation into daughter cells. Differentiating between cohesin roles in cohesion and condensation would provide an important advance in studying chromatin metabolism. Pds5 is a cohesin-associated factor that is essential for both cohesion maintenance and condensation. Recent studies revealed that ELG1 deletion suppresses the temperature sensitivity of pds5 mutant cells. However, the mechanisms through which Elg1 may regulate cohesion and condensation remain unknown. Here, we report that ELG1 deletion from pds5-1 mutant cells results in a significant rescue of cohesion, but not condensation, defects. Based on evidence that Elg1 unloads the DNA replication clamp PCNA from DNA, we tested whether PCNA overexpression would similarly rescue pds5-1 mutant cell cohesion defects. The results indeed reveal that elevated levels of PCNA rescue pds5-1 temperature sensitivity and cohesion defects, but do not rescue pds5-1 mutant cell condensation defects. In contrast, RAD61 deletion rescues the condensation defect, but importantly, neither the temperature sensitivity nor cohesion defects exhibited by pds5-1 mutant cells. In combination, these findings reveal that cohesion and condensation are separable pathways and regulated in nonredundant mechanisms. These results are discussed in terms of a new model through which cohesion and condensation are spatially regulated.

  5. Bacterial chromosome segregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Possoz, Christophe; Junier, Ivan; Espeli, Olivier

    2012-01-01

    Dividing cells have mechanisms to ensure that their genomes are faithfully segregated into daughter cells. In bacteria, the description of these mechanisms has been considerably improved in the recent years. This review focuses on the different aspects of bacterial chromosome segregation that can be understood thanks to the studies performed with model organisms: Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis, Caulobacter crescentus and Vibrio cholerae. We describe the global positionning of the nucleoid in the cell and the specific localization and dynamics of different chromosomal loci, kinetic and biophysic aspects of chromosome segregation are presented. Finally, a presentation of the key proteins involved in the chromosome segregation is made.

  6. Chromosome oscillations in mitosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campas, Otger

    2008-03-01

    Successful cell division necessitates a tight regulation of chromosome movement via the activity of molecular motors. Many of the key players at the origin of the forces generating the motion have been identified, but their spatial and temporal organization remains elusive. In animal cells, chromosomes periodically switch between phases of movement towards and away from the pole. This characteristic oscillatory behaviour cannot be explained by the current models of chromosome positioning and congression. We perform a self-contained theoretical analysis in which the motion of mono-oriented chromosomes results from the competition between the activity of the kinetochore and chromokinesin motors on the chromosome arms. Our analysis, consistent with the available experimental data, proposes that the interplay between the aster-like morphology of the spindle and the collective kinetics of molecular motors is at the origin of chromosome oscillations, positioning and congression. It provides a natural explanation for the so-called chromosome directional instability and for the mechanism by which chromosomes sense their position in space. In addition, we estimate the in vivo velocity of chromokinesins at vanishing load and propose new experiments to assess the mechanism at the origin of chromosome movement in cell division.

  7. Condensate losses and oscillations induced by Rydberg atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpiuk, Tomasz; Brewczyk, Mirosław; Rzążewski, Kazimierz; Gaj, Anita; Krupp, Alexander T.; Löw, Robert; Hofferberth, Sebastian; Pfau, Tilman

    2017-03-01

    We numerically analyze the impact of a single Rydberg electron onto a Bose–Einstein condensate. Both S- and D-Rydberg states are studied. The radial size of S- and D-states are comparable, hence the only difference is due to the angular dependence of the wavefunctions. We find the atom losses in the condensate after the excitation of a sequence of Rydberg atoms. Additionally, we investigate the mechanical effect in which the Rydberg atoms force the condensate to oscillate. Our numerical analysis is based on the classical fields approximation. Finally, we compare numerical results to experimental data.

  8. Condensate losses and oscillations induced by Rydberg atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Karpiuk, Tomasz; Rzążewski, Kazimierz; Gaj, Anita; Krupp, Alexander T; Löw, Robert; Hofferberth, Sebastian; Pfau, Tilman

    2016-01-01

    We numerically analyze the impact of a single Rydberg electron onto a Bose-Einstein condensate. Both $S-$ and $D-$ Rydberg states are studied. The radial size of $S-$ and $D-$states are comparable, hence the only difference is due to the angular dependence of the wavefunctions. We find the atom losses in the condensate after the excitation of a sequence of Rydberg atoms. Additionally, we investigate the mechanical effect in which the Rydberg atoms force the condensate to oscillate. Our numerical analysis is based on the classical fields approximation. Finally, we compare numerical results to experimental data.

  9. Extraction of condensed tannins from Mexican plant sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcíaa, Ramiro; Aguilera, Antonio; Contreras-Esquivel, Juan C; Rodríguez, Raúl; Aguilar, Cristóbal N

    2008-01-01

    Contents of total polyphenols, condensed tannins and proanthocyanidins, and their stability to various pH values and temperatures were studied in Mexican blueberry, cuautecomate fruit, garambullo fruit, aubergine, coffee pulp and residues of black grapes. Several aqueous extracts, obtained through a one-pass-extraction process, were analyzed using liquid chromatography in order to quantify the condensed tannin (proanthocyanidin) content responsible for their antioxidant activity and colour. All tested samples included high proanthocyanidin contents demonstrating that these Mexican fruits and vegetables are good sources of natural antioxidants, and they all could be considered as excellent functional foods due to their bioactivity measured as the condensed tannin level.

  10. Nonequilibrium Weak Processes in Kaon Condensation; 2, Kinetics of condensation

    CERN Document Server

    Muto, T; Iwamoto, N; Muto, Takumi; Tatsumi, Toshitaka; Iwamoto, Naoki

    2000-01-01

    The kinetics of negatively charged kaon condensation in the early stages of a newly born neutron star is considered. The thermal kaon process, in which kaons are thermally produced by nucleon-nucleon collisions, is found to be dominant throughout the equilibration process. Temporal changes of the order parameter of the condensate and the number densities of the chemical species are obtained from the rate equations, which include the thermal kaon reactions as well as the kaon-induced Urca and the modified Urca reactions. It is shown that the dynamical evolution of the condensate is characterized by three stages: the first, prior to establishment of a condensate, the second, during the growth and subsequent saturation of the condensate, and the third, near chemical equilibrium. The connection between the existence of a soft kaon mode and the instability of the noncondensed state is discussed. Implications of the nonequilibrium process on the possible delayed collapse of a protoneutron star are also mentioned.

  11. Condensation Processes in Geothermal Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, D. I.; Moore, J. N.

    2005-12-01

    We model condensation processes in geothermal systems to understand how this process changes fluid chemistry. We assume two processes operate in geothermal systems: 1) condensation of a vapor phase derived by boiling an aqueous geothermal fluid into a cool near surface water and 2) condensation of a magmatic vapor by a deep circulating meteoric thermal fluid. It is assumed that the condensation process has two stages. Initially the condensing fluid is under saturated in gaseous species. Condensation of the vapor phase continues until the pressure on the fluid equals the sum of the partial pressures of water and the dissolved gaseous species. At that time bubbles flux through the condensing fluid. In time the fluid and fluxing gas phase come to equilibrium. Calculation shows that during the second stage of the condensation process the liquid phase becomes enriched in more soluble gaseous species like CO2 and H2S, and depleted in less soluble species like CH4 and N2. Stage 2 condensation processes can therefore be monitored by ratios of more and less condensable species like CO2/N2. Condensation of vapor released by boiling geothermal fluids results in liquids with high concentrations of H2S and CO2 like is seen in geothermal system steam-heated waters. Condensation of a magmatic vapor into circulating meteoric water has been proposed, but not well demonstrated. We compare to our models the Cerro Prieto, Mexico gas analysis data set collected over twelve years time by USGS personnel. It was assumed for modeling that the Cerro Prieto geothermal fluids are circulating meteoritic fluids with N2/Ar ratios about 40 to which is added a magmatic vapor with N2/Ar ratio = 400. The Cerro Prieto analyses show a strong correlation between N2/Ar and CO2/N2 as predicted by calculation. Two dimensional image plots of well N2/Ar + CO2/N2 show a bull's-eye pattern on the geothermal field. Image plots of analyses collected over a year or less time show N2/Ar and CO2/N2 hot spots

  12. Microgravity condensing heat exchanger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Christopher M. (Inventor); Ma, Yonghui (Inventor); North, Andrew (Inventor); Weislogel, Mark M. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A heat exchanger having a plurality of heat exchanging aluminum fins with hydrophilic condensing surfaces which are stacked and clamped between two cold plates. The cold plates are aligned radially along a plane extending through the axis of a cylindrical duct and hold the stacked and clamped portions of the heat exchanging fins along the axis of the cylindrical duct. The fins extend outwardly from the clamped portions along approximately radial planes. The spacing between fins is symmetric about the cold plates, and are somewhat more closely spaced as the angle they make with the cold plates approaches 90.degree.. Passageways extend through the fins between vertex spaces which provide capillary storage and communicate with passageways formed in the stacked and clamped portions of the fins, which communicate with water drains connected to a pump externally to the duct. Water with no entrained air is drawn from the capillary spaces.

  13. Fetal chromosome analysis: screening for chromosome disease?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Philip, J; Tabor, Ann; Bang, J

    1983-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the rationale of the current indications for fetal chromosome analysis. 5372 women had 5423 amniocentesis performed, this group constituting a consecutive sample at the chromosome laboratory, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen from March 1973 to September 1980 (Group...... to women having amniocentesis, although considered not to have any increased risk of fetal chromosome abnormality (1390 pregnancies, group B). They were also compared with 750 consecutive pregnancies in women 25-34 years of age, in whom all heritable diseases were excluded (group C). The risk of unbalanced...... with women without elevated risk. Spontaneous abortion rate and prematurity rate did not differ from rates expected without amniocentesis. It is concluded that current indications may be characterized as a mixture of evident high risk factors and factors with only a minor influence on risk. Indications...

  14. Gaugino condensation in an improved heterotic $M$-theory

    CERN Document Server

    Ahmed, Nasr

    2008-01-01

    Gaugino condensation is discussed in the context of a consistent new version of low energy heterotic M-theory. The four dimensional reduction of the theory is described, based on simple boson and fermion backgrounds. This is generalised to include gaugino condenstates and various background fluxes, some with non-trivial topology. It is found that condensate and quantised flux contributions to the four-dimensional superpotential contain no corrections due to the warping of the higher dimensional metric.

  15. Condensation in Saturn's Stratospheric Haze Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barth, Erika L.; Moses, Julianne I.

    2016-10-01

    Haze particles in Saturn's stratosphere can be seen in the visible limb images of Cassini's Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS). These hazes are likely a mix of particles, including solid organics formed as a result of methane photolysis and electron deposition, as well as the condensation of water and hydrocarbon ices. We have examined data from both Cassini and Voyager to study the detailed vertical structure of absorbing/scattering particulates in Saturn's stratosphere and developed a Saturn version of the Community Aerosol and Radiation Model for Atmospheres (CARMA), adding a large database of hydrocarbons that are observed or expected to be present in Saturn's atmosphere.Our modeling indicates that water ice condenses independently of the hydrocarbons to form a thin layer above the 0.1 mbar pressure level. Between about 5 and 50 mbar, the hydrocarbons reach their condensation levels (in order of increasing pressure level): C6H6, C5H12, C4H2, C4H10, and C2H2. Because of the proximity of their condensation levels and due to the gravitational settling of the particles, the hydrocarbons are likely condensing on one another and forming a thicker layer of mixed composition. Interestingly, butane (C4H10) has a triple point around 135 K which is much lower than most of the other condensing species we've explored. Given an approximate condensation level of 10 mbar and the observed temperature changes at this pressure level following the December 2010 northern-hemisphere storm (stratospheric temperatures were elevated by as much as 50-70 K in a region near 40° N latitude.), melting and further nucleation of droplets could be occurring.A number of factors including temperature profile, vapor pressure equation, volatile abundance, nucleation critical saturation, and coagulation efficiency will affect the altitudes of the individual ice layers. We will present a summary of results following the nucleation and growth of compounds in order to quantify the likely size and

  16. PPOOLEX experiments on wall condensation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laine, J.; Puustinen, M. (Lappeenranta Univ. of Technology, Nuclear Safety Research Unit (Finland))

    2009-08-15

    This report summarizes the results of the wall condensation experiments carried out in December 2008 and January 2009 with the scaled down PPOOLEX test facility designed and constructed at Lappeenranta University of Technology. Steam was blown into the dry well compartment and from there through a DN200 blowdown pipe to the condensation pool. Altogether five experiments, each consisting of several blows, were carried out. The main purpose of the experiment series was to study wall condensation phenomenon inside the dry well compartment while steam is discharged through it into the condensation pool and to produce comparison data for CFD calculations at VTT. The PPOOLEX test facility is a closed stainless steel vessel divided into two compartments, dry well and wet well. For the wall condensation experiments the test facility was equipped with a system for collecting and measuring the amount of condensate from four different wall segments of the dry well compartment. A thermo graphic camera was used in a couple of experiments for filming the outside surface of the dry well wall. The effect of the initial temperature level of the dry well structures and of the steam flow rate for the accumulation of condensate was studied. The initial temperature level of the dry well structures varied from 23 to 99 deg. C. The steam flow rate varied from 90 to 690 g/s and the temperature of incoming steam from 115 to 160 deg. C. During the initial phase of steam discharge the accumulation of condensate was strongly controlled by the temperature level of the dry well structures; the lower the initial temperature level was the more condensate was accumulated. As the dry well structural temperatures increased the condensation process slowed down. Most of the condensate usually accumulated during the first 200 seconds of the discharge. However, the condensation process never completely stopped because a small temperature difference remained between the dry well atmosphere and inner wall

  17. Stationary and nonstationary fluid flow of a bose-einstein condensate through a penetrable barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engels, P; Atherton, C

    2007-10-19

    We experimentally study the fluid flow induced by a broad, penetrable barrier moving through an elongated dilute gaseous Bose-Einstein condensate. The barrier is created by a laser beam swept through the condensate, and the resulting dipole potential can be either attractive or repulsive. We examine both cases and find regimes of stable and unstable fluid flow: At slow speeds of the barrier, the fluid flow is steady due to the superfluidity of the condensate. At intermediate speeds, we observe an unsteady regime in which the condensate gets filled with dark solitons. At faster speeds, soliton formation completely ceases, and a remarkable absence of excitation in the condensate is seen again.

  18. APPARATUS FOR CONDENSATION AND SUBLIMATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, R.J.; Fuis, F. Jr.

    1958-10-01

    An apparatus is presented for the sublimation and condensation of uranium compounds in order to obtain an improved crystalline structure of this material. The apparatus comprises a vaporizing chamber and condensing structure connected thereto. There condenser is fitted with a removable liner having a demountable baffle attached to the liner by means of brackets and a removable pin. The baffle is of spiral cross-section and is provided with cooling coils disposed between the surfaces of the baffle for circulation of a temperature controlling liquid within the baffle. The cooling coll provides for controlllng the temperature of the baffle to insure formatlon of a satisfactory condensate, and the removable liner facilitates the removal of condensate formed during tbe sublimation process.

  19. Localization of latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA) on mitotic chromosomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahayu, Retno; Ohsaki, Eriko [Division of Virology, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, 2-2 Yamada-oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Omori, Hiroko [Central Instrumentation Laboratory Research Institute for Microbial Diseases (BIKEN), Osaka University, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Ueda, Keiji, E-mail: kueda@virus.med.osaka-u.ac.jp [Division of Virology, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, 2-2 Yamada-oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2016-09-15

    In latent infection of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), viral gene expression is extremely limited and copy numbers of viral genomes remain constant. Latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA) is known to have a role in maintaining viral genome copy numbers in growing cells. Several studies have shown that LANA is localized in particular regions on mitotic chromosomes, such as centromeres/pericentromeres. We independently examined the distinct localization of LANA on mitotic chromosomes during mitosis, using super-resolution laser confocal microscopy and correlative fluorescence microscopy–electron microscopy (FM-EM) analyses. We found that the majority of LANA were not localized at particular regions such as telomeres/peritelomeres, centromeres/pericentromeres, and cohesion sites, but at the bodies of condensed chromosomes. Thus, LANA may undergo various interactions with the host factors on the condensed chromosomes in order to tether the viral genome to mitotic chromosomes and realize faithful viral genome segregation during cell division. - Highlights: • This is the first report showing LANA dots on mitotic chromosomes by fluorescent microscopy followed by electron microscopy. • LANA dots localized randomly on condensed chromosomes other than centromere/pericentromere and telomere/peritelomre. • Cellular mitotic checkpoint should not be always involved in the segregation of KSHV genomes in the latency.

  20. XYY chromosome abnormality in sexual homicide perpetrators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briken, Peer; Habermann, Niels; Berner, Wolfgang; Hill, Andreas

    2006-03-05

    In a retrospective investigation of the court reports about sexual homicide perpetrators chromosome analysis had been carried out in 13 of 166 (7.8%) men. Three men (1.8%) with XYY chromosome abnormality were found. This rate is much higher than that found in unselected samples of prisoners (0.7-0.9%) or in the general population (0.01%). The three men had shown prepubescent abnormalities, school problems, and had suffered from physical abuse. The chromosome analysis in all cases had been carried out in connection with the forensic psychiatric court report due to the sexual homicide. However, two men had earlier psychiatric referrals. All were diagnosed as sexual sadistic, showed a psychopathic syndrome or psychopathy according to the Psychopathy Checklist-Revised [Hare RD, 1991, The Hare Psychopathy Checklist-Revised, Toronto, Ontario, Canada: Multi-Health Systems]. Two were multiple murderers. Especially forensic psychiatrists should be vigilant of the possibility of XYY chromosome abnormalities in sexual offenders.

  1. Diffusion in condensed matter methods, materials, models

    CERN Document Server

    Kärger, Jörg

    2005-01-01

    Diffusion as the process of particle transport due to stochastic movement is a phenomenon of crucial relevance for a large variety of processes and materials. This comprehensive, handbook- style survey of diffusion in condensed matter gives detailed insight into diffusion as the process of particle transport due to stochastic movement. Leading experts in the field describe in 23 chapters the different aspects of diffusion, covering microscopic and macroscopic experimental techniques and exemplary results for various classes of solids, liquids and interfaces as well as several theoretical concepts and models. Students and scientists in physics, chemistry, materials science, and biology will benefit from this detailed compilation.

  2. XYY chromosome anomaly and schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajagopalan, M; MacBeth, R; Varma, S L

    1998-02-07

    Sex chromosome anomalies have been associated with psychoses, and most of the evidence is linked to the presence of an additional X chromosome. We report a patient with XYY chromosome anomaly who developed schizophrenia.

  3. Sequencing papaya X and Yh chromosomes reveals molecular basis of incipient sex chromosome evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianping; Na, Jong-Kuk; Yu, Qingyi; Gschwend, Andrea R; Han, Jennifer; Zeng, Fanchang; Aryal, Rishi; VanBuren, Robert; Murray, Jan E; Zhang, Wenli; Navajas-Pérez, Rafael; Feltus, F Alex; Lemke, Cornelia; Tong, Eric J; Chen, Cuixia; Wai, Ching Man; Singh, Ratnesh; Wang, Ming-Li; Min, Xiang Jia; Alam, Maqsudul; Charlesworth, Deborah; Moore, Paul H; Jiang, Jiming; Paterson, Andrew H; Ming, Ray

    2012-08-21

    Sex determination in papaya is controlled by a recently evolved XY chromosome pair, with two slightly different Y chromosomes controlling the development of males (Y) and hermaphrodites (Y(h)). To study the events of early sex chromosome evolution, we sequenced the hermaphrodite-specific region of the Y(h) chromosome (HSY) and its X counterpart, yielding an 8.1-megabase (Mb) HSY pseudomolecule, and a 3.5-Mb sequence for the corresponding X region. The HSY is larger than the X region, mostly due to retrotransposon insertions. The papaya HSY differs from the X region by two large-scale inversions, the first of which likely caused the recombination suppression between the X and Y(h) chromosomes, followed by numerous additional chromosomal rearrangements. Altogether, including the X and/or HSY regions, 124 transcription units were annotated, including 50 functional pairs present in both the X and HSY. Ten HSY genes had functional homologs elsewhere in the papaya autosomal regions, suggesting movement of genes onto the HSY, whereas the X region had none. Sequence divergence between 70 transcripts shared by the X and HSY revealed two evolutionary strata in the X chromosome, corresponding to the two inversions on the HSY, the older of which evolved about 7.0 million years ago. Gene content differences between the HSY and X are greatest in the older stratum, whereas the gene content and order of the collinear regions are identical. Our findings support theoretical models of early sex chromosome evolution.

  4. Solitonic vortices in Bose-Einstein condensates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tylutki, M.; Donadello, S.; Serafini, S.; Pitaevskii, L. P.; Dalfovo, F.; Lamporesi, G.; Ferrari, G.

    2015-04-01

    We analyse, theoretically and experimentally, the nature of solitonic vortices (SV) in an elongated Bose-Einstein condensate. In the experiment, such defects are created via the Kibble-Zurek mechanism, when the temperature of a gas of sodium atoms is quenched across the BEC transition, and are imaged after a free expansion of the condensate. By using the Gross-Pitaevskii equation, we calculate the in-trap density and phase distributions characterizing a SV in the crossover from an elongated quasi-1D to a bulk 3D regime. The simulations show that the free expansion strongly amplifies the key features of a SV and produces a remarkable twist of the solitonic plane due to the quantized vorticity associated with the defect. Good agreement is found between simulations and experiments.

  5. Statistical steady state in turbulent droplet condensation

    CERN Document Server

    Siewert, Christoph; Krstulovic, Giorgio

    2016-01-01

    Motivated by the early stages of clouds and other systems in which droplets grow and shrink in a turbulence-driven supersaturation field, we investigate the problem of turbulent condensation using direct numerical simulations. The turbulent fluctuations of the supersaturation field offer different conditions for the growth of droplets which evolve in time due to turbulent transport and mixing. Based on that, we propose a Lagrangian stochastic model for condensation and evaporation of small droplets in turbulent flows. It consists of a set of stochastic integro-differential equations for the joint evolution of the squared radius and the supersaturation along the droplet trajectories. The model has two parameters fixed by the total amount of water and the thermodynamic properties, as well as the Lagrangian integral timescale of the turbulent supersaturation. The model reproduces very well the droplet size distributions obtained from direct numerical simulations and their time evolution. A noticeable result is t...

  6. Y-chromosome polymorphism: Possible largest Y chromosome in man?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murthy, D.S.K.; Al-Awadi, S.A.; Bastaki, L. [Kuwait Medical Genetics Centre, Sulaibikat (Kuwait)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    The role of variations (inversions/deletion or duplication) in the heterochromatin in gonadal development and function, reproductive fitness, and malignant disease has been extensively studied. However, the causal-relationship of large Y (Yqh+) and repeated fetal loss has not been established unequivocally. An Arab couple (?Bedouin origin) with a history of repeated abortions were investigated. Karyotype analysis of the husband showed a very large Y chromosome, confirmed by GTG-, QFQ- and CBG-banding techniques. C-banding showed discontinuous distribution of the heterochromatin blocks separated by pale bands. The origin of the large heterochromatin segment could be due to tandem duplication of the Yq region or translocation (Yq:Yq). No other relatives (males) of the propositus have been available for investigation. Polymorphism of the Y chromosome could be attributed to evolutionary changes from an ancestral type, either by deletion or duplication of the heterochromatin segment. More detailed studies on isolated, aboriginal/tribal human populations will enable us to better understand the significance of the Y chromosome polymorphism.

  7. Enhanced condensation on lubricant-impregnated nanotextured surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Sushant; Paxson, Adam T; Dhiman, Rajeev; Smith, J David; Varanasi, Kripa K

    2012-11-27

    Nanotextured superhydrophobic surfaces have received significant attention due to their ability to easily shed liquid drops. However, water droplets have been shown to condense within the textures of superhydrophobic surfaces, impale the vapor pockets, and strongly pin to the surface. This results in poor droplet mobility and degrades condensation performance. In this paper, we show that pinning of condensate droplets can be drastically reduced by designing a hierarchical micro-nanoscale texture on a surface and impregnating it with an appropriate lubricant. The choice of lubricant must take into account the surface energies of all phases present. A lubricant will cloak the condensate and inhibit growth if the spreading coefficient is positive. If the lubricant does not fully wet the solid, we show how condensate-solid pinning can be reduced by proper implementation of nanotexture. On such a surface, condensate droplets as small as 100 μm become highly mobile and move continuously at speeds that are several orders of magnitude higher than those on identically textured superhydrophobic surfaces. This remarkable mobility produces a continuous sweeping effect that clears the surface for fresh nucleation and results in enhanced condensation.

  8. Antikaon condensation in neutron stars

    CERN Document Server

    Pal, S; Greiner, W

    2000-01-01

    We investigate the condensation of charged K sup - meson and neutral anti-K sup 0 meson in dense neutron star matter. Calculations are performed in relativistic mean field models in which both the baryon-baryon and (anti)kaon-baryon interactions are mediated by meson exchange. It is found that anti-K sup 0 condensation is quite sensitive to the antikaon optical potential and depends more strongly on the nucleonic equation of state. For moderate values of antikaon potential and a rather stiff equation of state, a significant region of maximum mass star will contain anti-K sup 0 meson. The critical density of anti-K sup 0 condensation is always higher than that of K sup - condensation. With the appearance of K sup - and anti-K sup 0 condensates, pairs of p-K sup - and n-Kbar sup 0 are produced with equal proportion leading to a perfectly symmetric matter of nucleons and antikaons in neutron stars. Along with K sup - condensate, anti-K sup 0 condensate makes the equation of state much softer resulting in smaller...

  9. Analysis of Chromosomal Aberrations after Low and High Dose Rate Gamma Irradiation in ATM or NBS Suppressed Human Fibroblast Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hada, M.; Huff, J. L.; Patel, Z.; Pluth, J. M.; George, K. A.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2009-01-01

    A detailed understanding of the biological effects of heavy nuclei is needed for space radiation protection and for cancer therapy. High-LET radiation produces more complex DNA lesions that may be non-repairable or that may require additional processing steps compared to endogenous DSBs, increasing the possibility of misrepair. Interplay between radiation sensitivity, dose, and radiation quality has not been studied extensively. Previously we studied chromosome aberrations induced by low- and high- LET radiation in several cell lines deficient in ATM (ataxia telangactasia mutated; product of the gene that is mutated in ataxia telangiectasia patients) or NBS (nibrin; product of the gene mutated in the Nijmegen breakage syndrome), and gliomablastoma cells that are proficient or lacking in DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) activity. We found that the yields of both simple and complex chromosomal aberrations were significantly increased in the DSB repair defective cells compared to normal cells. The increased aberrations observed for the ATM and NBS defective lines was due to a significantly larger quadratic dose-response term compared to normal fibroblasts for both simple and complex aberrations, while the linear dose-response term was significantly higher in NBS cells only for simple exchanges. These results point to the importance of the functions of ATM and NBS in chromatin modifications that function to facilitate correct DSB repair and minimize aberration formation. To further understand the sensitivity differences that were observed in ATM and NBS deficient cells, in this study, chromosomal aberration analysis was performed in normal lung fibroblast cells treated with KU-55933, a specific ATM kinase inhibitor, or Mirin, an MRN complex inhibitor involved in activation of ATM. We are also testing siRNA knockdown of these proteins. Normal and ATM or NBS suppressed cells were irradiated with gamma-rays and chromosomes were collected with a premature chromosome

  10. Sequential cloning of chromosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacks, S.A.

    1995-07-18

    A method for sequential cloning of chromosomal DNA of a target organism is disclosed. A first DNA segment homologous to the chromosomal DNA to be sequentially cloned is isolated. The first segment has a first restriction enzyme site on either side. A first vector product is formed by ligating the homologous segment into a suitably designed vector. The first vector product is circularly integrated into the target organism`s chromosomal DNA. The resulting integrated chromosomal DNA segment includes the homologous DNA segment at either end of the integrated vector segment. The integrated chromosomal DNA is cleaved with a second restriction enzyme and ligated to form a vector-containing plasmid, which is replicated in a host organism. The replicated plasmid is then cleaved with the first restriction enzyme. Next, a DNA segment containing the vector and a segment of DNA homologous to a distal portion of the previously isolated DNA segment is isolated. This segment is then ligated to form a plasmid which is replicated within a suitable host. This plasmid is then circularly integrated into the target chromosomal DNA. The chromosomal DNA containing the circularly integrated vector is treated with a third, retrorestriction (class IIS) enzyme. The cleaved DNA is ligated to give a plasmid that is used to transform a host permissive for replication of its vector. The sequential cloning process continues by repeated cycles of circular integration and excision. The excision is carried out alternately with the second and third enzymes. 9 figs.

  11. Condensation of water vapor and carbon dioxide in the jet exhausts of rocket engines: 1. Heterogeneous condensation of combustion products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platov, Yu. V.; Semenov, A. I.; Filippov, B. V.

    2014-01-01

    Condensation of water vapor and carbon dioxide in the jet exhausts of rocket engines during last stages of Proton, Molniya, and Start launchers operating in the upper atmospheric with different types of fuels is considered. Particle heating is taken into account with emission of latent heat of condensation and energy loss due to radiation and heat exchange with combustion products. Using the solution of the heat balance and condensed particle mass equations, the temporal change in the temperature and thickness of the condensate layer is obtained. Practically, no condensation of water vapor and carbon dioxide in the jet exhaust of a Start launcher occurs. In plumes of Proton and Molniya launchers, the condensation of water vapor and carbon dioxide can start at distances of 120-170 m and 450-650 m from the engine nozzle, respectively. In the course of condensation, the thickness of the "water" layer on particles can exceed 100 Å, and the thickness of carbon dioxide can exceed 60 Å.

  12. Efficient, Long-Life Biocidal Condenser Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Environmental control systems for manned lunar and planetary bases will require condensing heat exchangers to control humidity in manned modules. Condensing surfaces...

  13. Efficient, Long-Life Biocidal Condenser Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Environmental control systems for manned lunar and planetary bases will require condensing heat exchangers to control humidity. Condensing surfaces must be...

  14. Bose condensation in (random traps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.A. Zagrebnov

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We study a non-interacting (perfect Bose-gas in random external potentials (traps. It is shown that a generalized Bose-Einstein condensation in the random eigenstates manifests if and only if the same occurs in the one-particle kinetic-energy eigenstates, which corresponds to the generalized condensation of the free Bose-gas. Moreover, we prove that the amounts of both condensate densities are equal. This statement is relevant for justification of the Bogoliubov approximation} in the theory of disordered boson systems.

  15. Integral Reactor Containment Condensation Model and Experimental Validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Qiao [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States); Corradini, Michael [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2016-05-02

    ranging from 4 to 21 bar with three different static inventories of non-condensable gas. Condensation and heat transfer rates were evaluated employing several methods, notably from measured temperature gradients in the HTP as well as measured condensate formation rates. A detailed mass and energy accounting was used to assess the various measurement methods and to support simplifying assumptions required for the analysis. Condensation heat fluxes and heat transfer coefficients are calculated and presented as a function of pressure to satisfy the objectives of this investigation. The major conclusions for those tests are summarized below: (1) In the steam blow-down tests, the initial condensation heat transfer process involves the heating-up of the containment heat transfer plate. An inverse heat conduction model was developed to capture the rapid transient transfer characteristics, and the analysis method is applicable to SMR safety analysis. (2) The average condensation heat transfer coefficients for different pressure conditions and non-condensable gas mass fractions were obtained from the integral test facility, through the measurements of the heat conduction rate across the containment heat transfer plate, and from the water condensation rates measurement based on the total energy balance equation. 15 (3) The test results using the measured HTP wall temperatures are considerably lower than popular condensation models would predict mainly due to the side wall conduction effects in the existing MASLWR integral test facility. The data revealed the detailed heat transfer characteristics of the model containment, important to the SMR safety analysis and the validation of associated evaluation model. However this approach, unlike separate effect tests, cannot isolate the condensation heat transfer coefficient over the containment wall, and therefore is not suitable for the assessment of the condensation heat transfer coefficient against system pressure and noncondensable

  16. CHROMOSOMES OF AMERICAN MARSUPIALS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    BIGGERS, J D; FRITZ, H I; HARE, W C; MCFEELY, R A

    1965-06-18

    Studies of the chromosomes of four American marsupials demonstrated that Caluromys derbianus and Marmosa mexicana have a diploid number of 14 chromosomes, and that Philander opossum and Didelphis marsupialis have a diploid number of 22. The karyotypes of C. derbianus and M. mexicana are similar, whereas those of P. opossum and D. marsupialis are dissimilar. If the 14-chromosome karyotype represents a reduction from a primitive number of 22, these observations suggest that the change has occurred independently in the American and Australasian forms.

  17. Simulating the in situ condensation process of solar prominences

    CERN Document Server

    Xia, Chun; Antolin, Patrick; Porth, Oliver

    2014-01-01

    Prominences in the solar corona are hundredfold cooler and denser than their surroundings, with a total mass of 1.e13 up to 1.e15 g. Here we report on the first comprehensive simulations of three-dimensional, thermally and gravitationally stratified magnetic flux ropes, where in situ condensation to a prominence happens due to radiative losses. After a gradual thermodynamic adjustment, we witness a phase where runaway cooling happens while counter-streaming shearing flows drain off mass along helical field lines. After this drainage, a prominence-like condensation resides in concave upward field regions, and this prominence retains its overall characteristics for more than two hours. While condensing, the prominence establishes a prominence-corona transition region, where magnetic field-aligned thermal conduction is operative during the runaway cooling. The prominence structure represents a force-balanced state in a helical flux rope. The simulated condensation demonstrates a right-bearing barb, as a remnant ...

  18. Film-wise and drop-wise condensation of steam on short inclined plates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Bum Jin; Kim, Min Chan [Cheju National University, Jeju (Korea, Republic of); Ahmadinejad, Mehrdad [Johnson Matthey Blount' s Court, Reading (United Kingdom)

    2008-01-15

    Film-wise and drop-wise condensation experiments were carried out at atmospheric pressure varying the condensing plates, their inclinations and orientations (upward or downward facing), and the air concentrations. As expected, dropwise condensation showed much higher heat transfer rates than corresponding film-wise condensation in the pure steam cases. However, with the presence of air, both modes of condensation showed similar heat transfer rates due to the high thermal resistance of the air-rich layer. Both modes of condensation showed systematic decreases in heat transfer as the angle of the plate to the horizontal decreased and as the concentration of air increased. A noteworthy observation made during the tests on the plate orientation showed that condensation heat transfer rates on the upward facing plate were slightly higher than those beneath the downward facing plate in the pure steam cases but that the trends were reversed in the steam and air mixture cases

  19. Study of steady and unsteady wet steam condensing flows in a turbine stage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Objective To develop the numerical method for the steady and unsteady wet steam condensing flow in turbine stage. Methods An Eulerian/Eulerian numerical model is used to describe the spontaneous condensation flow in the steam turbine. For the steady condensing flow computations, the mixing plane model was used. For the unsteady condensing flow computations, the sliding mesh method was used to simulate the rotor-stator interactions. Results The numerical results showed the obvious differences between non-condensing and condensing flows. The results also showed the unsteadiness effect due to rotor-stator interactions had a deep influence on the formation and growth process of water droplets. Conclusion The numerical methods presented in this paper are valid for the condensing flow in the turbine stage.

  20. Small Supernumerary Marker Chromosomes in Human Infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armanet, Narjes; Tosca, Lucie; Brisset, Sophie; Liehr, Thomas; Tachdjian, Gérard

    2015-01-01

    Small supernumerary marker chromosomes (sSMC) are structurally abnormal chromosomes that cannot be unambiguously identified by banding cytogenetics. The objective of this study was to provide an overview of sSMC frequency and characterization in a context of infertility and to review the literature describing sSMC in relation with male and female infertility. Therefore, a systematic literature review on sSMC associated with infertility was conducted by means of a PubMed literature and a sSMC database (http://ssmc-tl.com/sSMC.html) search. A total of 234 patients with infertility were identified as carriers of sSMC. All chromosomes, except chromosomes 10, 19 and the X, were involved in sSMC, and in 72% the sSMC originated from acrocentric chromosomes. Euchromatic imbalances were caused by the presence of sSMC in 30% of the cases. Putative genes have been identified in only 1.2% of sSMC associated with infertility. The implication of sSMC in infertility could be due to a partial trisomy of some genes but also to mechanical effects perturbing meiosis. Further precise molecular and interphase-architecture studies on sSMC are needed in the future to characterize the relationship between this chromosomal anomaly and human infertility.

  1. Chromosomal rearrangements in Tourette syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertelsen, Birgitte; Debes, Nanette Mol; Hjermind, Lena E

    2013-01-01

    Tourette syndrome (TS) is a childhood-onset complex neurobiological disorder characterized by a combination of persistent motor and vocal tics and frequent presence of other neuropsychiatric comorbidities. TS shares the fate of other complex disorders, where the genetic etiology is largely unknown......, and identification of susceptibility genes through linkage and association studies has been complicated due to inherent difficulties such as no clear mode of inheritance, genetic heterogeneity, and apparently incomplete penetrance. Positional cloning through mapping of disease-related chromosome rearrangements has...

  2. Chromosomal abnormalities in patients with sperm disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Y. Pylyp

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Chromosomal abnormalities are among the most common genetic causes of spermatogenic disruptions. Carriers of chromosomal abnormalities are at increased risk of infertility, miscarriage or birth of a child with unbalanced karyotype due to the production of unbalanced gametes. The natural selection against chromosomally abnormal sperm usually prevents fertilization with sperm barring in cases of serious chromosomal abnormalities. However, assisted reproductive technologies in general and intracytoplasmic sperm injection in particular, enable the transmission of chromosomal abnormalities to the progeny. Therefore, cytogenetic studies are important in patients with male factor infertility before assisted reproduction treatment. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the types and frequencies of chromosomal abnormalities in 724 patients with infertility and to estimate the risk of chromosomal abnormalities detection in subgroups of patients depending on the severity of spermatogenic disruption, aiming at identifying groups of patients in need of cytogenetic studies. Karyotype analysis was performed in 724 blood samples of men attending infertility clinic. Chromosomal preparation was performed by standard techniques. At least 20 GTG-banded metaphase plates with the resolution from 450 to 750 bands per haploid set were analysed in each case. When chromosomal mosaicism was suspected, this number was increased to 50. Abnormal karyotypes were observed in 48 (6.6% patients, including 67% of autosomal abnormalities and 33% of gonosomal abnormalities. Autosomal abnormalities were represented by structural rearrangements. Reciprocal translocations were the most common type of structural chromosomal abnormalities in the studied group, detected with the frequency of 2.6% (n = 19, followed by Robertsonian translocation, observed with the frequency of 1.2% (n = 9. The frequency of inversions was 0.6% (n = 4. Gonosomal abnormalities included 14 cases

  3. Electric-field-enhanced condensation on superhydrophobic nanostructured surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miljkovic, Nenad; Preston, Daniel J; Enright, Ryan; Wang, Evelyn N

    2013-12-23

    When condensed droplets coalesce on a superhydrophobic nanostructured surface, the resulting droplet can jump due to the conversion of excess surface energy into kinetic energy. This phenomenon has been shown to enhance condensation heat transfer by up to 30% compared to state-of-the-art dropwise condensing surfaces. However, after the droplets jump away from the surface, the existence of the vapor flow toward the condensing surface increases the drag on the jumping droplets, which can lead to complete droplet reversal and return to the surface. This effect limits the possible heat transfer enhancement because larger droplets form upon droplet return to the surface, which impedes heat transfer until they can be either removed by jumping again or finally shedding via gravity. By characterizing individual droplet trajectories during condensation on superhydrophobic nanostructured copper oxide (CuO) surfaces, we show that this vapor flow entrainment dominates droplet motion for droplets smaller than R ≈ 30 μm at moderate heat fluxes (q″ > 2 W/cm(2)). Subsequently, we demonstrate electric-field-enhanced condensation, whereby an externally applied electric field prevents jumping droplet return. This concept leverages our recent insight that these droplets gain a net positive charge due to charge separation of the electric double layer at the hydrophobic coating. As a result, with scalable superhydrophobic CuO surfaces, we experimentally demonstrated a 50% higher overall condensation heat transfer coefficient compared to that on a jumping-droplet surface with no applied field for low supersaturations (condensation heat transfer enhancement but also offers avenues for improving the performance of self-cleaning and anti-icing surfaces as well as thermal diodes.

  4. Nuclear fusion inside condense matters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Jing-tang

    2007-01-01

    This article describes in detail the nuclear fusion inside condense matters--the Fleischmann-Pons effect, the reproducibility of cold fusions, self-consistentcy of cold fusions and the possible applications.

  5. Nonequilibrium Thermodynamics of Wealth Condensation

    CERN Document Server

    Braun, D

    2006-01-01

    We analyze wealth condensation for a wide class of stochastic economy models on the basis of the economic analog of thermodynamic potentials, termed transfer potentials. The economy model is based on three common transfers modes of wealth: random transfer, profit proportional to wealth and motivation of poor agents to work harder. The economies never reach steady state. Wealth condensation is the result of stochastic tunneling through a metastable transfer potential. In accordance with reality, both wealth and income distribution transiently show Pareto tails for high income subjects. For metastable transfer potentials, exponential wealth condensation is a robust feature. For example with 10 % annual profit 1% of the population owns 50 % of the wealth after 50 years. The time to reach such a strong wealth condensation is a hyperbolic function of the annual profit rate.

  6. Solar engineering - a condensed course

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broman, Lars

    2011-11-15

    The document represents the material covered in a condensed two-week course focusing on the most important thermal and PV solar energy engineering topics, while also providing some theoretical background.

  7. Chromosomal abnormalities and autism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farida El-Baz

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Chromosomal abnormalities were not detected in the studied autistic children, and so the relation between the genetics and autism still needs further work up with different study methods and techniques.

  8. Chromosome doubling method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Akio

    2006-11-14

    The invention provides methods for chromosome doubling in plants. The technique overcomes the low yields of doubled progeny associated with the use of prior techniques for doubling chromosomes in plants such as grasses. The technique can be used in large scale applications and has been demonstrated to be highly effective in maize. Following treatment in accordance with the invention, plants remain amenable to self fertilization, thereby allowing the efficient isolation of doubled progeny plants.

