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Sample records for chromosome candidate genes

  1. Identification of candidate genes for dyslexia susceptibility on chromosome 18.

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    Thomas S Scerri

    Full Text Available Six independent studies have identified linkage to chromosome 18 for developmental dyslexia or general reading ability. Until now, no candidate genes have been identified to explain this linkage. Here, we set out to identify the gene(s conferring susceptibility by a two stage strategy of linkage and association analysis.Linkage analysis: 264 UK families and 155 US families each containing at least one child diagnosed with dyslexia were genotyped with a dense set of microsatellite markers on chromosome 18. Association analysis: Using a discovery sample of 187 UK families, nearly 3000 SNPs were genotyped across the chromosome 18 dyslexia susceptibility candidate region. Following association analysis, the top ranking SNPs were then genotyped in the remaining samples. The linkage analysis revealed a broad signal that spans approximately 40 Mb from 18p11.2 to 18q12.2. Following the association analysis and subsequent replication attempts, we observed consistent association with the same SNPs in three genes; melanocortin 5 receptor (MC5R, dymeclin (DYM and neural precursor cell expressed, developmentally down-regulated 4-like (NEDD4L.Along with already published biological evidence, MC5R, DYM and NEDD4L make attractive candidates for dyslexia susceptibility genes. However, further replication and functional studies are still required.

  2. Third chromosome candidate genes for conspecific sperm precedence between D. simulans and D. mauritiana

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    Brouwers Barb

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Male - female incompatibilities can be critical in keeping species as separate and discrete units. Premating incompatibilities and postzygotic hybrid sterility/inviability have been widely studied as isolating barriers between species. In recent years, a number of studies have brought attention to postmating prezygotic barriers arising from male - male competition and male - female interactions. Yet little is known about the genetic basis of postmating prezygotic isolation barriers between species. Results Using D. simulans lines with mapped introgressions of D. mauritiana into their third chromosome, we find at least two D. mauritiana introgressions causing male breakdown in competitive paternity success. Eighty one genes within the mapped introgressed regions were identified as broad-sense candidates on the basis of male reproductive tract expression and male-related function. The list of candidates was narrowed down to five genes based on differences in male reproductive tract expression between D. simulans and D. mauritiana. Another ten genes were confirmed as candidates using evidence of adaptive gene coding sequence diversification in the D. simulans and/or D. mauritiana lineage. Our results show a complex genetic basis for conspecific sperm precedence, with evidence of gene interactions between at least two third chromosome loci. Pleiotropy is also evident from correlation between conspecific sperm precedence and female induced fecundity and the identification of candidate genes that might exert an effect through genetic conflict and immunity. Conclusions We identified at least two loci responsible for conspecific sperm precedence. A third of candidate genes within these two loci are located in the 89B cytogenetic position, highlighting a possible major role for this chromosome position during the evolution of species specific adaptations to postmating prezygotic reproductive challenges.

  3. Early embryonic failure: Expression and imprinted status of candidate genes on human chromosome 21

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    Sherman, L.S.; Bennett, P.R.; Moore, G.E. [Queen Charlotte`s and Chelsea Hospital, London (United Kingdom)

    1994-09-01

    Two cases of maternal uniparental (hetero)disomy for human chromosome 21 (mUPD21) have been identified in a systematic search for UPD in 23 cases of early embryonic failure (EEF). Bi-parental origin of the other chromosome pairs was confirmed using specific VNTR probes or dinucleotide repeat analysis. Both maternally and paternally derived isochromosomes 21q have previously been identified in two individuals with normal phenotypes. Full UPD21 has a different mechanism of origin than uniparental isochromosome 21q and its effect on imprinted genes and phenotypic outcome will therefore not necessarily be the same. EEF associated with mUPD21 suggests that developmentally important genes on HSA 21 may be imprinted such that they are only expressed from either the maternally or paternally derived alleles. We have searched for monoallelic expression of candidate genes on HSA 21 in human pregnancy (CBS, IFNAR, COL6A1) using intragenic DNA polymorphisms. These genes were chosen either because their murine homologues lie in imprinted regions or because they are potentially important in embryogenesis. Once imprinted candidate genes have been identified, their methylation status and expression in normal, early embryonic failure and uniparental disomy 21 pregnancies will be studied. At the same time, a larger number of cases of EEF are being examined to further investigate the incidence of UPD21 in this group.

  4. Association study of candidate genes for susceptibility to schizophrenia and bipolar disorder on chromosome 22Q13

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Severinsen, Jacob; Binderup, Helle; Mors, Ole

    Chromosome 22q is suspected to harbor risk genes for schizophrenia as well as bipolar affective disorder. This is evidenced through genetic mapping studies, investigations of cytogenetic abnormalities, and direct examination of candidate genes. In a recent study of distantly related patients from...... the Faroe Islands we have obtained evidence suggesting two regions on chromosome 22q13 to potentially harbor susceptibility genes for both schizophrenia and bipolar affective disorder. We have selected a number of candidate genes from these two regions for further analysis, including the neuro-gene WKL1...... and unrelated controls, and in a Scottish case-control sample comprising 200 schizophrenics, 200 bipolar patients and 200 controls. None of the investigated SNPs have so far showed strong evidence of association to either bipolar disorder or schizophrenia....

  5. Identification of novel candidate gene loci and increased sex chromosome aneuploidy among infants with conotruncal heart defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osoegawa, Kazutoyo; Iovannisci, David M; Lin, Bin; Parodi, Christina; Schultz, Kathleen; Shaw, Gary M; Lammer, Edward J

    2014-02-01

    Congenital heart defects (CHDs) are common malformations, affecting four to eight per 1,000 total births. Conotruncal defects are an important pathogenetic subset of CHDs, comprising nearly 20% of the total. Although both environmental and genetic factors are known to contribute to the occurrence of conotruncal defects, the causes remain unknown for most. To identify novel candidate genes/loci, we used array comparative genomic hybridization to detect chromosomal microdeletions/duplications. From a population base of 974,579 total births born during 1999-2004, we screened 389 California infants born with tetralogy of Fallot or d-transposition of the great arteries. We found that 1.7% (5/288) of males with a conotruncal defect had sex chromosome aneuploidy, a sevenfold increased frequency (relative risk = 7.0; 95% confidence interval 2.9-16.9). We identified eight chromosomal microdeletions/duplications for conotruncal defects. From these duplications and deletions, we found five high priority candidate genes (GATA4, CRKL, BMPR1A, SNAI2, and ZFHX4). This is the initial report that sex chromosome aneuploidy is associated with conotruncal defects among boys. These chromosomal microduplications/deletions provide evidence that GATA4, SNAI2, and CRKL are highly dosage sensitive genes involved in outflow tract development. Genome wide screening for copy number variation can be productive for identifying novel genes/loci contributing to non-syndromic common malformations.

  6. Analysis of IFT74 as a candidate gene for chromosome 9p-linked ALS-FTD

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    Rogaeva Ekaterina

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A new locus for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis – frontotemporal dementia (ALS-FTD has recently been ascribed to chromosome 9p. Methods We identified chromosome 9p segregating haplotypes within two families with ALS-FTD (F476 and F2 and undertook mutational screening of candidate genes within this locus. Results Candidate gene sequencing at this locus revealed the presence of a disease segregating stop mutation (Q342X in the intraflagellar transport 74 (IFT74 gene in family 476 (F476, but no mutation was detected within IFT74 in family 2 (F2. While neither family was sufficiently informative to definitively implicate or exclude IFT74 mutations as a cause of chromosome 9-linked ALS-FTD, the nature of the mutation observed within F476 (predicted to truncate the protein by 258 amino acids led us to sequence the open reading frame of this gene in a large number of ALS and FTD cases (n = 420. An additional sequence variant (G58D was found in a case of sporadic semantic dementia. I55L sequence variants were found in three other unrelated affected individuals, but this was also found in a single individual among 800 Human Diversity Gene Panel samples. Conclusion Confirmation of the pathogenicity of IFT74 sequence variants will require screening of other chromosome 9p-linked families.

  7. Mutation screening and association analysis of six candidate genes for autism on chromosome 7q

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonora, Elena; Lamb, Janine A; Barnby, Gabrielle;

    2005-01-01

    Genetic studies have provided evidence for an autism susceptibility locus (AUTS1) on chromosome 7q. Screening for mutations in six genes mapping to 7q, CUTL1, SRPK2, SYPL, LAMB1, NRCAM and PTPRZ1 in 48 unrelated individuals with autism led to the identification of several new coding variants...

  8. Mutation screening and association analysis of six candidate genes for autism on chromosome 7q

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonora, E.; Lamb, J.A.; Barnby, G.;

    2005-01-01

    Genetic studies have provided evidence for an autism susceptibility locus (AUTS1) on chromosome 7q. Screening for mutations in six genes mapping to 7q, CUTL1, SRPK2, SYPL, LAMB1, NRCAM and PTPRZ1 in 48 unrelated individuals with autism led to the identification of several new coding variants in t...

  9. Evaluation of 6 candidate genes on chromosome 11q23 for coeliac disease susceptibility: a case control study

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    Close Eimear

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent whole genome analysis and follow-up studies have identified many new risk variants for coeliac disease (CD, gluten intolerance. The majority of newly associated regions encode candidate genes with a clear functional role in T-cell regulation. Furthermore, the newly discovered risk loci, together with the well established HLA locus, account for less than 50% of the heritability of CD, suggesting that numerous additional loci remain undiscovered. Linkage studies have identified some well-replicated risk regions, most notably chromosome 5q31 and 11q23. Methods We have evaluated six candidate genes in one of these regions (11q23, namely CD3E, CD3D, CD3G, IL10RA, THY1 and IL18, as risk factors for CD using a 2-phase candidate gene approach directed at chromosome 11q. 377 CD cases and 349 ethnically matched controls were used in the initial screening, followed by an extended sample of 171 additional coeliac cases and 536 additional controls. Results Promotor SNPs (-607, -137 in the IL18 gene, which has shown association with several autoimmune diseases, initially suggested association with CD (P IL18-137/-607 also supported this effect, primarily due to one relatively rare haplotype IL18-607C/-137C (P Conclusion Haplotypes of the IL18 promotor region may contribute to CD risk, consistent with this cytokine's role in maintaining inflammation in active CD.

  10. Exclusion of candidate genes from the chromosome 1q juvenile glaucoma region and mapping of the peripheral cannabis receptor gene (CNR2) to chromosome 1

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    Sunden, S.L.F.; Nichols, B.E.; Alward, W.L.M. [Univ. of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Juvenile onset primary open angle glaucoma has been mapped by linkage to 1q21-q31. Several candidate genes were evaluated in the same family used to identify the primary linkage. Atrionatriuretic peptide receptor A (NPR1) and laminin C1 (LAMC1) have been previously mapped to this region and could putatively play a role in the pathogenesis of glaucoma. A third gene, the peripheral cannabis receptor (CNR2) was not initially mapped in humans but was a candidate because of the relief that cannabis affords some patients with primary open angle glaucoma. Microsatellites associated with NPR1 and LAMC1 revealed multiple recombinations in affected members of this pedigree. CNR2 was shown to be on chromosome 1 by PCR amplification of a 150 bp fragment of the 3{prime} untranslated region in monochromosomal somatic cell hybrids (NIGMS panel No. 2). These primers also revealed a two allele single strand conformation polymorphism which showed multiple recombinants with juvenile onset primary open angle glaucoma in large pedigrees, segregating this disorder. The marker was then mapped to 1p34-p36 by linkage, with the most likely location between liver alkaline phosphatase (ALPL) and alpha-L-1 fucosidase (FUCA1).

  11. Identification of Two Candidate Tumor Suppressor Genes on Chromosome l7p13.3: Assessment of their Roles in Breast and Ovarian Carcinogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-07-01

    also been reported in primitive neuroectodermal tumors , carcinoma of the cervix uteri, medulloblastoma, osteosarcoma, astrocytoma (22), and acute...AD______ GRANT NUMBER: DAMD17-96-1-6088 TITLE: Identification of Two Candidate Tumor Suppressor Genes on Chromosome 17p13.3: Assessment of their...Identification of Two Candidate Tumor Suppressor Genes on Chromosome 17 p13 .3 : Assessment of their Roles in Breast... DAMD17-96-1-6088 6. AUTHOR(S

  12. Analysis of the chromosome X exome in patients with autism spectrum disorders identified novel candidate genes, including TMLHE

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    Nava, C; Lamari, F; Héron, D; Mignot, C; Rastetter, A; Keren, B; Cohen, D; Faudet, A; Bouteiller, D; Gilleron, M; Jacquette, A; Whalen, S; Afenjar, A; Périsse, D; Laurent, C; Dupuits, C; Gautier, C; Gérard, M; Huguet, G; Caillet, S; Leheup, B; Leboyer, M; Gillberg, C; Delorme, R; Bourgeron, T; Brice, A; Depienne, C

    2012-01-01

    The striking excess of affected males in autism spectrum disorders (ASD) suggests that genes located on chromosome X contribute to the etiology of these disorders. To identify new X-linked genes associated with ASD, we analyzed the entire chromosome X exome by next-generation sequencing in 12 unrelated families with two affected males. Thirty-six possibly deleterious variants in 33 candidate genes were found, including PHF8 and HUWE1, previously implicated in intellectual disability (ID). A nonsense mutation in TMLHE, which encodes the ɛ-N-trimethyllysine hydroxylase catalyzing the first step of carnitine biosynthesis, was identified in two brothers with autism and ID. By screening the TMLHE coding sequence in 501 male patients with ASD, we identified two additional missense substitutions not found in controls and not reported in databases. Functional analyses confirmed that the mutations were associated with a loss-of-function and led to an increase in trimethyllysine, the precursor of carnitine biosynthesis, in the plasma of patients. This study supports the hypothesis that rare variants on the X chromosome are involved in the etiology of ASD and contribute to the sex-ratio disequilibrium. PMID:23092983

  13. Analysis of the chromosome X exome in patients with autism spectrum disorders identified novel candidate genes, including TMLHE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nava, C; Lamari, F; Héron, D; Mignot, C; Rastetter, A; Keren, B; Cohen, D; Faudet, A; Bouteiller, D; Gilleron, M; Jacquette, A; Whalen, S; Afenjar, A; Périsse, D; Laurent, C; Dupuits, C; Gautier, C; Gérard, M; Huguet, G; Caillet, S; Leheup, B; Leboyer, M; Gillberg, C; Delorme, R; Bourgeron, T; Brice, A; Depienne, C

    2012-10-23

    The striking excess of affected males in autism spectrum disorders (ASD) suggests that genes located on chromosome X contribute to the etiology of these disorders. To identify new X-linked genes associated with ASD, we analyzed the entire chromosome X exome by next-generation sequencing in 12 unrelated families with two affected males. Thirty-six possibly deleterious variants in 33 candidate genes were found, including PHF8 and HUWE1, previously implicated in intellectual disability (ID). A nonsense mutation in TMLHE, which encodes the ɛ-N-trimethyllysine hydroxylase catalyzing the first step of carnitine biosynthesis, was identified in two brothers with autism and ID. By screening the TMLHE coding sequence in 501 male patients with ASD, we identified two additional missense substitutions not found in controls and not reported in databases. Functional analyses confirmed that the mutations were associated with a loss-of-function and led to an increase in trimethyllysine, the precursor of carnitine biosynthesis, in the plasma of patients. This study supports the hypothesis that rare variants on the X chromosome are involved in the etiology of ASD and contribute to the sex-ratio disequilibrium.

  14. Evaluation of 6 candidate genes on chromosome 11q23 for coeliac disease susceptibility: a case control study

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Brophy, Karen

    2010-05-17

    Abstract Background Recent whole genome analysis and follow-up studies have identified many new risk variants for coeliac disease (CD, gluten intolerance). The majority of newly associated regions encode candidate genes with a clear functional role in T-cell regulation. Furthermore, the newly discovered risk loci, together with the well established HLA locus, account for less than 50% of the heritability of CD, suggesting that numerous additional loci remain undiscovered. Linkage studies have identified some well-replicated risk regions, most notably chromosome 5q31 and 11q23. Methods We have evaluated six candidate genes in one of these regions (11q23), namely CD3E, CD3D, CD3G, IL10RA, THY1 and IL18, as risk factors for CD using a 2-phase candidate gene approach directed at chromosome 11q. 377 CD cases and 349 ethnically matched controls were used in the initial screening, followed by an extended sample of 171 additional coeliac cases and 536 additional controls. Results Promotor SNPs (-607, -137) in the IL18 gene, which has shown association with several autoimmune diseases, initially suggested association with CD (P < 0.05). Follow-up analyses of an extended sample supported the same, moderate effect (P < 0.05) for one of these. Haplotype analysis of IL18-137\\/-607 also supported this effect, primarily due to one relatively rare haplotype IL18-607C\\/-137C (P < 0.0001), which was independently associated in two case-control comparisons. This same haplotype has been noted in rheumatoid arthritis. Conclusion Haplotypes of the IL18 promotor region may contribute to CD risk, consistent with this cytokine\\'s role in maintaining inflammation in active CD.

  15. Evaluation of 6 candidate genes on chromosome 11q23 for coeliac disease susceptibility: a case control study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Brophy, Karen

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Recent whole genome analysis and follow-up studies have identified many new risk variants for coeliac disease (CD, gluten intolerance). The majority of newly associated regions encode candidate genes with a clear functional role in T-cell regulation. Furthermore, the newly discovered risk loci, together with the well established HLA locus, account for less than 50% of the heritability of CD, suggesting that numerous additional loci remain undiscovered. Linkage studies have identified some well-replicated risk regions, most notably chromosome 5q31 and 11q23. METHODS: We have evaluated six candidate genes in one of these regions (11q23), namely CD3E, CD3D, CD3G, IL10RA, THY1 and IL18, as risk factors for CD using a 2-phase candidate gene approach directed at chromosome 11q. 377 CD cases and 349 ethnically matched controls were used in the initial screening, followed by an extended sample of 171 additional coeliac cases and 536 additional controls. RESULTS: Promotor SNPs (-607, -137) in the IL18 gene, which has shown association with several autoimmune diseases, initially suggested association with CD (P < 0.05). Follow-up analyses of an extended sample supported the same, moderate effect (P < 0.05) for one of these. Haplotype analysis of IL18-137\\/-607 also supported this effect, primarily due to one relatively rare haplotype IL18-607C\\/-137C (P < 0.0001), which was independently associated in two case-control comparisons. This same haplotype has been noted in rheumatoid arthritis. CONCLUSION: Haplotypes of the IL18 promotor region may contribute to CD risk, consistent with this cytokine\\'s role in maintaining inflammation in active CD.

  16. Analysis of positional candidate genes in the AAA1 susceptibility locus for abdominal aortic aneurysms on chromosome 19

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    Ferrell Robert E

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA is a complex disorder with multiple genetic risk factors. Using affected relative pair linkage analysis, we previously identified an AAA susceptibility locus on chromosome 19q13. This locus has been designated as the AAA1 susceptibility locus in the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM database. Methods Nine candidate genes were selected from the AAA1 locus based on their function, as well as mRNA expression levels in the aorta. A sample of 394 cases and 419 controls was genotyped for 41 SNPs located in or around the selected nine candidate genes using the Illumina GoldenGate platform. Single marker and haplotype analyses were performed. Three genes (CEBPG, PEPD and CD22 were selected for DNA sequencing based on the association study results, and exonic regions were analyzed. Immunohistochemical staining of aortic tissue sections from AAA and control individuals was carried out for the CD22 and PEPD proteins with specific antibodies. Results Several SNPs were nominally associated with AAA (p CEBPG, peptidase D (PEPD, and CD22. Haplotype analysis found a nominally associated 5-SNP haplotype in the CEBPG/PEPD locus, as well as a nominally associated 2-SNP haplotype in the CD22 locus. DNA sequencing of the coding regions revealed no variation in CEBPG. Seven sequence variants were identified in PEPD, including three not present in the NCBI SNP (dbSNP database. Sequencing of all 14 exons of CD22 identified 20 sequence variants, five of which were in the coding region and six were in the 3'-untranslated region. Five variants were not present in dbSNP. Immunohistochemical staining for CD22 revealed protein expression in lymphocytes present in the aneurysmal aortic wall only and no detectable expression in control aorta. PEPD protein was expressed in fibroblasts and myofibroblasts in the media-adventitia border in both aneurysmal and non-aneurysmal tissue samples. Conclusions Association testing

  17. Delineation of candidate genes responsible for structural brain abnormalities in patients with terminal deletions of chromosome 6q27.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peddibhotla, Sirisha; Nagamani, Sandesh C S; Erez, Ayelet; Hunter, Jill V; Holder, J Lloyd; Carlin, Mary E; Bader, Patricia I; Perras, Helene M F; Allanson, Judith E; Newman, Leslie; Simpson, Gayle; Immken, LaDonna; Powell, Erin; Mohanty, Aaron; Kang, Sung-Hae L; Stankiewicz, Pawel; Bacino, Carlos A; Bi, Weimin; Patel, Ankita; Cheung, Sau W

    2015-01-01

    Patients with terminal deletions of chromosome 6q present with structural brain abnormalities including agenesis of corpus callosum, hydrocephalus, periventricular nodular heterotopia, and cerebellar malformations. The 6q27 region harbors genes that are important for the normal development of brain and delineation of a critical deletion region for structural brain abnormalities may lead to a better genotype-phenotype correlation. We conducted a detailed clinical and molecular characterization of seven unrelated patients with deletions involving chromosome 6q27. All patients had structural brain abnormalities. Using array comparative genomic hybridization, we mapped the size, extent, and genomic content of these deletions. The smallest region of overlap spans 1.7 Mb and contains DLL1, THBS2, PHF10, and C6orf70 (ERMARD) that are plausible candidates for the causation of structural brain abnormalities. Our study reiterates the importance of 6q27 region in normal development of brain and helps identify putative genes in causation of structural brain anomalies.

  18. Construction of an Americn mink Bacterial Artificial Chromosome (BAC) library and sequencing candidate genes important for the fur industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anistoroaei, Razvan Marian; Hallers, Boudewijn ten; Nefedov, Michael

    2011-01-01

    consisting of 18,432 clones spotted in duplicate, have been produced for hybridization screening and are publicly available. Overgo probes derived from expressed sequence tags (ESTs), representing 21 candidate genes for traits important for the mink industry, were used to screen the BAC library......BACKGROUND: Bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) libraries continue to be invaluable tools for the genomic analysis of complex organisms. Complemented by the newly and fast growing deep sequencing technologies, they provide an excellent source of information in genomics projects. RESULTS: Here, we...... report the construction and characterization of the CHORI-231 BAC library constructed from a Danish-farmed, male American mink (Neovison vison). The library contains approximately 165,888 clones with an average insert size of 170 kb, representing approximately 10-fold coverage. High-density filters, each...

  19. Construction of an American mink Bacterial Artificial Chromosome (BAC library and sequencing candidate genes important for the fur industry

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    Christensen Knud

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC libraries continue to be invaluable tools for the genomic analysis of complex organisms. Complemented by the newly and fast growing deep sequencing technologies, they provide an excellent source of information in genomics projects. Results Here, we report the construction and characterization of the CHORI-231 BAC library constructed from a Danish-farmed, male American mink (Neovison vison. The library contains approximately 165,888 clones with an average insert size of 170 kb, representing approximately 10-fold coverage. High-density filters, each consisting of 18,432 clones spotted in duplicate, have been produced for hybridization screening and are publicly available. Overgo probes derived from expressed sequence tags (ESTs, representing 21 candidate genes for traits important for the mink industry, were used to screen the BAC library. These included candidate genes for coat coloring, hair growth and length, coarseness, and some receptors potentially involved in viral diseases in mink. The extensive screening yielded positive results for 19 of these genes. Thirty-five clones corresponding to 19 genes were sequenced using 454 Roche, and large contigs (184 kb in average were assembled. Knowing the complete sequences of these candidate genes will enable confirmation of the association with a phenotype and the finding of causative mutations for the targeted phenotypes. Additionally, 1577 BAC clones were end sequenced; 2505 BAC end sequences (80% of BACs were obtained. An excess of 2 Mb has been analyzed, thus giving a snapshot of the mink genome. Conclusions The availability of the CHORI-321 American mink BAC library will aid in identification of genes and genomic regions of interest. We have demonstrated how the library can be used to identify specific genes of interest, develop genetic markers, and for BAC end sequencing and deep sequencing of selected clones. To our knowledge, this is the

  20. An integrated approach of comparative genomics and heritability analysis of pig and human on obesity trait: evidence for candidate genes on human chromosome 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Traditional candidate gene approach has been widely used for the study of complex diseases including obesity. However, this approach is largely limited by its dependence on existing knowledge of presumed biology of the phenotype under investigation. Our combined strategy of comparative genomics and chromosomal heritability estimate analysis of obesity traits, subscapular skinfold thickness and back-fat thickness in Korean cohorts and pig (Sus scrofa), may overcome the limitations of candidate gene analysis and allow us to better understand genetic predisposition to human obesity. Results We found common genes including FTO, the fat mass and obesity associated gene, identified from significant SNPs by association studies of each trait. These common genes were related to blood pressure and arterial stiffness (P = 1.65E-05) and type 2 diabetes (P = 0.00578). Through the estimation of variance of genetic component (heritability) for each chromosome by SNPs, we observed a significant positive correlation (r = 0.479) between genetic contributions of human and pig to obesity traits. Furthermore, we noted that human chromosome 2 (syntenic to pig chromosomes 3 and 15) was most important in explaining the phenotypic variance for obesity. Conclusions Obesity genetics still awaits further discovery. Navigating syntenic regions suggests obesity candidate genes on chromosome 2 that are previously known to be associated with obesity-related diseases: MRPL33, PARD3B, ERBB4, STK39, and ZNF385B. PMID:23253381

  1. An integrated approach of comparative genomics and heritability analysis of pig and human on obesity trait: evidence for candidate genes on human chromosome 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Jaemin

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Traditional candidate gene approach has been widely used for the study of complex diseases including obesity. However, this approach is largely limited by its dependence on existing knowledge of presumed biology of the phenotype under investigation. Our combined strategy of comparative genomics and chromosomal heritability estimate analysis of obesity traits, subscapular skinfold thickness and back-fat thickness in Korean cohorts and pig (Sus scrofa, may overcome the limitations of candidate gene analysis and allow us to better understand genetic predisposition to human obesity. Results We found common genes including FTO, the fat mass and obesity associated gene, identified from significant SNPs by association studies of each trait. These common genes were related to blood pressure and arterial stiffness (P = 1.65E-05 and type 2 diabetes (P = 0.00578. Through the estimation of variance of genetic component (heritability for each chromosome by SNPs, we observed a significant positive correlation (r = 0.479 between genetic contributions of human and pig to obesity traits. Furthermore, we noted that human chromosome 2 (syntenic to pig chromosomes 3 and 15 was most important in explaining the phenotypic variance for obesity. Conclusions Obesity genetics still awaits further discovery. Navigating syntenic regions suggests obesity candidate genes on chromosome 2 that are previously known to be associated with obesity-related diseases: MRPL33, PARD3B, ERBB4, STK39, and ZNF385B.

  2. A genome-wide association study on androstenone levels in pigs reveals a cluster of candidate genes on chromosome 6

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    Groenen Martien AM

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In many countries, male piglets are castrated shortly after birth because a proportion of un-castrated male pigs produce meat with an unpleasant flavour and odour. Main compounds of boar taint are androstenone and skatole. The aim of this high-density genome-wide association study was to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs associated with androstenone levels in a commercial sire line of pigs. The identification of major genetic effects causing boar taint would accelerate the reduction of boar taint through breeding to finally eliminate the need for castration. Results The Illumina Porcine 60K+SNP Beadchip was genotyped on 987 pigs divergent for androstenone concentration from a commercial Duroc-based sire line. The association analysis with 47,897 SNPs revealed that androstenone levels in fat tissue were significantly affected by 37 SNPs on pig chromosomes SSC1 and SSC6. Among them, the 5 most significant SNPs explained together 13.7% of the genetic variance in androstenone. On SSC6, a larger region of 10 Mb was shown to be associated with androstenone covering several candidate genes potentially involved in the synthesis and metabolism of androgens. Besides known candidate genes, such as cytochrome P450 A19 (CYP2A19, sulfotransferases SULT2A1, and SULT2B1, also new members of the cytochrome P450 CYP2 gene subfamilies and of the hydroxysteroid-dehydrogenases (HSD17B14 were found. In addition, the gene encoding the ß-chain of the luteinizing hormone (LHB which induces steroid synthesis in the Leydig cells of the testis at onset of puberty maps to this area on SSC6. Interestingly, the gene encoding the α-chain of LH is also located in one of the highly significant areas on SSC1. Conclusions This study reveals several areas of the genome at high resolution responsible for variation of androstenone levels in intact boars. Major genetic factors on SSC1 and SSC6 showing moderate to large effects on androstenone

  3. Linkage between stature and a region on chromosome 20 and analysis of a candidate gene, bone morphogenetic protein 2

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    Thompson, D.B.; Ossowski, V.; Janssen, R.C.; Knowler, W.C.; Bogardus, C. [National Inst. of Health, Phoenix, AZ (United States)

    1995-12-04

    Sib-pair linkage analysis of the quantitative trait, stature, in over 500 Pima Indians indicates that a genetic determinant of governing stature is located on chromosome 20. Analysis of 10 short tandem repeat polymorphisms localized this linkage to a 3. cM region that includes D20S98 and D20S66. Using all possible sib-pair combinations, linkage was detected to both stature (P = 0.0001) and to leg length (P = 0.001), but not to sitting height. Single-strand conformational polymorphism analysis of exon 3 of the bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2) gene, a candidate gene in this region, in genomic DNA of 20 of the tallest and 20 of the shortest individuals did not show any consistent differences associated with leg length or height. Sequence analysis of the region encoding the mature protein revealed a single nucleotide substitution, a T to G transversion, not detected by single-strand conformational polymorphism (SSCP) analysis. This transversion results in a conservative amino acid substitution of glycine for valine at codon 80 of BMP2. The frequency of this allele was 0.23 in the sample. No significant differences in height were noted in persons carrying either allele. This indicates that this structural alteration in the mature BMP2 protein does not contribute to the differences in stature observed in the Pima Indians, nor is this structural change in the mature protein likely to be responsible for the linkage observed with stature on chromosome 20. 33 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Four out of eight genes in a mouse chromosome 7 congenic donor region are candidate obesity genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarahan, Kari A.; Fisler, Janis S.

    2011-01-01

    We previously identified a region of mouse chromosome 7 that influences body fat mass in F2 littermates of congenic × background intercrosses. Current analyses revealed that alleles in the donor region of the subcongenic B6.C-D7Mit318 (318) promoted a twofold increase in adiposity in homozygous lines of 318 compared with background C57BL/6ByJ (B6By) mice. Parent-of-origin effects were discounted through cross-fostering studies and an F1 reciprocal cross. Mapping of the donor region revealed that it has a maximal size of 2.8 Mb (minimum 1.8 Mb) and contains a maximum of eight protein coding genes. Quantitative PCR in whole brain, liver, and gonadal white adipose tissue (GWAT) revealed differential expression between genotypes for three genes in females and two genes in males. Alpha-2,8-sialyltransferase 8B (St8sia2) showed reduced 318 mRNA levels in brain for females and males and in GWAT for females only. Both sexes of 318 mice had reduced Repulsive guidance molecule-a (Rgma) expression in GWAT. In brain, Family with sequence similarity 174 member b (Fam174b) had increased expression in 318 females, whereas Chromodomain helicase DNA binding protein 2 (Chd2-2) had reduced expression in 318 males. No donor region genes were differentially expressed in liver. Sequence analysis of coding exons for all genes in the 318 donor region revealed only one single nucleotide polymorphism that produced a nonsynonymous missense mutation, Gln7Pro, in Fam174b. Our findings highlight the difficulty of using expression and sequence to identify quantitative trait genes underlying obesity even in small genomic regions. PMID:21730028

  5. Four out of eight genes in a mouse chromosome 7 congenic donor region are candidate obesity genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarahan, Kari A; Fisler, Janis S; Warden, Craig H

    2011-09-22

    We previously identified a region of mouse chromosome 7 that influences body fat mass in F2 littermates of congenic × background intercrosses. Current analyses revealed that alleles in the donor region of the subcongenic B6.C-D7Mit318 (318) promoted a twofold increase in adiposity in homozygous lines of 318 compared with background C57BL/6ByJ (B6By) mice. Parent-of-origin effects were discounted through cross-fostering studies and an F1 reciprocal cross. Mapping of the donor region revealed that it has a maximal size of 2.8 Mb (minimum 1.8 Mb) and contains a maximum of eight protein coding genes. Quantitative PCR in whole brain, liver, and gonadal white adipose tissue (GWAT) revealed differential expression between genotypes for three genes in females and two genes in males. Alpha-2,8-sialyltransferase 8B (St8sia2) showed reduced 318 mRNA levels in brain for females and males and in GWAT for females only. Both sexes of 318 mice had reduced Repulsive guidance molecule-a (Rgma) expression in GWAT. In brain, Family with sequence similarity 174 member b (Fam174b) had increased expression in 318 females, whereas Chromodomain helicase DNA binding protein 2 (Chd2-2) had reduced expression in 318 males. No donor region genes were differentially expressed in liver. Sequence analysis of coding exons for all genes in the 318 donor region revealed only one single nucleotide polymorphism that produced a nonsynonymous missense mutation, Gln7Pro, in Fam174b. Our findings highlight the difficulty of using expression and sequence to identify quantitative trait genes underlying obesity even in small genomic regions.

  6. Fine Mapping of a Dravet Syndrome Modifier Locus on Mouse Chromosome 5 and Candidate Gene Analysis by RNA-Seq

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, Nicole A.; Zachwieja, Nicole J.; Miller, Alison R.; Anderson, Lyndsey L.; Kearney, Jennifer A.

    2016-01-01

    A substantial number of mutations have been identified in voltage-gated sodium channel genes that result in various forms of human epilepsy. SCN1A mutations result in a spectrum of severity ranging from mild febrile seizures to Dravet syndrome, an infant-onset epileptic encephalopathy. Dravet syndrome patients experience multiple seizures types that are often refractory to treatment, developmental delays, and elevated risk for SUDEP. The same sodium channel mutation can produce epilepsy phenotypes of varying clinical severity. This suggests that other factors, including genetic, modify the primary mutation and change disease severity. Mouse models provide a useful tool in studying the genetic basis of epilepsy. The mouse strain background can alter phenotype severity, supporting a contribution of genetic modifiers in epilepsy. The Scn1a+/- mouse model has a strain-dependent epilepsy phenotype. Scn1a+/- mice on the 129S6/SvEvTac (129) strain have a normal phenotype and lifespan, while [129xC57BL/6J]F1-Scn1a+/- mice experience spontaneous seizures, hyperthermia-induced seizures and high rates of premature death. We hypothesize the phenotypic differences are due to strain-specific genetic modifiers that influence expressivity of the Scn1a+/- phenotype. Low resolution mapping of Scn1a+/- identified several Dravet syndrome modifier (Dsm) loci responsible for the strain-dependent difference in survival. One locus of interest, Dsm1 located on chromosome 5, was fine mapped to a 9 Mb region using interval specific congenics. RNA-Seq was then utilized to identify candidate modifier genes within this narrowed region. Three genes with significant total gene expression differences between 129S6/SvEvTac and [129xC57BL/6J]F1 were identified, including the GABAA receptor subunit, Gabra2. Further analysis of Gabra2 demonstrated allele-specific expression. Pharmological manipulation by clobazam, a common anticonvulsant with preferential affinity for the GABRA2 receptor, revealed

  7. Fine Mapping of a Dravet Syndrome Modifier Locus on Mouse Chromosome 5 and Candidate Gene Analysis by RNA-Seq.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole A Hawkins

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available A substantial number of mutations have been identified in voltage-gated sodium channel genes that result in various forms of human epilepsy. SCN1A mutations result in a spectrum of severity ranging from mild febrile seizures to Dravet syndrome, an infant-onset epileptic encephalopathy. Dravet syndrome patients experience multiple seizures types that are often refractory to treatment, developmental delays, and elevated risk for SUDEP. The same sodium channel mutation can produce epilepsy phenotypes of varying clinical severity. This suggests that other factors, including genetic, modify the primary mutation and change disease severity. Mouse models provide a useful tool in studying the genetic basis of epilepsy. The mouse strain background can alter phenotype severity, supporting a contribution of genetic modifiers in epilepsy. The Scn1a+/- mouse model has a strain-dependent epilepsy phenotype. Scn1a+/- mice on the 129S6/SvEvTac (129 strain have a normal phenotype and lifespan, while [129xC57BL/6J]F1-Scn1a+/- mice experience spontaneous seizures, hyperthermia-induced seizures and high rates of premature death. We hypothesize the phenotypic differences are due to strain-specific genetic modifiers that influence expressivity of the Scn1a+/- phenotype. Low resolution mapping of Scn1a+/- identified several Dravet syndrome modifier (Dsm loci responsible for the strain-dependent difference in survival. One locus of interest, Dsm1 located on chromosome 5, was fine mapped to a 9 Mb region using interval specific congenics. RNA-Seq was then utilized to identify candidate modifier genes within this narrowed region. Three genes with significant total gene expression differences between 129S6/SvEvTac and [129xC57BL/6J]F1 were identified, including the GABAA receptor subunit, Gabra2. Further analysis of Gabra2 demonstrated allele-specific expression. Pharmological manipulation by clobazam, a common anticonvulsant with preferential affinity for the GABRA2

  8. Analysis of t(9;17)(q33.2;q25.3) chromosomal breakpoint regions and genetic association reveals novel candidate genes for bipolar disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rajkumar, A.P.; Christensen, Jane H.; Mattheisen, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Breakpoints of chromosomal abnormalities facilitate identification of novel candidate genes for psychiatric disorders. Genome-wide significant evidence supports the linkage between chromosome 17q25.3 and bipolar disorder (BD). Co-segregation of translocation t(9;17)(q33.2;q25.......3) with psychiatric disorders has been reported. We aimed to narrow down these chromosomal breakpoint regions and to investigate the associations between single nucleotide polymorphisms within these regions and BD as well as schizophrenia (SZ) in large genome-wide association study samples. METHODS: We cross......,856) data. Genetic associations between these disorders and single nucleotide polymorphisms within these breakpoint regions were analysed by BioQ, FORGE, and RegulomeDB programmes. RESULTS: Four protein-coding genes [coding for (endonuclease V (ENDOV), neuronal pentraxin I (NPTX1), ring finger protein 213...

  9. Mapping of a chromosome 12 region associated with airway hyperresponsiveness in a recombinant congenic mouse strain and selection of potential candidate genes by expression and sequence variation analyses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cynthia Kanagaratham

    Full Text Available In a previous study we determined that BcA86 mice, a strain belonging to a panel of AcB/BcA recombinant congenic strains, have an airway responsiveness phenotype resembling mice from the airway hyperresponsive A/J strain. The majority of the BcA86 genome is however from the hyporesponsive C57BL/6J strain. The aim of this study was to identify candidate regions and genes associated with airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR by quantitative trait locus (QTL analysis using the BcA86 strain. Airway responsiveness of 205 F2 mice generated from backcrossing BcA86 strain to C57BL/6J strain was measured and used for QTL analysis to identify genomic regions in linkage with AHR. Consomic mice for the QTL containing chromosomes were phenotyped to study the contribution of each chromosome to lung responsiveness. Candidate genes within the QTL were selected based on expression differences in mRNA from whole lungs, and the presence of coding non-synonymous mutations that were predicted to have a functional effect by amino acid substitution prediction tools. One QTL for AHR was identified on Chromosome 12 with its 95% confidence interval ranging from 54.6 to 82.6 Mbp and a maximum LOD score of 5.11 (p = 3.68 × 10(-3. We confirmed that the genotype of mouse Chromosome 12 is an important determinant of lung responsiveness using a Chromosome 12 substitution strain. Mice with an A/J Chromosome 12 on a C57BL/6J background have an AHR phenotype similar to hyperresponsive strains A/J and BcA86. Within the QTL, genes with deleterious coding variants, such as Foxa1, and genes with expression differences, such as Mettl21d and Snapc1, were selected as possible candidates for the AHR phenotype. Overall, through QTL analysis of a recombinant congenic strain, microarray analysis and coding variant analysis we identified Chromosome 12 and three potential candidate genes to be in linkage with airway responsiveness.

  10. A Narrow Segment of Maternal Uniparental Disomy of Chromosome 7q31-qter in Silver-Russell Syndrome Delimits a Candidate Gene Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannula, Katariina; Lipsanen-Nyman, Marita; Kontiokari, Tero; Kere, Juha

    2001-01-01

    Maternal uniparental disomy of chromosome 7 (matUPD7), the inheritance of both chromosomes from only the mother, is observed in ∼10% of patients with Silver-Russell syndrome (SRS). It has been suggested that at least one imprinted gene that regulates growth and development resides on human chromosome 7. To date, three imprinted genes—PEG1/MEST, γ2-COP, and GRB10—have been identified on chromosome 7, but their role in the etiology of SRS remains uncertain. In a systematic screening with microsatellite markers, for matUPD7 cases among patients with SRS, we identified a patient who had a small segment of matUPD7 and biparental inheritance of the remainder of chromosome 7. Such a pattern may be explained by somatic recombination in the zygote. The matUPD7 segment at 7q31-qter extends for 35 Mb and includes the imprinted gene cluster of PEG1/MEST and γ2-COP at 7q32. GRB10 at 7p11.2-p12 is located within a region of biparental inheritance. Although partial UPD has previously been reported for chromosomes 6, 11, 14, and 15, this is the first report of a patient with SRS who has segmental matUPD7. Our findings delimit a candidate imprinted region sufficient to cause SRS. PMID:11112662

  11. Focal chromosomal copy number aberrations identify CMTM8 and GPR177 as new candidate driver genes in osteosarcoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joeri Both

    Full Text Available Osteosarcoma is an aggressive bone tumor that preferentially develops in adolescents. The tumor is characterized by an abundance of genomic aberrations, which hampers the identification of the driver genes involved in osteosarcoma tumorigenesis. Our study aims to identify these genes by the investigation of focal copy number aberrations (CNAs, <3 Mb. For this purpose, we subjected 26 primary tumors of osteosarcoma patients to high-resolution single nucleotide polymorphism array analyses and identified 139 somatic focal CNAs. Of these, 72 had at least one gene located within or overlapping the focal CNA, with a total of 94 genes. For 84 of these genes, the expression status in 31 osteosarcoma samples was determined by expression microarray analysis. This enabled us to identify the genes of which the over- or underexpression was in more than 35% of cases in accordance to their copy number status (gain or loss. These candidate genes were subsequently validated in an independent set and furthermore corroborated as driver genes by verifying their role in other tumor types. We identified CMTM8 as a new candidate tumor suppressor gene and GPR177 as a new candidate oncogene in osteosarcoma. In osteosarcoma, CMTM8 has been shown to suppress EGFR signaling. In other tumor types, CMTM8 is known to suppress the activity of the oncogenic protein c-Met and GPR177 is known as an overexpressed upstream regulator of the Wnt-pathway. Further studies are needed to determine whether these proteins also exert the latter functions in osteosarcoma tumorigenesis.

  12. Construction of an Americn mink Bacterial Artificial Chromosome (BAC) library and sequencing candidate genes important for the fur industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anistoroaei, Razvan Marian; Hallers, Boudewijn ten; Nefedov, Michael;

    2011-01-01

    consisting of 18,432 clones spotted in duplicate, have been produced for hybridization screening and are publicly available. Overgo probes derived from expressed sequence tags (ESTs), representing 21 candidate genes for traits important for the mink industry, were used to screen the BAC library...

  13. A follow-up study for left ventricular mass on chromosome 12p11 identifies potential candidate genes

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    Slifer Susan

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Left ventricular mass (LVM is an important risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Previously we found evidence for linkage to chromosome 12p11 in Dominican families, with a significant increase in a subset of families with high average waist circumference (WC. In the present study, we use association analysis to further study the genetic effect on LVM. Methods Association analysis with LVM was done in the one LOD critical region of the linkage peak in an independent sample of 897 Caribbean Hispanics. Genotype data were available on 7085 SNPs from 23 to 53 MB on chromosome 12p11. Adjustment was made for vascular risk factors and population substructure using an additive genetic model. Subset analysis by WC was performed to test for a difference in genetic effects between the high and low WC subsets. Results In the overall analysis, the most significant association was found to rs10743465, downstream of the SOX5 gene (p = 1.27E-05. Also, 19 additional SNPs had nominal p TMTC1. Twelve additional SNPs in or near 6 genes had p Conclusions The current study supports previously identified evidence by linkage for a genetic effect on LVM on chromosome 12p11 using association analysis in population-based Caribbean Hispanic cohort. SOX5 may play an important role in the regulation of LVM. An interaction of TMTC1 with abdominal obesity may contribute to phenotypic variation of LVM.

  14. Female Drosophila melanogaster gene expression and mate choice: the X chromosome harbours candidate genes underlying sexual isolation.

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    Richard I Bailey

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The evolution of female choice mechanisms favouring males of their own kind is considered a crucial step during the early stages of speciation. However, although the genomics of mate choice may influence both the likelihood and speed of speciation, the identity and location of genes underlying assortative mating remain largely unknown. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We used mate choice experiments and gene expression analysis of female Drosophila melanogaster to examine three key components influencing speciation. We show that the 1,498 genes in Zimbabwean female D. melanogaster whose expression levels differ when mating with more (Zimbabwean versus less (Cosmopolitan strain preferred males include many with high expression in the central nervous system and ovaries, are disproportionately X-linked and form a number of clusters with low recombination distance. Significant involvement of the brain and ovaries is consistent with the action of a combination of pre- and postcopulatory female choice mechanisms, while sex linkage and clustering of genes lead to high potential evolutionary rate and sheltering against the homogenizing effects of gene exchange between populations. CONCLUSION: Taken together our results imply favourable genomic conditions for the evolution of reproductive isolation through mate choice in Zimbabwean D. melanogaster and suggest that mate choice may, in general, act as an even more important engine of speciation than previously realized.

  15. Genomic and expression profiling of human spermatocytic seminomas: primary spermatocyte as tumorigenic precursor and DMRT1 as candidate chromosome 9 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Looijenga, Leendert H J; Hersmus, Remko; Gillis, Ad J M; Pfundt, Rolph; Stoop, Hans J; van Gurp, Ruud J H L M; Veltman, Joris; Beverloo, H Berna; van Drunen, Ellen; van Kessel, Ad Geurts; Pera, Renee Reijo; Schneider, Dominik T; Summersgill, Brenda; Shipley, Janet; McIntyre, Alan; van der Spek, Peter; Schoenmakers, Eric; Oosterhuis, J Wolter

    2006-01-01

    Spermatocytic seminomas are solid tumors found solely in the testis of predominantly elderly individuals. We investigated these tumors using a genome-wide analysis for structural and numerical chromosomal changes through conventional karyotyping, spectral karyotyping, and array comparative genomic hybridization using a 32 K genomic tiling-path resolution BAC platform (confirmed by in situ hybridization). Our panel of five spermatocytic seminomas showed a specific pattern of chromosomal imbalances, mainly numerical in nature (range, 3-24 per tumor). Gain of chromosome 9 was the only consistent anomaly, which in one case also involved amplification of the 9p21.3-pter region. Parallel chromosome level expression profiling as well as microarray expression analyses (Affymetrix U133 plus 2.0) was also done. Unsupervised cluster analysis showed that a profile containing transcriptional data on 373 genes (difference of > or = 3.0-fold) is suitable for distinguishing these tumors from seminomas/dysgerminomas. The diagnostic markers SSX2-4 and POU5F1 (OCT3/OCT4), previously identified by us, were among the top discriminatory genes, thereby validating the experimental set-up. In addition, novel discriminatory markers suitable for diagnostic purposes were identified, including Deleted in Azospermia (DAZ). Although the seminomas/dysgerminomas were characterized by expression of stem cell-specific genes (e.g., POU5F1, PROM1/CD133, and ZFP42), spermatocytic seminomas expressed multiple cancer testis antigens, including TSP50 and CTCFL (BORIS), as well as genes known to be expressed specifically during prophase meiosis I (TCFL5, CLGN, and LDHc). This is consistent with different cells of origin, the primordial germ cell and primary spermatocyte, respectively. Based on the region of amplification defined on 9p and the associated expression plus confirmatory immunohistochemistry, DMRT1 (a male-specific transcriptional regulator) was identified as a likely candidate gene for

  16. Focal chromosomal copy number aberrations identify CMTM8 and GPR177 as new candidate driver genes in osteosarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Both, Joeri; Krijgsman, Oscar; Bras, Johannes; Schaap, Gerard R; Baas, Frank; Ylstra, Bauke; Hulsebos, Theo J M

    2014-01-01

    Osteosarcoma is an aggressive bone tumor that preferentially develops in adolescents. The tumor is characterized by an abundance of genomic aberrations, which hampers the identification of the driver genes involved in osteosarcoma tumorigenesis. Our study aims to identify these genes by the investigation of focal copy number aberrations (CNAs, GPR177 as a new candidate oncogene in osteosarcoma. In osteosarcoma, CMTM8 has been shown to suppress EGFR signaling. In other tumor types, CMTM8 is known to suppress the activity of the oncogenic protein c-Met and GPR177 is known as an overexpressed upstream regulator of the Wnt-pathway. Further studies are needed to determine whether these proteins also exert the latter functions in osteosarcoma tumorigenesis.

  17. High-density SNP association study of the 17q21 chromosomal region linked to autism identifies CACNA1G as a novel candidate gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strom, S P; Stone, J L; Ten Bosch, J R; Merriman, B; Cantor, R M; Geschwind, D H; Nelson, S F

    2010-10-01

    Chromosome 17q11-q21 is a region of the genome likely to harbor susceptibility to autism (MIM(209850)) based on earlier evidence of linkage to the disorder. This linkage is specific to multiplex pedigrees containing only male probands (MO) within the Autism Genetic Resource Exchange (AGRE). Earlier, Stone et al.(1) completed a high-density single nucleotide polymorphism association study of 13.7 Mb within this interval, but common variant association was not sufficient to account for the linkage signal. Here, we extend this single nucleotide polymorphism-based association study to complete the coverage of the two-LOD support interval around the chromosome 17q linkage peak by testing the majority of common alleles in 284 MO trios. Markers within an interval containing the gene, CACNA1G, were found to be associated with Autism Spectrum Disorder at a locally significant level (P=1.9 × 10(-5)). While establishing CACNA1G as a novel candidate gene for autism, these alleles do not contribute a sufficient genetic effect to explain the observed linkage, indicating that there is substantial genetic heterogeneity despite the clear linkage signal. The region thus likely harbors a combination of multiple common and rare alleles contributing to the genetic risk. These data, along with earlier studies of chromosomes 5 and 7q3, suggest few if any major common risk alleles account for Autism Spectrum Disorder risk under major linkage peaks in the AGRE sample. This provides important evidence for strategies to identify Autism Spectrum Disorder genes, suggesting that they should focus on identifying rare variants and common variants of small effect.

  18. Candidate-Gene Screening and Association Analysis at the Autism-Susceptibility Locus on Chromosome 16p: Evidence of Association at GRIN2A and ABAT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnby, Gabrielle; Abbott, Aaron; Sykes, Nuala; Morris, Andrew; Weeks, Daniel E.; Mott, Richard; Lamb, Janine; Bailey, Anthony J.; Monaco, Anthony P.

    2005-01-01

    Autism is a highly heritable neurodevelopmental disorder whose underlying genetic causes have yet to be identified. To date, there have been eight genome screens for autism, two of which identified a putative susceptibility locus on chromosome 16p. In the present study, 10 positional candidate genes that map to 16p11-13 were examined for coding variants: A2BP1, ABAT, BFAR, CREBBP, EMP2, GRIN2A, MRTF-B, SSTR5, TBX6, and UBN1. Screening of all coding and regulatory regions by denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography identified seven nonsynonymous changes. Five of these mutations were found to cosegregate with autism, but the mutations are not predicted to have deleterious effects on protein structure and are unlikely to represent significant etiological variants. Selected variants from candidate genes were genotyped in the entire International Molecular Genetics Study of Autism Consortium collection of 239 multiplex families and were tested for association with autism by use of the pedigree disequilibrium test. Additionally, genotype frequencies were compared between 239 unrelated affected individuals and 192 controls. Patterns of linkage disequilibrium were investigated, and the transmission of haplotypes across candidate genes was tested for association. Evidence of single-marker association was found for variants in ABAT, CREBBP, and GRIN2A. Within these genes, 12 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were subsequently genotyped in 91 autism trios (one affected individual and two unaffected parents), and the association was replicated within GRIN2A (Fisher's exact test, P<.0001). Logistic regression analysis of SNP data across GRIN2A and ABAT showed a trend toward haplotypic differences between cases and controls. PMID:15830322

  19. Fine-scale mapping of type I allergy candidate loci suggests central susceptibility genes on chromosomes 3q, 4q and Xp

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haagerup, A; Børglum, A D; Binderup, H G;

    2004-01-01

    and prevention. Like for other complex disorders, achievement of the knowledge necessary depends on confirmation of reported genomic candidate regions. METHODS: We performed a two-stage fine-scale linkage analysis in 11 selected candidate regions on chromosome 3p, 3q, 4p, 4q, 5q, 6p, 9p, 12q, 12qter, 18q and Xp...

  20. Whole-Genome Resequencing of a Cucumber Chromosome Segment Substitution Line and Its Recurrent Parent to Identify Candidate Genes Governing Powdery Mildew Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ting; Xu, Xuewen; Yan, Yali; Qi, Xiaohua; Chen, Xuehao

    2016-01-01

    Cucumber is an economically important vegetable crop worldwide. Powdery mildew (PM) is one of the most severe diseases that can affect cucumber crops. There have been several research efforts to isolate PM resistance genes for breeding PM-resistant cucumber. In the present study, we used a chromosome segment substitution line, SSL508-28, which carried PM resistance genes from the donor parent, JIN5-508, through twelve generations of backcrossing with a PM-susceptible inbred line, D8. We performed whole-genome resequencing of SSL508-28 and D8 to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), and insertions and deletions (indels). When compared against the reference genome of the inbred cucumber line 9930, a total of 468,616 SNPs and 67,259 indels were identified in SSL508-28, and 537,352 SNPs and 91,698 indels were identified in D8. Of these, 3,014 non-synonymous SNPs and 226 frameshift indels in SSL508-28, and 3,104 non-synonymous SNPs and 251 frameshift indels in D8, were identified. Bioinformatics analysis of these variations revealed a total of 15,682 SNPs and 6,262 indels between SSL508-28 and D8, among which 120 non-synonymous SNPs and 30 frameshift indels in 94 genes were detected between SSL508-28 and D8. Finally, out of these 94 genes, five resistance genes with nucleotide-binding sites and leucine-rich repeat domains were selected for qRT-PCR analysis. This revealed an upregulation of two transcripts, Csa2M435460.1 and Csa5M579560.1, in SSL508-28. Furthermore, the results of qRT-PCR analysis of these two genes in ten PM resistant and ten PM susceptible cucumber lines showed that when exposed to PM, Csa2M435460.1 and Csa5M579560.1 exhibited a higher expression level of resistant lines than susceptible lines. This indicates that Csa2M435460.1 and Csa5M579560.1 are candidate genes for PM resistance in cucumber. In addition, the non-synonymous SNPs in Csa2M435460.1 and Csa5M579560.1, identified in SSL508-28 and D8, might be the key to high PM-resistance in

  1. A sib-pair analysis study of 15 candidate genes in French families with morbid obesity: indication for linkage with islet 1 locus on chromosome 5q.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clément, K; Dina, C; Basdevant, A; Chastang, N; Pelloux, V; Lahlou, N; Berlan, M; Langin, D; Guy-Grand, B; Froguel, P

    1999-02-01

    As part of an ongoing search for susceptibility genes in obese families, we performed linkage analyses in 101 French families between qualitative and quantitative traits related to morbid obesity and polymorphisms located in or near 15 candidate genes whose products are involved in body weight regulation. These included cholecystokinin A and B receptors (CCK-AR and CCK-BR), glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor (GLP-1R), the LIM/homeodomain islet-1 gene (Isl-1), the caudal-type homeodomain 3 (CDX-3), the uncoupling protein 1 (UCP-1), the beta3-adrenoceptor (beta3-AR), the fatty acid-binding protein 2 (FABP-2), the hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL), the lipoprotein lipase (LPL), the apoprotein-C2 (apo-C2), the insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1), the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPAR-gamma), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), and the liver carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1 (CPT-1). Phenotypes related to obesity such as BMI, adult life body weight gain, fasting leptin, insulin, fasting glycerol, and free fatty acids were used for nonparametric sib-pair analyses. A weak indication for linkage was obtained between the Isl-1 locus and obesity status defined by a z score over one SD of BMI (n = 226 sib pairs, pi = 0.54 +/- 0.02, P = 0.03). Moreover, a suggestive indication for linkage was found between the Isl-1 locus and BMI and leptin values (P = 0.001 and 0.0003, respectively) and leptin adjusted for BMI (P = 0.0001). Multipoint analyses for leptin trait with Isl-1 and two flanking markers (D5S418 and D5S407) showed that the logarithm of odds (LOD) score is 1.73, coinciding with the Isl-1 locus. Although marginally positive indications for linkage in subgroups of families were found with IRS-1, CPT-1, and HSL loci, our data suggested that these genes are not major contributors to obesity. Whether an obesity susceptibility gene (Isl-1 itself or another nearby gene) lies on chromosome 5q should be determined by further analyses.

  2. Deletions in chromosome 4 differentially associated with the development of cervical cancer: evidence of slit2 as a candidate tumor suppressor gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ratnesh Kumar; Indra, Dipanjana; Mitra, Sraboni; Mondal, Ranajit Kumar; Basu, Partha Sarathi; Roy, Anup; Roychowdhury, Susanta; Panda, Chinmay Kumar

    2007-08-01

    The aim of this study was to locate the candidate tumor suppressor genes (TSGs) loci in the chromosomal 4p15-16, 4q22-23 and 4q34-35 regions associated with the development of uterine cervical carcinoma (CA-CX). Deletion mapping of the regions by microsatellite markers identified six discrete areas with high frequency of deletions, viz. 4p16.2 (D1: 40%), 4p15.31 (D2: 35-38%), 4p15.2 (D3: 37-40%), 4q22.2 (D4: 34%), 4q34.2-34.3 (D5: 37-59%) and 4q35.1 (D6: 40-50%). Significant correlation was noted among the deleted regions D1, D2 and D3. The deletions in D1, D2, D5 and D6 regions are suggested to be associated with the cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN), and deletions in the D2, D3, D5 and D6 regions seems to be associated with progression of CA-CX. The deletions in the D2 and D6 regions showed significant prognostic implications (P = 0.001; 0.02). The expression of the candidate TSG SLIT2 mapped to D2 region gradually reduced from normal cervix uteri -->CIN --> CA-CX. SLIT2 promoter hypermethylation was seen in 28% CIN samples and significantly increased with tumor progression (P = 0.04). Significant correlation was seen between SLIT2 deletion and its promoter methylation (P = 0.001), indicating that both these phenomena could occur simultaneously to inactivate this gene. Immunohistochemical analysis showed reduced expression of SLIT2 in cervical lesions and CA-CX cell lines. Although no mutation was detected in the SLIT2 promoter region (-432 to + 55 bp), CC and AA haplotypes were seen in -227 and -195 positions, respectively. Thus, it indicates that inactivation of SLIT2-ROBO1 signaling pathway may have an important role in CA-CX development.

  3. Systematic characterisation of disease associated balanced chromosome rearrangements by FISH: cytogenetically and genetically anchored YACs identify microdeletions and candidate regions for mental retardation genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wirth, J; Nothwang, H G; van der Maarel, S

    1999-01-01

    Disease associated balanced chromosome rearrangements (DBCRs) have been instrumental in the isolation of many disease genes. To facilitate the molecular cytogenetic characterisation of DBCRs, we have generated a set of >1200 non-chimeric, cytogenetically and genetically anchored CEPH YACs, on ave...... of disease in seemingly balanced chromosome rearrangements that are associated with a disease phenotype. Our region specific FISH probes, which are available to MCN members, can be a powerful tool in clinical cytogenetics and positional cloning.......Disease associated balanced chromosome rearrangements (DBCRs) have been instrumental in the isolation of many disease genes. To facilitate the molecular cytogenetic characterisation of DBCRs, we have generated a set of >1200 non-chimeric, cytogenetically and genetically anchored CEPH YACs...

  4. Genomic dissection and prioritizing of candidate genes of QTL for regulating spontaneous arthritis on chromosome 1 in mice deficient for interleukin-1 receptor antagonist

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Yanhong Cao; Jifei Zhang; Yan Jiao; Jian Yan; Feng Jiao; Xiaoyun Liu; Robert W. Williams; Karen A. Hasty; John M. Stuart; Weikuan Gu

    2012-08-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a heterogeneous disease with clinical and biological polymorphisms. IL-1RN is a protein that binds to interleukin-1 (IL-1) receptors and inhibits the binding of IL-1-alpha and IL-1-beta. IL-1RN levels are elevated in the blood of patients with a variety of infectious, immune, and traumatic conditions. Balb/c mice deficient in IL-1ra (mouse gene of IL-1RN) develop spontaneous autoimmune arthritis while DBA/1 mice deficient in IL-1ra do not. Previously, we identified a major QTL that regulates the susceptibility to arthritis in Balb/c mice with IL-1ra deficiency. In this study, we found that the QTL may contain two peaks that are regulated by two sets of candidate genes. By haplotype analysis, the total genomic regions of candidate genes were reduced from about 19 Mbp to approximately 9 Mbp. The total number of candidate genes was reduced from 208 to 21.

  5. Phenol sulfotransferases: Candidate genes for Batten disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dooley, T.P.; Probst, P.; Obermoeller, R.D. [M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)] [and others

    1995-06-05

    Batten disease (juvenile-onset neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis; JNCL) is an autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder, characterized by the cytosomal accumulation of autofluorescent protolipopigments in neurons and other cell types. The Batten disease gene (CLN3) has not yet been identified, but has been mapped to a small region of human chromosome area 16p12.1-p11.2. We recently reported the fortuitous discovery that the cytosolic phenol sulfotransferase gene (STP) is located within this same interval of chromosome 16p. Since phenol sulfotransferase is expressed in neurons, can sulfate lipophilic phenolic compounds, and is mapped near CLN3, STP is considered as a candidate gene for Batten disease. YAC and cosmid cloning results have further substantiated the close proximity of STP and a highly related sulfotransferase (STM), encoding the catecholamine-preferring enzyme, to the CLN3 region of chromosome 16p. In this report, we summarize some of the recent progress in the identification of two phenol sulfotransferase genes (STP and STM) as positional candidate genes for Batten disease. 42 refs., 1 tab.

  6. Chromosome 5q candidate genes in coeliac disease: genetic variation at IL4, IL5, IL9, IL13, IL17B and NR3C1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, A W; Thornton, J M; Brophy, K; Daly, J S; McLoughlin, R M; O'Morain, C; Abuzakouk, M; Kennedy, N P; Stevens, F M; Feighery, C; Kelleher, D; McManus, R

    2005-02-01

    Genetic predisposition to coeliac disease (CD) is determined primarily by alleles at the HLA-DQB locus, and evidence exists implicating other major histocompatibility complex-linked genes (6p21) and the CTLA4 locus on chromosome 2q33. In addition, extensive family studies have provided strong, reproducible evidence for a susceptibility locus on chromosome 5q (CELIAC2). However, the gene responsible has not been identified. We have assayed genetic variation at the IL4, IL5, IL9, IL13, IL17B and NR3C1 (GR) loci, all of which are present on chromosome 5q and have potential or demonstrated involvement in autoimmune and/or inflammatory disease, in a sample of 409 CD cases and 355 controls. Thirteen single nucleotide polymorphisms were chosen on the basis of functional relevance, prior disease association and, where possible, prior knowledge of the haplotype variation present in European populations. There were no statistically significant allele or haplotype frequency differences between cases and controls. Therefore, these results provide no evidence that these loci are associated with CD in this sample population.

  7. Candidate gene prioritization with Endeavour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tranchevent, Léon-Charles; Ardeshirdavani, Amin; ElShal, Sarah; Alcaide, Daniel; Aerts, Jan; Auboeuf, Didier; Moreau, Yves

    2016-07-08

    Genomic studies and high-throughput experiments often produce large lists of candidate genes among which only a small fraction are truly relevant to the disease, phenotype or biological process of interest. Gene prioritization tackles this problem by ranking candidate genes by profiling candidates across multiple genomic data sources and integrating this heterogeneous information into a global ranking. We describe an extended version of our gene prioritization method, Endeavour, now available for six species and integrating 75 data sources. The performance (Area Under the Curve) of Endeavour on cross-validation benchmarks using 'gold standard' gene sets varies from 88% (for human phenotypes) to 95% (for worm gene function). In addition, we have also validated our approach using a time-stamped benchmark derived from the Human Phenotype Ontology, which provides a setting close to prospective validation. With this benchmark, using 3854 novel gene-phenotype associations, we observe a performance of 82%. Altogether, our results indicate that this extended version of Endeavour efficiently prioritizes candidate genes. The Endeavour web server is freely available at https://endeavour.esat.kuleuven.be/.

  8. Investigation of LDHA and COPB1 as candidate genes for muscle development in the MYOD1 region of pig chromosome 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Haifeng; Xu, Xuewen; Fan, Bing; Rothschild, Max F; Martin, Yerle; Liu, Bang

    2010-01-01

    Porcine MYOD1 gene has been mapped to swine chromosome (SSC) 2p14-p17, which is involved in the regulation of the proliferation and differentiation of skeletal muscle cells. The LDHA (lactate dehydrogenase A) and COPB1 (coatomer protein complex, subunit beta 1) genes, which map close to MYOD1, are involved in energy metabolism and protein transport processes. Both genes might play important roles in muscle development. However, little is known about the porcine LDHA and COPB1 genes. In the present study, the full-length cDNA of these two genes were cloned. The mapping results demonstrated that porcine LDHA and COPB1 were all mapped to SSC 2p14-p17. In this region, there are several QTL for growth and carcass traits, including average backfat thickness, lean and fat percentage. The RT-PCR results revealed that both LDHA and COPB1 were highly expressed in porcine skeletal muscle tissues, implying their potential regulatory function of muscle development. LDHA and COPB1 were then mapped to the region and multipoint analyses generated a best sex-averaged map order of each gene between linked markers: MYOD1_75.2 cM _LDHA_79 cM _CSRP3_83.8 cM _TEF-1_86.5 cM _COPB1_90 cM. Association analyses revealed that the substitution of c.423A>G had a significant effect on average daily gain on test, average backfat thickness (BFT), loin muscle area, lumbar BFT, marbling score, tenth rib BFT, average drip loss and fiber type II ratio. The substitution of c.3096C>T had a significant effect on average BFT, lumbar BFT, tenth rib BFT, carcass weight and last rib BFT. Interestingly, both SNPs were all associated with average BFT, lumbar BFT and tenth rib BFT.

  9. Cystatin C (CST3), the candidate gene for hereditary cystatin C amyloid angiopathy (HCCAA), and other members of the cystatin gene family are clustered on chromosome 20p11. 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schnittger, S.; Gopal Rao, V.V.N.; Hansmann, I. (Universitaet Goettingen (Germany)); Abrahamson, M. (Univ. of Lund (Sweden))

    1993-04-01

    The cystatin C gene (CST3) encodes a low-molecular-weight cysteine proteinase inhibitor belonging to family II of the cystatin superfamily and is mutated in cases of hereditary cystatin C amyloid angiopathy (HCCAA). CST3, which along with other family II cystatin genes is a member of the cystatin gene family, has been assigned to chromosome 20. To investigate the genomic organization on chromosome 20, the CST3 gene and related sequences were regionally mapped by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), Southern blot, and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) analysis using the CDNA cystatin C probe C6a and three genomic probes, C3E1, C3E2, and C3E2-2. Probe C3E2-2, which like probe C3E2 is specific for CST3, hybridized to only one HindIII and one XbaI fragment on Southern blots and to a 300-kb BssHII PFGE fragment. FISH with probe C3E2 mapped this locus to chromosome 20p11.2, with an FL-pter value of 0.37 [+-] 0.07 on the physical map. Probe C3E1 containing the most conserved cystatin gene exon (exon 1) and its flanking sequences hybridized with more fragments, e.g., to eight XbaI and nine HindIII fragments on conventional Southern blots and to eight SmaI, two BssHII (900 and 300 kb), and two Notl fragments after PFGE. FISH with C3E1 revealed only one single site at 20p11.2 with an FL-pter value of 0.37 [+-] 0.04, identical to that obtained with C3E2. From these results it is concluded that (1) exon 1 and its flanking sequences are preferentially conserved within the cystatin gene family and that (2) CST3 and probably seven other members of the cystatin gene family are clustered within an at maximum 1.2-Mb segment on chromosome 20p11.2. 45 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Identification of Candidate Signaling Genes Including Regulators of Chromosome Condensation 1 Protein Family Differentially Expressed in the Soybean - Phytophthora Sojae Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stem and root rot caused by the oomycete pathogen, Phytopthora sojae, is a serious soybean disease. Use of Phytophthora resistance genes (Rps) in soybean cultivars has been very effective in controlling this pathogen. Resistance encoded by Rps genes is manifested through activation of defense resp...

