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Sample records for chromosome alterations frequency

  1. Analysis of unstable chromosome alterations frequency induced by neutron-gamma mixed field radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nowadays monitoring chromosome alterations in peripheral blood lymphocytes have been used to access the radiation absorbed dose in individuals exposed accidental or occupationally to gamma radiation. However there are not many studies based on the effects of mixed field neutron-gamma. The radiobiology of neutrons has great importance because in nuclear factories worldwide there are several hundred thousand individuals monitored as potentially receiving doses of neutron. In this paper it was observed the frequencies of unstable chromosome alterations induced by a gamma-neutron mixed field. Blood was obtained from one healthy donor and exposed to mixed field neutron-gamma sources 241AmBe (20 Ci) at the Neutron Calibration Laboratory (NCL-CRCN/NE-PE-Brazil). The chromosomes were observed at metaphase, following colcemid accumulation and 1000 well-spread metaphases were analyzed for the presence of chromosome alterations by two experienced scorers. The results suggest that there is the possibility of a directly proportional relationship between absorbed dose of neutron-gamma mixed field radiation and the frequency of unstable chromosome alterations analyzed in this paper. (author)

  2. Preliminary study about frequencies of unstable chromosome alterations induced by gamma beam and neutron-gamma mixed field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendes, Mariana E.; Souza, Priscilla L.G.; Brandao, Jose Odinilson de C.; Santos, Joelan A.L.; Vilela, Eudice C.; Lima, Fabiana F. [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares (CRCN-NE/CNEN-PE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Calixto, Merilane S.; Santos, Neide [Universidade Federal de Pernanmbuco (CCB/UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Centro de Ciencias Biologicas. Dept. de Genetica

    2011-07-01

    The estimate on approximate dose in exposed individual can be made through conventional cytogenetic analysis of dicentric, this technique has been used to support physical dosimetry. It is important to estimate the absorbed dose in case of accidents with the aim of developing an appropriate treatment and biological dosimetry can be very useful in case where the dosimetry is unavailable. Exposure to gamma and neutron radiation leads to the same biological effects such as chromosomal alterations and cancer. However, neutrons cause more genetic damage, such as mutation or more structural damage, such as chromosome alterations. The aim of research is to compare frequencies of unstable chromosome alterations induced by a gamma beam with those from neutron-gamma mixed field. Two blood samples were obtained from one healthy donor and irradiated at different sources. The first sample was exposed to mixed field neutron-gamma sources {sup 241}AmBe at the Neutron Calibration Laboratory (NCL - CRCN/NE - PE - Brazil) and the second one was exposed to {sup 137}Cs gamma rays at {sup 137}Cs Laboratory (CRCN/NE - PE - Brazil), both exposures resulting in an absorbed dose of 0.66Gy. Mitotic metaphase cells were obtained by lymphocyte culture for chromosomal analysis and slides were stained with Giemsa 5%. These preliminary results showed a similarity in associated dicentrics frequency per cell (0.041 and 0.048) after {sup 137}Cs and {sup 241}AmBe sources irradiations, respectively. However, it was not observed centric rings frequency per cell (0.0 and 0.027). This study will be continue to verify the frequencies of unstable chromosome alterations induced by only gamma beam and neutron-gamma mixed field. (author)

  3. Origin and significance of chromosomal alterations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The spontaneous frequency of chromsomal changes (structural and numerical aberations) in humans is in the order of 6 in 1,000 newborn. Chromosomal analysis of spontaneous abortuses indicate that about 50% of all spontaneous abortions are chromsomally abnormal. Populations exposed to ionizing radiations (atom bomb survivors) or chemical mutagens (e.g., workers occupational.y exposed to vinyl chloride or benzene) show increased frequencies of chromosomal aberrations in their peripheral blood lymphocytes. Many types of human cancer are associated with specific or non-specific chromosomal aberrations. Several human recessive diseases, such as ataxia telangiectasia (A-T), Faconi's anemia (FA) and Bloom's syndrome (BS) are associated with increased frequencies of chromosomal aberrations. However, no detectable increase in the frequency of spontaneous point mutations in human populations exposed to ionizing radiations or chemical mutagens has been demonstrated so far. These observations point to the importance of understanding the mechanism involved in the origin of chromosomal alterations and their significance, which the author discusses in this paper

  4. Evaluation of chromosomal alteration in electrical workers occupationally exposed to low frequency of electro magnetic field (EMFs) in Coimbatore population, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balamuralikrishnan, Balasubramanian; Balachandar, Vellingiri; Kumar, Shanmugam Suresh; Stalin, Nattan; Varsha, Prakash; Devi, Subramaniam Mohana; Arun, Meyyazhagan; Manikantan, Pappuswamy; Venkatesan, Chinnakulandhai; Sasikala, Keshavarao; Dharwadkar, Shahnaz N

    2012-01-01

    Extremely low frequency electro magnetic fields (EMFs) have been classified as possibly carcinogenic to humans by the International Agency for Research on Cancer. An increased number of chromosomal alterations in peripheral lymphocytes are correlated with elevated incidence of cancer. The aim of the present study was to assess occupationally induced chromosomal damage in EMF workers exposed to low levels of radiation. We used conventional metaphase chromosome aberration (CA) analysis and the micronucleus (MN) assay as biological indicators of non ionizing radiation exposure. In the present study totally 70 subjects were selected including 50 exposed and 20 controls. Informed written consent was obtained from all participants and the study was performed in accordance with the Declaration of Helsinki and the approval of the local ethical committee. A higher degree of CA and MN was observed in exposed subjects compared to controls, the frequency of CA being significantly enhanced with long years of exposure (P<0.05). Moreover increase in CA and MN with age was noted in both exposed subjects and controls, but was significantly greater in the former. The results of this study demonstrated that a significant induction of cytogenetic damage in peripheral lymphocytes of workers occupationally exposed to EMFs in electric transformer and distribution stations. In conclusion, our findings suggest that EMFs possess genotoxic capability, as measured by CA and MN assays; CA analysis appeared more sensitive than other cytogenetic end-points. It can be concluded that chronic occupational exposure to EMFs may lead to an increased risk of genetic damage among electrical workers. PMID:22938490

  5. Clonal chromosomal alterations in fibroadenomas of the breast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cavalli, L R; Cornélio, D A; Wuicik, L; Bras, A T; Ribeiro, E M; Lima, R S; Urban, C A; Rogatto, S R; Cavalli, I J

    2001-01-01

    A cytogenetic study on short-term cell cultures from 10 fibroadenomas of the breast is reported. Clonal chromosomal alterations were observed in all cases analyzed, involving preferentially chromosomes X, 12, 14, 20, and 22. Normal karyotypes were found in 34.9% of the cells. The present findings...

  6. Allelotyping identification of genomic alterations in rectal chromosomally unstable tumors without preoperative treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Numerous studies reported genomic alterations in colorectal human tumors but few focused on rectal tumors with the specification of preoperative-treated or untreated tumors. The goals of this study were to list chromosome allelic imbalances and correlate their frequency with tumor progression and to identify potential molecular markers of progression in rectal chromosomally unstable tumors without preoperative treatment. Genomic alterations of 57 rectal tumors assessed by allelotyping targeting 33 chromosomal loci, were clusterised and compared to those of 151 left colon tumors. Clustering separated the rectal tumors without preoperative treatment into three subtypes according to the allelic imbalance frequency and genomic alteration associations. The tumors without preoperative treatment displayed a significantly higher allelic imbalance frequency (54%) than the tumors with preoperative treatment (33%), suggesting that treatment could target highly altered tumor clones. Interestingly, the survival analysis identified three potential prognostic molecular survival markers, D1S197, D5S430, and D14S65, for tumors without preoperative treatment. Based on the genomic status of 33 chromosomal loci, we observed that rectal tumors without preoperative treatment segregate according to the global allelic imbalance frequency but without correlation to the tumor progression. Moreover, the detailed associations of alterations in rectal tumors are different from those described in colon tumors suggesting that rectal and left tumors should be considered as separate entities. Finally, potential prognostic genomic molecular markers for survival are proposed which status could specify the clinical course of the tumors

  7. Frequency and distribution studies of asymmetrical versus symmetrical chromosome aberrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two aspects of the relationship between Asymmetrical (A) and Symmetrical (S) radiation-induced chromosomal aberrations are considered in this paper. (1) Are A and S truly alternative modes of lesion interaction. Relative frequencies for chromatid-type and chromosome-type are examined, and new lymphocyte data using banding is used to look at this, and also for parallelism in chromosome participation of the two forms for various aberration categories. All the tests applied suggest that A and S are alternative interaction modes. (2) The long-term survival characteristics of A and S are discussed, and the differences in expected frequencies of derived S per surviving cell from chromosome-type and chromatid-types are stressed. Since many in vivo tissues have varying mixtures of potential chromatid and chromosome aberration-bearing target cells, ultimate cell survival and derived S frequencies may differ between tissues for the same absorbed dose. An Appendix gives Relative Corrected Lengths (RCL) for chromosomes of the human karyotype which should be used when testing the various exchange aberration categories for random chromosome participation. (orig.)

  8. Chromosome 3p alterations in pancreatic endocrine neoplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amato, Eliana; Barbi, Stefano; Malpeli, Giorgio; Bersani, Samantha; Pelosi, Giuseppe; Capelli, Paola

    2010-01-01

    Pancreatic endocrine tumors (PET) are rare neoplasms classified as functioning (F-PET) or non-functioning (NF-PET) according to the presence of a clinical syndrome due to hormonal hypersecretion. PETs show variable degrees of clinical aggressiveness and loss of chromosome 3p has been suggested to be associated with an advanced stage of disease. We assessed chromosome 3p copy number in 113 primary PETs and 32 metastases by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using tissue microarrays. The series included 56 well-differentiated endocrine tumors (WDET), 62 well-differentiated endocrine carcinomas (WDEC), and 6 poorly differentiated endocrine carcinomas (PDEC). Chromosome 3p alterations were found in 23/113 (20%) primary tumors, with losses being predominant over gains (14% vs. 6%). Loss of 3p was found in 5/55 (9%) WDET, 11/52 (21%) WDEC, and never in PDEC. Gains of 3p were detected in 4/55 (7%) WDET, no WDEC, but notably in 3/6 (50%) PDEC (OR 23.6; P = 0.003). Metastases were more frequently monosomic for 3p compared to primary tumors (OR 3.6; P = 0.005). Monosomy was significantly associated with larger tumor size, more advanced tumor stage, and metastasis. No association was found with survival. Chromosome 3p copy number alterations are frequent events in advanced stage PET, with gains prevailing in PDEC while losses are more frequent in WDEC, supporting the view that a specific pattern of alterations are involved in these diverse disease subtypes. PMID:20981439

  9. Frequency of chromosomal aberrations in a group of patients carriers of gonosomopathies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper was aimed at determining the frequency of chromosomal aberrations in a group of patients carriers of gonosomopathies and at relating in each case the meaning of the different chromosomal aberrations found to the patients' clinical diagnosis. 656 patients with presumptive diagnosis of gonosomopathies from different hospital institutions of the country that were received at the molecular genetics laboratory of Hermanos Ameijeiras Clinical and Surgical Hospital from 1982 to 2001, were studied. Of the total of patients with presumptive diagnosis of gonosomopathies, in 32.7 % (215/656) the clinical diagnosis was confirmed by the cytogenetic study. The chromosomal study was conducted by using G band techniques. The chromosomal rearrangements found were classified into 4 groups. The group of numerical gonosomopathies showed the highest frequency with 110 patients, accounting for 51 % of the total. It was followed by the group of numerical and structural alterations (mosaics) with 59 patients (27.0), the inversions of sex with 24 patients (12.0), and the group of structural gonosomopathies with 22 patients (10.0) The most common chromosomal aberrations were the numerical gonosomopathies (Turner and Klinefelter's syndrome). The chromosomal study in these patients is a very important diagnostic value indicator for the therapeutical conduct to be followed in every case

  10. Chromosomal aberration frequency in lymphocytes predicts the risk of cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonassi, Stefano; Norppa, Hannu; Ceppi, Marcello;

    2008-01-01

    Mechanistic evidence linking chromosomal aberration (CA) to early stages of cancer has been recently supported by the results of epidemiological studies that associated CA frequency in peripheral lymphocytes of healthy individuals to future cancer incidence. To overcome the limitations of single...

  11. Detection of Chromosomal Structural Alterations in Single Cells by SNP Arrays: A Systematic Survey of Amplification Bias and Optimized Workflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwamoto, Kazuya; Bundo, Miki; Ueda, Junko; Nakano, Yoko; Ukai, Wataru; Hashimoto, Eri; Saito, Toshikazu; Kato, Tadafumi

    2007-01-01

    Background In single-cell human genome analysis using whole-genome amplified product, a strong amplification bias involving allele dropout and preferential amplification hampers the quality of results. Using an oligonucleotide single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array, we systematically examined the nature of this amplification bias, including frequency, degree, and preference for genomic location, and we assessed the effects of this amplification bias on subsequent genotype and chromosomal copy number analyses. Methodology/Principal Findings We found a large variability in amplification bias among the amplified products obtained by multiple displacement amplification (MDA), and this bias had a severe effect on the genotype and chromosomal copy number analyses. We established optimal experimental conditions for pre-screening for high-quality amplified products, processing array data, and analyzing chromosomal structural alterations. Using this optimized protocol, we successfully detected previously unidentified chromosomal structural alterations in single cells from a lymphoblastoid cell line. These alterations were subsequently confirmed by karyotype analysis. In addition, we successfully obtained reproducible chromosomal copy number profiles of single cells from the cell line with a complex karyotype, indicating the applicability and potential of our optimized workflow. Conclusions/Significance Our results suggest that the quality of amplification products should be critically assessed before using them for genomic analyses. The method of MDA-based whole-genome amplification followed by SNP array analysis described here will be useful for exploring chromosomal alterations in single cells. PMID:18074030

  12. Frequency of primary amenorrhea due to chromosomal aberration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To find out the frequency of primary amenorrhea due to chromosomal aberration and the different options available for management. Subjects and Methods: All patients with primary amenorrhea due to chromosomal aberrations were included in study. Patient's detailed history, general physical examination, presence or absence of secondary sexual characteristics, abdominal and pelvic examination finding were noted. Targeted investigations, including ultrasound, hormonal assay, buccal smear and karyotyping results were recorded. The management options were individually tailored with focus n psychological management. Results: Eighteen patients out of 30,000 patients were diagnosed as having primary amenorrhea. Six had primary amenorrhea due to chromosomal aberrations with the frequency of 0.02%. The age at presentation was 20 years and above in 50%. The most common cause was Turner's syndrome seen in 4 out of 6. The presenting symptoms were delay in onset of menstruation in 05 patients and primary infertility in 01 patient. Conclusion: Primary amenorrhea due to chromosomal aberration is an uncommon condition requiring an early and accurate diagnosis. Turner's syndrome is a relatively common cause of this condition. Management should be multi-disciplinary and individualized according to the patient's age and symptom at presentation. Psychological management is very important and counselling throughout treatment is recommended. (author)

  13. Altered Crossover Distribution and Frequency in Spermatocytes of Infertile Men with Azoospermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, He; Ferguson, Kyle; Kirkpatrick, Gordon; Vinning, Tanya; Chow, Victor; Ma, Sai

    2016-01-01

    During meiosis, homologous chromosomes pair to facilitate the exchange of DNA at crossover sites along the chromosomes. The frequency and distribution of crossover formation are tightly regulated to ensure the proper progression of meiosis. Using immunofluorescence techniques, our group and others have studied the meiotic proteins in spermatocytes of infertile men, showing that this population displays a reduced frequency of crossovers compared to fertile men. An insufficient number of crossovers is thought to promote chromosome missegregation, in which case the faulty cell may face meiotic arrest or contribute to the production of aneuploid sperm. Increasing evidence in model organisms has suggested that the distribution of crossovers may also be important for proper chromosome segregation. In normal males, crossovers are shown to be rare near centromeres and telomeres, while frequent in subtelomeric regions. Our study aims to characterize the crossover distribution in infertile men with non-obstructive (NOA) and obstructive azoospermia (OA) along chromosomes 13, 18 and 21. Eight of the 16 NOA men and five of the 21 OA men in our study displayed reduced crossover frequency compared to control fertile men. Seven NOA men and nine OA men showed altered crossover distributions on at least one of the chromosome arms studied compared to controls. We found that although both NOA and OA men displayed altered crossover distributions, NOA men may be at a higher risk of suffering both altered crossover frequencies and distributions compared to OA men. Our data also suggests that infertile men display an increase in crossover formation in regions where they are normally inhibited, specifically near centromeres and telomeres. Finally, we demonstrated a decrease in crossovers near subtelomeres, as well as increased average crossover distance to telomeres in infertile men. As telomere-guided mechanisms are speculated to play a role in crossover formation in subtelomeres, future

  14. Chromosome Structural Alteration an Unusual Abnormality Characterizing Human Neoplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abolfazl Movafagh

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Ring chromosomes are rare cytogenetic abnormalities that occur in less than 10% of hematopoietic malignancies. They are rare in blood disorder. The present review has focused on the ring chromosome associated with oncology malignancies. Materials and Methods: By reviewing the web-based search for all English scientific peer review articles published, was initiated using Medline/PubMed, Mitelman database (http://cgap.nci.nih.gov/Chromosomes/Mitelman, and other pertinent references on websites about ring chromosomes in Oncology. The software program as End Note was used to handle the proper references for instruction to author. Karyotype descriptions were cited according to ISCN.Conclusion: Ring chromosomes are rare chromosomal aberrations, almost many times are of de novo origin, presenting a different phenotype regarding the loss of genetic material. The karyotype represents the main analysis for detection of ring chromosomes, but other molecular technics are necessary for complete characterization. The information of this review article adds to the spectrum of both morphology and genetic rearrangements in the field of oncology malignancies.

  15. Use of Chromosome Aberration Frequencies for Biological Dosimetry in Man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The vast amount of work on chromosome aberrations induced by radiation exposure under defined biological and physical conditions, has shown that there exist strict relationships between aberration frequencies, radiation quality and absorbed dose in a variety of cell systems. These relationships are such that in many irradiated plant and animal systems the frequency of induced chromosome aberrations has been used to give reliable estimates of the radiation dose to which the system was exposed. A similar extrapolation from induced aberration frequency to absorbed dose can be made with human peripheral blood lymphocytes, if such cells are exposed and cultured in vitro under well defined conditions. Moreover, since aberrations induced in lymphocytes following an in vivo exposure can be detected in the cells when subsequently cultured in vitro, the peripheral blood leucocyte system has been utilized for biological dosimetry in cases where individuals have been accidentally exposed to radiations. In the case of uniform whole-body exposure of an individual, and under defined conditions of in vitro culture, the system may be expected to fulfil most of the requirements for a sensitive and accurate biological measure of absorbed dose. In this context biological variations between individuals may be of importance and the influence of such factors as age and genotype on the radiation response are considered. In cases of partial body exposure, there are a variety of biological factors that may have a considerable influence on the yields of aberrations measured in cells removed from the body shortly after exposure. Factors that are important include: the proportions of lymphocytes located in or passing through the radiation field at the time of exposure; the distribution and mobility of lymphocytes between peripheral blood and the lymphoid systems; differences in the radiation response of lymphocytes of differing types, and differences in the capacities of irradiated and non

  16. Translocation frequencies measured in individuals exposed to low levels of ionizing radiation using chromosome painting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chromosome painting, the selective staining of one or more chromosomes by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using whole-chromosome probes, facilitates rapid and accurate detection of chromosome translocations in human lymphocytes. Using this method, entire lengths of targeted chromosomes may be stained. After chromosome painting, interchromosomal exchange aberrations become rapidly apparent as bicolor chromosomes when all non-painted chromosomes are counter stained a different color. Here, following a brief discussion of this methodology, the use is described of chromosome painting for measuring translocation frequencies in individuals exposed years to decades previously to whole-body doses of ionizing radiation. Also the use of 3-color FISH for increasing the translocation detection efficiency is discussed. (author). 10 refs., 1 fig

  17. Identification of a high frequency of chromosomal rearrangements in the centromeric regions of prostate cancer patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The aim of the present investigation was to study the major chromosomal aberrations (CA) like deletion, translocation,inversion and mosaic in prostate cancer patients of Tamilnadu, Southern India. Totally 45 blood samples were collected from various hospitals in Tamilnadu, Southern India. Equal numbers of normal healthy subjects were chosen after signing a consent form. Volunteers provided blood samples (5 ml) to establish leukocyte cultures. Cytogenetic studies were performed by using Giemsa-banding technique and finally the results were ensured by spectral karyotyping (SKY) technique. In the present investigation, major CA like deletion, translocation, inversion and mosaic were identified in experimental subjects. Results showed frequent CA in chromosomes 1, 3, 5, 6, 7, 9, 13, 16, 18 and X. In comparison with experimental subjects, the control subjects exhibited very low levels of major CA (P<0.05). In the present study, the high frequency of centromeric rearrangements indicates a potential role for mitotic irregularities associated with the centromere in prostate cancer tumorigenesis. Identification of chromosome alterations may be helpful in understanding the molecular basis of the disease in better manner.

  18. Frequencies of fetal chromosomal abnormalities at prenatal diagnosis: 10 years experiences in a single institution.

    OpenAIRE

    Park, S. Y.; J.W. Kim; Y.M. Kim; Kim, J.M.; Lee, M. H.; Lee, B. Y.; Han, J. Y.; Kim, M. Y.; Yang, J. H.; Ryu, H. M.

    2001-01-01

    We present frequencies of fetal chromosomal abnormalities in 4,907 prenatal cytogenetic examinations at Samsung Cheil Hospital from 1988 to 1997 for 10 yr duration. Prenatal karyotypes were undertaken in 3,913 amniotic fluid samples, 800 chorionic villi samples, and 194 percutaneous umbilical blood samples. The frequency of fetal abnormal karyotypes was 3.1% (150 cases). Numerical chromosome abnormalities were 87 cases (1.8%) and structural aberrations of chromosomes were 63 cases (1.3%). In ...

  19. High-order chromatin architecture shapes the landscape of chromosomal alterations in cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fudenberg, Geoffrey; Getz, Gad; Meyerson, Matthew; Mirny, Leonid

    2012-02-01

    The rapid growth of cancer genome structural information provides an opportunity for a better understanding of the mutational mechanisms of genomic alterations in cancer and the forces of selection that act upon them. Here we test the evidence for two major forces, spatial chromosome structure and purifying (or negative) selection, that shape the landscape of somatic copy-number alterations (SCNAs) in cancer (Beroukhim et al, 2010). Using a maximum likelihood framework we compare SCNA maps and three-dimensional genome architecture as determined by genome-wide chromosome conformation capture (HiC) and described by the proposed fractal-globule (FG) model (Lieberman-Aiden and Van Berkum et al, 2009). This analysis provides evidence that the distribution of chromosomal alterations in cancer is spatially related to three-dimensional genomic architecture and additionally suggests that purifying selection as well as positive selection shapes the landscape of SCNAs during somatic evolution of cancer cells.

  20. Frequencies of chromosomal aberrations and sister chromatid exchanges in the benthic worm Neanthes arenaceodentata exposed to ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrison, F.L.; Rice, D.W. Jr., Moore, D.H.

    1984-07-01

    Traditional bioassays are unsuitable for assessing sublethal effects from ocean disposal of low-level radioactive waste because mortality and phenotypic responses are not anticipated. We compared the usefulness of chromosomal aberration and sister chromatid exchange (SCE) induction as measures of low-level radiation effects in a sediment-dwelling marine worm, Neanthes arenaceodentata. The SCEs, in contrast to chromosomal aberrations, do not alter the overall chromosome morphology and in mammalian cells appear to be a more sensitive indicator of DNA alterations caused by environmental mutagens. Newly hatched larvae were exposed to two radiation-exposure regimes of either x rays at a high dose rate of 0.7 Gy (70 rad)/min for as long as 5.5 min or to /sup 60/Co gamma rays at a low dose rate of from 4.8 x 10/sup -5/ to 1.2 x 10/sup -1/ Gy (0.0048 to 12 rad)/h for 24 h. After irradiation, the larvae were exposed to 3 x 10/sup -5/M bromodeoxyuridine (BrdUrd) for 28 h (x-ray-irradiated larvae) or for 54 h (/sup 60/Co-irradiated larvae). Larval cells were examined for the proportion of cells in first, second, and third or greater division. Frequencies of chromosomal aberrations and SCEs were determined in first and second division cells, respectively. Results from x-ray irradiation indicated that dose-related increases occur in chromosome and chromatid deletions, but a dose of equal or greater 2 Gy (equal to or greater than 200 rad) was required to observe a significant increase. Worm larvae receiving /sup 60/Co irradiation showed elevated SCE frequencies with a significant increase of 0.6 Gy (60 rad). We suggest that both SCEs and chromosomal aberrations may be useful for measuring effects on genetic material induced by radiation. 56 references, 7 figures, 9 tables.

  1. Frequencies of chromosomal aberrations and sister chromatid exchanges in the benthic worm Neanthes arenaceodentata exposed to ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Traditional bioassays are unsuitable for assessing sublethal effects from ocean disposal of low-level radioactive waste because mortality and phenotypic responses are not anticipated. We compared the usefulness of chromosomal aberration and sister chromatid exchange (SCE) induction as measures of low-level radiation effects in a sediment-dwelling marine worm, Neanthes arenaceodentata. The SCEs, in contrast to chromosomal aberrations, do not alter the overall chromosome morphology and in mammalian cells appear to be a more sensitive indicator of DNA alterations caused by environmental mutagens. Newly hatched larvae were exposed to two radiation-exposure regimes of either x rays at a high dose rate of 0.7 Gy (70 rad)/min for as long as 5.5 min or to 60Co gamma rays at a low dose rate of from 4.8 x 10-5 to 1.2 x 10-1 Gy (0.0048 to 12 rad)/h for 24 h. After irradiation, the larvae were exposed to 3 x 10-5M bromodeoxyuridine (BrdUrd) for 28 h (x-ray-irradiated larvae) or for 54 h (60Co-irradiated larvae). Larval cells were examined for the proportion of cells in first, second, and third or greater division. Frequencies of chromosomal aberrations and SCEs were determined in first and second division cells, respectively. Results from x-ray irradiation indicated that dose-related increases occur in chromosome and chromatid deletions, but a dose of equal or greater 2 Gy (equal to or greater than 200 rad) was required to observe a significant increase. Worm larvae receiving 60Co irradiation showed elevated SCE frequencies with a significant increase of 0.6 Gy (60 rad). We suggest that both SCEs and chromosomal aberrations may be useful for measuring effects on genetic material induced by radiation. 56 references, 7 figures, 9 tables

  2. Chromosomal geometry in the interface from the frequency of the radiation induced chromosome aberrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionizing radiation induces DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) and their interaction and illegitimate recombination produces chromosomal aberrations. Stable chromosomal aberrations comprise inter-chromosomal events (translocations) and intra-chromosomal events (inversions). When DSBs induction and interaction is done at random, and the proximity effects are neglected, the expected relation between translocations and inversions is F=86, based on chromosome arm length. The number of translocations and inversions is analyzed by using G-banding in 16 lymphocytes cultures from blood samples acutely irradiated with γ-rays (dose range: 0,5 Gy - 3 Gy). The result obtained was: F=13,5, significantly smaller than F=86. Literature data show similar small F values, but strongly spread. The excess of inversions could be explained by a 'proximity effect', it means that more proximate DSBs have more interaction probability. Therefore, it is possible to postulate a special chromosome arrangement during irradiation and the subsequent interval. We propose a model where individual chromosomes show spherical confinement with some degree of overlapping and DSBs induction proportional to cross section. A DSBs interaction probability function with cut-off length= 1μ is assumed. According to our results, the confinement volume is ≅ 6.4% of the nuclear volume. Nevertheless, we presume that large spread in F data could be due to temporal variation in overlapping and spatial chromosomal confinement. (authors). 14 refs

  3. Alterations of the short arm of chromosome 9p in lymphoid malignancies

    OpenAIRE

    Heyman, Mats

    1996-01-01

    CHROMOSOME 9p ALTERATIONS IN LYMPHOID MALIGNANCIES by Mats Heyman Department of Oncology-Pathology, Radiumhemmet, Karolinska Hospital and Institute, S-171 76 Stockholm, Sweden.Malignant disease evolves through the successive accumulation of genetic lesions affecting growth-controlling genes in the cell-clone undergoing malignant transformation. 9p21 has long beensusp...

  4. Frequency and distribution analysis of chromosomal translocations induced by x-ray in human lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The characteristic of ionizing radiation suggests that induced chromosomal damage in the form of translocations would appear to be randomly distributed. However, the outcome of tests performed in vitro and in vivo (irradiated individuals) are contradictories. The most translocation-related chromosomes, as far as some studies reveal on one hand, appear to be less involved in accordance with others. These data, together with those related to molecular mechanisms involved in translocations production suggest that in G0 -irradiated cells, the frequency and distribution of this kind of chromosomal rearrangement, does not take place at random. They seem to be affected by in-nucleus chromosome distribution, by each chromosome's DNA length and functional features, by the efficiency of DNA repair mechanisms, and by inter individual differences. The objective of this study was to establish the frequency pattern of each human chromosome involved in radio-induced translocations, as well as to analyze the importance the chromosome length, the activity of DNA polymerase- dependant repair mechanisms, and inter individual differences within the scope of such distribution. To achieve the goals, peripheral blood lymphocytes from healthy donors were irradiated in presence and absence of 2'-3' dideoxithimidine (ddThd), a Β - DNA polymerase inhibitor, which takes part in the base repair mechanism (B E R). The results showed that: The presence of ddThd during the irradiation increase the basal frequency of radioinduced translocations in 60 %. This result suggests that ddThd repair synthesis inhibition can be in itself a valid methodology for radiation-induced bases damage assessment, damage which if not BER-repaired may result in translocation-leading double strand breaks. A statistically significant correlation between translocation frequency and chromosome length, in terms of percentage of genome, has been noticed both in (basal) irradiation and in irradiation with ddThd inhibitor

  5. Frequency of chromosomal aberrations in Prague mothers and their newborns.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rössnerová, Andrea; Balascak, I.; Rössner ml., Pavel; Šrám, Radim

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 699, 1-2 (2010), s. 29-34. ISSN 1383-5718 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 2B06088 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390512 Keywords : Carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons * Chromosomal aberrations * Fluorescence in situ hybridization Subject RIV: DN - Health Impact of the Environment Quality Impact factor: 2.938, year: 2010

  6. Chromosome aberrations, valued as frequency of spontaneous micronuclei, in subjects with suspected presclerodermic Raynaud’s phenomenon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Migliore

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the prevalence of spontaneous chromosome damage in cultured peripheral lymphocytes of subjects with suspected presclerodermic Raynaud’s phenomenon (RP, by means of molecular cytogenetic analysis. Methods: We studied 20 suspected presclerodermic RP, 20 idiopathic RP and 25 healthy subjects. As marker of chromosome alteration we used the micronucleus assay. All subjects were also classified as ANA-, ACA+ or Scl70+. To identify the mechanism of MN formation, a MN fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH analysis using a pancentromeric DNA probe was also performed. Results: Suspected presclerodermic RP subjects, showed significantly higher MN frequencies than idiopathic RP and controls (39±15.2 vs 10±2.1 and 9.8±3.5 respectively p<0.0001. Interestingly, subjects with idiopathic RP displayed MN frequency comparable to that of controls. Furthermore, ACA+ subjects showed the highest MN frequencies (44±8.1 as compared to subjects with different antibody pattern (26±7.1. Conclusions: Our results show the presence of higher levels of chromosomal damage in circulating lymphocytes of suspected presclerodermic RP. They also would suggest a key role of anti-centromere antibody in determining the observed cytogenetic anomalies. FISH analysis indicated that both aneuploidogenic and clastogenic events contribute to the formation of MN observed in suspected presclerodermic RP.

  7. Prognostic values of chromosome 18q microsatellite alterations in stage Ⅱ colonic carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the prognostic value of chromosome 18q microsatellite alterations (MA) in stage Ⅱ colon cancer. METHODS: One hundred and six patients with sporadic stage Ⅱ colon cancer were enrolled in this study. DNA was extracted from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tumor and adjacent normal mucosal tissue samples. MA, including loss of heterozygosity (LOH) and microsatellite instability (MSI), was analyzed by polymerase chain reaction, polyacrylamide gel-electrophoresis and DNA sequencing at 5 micr...

  8. Comparison of hprt variant frequencies and chromosome aberration frequencies in lymphocytes from radiotherapy and chemotherapy patients: A prospective study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The autoradiographic 6-thioguanine-resistant mutant lymphocyte assay and a chromosome aberration assay were used to determine the time-course of appearance and persistence of elevated frequencies of hprt variants and dicentric chromosomes in patients receiving x-irradiation therapy. The hprt mutation assays were done with frozen/thawed lymphocytes isolated from aliquots of the same blood samples used for the chromosome aberration assays. Five multiple sclerosis patients were also studied before and at 2 and 4 wk intervals after treatment with monthly i.v. doses of 750 mg/m2 of cyclophosphamide (CP). There were no significant elevations in chromosome aberrations at these post-treatment sample times. The results demonstrate the complementary nature of these two human monitoring assays and emphasize the importance of careful selection of optimal sampling times

  9. Influence of inhibitors of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase on DNA repair, chromosomal alterations, and mutations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natarajan, A.T.; van Zeeland, A.A.; Zwanenburg, T.S.

    1983-01-01

    The influence of inhibitors of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase such as 3-aminobenzamide (3AB) and benzamide (B) on the spontaneously occurring as well as mutagen induced chromosomal aberrations, sister chromatid exchanges (SCEs) and point mutations has been studied. In addition, the influence of 3AB on DNA repair was measured following treatment with physical and chemical mutagens. Post treatment of X-irradiated mammalian cells with 3AB increases the frequencies of induced chromosomal aberrations by a factor of 2 to 3. 3AB, when present in the medium containing bromodeoxyuridine(BrdUrd) during two cell cycles, increases the frequencies of SCEs in Chinese hamster ovary cells (CHO) in a concentration dependent manner leading to about a 10-fold increase at 10 mM concentration. The extent of increase in the frequencies of SCEs due to 1 mM 3AB in several human cell lines has been studied, including those derived from patients suffering from genetic diseases such as ataxia telangiectasia (A-T), Fanconi's anemia (FA), and Huntington's chorea. None of these syndromes showed any increased response when compared to normal cells. 3AB, however, increased the frequencies of spontaneously occurring chromosomal aberrations in A-T and FA cells. 3AB does not influence the frequencies of SCEs induced by UV or mitomycin C (MMC) in CHO cells. However, it increases the frequencies of SCEs induced by ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS) and methyl methanesulfonate (MMS). Under the conditions in which 3AB increases the frequencies of spontaneously occurring as well as induced SCEs, it does not increase the frequencies of point mutations in hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGPRT) locus. 3AB does not influence the amount of repair replication following dimethylsulphate (DMS) treatment of human fibroblasts, or UV irradiated human lymphocytes.

  10. Evaluation of radioprotection properties of propolis by chromosomal alterations, cell proliferation kinetics, mitotic index and sister chromatid exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A consequence of ionizing radiation is the induction of chromosomal alterations. This causality relation involves that chromosomal alterations can be considered a good indicator of the radiological damage. Some chemical agents can modulate the tissue response to radiation. These compounds are useful because they show certain selectivity, protecting the healthy tissues (radioprotectors) or increasing the sensibility of tissues to radiations (radiosensibilizators). Propolis substance has showed radioprotection properties which are performed in the following study. Propolis is a product of extraordinary interest for both medicine and pharmaceutical industry, since it is assumed to show diverse beneficial health effects. Among many other attributes of EEP (propolis ethanolic extract), it exhibits antioxidant and radical free scavenger properties. In a previous study, human peripheral blood lymphocytes were exposed to 2 Gy of γ rays in presence and absence of EEP, and the analysis showed a reduction in the frequency of dicentrics and rings, with a maximum protection of 50%. The proposed concentration for radioprotection would be between 120-500 μg.ml-1. The cytotoxic effect has been evaluated analyzing the EEP effect in the cellular division cycle. Propolis ethanolic extract (EEP) has been obtained and samples of peripheral blood have been cultured in the presence of increasing concentrations of EEP. In order to quantify it, two indexes have been used, the mitotic index and cell proliferation index. For both indexes the cytotoxic effect takes place from 750 μg.ml-1 concentrations onwards. Similar results were obtained for the analysis of chromosomal aberrations. Finally, propolis effect in lymphocytes by sister chromatid exchange test has been presented for higher concentrations of EEP. (author)

  11. Analysis of the frequency of unstable chromosome aberrations in human lymphocytes irradiated with 60Co

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to analyze the frequency of unstable chromosomal aberrations induced by gamma radiation from a 60Co source at two different doses. Samples were obtained from a healthy donor and exposed to 60Co source (Gammacel 220 ) located in the Department of Nuclear Energy of Pernambuco Federal University (DEN/UFPe/Brazil) with a rate of air Kerma to 3,277 Gy/h. Exposures resulted in absorbed dose 0.51 Gy and 0.77 Gy. Mitotic metaphases were obtained by culturing lymphocytes for chromosome analysis and the slides were stained with 5% Giemsa. Among the unstable chromosomal aberrations the dicentric chromosomes, ring chromosomes and acentric fragments were analyzed. To calculate the significance level the chi - square test was used, considering relevant differences between the frequencies when the value of p < 0.05. To calculate the significance level of the chi - square test was used, considering relevant differences between the frequencies when the value of p < 0.05. The results showed that there was significant difference of the frequencies of dicentric chromosomes (from 0.18 to 0.51 to 0.37 Gy to 0.77 Gy), however there was no statistically significant difference between the frequencies of acentric fragments ( 0.054 to 0, 51 Gy to 0.063 to 0.77 Gy) and ring chromosomes (0.001 to 0.51 Gy to 0.003 to 0.77 Gy). The low number of rings is found justified, considering that in irradiated human lymphocytes, its appearance is rare relative to dicentrics. The results confirm that dicentrics are the most reliable biomarkers in estimating dose after exposure to gamma radiation. These two points will make the calibration curve dose-response being built for Biological Dosimetry Laboratory of CRCN-NE/CNEN

  12. Influence of inhibitors of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase on DNA repair, chromosomal alterations, and mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natarajan, A T; van Zeeland, A A; Zwanenburg, T S

    1983-01-01

    The influence of inhibitors of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase such as 3-aminobenzamide (3AB) and benzamide (B) on the spontaneously occurring as well as mutagen induced chromosomal aberrations, sister chromatid exchanges (SCEs) and point mutations has been studied. In addition, we have measured the influence of 3AB on DNA repair following treatment with physical and chemical mutagens. Post treatment of X-irradiated mammalian cells with 3AB increases the frequencies of induced chromosomal aberrations by a factor of 2 to 3. Both acentric fragments and exchanges increase indicating that the presence of 3AB slows down the repair of DNA strand breaks (probably DNA double strand breaks), thus making breaks available for interaction with each other to give rise to exchanges. 3AB, when present in the medium containing bromodeoxyuridine(BrdUrd) during two cell cycles, increases the frequencies of SCEs in Chinese hamster ovary cells (CHO) in a concentration dependent manner leading to about a 10-fold increase at 10 mM concentration. Most 3AB induced SCEs occur during the second cell cycle, in which DNA containing bromouridine (BU) is used as template for replication. BU containing DNA appears to be prone to errors during replication. The extent of increase in the frequencies of SCEs by 3AB is correlated with the amount of BU incorporated in the DNA of the cells. The frequencies of spontaneously occurring DNA single strand breaks in cells grown in BrdUrd containing medium are higher than in the cells grown in normal medium and this increase depends on the amount of BU incorporated in the DNA of these cells. We have studied the extent of increase in the frequencies of SCEs due to 1 mM 3AB in several human cell lines, including those derived from patients suffering from genetic diseases such as ataxia telangiectasia (A-T), Fanconi's anemia (FA), and Huntington's chorea. None of these syndromes showed any increased response when compared to normal cells. 3AB, however, increased the

  13. Frequency of Chromosomally-Integrated Human Herpesvirus 6 in Children with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Annie Gravel; Daniel Sinnett; Louis Flamand

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) is a ubiquitous pathogen infecting nearly 100% of the human population. Of these individuals, between 0.2% and 1% of them carry chromosomally-integrated HHV-6 (ciHHV-6). The biological consequences of chromosomal integration by HHV-6 remain unknown. Objective To determine and compare the frequency of ciHHV-6 in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia to healthy blood donors. Methodology A total of 293 DNA samples from children with pre-B (n = 255), ...

  14. On the spontaneous frequency of the structural chromosome aberrations (anomalies) in lymphocytes from human blood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chromosomal aberrations are observed both in irradiated cells and in cells which have not been irradiated but submitted to the action of the natural radioactive background. The reasons for these ''spontaneous chromosomal aberrations'' are both the natural radioactivity and a complex of physical, chemical and biological factors. A cytogenetic analysis of 6000 lymphocytes metaphases from the peripheral blood of 47 people indicates that the overall amount of the spontaneous aberrations is 2% with a ratio of chromosomal type aberrations to chromatide type aberrations of 1:5. Chromatide type aberrations are seen as the result of purely mechanical factors acting during slides preparation but yet another unknown moments cannot be excluded. They are more one hit type aberrations - chromatide and chromosomal fragments, wereas the two hit aberrations are very rare - one dicentric per 3000 cells. The chromosome type aberrations are proposed for comparison with radiation induced aberrations in human lymphocytes. They have a frequency of 0.0035 per cell or 0.0040 breakages per cell. Ionizing radiation does not induce qualitatively specific type of aberrations but increases many times the yield of anomalies, which are spontaneously observed. (A.B.)

  15. Characterization of Common Chromosomal Translocations and Their Frequencies in Acute Myeloid Leukemia Patients of Northwest Iran

    OpenAIRE

    Elnaz Amanollahi Kamaneh; Karim Shams Asenjan; Aliakbar Movassaghpour Akbari; Parvin Akbarzadeh Laleh; Hadi Chavoshi; Jamal Eivazi Ziaei; Alireza Nikanfar; Iraj Asvadi Kermani; Ali Esfahani

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Detection of chromosomal translocations has an important role in diagnosis and treatment of hematological disorders. We aimed to evaluate the 46 new cases of de novo acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients for common translocations and to assess the effect of geographic and ethnic differences on their frequencies. Materials and Methods: In this descriptive study, reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was used on 46 fresh bone marrow or peripheral blo...

  16. Reciprocal white matter alterations due to 16p11.2 chromosomal deletions versus duplications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yi Shin; Owen, Julia P; Pojman, Nicholas J; Thieu, Tony; Bukshpun, Polina; Wakahiro, Mari L J; Marco, Elysa J; Berman, Jeffrey I; Spiro, John E; Chung, Wendy K; Buckner, Randy L; Roberts, Timothy P L; Nagarajan, Srikantan S; Sherr, Elliott H; Mukherjee, Pratik

    2016-08-01

    Copy number variants at the 16p11.2 chromosomal locus are associated with several neuropsychiatric disorders, including autism, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, and speech and language disorders. A gene dosage dependence has been suggested, with 16p11.2 deletion carriers demonstrating higher body mass index and head circumference, and 16p11.2 duplication carriers demonstrating lower body mass index and head circumference. Here, we use diffusion tensor imaging to elucidate this reciprocal relationship in white matter organization, showing widespread increases of fractional anisotropy throughout the supratentorial white matter in pediatric deletion carriers and, in contrast, extensive decreases of white matter fractional anisotropy in pediatric and adult duplication carriers. We find associations of these white matter alterations with cognitive and behavioral impairments. We further demonstrate the value of imaging metrics for characterizing the copy number variant phenotype by employing linear discriminant analysis to predict the gene dosage status of the study subjects. These results show an effect of 16p11.2 gene dosage on white matter microstructure, and further suggest that opposite changes in diffusion tensor imaging metrics can lead to similar cognitive and behavioral deficits. Given the large effect sizes found in this study, our results support the view that specific genetic variations are more strongly associated with specific brain alterations than are shared neuropsychiatric diagnoses. Hum Brain Mapp 37:2833-2848, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27219475

  17. Chromosomal and Nuclear Alterations in Root Tip Cells of Allium Cepa L. Induced by Alprazolam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nefic, Hilada; Musanovic, Jasmin; Metovic, Azra; Kurteshi, Kemajl

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: Alprazolam is a triazolobenzodiazepine used in panic disorders and other anxiety states. Target organ of Alprazolam is CNS, causing depression of respiration and consciousness. Aim: This study aimed to estimate the genotoxic potential of Alprazolam using Allium cepa test. Methods: Allium cepa is one of the most suitable plants for detecting different types of xenobiotics. The test enables the assessment of different genetic endpoints making possible damage to the DNA of humans to be predicted. Results: Alprazolam induced chromosomal (anaphase bridges, breaks, lagging and stickiness, abnormal spiralisation, multipolarity and polyploidy) and cytological aberrations, especially nuclear alterations (nuclear buds, fragmented nucleus and apoptotic bodies, cells without nucleus, binucleated and micronucleated cells), morphological alterations in shape and size of cells, spindle disturbance and polar deviation in root tip meristem cells of Allium cepa at all tested concentrations. Alprazolam also caused significant inhibition of mitotic index in these cells. Conclusion: These changes in cells are indicators of genotoxic potential of Alprazolam suggesting a need for further in vitro studies on animal and human lymphocytes as well as in vivo studies. PMID:25568504

  18. Role of 239Pu-induced chromosome alterations and mutated Ki-v-ras oncogene during liver-cancer induction in Chinese hamsters and mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chromosome aberrations and mutated oncogenes can cause important changes during carcinogenesis. Model systems are being studied in which defined cellular and molecular changes can be quantitated and altered, and tumor frequency, type, and time of appearance can be evaluated. Dose-response relationships for Pu Citrate-induced chromosome aberrations and liver cancer were measured in Chinese hamsters. Chromosome aberrations increased linearly according to dose, with a slope of 4.8 x 10-1 aberrations/cell/Gy; liver-tumor incidence was 1.1 x 10-1 tumors/animal/Gy. The dose was calculated at the 50% survival time. The interaction between Pu and Ki-v-ras, an altered, dominant-acting oncogene, on the induction of liver cancer was measured in B6C3F1 mice. The neo oncogene was used as a negative control in these studies. The Ki-v-ras oncogene was inserted into a viral vector and incorporated into the livers of mice either 30 days before or after the incorporation of 239Pu. Compared with both the controls and the mice injected with a single insult, mortality increased in groups of animals that received combined exposure to oncogenes, CCl4, and 239Pu. The relationships between molecular and cellular damage and the induction of cancer is being defined in both mice and Chinese hamsters

  19. Frequency of chromosomally-integrated human herpesvirus 6 in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annie Gravel

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6 is a ubiquitous pathogen infecting nearly 100% of the human population. Of these individuals, between 0.2% and 1% of them carry chromosomally-integrated HHV-6 (ciHHV-6. The biological consequences of chromosomal integration by HHV-6 remain unknown. OBJECTIVE: To determine and compare the frequency of ciHHV-6 in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia to healthy blood donors. METHODOLOGY: A total of 293 DNA samples from children with pre-B (n=255, pre-pre-B (n=4, pre-T (n=26 and undetermined (n=8 leukemia were analyzed for ciHHV-6 by quantitative TaqMan PCR (QPCR using HHV-6 specific primers and probe. As control, DNA samples from 288 healthy individuals were used. Primers and probe specific to the cellular GAPDH gene were used to estimate integrity and DNA content. RESULTS: Out of 293 DNA samples from the leukemic cohort, 287 contained amplifiable DNA. Of these, only 1 (0.35% contained ciHHV-6. Variant typing indicates that the ci-HHV-6 corresponds to variant A. None of the 288 DNA samples from healthy individuals contained ciHHV-6. CONCLUSION: The frequency of ciHHV-6 in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia is similar (p=0.5 to that of healthy individuals. These results suggest that acute lymphoblastic leukemia does not originate as a consequence to integration of HHV-6 within the chromosomes.

  20. DNA methylation patterns of Brachypodium distachyon chromosomes and their alteration by 5-azacytidine treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Borowska, Natalia; Idziak, Dominika; Hasterok, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Sequential immunolocalisation of 5-methylcytosine (5-MeC) and fluorescence in situ hybridisation with chromosome-specific BAC clones were performed on Brachypodium distachyon mitotic metaphase chromosomes to determine specific DNA methylation patterns of each chromosome in the complement. In the majority of cells examined, chromosomes Bd4 and Bd5, which bear the loci of 5S and 35S ribosomal DNA, respectively, had characteristic 5-MeC patterns. In contrast, the distribution of 5-MeC along the ...

  1. Frequency of Early and Late Chromosome Aberrations in Different Types of Cells After Proton and Fe Ion Irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Tao; Zhang, Ye; Yeshitla, Samrawit; Bowler, Deborah; Kadhim, Munira; Wilson, Bobby; Wu, Honglu

    2016-01-01

    DNA damages induced by space radiation, consisting of protons and high-LET charged particles, can be complex in nature, which are often left unrepaired and cause chromosomal aberrations. Increased level of genomic instability is attributed to tumorigenesis and increased cancer risks. To investigate genomic instability induced by charged particles, human lymphocytes ex vivo, human fibroblasts, and human mammary epithelial cells, as well as mouse bone marrow stem cells isolated from CBA/CaH and C57BL/6 strains were exposed to high energy protons and Fe ions. Metaphase chromosome spreads at different cell divisions after radiation exposure were collected and, chromosome aberrations were analyzed with fluorescence in situ hybridization with whole chromosome-specific probes for human cells. With proton irradiation, levels of chromosome aberrations decreased by about 50% in both lymphocytes and epithelial cells after multiple cell divisions, compared to initial chromosome aberrations at 48 hours post irradiation in both cell types. With Fe ion irradiation, however, the frequency of chromosome aberrations in lymphocytes after multiple cell divisions was significantly lower than that in epithelial cells at comparable cell divisions, while their initial chromosome aberrations were at similar levels. Similar to the human cells, after Fe ion irradiation, the frequency of late chromosome aberrations was similar to that of the early damages for radio-sensitive CBA cells, but different for radio-resistant C57 cells. Our results suggest that relative biological effectiveness (RBE) values are dependent not only on radiation sources, but also on cell types and cell divisions.

  2. Y-chromosome diversity in Catalan surname samples: insights into surname origin and frequency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solé-Morata, Neus; Bertranpetit, Jaume; Comas, David; Calafell, Francesc

    2015-11-01

    The biological behavior of the Y chromosome, which is paternally inherited, implies that males sharing the same surname may also share a similar Y chromosome. However, socio-cultural factors, such as polyphyletism, non-paternity, adoption, or matrilineal surname transmission, may prevent the joint transmission of the surname and the Y chromosome. By genotyping 17 Y-STRs and 68 SNPs in ~2500 male samples that each carried one of the 50 selected Catalan surnames, we could determine sets of descendants of a common ancestor, the population of origin of the common ancestor, and the date when such a common ancestor lived. Haplotype diversity was positively correlated with surname frequency, that is, rarer surnames showed the strongest signals of coancestry. Introgression rates of Y chromosomes into a surname by non-paternity, adoption, and transmission of the maternal surname were estimated at 1.5-2.6% per generation, with some local variation. Average ages for the founders of the surnames were estimated at ~500 years, suggesting a delay between the origin of surnames (twelfth and thirteenth centuries) and the systematization of their paternal transmission. We have found that, in general, a foreign etymology for a surname does not often result in a non-indigenous origin of surname founders; however, bearers of some surnames with an Arabic etymology show an excess of North African haplotypes. Finally, we estimate that surname prediction from a Y-chromosome haplotype, which may have interesting forensic applications, has a ~60% sensitivity but a 17% false discovery rate. PMID:25689924

  3. Universal spectrum for DNA base C+G frequency distribution in Human chromosomes 1 to 24

    CERN Document Server

    Selvam, A M

    2007-01-01

    Power spectra of human DNA base C+G frequency distribution in all available contiguous sections exhibit the universal inverse power law form of the statistical normal distribution for the 24 chromosomes. Inverse power law form for power spectra of space-time fluctuations is generic to dynamical systems in nature and indicate long-range space-time correlations. A recently developed general systems theory predicts the observed non-local connections as intrinsic to quantumlike chaos governing space-time fluctuations of dynamical systems. The model predicts the following. (1) The quasiperiodic Penrose tiling pattern for the nested coiled structure of the DNA molecule in the chromosome resulting in maximum packing efficiency. (2) The DNA molecule functions as a unified whole fuzzy logic network with ordered two-way signal transmission between the coding and non-coding regions. Recent studies indicate influence of non-coding regions on functions of coding regions in the DNA molecule.

  4. Altered metaphase chromosome structure in xrs-5 cells is not related to its radiation sensitivity or defective DNA break rejoining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell line xrs-5 is a radiation-sensitive derivative of CHO-K1 cells. The xrs-5 cells have a defect in DNA double-strand break rejoining and show alterations in chromosome structure and nuclear morphology. The relationship between radiation sensitivity and metaphase chromosome morphology was examined in 12 'revertant' xrs-5 clones isolated following treatment with 5-azacytidine. Nine of the clones were radioresistant while the other three retained xrs-5-like radiation sensitivity. Chromosome morphology reverted to CHO-K1-like characteristics in three of the radioresistant clones and one of the radiosensitive clones suggesting that the over-condensed metaphase chromosome morphology of xrs-5 cells does not underlie its radiation sensitivity. Radiation sensitivity did correlate with DNA double-strand break rejoining ability. The radioresistant clones showing the over-condensed xrs-5-like chromosome morphology were also slightly more sensitive to the topoisomerase II inhibitor etoposide (VP-16) than CHO-K1, suggesting that the over-condensed morphology might be due to alterations in the phosphorylation of chromatin proteins

  5. Gene alterations at Drosophila inversion breakpoints provide prima facie evidence for natural selection as an explanation for rapid chromosomal evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillén Yolanda

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chromosomal inversions have been pervasive during the evolution of the genus Drosophila, but there is significant variation between lineages in the rate of rearrangement fixation. D. mojavensis, an ecological specialist adapted to a cactophilic niche under extreme desert conditions, is a chromosomally derived species with ten fixed inversions, five of them not present in any other species. Results In order to explore the causes of the rapid chromosomal evolution in D. mojavensis, we identified and characterized all breakpoints of seven inversions fixed in chromosome 2, the most dynamic one. One of the inversions presents unequivocal evidence for its generation by ectopic recombination between transposon copies and another two harbor inverted duplications of non-repetitive DNA at the two breakpoints and were likely generated by staggered single-strand breaks and repair by non-homologous end joining. Four out of 14 breakpoints lay in the intergenic region between preexisting duplicated genes, suggesting an adaptive advantage of separating previously tightly linked duplicates. Four out of 14 breakpoints are associated with transposed genes, suggesting these breakpoints are fragile regions. Finally two inversions contain novel genes at their breakpoints and another three show alterations of genes at breakpoints with potential adaptive significance. Conclusions D. mojavensis chromosomal inversions were generated by multiple mechanisms, an observation that does not provide support for increased mutation rate as explanation for rapid chromosomal evolution. On the other hand, we have found a number of gene alterations at the breakpoints with putative adaptive consequences that directly point to natural selection as the cause of D. mojavensis rapid chromosomal evolution.

  6. Frequency of Cancer Genes on the Chicken Z Chromosome and Its Human Homologues: Implications for Sex Chromosome Evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rami Stiglec

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been suggested that there are special evolutionary forces that act on sex chromosomes. Hemizygosity of the X chromosome in male mammals has led to selection for male-advantage genes, and against genes posing extreme risks of tumor development. A similar bias against cancer genes should also apply to the Z chromosome that is present as a single copy in female birds. Using comparative database analysis, we found that there was no significant underrepresentation of cancer genes on the chicken Z, nor on the Z-orthologous regions of human chromosomes 5 and 9. This result does not support the hypothesis that genes involved in cancer are selected against on the sex chromosomes.

  7. Investigation of the frequency of chromosomal aneuploidy using triple fluorescence in situ hybridization in 12 Chinese infertile men

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张群芳; 卢光琇

    2004-01-01

    Background Chromosomal aberrations are the major cause of pre-and post-implantation embryo wastage and some studies suggest that half of all human conceptions have a chromosomal abnormality. A chromosomal aberration in human sperms is also one of the causes of failure of in vitro fertilization. This study was designed to ascertain whether chromosomal aneuploidy in spermatozoa is a risk factor for male infertility.Methods Twelve infertile men were divided into two groups: 10 with oligoasthenoteratozoospermia (OAT, Group A) and two with a normal semen analysis (Group B). Two normal healthy sperm donors acted as controls (Group C). We used fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and probes for chromosomes X, Y and 18 to determine the frequency of aneuploidy.Results The frequencies of spermatozoa disomy for chromosomes X, Y and 18 were 0.30% and 0.30%, respectively, in Group B. The percentages were not significantly different from those of Group C (0.15% and 0. 16%). The frequencies of nullisomy for chromosomes X, Y and 18 were 0.15%and 0 for Group B, and 0 and 0.15% for Group C (P>0.05). In Group A, the incidences of disomy were 1.13% and 0. 96% and the frequencies of nullisomy were 1.13% and 1.60%. In these three groups, the incidences of diploidy were 0.60%, 1.00%, and 0.30%, respectively. Both the frequencies of disomic and nullisomic spermatozoa for chromosomes X, Y, and 18 and of diploid spermatozoa were significantly higher in Group A than in Groups B and C. The estimated total aneuploidy rates in the sperm from the three groups were 42.44%, 6.05%, and 2.59%,respectively.Conclusion These results indicate that chromosomal aneuploidy in spermatozoa may be a risk factor for infertility.

  8. A correlative study on the frequencies of radiation-induced chromosome aberrations in somatic and germ cells of mammals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A series of investigations on the correlation between the frequencies of radiation-induced chromosome aberrations in somatic and germ cells of mouse and rhesus monkey is described. In the mouse the induction of reciprocal translocations in bone-marrow cells was compared with that in spermatogonia (as scored in the descending spermatocytes). In the rhesus monkey frequencies of radiation-induced chromosome aberrations in spermatogonia and peripheral blood lymphocytes were studied. Furthermore the effect of multigeneration irradiation (69 generations with 200 rads X-rays) on the sensitivity for translocation induction in spermatogonia of male mice was studied. Frequencies of dicentric chromosomes and chromosomal deletions in cultured peripheral blood lymphocytes of 5 different types of mice were determined following in vitro irradiation with doses of 100 and/or 200 rad X-rays. To obtain more insight into the processes underlying translocation induction in spermatogonia of the mouse, fractionation experiments were conducted

  9. Chromosome aberration frequency in blood lymphocytes of animals with 239Pu lung burdens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Other investigators have suggested a causal relationship between accidental 239Pu exposures in man and the presence of chromosome aberrations in blood lymphocytes. To assess this relationship experimimentally, 16 Rhesus monkeys and 171 Chinese hamsters were exposed by inhalation to 239PuO2 aerosols and an additional five hamsters were injected with 239Pu citrate and the frequency of aberrations in blood lymphocytes determined. After an initial rapid clearance phase, the 239Pu was retained in the monkey lung with a long effective half-life (greater than 500 days). At 30 days after inhalation, 99 percent of the sacrifice body burden was in the lungs of both species. The ranges of cumulative radiation dose to the hamster lungs 30 days after inhalation were calculated to be 80 to 170, 220 to 540, and 830 to 2120 rads for initial lung burden levels of 10 to 30, 30 to 70, and 180 to 260 nCi/g, respectively. By 120 days, these doses were calculated to be 40 to 350, 500 to 710, and 1440 to 2170 rads. Hamsters with the highest lung burdens had a median survival time of about 80 days. No deaths occurred in any of the other treated hamsters or monkeys by 250 days after 239Pu inhalation. Hamsters sacrificed at 30 days showed an increase in chromosome aberration frequency with increasing dose to lung. By 120 days after inhalation, the aberration frequency in the controls was 0.012. The frequency in animals with doses that produced significant life shortening (1440 to 2170 rads) had decreased to 0.018 and to 0.032 aberrations/cell in animals with lung doses of 500 to 710 rads. At 380 days after injection of 60 nCi 239Pu citrate/gm, hamster lymphocytes had an aberration frequency of 0.048 aberrations/cell. The level of chromosome damage in the 239PuO2 exposed monkeys at 30 and 90 days after inhalation was not different than observed in controls. (U.S.)

  10. Frequency of unstable chromosome aberrations in peripheral lymphocytes of women with breast cancer treated with radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study proposes to obtain information about the behavior of the frequency and distribution of radiation induced lymphocyte dicentric chromosome aberrations with therapeutic doses in women with breast cancer treated only with radiotherapy, about which there are no existing works in Chile. Blood samples were taken from 6 women volunteers included in the study, with their informed consent, treated in the Fundacion Arturo Lopez Perez, aged 24 to 65 years old, without prior or parallel chemotherapy, nor prior radiotherapy. Three peripheral blood samples were taken from each patient in 0, 16.2 and 43.2 Gy doses. The lymphocytes obtained from each sample were cultivated using the micro-culture technique following the protocol in IAEA Technical Report No. 405, 2001. The samples were evaluated under a microscope and the unstable chromosome aberrations for lymphocytes were counted. A total of 500 cells per sample was evaluated in most cases, which were distributed depending on the number of aberrations that they had. The results were analyzed by treatment dose for each of the study patients, using the Papworth u test, Dolphin's 'Contaminated Poisson' method and Sasaki's 'QDR'. Great variations were observed in the frequency distribution of aberrations among the patients studied, which could be due to the influence of factors related to the patients' partial irradiations (C.Wood)

  11. Determination of the relationship between genotypes and chromosomal aberration frequencies in a normal population

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramsey, M.; Tucker, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1997-10-01

    Individual differences in cancer susceptibility may be attributed in part to genetic differences in the genes which code for enzymes involved in metabolic activation and detoxification of environmental procarcinogens. Polymorphisms of certain genes functioning in this manner (CYP2D6, CYP1A1, CYP2E1, NAT1, NAT2, GSTT1, GSTM1) have been linked to an increased risk of some cancers. An increased level of genomic instability, often reflected as an increase in chromosomal aberrations (CA), has also been associated with an elevated risk of cancer. Accurate polymorphism frequency determinations for these genes in a normal population is needed to establish whether these frequencies are different in a diseased population. In this work, analyses are being performed on over 100 normal individuals, ranging from 0 to 80 years of age, to determine CA frequency and genotypes. Individual exposure and health data have also been obtained from all individuals in the study. These analyses will provide a baseline frequency for the various gene polymorphisms in a normal (mainly Caucasian) population, and will determine whether a relationship between the CA frequency and certain polymorphisms and or genotypes exists. In addition the interaction between environmental exposures (such as smoking), genotypes and CA frequencies are being examined. At present 24 individuals have been genotyped for GSTT1, GSTM1 and CYP2D6(T) and their CA frequencies determined. Genotype frequencies of 21% for GSTM1 B, 4% for GSTM1 null, 29% for GSTM1 A, 21% for GSTM1 B, 4% for GSTM1 A,B, and 0% for CYP2D6(T) have been determined from the small sample analyzed to date. We plan to extend our genotype analysis to include the remaining CYP2D6 polymorphisms, CYP2E1, CYP1A1, NAT1 and NAT2.

  12. Chromosomal breakpoints and structural alterations of the c-myc locus differ in endemic and sporadic forms of Burkitt lymphoma.

    OpenAIRE

    Pelicci, P.G.; Knowles, D M; Magrath, I; Dalla-Favera, R

    1986-01-01

    We have examined the position of the chromosomal breakpoint relative to the human c-myc gene (MYC) and the presence of other structural alterations of the same locus in 19 fresh samples of Burkitt lymphoma (BL) and 13 BL-derived cell lines. This panel includes the two pathogenetic forms of BL: the endemic (African-type) BL (eBL) and sporadic (American-type) BL (sBL). In all cases tested, including fresh samples and cell lines, structural alterations of the 5' portion of the gene were detected...

  13. Linkage disequilibrium, SNP frequency change due to selection, and association mapping in popcorn chromosome regions containing QTLs for quality traits

    OpenAIRE

    Geísa Pinheiro Paes; José Marcelo Soriano Viana; Fabyano Fonseca e Silva; Gabriel Borges Mundim

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The objectives of this study were to assess linkage disequilibrium (LD) and selection-induced changes in single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) frequency, and to perform association mapping in popcorn chromosome regions containing quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for quality traits. Seven tropical and two temperate popcorn populations were genotyped for 96 SNPs chosen in chromosome regions containing QTLs for quality traits. The populations were phenotyped for expansion volume, 100-kerne...

  14. Influence of heavy ions on frequency of chromosome aberration in radicle cells for four kinds of plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The experiment results about the influence of C6+ ions with 46.6 MeV/u on types and frequencies of chromosome aberration in radicle cells for four kinds of plants Triticum aestivum L, Cucumis melo var indorous, Lathrus sativus L and lycium barbarum L are presented. Irradiation of heavy ions could seriously inhibit germination ability of seeds and also induce a great number of chromosome aberration in root tip cells

  15. Association between occupational exposure to benzene and chromosomal alterations in lymphocytes of Brazilian petrochemical workers removed from exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Rozana Oliveira; de Almeida Melo, Neli; Rêgo, Marco Antônio Vasconcelos

    2016-06-01

    We aimed to investigate the association between chronic exposure to benzene and genotoxicity in the lymphocytes of workers removed from exposure. The study included 20 workers with hematological disorders who had previously worked in the petrochemical industry of Salvador, Bahia, Brazil; 16 workers without occupational exposure to benzene served as the control group. Chromosomal analysis was performed on lymphocytes from peripheral blood, to assess chromosomal breaks and gaps and to identify aneuploidy. The Kruskal-Wallis test was used to compare the mean values between two groups, and Student's t test for comparison of two independent means. The frequency of gaps was statistically higher in and the exposed group than in the controls (2.13 ± 2.86 vs. 0.97 ± 1.27, p = 0.001). The frequency of chromosomal breaks was significantly higher among cases (0.21 ± 0.58) than among controls (0.12 ± 0.4) (p = 0.0002). An association was observed between chromosomal gaps and breaks and occupational exposure to benzene. Our study showed that even when removed from exposure for several years, workers still demonstrated genotoxic damage. Studies are still needed to clarify the long-term genotoxic potential of benzene after removal from exposure. PMID:27155858

  16. Rainfall-driven sex-ratio genes in African buffalo suggested by correlations between Y-chromosomal haplotype frequencies and foetal sex ratio

    OpenAIRE

    Greyling Barend J; van Wieren Sipke E; Jolles Anna E; Getz Wayne M; Prins Herbert HT; van Hooft Pim; van Helden Paul D; Bastos Armanda DS

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background The Y-chromosomal diversity in the African buffalo (Syncerus caffer) population of Kruger National Park (KNP) is characterized by rainfall-driven haplotype frequency shifts between year cohorts. Stable Y-chromosomal polymorphism is difficult to reconcile with haplotype frequency variations without assuming frequency-dependent selection or specific interactions in th...

  17. Chromosomal Alterations during Lymphatic and Liver Metastasis Formation of Colorectal Cancer1

    OpenAIRE

    Knösel, Thomas; Schlüns, Karsten; Stein, Ulrike; Schwabe, Holger; Schlag, Peter Michael; Dietel, Manfred; Petersen, Iver

    2004-01-01

    Comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) was used to screen colorectal carcinomas for chromosomal aberrations that are associated with metastatic phenotype. In total, 63 tumor specimens from 40 patients were investigated, comprising 30 primary tumors, 22 systemic metastases (12 liver, 6 brain, and 4 abdominal wall metastases) and 11 lymph node tumors. Using statistical analysis and histograms to evaluate the chromosomal imbalances, overrepresentations were detected most frequently at 20q11.2–2...