  9. Activation of X Chromosome Inactivation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.M. Maduro (Cheryl)

    2016-01-01

    markdownabstractIn mammals, males are the heterogametic sex having an X chromosome and a Y chromosome whereas females have two X chromosomes. Despite originating from an ancient homologous autosomal pair, the X and Y chromosome now differ greatly in size and gene content after ~180 MY of evolution.

  10. Experimental and theoretical study of reflux condensation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bakke, Knut

    1997-12-31

    This thesis studies the separation of gas mixtures in a reflux condenser. also called a dephlegmator. Reflux condensation is separation of a gas mixture, in reflux flow with condensing liquid, under continuous heat removal. A numerical model of a dephlegmator for binary mixtures was developed. The model may readily be extended to multi-component mixtures, as the solution method is based on a matrix solver. Separation of a binary mixture in a reflux condenser test rig is demonstrated. The test facility contains a single-tube test section that was designed and built as part of the project. Test mixtures of propane and n-butane were used, and a total of 15 experiments are reported. Limited degree of separation was achieved due to limited heat transfer area and narrow boiling point range of the test mixture. The numerical model reproduces the experimental data within reasonable accuracy. Deviation between calculated and measured properties is less than 6% of the measured temperature and less than 5% of the measured flow rate. The model is based on mechanistic models of physical processes and is not calibrated or tuned to fit the experimental data. The numerical model is applied to a number of separation processes. These case studies show that the required heat transfer area increases rapidly with increments in top product composition (light component). Flooding limits the amount of reflux liquid. The dephlegmator is suitable for separation of feed mixtures that are rich in light components. The gliding temperature in the dephlegmation process enables utilization of top product as refrigerant, with subsequent energy saving as a result. 61 refs., 50 figs., 34 tabs.

  11. Roles of the Y chromosome genes in human cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatsuo Kido

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Male and female differ genetically by their respective sex chromosome composition, that is, XY as male and XX as female. Although both X and Y chromosomes evolved from the same ancestor pair of autosomes, the Y chromosome harbors male-specific genes, which play pivotal roles in male sex determination, germ cell differentiation, and masculinization of various tissues. Deletions or translocation of the sex-determining gene, SRY, from the Y chromosome causes disorders of sex development (previously termed as an intersex condition with dysgenic gonads. Failure of gonadal development results not only in infertility, but also in increased risks of germ cell tumor (GCT, such as gonadoblastoma and various types of testicular GCT. Recent studies demonstrate that either loss of Y chromosome or ectopic expression of Y chromosome genes is closely associated with various male-biased diseases, including selected somatic cancers. These observations suggest that the Y-linked genes are involved in male health and diseases in more frequently than expected. Although only a small number of protein-coding genes are present in the male-specific region of Y chromosome, the impacts of Y chromosome genes on human diseases are still largely unknown, due to lack of in vivo models and differences between the Y chromosomes of human and rodents. In this review, we highlight the involvement of selected Y chromosome genes in cancer development in men.

  12. Structural organization of very small chromosomes: study on a single-celled evolutionary distant eukaryote Giardia intestinalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tůmová, Pavla; Uzlíková, Magdalena; Wanner, Gerhard; Nohýnková, Eva

    2015-03-01

    During mitotic prophase, chromosomes of the pathogenic unicellular eukaryote Giardia intestinalis condense in each of the cell's two nuclei. In this study, Giardia chromosomes were investigated using light microscopy, high-resolution field emission scanning electron microscopy, and in situ hybridization. For the first time, we describe the overall morphology, condensation stages, and mitotic segregation of these chromosomes. Despite the absence of several genes involved in the cohesion and condensation pathways in the Giardia genome, we observed chromatin organization similar to those found in eukaryotes, i.e., 10-nm nucleosomal fibrils, 30-nm fibrils coiled to chromomeres or in parallel arrangements, and closely aligned sister chromatids. DNA molecules of Giardia terminate with telomeric repeats that we visualized on each of the four chromatid endings of metaphase chromosomes. Giardia chromosomes lack primary and secondary constrictions, thus preventing their classification based on the position of the centromere. The anaphase poleward segregation of sister chromatids is atypical in orientation and tends to generate lagging chromatids between daughter nuclei. In the Giardia genome database, we identified two putative members of the kleisin family thought to be responsible for condensin ring establishment. Thus far, Giardia chromosomes (300 nm to 1.5 μm) are the smallest chromosomes that were analyzed at the ultrastructural level. This study complements the existing molecular and sequencing data on Giardia chromosomes with cytological and ultrastructural information.

  13. Vibrio chromosomes share common history

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gevers Dirk

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While most gamma proteobacteria have a single circular chromosome, Vibrionales have two circular chromosomes. Horizontal gene transfer is common among Vibrios, and in light of this genetic mobility, it is an open question to what extent the two chromosomes themselves share a common history since their formation. Results Single copy genes from each chromosome (142 genes from chromosome I and 42 genes from chromosome II were identified from 19 sequenced Vibrionales genomes and their phylogenetic comparison suggests consistent phylogenies for each chromosome. Additionally, study of the gene organization and phylogeny of the respective origins of replication confirmed the shared history. Conclusions Thus, while elements within the chromosomes may have experienced significant genetic mobility, the backbones share a common history. This allows conclusions based on multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA for one chromosome to be applied equally to both chromosomes.

  14. Biodosimetry of heavy ions by interphase chromosome painting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durante, M.; Kawata, T.; Nakano, T.; Yamada, S.; Tsujii, H.

    1998-11-01

    We report measurements of chromosomal aberrations in peripheral blood lymphocytes from cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy treatment. Patients with cervix or esophageal cancer were treated with 10 MV X-rays produced at a LINAC accelerator, or high-energy carbon ions produced at the HIMAC accelerator at the National Institute for Radiological Sciences (NIRS) in Chiba. Blood samples were obtained before, during, and after the radiation treatment. Chromosomes were prematurely condensed by incubation in calyculin A. Aberrations in chromosomes 2 and 4 were scored after fluorescence in situ hybridization with whole-chromosome probes. Pre-treatment samples were exposed in vitro to X-rays, individual dose-response curves for the induction of chromosomal aberrations were determined, and used as calibration curves to calculate the effective whole-body dose absorbed during the treatment. This calculated dose, based on the calibration curve relative to the induction of reciprocal exchanges, has a sharp increase after the first few fractions of the treatment, then saturates at high doses. Although carbon ions are 2-3 times more effective than X-rays in tumor sterilization, the effective dose was similar to that of X-ray treatment. However, the frequency of complex-type chromosomal exchanges was much higher for patients treated with carbon ions than X-ray.

  15. Diversity and redundancy in bacterial chromosome segregation mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Errington, Jeff; Murray, Heath; Wu, Ling Juan

    2005-03-29

    Bacterial cells are much smaller and have a much simpler overall structure and organization than eukaryotes. Several prominent differences in cell organization are relevant to the mechanisms of chromosome segregation, particularly the lack of an overt chromosome condensation/decondensation cycle and the lack of a microtubule-based spindle. Although bacterial chromosomes have a rather dispersed appearance, they nevertheless have an underlying high level of spatial organization. During the DNA replication cycle, early replicated (oriC) regions are localized towards the cell poles, whereas the late replicated terminus (terC) region is medially located. This spatial organization is thought to be driven by an active segregation mechanism that separates the sister chromosomes continuously as replication proceeds. Comparisons of various well-characterized bacteria suggest that the mechanisms of chromosome segregation are likely to be diverse, and that in many bacteria, multiple overlapping mechanisms may contribute to efficient segregation. One system in which the molecular mechanisms of chromosome segregation are beginning to be elucidated is that of sporulating cells of Bacillus subtilis. The key components of this system have been identified, and their functions are understood, in outline. Although this system appears to be specialized, most of the functions are conserved widely throughout the bacteria.

  16. Exhaled Breath Condensate for Proteomic Biomarker Discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean W. Harshman

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Exhaled breath condensate (EBC has been established as a potential source of respiratory biomarkers. Compared to the numerous small molecules identified, the protein content of EBC has remained relatively unstudied due to the methodological and technical difficulties surrounding EBC analysis. In this review, we discuss the proteins identified in EBC, by mass spectrometry, focusing on the significance of those proteins identified. We will also review the limitations surrounding mass spectral EBC protein analysis emphasizing recommendations to enhance EBC protein identifications by mass spectrometry. Finally, we will provide insight into the future directions of the EBC proteomics field.

  17. Condenser Optimization in Steam Power Plant

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sukru Bekdemir; Recep Ozturk; Zehra Yumurtac

    2003-01-01

    In this paper the effects of the condenser design parameters (such as turbine inlet condition, turbine power and condenser pressure) on heat transfer area, cooling water flow-rate, condenser cost and specific energy generation cost are studied for surface type condenser.The results are given in the text and also shown as diagrams.

  18. Rapid Drop Dynamics During Superhydrophobic Condensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaodong; Boreyko, Jonathan; Chen, Chuan-Hua

    2008-11-01

    Rapid drop motion is observed on superhydrophobic surfaces during condensation; condensate drops with diameter of order 10 μm can move at above 100G and 0.1 m/s. When water vapor condenses on a horizontal superhydrophobic surface, condensate drops move in a seemingly random direction. The observed motion is attributed to the energy released through coalescence of neighboring condensate drops. A scaling analysis captured the initial acceleration and terminal velocity. Our work is a step forward in understanding the dynamics of superhydrophobic condensation occurring in both natural water-repellant plants and engineered dropwise condensers.

  19. The Planck distribution of phonons in a Bose-Einstein condensate

    OpenAIRE

    Schley, R.; Berkovitz, A.; Rinott, S.; Shammass, I.; Blumkin, A.; Steinhauer, J.

    2013-01-01

    The Planck distribution of photons emitted by a black body led to the development of quantum theory. An analogous distribution of phonons should exist in a Bose-Einstein condensate. We observe this Planck distribution of thermal phonons in a 3D condensate. This observation provides an important confirmation of the basic nature of the condensate's quantized excitations. In contrast to the bunching effect, the density fluctuations are seen to increase with increasing temperature. This is due to...

  20. Sulphur condensation influence in Claus catalyst performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora, R L

    2000-12-01

    The Claus process is an efficient way of removing H(2)S from acid gas streams and this is widely practised in industries such as natural gas processing, oil refining and metal smelting. Increasingly strict pollution control regulations require maximum sulphur recovery from the Claus unit in order to minimise sulphur-containing effluent. The most widely used Claus catalyst in sulphur recovery units is non-promoted spherical activated alumina. Properties associated with optimum non-promoted Claus catalyst performance include high surface area, appropriate pore size distribution and enhanced physical properties. The objective of this paper is to outline a procedure in order to estimate Claus catalyst effectiveness after pore plugging due to sulphur condensation. Catalyst deactivation due to pore plugging by sulphur is modelled employing a Bethe lattice and its corresponding performance is described by means of a modified effectiveness factor. Model results show an improvement in the modified effectiveness factor due to modifications in catalyst porous structure.

  1. Stacked thin layers of metaphase chromatin explain the geometry of chromosome rearrangements and banding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daban, Joan-Ramon

    2015-10-08

    The three-dimensional organization of tightly condensed chromatin within metaphase chromosomes has been one of the most challenging problems in structural biology since the discovery of the nucleosome. This study shows that chromosome images obtained from typical banded karyotypes and from different multicolour cytogenetic analyses can be used to gain information about the internal structure of chromosomes. Chromatin bands and the connection surfaces in sister chromatid exchanges and in cancer translocations are planar and orthogonal to the chromosome axis. Chromosome stretching produces band splitting and even the thinnest bands are orthogonal and well defined, indicating that short stretches of DNA can occupy completely the chromosome cross-section. These observations impose strong physical constraints on models that attempt to explain chromatin folding in chromosomes. The thin-plate model, which consists of many stacked layers of planar chromatin perpendicular to the chromosome axis, is compatible with the observed orientation of bands, with the existence of thin bands, and with band splitting; it is also compatible with the orthogonal orientation and planar geometry of the connection surfaces in chromosome rearrangements. The results obtained provide a consistent interpretation of the chromosome structural properties that are used in clinical cytogenetics for the diagnosis of hereditary diseases and cancers.

  2. Meiotic pairing of B chromosomes, multiple sexual system, and Robertsonian fusion in the red brocket deer Mazama americana (Mammalia, Cervidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquino, C I; Abril, V V; Duarte, J M B

    2013-09-13

    Deer species of the genus Mazama show significant inter- and intraspecific chromosomal variation due to the occurrence of rearrangements and B chromosomes. Given that carriers of aneuploidies and structural rearrangements often show anomalous chromosome pairings, we here performed a synaptonemal complex analysis to study chromosome pairing behavior in a red brocket deer (Mazama americana) individual that is heterozygous for a Robertsonian translocation, is a B chromosome carrier, and has a multiple sex chromosome system (XY₁Y₂). The synaptonemal complex in spermatocytes showed normal chromosome pairings for all chromosomes, including the autosomal and sex trivalents. The electromicrographs showed homology among B chromosomes since they formed bivalents, but they also appeared as univalents, indicating their anomalous behavior and non-Mendelian segregation. Thus, synaptonemal complex analysis is a useful tool to evaluate the role of B chromosomes and rearrangements during meiosis on the intraspecific chromosomal variation that is observed in the majority of Mazama species.

  3. "Chromosome": a knowledge-based system for the chromosome classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramstein, G; Bernadet, M

    1993-01-01

    Chromosome, a knowledge-based analysis system has been designed for the classification of human chromosomes. Its aim is to perform an optimal classification by driving a tool box containing the procedures of image processing, pattern recognition and classification. This paper presents the general architecture of Chromosome, based on a multiagent system generator. The image processing tool box is described from the met aphasic enhancement to the fine classification. Emphasis is then put on the knowledge base intended for the chromosome recognition. The global classification process is also presented, showing how Chromosome proceeds to classify a given chromosome. Finally, we discuss further extensions of the system for the karyotype building.

  4. Heavy ion-induced chromosomal aberrations analyzed by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durante, M.; Gialanella, G.; Grossi, G.; Pugliese, M. [Univ. ``Federico II``, Naples (Italy). Dept. of Physics]|[INFN, Naples (Italy); Cella, L.; Greco, O. [Univ. ``Federico II``, Naples (Italy). Dept. of Physics; Furusawa, Y. [NIRS, Chiba (Japan); George, K.; Yang, T.C. [NASA Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    1997-09-01

    We have investigated the effectiveness of heavy ions in the induction of chromosomal aberrations in mammalian cells by the recent technique of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with whole-chromosome probes. FISH-painting was used both in metaphase and interphase (prematurely condensed) chromosomes. The purpose of our experiments was to address the following problems: (a) the ratio of different types of aberrations as a function of radiation quality (search for biomarkers); (b) the ratio between aberrations scored in interphase and metaphase as a function of radiation quality (role of apoptosis); (c) differences between cytogenetic effects produced by different ions at the same LET (role of track structure). (orig./MG)

  5. Scrutinizing the pion condensed phase

    CERN Document Server

    Carignano, Stefano; Mammarella, Andrea; Mannarelli, Massimo; Pagliaroli, Giulia

    2016-01-01

    When the isospin chemical potential exceeds the pion mass, charged pions condense in the zero-momentum state forming a superfluid. Chiral perturbation theory provides a very powerful tool for studying this phase. However, the formalism that is usually employed in this context does not clarify various aspects of the condensation mechanism and makes the identification of the soft modes problematic. We re-examine the pion condensed phase using different approaches within the chiral perturbation theory framework. As a first step, we perform a low-density expansion of the chiral Lagrangian valid in the normal phase and close to the onset of the Bose-Einstein condensation. We obtain an effective theory that can be mapped to a Gross-Pitaevskii Lagrangian in which, remarkably, all the coefficients depend on the isospin chemical potential. The low-density expansion becomes unreliable deep in the pion condensed phase. For this reason, we develop an alternative field expansion deriving a low-energy Lagrangian analog to ...

  6. Polariton condensates at room temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillet, Thierry; Brimont, Christelle

    2016-10-01

    We review the recent developments of the polariton physics in microcavities featuring the exciton-photon strong coupling at room temperature, and leading to the achievement of room-temperature polariton condensates. Such cavities embed active layers with robust excitons that present a large binding energy and a large oscillator strength, i.e. wide bandgap inorganic or organic semiconductors, or organic molecules. These various systems are compared, in terms of figures of merit and of common features related to their strong oscillator strength. The various demonstrations of polariton laser are compared, as well as their condensation phase diagrams. The room-temperature operation indeed allows a detailed investigation of the thermodynamic and out-of-equilibrium regimes of the condensation process. The crucial role of the spatial dynamics of the condensate formation is discussed, as well as the debated issue of the mechanism of stimulated relaxation from the reservoir to the condensate under non-resonant excitation. Finally the prospects of polariton devices are presented.

  7. Why is chromosome segregation error in oocytes increased with maternal aging?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhen-Bo; Schatten, Heide; Sun, Qing-Yuan

    2011-10-01

    It is well documented that female fertility is decreased with advanced maternal age due to chromosome abnormality in oocytes. Increased chromosome missegregation is mainly caused by centromeric cohesion reduction. Other factors such as weakened homologous recombination, improper spindle organization, spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) malfunction, chromatin epigenetic changes, and extra-oocyte factors may also cause chromosome errors.

  8. Unconventional Bose-Einstein Condensations from Spin-Orbit Coupling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Xiang-Fa; WU Cong-Jun; Ian Mondragon-Shem

    2011-01-01

    According to the "no-node" theorem, the many-body ground state wavefunctions of conventional Bose-Einstein condensations (BEC) are positive-definite, thus time-reversal symmetry cannot be spontaneously broken. We find that multi-component bosons with spin-orbit coupling provide an unconventional type of BECs beyond this paradigm. We focus on a subtle case ofisotropic Rashba spin-orbit coupling and the spin-independent interaction. In the limit of the weak confining potential, the condensate wavefunctions are frustrated at the Hartree-Fock level due to the degeneracy of the Rashba ring. Quantum zero-point energy selects the spin-spiral type condensate through the "order-from-disorder" mechanism. In a strong harmonic confining trap, the condensate spontaneously generates a half-quantum vortex combined with the skyrmion type of spin texture. In both cases, time-reversal symmetry is spontaneously broken. These phenomena can be realized in both cold atom systems with artificial spin-orbit couplings generated from atom-laser interactions and exciton condensates in semi-conductor systems.%@@ According to the"no-node"theorem,the many-body ground state wavefunctions of conventional Bose-Einstein condensations(BEC)are positive-definite,thus time-reversal symmetry cannot be spontaneously broken.We find that multi-component bosons with spin-orbit coupling provide an unconventional type of BECs beyond this paradigm.We focus on a subtle case of isotropic Rashba spin-orbit coupling and the spin-independent interaction.In the limit of the weak confining potential,the condensate wavefunctions are frustrated at the Hartree-Fork level due to the degeneracy of the Rashba ring.Quantum zero-point energy selects the spin-spiral type condensate through the"order-from-disorder"mechanism.In a strong harmonic confining trap,the condensate spontaneously generates a half-quantum vortex combined with the skyrmion type of spin texture.In both cases,time-reversal symmetry is spontaneously broken

  9. Chromosome numbers in Bromeliaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cotias-de-Oliveira Ana Lúcia Pires

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study reports chromosome numbers of 17 species of Bromeliaceae, belonging to the genera Encholirium, Bromelia, Orthophytum, Hohenbergia, Billbergia, Neoglaziovia, Aechmea, Cryptanthus and Ananas. Most species present 2n = 50, however, Bromelia laciniosa, Orthophytum burle-marxii and O. maracasense are polyploids with 2n = 150, 2n = 100 and 2n = 150, respectively, while for Cryptanthus bahianus, 2n = 34 + 1-4B. B chromosomes were observed in Bromelia plumieri and Hohenbergia aff. utriculosa. The chromosome number of all species was determined for the first time, except for Billbergia chlorosticta and Cryptanthus bahianus. Our data supports the hypothesis of a basic number of x = 25 for the Bromeliaceae family and decreasing aneuploidy in the genus Cryptanthus.

  10. Those amazing dinoflagellate chromosomes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PETER J RIZZO

    2003-01-01

    Dinoflagellates are a very large and diverse group of eukaryotic algae that play a major role in aquatic food webs of both fresh water and marine habitats. Moreover, the toxic members of this group pose a health threat in the form of red tides. Finally, dinoflagellates are of great evolutionary importance,because of their taxonomic position, and their unusual chromosome structure and composition. While the cytoplasm of dinoflagellates is typically eukaryotic, the nucleus is unique when compared to the nucleus of other eukaryotes. More specifically, while the chromosomes of all other eukaryotes contain histones,dinoflagellate chromosomes lack histones completely. There are no known exceptions to this observation: all dinoflagellates lack histones, and all other eukaryotes contain histones. Nevertheless, dinoflagellates remain a relatively unstudied group of eukaryotes.

  11. On the onset of surface condensation: formation and transition mechanisms of condensation mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Qiang; Sun, Jie; Wang, Qian; Wang, Wen; Wang, Hua Sheng

    2016-08-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been carried out to investigate the onset of surface condensation. On surfaces with different wettability, we snapshot different condensation modes (no-condensation, dropwise condensation and filmwise condensation) and quantitatively analyze their characteristics by temporal profiles of surface clusters. Two different types of formation of nanoscale droplets are identified, i.e. the formations with and without film-like condensate. We exhibit the effect of surface tensions on the formations of nanoscale droplets and film. We reveal the formation mechanisms of different condensation modes at nanoscale based on our simulation results and classical nucleation theory, which supplements the ‘classical hypotheses’ of the onset of dropwise condensation. We also reveal the transition mechanism between different condensation modes based on the competition between surface tensions and reveal that dropwise condensation represents the transition states from no-condensation to filmwise condensation.

  12. Chromosomal polymorphism in the Sporothrix schenckii complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Alexandre A; Fernandes, Geisa F; Rodrigues, Anderson M; Lima, Fábio M; Marini, Marjorie M; Dos S Feitosa, Luciano; de Melo Teixeira, Marcus; Felipe, Maria Sueli Soares; da Silveira, José Franco; de Camargo, Zoilo P

    2014-01-01

    Sporotrichosis is a polymorphic disease caused by a complex of thermodimorphic fungi including S. brasiliensis, S. schenckii sensu stricto (s. str.), S. globosa and S. luriei. Humans and animals can acquire the disease through traumatic inoculation of propagules into the subcutaneous tissue. Despite the importance of sporotrichosis as a disease that can take epidemic proportions there are just a few studies dealing with genetic polymorphisms and genomic architecture of these pathogens. The main objective of this study was to investigate chromosomal polymorphisms and genomic organization among different isolates in the S. schenckii complex. We used pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) to separate chromosomal fragments of isolated DNA, followed by probe hybridization. Nine loci (β-tubulin, calmodulin, catalase, chitin synthase 1, Internal Transcribed Spacer, Pho85 cyclin-dependent kinase, protein kinase C Ss-2, G protein α subunit and topoisomerase II) were mapped onto chromosomal bands of Brazilian isolates of S. schenckii s. str. and S. brasiliensis. Our results revealed the presence of intra and interspecies polymorphisms in chromosome number and size. The gene hybridization analysis showed that closely related species in phylogenetic analysis had similar genetic organizations, mostly due to identification of synteny groups in chromosomal bands of similar sizes. Our results bring new insights into the genetic diversity and genome organization among pathogenic species in the Sporothrix schenckii complex.

  13. Condensed Matter Physics - Biology Resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baskaran, G.

    The field of condensed matter physics had its genesis this century and it has had a remarkable evolution. A closer look at its growth reveals a hidden aim in the collective consciousness of the field - a part of the development this century is a kind of warm up exercise to understand the nature of living condensed matter, namely the field of biology, by a growing new breed of scientists in the coming century. Through some examples the vitality of this interaction will be pointed out.

  14. Turbulent mixing condensation nucleus counter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavliev, Rashid

    The construction and operating principles of the Turbulent Mixing Condensation Nucleus Counter (TM CNC) are described. Estimations based on the semiempirical theory of turbulent jets and the classical theory of nucleation and growth show the possibility of detecting particles as small as 2.5 nm without the interference of homogeneous nucleation. This conclusion was confirmed experimentally during the International Workshop on Intercomparison of Condensation Nuclei and Aerosol Particle Counters (Vienna, Austria). Number concentration, measured by the Turbulent Mixing CNC and other participating instruments, is found to be essentially equal.

  15. Similar Sister Chromatid Arrangement in Mono- and Holocentric Plant Chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, Veit; Zelkowski, Mateusz; Klemme, Sonja; Houben, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Due to the X-shape formation at somatic metaphase, the arrangement of the sister chromatids is obvious in monocentric chromosomes. In contrast, the sister chromatids of holocentric chromosomes cannot be distinguished even at mitotic metaphase. To clarify their organization, we differentially labelled the sister chromatids of holocentric Luzula and monocentric rye chromosomes by incorporating the base analogue EdU during replication. Using super-resolution structured illumination microscopy (SIM) and 3D rendering, we found that holocentric sister chromatids attach to each other at their contact surfaces similar to those of monocentrics in prometaphase. We found that sister chromatid exchanges (SCEs) are distributed homogeneously along the whole holocentric chromosomes of Luzula, and that their occurrence is increased compared to monocentric rye chromosomes. The SCE frequency of supernumerary B chromosomes, present additionally to the essential A chromosome complement of rye, does not differ from that of A chromosomes. Based on these results, models of the sister chromatid arrangement in mono- and holocentric plant chromosomes are presented.

  16. Searching for Electrical Properties, Phenomena and Mechanisms in the Construction and Function of Chromosomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Kanev

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Our studies reveal previously unidentified electrical properties of chromosomes: (1 chromosomes are amazingly similar in construction and function to electrical transformers; (2 chromosomes possess in their construction and function, components similar to those of electric generators, conductors, condensers, switches, and other components of electrical circuits; (3 chromosomes demonstrate in nano-scale level electromagnetic interactions, resonance, fusion and other phenomena similar to those described by equations in classical physics. These electrical properties and phenomena provide a possible explanation for unclear and poorly understood mechanisms in clinical genetics including: (a electrically based mechanisms responsible for breaks, translocations, fusions, and other chromosomal abnormalities associated with cancer, intellectual disability, infertility, pregnancy loss, Down syndrome, and other genetic disorders; (b electrically based mechanisms involved in crossing over, non-disjunction and other events during meiosis and mitosis; (c mechanisms demonstrating heterochromatin to be electrically active and genetically important.

  17. Chromosomal rearrangements in cattle and pigs revealed by chromosome microdissection and chromosome painting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yerle Martine

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A pericentric inversion of chromosome 4 in a boar, as well as a case of (2q-;5p+ translocation mosaicism in a bull were analysed by chromosome painting using probes generated by conventional microdissection. For the porcine inversion, probes specific for p arms and q arms were produced and hybridised simultaneously on metaphases of a heterozygote carrier. In the case of the bovine translocation, two whole chromosome probes (chromosome 5, and derived chromosome 5 were elaborated and hybridised independently on chromosomal preparations of the bull who was a carrier of the mosaic translocation. The impossibility of differentiating chromosomes 2 and der(2 from other chromosomes of the metaphases did not allow the production of painting probes for these chromosomes. For all experiments, the quality of painting was comparable to that usually observed with probes obtained from flow-sorted chromosomes. The results obtained allowed confirmation of the interpretations proposed with G-banding karyotype analyses. In the bovine case, however, the reciprocity of the translocation could not be proven. The results presented in this paper show the usefulness of the microdissection technique for characterising chromosomal rearrangements in species for which commercial probes are not available. They also confirmed that the main limiting factor of the technique is the quality of the chromosomal preparations, which does not allow the identification of target chromosomes or chromosome fragments in all cases.

  18. Dynamic Analysis of Condenser Assembly of Automobile Air Conditioning System Using CAE Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, M.; Singh, D.; Saini, J. S.

    2013-04-01

    With the automotive air-conditioning industry aiming at higher levels of quality, cost effectiveness and a short time to market, the need for simulation is at an all time high. In the present work, the use of dynamics analysis is proposed in the simulation of the automobile air conditioning condenser assembly for the vibration loads. The condenser assembly has been analyzed using the standard testing conditions. The results revealed that the components of condenser assembly may fail due to resonance in dynamic analysis. Thereafter, the condenser assembly was optimized, resulting in a 2 % reduction in mass.

  19. Molecular cytogenetic studies in structural abnormalities of chromosome 13

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lozzio, C.B.; Bamberger, E.; Anderson, I. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    A partial trisomy 13 was detected prenatally in an amniocentesis performed due to the following ultrasound abnormalities: open sacral neural tube defect (NTD), a flattened cerebellum, and lumbar/thoracic hemivertebrae. Elevated AFP and positive acetylcholinesterase in amniotic fluid confirmed the open NTD. Chromosome analysis showed an extra acrocentric chromosome marker. FISH analysis with the painting probe 13 showed that most of the marker was derived from this chromosome. Chromosomes on the parents revealed that the mother had a balanced reciprocal translocation t(2;13)(q23;q21). Dual labeling with painting chromosomes 2 and 13 on cells from the mother and from the amniotic fluid identified the marker as a der(13)t(2;13)(p23;q21). Thus, the fetus had a partial trisomy 13 and a small partial trisomy 2p. The maternal grandfather was found to be a carrier for this translocation. Fetal demise occurred a 29 weeks of gestation. The fetus had open lumbar NTD and showed dysmorphic features, overlapping fingers and imperforate anus. This woman had a subsequent pregnancy and chorionic villi sample showed that this fetus was normal. Another case with an abnormal chromosome 13 was a newborn with partial monosomy 13 due to the presence of a ring chromosome 13. This infant had severe intrauterine growth retardation, oligohydramnios, dysmorphic features and multiple congenital microphthalmia, congenital heart disease, absent thumbs and toes and cervical vertebral anomalies. Chromosome studies in blood and skin fibroblast cultures showed that one chromosome 3 was replaced by a ring chromosome of various sizes. This ring was confirmed to be derived from chromosome 13 using the centromeric 21/13 probe.

  20. Chromosomal rearrangement interferes with meiotic X chromosome inactivation

    OpenAIRE

    Homolka, David; Ivanek, Robert; Capkova, Jana; Jansa, Petr; Forejt, Jiri

    2007-01-01

    Heterozygosity for certain mouse and human chromosomal rearrangements is characterized by the incomplete meiotic synapsis of rearranged chromosomes, by their colocalization with the XY body in primary spermatocytes, and by male-limited sterility. Previously, we argued that such X–autosomal associations could interfere with meiotic sex chromosome inactivation. Recently, supporting evidence has reported modifications of histones in rearranged chromosomes by a process called the meiotic silencin...

  1. Karyotype evolution in apomictic Boechera and the origin of the aberrant chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandáková, Terezie; Schranz, M Eric; Sharbel, Timothy F; de Jong, Hans; Lysak, Martin A

    2015-06-01

    Chromosome rearrangements may result in both decrease and increase of chromosome numbers. Here we have used comparative chromosome painting (CCP) to reconstruct the pathways of descending and ascending dysploidy in the genus Boechera (tribe Boechereae, Brassicaceae). We describe the origin and structure of three Boechera genomes and establish the origin of the previously described aberrant Het and Del chromosomes found in Boechera apomicts with euploid (2n = 14) and aneuploid (2n = 15) chromosome number. CCP analysis allowed us to reconstruct the origin of seven chromosomes in sexual B. stricta and apomictic B. divaricarpa from the ancestral karyotype (n = 8) of Brassicaceae lineage I. Whereas three chromosomes (BS4, BS6, and BS7) retained their ancestral structure, five chromosomes were reshuffled by reciprocal translocations to form chromosomes BS1-BS3 and BS5. The reduction of the chromosome number (from x = 8 to x = 7) was accomplished through the inactivation of a paleocentromere on chromosome BS5. In apomictic 2n = 14 plants, CCP identifies the largely heterochromatic chromosome (Het) being one of the BS1 homologues with the expansion of pericentromeric heterochromatin. In apomictic B. polyantha (2n = 15), the Het has undergone a centric fission resulting in two smaller chromosomes - the submetacentric Het' and telocentric Del. Here we show that new chromosomes can be formed by a centric fission and can be fixed in populations due to the apomictic mode of reproduction.

  2. Activated hydrotalcites as solid base catalysts in aldol condensations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roelofs, J.C.A.A.

    2002-01-01

    The development of new catalytic materials and routes to replace environmentally unacceptable processes in the fine chemical industry is emerging due to stringent legislation. Replacement of currently applied alkali bases in liquid-phase aldol condensations can result in diminishing of waste water s

  3. Evaporative Condensers in Comfortable Air Conditioning System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YIN Ying-de; ZHU Dong-sheng; DU Gui-mei; LI Yuan-xi; SUN He-jing; LIU Qing-ming

    2009-01-01

    The operating theory of an evaporative condenser was expatiated.The difference between an e-vaporative condensing refrigeration system and a general refrigeration system was analyzed.Compared with the air-cooled and the water-cooled,the virtues of energy-conservation and water-conservation of evaporative con-densers were analyzed.Some questions existing in the application of evaporative condensers were pointed out,the corresponding solving methods were analyzed accordingly,and the development trend of evaporative con-densing technique in mechanical refrigeration system field and the applied foreground of evaporative condensers in comfortable air conditioning were prospected.

  4. Electochemical detection of chromosome translocation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kwasny, Dorota; Dimaki, Maria; Silahtaroglu, Asli;

    2014-01-01

    Cytogenetics is a study of the cell structure with a main focus on chromosomes content and their structure. Chromosome abnormalities, such as translocations may cause various genetic disorders and heametological malignancies. Chromosome translocations are structural rearrangements of two...... chromosomes that results in formation of derivative chromosomes with a mixed DNA sequence. The method currently used for their detection is Fluorescent In Situ Hybridization, which requires a use of expensive, fluorescently labeled probes that target the derivative chromosomes. We present here a double...... hybridization approach developed for label-free detection of the chromosome translocations. For specific translocation detection it is necessary to determine that the two DNA sequences forming a derivative chromosome are connected, which is achieved by two subsequent hybridization steps. The electrochemical...

  5. Chromosome Variations And Human Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soudek, D.

    1974-01-01

    Article focused on the science of cytogenetics, which studied the transmission of the units of heredity called chromosomes, and considered the advantage of proper diagnosis of genetic diseases, treated on the chromosomal level. (Author/RK)

  6. Integral Reactor Containment Condensation Model and Experimental Validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Qiao [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States); Corradini, Michael [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2016-05-02

    ranging from 4 to 21 bar with three different static inventories of non-condensable gas. Condensation and heat transfer rates were evaluated employing several methods, notably from measured temperature gradients in the HTP as well as measured condensate formation rates. A detailed mass and energy accounting was used to assess the various measurement methods and to support simplifying assumptions required for the analysis. Condensation heat fluxes and heat transfer coefficients are calculated and presented as a function of pressure to satisfy the objectives of this investigation. The major conclusions for those tests are summarized below: (1) In the steam blow-down tests, the initial condensation heat transfer process involves the heating-up of the containment heat transfer plate. An inverse heat conduction model was developed to capture the rapid transient transfer characteristics, and the analysis method is applicable to SMR safety analysis. (2) The average condensation heat transfer coefficients for different pressure conditions and non-condensable gas mass fractions were obtained from the integral test facility, through the measurements of the heat conduction rate across the containment heat transfer plate, and from the water condensation rates measurement based on the total energy balance equation. 15 (3) The test results using the measured HTP wall temperatures are considerably lower than popular condensation models would predict mainly due to the side wall conduction effects in the existing MASLWR integral test facility. The data revealed the detailed heat transfer characteristics of the model containment, important to the SMR safety analysis and the validation of associated evaluation model. However this approach, unlike separate effect tests, cannot isolate the condensation heat transfer coefficient over the containment wall, and therefore is not suitable for the assessment of the condensation heat transfer coefficient against system pressure and noncondensable

  7. Ring chromosome 13

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, C A; Hertz, Jens Michael; Petersen, M B;

    1992-01-01

    A stillborn male child with anencephaly and multiple malformations was found to have the karyotype 46,XY,r(13) (p11q21.1). The breakpoint at 13q21.1, determined by high resolution banding, is the most proximal breakpoint ever reported in patients with ring chromosome 13. In situ hybridisation...

  8. Chromosomes, cancer and radiosensitivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samouhos, E.

    1983-08-01

    Some specific chromosomal abnormalities are associated with certain cancers. The earliest description of such a specific association is the one of the Philadelphia chromosome and myelogenous leukemia (1960). Other congenital karyotype abnormalities are associated with specific cancers. Examples of these are Down's syndrome with leukemia and Klinefelter's syndrome with male breast cancer. Genetic diseases of increased chromosome breakage, or of defective chromosome repair, are associated with greatly increased cancer incidence. Three such diseases have been recognized: 1) Fanconi's anemia, associated with leukemias and lymphomas, 2) Bloom's syndrome, associated with acute leukemias and lymphosarcoma, and 3) ataxia telangiectasia, associated with Hodgkin's disease, leukemia, and lymphosarcomas. Ten percent of individuals with ataxia telangiectasia will develop one of these neoplasms. Individuals with certain of these syndromes display an unusually high radiosensitivity. Radiation therapy for cancers has been fatal in patients who received as low as 3000 rad. This remarkable radiosensitivity has been quantitated in cell cultures from such cases. Evidence suggests that the apparent sensitivity may reflect subnormal ability to repair radiation damage. The rapid proliferation of information in this field stems from the interdigitation of many disciplines and specialties, including cytogenetics, cell biology, molecular biology, epidemiology, radiobiology, and several others. This paper is intended for clinicians; it presents a structured analytic scheme for correlating and classifying this multidisciplinary information as it becomes available.

  9. The Y Chromosome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Offner, Susan

    2010-01-01

    The Y chromosome is of great interest to students and can be used to teach about many important biological concepts in addition to sex determination. This paper discusses mutation, recombination, mammalian sex determination, sex determination in general, and the evolution of sex determination in mammals. It includes a student activity that…

  10. Why Chromosome Palindromes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther Betrán

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We look at sex-limited chromosome (Y or W evolution with particular emphasis on the importance of palindromes. Y chromosome palindromes consist of inverted duplicates that allow for local recombination in an otherwise nonrecombining chromosome. Since palindromes enable intrachromosomal gene conversion that can help eliminate deleterious mutations, they are often highlighted as mechanisms to protect against Y degeneration. However, the adaptive significance of recombination resides in its ability to decouple the evolutionary fates of linked mutations, leading to both a decrease in degeneration rate and an increase in adaptation rate. Our paper emphasizes the latter, that palindromes may exist to accelerate adaptation by increasing the potential targets and fixation rates of incoming beneficial mutations. This hypothesis helps reconcile two enigmatic features of the “palindromes as protectors” view: (1 genes that are not located in palindromes have been retained under purifying selection for tens of millions of years, and (2 under models that only consider deleterious mutations, gene conversion benefits duplicate gene maintenance but not initial fixation. We conclude by looking at ways to test the hypothesis that palindromes enhance the rate of adaptive evolution of Y-linked genes and whether this effect can be extended to palindromes on other chromosomes.

  11. Magnetofermionic condensate in two dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulik, L. V.; Zhuravlev, A. S.; Dickmann, S.; Gorbunov, A. V.; Timofeev, V. B.; Kukushkin, I. V.; Schmult, S.

    2016-11-01

    Coherent condensate states of particles obeying either Bose or Fermi statistics are in the focus of interest in modern physics. Here we report on condensation of collective excitations with Bose statistics, cyclotron magnetoexcitons, in a high-mobility two-dimensional electron system in a magnetic field. At low temperatures, the dense non-equilibrium ensemble of long-lived triplet magnetoexcitons exhibits both a drastic reduction in the viscosity and a steep enhancement in the response to the external electromagnetic field. The observed effects are related to formation of a super-absorbing state interacting coherently with the electromagnetic field. Simultaneously, the electrons below the Fermi level form a super-emitting state. The effects are explicable from the viewpoint of a coherent condensate phase in a non-equilibrium system of two-dimensional fermions with a fully quantized energy spectrum. The condensation occurs in the space of vectors of magnetic translations, a property providing a completely new landscape for future physical investigations.

  12. Approaching Bose-Einstein Condensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Loris

    2011-01-01

    Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) is discussed at the level of an advanced course of statistical thermodynamics, clarifying some formal and physical aspects that are usually not covered by the standard pedagogical literature. The non-conventional approach adopted starts by showing that the continuum limit, in certain cases, cancels out the crucial…

  13. Condensational theory of stationary tornadoes

    CERN Document Server

    Makarieva, Anastassia M; Nefiodov, Andrei V; 10.1016/j.physleta.2011.04.023

    2012-01-01

    Using the Bernoulli integral for air streamline with condensing water vapor a stationary axisymmetric tornado circulation is described. The obtained profiles of vertical, radial and tangential velocities are in agreement with observations for the Mulhall tornado, world's largest on record and longest-lived among the three tornadoes for which 3D velocity data are available. Maximum possible vortex velocities are estimated.

  14. Primordial Universe with radiation and Bose-Einstein condensate

    CERN Document Server

    Alvarenga, F G; Fracalossi, R; Freitas, R C; Gonçalves, S V B; Monerat, G A; Oliveira-Neto, G; Silva, E V Corrêa

    2016-01-01

    In this work we derive a scenario where the early Universe consists of radiation and the Bose-Einstein condensate. We have included in our analysis the possibility of gravitational self-interaction due to the Bose-Einstein condensate being attractive or repulsive. After presenting the general structure of our model, we proceed to compute the finite-norm wave packet solutions to the Wheeler-DeWitt equation. The behavior of the scale factor is studied by applying the many-worlds interpretation of quantum mechanics. At the quantum level the cosmological model, in both attractive and repulsive cases, is free from the Big Bang singularity.