  11. Chromosomal localization of the human and mouse hyaluronan synthase genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spicer, A.P.; McDonald, J.A. [Mayo Clinic Scottsdale, AZ (United States); Seldin, M.F. [Univ. of California Davis, CA (United States)] [and others

    1997-05-01

    We have recently identified a new vertebrate gene family encoding putative hyaluronan (HA) synthases. Three highly conserved related genes have been identified, designated HAS1, HAS2, and HAS3 in humans and Has1, Has2, and Has3 in the mouse. All three genes encode predicted plasma membrane proteins with multiple transmembrane domains and approximately 25% amino acid sequence identity to the Streptococcus pyogenes HA synthase, HasA. Furthermore, expression of any one HAS gene in transfected mammalian cells leads to high levels of HA biosynthesis. We now report the chromosomal localization of the three HAS genes in human and in mouse. The genes localized to three different positions within both the human and the mouse genomes. HAS1 was localized to the human chromosome 19q13.3-q13.4 boundary and Has1 to mouse Chr 17. HAS2 was localized to human chromosome 8q24.12 and Has2 to mouse Chr 15. HAS3 was localized to human chromosome 16q22.1 and Has3 to mouse Chr 8. The map position for HAS1 reinforces the recently reported relationship between a small region of human chromosome 19q and proximal mouse chromosome 17. HAS2 mapped outside the predicted critical region delineated for the Langer-Giedion syndrome and can thus be excluded as a candidate gene for this genetic syndrome. 33 refs., 2 figs.

  12. Identifying new candidate genes for hereditary facial paresis on chromosome 3q21-q22 by RNA in situ hybridization in mouse.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwaag, B. van der; Burbach, J.P.; Scharfe, C.; Oefner, P.J.; Brunner, H.G.; Padberg, G.W.A.M.; Bokhoven, J.H.L.M. van

    2005-01-01

    Hereditary congenital facial paresis (HCFP) belongs to the family of congenital cranial dysinnervation disorders and is characterized by an isolated dysfunction of the facial nerve (nVII). While genetic defects have been identified for several members of this disease family, genes underlying congeni

  13. The Important Candidate Genes in Goats - A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    China SUPAKORN

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A total of 271 candidate genes have been detected in goats. However, comprehensive investigations have been carried out on the polymorphism of some genes, involved in the control of economic traits. Candidate genes have an effect on the physiological pathway, metabolism and expression of phenotypes. For growth traits, growth hormone (GH, growth hormone receptor (GHR, insulin like growth factor I (IGF-I, leptin (LEP, caprine pituitary specific transcription factor-1 (POU1F1, caprine myostatin (MSTN and bone morphogenetic protein (BMP genes are necessary for bone formation, birth weight, weaning weight, body condition and muscle growth. For reproduction, forkhead box L 2 (FOXL2, melatonin receptor 1A (MTNR1A, sex determination region of Y chromosome (SRY and amelogenin (AMEL genes influence sex determination and proliferation. The major candidate genes for milk yield and milk composition traits are the casein gene and their family. Keratin associated protein (KAP and melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R genes are candidate genes for wool traits. The major histocompatibility complex (MHC gene is considered important for the immune system and disease resistance traits. The functions of these genes on economically important traits are different. Some genes have synergistic or antagonistic effects in nature for expression of phenotypic traits. On the other hand, some genes could control more than one trait. Also, the producers should be concerned with these effects because selection of a single trait by using only a gene could affect other traits. Therefore, the identification of candidate genes and their mutations which cause variations of gene expression and phenotype of economic traits will help breeders to search some genetic markers for these economic traits. It may be used as an aid in the selection of parent stock at an early age in the future.

  14. Cattle Candidate Genes for Milk Production Traits

    OpenAIRE

    Kadlec, Tomáš

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this thesis is to make an overview of important candidate genes affecting milk yield and milk quality parameters, with an emphasis on genes associated with the quantity and quality of milk proteins and milk fat.

  15. Bioinformatics methods for identifying candidate disease genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Driel, M.A. van; Brunner, H.G.

    2006-01-01

    With the explosion in genomic and functional genomics information, methods for disease gene identification are rapidly evolving. Databases are now essential to the process of selecting candidate disease genes. Combining positional information with disease characteristics and functional information i

  16. Evaluating historical candidate genes for schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farrell, M S; Werge, T; Sklar, P

    2015-01-01

    Prior to the genome-wide association era, candidate gene studies were a major approach in schizophrenia genetics. In this invited review, we consider the current status of 25 historical candidate genes for schizophrenia (for example, COMT, DISC1, DTNBP1 and NRG1). The initial study for 24 of thes...

  17. Novel gene acquisition on carnivore Y chromosomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William J Murphy

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Despite its importance in harboring genes critical for spermatogenesis and male-specific functions, the Y chromosome has been largely excluded as a priority in recent mammalian genome sequencing projects. Only the human and chimpanzee Y chromosomes have been well characterized at the sequence level. This is primarily due to the presumed low overall gene content and highly repetitive nature of the Y chromosome and the ensuing difficulties using a shotgun sequence approach for assembly. Here we used direct cDNA selection to isolate and evaluate the extent of novel Y chromosome gene acquisition in the genome of the domestic cat, a species from a different mammalian superorder than human, chimpanzee, and mouse (currently being sequenced. We discovered four novel Y chromosome genes that do not have functional copies in the finished human male-specific region of the Y or on other mammalian Y chromosomes explored thus far. Two genes are derived from putative autosomal progenitors, and the other two have X chromosome homologs from different evolutionary strata. All four genes were shown to be multicopy and expressed predominantly or exclusively in testes, suggesting that their duplication and specialization for testis function were selected for because they enhance spermatogenesis. Two of these genes have testis-expressed, Y-borne copies in the dog genome as well. The absence of the four newly described genes on other characterized mammalian Y chromosomes demonstrates the gene novelty on this chromosome between mammalian orders, suggesting it harbors many lineage-specific genes that may go undetected by traditional comparative genomic approaches. Specific plans to identify the male-specific genes encoded in the Y chromosome of mammals should be a priority.

  18. Alterations in candidate genes PHF2, FANCC, PTCH1 and XPA at chromosomal 9q22.3 region: Pathological significance in early- and late-onset breast carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roychoudhury Susanta

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Younger women with breast carcinoma (BC exhibits more aggressive pathologic features compared to older women; young age could be an independent predictor of adverse prognosis. To find any existing differences in the molecular pathogenesis of BC in both younger and older women, alterations at chromosomal (chr. 9q22.32-22.33 region were studied owing to its association in wide variety of tumors. Present work focuses on comparative analysis of alterations of four candidate genes; PHF2, FANCC, PTCH1 and XPA located within 4.4 Mb region of the afore-said locus in two age groups of BC, as well as the interrelation and prognostic significance of alterations of these genes. Methods Deletion analysis of PHF2, FANCC, PTCH1 and XPA were examined in a subset of 47 early-onset (group-A: ≤ 40 years and 59 late-onset (group-B: > 40 years breast carcinomas using both microsatellite and exonic markers. Methylation Sensitive Restriction analysis (MSRA was done to check for promoter methylation. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (Q-PCR and immunohistochemisty (IHC was done in some genes to see their relative mRNA and protein expressions respectively. Clinico-pathological correlation of different parameters as well as patient survival was calculated using different statistical softwares like EpiInfo 6.04b, SPSS 10.0 etc. Results Either age group exhibited high frequency of overall alterations in PHF2, FANCC and PTCH1 compared to XPA. Samples with alteration (deletion/methylation in these genes showed reduced level of mRNA expression as seen by Q-PCR. Immunohistochemical analysis of FANCC and PTCH1 also supported this observation. Poor patient survival was noted in both age groups having alterations in FANCC. Similar result was also seen with PTCH1 and XPA alterations in group-A and PHF2 alterations in group-B. This reflected their roles as prognostic tools in the respective groups in which they were altered. Conclusion Overall

  19. Identification of genes from the Treacher Collins candidate region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dixon, M.; Dixon, J.; Edwards, S. [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States)]|[Univ. of Manchester (United Kingdom)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Treacher Collins syndrome (TCOF1) is an autosomal dominant disorder of craniofacial development. The TCOF1 locus has previously been mapped to chromosome 5q32-33. The candidate gene region has been defined as being between two flanking markers, ribosomal protein S14 (RPS14) and Annexin 6 (ANX6), by analyzing recombination events in affected individuals. It is estimated that the distance between these flanking markers is 500 kb by three separate analysis methods: (1) radiation hybrid mapping; (2) genetic linkage; and (3) YAC contig analysis. A cosmid contig which spans the candidate gene region for TCOF1 has been constructed by screening the Los Alamos National Laboratory flow-sorted chromosome 5 cosmid library. Cosmids were obtained by using a combination of probes generated from YAC end clones, Alu-PCR fragments from YACs, and asymmetric PCR fragments from both T7 and T3 cosmid ends. Exon amplifications, the selection of genomic coding sequences based upon the presence of functional splice acceptor and donor sites, was used to identify potential exon sequences. Sequences found to be conserved between species were then used to screen cDNA libraries in order to identify candidate genes. To date, four different cDNAs have been isolated from this region and are being analyzed as potential candidate genes for TCOF1. These include the genes encoding plasma glutathione peroxidase (GPX3), heparin sulfate sulfotransferase (HSST), a gene with homology to the ETS family of proteins and one which shows no homology to any known genes. Work is also in progress to identify and characterize additional cDNAs from the candidate gene region.

  20. Tagging Blast Resistance Gene Pi 1 in Rice (Oryza sativa) Using Candidate Resistance Genes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Ai-hong; WU Jian-li; XU Xin-ping; Menchu BERNADO; DAI Zheng-yuan; ZHUANG Jie-yun; CHEN Zong-xiang; ZHENG Kang-le; LI Bao-jian; Hei LEUNG; ZHANG Hong-xi; PAN Xue-biao

    2004-01-01

    An F3 population derived from C101LAC/CO39 containing 90 lines was analyzed for blast resistance with 48 candidate genes developed from resistance gene analogs (RGA) and suppression subtractive library. Genetic analysis confirmed that blast resistance of the population was controlled by a single gene Pi 1. One of the candidate genes, R10 was identified as associated with the blast resistance gene on the long arm of chromosome 11 and mapped using a DH population derived from Azucena/IR64.A pair of PCR based primers was designed based on the sequence of R10 for marker-aided selection of the blast resistance gene.The recombination frequency between Pi 1 and the marker was estimated as 1.28%. It suggested that strategy of employing candidate genes is useful for gene identification and mapping. A new RFLP marker and the corresponding PCR marker for tagging of Pi 1 were provided.

  1. Bioinformatics methods for identifying candidate disease genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Driel Marc A

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract With the explosion in genomic and functional genomics information, methods for disease gene identification are rapidly evolving. Databases are now essential to the process of selecting candidate disease genes. Combining positional information with disease characteristics and functional information is the usual strategy by which candidate disease genes are selected. Enrichment for candidate disease genes, however, depends on the skills of the operating researcher. Over the past few years, a number of bioinformatics methods that enrich for the most likely candidate disease genes have been developed. Such in silico prioritisation methods may further improve by completion of datasets, by development of standardised ontologies across databases and species and, ultimately, by the integration of different strategies.

  2. Candidate genes for behavioural ecology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fitzpatrick, M.J.; Ben-Sahar, Y.; Smid, H.M.; Vet, L.E.M.; Robinson, G.E.; Sokolowski, M.B.

    2005-01-01

    In spite of millions of years of evolutionary divergence, the conservation of gene function is common across distant lineages. As such, genes that are known to influence behaviour in one organism are likely to influence similar behaviours in other organisms. Recent studies of the evolution of behavi

  3. The X chromosome and immune associated genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, Ilaria; Lleo, Ana; Gershwin, M Eric; Invernizzi, Pietro

    2012-05-01

    The X chromosome is known to contain the largest number of immune-related genes of the whole human genome. For this reason, X chromosome has recently become subject of great interest and attention and numerous studies have been aimed at understanding the role of genes on the X chromosome in triggering and maintaining the autoimmune aggression. Autoimmune diseases are indeed a growing heath burden affecting cumulatively up to 10% of the general population. It is intriguing that most X-linked primary immune deficiencies carry significant autoimmune manifestations, thus illustrating the critical role played by products of single gene located on the X chromosome in the onset, function and homeostasis of the immune system. Again, the plethora of autoimmune stigmata observed in patients with Turner syndrome, a disease due to the lack of one X chromosome or the presence of major X chromosome deletions, indicate that X-linked genes play a unique and major role in autoimmunity. There have been several reports on a role of X chromosome gene dosage through inactivation or duplication in women with autoimmune diseases, for example through a higher rate of circulating cells with a single X chromosome (i.e. with X monosomy). Finally, a challenge for researchers in the coming years will be to dissect the role for the large number of X-linked microRNAs from the perspective of autoimmune disease development. Taken together, X chromosome might well constitute the common trait of the susceptibility to autoimmune diseases, other than to explain the female preponderance of these conditions. This review will focus on the available evidence on X chromosome changes and discuss their potential implications and limitations.

  4. Candidate gene markers for sperm quality and fertility in bulls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chinmoy Mishra

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Fertility is one of the primary traits of reproduction in bulls. Decrease in fertility is a multifactorial condition and is verydifficult to diagnose. Among various causes genetic abnormality holds a major share. By identifying various genes that haveeffects on fertility the genetic cause behind subferility can be explored and also other non genetic factors can be identified.Advancement of molecular genetic tools now easily enables us to explore individual genes in animals. Identification of thesegenes will eventually lead to genome assembly and development of novel tools for analysing complex genetic traits. Thispaper gives a brief idea about the candidate genes for bull fertility, including genes encoding hormones and their receptors,proteins of the seminal plasma, proteins involved in spermatozoa-ovum binding and genes influencing sexual development.The chromosomal location and gene structure are described, based on the bovine genome assembly.

  5. Alcoholism and Alternative Splicing of Candidate Genes

    OpenAIRE

    Toshikazu Sasabe; Shoichi Ishiura

    2010-01-01

    Gene expression studies have shown that expression patterns of several genes have changed during the development of alcoholism. Gene expression is regulated not only at the level of transcription but also through alternative splicing of pre-mRNA. In this review, we discuss some of the evidence suggesting that alternative splicing of candidate genes such as DRD2 (encoding dopamine D2 receptor) may form the basis of the mechanisms underlying the pathophysiology of alcoholism. These reports sugg...

  6. Evaluating historical candidate genes for schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, M S; Werge, T; Sklar, P; Owen, M J; Ophoff, R A; O'Donovan, M C; Corvin, A; Cichon, S; Sullivan, P F

    2015-05-01

    Prior to the genome-wide association era, candidate gene studies were a major approach in schizophrenia genetics. In this invited review, we consider the current status of 25 historical candidate genes for schizophrenia (for example, COMT, DISC1, DTNBP1 and NRG1). The initial study for 24 of these genes explicitly evaluated common variant hypotheses about schizophrenia. Our evaluation included a meta-analysis of the candidate gene literature, incorporation of the results of the largest genomic study yet published for schizophrenia, ratings from informed researchers who have published on these genes, and ratings from 24 schizophrenia geneticists. On the basis of current empirical evidence and mostly consensual assessments of informed opinion, it appears that the historical candidate gene literature did not yield clear insights into the genetic basis of schizophrenia. A likely reason why historical candidate gene studies did not achieve their primary aims is inadequate statistical power. However, the considerable efforts embodied in these early studies unquestionably set the stage for current successes in genomic approaches to schizophrenia.

  7. Candidate genes in ocular dominance plasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Liset Rietman

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to identify new candidate genes involved in experience-dependent plasticity. To this aim, we combined previously obtained data from recombinant inbred BXD strains on ocular dominance (OD plasticity and gene expression levels in the neocortex. We validated our approach using a list of genes which alter OD plasticity when inactivated. The expression levels of one fifth of these genes correlated with the amount of OD plasticity. Moreover, the two genes with the highest relative inter-strain differences were among the correlated genes. This suggests that correlation between gene expression levels and OD plasticity is indeed likely to point to genes with a causal role in modulating or generating plasticity in the visual cortex. After this validation on known plasticity genes, we identified new candidate genes by a multi-step approach. First, a list was compiled of all genes of which the expression level in BXD strains correlate with the amount of OD plasticity. To narrow this list to the more promising candidates, we took its cross-section with a list of genes co-regulated with the sensitive period for OD plasticity and a list of genes associated with pathways implicated in OD plasticity. This analysis resulted in a list of 32 candidate genes. The list contained unproven, but not surprising, candidates, such as the genes for IGF-1, NCAM1, NOGO-A, the gamma2 subunit of the GABA(A receptor, acetylcholine esterase and the catalytic subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase A. This was indicative of the viability of our approach, but more interesting were the novel candidate genes: Akap7, Akt1, Camk2d, Cckbr, Cd44, Crim1, Ctdsp2, Dnajc5, Gnai1, Itpka, Mapk8, Nbea, Nfatc3, Nlk, Npy5r, Phf21a, Phip, Ppm1l, Ppp1r1b, Rbbp4, Slc1a3, Slit2, Socs2, Spock3, St8sia1, Zfp207. The possible role of some of these candidates is discussed in the article.

  8. Candidate genes in ocular dominance plasticity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.L. Rietman; J.-P. Sommeijer; C.N. Levelt; J.A. Heimel; A.B. Brussaard; J.G.G. Borst; Y. Elgersma; N. Galjart; G.T. van der Horst; C.M. Pennartz; A.B. Smit; B.M. Spruijt; M. Verhage; C.I. de Zeeuw

    2012-01-01

    Many studies have been devoted to the identification of genes involved in experience-dependent plasticity in the visual cortex. To discover new candidate genes, we have reexamined data from one such study on ocular dominance (OD) plasticity in recombinant inbred BXD mouse strains. We have correlated

  9. Searching for candidate genes for male infertility

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    B.N.Truong; E.K.Moses; J.E.Armes; D.J.Venter; H.W.G.Baker

    2003-01-01

    Aim: We describe an approach to search for candidate genes for male infertility using the two human genome databases: the public University of California at Santa Cruz (UCSC) and private Celera databases which list known and predicted gene sequences and provide related information such as gene function, tissue expression,known mutations and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Methods and Results: To demonstrate this in silico research, the following male infertility candidate genes were selected: (1) human BOULE, mutations of which may lead to germ cell arrest at the primary spermatocyte stage, (2) mutations of casein kinase 2 alpha genes which may cause globozoospermia, (3) DMR-N9 which is possibly involved in the spermatogenic defect of myotonic dystrophy and (4) several testes expressed genes at or near the breakpoints of a balanced translocation associated with hypospermatogenesis. We indicate how information derived from the human genome databases can be used to confirm these candidate genes may be pathogenic by studying RNA expression in tissue arrays using in situ hybridization and gene sequencing. Conclusion: The paper explains the new approach to discovering genetic causes of male infertility using information about the human genome. ( Asian J Andro1 2003 Jun; 5:137-147 )

  10. Alcoholism and alternative splicing of candidate genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasabe, Toshikazu; Ishiura, Shoichi

    2010-04-01

    Gene expression studies have shown that expression patterns of several genes have changed during the development of alcoholism. Gene expression is regulated not only at the level of transcription but also through alternative splicing of pre-mRNA. In this review, we discuss some of the evidence suggesting that alternative splicing of candidate genes such as DRD2 (encoding dopamine D2 receptor) may form the basis of the mechanisms underlying the pathophysiology of alcoholism. These reports suggest that aberrant expression of splice variants affects alcohol sensitivities, and alcohol consumption also regulates alternative splicing. Thus, investigations of alternative splicing are essential for understanding the molecular events underlying the development of alcoholism.

  11. Mapping of Ppd-B1, a Major Candidate Gene for Late Heading on Wild Emmer Chromosome Arm 2BS and Assessment of Its Interactions with Early Heading QTLs on 3AL.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Zhou

    Full Text Available Wheat heading date is an important agronomic trait determining maturation time and yield. A set of common wheat (Triticum aestivum var. Chinese Spring; CS-wild emmer (T. turgidum L. subsp. dicoccoides (TDIC chromosome arm substitution lines (CASLs was used to identify and allocate QTLs conferring late or early spike emergence by examining heading date. Genetic loci accelerating heading were found on TDIC chromosome arms 3AL and 7BS, while loci delaying heading were located on 4AL and 2BS. To map QTLs conferring late heading on 2BS, F2 populations derived from two cross combinations of CASL2BS × CS and CASL3AL × CASL2BS were developed and each planted at two times, constituting four F2 mapping populations. Heading date varied continuously among individuals of these four populations, suggesting quantitative characteristics. A genetic map of 2BS, consisting of 23 SSR and one single-stranded conformation polymorphism (SSCP marker(s, was constructed using these F2 populations. This map spanned a genetic length of 53.2 cM with average marker density of 2.3 cM. The photoperiod-sensitivity gene Ppd-B1 was mapped to chromosome arm 2BS as a SSCP molecular marker, and was validated as tightly linked to a major QTL governing late heading of CASL2BS in all mapping populations. A significant dominance by additive effect of Ppd-B1 with the LUX gene located on 3AL was also detected. CS had more copies of Ppd-B1 than CASL2BS, implying that increased copy number could elevate the expression of Ppd-1 in CS, also increasing expression of LUX and FT genes and causing CS to have an earlier heading date than CASL2BS in long days.

  12. Are TMEM genes potential candidate genes for panic disorder?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    NO, Gregersen; Buttenschøn, Henriette Nørmølle; Hedemand, Anne;

    2014-01-01

    We analysed single nucleotide polymorphisms in two transmembrane genes (TMEM98 and TMEM132E) in panic disorder (PD) patients and control individuals from the Faroe Islands, Denmark and Germany. The genes encode single-pass membrane proteins and are located within chromosome 17q11.2-q12...

  13. Genes and chromosomes: control of development

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    Oleg Serov

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available The past decade has witnessed immense progress in research into the molecular basis behind the developmental regulation of genes. Sets of genes functioning under hierarchical control have been identified, evolutionary conserved systems of genes effecting the cell-to-cell transmission of transmembrane signals and assigned a central role in morphogenesis have been intensively studied; the concept of genomic regulatory networks coordinating expression of many genes has been introduced, to mention some of the major breakthroughs. It should be noted that the temporal and tissue-specific parameters of gene expression are correctly regulated in development only in the context of the chromosome and that they are to a great extent dependent on the position of the gene on the chromosome or the interphase nucleus. Moreover epigenetic inheritance of the gene states through successive cell generations has been conducted exclusively at the chromosome level by virtue of cell or chromosome memory. The ontogenetic memory is an inherent property of the chromosome and cis-regulation has a crucial role in its maintenance.Durante a última década houve imenso progresso na pesquisa sobre as bases moleculares da regulação gênica durante o desenvolvimento. Foram identificados grupos de genes funcionando sob controle hierárquico, sistemas de genes conservados ao longo da evolução atuando na transmissão célula a célula de sinais transmembrana e com uma função central na morfogênese foram intensamente estudados e o conceito de redes genômicas regulatórias coordenando a expressão de diversos genes foi introduzido, para citar apenas alguns dos principais avanços. Deve-se notar que os parâmetros tempo e tecido-específicos da expressão gênica são corretamente regulados durante o desenvolvimento apenas no contexto do cromossomo e que são amplamente dependentes da posição do gene no cromossomo ou no núcleo em interfase. Além do mais, a herança epigen

  14. X-Linked Candidate Genes for a Ciliopathy-Like Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavey, Ashleigh R; Vilboux, Thierry; Babcock, Holly E; Ahronovich, Margot; Solomon, Benjamin D

    2016-04-01

    The ability to interrogate the genome via chromosomal microarray and sequencing-based technologies has accelerated the ability to rapidly and accurately define etiologies as well as new candidate genes related to genetic conditions. We describe a male patient with a lethal presentation of a multiple congenital anomaly syndrome that appeared consistent with a ciliopathy phenotype. The patient was found to have a novel maternally inherited 1.9-Mb X chromosome deletion including 4 known genes. Presently, the biological functions of these genes are not well delineated. However, at least one of these genes may be a promising candidate gene for this pattern of anomalies based on the function of related genes and information from publicly available copy number variant databases of control and affected individuals. These genes would bear further scrutiny in larger cohorts of patients with similar phenotypes.

  15. Mapping genes on human chromosome 20

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keith, T.; Phipps, P.; Serino, K. [Collaborative Research, Inc., Waltham, MA (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    While a substantial number of genes have been physically localized to human chromosome 20, few have been genetically mapped. In the process of developing a genetic linkage map of chromosome 20, we have mapped microsatellite polymorphisms associated with six genes. Three of these had highly informative polymorphisms (greater than 0.70) that were originally identified by other investigators. These include avian sarcoma oncogene homolog (SRC), ribophorin II (RPN2), and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PCK1). Polymorphisms associated with two genes were determined following a screen of their DNA sequences in GenBank. These include dinucleotide polymorphisms in introl II of cystatin c (CST3) and in the promoter region of neuroendocrine convertase 2 (NEC2) with heterozygosities of 0.52 and 0.54, respectively. A sixth gene, prodynorphin (PDYN) was mapped following the identification of a dinucleotide repeat polymorphism (heterozygosity of 0.35) in a cosmid subclone from a YAC homologous to the original phage clone. CA-positive cosmid subclones from a YAC for an additional gene, guanine nucleotide binding protein, alpha (GNAS10), have been identified and sequencing is in progress. Similar efforts were utilized to identify a microsatellite polymorphism from a half-YAC cloned by W. Brown and localized by FISH to 20pter. This polymorphism is highly informative, with a heterozygosity of 0.83, and serves to delimit the genetic map of the short arm of this chromosome.

  16. Alcoholism and Alternative Splicing of Candidate Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshikazu Sasabe

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Gene expression studies have shown that expression patterns of several genes have changed during the development of alcoholism. Gene expression is regulated not only at the level of transcription but also through alternative splicing of pre-mRNA. In this review, we discuss some of the evidence suggesting that alternative splicing of candidate genes such as DRD2 (encoding dopamine D2 receptor may form the basis of the mechanisms underlying the pathophysiology of alcoholism. These reports suggest that aberrant expression of splice variants affects alcohol sensitivities, and alcohol consumption also regulates alternative splicing. Thus, investigations of alternative splicing are essential for understanding the molecular events underlying the development of alcoholism.

  17. Positional cloning of disease genes on chromosome 16

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doggett, N. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Bruening, M. [Leiden Univ. (Netherlands); Callen, D. [Adelaide Women`s and Children`s Hospital, North Adelaide, South Australia (Australia); Gardiner, M. [University Coll., London (United Kingdom); Lerner, T. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

    1996-04-01

    The project seeks to elucidate the molecular basis of an important genetic disease (Batten`s disease) by molecular cloning of the affected gene by utilizing an overlapping clone map of chromosome 16. Batten disease (also known as juvenile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis) is a recessively inherited neurodegenerative disorder of childhood characterized by progressive loss of vision, seizures, and psychomoter disturbances. The Batten disease gene was genetically mapped to the chromosome region 16p 12.1 in close linkage with the genetic markers D16S299 and D16S298. Exon amplification of a cosmid containing D16S298 yielded a candidate gene that was disrupted by a 1 kb genomic deletion in all patients containing the most common haplotype for the disease. Two separate deletions and a point mutation altering a splice site in three unrelated families have confirmed the gene as the Batten disease gene. The disease gene encodes a novel 438 amino acid membrane binding protein of unknown function.

  18. A transcription map of the 6p22.3 reading disability locus identifying candidate genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gruen Jeffrey R

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Reading disability (RD is a common syndrome with a large genetic component. Chromosome 6 has been identified in several linkage studies as playing a significant role. A more recent study identified a peak of transmission disequilibrium to marker JA04 (G72384 on chromosome 6p22.3, suggesting that a gene is located near this marker. Results In silico cloning was used to identify possible candidate genes located near the JA04 marker. The 2 million base pairs of sequence surrounding JA04 was downloaded and searched against the dbEST database to identify ESTs. In total, 623 ESTs from 80 different tissues were identified and assembled into 153 putative coding regions from 19 genes and 2 pseudogenes encoded near JA04. The identified genes were tested for their tissue specific expression by RT-PCR. Conclusions In total, five possible candidate genes for RD and other diseases mapping to this region were identified.

  19. Genome-Wide Association Study with Sequence Variants Identifies Candidate Genes for Mastitis Resistance in Dairy Cattle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sahana, Goutam; Guldbrandtsen, Bernt; Bendixen, Christian;

    Effect Predictor (VEP) vers. 2.6 using ENSEMBL vers. 67 databases. Candidate polymorphisms affecting clinical mastitis were selected based on their association with the traits and functional annotations. A strong positional candidate gene for mastitis resistance on chromosome-6 is the NPFFR2 which...

  20. Chromosomal assignment of canine THADA gene to CFA 10q25

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    Dolf Gaudenz

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chromosomal translocations affecting the chromosome 2p21 cluster in a 450 kb breakpoint region are frequently observed in human benign thyroid adenomas. THADA (thyroid adenoma associated was identified as the affected gene within this breakpoint region. In contrast to man tumours of the thyroid gland of dogs (Canis lupus familiaris constitute mainly as follicular cell carcinomas, with malignant thyroid tumours being more frequent than benign thyroid adenomas. In order to elucidate if the THADA gene is also a target of chromosomal rearrangements in thyroid adenomas of the dog we have physically mapped the canine THADA gene to canine chromosome 10. A PCR was established to screen a canine genome library for a BAC clone containing the gene sequence of canine THADA. Further PCR reactions were done using the identified BAC clone as a template in order to verify the corresponding PCR product by sequencing. Canine whole blood was incubated with colcemid in order to arrest the cultured cells in metaphases. The verified BAC DNA was digoxigenin labeled and used as a probe in fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH. Ten well spread metaphases were examined indicating a signal on canine chromosome 10 on both chromatids. A detailed fine mapping was performed indicating the canine THADA gene locus on the q-arm of chromosome 10. Results The canine THADA gene locus was mapped on chromosome 10q25. Our mapping results obtained in this study following the previously described nomenclature for the canine karyotype. Conclusion We analysed whether the THADA gene locus is a hotspot of canine chromosomal rearrangements in canine neoplastic lesions of the thyroid and in addition might play a role as a candidate gene for a possible malignant transformation of canine thyroid adenomas. Although the available cytogenetic data of canine thyroid adenomas are still insufficient the chromosomal region to which the canine THADA has been mapped seems to be no

  1. Mammalian X chromosome inactivation evolved as a dosage-compensation mechanism for dosage-sensitive genes on the X chromosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pessia, Eugénie; Makino, Takashi; Bailly-Bechet, Marc; McLysaght, Aoife; Marais, Gabriel A B

    2012-04-03

    How and why female somatic X-chromosome inactivation (XCI) evolved in mammals remains poorly understood. It has been proposed that XCI is a dosage-compensation mechanism that evolved to equalize expression levels of X-linked genes in females (2X) and males (1X), with a prior twofold increase in expression of X-linked genes in both sexes ("Ohno's hypothesis"). Whereas the parity of X chromosome expression between the sexes has been clearly demonstrated, tests for the doubling of expression levels globally along the X chromosome have returned contradictory results. However, changes in gene dosage during sex-chromosome evolution are not expected to impact on all genes equally, and should have greater consequences for dosage-sensitive genes. We show that, for genes encoding components of large protein complexes (≥ 7 members)--a class of genes that is expected to be dosage-sensitive--expression of X-linked genes is similar to that of autosomal genes within the complex. These data support Ohno's hypothesis that XCI acts as a dosage-compensation mechanism, and allow us to refine Ohno's model of XCI evolution. We also explore the contribution of dosage-sensitive genes to X aneuploidy phenotypes in humans, such as Turner (X0) and Klinefelter (XXY) syndromes. X aneuploidy in humans is common and is known to have mild effects because most of the supernumerary X genes are inactivated and not affected by aneuploidy. Only genes escaping XCI experience dosage changes in X-aneuploidy patients. We combined data on dosage sensitivity and XCI to compute a list of candidate genes for X-aneuploidy syndromes.

  2. Deficit of mitonuclear genes on the human X chromosome predates sex chromosome formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Rebecca; Zimmer, Fabian; Mank, Judith E

    2015-01-29

    Two taxa studied to date, the therian mammals and Caenorhabditis elegans, display underrepresentations of mitonuclear genes (mt-N genes, nuclear genes whose products are imported to and act within the mitochondria) on their X chromosomes. This pattern has been interpreted as the result of sexual conflict driving mt-N genes off of the X chromosome. However, studies in several other species have failed to detect a convergent biased distribution of sex-linked mt-N genes, leading to questions over the generality of the role of sexual conflict in shaping the distribution of mt-N genes. Here we tested whether mt-N genes moved off of the therian X chromosome following sex chromosome formation, consistent with the role of sexual conflict, or whether the paucity of mt-N genes on the therian X is a chance result of an underrepresentation on the ancestral regions that formed the X chromosome. We used a synteny-based approach to identify the ancestral regions in the platypus and chicken genomes that later formed the therian X chromosome. We then quantified the movement of mt-N genes on and off of the X chromosome and the distribution of mt-N genes on the human X and ancestral X regions. We failed to find an excess of mt-N gene movement off of the X. The bias of mt-N genes on ancestral therian X chromosomes was also not significantly different from the biases on the human X. Together our results suggest that, rather than conflict driving mt-N genes off of the mammalian X, random biases on chromosomes that formed the X chromosome could explain the paucity of mt-N genes in the therian lineage.

  3. Inherited variants in the inner centromere protein (INCENP) gene of the chromosomal passenger complex contribute to the susceptibility of ER-negative breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kabisch, Maria; Lorenzo Bermejo, Justo; Dünnebier, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The chromosomal passenger complex (CPC) plays a pivotal role in the regulation of cell division. Therefore, inherited CPC variability could influence tumor development. The present candidate gene approach investigates the relationship between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes encodi...

  4. Chromosomal redistribution of male-biased genes in mammalian evolution with two bursts of gene gain on the X chromosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yong E; Vibranovski, Maria D; Landback, Patrick; Marais, Gabriel A B; Long, Manyuan

    2010-10-05

    Mammalian X chromosomes evolved under various mechanisms including sexual antagonism, the faster-X process, and meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI). These forces may contribute to nonrandom chromosomal distribution of sex-biased genes. In order to understand the evolution of gene content on the X chromosome and autosome under these forces, we dated human and mouse protein-coding genes and miRNA genes on the vertebrate phylogenetic tree. We found that the X chromosome recently acquired a burst of young male-biased genes, which is consistent with fixation of recessive male-beneficial alleles by sexual antagonism. For genes originating earlier, however, this pattern diminishes and finally reverses with an overrepresentation of the oldest male-biased genes on autosomes. MSCI contributes to this dynamic since it silences X-linked old genes but not X-linked young genes. This demasculinization process seems to be associated with feminization of the X chromosome with more X-linked old genes expressed in ovaries. Moreover, we detected another burst of gene originations after the split of eutherian mammals and opossum, and these genes were quickly incorporated into transcriptional networks of multiple tissues. Preexisting X-linked genes also show significantly higher protein-level evolution during this period compared to autosomal genes, suggesting positive selection accompanied the early evolution of mammalian X chromosomes. These two findings cast new light on the evolutionary history of the mammalian X chromosome in terms of gene gain, sequence, and expressional evolution.

  5. Chromosomal redistribution of male-biased genes in mammalian evolution with two bursts of gene gain on the X chromosome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong E Zhang

    Full Text Available Mammalian X chromosomes evolved under various mechanisms including sexual antagonism, the faster-X process, and meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI. These forces may contribute to nonrandom chromosomal distribution of sex-biased genes. In order to understand the evolution of gene content on the X chromosome and autosome under these forces, we dated human and mouse protein-coding genes and miRNA genes on the vertebrate phylogenetic tree. We found that the X chromosome recently acquired a burst of young male-biased genes, which is consistent with fixation of recessive male-beneficial alleles by sexual antagonism. For genes originating earlier, however, this pattern diminishes and finally reverses with an overrepresentation of the oldest male-biased genes on autosomes. MSCI contributes to this dynamic since it silences X-linked old genes but not X-linked young genes. This demasculinization process seems to be associated with feminization of the X chromosome with more X-linked old genes expressed in ovaries. Moreover, we detected another burst of gene originations after the split of eutherian mammals and opossum, and these genes were quickly incorporated into transcriptional networks of multiple tissues. Preexisting X-linked genes also show significantly higher protein-level evolution during this period compared to autosomal genes, suggesting positive selection accompanied the early evolution of mammalian X chromosomes. These two findings cast new light on the evolutionary history of the mammalian X chromosome in terms of gene gain, sequence, and expressional evolution.

  6. Chromosomal divergence and evolutionary inferences in Rhodniini based on the chromosomal location of ribosomal genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Pita

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we used fluorescence in situ hybridisation to determine the chromosomal location of 45S rDNA clusters in 10 species of the tribe Rhodniini (Hemiptera: Reduviidae: Triatominae. The results showed striking inter and intraspecific variability, with the location of the rDNA clusters restricted to sex chromosomes with two patterns: either on one (X chromosome or both sex chromosomes (X and Y chromosomes. This variation occurs within a genus that has an unchanging diploid chromosome number (2n = 22, including 20 autosomes and 2 sex chromosomes and a similar chromosome size and genomic DNA content, reflecting a genome dynamic not revealed by these chromosome traits. The rDNA variation in closely related species and the intraspecific polymorphism in Rhodnius ecuadoriensis suggested that the chromosomal position of rDNA clusters might be a useful marker to identify recently diverged species or populations. We discuss the ancestral position of ribosomal genes in the tribe Rhodniini and the possible mechanisms involved in the variation of the rDNA clusters, including the loss of rDNA loci on the Y chromosome, transposition and ectopic pairing. The last two processes involve chromosomal exchanges between both sex chromosomes, in contrast to the widely accepted idea that the achiasmatic sex chromosomes of Heteroptera do not interchange sequences.

  7. Strong purifying selection at genes escaping X chromosome inactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Chungoo; Carrel, Laura; Makova, Kateryna D

    2010-11-01

    To achieve dosage balance of X-linked genes between mammalian males and females, one female X chromosome becomes inactivated. However, approximately 15% of genes on this inactivated chromosome escape X chromosome inactivation (XCI). Here, using a chromosome-wide analysis of primate X-linked orthologs, we test a hypothesis that such genes evolve under a unique selective pressure. We find that escape genes are subject to stronger purifying selection than inactivated genes and that positive selection does not significantly affect the evolution of these genes. The strength of selection does not differ between escape genes with similar versus different expression levels in males versus females. Intriguingly, escape genes possessing Y homologs evolve under the strongest purifying selection. We also found evidence of stronger conservation in gene expression levels in escape than inactivated genes. We hypothesize that divergence in function and expression between X and Y gametologs is driving such strong purifying selection for escape genes.

  8. Is mortalin a candidate gene for T1DM ?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johannesen, Jesper; Pie, Angeles; Karlsen, Allan Ertmann; Larsen, Zenia Marian; Jensen, Allan; Vissing, Henrik; Kristiansen, Ole Peter; Pociot, Flemming; Nerup, Jørn

    2004-01-01

    Mortalin has been found to be up-regulated by 2D-protein gel analysis in isolated rodent islets exposed to cytokines. In islets from two rat strains with different sensitivity to the toxic effects of cytokines we observed a significant difference in IL-1beta mediated mortalin expression. Constitutive over-expression of rat mortalin in NIH3T3 cells reduced cellular survival in accordance with mortalin being associated to cellular senescence. Hence we consider the gene encoding for mortalin at chromosome 5q31.1 a putative candidate gene in cytokine induced beta-cell destruction. We scanned the human mortalin gene for polymorphisms and identified three novel polymorphisms. Neither the SNPs individually nor as constructed haplotypes showed disease association tested by (E)TDT in a Danish type 1 diabetes (T1DM) population. Furthermore, we tested the D5S500 microsatelite located close to 5q31.1 without finding linkage to (T1DM). In conclusion, the functional data identifying a difference in mortalin expression in IL-1beta stimulated islets between two rat strains and over-expression of mortalin in NIH3T3 cells associated with decreased viability suggests a functional role for mortalin in cytokine mediated beta cell destruction; however, the identified polymorphisms did not reveal any association in the presence of linkage disequilibrium of mortalin to T1DM in the Danish population.

  9. Fish on avian lampbrush chromosomes produces higher resolution gene mapping

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Galkina, S.A.; Deryusheva, S.; Fillon, V.; Vignal, A.; Crooijmans, R.P.M.A.; Groenen, M.A.M.; Rodionov, A.V.; Gaginskaya, E.

    2006-01-01

    Giant lampbrush chromosomes, which are characteristic of the diplotene stage of prophase I during avian oogenesis, represent a very promising system for precise physical gene mapping. We applied 35 chicken BAC and 4 PAC clones to both mitotic metaphase chromosomes and meiotic lampbrush chromosomes o

  10. Roles of the Y chromosome genes in human cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatsuo Kido

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Male and female differ genetically by their respective sex chromosome composition, that is, XY as male and XX as female. Although both X and Y chromosomes evolved from the same ancestor pair of autosomes, the Y chromosome harbors male-specific genes, which play pivotal roles in male sex determination, germ cell differentiation, and masculinization of various tissues. Deletions or translocation of the sex-determining gene, SRY, from the Y chromosome causes disorders of sex development (previously termed as an intersex condition with dysgenic gonads. Failure of gonadal development results not only in infertility, but also in increased risks of germ cell tumor (GCT, such as gonadoblastoma and various types of testicular GCT. Recent studies demonstrate that either loss of Y chromosome or ectopic expression of Y chromosome genes is closely associated with various male-biased diseases, including selected somatic cancers. These observations suggest that the Y-linked genes are involved in male health and diseases in more frequently than expected. Although only a small number of protein-coding genes are present in the male-specific region of Y chromosome, the impacts of Y chromosome genes on human diseases are still largely unknown, due to lack of in vivo models and differences between the Y chromosomes of human and rodents. In this review, we highlight the involvement of selected Y chromosome genes in cancer development in men.

  11. Modeling Three-Dimensional Chromosome Structures Using Gene Expression Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Guanghua; Wang, Xinlei; Khodursky, Arkady B

    2011-03-01

    Recent genomic studies have shown that significant chromosomal spatial correlation exists in gene expression of many organisms. Interestingly, coexpression has been observed among genes separated by a fixed interval in specific regions of a chromosome chain, which is likely caused by three-dimensional (3D) chromosome folding structures. Modeling such spatial correlation explicitly may lead to essential understandings of 3D chromosome structures and their roles in transcriptional regulation. In this paper, we explore chromosomal spatial correlation induced by 3D chromosome structures, and propose a hierarchical Bayesian method based on helical structures to formally model and incorporate the correlation into the analysis of gene expression microarray data. It is the first study to quantify and infer 3D chromosome structures in vivo using expression microarrays. Simulation studies show computing feasibility of the proposed method and that, under the assumption of helical chromosome structures, it can lead to precise estimation of structural parameters and gene expression levels. Real data applications demonstrate an intriguing biological phenomenon that functionally associated genes, which are far apart along the chromosome chain, are brought into physical proximity by chromosomal folding in 3D space to facilitate their coexpression. It leads to important biological insight into relationship between chromosome structure and function.

  12. Condensin-mediated chromosome organization and gene regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alyssa Christine Lau

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In many organisms sexual fate is determined by a chromosome-based method which entails a difference in sex chromosome-linked gene dosage. Consequently, a gene regulatory mechanism called dosage compensation equalizes X-linked gene expression between the sexes. Dosage compensation initiates as cells transition from pluripotency to differentiation. In C. elegans, dosage compensation is achieved by the dosage compensation complex (DCC binding to both X chromosomes in hermaphrodites to downregulate gene expression by two fold. The DCC contains a subcomplex (condensin IDC similar to the evolutionarily conserved condensin complexes which play a fundamental role in chromosome dynamics during mitosis. Therefore, mechanisms related to mitotic chromosome condensation are hypothesized to mediate dosage compensation. Consistent with this hypothesis, monomethylation of histone H4 lysine 20 (H4K20 is increased, whereas acetylation of histone H4 lysine 16 (H4K16 is decreased, both on mitotic chromosomes and on interphase dosage compensated X chromosomes in worms. These observations suggest that interphase dosage compensated X chromosomes maintain some characteristics associated with condensed mitotic chromosome. This chromosome state is stably propagated from one cell generation to the next. In this review we will speculate on how the biochemical activities of condensin can achieve both mitotic chromosome compaction and gene repression.

  13. Identification of susceptibility genes for bipolar affective disorder and schizophrenia on chromosome 22q13

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Severinsen, Jacob Eg

    2006-01-01

    Linkage analyses suggest that chromosome 22q12-13 may harbor one or more shared susceptibility loci for bipolar affective disorder (BPD) and schizophrenia (SZ). In a study of distantly related cases and control individuals from the Faeroe Islands our group has previously reported that chromosome 22......q13 may harbor two shared susceptibility loci for BPD and SZ. The aim of the Ph.D. project was to identify and characterize susceptibility genes for BPD and SZ located in these two loci on 22q13, primarily by association analyses of selected positional candidate genes in a number of population...... samples (total of 1,751 individuals), and by bioinformatic and expression analyses of a subset of disease associated genes and gene variants. In total 67 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) located in 18 positional candidate genes, and 4 microsattelite markers were investigated, using a Scottish case...

  14. Detection of chromosomal regions showing differential gene expression in human skeletal muscle and in alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bortoluzzi Stefania

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rhabdomyosarcoma is a relatively common tumour of the soft tissue, probably due to regulatory disruption of growth and differentiation of skeletal muscle stem cells. Identification of genes differentially expressed in normal skeletal muscle and in rhabdomyosarcoma may help in understanding mechanisms of tumour development, in discovering diagnostic and prognostic markers and in identifying novel targets for drug therapy. Results A Perl-code web client was developed to automatically obtain genome map positions of large sets of genes. The software, based on automatic search on Human Genome Browser by sequence alignment, only requires availability of a single transcribed sequence for each gene. In this way, we obtained tissue-specific chromosomal maps of genes expressed in rhabdomyosarcoma or skeletal muscle. Subsequently, Perl software was developed to calculate gene density along chromosomes, by using a sliding window. Thirty-three chromosomal regions harbouring genes mostly expressed in rhabdomyosarcoma were identified. Similarly, 48 chromosomal regions were detected including genes possibly related to function of differentiated skeletal muscle, but silenced in rhabdomyosarcoma. Conclusion In this study we developed a method and the associated software for the comparative analysis of genomic expression in tissues and we identified chromosomal segments showing differential gene expression in human skeletal muscle and in alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma, appearing as candidate regions for harbouring genes involved in origin of alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma representing possible targets for drug treatment and/or development of tumor markers.

  15. Chromosome abnormalities, mental retardation and the search for genes in bipolar disorder and schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackwood, D H R; Thiagarajah, T; Malloy, P; Pickard, B S; Muir, W J

    2008-10-01

    Genetic factors contribute to schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, and linkage and association studies have been successful in identifying several candidate genes. However these genes explain only a very small part of the total population risk and the psychoses appear to be very heterogeneous with several models of genetic inheritance relevant to different groups of patients, including some cases caused by multiple common genetic variants, while others are single gene disorders. Studying chromosomal abnormalities is a useful strategy for identifying genes in illness, and patients with both mental retardation and psychosis form a special group where large chromosomal abnormalities detected by routine cytogenetic analysis are more prevalent than in patients with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder alone, or in the general population. Studying these patients provides valuable opportunities to identify genes contributing to psychoses. This review of the literature on large chromosomal rearrangements in patients with mental retardation and psychotic illness illustrates how schizophrenia and bipolar phenotypes are associated with a large number of different chromosomal disruptions. Recent genome wide association studies have identified an excess of small chromosomal deletions and duplications in schizophrenia, adding further support to the importance of chromosomal structural variation in psychotic illness. The genes GRIK4 and NPAS3, each associated with psychosis in patients with mental retardation are discussed to illustrate the value of rare cytogenetic events as a means to signpost neurobiological pathways of general importance for illness in the wider population.

  16. X chromosome regulation of autosomal gene expression in bovine blastocysts

    OpenAIRE

    Itoh, Yuichiro; Arnold, Arthur P.

    2014-01-01

    Although X chromosome inactivation in female mammals evolved to balance the expression of X chromosome and autosomal genes in the two sexes, female embryos pass through developmental stages in which both X chromosomes are active in somatic cells. Bovine blastocysts show higher expression of many X genes in XX than XY embryos, suggesting that X inactivation is not complete. Here we reanalyzed bovine blastocyst microarray expression data from a network perspective with a focus on interactions b...

  17. Genetics of human longevity with emphasis on the relevance of HSP70 as candidate genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, Ripudaman; Kølvrå, Steen; Rattan, Suresh I S

    2007-01-01

    Human longevity is determined to a certain extent by genetic factors. Several candidate genes have been studied for their association with human longevity, but the data collected so far are inconclusive. One of the reasons is the choice of the candidate genes in addition to the choice...... of an appropriate study design and methodology. Since aging is characterized by a progressive accumulation of molecular damage and an attenuation of the cellular defense mechanisms, the focus of studies on human longevity association with genes has now shifted to the pathways of cellular maintenance and repair...... mechanisms. One such pathway includes the battery of stress response genes, especially the heat shock protein HSP70 genes. Three such genes, HSPA1A, HSPA1B and HSPA1L, are present within the MHC-III region on the short arm of chromosome 6. We and others have found alleles, genotypes and haplotypes which have...

  18. Mapping regulatory genes as candidates for cold and drought stress tolerance in barley.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tondelli, A; Francia, E; Barabaschi, D; Aprile, A; Skinner, J S; Stockinger, E J; Stanca, A M; Pecchioni, N

    2006-02-01

    Cereal crop yield is greatly affected in many growing areas by abiotic stresses, mainly low temperature and drought. In order to find candidates for the tolerance genes for these stresses, 13 genes encoding for transcription factors and upstream regulators were screened by amplification and SSCP on six parental genotypes of three barley mapping populations ('Nure' x 'Tremois', 'Proctor' x 'Nudinka', and 'Steptoe' x 'Morex'), and mapped as newly developed STS, SNP, and SSCP markers. A new consensus function map was then drawn using the three maps above, including 16 regulatory candidate genes (CGs). The positions of barley cold and drought tolerance quantitative trait loci (QTLs) presently described in the literature were added to the consensus map to find positional candidates from among the mapped genes. A cluster of six HvCBF genes co-mapped with the Fr-H2 cold tolerance QTL, while no QTLs for the same trait were positioned on chromosome 7H, where two putative barley regulators of CBF expression, ICE1 and FRY1, found by homology search, were mapped in this work. These observations suggest that CBF gene(s) themselves, rather than their two regulators, are at present the best candidates for cold tolerance. Four out of 12 drought tolerance QTLs of the consensus map are associated with regulatory CGs, on chromosomes 2H, 5H, and 7H, and two QTLs with effector genes, on chromosomes 5H and 6H. The results obtained could be used to guide MAS applications, allowing introduction into an ideal genotype of favourable alleles of tolerance QTLs.

  19. Pathogenic Network Analysis Predicts Candidate Genes for Cervical Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun-Xia Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The objective of our study was to predicate candidate genes in cervical cancer (CC using a network-based strategy and to understand the pathogenic process of CC. Methods. A pathogenic network of CC was extracted based on known pathogenic genes (seed genes and differentially expressed genes (DEGs between CC and normal controls. Subsequently, cluster analysis was performed to identify the subnetworks in the pathogenic network using ClusterONE. Each gene in the pathogenic network was assigned a weight value, and then candidate genes were obtained based on the weight distribution. Eventually, pathway enrichment analysis for candidate genes was performed. Results. In this work, a total of 330 DEGs were identified between CC and normal controls. From the pathogenic network, 2 intensely connected clusters were extracted, and a total of 52 candidate genes were detected under the weight values greater than 0.10. Among these candidate genes, VIM had the highest weight value. Moreover, candidate genes MMP1, CDC45, and CAT were, respectively, enriched in pathway in cancer, cell cycle, and methane metabolism. Conclusion. Candidate pathogenic genes including MMP1, CDC45, CAT, and VIM might be involved in the pathogenesis of CC. We believe that our results can provide theoretical guidelines for future clinical application.

  20. Spare PRELI gene loci: failsafe chromosome insurance?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenbin Ma

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: LEA (late embryogenesis abundant proteins encode conserved N-terminal mitochondrial signal domains and C-terminal (A/TAEKAK motif repeats, long-presumed to confer cell resistance to stress and death cues. This prompted the hypothesis that LEA proteins are central to mitochondria mechanisms that connect bioenergetics with cell responses to stress and death signaling. In support of this hypothesis, recent studies have demonstrated that mammalian LEA protein PRELI can act as a biochemical hub, which upholds mitochondria energy metabolism, while concomitantly promoting B cell resistance to stress and induced death. Hence, it is important to define in vivo the physiological relevance of PRELI expression. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Given the ubiquitous PRELI expression during mouse development, embryo lethality could be anticipated. Thus, conditional gene targeting was engineered by insertion of flanking loxP (flox/Cre recognition sites on PRELI chromosome 13 (Chr 13 locus to abort its expression in a tissue-specific manner. After obtaining mouse lines with homozygous PRELI floxed alleles (PRELI(f/f, the animals were crossed with CD19-driven Cre-recombinase transgenic mice to investigate whether PRELI inactivation could affect B-lymphocyte physiology and survival. Mice with homozygous B cell-specific PRELI deletion (CD19-Cre/Chr13 PRELI(-/- bred normally and did not show any signs of morbidity. Histopathology and flow cytometry analyses revealed that cell lineage identity, morphology, and viability were indistinguishable between wild type CD19-Cre/Chr13 PRELI(+/+ and CD19-Cre/Chr13 PRELI(-/- deficient mice. Furthermore, B cell PRELI gene expression seemed unaffected by Chr13 PRELI gene targeting. However, identification of additional PRELI loci in mouse Chr1 and Chr5 provided an explanation for the paradox between LEA-dependent cytoprotection and the seemingly futile consequences of Chr 13 PRELI gene inactivation. Importantly, PRELI expression

  1. Deficit of mito-nuclear genes on the human X chromosome predates sex chromosome formation

    OpenAIRE

    Dean, R; Zimmer, F.; Mank, J E

    2015-01-01

    Two taxa studied to date, the therian mammals and Caenorhaditis elegans, display under-representations of mito-nuclear genes (mt-N genes, nuclear genes whose products are imported to and act within the mitochondria) on their X chromosomes. This pattern has been interpreted as the result of sexual conflict driving mt-N genes off of the X chromosome. However, studies in several other species have failed to detect a convergent biased distribution of sex-linked mt-N genes, leading to questions ov...

  2. Candidate luminal B breast cancer genes identified by genome, gene expression and DNA methylation profiling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphanie Cornen

    Full Text Available Breast cancers (BCs of the luminal B subtype are estrogen receptor-positive (ER+, highly proliferative, resistant to standard therapies and have a poor prognosis. To better understand this subtype we compared DNA copy number aberrations (CNAs, DNA promoter methylation, gene expression profiles, and somatic mutations in nine selected genes, in 32 luminal B tumors with those observed in 156 BCs of the other molecular subtypes. Frequent CNAs included 8p11-p12 and 11q13.1-q13.2 amplifications, 7q11.22-q34, 8q21.12-q24.23, 12p12.3-p13.1, 12q13.11-q24.11, 14q21.1-q23.1, 17q11.1-q25.1, 20q11.23-q13.33 gains and 6q14.1-q24.2, 9p21.3-p24,3, 9q21.2, 18p11.31-p11.32 losses. A total of 237 and 101 luminal B-specific candidate oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes (TSGs presented a deregulated expression in relation with their CNAs, including 11 genes previously reported associated with endocrine resistance. Interestingly, 88% of the potential TSGs are located within chromosome arm 6q, and seven candidate oncogenes are potential therapeutic targets. A total of 100 candidate oncogenes were validated in a public series of 5,765 BCs and the overexpression of 67 of these was associated with poor survival in luminal tumors. Twenty-four genes presented a deregulated expression in relation with a high DNA methylation level. FOXO3, PIK3CA and TP53 were the most frequent mutated genes among the nine tested. In a meta-analysis of next-generation sequencing data in 875 BCs, KCNB2 mutations were associated with luminal B cases while candidate TSGs MDN1 (6q15 and UTRN (6q24, were mutated in this subtype. In conclusion, we have reported luminal B candidate genes that may play a role in the development and/or hormone resistance of this aggressive subtype.

  3. Candidate luminal B breast cancer genes identified by genome, gene expression and DNA methylation profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornen, Stéphanie; Guille, Arnaud; Adélaïde, José; Addou-Klouche, Lynda; Finetti, Pascal; Saade, Marie-Rose; Manai, Marwa; Carbuccia, Nadine; Bekhouche, Ismahane; Letessier, Anne; Raynaud, Stéphane; Charafe-Jauffret, Emmanuelle; Jacquemier, Jocelyne; Spicuglia, Salvatore; de The, Hugues; Viens, Patrice; Bertucci, François; Birnbaum, Daniel; Chaffanet, Max

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancers (BCs) of the luminal B subtype are estrogen receptor-positive (ER+), highly proliferative, resistant to standard therapies and have a poor prognosis. To better understand this subtype we compared DNA copy number aberrations (CNAs), DNA promoter methylation, gene expression profiles, and somatic mutations in nine selected genes, in 32 luminal B tumors with those observed in 156 BCs of the other molecular subtypes. Frequent CNAs included 8p11-p12 and 11q13.1-q13.2 amplifications, 7q11.22-q34, 8q21.12-q24.23, 12p12.3-p13.1, 12q13.11-q24.11, 14q21.1-q23.1, 17q11.1-q25.1, 20q11.23-q13.33 gains and 6q14.1-q24.2, 9p21.3-p24,3, 9q21.2, 18p11.31-p11.32 losses. A total of 237 and 101 luminal B-specific candidate oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes (TSGs) presented a deregulated expression in relation with their CNAs, including 11 genes previously reported associated with endocrine resistance. Interestingly, 88% of the potential TSGs are located within chromosome arm 6q, and seven candidate oncogenes are potential therapeutic targets. A total of 100 candidate oncogenes were validated in a public series of 5,765 BCs and the overexpression of 67 of these was associated with poor survival in luminal tumors. Twenty-four genes presented a deregulated expression in relation with a high DNA methylation level. FOXO3, PIK3CA and TP53 were the most frequent mutated genes among the nine tested. In a meta-analysis of next-generation sequencing data in 875 BCs, KCNB2 mutations were associated with luminal B cases while candidate TSGs MDN1 (6q15) and UTRN (6q24), were mutated in this subtype. In conclusion, we have reported luminal B candidate genes that may play a role in the development and/or hormone resistance of this aggressive subtype.

  4. Fine mapping of an IgE-controlling gene on chromosome 2q : Analysis of CTLA4 and CD28

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Howard, TD; Postma, DS; Hawkins, GA; Koppelman, GH; Zheng, SL; Wysong, AKS; Meyers, DA; Bleecker, ER

    2002-01-01

    Background: Several genomic regions have been identified that might contain genes contributing to the development of asthma and atopy. These include chromosome 2q33, where we have observed evidence for linkage for variation in total serum IgE levels in a Dutch asthma population. Two candidate genes,

  5. BRCA1-mediated repression of select X chromosome genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ropers H Hilger

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Recently BRCA1 has been implicated in the regulation of gene expression from the X chromosome. In this study the influence of BRCA1 on expression of X chromosome genes was investigated. Complementary DNA microarrays were used to compare the expression levels of X chromosome genes in 18 BRCA1-associated ovarian cancers to those of the 13 "BRCA1-like" and 14 "BRCA2-like" sporadic tumors (as defined by previously reported expression profiling. Significance was determined using parametric statistics with P

  6. Inherited variants in the inner centromere protein (INCENP) gene of the chromosomal passenger complex contribute to the susceptibility of ER-negative breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Kabisch (Maria); J.L. Bermejo (Justo Lorenzo); T. Dun̈nebier (Thomas); S. Ying (Shibo); K. Michailidou (Kyriaki); M.K. Bolla (Manjeet); Q. Wang (Qing); J. Dennis (Joe); M. Shah (Mitul); B. Perkins (Barbara); K. Czene (Kamila); H. Darabi (Hatef); M. Eriksson (Mikael); S.E. Bojesen (Stig); B.G. Nordestgaard (Børge); S.F. Nielsen (Sune); H. Flyger (Henrik); D. Lambrechts (Diether); P. Neven (Patrick); S.T.H. Peeters (Stephanie); C. Weltens (Caroline); F.J. Couch (Fergus); J.E. Olson (Janet); X. Wang (Xianshu); K. Purrington (Kristen); J. Chang-Claude (Jenny); A. Rudolph (Anja); P. Seibold (Petra); D. Flesch-Janys (Dieter); J. Peto (Julian); I. dos Santos Silva (Isabel); N. Johnson (Nichola); O. Fletcher (Olivia); H. Nevanlinna (Heli); T.A. Muranen (Taru); K. Aittomäki (Kristiina); C. Blomqvist (Carl); M.K. Schmidt (Marjanka); A. Broeks (Annegien); S. Cornelissen (Sten); F.B.L. Hogervorst (Frans); J. Li (Jingmei); J.S. Brand (Judith S.); M.K. Humphreys (Manjeet); P. Guénel (Pascal); T. Truong (Thérèse); F. Menegaux (Florence); M. Sanchez (Marie); B. Burwinkel (Barbara); F. Marme (Federick); R. Yang (Rongxi); P. Bugert (Peter); A. González-Neira (Anna); J. Benítez (Javier); M.P. Zamora (Pilar); J.I. Arias Pérez (José Ignacio); A. Cox (Angela); S.S. Cross (Simon); M.W.R. Reed (Malcolm); I.L. Andrulis (Irene); J.A. Knight (Julia); G. Glendon (Gord); S. Tchatchou (Sandrine); E.J. Sawyer (Elinor); I.P. Tomlinson (Ian); M. Kerin (Michael); N. Miller (Nicola); C.A. Haiman (Christopher); F.R. Schumacher (Fredrick); B.E. Henderson (Brian); L. Le Marchand (Loic); A. Lindblom (Annika); S. Margolin (Sara); M.J. Hooning (Maartje); A. Hollestelle (Antoinette); M. Kriege (Mieke); L.B. Koppert (Linetta); J. Hopper (John); M.C. Southey (Melissa); H. Tsimiklis (Helen); C. Apicella (Carmel); S. Slettedahl (Seth); A.E. Toland (Amanda); C. Vachon (Celine); D. Yannoukakos (Drakoulis); G.G. Giles (Graham); R.L. Milne (Roger); C.A. McLean (Catriona Ann); P.A. Fasching (Peter); M. Ruebner (Matthias); A.B. Ekici (Arif); M.W. Beckmann (Matthias); H. Brenner (Hermann); A.K. Dieffenbach (Aida Karina); V. Arndt (Volker); C. Stegmaier (Christa); A. Ashworth (Alan); N. Orr (Nick); M. Schoemaker (Minouk); A.J. Swerdlow (Anthony ); M. García-Closas (Montserrat); J.D. Figueroa (Jonine); S.J. Chanock (Stephen); J. Lissowska (Jolanta); M.S. Goldberg (Mark); F. Labrèche (France); M. Dumont (Martine); R. Winqvist (Robert); K. Pykäs (Katri); A. Jukkola-Vuorinen (Arja); M. Grip (Mervi); H. Brauch (Hiltrud); T. Brüning (Thomas); Y-D. Ko (Yon-Dschun); P. Radice (Paolo); P. Peterlongo (Paolo); G. Scuvera (Giulietta); S. Fortuzzi (S.); N.V. Bogdanova (Natalia); T. Dörk (Thilo); A. Mannermaa (Arto); V. Kataja (Vesa); V-M. Kosma (Veli-Matti); J.M. Hartikainen (J.); P. Devilee (Peter); R.A.M. Tollenaar (Robert A.M.); C.M. Seynaeve (Caroline); C.J. van Asperen (Christi); A. Jakubowska (Anna); J. Lubinski (Jan); K. Jaworska-Bieniek (Katarzyna); K. Durda (Katarzyna); W. Zheng (Wei); M. Shrubsole (Martha); Q. Cai (Qiuyin); D. Torres (Diana); H. Anton-Culver (Hoda); V. Kristensen (Vessela); F. Bacot (Francois); D.C. Tessier (Daniel C.); D. Vincent (Daniel); C. Luccarini (Craig); C. Baynes (Caroline); S. Ahmed (Shahana); M. Maranian (Melanie); J. Simard (Jacques); G. Chenevix-Trench (Georgia); P. Hall (Per); P.D.P. Pharoah (Paul); A.M. Dunning (Alison); D.F. Easton (Douglas); U. Hamann (Ute)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractThe chromosomal passenger complex (CPC) plays a pivotal role in the regulation of cell division. Therefore, inherited CPC variability could influence tumor development. The present candidate gene approach investigates the relationship between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in gen

  7. Microsatellite Scan Identifies New Candidate Genes for Susceptibility to Alcoholic Chronic Pancreatitis in Japanese Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kei Kitahara

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Alcohol abuse is one of the most common risk factor for chronic pancreatitis, but the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms remain unclear. The aim of this study was to identify genes that contribute to susceptibility or resistance for alcoholic chronic pancreatitis by screening the whole genome. Sixty-five patients with alcoholic chronic pancreatitis (63 men and 2 women, mean age 55.2 years and 99 healthy Japanese controls were enrolled in this study. This was an association study using 400 polymorphic microsatellite markers with an average spacing of 10.8 cM distributed throughout the whole genome. This search revealed 10 candidate susceptibility regions and 5 candidate resistant regions throughout the genome. No specific microsatellite markers were detected in association with previously reported susceptibility genes for chronic pancreatitis, such as PRSS1, PRSS2, CTRC, SPINK1, CFTR, ALDH2, and CYP2E1. Among the statistically significant markers, D15S1007 on chromosome 15q14 showed strong evidence for disease susceptibility (70.8% vs. 35.1%, Pc = 0.0001. Within 500 kb of D15S1007, several genes were candidate genes for susceptibility, including FMN1, DKFZP686C2281, LOC440268, RYR3, and AVEN, This study identified 10 candidate susceptibility and 5 candidate resistant regions that may contain genes involved in ACP pathogenesis.

  8. Fine mapping and candidate gene analysis of purple pericarp gene Pb in rice (Oryza sativa L.)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Purple rice is a type of rice with anthocyanins deposited in its grain pericarp. The rice Pb gene controlling purple pericarp character is known to be on chromosome 4, and the purple color is dominant over white color. In this study, we fine mapped the Pb gene using two F2 segregating populations, i.e. Pei'ai 64S (white) × Yunanheixiannuo (purple) and Pei'ai 64S × Chuanheinuo (purple). In the first-pass mapping, the Pb gene was located in the region downstream the SSR marker RM3820. In the fine mapping, the candidate region was saturated with InDel and CAPS markers developed specifically for this study. Eventually, the Pb gene was mapped within the 25-kb region delimited by the upstream marker RID3 and the downstream marker RID4. The delimited region contained two annotated genes, Ra and bhlh16 (TIGR Rice Genome, R.5). The former is a homologue of the Myc transcription factor Lc controlling anthocyanin biosynthesis in maize, and the latter is a homologue of the TT8 gene, which is also an Myc transcription factor gene controlling the pericarp pigmentation in Arabidopsis thaliana. Sequence analysis showed that the exon 7 of the Ra gene of Yunanheixiannuo and Chuanheinuo had a 2-bp (GT) deletion compared with those of the white rice varieties Pei'ai 64S, 9311 and Nipponbare. A CAPS marker, CAPSRa, was developed according to the GT deletion for analysis of the two F2 segregating populations and 106 rice lines. The results showed that all F2 plants with white pericarp, and all non-purple rice lines (63 white and 22 red) contained no GT deletion, but all 20 purple rice lines contained the GT deletion. These results suggested that the Ra gene may be the Pb gene and the purple pericarp characteristic of rice is caused by the GT deletion within exon 7 of the Ra gene.

  9. Modeling chromosomes in mouse to explore the function of genes, genomic disorders, and chromosomal organization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Véronique Brault

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available One of the challenges of genomic research after the completion of the human genome project is to assign a function to all the genes and to understand their interactions and organizations. Among the various techniques, the emergence of chromosome engineering tools with the aim to manipulate large genomic regions in the mouse model offers a powerful way to accelerate the discovery of gene functions and provides more mouse models to study normal and pathological developmental processes associated with aneuploidy. The combination of gene targeting in ES cells, recombinase technology, and other techniques makes it possible to generate new chromosomes carrying specific and defined deletions, duplications, inversions, and translocations that are accelerating functional analysis. This review presents the current status of chromosome engineering techniques and discusses the different applications as well as the implication of these new techniques in future research to better understand the function of chromosomal organization and structures.

  10. Chromosome banding and gene localizations support extensive conservation of chromosome structure between cattle and sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hediger, R; Ansari, H A; Stranzinger, G F

    1991-01-01

    By using three gene probes, one derived from the porcine major histocompatibility complex (MHC) and two from bovine cytokeratin genes, type I (KRTA) and type II (KRTB), the hypothesis of conservation of genome structure in two members of the family Bovidae was examined. Gene mapping data revealed the MHC to be in chromosome region 23q15----q23 in cattle (BOLA) and 20q15----q23 in sheep (OLA). KRTA was localized to chromosome region 19q25----q29 in cattle and 11q25----q29 in sheep and KRTB to 5q14----q22 in cattle and 3q14----q22 in sheep. The banding patterns of the chromosome arms to which the loci were assigned were identical in both species. Moreover, the resemblances of GTG- or QFQ-banding patterns between the cattle and sheep karyotypes illustrated further chromosome homologies. These studies, based on gene mapping comparisons and comparative cytogenetics, document that within bovid chromosomes, homology of banding patterns corresponds to a homologous genetic structure. Hence, we propose that gene assignments on identified chromosomal segments in one species of the Bovidae can be extrapolated, in general, to other bovid species based on the banding homologies presented here.