  18. Deletion of DXZ4 on the human inactive X chromosome alters higher-order genome architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darrow, Emily M; Huntley, Miriam H; Dudchenko, Olga; Stamenova, Elena K; Durand, Neva C; Sun, Zhuo; Huang, Su-Chen; Sanborn, Adrian L; Machol, Ido; Shamim, Muhammad; Seberg, Andrew P; Lander, Eric S; Chadwick, Brian P; Aiden, Erez Lieberman

    2016-08-01

    During interphase, the inactive X chromosome (Xi) is largely transcriptionally silent and adopts an unusual 3D configuration known as the "Barr body." Despite the importance of X chromosome inactivation, little is known about this 3D conformation. We recently showed that in humans the Xi chromosome exhibits three structural features, two of which are not shared by other chromosomes. First, like the chromosomes of many species, Xi forms compartments. Second, Xi is partitioned into two huge intervals, called "superdomains," such that pairs of loci in the same superdomain tend to colocalize. The boundary between the superdomains lies near DXZ4, a macrosatellite repeat whose Xi allele extensively binds the protein CCCTC-binding factor. Third, Xi exhibits extremely large loops, up to 77 megabases long, called "superloops." DXZ4 lies at the anchor of several superloops. Here, we combine 3D mapping, microscopy, and genome editing to study the structure of Xi, focusing on the role of DXZ4 We show that superloops and superdomains are conserved across eutherian mammals. By analyzing ligation events involving three or more loci, we demonstrate that DXZ4 and other superloop anchors tend to colocate simultaneously. Finally, we show that deleting DXZ4 on Xi leads to the disappearance of superdomains and superloops, changes in compartmentalization patterns, and changes in the distribution of chromatin marks. Thus, DXZ4 is essential for proper Xi packaging. PMID:27432957

  19. Deletion of DXZ4 on the human inactive X chromosome alters higher-order genome architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darrow, Emily M.; Huntley, Miriam H.; Dudchenko, Olga; Stamenova, Elena K.; Durand, Neva C.; Sun, Zhuo; Huang, Su-Chen; Sanborn, Adrian L.; Machol, Ido; Shamim, Muhammad; Seberg, Andrew P.; Lander, Eric S.; Chadwick, Brian P.; Aiden, Erez Lieberman

    2016-01-01

    During interphase, the inactive X chromosome (Xi) is largely transcriptionally silent and adopts an unusual 3D configuration known as the “Barr body.” Despite the importance of X chromosome inactivation, little is known about this 3D conformation. We recently showed that in humans the Xi chromosome exhibits three structural features, two of which are not shared by other chromosomes. First, like the chromosomes of many species, Xi forms compartments. Second, Xi is partitioned into two huge intervals, called “superdomains,” such that pairs of loci in the same superdomain tend to colocalize. The boundary between the superdomains lies near DXZ4, a macrosatellite repeat whose Xi allele extensively binds the protein CCCTC-binding factor. Third, Xi exhibits extremely large loops, up to 77 megabases long, called “superloops.” DXZ4 lies at the anchor of several superloops. Here, we combine 3D mapping, microscopy, and genome editing to study the structure of Xi, focusing on the role of DXZ4. We show that superloops and superdomains are conserved across eutherian mammals. By analyzing ligation events involving three or more loci, we demonstrate that DXZ4 and other superloop anchors tend to colocate simultaneously. Finally, we show that deleting DXZ4 on Xi leads to the disappearance of superdomains and superloops, changes in compartmentalization patterns, and changes in the distribution of chromatin marks. Thus, DXZ4 is essential for proper Xi packaging. PMID:27432957

  20. The frequency of chromosome exchanges in critical groups of Chernobyl accident victims according to conventional chromosome analysis and FISH method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conventional cytogenetic with group karyotyping and FISH analyses were performed in 16 Chernobyl accident liquidators diagnosed in 1986 with acute radiation sickness of different degree of severity. The data received confirmed the validity of FISH both as for evaluation of stable chromosome aberrations in peripheral lymphocytes of irradiated persons as enough high sensitivity of FISH for the tentative retrospective dose evaluation in the remote period after acute irradiation and during chronic radiation exposure in doses above 0.25 Gy

  1. Dynamics of rye chromosome 1R regions with high or low crossover frequency in homology search and synapsis development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nohelia T Valenzuela

    Full Text Available In many organisms, homologous pairing and synapsis depend on the meiotic recombination machinery that repairs double-strand DNA breaks (DSBs produced at the onset of meiosis. The culmination of recombination via crossover gives rise to chiasmata, which locate distally in many plant species such as rye, Secale cereale. Although, synapsis initiates close to the chromosome ends, a direct effect of regions with high crossover frequency on partner identification and synapsis initiation has not been demonstrated. Here, we analyze the dynamics of distal and proximal regions of a rye chromosome introgressed into wheat to define their role on meiotic homology search and synapsis. We have used lines with a pair of two-armed chromosome 1R of rye, or a pair of telocentrics of its long arm (1RL, which were homozygous for the standard 1RL structure, homozygous for an inversion of 1RL that changes chiasma location from distal to proximal, or heterozygous for the inversion. Physical mapping of recombination produced in the ditelocentric heterozygote (1RL/1RL(inv showed that 70% of crossovers in the arm were confined to a terminal segment representing 10% of the 1RL length. The dynamics of the arms 1RL and 1RL(inv during zygotene demonstrates that crossover-rich regions are more active in recognizing the homologous partner and developing synapsis than crossover-poor regions. When the crossover-rich regions are positioned in the vicinity of chromosome ends, their association is facilitated by telomere clustering; when they are positioned centrally in one of the two-armed chromosomes and distally in the homolog, their association is probably derived from chromosome elongation. On the other hand, chromosome movements that disassemble the bouquet may facilitate chromosome pairing correction by dissolution of improper chromosome associations. Taken together, these data support that repair of DSBs via crossover is essential in both the search of the homologous partner

  2. A large scale survey reveals that chromosomal copy-number alterations significantly affect gene modules involved in cancer initiation and progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cigudosa Juan C

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent observations point towards the existence of a large number of neighborhoods composed of functionally-related gene modules that lie together in the genome. This local component in the distribution of the functionality across chromosomes is probably affecting the own chromosomal architecture by limiting the possibilities in which genes can be arranged and distributed across the genome. As a direct consequence of this fact it is therefore presumable that diseases such as cancer, harboring DNA copy number alterations (CNAs, will have a symptomatology strongly dependent on modules of functionally-related genes rather than on a unique "important" gene. Methods We carried out a systematic analysis of more than 140,000 observations of CNAs in cancers and searched by enrichments in gene functional modules associated to high frequencies of loss or gains. Results The analysis of CNAs in cancers clearly demonstrates the existence of a significant pattern of loss of gene modules functionally related to cancer initiation and progression along with the amplification of modules of genes related to unspecific defense against xenobiotics (probably chemotherapeutical agents. With the extension of this analysis to an Array-CGH dataset (glioblastomas from The Cancer Genome Atlas we demonstrate the validity of this approach to investigate the functional impact of CNAs. Conclusions The presented results indicate promising clinical and therapeutic implications. Our findings also directly point out to the necessity of adopting a function-centric, rather a gene-centric, view in the understanding of phenotypes or diseases harboring CNAs.

  3. Nursing frequency alters circadian patterns of mammary gene expression in lactating mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milking frequency impacts lactation in dairy cattle and in rodent models of lactation. The role of circadian gene expression in this process is unknown. The hypothesis tested was that changing nursing frequency alters the circadian patterns of mammary gene expression. Mid-lactation CD1 mice were stu...

  4. Characterization of Common Chromosomal Translocations and Their Frequencies in Acute Myeloid Leukemia Patients of Northwest Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elnaz Amanollahi Kamaneh

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Detection of chromosomal translocations has an important role in diagnosis and treatment of hematological disorders. We aimed to evaluate the 46 new cases of de novo acute myeloid leukemia (AML patients for common translocations and to assess the effect of geographic and ethnic differences on their frequencies. Materials and Methods: In this descriptive study, reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR was used on 46 fresh bone marrow or peripheral blood samples to detect translocations t (8; 21, t (15; 17, t (9; 11 and inv (16. Patients were classified using the French-American-British (FAB criteria in to eight sub-groups (M0-M7. Immunophenotyping and biochemical test results of patients were compared with RT-PCR results. Results: Our patients were relatively young with a mean age of 44 years. AML was relatively predominant in female patients (54.3% and most of patients belonged to AML-M2. Translocation t (8; 21 had the highest frequency (13% and t (15; 17 with 2.7% incidence was the second most frequent. CD19 as an immunophenotypic marker was at a relatively high frequency (50% in cases with t (8; 21, and patients with this translocation had a specific immunophenotypic pattern of complete expression of CD45, CD38, CD34, CD33 and HLA-DR. Conclusion: Similarities and differences of results in Iran with different parts of the world can be explained with ethnic and geographic factors in characterizations of AML. Recognition of these factors especially in other comprehensive studies may aid better diagnosis and management of this disease.

  5. Altered expression of mitochondrial and extracellular matrix genes in the heart of human fetuses with chromosome 21 trisomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olla Carlo

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Down syndrome phenotype has been attributed to overexpression of chromosome 21 (Hsa21 genes. However, the expression profile of Hsa21 genes in trisomic human subjects as well as their effects on genes located on different chromosomes are largely unknown. Using oligonucleotide microarrays we compared the gene expression profiles of hearts of human fetuses with and without Hsa21 trisomy. Results Approximately half of the 15,000 genes examined (87 of the 168 genes on Hsa21 were expressed in the heart at 18–22 weeks of gestation. Hsa21 gene expression was globally upregulated 1.5 fold in trisomic samples. However, not all genes were equally dysregulated and 25 genes were not upregulated at all. Genes located on other chromosomes were also significantly dysregulated. Functional class scoring and gene set enrichment analyses of 473 genes, differentially expressed between trisomic and non-trisomic hearts, revealed downregulation of genes encoding mitochondrial enzymes and upregulation of genes encoding extracellular matrix proteins. There were no significant differences between trisomic fetuses with and without heart defects. Conclusion We conclude that dosage-dependent upregulation of Hsa21 genes causes dysregulation of the genes responsible for mitochondrial function and for the extracellular matrix organization in the fetal heart of trisomic subjects. These alterations might be harbingers of the heart defects associated with Hsa21 trisomy, which could be based on elusive mechanisms involving genetic variability, environmental factors and/or stochastic events.

  6. Elevated tolerance to aneuploidy in cancer cells: estimating the fitness effects of chromosome number alterations by in silico modelling of somatic genome evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valind, Anders; Jin, Yuesheng; Gisselsson, David

    2013-01-01

    An unbalanced chromosome number (aneuploidy) is present in most malignant tumours and has been attributed to mitotic mis-segregation of chromosomes. However, recent studies have shown a relatively high rate of chromosomal mis-segregation also in non-neoplastic human cells, while the frequency of aneuploid cells remains low throughout life in most normal tissues. This implies that newly formed aneuploid cells are subject to negative selection in healthy tissues and that attenuation of this selection could contribute to aneuploidy in cancer. To test this, we modelled cellular growth as discrete time branching processes, during which chromosome gains and losses were generated and their host cells subjected to selection pressures of various magnitudes. We then assessed experimentally the frequency of chromosomal mis-segregation as well as the prevalence of aneuploid cells in human non-neoplastic cells and in cancer cells. Integrating these data into our models allowed estimation of the fitness reduction resulting from a single chromosome copy number change to an average of ≈30% in normal cells. In comparison, cancer cells showed an average fitness reduction of only 6% (p = 0.0008), indicative of aneuploidy tolerance. Simulations based on the combined presence of chromosomal mis-segregation and aneuploidy tolerance reproduced distributions of chromosome aberrations in >400 cancer cases with higher fidelity than models based on chromosomal mis-segregation alone. Reverse engineering of aneuploid cancer cell development in silico predicted that aneuploidy intolerance is a stronger limiting factor for clonal expansion of aneuploid cells than chromosomal mis-segregation rate. In conclusion, our findings indicate that not only an elevated chromosomal mis-segregation rate, but also a generalised tolerance to novel chromosomal imbalances contribute to the genomic landscape of human tumours. PMID:23894657

  7. What the Erythrocytic Nuclear Alteration Frequencies Could Tell Us about Genotoxicity and Macrophage Iron Storage?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Juliana M. M.; Ribeiro, Heder J.; Procópio, Marcela S.; Alvarenga, Betânia M.; Castro, Antônio C. S.; Dutra, Walderez O.; da Silva, José B. B.; Corrêa Junior, José D.

    2015-01-01

    Erythrocytic nuclear alterations have been considered as an indicative of organism’s exposure to genotoxic agents. Due to their close relationship among their frequencies and DNA damages, they are considered excellent markers of exposure in eukaryotes. However, poor data has been found in literature concerning their genesis, differential occurrence and their life span. In this study, we use markers of cell viability; genotoxicity and cellular turn over in order to shed light to these events. Tilapia and their blood were exposed to cadmium in acute exposure and in vitro assays. They were analyzed using flow cytometry for oxidative stress and membrane disruption, optical microscopy for erythrocytic nuclear alteration, graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry for cadmium content in aquaria water, blood and cytochemical and analytical electron microscopy techniques for the hemocateretic aspects. The results showed a close relationship among the total nuclear alterations and cadmium content in the total blood and melanomacrophage centres area, mismatching reactive oxygen species and membrane damages. Moreover, nuclear alterations frequencies (vacuolated, condensed and blebbed) showed to be associated to cadmium exposure whereas others (lobed and bud) were associated to depuration period. Decrease on nuclear alterations frequencies was also associated with hemosiderin increase inside spleen and head kidney macrophages mainly during depurative processes. These data disclosure in temporal fashion the main processes that drive the nuclear alterations frequencies and their relationship with some cellular and systemic biomarkers. PMID:26619141

  8. Altered Frequency Distribution in the Electroencephalogram is Correlated to the Analgesic Effect of Remifentanil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graversen, Carina; Malver, Lasse P; Kurita, Geana P;

    2015-01-01

    Opioids alter resting state brain oscillations by multiple and complex factors, which are still to be elucidated. To increase our knowledge, multi-channel electroencephalography (EEG) was subjected to multivariate pattern analysis (MVPA), to identify the most descriptive frequency bands and scalp...... individual changes in heat pain in the delta (p = 0.045), theta (p = 0.038) and alpha (p = 0.039) bands and to bone pain in the alpha band (p = 0.0092). Hence, MVPA of multi-channel EEG was able to identify frequency bands and corresponding channels most sensitive to altered brain activity during...... locations altered by remifentanil in healthy volunteers. Sixty-two channels of resting EEG followed by independent measures of pain scores to heat and bone pain were recorded in 21 healthy males before and during remifentanil infusion in a placebo-controlled, double-blind crossover study. EEG frequency...

  9. Use of High Frequency Ultrasound to Monitor Cervical Lymph Node Alterations in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Walk, Elyse L.; McLaughlin, Sarah; Coad, James; Weed, Scott A.

    2014-01-01

    Cervical lymph node evaluation by clinical ultrasound is a non-invasive procedure used in diagnosing nodal status, and when combined with fine-needle aspiration cytology (FNAC), provides an effective method to assess nodal pathologies. Development of high-frequency ultrasound (HF US) allows real-time monitoring of lymph node alterations in animal models. While HF US is frequently used in animal models of tumor biology, use of HF US for studying cervical lymph nodes alterations associated with...

  10. A case-control study identifying chromosomal polymorphic variations as forms of epigenetic alterations associated with the infertility phenotype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Minocherhomji, Sheroy; Athalye, Arundhati S; Madon, Prochi F;

    2009-01-01

    To study the association of chromosomal polymorphic variations with infertility and subfertility.......To study the association of chromosomal polymorphic variations with infertility and subfertility....

  11. Alteration of wheat vernalization requirement by alien chromosome-mediated transposition of MITE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorafi, Yasir Serag Alnor; Eltayeb, Amin Elsadig; Tsujimoto, Hisashi

    2016-03-01

    Under the changing climate, early flowering is advantageous to escape terminal heat and drought. Previously during evaluation of 14 chromosome introgression lines (ILs), we found three ILs that flowered a month earlier than their wheat background Chinese Spring (CS). This paper describes the cause of the early flowering in the ILs and provides insight into the evolution of spring wheat from the winter wheat. We used specific molecular markers for Vrn genes to determine its allelic composition. Phenotypic evaluations carried out under field conditions and in a growth chamber. Unlike the winter vrn-A1 allele of CS, the spring Vrn-A1 allele of the ILs had insertions of 222 and 131-bp miniature inverted-repeat transposable element (MITE) in the promoter region. Sequence analysis indicated that the 222-bp insertion is similar to an insertion in the spring genotype, Triple Dirk D. Our results ruled out any possibility of outcrossing or contamination. Without vernalization, Vrn-A1 is highly expressed in the ILs compared to CS. We attribute the early flowering of the ILs to the insertion of the MITE in the promoter of Vrn-A1. The alien chromosome might mediate this insertion. PMID:27162490

  12. The frequency of chromosomal aberrations in sheep from the area contaminated by depleted uranium during NATO air strikes in 1999

    OpenAIRE

    Fišter Svetlana L.; Jović Slavoljub Z.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the results of cytogenetic studies in sheep from the region of Bujanovac that was contaminated by depleted uranium during the NATO air strikes in 1999. The study was conducted on sheep blood lymphocytes, in order to determine the frequency of chromosomal aberrations and to assess the presence of genetic risk as a result of the possible impact of depleted uranium. Blood samples for lymphocyte cultures were taken at random from the 20 anim...

  13. The effects of biological and life-style factors on baseline frequencies of chromosome aberrations in human lymphocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilada Nefic

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study investigated the influence of sex and ageing on chromosomal damage and the role of life-style habits on the frequency of chromosomal aberrations (CAs in peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs of healthy Bosnian subjects. Materials and Methods: Peripheral blood samples were obtained from 100 healthy, unrelated individuals in Bosnia and Herzegovina during 2010 and 2011. Chromosome preparations were made by dropping and air drying and slides were stained with 10% Giemsa solution (pH 6.8. The cytogenetic analysis was carried out in a cytogenetic laboratory in the Department of Biology of the Faculty of Science in Sarajevo. The category of total structural CAs was sub classified as chromosome-type aberrations (CSAs and chromatid-type aberrations (CTAs while the category of total numerical CAs was sub classified as aneuploid and polyploid mitoses. All statistical analyses were carried out using Microsoft Excel 2010 (Microsoft Corporation and the Windows Kwikstat Winks SDA 7.0.2 statistical software package (Texa Soft Cedar Hill, Texas. Results: Cytogenetic analysis revealed the average number of structural CAs was 2.84 and of numerical CAs was 9.56. There was a significant increase in the frequency of chromosome-type aberrations (1.92 compared with chromatid-type aberrations (CTAs (0.92 and a significant increase in the frequency of aneuploid (8.83 compared with polyploid (0.73 mitoses. Significant positive correlations between age and CTAs in human PBLs were also demonstrated. Additional statistical analysis showed that ageing increase number of numerical CAs in lymphocytes of drinkers. The frequency of structural CAs of females exposed to radiation was significantly greater than in males. Analysis indicates the presence of a positive association between CAs and smoking in younger subjects but a negative correlation between aberrant cells frequencies and alcohol in older drinkers. Conclusion: The results of the study support the

  14. Higher frequencies of chromosomal aberrations in lymphocytes of children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia after in vitro gamma irradiation

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    A Ramyar

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL is the most common malignancy in childhood, characterized by excess lymphoblasts, and immature white blood cells that are continuously multiplying and overproducing in the bone marrow. The aim of this investigation was to measure the sensitivity of lymphocytes against gamma irradiation in patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia, and also find out the effect of such irradiations in causing chromosomal abnormalities.Methods: In this investigation performed between April 2010 and July 2011, at the Department of Genetics, Cancer Institute of Iran, we studied the effects of gamma irradiation on the lymphocytes of 20 children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. The lymphocytes of 30 healthy donors were used to establish as a normal response to gamma irradiation and seven age-matched ataxia telangiectasia patients were recruited as positive control. The chromosomal radiosensitivity was assessed with the G2- and the G0-assay. We compared the mean number of chromosomal abnormalities such as chromosome and chromatid breakages, chromosome and chromatid gaps, and chromatid exchanges in one-hundred metaphases of patients and control groups.Results: The frequency of chromosomal aberrations was statistically higher among patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia than the normal controls (P<0.01. In total, 65% of the patients were sensitive to gamma irradiation, but the remaining 35% were similar to the normal controls. Patients with ataxia telangiectasia showed the highest sensitivity to gamma irradiation (P=0.001.Conclusion: Our results showed that a high percentage of patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia were sensitive to irradiation, meaning that maximum care should be taken during their treatment to avoid unnecessary X-rays or radiotherapies.

  15. Influence of the Chernobyl accident on the frequency of chromosomal damage and health status of Lithuanian clean-up workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chromosomal damage and health status were analyzed in Chernobyl clean-up workers currently residing in Lithuania. Statistically significantly (P < 0.05) increased frequencies of chromosome-type aberrations (chromosome breaks, dicentric and ring chromosomes) as well as aberrant cells were found in the peripheral blood lymphocytes of clean-up workers when measured 6-8 years after the exposure. Significant health impairment was characteristic of these persons as well. On average, 5.6 diseases per patient were diagnosed in clean-up workers suffering from cardiovascular diseases. This high co-morbidity resulted in quite high rates of metabolic syndrome (16.7%). Among Chernobyl clean-up workers that had experienced post-traumatic stress disorder, 76% suffered from highly expressed sleep disturbances. Analysis of thyroid diseases among 500 clean-up workers has revealed that 27.6% individuals have different pathology of thyroid gland. Thus, even 20 years after the Chernobyl disaster, clean-up workers must be considered as a group of primary interest both for researchers and physicians. (author)

  16. Unexpected rates of chromosomal instabilities and alterations of hormone levels in Namibian uranium miners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaire, R; Notter, M; Riedel, W; Thiel, E

    1997-05-01

    A common problem in determining the health consequences of radiation exposure is factoring out other carcinogenic influences. The conditions in Namibia provide a test case for distinguishing the effects of long-term low-dose exposure to uranium from the other environmental factors because of good air quality and the lack of other industries with negative health effects. Present records indicate a much higher prevalence of cancer among male workers in the open-pit uranium mine in Namibia compared with the general population. The objective of the present study was to determine whether long-term exposure to low doses of uranium increases the risk of a biological radiation damage which would lead to malignant diseases and to derive a dose-response model for these miners. To investigate this risk, we measured uranium excretion in urine, neutrophil counts and the serum level of FSH, LH and testosterone and analyzed chromosome aberrations in whole blood cells using fluorescence in situ hybridization. A representative cohort of 75 non-smoking, HIV-negative miners was compared to a control group of 31 individuals with no occupational history in mining. A sixfold increase in uranium excretion among the miners compared to the controls was recorded (P atomic bomb or the Chernobyl accident. We conclude that the miners exposed to uranium are at an increased risk to acquire various degrees of genetic damage, and that the damage may be associated with an increased risk for malignant transformation. As expected, the chronic radiation injury of the hematopoietic system resulted in low neutrophil counts. Also, low hormone levels probably reflect damage to the gonadal endocrine system. PMID:9146703

  17. Pacifier-sucking habit duration and frequency on occlusal and myofunctional alterations in preschool children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valdeane Simone Cenci NIHI

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the association of pacifier-sucking habit with occlusal and oral myofunctional alterations in preschool children. Eighty-four 2- to 5-year-old children participated in the study. Data on duration and frequency of pacifier use were collected from parents or guardians. Occlusal and oral myofunctional characteristics were examined by a dentist and a speech therapist, respectively. Chi-square tests and Poisson regression were used to analyze the data. The occlusal characteristics that were significantly associated with a pacifier-sucking habit were anterior open bite, altered canine relation, posterior crossbite, increased overjet, and malocclusion. The oral myofunctional characteristics that were significantly associated with a pacifier-sucking habit were resting lip position, resting tongue position, shape of the hard palate, and swallowing pattern. The strongest associations were for anterior open bite (prevalence ratio [PR] = 11.33, malocclusion (PR = 2.33, altered shape of the hard palate (PR = 1.29, and altered swallowing pattern (PR = 1.27. Both duration and frequency of pacifier-sucking habit were associated with occlusal and oral myofunctional alterations. These results emphasize the need for pediatric dentists to advise parents and caregivers about the risks of prolonged pacifier use and refer children to professionals for multidisciplinary assistance to minimize these risks whenever necessary.

  18. Rainfall-driven sex-ratio genes in African buffalo suggested by correlations between Y-chromosomal haplotype frequencies and foetal sex ratio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greyling Barend J

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Y-chromosomal diversity in the African buffalo (Syncerus caffer population of Kruger National Park (KNP is characterized by rainfall-driven haplotype frequency shifts between year cohorts. Stable Y-chromosomal polymorphism is difficult to reconcile with haplotype frequency variations without assuming frequency-dependent selection or specific interactions in the population dynamics of X- and Y-chromosomal genes, since otherwise the fittest haplotype would inevitably sweep to fixation. Stable Y-chromosomal polymorphism due one of these factors only seems possible when there are Y-chromosomal distorters of an equal sex ratio, which act by negatively affecting X-gametes, or Y-chromosomal suppressors of a female-biased sex ratio. These sex-ratio (SR genes modify (suppress gamete transmission in their own favour at a fitness cost, allowing for stable polymorphism. Results Here we show temporal correlations between Y-chromosomal haplotype frequencies and foetal sex ratios in the KNP buffalo population, suggesting SR genes. Frequencies varied by a factor of five; too high to be alternatively explained by Y-chromosomal effects on pregnancy loss. Sex ratios were male-biased during wet and female-biased during dry periods (male proportion: 0.47-0.53, seasonally and annually. Both wet and dry periods were associated with a specific haplotype indicating a SR distorter and SR suppressor, respectively. Conclusions The distinctive properties suggested for explaining Y-chromosomal polymorphism in African buffalo may not be restricted to this species alone. SR genes may play a broader and largely overlooked role in mammalian sex-ratio variation.

  19. Linkage disequilibrium, SNP frequency change due to selection, and association mapping in popcorn chromosome regions containing QTLs for quality traits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paes, Geísa Pinheiro; Viana, José Marcelo Soriano; Silva, Fabyano Fonseca e; Mundim, Gabriel Borges

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The objectives of this study were to assess linkage disequilibrium (LD) and selection-induced changes in single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) frequency, and to perform association mapping in popcorn chromosome regions containing quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for quality traits. Seven tropical and two temperate popcorn populations were genotyped for 96 SNPs chosen in chromosome regions containing QTLs for quality traits. The populations were phenotyped for expansion volume, 100-kernel weight, kernel sphericity, and kernel density. The LD statistics were the difference between the observed and expected haplotype frequencies (D), the proportion of D relative to the expected maximum value in the population, and the square of the correlation between the values of alleles at two loci. Association mapping was based on least squares and Bayesian approaches. In the tropical populations, D-values greater than 0.10 were observed for SNPs separated by 100-150 Mb, while most of the D-values in the temperate populations were less than 0.05. Selection for expansion volume indirectly led to increase in LD values, population differentiation, and significant changes in SNP frequency. Some associations were observed for expansion volume and the other quality traits. The candidate genes are involved with starch, storage protein, lipid, and cell wall polysaccharides synthesis. PMID:27007903

  20. Linkage disequilibrium, SNP frequency change due to selection, and association mapping in popcorn chromosome regions containing QTLs for quality traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paes, Geísa Pinheiro; Viana, José Marcelo Soriano; Silva, Fabyano Fonseca E; Mundim, Gabriel Borges

    2016-03-01

    The objectives of this study were to assess linkage disequilibrium (LD) and selection-induced changes in single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) frequency, and to perform association mapping in popcorn chromosome regions containing quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for quality traits. Seven tropical and two temperate popcorn populations were genotyped for 96 SNPs chosen in chromosome regions containing QTLs for quality traits. The populations were phenotyped for expansion volume, 100-kernel weight, kernel sphericity, and kernel density. The LD statistics were the difference between the observed and expected haplotype frequencies (D), the proportion of D relative to the expected maximum value in the population, and the square of the correlation between the values of alleles at two loci. Association mapping was based on least squares and Bayesian approaches. In the tropical populations, D-values greater than 0.10 were observed for SNPs separated by 100-150 Mb, while most of the D-values in the temperate populations were less than 0.05. Selection for expansion volume indirectly led to increase in LD values, population differentiation, and significant changes in SNP frequency. Some associations were observed for expansion volume and the other quality traits. The candidate genes are involved with starch, storage protein, lipid, and cell wall polysaccharides synthesis. PMID:27007903

  1. Linkage disequilibrium, SNP frequency change due to selection, and association mapping in popcorn chromosome regions containing QTLs for quality traits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geísa Pinheiro Paes

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The objectives of this study were to assess linkage disequilibrium (LD and selection-induced changes in single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP frequency, and to perform association mapping in popcorn chromosome regions containing quantitative trait loci (QTLs for quality traits. Seven tropical and two temperate popcorn populations were genotyped for 96 SNPs chosen in chromosome regions containing QTLs for quality traits. The populations were phenotyped for expansion volume, 100-kernel weight, kernel sphericity, and kernel density. The LD statistics were the difference between the observed and expected haplotype frequencies (D, the proportion of D relative to the expected maximum value in the population, and the square of the correlation between the values of alleles at two loci. Association mapping was based on least squares and Bayesian approaches. In the tropical populations, D-values greater than 0.10 were observed for SNPs separated by 100-150 Mb, while most of the D-values in the temperate populations were less than 0.05. Selection for expansion volume indirectly led to increase in LD values, population differentiation, and significant changes in SNP frequency. Some associations were observed for expansion volume and the other quality traits. The candidate genes are involved with starch, storage protein, lipid, and cell wall polysaccharides synthesis.

  2. Quantumlike chaos in the frequency distributions of bases A, C, G, T in human chromosome1 DNA

    OpenAIRE

    Selvam, A. M.

    2002-01-01

    Recent studies of DNA sequence of letters A, C, G and T exhibit the inverse power law form. Inverse power-law form of the power spectra of fractal space-time fluctuations is generic to the dynamical systems in nature and is identified as self-organized criticality. In this study it is shown that the power spectra of the frequency distributions of bases A, C, G, T in the Human chromosome 1 DNA exhibit self-organized criticality. DNA is a quasicrystal possessing maximum packing efficiency in a ...

  3. Frequency of sister chromatid exchange and chromosomal aberrations in asbestos cement workers.

    OpenAIRE

    Fatma, N; Jain, A. K.; Rahman, Q

    1991-01-01

    Exposure to asbestos minerals has been associated with a wide variety of adverse health effects including lung cancer, pleural mesothelioma, and cancer of other organs. It was shown previously that asbestos samples collected from a local asbestos factory enhanced sister chromatid exchanges (SCEs) and chromosomal aberrations in vitro using human lymphocytes. In the present study, 22 workers from the same factory and 12 controls were further investigated. Controls were matched for age, sex, and...

  4. Frequency of births with potentially avoidable serious chromosomal anomalies in EEC countries, 1979-1982.

    OpenAIRE

    Ten Kate, L P; Dolk, H; Cornel, M.C.; De Wals, P; Te Meerman, G J; Lechat, M. F.; Weatherall, J A

    1988-01-01

    Child bearing at an early age and prenatal cytogenetic diagnosis in pregnant women of advanced age, combined with selective abortion, make it possible to avoid the birth of many children with serious chromosomal anomalies. To see how many of such births were still avoidable in Europe, data from 16 regional EUROCAT registers of congenital anomalies in nine EEC countries were analysed. In the period 1979-1982 about 30% of children with unbalanced anomalies of autosomes were born (live- and stil...

  5. Frequency-specific Alterations of Large-scale Functional Brain Networks in Patients with Alzheimer's Disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuan-Yuan Qin; Ya-Peng Li; Shun Zhang; Ying Xiong; Lin-Ying Guo; Shi-Qi Yang; Yi-Hao Yao

    2015-01-01

    Background:Previous studies have indicated that the cognitive deficits in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) may be due to topological deteriorations of the brain network.However,whether the selection of a specific frequency band could impact the topological properties is still not clear.Our hypothesis is that the topological properties of AD patients are also frequency-specific.Methods:Resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging data from l0 right-handed moderate AD patients (mean age:64.3 years; mean mini mental state examination [MMSE]:18.0) and 10 age and gender-matched healthy controls (mean age:63.6 years; mean MMSE:28.2) were enrolled in this study.The global efficiency,the clustering coefficient (CC),the characteristic path length (CpL),and "small-world" property were calculated in a wide range of thresholds and averaged within each group,at three different frequency bands (0.01-0.06 Hz,0.06-0.11 Hz,and 0.11-0.25 Hz).Results:At lower-frequency bands (0.01-0.06 Hz,0.06-0.11 Hz),the global efficiency,the CC and the "small-world" properties of AD patients decreased compared to controls.While at higher-frequency bands (0.11-0.25 Hz),the CpL was much longer,and the "small-world" property was disrupted in AD,particularly at a higher threshold.The topological properties changed with different frequency bands,suggesting the existence of disrupted global and local functional organization associated with AD.Conclusions:This study demonstrates that the topological alterations of large-scale functional brain networks inAD patients are frequency dependent,thus providing fundamental support for optimal frequency selection in future related research.

  6. Frequencies of X-ray induced chromosome aberrations in lymphocytes of xeroderma pigmentosum and Fanconi anemia patients estimated by Giemsa and fluorescence in situ hybridization staining techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saraswathy Radha

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Blood lymphocytes from xeroderma pigmentosum (XP and Fanconi anemia (FA patients were assessed for their sensitivity to ionizing radiation by estimating the frequency of X-ray (1 and 2 Gy-induced chromosome aberrations (CA. The frequencies of aberrations in the whole genome were estimated in Giemsa-stained preparations of lymphocytes irradiated at G0 or G2 stages. The frequencies of translocations and dicentrics involving chromosomes 1 and 3 as well as the X-chromosome were determined in slides stained by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH technique. An increase in all types of CA was observed in XP and FA lymphocytes irradiated at G0 when compared to controls. The frequency of dicentrics and rings was 6 to 27% higher (at 1 and 2 Gy in XP lymphocytes and 37% higher (at 2 Gy in FA lymphocytes than in controls, while chromosome deletions were higher in irradiated (30% in 1 Gy and 72% in 2 Gy than in control XP lymphocytes and 28 to 102% higher in FA lymphocytes. In G2-irradiated lymphocytes the frequency of CA was 24 to 55% higher in XP lymphocytes than in controls. In most cases the translocation frequencies were higher than the frequencies of dicentrics (21/19.

  7. Subthalamic nucleus high-frequency stimulation restores altered electrophysiological properties of cortical neurons in parkinsonian rat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bertrand Degos

    Full Text Available Electrophysiological recordings performed in parkinsonian patients and animal models have confirmed the occurrence of alterations in firing rate and pattern of basal ganglia neurons, but the outcome of these changes in thalamo-cortical networks remains unclear. Using rats rendered parkinsonian, we investigated, at a cellular level in vivo, the electrophysiological changes induced in the pyramidal cells of the motor cortex by the dopaminergic transmission interruption and further characterized the impact of high-frequency electrical stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus, a procedure alleviating parkinsonian symptoms. We provided evidence that a lesion restricted to the substantia nigra pars compacta resulted in a marked increase in the mean firing rate and bursting pattern of pyramidal neurons of the motor cortex. These alterations were underlain by changes of the electrical membranes properties of pyramidal cells including depolarized resting membrane potential and increased input resistance. The modifications induced by the dopaminergic loss were more pronounced in cortico-striatal than in cortico-subthalamic neurons. Furthermore, subthalamic nucleus high-frequency stimulation applied at parameters alleviating parkinsonian signs regularized the firing pattern of pyramidal cells and restored their electrical membrane properties.

  8. Extra-Low-Frequency Magnetic Fields alter Cancer Cells through Metabolic Restriction

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Ying

    2012-01-01

    Background: Biological effects of extra-low-frequency (ELF) magnetic fields (MF) have lacked a credible mechanism of interaction between MFs and living material. Objectives: Examine the effect of ELF-MFs on cancer cells. Methods: Five cancer cell lines were exposed to ELF-MFs within the range of 0.025 to 5 microT, and the cells were examined for karyotype changes after 6 days. Results: All cancer cells lines lost chromosomes from MF exposure, with a mostly flat dose-response. Constant MF exposures for three weeks allow a rising return to the baseline, unperturbed karyotypes. From this point, small MF increases or decreases are again capable of inducing karyotype contractions. Our data suggests that the karyotype contractions are caused by MF interference with mitochondria's ATP synthase (ATPS), compensated by the action of AMP-activated Protein Kinase (AMPK). The effects of MFs are similar to those of the ATPS inhibitor oligomycin. They are amplified by metformin, an AMPK stimulator, and attenuated by resisti...

  9. Factor interaction analysis for chromosome 8 and DNA methylation alterations highlights innate immune response suppression and cytoskeletal changes in prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lengauer Thomas

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alterations of chromosome 8 and hypomethylation of LINE-1 retrotransposons are common alterations in advanced prostate carcinoma. In a former study including many metastatic cases, they strongly correlated with each other. To elucidate a possible interaction between the two alterations, we investigated their relationship in less advanced prostate cancers. Results In 50 primary tumor tissues, no correlation was observed between chromosome 8 alterations determined by comparative genomic hybridization and LINE-1 hypomethylation measured by Southern blot hybridization. The discrepancy towards the former study, which had been dominated by advanced stage cases, suggests that both alterations converge and interact during prostate cancer progression. Therefore, interaction analysis was performed on microarray-based expression profiles of cancers harboring both alterations, only one, or none. Application of a novel bioinformatic method identified Gene Ontology (GO groups related to innate immunity, cytoskeletal organization and cell adhesion as common targets of both alterations. Many genes targeted by their interaction were involved in type I and II interferon signaling and several were functionally related to hereditary prostate cancer genes. In addition, the interaction appeared to influence a switch in the expression pattern of EPB41L genes encoding 4.1 cytoskeleton proteins. Real-time RT-PCR revealed GADD45A, MX1, EPB41L3/DAL1, and FBLN1 as generally downregulated in prostate cancer, whereas HOXB13 and EPB41L4B were upregulated. TLR3 was downregulated in a subset of the cases and associated with recurrence. Downregulation of EPB41L3, but not of GADD45A, was associated with promoter hypermethylation, which was detected in 79% of carcinoma samples. Conclusion Alterations of chromosome 8 and DNA hypomethylation in prostate cancer probably do not cause each other, but converge during progression. The present analysis implicates their

  10. Alterations in candidate genes PHF2, FANCC, PTCH1 and XPA at chromosomal 9q22.3 region: Pathological significance in early- and late-onset breast carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roychoudhury Susanta

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Younger women with breast carcinoma (BC exhibits more aggressive pathologic features compared to older women; young age could be an independent predictor of adverse prognosis. To find any existing differences in the molecular pathogenesis of BC in both younger and older women, alterations at chromosomal (chr. 9q22.32-22.33 region were studied owing to its association in wide variety of tumors. Present work focuses on comparative analysis of alterations of four candidate genes; PHF2, FANCC, PTCH1 and XPA located within 4.4 Mb region of the afore-said locus in two age groups of BC, as well as the interrelation and prognostic significance of alterations of these genes. Methods Deletion analysis of PHF2, FANCC, PTCH1 and XPA were examined in a subset of 47 early-onset (group-A: ≤ 40 years and 59 late-onset (group-B: > 40 years breast carcinomas using both microsatellite and exonic markers. Methylation Sensitive Restriction analysis (MSRA was done to check for promoter methylation. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (Q-PCR and immunohistochemisty (IHC was done in some genes to see their relative mRNA and protein expressions respectively. Clinico-pathological correlation of different parameters as well as patient survival was calculated using different statistical softwares like EpiInfo 6.04b, SPSS 10.0 etc. Results Either age group exhibited high frequency of overall alterations in PHF2, FANCC and PTCH1 compared to XPA. Samples with alteration (deletion/methylation in these genes showed reduced level of mRNA expression as seen by Q-PCR. Immunohistochemical analysis of FANCC and PTCH1 also supported this observation. Poor patient survival was noted in both age groups having alterations in FANCC. Similar result was also seen with PTCH1 and XPA alterations in group-A and PHF2 alterations in group-B. This reflected their roles as prognostic tools in the respective groups in which they were altered. Conclusion Overall

  11. A comparative study of the frequencies of radiation-induced chromosome aberrations in somatic and germ cells of the Rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frequencies of radiation-induced chromosome aberrations in spermatogonia peripheral blood lymphocytes and bone-marrow cells of the rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta) and in human blood lymphocytes, where determined at different exposures of X-rays. The dose-response curve for the induction of reciprocal translocations in spermatogonia suggested a 'hump' at about 200 rad. The absolute frequencies of chromosome aberrations in somatic and germ cells of the rhesus monkey were low in comparison with most other mammalian species and the ratio between aberrations in the two tissues was 25 to 1 at the 100 rad level. Although the numbers of 'effective chromosome arms' in man and rhesus monkey are similar (81 vs. 83), the rhesus monkey showed a lower rate of induction of dicentrics in blood lymphocytes than man at all doses reaching statistical significance at the 300 rad level

  12. Evaluation of chromosome aberration frequency instable in individual groups residents at the municipality of Monte Alegre, Para, Brazil, exposed to radon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The municipality of Monte Alegre is a region that presents natural radiation high due to the presence of the radionuclide uranium (238U) in its soil, which through its decay gives rise to element Rn, a gas. The radioactivity of the rocks has become a problem for the population of Monte Alegre, from the moment when the radioactive material began to be used in the construction of houses and paving of streets. Among all bio markers related to environmental exposures and its biological effects, the chromosomal aberrations are considered good bio markers as predictors of the risk of cancer. Studies suggest that the frequency of chromosomal aberrations may be related to the genetic instability individual and/or exposure to ionizing radiation. Our work aimed to evaluate the frequency of chromosomal aberrations in individuals in the region of high natural radioactivity in Monte Alegre-PA. As well as to correlate the cytogenetic analysis made in this study with the results of analysis of frequency of polymorphisms of genes of DNA repair carried out in another study that resulted in other dissertation. In accordance with the distribution of the data obtained in characterizing environmental radiological and in the calculation of dose, were chosen residents of homes with more and less exposure to radiation. The samples of peripheral blood of 85 individuals of the resident population of the region of Monte Alegre - PA were collected and examine provided two slides for individual was performed to verify the quality of the sample. Through this evaluation we decide that 33% of the material collected, or is, samples of 28 individuals were in suitable conditions for analysis of the frequency of chromosomal aberrations. After the collections lymphocytes present in the sample were cultivated in accordance with the methodology proposed for obtaining of cells in metaphase. were analyzed 6,177 metaphases of 28 individuals among which were found dicentric chromosomes 4 and 19 fragments

  13. Sensorimotor learning in children and adults: Exposure to frequency-altered auditory feedback during speech production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheerer, N E; Jacobson, D S; Jones, J A

    2016-02-01

    Auditory feedback plays an important role in the acquisition of fluent speech; however, this role may change once speech is acquired and individuals no longer experience persistent developmental changes to the brain and vocal tract. For this reason, we investigated whether the role of auditory feedback in sensorimotor learning differs across children and adult speakers. Participants produced vocalizations while they heard their vocal pitch predictably or unpredictably shifted downward one semitone. The participants' vocal pitches were measured at the beginning of each vocalization, before auditory feedback was available, to assess the extent to which the deviant auditory feedback modified subsequent speech motor commands. Sensorimotor learning was observed in both children and adults, with participants' initial vocal pitch increasing following trials where they were exposed to predictable, but not unpredictable, frequency-altered feedback. Participants' vocal pitch was also measured across each vocalization, to index the extent to which the deviant auditory feedback was used to modify ongoing vocalizations. While both children and adults were found to increase their vocal pitch following predictable and unpredictable changes to their auditory feedback, adults produced larger compensatory responses. The results of the current study demonstrate that both children and adults rapidly integrate information derived from their auditory feedback to modify subsequent speech motor commands. However, these results also demonstrate that children and adults differ in their ability to use auditory feedback to generate compensatory vocal responses during ongoing vocalization. Since vocal variability also differed across the children and adult groups, these results also suggest that compensatory vocal responses to frequency-altered feedback manipulations initiated at vocalization onset may be modulated by vocal variability. PMID:26628403

  14. Use of high frequency ultrasound to monitor cervical lymph node alterations in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elyse L Walk

    Full Text Available Cervical lymph node evaluation by clinical ultrasound is a non-invasive procedure used in diagnosing nodal status, and when combined with fine-needle aspiration cytology (FNAC, provides an effective method to assess nodal pathologies. Development of high-frequency ultrasound (HF US allows real-time monitoring of lymph node alterations in animal models. While HF US is frequently used in animal models of tumor biology, use of HF US for studying cervical lymph nodes alterations associated with murine models of head and neck cancer, or any other model of lymphadenopathy, is lacking. Here we utilize HF US to monitor cervical lymph nodes changes in mice following exposure to the oral cancer-inducing carcinogen 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide (4-NQO and in mice with systemic autoimmunity. 4-NQO induces tumors within the mouse oral cavity as early as 19 wks that recapitulate HNSCC. Monitoring of cervical (mandibular lymph nodes by gray scale and power Doppler sonography revealed changes in lymph node size eight weeks after 4-NQO treatment, prior to tumor formation. 4-NQO causes changes in cervical node blood flow resulting from oral tumor progression. Histological evaluation indicated that the early 4-NQO induced changes in lymph node volume were due to specific hyperproliferation of T-cell enriched zones in the paracortex. We also show that HF US can be used to perform image-guided fine needle aspirate (FNA biopsies on mice with enlarged mandibular lymph nodes due to genetic mutation of Fas ligand (Fasl. Collectively these studies indicate that HF US is an effective technique for the non-invasive study of cervical lymph node alterations in live mouse models of oral cancer and other mouse models containing cervical lymphadenopathy.

  15. Use of high frequency ultrasound to monitor cervical lymph node alterations in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walk, Elyse L; McLaughlin, Sarah; Coad, James; Weed, Scott A

    2014-01-01

    Cervical lymph node evaluation by clinical ultrasound is a non-invasive procedure used in diagnosing nodal status, and when combined with fine-needle aspiration cytology (FNAC), provides an effective method to assess nodal pathologies. Development of high-frequency ultrasound (HF US) allows real-time monitoring of lymph node alterations in animal models. While HF US is frequently used in animal models of tumor biology, use of HF US for studying cervical lymph nodes alterations associated with murine models of head and neck cancer, or any other model of lymphadenopathy, is lacking. Here we utilize HF US to monitor cervical lymph nodes changes in mice following exposure to the oral cancer-inducing carcinogen 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide (4-NQO) and in mice with systemic autoimmunity. 4-NQO induces tumors within the mouse oral cavity as early as 19 wks that recapitulate HNSCC. Monitoring of cervical (mandibular) lymph nodes by gray scale and power Doppler sonography revealed changes in lymph node size eight weeks after 4-NQO treatment, prior to tumor formation. 4-NQO causes changes in cervical node blood flow resulting from oral tumor progression. Histological evaluation indicated that the early 4-NQO induced changes in lymph node volume were due to specific hyperproliferation of T-cell enriched zones in the paracortex. We also show that HF US can be used to perform image-guided fine needle aspirate (FNA) biopsies on mice with enlarged mandibular lymph nodes due to genetic mutation of Fas ligand (Fasl). Collectively these studies indicate that HF US is an effective technique for the non-invasive study of cervical lymph node alterations in live mouse models of oral cancer and other mouse models containing cervical lymphadenopathy. PMID:24955984

  16. The rad52-Y66A allele alters the choice of donor template during spontaneous chromosomal recombination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Mayolo, A.A.; Sunjevaric, I.; Reid, R.;

    2010-01-01

    Spontaneous mitotic recombination is a potential source of genetic changes Such as loss of heterozygosity and chromosome translocations, which may lead to genetic disease. In this study we have used a rad52 hyper-recombination mutant, rad52-Y66A, to investigate the process of spontaneous...... heteroallelic recombination in the yeast Soccharomyces cerevisiae. We find that spontaneous recombination has different genetic requirements, depending on whether the recombination event occurs between chromosomes or between chromosome and plasmid sequences. The hyper-recombination phenotype of the rad52-Y66A......-pass of the window-of-opportunity for sister chromatid recombination normally promoted by MRE11-dependent damage-induced cohesion thereby causing a shift towards interchromosomal recombination....

  17. Controlled meal frequency without caloric restriction alters peripheral blood mononuclear cell cytokine production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Longo Dan L

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Intermittent fasting (IF improves healthy lifespan in animals by a mechanism involving reduced oxidative damage and increased resistance to stress. However, no studies have evaluated the impact of controlled meal frequency on immune responses in human subjects. Objective A study was conducted to establish the effects of controlled diets with different meal frequencies, but similar daily energy intakes, on cytokine production in healthy male and female subjects. Design In a crossover study design with an intervening washout period, healthy normal weight middle-age male and female subjects (n = 15 were maintained for 2 months on controlled on-site one meal per day (OMD or three meals per day (TMD isocaloric diets. Serum samples and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs culture supernatants from subjects were analyzed for the presence of inflammatory markers using a multiplex assay. Results There were no significant differences in the inflammatory markers in the serum of subjects on the OMD or TMD diets. There was an increase in the capacity of PBMCs to produce cytokines in subjects during the first month on the OMD or TMD diets. Lower levels of TNF-α, IL-17, MCP-1 and MIP-1β were produced by PBMCs from subjects on the OMD versus TMD diet. Conclusions PBMCs of subjects on controlled diets exhibit hypersensitivities to cellular stimulation suggesting that stress associated with altered eating behavior might affect cytokine production by immune cells upon stimulation. Moreover, stimulated PBMCs derived from healthy individuals on a reduced meal frequency diet respond with a reduced capability to produce cytokines.

  18. The frequency of chromosomal aberrations in sheep from the area contaminated by depleted uranium during NATO air strikes in 1999

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fišter Svetlana L.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of cytogenetic studies in sheep from the region of Bujanovac that was contaminated by depleted uranium during the NATO air strikes in 1999. The study was conducted on sheep blood lymphocytes, in order to determine the frequency of chromosomal aberrations and to assess the presence of genetic risk as a result of the possible impact of depleted uranium. Blood samples for lymphocyte cultures were taken at random from the 20 animals of the households in the village of Borovac, near Bujanovac. The animals were chosen because they were pastured, fed, and watered in the NATO bombing area. With the purpose of comparing the results two control groups were cytogenetically analyzed, each consisted of 20 sheep from Zemun and Ovča, two northern localities that were not contaminated with depleted uranium. The established structural chromosomal changes were of breaks and gap types, and their frequencies in sheep of all surveyed localities were within the range of basic level values that are commonly found in the sheep lymphocyte cultures analyses. Significant differences are apparent between the values defined in the sheep from Bujanovac compared to those obtained in the sheep from the northern locality (Zemun, probably as a result of breeding of animals in the farm conditions and their being less exposed to the impact of environmental agents. There were neither elevated values of polyploid and aneuploid cells nor significant differences between the sites. According to earlier known data, depleted uranium was below the detection limit of the method applied both in the soil and feed given to cytogenetically analyzed animals. Based on the low-level changes that are in the range of the basic level changes, commonly observed in sheep lymphocytes control cultures, it cannot be said with certainty that it was depleted uranium that caused the changes, or that it is wide-spread in the region of Bujanovac. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke

  19. Nicotine-induced Disturbances of Meiotic Maturation in Cultured Mouse Oocytes: Alterations of Spindle Integrity and Chromosome Alignment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zenzes Maria

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We investigated whether nicotine exposure in vitro of mouse oocytes affects spindle and chromosome function during meiotic maturation (M-I and M-II. Oocytes in germinal vesicle (GV stage were cultured in nicotine for 8 h or for 16 h, to assess effects in M-I and in metaphase II (M-II. The latter culture setting used the three protocols: 8 h nicotine then 8 h medium (8N + 8M; 16 h nicotine (16N; 8 h medium then 8 h nicotine (8M + 8N. Non-toxic concentrations of nicotine at 1.0, 2.5, 5.0 and 10.0 mmol/L were used. Spindle-chromosome configurations were analyzed with wide-field optical sectioning microscopy. In 8 h cultures, nicotine exposure resulted in dose-related increased proportions of M-I oocytes with defective spindle-chromosome configurations. A dose-related delayed entry into anaphase I was also detected. In 16 h cultures, nicotine exposure for the first 8 h (8N + 8M, or for 16 h (16N, resulted in dose- and time-related increased proportions of oocytes arrested in M-I (10 mmol/L; 8 h: 53.2%, controls 9.6%; 16 h: 87.6%, controls 8.5%. Defects in M-I spindles and chromosomes caused M-I arrest leading to dose-related decreased proportions of oocytes that reached metaphase-II (10 mmol/L 8 h: 46.8%, controls 90.4%;16 h: 12.4%, controls 91.5%. A delayed anaphase-I affected the normal timing of M-II, leading to abnormal oocytes with dispersed chromosomes, or with double spindles and no polar body. Nicotine exposure during the second 8 h (8M + 8N resulted in dose-related, increased proportions of M-II oocytes with defective spindles and chromosomes (10 mmol/L: 42.9%, controls 2.0%. Nicotine has no adverse effects on GV break down, but induces spindle and chromosome defects compromising oocyte meiotic maturation and development.

  20. Induction of chromosome instability and stomach cancer by altering the expression pattern of mitotic checkpoint genes in mice exposed to areca-nut

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There are strong indications for a causal association between areca-nut consumption and cancers. In Meghalaya, India, the variety of areca-nut is used as raw and unprocessed form whose chemical composition and pharmacological actions have been reported. Yet we know little on the initial pathway involved in areca-nut associated carcinogenesis since it is difficult to assess its effects on genetic alterations without interference of other compounding factors. Therefore, present study was undertaken in mice to verify the ability of raw areca-nut (RAN) to induce cancer and to monitor the expression of certain genes involved in carcinogenesis. This study was not intended to isolate any active ingredients from the RAN and to look its action. Three groups of mice (n = 25 in each) were taken and used at different time-points for different experimental analysis. The other three groups of mice (n = 15 in each) were considered for tumor induction studies. In each set, two groups were administered RAN-extract ad libitum in drinking water with or without lime. The expression of certain genes was assessed by conventional RT-PCR and immunoblotting. The mice were given the whole RAN-extract with and without lime in order to mimic the human consumption style of RAN. Histological preparation of stomach tissue revealed that RAN induced stomach cancer. A gradual increase in the frequency of precocious anaphase and aneuploid cells was observed in the bone marrow cells with a greater increment following RAN + lime administeration. Levels of p53, Bax, Securin and p65 in esophageal and stomach cells were elevated during early days of RAN exposure while those of different mitotic checkpoint proteins were downregulated. Apoptotic cell death was detected in non-cancerous stomach cells but not in tumor cells which showed overexpression of Bax and absence of PARP. Present study suggested (a) RAN induces stomach cancer, however, presence of lime promoted higher cell transformation and thereby

  1. A comparative study on the frequencies of radiation-induced chromosome aberrations in the somatic and germ cells in mouse and monkey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two systems were mainly used for studying the relationship between radiation induced chromosome aberration frequencies in somatic and germ cells. The first consists of reciprocal translocation induced in bone-marrow cells of mice compared to reciprocal translocation induced spermatogonia (scored in descending spermatocytes) of the same mice. Dose-response curves for induced aberrations in both cell types (0-100-200-300-400-500 and 600 R X-rays) and dose rate effects indicated that (130-1.92-0.0287 R/min) of a 400 R γ-ray exposure of the two cell types mitotically dividing germ cells respond to radiation similarly to mitotic dividing germ cells. Clonal proliferation or selective elimination of aberration-carrying cells, and other post-irradiation factors can, however, cause great differences in absolute aberration frequencies. A similar study was attempted, using the rhesus monkey as a second system. Its bone-marrow cells were proved unsuitable for induced reciprocal translocations. Stimulated peripheral blood lymphocytes were studied instead. Following 100, 200 and 300 R of X-rays, the frequencies of induced dicentric chromosomes were compared to those of induced reciprocal translocations in spermatogonia. Human peripheral blood was studied similarly. It was concluded that: (a) The absolute frequencies of chromosome aberrations in somatic and germ cells of the rhesus monkey are low compared to most other mammalian species. (b) The ratio between dicentric frequencies and reciprocal translocation frequencies at 100 R and 200 R differed significantly from 4:1 reported for mouse and Chinese hamster and 2:1 for marmoset and man. (c) Although the numbers of 'effective chromosome arms' in man and rhesus monkey are similar (81 vs 83), the rhesus monkey showed at all doses a lower rate of induction of dicentrics in blood lymphocytes than man, reaching statistical significance at the 300 R level

  2. Reversal of DNA methylation with 5-azacytidine alters chromosome replication patterns in human lymphocyte and fibroblast cultures.

    OpenAIRE

    Shafer, D A; Priest, J H

    1984-01-01

    Prior studies demonstrated that developmental or induced methylation of DNA can inactivate associated gene loci. Such DNA methylation can be reversed and specific genes reactivated by treatment with 5-azacytidine (5- azaC ). The present cytogenetic studies using replication banding methods show that 5- azaC treatment also results in an increase or decrease in replication staining at one or more band locations in human lymphocyte and fibroblast chromosomes. New replication band locations are n...

  3. Genetic Alterations in Pesticide Exposed Bolivian Farmers: An evaluation by analysis of chromosomal aberrations and the comet assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik Jørs

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pesticides are of concern in Bolivia because of increasing use. Frequent intoxications have been demonstrated due to use of very toxic pesticides, insufficient control of distribution and sale and little knowledge among farmers of protective measures and hygienic procedures.Method: Questionnaires were applied and blood tests taken from 81 volunteers from La Paz County, of whom 48 were pesticide exposed farmers and 33 non-exposed controls. Sixty males and 21 females participated with a mean age of 37.3 years (range 17–76. Data of exposure and possible genetic damage were collected and evaluated by well known statistical methods, controlling for relevant confounders. To measure genetic damage chromosomal aberrations and the comet assay analysis were performed.Results: Pesticide exposed farmers had a higher degree of genetic damage compared to the control group. The number of chromosomal aberrations increased with the intensity of pesticide exposure. Females had a lower number of chromosomal aberrations than males, and people living at altitudes above 2500 metres seemed to exhibit more DNA damage measured by the comet assay.Conclusions: Bolivian farmers showed signs of genotoxic damage, probably related to exposure to pesticides. Due to the potentially negative long term health effects of genetic damage on reproduction and the development of cancer, preventive measures are recommended. Effective control with imports and sales, banning of the most toxic pesticides, education and information are possible measures, which could help preventing the negative effects of pesticides on human health and the environment.

  4. Radiation-induced chromosome aberrations in ataxia telangiectasia cells: high frequency of deletions and misrejoining detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawata, Tetsuya; Ito, Hisao; George, Kerry; Wu, Honglu; Uno, Takashi; Isobe, Kouichi; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2003-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying the hyper-radiosensitivity of AT cells were investigated by analyzing chromosome aberrations in the G(2) and M phases of the cell cycle using a combination of chemically induced premature chromosome condensation (PCC) and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with chromosome painting probes. Confluent cultures of normal fibroblast cells (AG1522) and fibroblast cells derived from an individual with AT (GM02052) were exposed to gamma rays and allowed to repair at 37 degrees C for 24 h. At doses that resulted in 10% survival, GM02052 cells were approximately five times more sensitive to gamma rays than AG1522 cells. For a given dose, GM02052 cells contained a much higher frequency of deletions and misrejoining than AG1522 cells. For both cell types, a good correlation was found between the percentage of aberrant cells and cell survival. The average number of color junctions, which represent the frequency of chromosome misrejoining, was also found to correlate well with survival. However, in a similar surviving population of GM02052 and AG1522 cells, induced by 1 Gy and 6 Gy, respectively, AG1522 cells contained four times more color junctions and half as many deletions as GM02052 cells. These results indicate that both repair deficiency and misrepair may be involved in the hyper-radiosensitivity of AT cells.

  5. Chromosomal aberration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chromosomal aberrations are classified into two types, chromosome-type and chromatid-type. Chromosom-type aberrations include terminal deletion, dicentric, ring and interstitial deletion, and chromatid-type aberrations include achromatic lesion, chromatid deletion, isochromatid deletion and chromatid exchange. Clastogens which induce chromosomal aberration are divided into ''S-dependent'' agents and ''S-independent''. It might mean whether they can induce double strand breaks independent of the S phase or not. Double strand breaks may be the ultimate lesions to induce chromosomal aberrations. Caffeine added even in the G2 phase appeared to modify the frequency of chromatid aberrations induced by X-rays and mitomycin C. Those might suggest that the G2 phase involves in the chromatid aberration formation. The double strand breaks might be repaired by ''G2 repair system'', the error of which might yield breakage types of chromatid aberrations and the by-pass of which might yield chromatid exchanges. Chromosome-type aberrations might be formed in the G1 phase. (author)

  6. Frequencies of Dicentric Chromosome and Translocation in Lymphocytes from Residents in Radio-contaminated Villages near Semipalatinsk Nuclear Explosion Test Site

    OpenAIRE

    Tanaka, Kimio; Iida, Shozho; Takeichi, Nobuo; Hoshi, Masaharu

    2012-01-01

    More than 400 above-ground and underground nuclear explosion tests were conducted at Semipalatinsk nuclear explosion test site (SNETS). The significant radioactive substances was released and radioactive plumes moved on villages at the time of explosion test, then residents in villages near SNETS are considered to be exposed internally and externally. In order to assess the biological effects on residents, frequencies of chromosome aberrations in peripheral blood lymphocytes were observed in ...

  7. A case report of a patient with microcephaly, facial dysmorphism, chromosomal radiosensitivity and telomere length alterations closely resembling "Nijmegen breakage syndrome" phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berardinelli, F; di Masi, A; Salvatore, M; Banerjee, S; Myung, K; De Villartay, J P; Revy, P; Plebani, A; Soresina, A; Taruscio, D; Tanzarella, C; Antoccia, A

    2007-01-01

    Genetic heterogeneity in Nijmegen breakage syndrome (NBS) is highlighted by patients showing clinical and cellular features of NBS but with no mutations in NBS1 and normal levels of nibrin. NBS is an autosomal recessive disorder, whose clinical cellular signs include growth and developmental defects, dysmorphic facies, immunodeficiency, cancer predisposition, chromosomal instability and radiosensitivity. NBS is caused by mutations in the NBS1 gene, whose product is part of the MRE11/RAD50/NBS1 complex involved in the DNA double-strand break (DSB) response pathway. Since the identification of the NBS1 gene, patients with NBS clinical signs, particularly severe congenital microcephaly, are screened for mutations in the NBS1 gene. Further analyses include X-ray-induced chromosome aberrations, telomere analysis, kinetics of DSBs repair, levels of a panel of proteins involved in the maintenance of genetic stability, radiation-induced phosphorylation of various substrates and cell cycle analysis. We describe a patient with a NBS clinical phenotype, chromosomal sensitivity to X-rays but without mutations in the whole NBS1 or in the Cernunnos gene. Enhanced response to irradiation was mediated neither by DSBs rejoining defects nor by the NBS/AT-dependent DNA-damage response pathway. Notably, we found that primary fibroblasts from this patient displayed telomere length alterations. Cross-talk between pathways controlling response to DSBs and those involved in maintaining telomeres has been shown in the present patient. Dissecting the cellular phenotype of radiosensitive NBS-like patients represents a useful tool for the research of new genes involved in the cellular response to DSBs. PMID:17395558

  8. Frequency-specific alterations in the fractional amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xujing; Zhang, Jiuquan; Zhang, Youxue; Chen, Heng; Li, Rong; Long, Zhiliang; Zheng, Junjie; Wang, Jian; Chen, Huafu

    2016-08-01

    This study used resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging and fractional amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations (fALFF) method to investigate low-frequency spontaneous neural activity at the bands of slow-5 (0.01-0.027 Hz) and slow-4 (0.027-0.073 Hz) in 20 patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and 20 healthy controls. We determined that, at slow-5 band, patients with ALS showed increased fALFF in the right middle frontal gyrus and decreased fALFF in the left middle occipital gyrus. However, compared with healthy controls, patients with ALS exhibited higher fALFF in the right caudate nucleus, left superior frontal gyrus, and right anterior cingulate cortex and lower fALFF in the right inferior occipital gyrus and bilateral middle occipital gyrus at slow-4 band. Furthermore, the fALFF value in the left superior frontal gyrus at slow-4 band was negatively correlated with functional rating scale-revised score. Our results demonstrated that the fALFF changes in ALS were widespread and frequency dependent. These findings may provide a novel way to look into the pathophysiology mechanisms underlying ALS. PMID:27139743

  9. Effect of low-dose acute X-irradiation on the frequencies of chromosomal aberrations in human peripheral lymphocytes in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a coordinated research programme sponsored by the International Atomic Energy Agency, the frequencies of chromosomal aberrations induced in peripheral blood lymphocytes (in vitro) by 250 kV X-rays at low doses (0.4, 1, 2, 3, 5, 10 and 30 rad) were determined. Blood from 2 donors was used to conduct one master experiment at these dose levels. The culture time used was 48 h and all samples including the controls were processed according to a standard protocol. The coded slides were scored by investigators from 10 participating laboratories. The main results are the following: the frequencies of all types of chromosome aberrations at 0.4 rad are significantly lower than the control values; there is no increase in the frequencies of dicentrics up to 2 rad and in those of terminal deletions up to 5 rad; the mean frequencies of all aberrations considered together are not significantly different from one another at 1, 2 and 3 rad (P=0.05); and (4) over the entire dose range the dose-effect relationship is clearly non-linear. (orig./AJ)

  10. Study on frequency of dental developmental alterations in a Mexican school-based population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcés-Ortíz, Maricela; Salcido-García, Juan-Francisco; Hernández-Flores, Florentino

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to know the distribution of dental developmental alterations in the population requesting stomatological attention at the Admission and Diagnosis Clinic of our institution in Mexico City. Material and Methods We reviewed the archives and selected those files with developmental dental alterations. Analyzed data were diagnoses, age, gender, location and number of involved teeth. Results Of the 3.522 patients reviewed, 179 (5.1%) harbored 394 developmental dental alterations. Of them, 45.2% were males and 54.8% were females with a mean age of 16.7 years. The most common were supernumeraries, dental agenesia and dilaceration. Adults were 30.7% of the patients with dental developmental alterations. In them, the most common lesions were agenesia and supernumeraries. Mesiodens was the most frequently found supernumerary teeth (14.7%). Conclusions Our finding that 30.7% of the affected patients were adults is an undescribed and unusually high proportion of patients that have implications on planning and prognosis of their stomatological treatment. Key words:Developmental dental alterations, developmental alterations, supernumerary teeth, dental agenesia, root dilaceration. PMID:26946196

  11. Frequency and pattern of cytogenetic alterations in primary amenorrhea cases of Kashmir, North India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tahir M. Malla

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: The results of the present study indicate that chromosomal analysis of females with PA, after the exclusion of non-genetic causes, should be essentially considered for the precise diagnosis and the development of more successful treatment. The study being the first of its kind in this part of the world forms the basis for further studies of the PA cases of this region. The precise molecular characterization of the unique breakpoint regions reported in our study can possibly help in the identification of new genes involved in primary amenorrhea.

  12. Genome and gene alterations by insertions and deletions in the evolution of human and chimpanzee chromosome 22

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volfovsky Natalia

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Understanding structure and function of human genome requires knowledge of genomes of our closest living relatives, the primates. Nucleotide insertions and deletions (indels play a significant role in differentiation that underlies phenotypic differences between humans and chimpanzees. In this study, we evaluated distribution, evolutionary history, and function of indels found by comparing syntenic regions of the human and chimpanzee genomes. Results Specifically, we identified 6,279 indels of 10 bp or greater in a ~33 Mb alignment between human and chimpanzee chromosome 22. After the exclusion of those in repetitive DNA, 1,429 or 23% of indels still remained. This group was characterized according to the local or genome-wide repetitive nature, size, location relative to genes, and other genomic features. We defined three major classes of these indels, using local structure analysis: (i those indels found uniquely without additional copies of indel sequence in the surrounding (10 Kb region, (ii those with at least one exact copy found nearby, and (iii those with similar but not identical copies found locally. Among these classes, we encountered a high number of exactly repeated indel sequences, most likely due to recent duplications. Many of these indels (683 of 1,429 were in proximity of known human genes. Coding sequences and splice sites contained significantly fewer of these indels than expected from random expectations, suggesting that selection is a factor in limiting their persistence. A subset of indels from coding regions was experimentally validated and their impacts were predicted based on direct sequencing in several human populations as well as chimpanzees, bonobos, gorillas, and two subspecies of orangutans. Conclusion Our analysis demonstrates that while indels are distributed essentially randomly in intergenic and intronic genomic regions, they are significantly under-represented in coding sequences. There are

  13. Frequency of chromosome aberration and dose/dose rate effects in the mouse exposed to long-term low dose radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Authors have been conducting long term irradiation experiments in the mouse with the dose rate as low as unreported hitherto and have shown with highly sensitive methods to detect chromosomal aberration, that there is the positive dose rate effect under even such a condition, of which details are described herein. According to the definition of United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCER) (1993), the low dose rate is 137Cs-gamma-ray at the low dose rate of 1 or 20 mGy/22 h/day (total, 125-615 or 100-8000 mGy, respectively). Other groups received radiations of 0 Gy (non-irradiated, age-matched control), 200-8000 mGy at 200 mGy/22 h/day, 400-8000 mGy at 400 mGy/22 h/day, or 250-2000 mGy at 890 mGy/min. At the defined days after exposure, mice were sacrificed, their spleens were dissected out, splenic cells were cultured for 48 hr, and their chromosome specimens were prepared to be stained with Giemsa or FISH (fluorescence in situ hybridization). Dicentric (dic) and translocation chromosomal aberrations were found to increase even with the lowest total (accumulated) dose, where the frequency was significantly higher than that in control. Comparison of the regression slopes at each dose rate of the relation between dose and aberration revealed the difference dependent on the rate, thus demonstrating the presence of dose rate effect. Dose/dose rate effect factor (DDREF) calculated by authors' procedure (at 1000-100 mGy: DDREF=17.8-4.5 for dic by FISH; 24.5-5.2 for dic+ring chromosome by Giemsa) was thought important in the risk assessment of low dose radiation and also revealed a problem in International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) (1991) calculation of the factor. (K.T.)

  14. Cold-induced alteration in the global structure of the male sex chromosome of In(1)B$^{M2}$(reinverted) of Drosophila melanogaster is associated with increased acetylation of histone 4 at lysine 16

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S. Kulkarni-Shukla; A. P. Barge; R. S. Vartak; Anita Kar

    2008-12-01

    In Drosophila melanogaster, dosage compensation occurs through hypertranscription of sex-linked genes in males. The hypertranscription involves acetylation of histone 4 at lysine 16 (H4K16) on amale X-chromosome, brought about by a histone acetyltransferase encoded by the dosage compensation gene, males absent on the first (mof). We report a phenomenon in the strain In(1)B$^{M2}$(reinverted) of D. melanogaster where the global structure of the male X-chromosome can be altered at the third instar larval stage through a 4-h cold shock at 12±1°C. We show that the cold shock results in a transient hyperacetylation of H4K16 and an increased expression of MOF. Control proteins H4 acetylated at lysine 5, and the dosage compensation gene msl-2, do not show any change in expression after cold shock. Cytology of the male X-chromosome at different time points during cold shock and recovery, suggests that the hyperacetylation of H4 at lysine 16 causes the X-chromosome to corkscrew into itself, thereby achieving the cold-induced change in the higher order structure of the male polytene X-chromosome. Our studies suggest a role for H4K16 in maintaining the structure of the male X-chromosome in Drosophila.

  15. Subthalamic Nucleus High-Frequency Stimulation Restores Altered Electrophysiological Properties of Cortical Neurons in Parkinsonian Rat

    OpenAIRE

    Bertrand Degos; Jean-Michel Deniau; Mario Chavez; Nicolas Maurice

    2013-01-01

    Electrophysiological recordings performed in parkinsonian patients and animal models have confirmed the occurrence of alterations in firing rate and pattern of basal ganglia neurons, but the outcome of these changes in thalamo-cortical networks remains unclear. Using rats rendered parkinsonian, we investigated, at a cellular level in vivo, the electrophysiological changes induced in the pyramidal cells of the motor cortex by the dopaminergic transmission interruption and further characterized...

  16. Data in support of dyslipidemia-associated alterations in B cell subpopulations frequency and phenotype during experimental atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rincón-Arévalo, Héctor; Castaño, Diana; Villa-Pulgarín, Janny; Rojas, Mauricio; Vásquez, Gloria; Correa, Luis A; Ramírez-Pineda, José R; Yassin, Lina M

    2016-06-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are the most common cause of death in the world, atherosclerosis being its main underlying disease. Information about the role of B cells during atherosclerotic process is scarce, but both proatherogenic and atheroprotective properties have been described in the immunopathology of this disease. Frequency and phenotype of B cell subpopulations were studied in wild type and apolipoprotein-E-deficient (apoE (-/-) ) mice fed or not with high-fat diet (HFD), by flow cytometry. Here, we provide the information about the materials, methods, analysis and additional information related to our study published in Atherosclerosis (DOI: 10.1016/j.atherosclerosis.2015.12.022, article reference: ATH14410) [1]. The data contained in this article shows and supports that mice with advanced atherosclerosis have a variety of alterations in frequency and phenotype of B cell subsets, most of which associated with dyslipidemia. PMID:27081674

  17. Observation on the Frequency of Chromosomal Aberration and Changes in Number of Peripheral Lymphocytes in Radioactive Iodine Treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koo, Chun Hee; Shin, Min Ho; Park, Young Ju; Lee, Jung Yim; Park, Tae Yong; Lee, Jae Yong; Kim, Chong Soon; Han, Seung Soo; Kim, Kwang Hoe [Hanil General Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hee Gun; Kang, Duck Won; Song, Myung Jae [Korean Electric Power Corporation Research-Development Center, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-06-15

    For biological dosimetry of radiation exposure, both observing hematologic change and calculating Ydr by chromosomal analysis as biological indicators are widely used. However, due to the lack of studies on biological dosimetry of radiation dose absorbed in the body such as in the cases of radioactive iodine therapy, the maximal and safe dose is not well known, nor is the extent to which the body can safely endure radiation exposure. To investigate the practical applicability of hematologic changes and Ydr as an indicator for estimating radiation exposure, to patients with thyroid diseases after doses of radioactive iodine. 5 patients with hyperthyroidism and 35 patients who have had thyroid cancer operation were under treatment with radioactive iodine, changes in number of lymphocytes were tracked and Ydr was calculated for more than 2 months by chromosomal analysis in peripheral lymphocytes. 1) The number of lymphocytes began to decrease 2 weeks after doses of radioactive iodine, and reached the nadir after 6 and 8 weeks, then gradually recovered. 2) The nadir count of lymphocytes was reversely correlated with the administered dosage of radioactive iodine. 3) Ydr was generally stable between 2 and 8 weeks. 4) The maximal value of Ydr was correlated with the administered dosage of radioactive iodine. 5) Ydr value at the 2nd week increased with augmented dosage of radioactive iodine. 6) Ydr value at the 2nd week was correlated with fall of lymphocyte count. Patients must be closely observed, because temporary bone marrow suppression and slight chromosomal aberration can be produced by even generally used dosages of radioactive iodine for diagnosis and therapy. Maximal percent fall of lymphocyte count, Ydr at the 2 week interval and maximal Ydr can be used as the biological predictor of administered dosage of radioactive iodine.