  15. High visibility gravimetry with a Bose-Einstein condensate

    CERN Document Server

    Debs, J E; Barter, T H; Döring, D; Dennis, G R; McDonald, G; Robins, N P; Close, J D

    2010-01-01

    We present results from an atomic gravimeter using a Bose-Einstein condensate with fringe visibility up to 85%. A direct comparison with a thermal state displays a significant increase in visibility for a condensed source. We do not observe any detrimental effects of atom-atom interactions, provided the cloud is allowed to reach the ballistic free-expansion regime. By increasing the space-time area enclosed by our interferometer using large-momentum-transfer beamsplitters, we achieve a precision of 17 ppm in a measurement of the local acceleration due to gravity.

  16. [Dicentric Y chromosome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelmoula, N Bouayed; Amouri, A

    2005-01-01

    Dicentric Y chromosomes are the most common Y structural abnormalities and their influence on gonadal and somatic development is extremely variable. Here, we report the third comprehensive review of the literature concerning dicentric Y chromosomes reported since 1994. We find 78 new cases for which molecular studies (PCR or FISH) have been widely applied to investigate SRY (68% of cases), GBY, ZFY, RFS4Y, GCY and different genes at AZF region. For dic(Yq), all cases (n = 20) were mosaic for 45,X and 4 of them were also mosaic for a 46,XY cell line. When breakpoints were available (15/20 cases), they were in Yp11. 50% of cases were phenotypic female and 20% phenotypic male while 20% of cases were reported with gonadal dysgenesis. Gonadal histology was defined in 8 cases but only in one case, gonadal tissu was genetically investigated because of gonadoblastoma. For dic(Yp) (n = 55), mosaicism concerned only 45,X cell line and was found in 50 cases while the remainder five cases were homogeneous. When breakpoints were available, it was at Yq11 in 50 cases and at Yq12 in two cases. 54% of cases were phenotypic female, 26% were phenotypic male and 18% were associated with genitalia ambiguous. SRY was analyzed in 33 cases, sequenced in 9 cases and was muted in only one case. Gonads were histologically explored in 34 cases and genetically investigated in 8 cases. Gonadoblastoma was found in only two cases. Through this review, it seems that phenotype-genotype correlations are still not possible and that homogeneous studies of dic(Y) in more patients using molecular tools for structural characterization of the rearranged Y chromosome and assessment of mosaicism in many organs are necessary to clarify the basis of the phenotypic heterogeneity of dicentric Y chromosomes and then to help phenotypic prediction of such chromosome rearrangement.

  17. Dynamics of X Chromosome Inactivation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F. Loos (Friedemann)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Dosage compensation evolved to account for the difference in expression of sex chromosome-linked genes. In mammals dosage compensation is achieved by inactivation of one X chromosome during early female embryogenesis in a process called X chromosome inactivation (XCI).

  18. Chromosomal breakpoints characterization of two supernumerary ring chromosomes 20.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guediche, N; Brisset, S; Benichou, J-J; Guérin, N; Mabboux, P; Maurin, M-L; Bas, C; Laroudie, M; Picone, O; Goldszmidt, D; Prévot, S; Labrune, P; Tachdjian, G

    2010-02-01

    The occurrence of an additional ring chromosome 20 is a rare chromosome abnormality, and no common phenotype has been yet described. We report on two new patients presenting with a supernumerary ring chromosome 20 both prenatally diagnosed. The first presented with intrauterine growth retardation and some craniofacial dysmorphism, and the second case had a normal phenotype except for obesity. Conventional cytogenetic studies showed for each patient a small supernumerary marker chromosome (SMC). Using fluorescence in situ hybridization, these SMCs corresponded to ring chromosomes 20 including a part of short and long arms of chromosome 20. Detailed molecular cytogenetic characterization showed different breakpoints (20p11.23 and 20q11.23 for Patient 1 and 20p11.21 and 20q11.21 for Patient 2) and sizes of the two ring chromosomes 20 (13.6 Mb for case 1 and 4.8 Mb for case 2). Review of the 13 case reports of an extra r(20) ascertained postnatally (8 cases) and prenatally (5 cases) showed varying degrees of phenotypic abnormalities. We document a detailed molecular cytogenetic chromosomal breakpoints characterization of two cases of supernumerary ring chromosomes 20. These results emphasize the need to characterize precisely chromosomal breakpoints of supernumerary ring chromosomes 20 in order to establish genotype-phenotype correlation. This report may be helpful for prediction of natural history and outcome, particularly in prenatal diagnosis.

  19. Familial complex chromosomal rearrangement resulting in a recombinant chromosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berend, Sue Ann; Bodamer, Olaf A F; Shapira, Stuart K; Shaffer, Lisa G; Bacino, Carlos A

    2002-05-15

    Familial complex chromosomal rearrangements (CCRs) are rare and tend to involve fewer breakpoints and fewer chromosomes than CCRs that are de novo in origin. We report on a CCR identified in a child with congenital heart disease and dysmorphic features. Initially, the child's karyotype was thought to involve a straightforward three-way translocation between chromosomes 3, 8, and 16. However, after analyzing the mother's chromosomes, the mother was found to have a more complex rearrangement that resulted in a recombinant chromosome in the child. The mother's karyotype included an inverted chromosome 2 and multiple translocations involving chromosomes 3, 5, 8, and 16. No evidence of deletion or duplication that could account for the clinical findings in the child was identified.

  20. SIMULATING THE IN SITU CONDENSATION PROCESS OF SOLAR PROMINENCES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xia, C.; Keppens, R. [Centre for mathematical Plasma Astrophysics, Department of Mathematics, KU Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200B, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Antolin, P. [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Porth, O. [Department of Applied Mathematics, The University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom)

    2014-09-10

    Prominences in the solar corona are a hundredfold cooler and denser than their surroundings, with a total mass of 10{sup 13} up to 10{sup 15} g. Here, we report on the first comprehensive simulations of three-dimensional, thermally and gravitationally stratified magnetic flux ropes where in situ condensation to a prominence occurs due to radiative losses. After a gradual thermodynamic adjustment, we witness a phase where runaway cooling occurs while counter-streaming shearing flows drain off mass along helical field lines. After this drainage, a prominence-like condensation resides in concave upward field regions, and this prominence retains its overall characteristics for more than two hours. While condensing, the prominence establishes a prominence-corona transition region where magnetic field-aligned thermal conduction is operative during the runaway cooling. The prominence structure represents a force-balanced state in a helical flux rope. The simulated condensation demonstrates a right-bearing barb, as a remnant of the drainage. Synthetic images at extreme ultraviolet wavelengths follow the onset of the condensation, and confirm the appearance of horns and a three-part structure for the stable prominence state, as often seen in erupting prominences. This naturally explains recent Solar Dynamics Observatory views with the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on prominences in coronal cavities demonstrating horns.

  1. Investigation of viscosity of whole hydrolyze sweetened condensed milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Kalinina

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Рaper is aimed at developing of low-lactose (hydrolyzed sweetened condensed milk products technology for lactose intolerant people and for the whole population. Materials and methods: Rheological characteristics were determined on a Reotest device by the 2 nd method of viscometry Results and discussion. Reasonability of ß-galactosidase use for milk lactose hydrolyze during the production of canned products with sugar was proved in the previous works. This technology gives possibility to increase the quality of condensed canned foods, to reduce sugar concentration till 50 %, to increase dietary properties. Due to the reducing of saccharose mass part till 22 and 31 % the products had a liquid consistency that’s why was a necessity to increase the viscosity properties of condensed products. One of method to increase the product viscosity is inoculation of stabilization systems. Reasonability of the usage of stabilization system Bivicioc 1L was proved. The researches of viscosity determination in whole hydrolyzed sweetened condensed milk were shown in the work. Relations of viscosity of whole hydrolyzed condensed milk to the deformation rate were presented. Conclusions Viscosity indices of experimental samples in the fresh produced products and during storage are determined and justified.

  2. Atom loss resonances in a Bose-Einstein condensate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langmack, Christian; Smith, D Hudson; Braaten, Eric

    2013-07-12

    Atom loss resonances in ultracold trapped atoms have been observed at scattering lengths near atom-dimer resonances, at which Efimov trimers cross the atom-dimer threshold, and near two-dimer resonances, at which universal tetramers cross the dimer-dimer threshold. We propose a new mechanism for these loss resonances in a Bose-Einstein condensate of atoms. As the scattering length is ramped to the large final value at which the atom loss rate is measured, the time-dependent scattering length generates a small condensate of shallow dimers coherently from the atom condensate. The coexisting atom and dimer condensates can be described by a low-energy effective field theory with universal coefficients that are determined by matching exact results from few-body physics. The classical field equations for the atom and dimer condensates predict narrow enhancements in the atom loss rate near atom-dimer resonances and near two-dimer resonances due to inelastic dimer collisions.

  3. Condensation energy of the superconducting bilayer cuprates

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Govind; Ajay; S K Joshi

    2002-05-01

    In the present work, we report the interplay of single particle and Cooper pair tunnelings on the superconducting state of layered high-c cuprate superconductors. For this we have considered a model Hamiltonian incorporating the intra-planar interactions and the contributions arising due to the coupling between the planes. The interplanar interactions include the single particle tunneling as well as the Josephson tunneling of Cooper pairs between the two layers. The expression of the out-of-plane correlation parameter which describes the hopping of a particle from one layer to another layer in the superconducting state is obtained within a Bardeen–Cooper–Schriefer (BCS) formalism using the Green’s function technique. This correlation is found to be sensitive to the various parameter of the model Hamiltonian. We have calculated the out-of-plane contribution to the superconducting condensation energy. The calculated values of condensation energy are in agreement with those obtained from the specific heat and the -axis penetration depth measurements on bilayer cuprates.

  4. Molecular Effects on Evaporation and Condensation

    OpenAIRE

    Meland, Roar

    2002-01-01

    In this thesis the evaporation from and condensation on a plane liquid surface have been studied by analysis and molecular dynamics simulations. The effect of the condensation coefficient on the inverted temperature gradient for a two-surface evaporation-condensation geometry is investigated by the moment method. The influence of the molecular exchange phenomenon on the gas-kinetic treatment of evaporation and condensation is shown to be neglible under certain assumptions. Methods to simulate...

  5. Polymer induced condensation of dna supercoils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bessa Ramos Jr., J.E.; Ruggiero Neto, J.; Vries, de R.J.

    2008-01-01

    Macromolecular crowding is thought to be a significant factor driving DNA condensation in prokaryotic cells. Whereas DNA in prokaryotes is supercoiled, studies on crowding-induced DNA condensation have so far focused on linear DNA. Here we compare DNA condensation by poly(ethylene oxide) for superco

  6. Condensed matter analogues of cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kibble, Tom; Srivastava, Ajit

    2013-10-01

    It is always exciting when developments in one branch of physics turn out to have relevance in a quite different branch. It would be hard to find two branches farther apart in terms of energy scales than early-universe cosmology and low-temperature condensed matter physics. Nevertheless ideas about the formation of topological defects during rapid phase transitions that originated in the context of the very early universe have proved remarkably fruitful when applied to a variety of condensed matter systems. The mathematical frameworks for describing these systems can be very similar. This interconnection has led to a deeper understanding of the phenomena in condensed matter systems utilizing ideas from cosmology. At the same time, one can view these condensed matter analogues as providing, at least in a limited sense, experimental access to the phenomena of the early universe for which no direct probe is possible. As this special issue well illustrates, this remains a dynamic and exciting field. The basic idea is that when a system goes through a rapid symmetry-breaking phase transition from a symmetric phase into one with spontaneously broken symmetry, the order parameter may make different choices in different regions, creating domains that when they meet can trap defects. The scale of those domains, and hence the density of defects, is constrained by the rate at which the system goes through the transition and the speed with which order parameter information propagates. This is what has come to be known as the Kibble-Zurek mechanism. The resultant scaling laws have now been tested in a considerable variety of different systems. The earliest experiments illustrating the analogy between cosmology and condensed matter were in liquid crystals, in particular on the isotropic-to-nematic transition, primarily because it is very easy to induce the phase transition (typically at room temperature) and to image precisely what is going on. This field remains one of the

  7. Organizing the bacterial chromosome for division

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broedersz, Chase

    2014-03-01

    The chromosome is highly organized in space in many bacteria, although the origin and function of this organization remain unclear. This organization is further complicated by the necessity for chromosome replication and segregation. Partitioning proteins of the ParABS system mediate chromosomal and plasmid segregation in a variety of bacteria. This segregation machinery includes a large ParB-DNA complex consisting of roughly 1000 ParB dimers, which localizes around one or a few centromere-like parS sites near the origin of replication. Despite the apparent simplicity of this segregation machinery as compared to eukaryotic segregations systems, puzzles remain: In particular, what is the nature of interactions among DNA-bound ParB proteins, and how do these determine the organizational and functional properties of the ParB-DNA partitioning complex? A crucial aspect of this question is whether ParB spreads along the DNA to form a filamentous protein-DNA complex with a 1D character, or rather assembles to form a 3D complex on the DNA. Furthermore, it remains unclear how the presence of only one or even a few parS sites can lead to robust formation and localization of such a large protein-DNA complex. We developed a simple model for interacting proteins on DNA, and found that a combination of 1D spreading bonds and a 3D bridging bond between ParB proteins constitutes the minimal model for condensation of a 3D ParB-DNA complex. These combined interactions provide an effective surface tension that prevents fragmentation of the ParB-DNA complex. Thus, ParB spreads to form multiple 1D domains on the DNA, connected in 3D by bridging interactions to assemble into a 3D ParB-DNA condensate. Importantly, this model accounts for recent experiments on ParB-induced gene-silencing and the effect of a DNA ``roadblock'' on ParB localization. Furthermore, our model provides a simple mechanism to explain how a single parS site is both necessary and sufficient for the formation and

  8. Chromosome 19 International Workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pericak-Vance, M.A. (Duke Univ., Durham, NC (United States). Medical Center); Ropers, H.H. (Univ. Hospital Nijmegen, (The Netherlands). Dept. of Human Genetics); Carrano, A.J. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States))

    1993-01-04

    The Second International Workshop on Human Chromosome 19 was hosted on January 25 and 26, 1992, by the Department of Human Genetics, University Hospital Nijmegen, The Netherlands, at the 'Meerdal Conference Center'. The workshop was supported by a grant from the European Community obtained through HUGO, the Dutch Research Organization (NWO) and the Muscular Dystrophy Association (MDA). Travel support for American participants was provided by the Department of Energy. The goals of this workshop were to produce genetic, physical and integrated maps of chromosome 19, to identify inconsistencies and gaps, and to discuss and exchange resources and techniques available for the completion of these maps. The second day of the meeting was largely devoted to region or disease specific efforts. In particular, the meeting served as a platform for assessing and discussing the recent progress made into the molecular elucidation of myotonic dystrophy.

  9. Polymer Bose–Einstein condensates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castellanos, E., E-mail: ecastellanos@fis.cinvestav.mx [Departamento de Física, Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados del Instituto Politécnico Nacional, A.P. 14-740, México D.F. 07000 (Mexico); Chacón-Acosta, G., E-mail: gchacon@correo.cua.uam.mx [Departamento de Matemáticas Aplicadas y Sistemas, Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana-Cuajimalpa, Artificios 40, México D.F. 01120 (Mexico)

    2013-05-13

    In this work we analyze a non-interacting one-dimensional polymer Bose–Einstein condensate in a harmonic trap within the semiclassical approximation. We use an effective Hamiltonian coming from the polymer quantization that arises in loop quantum gravity. We calculate the number of particles in order to obtain the critical temperature. The Bose–Einstein functions are replaced by series, whose high order terms are related to powers of the polymer length. It is shown that the condensation temperature presents a shift respect to the standard case, for small values of the polymer scale. In typical experimental conditions, it is possible to establish a bound for λ{sup 2} up to ≲10{sup −16} m{sup 2}. To improve this bound we should decrease the frequency of the trap and also decrease the number of particles.

  10. Fundamentals of condensed matter physics

    CERN Document Server

    Cohen, Marvin L

    2016-01-01

    Based on an established course and covering the fundamentals, central areas, and contemporary topics of this diverse field, Fundamentals of Condensed Matter Physics is a much-needed textbook for graduate students. The book begins with an introduction to the modern conceptual models of a solid from the points of view of interacting atoms and elementary excitations. It then provides students with a thorough grounding in electronic structure as a starting point to understand many properties of condensed matter systems - electronic, structural, vibrational, thermal, optical, transport, magnetic and superconductivity - and methods to calculate them. Taking readers through the concepts and techniques, the text gives both theoretically and experimentally inclined students the knowledge needed for research and teaching careers in this field. It features 200 illustrations, 40 worked examples and 150 homework problems for students to test their understanding. Solutions to the problems for instructors are available at w...

  11. The analysis of mutant alleles of different strength reveals multiple functions of topoisomerase 2 in regulation of Drosophila chromosome structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mengoli, Valentina; Bucciarelli, Elisabetta; Lattao, Ramona; Piergentili, Roberto; Gatti, Maurizio; Bonaccorsi, Silvia

    2014-10-01

    Topoisomerase II is a major component of mitotic chromosomes but its role in the assembly and structural maintenance of chromosomes is rather controversial, as different chromosomal phenotypes have been observed in various organisms and in different studies on the same organism. In contrast to vertebrates that harbor two partially redundant Topo II isoforms, Drosophila and yeasts have a single Topo II enzyme. In addition, fly chromosomes, unlike those of yeast, are morphologically comparable to vertebrate chromosomes. Thus, Drosophila is a highly suitable system to address the role of Topo II in the assembly and structural maintenance of chromosomes. Here we show that modulation of Top2 function in living flies by means of mutant alleles of different strength and in vivo RNAi results in multiple cytological phenotypes. In weak Top2 mutants, meiotic chromosomes of males exhibit strong morphological abnormalities and dramatic segregation defects, while mitotic chromosomes of larval brain cells are not affected. In mutants of moderate strength, mitotic chromosome organization is normal, but anaphases display frequent chromatin bridges that result in chromosome breaks and rearrangements involving specific regions of the Y chromosome and 3L heterochromatin. Severe Top2 depletion resulted in many aneuploid and polyploid mitotic metaphases with poorly condensed heterochromatin and broken chromosomes. Finally, in the almost complete absence of Top2, mitosis in larval brains was virtually suppressed and in the rare mitotic figures observed chromosome morphology was disrupted. These results indicate that different residual levels of Top2 in mutant cells can result in different chromosomal phenotypes, and that the effect of a strong Top2 depletion can mask the effects of milder Top2 reductions. Thus, our results suggest that the previously observed discrepancies in the chromosomal phenotypes elicited by Topo II downregulation in vertebrates might depend on slight differences

  12. The analysis of mutant alleles of different strength reveals multiple functions of topoisomerase 2 in regulation of Drosophila chromosome structure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Mengoli

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Topoisomerase II is a major component of mitotic chromosomes but its role in the assembly and structural maintenance of chromosomes is rather controversial, as different chromosomal phenotypes have been observed in various organisms and in different studies on the same organism. In contrast to vertebrates that harbor two partially redundant Topo II isoforms, Drosophila and yeasts have a single Topo II enzyme. In addition, fly chromosomes, unlike those of yeast, are morphologically comparable to vertebrate chromosomes. Thus, Drosophila is a highly suitable system to address the role of Topo II in the assembly and structural maintenance of chromosomes. Here we show that modulation of Top2 function in living flies by means of mutant alleles of different strength and in vivo RNAi results in multiple cytological phenotypes. In weak Top2 mutants, meiotic chromosomes of males exhibit strong morphological abnormalities and dramatic segregation defects, while mitotic chromosomes of larval brain cells are not affected. In mutants of moderate strength, mitotic chromosome organization is normal, but anaphases display frequent chromatin bridges that result in chromosome breaks and rearrangements involving specific regions of the Y chromosome and 3L heterochromatin. Severe Top2 depletion resulted in many aneuploid and polyploid mitotic metaphases with poorly condensed heterochromatin and broken chromosomes. Finally, in the almost complete absence of Top2, mitosis in larval brains was virtually suppressed and in the rare mitotic figures observed chromosome morphology was disrupted. These results indicate that different residual levels of Top2 in mutant cells can result in different chromosomal phenotypes, and that the effect of a strong Top2 depletion can mask the effects of milder Top2 reductions. Thus, our results suggest that the previously observed discrepancies in the chromosomal phenotypes elicited by Topo II downregulation in vertebrates might depend on

  13. Continuous droplet removal upon dropwise condensation of humid air on a hydrophobic micropatterned surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamuruyev, Konstantin O; Bardaweel, Hamzeh K; Carron, Christopher J; Kenyon, Nicholas J; Brand, Oliver; Delplanque, Jean-Pierre; Davis, Cristina E

    2014-08-26

    Combination of two physical phenomena, capillary pressure gradient and wettability gradient, allows a simple two-step fabrication process that yields a reliable hydrophobic self-cleaning condenser surface. The surface is fabricated with specific microscopic topography and further treatment with a chemically inert low-surface-energy material. This process does not require growth of nanofeatures (nanotubes) or hydrophilic-hydrophobic patterning of the surface. Trapezoidal geometry of the microfeatures facilitates droplet transfer from the Wenzel to the Cassie state and reduces droplet critical diameter. The geometry of the micropatterns enhances local coalescence and directional movement for droplets with diameter much smaller than the radial length of the micropatterns. The hydrophobic self-cleaning micropatterned condenser surface prevents liquid film formation and promotes continuous dropwise condensation cycle. Upon dropwise condensation, droplets follow a designed wettability gradient created with micropatterns from the most hydrophobic to the least hydrophobic end of the surface. The surface has higher condensation efficiency, due to its directional self-cleaning property, than a plain hydrophobic surface. We explain the self-actuated droplet collection mechanism on the condenser surface and demonstrate experimentally the creation of an effective wettability gradient over a 6 mm radial distance. In spite of its fabrication simplicity, the fabricated surface demonstrates self-cleaning property, enhanced condensation performance, and reliability over time. Our work enables creation of a hydrophobic condenser surface with the directional self-cleaning property that can be used for collection of biological (chemical, environmental) aerosol samples or for condensation enhancement.

  14. On nitrogen condensation in hypersonic nozzle flows: Numerical method and parametric study

    KAUST Repository

    Lin, Longyuan

    2013-12-17

    A numerical method for calculating two-dimensional planar and axisymmetric hypersonic nozzle flows with nitrogen condensation is developed. The classical nucleation theory with an empirical correction function and the modified Gyarmathy model are used to describe the nucleation rate and the droplet growth, respectively. The conservation of the liquid phase is described by a finite number of moments of the size distribution function. The moment equations are then combined with the Euler equations and are solved by the finite-volume method. The numerical method is first validated by comparing its prediction with experimental results from the literature. The effects of nitrogen condensation on hypersonic nozzle flows are then numerically examined. The parameters at the nozzle exit under the conditions of condensation and no-condensation are evaluated. For the condensation case, the static pressure, the static temperature, and the amount of condensed fluid at the nozzle exit decrease with the increase of the total temperature. Compared with the no-condensation case, both the static pressure and temperature at the nozzle exit increase, and the Mach number decreases due to the nitrogen condensation. It is also indicated that preheating the nitrogen gas is necessary to avoid the nitrogen condensation even for a hypersonic nozzle with a Mach number of 5 operating at room temperatures. © 2013 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

  15. Advances in condensed matter optics

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Liangyao; Jiang, Xunya; Jin, Kuijuan; Liu, Hui; Zhao, Haibin

    2015-01-01

    This book describes some of the more recent progresses and developmentsin the study of condensed matter optics in both theoretic and experimental fields.It will help readers, especially graduate students and scientists who are studying and working in the nano-photonic field, to understand more deeply the characteristics of light waves propagated in nano-structure-based materials with potential applications in the future.

  16. Atomistic modeling of dropwise condensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikarwar, B. S.; Singh, P. L.; Muralidhar, K.; Khandekar, S.

    2016-05-01

    The basic aim of the atomistic modeling of condensation of water is to determine the size of the stable cluster and connect phenomena occurring at atomic scale to the macroscale. In this paper, a population balance model is described in terms of the rate equations to obtain the number density distribution of the resulting clusters. The residence time is taken to be large enough so that sufficient time is available for all the adatoms existing in vapor-phase to loose their latent heat and get condensed. The simulation assumes clusters of a given size to be formed from clusters of smaller sizes, but not by the disintegration of the larger clusters. The largest stable cluster size in the number density distribution is taken to be representative of the minimum drop radius formed in a dropwise condensation process. A numerical confirmation of this result against predictions based on a thermodynamic model has been obtained. Results show that the number density distribution is sensitive to the surface diffusion coefficient and the rate of vapor flux impinging on the substrate. The minimum drop radius increases with the diffusion coefficient and the impinging vapor flux; however, the dependence is weak. The minimum drop radius predicted from thermodynamic considerations matches the prediction of the cluster model, though the former does not take into account the effect of the surface properties on the nucleation phenomena. For a chemically passive surface, the diffusion coefficient and the residence time are dependent on the surface texture via the coefficient of friction. Thus, physical texturing provides a means of changing, within limits, the minimum drop radius. The study reveals that surface texturing at the scale of the minimum drop radius does not provide controllability of the macro-scale dropwise condensation at large timescales when a dynamic steady-state is reached.

  17. Radiative corrections to Bose condensation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez, A. (Academia de Ciencias de Cuba, La Habana. Inst. de Matematica, Cibernetica y Computacion)

    1985-04-01

    The Bose condensation of the scalar field in a theory behaving in the Coleman-Weinberg mode is considered. The effective potential of the model is computed within the semiclassical approximation in a dimensional regularization scheme. Radiative corrections are shown to introduce certain ..mu..-dependent ultraviolet divergences in the effective potential coming from the Many-Particle theory. The weight of radiative corrections in the dynamics of the system is strongly modified by the charge density.

  18. Theory of laminar film condensation

    CERN Document Server

    Fujii, Tetsu

    1991-01-01

    Since the petroleum crisis in the 1970s, a lot of effort to save energy was made in industry, and remarkable achievements have been made. In the research and development concerning thermal energy, however, it was clar­ ified that one of the most important problems was manufacturing con­ densing systems with smaller size and higher performance. To solve this problem we need a method which synthesizes selections_ of the type of con­ denser, cooling tube and its arrangement, assessment of fouling on the cooling surfaces, consideration of transient characteristics of a condenser, etc. The majority of effort, however, has been to devise a surface element which enhances the heat transfer coefficient in condensation of a single or multicomponent vapor. Condensation phenomena are complexly affected by a lot of physical property values, and accordingly the results of theo­ retical research are expressed with several dimensionless parameters. On the other hand, the experimental research is limited to those with som...

  19. Condensation on Slippery Asymmetric Bumps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kyoo-Chul; Kim, Philseok; Aizenberg, Joanna

    2016-11-01

    Controlling dropwise condensation by designing surfaces that enable droplets to grow rapidly and be shed as quickly as possible is fundamental to water harvesting systems, thermal power generation, distillation towers, etc. However, cutting-edge approaches based on micro/nanoscale textures suffer from intrinsic trade-offs that make it difficult to optimize both growth and transport at once. Here we present a conceptually different design approach based on principles derived from Namib desert beetles, cacti, and pitcher plants that synergistically couples both aspects of condensation and outperforms other synthetic surfaces. Inspired by an unconventional interpretation of the role of the beetle's bump geometry in promoting condensation, we show how to maximize vapor diffusion flux at the apex of convex millimetric bumps by optimizing curvature and shape. Integrating this apex geometry with a widening slope analogous to cactus spines couples rapid drop growth with fast directional transport, by creating a free energy profile that drives the drop down the slope. This coupling is further enhanced by a slippery, pitcher plant-inspired coating that facilitates feedback between coalescence-driven growth and capillary-driven motion. We further observe an unprecedented six-fold higher exponent in growth rate and much faster shedding time compared to other surfaces. We envision that our fundamental understanding and rational design strategy can be applied to a wide range of phase change applications.

  20. Quality factors to consider in condensate selection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lywood, B. [Crude Quality Inc., Edmonton, AB (Canada)

    2009-07-01

    Many factors must be considered when assessing the feasibility of using condensates as a diluent for bitumen or heavy crude production blending. In addition to commercial issues, the effect of condensate quality is a key consideration. In general, condensate quality refers to density and viscosity. However, valuation decisions could be enhanced through the expansion of quality definitions and understanding. This presentation focused on the parameters that are important in choosing a diluent grade product. It also reviewed pipeline and industry specifications and provided additional information regarding general properties for bitumen and condensate compatibility; sampling and quality testing needs; and existing sources of information regarding condensate quality. tabs., figs.

  1. Condensate from a two-stage gasifier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentzen, Jens Dall; Henriksen, Ulrik Birk; Hindsgaul, Claus

    2000-01-01

    that the organic compounds and the inhibition effect are very low even before treatment with activated carbon. The moderate inhibition effect relates to a high content of ammonia in the condensate. The nitrifiers become tolerant to the condensate after a few weeks of exposure. The level of organic compounds......Condensate, produced when gas from downdraft biomass gasifier is cooled, contains organic compounds that inhibit nitrifiers. Treatment with activated carbon removes most of the organics and makes the condensate far less inhibitory. The condensate from an optimised two-stage gasifier is so clean...

  2. Origin of uranium isotope variations in early solar nebula condensates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tissot, François L H; Dauphas, Nicolas; Grossman, Lawrence

    2016-03-01

    High-temperature condensates found in meteorites display uranium isotopic variations ((235)U/(238)U), which complicate dating the solar system's formation and whose origin remains mysterious. It is possible that these variations are due to the decay of the short-lived radionuclide (247)Cm (t 1/2 = 15.6 My) into (235)U, but they could also be due to uranium kinetic isotopic fractionation during condensation. We report uranium isotope measurements of meteoritic refractory inclusions that reveal excesses of (235)U reaching ~+6% relative to average solar system composition, which can only be due to the decay of (247)Cm. This allows us to constrain the (247)Cm/(235)U ratio at solar system formation to (1.1 ± 0.3) × 10(-4). This value provides new clues on the universality of the nucleosynthetic r-process of rapid neutron capture.

  3. Origin of uranium isotope variations in early solar nebula condensates

    CERN Document Server

    Tissot, Francois L H; Grossman, Lawrence

    2016-01-01

    High temperature condensates found in meteorites display uranium isotopic variations (235U/238U) that complicate dating of the formation of the Solar System and whose origin remains mysterious. It is possible that these variations are due to decay of the short-lived radionuclide 247Cm (t1/2=15.6 Myr) into 235U but they could also be due to uranium kinetic isotopic fractionation during condensation. We report uranium isotope measurements of meteoritic refractory inclusions that reveal excesses of 235U reaching ~+6 % relative to average solar system composition, which can only be due to decay of 247Cm. This allows us to constrain the 247Cm/235U ratio at Solar System formation to (1.1 +- 0.3) x 10-4. This value provides new clues on the universality of nucleosynthetic r-process of rapid neutron capture.

  4. [Spontaneous chromosome aberrations in the oogenesis of laboratory rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyban, A P; Chebotar', N A

    1975-08-01

    Cytological preparations were made by Tarkovsky's method from 2335 rat oocytes obtained after an induced superodulation. The chromosomes could be counted exactly in 861 oocytes. In 797 oocytes (92.7%) euploidy (metaphase II with 21 chromosomes) and in 64 oocytes (7.5%) aneuploidy was found. 60 oocytes were hypoploid, but only 4 oocytes (0.4%) were hyperploid (with 22 chromosomes). Hypoploidy can often be due to the presence of artefacts. Probably the rate of spontaneous aneuploidy in rat oogenesis is about 0.8%, this being significantly lower than the rate of spontaneous aneuploidy in mice oogenesis.

  5. First trimester ultrasound screening of chromosomal abnormalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trninić-Pjević Aleksandra

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: A retrocervical subcutaneous collection of fluid at 11-14 weeks of gestation, can be visualized by ultrasound as nuchal translucency (NT. Objective. To examine the distribution of fetal nuchal translucency in low risk population, to determine the detection rate of chromosomal abnormalities in the population of interest based on maternal age and NT measurement. Method. Screening for chromosomal defects, advocated by The Fetal Medicine Foundation (FMF, was performed in 1,341 pregnancies in the period January 2000 - April 2004. Initial risk for chromosomal defects (based on maternal and gestational age and corrected risk, after the NT measurement, were calculated. Complete data were collected from 1,048 patients. Results. Out of 1,048 pregnancies followed, 8 cases of Down’s syndrome were observed, 7 were detected antenatally and 6 out of 7 were detected due to screening that combines maternal age and NT measurement. According to our results, sensitivity of the screening for aneuploidies based on maternal age alone was 12.5% and false positive rate 13.1%, showing that screening based on NT measurement is of great importance. Screening by a combination of maternal age and NT, and selecting a screening-positive group for invasive testing enabled detection of 75% of fetuses with trisomy 21. Conclusion. In screening for chromosomal abnormalities, an approach which combines maternal age and NT is effective and increases the detection rate compared to the use of any single test. .

  6. Nondisjunction of chromosome 15: Origin and recombination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, W.P.; Bernasconi, F.; Schinzel, A.A.; Mutirangura, A.; Ledbetter, D.H. (Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States)); Langlois, S. (Univ. of Britisch Columbia, Vancouver (Canada)); Morris, M.A.; Malcolm, S.

    1993-09-01

    Thirty-two cases of uniparental disomy (UPD), ascertained from Prader-Willi syndrome patients (N=27) and Angelman syndrome patients (N-5), are used to investigate the pattern of recombination associated with nondisjunction of chromosome 15. In addition, the meiotic stage of nondisjunction is inferred by using markers mapping near the centromere. Two basic approaches to the analysis of recombination in specific pairwise intervals along the chromosome. This method shows a significant reduction in recombination for two of five intervals examined. Second, the observed frequency of each recombinant class (i.e., zero, one, two, three, or more observable crossovers) is compared with expected values. This is useful for testing whether the reduction in recombination can be attributed solely to a proportion of cases with no recombination at all (because of asynapsis), with the remaining groups showing normal recombination (or even excess recombination), or whether recombination is uniformly reduced. Analysis of maternal UPD(15) data shows a slight reduction in the multiple-recombinant classes, with a corresponding increase in both the zero- and one-recombinant classes over expected values. The majority, more than 82%, of the extra chromosomes in maternal UPD(15) cases are due to meiotic I nondisjunction events. In contrast, more paternal UPD(15) cases so far examined appear to have a postzygotic origin of the extra paternal chromosome. 33 refs., 1 fig., 7 tabs.

  7. Role of antikaon condensation in r-mode instability

    CERN Document Server

    Chatterjee, Debarati

    2007-01-01

    We investigate the effect of antikaon condensed matter on bulk viscosity in rotating neutron stars. We use relativistic field theoretical models to construct the equation of state of neutron stars with the condensate, where the phase transition from nucleonic to $K^-$ condensed phase is assumed to be of first order. We calculate the coefficient of bulk viscosity due to the non-leptonic weak interaction n --> p + K^-. The influence of antikaon bulk viscosity on the gravitational radiation reaction driven instability in the r-modes is investigated. We compare our results with the previously studied non-leptonic weak interaction $n + p --> p + \\Lambda$ involving hyperons on the damping of the r-mode oscillations. We find that the bulk viscosity coefficient due to the non-leptonic weak process involving the condensate is suppressed by several orders of magnitude in comparison with the non-superfluid hyperon bulk viscosity coefficient. Consequently, the antikaon bulk viscosity may not be able to damp the r-mode in...

  8. Optimized wood/pellet heater with flue gas condensation; Optimerad ved/pelletspanna med roekgaskondensering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fredriksson, Christian; Ramstroem, Erik; Berge, Niklas [TPS Termiska Processer AB, Nykoeping (Sweden)

    2002-09-01

    To increase the efficiency of small-scale combustion equipment it is possible to cool the flue gas and condense the water vapor in the flue gas in a flue gas condenser. This also makes it possible to reduce the emissions of particles and unburnt hydrocarbon if the condenser is designed in a suitable way. This work concerns flue gas condensation with respect to the design of the condenser, the handling of the condensate and the integration of the flue gas condenser in a heating system from a technical and an economical point of view. The results from laboratory experiments shows that a flue gas condenser, designed as a plate heat exchanger, connected to a wood pellet fired heater reduces the emissions of both particles and unburnt hydrocarbons. A reduction of 10 to 77% of the particle content in the gas was achieved, the content of hydrocarbons (BTX) was reduced by 50 to 91 %. It was not possible to see any effect on the emissions by changing the design of the condenser, due to the relatively large scatter in the determined particle content in the gas. When it comes to cooling capacity the trends were however more clear; the cooling capacity was strongly dependent on the design of the condenser. It was possible to increase the cooling capacity of the condenser with 124% by changing the condenser design from a reference case with conventional design of the condenser with flat walls, to a design with a corrugated shape of the wall. For a typical domestic wood stove heater of 30 kW this means that the cooling capacity in a condenser under similar conditions increases from 3.3 to 7.4 kW. The addition of water in a spray in the gas upstream of the condenser had only a limited effect on the cooling capacity. The condensate from the condenser was analyzed with respect to the components that currently are regulated for disposal to the district sewer system. The analyses showed that the condensate most likely could be disposed to the sewer system directly without any

  9. Supernumerary marker chromosomes derived from chromosome 6: cytogenetic, molecular cytogenetic, and array CGH characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Bing; Pearle, Phyllis; Rauen, Katherine A; Cotter, Philip D

    2012-07-01

    Supernumerary marker chromosomes (SMC) are relatively common in prenatal diagnosis. As the clinical outcomes vary greatly, a better understanding of the karyotype-phenotype correlation for different SMCs will be important for genetic counseling. We present two cases of prenatally detected de novo, small SMCs. The markers were present in 80% of amniocyte colonies in Case 1 and 38% of the colonies in Case 2. The SMCs were determined to be derived from chromosome 6 during postnatal confirmation studies. Although the sizes and the chromosomal origin of the SMCs in these two cases appeared to be similar, the clinical outcomes varied. The clinical manifestations observed in Case 1 included small for gestational age, feeding difficulty at birth, hydronephrosis, deviated septum and dysmorphic features, while the phenotype is apparently normal in Case 2. Array comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) was performed and showed increase in dosage for approximately 26 Mb of genetic material from the proximal short and long arms of chromosome 6 in Case 1. Results of array CGH were uninformative in Case 2, either due to mosaicism or lack of detectable euchromatin. The difference in the clinical presentation in these two patients may have resulted from the difference in the actual gene contents of the marker chromosomes and/or the differential distribution of the mosaicism.

  10. Rapid turnover of the W chromosome in geographical populations of wild silkmoths, Samia cynthia ssp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshido, Atsuo; Síchová, Jindra; Kubíčková, Svatava; Marec, František; Sahara, Ken

    2013-04-01

    Our previous studies revealed a considerably high level of chromosomal polymorphism in wild silkmoths, Samia cynthia ssp. (Lepidoptera: Saturniidae). Geographical populations of this species complex differ in chromosome numbers and show derived sex chromosome systems including Z0/ZZ in S. cynthia ricini (2n = 27/28; Vietnam), neo-Wneo-Z/neo-Zneo-Z in S. cynthia walkeri (2n = 26/26; Sapporo, Hokkaido) and neo-WZ1Z2/Z1Z1Z2Z2 in S. cynthia subsp. indet. (2n = 25/26; Nagano, Honshu). In this study, we collected specimens of S. cynthia pryeri in Japanese islands Kyushu, Shikoku and Honshu, with an ancestral-like karyotype of 2n = 28 in both sexes and a WZ/ZZ sex chromosome system, except for one population, in which females have lost the W chromosome. However, the S. cynthia pryeri W chromosome showed a very unusual morphology: It was composed of a highly heterochromatic body, which remained condensed throughout the whole cell cycle and of a euchromatin-like "tail." We examined molecular composition of the W and neo-W chromosomes in S. cynthia subspecies by comparative genomic hybridisation and fluorescence in situ hybridisation with W chromosome painting probes prepared from laser-microdissected W chromatin of S. cynthia pryeri. These methods revealed that the molecular composition of highly heterochromatic part of the S. cynthia pryeri W chromosome is very different and lacks homology in the genomes of other subspecies, whereas the euchromatin-like part of the W chromosome corresponds to a heterochromatic part of the neo-W chromosomes in S. cynthia walkeri and S. cynthia subsp. indet. Our findings suggest that the curious WZ system of S. cynthia pryeri may represent an ancestral state of the Samia species complex but do not exclude an alternative hypothesis of its derived origin.

  11. Chromosome aberrations in ataxia telangiectasia cells exposed to heavy ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawata, T.; Cucinotta, F.; George, K.; Wu, H.; Shigematsu, N.; Furusawa, Y.; Uno, T.; Isobe, K.; Ito, H.

    Understanding of biological effects of heavy ions is important to assess healt h risk in space. One of the most important issues may be to take into account individual susceptibility. Ataxia telangiectasia (A-T) cells are known to exhibit abnormal responses to radiations but the mechanism of hyper radiosensitivity of A-T still remains unknown. We report chromosome aberrations in normal human fibroblasts and AT fibroblasts exposed to low- and high-LET radiations. A chemical-induced premature chromosome condensation (PCC) technique combined with chromosome- painting technique was applied to score chromosome aberrations in G2/M-phase cells. Following gamma irradiation, GM02052 cells were approximately 5 times more sensitive to g-rays than AG1522 cells. GM02052 cells had a much higher frequency of deletions and misrejoining than AG1522 cells. When the frequency of complex type aberrations was compared, GM02052 cells showed more than 10 times higher frequency than AG1522 cells. The results will be compared with those obtained from high-LET irradiations.

