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Sample records for chromosomal phage resistance

  1. Host specific diversity in Lactobacillus johnsonii as evidenced by a major chromosomal inversion and phage resistance mechanisms.

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    Caitriona M Guinane

    Full Text Available Genetic diversity and genomic rearrangements are a driving force in bacterial evolution and niche adaptation. We sequenced and annotated the genome of Lactobacillus johnsonii DPC6026, a strain isolated from the porcine intestinal tract. Although the genome of DPC6026 is similar in size (1.97 mbp and GC content (34.8% to the sequenced human isolate L. johnsonii NCC 533, a large symmetrical inversion of approximately 750 kb differentiated the two strains. Comparative analysis among 12 other strains of L. johnsonii including 8 porcine, 3 human and 1 poultry isolate indicated that the genome architecture found in DPC6026 is more common within the species than that of NCC 533. Furthermore a number of unique features were annotated in DPC6026, some of which are likely to have been acquired by horizontal gene transfer (HGT and contribute to protection against phage infection. A putative type III restriction-modification system was identified, as were novel Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR elements. Interestingly, these particular elements are not widely distributed among L. johnsonii strains. Taken together these data suggest intra-species genomic rearrangements and significant genetic diversity within the L. johnsonii species and indicate towards a host-specific divergence of L. johnsonii strains with respect to genome inversion and phage exposure.

  2. Differences in DNA curvature-related sequence periodicity between prokaryotic chromosomes and phages, and relationship to chromosomal prophage content

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    Abel Jacob

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Periodic spacing of A-tracts (short runs of A or T with the DNA helical period of ~10–11 bp is characteristic of intrinsically bent DNA. In eukaryotes, the DNA bending is related to chromatin structure and nucleosome positioning. However, the physiological role of strong sequence periodicity detected in many prokaryotic genomes is not clear. Results We developed measures of intensity and persistency of DNA curvature-related sequence periodicity and applied them to prokaryotic chromosomes and phages. The results indicate that strong periodic signals present in chromosomes are generally absent in phage genomes. Moreover, chromosomes containing prophages are less likely to possess a persistent periodic signal than chromosomes with no prophages. Conclusions Absence of DNA curvature-related sequence periodicity in phages could arise from constraints associated with DNA packaging in the viral capsid. Lack of prophages in chromosomes with persistent periodic signal suggests that the sequence periodicity and concomitant DNA curvature could play a role in protecting the chromosomes from integration of phage DNA.

  3. The Phage-Inducible Chromosomal Islands: A Family of Highly Evolved Molecular Parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penadés, José R; Christie, Gail E

    2015-11-01

    The phage-inducible chromosomal islands (PICIs) are a family of highly mobile genetic elements that contribute substantively to horizontal gene transfer, host adaptation, and virulence. Initially identified in Staphylococcus aureus, these elements are now thought to occur widely in gram-positive bacteria. They are molecular parasites that exploit certain temperate phages as helpers, using a variety of elegant strategies to manipulate the phage life cycle and promote their own spread, both intra- and intergenerically. At the same time, these PICI-encoded mechanisms severely interfere with helper phage reproduction, thereby enhancing survival of the bacterial population. In this review we discuss the genetics and the life cycle of these elements, with special emphasis on how they interact and interfere with the helper phage machinery for their own benefit. We also analyze the role that these elements play in driving bacterial and viral evolution.

  4. Lysogenic Conversion and Phage Resistance Development in Phage Exposed Escherichia coli Biofilms

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    Abram Aertsen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, three-day old mature biofilms of Escherichia coli were exposed once to either a temperate Shiga-toxin encoding phage (H-19B or an obligatory lytic phage (T7, after which further dynamics in the biofilm were monitored. As such, it was found that a single dose of H-19B could rapidly lead to a near complete lysogenization of the biofilm, with a subsequent continuous release of infectious H-19B particles. On the other hand, a single dose of T7 rapidly led to resistance development in the biofilm population. Together, our data indicates a profound impact of phages on the dynamics within structured bacterial populations.

  5. Lysogenic conversion and phage resistance development in phage exposed Escherichia coli biofilms.

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    Moons, Pieter; Faster, David; Aertsen, Abram

    2013-01-01

    In this study, three-day old mature biofilms of Escherichia coli were exposed once to either a temperate Shiga-toxin encoding phage (H-19B) or an obligatory lytic phage (T7), after which further dynamics in the biofilm were monitored. As such, it was found that a single dose of H-19B could rapidly lead to a near complete lysogenization of the biofilm, with a subsequent continuous release of infectious H-19B particles. On the other hand, a single dose of T7 rapidly led to resistance development in the biofilm population. Together, our data indicates a profound impact of phages on the dynamics within structured bacterial populations. PMID:23344561

  6. Spontaneous deletion of a 209-kilobase-pair fragment from the Escherichia coli genome occurs with acquisition of resistance to an assortment of infectious phages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanji, Yasunori; Hattori, Kenji; Suzuki, Kohichi; Miyanaga, Kazuhiko

    2008-07-01

    To breed resistance to an assortment of infectious phages, continuous cultures of Escherichia coli JM109 grown in a chemostat were exposed to phage mixtures prepared from sewage influent. Four sequential chemostat-grown cultures were each infected with a different phage mixture. At the end of a chemostat run, one phage-resistant colony was isolated and used to inoculate the subsequent culture. This process was repeated, and increased phage resistance of the input bacterial strain resulted from the successive challenges with different phage cocktails. Multiple mutations apparently accumulated progressively. A mutant isolated at the end of the four runs, designated D198, showed resistance to 38 of 40 phages that infect the parent strain, JM109. D198 produced less outer membrane protein C (OmpC) than JM109. However, restoration of the OmpC protein by plasmid-mediated complementation did not completely restore the susceptibility of D198 to the 38 phages. Therefore, alterations beyond the level of OmpC protein production contribute to the phage resistance of D198. PCR-based genetic analysis revealed that D198 has a genome that is 209 kbp (about 200 genes) smaller than JM109. The deletion includes the chromosomal section from ompC to wbbL that encodes the rhamnosyl transferase involved in lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis. Strains D198 and JM109 were comparable in their growth characteristics and their abilities to express a recombinant protein.

  7. Strain diversity and phage resistance in complex dairy starter cultures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spus, M.; Alexeeva, S.V.; Wolkers-Rooijackers, J.C.M.; Zwietering, M.H.; Abee, T.; Smid, E.J.

    2015-01-01

    The compositional stability of the complex Gouda cheese starter culture Ur is thought to be influenced by diversity in phage resistance of highly related strains that co-exist together with bacteriophages. To analyze the role of bacteriophages in maintaining culture diversity at the level of genetic

  8. CRISPR: new horizons in phage resistance and strain identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrangou, Rodolphe; Horvath, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    Bacteria have been widely used as starter cultures in the food industry, notably for the fermentation of milk into dairy products such as cheese and yogurt. Lactic acid bacteria used in food manufacturing, such as lactobacilli, lactococci, streptococci, Leuconostoc, pediococci, and bifidobacteria, are selectively formulated based on functional characteristics that provide idiosyncratic flavor and texture attributes, as well as their ability to withstand processing and manufacturing conditions. Unfortunately, given frequent viral exposure in industrial environments, starter culture selection and development rely on defense systems that provide resistance against bacteriophage predation, including restriction-modification, abortive infection, and recently discovered CRISPRs (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats). CRISPRs, together with CRISPR-associated genes (cas), form the CRISPR/Cas immune system, which provides adaptive immunity against phages and invasive genetic elements. The immunization process is based on the incorporation of short DNA sequences from virulent phages into the CRISPR locus. Subsequently, CRISPR transcripts are processed into small interfering RNAs that guide a multifunctional protein complex to recognize and cleave matching foreign DNA. Hypervariable CRISPR loci provide insights into the phage and host population dynamics, and new avenues for enhanced phage resistance and genetic typing and tagging of industrial strains.

  9. The Resistance of Vibrio cholerae O1 El Tor Strains to the Typing Phage 919TP, a Member of K139 Phage Family.

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    Shen, Xiaona; Zhang, Jingyun; Xu, Jialiang; Du, Pengcheng; Pang, Bo; Li, Jie; Kan, Biao

    2016-01-01

    Bacteriophage 919TP is a temperate phage of Vibrio cholerae serogroup O1 El Tor and is used as a subtyping phage in the phage-biotyping scheme in cholera surveillance in China. In this study, sequencing of the 919TP genome showed that it belonged to the Vibrio phage K139 family. The mechanisms conferring resistance to 919TP infection of El Tor strains were explored to help understand the subtyping basis of phage 919TP and mutations related to 919TP resistance. Among the test strains resistant to phage 919TP, most contained the temperate 919TP phage genome, which facilitated superinfection exclusion to 919TP. Our data suggested that this immunity to Vibrio phage 919TP occurred after absorption of the phage onto the bacteria. Other strains contained LPS receptor synthesis gene mutations that disable adsorption of phage 919TP. Several strains resistant to 919TP infection possessed unknown resistance mechanisms, since they did not contain LPS receptor mutations or temperate K139 phage genome. Further research is required to elucidate the phage infection steps involved in the resistance of these strains to phage infection. PMID:27242744

  10. Lytic phages obscure the cost of antibiotic resistance in Escherichia coli

    OpenAIRE

    Tazzyman, Samuel J; Hall, Alex R

    2014-01-01

    The long-term persistence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria depends on their fitness relative to other genotypes in the absence of drugs. Outside the laboratory, viruses that parasitize bacteria (phages) are ubiquitous, but costs of antibiotic resistance are typically studied in phage-free experimental conditions. We used a mathematical model and experiments with Escherichia coli to show that lytic phages strongly affect the incidence of antibiotic resistance in drug-free conditions. Under pha...

  11. CRISPR/Cas9-mediated phage resistance is not impeded by the DNA modifications of phage T4.

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    Stephanie J Yaung

    Full Text Available Bacteria rely on two known DNA-level defenses against their bacteriophage predators: restriction-modification and Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR-CRISPR-associated (Cas systems. Certain phages have evolved countermeasures that are known to block endonucleases. For example, phage T4 not only adds hydroxymethyl groups to all of its cytosines, but also glucosylates them, a strategy that defeats almost all restriction enzymes. We sought to determine whether these DNA modifications can similarly impede CRISPR-based defenses. In a bioinformatics search, we found naturally occurring CRISPR spacers that potentially target phages known to modify their DNA. Experimentally, we show that the Cas9 nuclease from the Type II CRISPR system of Streptococcus pyogenes can overcome a variety of DNA modifications in Escherichia coli. The levels of Cas9-mediated phage resistance to bacteriophage T4 and the mutant phage T4 gt, which contains hydroxymethylated but not glucosylated cytosines, were comparable to phages with unmodified cytosines, T7 and the T4-like phage RB49. Our results demonstrate that Cas9 is not impeded by N6-methyladenine, 5-methylcytosine, 5-hydroxymethylated cytosine, or glucosylated 5-hydroxymethylated cytosine.

  12. Effect of Bacteriophages on the Growth of Flavobacterium psychrophilum and Development of Phage-Resistant Strains.

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    Christiansen, Rói Hammershaimb; Madsen, Lone; Dalsgaard, Inger; Castillo, Daniel; Kalatzis, Panos G; Middelboe, Mathias

    2016-05-01

    The controlling effect of single and multiple phages on the density of Flavobacterium psychrophilum at different initial multiplicity of infection (MOI) was assessed in batch cultures to explore the potential for phage-based treatment of this important fish pathogen. A high initial phage concentration (MOI = 0.3-4) was crucial for efficient viral lysis, resulting in a 10(4)-10(5)-fold reduction of phage-sensitive cells (both single phages and phage cocktails), which was maintained throughout the incubation (>10 days). Following cell lysis, regrowth of phage-resistant strains was examined and resistant strains were isolated for further characterization. The application of a mathematical model allowed simulation of phage-host interactions and resistance development, confirming indications from strain isolations that phage-sensitive strains dominated the regrowing population (>99.8%) at low MOI and phage-resistant strains (>87.8%) dominated at high MOI. A cross-infectivity test covering 68 isolated strains and 22 phages resulted in 23 different host susceptibility patterns, with 20 of the isolates being resistant to all the applied phages. Eleven isolated strains with different susceptibility patterns had lower growth rates (0.093 to 0.31 h(-1)) than the host strain (0.33 h(-1)), while 10 of 14 examined strains had lost the ability to take up specific substrates as shown by BIOLOG profiles. Despite increased selection for phage resistance at high MOI, the results emphasize that high initial MOI is essential for fast and effective control of F. psychrophilum infection and suggest that the small populations of resistant clones had reduced competitive abilities relative to the sensitive ancestral strain.

  13. Lytic phages obscure the cost of antibiotic resistance in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tazzyman, Samuel J; Hall, Alex R

    2015-04-01

    The long-term persistence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria depends on their fitness relative to other genotypes in the absence of drugs. Outside the laboratory, viruses that parasitize bacteria (phages) are ubiquitous, but costs of antibiotic resistance are typically studied in phage-free experimental conditions. We used a mathematical model and experiments with Escherichia coli to show that lytic phages strongly affect the incidence of antibiotic resistance in drug-free conditions. Under phage parasitism, the likelihood that antibiotic-resistant genetic backgrounds spread depends on their initial frequency, mutation rate and intrinsic growth rate relative to drug-susceptible genotypes, because these parameters determine relative rates of phage-resistance evolution on different genetic backgrounds. Moreover, the average cost of antibiotic resistance in terms of intrinsic growth in the antibiotic-free experimental environment was small relative to the benefits of an increased mutation rate in the presence of phages. This is consistent with our theoretical work indicating that, under phage selection, typical costs of antibiotic resistance can be outweighed by realistic increases in mutability if drug resistance and hypermutability are genetically linked, as is frequently observed in clinical isolates. This suggests the long-term distribution of antibiotic resistance depends on the relative rates at which different lineages adapt to other types of selection, which in the case of phage parasitism is probably extremely common, as well as costs of resistance inferred by classical in vitro methods. PMID:25268496

  14. BREX is a novel phage resistance system widespread in microbial genomes

    OpenAIRE

    Goldfarb, Tamara; Sberro, Hila; Weinstock, Eyal; Cohen, Ofir; Doron, Shany; Charpak-Amikam, Yoav; Afik, Shaked; Ofir, Gal; Sorek, Rotem

    2014-01-01

    The perpetual arms race between bacteria and phage has resulted in the evolution of efficient resistance systems that protect bacteria from phage infection. Such systems, which include the CRISPR-Cas and restriction-modification systems, have proven to be invaluable in the biotechnology and dairy industries. Here, we report on a six-gene cassette in Bacillus cereus which, when integrated into the Bacillus subtilis genome, confers resistance to a broad range of phages, including both virulent ...

  15. On-demand isolation of bacteriophages against drug-resistant bacteria for personalized phage therapy

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    Sari eMattila

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Bacteriophages are bacterial viruses, capable of killing even multi-drug resistant bacterial cells. For this reason, therapeutic use of phages is considered as a possible alternative to conventional antibiotics. However, phages are very host specific in comparison to wide-spectrum antibiotics and thus preparation of phage-cocktails beforehand against pathogens can be difficult. In this study, we evaluate whether it may be possible to isolate phages on-demand from environmental reservoir. We attempted to enrich infectious bacteriophages from sewage against nosocomial drug-resistant bacterial strains of different medically important species in order to evaluate the probability of discovering novel therapeutic phages. Stability and host-range were determined for the acquired phages. Our results suggest that on-demand isolation of phages is possible against Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella and extended spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae. The probability of finding suitable phages was less than 40% against vancomycin resistant Enterococcus (VRE and Acinetobacter baumannii strains. Furthermore, isolation of new phages against methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA strains was found to be very difficult.

  16. Phenotypic resistance and the dynamics of bacterial escape from phage control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bull, James J.; Vegge, Christina Skovgaard; Schmerer, Matthew;

    2014-01-01

    The canonical view of phage - bacterial interactions in dense, liquid cultures is that the phage will eliminate most of the sensitive cells; genetic resistance will then ascend to restore high bacterial densities. Yet there are various mechanisms by which bacteria may remain sensitive to phages...... but still attain high densities in their presence - because bacteria enter a transient state of reduced adsorption. Importantly, these mechanisms may be cryptic and inapparent prior to the addition of phage yet result in a rapid rebound of bacterial density after phage are introduced. We describe...... mathematical models of these processes and suggest how different types of this 'phenotypic' resistance may be elucidated. We offer preliminary in vitro studies of a previously characterized E. coli model system and Campylobacter jejuni illustrating apparent phenotypic resistance. As phenotypic resistance may...

  17. Bacteriophage-resistant mutants in Yersinia pestis: identification of phage receptors and attenuation for mice.

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    Andrey A Filippov

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Bacteriophages specific for Yersinia pestis are routinely used for plague diagnostics and could be an alternative to antibiotics in case of drug-resistant plague. A major concern of bacteriophage therapy is the emergence of phage-resistant mutants. The use of phage cocktails can overcome this problem but only if the phages exploit different receptors. Some phage-resistant mutants lose virulence and therefore should not complicate bacteriophage therapy. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The purpose of this work was to identify Y. pestis phage receptors using site-directed mutagenesis and trans-complementation and to determine potential attenuation of phage-resistant mutants for mice. Six receptors for eight phages were found in different parts of the lipopolysaccharide (LPS inner and outer core. The receptor for R phage was localized beyond the LPS core. Most spontaneous and defined phage-resistant mutants of Y. pestis were attenuated, showing increase in LD₅₀ and time to death. The loss of different LPS core biosynthesis enzymes resulted in the reduction of Y. pestis virulence and there was a correlation between the degree of core truncation and the impact on virulence. The yrbH and waaA mutants completely lost their virulence. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We identified Y. pestis receptors for eight bacteriophages. Nine phages together use at least seven different Y. pestis receptors that makes some of them promising for formulation of plague therapeutic cocktails. Most phage-resistant Y. pestis mutants become attenuated and thus should not pose a serious problem for bacteriophage therapy of plague. LPS is a critical virulence factor of Y. pestis.

  18. Osmotic pressure: resisting or promoting DNA ejection from phage

    CERN Document Server

    Jeembaeva, Meerim; Larsson, Frida; Evilevitch, Alex

    2008-01-01

    Recent in vitro experiments have shown that DNA ejection from bacteriophage can be partially stopped by surrounding osmotic pressure when ejected DNA is digested by DNase I on the course of ejection. We argue in this work by combination of experimental techniques (osmotic suppression without DNaseI monitored by UV absorbance, pulse-field electrophoresis, and cryo-EM visualization) and simple scaling modeling that intact genome (i.e. undigested) ejection in a crowded environment is, on the contrary, enhanced or eventually complete with the help of a pulling force resulting from DNA condensation induced by the osmotic stress itself. This demonstrates that in vivo, the osmotically stressed cell cytoplasm will promote phage DNA ejection rather than resisting it. The further addition of DNA-binding proteins under crowding conditions is shown to enhance the extent of ejection. We also found some optimal crowding conditions for which DNA content remaining in the capsid upon ejection is maximum, which correlates well...

  19. Association between phage types and antimicrobial resistance among bovine isolates of Staphylococcus aureus in 10 countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vintov, J.; Aarestrup, Frank Møller; Zinn, C. E.;

    2003-01-01

    associated with penicillin resistance in contrast to phage group I (P = 0.0023) and phage complex-80 (P = 0.0066). This study confirms that a large number of phage types of S. aureus cause bovine mastitis, but that some types predominate. In addition, these findings could indicate that the use of penicillin...... in the bovine environment has selected for specific types of S. aureus in countries with a high frequency of resistance. (C) 2003 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.......This study was conducted to investigate the diversity of phage types and associations between penicillin resistance and phage types among 815 Staphylococcus aureus isolates from bovine mastitis in nine European countries and USA. All isolates were examined for susceptibility to antimicrobial agents...

  20. Association between phage types and antimicrobial resistance among bovine Staphylococcus aureus from 10 countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vintov, J.; Aarestrup, Frank Møller; Zinn, C. E.;

    2003-01-01

    associated with penicillin resistance in contrast to phage group I (P = 0.0023) and phage complex-80 (P = 0.0066). This study confirms that a large number of phage types of S. aureus cause bovine mastitis, but that some types predominate. In addition, these findings could indicate that the use of penicillin...... in the bovine environment has selected for specific types of S. aureus in countries with a high frequency of resistance.......This study was conducted to investigate the diversity of phage types and associations between penicillin resistance and phage types among 815 Staphylococcus aureus isolates from bovine mastitis in nine European countries and USA. All isolates were examined for susceptibility to antimicrobial agents...

  1. Tetracycline consumption and occurrence of tetracycline resistance in Salmonella typhimurium phage types from Danish pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Emborg, Hanne-Dorthe; Vigre, Håkan; Jensen, Vibeke Frøkjær;

    2007-01-01

    The aims of the present study were to investigate at the farm-owner level the effect of prescribed tetracycline consumption in pigs and different Salmonella Typhimurium phage types on the probability that the S. Typhimurium was resistant to tetracycline. In this study, 1,307 isolates were included......, originating from 877 farm owners, and data were analyzed using logistic regression. The analysis showed that both the S. Typhimurium phage type (p consumption (p = 0.0007) were significantly associated with tetracycline resistance. In particular, the phage type...... was strongly associated with tetracycline resistance. A further analysis of data from the Danish Integrated Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring and Research Programme (DANMAP) indicates that the tetracycline-susceptible phage types only slowly become tetracycline resistant, although tetracycline consumption...

  2. Characterization of bacteriophages infecting Streptomyces erythreus and properties of phage-resistant mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donadio, S; Paladino, R; Costanzi, I; Sparapani, P; Schreil, W; Iaccarino, M

    1986-06-01

    Three bacteriophages infecting Streptomyces erythreus, called G3, G4 and G5, were isolated and characterized. They contain double-stranded linear DNA molecules with cohesive ends. The restriction map of G3 DNA (48 kilobases long) for four restriction endonucleases and that of G4 DNA (43 kilobases long) for seven restriction endonucleases are reported. Restriction analysis and hybridization experiments showed that G3 and G4 share little DNA homology, while G4 and G5 are apparently identical except for an additional EcoRI site present in G5. The region containing this EcoRI site has been mapped on G4 DNA. Microbiological and serological data showed that G5 is very similar to G4. G3- and G4-resistant mutants of S. erythreus PS1 were isolated. The screening of phage-resistant mutants showed a high frequency of strains with increased erythromycin production. The mechanism of phage resistance of strain PS3 (G3 resistant) and of strain PS16 (G4 resistant) was examined. The DNA of the resistant strains contains no phage DNA, ruling out lysogeny as a cause of phage resistance. Transfection of strains PS1, PS3, and PS16 with DNA of the three phages showed the same efficiency, indicating that resistance is at the level of the bacterial wall.

  3. Incorporation of a lambda phage recombination system and EGFP detection to simplify mutagenesis of Herpes simplex virus bacterial artificial chromosomes

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    Weir Jerry P

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Targeted mutagenesis of the herpesvirus genomes has been facilitated by the use of bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC technology. Such modified genomes have potential uses in understanding viral pathogenesis, gene identification and characterization, and the development of new viral vectors and vaccines. We have previously described the construction of a herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2 BAC and the use of an allele replacement strategy to construct HSV-2 recombinants. While the BAC mutagenesis procedure is a powerful method to generate HSV-2 recombinants, particularly in the absence of selective marker in eukaryotic culture, the mutagenesis procedure is still difficult and cumbersome. Results Here we describe the incorporation of a phage lambda recombination system into an allele replacement vector. This strategy enables any DNA fragment containing the phage attL recombination sites to be efficiently inserted into the attR sites of the allele replacement vector using phage lambda clonase. We also describe how the incorporation of EGFP into the allele replacement vector can facilitate the selection of the desired cross-over recombinant BACs when the allele replacement reaction is a viral gene deletion. Finally, we incorporate the lambda phage recombination sites directly into an HSV-2 BAC vector for direct recombination of gene cassettes using the phage lambda clonase-driven recombination reaction. Conclusion Together, these improvements to the techniques of HSV BAC mutagenesis will facilitate the construction of recombinant herpes simplex viruses and viral vectors.

  4. Characterization and lytic activity of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus(MRSA phages isolated from NICU

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    Golnar Rahimzadeh

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA is a well-known pathogen that causes serious diseases in humans. As part of the efforts to control this pathogen, an isolated bacteriophage, Siphoviridae, which specifically targets Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA, was characterized. Aims The objective of this study was to characterize of a virulent bacteriophage (Siphoviridae isolated from a NICU bathroom sink. Methods The MRSA strain was isolated from patient blood. The isolated strain was confirmed as MRSA using conventional methods. Phages were isolated from a NICU bathroom sink and activity was lytic as determined by spot test. Titer phage lysate was measured by the Double Layer Agar (DLA technique. The morphology was found with electron microscopy. The single-step growth curve was plotted. Results Electron microscopy showed the phage as a member of the family Siphoviridae, serogroup A and F. The isolated phage was capable of lytic activity against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA strain as shown by spot test. By DLA, the titre of the phages was determined to be 10×108PFU/ml. The single-step growth curve showed that the latent period of the isolated bacteriophage was 30 min and the total number of viable progeny per infected host, burst size, was 2600 PFU/infected host. Conclusion In this study, two phages were isolated and characterized from a NICU bathroom sink, from the Siphoviridae family, which specifically targetsmethicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA.

  5. Phage p1-derived artificial chromosomes facilitate heterologous expression of the FK506 gene cluster.

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    Adam C Jones

    Full Text Available We describe a procedure for the conjugative transfer of phage P1-derived Artificial Chromosome (PAC library clones containing large natural product gene clusters (≥70 kilobases to Streptomyces coelicolor strains that have been engineered for improved heterologous production of natural products. This approach is demonstrated using the gene cluster for FK506 (tacrolimus, a clinically important immunosuppressant of high commercial value. The entire 83.5 kb FK506 gene cluster from Streptomyces tsukubaensis NRRL 18488 present in one 130 kb PAC clone was introduced into four different S. coelicolor derivatives and all produced FK506 and smaller amounts of the related compound FK520. FK506 yields were increased by approximately five-fold (from 1.2 mg L(-1 to 5.5 mg L(-1 in S. coelicolor M1146 containing the FK506 PAC upon over-expression of the FK506 LuxR regulatory gene fkbN. The PAC-based gene cluster conjugation methodology described here provides a tractable means to evaluate and manipulate FK506 biosynthesis and is readily applicable to other large gene clusters encoding natural products of interest to medicine, agriculture and biotechnology.

  6. Chromosomal Instability Confers Intrinsic Multidrug Resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, Alvin J. X.; Endesfelder, David; Rowan, Andrew J.;

    2011-01-01

    their diploid parental cells only with increasing chromosomal heterogeneity and isogenic cell line models of CIN+ displayed multidrug resistance relative to their CIN- parental cancer cell line derivatives. In a meta-analysis of CRC outcome following cytotoxic treatment, CIN+ predicted worse progression...

  7. BREX is a novel phage resistance system widespread in microbial genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldfarb, Tamara; Sberro, Hila; Weinstock, Eyal; Cohen, Ofir; Doron, Shany; Charpak-Amikam, Yoav; Afik, Shaked; Ofir, Gal; Sorek, Rotem

    2015-01-13

    The perpetual arms race between bacteria and phage has resulted in the evolution of efficient resistance systems that protect bacteria from phage infection. Such systems, which include the CRISPR-Cas and restriction-modification systems, have proven to be invaluable in the biotechnology and dairy industries. Here, we report on a six-gene cassette in Bacillus cereus which, when integrated into the Bacillus subtilis genome, confers resistance to a broad range of phages, including both virulent and temperate ones. This cassette includes a putative Lon-like protease, an alkaline phosphatase domain protein, a putative RNA-binding protein, a DNA methylase, an ATPase-domain protein, and a protein of unknown function. We denote this novel defense system BREX (Bacteriophage Exclusion) and show that it allows phage adsorption but blocks phage DNA replication. Furthermore, our results suggest that methylation on non-palindromic TAGGAG motifs in the bacterial genome guides self/non-self discrimination and is essential for the defensive function of the BREX system. However, unlike restriction-modification systems, phage DNA does not appear to be cleaved or degraded by BREX, suggesting a novel mechanism of defense. Pan genomic analysis revealed that BREX and BREX-like systems, including the distantly related Pgl system described in Streptomyces coelicolor, are widely distributed in ~10% of all sequenced microbial genomes and can be divided into six coherent subtypes in which the gene composition and order is conserved. Finally, we detected a phage family that evades the BREX defense, implying that anti-BREX mechanisms may have evolved in some phages as part of their arms race with bacteria.

  8. BREX is a novel phage resistance system widespread in microbial genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldfarb, Tamara; Sberro, Hila; Weinstock, Eyal; Cohen, Ofir; Doron, Shany; Charpak-Amikam, Yoav; Afik, Shaked; Ofir, Gal; Sorek, Rotem

    2015-01-13

    The perpetual arms race between bacteria and phage has resulted in the evolution of efficient resistance systems that protect bacteria from phage infection. Such systems, which include the CRISPR-Cas and restriction-modification systems, have proven to be invaluable in the biotechnology and dairy industries. Here, we report on a six-gene cassette in Bacillus cereus which, when integrated into the Bacillus subtilis genome, confers resistance to a broad range of phages, including both virulent and temperate ones. This cassette includes a putative Lon-like protease, an alkaline phosphatase domain protein, a putative RNA-binding protein, a DNA methylase, an ATPase-domain protein, and a protein of unknown function. We denote this novel defense system BREX (Bacteriophage Exclusion) and show that it allows phage adsorption but blocks phage DNA replication. Furthermore, our results suggest that methylation on non-palindromic TAGGAG motifs in the bacterial genome guides self/non-self discrimination and is essential for the defensive function of the BREX system. However, unlike restriction-modification systems, phage DNA does not appear to be cleaved or degraded by BREX, suggesting a novel mechanism of defense. Pan genomic analysis revealed that BREX and BREX-like systems, including the distantly related Pgl system described in Streptomyces coelicolor, are widely distributed in ~10% of all sequenced microbial genomes and can be divided into six coherent subtypes in which the gene composition and order is conserved. Finally, we detected a phage family that evades the BREX defense, implying that anti-BREX mechanisms may have evolved in some phages as part of their arms race with bacteria. PMID:25452498

  9. Pre-adapting parasitic phages to a pathogen leads to increased pathogen clearance and lowered resistance evolution with Pseudomonas aeruginosa cystic fibrosis bacterial isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friman, V-P; Soanes-Brown, D; Sierocinski, P; Molin, S; Johansen, H K; Merabishvili, M; Pirnay, J-P; De Vos, D; Buckling, A

    2016-01-01

    Recent years have seen renewed interest in phage therapy--the use of viruses to specifically kill disease-causing bacteria--because of the alarming rise in antibiotic resistance. However, a major limitation of phage therapy is the ease at with bacteria can evolve resistance to phages. Here, we determined whether in vitro experimental coevolution can increase the efficiency of phage therapy by limiting the resistance evolution of intermittent and chronic cystic fibrosis Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung isolates to four different phages. We first pre-adapted all phage strains against all bacterial strains and then compared the efficacy of pre-adapted and nonadapted phages against ancestral bacterial strains. We found that evolved phages were more efficient in reducing bacterial densities than ancestral phages. This was primarily because only 50% of bacterial strains were able to evolve resistance to evolved phages, whereas all bacteria were able to evolve some level of resistance to ancestral phages. Although the rate of resistance evolution did not differ between intermittent and chronic isolates, it incurred a relatively higher growth cost for chronic isolates when measured in the absence of phages. This is likely to explain why evolved phages were more effective in reducing the densities of chronic isolates. Our data show that pathogen genotypes respond differently to phage pre-adaptation, and as a result, phage therapies might need to be individually adjusted for different patients. PMID:26476097

  10. Effective Phages as Green Antimicrobial Agents Against Antibiotic-Resistant Hospital Escherichia coli

    OpenAIRE

    Rahmani, Rana; Zarrini, Gholamreza; Sheikhzadeh, Farzam; Aghamohammadzadeh, Naser

    2015-01-01

    Background: Bacteriophages are viruses that attack bacteria and lead to their lysis in an efficient and highly specific manner. These natural enemies of bacteria were used as therapeutic agents before the advent of antibiotics. Currently, with the rapid spread of multi-drug resistant bacteria, phage therapy can be an effective alternative treatment for antibiotic resistant bacteria. Objectives: This study evaluated the effectiveness of bacteriophages in removing antibiotic-resistant clinical ...

  11. Bacterail Pathogens Resistance to Phages During the Phage Therapy%噬菌体治疗中细菌对噬菌体的抗性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蔡刘体; 陈兴江; 刘艳霞; 石俊雄

    2014-01-01

    抗生素治疗尽管有几十年有效治疗的历史,但随着越来越多耐/抗药性细菌的出现,细菌对抗生素的抗药性已成为一个大问题。噬菌体治疗是使用噬菌体作为抗菌剂来感染细菌株系,它一直是人们倡导的一个很有前途的常规抗生素治疗的替代方案。然而,由于细菌与噬菌体的协同进化中,细菌可以通过多种机制获得对噬菌体的抗性。因此,人们对噬菌体治疗抱有期望的同时,也关注噬菌体治疗长时间的使用之后,是否会与抗生素使用之后结果相类似,导致抗性细菌病原菌感染的治疗困难。综述了细菌-噬菌体协同进化中细菌病原菌对有感染能力的噬菌体是否会产生抗性,及其在噬菌体治疗中影响的争论,并展望了噬菌体治疗的潜在前景。%Bacterial pathogens have been treated effectively with antibiotics for several decades, but with more and more resistant bacteria appeared, the resistance to antibiotics has become a difficulty issue in antibiotics therapies. Phages therapy, the application of the phages that infect bacterial pathogens as antimicrobials, has been expected and advocated as a promising alternative to conventional antibiotics. However, under the selection of the co-evolution between phages and bacteria, bacterial pathogens can became resistance to the phages by several mechanisms. So, at the same expecting and advocating, should we worry about the problem that whether the phage-treated pathogens will develop to resistance to the phages caused to treat difficulty at last? Here, the arguments about the bacterial pathogens resistance to the phages under the phage-bacterium co-evolution and its effect on the phages therapy were summarized and reviewed, and the phage therapy for control the bacterial pathogen was prospected.

  12. Global features of sequences of bacterial chromosomes, plasmids and phages revealed by analysis of oligonucleotide usage patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tümmler Burkhard

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Oligonucleotide frequencies were shown to be conserved signatures for bacterial genomes, however, the underlying constraints have yet not been resolved in detail. In this paper we analyzed oligonucleotide usage (OU biases in a comprehensive collection of 155 completely sequenced bacterial chromosomes, 316 plasmids and 104 phages. Results Two global features were analyzed: pattern skew (PS and variance of OU deviations normalized by mononucleotide content of the sequence (OUV. OUV reflects the strength of OU biases and taxonomic signals. PS denotes asymmetry of OU in direct and reverse DNA strands. A trend towards minimal PS was observed for almost all complete sequences of bacterial chromosomes and plasmids, however, PS was substantially higher in separate genomic loci and several types of plasmids and phages characterized by long stretches of non-coding DNA and/or asymmetric gene distribution on the two DNA strands. Five of the 155 bacterial chromosomes have anomalously high PS, of which the chromosomes of Xylella fastidiosa 9a5c and Prochlorococcus marinus MIT9313 exhibit extreme PS values suggesting an intermediate unstable state of these two genomes. Conclusions Strand symmetry as indicated by minimal PS is a universally conserved feature of complete bacterial genomes that results from the matching mutual compensation of local OU biases on both replichors while OUV is more a taxon specific feature. Local events such as inversions or the incorporation of genome islands are balanced by global changes in genome organization to minimize PS that may represent one of the leading evolutionary forces driving bacterial genome diversification.

  13. The Impact of Resource Availability on Bacterial Resistance to Phages in Soil

    OpenAIRE

    Pedro Gómez; Jonathan Bennie; Gaston, Kevin J; Angus Buckling

    2015-01-01

    Resource availability can affect the coevolutionary dynamics between host and parasites, shaping communities and hence ecosystem function. A key finding from theoretical and in vitro studies is that host resistance evolves to greater levels with increased resources, but the relevance to natural communities is less clear. We took two complementary approaches to investigate the effect of resource availability on the evolution of bacterial resistance to phages in soil. First, we measured the res...

  14. Pre-adapting parasitic phages to a pathogen leads to increased pathogen clearance and lowered resistance evolution with Pseudomonas aeruginosacystic fibrosis bacterial isolates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friman, Ville-Petri; Soanes-Brown, Daniel; Sierocinski, Pawel;

    2016-01-01

    Recent years have seen renewed interest in phage therapy - the use of viruses to specifically kill disease-causing bacteria – because of the alarming rise in antibiotic resistance. However, a major limitation of phage therapy is the ease at with bacteria can evolve resistance to phages. Here we......, while all bacteria were able to evolve some level of resistance to ancestral phages. While the rate of resistance evolution did not differ between intermittent and chronic isolates, it incurred a relatively higher growth cost for chronic isolates when measured in the absence of phages. This is likely...

  15. Relative entropy differences in bacterial chromosomes, plasmids, phages and genomic islands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bohlin, Jon; van Passel, Mark W. J.; Snipen, Lars;

    2012-01-01

    with the strongest association being in phages. Relative entropy was also found to be lower in the obligate intracellular Mycobacterium leprae than in the related M. tuberculosis when measured on a shared set of highly conserved genes. Conclusions: We argue that relative entropy differences reflect how plasmids...

  16. CRISPR/Cas9-Mediated Phage Resistance Is Not Impeded by the DNA Modifications of Phage T4

    OpenAIRE

    Yaung, Stephanie J.; Kevin M Esvelt; Church, George M

    2014-01-01

    Bacteria rely on two known DNA-level defenses against their bacteriophage predators: restriction-modification and Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR)-CRISPR-associated (Cas) systems. Certain phages have evolved countermeasures that are known to block endonucleases. For example, phage T4 not only adds hydroxymethyl groups to all of its cytosines, but also glucosylates them, a strategy that defeats almost all restriction enzymes. We sought to determine whether the...

  17. A novel Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteriophage, Ab31, a chimera formed from temperate phage PAJU2 and P. putida lytic phage AF: characteristics and mechanism of bacterial resistance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Libera Latino

    Full Text Available A novel temperate bacteriophage of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, phage vB_PaeP_Tr60_Ab31 (alias Ab31 is described. Its genome is composed of structural genes related to those of lytic P. putida phage AF, and regulatory genes similar to those of temperate phage PAJU2. The virion structure resembles that of phage AF and other lytic Podoviridae (S. enterica Epsilon 15 and E. coli phiv10 with similar tail spikes. Ab31 was able to infect P. aeruginosa strain PA14 and two genetically related strains called Tr60 and Tr162, out of 35 diverse strains from cystic fibrosis patients. Analysis of resistant host variants revealed different phenotypes, including induction of pigment and alginate overproduction. Whole genome sequencing of resistant variants highlighted the existence of a large deletion of 234 kbp in two strains, encompassing a cluster of genes required for the production of CupA fimbriae. Stable lysogens formed by Ab31 in strain Tr60, permitted the identification of the insertion site. During colonization of the lung in cystic fibrosis patients, P. aeruginosa adapts by modifying its genome. We suggest that bacteriophages such as Ab31 may play an important role in this adaptation by selecting for bacterial characteristics that favor persistence of bacteria in the lung.

  18. Site-specific integration of the temperate bacteriophage phi adh into the Lactobacillus gasseri chromosome and molecular characterization of the phage (attP) and bacterial (attB) attachment sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raya, R R; Fremaux, C; De Antoni, G L; Klaenhammer, T R

    1992-01-01

    The temperate bacteriophage phi adh integrates its genome into the chromosomal DNA of Lactobacillus gasseri ADH by a site-specific recombination process. Southern hybridization analysis of BclI-digested genomic DNA from six relysogenized derivatives of the prophage-cured strain NCK102 displayed phage-chromosomal junction fragments identical to those of the lysogenic parent. The phi adh attachment site sequence, attP, was located within a 365-bp EcoRI-HindIII fragment of phage phi adh. This fragment was cloned and sequenced. DNA sequence analysis revealed striking features common to the attachment sites of other site-specific recombination systems: five direct repeats of the sequence TGTCCCTTTT(C/T) and a 14-bp inverted repeat. Oligonucleotides derived from the sequence of the attP-containing fragment enabled us to amplify predicted junction fragment sequences and thus to identify attL, attR, and attB. The core region was defined as the 16-bp sequence TACACTTCTTAGGAGG. Phage-encoded functions essential for site-specific insertion of phage phi adh were located in a 4.5-kb BclI fragment. This fragment was cloned in plasmid pSA34 to generate the insertional vector pTRK182. Plasmid pTRK182 was introduced into L. gasseri NCK102 by electroporation. Hybridization analysis showed that a single copy of pTRK182 had integrated at the attB site of the NCK102 erythromycin-resistant transformants. This is the first site-specific recombination system described in lactobacilli, as well as the first attP-based site-specific integration vector constructed for L. gasseri ADH. Images PMID:1512192

  19. Isolation of lytic phages for clinical antibiotic resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    OpenAIRE

    Pires, Diana; Sillankorva, Sanna; Faustino, A.; Azeredo, Joana

    2009-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a relevant opportunist pathogen involved in noso-comial infections. P. aeruginosa uses an arsenal of virulence factors to cause serious infections and one of the most worrying characteristics of this bacte-rium is its low antibiotic susceptibility. The low susceptibility to antibiotics can be attributed to a concerted action of multidrug efflux pumps with chromo-somally-encoded antibiotic resistance genes and the low permeability of the bacterial cellular envelopes. ...

  20. Pseudomonas aeruginosa adaptation to lungs of cystic fibrosis patients leads to lowered resistance to phage and protist enemies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ville-Petri Friman

    Full Text Available Pathogenic life styles can lead to highly specialized interactions with host species, potentially resulting in fitness trade-offs in other ecological contexts. Here we studied how adaptation of the environmentally transmitted bacterial pathogen, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, to cystic fibrosis (CF patients affects its survival in the presence of natural phage (14/1, ΦKZ, PNM and PT7 and protist (Tetrahymena thermophila and Acanthamoebae polyphaga enemies. We found that most of the bacteria isolated from relatively recently intermittently colonised patients (1-25 months, were innately phage-resistant and highly toxic for protists. In contrast, bacteria isolated from long time chronically infected patients (2-23 years, were less efficient in both resisting phages and killing protists. Moreover, chronic isolates showed reduced killing of wax moth larvae (Galleria mellonella probably due to weaker in vitro growth and protease expression. These results suggest that P. aeruginosa long-term adaptation to CF-lungs could trade off with its survival in aquatic environmental reservoirs in the presence of microbial enemies, while lowered virulence could reduce pathogen opportunities to infect insect vectors; factors that are both likely to result in poorer environmental transmission. From an applied perspective, phage therapy could be useful against chronic P. aeruginosa lung infections that are often characterized by multidrug resistance: chronic isolates were least resistant to phages and their poor growth will likely slow down the emergence of beneficial resistance mutations.

  1. Pseudomonas aeruginosa adaptation to lungs of cystic fibrosis patients leads to lowered resistance to phage and protist enemies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friman, Ville-Petri; Ghoul, Melanie; Molin, Søren; Johansen, Helle Krogh; Buckling, Angus

    2013-01-01

    Pathogenic life styles can lead to highly specialized interactions with host species, potentially resulting in fitness trade-offs in other ecological contexts. Here we studied how adaptation of the environmentally transmitted bacterial pathogen, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, to cystic fibrosis (CF) patients affects its survival in the presence of natural phage (14/1, ΦKZ, PNM and PT7) and protist (Tetrahymena thermophila and Acanthamoebae polyphaga) enemies. We found that most of the bacteria isolated from relatively recently intermittently colonised patients (1-25 months), were innately phage-resistant and highly toxic for protists. In contrast, bacteria isolated from long time chronically infected patients (2-23 years), were less efficient in both resisting phages and killing protists. Moreover, chronic isolates showed reduced killing of wax moth larvae (Galleria mellonella) probably due to weaker in vitro growth and protease expression. These results suggest that P. aeruginosa long-term adaptation to CF-lungs could trade off with its survival in aquatic environmental reservoirs in the presence of microbial enemies, while lowered virulence could reduce pathogen opportunities to infect insect vectors; factors that are both likely to result in poorer environmental transmission. From an applied perspective, phage therapy could be useful against chronic P. aeruginosa lung infections that are often characterized by multidrug resistance: chronic isolates were least resistant to phages and their poor growth will likely slow down the emergence of beneficial resistance mutations.

  2. Phage types and antimicrobial resistance among Danish bovine Staphylococcus aureus isolates since the 1950s

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vintov, Jan; Aarestrup, Frank Møller; Zinn, C. E.;

    2003-01-01

    A total of 292 bovine Staphylococcus aureus isolates obtained from the 1950s (86 isolates), 1992 (107 isolates), and 2000 (99 isolates) were examined for antimicrobial susceptibility and phage typing. The same types of S. aureus (80, 52, 3A, 3A/3C, 42E, 77) were found among the isolates from all...... three time periods, representing 43.3% of the typeable isolates. This indicates that the Danish S. aureus population related to bovine mastitis has remained relatively unchanged over the last 50 years. The occurrence of antimicrobial resistance has remained low in Denmark in comparison to other...

  3. Inhibition of multidrug resistant Listeria monocytogenes by peptides isolated from combinatorial phage display libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flachbartova, Z; Pulzova, L; Bencurova, E; Potocnakova, L; Comor, L; Bednarikova, Z; Bhide, M

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to isolate and characterize novel antimicrobial peptides from peptide phage library with antimicrobial activity against multidrug resistant Listeria monocytogenes. Combinatorial phage-display library was used to affinity select peptides binding to the cell surface of multidrug resistant L. monocytogenes. After several rounds of affinity selection followed by sequencing, three peptides were revealed as the most promising candidates. Peptide L2 exhibited features common to antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), and was rich in Asp, His and Lys residues. Peptide L3 (NSWIQAPDTKSI), like peptide L2, inhibited bacterial growth in vitro, without any hemolytic or cytotoxic effects on eukaryotic cells. L1 peptide showed no inhibitory effect on Listeria. Structurally, peptides L2 and L3 formed random coils composed of α-helix and β-sheet units. Peptides L2 and L3 exhibited antimicrobial activity against multidrug resistant isolates of L. monocytogenes with no haemolytic or toxic effects. Both peptides identified in this study have the potential to be beneficial in human and veterinary medicine. PMID:27296960

  4. Pseudomonas aeruginosa adaptation to lungs of cystic fibrosis patients leads to lowered resistance to phage and protist enemies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friman, Ville-Petri; Ghoul, Melanie; Molin, Søren;

    2013-01-01

    -resistant and highly toxic for protists. In contrast, bacteria isolated from long time chronically infected patients (2-23 years), were less efficient in both resisting phages and killing protists. Moreover, chronic isolates showed reduced killing of wax moth larvae (Galleria mellonella) probably due to weaker...

  5. Effect of Bacteriophages on the Growth of Flavobacterium psychrophilum and Development of Phage-Resistant Strains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Rói Hammershaimb; Madsen, Lone; Dalsgaard, Inger;

    2016-01-01

    The controlling effect of single and multiple phages on the density of Flavobacterium psychrophilum at different initial multiplicity of infection (MOI) was assessed in batch cultures to explore the potential for phage-based treatment of this important fish pathogen. A high initial phage concentr...

  6. Multi-drug resistance in Salmonella enterica: efflux mechanisms and their relationships with the development of chromosomal resistance gene clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Teresa; O'Mahony, Rebecca; Baird, Alan W; Drudy, Denise; Whyte, Paul; Fanning, Séamus

    2006-07-01

    Bacterial drug resistance represents one of the most crucial problems in present day antibacterial chemotherapy. Of particular concern to public health is the continuing worldwide epidemic spread of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium phage type DT104 harbouring a genomic island called Salmonella genomic island I (SGI-1). This island contains an antibiotic gene cluster conferring resistance to ampicillin, chloramphenicol, florfenicol, streptomycin, sulfonamides and tetracyclines. These resistance genes are assembled in a mosaic pattern, indicative of several independent recombinational events. The mobility of SGI-1 coupled with the ability of various antibiotic resistance genes to be integrated and lost from the chromosomal resistance locus allows for the transfer of stable antibiotic resistance to most of the commonly used antibiotics and adaptation to new antibiotic challenges. This, coupled with the incidence of increasing fluoroquinolone resistance in these strains increases the risk of therapeutic failure in cases of life-threatening salmonellosis. Fluoroquinolone resistance has largely been attributed to mutations occurring in the genes coding for intracellular targets of these drugs. However, efflux by the AcrAB-TolC multi-drug efflux pump has recently been shown to directly contribute to fluoroquinolone resistance. Furthermore, the resistance to chloramphenicol-florfenicol and tetracyclines in DT104 isolates, is due to interaction between specific transporters for these antibiotics encoded by genes mapping to the SGI-1 and the AcrAB-TolC tripartite efflux pump. The potential for the use of efflux pump inhibitors to restore therapeutic efficacy to fluoroquinolones and other antibiotics offers an exciting developmental area for drug discovery. PMID:16842216

  7. Isolation and characterization of φkm18p, a novel lytic phage with therapeutic potential against extensively drug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gwan-Han Shen

    Full Text Available AIMS: To isolate phages against extensively drug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (XDRAB and characterize the highest lytic capability phage as a model to evaluate the potential on phage therapy. METHODS AND RESULTS: Eight phages were isolated from hospital sewage and showed narrow host spectrum. Phage φkm18p was able to effectively lyse the most XDRAB. It has a dsDNA genome of 45 kb in size and hexagonal head of about 59 nm in diameter and no tail. Bacterial population decreased quickly from 10(8 CFU ml(-1 to 10(3 CFU ml(-1 in 30 min by φkm18p. The 185 kDa lysis protein encoded by φkm18p genome was detected when the extracted protein did not boil before SDS-PAGE; it showed that the lysis protein is a complex rather than a monomer. Phage φkm18p improved human lung epithelial cells survival rates when they were incubated with A. baumannii. Combination of phages (φkm18p, φTZ1 and φ314 as a cocktail could lyse all genotype-varying XDRAB isolates. CONCLUSION: Infections with XDRAB are extremely difficult to treat and development of a phage cocktails therapy could be a therapeutic alternative in the future. Phage φkm18p is a good candidate for inclusion in phage cocktails.