  11. Sequencing the mouse Y chromosome reveals convergent gene acquisition and amplification on both sex chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soh, Y Q Shirleen; Alföldi, Jessica; Pyntikova, Tatyana; Brown, Laura G; Graves, Tina; Minx, Patrick J; Fulton, Robert S; Kremitzki, Colin; Koutseva, Natalia; Mueller, Jacob L; Rozen, Steve; Hughes, Jennifer F; Owens, Elaine; Womack, James E; Murphy, William J; Cao, Qing; de Jong, Pieter; Warren, Wesley C; Wilson, Richard K; Skaletsky, Helen; Page, David C

    2014-11-06

    We sequenced the MSY (male-specific region of the Y chromosome) of the C57BL/6J strain of the laboratory mouse Mus musculus. In contrast to theories that Y chromosomes are heterochromatic and gene poor, the mouse MSY is 99.9% euchromatic and contains about 700 protein-coding genes. Only 2% of the MSY derives from the ancestral autosomes that gave rise to the mammalian sex chromosomes. Instead, all but 45 of the MSY's genes belong to three acquired, massively amplified gene families that have no homologs on primate MSYs but do have acquired, amplified homologs on the mouse X chromosome. The complete mouse MSY sequence brings to light dramatic forces in sex chromosome evolution: lineage-specific convergent acquisition and amplification of X-Y gene families, possibly fueled by antagonism between acquired X-Y homologs. The mouse MSY sequence presents opportunities for experimental studies of a sex-specific chromosome in its entirety, in a genetically tractable model organism.

  12. Cytosolic phospholipase A{sub 2} gene in human and rat: Chromosomal localization and polymorphic markers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tay, A.; Simon, J.S.; Jacob, H.J. [Univ. of Toronto (Canada)] [and others

    1995-03-01

    The authors report the chromosomal localization and a simple sequence repeat (SSR) in the cytosolic phospholipase A{sub 2} (cPLA{sub 2}) gene in both human and rat. A (CA){sub 18} repeat in the promoter of the rat gene was determined to exhibit length polymorphism when analyzed using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in 19 different inbred rat strains. Genotyping for this marker in 234 F{sub 2} progeny of a SHRXBN intercross mapped the gene to rat chromosome 13. Using a PCR strategy, a fragment of the promoter for the human gene was isolated, and a (CA){sub 18} repeat was identified. Since this marker displayed a low heterozygosity index, they also identified a mononucleotide repeat in the promoter for cPLA{sub 2} that displayed a polymorphism information content value of 0.76. The human gene was mapped using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) to chromosome 1q25. Of interest, the gene encoding the enzyme prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase 2 (cyclooxygenase-2), which acts on the arachidonic acid product of cPLA{sub 2}, was previously localized to this same chromosomal region, raising the possibility of coordinate regulation. Identification of intragenic markers may facilitate studies of polymorphic variants of these genes as candidates for disorders in which perturbations of the eicosanoid cascade may play a role. 20 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. DAZLA: an important candidate gene in male subfertility?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Golde, R.J.T. van; Tuerlings, J.H.A.M.; Kremer, J.A.M.; Braat, D.D.M.; Schoute, F.; Hoefsloot, L.H.

    2001-01-01

    PURPOSE: To study the role of the autosomal candidate gene DAZLA (Deleted in AZoospermia Like Autosome) in male subfertility. METHODS: We reviewed clinical data of subfertile men with oligozoospermia or azoospermia, mostly candidates for intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI). Mutation detection wa

  14. Integrating chromosomal aberrations and gene expression profiles to dissect rectal tumorigenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eilers Paul HC

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Accurate staging of rectal tumors is essential for making the correct treatment choice. In a previous study, we found that loss of 17p, 18q and gain of 8q, 13q and 20q could distinguish adenoma from carcinoma tissue and that gain of 1q was related to lymph node metastasis. In order to find markers for tumor staging, we searched for candidate genes on these specific chromosomes. Methods We performed gene expression microarray analysis on 79 rectal tumors and integrated these data with genomic data from the same sample series. We performed supervised analysis to find candidate genes on affected chromosomes and validated the results with qRT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. Results Integration of gene expression and chromosomal instability data revealed similarity between these two data types. Supervised analysis identified up-regulation of EFNA1 in cases with 1q gain, and EFNA1 expression was correlated with the expression of a target gene (VEGF. The BOP1 gene, involved in ribosome biogenesis and related to chromosomal instability, was over-expressed in cases with 8q gain. SMAD2 was the most down-regulated gene on 18q, and on 20q, STMN3 and TGIF2 were highly up-regulated. Immunohistochemistry for SMAD4 correlated with SMAD2 gene expression and 18q loss. Conclusion On basis of integrative analysis this study identified one well known CRC gene (SMAD2 and several other genes (EFNA1, BOP1, TGIF2 and STMN3 that possibly could be used for rectal cancer characterization.

  15. Epidermal growth factor gene is a newly identified candidate gene for gout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Lin; Cao, Chunwei; Jia, Zhaotong; Liu, Shiguo; Liu, Zhen; Xin, Ruosai; Wang, Can; Li, Xinde; Ren, Wei; Wang, Xuefeng; Li, Changgui

    2016-01-01

    Chromosome 4q25 has been identified as a genomic region associated with gout. However, the associations of gout with the genes in this region have not yet been confirmed. Here, we performed two-stage analysis to determine whether variations in candidate genes in the 4q25 region are associated with gout in a male Chinese Han population. We first evaluated 96 tag single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in eight inflammatory/immune pathway- or glucose/lipid metabolism-related genes in the 4q25 region in 480 male gout patients and 480 controls. The SNP rs12504538, located in the elongation of very-long-chain-fatty-acid-like family member 6 gene (Elovl6), was found to be associated with gout susceptibility (Padjusted = 0.00595). In the second stage of analysis, we performed fine mapping analysis of 93 tag SNPs in Elovl6 and in the epidermal growth factor gene (EGF) and its flanking regions in 1017 male patients gout and 1897 healthy male controls. We observed a significant association between the T allele of EGF rs2298999 and gout (odds ratio = 0.77, 95% confidence interval = 0.67–0.88, Padjusted = 6.42 × 10−3). These results provide the first evidence for an association between the EGF rs2298999 C/T polymorphism and gout. Our findings should be validated in additional populations. PMID:27506295

  16. Genetics of human longevity with emphasis on the relevance of HSP70 as candidate genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ripudaman; Kolvraa, Steen; Rattan, Suresh I S

    2007-05-01

    Human longevity is determined to a certain extent by genetic factors. Several candidate genes have been studied for their association with human longevity, but the data collected so far are inconclusive. One of the reasons is the choice of the candidate genes in addition to the choice of an appropriate study design and methodology. Since aging is characterized by a progressive accumulation of molecular damage and an attenuation of the cellular defense mechanisms, the focus of studies on human longevity association with genes has now shifted to the pathways of cellular maintenance and repair mechanisms. One such pathway includes the battery of stress response genes, especially the heat shock protein HSP70 genes. Three such genes, HSPA1A, HSPA1B and HSPA1L, are present within the MHC-III region on the short arm of chromosome 6. We and others have found alleles, genotypes and haplotypes which have been significantly associated with human longevity and survival. We have also provided some functional evidence for these genetic associations by showing that isolated peripheral blood cells from those genotypes which are negatively associated with human longevity also have less ability to respond to heat shock. Stress response genes, particularly HSP70, are now the major candidates in the gene-longevity association studies.

  17. Examination of NRCAM, LRRN3, KIAA0716, and LAMB1 as autism candidate genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santangelo Susan L

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A substantial body of research supports a genetic involvement in autism. Furthermore, results from various genomic screens implicate a region on chromosome 7q31 as harboring an autism susceptibility variant. We previously narrowed this 34 cM region to a 3 cM critical region (located between D7S496 and D7S2418 using the Collaborative Linkage Study of Autism (CLSA chromosome 7 linked families. This interval encompasses about 4.5 Mb of genomic DNA and encodes over fifty known and predicted genes. Four candidate genes (NRCAM, LRRN3, KIAA0716, and LAMB1 in this region were chosen for examination based on their proximity to the marker most consistently cosegregating with autism in these families (D7S1817, their tissue expression patterns, and likely biological relevance to autism. Methods Thirty-six intronic and exonic single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs and one microsatellite marker within and around these four candidate genes were genotyped in 30 chromosome 7q31 linked families. Multiple SNPs were used to provide as complete coverage as possible since linkage disequilibrium can vary dramatically across even very short distances within a gene. Analyses of these data used the Pedigree Disequilibrium Test for single markers and a multilocus likelihood ratio test. Results As expected, linkage disequilibrium occurred within each of these genes but we did not observe significant LD across genes. None of the polymorphisms in NRCAM, LRRN3, or KIAA0716 gave p LAMB1, the allelic association analysis revealed suggestive evidence for a positive association, including one individual SNP (p = 0.02 and three separate two-SNP haplotypes across the gene (p = 0.007, 0.012, and 0.012. Conclusions NRCAM, LRRN3, KIAA0716 are unlikely to be involved in autism. There is some evidence that variation in or near the LAMB1 gene may be involved in autism.

  18. A direct molecular link between the autism candidate gene RORa and the schizophrenia candidate MIR137

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devanna, Paolo; Vernes, Sonja C.

    2014-02-01

    Retinoic acid-related orphan receptor alpha gene (RORa) and the microRNA MIR137 have both recently been identified as novel candidate genes for neuropsychiatric disorders. RORa encodes a ligand-dependent orphan nuclear receptor that acts as a transcriptional regulator and miR-137 is a brain enriched small non-coding RNA that interacts with gene transcripts to control protein levels. Given the mounting evidence for RORa in autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and MIR137 in schizophrenia and ASD, we investigated if there was a functional biological relationship between these two genes. Herein, we demonstrate that miR-137 targets the 3'UTR of RORa in a site specific manner. We also provide further support for MIR137 as an autism candidate by showing that a large number of previously implicated autism genes are also putatively targeted by miR-137. This work supports the role of MIR137 as an ASD candidate and demonstrates a direct biological link between these previously unrelated autism candidate genes.

  19. Evaluation of the porcine ACSL4 gene as a candidate gene for meat quality traits in pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corominas, J; Ramayo-Caldas, Y; Castelló, A; Muñoz, M; Ibáñez-Escriche, N; Folch, J M; Ballester, M

    2012-12-01

    Long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase (ACSL) family members catalyse the formation of long-chain acyl-CoA from fatty acid, ATP and CoA, thus playing an important role in both de novo lipid synthesis and fatty acid catabolism. Previous studies in our group evaluated ACSL4 as a positional candidate gene for quantitative trait loci located on chromosome X in an Iberian × Landrace cross. A DQ144454:c.2645G>A SNP located in the 3' untranslated region of the ACSL4 gene was associated with the percentages of oleic and monounsaturated fatty acids. The aim of the present work was to evaluate the functional implication of this genetic variant. An expression analysis was performed for 120 individuals with different genotypes for the DQ144454:c.2645G>A polymorphism using real-time quantitative PCR. Differences between genotypes were identified in liver, with the ACSL4 mRNA expression levels higher in animals with the G allele than in animals with the A allele. A SNP genome-wide association study with ACSL4 relative expression levels showed significant positions on chromosomes 6 and 12. Description of positional candidate genes for ACSL4 regulation on chromosomes 6 and 12 is provided.

  20. Utilization of Gene Mapping and Candidate Gene Mutation Screening for Diagnosing Clinically Equivocal Conditions:A Norrie Disease Case Study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Vasiliki Chini; Danai Stambouli; Florina Mihaela Nedelea; George Alexandru Filipescu; Diana Mina; Marios Kambouris; Hatem El-Shanti

    2014-01-01

    Prenatal diagnosis was requested for an undiagnosed eye disease showing X-linked inheritance in a family. No medical records existed for the affected family members..Mapping of the X chromosome and candidate gene mutation screening i-dentified a c.C267A[p.F89L] mutation in NPD previously de-scribed as possibly causing Norrie disease..The detection of the c.C267A[p.F89L] variant in another unrelated family con-firms the pathogenic nature of the mutation for the Norrie dis-ease phenotype. Gene mapping, haplotype analysis, and can-didate gene screening have been previously utilized in research applications but were applied here in a diagnostic setting due to the scarcity of available clinical information..The clinical diagnosis and mutation identification were critical for provid-ing proper genetic counseling and prenatal diagnosis for this family.

  1. Generating Genome-Scale Candidate Gene Lists for Pharmacogenomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Niclas Tue; Brunak, Søren; Altman, R. B.

    2009-01-01

    A critical task in pharmacogenomics is identifying genes that may be important modulators of drug response. High-throughput experimental methods are often plagued by false positives and do not take advantage of existing knowledge. Candidate gene lists can usefully summarize existing knowledge...

  2. Fine Mapping and Candidate Gene Analysis of Resistance Gene RSC3Q to Soybean mosaic virus in Qihuang 1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zheng gui-jie; Yang Yong-qing; Ma Ying; Yang Xiao-feng; Chen Shan-yu; Ren Rui; Wang Da-gang; Yang Zhong-lu; ZhI hai-jian

    2014-01-01

    Soybean mosaic virus (SMV) disease is one of the most destructive viral diseases in soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.). SMV strain SC3 is the major prevalent strain in huang-huai and Yangtze valleys, China. The soybean cultivar Qihuang 1 is of a rich resistance spectrum and has a wide range of application in breeding programs in China. In this study, F1, F2 and F2:3 from Qihuang 1×nannong 1138-2 were used to study inheritance and linkage mapping of the SC3 resistance gene in Qihuang 1. The secondary F2 population and near isogenic lines (nILs) derived from residual heterozygous lines (RhLs) of Qihuang 1×nannong 1138-2 were separatively used in the ifne mapping and candidate gene analysis of the resistance gene. Results indicated that a single dominant gene (designated RSC3Q) controls resistance, which was located on chromosome 13. Two genomic-simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers BARCSOYSSR_13_1114 and BARCSOYSSR_13_1136 were found lfanking the two sides of the RSC3Q. The interval between the two markers was 651 kb. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis of the candidate genes showed that ifve genes (Glyma13g25730, 25750, 25950, 25970 and 26000) were likely involved in soybean SMV resistance. These results would have utility in cloning of RSC3Q resistance candidate gene and marker-assisted selection (MaS) in resistance breeding to SMV.

  3. Identification of Pneumocystis carinii chromosomes and mapping of five genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundgren, B; Cotton, R; Lundgren, J D;

    1990-01-01

    Pulsed field gel electrophoresis was used to identify the chromosome-size DNA of Pneumocystis carinii, a major pathogen of immunocompromised patients. Thirteen chromosomes of rodent Pneumocystis carinii, ranging in size from 300 to 700 kilobases (kb), were identified. The minimum genome size for P....... carinii, estimated on the basis of the sizes of chromosomes, is 7,000 kb. Genetic heterogeneity among different P. carinii isolates was documented by demonstration of chromosomal size variability. By hybridization studies, the genes for topoisomerase I, dihydrofolate reductase, rRNA, actin......, and thymidylate synthase were mapped to single chromosomes of approximately 650, 590, 550, 460, and 350 kb, respectively. Hybridization studies further confirmed the genetic heterogeneity of P. carinii....

  4. Linkage and candidate gene studies of autism spectrum disorders in European populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Richard; Barnby, Gabrielle; Maestrini, Elena; Bacchelli, Elena; Brocklebank, Denise; Sousa, Inês; Mulder, Erik J; Kantojärvi, Katri; Järvelä, Irma; Klauck, Sabine M; Poustka, Fritz; Bailey, Anthony J; Monaco, Anthony P

    2010-01-01

    Over the past decade, research on the genetic variants underlying susceptibility to autism and autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) has focused on linkage and candidate gene studies. This research has implicated various chromosomal loci and genes. Candidate gene studies have proven to be particularly intractable, with many studies failing to replicate previously reported associations. In this paper, we investigate previously implicated genomic regions for a role in ASD susceptibility, using four cohorts of European ancestry. Initially, a 384 SNP Illumina GoldenGate array was used to examine linkage at six previously implicated loci. We identify linkage approaching genome-wide suggestive levels on chromosome 2 (rs2885116, MLOD=1.89). Association analysis showed significant associations in MKL2 with ASD (rs756472, P=4.31 × 10−5) and between SND1 and strict autism (rs1881084, P=7.76 × 10−5) in the Finnish and Northern Dutch populations, respectively. Subsequently, we used a second 384 SNP Illumina GoldenGate array to examine the association in seven candidate genes, and evidence for association was found in RELN (rs362780, P=0.00165). Further increasing the sample size strengthened the association with RELN (rs362780, P=0.001) and produced a second significant result in GRIK2 (rs2518261, P=0.008). Our results strengthen the case for a more detailed study of the role of RELN and GRIK2 in autism susceptibility, as well as identifying two new potential candidate genes, MKL2 and SND1. PMID:20442744

  5. Y-chromosomal genes affecting male fertility: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhanoa, Jasdeep Kaur; Mukhopadhyay, Chandra Sekhar; Arora, Jaspreet Singh

    2016-01-01

    The mammalian sex-chromosomes (X and Y) have evolved from autosomes and are involved in sex determination and reproductive traits. The Y-chromosome is the smallest chromosome that consists of 2-3% of the haploid genome and may contain between 70 and 200 genes. The Y-chromosome plays major role in male fertility and is suitable to study the evolutionary relics, speciation, and male infertility and/or subfertility due to its unique features such as long non-recombining region, abundance of repetitive sequences, and holandric inheritance pattern. During evolution, many holandric genes were deleted. The current review discusses the mammalian holandric genes and their functions. The commonly encountered infertility and/or subfertility problems due to point or gross mutation (deletion) of the Y-chromosomal genes have also been discussed. For example, loss or microdeletion of sex-determining region, Y-linked gene results in XY males that exhibit female characteristics, deletion of RNA binding motif, Y-encoded in azoospermic factor b region results in the arrest of spermatogenesis at meiosis. The holandric genes have been covered for associating the mutations with male factor infertility. PMID:27536043

  6. Y-chromosomal genes affecting male fertility: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasdeep Kaur Dhanoa

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The mammalian sex-chromosomes (X and Y have evolved from autosomes and are involved in sex determination and reproductive traits. The Y-chromosome is the smallest chromosome that consists of 2-3% of the haploid genome and may contain between 70 and 200 genes. The Y-chromosome plays major role in male fertility and is suitable to study the evolutionary relics, speciation, and male infertility and/or subfertility due to its unique features such as long non-recombining region, abundance of repetitive sequences, and holandric inheritance pattern. During evolution, many holandric genes were deleted. The current review discusses the mammalian holandric genes and their functions. The commonly encountered infertility and/or subfertility problems due to point or gross mutation (deletion of the Y-chromosomal genes have also been discussed. For example, loss or microdeletion of sex-determining region, Y-linked gene results in XY males that exhibit female characteristics, deletion of RNA binding motif, Y-encoded in azoospermic factor b region results in the arrest of spermatogenesis at meiosis. The holandric genes have been covered for associating the mutations with male factor infertility.

  7. Candidate genes for idiopathic epilepsy in four dog breeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mickelson James R

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Idiopathic epilepsy (IE is a naturally occurring and significant seizure disorder affecting all dog breeds. Because dog breeds are genetically isolated populations, it is possible that IE is attributable to common founders and is genetically homogenous within breeds. In humans, a number of mutations, the majority of which are genes encoding ion channels, neurotransmitters, or their regulatory subunits, have been discovered to cause rare, specific types of IE. It was hypothesized that there are simple genetic bases for IE in some purebred dog breeds, specifically in Vizslas, English Springer Spaniels (ESS, Greater Swiss Mountain Dogs (GSMD, and Beagles, and that the gene(s responsible may, in some cases, be the same as those already discovered in humans. Results Candidate genes known to be involved in human epilepsy, along with selected additional genes in the same gene families that are involved in murine epilepsy or are expressed in neural tissue, were examined in populations of affected and unaffected dogs. Microsatellite markers in close proximity to each candidate gene were genotyped and subjected to two-point linkage in Vizslas, and association analysis in ESS, GSMD and Beagles. Conclusions Most of these candidate genes were not significantly associated with IE in these four dog breeds, while a few genes remained inconclusive. Other genes not included in this study may still be causing monogenic IE in these breeds or, like many cases of human IE, the disease in dogs may be likewise polygenic.

  8. Genome-wide association study identifies candidate genes for starch content regulation in maize kernels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Na Liu

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Kernel starch content is an important trait in maize (Zea mays L. as it accounts for 65% to 75% of the dry kernel weight and positively correlates with seed yield. A number of starch synthesis-related genes have been identified in maize in recent years. However, many loci underlying variation in starch content among maize inbred lines still remain to be identified. The current study is a genome-wide association study that used a set of 263 maize inbred lines. In this panel, the average kernel starch content was 66.99%, ranging from 60.60% to 71.58% over the three study years. These inbred lines were genotyped with the SNP50 BeadChip maize array, which is comprised of 56,110 evenly spaced, random SNPs. Population structure was controlled by a mixed linear model (MLM as implemented in the software package TASSEL. After the statistical analyses, four SNPs were identified as significantly associated with starch content (P ≤ 0.0001, among which one each are located on chromosomes 1 and 5 and two are on chromosome 2. Furthermore, 77 candidate genes associated with starch synthesis were found within the 100-kb intervals containing these four QTLs, and four highly associated genes were within 20-kb intervals of the associated SNPs. Among the four genes, Glucose-1-phosphate adenylyltransferase (APS1; Gene ID GRMZM2G163437 is known as an important regulator of kernel starch content. The identified SNPs, QTLs, and candidate genes may not only be readily used for germplasm improvement by marker-assisted selection in breeding, but can also elucidate the genetic basis of starch content. Further studies on these identified candidate genes may help determine the molecular mechanisms regulating kernel starch content in maize and other important cereal crops.

  9. Isolation of Breast Tumor Suppressor Genes from Chromosome 11p

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-09-01

    at chromosome crucial role in urogenital development (Pelletier et al., llp15 has also been described in Wilms tumors but thus 1991). However...Atkins L and Riccardi VM. (1979). Nowak NJ, Evans G, Stanbridge EJ, de Jong P, Shows TB , Cytogenet. Cell Genet., 24, 185-192. Weissman BE and Higgins MJ...Singh-Kahlon P, Weksberg R, Squire J, Grundy P, Coppes MJ and Haber D. (1995). Hematology/ Shows TB and Higgins MJ. (1994). Genes Chromosomes Oncology

  10. Investigation of the molecular relationship between breast cancer and obesity by candidate gene prioritization methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saba Garshasbi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cancer and obesity are two major public health concerns. More than 12 million cases of cancer are reported annually. Many reports confirmed obesity as a risk factor for cancer. The molecular relationship between obesity and breast cancer has not been clear yet. The purpose of this study was to investigate priorities of effective genes in the molecular relationship between obesity and breast cancer. Methods: In this study, computer simulation method was used for prioritizing the genes that involved in the molecular links between obesity and breast cancer in laboratory of systems biology and bioinformatics (LBB, Tehran University, Tehran, Iran, from March to July 2014. In this study, ENDEAVOUR software was used for prioritizing the genes and integrating multiple data sources was used for data analysis. Training genes were selected from effective genes in obesity and/or breast cancer. Two groups of candidate genes were selected. The first group was included the existential genes in 5 common region chromosomes (between obesity and breast cancer and the second group was included the results of genes microarray data analysis of research Creighton, et al (In 2012 on patients with breast cancer. The microarray data were analyzed with GER2 software (R online software on GEO website. Finally, both training and candidate genes were entered in ENDEAVOUR software package. Results: The candidate genes were prioritized to four style and five genes in ten of the first priorities were repeated twice. In other word, the outcome of prioritizing of 72 genes (Product of microarray data analysis and genes of 5 common chromosome regions (Between obesity and breast cancer showed, 5 genes (TNFRSF10B, F2, IGFALS, NTRK3 and HSP90B1 were the priorities in the molecular connection between obesity and breast cancer. Conclusion: There are some common genes between breast cancer and obesity. So, molecular relationship is confirmed. In this study the possible effect

  11. Associations between Variation in X Chromosome Male Reproductive Genes and Sperm Competitive Ability in Drosophila melanogaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leah Greenspan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Variation in reproductive success has long been thought to be mediated in part by genes encoding seminal proteins. Here we explore the effect on male reproductive phenotypes of X-linked polymorphisms, a chromosome that is depauperate in genes encoding seminal proteins. Using 57 X chromosome substitution lines, sperm competition was tested both when the males from the wild-extracted line were the first to mate (“defense” crosses, followed by a tester male, and when extracted-line males were the second to mate, after a tester male (“offfense” crosses. We scored the proportion of progeny sired by each male, the fecundity, the remating rate and refractoriness to remating, and tested the significance of variation among lines. Eleven candidate genes were chosen based on previous studies, and portions of these genes were sequenced in all 57 lines. A total of 131 polymorphisms were tested for associations with the reproductive phenotypes using linear models. Nine polymorphisms in 4 genes were found to show significant associations (at a 5% FDR. Overall, it appears that the X chromosomes harbor abundant variation in sperm competition, especially considering the paucity of seminal protein genes. This suggests that much of the male reproductive variation lies outside of genes that encode seminal proteins.

  12. Candidate Gene Approach for Parasite Resistance in Sheep – Variation in Immune Pathway Genes and Association with Fecal Egg Count

    Science.gov (United States)

    Periasamy, Kathiravan; Pichler, Rudolf; Poli, Mario; Cristel, Silvina; Cetrá, Bibiana; Medus, Daniel; Basar, Muladno; A. K., Thiruvenkadan; Ramasamy, Saravanan; Ellahi, Masroor Babbar; Mohammed, Faruque; Teneva, Atanaska; Shamsuddin, Mohammed; Podesta, Mario Garcia; Diallo, Adama

    2014-01-01

    Sheep chromosome 3 (Oar3) has the largest number of QTLs reported to be significantly associated with resistance to gastro-intestinal nematodes. This study aimed to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within candidate genes located in sheep chromosome 3 as well as genes involved in major immune pathways. A total of 41 SNPs were identified across 38 candidate genes in a panel of unrelated sheep and genotyped in 713 animals belonging to 22 breeds across Asia, Europe and South America. The variations and evolution of immune pathway genes were assessed in sheep populations across these macro-environmental regions that significantly differ in the diversity and load of pathogens. The mean minor allele frequency (MAF) did not vary between Asian and European sheep reflecting the absence of ascertainment bias. Phylogenetic analysis revealed two major clusters with most of South Asian, South East Asian and South West Asian breeds clustering together while European and South American sheep breeds clustered together distinctly. Analysis of molecular variance revealed strong phylogeographic structure at loci located in immune pathway genes, unlike microsatellite and genome wide SNP markers. To understand the influence of natural selection processes, SNP loci located in chromosome 3 were utilized to reconstruct haplotypes, the diversity of which showed significant deviations from selective neutrality. Reduced Median network of reconstructed haplotypes showed balancing selection in force at these loci. Preliminary association of SNP genotypes with phenotypes recorded 42 days post challenge revealed significant differences (P<0.05) in fecal egg count, body weight change and packed cell volume at two, four and six SNP loci respectively. In conclusion, the present study reports strong phylogeographic structure and balancing selection operating at SNP loci located within immune pathway genes. Further, SNP loci identified in the study were found to have potential for

  13. Candidate gene approach for parasite resistance in sheep--variation in immune pathway genes and association with fecal egg count.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathiravan Periasamy

    Full Text Available Sheep chromosome 3 (Oar3 has the largest number of QTLs reported to be significantly associated with resistance to gastro-intestinal nematodes. This study aimed to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs within candidate genes located in sheep chromosome 3 as well as genes involved in major immune pathways. A total of 41 SNPs were identified across 38 candidate genes in a panel of unrelated sheep and genotyped in 713 animals belonging to 22 breeds across Asia, Europe and South America. The variations and evolution of immune pathway genes were assessed in sheep populations across these macro-environmental regions that significantly differ in the diversity and load of pathogens. The mean minor allele frequency (MAF did not vary between Asian and European sheep reflecting the absence of ascertainment bias. Phylogenetic analysis revealed two major clusters with most of South Asian, South East Asian and South West Asian breeds clustering together while European and South American sheep breeds clustered together distinctly. Analysis of molecular variance revealed strong phylogeographic structure at loci located in immune pathway genes, unlike microsatellite and genome wide SNP markers. To understand the influence of natural selection processes, SNP loci located in chromosome 3 were utilized to reconstruct haplotypes, the diversity of which showed significant deviations from selective neutrality. Reduced Median network of reconstructed haplotypes showed balancing selection in force at these loci. Preliminary association of SNP genotypes with phenotypes recorded 42 days post challenge revealed significant differences (P<0.05 in fecal egg count, body weight change and packed cell volume at two, four and six SNP loci respectively. In conclusion, the present study reports strong phylogeographic structure and balancing selection operating at SNP loci located within immune pathway genes. Further, SNP loci identified in the study were found to have

  14. Y Chromosome Regulation of Autism Susceptibility Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-06-01

    of chromatin immunoprecipitation and genome-wide promoter tiling microarray (ChIP-Chip) experiments with gonadal cells isolated from mouse embryos ...disorders: developmental disconnection syndromes. Curr Opin Neurobiol, 2007. 17(1): p. 103-11. 4. Kumar, R.A. and S.L. Christian , Genetics of autism... Christian , S.L., et al., Novel submicroscopic chromosomal abnormalities detected in autism spectrum disorder. Biol Psychiatry, 2008. 63(12): p. 1111

  15. Synteny mapping of five human chromosome 7 genes on bovine chromosomes 4 and 21.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoniou, E; Womack, J E; Grosz, M D

    1999-01-01

    Five genes on human chromosome 7 (HSA 7) were assigned to bovine chromosome 21 (BTA 21) and 4 (BTA 4) using a bovine-rodent somatic hybrid cell panel. These five genes were alpha-I subunit of adenylate cyclase-inhibiting G-protein (GNAI1), alpha/beta preprotachykinin (TAC1), reelin (RELN), c-AMP dependant protein kinase type II beta regulatory chain (PRKAR2B) and apolipoprotein A1 regulatory protein 1 (TFCOUP2). Four genes mapped to BTA 4 (GNAI1, TAC1, RELN, PRKAR2B) while one gene mapped to BTA 21 (TFCOUP2). This study confirms the synteny conservation between HSA 7 and BTA 4, finely maps the breakpoints of conserved synteny on HSA 7 and defines a new synteny conservation between HSA 7 and BTA 21.

  16. KIAA1462, a coronary artery disease associated gene, is a candidate gene for late onset Alzheimer disease in APOE carriers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah G Murdock

    Full Text Available Alzheimer disease (AD is a devastating neurodegenerative disease affecting more than five million Americans. In this study, we have used updated genetic linkage data from chromosome 10 in combination with expression data from serial analysis of gene expression to choose a new set of thirteen candidate genes for genetic analysis in late onset Alzheimer disease (LOAD. Results in this study identify the KIAA1462 locus as a candidate locus for LOAD in APOE4 carriers. Two genes exist at this locus, KIAA1462, a gene associated with coronary artery disease, and "rokimi", encoding an untranslated spliced RNA The genetic architecture at this locus suggests that the gene product important in this association is either "rokimi", or a different isoform of KIAA1462 than the isoform that is important in cardiovascular disease. Expression data suggests that isoform f of KIAA1462 is a more attractive candidate for association with LOAD in APOE4 carriers than "rokimi" which had no detectable expression in brain.

  17. Structure, tissue distribution, and chromosomal localization of the prepronociceptin gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollereau, C; Simons, M J; Soularue, P; Liners, F; Vassart, G; Meunier, J C; Parmentier, M

    1996-08-01

    Nociceptin (orphanin FQ), the newly discovered natural agonist of opioid receptor-like (ORL1) receptor, is a neuropeptide that is endowed with pronociceptive activity in vivo. Nociceptin is derived from a larger precursor, prepronociceptin (PPNOC), whose human, mouse, and rat genes we have now isolated. The PPNOC gene is highly conserved in the three species and displays organizational features that are strikingly similar to those of the genes of preproenkephalin, preprodynorphin, and preproopiomelanocortin, the precursors to endogenous opioid peptides, suggesting the four genes belong to the same family-i.e., have a common evolutionary origin. The PPNOC gene encodes a single copy of nociceptin as well as of other peptides whose sequence is strictly conserved across murine and human species; hence it is likely to be neurophysiologically significant. Northern blot analysis shows that the PPNOC gene is predominantly transcribed in the central nervous system (brain and spinal cord) and, albeit weakly, in the ovary, the sole peripheral organ expressing the gene. By using a radiation hybrid cell line panel, the PPNOC gene was mapped to the short arm of human chromosome 8 (8p21), between sequence-tagged site markers WI-5833 and WI-1172, in close proximity of the locus encoding the neurofilament light chain NEFL. Analysis of yeast artificial chromosome clones belonging to the WC8.4 contig covering the 8p21 region did not allow to detect the presence of the gene on these yeast artificial chromosomes, suggesting a gap in the coverage within this contig.

  18. From amplification to gene in thyroid cancer: A high-resolution mapped bacterial-artificial-chromosome resource for cancer chromosome aberrations guides gene discovery after comparative genome hybridization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, X.N.; Gonsky, R.; Korenberg, J.R. [UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Cedars-Sinai Research Inst.; Knauf, J.A.; Fagin, J.A. [Univ. of Cincinnati, OH (United States). Div. of Endocrinology/Metabolism; Wang, M.; Lai, E.H. [Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States). Dept. of Pharmacology; Chissoe, S. [Washington Univ. School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States). Genome Sequencing

    1998-08-01

    Chromosome rearrangements associated with neoplasms provide a rich resource for definition of the pathways of tumorigenesis. The power of comparative genome hybridization (CGH) to identify novel genes depends on the existence of suitable markers, which are lacking throughout most of the genome. The authors now report a general approach that translates CGH data into higher-resolution genomic-clone data that are then used to define the genes located in aneuploid regions. They used CGH to study 33 thyroid-tumor DNAs and two tumor-cell-line DNAs. The results revealed amplifications of chromosome band 2p21, with less-intense amplification on 2p13, 19q13.1, and 1p36 and with least-intense amplification on 1p34, 1q42, 5q31, 5q33-34, 9q32-34, and 14q32. To define the 2p21 region amplified, a dense array of 373 FISH-mapped chromosome 2 bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) was constructed, and 87 of these were hybridized to a tumor-cell line. Four BACs carried genomic DNA that was amplified in these cells. The maximum amplified region was narrowed to 3--6 Mb by multicolor FISH with the flanking BACs, and the minimum amplicon size was defined by a contig of 420 kb. Sequence analysis of the amplified BAC 1D9 revealed a fragment of the gene, encoding protein kinase C epsilon (PKC{epsilon}), that was then shown to be amplified and rearranged in tumor cells. In summary, CGH combined with a dense mapped resource of BACs and large-scale sequencing has led directly to the definition of PKC{epsilon} as a previously unmapped candidate gene involved in thyroid tumorigenesis.

  19. Localization of candidate regions for a novel gene for Kartagener syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez-Roelens, Ilse; Sluysmans, Thierry; Jorissen, Mark; Amyere, Mustapha; Vikkula, Miikka

    2006-07-01

    Asymmetric positioning of internal organs is a characteristics of vertebrates. The normal left-right anatomic positioning, situs solitus, sometimes does not occur normaly, leading to laterality defects. Studies in animal models have shown that laterality decisions are mediated by a cascade of genes that lead to the asymmetric expression of Nodal, LEFTA, LEFTB and PITX2 in the lateral plate mesoderm. A search for mutations in genes implicated in left-right patterning in animal models allowed genes associated with heterotaxia defects in humans to be identified. However, these genes explain only a small percentage of human situs defects, suggesting that other genes must play a role. In this study, we report a consanguineous family of Turkish origin, composed of two unaffected parents and three children, two of whom presented Kartagener syndrome. On the basis of their family history, we hypothesize autosomal recessive mode of inheritance. A genotype analysis with polymorphic markers did not show linkage with any known genes or loci causing laterality disorders. Array CGH did not detect a duplication or microdeletion greater than 1 Mb as a possible cause. Genome wide screening using 10 K Affymetrix SNP chips was performed, allowing the identification of two regions of autozygosity, one in chromosome 1 and the other on chromosome 7. In the chromosome 1 locus, a strong candidate gene, encoding the kinesin-associated protein 3 (KIF3AP) was not mutated, based on SSCP/heteroduplex analysis and direct sequencing. These data provide a basis for the identification of a novel gene implicated in Kartagener syndrome.

  20. Candidate gene analysis of GH1 for effects on growth and carcass composition of cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, J F; Coutinho, L L; Herring, K L; Gallagher, D S; Brenneman, R A; Burney, N; Sanders, J O; Turner, J W; Smith, S B; Miller, R K; Savell, J W; Davis, S K

    1998-06-01

    We present an approach to evaluate the support for candidate genes as quantitative trait loci (QTLs) within the context of genome-wide map-based cloning strategies. To establish candidacy, a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clone containing a putative candidate gene is physically assigned to an anchored linkage map to localise the gene relative to an identified QTL effect. Microsatellite loci derived from BAC clones containing an established candidate gene are integrated into the linkage map facilitating the evaluation by interval analysis of the statistical support for QTL identity. Permutation analysis is employed to determine experiment-wise statistical support. The approach is illustrated for the growth hormone 1 (GH1) gene and growth and carcass phenotypes in cattle. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) primers which amplify a 441 bp fragment of GH1 were used to systematically screen a bovine BAC library comprising 60,000 clones and with a 95% probability of containing a single copy sequence. The presence of GH1 in BAC-110R2C3 was confirmed by sequence analysis of the PCR product from this clone and by the physical assignment of BAC110R2C3 to bovine chromosome 19 (BTA19) band 22 by fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH). Microsatellite KHGH1 was isolated from BAC110R2C3 and scored in 529 reciprocal backcross and F2 fullsib progeny from 41 resource families derived from Angus (Bos taurus) and Brahman (Bos indicus). The microsatellite KHGH1 was incorporated into a framework genetic map of BTA19 comprising 12 microsatellite loci, the erythrocyte antigen T and a GH1-TaqI restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP). Interval analysis localised effects of taurus vs. indicus alleles on subcutaneous fat and the percentage of either extractable fat from the Iongissimus dorsi muscle to the region of BTA19 harbouring GH1.

  1. SEMG1 may be the candidate gene for idiopathic asthenozoospermia.

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    Yu, Q; Zhou, Q; Wei, Q; Li, J; Feng, C; Mao, X

    2014-03-01

    Asthenozoospermia (AZS) is a major cause of male infertility, aetiology of which is reported to be related with gene mutation or deletion. However, studies on candidate genes for AZS are very scarce. In this study, we examined the gene expression profiles of asthenozoosperm. Gene expression profile analyses with microarray on spermatozoa specimens from 12 asthenozoosperm patients and 12 age-matched volunteers were performed; data analysis was performed with bioinformatics tools. Data analysis revealed that 1265 and 262 genes were significantly (P < 0.05) and differently expressed (≥2-fold) between groups performed with GeneSpring and BRB-ArrayTools respectively. Of these differently expressed genes, 71 were identified as molecular signatures of asthenozoosperm, of which most involved in primary metabolic process and cellular metabolic process. Molecular signatures were filtered performed with NextBio, 21 genes were identified to be specially expressed in asthenozoosperm. We used Finding Associated Concepts with Text Analysis to match the specially expressed genes against the MEDLINE database and found SEMG1 and PGAP1 were related to male fertility. Validation of the microarray data of SEMG1 was carried out using real-time PCR. Our study demonstrated that SEMG1 was significantly changed in asthenozoosperm, which could be the candidate gene for the development of diagnostic marker and provided the opportunity to further illustrate the biological mechanisms of asthenozoosperm.

  2. The WRKY Transcription Factor Family in Citrus: Valuable and Useful Candidate Genes for Citrus Breeding.

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    Ayadi, M; Hanana, M; Kharrat, N; Merchaoui, H; Marzoug, R Ben; Lauvergeat, V; Rebaï, A; Mzid, R

    2016-10-01

    WRKY transcription factors belong to a large family of plant transcriptional regulators whose members have been reported to be involved in a wide range of biological roles including plant development, adaptation to environmental constraints and response to several diseases. However, little or poor information is available about WRKY's in Citrus. The recent release of completely assembled genomes sequences of Citrus sinensis and Citrus clementina and the availability of ESTs sequences from other citrus species allowed us to perform a genome survey for Citrus WRKY proteins. In the present study, we identified 100 WRKY members from C. sinensis (51), C. clementina (48) and Citrus unshiu (1), and analyzed their chromosomal distribution, gene structure, gene duplication, syntenic relation and phylogenetic analysis. A phylogenetic tree of 100 Citrus WRKY sequences with their orthologs from Arabidopsis has distinguished seven groups. The CsWRKY genes were distributed across all ten sweet orange chromosomes. A comprehensive approach and an integrative analysis of Citrus WRKY gene expression revealed variable profiles of expression within tissues and stress conditions indicating functional diversification. Thus, candidate Citrus WRKY genes have been proposed as potentially involved in fruit acidification, essential oil biosynthesis and abiotic/biotic stress tolerance. Our results provided essential prerequisites for further WRKY genes cloning and functional analysis with an aim of citrus crop improvement.

  3. Chromosomal gene movements reflect the recent origin and biology of therian sex chromosomes.

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    Lukasz Potrzebowski

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Mammalian sex chromosomes stem from ancestral autosomes and have substantially differentiated. It was shown that X-linked genes have generated duplicate intronless gene copies (retrogenes on autosomes due to this differentiation. However, the precise driving forces for this out-of-X gene "movement" and its evolutionary onset are not known. Based on expression analyses of male germ-cell populations, we here substantiate and extend the hypothesis that autosomal retrogenes functionally compensate for the silencing of their X-linked housekeeping parental genes during, but also after, male meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI. Thus, sexually antagonistic forces have not played a major role for the selective fixation of X-derived gene copies in mammals. Our dating analyses reveal that although retrogenes were produced ever since the common mammalian ancestor, selectively driven retrogene export from the X only started later, on the placental mammal (eutherian and marsupial (metatherian lineages, respectively. Together, these observations suggest that chromosome-wide MSCI emerged close to the eutherian-marsupial split approximately 180 million years ago. Given that MSCI probably reflects the spread of the recombination barrier between the X and Y, crucial for their differentiation, our data imply that these chromosomes became more widely differentiated only late in the therian ancestor, well after the divergence of the monotreme lineage. Thus, our study also provides strong independent support for the recent notion that our sex chromosomes emerged, not in the common ancestor of all mammals, but rather in the therian ancestor, and therefore are much younger than previously thought.

  4. Construction of a genetic map of human chromosome 17 by use of chromosome-mediated gene transfer

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    Xu, Weiming; Gorman, P.A.; Rider, S.H.; Hedge, P.J.; Moore, G.; Prichard, C.; Sheer, D.; Solomon, E. (Imperial Cancer Research Fund, London (England))

    1988-11-01

    The authors used somatic-cell hybrids, containing as their only human genetic contribution part or all of chromosome 17, as donors for chromosome-mediated gene transfer. A total of 54 independent transfectant clones were isolated and analyzed by use of probes or isoenzymes for >20 loci located on chromosome 17. By combining the data from this chromosome-mediated gene transfer transfectant panel, conventional somatic-cell hybrids containing well-defined breaks on chromosome 17, and in situ hybridization they propose the following order for these loci; pter-(TP53-RNP2-D17S1)-(MYH2-MYH1)-D17Z1-CRYB1-(ERBA1-GCSF-NGL)-acute promyelocytic leukemia breakpoint-RNU2-HOX2-(NGFR-COLIAI-MPO)-GAA-UMPH-GHC-TK1-GALK-qter. Using chromosome-mediated gene transfer, they have also regionally localized the random probes D17S6 to D17S19 on chromosome 17.

  5. The mouse X chromosome is enriched for sex-biased genes not subject to selection by meiotic sex chromosome inactivation.

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    Khil, Pavel P; Smirnova, Natalya A; Romanienko, Peter J; Camerini-Otero, R Daniel

    2004-06-01

    Sex chromosomes are subject to sex-specific selective evolutionary forces. One model predicts that genes with sex-biased expression should be enriched on the X chromosome. In agreement with Rice's hypothesis, spermatogonial genes are over-represented on the X chromosome of mice and sex- and reproduction-related genes are over-represented on the human X chromosome. Male-biased genes are under-represented on the X chromosome in worms and flies, however. Here we show that mouse spermatogenesis genes are relatively under-represented on the X chromosome and female-biased genes are enriched on it. We used Spo11(-/-) mice blocked in spermatogenesis early in meiosis to evaluate the temporal pattern of gene expression in sperm development. Genes expressed before the Spo11 block are enriched on the X chromosome, whereas those expressed later in spermatogenesis are depleted. Inactivation of the X chromosome in male meiosis may be a universal driving force for X-chromosome demasculinization.

  6. Number of X-chromosome genes influences social behavior and vasopressin gene expression in mice.

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    Cox, Kimberly H; Quinnies, Kayla M; Eschendroeder, Alex; Didrick, Paula M; Eugster, Erica A; Rissman, Emilie F

    2015-01-01

    Sex differences in behavior are widespread and often caused by hormonal differences between the sexes. In addition to hormones, the composition and numbers of the sex chromosomes also affect a variety of sex differences. In humans, X-chromosome genes are implicated in neurobehavioral disorders (i.e. fragile-X, autism). To investigate the role of X-chromosome genes in social behavior, we used a mouse model that has atypical sex chromosome configurations resembling Turner (45, XO) and Klinefelter syndromes (47, XXY). We examined a number of behaviors in juvenile mice. Mice with only one copy of most X-chromosome genes, regardless of gonadal sex, were less social in dyadic interaction and social preference tasks. In the elevated plus maze, mice with one X-chromosome spent less time in the distal ends of the open arms as compared to mice with two copies of X-chromosome genes. Using qRTPCR, we noted that amygdala from female mice with one X-chromosome had higher expression levels of vasopressin (Avp) as compared to mice in the other groups. Finally, in plasma from girls with Turner syndrome we detected reduced vasopressin (AVP) concentrations as compared to control patients. These novel findings link sex chromosome genes with social behavior via concentrations of AVP in brain, adding to our understanding of sex differences in neurobehavioral disorders.

  7. Characterisation of five candidate genes within the ETEC F4ab/ac candidate region in pigs

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    Bertschinger Hans U

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC that express the F4ab and F4ac fimbriae is a major contributor to diarrhoea outbreaks in the pig breeding industry, infecting both newborn and weaned piglets. Some pigs are resistant to this infection, and susceptibility is inherited as a simple dominant Mendelian trait. Indentifying the genetics behind this trait will greatly benefit pig welfare as well as the pig breeding industry by providing an opportunity to select against genetically susceptible animals, thereby reducing the number of diarrhoea outbreaks. The trait has recently been mapped by haplotype sharing to a 2.5 Mb region on pig chromosome 13, a region containing 18 annotated genes. Findings The coding regions of five candidate genes for susceptibility to ETEC F4ab/ac infection (TFRC, ACK1, MUC20, MUC4 and KIAA0226, all located in the 2.5 Mb region, were investigated for the presence of possible causative mutations. A total of 34 polymorphisms were identified in either coding regions or their flanking introns. The genotyping data for two of those were found to perfectly match the genotypes at the ETEC F4ab/ac locus, a G to C polymorphism in intron 11 of TFRC and a C to T silent polymorphism in exon 22 of KIAA0226. Transcriptional profiles of the five genes were investigated in a porcine tissue panel including various intestinal tissues. All five genes were expressed in intestinal tissues at different levels but none of the genes were found differentially expressed between ETEC F4ab/ac resistant and ETEC F4ab/ac susceptible animals in any of the tested tissues. Conclusions None of the identified polymorphisms are obvious causative mutations for ETEC F4ab/ac susceptibility, as they have no impact on the level of the overall mRNA expression nor predicted to influence the composition of the amino acids composition. However, we cannot exclude that the five tested genes are bona fide candidate genes for susceptibility to ETEC F4ab

  8. Chromosomal evolution of the PKD1 gene family in primates

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    Krawczak Michael

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Correction to Kirsch S, Pasantes J, Wolf A, Bogdanova N, Münch C, Pennekamp P, Krawczak M, Dworniczak B, Schempp W: Chromosomal evolution of the PKD1 gene family in primates. BMC Evolutionary Biology 2008, 8:263 (doi:10.1186/1471-2148-8-263

  9. Chromosomal evolution of the PKD1 gene family in primates

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    Krawczak Michael

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD is mostly caused by mutations in the PKD1 (polycystic kidney disease 1 gene located in 16p13.3. Moreover, there are six pseudogenes of PKD1 that are located proximal to the master gene in 16p13.1. In contrast, no pseudogene could be detected in the mouse genome, only a single copy gene on chromosome 17. The question arises how the human situation originated phylogenetically. To address this question we applied comparative FISH-mapping of a human PKD1-containing genomic BAC clone and a PKD1-cDNA clone to chromosomes of a variety of primate species and the dog as a non-primate outgroup species. Results Comparative FISH with the PKD1-cDNA clone clearly shows that in all primate species studied distinct single signals map in subtelomeric chromosomal positions orthologous to the short arm of human chromosome 16 harbouring the master PKD1 gene. Only in human and African great apes, but not in orangutan, FISH with both BAC and cDNA clones reveals additional signal clusters located proximal of and clearly separated from the PKD1 master genes indicating the chromosomal position of PKD1 pseudogenes in 16p of these species, respectively. Indeed, this is in accordance with sequencing data in human, chimpanzee and orangutan. Apart from the master PKD1 gene, six pseudogenes are identified in both, human and chimpanzee, while only a single-copy gene is present in the whole-genome sequence of orangutan. The phylogenetic reconstruction of the PKD1-tree reveals that all human pseudogenes are closely related to the human PKD1 gene, and all chimpanzee pseudogenes are closely related to the chimpanzee PKD1 gene. However, our statistical analyses provide strong indication that gene conversion events may have occurred within the PKD1 family members of human and chimpanzee, respectively. Conclusion PKD1 must have undergone amplification very recently in hominid evolution. Duplicative

  10. Studies of Tumor Suppressor Genes via Chromosome Engineering

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    Hiroyuki Kugoh

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The development and progression of malignant tumors likely result from consecutive accumulation of genetic alterations, including dysfunctional tumor suppressor genes. However, the signaling mechanisms that underlie the development of tumors have not yet been completely elucidated. Discovery of novel tumor-related genes plays a crucial role in our understanding of the development and progression of malignant tumors. Chromosome engineering technology based on microcell-mediated chromosome transfer (MMCT is an effective approach for identification of tumor suppressor genes. The studies have revealed at least five tumor suppression effects. The discovery of novel tumor suppressor genes provide greater understanding of the complex signaling pathways that underlie the development and progression of malignant tumors. These advances are being exploited to develop targeted drugs and new biological therapies for cancer.

  11. Studies of Tumor Suppressor Genes via Chromosome Engineering.

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    Kugoh, Hiroyuki; Ohira, Takahito; Oshimura, Mitsuo

    2015-12-30

    The development and progression of malignant tumors likely result from consecutive accumulation of genetic alterations, including dysfunctional tumor suppressor genes. However, the signaling mechanisms that underlie the development of tumors have not yet been completely elucidated. Discovery of novel tumor-related genes plays a crucial role in our understanding of the development and progression of malignant tumors. Chromosome engineering technology based on microcell-mediated chromosome transfer (MMCT) is an effective approach for identification of tumor suppressor genes. The studies have revealed at least five tumor suppression effects. The discovery of novel tumor suppressor genes provide greater understanding of the complex signaling pathways that underlie the development and progression of malignant tumors. These advances are being exploited to develop targeted drugs and new biological therapies for cancer.

  12. The cavefish genome reveals candidate genes for eye loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGaugh, Suzanne E.; Gross, Joshua B.; Aken, Bronwen; Blin, Maryline; Borowsky, Richard; Chalopin, Domitille; Hinaux, Hélène; Jeffery, William R.; Keene, Alex; Ma, Li; Minx, Patrick; Murphy, Daniel; O’Quin, Kelly E.; Rétaux, Sylvie; Rohner, Nicolas; Searle, Steve M. J.; Stahl, Bethany A.; Tabin, Cliff; Volff, Jean-Nicolas; Yoshizawa, Masato; Warren, Wesley C.

    2014-01-01

    Natural populations subjected to strong environmental selection pressures offer a window into the genetic underpinnings of evolutionary change. Cavefish populations, Astyanax mexicanus (Teleostei: Characiphysi), exhibit repeated, independent evolution for a variety of traits including eye degeneration, pigment loss, increased size and number of taste buds and mechanosensory organs, and shifts in many behavioural traits. Surface and cave forms are interfertile making this system amenable to genetic interrogation; however, lack of a reference genome has hampered efforts to identify genes responsible for changes in cave forms of A. mexicanus. Here we present the first de novo genome assembly for Astyanax mexicanus cavefish, contrast repeat elements to other teleost genomes, identify candidate genes underlying quantitative trait loci (QTL), and assay these candidate genes for potential functional and expression differences. We expect the cavefish genome to advance understanding of the evolutionary process, as well as, analogous human disease including retinal dysfunction. PMID:25329095

  13. Candidate chemosensory genes in the Stemborer Sesamia nonagrioides.

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    Glaser, Nicolas; Gallot, Aurore; Legeai, Fabrice; Montagné, Nicolas; Poivet, Erwan; Harry, Myriam; Calatayud, Paul-André; Jacquin-Joly, Emmanuelle

    2013-01-01

    The stemborer Sesamia nonagrioides is an important pest of maize in the Mediterranean Basin. Like other moths, this noctuid uses its chemosensory system to efficiently interact with its environment. However, very little is known on the molecular mechanisms that underlie chemosensation in this species. Here, we used next-generation sequencing (454 and Illumina) on different tissues from adult and larvae, including chemosensory organs and female ovipositors, to describe the chemosensory transcriptome of S. nonagrioides and identify key molecular components of the pheromone production and detection systems. We identified a total of 68 candidate chemosensory genes in this species, including 31 candidate binding-proteins and 23 chemosensory receptors. In particular, we retrieved the three co-receptors Orco, IR25a and IR8a necessary for chemosensory receptor functioning. Focusing on the pheromonal communication system, we identified a new pheromone-binding protein in this species, four candidate pheromone receptors and 12 carboxylesterases as candidate acetate degrading enzymes. In addition, we identified enzymes putatively involved in S. nonagrioides pheromone biosynthesis, including a ∆11-desaturase and different acetyltransferases and reductases. RNAseq analyses and RT-PCR were combined to profile gene expression in different tissues. This study constitutes the first large scale description of chemosensory genes in S. nonagrioides.

  14. CANDIDATE GENE ANALYSIS IN ISRAELI SOLDIERS WITH STRESS FRACTURES

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    Ran Yanovich

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the association of polymorphisms within candidate genes which we hypothesized may contribute to stress fracture predisposition, a case-control, cross- sectional study design was employed. Genotyping 268 Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms- SNPs within 17 genes in 385 Israeli young male and female recruits (182 with and 203 without stress fractures. Twenty-five polymorphisms within 9 genes (NR3C1, ANKH, VDR, ROR2, CALCR, IL6, COL1A2, CBG, and LRP4 showed statistically significant differences (p < 0.05 in the distribution between stress fracture cases and non stress fracture controls. Seventeen genetic variants were associated with an increased stress fracture risk, and eight variants with a decreased stress fracture risk. None of the SNP associations remained significant after correcting for multiple comparisons (false discovery rate- FDR. Our findings suggest that genes may be involved in stress fracture pathogenesis. Specifically, the CALCR and the VDR genes are intriguing candidates. The putative involvement of these genes in stress fracture predisposition requires analysis of more cases and controls and sequencing the relevant genomic regions, in order to define the specific gene mutations

  15. No Evidence for Association between Amelogenesis Imperfecta and Candidate Genes

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    M Ghandehari Motlagh

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground: Amelogenesis imperfecta (AI is an inherited tooth disorder. Despite the fact that up to now, several gene muta­tions in MMP20, ENAM, AMELX and KLK4 genes have been reported to be associated with AI, many other genes sug­gested to be involved. The main objective of this study was to find the mutations in three major candidate genes including MMP20, ENAM and KLK4 responsible for AI from three Iranian families with generalized hypoplastic phenotype in all teeth. "nMethods: All exon/intron boundaries of subjected genes were amplified by polymerase chain reaction and subjected to direct sequencing."nResults: One polymorphisms was identified in KLK4 exon 2, in one family a homozygous mutation was found in the third base of codon 22 for serine (TCG>TCT, but not in other families. Although these base substitutions have been occurred in the signaling domain, they do not seem to influence the activity of KLK4 protein."nConclusion: Our results might support the further evidence for genetic heterogeneity; at least, in some AI cases are not caused by a gene in these reported candidate genes.

  16. Speeding disease gene discovery by sequence based candidate prioritization

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    Porteous David J

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Regions of interest identified through genetic linkage studies regularly exceed 30 centimorgans in size and can contain hundreds of genes. Traditionally this number is reduced by matching functional annotation to knowledge of the disease or phenotype in question. However, here we show that disease genes share patterns of sequence-based features that can provide a good basis for automatic prioritization of candidates by machine learning. Results We examined a variety of sequence-based features and found that for many of them there are significant differences between the sets of genes known to be involved in human hereditary disease and those not known to be involved in disease. We have created an automatic classifier called PROSPECTR based on those features using the alternating decision tree algorithm which ranks genes in the order of likelihood of involvement in disease. On average, PROSPECTR enriches lists for disease genes two-fold 77% of the time, five-fold 37% of the time and twenty-fold 11% of the time. Conclusion PROSPECTR is a simple and effective way to identify genes involved in Mendelian and oligogenic disorders. It performs markedly better than the single existing sequence-based classifier on novel data. PROSPECTR could save investigators looking at large regions of interest time and effort by prioritizing positional candidate genes for mutation detection and case-control association studies.

  17. Methods of Reprogramming to Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Associated with Chromosomal Integrity and Delineation of a Chromosome 5q Candidate Region for Growth Advantage.

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    Sobol, Maria; Raykova, Doroteya; Cavelier, Lucia; Khalfallah, Ayda; Schuster, Jens; Dahl, Niklas

    2015-09-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) have brought great promises for disease modeling and cell-based therapies. One concern related to the use of reprogrammed somatic cells is the loss of genomic integrity and chromosome stability, a hallmark for cancer and many other human disorders. We investigated 16 human iPSC lines reprogrammed by nonintegrative Sendai virus (SeV) and another 16 iPSC lines generated by integrative lentivirus for genetic changes. At early passages we detected cytogenetic rearrangements in 44% (7/16) of iPSC lines generated by lentiviral integration whereas the corresponding figure was 6% (1/16) using SeV-based delivery. The rearrangements were numerical and/or structural with chromosomes 5 and 12 as the most frequently involved chromosomes. Three iPSC lines with chromosome 5 aberrations were derived from one and the same donor. We present in this study the aberrant karyotypes including a duplication of chromosome 5q13q33 that restricts a candidate region for growth advantage. Our results suggest that the use of integrative lentivirus confers a higher risk for cytogenetic abnormalities at early passages when compared to SeV-based reprogramming. In combination, our findings expand the knowledge on acquired cytogenetic aberrations in iPSC after reprogramming and during culture.

  18. Altered Chromosomal Positioning, Compaction, and Gene Expression with a Lamin A/C Gene Mutation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abuisneineh, Fida; Fahrenbach, John P.; Zhang, Yuan; MacLeod, Heather; Dellefave, Lisa; Pytel, Peter; Selig, Sara; Labno, Christine M.; Reddy, Karen; Singh, Harinder; McNally, Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    Background Lamins A and C, encoded by the LMNA gene, are filamentous proteins that form the core scaffold of the nuclear lamina. Dominant LMNA gene mutations cause multiple human diseases including cardiac and skeletal myopathies. The nuclear lamina is thought to regulate gene expression by its direct interaction with chromatin. LMNA gene mutations may mediate disease by disrupting normal gene expression. Methods/Findings To investigate the hypothesis that mutant lamin A/C changes the lamina's ability to interact with chromatin, we studied gene misexpression resulting from the cardiomyopathic LMNA E161K mutation and correlated this with changes in chromosome positioning. We identified clusters of misexpressed genes and examined the nuclear positioning of two such genomic clusters, each harboring genes relevant to striated muscle disease including LMO7 and MBNL2. Both gene clusters were found to be more centrally positioned in LMNA-mutant nuclei. Additionally, these loci were less compacted. In LMNA mutant heart and fibroblasts, we found that chromosome 13 had a disproportionately high fraction of misexpressed genes. Using three-dimensional fluorescence in situ hybridization we found that the entire territory of chromosome 13 was displaced towards the center of the nucleus in LMNA mutant fibroblasts. Additional cardiomyopathic LMNA gene mutations were also shown to have abnormal positioning of chromosome 13, although in the opposite direction. Conclusions These data support a model in which LMNA mutations perturb the intranuclear positioning and compaction of chromosomal domains and provide a mechanism by which gene expression may be altered. PMID:21179469

  19. Altered chromosomal positioning, compaction, and gene expression with a lamin A/C gene mutation.

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    Stephanie K Mewborn

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Lamins A and C, encoded by the LMNA gene, are filamentous proteins that form the core scaffold of the nuclear lamina. Dominant LMNA gene mutations cause multiple human diseases including cardiac and skeletal myopathies. The nuclear lamina is thought to regulate gene expression by its direct interaction with chromatin. LMNA gene mutations may mediate disease by disrupting normal gene expression. METHODS/FINDINGS: To investigate the hypothesis that mutant lamin A/C changes the lamina's ability to interact with chromatin, we studied gene misexpression resulting from the cardiomyopathic LMNA E161K mutation and correlated this with changes in chromosome positioning. We identified clusters of misexpressed genes and examined the nuclear positioning of two such genomic clusters, each harboring genes relevant to striated muscle disease including LMO7 and MBNL2. Both gene clusters were found to be more centrally positioned in LMNA-mutant nuclei. Additionally, these loci were less compacted. In LMNA mutant heart and fibroblasts, we found that chromosome 13 had a disproportionately high fraction of misexpressed genes. Using three-dimensional fluorescence in situ hybridization we found that the entire territory of chromosome 13 was displaced towards the center of the nucleus in LMNA mutant fibroblasts. Additional cardiomyopathic LMNA gene mutations were also shown to have abnormal positioning of chromosome 13, although in the opposite direction. CONCLUSIONS: These data support a model in which LMNA mutations perturb the intranuclear positioning and compaction of chromosomal domains and provide a mechanism by which gene expression may be altered.

  20. Reranking candidate gene models with cross-species comparison for improved gene prediction

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    Pereira Fernando CN

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most gene finders score candidate gene models with state-based methods, typically HMMs, by combining local properties (coding potential, splice donor and acceptor patterns, etc. Competing models with similar state-based scores may be distinguishable with additional information. In particular, functional and comparative genomics datasets may help to select among competing models of comparable probability by exploiting features likely to be associated with the correct gene models, such as conserved exon/intron structure or protein sequence features. Results We have investigated the utility of a simple post-processing step for selecting among a set of alternative gene models, using global scoring rules to rerank competing models for more accurate prediction. For each gene locus, we first generate the K best candidate gene models using the gene finder Evigan, and then rerank these models using comparisons with putative orthologous genes from closely-related species. Candidate gene models with lower scores in the original gene finder may be selected if they exhibit strong similarity to probable orthologs in coding sequence, splice site location, or signal peptide occurrence. Experiments on Drosophila melanogaster demonstrate that reranking based on cross-species comparison outperforms the best gene models identified by Evigan alone, and also outperforms the comparative gene finders GeneWise and Augustus+. Conclusion Reranking gene models with cross-species comparison improves gene prediction accuracy. This straightforward method can be readily adapted to incorporate additional lines of evidence, as it requires only a ranked source of candidate gene models.

  1. Candidate gene copy number analysis by PCR and multicapillary electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szantai, Eszter; Elek, Zsuzsanna; Guttman, András; Sasvari-Szekely, Maria

    2009-04-01

    Genetic polymorphisms are often considered as risk factors of complex diseases serving as valuable and easily detectable biomarkers, also stable during the whole lifespan. A novel type of genetic polymorphism has been identified just recently, referred to as gene copy number variation (CNV) or copy number polymorphism. CNV of glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta and its adjacent gene, Nr1i2 (pregnane X receptor isoform), has been reported to associate with bipolar depression. In our study we introduced multicapillary electrophoresis for gene copy number analysis as an affordable alternative to real-time PCR quantification with TaqMan gene probes. Our results show the reliability of the developed method based on conventional PCR followed by separation of products by multicapillary electrophoresis with quantitative evaluation. This method can be readily implemented for the analysis of candidate gene CNVs in high throughput clinical laboratories and also in personalized medicine care of depression-related risk factors.

  2. Dynamic QTL analysis and candidate gene mapping for waterlogging tolerance at maize seedling stage.

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    Khalid A Osman

    Full Text Available Soil waterlogging is one of the major abiotic stresses adversely affecting maize growth and yield. To identify dynamic expression of genes or quantitative trait loci (QTL, QTL associated with plant height, root length, root dry weight, shoot dry weight and total dry weight were identified via conditional analysis in a mixed linear model and inclusive composite interval mapping method at three respective periods under waterlogging and control conditions. A total of 13, 19 and 23 QTL were detected at stages 3D|0D (the period during 0-3 d of waterlogging, 6D|3D and 9D|6D, respectively. The effects of each QTL were moderate and distributed over nine chromosomes, singly explaining 4.14-18.88% of the phenotypic variation. Six QTL (ph6-1, rl1-2, sdw4-1, sdw7-1, tdw4-1 and tdw7-1 were identified at two consistent stages of seedling development, which could reflect a continuous expression of genes; the remaining QTL were detected at only one stage. Thus, expression of most QTL was influenced by the developmental status. In order to provide additional evidence regarding the role of corresponding genes in waterlogging tolerance, mapping of Expressed Sequence Tags markers and microRNAs were conducted. Seven candidate genes were observed to co-localize with the identified QTL on chromosomes 1, 4, 6, 7 and 9, and may be important candidate genes for waterlogging tolerance. These results are a good starting point for understanding the genetic basis for selectively expressing of QTL in different stress periods and the common genetic control mechanism of the co-localized traits.

  3. Association testing to detect gene-gene interactions on sex chromosomes in trio data

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    Yeonok eLee

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD occurs more often among males than females in a 4:1 ratio. Among theories used to explain the causes of ASD, the X chromosome and the Y chromosome theories attribute ASD to X-linked mutation and the male-limited gene expressions on the Y chromosome, respectively. Despite the rationale of the theory, studies have failed to attribute the sex-biased ratio to the significant linkage or association on the regions of interest on X chromosome. We further study the gender biased ratio by examining the possible interaction effects between two genes in the sex chromosomes. We propose a logistic regression model with mixed effects to detect gene-gene interactions on sex chromosomes. We investigated the power and type I error rates of the approach for a range of minor allele frequencies and varying linkage disequilibrium between markers and QTLs. We also evaluated the robustness of the model to population stratification. We applied the model to a trio-family data set with an ASD affected male child to study gene-gene interactions on sex chromosomes.

  4. Genome sequence comparison reveals a candidate gene involved in male-hermaphrodite differentiation in papaya (Carica papaya) trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno, Hiroki; Urasaki, Naoya; Natsume, Satoshi; Yoshida, Kentaro; Tarora, Kazuhiko; Shudo, Ayano; Terauchi, Ryohei; Matsumura, Hideo

    2015-04-01

    The sex type of papaya (Carica papaya) is determined by the pair of sex chromosomes (XX, female; XY, male; and XY(h), hermaphrodite), in which there is a non-recombining genomic region in the Y and Y(h) chromosomes. This region is presumed to be involved in determination of males and hermaphrodites; it is designated as the male-specific region in the Y chromosome (MSY) and the hermaphrodite-specific region in the Y(h) chromosome (HSY). Here, we identified the genes determining male and hermaphrodite sex types by comparing MSY and HSY genomic sequences. In the MSY and HSY genomic regions, we identified 14,528 nucleotide substitutions and 965 short indels with a large gap and two highly diverged regions. In the predicted genes expressed in flower buds, we found no nucleotide differences leading to amino acid changes between the MSY and HSY. However, we found an HSY-specific transposon insertion in a gene (SVP like) showing a similarity to the Short Vegetative Phase (SVP) gene. Study of SVP-like transcripts revealed that the MSY allele encoded an intact protein, while the HSY allele encoded a truncated protein. Our findings demonstrated that the SVP-like gene is a candidate gene for male-hermaphrodite determination in papaya.