  18. Multisensory stimuli elicit altered oscillatory brain responses at gamma frequencies in patients with schizophrenia

    OpenAIRE

    David B. Stone; Coffman, Brian A; Juan Bustillo; Cheryl Aine

    2014-01-01

    Deficits in auditory and visual unisensory responses are well documented in patients with schizophrenia; however, potential abnormalities elicited from multisensory audio-visual stimuli are less understood. Further, schizophrenia patients have shown abnormal patterns in task-related and task-independent oscillatory brain activity, particularly in the gamma frequency band. We examined oscillatory responses to basic unisensory and multisensory stimuli in schizophrenia patients (N = 46) and heal...

  19. Multisensory stimuli elicit altered oscillatory brain responses at gamma frequencies in patients with schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David B. Stone

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Deficits in auditory and visual unisensory responses are well documented in patients with schizophrenia; however, potential abnormalities elicited from multisensory audio-visual stimuli are less understood. Further, schizophrenia patients have shown abnormal patterns in task-related and task-independent oscillatory brain activity, particularly in the gamma frequency band. We examined oscillatory responses to basic unisensory and multisensory stimuli in schizophrenia patients (N = 46 and healthy controls (N = 57 using magnetoencephalography (MEG. Time-frequency decomposition was performed to determine regions of significant changes in gamma band power by group in response to unisensory and multisensory stimuli relative to baseline levels. Results showed significant behavioral differences between groups in response to unisensory and multisensory stimuli. In addition, time-frequency analysis revealed significant decreases and increases in gamma-band power in schizophrenia patients relative to healthy controls, which emerged both early and late over both sensory and frontal regions in response to unisensory and multisensory stimuli. Unisensory gamma-band power predicted multisensory gamma-band power differently by group. Furthermore, gamma-band power in these regions predicted performance in select measures of the Measurement and Treatment Research to Improve Cognition in Schizophrenia (MATRICS test battery differently by group. These results reveal a unique pattern of task-related gamma-band power in schizophrenia patients relative to controls that may indicate reduced inhibition in combination with impaired oscillatory mechanisms in patients with schizophrenia.

  20. An association, in adult Japanese, between the occurrence of rogue cells among cultured lymphocytes (JC virus activity) and the frequency of "simple" chromosomal damage among the lymphocytes of persons exhibiting these rogue cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Neel, J V

    1998-01-01

    Data from a previous study of the cytogenetic effects, in cultured lymphocytes, of exposure to the atomic bomb in Hiroshima have been reanalyzed to determine the relationship between the occurrence of "rogue" cells in an individual and the frequency of "simple" chromosomal damage in the nonrogue cells of the same individual. Rogue cells are cells with complex chromosomal damage, currently believed to be a manifestation of the activity of a human polyoma virus termed "JC." Among a total of 1,8...

  1. Analysis of the frequency of unstable chromosome aberrations in human lymphocytes irradiated with {sup 60}Co; Analise da frequencia de alteracoes cromossomicas instaveis em linfocitos humanos irradiados com {sup 60}Co

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendonca, Julyanne C.G.; Mendes, Mariana E.; Lima, Fabiana F., E-mail: july_cgm@hotmail.com, E-mail: mendes_sb@hotmail.com [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares (CRCN-NE/CNEN-PE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Santos, Neide, E-mail: santos_neide@yahoo.com.br [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (CCB/UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Departamento de Genetica

    2013-07-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the frequency of unstable chromosomal aberrations induced by gamma radiation from a {sup 60}Co source at two different doses. Samples were obtained from a healthy donor and exposed to {sup 60}Co source (Gammacel 220 ) located in the Department of Nuclear Energy of Pernambuco Federal University (DEN/UFPe/Brazil) with a rate of air Kerma to 3,277 Gy/h. Exposures resulted in absorbed dose 0.51 Gy and 0.77 Gy. Mitotic metaphases were obtained by culturing lymphocytes for chromosome analysis and the slides were stained with 5% Giemsa. Among the unstable chromosomal aberrations the dicentric chromosomes, ring chromosomes and acentric fragments were analyzed. To calculate the significance level the chi - square test was used, considering relevant differences between the frequencies when the value of p < 0.05. To calculate the significance level of the chi - square test was used, considering relevant differences between the frequencies when the value of p < 0.05. The results showed that there was significant difference of the frequencies of dicentric chromosomes (from 0.18 to 0.51 to 0.37 Gy to 0.77 Gy), however there was no statistically significant difference between the frequencies of acentric fragments ( 0.054 to 0, 51 Gy to 0.063 to 0.77 Gy) and ring chromosomes (0.001 to 0.51 Gy to 0.003 to 0.77 Gy). The low number of rings is found justified, considering that in irradiated human lymphocytes, its appearance is rare relative to dicentrics. The results confirm that dicentrics are the most reliable biomarkers in estimating dose after exposure to gamma radiation. These two points will make the calibration curve dose-response being built for Biological Dosimetry Laboratory of CRCN-NE/CNEN.

  2. Effect of post-treatments with caffeine during G2 on the frequencies of chromosome-type aberrations produced by X-rays in human lymphocytes during G0 and G1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Human lymphocytes were irradiated with X-rays in G0 and G1, grown in the presence of 5-bromodeoxyuridine, and harvested at different times from 48 to 80 h after stimulation. Some cultures were exposed to 2.5-5 mM caffeine during the last 3 h before harvesting. The frequencies of chromosome-type aberrations were scored in first division (M1) metaphases. The post-treatment with caffeine increased the frequencies of mitoses and chromosome-type aberrations in irradiated cultures. The results suggest that cells carrying chromosome-type aberrations are delayed in G2 and that caffeine increases the frequencies of aberrations in dividing cells by removing this G2-block. (author)

  3. Metabolic impacts of altering meal frequency and timing - Does when we eat matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchison, Amy T; Heilbronn, Leonie K

    2016-05-01

    Obesity prevalence continues to rise throughout the developed world, as a result of positive energy balance and reduced physical activity. At present, there is still a perception within the general community, and amongst some nutritionists, that eating multiple small meals spaced throughout the day is beneficial for weight control and metabolic health. However, intervention trials do not generally support the epidemiological evidence, and data is emerging to suggest that increasing the fasting period between meals may beneficially impact body weight and metabolic health. To date, this evidence is of short term duration, and it is becoming increasingly apparent that meal timing must also be considered if we are to ensure optimal health benefits in response to this dietary pattern. The purpose of this review is to summate the existing human literature on modifying meal frequency and timing on body weight control, appetite regulation, energy expenditure, and metabolic health under conditions of energy balance, restriction and surplus. PMID:26226640

  4. High frequency application of nanosecond pulsed electric fields alters cellular membrane disruption and fluorescent dye uptake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steelman, Zachary A.; Tolstykh, Gleb P.; Beier, Hope T.; Ibey, Bennett L.

    2016-03-01

    Cells exposed to nanosecond-pulsed electric fields (nsPEF) exhibit a wide variety of nonspecific effects, including blebbing, swelling, intracellular calcium bursts, apoptotic and necrotic cell death, formation of nanopores, and depletion of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-biphosphate (PIP2) to induce activation of the inositol trisphosphate/diacylglycerol pathway. While several studies have taken place in which multiple pulses were delivered to cells, the effect of pulse repetition rate (PRR) is not well understood. To better understand the effects of PRR, a laser scanning confocal microscope was used to observe CHO-K1 cells exposed to ten 600ns, 200V pulses at varying repetition rates (5Hz up to 500KHz) in the presence of either FM 1-43, YO-PRO-1, or Propidium Iodide (PI) fluorescent dyes, probes frequently used to indicate nanoporation or permeabilization of the plasma membrane. Dye uptake was monitored for 30 seconds after pulse application at a rate of 1 image/second. In addition, a single long pulse of equivalent energy (200V, 6 μs duration) was applied to test the hypothesis that very fast PRR will approximate the biological effects of a single long pulse of equal energy. Upon examination of the data, we found strong variation in the relationship between PRR and uptake in each of the three dyes. In particular, PI uptake showed little frequency dependence, FM 1-43 showed a strong inverse relationship between frequency and internal cell fluorescence, and YO-PRO-1 exhibited a "threshold" point of around 50 KHz, after which the inverse trend observed in FM 1-43 was seen to reverse itself. Further, a very high PRR of 500 KHz only approximated the biological effects of a single 6 μs pulse in cells stained with YO-PRO-1, suggesting that uptake of different dyes may proceed by different physical mechanisms.

  5. Cytogenetic findings in adult secondary acute myeloid leukemia (AML): frequency of favorable and adverse chromosomal aberrations do not differ from adult de novo AML

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Preiss, Birgitte S; Bergman, Olav J; Friis, Lone S; Sørensen, Anne; Frederiksen, Michael; Gadeberg, Ole V; Mourits-Andersen, Torben; Østergaard, Birthe; Kerndrup, Gitte B

    2010-01-01

    by treatment with chemotherapy and/or irradiation (t-AML). Cytogenetic analysis was carried out in 93%, of which 61% had clonal chromosome aberrations. MDS-AML correlated to a normal karyotype (P <0.001). t-AML correlated to abnormal clones with numerical and structural aberrations (P = 0.03), five...... or more unrelated aberrations (P = 0.03), marker chromosomes (P = 0.006), abnormal mitoses only (P = 0.01), female sex (P <0.001), and -7 (P = 0.006). Centromeric breakage correlated to a complex karyotype (P = 0.01). The frequencies of aberrations in s-AML patients were compared with an age......-matched group of de novo AML patients diagnosed in the same area and period. In this comparison, s-AML only correlated to -7 (P = 0.02). In 42 patients, we found that MDS patients with an abnormal karyotype were more likely to show cytogenetic evolution during progression to AML than MDS patients with a normal...

  6. Acupuncture induces divergent alterations of functional connectivity within conventional frequency bands: evidence from MEG recordings.

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    Youbo You

    Full Text Available As an ancient Chinese healing modality which has gained increasing popularity in modern society, acupuncture involves stimulation with fine needles inserted into acupoints. Both traditional literature and clinical data indicated that modulation effects largely depend on specific designated acupoints. However, scientific representations of acupoint specificity remain controversial. In the present study, considering the new findings on the sustained effects of acupuncture and its time-varied temporal characteristics, we employed an electrophysiological imaging modality namely magnetoencephalography with a temporal resolution on the order of milliseconds. Taken into account the differential band-limited signal modulations induced by acupuncture, we sought to explore whether or not stimulation at Stomach Meridian 36 (ST36 and a nearby non-meridian point (NAP would evoke divergent functional connectivity alterations within delta, theta, alpha, beta and gamma bands. Whole-head scanning was performed on 28 healthy participants during an eyes-closed no-task condition both preceding and following acupuncture. Data analysis involved calculation of band-limited power (BLP followed by pair-wise BLP correlations. Further averaging was conducted to obtain local and remote connectivity. Statistical analyses revealed the increased connection degree of the left temporal cortex within delta (0.5-4 Hz, beta (13-30 Hz and gamma (30-48 Hz bands following verum acupuncture. Moreover, we not only validated the closer linkage of the left temporal cortex with the prefrontal and frontal cortices, but further pinpointed that such patterns were more extensively distributed in the ST36 group in the delta and beta bands compared to the restriction only to the delta band for NAP. Psychophysical results for significant pain threshold elevation further confirmed the analgesic effect of acupuncture at ST36. In conclusion, our findings may provide a new perspective to lend

  7. Subpopulations of lymphocytes and their bearing on the radiation dose-response of the human lymphocyte (cell survival, mitogenic stimulation and chromosome aberration frequency)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine whether in the lymphocyte the frequency of chromosome aberrations might be influenced by a differential radiation response of the varying types of cells, as well as interactions among them, subpopulations were separated on the basis of differences in cell surface receptors. The subpopulations, namely, T and B lymphocytes and three T subsets, T-M, T-G, T-null, were found to differ in radiosensitivity as measured by survival in culture and mitotic index after PHA stimulation. All the populations studied are represented to varying degrees among the mitotic cells of unirradiated samples 48 hours after PHA stimulation. At increasing doses of 6Co gamma rays (50, 100, 250, 500 rads), however, their proportions change both as a direct result of irradiation, such as cell killing, and as an indirect effect, such as the reduction in suppressor cell action

  8. Effects of inhibitors of DNA, RNA, and protein synthesis on frequencies and types of premature chromosome condensation from x-ray induced micronuclei. [Cytosine arabinoside, azathioprine, thymidine, trenimon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madle, S.; Nowak, J.; Obe, G.

    1976-10-28

    Cells containing x-ray induced micronuclei were treated for a few hours before fixation with inhibitors of DNA synthesis (cytosine arabinoside; azathioprine; thymidine; trenimon), of RNA synthesis (actinomycin D; ethidium bromide), and of protein synthesis (puromycin). Only the inhibitors of DNA synthesis lead to a significant suppression of the frequencies of mitoses with micronucleus derived premature chromosome condensation (PCC). We tend to interpret the result as follows: Micronuclei that are in the G1 phase of their cell cycles are accumulated at the G1/S border or in the early S phase of their cell cycles under the influence of the inhibitors of the DNA synthesis. Micronuclei blocked in this way cannot be induced to undergo PCC and seem to disappear from the cells.

  9. The effects of sex, age and cigarette smoking on micronucleus and degenerative nuclear alteration frequencies in human buccal cells of healthy Bosnian subjects

    OpenAIRE

    Hilada Nefić; Jasmin Mušanović; Kemajl Kurteshi; Enida Prutina; Elvira Turcalo

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: This study was performed to establish a baseline value of micronucleus frequency in buccal cells and to estimate the impact of the most common factors (sex and age, and smoking) on micronucleus and degenerative nuclear alteration frequencies in the sample of healthy Bosnian subjects.Methods: The Buccal Micronucleus Cytome (BMCyt) assay, based on scoring not only micronucleus frequency but also other genome damage markers, dead or degenerated cells, provides a measure of cytotoxi...

  10. Genetic alterations on chromosome 16 and 17 are important features of ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast and are associated with histologic type

    OpenAIRE

    Vos, C B J; Haar, N.T. ter; Rosenberg, C; Peterse, J L; Cleton-Jansen, A-M; Cornelisse, C. J.; Vijver, M J van de

    1999-01-01

    We analysed the involvement of known and putative tumour suppressor- and oncogene loci in ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) by microsatellite analysis (LOH), Southern blotting and comparative genomic hybridization (CGH). A total of 78 pure DCIS cases, classified histologically as well, intermediately and poorly differentiated, were examined for LOH with 76 markers dispersed along all chromosome arms. LOH on chromosome 17 was more frequent in poorly differentiated DCIS (70%) compared to well-dif...

  11. Gametocidal chromosomes enhancing chromosome aberration in common wheat induced by 5-azacytidine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, W-Y; Cong, W-W; Shu, Y-J; Wang, D; Xu, G-H; Guo, C-H

    2013-01-01

    The gametocidal (Gc) chromosome from Aegilops spp induces chromosome mutation, which is introduced into common wheat as a tool of chromosome manipulation for genetic improvement. The Gc chromosome functions similar to a restriction-modification system in bacteria, in which DNA methylation is an important regulator. We treated root tips of wheat carrying Gc chromosomes with the hypomethylation agent 5-azacytidine; chromosome breakage and micronuclei were observed in these root tips. The frequency of aberrations differed in wheat containing different Gc chromosomes, suggesting different functions inducing chromosome breakage. Gc chromosome 3C caused the greatest degree of chromosome aberration, while Gc chromosome 3C(SAT) and 2C caused only slight chromosome aberration. Gc chromosome 3C induced different degrees of chromosome aberration in wheat varieties Triticum aestivum var. Chinese Spring and Norin 26, demonstrating an inhibition function in common wheat. PMID:23884766

  12. Altered low frequency oscillations of cortical vessels in patients with cerebrovascular occlusive disease – a NIRS study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DortePhillip

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of cerebral autoregulation by measuring spontaneous oscillations in the low frequency spectrum of cerebral cortical vessels might be a useful tool for assessing risk and investigating different treatment strategies in carotid artery disease (CAD and stroke. Near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS is a non-invasive optical method to investigate regional changes in oxygenated (oxyHb and deoxygenated hemoglobin (deoxyHb in the outermost layers of the cerebral cortex. In the present study we examined oxyHb low frequency oscillations (LFOs, believed to reflect cortical cerebral autoregulation, in 16 patients with both symptomatic carotid occlusive disease and cerebral hypoperfusion in comparison to healthy controls. Each hemisphere was examined with 2 NIRS channels using a 3 cm source detector distance. Arterial blood pressure (ABP was measured via a finger plethysmograph. Using transfer function analysis ABP-oxyHb phase shift and gain as well as inter-hemispheric phase shift and amplitude ratio were assessed. We found that inter-hemispheric amplitude ratio was significantly altered in hypoperfusion patients compared to healthy controls (P= 0.010, because of relatively lower amplitude on the hypoperfusion side. The inter-hemispheric phase shift showed a trend (P = 0.061 towards increased phase shift in hypoperfusion patients compared to controls. We found no statistical difference between hemispheres in hypoperfusion patients for phase shift or gain values. There were no differences between the hypoperfusion side and controls for phase shift or gain values. These preliminary results suggest an impairment of autoregulation in hypoperfusion patients at the cortical level using NIRS.

  13. Prevalencia al nacimiento de aberraciones cromosómicas en el Hospital Clínico de la Universidad de Chile: Período 1990-2001 Frequency of chromosomal aberrations at birth in a University Clinical Hospital

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    Julio Nazer H

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: A cytogenetical study should be performed to every newborn with malformations. If a chromosomal aberration is found, parents must be studied to give an adequate genetic advise. Aim: To study the frequency of chromosomal aberrations in newborns with malformations. Patients and methods: In the Clinical Hospital of the University of Chile all malformations in newborns are registered, as part of the Collaborative Latin American Study of Congenital Malformations (ECLAMC. The frequency of chromosomal aberrations, determined by cytogenetical studies, was determined in newborns with malformations. Results: In the study period, there were 32,214 births. Of these, 2,268 live newborns and 43 stillbirths had malformations. Ninety nine children with malformations had chromosomal aberrations (4.3%. Trisomy 21 was the most common aberration with a rate of 23/10,000 births, followed by trisomy 18 with a rate of 4/10,000 and trisomy 18 with a rate of 1.2/10,000. Ninety four percent of these children were born alive and 16.1% died before discharge from the hospital. The masculinity indexes for Down syndrome and for trisomy 18 were 0.38 and 0.61 respectively. Conclusions: A higher frequency of female gender for trisomy 21 and male gender for trisomy 18 has not been reported previously (Rev Méd Chile 2003; 131: 651-658

  14. The effects of sex, age and cigarette smoking on micronucleus and degenerative nuclear alteration frequencies in human buccal cells of healthy Bosnian subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilada Nefić

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: This study was performed to establish a baseline value of micronucleus frequency in buccal cells and to estimate the impact of the most common factors (sex and age, and smoking on micronucleus and degenerative nuclear alteration frequencies in the sample of healthy Bosnian subjects.Methods: The Buccal Micronucleus Cytome (BMCyt assay, based on scoring not only micronucleus frequency but also other genome damage markers, dead or degenerated cells, provides a measure of cytotoxic and genotoxic effects.Results: Our results showed the baseline buccal micronucleus frequency was 0.135% or 1.35‰, as well as positive correlations between micronucleus frequencies and formations of degenerative nuclear alterations (nuclear buds, karyolytic and karyorrhectic cells. The number of micronuclei in buccal cells was significantly higher in females than in males. There was positive association between the age and frequency of analysed cytogenetic biomarkers. Buccal cell micronuclei and degenerative nuclear alternations were more frequent among cigarette smokers than non-smokers and significantly higher in female smokers than in male smokers. Cytogenetic damages showed significantly positive correlation between intensity of smoking and the number of nuclear alterations. The years of smoking had a significant influence not only on the number of nuclear alterations but also in micronuclei and nuclear buds in buccal cells.Conclusions: The sex influences the number of micronuclei in human buccal cells. The ageing increased the number of micronuclei and other biomarkers of DNA damage. The cigarette smoking significantly increases the frequencies of micronuclei and nuclear buds, pyknotic, karyolytic and karyorrhectic cells.

  15. Chromosomal instability in multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1. Cytogenetic evaluation with DEB test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomassetti, P; Cometa, G; Del Vecchio, E; Baserga, M; Faccioli, P; Bosoni, D; Paolucci, G; Barbara, L

    1995-02-01

    Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN 1) is an autosomal dominant condition with high penetrance and variable expressivity, in which tumors or hyperplasia occur in two or more endocrine organs. Some authors have investigated chromosomal instability in MEN 1 and MEN 2; the results are controversial. Chromosome analyses were performed on lymphocytes from seven patients with MEN 1, four healthy first-degree relatives (three of whom were children), six phenotypically normal volunteers, and three patients with Fanconi's anemia. To evaluate chromosomal instability we analyzed phytohemagglutinin-stimulated lymphocyte cultures with and without diepoxibutane. We observed an increase in the frequency of spontaneous chromosomal alterations in four patients. After the DEB test we found an increase in chromatid breakages, gaps, and exchange figures. These findings support the inclusion of the MEN 1 syndrome among the disorders with "chromosomal instability." PMID:7889502

  16. Alterations in High-Frequency Neuronal Oscillations in a Cynomolgus Macaque Test of Sustained Attention Following NMDA Receptor Antagonism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goonawardena, Anushka V; Heiss, Jaime; Glavis-Bloom, Courtney; Trube, Gerhard; Borroni, Edilio; Alberati, Daniela; Wallace, Tanya L

    2016-04-01

    A growing body of evidence indicates that neuronal oscillations in the gamma frequency range (30-80 Hz) are disturbed in schizophrenic patients during cognitive processes and may represent an endophenotype of the disease. N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonists have been used experimentally to induce schizophrenia-like symptoms including cognitive deficits in animals and humans. Here we characterized neuronal oscillations and event-related potentials (ERPs) in Cynomolgus macaques fully trained to perform a continuous performance test (CPT) in the presence and absence of the NMDA antagonist phencyclidine (PCP). Macaques (n=8) were trained to touch 'target' stimuli and ignore 'distractor' stimuli presented randomly on a touchscreen. Subsequently, all subjects were implanted with epidural EEG electrodes over frontal (FC) and parietal cortices (PC) and later tested under vehicle (saline, i.m.) or acute PCP (0.1-0.3 mg/kg, i.m.) conditions. Compared with vehicle treatment, PCP produced a significant dose-dependent decrease in CPT performance accuracy and increased reaction times. Furthermore, PCP elevated the amplitudes of 'low' (30-50 Hz) and 'high' (51-80 Hz) gamma oscillations in FC and PC around target presentations for all correct responses. The CPT accuracy was inversely correlated with the gamma band amplitude in the presence of PCP. Additionally, PCP delayed the N100 peak latency in FC, and prolonged and suppressed the cognitively relevant P300 component of mean ERPs in FC and PC, respectively. The NMDA receptor antagonist-induced alteration in neuronal oscillations and ERPs may contribute to the observed cognitive deficits in macaques, and enhance our understanding of EEG recordings as a translatable biomarker. PMID:26354045

  17. The Williams syndrome chromosome 7q11.23 hemideletion confers hypersocial, anxious personality coupled with altered insula structure and function

    OpenAIRE

    Jabbi, Mbemba; Kippenhan, J. Shane; Kohn, Philip; Marenco, Stefano; Mervis, Carolyn B.; Morris, Colleen A.; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Berman, Karen Faith

    2012-01-01

    Although it is widely accepted that genes can influence complex behavioral traits such as human temperament, the underlying neurogenetic mechanisms remain unclear. Williams syndrome (WS), a rare disorder caused by a hemizygous deletion on chromosome 7q11.23, including genes important for neuronal migration and maturation (LIMK1 and CLIP2), is typified by a remarkable hypersocial but anxious personality and offers a unique opportunity to investigate this open issue. Based on the documented rol...

  18. Sex chromosome aneuploidy in cytogenetic findings of referral patients from south of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Najmeh Jouyan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chromosome abnormality (CA including Sex chromosomes abnormality (SCAs is one of the most important causes of disordered sexual development and infertility. SCAs formed by numerical or structural alteration in X and Y chromosomes, are the most frequently CA encountered at both prenatal diagnosis and at birth. Objective: This study describes cytogenetic findings of cases suspected with CA referred for cytogenetic study. Materials and Methods: Blood samples of 4151 patients referred for cytogenetic analysis were cultured for chromosome preparation. Karyotypes were prepared for all samples and G-Banded chromosomes were analyzed using x100 objective lens. Sex chromosome aneuploidy cases were analyzed and categorized in two groups of Turners and Klinefelter’s syndrome (KFS. Results: Out of 230 (5.54% cases with chromosomally abnormal karyotype, 122 (30% cases suspected of sexual disorder showed SCA including 46% Turner’s syndrome, 46% KFS and the remaining other sex chromosome abnormalities. The frequency of classic and mosaic form of Turner’s syndrome was 33% and 67%, this was 55% and 45% for KFS, respectively. Conclusion: This study shows a relatively high sex chromosome abnormality in this region and provides cytogenetic data to assist clinicians and genetic counselors to determine the priority of requesting cytogenetic study. Differences between results from various reports can be due to different genetic background or ethnicity.

  19. 泰国少精无精不育男性中Y染色体微缺失和染色体异常的发病率%Frequency of Y chromosome microdeletions and chromosomal abnormalities in infertile Thai men with oligozoospermia and azoospermia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    T.Vutyavanich; W.Piromlertamorn; W.Sirirungsi; S.Sirisukkasem

    2007-01-01

    Aim:To investigate the possible causes of oligozoospermia and azoospermia in infertile Thai men, and to find the frequencies of Y chromosome microdeletions and cytogenetic abnormalities in this group. Methods: From June 2003 to November 2005, 50 azoospermic and 80 oligozoospermic men were enrolled in the study. A detailed history was taken for each man, followed by general and genital examinations. Y chromosome microdeletions were detected by multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using 11 gene-specific primers that covered all three regions of the azoospermic factor (AZFa, AZFb and AZFc). Fifty men with normal semen analysis were also studied. Karyotyping was done with the standard G- and Q-banding. Serum concentrations of follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), prolactin (PRL) and testosterone were measured by electrochemiluminescence immunoassays (ECLIA). Results: Azoospermia and oligozoospermia could be explained by previous orchitis in 22.3%, former bilateral cryptorchidism in 19.2%, abnormal karyotypes in 4.6% and Y chromosome microdeletions in 3.8% of the subjects. The most frequent deletions were in the AZFc region (50%), followed by AZFb (33%) and AZFbc (17%).No significant difference was detected in hormonal profiles of infertile men, with or without microdeletions.Conclusion: The frequencies of Y chromosome microdeletions and cytogenetic abnormalities in oligozoospermic and azoospermic Thai men are comparable with similarly infertile men from other Asian and Western countries.

  20. Frequency-dependent brain regional homogeneity alterations in patients with mild cognitive impairment during working memory state relative to resting state

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    Pengyun eWang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Several studies have reported working memory deficits in patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI. However, previous studies investigating the neural mechanisms of MCI have primarily focused on brain activity alterations during working memory tasks. No study to date has compared brain network alterations in the working memory state between MCI patients and normal control subjects. Therefore, using the index of regional homogeneity (ReHo, we explored brain network impairments in MCI patients during a working memory task relative to the resting state, and identified frequency-dependent effects in separate frequency bands.Our results indicate that, in MCI patients, ReHo is altered in the posterior cingulate cortex in the slow-3 band (0.073–0.198 Hz, and in the bottom of the right occipital lobe and part of the right cerebellum, the right thalamus, a diffusing region in the bilateral prefrontal cortex, the left and right parietal-occipital regions, and the right angular gyrus in the slow-5 band (0.01–0.027 Hz. Furthermore, in normal controls, the value of ReHo in clusters belonging to the default mode network decreased, while the value of ReHo in clusters belonging to the attentional network increased during the task state. However, this pattern was reversed in MCI patients, and was associated with decreased working memory performance. In addition, we identified altered functional connectivity of the abovementioned regions with other parts of the brain in MCI patients.This is the first study to compare frequency-dependent alterations of ReHo in MCI patients between resting and working memory states. The results provide a new perspective regarding the neural mechanisms of working memory deficits in MCI patients, and extend our knowledge of altered brain patterns in resting and task-evoked states.

  1. Comparative evaluation of changes in the absorbed doses of neutron radiation and chromosome aberration frequency in human blood lymphocytes by a water phantom depth during irradiation with a medico-biological beam at the BR-10 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Distribution of the chromosome aberration frequency in human blood lymphocyte samples and absorbed doses have been compared by the water phantom depth during irradiation with 1.5 Gy neutrons (mean energy of 0.85 MeV). There is a good concordance of their depth distribution. The half-fall layer of the absorbed dose within the tissue-equivalent medium is similar (∼ 5 cm) with both measurements done. The aberration frequency in the biological samples placed outside the radiation field in the phantom increases which indicates that the neutron beem bounds are indistinct upon passing the tissue-equivalent medium

  2. A novel balanced chromosomal translocation found in subjects with schizophrenia and schizotypal personality disorder: Altered L-serine level associated with disruption of PSAT1 gene expression

    OpenAIRE

    Ozeki, Yuji; Pickard, Benjamin S; Kano, Shin-ichi; Malloy, Mary P.; Zeledon, Mariela; SUN, DANIEL Q.; Fujii, Kumiko; Wakui, Keiko; Shirayama, Yukihiko; Fukushima, Yoshimitsu; Kunugi, Hiroshi; Hashimoto, Kenji; Muir, Walter J; Blackwood, Douglas H; Sawa, Akira

    2011-01-01

    L-Serine is required for the synthesis of glycine and D-serine, both of which are NMDA receptor coagonists. Although roles for D-serine and glycine have been suggested in schizophrenia, little is known about the role of the L-serine synthesizing cascade in schizophrenia or related psychiatric conditions. Here we report a patient with schizophrenia carrying a balanced chromosomal translocation with the breakpoints localized to 3q13.12 and 9q21.2. We examined this proband and her son with schiz...

  3. Transient Microgeographic Clines during B Chromosome Invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camacho, Juan Pedro M; Shaw, Michael W; Cabrero, Josefa; Bakkali, Mohammed; Ruíz-Estévez, Mercedes; Ruíz-Ruano, Francisco J; Martín-Blázquez, Rubén; López-León, María Dolores

    2015-11-01

    The near-neutral model of B chromosome evolution predicts that the invasion of a new population should last some tens of generations, but the details on how it proceeds in real populations are mostly unknown. Trying to fill this gap, we analyze here a natural population of the grasshopper Eyprepocnemis plorans at three time points during the last 35 years. Our results show that B chromosome frequency increased significantly during this period and that a cline observed in 1992 had disappeared in 2012 once B chromosome frequency reached an upper limit at all sites sampled. This indicates that, during B chromosome invasion, transient clines for B chromosome frequency are formed at the invasion front on a microgeographic scale. Computer simulation experiments showed that the pattern of change observed for genotypic frequencies is consistent with the existence of B chromosome drive through females and selection against individuals with a high number of B chromosomes. PMID:26655780

  4. Association of a Chromosomal Rearrangement Event with Mouse Posterior Polymorphous Corneal Dystrophy and Alterations in Csrp2bp, Dzank1, and Ovol2 Gene Expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna L Shen

    Full Text Available We have previously described a mouse model of human posterior polymorphous corneal dystrophy (PPCD and localized the causative mutation to a 6.2 Mbp region of chromosome 2, termed Ppcd1. We now show that the gene rearrangement linked to mouse Ppcd1 is a 3.9 Mbp chromosomal inversion flanked by 81 Kbp and 542 bp deletions. This recombination event leads to deletion of Csrp2bp Exons 8 through 11, Dzank1 Exons 20 and 21, and the pseudogene Znf133. In addition, we identified translocation of novel downstream sequences to positions adjacent to Csrp2bp Exon 7 and Dzank1 Exon 20. Twelve novel fusion transcripts involving Csrp2bp or Dzank1 linked to downstream sequences have been identified. Eight are expressed at detectable levels in PPCD1 but not wildtype eyes. Upregulation of two Csrp2bp fusion transcripts, as well as upregulation of the adjacent gene, Ovol2, was observed. Absence of the PPCD1 phenotype in animals haploinsufficient for Csrp2bp or both Csrp2bp and Dzank1 rules out haploinsufficiency of these genes as a cause of mouse PPCD1. Complementation experiments confirm that PPCD1 embryonic lethality is due to disruption of Csrp2bp expression. The ocular expression pattern of Csrp2bp is consistent with a role for this protein in corneal development and pathogenesis of PPCD1.

  5. Altered Cortical Responsiveness to Pain Stimuli after High Frequency Electrical Stimulation of the Skin in Patients with Persistent Pain after Inguinal Hernia Repair

    OpenAIRE

    Broeke, E.N. van den; Koeslag, L.; Arendsen, L.J.; Nienhuijs, S.W.; Rosman, C.; van Rijn, C.M.

    2013-01-01

    Background High Frequency electrical Stimulation (HFS) of the skin induces enhanced brain responsiveness expressed as enhanced Event-Related Potential (ERP) N1 amplitude to stimuli applied to the surrounding unconditioned skin in healthy volunteers. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether this enhanced ERP N1 amplitude could be a potential marker for altered cortical sensory processing in patients with persistent pain after surgery. Materials and Methods Nineteen male patients...

  6. Altered Cortical Responsiveness to Pain Stimuli after High Frequency Electrical Stimulation of the Skin in Patients with Persistent Pain after Inguinal Hernia Repair

    OpenAIRE

    van den Broeke, Emanuel N; Lonneke Koeslag; Arendsen, Laura J.; Nienhuijs, Simon W; Camiel Rosman; van Rijn, Clementina M.; Oliver H G Wilder-Smith; Harry van Goor

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: High Frequency electrical Stimulation (HFS) of the skin induces enhanced brain responsiveness expressed as enhanced Event-Related Potential (ERP) N1 amplitude to stimuli applied to the surrounding unconditioned skin in healthy volunteers. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether this enhanced ERP N1 amplitude could be a potential marker for altered cortical sensory processing in patients with persistent pain after surgery. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Nineteen male patien...

  7. Altered cortical responsiveness to pain stimuli after high frequency electrical stimulation of the skin in patients with persistent pain after inguinal hernia repair

    OpenAIRE

    Broeke, E.N. van den; Koeslag, L.; Arendsen, L.J.; Nienhuijs, S.W.; Rosman, C.; Rijn, C.M. van; Wilder-Smith, O.H.G.; van Goor, H.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: High Frequency electrical Stimulation (HFS) of the skin induces enhanced brain responsiveness expressed as enhanced Event-Related Potential (ERP) N1 amplitude to stimuli applied to the surrounding unconditioned skin in healthy volunteers. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether this enhanced ERP N1 amplitude could be a potential marker for altered cortical sensory processing in patients with persistent pain after surgery. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Nineteen male patien...

  8. The TP53 dependence of radiation-induced chromosome instability in human lymphoblastoid cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Jeffrey L.; Jordan, Robert; Evans, Helen H.; Lenarczyk, Marek; Liber, Howard

    2003-01-01

    The dose and TP53 dependence for the induction of chromosome instability were examined in cells of three human lymphoblastoid cell lines derived from WIL2 cells: TK6, a TP53-normal cell line, NH32, a TP53-knockout created from TK6, and WTK1, a WIL2-derived cell line that spontaneously developed a TP53 mutation. Cells of each cell line were exposed to (137)Cs gamma rays, and then surviving clones were isolated and expanded in culture for approximately 35 generations before the frequency and characteristics of the instability were analyzed. The presence of dicentric chromosomes, formed by end-to-end fusions, served as a marker of chromosomal instability. Unexposed TK6 cells had low levels of chromosomal instability (0.002 +/- 0.001 dicentrics/cell). Exposure of TK6 cells to doses as low as 5 cGy gamma rays increased chromosome instability levels nearly 10-fold to 0.019 +/- 0.008 dicentrics/cell. There was no further increase in instability levels beyond 5 cGy. In contrast to TK6 cells, unexposed cultures of WTK1 and NH32 cells had much higher levels of chromosome instability of 0.034 +/- 0.007 and 0.041 +/- 0.009, respectively, but showed little if any effect of radiation on levels of chromosome instability. The results suggest that radiation exposure alters the normal TP53-dependent cell cycle checkpoint controls that recognize alterations in telomere structure and activate apoptosis.

  9. Genome-wide significant schizophrenia risk variation on chromosome 10q24 is associated with altered cis-regulation of BORCS7, AS3MT, and NT5C2 in the human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, Rodrigo R R; Troakes, Claire; Nolan, Matthew; Srivastava, Deepak P; Murray, Robin M; Bray, Nicholas J

    2016-09-01

    Chromosome 10q24.32-q24.33 is one of the most robustly supported risk loci to emerge from genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of schizophrenia. However, extensive linkage disequilibrium makes it difficult to distinguish the actual susceptibility gene(s) at the locus, limiting its value for improving biological understanding of the condition. In the absence of coding changes that can account for the association, risk is likely conferred by altered regulation of one or more genes in the region. We, therefore, used highly sensitive measures of allele-specific expression to assess cis-regulatory effects associated with the two best-supported schizophrenia risk variants (SNP rs11191419 and indel ch10_104957618_I/rs202213518) on the primary positional candidates BORCS7, AS3MT, CNNM2, and NT5C2 in the human brain. Heterozygosity at rs11191419 was associated with increased allelic expression of BORCS7 and AS3MT in the fetal and adult brain, and with reduced allelic expression of NT5C2 in the adult brain. Heterozygosity at ch10_104957618_I was associated with reduced allelic expression of NT5C2 in both the fetal and adult brain. Comparisons between cDNA ratios in heterozygotes and homozygotes for the risk alleles indicated that cis-effects on NT5C2 expression in the adult dorsolateral prefrontal cortex could be largely accounted for by genotype at these two risk variants. While not excluding effects on other genes in the region, this study implicates altered neural expression of BORCS7, AS3MT, and NT5C2 in susceptibility to schizophrenia arising from genetic variation at the chromosome 10q24 locus. © 2016 The Authors. American Journal of Medical Genetics Part B: Neuropsychiatric Genetics Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27004590

  10. Genome‐wide significant schizophrenia risk variation on chromosome 10q24 is associated with altered cis‐regulation of BORCS7, AS3MT, and NT5C2 in the human brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, Rodrigo R. R.; Troakes, Claire; Nolan, Matthew; Srivastava, Deepak P.; Murray, Robin M.

    2016-01-01

    Chromosome 10q24.32‐q24.33 is one of the most robustly supported risk loci to emerge from genome‐wide association studies (GWAS) of schizophrenia. However, extensive linkage disequilibrium makes it difficult to distinguish the actual susceptibility gene(s) at the locus, limiting its value for improving biological understanding of the condition. In the absence of coding changes that can account for the association, risk is likely conferred by altered regulation of one or more genes in the region. We, therefore, used highly sensitive measures of allele‐specific expression to assess cis‐regulatory effects associated with the two best‐supported schizophrenia risk variants (SNP rs11191419 and indel ch10_104957618_I/rs202213518) on the primary positional candidates BORCS7, AS3MT, CNNM2, and NT5C2 in the human brain. Heterozygosity at rs11191419 was associated with increased allelic expression of BORCS7 and AS3MT in the fetal and adult brain, and with reduced allelic expression of NT5C2 in the adult brain. Heterozygosity at ch10_104957618_I was associated with reduced allelic expression of NT5C2 in both the fetal and adult brain. Comparisons between cDNA ratios in heterozygotes and homozygotes for the risk alleles indicated that cis‐effects on NT5C2 expression in the adult dorsolateral prefrontal cortex could be largely accounted for by genotype at these two risk variants. While not excluding effects on other genes in the region, this study implicates altered neural expression of BORCS7, AS3MT, and NT5C2 in susceptibility to schizophrenia arising from genetic variation at the chromosome 10q24 locus. © 2016 The Authors. American Journal of Medical Genetics Part B: Neuropsychiatric Genetics Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27004590

  11. Three-dimensional genome architecture influences partner selection for chromosomal translocations in human disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesse M Engreitz

    Full Text Available Chromosomal translocations are frequent features of cancer genomes that contribute to disease progression. These rearrangements result from formation and illegitimate repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs, a process that requires spatial colocalization of chromosomal breakpoints. The "contact first" hypothesis suggests that translocation partners colocalize in the nuclei of normal cells, prior to rearrangement. It is unclear, however, the extent to which spatial interactions based on three-dimensional genome architecture contribute to chromosomal rearrangements in human disease. Here we intersect Hi-C maps of three-dimensional chromosome conformation with collections of 1,533 chromosomal translocations from cancer and germline genomes. We show that many translocation-prone pairs of regions genome-wide, including the cancer translocation partners BCR-ABL and MYC-IGH, display elevated Hi-C contact frequencies in normal human cells. Considering tissue specificity, we find that translocation breakpoints reported in human hematologic malignancies have higher Hi-C contact frequencies in lymphoid cells than those reported in sarcomas and epithelial tumors. However, translocations from multiple tissue types show significant correlation with Hi-C contact frequencies, suggesting that both tissue-specific and universal features of chromatin structure contribute to chromosomal alterations. Our results demonstrate that three-dimensional genome architecture shapes the landscape of rearrangements directly observed in human disease and establish Hi-C as a key method for dissecting these effects.

  12. High frequencies of Y chromosome lineages characterized by E3b1, DYS19-11, DYS392-12 in Somali males

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sanchez Sanchez, Juan Jose; Hallenberg, Charlotte; Børsting, Claus;

    2005-01-01

    We genotyped 45 biallelic markers and 11 STR systems on the Y chromosome in 201 male Somalis. In addition, 65 sub-Saharan Western Africans, 59 Turks and 64 Iraqis were typed for the biallelic Y chromosome markers. In Somalis, 14 Y chromosome haplogroups were identified including E3b1 (77.6%) and K2...... (10.4%). The haplogroup E3b1 with the rare DYS19-11 allele (also called the E3b1 cluster gamma) was found in 75.1% of male Somalis, and 70.6% of Somali Y chromosomes were E3b1, DYS19-11, DYS392-12, DYS437-14, DYS438-11 and DYS393-13. The haplotype diversity of eight Y-STRs ('minimal haplotype') was 0.......9575 compared to an average of 0.9974 and 0.9996 in European and Asian populations. In sub-Saharan Western Africans, only four haplogroups were identified. The West African clade E3a was found in 89.2% of the samples and the haplogroup E3b1 was not observed. In Turks, 12 haplogroups were found including J2*(xJ2...

  13. Molecular genetic approach to human meningioma: loss of genes on chromosome 22

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seizinger, B.R.; De La Monte, S.; Atkins, L.; Gusella, J.F.; Martuza, R.L.

    1987-08-01

    A molecular genetic approach employing polymorphic DNA markers has been used to investigate the role of chromosomal aberrations in meningioma, one of the most common tumors of the human nervous system. Comparison of the alleles detected by DNA markers in tumor DNA versus DNA from normal tissue revealed chromosomal alterations present in primary surgical specimens. In agreement with cytogenetic studies of cultured meningiomas, the most frequent alteration detected was loss of heterozygosity on chromosome 22. Forty of 51 patients were constitutionally heterozygous for at least one chromosome 22 DNA marker. Seventeen of the 40 constitutionally heterozygotic patients (43%) displayed hemizygosity for the corresponding marker in their meningioma tumor tissues. Loss of heterozygosity was also detected at a significantly lower frequency for markers on several other autosomes. In view of the striking association between acoustic neuroma and meningioma in bilateral acoustic neurofibromatosis and the discovery that acoustic neuromas display specific loss of genes on chromosome 22, the authors propose that a common mechanism involving chromosome 22 is operative in the development of both tumor types. Fine-structure mapping to reveal partial deletions in meningiomas may provide the means to clone and characterize a gene (or genes) of importance for tumorigenesis in this and possibly other clinically associated tumors of the human nervous system.

  14. Meiotic abnormalities in metaphase I human spermatocytes from infertile males: frequencies, chromosomes involved, and the relationships with polymorphic karyotype and seminal parameters

    OpenAIRE

    Zaida Sarrate; Francesca Vidal; Joan Blanco

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to look in depth at the relationship between meiotic anomalies and male infertility, such as the determination of the chromosomes involved or the correlation with patient features. For this purpose, a total of 31 testicular tissue samples from individuals consulting for fertility problems were analyzed. Metaphase I cells were evaluated using a sequential methodology combining Leishman stained procedures and multiplex fluorescence in situ hybridization protocols. The ...

  15. γ-radiation induced chromosomal aberrations and alteration of gene expression in human peripheral blood lymphocyte show good correlation: implications in molecular biodosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humans are at risk of exposure to ionizing radiation due to professional, diagnostic and therapeutic exposures. In addition, large scale exposures triggered either accidentally or by natural calamities or due to perceived terrorist threats are also possible. The median lethal dose of radiation (LD50/60, without medical intervention) for humans is quite low and is estimated to be 4.5 Gy. Due to this, it is imperative that biological dosimetry is conducted on all exposed or suspected-to-be exposed human population in shortest possible time for triage and appropriate medical intervention to save precious human lives. The 'gold standard' of contemporary biological dosimetry is dicentric assay (DCA) wherein dicentrics on chromosomes of human peripheral blood lymphocytes (HPBL) exposed to radiation is measured. At the present time it is considered as the reliable biomarkers of radiation exposure. However, DCA suffers from methodological limitation making applications of the technique practically impossible for a large number of samples in short time. In order to overcome this limitation of DCA, it is important to look for molecular biomarker of radiation exposure. In this study, it is our endeavor, to identify genes which correlate with radiation exposure to develop a reliable and sensitive molecular biodosimeter. Fresh human blood was exposed to 0.5, 1 and 2 of γ-rays (5.5 Gy min-1) and immediately subjected to DCA as well as DNA Microarray (Affymetrix Platform) and quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR). DNA Microarray revealed 20 early radiation response genes (RRGs) in HPBL exposed to γ-rays. Out of these, 8 genes, which showed dose response relationships, have been validated by qPCR at 0 and 24 h post-irradiation incubation periods using GAPDH and 18 S genes as normalizers. Simultaneous linear regression analysis of dose dependent DCA was performed for each gene, which exhibited good correlation. We do, however, see influence of inter-individual variability

  16. Genotoxic effect of copper on salivary gland polytene chromosomes of Chironomus riparius Meigen 1804 (Diptera, Chironomidae)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The genotoxic action of copper (Cu) on the polytene chromosomes of Chironomus riparius was investigated by analysing structural and functional chromosome aberrations of fourth instars larvae hatched from eggs subject to acute (48 h) exposure with three environmentally relevant concentrations of aqueous Cu (0.005, 0.01, 0.05 mg/l). A dose dependent relationship was observed between Cu concentration and frequency of chromosomal aberrations. A significantly higher frequency of functional alterations, specifically decondensed centromeres and telomeres, and reduction in activity of Balbiani rings, was observed in treated material compared to control. A comparison of breakpoints resulting from treatment with chromium and lead from earlier studies with those Cu-induced identified a series of chromosomal weak points particularly vulnerable to trace metals. We also show that the appearance of structural and functional chromosome aberrations are more sensitive indicators of acute Cu toxicity in chironomid larvae than changes in external morphology. - Acute exposure of Chironomus eggs to copper resulted in changes in chromosome structure and function

  17. Genotoxic effect of copper on salivary gland polytene chromosomes of Chironomus riparius Meigen 1804 (Diptera, Chironomidae)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michailova, P. [Institute of Zoology, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, 1 Tzar Osvoboditel boul., Sofia 1000 (Bulgaria)]. E-mail: michailova@zoology.bas.bg; Petrova, N. [Institute of Zoology, Russian Academy of Sciences, St. Petersburg, 199034, Universit. nab. 1, Russia (Russian Federation); Ilkova, J. [Institute of Zoology, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, 1 Tzar Osvoboditel boul., Sofia 1000 (Bulgaria); Bovero, S. [Department of Animal Biology, University of Turin, via Albertina 13, Turin (Italy); Brunetti, S. [Department of Animal Biology, University of Turin, via Albertina 13, Turin (Italy); White, K. [School of Biological Sciences, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PT (United Kingdom); Sella, G. [Department of Animal Biology, University of Turin, via Albertina 13, Turin (Italy)

    2006-11-15

    The genotoxic action of copper (Cu) on the polytene chromosomes of Chironomus riparius was investigated by analysing structural and functional chromosome aberrations of fourth instars larvae hatched from eggs subject to acute (48 h) exposure with three environmentally relevant concentrations of aqueous Cu (0.005, 0.01, 0.05 mg/l). A dose dependent relationship was observed between Cu concentration and frequency of chromosomal aberrations. A significantly higher frequency of functional alterations, specifically decondensed centromeres and telomeres, and reduction in activity of Balbiani rings, was observed in treated material compared to control. A comparison of breakpoints resulting from treatment with chromium and lead from earlier studies with those Cu-induced identified a series of chromosomal weak points particularly vulnerable to trace metals. We also show that the appearance of structural and functional chromosome aberrations are more sensitive indicators of acute Cu toxicity in chironomid larvae than changes in external morphology. - Acute exposure of Chironomus eggs to copper resulted in changes in chromosome structure and function.

  18. Synthetic chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindler, Daniel; Waldminghaus, Torsten

    2015-11-01

    What a living organism looks like and how it works and what are its components-all this is encoded on DNA, the genetic blueprint. Consequently, the way to change an organism is to change its genetic information. Since the first pieces of recombinant DNA have been used to transform cells in the 1970s, this approach has been enormously extended. Bigger and bigger parts of the genetic information have been exchanged or added over the years. Now we are at a point where the construction of entire chromosomes becomes a reachable goal and first examples appear. This development leads to fundamental new questions, for example, about what is possible and desirable to build or what construction rules one needs to follow when building synthetic chromosomes. Here we review the recent progress in the field, discuss current challenges and speculate on the appearance of future synthetic chromosomes. PMID:26111960

  19. Altered low frequency oscillations of cortical vessels in patients with cerebrovascular occlusive disease – a NIRS study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Phillip, Dorte; Iversen, Helle K; Schytz, Henrik W;

    2013-01-01

    Analysis of cerebral autoregulation by measuring spontaneous oscillations in the low frequency spectrum of cerebral cortical vessels might be a useful tool for assessing risk and investigating different treatment strategies in carotid artery disease and stroke. Near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is...... patients with both symptomatic carotid occlusive disease and cerebral hypoperfusion in comparison to healthy controls. Each hemisphere was examined with two NIRS channels using a 3 cm source detector distance. Arterial blood pressure (ABP) was measured via a finger plethysmograph. Using transfer function...

  20. Treatment with anti-OX40L or anti-TSLP does not alter the frequency of T regulatory cells in allergic asthmatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baatjes, A J; Smith, S G; Dua, B; Watson, R; Gauvreau, G M; O'Byrne, P M

    2015-11-01

    OX40-OX40L interactions and thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) are important in the induction and maintenance of Th2 responses in allergic disease, whereas T regulatory cells (Treg) have been shown to suppress pro-inflammatory Th2 responses. Both OX40L and TSLP have been implicated in the negative regulation of Treg. The effect of anti-asthma therapies on Treg is not well known. Our aim was to assess the effects of two monoclonal antibody therapies (anti-OX40L and anti-TSLP) on Treg frequency using a human model of allergic asthma. We hypothesized that the anti-inflammatory effects of these therapies would result in an increase in circulating Treg (CD4(+) CD25(+) CD127(low) Foxp3(+) cells) frequency. We measured Treg using flow cytometry, and our results showed that neither allergen challenge nor monoclonal antibody therapy altered circulating Treg frequency. These data highlight the need for assessment of airway Treg and for a more complete understanding of Treg biology so as to develop pharmacologics/biologics that modulate Treg for asthma therapy. PMID:26213896

  1. Sequence analysis of the MYC oncogene involved in the t(8;14)(q24;q11) chromosome translocation in a human leukemia T-cell line indicates that putative regulatory regions are not altered

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors cloned the translocation-associated and homologous normal MYC alleles from SKW-3, a leukemia T-cell line with the t(8; 14)(q24; q11) translocation, and determined the sequence of the MYC oncogene first exon and flanking 5' putative regulatory regions. S1 nuclease protection experiments utilizing a MYC first exon probe demonstrated transcriptional deregulation of the MYC gene associated with the T-cell receptor α locus on the 8q + chromosome of SKW-3 cells. Nucleotide sequence analysis of the translocation-associated (8q +) MYC allele identified a single base substitution within the upstream flanking region; the homologous nontranslocated allele contained an additional substitution and a two-base deletion. None of the deletions or substitutions localized to putative 5' regulatory regions. The MYC first exon sequence was germ line in both alleles. These results demonstrate that alterations within the putative 5' MYC regulatory regions are not necessarily involved in MYC deregulation in T-cell leukemias, and they show that juxtaposition of the T-cell receptor α locus to a germ-line MYC oncogene results in MYC deregulation

  2. Retrospective dosimetry using chromosome painting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chromosome aberration frequency measured in peripheral lymphocytes of persons exposed to ionizing radiation has been used since 1960s for dose assessment. Suspected overexposure is usually evaluated by the frequency of dicentrics and centric rings using an appropriate in vitro calibration curve. However, these chromosome aberrations are unstable with time after exposure and dose reconstruction may encounter uncertainties when the time between the exposure and the analysis is considerable or even unknown. It appears that translocations persist with time after exposure and may be used as an indication of acute past overexposures. Moreover, they appear to accumulate the cytogenetical information, which correlates with the dose received under fractionated, chronic or even occupational exposure conditions. Translocations may be detected using G-banding, which allows to score the total amount of radiation induced translocations but it is a time consuming method, or by Chromosome Painting, a method base on the Fluorescence in situ Hybridization (FISH) technique, painting only some chromosome pairs with specific whole chromosome probes and then extrapolating the observed translocation frequencies to the full genome. The latter method allows a faster aberration scoring than G-banding and appears to be the most promissory tool for biodosimetry, particularly when it is necessary to assess low doses and consequently to score a large number of metaphases, e.g. radiation workers exposed within dose limits. As with the unstable chromosome aberration, it is necessary an in vitro calibration curve based on the frequency of stable chromosome aberrations to assess doses. Our laboratory performed calibration curves for Co60 γ-rays based on the frequencies of unstable (dicentrics and centric rings detected by conventional Giemsa staining) and stable chromosome aberrations (translocations and inversions, detected by G-banding). In order to minimize the interlaboratory variability, we

  3. An evaluation of the performance of HapMap SNP data in a Shanghai Chinese population: Analyses of allele frequency, linkage disequilibrium pattern and tagging SNPs transferability on chromosome 1q21-q25

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Jie

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The HapMap project aimed to catalog millions of common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in the human genome in four major populations, in order to facilitate association studies of complex diseases. To examine the transferability of Han Chinese in Beijing HapMap data to the Southern Han Chinese in Shanghai, we performed comparative analyses between genotypes from over 4,500 SNPs in a 21 Mb region on chromosome 1q21-q25 in 80 unrelated Shanghai Chinese and 45 HapMap Chinese data. Results Three thousand and forty-two SNPs were analyzed after removal of SNPs that failed quality control and those not in the HapMap panel. We compared the allele frequency distributions, linkage disequilibrium patterns, haplotype frequency distributions and tagging SNP sets transferability between the HapMap population and Shanghai Chinese population. Among the four HapMap populations, Beijing Chinese showed the best correlation with Shanghai population on allele frequencies, linkage disequilibrium and haplotype frequencies. Tagging SNP sets selected from four HapMap populations at different thresholds were evaluated in the Shanghai sample. Under the threshold of r2 equal to 0.8 or 0.5, both HapMap Chinese and Japanese data showed better coverage and tagging efficiency than Caucasian and African data. Conclusion Our study supported the applicability of HapMap Beijing Chinese SNP data to the study of complex diseases among southern Chinese population.

  4. The buccal cytome and micronucleus frequency is substantially altered in Down's syndrome and normal ageing compared to young healthy controls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The buccal micronucleus cytome assay was used to investigate biomarkers for DNA damage, cell death and basal cell frequency in buccal cells of healthy young, healthy old and young Down's syndrome cohorts. With normal ageing a significant increase in cells with micronuclei (P < 0.05, average increase +366%), karyorrhectic cells (P < 0.001, average increase +439%), condensed chromatin cells (P < 0.01, average increase +45.8%) and basal cells (P < 0.001, average increase +233%) is reported relative to young controls. In Down's syndrome we report a significant increase in cells with micronuclei (P < 0.001, average increase +733%) and binucleated cells (P < 0.001, average increase +84.5%) and a significant decrease in condensed chromatin cells (P < 0.01, average decrease -52%), karyolytic cells (P < 0.001, average decrease -51.8%) and pyknotic cells (P < 0.001, average decrease -75.0%) relative to young controls. These changes show distinct differences between the cytome profile of normal ageing relative to that for a premature ageing syndrome, and highlight the diagnostic value of the cytome approach for measuring the profile of cells with DNA damage, cell death and proportion of cells with proliferative potential (i.e., basal cells). Significant correlations amongst cell death biomarkers observed in this study were used to propose a new model of the inter-relationship of cell types scored within the buccal micronucleus cytome assay. This study validates the use of a cytome approach to investigate DNA damage, cell death and cell proliferation in buccal cells with ageing

  5. Mutagenesis by site-specific arylamine adducts in plasmid DNA: Enhancing replication of the adducted strand alters mutation frequency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Site specifically modified plasmids were used to determine the mutagenic effects of single arylamine adducts in bacterial cells. A synthetic heptadecamer bearing a single N-(guanin-8-yl)-2-aminofluorene (AF) or N-(guanin-8-yl)-2-(acetylamino)fluorene (AAF) adduct was used to introduce the adducts into a specific site in plasmid DNA that contained a 17-base single-stranded region complementary to the modified oligonucleotide. Following transformation of bacterial cells with the adduct-bearing DNA, putative mutants were detected by colony hybridization techniques that allowed unbiased detection of all mutations at or near the site of the adduct. The site-specific AF or AAF adducts were also placed into plasmid DNA that contained uracil residues on the strand opposite that bearing the lesions. The presence of uracil in one strand of the DNA decreases the ability of the bacterial replication system to use the uracil-containing strand, thereby favoring the use of the strand bearing the adducts. In a comparison of the results obtained with site specifically modified DNA, either with or without uracil, the presence of the uracil increased the mutation frequencies of the AF adduct by >7-fold to 2.9% and of the AAF adduct by >12-fold to 0.75%. The AF adduct produced primarily single-base deletions in the absence of uracil but only base substitutions in the uracil-containing constructs. The AAF adduct produced mutations only in the uracil-containing DNA, which included both frame shifts and base substitutions. Mutations produced by both adducts were SOS dependent

  6. Appearance and evolution of the specific chromosomal rearrangements associated with malignant transformation of mouse m5S cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chromosomal alterations were studied during the acquisition of malignant phenotypes in two karyotypically distinct cells isolated from transformed foci induced by x-irradiation in mouse m5S cells. Because the transformants, despite foci origin, showed low ability to grow in agar, they were cultured in vitro with serial transfer schedules to allow further cell generations and assayed for anchorage independence (AI) at each passage level. The AI frequency increased with the cell doubling numbers. Chromosome analysis showed that a focus was one cell origin, but the transformants showed karyotypic instability during cell proliferation, giving rise to the rearrangements clustered in the distal region of the specific chromosomes. These rearrangements appeared to be directed toward the acquisition of malignant phenotypes. Analysis of the types and sites of rearrangements indicated that a mechanism exists that induces frequent rearrangements of the specific region of a chromosome during the process of transformation into the malignant state

  7. Influence of preliminary chronic irradiation and treatment with. cap alpha. -tocopherol on the frequency of chromosome aberrations in mouse bone marrow cells induced by acute. gamma. -irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aliev, A.A.; Akhundov, V.Yu.; Alekperov, U.K.; Gamzaeva, I.A.; Asadova, A.I.; Shekhtman, A.B.; Gabaj, N.S. (AN Azerbajdzhanskoj SSR, Baku. Inst. Botaniki)

    The incidence of chromosome aberrations in bone marrow cells of femur did not exceed the spontaneous one in CBA mice exposed, during 70 days, to ..gamma..-radiation at dose-rates of 33.7-35.8 nA/kg and cumulative dose of 2.75 Gy. A single acute exposure of intact animals to a dose of 2.98 Gy increased significantly the mutation level. Preirradiation with small doses increased the resistance of hereditary structures to sublethal radiation doses. Exogenous ..cap alpha..-tocopherol (0.06 mg/20 g mass) protected the genetic apparatus of cells from total-body irradiation and was an additional factor decreasing the mutaton level after acute exposure of mice at the background of long-term irradiation with small doses.

  8. Tensor GSVD of patient- and platform-matched tumor and normal DNA copy-number profiles uncovers chromosome arm-wide patterns of tumor-exclusive platform-consistent alterations encoding for cell transformation and predicting ovarian cancer survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankaranarayanan, Preethi; Schomay, Theodore E; Aiello, Katherine A; Alter, Orly

    2015-01-01

    The number of large-scale high-dimensional datasets recording different aspects of a single disease is growing, accompanied by a need for frameworks that can create one coherent model from multiple tensors of matched columns, e.g., patients and platforms, but independent rows, e.g., probes. We define and prove the mathematical properties of a novel tensor generalized singular value decomposition (GSVD), which can simultaneously find the similarities and dissimilarities, i.e., patterns of varying relative significance, between any two such tensors. We demonstrate the tensor GSVD in comparative modeling of patient- and platform-matched but probe-independent ovarian serous cystadenocarcinoma (OV) tumor, mostly high-grade, and normal DNA copy-number profiles, across each chromosome arm, and combination of two arms, separately. The modeling uncovers previously unrecognized patterns of tumor-exclusive platform-consistent co-occurring copy-number alterations (CNAs). We find, first, and validate that each of the patterns across only 7p and Xq, and the combination of 6p+12p, is correlated with a patient's prognosis, is independent of the tumor's stage, the best predictor of OV survival to date, and together with stage makes a better predictor than stage alone. Second, these patterns include most known OV-associated CNAs that map to these chromosome arms, as well as several previously unreported, yet frequent focal CNAs. Third, differential mRNA, microRNA, and protein expression consistently map to the DNA CNAs. A coherent picture emerges for each pattern, suggesting roles for the CNAs in OV pathogenesis and personalized therapy. In 6p+12p, deletion of the p21-encoding CDKN1A and p38-encoding MAPK14 and amplification of RAD51AP1 and KRAS encode for human cell transformation, and are correlated with a cell's immortality, and a patient's shorter survival time. In 7p, RPA3 deletion and POLD2 amplification are correlated with DNA stability, and a longer survival. In Xq, PABPC5

  9. Tensor GSVD of patient- and platform-matched tumor and normal DNA copy-number profiles uncovers chromosome arm-wide patterns of tumor-exclusive platform-consistent alterations encoding for cell transformation and predicting ovarian cancer survival.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preethi Sankaranarayanan

    Full Text Available The number of large-scale high-dimensional datasets recording different aspects of a single disease is growing, accompanied by a need for frameworks that can create one coherent model from multiple tensors of matched columns, e.g., patients and platforms, but independent rows, e.g., probes. We define and prove the mathematical properties of a novel tensor generalized singular value decomposition (GSVD, which can simultaneously find the similarities and dissimilarities, i.e., patterns of varying relative significance, between any two such tensors. We demonstrate the tensor GSVD in comparative modeling of patient- and platform-matched but probe-independent ovarian serous cystadenocarcinoma (OV tumor, mostly high-grade, and normal DNA copy-number profiles, across each chromosome arm, and combination of two arms, separately. The modeling uncovers previously unrecognized patterns of tumor-exclusive platform-consistent co-occurring copy-number alterations (CNAs. We find, first, and validate that each of the patterns across only 7p and Xq, and the combination of 6p+12p, is correlated with a patient's prognosis, is independent of the tumor's stage, the best predictor of OV survival to date, and together with stage makes a better predictor than stage alone. Second, these patterns include most known OV-associated CNAs that map to these chromosome arms, as well as several previously unreported, yet frequent focal CNAs. Third, differential mRNA, microRNA, and protein expression consistently map to the DNA CNAs. A coherent picture emerges for each pattern, suggesting roles for the CNAs in OV pathogenesis and personalized therapy. In 6p+12p, deletion of the p21-encoding CDKN1A and p38-encoding MAPK14 and amplification of RAD51AP1 and KRAS encode for human cell transformation, and are correlated with a cell's immortality, and a patient's shorter survival time. In 7p, RPA3 deletion and POLD2 amplification are correlated with DNA stability, and a longer survival

  10. CHROMOSOMAL ABNORMALITIES IN PATIENTS WITH RECURRENT MISCARRIAGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Mierla

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Chromosomal abnormalities are involved in the etiology of recurrent spontaneous pregnancy loss and sub-fertility. The purpose of this study was to determine the frequency and contribution of chromosomal abnormalities in recurrent miscarriages. The results obtained and literature review are helpful in understanding the importance of cytogenetics analysis of female infertility. To investigate the distribution of chromosomal abnormalities in the Romanian population with recurrent miscarriage, karyotype analysis by G-banding was performed from peripheral blood in 967 women infertility. Results: Chromosomal abnormalities were found to 79 women (8,17%. The percentage of chromosomal abnormalities in the studied population correlates with the data in the literature. Chromosomal abnormalities could play the important role in etiology of infertility and are more frequently detected in this group of patients compared to general population. In the infertile couples balanced chromosomal abnormalities are the main cause of spontaneous abortions.

  11. Seizure-induced alterations in fast-spiking basket cell GABA currents modulate frequency and coherence of gamma oscillation in network simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proddutur, Archana; Yu, Jiandong; Elgammal, Fatima S.; Santhakumar, Vijayalakshmi

    2013-12-01

    Gamma frequency oscillations have been proposed to contribute to memory formation and retrieval. Fast-spiking basket cells (FS-BCs) are known to underlie development of gamma oscillations. Fast, high amplitude GABA synapses and gap junctions have been suggested to contribute to gamma oscillations in FS-BC networks. Recently, we identified that, apart from GABAergic synapses, FS-BCs in the hippocampal dentate gyrus have GABAergic currents mediated by extrasynaptic receptors. Our experimental studies demonstrated two specific changes in FS-BC GABA currents following experimental seizures [Yu et al., J. Neurophysiol. 109, 1746 (2013)]: increase in the magnitude of extrasynaptic (tonic) GABA currents and a depolarizing shift in GABA reversal potential (EGABA). Here, we use homogeneous networks of a biophysically based model of FS-BCs to examine how the presence of extrasynaptic GABA conductance (gGABA-extra) and experimentally identified, seizure-induced changes in gGABA-extra and EGABA influence network activity. Networks of FS-BCs interconnected by fast GABAergic synapses developed synchronous firing in the dentate gamma frequency range (40-100 Hz). Systematic investigation revealed that the biologically realistic range of 30 to 40 connections between FS-BCs resulted in greater coherence in the gamma frequency range when networks were activated by Poisson-distributed dendritic synaptic inputs rather than by homogeneous somatic current injections, which were balanced for FS-BC firing frequency in unconnected networks. Distance-dependent conduction delay enhanced coherence in networks with 30-40 FS-BC interconnections while inclusion of gap junctional conductance had a modest effect on coherence. In networks activated by somatic current injections resulting in heterogeneous FS-BC firing, increasing gGABA-extra reduced the frequency and coherence of FS-BC firing when EGABA was shunting (-74 mV), but failed to alter average FS-BC frequency when EGABA was depolarizing

  12. Seizure-induced alterations in fast-spiking basket cell GABA currents modulate frequency and coherence of gamma oscillation in network simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Proddutur, Archana; Yu, Jiandong; Elgammal, Fatima S. [Department of Neurology and Neurosciences, New Jersey Medical School, Rutgers, Newark, New Jersey 07103 (United States); Santhakumar, Vijayalakshmi, E-mail: santhavi@njms.rutgers.edu [Department of Neurology and Neurosciences, New Jersey Medical School, Rutgers, Newark, New Jersey 07103 (United States); Department of Pharmacology and Physiology, New Jersey Medical School, Rutgers, Newark, New Jersey 07103 (United States)

    2013-12-15

    Gamma frequency oscillations have been proposed to contribute to memory formation and retrieval. Fast-spiking basket cells (FS-BCs) are known to underlie development of gamma oscillations. Fast, high amplitude GABA synapses and gap junctions have been suggested to contribute to gamma oscillations in FS-BC networks. Recently, we identified that, apart from GABAergic synapses, FS-BCs in the hippocampal dentate gyrus have GABAergic currents mediated by extrasynaptic receptors. Our experimental studies demonstrated two specific changes in FS-BC GABA currents following experimental seizures [Yu et al., J. Neurophysiol. 109, 1746 (2013)]: increase in the magnitude of extrasynaptic (tonic) GABA currents and a depolarizing shift in GABA reversal potential (E{sub GABA}). Here, we use homogeneous networks of a biophysically based model of FS-BCs to examine how the presence of extrasynaptic GABA conductance (g{sub GABA-extra}) and experimentally identified, seizure-induced changes in g{sub GABA-extra} and E{sub GABA} influence network activity. Networks of FS-BCs interconnected by fast GABAergic synapses developed synchronous firing in the dentate gamma frequency range (40–100 Hz). Systematic investigation revealed that the biologically realistic range of 30 to 40 connections between FS-BCs resulted in greater coherence in the gamma frequency range when networks were activated by Poisson-distributed dendritic synaptic inputs rather than by homogeneous somatic current injections, which were balanced for FS-BC firing frequency in unconnected networks. Distance-dependent conduction delay enhanced coherence in networks with 30–40 FS-BC interconnections while inclusion of gap junctional conductance had a modest effect on coherence. In networks activated by somatic current injections resulting in heterogeneous FS-BC firing, increasing g{sub GABA-extra} reduced the frequency and coherence of FS-BC firing when E{sub GABA} was shunting (−74 mV), but failed to alter average

  13. Chromosome Microarray.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Sharon

    2016-01-01

    Over the last half century, knowledge about genetics, genetic testing, and its complexity has flourished. Completion of the Human Genome Project provided a foundation upon which the accuracy of genetics, genomics, and integration of bioinformatics knowledge and testing has grown exponentially. What is lagging, however, are efforts to reach and engage nurses about this rapidly changing field. The purpose of this article is to familiarize nurses with several frequently ordered genetic tests including chromosomes and fluorescence in situ hybridization followed by a comprehensive review of chromosome microarray. It shares the complexity of microarray including how testing is performed and results analyzed. A case report demonstrates how this technology is applied in clinical practice and reveals benefits and limitations of this scientific and bioinformatics genetic technology. Clinical implications for maternal-child nurses across practice levels are discussed. PMID:27276104

  14. Chromosomal abnormalities in spontaneous abortion after assisted reproductive treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim You

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We evaluated cytogenetic results occurring with first trimester pregnancy loss, and assessed the type and frequency of chromosomal abnormalities after assisted reproductive treatment (ART and compared them with a control group. We also compared the rate of chromosomal abnormalities according to infertility causes in ICSI group. Methods A retrospective cohort analysis was made of all patients who were referred to the Genetics Laboratory of Fertility Center of CHA Gangnam Medical Center from 2005 to 2009 because of clinical abortion with a subsequent dilation and evacuation (D&E performed, and patients were grouped by type of conception as follows: conventional IVF (in vitro fertilization (n = 114, ICSI (intracytoplasmic sperm injection (n = 140, and control (natural conception or intrauterine insemination [IUI] (n = 128. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS software. Results A total 406 specimens were referred to laboratory, ten abortuses were excluded, and in 14 cases, we did not get any spontaneous metaphase, chromosomal constitutions of 382 specimens were successfully obtained with conventional cytogenetic methods. Overall, 52.62% of the miscarriages were found to be cytogenetically abnormal among all patients, the frequency was 48.4% in the control group, 54.3% of miscarriages after ICSI and 55.3% after conventional IVF (p = 0.503. The most prevalent abnormalities were autosomal trisomy, however, nine (11.69% sex chromosome aneuploidy were noted in the ICSI group vs. four (6.45% and two (3.23% cases in the conventional IVF group and control group. We compared chromosomal abnormalities of miscarriages after ICSI according to infertility factor. 55.71% underwent ICSI due to male factors, 44.29% due to non-male factors. ICSI group having male factors showed significantly higher risk of chromosomal abnormalities than ICSI group having non-male factors (65.8% vs. 34.2%, p = 0.009, odds ratio = 1.529, 95% CI = 1

  15. CHROMOSOMAL ABNORMALITIES IN PATIENTS WITH RECURRENT MISCARRIAGE

    OpenAIRE

    Daniela Mierla; Viorica Radoi; Veronica Stoian

    2012-01-01

    Chromosomal abnormalities are involved in the etiology of recurrent spontaneous pregnancy loss and sub-fertility. The purpose of this study was to determine the frequency and contribution of chromosomal abnormalities in recurrent miscarriages. The results obtained and literature review are helpful in understanding the importance of cytogenetics analysis of female infertility. To investigate the distribution of chromosomal abnormalities in the Romanian population with recurrent miscarriage, ka...