  8. Bacteria, phages and septicemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ausra Gaidelyte

    Full Text Available The use of phages is an attractive option to battle antibiotic resistant bacteria in certain bacterial infections, but the role of phage ecology in bacterial infections is obscure. Here we surveyed the phage ecology in septicemia, the most severe type of bacterial infection. We observed that the majority of the bacterial isolates from septicemia patients spontaneously secreted phages active against other isolates of the same bacterial strain, but not to the strain causing the disease. Such phages were also detected in the initial blood cultures, indicating that phages are circulating in the blood at the onset of sepsis. The fact that most of the septicemic bacterial isolates carry functional prophages suggests an active role of phages in bacterial infections. Apparently, prophages present in sepsis-causing bacterial clones play a role in clonal selection during bacterial invasion.

  9. Temperature-Dependent Phage Resistance of Listeria monocytogenes Epidemic Clone II▿

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Jae-Won; Kathariou, Sophia

    2009-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes epidemic clone II (ECII) has been responsible for two multistate outbreaks in the United States in 1998-1999 and in 2002, in which contaminated ready-to-eat meat products (hot dogs and turkey deli meats, respectively) were implicated. However, ecological adaptations of ECII strains in the food-processing plant environment remain unidentified. In this study, we found that broad-host-range phages, including phages isolated from the processing plant environment, produced p...

  10. The revival of Phage Therapy to fight Antimicrobial Resistance – Part I: What are the legal implications?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Minssen, Timo

    2014-01-01

    therapies, also addressed in the paper, lies in the reluctance of pharmaceutical companies to invest into the field. The potential obstacles for more private involvement in phage therapy are many and range from considerable risks of failure, reputational damage, and unforeseeable side-effects...... key areas in its strategy to fight antibiotic resistance. So far Western practice has concentrated on treating complex or unidentified infections with broad-spectrum antibiotics. These antibiotics would typically eliminate multiple types of bacteria, including those who have beneficial effects......, and the regulation of relevant research. It also appears questionable if – or under what circumstances – regulatory authorities would be willing to grant market approval for such a rapidly changing product like in the case of e.g. influenza vaccines. Another significant problem for the development of new phage...

  11. Genomic and Gene-Expression Comparisons among Phage-Resistant Type-IV Pilus Mutants of Pseudomonas syringae pathovar phaseolicola.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Sistrom

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola (Pph is a significant bacterial pathogen of agricultural crops, and phage Φ6 and other members of the dsRNA virus family Cystoviridae undergo lytic (virulent infection of Pph, using the type IV pilus as the initial site of cellular attachment. Despite the popularity of Pph/phage Φ6 as a model system in evolutionary biology, Pph resistance to phage Φ6 remains poorly characterized. To investigate differences between phage Φ6 resistant Pph strains, we examined genomic and gene expression variation among three bacterial genotypes that differ in the number of type IV pili expressed per cell: ordinary (wild-type, non-piliated, and super-piliated. Genome sequencing of non-piliated and super-piliated Pph identified few mutations that separate these genotypes from wild type Pph--and none present in genes known to be directly involved in type IV pilus expression. Expression analysis revealed that 81.1% of gene ontology (GO terms up-regulated in the non-piliated strain were down-regulated in the super-piliated strain. This differential expression is particularly prevalent in genes associated with respiration--specifically genes in the tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA cycle, aerobic respiration, and acetyl-CoA metabolism. The expression patterns of the TCA pathway appear to be generally up and down-regulated, in non-piliated and super-piliated Pph respectively. As pilus retraction is mediated by an ATP motor, loss of retraction ability might lead to a lower energy draw on the bacterial cell, leading to a different energy balance than wild type. The lower metabolic rate of the super-piliated strain is potentially a result of its loss of ability to retract.

  12. Phage type conversion in Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis caused by the introduction of a resistance plasmid of incompatibility group X (IncX)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brown, D. J.; Baggesen, Dorte Lau; Platt, D. J.;

    1999-01-01

    The plasmid pOG670, a 54 kb, conjugative plasmid that specifies resistance to ampicillin and kanamycin and belonging to the incompatibility group X (IncX), was transferred into 10 isolates of Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis belonging to 10 different phage types (PT1, 2, 3, 4, 8, 9, 9b, 10......, 11 and 13). Acquisition of the plasmid by these strains did not result in the loss of any resident plasmids but resulted in phage type conversion in 8 of the 10 strains (PT1, 2, 4, 8, 9, 9b, 10 and 11). The observed changes in phage type were found to result from the loss of sensitivity to 3...... of the 10 typing phages used (phages 3, 5 and 7). Where the conversion resulted in a change to a defined phage type, both the new and original PTs belonged to the same, previously described, evolutionary lines. Enteritidis PTs 1, 4 and 8, commonly associated with poultry world-wide, were converted to PTs 21...

  13. The CRISPR/Cas Adaptive Immune System of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Mediates Resistance to Naturally Occurring and Engineered Phages

    OpenAIRE

    Cady, Kyle C.; Bondy-Denomy, Joe; Heussler, Gary E; Davidson, Alan R.; O'Toole, George A.

    2012-01-01

    Here we report the isolation of 6 temperate bacteriophages (phages) that are prevented from replicating within the laboratory strain Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA14 by the endogenous CRISPR/Cas system of this microbe. These phages are only the second identified group of naturally occurring phages demonstrated to be blocked for replication by a nonengineered CRISPR/Cas system, and our results provide the first evidence that the P. aeruginosa type I-F CRISPR/Cas system can function in phage resista...

  14. Luciferase reporter phage phAE85 for rapid detection of rifampicin resistance in clinical isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gomathi Sivaramakrishnan; Balaji Subramanyam; Ponnuraja C; Vanaja Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Objective:To evaluate luciferase reporter phage (LRP) phAE85 in rapid detection of rifampicin resistance in a region where TB is endemic. Methods:One hundred and ninety primary isolates on Lowenstein-Jensen medium were tested. Middlebrook 7H9 complete medium with and without rifampicin at 2μg/mL was inoculated with standard inoculum from suspensions of the clinical isolate. After incubation for 72 h, LRP was added. Following 4 h of further incubation, light output from both control and test was measured as relative light units. Strains exhibiting a reduction of less than 50%relative light units in the drug containing vial compared to control were classified as resistant. Results were compared with the conventional minimum inhibitory concentration method (MIC) of drug susceptibility testing. Results:The two methods showed high level of agreement of 97% (CI 0.94, 0.99) and P value was 0.000 1. The sensitivity and specificity of LRP assay for detection of rifampicin resistance were 91%(CI 0.75, 0.98) and 99%(CI 0.95, 1.00) respectively. Time to detection of resistance by LRP assay was 3 d in comparison with 28 d by the minimum inhibitory concentration method. Conclusions: LRP assay with phAE85 is 99%specific, 91%sensitive and is highly reproducible. Thus the assay offers a simple procedure for drug sensitivity testing, within the scope of semi-automation.

  15. [Chromosome composition of wheat-rye lines and the influence of rye chromosomes on disease resistance and agronomic traits].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chumanova, E V; Efremova, T T; Trubacheeva, N V; Arbuzova, V S; Rosseeva, L P

    2014-11-01

    Identification of the chromosomal composition of common wheat lines with rye chromosomes was carried out using genomic in situ hybridization and 1RS- and 5P-specific PCR markers. It was demonstrated that wheat chromosomes 5A or 5D were substituted by rye chromosome 5R in the wheat-rye lines. It was established that one of the lines with complex disease resistance contained rye chromosome 5R and T1RS.1BL, while another line was found to contain, in addition to T1RS.1BL, a new Robertsonian translocation, T5AS.5RL. Substitution of the wheat chromosome 5A with the dominant Vrn-A1 gene for the Onokhoiskaya rye chromosome 5R led to lengthening of the germination-heading period or to a change in the type of development. A negative influence of T1RS.1BL on SDS sedimentation volume and grain hardness was demonstrated, along with a positive effect of the combination of T1RS. BL and 5R(5D) substitution on grain protein content. Quantitative traits of the 5R(5A) and 5R(5D) substitution lines were at the level of recipient cultivars. A line with two translocations, T1RS.1BL + T5AS.5R1, appeared to be more productive as compared to the line carrying T1RS.1BL in combination with the 5R(5D) substitution.

  16. Chromosome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chromosomes are structures found in the center (nucleus) of cells that carry long pieces of DNA. DNA ... is the building block of the human body. Chromosomes also contain proteins that help DNA exist in ...

  17. Cytogenetic Mapping of Disease Resistance Genes and Analysis of Their Distribution Features on Chromosomes in Maize

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LiLi-jia; SongYun-chun

    2003-01-01

    Cytogenetic maps of four clusters of disease resistance genes were generated by ISH of the two RFLP markers tightly linked to and flanking each of maize resistance genes and the cloned resistance genes from other plant species onto maize chromosomes, combining with data published before. These genes include Helminthosporium turcium Pass resistance genes Htl, Htnl and Ht2, Helminthosporium maydis Nisik resistance genes Rhml and Rhm2,maize dwarf mosaic virus resistance gene Mdml, wheat streak mosaic virus resistance gene Wsml, Helminthosporium carbonum ULLstrup resistance gene Hml and the cloned Xanthomonas oryzae pv. Oryzae resistance gene Xa21 of rice, Cladosporium fulvum resistance genes Cf-9 and Cf-2. 1 of tomato, and Pseudomonas syringae resistance gene RPS2 of Arabidopsis. Most of the tested disease resistance genes located on the four chromosomes, i. e. , chromosomesl, 3, 6 and 8, and they closely distributed at the interstitial regions of these chromosomal long arms with percentage distances ranging 31.44(±3.72)-72.40(±3. 25) except for genes Rhml, Rhm2, Mdml and Wsml which mapped on the satellites of the short arms of chromosome6. It showed that the tested RFLP markers and genes were duplicated or triplicated in maize genome. Homology and conservation of disease resistance genes among species, and relationship between distribution features and functions of the genes were discussed. The results provide important scientific basis for deeply understanding structure and function of disease resistance genes and breeding in maize.

  18. Genes for resistance to stripe rust on chromosome 2B and their application in wheat breeding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peigao Luo; Xueyun Hu; Huaiyu Zhang; Zhenglong Ren

    2009-01-01

    Stripe rust,caused by Puccinia striiformis f.sp.tritici,is one of the most damaging diseases of wheat worldwide.Growing resistant cultivars is the most economic and environmental friendly way to control the disease.There are many resistance genes to stripe rust located on wheat chromosome 2B.Here,we propose a strategy to construct the recombinant wheat chromosome 2B with multiple resistances to stripe rust by making crosses between wheat lines or cultivars carrying Yr genes and using marker-assisted selection,based on the reported information about resistance spectrum,chromosomal location,and linked markers of the genes.Pyramiding the resistance genes on 2B would afford a valuable strategy to control the disease by cultivating varieties with durable resistance.The possibility,efficiency,and prospect of the suggested strategy are reviewed in the paper.

  19. Bacteriophages with potential to inactivate Salmonella Typhimurium: Use of single phage suspensions and phage cocktails.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Carla; Moreirinha, Catarina; Lewicka, Magdalena; Almeida, Paulo; Clemente, Carla; Cunha, Ângela; Delgadillo, Ivonne; Romalde, Jésus L; Nunes, Maria L; Almeida, Adelaide

    2016-07-15

    The aim of this study was to compare the dynamics of three previously isolated bacteriophages (or phages) individually (phSE-1, phSE-2 and phSE-5) or combined in cocktails of two or three phages (phSE-1/phSE-2, phSE-1/phSE-5, phSE-2/phSE-5 and phSE-1/phSE-2/phSE-5) to control Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (Salmonella Typhimurium) in order to evaluate their potential application during depuration. Phages were assigned to the family Siphoviridae and revealed identical restriction digest profiles, although they showed a different phage adsorption, host range, burst size, explosion time and survival in seawater. The three phages were effective against S. Typhimurium (reduction of ∼2.0 log CFU/mL after 4h treatment). The use of cocktails was not significantly more effective than the use of single phages. A big fraction of the remained bacteria are phage-resistant mutants (frequency of phage-resistant mutants 9.19×10(-5)-5.11×10(-4)) but phage- resistant bacterial mutants was lower for the cocktail phages than for the single phage suspensions and the phage phSE-1 presented the highest rate of resistance and phage phSE-5 the lowest one. The spectral changes of S. Typhimurium resistant and phage-sensitive cells were compared and revealed relevant differences for peaks associated to amide I (1620cm(-1)) and amide II (1515cm(-1)) from proteins and from carbohydrates and phosphates region (1080-1000cm(-1)). Despite the similar efficiency of individual phages, the development of lower resistance indicates that phage cocktails might be the most promising choice to be used during the bivalve depuration to control the transmission of salmonellosis.

  20. Cytogenetic Mapping of Disease Resistance Genes and Analysis of Their Distribution Features on Chromosomes in Maize

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Li-jia; Song Yun-chun

    2003-01-01

    Cytogenetic maps of four clusters of disease resistance genes were generated by ISH of the two RFLP markers tightly linked to and flanking each of maize resistance genes and the cloned resistance genes from other plant species onto maize chromosomes, combining with data published before. These genes include Helminthosporium turcium Pass resistance genes Ht1, Htn1 and Ht2, Helminthosporium maydis Nisik resistance genes Rhm1 and Rhm2, maize dwarf mosaic virus resistance gene Mdm1, wheat streak mosaic virus resistance gene Wsm1, Helminthosporium carbonum ULLstrup resistance gene Hml and the cloned Xanthomonas oryzae pv. Oryzae resistance gene Xa21 of rice, Cladosporium fulvum resistance genes Cf-9 and Cf-2.1 of tomato,and Pseudomonas syringae resistance gene RPS2 of Arabidopsis. Most of the tested disease resistance genes located on the four chromosomes, i.e., chromosomes1, 3, 6 and 8, and they closely distributed at the interstitial regions of these chromosomal long arms with percentage distances ranging 31.44(±3.72)-72.40(±3.25) except for genes Rhm1, Rhm2, Mdm1 and Wsm1 which mapped on the satellites of the short arms of chromosome6. It showed that the tested RFLP markers and genes were duplicated or triplicated in maize genome. Homology and conservation of disease resistance genes among species, and relationship between distribution features and functions of the genes were discussed. The results provide important scientific basis for deeply understanding structure and function of disease resistance genes and breeding in maize.

  1. In Vivo Assessment of Phage and Linezolid Based Implant Coatings for Treatment of Methicillin Resistant S. aureus (MRSA) Mediated Orthopaedic Device Related Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Sandeep; Harjai, Kusum; Chhibber, Sanjay

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus comprises up to two-thirds of all pathogens in orthopaedic implant infections with two species respectively Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis, being the predominate etiological agents isolated. Further, with the emergence of methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), treatment of S. aureus implant infections has become more difficult, thus representing a devastating complication. Use of local delivery system consisting of S.aureus specific phage along with linezolid (incorporated in biopolymer) allowing gradual release of the two agents at the implant site represents a new, still unexplored treatment option (against orthopaedic implant infections) that has been studied in an animal model of prosthetic joint infection. Naked wire, hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) coated wire and phage and /or linezolid coated K-wire were surgically implanted into the intra-medullary canal of mouse femur bone of respective groups followed by inoculation of S.aureus ATCC 43300(MRSA). Mice implanted with K-wire coated with both the agents i.e phage as well as linezolid (dual coated wires) showed maximum reduction in bacterial adherence, associated inflammation of the joint as well as faster resumption of locomotion and motor function of the limb. Also, all the coating treatments showed no emergence of resistant mutants. Use of dual coated implants incorporating lytic phage (capable of self-multiplication) as well as linezolid presents an attractive and aggressive early approach in preventing as well as treating implant associated infections caused by methicillin resistant S. aureus strains as assessed in a murine model of experimental joint infection. PMID:27333300

  2. Resistência de bactérias ácido-láticas a bacteriófagos provenientes de unidades de processamento de queijo Coalho Phage resistance of acid lactic bacteria isolated from Coalho cheese industries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiane Pereira de Lima

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho teve como objetivos isolar bacteriófagos de amostras de leite, soro e queijo de Coalho e avaliar a resistência de cepas de Lactobacillus paracasei, pertencentes à Coleção de Micro-organismos de Interesse para a Agroindústria Tropical da Embrapa Agroindústria Tropical, aos fagos isolados. Posteriormente, a resistência destas cepas a fagos específicos para L. paracasei, da Coleção do Instituto de Lactología Industrial - INLAIN (Santa Fe, Argentina, também foi avaliada. As amostras para isolamento dos fagos foram obtidas em quatro unidades de processamento de queijo de Coalho, sendo duas artesanais e duas industriais, localizadas no Estado do Ceará. Para o isolamento dos bacteriófagos, foi empregado o teste de lise celular (spot, enquanto que a resistência das culturas aos fagos foi avaliada pelos testes de capacidade de produção de ácido e avaliação da turbidez. As cepas avaliadas foram resistentes aos bacteriófagos provenientes das unidades de processamento de queijo de Coalho e aos bacteriófagos da Coleção do INLAIN. Os resultados obtidos indicaram que as culturas láticas testadas, resistentes aos bacteriófagos, podem ser utilizadas na composição de fermento lático destinado à elaboração de queijo de Coalho, a partir de leite pasteurizado.The objectives of this research were to isolate bacteriophages from milk samples, whey and Coalho cheese and to evaluate the resistance of strains of Lactobacillus paracasei from the Collection of Microorganisms of Interest for the Tropical Agroindustry, belonging to Embrapa Tropical Agroindustry, to isolate phages. The strains resistance to specific L. paracasei phages from the collection of the Instituto de Lactología Industrial - INLAIN (Santa Fe, Argentina was also evaluated. Samples for phage isolation were from four Coalho cheese processing units, two artisanal and two industrial, localized in the state of Ceará. Spot test was employed for bacteriophages

  3. Genetic dissection of tetraploid cotton resistant to Verticillium wilt using interspecific chromosome segment introgression lines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peng; Wang; Zhiyuan; Ning; Ling; Lin; Hong; Chen; Hongxian; Mei; Jun; Zhao; Bingliang; Liu; Xin; Zhang; Wangzhen; Guo; Tianzhen; Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Verticillium wilt(caused by the pathogen Verticillium dahliae) is of high concern for cotton producers and consumers. The major strategy for controlling this disease is the development of resistant cotton(Gossypium spp.) cultivars. We used interspecific chromosome segment introgression lines(CSILs) to identify quantitative trait loci(QTL) associated with resistance to Verticillium wilt in cotton grown in greenhouse and inoculated with three defoliating V. dahliae isolates. A total of 42 QTL, including 23 with resistance-increasing and 19 with resistancedecreasing, influenced host resistance against the three isolates. These QTL were identified and mapped on 18 chromosomes(chromosomes A1, A3, A4, A5, A7, A8, A9, A12, A13, D1, D2,D3, D4, D5, D7, D8, D11, and D12), with LOD values ranging from 3.00 to 9.29. Among the positive QTL with resistance-increasing effect, 21 conferred resistance to only one V. dahliae isolate, suggesting that resistance to V. dahliae conferred by most QTL is pathogen isolate-specific. The At subgenome of cotton had greater effect on resistance to Verticillium wilt than the Dt subgenome. We conclude that pyramiding different resistant QTL could be used to breed cotton cultivars with broad-spectrum resistance to Verticillium wilt.

  4. [Phage therapy for bacterial infection of burn].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Y Z; Huang, G T

    2016-09-20

    With the long-term and widespread use of antibiotics, drug resistance of bacteria has become a major problem in the treatment of burn infection. For treating multidrug resistant bacteria, phage therapy has become the focus of attention. Development of phage therapy to fill the blank of this field in China is extremely urgent. PMID:27647065

  5. The revival of Phage Therapy to fight Antimicrobial Resistance (AMR) – Part III: What about patent protection and alternative incentives?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Minssen, Timo

    2014-01-01

    – enabled to target only specific bacteria. This technology was recently presented by MIT researchers at the 2014 American Society for Microbiology Meeting. The researchers led by Timothy Lu had genetically engineered phages that use a DNA-editing system called CRISPR to target and kill only antibiotic......, and the number of patients in which this technology could be applied is (so far) rather limited. So what can be done to enhance the development of phage therapies? As pointed out in an earlier blog one solution could be more governmental and public involvement, e.g. through public private partnerships (PPPs...

  6. Control of Pierce's Disease by Phage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Mayukh; Bhowmick, Tushar Suvra; Ahern, Stephen J; Young, Ry; Gonzalez, Carlos F

    2015-01-01

    Pierce's Disease (PD) of grapevines, caused by Xylella fastidiosa subsp. fastidiosa (Xf), is a limiting factor in the cultivation of grapevines in the US. There are presently no effective control methods to prevent or treat PD. The therapeutic and prophylactic efficacy of a phage cocktail composed of four virulent (lytic) phages was evaluated for control of PD. Xf levels in grapevines were significantly reduced in therapeutically or prophylactically treated grapevines. PD symptoms ceased to progress one week post-therapeutic treatment and symptoms were not observed in prophylactically treated grapevines. Cocktail phage levels increased in grapevines in the presence of the host. No in planta phage-resistant Xf isolates were obtained. Moreover, Xf mutants selected for phage resistance in vitro did not cause PD symptoms. Our results indicate that phages have great potential for biocontrol of PD and other economically important diseases caused by Xylella. PMID:26107261

  7. Control of Pierce's Disease by Phage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayukh Das

    Full Text Available Pierce's Disease (PD of grapevines, caused by Xylella fastidiosa subsp. fastidiosa (Xf, is a limiting factor in the cultivation of grapevines in the US. There are presently no effective control methods to prevent or treat PD. The therapeutic and prophylactic efficacy of a phage cocktail composed of four virulent (lytic phages was evaluated for control of PD. Xf levels in grapevines were significantly reduced in therapeutically or prophylactically treated grapevines. PD symptoms ceased to progress one week post-therapeutic treatment and symptoms were not observed in prophylactically treated grapevines. Cocktail phage levels increased in grapevines in the presence of the host. No in planta phage-resistant Xf isolates were obtained. Moreover, Xf mutants selected for phage resistance in vitro did not cause PD symptoms. Our results indicate that phages have great potential for biocontrol of PD and other economically important diseases caused by Xylella.

  8. Physical mapping, expression analysis and polymorphism survey of resistance gene analogues on chromosome 11 of rice

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Irfan A Ghazi; Prem S Srivastava; Vivek Dalal; Kishor Gaikwad; Ashok K Singh; Tilak R Sharma; Nagendra K Singh; Trilochan Mohapatra

    2009-06-01

    Rice is the first cereal genome with a finished sequence and a model crop that has important syntenic relationships with other cereal species. The objectives of our study were to identify resistance gene analogue (RGA) sequences from chromosome 11 of rice, understand their expression in other cereals and dicots by in silico analysis, determine their presence on other rice chromosomes, and evaluate the extent of polymorphism and actual expression in a set of rice genotypes. A total of 195 RGAs were predicted and physically localised. Of these, 91.79% expressed in rice, and 51.28% expressed in wheat, which was the highest among other cereals. Among monocots, sugarcane showed the highest (78.92%) expression, while among dicots, RGAs were maximally expressed in Arabidopsis (11.79%). Interestingly, two of the chromosome 11-specific RGAs were found to be expressing in all the organisms studied. Eighty RGAs of chromosome 11 had significant homology with chromosome 12, which was the maximum among all the rice chromosomes. Thirty-one per cent of the RGAs used in polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification showed polymorphism in a set of rice genotypes. Actual gene expression analysis revealed post-inoculation induction of one RGA in the rice line IRBB-4 carrying the bacterial blight resistance gene Xa-4. Our results have implications for the development of sequence-based markers and functional validation of specific RGAs in rice.

  9. Aegilops-Secale amphiploids: chromosome categorisation, pollen viability and identification of fungal disease resistance genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwiatek, M; Błaszczyk, L; Wiśniewska, H; Apolinarska, B

    2012-02-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the potential breeding value of goatgrass-rye amphiploids, which we are using as a "bridge" in a transfer of Aegilops chromatin (containing, e.g. leaf rust resistance genes) into triticale. We analysed the chromosomal constitution (by genomic in situ hybridisation, GISH), fertility (by pollen viability tests) and the presence of leaf rust and eyespot resistance genes (by molecular and endopeptidase assays) in a collection of 6× and 4× amphiploids originating from crosses between five Aegilops species and Secale cereale. In the five hexaploid amphiploids Aegilops kotschyi × Secale cereale (genome UUSSRR), Ae. variabilis × S. cereale (UUSSRR), Ae. biuncialis × S. cereale (UUMMRR; two lines) and Ae. ovata × S. cereale (UUMMRR), 28 Aegilops chromosomes were recognised, while in the Ae. tauschii × S. cereale amphiploid (4×; DDRR), only 14 such chromosomes were identified. In the materials, the number of rye chromosomes varied from 14 to 16. In one line of Ae. ovata × S. cereale, the U-R translocation was found. Pollen viability varied from 24.4 to 75.4%. The leaf rust resistance genes Lr22, Lr39 and Lr41 were identified in Ae. tauschii and the 4× amphiploid Ae. tauschii × S. cereale. For the first time, the leaf rust resistance gene Lr37 was found in Ae. kotschyi, Ae. ovata, Ae. biuncialis and amphiploids derived from those parental species. No eyespot resistance gene Pch1 was found in the amphiploids.

  10. Meiotic chromosome mobility in fission yeast is resistant to environmental stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illner, Doris; Lorenz, Alexander; Scherthan, Harry

    2016-01-01

    The formation of healthy gametes requires pairing of homologous chromosomes (homologs) as a prerequisite for their correct segregation during meiosis. Initially, homolog alignment is promoted by meiotic chromosome movements feeding into intimate homolog pairing by homologous recombination and/or synaptonemal complex formation. Meiotic chromosome movements in the fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, depend on astral microtubule dynamics that drag the nucleus through the zygote; known as horsetail movement. The response of microtubule-led meiotic chromosome movements to environmental stresses such as ionizing irradiation (IR) and associated reactive oxygen species (ROS) is not known. Here, we show that, in contrast to budding yeast, the horsetail movement is largely radiation-resistant, which is likely mediated by a potent antioxidant defense. IR exposure of sporulating S. pombe cells induced misrepair and irreparable DNA double strand breaks causing chromosome fragmentation, missegregation and gamete death. Comparing radiation outcome in fission and budding yeast, and studying meiosis with poisoned microtubules indicates that the increased gamete death after IR is innate to fission yeast. Inhibition of meiotic chromosome mobility in the face of IR failed to influence the course of DSB repair, indicating that paralysis of meiotic chromosome mobility in a genotoxic environment is not a universal response among species. PMID:27074839

  11. Screening and incorporation of rust resistance from Allium cepa into bunching onion (Allium fistulosum) via alien chromosome addition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wako, Tadayuki; Yamashita, Ken-ichiro; Tsukazaki, Hikaru; Ohara, Takayoshi; Kojima, Akio; Yaguchi, Shigenori; Shimazaki, Satoshi; Midorikawa, Naoko; Sakai, Takako; Yamauchi, Naoki; Shigyo, Masayoshi

    2015-04-01

    Bunching onion (Allium fistulosum L.; 2n = 16), bulb onion (Allium cepa L. Common onion group), and shallot (Allium cepa L. Aggregatum group) cultivars were inoculated with rust fungus, Puccinia allii, isolated from bunching onion. Bulb onions and shallots are highly resistant to rust, suggesting they would serve as useful resources for breeding rust resistant bunching onions. To identify the A. cepa chromosome(s) related to rust resistance, a complete set of eight A. fistulosum - shallot monosomic alien addition lines (MAALs) were inoculated with P. allii. At the seedling stage, FF+1A showed a high level of resistance in controlled-environment experiments, suggesting that the genes related to rust resistance could be located on shallot chromosome 1A. While MAAL, multi-chromosome addition line, and hypoallotriploid adult plants did not exhibit strong resistance to rust. In contrast to the high resistance of shallot, the addition line FF+1A+5A showed reproducibly high levels of rust resistance.

  12. The Agricultural Antibiotic Carbadox Induces Phage-mediated Gene Transfer in Salmonella

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bradley L. Bearson

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotics are used for disease therapeutic or preventative effects in humans and animals, as well as for enhanced feed conversion efficiency in livestock. Antibiotics can also cause undesirable effects in microbial populations, including selection for antibiotic resistance, enhanced pathogen invasion, and stimulation of horizontal gene transfer. Carbadox is a veterinary antibiotic used in the U.S. during the starter phase of swine production for improved feed efficiency and control of swine dysentery and bacterial swine enteritis. Carbadox has been shown in vitro to induce phage-encoded Shiga toxin in Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli and a phage-like element transferring antibiotic resistance genes in Brachyspira hyodysenteriae, but the effect of carbadox on prophages in other bacteria is unknown. This study examined carbadox exposure on prophage induction and genetic transfer in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, a human foodborne pathogen that frequently colonizes swine without causing disease. S. Typhimurium LT2 exposed to carbadox induced prophage production, resulting in bacterial cell lysis and release of virions that were visible by electron microscopy. Carbadox induction of phage-mediated gene transfer was confirmed by monitoring the transduction of a sodCIII::neo cassette in the Fels-1 prophage from LT2 to a recipient Salmonella strain. Furthermore, carbadox frequently induced generalized transducing phages in multidrug-resistant phage type DT104 and DT120 isolates, resulting in the transfer of chromosomal and plasmid DNA that included antibiotic resistance genes. Our research indicates that exposure of Salmonella to carbadox induces prophages that can transfer virulence and antibiotic resistance genes to susceptible bacterial hosts. Carbadox-induced, phage-mediated gene transfer could serve as a contributing factor in bacterial evolution during animal production, with prophages being a reservoir for bacterial fitness

  13. Dihydrofolate reductase mutations and chromosomal changes associated with pyrimethamine resistance of Plasmodium falciparum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, M; Gu, H M; Bzik, D J; Li, W B; Inselburg, J W

    1990-02-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the dihydrofolate reductase-thymidylate synthase (DHFR-TS) gene in pyrimethamine-resistant (PyrR) mutants of Plasmodium falciparum selected in vitro was examined to determine if specific mutations in DHFR were associated with drug resistance. We analysed the sequence of genomic DNA from strain FCR3, from eight previously isolated PyrR parasites derived from FCR3, and from strain Honduras-1. We found that: (1) five PyrR FCR3 mutants, FCR3-D4-D8, had an identical nucleotide change and a novel single amino acid change (Phe to Ser) at amino acid 223 of DHFR; (2) our originally reported nucleotide sequence of the DHFR-TS gene was of the PyrR strain Honduras-1, and was not of FCR3; (3) three PyrR mutants, FCR3-D1, D2, and D3, thought to have been derived from the FCR3 strain, were in fact isolates of Honduras-1. We also examined the chromosomal DNA of PyrR mutants by pulsed-field gradient gel (PFG) electrophoresis. The PyrR mutants FCR3-D1, D2, and D3 had several chromosome size polymorphisms compared to FCR3. In two of the PyrR FCR3 mutants, FCR3-D7 and D8, the chromosome 4-size DNA of FCR3 that the DHFR-TS probe normally hybridised to was not observed. Instead, in FCR3-D7, a chromosome larger than the chromosome 4-size DNA was observed to hybridise to the DHFR-TS probe. In FCR3-D8, two chromosomes that hybridised to the DHFR-TS probe were found. One of them was larger than FCR-3 chromosome 4-size DNA, and the other was smaller than FCR3 chromosome 1-size DNA.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2406591

  14. A novel strategy to isolate cell-envelope mutants resistant to phage infection: bacteriophage mEp213 requires lipopolysaccharides in addition to FhuA to enter Escherichia coli K-12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes-Cortés, Ruth; Martínez-Peñafiel, Eva; Martínez-Pérez, Francisco; de la Garza, Mireya; Kameyama, Luis

    2012-12-01

    We have developed a direct and efficient strategy, based on a three-step method, to select bacterial cell-envelope mutants resistant to bacteriophage infection. Escherichia coli K-12 strain W3110 underwent classical transposon mutagenesis followed by replica plating and selection for mutants resistant to infection by coliphage mEp213. To verify that phage resistance was due to mutations in the cell envelope, we transformed host cells with the viral genome using electroporation and selected those in which virions were subsequently detected in the supernatant. Among the nine mutants resistant to coliphage infection that we selected, six were in the fhuA gene, two were mutated in the waaC gene, and one was mutated in the gmhD gene. The latter two gene products are involved in the synthesis of lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The efficiency of plating and adsorption of phage mEp213 was affected in these mutants. We verified that LPS is required for the efficient infection of phage λ as well. We propose that this mutation-and-selection strategy can be used to find host factors involved in the initial steps of phage infection for any cognate pair of phage and bacteria.

  15. Phages Preying on Bacillus anthracis, Bacillus cereus, and Bacillus thuringiensis: Past, Present and Future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annika Gillis

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Many bacteriophages (phages have been widely studied due to their major role in virulence evolution of bacterial pathogens. However, less attention has been paid to phages preying on bacteria from the Bacillus cereus group and their contribution to the bacterial genetic pool has been disregarded. Therefore, this review brings together the main information for the B. cereus group phages, from their discovery to their modern biotechnological applications. A special focus is given to phages infecting Bacillus anthracis, B. cereus and Bacillus thuringiensis. These phages belong to the Myoviridae, Siphoviridae, Podoviridae and Tectiviridae families. For the sake of clarity, several phage categories have been made according to significant characteristics such as lifestyles and lysogenic states. The main categories comprise the transducing phages, phages with a chromosomal or plasmidial prophage state, γ-like phages and jumbo-phages. The current genomic characterization of some of these phages is also addressed throughout this work and some promising applications are discussed here.

  16. Phages preying on Bacillus anthracis, Bacillus cereus, and Bacillus thuringiensis: past, present and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillis, Annika; Mahillon, Jacques

    2014-07-01

    Many bacteriophages (phages) have been widely studied due to their major role in virulence evolution of bacterial pathogens. However, less attention has been paid to phages preying on bacteria from the Bacillus cereus group and their contribution to the bacterial genetic pool has been disregarded. Therefore, this review brings together the main information for the B. cereus group phages, from their discovery to their modern biotechnological applications. A special focus is given to phages infecting Bacillus anthracis, B. cereus and Bacillus thuringiensis. These phages belong to the Myoviridae, Siphoviridae, Podoviridae and Tectiviridae families. For the sake of clarity, several phage categories have been made according to significant characteristics such as lifestyles and lysogenic states. The main categories comprise the transducing phages, phages with a chromosomal or plasmidial prophage state, γ-like phages and jumbo-phages. The current genomic characterization of some of these phages is also addressed throughout this work and some promising applications are discussed here. PMID:25010767

  17. Chromosome engineering to enhance utility of alien-derived stem rust resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    In the past 50 years, a number of stem rust (Sr) resistance genes identified from wild relatives of wheat have been incorporated into wheat genomes through chromosome engineering. Some of these genes, including Sr25, Sr26, Sr32, Sr37, Sr39, Sr40, Sr43, Sr44, SrR, and three unnamed novel Sr genes fr...

  18. FK phage for differentiating the classical and El T or groups of Vibrio cholerae.

    OpenAIRE

    Takeya, K; Otohuji, T; Tokiwa, H

    1981-01-01

    A new vibrio-infecting phage (FK phage) isolated from sewage lysed all strains of Vibrio cholerae biovar cholerae, whereas all strains of V. cholerae biovar El Tor were resistant to it. FK phage was entirely different from Mukerjee group IV phage in morphology and antigenicity. In addition to group IV phage, the use of FK phage will be useful in the examination and typing of V. cholerae.

  19. Selection of phages and conditions for the safe phage therapy against Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Victor; Krylov; Olga; Shaburova; Elena; Pleteneva; Sergey; Krylov; Alla; Kaplan; Maria; Burkaltseva; Olga; Polygach; Elena; Chesnokova

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of multidrug-resistant bacterial pathogens forced us to consider the phage therapy as one of the possible alternative approaches to treatment. The purpose of this paper is to consider the conditions for the safe, long-term use of phage therapy against various infections caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We describe the selection of the most suitable phages, their most effective combinations and some approaches for the rapid recognition of phages unsuitable for use in therapy. The benefi ts and disadvantages of the various different approaches to the preparation of phage mixtures are considered, together with the specifi c conditions that are required for the safe application of phage therapy in general hospitals and the possibilities for the development of personalized phage therapy.

  20. Mammalian Host-Versus-Phage immune response determines phage fate in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodyra-Stefaniak, Katarzyna; Miernikiewicz, Paulina; Drapała, Jarosław; Drab, Marek; Jończyk-Matysiak, Ewa; Lecion, Dorota; Kaźmierczak, Zuzanna; Beta, Weronika; Majewska, Joanna; Harhala, Marek; Bubak, Barbara; Kłopot, Anna; Górski, Andrzej; Dąbrowska, Krystyna

    2015-01-01

    Emerging bacterial antibiotic resistance draws attention to bacteriophages as a therapeutic alternative to treat bacterial infection. Examples of phage that combat bacteria abound. However, despite careful testing of antibacterial activity in vitro, failures nevertheless commonly occur. We investigated immunological response of phage antibacterial potency in vivo. Anti-phage activity of phagocytes, antibodies, and serum complement were identified by direct testing and by high-resolution fluorescent microscopy. We accommodated the experimental data into a mathematical model. We propose a universal schema of innate and adaptive immunity impact on phage pharmacokinetics, based on the results of our numerical simulations. We found that the mammalian-host response to infecting bacteria causes the concomitant removal of phage from the system. We propose the notion that this effect as an indirect pathway of phage inhibition by bacteria with significant relevance for the clinical outcome of phage therapy. PMID:26440922

  1. Comparison of the chromosome maps around a resistance hot spot on chromosome 5 of potato and tomato using BAC-FISH painting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Achenbach, U.C.; Tang, X.M.; Ballvora, A.; Jong, de H.; Gebhardt, C.

    2010-01-01

    Potato chromosome 5 harbours numerous genes for important qualitative and quantitative traits, such as resistance to the root cyst nematode Globodera pallida and the late blight fungus, Phytophthora infestans. The genes make up part of a “hot spot” for resistances to various pathogens covering a gen

  2. Pf Filamentous Phage Requires UvrD for Replication in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Eriel; Campos-Gómez, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Pf is a lysogenic filamentous phage that promotes biofilm development in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Pf replicates by a rolling circle replication system which depends on a phage-encoded initiator protein and host factors usually involved in chromosome replication. Rep, an accessory replicative DNA helicase, is crucial for replication of filamentous phages in Escherichia coli. In contrast, here we show that, instead of depending on Rep, Pf replication depends on UvrD, an accessory helicase implicated in DNA repair. In this study, we also identified the initiator protein of Pf and found that it shares similarities with that of Vibrio phages CTXφ and VGJφ, which also depend on UvrD for replication. A structural comparative analysis of the initiator proteins of most known filamentous phages described thus far suggested that UvrD, known as a nonreplicative helicase, is involved in rolling circle replication of filamentous phages in diverse bacteria genera. This report consolidates knowledge on the new role of UvrD in filamentous phage replication, a function previously thought to be exclusive of Rep helicase. IMPORTANCE Biofilm development is a key component of the ability of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to evade host immune defenses and resist multiple drugs. Induction of the filamentous phage Pf, which usually is lysogenized in clinical and environmental isolates of P. aeruginosa, plays an important role in biofilm assembly, maturation, and dispersal. Despite the clinical relevance of Pf, the molecular biology of this phage is largely unknown. In this study, we found that rolling circle replication of Pf depends on UvrD, a DNA helicase normally involved in DNA repair. We also identified the initiator protein of Pf and found that it shares structural similarity with that of Vibrio cholerae phages CTXφ and VGJφ, which also use UvrD for replication. Our results reveal that, in addition to DNA repair, UvrD plays an essential role in rolling circle replication of filamentous

  3. Analysis of phage Mu DNA transposition by whole-genome Escherichia coli tiling arrays reveals a complex relationship to distribution of target selection protein B, transcription and chromosome architectural elements

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jun Ge; Zheng Lou; Hong Cui; Lei Shang; Rasika M Harshey

    2011-09-01

    Of all known transposable elements, phage Mu exhibits the highest transposition efficiency and the lowest target specificity. In vitro, MuB protein is responsible for target choice. In this work, we provide a comprehensive assessment of the genome-wide distribution of MuB and its relationship to Mu target selection using high-resolution Escherichia coli tiling DNA arrays. We have also assessed how MuB binding and Mu transposition are influenced by chromosome-organizing elements such as AT-rich DNA signatures, or the binding of the nucleoid-associated protein Fis, or processes such as transcription. The results confirm and extend previous biochemical and lower resolution in vivo data. Despite the generally random nature of Mu transposition and MuB binding, there were hot and cold insertion sites and MuB binding sites in the genome, and differences between the hottest and coldest sites were large. The new data also suggest that MuB distribution and subsequent Mu integration is responsive to DNA sequences that contribute to the structural organization of the chromosome.

  4. Structural characterizations of phage antitoxin Dmd and its interactions with bacterial toxin RnlA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Yong; Gao, Zengqiang; Zhang, Heng; Dong, Yuhui

    2016-04-15

    Toxin-antitoxin (TA) loci are widespread in bacteria plasmids and chromosomes, and target various cellular functions to regulate cell growth and death. A type II TA system RnlA-RnlB from Escherichia coli is associated with phage-resistance. After the infection of bacteriophage T4 with Dmd defection, RnlA is activated by the disappearance of RnlB, resulting in the rapid degradation of T4 mRNAs. Dmd can bind to RnlA directly and neutralize RnlA toxicity to allow phage reproduction. Dmd represent a heterogenous antitoxin of RnlA replacing antitoxin RnlB. Here, we reported two structures of Dmd from T4 phage and RB69 phage. Both Dmd structures are high similar with a compacted domain composed of a four-stranded anti-parallel β-sheet and an α-helix. Chromatography and SAXS suggest Dmd forms a dimer in solution consistent with that in crystal. Structure-based mutagenesis of Dmd reveals key residues involved in RnlA-binding. Possibility cavities in Dmd used for compounds design were modeled. Our structural study revealed the recognition and inhibition mechanism of RnlA by Dmd and providing a potential laboratory phage prevention target for drug design. PMID:26972252

  5. Mammalian Host-Versus-Phage immune response determines phage fate in vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Katarzyna Hodyra-Stefaniak; Paulina Miernikiewicz; Jarosław Drapała; Marek Drab; Ewa Jończyk-Matysiak; Dorota Lecion; Zuzanna Kaźmierczak; Weronika Beta; Joanna Majewska; Marek Harhala; Barbara Bubak; Anna Kłopot; Andrzej Górski; Krystyna Dąbrowska

    2015-01-01

    Emerging bacterial antibiotic resistance draws attention to bacteriophages as a therapeutic alternative to treat bacterial infection. Examples of phage that combat bacteria abound. However, despite careful testing of antibacterial activity in vitro, failures nevertheless commonly occur. We investigated immunological response of phage antibacterial potency in vivo. Anti-phage activity of phagocytes, antibodies, and serum complement were identified by direct testing and by high-resolution fluor...

  6. Isolation and biological characteristics of phages of carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii%耐碳青霉烯类鲍曼不动杆菌噬菌体的分离鉴定及其生物学特性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张劼; 罗永艾

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the biological characteristics of phages of carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii ( CRAB), and provide new strategy for controlling CRAB infection. Methods Phages of CRAB isolated from raw sewage of a hospital were identified using the plaque method. The morphology of phages was observed by electron microscopy. The genome of phages was extracted for electrophoresis. The structural proteins of phages were analysed by SDS-PAGE. The optimal multiplicity of infection, resistant mutation rate and one-step growth curve of phages were determined. Results One CRAB-specific and tailless phage with double-stranded DNA was isolated, and was named as phage AB3. The size of phage AB3 genome was about 35 kb, and the relative molecular mass of major coat protein was 35 x 10 . The incubation and burst periods of phage AB3 were 20 min and 60 min respectively, the burst size was 350, and the mutation rate of phage resistance was 2.5 × 10-10 . The phage AB3 was stable to a wide range of pH and temperature. Conclusion Phage AB3 has relatively broad host range, shorter incubation period, apparent burst size, lower resistant mutation rate and good stability to physical and chemical factors, which leads to its promising prospect in clinical application.%目的 通过分离耐碳青霉烯类鲍曼小动杆菌(CRAB)噬菌体,研究其生物学特性,为噬菌体治疗CRAB感染提供实验依据.方法 利用噬菌斑法从医院污水中分离CRAB噬菌体,电子显微镜观察噬菌体的形态特征,提取其基因组行酶切电泳,SDSPAGE分析噬菌体表面衣壳蛋白,测定噬菌体感染复数和耐受突变率,并观察其一步生长曲线.结果 筛选出1株具有较宽裂解谱的无尾双链DNA的CRAB噬菌体,命名为噬菌体AB3.其基因组大小约35 kb,表面主要衣壳蛋白相对分子质量约为35×103.该噬菌体感染宿主菌的潜伏期为20 min,爆发期为60 min,裂解量为350,耐受突变率为2.5×10-10,对pH值耐受

  7. Reduced binding of the endolysin LysTP712 to Lactococcus lactis ΔftsH contributes to phage resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CLARA eROCES

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Absence of the membrane protease FtsH in Lactococcus lactis hinders release of the bacteriophage TP712. In this work we have analysed the mechanism responsible for the non-lytic phenotype of L. lactis ΔftsH after phage infection. The lytic cassette of TP712 contains a putative antiholin-pinholin system and a modular endolysin (LysTP712. Inducible expression of the holin gene demonstrated the presence of a dual start motif which is functional in both wildtype and L. lactis ΔftsH cells. Moreover, simulating holin activity with ionophores accelerated lysis of wildtype cells but not L. lactis ΔftsH cells, suggesting inhibition of the endolysin rather than a role of FtsH in holin activation. However, zymograms revealed the synthesis of an active endolysin in both wildtype and L. lactis ΔftsH TP712 lysogens. A reporter protein was generated by fusing the cell wall binding domain of LysTP712 to the fluorescent mCherry protein. Binding of this reporter protein took place at the septa of both wildtype and L. lactis ΔftsH cells as shown by fluorescence microscopy. Nonetheless, fluorescence spectroscopy demonstrated that mutant cells bound 40 % less protein. In conclusion, the non-lytic phenotype of L. lactis ΔftsH is not due to direct action of the FtsH protease on the phage lytic proteins but rather to a putative function of FtsH in modulating the architecture of the L. lactis cell envelope that contributes to a lower affinity of the phage endolysin to its substrate and, likely to its catalytic activity.