  12. Chromosome remodeling and differentiation of tetraploid embryos during preimplantation development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Mi-Ryung; Lee, Ah-Reum; Bui, Hong-Thuy; Park, Chankyu; Park, Keun-Kyu; Cho, Ssang-Goo; Song, Hyuk; Kim, Jae-Hwan; Nguyen, Van Thuan; Kim, Jin-Hoi

    2011-07-01

    Although it is known that the tetraploid embryo contributes only to the placenta, the question of why tetraploid embryos differentiate into placenta remains unclear. To study the effect of electrofusion on the development of mouse tetraploid oocytes, mouse two-cell embryos were fused and cultured in vitro in Chatot-Ziomek-Bavister medium. After electrofusion, two chromosome sets from the tetraploid blastomere were individually duplicated before nuclear fusion. At 8-10 hr after electrofusion, each chromosome set was condensing and the nuclear membrane was breaking down. Around 12-14 hr after electrofusion, the two chromosome sets had combined together and had reached the second mitotic metaphase, at this point with 8n sets of chromosomes. Interestingly, we discovered that expression of OCT4, an inner cell mass cells biomarker, is lost by the tetraploid expanded blastocysts, but that CDX2, a trophectoderm cells biomarker, is strongly expressed at this stage. This observation provides evidence clarifying why tetraploid embryos contribute only to trophectoderm.

  13. Chromosome aberrations as biomarkers of radiation exposure: Modelling basic mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballarini, F.; Ottolenghi, A.

    The space radiation environment is a mixed field consisting of different particles having different energies, including high charge and energy (HZE) ions. Conventional measurements of absorbed doses may not be sufficient to completely characterise the radiation field and perform reliable estimates of health risks. Biological dosimetry, based on the observation of specific radiation-induced endpoints (typically chromosome aberrations), can be a helpful approach in case of monitored exposure to space radiation or other mixed fields, as well as in case of accidental exposure. Furthermore, various ratios of aberrations (e.g. dicentric chromosomes to centric rings and complex exchanges to simple exchanges) have been suggested as possible fingerprints of radiation quality, although all of them have been subjected to some criticisms. In this context a mechanistic model and a Monte Carlo code for the simulation of chromosome aberration induction were developed. The model, able to provide dose-responses for different aberrations (e.g. dicentrics, rings, fragments, translocations, insertions and other complex exchanges), was further developed to assess the dependence of various ratios of aberrations on radiation quality. The predictions of the model were compared with available data, whose experimental conditions were faithfully reproduced. Particular attention was devoted to the scoring criteria adopted in different laboratories and to possible biases introduced by interphase death and mitotic delay. This latter aspect was investigated by taking into account both metaphase data and data obtained with Premature Chromosome Condensation (PCC).

  14. Intraspecific chromosome variability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Dubinin

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available (Editorial preface. The publication is presented in order to remind us of one of dramatic pages of the history of genetics. It re-opens for the contemporary reader a comprehensive work marking the priority change from plant cytogenetics to animal cytogenetics led by wide population studies which were conducted on Drosophila polytene chromosomes. The year of the publication (1937 became the point of irretrievable branching between the directions of Old World and New World genetics connected with the problems of chromosome variability and its significance for the evolution of the species. The famous book of T. Dobzhansky (1937 was published by Columbia University in the US under the title “Genetics and the origin of species”, and in the shadow of this American ‘skybuilding’ all other works grew dim. It is remarkable that both Dobzhansky and Dubinin come to similar conclusions about the role of chromosomes in speciation. This is not surprising given that they both might be considered as representatives of the Russian genetic school, by their birth and education. Interestingly, Dobzhansky had never referred to the full paper of Dubinin et al. (1937, though a previous short communication in Nature (1936 was included together with all former papers on the related subject. In full, the volume of the original publication printed in the Biological Journal in Moscow comprised 47 pages, in that number 41 pages of the Russian text accompanied by 16 Figs, a table and reference list, and, above all, 6 pages of the English summary. This final part in English is now reproduced in the authors’ version with the only addition being the reference list in the originally printed form.

  15. Chromosome assortment in Saccharum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Janabi, S M; Honeycutt, R J; Sobral, B W

    1994-12-01

    Recent work has revealed random chromosome pairing and assortment in Saccharum spontaneum L., the most widely distributed, and morphologically and cytologically variable of the species of Saccharum. This conclusion was based on the analysis of a segregating population from across between S. spontaneum 'SES 208' and a spontaneously-doubled haploid of itself, derived from anther culture. To determine whether polysomic inheritance is common in Saccharum and whether it is observed in a typical biparental cross, we studied chromosome pairing and assortment in 44 progeny of a cross between euploid, meiotically regular, 2n=80 forms of Saccharum officinarum 'LA Purple' and Saccharum robustum ' Mol 5829'. Papuan 2n=80 forms of S. robustum have been suggested as the immediate progenitor species for cultivated sugarcane (S. officinarum). A total of 738 loci in LA Purple and 720 loci in Mol 5829 were amplified and typed in the progeny by arbitrarily primed PCR using 45 primers. Fifty and 33 single-dose polymorphisms were identified in the S. officinarum and S. robustum genomes, respectively (χ 2 at 98%). Linkage analysis of single-dose polymorphisms in both genomes revealed linkages in repulsion and coupling phases. In the S. officinarum genome, a map hypothesis gave 7 linkage groups with 17 linked and 33 unlinked markers. Four of 13 pairwise linkages were in repulsion phase and 9 were in coupling phase. In the S. robustum genome, a map hypothesis gave 5 linkage groups, defined by 12 markers, with 21 markers unlinked, and 2 of 9 pairwise linkages were in repulsion phase. Therefore, complete polysomic inheritance was not observed in either species, suggesting that chromosomal behavior is different from that observed by linkage analysis of over 500 markers in the S. spontaneum map. Implications of this finding for evolution and breeding are discussed.

  16. Chromosomal variation in Argentine populations of Akodon montensis Thomas, 1913 (Rodentia, Cricetidae, Sigmodontinae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malleret, Matías Maximiliano; Labaroni, Carolina Alicia; García, Gabriela Verónica; Ferro, Juan Martín; Martí, Dardo Andrea; Lanzone, Cecilia

    2016-01-01

    The genus Akodon Meyen, 1833 is one of the most species-rich among sigmodontine rodents and has great chromosome variability. Akodon montensis has a relatively broad distribution in South America, and Argentine populations are located in the southernmost region of its range. Brazilian populations have important chromosomal variability, but cytogenetic data from Argentina are scarce. We performed a chromosome characterization of natural populations of Akodon montensis using conventional staining, C-banding, Ag-NORs and base-specific fluorochromes. A total of 31 specimens from five localities of Misiones Province, in Argentina, were analyzed. The 2n=24 chromosomes was the most frequently observed karyotype. However, five individuals presented 25 chromosomes due to a supernumerary B-chromosome; and one individual had 2n=26 due to one B plus a trisomy for chromosome 11. Additionally, two XY females and two variants of the X chromosomes were found. C-positive centromeric bands occurred in all chromosomes; additional C-bands were observed in some autosomes, the X, Y and B chromosomes. Ag-NORs were observed in five autosomes, and the B chromosome was frequently marked. Fluorochrome banding was similar among karyotypes of the analyzed populations. Comparisons of cytogenetic data among populations of Argentina and Brazil showed the presence of high intraspecific variability in Akodon montensis and some differences among regions.

  17. Effect of Vapor Flow on Jumping Droplets during Condensation on Superhydrophobic Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preston, Daniel J.; Miljkovic, Nenad; Enright, Ryan; Limia, Alexander; Wang, Evelyn N.

    2013-11-01

    Upon coalescence of droplets on a superhydrophobic surface, the net reduction in droplet surface area results in a release of surface energy that can cause the coalesced droplet to ``jump'' away from the surface. Jumping condensing surfaces have been shown to enhance condensation heat transfer by up to 30% compared to state-of-the-art dropwise condensing surfaces. While the heat transfer enhancement of jumping condensation is well documented, droplet behavior after departure from the surface has not been considered. Vapor flows to the condensing surface due to mass conservation. This flow can increase drag on departing droplets, resulting in complete droplet reversal and return to the surface. Upon return, these larger droplets impede heat transfer until they jump again or finally shed due to gravity. By characterizing individual droplet trajectories during condensation on hydrophobic nanostructured copper oxide surfaces for a variety of heat fluxes (q'' = 0.1 - 2 W/cm2), we showed that vapor flow entrainment dominates droplet motion for droplets smaller than R ~ 30 um at high heat fluxes (q'' >2 W/cm2). Furthermore, we developed an analytical model of droplet motion based on first principles and the Reynolds drag equation which agreed well with the experimental data. We considered condensation on both flat and tubular geometries with our model, and we suggest avenues to further enhance heat transfer which minimize droplet return due to entrainment.

  18. Droplet condensation and growth on nanotextured surfaces impregnated with an immiscible liquid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Sushant; Paxson, Adam; Smith, Jonathan; Dhiman, Rajeev; Varanasi, Kripa

    2012-02-01

    For effective dropwise condensation, a surface that sheds droplets easily is desirable due to the enhancement in accompanying heat transfer. Incorporating nano-textures on the surface can enhance the droplet shedding or spreading. We demonstrate that droplet shedding can be further influenced by impregnating the nano-textured surface with a liquid which is immiscible with respect to the droplet. In this study, the dynamics of dropwise condensation on such immiscible liquid impregnated nano-textured surfaces have been investigated in pure quiescent water vapor conditions. Condensation experiments were conducted using an Environmental Scanning Electron Microscope by controlling the chamber water vapor pressure and substrate temperature. We show preferential sites for condensation and different modes under which droplets grow, depending upon the surface chemistry, surface texture, and the impregnating liquid properties. Concurrently, we show an evolution of apparent contact angles during the condensation process on the impregnated surfaces.

  19. Progress of the synthesis of condensed pyrazole derivatives (from 2010 to mid-2013).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Meng; Zhao, Bao-Xiang

    2014-10-06

    Condensed pyrazole derivatives are important heterocyclic compounds due to their excellent biological activities and have been widely applied in pharmaceutical and agromedical fields. In recent years, numerous condensed pyrazole derivatives have been synthesized and advanced to clinic studies with various biological activities. In this review, we summarized the reported synthesis methods of condensed pyrazole derivatives from 2010 until now. All compounds are divided into three parts according to the rings connected to pyrazole-ring, i.e. [5, 5], [5,F 6], and [5, 7]-condensed pyrazole derivatives. The biological activities and applications in pharmaceutical fields are briefly introduced to offer an orientation for the design and synthesis of condensed pyrazole derivatives with good biological activities.

  20. Condensation on slippery asymmetric bumps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kyoo-Chul; Kim, Philseok; Grinthal, Alison; He, Neil; Fox, David; Weaver, James C.; Aizenberg, Joanna

    2016-03-01

    Controlling dropwise condensation is fundamental to water-harvesting systems, desalination, thermal power generation, air conditioning, distillation towers, and numerous other applications. For any of these, it is essential to design surfaces that enable droplets to grow rapidly and to be shed as quickly as possible. However, approaches based on microscale, nanoscale or molecular-scale textures suffer from intrinsic trade-offs that make it difficult to optimize both growth and transport at once. Here we present a conceptually different design approach—based on principles derived from Namib desert beetles, cacti, and pitcher plants—that synergistically combines these aspects of condensation and substantially outperforms other synthetic surfaces. Inspired by an unconventional interpretation of the role of the beetle’s bumpy surface geometry in promoting condensation, and using theoretical modelling, we show how to maximize vapour diffusion fluxat the apex of convex millimetric bumps by optimizing the radius of curvature and cross-sectional shape. Integrating this apex geometry with a widening slope, analogous to cactus spines, directly couples facilitated droplet growth with fast directional transport, by creating a free-energy profile that drives the droplet down the slope before its growth rate can decrease. This coupling is further enhanced by a slippery, pitcher-plant-inspired nanocoating that facilitates feedback between coalescence-driven growth and capillary-driven motion on the way down. Bumps that are rationally designed to integrate these mechanisms are able to grow and transport large droplets even against gravity and overcome the effect of an unfavourable temperature gradient. We further observe an unprecedented sixfold-higher exponent of growth rate, faster onset, higher steady-state turnover rate, and a greater volume of water collected compared to other surfaces. We envision that this fundamental understanding and rational design strategy can be

  1. Chromosomal aberrations in ISS crew members

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johannes, Christian; Goedecke, Wolfgang; Antonopoulos, Alexandra

    2012-07-01

    High energy radiation is a major risk factor in manned space missions. Astronauts and cosmonauts are exposed to ionising radiations of cosmic and solar origin, while on the Earth's surface people are well protected by the atmosphere and a deflecting magnetic field. There are now data available describing the dose and the quality of ionising radiation on-board of the International Space Station (ISS). Nonetheless, the effect of increased radiation dose on mutation rates of ISS crew members are hard to predict. Therefore, direct measurements of mutation rates are required in order to better estimate the radiation risk for longer duration missions. The analysis of chromosomal aberrations in peripheral blood lymphocytes is a well established method to measure radiation-induced mutations. We present data of chromosome aberration analyses from lymphocyte metaphase spreads of ISS crew members participating in short term (10-14 days) or long term (around 6 months) missions. From each subject we received two blood samples. The first sample was drawn about 10 days before launch and a second one within 3 days after return from flight. From lymphocyte cultures metaphase plates were prepared on glass slides. Giemsa stained and in situ hybridised metaphases were scored for chromosome changes in pre-flight and post-flight blood samples and the mutation rates were compared. Results obtained in chromosomal studies on long-term flight crew members showed pronounced inter-individual differences in the response to elevated radiation levels. Overall slight but significant elevations of typical radiation induced aberrations, i.e., dicentric chromosomes and reciprocal translocations have been observed. Our data indicate no elevation of mutation rates due to short term stays on-board the ISS.

  2. Quantum tunnelling in condensed media

    CERN Document Server

    Kagan, Yu

    1992-01-01

    The essays in this book deal with of the problem of quantum tunnelling and related behavior of a microscopic or macroscopic system, which interacts strongly with an ""environment"" - this being some form of condensed matter. The ""system"" in question need not be physically distinct from its environment, but could, for example, be one particular degree of freedom on which attention is focussed, as in the case of the Josephson junction studied in several of the papers. This general problem has been studied in many hundreds, if not thousands, of articles in the literature, in contexts as diverse

  3. Velocity condensation for magnetotactic bacteria

    CERN Document Server

    Rupprecht, Jean-Francois; Bocquet, Lydéric

    2015-01-01

    Magnetotactic swimmers tend to align along magnetic field lines against stochastic reorientations. We show that the swimming strategy, e.g. active Brownian motion versus run-and-tumble dynamics, strongly affects the orientation statistics. The latter can exhibit a velocity condensation whereby the alignment probability density diverges. As a consequence, we find that the swimming strategy affects the nature of the phase transition to collective motion, indicating that L\\'evy run-and-tumble walks can outperform active Brownian processes as strategies to trigger collective behavior.

  4. Dropwise Condensation on Hydrophobic Cylinders

    CERN Document Server

    Park, Kyoo-Chul; Hoang, Michelle; McManus, Brendan; Aizenberg, Joanna

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we studied the effect of the diameter of horizontal hydrophobic cylinders on droplet growth. We postulate that the concentration gradient created by natural convection around a horizontal circular cylinder is related to the droplet growth on the cylinder by condensation. We derive a simple scaling law of droplet growth and compare it with experimental results. The predicted negative exponent of drop diameter (d) as a function of cylinder diameter (D) at different time points is similar to the general trend of experimental data. Further, this effect of cylinder diameter on droplet growth is observed to be stronger than the supersaturation conditions created by different surface temperatures.

  5. Chromosome Connections: Compelling Clues to Common Ancestry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flammer, Larry

    2013-01-01

    Students compare banding patterns on hominid chromosomes and see striking evidence of their common ancestry. To test this, human chromosome no. 2 is matched with two shorter chimpanzee chromosomes, leading to the hypothesis that human chromosome 2 resulted from the fusion of the two shorter chromosomes. Students test that hypothesis by looking for…

  6. Chromosomal rearrangement interferes with meiotic X chromosome inactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homolka, David; Ivanek, Robert; Capkova, Jana; Jansa, Petr; Forejt, Jiri

    2007-10-01

    Heterozygosity for certain mouse and human chromosomal rearrangements is characterized by the incomplete meiotic synapsis of rearranged chromosomes, by their colocalization with the XY body in primary spermatocytes, and by male-limited sterility. Previously, we argued that such X-autosomal associations could interfere with meiotic sex chromosome inactivation. Recently, supporting evidence has reported modifications of histones in rearranged chromosomes by a process called the meiotic silencing of unsynapsed chromatin (MSUC). Here, we report on the transcriptional down-regulation of genes within the unsynapsed region of the rearranged mouse chromosome 17, and on the subsequent disturbance of X chromosome inactivation. The partial transcriptional suppression of genes in the unsynapsed chromatin was most prominent prior to the mid-pachytene stage of primary spermatocytes. Later, during the mid-late pachytene, the rearranged autosomes colocalized with the XY body, and the X chromosome failed to undergo proper transcriptional silencing. Our findings provide direct evidence on the MSUC acting at the mRNA level, and implicate that autosomal asynapsis in meiosis may cause male sterility by interfering with meiotic sex chromosome inactivation.

  7. The physics of exciton-polariton condensates

    CERN Document Server

    Lagoudakis, Konstantinos

    2013-01-01

    In 2006 researchers created the first polariton Bose-Einstein condensate at 19K in the solid state. Being inherently open quantum systems, polariton condensates open a window into the unpredictable world of physics beyond the “fifth state of matter”: the limited lifetime of polaritons renders polariton condensates out-of-equilibrium and provides a fertile test-bed for non-equilibrium physics. This book presents an experimental investigation into exciting features arising from this non-equilibrium behavior. Through careful experimentation, the author demonstrates the ability of polaritons to synchronize and create a single energy delocalized condensate. Under certain disorder and excitation conditions the complete opposite case of coexisting spatially overlapping condensates may be observed. The author provides the first demonstration of quantized vortices in polariton condensates and the first observation of fractional vortices with full phase and amplitude characterization. Finally, this book investigate...

  8. Bio-oil fractionation and condensation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Robert C.; Jones, Samuel T.; Pollard, Anthony

    2017-04-04

    The present invention relates to a method of fractionating bio-oil vapors which involves providing bio-oil vapors comprising bio-oil constituents. The bio-oil vapors are cooled in a first stage which comprises a condenser having passages for the bio-oil separated by a heat conducting wall from passages for a coolant. The coolant in the condenser of the first stage is maintained at a substantially constant temperature, set at a temperature in the range of 75 to 100.degree. C., to condense a first liquid fraction of liquefied bio-oil constituents in the condenser of the first stage. The first liquid fraction of liquified bio-oil constituents from the condenser in the first stage is collected. Also disclosed are steps for subsequently recovering further liquid fractions of liquefied bio-oil constituents. Particular compositions of bio-oil condensation products are also described.

  9. Bio-oil fractionation and condensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Robert C; Jones, Samuel T; Pollard, Anthony

    2013-07-02

    A method of fractionating bio-oil vapors which involves providing bio-oil vapors comprising bio-oil constituents is described. The bio-oil vapors are cooled in a first stage which comprises a condenser having passages for the bio-oil separated by a heat conducting wall from passages for a coolant. The coolant in the condenser of the first stage is maintained at a substantially constant temperature, set at a temperature in the range of 75 to 100.degree. C., to condense a first liquid fraction of liquefied bio-oil constituents in the condenser of the first stage. The first liquid fraction of liquified bio-oil constituents from the condenser in the first stage is collected. Also described are steps for subsequently recovering further liquid fractions of liquefied bio-oil constituents. Particular compositions of bio-oil condensation products are also described.

  10. Dynamics of a condensing liquid film under conjoining/disjoining pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oron, Alexander; Bankoff, S. George

    2001-05-01

    The dynamics of a condensing apolar ultrathin liquid film is studied in the framework of long-wave theory in the cases of both horizontal and slightly tilted solid coated surfaces. When condensation is slow, the film on a horizontal substrate passes through the stages of hole opening driven by the "reverse reservoir effect," hole closing, eventual thickness equilibration and further spatially uniform growth of the condensate. When condensation is faster and the resistance to phase change is lower, secondary droplet(s) may emerge within the hole. During the film evolution the thickness of the microlayer covering the hole remains practically constant due to the "reverse reservoir effect." The total heat flux across the condensate film is found to decrease with the absolute value of the condensation constant. When the solid substrate is tilted, the film dynamics exhibits the formation of multidrop structures and their coarsening along with the stages typical for the horizontal case. The increase of the tilt angle leads to faster transition from dropwise to filmwise condensation and to the increase of the total heat flux through the condensate.

  11. An Experimental Study of the Dropwise Condensation on Physically Processed Surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Jaeyoung; Chang, Soonheung [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Watanabe, N.; Sambuichi, T.; Shiota, D.; Aritomi, M. [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo (Japan)

    2013-05-15

    Recent research by Kawakubo et al. derived empirical condensation heat transfer correlation suitable for wider range of operating condition in presence of non-condensable gas. However, their proposals of PCCS are focused on plane tube surface. To design better PCCS heat exchanger with high heat transfer coefficient new treatment on condensation surface can be considered in order to maintain dropwise condensation, the heat transfer coefficient of which has an order of magnitude larger than those of film condensation. Advanced research measure dropwise condensation heat transfer coefficient of Au and Cr coated surface based on number of droplet and droplet growth rate. However, coated surface is not desirable in power plant due to its duration of few years. On the other hand, physical processing (micro holes and patterns) on stainless steel and titanium surface is expected to perform better heat transfer, also is durable for the whole reactor lifetime. Since there is no published research about dropwise condensation for physically processed surface on SUS and Ti, the purposes of this research are to measure the condensation heat transfer coefficient and analyze its mechanism of enhanced heat transfer of treated SUS and Ti commonly used to nuclear plant. In the comparison of theoretical equation and experiment, it shows same result that heat transfer coefficient is proportional to maximum droplet diameter power to -0.321. Moreover, in the comparison of bare and processed surface, heat transfer coefficient decreases in processed surface.

  12. Muonic Chemistry in Condensed Matter

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    When polarized muons (@m|+) stop in condensed matter, muonic atoms are formed in the final part of their range, and direct measurements of the @m|+-spin polarization are possible via the asymmetric decay into positrons. The hyperfine interaction determines the characteristic precession frequencies of the @m|+ spin in muonium, @w(Mu). Such frequencies can be altered by the interactions of the muonium's electron spin with the surrounding medium. The measurement of @w(Mu) in a condensed system is known often to provide unique information regarding the system. \\\\ \\\\ In particular, the use of muonium atoms as a light isotope of the simple reactive radical H|0 allows the investigation of fast reactions of radicals over a typical time scale 10|-|9~@$<$~t~@$<$~10|-|5~sec, which is determined by the instrumental resolution at one end and by the @m|+ lifetime at the other. \\\\ \\\\ In biological macromolecules transient radicals, such as the constituents of DNA itself, exist on a time scale of sub-microseconds, acco...

  13. Condensation induced water hammer safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gintner, M.A.

    1997-03-10

    Condensation induced water hammer events in piping systems can cause catastrophic steam system failures which can result in equipment damage, personal injury, and even death. As an industry, we have learned to become accustomed to the ''banging'' that we often hear in our steam piping systems, and complacent in our actions to prevent it. It is unfortunate that lives are lost needlessly, as this type of water hammer event is preventable if one only applies some basic principles when operating and maintaining their steam systems. At the U. S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site where I work, there was one such accident that occurred in 1993 which took the life of a former co-worker and friend of mine. Hanford was established as part of the Manhattan Project during World War II. it is a 560 square mile complex located along the banks of the Columbia River in Southeastern Washington State. For almost 45 years, hanford's mission was to produce weapons grade plutonium for our nations defense programs. Today, Hanford no longer produces plutonium, but is focused on site clean-up and economic diversification. Hanford still uses steam for heating and processing activities, utilizing over 20 miles of piping distribution systems similar to those found in industry. Although these aging systems are still sound, they cannot stand up to the extreme pressure pulses developed by a condensation induced water hammer.

  14. DNA condensation in one dimension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardatscher, Günther; Bracha, Dan; Daube, Shirley S.; Vonshak, Ohad; Simmel, Friedrich C.; Bar-Ziv, Roy H.

    2016-12-01

    DNA can be programmed to assemble into a variety of shapes and patterns on the nanoscale and can act as a template for hybrid nanostructures such as conducting wires, protein arrays and field-effect transistors. Current DNA nanostructures are typically in the sub-micrometre range, limited by the sequence space and length of the assembled strands. Here we show that on a patterned biochip, DNA chains collapse into one-dimensional (1D) fibres that are 20 nm wide and around 70 µm long, each comprising approximately 35 co-aligned chains at its cross-section. Electron beam writing on a photocleavable monolayer was used to immobilize and pattern the DNA molecules, which condense into 1D bundles in the presence of spermidine. DNA condensation can propagate and split at junctions, cross gaps and create domain walls between counterpropagating fronts. This system is inherently adept at solving probabilistic problems and was used to find the possible paths through a maze and to evaluate stochastic switching circuits. This technique could be used to propagate biological or ionic signals in combination with sequence-specific DNA nanotechnology or for gene expression in cell-free DNA compartments.

  15. The Barley Chromosome 5 Linkage Map

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, J.; Jørgensen, Jørgen Helms

    1975-01-01

    The literature is surveyed for data on recombination between loci on chromosome 5 of barley; 13 loci fall into the category “mapped” loci, more than 20 into the category “associated” loci and nine into the category “loci once suggested to be on chromosome 5”. A procedure was developed...... for estimating a linkage map; it involves (1) transformation by the Kosambi mapping function of the available recombination percentages to additive map distances, (2) calculations of a set of map distances from the transformed recombination percentages by a maximum likelihood method in which all the available...... data are utilized jointly, and (3) omission of inconsistent data and determination of the most likely order of the loci. This procedure was applied to the 42 recombination percentages available for the 13 “mapped” loci. Due to inconsistencies 14 of the recombination percentages and, therefore, two...

  16. Calculation in Orifice Plate of CEFR Condensate Water Recycling System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG; Yi-min

    2012-01-01

    <正>In order to avoid condensation water pump occurring cavitation due to the flow is too small and affect the normal operation of pump when the startup or shutdown in the unit, low load or accident under empty load operation, recirculation loop should maintain a certain flow, to ensure that the shaft seal heater has enough cooling water, recirculation flow is not less than 20 t/h.

  17. Monopole Condensation and Confinement in SU(2) QCD (1)

    CERN Document Server

    Shiba, H; Shiba, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Tsuneo

    1993-01-01

    An effective monopole action is derived from vacuum configurations after abelian projection in the maximally abelian gauge in $SU(2)$ QCD. Entropy dominance over energy of monopole loops is seen on the renormalized lattice with the spacing $b>b_c\\simeq 5.2\\times10^{-3} \\Lambda_L^{-1}$ when the physical volume of the system is large enough. QCD confinement may be interpreted as the (dual) Meissner effect due to the monopole condensation.

  18. Contribution of cloud condensate to surface rainfall process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Yushu; CUI Xiaopeng; LI Xiaofan

    2006-01-01

    Contribution of cloud condensate to surface rainfall processes is investigated in a life span of tropical convection based on hourly data from a two-dimensional cloud resolving simulation. The model is forced by the large-scale vertical velocity, zonal wind and horizontal advections obtained from tropical ocean global atmosphere coupled ocean-atmosphere response experiment (TOGA COARE). The results show that during the genesis, development, and decay of tropical convection, calculations with water vapor overestimate surface rain rate, and cloud condensate plays an important role in correcting overestimation in surface rain rates. The analysis is carried out in deep convective clouds and anvil clouds during the development of tropical convection. The surface rain rates calculated with water vapor in deep convective clouds and anvil clouds have similar magnitudes, the large surface rain rate appears in deep convective clouds due to the consumption of water hydrorneteors whereas the small surface rain rate occurs in anvil clouds because of the gain of ice hydrometeors. Further analysis of the grid data shows that the surface rain rates calculated with water vapor and with cloud condensate are negatively correlated with the correlation coefficient of - 0.85, and the surface rain rate calculated with cloud condensate is mainly contributed to the water hydrometeors in the tropical deep convective regime.

  19. Lorentz violation and Condensed Matter Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Ajaib, Muhammad Adeel

    2014-01-01

    We present heuristic arguments that hint to a possible connection of Lorentz violation with observed phenomenon in condensed matter physics. Various references from condensed matter literature are cited where operators in the Standard Model Extension (SME) appear to be enhanced. Based on this we propose that, in the non-relativistic limit, Lorentz violation in the context of the SME exhibits itself in various condensed matter systems.

  20. Van der Waals Interactions and Exciton Condensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handel, P. H.; Kittel, C.

    1971-01-01

    It is shown that the van der Waals interaction can lead at low temperatures to a condensed state of excitons with properties in qualitative agreement with the observations of exciton droplets. Our calculation gives a binding energy of the correct sign and magnitude for the exciton condensate. In a diclectric medium, the strong enhancement of the exciton polarizability leads to a giant van der Waals interaction, and this interaction appears to make possible a condensed exciton phase. PMID:16591958

  1. Ultra-low threshold polariton condensation

    CERN Document Server

    Steger, Mark; Alberi, Kirstin; Mascarenhas, Angelo; Snoke, David W; Pfeiffer, Loren N; West, Ken

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate condensation of microcavity polaritons with a very sharp threshold occuring at two orders of magnitude lower pump intensity than previous demonstrations of condensation. The long cavity-lifetime and trapping and pumping geometries are crucial to the realization of this low threshold. Polariton condensation, or "polariton lasing" has long been proposed as a promising source of coherent light at lower threshold than traditional lasing, and these results suggest methods to bring this threshold even lower.

  2. Structure of Nonlocal Vacuum Condensate of Quarks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周丽娟; 马维兴

    2003-01-01

    The Dyson-Schwinger formalism is used to derive a fully dressed quark propagator. By use of the derived form of the quark propagator, the structure of non-local quark vacuum condensate is studied, and the values of local quark vacuum condensate as well as quark gluon mixed condensate are calculated. The theoretical predictions are in good agreement with the empirical one used commonly in the literature.

  3. Enhanced condensation heat transfer with wettability patterning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha Mahapatra, Pallab; Ghosh, Aritra; Ganguly, Ranjan; Megaridis, Constantine

    2015-11-01

    Condensation of water vapor on metal surfaces is useful for many engineering applications. A facile and scalable method is proposed for removing condensate from a vertical plate during dropwise condensation (DWC) in the presence of non-condensable gases (NCG). We use wettability-patterned superhydrophilic tracks (filmwise condensing domains) on a mirror-finish (hydrophilic) aluminum surface that promotes DWC. Tapered, horizontal ``collection'' tracks are laid to create a Laplace pressure driven flow, which collects condensate from the mirror-finish domains and sends it to vertical ``drainage tracks'' for gravity-induced shedding. An optimal design is achieved by changing the fractional area of superhydrophilic tracks with respect to the overall plate surface, and augmenting capillary-driven condensate-drainage by adjusting the track spatial layout. The design facilitates pump-less condensate drainage and enhances DWC heat transfer on the mirror-finish regions. The study highlights the relative influences of the promoting and retarding effects of dropwise and filmwise condensation zones on the overall heat transfer improvement on the substrate. The study demonstrated ~ 34% heat transfer improvement on Aluminum surface for the optimized design.

  4. Advances in modelling of condensation phenomena

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, W.S.; Zaltsgendler, E. [Ontario Hydro Nuclear, Toronto (Canada); Hanna, B. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Pinawa, Manitoba (Canada)

    1997-07-01

    The physical parameters in the modelling of condensation phenomena in the CANDU reactor system codes are discussed. The experimental programs used for thermal-hydraulic code validation in the Canadian nuclear industry are briefly described. The modelling of vapour generation and in particular condensation plays a key role in modelling of postulated reactor transients. The condensation models adopted in the current state-of-the-art two-fluid CANDU reactor thermal-hydraulic system codes (CATHENA and TUF) are described. As examples of the modelling challenges faced, the simulation of a cold water injection experiment by CATHENA and the simulation of a condensation induced water hammer experiment by TUF are described.

  5. X chromosome inactivation and X-linked mental retardation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willard, H.F. [Case Western Reserve Univ. School of Medicine, Cleveland, OH (United States)]|[Univ. Hospitals of Cleveland, OH (United States)

    1996-07-12

    The expression of X-linked genes in females heterozygous for X-linked defects can be modulated by epigenetic control mechanisms that constitute the X chromosome inactivation pathway. At least four different effects have been found to influence, in females, the phenotypic expression of genes responsible for X-linked mental retardation (XLMR). First, non-random X inactivation, due either to stochastic or genetic factors, can result in tissues in which one cell type (for example, that in which the X chromosome carrying a mutant XLMR gene is active) dominates, instead of the normal mosaic cell population expected as a result of random X inactivation. Second, skewed inactivation of the normal X in individuals carrying a deletion of part of the X chromosome has been documented in a number of mentally retarded females. Third, functional disomy of X-linked genes that are expressed inappropriately due to the absence of X inactivation has been found in mentally retarded females with structurally abnormal X chromosomes that do not contain the X inactivation center. And fourth, dose-dependent overexpression of X-linked genes that normally {open_quotes}escape{close_quotes} X inactivation may account for the mental and developmental delay associated with increasing numbers of otherwise inactive X chromosomes in individuals with X chromosome aneuploidy. 53 refs., 1 fig.

  6. Cohesin in determining chromosome architecture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haering, Christian H., E-mail: christian.haering@embl.de [Cell Biology and Biophysics Unit, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), Heidelberg (Germany); Jessberger, Rolf, E-mail: rolf.jessberger@tu-dresden.de [Institute of Physiological Chemistry, Dresden University of Technology, Dresden (Germany)

    2012-07-15

    Cells use ring-like structured protein complexes for various tasks in DNA dynamics. The tripartite cohesin ring is particularly suited to determine chromosome architecture, for it is large and dynamic, may acquire different forms, and is involved in several distinct nuclear processes. This review focuses on cohesin's role in structuring chromosomes during mitotic and meiotic cell divisions and during interphase.

  7. Bloom syndrome and maternal uniparental disomy for chromosome 15

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woodage, T.; Prasad, M.; Trent, R.J.; Smith, A. (Children' s Hospital, Camperdown, New South Wales (New Zealand)); Dixon, J.W.; Romain, D.R.; Columbano-Green, L.M.; Selby, R.E. (Wellington Hospital (New Zealand)); Graham, D. (Waikato Hospital, Hamilton (New Zealand)); Rogan, P.K. (Pennsylvania State Univ., Hershey, PA (United States)) (and others)

    1994-07-01

    Bloom syndrome (BS) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by increases in the frequency of sister-chromatid exchange and in the incidence of malignancy. Chromosome-transfer studies have shown the BS locus to map to chromosome 15q. This report describes a subject with features of both BS and Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS). Molecular analysis showed maternal uniparental disomy for chromosome 15. Meiotic recombination between the two disomic chromosomes 15 has resulted in heterodisomy for proximal 15q and isodisomy for distal 15q. In this individual BS is probably due to homozygosity for a gene that is telomeric to D15S95 (15q25), rather than to genetic imprinting, the mechanism responsible for the development of PWS. This report represents the first application of disomy analysis to the regional localization of a disease gene. This strategy promises to be useful in the genetic mapping of other uncommon autosomal recessive conditions. 37 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Apoptosis preferentially eliminates irradiated g0 human lymphocytes bearing dicentric chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belloni, P; Meschini, R; Lewinska, D; Palitti, F

    2008-02-01

    G(0) human peripheral blood lymphocytes were X-irradiated to determine whether there is a direct relationship between radiation-induced dicentric chromosomes and the triggering of apoptosis. Immediately after X-ray exposure, control and irradiated lymphocytes were analyzed for viability, apoptosis and chromosome damage using the premature chromosome condensation technique. A batch of lymphocytes was kept in liquid holding for 48 h and then loaded on Ficoll-Paque medium to separate apoptotic (high-density) and normal (normal-density) cells. Then the same end points were analyzed in high-density and normal-density fractions of control and irradiated lymphocytes. After 48 h of liquid holding, the majority of apoptotic cells contained dicentric chromosomes. These results demonstrate that in human lymphocytes, the type of chromosome damage influences the induction of programmed cell death and provide direct evidence that cells bearing dicentrics are eliminated by apoptosis. G0 lymphocytes are the most common tissue used in biodosimetry studies, and the amount of chromosomal damage detected depends on the time between exposure and sampling. Since the radiation-induced apoptotic cells show the presence of dicentrics, radiation-induced damage can be underestimated. These results may have relevance in evaluations of the efficacy of radiotherapy based on the frequencies of chromosomal aberrations.

  9. PRESANTATION OF A FAST TECHNICS FOR THE DESCRIPTION OF THE CHROMOSOMIC CHART OF A VEGETABLE SPECIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria ABDUL HUSSAIN

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available The caryologic technics aim to determine the level of polyploidy of a population or a species. The information brought for the knowledge of the chromosomal number of a species, is of various nature. Thus for several years the caryology has made it possible to better understand the taxonomy of a species, its tendencies evolutionary, its geographical distribution and the phenomena of its speciation [16]. Any time the chromosomal number, although being able to characterize a plant or a group of plants is not a character constant.It can vary inside a group, tribe, family or kind, and within same species[12,15,16]. The technics of identification of the most known chromosomes are: traditional technics based on the histological cut, the Technics of Feulgen which has like action to colour in purple red the DNA chromosomal [6,7,8] and technics of bands or mechanisms that it brings into play are related to the physicochemical properties of the chromatin and the condensed form of the chromosomes. To highlight the chromosomes of a species we observed somatic mitosis carried out bolsters of young roots. The principal stages of the technics has to follow are: the pretreatment, fixing, storage, the hydrolysis, colouring, the assembly and observation. All this work was completed on young roots of Solanum sodomeum L. or the number of the chromosome is still questioned.

  10. Genetics Home Reference: Y chromosome infertility

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Health Conditions Y chromosome infertility Y chromosome infertility Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... PDF Open All Close All Description Y chromosome infertility is a condition that affects the production of ...

  11. DEAD-box RNA helicase Belle/DDX3 and the RNA interference pathway promote mitotic chromosome segregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pek, Jun Wei; Kai, Toshie

    2011-07-19

    During mitosis, faithful inheritance of genetic material is achieved by chromosome segregation, as mediated by the condensin I and II complexes. Failed chromosome segregation can result in neoplasm formation, infertility, and birth defects. Recently, the germ-line-specific DEAD-box RNA helicase Vasa was demonstrated to promote mitotic chromosome segregation in Drosophila by facilitating robust chromosomal localization of Barren (Barr), a condensin I component. This mitotic function of Vasa is mediated by Aubergine and Spindle-E, which are two germ-line components of the Piwi-interacting RNA pathway. Faithful segregation of chromosomes should be executed both in germ-line and somatic cells. However, whether a similar mechanism also functions in promoting chromosome segregation in somatic cells has not been elucidated. Here, we present evidence that belle (vasa paralog) and the RNA interference pathway regulate chromosome segregation in Drosophila somatic cells. During mitosis, belle promotes robust Barr chromosomal localization and chromosome segregation. Belle's localization to condensing chromosomes depends on dicer-2 and argonaute2. Coimmunoprecipitation experiments indicated that Belle interacts with Barr and Argonaute2 and is enriched at endogenous siRNA (endo-siRNA)-generating loci. Our results suggest that Belle functions in promoting chromosome segregation in Drosophila somatic cells via the endo-siRNA pathway. DDX3 (human homolog of belle) and DICER function in promoting chromosome segregation and hCAP-H (human homolog of Barr) localization in HeLa cells, indicating a conserved function for those proteins in human cells. Our results suggest that the RNA helicase Belle/DDX3 and the RNA interference pathway perform a common role in regulating chromosome segregation in Drosophila and human somatic cells.

  12. Higher order structure of chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, T A; Comings, D E

    1979-04-01

    Isolated Chinese hamster metaphase chromosomes were resuspended in 4 M ammonium acetate and spread on a surface of distilled water or 0.15 to 0.5 M ammonium acetate. The DNA was released in the form of a regular series of rosettes connected by interrossette DNA. The mean length of the rosette DNA was 14 micron, similar to the mean length of 10 micron for chromomere DNA of Drosophila polytene chromosomes. The mean interrosette DNA was 4.2 micron. SDS gel electrophoresis of the chromosomal nonhistone proteins showed them to be very similar to nuclear nonhistone proteins except for the presence of more actin and tubulin. Nuclear matrix proteins were present in the chromosomes and may play a role in forming the rosettes. Evidence that the rosette pattern is artifactual versus the possibility that it represents a real organizational substructure of the chromosomes is reviewed.

  13. Bacterial chromosome organization and segregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badrinarayanan, Anjana; Le, Tung B K; Laub, Michael T

    2015-01-01

    If fully stretched out, a typical bacterial chromosome would be nearly 1 mm long, approximately 1,000 times the length of a cell. Not only must cells massively compact their genetic material, but they must also organize their DNA in a manner that is compatible with a range of cellular processes, including DNA replication, DNA repair, homologous recombination, and horizontal gene transfer. Recent work, driven in part by technological advances, has begun to reveal the general principles of chromosome organization in bacteria. Here, drawing on studies of many different organisms, we review the emerging picture of how bacterial chromosomes are structured at multiple length scales, highlighting the functions of various DNA-binding proteins and the impact of physical forces. Additionally, we discuss the spatial dynamics of chromosomes, particularly during their segregation to daughter cells. Although there has been tremendous progress, we also highlight gaps that remain in understanding chromosome organization and segregation.

  14. Chromosome choreography: the meiotic ballet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Scott L; Hawley, R Scott

    2003-08-08

    The separation of homologous chromosomes during meiosis in eukaryotes is the physical basis of Mendelian inheritance. The core of the meiotic process is a specialized nuclear division (meiosis I) in which homologs pair with each other, recombine, and then segregate from each other. The processes of chromosome alignment and pairing allow for homolog recognition. Reciprocal meiotic recombination ensures meiotic chromosome segregation by converting sister chromatid cohesion into mechanisms that hold homologous chromosomes together. Finally, the ability of sister kinetochores to orient to a single pole at metaphase I allows the separation of homologs to two different daughter cells. Failures to properly accomplish this elegant chromosome dance result in aneuploidy, a major cause of miscarriage and birth defects in human beings.