  16. Chromosome heteromorphism quantified by high-resolution bivariate flow karyotyping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trask, B; van den Engh, G; Mayall, B; Gray, J W

    1989-11-01

    Maternal and paternal homologues of many chromosome types can be differentiated on the basis of their peak position in Hoechst 33258 versus chromomycin A3 bivariate flow karyotypes. We demonstrate here the magnitude of DNA content differences among normal chromosomes of the same type. Significant peak-position differences between homologues were observed for an average of four chromosome types in each of the karyotypes of 98 different individuals. The frequency of individuals with differences in homologue peak positions varied among chromosome types: e.g., chromosome 15, 61%; chromosome 3, 4%. Flow karyotypes of 33 unrelated individuals were compared to determine the range of peak position among normal chromosomes. Chromosomes Y, 21, 22, 15, 16, 13, 14, and 19 were most heteromorphic, and chromosomes 2-8 and X were least heteromorphic. The largest chromosome 21 was 45% larger than the smallest 21 chromosome observed. The base composition of the variable regions differed among chromosome types. DNA contents of chromosome variants determined from flow karyotypes were closely correlated to measurements of DNA content made of gallocyanin chrome alum-stained metaphase chromosomes on slides. Fluorescence in situ hybridization with chromosome-specific repetitive sequences indicated that variability in their copy number is partly responsible for peak-position variability in some chromosomes. Heteromorphic chromosomes are identified for which parental flow karyotype information will be essential if de novo rearrangements resulting in small DNA content changes are to be detected with flow karyotyping. PMID:2479266

  17. Chromosome engineering: power tools for plant genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Simon W L

    2010-12-01

    The term "chromosome engineering" describes technologies in which chromosomes are manipulated to change their mode of genetic inheritance. This review examines recent innovations in chromosome engineering that promise to greatly increase the efficiency of plant breeding. Haploid Arabidopsis thaliana have been produced by altering the kinetochore protein CENH3, yielding instant homozygous lines. Haploid production will facilitate reverse breeding, a method that downregulates recombination to ensure progeny contain intact parental chromosomes. Another chromosome engineering success is the conversion of meiosis into mitosis, which produces diploid gametes that are clones of the parent plant. This is a key step in apomixis (asexual reproduction through seeds) and could help to preserve hybrid vigor in the future. New homologous recombination methods in plants will potentiate many chromosome engineering applications. PMID:20933291

  18. Molecular Characterisation of Structural Chromosomal Abnormalities Associated with Congenital Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Mansouri, Mahmoud R.

    2006-01-01

    Chromosomal abnormalities are defined as changes in the chromosome structure and fall in one of two categories. The first category is numerical alterations while the second category consists of structural abnormalities. Structural chromosomal abnormalities do not always interrupt genes in order to cause disease. They can also affect gene expression by separating a gene and its promoter element from distant regulatory elements. We have used characterisation of structural chromosomal abnormalit...

  19. Long-term persistence of chromosome aberrations in uranium miners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mészáros, Gabriella; Bognár, Gabriella; Köteles, G J

    2004-07-01

    Chromosome aberration analyses were performed on blood samples from 165 active underground uranium miners between 1981 and 1985. After decommissioning the mine in 1997 chromosome aberration analyses were also included in the medical laboratory investigations of health conditions of 141 subjects between 1998 and 2002 within the framework of a follow-up-study. The numerical data are presented as functions of the exposure categories expressed in working level month up to 600. In the active groups the dicentric level was 7 to 12 times higher than in the unexposed population, the acentrics also higher with more than an order of magnitude, the frequency of total aberrations--including dicentrics, acentrics, rings, deletions, minits and numerical aberrations, i.e. both chromatid and chromosome type of aberrations were also well above the control level. In the group of former uranium miners although there were slight decreases in the dicentrics after 8 to 25 yr, the values were not significantly different from the values of active miners. The frequency of deletions was also maintained in the post-mining period. The frequency of acentrics, however, decreased significantly, but even the lowest values remained 2-3 times higher than the values in the unexposed population.The possibility is suggested that for the long-term persistence of cytogenetic alterations the permanent production and presence of clastogenic factors might be responsible. The comparison of the two datasets suggest a long-term persistence of cytogenetic alterations above the population average values in a large fraction of persons investigated. PMID:15308832

  20. Evaluation of chromosome aberration frequency instable in individual groups residents at the municipality of Monte Alegre, Para, Brazil, exposed to radon; Avaliacao da frequencia de aberracoes cromossomicas instaveis em grupos de individuos residentes no municipio de Monte Alegre - PA expostos diferencialmente ao radonio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yunes, Samira Nogarol

    2010-07-01

    The municipality of Monte Alegre is a region that presents natural radiation high due to the presence of the radionuclide uranium ({sup 238}U) in its soil, which through its decay gives rise to element Rn, a gas. The radioactivity of the rocks has become a problem for the population of Monte Alegre, from the moment when the radioactive material began to be used in the construction of houses and paving of streets. Among all bio markers related to environmental exposures and its biological effects, the chromosomal aberrations are considered good bio markers as predictors of the risk of cancer. Studies suggest that the frequency of chromosomal aberrations may be related to the genetic instability individual and/or exposure to ionizing radiation. Our work aimed to evaluate the frequency of chromosomal aberrations in individuals in the region of high natural radioactivity in Monte Alegre-PA. As well as to correlate the cytogenetic analysis made in this study with the results of analysis of frequency of polymorphisms of genes of DNA repair carried out in another study that resulted in other dissertation. In accordance with the distribution of the data obtained in characterizing environmental radiological and in the calculation of dose, were chosen residents of homes with more and less exposure to radiation. The samples of peripheral blood of 85 individuals of the resident population of the region of Monte Alegre - PA were collected and examine provided two slides for individual was performed to verify the quality of the sample. Through this evaluation we decide that 33% of the material collected, or is, samples of 28 individuals were in suitable conditions for analysis of the frequency of chromosomal aberrations. After the collections lymphocytes present in the sample were cultivated in accordance with the methodology proposed for obtaining of cells in metaphase. were analyzed 6,177 metaphases of 28 individuals among which were found dicentric chromosomes 4 and 19

  1. Ozone and allergen exposure during postnatal development alters the frequency and airway distribution of CD25+ cells in infant rhesus monkeys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The epidemiologic link between air pollutant exposure and asthma has been supported by experimental findings, but the mechanisms are not understood. In this study, we evaluated the impact of combined ozone and house dust mite (HDM) exposure on the immunophenotype of peripheral blood and airway lymphocytes from rhesus macaque monkeys during the postnatal period of development. Starting at 30 days of age, monkeys were exposed to 11 cycles of filtered air, ozone, HDM aerosol, or ozone + HDM aerosol. Each cycle consisted of ozone delivered at 0.5 ppm for 5 days (8 h/day), followed by 9 days of filtered air; animals received HDM aerosol during the last 3 days of each ozone exposure period. Between 2-3 months of age, animals co-exposed to ozone + HDM exhibited a decline in total circulating leukocyte numbers and increased total circulating lymphocyte frequency. At 3 months of age, blood CD4+/CD25+ lymphocytes were increased with ozone + HDM. At 6 months of age, CD4+/CD25+ and CD8+/CD25+ lymphocyte populations increased in both blood and lavage of ozone + HDM animals. Overall volume of CD25+ cells within airway mucosa increased with HDM exposure. Ozone did not have an additive effect on volume of mucosal CD25+ cells in HDM-exposed animals, but did alter the anatomical distribution of this cell type throughout the proximal and distal airways. We conclude that a window of postnatal development is sensitive to air pollutant and allergen exposure, resulting in immunomodulation of peripheral blood and airway lymphocyte frequency and trafficking

  2. Chromosome heteromorphisms in the Japanese, 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The type and frequency of chromosome variants detected by the C-staining method were ascertained in 1,857 individuals residing in Hiroshima. The most frequent heteromorphic variant was the total inversion of the C-band in chromosome 9 found in 27 individuals (1.45%). The total inversion of the C-band in chromosome 1 was not seen in this sample, but the partial inversion of the C-band in chromosome 1 was found in 18 persons (0.97%). Partial inversion was also detected in the C-band in chromosome 9 in 22 individuals (1.18%). In chromosome 16, neither total nor partial inversion of the C-band was observed in the present study. The frequencies of chromosomes 1, 9, and 16 with a very large C-band were 0.70%, 0.22%, and 0.54%, respectively. Aside from these (1, 9, and 16) a very large C-band was found occasionally in chromosomes 4, 5, 6, 11, 12, 14, and 15, and an unusual insertion of the Y chromosome was observed. A total of 128 C-band variants (6.89%) was found in the 1,857 Hiroshima residents. (author)

  3. Transmission Behavior of B Chromosomes in Prochilodus lineatus (Characiformes, Prochilodontidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penitente, Manolo; Daniel, Sandro N; Senhorini, José A; Foresti, Fausto; Porto-Foresti, Fábio

    2015-01-01

    The population of Prochilodus lineatus found in the Mogi-Guaçu River is karyotypically polymorphic, carrying acrocentric, metacentric, and submetacentric B chromosomes. The analysis of each B chromosome frequency in this species revealed a variation in the distribution pattern, with the metacentric type having the highest frequency (73.30%), followed by submetacentric (25.22%) and acrocentric B chromosomes (1.48%). The transmission pattern of the supernumerary chromosomes was identified by controlled crosses, and it was shown that the acro- and submetacentric B chromosomes have a transmission pattern below the Mendelian rate (kB = 0.333 and kB = 0.385, respectively), but the metacentric variant has a cumulative transmission pattern (kB = 0.587). These results indicate that the acro- and submetacentric B chromosomes are undergoing an extinction process, while the metacentric B chromosomes appear to be accumulating in frequency with each generation. PMID:26795613

  4. Human chromosome 'painting' probes used to measure chromosome translocations in non-human primates: extrapolations from monkey to man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chromosome painting with a probe specific for human chromosome 4 was used to 'paint' monkey chromosomes to measure the persistence of translocations in peripheral blood lymphocytes of a rhesus monkey exposed to ionising radiation more than 25 years ago. The human probe painted the entire length of two large rhesus and cynomolgus monkey chromosomes with no cross hybridisation to other chromosomes, facilitating rapid detection of chromosome translocations. Translocation frequency measured in one monkey was significantly higher than that for unirradiated animals. The use of human probes to obtain cytogenetic data from Macaca species irradiated years previously or exposed to chemical clastogens makes this genus an excellent model for studying genetic damage. (author)

  5. Chromatin structure and ionizing-radiation-induced chromosome aberrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The possible influence of chromatic structure or activity on chromosomal radiosensitivity was studied. A cell line was isolated which contained some 105 copies of an amplified plasmid in a single large mosquito artificial chromosome (MAC). This chromosome was hypersensitive to DNase I. Its radiosensitivity was some three fold greater than normal mosquito chromosomes in the same cell. In cultured human cells irradiated during G0, the initial breakage frequency in chromosome 4, 19 and the euchromatic and heterochromatic portions of the Y chromosome were measured over a wide range of doses by inducing Premature Chromosome Condensation (PCC) immediately after irradiation with Cs-137 gamma rays. No evidence was seen that Y heterochromatin or large fragments of it remained unbroken. The only significant deviation from the expected initial breakage frequency per Gy per unit length of chromosome was that observed for the euchromatic portion of the Y chromosome, with breakage nearly twice that expected. The development of aberrations involving X and Y chromosomes at the first mitosis after irradation was also studied. Normal female cells sustained about twice the frequency of aberrations involving X chromosomes for a dose of 7.3 Gy than the corresponding male cells. Fibroblasts from individuals with supernumerary X chromosomes did not show any further increase in X aberrations for this dos. The frequency of aberrations involving the heterochromatic portion of the long arm of the Y chromosome was about what would be expected for a similar length of autosome, but the euchromatic portion of the Y was about 3 times more radiosensitive per unit length. 5-Azacytidine treatment of cultured human female fibroblasts or fibroblasts from a 49,XXXXY individual, reduced the methylation of cytosine residues in DNA, and resulted in an increased chromosomal radiosensitivity in general, but it did not increase the frequency of aberrations involving the X chromosomes

  6. Mitotic chromosome structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mounting evidence is compiling linking the physical organizational structure of chromosomes and the nuclear structure to biological function. At the base of the physical organizational structure of both is the concept of loop formation. This implies that physical proximity within chromosomes is provided for otherwise distal genomic regions and thus hierarchically organizing the chromosomes. Together with entropy many experimental observations can be explained with these two concepts. Among the observations that can be explained are the measured physical extent of the chromosomes, their shape, mechanical behavior, the segregation into territories (chromosomal and territories within chromosomes), the results from chromosome conformation capture experiments, as well as linking gene expression to structural organization.

  7. Radiation-induced chromosomal instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ritter, S. [GSI, Biophysics, Darmstadt (Germany)

    1999-03-01

    Recent studies on radiation-induced chromosomal instability in the progeny of exposed mammalian cells were briefly described as well as other related studies. For the analysis of chromosomal damage in clones, cells were seeded directly after exposure in cell well-dish to form single cell clones and post-irradiation chromosome aberrations were scored. Both exposure to isoeffective doses of X-ray or 270 MeV/u C-ions (13 keV/{mu}m) increased the number of clones with abnormal karyotype and the increase was similar for X-ray and for C-ions. Meanwhile, in the progeny of cells for mass cultures, there was no indication of a delayed expression of chromosomal damage up to 40 population doublings after the exposure. A high number of aberrant cells were only observed directly after exposure to 10.7 MeV/u O-ions, i.e. in the first cycle cells and decreased with subsequent cell divisions. The reason for these differences in the radiation-induced chromosomal instability between clonal isolates and mass culture has not been clarified. Recent studies indicated that genomic instability occurs at a high frequency in the progeny of cells irradiated with both sparsely and densely ionizing radiation. Such genomic instability is thought likely to increase the risk of carcinogenesis, but more data are required for a well understanding of the health risks resulting from radiation-induced delayed instability. (M.N.)

  8. Chromosomal abnormalities in patients with sperm disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Y. Pylyp

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Chromosomal abnormalities are among the most common genetic causes of spermatogenic disruptions. Carriers of chromosomal abnormalities are at increased risk of infertility, miscarriage or birth of a child with unbalanced karyotype due to the production of unbalanced gametes. The natural selection against chromosomally abnormal sperm usually prevents fertilization with sperm barring in cases of serious chromosomal abnormalities. However, assisted reproductive technologies in general and intracytoplasmic sperm injection in particular, enable the transmission of chromosomal abnormalities to the progeny. Therefore, cytogenetic studies are important in patients with male factor infertility before assisted reproduction treatment. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the types and frequencies of chromosomal abnormalities in 724 patients with infertility and to estimate the risk of chromosomal abnormalities detection in subgroups of patients depending on the severity of spermatogenic disruption, aiming at identifying groups of patients in need of cytogenetic studies. Karyotype analysis was performed in 724 blood samples of men attending infertility clinic. Chromosomal preparation was performed by standard techniques. At least 20 GTG-banded metaphase plates with the resolution from 450 to 750 bands per haploid set were analysed in each case. When chromosomal mosaicism was suspected, this number was increased to 50. Abnormal karyotypes were observed in 48 (6.6% patients, including 67% of autosomal abnormalities and 33% of gonosomal abnormalities. Autosomal abnormalities were represented by structural rearrangements. Reciprocal translocations were the most common type of structural chromosomal abnormalities in the studied group, detected with the frequency of 2.6% (n = 19, followed by Robertsonian translocation, observed with the frequency of 1.2% (n = 9. The frequency of inversions was 0.6% (n = 4. Gonosomal abnormalities included 14 cases

  9. Fetal chromosome analysis: screening for chromosome disease?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Philip, J; Tabor, Ann; Bang, J;

    1983-01-01

    A + B). Pregnant women 35 years of age, women who previously had a chromosomally abnormal child, families with translocation carriers or other heritable chromosomal disease, families where the father was 50 years or more and women in families with a history of Down's syndrome (group A), were...... unbalanced chromosome abnormality in group A (women with elevated risk) is significantly higher than in group B + C (women without elevated risk) (relative risk 2.4). Women with a known familial translocation and women 40 years or more have a relative risk of 5.7 of having an unbalanced chromosome......The aim of the study was to investigate the rationale of the current indications for fetal chromosome analysis. 5372 women had 5423 amniocentesis performed, this group constituting a consecutive sample at the chromosome laboratory, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen from March 1973 to September 1980 (Group...

  10. Comparison of alterations in frequency and cost of antibiotic use in neonatal and pediatric intensive care units of a hospital following protocol to an education and research hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Dogan

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available AiM: The objective of this study is to show the alterations in frequency and cost of antibiotic use in neonatal and pediatric intensive care units of a state hospital after it started to service as an education and research hospital. We also aimed to raise an awareness related to rational antibiotic use. METHODS: The surveillance of antibiotic use and comparison of costs were evaluated in 392 patients in between August 2013-January 2014. The rate and cost of antibiotic use during last 90 days before the protocol of state hospital to research and education hospital and the first 90 days after protocol were evaluated. Antibiotics were assessed according to the treatment protocols of the Committee of Rational Drug Use, Infection Control Committee and Antibiotic Control Committee. Antibiotics were provided from administrative system and the data related to costs were obtained from Ministry of Health and Ministry of Finance. The demographic data and the data related to indication for admission to intensive care units, antibiotic dosages and pathogens causing infections were also obtained. For statistical analysis, SPSS program was used and descriptive analysis were made. In comparison of the groups, Mann Whitney U and chi-square tests were used. The data were evaluated within a 95% confidence interval. RESULTS: In first and second period, 143 patients were hospitalized for 3.18+/-1.13 days and 105 patients were hospitalized for 2.69+/-4.14 days in pediatric intensive care unit(PICU; 79 patients were hospitalized for 17.29+/-3.61 days and 65 patients stayed for 21.29+/-3.29 days in neonatal intensive care unit(NICU, respectively. In the first and second period, cost of antibiotics in PICU was found 341.81+/-744.49 (med:14.91 and 585.35+/-796.62 (med:256.44 (p=0.02 Turkish Liras (TL; in NICU 137.92+/-178.78 (med:14.59 and 247.40+/-370.13(med:19.23 (p=0.76 TL respectively. CONCLUSiON: In the second period, in PICU, duration of hospitalization was found

  11. Nonrandom involvement of chromosomal segments in human hematologic malignancies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowley, J. D.

    1977-01-01

    The consistent occurrence of nonrandom chromosome changes in human malignancies suggests that they are not trivial epiphenomena. Whereas we do not understand their significance at present, one possible role which they may fulfill is to provide the chromosomally aberrant cells with a proliferative advantage as the result of alteration of the number and/or location of genes related to nucleic acid biosynthesis. It would be expected that the proliferative advantage provided by various chromosome aberrations differs in patients with different genetic constitutions.

  12. Y chromosome microdeletions in Turkish infertile men

    OpenAIRE

    Zamani Ayse; Kutlu Ruhusen; Durakbasi-Dursun H; Gorkemli Huseyin; Acar Aynur

    2006-01-01

    AIMS: To detect the frequency and types of both chromosomal abnormalities and Y chromosome microdeletions in infertile men attending to our university intracytoplasmic sperm injection ICSI/IVF centre and fertile control subjects in our patient population. SETTINGS AND DESIGN: A total of 50 infertile men who were referred to IVF center of Meram medical faculty were selected for the molecular azospermia factor (AZF) screening program. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Karyotype analysis and polymeras...

  13. Adaptation through chromosomal inversions in Anopheles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego eAyala

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Chromosomal inversions have been repeatedly involved in local adaptation in a large number of animals and plants. The ecological and behavioral plasticity of Anopheles species - human malaria vectors - is mirrored by high amounts of polymorphic inversions. The adaptive significance of chromosomal inversions has been consistently attested by strong and significant correlations between their frequencies and a number of phenotypic traits. Here, we provide an extensive literature review of the different adaptive traits associated with chromosomal inversions in the genus Anopheles. Traits having important consequences for the success of present and future vector control measures, such as insecticide resistance and behavioral changes, are discussed.

  14. Chromosomal Aneuploidies and Early Embryonic Developmental Arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Maurer

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Selecting the best embryo for transfer, with the highest chance of achieving a vital pregnancy, is a major goal in current in vitro fertilization (IVF technology. The high rate of embryonic developmental arrest during IVF treatment is one of the limitations in achieving this goal. Chromosomal abnormalities are possibly linked with chromosomal arrest and selection against abnormal fertilization products. The objective of this study was to evaluate the frequency and type of chromosomal abnormalities in preimplantation embryos with developmental arrest. Materials and Methods: This cohort study included blastomeres of embryos with early developmental arrest that were biopsied and analyzed by fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH with probes for chromosomes 13, 16, 18, 21 and 22. Forty-five couples undergoing IVF treatment were included, and 119 arrested embryos were biopsied. All probes were obtained from the Kinderwunsch Zentrum, Linz, Austria, between August 2009 and August 2011. Results: Of these embryos, 31.6% were normal for all chromosomes tested, and 68.4% were abnormal. Eleven embryos were uniformly aneuploid, 20 were polyploid, 3 were haploid, 11 displayed mosaicism and 22 embryos exhibited chaotic chromosomal complement. Conclusion: Nearly 70% of arrested embryos exhibit chromosomal errors, making chromosomal abnormalities a major cause of embryonic arrest and may be a further explanation for the high developmental failure rates during culture of the embryos in the IVF setting.

  15. Cytological alteration of cultured rat liver cells by 3'-methyl-4-dimethylaminoazobenzene with special reference to chromosome changes, changes of growth patterns at a colony level and alpha-fetoprotein production.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tokiwa,Takayoshi

    1980-06-01

    Full Text Available A near diploid clone derived from a rat liver cell line was continuously treated with various concentrations of 3'-methyl-4-dimethylaminoazobenzene (3'-Me-DAB in culture. By treatment with 2.8 micrograms/ml, cells with 41 chromosomes formed a mode and which then shifted to 39. The chromosome numbers of cells treated with 5.4 micrograms/ml were widely distributed at early stages, but later the mode shifted to hypotetraploid region. Untreated control cells were confirmed as near diploid. Increased plating efficiency by 3'-Me-DAB as well as the appearance of large sized colonies was obtained. The production of alpha-fetoprotein (AFP by the cells was slightly enhanced by treatment with 3'-Me-DAB. The cells treated with and without 3'-Me-DAB did not produce any tumor in rats 6 months after their intraperitoneal injection.

  16. Genetic alterations in uncommon low-grade neuroepithelial tumors: BRAF, FGFR1, and MYB mutations occur at high frequency and align with morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qaddoumi, Ibrahim; Orisme, Wilda; Wen, Ji; Santiago, Teresa; Gupta, Kirti; Dalton, James D; Tang, Bo; Haupfear, Kelly; Punchihewa, Chandanamali; Easton, John; Mulder, Heather; Boggs, Kristy; Shao, Ying; Rusch, Michael; Becksfort, Jared; Gupta, Pankaj; Wang, Shuoguo; Lee, Ryan P; Brat, Daniel; Peter Collins, V; Dahiya, Sonika; George, David; Konomos, William; Kurian, Kathreena M; McFadden, Kathryn; Serafini, Luciano Neder; Nickols, Hilary; Perry, Arie; Shurtleff, Sheila; Gajjar, Amar; Boop, Fredrick A; Klimo, Paul D; Mardis, Elaine R; Wilson, Richard K; Baker, Suzanne J; Zhang, Jinghui; Wu, Gang; Downing, James R; Tatevossian, Ruth G; Ellison, David W

    2016-06-01

    Low-grade neuroepithelial tumors (LGNTs) are diverse CNS tumors presenting in children and young adults, often with a history of epilepsy. While the genetic profiles of common LGNTs, such as the pilocytic astrocytoma and 'adult-type' diffuse gliomas, are largely established, those of uncommon LGNTs remain to be defined. In this study, we have used massively parallel sequencing and various targeted molecular genetic approaches to study alterations in 91 LGNTs, mostly from children but including young adult patients. These tumors comprise dysembryoplastic neuroepithelial tumors (DNETs; n = 22), diffuse oligodendroglial tumors (d-OTs; n = 20), diffuse astrocytomas (DAs; n = 17), angiocentric gliomas (n = 15), and gangliogliomas (n = 17). Most LGNTs (84 %) analyzed by whole-genome sequencing (WGS) were characterized by a single driver genetic alteration. Alterations of FGFR1 occurred frequently in LGNTs composed of oligodendrocyte-like cells, being present in 82 % of DNETs and 40 % of d-OTs. In contrast, a MYB-QKI fusion characterized almost all angiocentric gliomas (87 %), and MYB fusion genes were the most common genetic alteration in DAs (41 %). A BRAF:p.V600E mutation was present in 35 % of gangliogliomas and 18 % of DAs. Pathogenic alterations in FGFR1/2/3, BRAF, or MYB/MYBL1 occurred in 78 % of the series. Adult-type d-OTs with an IDH1/2 mutation occurred in four adolescents, the youngest aged 15 years at biopsy. Despite a detailed analysis, novel genetic alterations were limited to two fusion genes, EWSR1-PATZ1 and SLMAP-NTRK2, both in gangliogliomas. Alterations in BRAF, FGFR1, or MYB account for most pathogenic alterations in LGNTs, including pilocytic astrocytomas, and alignment of these genetic alterations and cytologic features across LGNTs has diagnostic implications. Additionally, therapeutic options based upon targeting the effects of these alterations are already in clinical trials. PMID:26810070

  17. Histone modifications rather than the novel regional centromeres of Zymoseptoria tritici distinguish core and accessory chromosomes

    OpenAIRE

    Schotanus, Klaas; Soyer, Jessica; Connolly, Lanelle R.; Grandaubert, Jonathan; Happel, Petra; Smith, Kristina M.; Freitag, Michael; Stukenbrock, Eva H.

    2015-01-01

    Background Supernumerary chromosomes have been found in many organisms. In fungi, these “accessory” or “dispensable” chromosomes are present at different frequencies in populations and are usually characterized by higher repetitive DNA content and lower gene density when compared to the core chromosomes. In the reference strain of the wheat pathogen, Zymoseptoria tritici, eight discrete accessory chromosomes have been found. So far, no functional role has been assigned to these chromosomes; h...

  18. Chromosome painting in plants.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schubert, I.; Fransz, P.F.; Fuchs, J.; Jong, de J.H.

    2001-01-01

    The current 'state-of-art' as to chromosome painting in plants is reviewed. We define different situations described as painting so far: i) Genomic in situ hybridisation (GISH) with total genomic DNA to distinguish alien chromosomes on the basis of divergent dispersed repeats, ii) 'Chromosomal in si

  19. High frequency of submicroscopic chromosomal imbalances in patients with syndromic craniosynostosis detected by a combined approach of microsatellite segregation analysis, multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification and array-based comparative genome hybridisation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jehee, F.S.; Krepischi-Santos, A.C.; Rocha, K.M.; Cavalcanti, D.P.; Kim, C.A.; Bertola, D.R.; Alonso, L.G.; D'Angelo, C.S.; Mazzeu, J.F.; Froyen, G.; Lugtenberg, D.; Vianna-Morgante, A.M.; Rosenberg, C.; Passos-Bueno, M.R.

    2008-01-01

    We present the first comprehensive study, to our knowledge, on genomic chromosomal analysis in syndromic craniosynostosis. In total, 45 patients with craniosynostotic disorders were screened with a variety of methods including conventional karyotype, microsatellite segregation analysis, subtelomeric

  20. Retrospective chromosome aberration analysis of former uranium miners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper we present our data collected in the period of 1981-1985 on 165 persons exposed by different radon concentrations expressed in working level month (WLM) units from 100 up to 600. Following the decommissioning of the uranium mine in Hungary in 1997 cytogenetic status of 131 persons were within a follow-up-study of their health conditions initiated by the Hungarian Academy of Science. The persons have terminated their underground activities 5 to 20 years before testing. The comparison of the two datasets suggest a long-term persistence of cytogenetic alterations above the population average values in large percentages of persons investigated. The frequency of chromosome aberrations of uranium miners was found increased in function of their exposure to radon. The comparison of the miner's categories 20 years ago and in the recent years demonstrated the long-term existence of aberrations for many years after completion of underground mining activities. (authors)

  1. Non-disjunction of chromosome 18

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bugge, M; Collins, A; Petersen, M B;

    1998-01-01

    A sample of 100 trisomy 18 conceptuses analysed separately and together with a published sample of 61 conceptuses confirms that an error in maternal meiosis II (MII) is the most frequent cause of non-disjunction for chromosome 18. This is unlike all other human trisomies that have been studied......, which show a higher frequency in maternal meiosis I (MI). Maternal MI trisomy 18 shows a low frequency of recombination in proximal p and medial q, but not the reduction in proximal q observed in chromosome 21 MI non-disjunction. Maternal MII non-disjunction does not fit the entanglement model that...

  2. Meiotic chromosomal variation resulting from irradiation of pollen in maize

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this study was to standardize an induction strategy of chromosome aberrations in maize inbred line L-869. Pollen grains irradiated with 0, 36 and 72 Gy were used for fertilization. Resulting seeds were planted in a greenhouse to assess the number of abnormal meiotic cells. Germination, height, sterility and mortality were verified. Cells with delayed separation of chromosomes, translocation, deficiency, abnormal pairing, later condensation and anaphase bridges were observed. The number of abnormalities increased as the dosage increased but chromosome aberration types were the same regardless of the dosages used. Various chromosome-altered plants were obtained without viability loss. (author)

  3. Sex Chromosome Evolution in Amniotes: Applications for Bacterial Artificial Chromosome Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janes, Daniel E.; Valenzuela, Nicole; Ezaz, Tariq; Amemiya, Chris; Edwards, Scott V.

    2011-01-01

    Variability among sex chromosome pairs in amniotes denotes a dynamic history. Since amniotes diverged from a common ancestor, their sex chromosome pairs and, more broadly, sex-determining mechanisms have changed reversibly and frequently. These changes have been studied and characterized through the use of many tools and experimental approaches but perhaps most effectively through applications for bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) libraries. Individual BAC clones carry 100–200 kb of sequence from one individual of a target species that can be isolated by screening, mapped onto karyotypes, and sequenced. With these techniques, researchers have identified differences and similarities in sex chromosome content and organization across amniotes and have addressed hypotheses regarding the frequency and direction of past changes. Here, we review studies of sex chromosome evolution in amniotes and the ways in which the field of research has been affected by the advent of BAC libraries. PMID:20981143

  4. Adaptation of primate vestibuloocular reflex to altered peripheral vestibular inputs. I. Frequency-specific recovery of horizontal VOR after inactivation of the lateral semicircular canals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelaki, D. E.; Hess, B. J.; Arai, Y.; Suzuki, J.

    1996-01-01

    1. The adaptive plasticity of the vestibuloocular reflex (VOR) following a selective lesion of the peripheral vestibular organs was investigated in rhesus monkeys whose lateral semicircular canals were inactivated by plugging of the canal lumen in both ears. Gain and phase of horizontal, vertical, and torsional slow-phase eye velocity were determined from three-dimensional eye movement recordings obtained acutely after the plugging operation, as well as in regular intervals up to 10 mo later. 2. Acutely after plugging, horizontal VOR was minimal during yaw rotation with gains of frequencies. Horizontal VOR gain gradually increased over time, reaching gains of 0.4-0.5 for yaw oscillations at 1.1 Hz approximately 5 mo after lateral canal inactivation. This response recovery was strongly frequency dependent: horizontal VOR gains were largest at the highest frequency tested and progressively decreased for lower frequencies. Below approximately 0.1 Hz, no consistent horizontal VOR could be elicited even 10 mo after plugging. 3. The frequency-dependent changes in gain paralleled changes in horizontal VOR phase. Below approximately 0.1-0.05 Hz large phase leads were present, similarly as in semicircular canal primary afferents. Smaller phase leads were also present at higher frequencies, particularly at 1.1 Hz (the highest frequency tested). 4. Consistent with the afferent-like dynamics of the adapted horizontal VOR, per- and postrotatory horizontal responses to constant-velocity yaw rotations were short lasting. Time constants of the slow-phase eye velocity envelope of the horizontal postrotatory nystagmus were approximately 2 s. Nonetheless, a consistent horizontal optokinetic afternystagmus was evoked in plugged animals. 5. A torsional component that was absent in intact animals was consistently present during yaw rotation acutely after lateral canal inactivation and remained approximately constant thereafter. The frequency response characteristics of this torsional

  5. Monitoring of chromosomal aberrations in natural populations of Pinus pallasiana

    OpenAIRE

    V. P. Koba

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the results of monitoring research of the chromosome aberrations at the stage of anaphase-telophase. The statistical characteristics of dynamics of chromosomal aberrations in populations of Pinus pallasiana D. Don across the high-altitude zones of the Mountain Crimea is given. It is established that on the southern macroslope of the Crimean Main Ridge the frequency of chromosomal aberrations in the P. pallasiana stands is higher in the lower zone in comparison with the mid...

  6. Chromosome heteromorphism quantified by high-resolution bivariate flow karyotyping.

    OpenAIRE

    Trask, B; van den Engh, G; Mayall, B; Gray, J. W.

    1989-01-01

    Maternal and paternal homologues of many chromosome types can be differentiated on the basis of their peak position in Hoechst 33258 versus chromomycin A3 bivariate flow karyotypes. We demonstrate here the magnitude of DNA content differences among normal chromosomes of the same type. Significant peak-position differences between homologues were observed for an average of four chromosome types in each of the karyotypes of 98 different individuals. The frequency of individuals with differences...

  7. Chromosomal aberrations in children exposed to diagnostic x-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Among children who have received high x-ray doses congenital dislocation of the hip joint is the predominating diagnosis. In a series of 9 children who had received high x-ray doses (8 with luxation of the hip joint and one with achondroplasia) a significant increase of chromosomal aberrations was found. The increase concerned mainly chromosome type aberrations. The shorter the time since the last x-ray investigation the higher was the frequency of chromosome type aberrations. (author)

  8. Chimpanzee chromosome 12 is homologous to human chromosome 2q

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, N. C.; Sun, C. R.Y.; Ho, T.

    1977-01-01

    Most of the 46 human chromosomes find their counterparts in the 48 chimpanzee chromosomes except for chromosome 2 which has been hypothesized to have been derived from a centric fusion of two chimpanzee acrocentric chromosomes. These two chromosomes correspond to the human chromosomes 2p and 2g. This conclusion is based primarily on chromosome banding techniques, and the somatic cell hybridization technique has also been used. (HLW)

  9. Premature Centromere Division of Metaphase Chromosomes in Peripheral Blood Lymphocytes of Alzheimer's Disease Patients: Relation to Gender and Age

    OpenAIRE

    Živković, Lada; Spremo-Potparević, Biljana; Plećaš-Solarović, Bosiljka; Djelić, Ninoslav; Ocić, Gordana; Smiljković, Predrag; Siedlak, Sandra L.; Smith, Mark A.; Bajić, Vladan

    2010-01-01

    Chromosomal alterations are a feature of both aging and Alzheimer's disease (AD). This study examined if premature centromere division (PCD), a chromosomal instability indicator increased in AD, is correlated with aging or, instead, represents a de novo chromosomal alteration due to accelerating aging in AD. PCD in peripheral blood lymphocytes was determined in sporadic AD patients and gender and age-matched unaffected controls. Metaphase nuclei were analyzed for chromosomes showing PCD, X ch...

  10. Membrane-mediated changes in the structure of chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belyaev, N D; Budker, V G; Dubrovskaya, V A; Khristoljubova, N B; Kiseleva, E V; Matveeva, N M; Sukojan, M A

    1985-01-01

    In the present paper the interaction of metaphase chromosomes and chromatin with model and natural lipid membranes was studied. It was shown that chromatin and chromosomes are able to form complexes with membranes in the presence of divalent cations. In such complexes, the typical structure of chromosomes is altered. The character of this alteration in chromosomal structure was investigated with the use of electron microscopy and chemical modification with dimethylsulphate (DMS). The latter is possible because, according to the presented data, the condensation of chromatin into chromosomes is associated with a decrease in accessibility of N-3 in adenine (the protection of the minor groove of DNA) to modifications, and with an increased methylation of N-1 in adenine (the disarrangement of the secondary structure of DNA). It was shown that the interaction of chromosomes with liposomes provides various levels of unfolding up to the appearance of chromatin-like structures. The secondary DNA structure of decondensed chromosomes coincides with the secondary structure of chromosomal but not chromatin DNA, whereas the extent of shielding of the minor groove of DNA in such decondensed structures typical for chromatin DNA. It is possible to suggest that the chromosomal decondensation in telophase of mitosis is initiated by the action of a membrane component of the developing nuclear envelope. PMID:3926416

  11. Reduction of transgenerational radiation induced genetic damages observed as numerical chromosomal abnormalities in preimplantation embryos by vitamin E

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To study the effects of parental gamma irradiation (4 Gy) of NMRI (Naval Medical Research Institute) mice on the numerical chromosome abnormalities in subsequent preimplantation embryos in the presence of vitamin E (200 IU/kg), super-ovulated irradiated females were mated with irradiated males at weekly intervals in successive 6 weekly periods. About 68 h post coitus, 8-cell embryos were fixed on slides using standard methods in order to screen for abnormalities in chromosome number. In embryos generated by irradiated mice, the frequency of aneuploids dramatically increased compared to control unirradiated groups (p < 0.001), while no significant difference were observed within irradiated groups mated at weekly interval. Administration of vitamin E significantly decreased chromosomal aberrations in all groups (p < 0.05). Data indicate that gamma irradiation affects spermatogenesis and oogenesis and causes DNA alterations that may lead to chromosome abnormalities in subsequent embryos. Vitamin E effectively reduced the frequency of abnormalities. The way vitamin E reduces genotoxic effects of radiation might be via radical scavenging or antioxidative mechanism. (authors)

  12. ATM Modulates the Loading of Recombination Proteins onto a Chromosomal Translocation Breakpoint Hotspot

    OpenAIRE

    Jiying Sun; Yukako Oma; Masahiko Harata; Kazuteru Kono; Hiroki Shima; Aiko Kinomura; Tsuyoshi Ikura; Hidekazu Suzuki; Shuki Mizutani; Roland Kanaar; Satoshi Tashiro

    2010-01-01

    textabstractChromosome translocations induced by DNA damaging agents, such as ionizing radiation and certain chemotherapies, alter genetic information resulting in malignant transformation. Abrogation or loss of the ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) protein, a DNA damage signaling regulator, increases the incidence of chromosome translocations. However, how ATM protects cells from chromosome translocations is still unclear. Chromosome translocations involving the MLL gene on 11q23 are the m...

  13. Chromosome-Specific Painting in Cucumis Species Using Bulked Oligonucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yonghua; Zhang, Tao; Thammapichai, Paradee; Weng, Yiqun; Jiang, Jiming

    2015-07-01

    Chromosome-specific painting is a powerful technique in molecular cytogenetic and genome research. We developed an oligonucleotide (oligo)-based chromosome painting technique in cucumber (Cucumis sativus) that will be applicable in any plant species with a sequenced genome. Oligos specific to a single chromosome of cucumber were identified using a newly developed bioinformatic pipeline and then massively synthesized de novo in parallel. The synthesized oligos were amplified and labeled with biotin or digoxigenin for use in fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). We developed three different probes with each containing 23,000-27,000 oligos. These probes spanned 8.3-17 Mb of DNA on targeted cucumber chromosomes and had the densities of 1.5-3.2 oligos per kilobases. These probes produced FISH signals on a single cucumber chromosome and were used to paint homeologous chromosomes in other Cucumis species diverged from cucumber for up to 12 million years. The bulked oligo probes allowed us to track a single chromosome in early stages during meiosis. We were able to precisely map the pairing between cucumber chromosome 7 and chromosome 1 of Cucumis hystrix in a F1 hybrid. These two homeologous chromosomes paired in 71% of prophase I cells but only 25% of metaphase I cells, which may provide an explanation of the higher recombination rates compared to the chiasma frequencies between homeologous chromosomes reported in plant hybrids. PMID:25971668

  14. The Meiotic Behavior of an Alien Chromosome in Triticum aestivum-Haynaldia villosa Monosomic Addition Lines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Rui-fen; LIANG Hong-xia; ZHAO Mao-lin

    2002-01-01

    By the combination of cytological analysis and using genomic in situ hybridization technique to identify an alien chromosome in wheat-Haynaldia villosa monosomic addition lines, we studied the meiotic behavior of the alien chromosome. The results indicated that the frequency of bivalent pairing was lower than the value expected in PMCs of two monosomic addition lines, the frequency of wheat chromosomes unpairing increased, and the wheat homologous chromosome pairing was interfered with by the added chromosome 6V at metaphase I. The chromosome 6V lagged in 20.3% -29.3% of PMCs, sister chromatids 6V early divided in 29.0% - 34.1% of PMCs, the single chromosome 6V in 18.2% - 26.1% of PMCs went to a pole randomly,the breakage frequency of chromosome 6V was 1.2% - 2.9%. Meanwhile, it was also found that several wheat chromosomes showed earlier division, lagging and breakage in a few PMCs. It revealed that the added chromosome 6V influenced the behavior of wheat chromosomes at anaphase. It was also found that the translocation was produced between 6V and wheat chromosomes in 1.2% of PMCs. It offered evidence for translocation between wheat and Haynaldia villosa 6V chromosomes.

  15. Chromosome polymorphism in a population of ceratitis capitata

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A morphological chromosomal polymorphism along with the observation of B chromosomes in a natural population of Ceratitis capitata is reported. A variability affecting the centromere size of chromosome 3 is described. The observed B chromosome is minute, heterochromatic and telocentric. The B chromosome was found in the male and female germ cells and it exhibited, in the males, intra-individual numerical variation with OB and IB cells, which suggested a mitotic instability. It was also found, in both sexes, in somatic cells (cerebral ganglia tissue). Only males transmitted the B chromosomes to the progeny. The high rate of transmission suggested a differential utilization of the sperm carrying the B chromosomes or a preferential segregation into secondary spermatocytes. Previously reported linkage relationship between a pupal esterase gene (Est-1) and a pupa colour mutant (nig) has been extended to a line carrying a Y-chromosome (Y,B) shorter than the one previously studied (Y,A). Furthermore, an elaborate crossing scheme has been devised in order to estimate the recombination distances between these two genes and a third one affecting pupal length (lp-1). It is concluded that all three genes are in the same linkage group but Est-1 is far from the other two. In turn, nig and lp-1 are separated by 14.9 map units. It is confirmed that genetic recombination does not regularly occur at high frequency in the male and this frequency is not increased by the varying length of the Y-chromosome. Refs, figs, tabs

  16. Plant sex chromosome evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlesworth, Deborah

    2013-01-01

    It is now well established that plants have an important place in studies of sex chromosome evolution because of the repeated independent evolution of separate sexes and sex chromosomes. There has been considerable recent progress in studying plant sex chromosomes. In this review, I focus on how these recent studies have helped clarify or answer several important questions about sex chromosome evolution, and I shall also try to clarify some common misconceptions. I also outline future work that will be needed to make further progress, including testing some important ideas by genetic, molecular, and developmental approaches. Systems with different ages can clearly help show the time course of events during changes from an ancestral co-sexual state (hermaphroditism or monoecy), and I will also explain how different questions can be studied in lineages whose dioecy or sex chromosomes evolved at different times in the past. PMID:23125359

  17. Vibrio chromosomes share common history

    OpenAIRE

    Gevers Dirk; Chang Sarah; Chang LeeAnn; Kirkup Benjamin C; Polz Martin F

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background While most gamma proteobacteria have a single circular chromosome, Vibrionales have two circular chromosomes. Horizontal gene transfer is common among Vibrios, and in light of this genetic mobility, it is an open question to what extent the two chromosomes themselves share a common history since their formation. Results Single copy genes from each chromosome (142 genes from chromosome I and 42 genes from chromosome II) were identified from 19 sequenced Vibrionales genomes ...

  18. Meiotic behaviour of individual chromosomes in allotriploid Alstroemeria hybrids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamstra, S A; de Jong, J H; Jacobsen, E; Ramanna, M S; Kuipers, A G J

    2004-07-01

    Chromosome association and chiasma formation were studied in pollen mother cells at metaphase I of four allotriplod BC1 plants (2n=3x=24) obtained from the backcross of the hybrid Alstroemeria aurea x A. inodora with its parent A. inodora. We distinguished the chromosomes of both parental species by genomic in situ hybridization (GISH), whereas the individual chromosomes were identified on the basis of their multicolour FISH banding patterns obtained after a second hybridization with two species-specific satellite repeats as probes. All the four BC1 plants possessed two genomes of A. inodora and one of A. aurea. Variable numbers of recombinant chromosomes, resulting from meiotic recombination in the interspecific hybrid, were present in these plants. The homologous A. inodora chromosomes generally formed bivalents, leaving the homoeologous A. aurea chromosomes unassociated. High frequencies of trivalents were observed for the chromosome sets that contained recombinant chromosomes, even when the recombinant segments were small. Chromosome associations in the trivalents were restricted to homologous segments. The implications of the absence of homoeologous chromosome pairing on gamete constitution and prospects for introgression in Alstroemeria are discussed. PMID:15100711

  19. Chromosomal aberrations detected by chromosome painting in lymphocytes from cancer patients given high doses of therapeutic X-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chromosome painting by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with a whole chromosome-specific DNA probe was used to detect chromosomal aberrations in lymphocytes from cancer patients given partial-body fractionated X-ray therapy. Six male patients with cancer of the stomach, prostate, lung, or hepatocellular carcinoma, received X-rays in total doses of 40.5 to 70.08 Gy. Lymphocytes were cultured for 50 h with phytohemagglutinin. The mean frequency of aberrant cells detected by chromosome 4 painting varied from 1.57% to 14.34% in the patients and was markedly higher than in healthy controls (mean=0.12%). Chromosome painting effectively detected chromosomal aberrations in lymphocytes from cancer patients. Equivalent biological doses extrapolated from a dose-response curve obtained in an in vitro human lymphocyte X-ray irradiation study are discussed as an indicator of the cytogenetic damage inducible by radiotherapy in cancer patients. (author)

  20. The fragile Y hypothesis: Y chromosome aneuploidy as a selective pressure in sex chromosome and meiotic mechanism evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackmon, Heath; Demuth, Jeffery P

    2015-09-01

    Loss of the Y-chromosome is a common feature of species with chromosomal sex determination. However, our understanding of why some lineages frequently lose Y-chromosomes while others do not is limited. The fragile Y hypothesis proposes that in species with chiasmatic meiosis the rate of Y-chromosome aneuploidy and the size of the recombining region have a negative correlation. The fragile Y hypothesis provides a number of novel insights not possible under traditional models. Specifically, increased rates of Y aneuploidy may impose positive selection for (i) gene movement off the Y; (ii) translocations and fusions which expand the recombining region; and (iii) alternative meiotic segregation mechanisms (achiasmatic or asynaptic). These insights as well as existing evidence for the frequency of Y-chromosome aneuploidy raise doubt about the prospects for long-term retention of the human Y-chromosome despite recent evidence for stable gene content in older non-recombining regions. PMID:26200104

  1. Plasmid-Chromosome Recombination of Irradiated Shuttle Vector DNA in African Green Monkey Kidney Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudgett, John Stuart

    1987-09-01

    An autonomously replicating shuttle vector was used to investigate the enhancement of plasmid-chromosome recombination in mammalian host cells by ultraviolet light and gamma radiation. Sequences homologous to the shuttle vector were stably inserted into the genome of African Green Monkey kidney cells to act as the target substrate for these recombination events. The SV40- and pBR322-derived plasmid DNA was irradiated with various doses of radiation before transfection into the transformed mammalian host cells. The successful homologous transfer of the bacterial ampicillin resistance (amp^{rm r}) gene from the inserted sequences to replace a mutant amp^->=ne on the shuttle vector was identified by plasmid extraction and transformation into E. coli host cells. Ultraviolet light (UV) was found not to induce homologous plasmid-chromosome recombination, while gamma radiation increased the frequency of recombinant plasmids detected. The introduction of specific double -strand breaks in the plasmid or prolonging the time of plasmid residence in the mammalian host cells also enhanced plasmid-chromosome recombination. In contrast, plasmid mutagenesis was found to be increased by plasmid UV irradiation, but not to change with time. Plasmid survival, recombination, and mutagenesis were not affected by treating the mammalian host cells with UV light prior to plasmid transfection. The amp^{rm r} recombinant plasmid molecules analyzed were found to be mostly the result of nonconservative exchanges which appeared to involve both homologous and possibly nonhomologous interactions with the host chromosome. The observation that these recombinant structures were obtained from all of the plasmid alterations investigated suggests a common mechanistic origin for plasmid -chromosome recombination in these mammalian cells.

  2. Wpkci, Encoding an Altered Form of PKCI, Is Conserved Widely on the Avian W Chromosome and Expressed in Early Female Embryos: Implication of Its Role in Female Sex Determination

    OpenAIRE

    Hori, Tetsuya; Asakawa, Shuichi; Itoh, Yuichiro; Shimizu, Nobuyoshi; Mizuno, Shigeki

    2000-01-01

    Two W chromosome–linked cDNA clones, p5fm2 and p5fm3, were obtained from a subtracted (female minus male) cDNA library prepared from a mixture of undifferentiated gonads and mesonephroi of male or female 5-d (stages 26–28) chicken embryos. These two clones were demonstrated to be derived from the mRNA encoding an altered form of PKC inhibitor/interacting protein (PKCI), and its gene was named Wpkci. The Wpkci gene reiterated ∼40 times tandemly and located at the no...

  3. Diffusing Polymers in Confined Microdomains and Estimation of Chromosomal Territory Sizes from Chromosome Capture Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amitai, A.; Holcman, D.

    2013-06-01

    Is it possible to extract the size and structure of chromosomal territories (confined domain) from the encounter frequencies of chromosomal loci? To answer this question, we estimate the mean time for two monomers located on the same polymer to encounter, which we call the mean first encounter time in a confined microdomain (MFETC). We approximate the confined domain geometry by a harmonic potential well and obtain an asymptotic expression that agrees with Brownian simulations for the MFETC as a function of the polymer length, the radius of the confined domain, and the activation distance radius ɛ at which the two searching monomers meet. We illustrate the present approach using chromosome capture data for the encounter rate distribution of two loci depending on their distances along the DNA. We estimate the domain size that restricts the motion of one of these loci for chromosome II in yeast.

  4. Sequential cloning of chromosomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacks, S.A.

    1991-12-31

    A method for sequential cloning of chromosomal DNA and chromosomal DNA cloned by this method are disclosed. The method includes the selection of a target organism having a segment of chromosomal DNA to be sequentially cloned. A first DNA segment, having a first restriction enzyme site on either side. homologous to the chromosomal DNA to be sequentially cloned is isolated. A first vector product is formed by ligating the homologous segment into a suitably designed vector. The first vector product is circularly integrated into the target organism`s chromosomal DNA. The resulting integrated chromosomal DNA segment includes the homologous DNA segment at either end of the integrated vector segment. The integrated chromosomal DNA is cleaved with a second restriction enzyme and ligated to form a vector-containing plasmid, which is replicated in a host organism. The replicated plasmid is then cleaved with the first restriction enzyme. Next, a DNA segment containing the vector and a segment of DNA homologous to a distal portion of the previously isolated DNA segment is isolated. This segment is then ligated to form a plasmid which is replicated within a suitable host. This plasmid is then circularly integrated into the target chromosomal DNA. The chromosomal DNA containing the circularly integrated vector is treated with a third, retrorestriction enzyme. The cleaved DNA is ligated to give a plasmid that is used to transform a host permissive for replication of its vector. The sequential cloning process continues by repeated cycles of circular integration and excision. The excision is carried out alternately with the second and third enzymes.

  5. Peripheral drive in Aα/β-fiber neurons is altered in a rat model of osteoarthritis: changes in following frequency and recovery from inactivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Q

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Qi Wu, James L HenryDepartment of Psychiatry and Behavioral Neurosciences, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, CanadaPurpose: To determine conduction fidelity of Aα/β-fiber low threshold mechanoreceptors in a model of osteoarthritis (OA.Methods: Four weeks after cutting the anterior cruciate ligament and removing the medial meniscus to induce the model, in vivo intracellular recordings were made in ipsilateral L4 dorsal root ganglion neurons. L4 dorsal roots were stimulated to determine the refractory interval and the maximum following frequency of the evoked action potential (AP. Neurons exhibited two types of response to paired pulse stimulation. Results: One type of response was characterized by fractionation of the evoked AP into an initial nonmyelinated-spike and a later larger-amplitude somatic-spike at shorter interstimulus intervals. The other type of response was characterized by an all-or-none AP, where the second evoked AP failed altogether at shorter interstimulus intervals. In OA versus control animals, the refractory interval measured in paired pulse testing was less in all low threshold mechanoreceptors. With train stimulation, the maximum rising rate of the nonmyelinated-spike was greater in OA nonmuscle spindle low threshold mechanoreceptors, possibly due to changes in fast kinetics of currents. Maximum following frequency in Pacinian and muscle spindle neurons was greater in model animals compared to controls. Train stimulation also induced an inactivation and fractionation of the AP in neurons that showed fractionation of the AP in paired pulse testing. However, with train stimulation this fractionation followed a different time course, suggesting more than one type of inactivation.Conclusion: The data suggest that joint damage can lead to changes in the fidelity of AP conduction of large diameter sensory neurons, muscle spindle neurons in particular, arising from articular and nonarticular tissues in OA animals compared to

  6. Chromosome aberrations in pesticide-exposed greenhouse workers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lander, B F; Knudsen, Lisbeth E.; Gamborg, M O;

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to investigate the possibility of subtoxic exposure to pesticides causing chromosome aberrations in greenhouse workers. METHODS: In a cross-sectional and prospective study design chromosome aberration frequencies in cultured lymphocytes were examined for 116...... greenhouse workers exposed to a complex mixture of almost 50 insecticides, fungicides, and growth regulators and also for 29 nonsmoking, nonpesticide-exposed referents. RESULTS: The preseason frequencies of chromosome aberrations were slightly but not statistically significantly elevated for the greenhouse...... workers when they were compared with the referents. After a summer season of pesticide spraying in the greenhouses, the total frequencies of cells with chromosome aberrations were significantly higher than in the preseason samples (P=0.02) and also higher than for the referents (P=0.05). This finding was...

  7. A new chromosome was born: comparative chromosome painting in Boechera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Marcus A

    2015-09-01

    Comparative chromosome painting is a powerful tool to study the evolution of chromosomes and genomes. Analyzing karyotype evolution in cruciferous plants highlights the origin of aberrant chromosomes in apomictic Boechera and further establishes the cruciferous plants as important model system for our understanding of plant chromosome and genome evolution. PMID:26228436

  8. Mathematical Modeling of Carcinogenesis Based on Chromosome Aberration Data

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-bo Li

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The progression of human cancer is characterized by the accumulation of genetic instability. An increasing number of experimental genetic molecular techniques have been used to detect chromosome aberrations. Previous studies on chromosome abnormalities often focused on identifying the frequent loci of chromosome alterations, but rarely addressed the issue of interrelationship of chromosomal abnormalities. In the last few years, several mathematical models have been employed to construct models of carcinogenesis, in an attempt to identify the time order and cause-and-effect relationship of chromosome aberrations. The principles and applications of these models are reviewed and compared in this paper. Mathematical modeling of carcinogenesis can contribute to our understanding of the molecular genetics of tumor development, and identification of cancer related genes, thus leading to improved clinical practice of cancer.

  9. Why it is crucial to analyze non clonal chromosome aberrations or NCCAs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heng, Henry H Q; Regan, Sarah M; Liu, Guo; Ye, Christine J

    2016-01-01

    Current cytogenetics has largely focused its efforts on the identification of recurrent karyotypic alterations, also known as clonal chromosomal aberrations (CCAs). The rationale of doing so seems simple: recurrent genetic changes are relevant for diseases or specific physiological conditions, while non clonal chromosome aberrations (NCCAs) are insignificant genetic background or noise. However, in reality, the vast majority of chromosomal alterations are NCCAs, and it is challenging to identify commonly shared CCAs in most solid tumors. Furthermore, the karyotype, rather than genes, represents the system inheritance, or blueprint, and each NCCA represents an altered genome system. These realizations underscore the importance of the re-evaluation of NCCAs in cytogenetic analyses. In this concept article, we briefly review the definition of NCCAs, some historical misconceptions about them, and why NCCAs are not insignificant "noise," but rather a highly significant feature of the cellular population for providing genome heterogeneity and complexity, representing one important form of fuzzy inheritance. The frequencies of NCCAs also represent an index to measure both internally- and environmentally-induced genome instability. Additionally, the NCCA/CCA cycle is associated with macro- and micro-cellular evolution. Lastly, elevated NCCAs are observed in many disease/illness conditions. Considering all of these factors, we call for the immediate action of studying and reporting NCCAs. Specifically, effort is needed to characterize and compare different types of NCCAs, to define their baseline in various tissues, to develop methods to access mitotic cells, to re-examine/interpret the NCCAs data, and to develop an NCCA database. PMID:26877768

  10. Chromosomal replicons of higher plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van' t Hof, J.

    1987-03-16

    This brief discussion of replicons of higher plants offers a glimpse into the properties of chromosomal DNA replication. It gives evidence that the S phase of unrelated plant species is comprised of temporally ordered replicon families that increase in number with genome size. This orderly process, which assures a normal inheritance of genetic material to recipient daughter cells, is maintained at the level of replicon clusters by two mutually exclusive mechanisms, one involving the rate at which single replicons replicate their allotment of DNA, and another by means of the tempo-pause. The same two mechanisms are used by cells to alter the pattern of chromosomal DNA replication just prior to and during normal development. Both mechanisms are genetically determined and produce genetic effects when disturbed of disrupted by additional non-conforming DNAs. Further insight into how these two mechanisms operate requires more molecular information about the nature of replicons and the factors that govern when a replicon family replicates. Plant material is a rich and ideal source for this information just awaiting exploitation. 63 refs.

  11. Chromosomal replicons of higher plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This brief discussion of replicons of higher plants offers a glimpse into the properties of chromosomal DNA replication. It gives evidence that the S phase of unrelated plant species is comprised of temporally ordered replicon families that increase in number with genome size. This orderly process, which assures a normal inheritance of genetic material to recipient daughter cells, is maintained at the level of replicon clusters by two mutually exclusive mechanisms, one involving the rate at which single replicons replicate their allotment of DNA, and another by means of the tempo-pause. The same two mechanisms are used by cells to alter the pattern of chromosomal DNA replication just prior to and during normal development. Both mechanisms are genetically determined and produce genetic effects when disturbed of disrupted by additional non-conforming DNAs. Further insight into how these two mechanisms operate requires more molecular information about the nature of replicons and the factors that govern when a replicon family replicates. Plant material is a rich and ideal source for this information just awaiting exploitation. 63 refs

  12. Chromosomal aberrations induced by alpha particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The chromosomal aberrations produced by the ionizing radiation are commonly used when it is necessary to establish the exposure dose of an individual, it is a study that is used like complement of the traditional physical systems and its application is only in cases in that there is doubt about what indicates the conventional dosimetry. The biological dosimetry is based on the frequency of aberrations in the chromosomes of the lymphocytes of the individual in study and the dose is calculated taking like reference to the dose-response curves previously generated In vitro. A case of apparent over-exposure to alpha particles to which is practiced analysis of chromosomal aberrations to settle down if in fact there was exposure and as much as possible, to determine the presumed dose is presented. (Author)

  13. Stable type chromosome aberrations in the residents of the high background radiation area in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chromosome translocations were analyzed by chromosome painting techniques using No.1, 2 and 4 whole chromosome painting probes to examine the effect of high-level natural radiation on the frequencies of chromosome translocations in human peripheral lymphocytes. The subjects were 5 children and 13 old men from the high background radiation area and 6 children and 11 old men from the control area. Children had lesser translocations and smaller variation compared with the old men. The frequency of translocations among the old subjects varied widely from person to person. There is no difference of the frequency of chromosome translocations between high background radiation area and control area. No effect of high-level natural background radiation on the frequencies of stable chromosome translocation was detected

  14. Altered baseline brain activity in experts measured by amplitude of low frequency fluctuations (ALFF: a resting state fMRI study using expertise model of acupuncturists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minghao Dong

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available It is well established that expertise modulates evoked brain activity in response to specific stimuli. Recently, researchers have begun to investigate how expertise influences the resting brain. Among these studies, most focused on the connectivity features within/across regions, i.e. connectivity patterns/strength. However, little concern has been given to a more fundamental issue whether or not expertise modulates baseline brain activity. We investigated this question using amplitude of low-frequency (<0.08Hz fluctuation (ALFF as the metric of brain activity and a novel expertise model, i.e. acupuncturists, due to their robust proficiency in tactile perception and emotion regulation. After the psychophysical and behavioral expertise screening procedure, 23 acupuncturists and 23 matched non-acupuncturists (NA were enrolled. Our results explicated higher ALFF for acupuncturists in the left ventral medial prefrontal cortex (VMPFC and the contralateral hand representation of the primary somatosensory area (SI (corrected for multiple comparisons. Additionally, ALFF of VMPFC was negatively correlated with the outcomes of the emotion regulation task (corrected for multiple comparisons. We suggest that our study may reveal a novel connection between the neuroplasticity mechanism and resting state activity, which would upgrade our understanding of the central mechanism of learning. Furthermore, by showing that expertise can affect the baseline brain activity as indicated by ALFF, our findings may have profound implication for functional neuroimaging studies especially those involving expert models, in that difference in baseline brain activity may either smear the spatial pattern of activations for task data or introduce biased results into connectivity-based analysis for resting data.

  15. Chimpanzee chromosome 13 is homologous to human chromosome 2p

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, N. C.; Sun, C. R.Y.; Ho, T.

    1977-01-01

    Similarities between human and chimpanzee chromosomes are shown by chromosome banding techniques and somatic cell hybridization techniques. Cell hybrids were obtained from the chimpanzee lymphocyte LE-7, and the Chinese hamster mutant cell, Gal-2. Experiments showed that the ACPL, MDHs, and Gal-Act genes could be assigned to chimpanzee chromosome 13, and since these genes have been assigned to human chromosme 2p, it is suggested that chimpanzee chromosome 13 is homologous to human chromosome 2p. (HLW)

  16. Chromosome condensation and segmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some aspects of chromosome condensation in mammalians -humans especially- were studied by means of cytogenetic techniques of chromosome banding. Two further approaches were adopted: a study of normal condensation as early as prophase, and an analysis of chromosome segmentation induced by physical (temperature and γ-rays) or chemical agents (base analogues, antibiotics, ...) in order to show out the factors liable to affect condensation. Here 'segmentation' means an abnormal chromosome condensation appearing systematically and being reproducible. The study of normal condensation was made possible by the development of a technique based on cell synchronization by thymidine and giving prophasic and prometaphasic cells. Besides, the possibility of inducing R-banding segmentations on these cells by BrdU (5-bromodeoxyuridine) allowed a much finer analysis of karyotypes. Another technique was developed using 5-ACR (5-azacytidine), it allowed to induce a segmentation similar to the one obtained using BrdU and identify heterochromatic areas rich in G-C bases pairs

  17. Chromosomal abnormalities and autism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farida El-Baz

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Chromosomal abnormalities were not detected in the studied autistic children, and so the relation between the genetics and autism still needs further work up with different study methods and techniques.

  18. Recurrent chromosomal aberrations in intravenous leiomyomatosis of the uterus: high-resolution array comparative genomic hybridization study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buza, Natalia; Xu, Fang; Wu, Weiqing; Carr, Ryan J; Li, Peining; Hui, Pei

    2014-09-01

    Uterine intravenous leiomyomatosis (IVL) is a distinct smooth muscle neoplasm with a potential of clinical aggressiveness due to its ability to extend into intrauterine and extrauterine vasculature. In this study, chromosomal alterations analyzed by oligonucleotide array comparative genomic hybridization were performed in 9 cases of IVL. The analysis was informative in all cases with multiple copy number losses and/or gains observed in each tumor. The most frequent recurrent loss of 22q12.3-q13.1 was observed in 6 tumors (66.7%), followed by losses of 22q11.23-q13.31, 1p36.13-p33, 2p25.3-p23.3, and 2q24.2-q32.2 and gains of 6p22.2, 2q37.3 and 10q22.2-q22.3, in decreasing order of frequency. Copy number variants were identified at 14q11.2, 15q11.1-q11.2, and 15q26.2. Genes mapping to the regions of loss include CHEK2, EWS, NF2, PDGFB, and MAP3K7IP1 on chromosome 22q, HEI10 on chromosome 14q, and succinate dehydrogenase subunit B, E2F2, ARID1A KPNA6, EIF3S2 , PTCH2, and PIK3R3 on chromosome 1p. Regional losses on chromosomes 22q and 1p and gains on chromosomes 12q showed overlaps with those previously observed in uterine leiomyosarcomas. In addition, presence of multiple chromosomal aberrations implies a higher level of genetic instability. Follow-up polymerase chain reaction (PCR) sequencing analysis of MED12 gene revealed absence of G> A transition at nucleotides c.130 or c.131 in all 9 cases, a frequent mutation found in uterine leiomyoma and its variants. In conclusion, this is the first report of high-resolution, genome-wide investigation of IVL by oligonucleotide array comparative genomic hybridization. The presence of high frequencies of recurrent regional loss involving several chromosomes is an important finding and likely related to the pathogenesis of the disease. PMID:25033729

  19. Chromosome anomalies in mouse oocytes after irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigated the cytogenetic effects of X-rays on unfertilized mouse oocytes. NMRI females received an irradiation with 0, 22.2, 66.6, 200, and 600 R during the preovulatory phase 3 hrs after HCG (human chorionic gonadotrophin). This is a stage during oogenesis in which the oocytes pass from late dictyotene to diakinesis. Chromosome anlysis was per formed after ovulation at metaphase II. From these experiments we can draw the following conclusions: X-rays induced during the preovulatory phase a high number of chromosome anomalies. Among these, structural anomalies prevail. 7 out of 144 ovulated oocytes in matched controls carried such an abnormality, whereas after irradiation we observed with 22.2, 66.6, 200, and 600 R, 11 out of 72, 34 out of 108, 89 out of 102, and 122 out of 124, respectively. Irradiation seems also to affect the chromosome segregation during the 1. meiotic division, as we observed after 22.2, 66.6 and 200 R a total of 6 oocytes out of 204 with a supernummary chromosome. In controls, however, no hyperploidy was found in 143 ova. This increase, however, was not significant. Chromosome anomalies, e.g. breaks and deletions that go back to a one-break event increased linearly with increasing dose. Exchanges, however, going back to two-break events fittet best to the linear-quadratic dose-response model. The dose of 600 R seems to represent a kind of borderline in this experiment, because nearly all (122 out 124) carried at least one structural chromosome anomaly. It is also this dose after which the highest frequency of reciprocal translocations was observed in a humpshaped slope in spermatocytes after irradiation of spermatogonia (Preston and Brewen, 1973). With an increasing dosage up to 1,200 R the frequency of translocations decrease again. The elimination of cells, crossing this borderline, might be due to genetic or non-genetic effects. (orig./GSE)

  20. Pattern of Chromosomal Aberrations in Patients from North East Iran

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    Saeedeh Ghazaey

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Chromosomal aberrations are common causes of multiple anomaly syndromes. Recurrent chromosomal aberrations have been identified by conventional cytogenetic methods used widely as one of the most important clinical diagnostic techniques.Materials and Methods: In this retrospective study, the incidences of chromosomal aberrations were evaluated in a six year period from 2005 to 2011 in Pardis Clinical and Genetics Laboratory on patients referred to from Mashhad and other cities in Khorasan province. Karyotyping was performed on 3728 patients suspected of having chromosomal abnormalities.Results: The frequencies of the different types of chromosomal abnormalities were determined, and the relative frequencies were calculated in each group. Among these patients, 83.3% had normal karyotypes with no aberrations. The overall incidences of chromosomal abnormalities were 16.7% including sex and autosomal chromosomal anomalies. Of those, 75.1 % showed autosomal chromosomal aberrations. Down syndrome (DS was the most prevalent autosomal aberration in the patients (77.1%. Pericentric inversion of chromosome 9 was seen in 5% of patients. This inversion was prevalent in patients with recurrent spontaneous abortion (RSA. Sex chromosomal aberrations were observed in 24.9% of abnormal patients of which 61% had Turner’s syndrome and 33.5% had Klinefelter’s syndrome.Conclusion: According to the current study, the pattern of chromosomal aberrations in North East of Iran demonstrates the importance of cytogenetic evaluation in patients who show clinical abnormalities. These findings provide a reason for preparing a local cytogenetic data bank to enhance genetic counseling of families who require this service.