  8. Reduced Binding of the Endolysin LysTP712 to Lactococcus lactis ΔftsH Contributes to Phage Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roces, Clara; Campelo, Ana B; Escobedo, Susana; Wegmann, Udo; García, Pilar; Rodríguez, Ana; Martínez, Beatriz

    2016-01-01

    Absence of the membrane protease FtsH in Lactococcus lactis hinders release of the bacteriophage TP712. In this work we have analyzed the mechanism responsible for the non-lytic phenotype of L. lactis ΔftsH after phage infection. The lytic cassette of TP712 contains a putative antiholin-pinholin system and a modular endolysin (LysTP712). Inducible expression of the holin gene demonstrated the presence of a dual start motif which is functional in both wildtype and L. lactis ΔftsH cells. Moreover, simulating holin activity with ionophores accelerated lysis of wildtype cells but not L. lactis ΔftsH cells, suggesting inhibition of the endolysin rather than a role of FtsH in holin activation. However, zymograms revealed the synthesis of an active endolysin in both wildtype and L. lactis ΔftsH TP712 lysogens. A reporter protein was generated by fusing the cell wall binding domain of LysTP712 to the fluorescent mCherry protein. Binding of this reporter protein took place at the septa of both wildtype and L. lactis ΔftsH cells as shown by fluorescence microscopy. Nonetheless, fluorescence spectroscopy demonstrated that mutant cells bound 40% less protein. In conclusion, the non-lytic phenotype of L. lactis ΔftsH is not due to direct action of the FtsH protease on the phage lytic proteins but rather to a putative function of FtsH in modulating the architecture of the L. lactis cell envelope that results in a lower affinity of the phage endolysin to its substrate. PMID:26904011

  9. Three New Escherichia coli Phages from the Human Gut Show Promising Potential for Phage Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalmasso, Marion; Strain, Ronan; Neve, Horst; Franz, Charles M A P; Cousin, Fabien J; Ross, R Paul; Hill, Colin

    2016-01-01

    With the emergence of multi-drug resistant bacteria the use of bacteriophages (phages) is gaining renewed interest as promising anti-microbial agents. The aim of this study was to isolate and characterize phages from human fecal samples. Three new coliphages, ɸAPCEc01, ɸAPCEc02 and ɸAPCEc03, were isolated. Their phenotypic and genomic characteristics, and lytic activity against biofilm, and in combination with ciprofloxacin, were investigated. All three phages reduced the growth of E. coli strain DPC6051 at multiplicity of infection (MOI) between 10-3 and 105. A cocktail of all three phages completely inhibited the growth of E. coli. The phage cocktail also reduced biofilm formation and prevented the emergence of phage-resistant mutants which occurred with single phage. When combined with ciprofloxacin, phage alone or in cocktail inhibited the growth of E. coli and prevented the emergence of resistant mutants. These three new phages are promising biocontrol agents for E. coli infections. PMID:27280590

  10. Experimental Phage Therapy for Burkholderia pseudomallei Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guang-Han, Ong; Leang-Chung, Choh; Vellasamy, Kumutha Malar; Mariappan, Vanitha; Li-Yen, Chang; Vadivelu, Jamuna

    2016-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei is an intracellular Gram-negative bacterial pathogen intrinsically resistant to a variety of antibiotics. Phages have been developed for use as an alternative treatment therapy, particularly for bacterial infections that do not respond to conventional antibiotics. In this study, we investigated the use of phages to treat cells infected with B. pseudomallei. Phage C34 isolated from seawater was purified and characterised on the basis of its host range and morphology using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Phage C34 was able to lyse 39.5% of B. pseudomallei clinical strains. Due to the presence of contractile tail, phage C34 is classified as a member of the family Myoviridae, a tailed double-stranded DNA virus. When 2 × 105 A549 cells were exposed to 2 × 107 PFU of phage C34, 24 hours prior to infection with 2 × 106 CFU of B. pseudomallei, it was found that the survivability of the cells increased to 41.6 ± 6.8% as compared to 22.8 ± 6.0% in untreated control. Additionally, application of phage successfully rescued 33.3% of mice infected with B. pseudomallei and significantly reduced the bacterial load in the spleen of the phage-treated mice. These findings indicate that phage can be a potential antimicrobial agent for B. pseudomallei infections. PMID:27387381

  11. Allelic variation on murine chromosome 11 modifies host inflammatory responses and resistance to Bacillus anthracis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jill K Terra

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Anthrax is a potentially fatal disease resulting from infection with Bacillus anthracis. The outcome of infection is influenced by pathogen-encoded virulence factors such as lethal toxin (LT, as well as by genetic variation within the host. To identify host genes controlling susceptibility to anthrax, a library of congenic mice consisting of strains with homozygous chromosomal segments from the LT-responsive CAST/Ei strain introgressed on a LT-resistant C57BL/6 (B6 background was screened for response to LT. Three congenic strains containing CAST/Ei regions of chromosome 11 were identified that displayed a rapid inflammatory response to LT similar to, but more severe than that driven by a LT-responsive allele of the inflammasome constituent NRLP1B. Importantly, increased response to LT in congenic mice correlated with greater resistance to infection by the Sterne strain of B. anthracis. The genomic region controlling the inflammatory response to LT was mapped to 66.36-74.67 Mb on chromosome 11, a region that encodes the LT-responsive CAST/Ei allele of Nlrp1b. However, known downstream effects of NLRP1B activation, including macrophage pyroptosis, cytokine release, and leukocyte infiltration could not fully explain the response to LT or the resistance to B. anthracis Sterne in congenic mice. Further, the exacerbated response in congenic mice is inherited in a recessive manner while the Nlrp1b-mediated response to LT is dominant. Finally, congenic mice displayed increased responsiveness in a model of sepsis compared with B6 mice. In total, these data suggest that allelic variation of one or more chromosome 11 genes in addition to Nlrp1b controls the severity of host response to multiple inflammatory stimuli and contributes to resistance to B. anthracis Sterne. Expression quantitative trait locus analysis revealed 25 genes within this region as high priority candidates for contributing to the host response to LT.

  12. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus saprophyticus in Sweden carries various types of staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Söderquist, B; Berglund, C

    2009-12-01

    Staphylococcus saprophyticus is a common cause of uncomplicated urinary tract infections and is usually susceptible to the antimicrobial agents used for their treatment. However, S. saprophyticus resistant to beta-lactam antibiotics and carrying mecA has been reported. Eight Swedish isolates of mecA-positive S. saprophyticus with diverse origin carrying at least three different types of staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) are described here.

  13. Phage and Yeast Display.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheehan, Jared; Marasco, Wayne A

    2015-02-01

    Despite the availability of antimicrobial drugs, the continued development of microbial resistance--established through escape mutations and the emergence of resistant strains--limits their clinical utility. The discovery of novel, therapeutic, monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) offers viable clinical alternatives in the treatment and prophylaxis of infectious diseases. Human mAb-based therapies are typically nontoxic in patients and demonstrate high specificity for the intended microbial target. This specificity prevents negative impacts on the patient microbiome and avoids driving the resistance of nontarget species. The in vitro selection of human antibody fragment libraries displayed on phage or yeast surfaces represents a group of well-established technologies capable of generating human mAbs. The advantage of these forms of microbial display is the large repertoire of human antibody fragments present during a single selection campaign. Furthermore, the in vitro selection environments of microbial surface display allow for the rapid isolation of antibodies--and their encoding genes--against infectious pathogens and their toxins that are impractical within in vivo systems, such as murine hybridomas. This article focuses on the technologies of phage display and yeast display, as these strategies relate to the discovery of human mAbs for the treatment and vaccine development of infectious diseases. PMID:26104550

  14. Complete Genome Sequence of a Klebsiella pneumoniae Isolate with Chromosomally Encoded Carbapenem Resistance and Colibactin Synthesis Loci

    OpenAIRE

    Conlan, Sean; Deming, Clayton; Tsai, Yu-Chih; Lau, Anna F.; Dekker, John P.; Korlach, Jonas; Segre, Julia A

    2014-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is an important nosocomial pathogen, and multidrug-resistant strains have become a worldwide concern. Here, we report the complete genome of a K. pneumoniae isolate with chromosomally integrated bla KPC genes and a colibactin synthesis locus.

  15. Differential epigenetic compatibility of qnr antibiotic resistance determinants with the chromosome of Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María B Sánchez

    Full Text Available Environmental bacteria harbor a plethora of genes that, upon their horizontal transfer to new hosts, may confer resistance to antibiotics, although the number of such determinants actually acquired by pathogenic bacteria is very low. The founder effect, fitness costs and ecological connectivity all influence the chances of resistance transfer being successful. We examined the importance of these bottlenecks using the family of quinolone resistance determinants Qnr. The results indicate the epigenetic compatibility of a determinant with the host genome to be of great importance in the acquisition and spread of resistance. A plasmid carrying the widely distributed QnrA determinant was stable in Escherichia coli, whereas the SmQnr determinant was unstable despite both proteins having very similar tertiary structures. This indicates that the fitness costs associated with the acquisition of antibiotic resistance may not derive from a non-specific metabolic burden, but from the acquired gene causing specific changes in bacterial metabolic and regulatory networks. The observed stabilization of the plasmid encoding SmQnr by chromosomal mutations, including a mutant lacking the global regulator H-NS, reinforces this idea. Since quinolones are synthetic antibiotics, and since the origin of QnrA is the environmental bacterium Shewanella algae, the role of QnrA in this organism is unlikely to be that of conferring resistance. Its evolution toward this may have occurred through mutations or because of an environmental change (exaptation. The present results indicate that the chromosomally encoded Qnr determinants of S. algae can confer quinolone resistance upon their transfer to E. coli without the need of any further mutation. These results suggest that exaptation is important in the evolution of antibiotic resistance.

  16. Phage-host interplay: examples from tailed phages and Gram-negative bacterial pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soraya eChaturongakul

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Complex interactions between bacteriophages and their bacterial hosts play significant roles in shaping the structure of environmental microbial communities, not only by genetic transduction but also by modification of bacterial gene expression patterns. Survival of phages solely depends on their ability to infect their bacterial hosts, most importantly during phage entry. Successful dynamic adaptation of bacteriophages when facing selective pressures, such as host adaptation and resistance, dictates their abundance and diversification. Co-evolution of the phage tail fibers and bacterial receptors determine bacterial host ranges, mechanisms of phage entry and other infection parameters. This review summarizes the current knowledge about the physical interactions between tailed bacteriophages and bacterial pathogens (e.g., Salmonella enterica and Pseudomonas aeruginosa and the influences of the phage on host gene expression. Understanding these interactions can offer insights into phage-host dynamics and suggest novel strategies for the design of bacterial pathogen biological controls.

  17. Introgression of Resistance to Powdery Mildew Conferred by Chromosome 2R by Crossing Wheat Nullisomic 2D with Rye

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Using the nullisomic back-cross procedure, four wheat-rye chromosome substitution 2R (2D) lines with different agronomic performance, designated WR02-145-1, WR01-145-2, WR02-145-3, and WR02-145-4, were produced from a cross between 2D nullisomic wheat (Triticum aestivum L. cv. "Xiaoyan 6") and rye (Secale cereale L. cv. "German White"). The chromosomal constitution of 2n=42=21 in WR02-145 lines was confirmed by cytological and molecular cytogenetic methods. Using genomic in situ hybridization on root tip chromosome preparations, a pair of intact rye chromosomes was detected in the WR02-145 lines. PCR using chromosome-specific primers confirmed the presence of 2R chromosomes of rye in these wheat-rye lines, indicating that WR02-145 lines are disomic chromosome substitution lines 2R (2D). The WR02-145 lines are resistant to the powdery mildew (Erysiphe graminis DC. f. sp. tritici E. Marchal) isolates prevalent in northern China and may possess gene(s) for resistance to powdery mildew, which differ from the previously identified Pm7 gene located on chromosome 2RL. The newly developed "Xiaoyan 6"- "German White"2R (2D) chromosome substitution lines are genetically stable, show desirable agronomic traits, and are expected to be useful in wheat improvement.

  18. Supersize me: Cronobacter sakazakii phage GAP32

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbasifar, Reza; Griffiths, Mansel W. [Canadian Research Institute for Food Safety, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON, Canada N1G 2W1 (Canada); Sabour, Parviz M. [Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Guelph Food Research Centre, Guelph, ON, Canada N1G 5C9 (Canada); Ackermann, Hans-Wolfgang [Department of Microbiology-Infectiology and Immunology, Faculty of Medicine, Université Laval, Quebec, QC (Canada); Vandersteegen, Katrien; Lavigne, Rob [Laboratory of Gene Technology, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Leuven (Belgium); Noben, Jean-Paul [Biomedical Research Institute and Transnational University Limburg, School of Life Sciences, Hasselt University, Diepenbeek (Belgium); Alanis Villa, Argentina; Abbasifar, Arash [Canadian Research Institute for Food Safety, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON, Canada N1G 2W1 (Canada); Nash, John H.E. [Public Health Agency of Canada, Laboratory for Foodborne Zoonoses, Guelph, ON, Canada N1G 3W4 (Canada); Kropinski, Andrew M., E-mail: akropins@uoguelph.ca [Public Health Agency of Canada, Laboratory for Foodborne Zoonoses, Guelph, ON, Canada N1G 3W4 (Canada); Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON, Canada N1G 2W1 (Canada)

    2014-07-15

    Cronobacter sakazakii is a Gram-negative pathogen found in milk-based formulae that causes infant meningitis. Bacteriophages have been proposed to control bacterial pathogens; however, comprehensive knowledge about a phage is required to ensure its safety before clinical application. We have characterized C. sakazakii phage vB{sub C}saM{sub G}AP32 (GAP32), which possesses the second largest sequenced phage genome (358,663 bp). A total of 571 genes including 545 protein coding sequences and 26 tRNAs were identified, thus more genes than in the smallest bacterium, Mycoplasma genitalium G37. BLASTP and HHpred searches, together with proteomic analyses reveal that only 23.9% of the putative proteins have defined functions. Some of the unique features of this phage include: a chromosome condensation protein, two copies of the large subunit terminase, a predicted signal-arrest-release lysin; and an RpoD-like protein, which is possibly involved in the switch from immediate early to delayed early transcription. Its closest relatives are all extremely large myoviruses, namely coliphage PBECO4 and Klebsiella phage vB{sub K}leM-RaK2, with whom it shares approximately 44% homologous proteins. Since the homologs are not evenly distributed, we propose that these three phages belong to a new subfamily. - Highlights: • Cronobacter sakazakii phage vB{sub C}saM{sub G}AP32 has a genome of 358,663 bp. • It encodes 545 proteins which is more than Mycoplasma genitalium G37. • It is a member of the Myoviridae. • It is peripherally related to coliphage PBECO4 and Klebsiella phage vB{sub K}leM-RaK2. • GAP32 encodes a chromosome condensation protein.

  19. Supersize me: Cronobacter sakazakii phage GAP32

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cronobacter sakazakii is a Gram-negative pathogen found in milk-based formulae that causes infant meningitis. Bacteriophages have been proposed to control bacterial pathogens; however, comprehensive knowledge about a phage is required to ensure its safety before clinical application. We have characterized C. sakazakii phage vBCsaMGAP32 (GAP32), which possesses the second largest sequenced phage genome (358,663 bp). A total of 571 genes including 545 protein coding sequences and 26 tRNAs were identified, thus more genes than in the smallest bacterium, Mycoplasma genitalium G37. BLASTP and HHpred searches, together with proteomic analyses reveal that only 23.9% of the putative proteins have defined functions. Some of the unique features of this phage include: a chromosome condensation protein, two copies of the large subunit terminase, a predicted signal-arrest-release lysin; and an RpoD-like protein, which is possibly involved in the switch from immediate early to delayed early transcription. Its closest relatives are all extremely large myoviruses, namely coliphage PBECO4 and Klebsiella phage vBKleM-RaK2, with whom it shares approximately 44% homologous proteins. Since the homologs are not evenly distributed, we propose that these three phages belong to a new subfamily. - Highlights: • Cronobacter sakazakii phage vBCsaMGAP32 has a genome of 358,663 bp. • It encodes 545 proteins which is more than Mycoplasma genitalium G37. • It is a member of the Myoviridae. • It is peripherally related to coliphage PBECO4 and Klebsiella phage vBKleM-RaK2. • GAP32 encodes a chromosome condensation protein

  20. Localization of the Laevigatum powdery mildew resistance gene to barley chromosome 2 by the use of RFLP markers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giese, H.; Holm-Jensen, A.G.; Jensen, H.P.;

    1993-01-01

    The powdery mildew disease resistance gene Ml(La) was found to belong to a locus on barely chromosome 2. We suggest that this locus be designated MlLa. Linkage analysis was carried out on 72 chromosome-doubled, spring-type progeny lines from a cross between the winter var 'Vogelsanger Gold' and t......' and the spring var 'Alf'. A map of chromosome 2 spanning 119 cM and flanked by two peroxidase gene loci was constructed. In addition to the Laevigatum resistance locus the map includes nine RFLP markers, the two peroxidase gene loci and the six-row locus in barley....

  1. Analisis Tipe Staphylococcal Cassette Chromosome mec (SCCmec Isolat Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunarjati Sudigdoadi

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Resistance of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA were based mainly on insertion of mobile genetic elements namely Staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec in the chromosome of Staphylococcus aureus. SCCmec consists of recombinase genes (ccr, mec genes complex, additional resistance genes, and insertion sequences. Recombinase genes structure mediates transfer of SCCmec from one bacteria to another. Identification of SCCmec is very important to know basic genetic resistance and to predict spreading of MRSA. The aim of this research was to analyze SCCmec type and antimicrobial susceptibility patterns. The design of this study was observational analytic study by typing SCCmec and antimicrobial susceptibility testing on July– December 2007. Isolation and identification of 45 MRSA isolates was performed in the Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Padjadjaran, whereas identification of mecA gene and typing of SCCmec by multiplex PCR was performed in the Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, Sriwijaya University, Palembang. The result showed that all isolates contained mecA gene. Multiplex PCR revealed that 40 MRSA isolates had SCCmec type III and 5 isolates with type IV. All SCCmec type III isolates were multiresistant and all of the type IV were not multiresistant. In conclusion, MRSA isolates with SCCmec type III was associated with multiresistant whereas type IV was not.

  2. Heat tolerance of dairy lactococcal c2 phages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Cecilie Lykke Marvig; Basheer, Aideh; Neve, H.;

    2011-01-01

    Nine Lactococcus lactis c2 phages propagated on different hosts were screened for thermal resistance in skimmed milk. Pronounced variations in thermal resistance were found. Three phages displayed high sensitivity towards heat resulting in >8 log reductions after 70 °C for 5 min, whereas the most...... thermal resistant phages required 80 °C for 5 min to obtain the same reduction. Inactivation kinetics were determined for a thermo-sensitive and a thermo-resistant phage at 60–70 °C and 65–78 °C, respectively, using a submerged-coil system with extremely short heating-up times. Inactivation followed first...... thermal inactivated lysates (15% phage inactivation) of the heat tolerant phage P635....

  3. Diversity and Geographical Distribution of Flavobacterium psychrophilum Isolates and Their Phages: Patterns of Susceptibility to Phage Infection and Phage Host Range

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castillo, Daniel; Christiansen, Rói Hammershaimb; Espejo, Romilio;

    2014-01-01

    in disease control requires detailed knowledge about the diversity and dynamics of host susceptibility to phage infection. For this reason, we examined the genetic diversity of 49 F. psychrophilum strains isolated in three different areas (Chile, Denmark, and USA) through direct genome restriction enzyme...... analysis (DGREA) and their susceptibility to 33 bacteriophages isolated in Chile and Denmark, thus covering large geographical (>12,000 km) and temporal (>60 years) scales of isolation. An additional 40 phage-resistant isolates obtained from culture experiments after exposure to specific phages were...... examined for changes in phage susceptibility against the 33 phages. The F. psychrophilum and phage populations isolated from Chile and Denmark clustered into geographically distinct groups with respect to DGREA profile and host range, respectively. However, cross infection between Chilean phage isolates...

  4. A Cmv2 QTL on chromosome X affects MCMV resistance in New Zealand male mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Marisela R; Lundgren, Alyssa; Sabastian, Pearl; Li, Qian; Churchill, Gary; Brown, Michael G

    2009-07-01

    NK cell-mediated resistance to viruses is subject to genetic control in humans and mice. Here we used classical and quantitative genetic strategies to examine NK-mediated murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) control in genealogically related New Zealand white (NZW) and black (NZB) mice. NZW mice display NK cell-dependent MCMV resistance while NZB NK cells fail to limit viral replication after infection. Unlike Ly49H(+) NK resistance in C57BL/6 mice, NZW NK-mediated MCMV control was Ly49H-independent. Instead, MCMV resistance in NZW (Cmv2) involves multiple genetic factors. To establish the genetic basis of Cmv2 resistance, we further characterized a major chromosome X-linked resistance locus (DXMit216) responsible for innate MCMV control in NZW x NZB crosses. We found that the DXMit216 locus affects early MCMV control in New Zealand F(2) crosses and demonstrate that the NZB-derived DXMit216 allele enhances viral resistance in F(2) males. The evolutionary conservation of the DXMit216 region in mice and humans suggests that a Cmv2-related mechanism may affect human antiviral responses.

  5. Engineered phages for electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yue

    2016-11-15

    Phages are traditionally widely studied in biology and chemistry. In recent years, engineered phages have attracted significant attentions for functionalization or construction of electronic devices, due to their specific binding, catalytic, nucleating or electronic properties. To apply the engineered phages in electronics, these are a number of interesting questions: how to engineer phages for electronics? How are the engineered phages characterized? How to assemble materials with engineered phages? How are the engineered phages micro or nanopatterned? What are the strategies to construct electronics devices with engineered phages? This review will highlight the early attempts to address these questions and explore the fundamental and practical aspects of engineered phages in electronics, including the approaches for selection or expression of specific peptides on phage coat proteins, characterization of engineered phages in electronics, assembly of electronic materials, patterning of engineered phages, and construction of electronic devices. It provides the methodologies and opens up ex-cit-ing op-por-tu-ni-ties for the development of a variety of new electronic materials and devices based on engineered phages for future applications.

  6. HostPhinder: A Phage Host Prediction Tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villarroel, Julia; Kleinheinz, Kortine Annina; Jurtz, Vanessa Isabell; Zschach, Henrike; Lund, Ole; Nielsen, Morten; Larsen, Mette Voldby

    2016-01-01

    The current dramatic increase of antibiotic resistant bacteria has revitalised the interest in bacteriophages as alternative antibacterial treatment. Meanwhile, the development of bioinformatics methods for analysing genomic data places high-throughput approaches for phage characterization within reach. Here, we present HostPhinder, a tool aimed at predicting the bacterial host of phages by examining the phage genome sequence. Using a reference database of 2196 phages with known hosts, HostPhinder predicts the host species of a query phage as the host of the most genomically similar reference phages. As a measure of genomic similarity the number of co-occurring k-mers (DNA sequences of length k) is used. Using an independent evaluation set, HostPhinder was able to correctly predict host genus and species for 81% and 74% of the phages respectively, giving predictions for more phages than BLAST and significantly outperforming BLAST on phages for which both had predictions. HostPhinder predictions on phage draft genomes from the INTESTI phage cocktail corresponded well with the advertised targets of the cocktail. Our study indicates that for most phages genomic similarity correlates well with related bacterial hosts. HostPhinder is available as an interactive web service [1] and as a stand alone download from the Docker registry [2]. PMID:27153081

  7. HostPhinder: A Phage Host Prediction Tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Villarroel

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The current dramatic increase of antibiotic resistant bacteria has revitalised the interest in bacteriophages as alternative antibacterial treatment. Meanwhile, the development of bioinformatics methods for analysing genomic data places high-throughput approaches for phage characterization within reach. Here, we present HostPhinder, a tool aimed at predicting the bacterial host of phages by examining the phage genome sequence. Using a reference database of 2196 phages with known hosts, HostPhinder predicts the host species of a query phage as the host of the most genomically similar reference phages. As a measure of genomic similarity the number of co-occurring k-mers (DNA sequences of length k is used. Using an independent evaluation set, HostPhinder was able to correctly predict host genus and species for 81% and 74% of the phages respectively, giving predictions for more phages than BLAST and significantly outperforming BLAST on phages for which both had predictions. HostPhinder predictions on phage draft genomes from the INTESTI phage cocktail corresponded well with the advertised targets of the cocktail. Our study indicates that for most phages genomic similarity correlates well with related bacterial hosts. HostPhinder is available as an interactive web service [1] and as a stand alone download from the Docker registry [2].

  8. Chromosomally and Extrachromosomally Mediated High-Level Gentamicin Resistance in Streptococcus agalactiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sendi, Parham; Furitsch, Martina; Mauerer, Stefanie; Florindo, Carlos; Kahl, Barbara C; Shabayek, Sarah; Berner, Reinhard; Spellerberg, Barbara

    2016-03-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae (group B Streptococcus [GBS]) is a leading cause of sepsis in neonates. The rate of invasive GBS disease in nonpregnant adults also continues to climb. Aminoglycosides alone have little or no effect on GBS, but synergistic killing with penicillin has been shown in vitro. High-level gentamicin resistance (HLGR) in GBS isolates, however, leads to the loss of a synergistic effect. We therefore performed a multicenter study to determine the frequency of HLGR GBS isolates and to elucidate the molecular mechanisms leading to gentamicin resistance. From eight centers in four countries, 1,128 invasive and colonizing GBS isolates were pooled and investigated for the presence of HLGR. We identified two strains that displayed HLGR (BSU1203 and BSU452), both of which carried the aacA-aphD gene, typically conferring HLGR. However, only one strain (BSU1203) also carried the previously described chromosomal gentamicin resistance transposon designated Tn3706. For the other strain (BSU452), plasmid purification and subsequent DNA sequencing resulted in the detection of plasmid pIP501 carrying a remnant of a Tn3 family transposon. Its ability to confer HLGR was proven by transfer into an Enterococcus faecalis isolate. Conversely, loss of HLGR was documented after curing both GBS BSU452 and the transformed E. faecalis strain from the plasmid. This is the first report showing plasmid-mediated HLGR in GBS. Thus, in our clinical GBS isolates, HLGR is mediated both chromosomally and extrachromosomally. PMID:26729498

  9. Staphylococcal Cassette Chromosome mec Types Among Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Northern Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taherirad, Akram; Jahanbakhsh, Roghayeh; Shakeri, Fatemeh; Anvary, Shaghayegh; Ghaemi, Ezzat Allah

    2016-01-01

    Background Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a common cause of nosocomial and community-acquired infections around the world. Staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) typing methods are often used to study MRSA molecular epidemiology. Objectives The current study was designed to explore the distribution profiles of different SCCmec types among methicillin-resistant S. aureus strains isolated from hospitals in Gorgan, in northern Iran, and to correlate the types into observed bacterial virulence factors. Materials and Methods Staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec typing of 62 MRSA strains isolated from patients and health-care workers in Gorgan was performed using multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay. The prevalence of the strains was then compared according to isolation source, antibiotic susceptibility profiles, biofilm production, and the presence of the Panton-Valentine gene in isolates. Results The most common SCCmec type was type III, with a frequency rate of 76%, followed by types IV, I, and V, with frequency rates of 11.2%, 4.8%, and 3.2%, respectively; three isolates (4.8%) were not typeable by this method. SCCmec type I was only isolated from blood culture, and types IV and V were mainly isolated from wounds and urine samples; SCCmec type III was isolated from all of the clinically samples. All of the MRSA strains that were isolated from healthy carriers were type III. Multidrug resistance in the type III strains was higher compared to the other types. The frequencies of Panton-Valentine and biofilm production were significantly lower in the type III strains compared to the other SCCmec types (P < 0.05). Conclusions Similarly to other geographical regions of Iran, the SCCmec type III MRSA strain was the most frequently isolated strain from patients in Gorgan. Staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec type III showed fewer virulence factors compared to other SCCmec types. PMID:27800133

  10. Fine mapping of quantitative trait loci for mastitis resistance on bovine chromosome 11

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schulman, N F; Sahana, G; Iso-Touru, T;

    2009-01-01

    Quantitative trait loci (QTL) affecting clinical mastitis (CM) and somatic cell score (SCS) were mapped on bovine chromosome 11. The mapping population consisted of 14 grandsire families belonging to three Nordic red cattle breeds: Finnish Ayrshire (FA), Swedish Red and White (SRB) and Danish Red......, each affecting one trait; or one QTL affecting a single trait. A QTL affecting CM was fine-mapped. In FA, a haplotype having a strong association with a high negative effect on mastitis resistance was identified. The mapping precision of an earlier detected SCS-QTL was not improved by the LDLA analysis...

  11. Resistance to β-Lactams in Neisseria ssp Due to Chromosomally Encoded Penicillin-Binding Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Zapun

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Neisseria meningitidis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae are human pathogens that cause a variety of life-threatening systemic and local infections, such as meningitis or gonorrhoea. The treatment of such infection is becoming more difficult due to antibiotic resistance. The focus of this review is on the mechanism of reduced susceptibility to penicillin and other β-lactams due to the modification of chromosomally encoded penicillin-binding proteins (PBP, in particular PBP2 encoded by the penA gene. The variety of penA alleles and resulting variant PBP2 enzymes is described and the important amino acid substitutions are presented and discussed in a structural context.

  12. A chromosome study of 6-thioguanine-resistant mutants in T lymphocytes of Hiroshima atomic bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cytogenetic characterizations were made of lymphocyte colonies established from somatic mutation assays for 6-thioguanine (TG) resistance in Hiroshima atomic bomb survivors. G-banded chromosomes were analyzed in both TG-resistant (TGr) and wild-type (not TG-selected) colonies. Included were 45 TGr and 19 wild-type colonies derived from proximally exposed A-bomb survivors, as well as colonies from distally exposed control individuals who were not exposed to a significant level of A-bomb radiation (18 TGr and 9 wild-type colonies). Various structural and numerical abnormalities of chromosomes were observed in both TGr and wild-type colonies. Aberrations of the X chromosome, on which the hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) locus is present, were found in six colonies: two resistant colonies from controls [45,X/46,XX; 46,X,ins(X)], three resistant colonies [45,X/46,XX/46,X,+mar; 46,X,t(Xq+;14q-); 46,Y,t(Xq-;5q+)], and one wild-type colony [45,X/47,XXX] from proximally exposed persons. In cases with exchange aberrations, each of the break points on the X chromosome was situated proximally to band q26 where the HPRT locus is known to be assigned. DNA replicating patterns were also studied, and it was found that abnormal X chromosomes showed early replicating patterns, while normal X chromosomes showed late replicating patterns. (author)

  13. Chromosomal location of genomic SSR markers associated with yellow rust resistance in Turkish bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L.)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    F. Senturk Akfirat; F. Ertugrul; S. Hasancebi; Y. Aydin; K. Akan; Z. Mert; M. Cakir; A. Altinkut Uncuoglu

    2013-08-01

    We have previously reported Xgwm382 as a diagnostic marker for disease resistance against yellow rust in Izgi2001 × ES14 F2 population. Among the same earlier tested 230 primers, one SSR marker (Xgwm311) also amplified a fragment which is present in the resistant parent and in the resistant bulks, but absent in the susceptible parent and in the susceptible bulks. To understand the chromosome group location of these diagnostic markers, Xgwm382 and Xgwm311, in the same population, we selected 16 SSR markers mapped only in one genome of chromosome group 2 around 1–21 cM distance to these diagnostic markers based on the SSR consensus map of wheat. Out of 16 SSRs, Xwmc658 identified resistant F2 individuals as a diagnostic marker for yellow rust disease and provided the location of Xgwm382 and Xgwm311 on chromosome 2AL in our plant material.

  14. Analysis of Resistant Spectrum to Rice Blast in Transgenic Rice Lines Introduced Lysozyme Gene from T4 Phage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Ming-hui; LI Cheng-yun; LI Jin-bin; TAN Xue-lin; TIAN Wen-zhong; TANG Zuo-shun

    2003-01-01

    The receptor cultivar Nan29 and thirty-six T5 rice lines derived from ten T0 generation transgen-ic plants harboring lysozyme gene were challenged in the greenhouse by inoculating 63 isolates belonging to 48races of Magnaporthe grisea from Yunnan Province. The transgenic rice lines exhibited resistance to morethan 72% of isolates inoculated in this experiment, and 38.1% (24 isolates) of them could infect the receptorcultivar Nan29. The results indicated that the transgenic rice lines possessed wide-spectrum resistance againstvarious rice blast races and the resistant spectrum of rice lines were different although some lines derived fromsame T0 plant. The transgenic rice lines exhibited also high resistance to leaf and neck blast in the disease fieldevaluation, but not all of resistant lines against leaf blast were resistant to neck blast.

  15. 噬菌体治疗耐药性幽门螺杆菌的研究进展%Advances of phage therapy in antibiotic-resistant Helicobacter pylori infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    熊婧; 白杨

    2011-01-01

    幽门螺杆菌感染是胃癌重要致病因子.目前,幽门螺杆菌对抗生素耐药情况日趋普遍.噬菌体治疗作为一种生物疗法在治疗幽门螺杆菌方面有极大的潜力.本文就噬菌体治疗耐药性幽门螺杆菌的现状及趋势进行综述.%Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is one of the most important risk factors leading to gastric cancer.To date, it has been more and more popular that H. pylori is resistant to antibiotics. Phage therapy has a great advantages in control of H. pylori infection. In this article, we will review the advance of phage therapy in antibiotic-resistant H.pylori infection.

  16. Phage lytic enzymes: a history

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    David; Trudil

    2015-01-01

    There are many recent studies regarding the efficacy of bacteriophage-related lytic enzymes: the enzymes of ‘bacteria-eaters’ or viruses that infect bacteria. By degrading the cell wall of the targeted bacteria, these lytic enzymes have been shown to efficiently lyse Gram-positive bacteria without affecting normal flora and non-related bacteria. Recent studies have suggested approaches for lysing Gram-negative bacteria as well(Briersa Y, et al., 2014). These enzymes include: phage-lysozyme, endolysin, lysozyme, lysin, phage lysin, phage lytic enzymes, phageassociated enzymes, enzybiotics, muralysin, muramidase, virolysin and designations such as Ply, PAE and others. Bacteriophages are viruses that kill bacteria, do not contribute to antimicrobial resistance, are easy to develop, inexpensive to manufacture and safe for humans, animals and the environment. The current focus on lytic enzymes has been on their use as anti-infectives in humans and more recently in agricultural research models. The initial translational application of lytic enzymes, however, was not associated with treating or preventing a specifi c disease but rather as an extraction method to be incorporated in a rapid bacterial detection assay(Bernstein D, 1997).The current review traces the translational history of phage lytic enzymes–from their initial discovery in 1986 for the rapid detection of group A streptococcus in clinical specimens to evolving applications in the detection and prevention of disease in humans and in agriculture.

  17. Phage Therapy -- Everything Old Is New again

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew M Kropinski

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The study of bacterial viruses (bacteriophages or phages proved pivotal in the nascence of the disciplines of molecular biology and microbial genetics, providing important information on the central processes of the bacterial cell (DNA replication, transcription and translation and on how DNA can be transferred from one cell to another. As a result of the pioneering genetics studies and modern genomics, it is now known that phages have contributed to the evolution of the microbial cell and to its pathogenic potential. Because of their ability to transmit genes, phages have been exploited to develop cloning vector systems. They also provide a plethora of enzymes for the modern molecular biologist. Until the introduction of antibiotics, phages were used to treat bacterial infections (with variable success. Western science is now having to re-evaluate the application of phage therapy -- a therapeutic modality that never went out of vogue in Eastern Europe -- because of the emergence of an alarming number of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. The present article introduces the reader to phage biology, and the benefits and pitfalls of phage therapy in humans and animals.

  18. Paving a regulatory pathway for phage therapy: Europe should muster the resources to financially, technically and legally support the introduction of phage therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Huys, Isabelle; Pirnay, Jean-Paul; Lavigne, Rob; Jennes, Serge; De Vos, Daniel; Casteels, Minne; Verbeken, Gilbert

    2013-01-01

    The growing problem of antibiotic-resistant bacteria has re-kindled interest in phage-based therapies. Yet, the use of phages to treat life-threatening bacterial infections is held back by the lack of an appropriate regulatory framework for phage therapy.

  19. Characterisation of recently emerged multiple antibiotic-resistant Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium DT104 and other multiresistant phage types from Danish pig herds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baggesen, Dorte Lau; Aarestrup, Frank Møller

    1998-01-01

    A total of 670 isolates of Salmonella enterica were isolated from Danish pig herds, phage typed and tested for susceptibility to amoxycillin + clavulanate, ampicillin, colistin, enrofloxacin, gentamicin, neomycin, spectinomycin, streptomycin, tetracyclines, and trimethoprim + sulphadiazine. S...

  20. Isolation and Characterization of Phages Infecting Bacillus subtilis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Krasowska

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacteriophages have been suggested as an alternative approach to reduce the amount of pathogens in various applications. Bacteriophages of various specificity and virulence were isolated as a means of controlling food-borne pathogens. We studied the interaction of bacteriophages with Bacillus species, which are very often persistent in industrial applications such as food production due to their antibiotic resistance and spore formation. A comparative study using electron microscopy, PFGE, and SDS-PAGE as well as determination of host range, pH and temperature resistance, adsorption rate, latent time, and phage burst size was performed on three phages of the Myoviridae family and one phage of the Siphoviridae family which infected Bacillus subtilis strains. The phages are morphologically different and characterized by icosahedral heads and contractile (SIOΦ, SUBω, and SPOσ phages or noncontractile (ARπ phage tails. The genomes of SIOΦ and SUBω are composed of 154 kb. The capsid of SIOΦ is composed of four proteins. Bacteriophages SPOσ and ARπ have genome sizes of 25 kbp and 40 kbp, respectively. Both phages as well as SUBω phage have 14 proteins in their capsids. Phages SIOΦ and SPOσ are resistant to high temperatures and to the acid (4.0 and alkaline (9.0 and 10.0 pH.

  1. Chromosomal inversions among insecticide-resistant strains of Anopheles stephensi Liston, a malaria mosquito.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shetty, N J; Hariprasad, T P N; Sanil, D; Zin, T

    2013-11-01

    Polytene chromosomes were prepared from the ovarian nurse cells of semi-gravid females of ten insecticide-resistant strains of Anopheles stephensi. Altogether, 16 heterozygous paracentric inversions, namely b/+ (11D-16C) in alphamethrin; i/+ (14B-18A) and h/+ (27B-28A) in DDT; j/+ (14A-16B) in chlorpyrifos; k/+ (11D-16B) in cyfluthrin; l/+ (11A-16C) in deltamethrin; m/+ (14B-15C) and e/+ (32A-33B) in bifenthrin; n/+ (12D-14B), f/+ (33A-36A) and g/+ (33C-34A) in propoxur; o/+ (11A-12D), h/+ (37A-37C) and i/+ (31C-32C) in temephos; d/+ (33D-35C) in carbofuran and a/+ (41C-43B) in neem strains, were reported. No inversions were observed in X chromosome so far. The frequency of inversions in different insecticides was found to be highest in the 2R arm, followed by the 3R arm. Such inversions were not reported in the corresponding susceptible strains or in the parental stocks. PMID:23982309

  2. Analysis of Plasmid and Chromosomal DNA of Multidrug-Resistant Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhi from Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirza, S.; Kariuki, S.; Mamun, K. Z.; Beeching, N. J.; Hart, C. A.

    2000-01-01

    Molecular analysis of chromosomal DNA from 193 multidrug-resistant (MDR) Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi isolates from 1990 to 1995 from Pakistan, Kuwait, Malaysia, Bangladesh, and India produced a total of five major different pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) patterns. Even within a particular country MDR S. enterica serovar Typhi DNA was found to be in different PFGE groups. Similar self-transferable 98-MDa plasmids belonging to either incompatibility group incHI1 or incHI1/FIIA were implicated in the MDR phenotype in S. enterica serovar Typhi isolates from all the locations except Quetta, Pakistan, where the majority were of incFIA. A total of five different PFGE genotypes with six different plasmids, based on incompatibility and restriction endonuclease analysis groups, were found among these MDR S. enterica serovar Typhi isolates. PMID:10747124

  3. Mutant dihydrofolate reductase-thymidylate synthase genes in pyrimethamine-resistant Plasmodium falciparum with polymorphic chromosome duplications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, M; Gu, H M; Bzik, D J; Li, W B; Inselburg, J

    1990-08-01

    We have identified dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) gene point mutations and chromosomal changes in pyrimethamine-resistant mutants selected in vitro of Plasmodium falciparum strain FCR3. A pyrimethamine-resistant derivative of the pyrimethamine-sensitive strain FCR3, FCR3-D8, that had been grown in the absence of pyrimethamine for an extended time, was grown in two concentrations of pyrimethamine, and surviving drug-resistant parasites were subcloned. One selected mutant, FCR3-D81, that grew at 1 X 10(-6) M pyrimethamine, contained a single point mutation in the DHFR domain which caused an amino acid change (Phe to Ser) at amino acid 223, whereas another mutant, FCR3-D85, that grew at 5 X 10(-6) M pyrimethamine had that same mutation and an additional point mutation that changed amino acid 54 (Asp to Asn). The selection of FCR3-D85, whose nucleotide sequence was identical to that previously reported for FCR3-D8, confirmed that the original FCR3-D8 parasite population had changed during extended growth in vitro in the absence of drug pressure. FCR3-D81 and FCR3-D85 cells contained different pairs of polymorphic chromosomes that hybridized to a DHFR-TS probe as well as to three other chromosome 4 specific DNAs, indicating that at least part of chromosome 4 had been duplicated and that these parasites were aneuploid with 15 rather than 14 chromosomes. The mutant DHFR-TS genes were diploid. We consider the roles of the polymorphic chromosome duplications and DHFR point mutation(s) as causes of pyrimethamine resistance. PMID:2233901

  4. Bacteriophages and Phage-Derived Proteins – Application Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drulis-Kawa, Zuzanna; Majkowska-Skrobek, Grazyna; Maciejewska, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Currently, the bacterial resistance, especially to most commonly used antibiotics has proved to be a severe therapeutic problem. Nosocomial and community-acquired infections are usually caused by multidrug resistant strains. Therefore, we are forced to develop an alternative or supportive treatment for successful cure of life-threatening infections. The idea of using natural bacterial pathogens such as bacteriophages is already well known. Many papers have been published proving the high antibacterial efficacy of lytic phages tested in animal models as well as in the clinic. Researchers have also investigated the application of non-lytic phages and temperate phages, with promising results. Moreover, the development of molecular biology and novel generation methods of sequencing has opened up new possibilities in the design of engineered phages and recombinant phage-derived proteins. Encouraging performances were noted especially for phage enzymes involved in the first step of viral infection responsible for bacterial envelope degradation, named depolymerases. There are at least five major groups of such enzymes – peptidoglycan hydrolases, endosialidases, endorhamnosidases, alginate lyases and hyaluronate lyases – that have application potential. There is also much interest in proteins encoded by lysis cassette genes (holins, endolysins, spanins) responsible for progeny release during the phage lytic cycle. In this review, we discuss several issues of phage and phage-derived protein application approaches in therapy, diagnostics and biotechnology in general. PMID:25666799

  5. Introgression of chromosome segments from multiple alien species in wheat breeding lines with wheat streak mosaic virus resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, N; Heslop-Harrison, Js Pat; Ahmad, H; Graybosch, R A; Hein, G L; Schwarzacher, T

    2016-08-01

    Pyramiding of alien-derived Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV) resistance and resistance enhancing genes in wheat is a cost-effective and environmentally safe strategy for disease control. PCR-based markers and cytogenetic analysis with genomic in situ hybridisation were applied to identify alien chromatin in four genetically diverse populations of wheat (Triticum aestivum) lines incorporating chromosome segments from Thinopyrum intermedium and Secale cereale (rye). Out of 20 experimental lines, 10 carried Th. intermedium chromatin as T4DL*4Ai#2S translocations, while, unexpectedly, 7 lines were positive for alien chromatin (Th. intermedium or rye) on chromosome 1B. The newly described rye 1RS chromatin, transmitted from early in the pedigree, was associated with enhanced WSMV resistance. Under field conditions, the 1RS chromatin alone showed some resistance, while together with the Th. intermedium 4Ai#2S offered superior resistance to that demonstrated by the known resistant cultivar Mace. Most alien wheat lines carry whole chromosome arms, and it is notable that these lines showed intra-arm recombination within the 1BS arm. The translocation breakpoints between 1BS and alien chromatin fell in three categories: (i) at or near to the centromere, (ii) intercalary between markers UL-Thin5 and Xgwm1130 and (iii) towards the telomere between Xgwm0911 and Xbarc194. Labelled genomic Th. intermedium DNA hybridised to the rye 1RS chromatin under high stringency conditions, indicating the presence of shared tandem repeats among the cereals. The novel small alien fragments may explain the difficulty in developing well-adapted lines carrying Wsm1 despite improved tolerance to the virus. The results will facilitate directed chromosome engineering producing agronomically desirable WSMV-resistant germplasm.

  6. Introgression of chromosome segments from multiple alien species in wheat breeding lines with wheat streak mosaic virus resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, N; Heslop-Harrison, Js Pat; Ahmad, H; Graybosch, R A; Hein, G L; Schwarzacher, T

    2016-08-01

    Pyramiding of alien-derived Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV) resistance and resistance enhancing genes in wheat is a cost-effective and environmentally safe strategy for disease control. PCR-based markers and cytogenetic analysis with genomic in situ hybridisation were applied to identify alien chromatin in four genetically diverse populations of wheat (Triticum aestivum) lines incorporating chromosome segments from Thinopyrum intermedium and Secale cereale (rye). Out of 20 experimental lines, 10 carried Th. intermedium chromatin as T4DL*4Ai#2S translocations, while, unexpectedly, 7 lines were positive for alien chromatin (Th. intermedium or rye) on chromosome 1B. The newly described rye 1RS chromatin, transmitted from early in the pedigree, was associated with enhanced WSMV resistance. Under field conditions, the 1RS chromatin alone showed some resistance, while together with the Th. intermedium 4Ai#2S offered superior resistance to that demonstrated by the known resistant cultivar Mace. Most alien wheat lines carry whole chromosome arms, and it is notable that these lines showed intra-arm recombination within the 1BS arm. The translocation breakpoints between 1BS and alien chromatin fell in three categories: (i) at or near to the centromere, (ii) intercalary between markers UL-Thin5 and Xgwm1130 and (iii) towards the telomere between Xgwm0911 and Xbarc194. Labelled genomic Th. intermedium DNA hybridised to the rye 1RS chromatin under high stringency conditions, indicating the presence of shared tandem repeats among the cereals. The novel small alien fragments may explain the difficulty in developing well-adapted lines carrying Wsm1 despite improved tolerance to the virus. The results will facilitate directed chromosome engineering producing agronomically desirable WSMV-resistant germplasm. PMID:27245423

  7. Allocation of the S-genome chromosomes of Aegilops variabilis Eig. carrying powdery mildew resistance in triticale (× Triticosecale Wittmack).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwiatek, M; Belter, J; Majka, M; Wiśniewska, H

    2016-03-01

    It has been hypothesized that the powdery mildew adult plant resistance (APR) controlled by the Pm13 gene in Aegilops longissima Schweinf. & Muschl. (S(l)S(l)) has been evolutionary transferred to Aegilops variabilis Eig. (UUSS). The molecular marker analysis and the visual evaluation of powdery mildew symptoms in Ae. variabilis and the Ae. variabilis × Secale cereale amphiploid forms (2n = 6x = 42, UUSSRR) showed the presence of product that corresponded to Pm13 marker and the lower infection level compared to susceptible model, respectively. This study also describes the transfer of Ae. variabilis Eig. (2n = 4x = 28, U(v)U(v)S(v)S(v)) chromosomes, carrying powdery mildew resistance, into triticale (× Triticosecale Wittm., 2n = 6x = 42, AABBRR) using Ae. variabilis × S. cereale amphiploid forms. The individual chromosomes of Ae. variabilis, triticale 'Lamberto' and hybrids were characterized by genomic and fluorescence in situ hybridization (GISH/FISH). The chromosome configurations of obtained hybrid forms were studied at first metaphase of meiosis of pollen mother cells (PMCs) using GISH. The statistical analysis showed that the way of S-genome chromosome pairing and transmission to subsequent hybrid generations was diploid-like and had no influence on chromosome pairing of triticale chromosomes. The cytogenetic study of hybrid forms were supported by the marker-assisted selection using Pm13 marker and visual evaluation of natural infection by Blumeria graminis, that allowed to select the addition or substitution lines of hybrids carrying chromosome 3S(v) which were tolerant to the powdery mildew infection.

  8. Phage & phosphatase: a novel phage-based probe for rapid, multi-platform detection of bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcaine, S D; Pacitto, D; Sela, D A; Nugen, S R

    2015-11-21

    Genetic engineering of bacteriophages allows for the development of rapid, highly specific, and easily manufactured probes for the detection of bacterial pathogens. A challenge for novel probes is the ease of their adoption in real world laboratories. We have engineered the bacteriophage T7, which targets Escherichia coli, to carry the alkaline phosphatase gene, phoA. This inclusion results in phoA overexpression following phage infection of E. coli. Alkaline phosphatase is commonly used in a wide range of diagnostics, and thus a signal produced by our phage-based probe could be detected using common laboratory equipment. Our work demonstrates the successful: (i) modification of T7 phage to carry phoA; (ii) overexpression of alkaline phosphatase in E. coli; and (iii) detection of this T7-induced alkaline phosphatase activity using commercially available colorimetric and chemilumiscent methods. Furthermore, we demonstrate the application of our phage-based probe to rapidly detect low levels of bacteria and discern the antibiotic resistance of E. coli isolates. Using our bioengineered phage-based probe we were able to detect 10(3) CFU per mL of E. coli in 6 hours using a chemiluminescent substrate and 10(4) CFU per mL within 7.5 hours using a colorimetric substrate. We also show the application of this phage-based probe for antibiotic resistance testing. We were able to determine whether an E. coli isolate was resistant to ampicillin within 4.5 hours using chemiluminescent substrate and within 6 hours using a colorimetric substrate. This phage-based scheme could be readily adopted in labs without significant capital investments and can be translated to other phage-bacteria pairs for further detection.