  5. The human glia maturation factor-gamma gene: genomic structure and mutation analysis in gliomas with chromosome 19q loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, N; Smith, J S; Tachibana, I; Lee, H K; Pohl, U; Portier, B P; Louis, D N; Jenkins, R B

    1999-09-01

    Human glia maturation factor-gamma (hGMF-gamma) is a recently identified gene that may be involved in glial differentiation, neural regeneration, and inhibition of tumor cell proliferation. The gene maps to the long arm of chromosome 19 at band q13.2, a region that is frequently deleted in human malignant gliomas and is thus suspected to harbor a glioma tumor suppressor gene. Given the putative role of hGMF-gamma in cell differentiation and proliferation and its localization to chromosome 19q13, this gene is an interesting candidate for the chromosome 19q glioma tumor suppressor gene. To evaluate this possibility, we determined the genomic structure of human hGMF-gamma and performed mutation screening in a series of 41 gliomas with and without allelic loss of chromosome 19q. Mutations were not detected, which suggests that hGMF-gamma is not the chromosome 19q glioma suppressor gene. However, the elucidation of the genomic structure of hGMF-gamma may prove useful in future investigations of hGMF-gamma in the normal adult and developing human nervous system.

  6. The human and mouse receptors of hyaluronan-mediated motility, RHAMM, genes (HMMR) map to human chromosome 5q33.2-qter and mouse chromosome 11

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spicer, A.P.; McDonald, J.A. [Mayo Clinic Scottsdale, AZ (United States); Roller, M.L.; Camper, S.A. [Univ. of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)] [and others

    1995-11-01

    The gene for the receptor for hyaluronan-mediated motility, RHAAM (designated hyaluronan-mediated motility receptor, HMMR (human) and Hmmr (mouse), for mapping purposes), was localized to human chromosome 5q33.2-qter by somatic cell and radiation hybrid analyses. Investigation of two interspecific back-crosses localized the mouse RHAMM (Hmmr) locus 18 cM from the centromere of mouse chromosome 11 within a region of synteny homology with human chromosome 5q23-q35 genes. The map position of the human RHAMM gene places it in a region comparatively rich in disease-associated genes, including those for low-frequency hearing loss, dominant limb-girdle muscular dystrophy, diastrophic dysplasia, Treacher Collins syndrome, and myeloid disorders associated with the 5q-syndrome. The RHAMM gene location and its ability to transform cells when overexpressed implicate RHAMM as a possible candidate gene in the pathogenesis of the recently described t(5;14)(q33-q34;q11) acute lymphoblastic leukemias. 18 refs., 1 fig.

  7. Assignment of the protein kinase C [delta] polypeptide gene (PRKCD) to human chromosome 3 and mouse chromosome 14

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huppi, K.; Siwarski, D.; Goodnight, J.; Mischak, H. (Molecular Genetics Section Lab. of Genetics, Bethesda, MD (United States))

    1994-01-01

    The protein kinase C (pkc) enzymes are a family of serine-threonine protein kinases, each encoded by a distinct and separate gene. The chromosomal locations of human PRKCA, PRKCB, and PRKCG have previously been established. The authors now report that PRKCD, a novel member of the pkc gene family, maps to human chromosome 3. The chromosomal location of Pkcd has also been determined in the mouse by analysis of recombination frequency in an interspecific panel of back-cross mice. They find that the locus encoding pkcd resides proximal to nucleoside phosphorylase (Np-2) and Tcra on mouse chromosome 14 in a region syntenic with human 3p. 9 refs., 2 tabs.

  8. Assignment of the protein kinase C delta polypeptide gene (PRKCD) to human chromosome 3 and mouse chromosome 14.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huppi, K; Siwarski, D; Goodnight, J; Mischak, H

    1994-01-01

    The protein kinase C (pkc) enzymes are a family of serine-threonine protein kinases, each encoded by a distinct and separate gene. The chromosomal locations of human PRKCA, PRKCB, and PRKCG have previously been established. We now report that PRKCD, a novel member of the pkc gene family, maps to human chromosome 3. The chromosomal location of Pkcd has also been determined in the mouse by analysis of recombination frequency in an interspecific panel of backcross mice. We find that the locus encoding pkcd resides proximal to nucleoside phosphorylase (Np-2) and Tcra on mouse chromosome 14 in a region syntenic with human 3p.

  9. Sex-biased gene expression at homomorphic sex chromosomes in emus and its implication for sex chromosome evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicoso, Beatriz; Kaiser, Vera B; Bachtrog, Doris

    2013-04-16

    Sex chromosomes originate from autosomes. The accumulation of sexually antagonistic mutations on protosex chromosomes selects for a loss of recombination and sets in motion the evolutionary processes generating heteromorphic sex chromosomes. Recombination suppression and differentiation are generally viewed as the default path of sex chromosome evolution, and the occurrence of old, homomorphic sex chromosomes, such as those of ratite birds, has remained a mystery. Here, we analyze the genome and transcriptome of emu (Dromaius novaehollandiae) and confirm that most genes on the sex chromosome are shared between the Z and W. Surprisingly, however, levels of gene expression are generally sex-biased for all sex-linked genes relative to autosomes, including those in the pseudoautosomal region, and the male-bias increases after gonad formation. This expression bias suggests that the emu sex chromosomes have become masculinized, even in the absence of ZW differentiation. Thus, birds may have taken different evolutionary solutions to minimize the deleterious effects imposed by sexually antagonistic mutations: some lineages eliminate recombination along the protosex chromosomes to physically restrict sexually antagonistic alleles to one sex, whereas ratites evolved sex-biased expression to confine the product of a sexually antagonistic allele to the sex it benefits. This difference in conflict resolution may explain the preservation of recombining, homomorphic sex chromosomes in other lineages and illustrates the importance of sexually antagonistic mutations driving the evolution of sex chromosomes.

  10. The chromosomal arrangement of six soybean leghemoglobin genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bojsen, Kirsten; Abildsten, Dorte; Jensen, Erik Ø

    1983-01-01

    Clones containing six leghemoglobin (Lb) genes have been isolated from two genomic libraries of soybean. They encompass two independent DNA regions: a 40-kb region containing four genes in the order 5' Lba-Lbc(1)-[unk]Lb-Lbc(3) 3' with the same transcriptional polarity, and another 40-kb region...... containing two genes in the order 5' Lbc(4)-Lbc(2) 3' with the same polarity. The order in which the Lb genes are arranged in the soybean genome imply that they are activated in the opposite order to which they are arranged on the chromosome. There is a close similarity between corresponding DNA regions...... differs from that of the Lb genes. The existence of two very similar Lb gene clusters in soybean suggest that soybean may have evolved from an ancestral form by genome duplication. Udgivelsesdato: 1983-null...

  11. Expression studies of the obesity candidate gene FTO in pig

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Majbritt Busk; Birck, Malene Muusfeldt; Fredholm, Merete

    2010-01-01

    Obesity is an increasing problem worldwide and research on candidate genes in good animal models is highly needed. The pig is an excellent model as its metabolism, organ size, and eating habits resemble that of humans. The present study is focused on the characterization of the fat mass and obesity...... associated gene (FTO) in pig. This gene has recently been associated with increased body mass index in several human populations. To establish information on the expression profile of FTO in the pig we performed quantitative PCR in a panel of adult pig tissues and in tissues sampled at different...... and cerebellum). Additionally, in order to see the involvement of the FTO gene in obesity, the changes in expression level were investigated in a nutritional study in brain of Gottingen minipigs under a high cholesterol diet. Significantly higher (P

  12. Candidate driver genes in microsatellite-unstable colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alhopuro, Pia; Sammalkorpi, Heli; Niittymäki, Iina;

    2012-01-01

    . Here, we evaluated somatic mutations in microsatellite repeats of 790 genes chosen based on reduced expression in MSI CRC and existence of a coding mononucleotide repeat of 6–10 bp in length. All the repeats were initially sequenced in 30 primary MSI CRC samples and whenever frameshift mutations were...... types (A/T and C/G, 6–10 bp). Along with several know target genes, including TGFBR2, ACVR2, and MSH3, six novel candidate driver genes emerged that harbored significantly more mutations than identical control repeats. The mutation frequencies in 100 MSI CRC samples were 51% in G8 of GLYR1, 47% in T9...... genes that when mutated are likely to contribute to MSI CRC development....

  13. The KCNE genes in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: a candidate gene study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedley, Paula L; Haundrup, Ole; Andersen, Paal S

    2011-01-01

    The gene family KCNE1-5, which encode modulating β-subunits of several repolarising K+-ion channels, has been associated with genetic cardiac diseases such as long QT syndrome, atrial fibrillation and Brugada syndrome. The minK peptide, encoded by KCNE1, is attached to the Z-disc of the sarcomere...... as well as the T-tubules of the sarcolemma. It has been suggested that minK forms part of an "electro-mechanical feed-back" which links cardiomyocyte stretching to changes in ion channel function. We examined whether mutations in KCNE genes were associated with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), a genetic...

  14. The KCNE genes in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: a candidate gene study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moolman-Smook Johanna C

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The gene family KCNE1-5, which encode modulating β-subunits of several repolarising K+-ion channels, has been associated with genetic cardiac diseases such as long QT syndrome, atrial fibrillation and Brugada syndrome. The minK peptide, encoded by KCNE1, is attached to the Z-disc of the sarcomere as well as the T-tubules of the sarcolemma. It has been suggested that minK forms part of an "electro-mechanical feed-back" which links cardiomyocyte stretching to changes in ion channel function. We examined whether mutations in KCNE genes were associated with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM, a genetic disease associated with an improper hypertrophic response. Results The coding regions of KCNE1, KCNE2, KCNE3, KCNE4, and KCNE5 were examined, by direct DNA sequencing, in a cohort of 93 unrelated HCM probands and 188 blood donor controls. Fifteen genetic variants, four previously unknown, were identified in the HCM probands. Eight variants were non-synonymous and one was located in the 3'UTR-region of KCNE4. No disease-causing mutations were found and no significant difference in the frequency of genetic variants was found between HCM probands and controls. Two variants of likely functional significance were found in controls only. Conclusions Mutations in KCNE genes are not a common cause of HCM and polymorphisms in these genes do not seem to be associated with a propensity to develop arrhythmia

  15. Identification of quantitative trait loci and candidate genes for cadmium tolerance in Populus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Induri, Brahma R [West Virginia University; Ellis, Danielle R [West Virginia University; Slavov, Goncho T. [West Virginia University; Yin, Tongming [ORNL; Zhang, Xinye [ORNL; Tuskan, Gerald A [ORNL; DiFazio, Steven P [West Virginia University

    2012-01-01

    Understanding genetic variation for the response of Populus to heavy metals like cadmium (Cd) is an important step in elucidating the underlying mechanisms of tolerance. In this study, a pseudo-backcross pedigree of Populus trichocarpa Torr. & Gray and Populus deltoides Bart. was characterized for growth and performance traits after Cd exposure. A total of 16 quantitative trait loci (QTL) at logarithm of odds (LOD) ratio 2.5 were detected for total dry weight, its components and root volume. Major QTL for Cd responses were mapped to two different linkage groups and the relative allelic effects were in opposing directions on the two chromosomes, suggesting differential mechanisms at these two loci. The phenotypic variance explained by Cd QTL ranged from 5.9 to 11.6% and averaged 8.2% across all QTL. A whole-genome microarray study led to the identification of nine Cd-responsive genes from these QTL. Promising candidates for Cd tolerance include an NHL repeat membrane-spanning protein, a metal transporter and a putative transcription factor. Additional candidates in the QTL intervals include a putative homolog of a glutamate cysteine ligase, and a glutathione-S-transferase. Functional characterization of these candidate genes should enhance our understanding of Cd metabolism and transport and phytoremediation capabilities of Populus.

  16. Development of specific chromosomal DNA pool for rice field eel and their application to gene mapping

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The chromosomes 1, 3, 5, 6, 7, 10 and 12 of rice field eel (Monopterus albus Zuiew) have been microdissected successfully from meiosis I diakinesis spreads by using glass microneedle under an inverted microscope. And the DOP-PCR products of the single chromosome dotted on the nylon membrane as "specific chromosomal DNA pool", have been hybridized with 6 probes to map these genes. The mapping results show that Zfa has been mapped to chromosome 1, rDNA to chromosomes 3 and 7, both Gh and Pdeg to chromosome 10, Hsl to chromosome 5 and Hox genes have been detected on chromosomes 1, 3, 6 and 10 meantime. It has initiatively been suggested that chromosome 10 of rice field eel might possess the commom conserved synteny to that on chromosome 17 of human, chromosome 11 of mouse,chromosome 12 of pig and chromosome 19 of bovine. And so chromosome 3 of rice field eel might also contain the commom conserved synteny to that on chromosome 2 of zebrafish. Our study is an attempt to establish a new and feasible method to advance the study of gene mapping and chromosome evolution in fish, and also to provide a new idea to distinguish each chromosome on the base of molecular markers for fish.

  17. Genomic hallmarks of genes involved in chromosomal translocations in hematological cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikhail Shugay

    Full Text Available Reciprocal chromosomal translocations (RCTs leading to the formation of fusion genes are important drivers of hematological cancers. Although the general requirements for breakage and fusion are fairly well understood, quantitative support for a general mechanism of RCT formation is still lacking. The aim of this paper is to analyze available high-throughput datasets with computational and robust statistical methods, in order to identify genomic hallmarks of translocation partner genes (TPGs. Our results show that fusion genes are generally overexpressed due to increased promoter activity of 5' TPGs and to more stable 3'-UTR regions of 3' TPGs. Furthermore, expression profiling of 5' TPGs and of interaction partners of 3' TPGs indicates that these features can help to explain tissue specificity of hematological translocations. Analysis of protein domains retained in fusion proteins shows that the co-occurrence of specific domain combinations is non-random and that distinct functional classes of fusion proteins tend to be associated with different components of the gene fusion network. This indicates that the configuration of fusion proteins plays an important role in determining which 5' and 3' TPGs will combine in specific fusion genes. It is generally accepted that chromosomal proximity in the nucleus can explain the specific pairing of 5' and 3' TPGS and the recurrence of hematological translocations. Using recently available data for chromosomal contact probabilities (Hi-C we show that TPGs are preferentially located in early replicated regions and occupy distinct clusters in the nucleus. However, our data suggest that, in general, nuclear position of TPGs in hematological cancers explains neither TPG pairing nor clinical frequency. Taken together, our results support a model in which genomic features related to regulation of expression and replication timing determine the set of candidate genes more likely to be translocated in

  18. Genome-wide screen identifies new candidate genes associated with artemisinin susceptibility in Plasmodium falciparum in Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrmann, Steffen; Straimer, Judith; Mwai, Leah; Abdi, Abdirahman; Rippert, Anja; Okombo, John; Muriithi, Steven; Sasi, Philip; Kortok, Moses Mosobo; Lowe, Brett; Campino, Susana; Assefa, Samuel; Auburn, Sarah; Manske, Magnus; Maslen, Gareth; Peshu, Norbert; Kwiatkowski, Dominic P.; Marsh, Kevin; Nzila, Alexis; Clark, Taane G.

    2013-01-01

    Early identification of causal genetic variants underlying antimalarial drug resistance could provide robust epidemiological tools for timely public health interventions. Using a novel natural genetics strategy for mapping novel candidate genes we analyzed >75,000 high quality single nucleotide polymorphisms selected from high-resolution whole-genome sequencing data in 27 isolates of Plasmodium falciparum. We identified genetic variants associated with susceptibility to dihydroartemisinin that implicate one region on chromosome 13, a candidate gene on chromosome 1 (PFA0220w, a UBP1 ortholog) and others (PFB0560w, PFB0630c, PFF0445w) with putative roles in protein homeostasis and stress response. There was a strong signal for positive selection on PFA0220w, but not the other candidate loci. Our results demonstrate the power of full-genome sequencing-based association studies for uncovering candidate genes that determine parasite sensitivity to artemisinins. Our study provides a unique reference for the interpretation of results from resistant infections. PMID:24270944

  19. Sleeping Beauty Mouse Models Identify Candidate Genes Involved in Gliomagenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyazunova, Irina; Maklakova, Vilena I.; Berman, Samuel; De, Ishani; Steffen, Megan D.; Hong, Won; Lincoln, Hayley; Morrissy, A. Sorana; Taylor, Michael D.; Akagi, Keiko; Brennan, Cameron W.; Rodriguez, Fausto J.; Collier, Lara S.

    2014-01-01

    Genomic studies of human high-grade gliomas have discovered known and candidate tumor drivers. Studies in both cell culture and mouse models have complemented these approaches and have identified additional genes and processes important for gliomagenesis. Previously, we found that mobilization of Sleeping Beauty transposons in mice ubiquitously throughout the body from the Rosa26 locus led to gliomagenesis with low penetrance. Here we report the characterization of mice in which transposons are mobilized in the Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein (GFAP) compartment. Glioma formation in these mice did not occur on an otherwise wild-type genetic background, but rare gliomas were observed when mobilization occurred in a p19Arf heterozygous background. Through cloning insertions from additional gliomas generated by transposon mobilization in the Rosa26 compartment, several candidate glioma genes were identified. Comparisons to genetic, epigenetic and mRNA expression data from human gliomas implicates several of these genes as tumor suppressor genes and oncogenes in human glioblastoma. PMID:25423036

  20. Engineering of glucosinolate biosynthesis: candidate gene identification and validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Møldrup, Morten E; Salomonsen, Bo; Halkier, Barbara A

    2012-01-01

    The diverse biological roles of glucosinolates as plant defense metabolites and anticancer compounds have spurred a strong interest in their biosynthetic pathways. Since the completion of the Arabidopsis genome, functional genomics approaches have enabled significant progress on the elucidation of glucosinolate biosynthesis, although in planta validation of candidate gene function often is hampered by time-consuming generation of knockout and overexpression lines in Arabidopsis. To better exploit the increasing amount of data available from genomic sequencing, microarray database and RNAseq, time-efficient methods for identification and validation of candidate genes are needed. This chapter covers the methodology we are using for gene discovery in glucosinolate engineering, namely, guilt-by-association-based in silico methods and fast proof-of-function screens by transient expression in Nicotiana benthamiana. Moreover, the lessons learned in the rapid, transient tobacco system are readily translated to our robust, versatile yeast expression platform, where additional genes critical for large-scale microbial production of glucosinolates can be identified. We anticipate that the methodology presented here will be beneficial to elucidate and engineer other plant biosynthetic pathways.

  1. The mapping of novel genes to human chromosome 19

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buenaventura, J.M. [Sarah Lawrence College, Bronxville, NY (United States)

    1994-12-01

    The principle goal of our laboratory is the discovery of new genes on human chromosome 19. One of the strategies to achieve this goal is through the use of cDNA clones known as {open_quotes}expressed sequence tags{close_quotes} (ESTs). ESTs, short segments of sequence from a cDNA clone that correspond to the mRNA, occur as unique regions in the genome and, therefore, can be used as markers for specific positions. In collaboration with researchers from Genethon in France, fifteen cDNA clones from a normalized human infant brain cDNA library were tested and determined to map to chromosome 19. A verification procedure is then followed to confirm assignment to chromosome 19. First, primers for each cDNA clone are developed and then amplified by polymerase chain reaction from genomic DNA. Next, a {sup 32}P-radiolabeled probe is made by polymerase chain reaction for each clone and then hybridized against filters containing an LLNL chromosome 19-specific cosmid library to find putative locations on the chromosome. The location is then verified by running a polymerase chain reactions from the positive cosmids. With the Browser database at LLNL, additional information about the positive cosmids can be found. Through use of the BLAST database at the National Library of Medicine, homologous sequences to the clones can be found. Among the fifteen cDNA clones received from Genethon, all have been amplified by polymerase chain reaction. Three have turned out as repetitive elements in the genome. Ten have been mapped to specific locations on chromosome 19. Putative locations have been found for the remaining two clones and thus verification testing will proceed.

  2. Novel sex-determining genes in fish and sex chromosome evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, Kiyoshi; Hamaguchi, Satoshi

    2013-04-01

    Although the molecular mechanisms underlying many developmental events are conserved across vertebrate taxa, the lability at the top of the sex-determining (SD) cascade has been evident from the fact that four master SD genes have been identified: mammalian Sry; chicken DMRT1; medaka Dmy; and Xenopus laevis DM-W. This diversity is thought to be associated with the turnover of sex chromosomes, which is likely to be more frequent in fishes and other poikilotherms than in therian mammals and birds. Recently, four novel candidates for vertebrate SD genes were reported, all of them in fishes. These include amhy in the Patagonian pejerrey, Gsdf in Oryzias luzonensis, Amhr2 in fugu and sdY in rainbow trout. These studies provide a good opportunity to infer patterns from the seemingly chaotic picture of sex determination systems. Here, we review recent advances in our understanding of the master SD genes in fishes.

  3. Localization of a human homolog of the mouse pericentrin gene (PCNT) to chromosome 21qter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Haiming [Univ. of Geneva Medical School (Switzerland); Gos, A.; Morris, M.A. [Cantonal Hospital, Geneva (Switzerland)] [and others

    1996-08-01

    Exon trapping was used to identify portions of genes from cosmid DNA of a human chromosome 21-specific library LL21NC02-Q. More than 650 potential exons have been cloned and characterized to date. Among these, 3 trapped {open_quotes}exons{close_quotes} showed strong homology to different regions of the cDNA for the mouse pericentrin (Pcnt) gene, indicating that these 3 exons are portions of a human homolog of the mouse pericentrin gene. With PCR amplification, Southern blot analysis, and FISH, we have mapped this presumed human pericentrin gene (PCNT) to the long arm of chromosome 21 between marker PFKL and 21qter. Pericentrin is a conserved protein component of the filamentous matrix of the centrosome involved in the initial establishment of the organized microtubule array. No candidate hereditary disorder for pericentrin deficiency/abnormality has yet been mapped in the most distal region of 21q; in addition the role of triplication of the pericentrin gene in the pathophysiology or etiology of trisomy 21 is currently unknown. 16 refs., 3 figs.

  4. Chromosomal Abnormalities in Iranian Infertile Males who are Candidates for Assisted Reproductive Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iman Salahshourifar

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The present study offers our contribution on the topic by a retrospective analysis of the prevalence of chromosomal abnormalities in a population of Iranian infertile men attending assisted reproduction programs.Materials and Methods: Cytogenetic analysis was performed according to standard methods on cultured cells obtained from the patient peripheral blood. In all, 874 files belonging to male partner of each couple were classified as follows: azoospermic, oligozoospermic and patients with low sperm quality in respect of morphology and motility.Results: Chromosomal abnormalities were observed in 136(15.5% individuals of the whole population studied including 12.0 %, 1.2 % and 2.0% of azoospermic, oligozoospermic and patients with low sperm quality, respectively. Of those, 116 (13.2% had sex chromosome abnormalities and 20(2.3% had autosomal chromosome abnormalities.Conclusion: We observed high frequency of aneuploidy and sex chromosomal mosaicism in azoospermic men and high structural aberrations in males with low sperm quality. We suggested that type of chromosomal abnormalities had an inverse relation to sperm count. So that, high chromosomal aneuploidy was detected in males with lower sperm count and high structural aberration was detected in males with low sperm quality. Chromosomal abnormalities are a major cause of male infertility. Consequently, Genetic testing and counselling is indicated for infertile men with abnormal semen parameters with either abnormal karyotype or normal karyotype before applying assisted reproductive techniques.

  5. Adaptations to climate in candidate genes for common metabolic disorders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela M Hancock

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Evolutionary pressures due to variation in climate play an important role in shaping phenotypic variation among and within species and have been shown to influence variation in phenotypes such as body shape and size among humans. Genes involved in energy metabolism are likely to be central to heat and cold tolerance. To test the hypothesis that climate shaped variation in metabolism genes in humans, we used a bioinformatics approach based on network theory to select 82 candidate genes for common metabolic disorders. We genotyped 873 tag SNPs in these genes in 54 worldwide populations (including the 52 in the Human Genome Diversity Project panel and found correlations with climate variables using rank correlation analysis and a newly developed method termed Bayesian geographic analysis. In addition, we genotyped 210 carefully matched control SNPs to provide an empirical null distribution for spatial patterns of allele frequency due to population history alone. For nearly all climate variables, we found an excess of genic SNPs in the tail of the distributions of the test statistics compared to the control SNPs, implying that metabolic genes as a group show signals of spatially varying selection. Among our strongest signals were several SNPs (e.g., LEPR R109K, FABP2 A54T that had previously been associated with phenotypes directly related to cold tolerance. Since variation in climate may be correlated with other aspects of environmental variation, it is possible that some of the signals that we detected reflect selective pressures other than climate. Nevertheless, our results are consistent with the idea that climate has been an important selective pressure acting on candidate genes for common metabolic disorders.

  6. Structure and chromosomal localization of the human thrombospondin gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, F W; Eddy, R L; Shows, T B; Dixit, V M

    1990-04-01

    Thrombospondin (THBS1) is a large modular glycoprotein component of the extracellular matrix and contains a variety of distinct domains, including three repeating subunits (types I, II, and III) that share homology to an assortment of other proteins. Determination of THBS1 gene structure has revealed that the type I repeat modules are encoded by symmetrical exons and that the heparin-binding domain is encoded by a single exon. To further elucidate the higher level organization of THBS1, the gene was localized to the q11-qter region of chromosome 15.

  7. Meta-analysis and candidate gene mining of low-phosphorus tolerance in maize

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hongwei Zhang; Mohammed Shalim Uddin; Cheng Zou; Chuanxiao Xie; Yunbi Xu; WenXue Li

    2014-01-01

    Plants with tolerance to low-phosphorus (P) can grow better under low-P conditions, and understanding of genetic mechanisms of low-P tolerance can not only facilitate identifying relevant genes but also help to develop low-P tolerant cultivars. QTL meta-analysis was conducted after a comprehensive review of the reports on QTL mapping for low-P tolerance-related traits in maize. Meta-analysis pro-duced 23 consensus QTL (cQTL), 17 of which located in similar chromosome regions to those previously reported to influence root traits. Meanwhile, candidate gene mining yielded 215 genes, 22 of which located in the cQTL regions. These 22 genes are homologous to 14 functionally character-ized genes that were found to participate in plant low-P tolerance, including genes encoding miR399s, Pi transporters and purple acid phosphatases. Four cQTL loci (cQTL2-1, cQTL5-3, cQTL6-2, and cQTL10-2) may play important roles for low-P tolerance because each contains more original QTL and has better consistency across previous reports.

  8. Chromosome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chromosomes are structures found in the center (nucleus) of cells that carry long pieces of DNA. DNA ... is the building block of the human body. Chromosomes also contain proteins that help DNA exist in ...

  9. Candidate Genes for Inherited Autism Susceptibility in the Lebanese Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kourtian, Silva; Soueid, Jihane; Makhoul, Nadine J.; Guisso, Dikran Richard; Chahrour, Maria; Boustany, Rose-Mary N.

    2017-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is characterized by ritualistic-repetitive behaviors and impaired verbal/non-verbal communication. Many ASD susceptibility genes implicated in neuronal pathways/brain development have been identified. The Lebanese population is ideal for uncovering recessive genes because of shared ancestry and a high rate of consanguineous marriages. Aims here are to analyze for published ASD genes and uncover novel inherited ASD susceptibility genes specific to the Lebanese. We recruited 36 ASD families (ASD: 37, unaffected parents: 36, unaffected siblings: 33) and 100 unaffected Lebanese controls. Cytogenetics 2.7 M Microarrays/CytoScan™ HD arrays allowed mapping of homozygous regions of the genome. The CNTNAP2 gene was screened by Sanger sequencing. Homozygosity mapping uncovered DPP4, TRHR, and MLF1 as novel candidate susceptibility genes for ASD in the Lebanese. Sequencing of hot spot exons in CNTNAP2 led to discovery of a 5 bp insertion in 23/37 ASD patients. This mutation was present in unaffected family members and unaffected Lebanese controls. Although a slight increase in number was observed in ASD patients and family members compared to controls, there were no significant differences in allele frequencies between affecteds and controls (C/TTCTG: γ2 value = 0.014; p = 0.904). The CNTNAP2 polymorphism identified in this population, hence, is not linked to the ASD phenotype. PMID:28358038

  10. Functional gene groups are concentrated within chromosomes, among chromosomes and in the nuclear space of the human genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thévenin, Annelyse; Ein-Dor, Liat; Ozery-Flato, Michal; Shamir, Ron

    2014-09-01

    Genomes undergo changes in organization as a result of gene duplications, chromosomal rearrangements and local mutations, among other mechanisms. In contrast to prokaryotes, in which genes of a common function are often organized in operons and reside contiguously along the genome, most eukaryotes show much weaker clustering of genes by function, except for few concrete functional groups. We set out to check systematically if there is a relation between gene function and gene organization in the human genome. We test this question for three types of functional groups: pairs of interacting proteins, complexes and pathways. We find a significant concentration of functional groups both in terms of their distance within the same chromosome and in terms of their dispersal over several chromosomes. Moreover, using Hi-C contact map of the tendency of chromosomal segments to appear close in the 3D space of the nucleus, we show that members of the same functional group that reside on distinct chromosomes tend to co-localize in space. The result holds for all three types of functional groups that we tested. Hence, the human genome shows substantial concentration of functional groups within chromosomes and across chromosomes in space.

  11. Systematic yeast synthetic lethal and synthetic dosage lethal screens identify genes required for chromosome segregation

    OpenAIRE

    Measday, Vivien; Baetz, Kristin; Guzzo, Julie; Yuen, Karen; Kwok, Teresa; Sheikh, Bilal; Ding, Huiming; Ueta, Ryo; Hoac, Trinh; Cheng, Benjamin; Pot, Isabelle; Tong, Amy; Yamaguchi-Iwai, Yuko; Boone, Charles; Hieter, Phil

    2005-01-01

    Accurate chromosome segregation requires the execution and coordination of many processes during mitosis, including DNA replication, sister chromatid cohesion, and attachment of chromosomes to spindle microtubules via the kinetochore complex. Additional pathways are likely involved because faithful chromosome segregation also requires proteins that are not physically associated with the chromosome. Using kinetochore mutants as a starting point, we have identified genes with roles in chromosom...

  12. Genetic effects of polymorphisms in candidate genes and the QTL region on chicken age at first egg

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Min

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The age at first egg (AFE, an important indicator for sexual maturation in female chickens, is controlled by polygenes. Based on our knowledge of reproductive physiology, 6 genes including gonadotrophin releasing hormone-I (GnRH-I, neuropeptide Y (NPY, dopamine D2 receptor (DRD2, vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP, VIP receptor-1 (VIPR-1, and prolactin (PRL, were selected as candidates for influencing AFE. Additionally, the region between ADL0201 and MCW0241 of chromosome Z was chosen as the candidate QTL region according to some QTL databases. The objective of the present study was to investigate the effects of mutations in candidate genes and the QTL region on chicken AFE. Results Marker-trait association analysis of 8 mutations in those 6 genes in a Chinese native population found a highly significant association (P G840327C of the GnRH-I gene with AFE, and it remained significant even with Bonferroni correction. Based on the results of the 2-tailed χ2 test, mutations T32742394C, T32742468C, G32742603A, and C33379782T in the candidate QTL region of chromosome Z were selected for marker-trait association analysis. The haplotypes of T32742394C and T32742468C were significantly associated (P T32742394C and T32742468C were located in the intron region of the SH3-domain GRB2-like 2 (SH3GL2 gene, which appeared to be associated in the endocytosis and development of the oocyte. Conclusion This study found that G840327C of the GnRH-I gene and the haplotypes of T32742394C-T32742468C of the SH3GL2 gene were associated with the chicken AFE.

  13. Candidate genes for performance in horses, including monocarboxylate transporters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inaê Cristina Regatieri

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Some horse breeds are highly selected for athletic activities. The athletic potential of each animal can be measured by its performance in sports. High athletic performance depends on the animal capacity to produce energy through aerobic and anaerobic metabolic pathways, among other factors. Transmembrane proteins called monocarboxylate transporters, mainly the isoform 1 (MCT1 and its ancillary protein CD147, can help the organism to adapt to physiological stress caused by physical exercise, transporting lactate and H+ ions. Horse breeds are selected for different purposes so we might expect differences in the amount of those proteins and in the genotypic frequencies for genes that play a significant role in the performance of the animals. The study of MCT1 and CD147 gene polymorphisms, which can affect the formation of the proteins and transport of lactate and H+, can provide enough information to be used for selection of athletic horses increasingly resistant to intense exercise. Two other candidate genes, the PDK4 and DMRT3, have been associated with athletic potential and indicated as possible markers for performance in horses. The oxidation of fatty acids is highly effective in generating ATP and is controlled by the expression of PDK4 (pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase, isozyme 4 in skeletal muscle during and after exercise. The doublesex and mab-3 related transcription factor 3 (DMRT3 gene encodes an important transcription factor in the setting of spinal cord circuits controlling movement in vertebrates and may be associated with gait performance in horses. This review describes how the monocarboxylate transporters work during physical exercise in athletic horses and the influence of polymorphisms in candidate genes for athletic performance in horses.

  14. Lack of global meiotic sex chromosome inactivation, and paucity of tissue-specific gene expression on the Drosophila X chromosome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurminsky Dmitry I

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Paucity of male-biased genes on the Drosophila X chromosome is a well-established phenomenon, thought to be specifically linked to the role of these genes in reproduction and/or their expression in the meiotic male germline. In particular, meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI has been widely considered a driving force behind depletion of spermatocyte-biased X-linked genes in Drosophila by analogy with mammals, even though the existence of global MCSI in Drosophila has not been proven. Results Microarray-based study and qRT-PCR analyses show that the dynamics of gene expression during testis development are very similar between X-linked and autosomal genes, with both showing transcriptional activation concomitant with meiosis. However, the genes showing at least ten-fold expression bias toward testis are significantly underrepresented on the X chromosome. Intriguingly, the genes with similar expression bias toward tissues other than testis, even those not apparently associated with reproduction, are also strongly underrepresented on the X. Bioinformatics analysis shows that while tissue-specific genes often bind silencing-associated factors in embryonic and cultured cells, this trend is less prominent for the X-linked genes. Conclusions Our data show that the global meiotic inactivation of the X chromosome does not occur in Drosophila. Paucity of testis-biased genes on the X appears not to be linked to reproduction or germline-specific events, but rather reflects a general underrepresentation of tissue-biased genes on this chromosome. Our analyses suggest that the activation/repression switch mechanisms that probably orchestrate the highly-biased expression of tissue-specific genes are generally not efficient on the X chromosome. This effect, probably caused by dosage compensation counteracting repression of the X-linked genes, may be the cause of the exodus of highly tissue-biased genes to the autosomes.

  15. A genome-wide study of panic disorder suggests the amiloride-sensitive cation channel 1 as a candidate gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregersen, Noomi; Dahl, Hans A.; Buttenschön, Henriette N.;

    2012-01-01

    Panic disorder (PD) is a mental disorder with recurrent panic attacks that occur spontaneously and are not associated to any particular object or situation. There is no consensus on what causes PD. However, it is recognized that PD is influenced by environmental factors, as well as genetic factors...... of the Faroe Islands. Subsequently, we conducted a fine mapping, which revealed the amiloride-sensitive cation channel 1 (ACCN1) located on chromosome 17q11.2-q12 as a potential candidate gene for PD. The further analyses of the ACCN1 gene using single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) revealed significant...

  16. Localization of a gene for autosomal dominant amelogenesis imperfecta (ADAI) to chromosome 4q

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forsman, K.; Lind. L.; Westermark, E. [Univ. of Umea (Sweden)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Amelogenesis imperfecta (AI), a disorder affecting the formation of enamel, is significantly more common in Northern Sweden than in other parts of the world. The disease is genetically and clinically heterogenous, and autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive and X-linked inheritance patterns have been recognized. Linkage analysis has identified two different loci for X-linked AI, one of which is identical to the gene encoding the enamel protein amelogenin. However, in families with an autosomal inheritance pattern for AI, the genetic basis of the disease still remains unknown. We report a linkage analysis study performed on three Swedish families where the affected members had an autosomal dominant variant of AI (ADAI) clinically characterized as local hypoplastic. Significant linkage to microsatellite markers on chromosome 4q were obtained, with a maximum lod score of 5.55 for the marker D4S428. Recombinations in the family localized the ADAI locus to the interval between D4S392 and D4S395. This chromosome region contains both a locus for the dental disorder dentinogenesis imperfecta and the albumin gene. Serum albumin has been suggested to play a role in enamel formation, and the albumin gene is therefore a candidate gene for this genetic disease.

  17. Identification of candidate susceptibility genes for colorectal cancer through eQTL analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Closa, Adria; Cordero, David; Sanz-Pamplona, Rebeca; Solé, Xavier; Crous-Bou, Marta; Paré-Brunet, Laia; Berenguer, Antoni; Guino, Elisabet; Lopez-Doriga, Adriana; Guardiola, Jordi; Biondo, Sebastiano; Salazar, Ramon; Moreno, Victor

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we aim to identify the genes responsible for colorectal cancer risk behind the loci identified in genome-wide association studies (GWAS). These genes may be candidate targets for developing new strategies for prevention or therapy. We analyzed the association of genotypes for 26 GWAS single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with the expression of genes within a 2 Mb region (cis-eQTLs). Affymetrix Human Genome U219 expression arrays were used to assess gene expression in two series of samples, one of healthy colonic mucosa (n = 47) and other of normal mucosa adjacent to colon cancer (n = 97, total 144). Paired tumor tissues (n = 97) were also analyzed but did not provide additional findings. Partial Pearson correlation (r), adjusted for sample type, was used for the analysis. We have found Bonferroni-significant cis-eQTLs in three loci: rs3802842 in 11q23.1 associated to C11orf53, COLCA1 (C11orf92) and COLCA2 (C11orf93; r = 0.60); rs7136702 in 12q13.12 associated to DIP2B (r = 0.63) and rs5934683 in Xp22.3 associated to SHROOM2 and GPR143 (r = 0.47). For loci in chromosomes 11 and 12, we have found other SNPs in linkage disequilibrium that are more strongly associated with the expression of the identified genes and are better functional candidates: rs7130173 for 11q23.1 (r = 0.66) and rs61927768 for 12q13.12 (r = 0.86). These SNPs are located in DNA regions that may harbor enhancers or transcription factor binding sites. The analysis of trans-eQTLs has identified additional genes in these loci that may have common regulatory mechanisms as shown by the analysis of protein–protein interaction networks. PMID:24760461

  18. Human estrogen sulfotransferase gene (STE): Cloning, structure, and chromosomal localization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Her, Chengtao; Aksoy, I.A.; Weinshilboum, M. [Mayo Foundation, Rochester, MI (United States)] [and others

    1995-09-01

    Sulfation is an important pathway in the metabolism of estrogens. We recently cloned a human liver estrogen sulfotransferase (EST) cDNA. We have now determined the structure and chromosomal localization of the EST gene, STE, as a step toward molecular genetic studies of the regulation of EST in humans. STE spans approximately 20 kb and consists of 8 exons, ranging in length from 95 to 181 bp. The locations of most exon-intron splice junctions within STE are identical to those found in a human phenol ST (PST) gene, STM, and in a rat PST gene. In addition, the locations of five STE introns are also conserved in the human dehydroepiandrosterone (DBEA) ST gene, STD. The 5{prime} flanking region of STE contains one CCAAT and two TATA sequences. The location of one of the TATA box elements is in excellent agreement with the site of transcription initiation as determined by 5{prime}-rapid amplification of cDNA ends. STE was mapped to human chromosome 4q13.1 by fluorescence in situ hybridization. Cloning and structural characterization of STE will now make it possible to study potential molecular genetic mechanisms involved in the regulation of EST in human tissues. 50 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Independent stratum formation on the avian sex chromosomes reveals inter-chromosomal gene conversion and predominance of purifying selection on the W chromosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Alison E; Harrison, Peter W; Montgomery, Stephen H; Pointer, Marie A; Mank, Judith E

    2014-11-01

    We used a comparative approach spanning three species and 90 million years to study the evolutionary history of the avian sex chromosomes. Using whole transcriptomes, we assembled the largest cross-species dataset of W-linked coding content to date. Our results show that recombination suppression in large portions of the avian sex chromosomes has evolved independently, and that long-term sex chromosome divergence is consistent with repeated and independent inversions spreading progressively to restrict recombination. In contrast, over short-term periods we observe heterogeneous and locus-specific divergence. We also uncover four instances of gene conversion between both highly diverged and recently evolved gametologs, suggesting a complex mosaic of recombination suppression across the sex chromosomes. Lastly, evidence from 16 gametologs reveal that the W chromosome is evolving with a significant contribution of purifying selection, consistent with previous findings that W-linked genes play an important role in encoding sex-specific fitness.

  20. A cohort of balanced reciprocal translocations associated with dyslexia: identification of two putative candidate genes at DYX1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buonincontri, Roberta; Bache, Iben; Silahtaroglu, Asli

    2011-01-01

    Dyslexia is one of the most common neurodevelopmental disorders where likely many genes are involved in the pathogenesis. So far six candidate dyslexia genes have been proposed, and two of these were identified by rare chromosomal translocations in affected individuals. By systematic re......-examination of all translocation carriers in Denmark, we have identified 16 different translocations associated with dyslexia. In four families, where the translocation co-segregated with the phenotype, one of the breakpoints concurred (at the cytogenetic level) with either a known dyslexia linkage region--at 15q21...... (DYX1), 2p13 (DYX3) and 1p36 (DYX8)--or an unpublished linkage region at 19q13. As a first exploitation of this unique cohort, we identify three novel candidate dyslexia genes, ZNF280D and TCF12 at 15q21, and PDE7B at 6q23.3, by molecular mapping of the familial translocation with the 15q21 breakpoint....

  1. Progression of colorectal cancer is associated with multiple tumor suppressor gene defects but inhibition of tumorigenicity is accomplished by correction of any single defect via chromosome transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goyette, M.C.; Fasching, C.L.; Stanbridge, E.J. (Univ. of California, Irvine (United States)); Cho, K.; Levy, D.B.; Kinzler, K.W.; Vogelstein, B. (John Hopkins Univ. School of Medicine and Hospital, Baltimore, MD (United States)); Paraskeva, C. (Univ. of Bristol, University Walk, Bristol (United Kingdom))

    1992-03-01

    Colorectal cancer has been associated with the activation of ras oncogenes and with the deletion of multiple chromosomal regions including chromosomes 5q, 17p, and 18q. The candidate tumor suppressor genes from these regions are, respectively, MCC and/or APC, p53, and DCC. In order to further understanding of the molecular and genetic mechanisms involved in tumor progression and, thereby, of normal cell growth, it is important to determine whether defects in one or more of these loci contribute functionally in the progression to malignancy in colorectal cancer and whether correction of any of these defects restores normal growth control in vitro and in vivo. To address this question, the authors have utilized the technique of microcell-mediated chromosome transfer to introduce normal human chromosomes 5, 17, and 18 individually into recipient colorectal cancer cells. Additionally, chromosome 15 was introduced into SW480 cells as an irrelevant control chromosome. While the introduction of chromosome 17 into the tumorigenic colorectal cell line SW480 yielded no viable clones, cell lines were established after the introduction of chromosomes 15, 5, and 18. SW480-chromosome 5 hybrids are strongly suppressed for tumorigenicity, while SW480-chromosome 18 hybrids produce slowly growing tumors in some of the animals injected. Hybrids containing the introduced chromosome 5 express the APC gene present on that chromosome as well as the endogenous mutant transcript. Expression of the putative tumor suppressor gene, DCC, was seen in the clones containing the introduced chromosome 18 but was significantly reduced in several of the tumor reconstitute cell lines. Our findings indicate that while multiple defects in tumor suppressor genes seem to be required for progression to the malignant state in colorectal cancer, correction of only a single defect can have significant effects in vivo and/or in vitro.

  2. Assignment of genes encoding metallothioneins I and II to Chinese hamster chromosomes 3. Evidence for the role of chromosome rearrangement in gene amplification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stallings, R.L.; Munk, A.C.; Longmire, J.L.; Hildebrand, C.E.; Crawford, B.D.

    1984-12-01

    Cadmium resistant (Cd/sup r/) variants with coordinately amplified metallothionein I and II (MTI and MTII) genes have been derived from both Chinese hamster ovary and near-euploid Chinese hamster cell lines. Cytogenetic analyses of Cd/sup r/ variants consistently revealed breakage and rearrangement involving chromosome 3p. In situ hybridization with Chinese hamster MT-encoding cDNA probe localized amplified MT gene sequences near the translocation breakpoint involving chromosome 3p. These observations suggested that both functionally related, isometallothionein loci are linked on Chinese hamster chromosome 3. Southern blot analyses of DNAs isolated from a panel of Chinese hamster x mouse somatic cell hybrids which segregate hamster chromosomes confirmed that both MTI and MTII are located on chromosome 3. The authors speculate that rearrangement of chromosome 3p could be causally involved with the amplification of MT genes in Cd/sup r/ hamster cell lines. 34 references, 3 figures, 1 table.

  3. Gene recovery microdissection (GRM) a process for producing chromosome region-specific libraries of expressed genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christian, A T; Coleman, M A; Tucker, J D

    2001-02-08

    Gene Recovery Microdissection (GRM) is a unique and cost-effective process for producing chromosome region-specific libraries of expressed genes. It accelerates the pace, reduces the cost, and extends the capabilities of functional genomic research, the means by which scientists will put to life-saving, life-enhancing use their knowledge of any plant or animal genome.

  4. Chromosomal mutagen sensitivity associated with mutations in BRCA genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speit, G; Trenz, K

    2004-01-01

    Chromosomal mutagen sensitivity is a common feature of cells from patients with different kinds of cancer. A portion of breast cancer patients also shows an elevated sensitivity to the induction of chromosome damage in cells exposed to ionizing radiation or chemical mutagens. Segregation analysis in families of patients with breast cancer indicated heritability of mutagen sensitivity. It has therefore been suggested that mutations in low-penetrance genes which are possibly involved in DNA repair predispose a substantial portion of breast cancer patients. Chromosomal mutagen sensitivity has been determined with the G2 chromosome aberration test and the G(0) micronucleus test (MNT). However, there seems to be no clear correlation between the results from the two tests, indicating that the inherited defect leading to enhanced G(0) sensitivity is different from that causing G2 sensitivity. Less than 5% of breast cancer patients have a familial form of the disease due to inherited mutations in the breast cancer susceptibility genes BRCA1 or BRCA2. Heterozygous mutations in BRCA1 or BRCA2 in lymphocytes from women with familial breast cancer are also associated with mutagen sensitivity. Differentiation between mutation carriers and controls seems to be much better with the MNT than with the G2 assay. Mutagen sensitivity was detected with the MNT not only after irradiation but also after treatment with chemical mutagens including various cytostatics. The enhanced formation of micronuclei after exposure of lymphocytes to these substances suggests that different DNA repair pathways are affected by a BRCA1 mutation in accordance with the proposed central role of BRCA1 in maintaining genomic integrity. Mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 seem to predispose cells to an increased risk of mutagenesis and transformation after exposure to radiation or cytostatics. This raises a question about potentially increased risks by mammography and cancer therapy in women carrying a mutation in

  5. Computational disease gene identification: a concert of methods prioritizes type 2 diabetes and obesity candidate genes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tiffin, N.; Adie, E.; Turner, F.; Brunner, H.G.; Driel, M.A. van; Oti, M.O.; Lopez-Bigas, N.; Ouzounis, C.A.; Perez-Iratxeta, C.; Andrade-Navarro, M.A.; Adeyemo, A.; Patti, M.E.; Semple, C.A.; Hide, W.

    2006-01-01

    Genome-wide experimental methods to identify disease genes, such as linkage analysis and association studies, generate increasingly large candidate gene sets for which comprehensive empirical analysis is impractical. Computational methods employ data from a variety of sources to identify the most li

  6. Computational disease gene identification : a concert of methods prioritizes type 2 diabetes and obesity candidate genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tiffin, N.; Adie, E.; Turner, F.; Brunner, H.G.; Driel, M.A. van; Oti, M.O.; Lopez-Bigas, N.; Ouzounis, C.A.; Perez-Iratxeta, C.; Andrade-Navarro, M.A.; Adeyemo, A.; Patti, M.E.; Semple, C.A.; Hide, W.

    2006-01-01

    Genome-wide experimental methods to identify disease genes, such as linkage analysis and association studies, generate increasingly large candidate gene sets for which comprehensive empirical analysis is impractical. Computational methods employ data from a variety of sources to identify the most li

  7. Validation of candidate genes putatively associated with resistance to SCMV and MDMV in maize (Zea mays L. by expression profiling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenzel Gerhard

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The potyviruses sugarcane mosaic virus (SCMV and maize dwarf mosaic virus (MDMV are major pathogens of maize worldwide. Two loci, Scmv1 and Scmv2, have ealier been shown to confer complete resistance to SCMV. Custom-made microarrays containing previously identified SCMV resistance candidate genes and resistance gene analogs were utilised to investigate and validate gene expression and expression patterns of isogenic lines under pathogen infection in order to obtain information about the molecular mechanisms involved in maize-potyvirus interactions. Results By employing time course microarray experiments we identified 68 significantly differentially expressed sequences within the different time points. The majority of differentially expressed genes differed between the near-isogenic line carrying Scmv1 resistance locus at chromosome 6 and the other isogenic lines. Most differentially expressed genes in the SCMV experiment (75% were identified one hour after virus inoculation, and about one quarter at multiple time points. Furthermore, most of the identified mapped genes were localised outside the Scmv QTL regions. Annotation revealed differential expression of promising pathogenesis-related candidate genes, validated by qRT-PCR, coding for metallothionein-like protein, S-adenosylmethionine synthetase, germin-like protein or 26S ribosomal RNA. Conclusion Our study identified putative candidate genes and gene expression patterns related to resistance to SCMV. Moreover, our findings support the effectiveness and reliability of the combination of different expression profiling approaches for the identification and validation of candidate genes. Genes identified in this study represent possible future targets for manipulation of SCMV resistance in maize.

  8. Identification of candidate genes in osteoporosis by integrated microarray analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, J. J.; Wang, B. Q.; Yang, Y.; Li, D.

    2016-01-01

    bone formation. Cite this article: J. J. Li, B. Q. Wang, Q. Fei, Y. Yang, D. Li. Identification of candidate genes in osteoporosis by integrated microarray analysis. Bone Joint Res 2016;5:594–601. DOI: 10.1302/2046-3758.512.BJR-2016-0073.R1. PMID:27908864

  9. Syndrome to gene (S2G): in-silico identification of candidate genes for human diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gefen, Avitan; Cohen, Raphael; Birk, Ohad S

    2010-03-01

    The identification of genomic loci associated with human genetic syndromes has been significantly facilitated through the generation of high density SNP arrays. However, optimal selection of candidate genes from within such loci is still a tedious labor-intensive bottleneck. Syndrome to Gene (S2G) is based on novel algorithms which allow an efficient search for candidate genes in a genomic locus, using known genes whose defects cause phenotypically similar syndromes. S2G (http://fohs.bgu.ac.il/s2g/index.html) includes two components: a phenotype Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM)-based search engine that alleviates many of the problems in the existing OMIM search engine (negation phrases, overlapping terms, etc.). The second component is a gene prioritizing engine that uses a novel algorithm to integrate information from 18 databases. When the detailed phenotype of a syndrome is inserted to the web-based software, S2G offers a complete improved search of the OMIM database for similar syndromes. The software then prioritizes a list of genes from within a genomic locus, based on their association with genes whose defects are known to underlie similar clinical syndromes. We demonstrate that in all 30 cases of novel disease genes identified in the past year, the disease gene was within the top 20% of candidate genes predicted by S2G, and in most cases--within the top 10%. Thus, S2G provides clinicians with an efficient tool for diagnosis and researchers with a candidate gene prediction tool based on phenotypic data and a wide range of gene data resources. S2G can also serve in studies of polygenic diseases, and in finding interacting molecules for any gene of choice.

  10. Sequence and chromosomal localization of the mouse brevican gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rauch, U; Meyer, H; Brakebusch, C

    1997-01-01

    Brevican is a brain-specific proteoglycan belonging to the aggrecan family. Phage clones containing the complete mouse brevican open reading frame of 2649 bp and the complete 3'-untranslated region of 341 bp were isolated from a mouse brain cDNA library, and cosmid clones containing the mouse bre...... to an alternative brevican cDNA, coding for a GPI-linked isoform. Single strand conformation polymorphism analysis mapped the brevican gene (Bcan) to chromosome 3 between the microsatellite markers D3Mit22 and D3Mit11....

  11. [The human genome--chromosome 10 and the collagen genes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brdicka, R

    1995-05-17

    In relation to locuses of the 10th chromosome at present the following are in the focus of interest: tumours of endocrine glands, medullary carcinoma of the thyroid gland (MTC) and multiple endocrine neoplasias (MEN). It seems that the unifying basis is the oncogene RET, responsible for the development of Hirschsprung's disease HSCR. The authors mentions also metabolically important locuses for choline acetyltransferase (CHAT), uriporphyrinogen synthase (UROS) and methyl guanine methyltransferase (MGMT). A special paragraph is devoted to a list of collagenous genes COL1-COL18 and diseases associated with them.

  12. Chromosomes Emission of Planet Candidate Host Stars: A Way to Identify False Positives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karoff, Christoffer; Albrecht, Simon; Bonanno, Alfio; Faurschou Knudsen, Mads

    2016-10-01

    It has been hypothesized that the presence of closely orbiting giant planets is associated with enhanced chromospheric emission of their host stars. The main cause for such a relation would likely be enhanced dynamo action induced by the planet. We present measurements of chromospheric emission in 234 planet candidate systems from the Kepler mission. This ensemble includes 37 systems with giant-planet candidates, which show a clear emission enhancement. The enhancement, however, disappears when systems that are also identified as eclipsing binary candidates are removed from the ensemble. This suggests that a large fraction of the giant-planet candidate systems with chromospheric emission stronger than the Sun are not giant-planet systems, but false positives. Such false-positive systems could be tidally interacting binaries with strong chromospheric emission. This hypothesis is supported by an analysis of 188 eclipsing binary candidates that show increasing chromospheric emission as function of decreasing orbital period.

  13. PCR-based panel for regional localization of genes on chromosome 15

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDaniel, L.D.; Zhang, B.; Schultz, R.A. [Univ. of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas (United States)

    1994-09-01

    As the number of genes mapped to specific human chromosomes continues to increase, the feasibility of identifying the gene involved in a human genetic disease via a `candidate gene` approach will continue to improve. Although fluorescence in situ hybridization offers one approach to achieve refined mapping, results are dependent on the size of the probe used, which is not optimal for cDNAs or ESTs. In contrast, a PCR-based approach can achieve mapping for clones <100 bp in size. Through the use of a previously described deletion of chromosome 15 and the 15/17 translocation common to acute promyelocytic leukemia, we have assembled a small panel of somatic cell hybrids that can be used to assign probes to the regions 15p-q15, 15q15-q22, and 15q22-ter. Primers specific for unique cDNA sequences were used to amplify genomic DNA through the polymerase chain reaction. With this approach, we have assigned hexosaminidase A and aggrecan1 to 15q22-qter and leukocyte tyrosine kinase to 15q15-22.

  14. Effects of candidate gene polymorphisms on the detailed fatty acids profile determined by gas chromatography in bovine milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pegolo, S; Cecchinato, A; Mele, M; Conte, G; Schiavon, S; Bittante, G

    2016-06-01

    Association analyses between candidate genes and bovine milk fatty acids can improve our understanding of genetic variation in milk fatty acid profiles and reveal potential opportunities to tailor milk fat composition through selection strategies. In this work, we investigated the association of 51 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) selected from 37 candidate genes using a functional and positional approach, with 47 fatty acids, 9 fatty acid groups, and 5 Δ(9)-desaturation indices in milk samples from Brown Swiss cows. Individual milk samples were collected from 1,158 Italian Brown Swiss cows, and gas chromatography was used to obtain detailed milk fatty acid compositions. A GoldenGate assay system (Illumina, San Diego, CA) was used to perform genotype 96 selected SNP located in 54 genes across 22 chromosomes. In total, 51 polymorphic SNP in 37 candidate genes were retained for the association analysis. A Bayesian linear animal model was used to estimate the contribution of each SNP. A total of 129 tests indicated relevant additive effects between a given SNP and a single fatty acid trait; 38 SNP belonging to 30 genes were relevant for a total of 57 fatty acid traits. Most of the studied fatty acid traits (~81%) were relevantly associated with multiple SNP. Relevantly associated SNP were mainly found in genes related to fat metabolism, linked to or contained in previously identified quantitative trait loci for fat yield or content, or associated with genes previously identified in association analyses with milk fatty acid profiles in other cow breeds. The most representative candidate genes were LEP, PRL, STAT5A, CCL3, ACACA, GHR, ADRB2, LPIN1, STAT1, FABP4, and CSN2. In particular, relevant associations with SNP located on bovine chromosome 19 (BTA19) were found. Two candidate genes on BTA19 (CCL3 and ACACA) were relevantly associated with de novo short- and medium-chain fatty acids, likely explaining the high heritability values found for these fatty acids

  15. A gene for cleidocranial dysplasia to the short arm of chromosome 6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feldman, G.F.; Muenke, M.; Robin, N.H.; Zackai, E.H. [Children`s Hospital of Philadelphia, PA (United States)]|[Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Gasser, D.L.; Bailey, C. [Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Siegel-Bartelt, J. [Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto (Canada); Brueton, L.A.; Robertson, E.; Thompson, E.M.

    1995-04-01

    Cleidocranial dysplasia (CCD) is an autosomal dominant generalized bone dysplasia characterized by mild-to-moderate short stature, clavicular aplasia or hypoplasia, supernumerary and ectopic teeth, delayed eruption of secondary teeth, a characteristic craniofacial appearance, and a variety of other skeletal anomalies. We have performed linkage studies in five families with CCD, with 24 affected and 20 unaffected individuals, using microsatellite markers spanning two candidate regions on chromosomes 8q and 6. The strongest support for linkage was with chromosome 6p microsatellite marker D6S282 with a two-point lod score of 4.84 ({theta} = .03). Furthermore, the multipoint lod score was 5.70 in the interval between D6S282 and D6S291. These data show that the gene for autosomal dominant CCD is located within a 19-cM interval on the short arm of chromosome 6, between D6S282 and D6S291. 25 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Elevated risks for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and blood disorders in Ashkenazi schizophrenic pedigrees suggest new candidate genes in schizophrenia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goodman, A.B. [Columbia Univ. School of Public Health, New York, NY (United States)

    1994-09-15

    Among relatives of Ashkenazi schizophrenic probands the rate of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis was 3/1,000, compared to expected population rates of approximately 2/100,000. Relative risk of bleeding disorders, including hematologic cancers, was increased more than three-fold compared to controls. Co-occurrence of motor neuron disease and blood dyscrasias, accompanied by psychosis, has long been recognized. A virally-mediated autoimmune pathogenesis has been proposed. However, the familial co-occurrence of these three disease entities raises the possibility that the disease constellation be considered as a manifestation of a common underlying genetic defect. Such expansion of the spectrum of affectation might enhance the power of both candidate gene and linkage studies. Based on these findings, the loci suggested as candidate regions in schizophrenia include a potential hot spot on chromosome 21q21-q22, involving the superoxide dismutase and amyloid precursor protein genes. Alternatively, genes on other chromosomes involved in the expression, transcription, or regulation of these genes, or associated with the illnesses of high frequency in these pedigrees are suggested. Candidates include the choroid plexus transport protein, transthyretin at 18q11.2-q12.1; the t(14;18)(q22;21) characterizing B-cell lymphoma-2, the most common form of hematologic cancer; and the 14q24 locus of early onset Alzheimer`s disease, c-Fos, transforming growth factor beta 3, and heat shock protein A2. Expression of hematologic cancers and the suggested candidate genes are known to involve retinoid pathways, and retinoid disregulation has been proposed as a cause of schizophrenia. 67 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Could the gene coding for human uteroglobin (clara cell 10 kDa protein) be a candidate gene for atopy?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukherjee, A.B.; Peri, A.; Miele, L. [SDG, Bethesda, MD (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    It has been proposed that human immune response to allergens is genetically determined. Most of these allergic responses are directed to environmental proteins and are mediated by immunoglobulin E (IgE). These allergic disorders (eg. allergic asthma) are commonly known as atopy. IgE activates phospholipase A{sub 2} (PLA{sub 2}) which hydrolyzes cell membrane phospholipids generating free fatty acids, such as arachidonic acid (AA). AA is utilized as the substrate for the generation of pro-inflammatory eicosanoids and platelet activating factor (PAF). These agents can cause inflammation as well as bronchoconstriction, hallmarks of asthma. IgE-induced mast cell degranulation and accumulation of basophils and eosinophils in the lung are also characteristic immunological processes commonly found in atopic asthma. Recent investigations suggest that a group I PLA{sub 2} may be associated with the secretory granules of these cells. An inverse relationship between the levels of eicosanoids and hUG has been found in the nasopharyngeal lavage fluid of children with viral infections of the upper respiratory tract, often a precipitating factor in asthma. Results of genetic linkage studies mapped a putative atopy gene in human chromosome 11q{sup 13}, the same region in which we localized the hUG gene. Moreover, a genetic linkage between atopic IgE responses and chromosome 11q{sup 13} has been reported. In addition, hUG is: (i) a potent inhibitor of PLA{sub 2} activity, (ii) a potent antiinflammatory/immunomodulatory and antichemotactic protein and has a hitherto undetermined receptor-mediated activity. Taken together, these findings suggest that a mutation either in the hUG or its receptor genes may manifest symptoms characteristic of atopy. Hence, we raise the question whether hUG is a candidate gene for this disease.

  18. Autosomal dominant familial spastic paraplegia: Reduction of the FSPI candidate region on chromosome 14q to 7 cM and locus heterogeneity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gispert, S.; Santos, N.; Auburger, G.; Damen, R.; Voit, T. [University Hospital, Duesseldorf (Germany); Schulz, J.; Klockgether, T. [University Hospital, Tuebingen (Germany); Orozco, G. [Hospital Lenin, Holguin (Cuba); Kreuz, F. [Technical Univ., Dresden (Netherlands); Weissenbach, J. [Unite de Genetique, Paris (France)

    1995-01-01

    Three large pedigrees of Germany descent with autosomal dominant {open_quotes}pure{close_quotes} familial spastic paraplegia (FSP) were characterized clinically and genetically. Haplotype and linkage analyses, with microsatellites covering the FSP region on chromosome 14q (locus FSP1), were performed. In pedigree W, we found a haplotype that cosegregates with the disease and observed three crossing-over events, reducing the FSP1 candidate region to 7 cM; in addition, the observation of apparent anticipation in this family suggests a trinucleotide repeat expansion as the mutation. In pedigree D and S, the gene locus could be excluded from the whole FSP1 region, confirming the locus heterogeneity of autosomal dominant FSP. 11 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Association and mutation analyses of 16p11.2 autism candidate genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravinesh A Kumar

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Autism is a complex childhood neurodevelopmental disorder with a strong genetic basis. Microdeletion or duplication of a approximately 500-700-kb genomic rearrangement on 16p11.2 that contains 24 genes represents the second most frequent chromosomal disorder associated with autism. The role of common and rare 16p11.2 sequence variants in autism etiology is unknown. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To identify common 16p11.2 variants with a potential role in autism, we performed association studies using existing data generated from three microarray platforms: Affymetrix 5.0 (777 families, Illumina 550 K (943 families, and Affymetrix 500 K (60 families. No common variants were identified that were significantly associated with autism. To look for rare variants, we performed resequencing of coding and promoter regions for eight candidate genes selected based on their known expression patterns and functions. In total, we identified 26 novel variants in autism: 13 exonic (nine non-synonymous, three synonymous, and one untranslated region and 13 promoter variants. We found a significant association between autism and a coding variant in the seizure-related gene SEZ6L2 (12/1106 autism vs. 3/1161 controls; p = 0.018. Sez6l2 expression in mouse embryos was restricted to the spinal cord and brain. SEZ6L2 expression in human fetal brain was highest in post-mitotic cortical layers, hippocampus, amygdala, and thalamus. Association analysis of SEZ6L2 in an independent sample set failed to replicate our initial findings. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We have identified sequence variation in at least one candidate gene in 16p11.2 that may represent a novel genetic risk factor for autism. However, further studies are required to substantiate these preliminary findings.

  20. Transcript analysis of 250 novel yeast genes from chromosome XIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planta, R J; Brown, A J; Cadahia, J L; Cerdan, M E; de Jonge, M; Gent, M E; Hayes, A; Kolen, C P; Lombardia, L J; Sefton, M; Oliver, S G; Thevelein, J; Tournu, H; van Delft, Y J; Verbart, D J; Winderickx, J

    1999-03-15

    The European Functional Analysis Network (EUROFAN) is systematically analysing the function of novel Saccharomyces cerevisiae genes revealed by genome sequencing. As part of this effort our consortium has performed a detailed transcript analysis for 250 novel ORFs on chromosome XIV. All transcripts were quantified by Northern analysis under three quasi-steady-state conditions (exponential growth on rich fermentative, rich non-fermentative, and minimal fermentative media) and eight transient conditions (glucose derepression, glucose upshift, stationary phase, nitrogen starvation, osmo-stress, heat-shock, and two control conditions). Transcripts were detected for 82% of the 250 ORFs, and only one ORF did not yield a transcript of the expected length (YNL285w). Transcripts ranged from low (62%), moderate (16%) to high abundance (2%) relative to the ACT1 mRNA. The levels of 73% of the 206 chromosome XIV transcripts detected fluctuated in response to the transient states tested. However, only a small number responded strongly to the transients: eight ORFs were induced upon glucose upshift; five were repressed by glucose; six were induced in response to nitrogen starvation; three were induced in stationary phase; five were induced by osmo-stress; four were induced by heat-shock. These data provide useful clues about the general function of these ORFs and add to our understanding of gene regulation on a genome-wide basis.

  1. Mapping of metastasis suppressor genes for prostate cancer by microcell-mediated chromosome transfer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TomohikoICHIKAWA; ShigeruHOSOKI; HiroyoshiSUZUKI; KoichiroAKAKURA; TatsuoIGARASHI; YuzoFURUYA; MitsuoOSHIMURA; CarrieW.RINKER-SCHAEFFER; NaokiNIHEI; JohnT.ISAACS; HaruoITO

    2000-01-01

    Aim: To identify the metastasis suppressor genes for prostate cancer. Methods: A copy of human chromosomes was introduced into the highly metastatic Dunning R-3327 rat prostate cancer cells by the use of microcell-mediated chromosome transfer. Relationships between the size of human chromosomes introduced into microcell hybrid clones and the number of lung metastases produced by the clones were analyzed to determine which part of human chromosomes contained the metastasis suppressor gene (s) for prostate cancer. To determine portions of human chromosomes introduced, G-banding chromosomal analysis, fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis, and polymerase chain reaction analysis were performed. Results: Each of microcell hybrid clones containing human chromosomes 7, 8, 10, 11, 12, or 17 showed decreased ability to metastasize to the lung without any loss of ttmaorigenicity. This demonstrates that these human chromosomes contain metastasis suppressor genes for prostate cancer. Spontaneous deletion of portions of human chromosomes was observed in the human chromosome 7, 10, 11, 12, and 17 studies. In the human chromosome 8 study, irradiated microcell-mediated chromosome transfer was performed to enrich chromosomal ann deletions of human chromosome 8. Molecular and cytogenetic analyses of microcell hybrid clones demonstrated that metastasis suppressor genes on human chromosomes were located on 7q21-22, 7q31.2-32, 8p21-12, 10q11-22, 11p13-11.2, 12p11-q13, 12q24-ter, and 17pter-q23. KAI1 and MKK4/SEKI were identified as metastasis suppressor genes from 11p11.2 and 17p12, respectively. Conclusion: This assay system is useful to identify metastasis suppressor gene (s) for prostate cancer.

  2. The norepinephrine transporter gene is a candidate gene for panic disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buttenschøn, Henriette Nørmølle; Kristensen, A S; Buch, H N

    2011-01-01

    of PD. The SLC6A2 gene is located on chromosome 16q12.2 and encodes the norepinephrine transporter (NET), responsible for the reuptake of norepinephrine into presynaptic nerve terminals. The aim of the present study was to analyze genetic variants located within the NET gene for association with PD....... The case-control sample consisted of 449 patients with PD and 279 ethnically matched controls. All cases fulfilled the ICD-10 diagnostic criteria for PD. Genotyping was performed using the Sequenom platform (Sequenom, Inc, San Diego, USA). To test for allelic and haplotypic association, the PLINK software...... was used, and COMBASSOC was applied to test for gene-wise association. After quality control 29 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) spanning the gene-region were successfully analyzed. Seven SNPs located within the 5' end of the gene were significantly associated with PD. Furthermore, the NET gene...

  3. Meta-analysis of QTL involved in silage quality of maize and comparison with the position of candidate genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truntzler, M; Barrière, Y; Sawkins, M C; Lespinasse, D; Betran, J; Charcosset, A; Moreau, L

    2010-11-01

    A meta-analysis of quantitative trait loci (QTL) associated with plant digestibility and cell wall composition in maize was carried out using results from 11 different mapping experiments. Statistical methods implemented in "MetaQTL" software were used to build a consensus map, project QTL positions and perform meta-analysis. Fifty-nine QTL for traits associated with digestibility and 150 QTL for traits associated with cell wall composition were included in the analysis. We identified 26 and 42 metaQTL for digestibility and cell wall composition traits, respectively. Fifteen metaQTL with confidence interval (CI) smaller than 10 cM were identified. As expected from trait correlations, 42% of metaQTL for digestibility displayed overlapping CIs with metaQTL for cell wall composition traits. Coincidences were particularly strong on chromosomes 1 and 3. In a second step, 356 genes selected from the MAIZEWALL database as candidates for the cell wall biosynthesis pathway were positioned on our consensus map. Colocalizations between candidate genes and metaQTL positions appeared globally significant based on χ(2) tests. This study contributed in identifying key chromosomal regions involved in silage quality and potentially associated genes for most of these regions. These genes deserve further investigation, in particular through association mapping.