  1. Chromosome numbers in Bromeliaceae

    OpenAIRE

    2000-01-01

    The present study reports chromosome numbers of 17 species of Bromeliaceae, belonging to the genera Encholirium, Bromelia, Orthophytum, Hohenbergia, Billbergia, Neoglaziovia, Aechmea, Cryptanthus and Ananas. Most species present 2n = 50, however, Bromelia laciniosa, Orthophytum burle-marxii and O. maracasense are polyploids with 2n = 150, 2n = 100 and 2n = 150, respectively, while for Cryptanthus bahianus, 2n = 34 + 1-4B. B chromosomes were observed in Bromelia plumieri and Hohenbergia aff. u...

  2. Folic acid deficiency increases chromosomal instability, chromosome 21 aneuploidy and sensitivity to radiation-induced micronuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Folic acid deficiency can lead to uracil incorporation into DNA, hypomethylation of DNA, inefficient DNA repair and increase chromosome malsegregation and breakage. Because ionising radiation increases demand for efficient DNA repair and also causes chromosome breaks we hypothesised that folic acid deficiency may increase sensitivity to radiation-induced chromosome breakage. We tested this hypothesis by using the cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay in 10 day WIL2-NS cell cultures at four different folic acid concentrations (0.2, 2, 20, and 200 nM) that span the 'normal' physiological range in humans. The study showed a significant dose-dependent increase in frequency of binucleated cells with micronuclei and/or nucleoplasmic bridges with decreasing folic acid concentration (P < 0.0001, P = 0.028, respectively). These biomarkers of chromosomal instability were also increased in cells irradiated (1.5 Gy γ-rays) on day 9 relative to un-irradiated controls (P < 0.05). Folic acid deficiency and γ-irradiation were shown to have a significant interactive effect on frequency of cells containing micronuclei (two-way ANOVA, interaction P 0.0039) such that the frequency of radiation-induced micronucleated cells (i.e. after subtracting base-line frequency of un-irradiated controls) increased with decreasing folic acid concentration (P-trend < 0.0001). Aneuploidy of chromosome 21, apoptosis and necrosis were increased by folic acid deficiency but not by ionising radiation. The results of this study show that folate status has an important impact on chromosomal stability and is an important modifying factor of cellular sensitivity to radiation-induced genome damage

  3. Cytological and molecular studies of chromosomal radiosensitivity in Down Syndrome cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molecular, cellular and cytogenetic studies were conducted to determine if altered levels of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase, a DNA repair-related enzyme, is responsible for the reported formation of excess X-ray induced chromosome aberrations in cells derived from Down Syndrome (DS) patients. Nonstimulated lymphocytes from normal and DS subjects were pretreated with 3-aminobenzamide, an inhibitor of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase, for 30 minutes before exposure to X-rays and the levels of induced chromosome aberrations were determined in mitotic cells. DS lymphocytes exhibited significantly higher frequencies of chromosome aberrations in the presence of 3-aminobenzamide that normal lymphocytes. No difference was observed in the absence of 3-aminobenzamide. Additional studies were done using normal and DS lymphoblastoid cell lines which exhibited a similar response at the DNA level as the lymphocytes. Analysis of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase activity based on incorporation of the substrate, NAD+, into acid insoluble materials, revealed that there was no significant difference in the ability to form poly (ADP-ribose) in the DS or normal cells. 3-aminobenzamide effectively inhibited poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase in both the normal and DS cells

  4. Loss of Y-chromosome does not correlate with age at onset of head and neck carcinoma: a case-control study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva Veiga, L.C. [Departamento de Genética, Instituto de Biociências, Universidade Estadual Paulista, Botucatu, SP (Brazil); Departamento de Clínica Médica, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Bérgamo, N.A. [Departamento de Biologia Geral, Instituto de Ciências Biológicas, Universidade Federal de Goiás, Goiânia, GO (Brazil); Reis, P.P. [Departamento de Cirurgia e Ortopedia, Faculdade de Medicina de Botucatu, Universidade Estadual Paulista, Botucatu, SP (Brazil); Kowalski, L.P. [Departamento de Cirurgia de Cabeça e Pescoço e Otorrinolaringologia, Hospital A.C. Camargo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Rogatto, S.R. [Laboratório NeoGene, Departamento de Urologia, Faculdade de Medicina de Botucatu, Universidade Estadual Paulista, Botucatu, SP (Brazil); Departamento de Pesquisa, Hospital A.C. Camargo,Fundação Antônio Prudente, São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2012-01-20

    Loss of Y-chromosome has been correlated with older age in males. Furthermore, current evidence indicates that Y-chromosome loss also occurs in several human tumors, including head and neck carcinomas. However, the association between Y nullisomy and the occurrence of neoplasias in elderly men has not been well established. In the present study, the association between Y-chromosome loss and head and neck carcinomas was evaluated by comparison to cells from peripheral blood lymphocytes and normal mucosa of cancer-free individuals matched for age using dual-color fluorescence in situ hybridization. Twenty-one patients ranging in age from 28 to 68 years were divided into five-year groups for comparison with 16 cancer-free individuals matched for age. The medical records of all patients were examined to obtain clinical and histopathological data. None of the patients had undergone radiotherapy or chemotherapy before surgery. In all groups, the frequency of Y-chromosome loss was higher among patients than among normal reference subjects (P < 0.0001) and was not age-dependent. These data suggest that Y-chromosome loss is a tumor-specific alteration not associated with advanced age in head and neck carcinomas.

  5. Loss of Y-chromosome does not correlate with age at onset of head and neck carcinoma: a case-control study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loss of Y-chromosome has been correlated with older age in males. Furthermore, current evidence indicates that Y-chromosome loss also occurs in several human tumors, including head and neck carcinomas. However, the association between Y nullisomy and the occurrence of neoplasias in elderly men has not been well established. In the present study, the association between Y-chromosome loss and head and neck carcinomas was evaluated by comparison to cells from peripheral blood lymphocytes and normal mucosa of cancer-free individuals matched for age using dual-color fluorescence in situ hybridization. Twenty-one patients ranging in age from 28 to 68 years were divided into five-year groups for comparison with 16 cancer-free individuals matched for age. The medical records of all patients were examined to obtain clinical and histopathological data. None of the patients had undergone radiotherapy or chemotherapy before surgery. In all groups, the frequency of Y-chromosome loss was higher among patients than among normal reference subjects (P < 0.0001) and was not age-dependent. These data suggest that Y-chromosome loss is a tumor-specific alteration not associated with advanced age in head and neck carcinomas

  6. Micromechanics of human mitotic chromosomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eukaryote cells dramatically reorganize their long chromosomal DNAs to facilitate their physical segregation during mitosis. The internal organization of folded mitotic chromosomes remains a basic mystery of cell biology; its understanding would likely shed light on how chromosomes are separated from one another as well as into chromosome structure between cell divisions. We report biophysical experiments on single mitotic chromosomes from human cells, where we combine micromanipulation, nano-Newton-scale force measurement and biochemical treatments to study chromosome connectivity and topology. Results are in accord with previous experiments on amphibian chromosomes and support the 'chromatin network' model of mitotic chromosome structure. Prospects for studies of chromosome-organizing proteins using siRNA expression knockdowns, as well as for differential studies of chromosomes with and without mutations associated with genetic diseases, are also discussed

  7. Vibrio chromosomes share common history

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    Gevers Dirk

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While most gamma proteobacteria have a single circular chromosome, Vibrionales have two circular chromosomes. Horizontal gene transfer is common among Vibrios, and in light of this genetic mobility, it is an open question to what extent the two chromosomes themselves share a common history since their formation. Results Single copy genes from each chromosome (142 genes from chromosome I and 42 genes from chromosome II were identified from 19 sequenced Vibrionales genomes and their phylogenetic comparison suggests consistent phylogenies for each chromosome. Additionally, study of the gene organization and phylogeny of the respective origins of replication confirmed the shared history. Conclusions Thus, while elements within the chromosomes may have experienced significant genetic mobility, the backbones share a common history. This allows conclusions based on multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA for one chromosome to be applied equally to both chromosomes.

  8. GENETIC ALTERRATIONS OF MICROSATELLITE MARKERS AT CHROMOSOME 17 IN NON-SMALL CELL LUNG CANCER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To analyse the microsatellite instability (MI) and loss of heterozygosity (LOH) in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods: MI and LOH at chromosome 17 were checked in 35 cases of NSCLC tumor-normal paired tissues using four microsatellite markers TP53 (17p13.1), THRA1 (17q11.2-12), D17S579 (17q12-21) and D17S855 (17q21) by PCR based analysis. Mutations of P53 exons 5-8 were also tested using PCR-single strand conformation polymorphism (PCR-SSCP) and PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) analysis. Results: 22 of 35 tumors (62.8%) displayed MI or LOH. 14 tumors (40.0%) exhibited MI, 11 tumors (31.4%) exhibited LOH, while 3 tumors (8.6%) exhibited MI and LOH concurrently. 23 tumors (65.7%) exhibited P53 gene mutations. The frequency of MI or LOH was obviously higher in the early-stage (stages I and II, 78.9%) than in the advanced-stage (stage III, 43.8%). However, the frequency of MI or LOH had no difference either between high-grade (75.0%) and low-grade (52.6%) differentiated NSCLC or between the tumors with P53 mutations (59.1%) and those without P53 mutations (69.2%). No relationship was observed between the presence of MI or LOH and the histologic subtype of NSCLC. Conclusion: The results suggest that MI and LOH at chromosome 17 may play a alterations on chromosome 17 in tumors of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In addition, studies reported contradictory results concerning the incidence of these alterations and the relationship between these genetic alterations and the clinical behavior of NSCLC. The aim of this study was to investigate the incidence of MI and LOH at chromosome 17 in tumors of patients with NSCLC and its association with clinical and histologic features of NSCLC.

  9. Y chromosome microdeletions in Turkish infertile men

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    Zamani Ayse

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available AIMS: To detect the frequency and types of both chromosomal abnormalities and Y chromosome microdeletions in infertile men attending to our university intracytoplasmic sperm injection ICSI/IVF centre and fertile control subjects in our patient population. SETTINGS AND DESIGN: A total of 50 infertile men who were referred to IVF center of Meram medical faculty were selected for the molecular azospermia factor (AZF screening program. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Karyotype analysis and polymerase chain reaction amplification using 15 Y-specific sequence-tagged sites of AZF region were done. RESULTS: The total prevalence of chromosomal abnormalities was found to be 10% (5/50, including 4 patients with numerical and 1 patient with structural abnormalities. Overall, 4 of the 50 patients tested (8% exhibited deletions of the Y chromosome, 3 of them being azospermic and 1 of them oligospermic men. The frequency of the microdeletions in subgroups with azospermia and oligozoospermia was found to be 10.7% (3/29 and 4.7% (1/21 respectively. Microdeletions of AZFb and AZFc regions were detected in all of the 4 patients. Neither AZFa nor AZFd microdeletions were indicated. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest that one must know whether there is a genetic cause for male infertility before patients can be subjected to ISCI or testicular sperm extraction (TESE/ISCI treatment.

  10. Computer aided analysis of additional chromosome aberrations in Philadelphia chromosome positive acute lymphoblastic leukaemia using a simplified computer readable cytogenetic notation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohr Brigitte

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The analysis of complex cytogenetic databases of distinct leukaemia entities may help to detect rare recurring chromosome aberrations, minimal common regions of gains and losses, and also hot spots of genomic rearrangements. The patterns of the karyotype alterations may provide insights into the genetic pathways of disease progression. Results We developed a simplified computer readable cytogenetic notation (SCCN by which chromosome findings are normalised at a resolution of 400 bands. Lost or gained chromosomes or chromosome segments are specified in detail, and ranges of chromosome breakpoint assignments are recorded. Software modules were written to summarise the recorded chromosome changes with regard to the respective chromosome involvement. To assess the degree of karyotype alterations the ploidy levels and numbers of numerical and structural changes were recorded separately, and summarised in a complex karyotype aberration score (CKAS. The SCCN and CKAS were used to analyse the extend and the spectrum of additional chromosome aberrations in 94 patients with Philadelphia chromosome positive (Ph-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL and secondary chromosome anomalies. Dosage changes of chromosomal material represented 92.1% of all additional events. Recurring regions of chromosome losses were identified. Structural rearrangements affecting (pericentromeric chromosome regions were recorded in 24.6% of the cases. Conclusions SCCN and CKAS provide unifying elements between karyotypes and computer processable data formats. They proved to be useful in the investigation of additional chromosome aberrations in Ph-positive ALL, and may represent a step towards full automation of the analysis of large and complex karyotype databases.

  11. Use of the 5-bromodeoxyuridine-labelling technique for exploring mechanisms involved in the formation of chromosomal aberrations. Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Synchronized G1 CHO cells with chromosomes of TB or TT constitution were irradiated with X-rays, short-wave UV and long-wave UV. The types and frequencies of chromosomal aberrations observed in the ensuing mitosis were studied. X-Rays induced predominantly chromosome types of aberration in chromosomes of TT constitution, whereas both chromosome- and chromatid-types of aberration were induced in cells with chromosomes of TB constitution. Short-wave UV induced only chromatid types of aberration in cells containing chromosomes of TT constitution, but both chromosome and chromatid types of aberration in cells with chromosomes of TB constitution. Long-wave UV induced chromosome and chromatid types of aberration in cells with chromosomes of TB constitution and no aberrations in cells containing chromosomes of TT constitution. Long-wave UV-irradiation of cells containing chromosomes of TB constitution increases the frequencies of SCEs. The relationship between chromosome constitution (TT or TB), the type of lesions induced by the 3 different agents employed, and the types chromosomal aberration induced are discussed. (orig.)

  12. Alteration in frequency and function of CD4⁺CD25⁺FOXP3⁺ regulatory T cells in patients with immune thrombocytopenic purpura.

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    Nargess Arandi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP is an autoimmune bleeding disorder characterized by production of auto-antibodies against platelet antigens. It is obvious that regulatory T cells (Tregs have a major role in controlling immune homeostasis and preventing autoimmunity.To investigate the frequency and functions of Tregs, twenty ITP patients and twenty age- and sex-matched healthy controls were recruited. The peripheral blood mononuclear cells were isolated and the proportion of Tregs was defined by flow cytometry method. The expression of immune-regulatory markers, cytotoxic T-lymphocyte associated antigen-4 (CTLA-4 and glucocorticoid induced tumor necrosis factor receptor (GITR were also assessed by quantitative Real-time PCR TaqMan method. For evaluation of Treg function, Tregs were enriched and their ability to inhibit proliferation of T cells was measured and levels of immune-regulatory cytokines IL-10 and TGF-β were also measured.Results showed that the frequency of Tregs and the mean fluorescence intensity of FOXP3 protein significantly decreased in ITP patients compared to those in healthy controls. In addition, there was a significant reduction in relative expression of both CTLA-4 and GITR mRNA in ITP patients (P=0.02 and P=0.006, respectively. The suppressive function of Tregs also diminished in ITP patients compared to that in controls. Both IL-10 and TGF-β cytokines were produced in lower amounts in ITP patients than controls.It could be concluded that alteration in Treg frequency and functional characteristics might be responsible for loss of self-tolerance and subsequently destructive immune responses observed in ITP patients.

  13. The high frequency of spontaneous micronuclei observed in lymphocytes of systemic sclerosis patients: preliminary results

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    L. Migliore

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: aim of the study is to assess the presence of spontaneous chromosome damage in patients affected by limited (lSSc or diffuse (dSSc Systemic Slerosis, using the micronucleus (MN assay. Methods: we evaluated MN frequency in cultured peripheral lymphocytes of 18 SSc and in a group of 20 healthy controls. Patients were also classified as ACA+, Scl70+, FAN+ according to the presence of the specific anti-nuclear antibodies. We also explored the hypothesis that the extent of cytogenetic alteration might be related to the severity of the pathological condition and/or to the immunological profile. Results: compared to controls, the patient group as a whole showed significantly higher MN frequencies (10.8±4.5 vs. 27.8±13.7, p<0.001. No correlation was found between spontaneous chromosome damage and severity of the disease, being MN frequency 33.1±17.0 and 19.8±2.7 in lSSc and dSSc, respectively. Interestingly, ACA+ subjects displayed the highest MN frequency (36.9±15.0, as compared to patients with different antibody pattern (Scl70+, FAN+; 19.7±8.2. Conclusions: our results confirm the presence of chromosomal damage in circulating lymphocytes of SSc patients and would suggest a key role of antibodies to the centromere in determining the observed cytogenetic anomalies.

  14. Radiation-induced chromosome breakages in bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meiosis and pollen fertility were studied in the M2 generation in four varieties of hexaploid wheat. Meiosis was characterized by the formation of interchange configurations, such as rings and chains of four chromosomes in several cells. Chromosomal aberrations showed linear relationship with gamma irradiation; 45 kR dose induced the highest chromosomal abnormalities. Most multivalents were interchange rings of four chromosomes. Translocations involving two pairs of homologous or nonhomologous chromosomes seemed to be higher in frequency than those involving more than two pairs of chromosomes. Anaphase abnormalities, such as laggards, bridges and fragments and unequal segregation of chromosomes, were frequently observed. Pollen fertility was considerably reduced in the M2 plants arising form the treatments of higher doses of gamma rays because of the induced chromosome interchanges. (author)

  15. Studies on chromosome aberrations in workers occupationally exposed to radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cytogenetic assays for unstable chromosomes were performed on 54 medical radiation workers who are occupationally exposed to radiation and 42 controls. A total of 15,577 metaphase cells were scored. The frequencies of dicentrics and acentric chromosomes on controls were 0.52*10-3 and 0.82*10-2, respectively. On radiation workers those were 2.28*10-3 and 1.34*10-2, respectively. Though the frequencies of all types of chromosome aberrations in the workers were higher than those in the controls, the only significant difference was found in the case of dicentrics (P 0.05) except exposure dose of recent one year (P < 0.05). These results could indicate that low level exposure to ionizing radiation can induce unstable chromosome aberrations in blood lymphocytes

  16. Chromosome numbers in Bromeliaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cotias-de-Oliveira Ana Lúcia Pires

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study reports chromosome numbers of 17 species of Bromeliaceae, belonging to the genera Encholirium, Bromelia, Orthophytum, Hohenbergia, Billbergia, Neoglaziovia, Aechmea, Cryptanthus and Ananas. Most species present 2n = 50, however, Bromelia laciniosa, Orthophytum burle-marxii and O. maracasense are polyploids with 2n = 150, 2n = 100 and 2n = 150, respectively, while for Cryptanthus bahianus, 2n = 34 + 1-4B. B chromosomes were observed in Bromelia plumieri and Hohenbergia aff. utriculosa. The chromosome number of all species was determined for the first time, except for Billbergia chlorosticta and Cryptanthus bahianus. Our data supports the hypothesis of a basic number of x = 25 for the Bromeliaceae family and decreasing aneuploidy in the genus Cryptanthus.

  17. Those amazing dinoflagellate chromosomes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PETER J RIZZO

    2003-01-01

    Dinoflagellates are a very large and diverse group of eukaryotic algae that play a major role in aquatic food webs of both fresh water and marine habitats. Moreover, the toxic members of this group pose a health threat in the form of red tides. Finally, dinoflagellates are of great evolutionary importance,because of their taxonomic position, and their unusual chromosome structure and composition. While the cytoplasm of dinoflagellates is typically eukaryotic, the nucleus is unique when compared to the nucleus of other eukaryotes. More specifically, while the chromosomes of all other eukaryotes contain histones,dinoflagellate chromosomes lack histones completely. There are no known exceptions to this observation: all dinoflagellates lack histones, and all other eukaryotes contain histones. Nevertheless, dinoflagellates remain a relatively unstudied group of eukaryotes.

  18. Persistent Increase in Chromosome Instability in Lung Cancer : Possible Indirect Involvement of p53 Inactivation

    OpenAIRE

    Haruki, Nobuhiro; Harano, Tomoko; Masuda, Akira; Kiyono, Tohru; TAKAHASHI, TAKAO; Tatematsu, Yoshio; Shimizu, Shigeki; Mitsudomi, Tetsuya; Konishi, Hiroyuki; Osada, Hirotaka; Fujii, Yoshitaka; Takahashi, Takashi

    2001-01-01

    Karyotype and fluorescence in situ hybridization analyses have demonstrated the frequent presence of an altered static state of the number of chromosomes (ie, aneuploidy) in lung cancer, but it has not been directly established whether aneuploidy is in fact associated with a persistent increase in the rate of chromosomal losses and gains (ie, chromosome instability, or CIN). The study presented here used a panel of 10 lung cancer cell lines to provide for the first time direct evidence that C...

  19. Metaphase chromosome aberrations as markers of radiation exposure and dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chromosome aberration frequency provides the most reliable biological marker of dose for detecting acute accidental radiation exposure. Significant radiation-induced changes in the frequency of chromosome aberrations can be detected at very low doses. Our paper provides information on using molecular chromosome probes ''paints'' to score chromosome damage and illustrates how technical advances make it possible to understand mechanisms involved during formation of chromosome aberrations. In animal studies chromosome aberrations provide a method to relate cellular damage to cellular dose. Using an In vivo/In vitro approach aberrations provided a biological marker of dose from radon progeny exposure which was used to convert WLM to dose in rat tracheal epithelial cells. Injection of Chinese hamsters with 144Ce which produced a low dose rate exposure of bone marrow to either low-LET radiation increased the sensitivity of the cells to subsequent external exposure to 60Co. These studies demonstrated the usefulness of chromosome damage as a biological marker of dose and cellular responsiveness

  20. Is Native American R Y-Chromosome of African Origin?

    OpenAIRE

    Clyde Winters

    2011-01-01

    Controversey surrounds the phylogeography and origin of the R haplotype among Native Americans. Some researchers have suggested that Europeans spread this haplotype among Native Americans. The purpose of this study was to determine the origin of the R-M173 y-chromosome among Native Americans . It is the third most frequent y-chromosome possessed by Native Americans. Native Americans with the highest frequency of R-M173 haplotypes like the Ojibwa and Seminoles mated frequently with African mal...

  1. Experimental observation of G banding verifying X-ray workers' chromosome translocation detected by FISH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: FISH is the most effective way of detecting chromosome aberration and many factors affect its accuracy. G-banding is used to verify the results of early X-ray workers' chromosome translocation examined by FISH. Methods: The chromosome translocations of early X-ray workers have been analysed by FISH (fluorescence in situ hybridization) and G-banding, yields of translocation treated with statistics. Results: The chromosome aberrations frequencies by tow methods are closely related. Conclusion: FISH is a feasible way to analyse chromosome aberrations of X-ray workers and reconstruct dose

  2. Chromosomal rearrangements in cattle and pigs revealed by chromosome microdissection and chromosome painting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yerle Martine

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A pericentric inversion of chromosome 4 in a boar, as well as a case of (2q-;5p+ translocation mosaicism in a bull were analysed by chromosome painting using probes generated by conventional microdissection. For the porcine inversion, probes specific for p arms and q arms were produced and hybridised simultaneously on metaphases of a heterozygote carrier. In the case of the bovine translocation, two whole chromosome probes (chromosome 5, and derived chromosome 5 were elaborated and hybridised independently on chromosomal preparations of the bull who was a carrier of the mosaic translocation. The impossibility of differentiating chromosomes 2 and der(2 from other chromosomes of the metaphases did not allow the production of painting probes for these chromosomes. For all experiments, the quality of painting was comparable to that usually observed with probes obtained from flow-sorted chromosomes. The results obtained allowed confirmation of the interpretations proposed with G-banding karyotype analyses. In the bovine case, however, the reciprocity of the translocation could not be proven. The results presented in this paper show the usefulness of the microdissection technique for characterising chromosomal rearrangements in species for which commercial probes are not available. They also confirmed that the main limiting factor of the technique is the quality of the chromosomal preparations, which does not allow the identification of target chromosomes or chromosome fragments in all cases.

  3. Chromosome aberrations and sister chromatid exchanges in Swedish paint industry workers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haglund, U.; Lundberg, I.; Zech, L.

    1980-12-01

    Workers in the Swedish paint industry exposed to a mixture of organic solvents, mainly containing xylene or toluene, were investigated for genotoxic effects. No difference in the frequency of sister chromatid exchanges (SCE), 0.192 and 0.193 per chromosome, respectively, was noted in the peripheral lymphocytes of the exposed group of 17 workers and their matched reference group. No correlation was found between xylene or toluene exposure and SCE frequency nor between total solvent exposure and SCE frequency. The frequency of chromosome aberrations was also investigated for the five most exposed workers and their matched referents, and no difference was found. There was no correlation between SCE and chromosome breaks.

  4. A cohesin-based structural platform supporting homologous chromosome pairing in meiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Da-Qiao; Haraguchi, Tokuko; Hiraoka, Yasushi

    2016-08-01

    The pairing and recombination of homologous chromosomes during the meiotic prophase is necessary for the accurate segregation of chromosomes in meiosis. However, the mechanism by which homologous chromosomes achieve this pairing has remained an open question. Meiotic cohesins have been shown to affect chromatin compaction; however, the impact of meiotic cohesins on homologous pairing and the fine structures of cohesion-based chromatin remain to be determined. A recent report using live-cell imaging and super-resolution microscopy demonstrated that the lack of meiotic cohesins alters the chromosome axis structures and impairs the pairing of homologous chromosomes. These results suggest that meiotic cohesin-based chromosome axis structures are crucial for the pairing of homologous chromosomes. PMID:26856595

  5. Chromosome painting and prematurely condensed chromosomes (PCC) - new methods of biological dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Classic methods of biological dosimetry - micronucleus and dicentric assay pose several problems. In the case of micronucleus there is a wide range of spontaneous frequencies and smoking and age are powerfull contributing factors. In the case of dicentrics - low mitotic index in some individuals especially in the elderly or accidentally exposed to high radiation doses. So, there are 2 quite new molecular techniques which at least in part solve these problems: chromosome painting and PCC. Chromosome painting by employing chromosome-specific DNA probes allow easy identification and quantification of translocations. recently, it was shown that calyculin A or okadaic acid, inhibitors of 1 and 2A protein phosphatases, induce PCC in peripheral blood cells. This is an easy biodosimetric method with a high PCC index and independent of the ability of cells to divide e.g. after high (20 Gy) doses when the mitotic index is extremely low. (author)

  6. APL1, an altered peptide ligand derived from human heat-shock protein 60, increases the frequency of Tregs and its suppressive capacity against antigen responding effector CD4 + T cells from rheumatoid arthritis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barberá, Ariana; Lorenzo, Noraylis; van Kooten, Peter; van Roon, Joel; de Jager, Wilco; Prada, Dinorah; Gómez, Jorge; Padrón, Gabriel; van Eden, Willem; Broere, Femke; Del Carmen Domínguez, María

    2016-07-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic autoimmune disease characterized by a chronic relapsing-remitting joint inflammation. Perturbations in the balance between CD4 + T cells producing IL-17 and CD4 + CD25(high)FoxP3 + Tregs correlate with irreversible bone and cartilage destruction in RA. APL1 is an altered peptide ligand derived from a CD4+ T-cell epitope of human HSP60, an autoantigen expressed in the inflamed synovium, which increases the frequency of CD4 + CD25(high)FoxP3+ Tregs in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from RA patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the suppressive capacity of Tregs induced by APL1 on proliferation of effector CD4+ T cells using co-culture experiments. Enhanced Treg-mediated suppression was observed in APL1-treated cultures compared with cells cultured only with media. Subsequent analyses using autologous cross-over experiments showed that the enhanced Treg suppression in APL1-treated cultures could reflect increased suppressive function of Tregs against APL1-responsive T cells. On the other hand, APL1-treatment had a significant effect reducing IL-17 levels produced by effector CD4+ T cells. Hence, this peptide has the ability to increase the frequency of Tregs and their suppressive properties whereas effector T cells produce less IL-17. Thus, we propose that APL1 therapy could help to ameliorate the pathogenic Th17/Treg balance in RA patients. PMID:27241313

  7. ATM modulates the loading of recombination proteins onto a chromosomal translocation breakpoint hotspot

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Sun (Jiying); Y. Oma (Yukako); M. Harata (Masahiko); K. Kono (Kazuteru); H. Shima (Hiroki); A. Kinomura (Aiko); T. Ikura (Tsuyoshi); H. Suzuki (Hidekazu); S. Mizutani (Shuki); R. Kanaar (Roland); S. Tashiro (Satoshi)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractChromosome translocations induced by DNA damaging agents, such as ionizing radiation and certain chemotherapies, alter genetic information resulting in malignant transformation. Abrogation or loss of the ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) protein, a DNA damage signaling regulator, incre

  8. Ring chromosome 13

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, C A; Hertz, Jens Michael; Petersen, M B; Vogel, F; Noer, H; Mikkelsen, M

    1992-01-01

    A stillborn male child with anencephaly and multiple malformations was found to have the karyotype 46,XY,r(13) (p11q21.1). The breakpoint at 13q21.1, determined by high resolution banding, is the most proximal breakpoint ever reported in patients with ring chromosome 13. In situ hybridisation with...

  9. The Y Chromosome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Offner, Susan

    2010-01-01

    The Y chromosome is of great interest to students and can be used to teach about many important biological concepts in addition to sex determination. This paper discusses mutation, recombination, mammalian sex determination, sex determination in general, and the evolution of sex determination in mammals. It includes a student activity that…

  10. Chromosomes, cancer and radiosensitivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samouhos, E.

    1983-08-01

    Some specific chromosomal abnormalities are associated with certain cancers. The earliest description of such a specific association is the one of the Philadelphia chromosome and myelogenous leukemia (1960). Other congenital karyotype abnormalities are associated with specific cancers. Examples of these are Down's syndrome with leukemia and Klinefelter's syndrome with male breast cancer. Genetic diseases of increased chromosome breakage, or of defective chromosome repair, are associated with greatly increased cancer incidence. Three such diseases have been recognized: 1) Fanconi's anemia, associated with leukemias and lymphomas, 2) Bloom's syndrome, associated with acute leukemias and lymphosarcoma, and 3) ataxia telangiectasia, associated with Hodgkin's disease, leukemia, and lymphosarcomas. Ten percent of individuals with ataxia telangiectasia will develop one of these neoplasms. Individuals with certain of these syndromes display an unusually high radiosensitivity. Radiation therapy for cancers has been fatal in patients who received as low as 3000 rad. This remarkable radiosensitivity has been quantitated in cell cultures from such cases. Evidence suggests that the apparent sensitivity may reflect subnormal ability to repair radiation damage. The rapid proliferation of information in this field stems from the interdigitation of many disciplines and specialties, including cytogenetics, cell biology, molecular biology, epidemiology, radiobiology, and several others. This paper is intended for clinicians; it presents a structured analytic scheme for correlating and classifying this multidisciplinary information as it becomes available.

  11. Chromosomes, cancer and radiosensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some specific chromosomal abnormalities are associated with certain cancers. The earliest description of such a specific association is the one of the Philadelphia chromosome and myelogenous leukemia (1960). Other congenital karyotype abnormalities are associated with specific cancers. Examples of these are Down's syndrome with leukemia and Klinefelter's syndrome with male breast cancer. Genetic diseases of increased chromosome breakage, or of defective chromosome repair, are associated with greatly increased cancer incidence. Three such diseases have been recognized: 1) Fanconi's anemia, associated with leukemias and lymphomas, 2) Bloom's syndrome, associated with acute leukemias and lymphosarcoma, and 3) ataxia telangiectasia, associated with Hodgkin's disease, leukemia, and lymphosarcomas. Ten percent of individuals with ataxia telangiectasia will develop one of these neoplasms. Individuals with certain of these syndromes display an unusually high radiosensitivity. Radiation therapy for cancers has been fatal in patients who received as low as 3000 rad. This remarkable radiosensitivity has been quantitated in cell cultures from such cases. Evidence suggests that the apparent sensitivity may reflect subnormal ability to repair radiation damage. The rapid proliferation of information in this field stems from the interdigitation of many disciplines and specialties, including cytogenetics, cell biology, molecular biology, epidemiology, radiobiology, and several others. This paper is intended for clinicians; it presents a structured analytic scheme for correlating and classifying this multidisciplinary information as it becomes available

  12. Chromosome Morphology in Kniphofia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. J de Wet

    1960-12-01

    Full Text Available A number of species and varieties of the genus  Kniphofia (Liliaceae were studied cytologically. The somatic chromosome number is  2n = 12 in all the species. This is also true in  Notosceptrum natalense Baker.

  13. Telomere dysfunction and chromosome instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murnane, John P., E-mail: jmurnane@radonc.ucsf.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California San Francisco, 2340 Sutter Street, San Francisco, CA 94143-1331 (United States)

    2012-02-01

    The ends of chromosomes are composed of a short repeat sequence and associated proteins that together form a cap, called a telomere, that keeps the ends from appearing as double-strand breaks (DSBs) and prevents chromosome fusion. The loss of telomeric repeat sequences or deficiencies in telomeric proteins can result in chromosome fusion and lead to chromosome instability. The similarity between chromosome rearrangements resulting from telomere loss and those found in cancer cells implicates telomere loss as an important mechanism for the chromosome instability contributing to human cancer. Telomere loss in cancer cells can occur through gradual shortening due to insufficient telomerase, the protein that maintains telomeres. However, cancer cells often have a high rate of spontaneous telomere loss despite the expression of telomerase, which has been proposed to result from a combination of oncogene-mediated replication stress and a deficiency in DSB repair in telomeric regions. Chromosome fusion in mammalian cells primarily involves nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ), which is the major form of DSB repair. Chromosome fusion initiates chromosome instability involving breakage-fusion-bridge (B/F/B) cycles, in which dicentric chromosomes form bridges and break as the cell attempts to divide, repeating the process in subsequent cell cycles. Fusion between sister chromatids results in large inverted repeats on the end of the chromosome, which amplify further following additional B/F/B cycles. B/F/B cycles continue until the chromosome acquires a new telomere, most often by translocation of the end of another chromosome. The instability is not confined to a chromosome that loses its telomere, because the instability is transferred to the chromosome donating a translocation. Moreover, the amplified regions are unstable and form extrachromosomal DNA that can reintegrate at new locations. Knowledge concerning the factors promoting telomere loss and its consequences is

  14. Organization of the bacterial chromosome.

    OpenAIRE

    Krawiec, S.; Riley, M

    1990-01-01

    Recent progress in studies on the bacterial chromosome is summarized. Although the greatest amount of information comes from studies on Escherichia coli, reports on studies of many other bacteria are also included. A compilation of the sizes of chromosomal DNAs as determined by pulsed-field electrophoresis is given, as well as a discussion of factors that affect gene dosage, including redundancy of chromosomes on the one hand and inactivation of chromosomes on the other hand. The distinction ...

  15. Effects of heavy-ion beams on chromosomes of common wheat, Triticum aestivum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kikuchi, Shinji; Saito, Yoshinaka [Laboratory of Plant Genetics and Breeding Science, Faculty of Agriculture, Tottori University, 4-101 Koyama-Minami, Tottori 680-8553 (Japan); Ryuto, Hiromichi; Fukunishi, Nobuhisa; Abe, Tomoko [RIKEN Nishina Center, RIKEN, Hirosawa, Wako 351-0198 (Japan); Tanaka, Hiroyuki [Laboratory of Plant Genetics and Breeding Science, Faculty of Agriculture, Tottori University, 4-101 Koyama-Minami, Tottori 680-8553 (Japan); Tsujimoto, Hisashi, E-mail: tsujim@muses.tottori-u.ac.jp [Laboratory of Plant Genetics and Breeding Science, Faculty of Agriculture, Tottori University, 4-101 Koyama-Minami, Tottori 680-8553 (Japan)

    2009-10-02

    To investigate the nature of plant chromosomes irradiated by heavy-ion beams, the effects of nitrogen (N) and neon (Ne) ion beams on hexaploid wheat chromosomes were compared with those of X-ray. Chromosome aberrations, such as short, ring and dicentric chromosomes appeared in high frequency. The average numbers of chromosome breaks at LD-50 by irradiation with X-ray, N and Ne ion beams were 32, 20 and 20, respectively. These values may be underestimated because chromosome rearrangement without change in chromosome morphology was not counted. Thus, we subsequently used a wheat line with a pair of extra chromosomes from an alien species (Leymus racemosus) and observed the fate of the irradiated marker chromosomes by genomic in situ hybridization. This analysis revealed that 50 Gy of neon beam induced about eight times more breaks than those induced by X-ray. This result suggests that heavy-ion beams induce chromosome rearrangement in high frequency rather than loss of gene function. This suggests further that most of the novel mutations produced by ion beam irradiation, which have been used in plant breeding, may not be caused by ordinary gene disruption but by chromosome rearrangements.

  16. SKY analysis revealed recurrent numerical and structural chromosome changes in BDII rat endometrial carcinomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behboudi Afrouz

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genomic alterations are common features of cancer cells, and some of these changes are proven to be neoplastic-specific. Such alterations may serve as valuable tools for diagnosis and classification of tumors, prediction of clinical outcome, disease monitoring, and choice of therapy as well as for providing clues to the location of crucial cancer-related genes. Endometrial carcinoma (EC is the most frequently diagnosed malignancy of the female genital tract, ranking fourth among all invasive tumors affecting women. Cytogenetic studies of human ECs have not produced very conclusive data, since many of these studies are based on karyotyping of limited number of cases and no really specific karyotypic changes have yet been identified. As the majority of the genes are conserved among mammals, the use of inbred animal model systems may serve as a tool for identification of underlying genes and pathways involved in tumorigenesis in humans. In the present work we used spectral karyotyping (SKY to identify cancer-related aberrations in a well-characterized experimental model for spontaneous endometrial carcinoma in the BDII rat tumor model. Results Analysis of 21 experimental ECs revealed specific nonrandom numerical and structural chromosomal changes. The most recurrent numerical alterations were gains in rat chromosome 4 (RNO4 and losses in RNO15. The most commonly structural changes were mainly in form of chromosomal translocations and were detected in RNO3, RNO6, RNO10, RNO11, RNO12, and RNO20. Unbalanced chromosomal translocations involving RNO3p was the most commonly observed structural changes in this material followed by RNO11p and RNO10 translocations. Conclusion The non-random nature of these events, as documented by their high frequencies of incidence, is suggesting for dynamic selection of these changes during experimental EC tumorigenesis and therefore for their potential contribution into development of this malignancy

  17. Fenton reaction induced cancer in wild type rats recapitulates genomic alterations observed in human cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinya Akatsuka

    Full Text Available Iron overload has been associated with carcinogenesis in humans. Intraperitoneal administration of ferric nitrilotriacetate initiates a Fenton reaction in renal proximal tubules of rodents that ultimately leads to a high incidence of renal cell carcinoma (RCC after repeated treatments. We performed high-resolution microarray comparative genomic hybridization to identify characteristics in the genomic profiles of this oxidative stress-induced rat RCCs. The results revealed extensive large-scale genomic alterations with a preference for deletions. Deletions and amplifications were numerous and sometimes fragmented, demonstrating that a Fenton reaction is a cause of such genomic alterations in vivo. Frequency plotting indicated that two of the most commonly altered loci corresponded to a Cdkn2a/2b deletion and a Met amplification. Tumor sizes were proportionally associated with Met expression and/or amplification, and clustering analysis confirmed our results. Furthermore, we developed a procedure to compare whole genomic patterns of the copy number alterations among different species based on chromosomal syntenic relationship. Patterns of the rat RCCs showed the strongest similarity to the human RCCs among five types of human cancers, followed by human malignant mesothelioma, an iron overload-associated cancer. Therefore, an iron-dependent Fenton chemical reaction causes large-scale genomic alterations during carcinogenesis, which may result in distinct genomic profiles. Based on the characteristics of extensive genome alterations in human cancer, our results suggest that this chemical reaction may play a major role during human carcinogenesis.

  18. Guidelines of Special Care Dentistry in Patients with Chromosomal and Genetic syndromes

    OpenAIRE

    Cremonesi, Ilaria

    2015-01-01

    Chromosomal and genetic syndromes are frequently associated with dental and cranio-facial alterations. The aim of our study is to identify and describe the dental and craniofacial alterations typical of six genetic and chromosomal syndromes examined. Materials and Methods- A dental visit was performed to 195 patients referred from Sant’Orsola Hospital of Bologna, University of Bologna, to Service of Special Need Dentistry, Dental Clinic, Department of Biomedical and Neuromotor Science, U...

  19. Study on micronucleus frequency and chromosomal aberration ratios of mouse testicle cells induced by methylene-dioxymethamphetamine%3,4亚甲基二氧基甲基苯丙胺对小鼠微核率及染色体畸变率的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵忠桂; 刘霜; 刘艳华; 李雅欣; 伍爱荣; 周业成

    2015-01-01

    目的:通过连续20 d对雄性小鼠灌胃染毒3,4亚甲基二氧基甲基苯丙胺(MDMA)后,探究MDMA对雄性小鼠睾丸组织细胞微核率及染色体畸变率的影响。方法将雄性小鼠随机数字表法分为 MDMA 低(5.0 mg/kg)、中(10.0 mg/kg)、高(20.0 mg/kg)3个染毒剂量组,采用0.9%氯化钠注射液做阴性对照,每日染毒1次。于末次给药后第2天,取小鼠睾丸组织细胞,采用常规微核(MN)试验,检测小鼠睾丸细胞微核率的改变;同时采用染色体畸变试验探究MDMA对小鼠睾丸细胞染色体畸变率的影响。结果微核试验结果表明MDMA高剂量与低剂量组小鼠睾丸细胞微核率及阴性对照组比较,差异有统计学意义(P<0.01)。染色体畸变试验结果中,MDM高、中剂量组染色体畸变率分别与阴性对照组比较,差异有统计学意义(P<0.05),高剂量组与中、低剂量组染色体畸变率比较差异有统计学意义(P<0.05)。结论高剂量组MDMA能诱导小鼠睾丸组织细胞微核率增加,高剂量组及中剂量组可以使小鼠睾丸细胞染色体畸变率增高,说明其对雄性小鼠睾丸遗传物质有一定的损伤效应。%Objective To study the effects of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) on micronucleus frequency and chromosomal aberration ratios of male mouse testicle cells. Methods Healthy adult male rats were randomly divided into four groups. Different doses of MDMA (0, 5, 10 and 20 mg/kg) were administrated to the rats every days for 20 days. The rats were killed after the last test substance given for 24 h. Each rat′s micronucleus frequency and chromosomal aberration ratio of testicle cell were detected by using micronucleus test and chromosomal aberration test. Results The micronucleus frequencies of rats testicle cell in high dose group was significantly different from the control group and low dose group(P<0.01). With the control group, the

  20. Using 3-color chromosome painting to decide between chromosome aberration models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionizing radiation produces chromosome aberrations when DNA double strand breaks (DSB) interact pairwise. For more than 30 years there have been two main, competing theories of such binary DSB interactions. The classical theory asserts that an unrepaired DSB makes two ends which separate, with each end subsequently able to join any similar (non-telomeric) end. The exchange theory asserts that the two DSB ends remain associated until repair or a reciprocal chromosome exchange involving a second DSB occurs. The authors conducted an experiment to test these models, using 3-color chromosome painting. After in vitro irradiation of resting human lymphocytes, they observed cells with three-color triplets at first metaphase: three derivative chromosomes having permuted colors, as if three broken chromosomes had played musical chairs. On the exchange model in its standard form such 3-color triplets cannot occur. On the classical model the expected frequency can be calculated. They report data and computer calculations which exclude the exchange model and favor the classical model

  1. Female chromosome X mosaicism is age-related and preferentially affects the inactivated X chromosome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machiela, Mitchell J.; Zhou, Weiyin; Karlins, Eric; Sampson, Joshua N.; Freedman, Neal D.; Yang, Qi; Hicks, Belynda; Dagnall, Casey; Hautman, Christopher; Jacobs, Kevin B.; Abnet, Christian C.; Aldrich, Melinda C.; Amos, Christopher; Amundadottir, Laufey T.; Arslan, Alan A.; Beane-Freeman, Laura E.; Berndt, Sonja I.; Black, Amanda; Blot, William J.; Bock, Cathryn H.; Bracci, Paige M.; Brinton, Louise A.; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas; Burdett, Laurie; Buring, Julie E.; Butler, Mary A.; Canzian, Federico; Carreón, Tania; Chaffee, Kari G.; Chang, I-Shou; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Chen, Chu; Chen, Constance; Chen, Kexin; Chung, Charles C.; Cook, Linda S.; Crous Bou, Marta; Cullen, Michael; Davis, Faith G.; De Vivo, Immaculata; Ding, Ti; Doherty, Jennifer; Duell, Eric J.; Epstein, Caroline G.; Fan, Jin-Hu; Figueroa, Jonine D.; Fraumeni, Joseph F.; Friedenreich, Christine M.; Fuchs, Charles S.; Gallinger, Steven; Gao, Yu-Tang; Gapstur, Susan M.; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Gaudet, Mia M.; Gaziano, J. Michael; Giles, Graham G.; Gillanders, Elizabeth M.; Giovannucci, Edward L.; Goldin, Lynn; Goldstein, Alisa M.; Haiman, Christopher A.; Hallmans, Goran; Hankinson, Susan E.; Harris, Curtis C.; Henriksson, Roger; Holly, Elizabeth A.; Hong, Yun-Chul; Hoover, Robert N.; Hsiung, Chao A.; Hu, Nan; Hu, Wei; Hunter, David J.; Hutchinson, Amy; Jenab, Mazda; Johansen, Christoffer; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Kim, Hee Nam; Kim, Yeul Hong; Kim, Young Tae; Klein, Alison P.; Klein, Robert; Koh, Woon-Puay; Kolonel, Laurence N.; Kooperberg, Charles; Kraft, Peter; Krogh, Vittorio; Kurtz, Robert C.; LaCroix, Andrea; Lan, Qing; Landi, Maria Teresa; Marchand, Loic Le; Li, Donghui; Liang, Xiaolin; Liao, Linda M.; Lin, Dongxin; Liu, Jianjun; Lissowska, Jolanta; Lu, Lingeng; Magliocco, Anthony M.; Malats, Nuria; Matsuo, Keitaro; McNeill, Lorna H.; McWilliams, Robert R.; Melin, Beatrice S.; Mirabello, Lisa; Moore, Lee; Olson, Sara H.; Orlow, Irene; Park, Jae Yong; Patiño-Garcia, Ana; Peplonska, Beata; Peters, Ulrike; Petersen, Gloria M.; Pooler, Loreall; Prescott, Jennifer; Prokunina-Olsson, Ludmila; Purdue, Mark P.; Qiao, You-Lin; Rajaraman, Preetha; Real, Francisco X.; Riboli, Elio; Risch, Harvey A.; Rodriguez-Santiago, Benjamin; Ruder, Avima M.; Savage, Sharon A.; Schumacher, Fredrick; Schwartz, Ann G.; Schwartz, Kendra L.; Seow, Adeline; Wendy Setiawan, Veronica; Severi, Gianluca; Shen, Hongbing; Sheng, Xin; Shin, Min-Ho; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Silverman, Debra T.; Spitz, Margaret R.; Stevens, Victoria L.; Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael; Stram, Daniel; Tang, Ze-Zhong; Taylor, Philip R.; Teras, Lauren R.; Tobias, Geoffrey S.; Van Den Berg, David; Visvanathan, Kala; Wacholder, Sholom; Wang, Jiu-Cun; Wang, Zhaoming; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Wheeler, William; White, Emily; Wiencke, John K.; Wolpin, Brian M.; Wong, Maria Pik; Wu, Chen; Wu, Tangchun; Wu, Xifeng; Wu, Yi-Long; Wunder, Jay S.; Xia, Lucy; Yang, Hannah P.; Yang, Pan-Chyr; Yu, Kai; Zanetti, Krista A.; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne; Zheng, Wei; Zhou, Baosen; Ziegler, Regina G.; Perez-Jurado, Luis A.; Caporaso, Neil E.; Rothman, Nathaniel; Tucker, Margaret; Dean, Michael C.; Yeager, Meredith; Chanock, Stephen J.

    2016-01-01

    To investigate large structural clonal mosaicism of chromosome X, we analysed the SNP microarray intensity data of 38,303 women from cancer genome-wide association studies (20,878 cases and 17,425 controls) and detected 124 mosaic X events >2 Mb in 97 (0.25%) women. Here we show rates for X-chromosome mosaicism are four times higher than mean autosomal rates; X mosaic events more often include the entire chromosome and participants with X events more likely harbour autosomal mosaic events. X mosaicism frequency increases with age (0.11% in 50-year olds; 0.45% in 75-year olds), as reported for Y and autosomes. Methylation array analyses of 33 women with X mosaicism indicate events preferentially involve the inactive X chromosome. Our results provide further evidence that the sex chromosomes undergo mosaic events more frequently than autosomes, which could have implications for understanding the underlying mechanisms of mosaic events and their possible contribution to risk for chronic diseases. PMID:27291797

  2. Transfer of small chromosome fragments of Agropyron elongatum to wheat chromosome via asymmetric somatic hybridization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    The chromosome constitution of hybrids and chromatin patterns of Agropyron elongatum(Host)Neviski in F5 somatic hybrid lines Ⅱ -1-3 and I-1-9 between Triticum aestivum L.and A.Elongatum were analyzed.Based on the statistic data of pollen mother cells,F5 I-1-9 and Ⅱ-1-3 had 20-21 bivalents with a frequency of 84.66% and 85.28%,of which,89.83% and 89.57% were ring bivalents.The result indicated that both hybrid lines were basically stable in the chromosome constitution and behavior.RAPD analysis showed that the two hybrids contained biparental and integrated DNA.GISH(Genome in situ hybridization)revealed that in the form of small chromosome segments,A.Elongatum chromatin was scattered on 4-6 wheat chromosomes near by the region of centromere and telomere in the two hybrid lines.SSR analysis indicated that A.Elongatum DNA segments were distributed on the 2A,5B,6B and 2D wheat chromosomes in the hybrids,which was in accordance with the GISH results that small-segments intercalated poly-site.

  3. Significance of molecular genetic alterations of chromosome 1p/19q in differential diagnosis of oligodendroglioma and astrocytoma%1p/19q分子遗传学改变在少突胶质细胞瘤和星形细胞瘤鉴别诊断中意义

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李俊芝; 侯国胜; 蒋茂芬; 张巍

    2011-01-01

    Objective To study the significance of molecular genetic alterations of chromosome 1p/ 19q in differential diagnosis of oligodendroglioma and astrocytoma. Methods Molecular genetic alterations of chromosome lp/19q were detected with fluorescence in situ hybridization in 63 patients with oligodendroglioma or astrocytoma. Results Polyploid of lp/19q was in 5 cases (3 cases of astrocytoma and 2 cases of oligodendroglioma). Loss lp/19q heterozygosity was in 58 cases (41 cases oligodendroglioma and 17 cases of astrocytoma). The loss rates of chromosome lp, 19q and lp/19q were 65.9%, 68. 5% and 58. 5% respectively in 41 cases of oligodendroglioma, and were 17. 6%, 29.4% and 17. 6% respectively in 17 cases of astrocytoma, which showed significant differences between two groups(P = 0. 001, P = 0. 006, P = 0. 004). Twenty-one cases (87. 5%) and 9 cases (52.9%) had typical oligodendrocyte morphological characteristics in 24 oligodendroglioma cases of lp/19q heterozygosity loss and 17 oligodendroglioma cases of no lp/19q heterozygosity loss resprctively, which showed significant differences between two groups (P = 0. 014). Conclusion Loss rate of lp/19q heterozygosity is higher in oligodendroglioma than that in astrocytoma, and more likely to occur in oligodendroglioma with typical histological features. Polyploidy of chromosome lp/19q is more common in astrocytoma subtypes.%目的:探讨1p/19q分子遗传学改变在少突胶质细胞瘤和星形细胞瘤鉴别诊断中的意义。方法:少突胶质细胞瘤和星形细胞瘤共63例,采用荧光原位杂交技术检测染色体1p/19q分子遗传学改变。结果:1p/19q呈多倍体改变5例,其中星形细胞瘤3例,少突胶质细胞瘤2例;1p和19q杂合性缺失58例,其中少突胶质细胞肿瘤41例,星形细胞肿瘤17例。少突胶质细胞瘤染色体1p,19q及1p/19q缺失率分别为65.9%,68.3%和58.5%,星形细胞瘤分别为17.6%,29.4%和1 7.6%,

  4. [Chromosomal organization of the genomes of small-chromosome plants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muravenko, O V; Zelenin, A V

    2009-11-01

    An effective approach to study the chromosome organization in genomes of plants with small chromosomes and/or with low-informative C-banding patterns was developed in the course of investigation of the karyotypes of cotton plant, camomile, flax, and pea. To increase the resolving power of chromosome analysis, methods were worked out for revealing early replication patterns on chromosomes and for artificial impairment of mitotic chromosome condensation with the use of a DNA intercalator, 9-aminoacridine (9-AMA). To estimate polymorphism of the patterns of C-banding of small chromosomes on preparations obtained with the use of 9-AMA, it is necessary to choose a length interval that must not exceed three average sizes of metaphase chromosomes without the intercalator. The use of 9-AMA increases the resolution of differential C- and OR-banding and the precision of physical chromosome mapping by the FISH method. Of particular importance in studying small chromosomes is optimization of the computer-aided methods used to obtain and process chromosome images. The complex approach developed for analysis of the chromosome organization in plant genomes was used to study the karyotypes of 24 species of the genus Linum L. It permitted their chromosomes to be identified for the first time, and, in addition, B chromosomes were discovered and studied in the karyotypes of the species of the section Syllinum. By similarity of the karyotypes, the studied flax species were distributed in eight groups in agreement with the clusterization of these species according to the results of RAPD analysis performed in parallel. Systematic positions and phylogenetic relationships of the studied flax species were verified. Out results can serve as an important argument in favour of the proposal to develop a special program for sequencing the genome of cultivated flax (L. usitatissimum L.), which is a major representative of small-chromosome species. PMID:20058798

  5. Prevalence of Chromosomal Abnormalities in Infertile Couples in Romania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mierla Dana

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to establish a correlation between the presence of chromosomal abnormalities in one of the partners and infertility. This retrospective study was performed at the Department of Reproductive Medicine, Life Memorial Hospital, Bucharest, Romania, between August 2007 to December 2011. Two thousand, one hundred and ninety-five patients with reproductive problems were investigated, and the frequency of chromosomal abnormalities was calculated. The control group consisting of 87 fertile persons who had two or more children, was investigated in this retrospective study. All the patients of this study were investigated by cytogenetic techniques and the results of the two groups were compared by a two-tailed Fisher’s exact test. In this study, 94.99% patients had a normal karyotype and 5.01% had chromosomal abnormalities (numerical and structural chromosomal abnormalities. In the study group, numerical chromosomal abnormalities were detected in 1.14% of infertile men and 0.62% of infertile women, and structural chromosomal abnormalities were detected in 1.38% of infertile men and 1.87% of infertile women, respectively. The correlation between the incidence of chromosomal anomalies in the two sexes in couple with reproductive problems was not statistically significant. Recently, a possible association between infertility and chromosomal abnormalities with a significant statistical association has been reported. Our study shows that there is no association between chromosomal abnormalities and infertility, but this study needs to be confirmed with further investigations and a larger control group to establish the role of chromosomal abnormalities in the etiology of infertility.

  6. Structural organization of the inactive X chromosome in the mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giorgetti, Luca; Lajoie, Bryan R; Carter, Ava C; Attia, Mikael; Zhan, Ye; Xu, Jin; Chen, Chong Jian; Kaplan, Noam; Chang, Howard Y; Heard, Edith; Dekker, Job

    2016-07-28

    X-chromosome inactivation (XCI) involves major reorganization of the X chromosome as it becomes silent and heterochromatic. During female mammalian development, XCI is triggered by upregulation of the non-coding Xist RNA from one of the two X chromosomes. Xist coats the chromosome in cis and induces silencing of almost all genes via its A-repeat region, although some genes (constitutive escapees) avoid silencing in most cell types, and others (facultative escapees) escape XCI only in specific contexts. A role for Xist in organizing the inactive X (Xi) chromosome has been proposed. Recent chromosome conformation capture approaches have revealed global loss of local structure on the Xi chromosome and formation of large mega-domains, separated by a region containing the DXZ4 macrosatellite. However, the molecular architecture of the Xi chromosome, in both the silent and expressed regions,remains unclear. Here we investigate the structure, chromatin accessibility and expression status of the mouse Xi chromosome in highly polymorphic clonal neural progenitors (NPCs) and embryonic stem cells. We demonstrate a crucial role for Xist and the DXZ4-containing boundary in shaping Xi chromosome structure using allele-specific genome-wide chromosome conformation capture (Hi-C) analysis, an assay for transposase-accessible chromatin with high throughput sequencing (ATAC-seq) and RNA sequencing. Deletion of the boundary disrupts mega-domain formation, and induction of Xist RNA initiates formation of the boundary and the loss of DNA accessibility. We also show that in NPCs, the Xi chromosome lacks active/inactive compartments and topologically associating domains (TADs), except around genes that escape XCI. Escapee gene clusters display TAD-like structures and retain DNA accessibility at promoter-proximal and CTCF-binding sites. Furthermore, altered patterns of facultative escape genes indifferent neural progenitor clones are associated with the presence of different TAD

  7. An Assay to Detect In Vivo Y Chromosome Loss in Drosophila Wing Disc Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Szabad, Janos; Bellen, Hugo J.; Venken, Koen J. T.

    2012-01-01

    Loss of the Y chromosome in Drosophila has no impact on cell viability and therefore allows us to assay the impact of environmental agents and genetic alterations on chromosomal loss. To detect in vivo chromosome loss in cells of the developing Drosophila wing primordia, we first engineered a Y chromosome with an attP docking site. By making use of the ΦC31 integrase system, we site-specifically integrated a genomic transgene encompassing the multiple wing hair ( mwh ) locus into this attP si...

  8. Chromosome 19 International Workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pericak-Vance, M.A. (Duke Univ., Durham, NC (United States). Medical Center); Ropers, H.H. (Univ. Hospital Nijmegen, (The Netherlands). Dept. of Human Genetics); Carrano, A.J. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States))

    1993-01-04

    The Second International Workshop on Human Chromosome 19 was hosted on January 25 and 26, 1992, by the Department of Human Genetics, University Hospital Nijmegen, The Netherlands, at the 'Meerdal Conference Center'. The workshop was supported by a grant from the European Community obtained through HUGO, the Dutch Research Organization (NWO) and the Muscular Dystrophy Association (MDA). Travel support for American participants was provided by the Department of Energy. The goals of this workshop were to produce genetic, physical and integrated maps of chromosome 19, to identify inconsistencies and gaps, and to discuss and exchange resources and techniques available for the completion of these maps. The second day of the meeting was largely devoted to region or disease specific efforts. In particular, the meeting served as a platform for assessing and discussing the recent progress made into the molecular elucidation of myotonic dystrophy.

  9. Functional and structural rearrangements of salivary gland polytene chromosomes of Chironomus riparius Mg. (Diptera,Chironomidae) in response to freshly neutralized aluminium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michailova, P.; Ilkova, J.; White, K.N

    2003-05-01

    Aluminium impacts on aquatic biota can be detected using polytene chromosomes as bio-markers - Although recent work has shown that environmentally relevant concentrations of freshly neutralized aluminium (AI) are bioavailable and toxic to freshwater invertebrates, the genotoxicity of Al has not been examined. Here we show that freshly neutralized Al affects structure and function of the salivary gland polytene chromosomes of the ubiquitous chironomid larva Chironomus riparius over three generations. Exposure to 500 {mu}g l{sup -1} added Al for 24-25 days resulted in a significantly higher frequency of numerous somatic aberrations, while no structural aberrations were found in F1 controls and few in the second and third generation. Aberrations also included deletions of sections of chromosome G of C. riparius larvae as well as deletions of one or more Balbiani rings. Changes in functional activity included decreased activity of the Balbiani rings (BR), and an increase in the number of decondensed centromeres. The activity of the nucleolar organizer (NOR) significantly decreased in F1 chironomids exposed to Al, while in the F2 and F3 generations the NOR showed normal (high) activity. First generation chironomids were generally more susceptible to Al although no clear evidence of tolerance was apparent over three generations. The possible use of alterations in chironomid polytene chromosomes as biomarkers of trace metal pollution is discussed.

  10. Functional and structural rearrangements of salivary gland polytene chromosomes of Chironomus riparius Mg. (Diptera,Chironomidae) in response to freshly neutralized aluminium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aluminium impacts on aquatic biota can be detected using polytene chromosomes as bio-markers - Although recent work has shown that environmentally relevant concentrations of freshly neutralized aluminium (AI) are bioavailable and toxic to freshwater invertebrates, the genotoxicity of Al has not been examined. Here we show that freshly neutralized Al affects structure and function of the salivary gland polytene chromosomes of the ubiquitous chironomid larva Chironomus riparius over three generations. Exposure to 500 μg l-1 added Al for 24-25 days resulted in a significantly higher frequency of numerous somatic aberrations, while no structural aberrations were found in F1 controls and few in the second and third generation. Aberrations also included deletions of sections of chromosome G of C. riparius larvae as well as deletions of one or more Balbiani rings. Changes in functional activity included decreased activity of the Balbiani rings (BR), and an increase in the number of decondensed centromeres. The activity of the nucleolar organizer (NOR) significantly decreased in F1 chironomids exposed to Al, while in the F2 and F3 generations the NOR showed normal (high) activity. First generation chironomids were generally more susceptible to Al although no clear evidence of tolerance was apparent over three generations. The possible use of alterations in chironomid polytene chromosomes as biomarkers of trace metal pollution is discussed

  11. Identification of DNA double strand breaks at chromosome boundaries along the track of particle irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niimi, Atsuko; Yamauchi, Motohiro; Limsirichaikul, Siripan; Sekine, Ryota; Oike, Takahiro; Sato, Hiro; Suzuki, Keiji; Held, Kathryn D; Nakano, Takashi; Shibata, Atsushi

    2016-08-01

    Chromosomal translocations arise from misrejoining of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) between loci located on two chromosomes. One current model suggests that spatial proximity of potential chromosomal translocation partners influences translocation probability. Ionizing radiation (IR) is a potent inducer of translocations. Accumulating evidence demonstrates that particle irradiation more frequently causes translocations compared with X-ray irradiation. This observation has led to the hypothesis that the high frequency of translocations after particle irradiation may be due to the formation of DSBs at chromosome boundaries along the particle track, because such DSBs can be misrejoined between distinct chromosomes. In this study, we simultaneously visualized the site of IR-induced DSBs and chromosome position by combining Immunofluorescence and fluorescence in situ hybridization. Importantly, the frequency of γH2AX foci at the chromosome boundary of chromosome 1 after carbon-ion irradiation was >4-fold higher than that after X-ray irradiation. This observation is consistent with the idea that particle irradiation generates DSBs at the boundaries of two chromosomes along the track. Further, we showed that resolution of γH2AX foci at chromosome boundaries is prevented by inhibition of DNA-PKcs activity, indicating that the DSB repair is NHEJ-dependent. Finally, we found that γH2AX foci at chromosome boundaries after carbon-ion irradiation contain DSBs undergoing DNA-end resection, which promotes repair utilizing microhomology mediated end-joining during translocation. Taken together, our study suggests that the frequency of DSB formation at chromosome boundaries is associated with the incidence of chromosomal translocations, supporting the notion that the spatial proximity between breaks is an important factor in translocation formation. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27113385

  12. Tolerance whole of genome doubling propagates chromosomal instability and accelerates cancer genome evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Dewhurst, Sally M; McGranahan, Nicholas; Burrell, Rebecca A.; Rowan, Andrew J.; Grönroos, Eva; Endesfelder, David; Joshi, Tejal; Mouradov, Dmitri; Gibbs, Peter; Ward, Robyn L.; Hawkins, Nicholas J.; Szallasi, Zoltan; Sieber, Oliver M.; Swanton, Charles

    2014-01-01

    The contribution of whole genome doubling to chromosomal instability (CIN) and tumour evolution is unclear. We use long-term culture of isogenic tetraploid cells from a stable diploid colon cancer progenitor to investigate how a genome-doubling event affects genome stability over time. Rare cells that survive genome doubling demonstrate increased tolerance to chromosome aberrations. Tetraploid cells do not exhibit increased frequencies of structural or numerical CIN per chromosome. However, t...

  13. Chromothripsis-like chromosomal rearrangements induced by ionizing radiation using proton microbeam irradiation system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morishita, Maki; Muramatsu, Tomoki; Suto, Yumiko; Hirai, Momoki; Konishi, Teruaki; Hayashi, Shin; Shigemizu, Daichi; Tsunoda, Tatsuhiko; Moriyama, Keiji; Inazawa, Johji

    2016-03-01

    Chromothripsis is the massive but highly localized chromosomal rearrangement in response to a one-step catastrophic event, rather than an accumulation of a series of subsequent and random alterations. Chromothripsis occurs commonly in various human cancers and is thought to be associated with increased malignancy and carcinogenesis. However, the causes and consequences of chromothripsis remain unclear. Therefore, to identify the mechanism underlying the generation of chromothripsis, we investigated whether chromothripsis could be artificially induced by ionizing radiation. We first elicited DNA double-strand breaks in an oral squamous cell carcinoma cell line HOC313-P and its highly metastatic subline HOC313-LM, using Single Particle Irradiation system to Cell (SPICE), a focused vertical microbeam system designed to irradiate a spot within the nuclei of adhesive cells, and then established irradiated monoclonal sublines from them, respectively. SNP array analysis detected a number of chromosomal copy number alterations (CNAs) in these sublines, and one HOC313-LM-derived monoclonal subline irradiated with 200 protons by the microbeam displayed multiple CNAs involved locally in chromosome 7. Multi-color FISH showed a complex translocation of chromosome 7 involving chromosomes 11 and 12. Furthermore, whole genome sequencing analysis revealed multiple de novo complex chromosomal rearrangements localized in chromosomes 2, 5, 7, and 20, resembling chromothripsis. These findings suggested that localized ionizing irradiation within the nucleus may induce chromothripsis-like complex chromosomal alterations via local DNA damage in the nucleus. PMID:26862731

  14. Genetic Diversity and Differentiation in Urban and Indigenous Populations of Mexico: Patterns of Mitochondrial DNA and Y-Chromosome Lineages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Sobrino, Blanca Z; Pintado-Cortina, Ana P; Sebastián-Medina, Leticia; Morales-Mandujano, Fabiola; Contreras, Alejandra V; Aguilar, Yasnaya E; Chávez-Benavides, Juan; Carrillo-Rodríguez, Aurelio; Silva-Zolezzi, Irma; Medrano-González, Luis

    2016-01-01

    Aside from the admixture between indigenous people and people from overseas, populations in Mexico changed drastically after the Spanish conquest of the sixteenth century, forming an intricate history that has been underutilized in understanding the genetic population structure of Mexicans. To infer historical processes of isolation, dispersal, and assimilation, we examined the phylogeography of mitochondrial (mt) DNA and Y-chromosome lineages in 3,026 individuals from 10 urban and nine indigenous populations by identifying single nucleotide polymorphisms. A geographic array with a predominance of Amerindian lineages was observed for mtDNA, with northern indigenous populations being divergent from the central and southern indigenous populations; urban populations showed low differentiation with isolation by distance. Y-chromosome variation distinguished urban and indigenous populations through the Amerindian haplogroup Q frequency. The MtDNA and the Y-chromosome together primarily distinguished urban and indigenous populations, with different geographic arrays for both. Gene flow across geographical distance and between the urban and indigenous realms appears to have altered the pre-Hispanic phylogeography in central and southern Mexico, mainly by displacement of women, while maintaining the indigenous isolation in the north, southeast, and Zapotec regions. Most Amerindian mtDNA diversity currently occurs in urban populations and appears to be reduced among indigenous people. PMID:27050033

  15. X-radiation-induced chromosome breakage in retinoblastoma lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors have examined the spontaneous and X-radiation-induced chromosomal damage in normal humans and in patients with retinoblastoma using the BudR-Giemsa technique in lymphocytes cultured for 48 h. 9 sporadic unilateral non-hereditary cases, 11 hereditary cases and 20 healthy individuals were studied simultaneously. No difference in the spontaneous frequency of chromatid and chromosome aberrations was observed between patients and controls. The results suggest that: (a) There is no relationship between spontaneous chromosome fragility and retinoblastoma. (b) Sporadic unilateral non-hereditary retinoblastoma has normal chromosome sensitivity to X-irradiation. (c) Some hereditary cases of retinoblastoma are sensitive to X-rays while others behave like normals. A mutation or a submicroscopic deletion at a DNA repair locus which is independent of the retinoblastoma gene may cause this radiosensitivity. (Auth.)

  16. Evidence from mutagenesis on the possible involvement of Cu++ and Mg++ ions in the eukaryotic chromosome structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The low thermostability of the DNA induced in vitro by Cu++ ions is coupled with a higher frequency of radiation-induced chromosomal aberrations while the high thermostability of the DNA induced in vitro by Mg++ ions is coupled with a lower frequency of radiation-induced chromosomal aberrations. The possible effects of bivalent ions on the structure and the mutagenicity of mammalian chromosomes are discussed. (author)

  17. MDMA(3,4亚甲基二氧甲基苯丙胺)对小鼠睾丸细胞微核率及染色体畸变率的影响%Effect of MDMA on Micronucleus Frequency and Chromosomal Aberration Ratio of Rats’ Testicle Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵忠桂; 刘霜; 刘艳华; 李雅欣; 伍爱荣; 周业成

    2015-01-01

    通过连续20 d对雄性小鼠灌胃染毒3,4-亚甲基二氧基甲基苯丙胺(3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine, MDMA)后,探究MDMA对雄性小鼠睾丸组织细胞微核率及染色体畸变率的影响.将雄性小鼠随机分为MDMA低(5.0mg/kg)、中(10.0mg/kg)、高(20.0 mg/kg)三个染毒剂量组,采用生理盐水做阴性对照,每日染毒1次.于末次给药后第二天,取小鼠睾丸组织细胞,采用常规微核( micronucleus,MN)试验,检测小鼠睾丸细胞微核率的改变;同时采用染色体畸变试验( chromosomal aberration test)探究MDMA对小鼠睾丸细胞染色体畸变率的影响.微核试验结果表明MDMA中、低剂量组小鼠睾丸细胞微核率与阴性对照组比较差异无显著性(P>0.05),而高剂量与低剂量组小鼠睾丸细胞微核率及阴性对照组比较,差异均有显著性(P0. 05), while that in high dose group was significantly different from the control group and low dose group ( P<0 . 01 ) . Compared with the control group, the chromosomal aberration ratios in testis of rats in high and middle dose group increased, the difference was not significant (P<0. 05), but that in low dose group was also significantly different from the control group(P<0. 05). It suggested that high dose of MDMA lead to the increase of micronucleus frequency. Besides,high dose group and middle dose group could make the chro-mosomal aberration ratio increase. So MDMA might damage genetic material of rat testicle cells. 4figs. , 2tabs. ,10refs.