  9. Location of a High-Lysine Gene and the DDT-Resistance Gene on Barley Chromosome 7

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, J.

    1979-01-01

    mutants, nos 1508.18, and 19. Linkage studies with translocations locate the Lys3 locus in the centromere region ofchromosome 7. A linkage study involving the loci lys3 and ddt (resistance to DDT) together with the marker locifi (fragile stem), s(short rachilla hairs), and r (smooth awn) show that the...... order of the five loci on chromosome 7 from the long to the short chromosome arm is Y, s,fi, lys3, ddt. The distance from locus I to locus ddt is about 100 centimorgans....

  10. Pf Filamentous Phage Requires UvrD for Replication in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    OpenAIRE

    Martínez, Eriel; Campos-Gómez, Javier

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Pf is a lysogenic filamentous phage that promotes biofilm development in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Pf replicates by a rolling circle replication system which depends on a phage-encoded initiator protein and host factors usually involved in chromosome replication. Rep, an accessory replicative DNA helicase, is crucial for replication of filamentous phages in Escherichia coli. In contrast, here we show that, instead of depending on Rep, Pf replication depends on UvrD, an accessory helica...

  11. Pseudomonas fluorescens biofilms subjected to phage phiIBB-PF7A

    OpenAIRE

    Neubauer Peter; Sillankorva Sanna; Azeredo Joana

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Pseudomonas fluorescens is an important food spoilage organism, usually found in the form of biofilms. Bacterial biofilms are inherently resistant to a variety of antimicrobial agents, therefore alternative methods to biofilm control, such as bacteriophages (phages) have been suggested. Phage behavior on biofilms is still poorly investigated and needs further understanding. Here we describe the application of phage ϕIBB-PF7, a newly isolated phage, to control P. fluorescen...

  12. Beyond the chromosome: the prevalence of unique extra-chromosomal bacteriophages with integrated virulence genes in pathogenic Staphylococcus aureus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryan Utter

    Full Text Available In Staphylococcus aureus, the disease impact of chromosomally integrated prophages on virulence is well described. However, the existence of extra-chromosomal prophages, both plasmidial and episomal, remains obscure. Despite the recent explosion in bacterial and bacteriophage genomic sequencing, studies have failed to specifically focus on extra-chromosomal elements. We selectively enriched and sequenced extra-chromosomal DNA from S. aureus isolates using Roche-454 technology and uncovered evidence for the widespread distribution of multiple extra-chromosomal prophages (ExPΦs throughout both antibiotic-sensitive and -resistant strains. We completely sequenced one such element comprised of a 43.8 kbp, circular ExPΦ (designated ФBU01 from a vancomycin-intermediate S. aureus (VISA strain. Assembly and annotation of ФBU01 revealed a number of putative virulence determinants encoded within a bacteriophage immune evasion cluster (IEC. Our identification of several potential ExPΦs and mobile genetic elements (MGEs also revealed numerous putative virulence factors and antibiotic resistance genes. We describe here a previously unidentified level of genetic diversity of stealth extra-chromosomal elements in S. aureus, including phages with a larger presence outside the chromosome that likely play a prominent role in pathogenesis and strain diversity driven by horizontal gene transfer (HGT.

  13. Tandem amplification of a chromosomal segment harboring 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase locus confers glyphosate resistance in Kochia scoparia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jugulam, Mithila; Niehues, Kindsey; Godar, Amar S; Koo, Dal-Hoe; Danilova, Tatiana; Friebe, Bernd; Sehgal, Sunish; Varanasi, Vijay K; Wiersma, Andrew; Westra, Philip; Stahlman, Phillip W; Gill, Bikram S

    2014-11-01

    Recent rapid evolution and spread of resistance to the most extensively used herbicide, glyphosate, is a major threat to global crop production. Genetic mechanisms by which weeds evolve resistance to herbicides largely determine the level of resistance and the rate of evolution of resistance. In a previous study, we determined that glyphosate resistance in Kochia scoparia is due to the amplification of the 5-Enolpyruvylshikimate-3-Phosphate Synthase (EPSPS) gene, the enzyme target of glyphosate. Here, we investigated the genomic organization of the amplified EPSPS copies using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and extended DNA fiber (Fiber FISH) on K. scoparia chromosomes. In both glyphosate-resistant K. scoparia populations tested (GR1 and GR2), FISH results displayed a single and prominent hybridization site of the EPSPS gene localized on the distal end of one pair of homologous metaphase chromosomes compared with a faint hybridization site in glyphosate-susceptible samples (GS1 and GS2). Fiber FISH displayed 10 copies of the EPSPS gene (approximately 5 kb) arranged in tandem configuration approximately 40 to 70 kb apart, with one copy in an inverted orientation in GR2. In agreement with FISH results, segregation of EPSPS copies followed single-locus inheritance in GR1 population. This is the first report of tandem target gene amplification conferring field-evolved herbicide resistance in weed populations.

  14. Tandem amplification of a chromosomal segment harboring 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase locus confers glyphosate resistance in Kochia scoparia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jugulam, Mithila; Niehues, Kindsey; Godar, Amar S; Koo, Dal-Hoe; Danilova, Tatiana; Friebe, Bernd; Sehgal, Sunish; Varanasi, Vijay K; Wiersma, Andrew; Westra, Philip; Stahlman, Phillip W; Gill, Bikram S

    2014-11-01

    Recent rapid evolution and spread of resistance to the most extensively used herbicide, glyphosate, is a major threat to global crop production. Genetic mechanisms by which weeds evolve resistance to herbicides largely determine the level of resistance and the rate of evolution of resistance. In a previous study, we determined that glyphosate resistance in Kochia scoparia is due to the amplification of the 5-Enolpyruvylshikimate-3-Phosphate Synthase (EPSPS) gene, the enzyme target of glyphosate. Here, we investigated the genomic organization of the amplified EPSPS copies using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and extended DNA fiber (Fiber FISH) on K. scoparia chromosomes. In both glyphosate-resistant K. scoparia populations tested (GR1 and GR2), FISH results displayed a single and prominent hybridization site of the EPSPS gene localized on the distal end of one pair of homologous metaphase chromosomes compared with a faint hybridization site in glyphosate-susceptible samples (GS1 and GS2). Fiber FISH displayed 10 copies of the EPSPS gene (approximately 5 kb) arranged in tandem configuration approximately 40 to 70 kb apart, with one copy in an inverted orientation in GR2. In agreement with FISH results, segregation of EPSPS copies followed single-locus inheritance in GR1 population. This is the first report of tandem target gene amplification conferring field-evolved herbicide resistance in weed populations. PMID:25037215

  15. Estimating richness from phage metagenomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacteriophages are important drivers of ecosystem functions, yet little is known about the vast majority of phages. Phage metagenomics, or the study of the collective genome of an assemblage of phages, enables the investigation of broad ecological questions in phage communities. One ecological cha...

  16. Construction of specific erythromycin resistance mutations in the temperate lactococcal bacteriophage TP901-1 and their use in studies of phage biology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, Birgit; Christiansen, Bettina; Evison, Tim;

    1997-01-01

    A method for the construction and isolation of specifically designed mutations of the temperate lactococcal phage TP901-1 has been developed. Two different erm-labeled mutants were isolated. One was shown to be defective in lysogenization and excision. The other, showing normal lysogenization, wa...

  17. Peptide-binding motif prediction by using phage display library for SasaUBA*0301, a resistance haplotype of MHC class I molecule from Atlantic Salmon (Salmo salar)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Heng; Hermsen, Trudi; Stet, Rene J M;

    2008-01-01

    -terminus. Meanwhile, phage display peptide library encoding random 12mer peptides was also screened against beta(2)m/SasaUBA*0301. Eighty-five percentages of the corresponding peptides have an enrichment of leucine, methionine, valine, or isoleucine at the C-terminus. We predict that this particular allele of Salmon...

  18. Development and characterization of a Psathyrostachys huashanica Keng 7Ns chromosome addition line with leaf rust resistance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanli Du

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to characterize a Triticum aestivum-Psathyrostachys huashanica Keng (2n = 2x = 14, NsNs disomic addition line 2-1-6-3. Individual line 2-1-6-3 plants were analyzed using cytological, genomic in situ hybridization (GISH, EST-SSR, and EST-STS techniques. The alien addition line 2-1-6-3 was shown to have two P. huashanica chromosomes, with a meiotic configuration of 2n = 44 = 22 II. We tested 55 EST-SSR and 336 EST-STS primer pairs that mapped onto seven different wheat chromosomes using DNA from parents and the P. huashanica addition line. One EST-SSR and nine EST-STS primer pairs indicated that the additional chromosome of P. huashanica belonged to homoeologous group 7, the diagnostic fragments of five EST-STS markers (BE404955, BE591127, BE637663, BF482781 and CD452422 were cloned, sequenced and compared. The results showed that the amplified polymorphic bands of P. huashanica and disomic addition line 2-1-6-3 shared 100% sequence identity, which was designated as the 7Ns disomic addition line. Disomic addition line 2-1-6-3 was evaluated to test the leaf rust resistance of adult stages in the field. We found that one pair of the 7Ns genome chromosomes carried new leaf rust resistance gene(s. Moreover, wheat line 2-1-6-3 had a superior numbers of florets and grains per spike, which were associated with the introgression of the paired P. huashanica chromosomes. These high levels of disease resistance and stable, excellent agronomic traits suggest that this line could be utilized as a novel donor in wheat breeding programs.

  19. Phage therapy against Enterococcus faecalis in dental root canals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalifa, Leron; Shlezinger, Mor; Beyth, Shaul; Houri-Haddad, Yael; Coppenhagen-Glazer, Shunit; Beyth, Nurit; Hazan, Ronen

    2016-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance is an ever-growing problem faced by all major sectors of health care, including dentistry. Recurrent infections related to multidrug-resistant bacteria such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae, and vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) in hospitals are untreatable and question the effectiveness of notable drugs. Two major reasons for these recurrent infections are acquired antibiotic resistance genes and biofilm formation. None of the traditionally known effective techniques have been able to efficiently resolve these issues. Hence, development of a highly effective antibacterial practice has become inevitable. One example of a hard-to-eradicate pathogen in dentistry is Enterococcus faecalis, which is one of the most common threats observed in recurrent root canal treatment failures, of which the most problematic to treat are its biofilm-forming VRE strains. An effective response against such infections could be the use of bacteriophages (phages). Phage therapy was found to be highly effective against biofilm and multidrug-resistant bacteria and has other advantages like ease of isolation and possibilities for genetic manipulations. The potential of phage therapy in dentistry, in particular against E. faecalis biofilms in root canals, is almost unexplored. Here we review the efforts to develop phage therapy against biofilms. We also focus on the phages isolated against E. faecalis and discuss the possibility of using phages against E. faecalis biofilm in root canals. PMID:27640530

  20. Phage therapy against Enterococcus faecalis in dental root canals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalifa, Leron; Shlezinger, Mor; Beyth, Shaul; Houri-Haddad, Yael; Coppenhagen-Glazer, Shunit; Beyth, Nurit; Hazan, Ronen

    2016-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance is an ever-growing problem faced by all major sectors of health care, including dentistry. Recurrent infections related to multidrug-resistant bacteria such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae, and vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) in hospitals are untreatable and question the effectiveness of notable drugs. Two major reasons for these recurrent infections are acquired antibiotic resistance genes and biofilm formation. None of the traditionally known effective techniques have been able to efficiently resolve these issues. Hence, development of a highly effective antibacterial practice has become inevitable. One example of a hard-to-eradicate pathogen in dentistry is Enterococcus faecalis, which is one of the most common threats observed in recurrent root canal treatment failures, of which the most problematic to treat are its biofilm-forming VRE strains. An effective response against such infections could be the use of bacteriophages (phages). Phage therapy was found to be highly effective against biofilm and multidrug-resistant bacteria and has other advantages like ease of isolation and possibilities for genetic manipulations. The potential of phage therapy in dentistry, in particular against E. faecalis biofilms in root canals, is almost unexplored. Here we review the efforts to develop phage therapy against biofilms. We also focus on the phages isolated against E. faecalis and discuss the possibility of using phages against E. faecalis biofilm in root canals. PMID:27640530

  1. Phage therapy against Enterococcus faecalis in dental root canals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leron Khalifa

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotic resistance is an ever-growing problem faced by all major sectors of health care, including dentistry. Recurrent infections related to multidrug-resistant bacteria such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae, and vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE in hospitals are untreatable and question the effectiveness of notable drugs. Two major reasons for these recurrent infections are acquired antibiotic resistance genes and biofilm formation. None of the traditionally known effective techniques have been able to efficiently resolve these issues. Hence, development of a highly effective antibacterial practice has become inevitable. One example of a hard-to-eradicate pathogen in dentistry is Enterococcus faecalis, which is one of the most common threats observed in recurrent root canal treatment failures, of which the most problematic to treat are its biofilm-forming VRE strains. An effective response against such infections could be the use of bacteriophages (phages. Phage therapy was found to be highly effective against biofilm and multidrug-resistant bacteria and has other advantages like ease of isolation and possibilities for genetic manipulations. The potential of phage therapy in dentistry, in particular against E. faecalis biofilms in root canals, is almost unexplored. Here we review the efforts to develop phage therapy against biofilms. We also focus on the phages isolated against E. faecalis and discuss the possibility of using phages against E. faecalis biofilm in root canals.

  2. Analysis of root-knot nematode and fusarium wilt disease resistance in cotton (Gossypium spp.) using chromosome substitution lines from two alien species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulloa, M; Wang, C; Saha, S; Hutmacher, R B; Stelly, D M; Jenkins, J N; Burke, J; Roberts, P A

    2016-04-01

    Chromosome substitution (CS) lines in plants are a powerful genetic resource for analyzing the contribution of chromosome segments to phenotypic variance. In this study, a series of interspecific cotton (Gossypium spp.) CS lines were used to identify a new germplasm resource, and to validate chromosomal regions and favorable alleles associated with nematode or fungal disease resistance traits. The CS lines were developed in the G. hirsutum L. TM-1 background with chromosome or chromosome segment substitutions from G. barbadense L. Pima 3-79 or G. tomentosum. Root-knot nematode (Meloidogyne incognita) and fusarium wilt (Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. vasinfectum) (races 1 and 4) resistance alleles and quantitative trait loci (QTL) previously placed on cotton chromosomes using SSR markers in two interspecific recombinant inbred line populations were chosen for testing. Phenotypic responses of increased resistance or susceptibility in controlled inoculation and infested field assays confirmed the resistance QTLs, based on substitution with the positive or negative allele for resistance. Lines CS-B22Lo, CS-B04, and CS-B18 showed high resistance to nematode root-galling, confirming QTLs on chromosomes 4 and 22 (long arm) with resistance alleles from Pima 3-79. Line CS-B16 had less fusarium race 1-induced vascular root staining and higher percent survival than the TM-1 parent, confirming a major resistance QTL on chromosome 16. Lines CS-B(17-11) and CS-B17 had high fusarium race 4 vascular symptoms and low survival due to susceptible alleles introgressed from Pima 3-79, confirming the localization on chromosome 17 of an identified QTL with resistance alleles from TM1 and other resistant lines. Analyses validated regions on chromosomes 11, 16, and 17 harboring nematode and fusarium wilt resistance genes and demonstrated the value of CS lines as both a germplasm resource for breeding programs and as a powerful genetic analysis tool for determining QTL effects for disease

  3. Analysis of root-knot nematode and fusarium wilt disease resistance in cotton (Gossypium spp.) using chromosome substitution lines from two alien species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulloa, M; Wang, C; Saha, S; Hutmacher, R B; Stelly, D M; Jenkins, J N; Burke, J; Roberts, P A

    2016-04-01

    Chromosome substitution (CS) lines in plants are a powerful genetic resource for analyzing the contribution of chromosome segments to phenotypic variance. In this study, a series of interspecific cotton (Gossypium spp.) CS lines were used to identify a new germplasm resource, and to validate chromosomal regions and favorable alleles associated with nematode or fungal disease resistance traits. The CS lines were developed in the G. hirsutum L. TM-1 background with chromosome or chromosome segment substitutions from G. barbadense L. Pima 3-79 or G. tomentosum. Root-knot nematode (Meloidogyne incognita) and fusarium wilt (Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. vasinfectum) (races 1 and 4) resistance alleles and quantitative trait loci (QTL) previously placed on cotton chromosomes using SSR markers in two interspecific recombinant inbred line populations were chosen for testing. Phenotypic responses of increased resistance or susceptibility in controlled inoculation and infested field assays confirmed the resistance QTLs, based on substitution with the positive or negative allele for resistance. Lines CS-B22Lo, CS-B04, and CS-B18 showed high resistance to nematode root-galling, confirming QTLs on chromosomes 4 and 22 (long arm) with resistance alleles from Pima 3-79. Line CS-B16 had less fusarium race 1-induced vascular root staining and higher percent survival than the TM-1 parent, confirming a major resistance QTL on chromosome 16. Lines CS-B(17-11) and CS-B17 had high fusarium race 4 vascular symptoms and low survival due to susceptible alleles introgressed from Pima 3-79, confirming the localization on chromosome 17 of an identified QTL with resistance alleles from TM1 and other resistant lines. Analyses validated regions on chromosomes 11, 16, and 17 harboring nematode and fusarium wilt resistance genes and demonstrated the value of CS lines as both a germplasm resource for breeding programs and as a powerful genetic analysis tool for determining QTL effects for disease

  4. Staphylococcal Cassette Chromosome mec and Panton-Valentine Leukocidin Characterization of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Clones▿

    OpenAIRE

    Moroney, Shannon M.; Heller, Loree C.; Arbuckle, Jesse; Talavera, Monica; Widen, Ray H.

    2006-01-01

    Staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) types and Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) gene carriage were compared among suspected community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus MRSA (CA-MRSA) and health care-associated MRSA (HA-MRSA) isolates. CA-MRSA isolates carried the SCCmec type IV complex, and most were PVL positive. The HA-MRSA isolates carried the SCCmec type II complex and did not harbor the PVL genes.

  5. Analysis of root-knot nematode and fusarium wilt disease resistance in cotton (Gossypium spp.) using chromosome substitution lines from two alien species

    Science.gov (United States)

    To Identify a new germplasm resource, and to validate chromosomal regions and favorable alleles associated with nematode and fungal disease resistance traits, a series of interspecific cotton (Gossypium spp.) chromosome substitution (CS) lines were used in this study. The CS lines were developed in ...

  6. The population and evolutionary dynamics of phage and bacteria with CRISPR-mediated immunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruce R Levin

    Full Text Available Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR, together with associated genes (cas, form the CRISPR-cas adaptive immune system, which can provide resistance to viruses and plasmids in bacteria and archaea. Here, we use mathematical models, population dynamic experiments, and DNA sequence analyses to investigate the host-phage interactions in a model CRISPR-cas system, Streptococcus thermophilus DGCC7710 and its virulent phage 2972. At the molecular level, the bacteriophage-immune mutant bacteria (BIMs and CRISPR-escape mutant phage (CEMs obtained in this study are consistent with those anticipated from an iterative model of this adaptive immune system: resistance by the addition of novel spacers and phage evasion of resistance by mutation in matching sequences or flanking motifs. While CRISPR BIMs were readily isolated and CEMs generated at high rates (frequencies in excess of 10(-6, our population studies indicate that there is more to the dynamics of phage-host interactions and the establishment of a BIM-CEM arms race than predicted from existing assumptions about phage infection and CRISPR-cas immunity. Among the unanticipated observations are: (i the invasion of phage into populations of BIMs resistant by the acquisition of one (but not two spacers, (ii the survival of sensitive bacteria despite the presence of high densities of phage, and (iii the maintenance of phage-limited communities due to the failure of even two-spacer BIMs to become established in populations with wild-type bacteria and phage. We attribute (i to incomplete resistance of single-spacer BIMs. Based on the results of additional modeling and experiments, we postulate that (ii and (iii can be attributed to the phage infection-associated production of enzymes or other compounds that induce phenotypic phage resistance in sensitive bacteria and kill resistant BIMs. We present evidence in support of these hypotheses and discuss the implications of these

  7. Resistance of Mice of the 129 Background to Yersinia pestis Maps to Multiple Loci on Chromosome 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tencati, Michael; Tapping, Richard I

    2016-10-01

    Yersinia pestis is a Gram-negative bacterium that is the causative agent of bubonic and pneumonic plague. It is commonly acquired by mammals such as rodents and humans via the bite of an infected flea. We previously reported that multiple substrains of the 129 mouse background are resistant to pigmentation locus-negative (pgm(-)) Yersinia pestis and that this phenotype maps to a 30-centimorgan (cM) region located on chromosome 1. In this study, we have further delineated this plague resistance locus to a region of less than 20 cM through the creation and phenotyping of recombinant offspring arising from novel crossovers in this region. Furthermore, our experiments have revealed that there are at least two alleles in this initial locus, both of which are required for resistance on a susceptible C57BL/6 background. These two alleles work in trans since resistance is restored in offspring possessing one allele contributed by each parent. Our studies also indicated that the Slc11a1 gene (formerly known as Nramp1) located within the chromosome1 locus is not responsible for conferring resistance to 129 mice. PMID:27481241

  8. Biofilm control with natural and genetically-modified phages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motlagh, Amir Mohaghegh; Bhattacharjee, Ananda Shankar; Goel, Ramesh

    2016-04-01

    Bacteriophages, as the most dominant and diverse entities in the universe, have the potential to be one of the most promising therapeutic agents. The emergence of multidrug-resistant bacteria and the antibiotic crisis in the last few decades have resulted in a renewed interest in phage therapy. Furthermore, bacteriophages, with the capacity to rapidly infect and overcome bacterial resistance, have demonstrated a sustainable approach against bacterial pathogens-particularly in biofilm. Biofilm, as complex microbial communities located at interphases embedded in a matrix of bacterial extracellular polysaccharide substances (EPS), is involved in health issues such as infections associated with the use of biomaterials and chronic infections by multidrug resistant bacteria, as well as industrial issues such as biofilm formation on stainless steel surfaces in food industry and membrane biofouling in water and wastewater treatment processes. In this paper, the most recent studies on the potential of phage therapy using natural and genetically-modified lytic phages and their associated enzymes in fighting biofilm development in various fields including engineering, industry, and medical applications are reviewed. Phage-mediated prevention approaches as an indirect phage therapy strategy are also explored in this review. In addition, the limitations of these approaches and suggestions to overcome these constraints are discussed to enhance the efficiency of phage therapy process. Finally, future perspectives and directions for further research towards a better understanding of phage therapy to control biofilm are recommended.

  9. Biofilm control with natural and genetically-modified phages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motlagh, Amir Mohaghegh; Bhattacharjee, Ananda Shankar; Goel, Ramesh

    2016-04-01

    Bacteriophages, as the most dominant and diverse entities in the universe, have the potential to be one of the most promising therapeutic agents. The emergence of multidrug-resistant bacteria and the antibiotic crisis in the last few decades have resulted in a renewed interest in phage therapy. Furthermore, bacteriophages, with the capacity to rapidly infect and overcome bacterial resistance, have demonstrated a sustainable approach against bacterial pathogens-particularly in biofilm. Biofilm, as complex microbial communities located at interphases embedded in a matrix of bacterial extracellular polysaccharide substances (EPS), is involved in health issues such as infections associated with the use of biomaterials and chronic infections by multidrug resistant bacteria, as well as industrial issues such as biofilm formation on stainless steel surfaces in food industry and membrane biofouling in water and wastewater treatment processes. In this paper, the most recent studies on the potential of phage therapy using natural and genetically-modified lytic phages and their associated enzymes in fighting biofilm development in various fields including engineering, industry, and medical applications are reviewed. Phage-mediated prevention approaches as an indirect phage therapy strategy are also explored in this review. In addition, the limitations of these approaches and suggestions to overcome these constraints are discussed to enhance the efficiency of phage therapy process. Finally, future perspectives and directions for further research towards a better understanding of phage therapy to control biofilm are recommended. PMID:26931607

  10. Phage abortive infection in lactococci: variations on a theme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopin, Marie-Christine; Chopin, Alain; Bidnenko, Elena

    2005-08-01

    Abortive infection (Abi) systems, also called phage exclusion, block phage multiplication and cause premature bacterial cell death upon phage infection. This decreases the number of progeny particles and limits their spread to other cells allowing the bacterial population to survive. Twenty Abi systems have been isolated in Lactococcus lactis, a bacterium used in cheese-making fermentation processes, where phage attacks are of economical importance. Recent insights in their expression and mode of action indicate that, behind diverse phenotypic and molecular effects, lactococcal Abis share common traits with the well-studied Escherichia coli systems Lit and Prr. Abis are widespread in bacteria, and recent analysis indicates that Abis might have additional roles other than conferring phage resistance.

  11. Characterization of Five Podoviridae Phages Infecting Citrobacter freundii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdi, Sana; Rousseau, Geneviève M; Labrie, Simon J; Kourda, Rim S; Tremblay, Denise M; Moineau, Sylvain; Slama, Karim B

    2016-01-01

    Citrobacter freundii causes opportunistic infections in humans and animals, which are becoming difficult to treat due to increased antibiotic resistance. The aim of this study was to explore phages as potential antimicrobial agents against this opportunistic pathogen. We isolated and characterized five new virulent phages, SH1, SH2, SH3, SH4, and SH5 from sewage samples in Tunisia. Morphological and genomic analyses revealed that the five C. freundii phages belong to the Caudovirales order, Podoviridae family, and Autographivirinae subfamily. Their linear double-stranded DNA genomes range from 39,158 to 39,832 bp and are terminally redundant with direct repeats between 183 and 242 bp. The five genomes share the same organization as coliphage T7. Based on genomic comparisons and on the phylogeny of the DNA polymerases, we assigned the five phages to the T7virus genus but separated them into two different groups. Phages SH1 and SH2 are very similar to previously characterized phages phiYeO3-12 and phiSG-JL2, infecting, respectively, Yersinia enterocolitica and Salmonella enterica, as well as sharing more than 80% identity with most genes of coliphage T7. Phages SH3, SH4, and SH5 are very similar to phages K1F and Dev2, infecting, respectively, Escherichia coli and Cronobacter turicensis. Several structural proteins of phages SH1, SH3, and SH4 were detected by mass spectrometry. The five phages were also stable from pH 5 to 10. No genes coding for known virulence factors or integrases were found, suggesting that the five isolated phages could be good candidates for therapeutic applications to prevent or treat C. freundii infections. In addition, this study increases our knowledge about the evolutionary relationships within the T7virus genus.

  12. The Am Gene Controlling Resistance to Alfalfa mosaic virus in Tomato Is Located in the Cluster of Dominant Resistance Genes on Chromosome 6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrella, Giuseppe; Moretti, André; Gognalons, Patrick; Lesage, Marie-Laure; Marchoux, George; Gebre-Selassie, Kashay; Caranta, Carole

    2004-04-01

    ABSTRACT The dominant gene Am from Lycopersicon hirsutum f. sp. glabratum PI134417 confers resistance to most strains of Alfalfa mosaic virus, including the recently identified necrotic strains. The phenotypic response includes a lack of symptom development following mechanical inoculation of leaves. To study the resistance mechanism controlled by Am, biological (back-inoculation to susceptible hosts), serological (double-antibody sandwich, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay), and molecular (reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and hybridization with specific riboprobes) methods of virus detection have been conducted on mechanically inoculated PI134417 leaves. The virus was never recovered, indicating that Am acts by an inhibition of viral accumulation during the early events of the virus life cycle. Am has been mapped genetically to the short arm of tomato chromosome 6 in the resistance hotspot, which includes the R-genes Mi and Cf-2/Cf-5 and the quantitative resistance factors Ty-1, Ol-1, and Bw-5. PMID:18944110

  13. Phage-Host Interactions in Flavobacterium psychrophilum and the Potential for Phage Therapy in Aquaculture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Rói Hammershaimb

    temperatures below 15°C and typically with fry mortality rates of 50-60%. Several attempts of vaccine development against RTFS have been made, but according to my knowledge no commercial vaccine is yet available. Bacterial chemotherapy is still the most effective and used treatment of RTFS today. However......, the increasing problem with antibiotic resistance has led to increased attention to the use of phages for controlling F. psychrophilum infections in aquaculture. In a synopsis and four scientific papers, this PhD project studies the potential and optimizes the use of phage therapy for treatment and prevention...... to be phage receptors. The observed links between phage resistance and the genetic modifications were supported by direct measurements of bacteriophage adsorption rates, biofilm formation and secretion of extracellular enzymes, which were all impaired in the resistant strains. In the fourth paper...

  14. Computational models of populations of bacteria and lytic phage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krysiak-Baltyn, Konrad; Martin, Gregory J O; Stickland, Anthony D; Scales, Peter J; Gras, Sally L

    2016-11-01

    The use of phages to control and reduce numbers of unwanted bacteria can be traced back to the early 1900s, when phages were explored as a tool to treat infections before the wide scale use of antibiotics. Recently, phage therapy has received renewed interest as a method to treat multiresistant bacteria. Phages are also widely used in the food industry to prevent the growth of certain bacteria in foods, and are currently being explored as a tool for use in bioremediation and wastewater treatment. Despite the large body of biological research on phages, relatively little attention has been given to computational modeling of the population dynamics of phage and bacterial interactions. The earliest model was described by Campbell in the 1960s. Subsequent modifications to this model include partial or complete resistance, multiple phage binding sites, and spatial heterogeneity. This review provides a general introduction to modeling of the population dynamics of bacteria and phage. The review introduces the basic model and relevant concepts and evaluates more complex variations of the basic model published to date, including a model of disease epidemics caused by infectious bacteria. Finally, the shortcomings and potential ways to improve the models are discussed. PMID:26828960

  15. Phage ΦPan70, a Putative Temperate Phage, Controls Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Planktonic, Biofilm and Burn Mouse Model Assays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holguín, Angela V.; Rangel, Guillermo; Clavijo, Viviana; Prada, Catalina; Mantilla, Marcela; Gomez, María Catalina; Kutter, Elizabeth; Taylor, Corinda; Fineran, Peter C.; Barrios, Andrés Fernando González; Vives, Martha J.

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is one of the Multi-Drug-Resistant organisms most frequently isolated worldwide and, because of a shortage of new antibiotics, bacteriophages are considered an alternative for its treatment. Previously, P. aeruginosa phages were isolated and best candidates were chosen based on their ability to form clear plaques and their host range. This work aimed to characterize one of those phages, ΦPan70, preliminarily identified as a good candidate for phage-therapy. We performed infection curves, biofilm removal assays, transmission-electron-microscopy, pulsed-field-gel-electrophoresis, and studied the in vivo ΦPan70 biological activity in the burned mouse model. ΦPan70 was classified as a member of the Myoviridae family and, in both planktonic cells and biofilms, was responsible for a significant reduction in the bacterial population. The burned mouse model showed an animal survival between 80% and 100%, significantly different from the control animals (0%). However, analysis of the ΦPan70 genome revealed that it was 64% identical to F10, a temperate P. aeruginosa phage. Gene annotation indicated ΦPan70 as a new, but possible temperate phage, therefore not ideal for phage-therapy. Based on this, we recommend genome sequence analysis as an early step to select candidate phages for potential application in phage-therapy, before entering into a more intensive characterization. PMID:26274971

  16. Phage ΦPan70, a Putative Temperate Phage, Controls Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Planktonic, Biofilm and Burn Mouse Model Assays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela V. Holguín

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa is one of the Multi-Drug-Resistant organisms most frequently isolated worldwide and, because of a shortage of new antibiotics, bacteriophages are considered an alternative for its treatment. Previously, P. aeruginosa phages were isolated and best candidates were chosen based on their ability to form clear plaques and their host range. This work aimed to characterize one of those phages, ΦPan70, preliminarily identified as a good candidate for phage-therapy. We performed infection curves, biofilm removal assays, transmission-electron-microscopy, pulsed-field-gel-electrophoresis, and studied the in vivo ΦPan70 biological activity in the burned mouse model. ΦPan70 was classified as a member of the Myoviridae family and, in both planktonic cells and biofilms, was responsible for a significant reduction in the bacterial population. The burned mouse model showed an animal survival between 80% and 100%, significantly different from the control animals (0%. However, analysis of the ΦPan70 genome revealed that it was 64% identical to F10, a temperate P. aeruginosa phage. Gene annotation indicated ΦPan70 as a new, but possible temperate phage, therefore not ideal for phage-therapy. Based on this, we recommend genome sequence analysis as an early step to select candidate phages for potential application in phage-therapy, before entering into a more intensive characterization.

  17. Prophage, phiPV83-pro, carrying panton-valentine leukocidin genes, on the Staphylococcus aureus P83 chromosome: comparative analysis of the genome structures of phiPV83-pro, phiPVL, phi11, and other phages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, D; Kaneko, J; Narita, S; Kamio, Y

    2000-12-01

    Staphylococcus aureus P83 has Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL)-like genes, lukM and lukF-PV. Here, lukM and lukF-PV genes were found on the genome of a prophage, which was designated as phiPV83-pro. The precise genome size was 45,636 bp with att core sequences of 10 base pairs. Sixty-four ORFs were identified on the phiPV83-pro genome, including two extra operons, lukM-lukF-PV and orfs63-64. The lukM-lukF-PV cluster was located 2.1 kb upstream of the attL site. The most striking feature of the phiPV83-pro genome was a constituent of at least 4 regions from phi11, phiPVL, and other phages, i.e., (i) att sites identical with those of phi11, (ii) a cos sequence and the genes encoding packaging and head proteins of phiPVL (occupied half region of phiPV83-pro), and (iii) the other two regions which showed no significant similarity with known phages (occupied about 40% of phiPV83-pro). Furthermore, two insertion sequences, ISSA1 and ISSA2 were integrated into attL site and orf44, respectively. PhiPV83-pro was not induced as phage particles from S. aureus P83 regardless of its treatment with mitomycin C. The insertion of ISSA1 into the attL site was one of the reasons of the failure of the induction of the phage particles by mitomycin C treatment of the strain P83.

  18. Clostridium difficile phages: still difficult?

    OpenAIRE

    Katherine R Hargreaves; Clokie, Martha R. J.

    2014-01-01

    Phages that infect Clostridium difficile were first isolated for typing purposes in the 1980s, but their use was short lived. However, the rise of C. difficile epidemics over the last decade has triggered a resurgence of interest in using phages to combat this pathogen. Phage therapy is an attractive treatment option for C. difficile infection, however, developing suitable phages is challenging. In this review we summarize the difficulties faced by researchers in this field, and we discuss th...

  19. Clostridium difficile phages: still difficult?

    OpenAIRE

    MarthaRebecca JaneClokie

    2014-01-01

    Phages that infect Clostridium difficile were first isolated for typing purposes in the 1980s, but their use was short lived. However, the rise of C. difficile epidemics over the last decade has triggered a resurgence of interest in using phages to combat this pathogen. Phage therapy is an attractive treatment option for C. difficile infection, however developing suitable phages is challenging. In this review we summarise the difficulties faced by researchers in this field, and we discuss the...

  20. Complete Sequence of pABTJ2, A Plasmid from Acinetobacter baumannii MDR-TJ, Carrying Many Phage-like Elements

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    He Huang; Yan Dong; Zhi-Liang Yang; Hao Luo; Xi Zhang; Feng Gao

    2014-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is an important opportunistic pathogen in hospital, and the multidrug-resistant isolates of A. baumannii have been increasingly reported in recent years. A num-ber of different mechanisms of resistance have been reported, some of which are associated with plasmid-mediated acquisition of genes. Therefore, studies on plasmids in A. baumannii have been a hot issue lately. We have performed complete genome sequencing of A. baumannii MDR-TJ, which is a multidrug-resistant isolate. Finalizing the remaining large scaffold of the previous assem-bly, we found a new plasmid pABTJ2, which carries many phage-like elements. The plasmid pAB-TJ2 is a circular double-stranded DNA molecule, which is 110,967 bp in length. We annotated 125 CDSs from pABTJ2 using IMG ER and ZCURVE_V, accounting for 88.28%of the whole plasmid sequence. Many phage-like elements and a tRNA-coding gene were detected in pABTJ2, which is rarely reported among A. baumannii. The tRNA gene is specific for asparagine codon GTT, which may be a small chromosomal sequence picked up through incorrect excision during plasmid forma-tion. The phage-like elements may have been acquired during the integration process, as the GC content of the region carrying phage-like elements was higher than that of the adjacent regions. The finding of phage-like elements and tRNA-coding gene in pABTJ2 may provide a novel insight into the study of A. baumannii pan-plasmidome.

  1. Oral Application of T4 Phage Induces Weak Antibody Production in the Gut and in the Blood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Majewska

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available A specific humoral response to bacteriophages may follow phage application for medical purposes, and it may further determine the success or failure of the approach itself. We present a long-term study of antibody induction in mice by T4 phage applied per os: 100 days of phage treatment followed by 112 days without the phage, and subsequent second application of phage up to day 240. Serum and gut antibodies (IgM, IgG, secretory IgA were analyzed in relation to microbiological status of the animals. T4 phage applied orally induced anti-phage antibodies when the exposure was long enough (IgG day 36, IgA day 79; the effect was related to high dosage. Termination of phage treatment resulted in a decrease of IgA again to insignificant levels. Second administration of phage induces secretory IgA sooner than that induced by the first administrations. Increased IgA level antagonized gut transit of active phage. Phage resistant E. coli dominated gut flora very late, on day 92. Thus, the immunological response emerges as a major factor determining phage survival in the gut. Phage proteins Hoc and gp12 were identified as highly immunogenic. A low response to exemplary foreign antigens (from Ebola virus presented on Hoc was observed, which suggests that phage platforms can be used in oral vaccine design.

  2. Molecular mapping of Verticillium wilt resistance QTL clustered on chromosomes D7 and D9 in upland cotton

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Verticillium wilt is a destructive disease with international consequences for cotton production. Breeding broad-spectrum resistant cultivars is considered to be one of the most effective means for reducing crop losses. A resistant cotton cultivar,60182,was crossed with a susceptible cultivar,Jun-mian 1,to identify markers for Verticillium resistance genes and validate the mode of its inheritance. Genetic segregation analysis for Verticillium wilt resistance was evaluated based upon infected leaf percentage in the seedling stage using major gene-polygene mixed inheritance models and joint analysis of P1,P2,F1,B1,B2 and F2 populations obtained from the cultivar cross. We found that resistance of upland cotton cultivar 60182 to isolates BP2,VD8 and T9,and their isoconcentration mixture was controlled by two major genes with additive-dominance-epistatic effects,and the inheritance of the major gene was dominant. Furthermore,a genetic linkage map was constructed using F2 segregating population and resistance phenotypic data were obtained using F2:3 families inoculated with different isolates and detected in different developmental stages. The genetic linkage map with 139 loci was comprised of 31 linkage groups covering 1165 cM,with an average distance of 8.38 cM between two markers,or 25.89% of the cotton genome length. From 60182,we found 4 QTL on chromosome D7 and 4 QTL on D9 for BP2,5 QTL on D7 and 9 QTL on D9 for VD8,4 QTL on D7 and 5 QTL on D9 for T9 and 3 QTL on D7 and 7 QTL on D7 for mixed pathogens. The QTL mapping results revealed that QTL clusters with high contribution rates were screened simultaneously on chromosomes D9 and D7 by multiple interval mapping (CIM),whether from resistance phenotypic data from different developmental stages or for different isolates. The result is consistent with the genetic model of two major genes in 60182 and suggests broad-spectrum resistance to both defoliating isolates of V. dahliae and nondefoliating isolates. The markers

  3. DNA markers closely linked to nematode resistance genes in sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) mapped using chromosome additions and translocations originating from wild beets of the Procumbentes section.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, C; Koch, R; Fischer, F; Brandes, A; Wricke, G; Herrmann, R G

    1992-03-01

    Genes conferring resistance to the beet cyst nematode (Heterodera schachtii Schm.) have been transferred to sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) from three wild species of the Procumbentes section using monosomic addition and translocation lines, because no meiotic recombination occurs between chromosomes of cultured and wild species. In the course of a project to isolate the nematode resistance genes by strategies of reverse genetics, probes were cloned from DNA of a fragmented B. procumbens chromosome carrying a resistance gene, which had been isolated by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. One probe (pRK643) hybridized with a short dispersed repetitive DNA element, which was found only in wild beets, and thus may be used as a molecular marker for nematode resistance to progeneis of monosomic addition lines segregating resistant and susceptible individuals. Additional probes for the resistance gene region were obtained with a polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based strategy using repetitive primers to amplify DNA located between repetitive elements. One of these probes established the existence of at least six different chromosomes from wild beet species, each conferring resistance independently of the others. A strict correlation between the length of the wild beet chromatin introduced in fragment addition and translocation lines and the repeat copy number has been used physically to map the region conferring resistance to a chromosome segment of 0.5-3 Mb.

  4. Quantitative models of in vitro bacteriophage-host dynamics and their application to phage therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin J Cairns

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Phage therapy is the use of bacteriophages as antimicrobial agents for the control of pathogenic and other problem bacteria. It has previously been argued that successful application of phage therapy requires a good understanding of the non-linear kinetics of phage-bacteria interactions. Here we combine experimental and modelling approaches to make a detailed examination of such kinetics for the important food-borne pathogen Campylobacter jejuni and a suitable virulent phage in an in vitro system. Phage-insensitive populations of C. jejuni arise readily, and as far as we are aware this is the first phage therapy study to test, against in vitro data, models for phage-bacteria interactions incorporating phage-insensitive or resistant bacteria. We find that even an apparently simplistic model fits the data surprisingly well, and we confirm that the so-called inundation and proliferation thresholds are likely to be of considerable practical importance to phage therapy. We fit the model to time series data in order to estimate thresholds and rate constants directly. A comparison of the fit for each culture reveals density-dependent features of phage infectivity that are worthy of further investigation. Our results illustrate how insight from empirical studies can be greatly enhanced by the use of kinetic models: such combined studies of in vitro systems are likely to be an essential precursor to building a meaningful picture of the kinetic properties of in vivo phage therapy.

  5. Recombinations in staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec elements compromise the molecular detection of methicillin resistance in Staphylococcus aureus

    KAUST Repository

    Hill-Cawthorne, Grant A.

    2014-06-27

    Clinical laboratories are increasingly using molecular tests for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) screening. However, primers have to be targeted to a variable chromosomal region, the staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec). We initially screened 726 MRSA isolates from a single UK hospital trust by recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA), a novel, isothermal alternative to PCR. Undetected isolates were further characterised using multilocus sequence, spa typing and whole genome sequencing. 96% of our tested phenotypically MRSA isolates contained one of the six orfX-SCCmec junctions our RPA test and commercially available molecular tests target. However 30 isolates could not be detected. Sequencing of 24 of these isolates demonstrated recombinations within the SCCmec element with novel insertions that interfered with the RPA, preventing identification as MRSA. This result suggests that clinical laboratories cannot rely solely upon molecular assays to reliably detect all methicillin-resistance. The presence of significant recombinations in the SCCmec element, where the majority of assays target their primers, suggests that there will continue to be isolates that escape identification. We caution that dependence on amplification-based molecular assays will continue to result in failure to diagnose a small proportion (?4%) of MRSA isolates, unless the true level of SCCmec natural diversity is determined by whole genome sequencing of a large collection of MRSA isolates. © 2014 Hill-Cawthorne et al.

  6. Recombinations in staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec elements compromise the molecular detection of methicillin resistance in Staphylococcus aureus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grant A Hill-Cawthorne

    Full Text Available Clinical laboratories are increasingly using molecular tests for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA screening. However, primers have to be targeted to a variable chromosomal region, the staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec. We initially screened 726 MRSA isolates from a single UK hospital trust by recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA, a novel, isothermal alternative to PCR. Undetected isolates were further characterised using multilocus sequence, spa typing and whole genome sequencing. 96% of our tested phenotypically MRSA isolates contained one of the six orfX-SCCmec junctions our RPA test and commercially available molecular tests target. However 30 isolates could not be detected. Sequencing of 24 of these isolates demonstrated recombinations within the SCCmec element with novel insertions that interfered with the RPA, preventing identification as MRSA. This result suggests that clinical laboratories cannot rely solely upon molecular assays to reliably detect all methicillin-resistance. The presence of significant recombinations in the SCCmec element, where the majority of assays target their primers, suggests that there will continue to be isolates that escape identification. We caution that dependence on amplification-based molecular assays will continue to result in failure to diagnose a small proportion (∼4% of MRSA isolates, unless the true level of SCCmec natural diversity is determined by whole genome sequencing of a large collection of MRSA isolates.

  7. Antimicrobial resistance profile, phage typing and molecular characterization of Salmonella Enteritidis strains from poultry originPerfil de resistência a antimicrobianos, fagotipagem e caracterização molecular de cepas de Salmonella Enteritidis de origem avícola

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marciane Magnani

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Enteritidis (SE is currently responsible for significant losses in the poultry industry with consequences on public health. In the present study, 38 SE isolates from biological material of chicken breeders were characterized using phage typing, antimicrobial resistance profile and pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE. The phage type (PT 7 and 9 were predominant and 26.3% of the isolates were resistance to nalidixic acid (NAL. The phage typing and analysis of antimicrobial resistance profile showed high discriminatory power (0.85. The PFGE profile of 13 strains with XbaI and SpeI discriminated the SE phage types, as well characterized strains from the same serovar. The results showed the importance to associate different methods for the characterization of SE and suggest that poultry products may have been source of human salmonellosis in the Parana State during the period of study. Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica sorovar Enteritidis (SE é responsável por prejuízos significativos à avicultura, com conseqüências importantes para saúde pública. No presente estudo foi realizada a caracterização de 38 isolados de SE provenientes de material biológico de reprodutoras destinadas à produção de frangos de corte através de fagotipagem, perfil de resistência antimicrobiana e de eletrofose de campo pulsado (PFGE. Os fagotipos (PT predominantes foram PT7 e PT9 e 26,3% dos isolados apresentaram resistência ao ácido nalidíxico (NAL. A fagotipagem e a análise do perfil de resistência antimicrobiana juntos mostraram elevado poder discriminatório (0,85. Os perfis de PFGE de 13 cepas, com as endonucleases XbaI e SpeI permitiram discriminar os fagotipos de SE, bem como associar perfis de um mesmo fagotipo. Os resultados mostram a importância da associação de métodos para a caracterização de SE e sugerem que produtos da avicultura de corte podem ser fonte de salmonelose humana.

  8. Phage sensitivity and prophage carriage in Staphylococcus aureus isolated from foods in Spain and New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez, Diana; Rodríguez-Rubio, Lorena; García, Pilar; Billington, Craig; Premarante, Aruni; Rodríguez, Ana; Martínez, Beatriz

    2016-08-01

    Bacteriophages (phages) are a promising tool for the biocontrol of pathogenic bacteria, including those contaminating food products and causing infectious diseases. However, the success of phage preparations is limited by the host ranges of their constituent phages. The phage resistance/sensitivity profile of eighty seven Staphylococcus aureus strains isolated in Spain and New Zealand from dairy, meat and seafood sources was determined for six phages (Φ11, K, ΦH5, ΦA72, CAPSa1 and CAPSa3). Most of the S. aureus strains were sensitive to phage K (Myoviridae) and CAPSa1 (Siphoviridae) regardless of their origin. There was a higher sensitivity of New Zealand S. aureus strains to phages isolated from both Spain (ΦH5 and ΦA72) and New Zealand (CAPSa1 and CAPSa3). Spanish phages had a higher infectivity on S. aureus strains of Spanish dairy origin, while Spanish strains isolated from other environments were more sensitive to New Zealand phages. Lysogeny was more prevalent in Spanish S. aureus compared to New Zealand strains. A multiplex PCR reaction, which detected ΦH5 and ΦA72 sequences, indicated a high prevalence of these prophages in Spanish S. aureus strains, but were infrequently detected in New Zealand strains. Overall, the correlation between phage resistance and lysogeny in S. aureus strains was found to be weak.