  4. Beyond the chromosome: the prevalence of unique extra-chromosomal bacteriophages with integrated virulence genes in pathogenic Staphylococcus aureus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryan Utter

    Full Text Available In Staphylococcus aureus, the disease impact of chromosomally integrated prophages on virulence is well described. However, the existence of extra-chromosomal prophages, both plasmidial and episomal, remains obscure. Despite the recent explosion in bacterial and bacteriophage genomic sequencing, studies have failed to specifically focus on extra-chromosomal elements. We selectively enriched and sequenced extra-chromosomal DNA from S. aureus isolates using Roche-454 technology and uncovered evidence for the widespread distribution of multiple extra-chromosomal prophages (ExPΦs throughout both antibiotic-sensitive and -resistant strains. We completely sequenced one such element comprised of a 43.8 kbp, circular ExPΦ (designated ФBU01 from a vancomycin-intermediate S. aureus (VISA strain. Assembly and annotation of ФBU01 revealed a number of putative virulence determinants encoded within a bacteriophage immune evasion cluster (IEC. Our identification of several potential ExPΦs and mobile genetic elements (MGEs also revealed numerous putative virulence factors and antibiotic resistance genes. We describe here a previously unidentified level of genetic diversity of stealth extra-chromosomal elements in S. aureus, including phages with a larger presence outside the chromosome that likely play a prominent role in pathogenesis and strain diversity driven by horizontal gene transfer (HGT.

  5. Mapping of the Sca1 and pcd genes on mouse chromosome 13 provides evidence that they are different genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Servadio, A.; McCall, A.; Zoghbi, H. [Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States); Eicher, E.M. [Jackson Laboratory, Bar Harbor, ME (United States)

    1995-10-10

    It is well established that large chromosomal segments have remained intact during the evolution of different mammalian species. Thus, mapping information for a gene in mammalian species facilitates mapping the same gene in another mammalian species. In addition, phenotypically similar diseases that map to linkage conserved regions in two species may be caused by mutations in the same gene. Spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 (SCA1) is a dominantly inherited human disorder characterized by progressive ataxia, dysarthria, and dysmetria. SCA1 maps to the short arm of human chromosome (Chr) 6 in the 6p23-p22 region. SCA1 is caused by the expansion of an unstable CAG repeat located within the coding region of a novel protein, ataxin-1, Purkinje cell degeneration (pcd) is a recessively inherited mouse disorder characterized by a moderate ataxia, usually noted by 3-4 weeks of age. Progressive degeneration of Purkinje cells is the underlying pathogenesis in this disorder. The pcd gene was assigned to mouse Chr 13 because it showed linkage to extra toes (Xt) and pearl (pe). Some doubt about this assignment existed, however, because the calculated genetic distance between pcd and Xt was 32 cM and that between pcd and pe was 18 cM. If pcd is located in Chr 13, its placement relative to Xt and pe suggests that it would be located in the region that shares linkage homology with the region that shares linkage homology with the region of human Chr 6 that contains SCA1. Here, we present data that confirm the assignment of pcd to Chr 13, map the mouse Sca1 gene to Chr 13, and eliminate Sca1 as a candidate gene for pcd. 11 refs., 1 tab.

  6. DNA sequence and haplotype variation in two candidate genes for dilated cardiomyopathy in the turkey Meleagris gallopavo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Kuan-chin; Xu, Jun; Kamara, Davida; Geng, Tuoyu; Gyenai, Kwaku; Reed, Kent M; Smith, Edward J

    2007-05-01

    Determining variation in genes is fundamental to understanding their function in the disease state. Cardiac troponin T (cTnT) and phospholamban (PLN) genes have been implicated in dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) in human and model species. To investigate the role of these 2 candidate genes in DCM in the turkey Meleagris gallopavo, understanding sequence variants and map position distribution is necessary. To this end, a total of 1854 and 1771 bp of cTnT and PLN gene sequences, respectively, were scanned for single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in a randomly bred population. A total of 15 SNPs was identified in the cTnT and PLN genomic sequences. Nine haplotypes, 5 in cTnT and 4 in PLN, were identified. Observed heterozygosities (0.02-0.39) in the turkey population were low for both genes. Within each gene, 1 SNP corresponding to a restriction enzyme site was identified and used to develop a PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) genotyping assay. The PLN gene was genetically mapped to turkey chromosome 2, equivalent to Gallus gallus chromosome 3, and cTnT mapped to a turkey microchromosome. Although limited because of the relatively small sample size of 55 birds, the data from this SNP analysis of PLN and cTnT provide a foundation from which to evaluate the function of cTnT and PLN in the turkey. Information about the distribution of the SNPs and haplotypes will facilitate future association and linkage studies.

  7. Localization of Sry gene on Y chromosome of Muntjac munticus vaginalis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The chromosomes 1, Y1, Y2 of Muntjac munticus vaginalis were isolated by fluorescence activated chromosome sorting and amplified by degenerate oligonucleotide primed-polymerase chain reaction (DOP-PCR). A primer pair within human Sry HMG box was designed and the Sry gene of the male M. m vaginalis was amplified. The product was cloned and sequenced. The result proved that Sry is located on chromosome Y2, which is the sex-determining chromosome in the male M. m vaginalis.

  8. Cell type-specific over-expression of chromosome 21 genes in fibroblasts and fetal hearts with trisomy 21

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zigman Warren B

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Down syndrome (DS is caused by trisomy 21 (+21, but the aberrations in gene expression resulting from this chromosomal aneuploidy are not yet completely understood. Methods We used oligonucleotide microarrays to survey mRNA expression in early- and late-passage control and +21 fibroblasts and mid-gestation fetal hearts. We supplemented this analysis with northern blotting, western blotting, real-time RT-PCR, and immunohistochemistry. Results We found chromosome 21 genes consistently over-represented among the genes over-expressed in the +21 samples. However, these sets of over-expressed genes differed across the three cell/tissue types. The chromosome 21 gene MX1 was strongly over-expressed (mean 16-fold in senescent +21 fibroblasts, a result verified by northern and western blotting. MX1 is an interferon target gene, and its mRNA was induced by interferons present in +21 fibroblast conditioned medium, suggesting an autocrine loop for its over-expression. By immunohistochemistry the p78MX1 protein was induced in lesional tissue of alopecia areata, an autoimmune disorder associated with DS. We found strong over-expression of the purine biosynthesis gene GART (mean 3-fold in fetal hearts with +21 and verified this result by northern blotting and real-time RT-PCR. Conclusion Different subsets of chromosome 21 genes are over-expressed in different cell types with +21, and for some genes this over-expression is non-linear (>1.5X. Hyperactive interferon signaling is a candidate pathway for cell senescence and autoimmune disorders in DS, and abnormal purine metabolism should be investigated for a potential role in cardiac defects.

  9. A Medaka Gene Map: The Trace of Ancestral Vertebrate Proto-Chromosomes Revealed by Comparative Gene Mapping

    OpenAIRE

    Naruse, Kiyoshi; Tanaka, Minoru; Mita, Kazuei; Shima, Akihiro; Postlethwait, John; Mitani, Hiroshi

    2004-01-01

    The mapping of Hox clusters and many duplicated genes in zebrafish indicated an extra whole-genome duplication in ray-fined fish. However, to reconstruct the preduplication chromosomes (proto-chromosomes), the comparative genomic studies of more distantly related teleosts are essential. Medaka and zebrafish are ideal for this purpose, because their lineages separated from their last common ancestor ∼140 million years ago. To reconstruct ancient vertebrate chromosomes, including the chromosome...

  10. Clinical phenotype and candidate genes for the 5q31.3 microdeletion syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosoki, Kana; Ohta, Tohru; Natsume, Jun; Imai, Sumiko; Okumura, Akihisa; Matsui, Takeshi; Harada, Naoki; Bacino, Carlos A; Scaglia, Fernando; Jones, Jeremy Y; Niikawa, Norio; Saitoh, Shinji

    2012-08-01

    Array-based technologies have led to the identification of many novel microdeletion and microduplication syndromes demonstrating multiple congenital anomalies and intellectual disability (MCA/ID). We have used chromosomal microarray analysis for the evaluation of patients with MCA/ID and/or neonatal hypotonia. Three overlapping de novo microdeletions at 5q31.3 with the shortest region of overlap (SRO) of 370 kb were detected in three unrelated patients. These patients showed similar clinical features including severe neonatal hypotonia, neonatal feeding difficulties, respiratory distress, characteristic facial features, and severe developmental delay. These features are consistent with the 5q31.3 microdeletion syndrome originally proposed by Shimojima et al., providing further evidence that this syndrome is clinically discernible. The 370 kb SRO encompasses only four RefSeq genes including neuregulin 2 (NRG2) and purine-rich element binding protein A (PURA). NRG2 is one of the members of the neuregulin family related to neuronal and glial cell growth and differentiation, thus making NRG2 a good candidate for the observed phenotype. Moreover, PURA is also a good candidate because Pura-deficient mice demonstrate postnatal neurological manifestations.

  11. Systematic analysis of S. cerevisiae chromosome VIII genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niedenthal, R; Riles, L; Güldener, U; Klein, S; Johnston, M; Hegemann, J H

    1999-12-01

    To begin genome-wide functional analysis, we analysed the consequences of deleting each of the 265 genes of chromosome VIII of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. For 33% of the deletion strains a growth phenotype could be detected: 18% of the genes are essential for growth on complete glucose medium, and 15% grow significantly more slowly than the wild-type strain or exhibit a conditional phenotype when incubated under one of 20 different growth conditions. Two-thirds of the mutants that exhibit conditional phenotypes are pleiotropic; about one-third of the mutants exhibit only one phenotype. We also measured the level of expression directed by the promoter of each gene. About half of the promoters direct detectable transcription in rich glucose medium, and most of these exhibited only low or medium activity. Only 1% of the genes are expressed at about the same level as ACT1. The number of active promoters increased to 76% upon growth on a non-fermentable carbon source, and to 93% in minimal glucose medium. The majority of promoters fluctuated in strength, depending on the medium.

  12. Candidate genes detected in transcriptome studies are strongly dependent on genetic background.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pernille Sarup

    Full Text Available Whole genome transcriptomic studies can point to potential candidate genes for organismal traits. However, the importance of potential candidates is rarely followed up through functional studies and/or by comparing results across independent studies. We have analysed the overlap of candidate genes identified from studies of gene expression in Drosophila melanogaster using similar technical platforms. We found little overlap across studies between putative candidate genes for the same traits in the same sex. Instead there was a high degree of overlap between different traits and sexes within the same genetic backgrounds. Putative candidates found using transcriptomics therefore appear very sensitive to genetic background and this can mask or override effects of treatments. The functional importance of putative candidate genes emerging from transcriptome studies needs to be validated through additional experiments and in future studies we suggest a focus on the genes, networks and pathways affecting traits in a consistent manner across backgrounds.

  13. Sequence analysis of 21 genes located in the Kartagener syndrome linkage region on chromosome 15q.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geremek, Maciej; Schoenmaker, Frederieke; Zietkiewicz, Ewa; Pogorzelski, Andrzej; Diehl, Scott; Wijmenga, Cisca; Witt, Michal

    2008-06-01

    Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is a rare genetic disorder, which shows extensive genetic heterogeneity and is mostly inherited in an autosomal recessive fashion. There are four genes with a proven pathogenetic role in PCD. DNAH5 and DNAI1 are involved in 28 and 10% of PCD cases, respectively, while two other genes, DNAH11 and TXNDC3, have been identified as causal in one PCD family each. We have previously identified a 3.5 cM (2.82 Mb) region on chromosome 15q linked to Kartagener syndrome (KS), a subtype of PCD characterized by the randomization of body organ positioning. We have now refined the KS candidate region to a 1.8 Mb segment containing 18 known genes. The coding regions of these genes and three neighboring genes were subjected to sequence analysis in seven KS probands, and we were able to identify 60 single nucleotide sequence variants, 35 of which resided in mRNA coding sequences. However, none of the variations alone could explain the occurrence of the disease in these patients.

  14. Human nucleolus organizers on nonhomologous chromosomes can share the same ribosomal gene variants.

    OpenAIRE

    Krystal, M; D'Eustachio, P; Ruddle, F H; Arnheim, N

    1981-01-01

    The distributions of three human ribosomal gene polymorphisms among individual chromosomes containing nucleolus organizers were analyzed by using mouse--human hybrid cells. Different nucleolus organizers can contain the same variant, suggesting the occurrence of genetic exchanges among ribosomal gene clusters on nonhomologous chromosomes. Such exchanges appear to occur less frequently in mice. This difference is discussed in terms of the nucleolar organization and chromosomal location of ribo...

  15. Cell number regulator genes in Prunus provide candidate genes for the control of fruit size in sweet and sour cherry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Franceschi, P; Stegmeir, T; Cabrera, A; van der Knaap, E; Rosyara, U R; Sebolt, A M; Dondini, L; Dirlewanger, E; Quero-Garcia, J; Campoy, J A; Iezzoni, A F

    2013-01-01

    Striking increases in fruit size distinguish cultivated descendants from small-fruited wild progenitors for fleshy fruited species such as Solanum lycopersicum (tomato) and Prunus spp. (peach, cherry, plum, and apricot). The first fruit weight gene identified as a result of domestication and selection was the tomato FW2.2 gene. Members of the FW2.2 gene family in corn (Zea mays) have been named CNR (Cell Number Regulator) and two of them exert their effect on organ size by modulating cell number. Due to the critical roles of FW2.2/CNR genes in regulating cell number and organ size, this family provides an excellent source of candidates for fruit size genes in other domesticated species, such as those found in the Prunus genus. A total of 23 FW2.2/CNR family members were identified in the peach genome, spanning the eight Prunus chromosomes. Two of these CNRs were located within confidence intervals of major quantitative trait loci (QTL) previously discovered on linkage groups 2 and 6 in sweet cherry (Prunus avium), named PavCNR12 and PavCNR20, respectively. An analysis of haplotype, sequence, segregation and association with fruit size strongly supports a role of PavCNR12 in the sweet cherry linkage group 2 fruit size QTL, and this QTL is also likely present in sour cherry (P. cerasus). The finding that the increase in fleshy fruit size in both tomato and cherry associated with domestication may be due to changes in members of a common ancestral gene family supports the notion that similar phenotypic changes exhibited by independently domesticated taxa may have a common genetic basis.

  16. Candidate Gene Identification with SNP Marker-Based Fine Mapping of Anthracnose Resistance Gene Co-4 in Common Bean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burt, Andrew J.; William, H. Manilal; Perry, Gregory; Khanal, Raja; Pauls, K. Peter; Kelly, James D.; Navabi, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    Anthracnose, caused by Colletotrichum lindemuthianum, is an important fungal disease of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris). Alleles at the Co–4 locus confer resistance to a number of races of C. lindemuthianum. A population of 94 F4:5 recombinant inbred lines of a cross between resistant black bean genotype B09197 and susceptible navy bean cultivar Nautica was used to identify markers associated with resistance in bean chromosome 8 (Pv08) where Co–4 is localized. Three SCAR markers with known linkage to Co–4 and a panel of single nucleotide markers were used for genotyping. A refined physical region on Pv08 with significant association with anthracnose resistance identified by markers was used in BLAST searches with the genomic sequence of common bean accession G19833. Thirty two unique annotated candidate genes were identified that spanned a physical region of 936.46 kb. A majority of the annotated genes identified had functional similarity to leucine rich repeats/receptor like kinase domains. Three annotated genes had similarity to 1, 3-β-glucanase domains. There were sequence similarities between some of the annotated genes found in the study and the genes associated with phosphoinositide-specific phosphilipases C associated with Co-x and the COK–4 loci found in previous studies. It is possible that the Co–4 locus is structured as a group of genes with functional domains dominated by protein tyrosine kinase along with leucine rich repeats/nucleotide binding site, phosphilipases C as well as β-glucanases. PMID:26431031

  17. A Parthenogenesis Gene Candidate and Evidence for Segmental Allopolyploidy in Apomictic Brachiaria decumbens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worthington, Margaret; Heffelfinger, Christopher; Bernal, Diana; Quintero, Constanza; Zapata, Yeny Patricia; Perez, Juan Guillermo; De Vega, Jose; Miles, John; Dellaporta, Stephen; Tohme, Joe

    2016-07-01

    Apomixis, asexual reproduction through seed, enables breeders to identify and faithfully propagate superior heterozygous genotypes by seed without the disadvantages of vegetative propagation or the expense and complexity of hybrid seed production. The availability of new tools such as genotyping by sequencing and bioinformatics pipelines for species lacking reference genomes now makes the construction of dense maps possible in apomictic species, despite complications including polyploidy, multisomic inheritance, self-incompatibility, and high levels of heterozygosity. In this study, we developed saturated linkage maps for the maternal and paternal genomes of an interspecific Brachiaria ruziziensis (R. Germ. and C. M. Evrard) × B. decumbens Stapf. F1 mapping population in order to identify markers linked to apomixis. High-resolution molecular karyotyping and comparative genomics with Setaria italica (L.) P. Beauv provided conclusive evidence for segmental allopolyploidy in B. decumbens, with strong preferential pairing of homologs across the genome and multisomic segregation relatively more common in chromosome 8. The apospory-specific genomic region (ASGR) was mapped to a region of reduced recombination on B. decumbens chromosome 5. The Pennisetum squamulatum (L.) R.Br. PsASGR-BABY BOOM-like (psASGR-BBML)-specific primer pair p779/p780 was in perfect linkage with the ASGR in the F1 mapping population and diagnostic for reproductive mode in a diversity panel of known sexual and apomict Brachiaria (Trin.) Griseb. and P. maximum Jacq. germplasm accessions and cultivars. These findings indicate that ASGR-BBML gene sequences are highly conserved across the Paniceae and add further support for the postulation of the ASGR-BBML as candidate genes for the apomictic function of parthenogenesis.

  18. Recombinant cells that highly express chromosomally-integrated heterologous gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingram, Lonnie O.; Ohta, Kazuyoshi; Wood, Brent E.

    2007-03-20

    Recombinant host cells are obtained that comprise (A) a heterologous, polypeptide-encoding polynucleotide segment, stably integrated into a chromosome, which is under transcriptional control of an endogenous promoter and (B) a mutation that effects increased expression of the heterologous segment, resulting in enhanced production by the host cells of each polypeptide encoded by that segment, relative to production of each polypeptide by the host cells in the absence of the mutation. The increased expression thus achieved is retained in the absence of conditions that select for cells displaying such increased expression. When the integrated segment comprises, for example, ethanol-production genes from an efficient ethanol producer like Zymomonas mobilis, recombinant Escherichia coli and other enteric bacterial cells within the present invention are capable of converting a wide range of biomass-derived sugars efficiently to ethanol.

  19. Assignment of ten DNA repair genes from Schizosaccharomyces pombe to chromosomal NotI restriction fragments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B.C. Broughton; N.C. Barbet; J. Murray (Johanne); F.Z. Watts (Felicity); M.H.M. Koken (Marcel); A.R. Lehmann (Alan); A.M. Carr (Anthony)

    1991-01-01

    textabstractTen DNA repair (rad) genes from the fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe were mapped to the 17 NotI fragments of the three chromosomes. Nine of the genes map to chromosome I, but there is no evidence for significant clustering.

  20. The gamma fibrinogen gene (FGG) maps to chromosome 17 in both cattle and sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, S E; Barendse, W; Hetzel, D J

    1993-01-01

    The gamma fibrinogen gene (FGG) was localised in both cattle and sheep using in situ hybridisation. The probe employed was a 1-kb bovine cDNA fragment. Based on observations of QFQ-banded chromosome preparations, this locus is on bovine chromosome 17q12-->q13 and on the homologous sheep chromosome 17. This localisation is, to our knowledge, the first assignment to chromosome 17 in either the bovine or ovine genome. In addition to localising FGG to this chromosome, the assignment provisionally maps the previously unassigned syntenic group U23, containing (besides FGG) the genes for mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2), interleukin 2 (IL2), immunoglobulin lambda (IGL), and beta fibrinogen (FGB), to chromosome 17 in cattle and probably to the same chromosome in sheep.

  1. The Axon Guidance Receptor Gene ROBO1 Is a Candidate Gene for Developmental Dyslexia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Dyslexia, or specific reading disability, is the most common learning disorder with a complex, partially genetic basis, but its biochemical mechanisms remain poorly understood. A locus on Chromosome 3, DYX5, has been linked to dyslexia in one large family and speech-sound disorder in a subset of small families. We found that the axon guidance receptor gene ROBO1, orthologous to the Drosophila roundabout gene, is disrupted by a chromosome translocation in a dyslexic individual. In a large pedigree with 21 dyslexic individuals genetically linked to a specific haplotype of ROBO1 (not found in any other chromosomes in our samples, the expression of ROBO1 from this haplotype was absent or attenuated in affected individuals. Sequencing of ROBO1 in apes revealed multiple coding differences, and the selection pressure was significantly different between the human, chimpanzee, and gorilla branch as compared to orangutan. We also identified novel exons and splice variants of ROBO1 that may explain the apparent phenotypic differences between human and mouse in heterozygous loss of ROBO1. We conclude that dyslexia may be caused by partial haplo-insufficiency for ROBO1 in rare families. Thus, our data suggest that a slight disturbance in neuronal axon crossing across the midline between brain hemispheres, dendrite guidance, or another function of ROBO1 may manifest as a specific reading disability in humans.

  2. The axon guidance receptor gene ROBO1 is a candidate gene for developmental dyslexia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katariina Hannula-Jouppi

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Dyslexia, or specific reading disability, is the most common learning disorder with a complex, partially genetic basis, but its biochemical mechanisms remain poorly understood. A locus on Chromosome 3, DYX5, has been linked to dyslexia in one large family and speech-sound disorder in a subset of small families. We found that the axon guidance receptor gene ROBO1, orthologous to the Drosophila roundabout gene, is disrupted by a chromosome translocation in a dyslexic individual. In a large pedigree with 21 dyslexic individuals genetically linked to a specific haplotype of ROBO1 (not found in any other chromosomes in our samples, the expression of ROBO1 from this haplotype was absent or attenuated in affected individuals. Sequencing of ROBO1 in apes revealed multiple coding differences, and the selection pressure was significantly different between the human, chimpanzee, and gorilla branch as compared to orangutan. We also identified novel exons and splice variants of ROBO1 that may explain the apparent phenotypic differences between human and mouse in heterozygous loss of ROBO1. We conclude that dyslexia may be caused by partial haplo-insufficiency for ROBO1 in rare families. Thus, our data suggest that a slight disturbance in neuronal axon crossing across the midline between brain hemispheres, dendrite guidance, or another function of ROBO1 may manifest as a specific reading disability in humans.

  3. Four kinds of ENU-induced white spot mice and chromosome locations of the mutant genes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Baojin; MAO Huihua; SHAO Yixiang; XUE Zhengfeng; LI Houda

    2003-01-01

    Phenotype-driven is the name for an approach used to study gene functions through mutagenesis, location and cloning of the mutant gene. In this study, 150 male C57BL/6J(B6) mice were treated with ENU and reproduced a total offspring of 3860. Of these descendants, 210 exhibited mutation phenotypes by screening, and more than 10 of them are hereditable. Four kinds of mutant mice, named Wbct, W-1Bao, W-2Bao, and W-3Bao, showed dominant hereditary white spot mutation with partial albinism on their belly, distal limbs and tail terminal. To map these mutant genes, 39 microsatellites, equally distributed on the mouse genome and with difference between B6 and DBA/2J (D2), were selected to scan the genome after discrimination of the white spots in the F2 mice [(B6×D2)×D2]. It is found that, the log odds score (LODS) between W-1Bao and D5Mit168 is 0.56, and the LODS of W-1Bao and D5Mit352 is 4.47. With the gradual application of microsatellites D5Mit290, D5Mit312, D5Mit308 and D5Mit356 that are close to the mutant gene, and the number of F2 mice going up to 537, the mutant W-1Bao is located between D5Mit356 and D5Mit308 on chromosome 5, about 42.19 cM from the centromere. In the same way, W-2Bao and W-3Bao are mapped nearby W-1Bao, and Wbct is located on chromosome 1, about 41.6 cM from the centromere. After searching for the mouse genome database (MGD) and performing a one-by-one study of all genes located on chromosome subregion, it is believed that the kit gene is an excellent candidate for the white spot mutations of W-1Bao, W-2Bao and W-3Bao.

  4. In silico Analysis of Candidate Genes Involved in Sanfilippo Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehreen Zaka

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Sanfilippo syndrome is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disorder, caused by the deficiency of enzymes that play an important role in degradation of glycosaminoglycans and also called mucopolysaccharidosis III. Mucopolysaccharidosis is genetic disorder. Here, we searched the candidate genes for Sanfilippo syndrome by using BLAST with the query sequence. As no suitable homology was found against the query sequence we moved towards threading approach. The threading approach was carried out by employing online CPH models and LOMETS tools. Through present research, domains of the proteins were predicted by utilizing the Domain Sweep tools, GNS and two domains were reported. Motif search reported the maximum number of motifs for Type D protein as compared to other types. All four proteins were totally soluble proteins and no transmembrane domains were found. In future, these results and predicted 3D structures can be used for the molecular docking studies, binding activities and protein-protein interactions for all the four types of Sanfilippo syndrome.

  5. Identification of a candidate gene for panicle length in rice (Oryza sativa L. via association and linkage analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erbao eLiu

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Panicle length (PL is an important trait for improving panicle architecture and grain yield in rice (Oryza sativa L.. Three populations were used to identify QTLs and candidate genes associated with PL. Four QTLs for PL were detected on chromosomes 4, 6 and 9 through linkage mapping in the recombinant inbred line population derived from a cross between the cultivars Xiushui79 (short panicle and C-bao (long panicle. Ten SSR markers associated with PL were detected on chromosomes 2, 3, 5, 6, 8, 9 and 10 in the natural population consisting of 540 accessions collected from East and Southeast Asia. A major locus on chromosome 9 with the largest effect was identified via both linkage and association mapping. LONG PANICLE 1 (LP1 locus was delimited to a 90-kb region of the long arm of chromosome 9 through fine mapping using a single segment segregating F2 population. Two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs leading to amino acid changes were detected in the third and fifth exons of LP1. LP1encodes a Remorin_C-containing protein of unknown function with homologs in a variety of species. Sequencing analysis of LP1 in two parents and 103 rice accessions indicated that SNP1 is associated with panicle length. The LP1 allele of Xiushui79 leads to reduced panicle length, whereas the allele of C-bao relieves the suppression of panicle length. LP1 and the elite alleles can be used to improve panicle length in rice.

  6. Gene expression meta-analysis identifies chromosomal regions involved in ovarian cancer survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomassen, Mads; Jochumsen, Kirsten M; Mogensen, Ole;

    2009-01-01

    the relation of gene expression and chromosomal position to identify chromosomal regions of importance for early recurrence of ovarian cancer. By use of *Gene Set Enrichment Analysis*, we have ranked chromosomal regions according to their association to survival. Over-representation analysis including 1......Ovarian cancer cells exhibit complex karyotypic alterations causing deregulation of numerous genes. Some of these genes are probably causal for cancer formation and local growth, whereas others are causal for metastasis and recurrence. By using publicly available data sets, we have investigated......-4 consecutive cytogenetic bands identified regions with increased expression for chromosome 5q12-14, and a very large region of chromosome 7 with the strongest signal at 7p15-13 among tumors from short-living patients. Reduced gene expression was identified at 4q26-32, 6p12-q15, 9p21-q32, and 11p14-11. We...

  7. The genome of Nectria haematococca: contribution of supernumerary chromosomes to gene expansion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey J Coleman

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The ascomycetous fungus Nectria haematococca, (asexual name Fusarium solani, is a member of a group of >50 species known as the "Fusarium solani species complex". Members of this complex have diverse biological properties including the ability to cause disease on >100 genera of plants and opportunistic infections in humans. The current research analyzed the most extensively studied member of this complex, N. haematococca mating population VI (MPVI. Several genes controlling the ability of individual isolates of this species to colonize specific habitats are located on supernumerary chromosomes. Optical mapping revealed that the sequenced isolate has 17 chromosomes ranging from 530 kb to 6.52 Mb and that the physical size of the genome, 54.43 Mb, and the number of predicted genes, 15,707, are among the largest reported for ascomycetes. Two classes of genes have contributed to gene expansion: specific genes that are not found in other fungi including its closest sequenced relative, Fusarium graminearum; and genes that commonly occur as single copies in other fungi but are present as multiple copies in N. haematococca MPVI. Some of these additional genes appear to have resulted from gene duplication events, while others may have been acquired through horizontal gene transfer. The supernumerary nature of three chromosomes, 14, 15, and 17, was confirmed by their absence in pulsed field gel electrophoresis experiments of some isolates and by demonstrating that these isolates lacked chromosome-specific sequences found on the ends of these chromosomes. These supernumerary chromosomes contain more repeat sequences, are enriched in unique and duplicated genes, and have a lower G+C content in comparison to the other chromosomes. Although the origin(s of the extra genes and the supernumerary chromosomes is not known, the gene expansion and its large genome size are consistent with this species' diverse range of habitats. Furthermore, the presence of unique

  8. The genome of Nectria haematococca: contribution of supernumerary chromosomes to gene expansion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coleman, J.J.; Rounsley, S.D.; Rodriguez-Carres, M.; Kuo, A.; Wasmann, C.c.; Grimwood, J.; Schmutz, J.; Taga, M.; White, G.J.; Zhuo, S.; Schwartz, D.C.; Freitag, M.; Ma, L.-J.; Danchin, E.G.J.; Henrissat, B.; Cutinho, P.M.; Nelson, D.R.; Straney, D.; Napoli, C.A.; Baker, B.M.; Gribskov, M.; Rep, M.; Kroken, S.; Molnar, I.; Rensing, C.; Kennell, J.C.; Zamora, J.; Farman, M.L.; Selker, E.U.; Salamov, A.; Shapiro, H.; Pangilinan, J.; Lindquist, E.; Lamers, C.; Grigoriev, I.V.; Geiser, D.M.; Covert, S.F.; Temporini, S.; VanEtten, H.D.

    2009-04-20

    The ascomycetous fungus Nectria haematococca, (asexual name Fusarium solani), is a member of a group of .50 species known as the"Fusarium solani species complex". Members of this complex have diverse biological properties including the ability to cause disease on .100 genera of plants and opportunistic infections in humans. The current research analyzed the most extensively studied member of this complex, N. haematococca mating population VI (MPVI). Several genes controlling the ability of individual isolates of this species to colonize specific habitats are located on supernumerary chromosomes. Optical mapping revealed that the sequenced isolate has 17 chromosomes ranging from 530 kb to 6.52 Mb and that the physical size of the genome, 54.43 Mb, and the number of predicted genes, 15,707, are among the largest reported for ascomycetes. Two classes of genes have contributed to gene expansion: specific genes that are not found in other fungi including its closest sequenced relative, Fusarium graminearum; and genes that commonly occur as single copies in other fungi but are present as multiple copies in N. haematococca MPVI. Some of these additional genes appear to have resulted from gene duplication events, while others may have been acquired through horizontal gene transfer. The supernumerary nature of three chromosomes, 14, 15, and 17, was confirmed by their absence in pulsed field gel electrophoresis experiments of some isolates and by demonstrating that these isolates lacked chromosome-specific sequences found on the ends of these chromosomes. These supernumerary chromosomes contain more repeat sequences, are enriched in unique and duplicated genes, and have a lower G+C content in comparison to the other chromosomes. Although the origin(s) of the extra genes and the supernumerary chromosomes is not known, the gene expansion and its large genome size are consistent with this species' diverse range of habitats. Furthermore, the presence of unique genes on

  9. Common alleles in candidate susceptibility genes associated with risk and development of epithelial ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Notaridou, Maria; Quaye, Lydia; Dafou, Dimitra;

    2011-01-01

    Common germline genetic variation in the population is associated with susceptibility to epithelial ovarian cancer. Microcell-mediated chromosome transfer and expression microarray analysis identified nine genes associated with functional suppression of tumorogenicity in ovarian cancer cell lines...

  10. Candidate genes for drought tolerance and improved productivity in rice (Oryza sativa L.)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M S Vinod; Naveen Sharma; K Manjunatha; Adnan Kanbar; N B Prakash; H E Shashidhar

    2006-03-01

    Candidate genes are sequenced genes of known biological action involved in the development or physiology of a trait. Twenty-one putative candidate genes were designed after an exhaustive search in the public databases along with an elaborate literature survey for candidate gene products and/or regulatory sequences associated with enhanced drought resistance. The downloaded sequences were then used to design primers considering the flanking sequences as well. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) performed on 10 diverse cultivars that involved Japonica, Indica and local accessions, revealed 12 polymorphic candidate genes. Seven polymorphic candidate genes were then utilized to genotype 148 individuals of CT9993 × IR62266 doubled haploid (DH) mapping population. The segregation data were tested for deviation from the expected Mendelian ratio (1:1) using a Chi-square test (<1%). Based on this, four candidate genes were assessed to be significant and the remaining three, as non-significant. All the significant candidate genes were biased towards CT9993, the female parent in the DH mapping population. Single-marker analysis strongly associated ( < 1%) them to different traits under both well-watered and low-moisture stress conditions. Two candidate genes, EXP15 and EXP13, were found to be associated with root number and silicon content in the stem respectively, under both well-watered and low-moisture stress conditions.

  11. Expression and chromosomal localization of the Requiem gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabig, T G; Crean, C D; Klenk, A; Long, H; Copeland, N G; Gilbert, D J; Jenkins, N A; Quincey, D; Parente, F; Lespinasse, F; Carle, G F; Gaudray, P; Zhang, C X; Calender, A; Hoeppener, J; Kas, K; Thakker, R V; Farnebo, F; Teh, B T; Larsson, C; Piehl, F; Lagercrantz, J; Khodaei, S; Carson, E; Weber, G

    1998-08-01

    Apoptosis in murine myeloid cell lines requires the expression of the Requiem gene, which encodes a putative zinc finger protein. We detected the protein in both cytoplasmic and nuclear subcellular fractions of murine myeloid cells and human K562 leukemia cells, which suggests that the protein might have a function distinct from a transcription factor. This distribution did not alter upon apoptosis induction by IL-3 deprivation. As an approach to investigate its role in development, we determined the spatio-temporal expression pattern in the mouse. Expression was detected in various tissues in earlier gestational age; however, confined to testes, spleen, thymus, and part of the hippocampus in the adult mouse. The expression profile is consistent with a functional role during rapid growth and cell turnover, and in agreement with a regulatory function for hematopoietic cells. The human cDNA clone sequenced showed high homology to its murine counterpart and extended the open reading frame by 20 codons upstream. The gene is located in the proximal region of mouse Chromosome (Chr) 19. In the homologous human region at 11q13, it is located at about 150 kb centromeric from MLK3.

  12. The mouse X chromosome is enriched for multicopy testis genes showing postmeiotic expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Jacob L; Mahadevaiah, Shantha K; Park, Peter J; Warburton, Peter E; Page, David C; Turner, James M A

    2008-06-01

    According to the prevailing view, mammalian X chromosomes are enriched in spermatogenesis genes expressed before meiosis and deficient in spermatogenesis genes expressed after meiosis. The paucity of postmeiotic genes on the X chromosome has been interpreted as a consequence of meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI)--the complete silencing of genes on the XY bivalent at meiotic prophase. Recent studies have concluded that MSCI-initiated silencing persists beyond meiosis and that most genes on the X chromosome remain repressed in round spermatids. Here, we report that 33 multicopy gene families, representing approximately 273 mouse X-linked genes, are expressed in the testis and that this expression is predominantly in postmeiotic cells. RNA FISH and microarray analysis show that the maintenance of X chromosome postmeiotic repression is incomplete. Furthermore, X-linked multicopy genes exhibit a similar degree of expression as autosomal genes. Thus, not only is the mouse X chromosome enriched for spermatogenesis genes functioning before meiosis, but in addition, approximately 18% of mouse X-linked genes are expressed in postmeiotic cells.

  13. Tag SNP selection for candidate gene association studies using HapMap and gene resequencing data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zongli; Kaplan, Norman L; Taylor, Jack A

    2007-10-01

    HapMap provides linkage disequilibrium (LD) information on a sample of 3.7 million SNPs that can be used for tag SNP selection in whole-genome association studies. HapMap can also be used for tag SNP selection in candidate genes, although its performance has yet to be evaluated against gene resequencing data, where there is near-complete SNP ascertainment. The Environmental Genome Project (EGP) is the largest gene resequencing effort to date with over 500 resequenced genes. We used HapMap data to select tag SNPs and calculated the proportions of common SNPs (MAF>or=0.05) tagged (rho2>or=0.8) for each of 127 EGP Panel 2 genes where individual ethnic information was available. Median gene-tagging proportions are 50, 80 and 74% for African, Asian, and European groups, respectively. These low gene-tagging proportions may be problematic for some candidate gene studies. In addition, although HapMap targeted nonsynonymous SNPs (nsSNPs), we estimate only approximately 30% of nonsynonymous SNPs in EGP are in high LD with any HapMap SNP. We show that gene-tagging proportions can be improved by adding a relatively small number of tag SNPs that were selected based on resequencing data. We also demonstrate that ethnic-mixed data can be used to improve HapMap gene-tagging proportions, but are not as efficient as ethnic-specific data. Finally, we generalized the greedy algorithm proposed by Carlson et al (2004) to select tag SNPs for multiple populations and implemented the algorithm into a freely available software package mPopTag.

  14. A wheat homologue of PHYTOCLOCK 1 is a candidate gene conferring the early heading phenotype to einkorn wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuno, Nobuyuki; Nitta, Miyuki; Sato, Kazuhiro; Nasuda, Shuhei

    2012-01-01

    An X-ray mutant showing an early flowering phenotype has been identified in einkorn wheat (Triticum monococcum L.), for which a major QTL for heading time was previously mapped in the telomeric region on the long arm of chromosome 3A. Recent advances in Triticeae genomics revealed that the gene order in this region is highly conserved between wheat and barley. Thus, we adopted a hypothetical gene order in barley, the so-called GenomeZipper, to develop DNA markers for fine mapping the target gene in wheat. We identified three genes tightly linked to the early heading phenotype. PCR analysis revealed that early-flowering is associated with the deletion of two genes in the mutant. Of the two deleted genes, one is an ortholog of the LUX ARRHYTHMO (LUX)/PHYTOCLOCK 1 (PCL1) gene found in Arabidopsis, which regulates the circadian clock and flowering time. We found distorted expression patterns of two clock genes (TOC1 and LHY) in the einkorn pcl1 deletion mutant as was reported for the Arabidopsis lux mutant. Transcript accumulation levels of photoperiod-response related genes, a photoperiod sensitivity gene (Ppd-1) and two wheat CONSTANS-like genes (WCO1 and TaHd1), were significantly higher in the einkorn wheat mutant. In addition, transcripts of the wheat florigen gene (WFT) accumulated temporally under short-day conditions in the einkorn wheat mutant. These results suggest that deletion of WPCL1 leads to abnormally higher expression of Ppd-1, resulting in the accumulation of WFT transcripts that triggers flowering even under short-day conditions. Our observations from gene mapping, gene deletions, and expression levels of flowering related genes strongly suggest that WPCL1 is the most likely candidate gene for controlling the early flowering phenotype in the einkorn wheat mutant.

  15. Cytogenetic Mapping of Disease Resistance Genes and Analysis of Their Distribution Features on Chromosomes in Maize

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LiLi-jia; SongYun-chun

    2003-01-01

    Cytogenetic maps of four clusters of disease resistance genes were generated by ISH of the two RFLP markers tightly linked to and flanking each of maize resistance genes and the cloned resistance genes from other plant species onto maize chromosomes, combining with data published before. These genes include Helminthosporium turcium Pass resistance genes Htl, Htnl and Ht2, Helminthosporium maydis Nisik resistance genes Rhml and Rhm2,maize dwarf mosaic virus resistance gene Mdml, wheat streak mosaic virus resistance gene Wsml, Helminthosporium carbonum ULLstrup resistance gene Hml and the cloned Xanthomonas oryzae pv. Oryzae resistance gene Xa21 of rice, Cladosporium fulvum resistance genes Cf-9 and Cf-2. 1 of tomato, and Pseudomonas syringae resistance gene RPS2 of Arabidopsis. Most of the tested disease resistance genes located on the four chromosomes, i. e. , chromosomesl, 3, 6 and 8, and they closely distributed at the interstitial regions of these chromosomal long arms with percentage distances ranging 31.44(±3.72)-72.40(±3. 25) except for genes Rhml, Rhm2, Mdml and Wsml which mapped on the satellites of the short arms of chromosome6. It showed that the tested RFLP markers and genes were duplicated or triplicated in maize genome. Homology and conservation of disease resistance genes among species, and relationship between distribution features and functions of the genes were discussed. The results provide important scientific basis for deeply understanding structure and function of disease resistance genes and breeding in maize.

  16. Are there tumor suppressor genes on chromosome 4p in sporadic colorectal carcinoma?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hai-Tao Zheng; Li-Xin Jiang; Zhong-Chuan Lv; Da-Peng Li; Chong-Zhi Zhou; Jian-Jun Gao; Lin He; Zhi-Hai Peng

    2008-01-01

    AIM:To study the candidate tumor suppressor genes (TSG) on chromosome 4p by detecting the high frequency of loss of heterozygosity (LOH) in sporadic colorectal carcinoma in Chinese patients. METHODS: Seven fluorescent labeled polymorphic microsatellite markers were analyzed in 83 cases of colorectal carcinoma and matched normal tissue DNA by PCR. PCR products were eletrophoresed on an ABI 377 DNA sequencer. Genescan 3.7 and Genotype 3.7 software were used for LOH scanning and analysis. The same procedure was performed by the other six microsatellite markers spanning D4S3013 locus to make further detailed deletion mapping. Comparison between LOH frequency and clinicopathological factors was performed by . RESULTS: Data were collected from all informative loci.The average LOH frequency on 4p was 24.25%, and 42.3% and 35.62% on D4S405 and D4S3013 locus, respectively. Adjacent markers of D4S3013 displayed a low LOH frequency (< 30%) by detailed deletion mapping. Significant opposite difference was observed between LOH frequency and tumor diameter on D4S412 and D4S1546 locus (0% vs 16.67%, P = 0.041; 54.55% vs 11.11%, P = 0.034, respectively). On D4S403 locus, LOH was significantly associated with tumor gross pattern (11.11%, 0, 33.33%, P = 0.030). No relationship was detected on other loci compared with clinicopathologial features. CONCLUSION: By deletion mapping, two obvious high frequency LOH regions spanning D4S3013 (4p15.2) and D4S405 (4p14) locus are detected. Candidate TSG, which is involved in carcinogenesis and progression of sporadic colorectal carcinoma on chromosome 4p, may be located between D4S3017 and D4S2933 (about 1.7 cm).

  17. Loci and candidate gene identification for resistance to Phytophthora sojae via association analysis in soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lihong; Guo, Na; Niu, Jingping; Wang, Zili; Cui, Xiaoxia; Sun, Jutao; Zhao, Tuanjie; Xing, Han

    2016-06-01

    Phytophthora sojae is an oomycete soil-borne plant pathogen that causes the serious disease Phytophthora root rot in soybean, leading to great loss of soybean production every year. Understanding the genetic basis of this plant-pathogen interaction is important to improve soybean disease resistance. To discover genes or QTLs underlying naturally occurring variations in soybean P.sojae resistance, we performed a genome-wide association study using 59,845 single-nucleotide polymorphisms identified from re-sequencing of 279 accessions from Yangtze-Huai soybean breeding germplasm. We used two models for association analysis. The same strong peak was detected by both two models on chromosome 13. Within the 500-kb flanking regions, three candidate genes (Glyma13g32980, Glyma13g33900, Glyma13g33512) had SNPs in their exon regions. Four other genes were located in this region, two of which contained a leucine-rich repeat domain, which is an important characteristic of R genes in plants. These candidate genes could be potentially useful for improving the resistance of cultivated soybean to P.sojae in future soybean breeding.

  18. Transcriptional profiling of type 1 diabetes genes on chromosome 21 in a rat beta-cell line and human pancreatic islets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergholdt, R.; Karlsen, A.E.; Hagedorn, Peter;

    2007-01-01

    We recently finemapped a type 1 diabetes (T1D)-linked region on chromosome 21, indicating that one or more T1D-linked genes exist in this region with 33 annotated genes. In the current study, we have taken a novel approach using transcriptional profiling in predicting and prioritizing the most...... likely candidate genes influencing beta-cell function in this region. Two array-based approaches were used, a rat insulinoma cell line (INS-1alphabeta) overexpressing pancreatic duodenum homeobox 1 (pdx-1) and treated with interleukin 1beta (IL-1beta) as well as human pancreatic islets stimulated...... with a mixture of cytokines. Several candidate genes with likely functional significance in T1D were identified. Genes showing differential expression in the two approaches were highly similar, supporting the role of these specific gene products in cytokine-induced beta-cell damage. These were genes involved...

  19. Adaptive evolution of genes duplicated from the Drosophila pseudoobscura neo-X chromosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meisel, Richard P; Hilldorfer, Benedict B; Koch, Jessica L; Lockton, Steven; Schaeffer, Stephen W

    2010-08-01

    Drosophila X chromosomes are disproportionate sources of duplicated genes, and these duplications are usually the result of retrotransposition of X-linked genes to the autosomes. The excess duplication is thought to be driven by natural selection for two reasons: X chromosomes are inactivated during spermatogenesis, and the derived copies of retroposed duplications tend to be testis expressed. Therefore, autosomal derived copies of retroposed genes provide a mechanism for their X-linked paralogs to "escape" X inactivation. Once these duplications have fixed, they may then be selected for male-specific functions. Throughout the evolution of the Drosophila genus, autosomes have fused with X chromosomes along multiple lineages giving rise to neo-X chromosomes. There has also been excess duplication from the two independent neo-X chromosomes that have been examined--one that occurred prior to the common ancestor of the willistoni species group and another that occurred along the lineage leading to Drosophila pseudoobscura. To determine what role natural selection plays in the evolution of genes duplicated from the D. pseudoobscura neo-X chromosome, we analyzed DNA sequence divergence between paralogs, polymorphism within each copy, and the expression profiles of these duplicated genes. We found that the derived copies of all duplicated genes have elevated nonsynonymous polymorphism, suggesting that they are under relaxed selective constraints. The derived copies also tend to have testis- or male-biased expression profiles regardless of their chromosome of origin. Genes duplicated from the neo-X chromosome appear to be under less constraints than those duplicated from other chromosome arms. We also find more evidence for historical adaptive evolution in genes duplicated from the neo-X chromosome, suggesting that they are under a unique selection regime in which elevated nonsynonymous polymorphism provides a large reservoir of functional variants, some of which are fixed

  20. Marfan syndrome with a complex chromosomal rearrangement including deletion of the FBN1 gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colovati Mileny ES

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The majority of Marfan syndrome (MFS cases is caused by mutations in the fibrillin-1 gene (FBN1, mapped to chromosome 15q21.1. Only few reports on deletions including the whole FBN1 gene, detected by molecular cytogenetic techniques, were found in literature. Results We report here on a female patient with clinical symptoms of the MFS spectrum plus craniostenosis, hypothyroidism and intellectual deficiency who presents a 1.9 Mb deletion, including the FBN1 gene and a complex rearrangement with eight breakpoints involving chromosomes 6, 12 and 15. Discussion This is the first report of MFS with a complex chromosome rearrangement involving a deletion of FBN1 and contiguous genes. In addition to the typical clinical findings of the Marfan syndrome due to FBN1 gene haploinsufficiency, the patient presents features which may be due to the other gene deletions and possibly to the complex chromosome rearrangement.

  1. Little evidence for demasculinization of the Drosophila X chromosome among genes expressed in the male germline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meiklejohn, Colin D; Presgraves, Daven C

    2012-01-01

    Male-biased genes-those expressed at higher levels in males than in females-are underrepresented on the X chromosome of Drosophila melanogaster. Several evolutionary models have been posited to explain this so-called demasculinization of the X. Here, we show that the apparent paucity of male-biased genes on the X chromosome is attributable to global X-autosome differences in expression in Drosophila testes, owing to a lack of sex chromosome dosage compensation in the male germline, but not to any difference in the density of testis-specific or testis-biased genes on the X chromosome. First, using genome-wide gene expression data from 20 tissues, we find no evidence that genes with testis-specific expression are underrepresented on the X chromosome. Second, using contrasts in gene expression profiles among pairs of tissues, we recover a statistical underrepresentation of testis-biased genes on the X but find that the pattern largely disappears once we account for the lack of dosage compensation in the Drosophila male germline. Third, we find that computationally "demasculinizing" the autosomes is not sufficient to produce an expression profile similar to that of the X chromosome in the testes. Our findings thus show that the lack of sex chromosome dosage compensation in Drosophila testes can explain the apparent signal of demasculinization on the X, whereas evolutionary demasculinization of the X cannot explain its overall reduced expression in the testes.

  2. Position effect modifying gene expression in a patient with ring chromosome 14.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilherme, Roberta Santos; Moysés-Oliveira, Mariana; Dantas, Anelisa Gollo; Meloni, Vera Ayres; Colovati, Mileny Esbravatti; Kulikowski, Leslie Domenici; Melaragno, Maria Isabel

    2016-05-01

    The clinical phenotype of patients with ring chromosomes usually reflects the loss of genomic material during ring formation. However, phenotypic alterations can also be found in the presence of complete ring chromosomes, in which the breakage and rejoining in terminal regions of both chromosome arms result in no gene loss. Here, we present a patient with a ring chromosome 14 that lost nothing but the telomeres. Since he and other patients with a similar chromosome abnormality present certain abnormal characteristics, we investigated the gene expression of eight chromosome 14 genes to find out whether the configuration of the ring had changed it, possibly producing some of these clinical features. The expression of these eight genes was studied by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) in the patient and in seven controls matched for gender and age. Two of them were found to be downregulated in the patient compared to the controls, indicating that his phenotype might be related to alterations in the expression of genes located in the abnormal chromosome, even when the copy number is normal. Thus, the phenotypic alterations found in the presence of complete ring chromosomes may be related to changes in the chromatin architecture, bringing about a change of expression by position effect. These results may explain some of the characteristics presented by our patient.

  3. Affected kindred analysis of human X chromosome exomes to identify novel X-linked intellectual disability genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tejasvi S Niranjan

    Full Text Available X-linked Intellectual Disability (XLID is a group of genetically heterogeneous disorders caused by mutations in genes on the X chromosome. Deleterious mutations in ~10% of X chromosome genes are implicated in causing XLID disorders in ~50% of known and suspected XLID families. The remaining XLID genes are expected to be rare and even private to individual families. To systematically identify these XLID genes, we sequenced the X chromosome exome (X-exome in 56 well-established XLID families (a single affected male from 30 families and two affected males from 26 families using an Agilent SureSelect X-exome kit and the Illumina HiSeq 2000 platform. To enrich for disease-causing mutations, we first utilized variant filters based on dbSNP, the male-restricted portions of the 1000 Genomes Project, or the Exome Variant Server datasets. However, these databases present limitations as automatic filters for enrichment of XLID genes. We therefore developed and optimized a strategy that uses a cohort of affected male kindred pairs and an additional small cohort of affected unrelated males to enrich for potentially pathological variants and to remove neutral variants. This strategy, which we refer to as Affected Kindred/Cross-Cohort Analysis, achieves a substantial enrichment for potentially pathological variants in known XLID genes compared to variant filters from public reference databases, and it has identified novel XLID candidate genes. We conclude that Affected Kindred/Cross-Cohort Analysis can effectively enrich for disease-causing genes in rare, Mendelian disorders, and that public reference databases can be used effectively, but cautiously, as automatic filters for X-linked disorders.

  4. Affected kindred analysis of human X chromosome exomes to identify novel X-linked intellectual disability genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niranjan, Tejasvi S; Skinner, Cindy; May, Melanie; Turner, Tychele; Rose, Rebecca; Stevenson, Roger; Schwartz, Charles E; Wang, Tao

    2015-01-01

    X-linked Intellectual Disability (XLID) is a group of genetically heterogeneous disorders caused by mutations in genes on the X chromosome. Deleterious mutations in ~10% of X chromosome genes are implicated in causing XLID disorders in ~50% of known and suspected XLID families. The remaining XLID genes are expected to be rare and even private to individual families. To systematically identify these XLID genes, we sequenced the X chromosome exome (X-exome) in 56 well-established XLID families (a single affected male from 30 families and two affected males from 26 families) using an Agilent SureSelect X-exome kit and the Illumina HiSeq 2000 platform. To enrich for disease-causing mutations, we first utilized variant filters based on dbSNP, the male-restricted portions of the 1000 Genomes Project, or the Exome Variant Server datasets. However, these databases present limitations as automatic filters for enrichment of XLID genes. We therefore developed and optimized a strategy that uses a cohort of affected male kindred pairs and an additional small cohort of affected unrelated males to enrich for potentially pathological variants and to remove neutral variants. This strategy, which we refer to as Affected Kindred/Cross-Cohort Analysis, achieves a substantial enrichment for potentially pathological variants in known XLID genes compared to variant filters from public reference databases, and it has identified novel XLID candidate genes. We conclude that Affected Kindred/Cross-Cohort Analysis can effectively enrich for disease-causing genes in rare, Mendelian disorders, and that public reference databases can be used effectively, but cautiously, as automatic filters for X-linked disorders.

  5. Chromosomal localization of the gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor gene to human chromosome 4q13. 1-q21. 1 and mouse chromosome 5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaiser, U.B.; Dushkin, H.; Beier, D.R.; Chin, W.W. (Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)); Altherr, M.R. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States))

    1994-04-01

    The gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor (GRHR) is a G-protein-coupled receptor on the cell surface of pituitary gonadotropes, where it serves to transduce signals from the extracellular ligand, the hypothalamic factor gonadotropin-releasing hormone, and to modulate the synthesis and secretion of luteinizing hormone and follicle-stimulating hormone. The authors have localized the GRHR gene to the q13.1-q21.1 region of the human chromosome 4 using mapping panels of human/rodent somatic cell hybrids containing different human chromosomes or different regions of human chromosome 4. Furthermore, using linkage analysis of single-strand conformational polymorphisms, the murine GRHR gene was localized to mouse chromosome 5, linked to the endogenous retroviral marker Pmv-11. This is consistent with the evolutionary conservation of homology between these two regions, as has been previously suggested from comparative mapping of several other loci. The localization of the GRHR gene may be useful in the study of disorders of reproduction. 22 refs., 2 figs.

  6. Colocalization of coregulated genes: a steered molecular dynamics study of human chromosome 19.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Di Stefano

    Full Text Available The connection between chromatin nuclear organization and gene activity is vividly illustrated by the observation that transcriptional coregulation of certain genes appears to be directly influenced by their spatial proximity. This fact poses the more general question of whether it is at all feasible that the numerous genes that are coregulated on a given chromosome, especially those at large genomic distances, might become proximate inside the nucleus. This problem is studied here using steered molecular dynamics simulations in order to enforce the colocalization of thousands of knowledge-based gene sequences on a model for the gene-rich human chromosome 19. Remarkably, it is found that most (≈ 88% gene pairs can be brought simultaneously into contact. This is made possible by the low degree of intra-chromosome entanglement and the large number of cliques in the gene coregulatory network. A clique is a set of genes coregulated all together as a group. The constrained conformations for the model chromosome 19 are further shown to be organized in spatial macrodomains that are similar to those inferred from recent HiC measurements. The findings indicate that gene coregulation and colocalization are largely compatible and that this relationship can be exploited to draft the overall spatial organization of the chromosome in vivo. The more general validity and implications of these findings could be investigated by applying to other eukaryotic chromosomes the general and transferable computational strategy introduced here.

  7. Facts and artifacts in studies of gene expression in aneuploids and sex chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birchler, James A

    2014-10-01

    Studies of gene expression in aneuploids have often made the assumption that measurements of RNA abundance from the varied chromosome will establish whether there is a dosage effect or compensation. Typical procedures of RNA isolation and use of equal amounts of RNA for quantitative estimates will not measure the total transcriptome size nor the absolute expression levels per cell. Use of internal endogenous standards or averages from unvaried chromosomes for normalizations makes the assumption that there are no global modulations across the genome. However, studies that use controls to test these assumptions reveal that there are in fact often modulations on all chromosomes. The same caveats apply to gene expression studies of sex chromosomes, which also involve changes in dosage of a small portion of the genome. Here, we describe some of the pitfalls of studies of aneuploidy and sex chromosome gene expression and review methods that have been used to avoid them.

  8. Chromosomal localization of murine and human oligodendrocyte-specific protein genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bronstein, J.M.; Wu, S.; Korenberg, J.R. [UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States)] [and others

    1996-06-01

    Oligodendrocyte-specific protein (OSP) is a recently described protein present only in myelin of the central nervous system. Several inherited disorders of myelin are caused by mutations in myelin genes but the etiology of many remain unknown. We mapped the location of the mouse OSP gene to the proximal region of chromosome 3 using two sets of multilocus crosses and to human chromosome 3 using somatic cell hybrids. Fine mapping with fluorescence in situ hybridization placed the OSP gene at human chromosome 3q26.2-q26.3. To date, there are no known inherited neurological disorders that localize to these regions. 24 refs., 2 figs.

  9. GeneWiz browser: An Interactive Tool for Visualizing Sequenced Chromosomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hallin, Peter Fischer; Stærfeldt, Hans Henrik; Rotenberg, Eva;

    2009-01-01

    We present an interactive web application for visualizing genomic data of prokaryotic chromosomes. The tool (GeneWiz browser) allows users to carry out various analyses such as mapping alignments of homologous genes to other genomes, mapping of short sequencing reads to a reference chromosome......, and calculating DNA properties such as curvature or stacking energy along the chromosome. The GeneWiz browser produces an interactive graphic that enables zooming from a global scale down to single nucleotides, without changing the size of the plot. Its ability to disproportionally zoom provides optimal...

  10. Sexual differentiation in the developing mouse brain: contributions of sex chromosome genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolstenholme, J T; Rissman, E F; Bekiranov, S

    2013-03-01

    Neural sexual differentiation begins during embryogenesis and continues after birth for a variable amount of time depending on the species and brain region. Because gonadal hormones were the first factors identified in neural sexual differentiation, their role in this process has eclipsed investigation of other factors. Here, we use a mouse with a spontaneous translocation that produces four different unique sets of sex chromosomes. Each genotype has one normal X-chromosome and a unique second sex chromosome creating the following genotypes: XY(*x) , XX, XY(*) , XX(Y) (*) . This Y(*) mouse line is used by several laboratories to study two human aneuploid conditions: Turner and Klinefelter syndromes. As sex chromosome number affects behavior and brain morphology, we surveyed brain gene expression at embryonic days 11.5 and 18.5 to isolate X-chromosome dose effects in the developing brain as possible mechanistic changes underlying the phenotypes. We compared gene expression differences between gonadal males and females as well as individuals with one vs. two X-chromosomes. We present data showing, in addition to genes reported to escape X-inactivation, a number of autosomal genes are differentially expressed between the sexes and in mice with different numbers of X-chromosomes. Based on our results, we can now identify the genes present in the region around the chromosomal break point that produces the Y(*) model. Our results also indicate an interaction between gonadal development and sex chromosome number that could further elucidate the role of sex chromosome genes and hormones in the sexual differentiation of behavior.

  11. Localization to Chromosomes of Structural Genes for the Major Protease Inhibitors of Barley Grains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hejgaard, Jørn; Bjørn, S.E.; Nielsen, Gunnar Gissel

    1984-01-01

    Wheat-barley chromosome addition lines were compared by isoelectric focusing of protein extracts to identify chromosomes carrying loci for the major immunochemically distinct protease inhibitors of barley grains. Structural genes for the following inhibitors were localized: an inhibitor of both...

  12. Cloning, tissue expression pattern, and chromosome localization of human protein kinase Bγ gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Protein kinase B (PKB) is a member of the second messenger-regulated subfamily of protein kinases, and plays a key role in cell-cycle regulation, glucose uptake and promotion of cell differentiation. Evidence shows that PKB undergoes activation in some human tumors and is involved in Ras pathway, which implies that PKB can trigger a pathway to induce oncogenic transformation. A nucleotide sequence of mouse Pkb? was used as a probe to screen homolog in a human liver cDNA library. A fragment of 1998 bp containing a 1440 bp ORF encoding 479 amino acid residues was obtained. Then the 3'-terminal of this fragment was extended to 2788 bp by 'electronic walking' screening, and the extended fragment was confirmed by PCR amplification. The protein deduced by the gene had a high identity of 83% and 78% to the human PKBγ and γ, respectively, and was designated as human PKB?. Northern hybridization detected two equally expressed transcripts of 8.5 and 6.5 kb in length in all 16 human tissues tested, with the highest expression level in brain, and lower levels with variation in the other tissues. By RH mapping, the PKBγ was placed on chromosome 1q43, between markers D1S304 and D1S2693. It is a valuable clue for cloning the candidate genes related to prostate cancer; Arrhythmogenic Right Ventricular Dysplasia (ARVD); Chediak-Higashi, NK cell Deficiency (CHS); and Hypoparathyrodism with Short Stature, Mental Retardation and Seizures which have already been mapped in this chromosomal region.

  13. Molecular genetic gene-environment studies using candidate genes in schizophrenia: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modinos, Gemma; Iyegbe, Conrad; Prata, Diana; Rivera, Margarita; Kempton, Matthew J; Valmaggia, Lucia R; Sham, Pak C; van Os, Jim; McGuire, Philip

    2013-11-01

    The relatively high heritability of schizophrenia suggests that genetic factors play an important role in the etiology of the disorder. On the other hand, a number of environmental factors significantly influence its incidence. As few direct genetic effects have been demonstrated, and there is considerable inter-individual heterogeneity in the response to the known environmental factors, interactions between genetic and environmental factors may be important in determining whether an individual develops the disorder. To date, a considerable number of studies of gene-environment interactions (G×E) in schizophrenia have employed a hypothesis-based molecular genetic approach using candidate genes, which have led to a range of different findings. This systematic review aims to summarize the results from molecular genetic candidate studies and to review challenges and opportunities of this approach in psychosis research. Finally, we discuss the potential of future prospects, such as new studies that combine hypothesis-based molecular genetic candidate approaches with agnostic genome-wide association studies in determining schizophrenia risk.

  14. Utilizing Gene Tree Variation to Identify Candidate Effector Genes in Zymoseptoria tritici

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan C. McDonald

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Zymoseptoria tritici is a host-specific, necrotrophic pathogen of wheat. Infection by Z. tritici is characterized by its extended latent period, which typically lasts 2 wks, and is followed by extensive host cell death, and rapid proliferation of fungal biomass. This work characterizes the level of genomic variation in 13 isolates, for which we have measured virulence on 11 wheat cultivars with differential resistance genes. Between the reference isolate, IPO323, and the 13 Australian isolates we identified over 800,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms, of which ∼10% had an effect on the coding regions of the genome. Furthermore, we identified over 1700 probable presence/absence polymorphisms in genes across the Australian isolates using de novo assembly. Finally, we developed a gene tree sorting method that quickly identifies groups of isolates within a single gene alignment whose sequence haplotypes correspond with virulence scores on a single wheat cultivar. Using this method, we have identified < 100 candidate effector genes whose gene sequence correlates with virulence toward a wheat cultivar carrying a major resistance gene.

  15. Candidate genes associated with testicular development, sperm quality, and hormone levels of inhibin, luteinizing hormone, and insulin-like growth factor 1 in Brahman bulls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortes, Marina R S; Reverter, Antonio; Hawken, Rachel J; Bolormaa, Sunduimijid; Lehnert, Sigrid A

    2012-09-01

    Bull fertility is an important target for genetic improvement, and early prediction using genetic markers is therefore a goal for livestock breeding. We performed genome-wide association studies to identify genes associated with fertility traits measured in young bulls. Data from 1118 Brahman bulls were collected for six traits: blood hormone levels of inhibin (IN) at 4 mo, luteinizing hormone (LH) following a gonadotropin-releasing hormone challenge at 4 mo, and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) at 6 mo, scrotal circumference (SC) at 12 mo, ability to produce sperm (Sperm) at 18 mo, and percentage of normal sperm (PNS) at 24 mo. All the bulls were genotyped with the BovineSNP50 chip. Sires and dams of the bull population (n = 304) were genotyped with the high-density chip (∼800 000 polymorphisms) to allow for imputation, thereby contributing detail on genome regions of interest. Polymorphism associations were discovered for all traits, except for Sperm. Chromosome 2 harbored polymorphisms associated with IN. For LH, associated polymorphisms were located in five different chromosomes. A region of chromosome 14 contained polymorphisms associated with IGF1 and SC. Regions of the X chromosome showed associations with SC and PNS. Associated polymorphisms yielded candidate genes in chromosomes 2, 14, and X. These findings will contribute to the development of genetic markers to help select cattle with improved fertility and will lead to better annotation of gene function in the context of reproductive biology.

  16. Gene mutations and genomic rearrangements in the mouse as a result of transposon mobilization from chromosomal concatemers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aron M Geurts

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies of the Sleeping Beauty (SB transposon system, as an insertional mutagen in the germline of mice, have used reverse genetic approaches. These studies have led to its proposed use for regional saturation mutagenesis by taking a forward-genetic approach. Thus, we used the SB system to mutate a region of mouse Chromosome 11 in a forward-genetic screen for recessive lethal and viable phenotypes. This work represents the first reported use of an insertional mutagen in a phenotype-driven approach. The phenotype-driven approach was successful in both recovering visible and behavioral mutants, including dominant limb and recessive behavioral phenotypes, and allowing for the rapid identification of candidate gene disruptions. In addition, a high frequency of recessive lethal mutations arose as a result of genomic rearrangements near the site of transposition, resulting from transposon mobilization. The results suggest that the SB system could be used in a forward-genetic approach to recover interesting phenotypes, but that local chromosomal rearrangements should be anticipated in conjunction with single-copy, local transposon insertions in chromosomes. Additionally, these mice may serve as a model for chromosome rearrangements caused by transposable elements during the evolution of vertebrate genomes.

  17. Mapping of Candidate Genes Involved in Bud Dormancy and Flowering Time in Sweet Cherry (Prunus avium).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castède, Sophie; Campoy, José Antonio; Le Dantec, Loïck; Quero-García, José; Barreneche, Teresa; Wenden, Bénédicte; Dirlewanger, Elisabeth

    2015-01-01

    The timing of flowering in perennial plants is crucial for their survival in temperate climates and is regulated by the duration of bud dormancy. Bud dormancy release and bud break depend on the perception of cumulative chilling during endodormancy and heat during the bud development. The objectives of this work were to identify candidate genes involved in dormancy and flowering processes in sweet cherry, their mapping in two mapping progenies 'Regina' × 'Garnet' and 'Regina' × 'Lapins', and to select those candidate genes which co-localized with quantitative trait loci (QTLs) associated with temperature requirements for bud dormancy release and flowering. Based on available data on flowering processes in various species, a list of 79 candidate genes was established. The peach and sweet cherry orthologs were identified and primers were designed to amplify sweet cherry candidate gene fragments. Based on the amplified sequences of the three parents of the mapping progenies, SNPs segregations in the progenies were identified. Thirty five candidate genes were genetically mapped in at least one of the two progenies and all were in silico mapped. Co-localization between candidate genes and QTLs associated with temperature requirements and flowering date were identified for the first time in sweet cherry. The allelic composition of the candidate genes located in the major QTL for heat requirements and flowering date located on linkage group 4 have a significant effect on these two traits indicating their potential use for breeding programs in sweet cherry to select new varieties adapted to putative future climatic conditions.

  18. Identification of candidate methylation-responsive genes in ovarian cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dickerson Erin B

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aberrant methylation of gene promoter regions has been linked to changes in gene expression in cancer development and progression. Genes associated with CpG islands (CGIs are especially prone to methylation, but not all CGI-associated genes display changes in methylation patterns in cancers. Results In order to identify genes subject to regulation by methylation, we conducted gene expression profile analyses of an ovarian cancer cell line (OVCAR-3 before and after treatment with the demethylating agent 5-aza-deoxycytidine (5-aza-dC. An overlapping subset of these genes was found to display significant differences in gene expression between normal ovarian surface epithelial cells and malignant cells isolated from ovarian carcinomas. While 40% of all human genes are associated with CGIs, > 94% of the overlapping subset of genes is associated with CGIs. The predicted change in methylation status of genes randomly selected from the overlapping subset was experimentally verified. Conclusion We conclude that correlating genes that are upregulated in response to 5-aza-dC treatment of cancer cell lines with genes that are down-regulated in cancer cells may be a useful method to identify genes experiencing epigenetic-mediated changes in expression over cancer development.