  18. Stable and unstable chromosomal aberrations in workers at nuclear waste repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A cytogenetic analysis of chromosomal aberrations was performed on 15 workers from final nuclear waste repository 'Novi Han'. The frequency of chromosomal aberrations were estimated in peripheral blood lymphocytes by conventional staining with Giemza and fluorescent in situ hybridization staining (FISH) using DNA specific probes. The results are compared with a control group from the administrative staff of the radioactive storage. All persons were interviewed by a special questionnaire list for professional, medical, and social status. The comparison of the results does not show increase of the frequency of unstable chromosomal aberrations detected by conventional staining. The frequency of stable chromosomal aberrations detected by FISH were significantly higher in workers group than in controls, although the statistical significance is low. The results show that FISH test is found to be more sensitive than conventional chromosomal analysis as a cytogenetic monitor test of the occupationally exposed subjects. (authors)

  19. Combined exposure to X-irradiation followed by N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea treatment alters the frequency and spectrum of Ikaros point mutations in murine T-cell lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionizing radiation is a well-known carcinogen, but its potency may be influenced by other environmental carcinogens, which is of practical importance in the assessment of risk. Data are scarce, however, on the combined effect of radiation with other environmental carcinogens and the underlying mechanisms involved. We studied the mode and mechanism of the carcinogenic effect of radiation in combination with N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) using doses approximately equal to the corresponding thresholds. B6C3F1 mice exposed to fractionated X-irradiation (Kaplan's method) followed by ENU developed T-cell lymphomas in a dose-dependent manner. Radiation doses above an apparent threshold acted synergistically with ENU to promote lymphoma development, whereas radiation doses below that threshold antagonized lymphoma development. Ikaros, which regulates the commitment and differentiation of lymphoid lineage cells, is a critical tumor suppressor gene frequently altered in both human and mouse lymphomas and shows distinct mutation spectra between X-ray- and ENU-induced lymphomas. In the synergistically induced lymphomas, we observed a low frequency of LOH and an inordinate increase of Ikaros base substitutions characteristic of ENU-indcued point mutations, G:C to A:T at non-CpG, A:T to G:C, G:C to T:A and A:T to T:A. This suggests that radiation doses above an apparent threshold activate the ENU mutagenic pathway. This is the first report on the carcinogenic mechanism elicited by combined exposure to carcinogens below and above threshold doses based on the mutation spectrum of the causative gene. These findings constitute a basis for assessing human cancer risk following exposure to multiple carcinogens.

  20. Chromosomal aberrations induced by the restriction endonucleases Alu I and Bam HI: comparison with X-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dose-effect relationships for the frequencies of polycentric chromosomes induced by the restriction endonucleases Alu I and Bam HI and by X-rays in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells were analyzed and compared. 1 Gy of X-rays produce the same frequency of polycentric chromosomes as 2 units Alu I and 7.9 units Bam HI. (author)

  1. Breakage-fusion-bridge cycles and de novo telomere formation on broken chromosomes in maize callus cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos-Serejo, Janay A; Aguiar-Perecin, Margarida L R

    2016-06-01

    Breakpoints involved in chromosome alterations associated with heterochromatin have been detected in maize plants regenerated from callus culture. A cytogenetic analysis of plants regenerated from a maize callus was performed aiming to analyze the stability of a chromosome 7 bearing a deficiency-duplication (Df-Dp), which was interpreted as derived from a chromatid type breakage-fusion-bridge (BFB) cycle. The Df-Dp chromosome 7 was stable in mitotic and meiotic cells of the regenerated plants. Fluorescence in situ hybridization showed signals of telomeric sequences on the broken chromosome arm and provided evidence of de novo telomere formation. The stability of two types of altered chromosome 7 was investigated in C-banded metaphases from samples of the original callus that were collected during a period of 30-42 months after culture initiation. New alterations involving heterochromatic knobs of chromosomes 7 and 9 were observed. The aberrant chromosomes were stable in the subcultures, thus providing evidence of broken chromosome healing. The examination of anaphases showed the presence of bridges, which was consistent with the occurrence of BFB cycles. De novo telomere formation occurred in euchromatic and heterochromatic chromosome termini. The results point to events of chromosomal evolution that might occur in plants. PMID:27203556

  2. Mode of ATM-dependent suppression of chromosome translocation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamauchi, Motohiro, E-mail: motoyama@nagasaki-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki University, 1-12-4 Sakamoto, Nagasaki 852-8523 (Japan); Suzuki, Keiji; Oka, Yasuyoshi; Suzuki, Masatoshi; Kondo, Hisayoshi; Yamashita, Shunichi [Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki University, 1-12-4 Sakamoto, Nagasaki 852-8523 (Japan)

    2011-12-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We addressed how ATM suppresses frequency of chromosome translocation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We found ATM/p53-dependent G1 checkpoint suppresses translocation frequency. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We found ATM and DNA-PKcs function in a common pathway to suppress translocation. -- Abstract: It is well documented that deficiency in ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) protein leads to elevated frequency of chromosome translocation, however, it remains poorly understood how ATM suppresses translocation frequency. In the present study, we addressed the mechanism of ATM-dependent suppression of translocation frequency. To know frequency of translocation events in a whole genome at once, we performed centromere/telomere FISH and scored dicentric chromosomes, because dicentric and translocation occur with equal frequency and by identical mechanism. By centromere/telomere FISH analysis, we confirmed that chemical inhibition or RNAi-mediated knockdown of ATM causes 2 to 2.5-fold increase in dicentric frequency at first mitosis after 2 Gy of gamma-irradiation in G0/G1. The FISH analysis revealed that ATM/p53-dependent G1 checkpoint suppresses dicentric frequency, since RNAi-mediated knockdown of p53 elevated dicentric frequency by 1.5-fold. We found ATM also suppresses dicentric occurrence independently of its checkpoint role, as ATM inhibitor showed additional effect on dicentric frequency in the context of p53 depletion and Chk1/2 inactivation. Epistasis analysis using chemical inhibitors revealed that ATM kinase functions in the same pathway that requires kinase activity of DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) to suppress dicentric frequency. From the results in the present study, we conclude that ATM minimizes translocation frequency through its commitment to G1 checkpoint and DNA double-strand break repair pathway that requires kinase activity of DNA-PKcs.

  3. Effect of chromosome tethering on nuclear organization in yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barış Avşaroğlu

    Full Text Available Interphase chromosomes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae are tethered to the nuclear envelope at their telomeres and to the spindle pole body (SPB at their centromeres. Using a polymer model of yeast chromosomes that includes these interactions, we show theoretically that telomere attachment to the nuclear envelope is a major determinant of gene positioning within the nucleus only for genes within 10 kb of the telomeres. We test this prediction by measuring the distance between the SPB and the silent mating locus (HML on chromosome III in wild-type and mutant yeast strains that contain altered chromosome-tethering interactions. In wild-type yeast cells we find that disruption of the telomere tether does not dramatically change the position of HML with respect to the SPB, in agreement with theoretical predictions. Alternatively, using a mutant strain with a synthetic tether that localizes an HML-proximal site to the nuclear envelope, we find a significant change in the SPB-HML distance, again as predicted by theory. Our study quantifies the importance of tethering at telomeres on the organization of interphase chromosomes in yeast, which has been shown to play a significant role in determining chromosome function such as gene expression and recombination.

  4. Large-scale selective sweep among Segregation Distorter chromosomes in African populations of Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presgraves, Daven C; Gérard, Pierre R; Cherukuri, Anjuli; Lyttle, Terrence W

    2009-05-01

    Segregation Distorter (SD) is a selfish, coadapted gene complex on chromosome 2 of Drosophila melanogaster that strongly distorts Mendelian transmission; heterozygous SD/SD(+) males sire almost exclusively SD-bearing progeny. Fifty years of genetic, molecular, and theory work have made SD one of the best-characterized meiotic drive systems, but surprisingly the details of its evolutionary origins and population dynamics remain unclear. Earlier analyses suggested that the SD system arose recently in the Mediterranean basin and then spread to a low, stable equilibrium frequency (1-5%) in most natural populations worldwide. In this report, we show, first, that SD chromosomes occur in populations in sub-Saharan Africa, the ancestral range of D. melanogaster, at a similarly low frequency (approximately 2%), providing evidence for the robustness of its equilibrium frequency but raising doubts about the Mediterranean-origins hypothesis. Second, our genetic analyses reveal two kinds of SD chromosomes in Africa: inversion-free SD chromosomes with little or no transmission advantage; and an African-endemic inversion-bearing SD chromosome, SD-Mal, with a perfect transmission advantage. Third, our population genetic analyses show that SD-Mal chromosomes swept across the African continent very recently, causing linkage disequilibrium and an absence of variability over 39% of the length of the second chromosome. Thus, despite a seemingly stable equilibrium frequency, SD chromosomes continue to evolve, to compete with one another, or evade suppressors in the genome. PMID:19412335

  5. Intra- and interindividual variability in lymphocyte chromosomal aberrations: implications for cancer risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Susan; Portengen, Lützen; Bonassi, Stefano; Sram, Radim; Vermeulen, Roel

    2011-08-15

    Chromosomal aberration frequency in peripheral lymphocytes of healthy individuals has been found to be predictive of future cancer risk. The variability of chromosomal aberrations over time, which is largely unknown, should be clarified to interpret the strength of this association and to determine its use in cancer prediction. Intra- and interindividual variability in chromosomal aberration frequency was therefore determined. From a pooled database comprising 11 national cohorts (1965-2002), the authors included 9,433 blood samples from 3,550 subjects with at least one repeated chromosomal aberration measurement. The generalized concordance correlation coefficient of 0.19 was low, indicating high intraindividual variability compared with interindividual variability, resulting in a high likelihood of misclassification. The relation between chromosomal aberration frequency and future cancer risk has probably been underestimated in previous studies. A single chromosomal aberration measurement seems not to be representative of the whole lifespan level of chromosome instability and greatly limits the use of chromosomal aberration frequency-as measured with Giemsa staining-for individual risk assessment. PMID:21652601

  6. PATTERN OF CHROMOSOMAL ANOMALIES IN DYSMORPHIC CHILDREN AND THEIR CLINICAL CORRELATION

    OpenAIRE

    Booma, van, J.G.J.; Mohamed Ansar Ali

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Chromosomal abnormalities are an important cause of congenital anomalies. OBJECTIVE To evaluate the pattern of chromosomal imbalances in congenital anomaly child and to find out the frequency of internal anomalies associated with external anomalies. METHOD A total of 75 individuals in different age groups presenting clinical profile like syndromic features, congenital anomalies and facial dysmorphism were taken. All patients underwent clinical ...

  7. Molecular fundamentals of chromosomal mutagenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Precise quantitative correlation between the yield of chromosome structure damages and the yield of DNA damages is shown when comparing data on molecular and cytogenetic investigations carried out in cultural Mammalia cells. As the chromosome structure damage is to be connected with the damage of its carcass structure, then it is natural that DNA damage in loop regions is not to affect considerably the structure, while DNA damage lying on the loop base and connected with the chromosome carcass is to play a determining role in chromosomal mutagenesis. This DNA constitutes 1-2% from the total quantity of nuclear DNA. If one accepts that damages of these regions of DNA are ''hot'' points of chromosomal mutagenesis, then it becomes clear why 1-2% of preparation damages in a cell are realized in chromosome structural damages

  8. Electochemical detection of chromosome translocation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kwasny, Dorota; Dimaki, Maria; Silahtaroglu, Asli;

    2014-01-01

    Cytogenetics is a study of the cell structure with a main focus on chromosomes content and their structure. Chromosome abnormalities, such as translocations may cause various genetic disorders and heametological malignancies. Chromosome translocations are structural rearrangements of two...... hybridization approach developed for label-free detection of the chromosome translocations. For specific translocation detection it is necessary to determine that the two DNA sequences forming a derivative chromosome are connected, which is achieved by two subsequent hybridization steps. The electrochemical...... impedance spectroscopy was selected as the sensing method on a microfabricated chip with array of 12 electrode sets. Two independent chips (Chip1 and Chip2) were used for targeting the chromosomal fragments involved in the translocation. Each chip was differentially functionalized with DNA probes matching...

  9. Intraspecific chromosome variability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Dubinin

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available (Editorial preface. The publication is presented in order to remind us of one of dramatic pages of the history of genetics. It re-opens for the contemporary reader a comprehensive work marking the priority change from plant cytogenetics to animal cytogenetics led by wide population studies which were conducted on Drosophila polytene chromosomes. The year of the publication (1937 became the point of irretrievable branching between the directions of Old World and New World genetics connected with the problems of chromosome variability and its significance for the evolution of the species. The famous book of T. Dobzhansky (1937 was published by Columbia University in the US under the title “Genetics and the origin of species”, and in the shadow of this American ‘skybuilding’ all other works grew dim. It is remarkable that both Dobzhansky and Dubinin come to similar conclusions about the role of chromosomes in speciation. This is not surprising given that they both might be considered as representatives of the Russian genetic school, by their birth and education. Interestingly, Dobzhansky had never referred to the full paper of Dubinin et al. (1937, though a previous short communication in Nature (1936 was included together with all former papers on the related subject. In full, the volume of the original publication printed in the Biological Journal in Moscow comprised 47 pages, in that number 41 pages of the Russian text accompanied by 16 Figs, a table and reference list, and, above all, 6 pages of the English summary. This final part in English is now reproduced in the authors’ version with the only addition being the reference list in the originally printed form.

  10. Reference-assisted chromosome assembly

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Jaebum; Larkin, Denis M; Cai, Qingle; Asan,; Zhang, Yongfen; Ge, Ri-Li; Auvil, Loretta; Capitanu, Boris; Zhang, Guojie; Lewin, Harris A.; Ma, Jian

    2013-01-01

    One of the most difficult problems in modern genomics is the assembly of full-length chromosomes using next generation sequencing (NGS) data. To address this problem, we developed “reference-assisted chromosome assembly” (RACA), an algorithm to reliably order and orient sequence scaffolds generated by NGS and assemblers into longer chromosomal fragments using comparative genome information and paired-end reads. Evaluation of results using simulated and real genome assemblies indicates that ou...

  11. Chromosomal Speciation Revisited: Modes of Diversification in Australian Morabine Grasshoppers (Vandiemenella, viatica Species Group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven J. B. Cooper

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Chromosomal rearrangements can alter the rate and patterns of gene flow within or between species through a reduction in the fitness of chromosomal hybrids or by reducing recombination rates in rearranged areas of the genome. This concept, together with the observation that many species have structural variation in chromosomes, has led to the theory that the rearrangements may play a direct role in promoting speciation. Australian morabine grasshoppers (genus Vandiemenella, viatica species group are an excellent model for studying the role of chromosomal rearrangement in speciation because they show extensive chromosomal variation, parapatric distribution patterns, and narrow hybrid zones at their boundaries. This species group stimulated development of one of the classic chromosomal speciation models, the stasipatric speciation model proposed by White in 1968. Our population genetic and phylogeographic analyses revealed extensive non-monophyly of chromosomal races along with historical and on-going gene introgression between them. These findings suggest that geographical isolation leading to the fixation of chromosomal variants in different geographic regions, followed by secondary contact, resulted in the present day parapatric distributions of chromosomal races. The significance of chromosomal rearrangements in the diversification of the viatica species group can be explored by comparing patterns of genetic differentiation between rearranged and co-linear parts of the genome.

  12. Chromosome Connections: Compelling Clues to Common Ancestry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flammer, Larry

    2013-01-01

    Students compare banding patterns on hominid chromosomes and see striking evidence of their common ancestry. To test this, human chromosome no. 2 is matched with two shorter chimpanzee chromosomes, leading to the hypothesis that human chromosome 2 resulted from the fusion of the two shorter chromosomes. Students test that hypothesis by looking for…

  13. ETOPOSIDE INDUCES CHROMOSOMAL ABNORMALITIES IN SPERMATOCYTES AND SPERMATOGONIAL STEM CELLS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchetti, F; Pearson, F S; Bishop, J B; Wyrobek, A J

    2005-07-15

    Etoposide (ET) is a chemotherapeutic agent widely used in the treatment of leukemia, lymphomas and many solid tumors, such as testicular and ovarian cancers, that affect patients in their reproductive years. The purpose of the study was to use sperm FISH analyses to characterize the long-term effects of ET on male germ cells. We used a mouse model to characterize the induction of chromosomal aberrations (partial duplications and deletions) and whole chromosomal aneuploidies in sperm of mice treated with a clinical dose of ET. Semen samples were collected at 25 and 49 days after dosing to investigate the effects of ET on meiotic pachytene cells and spermatogonial stem-cells, respectively. ET treatment resulted in major increases in the frequencies of sperm carrying chromosomal aberrations in both meiotic pachytene (27- to 578-fold) and spermatogonial stem-cells (8- to 16-fold), but aneuploid sperm were induced only after treatment of meiotic cells (27-fold) with no persistent effects in stem cells. These results demonstrate that male meiotic germ cells are considerably more sensitive to ET than spermatogonial stem-cell and that increased frequencies of sperm with structural aberrations persist after spermatogonial stem-cell treatment. These findings predict that patients who undergo chemotherapy with ET may have transient elevations in the frequencies of aneuploid sperm, but more importantly, may have persistent elevations in the frequencies of sperm with chromosomal aberrations, placing them at higher risk for abnormal reproductive outcomes long after the end of their chemotherapy.

  14. Y chromosomal STR analysis using Pyrosequencing technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edlund, Hanna; Allen, Marie

    2009-03-01

    Analysis of Y chromosome STR markers has proven to be useful in forensic cases where the samples contain a mixture of DNA from several individuals. STR markers are commonly genotyped based on length separation of PCR products. In this study we evaluated if Pyrosequencing can be used as an alternative method for determining Y-STR variants. In total 70 unrelated Swedish males were typed for the Y chromosomal markers (DYS19, DYS389 I-II, DYS390, DYS391, DYS392, DYS393 and DYS438) using Pyrosequencing. Using the 8 markers, 57 unique haplotypes were observed with a discrimination capacity of 0.81. At four loci, the Pyrosequencing analysis revealed sequence variants. The sequence variants were found in the DYS389 II, DYS390, DYS391, and DYS393 loci in frequencies between 1.43% and 14.3%. Pyrosequencing has here been shown to be a useful tool for typing Y chromosomal STRs and the method can provide a complement to conventional forensic Y STR analyses. Moreover, the Pyrosequencing method can be used to rapidly evaluate novel markers. PMID:19215881

  15. X-chromosome workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paterson, A D

    1998-01-01

    Researchers presented results of ongoing research to the X-chromosome workshop of the Fifth World Congress on Psychiatric Genetics, covering a wide range of disorders: X-linked infantile spasms; a complex phenotype associated with deletions of Xp11; male homosexuality; degree of handedness; bipolar affective disorder; schizophrenia; childhood onset psychosis; and autism. This report summarizes the presentations, as well as reviewing previous studies. The focus of this report is on linkage findings for schizophrenia and bipolar disorder from a number of groups. For schizophrenia, low positive lod scores were obtained for markers DXS991 and DXS993 from two studies, although the sharing of alleles was greatest from brother-brother pairs in one study, and sister-sister in the other. Data from the Irish schizophrenia study was also submitted, with no strong evidence for linkage on the X chromosome. For bipolar disease, following the report of a Finnish family linked to Xq24-q27, the Columbia group reported some positive results for this region from 57 families, however, another group found no evidence for linkage to this region. Of interest, is the clustering of low positive linkage results that point to regions for possible further study. PMID:9686435

  16. Chromosome analysis and sorting

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Doležel, Jaroslav; Kubaláková, Marie; Suchánková, Pavla; Kovářová, Pavlína; Bartoš, Jan; Šimková, Hana

    Weinheim : Wiley-VCH, 2007 - (Doležel, J.; Greilhuber, J.; Suda, J.), s. 373-403 ISBN 978-3-527-31487-4 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA521/04/0607; GA ČR GP521/05/P257; GA ČR GD521/05/H013; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06004 Grant ostatní: Mendelova zemědělská a lesnická univerzita v Brně / Agronomická fakulta(CZ) ME 844 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5038910 Source of funding: V - iné verejné zdroje ; V - iné verejné zdroje ; V - iné verejné zdroje ; V - iné verejné zdroje ; V - iné verejné zdroje Keywords : Plant flow cytometry * chromosome sorting * flow cytogenetics Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology http://books. google .com/books?id=3cwakORieqUC&pg=PA373&lpg=PA373&dq=Chromosome+analysis+and+sorting&source=web&ots=8IyvJlBQyq&sig=_NlXyQQgBCwpj1pTC9YITvvVZqU

  17. Computer aided analysis of additional chromosome aberrations in Philadelphia chromosome positive acute lymphoblastic leukaemia using a simplified computer readable cytogenetic notation

    OpenAIRE

    Mohr Brigitte; Jauch Anna; Heinze Barbara; Fonatsch Christa; Balz Harald; Bradtke Jutta; Schoch Claudia; Rieder Harald

    2003-01-01

    Abstract Background The analysis of complex cytogenetic databases of distinct leukaemia entities may help to detect rare recurring chromosome aberrations, minimal common regions of gains and losses, and also hot spots of genomic rearrangements. The patterns of the karyotype alterations may provide insights into the genetic pathways of disease progression. Results We developed a simplified computer readable cytogenetic notation (SCCN) by which chromosome findings are normalised at a resolution...

  18. Smectite alteration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains the proceedings of a second workshop in Washington DC December 8-9, 1983 on the alteration of smectites intended for use as buffer materials in the long-term containment of nuclear wastes. It includes extended summaries of all presentations and a transcript of the detailed scientific discussion. The discussions centered on three main questions: What is the prerequisite for and what is the precise mechanism by which smectite clays may be altered to illite. What are likly sources of potassium with respect to the KBS project. Is it likely that the conversion of smectite to illite will be of importance in the 10 5 to the 10 6 year time frame. The workshop was convened to review considerations and conclusions in connection to these questions and also to broaden the discussion to consider the use of smectite clays as buffer materials for similar applications in different geographical and geological settings. SKBF/KBS technical report 83-03 contains the proceedings from the first workshop on these matters that was held at the State University of New York, Buffalo May 26-27, 1982. (Author)

  19. The landscape of chromosomal aberrations in breast cancer mouse models reveals driver-specific routes to tumorigenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Ben-David, Uri; Ha, Gavin; Khadka, Prasidda; Jin, Xin; Wong, Bang; Franke, Lude; Golub, Todd R.

    2016-01-01

    Aneuploidy and copy-number alterations (CNAs) are a hallmark of human cancer. Although genetically engineered mouse models (GEMMs) are commonly used to model human cancer, their chromosomal landscapes remain underexplored. Here we use gene expression profiles to infer CNAs in 3,108 samples from 45 mouse models, providing the first comprehensive catalogue of chromosomal aberrations in cancer GEMMs. Mining this resource, we find that most chromosomal aberrations accumulate late during breast tu...

  20. Chromosome 7 Aneusomy. A Marker for Metastatic Melanoma?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Udart

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Receptor tyrosine kinases such as the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR play an important role in a variety of malignant neoplasias, making the search for aberrations in the relevant chromosomes an important issue. Differential expression of the EGFR gene was investigated by reverse transcriptase (RT-PCR on tissue samples of normal skin, nevi, primary melanomas, and melanoma metastases. The EGFR gene is located on chromosome 7p12.3-p12.1. To determine the number of chromosomes 7 in cell nuclei of the mentioned tissue samples we performed fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH on touch preparations, using a DNA probe that hybridizes specifically to the centromeric region of chromosome 7. Additionally, chromosome 7 number in interphase nuclei was determined in short-term primary cell cultures of nevi, primary melanomas, and metastases. The highest EGFR gene expression frequency was found in melanoma metastases. By FISH we detected the highest fraction of cell nuclei with more than two chromosomes 7 in the group of metastases. Our results suggest that overexpression of the EGFR gene might play an important role in metastasis of malignant melanoma. This is well reflected by polysomy 7, possibly accounting for an increased EGFRgene copy number.

  1. Chromosomal abnormalities and environmental exposures in acute nonlymphocytic leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chromosomal abnormalities are present in bone marrow of approximately 50% of newly diagnostic acute nonlymphatic leukemia (ANLL) patients, but their etiologic significance, if any, is unclear. The frequency of environmental exposures, gathered by questionnaire from patients or relatives, was compared in 127 newly diagnosed ANLL patients with marrow abnormalities (AA) and 109 ANLL patients with cytogenetically normal marrow. These represented 73% of de novo patients treated at M. D. Anderson Hospital between 1976 and 1983. AA patients were more likely than NN patients to: report cytotoxic treatment for prior medical conditions, smoke cigarettes, drink alcoholic beverages, and work at occupations with possible exposure to mutagens. No statistically significant associations between aneuploidy and use of other tobacco, avocational exposure to chemicals or exposure to animals were present. Associations between specific abnormalities and prior cytotoxic therapy (deletion of chromosome 7), smoking (extra chromosome 8, inversion chromosome 16), and occupation at the time of diagnosis (translocation between chromosomes 8 and 21) were noted. No association between occupational exposure to benzene or ionizing radiation and the 6 most common chromosomal abnormalities in ANLL patients were noted, although these agents are known to be leukemogenic. Problems with interpreting the above associations, including the high nonresponse rate, a high proportion of surrogate respondents, and the large number of significance tests that were performed, are discussed. These results are consistent with those from previously reported series, and suggest that tumor-specific markers may be present for some exposures in this disease

  2. The prevalence of Y chromosome microdeletions in Pakistani infertile men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubina Tabassum Siddiqui

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Microdeletions of the azoospermia factor locus of the long arm of Y chromosome are an etiological factor of severe oligozoospermia or azoospermia. Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of Y-chromosome microdeletions in AZF region and their role in infertility in Pakistani population. Materials and Methods: The type of deletions in AZF locus were detected in infertile men (n=113 and the association of Y chromosome microdeletions with male infertility was assessed by including men (50 with normal karyotype and having children. Y chromosome microdeletions were detected by multiplex PCR using 10 sequence tagged sites namely sY81, sY130, sY141, sY142, sY155, sY157, sY160, sY182, sY231, and sY202 that covered all three regions of AZF. Results: Individuals with severe oligozoospermia showed 2.86% deletion frequency in AZFc region as compared to azoospermic males (5.5%. Conclusion: The results of our study showed that deletions in Y chromosome are not playing major part in male infertility. Moreover, multiplex-PCR strategy might preferably be employed for the detection of Y chromosome microdeletions allied to male infertility.

  3. Telomere shortening correlates with increasing aneuploidy of chromosome 8 in human hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plentz, Ruben R; Schlegelberger, Brigitte; Flemming, Peer; Gebel, Michael; Kreipe, Hans; Manns, Michael P; Rudolph, K Lenhard; Wilkens, Ludwig

    2005-09-01

    Chromosomal instability (CIN) leads to an increase in aneuploidy and chromosomal aberrations in human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Telomere shortening appears as one mechanism fostering the development of CIN. Whether telomere shortening correlates to specific genetic changes that characterize a certain type of cancer has yet to be established. In our recent study, we combined on a cellular level the analysis of hepatocellular telomere fluorescent intensity (TFI) and copy number of chromosome 8-one of the hallmark chromosomal alterations in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). We investigated 15 cytological fine-needle biopsies of aneuploid HCC and 5 touch prints of cadaver livers without cancer. Hepatocyte-specific TFI and the measurement of centromere-specific probe for chromosome 8 were both performed by quantitative fluorescence in situ hybridization (qFISH) or FISH. Combined analysis of both methods (coFISH) allowed measurement of telomere length and chromosome 8 copy number on a single cell level. We observed that telomere shortening correlates significantly with increasing copy number of chromosome 8 in HCC on the cellular level. Above the level of 5 copies of chromosome 8 per nucleus, no further shortening of telomeres was found, indicating that telomeres had reached a critically short length at this stage of aneuploidy. In conclusion, our study gives direct evidence that telomere shortening is linked to a specific genetic alteration characteristic for human HCC. PMID:16116624

  4. Cohesin in determining chromosome architecture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haering, Christian H., E-mail: christian.haering@embl.de [Cell Biology and Biophysics Unit, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), Heidelberg (Germany); Jessberger, Rolf, E-mail: rolf.jessberger@tu-dresden.de [Institute of Physiological Chemistry, Dresden University of Technology, Dresden (Germany)

    2012-07-15

    Cells use ring-like structured protein complexes for various tasks in DNA dynamics. The tripartite cohesin ring is particularly suited to determine chromosome architecture, for it is large and dynamic, may acquire different forms, and is involved in several distinct nuclear processes. This review focuses on cohesin's role in structuring chromosomes during mitotic and meiotic cell divisions and during interphase.

  5. Causes of oncogenic chromosomal translocation

    OpenAIRE

    Aplan, Peter D.

    2005-01-01

    Non-random chromosomal translocations are frequently associated with a variety of cancers, especially hematologic malignancies and childhood sarcomas In addition to their diagnostic utility, chromosomal translocations are increasingly being used in the clinic to guide therapeutic decisions. However, the mechanisms which cause these translocations remain poorly understood. Illegit...

  6. Genetics Home Reference: ring chromosome 20 syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 3 links) Encyclopedia: Chromosome Encyclopedia: Epilepsy Health Topic: Epilepsy Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (1 link) Ring chromosome 20 Additional NIH Resources (2 links) National Human Genome Research Institute: Chromosome Abnormalities National Institute of ...

  7. Genetics Home Reference: ring chromosome 14 syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Encyclopedia: Chromosome Health Topic: Developmental Disabilities Health Topic: Epilepsy Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (1 link) Ring chromosome 14 Additional NIH Resources (2 links) National Human Genome Research Institute: Chromosome Abnormalities National Institute of ...

  8. Bacterial chromosome organization and segregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badrinarayanan, Anjana; Le, Tung B K; Laub, Michael T

    2015-01-01

    If fully stretched out, a typical bacterial chromosome would be nearly 1 mm long, approximately 1,000 times the length of a cell. Not only must cells massively compact their genetic material, but they must also organize their DNA in a manner that is compatible with a range of cellular processes, including DNA replication, DNA repair, homologous recombination, and horizontal gene transfer. Recent work, driven in part by technological advances, has begun to reveal the general principles of chromosome organization in bacteria. Here, drawing on studies of many different organisms, we review the emerging picture of how bacterial chromosomes are structured at multiple length scales, highlighting the functions of various DNA-binding proteins and the impact of physical forces. Additionally, we discuss the spatial dynamics of chromosomes, particularly during their segregation to daughter cells. Although there has been tremendous progress, we also highlight gaps that remain in understanding chromosome organization and segregation. PMID:26566111

  9. A novel genomic alteration of LSAMP associates with aggressive prostate cancer in African American men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gyorgy Petrovics

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Evaluation of cancer genomes in global context is of great interest in light of changing ethnic distribution of the world population. We focused our study on men of African ancestry because of their disproportionately higher rate of prostate cancer (CaP incidence and mortality. We present a systematic whole genome analyses, revealing alterations that differentiate African American (AA and Caucasian American (CA CaP genomes. We discovered a recurrent deletion on chromosome 3q13.31 centering on the LSAMP locus that was prevalent in tumors from AA men (cumulative analyses of 435 patients: whole genome sequence, 14; FISH evaluations, 101; and SNP array, 320 patients. Notably, carriers of this deletion experienced more rapid disease progression. In contrast, PTEN and ERG common driver alterations in CaP were significantly lower in AA prostate tumors compared to prostate tumors from CA. Moreover, the frequency of inter-chromosomal rearrangements was significantly higher in AA than CA tumors. These findings reveal differentially distributed somatic mutations in CaP across ancestral groups, which have implications for precision medicine strategies.

  10. Chromosome synapsis and recombination in simple and complex chromosomal heterozygotes of tuco-tuco (Ctenomys talarum: Rodentia: Ctenomyidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basheva, Ekaterina A; Torgasheva, Anna A; Gomez Fernandez, Maria Jimena; Boston, Emma; Mirol, Patricia; Borodin, Pavel M

    2014-09-01

    The chromosomal speciation hypothesis suggests that irregularities in synapsis, recombination, and segregation in heterozygotes for chromosome rearrangements may restrict gene flow between karyotypically distinct populations and promote speciation. Ctenomys talarum is a South American subterranean rodent inhabiting the coastal regions of Argentina, whose populations polymorphic for Robertsonian and tandem translocations seem to have a very restricted gene flow. To test if chromosomal differences are involved in isolation among its populations, we examined chromosome pairing, recombination, and meiotic silencing of unsynapsed chromatin in male meiosis of simple and complex translocation heterozygotes using immunolocalization of the MLH1 marking mature recombination nodules and phosphorylated histone γH2A.X marking unrepaired double-strand breaks. We observed small asynaptic areas labeled by γH2A.X in pericentromeric regions of the chromosomes involved in the trivalents and quadrivalents. We also observed a decrease of recombination frequency and a distalization of the crossover distribution in the heterozygotes and metacentric homozygotes compared to acrocentric homozygotes. We suggest that the asynapsis of the pericentromeric regions are unlikely to induce germ cell death and decrease fertility of the heterozygotes; however, suppressed recombination in pericentromeric areas of the multivalents may reduce gene flow between chromosomally different populations of the Talas tuco-tuco. PMID:24924853

  11. Topoisomerase IIα in chromosome instability and personalized cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, T; Sun, Y; Ji, P; Kopetz, S; Zhang, W

    2015-07-30

    Genome instability is a hallmark of cancer cells. Chromosome instability (CIN), which is often mutually exclusive from hypermutation genotypes, represents a distinct subtype of genome instability. Hypermutations in cancer cells are due to defects in DNA repair genes, but the cause of CIN is still elusive. However, because of the extensive chromosomal abnormalities associated with CIN, its cause is likely a defect in a network of genes that regulate mitotic checkpoints and chromosomal organization and segregation. Emerging evidence has shown that the chromosomal decatenation checkpoint, which is critical for chromatin untangling and packing during genetic material duplication, is defective in cancer cells with CIN. The decatenation checkpoint is known to be regulated by a family of enzymes called topoisomerases. Among them, the gene encoding topoisomerase IIα (TOP2A) is commonly altered at both gene copy number and gene expression level in cancer cells. Thus, abnormal alterations of TOP2A, its interacting proteins, and its modifications may have a critical role in CIN in human cancers. Clinically, a large arsenal of topoisomerase inhibitors has been used to suppress DNA replication in cancer. However, they often lead to the secondary development of leukemia because of their effect on the chromosomal decatenation checkpoint. Therefore, topoisomerase drugs must be used judiciously and administered on an individual basis. In this review, we highlight the biological function of TOP2A in chromosome segregation and the mechanisms that regulate this enzyme's expression and activity. We also review the roles of TOP2A and related proteins in human cancers, and raise a perspective for how to target TOP2A in personalized cancer therapy. PMID:25328138

  12. ADN et chromosomes

    OpenAIRE

    Hayes, Hélène

    2000-01-01

    Chaque chromosome contient une seule molécule d’ADN. L’ADN déroulé d’un noyau de cellule humaine mesurerait environ 1,8 m : chaque molécule d’ADN est enroulée et compactée en plusieurs étapes, grâce à l’association de différentes protéines, et loge dans le noyau de 6 µm de diamètre. Le degré de condensation de l’ADN est variable selon les régions chromosomiques et les régions les moins condensées sont les plus riches en gènes. L’ADN est composé d’une variété de séquences codantes ou non et ré...

  13. X-Chromosome dosage compensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Barbara J

    2005-01-01

    In mammals, flies, and worms, sex is determined by distinctive regulatory mechanisms that cause males (XO or XY) and females (XX) to differ in their dose of X chromosomes. In each species, an essential X chromosome-wide process called dosage compensation ensures that somatic cells of either sex express equal levels of X-linked gene products. The strategies used to achieve dosage compensation are diverse, but in all cases, specialized complexes are targeted specifically to the X chromosome(s) of only one sex to regulate transcript levels. In C. elegans, this sex-specific targeting of the dosage compensation complex (DCC) is controlled by the same developmental signal that establishes sex, the ratio of X chromosomes to sets of autosomes (X:A signal). Molecular components of this chromosome counting process have been defined. Following a common step of regulation, sex determination and dosage compensation are controlled by distinct genetic pathways. C. elegans dosage compensation is implemented by a protein complex that binds both X chromosomes of hermaphrodites to reduce transcript levels by one-half. The dosage compensation complex resembles the conserved 13S condensin complex required for both mitotic and meiotic chromosome resolution and condensation, implying the recruitment of ancient proteins to the new task of regulating gene expression. Within each C. elegans somatic cell, one of the DCC components also participates in the separate mitotic/meiotic condensin complex. Other DCC components play pivotal roles in regulating the number and distribution of crossovers during meiosis. The strategy by which C. elegans X chromosomes attract the condensin-like DCC is known. Small, well-dispersed X-recognition elements act as entry sites to recruit the dosage compensation complex and to nucleate spreading of the complex to X regions that lack recruitment sites. In this manner, a repressed chromatin state is spread in cis over short or long distances, thus establishing the

  14. Chromosomal mosaicism in mouse two-cell embryos after paternal exposure to acrylamide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchetti, Francesco; Bishop, Jack; Lowe, Xiu; Wyrobek, Andrew J

    2008-10-14

    Chromosomal mosaicism in human preimplantation embryos is a common cause ofspontaneous abortions, however, our knowledge of its etiology is limited. We used multicolor fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) painting to investigate whether paternally-transmitted chromosomal aberrations result in mosaicism in mouse 2-cell embryos. Paternal exposure to acrylamide, an important industrial chemical also found in tobacco smoke and generated during the cooking process of starchy foods, produced significant increases in chromosomally defective 2-cell embryos, however, the effects were transient primarily affecting the postmeiotic stages of spermatogenesis. Comparisons with our previous study of zygotes demonstrated similar frequencies of chromosomally abnormal zygotes and 2-cell embryos suggesting that there was no apparent selection against numerical or structural chromosomal aberrations. However, the majority of affected 2-cell embryos were mosaics showing different chromosomal abnormalities in the two blastomeric metaphases. Analyses of chromosomal aberrations in zygotes and 2-cell embryos showed a tendency for loss of acentric fragments during the first mitotic division ofembryogenesis, while both dicentrics and translocations apparently underwent propersegregation. These results suggest that embryonic development can proceed up to the end of the second cell cycle of development in the presence of abnormal paternal chromosomes and that even dicentrics can persist through cell division. The high incidence of chromosomally mosaic 2-cell embryos suggests that the first mitotic division of embryogenesis is prone to missegregation errors and that paternally-transmitted chromosomal abnromalities increase the risk of missegregation leading to embryonic mosaicism.

  15. Mitotic chromosome loss in a radiation-sensitive strain of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cells of Saccharomyces cerevisiae with mutations in the RAD52 gene have previously been shown to be defective in meiotic and mitotic recombination, in sporulation, and in repair of radiation-induced damage to DNA. In this study we show that diploid cells homozygous for rad52 lose chromosomes at high frequencies and that these frequencies of loss can be increased dramatically by exposure of these cells to x-rays. Genetic analyses of survivors of x-ray treatment demonstrate that chromosome loss events result in the conversion of diploid cells to cells with near haploid chromosome numbers

  16. Chromatid Painting for Chromosomal Inversion Detection Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose the continued development of a novel approach to the detection of chromosomal inversions. Transmissible chromosome aberrations (translocations and...

  17. Chromatid Painting for Chromosomal Inversion Detection Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose a novel approach to the detection of chromosomal inversions. Transmissible chromosome aberrations (translocations and inversions) have profound genetic...

  18. Mitotic chromosome condensation in vertebrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vagnarelli, Paola, E-mail: P.Vagnarelli@ed.ac.uk

    2012-07-15

    Work from several laboratories over the past 10-15 years has revealed that, within the interphase nucleus, chromosomes are organized into spatially distinct territories [T. Cremer, C. Cremer, Chromosome territories, nuclear architecture and gene regulation in mammalian cells, Nat. Rev. Genet. 2 (2001) 292-301 and T. Cremer, M. Cremer, S. Dietzel, S. Muller, I. Solovei, S. Fakan, Chromosome territories-a functional nuclear landscape, Curr. Opin. Cell Biol. 18 (2006) 307-316]. The overall compaction level and intranuclear location varies as a function of gene density for both entire chromosomes [J.A. Croft, J.M. Bridger, S. Boyle, P. Perry, P. Teague,W.A. Bickmore, Differences in the localization and morphology of chromosomes in the human nucleus, J. Cell Biol. 145 (1999) 1119-1131] and specific chromosomal regions [N.L. Mahy, P.E. Perry, S. Gilchrist, R.A. Baldock, W.A. Bickmore, Spatial organization of active and inactive genes and noncoding DNA within chromosome territories, J. Cell Biol. 157 (2002) 579-589] (Fig. 1A, A'). In prophase, when cyclin B activity reaches a high threshold, chromosome condensation occurs followed by Nuclear Envelope Breakdown (NEB) [1]. At this point vertebrate chromosomes appear as compact structures harboring an attachment point for the spindle microtubules physically recognizable as a primary constriction where the two sister chromatids are held together. The transition from an unshaped interphase chromosome to the highly structured mitotic chromosome (compare Figs. 1A and B) has fascinated researchers for several decades now; however a definite picture of how this process is achieved and regulated is not yet in our hands and it will require more investigation to comprehend the complete process. From a biochemical point of view a vertebrate mitotic chromosomes is composed of DNA, histone proteins (60%) and non-histone proteins (40%) [6]. I will discuss below what is known to date on the contribution of these two different classes

  19. Mitotic chromosome condensation in vertebrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Work from several laboratories over the past 10–15 years has revealed that, within the interphase nucleus, chromosomes are organized into spatially distinct territories [T. Cremer, C. Cremer, Chromosome territories, nuclear architecture and gene regulation in mammalian cells, Nat. Rev. Genet. 2 (2001) 292–301 and T. Cremer, M. Cremer, S. Dietzel, S. Muller, I. Solovei, S. Fakan, Chromosome territories—a functional nuclear landscape, Curr. Opin. Cell Biol. 18 (2006) 307–316]. The overall compaction level and intranuclear location varies as a function of gene density for both entire chromosomes [J.A. Croft, J.M. Bridger, S. Boyle, P. Perry, P. Teague,W.A. Bickmore, Differences in the localization and morphology of chromosomes in the human nucleus, J. Cell Biol. 145 (1999) 1119–1131] and specific chromosomal regions [N.L. Mahy, P.E. Perry, S. Gilchrist, R.A. Baldock, W.A. Bickmore, Spatial organization of active and inactive genes and noncoding DNA within chromosome territories, J. Cell Biol. 157 (2002) 579–589] (Fig. 1A, A'). In prophase, when cyclin B activity reaches a high threshold, chromosome condensation occurs followed by Nuclear Envelope Breakdown (NEB) [1]. At this point vertebrate chromosomes appear as compact structures harboring an attachment point for the spindle microtubules physically recognizable as a primary constriction where the two sister chromatids are held together. The transition from an unshaped interphase chromosome to the highly structured mitotic chromosome (compare Figs. 1A and B) has fascinated researchers for several decades now; however a definite picture of how this process is achieved and regulated is not yet in our hands and it will require more investigation to comprehend the complete process. From a biochemical point of view a vertebrate mitotic chromosomes is composed of DNA, histone proteins (60%) and non-histone proteins (40%) [6]. I will discuss below what is known to date on the contribution of these two different

  20. Allele frequencies of 5 short tandem repeat loci of Kashin-Beck disease patients on chromosome 12%大骨节病患者12号染色体5个短串联重复序列位点基因频率分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    平智广; 刘莉; 郭雄

    2008-01-01

    Objective To analyze the allele frequencies of 5 short tandem repeat(STR)loci(D12S313,D12S304,D12S1640,D12S1708 and D12S1583)on chromosome 12 among Kashin-Beck disease(KBD)patients and the control population living in the area suffered from KBD.Methods Fifty KBD patient8 and 50 non-KBD patients were chosen in endemic afea of Shaanxi Province,5 STR loci on chromosome 12 were genotyped by the technology of polymerase chain reacfion(PCR)and capillary electmphoresis.The pelymorphisms of STR in these popIllations were analyzed.The allele and genotype frequencies of each STR in the corresponding groups were caleulated and compared. Results In KBD group,the 5 STR loci had 8,6,7,5 and 11 types ofalleles and 17,11,15,8 and 28 genotypes, respectively;while in the control group,the number of aUele types of 5 STR loci were 6,8,6,4 and 10,the number of genotype of those loci were 13,21,14,8 and 23,respectively The allele frequence of D12S304 locus was statiBtically significant between KBD patients and controls(P<0.05),especially for the 319 bp allele(P<0.006 25). Conclusion There is an association between D12S304 locus and KBD.The 319 bp allele might play the key role.%目的 分析大骨节病(Kashin-Beck disease,KBD)病区患者与非患者在12号染色体上5个短串联重复序列(short tandem repeat,STR)位点的多态性并比较其差异.方法 在陕西省KBD病区选择KBD患者(病例组)和非KBD患者(对照组)各50人,采集静脉血,利用PCR扩增和毛细管电泳技术,对12号染色体上5个STR位点(D12S313、D12S304、D12S1640、D12S1708和D12S1583)进行分型,分析各位点在上述人群中的多态性,计算5个位点在相应人群中等位基因与基因型频率,对各位点的等位基冈及基因型频率进行比较.结果 上述5种位点,病例组分别检出8,6、7、5和11种等位基因以及17、11、15、8和28种基因型;在对照组中检出6、8、6、4和10种等位基因以及13、21、14、8和23种基因型;在D12S304位点,病

  1. Premature chromosome condensation: A novel method for biological dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, we have investigated the utility of different test systems for biological dosimetry and possible their application for therapy regime. Human peripheral blood lymphocytes were X-irradiated and mixed in different proportions with unirradiated lymphocytes. The frequencies of chromosomal aberrations were determined by the formation of dicentrics, excess of premature chromosome condensation fragments and micronuclie in cytochalasin B-blocked binucleated cells. These responses were with regard to estimate the dose received and to determine the population of unexposed cells (useful for the purpose of therapy) are discussed. 6 refs, 3 figs, 3 tabs

  2. Shannon Information and Power Law Analysis of the Chromosome Code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. A. Tenreiro Machado

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies the information content of the chromosomes of twenty-three species. Several statistics considering different number of bases for alphabet character encoding are derived. Based on the resulting histograms, word delimiters and character relative frequencies are identified. The knowledge of this data allows moving along each chromosome while evaluating the flow of characters and words. The resulting flux of information is captured by means of Shannon entropy. The results are explored in the perspective of power law relationships allowing a quantitative evaluation of the DNA of the species.

  3. Chromosome aberrations in ataxia telangiectasia cells exposed to heavy ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawata, T.; Cucinotta, F.; George, K.; Wu, H.; Shigematsu, N.; Furusawa, Y.; Uno, T.; Isobe, K.; Ito, H.

    Understanding of biological effects of heavy ions is important to assess healt h risk in space. One of the most important issues may be to take into account individual susceptibility. Ataxia telangiectasia (A-T) cells are known to exhibit abnormal responses to radiations but the mechanism of hyper radiosensitivity of A-T still remains unknown. We report chromosome aberrations in normal human fibroblasts and AT fibroblasts exposed to low- and high-LET radiations. A chemical-induced premature chromosome condensation (PCC) technique combined with chromosome- painting technique was applied to score chromosome aberrations in G2/M-phase cells. Following gamma irradiation, GM02052 cells were approximately 5 times more sensitive to g-rays than AG1522 cells. GM02052 cells had a much higher frequency of deletions and misrejoining than AG1522 cells. When the frequency of complex type aberrations was compared, GM02052 cells showed more than 10 times higher frequency than AG1522 cells. The results will be compared with those obtained from high-LET irradiations.

  4. An evolutionary conserved early replicating segment on the sex chromosomes of man and the great apes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, B; Schempp, W; Wiesner, H

    1986-01-01

    Replication studies on prometaphase chromosomes of man, the chimpanzee, the pygmy chimpanzee, the gorilla, and the orangutan reveal great interspecific homologies between the autosomes. The early replicating X chromosomes clearly show a high degree of conservation of both the pattern and the time course of replication. An early replicating segment on the short arm of the X chromosomes of man (Xp22.3) which escapes inactivation can be found on the X chromosomes of the great apes as well. Furthermore, the most early replicating segment on the Y chromosomes of all species tested appears to be homologous to this segment on the X chromosomes. Therefore, these early replicating segments in the great apes may correspond to the pseudoautosomal segment proposed to exist in man. From further cytogenetic characterization of the Y chromosomes it is evident that structural alterations have resulted in an extreme divergence in both the euchromatic and heterochromatic parts. It is assumed, therefore, that, in contrast to the X chromosomes, the Y chromosomes have undergone a rapid evolution within the higher primates. PMID:3096642

  5. The Relationship Between Spontaneous Telomere Loss and Chromosome Instability in a Human Tumor Cell Line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bijan Fouladi

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Chromosome instability plays an important role in cancer by promoting the alterations in the genome required for tumor cell progression. The loss of telomeres that protect the ends of chromosomes and prevent chromosome fusion has been proposed as one mechanism for chromosome instability in cancer cells, however, there is little direct evidence to support this hypothesis. To investigate the relationship between spontaneous telomere loss and chromosome instability in human cancer cells, clones of the EJ-30 tumor cell line were isolated in which a herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSV-tk gene was integrated immediately adjacent to a telomere. Selection for HSV-tkdeficient cells with ganciclovir demonstrated a high rate of loss of the end these "marked" chromosomes (10-4 events/cell per generation. DNA sequence and cytogenetic analysis suggests that the loss of function of the HSV-tk gene most often involves telomere loss, sister chromatid fusion, and prolonged periods of chromosome instability. In some HSV-tk-deficient cells, telomeric repeat sequences were added on to the end of the truncated HSV-tk gene at a new location, whereas in others, no telomere was detected on the end of the marked chromosome. These results suggest that spontaneous telomere loss is a mechanism for chromosome instability in human cancer cells.

  6. Chromosomal abnormalities in couples with repeated fetal loss: An Indian retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frenny J Sheth

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Recurrent pregnancy loss is a common occurrence and a matter of concern for couples planning the pregnancy. Chromosomal abnormalities, mainly balanced rearrangements, are common in couples with repeated miscarriages. Purpose: The purpose of this study is to evaluate the contribution of chromosomal anomalies causing repeated spontaneous miscarriages and provide detailed characterization of a few structurally altered chromosomes. Materials and Methods: A retrospective cytogenetic study was carried out on 4859 individuals having a history of recurrent miscarriages. The cases were analyzed using G-banding and fluorescence in situ hybridization wherever necessary. Results: Chromosomal rearrangements were found in 170 individuals (3.5%. Translocations were seen in 72 (42.35% cases. Of these, reciprocal translocations constituted 42 (24.70% cases while Robertsonian translocations were detected in 30 (17.64% cases. 7 (4.11% cases were mosaic, 8 (4.70% had small supernumerary marker chromosomes and 1 (0.6% had an interstitial microdeletion. Nearly, 78 (1.61% cases with heteromorphic variants were seen of which inversion of Y chromosome (57.70% and chromosome 9 pericentromeric variants (32.05% were predominantly involved. Conclusions: Chromosomal analysis is an important etiological investigation in couples with repeated miscarriages. Characterization of variants/marker chromosome enable calculation of a more precise recurrent risk in a subsequent pregnancy thereby facilitating genetic counseling and deciding further reproductive options.

  7. Partial trisomy 11q involving chromosome 1 detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCorquodale, M.; Bereziouk, O.; McCorquodale, D.J. [Univ. of Illinois College of Medicine, Chicago, IL (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Partial trisomy 11q was detected in an infant delivered 3-4 weeks prematurely. The phenotype included slanted palpebral fissures, high arched palate, developmental delay, microcephaly, and cardiac defects, all of which occur in the majority of cases with this syndrome. Other features included a column-shaped skull, preauricular pit, single palmar crease, short, broad great toes, flat occiput, unilateral kidney agenesis, and strabismus. Chromosomes obtained from peripheral blood cells revealed the presence of extra material on the long arm of chromosome 1. The G-banding pattern of this extra material indicated that it might be derived from chromosome 1 or 11. Chromosomal {open_quotes}paints{close_quotes} showed that it was not chromosome 1 material, but was chromosome 11 material extending from band q21 to qter. Partial trisomy 11q arising from translocation of the 11q material to chromosome 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 9, 10, 13, 17, 21, 22, and X has been reported previously, whereas translocation to chromosome 1 has not. The chromosome to which the 11q material is translocated does not alter the most frequent features of the partial trisomy 11q syndrome, but may influence other less common features.

  8. Chromosome conservation in squamate reptiles revealed by comparative chromosome painting

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Giovannotti, M.; Pokorná, Martina; Kratochvíl, L.; Caputo, V.; Olmo, E.; Ferguson-Smith, M. A.; Rens, W.

    Manchester : ICCS, 2011. 78-78. [Intarnational Chromosome Conference /18./. 29.08.2011-02.09.2011, Manchester] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50450515 Keywords : squamate reptiles Subject RIV: EG - Zoology

  9. Numerous transitions of sex chromosomes in Diptera.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Vicoso

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Many species groups, including mammals and many insects, determine sex using heteromorphic sex chromosomes. Diptera flies, which include the model Drosophila melanogaster, generally have XY sex chromosomes and a conserved karyotype consisting of six chromosomal arms (five large rods and a small dot, but superficially similar karyotypes may conceal the true extent of sex chromosome variation. Here, we use whole-genome analysis in 37 fly species belonging to 22 different families of Diptera and uncover tremendous hidden diversity in sex chromosome karyotypes among flies. We identify over a dozen different sex chromosome configurations, and the small dot chromosome is repeatedly used as the sex chromosome, which presumably reflects the ancestral karyotype of higher Diptera. However, we identify species with undifferentiated sex chromosomes, others in which a different chromosome replaced the dot as a sex chromosome or in which up to three chromosomal elements became incorporated into the sex chromosomes, and others yet with female heterogamety (ZW sex chromosomes. Transcriptome analysis shows that dosage compensation has evolved multiple times in flies, consistently through up-regulation of the single X in males. However, X chromosomes generally show a deficiency of genes with male-biased expression, possibly reflecting sex-specific selective pressures. These species thus provide a rich resource to study sex chromosome biology in a comparative manner and show that similar selective forces have shaped the unique evolution of sex chromosomes in diverse fly taxa.

  10. Familial transmission of a deletion of chromosome 21 derived from a translocation between chromosome 21 and an inverted chromosome 22.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aviv, H; Lieber, C; Yenamandra, A; Desposito, F

    1997-06-27

    Chromosome analysis of a newborn boy with Down syndrome resulted in the identification of a family with an unusual derivative chromosome 22. The child has 46 chromosomes, including two chromosomes 21, one normal chromosome 22, and a derivative chromosome 22. Giemsa banding and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) studies show that the derivative chromosome is chromosome 22 with evidence of both paracentric and pericentric inversions, joined to the long arm of chromosome 21 from 21q21.2 to qter. The rearrangement results in partial trisomy 21 extending from 21q21.2 to 21q terminus in the patient. The child's mother, brother, maternal aunt, and maternal grandmother are all carriers of the derivative chromosome. All have 45 chromosomes, with one normal chromosome 21, one normal chromosome 22, and the derivative chromosome 22. The rearrangement results in the absence of the short arm, the centromere, and the proximal long arm of chromosome 21 (del 21pter-21q21.2) in carriers. Carriers of the derivative chromosome in this family have normal physical appearance, mild learning disabilities and poor social adjustment. PMID:9182781

  11. How chromosome mis-segregation leads to cancer: lessons from BubR1 mouse models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyunsook

    2014-10-31

    Alteration in chromosome numbers and structures instigate and foster massive genetic instability. As Boveri has seen a hundred years ago (Boveri, 1914; 2008), aneuploidy is hallmark of many cancers. However, whether aneuploidy is the cause or the result of cancer is still at debate. The molecular mechanism behind aneuploidy includes the chromo-some mis-segregation in mitosis by the compromise of spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC). SAC is an elaborate network of proteins, which monitor that all chromosomes are bipolarly attached with the spindles. Therefore, the weakening of the SAC is the major reason for chromosome number instability, while complete compromise of SAC results in detrimental death, exemplified in natural abortion in embryonic stage. Here, I will review on the recent progress on the understanding of chromosome mis-segregation and cancer, based on the comparison of different mouse models of BubR1, the core component of SAC. PMID:25256220

  12. Anopheles darlingi polytene chromosomes: revised maps including newly described inversions and evidence for population structure in Manaus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornel, Anthony J; Brisco, Katherine K; Tadei, Wanderli P; Secundino, Nágila Fc; Rafael, Miriam S; Galardo, Allan Kr; Medeiros, Jansen F; Pessoa, Felipe Ac; Ríos-Velásquez, Claudia M; Lee, Yoosook; Pimenta, Paulo Fp; Lanzaro, Gregory C

    2016-05-01

    Salivary gland polytene chromosomes of 4th instar Anopheles darlingi Root were examined from multiple locations in the Brazilian Amazon. Minor modifications were made to existing polytene photomaps. These included changes to the breakpoint positions of several previously described paracentric inversions and descriptions of four new paracentric inversions, two on the right arm of chromosome 3 and two on the left arm of chromosome 3 that were found in multiple locations. A total of 18 inversions on the X (n = 1) chromosome, chromosome 2 (n = 7) and 3 (n = 11) were scored for 83 individuals from Manaus, Macapá and Porto Velho municipalities. The frequency of 2Ra inversion karyotypes in Manaus shows significant deficiency of heterozygotes (p < 0.0009). No significant linkage disequilibrium was found between inversions on chromosome 2 and 3. We hypothesize that at least two sympatric subpopulations exist within the An. darlingi population at Manaus based on inversion frequencies. PMID:27223867

  13. Anopheles darlingi polytene chromosomes: revised maps including newly described inversions and evidence for population structure in Manaus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornel, Anthony J; Brisco, Katherine K; Tadei, Wanderli P; Secundino, Nágila FC; Rafael, Miriam S; Galardo, Allan KR; Medeiros, Jansen F; Pessoa, Felipe AC; Ríos-Velásquez, Claudia M; Lee, Yoosook; Pimenta, Paulo FP; Lanzaro, Gregory C

    2016-01-01

    Salivary gland polytene chromosomes of 4th instar Anopheles darlingi Root were examined from multiple locations in the Brazilian Amazon. Minor modifications were made to existing polytene photomaps. These included changes to the breakpoint positions of several previously described paracentric inversions and descriptions of four new paracentric inversions, two on the right arm of chromosome 3 and two on the left arm of chromosome 3 that were found in multiple locations. A total of 18 inversions on the X (n = 1) chromosome, chromosome 2 (n = 7) and 3 (n = 11) were scored for 83 individuals from Manaus, Macapá and Porto Velho municipalities. The frequency of 2Ra inversion karyotypes in Manaus shows significant deficiency of heterozygotes (p < 0.0009). No significant linkage disequilibrium was found between inversions on chromosome 2 and 3. We hypothesize that at least two sympatric subpopulations exist within the An. darlingi population at Manaus based on inversion frequencies. PMID:27223867

  14. Meiosis and chromosome painting of sex chromosome systems in Ceboidea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudry, M D; Rahn, I M; Solari, A J

    2001-06-01

    The identity of the chromosomes involved in the multiple sex system of Alouatta caraya (Aca) and the possible distribution of this system among other Ceboidea were investigated by chromosome painting of mitotic cells from five species and by analysis of meiosis at pachytene in two species. The identity of the autosome #7 (X2) involved in the multiple system of Aca and its breakage points were demonstrated by both meiosis and chromosome painting. These features are identical to those described by Consigliere et al. [1996] in Alouatta seniculus sara (Assa) and Alouatta seniculus arctoidea (Asar). This multiple system was absent in the other four Ceboidea species studied here. However, data from the literature strongly suggest the presence of this multiple in other members of this genus. The presence of this multiple system among several species and subspecies that show high levels of chromosome rearrangements may suggest a special selective value of this multiple. The meiotic features of the sex systems of Aca and Cebus apella paraguayanus (Cap) are strikingly different at pachytene, as the latter system is similar to the sex pair of man and other primates. The relatively large genetic distances between species presently showing this multiple system suggest that its origin is not recent. Other members of the same genus should be investigated at meiosis and by chromosome painting in order to know the extent and distribution of this complex sex-chromosome system. PMID:11376445

  15. The human gene encoding acetylcholinesterase is located on the long arm of chromosome 7.

    OpenAIRE

    Getman, D K; Eubanks, J H; Camp, S; Evans, G.A.; Taylor, P

    1992-01-01

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) is a secreted enzyme essential for regulating cholinergic neurotransmission at neuronal and neuromuscular synapses. In view of the altered expression of AChE in some central neurological and neuromuscular disorders with a probable genetic basis, we have identified the chromosomal location of the gene encoding AChE. Chromosomal in situ suppression hybridization analysis revealed a single gene to be at 7q22, a result which was confirmed by PCR analysis of genomic DNA...

  16. The one-cell mouse embryo: cell cycle-dependent radiosensitivity and development of chromosomal anomalies in postradiation cell cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One-cell mouse embryos were irradiated with X-rays at different cell cycle stages. Examination of structural chromosomal anomalies and micronucleus formation in postradiation mitoses and interphases demonstrated cell cycle-dependent radiosensitivities in the order: late G2 phase > G1 phase > S phase > early G2 phase > stage of decondensing nuclei. Comparison of the quality and quantity of chromosomal aberrations from the first to third mitosis led to the conclusion that new chromosomal anomalies were formed in the course of postirradiation cell cycles. This hypothesis was supported by an increasing number of micronuclei from 24 to 48 h post-conception. In addition to structural chromosomal aberrations, radiation-induced chromosome loss was observed with a frequency that was obviously independent of the exposed cell cycle phase. Loss of acentric chromosome fragments and of single chromosomes contributed to the micronucleus formation. (author)

  17. Epilepsy and ring chromosome 20: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gomes Marleide da Mota

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available We present the clinical, electroencephalographic, neuroimaging (brain magnetic resonance image - MRI and spectroscopy by MRI and cytogenetic findings of a young male patient with a rare cytogenetic anomaly characterised by a de novo 46,XY,r(20(p13q13.3 karyotype. He presents with mental retardation, emotional liability, and strabismus, without any other significant dysmorphies. There are brain anomalies characterised by corpus callosum, uvula, nodule and cerebellum pyramid hypoplasias, besides arachnoid cysts in the occipital region. He had seizures refractory to pharmacotherapy and long period of confusional status with or without a motor component. The authors recognised that the EEG pattern was not fixed but changed over time, specially for bursts of slow waves with great amplitude accompanied or not by sharp components, and bursts of theta waves sharply contoured. Previously, epilepsy solely has been assigned to region 20q13. However, the important structural cerebral alterations present in our case has not been reported associated to such chromosomal abnormality and may indicate possible new chromosomal sites where such atypical neurological characteristics could be mapped.

  18. Chromosome aberration analysis based on a beta-binomial distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Analyses carried out here generalized on earlier studies of chromosomal aberrations in the populations of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, by allowing extra-binomial variation in aberrant cell counts corresponding to within-subject correlations in cell aberrations. Strong within-subject correlations were detected with corresponding standard errors for the average number of aberrant cells that were often substantially larger than was previously assumed. The extra-binomial variation is accomodated in the analysis in the present report, as described in the section on dose-response models, by using a beta-binomial (B-B) variance structure. It is emphasized that we have generally satisfactory agreement between the observed and the B-B fitted frequencies by city-dose category. The chromosomal aberration data considered here are not extensive enough to allow a precise discrimination between competing dose-response models. A quadratic gamma ray and linear neutron model, however, most closely fits the chromosome data. (author)

  19. Chromosome aberrations in A-bomb survivors, Hiroshima and Nagasaki

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation-induced chromosome rearrangements are known to have persisted in the peripheral blood lymphocytes of atomic bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. A dose-response relationship for chromosome aberration frequencies has been observed in both cities. A preliminary analysis of cytogenetic data indicates that the inter-city difference observed with the T65D dose estimate becomes less pronounced with the new DS86 dosimetry system. The regression coefficient of the dose-response curves is nevertheless higher in Hiroshima than in Nagasaki. The majority of chromosome aberrations detectable to date are of the stable type, such as translocations and inversions, and they have formed the dose-response relationship. (author)

  20. Chromosomal aberrations and SCEs as biomarkers of cancer risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norppa, H; Bonassi, S; Hansteen, I-L; Hagmar, L; Strömberg, U; Rössner, P; Boffetta, P; Lindholm, C; Gundy, S; Lazutka, J; Cebulska-Wasilewska, A; Fabiánová, E; Srám, R J; Knudsen, Lisbeth E.; Barale, R; Fucic, A

    Previous studies have suggested that the frequency of chromosomal aberrations (CAs), but not of sister chromatid exchanges (SCEs), predicts cancer risk. We have further examined this relationship in European cohorts comprising altogether almost 22,000 subjects, in the framework of a European...... collaborative project (CancerRiskBiomarkers). The present paper gives an overview of some of the results of the project, especially as regards CAs and SCEs. The results confirm that a high level of CAs is associated with an increased risk of cancer and indicate that this association does not depend on the time...... between CA analysis and cancer detection, i.e., is obviously not explained by undetected cancer. The present evidence indicates that both chromatid-type and chromosome-type CAs predict cancer, even though some data suggest that chromosome-type CAs may have a more pronounced predictive value than chromatid...

  1. Chromosome fragility in Freemartin cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Barbieri

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to verify chromosome fragility in freemartin cattle using chromosome aberration (CA and sister chromatid exchange (SCE tests. A total of eighteen co-twins were investigated. Fourteen animals were identified as cytogenetically chimeric (2n=60, XX/XY while 4 were classified as normal. Freemartin cattle showed a higher percentage of aneuploid cells (18.64% and highly significant statistical differences (P < 0.001 in mean values of gaps (4.53 ± 2.05, chromatid breaks (0.26 ± 0.51, and significant statistical differences (P < 0.005 in mean values of chromosome breaks (0.12 ± 0.43 when compared to 10 control animals from single births (aneuploid cells, 11.20%; gaps, 2.01 ± 1.42; chromatid breaks, 0.05 ± 0.22; chromosome breaks, 0.02 ± 0.14.

  2. The Incidence and Type of Chromosomal Translocations from Prenatal Diagnosis of 3800 Patients in the Republic of Macedonia

    OpenAIRE

    Vasilevska, M; Ivanovska, E; Kubelka Sabit, K; E. Sukarova-Angelovska; Dimeska, G

    2013-01-01

    Robertsonian and reciprocal chromosomal translocations are the most frequent type of structural chromosomal aberrations in the human population. We report the frequency and type of detected translocations in 10 years of prenatal diagnosis of 3800 prenatal samples. The materials came from amniocentesis and chorionic villus samples (CVS). We detected seven Robertsonian translocations (0.18%), eight autosomal reciprocal translocations (0.21%) and one sex chromosome translocation (0.03%). The ove...

  3. DNA Sequence Duplication in Rhodobacter sphaeroides 2.4.1: Evidence of an Ancient Partnership between Chromosomes I and II†

    OpenAIRE

    Choudhary, Madhusudan; Fu, Yun-Xin; Mackenzie, Chris; Kaplan, Samuel

    2004-01-01

    The complex genome of Rhodobacter sphaeroides 2.4.1, composed of chromosomes I (CI) and II (CII), has been sequenced and assembled. We present data demonstrating that the R. sphaeroides genome possesses an extensive amount of exact DNA sequence duplication, 111 kb or ∼2.7% of the total chromosomal DNA. The chromosomal DNA sequence duplications were aligned to each other by using MUMmer. Frequency and size distribution analyses of the exact DNA duplications revealed that the interchromosomal d...

  4. Methods for chromosome-specific staining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Joe W.; Pinkel, Daniel

    1995-01-01

    Methods and compositions for chromosome-specific staining are provided. Compositions comprise heterogenous mixtures of labeled nucleic acid fragments having substantially complementary base sequences to unique sequence regions of the chromosomal DNA for which their associated staining reagent is specific. Methods include methods for making the chromosome-specific staining compositions of the invention, and methods for applying the staining compositions to chromosomes.

  5. Chromosome Architecture and Genome Organization

    OpenAIRE

    Giorgio Bernardi

    2015-01-01

    How the same DNA sequences can function in the three-dimensional architecture of interphase nucleus, fold in the very compact structure of metaphase chromosomes and go precisely back to the original interphase architecture in the following cell cycle remains an unresolved question to this day. The strategy used to address this issue was to analyze the correlations between chromosome architecture and the compositional patterns of DNA sequences spanning a size range from a few hundreds to a few...

  6. Chromosome evolution in Neotropical butterflies

    OpenAIRE

    Saura, Anssi; Von Schoultz, Barbara; Saura, Anja O.; Brown, Keith S., Jr.

    2013-01-01

    We list the chromosome numbers for 65 species of Neotropical Hesperiidae and 104 species or subspecies of Pieridae. In Hesperiidae the tribe Pyrrhopygini have a modal n = 28, Eudaminae and Pyrgini a modal n = 31, while Hesperiinae have n = around 29. Among Pieridae, Coliadinae have a strong modal n = 31 and among Pierinae Anthocharidini are almost fixed for n = 15 while Pierini vary with n = 26 as the most common chromosome number. Dismorphiinae show wide variation. We discuss these results i...