  9. Phage sensitivity and prophage carriage in Staphylococcus aureus isolated from foods in Spain and New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez, Diana; Rodríguez-Rubio, Lorena; García, Pilar; Billington, Craig; Premarante, Aruni; Rodríguez, Ana; Martínez, Beatriz

    2016-08-01

    Bacteriophages (phages) are a promising tool for the biocontrol of pathogenic bacteria, including those contaminating food products and causing infectious diseases. However, the success of phage preparations is limited by the host ranges of their constituent phages. The phage resistance/sensitivity profile of eighty seven Staphylococcus aureus strains isolated in Spain and New Zealand from dairy, meat and seafood sources was determined for six phages (Φ11, K, ΦH5, ΦA72, CAPSa1 and CAPSa3). Most of the S. aureus strains were sensitive to phage K (Myoviridae) and CAPSa1 (Siphoviridae) regardless of their origin. There was a higher sensitivity of New Zealand S. aureus strains to phages isolated from both Spain (ΦH5 and ΦA72) and New Zealand (CAPSa1 and CAPSa3). Spanish phages had a higher infectivity on S. aureus strains of Spanish dairy origin, while Spanish strains isolated from other environments were more sensitive to New Zealand phages. Lysogeny was more prevalent in Spanish S. aureus compared to New Zealand strains. A multiplex PCR reaction, which detected ΦH5 and ΦA72 sequences, indicated a high prevalence of these prophages in Spanish S. aureus strains, but were infrequently detected in New Zealand strains. Overall, the correlation between phage resistance and lysogeny in S. aureus strains was found to be weak. PMID:27111797

  10. Chromosome mapping of Rmp-4, a gonad-dependent gene encoding host resistance to mousepox.

    OpenAIRE

    Brownstein, D. G.; Gras, L

    1995-01-01

    DBA/2 (D2) mice are susceptible and C57BL/6 (B6) mice are resistant to lethal mousepox. A congenic resistant strain, D2.B6-Rmp-4r (D2.R4), was developed by serially backcrossing male mice that survived ectromelia virus infection with D2 mice, beginning with (B6 x D2)F1 mice. Male D2.R4 mice were at least 300-fold more resistant to lethal mousepox than male D2 mice. Female D2.R4 mice were 100-fold more resistant than male D2.R4 mice and 500-fold more resistant than female D2 mice. Neonatal gon...

  11. Isolation and Expression of the Lysis Genes of Actinomyces naeslundii Phage Av-1

    OpenAIRE

    Delisle, Allan L.; Barcak, Gerard J.; Guo, Ming

    2006-01-01

    Like most gram-positive oral bacteria, Actinomyces naeslundii is resistant to salivary lysozyme and to most other lytic enzymes. We are interested in studying the lysins of phages of this important oral bacterium as potential diagnostic and therapeutic agents. To identify the Actinomyces phage genes encoding these species-specific enzymes in Escherichia coli, we constructed a new cloning vector, pAD330, that can be used to enrich for and isolate phage holin genes, which are located adjacent t...

  12. Synergy as a rationale for phage therapy using phage cocktails

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Schmerer

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Where phages are used to treat bacterial contaminations and infections, multiple phages are typically applied at once as a cocktail. When two or more phages in the cocktail attack the same bacterium, the combination may produce better killing than any single phage (synergy or the combination may be worse than the best single phage (interference. Synergy is of obvious utility, especially if it can be predicted a priori, but it remains poorly documented with few examples known. This study addresses synergy in which one phage improves adsorption by a second phage. It first presents evidence of synergy from an experimental system of two phages and a mucoid E. coli host. The synergy likely stems from a tailspike enzyme produced by one of the phages. We then offer mathematical models and simulations to understand the dynamics of synergy and the enhanced magnitude of bacterial control possible. The models and observations complement each other and suggest that synergy may be of widespread utility and may be predictable from easily observed phenotypes.

  13. Differential epigenetic compatibility of qnr antibiotic resistance determinants with the chromosome of Escherichia coli

    OpenAIRE

    María B Sánchez; Martínez, José L.

    2012-01-01

    Environmental bacteria harbor a plethora of genes that, upon their horizontal transfer to new hosts, may confer resistance to antibiotics, although the number of such determinants actually acquired by pathogenic bacteria is very low. The founder effect, fitness costs and ecological connectivity all influence the chances of resistance transfer being successful. We examined the importance of these bottlenecks using the family of quinolone resistance determinants Qnr. The results indicate the ep...

  14. Why do phage play dice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avlund, Mikkel; Dodd, Ian B; Semsey, Szabolcs; Sneppen, Kim; Krishna, Sandeep

    2009-11-01

    Phage lambda is among the simplest organisms that make a developmental decision. An infected bacterium goes either into the lytic state, where the phage particles rapidly replicate and eventually lyse the cell, or into a lysogenic state, where the phage goes dormant and replicates along with the cell. Experimental observations by P. Kourilsky are consistent with a single phage infection deterministically choosing lysis and double infection resulting in a stochastic choice. We argue that the phage are playing a "game" of minimizing the chance of extinction and that the shift from determinism to stochasticity is due to a shift from a single-player to a multiplayer game. Crucial to the argument is the clonal identity of the phage. PMID:19740995

  15. Chromosomal duplications and cointegrates generated by the bacteriophage lamdba Red system in Escherichia coli K-12

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadkarni Ashwini

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An Escherichia coli strain in which RecBCD has been genetically replaced by the bacteriophage λ Red system engages in efficient recombination between its chromosome and linear double-stranded DNA species sharing sequences with the chromosome. Previous studies of this experimental system have focused on a gene replacement-type event, in which a 3.5 kbp dsDNA consisting of the cat gene and flanking lac operon sequences recombines with the E. coli chromosome to generate a chloramphenicol-resistant Lac- recombinant. The dsDNA was delivered into the cell as part of the chromosome of a non-replicating λ vector, from which it was released by the action of a restriction endonuclease in the infected cell. This study characterizes the genetic requirements and outcomes of a variety of additional Red-promoted homologous recombination events producing Lac+ recombinants. Results A number of observations concerning recombination events between the chromosome and linear DNAs were made: (1 Formation of Lac+ and Lac- recombinants depended upon the same recombination functions. (2 High multiplicity and high chromosome copy number favored Lac+ recombinant formation. (3 The Lac+ recombinants were unstable, segregating Lac- progeny. (4 A tetracycline-resistance marker in a site of the phage chromosome distant from cat was not frequently co-inherited with cat. (5 Recombination between phage sequences in the linear DNA and cryptic prophages in the chromosome was responsible for most of the observed Lac+ recombinants. In addition, observations were made concerning recombination events between the chromosome and circular DNAs: (6 Formation of recombinants depended upon both RecA and, to a lesser extent, Red. (7 The linked tetracycline-resistance marker was frequently co-inherited in this case. Conclusions The Lac+ recombinants arise from events in which homologous recombination between the incoming linear DNA and both lac and cryptic prophage

  16. Helper plasmid cloning in Streptococcus sanguis: cloning of a tetracycline resistance determinant from the Streptococcus mutans chromosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobian, J A; Macrina, F L

    1982-10-01

    A model system for testing the helper plasmid cloning system of Gryczan et al. (Mol. Gen. Genet. 177:459-467, 1980) was devised for the Streptococcus sanguis (Challis) host-vector system. In this system, linearized pVA736 plasmid efficiently transformed an S. sanguis (Challis) host containing a homologous plasmid, pVA380-1, but did not transform a plasmidless host or a host containing a nonhomologous plasmid, pVA380. In addition, whereas monomeric circular pVA736 transformed a plasmidless host with two-hit kinetics, it transformed a pVA380-1-containing host with one-hit kinetics. This helper plasmid cloning system was used to isolate two HindIII fragments (5.0 megadaltons [Mdal] and 1.9 Mdal in size) from the chromosome of Streptococcus mutans V825 which conferred high-level tetracycline resistance. One tetracycline-resistant clone was examined and found to contain three plasmids which were sized and designated pVA868 (9.0 Mdal), pVA869 (9.5 Mdal), and pVA870 (9.8 Mdal). Results of Southern blot hybridization and restriction endonuclease digestion confirmed that all three chimeras were composed of two HindIII fragments of the S. mutans V825 chromosome, as well as a large portion, varying in size for each chimera, of the 2.8 Mdal cloning vector, pVA380-1. Incompatibility observed between pVA380-1 and each of the chimeras indicated that replication of the chimeras was governed by the pVA380-1 replicative origin. Southern blotting experiments revealed that the chimeras hybridized to Tn916, providing the first evidence that transposon-related genes of enteric streptococcal origin are disseminated among oral streptococci.

  17. The phage-host arms race: Shaping the evolution of microbes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stern, Adi [Weizmann Inst. of Science, Rehovot (Israel). Dept. of Molecular Genetics; Sorek, Rotem [Weizmann Inst. of Science, Rehovot (Israel). Dept. of Molecular Genetics

    2010-10-26

    Bacteria, the most abundant organisms on the planet, are outnumbered by a factor of 10 to 1 by phages that infect them. Faced with the rapid evolution and turnover of phage particles, bacteria have evolved various mechanisms to evade phage infection and killing, leading to an evolutionary arms race. The extensive co-evolution of both phage and host has resulted in considerable diversity on the part of both bacterial and phage defensive and offensive strategies. In this paper, we discuss the unique and common features of phage resistance mechanisms and their role in global biodiversity. Finally, the commonalities between defense mechanisms suggest avenues for the discovery of novel forms of these mechanisms based on their evolutionary traits.

  18. The phage-host arms-race: Shaping the evolution of microbes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adi_Stern,; Rotem_Sorek,; Stern, Adi; Sorek, Rotem

    2010-10-01

    Bacteria, the most abundant organisms on the planet, are outnumbered by a factor of 10 to 1 by phages that infect them. Faced with the rapid evolution and turnover of phage particles, bacteria have evolved various mechanisms to evade phage infection and killing, leading to an evolutionary arms-race. The extensive co-evolution of both phage and host has resulted in considerable diversity on the part of both bacterial and phage defensive and offensive strategies. Here, we discuss the unique and common features of phage resistance mechanisms and their role in global biodiversity. The commonalities between defense mechanisms suggest avenues for the discovery of novel such mechanisms based on their evolutionary traits.

  19. In-House Phage Amplification Assay Is a Sound Alternative for Detecting Rifampin-Resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Low-Resource Settings

    OpenAIRE

    Símboli, Norberto; Takiff, Howard; McNerney, Ruth; López, Beatriz; Martin, Anandi; Palomino, Juan Carlos; Barrera, Lucía; Ritacco, Viviana

    2005-01-01

    An in-house mycobacteriophage amplification assay for detecting rifampin-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis showed 100% sensitivity, 97.7% specificity, and 95.2% predictive value for resistance in a test of 129 isolates from a hot spot area of multidrug-resistant M. tuberculosis. The applicability of the test was demonstrated in the routine work flow of a low-resource reference laboratory.

  20. Association of virulence plasmid and antibiotic resistance determinants with chromosomal multilocus genotypes in Mexican Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silva Claudia

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bacterial genomes are mosaic structures composed of genes present in every strain of the same species (core genome, and genes present in some but not all strains of a species (accessory genome. The aim of this study was to compare the genetic diversity of core and accessory genes of a Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica serovar Typhimurium (Typhimurium population isolated from food-animal and human sources in four regions of Mexico. Multilocus sequence typing (MLST and macrorestriction fingerprints by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE were used to address the core genetic variation, and genes involved in pathogenesis and antibiotic resistance were selected to evaluate the accessory genome. Results We found a low genetic diversity for both housekeeping and accessory genes. Sequence type 19 (ST19 was supported as the founder genotype of STs 213, 302 and 429. We found a temporal pattern in which the derived ST213 is replacing the founder ST19 in the four geographic regions analyzed and a geographic trend in the number of resistance determinants. The distribution of the accessory genes was not random among chromosomal genotypes. We detected strong associations among the different accessory genes and the multilocus chromosomal genotypes (STs. First, the Salmonella virulence plasmid (pSTV was found mostly in ST19 isolates. Second, the plasmid-borne betalactamase cmy-2 was found only in ST213 isolates. Third, the most abundant integron, IP-1 (dfrA12, orfF and aadA2, was found only in ST213 isolates. Fourth, the Salmonella genomic island (SGI1 was found mainly in a subgroup of ST19 isolates carrying pSTV. The mapping of accessory genes and multilocus genotypes on the dendrogram derived from macrorestiction fingerprints allowed the establishment of genetic subgroups within the population. Conclusion Despite the low levels of genetic diversity of core and accessory genes, the non-random distribution of the accessory genes

  1. AbiV, a Novel Antiphage Abortive Infection Mechanism on the Chromosome of Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris MG1363

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haaber, Jakob Brandt Borup; Moineau, Sylvain; Fortier, Louis-Charles;

    2008-01-01

    MG1363. This gene was also found to confer phage resistance to L. lactis MG1363 when it was cloned into an expression vector. A subsequent frameshift mutation in the ORF completely eliminated the phage resistance phenotype, confirming that the ORF was necessary for phage resistance. This ORF provided...

  2. Chromosomal Locus for Cadmium Resistance in Pseudomonas putida Consisting of a Cadmium-Transporting ATPase and a MerR Family Response Regulator

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Seon-Woo; Glickmann, Eric; Cooksey, Donald A.

    2001-01-01

    Pseudomonads from environmental sources vary widely in their sensitivity to cadmium, but the basis for this resistance is largely uncharactarized. A chromosomal fragment encoding cadmium resistance was cloned from Pseudomonas putida 06909, a rhizosphere bacterium, and sequence analysis revealed two divergently transcribed genes, cadA and cadR. CadA was similar to cadmium-transporting ATPases known mostly from gram-positive bacteria, and to ZntA, a lead-, zinc-, and cadmium-transporting ATPase...

  3. Pseudomonas fluorescens biofilms subjected to phage phiIBB-PF7A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neubauer Peter

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pseudomonas fluorescens is an important food spoilage organism, usually found in the form of biofilms. Bacterial biofilms are inherently resistant to a variety of antimicrobial agents, therefore alternative methods to biofilm control, such as bacteriophages (phages have been suggested. Phage behavior on biofilms is still poorly investigated and needs further understanding. Here we describe the application of phage ϕIBB-PF7, a newly isolated phage, to control P. fluorescens biofilms. The biofilms were formed under static or dynamic conditions and with or without renewal of medium. Results Conditions for biofilm formation influenced the feature of the biofilm and the morphology of P. fluorescens. Biomass removal due to phage activity varied between 63 and 91% depending on the biofilm age and the conditions under which the biofilm had been formed and phages applied. Removal of the biofilm by phage treatment was faster in younger biofilms, but the same number of surviving cells was detected in all tested biofilms, after only 4 h of treatment, even in older biofilms. Under static conditions, a 3 log higher number of phage progeny remained either inside the biofilm matrix or attached to the substratum surface than under dynamic conditions, pointing to the importance of experimental conditions for the efficacy of phage entrapment into the biofilm. Conclusion Phage ϕIBB-PF7A is highly efficient in removing P. fluorescens biofilms within a short time interval. The conditions of biofilm formation and applied during phage infection are critical for the efficacy of the sanitation process. The integration of phages into the biofilm matrix and their entrapment to the surface may be further beneficial factors when phage treatment is considered alone or in addition to chemical biocides in industrial environments where P. fluorescens causes serious spoilage.

  4. The epic of phage therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Alain Dublanchet; Shawna Bourne

    2007-01-01

    The present report describes the presentation given by Dr Alain Dublanchet at the Stanier/Oxford Hygiene Symposium, held in Oxford, England, on November 10, 2004. Dr Dublanchet's lecture, entitled ‘The epic of phage therapy’, provided a sequential account of the use of phage as an antimicrobial from its discovery to its rise and fall and current rediscovery.

  5. Characterization of Five Novel Brevibacillus Bacteriophages and Genomic Comparison of Brevibacillus Phages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordan A Berg

    Full Text Available Brevibacillus laterosporus is a spore-forming bacterium that causes a secondary infection in beehives following European Foulbrood disease. To better understand the contributions of Brevibacillus bacteriophages to the evolution of their hosts, five novel phages (Jenst, Osiris, Powder, SecTim467, and Sundance were isolated and characterized. When compared with the five Brevibacillus phages currently in NCBI, these phages were assigned to clusters based on whole genome and proteome synteny. Powder and Osiris, both myoviruses, were assigned to the previously described Jimmer-like cluster. SecTim467 and Jenst, both siphoviruses, formed a novel phage cluster. Sundance, a siphovirus, was assigned as a singleton phage along with the previously isolated singleton, Emery. In addition to characterizing the basic relationships between these phages, several genomic features were observed. A motif repeated throughout phages Jenst and SecTim467 was frequently upstream of genes predicted to function in DNA replication, nucleotide metabolism, and transcription, suggesting transcriptional co-regulation. In addition, paralogous gene pairs that encode a putative transcriptional regulator were identified in four Brevibacillus phages. These paralogs likely evolved to bind different DNA sequences due to variation at amino acid residues predicted to bind specific nucleotides. Finally, a putative transposable element was identified in SecTim467 and Sundance that carries genes homologous to those found in Brevibacillus chromosomes. Remnants of this transposable element were also identified in phage Jenst. These discoveries provide a greater understanding of the diversity of phages, their behavior, and their evolutionary relationships to one another and to their host. In addition, they provide a foundation with which further Brevibacillus phages can be compared.

  6. Characterization of Five Novel Brevibacillus Bacteriophages and Genomic Comparison of Brevibacillus Phages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Jordan A; Merrill, Bryan D; Crockett, Justin T; Esplin, Kyle P; Evans, Marlee R; Heaton, Karli E; Hilton, Jared A; Hyde, Jonathan R; McBride, Morgan S; Schouten, Jordan T; Simister, Austin R; Thurgood, Trever L; Ward, Andrew T; Breakwell, Donald P; Hope, Sandra; Grose, Julianne H

    2016-01-01

    Brevibacillus laterosporus is a spore-forming bacterium that causes a secondary infection in beehives following European Foulbrood disease. To better understand the contributions of Brevibacillus bacteriophages to the evolution of their hosts, five novel phages (Jenst, Osiris, Powder, SecTim467, and Sundance) were isolated and characterized. When compared with the five Brevibacillus phages currently in NCBI, these phages were assigned to clusters based on whole genome and proteome synteny. Powder and Osiris, both myoviruses, were assigned to the previously described Jimmer-like cluster. SecTim467 and Jenst, both siphoviruses, formed a novel phage cluster. Sundance, a siphovirus, was assigned as a singleton phage along with the previously isolated singleton, Emery. In addition to characterizing the basic relationships between these phages, several genomic features were observed. A motif repeated throughout phages Jenst and SecTim467 was frequently upstream of genes predicted to function in DNA replication, nucleotide metabolism, and transcription, suggesting transcriptional co-regulation. In addition, paralogous gene pairs that encode a putative transcriptional regulator were identified in four Brevibacillus phages. These paralogs likely evolved to bind different DNA sequences due to variation at amino acid residues predicted to bind specific nucleotides. Finally, a putative transposable element was identified in SecTim467 and Sundance that carries genes homologous to those found in Brevibacillus chromosomes. Remnants of this transposable element were also identified in phage Jenst. These discoveries provide a greater understanding of the diversity of phages, their behavior, and their evolutionary relationships to one another and to their host. In addition, they provide a foundation with which further Brevibacillus phages can be compared.

  7. Localization of powdery mildew resistance gene Ml-ra on barley chromosome 5

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doll, Hans; Jensen, Hans Peter

    1986-01-01

    Evidence is presented that the powdery mildew resistance gene called Ml-(41/145) represents a unique, unnamed locus, which we suggest to be designated Ml-ra with reference to variety 'Ragusa b' [Hordeum vulgare]. Ml-ra is located on the short arm of chormosome 5 near powdery mildew resistance locus...... Ml-a and the seed storage protein loci Hor1 and Hor2. The most likely order of the loci is Hor1, Ml-a, Ml-ra, and Hor2....

  8. High resistance of fibroblasts from Mongolian gerbil embryos to cell killing and chromosome aberrations by X-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mongolian gerbil (Meriones unguiculatus) is known to be one of the most radioresistant animal species. In order to determine whether there is any correlation between mortality of mammals exposed to γ- or X-rays and radiation sensitivity of culture cells derived from different mammalian species, we have examined the X-ray survival curves of normal diploid fibroblasts from Mongolian gerbil embryos and compared with those of other cultured embryo cells from various laboratory animals and normal human. There was a big difference in cell survival to X-rays among different mammalian species. The D0 values of Mongolian gerbil cells ranged from 2.3 to 2.6 Gy which are twice as high as those of human cells. The mean D0 value of human cells was 1.1 Gy. Mouse, rat, Chinese hamster and Syrian/golden hamster cells showed similar D0 values ranging from 1.7 to 2.0 Gy. When cells were irradiated with 2 Gy of X-rays, three times longer mitotic delay was observed in human cells than in Mongolian gerbil cells. At this X-ray dose, furthermore, ten times more chromosome aberrations were detected in human cells than in Mongolian gerbil cells, and the frequencies of other rodent cells lay between the values for the two cell strains. These data indicate that the Mongolian gerbil cells are resistant to X-ray-induced cell killing and chromosome aberrations, and that radiation sensitivity of primarily cultured mammalian cells may be reflected by their radioresistance in vivo. (author)

  9. In vitro management of hospital Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm using indigenous T7-like lytic phage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahiwale, Sangeeta; Tamboli, Nilofer; Thorat, Kiran; Kulkarni, Rajendra; Ackermann, Hans; Kapadnis, Balasaheb

    2011-02-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a human pathogen capable of forming biofilm and contaminating medical settings, is responsible for 65% mortality in the hospitals all over the world. This study was undertaken to isolate lytic phages against biofilm forming Ps. aeruginosa hospital isolates and to use them for in vitro management of biofilms in the microtiter plate. Multidrug resistant strains of Ps. aeruginosa were isolated from the hospital environment in and around Pimpri-Chinchwad, Maharashtra by standard microbiological methods. Lytic phages against these strains were isolated from the Pavana river water by double agar layer plaque assay method. A wide host range phage bacterial virus Ps. aeruginosa phage (BVPaP-3) was selected. Electron microscopy revealed that BVPaP-3 phage is a T7-like phage and is a relative of phage species gh-1. A phage at MOI-0.001 could prevent biofilm formation by Ps. aeruginosa hospital strain-6(HS6) on the pegs within 24 h. It could also disperse pre-formed biofilms of all hospital isolates (HS1-HS6) on the pegs within 24 h. Dispersion of biofilm was studied by monitoring log percent reduction in cfu and log percent increase in pfu of respective bacterium and phage on the peg as well as in the well. Scanning electron microscopy confirmed that phage BVPaP-3 indeed causes biofilm reduction and bacterial cell killing. Laboratory studies prove that BVPaP-3 is a highly efficient phage in preventing and dispersing biofilms of Ps. aeruginosa. Phage BVPaP-3 can be used as biological disinfectant to control biofilm problem in medical devices.

  10. Genetic dissection of milk yield traits and mastitis resistance QTL on chromosome 20 in dairy cattle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kadri, Naveen Kumar; Guldbrandtsen, Bernt; Lund, Mogens Sandø;

    2015-01-01

    , there was indication on differences in the causal factor(s) across breeds. A previously reported F279Y mutation (rs385640152) within the growth hormone receptor (GHR) gene showed strong association with milk, fat, protein yields. In HOL, the highest peaks for milk yield and susceptibility to mastitis were separated......Intense selection to increase milk yield has had negative consequences for mastitis incidence in dairy cattle. Due to low heritability of mastitis resistance and an unfavorable genetic correlation with milk yield, a reduction in mastitis through traditional breeding has been difficult to achieve...... but not the former situation, undesirable genetic correlation could potentially be broken by selecting animals that have favorable variants for both traits. First, we performed a within-breed association study using a haplotype-based method in Danish Holstein cattle (HOL). Next, we analyzed Nordic Red dairy cattle...

  11. Application of phage-lysis method in clinical detection of drug resistance of Mycobacterium tuberculosis%噬菌体裂解法在肺结核分枝杆菌耐药性检测中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林惠玲; 崔健伟; 王怡心; 蒋英; 李琼英

    2012-01-01

    目的 探讨噬菌体裂解法在基层结核病防治机构实验中的应用价值.方法 应用噬菌体裂解法检测临床108例痰标本中结核分枝杆菌对利福平(R)、异烟肼(H)、链霉素(S)、乙胺丁醇(E)的耐药性,并与比例法比较.结果 以比例法检测结果为标准,噬菌体裂解法检测利福平(R)、异烟肼(H)、链霉素(S)、乙胺丁醇(E)耐药性的敏感性、特异性及准确性分别为100.0%、96.0%和96.3%,87.5%、95.7%和94.4%,76.2%、100.0%和95.4%,75.0%、96.0%和94.4%.噬菌体裂解法检测利福平(R)、异烟肼(H)、链霉素(S)、乙胺丁醇(E)药敏结果与比例浓度法检测药敏结果符合率分别为96.3%、94.4%、95.4%、94.4%.结论 噬菌体裂解法检测痰标本中结核分枝杆菌对利福平(R)、异烟肼(H)、链霉素(S)、乙胺丁醇(E)的耐药性具有较高的敏感性、特异性和准确性,与比例法比较,具有较高的符合率,且简便快速.%Objective To assess the value of phage-lysis method in clinical detection of drug resistance of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Methods The resistance of Mycobacterium tubercuolosis from 108 clinical isolated samples to rifampin,isoniazid,streptomycin,and ethambutol were detected with phage-lysis method and comparing with the results of concentration ratio (CR)method's. Results The susceptibility,specificity and accuracy of PL method in detection of resisthnace of Mycobacterium tuberculosis to rifampin were 100%, 96.0%, and 96.3%; to isoniazid were 87.5%, 95.7%, 94.4%; to streptomycin 76.2%, 100%,95.4% and to ethambutol were 75.0%,96.0%,94.4%. Coincidence of the results detected by CR and PL methods were 96.3% (rifampin),94.4% (isoniazid),95.4%(streptomycin),94.4% (ethambutol). Conclusion Comparing with CR methods,PL method should be as the better choice for detecting drug resistance of Mycobacterium tuberculosis as it is simple fast and without requiring sophisticated facilities and allowed

  12. Subtyping of Chilean Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains carrying the staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec type I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Medina

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec present in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA has two essential components, the ccr gene complex and the mec gene complex. Additionally, SCCmec has non-essential components called J regions which are used for MRSA subtyping. This study was performed to determine subtypes MRSA strains carrying SCCmec type I based on polymorphism of regions located downstream of the mecA gene. A total of 98 MRSA strains carrying SCCmec type I isolated from patients hospitalized at the County Hospital of Valdivia (Chile between May 2007 and May 2008, were analyzed by multiplex PCR designed to amplify the mecA gene and 7 DNA hypervariable regions located around the mecA gene. MRSA strains were classified into seventeen genotypes accordingly to amplification patterns of DNA hypervariable regions. Five genotypes showed amplification patterns previously described. The remaining twelve genotypes showed new amplification patterns. Genotypes 18 and Genotype 19 were the most frequently detected. Regions HVR, Ins117 and pI258 stand out as being present in more than 60% of tested isolates. The acquisition of hypervariable regions by MRSA is a continuous horizontal transfer process through which the SCCmec have been preserved intact, or even may give rise to new types and subtypes of SCCmec. Therefore it is possible to infer that most MRSA strains isolated at the County Hospital of Valdivia (Chile were originated from two local clones which correspond to Genotype 18 and Genotype 19.

  13. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus saprophyticus isolates carrying staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec have emerged in urogenital tract infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashide, Masato; Kuroda, Makoto; Omura, Carlos Takashi Neves; Kumano, Miyuki; Ohkawa, Saburo; Ichimura, Sadahiro; Ohta, Toshiko

    2008-06-01

    Staphylococcus saprophyticus is a uropathogenic bacterium that causes acute uncomplicated urinary tract infections, particularly in female outpatients. We investigated the dissemination and antimicrobial susceptibilities of 101 S. saprophyticus isolates from the genitourinary tracts of patients in Japan. Eight of these isolates were mecA positive and showed beta-lactam resistance. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis showed that only some isolates were isogenic, indicating that the mecA gene was apparently acquired independently by mecA-positive isolates through staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec). Type determination of SCCmec by multiplex PCR showed a nontypeable element in the eight mecA-positive isolates. Sequence analysis of the entire SCCmec element from a prototype S. saprophyticus strain revealed that it was nontypeable with the current SCCmec classification due to the novel composition of the class A mec gene complex (IS431-mecA-mecR1-mecI genes) and the ccrA1/ccrB3 gene complex. Intriguingly, the attachment sites of SCCmec are similar to those of type I SCCmec in S. aureus NCTC 10442. Furthermore, the genes around the mec gene complex are similar to those of type II/III SCCmec in S. aureus, while those around the ccr gene complex are similar to those of SCC15305RM found in S. saprophyticus ATCC 15305. In comparison with known SCCmec elements, this S. saprophyticus SCCmec is a novel type.

  14. Diversity of staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec elements in predominant methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus clones in a small geographic area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basset, Patrick; Senn, Laurence; Vogel, Valérie; Zanetti, Giorgio; Blanc, Dominique S

    2010-11-01

    Recent population genetic studies suggest that staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) was acquired much more frequently than previously thought. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the diversity of SCCmec elements in a local methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) population. Each MRSA isolate (one per patient) recovered in the Vaud canton of Switzerland from January 2005 to December 2008 was analyzed by the double-locus sequence typing (DLST) method and SCCmec typing. DLST analysis indicated that 1,884/2,036 isolates (92.5%) belong to four predominant clones. As expected from the local spread of a clone, most isolates within clones harbored an identical SCCmec type. However, three to seven SCCmec types have been recovered in every predominant DLST clone, suggesting that some of these elements might have been acquired locally. This pattern could also be explained by distinct importations of related isolates into the study region. The addition of a third highly variable locus to further increase the discriminatory power of typing as well as epidemiological data suggested that most ambiguous situations were explained by the second hypothesis. In conclusion, our study showed that even if the acquisition of new SCCmec elements at a local level likely occurs, it does not explain all the diversity observed in the study region. PMID:20713672

  15. A Multicenter Study of Beta-Lactamase Resistant Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae Reveals High Level Chromosome Mediated Extended Spectrum β Lactamase Resistance in Ogun State, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Folasoge A. Adeyankinnu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available As a result of the ever increasing problem of multiresistant bacteria, we instituted a surveillance program with the aim of identifying the basic molecular properties of ESBL in our environment. About 197 isolates of Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae were selected and tested for ESBL production and antimicrobial susceptibility. Plasmid profiles were determined and curing ability was tested. ESBL prevalence was 26.4% for all isolates tested, with E. coli having a greater proportion. There was absolute resistance to ampicilin, tetracycline, and co-trimaxole among tested isolates. There was above average susceptibility to the 2nd and 3rd generation cephalosporins. Plasmid profiles of tested isolates ranged from 9 kbp to 26 kbp with average of 14.99±2.3 kbp for E. coli and 20.98±1.8 kbp K. pneumoniae, 9.6% of ESBL positive E. coli plasmids were cured, while 3.9% of K. pneumoniae plasmids were cured after treatment. The present study shows an upsurge in ESBL acquisition by gram negative bacteria and evidence of cocirculation of varying subtypes of ESBL with both plasmid transmissible and chromosome encoded subtypes. This calls for universal surveillance and more effort towards molecular epidemiology of this public health treatment.

  16. Staphylococcal Cassette Chromosome mec (SCCmec) Typing of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Strains Isolated in 11 Asian Countries: a Proposal for a New Nomenclature for SCCmec Elements

    OpenAIRE

    Chongtrakool, Piriyaporn; Ito, Teruyo; Ma, Xiao Xue; Kondo, Yoko; Trakulsomboon, Suwanna; Tiensasitorn, Chuntima; Jamklang, Mantana; Chavalit, Tavinun; Song, Jae-Hoon; Hiramatsu, Keiichi

    2006-01-01

    A description of staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) elements carried by 615 methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains isolated in 11 Asian countries is reported, and a novel nomenclatural system based on their structures is proposed. The 615 strains were classified as type 3A (370 strains), type 2A (207 strains), type 2B (32 strains), type 1B (1 strain), and nontypeable (5 strains). The previously reported type III SCCmec (DDBJ/EMBL/GenBank accession no. AB037671...

  17. Novel Multiplex PCR Assay for Characterization and Concomitant Subtyping of Staphylococcal Cassette Chromosome mec Types I to V in Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Kunyan; McClure, Jo-Ann; Elsayed, Sameer; Louie, Thomas; Conly, John M

    2005-01-01

    Staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) typing is essential for understanding the molecular epidemiology of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). SCCmec elements are currently classified into types I to V based on the nature of the mec and ccr gene complexes, and are further classified into subtypes according to their junkyard region DNA segments. Previously described traditional SCCmec PCR typing schemes require multiple primer sets and PCR experiments, while a previous...

  18. Diversity of Staphylococcal Cassette Chromosome mec Elements in Predominant Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Clones in a Small Geographic Area ▿

    OpenAIRE

    Basset, Patrick; Senn, Laurence; Vogel, Valérie; Zanetti, Giorgio; Blanc, Dominique S.

    2010-01-01

    Recent population genetic studies suggest that staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) was acquired much more frequently than previously thought. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the diversity of SCCmec elements in a local methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) population. Each MRSA isolate (one per patient) recovered in the Vaud canton of Switzerland from January 2005 to December 2008 was analyzed by the double-locus sequence typing (DLST) method and SCCmec t...

  19. Interaction between the genomes of Lactococcus lactis and phages of the P335 species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William John Kelly

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Phages of the P335 species infect Lactococcus lactis and have been particularly studied because of their association with strains of L. lactis subsp. cremoris used as dairy starter cultures. Unlike other lactococcal phages, those of the P335 species may have a temperate or lytic lifestyle, and are believed to originate from the starter cultures themselves. We have sequenced the genome of L. lactis subsp. cremoris KW2 isolated from fermented corn and found that it contains an integrated P335 species prophage. This 41 kb prophage (ΦKW2 has a mosaic structure with functional modules that are highly similar to several other phages of the P335 species associated with dairy starter cultures. Comparison of the genomes of 26 phages of the P335 species, with either a lytic or temperate lifestyle, shows that they can be divided into three groups and that the morphogenesis gene region is the most conserved. Analysis of these phage genomes in conjunction with the genomes of several L. lactis strains shows that prophage insertion is site specific and occurs at seven different chromosomal locations. Exactly how induced or lytic phages of the P335 species interact with carbohydrate cell surface receptors in the host cell envelope remains to be determined. Genes for the biosynthesis of a variable cell surface polysaccharide and for lipoteichoic acids are found in L. lactis and are the main candidates for phage receptors, as the genes for other cell surface carbohydrates have been lost from dairy starter strains. Overall, phages of the P335 species appear to have had only a minor role in the adaptation of L. lactis subsp. cremoris strains to the dairy environment, and instead they appear to be an integral part of the L. lactis chromosome. There remains a great deal to be discovered about their role, and their contribution to the evolution of the bacterial genome.

  20. Influence of Environmental Factors on Phage-Bacteria Interaction and on the Efficacy and Infectivity of Phage P100.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fister, Susanne; Robben, Christian; Witte, Anna K; Schoder, Dagmar; Wagner, Martin; Rossmanith, Peter

    2016-01-01

    When using bacteriophages to control food-borne bacteria in food production plants and processed food, it is crucial to consider that environmental conditions influence their stability. These conditions can also affect the physiological state of bacteria and consequently host-virus interaction and the effectiveness of the phage ability to reduce bacteria numbers. In this study we investigated the stability, binding, and replication capability of phage P100 and its efficacy to control Listeria monocytogenes under conditions typically encountered in dairy plants. The influences of SDS, Lutensol AO 7, salt, smear water, and different temperatures were investigated. Results indicate that phage P100 is stable and able to bind to the host under most conditions tested. Replication was dependent upon the growth of L. monocytogenes and efficacy was higher when bacterial growth was reduced by certain environmental conditions. In long-term experiments at different temperatures phages were initially able to reduce bacteria up to seven log10 units after 2 weeks at 4°C. However, thereafter, re-growth and development of phage-resistant L. monocytogenes isolates were encountered. PMID:27516757

  1. Influence of environmental factors on phage-bacteria interaction and on the efficacy and infectivity of phage P100

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne Fister

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available When using bacteriophages to control food-borne bacteria in food production plants and processed food, it is crucial to consider that environmental conditions influence their stability. These conditions can also affect the physiological state of bacteria and consequently host-virus interaction and the effectiveness of the phage ability to reduce bacteria numbers. In this study we investigated the stability, binding and replication capability of phage P100 and its efficacy to control L. monocytogenes under conditions typically encountered in dairy plants. The influences of SDS, Lutensol AO 7, salt, smear water and different temperatures were investigated. Results indicate that phage P100 is stable and able to bind to the host under most conditions tested. Replication was dependent upon the growth of L. monocytogenes and efficacy was higher when bacterial growth was reduced by certain environmental conditions. In long-term experiments at different temperatures phages were initially able to reduce bacteria up to seven log10 units after two weeks at 4 °C. However, thereafter re-growth and development of phage-resistant L. monocytogenes isolates were encountered.

  2. Dynamics of success and failure in phage and antibiotic therapy in experimental infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walker Nina

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In 1982 Smith and Huggins showed that bacteriophages could be at least as effective as antibiotics in preventing mortality from experimental infections with a capsulated E. coli (K1 in mice. Phages that required the K1 capsule for infection were more effective than phages that did not require this capsule, but the efficacies of phages and antibiotics in preventing mortality both declined with time between infection and treatment, becoming virtually ineffective within 16 hours. Results We develop quantitative microbiological procedures that (1 explore the in vivo processes responsible for the efficacy of phage and antibiotic treatment protocols in experimental infections (the Resistance Competition Assay, or RCA, and (2 survey the therapeutic potential of phages in vitro (the Phage Replication Assay or PRA. We illustrate the application and utility of these methods in a repetition of Smith and Huggins' experiments, using the E. coli K1 mouse thigh infection model, and applying treatments of phages or streptomycin. Conclusions 1 The Smith and Huggins phage and antibiotic therapy results are quantitatively and qualitatively robust. (2 Our RCA values reflect the microbiological efficacies of the different phages and of streptomycin in preventing mortality, and reflect the decline in their efficacy with a delay in treatment. These results show specifically that bacteria become refractory to treatment over the term of infection. (3 The K1-specific and non-specific phages had similar replication rates on bacteria grown in broth (based on the PRA, but the K1-specific phage had markedly greater replication rates in mouse serum.

  3. Characterization of temperate phages infecting Clostridium difficile isolates of human and animal origins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekulovic, Ognjen; Garneau, Julian R; Néron, Audrey; Fortier, Louis-Charles

    2014-04-01

    Clostridium difficile is a Gram-positive pathogen infecting humans and animals. Recent studies suggest that animals could represent potential reservoirs of C. difficile that could then transfer to humans. Temperate phages contribute to the evolution of most bacteria, for example, by promoting the transduction of virulence, fitness, and antibiotic resistance genes. In C. difficile, little is known about their role, mainly because suitable propagating hosts and conditions are lacking. Here we report the isolation, propagation, and preliminary characterization of nine temperate phages from animal and human C. difficile isolates. Prophages were induced by UV light from 58 C. difficile isolates of animal and human origins. Using soft agar overlays with 27 different C. difficile test strains, we isolated and further propagated nine temperate phages: two from horse isolates (ΦCD481-1 and ΦCD481-2), three from dog isolates (ΦCD505, ΦCD506, and ΦCD508), and four from human isolates (ΦCD24-2, ΦCD111, ΦCD146, and ΦCD526). Two phages are members of the Siphoviridae family (ΦCD111 and ΦCD146), while the others are Myoviridae phages. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and restriction enzyme analyses showed that all of the phages had unique double-stranded DNA genomes of 30 to 60 kb. Phages induced from human C. difficile isolates, especially the members of the Siphoviridae family, had a broader host range than phages from animal C. difficile isolates. Nevertheless, most of the phages could infect both human and animal strains. Phage transduction of antibiotic resistance was recently reported in C. difficile. Our findings therefore call for further investigation of the potential risk of transduction between animal and human C. difficile isolates.

  4. Pseudomonas aeruginosa chromosomal beta-lactamase in patients with cystic fibrosis and chronic lung infection. Mechanism of antibiotic resistance and target of the humoral immune response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ciofu, Oana

    2003-01-01

    of chronic lung infection by assessing the effect of a beta ab raised by vaccination with purified chromosomal beta-lactamase on the outcome of the treatment with ceftazidime of bacteria resistant to beta-lactam antibiotics. Our results showed that significantly lower bacterial load and better lung pathology......The intensive antibiotic treatment of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients with chronic lung infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa has improved the survival rate and the clinical condition of Danish patients. Acquirement of resistance to anti-pseudomonal antibiotics is one of the main drawbacks...... of this therapeutic strategy and our results showed the development of resistance of P. aeruginosa to several antibiotics during 25 years of intensive antibiotic treatment. Our studies have been concentrating on the development of resistance to beta-lactam antibiotics. We have shown an association between...

  5. Phospholipid vesicles encapsulated bacteriophage: A novel approach to enhance phage biodistribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singla, S; Harjai, K; Raza, K; Wadhwa, S; Katare, O P; Chhibber, S

    2016-10-01

    Phage therapy has been at the centre of attraction for combating multi-drug resistant strains. However, less stability and rapid clearance of phage by mononuclear phagocytic system (MPS) restricts its use in humans. In the present study, aim was to develop a liposomal delivery system for bacteriophage that can assure efficient phage delivery and retention at the site of infection. Different ratios of cholesterol, lipids and surfactant along with different charge inducers were employed to prepare liposomes. Phage was then entrapped in the liposomes and characterized on the basis of morphology, size, entrapment efficiency and stability. Further, in vivo biodistribution of free phage and liposome entrapped phage was compared in different organs of mice. A cationic liposomal formulation showed maximum encapsulation efficiency of 92%. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) confirmed the entrapment of phages in liposomes. Liposome preparation was found to be most stable at 4°C during storage. Liposome entrapped bacteriophage was retained for longer duration in different organs i.e. upto day 4 in blood, day 6 in liver, lungs and kidney, 14days in spleen of mice as compared to free phage that became undetectable by 36th h in blood as well as lungs and by 48th h in all other organs. PMID:27393682

  6. Molecular Mapping of a Stripe Rust Resistance Gene YrH9020a Transferred from Psathyrostachys huashanica Keng on Wheat Chromosome 6D

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Ze-guang; YAO Wei-yuan; SHEN Xue-xue; CHAO Kai-xiang; FAN Yu; LI Min-zhou; WANG Bao-tong; LI Qiang; JING Jin-xue

    2014-01-01

    Stripe rust (yellow rust), caused by Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici (Pst), is one of the most devastating diseases of wheat throughout the world. H9020-1-6-8-3 is a translocation line originally developed from interspeciifc hybridization between wheat line 7182 and Psathyrostachys huashanica Keng and is resistant to most Pst races in China. To identify the resistance gene(s) in the translocation line, H9020-1-6-8-3 was crossed with susceptible cultivar Mingxian 169, and seedlings of the parents, F1, F2, F3, and BC1 generations were tested with prevalent Chinese Pst race CYR32 under controlled greenhouse conditions. The results indicated that there is a single dominant gene, temporarily designated as YrH9020a, conferring resistance to CYR32. The resistance gene was mapped by the F2 population from Mingxian 169/H9020-1-6-8-3. It was linked to six microsatellite markers, including Xbarc196, Xbarc202, Xbarc96, Xgpw4372, Xbarc21, and Xgdm141, lfanked by Xbarc96 and Xbarc202 with at 4.5 and 8.3 cM, respectively. Based on the chromosomal locations of these markers and the test of Chinese Spring (CS) nullitetrasomic and ditelosomic lines, the gene was assigned to chromosome 6D. According to the origin and the chromosomal location, YrH9020a might be a new resistance gene to stripe rust. The lfanking markers linked to YrH9020a could be useful for marker-assisted selection in breeding programs.

  7. Screening of Phage-Resistant Tryptophanase Genetic Engineering Strains%抗噬菌体色氨酸酶基因工程菌的筛选

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梅运军; 牟艳华; 石德太; 胡纯; 王文清

    2012-01-01

    利用自发突变、紫外诱变、协同进化、紫外耦合协同进化4种方法对色氨酸酶基因工程菌WD0801进行了抗噬菌体筛选.结果表明紫外耦合协同进化法具有较好的筛选效果,筛选的42株稳定遗传的抗性菌株中有23株的长势高于出发株,11株的酶活优于出发株.%4 methods, spontaneous mutation,UV mutagenesis,co-evolution,UV coupled co-evolution, were employed to screen EscheTichia coli tryptophanase genetic engineering strains. The results showed that the screening efficiency of UV-coupled co-evolution method was the best. Among the 42 stable phage—resistant strains screened out, the growth vigor of 23 strains, and enzyme activity of 11 strains were higher than the original strain.

  8. Complete Genome Sequence of Vibrio anguillarum Phage CHOED Successfully Used for Phage Therapy in Aquaculture

    OpenAIRE

    Romero, Jaime; Higuera, Gastón; Gajardo, Felipe; Castillo, Daniel; Middleboe, Mathias; García, Katherine; Ramírez, Carolina; Espejo, Romilio T.

    2014-01-01

    Vibrio anguillarum phage CHOED was isolated from Chilean mussels. It is a virulent phage showing effective inhibition of V. anguillarum. CHOED has potential in phage therapy, because it can protect fish from vibriosis in fish farms. Here, we announce the completely sequenced genome of V. anguillarum phage CHOED.

  9. The T7-related Pseudomonas putida phage φ15 displays virion-associated biofilm degradation properties.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anneleen Cornelissen

    Full Text Available Formation of a protected biofilm environment is recognized as one of the major causes of the increasing antibiotic resistance development and emphasizes the need to develop alternative antibacterial strategies, like phage therapy. This study investigates the in vitro degradation of single-species Pseudomonas putida biofilms, PpG1 and RD5PR2, by the novel phage ϕ15, a 'T7-like virus' with a virion-associated exopolysaccharide (EPS depolymerase. Phage ϕ15 forms plaques surrounded by growing opaque halo zones, indicative for EPS degradation, on seven out of 53 P. putida strains. The absence of haloes on infection resistant strains suggests that the EPS probably act as a primary bacterial receptor for phage infection. Independent of bacterial strain or biofilm age, a time and dose dependent response of ϕ15-mediated biofilm degradation was observed with generally a maximum biofilm degradation 8 h after addition of the higher phage doses (10(4 and 10(6 pfu and resistance development after 24 h. Biofilm age, an in vivo very variable parameter, reduced markedly phage-mediated degradation of PpG1 biofilms, while degradation of RD5PR2 biofilms and ϕ15 amplification were unaffected. Killing of the planktonic culture occurred in parallel with but was always more pronounced than biofilm degradation, accentuating the need for evaluating phages for therapeutic purposes in biofilm conditions. EPS degrading activity of recombinantly expressed viral tail spike was confirmed by capsule staining. These data suggests that the addition of high initial titers of specifically selected phages with a proper EPS depolymerase are crucial criteria in the development of phage therapy.

  10. Fine-scale genetic characterization of Plasmodium falciparum chromosome 7 encompassing the antigenic var and the drug-resistant pfcrt genes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ruchi Bajaj; Sujata Mohanty; A. P. Dash; Aparup Das

    2008-04-01

    The fact that malaria is still an uncontrolled disease is reflected by the genetic organization of the parasite genome. Efforts to curb malaria should begin with proper understanding of the mechanism by which the parasites evade human immune system and evolve resistance to different antimalarial drugs. We have initiated such a study and presented herewith the results from the in silico understanding of a seventh chromosomal region of the malarial parasite Plasmodium falciparum encompassing the antigenic var genes (coding pfemp1) and the drug-resistant gene pfcrt located at a specified region of the chromosome 7. We found 60 genes of various functions and lengths, majority (61.67%) of them were performing known functions. Almost all the genes have orthologs in other four species of Plasmodium, of which P. chabaudi seems to be the closest to P. falciparum. However, only two genes were found to be paralogous. Interestingly, the drug-resistant gene, pfcrt was found to be surrounded by seven genes coding for several CG proteins out of which six were reported to be responsible for providing drug resistance to P. vivax. The intergenic regions, in this specified region were generally large in size, majority (73%) of them were of more than 500 nucleotide bp length. We also designed primers for amplification of 21 noncoding DNA fragments in the whole region for estimating genetic diversity and inferring the evolutionary history of this region of P. falciparum genome.

  11. Synthetic Phage for Tissue Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    So Young Yoo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Controlling structural organization and signaling motif display is of great importance to design the functional tissue regenerating materials. Synthetic phage, genetically engineered M13 bacteriophage has been recently introduced as novel tissue regeneration materials to display a high density of cell-signaling peptides on their major coat proteins for tissue regeneration purposes. Structural advantages of their long-rod shape and monodispersity can be taken together to construct nanofibrous scaffolds which support cell proliferation and differentiation as well as direct orientation of their growth in two or three dimensions. This review demonstrated how functional synthetic phage is designed and subsequently utilized for tissue regeneration that offers potential cell therapy.