  15. Assessment of Modified Wall Condensation Models of MARS-KS and SPACE Codes using Reflux Condensation Test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kyung Won; Cheong, Ae Ju; Suh, Duk SUH [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    The wall condensation models of MARS-KS and SPACE codes adopt the Colburn-Hougen diffusion method to solve for the liquid-gas interface temperature in the presence of noncondensable (NC) gases. Recent studies reported that there was an error in the vapor mass flux term when the models were implemented in the codes. This error causes the codes to underestimate the steam condensation rate. This tendency becomes more noticeable with the increase in the mole fraction of NC gases. In this study, we assess the modified condensation model of MARS-KS and SPACE codes. The calculation results of modified version of the codes (MARS-KS 1.3r1 and SPACE 2.16r1) are compared to those of the original version (MARS-KS 1.3 and SPACE 2.14) and the experimental data. The modified model predicts higher heat fluxes and HTCs than the original model due to the increase in the steam condensation rate. At relatively high air mass fraction, the modified model increases the discrepancy between the measured data and calculated values.

  16. Depletion of superfluidity in a disordered non-equilibrium quantum condensate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janot, Alexander; Rosenow, Bernd [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Universitaet Leipzig, 04009 Leipzig (Germany); Hyart, Timo [Institute of Physics, Leiden University, Niels Bohrweg 2, 2333 CA Leiden (Netherlands); Eastham, Paul [School of Physics, Trinity College, Dublin 2 (Ireland)

    2013-07-01

    Observations of quantum coherence in driven systems, e.g. polariton condensates, have strongly stimulated experimental as well as theoretical efforts during the last decade. We analyze the superfluid stiffness of a non-equilibrium quantum-condensate in a disordered environment taking gain and loss of particles into account. To this end a modified effective Gross-Pitaevskii equation is employed. We find that the disorder-driven depletion of superfluidity is strongly enhanced due to the gain-loss mechanism. It turns out that the condensate remains stiff at finite length scales only.

  17. Electron beam heating effects during environmental scanning electron microscopy imaging of water condensation on superhydrophobic surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rykaczewski, K.; Scott, J. H. J.; Fedorov, A. G.

    2011-02-01

    Superhydrophobic surfaces (SHSs) show promise as promoters of dropwise condensation. Droplets with diameters below ˜10 μm account for the majority of the heat transferred during dropwise condensation but their growth dynamics on SHS have not been systematically studied. Due to the complex topography of the surface environmental scanning electron microscopy is the preferred method for observing the growth dynamics of droplets in this size regime. By studying electron beam heating effects on condensed water droplets we establish a magnification limit below which the heating effects are negligible and use this insight to study the mechanism of individual drop growth.

  18. Dual-species Bose-Einstein condensate of Rb87 and Cs133

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarron, D. J.; Cho, H. W.; Jenkin, D. L.; Köppinger, M. P.; Cornish, S. L.

    2011-07-01

    We report the formation of a dual-species Bose-Einstein condensate of Rb87 and Cs133 in the same trapping potential. Our method exploits the efficient sympathetic cooling of Cs133 via elastic collisions with Rb87, initially in a magnetic quadrupole trap and subsequently in a levitated optical trap. The two condensates each contain up to 2×104 atoms and exhibit a striking phase separation, revealing the mixture to be immiscible due to strong repulsive interspecies interactions. Sacrificing all the Rb87 during the cooling, we create single-species Cs133 condensates of up to 6×104 atoms.

  19. CFD simulation of aerosol deposition in a single tube of a passive containment condenser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ludwig, W.; Brown, D.P.; Jokiniemi, J.K. [VTT Energy, Aerosol Technology Group (Finland); Gamble, R.E. [General Electric Company, San Jose, CA (United States)

    2001-07-01

    The aim of this work is to study aerosol particle deposition in a single tube of the AIDA (Aerosol Impaction and Deposition Analysis) condenser test facility (Ludwig, 2000) and the full scale PCC (Passive Containment Condenser) of an ESBWR plant. This condenser utilizes natural circulation, which results in significant simplification due to the reduction of active components (e.g. pumps, valves etc.) in the reactor control system. After a severe core melt accident aerosol particles are likely to be generated. Deposition is an essential aspect of the source term prediction for severe core melt accidents. (author)

  20. Mechanisms of telomere loss and their consequences for chromosome instability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keiko eMuraki

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The ends of chromosomes in mammals, called telomeres, are composed of a 6 base pair repeat sequence, TTAGGG, which is added on by the enzyme telomerase. In combination with a protein complex called shelterin, these telomeric repeat sequences form a cap that protects the ends of chromosomes. Due to insufficient telomerase expression, telomeres shorten gradually with each cell division in human somatic cells, which limits the number of times they can divide. The extensive cell division involved in cancer cell progression therefore requires that cancer cells must acquire the ability to maintain telomeres, either through expression of telomerase, or through an alternative mechanism involving recombination. It is commonly thought that the source of many chromosome rearrangements in cancer cells is a result of the extensive telomere shortening that occurs prior to the expression of telomerase. However, despite the expression of telomerase, tumor cells can continue to show chromosome instability due to telomere loss. Dysfunctional telomeres in cancer cells can result from oncogene-induced replication stress, which results in double-strand breaks (DSBs at fragile sites, including telomeres. DSBs near telomeres are especially prone to chromosome rearrangements, because telomeric regions are deficient in DSB repair. The deficiency in DSB repair near telomeres is also an important mechanism for ionizing radiation-induced replicative senescence in normal human cells. In addition, DSBs near telomeres can result in chromosome instability in mouse embryonic stem cells, suggesting that telomere loss can contribute to heritable chromosome rearrangements. Consistent with this possibility, telomeric regions in humans are highly heterogeneous, and chromosome rearrangements near telomeres are commonly involved in human genetic disease. Understanding the mechanisms of telomere loss will therefore provide important insights into both human cancer and genetic disease.

  1. Identification of chromosome abnormalities in the horse using a panel of chromosome-specific painting probes generated by microdissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugno, Monika; Słota, Ewa; Pieńkowska-Schelling, Aldona; Schelling, Claude

    2009-09-01

    Fluorescent in situ hybridisation (FISH) using a panel of molecular probes for all chromosome pairs obtained by chromosome microdissection of the domestic horse ( Equus caballus ) was used to diagnose karyotype abnormalities in 35 horses (32 mares, 2 stallions and 1 intersex), which were selected for the study due to infertility (23 horses), reduced fertility (10 horses) and developmental anomalies (2 horses). The use of the FISH technique with probes for each horse chromosome pair enabled the diagnosis of many different chromosome aberrations in this population. Among the horses analysed, 21 animals had normal karyotype - 64,XX (19 mares) and 64,XY (2 stallions). Fourteen animals, constituting 40% of the population studied, showed the following chromosome abnormalities: 63,X (1 mare); 63,X/64,XX (6 mares); 63,X/64,XX/65,XXX (3 mares); 63,X/65,XXX (1 mare); 64,XX/65,XX+Xp (1 mare); 63,X/64,XX/65,XX+Xq (1 mare), and 63,X/64,XX/65,XX+delY (1 intersex). When only the mares studied because of complete infertility were taken into consideration, this proportion exceeded 56%. Due to the increased frequency of the above-mentioned aberrations in the mosaic form of two or more lines, it was necessary to analyse a large number (100-300) of metaphase spreads. The use of specific molecular probes obtained by chromosome microdissection made these diagnoses much easier.

  2. An experimental and numerical study into turbulent condensing steam jets in air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oerlemans, S.; Badie, R.; Van Dongen, M. E. H.

    Temperatures, velocities, and droplet sizes are measured in turbulent condensing steam jets produced by a facial sauna, for varying nozzle diameters and varying initial velocities (Re=3,600-9,200). The release of latent heat due to droplet condensation causes the temperature in the two-phase jet to be significantly higher than in a single-phase jet. At some distance from the nozzle, droplets reach a maximum size and start to evaporate again, which results in a change in sign of latent heat release. The distance of maximum size is determined from droplet size measurements. The experimental results are compared with semi-analytical expressions and with a fully coupled numerical model of the turbulent condensing steam jet. The increase in centreline temperature due to droplet condensation is successfully predicted.

  3. Spin-polarized versus chiral condensate in quark matter at finite temperature and density

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matsuoka, Hiroaki; Tsue, Yasuhiko; da Providencia, Joao;

    2016-01-01

    It is shown that the spin-polarized condensate appears in quark matter at high baryon density and low temperature due to the tensor-type four-point interaction in the Nambu-Jona-Lasiniotype model as a low-energy effective theory of quantum chromodynamics. It is indicated within this low-energy ef......It is shown that the spin-polarized condensate appears in quark matter at high baryon density and low temperature due to the tensor-type four-point interaction in the Nambu-Jona-Lasiniotype model as a low-energy effective theory of quantum chromodynamics. It is indicated within this low......-energy effective model that the chiral symmetry is broken again by the spin-polarized condensate on increasing the quark number density, while chiral symmetry restoration occurs, in which the chiral condensate disappears at a certain density....

  4. Condensation and Evaporation of Interstellar Clouds in Chemodynamical Models of Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Köppen, J; Hensler, G; Theis, Ch.

    1997-01-01

    The network of interactions between hot gas, cool clouds, massive stars, and stellar remnants used in the chemodynamical modeling of the interstellar medium is investigated for the types of its solutions. In a physically consistent formulation for the energy transfer during condensation, oscillations due to a cyclic switching between condensation and evaporation never occur. A closed-box system evolves in a hierarchy of equilibria: thermal balance in the cloud gas, star-formation self-regulated due to heating of the clouds by massive stars, and the balance of condensation and evaporation. Except for an initial transitory phase, the evolution of the metallicity follows that of the Simple Model quite closely. For galaxies with a high initial density, or if the condensation rate is low, the metals produced by the stars may remain stored in the hot gas phase even in evolved systems with low gas fractions.

  5. Immunolcocalization of actin in intact and DNA—and histone—depleted nuclei and chromosomes of allium cepa

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANLIHONG; MIAOXING

    1998-01-01

    The presence of actin in eukaryotic nuclei and chromosomes,and especially in higher plant nuclei and chromosomes,has not been well established.We detected actin in meristematic cells of Allium cepa with indirect immunofluorescence technique and observed bright fluorescence in the intact nuclei and chromosomes,indicating that actin is present in the nuclei and chromosomes of the higher plant.We labeld sections of the meristematic cells of A.cepa with immunogold technique,gold parti cles were concentrated in condensed chromatin and nucleoli,confirming the results of the immunofluoresence observations.We traeated the nuclei and chromosomes of A.cepa with DNase I and 2M NaCl and obtained DNA-and histone-depleted nuclei and chromosomes.Indirect immunofluorescence tests showed that the DNA-and histonedepleted nuclei and chromosomes reacted positively with the anti-actin antibodies.These results demonstrate that the anti-actin antibodies.These results demonstrate that actin exists not only in intact nuclei and chromosomes,but also in DNA-and histone-depleted nuclei and chrmosomes of the plant.In addition,our immuno-fluorescence tests indicate that tropomyosin is present in the nuclei and chromosomes of A.cepa.

  6. The mean condensate heat resistance of dropwise condensation with flowing inert gases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geld, van der C.W.M.; Brouwers, H.J.H.

    1995-01-01

    The quantification of the condensate heat resistance is studied for dropwise condensation from flowing air-steam mixtures. Flows are essentially laminar and stable with gas Reynolds numbers around 900 and 2000. The condensate shaping up as hemispheres on a plastic plane wall and the presence of iner

  7. Condensation on Slippery Asymmetric Bumps

    CERN Document Server

    Park, Kyoo-Chul; He, Neil; Aizenberg, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    Bumps are omnipresent from human skin to the geological structures on planets, which offer distinct advantages in numerous phenomena including structural color, drag reduction, and extreme wettability. Although the topographical parameters of bumps such as radius of curvature of convex regions significantly influence various phenomena including anti-reflective structures and contact time of impacting droplets, the effect of the detailed bump topography on growth and transport of condensates have not been clearly understood. Inspired by the millimetric bumps of the Namib Desert beetle, here we report the identified role of radius of curvature and width of bumps with homogeneous surface wettability in growth rate, coalescence and transport of water droplets. Further rational design of asymmetric convex topography and synergetic combination with slippery coating simultaneously enable self-transport, leading to unseen five-fold higher growth rate and an order of magnitude faster shedding time of droplets compared...

  8. Statistical physics and condensed matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-07-01

    This document is divided into 4 sections: 1) General aspects of statistical physics. The themes include: possible geometrical structures of thermodynamics, the thermodynamical foundation of quantum measurement, transport phenomena (kinetic theory, hydrodynamics and turbulence) and out of equilibrium systems (stochastic dynamics and turbulence). The techniques involved here are typical of applied analysis: stability criteria, mode decomposition, shocks and stochastic equations. 2) Disordered, glassy and granular systems: statics and dynamics. The complexity of the systems can be studied through the structure of their phase space. The geometry of this phase space is studied in several works: the overlap distribution can now be computed with a very high precision; the boundary energy between low lying states does not behave like in ordinary systems; and the Edward's hypothesis of equi-probability of low lying metastable states is invalidated. The phenomenon of aging, characteristic of glassy dynamics, is studied in several models. Dynamics of biological systems or of fracture is shown to bear some resemblance with that of disordered systems. 3) Quantum systems. The themes include: mesoscopic superconductors, supersymmetric approach to strongly correlated electrons, quantum criticality and heavy fermion compounds, optical sum rule violation in the cuprates, heat capacity of lattice spin models from high-temperature series expansion, Lieb-Schultz-Mattis theorem in dimension larger than one, quantum Hall effect, Bose-Einstein condensation and multiple-spin exchange model on the triangular lattice. 4) Soft condensed matter and biological systems. Path integral representations are invaluable to describe polymers, proteins and self-avoiding membranes. Using these methods, problems as diverse as the titration of a weak poly-acid by a strong base, the denaturation transition of DNA or bridge-hopping in conducting polymers have been addressed. The problems of RNA folding

  9. Chromatid Painting for Chromosomal Inversion Detection Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose the continued development of a novel approach to the detection of chromosomal inversions. Transmissible chromosome aberrations (translocations and...

  10. CHROMOSOMAL MAPPING IN STRAINS OF STAPHYLOCOCCUS AUREUS,

    Science.gov (United States)

    STAPHYLOCOCCUS AUREUS , CHROMOSOMES), (*CHROMOSOMES, MAPPING), NITROSO COMPOUNDS, GUANIDINES, GENETICS, MUTATIONS, DRUGS, TOLERANCES(PHYSIOLOGY), TEST METHODS, DEOXYRIBONUCLEIC ACIDS, INHIBITION, RESISTANCE(BIOLOGY).

  11. Chromatid Painting for Chromosomal Inversion Detection Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose a novel approach to the detection of chromosomal inversions. Transmissible chromosome aberrations (translocations and inversions) have profound genetic...

  12. Incidence of X and Y Chromosomal Aneuploidy in a Large Child Bearing Population

    OpenAIRE

    Samango-Sprouse, Carole; Kırkızlar, Eser; Hall, Megan P.; Lawson, Patrick; Demko, Zachary; Zneimer, Susan M.; Curnow, Kirsten J.; Gross, Susan; Gropman, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Background X&Y chromosomal aneuploidies are among the most common human whole-chromosomal copy number changes, but the population-based incidence and prevalence in the child-bearing population is unclear. Methods This retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data leveraged a routine non-invasive prenatal test (NIPT) using parental genotyping to estimate the population-based incidence of X&Y chromosome variations in this population referred for NIPT (generally due to advanced maternal...

  13. Sir protein–independent repair of dicentric chromosomes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCleary, David F.; Steakley, David Lee; Rine, Jasper

    2016-01-01

    Sir2 protein has been reported to be recruited to dicentric chromosomes under tension, and such chromosomes are reported to be especially vulnerable to breakage in sir2Δ mutants. We found that the loss of viability in such mutants was an indirect effect of the repression of nonhomologous end joining in Sir− mutants and that the apparent recruitment of Sir2 protein to chromosomes under tension was likely due to methodological weakness in early chromatin immunoprecipitation studies. PMID:27466318

  14. Sir protein-independent repair of dicentric chromosomes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCleary, David F; Steakley, David Lee; Rine, Jasper

    2016-09-15

    Sir2 protein has been reported to be recruited to dicentric chromosomes under tension, and such chromosomes are reported to be especially vulnerable to breakage in sir2Δ mutants. We found that the loss of viability in such mutants was an indirect effect of the repression of nonhomologous end joining in Sir(-) mutants and that the apparent recruitment of Sir2 protein to chromosomes under tension was likely due to methodological weakness in early chromatin immunoprecipitation studies.

  15. Interspecific Y chromosome variation is sufficient to rescue hybrid male sterility and is influenced by the grandparental origin of the chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araripe, L O; Tao, Y; Lemos, B

    2016-06-01

    Y chromosomes display population variation within and between species. Co-evolution within populations is expected to produce adaptive interactions between Y chromosomes and the rest of the genome. One consequence is that Y chromosomes from disparate populations could disrupt harmonious interactions between co-evolved genetic elements and result in reduced male fertility, sterility or inviability. Here we address the contribution of 'heterospecific Y chromosomes' to fertility in hybrid males carrying a homozygous region of Drosophila mauritiana introgressed in the Drosophila simulans background. In order to detect Y chromosome-autosome interactions, which may go unnoticed in a single-species background of autosomes, we constructed hybrid genotypes involving three sister species: Drosophila simulans, D. mauritiana, and D. sechellia. These engineered strains varied due to: (i) species origin of the Y chromosome (D. simulans or D. sechellia); (ii) location of the introgressed D. mauritiana segment on the D. simulans third chromosome, and (iii) grandparental genomic background (three genotypes of D. simulans). We find complex interactions between the species origin of the Y chromosome, the identity of the D. mauritiana segment and the grandparental genetic background donating the chromosomes. Unexpectedly, the interaction of the Y chromosome and one segment of D. mauritiana drastically reduced fertility in the presence of Ysim, whereas the fertility is partially rescued by the Y chromosome of D. sechellia when it descends from a specific grandparental genotype. The restoration of fertility occurs in spite of an autosomal and X-linked genome that is mostly of D. simulans origin. These results illustrate the multifactorial basis of genetic interactions involving the Y chromosome. Our study supports the hypothesis that the Y chromosome can contribute significantly to the evolution of reproductive isolation and highlights the conditional manifestation of infertility in

  16. Tissue-specific differences in the spatial interposition of X-chromosome and 3R chromosome regions in the malaria mosquito Anopheles messeae Fall.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gleb Artemov

    Full Text Available Spatial organization of a chromosome in a nucleus is very important in biology but many aspects of it are still generally unresolved. We focused on tissue-specific features of chromosome architecture in closely related malaria mosquitoes, which have essential inter-specific differences in polytene chromosome attachments in nurse cells. We showed that the region responsible for X-chromosome attachment interacts with nuclear lamina stronger in nurse cells, then in salivary glands cells in Anopheles messeae Fall. The inter-tissue differences were demonstrated more convincingly in an experiment of two distinct chromosomes interposition in the nucleus space of cells from four tissues. Microdissected DNA-probes from nurse cells X-chromosome (2BC and 3R chromosomes (32D attachment regions were hybridized with intact nuclei of nurse cells, salivary gland cells, follicle epithelium cells and imaginal disсs cells in 3D-FISH experiments. We showed that only salivary gland cells and follicle epithelium cells have no statistical differences in the interposition of 2BC and 32D. Generally, the X-chromosome and 3R chromosome are located closer to each other in cells of the somatic system in comparison with nurse cells on average. The imaginal disсs cell nuclei have an intermediate arrangement of chromosome interposition, similar to other somatic cells and nurse cells. In spite of species-specific chromosome attachments there are no differences in interposition of nurse cells chromosomes in An. messeae and An. atroparvus Thiel. Nurse cells have an unusual chromosome arrangement without a chromocenter, which could be due to the special mission of generative system cells in ontogenesis and evolution.

  17. Condensed Matter Theories - Volume 22

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinholz, Heidi; Röpke, Gerd; de Llano, Manuel

    2007-09-01

    pt. A. Fermi liquids. Pressure comparison between the spherical cellular model and the Thomas-Fermi model / G.A. Baker, Jr. Pair excitations and vertex corrections in Fermi fluids and the dynamic structure function of two-dimension 3He / H.M. Böhm, H. Godfrin, E. Krotscheck, H.J. Lauter, M. Meschke and M. Panholzer. Condensation of helium in wedges / E.S. Hernádez ... [et al.]. Non-Fermi liquid behavior from the Fermi-liquid approach / V.A. Khodel ... [et al.]. Theory of third sound and stability of thin 3He-4He superfluid films / E. Krotscheck and M.D. Miller. Pairing in asymmetrical Fermi systems / K.F. Quader and R. Liao. Ground-state properties of small 3He drops from quantum Monte Carlo simulations / E. Sola, J. Casulleras and J. Boronat. Ground-state energy and compressibility of a disordered two-dimensional electron gas / Tanatar ... [et al.]. Quasiexcitons in photoluminescence of incompressible quantum liquids / A. Wójs, A.G ladysiewicz and J.J. Quinn -- pt. B. Bose liquids. Quantum Boltzmann liquids / K.A. Gernoth, M L. Ristig and T. Lindenau. Condensate fraction in the dynamic structure function of Bose fluids / M. Saarela, F. Mazzanti and V. Apaja -- pt. C. Strongly-correlated electronic systems. Electron gas in high-field nanoscopic transport: metallic carbon nanotubes / F. Green and D. Neilson. Evolution and destruction of the Kondo effect in a capacitively coupled double dot system / D.E. Logan and M.R. Galpin. The method of increments-a wavefunction-based Ab-Initio correlation method for solids / B. Paulus. Fractionally charged excitations on frustrated lattices / E. Runge, F. Pollmann and P. Fulde. 5f Electrons in actinides: dual nature and photoemission spectra / G. Zwicknagl -- pt. D. Magnetism. Magnetism in disordered two-dimensional Kondo-Necklace / W. Brenig. On the de Haas-can Alphen oscillation in 2D / S. Fujita and D.L. Morabito. Dynamics in one-dimensional spin systems-density matrix reformalization group study / S. Nishimoto and M

  18. Assessment of the controllability of condensible emissions. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shareef, G.S.; Waddell, J.T.

    1990-10-01

    The report gives results of a study to gain insights into the condensible emissions area from an air toxics perspective, with emphasis on controllability and chemical composition of these emissions. The study: compiled existing data on condensible emissions; determined the chemical composition of condensible emissions, where possible; identified source categories that are major emitters of condensibles; evaluated the effectiveness of various control devices in reducing condensible emissions; and evaluated how the performance of currently available control technologies can be improved to better control condensible emissions. Two data bases were developed: the Condensibles Data Base contains 43 emission source categories; the Specialized Condensibles Data Base focuses on the chemical composition of condensible emissions.

  19. Telomere Chromatin Condensation Assay (TCCA): a novel approach to study structural telomere integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Vasconcellos, Iria; Alonso-Rodríguez, Silvia; López-Baltar, Isidoro; Fernández, José Luis

    2015-01-01

    Telomeres, the DNA-protein complexes located at the end of linear eukaryotic chromosomes are essential for genome stability. Improper higher-order chromatin organization at the chromosome ends can give rise to telomeric recombination and genomic instability. We report the development of an assay to quantify differences in the condensation of telomeric chromatin, thereby offering new opportunities to study telomere biology and stability. We have combined a DNA nuclease digestion with a quantitative PCR (qPCR) assay of telomeric DNA, which we term the Telomere Chromatin Condensation Assay (TCCA). By quantifying the relative quantities of telomeric DNA that are progressively digested with the exonuclease Bal 31 the method can discriminate between different levels of telomeric chromatin condensation. The structural chromatin packaging at telomeres shielded against exonuclease digestion delivered an estimate, which we term Chromatin Protection Factor (CPF) that ranged from 1.7 to 2.3 fold greater than that present in unpacked DNA. The CPF was significantly decreased when cell cultures were incubated with the DNA hypomethylating agent 5-azacytidine, demonstrating the ability of the TCCA assay to discriminate between packaging levels of telomeric DNA.

  20. Paternal uniparental disomy chromosome 14-like syndrome due a maternal de novo 160 kb deletion at the 14q32.2 region not encompassing the IG- and the MEG3-DMRs: Patient report and genotype-phenotype correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corsello, Giovanni; Salzano, Emanuela; Vecchio, Davide; Antona, Vincenzo; Grasso, Marina; Malacarne, Michela; Carella, Massimo; Palumbo, Pietro; Piro, Ettore; Giuffrè, Mario

    2015-12-01

    The human chromosome 14q32 carries a cluster of imprinted genes which include the paternally expressed genes (PEGs) DLK1 and RTL1, as well as the maternally expressed genes (MEGs) MEG3, RTL1as, and MEG8. PEGs and MEGs expression at the 14q32.2-imprinted region are regulated by two differentially methylated regions (DMRs): the IG-DMR and the MEG3-DMR, which are respectively methylated on the paternal and unmethylated on the maternal chromosome 14 in most cells. Genetic and epigenetic abnormalities affecting these imprinted gene clusters result in two different phenotypes currently known as maternal upd(14) syndrome and paternal upd(14) syndrome. However, only few patients carrying a maternal deletion at the 14q32.2-imprinted critical region have been reported so far. Here we report on the first patient with a maternal de novo deletion of 160 kb at the 14q32.2 chromosome that does not involves the IG-DMR or the MEG3-DMR but elicits a full upd(14)pat syndrome's phenotype encompassing the three mentioned MEGs. By the analysis of this unique genotype-phenotype correlation, we further widen the spectrum of the congenital anomalies associated to this rare disorder and we propose that the paternally expressed imprinted RTL1 gene, as well as its maternally expressed RTL1as antisense transcript, may play a prominent causative role.

  1. Breakage-fusion-bridge cycles and large insertions contribute to the rapid evolution of accessory chromosomes in a fungal pathogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croll, Daniel; Zala, Marcello; McDonald, Bruce A

    2013-06-01

    Chromosomal rearrangements are a major driver of eukaryotic genome evolution, affecting speciation, pathogenicity and cancer progression. Changes in chromosome structure are often initiated by mis-repair of double-strand breaks in the DNA. Mis-repair is particularly likely when telomeres are lost or when dispersed repeats misalign during crossing-over. Fungi carry highly polymorphic chromosomal complements showing substantial variation in chromosome length and number. The mechanisms driving chromosome polymorphism in fungi are poorly understood. We aimed to identify mechanisms of chromosomal rearrangements in the fungal wheat pathogen Zymoseptoria tritici. We combined population genomic resequencing and chromosomal segment PCR assays with electrophoretic karyotyping and resequencing of parents and offspring from experimental crosses to show that this pathogen harbors a highly diverse complement of accessory chromosomes that exhibits strong global geographic differentiation in numbers and lengths of chromosomes. Homologous chromosomes carried highly differentiated gene contents due to numerous insertions and deletions. The largest accessory chromosome recently doubled in length through insertions totaling 380 kb. Based on comparative genomics, we identified the precise breakpoint locations of these insertions. Nondisjunction during meiosis led to chromosome losses in progeny of three different crosses. We showed that a new accessory chromosome emerged in two viable offspring through a fusion between sister chromatids. Such chromosome fusion is likely to initiate a breakage-fusion-bridge (BFB) cycle that can rapidly degenerate chromosomal structure. We suggest that the accessory chromosomes of Z. tritici originated mainly from ancient core chromosomes through a degeneration process that included BFB cycles, nondisjunction and mutational decay of duplicated sequences. The rapidly evolving accessory chromosome complement may serve as a cradle for adaptive evolution in

  2. Breakage-fusion-bridge cycles and large insertions contribute to the rapid evolution of accessory chromosomes in a fungal pathogen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Croll

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Chromosomal rearrangements are a major driver of eukaryotic genome evolution, affecting speciation, pathogenicity and cancer progression. Changes in chromosome structure are often initiated by mis-repair of double-strand breaks in the DNA. Mis-repair is particularly likely when telomeres are lost or when dispersed repeats misalign during crossing-over. Fungi carry highly polymorphic chromosomal complements showing substantial variation in chromosome length and number. The mechanisms driving chromosome polymorphism in fungi are poorly understood. We aimed to identify mechanisms of chromosomal rearrangements in the fungal wheat pathogen Zymoseptoria tritici. We combined population genomic resequencing and chromosomal segment PCR assays with electrophoretic karyotyping and resequencing of parents and offspring from experimental crosses to show that this pathogen harbors a highly diverse complement of accessory chromosomes that exhibits strong global geographic differentiation in numbers and lengths of chromosomes. Homologous chromosomes carried highly differentiated gene contents due to numerous insertions and deletions. The largest accessory chromosome recently doubled in length through insertions totaling 380 kb. Based on comparative genomics, we identified the precise breakpoint locations of these insertions. Nondisjunction during meiosis led to chromosome losses in progeny of three different crosses. We showed that a new accessory chromosome emerged in two viable offspring through a fusion between sister chromatids. Such chromosome fusion is likely to initiate a breakage-fusion-bridge (BFB cycle that can rapidly degenerate chromosomal structure. We suggest that the accessory chromosomes of Z. tritici originated mainly from ancient core chromosomes through a degeneration process that included BFB cycles, nondisjunction and mutational decay of duplicated sequences. The rapidly evolving accessory chromosome complement may serve as a cradle for

  3. Design and Fabrication of a Hybrid Superhydrophobic-Hydrophilic Surface That Exhibits Stable Dropwise Condensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Bikash; Mac Giolla Eain, Marc; Xu, QianFeng; Egan, Vanessa M; Punch, Jeff; Lyons, Alan M

    2015-10-28

    Condensation of water vapor is an essential process in power generation, water collection, and thermal management. Dropwise condensation, where condensed droplets are removed from the surface before coalescing into a film, has been shown to increase the heat transfer efficiency and water collection ability of many surfaces. Numerous efforts have been made to create surfaces which can promote dropwise condensation, including superhydrophobic surfaces on which water droplets are highly mobile. However, the challenge with using such surfaces in condensing environments is that hydrophobic coatings can degrade and/or water droplets on superhydrophobic surfaces transition from the mobile Cassie to the wetted Wenzel state over time and condensation shifts to a less-effective filmwise mechanism. To meet the need for a heat-transfer surface that can maintain stable dropwise condensation, we designed and fabricated a hybrid superhydrophobic-hydrophilic surface. An array of hydrophilic needles, thermally connected to a heat sink, was forced through a robust superhydrophobic polymer film. Condensation occurs preferentially on the needle surface due to differences in wettability and temperature. As the droplet grows, the liquid drop on the needle remains in the Cassie state and does not wet the underlying superhydrophobic surface. The water collection rate on this surface was studied using different surface tilt angles, needle array pitch values, and needle heights. Water condensation rates on the hybrid surface were shown to be 4 times greater than for a planar copper surface and twice as large for silanized silicon or superhydrophobic surfaces without hydrophilic features. A convection-conduction heat transfer model was developed; predicted water condensation rates were in good agreement with experimental observations. This type of hybrid superhydrophobic-hydrophilic surface with a larger array of needles is low-cost, robust, and scalable and so could be used for heat

  4. A Comprehensive Model of Electric-Field-Enhanced Jumping-Droplet Condensation on Superhydrophobic Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birbarah, Patrick; Li, Zhaoer; Pauls, Alexander; Miljkovic, Nenad

    2015-07-21

    Superhydrophobic micro/nanostructured surfaces for dropwise condensation have recently received significant attention due to their potential to enhance heat transfer performance by shedding positively charged water droplets via coalescence-induced droplet jumping at length scales below the capillary length and allowing the use of external electric fields to enhance droplet removal and heat transfer, in what has been termed electric-field-enhanced (EFE) jumping-droplet condensation. However, achieving optimal EFE conditions for enhanced heat transfer requires capturing the details of transport processes that is currently lacking. While a comprehensive model has been developed for condensation on micro/nanostructured surfaces, it cannot be applied for EFE condensation due to the dynamic droplet-vapor-electric field interactions. In this work, we developed a comprehensive physical model for EFE condensation on superhydrophobic surfaces by incorporating individual droplet motion, electrode geometry, jumping frequency, field strength, and condensate vapor-flow dynamics. As a first step toward our model, we simulated jumping droplet motion with no external electric field and validated our theoretical droplet trajectories to experimentally obtained trajectories, showing excellent temporal and spatial agreement. We then incorporated the external electric field into our model and considered the effects of jumping droplet size, electrode size and geometry, condensation heat flux, and droplet jumping direction. Our model suggests that smaller jumping droplet sizes and condensation heat fluxes require less work input to be removed by the external fields. Furthermore, the results suggest that EFE electrodes can be optimized such that the work input is minimized depending on the condensation heat flux. To analyze overall efficiency, we defined an incremental coefficient of performance and showed that it is very high (∼10(6)) for EFE condensation. We finally proposed mechanisms

  5. Bose-Einstein condensation of atomic hydrogen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willmann, L

    1999-01-01

    The recent creation of a Bose-Einstein condensate of atomic hydrogen has added a new system to this exciting field, The differences between hydrogen and the alkali metal atoms require other techniques for the initial trapping and cooling of the atoms and the subsequent detection of the condensate. T

  6. ASSESSMENT OF THE CONTROLLABILITY OF CONDENSIBLE EMISSIONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report gives results of a study to gain insights into the condensible emissions area from an air toxics perspective, with emphasis on controllability and chemical composition of these emissions. he study compiled existing data on condensible emissions; determined the chemical...

  7. Soliton resonance in bose-einstein condensate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zak, Michail; Kulikov, I.

    2002-01-01

    A new phenomenon in nonlinear dispersive systems, including a Bose-Einstein Condensate (BEC), has been described. It is based upon a resonance between an externally induced soliton and 'eigen-solitons' of the homogeneous cubic Schrodinger equation. There have been shown that a moving source of positive /negative potential induces bright /dark solitons in an attractive / repulsive Bose condensate.

  8. Hydrophilic structures for condensation management in appliances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuehl, Steven John; Vonderhaar, John J.; Wu, Guolian; Wu, Mianxue

    2016-02-02

    An appliance that includes a cabinet having an exterior surface; a refrigeration compartment located within the cabinet; and a hydrophilic structure disposed on the exterior surface. The hydrophilic structure is configured to spread condensation. The appliance further includes a wicking structure located in proximity to the hydrophilic structure, and the wicking structure is configured to receive the condensation.

  9. Condensin II resolves chromosomal associations to enable anaphase I segregation in Drosophila male meiosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom A Hartl

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Several meiotic processes ensure faithful chromosome segregation to create haploid gametes. Errors to any one of these processes can lead to zygotic aneuploidy with the potential for developmental abnormalities. During prophase I of Drosophila male meiosis, each bivalent condenses and becomes sequestered into discrete chromosome territories. Here, we demonstrate that two predicted condensin II subunits, Cap-H2 and Cap-D3, are required to promote territory formation. In mutants of either subunit, territory formation fails and chromatin is dispersed throughout the nucleus. Anaphase I is also abnormal in Cap-H2 mutants as chromatin bridges are found between segregating heterologous and homologous chromosomes. Aneuploid sperm may be generated from these defects as they occur at an elevated frequency and are genotypically consistent with anaphase I segregation defects. We propose that condensin II-mediated prophase I territory formation prevents and/or resolves heterologous chromosomal associations to alleviate their potential interference in anaphase I segregation. Furthermore, condensin II-catalyzed prophase I chromosome condensation may be necessary to resolve associations between paired homologous chromosomes of each bivalent. These persistent chromosome associations likely consist of DNA entanglements, but may be more specific as anaphase I bridging was rescued by mutations in the homolog conjunction factor teflon. We propose that the consequence of condensin II mutations is a failure to resolve heterologous and homologous associations mediated by entangled DNA and/or homolog conjunction factors. Furthermore, persistence of homologous and heterologous interchromosomal associations lead to anaphase I chromatin bridging and the generation of aneuploid gametes.

  10. Formation of Chromosomal Domains by Loop Extrusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geoffrey Fudenberg

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Topologically associating domains (TADs are fundamental structural and functional building blocks of human interphase chromosomes, yet the mechanisms of TAD formation remain unclear. Here, we propose that loop extrusion underlies TAD formation. In this process, cis-acting loop-extruding factors, likely cohesins, form progressively larger loops but stall at TAD boundaries due to interactions with boundary proteins, including CTCF. Using polymer simulations, we show that this model produces TADs and finer-scale features of Hi-C data. Each TAD emerges from multiple loops dynamically formed through extrusion, contrary to typical illustrations of single static loops. Loop extrusion both explains diverse experimental observations—including the preferential orientation of CTCF motifs, enrichments of architectural proteins at TAD boundaries, and boundary deletion experiments—and makes specific predictions for the depletion of CTCF versus cohesin. Finally, loop extrusion has potentially far-ranging consequences for processes such as enhancer-promoter interactions, orientation-specific chromosomal looping, and compaction of mitotic chromosomes.

  11. Prediction of steam condensation in the presence of noncondensable gases using a CFD-based approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dehbi, A., E-mail: abdel.dehbi@psi.ch [Laboratory for Thermal-Hydraulics, Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen 5232 (Switzerland); Janasz, F., E-mail: filip.janasz@psi.ch [Laboratory for Thermal-Hydraulics, Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen 5232 (Switzerland); Bell, B., E-mail: brian.bell@ansys.com [ANSYS Inc., Lebanon, NH 03766 (United States)

    2013-05-15

    Highlights: ► A model of condensation with noncondensable gases is integrated in the Fluent code. ► Condensation is modeled as sink terms in the conservation equations. ► A best-estimate parameter is proposed for heat transfer enhancement due to suction. ► Validation is conducted for a wide range of flow conditions and geometries. ► Predictions are in good agreement with experimental correlations. -- Abstract: We integrate in the ANSYS CFD code Fluent a model for wall condensation from a vapor–noncondensable gas mixture. The condensation phenomenon is modeled from first principles as sink terms for the mass, momentum, species and energy conservation equations. The condensation rate is obtained by requiring the condensate–gas interface to be impermeable to the noncondensable gas. The model assumes in addition that the thermal resistance of the liquid film is negligible, and hence the predictions are only valid for relatively large mass fractions of the noncondensable gas (above 0.1). When the condensation rates are high, a best-estimate suction correction factor is proposed for CFD codes that impose the no-slip boundary conditions at the wall surfaces. In such a way, the enhancement in the heat transfer due to suction is accounted for. We first simulate condensation in laminar and turbulent forced flows along a cold flat plate. More challenging simulations are subsequently conducted for the case where vapor is introduced into closed vessels containing a noncondensable gas and in which stand condensing surfaces held at constant cold temperature. The flow transient is computed until steady conditions are reached, at which point the condensation flow rate equals the injected steam flow rate. Overall, the predicted heat transfer rates are in good agreement with available analytical solutions as well as experimental correlations. CFD Best Practice Guidelines are followed to a large extent. In particular, a hierarchy of grids is used to ensure mesh

  12. When does lasing become a condensation phenomenon?

    CERN Document Server

    Fischer, Baruch

    2012-01-01

    We present a generic classical light condensation (LC) phenomenon in linear photonic mode systems, such as cw laser cavities, in a noisy environment (spontaneous emission, etc.), based on weighting the modes in a loss-gain scale rather than in photon energy. It is characterized by a sharp transition from multi- to single-mode oscillation. The study uses a linear multivariate Langevin formulation which gives a mode occupation hierarchy that functions like Bose-Einstein statistics. We find that condensation occurs when the spectral filtering has near the lowest loss mode a power law dependence with exponent smaller than 1. We then discuss how and when condensation occurs in photon systems, how it relates to lasing, and the difficulties to observe regular photon Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) in laser cavities. We raise the possibility that recent experiments on photon condensation in optical cavities fall in a classical LC or lasing category rather than being a thermal-quantum BEC phenomenon.

  13. Gravitino condensation, supersymmetry breaking and inflation

    CERN Document Server

    Houston, N

    2015-01-01

    Motivated by dualistic considerations of the reality of quark condensation in quantum chromodynamics, and the connections of supergravity to the exotic physics of string and M-theory, in this thesis we investigate the dynamical breaking of local supersymmetry via gravitino condensation. We firstly demonstrate non-perturbative gravitino mass generation via this mechanism in flat spacetime, and from this derive the condensate mode wavefunction renormalisation. By then calculating the full canonically normalised one-loop effective potential for the condensate mode about a de Sitter background, we demonstrate that, contrary to claims in the literature, this process may both occur and function in a phenomenologically viable manner. In particular, we find that outside of certain unfortunate gauge choices, the stability of the condensate is intimately tied via gravitational degrees of freedom to the sign of the tree-level cosmological constant. Furthermore, we find that the energy density liberated may provide the n...

  14. Gametocidal chromosomes enhancing chromosome aberration in common wheat induced by 5-azacytidine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, W-Y; Cong, W-W; Shu, Y-J; Wang, D; Xu, G-H; Guo, C-H

    2013-07-08

    The gametocidal (Gc) chromosome from Aegilops spp induces chromosome mutation, which is introduced into common wheat as a tool of chromosome manipulation for genetic improvement. The Gc chromosome functions similar to a restriction-modification system in bacteria, in which DNA methylation is an important regulator. We treated root tips of wheat carrying Gc chromosomes with the hypomethylation agent 5-azacytidine; chromosome breakage and micronuclei were observed in these root tips. The frequency of aberrations differed in wheat containing different Gc chromosomes, suggesting different functions inducing chromosome breakage. Gc chromosome 3C caused the greatest degree of chromosome aberration, while Gc chromosome 3C(SAT) and 2C caused only slight chromosome aberration. Gc chromosome 3C induced different degrees of chromosome aberration in wheat varieties Triticum aestivum var. Chinese Spring and Norin 26, demonstrating an inhibition function in common wheat.

  15. Chromosome segregation in Vibrio cholerae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, Revathy; Jha, Jyoti; Chattoraj, Dhruba K

    2014-01-01

    The study of chromosome segregation is currently one of the most exciting research frontiers in cell biology. In this review, we discuss our current knowledge of the chromosome segregation process in Vibrio cholerae, based primarily on findings from fluorescence microscopy experiments. This bacterium is of special interest because of its eukaryotic feature of having a divided genome, a feature shared with 10% of known bacteria. We also discuss how the segregation mechanisms of V. cholerae compare with those in other bacteria, and highlight some of the remaining questions regarding the process of bacterial chromosome segregation.