  7. Influence of caffeine on chromosome lesions induced by chemical mutagens and radiation. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The modifying influence of caffeine on γ-ray induced chromosome lesions was studied by chromosome aberration anaysis. Caffeine was applied as a pre- and post-treatment agent following seed (G1) and root meristem (G2 and S) irradiation of C.capillaris. The frequency of chromosome aberrations induced in G1 was changed neither by post- nor by pre-treatment with caffeine. This fact proves the lack of caffeine modifying effect. Applied as a post-treatment agent caffeine enhances considerably the frequency of chromosome aberrations induced in root meristem cells. This is especially valid for G2 irradiated cells, while in S cells no synergistic effect was established between induced chromosome lesions and caffeine. The enhancement of chromosome aberration frequency produced in G2 shows a clearly manifested dependence on the time (moment) of caffeine application post irradiation. Most considerable enhancement was obtained following post-treatment with caffeine immediately after irradiation. In the following intervals - 15 and 30 min - it decreases progressively, while after 60, 180 and 300 min no enhancing effect is observed. The probable causes for the manifestation and the lack of synergistic effect between chromosome lesions induced in the various mitotic cycle phases and caffeine are discussed. (author)

  8. Functional and structural rearrangements of salivary gland polytene chromosomes of Chironomus riparius Mg. (Diptera,Chironomidae) in response to freshly neutralized aluminium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michailova, P; Ilkova, J; White, K N

    2003-01-01

    Although recent work has shown that environmentally relevant concentrations of freshly neutralized aluminium (AI) are bioavailable and toxic to freshwater invertebrates, the genotoxicity of Al has not been examined. Here we show that freshly neutralized Al affects structure and function of the salivary gland polytene chromosomes of the ubiquitous chironomid larva Chironomus riparius over three generations. Exposure to 500 microg l-1 added Al for 24-25 days resulted in a significantly higher frequency of numerous somatic aberrations, while no structural aberrations were found in F1 controls and few in the second and third generation. Aberrations also included deletions of sections of chromosome G of C. riparius larvae as well as deletions of one or more Balbiani rings. Changes in functional activity included decreased activity of the Balbiani rings (BR), and an increase in the number of decondensed centromeres. The activity of the nucleolar organizer (NOR) significantly decreased in F1 chironomids exposed to Al, while in the F2 and F3 generations the NOR showed normal (high) activity. First generation chironomids were generally more susceptible to Al although no clear evidence of tolerance was apparent over three generations. The possible use of alterations in chironomid polytene chromosomes as biomarkers of trace metal pollution is discussed. PMID:12628199

  9. Numerically abnormal chromosome constitutions in humans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 24, discusses numerically abnormal chromosome constitutions in humans. This involves abnormalities of human chromosome number, including polyploidy (when the number of sets of chromosomes increases) and aneuploidy (when the number of individual normal chromosomes changes). Chapter sections discuss the following chromosomal abnormalities: human triploids, imprinting and uniparental disomy, human tetraploids, hydatidiform moles, anomalies caused by chromosomal imbalance, 13 trisomy (D{sub 1} trisomy, Patau syndrome), 21 trisomy (Down syndrome), 18 trisomy syndrome (Edwards syndrome), other autosomal aneuploidy syndromes, and spontaneous abortions. The chapter concludes with remarks on the nonrandom participation of chromosomes in trisomy. 69 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  10. Chromosome evolution in Neotropical butterflies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saura, Anssi; Von Schoultz, Barbara; Saura, Anja O; Brown, Keith S

    2013-06-01

    We list the chromosome numbers for 65 species of Neotropical Hesperiidae and 104 species or subspecies of Pieridae. In Hesperiidae the tribe Pyrrhopygini have a modal n = 28, Eudaminae and Pyrgini a modal n = 31, while Hesperiinae have n = around 29. Among Pieridae, Coliadinae have a strong modal n = 31 and among Pierinae Anthocharidini are almost fixed for n = 15 while Pierini vary with n = 26 as the most common chromosome number. Dismorphiinae show wide variation. We discuss these results in the context of chromosome numbers of over 1400 Neotropical butterfly species and subspecies derived from about 3000 populations published here and in earlier papers of a series. The overall results show that many Neotropical groups are characterized by karyotype instability with several derived modal numbers or none at all, while almost all taxa of Lepidoptera studied from the other parts of the world have one of n = 29-31 as modal numbers. Possibly chromosome number changes become fixed in the course of speciation driven by biotic interactions. Population subdivision and structuring facilitate karyotype change. Factors that stabilize chromosome numbers include hybridization among species sharing the same number, migration, sexual selection and possibly the distribution of chromosomes within the nucleus. PMID:23865963

  11. Chromosome Architecture and Genome Organization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardi, Giorgio

    2015-01-01

    How the same DNA sequences can function in the three-dimensional architecture of interphase nucleus, fold in the very compact structure of metaphase chromosomes and go precisely back to the original interphase architecture in the following cell cycle remains an unresolved question to this day. The strategy used to address this issue was to analyze the correlations between chromosome architecture and the compositional patterns of DNA sequences spanning a size range from a few hundreds to a few thousands Kilobases. This is a critical range that encompasses isochores, interphase chromatin domains and boundaries, and chromosomal bands. The solution rests on the following key points: 1) the transition from the looped domains and sub-domains of interphase chromatin to the 30-nm fiber loops of early prophase chromosomes goes through the unfolding into an extended chromatin structure (probably a 10-nm “beads-on-a-string” structure); 2) the architectural proteins of interphase chromatin, such as CTCF and cohesin sub-units, are retained in mitosis and are part of the discontinuous protein scaffold of mitotic chromosomes; 3) the conservation of the link between architectural proteins and their binding sites on DNA through the cell cycle explains the “mitotic memory” of interphase architecture and the reversibility of the interphase to mitosis process. The results presented here also lead to a general conclusion which concerns the existence of correlations between the isochore organization of the genome and the architecture of chromosomes from interphase to metaphase. PMID:26619076

  12. The technique of chromosome painting and its application in radiation biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The analysis of chromosomal aberrations is one of the most important methods of investigating the effects of ionizing radiation on living cells. For a long time only structural unstable-type aberrations, like dicentrics, could be identified in uniformly stained chromosomes. The introduction of chromosome banding in the seventies allowed for the first time to analyze stable-type aberrations, such as translocations, however, the technical difficulties associated with this technique prevented its wide application in radiation biology. At the end of the eighties, the technique of chromosome painting was invented. With its help it is possible to hybridize 'in situ' fluorochrome-labelled DNA of individual chromosomes, so that any inter chromosomal rearrangements are easily detectable as color discontinuities. The analysis of radiation-induced translocations in painted chromosomes is presently being introduced in biodosimetry of human peripheral lymphocytes. The advantage of this system lies in the fact that, unlike unstable-type aberrations, the frequency of translocations in a proliferating cell population remains constant with time. This could allow a precise, retrospective estimation of the dose applied a long after exposure to radiation. Chromosome painting has also been used to investigate the mechanisms underlying the formation of radiation-induced chromosomal aberrations, and may play a role in estimation of radiosensitivity of tumors prior to radiotherapy. (author). 23 refs, 3 figs

  13. DNA damage response during mitosis induces whole chromosome mis-segregation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhoum, Samuel F.; Kabeche, Lilian; Murnane, John P.; Zaki, Bassem I.; Compton, Duane A.

    2014-01-01

    Many cancers display both structural (s-CIN) and numerical (w-CIN) chromosomal instabilities. Defective chromosome segregation during mitosis has been shown to cause DNA damage that induces structural rearrangements of chromosomes (s-CIN). In contrast, whether DNA damage can disrupt mitotic processes to generate whole chromosomal instability (w-CIN) is unknown. Here we show that activation of the DNA damage response (DDR) during mitosis selectively stabilizes kinetochore-microtubule (k-MT) attachments to chromosomes through Aurora-A and Plk1 kinases, thereby increasing the frequency of lagging chromosomes during anaphase. Inhibition of DDR proteins, ATM or Chk2, abolishes the effect of DNA damage on k-MTs and chromosome segregation, whereas activation of the DDR in the absence of DNA damage is sufficient to induce chromosome segregation errors. Finally, inhibiting the DDR during mitosis in cancer cells with persistent DNA damage suppresses inherent chromosome segregation defects. Thus, DDR during mitosis inappropriately stabilizes k-MTs creating a link between s-CIN and w-CIN. PMID:25107667

  14. Chromosomal abnormalities among children born with conotruncal cardiac defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lammer, Edward J.; Chak, Jacqueline S.; Iovannisci, David M.; Schultz, Kathleen; Osoegawa, Kazutoyo; Yang, Wei; Carmichael, Suzan L.; Shaw, Gary M.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND Conotruncal heart defects comprise 25%-30% of non-syndromic congenital heart defects. This study describes the frequency of chromosome abnormalities and microdeletion 22q11 associated with conotruncal heart malformations. METHODS From a population base of 974,579 infants/fetuses delivered, 622 Californian infants/fetuses were ascertained with a defect of aortico-pulmonary septation. Infants whose primary cardiac defect was tetralogy of Fallot (n=296) or D-transposition of the great vessels (n=189) were screened for microdeletions of 22q11. RESULTS Fourteen (2.3%) of the 622 infants/fetuses had chromosomal abnormalities. Thirty infants, 10% of those whose primary defect was tetralogy of Fallot, had chromosome 22q11 microdeletions. Right aortic arch, abnormal branching patterns of the major arteries arising from the thoracic aorta, and pulmonary artery abnormalities were observed more frequently in these children. CONCLUSIONS We found an unusual number of infants with an extra sex chromosome and a conotruncal defect. Infants with tetralogy of Fallot due to 22q11 microdeletion showed more associated vascular anomalies than infants with tetralogy but no 22q11 microdeletion. Although these associated vascular anomalies provide clues as to which infants with tetralogy of Fallot are more likely to carry the microdeletion, the overall risk of 10% among all infants with tetralogy of Fallot warrants chromosome analysis and FISH testing routinely. PMID:19067405

  15. Influence of DMSO on Carbon K ultrasoft X-rays induced chromosome aberrations in V79 Chinese hamster cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ultrasoft X-rays have been shown to be very efficient in inducing chromosomal aberrations in mammalian cells. The present study was aimed to evaluate the modifying effects of DMSO (a potent scavenger of free radicals) on the frequencies of chromosome aberrations induced by soft X-rays. Confluent held G1 Chinese hamster cells (V79) were irradiated with Carbon K ultrasoft X-rays in the presence and absence of 1 M DMSO and frequencies of chromosome aberrations in the first division cells were determined. DMSO reduced the frequencies of exchange types of aberrations (dicentrics and centric rings) by a factor of 2.1-3.5. The results indicate that free radicals induced by ultrasoft X-rays contribute to a great extent to the induction of chromosome aberrations. The possible implications of these results in interpreting the mechanisms involved in the high efficiency of ultrasoft X-rays in the induction of chromosome aberrations are discussed.

  16. Influence of DMSO on Carbon K ultrasoft X-rays induced chromosome aberrations in V79 Chinese hamster cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natarajan, Adayapalam T., E-mail: natarajan@live.nl [University of Tuscia, Viterbo (Italy); Palitti, Fabrizio [University of Tuscia, Viterbo (Italy); Hill, Mark A. [CRUK/MRC Gray Institute for Radiation Oncology and Biology, University of Oxford, Old Road Campus Research Building, Oxford OX3 7DQ (United Kingdom); MRC Radiation and Genome Stability Unit, Harwell, Oxfordshire OX11 0RD (United Kingdom); Stevens, David L. [MRC Radiation and Genome Stability Unit, Harwell, Oxfordshire OX11 0RD (United Kingdom); Ahnstroem, Gunnar [Department of Microbiology and Genetic Toxicology, Stockholm University, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2010-09-10

    Ultrasoft X-rays have been shown to be very efficient in inducing chromosomal aberrations in mammalian cells. The present study was aimed to evaluate the modifying effects of DMSO (a potent scavenger of free radicals) on the frequencies of chromosome aberrations induced by soft X-rays. Confluent held G1 Chinese hamster cells (V79) were irradiated with Carbon K ultrasoft X-rays in the presence and absence of 1 M DMSO and frequencies of chromosome aberrations in the first division cells were determined. DMSO reduced the frequencies of exchange types of aberrations (dicentrics and centric rings) by a factor of 2.1-3.5. The results indicate that free radicals induced by ultrasoft X-rays contribute to a great extent to the induction of chromosome aberrations. The possible implications of these results in interpreting the mechanisms involved in the high efficiency of ultrasoft X-rays in the induction of chromosome aberrations are discussed.

  17. Evolution of Sex Chromosomes in Insects

    OpenAIRE

    Kaiser, Vera B; Bachtrog, Doris

    2010-01-01

    Sex chromosomes have many unusual features relative to autosomes. Y (or W) chromosomes lack genetic recombination, are male- (female-) limited, and show an abundance of genetically inert heterochromatic DNA but contain few functional genes. X (or Z) chromosomes also show sex-biased transmission (i.e., X chromosomes show female-biased and Z-chromosomes show male-biased inheritance) and are hemizygous in the heterogametic sex. Their unusual ploidy level and pattern of inheritance imply that sex...

  18. Mechanisms of ring chromosome formation, ring instability and clinical consequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme Roberta S

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The breakpoints and mechanisms of ring chromosome formation were studied and mapped in 14 patients. Methods Several techniques were performed such as genome-wide array, MLPA (Multiplex Ligation-Dependent Probe Amplification and FISH (Fluorescent in situ Hybridization. Results The ring chromosomes of patients I to XIV were determined to be, respectively: r(3(p26.1q29, r(4(p16.3q35.2, r(10(p15.3q26.2, r(10(p15.3q26.13, r(13(p13q31.1, r(13(p13q34, r(14(p13q32.33, r(15(p13q26.2, r(18(p11.32q22.2, r(18(p11.32q21.33, r(18(p11.21q23, r(22(p13q13.33, r(22(p13q13.2, and r(22(p13q13.2. These rings were found to have been formed by different mechanisms, such as: breaks in both chromosome arms followed by end-to-end reunion (patients IV, VIII, IX, XI, XIII and XIV; a break in one chromosome arm followed by fusion with the subtelomeric region of the other (patients I and II; a break in one chromosome arm followed by fusion with the opposite telomeric region (patients III and X; fusion of two subtelomeric regions (patient VII; and telomere-telomere fusion (patient XII. Thus, the r(14 and one r(22 can be considered complete rings, since there was no loss of relevant genetic material. Two patients (V and VI with r(13 showed duplication along with terminal deletion of 13q, one of them proved to be inverted, a mechanism known as inv-dup-del. Ring instability was detected by ring loss and secondary aberrations in all but three patients, who presented stable ring chromosomes (II, XIII and XIV. Conclusions We concluded that the clinical phenotype of patients with ring chromosomes may be related with different factors, including gene haploinsufficiency, gene duplications and ring instability. Epigenetic factors due to the circular architecture of ring chromosomes must also be considered, since even complete ring chromosomes can result in phenotypic alterations, as observed in our patients with complete r(14 and r(22.

  19. Quantification of the DNA content of structurally abnormal X chromosomes and X chromosome aneuploidy using high resolution bivariate flow karyotyping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trask, B; van den Engh, G; Nussbaum, R; Schwartz, C; Gray, J

    1990-01-01

    Quantification of the Hoechst and chromomycin A3 fluorescence intensities of mitotic human chromosomes isolated from karyotypically normal and abnormal cells was performed with a dual beam flow cytometer. The resultant flow karyotypes contain information about the relative DNA content and base composition of chromosomes and their relative frequencies in the mitotic cell sample. The relative copy number of X and Y chromosomes was determined for 38 normal males and females and 6 cell lines with X or Y chromosome aneuploidy. Flow karyotype diagnoses corresponded with conventional cytogenetic results in all cases. We show that chromosome DNA content can be derived from peak position in Hoechst vs. chromomycin flow karyotypes. These values are linearly related to propidium iodide staining intensity as measured with flow cytometry and to the binding of gallocyanin chrome alum to phosphate groups as measured with slide-based scanning photometry. Cell lines with deleted or dicentric X chromosomes ranging in length from 0.53 to 1.95 times normal were analyzed by using flow cytometry. The measured difference in DNA content between a normal X and each of the structurally abnormal chromosomes was linearly correlated to the difference predicted from cytogenetics and/or probe analyses. Deletions of 3-5 Mb, which were at and below the detection limits of conventional cytogenetics, could be quantified by flow karyotyping in individuals with X-linked diseases such as Duchenne muscular dystrophy, choroideremia, and ocular albinism/ichthyosis. The results show that the use of flow karyotyping to quantify the size of restricted regions of the genome can complement conventional cytogenetics and other physical mapping techniques in the study of genetic disorders. PMID:2106419

  20. Afghanistan from a Y-chromosome perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacau, Harlette; Gayden, Tenzin; Regueiro, Maria; Chennakrishnaiah, Shilpa; Bukhari, Areej; Underhill, Peter A; Garcia-Bertrand, Ralph L; Herrera, Rene J

    2012-10-01

    Central Asia has served as a corridor for human migrations providing trading routes since ancient times. It has functioned as a conduit connecting Europe and the Middle East with South Asia and far Eastern civilizations. Therefore, the study of populations in this region is essential for a comprehensive understanding of early human dispersal on the Eurasian continent. Although Y- chromosome distributions in Central Asia have been widely surveyed, present-day Afghanistan remains poorly characterized genetically. The present study addresses this lacuna by analyzing 190 Pathan males from Afghanistan using high-resolution Y-chromosome binary markers. In addition, haplotype diversity for its most common lineages (haplogroups R1a1a*-M198 and L3-M357) was estimated using a set of 15 Y-specific STR loci. The observed haplogroup distribution suggests some degree of genetic isolation of the northern population, likely due to the Hindu Kush mountain range separating it from the southern Afghans who have had greater contact with neighboring Pathans from Pakistan and migrations from the Indian subcontinent. Our study demonstrates genetic similarities between Pathans from Afghanistan and Pakistan, both of which are characterized by the predominance of haplogroup R1a1a*-M198 (>50%) and the sharing of the same modal haplotype. Furthermore, the high frequencies of R1a1a-M198 and the presence of G2c-M377 chromosomes in Pathans might represent phylogenetic signals from Khazars, a common link between Pathans and Ashkenazi groups, whereas the absence of E1b1b1a2-V13 lineage does not support their professed Greek ancestry. PMID:22510847

  1. Somatic pairing, endomitosis and chromosome aberrations in snakes (Viperidae and Colubridae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beçak Maria Luiza

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The positioning of macrochromosomes of Bothrops jararaca and Bothrops insularis (Viperidae was studied in undistorted radial metaphases of uncultured cells (spermatogonia and oogonia not subjected to spindle inhibitors. Colchicinized metaphases from uncultured (spleen and intestine and cultured tissues (blood were also analyzed. We report two antagonic non-random chromosome arrangements in untreated premeiotic cells: the parallel configuration with homologue chromosomes associated side by side in the metaphase plate and the antiparallel configuration having homologue chromosomes with antipolar distribution in the metaphase ring. The antiparallel aspect also appeared in colchicinized cells. The spatial chromosome arrangement in both configurations is groupal size-dependent and maintained through meiosis. We also describe, in untreated gonia cells, endomitosis followed by reductional mitosis which restores the diploid number. In B. jararaca males we observed that some gonad regions present changes in the meiotic mechanism. In this case, endoreduplicated cells segregate the diplochromosomes to opposite poles forming directly endoreduplicated second metaphases of meiosis with the suppression of first meiosis. By a successive division, these cells form nuclei with one set of chromosomes. Chromosome doubling in oogonia is known in hybrid species and in parthenogenetic salamanders and lizards. This species also presented chromosome rearrangements leading to aneuploidies in mitosis and meiosis. It is suggested that somatic pairing, endomitosis, meiotic alterations, and chromosomal aberrations can be correlated processes. Similar aspects of nuclei configurations, endomitosis and reductional mitosis were found in other Viperidae and Colubridae species.

  2. Chromosomal analysis by G-banding techinque in youngsters of high background radiation area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It was demonstrated that the frequency of chromosome aberrations of peripheral lymphocytes in inhabitants of the high background radiation area was higher than that in people of the control area. In this study, the chromosome aberrations in inhabitants of both areas were analysed by means of G-banding techique in an efforf to improve the detection of stable aberrations. Chromosome aberrations were studied in blood lymphocytes from 34 inhabitnts of the high background radiation area, and from 40 controls of normal background radiation area. Seabright's trypsin G-banding technique with minor modification was employed. In the result, in the high background group 55 aberrations were found in 1711 banded metaphases with a frequency of 3.21/100 cells, while in the control group only 39 aberrations were observed in 2006 metaphases, showing a frequency of 1.94/100 cells. Obviously, the frequency in the former group was significantly higher than that in the latter. On analysis of the types of aberrations, translocations and deletions accounted for approximately 85% of the total aberrations. There were 86 breaks found by G-banding in the high background group and 67 breaks in the control. A statistical comparison of observed and expected values showed that the distributions of chromosome breaks in both groups were nonrandom. When individual chromosomes were compared separately, it was found that the observed values of the breaks of chromosomes 1, 2 and 8 were higher than the expected

  3. The influence of gamma-radiation to effectiveness of conjugation of polytene chromosome of Chironomus plumosus L

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chironomus plumosus L. from nature pond of the Brest region were used for experiments. Larvae were irradiated in doses 1, 10, 100 Gy and after 15 days checked for frequency of chromosomal disorder. On examination, gamma-radiation decreases effectiveness of conjugation of polytene chromosome of Chironomus plumosus L. This effect amplifies if increase dose of radiation

  4. Spatial positioning of all 24 chromosomes in the lymphocytes of six subjects: evidence of reproducible positioning and spatial repositioning following DNA damage with hydrogen peroxide and ultraviolet B.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrios Ioannou

    Full Text Available The higher-order organization of chromatin is well-established, with chromosomes occupying distinct positions within the interphase nucleus. Chromatin is susceptible to, and constantly assaulted by both endogenous and exogenous threats. However, the effects of DNA damage on the spatial topology of chromosomes are hitherto, poorly understood. This study investigates the organization of all 24 human chromosomes in lymphocytes from six individuals prior to- and following in-vitro exposure to genotoxic agents: hydrogen peroxide and ultraviolet B. This study is the first to report reproducible distinct hierarchical radial organization of chromosomes with little inter-individual differences between subjects. Perturbed nuclear organization was observed following genotoxic exposure for both agents; however a greater effect was observed for hydrogen peroxide including: 1 More peripheral radial organization; 2 Alterations in the global distribution of chromosomes; and 3 More events of chromosome repositioning (18 events involving 10 chromosomes vs. 11 events involving 9 chromosomes for hydrogen peroxide and ultraviolet B respectively. Evidence is provided of chromosome repositioning and altered nuclear organization following in-vitro exposure to genotoxic agents, with notable differences observed between the two investigated agents. Repositioning of chromosomes following genotoxicity involved recurrent chromosomes and is most likely part of the genomes inherent response to DNA damage. The variances in nuclear organization observed between the two agents likely reflects differences in mobility and/or decondensation of chromatin as a result of differences in the type of DNA damage induced, chromatin regions targeted, and DNA repair mechanisms.

  5. Proton and Fe Ion-Induced Early and Late Chromosome Aberrations in Different Cell Types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Tao; Zhang, Ye; Yeshitla, Samrawit; Bowler, Deborah; Kadhim, Munira; Wilson, Bobby; Wu, Honglu

    2016-01-01

    Genomic instability, induced by various metabolic, genetic, and environmental factors, is the driving force of tumorigenesis. Radiation exposure from different types of radiation sources induces different types of DNA damages, increases mutation and chromosome aberration rates, and increases cellular transformation in vitro and in vivo experiments. The cell survival rates and frequency of chromosome aberrations depend on the genetic background and radiation sources. To further understand genomic instability induced by charged particles, we exposed human lymphocytes ex vivo, human fibroblast cells, human mammary epithelial cells, and bone marrow cells isolated from CBA/CaH and C57BL/6 mice to high energy protons and Fe ions, and collected chromosomes at different generations after exposure. Chromosome aberrations were analyzed with fluorescent in situ hybridization with whole chromosome specific probes.

  6. Chromosome numbers and meiotic analysis in the pre-breeding of Brachiaria decumbens (Poaceae)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Gléia Cristina Laverde Ricci; Alice Maria De Souza-Kaneshima; Mariana Ferrari Felismino; Andrea Beatriz Mendes-Bonato; Maria Suely Pagliarini; Cacilda Borges Do Valle

    2011-08-01

    A total of 44 accessions of Brachiaria decumbens were analysed for chromosome count and meiotic behaviour in order to identify potential progenitors for crosses. Among them, 15 accessions presented $2n = 18$; 27 accessions, $2n = 36$; and 2 accessions, $2n = 45$ chromosomes. Among the diploid accessions, the rate of meiotic abnormalities was low, ranging from 0.82% to 7.93%. In the 27 tetraploid accessions, the rate of meiotic abnormalities ranged from 18.41% to 65.83%. The most common meiotic abnormalities were related to irregular chromosome segregation, but chromosome stickiness and abnormal cytokinesis were observed in low frequency. All abnormalities can compromise pollen viability by generating unbalanced gametes. Based on the chromosome number and meiotic stability, the present study indicates the apomictic tetraploid accessions that can act as male genitor to produce interspecific hybrids with B. ruziziensis or intraspecific hybrids with recently artificially tetraploidized accessions.

  7. The effects of exposure to different clastogens on the pattern of chromosomal aberrations detected by FISH whole chromosome painting in occupationally exposed individuals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beskid, O. [Institute of Experimental Medicine AS CR and Health Institute of Central Bohemia, Videnska 1083, 142 20 Prague 4 (Czech Republic); Dusek, Z. [Institute of Experimental Medicine AS CR and Health Institute of Central Bohemia, Videnska 1083, 142 20 Prague 4 (Czech Republic); Solansky, I. [Institute of Experimental Medicine AS CR and Health Institute of Central Bohemia, Videnska 1083, 142 20 Prague 4 (Czech Republic); Sram, R.J. [Institute of Experimental Medicine AS CR and Health Institute of Central Bohemia, Videnska 1083, 142 20 Prague 4 (Czech Republic)]. E-mail: sram@biomed.cas.cz

    2006-02-22

    The pattern of chromosomal aberrations (CA) was studied by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique (whole chromosomes 1 and 4 painting) in workers occupationally exposed to any of the four following conditions: acrylonitrile (ACN), ethyl benzene (EB), carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (c-PAHs), and irradiation in nuclear power plants (NPP), respectively. Decrease in the relative frequency of translocations was observed in EB group, and an increase in reciprocal translocations in ACN and NPP-exposed groups. An increase in a relative number of insertions was registered under all four conditions (significant at ACN, EB, c-PAHs, quasisignificant at NPP-exposed groups). Significant differences in the percentage of lymphocytes with aberrations on chromosome 1 (58.8 {+-} 32.7%, versus 73.8 {+-} 33.6% in the controls, P < 0.05), and chromosome 4 (47.0 {+-} 34.1%, versus 29.4 {+-} 32.2%, P < 0.01) were found in workers exposed to ACN. Similarly, a decrease in the proportion of cells with aberration on chromosome 1 (61.0 {+-} 24.0%, versus 73.8 {+-} 33.6%, P < 0.05) and an increase on chromosome 4 (45.6 {+-} 24.6%, versus 29.4 {+-} 32.2%, P < 0.05) were observed in workers exposed to EB. Frequency of aberrant cells (%AB.C.) as well as genomic frequency of translocations (F {sub G}/100) increased with age (P < 0.001). Aging also increased the percentage of translocations and reciprocal translocations (P < 0.05), but decreased the relative number of acentric fragments (P < 0.01). Smoking led to significantly increased F {sub G}/100 (P < 0.05), but did not affect the pattern of chromosomal aberrations. Our results seem to indicate that different carcinogens may induce a different pattern of chromosomal aberrations.

  8. Establishment of a markerless mutation delivery system in Bacillus subtilis stimulated by a double-strand break in the chromosome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting Shi

    Full Text Available Bacillus subtilis has been a model for gram-positive bacteria and it has long been exploited for industrial and biotechnological applications. However, the availability of facile genetic tools for physiological analysis has generally lagged substantially behind traditional genetic models such as Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In this work, we have developed an efficient, precise and scarless method for rapid multiple genetic modifications without altering the chromosome of B. subtilis. This method employs upp gene as a counter-selectable marker, double-strand break (DSB repair caused by exogenous endonuclease I-SceI and comK overexpression for fast preparation of competent cell. Foreign dsDNA can be simply and efficiently integrated into the chromosome by double-crossover homologous recombination. The DSB repair is a potent inducement for stimulating the second intramolecular homologous recombination, which not only enhances the frequency of resolution by one to two orders of magnitude, but also selects for the resolved product. This method has been successfully and reiteratively used in B. subtilis to deliver point mutations, to generate in-frame deletions, and to construct large-scale deletions. Experimental results proved that it allowed repeated use of the selectable marker gene for multiple modifications and could be a useful technique for B. subtilis.

  9. Therapeutic efficacy of inosine against radiation-induced damage at cellular, biochemical and chromosomal levels in swiss albino mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inosine has been used for treatment of various diseases and disorders in medicine. Modulator effect of inosine against γ radiation-induced histological alterations in testis, reduced glutathione (GSH), lipid peroxidation (LPO), acid and alkaline phosphatases activities (AP and ALP) and chromosomal aberrations (CA) in mice was studied at various experimental intervals between 1 and 30 days. Mice exposed to 8 Gy γ-rays showed acute radiation sickness including marked testis histological changes and chromosomal aberrations (CA) in bone marrow cells with 100 % mortality within 22 days. When inosine was given orally at a dose of 80 mg/ kg body wt for 15 consecutive days after exposure to γ-rays, death in radiation + inosine group was reduced to 70 % at 30 days. The radiation - dose reduction factor (DRF) was 1.43. There was significantly lesser degree of damage to testis tissue architecture and various cell populations including spermatogonia, spermatids and leydig cells. Correspondingly, a significant decrease in the LPO and increase in the GSH levels were observed in testis of radiation + inosine group. Similarly, a significant decrease in level of AP and increase in level of ALP were observed. Inosine treatment significantly prevented γ-rays-induced CA frequency in bone marrow cells.

  10. Relationships between DNA double-strand breaks and chromosomal aberrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evidence suggests that double strand breaks are induced linearly with radiation dose at frequencies of 30-40 DSB/cell/Gy. It seems possible that there is a fast component not normally related to the induction of chromosomal aberrations, and a second slower component underlying the observed joining of chromosome and chromatid breaks. Radiation induces a mixture of blunt and cohesive-ended DSB probably with a preponderance of the latter which are much less effective at inducing aberrations. Visible chromatid breaks are also induced linearly with dose at much lower frequency than DSB and rejoin with a half-time reminiscent of slowly repairing DSB. It is possible that this slow rejoining reflects underlying repair of biologically important DSB. Rejoining of chromatid breaks and misjoining giving rise to exchanges are thought to be determined by different mechanisms. (UK)

  11. Utility of X-chromosome SNPs in relationship testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tomas, Carmen; Sanchez, Juan Jose; Castro, J.A.;

    2008-01-01

    (SNPs) in relationship testing have been published. We selected 25 highly polymorphic biallelic SNPs distributed through the human X-chromosome. One 25-plex PCR reaction and one 25-plex single base extension (SNaPshot) reaction were developed. The maximum size of the PCR products was 120ábp and the size...... of the SBE primers varied between 18 and 85 nucleotides. We analyzed the allele and haplotype frequencies in 1078 unrelated males. All the SNPs were polymorphic and the lowest minor allele frequency was 0.103. All the haplotypes were unique. The forensic parameters were calculated in the Danish and...... 25 X-chromosome SNP-multiplex may help to solve a complex immigration case...

  12. The Reduction of Chromosome Number in Meiosis Is Determined by Properties Built into the Chromosomes

    OpenAIRE

    Paliulis, Leocadia V.; Nicklas, R. Bruce

    2000-01-01

    In meiosis I, two chromatids move to each spindle pole. Then, in meiosis II, the two are distributed, one to each future gamete. This requires that meiosis I chromosomes attach to the spindle differently than meiosis II chromosomes and that they regulate chromosome cohesion differently. We investigated whether the information that dictates the division type of the chromosome comes from the whole cell, the spindle, or the chromosome itself. Also, we determined when chromosomes can switch from ...

  13. Chromosome segregation in plant meiosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda eZamariola

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Faithful chromosome segregation in meiosis is essential for ploidy stability over sexual life cycles. In plants, defective chromosome segregation caused by gene mutations or other factors leads to the formation of unbalanced or unreduced gametes creating aneuploid or polyploid progeny, respectively. Accurate segregation requires the coordinated execution of conserved processes occurring throughout the two meiotic cell divisions. Synapsis and recombination ensure the establishment of chiasmata that hold homologous chromosomes together allowing their correct segregation in the first meiotic division, which is also tightly regulated by cell-cycle dependent release of cohesin and monopolar attachment of sister kinetochores to microtubules. In meiosis II, bi-orientation of sister kinetochores and proper spindle orientation correctly segregate chromosomes in four haploid cells. Checkpoint mechanisms acting at kinetochores control the accuracy of kinetochore-microtubule attachment, thus ensuring the completion of segregation. Here we review the current knowledge on the processes taking place during chromosome segregation in plant meiosis, focusing on the characterization of the molecular factors involved.

  14. Dean flow fractionation of chromosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hockin, Matt; Sant, Himanshu J.; Capecchi, Mario; Gale, Bruce K.

    2016-03-01

    Efforts to transfer intact mammalian chromosomes between cells have been attempted for more than 50 years with the consistent result being transfer of sub unit length pieces regardless of method. Inertial microfluidics is a new field that has shown much promise in addressing the fractionation of particles in the 2-20 μm size range (with unknown limits) and separations are based upon particles being carried by curving confined flows (within a spiral shaped, often rectangular flow chamber) and migrating to stable "equilibrium" positions of varying distance from a chamber wall depending on the balance of dean and lift forces. We fabricated spiral channels for inertial microfluidic separations using a standard soft lithography process. The concentration of chromosomes, small contaminant DNA and large cell debris in each outlets were evaluated using microscope (60X) and a flow cytometer. Using Dean Flow Fractionation, we were able to focus 4.5 times more chromosomes in outlet 2 compared to outlet 4 where most of the large debris is found. We recover 16% of the chromosomes in outlet #1- 50% in 2, 23% in 3 and 11% in 4. It should be noted that these estimates of recovery do not capture one piece of information- it actually may be that the chromosomes at each outlet are physically different and work needs to be done to verify this potential.

  15. Chromosomal rearrangement interferes with meiotic X chromosome inactivation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Homolka, David; Ivánek, Robert; Čapková, Jana; Jansa, Petr; Forejt, Jiří

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 17, č. 10 (2007), s. 1431-1437. ISSN 1088-9051 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0520; GA ČR GA301/06/1334; GA ČR GA301/07/1383 Grant ostatní: Howard Hughes Medical Institute(US) HHMI 55000306 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : chromosomal translocations * meiotic X chromosome inactivation * spermatogenesis Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 11.224, year: 2007

  16. Chromosome doubling in vine cacti hybrids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tel-Zur, N; Abbo, S; Bar-Zvi, D; Mizrahi, Y

    2003-01-01

    We performed reciprocal crosses between the tetraploid Selenicereus megalanthus and the diploid Hylocereus species, H. undatus and H. polyrhizus. S. megalanthus x H. undatus gave rise to viable hexaploids and 6x-aneuploid hybrids rather than to the expected triploids. No genuine hybrids were obtained in the reciprocal cross. The pollen diameter of the tetraploid S. megalanthus varied widely, indicating the occurrence of unreduced gametes, while that of H. undatus pollen was very uniform, indicating an extremely low frequency of unreduced gametes. This finding suggests that the hexaploids were formed by chromosome doubling after the formation of the hybrid triploid zygote rather than by fusion of unreduced gametes of the two species. PMID:12920104

  17. International study of factors affecting human chromosome translocations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sigurdson, A.J.; Ha, M.; Hauptmann, M.; Bhatti, P.; Šrám, Radim; Beskid, Olena; Tawn, E.J.; Whitehouse, C.A.; Lindholm, C.; Nakano, M.; Kodama, Y.; Nakamura, N.; Vorobtsova, I.; Oestreicher, U.; Stephan, G.; Yong, L.C.; Bauchinger, M.; Schmid, E.; Chung, H.W.; Darroudi, F.; Roy, L.; Voisin, P.; Barquinero, J.F.; Livingston, G.; Blakey, D.; Hayata, I.; Zhang, W.; Wang, Ch.; Benett, L.M.; Littlefield, L.G.; Edwards, A.A.; Kleinerman, R.A.; Tucker, J.D.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 652, č. 2 (2008), s. 112-121. ISSN 1383-5718 R&D Projects: GA MŽP SL/5/160/05; GA MŽP SI/340/2/00; GA MŽP SL/740/5/03 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390512 Keywords : Chromosome translocations * FISH * Background frequency Subject RIV: DN - Health Impact of the Environment Quality Impact factor: 2.363, year: 2008

  18. Protective Effect of Curcumin on γ - radiation Induced Chromosome Aberrations in Human Blood Lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present work is aimed at evaluating the radioprotective effect of curcumin on γ radiation induced genetic toxicity. The DNA damage was analyzed by the frequencies of chromosome aberrations assay. Human lymphocytes were treated in vitro with 5.0 γg/ml of curcumin for 30 min at 37 degree C then exposed to 1, 2 and 4 Gy gamma-radiation. The lymphocytes which were pre-treated with curcumin exhibited a significant decrease in the frequency of chromosome aberration at 1 and 2 Gy radiation-induced chromosome damage as compared with the irradiated cells which did not receive the curcumin pretreatment. Thus, pretreatment with curcumin gives protection to lymphocytes against γ-radiation induced chromosome aberration at certain doses. (author)

  19. Evaluation of Chromosomal Instability in Diabetic Rats Treated with Naringin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saleh A. Bakheet

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We used the bone marrow DNA strand breaks, micronucleus formations, spermatocyte chromosomal aberrations, and sperm characteristic assays to investigate the chromosomal instability in somatic and germinal cells of diabetic rats treated with multiple doses of naringin. The obtained results revealed that naringin was neither cytotoxic nor genotoxic for the rats at all tested doses. Moreover, naringin significantly reduced the diabetes-induced chromosomal instability in somatic and germinal cells in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, diabetes induced marked biochemical alterations characteristic of oxidative stress including enhanced lipid peroxidation, accumulation of oxidized glutathione, reduction in reduced glutathione, and accumulation of intracellular reactive oxygen species. Treatment with naringin ameliorated these biochemical markers dose-dependently. In conclusion, naringin confers an appealing protective effect against diabetes-induced chromosomal instability towards rat somatic and germinal cells which might be explained partially via diminishing the de novo free radical generation induced by hyperglycemia. Thus, naringin might be a good candidate to reduce genotoxic risk associated with hyperglycemia and may provide decreases in the development of secondary malignancy and abnormal reproductive outcomes risks, which seems especially important for diabetic patients.

  20. Phenotypic correlations in a patient with ring chromosome 22

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Demirhan Osman

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Ring chromosome 22, a rare cytogenetic anomaly, has been described in over 60 cases in the medical literature. The aim of this report was to present a case carrying ring chromosome 22, and her family. It is a case report of a patient presented at Medical Faculty of Ηukurova University in Turkey. An 8-year-old girl with ring chromosome 22 and her family were evaluated cytogenetically and clinically. A chromosome analysis of the proband revealed a de novo 46,XX,r(22(p11.2;q13 karyotype. Our subject demonstrated the prominent features of this syndrome including profound mental retardation, language impairment, dysmorphic features, lack of speech, hyperactivity, and behavioral disorders. There is lack of consistency between the physical abnormalities that we observed in our subject and those observed for such patients in the literature. The wide range of manifestations observed in patients with this cytogenetic alteration is probably due to size differences in the deleted region.

  1. Effect of therapeutic hypothermia on chromosomal aberration in perinatal asphyxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahubali D Gane

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Perinatal asphyxia is a major cause for neonatal mortality and morbidity around the world. The reduction of O2results in the generation of reactive oxygen species which interact with nucleic acid and make alteration in the structure and functioning of the genome. We studied the effect of therapeutic hypothermia on chromosomes with karyotyping. Subjects and Methods: Babies in the hypothermia group were cooled for the first 72 h, using gel packs. Rectal temperature of 33–34°C was maintained. Blood sample was collected after completion of therapeutic hypothermia for Chromosomal analysis. It was done with IKAROS Karyotyping system, Metasystems, based on recommendations of International system of human cytogenetic nomenclature. Results: The median chromosomal aberration was lower in hypothermia [2(0-5] than control group [4(1-7] and chromatid breakage was commonest aberration seen. Chromosomal aberration was significantly higher in severe encephalopathy group than moderate encephalopathy group. Conclusion: We conclude that the TH significantly reduces DNA damage in perinatal asphyxia.

  2. Escape Artists of the X Chromosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaton, Bradley P; Brown, Carolyn J

    2016-06-01

    Inactivation of one X chromosome in mammalian females achieves dosage compensation between XX females and XY males; however, over 15% of human X-linked genes continue to be expressed from the inactive X chromosome. New genomic methodologies have improved our identification and characterization of these escape genes, revealing the importance of DNA sequence, chromatin structure, and chromosome ultrastructure in regulating expression from an otherwise inactive chromosome. Study of these exceptions to the rule of silencing highlights the interconnectedness of chromatin and chromosome structure in X-chromosome inactivation (XCI). Recent advances also demonstrate the importance of these genes in sexually dimorphic disease risk, particularly cancer. PMID:27103486

  3. Apigenin ameliorates gamma radiation-induced cytogenetic alterations in cultured human blood lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begum, Naziya; Prasad, N Rajendra; Kanimozhi, G; Hasan, Annie Q

    2012-08-30

    The aim of the present study was to assess the protective effect of apigenin, a dietary flavone, against cytogenetic alterations in human peripheral blood lymphocytes (HPBL) induced by Cobalt-60 radiation (3Gy). Results of MTT [3-(4, 5-dimethyl-2-thiaozolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H tetrazolium bromide] assay revealed that 37.2μM of apigenin was found to be non-toxic in HPBL. At this dose (37.2μM) of apigenin, the LD(50) radiation dose of HPBL increased from 2.9Gy to 3.4Gy, which resulted in a DMF of 1.17. Apigenin (37.2μM) treatment 1h before irradiation significantly (p<0.05) reduced DNA damage in irradiated HPBL as measured by comet assay (% tail DNA, tail length, tail moment, and olive tail moment). Moreover, apigenin treatment significantly decreased the frequencies of dicentric (DC), acentric fragments (AF), and acentric rings (AR) in irradiated HPBL. Apigenin pretreatment also reduced the radiation-induced CBMN (cytokinesis blocked micronuclei) anomalies such as micronuclei (MNi), nucleoplasmic bridges (NPB) and nuclear buds (NBUD) in HPBL. These results also showed that there was a significant correlation between NPB and DC frequencies and MNi and AF+AR. Treatment with apigenin alone had no significant effect on DNA damage and chromosomal aberrations in HPBL. Thus, the current studies indicate that apigenin protects HPBL from radiation-induced cytogenetic alterations. PMID:22516036

  4. Adults with Chromosome 18 Abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soileau, Bridgette; Hasi, Minire; Sebold, Courtney; Hill, Annice; O'Donnell, Louise; Hale, Daniel E; Cody, Jannine D

    2015-08-01

    The identification of an underlying chromosome abnormality frequently marks the endpoint of a diagnostic odyssey. However, families are frequently left with more questions than answers as they consider their child's future. In the case of rare chromosome conditions, a lack of longitudinal data often makes it difficult to provide anticipatory guidance to these families. The objective of this study is to describe the lifespan, educational attainment, living situation, and behavioral phenotype of adults with chromosome 18 abnormalities. The Chromosome 18 Clinical Research Center has enrolled 483 individuals with one of the following conditions: 18q-, 18p-, Tetrasomy 18p, and Ring 18. As a part of the ongoing longitudinal study, we collect data on living arrangements, educational level attained, and employment status as well as data on executive functioning and behavioral skills on an annual basis. Within our cohort, 28 of the 483 participants have died, the majority of whom have deletions encompassing the TCF4 gene or who have unbalanced rearrangement involving other chromosomes. Data regarding the cause of and age at death are presented. We also report on the living situation, educational attainment, and behavioral phenotype of the 151 participants over the age of 18. In general, educational level is higher for people with all these conditions than implied by the early literature, including some that received post-high school education. In addition, some individuals are able to live independently, though at this point they represent a minority of patients. Data on executive function and behavioral phenotype are also presented. Taken together, these data provide insight into the long-term outcome for individuals with a chromosome 18 condition. This information is critical in counseling families on the range of potential outcomes for their child. PMID:25403900

  5. Micronuclei versus Chromosomal Aberrations Induced by X-Ray in Radiosensitive Mammalian Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Plamadeala

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available An experimental study was accomplished to compare estimation methods of ionizing radiations genotoxicity in mammalian cell cultures by means of two cytogenetic parameters with focus on aberrant cells characterized by multiple chromosomal damages.In vitro study was carried out on the genotoxicity of low-medium doses of 190 kV X-rays absorbed in Chinese hamster ovary cell cultures. Micronuclei and ten types of chromosomal aberrations were identified with Giemsa dying and optical microscope screening.The first parameter consisting in micronuclei relative frequency has led to higher linear correlation coefficient than the second one consistent with chromosomal aberrations relative frequency. However, the latter parameter estimated as the sum of all chromosomal aberrations appeared to be more sensitive to radiation dose increasing in the studied dose range, from 0 to 3 Gy. The number of micronuclei occurring simultaneously in a single cell was not higher than 3, while the number of chromosomal aberrations observed in the same cell reached the value of 5 for doses over 1 Gy.Polynomial dose-response curves were evidenced for cells with Ni micronuclei (i=1,3 while non-monotonic curves were evidenced through detailed analysis of aberrant cells with Ni chromosomal changes [Formula: see text] - in concordance with in vitro studies from literature. The investigation could be important for public health issues where micronucleus screening is routinely applied but also for research purposes where various chromosomal aberrations could be of particular interest.

  6. Mechanisms of induction of chromosomal aberrations and their detection by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently introduced fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique employing chromosome specific DNA libraries as well as region specific DNA probes (e.g., centromere, telomere) have helped to analyse chromosomal aberrations in great detail and thus have given some new insights into the mechanisms of induction of chromosomal aberrations. The relative proportion of induction of translocations and dicentrics by ionising radiation was studied in human, mice and Chinese hamster cells. Many of the studies point to the differences between the mechanisms of induction of dicentrics and translocations. Preliminary results obtained in our laboratory using arm specific probes for human chromosomes 1 and 3 indicate that the aberrations between the arms appear to be more than expected on a random basis. By employing telomeric probes the frequencies of interstitial deletions were found to be high and similar to the frequencies of dicentrics both in human and mouse lymphocytes. A recent study with human chromosome specific probes clearly shows variation of sensitivity of chromosomes for the induction of exchange aberrations. Radiation response studies with Chinese hamster cells using telomeric probes, suggest that telomeric sequences, especially interstitial ones appear to be an important factor in the origin of both spontaneous and induced chromosomal aberrations

  7. Conservation of chromosomal arrangement among three strains of the genetically unstable archaeon Halobacterium salinarium.

    OpenAIRE

    Hackett, N R; Bobovnikova, Y; Heyrovska, N

    1994-01-01

    Phenotypic variants of Halobacterium salinarium NRC-1 arise at a frequency of 10(-2). These result from transpositions of halobacterial insertion sequences and rearrangements mediated by halobacterial insertion sequences. We have tested the hypothesis that such mutations are confined to only a portion of the genome by comparing the chromosomal restriction map of H. salinarium NRC-1 and that of the derivative S9, which was made in 1969. The two chromosomes were mapped by using two-dimensional ...

  8. Biodosimetry: chromosome aberration in lymphocytes and electron paramagnetic resonance in tooth enamel from atomic bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One hundred enamel samples isolated from extracted teeth donated by atomic bomb survivors were subjected to free radical measurement by means of electron paramagnetic resonance (ESR). Results comparing ESR with the chromosome aberration frequency in lymphocytes of the tooth donors, and with the physically estimated DS86 dose suggested that ESR data correlated more closely with chromosome data than with the estimated DS86 doses, probably because DS86 may depend on erroneous memory in some cases. 9 refs, 4 figs

  9. Measurement of chromosomal breakage in cultured cells by the micronucleus technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of a series of experiments in which micronuclei were used to measure the extent of chromosomal damage by ionizing radiation are summarized. The data show that in most situations micronuclei accurately reflect chromosomal breakage and that they may be used for rapid and simple estimates of aberration frequency. The results of some studies on trisomy-21, Fanconi's anaemia, Bloom's syndrome and ataxia telangiectasia are included; the advantages and disadvantages of the technique are discussed. (author)

  10. Y-chromosome variability in four Native American populations from Panama.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The allele and haplotype frequencies for 13 Y-chromosome short tandem repeats (STRs) [nine STRs loci of the minimal Y chromosome haplotype (DYS19/DYS385a/DYS385b/DYS389-I/DYS389-II/DYS390/ DYS391/DYS392/ DYS393) plus four additional loci (DYS388/DYS426/DYS439/ DXYS156)] were determined in 99 males f...

  11. Radiation-induced chromosome aberrations and sister chromatid exchanges in lymphocytes from patients with tuberous sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lymphocytes from four patients with tuberous sclerosis (TS) and four normal controls were studied for sister chromatid exchanges (SCEs) and chromosome aberrations in gamma-ray irradiated cultures. There was no significant difference between SCE frequencies of TS lymphocytes and those of control lymphocytes at all doses examined (1, 2, and 4 Gy). However, chromosome aberrations in TS lymphocytes were significantly higher than those in the normal controls at the highest dose (4 Gy) (p < 0.05). (author)

  12. Biological dosimetry: registration of stable chromosome aberration by G-banding and FISH methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    G-banding analysis and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) for whole chromosomes 1, 2 and 4 were applied in comparative assay for frequency of stable chromosome aberration in 37 individuals with previous exposure to radiation (15 liquidators of Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant accident and 22 residents of radiocontaminated areas) and in 18 persons of a reference group. Comparison of the results reveals statistical trustworthy correlation between the two assays. The results point out that FISH for translocations in as few as three chromosomes, when combined with screening of numerous metaphases, provides sensitivity comparable with that provided by G-banding which covers the hole genome

  13. Making chromosome abnormalities treatable conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cody, Jannine DeMars; Hale, Daniel Esten

    2015-09-01

    Individuals affected by the classic chromosome deletion syndromes which were first identified at the beginning of the genetic age, are now positioned to benefit from genomic advances. This issue highlights five of these conditions (4p-, 5p-, 11q-, 18p-, and 18q-). It focuses on the increased in understanding of the molecular underpinnings and envisions how these can be transformed into effective treatments. While it is scientifically exciting to see the phenotypic manifestations of hemizygosity being increasingly understood at the molecular and cellular level, it is even more amazing to consider that we are now on the road to making chromosome abnormalities treatable conditions. PMID:26351122

  14. Using Chromosomes to Teach Evolution: Chromosomal Rearrangements in Speciation Events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Offner, Susan

    1994-01-01

    Uses diagrams to aid in discussing how the English map of the human chromosomes, published by Offner in 1993, can be used to illustrate some important questions in evolution, as well as give students a glimpse into some of the mechanisms underlying evolutionary change. (ZWH)

  15. Possible role of chromatin alteration in the radiosensitivity of ataxia-telangiectasia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hittelman, W.N. [Anderson (M.D.) Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Pandita, T.K. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    1994-12-01

    Cells derived from individuals with ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T) are known to exhibit increased sensitivity to ionizing radiation and certain radiomimetic chemical agents. Here we summarize our findings regarding the role of chromosome damage and repair in this radiosensitivity. Lymphoblastoid cells derived from A-T homozygotes were characterized for initial chromosome (premature chromosome condensation) and DNA (neutral filter elution) damage and repair kinetics in cells from G1 and G2 cell cycle phases. Despite initial levels of DNA damage being similar to normal controls, A-T cells exhibited nearly a two-fold higher initial amount of chromosome damage. Different A-T cell lines exhibited differing chromosome repair capacities compared with control lymphoblastoid cell lines. These results suggest that A-T cells have an altered chromatin structure whereby DNA double-strand breaks are apparently more efficiently converted into chromosome breaks. (author).

  16. Possible role of chromatin alteration in the radiosensitivity of ataxia-telangiectasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cells derived from individuals with ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T) are known to exhibit increased sensitivity to ionizing radiation and certain radiomimetic chemical agents. Here we summarize our findings regarding the role of chromosome damage and repair in this radiosensitivity. Lymphoblastoid cells derived from A-T homozygotes were characterized for initial chromosome (premature chromosome condensation) and DNA (neutral filter elution) damage and repair kinetics in cells from G1 and G2 cell cycle phases. Despite initial levels of DNA damage being similar to normal controls, A-T cells exhibited nearly a two-fold higher initial amount of chromosome damage. Different A-T cell lines exhibited differing chromosome repair capacities compared with control lymphoblastoid cell lines. These results suggest that A-T cells have an altered chromatin structure whereby DNA double-strand breaks are apparently more efficiently converted into chromosome breaks. (author)

  17. Working Memory Impairment in Calcineurin Knock-out Mice Is Associated with Alterations in Synaptic Vesicle Cycling and Disruption of High-Frequency Synaptic and Network Activity in Prefrontal Cortex

    OpenAIRE

    Cottrell, Jeffrey R.; Levenson, Jonathan M.; Kim, Sung Hyun; Gibson, Helen E.; Richardson, Kristen A.; Sivula, Michael; Li, Bing; Ashford, Crystle J.; Heindl, Karen A.; Babcock, Ryan J.; Rose, David M.; Hempel, Chris M; Wiig, Kjesten A.; Laeng, Pascal; Levin, Margaret E.

    2013-01-01

    Working memory is an essential component of higher cognitive function, and its impairment is a core symptom of multiple CNS disorders, including schizophrenia. Neuronal mechanisms supporting working memory under normal conditions have been described and include persistent, high-frequency activity of prefrontal cortical neurons. However, little is known about the molecular and cellular basis of working memory dysfunction in the context of neuropsychiatric disorders. To elucidate synaptic and n...

  18. Characterization of chromosome structures of Falconinae (Falconidae, Falconiformes, Aves) by chromosome painting and delineation of chromosome rearrangements during their differentiation

    OpenAIRE

    Nishida, Chizuko; Ishijima, Junko; KOSAKA, Ayumi; Tanabe, Hideyuki; Habermann, Felix A.; Griffin, Darren K.; MATSHUDA, Yoichi; 秀之, 田辺

    2008-01-01

    Karyotypes of most bird species are characterized by around 2n = 80 chromosomes, comprising 7–10 pairs of large- and medium-sized macrochromosomes including sex chromosomes and numerous morphologically indistinguishable microchromosomes. The Falconinae of the Falconiformes has a different karyotype from the typical avian karyotype in low chromosome numbers, little size difference between macrochromosomes and a smaller number of microchromosomes. To characterize chromosome structures of Falcon...

  19. Characterization of chromosome structures of Falconinae (Falconidae, Falconiformes, Aves) by chromosome painting and delineation of chromosome rearrangements during their differentiation

    OpenAIRE

    Nishida, Chizuko; Ishijima, Junko; KOSAKA, Ayumi; Tanabe, Hideyuki; Habermann, Felix A.; Griffin, Darren K.; Matsuda, Yoichi

    2008-01-01

    Karyotypes of most bird species are characterized by around 2n = 80 chromosomes, comprising 7Y10 pairs of large- and medium-sized macrochromosomes including sex chromosomes and numerous morphologically indistinguishable microchromosomes. The Falconinae of the Falconiformes has a different karyotype from the typical avian karyotype in low chromosome numbers, little size difference between macrochromosomes and a smaller number of microchromosomes. To characterize chromosome structures of Falcon...

  20. Is there a relationship between sperm chromosome abnormalities and sperm morphology?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ko Evelyn

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This review explores the relationship between sperm chromosomal constitution and morphology. With the advent of techniques for obtaining information on the chromosome complements of spermatozoa, this relationship has been studied in fertile men and in men with a high frequency of chromosomal abnormalities. Using human sperm karyotype analysis, no relationship between sperm chromosome abnormalities and morphology was found in fertile men, translocation carriers or post-radiotherapy cancer patients. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH analysis has not generally revealed a specific association between morphologically abnormal sperm and sperm chromosome abnormalities, but has indicated that teratozoospermia, like other forms of abnormal semen profiles (aesthenozoospermia, oligozoospermia is associated with a modest increase in the frequency of sperm chromosome abnormalities. However, FISH studies on some infertile men and mouse strains have suggested that certain types of morphologically abnormal spermatozoa, such as macrocephalic multitailed spermatozoa, are associated with a very significantly increased frequency of aneuploidy. Thus, there may be an association between sperm morphology and aneuploidy in infertile men with specific abnormalities.

  1. A comparison of chromosomal aberrations induced by in vivo radiotherapy in human sperm and lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chromosomal aberrations in human sperm and lymphocytes were compared before and after in vivo radiation treatment of 13 cancer patients. The times of analyses after radiotherapy (RT) were 1, 3, 12, 24, 36, 48 and 60 months. The median total radiation dose was 30 Gy and the testicular dose varied from 0.4 to 5.0 Gy. Human sperm chromosome complements were analysed after fusion with golden hamster eggs. There were no abnormalities in sperm or lymphocytes before RT. Following RT there was an increase in the frequency of numerical and structural chromosomal abnormalities in both lymphocytes and sperm. For structural abnormalities there were more rejoined lesions (dicentrics, rings) in lymphocytes and more unrejoined lesions (chromosome breaks, fragments) in sperm. It appears that the frequency of lymphocyte chromosomal abnormalities had an initial marked increase after RT followed by a gradual decrease with time whereas the frequency of sperm chromosomal abnormalities was elevated when sperm production recovered and remained elevated from 24 to 60 mo. post-RT. This difference in the effect of time makes it very difficult to compare abnormality rates in lymphocytes and sperm and to use analysis of induced damage in somatic cells as surrogates for germ cells since the ratio between sperm and lymphocytes varied from 1:1 (at 24 mo. post-RT) to 5:1 (at 60 mo. post-RT). (author). 14 refs.; 2 figs.; 5 tabs

  2. Paternal uniparental isodisomy for human chromosome 20 and absence of external ears

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spinner, N.B.; Rand, E.; McDonald-McGinn, D.M. [Childrens Hospital of Philadelphia, PA (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Uniparental disomy can cause disease if the involved chromosomal region contains imprinted genes. Uniparental disomy for portions of human chromosomes 6, 7, 9, 11, 14 and 15 have been associated with abnormal phenotypes. We studied a patient with multiple abnormalities including an absent left ear with a small right ear remnant, microcephaly, congenital heart disease and Hirschprung`s disease. Cytogenetics revealed a 45,XY,-20,-20,+ter rea(20;20)(p13;p13) in 10/10 cells from bone marrow and 20/20 cells from peripheral blood. Analysis of a skin culture revealed a second cell line with trisomy 20 resulting from an apparently normal chromosome 20 in addition to the terminally rearranged chromosome, in 8/100 cells studied. The unusual phenotype of our patient was not consistent with previously reported cases of deletions of 20p or mosaic trisomy 20. We hypothesized that the patient`s phenotype could either result from deletion of both copies of a gene near the p arm terminus of chromosome 20 or from uniparental disomy of chromosome 20. There were no alterations or rearrangements of PTP-alpha (which maps to distal 20p) by Southern or Northern blot analysis. A chromosome 20 sub-telomeric probe was found to be present on the rearranged 20 by FISH suggesting that subtelomeric sequences have not been lost as a consequece of this rearrangement. To determine the parental origin of the 2 chromosome 20`s in the terminal rearrangement, we studied the genotypes of the proband and his parents in lymphoblastoid cell lines at 8 polymorphic loci. Genotypes at D20S115, D20S186, and D20S119 indicated that there was paternal isodisomy. Other loci were uninformative. This is the first example of uniparental disomy for chromosome 20. Further studies are warranted to correlate phenotype with uniparental inheritance of this chromosome.

  3. Molecular analysis of the distribution of chromosomal breakpoints: characterization of a 'hot' region for breaks in human chromosome 11

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Ionizing radiation randomly damages DNA and chromosomes whereas subsequent chromosome breaks are non-random. Assuming, as an ideal and naive but useful proposition, that breaks are equally likely anywhere in the chromosome and that a deletion always occurs between two breaks, the frequency of fragments would decrease linearly with increasing fragment size. This simple distribution is not, however, observed. To shed light on the 'real' situation of break formation we mapped breakpoints in the human chromosome no. 11 of 353 independent CD59- mutants isolated from human/hamster hybrid AL cells exposed to radiations (high and low dose-rate gamma rays, high LET carbon or nitrogen ions, protons) or chemicals (arsenic or irradiated, mutagenic histidine) or unexposed. The number of breaks per unit length of DNA differed significantly in different regions of chromosome 11.The highest level of breaks (140/mbp) were in the 0.8 mbp segment between CD59 and Catalase (CAT). Finer mapping of break points was carried out using 26 PCR primer pairs spread across this interval in 15 independent mutants. In two mutants, the break point was in a 107 bp fragment; in the other 13 the breaks were in a single 35 mbp fragment, but not all were at exactly the same site; 4 of 13 occurred in 3 different 3 mbp sub-segments. We are sequencing these fragments to look for such features as repeats: 'colder' regions like that between CD59 and WT will also be analyzed. But, since at least some breaks occurred at different sites and the frequency and distribution of breaks was about the same for all treatments, our we postulate that hot (and cold spots) may be due more to structural features or specific repair than to sequence or type of damage

  4. Chromosomal and Genetic Analysis of a Human Lung Adenocarcinoma Cell Line OM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong-Wu Li; Lin Bai; Lyu-Xia Dai; Xu He; Xian-Ping Zhou

    2016-01-01

    Background: Lung cancer has become the leading cause of death in many regions.Carcinogenesis is caused by the stepwise accumulation of genetic and chromosomal changes.The aim of this study was to investigate the chromosome and gene alterations in the human lung adenocarcinoma cell line OM.Methods: We used Giemsa banding and multiplex fluorescence in situ hybridization focusing on the human lung adenocarcinoma cell line OM to analyze its chromosome alterations.In addition, the gains and losses in the specific chromosome regions were identified by comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) and the amplifications of cancer-related genes were also detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR).Results: We identified a large number of chromosomal numerical alterations on all chromosomes except chromosome X and 19.Chromosome 10 is the most frequently involved in translocations with six different interchromosomal translocations.CGH revealed the gains on chromosome regions of 3q25.3-28, 5p13, 12q22-23.24, and the losses on 3p25-26, 6p25, 6q26-27, 7q34-36, 8p22-23, 9p21-24, 10q25-26.3, 12p 13.31-13.33 and 17p 13.1-13.3.And PCR showed the amplification of genes: Membrane metalloendopeptidase (MME), sucrase-isomaltase (SI), butyrylcholinesterase (BCHE), and kininogen (KNG).Conclusions: The lung adenocarcinoma cell line OM exhibited multiple complex karyotypes, and chromosome 10 was frequently involved in chromosomal translocation, which may play key roles in tumorigenesis.We speculated that the oncogenes may be located at 3q25.3-28, 5p13, 12q22-23.24, while tumor suppressor genes may exist in 3p25-26, 6p25, 6q26-27, 7q34-36, 8p22-23, 9p21-24, 10q25-26.3, 12p 13.31-13.33, and 17p 13.1-13.3.Moreover, at least four genes (MME, SI, BCHE, and KNG) may be involved in the human lung adenocarcinoma cell line OM.

  5. Mathematical glimpse on the Y chromosome degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobo, M. P.

    2006-04-01

    The Y chromosomes are genetically degenerate and do not recombine with their matching partners X. Non-recombination of XY pairs has been pointed out as the key factor for the degeneration of the Y chromosome. The aim here is to show that there is a mathematical asymmetry in sex chromosomes which leads to the degeneration of Y chromosomes even in the absence of XX and XY recombination. A model for sex-chromosome evolution in a stationary regime is proposed. The consequences of their asymmetry are analyzed and lead us to a couple of conclusions. First, Y chromosome degeneration shows up sqrt{2} more often than X chromosome degeneration. Second, if nature prohibits female mortalities from beeing exactly 50%, then Y chromosome degeneration is inevitable.

  6. CHROMOSOMAL MULTIPLICITY IN BURKHOLDERIA CEPACIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    We have used CHEF gel electrophoresis to screen preparations of large DNA from different Burkholderia cepacia isolates for the presence of DNA species corresponding to the linearized forms of the three chromosomes of 3.4,2.5, and 0.9 Mb identified in B. cepacia strain 17616. DNA ...

  7. Vibrio chromosome-specific families

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lukjancenko, Oksana; Ussery, David

    2014-01-01

    We have compared chromosome-specific genes in a set of 18 finished Vibrio genomes, and, in addition, also calculated the pan- and core-genomes from a data set of more than 250 draft Vibrio genome sequences. These genomes come from 9 known species and 2 unknown species. Within the finished...

  8. Chromosome Territory Modeller and Viewer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tkacz, Magdalena A; Chromiński, Kornel; Idziak-Helmcke, Dominika; Robaszkiewicz, Ewa; Hasterok, Robert

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents ChroTeMo, a tool for chromosome territory modelling, accompanied by ChroTeVi-a chromosome territory visualisation software that uses the data obtained by ChroTeMo. These tools have been developed in order to complement the molecular cytogenetic research of interphase nucleus structure in a model grass Brachypodium distachyon. Although the modelling tool has been initially created for one particular species, it has universal application. The proposed version of ChroTeMo allows for generating a model of chromosome territory distribution in any given plant or animal species after setting the initial, species-specific parameters. ChroTeMo has been developed as a fully probabilistic modeller. Due to this feature, the comparison between the experimental data on the structure of a nucleus and the results obtained from ChroTeMo can indicate whether the distribution of chromosomes inside a nucleus is also fully probabilistic or is subjected to certain non-random patterns. The presented tools have been written in Python, so they are multiplatform, portable and easy to read. Moreover, if necessary they can be further developed by users writing their portions of code. The source code, documentation, and wiki, as well as the issue tracker and the list of related articles that use ChroTeMo and ChroTeVi, are accessible in a public repository at Github under GPL 3.0 license. PMID:27505434

  9. Chromosome Territory Modeller and Viewer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idziak-Helmcke, Dominika; Robaszkiewicz, Ewa; Hasterok, Robert

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents ChroTeMo, a tool for chromosome territory modelling, accompanied by ChroTeVi–a chromosome territory visualisation software that uses the data obtained by ChroTeMo. These tools have been developed in order to complement the molecular cytogenetic research of interphase nucleus structure in a model grass Brachypodium distachyon. Although the modelling tool has been initially created for one particular species, it has universal application. The proposed version of ChroTeMo allows for generating a model of chromosome territory distribution in any given plant or animal species after setting the initial, species-specific parameters. ChroTeMo has been developed as a fully probabilistic modeller. Due to this feature, the comparison between the experimental data on the structure of a nucleus and the results obtained from ChroTeMo can indicate whether the distribution of chromosomes inside a nucleus is also fully probabilistic or is subjected to certain non-random patterns. The presented tools have been written in Python, so they are multiplatform, portable and easy to read. Moreover, if necessary they can be further developed by users writing their portions of code. The source code, documentation, and wiki, as well as the issue tracker and the list of related articles that use ChroTeMo and ChroTeVi, are accessible in a public repository at Github under GPL 3.0 license. PMID:27505434

  10. Distinct nonrandom patterns of chromosomal deletions in giant-cell lesions of bone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baruffi Marcelo Razera

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Cytogenetic analyses were performed on a bone giant cell reparative granuloma (GCRG and on three bone giant cell tumors (GCT. The present GCRG case is the second to be described cytogenetically. A modal chromosome number of 46 was observed in all samples. Clonal chromosome abnormalities were detected in all cases. The numerical alterations most frequently observed involved the loss of chromosomes 17 and 18. Among the structural anomalies observed, there was preferential involvement of chromosomes 6 and 10. Three GCT cases presented del(10(p13 and two cases presented del(6(q25 (1 GCRG and 1 GCT. These breakpoints mapped on 10p and 6q may harbour genes of importance in the development of bone giant cell tumors.

  11. Multicolor spectral karyotyping of human chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröck, E; du Manoir, S; Veldman, T; Schoell, B; Wienberg, J; Ferguson-Smith, M A; Ning, Y; Ledbetter, D H; Bar-Am, I; Soenksen, D; Garini, Y; Ried, T

    1996-07-26

    The simultaneous and unequivocal discernment of all human chromosomes in different colors would be of significant clinical and biologic importance. Whole-genome scanning by spectral karyotyping allowed instantaneous visualization of defined emission spectra for each human chromosome after fluorescence in situ hybridization. By means of computer separation (classification) of spectra, spectrally overlapping chromosome-specific DNA probes could be resolved, and all human chromosomes were simultaneously identified. PMID:8662537

  12. CHROMOSOMAL ABNORMALITIES IN PATIENTS WITH SPERM DISORDERS

    OpenAIRE

    L. Y. Pylyp; L. A. Spinenko; V. D. Zukin; N. M. Bilko

    2013-01-01

    Chromosomal abnormalities are among the most common genetic causes of spermatogenic disruptions. Carriers of chromosomal abnormalities are at increased risk of infertility, miscarriage or birth of a child with unbalanced karyotype due to the production of unbalanced gametes. The natural selection against chromosomally abnormal sperm usually prevents fertilization with sperm barring in cases of serious chromosomal abnormalities. However, assisted reproductive technologies in general and intrac...

  13. Frequencies of mutagen-induced coincident mitotic recombination at unlinked loci in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freeman, Kathryn M. [Department of Biology, College of the Holy Cross, One College Street, Worcester, MA 01610-2395 (United States); Hoffmann, George R. [Department of Biology, College of the Holy Cross, One College Street, Worcester, MA 01610-2395 (United States)]. E-mail: ghoffmann@holycross.edu

    2007-03-01

    Frequencies of coincident genetic events were measured in strain D7 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This diploid strain permits the detection of mitotic gene conversion involving the trp5-12 and trp5-27 alleles, mitotic crossing-over and gene conversion leading to the expression of the ade2-40 and ade2-119 alleles as red and pink colonies, and reversion of the ilv1-92 allele. The three genes are on different chromosomes, and one might expect that coincident (simultaneous) genetic alterations at two loci would occur at frequencies predicted by those of the single alterations acting as independent events. Contrary to this expectation, we observed that ade2 recombinants induced by bleomycin, {beta}-propiolactone, and ultraviolet radiation occur more frequently among trp5 convertants than among total colonies. This excess among trp5 recombinants indicates that double recombinants are more common than expected for independent events. No similar enrichment was found among Ilv{sup +} revertants. The possibility of an artifact in which haploid yeasts that mimic mitotic recombinants are generated by a low frequency of cryptic meiosis has been excluded. Several hypotheses that can explain the elevated incidence of coincident mitotic recombination have been evaluated, but the cause remains uncertain. Most evidence suggests that the excess is ascribable to a subset of the population being in a recombination-prone state.

  14. Frequencies of mutagen-induced coincident mitotic recombination at unlinked loci in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frequencies of coincident genetic events were measured in strain D7 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This diploid strain permits the detection of mitotic gene conversion involving the trp5-12 and trp5-27 alleles, mitotic crossing-over and gene conversion leading to the expression of the ade2-40 and ade2-119 alleles as red and pink colonies, and reversion of the ilv1-92 allele. The three genes are on different chromosomes, and one might expect that coincident (simultaneous) genetic alterations at two loci would occur at frequencies predicted by those of the single alterations acting as independent events. Contrary to this expectation, we observed that ade2 recombinants induced by bleomycin, β-propiolactone, and ultraviolet radiation occur more frequently among trp5 convertants than among total colonies. This excess among trp5 recombinants indicates that double recombinants are more common than expected for independent events. No similar enrichment was found among Ilv+ revertants. The possibility of an artifact in which haploid yeasts that mimic mitotic recombinants are generated by a low frequency of cryptic meiosis has been excluded. Several hypotheses that can explain the elevated incidence of coincident mitotic recombination have been evaluated, but the cause remains uncertain. Most evidence suggests that the excess is ascribable to a subset of the population being in a recombination-prone state

  15. Human chromokinesins promote chromosome congression and spindle microtubule dynamics during mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wandke, Cornelia; Barisic, Marin; Sigl, Reinhard; Rauch, Veronika; Wolf, Frank; Amaro, Ana C; Tan, Chia H; Pereira, Antonio J; Kutay, Ulrike; Maiato, Helder; Meraldi, Patrick; Geley, Stephan

    2012-09-01

    Chromokinesins are microtubule plus end-directed motor proteins that bind to chromosome arms. In Xenopus egg cell-free extracts, Xkid and Xklp1 are essential for bipolar spindle formation but the functions of the human homologues, hKID (KIF22) and KIF4A, are poorly understood. By using RNAi-mediated protein knockdown in human cells, we find that only co-depletion delayed progression through mitosis in a Mad2-dependent manner. Depletion of hKID caused abnormal chromosome arm orientation, delayed chromosome congression, and sensitized cells to nocodazole. Knockdown of KIF4A increased the number and length of microtubules, altered kinetochore oscillations, and decreased kinetochore microtubule flux. These changes were associated with failures in establishing a tight metaphase plate and an increase in anaphase lagging chromosomes. Co-depletion of both chromokinesins aggravated chromosome attachment failures, which led to mitotic arrest. Thus, hKID and KIF4A contribute independently to the rapid and correct attachment of chromosomes by controlling the positioning of chromosome arms and the dynamics of microtubules, respectively. PMID:22945934

  16. Alternative Splicing of CHEK2 and Codeletion with NF2 Promote Chromosomal Instability in Meningioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Wei Yang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Mutations of the NF2 gene on chromosome 22q are thought to initiate tumorigenesis in nearly 50% of meningiomas, and 22q deletion is the earliest and most frequent large-scale chromosomal abnormality observed in these tumors. In aggressive meningiomas, 22q deletions are generally accompanied by the presence of large-scale segmental abnormalities involving other chromosomes, but the reasons for this association are unknown. We find that large-scale chromosomal alterations accumulate during meningioma progression primarily in tumors harboring 22q deletions, suggesting 22q-associated chromosomal instability. Here we show frequent codeletion of the DNA repair and tumor suppressor gene, CHEK2, in combination with NF2 on chromosome 22q in a majority of aggressive meningiomas. In addition, tumor-specific splicing of CHEK2 in meningioma leads to decreased functional Chk2 protein expression. We show that enforced Chk2 knockdown in meningioma cells decreases DNA repair. Furthermore, Chk2 depletion increases centrosome amplification, thereby promoting chromosomal instability. Taken together, these data indicate that alternative splicing and frequent codeletion of CHEK2 and NF2 contribute to the genomic instability and associated development of aggressive biologic behavior in meningiomas.