  12. Chromosomal integration of a cephalosporinase gene from Acinetobacter baumannii into Oligella urethralis as a source of acquired resistance to beta-lactams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mammeri, Hedi; Poirel, Laurent; Mangeney, Nicole; Nordmann, Patrice

    2003-05-01

    Clinical Oligella urethralis isolate COH-1, which was uncommonly resistant to penicillins and narrow-spectrum cephalosporins, was recovered from a 55-year-old patient with a urinary tract infection. Shotgun cloning into Escherichia coli and expression experiments gave recombinant clones expressing either an AmpC beta-lactamase-type phenotype of resistance or a carbenicillin-hydrolyzing beta-lactamase-type phenotype of resistance. The AmpC beta-lactamase identified (ABA-1), which had a pI value of 8.2, had 98% amino acid identity with a chromosomally encoded cephalosporinase of Acinetobacter baumannii. A 820-bp insertion sequence element, ISOur1, belonging to the IS6 family of insertion sequence elements, was identified immediately upstream of bla(ABA-1), providing a -35 promoter sequence and likely giving rise to a hybrid promoter region. The carbenicillin-hydrolyzing beta-lactamase identified (CARB-8), which had a pI value of 6.4, differed from CARB-5 by two amino acid substitutions. Hybridization of CeuI fragment I-restricted DNA fragments of O. urethralis COH-1 with bla(ABA-1)-, bla(CARB-8)-, and 16S rRNA-specific probes indicated the chromosomal integration of the beta-lactamase genes. PCR and hybridization experiments failed to detect bla(CARB-8)- and bla(ABA-1)-like genes in three O. urethralis reference strains, indicating that the beta-lactamase genes identified were the source of acquired resistance in O. urethralis COH-1. This is one of the few examples of the interspecies transfer and the chromosomal integration of a gene encoding a naturally occurring beta-lactamase.

  13. Phage Therapy: a Step Forward in the Treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pires, Diana P.; Vilas Boas, Diana; Sillankorva, Sanna

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance constitutes one of the major worldwide public health concerns. Bacteria are becoming resistant to the vast majority of antibiotics, and nowadays, a common infection can be fatal. To address this situation, the use of phages for the treatment of bacterial infections has been extensively studied as an alternative therapeutic strategy. Since Pseudomonas aeruginosa is one of the most common causes of health care-associated infections, many studies have reported the in vitro and in vivo antibacterial efficacy of phage therapy against this bacterium. This review collects data of all the P. aeruginosa phages sequenced to date, providing a better understanding about their biodiversity. This review further addresses the in vitro and in vivo results obtained by using phages to treat or prevent P. aeruginosa infections as well as the major hurdles associated with this therapy. PMID:25972556

  14. Phage type and sensitivity to antibiotics of Staphylococcus aureus film-forming strains isolated from airway mucosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. S. Voronkova

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Today film-forming strains of bacteria play very important role in clinical pathology. Staphylococci are ones of most dangerous of them. This bacteria can determine different pathological processes, for example, complication of airway mucosa. The ability to form a biofilm is one of the main properties of nosocomial strains. These strains should be monitored and their carriers are to be properly treated. To determine the origin of staphylococci strains we used bacteriophages from the International kit. The aim of research was to determine the phage type of staphylococci film-forming strains, that were isolated from naso-pharingial mucosa. Phage typing has been carried out for 16 film-forming strains of S. aureus. To solve this problem, we used the International phage kit by Fisher’s method. As a result, sensitivity to phages from the International kit showed 53.8% of studied strains of S. aureus. 64.3% of sensitivity strains were lysed by one of the phage, 21.4% – were by two of the phages, 14.3% – by three of the phages. Isolates were sensitive to phages: 81 – 42.9%, 75 – 35.7%, 28.6% were sensitive to phages 47 and 53. All cases of detection of sensitivity to phage 47 coincided with the ability to form biofilm. Among non-film-forming strains there was no sensitive strains for this phage. Film-forming strains resist to erythromycin (62.5%, ciprofloxacin (43.8%, gentamicin (56.3%, tetracycline (87.5%, amoxicillin (93.8%, and cefuroxime (37.5%. All cases of sensitivity to phage 47 coincided with resistance to erythromycin, amoxicillin and tetracycline. For two of these strains, we also defined resistance to gentamicin and for one of them – to ciprofloxacin. Results of research allowed to relate the bacterial cultures for determining the type. This may have implications for studying of film-forming ability, because surface structures of bacterial cell take place in this process. Belonging of an isolate to specific phage type may

  15. Isolation of New Stenotrophomonas Bacteriophages and Genomic Characterization of Temperate Phage S1▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Pilar; Monjardín, Cristina; Martín, Rebeca; Madera, Carmen; Soberón, Nora; Garcia, Eva; Meana, Álvaro; Suárez, Juan E.

    2008-01-01

    Twenty-two phages that infect Stenotrophomonas species were isolated through sewage enrichment and prophage induction. Of them, S1, S3, and S4 were selected due to their wide host ranges compared to those of the other phages. S1 and S4 are temperate siphoviruses, while S3 is a virulent myovirus. The genomes of S3 and S4, about 33 and 200 kb, were resistant to restriction digestion. The lytic cycles lasted 30 min for S3 and about 75 min for S1 and S4. The burst size for S3 was 100 virions/cell, while S1 and S4 produced about 75 virus particles/cell. The frequency of bacteriophage-insensitive host mutants, calculated by dividing the number of surviving colonies by the bacterial titer of a parallel, uninfected culture, ranged between 10−5 and 10−6 for S3 and 10−3 and 10−4 for S1 and S4. The 40,287-bp genome of S1 contains 48 open reading frames (ORFs) and 12-bp 5′ protruding cohesive ends. By using a combination of bioinformatics and experimental evidence, functions were ascribed to 21 ORFs. The morphogenetic and lysis modules are well-conserved, but no lysis-lysogeny switch or DNA replication gene clusters were recognized. Two major clusters of genes with respect to transcriptional orientation were observed. Interspersed among them were lysogenic conversion genes encoding phosphoadenosine phosphosulfate reductase and GspM, a protein involved in the general secretion system II. The attP site of S1 may be located within a gene that presents over 75% homology to a Stenotrophomonas chromosomal determinant. PMID:18952876

  16. Personalized Therapeutic Cocktail of Wild Environmental Phages Rescues Mice from Acinetobacter baumannii Wound Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regeimbal, James M; Jacobs, Anna C; Corey, Brendan W; Henry, Matthew S; Thompson, Mitchell G; Pavlicek, Rebecca L; Quinones, Javier; Hannah, Ryan M; Ghebremedhin, Meron; Crane, Nicole J; Zurawski, Daniel V; Teneza-Mora, Nimfa C; Biswas, Biswajit; Hall, Eric R

    2016-10-01

    Multidrug-resistant bacterial pathogens are an increasing threat to public health, and lytic bacteriophages have reemerged as a potential therapeutic option. In this work, we isolated and assembled a five-member cocktail of wild phages against Acinetobacter baumannii and demonstrated therapeutic efficacy in a mouse full-thickness dorsal infected wound model. The cocktail lowers the bioburden in the wound, prevents the spread of infection and necrosis to surrounding tissue, and decreases infection-associated morbidity. Interestingly, this effective cocktail is composed of four phages that do not kill the parent strain of the infection and one phage that simply delays bacterial growth in vitro via a strong but incomplete selection event. The cocktail here appears to function in a combinatorial manner, as one constituent phage targets capsulated A. baumannii bacteria and selects for loss of receptor, shifting the population to an uncapsulated state that is then sensitized to the remaining four phages in the cocktail. Additionally, capsule is a known virulence factor for A. baumannii, and we demonstrated that the emergent uncapsulated bacteria are avirulent in a Galleria mellonella model. These results highlight the importance of anticipating population changes during phage therapy and designing intelligent cocktails to control emergent strains, as well as the benefits of using phages that target virulence factors. Because of the efficacy of this cocktail isolated from a limited environmental pool, we have established a pipeline for developing new phage therapeutics against additional clinically relevant multidrug-resistant pathogens by using environmental phages sourced from around the globe. PMID:27431214

  17. Salmonella spp. in raw broiler parts: occurrence, antimicrobial resistance profile and phage typing of the Salmonella Enteritidis isolates Salmonella spp. em cortes de frango: ocorrência, resistência antimicrobiana e fagotipificação dos isolados de Salmonella Enteritidis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aldemir Reginato Ribeiro

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The present study was carried out to evaluate the occurrence of Salmonellae in raw broiler parts and to determine the antimicrobial resistance profile of the isolated strains. Twenty-four (39.3% broiler parts samples were positive for Salmonella and twenty-five Salmonella strains were isolated, since two different serovars were detected in one single positive sample. Salmonella Enteritidis was the most prevalent serovar. Among Salmonella Enteritidis isolates, 95.2% belonged to Phage Type 4 (PT4 (20/21 and 4.8% to PT7 (1/21. Twenty-two (88% strains of Salmonella were resistant to at least one antimicrobial agent, generating eight different resistance patterns. The S. Typhimurium (n: 1 and S. Hadar (n: 3 isolates presented multiple resistance. Three S. Enteritidis isolates were susceptible to all antimicrobials tested, two were resistant only to tetracycline. The high prevalence of Salmonella in the broiler parts strenghtens the importance of the use of good manufacturing practices (GMP, and HACCP. The results also emphasize the need for the responsible use of antimicrobials in animal production.Este trabalho foi conduzido para avaliar a ocorrência de Salmonella em cortes de frango e para determinar o perfil de resistência antimicrobiana das cepas isoladas. Vinte e quatro (39,3% cortes de frango foram positivas para Salmonella, tendo sido isoladas vinte e cinco cepas de Salmonella, uma vez que em uma amostra isolaram-se dois sorovares. Salmonella Enteritidis foi o sorovar prevalente. Entre as Salmonella Enteritidis isoladas, 95,2% pertencem ao Fagotipo 4 (PT4 (20/21 e 4,8% ao PT7 (1/21. Vinte e duas (88% cepas de Salmonella foram resistentes a pelo menos um agente antimicrobiano e oito diferentes padrões de resistência foram observados. S. Typhimurium (n:1 e S. Hadar (n: 3, apresentaram múltipla resistência. Três cepas de S. Enteritidis foram sensíveis a todos os antimicrobianos e duas resistentes somente a tetraciclina. A elevada ocorr

  18. Formation of biofilms under phage predation: considerations concerning a biofilm increase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseinidoust, Zeinab; Tufenkji, Nathalie; van de Ven, Theo G M

    2013-01-01

    Bacteriophages are emerging as strong candidates for combating bacterial biofilms. However, reports indicating that host populations can, in some cases, respond to phage predation by an increase in biofilm formation are of concern. This study investigates whether phage predation can enhance the formation of biofilm and if so, if this phenomenon is governed by the emergence of phage-resistance or by non-evolutionary mechanisms (eg spatial refuge). Single-species biofilms of three bacterial pathogens (Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium, and Staphylococcus aureus) were pretreated and post-treated with species-specific phages. Some of the phage treatments resulted in an increase in the levels of biofilm of their host. It is proposed that the phenotypic change brought about by acquiring phage resistance is the main reason for the increase in the level of biofilm of P. aeruginosa. For biofilms of S. aureus and S. enterica Typhimurium, although resistance was detected, increased formation of biofilm appeared to be a result of non-evolutionary mechanisms.

  19. Loss of plasmids containing cloned inserts coding for novobiocin resistance or novobiocin sensitivity in Haemophilus influenzae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Setlow, J.K.; Spikes, D.; Ledbetter, M.

    1984-06-01

    Plasmids pNov1 and pNov1s, coding for resistance and sensitivity to novobiocin, respectively, were readily lost from wild-type Haemophilus influenzae but retained in a strain lacking an inducible defective prophage. The plasmid loss could be partly or wholly eliminated by a low-copy-number mutation in the plasmid or by the presence of certain antibiotic resistance markers in the host chromosome. Release of both phage HP1c1, measured by plaque assay, and defective phage, measured by electron microscopy, was increased when the plasmids were present. The frequency of recombination between pNov1 and the chromosome, causing the plasmid to be converted to pNov1s, could under some circumstances be decreased from the normal 60 to 70% to below 10% by the presence of a kanamycin resistance marker in the chromosome. This suggested that a gene product coded for by the plasmid, the expression of which was affected by the kanamycin resistance marker, was responsible for the high recombination frequency. Evidence was obtained from in vitro experiments that the gene product was a gyrase.

  20. Challenging packaging limits and infectivity of phage {\\lambda}

    CERN Document Server

    Nurmemmedov, Elmar; Medina, Elizabeth; Catalano, Carlos Enrique; Evilevitch, Alex

    2011-01-01

    The terminase motors of bacteriophages have been shown to be among the strongest active machines in the biomolecular world, being able to package several tens of kilobase pairs of viral genome into a capsid within minutes. Yet these motors are hindered at the end of the packaging process by the progressive build-up of a force resisting packaging associated with already packaged DNA. In this experimental work, we raise the issue of what sets the upper limit on the length of the genome that can be packaged by the terminase motor of phage {\\lambda} and still yield infectious virions, and the conditions under which this can be efficiently performed. Using a packaging strategy developed in our laboratory of building phage {\\lambda} from scratch, together with plaque assay monitoring, we have been able to show that the terminase motor of phage {\\lambda} is able to produce infectious particles with up to 110% of the wild-type (WT) {\\lambda}-DNA length. However, the phage production rate, and thus the infectivity, de...

  1. Genetic Evidence for O-Specific Antigen as Receptor of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Phage K8 and Its Genomic Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuewei ePan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Phage therapy requires the comprehensive understanding of the mechanisms underlying the host-phage interactions. In this work, to identify the genes related to Pseudomonas aeruginosa phage K8 receptor synthesis, 16 phage-resistant mutants were selected from a Tn5G transposon mutant library of strain PAK. The disrupted genetic loci were identified and they were related to O-specific antigen (OSA synthesis, including gene wbpR, ssg, wbpV, wbpO, and Y880_RS05480, which encoded a putative O-antigen polymerase Wzy. The LPS profile of the Y880_RS05480 mutant was analyzed and shown to lack the O-antigen. Therefore, the data from characterization of Y880_RS05480 by TMHMM and SDS-PAGE silver staining analysis suggest that this locus might encode Wzy. The complete phage K8 genome was characterized as 93879 bp in length and contained identical 1188-bp terminal direct repeats. Comparative genomic analysis showed that phage K8 was highly homologous to members of the genus PaP1-like phages. On the basis of our genetic findings, OSA of P. aeruginosa PAK is proven to be the receptor of phage K8. The highly conserved structural proteins among the genetic closely related phages suggest that they may recognize the same receptor.

  2. PHAGE RESISTANT LACTIC ACID BACTERIAL MUTANTS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2001-01-01

    Method of obtaining mutated lactic acid bacteria having a reduced susceptibility towards attack by bacteriophages, the method comprising mutating a gene involved in the pyrimidine metabolism, including pyrG encoding CTP synthetase. Such lactic acid bacteria are useful in starter cultures in the p......Method of obtaining mutated lactic acid bacteria having a reduced susceptibility towards attack by bacteriophages, the method comprising mutating a gene involved in the pyrimidine metabolism, including pyrG encoding CTP synthetase. Such lactic acid bacteria are useful in starter cultures...

  3. The habits of highly effective phages: population dynamics as a framework for identifying therapeutic phages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James J Bull

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The use of bacteriophages as antibacterial agents is being actively researched on a global scale. Typically, the phages used are isolated from the wild by plating on the bacteria of interest, and a far larger set of candidate phages is often available than can be used in any application. When an excess of phages is available, how should the best phages be identified? Here we consider phage-bacterial population dynamics as a basis for evaluating and predicting phage success. A central question is whether the innate dynamical properties of phages are the determinants of success, or instead, whether extrinsic, indirect effects can be responsible. We address the dynamical perspective, motivated in part by the absence of dynamics in previously suggested principles of phage therapy. Current mathematical models of bacterial-phage dynamics do not capture the realities of in vivo dynamics, nor is this likely to change, but they do give insight to qualitative properties that may be generalizable. In particular, phage adsorption rate may be critical to treatment success, so understanding the effects of the in vivo environment on host availability may allow prediction of useful phages prior to in vivo experimentation. Principles for predicting efficacy may be derived by developing a greater understanding of the in vivo system, or such principles could be determined empirically by comparing phages with known differences in their dynamic properties. The comparative approach promises to be a powerful method of discovering the key to phage success. We offer five recommendations for future study: (i compare phages differing in treatment efficacy to identify the phage properties associated with success, (ii assay dynamics in vivo, (iii understand mechanisms of bacterial escape from phages, (iv test phages in model infections that are relevant to the intended clinical applications, and (v develop new classes of models for phage growth in spatially heterogeneous

  4. Genomic analysis and relatedness of P2-like phages of the Burkholderia cepacia complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis Jonathan J

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Burkholderia cepacia complex (BCC is comprised of at least seventeen Gram-negative species that cause infections in cystic fibrosis patients. Because BCC bacteria are broadly antibiotic resistant, phage therapy is currently being investigated as a possible alternative treatment for these infections. The purpose of our study was to sequence and characterize three novel BCC-specific phages: KS5 (vB_BceM-KS5 or vB_BmuZ-ATCC 17616, KS14 (vB_BceM-KS14 and KL3 (vB_BamM-KL3 or vB_BceZ-CEP511. Results KS5, KS14 and KL3 are myoviruses with the A1 morphotype. The genomes of these phages are between 32317 and 40555 base pairs in length and are predicted to encode between 44 and 52 proteins. These phages have over 50% of their proteins in common with enterobacteria phage P2 and so can be classified as members of the Peduovirinae subfamily and the "P2-like viruses" genus. The BCC phage proteins similar to those encoded by P2 are predominantly structural components involved in virion morphogenesis. As prophages, KS5 and KL3 integrate into an AMP nucleosidase gene and a threonine tRNA gene, respectively. Unlike other P2-like viruses, the KS14 prophage is maintained as a plasmid. The P2 E+E' translational frameshift site is conserved among these three phages and so they are predicted to use frameshifting for expression of two of their tail proteins. The lysBC genes of KS14 and KL3 are similar to those of P2, but in KS5 the organization of these genes suggests that they may have been acquired via horizontal transfer from a phage similar to λ. KS5 contains two sequence elements that are unique among these three phages: an ISBmu2-like insertion sequence and a reverse transcriptase gene. KL3 encodes an EcoRII-C endonuclease/methylase pair and Vsr endonuclease that are predicted to function during the lytic cycle to cleave non-self DNA, protect the phage genome and repair methylation-induced mutations. Conclusions KS5, KS14 and KL3 are the

  5. Detection of Hereditary 1,25-Hydroxyvitamin D-Resistant Rickets Caused by Uniparental Disomy of Chromosome 12 Using Genome-Wide Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Array.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayuko Tamura

    Full Text Available Hereditary 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D-resistant rickets (HVDRR is an autosomal recessive disease caused by biallelic mutations in the vitamin D receptor (VDR gene. No patients have been reported with uniparental disomy (UPD.Using genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP array to confirm whether HVDRR was caused by UPD of chromosome 12.A 2-year-old girl with alopecia and short stature and without any family history of consanguinity was diagnosed with HVDRR by typical laboratory data findings and clinical features of rickets. Sequence analysis of VDR was performed, and the origin of the homozygous mutation was investigated by target SNP sequencing, short tandem repeat analysis, and genome-wide SNP array.The patient had a homozygous p.Arg73Ter nonsense mutation. Her mother was heterozygous for the mutation, but her father was negative. We excluded gross deletion of the father's allele or paternal discordance. Genome-wide SNP array of the family (the patient and her parents showed complete maternal isodisomy of chromosome 12. She was successfully treated with high-dose oral calcium.This is the first report of HVDRR caused by UPD, and the third case of complete UPD of chromosome 12, in the published literature. Genome-wide SNP array was useful for detecting isodisomy and the parental origin of the allele. Comprehensive examination of the homozygous state is essential for accurate genetic counseling of recurrence risk and appropriate monitoring for other chromosome 12 related disorders. Furthermore, oral calcium therapy was effective as an initial treatment for rickets in this instance.

  6. Recombinant phage probes for Listeria monocytogenes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monitoring of food and environmental samples for biological threats, such as Listeria monocytogenes, requires probes that specifically bind biological agents and ensure their immediate and efficient detection. There is a need for robust and inexpensive affinity probes as an alternative to antibodies. These probes may be recruited from random peptide libraries displayed on filamentous phage. In this study, we selected from two phage peptide libraries phage clones displaying peptides capable of specific and strong binding to the L. monocytogenes cell surface. The ability of isolated phage clones to interact specifically with L. monocytogenes was demonstrated using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and confirmed by co-precipitation assay. We also assessed the sensitivity of phage-bacteria binding by PCR on phage-captured Listeria cells, which could be detected at a concentration of 104 cells ml-1. In addition, as proof-of-concept, we tested the possibility of immobilizing the affinity-selected phages to a putative biosensor surface. The quality of phage deposition was monitored by ELISA and fluorescent microscopy. Phage-bacterial binding was confirmed by high power optical phase contrast microscopy. Overall, the results of this work validate the concept of affinity-selected recombinant filamentous phages as probes for detecting and monitoring bacterial agents under any conditions that warrant their recognition, including in food products

  7. Recombinant phage probes for Listeria monocytogenes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carnazza, S; Gioffre, G; Felici, F; Guglielmino, S [Department of Microbiological, Genetic and Molecular Sciences, University of Messina, Messina (Italy)

    2007-10-03

    Monitoring of food and environmental samples for biological threats, such as Listeria monocytogenes, requires probes that specifically bind biological agents and ensure their immediate and efficient detection. There is a need for robust and inexpensive affinity probes as an alternative to antibodies. These probes may be recruited from random peptide libraries displayed on filamentous phage. In this study, we selected from two phage peptide libraries phage clones displaying peptides capable of specific and strong binding to the L. monocytogenes cell surface. The ability of isolated phage clones to interact specifically with L. monocytogenes was demonstrated using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and confirmed by co-precipitation assay. We also assessed the sensitivity of phage-bacteria binding by PCR on phage-captured Listeria cells, which could be detected at a concentration of 10{sup 4} cells ml{sup -1}. In addition, as proof-of-concept, we tested the possibility of immobilizing the affinity-selected phages to a putative biosensor surface. The quality of phage deposition was monitored by ELISA and fluorescent microscopy. Phage-bacterial binding was confirmed by high power optical phase contrast microscopy. Overall, the results of this work validate the concept of affinity-selected recombinant filamentous phages as probes for detecting and monitoring bacterial agents under any conditions that warrant their recognition, including in food products.

  8. Recombinant phage probes for Listeria monocytogenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnazza, S.; Gioffrè, G.; Felici, F.; Guglielmino, S.

    2007-10-01

    Monitoring of food and environmental samples for biological threats, such as Listeria monocytogenes, requires probes that specifically bind biological agents and ensure their immediate and efficient detection. There is a need for robust and inexpensive affinity probes as an alternative to antibodies. These probes may be recruited from random peptide libraries displayed on filamentous phage. In this study, we selected from two phage peptide libraries phage clones displaying peptides capable of specific and strong binding to the L. monocytogenes cell surface. The ability of isolated phage clones to interact specifically with L. monocytogenes was demonstrated using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and confirmed by co-precipitation assay. We also assessed the sensitivity of phage-bacteria binding by PCR on phage-captured Listeria cells, which could be detected at a concentration of 104 cells ml-1. In addition, as proof-of-concept, we tested the possibility of immobilizing the affinity-selected phages to a putative biosensor surface. The quality of phage deposition was monitored by ELISA and fluorescent microscopy. Phage-bacterial binding was confirmed by high power optical phase contrast microscopy. Overall, the results of this work validate the concept of affinity-selected recombinant filamentous phages as probes for detecting and monitoring bacterial agents under any conditions that warrant their recognition, including in food products.

  9. Assessment of genetic correlation between bacterial cold water disease resistance and spleen index in a domesticated population of rainbow trout: identification of QTL on chromosome Omy19.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory D Wiens

    Full Text Available Selective breeding of animals for increased disease resistance is an effective strategy to reduce mortality in aquaculture. However, implementation of selective breeding programs is limited by an incomplete understanding of host resistance traits. We previously reported results of a rainbow trout selection program that demonstrated increased survival following challenge with Flavobacterium psychrophilum, the causative agent of bacterial cold water disease (BCWD. Mechanistic study of disease resistance identified a positive phenotypic correlation between post-challenge survival and spleen somatic-index (SI. Herein, we investigated the hypothesis of a genetic correlation between the two traits influenced by colocalizing QTL. We evaluated the inheritance and calculated the genetic correlation in five year-classes of odd- and even-year breeding lines. A total of 322 pedigreed families (n = 25,369 fish were measured for disease resistance, and 251 families (n = 5,645 fish were evaluated for SI. Spleen index was moderately heritable in both even-year (h(2  = 0.56±0.18 and odd-year (h(2  = 0.60±0.15 lines. A significant genetic correlation between SI and BCWD resistance was observed in the even-year line (rg  = 0.45±0.20, P = 0.03 but not in the odd-year line (rg  = 0.16±0.12, P = 0.19. Complex segregation analyses of the even-year line provided evidence of genes with major effect on SI, and a genome scan of a single family, 2008132, detected three significant QTL on chromosomes Omy19, 16 and 5, in addition to ten suggestive QTL. A separate chromosome scan for disease resistance in family 2008132 identified a significant BCWD QTL on Omy19 that was associated with time to death and percent survival. In family 2008132, Omy19 microsatellite alleles that associated with higher disease resistance also associated with increased spleen size raising the hypothesis that closely linked QTL contribute to the correlation between

  10. Physical organization of mixed protease inhibitor gene clusters, coordinated expression and association with resistance to late blight at the StKI locus on potato chromosome III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odeny, Damaris Achieng; Stich, Benjamin; Gebhardt, Christiane

    2010-12-01

    Protease inhibitors (PIs) play a role in plant defence against pests and pathogens as well as in plant development. Potato (Solanum tuberosum) contains abundant levels of diverse PIs. Most potato Kunitz-type inhibitor (KTI) genes map to the StKI locus on potato chromosome III, which is linked to a quantitative trait locus (QTL) for resistance to Phytophthora infestans. To elucidate the physical organization of PIs at the StKI locus, we screened bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) libraries with KTI probes. Ten different clones were selected, sequenced and annotated. Of 100 putative genes, 22 corresponded to five PI classes. Expression analysis by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) using PI class-specific primers in different tissues of the tetraploid potato cultivars 'Nikita' and 'Baltica' revealed different transcript levels, depending on PI type and genotype. During the compatible interaction with a complex race of P. infestans, four PI classes showed coordinated expression over 3 d after infection, a strong decrease in infected leaves and a transient induction in systemic leaves. Basal transcript levels in non-infected leaves differed strongly between the two genotypes examined. Two microsatellite markers located within the PI gene cluster were associated with resistance to P. infestans in a population of potato varieties and breeding clones. PMID:20716067

  11. Complete genome sequence analysis of two Pseudomonas plecoglossicida phages, potential therapeutic agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawato, Yasuhiko; Yasuike, Motoshige; Nakamura, Yoji; Shigenobu, Yuya; Fujiwara, Atushi; Sano, Motohiko; Nakai, Toshihiro

    2015-02-01

    Pseudomonas plecoglossicida is a lethal pathogen of ayu (Plecoglossus altivelis) in Japan and is responsible for substantial economic costs to ayu culture. Previously, we demonstrated the efficacy of phage therapy against P. plecoglossicida infection using two lytic phages (PPpW-3 and PPpW-4) (S. C. Park, I. Shimamura, M. Fukunaga, K. Mori, and T. Nakai, Appl Environ Microbiol 66:1416-1422, 2000, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/AEM.66.4.1416-1422.2000; S. C. Park and T. Nakai, Dis Aquat Org 53:33-39, 2003, http://dx.doi.org/10.3354/dao053033). In the present study, the complete genome sequences of these therapeutic P. plecoglossicida phages were determined and analyzed for deleterious factors as therapeutic agents. The genome of PPpW-3 (myovirus) consisted of 43,564 bp with a GC content of 61.1% and 66 predicted open reading frames (ORFs). Approximately half of the genes were similar to the genes of the Escherichia coli phage vB_EcoM_ECO1230-10 (myovirus). The genome of PPpW-4 (podovirus) consisted of 41,386 bp with a GC content of 56.8% and 50 predicted ORFs. More than 70% of the genes were similar to the genes of Pseudomonas fluorescens phage ϕIBB-PF7A and Pseudomonas putida phage ϕ15 (podoviruses). The whole-genome analysis revealed that no known virulence genes were present in PPpW-3 and PPpW-4. An integrase gene was found in PPpW-3, but other factors used for lysogeny were not confirmed. The PCR detection of phage genes in phage-resistant variants provided no evidence of lysogenic activity in PPpW-3 and PPpW-4. We conclude that these two lytic phages qualify as therapeutic agents.

  12. Antibiotic resistance genes in the bacteriophage DNA fraction of environmental samples.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Colomer-Lluch

    Full Text Available Antibiotic resistance is an increasing global problem resulting from the pressure of antibiotic usage, greater mobility of the population, and industrialization. Many antibiotic resistance genes are believed to have originated in microorganisms in the environment, and to have been transferred to other bacteria through mobile genetic elements. Among others, β-lactam antibiotics show clinical efficacy and low toxicity, and they are thus widely used as antimicrobials. Resistance to β-lactam antibiotics is conferred by β-lactamase genes and penicillin-binding proteins, which are chromosomal- or plasmid-encoded, although there is little information available on the contribution of other mobile genetic elements, such as phages. This study is focused on three genes that confer resistance to β-lactam antibiotics, namely two β-lactamase genes (blaTEM and blaCTX-M9 and one encoding a penicillin-binding protein (mecA in bacteriophage DNA isolated from environmental water samples. The three genes were quantified in the DNA isolated from bacteriophages collected from 30 urban sewage and river water samples, using quantitative PCR amplification. All three genes were detected in the DNA of phages from all the samples tested, in some cases reaching 104 gene copies (GC of blaTEM or 102 GC of blaCTX-M and mecA. These values are consistent with the amount of fecal pollution in the sample, except for mecA, which showed a higher number of copies in river water samples than in urban sewage. The bla genes from phage DNA were transferred by electroporation to sensitive host bacteria, which became resistant to ampicillin. blaTEM and blaCTX were detected in the DNA of the resistant clones after transfection. This study indicates that phages are reservoirs of resistance genes in the environment.

  13. 噬菌体治疗创面细菌感染研究进展%Advances in the treatment of wound bacterial infection with phage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    崔泽龙

    2015-01-01

    The treatment of wound bacterial infection is an extremely difficult problem in clinic, especially in patients with large wounds which are infected by multidrug resistant, pan-resistant or omni-resistant bacteria.In recent years, with a grim prospect of antibiotic resistance, phage therapy is re-valued by researchers after being ignored for nearly half a century.Phage therapy has made great achievements in prevention and control of bacterial infection of open wounds.This review is mainly focused on the latest research progress of phage therapy in wound bacterial infection.

  14. Genome Sequences of Pseudomonas oryzihabitans Phage POR1 and Pseudomonas aeruginosa Phage PAE1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyson, Zoe A.; Seviour, Robert J.; Tucci, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    We report the genome sequences of two double-stranded DNA siphoviruses, POR1 infective for Pseudomonas oryzihabitans and PAE1 infective for Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The phage POR1 genome showed no nucleotide sequence homology to any other DNA phage sequence in the GenBank database, while phage PAE1 displayed synteny to P. aeruginosa phages M6, MP1412, and YuA. PMID:27313312

  15. Use of phages to control Campylobacter spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janež, Nika; Loc-Carrillo, Catherine

    2013-10-01

    The use of phages to control pathogenic bacteria has been investigated since they were first discovered in the beginning of the 1900s. Over the last century we have slowly gained an in-depth understanding of phage biology including which phage properties are desirable when considering phage as biocontrol agents and which phage characteristics to potentially avoid. Campylobacter infections are amongst the most frequently encountered foodborne bacterial infections around the world. Handling and consumption of raw or undercooked poultry products have been determined to be the main route of transmission. The ability to use phages to target these bacteria has been studied for more than a decade and although we have made progress towards deciphering how best to use phages to control Campylobacter associated with poultry production, there is still much work to be done. This review outlines methods to improve the isolation of these elusive phages, as well as methods to identify desirable characteristics needed for a successful outcome. It also highlights the body of research undertaken so far and what criteria to consider when doing in-vivo studies, especially because some in-vitro studies have not been found to translate into to phage efficacy in-vivo.

  16. Inhibition of bacterial conjugation by phage M13 and its protein g3p: quantitative analysis and model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abraham Lin

    Full Text Available Conjugation is the main mode of horizontal gene transfer that spreads antibiotic resistance among bacteria. Strategies for inhibiting conjugation may be useful for preserving the effectiveness of antibiotics and preventing the emergence of bacterial strains with multiple resistances. Filamentous bacteriophages were first observed to inhibit conjugation several decades ago. Here we investigate the mechanism of inhibition and find that the primary effect on conjugation is occlusion of the conjugative pilus by phage particles. This interaction is mediated primarily by phage coat protein g3p, and exogenous addition of the soluble fragment of g3p inhibited conjugation at low nanomolar concentrations. Our data are quantitatively consistent with a simple model in which association between the pili and phage particles or g3p prevents transmission of an F plasmid encoding tetracycline resistance. We also observe a decrease in the donor ability of infected cells, which is quantitatively consistent with a reduction in pili elaboration. Since many antibiotic-resistance factors confer susceptibility to phage infection through expression of conjugative pili (the receptor for filamentous phage, these results suggest that phage may be a source of soluble proteins that slow the spread of antibiotic resistance genes.

  17. Etude du système de résolution des dimères de chromosome chez Vibrio cholerae - Implication dans le contrôle de la lysogénie du phage CTXφ codant pour la toxine cholérique

    OpenAIRE

    Val, Marie-Eve

    2008-01-01

    The majority of the bacteria have a single circular chromosome. At the time of replication, chromosome dimers can be formed by homologous recombination between sister chromatides. Dimerisation of replicating chromosomes prevents the faithful segregation of genetic information between the two daughter cells. To correct this, the tyrosine recombinases, XerC and XerD, resolve dimers by adding an additional crossover at a specific site on the chromosome called dif. In Escherichia coli, the resolu...

  18. Introgression of chromosome segments from multiple alien species in wheat breeding lines with wheat streak mosaic virus resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyramiding of alien-derived Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV) resistance and resistance enhancing genes in wheat is a costeffective and environmentally safe strategy for disease control. PCR-based markers and cytogenetic analysis with genomic in situ hybridisation were applied to identify alien chrom...

  19. Mapping of the S. demissum late blight resistance gene R8 to a new locus on chromosome IX

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jo, K.R.; Arens, M.J.B.; Kim, T.Y.; Jongsma, M.A.; Visser, R.G.F.; Jacobsen, E.; Vossen, J.H.

    2011-01-01

    The use of resistant varieties is an important tool in the management of late blight, which threatens potato production worldwide. Clone MaR8 from the Mastenbroek differential set has strong resistance to Phytophthora infestans, the causal agent of late blight. The F1 progeny of a cross between the

  20. Corruption of phage display libraries by target-unrelated clones: diagnosis and countermeasures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, William D; Golomb, Miriam; Smith, George P

    2010-12-15

    Phage display is used to discover peptides or proteins with a desired target property-most often, affinity for a target selector molecule. Libraries of phage clones displaying diverse surface peptides are subject to a selection process designed to enrich for the target behavior and subsequently propagated to restore phage numbers. A recurrent problem is enrichment of clones, called target-unrelated phages or peptides (TUPs), that lack the target behavior. Many TUPs are propagation related; they have mutations conferring a growth advantage and are enriched during the propagations accompanying selection. Unlike other filamentous phage libraries, fd-tet-based libraries are relatively resistant to propagation-related TUP corruption. Their minus-strand origin is disrupted by a large cassette that simultaneously confers resistance to tetracycline and imposes a rate-limiting growth defect that cannot be bypassed with simple mutations. Nonetheless, a new type of propagation-related TUP emerged in the output of in vivo selections from an fd-tet library. The founding clone had a complex rearrangement that restored the minus-strand origin while retaining tetracycline resistance. The rearrangement involved two recombination events, one with a contaminant having a wild-type minus-strand origin. The founder's infectivity advantage spread by simple recombination to clones displaying different peptides. We propose measures for minimizing TUP corruption.

  1. Inactivation and reactivation of B. megatherium phage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    NORTHROP, J H

    1955-11-20

    Preparation of Reversibly Inactivated (R.I.) Phage.- If B. megatherium phage (of any type, or in any stage of purification) is suspended in dilute salt solutions at pH 5-6, it is completely inactivated; i.e., it does not form plaques, or give rise to more phage when mixed with a sensitive organism (Northrop, 1954). The inactivation occurs when the phage is added to the dilute salt solution. If a suspension of the inactive phage in pH 7 peptone is titrated to pH 5 and allowed to stand, the activity gradually returns. The inactivation is therefore reversible. Properties of R.I. Phage.- The R.I. phage is adsorbed by sensitive cells at about the same rate as the active phage. It kills the cells, but no active phage is produced. The R.I. phage therefore has the properties of phage "ghosts" (Herriott, 1951) or of colicines (Gratia, 1925), or phage inactivated by ultraviolet light (Luria, 1947). The R.I. phage is sedimented in the centrifuge at the same rate as active phage. It is therefore about the same size as the active phage. The R.I. phage is most stable in pH 7, 5 per cent peptone, and may be kept in this solution for weeks at 0 degrees C. The rate of digestion of R.I. phage by trypsin, chymotrypsin, or desoxyribonuclease is about the same as that of active phage (Northrop, 1955 a). Effect of Various Substances on the Formation of R.I. Phage.- There is an equilibrium between R.I. phage and active phage. The R.I. form is the stable one in dilute salt solution, pH 5 to 6.5 and at low temperature (6.5, in dilute salt solution, the R.I. phage changes to the active form. The cycle, active right harpoon over left harpoon inactive phage, may be repeated many times at 0 degrees C. by changing the pH of the solution back and forth between pH 7 and pH 6. Irreversible inactivation is caused by distilled water, some heavy metals, concentrated urea or quanidine solutions, and by l-arginine. Reversible inactivation is prevented by all salts tested (except those causing

  2. Physical and genetic mapping of amplified fragment length polymorphisms and the leaf rust resistance Lr3 gene on chromosome 6BL of wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diéguez, M J; Altieri, E; Ingala, L R; Perera, E; Sacco, F; Naranjo, T

    2006-01-01

    The Argentinian wheat cultivar Sinvalocho MA carries the Lr3 gene for leaf rust resistance on distal chromosome 6BL. In this cultivar, 33 spontaneous susceptible lines were isolated and cytogenetically characterized by C-banding. The analysis revealed deletions on chromosome 6BL in most lines. One line was nulli-6B, two lines were ditelo 6BS, two, three, and ten lines had long terminal deletions of 40, 30, and 20%, respectively, three lines showed very small terminal deletions, and one line had an intercalary deletion of 11%. Physical mapping of 55 amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) markers detected differences between deletions and led to the division of 6BL into seven bins delimited by deletion breakpoints. The most distal bin, with a length smaller than 5% of 6BL, contained 22 AFLP markers and the Lr3 gene. Polymorphism for nine AFLPs between Sinvalocho MA and the rust leaf susceptible cultivar Gamma 6 was used to construct a linkage map of Lr3. This gene is at a genetic distance of 0.9 cM from a group of seven closely linked AFLPs. The location of the gene in a high recombinogenic region indicated a physical distance of approximately 1 Mb to the markers. PMID:16215730

  3. Distance from cohesive end site cos determines the replication requirement for recombination in phage lambda.

    OpenAIRE

    Stahl, F. W.; KOBAYASHI, I.; Stahl, M M

    1982-01-01

    Previous work showed that crossing-over in the middle of the chromosome of phage lambda requires more DNA replication than does crossing-over near the termini. Relocation of cos, the sequence that determines the lambda termini, alters the requirements for replication in a given marked interval, demonstrating that distance from cos determines the amount of DNA replication that is required for genetic exchange. This result supports a break and copy mechanism for recombination mediated by the re...

  4. An AFLP marker linked to the leaf rust resistance gene LrBi16 and test of allelism with Lr14a on chromosome arm 7BL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peipei Zhang

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Leaf rust (LR, caused by Puccinia triticina, is one of the most widespread diseases of common wheat (Triticum aestivum L. worldwide. The LR resistance gene LrBi16 has been mapped on chromosome arm 7BL in Chinese wheat cultivar Bimai 16 and was closely linked to SSR loci Xcfa2257 and Xgwm344 with genetic distances of 2.8 cM and 2.9 cM, respectively. In the present study, a total of 304 AFLP primer pairs were used to screen Bimai 16 and Thatcher and resistant and susceptible DNA bulks. The polymorphic AFLP marker P-ATT/M-CGC173 bp was used to genotype F2 and F3 populations to identify markers more closely linked to LrBi16. Marker P-ATT/M-CGC173 bp was tightly linked to LrBi16 with a genetic distance of 0.5 cM. As LrBi16 was mapped near the Lr14a locus, 809 F2 plants from the Bimai 16/RL6013 (Lr14a cross were inoculated with the Pt pathotype FHNQ to test the allelism of Lr14a and LrBi16. All of the F2 plants were resistant to FHNQ (IT between; and 2, suggesting that Lr14a and LrBi16 are allelic.

  5. Prevalence of aac(6'-Ib-cr plasmid-mediated and chromosome-encoded fluoroquinolone resistance in Enterobacteriaceae in Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frasson Ilaria

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The spread of aac(6'-Ib-cr plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance determinants was evaluated in 197 enterobacterial isolates recovered in an Italian teaching hospital. The aac(6'-Ib-cr gene was found exclusively in Escherichia coli strains. The gene was located on a plasmid which presented additional ESBL genes. Most of the clinical strains were clonally related and displayed three point mutations at the topoisomerase level which conferred high resistance to fluoroquinolones.

  6. Whole-Genome Resequencing of a Cucumber Chromosome Segment Substitution Line and Its Recurrent Parent to Identify Candidate Genes Governing Powdery Mildew Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ting; Xu, Xuewen; Yan, Yali; Qi, Xiaohua; Chen, Xuehao

    2016-01-01

    Cucumber is an economically important vegetable crop worldwide. Powdery mildew (PM) is one of the most severe diseases that can affect cucumber crops. There have been several research efforts to isolate PM resistance genes for breeding PM-resistant cucumber. In the present study, we used a chromosome segment substitution line, SSL508-28, which carried PM resistance genes from the donor parent, JIN5-508, through twelve generations of backcrossing with a PM-susceptible inbred line, D8. We performed whole-genome resequencing of SSL508-28 and D8 to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), and insertions and deletions (indels). When compared against the reference genome of the inbred cucumber line 9930, a total of 468,616 SNPs and 67,259 indels were identified in SSL508-28, and 537,352 SNPs and 91,698 indels were identified in D8. Of these, 3,014 non-synonymous SNPs and 226 frameshift indels in SSL508-28, and 3,104 non-synonymous SNPs and 251 frameshift indels in D8, were identified. Bioinformatics analysis of these variations revealed a total of 15,682 SNPs and 6,262 indels between SSL508-28 and D8, among which 120 non-synonymous SNPs and 30 frameshift indels in 94 genes were detected between SSL508-28 and D8. Finally, out of these 94 genes, five resistance genes with nucleotide-binding sites and leucine-rich repeat domains were selected for qRT-PCR analysis. This revealed an upregulation of two transcripts, Csa2M435460.1 and Csa5M579560.1, in SSL508-28. Furthermore, the results of qRT-PCR analysis of these two genes in ten PM resistant and ten PM susceptible cucumber lines showed that when exposed to PM, Csa2M435460.1 and Csa5M579560.1 exhibited a higher expression level of resistant lines than susceptible lines. This indicates that Csa2M435460.1 and Csa5M579560.1 are candidate genes for PM resistance in cucumber. In addition, the non-synonymous SNPs in Csa2M435460.1 and Csa5M579560.1, identified in SSL508-28 and D8, might be the key to high PM-resistance in

  7. FISH to meiotic pachytene chromosomes of tomato locates the root-knot nematode resistance gene Mi-1 and the acid phosphatase gene Aps-1 near the junction of euchromatin and pericentromeric heterochromatin of chromosome arms 6S and 6L, respectively

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhong, X.B.; Bodeau, J.; Fransz, P.F.; Williamson, V.M.; Kammen, van A.; Jong, de J.H.; Zabel, P.

    1999-01-01

    The root-knot nematode resistance gene Mi-1 in tomato has long been thought to be located in the pericentromeric heterochromatin region of the long arm of chromosome 6 because of its very tight genetic linkage (approx. 1 cM) to the markers Aps-1 (Acid phosphatase 1) and yv (yellow virescent). Using

  8. Comparative genomics of Bacillus thuringiensis phage 0305φ8-36: defining patterns of descent in a novel ancient phage lineage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serwer Philip

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The recently sequenced 218 kb genome of morphologically atypical Bacillus thuringiensis phage 0305φ8-36 exhibited only limited detectable homology to known bacteriophages. The only known relative of this phage is a string of phage-like genes called BtI1 in the chromosome of B. thuringiensis israelensis. The high degree of divergence and novelty of phage genomes pose challenges in how to describe the phage from its genomic sequences. Results Phage 0305φ8-36 and BtI1 are estimated to have diverged 2.0 – 2.5 billion years ago. Positionally biased Blast searches aligned 30 homologous structure or morphogenesis genes between 0305φ8-36 and BtI1 that have maintained the same gene order. Functional clustering of the genes helped identify additional gene functions. A conserved long tape measure gene indicates that a long tail is an evolutionarily stable property of this phage lineage. An unusual form of the tail chaperonin system split to two genes was characterized, as was a hyperplastic homologue of the T4gp27 hub gene. Within this region some segments were best described as encoding a conservative array of structure domains fused with a variable component of exchangeable domains. Other segments were best described as multigene units engaged in modular horizontal exchange. The non-structure genes of 0305φ8-36 appear to include the remnants of two replicative systems leading to the hypothesis that the genome plan was created by fusion of two ancestral viruses. The case for a member of the RNAi RNA-directed RNA polymerase family residing in 0305φ8-36 was strengthened by extending the hidden Markov model of this family. Finally, it was noted that prospective transcriptional promoters were distributed in a gradient of small to large transcripts starting from a fixed end of the genome. Conclusion Genomic organization at a level higher than individual gene sequence comparison can be analyzed to aid in understanding large phage

  9. Neisseria gonorrhoeae: resistência cromossômica à tetraciclina em São Paulo, Brasil Neisseria gonorrhoeae: chromosomal resistance to tetracycline in São Paulo, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter Belda Junior

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available FUNDAMENTO: A utilização de antimicrobianos no tratamento da gonorréia iniciou-se em 1930 com as sulfonamidas. No decorrer dos anos outras drogas passaram a ser utilizadas, entre elas a tetraciclina. Embora eficaz no início, esta droga, ao longo do tempo, passou a não mais apresentar o resultado terapêutico esperado em virtude do aparecimento de quadros de resistência cromossômica e plasmidial em diversos países. Como a tetraciclina ainda continua sendo indicada, isoladamente ou associada a outras drogas antimicrobianas, para o tratamento da gonorréia no Brasil, tornou-se necessária a realização de um estudo de sensibilidade do gonococo à mesma, no intuito de se estimar a real dimensão da resistência do gonococo à tetraciclina. OBJETIVO: Avaliar a incidência de resistência cromossômica das cepas de Neisseria gonorrhoeae à tetraciclina. MÉTODO: Estudo da concentração inibitória mínima pelo método de diluição em ágar. RESULTADOS: A resistência cromossômica à tetraciclina detectada foi de 40,3% entre todas as cepas estudadas, segundo os critérios estabelecidos pelo Center for Diseases Control. CONCLUSÕES: Desaconselha-se definitivamente o uso isolado ou associado da tetraciclina e derivados, no tratamento da gonorréia no Brasil, no atual momento epidemiológico.BACKGROUND: The use of antimicrobials in the treatment of gonorrhoea started in 1930 with sulphonamides. Subsequently other drugs, such as tetracycline and its derivatives, were indicated for treating gonorrhoea. Therapeutic response to these drugs has tended to decline due to chromossomal and plasmidic resistance. However, tetracycline as a monotherapy or in association with other drugs is still prescribed for treating gonorrhea in Brazil. This justifies the need for a critical analysis in order to evaluate the sensitivity of gonococcus to this drug. OBJETIVE: Evaluate the real incidence of chromosomal resistance of Neisseria gonorrhoeae strains to

  10. Temperate phages TP901-1 and fLC3, belonging to the P335 species, apparently use different pathways for DNA injection in Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris 3107

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breum, Solvej Østergaard; Neve, Horst; Heller, Knut J.;

    2007-01-01

    Five mutant of Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris 3107 resistant to phage TP901-1 were obtained after treatment with ethyl methanesulfonate. Two of the mutants were also resistant to phage fLC3. The remaining three mutants were as sensitive as 3107. Mutants E46 and E100 did not adsorb the two...

  11. Temperate phages TP901-1 and phi LC3, belonging to the P335 species, apparently use different pathways for DNA injection in Lactococcus lactis subsp cremoris 3107

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breum, Solvej Østergaard; Neve, Horst; Heller, Knut J.;

    2007-01-01

    Five mutants of Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris 3107 resistant to phage TP901-1 were obtained after treatment with ethyl methanesulfonate. Two of the mutants were also resistant to phage phi LC3. The remaining three mutants were as sensitive as 3107. Mutants E46 and E100 did not adsorb the two...

  12. Development of a phage typing system for Staphylococcus hyicus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wegener, Henrik Caspar

    1993-01-01

    strains isolated from Danish pig herds, the phages were able to type 92% of the strains, producing 16 different phage types. Reproducibility of the phage typing system after subculture of the strains and using fresh phage stock was 96%. Typability ranged from 52 to 80% when typing porcine strains...