  16. Numerous transitions of sex chromosomes in Diptera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicoso, Beatriz; Bachtrog, Doris

    2015-04-01

    Many species groups, including mammals and many insects, determine sex using heteromorphic sex chromosomes. Diptera flies, which include the model Drosophila melanogaster, generally have XY sex chromosomes and a conserved karyotype consisting of six chromosomal arms (five large rods and a small dot), but superficially similar karyotypes may conceal the true extent of sex chromosome variation. Here, we use whole-genome analysis in 37 fly species belonging to 22 different families of Diptera and uncover tremendous hidden diversity in sex chromosome karyotypes among flies. We identify over a dozen different sex chromosome configurations, and the small dot chromosome is repeatedly used as the sex chromosome, which presumably reflects the ancestral karyotype of higher Diptera. However, we identify species with undifferentiated sex chromosomes, others in which a different chromosome replaced the dot as a sex chromosome or in which up to three chromosomal elements became incorporated into the sex chromosomes, and others yet with female heterogamety (ZW sex chromosomes). Transcriptome analysis shows that dosage compensation has evolved multiple times in flies, consistently through up-regulation of the single X in males. However, X chromosomes generally show a deficiency of genes with male-biased expression, possibly reflecting sex-specific selective pressures. These species thus provide a rich resource to study sex chromosome biology in a comparative manner and show that similar selective forces have shaped the unique evolution of sex chromosomes in diverse fly taxa.

  17. Comparative Sex Chromosome Genomics in Snakes: Differentiation, Evolutionary Strata, and Lack of Global Dosage Compensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zektser, Yulia; Mahajan, Shivani; Bachtrog, Doris

    2013-01-01

    Snakes exhibit genetic sex determination, with female heterogametic sex chromosomes (ZZ males, ZW females). Extensive cytogenetic work has suggested that the level of sex chromosome heteromorphism varies among species, with Boidae having entirely homomorphic sex chromosomes, Viperidae having completely heteromorphic sex chromosomes, and Colubridae showing partial differentiation. Here, we take a genomic approach to compare sex chromosome differentiation in these three snake families. We identify homomorphic sex chromosomes in boas (Boidae), but completely heteromorphic sex chromosomes in both garter snakes (Colubridae) and pygmy rattlesnake (Viperidae). Detection of W-linked gametologs enables us to establish the presence of evolutionary strata on garter and pygmy rattlesnake sex chromosomes where recombination was abolished at different time points. Sequence analysis shows that all strata are shared between pygmy rattlesnake and garter snake, i.e., recombination was abolished between the sex chromosomes before the two lineages diverged. The sex-biased transmission of the Z and its hemizygosity in females can impact patterns of molecular evolution, and we show that rates of evolution for Z-linked genes are increased relative to their pseudoautosomal homologs, both at synonymous and amino acid sites (even after controlling for mutational biases). This demonstrates that mutation rates are male-biased in snakes (male-driven evolution), but also supports faster-Z evolution due to differential selective effects on the Z. Finally, we perform a transcriptome analysis in boa and pygmy rattlesnake to establish baseline levels of sex-biased expression in homomorphic sex chromosomes, and show that heteromorphic ZW chromosomes in rattlesnakes lack chromosome-wide dosage compensation. Our study provides the first full scale overview of the evolution of snake sex chromosomes at the genomic level, thus greatly expanding our knowledge of reptilian and vertebrate sex chromosomes

  18. Comparative sex chromosome genomics in snakes: differentiation, evolutionary strata, and lack of global dosage compensation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Vicoso

    Full Text Available Snakes exhibit genetic sex determination, with female heterogametic sex chromosomes (ZZ males, ZW females. Extensive cytogenetic work has suggested that the level of sex chromosome heteromorphism varies among species, with Boidae having entirely homomorphic sex chromosomes, Viperidae having completely heteromorphic sex chromosomes, and Colubridae showing partial differentiation. Here, we take a genomic approach to compare sex chromosome differentiation in these three snake families. We identify homomorphic sex chromosomes in boas (Boidae, but completely heteromorphic sex chromosomes in both garter snakes (Colubridae and pygmy rattlesnake (Viperidae. Detection of W-linked gametologs enables us to establish the presence of evolutionary strata on garter and pygmy rattlesnake sex chromosomes where recombination was abolished at different time points. Sequence analysis shows that all strata are shared between pygmy rattlesnake and garter snake, i.e., recombination was abolished between the sex chromosomes before the two lineages diverged. The sex-biased transmission of the Z and its hemizygosity in females can impact patterns of molecular evolution, and we show that rates of evolution for Z-linked genes are increased relative to their pseudoautosomal homologs, both at synonymous and amino acid sites (even after controlling for mutational biases. This demonstrates that mutation rates are male-biased in snakes (male-driven evolution, but also supports faster-Z evolution due to differential selective effects on the Z. Finally, we perform a transcriptome analysis in boa and pygmy rattlesnake to establish baseline levels of sex-biased expression in homomorphic sex chromosomes, and show that heteromorphic ZW chromosomes in rattlesnakes lack chromosome-wide dosage compensation. Our study provides the first full scale overview of the evolution of snake sex chromosomes at the genomic level, thus greatly expanding our knowledge of reptilian and vertebrate sex

  19. Picosecond laser-induced water condensation in a cloud chamber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Haiyi; Liu, Yonghong; Ju, Jingjing; Tian, Ye; Bai, Yafeng; Liu, Yaoxiang; Du, Shengzhe; Wang, Cheng; Wang, Tiejun; Liu, Jiansheng; Chin, See Leang; Li, Ruxin; Xu, Zhizhan

    2016-09-05

    We investigated water condensation in a laboratory cloud chamber induced by picosecond (ps) laser pulses at ~350 ps (800 nm/1-1000 Hz) with a maximum peak power of ~25 MW. The peak power was much lower than the critical power for self-focusing in air (~3-10 GW depending on the pulse duration). Sparks, airflow and snow formation were observed under different laser energies or repetition rates. It was found that weaker ps laser pulses can also induce water condensation by exploding and breaking down ice crystals and/or water droplets into tiny particles although there was no formation of laser filament. These tiny particles would grow until precipitation in a super-saturation zone due to laser-induced airflow in a cold region with a large temperature gradient.

  20. Interferometry with Bose-Einstein Condensates in Microgravity

    CERN Document Server

    Müntinga, H; Krutzik, M; Wenzlawski, A; Arnold, S; Becker, D; Bongs, K; Dittus, H; Duncker, H; Gaaloul, N; Gherasim, C; Giese, E; Grzeschik, C; Hänsch, T W; Hellmig, O; Herr, W; Herrmann, S; Kajari, E; Kleinert, S; Lämmerzahl, C; Lewoczko-Adamczyk, W; Malcolm, J; Meyer, N; Nolte, R; Peters, A; Popp, M; Reichel, J; Roura, A; Rudolph, J; Schiemangk, M; Schneider, M; Seidel, S T; Sengstock, K; Tamma, V; Valenzuela, T; Vogel, A; Walser, R; Wendrich, T; Windpassinger, P; Zeller, W; van Zoest, T; Ertmer, W; Schleich, W P; Rasel, E M

    2013-01-01

    Atom interferometers covering macroscopic domains of space-time are a spectacular manifestation of the wave nature of matter. Due to their unique coherence properties, Bose-Einstein condensates are ideal sources for an atom interferometer in extended free fall. In this paper we report on the realization of an asymmetric Mach-Zehnder interferometer operated with a Bose-Einstein condensate in microgravity. The resulting interference pattern is similar to the one in the far-field of a double-slit and shows a linear scaling with the time the wave packets expand. We employ delta-kick cooling in order to enhance the signal and extend our atom interferometer. Our experiments demonstrate the high potential of interferometers operated with quantum gases for probing the fundamental concepts of quantum mechanics and general relativity.

  1. ON DAMPING COEFFICIENT DUE TO PHASE TRANSFORMATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Din-YuHSIEH

    2003-01-01

    The damping coefficient of capillary waves due to the evaporation-condensation process at the interface of the two phases of a fluid is evaluated. To highlight the mechanism of the effect of heat and mass transfer across the interface between regions of liquid and vapor, potential flow of incompressible fluids are assumed. Thus other mechanisms of damping are neglected. To fascilitate the analysis, the method of multiple-scale is employed in the analysis, even though the problem is linear.

  2. Evaluation of radiosensitivity of human tumor cells after irradiation of γ-rays based on G2-chromosome aberrations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the present investigation is to determine initial G2-chromosome aberrations and to validate whether the G2-chromosome aberrations can predict the cellular clonogenic survival in human tumor cell lines. Cell lines of human ovary carcinoma cells (HO8910) and human hepatoma cells (HepG2) were irradiated with a range of doses and assessed both for initial G2-chromosome aberrations and for cell survival after γ-irradiation. The initial G2-chromosome aberrations were measured by counting the number of G2-chromatid breaks after irradiation, detected by the premature chromosome condensation technique, and the G2-assay method. Cell survival was documented by a colony formation assay. A linear-quadratic survival curve was observed in both cell lines. The dose-response results show that the numbers of G2-chromatid breaks increase with the increase in dose in the two cell lines. At higher doses (higher than 4 Gy) of irradiation, the number of G2-chromatid breaks for the G2-assay method cannot be determined because too few cells reach mitosis, and hence their detection is difficult. A good correlation is found between the clonogenic survival and the radiation-induced initial G2-chromatid breaks per cell (r=0.9616). The present results suggest that the premature chromosome condensation technique may be useful for determining chromatid breaks in G2 cells, and the number of initial G2-chromatid breaks holds promise for predicting the radiosensitivity of tumor cells.

  3. Chromosome 12;15 rearrangements in patients with recurrent miscarriage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nair S

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: An abnormal karyotype in either partner, especially featuring a translocation and/or inversion is considered to be a cause of recurrent miscarriages. It is generally assumed that recurrent miscarriage might be due to recurrent chromosomal abnormalities in the fetus due to a balanced aberration in one of the parents being inherited by the offspring in an unbalanced form. Aim: Evaluation of chromosomal rearrangements in couples with recurrent miscarriages. Materials and Methods: Peripheral blood was collected and lymphocyte cultures were set up. Slides prepared from the cell suspension were stained and screened for metaphases followed by karyotyping. Result: Balanced translocation was observed in the male partner in one case and in the female partners in the three other cases. Conclusion: Couples with recurrent miscarriage should be investigated for chromosomal rearrangements, thus helping in genetic counseling and providing the options for future pregnancies.

  4. Unfolding DNA condensates produced by DNA-like charged depletants: A force spectroscopy study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, C. H. M.; Rocha, M. S.; Ramos, E. B.

    2017-02-01

    In this work, we have measured, by means of optical tweezers, forces acting on depletion-induced DNA condensates due to the presence of the DNA-like charged protein bovine serum albumin (BSA). The stretching and unfolding measurements performed on the semi-flexible DNA chain reveal (1) the softening of the uncondensed DNA contour length and (2) a mechanical behavior strikingly different from those previously observed: the force-extension curves of BSA-induced DNA condensates lack the "saw-tooth" pattern and applied external forces as high as ≈80 pN are unable to fully unfold the condensed DNA contour length. This last mechanical experimental finding is in agreement with force-induced "unpacking" detailed Langevin dynamics simulations recently performed by Cortini et al. on model rod-like shaped condensates. Furthermore, a simple thermodynamics analysis of the unfolding process has enabled us to estimate the free energy involved in the DNA condensation: the estimated depletion-induced interactions vary linearly with both the condensed DNA contour length and the BSA concentration, in agreement with the analytical and numerical analysis performed on model DNA condensates. We hope that future additional experiments can decide whether the rod-like morphology is the actual one we are dealing with (e.g. pulling experiments coupled with super-resolution fluorescence microscopy).

  5. DNA amount of X and B chromosomes in the grasshoppers Eyprepocnemis plorans and Locusta migratoria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Ruano, F J; Ruiz-Estévez, M; Rodríguez-Pérez, J; López-Pino, J L; Cabrero, J; Camacho, J P M

    2011-01-01

    We analyzed the DNA amount in X and B chromosomes of 2 XX/X0 grasshopper species (Eyprepocnemis plorans and Locusta migratoria), by means of Feulgen image analysis densitometry (FIAD), using previous estimates in L. migratoria as standard (5.89 pg). We first analyzed spermatids of 0B males and found a bimodal distribution of integrated optical densities (IODs), suggesting that one peak corresponded to +X and the other to -X spermatids. The difference between the 2 peaks corresponded to the X chromosome DNA amount, which was 1.28 pg in E. plorans and 0.80 pg in L. migratoria. In addition, the +X peak in E. plorans gave an estimate of the C-value in this species (10.39 pg). We next analyzed diplotene cells from 1B males in E. plorans and +B males in L. migratoria (a species where Bs are mitotically unstable and no integer B number can be defined for an individual) and measured B chromosome IOD relative to X chromosome IOD, within the same cell, taking advantage of the similar degree of condensation for both positively heteropycnotic chromosomes at this meiotic stage. From this proportion, we estimated the DNA amount for 3 different B chromosome variants found in individuals from 3 E. plorans Spanish populations (0.54 pg for B1 from Saladares, 0.51 pg for B2 from Salobreña and 0.64 for B24 from Torrox). Likewise, we estimated the DNA amount of the B chromosome in L. migratoria to be 0.15 pg. To automate measurements, we wrote a GPL3 licensed Python program (pyFIA). We discuss the utility of the present approach for estimating X and B chromosome DNA amount in a variety of situations, and the meaning of the DNA amount estimates for X and B chromosomes in these 2 species.

  6. Detection of dinoflagellates by the light scattering properties of the chiral structure of their chromosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jianping; Kattawar, George W.

    2013-12-01

    One of the most prominent properties of dinoflagellates is their large sized and highly chromosome-laden nucleus, which contains dozens of cylindrically shaped chromosomes. With such high chromatic concentration, these chromosomes condense into ordered helical structures and were claimed to be responsible for the large circular polarization effects observed in the light scattering from dinoflagellates. In previous research, a thin helix model of a chromosome was used to compare the Discrete Dipole Approximation (DDA) and the analytical Born approximation calculations. However, for such a simplified model only modest qualitative agreements with experimental measurements were achieved. Moreover, only one chromosome in one nucleus was simulated, overlooking the effects of interactions between chromosomes. In this work, we adopt the helical plywood liquid crystal model with a capsule shape, in which parallel fibrils lie in plains perpendicular to the helix axis and the orientations of these fibrils twist at a constant angle between two neighboring layers. The ADDA code is applied to calculate the 16 Mueller matrix elements of light scattering from a single chromosome and from the nucleus, which is composed of a collection of randomly positioned and randomly orientated chromosomes. Special attention is paid to the S14 Mueller matrix element, which describes the ability of differentiating left and right circularly polarized light. Our results show that large S14 back scattering signals from the dinoflagellate nucleus results from the underlying helical structures of its chromosomes. These signals are sensitive to the light wavelength and pitch of the chromatic helix, the latter of which is species specific. Therefore, detecting back scattering S14 signal could be a promising method to monitor dinoflagellates such as Karenia brevis, the causal agent of the Florida red tide.

  7. Chromosome fragility in Freemartin cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Barbieri

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to verify chromosome fragility in freemartin cattle using chromosome aberration (CA and sister chromatid exchange (SCE tests. A total of eighteen co-twins were investigated. Fourteen animals were identified as cytogenetically chimeric (2n=60, XX/XY while 4 were classified as normal. Freemartin cattle showed a higher percentage of aneuploid cells (18.64% and highly significant statistical differences (P < 0.001 in mean values of gaps (4.53 ± 2.05, chromatid breaks (0.26 ± 0.51, and significant statistical differences (P < 0.005 in mean values of chromosome breaks (0.12 ± 0.43 when compared to 10 control animals from single births (aneuploid cells, 11.20%; gaps, 2.01 ± 1.42; chromatid breaks, 0.05 ± 0.22; chromosome breaks, 0.02 ± 0.14.

  8. Chromosomal gene movements reflect the recent origin and biology of therian sex chromosomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukasz Potrzebowski

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Mammalian sex chromosomes stem from ancestral autosomes and have substantially differentiated. It was shown that X-linked genes have generated duplicate intronless gene copies (retrogenes on autosomes due to this differentiation. However, the precise driving forces for this out-of-X gene "movement" and its evolutionary onset are not known. Based on expression analyses of male germ-cell populations, we here substantiate and extend the hypothesis that autosomal retrogenes functionally compensate for the silencing of their X-linked housekeeping parental genes during, but also after, male meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI. Thus, sexually antagonistic forces have not played a major role for the selective fixation of X-derived gene copies in mammals. Our dating analyses reveal that although retrogenes were produced ever since the common mammalian ancestor, selectively driven retrogene export from the X only started later, on the placental mammal (eutherian and marsupial (metatherian lineages, respectively. Together, these observations suggest that chromosome-wide MSCI emerged close to the eutherian-marsupial split approximately 180 million years ago. Given that MSCI probably reflects the spread of the recombination barrier between the X and Y, crucial for their differentiation, our data imply that these chromosomes became more widely differentiated only late in the therian ancestor, well after the divergence of the monotreme lineage. Thus, our study also provides strong independent support for the recent notion that our sex chromosomes emerged, not in the common ancestor of all mammals, but rather in the therian ancestor, and therefore are much younger than previously thought.

  9. Chromosome Segregation in Vibrio cholerae

    OpenAIRE

    Ramachandran, R.; Jha, J.; Chattoraj, DK

    2014-01-01

    The study of chromosome segregation is currently one of the most exciting research frontiers in cell biology. In this review, we discuss our current knowledge of the chromosome segregation process in Vibrio cholerae, based primarily on findings from fluorescence microscopy experiments. This bacterium is of special interest because of its eukaryotic feature of having a divided genome, a feature shared with 10% of known bacteria. We also discuss how the segregation mechanisms of V. cholerae com...

  10. Enhancing dropwise condensation through bioinspired wettability patterning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Aritra; Beaini, Sara; Zhang, Bong June; Ganguly, Ranjan; Megaridis, Constantine M

    2014-11-01

    Dropwise condensation (DWC) heat transfer depends strongly on the maximum diameter (Dmax) of condensate droplets departing from the condenser surface. This study presents a facile technique implemented to gain control of Dmax in DWC within vapor/air atmospheres. We demonstrate how this approach can enhance the corresponding heat transfer rate by harnessing the capillary forces in the removal of the condensate from the surface. We examine various hydrophilic-superhydrophilic patterns, which, respectively, sustain and combine DWC and filmwise condensation on the substrate. The material system uses laser-patterned masking and chemical etching to achieve the desired wettability contrast and does not employ any hydrophobizing agent. By applying alternating straight parallel strips of hydrophilic (contact angle ∼78°) mirror-finish aluminum and superhydrophilic regions (etched aluminum) on the condensing surface, we show that the average maximum droplet size on the less-wettable domains is nearly 42% of the width of the corresponding strips. An overall improvement in the condensate collection rate, up to 19% (as compared to the control case of DWC on mirror-finish aluminum) was achieved by using an interdigitated superhydrophilic track pattern (on the mirror-finish hydrophilic surface) inspired by the vein network of plant leaves. The bioinspired interdigitated pattern is found to outperform the straight hydrophilic-superhydrophilic pattern design, particularly under higher humidity conditions in the presence of noncondensable gases (NCG), a condition that is more challenging for maintaining sustained DWC.

  11. Dynamics of condensation on lubricant impregnated surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Sushant; Paxson, Adam; Rykaczewski, Konrad; Beysens, Daniel; Varanasi, Kripa

    2013-03-01

    Replacing the filmwise condensation mode with dropwise condensation promises large improvements in heat transfer that will lead to large cost savings in material, water consumption and decreased size of the systems. In this regards, use of superhydrophobic surfaces fabricated by texturing surfaces with nano/microstructures has been shown to lead decrease in contact line pinning of millimetric drops resulting in fast shedding. However, these useful properties are lost during condensation where droplets that nucleate within texture grow by virtue of condensation to large sized droplets while still adhering to the surface. Recently we have shown that liquid impregnated surfaces can overcome many limitations of conventional superhydrophobic surfaces during condensation. Here we discuss aspects related to condensation on lubricant surfaces, such as behavior of growing droplets. We compare the characteristics of droplets condensing on these surfaces with their behavior on conventional un-impregnated superhydrophobic surfaces and show how use of lubricant impregnated surfaces may lead to large enhancement in heat transfer and energy efficiencies.

  12. Dispensing fuel with aspiration of condensed vapors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butkovich, M.S.; Strock, D.J.

    1993-08-10

    A vapor recovery process is described, comprising the steps of: fueling a motor vehicle with gasoline by discharging gasoline into a fill opening or filler pipe of a tank of said vehicle through a fuel outlet conduit of a nozzle; emitting gasoline vapors from said tank during said fueling; substantially collecting said vapors during said fueling with a vapor return conduit of said nozzle and passing said vapors through said vapor return conduit in counter current flow relationship to said discharging gasoline in said fuel conduit; conveying said vapors from said vapor return conduit to a vapor return hose; at least some of said vapors condensing to form condensate in said vapor return hose; substantially removing said condensate from said vapor return hose during said fueling with a condensate pickup tube from said nozzle by passing said condensate through said condensate pickup tube in counter current flow relationship to said conveying vapors in said vapor return hose; sensing the presence of gasoline with a liquid sensing tube in said vapor return conduit of said nozzle between inner and outer spouts of said nozzle to detect when said tank of said vehicle is filled with said fuel conduit being within the inner spout of said nozzle; and automatically shutting off said fueling and condensate removing when said liquid sensing tube detects when said tank of said vehicle is filled and fuel enters said vapor return conduit.

  13. Direct contact condensation in packed beds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yi; Klausner, James F.; Mei, Renwei; Knight, Jessica [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States)

    2006-12-15

    A diffusion driven desalination process was recently described where a very effective direct contact condenser with a packed bed is used to condense water vapor out of an air/vapor mixture. A laboratory scale direct contact condenser has been fabricated as a twin tower structure with two stages, co-current and countercurrent. Experiments have been operated in each stage with respective saturated air inlet temperatures of 36, 40 and 43{sup o}C. The temperature and humidity data have been collected at the inlet and exit of the packed bed for different water to air mass flow ratios that vary between 0 and 2.5. A one-dimensional model based on conservation principles has been developed, which predicts the variation of temperature, humidity, and condensation rate through the condenser stages. Agreement between the model and experiments is very good. It is observed that the countercurrent flow stage condensation effectiveness is significantly higher than that for the co-current stage. The condensation heat and mass transfer rates were found to decrease when water blockages occur within the packed bed. Using high-speed digital cinematography, it was observed that this problem can occur at any operating condition, and is dependent on the packing surface wetting characteristics. This observation is used to explain the requirement for two different empirical constants, depending on packing diameter, suggested by Onda for the air side mass transfer coefficient correlation. (author)

  14. Recombinant Chromosome 4 from a Familial Pericentric Inversion: Prenatal and Adulthood Wolf-Hirschhorn Phenotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Malvestiti

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Pericentric inversion of chromosome 4 can give rise to recombinant chromosomes by duplication or deletion of 4p. We report on a familial case of Wolf-Hirschhorn Syndrome characterized by GTG-banding karyotypes, FISH, and array CGH analysis, caused by a recombinant chromosome 4 with terminal 4p16.3 deletion and terminal 4q35.2 duplication. This is an aneusomy due to a recombination which occurred during the meiosis of heterozygote carrier of cryptic pericentric inversion. We also describe the adulthood and prenatal phenotypes associated with the recombinant chromosome 4.

  15. Origin and domestication of papaya Yh chromosome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sex in papaya is controlled by a pair of nascent sex chromosomes. Females are XX, and two slightly different Y chromosomes distinguish males (XY) and hermaphrodites (XYh). The hermaphrodite-specific region of the Yh chromosome (HSY) and its X chromosome counterpart were sequenced and analyzed previo...

  16. Silicate condensation in Mira variables

    CERN Document Server

    Gail, Hans-Peter; Pucci, Annemarie

    2016-01-01

    We study whether the condensation of silicate dust in Mira envelopes could be caused by cluster formation by the abundant SiO molecules. For a simplified model of the pulsational motions of matter in the the outer layers of a Mira variable which is guided by a numerical model for Mira pulsations, the equations of dust nucleation and growth are solved in the co-moving frame of a fixed mass element. It is assumed that seed particles form by clustering of SiO molecules. The calculation of the nucleation rate is based on the experimental data of Nuth and Donn (1982). The quantity of dust formed is calculated by a moment method and the calculation of radiation pressure on the dusty gas is based on a dirty silicate model. Dust nucleation occurs in the model at the upper culmination of the trajectory of a gas parcel where it stays for a considerable time at low temperatures while subsequent dust growth occurs during the descending part of the motion and continues after the next shock reversed motion. It is found tha...

  17. Stellar matter with pseudoscalar condensates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrianov, A.A. [Saint-Petersburg State University, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Universitat de Barcelona, Departament d' Estructura i Constituents de la Materia and Institut de Ciencies del Cosmos (ICCUB), Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain); Andrianov, V.A.; Kolevatov, S.S. [Saint-Petersburg State University, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Espriu, D. [Universitat de Barcelona, Departament d' Estructura i Constituents de la Materia and Institut de Ciencies del Cosmos (ICCUB), Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain)

    2016-03-15

    In this work we consider how the appearance of gradients of pseudoscalar condensates in dense systems may possibly influence the transport properties of photons in such a medium as well as other thermodynamic characteristics. We adopt the hypothesis that in regions where the pseudoscalar density gradient is large the properties of photons and fermions are governed by the usual lagrangian extended with a Chern-Simons interaction for photons and a constant axial field for fermions. We find that these new pieces in the lagrangian produce non-trivial reflection coefficients both for photons and fermions when entering or leaving a region where the pseudoscalar has a non-zero gradient. A varying pseudoscalar density may also lead to instability of some fermion and boson modes and modify some properties of the Fermi sea. We speculate that some of these modifications could influence the cooling rate of stellar matter (for instance in compact stars) and have other observable consequences. While quantitative results may depend on the precise astrophysical details most of the consequences are quite universal and consideration should be given to this possibility. (orig.)

  18. Numerically abnormal chromosome constitutions in humans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 24, discusses numerically abnormal chromosome constitutions in humans. This involves abnormalities of human chromosome number, including polyploidy (when the number of sets of chromosomes increases) and aneuploidy (when the number of individual normal chromosomes changes). Chapter sections discuss the following chromosomal abnormalities: human triploids, imprinting and uniparental disomy, human tetraploids, hydatidiform moles, anomalies caused by chromosomal imbalance, 13 trisomy (D{sub 1} trisomy, Patau syndrome), 21 trisomy (Down syndrome), 18 trisomy syndrome (Edwards syndrome), other autosomal aneuploidy syndromes, and spontaneous abortions. The chapter concludes with remarks on the nonrandom participation of chromosomes in trisomy. 69 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  19. Flow karyotyping and sorting of human chromosomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, J.W.; Lucas, J.; Peters, D.; Pinkel, D.; Trask, B.; van den Engh, G.; Van Dilla, M.A.

    1986-07-16

    Flow cytometry and sorting are becoming increasingly useful as tools for chromosome classfication and for the detection of numerical and structural chromosome aberrations. Chromosomes of a single type can be purified with these tools to facilitate gene mapping or production of chromosome specific recombinant DNA libraries. For analysis of chromosomes with flow cytometry, the chromosomes are extracted from mitotic cells, stained with one or more fluorescent dyes and classified one-by-one according to their dye content(s). Thus, the flow approach is fundamentally different than conventional karyotyping where chromosomes are classified within the context of a metaphase spread. Flow sorting allows purification of chromosomes that can be distinguished flow cytometrically. The authors describe the basic principles of flow cytometric chromosome classification i.e. flow karyotyping, and chromosome sorting and describe several applications. 30 refs., 8 figs.

  20. Microscopic theory of equilibrium polariton condensates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Fei; Wu, Fengcheng; Xie, Ming; Su, Jung-Jung; MacDonald, A. H.

    2016-12-01

    We present a microscopic theory of the equilibrium polariton condensate state of a semiconductor quantum well in a planar optical cavity. The theory accounts for the adjustment of matter excitations to the presence of a coherent photon field, predicts effective polariton-polariton interaction strengths that are weaker and condensate exciton fractions that are smaller than in the commonly employed exciton-photon model, and yields effective Rabi coupling strengths that depend on the detuning of the cavity-photon energy relative to the bare exciton energy. The dressed quasiparticle bands that appear naturally in the theory provide a mechanism for electrical manipulation of polariton condensates.

  1. The Dynamics of Aerosols in Condensational Scrubbers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannessen, Jens Tue; Christensen, Jan A.; Simonsen, Ole;

    1997-01-01

    A mathematical model for the simulation of the dynamics of aerosol change in condensational scrubbers and scrubbing condensers is proposed. The model is applicable for packed column gas/liquid contact when plug flow can be assumed. The model is compared with experimental data for particle removal...... in a pilot plant condensational scrubber. The model can satisfactorily predict particle growth and particle deposition by diffusional, convective and inertial mechanisms for a wide range of conditions. The parameters of principal importance for the model precision are identified and a procedure...

  2. Quark Virtuality and QCD Vacuum Condensates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Li-Juan; MA Wei-Xing

    2004-01-01

    @@ Based on the Dyson-Schwinger equations (DSEs) in the ‘rainbow' approximation, we investigate the quark virtuality in the vacuum state and quantum-chromodynamics (QCD) vacuum condensates. In particular, we calculate the local quark vacuum condensate and quark-gluon mixed condensates, and then the virtuality of quark. The calculated quark virtualities are λ2u,d = 0.7 GeV2 for u, d quarks, and 2s 1.6 GeV2 for s quark.Our theoretical predictions are consistent with empirical values used in QCD sum rules, and also fit to lattice QCD predictions.

  3. Holographic Duality in Condensed Matter Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaanen, Jan; Liu, Yan; Sun, Ya-Wen; Schalm, Koenraad

    2015-11-01

    Preface; 1. Introduction; 2. Condensed matter: the charted territory; 3. Condensed matter: the challenges; 4. Large N field theories for holography and condensed matter; 5. The AdS/CFT correspondence as computational device: the dictionary; 6. Finite temperature magic: black holes and holographic thermodynamics; 7. Holographic hydrodynamics; 8. Finite density: the Reissner-Nordström black hole and strange metals; 9. Holographic photoemission and the RN metal: the fermions as probes; 10. Holographic superconductivity; 11. Holographic Fermi liquids; 12. Breaking translational invariance; 13. AdS/CMT from the top down; 14. Outlook: holography and quantum matter; References; Index.

  4. Influence of chromatin condensation on the number of direct DSB damages induced by ions studied using a Monte Carlo code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Santos, M; Clairand, I; Gruel, G; Barquinero, J F; Incerti, S; Villagrasa, C

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this work is to evaluate the influence of the chromatin condensation on the number of direct double-strand break (DSB) damages induced by ions. Two geometries of chromosome territories containing either condensed or decondensed chromatin were implemented as biological targets in the Geant4 Monte Carlo simulation code and proton and alpha irradiation was simulated using the Geant4-DNA processes. A DBSCAN algorithm was used in order to detect energy deposition clusters that could give rise to single-strand breaks or DSBs on the DNA molecule. The results of this study show an increase in the number and complexity of DNA DSBs in condensed chromatin when compared with decondensed chromatin.

  5. Mixed gonadal dysgenesis in a 45,X neonate with chromosome Y material in the dysgenetic gonad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karatza, Ageliki; Chrysis, Dionisios; Stefanou, Eunice-Georgia; Mantagos, Stefanos; Salakos, Christos

    2009-11-01

    We report on a neonate with a disorder of sex development, Prader 3-4 external genitalia and a palpable structure in the right inguinal canal suggestive of gonadal tissue. Chromosome studies on blood lymphocytes showed monosomy of chromosome X. Laparoscopy identified a streak-like gonad on the left side, unicorn uterus and a dysgenetic testis on the right, attached to a Fallopian tube. Because of the unilateral palpable gonad and the presence of ambiguous genitalia we investigated further for the presence of Y material. Quantitative fluorescent PCR analysis of material from the dysgenetic gonad and skin fibroblasts revealed the presence of chromosome Y-derived sequences, suggesting sex chromosome mosaicism. In 45,X/46,XY mosaicism, chromosome studies carried out on peripheral lymphocytes do not always reflect the proportion of cell lines in the gonads. The detection of Y chromosome material in a dysgenetic gonad is extremely significant, due to the high risk of malignant transformation.

  6. Y-chromosomal genes affecting male fertility: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhanoa, Jasdeep Kaur; Mukhopadhyay, Chandra Sekhar; Arora, Jaspreet Singh

    2016-01-01

    The mammalian sex-chromosomes (X and Y) have evolved from autosomes and are involved in sex determination and reproductive traits. The Y-chromosome is the smallest chromosome that consists of 2-3% of the haploid genome and may contain between 70 and 200 genes. The Y-chromosome plays major role in male fertility and is suitable to study the evolutionary relics, speciation, and male infertility and/or subfertility due to its unique features such as long non-recombining region, abundance of repetitive sequences, and holandric inheritance pattern. During evolution, many holandric genes were deleted. The current review discusses the mammalian holandric genes and their functions. The commonly encountered infertility and/or subfertility problems due to point or gross mutation (deletion) of the Y-chromosomal genes have also been discussed. For example, loss or microdeletion of sex-determining region, Y-linked gene results in XY males that exhibit female characteristics, deletion of RNA binding motif, Y-encoded in azoospermic factor b region results in the arrest of spermatogenesis at meiosis. The holandric genes have been covered for associating the mutations with male factor infertility. PMID:27536043

  7. Y-chromosomal genes affecting male fertility: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasdeep Kaur Dhanoa

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The mammalian sex-chromosomes (X and Y have evolved from autosomes and are involved in sex determination and reproductive traits. The Y-chromosome is the smallest chromosome that consists of 2-3% of the haploid genome and may contain between 70 and 200 genes. The Y-chromosome plays major role in male fertility and is suitable to study the evolutionary relics, speciation, and male infertility and/or subfertility due to its unique features such as long non-recombining region, abundance of repetitive sequences, and holandric inheritance pattern. During evolution, many holandric genes were deleted. The current review discusses the mammalian holandric genes and their functions. The commonly encountered infertility and/or subfertility problems due to point or gross mutation (deletion of the Y-chromosomal genes have also been discussed. For example, loss or microdeletion of sex-determining region, Y-linked gene results in XY males that exhibit female characteristics, deletion of RNA binding motif, Y-encoded in azoospermic factor b region results in the arrest of spermatogenesis at meiosis. The holandric genes have been covered for associating the mutations with male factor infertility.

  8. Numerical Simulation of Condensation of Sulfuric Acid and Water in a Large Two-stroke Marine Diesel Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walther, J. H.; Karvounis, N.; Pang, K. M.

    2016-11-01

    We present results from computational fluid dynamics simulations of the condensation of sulfuric acid (H2SO 4) and water (H2 O) in a large two-stroke marine diesel engine. The model uses a reduced n-heptane skeletal chemical mechanism coupled with a sulfur subset to simulate the combustion process and the formation of SOx and H2SO 4 . Condensation is modeled using a fluid film model coupled with the Eulerian in-cylinder gas phase. The fluid film condensation model is validated against both experimental and numerical results. The engine simulations reveal that the fluid film has a significant effect on the sulfuric acid gas phase. A linear correlation is found between the fuel sulfur content and the sulfuric acid condensation rate. The initial in-cylinder water content is found not to affect the sulfuric acid condensation but it has a high impact on water condensation. The scavenging pressure level shows an inverse correlation between pressure and condensation rate due to change in the flame propagation speed. Finally, increasing the cylinder liner temperature significantly decreases water condensation but has a negligible influence on the condensation of sulfuric acid.

  9. Time study of DNA condensate morphology: implications regarding the nucleation, growth, and equilibrium populations of toroids and rods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilfan, Igor D; Conwell, Christine C; Sarkar, Tumpa; Hud, Nicholas V

    2006-07-04

    It is well known that multivalent cations cause free DNA in solution to condense into nanometer-scale particles with toroidal and rod-like morphologies. However, it has not been shown to what degree kinetic factors (e.g., condensate nucleation) versus thermodynamic factors (e.g., DNA bending energy) determine experimentally observed relative populations of toroids and rods. It is also not clear how multimolecular DNA toroids and rods interconvert in solution. We have conducted a series of condensation studies in which DNA condensate morphology statistics were measured as a function of time and DNA structure. Here, we show that in a typical in vitro DNA condensation reaction, the relative rod population 2 min after the initiation of condensation is substantially greater than that measured after morphological equilibrium is reached (ca. 20 min). This higher population of rods at earlier time points is consistent with theoretical studies that have suggested a favorable kinetic pathway for rod nucleation. By using static DNA loops to alter the kinetics and thermodynamics of condensation, we further demonstrate that reported increases in rod populations associated with decreasing DNA length are primarily due to a change in the thermodynamics of DNA condensation, rather than a change in the kinetics of condensate nucleation or growth. The results presented also reveal that the redistribution of DNA from rods to toroids is mediated through the exchange of DNA strands with solution.

  10. Reduced Effective Model for Condensation in Slender Tubes with Rotational Symmetry, Obtained by Generalized Dimensional Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Dziubek, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    Experimental results for condensation in compact heat exchangers show that the heat transfer due to condensation is significantly better compared to classical heat exchangers, especially when using R134a instead of water as the refrigerant. This suggests that surface tension plays a role. Using generalized dimensional analysis we derive reduced model equations and jump conditions for condensation in a vertical tube with cylindrical cross section. Based on this model we derive a single ordinary differential equation for the thickness of the condensate film as function of the tube axis. Our model agrees well with commonly used models from existing literature. It is based on the physical dimensions of the problem and has greater geometrical flexibility.

  11. Dose assessment intercomparisons within the RENEB network using G0-lymphocyte prematurely condensed chromosomes (PCC assay)

    OpenAIRE

    Terzoudi, Georgia I; Pantelias, Gabriel; Darroudi, Firouz; Barszczewska, Katarzyna; Buraczewska, Iwona; Depuydt, Julie; Georgieva, Dimka; Hadjidekova, Valeria; Hatzi, Vasiliki I.; Karachristou, Ioanna; Karakosta, Maria; Meschini, Roberta; M’kacher, Radhia; Montoro, Alegria; Palitti, Fabrizio

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Dose assessment intercomparisons within the RENEB network were performed for triage biodosimetry analyzing G0-lymphocyte PCC for harmonization, standardization and optimization of the PCC assay. Materials and methods: Comparative analysis among different partners for dose assessment included shipment of PCC-slides and captured images to construct dose-response curves for up to 6 Gy c-rays. Accident simulation exercises were performed to assess the suitability of the PCC assay by d...

  12. The antimicrobial polymer PHMB enters cells and selectively condenses bacterial chromosomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chindera, Kantaraja; Mahato, Manohar; Sharma, Ashwani Kumar;

    2016-01-01

    To combat infection and antimicrobial resistance, it is helpful to elucidate drug mechanism(s) of action. Here we examined how the widely used antimicrobial polyhexamethylene biguanide (PHMB) kills bacteria selectively over host cells. Contrary to the accepted model of microbial membrane disruption...

  13. Homologous recombination, sister chromatid cohesion, and chromosome condensation in mammalian meiosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eijpe, M.

    2002-01-01

    In the life cycle of sexually reproducing eukaryotes, haploid and diploid generations of cells alternate. Two types of cell division occur in such a life cycle: mitosis and meiosis. They are compared in chapter 1 . Haploid and diploid cells can multiply by mitoses.

  14. Convection in Condensible-rich Atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Ding, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Condensible substances are nearly ubiquitous in planetary atmospheres. For the most familiar case-water vapor in Earth's present climate-the condensible gas is dilute, in the sense that its concentration is everywhere small relative to the noncondensible background gases. A wide variety of important planetary climate problems involve nondilute condensible substances. These include planets near or undergoing a water vapor runaway and planets near the outer edge of the conventional habitable zone, for which CO2 is the condensible. Standard representations of convection in climate models rely on several approximations appropriate only to the dilute limit, while nondilute convection differs in fundamental ways from dilute convection. In this paper, a simple parameterization of convection valid in the nondilute as well as dilute limits is derived and used to discuss the basic character of nondilute convection. The energy conservation properties of the scheme are discussed in detail and are verified in radiative-co...

  15. Cold condensation of dust in the ISM

    CERN Document Server

    Rouillé, Gaël; Krasnokutski, Serge A; Krebsz, Melinda; Henning, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The condensation of complex silicates with pyroxene and olivine composition at conditions prevailing in molecular clouds has been experimentally studied. For this purpose, molecular species comprising refractory elements were forced to accrete on cold substrates representing the cold surfaces of surviving dust grains in the interstellar medium. The efficient formation of amorphous and homogeneous magnesium iron silicates at temperatures of about 12 K has been monitored by IR spectroscopy. The gaseous precursors of such condensation processes in the interstellar medium are formed by erosion of dust grains in supernova shock waves. In the laboratory, we have evaporated glassy silicate dust analogs and embedded the released species in neon ice matrices that have been studied spectroscopically to identify the molecular precursors of the condensing solid silicates. A sound coincidence between the 10 micron band of the interstellar silicates and the 10 micron band of the low-temperature siliceous condensates can be...

  16. Condensate of excitations in moving superfluids

    CERN Document Server

    Kolomeitsev, E E

    2016-01-01

    A possibility of the condensation of excitations with a non-zero momentum in rectilinearly moving and rotating superfluid bosonic and fermionic (with Cooper pairing) media is considered in terms of a phenomenological order-parameter functional at zero and non-zero temperature. The results might be applicable to the description of bosonic systems like superfluid $^4$He, ultracold atomic Bose gases, charged pion and kaon condensates in rotating neutron stars, and various superconducting fermionic systems with pairing, like proton and color-superconducting components in compact stars, metallic superconductors, and neutral fermionic systems with pairing, like the neutron component in compact stars and ultracold atomic Fermi gases. Order parameters of the "mother" condensate in the superfluid and the new condensate of excitations, corresponding energy gains, critical temperatures and critical velocities are found.