  19. A locus on porcine chromosome 13 harboring the MyRIP gene is associated with development of PMWS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlskov-Mortensen, Peter

    Post-weaning multisystemic wasting syndrome (PMWS) has spread dramatically among pigs over the last years with devastating consequences for animal welfare and great economic losses for farmers. Porcine circovirus 2 (PCV2) is the necessary causal infectious agent of PMWS, but other factors...... to microsatellite markers KVL3525 and KVL3526 on porcine chromosome 13 is associated with PMWS development. This was subsequently confirmed by an association study in which KVL3525 was found to be associated with development of PMWS. KVL3525 is located in the middle of the MyRIP gene. This gene encodes a protein...... involved in transport of vesicles in the cytosol. It is an interesting candidate gene because a number of studies have shown that impaired transport and accumulation of PCV2 in cells of the innate immune system may be an important factor in PMWS pathogenesis. We sequenced MyRIP in PMWS affected...

  20. Evolutionarily diverged regulation of X-chromosomal genes as a primal event in mouse reproductive isolation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oka, Ayako; Takada, Toyoyuki; Fujisawa, Hironori; Shiroishi, Toshihiko

    2014-04-01

    Improper gene regulation is implicated in reproductive isolation, but its genetic and molecular bases are unknown. We previously reported that a mouse inter-subspecific X chromosome substitution strain shows reproductive isolation characterized by male-specific sterility due to disruption of meiotic entry in spermatogenesis. Here, we conducted comprehensive transcriptional profiling of the testicular cells of this strain by microarray. The results clearly revealed gross misregulation of gene expression in the substituted donor X chromosome. Such misregulation occurred prior to detectable spermatogenetic impairment, suggesting that it is a primal event in reproductive isolation. The misregulation of X-linked genes showed asymmetry; more genes were disproportionally downregulated rather than upregulated. Furthermore, this misregulation subsequently resulted in perturbation of global transcriptional regulation of autosomal genes, probably by cascading deleterious effects. Remarkably, this transcriptional misregulation was substantially restored by introduction of chromosome 1 from the same donor strain as the X chromosome. This finding implies that one of regulatory genes acting in trans for X-linked target genes is located on chromosome 1. This study collectively suggests that regulatory incompatibility is a major cause of reproductive isolation in the X chromosome substitution strain.

  1. Emergence of male-biased genes on the chicken Z-chromosome: sex-chromosome contrasts between male and female heterogametic systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellegren, Hans

    2011-12-01

    There has been extensive traffic of male-biased genes out of the mammalian and Drosophila X-chromosomes, and there are also reports of an under-representation of male-biased genes on the X. This may reflect an adaptive process driven by natural selection where an autosomal location of male-biased genes is favored since male genes are only exposed to selection one-third of the time when X-linked. However, there are several alternative explanations to "out-of-the-X" gene movement, including mutational bias and a means for X-linked genes to escape meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI) during spermatogenesis. As a critical test of the hypothesis that genomic relocation of sex-biased genes is an adaptive process, I examined the emergence, and loss, of genes on the chicken Z-chromosome, i.e., a female heterogametic system (males ZZ, females ZW). Here, the analogous prediction would be an emergence of male-biased genes onto, not a loss from, the Z-chromosome because Z is found more often in males than autosomes are. I found that genes expressed in testis but not in ovary are highly over-represented among genes that have emerged on the Z-chromosome during avian evolution. Moreover, genes with male-biased expression are similarly over-represented among new Z-chromosomal genes. Interestingly, genes with female-biased expression have more often moved from than to the Z-chromosome. These observations show that male and female heterogametic organisms display opposing directionalities in the emergence and loss of sex-biased genes on sex chromosomes. This is consistent with theoretical models on the evolution of sexually antagonistic genes in which new mutations are at least partly dominant.

  2. Cytogenetic Mapping of Disease Resistance Genes and Analysis of Their Distribution Features on Chromosomes in Maize

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Li-jia; Song Yun-chun

    2003-01-01

    Cytogenetic maps of four clusters of disease resistance genes were generated by ISH of the two RFLP markers tightly linked to and flanking each of maize resistance genes and the cloned resistance genes from other plant species onto maize chromosomes, combining with data published before. These genes include Helminthosporium turcium Pass resistance genes Ht1, Htn1 and Ht2, Helminthosporium maydis Nisik resistance genes Rhm1 and Rhm2, maize dwarf mosaic virus resistance gene Mdm1, wheat streak mosaic virus resistance gene Wsm1, Helminthosporium carbonum ULLstrup resistance gene Hml and the cloned Xanthomonas oryzae pv. Oryzae resistance gene Xa21 of rice, Cladosporium fulvum resistance genes Cf-9 and Cf-2.1 of tomato,and Pseudomonas syringae resistance gene RPS2 of Arabidopsis. Most of the tested disease resistance genes located on the four chromosomes, i.e., chromosomes1, 3, 6 and 8, and they closely distributed at the interstitial regions of these chromosomal long arms with percentage distances ranging 31.44(±3.72)-72.40(±3.25) except for genes Rhm1, Rhm2, Mdm1 and Wsm1 which mapped on the satellites of the short arms of chromosome6. It showed that the tested RFLP markers and genes were duplicated or triplicated in maize genome. Homology and conservation of disease resistance genes among species, and relationship between distribution features and functions of the genes were discussed. The results provide important scientific basis for deeply understanding structure and function of disease resistance genes and breeding in maize.

  3. Mapping of a liver phosphorylase kinase [alpha]-subunit gene on the mouse x chromosome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geng, Yan; Derry, J.M.J.; Barnard, P.J. (MRC Molecular Neurobiology Unit, Cambridge (United Kingdom)); Hendrickx, J.; Coucke, P.; Willems, P.R. (Univ. of Antwerp (Belgium))

    1993-01-01

    Phosphorylase kinase (PHK) is a regulatory enzyme of the glycogenolytic pathway composed of a complex of four subunits. We recently mapped the muscle [alpha]-subunit gene (Phka) to the mouse X chromosome in a region syntenic with the proximal long arm of the human X chromosome and containing the human homologue of this gene, PHKA. We now report the mapping of the liver [alpha]-subunit gene to the telomeric end of the mouse X chromosome. This mapping position would suggest a location for the human liver [alpha]-subunit gene on the proximal short arm of the X chromosome, a region recently implicated in X-linked liver glycogenosis (XLG). 20 refs., 2 figs.

  4. Degrees of separation as a statistical tool for evaluating candidate genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Ronald M; Pettersson, Mats E

    2014-12-01

    Selection of candidate genes is an important step in the exploration of complex genetic architecture. The number of gene networks available is increasing and these can provide information to help with candidate gene selection. It is currently common to use the degree of connectedness in gene networks as validation in Genome Wide Association (GWA) and Quantitative Trait Locus (QTL) mapping studies. However, it can cause misleading results if not validated properly. Here we present a method and tool for validating the gene pairs from GWA studies given the context of the network they co-occur in. It ensures that proposed interactions and gene associations are not statistical artefacts inherent to the specific gene network architecture. The CandidateBacon package provides an easy and efficient method to calculate the average degree of separation (DoS) between pairs of genes to currently available gene networks. We show how these empirical estimates of average connectedness are used to validate candidate gene pairs. Validation of interacting genes by comparing their connectedness with the average connectedness in the gene network will provide support for said interactions by utilising the growing amount of gene network information available.

  5. Functional validation of GWAS gene candidates for abnormal liver function during zebrafish liver development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leah Y. Liu

    2013-09-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS have revealed numerous associations between many phenotypes and gene candidates. Frequently, however, further elucidation of gene function has not been achieved. A recent GWAS identified 69 candidate genes associated with elevated liver enzyme concentrations, which are clinical markers of liver disease. To investigate the role of these genes in liver homeostasis, we narrowed down this list to 12 genes based on zebrafish orthology, zebrafish liver expression and disease correlation. To assess the function of gene candidates during liver development, we assayed hepatic progenitors at 48 hours post fertilization (hpf and hepatocytes at 72 hpf using in situ hybridization following morpholino knockdown in zebrafish embryos. Knockdown of three genes (pnpla3, pklr and mapk10 decreased expression of hepatic progenitor cells, whereas knockdown of eight genes (pnpla3, cpn1, trib1, fads2, slc2a2, pklr, mapk10 and samm50 decreased cell-specific hepatocyte expression. We then induced liver injury in zebrafish embryos using acetaminophen exposure and observed changes in liver toxicity incidence in morphants. Prioritization of GWAS candidates and morpholino knockdown expedites the study of newly identified genes impacting liver development and represents a feasible method for initial assessment of candidate genes to instruct further mechanistic analyses. Our analysis can be extended to GWAS for additional disease-associated phenotypes.

  6. Chromosomal mapping of the structural gene coding for the mouse cell adhesion molecule uvomorulin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eistetter, H.R.; Adolph, S.; Ringwald, M.; Simon-Chazottes, D.; Schuh, R.; Guenet, J.L.; Kemler, R. (Max-Planck-Gesellschaft, Tuebingen (West Germany))

    1988-05-01

    The gene coding for the mouse cell adhesion molecule uvomorulin has been mapped to chromosome 8. Uvomorulin cDNA clone F5H3 identified restriction fragment length polymorphisms in Southern blots of genomic DNA from mouse species Mus musculus domesticus and Mus spretus. By analyzing the segregation pattern of the gene in 75 offspring from an interspecific backcross a single genetic locus, Um, was defined on chromosome 8. Recombination frequency between Um and the co-segregating loci serum esterase 1 (Es-1) and tyrosine aminotransferase (Tat) places Um about 14 centimorgan (cM) distal to Es-1, and 5 cM proximal to Tat. In situ hybridization of uvomorulin ({sup 3}H)cDNA to mouse metaphase chromosomes located the Um locus close to the distal end of chromosome 8 (bands C3-E1). Since uvomorulin is evolutionarily highly conserved, its chromosomal assignment adds an important marker to the mouse genetic map.

  7. Components of Genetic Variation Associated with Second and Third Chromosome Gene Arrangements in Drosophila melanogaster

    OpenAIRE

    Ferrari, James A.

    1987-01-01

    The effects of naturally occuring combinations of second and third chromosome gene arrangements of Drosophila melanogaster on two quantitative traits were partitioned into parameters of additive, dominance and interaction components of genetic variation. Development time and preadult survival of the gene arrangement genotypes were measured under four experimental conditions. Gene arrangement effects, when significant, were predominantly additive under all conditions. Experimental conditions, ...

  8. Gene-gene interaction between tuberculosis candidate genes in a South African population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Wit, Erika; van der Merwe, Lize; van Helden, Paul D; Hoal, Eileen G

    2011-02-01

    In a complex disease such as tuberculosis (TB) it is increasingly evident that gene-gene interactions play a far more important role in an individual's susceptibility to develop the disease than single polymorphisms on their own, as one gene can enhance or hinder the expression of another gene. Gene-gene interaction analysis is a new approach to elucidate susceptibility to TB. The possibility of gene-gene interactions was assessed, focusing on 11 polymorphisms in nine genes (DC-SIGN, IFN-γ, IFNGR1, IL-8, IL-1Ra, MBL, NRAMP1, RANTES, and SP-D) that have been associated with TB, some repeatedly. An optimal model, which best describes and predicts TB case-control status, was constructed. Significant interactions were detected between eight pairs of variants. The models fitted the observed data extremely well, with p activation is greatly enhanced by IFN-γ and IFN-γ response elements that are present in the human NRAMP1 promoter region, providing further evidence for their interaction. This study enabled us to test the theory that disease outcome may be due to interaction of several gene effects. With eight instances of statistically significant gene-gene interactions, the importance of epistasis is clearly identifiable in this study. Methods for studying gene-gene interactions are based on a multilocus and multigene approach, consistent with the nature of complex-trait diseases, and may provide the paradigm for future genetic studies of TB.

  9. Validation of Candidate Causal Genes for Abdominal Obesity Which Affect Shared Metabolic Pathways and Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Xia; Deignan, Joshua L; Qi, Hongxiu; Zhu, Jun; Qian, Su; Zhong, Judy; Torosyan, Gevork; Majid, Sana; Falkard, Brie; Kleinhanz, Robert R; Karlsson, Jenny; Castellani, Lawrence W.; Mumick, Sheena; Wang, Kai; Xie, Tao

    2009-01-01

    A major task in dissecting the genetics of complex traits is to identify causal genes for disease phenotypes. We previously developed a method to infer causal relationships among genes through the integration of DNA variation, gene transcription, and phenotypic information. Here we validated our method through the characterization of transgenic and knockout mouse models of candidate genes that were predicted to be causal for abdominal obesity. Perturbation of eight out of the nine genes, with...

  10. [From gene to disease; deletion of the DAZ-gene from the Y-chromosome in oligo- or azoospermia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tuerlings, J.H.A.M.; Hoefsloot, L.H.; Kremer, J.A.M.

    2001-01-01

    DAZ gene deletions at the azoospermia factor (AZF) locus on the Y chromosome, have been implicated as one of the major causes of idiopathic male subfertility. Deletions of the entire DAZ gene have been reported in azoospermia as well as in oligozoospermia. The DAZ gene encodes a RNA binding protein

  11. SPAG7 is a candidate gene for the periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis and adenopathy (PFAPA) syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bens, S; Zichner, T; Stütz, A M; Caliebe, A; Wagener, R; Hoff, K; Korbel, J O; von Bismarck, P; Siebert, R

    2014-01-01

    Periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis and adenopathy (PFAPA) syndrome is an auto-inflammatory disease for which a genetic basis has been postulated. Nevertheless, in contrast to the other periodic fever syndromes, no candidate genes have yet been identified. By cloning, following long insert size paired-end sequencing, of a de novo chromosomal translocation t(10;17)(q11.2;p13) in a patient with typical PFAPA syndrome lacking mutations in genes associated with other periodic fever syndromes we identified SPAG7 as a candidate gene for PFAPA. SPAG7 protein is expressed in tissues affected by PFAPA and has been functionally linked to antiviral and inflammatory responses. Haploinsufficiency of SPAG7 due to a microdeletion at the translocation breakpoint leading to loss of exons 2-7 from one allele was associated with PFAPA in the index. Sequence analyses of SPAG7 in additional patients with PFAPA point to genetic heterogeneity or alternative mechanisms of SPAG7 deregulation, such as somatic or epigenetic changes.

  12. Quantitative Trait Loci and Candidate Genes for Neutrophil Recruitment in Sterile Inflammation Mapped in AXB-BXA Recombinant Inbred Mice.

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    Quyen Cheng

    Full Text Available Neutrophil recruitment (NR to sites of sterile inflammation plays a key role in tissue damage and healing potential of lesions characteristic to non-infectious inflammatory diseases. Previous studies suggested significant genetic control of neutrophil survival, function, and migration in inflammatory responses to endogenous and exogenous stimuli. We have mapped the murine genome for quantitative trait loci (QTLs harbouring genetic determinants that regulate NR in SI using a murine model of chemically-induced peritonitis. NR was quantified in 16 AXB-BXA recombinant inbred strains and their progenitors, A/J (A and C57BL/6J (B. A continuous distribution of NR was found among the strains, with parent B showing higher NR and parent A showing lower NR (3.0-fold difference, p=0.05. Within the progeny strains, a 5.5-fold difference in NR was observed between the lowest, BXA1, and the highest responders AXB19 (p<0.001. This data was analyzed using GeneNetwork, which linked NR to one significant QTL on chromosome 12 (Peritoneal Neutrophil Recruitment 1, PNR1 and two suggestive QTLs (PNR2, PNR3 on chromosomes 12 and 16 respectively. Sixty-four candidate genes within PNR1 were cross-referenced with currently published data, mRNA expression from two NR microarrays, and single nucleotide polymorphism analysis. The present study brings new light into the genetics of NR in response to cell injury and highlights potential candidate genes Hif1α, Fntb, and Prkch and their products for further studies on neutrophil infiltration and inflammation resolution in sterile inflammation.

  13. Candidate gene prioritization by network analysis of differential expression using machine learning approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nitsch Daniela

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Discovering novel disease genes is still challenging for diseases for which no prior knowledge - such as known disease genes or disease-related pathways - is available. Performing genetic studies frequently results in large lists of candidate genes of which only few can be followed up for further investigation. We have recently developed a computational method for constitutional genetic disorders that identifies the most promising candidate genes by replacing prior knowledge by experimental data of differential gene expression between affected and healthy individuals. To improve the performance of our prioritization strategy, we have extended our previous work by applying different machine learning approaches that identify promising candidate genes by determining whether a gene is surrounded by highly differentially expressed genes in a functional association or protein-protein interaction network. Results We have proposed three strategies scoring disease candidate genes relying on network-based machine learning approaches, such as kernel ridge regression, heat kernel, and Arnoldi kernel approximation. For comparison purposes, a local measure based on the expression of the direct neighbors is also computed. We have benchmarked these strategies on 40 publicly available knockout experiments in mice, and performance was assessed against results obtained using a standard procedure in genetics that ranks candidate genes based solely on their differential expression levels (Simple Expression Ranking. Our results showed that our four strategies could outperform this standard procedure and that the best results were obtained using the Heat Kernel Diffusion Ranking leading to an average ranking position of 8 out of 100 genes, an AUC value of 92.3% and an error reduction of 52.8% relative to the standard procedure approach which ranked the knockout gene on average at position 17 with an AUC value of 83.7%. Conclusion In this study we

  14. Identification of candidate genes in osteoporosis by integrated microarray analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Li, J J; Wang, B. Q.; Fei, Q.; Yang, Y; Li, D.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives In order to screen the altered gene expression profile in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of patients with osteoporosis, we performed an integrated analysis of the online microarray studies of osteoporosis. Methods We searched the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) database for microarray studies of peripheral blood mononuclear cells in patients with osteoporosis. Subsequently, we integrated gene expression data sets from multiple microarray studies to obtain differentially expressed...

  15. Gentrepid V2.0: A web server for candidate disease gene prediction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ballouz, S.; Liu, J.Y.; George, R.A.; Bains, N.; Liu, A.; Oti, M.O.; Gaeta, B.; Fatkin, D.; Wouters, M.A.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Candidate disease gene prediction is a rapidly developing area of bioinformatics research with the potential to deliver great benefits to human health. As experimental studies detecting associations between genetic intervals and disease proliferate, better bioinformatic techniques that c

  16. Defining a new candidate gene for amelogenesis imperfecta: from molecular genetics to biochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urzúa, Blanca; Ortega-Pinto, Ana; Morales-Bozo, Irene; Rojas-Alcayaga, Gonzalo; Cifuentes, Víctor

    2011-02-01

    Amelogenesis imperfecta is a group of genetic conditions that affect the structure and clinical appearance of tooth enamel. The types (hypoplastic, hypocalcified, and hypomature) are correlated with defects in different stages of the process of enamel synthesis. Autosomal dominant, recessive, and X-linked types have been previously described. These disorders are considered clinically and genetically heterogeneous in etiology, involving a variety of genes, such as AMELX, ENAM, DLX3, FAM83H, MMP-20, KLK4, and WDR72. The mutations identified within these causal genes explain less than half of all cases of amelogenesis imperfecta. Most of the candidate and causal genes currently identified encode proteins involved in enamel synthesis. We think it is necessary to refocus the search for candidate genes using biochemical processes. This review provides theoretical evidence that the human SLC4A4 gene (sodium bicarbonate cotransporter) may be a new candidate gene.

  17. Chromosomal mapping, gene structure and characterization of the human and murine RAB27B gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huxley Clare

    2001-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rab GTPases are regulators of intracellular membrane traffic. The Rab27 subfamily consists of Rab27a and Rab27b. Rab27a has been recently implicated in Griscelli Disease, a disease combining partial albinism with severe immunodeficiency. Rab27a plays a key role in the function of lysosomal-like organelles such as melanosomes in melanocytes and lytic granules in cytotoxic T lymphocytes. Little is known about Rab27b. Results The human RAB27B gene is organised in six exons, spanning about 69 kb in the chromosome 18q21.1 region. Exon 1 is non-coding and is separated from the others by 49 kb of DNA and exon 6 contains a long 3' untranslated sequence (6.4 kb. The mouse Rab27b cDNA shows 95% identity with the human cDNA at the protein level and maps to mouse chromosome 18. The mouse mRNA was detected in stomach, large intestine, spleen and eye by RT-PCR, and in heart, brain, spleen and kidney by Northern blot. Transient over-expression of EGF-Rab27b fusion protein in cultured melanocytes revealed that Rab27b is associated with melanosomes, as observed for EGF-Rab27a. Conclusions Our results indicate that the Rab27 subfamily of Ras-like GTPases is highly conserved in mammals. There is high degree of conservation in sequence and gene structure between RAB27A and RAB27B genes. Exogenous expression of Rab27b in melanocytes results in melanosomal association as observed for Rab27a, suggesting the two Rab27 proteins are functional homologues. As with RAB27A in Griscelli Disease, RAB27B may be also associated with human disease mapping to chromosome 18.

  18. Candidate gene analysis and exome sequencing confirm LBX1 as a susceptibility gene for idiopathic scoliosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grauers, Anna; Wang, Jingwen; Einarsdottir, Elisabet;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND CONTEXT: Idiopathic scoliosis is a spinal deformity affecting approximately 3% of otherwise healthy children or adolescents. The etiology is still largely unknown but has an important genetic component. Genome-wide association studies have identified a number of common genetic variants...... that are significantly associated with idiopathic scoliosis in Asian and Caucasian populations, rs11190870 close to the LBX1 gene being the most replicated finding. PURPOSE: The aim of the present study was to investigate the genetics of idiopathic scoliosis in a Scandinavian cohort by performing a candidate gene study...... of four variants previously shown to be associated with idiopathic scoliosis and exome sequencing of idiopathic scoliosis patients with a severe phenotype to identify possible novel scoliosis risk variants. STUDY DESIGN: This was a case control study. PATIENT SAMPLE: A total of 1,739 patients...

  19. Age-dependent chromosomal distribution of male-biased genes in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yong E; Vibranovski, Maria D; Krinsky, Benjamin H; Long, Manyuan

    2010-11-01

    We investigated the correlation between the chromosomal location and age distribution of new male-biased genes formed by duplications via DNA intermediates (DNA-level) or by de novo origination in Drosophila. Our genome-wide analysis revealed an excess of young X-linked male-biased genes. The proportion of X-linked male-biased genes then diminishes through time, leading to an autosomal excess of male-biased genes. The switch between X-linked and autosomal enrichment of male-biased genes was also present in the distribution of both protein-coding genes on the D. pseudoobscura neo-X chromosome and microRNA genes of D. melanogaster. These observations revealed that the evolution of male-biased genes is more complicated than the previously detected one-step X→A gene traffic and the enrichment of the male-biased genes on autosomes. The pattern we detected suggests that the interaction of various evolutionary forces such as the meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI), faster-X effect, and sexual antagonism in the male germline might have shaped the chromosomal distribution of male-biased genes on different evolutionary time scales.

  20. Assessment of osteoarthritis candidate genes in a meta-analysis of nine genome-wide association studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Rodriguez-Fontenla (Cristina); M. Calaza (Manuel); E. Evangelou (Evangelos); A.M. Valdes (Ana Maria); N.K. Arden (Nigel); F.J. Blanco; A.J. Carr (Andrew Jonathan); K. Chapman (Kay); P. Deloukas (Panagiotis); M. Doherty (Michael); T. Esko (Tõnu); C.M. Garcés Aletá (Carlos); J.J. Gomez-Reino Carnota (Juan); H.T. Helgadottir (Hafdis); A. Hofman (Albert); I. Jonsdottir (Ingileif); J.M. Kerkhof (Hanneke); M. Kloppenburg (Margreet); A. McCaskie (Andrew); E.E. Ntzani (Evangelia); W.E.R. Ollier (William); N. Oreiro (Natividad); K. Panoutsopoulou (Kalliope); S.H. Ralston (Stuart); Y.F.M. Ramos (Yolande); J.A. Riancho (José); F. Rivadeneira Ramirez (Fernando); P.E. Slagboom (Eline); U. Styrkarsdottir (Unnur); U. Thorsteinsdottir (Unnur); G. Thorleifsson (Gudmar); A. Tsezou (Aspasia); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); G.A. Wallis (Gillian); J.M. Wilkinson (Mark); G. Zhai (Guangju); Y. Zhu (Yanyan); D. Felson; J.P.A. Ioannidis (John); J. Loughlin (John); A. Metspalu (Andres); I. Meulenbelt (Ingrid); J-A. Zwart (John-Anker); J.B.J. van Meurs (Joyce); E. Zeggini (Eleftheria); T.D. Spector (Timothy); A. Gonzalez (Antonio)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractObjective To assess candidate genes for association with osteoarthritis (OA) and identify promising genetic factors and, secondarily, to assess the candidate gene approach in OA. Methods A total of 199 candidate genes for association with OA were identified using Human Genome Epidemiolog

  1. Chromosomal localization of the major ribosomal RNA genes in scallop Chlamys farreri

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Xiaoting; BAO Zhenmin; BI Ke; HU Jingjie; ZHANG Can; ZHANG Quanqi; HU Xiaoli

    2006-01-01

    The chromosomes of Chlamys farreri were analyzed by means of silver staining and fluorescence in situ hybridization ( FISH ) with 18S-28S rDNA probe. Probe was made by PCR amplification of a DNA fragment containing internal transcribed spacers ITS1 between 18S and 5.8S ribosomal RNA gene, ITS2 between 5.8S and 28S ribosomal RNA gene and 5.8S rRNA gene, and labeled by PCR incorporation of bio-16-dUTP. FISH signals were located on the short arm of subtelocentric chromosome 10. After silverstaining, nucleolus organizer regions (NORs) could be observed on the telomere of the short arm of chromosome 10. However,one metaphase spread displayed an additional silver spot on the short arm of subtelocentric chromosome 12.

  2. Altered cohesin gene dosage affects Mammalian meiotic chromosome structure and behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murdoch, Brenda; Owen, Nichole; Stevense, Michelle; Smith, Helen; Nagaoka, So; Hassold, Terry; McKay, Michael; Xu, Huiling; Fu, Jun; Revenkova, Ekaterina; Jessberger, Rolf; Hunt, Patricia

    2013-01-01

    Based on studies in mice and humans, cohesin loss from chromosomes during the period of protracted meiotic arrest appears to play a major role in chromosome segregation errors during female meiosis. In mice, mutations in meiosis-specific cohesin genes cause meiotic disturbances and infertility. However, the more clinically relevant situation, heterozygosity for mutations in these genes, has not been evaluated. We report here evidence from the mouse that partial loss of gene function for either Smc1b or Rec8 causes perturbations in the formation of the synaptonemal complex (SC) and affects both synapsis and recombination between homologs during meiotic prophase. Importantly, these defects increase the frequency of chromosomally abnormal eggs in the adult female. These findings have important implications for humans: they suggest that women who carry mutations or variants that affect cohesin function have an elevated risk of aneuploid pregnancies and may even be at increased risk of transmitting structural chromosome abnormalities.

  3. Altered cohesin gene dosage affects Mammalian meiotic chromosome structure and behavior.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brenda Murdoch

    Full Text Available Based on studies in mice and humans, cohesin loss from chromosomes during the period of protracted meiotic arrest appears to play a major role in chromosome segregation errors during female meiosis. In mice, mutations in meiosis-specific cohesin genes cause meiotic disturbances and infertility. However, the more clinically relevant situation, heterozygosity for mutations in these genes, has not been evaluated. We report here evidence from the mouse that partial loss of gene function for either Smc1b or Rec8 causes perturbations in the formation of the synaptonemal complex (SC and affects both synapsis and recombination between homologs during meiotic prophase. Importantly, these defects increase the frequency of chromosomally abnormal eggs in the adult female. These findings have important implications for humans: they suggest that women who carry mutations or variants that affect cohesin function have an elevated risk of aneuploid pregnancies and may even be at increased risk of transmitting structural chromosome abnormalities.

  4. Location of 45S Ribosomal Genes in Mitotic and Meiotic Chromosomes of Buthid Scorpions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattos, Viviane Fagundes; Carvalho, Leonardo Sousa; Cella, Doralice Maria; Schneider, Marielle Cristina

    2014-09-01

    Buthid scorpions exhibit a high variability in diploid number within genera and even within species. Cytogenetically, Buthidae differs from other families of Scorpiones based on its low diploid numbers, holocentric chromosomes, and complex chromosomal chains, which form during meiosis. In this study, we analyzed the distribution of the 45S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) genes in the mitotic and meiotic chromosomes of seven buthid species belonging to the genera Rhopalurus and Tityus with the ultimate goal of elucidating the chromosome organization in these scorpions. The chromosome number ranged from 2n=6 to 2n=28. Despite the high variance in diploid number, all species examined carried their 45S rDNA sites in the terminal region of exactly two chromosomes. Analyses of meiotic cells revealed 45S rDNA clusters in the chromosomal chains of Rhopalurus agamemnon, Tityus bahiensis, Tityus confluens, and Tityus martinpaechi, or in bivalent-like configuration in Rhopalurus rochai, Tityus bahiensis, Tityus confluens, Tityus fasciolatus, and Tityus paraguayensis. In the species examined, the 45S rDNA sites colocalized with constitutive heterochromatin regions. In light of the high chromosome variability and maintenance of number and terminal position of 45S rDNA sites in buthids, the heterochromatin may act to conserve the integrity of the ribosomal genes.

  5. Quantitative DNA methylation analysis of candidate genes in cervical cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin M Siegel

    Full Text Available Aberrant DNA methylation has been observed in cervical cancer; however, most studies have used non-quantitative approaches to measure DNA methylation. The objective of this study was to quantify methylation within a select panel of genes previously identified as targets for epigenetic silencing in cervical cancer and to identify genes with elevated methylation that can distinguish cancer from normal cervical tissues. We identified 49 women with invasive squamous cell cancer of the cervix and 22 women with normal cytology specimens. Bisulfite-modified genomic DNA was amplified and quantitative pyrosequencing completed for 10 genes (APC, CCNA, CDH1, CDH13, WIF1, TIMP3, DAPK1, RARB, FHIT, and SLIT2. A Methylation Index was calculated as the mean percent methylation across all CpG sites analyzed per gene (~4-9 CpG site per sequence. A binary cut-point was defined at >15% methylation. Sensitivity, specificity and area under ROC curve (AUC of methylation in individual genes or a panel was examined. The median methylation index was significantly higher in cases compared to controls in 8 genes, whereas there was no difference in median methylation for 2 genes. Compared to HPV and age, the combination of DNA methylation level of DAPK1, SLIT2, WIF1 and RARB with HPV and age significantly improved the AUC from 0.79 to 0.99 (95% CI: 0.97-1.00, p-value = 0.003. Pyrosequencing analysis confirmed that several genes are common targets for aberrant methylation in cervical cancer and DNA methylation level of four genes appears to increase specificity to identify cancer compared to HPV detection alone. Alterations in DNA methylation of specific genes in cervical cancers, such as DAPK1, RARB, WIF1, and SLIT2, may also occur early in cervical carcinogenesis and should be evaluated.

  6. Quantitative DNA methylation analysis of candidate genes in cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Erin M; Riggs, Bridget M; Delmas, Amber L; Koch, Abby; Hakam, Ardeshir; Brown, Kevin D

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant DNA methylation has been observed in cervical cancer; however, most studies have used non-quantitative approaches to measure DNA methylation. The objective of this study was to quantify methylation within a select panel of genes previously identified as targets for epigenetic silencing in cervical cancer and to identify genes with elevated methylation that can distinguish cancer from normal cervical tissues. We identified 49 women with invasive squamous cell cancer of the cervix and 22 women with normal cytology specimens. Bisulfite-modified genomic DNA was amplified and quantitative pyrosequencing completed for 10 genes (APC, CCNA, CDH1, CDH13, WIF1, TIMP3, DAPK1, RARB, FHIT, and SLIT2). A Methylation Index was calculated as the mean percent methylation across all CpG sites analyzed per gene (~4-9 CpG site) per sequence. A binary cut-point was defined at >15% methylation. Sensitivity, specificity and area under ROC curve (AUC) of methylation in individual genes or a panel was examined. The median methylation index was significantly higher in cases compared to controls in 8 genes, whereas there was no difference in median methylation for 2 genes. Compared to HPV and age, the combination of DNA methylation level of DAPK1, SLIT2, WIF1 and RARB with HPV and age significantly improved the AUC from 0.79 to 0.99 (95% CI: 0.97-1.00, p-value = 0.003). Pyrosequencing analysis confirmed that several genes are common targets for aberrant methylation in cervical cancer and DNA methylation level of four genes appears to increase specificity to identify cancer compared to HPV detection alone. Alterations in DNA methylation of specific genes in cervical cancers, such as DAPK1, RARB, WIF1, and SLIT2, may also occur early in cervical carcinogenesis and should be evaluated.

  7. Chromosomal Organization and Sequence Diversity of Genes Encoding Lachrymatory Factor Synthase in Allium cepa L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masamura, Noriya; McCallum, John; Khrustaleva, Ludmila; Kenel, Fernand; Pither-Joyce, Meegham; Shono, Jinji; Suzuki, Go; Mukai, Yasuhiko; Yamauchi, Naoki; Shigyo, Masayoshi

    2012-06-01

    Lachrymatory factor synthase (LFS) catalyzes the formation of lachrymatory factor, one of the most distinctive traits of bulb onion (Allium cepa L.). Therefore, we used LFS as a model for a functional gene in a huge genome, and we examined the chromosomal organization of LFS in A. cepa by multiple approaches. The first-level analysis completed the chromosomal assignment of LFS gene to chromosome 5 of A. cepa via the use of a complete set of A. fistulosum-shallot (A. cepa L. Aggregatum group) monosomic addition lines. Subsequent use of an F(2) mapping population from the interspecific cross A. cepa × A. roylei confirmed the assignment of an LFS locus to this chromosome. Sequence comparison of two BAC clones bearing LFS genes, LFS amplicons from diverse germplasm, and expressed sequences from a doubled haploid line revealed variation consistent with duplicated LFS genes. Furthermore, the BAC-FISH study using the two BAC clones as a probe showed that LFS genes are localized in the proximal region of the long arm of the chromosome. These results suggested that LFS in A. cepa is transcribed from at least two loci and that they are localized on chromosome 5.

  8. Candidate pathways and genes for prostate cancer: a meta-analysis of gene expression data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Efstathiou Eleni

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Backgound The genetic mechanisms of prostate tumorigenesis remain poorly understood, but with the advent of gene expression array capabilities, we can now produce a large amount of data that can be used to explore the molecular and genetic mechanisms of prostate tumorigenesis. Methods We conducted a meta-analysis of gene expression data from 18 gene array datasets targeting transition from normal to localized prostate cancer and from localized to metastatic prostate cancer. We functionally annotated the top 500 differentially expressed genes and identified several candidate pathways associated with prostate tumorigeneses. Results We found the top differentially expressed genes to be clustered in pathways involving integrin-based cell adhesion: integrin signaling, the actin cytoskeleton, cell death, and cell motility pathways. We also found integrins themselves to be downregulated in the transition from normal prostate tissue to primary localized prostate cancer. Based on the results of this study, we developed a collagen hypothesis of prostate tumorigenesis. According to this hypothesis, the initiating event in prostate tumorigenesis is the age-related decrease in the expression of collagen genes and other genes encoding integrin ligands. This concomitant depletion of integrin ligands leads to the accumulation of ligandless integrin and activation of integrin-associated cell death. To escape integrin-associated death, cells suppress the expression of integrins, which in turn alters the actin cytoskeleton, elevates cell motility and proliferation, and disorganizes prostate histology, contributing to the histologic progression of prostate cancer and its increased metastasizing potential. Conclusion The results of this study suggest that prostate tumor progression is associated with the suppression of integrin-based cell adhesion. Suppression of integrin expression driven by integrin-mediated cell death leads to increased cell

  9. Using the candidate gene approach for detecting genes underlying seed oil concentration and yield in soybean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eskandari, Mehrzad; Cober, Elroy R; Rajcan, Istvan

    2013-07-01

    Increasing the oil concentration in soybean seeds has been given more attention in recent years because of demand for both edible oil and biodiesel production. Oil concentration in soybean is a complex quantitative trait regulated by many genes as well as environmental conditions. To identify genes governing seed oil concentration in soybean, 16 putative candidate genes of three important gene families (GPAT: acyl-CoA:sn-glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase, DGAT: acyl-CoA:diacylglycerol acyltransferase, and PDAT: phospholipid:diacylglycerol acyltransferase) involved in triacylglycerol (TAG) biosynthesis pathways were selected and their sequences retrieved from the soybean database ( http://www.phytozome.net/soybean ). Three sequence mutations were discovered in either coding or noncoding regions of three DGAT soybean isoforms when comparing the parents of a 203 recombinant inbreed line (RIL) population; OAC Wallace and OAC Glencoe. The RIL population was used to study the effects of these mutations on seed oil concentration and other important agronomic and seed composition traits, including seed yield and protein concentration across three field locations in Ontario, Canada, in 2009 and 2010. An insertion/deletion (indel) mutation in the GmDGAT2B gene in OAC Wallace was significantly associated with reduced seed oil concentration across three environments and reduced seed yield at Woodstock in 2010. A mutation in the 3' untranslated (3'UTR) region of GmDGAT2C was associated with seed yield at Woodstock in 2009. A mutation in the intronic region of GmDGAR1B was associated with seed yield and protein concentration at Ottawa in 2010. The genes identified in this study had minor effects on either seed yield or oil concentration, which was in agreement with the quantitative nature of the traits. However, the novel gene-specific markers designed in the present study can be used in soybean breeding for marker-assisted selection aimed at increasing seed yield and oil

  10. Involvement of condensin-directed gene associations in the organization and regulation of chromosome territories during the cell cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasaki, Osamu; Corcoran, Christopher J.; Noma, Ken-ichi

    2016-01-01

    Chromosomes are not randomly disposed in the nucleus but instead occupy discrete sub-nuclear domains, referred to as chromosome territories. The molecular mechanisms that underlie the formation of chromosome territories and how they are regulated during the cell cycle remain largely unknown. Here, we have developed two different chromosome-painting approaches to address how chromosome territories are organized in the fission yeast model organism. We show that condensin frequently associates RNA polymerase III-transcribed genes (tRNA and 5S rRNA) that are present on the same chromosomes, and that the disruption of these associations by condensin mutations significantly compromises the chromosome territory arrangement. We also find that condensin-dependent intra-chromosomal gene associations and chromosome territories are co-regulated during the cell cycle. For example, condensin-directed gene associations occur to the least degree during S phase, with the chromosomal overlap becoming largest. In clear contrast, condensin-directed gene associations become tighter in other cell-cycle phases, especially during mitosis, with the overlap between the different chromosomes being smaller. This study suggests that condensin-driven intra-chromosomal gene associations contribute to the organization and regulation of chromosome territories during the cell cycle. PMID:26704981

  11. Human artificial chromosome vectors meet stem cells: new prospects for gene delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Xianying; Tahimic, Candice Ginn T; Katoh, Motonobu; Kurimasa, Akihiro; Inoue, Toshiaki; Oshimura, Mitsuo

    2006-01-01

    The recent emergence of stem cell-based tissue engineering has now opened up new venues for gene therapy. The task now is to develop safe and effective vectors that can deliver therapeutic genes into specific stem cell lines and maintain long-term regulated expression of these genes. Human artificial chromosomes (HACs) possess several characteristics that require gene therapy vectors, including a stable episomal maintenance, and the capacity for large gene inserts. HACs can also carry genomic loci with regulatory elements, thus allowing for the expression of transgenes in a genetic environment similar to the chromosome. Currently, HACs are constructed by a two prone approaches. Using a top-down strategy, HACs can be generated from fragmenting endogenous chromosomes. By a bottom-up strategy, HACs can be created de novo from cloned chromosomal components using chromosome engineering. This review describes the current advances in developing HACs, with the main focus on their applications and potential value in gene delivery, such as HAC-mediated gene expression in embryonic, adult stem cells, and transgenic animals.

  12. Zfy genes are required for efficient meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI) in spermatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernet, Nadège; Mahadevaiah, Shantha K; de Rooij, Dirk G; Burgoyne, Paul S; Ellis, Peter J I

    2016-10-13

    During spermatogenesis, germ cells that fail to synapse their chromosomes or fail to undergo meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI) are eliminated via apoptosis during mid-pachytene. Previous work showed that Y-linked genes Zfy1 and Zfy2 act as 'executioners' for this checkpoint, and that wrongful expression of either gene during pachytene triggers germ cell death. Here, we show that in mice, Zfy genes are also necessary for efficient MSCI and the sex chromosomes are not correctly silenced in Zfy-deficient spermatocytes. This unexpectedly reveals a triple role for Zfy at the mid-pachytene checkpoint in which Zfy genes first promote MSCI, then monitor its progress (since if MSCI is achieved, Zfy genes will be silenced), and finally execute cells with MSCI failure. This potentially constitutes a negative feedback loop governing this critical checkpoint mechanism.

  13. Structure and chromosomal localization of the gene encoding the human myelin protein zero (MPZ)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayasaka, Kiyoshi; Himoro, Masato; Takada, Goro (Akita Univ. School of Medicine, Akita (Japan)); Wang, Yimin; Takata, Mizuho; Minoshima, Shinsei; Shimizu, Nobuyoshi; Miura, Masayuki; Uyemura, Keiichi (Keio Univ. School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan))

    1993-09-01

    The authors describe the cloning, characterization, and chromosomal mapping of the human myelin protein zero (MPZ) gene (a structural protein of myelin and an adhesive glycoprotein of the immunoglobulin superfamily). The gene is about 7 kb long and consists of six exons corresponding of the functional domains. All exon-intron junction sequences conform to the GT/AG rule. The 5[prime]-flanking region of the gene has a TA-rich element (TATA-like box), two CAAT boxes, and a single defined transcription initiation site detected by the primer extension method. The gene for human MPZ was assigned to chromosome 1q22-q23 by spot blot hybridization of flow-sorted human chromosomes and fluorescence in situ hybridization. The localization of the MPZ gene coincides with the locus for Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1B, determined by linkage analysis. 20 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Dosage compensation of X-chromosome inactivation center-linked genes in porcine preimplantation embryos: Non-chromosome-wide initiation of X-chromosome inactivation in blastocysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Jae Yeon; Oh, Jong-Nam; Park, Chi-Hun; Lee, Dong-Kyung; Lee, Chang-Kyu

    2015-11-01

    X-chromosome inactivation (XCI) is an epigenetic mechanism that occurs in the eutherian embryo development to equalize the dosage of X-linked genes between males and females. This event is regulated by various factors, and the genes located in the X-chromosome inactivation center (XIC), which is known to be an evolutionary conserved region, are associated with XCI; however, a number of studies regarding this epigenetic event and genomic region are primarily performed in mouse models despite its species-specific features. Thus, in this study, the porcine XIC was identified, and we analyzed the expression of XIC-linked genes in porcine preimplantation embryos. Comparative sequence analysis revealed that the porcine XIC is synteny with that of human and the non-coding RNAs were less conserved compared with the protein coding genes in the XIC. Among the XIC-linked genes, the expression levels of CHIC1 and RLIM were decreased from morula to blastocyst development and their dosage was compensated between the male and female blastocysts. Additionally, the CpG sites of CHIC1 were approximately 50% methylated in parthenote blastocysts. Contrary to these genes, XIST and LOC102165544, an uncharacterized non-coding gene, showed dramatically increased expression levels after the morula stage and preferential female expression in blastocysts. Imprinted XIST expression was not observed, and their CpG sites were hypo-methylated in parthenogenic blastocysts. These results demonstrate that the porcine XIC consists of an evolutionary conserved structure with fewer sequences conserved non-coding RNAs. In addition, a few XIC-linked genes would likely achieve dosage compensation, but XCI would not be completed in porcine blastocysts.

  15. A gene catalogue of the euchromatic male-specific region of the horse Y chromosome: comparison with human and other mammals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nandina Paria

    Full Text Available Studies of the Y chromosome in primates, rodents and carnivores provide compelling evidence that the male specific region of Y (MSY contains functional genes, many of which have specialized roles in spermatogenesis and male-fertility. Little similarity, however, has been found between the gene content and sequence of MSY in different species. This hinders the discovery of species-specific male fertility genes and limits our understanding about MSY evolution in mammals. Here, a detailed MSY gene catalogue was developed for the horse--an odd-toed ungulate. Using direct cDNA selection from horse testis, and sequence analysis of Y-specific BAC clones, 37 horse MSY genes/transcripts were identified. The genes were mapped to the MSY BAC contig map, characterized for copy number, analyzed for transcriptional profiles by RT-PCR, examined for the presence of ORFs, and compared to other mammalian orthologs. We demonstrate that the horse MSY harbors 20 X-degenerate genes with known orthologs in other eutherian species. The remaining 17 genes are acquired or novel and have so far been identified only in the horse or donkey Y chromosomes. Notably, 3 transcripts were found in the heterochromatic part of the Y. We show that despite substantial differences between the sequence, gene content and organization of horse and other mammalian Y chromosomes, the functions of MSY genes are predominantly related to testis and spermatogenesis. Altogether, 10 multicopy genes with testis-specific expression were identified in the horse MSY, and considered likely candidate genes for stallion fertility. The findings establish an important foundation for the study of Y-linked genetic factors governing fertility in stallions, and improve our knowledge about the evolutionary processes that have shaped Y chromosomes in different mammalian lineages.

  16. Chromosome mapping of dragline silk genes in the genomes of widow spiders (Araneae, Theridiidae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yonghui Zhao

    Full Text Available With its incredible strength and toughness, spider dragline silk is widely lauded for its impressive material properties. Dragline silk is composed of two structural proteins, MaSp1 and MaSp2, which are encoded by members of the spidroin gene family. While previous studies have characterized the genes that encode the constituent proteins of spider silks, nothing is known about the physical location of these genes. We determined karyotypes and sex chromosome organization for the widow spiders, Latrodectus hesperus and L. geometricus (Araneae, Theridiidae. We then used fluorescence in situ hybridization to map the genomic locations of the genes for the silk proteins that compose the remarkable spider dragline. These genes included three loci for the MaSp1 protein and the single locus for the MaSp2 protein. In addition, we mapped a MaSp1 pseudogene. All the MaSp1 gene copies and pseudogene localized to a single chromosomal region while MaSp2 was located on a different chromosome of L. hesperus. Using probes derived from L. hesperus, we comparatively mapped all three MaSp1 loci to a single region of a L. geometricus chromosome. As with L. hesperus, MaSp2 was found on a separate L. geometricus chromosome, thus again unlinked to the MaSp1 loci. These results indicate orthology of the corresponding chromosomal regions in the two widow genomes. Moreover, the occurrence of multiple MaSp1 loci in a conserved gene cluster across species suggests that MaSp1 proliferated by tandem duplication in a common ancestor of L. geometricus and L. hesperus. Unequal crossover events during recombination could have given rise to the gene copies and could also maintain sequence similarity among gene copies over time. Further comparative mapping with taxa of increasing divergence from Latrodectus will pinpoint when the MaSp1 duplication events occurred and the phylogenetic distribution of silk gene linkage patterns.

  17. Integrative strategies to identify candidate genes in rodent models of human alcoholism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treadwell, Julie A

    2006-01-01

    The search for genes underlying alcohol-related behaviours in rodent models of human alcoholism has been ongoing for many years with only limited success. Recently, new strategies that integrate several of the traditional approaches have provided new insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying ethanol's actions in the brain. We have used alcohol-preferring C57BL/6J (B6) and alcohol-avoiding DBA/2J (D2) genetic strains of mice in an integrative strategy combining high-throughput gene expression screening, genetic segregation analysis, and mapping to previously published quantitative trait loci to uncover candidate genes for the ethanol-preference phenotype. In our study, 2 genes, retinaldehyde binding protein 1 (Rlbp1) and syntaxin 12 (Stx12), were found to be strong candidates for ethanol preference. Such experimental approaches have the power and the potential to greatly speed up the laborious process of identifying candidate genes for the animal models of human alcoholism.

  18. A gene for autosomal dominant progressive cone dystrophy (CORD5) maps to chromosome 17p12-p13

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balciuniene, J.; Holmgren, G.; Forsman, K. [University Hospital, Umea (Sweden)] [and others

    1995-11-20

    Inherited retinal dystrophy is a common cause of visual impairment. Cone dystrophy affects the cone function and is manifested as progressive loss of the central vision, defective color vision, and photophobia. Linkage was demonstrated between progressive cone dystrophy (CORD5) and genetic markers on chromosome 17p12-p13 in a five-generation family. Multipoint analysis gave a maximum lod score of 7.72 at the marker D17S938. Recombinant haplotypes in the family suggest that the cone dystrophy locus is located in a 25-cM interval between the markers D17S926/D17S849 and D17S804/D17S945. Furthermore, one recombination was detected between the disease locus and a microsatellite marker in the candidate gene RCV1, encoding the retinal protein recoverin. Two additional candidate genes encoding retinal guanylate cyclase (GUC2D) and pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) are located at 17p13.1. Moreover, loci for retinitis pigmentosa and Leber congenital amaurosis have been mapped to the same region. Identification of the cone dystrophy locus may be of importance not only for identifying functional genes in the cone system, but also for identifying genes for other retinal disorders. 34 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Patterns of population differentiation of candidate genes for cardiovascular disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ding Keyue

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The basis for ethnic differences in cardiovascular disease (CVD susceptibility is not fully understood. We investigated patterns of population differentiation (FST of a set of genes in etiologic pathways of CVD among 3 ethnic groups: Yoruba in Nigeria (YRI, Utah residents with European ancestry (CEU, and Han Chinese (CHB + Japanese (JPT. We identified 37 pathways implicated in CVD based on the PANTHER classification and 416 genes in these pathways were further studied; these genes belonged to 6 biological processes (apoptosis, blood circulation and gas exchange, blood clotting, homeostasis, immune response, and lipoprotein metabolism. Genotype data were obtained from the HapMap database. Results We calculated FST for 15,559 common SNPs (minor allele frequency ≥ 0.10 in at least one population in genes that co-segregated among the populations, as well as an average-weighted FST for each gene. SNPs were classified as putatively functional (non-synonymous and untranslated regions or non-functional (intronic and synonymous sites. Mean FST values for common putatively functional variants were significantly higher than FST values for nonfunctional variants. A significant variation in FST was also seen based on biological processes; the processes of 'apoptosis' and 'lipoprotein metabolism' showed an excess of genes with high FST. Thus, putative functional SNPs in genes in etiologic pathways for CVD show greater population differentiation than non-functional SNPs and a significant variance of FST values was noted among pairwise population comparisons for different biological processes. Conclusion These results suggest a possible basis for varying susceptibility to CVD among ethnic groups.

  20. Birth of a new gene on the Y chromosome of Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Antonio Bernardo; Vicoso, Beatriz; Russo, Claudia A M; Swenor, Bonnielin; Clark, Andrew G

    2015-10-06

    Contrary to the pattern seen in mammalian sex chromosomes, where most Y-linked genes have X-linked homologs, the Drosophila X and Y chromosomes appear to be unrelated. Most of the Y-linked genes have autosomal paralogs, so autosome-to-Y transposition must be the main source of Drosophila Y-linked genes. Here we show how these genes were acquired. We found a previously unidentified gene (flagrante delicto Y, FDY) that originated from a recent duplication of the autosomal gene vig2 to the Y chromosome of Drosophila melanogaster. Four contiguous genes were duplicated along with vig2, but they became pseudogenes through the accumulation of deletions and transposable element insertions, whereas FDY remained functional, acquired testis-specific expression, and now accounts for ∼20% of the vig2-like mRNA in testis. FDY is absent in the closest relatives of D. melanogaster, and DNA sequence divergence indicates that the duplication to the Y chromosome occurred ∼2 million years ago. Thus, FDY provides a snapshot of the early stages of the establishment of a Y-linked gene and demonstrates how the Drosophila Y has been accumulating autosomal genes.

  1. Accuracy of preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) of single gene and chromosomal disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verlinsky, Y.; Strom, C.; Rechitsky, S. [Reproductive Genetics Institute, Chicage, IL (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    We have developed a polar body inferred approach for preconception diagnosis of single gene and chromosomal disorders. Preconception PCR or FISH analysis was performed in a total of 310 first polar bodies for the following genetic conditions: cystic fibrosis, hemophilia A, alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency, Tay Sachs disease, retinitis pigmentosa and common chromosomal trisomies. An important advantage of this approach is the avoidance of sperm (DNA) contamination, which is the major problem of PGD. We are currently applying FISH analysis of biopsied blastomeres, in combination with PCR or separately, and have demonstrated a significant improvement of the accuracy of PGD of X-linked disorders at this stage. Our data have also demonstrated feasibility of the application of FISH technique for PGD of chromosomal disorders. It was possible to detect chromosomal non-disjunctions and chromatid malsegregations in the first meiotic division, as well as to evaluate chromosomal mutations originating from the second meiotic nondisjunction.

  2. Physical mapping of the elephant X chromosome: conservation of gene order over 105 million years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado, Claudia Leticia Rodríguez; Waters, Paul D; Gilbert, Clément; Robinson, Terence J; Graves, Jennifer A Marshall

    2009-01-01

    All therian mammals (eutherians and marsupials) have an XX female/XY male sex chromosome system or some variant of it. The X and Y evolved from a homologous pair of autosomes over the 166 million years since therian mammals diverged from monotremes. Comparing the sex chromosomes of eutherians and marsupials defined an ancient X conserved region that is shared between species of these mammalian clades. However, the eutherian X (and the Y) was augmented by a recent addition (XAR) that is autosomal in marsupials. XAR is part of the X in primates, rodents, and artiodactyls (which belong to the eutherian clade Boreoeutheria), but it is uncertain whether XAR is part of the X chromosome in more distantly related eutherian mammals. Here we report on the gene content and order on the X of the elephant (Loxodonta africana)-a representative of Afrotheria, a basal endemic clade of African mammals-and compare these findings to those of other documented eutherian species. A total of 17 genes were mapped to the elephant X chromosome. Our results support the hypothesis that the eutherian X and Y chromosomes were augmented by the addition of autosomal material prior to eutherian radiation. Not only does the elephant X bear the same suite of genes as other eutherian X chromosomes, but gene order appears to have been maintained across 105 million years of evolution, perhaps reflecting strong constraints posed by the eutherian X inactivation system.

  3. Candidate genes of hypertension with defective environmental expression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUNYULIN; JOHANNETREMBLAY; 等

    1995-01-01

    Previous studies in our laboratory have demonstrated that the thermosensitivity locus cosegregates with blood pressure and that the elevated expression and restriction fragment length polymorphism of HSP70 gene are associated with hypertension.Cell protection against environmental stressors such as heat and chemicals is often accompanied by up-regulated expression of a wide spectrum of heat shock genes(HSP).To further investigate the interrelation between HSP expression and blood pressure regulation,we employed an effective method of cloning 2 potential hypertension-related HSPs.Synthetic oligonucleotides corresponding either to a highly-conserved region of the known HSP family or a repetitive sequence in the proteinencoding gene were used as target primers for polymerase chain reaction(PCR).cDNA prepared from heat-stressed and non-stressed vascular smooth muscle cells(VSMC)of Brown Norway rats(BN.1x)and spontaneously hypertensive rats(SHRp) respectively served as template in the reaction.The PCR products were subsequently analyzed in a single-stranded conformational polymorphism(SSCP) electrophoresing system.Differential gene expression in BN.1x and SHRp was seen on autoradiographs of SSCP gel by comparing the migration patterns of PCR-amplified DNA fragments.Using this technique,we also found that HSP27 and a new member of the large HSP gene family were differentially expressed in BN.1x and SHRp VSMC.

  4. Identification of candidate genes for drought stress tolerance in rice by the integration of a genetic (QTL) map with the rice genome physical map

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xu-sheng; ZHU Jun; MANSUETO Locedie; BRUSKIEWICH Richard

    2005-01-01

    Genetic improvement for drought stress tolerance in rice involves the quantitative nature of the trait, which reflects the additive effects of several genetic loci throughout the genome. Yield components and related traits under stressed and well-water conditions were assayed in mapping populations derived from crosses of Azucena×IR64 and Azucena×Bala. To find the candidate rice genes underlying Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL) in these populations, we conducted in silico analysis of a candidate region flanked by the genetic markers RM212 and RM319on chromosome 1, proximal to the semi-dwarf (sd1) locus. A total of 175annotated genes were identified from this region. These included 48 genes annotated by functional homology to known genes, 23pseudogenes, 24 ab initio predicted genes supported by an alignment match to an EST (Expressed sequence tag) of unknown function, and 80 hypothetical genes predicted solely by ab initio means. Among these, 16 candidate genes could potentially be involved in drought stress response.

  5. Microdissection and molecular manipulation of single chromosomes in woody fruit trees with small chromosomes using pomelo (Citrus grandis) as a model. II. Cloning of resistance gene analogs from single chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, D; Wu, W; Lu, L

    2004-05-01

    Amplification of resistance gene analogs (RGAs) is both a useful method for acquiring DNA markers closely linked to disease resistance (R) genes and a potential approach for the rapid cloning of R genes in plants. However, the screening of target sequences from among the numerous amplified RGAs can be very laborious. The amplification of RGAs from specific chromosomes could greatly reduce the number of RGAs to be screened and, consequently, speed up the identification of target RGAs. We have developed two methods for amplifying RGAs from single chromosomes. Method 1 uses products of Sau3A linker adaptor-mediated PCR (LAM-PCR) from a single chromosome as the templates for RGA amplification, while Method 2 directly uses a single chromosomal DNA molecule as the template. Using a pair of degenerate primers designed on the basis of the conserved nucleotide-binding-site motifs in many R genes, RGAs were successfully amplified from single chromosomes of pomelo using both these methods. Sequencing and cluster analysis of RGA clones obtained from single chromosomes revealed the number, type and organization of R-gene clusters on the chromosomes. We suggest that Method 1 is suitable for analyzing chromosomes that are unidentifiable under a microscope, while Method 2 is more appropriate when chromosomes can be clearly identified.

  6. Chromosomal locations of the maize (Zea mays L. HtP and rt genes that confer resistance to Exserohilum turcicum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Bernardi Ogliari

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available We used 125 microsatellite markers to genotype the maize (Zea mays L. near isogenic lines (NIL L30HtPHtPRtRt and L30htphtpRtRt and the L40htphtprtrt line which contrast regarding the presence of the recently described dominant HtP and the recessive rt genes that confer resistance to Exserohilum turcicum. Five microsatellite markers revealed polymorphisms between the NIL and were considered candidate linked markers for the HtP resistance gene. Linkage was confirmed by bulked segregant sample (BSS analysis of 32 susceptible and 34 resistant plants from a BC1F1 population derived from the cross (L30HtPHtPRtRt x L40htphtprtrt x L40htphtprtrt. The bnlg198 and dupssr25 markers, both located on maize chromosome 2L (bin 2.08, were polymorphic between bulks. Linkage distances were estimated based on co-segregation data of the 32 susceptible plants and indicated distances of 28.7 centimorgans (cM between HtP and bnlg198 and 23.5 cM between HtP and dupssr25. The same set of susceptible plants was also genotyped with markers polymorphic between L30HtPHtPRtRt and L40htphtprtrt in order to find markers linked to the rt gene. Marker bnlg197, from chromosome 3L (bin 3.06, was found linked to rt at a distance of 9.7 cM. This is the first report on the chromosomal locations of these newly described genes.

  7. Structure, allelic diversity and selection of Asr genes, candidate for drought tolerance, in Oryza sativa L. and wild relatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philippe, Romain; Courtois, Brigitte; McNally, Kenneth L; Mournet, Pierre; El-Malki, Redouane; Le Paslier, Marie Christine; Fabre, Denis; Billot, Claire; Brunel, Dominique; Glaszmann, Jean-Christophe; This, Dominique

    2010-08-01

    Asr (ABA, stress, ripening) genes represent a small gene family potentially involved in drought tolerance in several plant species. To analyze their interest for rice breeding for water-limited environments, this gene family was characterized further. Genomic organization of the gene family reveals six members located on four different chromosomes and with the same exon-intron structure. The maintenance of six members of the Asr gene family, which are the result of combination between tandem duplication and whole genome duplication, and their differential regulation under water stress, involves probably some sub-functionalization. The polymorphism of four members was studied in a worldwide collection of 204 accessions of Oryza sativa L. and 14 accessions of wild relatives (O. rufipogon and O. nivara). The nucleotide diversity of the Asr genes was globally low, but contrasted for the different genes, leading to different shapes of haplotype networks. Statistical tests for neutrality were used and compared to their distribution in a set of 111 reference genes spread across the genome, derived from another published study. Asr3 diversity exhibited a pattern concordant with a balancing selection at the species level and with a directional selection in the tropical japonica sub-group. This study provides a thorough description of the organization of the Asr family, and the nucleotide and haplotype diversity of four Asr in Oryza sativa species. Asr3 stood out as the best potential candidate. The polymorphism detected here represents a first step towards an association study between genetic polymorphisms of this gene family and variation in drought tolerance traits.

  8. Functional Insight From Fruit Flies on Human ADHD Candidate Genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rohde, Palle Duun; Demontis, Ditte; Arvidson, Sandra Marie Neumann

    2015-01-01

    Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a psychiatric disorder emerging in early childhood with an average prevalence rate of 5% in children and 3.7% in adults. ADHD is characterized by inattention, impulsivity and hyperactivity. This, combined with educational and social dysfunctions......, and increased risk of mental comorbidities, makes ADHD a disorder with high individual and societal costs. We use Drosophila melanogaster as a model to investigate the phenotypic consequences of gene disruption of 14 genes with human orthologs, selected by their proposed contribution to increased risk...... of developing ADHD. We use Minos mutants, where target genes have been disrupted by the Minos transposable element, to test the effect on locomotor activity. By measuring the distance traveled, we find disparity in locomotor activity between control and Minos mutants. Impaired dopamine system underlies...

  9. Fine mapping and candidate gene analysis of an anthocyanin-rich gene, BnaA.PL1, conferring purple leaves in Brassica napus L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haibo; Zhu, Lixia; Yuan, Gaigai; Heng, Shuangping; Yi, Bin; Ma, Chaozhi; Shen, Jinxiong; Tu, Jinxing; Fu, Tingdong; Wen, Jing

    2016-08-01

    Because of the advantages of anthocyanins, the genetics and breeding of crops rich in anthocyanins has become a hot research topic. However, due to the lack of anthocyanin-related mutants, no regulatory genes have been mapped in Brassica napus. In this study, we first report the characterization of a B. napus line with purple leaves and the fine mapping and candidate screening of the BnaA.PL1 gene. The amount of anthocyanins in the purple leaf line was six times higher than that in a green leaf line. A genetic analysis indicated that the purple character was controlled by an incomplete dominant gene. Through map-based cloning, we localized the BnaA.PL1 gene to a 99-kb region at the end of B. napus chromosome A03. Transcriptional analysis of 11 genes located in the target region revealed that the expression level of only the BnAPR2 gene in seedling leaves decreased from purple to reddish green to green individuals, a finding that was consistent with the measured anthocyanin accumulation levels. Molecular cloning and sequence analysis of BnAPR2 showed that the purple individual-derived allele contained 17 variants. Markers co-segregating with BnaA.PL1 were developed from the sequence of BnAPR2 and were validated in the BC4P2 population. These results suggested that BnAPR2, which encodes adenosine 5'-phosphosulfate reductase, is likely to be a valuable candidate gene. This work may lay the foundation for the marker-assisted selection of B. napus vegetables that are rich in anthocyanins and for an improved understanding of the molecular mechanisms controlling anthocyanin accumulation in Brassica.

  10. Expression Profiling Identifies Candidate Genes for Fiber Yield and Quality

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LLEWELLYN D J; MACHADO A; AI-GHAZI Y; WU Y; DENNIS E S

    2008-01-01

    @@ Gene expression profiling at early stages (0~2 DPA) of fiber development in Gossypiurn hirsuturn identified a number of transcription factors which were down regulated in fiberless mutants relative to wild type controls and which could play a role in controlling early fiber development.Chief among these was GhMYB25,a Mixta-like MYB gene.Transgenic GhMYB25-silenced cotton showeddramatic alterations in fiber initiation and the timing of rapid fiber elongation,reduction in trichomes on other parts of the plant,a delay in lateral root growth,and a reduction in seed production due toreduced fertilization efficiency.

  11. Two Y genes can replace the entire Y chromosome for assisted reproduction in the mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamauchi, Yasuhiro; Riel, Jonathan M; Stoytcheva, Zoia; Ward, Monika A

    2014-01-03

    The Y chromosome is thought to be important for male reproduction. We have previously shown that, with the use of assisted reproduction, live offspring can be obtained from mice lacking the entire Y chromosome long arm. Here, we demonstrate that live mouse progeny can also be generated by using germ cells from males with the Y chromosome contribution limited to only two genes, the testis determinant factor Sry and the spermatogonial proliferation factor Eif2s3y. Sry is believed to function primarily in sex determination during fetal life. Eif2s3y may be the only Y chromosome gene required to drive mouse spermatogenesis, allowing formation of haploid germ cells that are functional in assisted reproduction. Our findings are relevant, but not directly translatable, to human male infertility cases.

  12. Genetic and epigenetic changes of genes on chromosome 3 in human urogenital tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gordiyuk V. V.

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Numerous disorders of genes and alterations of their expression are observed on a short arm of human chromosome 3, particularly in 3p14, 3p21, 3p24 compact regions in epithelial tumors. These aberrations affect the key biological processes specific for cancerogenesis. Such genes or their products could be used for diagnostics and prognosis of cancer. Genetical and epigenetical changes of a number of genes on chromosome 3 in human urogenital cancer, their role in cellular processes and signal pathways and perspectives as molecular markers of cancer diseases are analyzed in the review

  13. Genes for resistance to stripe rust on chromosome 2B and their application in wheat breeding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peigao Luo; Xueyun Hu; Huaiyu Zhang; Zhenglong Ren

    2009-01-01

    Stripe rust,caused by Puccinia striiformis f.sp.tritici,is one of the most damaging diseases of wheat worldwide.Growing resistant cultivars is the most economic and environmental friendly way to control the disease.There are many resistance genes to stripe rust located on wheat chromosome 2B.Here,we propose a strategy to construct the recombinant wheat chromosome 2B with multiple resistances to stripe rust by making crosses between wheat lines or cultivars carrying Yr genes and using marker-assisted selection,based on the reported information about resistance spectrum,chromosomal location,and linked markers of the genes.Pyramiding the resistance genes on 2B would afford a valuable strategy to control the disease by cultivating varieties with durable resistance.The possibility,efficiency,and prospect of the suggested strategy are reviewed in the paper.

  14. Congenital diaphragmatic hernia candidate genes derived from embryonic transcriptomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Russell, Meaghan K; Longoni, Mauro; Wells, Julie

    2012-01-01

    Congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) is a common (1 in 3,000 live births) major congenital malformation that results in significant morbidity and mortality. The discovery of CDH loci using standard genetic approaches has been hindered by its genetic heterogeneity. We hypothesized that gene expre...

  15. Mapping of Candidate Genes Involved in Bud Dormancy and Flowering Time in Sweet Cherry (Prunus avium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie Castède

    Full Text Available The timing of flowering in perennial plants is crucial for their survival in temperate climates and is regulated by the duration of bud dormancy. Bud dormancy release and bud break depend on the perception of cumulative chilling during endodormancy and heat during the bud development. The objectives of this work were to identify candidate genes involved in dormancy and flowering processes in sweet cherry, their mapping in two mapping progenies 'Regina' × 'Garnet' and 'Regina' × 'Lapins', and to select those candidate genes which co-localized with quantitative trait loci (QTLs associated with temperature requirements for bud dormancy release and flowering. Based on available data on flowering processes in various species, a list of 79 candidate genes was established. The peach and sweet cherry orthologs were identified and primers were designed to amplify sweet cherry candidate gene fragments. Based on the amplified sequences of the three parents of the mapping progenies, SNPs segregations in the progenies were identified. Thirty five candidate genes were genetically mapped in at least one of the two progenies and all were in silico mapped. Co-localization between candidate genes and QTLs associated with temperature requirements and flowering date were identified for the first time in sweet cherry. The allelic composition of the candidate genes located in the major QTL for heat requirements and flowering date located on linkage group 4 have a significant effect on these two traits indicating their potential use for breeding programs in sweet cherry to select new varieties adapted to putative future climatic conditions.

  16. LOD score exclusion analyses for candidate disease susceptibility genes using case-parents design

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DENG Hongwen; GAO Guimin

    2006-01-01

    The focus of almost all the association studies of candidate genes is to test for their importance. We recently developed a LOD score approach that can be used to test against the importance of candidate genes for complex diseases and quantitative traits in random samples. As a complementary method to regular association analyses, our LOD score approach is powerful but still affected by the population admixture, though it is more conservative. To control the confounding effect of population heterogeneity, we develop here a LOD score exclusion analysis using case-parents design, the basic design of the transmission disequilibrium test (TDT) approach that is immune to population admixture. In the analysis, specific genetic effects and inheritance models at candidate genes can be analyzed and if a LOD score is ≤ - 2.0, the locus can be excluded from having an effect larger than that specified. Simulations show that this approach has reasonable power to exclude a candidate gene having small genetic effects if it is not a disease susceptibility locus (DSL) with sample size often employed in TDT studies. Similar to association analyses with the TDT in nuclear families, our exclusion analyses are generally not affected by population admixture. The exclusion analyses may be implemented to rule out candidate genes with no or minor genetic effects as supplemental analyses for the TDT. The utility of the approach is illustrated with an application to test the importance of vitamin D receptor (VDR) gene underlying the differential risk to osteoporosis.