  13. Variation in chromosome constitution of the Xiaoyan series partial amphiploids and its relations to stripe rust and stem rust resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    In the tertiary gene pool of wheat, tall wheatgrass Thinopyrum ponticum (2n = 10x = 70) is an excellent source of resistance genes against numerous wheat diseases. The creation of wheat-Th. ponticum partial amphiploids is an intermediate step for transferring the useful genes from Th. ponticum to w...

  14. Resistance to Stem Rust Pathotype TTKSK Maps to the Rgp4/Rpg5 Complex of Chromosome 5H of Barley

    Science.gov (United States)

    The wheat stem rust (Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici) pathotype TTKSK (original isolate synonym Ug99) is a serious threat to both wheat and barley production worldwide because of its wide virulence on many cultivars and rapid spread from eastern Africa. Line Q21861 is one of the most resistant bar...

  15. Diverse genomic location and sequence content of a Listeria monocytogenes chromosomal island harboring heavy metal resistance and other genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Listeria monocytogenes remains a major foodborne pathogen with three serotype 4b clonal groups (ECI, ECII, ECIa) repeatedly implicated in human listeriosis. For reasons that are unknown, many of these strains are also resistant to heavy metals, i.e. cadmium and arsenic. The acquisition and fitness i...

  16. Rapid enumeration of phage in monodisperse emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tjhung, Katrina F; Burnham, Sean; Anany, Hany; Griffiths, Mansel W; Derda, Ratmir

    2014-06-17

    Phage-based detection assays have been developed for the detection of viable bacteria for applications in clinical diagnosis, monitoring of water quality, and food safety. The majority of these assays deliver a positive readout in the form of newly generated progeny phages by the bacterial host of interest. Progeny phages are often visualized as plaques, or holes, in a lawn of bacteria on an agar-filled Petri dish; however, this rate-limiting step requires up to 12 h of incubation time. We have previously described an amplification of bacteriophages M13 inside droplets of media suspended in perfluorinated oil; a single phage M13 in a droplet yields 10(7) copies in 3-4 h. Here, we describe that encapsulation of reporter phages, both lytic T4-LacZ and nonlytic M13, in monodisperse droplets can also be used for rapid enumeration of phage. Compartmentalization in droplets accelerated the development of the signal from the reporter enzyme; counting of "positive" droplets yields accurate enumeration of phage particles ranging from 10(2) to 10(6) pfu/mL. For enumeration of T4-LacZ phage, the fluorescent signal appeared in as little as 90 min. Unlike bulk assays, quantification in emulsion is robust and insensitive to fluctuations in environmental conditions (e.g., temperature). Power-free emulsification using gravity-driven flow in the absence of syringe pumps and portable fluorescence imaging solutions makes this technology promising for use at the point of care in low-resource environments. This droplet-based phage enumeration method could accelerate and simplify point-of-care detection of the pathogens for which reporter bacteriophages have been developed.

  17. Complete genome sequence of Vibrio anguillarum phage CHOED successfully used for phage therapy in aquaculture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Romero, Jaime; Higuera, Gastón; Gajardo, Felipe;

    2014-01-01

    Vibrio anguillarum phage CHOED was isolated from Chilean mussels. It is a virulent phage showing effective inhibition of V. anguillarum. CHOED has potential in phage therapy, because it can protect fish from vibriosis in fish farms. Here, we announce the completely sequenced genome of V....... anguillarum phage CHOED....

  18. A Genetic Approach to the Development of New Therapeutic Phages to Fight Pseudomonas Aeruginosa in Wound Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Pleteneva

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a frequent participant in wound infections. Emergence of multiple antibiotic resistant strains has created significant problems in the treatment of infected wounds. Phage therapy (PT has been proposed as a possible alternative approach. Infected wounds are the perfect place for PT applications, since the basic condition for PT is ensured; namely, the direct contact of bacteria and their viruses. Plenty of virulent (“lytic” and temperate (“lysogenic” bacteriophages are known in P. aeruginosa. However, the number of virulent phage species acceptable for PT and their mutability are limited. Besides, there are different deviations in the behavior of virulent (and temperate phages from their expected canonical models of development. We consider some examples of non-canonical phage-bacterium interactions and the possibility of their use in PT. In addition, some optimal approaches to the development of phage therapy will be discussed from the point of view of a biologist, considering the danger of phage-assisted horizontal gene transfer (HGT, and from the point of view of a surgeon who has accepted the Hippocrates Oath to cure patients by all possible means. It is also time now to discuss the possible approaches in international cooperation for the development of PT. We think it would be advantageous to make phage therapy a kind of personalized medicine.

  19. A genetic approach to the development of new therapeutic phages to fight pseudomonas aeruginosa in wound infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krylov, Victor; Shaburova, Olga; Krylov, Sergey; Pleteneva, Elena

    2013-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a frequent participant in wound infections. Emergence of multiple antibiotic resistant strains has created significant problems in the treatment of infected wounds. Phage therapy (PT) has been proposed as a possible alternative approach. Infected wounds are the perfect place for PT applications, since the basic condition for PT is ensured; namely, the direct contact of bacteria and their viruses. Plenty of virulent ("lytic") and temperate ("lysogenic") bacteriophages are known in P. aeruginosa. However, the number of virulent phage species acceptable for PT and their mutability are limited. Besides, there are different deviations in the behavior of virulent (and temperate) phages from their expected canonical models of development. We consider some examples of non-canonical phage-bacterium interactions and the possibility of their use in PT. In addition, some optimal approaches to the development of phage therapy will be discussed from the point of view of a biologist, considering the danger of phage-assisted horizontal gene transfer (HGT), and from the point of view of a surgeon who has accepted the Hippocrates Oath to cure patients by all possible means. It is also time now to discuss the possible approaches in international cooperation for the development of PT. We think it would be advantageous to make phage therapy a kind of personalized medicine. PMID:23344559

  20. Emergence of sequence type 779 methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus harboring a novel pseudo staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec)-SCC-SCCCRISPR composite element in Irish hospitals.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kinnevey, Peter M

    2013-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has been a major cause of nosocomial infection in Irish hospitals for 4 decades, and replacement of predominant MRSA clones has occurred several times. An MRSA isolate recovered in 2006 as part of a larger study of sporadic MRSA exhibited a rare spa (t878) and multilocus sequence (ST779) type and was nontypeable by PCR- and DNA microarray-based staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) element typing. Whole-genome sequencing revealed the presence of a novel 51-kb composite island (CI) element with three distinct domains, each flanked by direct repeat and inverted repeat sequences, including (i) a pseudo SCCmec element (16.3 kb) carrying mecA with a novel mec class region, a fusidic acid resistance gene (fusC), and two copper resistance genes (copB and copC) but lacking ccr genes; (ii) an SCC element (17.5 kb) carrying a novel ccrAB4 allele; and (iii) an SCC element (17.4 kb) carrying a novel ccrC allele and a clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR) region. The novel CI was subsequently identified by PCR in an additional 13 t878\\/ST779 MRSA isolates, six from bloodstream infections, recovered between 2006 and 2011 in 11 hospitals. Analysis of open reading frames (ORFs) carried by the CI showed amino acid sequence similarity of 44 to 100% to ORFs from S. aureus and coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS). These findings provide further evidence of genetic transfer between S. aureus and CoNS and show how this contributes to the emergence of novel SCCmec elements and MRSA strains. Ongoing surveillance of this MRSA strain is warranted and will require updating of currently used SCCmec typing methods.

  1. Deletion of Chromosomal Region 8p21 Confers Resistance to Bortezomib and Is Associated with Upregulated Decoy TRAIL Receptor Expression in Patients with Multiple Myeloma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adil Doganay Duru

    Full Text Available Loss of the chromosomal region 8p21 negatively effects survival in patients with multiple myeloma (MM that undergo autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT. In this study, we aimed to identify the immunological and molecular consequences of del(8(p21 with regards to treatment response and bortezomib resistance. In patients receiving bortezomib as a single first line agent without any high-dose therapy, we have observed that patients with del(8(p21 responded poorly to bortezomib with 50% showing no response while patients without the deletion had a response rate of 90%. In vitro analysis revealed a higher resistance to bortezomib possibly due to an altered gene expression profile caused by del(8(p21 including genes such as TRAIL-R4, CCDC25, RHOBTB2, PTK2B, SCARA3, MYC, BCL2 and TP53. Furthermore, while bortezomib sensitized MM cells without del(8(p21 to TRAIL/APO2L mediated apoptosis, in cells with del(8(p21 bortezomib failed to upregulate the pro-apoptotic death receptors TRAIL-R1 and TRAIL-R2 which are located on the 8p21 region. Also expressing higher levels of the decoy death receptor TRAIL-R4, these cells were largely resistant to TRAIL/APO2L mediated apoptosis. Corroborating the clinical outcome of the patients, our data provides a potential explanation regarding the poor response of MM patients with del(8(p21 to bortezomib treatment. Furthermore, our clinical analysis suggests that including immunomodulatory agents such as Lenalidomide in the treatment regimen may help to overcome this negative effect, providing an alternative consideration in treatment planning of MM patients with del(8(p21.

  2. IncM Plasmid R1215 Is the Source of Chromosomally Located Regions Containing Multiple Antibiotic Resistance Genes in the Globally Disseminated Acinetobacter baumannii GC1 and GC2 Clones

    OpenAIRE

    Blackwell, Grace A.; Hamidian, Mohammad; Hall, Ruth M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Clear similarities between antibiotic resistance islands in the chromosomes of extensively antibiotic-resistant isolates from the two dominant, globally distributed Acinetobacter baumannii clones, GC1 and GC2, suggest a common origin. A close relative of the likely progenitor of both of these regions was found in R1215, a conjugative IncM plasmid from a Serratia marcescens strain isolated prior to 1980. The 37.8-kb resistance region in R1215 lies within the mucB gene and includes aac...

  3. A novel bacteriophage Tail-Associated Muralytic Enzyme (TAME from Phage K and its development into a potent antistaphylococcal protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chikkamadaiah Ravisha

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Staphylococcus aureus is a major cause of nosocomial and community-acquired infections. However, the rapid emergence of antibiotic resistance limits the choice of therapeutic options for treating infections caused by this organism. Muralytic enzymes from bacteriophages have recently gained attention for their potential as antibacterial agents against antibiotic-resistant gram-positive organisms. Phage K is a polyvalent virulent phage of the Myoviridae family that is active against many Staphylococcus species. Results We identified a phage K gene, designated orf56, as encoding the phage tail-associated muralytic enzyme (TAME. The gene product (ORF56 contains a C-terminal domain corresponding to cysteine, histidine-dependent amidohydrolase/peptidase (CHAP, which demonstrated muralytic activity on a staphylococcal cell wall substrate and was lethal to S. aureus cells. We constructed N-terminal truncated forms of ORF56 and arrived at a 16-kDa protein (Lys16 that retained antistaphylococcal activity. We then generated a chimeric gene construct encoding Lys16 and a staphylococcal cell wall-binding SH3b domain. This chimeric protein (P128 showed potent antistaphylococcal activity on global clinical isolates of S. aureus including methicillin-resistant strains. In addition, P128 was effective in decolonizing rat nares of S. aureus USA300 in an experimental model. Conclusions We identified a phage K gene that encodes a protein associated with the phage tail structure. The muralytic activity of the phage K TAME was localized to the C-terminal CHAP domain. This potent antistaphylococcal TAME was combined with an efficient Staphylococcus-specific cell-wall targeting domain SH3b, resulting in the chimeric protein P128. This protein shows bactericidal activity against globally prevalent antibiotic resistant clinical isolates of S. aureus and against the genus Staphylococcus in general. In vivo, P128 was efficacious against methicillin-resistant

  4. Phage therapy and ventilator-associated pneumonia due to Escherichia coli : a possible therapeutic approach ? Fundamental aspects and element of feasibility.

    OpenAIRE

    Dufour, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Year after year, multi-drug resistant bacteria expand over the world. As a real public health concern, bacterial resistance is particularly significant within healthcare-associated infections. Among alternative therapy to antibiotics, phage therapy appears as one of the most promising approach and is now reappraised in western countries.This work is dedicated to a feasibility approach in order to evaluate phage therapy potential in the most frequent and severe complication in the intensive ca...

  5. Conditional tolerance of temperate phages via transcription-dependent CRISPR-Cas targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Gregory W; Jiang, Wenyan; Bikard, David; Marraffini, Luciano A

    2014-10-30

    A fundamental feature of immune systems is the ability to distinguish pathogenic from self and commensal elements, and to attack the former but tolerate the latter. Prokaryotic CRISPR-Cas immune systems defend against phage infection by using Cas nucleases and small RNA guides that specify one or more target sites for cleavage of the viral genome. Temperate phages include viruses that can integrate into the bacterial chromosome, and they can carry genes that provide a fitness advantage to the lysogenic host. However, CRISPR-Cas targeting that relies strictly on DNA sequence recognition provides indiscriminate immunity both to lytic and lysogenic infection by temperate phages-compromising the genetic stability of these potentially beneficial elements altogether. Here we show that the Staphylococcus epidermidis CRISPR-Cas system can prevent lytic infection but tolerate lysogenization by temperate phages. Conditional tolerance is achieved through transcription-dependent DNA targeting, and ensures that targeting is resumed upon induction of the prophage lytic cycle. Our results provide evidence for the functional divergence of CRISPR-Cas systems and highlight the importance of targeting mechanism diversity. In addition, they extend the concept of 'tolerance to non-self' to the prokaryotic branch of adaptive immunity. PMID:25174707

  6. Expression of lysozymes from Erwinia amylovora phages and Erwinia genomes and inhibition by a bacterial protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Ina; Gernold, Marina; Schneider, Bernd; Geider, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    Genes coding for lysozyme-inhibiting proteins (Ivy) were cloned from the chromosomes of the plant pathogens Erwinia amylovora and Erwinia pyrifoliae. The product interfered not only with activity of hen egg white lysozyme, but also with an enzyme from E. amylovora phage ΦEa1h. We have expressed lysozyme genes from the genomes of three Erwinia species in Escherichia coli. The lysozymes expressed from genes of the E. amylovora phages ΦEa104 and ΦEa116, Erwinia chromosomes and Arabidopsis thaliana were not affected by Ivy. The enzyme from bacteriophage ΦEa1h was fused at the N- or C-terminus to other peptides. Compared to the intact lysozyme, a His-tag reduced its lytic activity about 10-fold and larger fusion proteins abolished activity completely. Specific protease cleavage restored lysozyme activity of a GST-fusion. The bacteriophage-encoded lysozymes were more active than the enzymes from bacterial chromosomes. Viral lyz genes were inserted into a broad-host range vector, and transfer to E. amylovora inhibited cell growth. Inserted in the yeast Pichia pastoris, the ΦEa1h-lysozyme was secreted and also inhibited by Ivy. Here we describe expression of unrelated cloned 'silent' lyz genes from Erwinia chromosomes and a novel interference of bacterial Ivy proteins with a viral lysozyme.

  7. Interaction Analysis through Proteomic Phage Display

    OpenAIRE

    Sundell, Gustav N.; Ylva Ivarsson

    2014-01-01

    Phage display is a powerful technique for profiling specificities of peptide binding domains. The method is suited for the identification of high-affinity ligands with inhibitor potential when using highly diverse combinatorial peptide phage libraries. Such experiments further provide consensus motifs for genome-wide scanning of ligands of potential biological relevance. A complementary but considerably less explored approach is to display expression products of genomic DNA, cDNA, open readin...

  8. Phage Therapy -- Everything Old Is New again

    OpenAIRE

    Kropinski, Andrew M.

    2006-01-01

    The study of bacterial viruses (bacteriophages or phages) proved pivotal in the nascence of the disciplines of molecular biology and microbial genetics, providing important information on the central processes of the bacterial cell (DNA replication, transcription and translation) and on how DNA can be transferred from one cell to another. As a result of the pioneering genetics studies and modern genomics, it is now known that phages have contributed to the evolution of the microbial cell and ...

  9. The Staphylococci Phages Family: An Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurence Van Melderen

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Due to their crucial role in pathogenesis and virulence, phages of Staphylococcus aureus have been extensively studied. Most of them encode and disseminate potent staphylococcal virulence factors. In addition, their movements contribute to the extraordinary versatility and adaptability of this prominent pathogen by improving genome plasticity. In addition to S. aureus, phages from coagulase-negative Staphylococci (CoNS are gaining increasing interest. Some of these species, such as S. epidermidis, cause nosocomial infections and are therefore problematic for public health. This review provides an overview of the staphylococcal phages family extended to CoNS phages. At the morphological level, all these phages characterized so far belong to the Caudovirales order and are mainly temperate Siphoviridae. At the molecular level, comparative genomics revealed an extensive mosaicism, with genes organized into functional modules that are frequently exchanged between phages. Evolutionary relationships within this family, as well as with other families, have been highlighted. All these aspects are of crucial importance for our understanding of evolution and emergence of pathogens among bacterial species such as Staphylococci.

  10. Phage Therapy: Combating Infections with Potential for Evolving from Merely a Treatment for Complications to Targeting Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Górski, Andrzej; Międzybrodzki, Ryszard; Weber-Dąbrowska, Beata; Fortuna, Wojciech; Letkiewicz, Sławomir; Rogóż, Paweł; Jończyk-Matysiak, Ewa; Dąbrowska, Krystyna; Majewska, Joanna; Borysowski, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance is considered to be one of the greatest challenges of medicine and our civilization. Lack of progress in developing new anti-bacterial agents has greatly revived interest in using phage therapy to combat antibiotic-resistant infections. Although a number of clinical trials are underway and more are planned, the realistic perspective of registration of phage preparations and their entering the health market and significantly contributing to the current antimicrobial crisis is rather remote. Therefore, in addition to planning further clinical trials, our present approach of phage treatment carried out as experimental therapy (compassionate use) should be expanded to address the growing and urgent needs of increasing cohorts of patients for whom no alternative treatment is currently available. During the past 11 years of our phage therapy center’s operation, we have obtained relevant clinical and laboratory data which not only confirm the safety of the therapy but also provide important information shedding more light on many aspects of the therapy, contributing to its optimization and allowing for construction of the most appropriate clinical trials. New data on phage biology and interactions with the immune system suggest that in the future phage therapy may evolve from dealing with complications to targeting diseases. However, further studies are necessary to confirm this promising trend. PMID:27725811

  11. Phage-antibiotic synergism: a possible approach to combatting Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knezevic, Petar; Curcin, Sanja; Aleksic, Verica; Petrusic, Milivoje; Vlaski, Ljiljana

    2013-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a highly resistant opportunistic pathogen and an important etiological agent of various types of infections. During the last decade, P. aeruginosa phages have been extensively examined as alternative antimicrobial agents. The aim of the study was to determine antimicrobial effectiveness of combining subinhibitory concentrations of gentamicin, ceftriaxone, ciprofloxacin or polymyxin B with P. aeruginosa-specific bacteriophages belonging to families Podoviridae and Siphoviridae. The time-kill curve method showed that a combination of bacteriophages and subinhibitory concentrations of ceftriaxone generally reduced bacterial growth, and synergism was proven for a Siphoviridae phage σ-1 after 300 min of incubation. The detected alteration in morphology after ceftriaxone application, resulting in cell elongation, along with its specific mode of action, seemed to be a necessary but was not a sufficient reason for phage-antibiotic synergism. The phenomenon offers an opportunity for future development of treatment strategies for potentially lethal infections caused by P. aeruginosa.

  12. The Lytic SA Phage Demonstrate Bactericidal Activity against Mastitis Causing Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamza Ameer

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is the major causative agent of mastitis among dairy animals as it causes intramammary gland infection. Due to antibiotic resistance and contamination of antibiotics in the milk of diseased animals; alternative therapeutic agents are required to cure mastitis. Lytic bacteriophages and their gene products can be potential therapeutic agents against bacteria as they are host specific and less harmful than antibiotics. In this study, Staphylococcus aureus were isolated from milk samples of the infected animals and identified biochemically. SA phage was isolated from sewage water showing lytic activity against Staphylococcus aureus isolates. The highest lytic activity of bacteriophages was observed at 37°C and pH 7, and the most suitable storage condition was at 4°C. SA phage efficiently reduced bacterial growth in the bacterial reduction assay. The characterization and bacterial growth reduction activity of the bacteriophages against Staphylococcus aureus signifies their underlying potential of phage therapy against mastitis.

  13. The factors affecting effectiveness of treatment in phages therapy, mini review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mai Huong eCHATAIN-LY

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the use of lytic bacteriophages as antimicrobial agents controlling pathogenic bacteria has appeared as a promising new alternative strategy in the face of growing antibiotic resistance which has caused problems in many fields including medicine, veterinary medicine and aquaculture. The use of bacteriophages has numerous advantages over traditional antimicrobials. The effectiveness of phage applications in fighting against pathogenic bacteria depends on several factors such as the bacteriophages/target bacteria ratio, the mode and moment of treatment, environmental conditions (pH, temperature ..., the neutralization of phage and accessibility to target bacteria, amongst others. This report presents these factors and the challenges involved in developing phage therapy applications

  14. KSY1, a lactococcal phage with a T7-like transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopin, Alain; Deveau, Hélène; Ehrlich, S Dusko; Moineau, Sylvain; Chopin, Marie-Christine

    2007-08-15

    The virulent lactococcal phage KSY1 possesses a large elongated capsid (223 nm long, 45 nm wide) and a short tail (32 nm). This phage of the Podoviridae group (C3 morphotype) has a linear 79,232-bp double-stranded DNA genome, which encodes 131 putative proteins and 3 tRNAs. This is the first description of the genome of a phage of this morphotype. KSY1 possesses a T7-like transcription system, including an RNA polymerase and a series of specific promoters, showing sequence homology to other known T7-like RNA polymerase promoters. Late stages of KSY1 multiplication are resistant to rifampicin. Otherwise, KSY1 shares limited similarity with other Podoviridae phages. Fourteen KSY1 structural proteins were identified by SDS-PAGE analysis. Among these proteins, those forming the distal tail structure and likely involved in host recognition are encoded by a 5-kb genomic region of KSY1. This region consists of a mosaic of DNA segments highly homologous to DNA of other lactococcal phages, suggesting an horizontal gene transfer.

  15. Rec-8 dimorphism affects longevity, stress resistance and X-chromosome nondisjunction in C. elegans, and replicative lifespan in yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srinivas eAyyadevara

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available A quantitative trait locus (QTL in the nematode C. elegans, lsq4, was recently implicated by mapping longevity genes. QTLs for lifespan and 3 stress-resistance traits coincided within a span of <300 kbp, later narrowed to <200 kbp. A single gene in this interval is now shown to modulate all lsq4-associated traits. Full-genome analysis of transcript levels indicates that lsq4 contains a dimorphic gene governing expression of sperm-specific genes, suggesting effects on spermatogenesis. Quantitation of allele-specific transcripts encoded within the lsq4 interval revealed significant, 2- to 15-fold expression differences for 10 of 33 genes. Fourteen genes, implicated by both position and expression, were tested for RNA-interference effects on QTL-linked traits. In a strain carrying the shorter-lived allele, knockdown of rec-8 (encoding a meiotic cohesin reduced its transcripts 4-fold, to a level similar to the longer-lived strain, and extended lifespan 25–26% whether begun before fertilization or at maturity. The short-lived lsq4 allele also conferred sensitivity to oxidative and thermal stresses, and lower male frequency, traits reversed uniquely by rec-8 knockdown. A strain bearing the longer-lived lsq4 allele, differing from the short-lived strain at <0.3% of its genome, derived no lifespan or stress-survival benefit from rec-8 knockdown. We consider two possible explanations: high rec-8 expression may include increased leaky expression in mitotic cells, leading to deleterious destabilization of somatic genomes; or REC-8 may act entirely in germ-line meiotic cells to reduce aberrations such as nondisjunction, thereby blunting a stress-resistance response mediated by innate immunity. Replicative lifespan was extended 20% in haploid S. cerevisiae (BY4741 by deletion of REC8, orthologous to nematode rec-8, implying that REC8 disruption of mitotic-cell survival is widespread, reflecting antagonistic pleiotropy and/or balancing selection.

  16. Targeted introduction of a diphtheria toxin resistant mutation into the chromosomal EF-2 locus of Pichia pastoris and expression of immunotoxin in the EF-2 mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuan Yi; Woo, Jung Hee; Neville, David M

    2003-08-01

    In an attempt to increase the production of a diphtheria toxin (DT) based immunotoxin by Pichia pastoris, we have created DT-resistant mutants that contain a substitution of arginine for glycine at position 701 in elongation factor 2 (EF-2). To achieve this, we first cloned and characterized the EF-2 gene (PEF1), and then made a construct pBLURA-Delta5'mutEF-2 that efficiently introduces specific mutations into the chromosomal EF-2 gene in P. pastoris by in vivo homologous recombination. pBLURA-Delta5(')mutEF-2 contains a selection marker URA3 and a 5' truncated form of the P. pastoris PEF1 that had been modified in vitro to carry the nucleotide mutations for the Gly(701) to Arg transition. Unlike the non-mutated strains, the EF-2 mutants are resistant to high-level intracellular expression of DT A chain that can catalyze the ADP-ribosylation. When used to express the secreted bivalent anti-T cell immunotoxin, A-dmDT390-bisFv(G4S), the EF-2 mutant strains showed increased viability compared to the non-mutated strains. However, they did not show an advantage over the non-mutated expressing strain in the production of the immunotoxin. Western blotting analysis revealed that although the EF-2 mutants did not increase the accumulation of intact A-dmDT390-bisFv(G4S) in the culture medium, they generated larger amounts of degraded products found in both the medium and cell pellets compared to the non-mutant expressing clone. In addition, double copy expression resulted in greater amounts of intact immunotoxin being retained within cellular compartments as well as degraded products. Based on these findings, we suggest that the secretory capacity may be rate limiting for divalent immunotoxin production in P. pastoris. PMID:12880776

  17. Spreading of genes encoding enterotoxins, haemolysins, adhesin and biofilm among methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains with staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec type IIIA isolated from burn patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motallebi, Mitra; Jabalameli, Fereshteh; Asadollahi, Kheirollah; Taherikalani, Morovat; Emaneini, Mohammad

    2016-08-01

    The emergence of antibiotic-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in particular methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) is an important concern in burn medical centers either in Iran or worldwide. A total of 128 S. aureus isolates were collected from wound infection of burn patients during June 2013 to June 2014. Multiplex-polymerase chain reaction (MPCR) assay was performed for the characterization of the staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec). Genes encoding virulence factors and biofilm were targeted by PCR. Of 128 S. aureus isolates, 77 (60.1%) isolates were MRSA. Fifty four (70.1%) isolates were identified as SCCmec type IIIA. The most frequently detected toxin genes among MRSA isolates with SCCmec type IIIA were sea (64.1%) and hla (51.8%). The rate of coexistence of sea with hla and sea with hla and hlb was 37% and12.9%, respectively. The sec, eta, tst, pvl, hla and hlb genes were not detected in any of the MRSA isolates. The most prevalent genes encoding biofilm was eno, found in 61.1% of isolates, followed by fib and icaA found in 48.1% and 38.8% of the isolates, respectively. The rate of coexistence of fib + eno + icaA + icaD and fib + eno was 20.3% and 9.2%, respectively. The ebps gene was not detected in any of the isolates. In conclusion, our study indicated that the sea, hla, fib and icaA were most frequent genes encoding virulence factors among MRSA with SCCmec type IIIA isolated from burn wound infection. Moreover, the results of this study shows that the rate of coexistence of genes encoding different virulence factor were high. PMID:27238459

  18. Phage therapy of staphylococcal chronic osteomyelitis in experimental animal model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandan Kishor

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA are the commonest cause of osteomyelitis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of an alternative therapy i.e. application of S. aureus specific bacteriophages in cases of osteomyelitis caused by MRSA in animal model. Methods: Twenty two rabbits were included in this study. The first two rabbits were used to test the safety of phage cocktail while the remaining 20 rabbits were divided into three groups; group A (n=4 to assess the establishment of osteomyelitis; group B (n=4 osteomyelitis developed but therapy started only after six weeks; and group C (n=12 osteomyelitis developed and therapy started after three weeks. Groups B and C rabbits were treated with four doses of cocktail of seven virulent bacteriophages at the interval of 48 h. Comparison between three groups was made on the basis of observation of clinical, radiological, microbiological, and histopathological examinations. Results: Experimental group rabbits recovered from the illness in the subsequent two weeks of the therapy. Appetite and activity of the rabbits improved, local oedema, erythema and induration subsided. There were minimal changes associated with osteomyelitis in X-ray and histopathology also showed no signs of infection with new bone formation. Control B group rabbits also recovered well from the infection. Interpretation & conclusions: The present study shows a potential of phage therapy to treat difficult infections caused by multidrug resistant bacteria.

  19. Sequences of a co-existing SXT element, a chromosomal integron (CI) and an IncA/C plasmid and their roles in multidrug resistance in a Vibrio cholerae O1 El Tor strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ruibai; Li, Jie; Kan, Biao

    2016-09-01

    The ongoing seventh cholera pandemic is attributed to Vibrio cholerae O1 El Tor biotype strains. Although antibiotic therapy ameliorates symptoms in patients and reduces pathogen transfer to the environment, multidrug resistance remains a major clinical threat. An O1 El Tor strain isolated from a patient in 1998 was intermediate or resistant to 13 antibiotics and could potentially produce extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL), which is very rare in O1 strains. Using genome sequencing, three relevant genetic elements were identified in this strain: a hybrid SXT element (ICEVchCHN1307); a new IncA/C plasmid (pVC1307); and a chromosomal integron. Twenty antibiotic resistance genes were located on them, including blaTEM-1, blaCTX-M-14 and phenotypically silenced tetRA genes. These data elucidate the role of individual genetic components in antibiotic resistance and the accumulation of drug resistance genes in V. cholerae.

  20. Sequences of a co-existing SXT element, a chromosomal integron (CI) and an IncA/C plasmid and their roles in multidrug resistance in a Vibrio cholerae O1 El Tor strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ruibai; Li, Jie; Kan, Biao

    2016-09-01

    The ongoing seventh cholera pandemic is attributed to Vibrio cholerae O1 El Tor biotype strains. Although antibiotic therapy ameliorates symptoms in patients and reduces pathogen transfer to the environment, multidrug resistance remains a major clinical threat. An O1 El Tor strain isolated from a patient in 1998 was intermediate or resistant to 13 antibiotics and could potentially produce extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL), which is very rare in O1 strains. Using genome sequencing, three relevant genetic elements were identified in this strain: a hybrid SXT element (ICEVchCHN1307); a new IncA/C plasmid (pVC1307); and a chromosomal integron. Twenty antibiotic resistance genes were located on them, including blaTEM-1, blaCTX-M-14 and phenotypically silenced tetRA genes. These data elucidate the role of individual genetic components in antibiotic resistance and the accumulation of drug resistance genes in V. cholerae. PMID:27470490

  1. Colonisation of a phage susceptible Campylobacter jejuni population in two phage positive broiler flocks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie Kittler

    Full Text Available The pathogens Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli are commensals in the poultry intestine and campylobacteriosis is one of the most frequent foodborne diseases in developed and developing countries. Phages were identified to be effective in reducing intestinal Campylobacter load and this was evaluated, in the first field trials which were recently carried out. The aim of this study was to further investigate Campylobacter population dynamics during phage application on a commercial broiler farm. This study determines the superiority in colonisation of a Campylobacter type found in a field trial that was susceptible to phages in in vitro tests. The colonisation factors, i.e. motility and gamma glutamyl transferase activity, were increased in this type. The clustering in phylogenetic comparisons of MALDI-TOF spectra did not match the ST, biochemical phenotype and phage susceptibility. Occurrence of Campylobacter jejuni strains and phage susceptibility types with different colonisation potential seem to play a very important role in the success of phage therapy in commercial broiler houses. Thus, mechanisms of both, phage susceptibility and Campylobacter colonisation should be further investigated and considered when composing phage cocktails.

  2. Influence of phage proteins on formation of specific UV DNA photoproducts in phage T7

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fekete, A.; Vink, A.A.; Gaspar, S.; Modos, K.; Berces, A.; Ronto, Gy.; Roza, L.

    1999-01-01

    Phage T7 can be used as a biological UV dosimeter. Its reading is proportional to the inactivation rate expressed in HT7 units. To understand the influence of phage proteins on the formation of DNA UV photoproducts, cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPD) and (6-4)photoproducts ((6-4)PD) were determined

  3. Changing patterns among the subgroups of strains of Staphylococcus aureus of phage group II in Danish hospitals from 1961-91

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, N H; Hartzen, S H; Bangsborg, Jette Marie;

    1994-01-01

    During the period 1961-91 a total of 567,635 strains of Staphylococcus aureus from hospitalized patients in Denmark have been characterized according to their antibiotic resistance, site of isolation and phage type. Strains of phage group II (typed by the phages 3A, 3C, 55 and 71) have been...... analysed further. The occurrence of group II strains was relatively constant (approximately 16%) from 1961 until 1983. Since then the frequency of group II strains increased; in 1991 they accounted for 22.7% of all S. aureus strains isolated. Strains of group II can, on the basis of their phage types......, be divided in four subgroups: 3A, 71, 71+ and the 'rest of group II'. Furthermore, within these groups strains may differ from one another in respect to their sensitivity to phages. The increased isolation of group II strains during recent years was because of an increase in strains of subgroups 71...

  4. Influence of environmental variables in the efficiency of phage therapy in aquaculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Yolanda J; Costa, Liliana; Pereira, Carla; Cunha, Ângela; Calado, Ricardo; Gomes, Newton C M; Almeida, Adelaide

    2014-09-01

    Aquaculture facilities worldwide continue to experience significant economic losses because of disease caused by pathogenic bacteria, including multidrug-resistant strains. This scenario drives the search for alternative methods to inactivate pathogenic bacteria. Phage therapy is currently considered as a viable alternative to antibiotics for inactivation of bacterial pathogens in aquaculture systems. While phage therapy appears to represent a useful and flexible tool for microbiological decontamination of aquaculture effluents, the effect of physical and chemical properties of culture waters on the efficiency of this technology has never been reported. The present study aimed to evaluate the effect of physical and chemical properties of aquaculture waters (e.g. pH, temperature, salinity and organic matter content) on the efficiency of phage therapy under controlled experimental conditions in order to provide a basis for the selection of the most suitable protocol for subsequent experiments. A bioluminescent genetically transformed Escherichia coli was selected as a model microorganism to monitor real-time phage therapy kinetics through the measurement of bioluminescence, thus avoiding the laborious and time-consuming conventional method of counting colony-forming units (CFU). For all experiments, a bacterial concentration of ≈ 10(5) CFU ml(-1) and a phage concentration of ≈ 10(6-8) plaque forming unit ml(-1) were used. Phage survival was not significantly affected by the natural variability of pH (6.5-7.4), temperature (10-25 °C), salinity (0-30 g NaCl l(-1) ) and organic matter concentration of aquaculture waters in a temperate climate. Nonetheless, the efficiency of phage therapy was mostly affected by the variation of salinity and organic matter content. As the effectiveness of phage therapy increases with water salt content, this approach appears to be a suitable choice for marine aquaculture systems. The success of phage therapy may also be enhanced in

  5. Exploration of Phage-Host Interactions in Fish Pathogen Vibrio anguillarum and Anti-Phage Defense Strategies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tan, Demeng

    of bacterial pathogenicity development. Therefore, successful application of phage therapy in the treatment of vibriosis requires a detailed understanding of phage-host interactions, especially with regards to anti-phage defense mechanisms in the host. Part I. As a first approach, 24 V. anguillarum and 13....... In conclusion, this thesis provides a first insight into the dynamic vibriophage-host interactions, indicating the complexity of phage therapy in the treatment of vibriosis, regarding the evolution of anti-phage defense mechanisms, gene regulation, quorum sensing, biofilm formation, as well as pathogenesis...... outcome of phage therapy and QS inhibiting molecules....

  6. Chromosomal Islands of Streptococcus pyogenes and related streptococci: Molecular Switches for Survival and Virulence

    OpenAIRE

    Scott Van Nguyen; William Michael Mcshan

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes is a significant pathogen of humans, annually causing over 700,000,000 infections and 500,000 deaths. Virulence in S. pyogenes is closely linked to mobile genetic elements like phages and chromosomal islands (CI). S. pyogenes phage-like chromosomal islands (SpyCI) confer a complex mutator phenotype on their host. SpyCI integrate into the 5’ end of DNA mismatch repair (MMR) gene mutL, which also disrupts downstream operon genes lmrP, ruvA, and tag. During early logari...

  7. Chromosomal islands of Streptococcus pyogenes and related streptococci: molecular switches for survival and virulence

    OpenAIRE

    Nguyen, Scott V.; McShan, William M.

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes is a significant pathogen of humans, annually causing over 700,000,000 infections and 500,000 deaths. Virulence in S. pyogenes is closely linked to mobile genetic elements like phages and chromosomal islands (CI). S. pyogenes phage-like chromosomal islands (SpyCI) confer a complex mutator phenotype on their host. SpyCI integrate into the 5′ end of DNA mismatch repair (MMR) gene mutL, which also disrupts downstream operon genes lmrP, ruvA, and tag. During early logarithm...

  8. The Bacillus anthracis chromosome contains four conserved, excision-proficient, putative prophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sozhamannan Shanmuga

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bacillus anthracis is considered to be a recently emerged clone within the Bacillus cereus sensu lato group. The B. anthracis genome sequence contains four putative lambdoid prophages. We undertook this study in order to understand whether the four prophages are unique to B. anthracis and whether they produce active phages. Results More than 300 geographically and temporally divergent isolates of B. anthracis and its near neighbors were screened by PCR for the presence of specific DNA sequences from each prophage region. Every isolate of B. anthracis screened by PCR was found to produce all four phage-specific amplicons whereas none of the non-B. anthracis isolates, produced more than one phage-specific amplicon. Excision of prophages could be detected by a PCR based assay for attP sites on extra-chromosomal phage circles and for attB sites on phage-excised chromosomes. SYBR-green real-time PCR assays indicated that prophage excision occurs at very low frequencies (2 × 10-5 - 8 × 10-8/cell. Induction with mitomycin C increased the frequency of excision of one of the prophages by approximately 250 fold. All four prophages appear to be defective since, mitomycin C induced culture did not release any viable phage particle or lyse the cells or reveal any phage particle under electron microscopic examination. Conclusion The retention of all four putative prophage regions across all tested strains of B. anthracis is further evidence of the very recent emergence of this lineage and the prophage regions may be useful for differentiating the B. anthracis chromosome from that of its neighbors. All four prophages can excise at low frequencies, but are apparently defective in phage production.

  9. Morphological evidence for phages in Xylella fastidiosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Civerolo Edwin L

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Presumptive phage particles associated with Xylella fastidiosa strain Temecula-1 grown in PW broth were observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM in ultrathin sections of bacterial cell-containing low speed centrifugation pellets and in partially purified preparations from CsCl equilibrium centrifugation density gradients. Ultrathin-sectioned cell pellets contained icosahedral particles of about 45 nm in diameter. Samples collected from CsCl density gradients revealed mostly non-tailed icosahedral but also tailed particles. The icosahedral particles could be divided into two types: a large type (about 45 nm and a small type (about 30 nm. Filamentous phage-like particles (17 × 120 to 6,300 nm were also observed. The presence of different types of phage-like particles resembling to those in several bacteriophage families provides new physical evidence, in addition to X. fastidiosa genomic information, that X. fastidiosa possesses active phages. This is the first report of phage particles released in X. fastidiosa cultures.

  10. Genetic dissection of milk yield traits and mastitis resistance quantitative trait loci on chromosome 20 in dairy cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadri, Naveen K; Guldbrandtsen, Bernt; Lund, Mogens S; Sahana, Goutam

    2015-12-01

    Intense selection to increase milk yield has had negative consequences for mastitis incidence in dairy cattle. Due to low heritability of mastitis resistance and an unfavorable genetic correlation with milk yield, a reduction in mastitis through traditional breeding has been difficult to achieve. Here, we examined quantitative trait loci (QTL) that segregate for clinical mastitis and milk yield on Bos taurus autosome 20 (BTA20) to determine whether both traits are affected by a single polymorphism (pleiotropy) or by multiple closely linked polymorphisms. In the latter but not the former situation, undesirable genetic correlation could potentially be broken by selecting animals that have favorable variants for both traits. First, we performed a within-breed association study using a haplotype-based method in Danish Holstein cattle (HOL). Next, we analyzed Nordic Red dairy cattle (RDC) and Danish Jersey cattle (JER) with the goal of determining whether these QTL identified in Holsteins were segregating across breeds. Genotypes for 12,566 animals (5,966 HOL, 5,458 RDC, and 1,142 JER) were determined by using the Illumina Bovine SNP50 BeadChip (50K; Illumina, San Diego, CA), which identifies 1,568 single nucleotide polymorphisms on BTA20. Data were combined, phased, and clustered into haplotype states, followed by within- and across-breed haplotype-based association analyses using a linear mixed model. Association signals for both clinical mastitis and milk yield peaked in the 26- to 40-Mb region on BTA20 in HOL. Single-variant association analyses were carried out in the QTL region using whole sequence level variants imputed from references of 2,036 HD genotypes (BovineHD BeadChip; Illumina) and 242 whole-genome sequences. The milk QTL were also segregating in RDC and JER on the BTA20-targeted region; however, an indication of differences in the causal factor(s) was observed across breeds. A previously reported F279Y mutation (rs385640152) within the growth hormone

  11. Genetic dissection of milk yield traits and mastitis resistance quantitative trait loci on chromosome 20 in dairy cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadri, Naveen K; Guldbrandtsen, Bernt; Lund, Mogens S; Sahana, Goutam

    2015-12-01

    Intense selection to increase milk yield has had negative consequences for mastitis incidence in dairy cattle. Due to low heritability of mastitis resistance and an unfavorable genetic correlation with milk yield, a reduction in mastitis through traditional breeding has been difficult to achieve. Here, we examined quantitative trait loci (QTL) that segregate for clinical mastitis and milk yield on Bos taurus autosome 20 (BTA20) to determine whether both traits are affected by a single polymorphism (pleiotropy) or by multiple closely linked polymorphisms. In the latter but not the former situation, undesirable genetic correlation could potentially be broken by selecting animals that have favorable variants for both traits. First, we performed a within-breed association study using a haplotype-based method in Danish Holstein cattle (HOL). Next, we analyzed Nordic Red dairy cattle (RDC) and Danish Jersey cattle (JER) with the goal of determining whether these QTL identified in Holsteins were segregating across breeds. Genotypes for 12,566 animals (5,966 HOL, 5,458 RDC, and 1,142 JER) were determined by using the Illumina Bovine SNP50 BeadChip (50K; Illumina, San Diego, CA), which identifies 1,568 single nucleotide polymorphisms on BTA20. Data were combined, phased, and clustered into haplotype states, followed by within- and across-breed haplotype-based association analyses using a linear mixed model. Association signals for both clinical mastitis and milk yield peaked in the 26- to 40-Mb region on BTA20 in HOL. Single-variant association analyses were carried out in the QTL region using whole sequence level variants imputed from references of 2,036 HD genotypes (BovineHD BeadChip; Illumina) and 242 whole-genome sequences. The milk QTL were also segregating in RDC and JER on the BTA20-targeted region; however, an indication of differences in the causal factor(s) was observed across breeds. A previously reported F279Y mutation (rs385640152) within the growth hormone

  12. Phages of Listeria offer novel tools for diagnostics and biocontrol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin J Loessner

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Historically, bacteriophages infecting their hosts have perhaps been best known and even notorious for being a nuisance in dairy-fermentation processes. However, with the rapid progress in molecular microbiology and microbial ecology, a new dawn has risen for phages. This review will provide an overview on possible uses and applications of Listeria phages, including phage-typing, reporter phage for bacterial diagnostics, and use of phage as biocontrol agents for food safety. The use of phage-encoded enzymes such as endolysins for the detection and as antimicrobial will also be addressed. Desirable properties of candidate phages for biocontrol will be discussed. While emphasizing the enormous future potential for applications, we will also consider some of the intrinsic limitations dictated by both phage and bacterial ecology.

  13. Current taxonomy of phages infecting lactic acid bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer eMahony

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Phages infecting lactic acid bacteria have been the focus of significant research attention over the past three decades. Through the isolation and characterization of hundreds of phage isolates, it has been possible to classify phages of the dairy starter and adjunct bacteria Lactococus lactis, Streptococcus thermophilus, Leuconostoc spp. and Lactobacillus spp. Among these, phages of L. lactis have been most thoroughly scrutinized and serve as an excellent model system to address issues that arise when attempting taxonomic classification of phages infecting other LAB species. Here, we present an overview of the current taxonomy of phages infecting LAB genera of industrial significance, the methods employed in these taxonomic efforts and how these may be employed for the taxonomy of phages of currently underrepresented and emerging phage species.

  14. Rapid Detection of Viable Bacillus anthracis Spores in Environmental Samples by Using Engineered Reporter Phages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, Natasha J; Molineux, Ian J; Page, Martin A; Schofield, David A

    2016-04-01

    Bacillus anthracis, the causative agent of anthrax, was utilized as a bioterrorism agent in 2001 when spores were distributed via the U.S. postal system. In responding to this event, the Federal Bureau of Investigation used traditional bacterial culture viability assays to ascertain the extent of contamination of the postal facilities within 24 to 48 h of environmental sample acquisition. Here, we describe a low-complexity, second-generation reporter phage assay for the rapid detection of viableB. anthracis spores in environmental samples. The assay uses an engineered B. anthracis reporter phage (Wβ::luxAB-2) which transduces bioluminescence to infected cells. To facilitate low-level environmental detection and maximize the signal response, expression of luxABin an earlier version of the reporter phage (Wβ::luxAB-1) was optimized. These alterations prolonged signal kinetics, increased light output, and improved assay sensitivity. Using Wβ::luxAB-2, detection of B. anthracis spores was 1 CFU in 8 h from pure cultures and as low as 10 CFU/g in sterile soil but increased to 10(5)CFU/g in unprocessed soil due to an unstable signal and the presence of competing bacteria. Inclusion of semiselective medium, mediated by a phage-expressed antibiotic resistance gene, maintained signal stability and enabled the detection of 10(4)CFU/g in 6 h. The assay does not require spore extraction and relies on the phage infecting germinating cells directly in the soil sample. This reporter phage displays promise for the rapid detection of low levels of spores on clean surfaces and also in grossly contaminated environmental samples from complex matrices such as soils. PMID:26873316

  15. Physiological and Molecular Characterization of Salmonella Bacteriophages Previously Used in Phage Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, J; Hong, Y; Fealey, M; Singh, A; Walton, K; Martin, C; Harman, N J; Mahlie, J; Ebner, P D

    2015-12-01

    The use of bacteriophages as biocontrol agents to control Salmonella in food production has gained popularity over the last two decades. Previously, our laboratory demonstrated that bacteriophages can be direct fed to limit Salmonella colonization and transmission in pigs. Here, we characterized the bacteriophages in our treatment cocktail in terms of lytic spectrum, growth kinetics, survivability under various conditions, and genomic sequencing. PCR-based fingerprinting indicated that 9 of the 10 phages, while related, were distinct isolates. Single-step growth kinetics analysis determined that the eclipse periods, latent periods, and burst sizes averaged 21.5 min, 31.5 min, and 43.3 particles, respectively. The viability of the phages was measured after exposure to various pH ranges, temperatures, digestive enzymes, UV light, and chlorinated water. Temperatures greater than 87.5°C, pH of <2.0, UV light (302 and 365 nm), and chlorinated water (500 ppm) inactivated the tested phages. Only select bacteriophages, however, were affected by incubation at temperatures of ≤75.0°C or pH of 4.0 to 10.0. Genomic sequencing of the phage with the broadest spectrum in the collection (effectively lysed all four Salmonella serovars tested), vB_SalM_SJ2, revealed it to belong to the Viunalikevirus genus of the Myoviridae family. Of the 197 predicted open reading frames, no toxin-associated, lysogenic, Salmonella virulence, or antimicrobial resistance genes were identified. Taken together, these data indicate that phages, as biologicals, may require some manner of protection (e.g., microencapsulation) to remain viable under various physiological and manufacturing conditions. In addition, based on its ability to effectively lyse diverse Salmonella serovars, phage vB_SalM-SJ2 could be further developed as an important biocontrol agent in various aspects of food production when the exact serovar or strain of contaminating Salmonella is not yet known.

  16. Rapid Detection of Viable Bacillus anthracis Spores in Environmental Samples by Using Engineered Reporter Phages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, Natasha J.; Molineux, Ian J.; Page, Martin A.