  17. Chromosomal context and replication properties of ARS plasmids in Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Aditya S Pratihar; Vishnu P Tripathi; Mukesh P Yadav; Dharani D Dubey

    2015-12-01

    Short, specific DNA sequences called as Autonomously Replicating Sequence (ARS) elements function as plasmid as well as chromosomal replication origins in yeasts. As compared to ARSs, different chromosomal origins vary greatly in their efficiency and timing of replication probably due to their wider chromosomal context. The two Schizosaccharomyces pombe ARS elements, ars727 and ars2OO4, represent two extremities in their chromosomal origin activity - ars727 is inactive and late replicating, while ars2OO4 is a highly active, early-firing origin. To determine the effect of chromosomal context on the activity of these ARS elements, we have cloned them with their extended chromosomal context as well as in the context of each other in both orientations and analysed their replication efficiency by ARS and plasmid stability assays. We found that these ARS elements retain their origin activity in their extended/altered context. However, deletion of a 133-bp region of the previously reported ars727-associated late replication enforcing element (LRE) caused advancement in replication timing of the resulting plasmid. These results confirm the role of LRE in directing plasmid replication timing and suggest that the plasmid origin efficiency of ars2OO4 or ars727 remains unaltered by the extended chromosomal context.

  18. Aneuploidy: the impact of chromosome imbalance on nuclear organization and overall genome expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hervé, B; Coussement, A; Gilbert, T; Dumont, F; Jacques, S; Cuisset, L; Chicard, M; Hizem, S; Bourdoncle, P; Letourneur, F; Dupont, C; Vialard, F; Choiset, A; Dupont, J-M

    2016-07-01

    The organization and dynamics of chromatin within the interphase nucleus as chromosome territories (CTs) and the relationship with transcriptional regulation are not fully understood. We studied a natural example of chromosomal disorganization: aneuploidy due to trisomies 13, 18 and 21. We hypothesized that the presence of an extra copy of one chromosome alters the CT distribution, which perturbs transcriptional activity. We used 3D-FISH to study the position of the chromosomes of interest (18 and 21) in cultured amniocytes and chorionic villus cells from pregnancies with a normal or aneuploid karyotype. We studied the volumes of nuclei and CTs in both conditions and performed a compared transcriptome analysis. We did not observe any differences between euploid and aneuploid cells in terms of the radial and relative CT positions, suggesting that the same rules govern nuclear organization in cases of trisomy. We observed lower volumes for CTs 18 and 21. Overall genome expression profiles highlighted changes in the expression of a subset of genes in trisomic chromosomes, while the majority of transcriptional changes concerned genes located on euploid chromosomes. Our results suggest that a dosage imbalance of the genes on trisomic chromosomes is associated with a disturbance of overall genomic expression. PMID:27283765

  19. Evolution of sex chromosomes ZW of Schistosoma mansoni inferred from chromosome paint and BAC mapping analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirai, Hirohisa; Hirai, Yuriko; LoVerde, Philip T

    2012-12-01

    Chromosomes of schistosome parasites among digenetic flukes have a unique evolution because they exhibit the sex chromosomes ZW, which are not found in the other groups of flukes that are hermaphrodites. We conducted molecular cytogenetic analyses for investigating the sex chromosome evolution using chromosome paint analysis and BAC clones mapping. To carry this out, we developed a technique for making paint probes of genomic DNA from a single scraped chromosome segment using a chromosome microdissection system, and a FISH mapping technique for BAC clones. Paint probes clearly identified each of the 8 pairs of chromosomes by a different fluorochrome color. Combination analysis of chromosome paint analysis with Z/W probes and chromosome mapping with 93 BAC clones revealed that the W chromosome of Schistosoma mansoni has evolved by at least four inversion events and heterochromatinization. Nine of 93 BAC clones hybridized with both the Z and W chromosomes, but the locations were different between Z and W chromosomes. The homologous regions were estimated to have moved from the original Z chromosome to the differentiated W chromosome by three inversions events that occurred before W heterohcromatinization. An inversion that was observed in the heterochromatic region of the W chromosome likely occurred after W heterochromatinization. These inversions and heterochromatinization are hypothesized to be the key factors that promoted the evolution of the W chromosome of S. mansoni. PMID:22831897

  20. Chromosome Aberrations by Heavy Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballarini, Francesca; Ottolenghi, Andrea

    It is well known that mammalian cells exposed to ionizing radiation can show different types of chromosome aberrations (CAs) including dicentrics, translocations, rings, deletions and complex exchanges. Chromosome aberrations are a particularly relevant endpoint in radiobiology, because they play a fundamental role in the pathways leading either to cell death, or to cell conversion to malignancy. In particular, reciprocal translocations involving pairs of specific genes are strongly correlated (and probably also causally-related) with specific tumour types; a typical example is the BCR-ABL translocation for Chronic Myeloid Leukaemia. Furthermore, aberrations can be used for applications in biodosimetry and more generally as biomarkers of exposure and risk, that is the case for cancer patients monitored during Carbon-ion therapy and astronauts exposed to space radiation. Indeed hadron therapy and astronauts' exposure to space radiation represent two of the few scenarios where human beings can be exposed to heavy ions. After a brief introduction on the main general features of chromosome aberrations, in this work we will address key aspects of the current knowledge on chromosome aberration induction, both from an experimental and from a theoretical point of view. More specifically, in vitro data will be summarized and discussed, outlining important issues such as the role of interphase death/mitotic delay and that of complex-exchange scoring. Some available in vivo data on cancer patients and astronauts will be also reported, together with possible interpretation problems. Finally, two of the few available models of chromosome aberration induction by ionizing radiation (including heavy ions) will be described and compared, focusing on the different assumptions adopted by the authors and on how these models can deal with heavy ions.

  1. A case of trisomy of chromosome 15

    OpenAIRE

    Coldwell, S; Fitzgerald, B.; Semmens, J.M.; Ede, R; Bateman, C

    1981-01-01

    We describe a case of trisomy of chromosome 15 in an infant who presented at birth with numerous abnormalities. As far as we are aware this chromosomal abnormality has not been described before. On the basis of this one case there appear to be no features which are specific to this chromosomal abnormality.

  2. Chromosomal bands affected by acute oil exposure and DNA repair errors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gemma Monyarch

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In a previous study, we showed that individuals who had participated in oil clean-up tasks after the wreckage of the Prestige presented an increase of structural chromosomal alterations two years after the acute exposure had occurred. Other studies have also reported the presence of DNA damage during acute oil exposure, but little is known about the long term persistence of chromosomal alterations, which can be considered as a marker of cancer risk. OBJECTIVES: We analyzed whether the breakpoints involved in chromosomal damage can help to assess the risk of cancer as well as to investigate their possible association with DNA repair efficiency. METHODS: Cytogenetic analyses were carried out on the same individuals of our previous study and DNA repair errors were assessed in cultures with aphidicolin. RESULTS: Three chromosomal bands, 2q21, 3q27 and 5q31, were most affected by acute oil exposure. The dysfunction in DNA repair mechanisms, expressed as chromosomal damage, was significantly higher in exposed-oil participants than in those not exposed (p= 0.016. CONCLUSION: The present study shows that breaks in 2q21, 3q27 and 5q31 chromosomal bands, which are commonly involved in hematological cancer, could be considered useful genotoxic oil biomarkers. Moreover, breakages in these bands could induce chromosomal instability, which can explain the increased risk of cancer (leukemia and lymphomas reported in chronically benzene-exposed individuals. In addition, it has been determined that the individuals who participated in clean-up of the oil spill presented an alteration of their DNA repair mechanisms two years after exposure.

  3. The production of micronuclei from chromosome aberrations in irradiated cultures of human lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The characteristics of an assay for chromosomal damage - micronuclei produced in cultured human lymphocytes - are given together with the evidence that the assay accurately measures X-ray-induced chromosomal damage. In the experiments the response of lymphocytes from different donors was very uniform: (1) the increase in micronucleus frequency begins at the time of the first mitoses, 48 hours after the cultures are started, (2) the exponent of the dose response equation (y = kDsup(n)) was 1.2 for micronulei, (3) the frequency of micronuclei was decreased by a factor of about two when the dose was fractionated. The rejoining time for four of five donors was between 30 and 60 minutes, (4) the X-ray-induced micronucleus frequency in cells from people with Down's syndrome (trisomy-21) was twice that of control donors. Since the micronucleus assay reflects the aberration so well and is so fast, it is suitable for a rapid assessment of chromosomal damage

  4. Cytogenetic biological dosimetry in radiological protection: chromosome aberration analysis in human lymphocyties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of ionizing radiation on chromosomes have been know for several decades and dose effect relationships are also fairly well established for several doses and dose rates. Apart from its biological significance, the interpretation of chromosome aberration frequency associated with human exposure to radiation plays an important role in dose assessment, particularly in cases where exposure is though to have occurred but no physical dose monitoring system was present. Based on the cytogenetic data obtained from seven cases of exposure to radiation the aberration frequency have been fitted to the quadratic function Y= αD + βD2 as the dose response curves from literature. The dose equivalent estimate by frequency of chromosomic aberration found here was compared with 60Co and 192Ir already published curves obtained at almost similar dose rate together with some hematological data. (author)

  5. The impact of founder events on chromosomal variability in multiply mating species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pool, John E; Nielsen, Rasmus

    2008-01-01

    In species with heterogametic males, the relative levels of X chromosome versus autosome diversity hold key information about the evolutionary forces at work in a population. It has been shown that population size changes alter the ratio of X linked to autosomal (X/A) variation, with population s...

  6. Frequency standards

    CERN Document Server

    Riehle, Fritz

    2006-01-01

    Of all measurement units, frequency is the one that may be determined with the highest degree of accuracy. It equally allows precise measurements of other physical and technical quantities, whenever they can be measured in terms of frequency.This volume covers the central methods and techniques relevant for frequency standards developed in physics, electronics, quantum electronics, and statistics. After a review of the basic principles, the book looks at the realisation of commonly used components. It then continues with the description and characterisation of important frequency standards

  7. An Asymmetric Chromosome Pair Undergoes Synaptic Adjustment and Crossover Redistribution During Caenorhabditis elegans Meiosis: Implications for Sex Chromosome Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henzel, Jonathan V.; Nabeshima, Kentaro; Schvarzstein, Mara; Turner, B. Elizabeth; Villeneuve, Anne M.; Hillers, Kenneth J.

    2011-01-01

    Heteromorphic sex chromosomes, such as the X/Y pair in mammals, differ in size and DNA sequence yet function as homologs during meiosis; this bivalent asymmetry presents special challenges for meiotic completion. In Caenorhabditis elegans males carrying mnT12, an X;IV fusion chromosome, mnT12 and IV form an asymmetric bivalent: chromosome IV sequences are capable of pairing and synapsis, while the contiguous X portion of mnT12 lacks a homologous pairing partner. Here, we investigate the meiotic behavior of this asymmetric neo-X/Y chromosome pair in C. elegans. Through immunolocalization of the axis component HIM-3, we demonstrate that the unpaired X axis has a distinct, coiled morphology while synapsed axes are linear and extended. By showing that loci at the fusion-proximal end of IV become unpaired while remaining synapsed as pachytene progresses, we directly demonstrate the occurrence of synaptic adjustment in this organism. We further demonstrate that meiotic crossover distribution is markedly altered in males with the asymmetric mnT12/+ bivalent relative to controls, resulting in greatly reduced crossover formation near the X;IV fusion point and elevated crossovers at the distal end of the bivalent. In effect, the distal end of the bivalent acts as a neo-pseudoautosomal region in these males. We discuss implications of these findings for mechanisms that ensure crossover formation during meiosis. Furthermore, we propose that redistribution of crossovers triggered by bivalent asymmetry may be an important driving force in sex chromosome evolution. PMID:21212235

  8. Chromosomal instability in Streptomyces avermitilis: major deletion in the central region and stable circularized chromosome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen Ying

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The chromosome of Streptomyces has been shown to be unstable, frequently undergoing gross chromosomal rearrangements. However, the mechanisms underlying this phenomenon remain unclear, with previous studies focused on two chromosomal ends as targets for rearrangements. Here we investigated chromosomal instability of Streptomyces avermitilis, an important producer of avermectins, and characterized four gross chromosomal rearrangement events, including a major deletion in the central region. The present findings provide a valuable contribution to the mechanistic study of genetic instability in Streptomyces. Results Thirty randomly-selected "bald" mutants derived from the wild-type strain all contained gross chromosomal rearrangements of various types. One of the bald mutants, SA1-8, had the same linear chromosomal structure as the high avermectin-producing mutant 76-9. Chromosomes of both strains displayed at least three independent chromosomal rearrangements, including chromosomal arm replacement to form new 88-kb terminal inverted repeats (TIRs, and two major deletions. One of the deletions eliminated the 36-kb central region of the chromosome, but surprisingly did not affect viability of the cells. The other deletion (74-kb was internal to the right chromosomal arm. The chromosome of another bald mutant, SA1-6, was circularized with deletions at both ends. No obvious homology was found in all fusion sequences. Generational stability analysis showed that the chromosomal structure of SA1-8 and SA1-6 was stable. Conclusions Various chromosomal rearrangements, including chromosomal arm replacement, interstitial deletions and chromosomal circularization, occurred in S. avermitilis by non-homologous recombination. The finding of an inner deletion involving in the central region of S. avermitilis chromosome suggests that the entire Streptomyces chromosome may be the target for rearrangements, which are not limited, as previously

  9. The origin of human chromosome 2 analyzed by comparative chromosome mapping with a DNA microlibrary

    OpenAIRE

    Wienberg, Johannes; Jauch, Anna; Lüdecke, H J; Senger, G; Horsthemke, B; Claussen, U; Cremer, Thomas; Arnold, N.; Lengauer, Christoph

    1994-01-01

    Fluorescencein situ hybridization (FISH) of microlibraries established from distinct chromosome subregions can test the evolutionary conservation of chromosome bands as well as chromosomal rearrangements that occurred during primate evolution and will help to clarify phylogenetic relationships. We used a DNA library established by microdissection and microcloning from the entire long arm of human chromosome 2 for fluorescencein situ hybridization and comparative mapping of the chromosomes of ...

  10. Chromosomal instability as a prognostic marker in cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cervical cancer is the third most common cancer in women globally, and despite treatment, distant metastasis and nodal recurrence will still develop in approximately 30% of patients. The ability to predict which patients are likely to experience distant relapse would allow clinicians to better tailor treatment. Previous studies have investigated the role of chromosomal instability (CIN) in cancer, which can promote tumour initiation and growth; a hallmark of human malignancies. In this study, we sought to examine the published CIN70 gene signature in a cohort of cervical cancer patients treated at the Princess Margaret (PM) Cancer Centre and an independent cohort of The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) cervical cancer patients, to determine if this CIN signature associated with patient outcome. Cervical cancer samples were collected from 79 patients, treated between 2000–2007 at the PM, prior to undergoing curative chemo-radiation. Total RNA was extracted from each patient sample and analyzed using the GeneChip Human Genome U133 Plus 2.0 array (Affymetrix). High CIN70 scores were significantly related to increased chromosomal alterations in TCGA cervical cancer patients, including a higher percentage of genome altered and a higher number of copy number alterations. In addition, this same CIN70 signature was shown to be predictive of para-aortic nodal relapse in the PM Cancer Centre cohort. These findings demonstrate that chromosomal instability plays an important role in cervical cancer, and is significantly associated with patient outcome. For the first time, this CIN70 gene signature provided prognostic value for patients with cervical cancer

  11. Correlation of chromosome patterns in human leukemic cells with exposure to chemicals and/or radiation. Progress report, January 1, 1981-December 31, 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The overall aim is to determine whether there is a relationship between exposure to radiation, environmental pollutants, and/or genetic background and the development of ANLL or other hematologic malignancies. I will try to define the factors that influence the development of ANLL as a second malignancy in patients who have been exposed to large doses of radiotherapy and/or chemotherapeutic agents. Two long-term goals are (1) to identify the genes that are located at the sites of consistent translocations, and then to determine the alterations in gene function that are associated with these translocations and (2) to establish the baseline frequency of various chromosome changes (mutations) in myeloid cells and then to analyze the influence of various types of environmental exposure or medical treatment on this baseline mutation rate. Ultimately, it may be possible to determine the extent of mutagenic exposure in various populations through an analysis of the leukemic cells of that populations

  12. Temporal genomic evolution of bird sex chromosomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Zongji; Zhang, Jilin; Yang, Wei;

    2014-01-01

    driving forces of Z chromosome evolution, we analyze here 45 newly available bird genomes and four species' transcriptomes, over their course of recombination loss between the sex chromosomes. RESULTS: We show Z chromosomes in general have a significantly higher substitution rate in introns and synonymous...... evolved very recently. CONCLUSIONS: In conclusion, we uncover that the sequence and expression patterns of Z chromosome genes covary with their ages of becoming Z-linked. In contrast to the mammalian X chromosomes, such patterns are mainly driven by mutational bias and genetic drift in birds, due...... to the opposite sex-biased inheritance of Z vs. X....

  13. Holoprosencephaly due to numeric chromosome abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Benjamin D; Rosenbaum, Kenneth N; Meck, Jeanne M; Muenke, Maximilian

    2010-02-15

    Holoprosencephaly (HPE) is the most common malformation of the human forebrain. When a clinician identifies a patient with HPE, a routine chromosome analysis is often the first genetic test sent for laboratory analysis in order to assess for a structural or numerical chromosome anomaly. An abnormality of chromosome number is overall the most frequently identified etiology in a patient with HPE. These abnormalities include trisomy 13, trisomy 18, and triploidy, though several others have been reported. Such chromosome number abnormalities are almost universally fatal early in gestation or in infancy. Clinical features of specific chromosome number abnormalities may be recognized by phenotypic manifestations in addition to the HPE. PMID:20104610

  14. Novel insights into mitotic chromosome condensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piskadlo, Ewa; Oliveira, Raquel A.

    2016-01-01

    The fidelity of mitosis is essential for life, and successful completion of this process relies on drastic changes in chromosome organization at the onset of nuclear division. The mechanisms that govern chromosome compaction at every cell division cycle are still far from full comprehension, yet recent studies provide novel insights into this problem, challenging classical views on mitotic chromosome assembly. Here, we briefly introduce various models for chromosome assembly and known factors involved in the condensation process (e.g. condensin complexes and topoisomerase II). We will then focus on a few selected studies that have recently brought novel insights into the mysterious way chromosomes are condensed during nuclear division.

  15. Mitosis. Microtubule detyrosination guides chromosomes during mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barisic, Marin; Silva e Sousa, Ricardo; Tripathy, Suvranta K; Magiera, Maria M; Zaytsev, Anatoly V; Pereira, Ana L; Janke, Carsten; Grishchuk, Ekaterina L; Maiato, Helder

    2015-05-15

    Before chromosomes segregate into daughter cells, they align at the mitotic spindle equator, a process known as chromosome congression. Centromere-associated protein E (CENP-E)/Kinesin-7 is a microtubule plus-end-directed kinetochore motor required for congression of pole-proximal chromosomes. Because the plus-ends of many astral microtubules in the spindle point to the cell cortex, it remains unknown how CENP-E guides pole-proximal chromosomes specifically toward the equator. We found that congression of pole-proximal chromosomes depended on specific posttranslational detyrosination of spindle microtubules that point to the equator. In vitro reconstitution experiments demonstrated that CENP-E-dependent transport was strongly enhanced on detyrosinated microtubules. Blocking tubulin tyrosination in cells caused ubiquitous detyrosination of spindle microtubules, and CENP-E transported chromosomes away from spindle poles in random directions. Thus, CENP-E-driven chromosome congression is guided by microtubule detyrosination. PMID:25908662

  16. [The evolution of human Y chromosome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xianrong; Wang, Meiqin; Li, Shaohua

    2014-09-01

    The human Y chromosome is always intriguing for researchers, because of its role in gender determination and its unusual evolutionary history. The Y chromosome evolves from an autosome, and its evolution has been characterized by massive gene decay. The lack of recombination and protein-coding genes and high content of repetitive sequences have hindered the progress in our understanding of the Y chromosome biology. Recently, with the advances in comparative genomics and sequencing technology, the research on Y chromosome has become a hotspot, with an intensified debate about Y-chromosome final destination resulting from degeneration. This review focuses on the structure, inheritance characteristics, gene content, and the origin and evolution of Y chromosome. We also discuss the long-term destiny of Y chromosome. PMID:25252301

  17. Dynamics of chromosome segregation in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Henrik Jørck

    2007-01-01

    Since the 1960’es the conformation and segregation of the chromosome in Escherichia coli has been a subject of interest for many scientists. However, after 40 years of research, we still know incredibly little about how the chromosome is organized inside the cell, how it manages to duplicate this...... and reliable method enabled us to start the analysis on the distribution of various chromosomal loci inside slowly growing cells. With the actual counting and measuring no longer being any problem we could easily analyze 14 loci distributed on the E.coli chromosome. More than 15.000 cells were...... on the P1 par system. Using the new system, which is based on the pMT1 par system from Yersenia pestis, we labeled loci on opposite sides of the E.coli chromosome simultaneously and were able to show that the E.coli chromosome is organized with one chromosomal arm in each cell half. This astounding...

  18. Microdissection and chromosome painting of the alien chromosome in an addition line of wheat-Thinopyrum intermedium

    Science.gov (United States)

    The chromosome painting is an efficient tool for chromosome research. However, plant chromosome painting is relatively underdeveloped. In this study, chromosome painting was developed and used to identify alien chromosomes in TAi-27, a wheat-Thinopyrum intermedium addition line, and chromosomes of...

  19. Chromosomal imbalance in the progression of high-risk non-muscle invasive bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Non-muscle invasive bladder neoplasms with invasion of the lamina propria (stage T1) or high grade of dysplasia are at 'high risk' of progression to life-threatening cancer. However, the individual course is difficult to predict. Chromosomal instability (CI) is associated with high tumor stage and grade, and possibly with the risk of progression. To investigate the relationship between CI and subsequent disease progression, we performed a case-control-study of 125 patients with 'high-risk' non-muscle invasive bladder neoplasms, 67 with later disease progression, and 58 with no progression. Selection criteria were conservative (non-radical) resections and full prospective clinical follow-up (> 5 years). We investigated primary lesions in 59, and recurrent lesions in 66 cases. We used Affymetrix GeneChip® Mapping 10 K and 50 K SNP microarrays to evaluate genome wide chromosomal imbalance (loss-of-heterozygosity and DNA copy number changes) in 48 representative tumors. DNA copy number changes of 15 key instability regions were further investigated using QPCR in 101 tumors (including 25 tumors also analysed on 50 K SNP microarrays). Chromosomal instability did not predict any higher risk of subsequent progression. Stage T1 and high-grade tumors had generally more unstable genomes than tumors of lower stage and grade (mostly non-primary tumors following a 'high-risk' tumor). However, about 25% of the 'high-risk' tumors had very few alterations. This was independent of subsequent progression. Recurrent lesions represent underlying field disease. A separate analysis of these lesions did neither reflect any difference in the risk of progression. Of specific chromosomal alterations, a possible association between loss of chromosome 8p11 and the risk of progression was found. However, the predictive value was limited by the heterogeneity of the changes. Chromosomal instability (CI) was associated with 'high risk' tumors

  20. International workshop of chromosome 19

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pericak-Vance, M.A. (Duke Univ. Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States). Div. of Neurology); Carrano, A.J. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States))

    1991-09-16

    This document summarizes the workshop on physical and genetic mapping of chromosome 19. The first session discussed the major disease loci found on the chromosome. The second session concentrated on reference families, markers and linkage maps. The third session concentrated on radiation hybrid mapping, somatic cell hybrid panels, macro restriction maps and YACs, followed by cDNA and long range physical maps. The fourth session concentrated on compiling consensus genetic and physical maps as well as discussing regions of conflict. The final session dealt with the LLNL cosmid contig database and comparative mapping of homologous regions of the human and mouse genomes, and ended with a discussion of resource sharing. 18 refs., 2 figs. (MHB)

  1. Baseline chromosome aberrations in children

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Merlo, D.F.; Ceppi, M.; Stagi, E.; Bocchini, V.; Šrám, Radim; Rössner st., Pavel

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 172, - (2007), s. 60-67. ISSN 0378-4274 Grant ostatní: EU(EU) 2002-02198; EU(EU) 2005-016320 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390512 Source of funding: R - rámcový projekt EK ; R - rámcový projekt EK Keywords : chromosome aberrations * children * molecular epidemiology Subject RIV: DN - Health Impact of the Environment Quality Impact factor: 2.826, year: 2007

  2. Clonality - X Chromosome Inactivation Assay

    OpenAIRE

    sprotocols

    2014-01-01

    Author: Molecular Profiling Initiative, NCI This method was successful in our lab using prostate tissue and for our specific objectives. Investigators must be aware that they will need to tailor the following protocol for their own research objectives and tissue under study. Investigators can utilize X chromosome inactivation (methylation) to determine the clonality status of a tumor or premalignant lesion in females. The technique is based on a methylation-sensitive restriction enzym...

  3. Hobo transposons causing chromosomal breakpoints.

    OpenAIRE

    Ladevèze, V; Aulard, S.; Chaminade, N; Périquet, G; Lemeunier, F

    1998-01-01

    Several laboratory surveys have shown that transposable elements (TEs) can cause chromosomal breaks and lead to inversions, as in dysgenic crosses involving P-elements. However, it is not presently clear what causes inversions in natural populations of Drosophila. The only direct molecular studies must be taken as evidence against the involvement of mobile elements. Here, in Drosophila lines transformed with the hobo transposable element, and followed for 100 generations, we show the appearan...

  4. Chromosomal instability determines taxane response

    OpenAIRE

    Swanton, Charles; Nicke, Barbara; Schuett, Marion; Eklund, Aron C.; Ng, Charlotte; Li, Qiyuan; Hardcastle, Thomas; Lee, Alvin; Roy, Rajat; East, Philip; Kschischo, Maik; Endesfelder, David; Wylie, Paul; Kim, Se Nyun; Chen, Jie-Guang

    2009-01-01

    Microtubule-stabilizing (MTS) agents, such as taxanes, are important chemotherapeutics with a poorly understood mechanism of action. We identified a set of genes repressed in multiple cell lines in response to MTS agents and observed that these genes are overexpressed in tumors exhibiting chromosomal instability (CIN). Silencing 22/50 of these genes, many of which are involved in DNA repair, caused cancer cell death, suggesting that these genes are involved in the survival of aneuploid cells....

  5. Is Native American R Y-Chromosome of African Origin?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clyde Winters

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Controversey surrounds the phylogeography and origin of the R haplotype among Native Americans. Some researchers have suggested that Europeans spread this haplotype among Native Americans. The purpose of this study was to determine the origin of the R-M173 y-chromosome among Native Americans . It is the third most frequent y-chromosome possessed by Native Americans. Native Americans with the highest frequency of R-M173 haplotypes like the Ojibwa and Seminoles mated frequently with African males. Our findings indicate that the African male, Native American female pattern of mating in the United States probably led to the introduction and spread of R-M173 among Native Americans during slavery.

  6. Chromosomal anomalies in radiation-induced fibrosis in the pig

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    R-banded karyotypes were established on fibroblasts from fibrotic tissues derived from experimental fibrosis induced in pigs, either surgically or by 64 Gy of γ-rays from iridium-192. No chromosome aberrations were observed in the surgical fibrosis. In radiation-induced fibrosis, the high frequency of abnormal karyotypes and frequent complexity of the chromosomal rearrangements suggest that the fibroblasts originated either from the 64-Gy area, or from the penumbra, but certainly not from non-irradiated areas. At early passages in vitro, almost all karyotypes were different, demonstrating a multiclonal origin of fibrotic tissue. At late passages (above 24), the situation was quite different, with the persistence of one or two clones only, demonstrating a strong selective pressure occurring in vitro. (author). 23 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs

  7. Chromosome aberration assays in Allium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grant, W.F.

    1982-01-01

    The common onion (Allium cepa) is an excellent plant for the assay of chromosome aberrations after chemical treatment. Other species of Allium (A. cepa var. proliferum, A. carinatum, A. fistulosum and A. sativum) have also been used but to a much lesser extent. Protocols have been given for using root tips from either bulbs or seeds of Allium cepa to study the cytological end-points, such as chromosome breaks and exchanges, which follow the testing of chemicals in somatic cells. It is considered that both mitotic and meiotic end-points should be used to a greater extent in assaying the cytogenetic effects of a chemical. From a literature survey, 148 chemicals are tabulated that have been assayed in 164 Allium tests for their clastogenic effect. Of the 164 assays which have been carried out, 75 are reported as giving a positive reaction, 49 positive and with a dose response, 1 positive and temperature-related, 9 borderline positive, and 30 negative; 76% of the chemicals gave a definite positive response. It is proposed that the Allium test be included among those tests routinely used for assessing chromosomal damage induced by chemicals.

  8. Chromosome rearrangements and transposable elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lonnig, Wolf-Ekkehard; Saedler, Heinz

    2002-01-01

    There has been limited corroboration to date for McClintock's vision of gene regulation by transposable elements (TEs), although her proposition on the origin of species by TE-induced complex chromosome reorganizations in combination with gene mutations, i.e., the involvement of both factors in relatively sudden formations of species in many plant and animal genera, has been more promising. Moreover, resolution is in sight for several seemingly contradictory phenomena such as the endless reshuffling of chromosome structures and gene sequences versus synteny and the constancy of living fossils (or stasis in general). Recent wide-ranging investigations have confirmed and enlarged the number of earlier cases of TE target site selection (hot spots for TE integration), implying preestablished rather than accidental chromosome rearrangements for nonhomologous recombination of host DNA. The possibility of a partly predetermined generation of biodiversity and new species is discussed. The views of several leading transposon experts on the rather abrupt origin of new species have not been synthesized into the macroevolutionary theory of the punctuated equilibrium school of paleontology inferred from thoroughly consistent features of the fossil record. PMID:12429698

  9. The genetic content of chromosomal inversions across a wide latitudinal gradient.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Simões

    Full Text Available There is increasing evidence regarding the role of chromosomal inversions in relevant biological processes such as local adaptation and speciation. A classic example of the adaptive role of chromosomal polymorphisms is given by the clines of inversion frequencies in Drosophila subobscura, repeatable across continents. Nevertheless, not much is known about the molecular variation associated with these polymorphisms. We characterized the genetic content of ca. 600 individuals from nine European populations following a latitudinal gradient by analysing 19 microsatellite loci from two autosomes (J and U and the sex chromosome (A, taking into account their chromosomal inversions. Our results clearly demonstrate the molecular genetic uniformity within a given chromosomal inversion across a large latitudinal gradient, particularly from Groningen (Netherlands in the north to Málaga (Spain in the south, experiencing highly diverse environmental conditions. This low genetic differentiation within the same gene arrangement across the nine European populations is consistent with the local adaptation hypothesis for th evolutionof chromosomal polymorphisms. We also show the effective role of chromosomal inversions in maintaining different genetic pools within these inverted genomic regions even in the presence of high gene flow. Inversions represent thus an important barrier to gene flux and can help maintain specific allelic combinations with positive effects on fitness. Consistent patterns of microsatellite allele-inversion linkage disequilibrium particularly in loci within inversions were also observed. Finally, we identified areas within inversions presenting clinal variation that might be under selection.

  10. The epitheliogenesis imperfecta locus maps to equine chromosome 8 in American Saddlebred horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieto, L D; Cothran, E G

    2003-01-01

    Epitheliogenesis imperfecta (EI) is a hereditary junctional mechanobullous disease that occurs in newborn American Saddlebred foals. The pathological signs of epitheliogenesis imperfecta closely match a similar disease in humans known as Herlitz junctional epidermolysis bullosa, which is caused by a mutation in one of the genes (LAMA3, LAMB3 and LAMC2) coding for the subunits of the laminin 5 protein (laminin alpha3, laminin beta3 and laminin gamma2). The LAMA3 gene has been assigned to equine chromosome 8 and LAMB3 and LAMC2 have been mapped to equine chromosome 5. Linkage disequilibrium between microsatellite markers that mapped to equine chromosome 5 and equine chromosome 8 and the EI disease locus was tested in American Saddlebred horses. The allele frequencies of microsatellite alleles at 11 loci were determined for both epitheliogenesis imperfecta affected and unaffected populations of American Saddlebred horses by genotyping and direct counting of alleles. These were used to determine fit to Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium for control and EI populations using Chi square analysis. Two microsatellite loci located on equine chromosome 8q, ASB14 and AHT3, were not in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium in affected American Saddlebred horses. In comparison, all of the microsatellite markers located on equine chromosome 5 were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium in affected American Saddlebred horses. This suggested that the EI disease locus was located on equine chromosome 8q, where LAMA3 is also located. PMID:14970704

  11. Developmental potential of clinically discarded human embryos and associated chromosomal analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Guidong; Xu, Jiawei; Xin, Zhimin; Niu, Wenbin; Shi, Senlin; Jin, Haixia; Song, Wenyan; Wang, Enyin; Yang, Qingling; Chen, Lei; Sun, Yingpu

    2016-01-01

    Clinically discarded human embryos, which are generated from both normal and abnormal fertilizations, have the potential of developing into blastocysts. A total of 1,649 discarded human embryos, including zygotes containing normal (2PN) and abnormal (0PN, 1PN, 3PN and ≥4PN) pronuclei and prematurely cleaved embryos (2Cell), were collected for in vitro culture to investigate their developmental potential and chromosomal constitution using an SNP array-based chromosomal analysis. We found that blastocyst formation rates were 63.8% (for 2Cell embryos), 22.6% (2PN), 16.7% (0PN), 11.2% (3PN) and 3.6% (1PN). SNP array-based chromosomal analysis of the resultant blastocysts revealed that the percentages of normal chromosomes were 55.2% (2Cell), 60.7% (2PN), 44.4% (0PN) and 47.4% (0PN). Compared with clinical preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) data generated with clinically acceptable embryos, results of the SNP array-based chromosome analysis on blastocysts from clinically discarded embryos showed similar values for the frequency of abnormal chromosome occurrence, aberrant signal classification and chromosomal distribution. The present study is perhaps the first systematic analysis of the developmental potential of clinically discarded embryos and provides a basis for future studies. PMID:27045374

  12. The evolution of chromosomal instability in Chinese hamster cells: a changing picture?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponnaiya, B.; Limoli, C. L.; Corcoran, J.; Kaplan, M. I.; Hartmann, A.; Morgan, W. F.

    1998-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate the kinetics of chromosomal instability induced in clones of Chinese hamster cells following X-irradiation. MATERIALS AND METHODS: X-irradiated clones of GM10115, human-hamster hybrid cells containing a single human chromosome 4 (HC4), have been previously established. These clones were defined as unstable if they contained > or = three subpopulations of cells with unique rearrangements of HC4 as detected by FISH. Stable and unstable clones were analysed by FISH and Giemsa staining at various times post-irradiation. RESULTS: While most of the stable clones continued to show chromosomal stability of HC4 over time, one became marginally unstable at approximately 45 population doublings post-irradiation. Clones exhibiting chromosomal instability had one of several fates. Many of the unstable clones were showed similar levels of instability over time. However, one unstable clone became stable with time in culture, while another became even more unstable over time. Cytogenetic analyses of all clones after Giemsa staining indicated that in some clones the hamster chromosomes were rearranged independent of HC4, demonstrating increased frequencies of chromatid breaks and dicentric chromosomes. The majority of the unstable clones also had higher yields of chromatid gaps. CONCLUSIONS: These data demonstrate the dynamic nature of chromosomal instability as measured by two different cytogenetic assays.

  13. Risk of chromosomal abnormalities in early spontaneous abortion after assisted reproductive technology: a meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-Zhen Qin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Studies on the risk of chromosomal abnormalities in early spontaneous abortion after assisted reproductive technology (ART are relatively controversial and insufficient. Thus, to obtain a more precise evaluation of the risk of embryonic chromosomal abnormalities in first-trimester miscarriage after ART, we performed a meta-analysis of all available case-control studies relating to the cytogenetic analysis of chromosomal abnormalities in first-trimester miscarriage after ART. METHODS: Literature search in the electronic databases MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL based on the established strategy. Meta-regression, subgroup analysis, and Galbraith plots were conducted to explore the sources of heterogeneity. RESULTS: A total of 15 studies with 1,896 cases and 1,186 controls relevant to the risk of chromosomal abnormalities in first- trimester miscarriage after ART, and 8 studies with 601 cases and 602 controls evaluating frequency of chromosome anomaly for maternal age≥35 versus <35 were eligible for the meta-analysis. No statistical difference was found in risk of chromosomally abnormal miscarriage compared to natural conception and the different types of ART utilized, whereas the risk of fetal aneuploidy significantly increased with maternal age≥35 (OR 2.88, 95% CI: 1.74-4.77. CONCLUSIONS: ART treatment does not present an increased risk for chromosomal abnormalities occurring in a first trimester miscarriage, but incidence of fetal aneuploidy could increase significantly with advancing maternal age.

  14. Association testing to detect gene-gene interactions on sex chromosomes in trio data

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    Yeonok eLee

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD occurs more often among males than females in a 4:1 ratio. Among theories used to explain the causes of ASD, the X chromosome and the Y chromosome theories attribute ASD to X-linked mutation and the male-limited gene expressions on the Y chromosome, respectively. Despite the rationale of the theory, studies have failed to attribute the sex-biased ratio to the significant linkage or association on the regions of interest on X chromosome. We further study the gender biased ratio by examining the possible interaction effects between two genes in the sex chromosomes. We propose a logistic regression model with mixed effects to detect gene-gene interactions on sex chromosomes. We investigated the power and type I error rates of the approach for a range of minor allele frequencies and varying linkage disequilibrium between markers and QTLs. We also evaluated the robustness of the model to population stratification. We applied the model to a trio-family data set with an ASD affected male child to study gene-gene interactions on sex chromosomes.

  15. Chromosome arm-specific long telomeres: a new clonal event in primary chronic myelogenous leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samassekou, Oumar; Li, Huiyu; Hébert, Josée; Ntwari, Aimé; Wang, Haixia; Cliché, Catherine Grenier; Bouchard, Eric; Huang, Shiang; Yan, Ju

    2011-06-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that critically shortened telomere lengths correlate with the chromosome instability in carcinogenesis. However, little has been noticed regarding the correlation of long telomeres at specific chromosomes with malignant disorders. We studied relative telomere lengths (RTLs) for individual chromosomes using the quantitative fluorescence in situ hybridization technique in a cohort of 32 patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) and 32 normal samples. We found that telomeres at some specific chromosome arms remain well maintained or even lengthened in a high frequency (27/32) of leukemia cases. In particular, 10 chromosome arms, 4q, 5p, 7q, 11p, 13p, 13q, 14p, 15p, 18p, and Xp, with long telomeres were consistently identified in different samples, and six of them (4q, 5p, 13p, 13q, 14p, and Xp) with relatively long telomeres were also observed in normal samples, but they appeared in lower occurrence rate and shorter RTL than in CML samples. Our results strongly indicate the presence of a special leukemia cell population, or a clone, originated from a common progenitor that is characterized with chromosome arm-specific long telomeres. We suggest that relatively long telomeres located at key chromosomes could be preferentially maintained or further elongated during the early stage of malignant transformation. PMID:21677878

  16. Chromosome breakage at sites of oncogenes in a population accidentally exposed to radioactive chemical pollution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the level of aberrations at fragile sites of chromosomes in peripheral blood lymphocytes of the population of an area polluted with radionuclides, following an accident at the Siberian Chemical Plant (SCP). We carried out the micro-nucleus test to screen people with radiation-related cytogenetic effects. Of the 1246 examined inhabitants of the settlement of Samus, 148 showed a significantly increased frequency of micro-nucleated erythrocytes and were selected for the chromosome analysis as a radiation-exposed group. Additional analysis was carried out on 40 patients with gastric cancer and atrophic gastritis with stage II-III epithelial dysplasia. Eighty six individuals from a non-polluted area were used as a control group. Chromosomal breaks and exchanges occurred preferentially in chromosomes 3 and 6 among radiation-exposed persons and patients. The regions 3p14-3p25 and 6p23 were damaged most often. There was a tendency towards preferential involvement at q21-q25 of chromosome 6 in patients with gastric cancer and atrophic gastritis. Specific damage at certain chromosome sites was observed in the radiation-exposed population as well as in patients with gastric cancer. Most often this damage were located near oncogene loci which could imply that chromosome damage induced by radiation is likely to be a predisposing factor to the expression of oncogenes and malignant transformation of cells in exposed individuals. (author)

  17. Chromosome Arm-Specific Long Telomeres: A New Clonal Event in Primary Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oumar Samassekou

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies demonstrated that critically shortened telomere lengths correlate with the chromosome instability in carcinogenesis. However, little has been noticed regarding the correlation of long telomeres at specific chromosomes with malignant disorders. We studied relative telomere lengths (RTLs for individual chromosomes using the quantitative fluorescence in situ hybridization technique in a cohort of 32 patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML and 32 normal samples. We found that telomeres at some specific chromosome arms remain well maintained or even lengthened in a high frequency (27/32 of leukemia cases. In particular, 10 chromosome arms, 4q, 5p, 7q, 11p, 13p, 13q, 14p, 15p, 18p, and Xp, with long telomeres were consistently identified in different samples, and six of them (4q, 5p, 13p, 13q, 14p, and Xp with relatively long telomeres were also observed in normal samples, but they appeared in lower occurrence rate and shorter RTL than in CML samples. Our results strongly indicate the presence of a special leukemia cell population, or a clone, originated from a common progenitor that is characterized with chromosome arm-specific long telomeres. We suggest that relatively long telomeres located at key chromosomes could be preferentially maintained or further elongated during the early stage of malignant transformation.

  18. Caffeine potentiates or protects against radiation-induced DNA and chromosomal damage in human lymphocytes depending on temperature and concentration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of caffeine on radiation-induced chromosomal aberrations and DNA strand breaks in unstimulated human lymphocytes was investigated. When present prior to and during the radiation exposure, caffeine treatment was found to cause either potentiation or protection against induction of chromosomal aberrations depending on the concentration and temperature. When the nucleoid sedimentation technique was applied, enhancement or reduction of radiation-induced DNA strand breaks by caffeine was also found to be dependent on temperature and caffeine concentration. It is proposed that caffeine, in addition to its suspected ability to influence DNA repair, can also influence the induction of DNA damage, leading to alterations in the yield of chromosomal aberrations

  19. Comparative analysis of sex chromosomes in Leporinus species (Teleostei, Characiformes) using chromosome painting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background The Leporinus genus, belonging to the Anostomidae family, is an interesting model for studies of sex chromosome evolution in fish, particularly because of the presence of heteromorphic sex chromosomes only in some species of the genus. In this study we used W chromosome-derived probes in a series of cross species chromosome painting experiments to try to understand events of sex chromosome evolution in this family. Results W chromosome painting probes from Leporinus elongatus, L. macrocephalus and L. obtusidens were hybridized to each others chromosomes. The results showed signals along their W chromosomes and the use of L. elongatus W probe against L. macrocephalus and L. obtusidens also showed signals over the Z chromosome. No signals were observed when the later aforementioned probe was used in hybridization procedures against other four Anostomidae species without sex chromosomes. Conclusions Our results demonstrate a common origin of sex chromosomes in L. elongatus, L. macrocephalus and L. obtusidens but suggest that the L. elongatus chromosome system is at a different evolutionary stage. The absence of signals in the species without differentiated sex chromosomes does not exclude the possibility of cryptic sex chromosomes, but they must contain other Leporinus W sequences than those described here. PMID:23822802

  20. Whole chromosome painting of B chromosomes of the red-eye tetra Moenkhausia sanctaefilomenae (Teleostei, Characidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scudeler, Patricia Elda Sobrinho; Diniz, Débora; Wasko, Adriane Pinto; Oliveira, Claudio; Foresti, Fausto

    2015-01-01

    Abstract B chromosomes are dispensable genomic elements found in different groups of animals and plants. In the present study, a whole chromosome probe was generated from a specific heterochromatic B chromosome occurring in cells of the characidae fish Moenkhausia sanctaefilomenae (Steindachner, 1907). The chromosome painting probes were used in fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) experiments for the assessment of metaphase chromosomes obtained from individuals from three populations of Moenkhausia sanctaefilomenae. The results revealed that DNA sequences were shared between a specific B chromosome and many chromosomes of the A complement in all populations analyzed, suggesting a possible intra-specific origin of these B chromosomes. However, no hybridization signals were observed in other B chromosomes found in the same individuals, implying a possible independent origin of B chromosome variants in this species. FISH experiments using 18S rDNA probes revealed the presence of non-active ribosomal genes in some B chromosomes and in some chromosomes of the A complement, suggesting that at least two types of B chromosomes had an independent origin. The role of heterochromatic segments and ribosomal sequences in the origin of B chromosomes were discussed. PMID:26753081

  1. Chromosomal divergence and evolutionary inferences in Rhodniini based on the chromosomal location of ribosomal genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Pita

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we used fluorescence in situ hybridisation to determine the chromosomal location of 45S rDNA clusters in 10 species of the tribe Rhodniini (Hemiptera: Reduviidae: Triatominae. The results showed striking inter and intraspecific variability, with the location of the rDNA clusters restricted to sex chromosomes with two patterns: either on one (X chromosome or both sex chromosomes (X and Y chromosomes. This variation occurs within a genus that has an unchanging diploid chromosome number (2n = 22, including 20 autosomes and 2 sex chromosomes and a similar chromosome size and genomic DNA content, reflecting a genome dynamic not revealed by these chromosome traits. The rDNA variation in closely related species and the intraspecific polymorphism in Rhodnius ecuadoriensis suggested that the chromosomal position of rDNA clusters might be a useful marker to identify recently diverged species or populations. We discuss the ancestral position of ribosomal genes in the tribe Rhodniini and the possible mechanisms involved in the variation of the rDNA clusters, including the loss of rDNA loci on the Y chromosome, transposition and ectopic pairing. The last two processes involve chromosomal exchanges between both sex chromosomes, in contrast to the widely accepted idea that the achiasmatic sex chromosomes of Heteroptera do not interchange sequences.

  2. Study on the dose-response relation of premature chromosome condensation induced by Okadaic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to study the effect-dosage relationship between the PCC induced by Okadaic acid and the IR dosages, human peripheral blood in vitro was irradiated by X-rays at different doses (0, 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, 3.0, 5.0Gy) cultivated for 48 hours and added with Okadaic acid two hours before the end of culture. Chromosome aberrations frequencies was analyzed and compared with that induced by the conventional chromosome assay and their dose-response curves were fitted. The results show that the mitotic index of the PCC induced by Okadaic acid is higher than that of the conventional chromosome assay. And the fragment rate of chromosome condensation induced by Okadaic acid has a favorable linearity relationship with external radiation doses. (authors)

  3. Chromosomal aberration analysis of persons occupationally exposed to radiation in Iran (2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of chromosome aberration analysis on lymphocytes from 333 persons suspected of being overexposed to X and gamma rays in recent years at Iran is presented. 91 persons were associated with industrial radiography, 124 with radiology and 118 with medical research and therapy centers. The total yields of chromosome aberration per 100 cells were respectively 3.76, 2.92 and 2.96. The frequencies of dicentrics which are important in biological dosimetry were respectively 0.18, 0.17 and 0.21. In this investigation, 50 subjects were also examined as control with a mean aberration of 1.14 per 100 cells. With regard to incidence of chromosome aberrations as mentioned, the rate of chromosome aberrations in industrial radiographers was the most significant

  4. Transmission rate variation among three B chromosome variants in the fish Prochilodus lineatus (Characiformes, Prochilodontidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penitente, Manolo; Voltolin, Tatiana A; Senhorini, José A; Bortolozzi, Jehud; Foresti, Fausto; Porto-Foresti, Fábio

    2013-01-01

    Cytogenetic studies were developed in Prochilodus lineatus (Valenciennes 1836), describing an interesting system of small supernumerary chromosomes. The purpose of this work is to study the frequency and morphology of B chromosomes in individuals from the parental line and the inheritance patterns of these elements in individuals obtained from controlled crosses in the species P. lineatus. The transmission rate of B chromosomes revealed a k(B)=0.388 for the acrocentric type, a kB=0.507 for the metacentric type and a k(B)=0.526 for the submetacentric type. The obtained results raise hypothesis that B-acrocentric chromosomes are involved in an extinction process in this species, while the metacentric and submetacentric supernumerary elements comprises a neutral mechanism and follows a Mendelian transmission rate. PMID:24141415

  5. The nonlinear relationship of radiation dose to chromosome aberrations among atomic bomb survivors, Hiroshima and Nagasaki

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The quantitative relationship of the frequency of cells with radiation-induced chromosome aberrations in peripheral leukocytes in atomic bomb survivors has been evaluated as a function of gamma and neutron doses. Three different models have been examined; each assumes a nonlinear-response to gamma rays and a linear-response to neutrons. From the standpoint of the goodness of fit of these models, the model which ''best'' fits the data of radiation-induced chromosome aberrations is the exponit model, where the frequency of aberrant cells increases exponentially with dose. It is of radiobiological interest that the goodness of fit for this model shows the frequencies of cells with any chromosome aberration or an exchange aberration to be dependent cubically on the gamma ray dose and linearly on the neutron dose. The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of neutrons is calculated to be 129Dn sup(-2/3) (95% confidence intervals: (121 -- 137)Dn sup(-2/3)) for frequency of cells with any chromosome aberration, and 125Dn sup(-2/3) (95% confidence intervals: (117 -- 132)Dn sup(-2/3)) for the frequency of cells with an exchange aberration where Dn is the neutron dose. (author)

  6. Metaphase chromosome and nucleoid differences between CHO-K1 and its radiosensitive derivative xrs-5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell line xrs-5 is a radiation-sensitive mutant isolated from CHO-K1 cells. The radiation sensitivity is associated with a defect in DNA double-strand break rejoining. Chromatin structure also appears altered in xrs-5 cells compared to the parental CHO-K1 cells. Metaphase chromosomes from xrs-5 are more condensed in appearance than CHO-K1 chromosomes. The overcondensed look is not the result of colcemid sensitivity. Electron microscopy studies suggest that xrs-5 metaphase chromosomes have larger loops of chromatin extending out from the chromosome core. There are also differences between CHO-K1 and xrs-5 cells in the size and fluorescence pattern of ethidium bromide-stained nucleoid preparations. These results suggest that there is a fundamental difference between CHO-K1 and xrs-5 in either the organization of the supercoiled loops of DNA attached to the nuclear matrix or in the nature of the proteins that attach the DNA to the matrix. These alterations in chromosome structure may underlie, in part, the radiation sensitivity of xrs-5 cells

  7. Abrupt evolution of Philadelphia chromosome-positive acute myeloid leukemia in myelodysplastic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukunaga, Akiko; Sakoda, Hiroto; Iwamoto, Yoshihiro; Inano, Shojiro; Sueki, Yuki; Yanagida, Soshi; Arima, Nobuyoshi

    2013-03-01

    Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) is a clonal disorder arising from an alteration in multipotent stem cells, which lose the ability of normal proliferation and differentiation. Disease progression occurs in approximately 30% MDS cases. Specific chromosomal alterations seem responsible for each step in the evolution of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Multiple genetic aberrations occur during the clonal evolution of MDS; however, few studies report the presence of the Philadelphia (Ph) chromosome. We report a rare case of Ph-positive AML, which evolved during the course of low-risk MDS. The patient, a 76-year-old man with mild leukocytopenia, was diagnosed with MDS, refractory neutropenia (RN). After 1.5 yr, his peripheral blood and bone marrow were suddenly occupied by immature basophils and myeloblasts, indicating the onset of AML. A bone marrow smear showed multilineage dysplasia, consistent with MDS evolution. Chromosomal analysis showed an additional t(9;22)(q34;q11) translocation. Because progression occurred concurrently with emergence of the Ph chromosome, we diagnosed this case as Ph-positive AML with basophilia arising from the clonal evolution of MDS. The patient was initially treated with nilotinib. A hematological response was soon achieved with disappearance of the Ph chromosome in the bone marrow. Emergence of Ph-positive AML in the course of low-risk MDS has rarely been reported. We report this case as a rare clinical course of MDS. PMID:23240925

  8. Chromosome analysis of arsenic affected cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Shekhar

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim was to study the chromosome analysis of arsenic affected cattle. Materials and Methods: 27 female cattle (21 arsenic affected and 6 normal were selected for cytogenetical study. The blood samples were collected, incubated, and cultured using appropriate media and specific methods. The samples were analyzed for chromosome number and morphology, relative length of the chromosome, arm ratio, and centromere index of X chromosome and chromosomal abnormalities in arsenic affected cattle to that of normal ones. Results: The diploid number of metaphase chromosomes in arsenic affected cattle as well as in normal cattle were all 2n=60, 58 being autosomes and 2 being sex chromosomes. From the centromeric position, karyotyping studies revealed that all the 29 pair of autosomes was found to be acrocentric or telocentric, and the sex chromosomes (XX were submetacentric in both normal and arsenic affected cattle. The relative length of all the autosome pairs and sex chrosomosome pair was found to be higher in normal than that of arsenic affected cattle. The mean arm ratio of X-chromosome was higher in normal than that of arsenic affected cattle, but it is reverse in case of centromere index value of X-chromosome. There was no significant difference of arm ratio and centromere index of X-chromosomes between arsenic affected and normal cattle. No chromosomal abnormalities were found in arsenic affected cattle. Conclusion: The chromosome analysis of arsenic affected cattle in West Bengal reported for the first time in this present study which may serve as a guideline for future studies in other species. These reference values will also help in comparison of cytological studies of arsenic affected cattle to that of various toxicants.

  9. [Revision of th distribution of chromosome aberrations induced by chemical mutagens using the BUDR label].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chebotarev, A N; Chernyshova, N A

    1990-08-01

    Cell distribution was analysed with the help of the BrDU label for the number of chromosome aberrations and breaks induced by one-center (thiophosphamide and phosphamide) and two-center (dipine and fotrine) mutagens at the stage G0 in the Ist mitosis of human lymphocytes harvested at different times of culturing (from 56 to 96 h). The comparison was made between the type of aberration distribution in cells and the dependence of their frequency on the harvesting point for various mutagens. Poisson aberration distribution in cells for two-center mutagens was found to correspond to their constant frequency observed at different times of harvesting. On the other hand, for one-center mutagens, a geometrical distribution of chromosome breaks corresponded to an exponential decrease in their frequency in time. It is suggested that two-center chemical mutagens and ionizing radiation cause largely short-live damages which are realized into chromosome aberrations rather quickly (during one cell cycle). One-center mutagens, however, cause such damages that the probability of their transformation into chromosome aberrations is decreasing rather slowly in time, under the exponential law, and their realization into chromosome aberrations can occur in subsequent cell cycle. PMID:2258036

  10. The peripheral chromosome scaffold, a novel structural component of mitotic chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheval, Eugene V; Polyakov, Vladimir Y

    2008-06-01

    Using an original high-salt extraction protocol, we observed a novel chromosome substructure, referred to as the peripheral chromosome scaffold. This chromosome domain contained the perichromosomal layer proteins pKi-67, B23/nucleophosmin and fibrillarin, but no DNA fragments (i.e., the loop domain bases were not associated with the peripheral scaffold). Modern models of chromosome organization do not predict the existence of a peripheral chromosome scaffold domain, and thus our observations have conceptual implications for understanding chromosome architecture. PMID:18337132

  11. Frequency stability

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kroupa, Věnceslav František

    Bratislava: Department of Radio and Electronics, FEI STU, 2006 - (Píš, P.; Krajčušková, Z.), I.1-I.9 ISBN 80-227-2388-6. [ Radio elektronika 2006. Conference proceedings. Bratislava (SK), 25.04.2006-26.04.2006] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA102/05/0852 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20670512 Keywords : noise * frequency stability * frequency control Subject RIV: JW - Navigation, Links, Detection ; Counter-Measures

  12. Large-scale polymorphism near the ends of several human chromosomes analyzed by using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trask, B.J.; Friedman, C. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Giorgi, D. [CNRS, Montpelier (France)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    We have discovered a large DNA segment that is polymorphically present at the ends of several human chromosomes. The segment, f7501, was originally derived form a human chromosome 19-specific cosmid library. FISH was used to determine the cosmid`s chromosomal distribution on 44 unrelated humans and several closely related primates. The human subjects represent a diversity of reproductively isolated ethnic populations. FISH analysis revealed that sequences highly homologous to the cosmid`s insert are present on both homologs at 3q, 15q,. and 19p in almost all individuals (88, 85, and 87 of 88 homologs, respectively). Other chromosomes sites were labeled much more rarely in the sampled individuals. For example, 56 of the 88 analyzed chromosomes 11 were labeled (18+/+, 6-/-, and 20+/- individuals). In contrast, 2q was labeled on only 1/88 sampled chromosomes. The termini of 2q, 5q, 6p, 6q, 7p, 8p, 9p, 9q, 11p, 12q, 16p, 19q, and 20q and an interstitial site at 2q13-14 were labeled in at least one individual of the set. EcoR1-fragments derived from the cosmid showed the same hybridization pattern as the entire cosmid, indicating that at least 40 kbp is shared by these chromosome ends. Ethnic differences in the allele frequency of these polymorphic variants was observed. For example, signals were observed on 8/10 and 7/10 of the chromosomes 7p and 16q, respectively, derived form Biakan Pygmies, but these sites were infrequently labeled in non-Pygmy human populations (2/68, respectively). This region has undergone significant changes in chromosome location during human evolution. Strong signal was seen on chimpanzee and gorilla chromosome 3, which is homologous to human chromosome 4, a chromosome unlabeled in any of the humans we have analyzed.

  13. Chronic lymphocytic leukemia-associated chromosomal abnormalities and miRNA deregulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiefer Y

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Yvonne Kiefer1, Christoph Schulte2, Markus Tiemann2, Joern Bullerdiek11Center for Human Genetics, University of Bremen, Bremen, Germany; 2Hematopathology Hamburg, Hamburg, GermanyAbstract: Chronic lymphocytic leukemia is the most common leukemia in adults. By cytogenetic investigations major subgroups of the disease can be identified that reflect different routes of tumor development. Of these chromosomal deviations, trisomy 12 and deletions of parts of either the long arm of chromosome 13, the long arm of chromosome 11, or the short arm of chromosome 17 are most commonly detected. In some of these aberrations the molecular target has been identified as eg, ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM in case of deletions of chromosomal region 11q22~23 and the genes encoding microRNAs miR-15a/16-1 as likely targets of deletions of chromosomal band 13q14.3. Of note, these aberrations do not characterize independent subgroups but often coexist within the metaphases of one tumor. Generally, complex aberrations are associated with a worse prognosis than simple karyotypic alterations. Due to smaller sizes of the missing segment the detection of recurrent deletions is not always possible by means of classical cytogenetics but requires more advanced techniques as in particular fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH. Nevertheless, at this time it is not recommended to replace classical cytogenetics by FISH because this would miss additional information given by complex or secondary karyotypic alterations. However, the results of cytogenetic analyses allow the stratification of prognostic and predictive groups of the disease. Of these, the group characterized by deletions involving TP53 is clinically most relevant. In the future refined methods as eg, array-based comparative genomic hybridization will supplement the existing techniques to characterize CLL. Keywords: chronic lymphocytic leukemia, chromosomal abnormality, miRNA deregulation

  14. A genome-wide map of aberrantly expressed chromosomal islands in colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Castanos-Velez Esmeralda

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cancer development is accompanied by genetic phenomena like deletion and amplification of chromosome parts or alterations of chromatin structure. It is expected that these mechanisms have a strong effect on regional gene expression. Results We investigated genome-wide gene expression in colorectal carcinoma (CRC and normal epithelial tissues from 25 patients using oligonucleotide arrays. This allowed us to identify 81 distinct chromosomal islands with aberrant gene expression. Of these, 38 islands show a gain in expression and 43 a loss of expression. In total, 7.892 genes (25.3% of all human genes are located in aberrantly expressed islands. Many chromosomal regions that are linked to hereditary colorectal cancer show deregulated expression. Also, many known tumor genes localize to chromosomal islands of misregulated expression in CRC. Conclusion An extensive comparison with published CGH data suggests that chromosomal regions known for frequent deletions in colon cancer tend to show reduced expression. In contrast, regions that are often amplified in colorectal tumors exhibit heterogeneous expression patterns: even show a decrease of mRNA expression. Because for several islands of deregulated expression chromosomal aberrations have never been observed, we speculate that additional mechanisms (like abnormal states of regional chromatin also have a substantial impact on the formation of co-expression islands in colorectal carcinoma.

  15. Automatic aberration scoring using whole chromosome F.I.S.H

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A radiation-induced rearrangement involving a painted and a non-painted chromosome will usually result in two partly-painted chromosomes, typically either a dicentric chromosome and associated fragment, or a reciprocal translocation pair. A consequence of such a rearrangement is that the number of painted image regions in the metaphase is increased by one, and their size distribution is altered. More complex rearrangements are uncommon, particularly at low doses. A high proportion of damaged cells can therefore be registered simply by detecting when the distribution of painted components differs from the expected number and size. A system has been constructed to pre-screen for damaged cells. It comprises automatic fluorescence metaphase finding followed by relocation and digitization of probe and counterstain channels at high resolution. Fully automatic segmentation in counterstain discriminates chromosomes from interphase nuclei and determines whether a metaphase is approximately diploid. The painted regions are segmented and their relative sizes estimated. Rules are applied which reduce the false positives due to artifacts such as overlapped painted chromosomes. More than 70% of cells with radiation damage involving painted and unpainted chromosomes were detected in a preliminary experiment using a small data set, with a low false positive rate. Results from a larger experiment in progress are presented

  16. Molecular and cellular pathways associated with chromosome 1p deletions during colon carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Payne CM

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Claire M Payne, Cheray Crowley-Skillicorn, Carol Bernstein, Hana Holubec, Harris BernsteinDepartment of Cell Biology and Anatomy, College of Medicine, University of Arizona Tucson, AZ, USAAbstract: Chromosomal instability is a major pathway of sporadic colon carcinogenesis. Chromosome arm 1p appears to be one of the “hot spots” in the non-neoplastic mucosa that, when deleted, is associated with the initiation of carcinogenesis. Chromosome arm 1p contains genes associated with DNA repair, spindle checkpoint function, apoptosis, multiple microRNAs, the Wnt signaling pathway, tumor suppression, antioxidant activities, and defense against environmental toxins. Loss of 1p is dangerous since it would likely contribute to genomic instability leading to tumorigenesis. The 1p deletion-associated colon carcinogenesis pathways are reviewed at the molecular and cellular levels. Sporadic colon cancer is strongly linked to a high-fat/low-vegetable/low-micronutrient, Western-style diet. We also consider how selected dietary-related compounds (eg, excess hydrophobic bile acids, and low levels of folic acid, niacin, plant-derived antioxidants, and other modulatory compounds might affect processes leading to chromosomal deletions, and to the molecular and cellular pathways specifically altered by chromosome 1p loss.Keywords: chromosome 1p, colon carcinogenesis, molecular pathways, cellular pathways

  17. Differential radio-sensitivities of human chromosomes 1 and 2 in one donor in interphase- and metaphase-spreads after 60Co γ-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation-induced chromosome aberrations lead to a plethora of detrimental effects at cellular level. Chromosome aberrations provide broad spectrum of information ranging from probability of malignant transformation to assessment of absorbed dose. Studies mapping differences in radiation sensitivities between human chromosomes are seldom undertaken. Consequently, health risk assessment based on radio-sensitivities of individual chromosomes may be erroneous. Our efforts in this article, attempt to demonstrate differences in radio-sensitivities of human chromosome-1 and/or -2, both in interphase and metaphase spreads. Upon blood collection, dosimetry and irradiation were performed. Lymphocytes were isolated after whole-blood irradiation with 60Co γ-rays in the dose range of 0–5 Gy for both interphase, and metaphase aberration studies. Induction of premature chromosome condensation in interphase cells was accomplished using a phosphatase inhibitor, calyculin-A. Metaphase spreads were harvested from short-term peripheral blood lymphocyte cultures following colcemid arrest and using an automated metaphase harvester and spreader. Aberration analysis in both interphase and metaphase spreads were done using FISH. In interphase, aberrant cell and aberration frequency involving chromosome 1 and/or 2 increased linearly with radiation dose. In metaphase, aberrations increased in a linear-quadratic manner with dose. Our studies ascertain that chromosome-2 is more radio-sensitive than chromosome-1 in both interphase and metaphase stages, albeit the DNA content of chromosome-2 is lesser than chromosome-1 by almost 10 million base pairs. Differences in radio-sensitivities of chromosomes have implications in genetic damage, chromosome organization, and chromosome function. Designing research experiments based on our vital findings may bring benefit to radiation-induced risk assessment, therapeutics and development of chromosome specific biomarkers

  18. Deciphering evolutionary strata on plant sex chromosomes and fungal mating-type chromosomes through compositional segmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Ravi S; Azad, Rajeev K

    2016-03-01

    Sex chromosomes have evolved from a pair of homologous autosomes which differentiated into sex determination systems, such as XY or ZW system, as a consequence of successive recombination suppression between the gametologous chromosomes. Identifying the regions of recombination suppression, namely, the "evolutionary strata", is central to understanding the history and dynamics of sex chromosome evolution. Evolution of sex chromosomes as a consequence of serial recombination suppressions is well-studied for mammals and birds, but not for plants, although 48 dioecious plants have already been reported. Only two plants Silene latifolia and papaya have been studied until now for the presence of evolutionary strata on their X chromosomes, made possible by the sequencing of sex-linked genes on both the X and Y chromosomes, which is a requirement of all current methods that determine stratum structure based on the comparison of gametologous sex chromosomes. To circumvent this limitation and detect strata even if only the sequence of sex chromosome in the homogametic sex (i.e. X or Z chromosome) is available, we have developed an integrated segmentation and clustering method. In application to gene sequences on the papaya X chromosome and protein-coding sequences on the S. latifolia X chromosome, our method could decipher all known evolutionary strata, as reported by previous studies. Our method, after validating on known strata on the papaya and S. latifolia X chromosome, was applied to the chromosome 19 of Populus trichocarpa, an incipient sex chromosome, deciphering two, yet unknown, evolutionary strata. In addition, we applied this approach to the recently sequenced sex chromosome V of the brown alga Ectocarpus sp. that has a haploid sex determination system (UV system) recovering the sex determining and pseudoautosomal regions, and then to the mating-type chromosomes of an anther-smut fungus Microbotryum lychnidis-dioicae predicting five strata in the non

  19. Interphase Chromosome Conformation and Chromatin-Chromatin Interactions in Human Epithelial Cells Cultured Under Different Gravity Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ye; Wong, Michael; Hada, Megumi; Wu, Honglu

    2015-01-01

    Microgravity has been shown to alter global gene expression patterns and protein levels both in cultured cells and animal models. It has been suggested that the packaging of chromatin fibers in the interphase nucleus is closely related to genome function, and the changes in transcriptional activity are tightly correlated with changes in chromatin folding. This study explores the changes of chromatin conformation and chromatin-chromatin interactions in the simulated microgravity environment, and investigates their correlation to the expression of genes located at different regions of the chromosome. To investigate the folding of chromatin in interphase under various culture conditions, human epithelial cells, fibroblasts, and lymphocytes were fixed in the G1 phase. Interphase chromosomes were hybridized with a multicolor banding in situ hybridization (mBAND) probe for chromosome 3 which distinguishes six regions of the chromosome as separate colors. After images were captured with a laser scanning confocal microscope, the 3-dimensional structure of interphase chromosome 3 was reconstructed at multi-mega base pair scale. In order to determine the effects of microgravity on chromosome conformation and orientation, measures such as distance between homologous pairs, relative orientation of chromosome arms about a shared midpoint, and orientation of arms within individual chromosomes were all considered as potentially impacted by simulated microgravity conditions. The studies revealed non-random folding of chromatin in interphase, and suggested an association of interphase chromatin folding with radiation-induced chromosome aberration hotspots. Interestingly, the distributions of genes with expression changes over chromosome 3 in cells cultured under microgravity environment are apparently clustered on specific loci and chromosomes. This data provides important insights into how mammalian cells respond to microgravity at molecular level.

  20. Mutagenesis and Physical Mapping of Genes in Crops with Small Chromosomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The manipulation of quality genes in agronomical and economical important plant species requires well-established cytogenetic maps and detailed genome characterization. Advance cytogenetic molecular methods, especially fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) have proved to be helpful in detecting chromosome-specific tags. The introduction of new cytogenetic markers to karyotyping using FISH is necessary, especially in species, which chromosomes are inordinately small and morphologically uniform, such as Brassica and Chenopodium species. The application of rDNA as probes for FISH does not provide enough chromosome specific landmarks in Chenopodium and Brassica. More molecular markers are still needed for identification of chromosomes of investigated species. In this study, different DNA sequences: BAC clones, retroelements-like and transposon-like sequences were localized on chromosomes of the three species studied using FISH. A detailed characterization of chromosomal aberrations in Hordeum vulgare (2n = 14) cells was done by the identification of individual chromosomes involved in their formation with FISH. Simultaneous FISH with 5S and 25S rDNA and, after reprobing of preparations, telomeric and centromeric DNA sequences as probes, was used to compare the cytogenetic effects of different mutagens on root tip meristem cells of barley. This is the first application of more than 2 DNA probes in FISH experiments in order to analyze chromosomal aberrations in plant cells. A better knowledge of the correlation between the level of DNA breaks detected by TUNEL and comet assay and the frequency of chromosome aberrations could speed up evaluation of effectiveness of mutagenic treatment in barley root cells. The comet assay and TUNEL test can be used as a predictive test for the outcome of the CA after using physical mutagen. The potential usefulness of the analysis of the level of DNA breaks in embryo in order to speed up the evaluation the effectiveness of mutagenic