  17. Vacuum condensates and `ether-drift' experiments

    OpenAIRE

    Consoli, M.; Pagano, A.; Pappalardo, L.

    2003-01-01

    The idea of a `condensed' vacuum state is generally accepted in modern elementary particle physics. We argue that this should motivate a new generation of precise `ether-drift' experiments with present-day technology.

  18. Recent developments in Bose-Einstein condensation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalman, G.

    1997-09-22

    This paper contains viewgraphs on developments on Bose-Einstein condensation. Some topics covered are: strongly coupled coulomb systems; standard response functions of the first and second kind; dynamical mean field theory; quasi localized charge approximation; and the main equations.

  19. Preparation and Properties of Vesicles from Condensable Amphiphilic Amino Acids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    熊向源; 何巍; 李子臣; 李福绵

    2001-01-01

    Three double-chain amphiphiles with amino acid groups as hydrphilic moiety were synthesized. These amphiphiles can be easily dispersed in buffer solution to form transparent dispersion. Examination of the dispersion by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed the formation of stable vesicular aggregates, which was also confirmed by the ability to encapsulate water-soluble dyes. Since amino acid groups are located on the surface of the vesicles, water-soluble carbodiimide can induce the condensation of these groups to form peptide. The phase transition temperatures of these vesicles were estimated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and a decrease of phase transition temperature was observed after polycondensation due to the disturbance of the ordered arrangement of the hydrophobic chains. The leakage rate of the vesicles before and after condensation was studied by monitoring the increase of fluorescence intensity of water-soluble dye. These vesicles belong to the least permeable ones and the leakage rate can be controlled by varying the degree of condensation or the temperature.

  20. High temperature condensate clouds in super-hot Jupiter atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Wakeford, Hannah R; Lewis, Nikole K; Kataria, Tiffany; Marley, Mark S; Fortney, Jonathan J; Mandell, Avi M

    2016-01-01

    Deciphering the role of clouds is central to our understanding of exoplanet atmospheres, as they have a direct impact on the temperature and pressure structure, and observational properties of the planet. Super-hot Jupiters occupy a temperature regime similar to low mass M-dwarfs, where minimal cloud condensation is expected. However, observations of exoplanets such as WASP-12b (Teq ~ 2500 K) result in a transmission spectrum indicative of a cloudy atmosphere. We re-examine the temperature and pressure space occupied by these super-hot Jupiter atmospheres, to explore the role of the initial Al- and Ti-bearing condensates as the main source of cloud material. Due to the high temperatures a majority of the more common refractory material is not depleted into deeper layers and would remain in the vapor phase. The lack of depletion into deeper layers means that these materials with relatively low cloud masses can become significant absorbers in the upper atmosphere. We provide condensation curves for the initial ...

  1. Coupling a single electron to a Bose-Einstein condensate

    CERN Document Server

    Balewski, Jonathan B; Gaj, Anita; Peter, David; Büchler, Hans Peter; Löw, Robert; Hofferberth, Sebastian; Pfau, Tilman

    2013-01-01

    The coupling of electrons to matter is at the heart of our understanding of material properties such as electrical conductivity. One of the most intriguing effects is that electron-phonon coupling can lead to the formation of a Cooper pair out of two repelling electrons, the basis for BCS superconductivity. Here we study the interaction of a single localized electron with a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) and show that it can excite phonons and eventually set the whole condensate into a collective oscillation. We find that the coupling is surprisingly strong as compared to ionic impurities due to the more favorable mass ratio. The electron is held in place by a single charged ionic core forming a Rydberg bound state. This Rydberg electron is described by a wavefunction extending to a size comparable to the dimensions of the BEC, namely up to 8 micrometers. In such a state, corresponding to a principal quantum number of n=202, the Rydberg electron is interacting with several tens of thousands of condensed atoms...

  2. Harvesting liquid from unsaturated vapor - nanoflows induced by capillary condensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Olivier; Marguet, Bastien; Stroock, Abraham

    2016-11-01

    A vapor, even subsaturated, can spontaneously form liquid in nanoscale spaces. This process, known as capillary condensation, plays a fundamental role in various contexts, such as the formation of clouds or the dynamics of hydrocarbons in the geological subsurface. However, large uncertainties remain on the thermodynamics and fluid mechanics of the phenomenon, due to experimental challenges as well as outstanding questions about the validity of macroscale physics at the nanometer scale. We studied experimentally the spatio-temporal dynamics of water condensation in a model nanoporous medium (pore radius 2 nm), taking advantage of the color change of the material upon hydration. We found that at low relative humidities (diffusive fashion, while it occurred through a well-defined capillary-viscous imbibition front at > 60 % RH, driven by a balance between the pore capillary pressure and the condensation stress given by Kelvin equation. Further analyzing the imbibition dynamics as a function of saturation allowed us to extract detailed information about the physics of nano-confined fluids. Our results suggest excellent extension of macroscale fluid dynamics and thermodynamics even in pores 10 molecules in diameter.

  3. Essay: fifty years of condensed matter physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Marvin L

    2008-12-19

    Since the birth of Physical Review Letters fifty years ago, condensed matter physics has seen considerable growth, and both the journal and the field have flourished during this period. In this essay, I begin with some general comments about condensed matter physics and then give some personal views on the conceptual development of the field and list some highlights. The focus is mostly on theoretical developments.

  4. Chromosome Aberration in Human Blood Lymphocytes Exposed to Energetic Protons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hada, M.; George, Kerry A.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2008-01-01

    During space flight, astronauts are exposed to a space radiation consisting of high-energy protons, high charge and energy (HZE) nuclei, as well as secondary particles that are generated when the primary particles penetrate the spacecraft shielding. Secondary particles have a higher LET value than primary protons and therefore expected to have a higher relative biological effectiveness (RBE). To investigate this theory, we exposed human peripheral blood lymphocytes to protons with energies of 250 MeV, 800MeV, 2 GeV, or 2.5 GeV. LET values for these protons ranged from 0.4 to 0.2 keV/micrometer. and doses ranged from 0.2 to 3 Gy. Over this energy the probability of nuclear reaction leading to secondary radiation, and the multiplicity of reaction produces such as neutrons and mesons increases substantially. The effect of aluminum and polyethylene shielding was also assessed using the 2 GeV and 2.5GeV proton beams. After exposure lymphocytes were stimulated to divide and chromosomes were collected from cells in the first G2 and metaphase cell cycle after exposure using a chemical induced premature chromosome condensation (PCC) technique. Dose response data for chromosome damage was analyzed using the fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) chromosome painting technique. Selected samples were also analyzed with multicolor FISH (mFISH) and multicolor banding FISH (mBAND) techniques. Data indicates that the dose response for simple-type exchanges is similar for proton and gamma exposure, whereas protons induce higher yields of complex exchanges that are LET dependent. RBE values will be presented for each proton energy, and the effects of shielding and possible cytogenetic signatures of proton exposure will be discussed.

  5. Chromosome aberrations in human blood lymphocytes exposed to energetic protons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hada, Megumi; George, Ms Kerry; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    During space flight, astronauts are exposed to space radiation consisting of high-energy protons, high charge and energy (HZE) nuclei, as well as secondary particles that are generated when the primary particles penetrate the spacecraft shielding. Secondary particles have a higher LET value than primary protons and are therefore expected to have a higher relative biological effectiveness (RBE). To investigate this theory, we exposed human peripheral blood lymphocytes to protons with energies of 250 MeV, 800MeV, 2 GeV, or 2.5 GeV. LET values for these protons ranged from 0.4 to 0.2 keV/µm. and doses ranged from 0.2 to 3 Gy. Over this energy range the probability of nuclear reaction leading to secondary radiation, and the multiplicity of reaction products such as neutrons and mesons increases substantially. The effect of aluminum and polyethylene shielding was also assessed using the 2 GeV and 2.5GeV proton beams. After exposure lymphocytes were stimulated to divide and chromosomes were collected from cells in the first G2 and metaphase cell cycle after exposure using a chemical induced premature chromosome condensation (PCC) technique. Dose response data for chromosome damage was analyzed using the fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) chromosome painting technique. Selected samples were also analyzed with multicolor FISH (mFISH) and multicolor banding FISH (mBAND) techniques. Data indicates that the dose response for simple-type exchanges is similar for proton and gamma exposure, whereas protons induce higher yields of complex exchanges that are energy dependent. RBE values will be presented for each proton energy, and the effects of shielding and possible cytogenetic signatures of proton exposure will be discussed.

  6. Experimental simulation of the condensation and metamorphism of seasonal CO2 condensates under martian conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grisolle, F.; Schmitt, B.; Beck, P.; Philippe, S.; Brissaud, O.

    2014-04-01

    An experimental set-up, CARBON-IR, has been developed in order to perform the condensation and metamorphism of CO2 condensates in various controlled martian conditions at, or out of, equilibrium. The sample texture is monitored and near-infrared reflectance spectra are recorded. We present a first set of experiments aimed to simulate the formation of compact translucent slabs by condensation of CO2 gas, the metamorphism of CO2 snow, as well as their sublimation.

  7. Inherited unbalanced structural chromosome abnormalities at prenatal chromosome analysis are rarely ascertained through recurrent miscarriage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franssen, M. T. M.; Korevaar, J. C.; Tjoa, W. M.; Leschot, N. J.; Bossuyt, P. M. M.; Knegt, A. C.; Suykerbuyk, R. F.; Hochstenbach, R.; van der Veen, F.; Goddijn, M.

    2008-01-01

    Objective To determine the mode of ascertainment of inherited unbalanced structural chromosome abnormalities detected at prenatal chromosome analysis. Methods From the databases of three centres for clinical genetics in the Netherlands, all cases of inherited unbalanced structural chromosome abnorma

  8. Wettability Patterning for Enhanced Dropwise Condensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Aritra; Ganguly, Ranjan; Megaridis, Constantine

    2014-11-01

    Dropwise condensation (DwC), in order to be sustainable, requires removal of the condensate droplets. This removal is frequently facilitated by gravity. The rate of DwC heat transfer depends strongly on the maximum departing droplet diameter. Based on wettability patterning, we present a facile technique designed to control the maximum droplet size in DwC within vapor/air atmospheres, and demonstrate how this approach can be used to enhance the corresponding heat transfer rate. We examine various hydrophilic-superhydrophilic patterns, which, respectively sustain DwC and filmwise (FwC) condensation on the substrate. The fabrication method does notemploy any hydrophobizing agent. By juxtaposing parallel lines of hydrophilic (CA ~ 78°) and superhydrophilic (CA ~ 0°) regions on the condensing surface, we create alternating domains of DwC and FwC. The average droplet size on the DwC domain is reduced by ~ 60% compared to the theoretical maximum, which corresponds to the line width. We compare heat transfer rate between unpatternend DwC surfaces and patterned DwC surfaces. Even after sacrificing 40% of condensing area, we achieve up to 20% improvement in condensate collection rate using an interdigitated superhydrophilic pattern, inspired by the vein network of plant leaves. The bioinspired interdigitated pattern is found to outperform the straight hydrophilic-superhydrophilic pattern, particularly under higher vapor loadings in an air/vapor ambient atmosphere. NSF STTR Grant 1331817 via NBD Nano.

  9. Numerical simulation of condensation on structured surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Xiaowu; Yao, Zhaohui; Hao, Pengfei

    2014-11-25

    Condensation of liquid droplets on solid surfaces happens widely in nature and industrial processes. This phase-change phenomenon has great effect on the performance of some microfluidic devices. On the basis of micro- and nanotechnology, superhydrophobic structured surfaces can be well-fabricated. In this work, the nucleating and growth of droplets on different structured surfaces are investigated numerically. The dynamic behavior of droplets during the condensation is simulated by the multiphase lattice Boltzmann method (LBM), which has the ability to incorporate the microscopic interactions, including fluid-fluid interaction and fluid-surface interaction. The results by the LBM show that, besides the chemical properties of surfaces, the topography of structures on solid surfaces influences the condensation process. For superhydrophobic surfaces, the spacing and height of microridges have significant influence on the nucleation sites. This mechanism provides an effective way for prevention of wetting on surfaces in engineering applications. Moreover, it suggests a way to prevent ice formation on surfaces caused by the condensation of subcooled water. For hydrophilic surfaces, however, microstructures may be submerged by the liquid films adhering to the surfaces. In this case, microstructures will fail to control the condensation process. Our research provides an optimized way for designing surfaces for condensation in engineering systems.

  10. A high-resolution comparative map between pig chromosome 17 and human chromosomes 4, 8, and 20: Identification of synteny breakpoints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lahbib-Mansais, Yvette; Karlskov-Mortensen, Peter; Mompart, Florence;

    2005-01-01

    We report on the construction of a high-resolution comparative map of porcine chromosome 17 (SSC17) focusing on evolutionary breakpoints with human chromosomes. The comparative map shows high homology with human chromosome 20 but suggests more limited homologies with other human chromosomes. SSC17...... is of particular interest in studies of chromosomal organization due to the presence of QTLs that affect meat quality and carcass composition. A total of 158 pig ESTs available in databases or developed by the Sino-Danish Pig Genome Sequencing Consortium were mapped using the INRA-University of Minnesota porcine...... radiation hydrid panel. The high-resolution map was further anchored by fluorescence in situ hybridization. This study confirmed the extensive conservation between SSC17 and HSA20 and enabled the gene order to be determined. The homology of the SSC17 pericentromeric region was extended to other human...

  11. Condensation of the air-steam mixture in a vertical tube condenser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Havlík Jan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the condensation of water vapour in the presence of non-condensable air. Experimental and theoretical solutions of this problem are presented here. A heat exchanger for the condensation of industrial waste steam containing infiltrated air was designed. The condenser consists of a bundle of vertical tubes in which the steam condenses as it flows downwards with cooling water flowing outside the tubes in the opposite direction. Experiments with pure steam and with mixtures of steam with added air were carried out to find the dependence of the condensation heat transfer coefficient (HTC on the air concentration in the steam mixture. The experimental results were compared with the theoretical formulas describing the cases. The theoretical determination of the HTC is based on the Nusselt model of steam condensation on a vertical wall, where the analogy of heat and mass transfer is used to take into account the behaviour of air in a steam mixture during the condensation process. The resulting dependencies obtained from the experiments and obtained from the theoretical model have similar results. The significant decrease in the condensation HTC, which begins at very low air concentrations in a steam mixture, was confirmed.

  12. Condensation of the air-steam mixture in a vertical tube condenser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havlík, Jan; Dlouhý, Tomáš

    2016-03-01

    This paper deals with the condensation of water vapour in the presence of non-condensable air. Experimental and theoretical solutions of this problem are presented here. A heat exchanger for the condensation of industrial waste steam containing infiltrated air was designed. The condenser consists of a bundle of vertical tubes in which the steam condenses as it flows downwards with cooling water flowing outside the tubes in the opposite direction. Experiments with pure steam and with mixtures of steam with added air were carried out to find the dependence of the condensation heat transfer coefficient (HTC) on the air concentration in the steam mixture. The experimental results were compared with the theoretical formulas describing the cases. The theoretical determination of the HTC is based on the Nusselt model of steam condensation on a vertical wall, where the analogy of heat and mass transfer is used to take into account the behaviour of air in a steam mixture during the condensation process. The resulting dependencies obtained from the experiments and obtained from the theoretical model have similar results. The significant decrease in the condensation HTC, which begins at very low air concentrations in a steam mixture, was confirmed.

  13. Sex Chromosome Meiotic Drive in Stalk-Eyed Flies

    OpenAIRE

    1997-01-01

    Meiotically driven sex chromosomes can quickly spread to fixation and cause population extinction unless balanced by selection or suppressed by genetic modifiers. We report results of genetic analyses that demonstrate that extreme female-biased sex ratios in two sister species of stalk-eyed flies, Cyrtodiopsis dalmanni and C. whitei, are due to a meiotic drive element on the X chromosome (X(d)). Relatively high frequencies of X(d) in C. dalmanni and C. whitei (13-17% and 29%, respectively) ca...

  14. Dean flow fractionation of chromosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hockin, Matt; Sant, Himanshu J.; Capecchi, Mario; Gale, Bruce K.

    2016-03-01

    Efforts to transfer intact mammalian chromosomes between cells have been attempted for more than 50 years with the consistent result being transfer of sub unit length pieces regardless of method. Inertial microfluidics is a new field that has shown much promise in addressing the fractionation of particles in the 2-20 μm size range (with unknown limits) and separations are based upon particles being carried by curving confined flows (within a spiral shaped, often rectangular flow chamber) and migrating to stable "equilibrium" positions of varying distance from a chamber wall depending on the balance of dean and lift forces. We fabricated spiral channels for inertial microfluidic separations using a standard soft lithography process. The concentration of chromosomes, small contaminant DNA and large cell debris in each outlets were evaluated using microscope (60X) and a flow cytometer. Using Dean Flow Fractionation, we were able to focus 4.5 times more chromosomes in outlet 2 compared to outlet 4 where most of the large debris is found. We recover 16% of the chromosomes in outlet #1- 50% in 2, 23% in 3 and 11% in 4. It should be noted that these estimates of recovery do not capture one piece of information- it actually may be that the chromosomes at each outlet are physically different and work needs to be done to verify this potential.

  15. Chromosome segregation in plant meiosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda eZamariola

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Faithful chromosome segregation in meiosis is essential for ploidy stability over sexual life cycles. In plants, defective chromosome segregation caused by gene mutations or other factors leads to the formation of unbalanced or unreduced gametes creating aneuploid or polyploid progeny, respectively. Accurate segregation requires the coordinated execution of conserved processes occurring throughout the two meiotic cell divisions. Synapsis and recombination ensure the establishment of chiasmata that hold homologous chromosomes together allowing their correct segregation in the first meiotic division, which is also tightly regulated by cell-cycle dependent release of cohesin and monopolar attachment of sister kinetochores to microtubules. In meiosis II, bi-orientation of sister kinetochores and proper spindle orientation correctly segregate chromosomes in four haploid cells. Checkpoint mechanisms acting at kinetochores control the accuracy of kinetochore-microtubule attachment, thus ensuring the completion of segregation. Here we review the current knowledge on the processes taking place during chromosome segregation in plant meiosis, focusing on the characterization of the molecular factors involved.

  16. The Reduction of Chromosome Number in Meiosis Is Determined by Properties Built into the Chromosomes

    OpenAIRE

    Paliulis, Leocadia V.; Nicklas, R. Bruce

    2000-01-01

    In meiosis I, two chromatids move to each spindle pole. Then, in meiosis II, the two are distributed, one to each future gamete. This requires that meiosis I chromosomes attach to the spindle differently than meiosis II chromosomes and that they regulate chromosome cohesion differently. We investigated whether the information that dictates the division type of the chromosome comes from the whole cell, the spindle, or the chromosome itself. Also, we determined when chromosomes can switch from ...

  17. Primes, Geometry and Condensed Matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al Rabeh R. H.

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Fascination with primes dates back to the Greeks and before. Primes are named by some "the elementary particles of arithmetic" as every nonprime integer is made of a unique set of primes. In this article we point to new connections between primes, geometry and physics which show that primes could be called "the elementary particles of physics" too. This study considers the problem of closely packing similar circles/spheres in 2D/3D space. This is in effect a discretization process of space and the allowable number in a pack is found to lead to some unexpected cases of prime configurations which is independent of the size of the constituents. We next suggest that a non-prime can be considered geometrically as a symmetric collection that is separable (factorable into similar parts- six is two threes or three twos for example. A collection that has no such symmetry is a prime. As a result, a physical prime aggregate is more difficult to split symmetrically resulting in an inherent stability. This "number/physical" stability idea applies to bigger collections made from smaller (prime units leading to larger stable prime structures in a limitless scaling up process. The distribution of primes among numbers can be understood better using the packing ideas described here and we further suggest that differing numbers (and values of distinct prime factors making a nonprime collection is an important factor in determining the probability and method of possible and subsequent disintegration. Disintegration is bound by energy conservation and is closely related to symmetry by Noether theorems. Thinking of condensed matter as the packing of identical elements, we examine plots of the masses of chemical elements of the periodic table, and also those of the elementary particles of physics, and show that prime packing rules seem to play a role in the make up of matter. The plots show convincingly that the growth of prime numbers and that of the masses of

  18. Primes, Geometry and Condensed Matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al Rabeh R. H.

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Fascination with primes dates back to the Greeks and before. Primes are named by some “the elementary particles of arithmetic” as every nonprime integer is made of a unique set of primes. In this article we point to new connections between primes, geometry and physics which show that primes could be called “the elementary particles of physics” too. This study considers the problem of closely packing similar circles / spheres in 2D / 3D space. This is in effect a discretization process of space and the allowable num- ber in a pack is found to lead to some unexpected cases of prime configurations which is independent of the size of the constituents. We next suggest that a non-prime can be considered geometrically as a symmetric collection that is separable (factorable into similar parts- six is two threes or three twos for example. A collection that has no such symmetry is a prime. As a result, a physical prime aggregate is more difficult to split symmetrically resulting in an inherent stability. This “number / physical” stability idea applies to bigger collections made from smaller (prime units leading to larger sta- ble prime structures in a limitless scaling up process. The distribution of primes among numbers can be understood better using the packing ideas described here and we further suggest that differing numbers (and values of distinct prime factors making a nonprime collection is an important factor in determining the probability and method of possible and subsequent disintegration. Disintegration is bound by energy conservation and is closely related to symmetry by Noether theorems. Thinking of condensed matter as the packing of identical elements, we examine plots of the masses of chemical elements of the periodic table, and also those of the elementary particles of physics, and show that prime packing rules seem to play a role in the make up of matter. The plots show con- vincingly that the growth of prime numbers and that

  19. Epigenetics and autoimmune diseases: the X chromosome-nucleolus nexus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Wesley H; Renaudineau, Yves

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases occur more often in females, suggesting a key role for the X chromosome. X chromosome inactivation, a major epigenetic feature in female cells that provides dosage compensation of X-linked genes to avoid overexpression, presents special vulnerabilities that can contribute to the disease process. Disruption of X inactivation can result in loss of dosage compensation with expression from previously sequestered genes, imbalance of gene products, and altered endogenous material out of normal epigenetic context. In addition, the human X has significant differences compared to other species and these differences can contribute to the frequency and intensity of the autoimmune disease in humans as well as the types of autoantigens encountered. Here a link is demonstrated between autoimmune diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus, and the X chromosome by discussing cases in which typically non-autoimmune disorders complicated with X chromosome abnormalities also present lupus-like symptoms. The discussion is then extended to the reported spatial and temporal associations of the inactive X chromosome with the nucleolus. When frequent episodes of cellular stress occur, the inactive X chromosome may be disrupted and inadvertently become involved in the nucleolar stress response. Development of autoantigens, many of which are at least transiently components of the nucleolus, is then described. Polyamines, which aid in nucleoprotein complex assembly in the nucleolus, increase further during cell stress, and appear to have an important role in the autoimmune disease process. Autoantigenic endogenous material can potentially be stabilized by polyamines. This presents a new paradigm for autoimmune diseases: that many are antigen-driven and the autoantigens originate from altered endogenous material due to episodes of cellular stress that disrupt epigenetic control. This suggests that epigenetics and the X chromosome are important aspects of autoimmune

  20. Cost-optimized design approach for steam condensers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurma Rao, P.S.V.

    1982-08-23

    Examines methods of selecting cooling water quality for a steam surface condenser operating in a power plant or in a process. Equations and graphs for determining optimum terminal temperature difference and optimum cooling water velocity are presented. With large quantity with large terminal temperature difference, water cost will be more, but the annual fixed charges for maintenance will be smaller because the surface area is less due to the large terminal temperature difference. With high velocities giving high heat transfer rates with less surface area, initial costs are low, but pumping costs will be higher.

  1. Comprehensive meiotic segregation analysis of a 4-breakpoint t(1;3;6) complex chromosome rearrangement using single sperm array comparative genomic hybridization and FISH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornak, Miroslav; Vozdova, Miluse; Musilova, Petra; Prinosilova, Petra; Oracova, Eva; Linkova, Vlasta; Vesela, Katerina; Rubes, Jiri

    2014-10-01

    Complex chromosomal rearrangements (CCR) represent rare structural chromosome abnormalities frequently associated with infertility. In this study, meiotic segregation in spermatozoa of an infertile normospermic carrier of a 4-breakpoint t(1;3;6) CCR was analysed. A newly developed array comparative genomic hybridization protocol was used, and all chromosomes in 50 single sperm cells were simultaneously examined. Three-colour FISH was used to analyse chromosome segregation in 1557 other single sperm cells. It was also used to measure an interchromosomal effect; sperm chromatin structure assay was used to measure chromatin integrity. A high-frequency of unbalanced spermatozoa (84%) was observed, mostly arising from the 3:3 symmetrical segregation mode. Array comparative genomic hybridization was used to detect additional aneuploidies in two out of 50 spermatozoa (4%) in chromosomes not involved in the complex chromosome rearrangement. Significantly increased rates of diploidy and XY disomy were found in the CCR carrier compared with the control group (P < 0.001). Defective condensation of sperm chromatin was also found in 22.7% of spermatozoa by sperm chromatin structure assay. The results indicate that the infertility in the man with CCR and normal spermatozoa was caused by a production of chromosomally unbalanced, XY disomic and diploid spermatozoa and spermatozoa with defective chromatin condensation.

  2. Enhanced tubes for steam condensers. Volume 1, Summary of condensation and fouling; Volume 2, Detailed study of steam condensation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Webb, R.L.; Chamra, L.; Jaber, H.

    1992-02-01

    Electric utility steam condensers typically use plain tubes made of titanium, stainless steel, or copper alloys. Approximately two-thirds of the total thermal resistance is on the water side of the plain tube. This program seeks to conceive and develop a tube geometry that has special enhancement geometries on the tube (water) side and the steam (shell) side. This ``enhanced`` tube geometry, will provide increased heat transfer coefficients. The enhanced tubes will allow the steam to condense at a lower temperature. The reduced condensing temperature will reduce the turbine heat rate, and increase the plant peak load capability. Water side fouling and fouling control is a very important consideration affecting the choice of the tube side enhancement. Hence, we have consciously considered fouling potential in our selection of the tube side surface geometry. Using appropriate correlations and theoretical models, we have designed condensation and water side surface geometries that will provide high performance and be cleanable using sponge ball cleaning. Commercial tube manufacturers have made the required tube geometries for test purposes. The heat transfer test program includes measurement of the condensation and water side heat transfer coefficients. Fouling tests are being run to measure the waterside fouling resistance, and to the test the ability of the sponge ball cleaning system to clean the tubes.

  3. Dropwise condensation on superhydrophobic surfaces with two-tier roughness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chuan-Hua; Cai, Qingjun; Tsai, Chialun; Chen, Chung-Lung; Xiong, Guangyong; Yu, Ying; Ren, Zhifeng

    2007-04-01

    Dropwise condensation can enhance heat transfer by an order of magnitude compared to film condensation. Superhydrophobicity appears ideal to promote continued dropwise condensation which requires rapid removal of condensate drops; however, such promotion has not been reported on engineered surfaces. This letter reports continuous dropwise condensation on a superhydrophobic surface with short carbon nanotubes deposited on micromachined posts, a two-tier texture mimicking lotus leaves. On such micro-/nanostructured surfaces, the condensate drops prefer the Cassie state which is thermodynamically more stable than the Wenzel state. With a hexadecanethiol coating, superhydrophobicity is retained during and after condensation and rapid drop removal is enabled.

  4. Recombination of an intrachromosomal paracentric insertion of chromosome 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Best, R.G.; Burnett, W.J.; Brock, J.K. [Univ. of South Carolina School of Medicine, Columbia, SC (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Cytogenetic studies were initiated on a newborn female due to multiple congenital anomalies including microcephaly, clinodactyly, abnormal positioning of hands, left facial palsy, heart defect, sacral dimple, and facial dysmorphic features. Facial features were described as low set rotated ears, nystagmus, and a small, flattened nose. A structural rearrangement of the long arm of chromosome 3 was observed with a complex banding pattern. Study of parental chromosomes revealed a normal male pattern for the father, and an intrachromosomal insertion on the long arm of chromosome 3 for the mother described as 46,XX,dir ins(3)(q21q23q26.2). Further characterization of the proband`s structurally abnormal chromosome 3 revealed a karyotype best described as: 46,XX,rec(3),dupq23{r_arrow}q26.2::q21{r_arrow}q23,dir ins(3)(q21q23q26.2), which is a partial duplication of both the inserted segment as well as the intervening segment between the inserted segment and the insertion site. This would appear to be the result of a three-strand double cross-over within the insertion loop. Molecular cytogenetic studies are presently underway to further elucidate chromosome structure of the proband and her mother.

  5. Sex chromosome aneuploidy in cytogenetic findings of referral patients from south of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Najmeh Jouyan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chromosome abnormality (CA including Sex chromosomes abnormality (SCAs is one of the most important causes of disordered sexual development and infertility. SCAs formed by numerical or structural alteration in X and Y chromosomes, are the most frequently CA encountered at both prenatal diagnosis and at birth. Objective: This study describes cytogenetic findings of cases suspected with CA referred for cytogenetic study. Materials and Methods: Blood samples of 4151 patients referred for cytogenetic analysis were cultured for chromosome preparation. Karyotypes were prepared for all samples and G-Banded chromosomes were analyzed using x100 objective lens. Sex chromosome aneuploidy cases were analyzed and categorized in two groups of Turners and Klinefelter’s syndrome (KFS. Results: Out of 230 (5.54% cases with chromosomally abnormal karyotype, 122 (30% cases suspected of sexual disorder showed SCA including 46% Turner’s syndrome, 46% KFS and the remaining other sex chromosome abnormalities. The frequency of classic and mosaic form of Turner’s syndrome was 33% and 67%, this was 55% and 45% for KFS, respectively. Conclusion: This study shows a relatively high sex chromosome abnormality in this region and provides cytogenetic data to assist clinicians and genetic counselors to determine the priority of requesting cytogenetic study. Differences between results from various reports can be due to different genetic background or ethnicity.

  6. Sex ratio in normal and disomic sperm: Evidence that the extra chromosome 21 preferentially segregates with the Y chromosome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffin, D.K.; Millie, E.A.; Hassold, T.J. [Case Western Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States)]|[Univ. Hospitals of Cleveland, OH (United States)] [and others

    1996-11-01

    In humans, deviations from a 1:1 male:female ratio have been identified in both chromosomally normal and trisomic live births: among normal newborns there is a slight excess of males, among trisomy 18 live borns a large excess of females, and among trisomy 21 live borns an excess of males. These differences could arise from differential production of or fertilization by Y- or X-bearing sperm or from selection against male or female conceptions. To examine the proportion of Y- and X- bearing sperm in normal sperm and in sperm disomic for chromosomes 18 or 21, we used three-color FISH (to the X and Y and either chromosome 18 or chromosome 21) to analyze > 300,000 sperm from 24 men. In apparently normal sperm, the sex ratio was nearly 1:1 (148,074 Y-bearing to 148,657 X-bearing sperm), and the value was not affected by the age of the donor. Certain of the donors, however, had significant excesses of Y- or X-bearing sperm. In disomy 18 sperm, there were virtually identical numbers of Y- and X-bearing sperm; thus, the excess of females in trisomy 18 presumably is due to selection against male trisomic conceptions. In contrast, we observed 69 Y-bearing and 44 X-bearing sperm disomic for chromosome 21. This is consistent with previous molecular studies, which have identified an excess of males among paternally derived cases of trisomy 21, and suggests that some of the excess of males among Down syndrome individuals is attributable to a nondisjunctional mechanism in which the extra chromosome 21 preferentially segregates with the Y chromosome. 17 refs., 2 tabs.

  7. Human interphase chromosomes: a review of available molecular cytogenetic technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yurov Yuri B

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Human karyotype is usually studied by classical cytogenetic (banding techniques. To perform it, one has to obtain metaphase chromosomes of mitotic cells. This leads to the impossibility of analyzing all the cell types, to moderate cell scoring, and to the extrapolation of cytogenetic data retrieved from a couple of tens of mitotic cells to the whole organism, suggesting that all the remaining cells possess these genomes. However, this is far from being the case inasmuch as chromosome abnormalities can occur in any cell along ontogeny. Since somatic cells of eukaryotes are more likely to be in interphase, the solution of the problem concerning studying postmitotic cells and larger cell populations is interphase cytogenetics, which has become more or less applicable for specific biomedical tasks due to achievements in molecular cytogenetics (i.e. developments of fluorescence in situ hybridization -- FISH, and multicolor banding -- MCB. Numerous interphase molecular cytogenetic approaches are restricted to studying specific genomic loci (regions being, however, useful for identification of chromosome abnormalities (aneuploidy, polyploidy, deletions, inversions, duplications, translocations. Moreover, these techniques are the unique possibility to establish biological role and patterns of nuclear genome organization at suprachromosomal level in a given cell. Here, it is to note that this issue is incompletely worked out due to technical limitations. Nonetheless, a number of state-of-the-art molecular cytogenetic techniques (i.e multicolor interphase FISH or interpahase chromosome-specific MCB allow visualization of interphase chromosomes in their integrity at molecular resolutions. Thus, regardless numerous difficulties encountered during studying human interphase chromosomes, molecular cytogenetics does provide for high-resolution single-cell analysis of genome organization, structure and behavior at all stages of cell cycle.

  8. Chromosomal abnormalities in spontaneous abortion after assisted reproductive treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim You

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We evaluated cytogenetic results occurring with first trimester pregnancy loss, and assessed the type and frequency of chromosomal abnormalities after assisted reproductive treatment (ART and compared them with a control group. We also compared the rate of chromosomal abnormalities according to infertility causes in ICSI group. Methods A retrospective cohort analysis was made of all patients who were referred to the Genetics Laboratory of Fertility Center of CHA Gangnam Medical Center from 2005 to 2009 because of clinical abortion with a subsequent dilation and evacuation (D&E performed, and patients were grouped by type of conception as follows: conventional IVF (in vitro fertilization (n = 114, ICSI (intracytoplasmic sperm injection (n = 140, and control (natural conception or intrauterine insemination [IUI] (n = 128. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS software. Results A total 406 specimens were referred to laboratory, ten abortuses were excluded, and in 14 cases, we did not get any spontaneous metaphase, chromosomal constitutions of 382 specimens were successfully obtained with conventional cytogenetic methods. Overall, 52.62% of the miscarriages were found to be cytogenetically abnormal among all patients, the frequency was 48.4% in the control group, 54.3% of miscarriages after ICSI and 55.3% after conventional IVF (p = 0.503. The most prevalent abnormalities were autosomal trisomy, however, nine (11.69% sex chromosome aneuploidy were noted in the ICSI group vs. four (6.45% and two (3.23% cases in the conventional IVF group and control group. We compared chromosomal abnormalities of miscarriages after ICSI according to infertility factor. 55.71% underwent ICSI due to male factors, 44.29% due to non-male factors. ICSI group having male factors showed significantly higher risk of chromosomal abnormalities than ICSI group having non-male factors (65.8% vs. 34.2%, p = 0.009, odds ratio = 1.529, 95% CI = 1

  9. Condensation of refractory metals in asymptotic giant branch and other stellar environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwander, D.; Berg, T.; Schönhense, G.; Ott, U., E-mail: schwandd@uni-mainz.de [Institut für Physik, Johannes Gutenberg-Universität, Staudingerweg 7, D-55128 Mainz (Germany)

    2014-09-20

    The condensation of material from a gas of solar composition has been extensively studied, but less so condensation in the environment of evolved stars, which has been mainly restricted to major compounds and some specific element groups such as the Rare Earth elements. Also of interest, however, are refractory metals like Mo, Ru, Os, W, Ir, and Pt, which may condense to form refractory metal nuggets (RMNs) like the ones that have been found in association with presolar graphite. We have performed calculations describing the condensation of these elements in the outflows of s-process enriched AGB stars as well as from gas enriched in r-process products. While in carbon-rich environments (C > O), the formation of carbides is expected to consume W, Mo, and V (Lodders and Fegley), the condensation sequence for the other refractory metals under these conditions does not significantly differ from the case of a cooling gas of solar composition. The composition in detail, however, is significantly different due to the completely different source composition. Condensation from an r-process enriched source differs less from the solar case. Elemental abundance ratios of the refractory metals can serve as a guide for finding candidate presolar grains among the RMNs in primitive meteorites—most of which have a solar system origin—for confirmation by isotopic analysis. We apply our calculations to the case of the four RMNs found by Croat et al., which may very well be presolar.

  10. Analysis of chromosome translocation frequency after a single CT scan in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Yu; Miura, Tomisato; Yoshida, Mitsuaki A; Ujiie, Risa; Kurosu, Yumiko; Kato, Nagisa; Katafuchi, Atsushi; Tsuyama, Naohiro; Kawamura, Fumihiko; Ohba, Takashi; Inamasu, Tomoko; Shishido, Fumio; Noji, Hideyoshi; Ogawa, Kazuei; Yokouchi, Hiroshi; Kanazawa, Kenya; Ishida, Takashi; Muto, Satoshi; Ohsugi, Jun; Suzuki, Hiroyuki; Ishikawa, Tetsuo; Kamiya, Kenji; Sakai, Akira

    2016-06-01

    We recently reported an increase in dicentric chromosome (DIC) formation after a single computed tomography (CT) scan (5.78-60.27 mSv: mean 24.24 mSv) and we recommended analysis of 2000 metaphase cells stained with Giemsa and centromere-FISH for dicentric chromosome assay (DCA) in cases of low-dose radiation exposure. In the present study, we analyzed the frequency of chromosome translocations using stored Carnoy's-fixed lymphocyte specimens from the previous study; these specimens were from 12 patients who were subject to chromosome painting of Chromosomes 1, 2 and 4. Chromosomes 1, 2 and 4 were analyzed in ∼5000 cells, which is equivalent to the whole-genome analysis of almost 2000 cells. The frequency of chromosome translocation was higher than the number of DICs formed, both before and after CT scanning. The frequency of chromosome translocations tended to be higher, but not significantly higher, in patients with a treatment history compared with patients without such a history. However, in contrast to the results for DIC formation, the frequency of translocations detected before and after the CT scan did not differ significantly. Therefore, analysis of chromosome translocation may not be a suitable assay for detecting chromosome aberrations in cases of low-dose radiation exposure from a CT scan. A significant increase in the frequency of chromosome translocations was not likely to be detected due to the high baseline before the CT scan; the high and variable frequency of translocations was probably due to multiple confounding factors in adults.

  11. Chromosome-specific families in Vibrio genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oksana eLukjancenko

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available We have compared chromosome-specific genes in a set of 18 finished Vibrio genomes, and, in addition, also calculated the pan- and core-genomes from a data set of more than 250 draft Vibrio genome sequences. These genomes come from 9 known species and 2 unknown species. Within the finished chromosomes, we find a core set of 1269 encoded protein families for chromosome 1, and a core of 252 encoded protein families for chromosome 2. Many of these core proteins are also found in the draft genomes (although which chromosome they are located on is unknown. Of the chromosome specific core protein families, 1169 and 153 are uniquely found in chromosomes 1 and 2, respectively. Gene ontology (GO terms for each of the protein families were determined, and the different sets for each chromosome were compared. A total of 363 different `Molecular Function` GO categories were found for chromosome 1 specific protein families, and these include several broad activities: pyridoxine 5' phosphate synthetase, glucosylceramidase, heme transport, DNA ligase, amino acid binding, and ribosomal components; in contrast, chromosome 2 specific protein families have only 66 Molecular Function GO terms and include many membrane-associated activities, such as ion channels, transmembrane transporters, and electron transport chain proteins. Thus, it appears that whilst there are many 'housekeeping systems' encoded in chromosome 1, there are far fewer core functions found in chromosome 2. However, the presence of many membrane-associated encoded proteins in chromosome 2 is surprising.

  12. Evolution and thermalization of dark matter axions in the condensed regime

    CERN Document Server

    Saikawa, Ken'ichi

    2012-01-01

    We discuss the possibility that dark matter axions form a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) due to the gravitational self-interactions. The formation of BEC occurs in the condensed regime, where the transition rate between different momentum states is large compared to the energy exchanged in the transition. The time evolution of the quantum state occupation number of axions in the condensed regime is derived based on the in-in formalism. We recover the expression for the thermalization rate due to self-interaction of the axion field, which was obtained in the other literature. It is also found that the leading order contributions for interactions between axions and other species vanish, which implies that the axion BEC does not give any significant modifications on standard cosmological parameters.

  13. The influence of shielding on the biological effectiveness of accelerated particles for the induction of chromosome damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, K.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    Chromosome damage was assessed in human peripheral blood lymphocytes after in vitro exposure to 28Si (490 or 600 MeV/n), 48Ti (1000 MeV/n), or 56Fe (600, 1000, or 5000 MeV/n). LET values for these ions ranged from 51 to 184 keV/μm and doses ranged from 10 to 200 cGy. The effect of either aluminum or polyethylene shielding on the induction of chromosome aberrations was investigated for each ion. After chromosomes were prematurely condensed using calyculin-A, chromosome exchanges were measured using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with whole chromosome probes in cells collected at G2 and at mitosis in first division post-irradiation. The yield of chromosome aberrations increased linearly with dose, and the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for the primary beams, estimated from the initial slope of the dose-response curve for total chromosome exchanges with respect to γ-rays, ranged from 9 to 35. The RBE values increased with LET, reaching a maximum for the 600 MeV/n Fe ions with LET of 184 keV/μm. When the LET of the primary beam was below about 100 keV/μm, the addition of shielding material increased the effectiveness per unit dose. When the LET of the primary beam was greater than 100 keV/μm, shielding decreased the effectiveness per unit dose.