  17. The constrained maximal expression level owing to haploidy shapes gene content on the mammalian X chromosome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hurst, Laurence D.; Ghanbarian, Avazeh T.; Forrest, Alistair R R;

    2015-01-01

    abundant in structural proteins) are also tissues in which gene expression is relatively rare on the X chromosome. These trends cannot be fully accounted for in terms of alternative models of biased expression. In conclusion, the notion that it is hard for genes on the Therian X to be highly expressed...

  18. Chromosome engineering for alien gene introgression in wheat: Progress and prospective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chromosome engineering is a useful strategy for introgression of desirable genes from wild relatives into cultivated wheat. However, it has been a challenge to transfer a small amount of alien chromatin containing the gene of interest from one genome to another non-homologous genome through classic...

  19. Absolute Quantitation of DNA Methylation of 28 Candidate Genes in Prostate Cancer Using Pyrosequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nataڑa Vasiljeviš

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aberrant DNA methylation plays a pivotal role in carcinogenesis and its mapping is likely to provide biomarkers for improved diagnostic and risk assessment in prostate cancer (PCa. We quantified and compared absolute methylation levels among 28 candidate genes in 48 PCa and 29 benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH samples using the pyrosequencing (PSQ method to identify genes with diagnostic and prognostic potential.

  20. Haplotype sharing analysis with SNPs in candidate genes : The genetic analysis workshop 12 example

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fischer, C; Beckmann, L; Majoram, P; Meerman, GT; Chang-Claude, J

    2003-01-01

    Haplotype sharing analysis was used to investigate the association of affection status with single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) haplotypes within candidate gene 1 in one sample each from the isolated and the general population of Genetic Analysis Workshop (GAW) 12 simulated data. Gene 1 has direct

  1. Novel method to load multiple genes onto a mammalian artificial chromosome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Tóth

    Full Text Available Mammalian artificial chromosomes are natural chromosome-based vectors that may carry a vast amount of genetic material in terms of both size and number. They are reasonably stable and segregate well in both mitosis and meiosis. A platform artificial chromosome expression system (ACEs was earlier described with multiple loading sites for a modified lambda-integrase enzyme. It has been shown that this ACEs is suitable for high-level industrial protein production and the treatment of a mouse model for a devastating human disorder, Krabbe's disease. ACEs-treated mutant mice carrying a therapeutic gene lived more than four times longer than untreated counterparts. This novel gene therapy method is called combined mammalian artificial chromosome-stem cell therapy. At present, this method suffers from the limitation that a new selection marker gene should be present for each therapeutic gene loaded onto the ACEs. Complex diseases require the cooperative action of several genes for treatment, but only a limited number of selection marker genes are available and there is also a risk of serious side-effects caused by the unwanted expression of these marker genes in mammalian cells, organs and organisms. We describe here a novel method to load multiple genes onto the ACEs by using only two selectable marker genes. These markers may be removed from the ACEs before therapeutic application. This novel technology could revolutionize gene therapeutic applications targeting the treatment of complex disorders and cancers. It could also speed up cell therapy by allowing researchers to engineer a chromosome with a predetermined set of genetic factors to differentiate adult stem cells, embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem (iPS cells into cell types of therapeutic value. It is also a suitable tool for the investigation of complex biochemical pathways in basic science by producing an ACEs with several genes from a signal transduction pathway of interest.

  2. Novel method to load multiple genes onto a mammalian artificial chromosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tóth, Anna; Fodor, Katalin; Praznovszky, Tünde; Tubak, Vilmos; Udvardy, Andor; Hadlaczky, Gyula; Katona, Robert L

    2014-01-01

    Mammalian artificial chromosomes are natural chromosome-based vectors that may carry a vast amount of genetic material in terms of both size and number. They are reasonably stable and segregate well in both mitosis and meiosis. A platform artificial chromosome expression system (ACEs) was earlier described with multiple loading sites for a modified lambda-integrase enzyme. It has been shown that this ACEs is suitable for high-level industrial protein production and the treatment of a mouse model for a devastating human disorder, Krabbe's disease. ACEs-treated mutant mice carrying a therapeutic gene lived more than four times longer than untreated counterparts. This novel gene therapy method is called combined mammalian artificial chromosome-stem cell therapy. At present, this method suffers from the limitation that a new selection marker gene should be present for each therapeutic gene loaded onto the ACEs. Complex diseases require the cooperative action of several genes for treatment, but only a limited number of selection marker genes are available and there is also a risk of serious side-effects caused by the unwanted expression of these marker genes in mammalian cells, organs and organisms. We describe here a novel method to load multiple genes onto the ACEs by using only two selectable marker genes. These markers may be removed from the ACEs before therapeutic application. This novel technology could revolutionize gene therapeutic applications targeting the treatment of complex disorders and cancers. It could also speed up cell therapy by allowing researchers to engineer a chromosome with a predetermined set of genetic factors to differentiate adult stem cells, embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells into cell types of therapeutic value. It is also a suitable tool for the investigation of complex biochemical pathways in basic science by producing an ACEs with several genes from a signal transduction pathway of interest.

  3. Frequent gene conversion events between the X and Y homologous chromosomal regions in primates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirai Hirohisa

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mammalian sex-chromosomes originated from a pair of autosomes. A step-wise cessation of recombination is necessary for the proper maintenance of sex-determination and, consequently, generates a four strata structure on the X chromosome. Each stratum shows a specific per-site nucleotide sequence difference (p-distance between the X and Y chromosomes, depending on the time of recombination arrest. Stratum 4 covers the distal half of the human X chromosome short arm and the p-distance of the stratum is ~10%, on average. However, a 100-kb region, which includes KALX and VCX, in the middle of stratum 4 shows a significantly lower p-distance (1-5%, suggesting frequent sequence exchanges or gene conversions between the X and Y chromosomes in humans. To examine the evolutionary mechanism for this low p-distance region, sequences of a corresponding region including KALX/Y from seven species of non-human primates were analyzed. Results Phylogenetic analysis of this low p-distance region in humans and non-human primate species revealed that gene conversion like events have taken place at least ten times after the divergence of New World monkeys and Catarrhini (i.e., Old World monkeys and hominoids. A KALY-converted KALX allele in white-handed gibbons also suggests a possible recent gene conversion between the X and Y chromosomes. In these primate sequences, the proximal boundary of this low p-distance region is located in a LINE element shared between the X and Y chromosomes, suggesting the involvement of this element in frequent gene conversions. Together with a palindrome on the Y chromosome, a segmental palindrome structure on the X chromosome at the distal boundary near VCX, in humans and chimpanzees, may mediate frequent sequence exchanges between X and Y chromosomes. Conclusion Gene conversion events between the X and Y homologous regions have been suggested, mainly in humans. Here, we found frequent gene conversions in the

  4. Exogenous phage recombinase-independent inactivation of chromosomal genes in Yersinia enterocolitica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhar, Mahesh S; Kumar, Pradeep; Virdi, Jugsharan S

    2013-11-01

    Characterization of newly identified genes is necessary to understand their functions. Phenotypic characterization of isogenic mutants provides good understanding of the functions of the genes in wild type strains. In the present study, we report the use of linear dsDNA as a substrate for homologous recombination in Yersinia enterocolitica. A double-stranded linear recombinant DNA (LRD) containing an antibiotic resistance gene flanked by homologous regions to the target gene was created. Transformation of this LRD into Y. enterocolitica led to the replacement of targeted loci with antibiotic resistance gene. Using this strategy, two chromosomal genes namely urease C (ureC) and hemophore A (hasA) were disrupted in three strains of Y. enterocolitica. These recombinations were independent of the EPR functions. This is the first report of EPR-independent inactivation of chromosomal genes in Y. enterocolitica strains.

  5. Candidates in Astroviruses, Seadornaviruses, Cytorhabdoviruses and Coronaviruses for +1 frame overlapping genes accessed by leaky scanning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atkins John F

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Overlapping genes are common in RNA viruses where they serve as a mechanism to optimize the coding potential of compact genomes. However, annotation of overlapping genes can be difficult using conventional gene-finding software. Recently we have been using a number of complementary approaches to systematically identify previously undetected overlapping genes in RNA virus genomes. In this article we gather together a number of promising candidate new overlapping genes that may be of interest to the community. Results Overlapping gene predictions are presented for the astroviruses, seadornaviruses, cytorhabdoviruses and coronaviruses (families Astroviridae, Reoviridae, Rhabdoviridae and Coronaviridae, respectively.

  6. Chromosome locations of genes encoding human signal transduction adapter proteins, Nck (NCK), Shc (SHC1), and Grb2 (GRB2)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huebner, K; Kastury, K; Druck, T;

    1994-01-01

    Abnormalities due to chromosomal aberration or point mutation in gene products of growth factor receptors or in ras gene products, which lie on the same signaling pathway, can cause disease in animals and humans. Thus, it can be important to determine chromosomal map positions of genes encoding "...

  7. Molecular genetic approach to human meningioma: loss of genes on chromosome 22

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seizinger, B.R.; De La Monte, S.; Atkins, L.; Gusella, J.F.; Martuza, R.L.

    1987-08-01

    A molecular genetic approach employing polymorphic DNA markers has been used to investigate the role of chromosomal aberrations in meningioma, one of the most common tumors of the human nervous system. Comparison of the alleles detected by DNA markers in tumor DNA versus DNA from normal tissue revealed chromosomal alterations present in primary surgical specimens. In agreement with cytogenetic studies of cultured meningiomas, the most frequent alteration detected was loss of heterozygosity on chromosome 22. Forty of 51 patients were constitutionally heterozygous for at least one chromosome 22 DNA marker. Seventeen of the 40 constitutionally heterozygotic patients (43%) displayed hemizygosity for the corresponding marker in their meningioma tumor tissues. Loss of heterozygosity was also detected at a significantly lower frequency for markers on several other autosomes. In view of the striking association between acoustic neuroma and meningioma in bilateral acoustic neurofibromatosis and the discovery that acoustic neuromas display specific loss of genes on chromosome 22, the authors propose that a common mechanism involving chromosome 22 is operative in the development of both tumor types. Fine-structure mapping to reveal partial deletions in meningiomas may provide the means to clone and characterize a gene (or genes) of importance for tumorigenesis in this and possibly other clinically associated tumors of the human nervous system.

  8. Physical mapping, expression analysis and polymorphism survey of resistance gene analogues on chromosome 11 of rice

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Irfan A Ghazi; Prem S Srivastava; Vivek Dalal; Kishor Gaikwad; Ashok K Singh; Tilak R Sharma; Nagendra K Singh; Trilochan Mohapatra

    2009-06-01

    Rice is the first cereal genome with a finished sequence and a model crop that has important syntenic relationships with other cereal species. The objectives of our study were to identify resistance gene analogue (RGA) sequences from chromosome 11 of rice, understand their expression in other cereals and dicots by in silico analysis, determine their presence on other rice chromosomes, and evaluate the extent of polymorphism and actual expression in a set of rice genotypes. A total of 195 RGAs were predicted and physically localised. Of these, 91.79% expressed in rice, and 51.28% expressed in wheat, which was the highest among other cereals. Among monocots, sugarcane showed the highest (78.92%) expression, while among dicots, RGAs were maximally expressed in Arabidopsis (11.79%). Interestingly, two of the chromosome 11-specific RGAs were found to be expressing in all the organisms studied. Eighty RGAs of chromosome 11 had significant homology with chromosome 12, which was the maximum among all the rice chromosomes. Thirty-one per cent of the RGAs used in polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification showed polymorphism in a set of rice genotypes. Actual gene expression analysis revealed post-inoculation induction of one RGA in the rice line IRBB-4 carrying the bacterial blight resistance gene Xa-4. Our results have implications for the development of sequence-based markers and functional validation of specific RGAs in rice.

  9. Evolution of the DAZ gene and the AZFc region on primate Y chromosomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Jane-Fang

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Azoospermia Factor c (AZFc region of the human Y chromosome is a unique product of segmental duplication. It consists almost entirely of very long amplicons, represented by different colors, and is frequently deleted in subfertile men. Most of the AZFc amplicons have high sequence similarity with autosomal segments, indicating recent duplication and transposition to the Y chromosome. The Deleted in Azoospermia (DAZ gene within the red-amplicon arose from an ancestral autosomal DAZ-like (DAZL gene. It varies significantly between different men regarding to its copy number and the numbers of RNA recognition motif and DAZ repeat it encodes. We used Southern analyses to study the evolution of DAZ and AZFc amplicons on the Y chromosomes of primates. Results The Old World monkey rhesus macaque has only one DAZ gene. In contrast, the great apes have multiple copies of DAZ, ranging from 2 copies in bonobos and gorillas to at least 6 copies in orangutans, and these DAZ genes have polymorphic structures similar to those of their human counterparts. Sequences homologous to the various AZFc amplicons are present on the Y chromosomes of some but not all primates, indicating that they arrived on the Y chromosome at different times during primate evolution. Conclusion The duplication and transposition of AZFc amplicons to the human Y chromosome occurred in three waves, i.e., after the branching of the New World monkey, the gorilla, and the chimpanzee/bonobo lineages, respectively. The red-amplicon, one of the first to arrive on the Y chromosome, amplified by inverted duplication followed by direct duplication after the separation of the Old World monkey and the great ape lineages. Subsequent duplication/deletion in the various lineages gave rise to a spectrum of DAZ gene structure and copy number found in today's great apes.

  10. A potato skin SSH library yields new candidate genes for suberin biosynthesis and periderm formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soler, Marçal; Serra, Olga; Fluch, Silvia; Molinas, Marisa; Figueras, Mercè

    2011-05-01

    Potato (Solanum tuberosum) tubers are underground storage organs covered by the skin or periderm, a suberized layer that protects inner flesh from dehydration and pathogens. Understanding the molecular processes associated with periderm formation is of great importance for a better knowledge of this protective tissue and for improving the storage life of tubers. Here, to isolate new candidate genes for potato periderm, a suppression subtractive hybridization library from potato skin was performed. This library yielded a comprehensive list of 108 candidate genes that were manually sorted in functional categories according to the main cellular and metabolic processes in periderm. As expected, the list contains Suberin and wax genes, including some genes with a demonstrated role in the biosynthesis of these cell wall aliphatic compounds. Moreover, Regulation and Stress and defence genes are highly abundant in the library in general agreement with previous potato skin proteomic studies. The putative function of the genes in periderm is discussed.

  11. Candidate genes expressed in human islets and their role in the pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Storling, Joachim; Brorsson, Caroline Anna

    2013-01-01

    In type 1 diabetes (T1D), the insulin-producing β cells are destroyed by an immune-mediated process leading to complete insulin deficiency. There is a strong genetic component in T1D. Genes located in the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) region are the most important genetic determinants of disease...... exposure to proinflammatory cytokines highlighting that these genes may be involved in the response of β cells to immune attack. In this review, the compiling evidence that many of the candidate genes are expressed in islets and β cells will be presented. Further, we perform the first systematic human...... islet expression analysis of all genes located in 50 T1D-associated GWAS loci using a published RNA sequencing dataset. We find that 336 out of 857 genes are expressed in human islets and that many of these interact in protein networks. Finally, the potential pathogenetic roles of some candidate genes...

  12. Identifying Novel Candidate Genes Related to Apoptosis from a Protein-Protein Interaction Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baoman Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Apoptosis is the process of programmed cell death (PCD that occurs in multicellular organisms. This process of normal cell death is required to maintain the balance of homeostasis. In addition, some diseases, such as obesity, cancer, and neurodegenerative diseases, can be cured through apoptosis, which produces few side effects. An effective comprehension of the mechanisms underlying apoptosis will be helpful to prevent and treat some diseases. The identification of genes related to apoptosis is essential to uncover its underlying mechanisms. In this study, a computational method was proposed to identify novel candidate genes related to apoptosis. First, protein-protein interaction information was used to construct a weighted graph. Second, a shortest path algorithm was applied to the graph to search for new candidate genes. Finally, the obtained genes were filtered by a permutation test. As a result, 26 genes were obtained, and we discuss their likelihood of being novel apoptosis-related genes by collecting evidence from published literature.

  13. Copy number variations of 11 macronuclear chromosomes and their gene expression in Oxytricha trifallax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ke; Doak, Thomas G; Lipps, Hans J; Wang, Jingmei; Swart, Estienne C; Chang, Wei-Jen

    2012-08-15

    Ciliated protozoa are peculiar for their nuclear dimorphism, wherein two types of nuclei divide nuclear functions: a germline micronucleus (MIC) is transcriptionally inert during vegetative growth, but serves as the genetic blueprint for the somatic macronucleus (MAC), which is responsible for all transcripts supporting cell growth and reproduction. While all the advantages/disadvantages associated with nuclear dimorphism are not clear, an essential advantage seems to be the ability to produce a highly polyploid MAC, which then allows for the maintenance of extremely large single cells - many ciliate cells are larger than small metazoa. In some ciliate classes, chromosomes in the MAC are extensively fragmented to create extremely short chromosomes that often carry single genes, and these chromosomes may be present in different copy numbers, resulting in different ploidies. While using gene copy number to regulate gene expression is limited in most eukaryotic systems, the extensive fragmentation in some ciliate classes provides this opportunity to every MAC gene. However, it is still unclear if this mechanism is in fact used extensively in these ciliates. To address this, we have quantified copy numbers of 11 MAC chromosomes and their gene expression in Oxytricha trifallax (CI: Spirotrichea). We compared copy numbers between two subpopulations of O. trifallax, and copy numbers of 7 orthologous genes between O. trifallax and the closely related Stylonychia lemnae. We show that copy numbers of MAC chromosomes are variable, dynamic, and positively correlated to gene expression. These features might be conserved in all spirotrichs, and might exist in other classes of ciliates with heavily fragmented MAC chromosomes.

  14. A potential novel spontaneous preterm birth gene, AR, identified by linkage and association analysis of X chromosomal markers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minna K Karjalainen

    Full Text Available Preterm birth is the major cause of neonatal mortality and morbidity. In many cases, it has severe life-long consequences for the health and neurological development of the newborn child. More than 50% of all preterm births are spontaneous, and currently there is no effective prevention. Several studies suggest that genetic factors play a role in spontaneous preterm birth (SPTB. However, its genetic background is insufficiently characterized. The aim of the present study was to perform a linkage analysis of X chromosomal markers in SPTB in large northern Finnish families with recurrent SPTBs. We found a significant linkage signal (HLOD = 3.72 on chromosome locus Xq13.1 when the studied phenotype was being born preterm. There were no significant linkage signals when the studied phenotype was giving preterm deliveries. Two functional candidate genes, those encoding the androgen receptor (AR and the interleukin-2 receptor gamma subunit (IL2RG, located near this locus were analyzed as candidates for SPTB in subsequent case-control association analyses. Nine single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs within these genes and an AR exon-1 CAG repeat, which was previously demonstrated to be functionally significant, were analyzed in mothers with preterm delivery (n = 272 and their offspring (n = 269, and in mothers with exclusively term deliveries (n = 201 and their offspring (n = 199, all originating from northern Finland. A replication study population consisting of individuals born preterm (n = 111 and term (n = 197 from southern Finland was also analyzed. Long AR CAG repeats (≥ 26 were overrepresented and short repeats (≤ 19 underrepresented in individuals born preterm compared to those born at term. Thus, our linkage and association results emphasize the role of the fetal genome in genetic predisposition to SPTB and implicate AR as a potential novel fetal susceptibility gene for SPTB.

  15. The gene for calcium-modulating cyclophilin ligand (CAMLG) is located on human Chromosome 5q23 and a syntenic region of mouse chromosome 13

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bram, R.J.; Valentine, V.; Shapiro, D.N. [St. Jude Children`s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN (United States)]|[Univ. of Tennessee, Memphis, TN (United States)] [and others

    1996-01-15

    The CAMLG gene encodes a novel cyclophilin B-binding protein called calcium-modulating cyclophilin ligand, which appears to be involved in the regulation of calcium signaling in T lymphocytes and other cells. The murine homolog, Caml, was localized by interspecific backcross analysis in the middle of chromosome 13. By fluorescence in situ hybridization, this gene was localized to human chromosome 5 in a region (q23) known to be syntenic to mouse chromosome 13. These results provide further evidence supporting the extensive homology between human chromosome 5q and mouse chromosome 13. In addition, the results will provide a basis for further evaluation of cytogenetic anomalies that may contribute to inherited defects in calcium signaling or immune system function. 15 refs., 2 figs.

  16. Joint QTL mapping and gene expression analysis identify positional candidate genes influencing pork quality traits

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Prendes, Rayner; Quintanilla, Raquel; Cánovas, Angela; Manunza, Arianna; Figueiredo Cardoso, Tainã; Jordana, Jordi; Noguera, José Luis; Pena, Ramona N.; Amills, Marcel

    2017-01-01

    Meat quality traits have an increasing importance in the pig industry because of their strong impact on consumer acceptance. Herewith, we have combined phenotypic and microarray expression data to map loci with potential effects on five meat quality traits recorded in the longissimus dorsi (LD) and gluteus medius (GM) muscles of 350 Duroc pigs, i.e. pH at 24 hours post-mortem (pH24), electric conductivity (CE) and muscle redness (a*), lightness (L*) and yellowness (b*). We have found significant genome-wide associations for CE of LD on SSC4 (~104 Mb), SSC5 (~15 Mb) and SSC13 (~137 Mb), while several additional regions were significantly associated with meat quality traits at the chromosome-wide level. There was a low positional concordance between the associations found for LD and GM traits, a feature that reflects the existence of differences in the genetic determinism of meat quality phenotypes in these two muscles. The performance of an eQTL search for SNPs mapping to the regions associated with meat quality traits demonstrated that the GM a* SSC3 and pH24 SSC17 QTL display positional concordance with cis-eQTL regulating the expression of several genes with a potential role on muscle metabolism. PMID:28054563

  17. Structural comparison and chromosomal localization of the human and mouse IL-13 genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKenzie, A.N.J.; Sato, A.; Doyle, E.L.; Zurawski, G. (DNAX Research Institute of Cellular and Molecular Biology, Palo Alto, CA (United States)); Li, X.; Milatovich, A.; Francke, U. (Stanford Univ. Medical School, CA (United States)); Largaespada, D.A.; Copeland, N.G.; Jenkins, N.A. (National Cancer Institute, Frederick, MD (United States))

    1993-06-15

    The genomic structure of the recently described cytokine IL-13 has been determined for both human and mouse genes. The nucleotide sequence of a 4.6-kb DNA segment of the human gene is described. The human IL-13 gene (IL 13) occurs as a single copy in the haploid genome and maps to human chromosome 5. A 4.3-kb DNA fragment of the mouse IL-13 gene (Il 13) has been sequenced and found to occur as a single copy, mapping to mouse chromosome 11. Intrachromosomal mapping studies revealed that both genes contain four exons and three introns and show a high degree of sequence identify throughout their length. Potential recognition sequences for transcription factors that are present in the 5'-flanking region and are conserved between both genes include IFN-responsive elements, binding sites for AP-1, AP-2, and AP-3, an NF-lL 6 site, and a TATA-like sequence. Both genes map to chromosomal locations adjacent to genes encoding other cytokines, including IL-3, GM-CSF, IL-5, and IL-4 suggesting that IL-13 is another member of this cytokine gene family that may have arisen by gene duplication. 26 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. A novel candidate locus on chromosome 11p14.1-p11.2 for autosomal dominant hereditary spastic paraplegia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Guo-hua; TANG Bei-sha; HU Zheng-mao; SHEN Lu; JIANG Hong; REN Zhi-jun; LIU Xiao-min; XIA Kun; GUO Peng; PAN Qian

    2008-01-01

    Background Hereditary spastic paraplegia(HSP)is a group of inherited neurodegenerative disorders with the shared characteristics of slowly progressive spasticity and weakness of the lower limbs.Thirteen loci for autosomal dominant HSP have been mapped.Methods A Chinese family with HSP was found in the Shandong province and Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region of China and genomic DNA of all 19 family members was isolated.After exclusion of known autosomal dominant loci,a genome wide scan and linkage analysis were performed.Results The known autosomal dominant loci of SPG3A,SPG4,SPG6,SPG8,SPG9,SPG10,SPGl2,SPG13,SPG17,SPG19,SPG29,SPG31 and SPG33 were excluded by linkage analysis.The results of a genome wide scan demonstrated candidate linkage to a locus on chromosome 11p14.1-p11.2,over an 18.88 cM interval between markers D11S1324 and D11S1933.A maximal,two point LOD score of 2.36 for marker D11S935 at a recombination fraction(Φ)of 0 and a multipoint LOD score of 2.36 for markers D11S1776,D11S1751,D11S1392,D11S4203,D11S935,D11S4083,and D11S4148at Φ=0,suggest linkage to this locus.Conclusion The HSP neuropathy in this family may represent a novel genetic entity,which will facilitate discovery of this causative gene.

  19. miRNA gene counts in chromosomes vary widely in a species and biogenesis of miRNA largely depends on transcription or posttranscriptional processing of coding genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atanu eGhorai

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs target specific mRNA(s to silence its expression and thereby regulate various cellular processes. We have investigated miRNA gene counts in chromosomes for 20 different species and observed wide variation. Certain chromosomes have extremely high number of miRNA gene compared with others in all the species. For example, high number of miRNA gene in X chromosome and the least or absence of miRNA gene in Y chromosome was observed in all species. To search the criteria governing such variation of miRNA gene counts in chromosomes, we have selected three parameters- length, number of non-coding and coding genes in a chromosome. We have calculated Pearson’s correlation coefficient of miRNA gene counts with length, number of non-coding and coding genes in a chromosome for all 20 species. Major number of species showed that number of miRNA gene was not correlated with chromosome length. 85% of species under study showed strong positive correlation coefficient (r≥0.5 between the numbers of miRNA gene vs non-coding gene in chromosomes as expected because miRNA is a sub-set of non-coding genes. 55% species under study showed strong positive correlation coefficient (r≥0.5 between numbers of miRNA gene vs coding gene. We hypothesize biogenesis of miRNA largely depends on coding genes, an evolutionary conserved process. Chromosomes having higher number of miRNA genes will be most likely playing regulatory roles in several cellular processes including different disorders. In humans, cancer and cardiovascular disease associated miRNAs are mostly intergenic and located in Chromosome 19, X, 14 and 1.

  20. Chromosome-biased binding and gene regulation by the Caenorhabditis elegans DRM complex.

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    Tomoko M Tabuchi

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available DRM is a conserved transcription factor complex that includes E2F/DP and pRB family proteins and plays important roles in development and cancer. Here we describe new aspects of DRM binding and function revealed through genome-wide analyses of the Caenorhabditis elegans DRM subunit LIN-54. We show that LIN-54 DNA-binding activity recruits DRM to promoters enriched for adjacent putative E2F/DP and LIN-54 binding sites, suggesting that these two DNA-binding moieties together direct DRM to its target genes. Chromatin immunoprecipitation and gene expression profiling reveals conserved roles for DRM in regulating genes involved in cell division, development, and reproduction. We find that LIN-54 promotes expression of reproduction genes in the germline, but prevents ectopic activation of germline-specific genes in embryonic soma. Strikingly, C. elegans DRM does not act uniformly throughout the genome: the DRM recruitment motif, DRM binding, and DRM-regulated embryonic genes are all under-represented on the X chromosome. However, germline genes down-regulated in lin-54 mutants are over-represented on the X chromosome. We discuss models for how loss of autosome-bound DRM may enhance germline X chromosome silencing. We propose that autosome-enriched binding of DRM arose in C. elegans as a consequence of germline X chromosome silencing and the evolutionary redistribution of germline-expressed and essential target genes to autosomes. Sex chromosome gene regulation may thus have profound evolutionary effects on genome organization and transcriptional regulatory networks.

  1. Allele diversity for abiotic stress responsive candidate genes in chickpea reference set using gene based SNP markers

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    Manish eRoorkiwal

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Chickpea is an important food legume crop for the semi-arid regions, however, its productivity is adversely affected by various biotic and abiotic stresses. Identification of candidate genes associated with abiotic stress response will help breeding efforts aiming to enhance its productivity. With this objective, 10 abiotic stress responsive candidate genes were selected on the basis of prior knowledge of this complex trait. These 10 genes were subjected to allele specific sequencing across a chickpea reference set comprising 300 genotypes including 211 accessions of chickpea mini core collection. A total of 1.3 Mbp sequence data were generated. Multiple sequence alignment revealed 79 SNPs and 41 indels in nine genes while the CAP2 gene was found to be conserved across all the genotypes. Among ten candidate genes, the maximum number of SNPs (34 was observed in abscisic acid stress and ripening (ASR gene including 22 transitions, 11 transversions and one tri-allelic SNP. Nucleotide diversity varied from 0.0004 to 0.0029 while PIC values ranged from 0.01 (AKIN gene to 0.43 (CAP2 promoter. Haplotype analysis revealed that alleles were represented by more than two haplotype blocks, except alleles of the CAP2 and sucrose synthase (SuSy gene, where only one haplotype was identified. These genes can be used for association analysis and if validated, may be useful for enhancing abiotic stress, including drought tolerance, through molecular breeding.

  2. The evolution of vertebrate somatostatin receptors and their gene regions involves extensive chromosomal rearrangements

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    Ocampo Daza Daniel

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Somatostatin and its related neuroendocrine peptides have a wide variety of physiological functions that are mediated by five somatostatin receptors with gene names SSTR1-5 in mammals. To resolve their evolution in vertebrates we have investigated the SSTR genes and a large number of adjacent gene families by phylogeny and conserved synteny analyses in a broad range of vertebrate species. Results We find that the SSTRs form two families that belong to distinct paralogons. We observe not only chromosomal similarities reflecting the paralogy relationships between the SSTR-bearing chromosome regions, but also extensive rearrangements between these regions in teleost fish genomes, including fusions and translocations followed by reshuffling through intrachromosomal rearrangements. These events obscure the paralogy relationships but are still tractable thanks to the many genomes now available. We have identified a previously unrecognized SSTR subtype, SSTR6, previously misidentified as either SSTR1 or SSTR4. Conclusions Two ancestral SSTR-bearing chromosome regions were duplicated in the two basal vertebrate tetraploidizations (2R. One of these ancestral SSTR genes generated SSTR2, -3 and -5, the other gave rise to SSTR1, -4 and -6. Subsequently SSTR6 was lost in tetrapods and SSTR4 in teleosts. Our study shows that extensive chromosomal rearrangements have taken place between related chromosome regions in teleosts, but that these events can be resolved by investigating several distantly related species.

  3. POF regulates the expression of genes on the fourth chromosome in Drosophila melanogaster by binding to nascent RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Anna-Mia; Stenberg, Per; Allgardsson, Anders; Larsson, Jan

    2012-06-01

    In Drosophila, two chromosome-wide compensatory systems have been characterized: the dosage compensation system that acts on the male X chromosome and the chromosome-specific regulation of genes located on the heterochromatic fourth chromosome. Dosage compensation in Drosophila is accomplished by hypertranscription of the single male X chromosome mediated by the male-specific lethal (MSL) complex. The mechanism of this compensation is suggested to involve enhanced transcriptional elongation mediated by the MSL complex, while the mechanism of compensation mediated by the painting of fourth (POF) protein on the fourth chromosome has remained elusive. Here, we show that POF binds to nascent RNA, and this binding is associated with increased transcription output from chromosome 4. We also show that genes located in heterochromatic regions spend less time in transition from the site of transcription to the nuclear envelope. These results provide useful insights into the means by which genes in heterochromatic regions can overcome the repressive influence of their hostile environment.

  4. High Prevalence and Clinical Relevance of Genes Affected by Chromosomal Breaks in Colorectal Cancer.

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    Evert van den Broek

    Full Text Available Cancer is caused by somatic DNA alterations such as gene point mutations, DNA copy number aberrations (CNA and structural variants (SVs. Genome-wide analyses of SVs in large sample series with well-documented clinical information are still scarce. Consequently, the impact of SVs on carcinogenesis and patient outcome remains poorly understood. This study aimed to perform a systematic analysis of genes that are affected by CNA-associated chromosomal breaks in colorectal cancer (CRC and to determine the clinical relevance of recurrent breakpoint genes.Primary CRC samples of patients with metastatic disease from CAIRO and CAIRO2 clinical trials were previously characterized by array-comparative genomic hybridization. These data were now used to determine the prevalence of CNA-associated chromosomal breaks within genes across 352 CRC samples. In addition, mutation status of the commonly affected APC, TP53, KRAS, PIK3CA, FBXW7, SMAD4, BRAF and NRAS genes was determined for 204 CRC samples by targeted massive parallel sequencing. Clinical relevance was assessed upon stratification of patients based on gene mutations and gene breakpoints that were observed in >3% of CRC cases.In total, 748 genes were identified that were recurrently affected by chromosomal breaks (FDR 3% of cases, indicating that prevalence of gene breakpoints is comparable to the prevalence of well-known gene point mutations. Patient stratification based on gene breakpoints and point mutations revealed one CRC subtype with very poor prognosis.We conclude that CNA-associated chromosomal breaks within genes represent a highly prevalent and clinically relevant subset of SVs in CRC.

  5. SORBS1 gene, a new candidate for diabetic nephropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Germain, Marine; Pezzolesi, Marcus G; Sandholm, Niina

    2015-01-01

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: The genetic determinants of diabetic nephropathy remain poorly understood. We aimed to identify novel susceptibility genes for diabetic nephropathy. METHODS: We performed a genome-wide association study using 1000 Genomes-based imputation to compare type 1 diabetic nephropathy...... consistently and significantly (p diabetic nephropathy. The minor rs1326934-C allele was less frequent in cases than in controls (0.34 vs 0.43) and was associated with a decreased risk for diabetic nephropathy (OR 0.70; 95% CI 0.60, 0.82). However, this association was not observed...... in a second stage with two additional diabetic nephropathy cohorts, the All Ireland-Warren 3-Genetics of Kidneys in Diabetes UK and Republic of Ireland (UK-ROI; p = 0.15) and the Finnish Diabetic Nephropathy (FinnDiane; p = 0.44) studies, totalling 2,142 cases and 2,494 controls. Altogether, the random...

  6. The Constrained Maximal Expression Level Owing to Haploidy Shapes Gene Content on the Mammalian X Chromosome

    KAUST Repository

    Hurst, Laurence D.

    2015-12-18

    X chromosomes are unusual in many regards, not least of which is their nonrandom gene content. The causes of this bias are commonly discussed in the context of sexual antagonism and the avoidance of activity in the male germline. Here, we examine the notion that, at least in some taxa, functionally biased gene content may more profoundly be shaped by limits imposed on gene expression owing to haploid expression of the X chromosome. Notably, if the X, as in primates, is transcribed at rates comparable to the ancestral rate (per promoter) prior to the X chromosome formation, then the X is not a tolerable environment for genes with very high maximal net levels of expression, owing to transcriptional traffic jams. We test this hypothesis using The Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) and data from the Functional Annotation of the Mammalian Genome (FANTOM5) project. As predicted, the maximal expression of human X-linked genes is much lower than that of genes on autosomes: on average, maximal expression is three times lower on the X chromosome than on autosomes. Similarly, autosome-to-X retroposition events are associated with lower maximal expression of retrogenes on the X than seen for X-to-autosome retrogenes on autosomes. Also as expected, X-linked genes have a lesser degree of increase in gene expression than autosomal ones (compared to the human/Chimpanzee common ancestor) if highly expressed, but not if lowly expressed. The traffic jam model also explains the known lower breadth of expression for genes on the X (and the Z of birds), as genes with broad expression are, on average, those with high maximal expression. As then further predicted, highly expressed tissue-specific genes are also rare on the X and broadly expressed genes on the X tend to be lowly expressed, both indicating that the trend is shaped by the maximal expression level not the breadth of expression per se. Importantly, a limit to the maximal expression level explains biased tissue of expression

  7. The Constrained Maximal Expression Level Owing to Haploidy Shapes Gene Content on the Mammalian X Chromosome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurence D Hurst

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available X chromosomes are unusual in many regards, not least of which is their nonrandom gene content. The causes of this bias are commonly discussed in the context of sexual antagonism and the avoidance of activity in the male germline. Here, we examine the notion that, at least in some taxa, functionally biased gene content may more profoundly be shaped by limits imposed on gene expression owing to haploid expression of the X chromosome. Notably, if the X, as in primates, is transcribed at rates comparable to the ancestral rate (per promoter prior to the X chromosome formation, then the X is not a tolerable environment for genes with very high maximal net levels of expression, owing to transcriptional traffic jams. We test this hypothesis using The Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE and data from the Functional Annotation of the Mammalian Genome (FANTOM5 project. As predicted, the maximal expression of human X-linked genes is much lower than that of genes on autosomes: on average, maximal expression is three times lower on the X chromosome than on autosomes. Similarly, autosome-to-X retroposition events are associated with lower maximal expression of retrogenes on the X than seen for X-to-autosome retrogenes on autosomes. Also as expected, X-linked genes have a lesser degree of increase in gene expression than autosomal ones (compared to the human/Chimpanzee common ancestor if highly expressed, but not if lowly expressed. The traffic jam model also explains the known lower breadth of expression for genes on the X (and the Z of birds, as genes with broad expression are, on average, those with high maximal expression. As then further predicted, highly expressed tissue-specific genes are also rare on the X and broadly expressed genes on the X tend to be lowly expressed, both indicating that the trend is shaped by the maximal expression level not the breadth of expression per se. Importantly, a limit to the maximal expression level explains biased

  8. The Constrained Maximal Expression Level Owing to Haploidy Shapes Gene Content on the Mammalian X Chromosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurst, Laurence D; Ghanbarian, Avazeh T; Forrest, Alistair R R; Huminiecki, Lukasz

    2015-12-01

    X chromosomes are unusual in many regards, not least of which is their nonrandom gene content. The causes of this bias are commonly discussed in the context of sexual antagonism and the avoidance of activity in the male germline. Here, we examine the notion that, at least in some taxa, functionally biased gene content may more profoundly be shaped by limits imposed on gene expression owing to haploid expression of the X chromosome. Notably, if the X, as in primates, is transcribed at rates comparable to the ancestral rate (per promoter) prior to the X chromosome formation, then the X is not a tolerable environment for genes with very high maximal net levels of expression, owing to transcriptional traffic jams. We test this hypothesis using The Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) and data from the Functional Annotation of the Mammalian Genome (FANTOM5) project. As predicted, the maximal expression of human X-linked genes is much lower than that of genes on autosomes: on average, maximal expression is three times lower on the X chromosome than on autosomes. Similarly, autosome-to-X retroposition events are associated with lower maximal expression of retrogenes on the X than seen for X-to-autosome retrogenes on autosomes. Also as expected, X-linked genes have a lesser degree of increase in gene expression than autosomal ones (compared to the human/Chimpanzee common ancestor) if highly expressed, but not if lowly expressed. The traffic jam model also explains the known lower breadth of expression for genes on the X (and the Z of birds), as genes with broad expression are, on average, those with high maximal expression. As then further predicted, highly expressed tissue-specific genes are also rare on the X and broadly expressed genes on the X tend to be lowly expressed, both indicating that the trend is shaped by the maximal expression level not the breadth of expression per se. Importantly, a limit to the maximal expression level explains biased tissue of expression

  9. Dissecting the organ specificity of insecticide resistance candidate genes in Anopheles gambiae: known and novel candidate genes

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Background The elevated expression of enzymes with insecticide metabolism activity can lead to high levels of insecticide resistance in the malaria vector, Anopheles gambiae. In this study, adult female mosquitoes from an insecticide susceptible and resistant strain were dissected into four different body parts. RNA from each of these samples was used in microarray analysis to determine the enrichment patterns of the key detoxification gene families within the mosquito and to identify additio...

  10. Prioritization and evaluation of depression candidate genes by combining multidimensional data resources.

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    Chung-Feng Kao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Large scale and individual genetic studies have suggested numerous susceptible genes for depression in the past decade without conclusive results. There is a strong need to review and integrate multi-dimensional data for follow up validation. The present study aimed to apply prioritization procedures to build-up an evidence-based candidate genes dataset for depression. METHODS: Depression candidate genes were collected in human and animal studies across various data resources. Each gene was scored according to its magnitude of evidence related to depression and was multiplied by a source-specific weight to form a combined score measure. All genes were evaluated through a prioritization system to obtain an optimal weight matrix to rank their relative importance with depression using the combined scores. The resulting candidate gene list for depression (DEPgenes was further evaluated by a genome-wide association (GWA dataset and microarray gene expression in human tissues. RESULTS: A total of 5,055 candidate genes (4,850 genes from human and 387 genes from animal studies with 182 being overlapped were included from seven data sources. Through the prioritization procedures, we identified 169 DEPgenes, which exhibited high chance to be associated with depression in GWA dataset (Wilcoxon rank-sum test, p = 0.00005. Additionally, the DEPgenes had a higher percentage to express in human brain or nerve related tissues than non-DEPgenes, supporting the neurotransmitter and neuroplasticity theories in depression. CONCLUSIONS: With comprehensive data collection and curation and an application of integrative approach, we successfully generated DEPgenes through an effective gene prioritization system. The prioritized DEPgenes are promising for future biological experiments or replication efforts to discover the underlying molecular mechanisms for depression.

  11. Macronuclear genome structure of the ciliate Nyctotherus ovalis: Single-gene chromosomes and tiny introns

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    Landweber Laura F

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nyctotherus ovalis is a single-celled eukaryote that has hydrogen-producing mitochondria and lives in the hindgut of cockroaches. Like all members of the ciliate taxon, it has two types of nuclei, a micronucleus and a macronucleus. N. ovalis generates its macronuclear chromosomes by forming polytene chromosomes that subsequently develop into macronuclear chromosomes by DNA elimination and rearrangement. Results We examined the structure of these gene-sized macronuclear chromosomes in N. ovalis. We determined the telomeres, subtelomeric regions, UTRs, coding regions and introns by sequencing a large set of macronuclear DNA sequences (4,242 and cDNAs (5,484 and comparing them with each other. The telomeres consist of repeats CCC(AAAACCCCn, similar to those in spirotrichous ciliates such as Euplotes, Sterkiella (Oxytricha and Stylonychia. Per sequenced chromosome we found evidence for either a single protein-coding gene, a single tRNA, or the complete ribosomal RNAs cluster. Hence the chromosomes appear to encode single transcripts. In the short subtelomeric regions we identified a few overrepresented motifs that could be involved in gene regulation, but there is no consensus polyadenylation site. The introns are short (21–29 nucleotides, and a significant fraction (1/3 of the tiny introns is conserved in the distantly related ciliate Paramecium tetraurelia. As has been observed in P. tetraurelia, the N. ovalis introns tend to contain in-frame stop codons or have a length that is not dividable by three. This pattern causes premature termination of mRNA translation in the event of intron retention, and potentially degradation of unspliced mRNAs by the nonsense-mediated mRNA decay pathway. Conclusion The combination of short leaders, tiny introns and single genes leads to very minimal macronuclear chromosomes. The smallest we identified contained only 150 nucleotides.

  12. Gene Duplication and Gene Expression Changes Play a Role in the Evolution of Candidate Pollen Feeding Genes in Heliconius Butterflies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Gilbert; Macias-Muñoz, Aide; Briscoe, Adriana D

    2016-09-02

    Heliconius possess a unique ability among butterflies to feed on pollen. Pollen feeding significantly extends their lifespan, and is thought to have been important to the diversification of the genus. We used RNA sequencing to examine feeding-related gene expression in the mouthparts of four species of Heliconius and one nonpollen feeding species, Eueides isabella We hypothesized that genes involved in morphology and protein metabolism might be upregulated in Heliconius because they have longer proboscides than Eueides, and because pollen contains more protein than nectar. Using de novo transcriptome assemblies, we tested these hypotheses by comparing gene expression in mouthparts against antennae and legs. We first looked for genes upregulated in mouthparts across all five species and discovered several hundred genes, many of which had functional annotations involving metabolism of proteins (cocoonase), lipids, and carbohydrates. We then looked specifically within Heliconius where we found eleven common upregulated genes with roles in morphology (CPR cuticle proteins), behavior (takeout-like), and metabolism (luciferase-like). Closer examination of these candidates revealed that cocoonase underwent several duplications along the lineage leading to heliconiine butterflies, including two Heliconius-specific duplications. Luciferase-like genes also underwent duplication within lepidopterans, and upregulation in Heliconius mouthparts. Reverse-transcription PCR confirmed that three cocoonases, a peptidase, and one luciferase-like gene are expressed in the proboscis with little to no expression in labial palps and salivary glands. Our results suggest pollen feeding, like other dietary specializations, was likely facilitated by adaptive expansions of preexisting genes-and that the butterfly proboscis is involved in digestive enzyme production.

  13. CHROMOSOME 3 MAY HARBOR MULTIPLE TUMOR SUPPRESSOR GENES ASSOCIATED WITH PRIMARY GLIOBLASTOMA MULTIFORME

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡杰; 江澄川; 吴浩强; 彭颂先; 唐婉君; 陈商群

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To investigate whether deletion of chromosome 3 is involved in the carcinogenesis of primary glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) and to localize the possible common deletion region in the aforementioned chromosome. Methods: PCR based microsatellite polymorphism analyses were performed to detect loss of heterozygosity (LOH). Twenty-three loci on chromosome 3 were examined in 20 cases of GBM. Fluorescence-labeled primers and Perkin Elmer 377 DNA Sequencer were applied. Results: 50% informative cases of GBM displayed LOH on chromosome 3. 50% of informative cases displayed LOH on 3q and 35% on 3p. 25.6% of informative loci showed LOH in our series, in which frequent LOH were observed in the chromosomal region from loci D3S1614 (42.9%) to D3S1565 (35.3%) on 3q24(27 and at loci D3S1569 (35.3%) on 3q22(23 and D3S1289 (33.3%) on 3p14.1(14.3. Conclusion: Loss of genetic material on chromosome 3 may play an important part in the tumorigenesis of GBM. The chromosomal regions from loci D3S1614 to D3S1565 on 3q24(27 and at loci D3S1569 on 3q22(23 and D3S1289 on 3p14.1(14.3 are potential sites for novel tumor suppressor genes associated with GBM.

  14. Identification of putative candidate genes for juvenile wood density in Pinus radiata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xinguo; Wu, Harry X; Southerton, Simon G

    2012-08-01

    Wood formation is a complex developmental process driven by the annual activity of the vascular cambium. Conifers usually produce juvenile wood at young ages followed by mature wood for the rest of their lifetime. Juvenile wood exhibits poorer wood quality (i.e., lower density) compared with mature wood and can account for up to 50% of short-rotation harvested logs, thus representing a major challenge for commercial forestry globally. Wood density is an important quality trait for many timber-related products. Understanding the molecular mechanisms involved in the regulation of juvenile wood density is critical for the improvement of juvenile wood quality via marker-aided selection. A previous study has identified several candidate genes affecting mature wood density in Picea sitchensis (Bong.) Carr.; however, genes associated with juvenile wood density in conifers remain poorly characterized. Here, cDNA microarrays containing 3320 xylem unigenes were used to investigate genes differentially transcribed in juvenile wood with high (HD) and low density (LD) in Pinus radiata D.Don. In total, 814 xylem unigenes with differential transcription were identified in at least one of two microarray experiments and 73 genes (45 for HD, 28 for LD) were identified in both experiments, thus representing putative candidate genes for juvenile wood density. Interestingly, cellulose synthases (PrCesA3, PrCesA11) and sucrose synthase (SuSy), which are involved in secondary cell wall formation, had stronger transcription in juvenile wood with HD, while genes functioning in primary wall formation (pectin synthesis, cell expansion and other modifications) were more transcribed in LD wood. Cell wall genes encoding monolignol biosynthesis enzymes, arabinogalactan proteins, actins and tubulins were differentially transcribed in either HD or LD juvenile wood; however, the latter had exclusively greater transcription of genes involved in monolignol polymerization (laccase and peroxidase). The

  15. Mutation screening of two candidate genes from 13q32 in families affected with Bipolar disorder: human peptide transporter (SLC15A1 and human glypican5 (GPC5

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Detera-Wadleigh S

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multiple candidate regions as sites for Schizophrenia and Bipolar susceptibility genes have been reported, suggesting heterogeneity of susceptibility genes or oligogenic inheritance. Linkage analysis has suggested chromosome 13q32 as one of the regions with evidence of linkage to Schizophrenia and, separately, to Bipolar disorder (BP. SLC15A1 and GPC5 are two of the candidate genes within an approximately 10-cM region of linkage on chromosome 13q32. In order to identify a possible role for these candidates as susceptibility genes, we performed mutation screening on the coding regions of these two genes in 7 families (n-20 affected with Bipolar disorder showing linkage to 13q32. Results Genomic organization revealed 23 exons in SLC15A1 and 8 exons in GPC5 gene respectively. Sequencing of the exons did not reveal mutations in the GPC5 gene in the 7 families affected with BP. Two polymorphic variants were discovered in the SLC15A1 gene. One was T to C substitution in the third position of codon encoding alanine at 1403 position of mRNA in exon 17, and the other was A to G substitution in the untranslated region at position 2242 of mRNA in exon 23. Conclusions Mutation analysis of 2 candidate genes for Bipolar disorder on chromosome 13q32 did not identify any potentially causative mutations within the coding regions or splice junctions of the SLC15A1 or GPC5 genes in 7 families showing linkage to 13q32. Further studies of the regulatory regions are needed to completely exclude these genes as causative for Bipolar disorder.

  16. No excess gene movement is detected off the avian or lepidopteran Z chromosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toups, Melissa A; Pease, James B; Hahn, Matthew W

    2011-01-01

    Most of our knowledge of sex-chromosome evolution comes from male heterogametic (XX/XY) taxa. With the genome sequencing of multiple female heterogametic (ZZ/ZW) taxa, we can now ask whether there are patterns of evolution common to both sex chromosome systems. In all XX/XY systems examined to date, there is an excess of testis-biased retrogenes moving from the X chromosome to the autosomes, which is hypothesized to result from either sexually antagonistic selection or escape from meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI). We examined RNA-mediated (retrotransposed) and DNA-mediated gene movement in two independently evolved ZZ/ZW systems, birds (chicken and zebra finch) and lepidopterans (silkworm). Even with sexually antagonistic selection likely operating in both taxa and MSCI having been identified in the chicken, we find no evidence for an excess of genes moving from the Z chromosome to the autosomes in either lineage. We detected no excess for either RNA- or DNA-mediated duplicates, across a range of approaches and methods. We offer some potential explanations for this difference between XX/XY and ZZ/ZW sex chromosome systems, but further work is needed to distinguish among these hypotheses. Regardless of the root causes, we have identified an additional, potentially inherent, difference between XX/XY and ZZ/ZW systems.

  17. RNA-seq analysis reveals new candidate genes for drip loss in a Pietrain × Duroc × Landrace × Yorkshire population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bojiang; Liu, Kaiqing; Weng, Qiannan; Li, Pinghua; Wei, Wei; Li, Qifa; Chen, Jie; Huang, Ruihua; Wu, Wangjun; Liu, Honglin

    2016-04-01

    Drip loss, one of the most important meat quality traits, is characterized by low heritability. To date, the genetic factors affecting the drip loss trait have not been clearly elucidated. The objective of this study was to identify critical candidate genes affecting drip loss. First, we generated a Pietrain × Duroc × Landrace × Yorkshire commercial pig population and obtained phenotypic values for the drip loss trait. Furthermore, we constructed two RNA libraries from pooled samples of longissimus dorsi muscles with the highest (H group) and lowest (L group) drip loss and identified the differentially expressed genes (DEGs) between these extreme phenotypes using RNA-seq technology. In total, 25 883 genes were detected in the H and L group libraries, and none was specifically expressed in only one library. Comparative analysis of gene expression levels found that 150 genes were differentially expressed, of which 127 were upregulated and 23 were downregulated in the H group relative to the L group. In addition, 68 drip loss quantitative trait loci (QTL) overlapping with 63 DEGs were identified, and these QTL were distributed mainly on chromosomes 1, 2, 5 and 6. Interestingly, the triadin (TRDN) gene, which is involved in muscle contraction and fat deposition, and the myostatin (MSTN) gene, which has a role in muscle growth, were localized to more than two drip loss QTL, suggesting that both are critical candidate genes responsible for drip loss.

  18. Chromosomal localization of the human apolipoprotein B gene and detection of homologous RNA in monkey intestine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deeb, S.S.; Disteche, C.; Motulsky, A.G.; Lebo, R.V.; Kan, Y.W.

    1986-01-01

    A cDNA clone of the human apolipoprotein B-100 was used as a hybridization probe to detect homologous sequences in both flow-sorted and in situ metaphase chromosomes. The results indicate that the gene encoding this protein is on the distal end of the short arm of chromosome 2 (2p23-2p24). RNA isolated from monkey small intestine contained sequences (6.5 and 18 kilobases) homologous to the cDNA of apolipoprotein B-100. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that one gene codes for both the intestinal (B-48) and the hepatic (B-100) forms.

  19. Mapping a candidate gene (MdMYB10) for red flesh and foliage colour in apple

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chagné, David; Carlisle, Charmaine M; Blond, Céline; Volz, Richard K; Whitworth, Claire J; Oraguzie, Nnadozie C; Crowhurst, Ross N; Allan, Andrew C; Espley, Richard V; Hellens, Roger P; Gardiner, Susan E

    2007-01-01

    Background Integrating plant genomics and classical breeding is a challenge for both plant breeders and molecular biologists. Marker-assisted selection (MAS) is a tool that can be used to accelerate the development of novel apple varieties such as cultivars that have fruit with anthocyanin through to the core. In addition, determining the inheritance of novel alleles, such as the one responsible for red flesh, adds to our understanding of allelic variation. Our goal was to map candidate anthocyanin biosynthetic and regulatory genes in a population segregating for the red flesh phenotypes. Results We have identified the Rni locus, a major genetic determinant of the red foliage and red colour in the core of apple fruit. In a population segregating for the red flesh and foliage phenotype we have determined the inheritance of the Rni locus and DNA polymorphisms of candidate anthocyanin biosynthetic and regulatory genes. Simple Sequence Repeats (SSRs) and Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) in the candidate genes were also located on an apple genetic map. We have shown that the MdMYB10 gene co-segregates with the Rni locus and is on Linkage Group (LG) 09 of the apple genome. Conclusion We have performed candidate gene mapping in a fruit tree crop and have provided genetic evidence that red colouration in the fruit core as well as red foliage are both controlled by a single locus named Rni. We have shown that the transcription factor MdMYB10 may be the gene underlying Rni as there were no recombinants between the marker for this gene and the red phenotype in a population of 516 individuals. Associating markers derived from candidate genes with a desirable phenotypic trait has demonstrated the application of genomic tools in a breeding programme of a horticultural crop species. PMID:17608951

  20. Mapping a candidate gene (MdMYB10 for red flesh and foliage colour in apple

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allan Andrew C

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Integrating plant genomics and classical breeding is a challenge for both plant breeders and molecular biologists. Marker-assisted selection (MAS is a tool that can be used to accelerate the development of novel apple varieties such as cultivars that have fruit with anthocyanin through to the core. In addition, determining the inheritance of novel alleles, such as the one responsible for red flesh, adds to our understanding of allelic variation. Our goal was to map candidate anthocyanin biosynthetic and regulatory genes in a population segregating for the red flesh phenotypes. Results We have identified the Rni locus, a major genetic determinant of the red foliage and red colour in the core of apple fruit. In a population segregating for the red flesh and foliage phenotype we have determined the inheritance of the Rni locus and DNA polymorphisms of candidate anthocyanin biosynthetic and regulatory genes. Simple Sequence Repeats (SSRs and Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs in the candidate genes were also located on an apple genetic map. We have shown that the MdMYB10 gene co-segregates with the Rni locus and is on Linkage Group (LG 09 of the apple genome. Conclusion We have performed candidate gene mapping in a fruit tree crop and have provided genetic evidence that red colouration in the fruit core as well as red foliage are both controlled by a single locus named Rni. We have shown that the transcription factor MdMYB10 may be the gene underlying Rni as there were no recombinants between the marker for this gene and the red phenotype in a population of 516 individuals. Associating markers derived from candidate genes with a desirable phenotypic trait has demonstrated the application of genomic tools in a breeding programme of a horticultural crop species.

  1. Candidate genes for obesity-susceptibility show enriched association within a large genome-wide association study for BMI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vimaleswaran, Karani S.; Tachmazidou, Ioanna; Zhao, Jing Hua; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Dudbridge, Frank; Loos, Ruth J.F.

    2012-01-01

    Before the advent of genome-wide association studies (GWASs), hundreds of candidate genes for obesity-susceptibility had been identified through a variety of approaches. We examined whether those obesity candidate genes are enriched for associations with body mass index (BMI) compared with non-candidate genes by using data from a large-scale GWAS. A thorough literature search identified 547 candidate genes for obesity-susceptibility based on evidence from animal studies, Mendelian syndromes, linkage studies, genetic association studies and expression studies. Genomic regions were defined to include the genes ±10 kb of flanking sequence around candidate and non-candidate genes. We used summary statistics publicly available from the discovery stage of the genome-wide meta-analysis for BMI performed by the genetic investigation of anthropometric traits consortium in 123 564 individuals. Hypergeometric, rank tail-strength and gene-set enrichment analysis tests were used to test for the enrichment of association in candidate compared with non-candidate genes. The hypergeometric test of enrichment was not significant at the 5% P-value quantile (P = 0.35), but was nominally significant at the 25% quantile (P = 0.015). The rank tail-strength and gene-set enrichment tests were nominally significant for the full set of genes and borderline significant for the subset without SNPs at P < 10−7. Taken together, the observed evidence for enrichment suggests that the candidate gene approach retains some value. However, the degree of enrichment is small despite the extensive number of candidate genes and the large sample size. Studies that focus on candidate genes have only slightly increased chances of detecting associations, and are likely to miss many true effects in non-candidate genes, at least for obesity-related traits. PMID:22791748

  2. Candidate gene analysis using imputed genotypes: cell cycle single-nucleotide polymorphisms and ovarian cancer risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goode, Ellen L; Fridley, Brooke L; Vierkant, Robert A;

    2009-01-01

    Polymorphisms in genes critical to cell cycle control are outstanding candidates for association with ovarian cancer risk; numerous genes have been interrogated by multiple research groups using differing tagging single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) sets. To maximize information gleaned from...... existing genotype data, we conducted a combined analysis of five independent studies of invasive epithelial ovarian cancer. Up to 2,120 cases and 3,382 controls were genotyped in the course of two collaborations at a variety of SNPs in 11 cell cycle genes (CDKN2C, CDKN1A, CCND3, CCND1, CCND2, CDKN1B, CDK2......, and rs3212891; CDK2 rs2069391, rs2069414, and rs17528736; and CCNE1 rs3218036. These results exemplify the utility of imputation in candidate gene studies and lend evidence to a role of cell cycle genes in ovarian cancer etiology, suggest a reduced set of SNPs to target in additional cases and controls....

  3. Functional confirmation of PLAG1 as the candidate causative gene underlying major pleiotropic effects on body weight and milk characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, Tania; Tiplady, Kathryn; Lopdell, Thomas; Johnson, Thomas; Snell, Russell G.; Spelman, Richard J.; Davis, Stephen R.; Littlejohn, Mathew D.

    2017-01-01

    A major pleiotropic quantitative trait locus (QTL) located at ~25 Mbp on bovine chromosome 14 affects a myriad of growth and developmental traits in Bos taurus and indicus breeds. These QTL have been attributed to two functional variants in the bidirectional promoter of PLAG1 and CHCHD7. Although PLAG1 is a good candidate for mediating these effects, its role remains uncertain given that these variants are also associated with expression of five additional genes at the broader locus. In the current study, we conducted expression QTL (eQTL) mapping of this region using a large, high depth mammary RNAseq dataset representing 375 lactating cows. Here we show that of the seven previously implicated genes, only PLAG1 and LYN are differentially expressed by QTL genotype, and only PLAG1 bears the same association signature of the growth and body weight QTLs. For the first time, we also report significant association of PLAG1 genotype with milk production traits, including milk fat, volume, and protein yield. Collectively, these data strongly suggest PLAG1 as the causative gene underlying this diverse range of traits, and demonstrate new effects for the locus on lactation phenotypes. PMID:28322319

  4. Identification of Candidate Genes for Reactivity in Guzerat (Bos indicus) Cattle: A Genome-Wide Association Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, Pablo Augusto de Souza; Pires, Maria de Fátima Ávila; Ventura, Ricardo Vieira; Rosse, Izinara da Cruz.; Bruneli, Frank Angelo Tomita; Machado, Marco Antonio; Carvalho, Maria Raquel Santos

    2017-01-01

    Temperament is fundamental to animal production due to its direct influence on the animal-herdsman relationship. When compared to calm animals, the aggressive, anxious or fearful ones exhibit less weight gain, lower reproductive efficiency, decreased milk production and higher herd maintenance costs, all of which contribute to reduced profits. However, temperament is a trait that is complex and difficult to assess. Recently, a new quantitative system, REATEST®, for assessing reactivity, a phenotype of temperament, was developed. Herein, we describe the results of a Genome-wide association study for reactivity, assessed using REATEST® with a sample of 754 females from five dual-purpose (milk and meat production) Guzerat (Bos indicus) herds. Genotyping was performed using a 50k SNP chip and a two-step mixed model approach (Grammar-Gamma) with a one-by-one marker regression was used to identify QTLs. QTLs for reactivity were identified on chromosomes BTA1, BTA5, BTA14, and BTA25. Five intronic and two intergenic markers were significantly associated with reactivity. POU1F1, DRD3, VWA3A, ZBTB20, EPHA6, SNRPF and NTN4 were identified as candidate genes. Previous QTL reports for temperament traits, covering areas surrounding the SNPs/genes identified here, further corroborate these associations. The seven genes identified in the present study explain 20.5% of reactivity variance and give a better understanding of temperament biology. PMID:28125592

  5. Fine mapping and candidate gene prediction of a pleiotropic quantitative trait locus for yield-related trait in Zea mays.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruixiang Liu

    Full Text Available The yield of maize grain is a highly complex quantitative trait that is controlled by multiple quantitative trait loci (QTLs with small effects, and is frequently influenced by multiple genetic and environmental factors. Thus, it is challenging to clone a QTL for grain yield in the maize genome. Previously, we identified a major QTL, qKNPR6, for kernel number per row (KNPR across multiple environments, and developed two nearly isogenic lines, SL57-6 and Ye478, which differ only in the allelic constitution at the short segment harboring the QTL. Recently, qKNPR6 was re-evaluated in segregating populations derived from SL57-6×Ye478, and was narrowed down to a 2.8 cM interval, which explained 56.3% of the phenotypic variance of KNPR in 201 F(2∶3 families. The QTL simultaneously affected ear length, kernel weight and grain yield. Furthermore, a large F(2 population with more than 12,800 plants, 191 recombinant chromosomes and 10 overlapping recombinant lines placed qKNPR6 into a 0.91 cM interval corresponding to 198Kb of the B73 reference genome. In this region, six genes with expressed sequence tag (EST evidence were annotated. The expression pattern and DNA diversity of the six genes were assayed in Ye478 and SL57-6. The possible candidate gene and the pathway involved in inflorescence development were discussed.

  6. Reconstruction of ancestral chromosome architecture and gene repertoire reveals principles of genome evolution in a model yeast genus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakirlis, Nikolaos; Sarilar, Véronique; Drillon, Guénola; Fleiss, Aubin; Agier, Nicolas; Meyniel, Jean-Philippe; Blanpain, Lou; Carbone, Alessandra; Devillers, Hugo; Dubois, Kenny; Gillet-Markowska, Alexandre; Graziani, Stéphane; Huu-Vang, Nguyen; Poirel, Marion; Reisser, Cyrielle; Schott, Jonathan; Schacherer, Joseph; Lafontaine, Ingrid; Llorente, Bertrand; Neuvéglise, Cécile; Fischer, Gilles

    2016-07-01

    Reconstructing genome history is complex but necessary to reveal quantitative principles governing genome evolution. Such reconstruction requires recapitulating into a single evolutionary framework the evolution of genome architecture and gene repertoire. Here, we reconstructed the genome history of the genus Lachancea that appeared to cover a continuous evolutionary range from closely related to more diverged yeast species. Our approach integrated the generation of a high-quality genome data set; the development of AnChro, a new algorithm for reconstructing ancestral genome architecture; and a comprehensive analysis of gene repertoire evolution. We found that the ancestral genome of the genus Lachancea contained eight chromosomes and about 5173 protein-coding genes. Moreover, we characterized 24 horizontal gene transfers and 159 putative gene creation events that punctuated species diversification. We retraced all chromosomal rearrangements, including gene losses, gene duplications, chromosomal inversions and translocations at single gene resolution. Gene duplications outnumbered losses and balanced rearrangements with 1503, 929, and 423 events, respectively. Gene content variations between extant species are mainly driven by differential gene losses, while gene duplications remained globally constant in all lineages. Remarkably, we discovered that balanced chromosomal rearrangements could be responsible for up to 14% of all gene losses by disrupting genes at their breakpoints. Finally, we found that nonsynonymous substitutions reached fixation at a coordinated pace with chromosomal inversions, translocations, and duplications, but not deletions. Overall, we provide a granular view of genome evolution within an entire eukaryotic genus, linking gene content, chromosome rearrangements, and protein divergence into a single evolutionary framework.

  7. The calcitonin receptor gene is a candidate for regulation of susceptibility to herpes simplex type 1 neuronal infection leading to encephalitis in rat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nada Abdelmagid

    Full Text Available Herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE is a fatal infection of the central nervous system (CNS predominantly caused by Herpes simplex virus type 1. Factors regulating the susceptibility to HSE are still largely unknown. To identify host gene(s regulating HSE susceptibility we performed a genome-wide linkage scan in an intercross between the susceptible DA and the resistant PVG rat. We found one major quantitative trait locus (QTL, Hse1, on rat chromosome 4 (confidence interval 24.3-31 Mb; LOD score 29.5 governing disease susceptibility. Fine mapping of Hse1 using recombinants, haplotype mapping and sequencing, as well as expression analysis of all genes in the interval identified the calcitonin receptor gene (Calcr as the main candidate, which also is supported by functional studies. Thus, using unbiased genetic approach variability in Calcr was identified as potentially critical for infection and viral spread to the CNS and subsequent HSE development.

  8. Simultaneous integration of multiple genes into the Kluyveromyces marxianus chromosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heo, Paul; Yang, Tae-Jun; Chung, Soon-Chun; Cheon, Yuna; Kim, Jun-Seob; Park, Jun-Bum; Koo, Hyun Min; Cho, Kwang Myung; Seo, Jin-Ho; Park, Jae Chan; Kweon, Dae-Hyuk

    2013-09-10

    While Kluyveromyces marxianus is a promising yeast strain for biotechnological applications, genetic engineering of this strain is still challenging, especially when multiple genes are to be transformed. Sequential gene integration, which takes advantage of repetitive insertion/excision of the URA3 gene as a marker, has been the best option until now, because the URA3-deletion mutant is the only precondition for this method. However, we found that the introduced gene is co-excised during the URA3 excision step for next gene introduction, resulting in a very low cumulative probability (<1.57×10⁻⁶ % for 4 genes) of integrating all genes of interest. To overcome this extremely low probability, and to reduce labor and time, all 4 genes were simultaneously transformed. Surprisingly, the infamously high 'non-homologous end joining' activity of K. marxianus enabled simultaneous integration of all 4 genes in a single step, with a probability of 7.9%. Various K. marxianus strains could also be similarly transformed. Our finding not only reduces the labor and time required for such procedures, but also removes a number of preconditions, such as pre-made vectors, selection markers and knockout mutants, which are needed to introduce many genes into K. marxianus.

  9. Social cognitive role of schizophrenia candidate gene GABRB2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shui Ying Tsang

    Full Text Available The occurrence of positive selection in schizophrenia-associated GABRB2 suggests a broader impact of the gene product on population fitness. The present study considered the possibility of cognition-related GABRB2 involvement by examining the association of GABRB2 with psychosis and altruism, respectively representing psychiatric and psychological facets of social cognition. Four single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs were genotyped for quantitative trait analyses and population-based association studies. Psychosis was measured by either the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS or antipsychotics dosage, and altruism was based on a self-report altruism scale. The minor alleles of SNPs rs6556547, rs1816071 and rs187269 in GABRB2 were correlated with high PANSS score for positive symptoms in a Han Chinese schizophrenic cohort, whereas those of rs1816071 and rs1816072 were associated with high antipsychotics dosage in a US Caucasian schizophrenic cohort. Moreover, strongly significant GABRB2-disease associations were found among schizophrenics with severe psychosis based on high PANSS positive score, but no significant association was observed for schizophrenics with only mild psychosis. Interestingly, in addition to association with psychosis in schizophrenics, rs187269 was also associated with altruism in healthy Han Chinese. Furthermore, parallel to correlation with severe psychosis, its minor allele was correlated with high altruism scores. These findings revealed that GABRB2 is associated with psychosis, the core symptom and an endophenotype of schizophrenia. Importantly, the association was found across the breadth of the psychiatric (psychosis to psychological (altruism spectrum of social cognition suggesting GABRB2 involvement in human cognition.

  10. The HOX-5 and surfeit gene clusters are linked in the proximal portion of mouse chromosome 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stubbs, L; Huxley, C; Hogan, B; Evans, T; Fried, M; Duboule, D; Lehrach, H

    1990-04-01

    Using an interspecies backcross, we have mapped the HOX-5 and surfeit (surf) gene clusters within the proximal portion of mouse chromosome 2. While the HOX-5 cluster of homeobox-containing genes has been localized to chromosome 2, bands C3-E1, by in situ hybridization, its more precise position relative to the genes and cloned markers of chromosome 2 was not known. Surfeit, a tight cluster of at least six highly conserved "housekeeping" genes, has not been previously mapped in mouse, but has been localized to human chromosome 9q, a region of the human genome with strong homology to proximal mouse chromosome 2. The data presented here place HOX-5 in the vicinity of the closely linked set of developmental mutations rachiterata, lethargic, and fidget and place surf close to the proto-oncogene Abl, near the centromere of chromosome 2.