  14. The Influence of Shielding on the Biological Effectiveness of Accelerated Particles for the Induction of Chromosome Damages

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, K.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2006-01-01

    Chromosome damage was assessed in human peripheral blood lymphocytes after in vitro exposure to the either Si-28 (490 or 600 MeV/n), Ti-48 (1000 MeV/n), or Fe-56 (600, 1000, or 5000 MeV/n). LET values for these ions ranged from approximately 50 to 174 keV/micrometers and doses ranged from 10 to 200 cGy. The effect of either aluminum or polyethylene shielding on the induction of chromosome aberrations was investigated for each ion. Chromosome exchanges were measured using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with whole chromosome probes in cells collected 48-56 hours after irradiation using a chemical-induced premature chromosome condensation (PCC) technique. The yield of chromosomal aberrations increased linearly with dose and the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for the primary beams, estimated from the initial slope of the dose response curve for total chromosomal exchanges with respect to gamma-rays, ranged from 14 to 35. The RBE values increased with LET, reaching a maximum for the 1 GeV/n Fe ions with LET of 150 keV/micrometers, and decreased with further increases in LET. When LET of the primary beam was in the region of increasing RBE (i.e. below approximately 100 keV/micrometers), the addition of shielding material increased the effectiveness per unit dose. Whereas shielding decreased the effectiveness per unit dose when the LET of the primary particle beam was higher than 150 keV/micrometers.

  15. Simulation Prediction of Transient Dropwise Condensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macner, Ashley; Daniel, Susan; Steen, Paul

    2014-11-01

    In order to design effective surfaces for large-scale dropwise condensation, an understanding of how surface functionalization affects drop growth and coalescence is needed. The long term technological goal is a set of design conditions to help NASA achieve maximum heat transfer rates of waste heat generated from electronics and habitable environments under microgravity conditions. Prediction of condenser surface heat transfer performance requires accurate simulation and modeling of the evolution of populations of drops in time. At shorter times, drops are primarily isolated and grow mainly by condensation onto the liquid-gas interface. At longer times, drops grow mainly by coalescence with neighbors. Simulation of dropwise condensation on a neutrally wetting surface and comparison with our previous experimental results is reported. A steady-state single drop conduction model is empirically fitted to determine a temperature profile that captures the drop size evolution. The simulation accurately predicts the continuous time evolution of number-density of drops, drop-size distributions, total condensate volume, fractional coverage, and median drop-size for both transient and steady states, all with no free parameters. This work was supported by a NASA Office of the Chief Technologist's Space Technology Research Fellowship.

  16. The NSF Condensed Matter Physics Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokol, Paul

    The Condensed Matter Physics (CMP) program in the NSF Division of Materials Research (DMR) supports experimental, as well as combined experiment and theory projects investigating the fundamental physics behind phenomena exhibited by condensed matter systems. CMP is the largest Individual Investigator Award program in DMR and supports a broad portfolio of research spanning both hard and soft condensed matter. Representative research areas include: 1) phenomena at the nano- to macro-scale including: transport, magnetic, and optical phenomena; classical and quantum phase transitions; localization; electronic, magnetic, and lattice structure or excitations; superconductivity; topological insulators; and nonlinear dynamics. 2) low-temperature physics: quantum fluids and solids; 1D & 2D electron systems. 3) soft condensed matter: partially ordered fluids, granular and colloid physics, liquid crystals, and 4) understanding the fundamental physics of new states of matter as well as the physical behavior of condensed matter under extreme conditions e.g., low temperatures, high pressures, and high magnetic fields. In this talk I will review the current CMP portfolio and discuss future funding trends for the program. I will also describe recent activities in the program aimed at addressing the challenges facing current and future principal investigators.

  17. Condensation of refrigerants on vertical fluted tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Combs, S.K.; Mailen, G.S.; Murphy, R.W.

    1978-08-01

    Experiments were run to determine heat transfer performance of single vertical fluted tubes with selected fluids condensing on the outside. Working fluids included six fluorocarbons (Refrigerants 11, 21, 22, 113, 114, and 115) and a hydrocarbon (Refrigerant 600a or isobutane). The nine test tubes were of 2.54-cm (1-in.) nominal outside diameter and 1.2 m (4 ft) in length with from 0 (smooth) to 60 axial flutes. Condensing heat transfer coefficients ranged from 620 to 7900 W/m/sup 2/ . K (110 to 1400 Btu/hr . ft/sup 2/ . /sup 0/F) over the heat flux range of 2000 to 43,000 W/m/sup 2/ (920 to 13,600 Btu/hr . ft/sup 2/). All parameters are based on total condensing surface area. The data show that, for a given heat flux, a fluted tube can increase condensing coefficients up to 6.0 times smooth tube values. Further heat transfer enhancement was achieved by the use of drainage skirts on fluted tubes; these skirts effectively divided the 1.2-m (4-ft) tubes into two, four, and eight equal condensing lengths.

  18. CFD modelling and validation of wall condensation in the presence of non-condensable gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zschaeck, G., E-mail: guillermo.zschaeck@ansys.com [ANSYS Germany GmbH, Staudenfeldweg 12, Otterfing 83624 (Germany); Frank, T. [ANSYS Germany GmbH, Staudenfeldweg 12, Otterfing 83624 (Germany); Burns, A.D. [ANSYS UK Ltd, 97 Milton Park, Abingdon, Oxfordshire OX14 4RY (United Kingdom)

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • A wall condensation model was implemented and validated in ANSYS CFX. • Condensation rate is assumed to be controlled by the concentration boundary layer. • Validation was done using two laboratory scale experiments. • CFD calculations show good agreement with experimental data. - Abstract: The aim of this paper is to present and validate a mathematical model implemented in ANSYS CFD for the simulation of wall condensation in the presence of non-condensable substances. The model employs a mass sink at isothermal walls or conjugate heat transfer (CHT) domain interfaces where condensation takes place. The model was validated using the data reported by Ambrosini et al. (2008) and Kuhn et al. (1997)

  19. Measurement of liquid-liquid equilibria for condensate + glycol and condensate + glycol + water systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riaz, Muhammad; Kontogeorgis, Georgios; Stenby, Erling Halfdan

    2011-01-01

    Today's oil and gas production requires the application of various chemicals in large amounts. To evaluate the effects of those chemicals on the environment, it is of crucial importance to know how much of the chemicals are discharged via produced water and how much is dissolved in the crude oil....... The ultimate objective of this work is to develop a predictive thermodynamic model for the mutual solubility of oil, water, and polar chemicals. But for the development and validation of the model, experimental data are required. This work presents new experimental liquid-liquid equilibrium (LLE) data for 1......,2-ethanediol (MEG) + condensate and MEG + water + condensate systems at temperatures from (275 to 323) K at atmospheric pressure. The condensate used in this work is a stabilized natural gas condensate from an offshore field in the North Sea. Compositional analysis of the natural gas condensate was carried out...

  20. Sex chromosome rearrangements in Polyphaga beetles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutrillaux, A M; Dutrillaux, B

    2009-01-01

    The presence of a parachute sex chromosome bivalent (Xyp) at metaphase I of male meiosis is a well-known characteristic of Coleoptera, present in almost all families of this order and assumed to represent their ancestral sex chromosome formula. Sex chromosomes appear to be manifold more frequently involved in inter-chromosomal rearrangements than the average of the nine autosomal pairs usually forming their karyotype. This leads to various formulae such as neo-sex, multiple sex and perhaps unique sex chromosomes. These rearrangements alter the intimate association between sex chromosomes and nucleolar proteins, which are usual components of the Xyp. Different situations, selected in a series of 125 mitotic and meiotic cytogenetic studies of Polyphaga beetle species, are reported and discussed, with the aim to improve our knowledge on the mechanisms of sex chromosome rearrangements, the relationships with nucleoli and the consequences on dosage compensation and chromosome segregation.

  1. Radiotherapeutical chromosomal aberrations in laryngeal cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stošić-Divjak Svetlana L.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The authors present the results of cytogenetic analysis of 21 patients with laryngeal carcinomas diagnosed and treated in the period 1995-2000 at the Institute of Otorhinolaryngology and Maxillofacial Surgery, Clinical Center of Serbia and Clinical Center of Novi Sad. Material and methods. The patients were specially monitored and the material was analyzed at the Institute of Human Genetics of the School of Medicine in Belgrade as well as in the Laboratory for Radiological Protection of the Institute of Occupational and Radiological Health 'Dr Dragomir Karajovic' in Belgrade. Results. The incidence of chromosomal aberrations and incidence of exchange of material between sister chromatids were observed in the preparation of the metaphasic lymphocyte chromosomes of the peripheral blood obtained in the culture. Structural aberrations were found on the chromosomes in the form of breakups, rings, translocations and dicentrics as early as after a single exposure of patients to tumor radiation dose of 2 Gy in the field sized 5x7. Out of the total number of 35 cultivated blood samples obtained from 13 patients, 21 were successfully cultivated and they were proved to contain chromosomal aberrations. Some of the peripheral blood samples failed to show cell growth in vitro due to the lethal cell damages in vivo. Discussion.. We have consluded that the number of structural aberrations cannot be used as a biological measure of the absorbed ionizing radiation dose. The presence of aberrations per se is indicative of the mutagenic effect of the ionizing radiation, which was also confirmed in our series on the original model by cultivation of the peripheral blood lymphocytes in the culture of the cells of the volunteer donors upon in vitro radiation. Using the method of bromdeoxyuridylreductase, the increased incidence of SCE as a mutagenic effect was registered. Conclusion. It has been concluded that the increase of absorbed radiation dose in

  2. Bose–Einstein condensation and superfluidity of magnons in yttrium iron garnet films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Chen; Nattermann, Thomas; Pokrovsky, Valery L.

    2017-04-01

    A brief review of the theory of quasi-equilibrium Bose–Einstein condensation and superfluidity of magnons in a film of yttrium iron garnet is presented. The Bose–Einstein condensation of magnons in YIG film at room temperature under rf pumping was discovered in 2006 by the Münster experimental team led by Demokritov. There are two symmetric minima in the magnon spectrum of a ferromagnetic film, and therefore two condensates. In 2012 the same experimental group discovered the interference of these two condensates, thus proving their coherence. The reviewed theory that explains these experimental observations predicts that the reflection symmetry of the magnon gas is spontaneously violated at Bose–Einstein condensation in thick films. In thin films the condensate is symmetric at low magnetic field and transits to the non-symmetric state at higher field. Dipolar interaction energy depends on the phase of the condensate wave function. In quasi-equilibrium it traps the phase. All these features are due to the interaction between magnons Since the magnon condensate is coherent, a logical question is whether the condensate is superfluid. Two obstacles for superfluidity are the dominance of the normal magnon density over the condensate (approximately 100-fold) and the phase trapping. We show that the velocity of the superfluid part is by 5–7 decimal orders larger than that of the normal part at typical values of the field gradients. Thus, the spin current is mainly superfluid. The phase trapping violates the U(1) symmetry, reducing it to a discrete symmetry. Stationary superfluid flow is still possible, but it becomes inhomogeneous. In 1-d stationary flow at low kinetic energy the condensate phase over long intervals of length remains close to the trapped values and changes by 2π within comparatively short intervals (phase solitons). The current and number of magnons are conserved globally but not locally, since they transfer spin momentum to the lattice. These

  3. Vibrio chromosome-specific families

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lukjancenko, Oksana; Ussery, David

    2014-01-01

    We have compared chromosome-specific genes in a set of 18 finished Vibrio genomes, and, in addition, also calculated the pan- and core-genomes from a data set of more than 250 draft Vibrio genome sequences. These genomes come from 9 known species and 2 unknown species. Within the finished...

  4. CHROMOSOMAL MULTIPLICITY IN BURKHOLDERIA CEPACIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    We have used CHEF gel electrophoresis to screen preparations of large DNA from different Burkholderia cepacia isolates for the presence of DNA species corresponding to the linearized forms of the three chromosomes of 3.4,2.5, and 0.9 Mb identified in B. cepacia strain 17616. DNA ...

  5. Chromosome synteny in cucumis species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucumber, Cucumis sativus L. (2n = 2x = 14) and melon, C. melo L. (2n = 2x = 24) are two important vegetable species in the genus Cucumis (family Cucurbitaceae). Two inter-fertile botanical varieties with 14 chromosomes, the cultivated C. sativus var. sativus L. and the wild C. sativus var. hardwick...

  6. Chromosomal disorders and male infertility

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gary L Harton; Helen G Tempest

    2012-01-01

    infertility in humans is surprisingly common occurring in approximately 15% of the population wishing to start a family.Despite this,the molecular and genetic factors underlying the cause of infertility remain largely undiscovered.Nevertheless,more and more genetic factors associated with infertility are being identified.This review will focus on our current understanding of the chromosomal basis of male infertility specifically:chromosomal aneuploidy,structural and numerical karyotype abnormalities and Y chromosomal microdeletions.Chromosomal aneuploidy is the leading cause of pregnancy loss and developmental disabilities in humans.Aneuploidy is predominantly maternal in origin,but concerns have been raised regarding the safety of intracytoplasmic sperm injection as infertile men have significantly higher levels of sperm aneuploidy compared to their fertile counterparts.Males with numerical or structural karyotype abnormalities are also at an increased risk of producing aneuploid sperm.Our current understanding of how sperm aneuploidy translates to embryo aneuploidy will be reviewed,as well as the application of preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) in such cases.Clinical recommendations where possible will be made,as well as discussion of the use of emerging array technology in PGD and its potential applications in male infertility.

  7. Sex chromosome complement influences operant responding for a palatable food in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seu, E; Groman, S M; Arnold, A P; Jentsch, J D

    2014-07-01

    The procurement and consumption of palatable, calorie-dense foods is influenced by the nutritional and hedonic value of foods. Although many factors can influence the control over behavior by foods rich in sugar and fat, emerging evidence indicates that biological sex may play a particularly crucial role in the types of foods individuals seek out, as well as the level of motivation individuals will exert to obtain those foods. However, a systematic investigation of food-seeking and consumption that disentangles the effects of the major sex-biasing factors, including sex chromosome complement and organizational and activational effects of sex hormones, has yet to be conducted. Using the four core genotypes mouse model system, we separated and quantified the effects of sex chromosome complement and gonadal sex on consumption of and motivation to obtain a highly palatable solution [sweetened condensed milk (SCM)]. Gonadectomized mice with an XY sex chromosome complement, compared with those with two X chromosomes, independent of gonadal sex, appeared to be more sensitive to the reward value of the SCM solution and were more motivated to expend effort to obtain it, as evidenced by their dramatically greater expended effort in an instrumental task with progressively larger response-to-reward ratios. Gonadal sex independently affected free consumption of the solution but not motivation to obtain it. These data indicate that gonadal and chromosomal sex effects independently influence reward-related behaviors, contributing to sexually dimorphic patterns of behavior related to the pursuit and consumption of rewards.

  8. C-banding and fluorescent in situ hybridization with rDNA sequences in chromosomes of Cycloneda sanguinea Linnaeus (Coleoptera, Coccinellidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliane Mariza Dortas Maffei

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to describe mitotic and meiotic chromosomes of Cycloneda sanguinea using C-banding, fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH rDNA probes, and sequential FISH/Ag-NOR staining. The chromosome number was 2n = 18 + XX for females and 2n = 18 + Xy for males. The X chromosome was metacentric and the Y chromosome was very small. During meiosis, the karyotypic meioformula was n = 9 + Xy p, and sex chromosomes configured a parachute at metaphase I. At the beginning of pachytene, bivalents were still individualized, and sex chromosomes were associated end-to-end through the heteropycnotic region of the X chromosome. Later in pachytene, further condensation led to the formation of a pseudo-ring by the sex bivalent. All chromosomes showed pericentromeric heterochromatin. FISH and sequential FISH/Ag-NOR staining evidenced the location of the nucleolar organizer region in one pair of autosomes (at spermatogonial metaphase. During meiosis, these genes were mapped to a region outside the sex vesicle by FISH, although Xy p was deeply stained with silver at metaphase I. These results suggest that these argyrophilic substances are of a nucleolar protein nature, and seem to be synthesized by a pair of autosomes and imported during meiosis (prophase I to the sex pair, during the association of the sex chromosomes.

  9. Preoperational test report, recirculation condenser cooling systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clifton, F.T.

    1997-11-04

    This represents a preoperational test report for Recirculation Condenser Systems, Project W-030. Project W-030 provides a ventilation upgrade for the four Aging Waste Facility tanks. The four system provide condenser cooling water for vapor space cooling of tanks AY1O1, AY102, AZ1O1, AZ102. Each system consists of a valved piping loop, a pair of redundant recirculation pumps, a closed-loop evaporative cooling tower, and supporting instrumentation; equipment is located outside the farm on concrete slabs. Piping is routed to the each ventilation condenser inside the farm via below-grade concrete trenches. The tests verify correct system operation and correct indications displayed by the central Monitor and Control System.

  10. Field theories of condensed matter physics

    CERN Document Server

    Fradkin, Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    Presenting the physics of the most challenging problems in condensed matter using the conceptual framework of quantum field theory, this book is of great interest to physicists in condensed matter and high energy and string theorists, as well as mathematicians. Revised and updated, this second edition features new chapters on the renormalization group, the Luttinger liquid, gauge theory, topological fluids, topological insulators and quantum entanglement. The book begins with the basic concepts and tools, developing them gradually to bring readers to the issues currently faced at the frontiers of research, such as topological phases of matter, quantum and classical critical phenomena, quantum Hall effects and superconductors. Other topics covered include one-dimensional strongly correlated systems, quantum ordered and disordered phases, topological structures in condensed matter and in field theory and fractional statistics.

  11. Dropwise condensation on inclined textured surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Khandekar, Sameer

    2014-01-01

    Dropwise Condensation on Textured Surfaces presents a holistic framework for understanding dropwise condensation through mathematical modeling and meaningful experiments. The book presents a review of the subject required to build up models as well as to design experiments. Emphasis is placed on the effect of physical and chemical texturing and their effect on the bulk transport phenomena. Application of the model to metal vapor condensation is of special interest. The unique behavior of liquid metals, with their low Prandtl number and high surface tension, is also discussed. The model predicts instantaneous drop size distribution for a given level of substrate subcooling and derives local as well as spatio-temporally averaged heat transfer rates and wall shear stress.

  12. Nonlocal Condensate Model for QCD Sum Rules

    CERN Document Server

    Hsieh, Ron-Chou

    2009-01-01

    We include effects of nonlocal quark condensates into QCD sum rules (QSR) via the K$\\ddot{\\mathrm{a}}$ll$\\acute{\\mathrm{e}}$n-Lehmann representation for a dressed fermion propagator, in which a negative spectral density function manifests their nonperturbative nature. Applying our formalism to the pion form factor as an example, QSR results are in good agreement with data for momentum transfer squared up to $Q^2 \\approx 10 $ GeV$^2$. It is observed that the nonlocal quark-condensate contribution descends like $1/Q^4$, different from the exponential decrease in $Q^2$ obtained in the literature, and contrary to the linear rise in the local-condensate approximation.

  13. Efficient cell migration requires global chromatin condensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerlitz, Gabi; Bustin, Michael

    2010-07-01

    Cell migration is a fundamental process that is necessary for the development and survival of multicellular organisms. Here, we show that cell migration is contingent on global condensation of the chromatin fiber. Induction of directed cell migration by the scratch-wound assay leads to decreased DNaseI sensitivity, alterations in the chromatin binding of architectural proteins and elevated levels of H4K20me1, H3K27me3 and methylated DNA. All these global changes are indicative of increased chromatin condensation in response to induction of directed cell migration. Conversely, chromatin decondensation inhibited the rate of cell migration, in a transcription-independent manner. We suggest that global chromatin condensation facilitates nuclear movement and reshaping, which are important for cell migration. Our results support a role for the chromatin fiber that is distinct from its known functions in genetic processes.

  14. The condensation of water on adsorbed viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, José María; Tatti, Francesco; Chuvilin, Andrey; Mam, Keriya; Ondarçuhu, Thierry; Bittner, Alexander M

    2013-11-26

    The wetting and dewetting behavior of biological nanostructures and to a greater degree single molecules is not well-known even though their contact with water is the basis for all biology. Here, we show that environmental electron microscopy (EM) can be applied as a means of imaging the condensation of water onto viruses. We captured the formation of submicrometer water droplets and filaments on single viral particles by environmental EM and by environmental transmission EM. The condensate structures are compatible with capillary condensation between adsorbed virus particles and with known droplet shapes on patterned surfaces. Our results confirm that such droplets exist down to evaporation cycle as expected from their stability in air and water. Moreover we developed procedures that overcome problems of beam damage and of resolving structures with a low atomic number.

  15. Vector meson condensation in a pion superfluid

    CERN Document Server

    Brauner, Tomas

    2016-01-01

    We revisit the suggestion that charged rho-mesons undergo Bose-Einstein condensation in isospin-rich nuclear matter. Using a simple version of the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio (NJL) model, we conclude that rho-meson condensation is either avoided or postponed to isospin chemical potentials much higher than the rho-meson mass as a consequence of the repulsive interaction with the preformed pion condensate. In order to support our numerical results, we work out a linear sigma model for pions and rho-mesons, showing that the two models lead to similar patterns of medium dependence of meson masses. As a byproduct, we analyze in detail the mapping between the NJL model and the linear sigma model, focusing on conditions that must be satisfied for a quantitative agreement between the models.

  16. Vector meson condensation in a pion superfluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brauner, Tomáš; Huang, Xu-Guang

    2016-11-01

    We revisit the suggestion that charged ρ -mesons undergo Bose-Einstein condensation in isospin-rich nuclear matter. Using a simple version of the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio (NJL) model, we conclude that ρ -meson condensation is either avoided or postponed to isospin chemical potentials much higher than the ρ -meson mass as a consequence of the repulsive interaction with the preformed pion condensate. In order to support our numerical results, we work out a linear sigma model for pions and ρ -mesons, showing that the two models lead to similar patterns of medium dependence of meson masses. As a byproduct, we analyze in detail the mapping between the NJL model and the linear sigma model, focusing on conditions that must be satisfied for a quantitative agreement between the models.

  17. Paroxysmal dystonic choreoathetosis: Tight linkage to chromosome 2q

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fink, J.K.; Rainier, S.; Wilkowski, J.; Jones, S.M. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)] [and others

    1996-07-01

    Paroxysmal dystonic choreoathetosis (PDC) is characterized by attacks of involuntary movements that last up to several hours and occur at rest both spontaneously and following caffeine or alcohol consumption. We analyzed a Polish-American kindred with autosomal dominant PDC and identified tight linkage between the disorder and microsatellite markers on chromosome 2q (maximum two-point LOD score 4.77; recombination fraction 0). Our results clearly establish the existence of a locus for autosomal dominant PDC on distal chromosome 2q. The fact that three other paroxysmal neurological disorders (periodic ataxia with myokymia and hypo- and hyperkalemic periodic paralysis) are due to mutation in ion-channel genes raises the possibility that PDC is also due to an ion-channel gene mutation. It is noteworthy that a cluster of sodium-channel genes is located on distal chromosome 2q, near the PDC locus. Identifying the PDC locus on chromosome 2q will facilitate discovery whether PDC is genetically homogeneous and whether other paroxysmal movement disorders are also genetically linked to the PDC locus. 28 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Why double-stranded RNA resists condensation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tolokh, Igor S.; Pabit, Suzette; Katz, Andrea M.; Chen, Yujie; Drozdetski, Aleksander; Baker, Nathan A.; Pollack, Lois; Onufriev, Alexey

    2014-09-15

    The addition of small amounts of multivalent cations to solutions containing double-stranded DNA leads to attraction between the negatively charged helices and eventually to condensation. Surprisingly, this effect is suppressed in double-stranded RNA, which carries the same charge as the DNA, but assumes a different double helical form. However, additional characterization of short (25 base-pairs) nucleic acid (NA) duplex structures by circular dichroism shows that measured differences in condensation are not solely determined by duplex helical geometry. Here we combine experiment, theory, and atomistic simulations to propose a mechanism that connects the observed variations in condensation of short NA duplexes with the spatial variation of cobalt hexammine (CoHex) binding at the NA duplex surface. The atomistic picture that emerged showed that CoHex distributions around the NA reveals two major NA-CoHex binding modes -- internal and external -- distinguished by the proximity of bound CoHex to the helical axis. Decreasing trends in experimentally observed condensation propensity of the four studied NA duplexes (from B-like form of homopolymeric DNA, to mixed sequence DNA, to DNA:RNA hybrid, to A-like RNA) are explained by the progressive decrease of a single quantity: the fraction of CoHex ions in the external binding mode. Thus, while NA condensation depends on a complex interplay between various structural and sequence features, our coupled experimental and theoretical results suggest a new model in which a single parameter connects the NA condensation propensity with geometry and sequence dependence of CoHex binding.

  19. Condensed droplet jumping: Capillary to inertial energy transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enright, Ryan; Miljkovic, Nenad; Morris, Michael; Wang, Evelyn

    2013-03-01

    When condensed droplets coalesce on a superhydrophobic nanostructured surface, the resulting droplet can jump from the surface due to the release of excess surface energy. This behavior has been shown to follow a simple inertial-capillary scaling. However, questions remain regarding the nature of the energy conversion process linking the excess surface energy of the system before coalescence and the kinetic energy of the jumping droplet. Furthermore, the primary energy dissipation mechanisms limiting this jumping behavior remain relatively unexplored. In this work, we present new experimental data from a two-camera setup capturing the trajectory of jumping droplets on nanostructured surfaces with a characteristic surface roughness length scale on the order of 10 nm. Coupled with a model developed to capture the main details of the bridging flow during coalescence, our findings suggest that: 1. the excess surface energy available for jumping is a fraction of that suggested by simple scaling due to incomplete energy transfer, 2. internal viscous dissipation is not a limiting factor on the jumping process at droplet sizes on the order of 10 μm and 3. jumping performance is strongly affected by forces associated with the external flow and fields around the droplet. This work suggests bounds on the heat transfer performance of superhydrophobic condensation surfaces.

  20. A Plain English Map of the Human Chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Offner, Susan

    1992-01-01

    Presents a chromosome map for 19 known chromosomes in human genetics. Describes the characteristics attributed to the genetic codes for each of the chromosomes and discusses the teaching applications of the chromosome map. (MDH)

  1. Familial transmission of a ring chromosome 21

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertz, Jens Michael

    1987-01-01

    A ring chromosome 21 was found in a phenotypically normal mother and her son. The clinical findings in the son were bilateral retention of the testes and a slightly delayed puberty onset. Consequences of a ring formation of a chromosome 21 in phenotypically normal patients are presented...... and discussed, and the previously reported cases of familially transmitted G-group ring chromosomes are reviewed....

  2. Female meiotic sex chromosome inactivation in chicken

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Schoenmakers (Sam); E. Wassenaar (Evelyne); J.W. Hoogerbrugge (Jos); J.S.E. Laven (Joop); J.A. Grootegoed (Anton); W.M. Baarends (Willy)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractDuring meiotic prophase in male mammals, the heterologous X and Y chromosomes remain largely unsynapsed, and meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI) leads to formation of the transcriptionally silenced XY body. In birds, the heterogametic sex is female, carrying Z and W chromosomes (Z

  3. Geometric approach to condensates in holographic QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Hirn, J; Sanz, V; Hirn, Johannes; Rius, Nuria; Sanz, Veronica

    2006-01-01

    An SU(Nf)xSU(Nf) Yang-Mills theory on an extra-dimensional interval is considered, with appropriate symmetry-breaking boundary conditions on the IR brane. UV-brane to UV-brane correlators at high energies are compared with the OPE of two-point functions of QCD quark currents. Condensates correspond to departure from AdS of the (different) metrics felt by vector and axial combinations, away from the UV brane. Their effect on hadronic observables is studied: the extracted condensates agree with the signs and orders of magnitude expected from QCD.

  4. Colored condensates deep inside neutron stars

    CERN Document Server

    Blaschke, David

    2014-01-01

    It is demonstrated how in the absence of solutions for QCD under conditions deep inside compact stars an equation of state can be obtained within a model that is built on the basic symmetries of the QCD Lagrangian, in particular chiral symmetry and color symmetry. While in the vacuum the chiral symmetry is spontaneously broken, it gets restored at high densities. Color symmetry, however, gets broken simultaneously by the formation of colorful diquark condensates. It is shown that a strong diquark condensate in cold dense quark matter is essential for supporting the possibility that such states could exist in the recently observed pulsars with masses of 2 $M_\\odot$.

  5. Bose-Einstein Condensation of Atomic Hydrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Kleppner, D; Killian, T C; Fried, D G; Willmann, L; Landhuis, D; Moss, S C; Kleppner, Daniel; Greytak, Thomas J.; Killian, Thomas C.; Fried, Dale G.; Willmann, Lorenz; Landhuis, David; Moss, Stephen C.

    1998-01-01

    We have observed Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) of trapped atomic hydrogen, and studied it by two-photon spectroscopy of the 1S-2S transition. In these lecture notes we briefly review the history of spin-polarized atomic hydrogen and describe the final steps to BEC. Laser spectroscopy, which probes the difference in mean field energy of the 1S and 2S states, is used to study the condensate, which has a peak density of 4.8e15 cm^-3 and population of 10^9.

  6. Turbulent meson condensation in quark deconfinement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koji Hashimoto

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In a QCD-like strongly coupled gauge theory at large Nc, using the AdS/CFT correspondence, we find that heavy quark deconfinement is accompanied by a coherent condensation of higher meson resonances. This is revealed in non-equilibrium deconfinement transitions triggered by static, as well as quenched electric fields even below the Schwinger limit. There, we observe a “turbulent” energy flow to higher meson modes, which finally results in the quark deconfinement. Our observation is consistent with seeing deconfinement as a condensation of long QCD strings.

  7. Composition of gases vented from a condenser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyon, R.N.

    1980-08-01

    Designers of systems that involve condensers often need to predict the amount of process vapor that accompanies the noncondensable gases that are vented from the condensers. An approximation is given that appears to provide, in many cases, reasonably accurate values for the mole ratio of process vapor to noncondensable gases in the vented mixture. The approximation is particularly applicable to flash and direct-contact power systems for geothermal brines and ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC). More regorous relationships are available for exceptional cases.

  8. Renormalisation Group Flow and Kaon Condensation

    CERN Document Server

    Krippa, Boris

    2016-01-01

    Functional renormalisation group approach is applied to a system of kaons with finite chemical potential. A set of approximate flow equations for the effective couplings is derived and solved. At high scale the system is found to be at the normal phase whereas at some critical value of the running scale it undergoes the phase transition (PT) to the phase with a spontaneously broken symmetry with the kaon condensate as an order parameter. The value of the condensate turns out to be quite sensitive to the kaon-kaon scattering length.

  9. Influence of condensation temperature on selected exhaled breath parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manini Paola

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The effects of changes in cooling temperature on biomarker levels in exhaled breath condensate have been little investigated. The aim of the study was to test the effect of condensation temperature on the parameters of exhaled breath condensate and the levels of selected biomarkers. Methods Exhaled breath condensate was collected from 24 healthy subjects at temperatures of -10, -5, 0 and +5 C degrees. Selected parameters (condensed volume and conductivity and biomarkers (hydrogen peroxide, malondialdehyde were measured. Results There was a progressive increase in hydrogen peroxide and malondialdehyde concentrations, and condensate conductivity as the cooling temperature increased; total condensate volume increased as the cooling temperature decreased. Conclusion The cooling temperature of exhaled breath condensate collection influenced selected biomarkers and potential normalizing factors (particularly conductivity in different ways ex vivo. The temperature of exhaled breath condensate collection should be controlled and reported.

  10. Investigation of Bose Condensation in Ideal Bose Gas Trapped under Generic Power Law Potential in d Dimension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehedi Faruk, Mir; Sazzad Hossain, Md.; Muktadir Rahman, Md.

    2016-02-01

    The changes in characteristics of Bose condensation of ideal Bose gas due to an external generic power law potential U=\\sumi=1dci\\vert xi/ai\\vertni are studied carefully. Detailed calculation of Kim et al. (J. Phys. Condens. Matter 11 (1999) 10269) yielded the hierarchy of condensation transitions with changing fractional dimensionality. In this manuscript, some theorems regarding specific heat at constant volume CV are presented. Careful examination of these theorems reveal the existence of hidden hierarchy of the condensation transition in trapped systems as well.

  11. Collapse and revival of the monopole mode of a Bose-Einstein condensate in a spherical harmonic trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colussi, Victor; Straatsma, Cameron; Davis, Matthew; Lobser, Dan; Holland, Murray; Anderson, Dana; Cornell, Eric; Lewandowski, Heather

    2016-05-01

    We observe the relaxation of the monopole (breathing) mode of a rubidium-87 Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) in a highly spherical harmonic trap at finite temperature. The experiments show a collapse and revival of the condensate oscillation, consistent with numerical simulations of the system using the Zaremba-Nikuni-Griffin methodology for the nonequilibrium dynamics of BECs. The beating signal is shown to be due to the resonant excitation of the ``out-of-phase'' normal mode of the condensate and thermal cloud. Permanent Address: School of Mathematics and Physics, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland.

  12. Specific and non-specific interactions of ParB with DNA: implications for chromosome segregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, James A; Pastrana, Cesar L; Butterer, Annika; Pernstich, Christian; Gwynn, Emma J; Sobott, Frank; Moreno-Herrero, Fernando; Dillingham, Mark S

    2015-01-01

    The segregation of many bacterial chromosomes is dependent on the interactions of ParB proteins with centromere-like DNA sequences called parS that are located close to the origin of replication. In this work, we have investigated the binding of Bacillus subtilis ParB to DNA in vitro using a variety of biochemical and biophysical techniques. We observe tight and specific binding of a ParB homodimer to the parS sequence. Binding of ParB to non-specific DNA is more complex and displays apparent positive co-operativity that is associated with the formation of larger, poorly defined, nucleoprotein complexes. Experiments with magnetic tweezers demonstrate that non-specific binding leads to DNA condensation that is reversible by protein unbinding or force. The condensed DNA structure is not well ordered and we infer that it is formed by many looping interactions between neighbouring DNA segments. Consistent with this view, ParB is also able to stabilize writhe in single supercoiled DNA molecules and to bridge segments from two different DNA molecules in trans. The experiments provide no evidence for the promotion of non-specific DNA binding and/or condensation events by the presence of parS sequences. The implications of these observations for chromosome segregation are discussed.

  13. A dominant negative mutant of TLK1 causes chromosome missegregation and aneuploidy in normal breast epithelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Williams Briana

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Arabidopsis thaliana, the gene Tousled encodes a protein kinase of unknown function, but mutations in the gene lead to flowering and leaf morphology defects. We have recently cloned a mammalian Tousled-Like Kinase (TLK1B and found that it phosphorylates specifically histone H3, in vitro and in vivo. We now report the effects that overexpression of a kinase-dead mutant of TLK1B mediates in a normal diploid cell line. Results Expression of a kinase-dead mutant resulted in reduction of phosphorylated histone H3, which could have consequences in mitotic segregation of chromosomes. When analyzed by FACS and microscopy, these cells displayed high chromosome number instability and aneuploidy. This phenomenon was accompanied by less condensed chromosomes at mitosis; failure of a number of chromosomes to align properly on the metaphase plate; failure of some chromosomes to attach to microtubules; and the occasional presentation of two bipolar spindles. We also used a different method (siRNA to reduce the level of endogenous TLK1, but in this case, the main result was a strong block of cell cycle progression suggesting that TLK1 may also play a role in progression from G1. This block in S phase progression could also offer a different explanation of some of the later mitotic defects. Conclusions TLK1 has a function important for proper chromosome segregation and maintenance of diploid cells at mitosis in mammalian cells that could be mediated by reduced phosphorylation of histone H3 and condensation of chromosomes, although other explanations to the phenotype are possible.

  14. The r1162 mob proteins can promote conjugative transfer from cryptic origins in the bacterial chromosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Richard

    2009-03-01

    The mobilization proteins of the broad-host-range plasmid R1162 can initiate conjugative transfer of a plasmid from a 19-bp locus that is partially degenerate in sequence. Such loci are likely to appear by chance in the bacterial chromosome and could act as cryptic sites for transfer of chromosomal DNA when R1162 is present. The R1162-dependent transfer of chromosomal DNA, initiated from one such potential site in Pectobacterium atrosepticum, is shown here. A second active site was identified in Escherichia coli, where it is also shown that large amounts of DNA are transferred. This transfer probably reflects the combined activity of the multiple cryptic origins in the chromosome. Transfer of chromosomal DNA due to the presence of a plasmid in the cytoplasm describes a previously unrecognized potential for the exchange of bacterial DNA.

  15. Down-Turner Syndrome: A Case with Double Monoclonal Chromosomal Abnormality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Manassero, Denisse; Merino-Luna, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. The coexistence of Down and Turner syndromes due to double chromosome aneuploidy is very rare; it is even more rare to find the presence of a double monoclonal chromosomal abnormality. Objective. To report a unique case of double monoclonal chromosomal abnormality with trisomy of chromosome 21 and an X ring chromosome in all cells studied; no previous report has been found. Case Report. Female, 28 months old, with pathological short stature from birth, with the following dysmorphic features: tilted upward palpebral fissures, short neck, brachycephaly, and low-set ears. During the neonatal period, the infant presented generalized hypotonia and lymphedema of hands and feet. Karyotype showed 47,X,r(X),+21 [30]. Conclusion. Clinical features of both Down and Turner syndromes were found, highlighting short stature that has remained below 3 z score from birth to the present, associated with delayed psychomotor development. G-banded karyotype analysis in peripheral blood is essential for a definitive diagnosis. PMID:27672470

  16. [Chromosome territories in the interphase nucleus in normal or pathological condition].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavrov, A V; Vol'dgorn, Ia I; Bochkov, N P

    2011-01-01

    The non-random arrangement of chromosomes in the interphase nucleus was observed for the first time in the late XIX century. However, considerable progress in studying chromosome territories became possible only in the end of the XX century mainly due to advances in microscopy and molecular biology. At present, chromosome territories are believed to play an important role in epigenetic regulation of genome activity during various cell processes including but not limited to cell cycle, differentiation, stress response. 3D structure of genome also plays an important role in pathogenesis of various hereditary diseases and cancer. This article describes main provisions of the chromosome territory theory and current trends toward further development of human genetics based on the new knowledge about the role of chromosome territories.

  17. Down-Turner Syndrome: A Case with Double Monoclonal Chromosomal Abnormality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manassero-Morales, Gioconda; Alvarez-Manassero, Denisse; Merino-Luna, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. The coexistence of Down and Turner syndromes due to double chromosome aneuploidy is very rare; it is even more rare to find the presence of a double monoclonal chromosomal abnormality. Objective. To report a unique case of double monoclonal chromosomal abnormality with trisomy of chromosome 21 and an X ring chromosome in all cells studied; no previous report has been found. Case Report. Female, 28 months old, with pathological short stature from birth, with the following dysmorphic features: tilted upward palpebral fissures, short neck, brachycephaly, and low-set ears. During the neonatal period, the infant presented generalized hypotonia and lymphedema of hands and feet. Karyotype showed 47,X,r(X),+21 [30]. Conclusion. Clinical features of both Down and Turner syndromes were found, highlighting short stature that has remained below 3 z score from birth to the present, associated with delayed psychomotor development. G-banded karyotype analysis in peripheral blood is essential for a definitive diagnosis.

  18. Down-Turner Syndrome: A Case with Double Monoclonal Chromosomal Abnormality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gioconda Manassero-Morales

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The coexistence of Down and Turner syndromes due to double chromosome aneuploidy is very rare; it is even more rare to find the presence of a double monoclonal chromosomal abnormality. Objective. To report a unique case of double monoclonal chromosomal abnormality with trisomy of chromosome 21 and an X ring chromosome in all cells studied; no previous report has been found. Case Report. Female, 28 months old, with pathological short stature from birth, with the following dysmorphic features: tilted upward palpebral fissures, short neck, brachycephaly, and low-set ears. During the neonatal period, the infant presented generalized hypotonia and lymphedema of hands and feet. Karyotype showed 47,X,r(X,+21 [30]. Conclusion. Clinical features of both Down and Turner syndromes were found, highlighting short stature that has remained below 3 z score from birth to the present, associated with delayed psychomotor development. G-banded karyotype analysis in peripheral blood is essential for a definitive diagnosis.

  19. Fossilized condensation lines in the Solar System protoplanetary disk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morbidelli, A.; Bitsch, B.; Crida, A.; Gounelle, M.; Guillot, T.; Jacobson, S.; Johansen, A.; Lambrechts, M.; Lega, E.

    2016-03-01

    The terrestrial planets and the asteroids dominant in the inner asteroid belt are water poor. However, in the protoplanetary disk the temperature should have decreased below water-condensation level well before the disk was photo-evaporated. Thus, the global water depletion of the inner Solar System is puzzling. We show that, even if the inner disk becomes cold, there cannot be direct condensation of water. This is because the snowline moves towards the Sun more slowly than the gas itself. Thus the gas in the vicinity of the snowline always comes from farther out, where it should have already condensed, and therefore it should be dry. The appearance of ice in a range of heliocentric distances swept by the snowline can only be due to the radial drift of icy particles from the outer disk. However, if a planet with a mass larger than 20 Earth mass is present, the radial drift of particles is interrupted, because such a planet gives the disk a super-Keplerian rotation just outside of its own orbit. From this result, we propose that the precursor of Jupiter achieved this threshold mass when the snowline was still around 3 AU. This effectively fossilized the snowline at that location. In fact, even if it cooled later, the disk inside of Jupiter's orbit remained ice-depleted because the flow of icy particles from the outer system was intercepted by the planet. This scenario predicts that planetary systems without giant planets should be much more rich in water in their inner regions than our system. We also show that the inner edge of the planetesimal disk at 0.7 AU, required in terrestrial planet formation models to explain the small mass of Mercury and the absence of planets inside of its orbit, could be due to the silicate condensation line, fossilized at the end of the phase of streaming instability that generated the planetesimal seeds. Thus, when the disk cooled, silicate particles started to drift inwards of 0.7 AU without being sublimated, but they could not be

  20. Dicke superradiance, Bose-Einstein condensation of photons and spontaneous symmetry breaking

    CERN Document Server

    Vyas, Vivek M; Srinivasan, V

    2016-01-01

    It is shown that the phenomenon of Dicke superradiance essentially occurs due to spontaneous symmetry breaking. Two generalised versions of the Dicke model are studied, and compared with a model that describes photonic Bose-Einstein condensate, which was experimentally realised. In all the models, it is seen that, the occurrence of spontaneous symmetry breaking is responsible for coherent radiation emission.