  11. High-throughput analysis of candidate imprinted genes and allele-specific gene expression in the human term placenta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clark Taane G

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Imprinted genes show expression from one parental allele only and are important for development and behaviour. This extreme mode of allelic imbalance has been described for approximately 56 human genes. Imprinting status is often disrupted in cancer and dysmorphic syndromes. More subtle variation of gene expression, that is not parent-of-origin specific, termed 'allele-specific gene expression' (ASE is more common and may give rise to milder phenotypic differences. Using two allele-specific high-throughput technologies alongside bioinformatics predictions, normal term human placenta was screened to find new imprinted genes and to ascertain the extent of ASE in this tissue. Results Twenty-three family trios of placental cDNA, placental genomic DNA (gDNA and gDNA from both parents were tested for 130 candidate genes with the Sequenom MassArray system. Six genes were found differentially expressed but none imprinted. The Illumina ASE BeadArray platform was then used to test 1536 SNPs in 932 genes. The array was enriched for the human orthologues of 124 mouse candidate genes from bioinformatics predictions and 10 human candidate imprinted genes from EST database mining. After quality control pruning, a total of 261 informative SNPs (214 genes remained for analysis. Imprinting with maternal expression was demonstrated for the lymphocyte imprinted gene ZNF331 in human placenta. Two potential differentially methylated regions (DMRs were found in the vicinity of ZNF331. None of the bioinformatically predicted candidates tested showed imprinting except for a skewed allelic expression in a parent-specific manner observed for PHACTR2, a neighbour of the imprinted PLAGL1 gene. ASE was detected for two or more individuals in 39 candidate genes (18%. Conclusions Both Sequenom and Illumina assays were sensitive enough to study imprinting and strong allelic bias. Previous bioinformatics approaches were not predictive of new imprinted genes

  12. Insulin mediated hemodynamic responses in spontaneous hypertensive rats (SHRs): effect of chromosome 4 gene transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Sumangala P; McRae, Crystal; Lapanowski, Karen; Churchill, Monique; Kurtz, Theodore W; Dunbar, Joseph C

    2003-02-01

    The spontaneous hypertensive rat (SHR) is a widely studied model of essential hypertension and has been reported to exhibit alterations in carbohydrate and lipid metabolism. Genetic linkage studies implicated that SHR carries deletion variant of Cd36 gene of chromosome 4, the gene that encodes fatty acid transporter. Thus it could be possible that primary genetic defect in SHR is compromised tissue utilization of fatty acid that would form the basis for the pathogenesis of hyperinsulinemia, insulin resistance and insulin-mediated responses. We measured both the hemodynamic and metabolic responses to insulin in SHR in comparison with the chromosome congenic spontaneous hypertensive rats (cSHRs) (rats in which piece of chromosome 4 containing wild type Cd36 was integrated into the SHR genome). A bolus infusion of insulin increased iliac conductance and decreased blood pressure in Wistar Kyoto (WKY) rats. However, in SHR insulin did not reduce blood pressure as in WKY but after about 15 min it significantly enhanced blood pressure and reduced iliac conductance. Whereas in cSHR insulin did not reduce blood pressure as in WKY rats. However, pressor responses to insulin were eliminated by chromosome 4 gene transfer. Glucose clearance was significantly slower in both SHR and cSHR. Glucose tolerance test revealed that SHR are hyperinsulinemic and insulin resistant. These findings indicate that transfer of segment of chromosome 4 from Brown Norway rats onto spontaneous hypertensive background eliminates hyperinsulinemia and pressor effects of insulin.

  13. Untangling the Contributions of Sex-Specific Gene Regulation and X-Chromosome Dosage to Sex-Biased Gene Expression in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Maxwell; Rao, Prashant; Ercan, Sevinc

    2016-09-01

    Dosage compensation mechanisms equalize the level of X chromosome expression between sexes. Yet the X chromosome is often enriched for genes exhibiting sex-biased, i.e., imbalanced expression. The relationship between X chromosome dosage compensation and sex-biased gene expression remains largely unexplored. Most studies determine sex-biased gene expression without distinguishing between contributions from X chromosome copy number (dose) and the animal's sex. Here, we uncoupled X chromosome dose from sex-specific gene regulation in Caenorhabditis elegans to determine the effect of each on X expression. In early embryogenesis, when dosage compensation is not yet fully active, X chromosome dose drives the hermaphrodite-biased expression of many X-linked genes, including several genes that were shown to be responsible for hermaphrodite fate. A similar effect is seen in the C. elegans germline, where X chromosome dose contributes to higher hermaphrodite X expression, suggesting that lack of dosage compensation in the germline may have a role in supporting higher expression of X chromosomal genes with female-biased functions in the gonad. In the soma, dosage compensation effectively balances X expression between the sexes. As a result, somatic sex-biased expression is almost entirely due to sex-specific gene regulation. These results suggest that lack of dosage compensation in different tissues and developmental stages allow X chromosome copy number to contribute to sex-biased gene expression and function.

  14. [Chromosomal localization of the hormone-sensitive lipase gene (Hsl) in rice field eel].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Fu-Yun; Yu, Qi-Xing; Pan, Pei-Wen

    2003-03-01

    Adipose tissue triacylglycerols are the quantitatively most important source of stored energy in animals. Hormone-sensitive lipase encoded by hormone-sensitive lipase gene (Hsl) is a multifunctional enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of triacylglycerol stored in adipose tissue and cholesterol esters in the adrenals, ovaries, testes and macrophages. Using pig Hsl gene inserted into pBS labeled by the radioactive isotope and the digoxigenin as the probes respectively one band, 11.5kb, has been shown to hybridized with total DNA of rice field eel digested with Pst I by Southern blotting and Hsl gene has been assigned to metaphase chromosome 5, at the position of 78.35+/-1.26 from the centromere in rice field eel by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). The mapping results are corresponding to that of "specific-chromosomal DNA pool" obtained by chromosome microisolation used to map gene and the mapping result is more accurate. The results of the study further illustrate the importance of the presence of Hsl gene in rice field eel genome and provide the first FISH mapping data for rice field eel chromosome 5. The current studies would advance the addition of known genetic markers and the construction of high resolution genetic map in rice field eel genome.

  15. Imbalance between the expression dosages of X-chromosome and autosomal genes in mammalian oocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Atsushi; Tanino, Motohiko; Matoba, Ryo; Umezawa, Akihiro; Akutsu, Hidenori

    2015-09-15

    Oocytes have unique characteristics compared with other cell types. In mouse and human oocytes, two X chromosomes are maintained in the active state. Previous microarray studies have shown that the balance of the expression state is maintained in haploid oocytes. Here, we investigated transcripts using RNA-sequence technology in mouse and human oocytes. The median expression ratio between X chromosome and autosomal genes (X:A) in immature mouse oocytes increased as the gene expression levels increased, reaching a value of 1. However, the ratio in mature oocytes was under 1 for all expression categories. Moreover, we observed a markedly low ratio resulting from the bimodal expression patterns of X-linked genes. The low X:A expression ratio in mature oocyte was independent of DNA methylation. While mature human oocytes exhibited a slightly low X:A expression ratio, this was the result of the skewed high frequency of lowly expressed X-linked genes rather than the bimodal state. We propose that this imbalance between the expression dosages of X-chromosome and autosomal genes is a feature of transcripts in mammalian oocytes lacking X-chromosome inactivation.

  16. Aegilops-Secale amphiploids: chromosome categorisation, pollen viability and identification of fungal disease resistance genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwiatek, M; Błaszczyk, L; Wiśniewska, H; Apolinarska, B

    2012-02-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the potential breeding value of goatgrass-rye amphiploids, which we are using as a "bridge" in a transfer of Aegilops chromatin (containing, e.g. leaf rust resistance genes) into triticale. We analysed the chromosomal constitution (by genomic in situ hybridisation, GISH), fertility (by pollen viability tests) and the presence of leaf rust and eyespot resistance genes (by molecular and endopeptidase assays) in a collection of 6× and 4× amphiploids originating from crosses between five Aegilops species and Secale cereale. In the five hexaploid amphiploids Aegilops kotschyi × Secale cereale (genome UUSSRR), Ae. variabilis × S. cereale (UUSSRR), Ae. biuncialis × S. cereale (UUMMRR; two lines) and Ae. ovata × S. cereale (UUMMRR), 28 Aegilops chromosomes were recognised, while in the Ae. tauschii × S. cereale amphiploid (4×; DDRR), only 14 such chromosomes were identified. In the materials, the number of rye chromosomes varied from 14 to 16. In one line of Ae. ovata × S. cereale, the U-R translocation was found. Pollen viability varied from 24.4 to 75.4%. The leaf rust resistance genes Lr22, Lr39 and Lr41 were identified in Ae. tauschii and the 4× amphiploid Ae. tauschii × S. cereale. For the first time, the leaf rust resistance gene Lr37 was found in Ae. kotschyi, Ae. ovata, Ae. biuncialis and amphiploids derived from those parental species. No eyespot resistance gene Pch1 was found in the amphiploids.

  17. Sex Chromosome-wide Transcriptional Suppression and Compensatory Cis-Regulatory Evolution Mediate Gene Expression in the Drosophila Male Germline.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily L Landeen

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The evolution of heteromorphic sex chromosomes has repeatedly resulted in the evolution of sex chromosome-specific forms of regulation, including sex chromosome dosage compensation in the soma and meiotic sex chromosome inactivation in the germline. In the male germline of Drosophila melanogaster, a novel but poorly understood form of sex chromosome-specific transcriptional regulation occurs that is distinct from canonical sex chromosome dosage compensation or meiotic inactivation. Previous work shows that expression of reporter genes driven by testis-specific promoters is considerably lower-approximately 3-fold or more-for transgenes inserted into X chromosome versus autosome locations. Here we characterize this transcriptional suppression of X-linked genes in the male germline and its evolutionary consequences. Using transgenes and transpositions, we show that most endogenous X-linked genes, not just testis-specific ones, are transcriptionally suppressed several-fold specifically in the Drosophila male germline. In wild-type testes, this sex chromosome-wide transcriptional suppression is generally undetectable, being effectively compensated by the gene-by-gene evolutionary recruitment of strong promoters on the X chromosome. We identify and experimentally validate a promoter element sequence motif that is enriched upstream of the transcription start sites of hundreds of testis-expressed genes; evolutionarily conserved across species; associated with strong gene expression levels in testes; and overrepresented on the X chromosome. These findings show that the expression of X-linked genes in the Drosophila testes reflects a balance between chromosome-wide epigenetic transcriptional suppression and long-term compensatory adaptation by sex-linked genes. Our results have broad implications for the evolution of gene expression in the Drosophila male germline and for genome evolution.

  18. Sex Chromosome-wide Transcriptional Suppression and Compensatory Cis-Regulatory Evolution Mediate Gene Expression in the Drosophila Male Germline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landeen, Emily L; Muirhead, Christina A; Wright, Lori; Meiklejohn, Colin D; Presgraves, Daven C

    2016-07-01

    The evolution of heteromorphic sex chromosomes has repeatedly resulted in the evolution of sex chromosome-specific forms of regulation, including sex chromosome dosage compensation in the soma and meiotic sex chromosome inactivation in the germline. In the male germline of Drosophila melanogaster, a novel but poorly understood form of sex chromosome-specific transcriptional regulation occurs that is distinct from canonical sex chromosome dosage compensation or meiotic inactivation. Previous work shows that expression of reporter genes driven by testis-specific promoters is considerably lower-approximately 3-fold or more-for transgenes inserted into X chromosome versus autosome locations. Here we characterize this transcriptional suppression of X-linked genes in the male germline and its evolutionary consequences. Using transgenes and transpositions, we show that most endogenous X-linked genes, not just testis-specific ones, are transcriptionally suppressed several-fold specifically in the Drosophila male germline. In wild-type testes, this sex chromosome-wide transcriptional suppression is generally undetectable, being effectively compensated by the gene-by-gene evolutionary recruitment of strong promoters on the X chromosome. We identify and experimentally validate a promoter element sequence motif that is enriched upstream of the transcription start sites of hundreds of testis-expressed genes; evolutionarily conserved across species; associated with strong gene expression levels in testes; and overrepresented on the X chromosome. These findings show that the expression of X-linked genes in the Drosophila testes reflects a balance between chromosome-wide epigenetic transcriptional suppression and long-term compensatory adaptation by sex-linked genes. Our results have broad implications for the evolution of gene expression in the Drosophila male germline and for genome evolution.

  19. Mapping of two genes encoding isoforms of the actin binding protein ABP-280, a dystrophin like protein, to Xq28 and to chromosome 7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maestrini, E; Patrosso, C; Mancini, M; Rivella, S; Rocchi, M; Repetto, M; Villa, A; Frattini, A; Zoppè, M; Vezzoni, P

    1993-06-01

    ABP-280 is a ubiquitous actin binding protein present in the cytoskeleton of many different cell types. ABP-280 was mapped to distal Xq28, 50-60 kb downstream of the Green Colour Pigment (GCP) genes. To establish if ABP-280 may be a candidate for one of the muscle disease localized by linkage analysis to distal Xq28 we looked for alternative forms of ABP-280 mRNA. Several different ABP-280 mRNAs were indeed identified: two are X-linked and are produced by alternative splicing of a small exon of 24 nucleotides. At least one additional gene encoding a RNA more than 70% identical to ABP-280 in the 1700 bp sequenced has also been found. It was mapped to chromosome 7. While both forms of the X-linked ABP-280 are ubiquitous, the gene on chromosome 7 is highly expressed only in skeletal muscle and heart. The two genes were therefore excellent candidates for the X-linked and for the autosomal dominant form of the Emery-Dreifuss Muscular Dystrophy (EDMD) both of which have been described. So far, however we were unable to demonstrate mutations in the coding region or affecting the alternative splicing of the X-linked form of ABP-280, in several patients studied, and we think that it is quite unlikely that this is the gene responsible for EDMD.

  20. Deletion or underexpression of the Y-chromosome genes CDY2 and HSFY is associated with maturation arrest in American men with nonobstructive azoospermia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peter J Stahl; Anna N Mielnik; Christopher E Barbieri; Peter N Schlegel; Darius A Paduch

    2012-01-01

    Maturation arrest (MA) refers to failure of germ cell development leading to clinical nonobstructive azoospermia.Although the azoospermic factor (AZF) region of the human Y chromosome is clearly implicated in some cases,thus far very little is known about which individual Y-chromosome genes are important for complete male germ cell development.We sought to identify single genes on the Y chromosome that may be implicated in the pathogenesis of nonobstructive azoospermia associated with MA in the American population.Genotype-phenotype analysis of 132 men with Y-chromosome microdeletions was performed.Protein-coding genes associated with MA were identified by visual analysis of a genotype-phenotype map.Genes associated with MA were selected as those genes within a segment of the Y chromosome that,when completely or partially deleted,were always associated with MA and absence of retrievable testicular sperm.Expression of each identified gene transcript was then measured with quantitative RT-PCR in testicular tissue from separate cohorts of patients with idiopathic MA and obstructive azoospermia.Ten candidate genes for association with MA were identified within an 8.4-Mb segment of the Y chromosome overlapping the AZFb region,CDY2 and HSFYwere the only identified genes for which differences in expression were observed between the MA and obstructive azoospermia cohorts.Men with obstructive azoospermia had 12-fold higher relative expression of CDY2 transcript (1.33±0.40 vs.0.11±0.04; P=0.0003) and 16-fold higher expression of HSFY transcript (0.78±0.32 vs.0.05±0.02; P=0.0005) compared to men with MA.CDY2 and HSFY were also underexpressed in patients with Sertoli cell only syndrome.These data indicate that CDY2 and HSFY are located within a segment of the Y chromosome that is important for sperm maturation,and am underexpressed in testicular tissue derived from men with MA.These observations suggest that impairments in CDY2 or HSFY expression could be implicated in the

  1. In silico identification of genetically attenuated vaccine candidate genes for Plasmodium liver stage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Hirdesh; Frischknecht, Friedrich; Mair, Gunnar R; Gomes, James

    2015-12-01

    Genetically attenuated parasites (GAPs) that lack genes essential for the liver stage of the malaria parasite, and therefore cause developmental arrest, have been developed as live vaccines in rodent malaria models and recently been tested in humans. The genes targeted for deletion were often identified by trial and error. Here we present a systematic gene - protein and transcript - expression analyses of several Plasmodium species with the aim to identify candidate genes for the generation of novel GAPs. With a lack of liver stage expression data for human malaria parasites, we used data available for liver stage development of Plasmodium yoelii, a rodent malaria model, to identify proteins expressed in the liver stage but absent from blood stage parasites. An orthology-based search was then employed to identify orthologous proteins in the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum resulting in a total of 310 genes expressed in the liver stage but lacking evidence of protein expression in blood stage parasites. Among these 310 possible GAP candidates, we further studied Plasmodium liver stage proteins by phyletic distribution and functional domain analyses and shortlisted twenty GAP-candidates; these are: fabB/F, fabI, arp, 3 genes encoding subunits of the PDH complex, dnaJ, urm1, rS5, ancp, mcp, arh, gk, lisp2, valS, palm, and four conserved Plasmodium proteins of unknown function. Parasites lacking one or several of these genes might yield new attenuated malaria parasites for experimental vaccination studies.

  2. Thermolabile phenol sulfotransferase gene (STM): Localization to human chromosome 16p11.2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aksoy, I.A.; Her, C.; Weinshilboum, M. [Mayo Medical School, Rochester, MN (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Thermolabile (TL) phenol sulfotransferase (PST) catalyzes the sulfate conjugation of phenolic monoamine neurotransmitters such as dopamine and serotonin. We recently cloned a cDNA for human liver TL PST and expressed it in COS-1 cells. We now report the chromosomal localization of the human TL PST gene (STM) as well as its partial sequence. DNA from NIGMS Human/Rodent Somatic Cell Hybrid Mapping Panels 1 and 2 was screened by use of the PCR, and the STM gene was mapped to chromosome 16. Regional localization to 16p11.2 was performed by PCR analysis of a high-resolution mouse/human somatic cell hybrid panel that contained defined portions of human chromosome 16. 15 refs., 2 figs.

  3. The gene for human glutaredoxin (GLRX) is localized to human chromosome 5q14

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Padilla, C.A.; Holmgren, A. [Karolinska Inst., Stockholm (Sweden); Bajalica, S.; Lagercrantz, J. [Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden)

    1996-03-05

    Glutaredoxin is a small protein (12 kDa) catalyzing glutathione-dependent disulfide oxidoreduction reactions in a coupled system with NADPH, GSH, and glutathione reductase. A cDNA encoding the human glutaredoxin gene (HGMW-approved symbol GLRX) has recently been isolated and cloned from a human fetal spleen cDNA library. The screening of a human fetal spleen cDNA library. The screening of a human genomic library in Charon 4A led to the identification of three genomic clones. Using fluorescence in situ hybridization to metaphase chromosomes with one genomic clone as a probe, the human glutaredoxin gene was localized to chromosomal region 5q14. This localization at chromosome 5 was in agreement with the somatic cell hybrid analysis, using DNA from a human-hamster and a human-mouse hybrid panel and using a human glutaredoxin cDNA as a probe. 13 refs., 2 figs.

  4. Spermatogenesis Drives Rapid Gene Creation and Masculinization of the X Chromosome in Stalk-Eyed Flies (Diopsidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Richard H; Narechania, Apurva; DeSalle, Rob; Johns, Philip M; Reinhardt, Josephine A; Wilkinson, Gerald S

    2016-03-26

    Throughout their evolutionary history, genomes acquire new genetic material that facilitates phenotypic innovation and diversification. Developmental processes associated with reproduction are particularly likely to involve novel genes. Abundant gene creation impacts the evolution of chromosomal gene content and general regulatory mechanisms such as dosage compensation. Numerous studies in model organisms have found complex and, at times contradictory, relationships among these genomic attributes highlighting the need to examine these patterns in other systems characterized by abundant sexual selection. Therefore, we examined the association among novel gene creation, tissue-specific gene expression, and chromosomal gene content within stalk-eyed flies. Flies in this family are characterized by strong sexual selection and the presence of a newly evolved X chromosome. We generated RNA-seq transcriptome data from the testes for three species within the family and from seven additional tissues in the highly dimorphic species,Teleopsis dalmanni Analysis of dipteran gene orthology reveals dramatic testes-specific gene creation in stalk-eyed flies, involving numerous gene families that are highly conserved in other insect groups. Identification of X-linked genes for the three species indicates that the X chromosome arose prior to the diversification of the family. The most striking feature of this X chromosome is that it is highly masculinized, containing nearly twice as many testes-specific genes as expected based on its size. All the major processes that may drive differential sex chromosome gene content-creation of genes with male-specific expression, development of male-specific expression from pre-existing genes, and movement of genes with male-specific expression-are elevated on the X chromosome ofT. dalmanni This masculinization occurs despite evidence that testes expressed genes do not achieve the same levels of gene expression on the X chromosome as they do on

  5. Comprehensive evaluation of the contribution of X chromosome genes to platinum sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamazon, Eric R; Im, Hae Kyung; O'Donnell, Peter H; Ziliak, Dana; Stark, Amy L; Cox, Nancy J; Dolan, M Eileen; Huang, Rong Stephanie

    2011-03-01

    Using a genome-wide gene expression data set generated from Affymetrix GeneChip Human Exon 1.0ST array, we comprehensively surveyed the role of 322 X chromosome gene expression traits on cellular sensitivity to cisplatin and carboplatin. We identified 31 and 17 X chromosome genes whose expression levels are significantly correlated (after multiple testing correction) with sensitivity to carboplatin and cisplatin, respectively, in the combined HapMap CEU (Utah residents with ancestry from northern and western Europe) and YRI (Yoruba in Ibahan, Nigeria) populations (false discovery rate, FDR gene expression quantification method, the Illumina Sentrix Human-6 Expression BeadChip, measured on the same HapMap cell lines, we found that 4 and 2 of these genes are significantly associated with carboplatin and cisplatin sensitivity, respectively, in both analyses. Two genes, CTPS2 and DLG3, were identified by both genome-wide gene expression analyses as correlated with cellular sensitivity to both platinating agents. The expression of DLG3 gene was also found to correlate with cellular sensitivity to platinating agents in NCI-60 cancer cell lines. In addition, we evaluated whether the expression of X chromosome genes contributed to the observed differences in sensitivity to the platinums between CEU and YRI-derived cell lines. Of the 34 distinct genes significantly correlated with either carboplatin or cisplatin sensitivity, 14 are differentially expressed (defined as P genes play a role in cellular sensitivity to platinating agents and differences in the expression level of these genes are an important source of variation that should be included in comprehensive pharmacogenomic studies.

  6. Schizophrenia susceptibility genes on chromosome 13q32

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡颖; 许琪; 鞠桂芝; 刘树铮; 史杰萍; 于雅琴; 尉军

    2004-01-01

    @@Schizophrenia is a complex mental disorder affecting approximately 1% of the general population worldwide.1 It has a high incidence in the general population, a poor prognosis and a poor outcome, in that it has become a major social problem. Family, twin, and adoption studies have clearly shown that a genetic component is quite likely to play an important role in determining susceptibility to schizophrenia. The genome-wide scan indicates that several chromosomal regions are linked to schizophrenia, some of which have been replicated independently including 6p21-24, 8p21-22, 13q14-33 and 22q11-12.2,3 This study was designed to detect two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) located in the 13q14-33 region, rs188608 at the STK24 locus and rs2892679 at the GPC6 locus, among Chinese population.

  7. Molecular structure and chromosomal mapping of the human homolog of the agouti gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, H.Y.; Woychik, R.P. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Bultman, S.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)]|[Univ. of Tennessee, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Loeffler, C.; Hansmann, I. [Universitaet Goettingen (Germany); Chen, W.J.; Furdon, P.J.; Wilkison, W. [Glaxo Research Institute, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Powell, J.G.; Usala, A.L. [Eastern Carolina Univ., Greenville, NC (United States)

    1994-10-11

    The agouti (a) locus in mouse chromosome 2 normally regulates coat color pigmentation. The mouse agouti gene was recently cloned and shown to encode a distinctive 131-amino acid protein with a consensus signal peptide. Here the authors describe the cloning of the human homolog of the mouse agouti gene using an interspecies DNA-hybridization approach. Sequence analysis revealed that the coding region of the human agouti gene is 85% identical to the mouse gene and has the potential to encode a protein of 132 amino acids with a consensus signal peptide. Chromosomal assignment using somatic-cell-hybrid mapping panels and fluorescence in situ hybridization demonstrated that the human agouti gene maps to chromosome band 20q11.2. This result revealed that the human agouti gene is closely linked to several traits, including a locus called MODY (for maturity onset diabetes of the young) and another region that is associated with the development of myeloid leukemia. Initial expression studies with RNA from several adult human tissues showed that the human agouti gene is expressed in adipose tissue and testis.

  8. The mouse Fau gene: genomic structure, chromosomal localization, and characterization of two retropseudogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casteels, D; Poirier, C; Guénet, J L; Merregaert, J

    1995-01-01

    The Fau gene is the cellular homolog of the fox sequence of the Finkel-Biskis-Reilly murine sarcoma virus (FBR-MuSV). FBR-MuSV acquired the Fau gene by transduction in a transcriptional orientation opposite to that of the genomic Fau gene. The genomic structure of the mouse Fau gene (MMFAU) and its upstream elements have been determined and are similar to those of the human FAU gene. The gene consists of five exons and is located on chromosome 19. The first exon is not translated. The promoter region has no well-defined TATA box but contains the polypyrimidine initiator flanked by regions of high GC content (65%) and shows all of the characteristics of a housekeeping gene. The 5' end of the mRNA transcript was determined by 5' RACE analysis and is located, as expected, in the polypyrimidine initiator site. Furthermore, the sequences of two retropseudogenes (Fau-ps1 and Fau-ps2) are reported. Both pseudogenes are approximately 75% identical to the Fau cDNA, but both are shorter due to a deletion at the 5' end and do not encode a functional protein. Fau-prs is interrupted by an AG-rich region of about 350 bp within the S30 region of the Fau cDNA. Fau-ps1 was localized on chromosome 1 and Fau-ps2 on chromosome 7.

  9. Re-analysis of the larval testis data on meiotic sex chromosome inactivation revealed evidence for tissue-specific gene expression related to the drosophila X chromosome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vibranovski Maria D

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI during spermatogenesis has been proposed as one of the evolutionary driving forces behind both the under-representation of male-biased genes on, and the gene movement out of, the X chromosome in Drosophila. However, the relevance of MSCI in shaping sex chromosome evolution is controversial. Here we examine two aspects of a recent study on testis gene expression (Mikhaylova and Nurminsky, BMC Biol 2011, 9:29 that failed to support the MSCI in Drosophila. First, Mikhaylova and Nurminsky found no differences between X-linked and autosomal genes based on the transcriptional profiling of the early testis development, and thus concluded that MSCI does not occur in D. melanogaster. Second, they also analyzed expression data from several D. melanogaster tissues and concluded that under-representation on the X chromosome is not an exclusive property of testis-biased genes, but instead, a general property of tissue-specific genes. Results By re-analyzing the Mikhaylova and Nurminsky's testis data and the expression data on several D. melanogaster tissues, we made two major findings that refuted their original claims. First, the developmental testis data has generally greater experimental error than conventional analyses, which reduced significantly the power to detect chromosomal differences in expression. Nevertheless, our re-analysis observed significantly lower expression of the X chromosome in the genomic transcriptomes of later development stages of the testis, which is consistent with the MSCI hypothesis. Second, tissue-specific genes are also in general enriched with genes more expressed in testes than in ovaries, that is testis-biased genes. By completely excluding from the analyses the testis-biased genes, which are known to be under-represented in the X, we found that all the other tissue-specific genes are randomly distributed between the X chromosome and the autosomes. Conclusions

  10. The constrained maximal expression level owing to haploidy shapes gene content on the mammalian X chromosome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hurst, Laurence D.; Ghanbarian, Avazeh T.; Forrest, Alistair R R

    2015-01-01

    X chromosomes are unusual in many regards, not least of which is their nonrandom gene content. The causes of this bias are commonly discussed in the context of sexual antagonism and the avoidance of activity in the male germline. Here, we examine the notion that, at least in some taxa, functional...

  11. Isolation of a Breast Cancer Tumor Suppressor Gene from Chromosome 3p

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-10-01

    on chromosome 8. The recent observation by Geurts et al., (34) that FHIT was fused to the HMGI(C) gene in a benign parotid adenoma suggested that a...adenoma of the parotid gland. Cancer Res., 57: 13-17, 1997. 35. Lucito, R., Nakimura, M., West, J.A., Han, Y., Chin, K., Jensen, K., McCombie, R., Gray

  12. High School Students' Understanding of Chromosome/Gene Behavior during Meiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Jim; Dale, Michael

    1989-01-01

    Investigates high school students' understanding of the physical relationship of chromosomes and genes as expressed in their conceptual models and in their ability to manipulate the models to explain solutions to dihybrid cross problems. Describes three typical models and three students' reasoning processes. Discusses four implications. (YP)

  13. Candidate genes for cross-resistance against DNA-damaging drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wittig, Rainer; Nessling, Michelle; Will, Rainer D

    2002-01-01

    Drug resistance of tumor cells leads to major drawbacks in the treatment of cancer. To identify candidate genes for drug resistance, we compared the expression patterns of the drug-sensitive human malignant melanoma cell line MeWo and three derived sublines with acquired resistance to the DNA-dam...

  14. Targeted sequencing of 351 candidate genes for epileptic encephalopathy in a large cohort of patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Kovel, Carolien G F; Brilstra, Eva H; van Kempen, Marjan J A;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Many genes are candidates for involvement in epileptic encephalopathy (EE) because one or a few possibly pathogenic variants have been found in patients, but insufficient genetic or functional evidence exists for a definite annotation. METHODS: To increase the number of validated EE...

  15. A Candidate Gene Analysis of Methylphenidate Response in Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGough, James J.; McCracken, James T.; Loo, Sandra K.; Manganiello, Marc; Leung, Michael C.; Tietjens, Jeremy R.; Trinh, Thao; Baweja, Shilpa; Suddath, Robert; Smalley, Susan L.; Hellemann, Gerhard; Sugar, Catherine A.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: This study examines the potential role of candidate genes in moderating treatment effects of methylphenidate (MPH) in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Method: Eighty-two subjects with ADHD aged 6 to 17 years participated in a prospective, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multiple-dose, crossover titration trial of…

  16. Genetics of Estrogen-Related Traits; From Candidate Genes to GWAS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Stolk (Lisette)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractIn the first part of this thesis, the association of polymorphisms in three candidate genes (estrogen receptor alpha (ESR1), retinoblastoma interacting zinc finger domain (RIZ1) and catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT)) with estradiol levels, age at natural menopause, BMD and fracture ris

  17. No association of candidate genes with cannabis use in a large sample of Australian twin families

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verweij, K.J.H.; Zietsch, B.P.; Liu, J.Z.; Medland, S.E.; Lynskey, M.T.; Madden, P.A.F.; Agrawal, A.; Montgomery, G.W.; Heath, A.C.; Martin, N.G.

    2012-01-01

    While there is solid evidence that cannabis use is heritable, attempts to identify genetic influences at the molecular level have yielded mixed results. Here, a large twin family sample (n = 7452) was used to test for association between 10 previously reported candidate genes and lifetime frequency

  18. Functional complementation studies identify candidate genes and common genetic variants associated with ovarian cancer survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quaye, Lydia; Dafou, Dimitra; Ramus, Susan J;

    2009-01-01

    Common germline genetic variation and/or somatic alterations in tumours may be associated with survival in women diagnosed with ovarian cancer. The successful identification of genetic associations relies on a suitable strategy for identifying and testing candidate genes. We used microcell-mediat...

  19. Functional characterisation of polymorphisms in candidate genes for coronary heart disease

    OpenAIRE

    van't Hooft, Ferdinand M.

    1999-01-01

    Coronary heart disease (CHD) is a multifactorial disorder. Several important risk factors, in particular cigarette smoking, hypertension, hypercholesterolaemia, reduced high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol concentration and hyperglycaemia, have been defined. It appears that most risk factors are influenced by genetic components, suggesting that genetic variants in candidate genes play an important role in the development of CHD. In view of the importance of transcripti...

  20. Candidate fire blight resistance genes in Malus identified with the use of genomic tools and approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    The goal of this research is to utilize current advances in Rosaceae genomics to identify DNA markers for use in marker-assisted selection of durable resistance to fire blight. Candidate fire blight resistance genes were selected and ranked based upon differential expression after inoculation with ...

  1. Bioinformatics-Driven Identification and Examination of Candidate Genes for Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Banasik, Karina; Justesen, Johanne M.; Hornbak, Malene

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Candidate genes for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) identified by a bioinformatics approach were examined for variant associations to quantitative traits of NAFLD-related phenotypes. Research Design and Methods: By integrating public database text mining, trans-organism protein...

  2. Functional annotation and identification of candidate disease genes by computational analysis of normal tissue gene expression data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Miozzi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: High-throughput gene expression data can predict gene function through the "guilt by association" principle: coexpressed genes are likely to be functionally associated. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We analyzed publicly available expression data on normal human tissues. The analysis is based on the integration of data obtained with two experimental platforms (microarrays and SAGE and of various measures of dissimilarity between expression profiles. The building blocks of the procedure are the Ranked Coexpression Groups (RCG, small sets of tightly coexpressed genes which are analyzed in terms of functional annotation. Functionally characterized RCGs are selected by means of the majority rule and used to predict new functional annotations. Functionally characterized RCGs are enriched in groups of genes associated to similar phenotypes. We exploit this fact to find new candidate disease genes for many OMIM phenotypes of unknown molecular origin. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We predict new functional annotations for many human genes, showing that the integration of different data sets and coexpression measures significantly improves the scope of the results. Combining gene expression data, functional annotation and known phenotype-gene associations we provide candidate genes for several genetic diseases of unknown molecular basis.

  3. Genome-Wide Association Analyses Point to Candidate Genes for Electric Shock Avoidance in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appel, Mirjam; Scholz, Claus-Jürgen; Müller, Tobias; Dittrich, Marcus; König, Christian; Bockstaller, Marie; Oguz, Tuba; Khalili, Afshin; Antwi-Adjei, Emmanuel; Schauer, Tamas; Margulies, Carla; Tanimoto, Hiromu; Yarali, Ayse

    2015-01-01

    Electric shock is a common stimulus for nociception-research and the most widely used reinforcement in aversive associative learning experiments. Yet, nothing is known about the mechanisms it recruits at the periphery. To help fill this gap, we undertook a genome-wide association analysis using 38 inbred Drosophila melanogaster strains, which avoided shock to varying extents. We identified 514 genes whose expression levels and/ or sequences co-varied with shock avoidance scores. We independently scrutinized 14 of these genes using mutants, validating the effect of 7 of them on shock avoidance. This emphasizes the value of our candidate gene list as a guide for follow-up research. In addition, by integrating our association results with external protein-protein interaction data we obtained a shock avoidance-associated network of 38 genes. Both this network and the original candidate list contained a substantial number of genes that affect mechanosensory bristles, which are hair-like organs distributed across the fly's body. These results may point to a potential role for mechanosensory bristles in shock sensation. Thus, we not only provide a first list of candidate genes for shock avoidance, but also point to an interesting new hypothesis on nociceptive mechanisms.

  4. Identification of candidate olfactory genes in Leptinotarsa decemlineata by antennal transcriptome analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang eLiu

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The sense of smell is critical for the survival of insects, by which insects detect the odor signals in the environment and make appropriate behavioral responses such as host preference, mate choice, and oviposition site selection. The antenna is the main olfactory organ in insects. Multiple antennal proteins have been suggested to be involved in olfactory signal transduction pathway such as odorant receptors (ORs, ionotropic receptors (IRs, odorant binding proteins (OBPs, chemosensory proteins (CSPs and sensory neuron membrane proteins (SNMPs. In this study, we identified several olfactory gene subfamilies in the economically important Coleopteran agricultural pest, Leptinotarsa decemlineata, by assembling the adult male and female antennal transcriptomes. In the male and female antennal transcriptome, we identified a total of 37 OR genes, 10 IR genes, 26 OBP genes, 15 CSP genes and 3 SNMP genes. Further all candidate ORs were validated to be expressed in male or female antenna by semi-quantitative reverse transcription PCR. Most of the candidate OR genes have similar expression level in male and female. A few OR genes have been detected as male-specific (LdecOR6 or male-bias (LdecOR5, LdecOR12, LdecOR26 and LdecOR32 expression. As well as that, two OR genes (LdecOR3 and LdecOR29 were proved to be expressed higher in female. Our findings make it possible for future research of the olfactory system of L. decemlineata at the molecular level.

  5. ReCGiP, a database of reproduction candidate genes in pigs based on bibliomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Lun

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Reproduction in pigs is one of the most economically important traits. To improve the reproductive performances, numerous studies have focused on the identification of candidate genes. However, it is hard for one to read all literatures thoroughly to get information. So we have developed a database providing candidate genes for reproductive researches in pig by mining and processing existing biological literatures in human and pigs, named as ReCGiP. Description Based on text-mining and comparative genomics, ReCGiP presents diverse information of reproduction-relevant genes in human and pig. The genes were sorted by the degree of relevance with the reproduction topics and were visualized in a gene's co-occurrence network where two genes were connected if they were co-cited in a PubMed abstract. The 'hub' genes which had more 'neighbors' were thought to be have more important functions and could be identified by the user in their web browser. In addition, ReCGiP provided integrated GO annotation, OMIM and biological pathway information collected from the Internet. Both pig and human gene information can be found in the database, which is now available. Conclusions ReCGiP is a unique database providing information on reproduction related genes for pig. It can be used in the area of the molecular genetics, the genetic linkage map, and the breeding of the pig and other livestock. Moreover, it can be used as a reference for human reproduction research.

  6. Molecular evolution of candidate genes for crop-related traits in sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandel, Jennifer R; McAssey, Edward V; Nambeesan, Savithri; Garcia-Navarro, Elena; Burke, John M

    2014-01-01

    Evolutionary analyses aimed at detecting the molecular signature of selection during crop domestication and/or improvement can be used to identify genes or genomic regions of likely agronomic importance. Here, we describe the DNA sequence-based characterization of a pool of candidate genes for crop-related traits in sunflower. These genes, which were identified based on homology to genes of known effect in other study systems, were initially sequenced from a panel of improved lines. All genes that exhibited a paucity of sequence diversity, consistent with the possible effects of selection during the evolution of cultivated sunflower, were then sequenced from a panel of wild sunflower accessions an outgroup. These data enabled formal tests for the effects of selection in shaping sequence diversity at these loci. When selection was detected, we further sequenced these genes from a panel of primitive landraces, thereby allowing us to investigate the likely timing of selection (i.e., domestication vs. improvement). We ultimately identified seven genes that exhibited the signature of positive selection during either domestication or improvement. Genetic mapping of a subset of these genes revealed co-localization between candidates for genes involved in the determination of flowering time, seed germination, plant growth/development, and branching and QTL that were previously identified for these traits in cultivated × wild sunflower mapping populations.

  7. A family of selfish minicircular chromosomes with jumbled chloroplast gene fragments from a dinoflagellate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Z; Cavalier-Smith, T; Green, B R

    2001-08-01

    Chloroplast genes of several dinoflagellate species are located on unigenic DNA minicircular chromosomes. We have now completely sequenced five aberrant minicircular chromosomes from the dinoflagellate Heterocapsa triquetra. These probably nonfunctional DNA circles lack complete genes, with each being composed of several short fragments of two or three different chloroplast genes and a common conserved region with a tripartite 9G-9A-9G core like the putative replicon origin of functional single-gene circular chloroplast chromosomes. Their sequences imply that all five circles evolved by differential deletions and duplications from common ancestral circles bearing fragments of four genes: psbA, psbC, 16S rRNA, and 23S rRNA. It appears that recombination between separate unigenic chromosomes initially gave intermediate heterodimers, which were subsequently stabilized by deletions that included part or all of one putative replicon origin. We suggest that homologous recombination at the 9G-9A-9G core regions produced a psbA/psbC heterodimer which generated two distinct chimeric circles by differential deletions and duplications. A 23S/16S rRNA heterodimer more likely formed by illegitimate recombination between 16S and 23S rRNA genes. Homologous recombination between the 9G-9A-9G core regions of both heterodimers and additional differential deletions and duplications could then have yielded the other three circles. Near identity of the gene fragments and 9G-9A-9G cores, despite diverging adjacent regions, may be maintained by gene conversion. The conserved organization of the 9G-9A-9G cores alone favors the idea that they are replicon origins and suggests that they may enable the aberrant minicircles to parasitize the chloroplast's replication machinery as selfish circles.

  8. Gene Expression Signature TOPFOX Reflecting Chromosomal Instability Refines Prediction of Prognosis in Grade 2 Breast Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szasz, A.; Li, Qiyuan; Sztupinszki, Z.

    2011-01-01

    were diagnosed between 1999–2002 at the Budai MA´ V Hospital. 187 formalinfixed, paraffin-embedded breast cancer samples were included in the qPCR-based measurement of expression of AURKA, FOXM1, TOP2A and TPX2 genes. The expression of the genes were correlated to recurrencefree survival (RFS......Purpose: To assess the ability of genes selected from those reflecting chromosomal instability to identify good and poor prognostic subsets of Grade 2 breast carcinomas. Methods: We selected genes for splitting grade 2 tumours into low and high grade type groups by using public databases. Patients...

  9. The database of chromosome imbalance regions and genes resided in lung cancer from Asian and Caucasian identified by array-comparative genomic hybridization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lo Fang-Yi

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cancer-related genes show racial differences. Therefore, identification and characterization of DNA copy number alteration regions in different racial groups helps to dissect the mechanism of tumorigenesis. Methods Array-comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH was analyzed for DNA copy number profile in 40 Asian and 20 Caucasian lung cancer patients. Three methods including MetaCore analysis for disease and pathway correlations, concordance analysis between array-CGH database and the expression array database, and literature search for copy number variation genes were performed to select novel lung cancer candidate genes. Four candidate oncogenes were validated for DNA copy number and mRNA and protein expression by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR, chromogenic in situ hybridization (CISH, reverse transcriptase-qPCR (RT-qPCR, and immunohistochemistry (IHC in more patients. Results We identified 20 chromosomal imbalance regions harboring 459 genes for Caucasian and 17 regions containing 476 genes for Asian lung cancer patients. Seven common chromosomal imbalance regions harboring 117 genes, included gain on 3p13-14, 6p22.1, 9q21.13, 13q14.1, and 17p13.3; and loss on 3p22.2-22.3 and 13q13.3 were found both in Asian and Caucasian patients. Gene validation for four genes including ARHGAP19 (10q24.1 functioning in Rho activity control, FRAT2 (10q24.1 involved in Wnt signaling, PAFAH1B1 (17p13.3 functioning in motility control, and ZNF322A (6p22.1 involved in MAPK signaling was performed using qPCR and RT-qPCR. Mean gene dosage and mRNA expression level of the four candidate genes in tumor tissues were significantly higher than the corresponding normal tissues (PP=0.06. In addition, CISH analysis of patients indicated that copy number amplification indeed occurred for ARHGAP19 and ZNF322A genes in lung cancer patients. IHC analysis of paraffin blocks from Asian Caucasian patients demonstrated that the frequency of

  10. High-Resolution Chromosome Ideogram Representation of Currently Recognized Genes for Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merlin G. Butler

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Recently, autism-related research has focused on the identification of various genes and disturbed pathways causing the genetically heterogeneous group of autism spectrum disorders (ASD. The list of autism-related genes has significantly increased due to better awareness with advances in genetic technology and expanding searchable genomic databases. We compiled a master list of known and clinically relevant autism spectrum disorder genes identified with supporting evidence from peer-reviewed medical literature sources by searching key words related to autism and genetics and from authoritative autism-related public access websites, such as the Simons Foundation Autism Research Institute autism genomic database dedicated to gene discovery and characterization. Our list consists of 792 genes arranged in alphabetical order in tabular form with gene symbols placed on high-resolution human chromosome ideograms, thereby enabling clinical and laboratory geneticists and genetic counsellors to access convenient visual images of the location and distribution of ASD genes. Meaningful correlations of the observed phenotype in patients with suspected/confirmed ASD gene(s at the chromosome region or breakpoint band site can be made to inform diagnosis and gene-based personalized care and provide genetic counselling for families.

  11. A cross-species genetic analysis identifies candidate genes for mouse anxiety and human bipolar disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David G Ashbrook

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Bipolar disorder (BD is a significant neuropsychiatric disorder with a lifetime prevalence of ~1%. To identify genetic variants underlying BD genome-wide association studies (GWAS have been carried out. While many variants of small effect associated with BD have been identified few have yet been confirmed, partly because of the low power of GWAS due to multiple comparisons being made. Complementary mapping studies using murine models have identified genetic variants for behavioral traits linked to BD, often with high power, but these identified regions often contain too many genes for clear identification of candidate genes. In the current study we have aligned human BD GWAS results and mouse linkage studies to help define and evaluate candidate genes linked to BD, seeking to use the power of the mouse mapping with the precision of GWAS. We use quantitative trait mapping for open field test and elevated zero maze data in the largest mammalian model system, the BXD recombinant inbred mouse population, to identify genomic regions associated with these BD-like phenotypes. We then investigate these regions in whole genome data from the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium’s bipolar disorder GWAS to identify candidate genes associated with BD. Finally we establish the biological relevance and pathways of these genes in a comprehensive systems genetics analysis.We identify four genes associated with both mouse anxiety and human BD. While TNR is a novel candidate for BD, we can confirm previously suggested associations with CMYA5, MCTP1 and RXRG. A cross-species, systems genetics analysis shows that MCTP1, RXRG and TNR coexpress with genes linked to psychiatric disorders and identify the striatum as a potential site of action. CMYA5, MCTP1, RXRG and TNR are associated with mouse anxiety and human BD. We hypothesize that MCTP1, RXRG and TNR influence intercellular signaling in the striatum.

  12. Identification of novel candidate genes for follicle selection in the broiler breeder ovary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McDerment Neil A

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Broiler breeders fed ad libitum are characterised by multiple ovulation, which leads to poor shell quality and egg production. Multiple ovulation is controlled by food restriction in commercial flocks. However, the level of food restriction raises welfare concerns, including that of severe hunger. Reducing the rate of multiple ovulation by genetic selection would facilitate progress towards developing a growth profile for optimum animal welfare. Results The study utilised 3 models of ovarian follicle development; laying hens fed ad libitum (experiment 2 and broiler breeders fed ad libitum or a restricted diet (experiments 1 & 3. This allowed us to investigate gene candidates for follicular development by comparing normal, abnormal and “controlled” follicle hierarchies at different stages of development. Several candidate genes for multiple ovulation were identified by combining microarray analysis of restricted vs. ad libitum feeding, literature searches and QPCR expression profiling throughout follicle development. Three candidate genes were confirmed by QPCR as showing significant differential expression between restricted and ad libitum feeding: FSHR, GDF9 and PDGFRL. PDGFRL, a candidate for steroidogenesis, showed significantly up-regulated expression in 6–8 mm follicles of ad libitum fed broiler breeders (P = 0.016, the period at which follicle recruitment occurs. Conclusions Gene candidates have been identified and evidence provided to support a possible role in regulation of ovarian function and follicle number. Further characterisation of these genes will be required to assess their potential for inclusion into breeding programmes to improve the regulation of follicle selection and reduce the need for feed restriction.

  13. Close proximity of the tdh, trh and ure genes on the chromosome of Vibrio parahaemolyticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iida, T; Park, K S; Suthienkul, O; Kozawa, J; Yamaichi, Y; Yamamoto, K; Honda, T

    1998-09-01

    The distribution and location of the virulence-factor genes of Vibrio parahaemolyticus, tdh and trh, and the structural gene of urease, ureC, were examined on the genomic DNAs of 115 clinical isolates of V. parahaemolyticus. The majority of strains (81%) had two copies of tdh on the chromosome, and no copies of trh or ure. Southern hybridization with a tdh probe, after pulsed-field gel electrophoresis of Notl-digested genomic DNA of each strain revealed only single bands, suggesting that the two copies of the exist on single Notl fragments in each strain. Of the 115 strains, 7% had the tdh, trh and ure genes on chromosomal DNA. The three genes were also detected on single Notl fragments in these strains. More detailed analysis revealed that the three genes were localized within 40 kb. By long and accurate polymerase chain reactions (LA-PCR) the distance between trh and ure was shown to be less than 8.5 kb. These results reveal a close proximity of the tdh, trh and ure genes on the chromosome of pathogenic V. parahaemolyticus strains.

  14. Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Microarray Analysis in Cortisol-Secreting Adrenocortical Adenomas Identifies New Candidate Genes and Pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina L. Ronchi

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The genetic mechanisms underlying adrenocortical tumor development are still largely unknown. We used high-resolution single nucleotide polymorphism microarrays (Affymetrix SNP 6.0 to detect copy number alterations (CNAs and copy-neutral losses of heterozygosity (cnLOH in 15 cortisol-secreting adrenocortical adenomas with matched blood samples. We focused on microalterations aiming to discover new candidate genes involved in early tumorigenesis and/or autonomous cortisol secretion. We identified 962 CNAs with a median of 18 CNAs per sample. Half of them involved noncoding regions, 89% were less than 100 kb, and 28% were found in at least two samples. The most frequently gained regions were 5p15.33, 6q16.1, 7p22.3-22.2, 8q24.3, 9q34.2-34.3, 11p15.5, 11q11, 12q12, 16q24.3, 20p11.1-20q21.11, and Xq28 (≥20% of cases, most of them being identified in the same three adenomas. These regions contained among others genes like NOTCH1, CYP11B2, HRAS, and IGF2. Recurrent losses were less common and smaller than gains, being mostly localized at 1p, 6q, and 11q. Pathway analysis revealed that Notch signaling was the most frequently altered. We identified 46 recurrent CNAs that each affected a single gene (31 gains and 15 losses, including genes involved in steroidogenesis (CYP11B1 or tumorigenesis (CTNNB1, EPHA7, SGK1, STIL, FHIT. Finally, 20 small cnLOH in four cases affecting 15 known genes were found. Our findings provide the first high-resolution genome-wide view of chromosomal changes in cortisol-secreting adenomas and identify novel candidate genes, such as HRAS, EPHA7, and SGK1. Furthermore, they implicate that the Notch1 signaling pathway might be involved in the molecular pathogenesis of adrenocortical tumors.

  15. Fine Mapping for Identification of Citrus Alternaria Brown Spot Candidate Resistance Genes and Development of New SNP Markers for Marker-Assisted Selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuenca, Jose; Aleza, Pablo; Garcia-Lor, Andres; Ollitrault, Patrick; Navarro, Luis

    2016-01-01

    Alternaria brown spot (ABS) is a serious disease affecting susceptible citrus genotypes, which is a strong concern regarding citrus breeding programs. Resistance is conferred by a recessive locus (ABSr) previously located by our group within a 3.3 Mb genome region near the centromere in chromosome III. This work addresses fine-linkage mapping of this region for identifying candidate resistance genes and develops new molecular markers for ABS-resistance effective marker-assisted selection (MAS). Markers closely linked to ABSr locus were used for fine mapping using a 268-segregating diploid progeny derived from a heterozygous susceptible × resistant cross. Fine mapping limited the genomic region containing the ABSr resistance gene to 366 kb, flanked by markers at 0.4 and 0.7 cM. This region contains nine genes related to pathogen resistance. Among them, eight are resistance (R) gene homologs, with two of them harboring a serine/threonine protein kinase domain. These two genes along with a gene encoding a S-adenosyl-L-methionine-dependent-methyltransferase protein, should be considered as strong candidates for ABS-resistance. Moreover, the closest SNP was genotyped in 40 citrus varieties, revealing very high association with the resistant/susceptible phenotype. This new marker is currently used in our citrus breeding program for ABS-resistant parent and cultivar selection, at diploid, triploid and tetraploid level. PMID:28066498

  16. Discovery of candidate disease genes in ENU-induced mouse mutants by large-scale sequencing, including a splice-site mutation in nucleoredoxin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa K Boles

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available An accurate and precisely annotated genome assembly is a fundamental requirement for functional genomic analysis. Here, the complete DNA sequence and gene annotation of mouse Chromosome 11 was used to test the efficacy of large-scale sequencing for mutation identification. We re-sequenced the 14,000 annotated exons and boundaries from over 900 genes in 41 recessive mutant mouse lines that were isolated in an N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU mutation screen targeted to mouse Chromosome 11. Fifty-nine sequence variants were identified in 55 genes from 31 mutant lines. 39% of the lesions lie in coding sequences and create primarily missense mutations. The other 61% lie in noncoding regions, many of them in highly conserved sequences. A lesion in the perinatal lethal line l11Jus13 alters a consensus splice site of nucleoredoxin (Nxn, inserting 10 amino acids into the resulting protein. We conclude that point mutations can be accurately and sensitively recovered by large-scale sequencing, and that conserved noncoding regions should be included for disease mutation identification. Only seven of the candidate genes we report have been previously targeted by mutation in mice or rats, showing that despite ongoing efforts to functionally annotate genes in the mammalian genome, an enormous gap remains between phenotype and function. Our data show that the classical positional mapping approach of disease mutation identification can be extended to large target regions using high-throughput sequencing.

  17. Mouse autosomal homolog of DAZ, a candidate male sterility gene in humans, is expressed in male germ cells before and after puberty

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reijo, R.; Seligman, J.; Jaffe, T. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States)] [and others

    1996-07-15

    Deletion of the Azoospermia Factor (AZF) region of the human Y chromosome results in spermatogenic failure. While the identity of the critical missing gene has yet to be established, a strong candidate is the putative RNA-binding protein DAZ (Deleted in Azoospermia). Here we describe the mouse homolog of DAZ. Unlike human DAZ, which is Y-linked, in mouse the Dazh (DAZ homolog) gene maps to chromosome 17. Nonetheless, the predicted amino acid sequences of the gene products are quite similar, especially in their RNP/RRM (putative RNA-binding) domains, and both genes are transcribed predominantly in testes; the mouse gene is transcribed at a lower level in ovaries. Dazh transcripts were not detected in testes of mice that lack germ cells. In testes of wildtype mice, Dazh transcription is detectable 1 day after birth (when the only germ cells are prospermatogonia), increases steadily as spermatogonial stem cells appear, plateaus as the first wave of spermatogenic cells enters meiosis (10 days after birth), and is sustained at this level thereafter. This unique pattern of expression suggests the Dazh participates in differentiation, proliferation, or maintenance of germ cell founder populations before, during, and after the pubertal onset of spermatogenesis. Such functions could readily account for the diverse spermatogenic defects observed in human males with AZF deletion. 29 refs., 4 figs.

  18. Genetic and functional analyses identify DISC1 as a novel callosal agenesis candidate gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osbun, Nathan; Li, Jiang; O'Driscoll, Mary C; Strominger, Zoe; Wakahiro, Mari; Rider, Eric; Bukshpun, Polina; Boland, Elena; Spurrell, Cailyn H; Schackwitz, Wendy; Pennacchio, Len A; Dobyns, William B; Black, Graeme C M; Sherr, Elliott H

    2011-08-01

    Agenesis of the corpus callosum (AgCC) is a congenital brain malformation that occurs in approximately 1:1,000-1:6,000 births. Several syndromes associated with AgCC have been traced to single gene mutations; however, the majority of AgCC causes remain unidentified. We investigated a mother and two children who all shared complete AgCC and a chromosomal deletion at 1q42. We fine mapped this deletion and show that it includes Disrupted-in-Schizophrenia 1 (DISC1), a gene implicated in schizophrenia and other psychiatric disorders. Furthermore, we report a de novo chromosomal deletion at 1q42.13 to q44, which includes DISC1, in another individual with AgCC. We resequenced DISC1 in a cohort of 144 well-characterized AgCC individuals and identified 20 sequence changes, of which 4 are rare potentially pathogenic variants. Two of these variants were undetected in 768 control chromosomes. One of these is a splice site mutation at the 5' boundary of exon 11 that dramatically reduces full-length mRNA expression of DISC1, but not of shorter forms. We investigated the developmental expression of mouse DISC1 and find that it is highly expressed in the embryonic corpus callosum at a critical time for callosal formation. Taken together our results suggest a significant role for DISC1 in corpus callosum development.

  19. Chromosome jumping from D4S10 (G8) toward the Huntington disease gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richards, J.E.; Gilliam, T.C.; Cole, J.L.; Drumm, M.L.; Wasmuth, J.J.; Gusella, J.F.; Collins, F.S.

    1988-09-01

    The gene for Huntington disease (HD) has been localized to the distal portion of the short arm of human chromosome 4 by linkage analysis. Currently, the two closest DNA markers are D4S10 (G8), located /approx/3 centimorgans centromeric to HD, and D4S43 (C4H), positioned 0-1.5 centimorgans from HD. In an effort to move closer to the HD gene, with the eventual goal of identifying the gene itself, the authors have applied the technique of chromosome jumping to this region. A 200-kilobase jumping library has been constructed, and a jump from D4S10 has been obtained and its approximate distance verified by pulsed field gel electrophoresis. Two restriction fragment length polymorphisms have been identified at the jump locus, which is denoted D4S81. Linkage analysis of previously identified recombinants between D4S10 and HD or D4S10 and D4S43 shows that in two of five events the jump has crossed the recombination points. This unequivocally orients D4S10 and D4S81 on the chromosome, provides additional markers for HD, and suggests that recombination frequency in this region of chromosome 4 may be increased, so that the physical distance from D4S10 to HD may not be as large as originally suspected.

  20. A unique mosaic Turner syndrome patient with androgen receptor gene derived marker chromosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalkan, Rasime; Özdağ, Nermin; Bundak, Rüveyde; Çirakoğlu, Ayşe; Serakinci, Nedime

    2016-01-01

    Patients with Turner syndrome are generally characterized by having short stature with no secondary sexual characteristics. Some abnormalities, such as webbed neck, renal malformations (>50%) and cardiac defects (10%) are less common. The intelligence of these patients is considered normal. Non-mosaic monosomy X is observed in approximately 45% of postnatal patients with Turner syndrome and the rest of the patients have structural abnormalities or mosaicism involving 46,X,i(Xq), 45,X/46,XX, 45,X and other variants. The phenotype of 45,X/46,X,+mar individuals varies by the genetic continent and degree of the mosaicism. The gene content of the marker chromosome is the most important when correlating the phenotype with the genotype. Here we present an 11-year-old female who was referred for evaluation of her short stature and learning disabilities. Conventional cytogenetic investigation showed a mosaic 45,X/46,X,+mar karyotype. Fluorescence in situ hybridization showed that the marker chromosome originated from the X chromosome within the androgen receptor (AR) and X-inactive specific transcript (XIST) genes. Therefore, it is possible that aberrant activation of the marker chromosome, compromising the AR and XIST genes, may modify the Turner syndrome phenotype.

  1. QTLs and candidate genes for desiccation and abscisic acid content in maize kernels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charcosset Alain

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Kernel moisture at harvest is an important trait since a low value is required to prevent unexpected early germination and ensure seed preservation. It is also well known that early germination occurs in viviparous mutants, which are impaired in abscisic acid (ABA biosynthesis. To provide some insight into the genetic determinism of kernel desiccation in maize, quantitative trait loci (QTLs were detected for traits related to kernel moisture and ABA content in both embryo and endosperm during kernel desiccation. In parallel, the expression and mapping of genes involved in kernel desiccation and ABA biosynthesis, were examined to detect candidate genes. Results The use of an intermated recombinant inbred line population allowed for precise QTL mapping. For 29 traits examined in an unreplicated time course trial of days after pollination, a total of 78 QTLs were detected, 43 being related to kernel desiccation, 15 to kernel weight and 20 to ABA content. Multi QTL models explained 35 to 50% of the phenotypic variation for traits related to water status, indicating a large genetic control amenable to breeding. Ten of the 20 loci controlling ABA content colocated with previously detected QTLs controlling water status and ABA content in water stressed leaves. Mapping of candidate genes associated with kernel desiccation and ABA biosynthesis revealed several colocations between genes with putative functions and QTLs. Parallel investigation via RT-PCR experiments showed that the expression patterns of the ABA-responsive Rab17 and Rab28 genes as well as the late embryogenesis abundant Emb5 and aquaporin genes were related to desiccation rate and parental allele effect. Database searches led to the identification and mapping of two zeaxanthin epoxidase (ZEP and five novel 9-cis-epoxycarotenoid dioxygenase (NCED related genes, both gene families being involved in ABA biosynthesis. The expression of these genes appeared independent in

  2. Fine mapping and candidate gene prediction of the photoperiod and thermo-sensitive genic male sterile gene pms1(t) in rice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuan-fei ZHOU; Xian-yin ZHANG; Qing-zhong XUE

    2011-01-01

    Pei'ai64S, an indica sterile variety with photoperiod and thermo-sensitive genic male sterile (PTGMS) genes, has been widely exploited for commercial seed production for "two-line" hybrid rice in China. One PTGMS gene from Pei'ai64S, pms1(t), was mapped by a strategy of bulked-extreme and recessive-class approach with simple sequence repeat (SSR) and insert and deletion (In-Del) markers. Using linkage analysis for the F2 mapping population consisting of 320 completely male sterile individuals derived from a cross between Pei'ai64S and 93-11 (indica restorer) lines, the pms1(t) gene was delimited to the region between the RM21242 (0.2 cM) and YF11 (0.2 cM) markers on the short arm of chromosome 7. The interval containing the pms1(t) locus, which was co-segregated with RM6776, is a 101.1 kb region based on the Nipponbare rice genome. Fourteen predicted loci were found in this region by the Institute for Genomic Research (TIGR) Genomic Annotation. Based on the function of the locus LOC_Os07g12130 by bioinformatics analysis, it is predicted to encode a protein containing a Myb-like DNA-binding domain, and may process the transcript with thermosensory response. The reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) results revealed that the mRNA levels of LOC_Os07g12130 were altered in different photoperiod and temperature treatments. Thus, the LOC_Os07g12130 locus is the most likely candidate gene for pms1(t). These results may facilitate not only using the molecular marker assisted selection of PTGMS genes, but also cloning of the pms1(t) gene itself.

  3. Chromosomal Abnormalities and Putative Susceptibility Genes in Autism Spectrum Disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mette Gilling

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) is a heterogeneous group of neurodevelopmental disorders with a significant genetic component as shown by family and twin studies. However, only a few genes have repeatedly been shown to be involved in the development of ASDs. The aim of this study has been...

  4. Chromosomal mapping of the human M6 genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olinsky, S.; Loop, B.T.; DeKosky, A. [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States)] [and others

    1996-05-01

    M6 is a neuronal membrane glycoprotein that may have an important role in neural development. This molecule was initially defined by a monoclonal antibody that affected the survival of cultured cerebellar neurons and the outgrowth of neurites. The nature of the antigen was discovered by expression cDNA cloning using this monoclonal antibody. Two distinct murine M6 cDNAs (designated M6a and M6b) whose deduced amino acid sequences were remarkably similar to that of the myelin proteolipid protein human cDNA and genomic clones encoding M6a and M6b and have characterized them by restriction mapping, Southern hybridization with cDNA probes, and sequence analysis. We have localized these genes within the human genome by FISH (fluorescence in situ hybridization). The human M6a gene is located at 4q34, and the M6b gene is located at Xp22.2 A number of human neurological disorders have been mapped to the Xp22 region, including Aicardi syndrome (MIM 304050), Rett syndrome (MIM 312750), X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy (MIM 302801), and X-linked mental retardation syndromes (MRX1, MIM 309530). This raises the possibility that a defect in the M6b gene is responsible for one of these neurological disorders. 8 refs., 3 figs.

  5. Testing candidate genes for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder in fruit flies using a high throughput assay for complex behavior

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rohde, Palle Duun; Madsen, Lisbeth Strøm; Arvidson, Sandra Marie Neumann

    2016-01-01

    Fruit flies are important model organisms for functional testing of candidate genes in multiple disciplines, including the study of human diseases. Here we use a high-throughput locomotor activity assay to test the response on activity behavior of gene disruption in Drosophila melanogaster. The aim...... was to investigate the impact of disruption of 14 candidate genes for human attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) on fly behavior. By obtaining a range of correlated measures describing the space of variables for behavioral activity we show, that some mutants display similar phenotypic responses...... in fruit flies. Results provide additional support for the investigated genes being risk candidate genes for ADHD in humans....

  6. Evaluation of candidate reference genes for gene expression normalization in Brassica juncea using real time quantitative RT-PCR.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruby Chandna

    Full Text Available The real time quantitative reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR is becoming increasingly important to gain insight into function of genes. Given the increased sensitivity, ease and reproducibility of qRT-PCR, the requirement of suitable reference genes for normalization has become important and stringent. It is now known that the expression of internal control genes in living organism vary considerably during developmental stages and under different experimental conditions. For economically important Brassica crops, only a couple of reference genes are reported till date. In this study, expression stability of 12 candidate reference genes including ACT2, ELFA, GAPDH, TUA, UBQ9 (traditional housekeeping genes, ACP, CAC, SNF, TIPS-41, TMD, TSB and ZNF (new candidate reference genes, in a diverse set of 49 tissue samples representing different developmental stages, stress and hormone treated conditions and cultivars of Brassica juncea has been validated. For the normalization of vegetative stages the ELFA, ACT2, CAC and TIPS-41 combination would be appropriate whereas TIPS-41 along with CAC would be suitable for normalization of reproductive stages. A combination of GAPDH, TUA, TIPS-41 and CAC were identified as the most suitable reference genes for total developmental stages. In various stress and hormone treated samples, UBQ9 and TIPS-41 had the most stable expression. Across five cultivars of B. juncea, the expression of CAC and TIPS-41 did not vary significantly and were identified as the most stably expressed reference genes. This study provides comprehensive information that the new reference genes selected herein performed better than the traditional housekeeping genes. The selection of most suitable reference genes depends on the experimental conditions, and is tissue and cultivar-specific. Further, to attain accuracy in the results more than one reference genes are necessary for normalization.

  7. Fine genetic mapping of a gene for autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa on chromosome 6p21

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shugart, Yin Y.; Banerjee, P.; Knowles, J.A. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States)] [and others

    1995-08-01

    The inherited retinal degenerations known as retinitis pigmentosa (RP) can be caused by mutations at many different loci and can be inherited as an autosomal recessive, autosomal dominant, or X-linked recessive trait. Two forms of autosomal recessive (arRP) have been reported to cosegregate with mutations in the rhodopsin gene and the beta-subunit of rod phosphodiesterase on chromosome 4p. Genetic linkage has been reported on chromosomes 6p and 1q. In a large Dominican family, we reported an arRp gene near the region of the peripherin/RDS gene. Four recombinations were detected between the disease locus and an intragenic marker derived from peripherin/RDS. 26 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Human nicotinamide N-methyltransferase gene: Molecular cloning, structural characterization and chromosomal localization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aksoy, S.; Weinshilboum, R.M. [Mayo Medical School/Mayo Clinic/Mayo Foundation, Rochester, MN (United States); Brandriff, B.F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Ward, A.; Little, P.F.R. [Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine, London (United Kingdom)

    1995-10-10

    Genomic DNA clones for nicotinamide N-methyltransferase (NNMT), an enzyme that catalyzes drug and xenobiotic metabolism, were isolated from a human chromosome 11-specific DNA library. Study of one of those clones, when combined with PCR-based experiments performed with human genomic DNA, made it possible to determine the structure of the human NNMT gene. The gene was approximately 16.5 kb in length and consisted of 3 exons and 2 introns. Transcription initiation for the NNMT gene occurred 105-109 nucleotides 5{prime}-upstream from the cDNA translation initiation codon on the basis of the results of both primer extension and 5{prime}-rapid amplification of cDNA ends. NNMT mapped to chromosome band 11q23.1 by fluorescence in situ hybridization.

  9. Mapping a gene for adult-onset primary open-angle glaucoma to chromosome 3q

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wirtz, M.K.; Samples, J.R.; Kramer, P.L. [Oregon Health Sciences Univ., Portland, OR (United States)] [and others

    1997-02-01

    Glaucoma is the third-leading cause of blindness in the world, affecting >13.5 million people. Adult-on-set primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) is the most common form of glaucoma in the United States. We present a family in which adult-onset POAG is inherited as an autosomal dominant trait. Twelve affected family members were identified from 44 at-risk individuals. The disease-causing gene was mapped to chromosome 3q21-24, with analysis of recombinant haplotypes suggesting a total inclusion region of 11.1 cM between markers D3S3637 and D3S1744. This is the first report of mapping of an adult-onset POAG gene to chromosome 3q, gene symbol GLC1C. 57 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. Identification of a novel asthma susceptibility gene on chromosome 1qter and its functional evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    White, Julia H; Chiano, Mathias; Wigglesworth, Mark

    2008-01-01

    Asthma is a multifactorial disease, in which the intricate interplay between genetic and environmental factors underlies the overall phenotype of the disease. Using a genome-wide scan for linkage in a population comprising of Danish families, we identified a novel linked locus on chromosome 1qter...... (LOD 3.6, asthma) and supporting evidence for this locus was identified for both asthma an