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus anthracis, the causative agent of anthrax, was utilized as a bioterrorism agent in 2001 when spores were distributed via the U.S. postal system. In responding to this event, the Federal Bureau of Investigation used traditional bacterial culture viability assays to ascertain the extent of contamination of the postal facilities within 24 to 48 h of environmental sample acquisition. Here, we describe a low-complexity, second-generation reporter phage assay for the rapid detection of viable B. anthracis spores in environmental samples. The assay uses an engineered B. anthracis reporter phage (Wβ::luxAB-2) which transduces bioluminescence to infected cells. To facilitate low-level environmental detection and maximize the signal response, expression of luxAB in an earlier version of the reporter phage (Wβ::luxAB-1) was optimized. These alterations prolonged signal kinetics, increased light output, and improved assay sensitivity. Using Wβ::luxAB-2, detection of B. anthracis spores was 1 CFU in 8 h from pure cultures and as low as 10 CFU/g in sterile soil but increased to 105 CFU/g in unprocessed soil due to an unstable signal and the presence of competing bacteria. Inclusion of semiselective medium, mediated by a phage-expressed antibiotic resistance gene, maintained signal stability and enabled the detection of 104 CFU/g in 6 h. The assay does not require spore extraction and relies on the phage infecting germinating cells directly in the soil sample. This reporter phage displays promise for the rapid detection of low levels of spores on clean surfaces and also in grossly contaminated environmental samples from complex matrices such as soils. PMID:26873316

  17. Mechanistic Insights Into Filamentous Phage Integration In Vibrio cholerae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhabatosh eDas

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Vibrio cholerae, the etiological agent of acute diarrhoeal disease cholera, harbors large numbers of lysogenic filamentous phages, contribute significantly to the host pathogenesis and provide fitness factors to the pathogen that help the bacterium to survive in natural environment. Most of the vibriophage genomes are not equipped with integrase and thus exploit two host-encoded tyrosine recombinases, XerC and XerD, for lysogenic conversion. Integration is site-specific and it occurs at dimer resolution site (dif of either one or both chromosomes of V. cholerae. Each dif sequence contains two recombinase-binding sequences flanking a central region. The integration follows a sequential strand exchanges between dif and attP sites within a DNA-protein complex consisting of one pair of each recombinase and two DNA fragments. During entire process of recombination, both the DNA components and recombinases of the synaptic complex keep transiently interconnected. Within the context of synaptic complex, both of the actuated enzymes mediate cleavage of phosphodiester bonds. First cleavage generates a phosphotyrosyl-linked recombinase-DNA complex at the recombinase binding sequence and free 5’-hydroxyl end at the first base of the central region. Following the cleavage, the exposed bases with 5’-hydroxyl ends of the central region of dif and attP sites melt from their complementary strands and react with the recombinase-DNA phosphotyrosyl linkage of their recombining partner. Subsequent ligation between dif and attP strands requires complementary base pair interactions at the site of phosphodiester bond formation. Integration mechanism is mostly influenced by the compatibility of dif and attP sequences. dif sites are highly conserved across bacterial phyla. Different phage genomes have different attP sequences; therefore they rely on different mechanisms for integration. Here, I review our current understanding of integration mechanisms used by the

  18. The Caulobacter crescentus phage phiCbK: genomics of a canonical phage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gill Jason J

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The bacterium Caulobacter crescentus is a popular model for the study of cell cycle regulation and senescence. The large prolate siphophage phiCbK has been an important tool in C. crescentus biology, and has been studied in its own right as a model for viral morphogenesis. Although a system of some interest, to date little genomic information is available on phiCbK or its relatives. Results Five novel phiCbK-like C. crescentus bacteriophages, CcrMagneto, CcrSwift, CcrKarma, CcrRogue and CcrColossus, were isolated from the environment. The genomes of phage phiCbK and these five environmental phage isolates were obtained by 454 pyrosequencing. The phiCbK-like phage genomes range in size from 205 kb encoding 318 proteins (phiCbK to 280 kb encoding 448 proteins (CcrColossus, and were found to contain nonpermuted terminal redundancies of 10 to 17 kb. A novel method of terminal ligation was developed to map genomic termini, which confirmed termini predicted by coverage analysis. This suggests that sequence coverage discontinuities may be useable as predictors of genomic termini in phage genomes. Genomic modules encoding virion morphogenesis, lysis and DNA replication proteins were identified. The phiCbK-like phages were also found to encode a number of intriguing proteins; all contain a clearly T7-like DNA polymerase, and five of the six encode a possible homolog of the C. crescentus cell cycle regulator GcrA, which may allow the phage to alter the host cell’s replicative state. The structural proteome of phage phiCbK was determined, identifying the portal, major and minor capsid proteins, the tail tape measure and possible tail fiber proteins. All six phage genomes are clearly related; phiCbK, CcrMagneto, CcrSwift, CcrKarma and CcrRogue form a group related at the DNA level, while CcrColossus is more diverged but retains significant similarity at the protein level. Conclusions Due to their lack of any apparent relationship to

  19. Phage therapy reduces Campylobacter jejuni colonization in broilers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wagenaar, J.A.; Bergen, van M.A.P.; Mueller, M.A.; Wassenaar, T.M.; Carlton, R.M.

    2005-01-01

    The effect of phage therapy in the control of Campylobacter jejuni colonization in young broilers, either as a preventive or a therapeutic measure, was tested. A prevention group was infected with C. jejuni at day 4 of a 10-day phage treatment. A therapeutic group was phage treated for 6 days, start

  20. HostPhinder: A Phage Host Prediction Tool

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villarroel, Julia; Kleinheinz, Kortine Annina; Jurtz, Vanessa Isabell;

    2016-01-01

    phages. As a measure of genomic similarity the number of co-occurring k-mers (DNA sequences of length k) is used. Using an independent evaluation set, HostPhinder was able to correctly predict host genus and species for 81% and 74% of the phages respectively, giving predictions for more phages than BLAST...

  1. Complete Genome Sequence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Phage AAT-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade-Domínguez, Andrés; Kolter, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Aspects of the interaction between phages and animals are of interest and importance for medical applications. Here, we report the genome sequence of the lytic Pseudomonas phage AAT-1, isolated from mammalian serum. AAT-1 is a double-stranded DNA phage, with a genome of 57,599 bp, containing 76 predicted open reading frames. PMID:27563032

  2. A New Group of Phage Anti-CRISPR Genes Inhibits the Type I-E CRISPR-Cas System of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    OpenAIRE

    Pawluk, April; Bondy-Denomy, Joseph; Cheung, Vivian H. W.; Maxwell, Karen L.; Davidson, Alan R.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT CRISPR-Cas systems are one of the most widespread phage resistance mechanisms in prokaryotes. Our lab recently identified the first examples of phage-borne anti-CRISPR genes that encode protein inhibitors of the type I-F CRISPR-Cas system of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. A key question arising from this work was whether there are other types of anti-CRISPR genes. In the current work, we address this question by demonstrating that some of the same phages carrying type I-F anti-CRISPR genes ...

  3. Cell biology perspectives in phage biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansaldi, Mireille

    2012-01-01

    Cellular biology has long been restricted to large cellular organisms. However, as the resolution of microscopic methods increased, it became possible to study smaller cells, in particular bacterial cells. Bacteriophage biology is one aspect of bacterial cell biology that has recently gained insight from cell biology. Despite their small size, bacteriophages could be successfully labeled and their cycle studied in the host cells. This review aims to put together, although non-extensively, several cell biology studies that recently pushed the elucidation of key mechanisms in phage biology, such as the lysis-lysogeny decision in temperate phages or genome replication and transcription, one step further.

  4. Comparative genetic mapping revealed powdery mildew resistance gene MlWE4 derived from wild emmer is located in same genomic region of Pm36 and Ml3D232 on chromosome 5BL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Dong; WANG Yong; CHEN Yong-xing; LIU Zhi-yong; OUYANG Shu-hong; WANG Li-li; CUI Yu; WU Qiu-hong; LIANG Yong; WANG Zhen-zhong; XIE Jing-zhong; ZHANG De-yun

    2015-01-01

    Powdery mildew, caused by Blumeria graminis f. sp. tritici, is one of the most devastating wheat diseases. Wild emmer wheat (Triticum turgidum ssp. dicoccoides) is a promising source of disease resistance for wheat. A powdery mildew resistance gene conferring resistance to B. graminis f. sp. tritici isolate E09, originating from wild emmer wheat, has been transferred into the hexaploid wheat line WE4 through crossing and backcrossing. Genetic analyses indicated that the powdery mildew resistance was control ed by a single dominant gene, temporarily designated MlWE4. By mean of comparative genomics and bulked segregant analysis, a genetic linkage map of MlWE4 was constructed, and MlWE4 was mapped on the distal region of chromosome arm 5BL. Comparative genetic linkage maps showed that genes MlWE4, Pm36 and Ml3D232 were co-segregated with markers XBD37670 and XBD37680, indicating they are likely the same gene or al eles in the same locus. The co-segregated markers provide a starting point for chromosome landing and map-based cloning of MlWE4, Pm36 and Ml3D232.

  5. Effect of bacteriophage infection in combination with tobramycin on the emergence of resistance in Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coulter, Lindsey B; McLean, Robert J C; Rohde, Rodney E; Aron, Gary M

    2014-10-03

    Bacteriophage infection and antibiotics used individually to reduce biofilm mass often result in the emergence of significant levels of phage and antibiotic resistant cells. In contrast, combination therapy in Escherichia coli biofilms employing T4 phage and tobramycin resulted in greater than 99% and 39% reduction in antibiotic and phage resistant cells, respectively. In P. aeruginosa biofilms, combination therapy resulted in a 60% and 99% reduction in antibiotic and PB-1 phage resistant cells, respectively. Although the combined treatment resulted in greater reduction of E. coli CFUs compared to the use of antibiotic alone, infection of P. aeruginosa biofilms with PB-1 in the presence of tobramycin was only as effective in the reduction of CFUs as the use of antibiotic alone. The study demonstrated phage infection in combination with tobramycin can significantly reduce the emergence of antibiotic and phage resistant cells in both E. coli and P. aeruginosa biofilms, however, a reduction in biomass was dependent on the phage-host system.

  6. Repetitive, Marker-Free, Site-Specific Integration as a Novel Tool for Multiple Chromosomal Integration of DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Kia Vest; Martinussen, Jan; Jensen, Peter Ruhdal;

    2013-01-01

    We present a tool for repetitive, marker-free, site-specific integration in Lactococcus lactis, in which a nonreplicating plasmid vector (pKV6) carrying a phage attachment site (attP) can be integrated into a bacterial attachment site (attB). The novelty of the tool described here is the inclusion...... of a minimal bacterial attachment site (attBmin), two mutated loxP sequences (lox66 and lox71) allowing for removal of undesirable vector elements (antibiotic resistance marker), and a counterselection marker (oroP) for selection of loxP recombination on the pKV6 vector. When transformed into L. lactis...... expressing the phage TP901-1 integrase, pKV6 integrates with high frequency into the chromosome, where it is flanked by attL and attR hybrid attachment sites. After expression of Cre recombinase from a plasmid that is not able to replicate in L. lactis, loxP recombinants can be selected for by using 5...

  7. Harnessing phages for supramolecular and materials chemistry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marcozzi, Alessio

    2016-01-01

    Het eerste gedeelte van de scriptie betreft het onderzoek naar de toepassing van phage display, om korte aptamers te selecteren voor zeer verschillende moleculen. Door deze techniek te gebruiken hebben we een peptide kunnen selecteren die de bateriele enzym dxs in-vitro verhinderd. Dit soort peptide

  8. Interaction analysis through proteomic phage display.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundell, Gustav N; Ivarsson, Ylva

    2014-01-01

    Phage display is a powerful technique for profiling specificities of peptide binding domains. The method is suited for the identification of high-affinity ligands with inhibitor potential when using highly diverse combinatorial peptide phage libraries. Such experiments further provide consensus motifs for genome-wide scanning of ligands of potential biological relevance. A complementary but considerably less explored approach is to display expression products of genomic DNA, cDNA, open reading frames (ORFs), or oligonucleotide libraries designed to encode defined regions of a target proteome on phage particles. One of the main applications of such proteomic libraries has been the elucidation of antibody epitopes. This review is focused on the use of proteomic phage display to uncover protein-protein interactions of potential relevance for cellular function. The method is particularly suited for the discovery of interactions between peptide binding domains and their targets. We discuss the largely unexplored potential of this method in the discovery of domain-motif interactions of potential biological relevance. PMID:25295249

  9. Interaction Analysis through Proteomic Phage Display

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustav N. Sundell

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Phage display is a powerful technique for profiling specificities of peptide binding domains. The method is suited for the identification of high-affinity ligands with inhibitor potential when using highly diverse combinatorial peptide phage libraries. Such experiments further provide consensus motifs for genome-wide scanning of ligands of potential biological relevance. A complementary but considerably less explored approach is to display expression products of genomic DNA, cDNA, open reading frames (ORFs, or oligonucleotide libraries designed to encode defined regions of a target proteome on phage particles. One of the main applications of such proteomic libraries has been the elucidation of antibody epitopes. This review is focused on the use of proteomic phage display to uncover protein-protein interactions of potential relevance for cellular function. The method is particularly suited for the discovery of interactions between peptide binding domains and their targets. We discuss the largely unexplored potential of this method in the discovery of domain-motif interactions of potential biological relevance.

  10. Phage-bacteria interaction network in human oral microbiome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jinfeng; Gao, Yuan; Zhao, Fangqing

    2016-07-01

    Although increasing knowledge suggests that bacteriophages play important roles in regulating microbial ecosystems, phage-bacteria interaction in human oral cavities remains less understood. Here we performed a metagenomic analysis to explore the composition and variation of oral dsDNA phage populations and potential phage-bacteria interaction. A total of 1,711 contigs assembled with more than 100 Gb shotgun sequencing data were annotated to 104 phages based on their best BLAST matches against the NR database. Bray-Curtis dissimilarities demonstrated that both phage and bacterial composition are highly diverse between periodontally healthy samples but show a trend towards homogenization in diseased gingivae samples. Significantly, according to the CRISPR arrays that record infection relationship between bacteria and phage, we found certain oral phages were able to invade other bacteria besides their putative bacterial hosts. These cross-infective phages were positively correlated with commensal bacteria while were negatively correlated with major periodontal pathogens, suggesting possible connection between these phages and microbial community structure in oral cavities. By characterizing phage-bacteria interaction as networks rather than exclusively pairwise predator-prey relationships, our study provides the first insight into the participation of cross-infective phages in forming human oral microbiota.

  11. Characterization and adsorption of Lactobacillus virulent phage P1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, X; Xi, Y; Zhang, H; Wang, Z; Fan, M; Liu, Y; Wu, W

    2016-09-01

    Bacteriophage infection of lactic acid bacteria is considered an important problem worldwide in the food fermentation industry, as it may produce low quality or unsafe foods, cause fermentation failure, and result in economic losses. To increase current knowledge on the properties of Lactobacillus virulent phages, we evaluated the effect of divalent cations, temperature, pH, and chloramphenicol on the adsorption ability of Lactobacillus virulent phage P1. Phage P1 was isolated from the abnormal fermentation liquid of Lactobacillus plantarum IMAU10120. The results showed that this phage belonged to the Siphoviridae family. The latent period of this phage was 45min, and the burst time was 90min. Burst size was 132.88±2.37 phage counts expressed per milliliter per infective center. This phage showed good tolerance at different temperatures, but incubation at 50°C only affected its adsorption. Adsorption rate reached a maximum value between 30 and 42°C. A high adsorption value of phage infectivity was obtained from pH 6 to 8. Moreover, calcium ions promoted and increased the adsorption capacity of phage P1, but magnesium ions had negative effects. Chloramphenicol had no effect on phage adsorption. This study increased current knowledge on the characterization and biological aspects of Lactobacillus virulent phages, and may provide some basic information that can be used to design successful antiphage strategies in the food industry. PMID:27372579

  12. Small regulatory RNAs in lambdoid bacteriophages and phage-derived plasmids: Not only antisense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nejman-Faleńczyk, Bożena; Bloch, Sylwia; Licznerska, Katarzyna; Felczykowska, Agnieszka; Dydecka, Aleksandra; Węgrzyn, Alicja; Węgrzyn, Grzegorz

    2015-03-01

    Until recently, only two small regulatory RNAs encoded by lambdoid bacteriophages were known. These transcripts are derived from paQ and pO promoters. The former one is supposed to act as an antisense RNA for expression of the Q gene, encoding a transcription antitermination protein. The latter transcript, called oop RNA, was initially proposed to have a double role, in establishing expression of the cI gene and in providing a primer for DNA replication. Although the initially proposed mechanisms by which oop RNA could influence the choice between two alternative developmental pathways of the phage and the initiation of phage DNA replication were found not true, the pO promoter has been demonstrated to be important for both regulation of phage development and control of DNA replication. Namely, the pO-derived transcript is an antisense RNA for expression of the cII gene, and pO is a part of a dual promoter system responsible for regulation of initiation of DNA synthesis from the oriλ region. Very recent studies identified a battery of small RNAs encoded by lambdoid bacteriophages existing as prophages in chromosomes of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli strains. Some of them have very interesting functions, like anti-small RNAs.

  13. Therapeutic effect of Pseudomonas aeruginosa phage YH30 on mink hemorrhagic pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Jingmin; Li, Xinwei; Yang, Mei; Du, Chongtao; Cui, Ziyin; Gong, Pengjuan; Xia, Feifei; Song, Jun; Zhang, Lei; Li, Juecheng; Yu, Chuang; Sun, Changjiang; Feng, Xin; Lei, Liancheng; Han, Wenyu

    2016-07-15

    Hemorrhagic pneumonia caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa remains one of the most costly infectious diseases among farmed mink and commonly leads to large economic losses during mink production. The objective of this study was to investigate the potential of using phages as a therapy against hemorrhagic pneumonia in mink. A broad-host-range phage from the Podoviridae family, YH30, was isolated using the mink-originating P. aeruginosa (serotype G) D7 strain as a host. The genome of YH30 was 72,192bp (54.92% G+C), contained 86 open reading frames and lacked regions encoding known virulence factors, integration-related proteins or antibiotic resistance determinants. These characteristics make YH30 eligible for use in phage therapy. The results of a curative treatment experiment demonstrated that a single intranasal administration of YH30 was sufficient to cure hemorrhagic pneumonia in mink. The mean colony count of P. aeruginosa in the blood and lung of YH30-protected mink was less than 10(3) CFU/mL (g) within 24h of bacterial challenge and ultimately became undetectable, whereas that in unprotected mink reached more than 10(8) CFU/mL (g). Additionally, YH30 dramatically improved the pathological manifestations of lung injury in mink with hemorrhagic pneumonia. Our work demonstrates the potential of phages to treat P. aeruginosa-caused hemorrhagic pneumonia in mink. PMID:27283850

  14. An Electrochemiluminescence Immunosensor Based on Gold-Magnetic Nanoparticles and Phage Displayed Antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Xihui; Tong, Zhaoyang; Huang, Qibin; Liu, Bing; Liu, Zhiwei; Hao, Lanqun; Dong, Hua; Zhang, Jinping; Gao, Chuan

    2016-01-01

    Using the multiple advantages of the ultra-highly sensitive electrochemiluminescence (ECL) technique, Staphylococcus protein A (SPA) functionalized gold-magnetic nanoparticles and phage displayed antibodies, and using gold-magnetic nanoparticles coated with SPA and coupled with a polyclonal antibody (pcAb) as magnetic capturing probes, and Ru(bpy)32+-labeled phage displayed antibody as a specific luminescence probe, this study reports a new way to detect ricin with a highly sensitive and specific ECL immunosensor and amplify specific detection signals. The linear detection range of the sensor was 0.0001~200 µg/L, and the limit of detection (LOD) was 0.0001 µg/L, which is 2500-fold lower than that of the conventional ELISA technique. The gold-magnetic nanoparticles, SPA and Ru(bpy)32+-labeled phage displayed antibody displayed different amplifying effects in the ECL immunosensor and can decrease LOD 3-fold, 3-fold and 20-fold, respectively, compared with the ECL immunosensors without one of the three effects. The integrated amplifying effect can decrease the LOD 180-fold. The immunosensor integrates the unique advantages of SPA-coated gold-magnetic nanoparticles that improve the activity of the functionalized capturing probe, and the amplifying effect of the Ru(bpy)32+-labeled phage displayed antibodies, so it increases specificity, interference-resistance and decreases LOD. It is proven to be well suited for the analysis of trace amounts of ricin in various environmental samples with high recovery ratios and reproducibility. PMID:26927130

  15. Display technology on filamentous phage in the search for anti-infective biological agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson Santiago Vispo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The causes of antibiotic resistance are complex. The phage display technology has been used mainly to produce monoclonal antibodies (MAbs and peptides directed against cancer or inflammatory disease targets. Today, this technology is recognized as a powerful tool for selecting novel peptides and antibodies that can bind to a wide range of antigens, ranging from whole cells to proteins and lipid targets. In this review, we highlight research that exploits the phage display technology to discover new drugs against infectious diseases, with a focus on antimicrobial peptides and antibodies. Methods: Basic and recent literature review was made, mainly focused on general aspects of phage display technology and the application in the search of new peptides or antibodies of pharmaceutical use to combat the infectious diseases transmitted by bacteria and virus. Results: Updated information on the selected topics is shown, with a guiding and practical approach aimed at researchers in the field of molecular biology to continue deepening the technology with special emphasis in the applications that have been developed in Cuba. Conclusions: Advances in methods of screening, manufacturing, and humanization technologies show that phage display technology can significantly contribute in the fight against clinically important pathogens.

  16. Twelve previously unknown phage genera are ubiquitous in global oceans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holmfeldt, Karin [University of Arizona; Solonenko, Natalie [University of Arizona; Shah, Manesh B [ORNL; Corrier, Kristen L [ORNL; Riemann, Lasse [University of Copenhagen; Verberkmoes, Nathan C [ORNL; Sullivan, Matthew B [University of Arizona

    2013-01-01

    Viruses are fundamental to ecosystems ranging from oceans to humans, yet our ability to study them is bottlenecked by the lack of ecologically relevant isolates, resulting in unknowns dominating culture-independent surveys. Here we present genomes from 31 phages infecting multiple strains of the aquatic bacterium Cellulophaga baltica (Bacteroidetes) to provide data for an underrepresented and environmentally abundant bacterial lineage. Comparative genomics delineated 12 phage groups that (i) each represent a new genus, and (ii) represent one novel and four wellknown viral families. This diversity contrasts the few well-studied marine phage systems, but parallels the diversity of phages infecting human-associated bacteria. Although all 12 Cellulophaga phages represent new genera, the podoviruses and icosahedral, nontailed ssDNA phages were exceptional, with genomes up to twice as large as those previously observed for each phage type. Structural novelty was also substantial, requiring experimental phage proteomics to identify 83% of the structural proteins. The presence of uncommon nucleotide metabolism genes in four genera likely underscores the importance of scavenging nutrient-rich molecules as previously seen for phages in marine environments. Metagenomic recruitment analyses suggest that these particular Cellulophaga phages are rare and may represent a first glimpse into the phage side of the rare biosphere. However, these analyses also revealed that these phage genera are widespread, occurring in 94% of 137 investigated metagenomes. Together, this diverse and novel collection of phages identifies a small but ubiquitous fraction of unknown marine viral diversity and provides numerous environmentally relevant phage host systems for experimental hypothesis testing.

  17. Twelve previously unknown phage genera are ubiquitous in global oceans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmfeldt, Karin; Solonenko, Natalie; Shah, Manesh; Corrier, Kristen; Riemann, Lasse; Verberkmoes, Nathan C; Sullivan, Matthew B

    2013-07-30

    Viruses are fundamental to ecosystems ranging from oceans to humans, yet our ability to study them is bottlenecked by the lack of ecologically relevant isolates, resulting in "unknowns" dominating culture-independent surveys. Here we present genomes from 31 phages infecting multiple strains of the aquatic bacterium Cellulophaga baltica (Bacteroidetes) to provide data for an underrepresented and environmentally abundant bacterial lineage. Comparative genomics delineated 12 phage groups that (i) each represent a new genus, and (ii) represent one novel and four well-known viral families. This diversity contrasts the few well-studied marine phage systems, but parallels the diversity of phages infecting human-associated bacteria. Although all 12 Cellulophaga phages represent new genera, the podoviruses and icosahedral, nontailed ssDNA phages were exceptional, with genomes up to twice as large as those previously observed for each phage type. Structural novelty was also substantial, requiring experimental phage proteomics to identify 83% of the structural proteins. The presence of uncommon nucleotide metabolism genes in four genera likely underscores the importance of scavenging nutrient-rich molecules as previously seen for phages in marine environments. Metagenomic recruitment analyses suggest that these particular Cellulophaga phages are rare and may represent a first glimpse into the phage side of the rare biosphere. However, these analyses also revealed that these phage genera are widespread, occurring in 94% of 137 investigated metagenomes. Together, this diverse and novel collection of phages identifies a small but ubiquitous fraction of unknown marine viral diversity and provides numerous environmentally relevant phage-host systems for experimental hypothesis testing. PMID:23858439

  18. Chromosome Microarray.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Sharon

    2016-01-01

    Over the last half century, knowledge about genetics, genetic testing, and its complexity has flourished. Completion of the Human Genome Project provided a foundation upon which the accuracy of genetics, genomics, and integration of bioinformatics knowledge and testing has grown exponentially. What is lagging, however, are efforts to reach and engage nurses about this rapidly changing field. The purpose of this article is to familiarize nurses with several frequently ordered genetic tests including chromosomes and fluorescence in situ hybridization followed by a comprehensive review of chromosome microarray. It shares the complexity of microarray including how testing is performed and results analyzed. A case report demonstrates how this technology is applied in clinical practice and reveals benefits and limitations of this scientific and bioinformatics genetic technology. Clinical implications for maternal-child nurses across practice levels are discussed. PMID:27276104

  19. The genome and proteome of a virulent Escherichia coli O157:H7 bacteriophage closely resembling Salmonella phage Felix O1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waddell Thomas E

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Based upon whole genome and proteome analysis, Escherichia coli O157:H7-specific bacteriophage (phage wV8 belongs to the new myoviral genus, "the Felix O1-like viruses" along with Salmonella phage Felix O1 and Erwinia amylovora phage φEa21-4. The genome characteristics of phage wV8 (size 88.49 kb, mol%G+C 38.9, 138 ORFs, 23 tRNAs are very similar to those of phage Felix O1 (86.16 kb, 39.0 mol%G+C, 131 ORFs and 22 tRNAs and, indeed most of the proteins have their closest homologs within Felix O1. Approximately one-half of the Escherichia coli O157:H7 mutants resistant to phage wV8 still serotype as O157:H7 indicating that this phage may recognize, like coliphage T4, two different surface receptors: lipopolysaccharide and, perhaps, an outer membrane protein.

  20. Detection of staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec type XI carrying highly divergent mecA, mecI, mecR1, blaZ, and ccr genes in human clinical isolates of clonal complex 130 methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Shore, Anna C

    2011-08-01

    Methicillin resistance in staphylococci is mediated by penicillin binding protein 2a (PBP 2a), encoded by mecA on mobile staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) elements. In this study, two clonal complex 130 (CC130) methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) isolates from patients in Irish hospitals were identified that were phenotypically PBP 2a positive but lacked mecA by conventional PCR and by DNA microarray screening. The isolates were identified as methicillin-susceptible S. aureus using the GeneXpert real-time PCR assay. Whole-genome sequencing of one isolate (M10\\/0061) revealed a 30-kb SCCmec element encoding a class E mec complex with highly divergent blaZ-mecA-mecR1-mecI, a type 8 cassette chromosome recombinase (ccr) complex consisting of ccrA1-ccrB3, an arsenic resistance operon, and flanking direct repeats (DRs). The SCCmec element was almost identical to that of SCCmec type XI (SCCmec XI) identified by the Sanger Institute in sequence type 425 bovine MRSA strain LGA251 listed on the website of the International Working Group on the Classification of Staphylococcal Cassette Chromosome Elements. The open reading frames (ORFs) identified within SCCmec XI of M10\\/0061 exhibited 21 to 93% amino acid identity to ORFs in GenBank. A third DR was identified ca. 3 kb downstream of SCCmec XI, indicating the presence of a possible SCC remnant. SCCmec XI was also identified in the second CC130 MRSA isolate by PCR and sequencing. The CC130 MRSA isolates may be of animal origin as previously reported CC130 S. aureus strains were predominantly from bovine sources. The highly divergent nature of SCCmec XI relative to other SCCmec elements indicates that it may have originated in another taxon.

  1. A Plasmid Bearing the bla(CTX-M-15) Gene and Phage P1-Like Sequences from a Sequence Type 11 Klebsiella pneumoniae Isolate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Juyoun; Ko, Kwan Soo

    2015-10-01

    Plasmid pKP12226 was extracted and analyzed from a CTX-M-15-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae sequence type 11 (ST11) isolate collected in South Korea. The plasmid represents chimeric characteristics consisting of a pIP1206-like backbone and lysogenized phage P1-like sequences. It bears a resistance region that includes resistance genes to several antibiotics and is different from previously characterized plasmids from South Korea bearing blaCTX-M-15. It may have resulted from recombination between an Escherichia coli plasmid backbone, a blaCTX-M-15-bearing resistance region, and lysogenized phage P1-like sequences. PMID:26195513

  2. Convergent evolution of pathogenicity islands in helper cos phage interference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpena, Nuria; Manning, Keith A; Dokland, Terje; Marina, Alberto; Penadés, José R

    2016-11-01

    Staphylococcus aureus pathogenicity islands (SaPIs) are phage satellites that exploit the life cycle of their helper phages for their own benefit. Most SaPIs are packaged by their helper phages using a headful (pac) packaging mechanism. These SaPIs interfere with pac phage reproduction through a variety of strategies, including the redirection of phage capsid assembly to form small capsids, a process that depends on the expression of the SaPI-encoded cpmA and cpmB genes. Another SaPI subfamily is induced and packaged by cos-type phages, and although these cos SaPIs also block the life cycle of their inducing phages, the basis for this mechanism of interference remains to be deciphered. Here we have identified and characterized one mechanism by which the SaPIs interfere with cos phage reproduction. This mechanism depends on a SaPI-encoded gene, ccm, which encodes a protein involved in the production of small isometric capsids, compared with the prolate helper phage capsids. As the Ccm and CpmAB proteins are completely unrelated in sequence, this strategy represents a fascinating example of convergent evolution. Moreover, this result also indicates that the production of SaPI-sized particles is a widespread strategy of phage interference conserved during SaPI evolution.This article is part of the themed issue 'The new bacteriology'. PMID:27672154

  3. Convergent evolution of pathogenicity islands in helper cos phage interference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, Keith A.; Dokland, Terje; Marina, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus pathogenicity islands (SaPIs) are phage satellites that exploit the life cycle of their helper phages for their own benefit. Most SaPIs are packaged by their helper phages using a headful (pac) packaging mechanism. These SaPIs interfere with pac phage reproduction through a variety of strategies, including the redirection of phage capsid assembly to form small capsids, a process that depends on the expression of the SaPI-encoded cpmA and cpmB genes. Another SaPI subfamily is induced and packaged by cos-type phages, and although these cos SaPIs also block the life cycle of their inducing phages, the basis for this mechanism of interference remains to be deciphered. Here we have identified and characterized one mechanism by which the SaPIs interfere with cos phage reproduction. This mechanism depends on a SaPI-encoded gene, ccm, which encodes a protein involved in the production of small isometric capsids, compared with the prolate helper phage capsids. As the Ccm and CpmAB proteins are completely unrelated in sequence, this strategy represents a fascinating example of convergent evolution. Moreover, this result also indicates that the production of SaPI-sized particles is a widespread strategy of phage interference conserved during SaPI evolution. This article is part of the themed issue ‘The new bacteriology’. PMID:27672154

  4. Neisseria gonorrhoeae filamentous phage NgoΦ6 is capable of infecting a variety of Gram-negative bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piekarowicz, Andrzej; Kłyż, Aneta; Majchrzak, Michał; Szczêsna, Ewa; Piechucki, Marcin; Kwiatek, Agnieszka; Maugel, Timothy K; Stein, Daniel C

    2014-01-01

    We constructed a phagemid consisting of the whole genome of the Neisseria gonorrhoeae bacteriophage NgoΦ6 cloned into a pBluescript plasmid derivative lacking the f1 origin of replication (named pBS::Φ6). Escherichia coli cells harboring pBS::Φ6 were able to produce a biologically active phagemid, NgoΦ6fm, capable of infecting, integrating its DNA into the chromosome of, and producing progeny phagemids in, a variety of taxonomically distant Gram-negative bacteria, including E. coli, Haemophilus influenzae, Neisseria sicca, Pseudomonas sp., and Paracoccus methylutens. A derivative of pBS::Φ6 lacking the phage orf7 gene, a positional homolog of filamentous phage proteins that mediate the interaction between the phage and the bacterial pilus, was capable of producing phagemid particles that were able to infect E. coli, Haemophilus influenzae, N. sicca, Pseudomonas sp., and Paracoccus methylutens, indicating that NgoΦ6 infects cells of these species using a mechanism that does not involve the Orf7 gene product and that NgoΦ6 initiates infection through a novel process in these species. We further demonstrate that the establishment of the lysogenic state does not require an active phage integrase. Since phagemid particles were capable of infecting diverse hosts, this indicates that NgoΦ6 is the first broad-host-range filamentous bacteriophage described. PMID:24198404

  5. Morphology, genome sequence, and structural proteome of type phage P335 from Lactococcus lactis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Labrie, Simon J.; Josephsen, Jytte; Neve, Horst;

    2008-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis phage P335 is a virulent type phage for the species that bears its name and belongs phage P335 is a virulent type phage for the species that bears its name and belongs to the Siphoviridae family. Morphologically, P335 resembled the L. lactis phages TP901-1 and Tuc2009, except f...

  6. Genomic sequence and activity of KS10, a transposable phage of the Burkholderia cepacia complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shrivastava Savita

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Burkholderia cepacia complex (BCC is a versatile group of Gram negative organisms that can be found throughout the environment in sources such as soil, water, and plants. While BCC bacteria can be involved in beneficial interactions with plants, they are also considered opportunistic pathogens, specifically in patients with cystic fibrosis and chronic granulomatous disease. These organisms also exhibit resistance to many antibiotics, making conventional treatment often unsuccessful. KS10 was isolated as a prophage of B. cenocepacia K56-2, a clinically relevant strain of the BCC. Our objective was to sequence the genome of this phage and also determine if this prophage encoded any virulence determinants. Results KS10 is a 37,635 base pairs (bp transposable phage of the opportunistic pathogen Burkholderia cenocepacia. Genome sequence analysis and annotation of this phage reveals that KS10 shows the closest sequence homology to Mu and BcepMu. KS10 was found to be a prophage in three different strains of B. cenocepacia, including strains K56-2, J2315, and C5424, and seven tested clinical isolates of B. cenocepacia, but no other BCC species. A survey of 23 strains and 20 clinical isolates of the BCC revealed that KS10 is able to form plaques on lawns of B. ambifaria LMG 19467, B. cenocepacia PC184, and B. stabilis LMG 18870. Conclusion KS10 is a novel phage with a genomic organization that differs from most phages in that its capsid genes are not aligned into one module but rather separated by approximately 11 kb, giving evidence of one or more prior genetic rearrangements. There were no potential virulence factors identified in KS10, though many hypothetical proteins were identified with no known function.

  7. An orthologue of the cor gene is involved in the exclusion of temperate lambdoid phages. Evidence that Cor inactivates FhuA receptor functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new set of lambdoid phages (mEp) classified into different immunity groups was previously described. Phages mEp213, mEp237, and mEp410 were unable to grow in mEp167 lysogenic cells, presumably due to an exclusion mechanism expressed constitutively by the mEp167 repressed prophage. In this work, to analyze the exclusion phenomenon, we constructed a genomic library from mEp167 phage in a pPROEX derivative plasmid. A DNA fragment containing an open reading frame for a 77 amino acid polypeptide was selected by its ability to confer resistance to heteroimmune phage infection. This ORF shows high amino acid sequence identity with putative Cor proteins of phages HK022, φ80 and N15. Cells expressing the mEp167 cor gene from a plasmid (Cor+ phenotype) excluded 13 of 20 phages from different infection immunity groups. This exclusion was observed in both tonB- and tonB+ cells. Lambdoid mEp phages that were excluded in these cells were unable to infect cells defective in the outer membrane FhuA receptor (fhuA-). Thus, Cor-mediated exclusion was only observed in fhuA+ cells. Phage production after DNA transfection or the spontaneous induction of mEp prophage in Cor+ cells was not blocked. In addition, ferrichrome uptake, which is mediated by FhuA, was inhibited in Cor+ cells. Our results show that not only phage infection via FhuA but also a FhuA transport activity (ferrichrome uptake) are inhibited by Cor, presumably by inactivation of FhuA

  8. Molecular mapping of chromosomes 17 and X

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barker, D.F.

    1991-01-15

    Progress toward the construction of high density genetic maps of chromosomes 17 and X has been made by isolating and characterizing a relatively large set of polymorphic probes for each chromosome and using these probes to construct genetic maps. We have mapped the same polymorphic probes against a series of chromosome breakpoints on X and 17. The probes could be assigned to over 30 physical intervals on the X chromosome and 7 intervals on 17. In many cases, this process resulted in improved characterization of the relative locations of the breakpoints with respect to each other and the definition of new physical intervals. The strategy for isolation of the polymorphic clones utilized chromosome specific libraries of 1--15 kb segments from each of the two chromosomes. From these libraries, clones were screened for those detecting restriction fragment length polymorphisms. The markers were further characterized, the chromosomal assignments confirmed and in most cases segments of the original probes were subcloned into plasmids to produce probes with improved signal to noise ratios for use in the genetic marker studies. The linkage studies utilize the CEPH reference families and other well-characterized families in our collection which have been used for genetic disease linkage work. Preliminary maps and maps of portions of specific regions of 17 and X are provided. We have nearly completed a map of the 1 megabase Mycoplasma arthritidis genome by applying these techniques to a lambda phage library of its genome. We have found bit mapping to be an efficient means to organize a contiguous set of overlapping clones from a larger genome.

  9. The phage growth limitation system in Streptomyces coelicolor A(3)2 is a toxin/antitoxin system, comprising enzymes with DNA methyltransferase, protein kinase and ATPase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoskisson, Paul A; Sumby, Paul; Smith, Margaret C M

    2015-03-01

    The phage growth limitation system of Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2) is an unusual bacteriophage defence mechanism. Progeny ϕC31 phage from an initial infection are thought to be modified such that subsequent infections are attenuated in a Pgl(+) host but normal in a Pgl(-) strain. Earlier work identified four genes required for phage resistance by Pgl. Here we demonstrate that Pgl is an elaborate and novel phage restriction system that, in part, comprises a toxin/antitoxin system where PglX, a DNA methyltransferase is toxic in the absence of a functional PglZ. In addition, the ATPase activity of PglY and a protein kinase activity in PglW are shown to be essential for phage resistance by Pgl. We conclude that on infection of a Pgl(+) cell by bacteriophage ϕC31, PglW transduces a signal, probably via phosphorylation, to other Pgl proteins resulting in the activation of the DNA methyltransferase, PglX and this leads to phage restriction.

  10. Targeted bacterial immunity buffers phage diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haerter, Jan O; Trusina, Ala; Sneppen, Kim

    2011-10-01

    Bacteria have evolved diverse defense mechanisms that allow them to fight viral attacks. One such mechanism, the clustered, regularly interspaced, short palindromic repeat (CRISPR) system, is an adaptive immune system consisting of genetic loci that can take up genetic material from invasive elements (viruses and plasmids) and later use them to reject the returning invaders. It remains an open question how, despite the ongoing evolution of attack and defense mechanisms, bacteria and viral phages manage to coexist. Using a simple mathematical model and a two-dimensional numerical simulation, we found that CRISPR adaptive immunity allows for robust phage-bacterium coexistence even when the number of virus species far exceeds the capacity of CRISPR-encoded genetic memory. Coexistence is predicted to be a consequence of the presence of many interdependent species that stress but do not overrun the bacterial defense system. PMID:21813617

  11. Influence of Environmental Factors on Phage–Bacteria Interaction and on the Efficacy and Infectivity of Phage P100

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fister, Susanne; Robben, Christian; Witte, Anna K.; Schoder, Dagmar; Wagner, Martin; Rossmanith, Peter

    2016-01-01

    When using bacteriophages to control food-borne bacteria in food production plants and processed food, it is crucial to consider that environmental conditions influence their stability. These conditions can also affect the physiological state of bacteria and consequently host–virus interaction and the effectiveness of the phage ability to reduce bacteria numbers. In this study we investigated the stability, binding, and replication capability of phage P100 and its efficacy to control Listeria monocytogenes under conditions typically encountered in dairy plants. The influences of SDS, Lutensol AO 7, salt, smear water, and different temperatures were investigated. Results indicate that phage P100 is stable and able to bind to the host under most conditions tested. Replication was dependent upon the growth of L. monocytogenes and efficacy was higher when bacterial growth was reduced by certain environmental conditions. In long-term experiments at different temperatures phages were initially able to reduce bacteria up to seven log10 units after 2 weeks at 4°C. However, thereafter, re-growth and development of phage-resistant L. monocytogenes isolates were encountered. PMID:27516757

  12. The XXIIIrd Phage/Virus Assembly Meeting

    OpenAIRE

    Serwer, Philip

    2014-01-01

    The XXIIIrd Phage/Virus Assembly (PVA) meeting returned to its birthplace in Lake Arrowhead, CA on September 8–13, 2013 (Fig. 1). The original meeting occurred in 1968, organized by Bob Edgar (Caltech, Pasadena, CA USA), Fred Eiserling (University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA USA) and Bill Wood (Caltech, Pasadena, CA USA). The organizers of the 2013 meeting were Bill Gelbart (University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA USA) and Jack Johnson (Scripps Research Institut...

  13. Phase variation in the phage growth limitation system of Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumby, Paul; Smith, Margaret C M

    2003-08-01

    The phase-variable phage growth limitation (Pgl) system of Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2) is an unusual bacteriophage resistance mechanism that confers protection against the temperate phage phiC31 and homoimmune relatives. Pgl is subject to phase variation, and data presented here show that this is at least partially due to expansion and contraction of a polyguanine tract present within the putative adenine-specific DNA methyltransferase gene, pglX. Furthermore, the pglX paralogue SC6G9.02, here renamed pglS, was shown to be able to interfere with the Pgl phenotype, suggesting that PglS could provide an alternative activity to that conferred by PglX.

  14. Genome characteristics of a novel phage from Bacillus thuringiensis showing high similarity with phage from Bacillus cereus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yihui Yuan

    Full Text Available Bacillus thuringiensis is an important entomopathogenic bacterium belongs to the Bacillus cereus group, which also includes B. anthracis and B. cereus. Several genomes of phages originating from this group had been sequenced, but no genome of Siphoviridae phage from B. thuringiensis has been reported. We recently sequenced and analyzed the genome of a novel phage, BtCS33, from a B. thuringiensis strain, subsp. kurstaki CS33, and compared the gneome of this phage to other phages of the B. cereus group. BtCS33 was the first Siphoviridae phage among the sequenced B. thuringiensis phages. It produced small, turbid plaques on bacterial plates and had a narrow host range. BtCS33 possessed a linear, double-stranded DNA genome of 41,992 bp with 57 putative open reading frames (ORFs. It had a typical genome structure consisting of three modules: the "late" region, the "lysogeny-lysis" region and the "early" region. BtCS33 exhibited high similarity with several phages, B. cereus phage Wβ and some variants of Wβ, in genome organization and the amino acid sequences of structural proteins. There were two ORFs, ORF22 and ORF35, in the genome of BtCS33 that were also found in the genomes of B. cereus phage Wβ and may be involved in regulating sporulation of the host cell. Based on these observations and analysis of phylogenetic trees, we deduced that B. thuringiensis phage BtCS33 and B. cereus phage Wβ may have a common distant ancestor.

  15. Complete Genome Sequences of Four Novel Escherichia coli Bacteriophages Belonging to New Phage Groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carstens, Alexander B; Kot, Witold; Hansen, Lars H

    2015-01-01

    Here, we describe the sequencing and genome annotations of a set of four Escherichia coli bacteriophages (phages) belonging to newly discovered groups previously consisting of only a single phage and thus expand our knowledge of these phage groups.......Here, we describe the sequencing and genome annotations of a set of four Escherichia coli bacteriophages (phages) belonging to newly discovered groups previously consisting of only a single phage and thus expand our knowledge of these phage groups....

  16. Improvement and efficient display of Bacillus thuringiensis toxins on M13 phages and ribosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheco, Sabino; Cantón, Emiliano; Zuñiga-Navarrete, Fernando; Pecorari, Frédéric; Bravo, Alejandra; Soberón, Mario

    2015-12-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) produces insecticidal proteins that have been used worldwide in the control of insect-pests in crops and vectors of human diseases. However, different insect species are poorly controlled by the available Bt toxins or have evolved resistance to these toxins. Evolution of Bt toxicity could provide novel toxins to control insect pests. To this aim, efficient display systems to select toxins with increased binding to insect membranes or midgut proteins involved in toxicity are likely to be helpful. Here we describe two display systems, phage display and ribosome display, that allow the efficient display of two non-structurally related Bt toxins, Cry1Ac and Cyt1Aa. Improved display of Cry1Ac and Cyt1Aa on M13 phages was achieved by changing the commonly used peptide leader sequence of the coat pIII-fusion protein, that relies on the Sec translocation pathway, for a peptide leader sequence that relies on the signal recognition particle pathway (SRP) and by using a modified M13 helper phage (Phaberge) that has an amber mutation in its pIII genomic sequence and preferentially assembles using the pIII-fusion protein. Also, both Cry1Ac and Cyt1Aa were efficiently displayed on ribosomes, which could allow the construction of large libraries of variants. Furthermore, Cry1Ac or Cyt1Aa displayed on M13 phages or ribosomes were specifically selected from a mixture of both toxins depending on which antigen was immobilized for binding selection. These improved systems may allow the selection of Cry toxin variants with improved insecticidal activities that could counter insect resistances. PMID:26606918

  17. Multiple-site mutations of phage Bp7 endolysin improves its activities against target bacteria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Can; Zhang; Yuanchao; Wang; Huzhi; Sun; Huiying; Ren

    2015-01-01

    The widespread use of antibiotics has caused serious drug resistance. Bacteria that were once easily treatable are now extremely difficult to treat. Endolysin can be used as an alternative to antibiotics for the treatment of drug-resistant bacteria. To analyze the antibacterial activity of the endolysin of phage Bp7(Bp7e), a 489-bp DNA fragment of endolysin Bp7e was PCR-amplified from a phage Bp7 genome and cloned, and then a p ET28a-Bp7e prokaryotic expression vector was constructed. Two amino acids were mutated(L99A, M102E) to construct p ET28a-Bp7Δe, with p ET28a-Bp7e as a template. Phylogenetic analysis suggested that BP7e belongs to a T4-like phage endolysin group. Bp7e and its mutant Bp7Δe were expressed in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) as soluble proteins. They were purified by affinity chromatography, and then their antibacterial activities were analyzed. The results demonstrated that the recombinant proteins Bp7e and Bp7Δe showed obvious antibacterial activity against Micrococcus lysodeikticus but no activity against Staphylococcus aureus. In the presence of malic acid, Bp7e and Bp7Δe exhibited an effect on most E. coli strains which could be lysed by phage Bp7, but no effect on Salmonella paratyphi or Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Moreover, Bp7Δe with double-site mutations showed stronger antibacterial activity and a broader lysis range than Bp7e.

  18. Bacteriophages: biosensing tools for multi-drug resistant pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tawil, N; Sacher, E; Mandeville, R; Meunier, M

    2014-03-21

    Pathogen detection is of utmost importance in many sectors, such as in the food industry, environmental quality control, clinical diagnostics, bio-defence and counter-terrorism. Failure to appropriately, and specifically, detect pathogenic bacteria can lead to serious consequences, and may ultimately be lethal. Public safety, new legislation, recent outbreaks in food contamination, and the ever-increasing prevalence of multidrug-resistant infections have fostered a worldwide research effort targeting novel biosensing strategies. This review concerns phage-based analytical and biosensing methods targeted towards theranostic applications. We discuss and review phage-based assays, notably phage amplification, reporter phage, phage lysis, and bioluminescence assays for the detection of bacterial species, as well as phage-based biosensors, including optical (comprising SPR sensors and fiber optic assays), electrochemical (comprising amperometric, potentiometric, and impedimetric sensors), acoustic wave and magnetoelastic sensors.

  19. Plasmid-borne cadmium resistant determinants are associated with the susceptibility of Listeria monocytogenes to bacteriophage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hui; Zhou, Yan; Bao, Hongduo; Zhang, Lili; Wang, Ran; Zhou, Xiaohui

    2015-03-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is an intracellular pathogen causing gastroenteritis, central nervous system infections and abortions. Chromosomal virulence determinants have been extensively investigated. However, the function of genes encoded by plasmids in L. monocytogenes has not been fully understood. In this study, we determined the prevalence and molecular profile of plasmids in food isolates of L. monocytogenes and examined the contribution of four plasmid-borne cadmium-resistant genes to the susceptibility of L. monocytogenes to bacteriophage infection. The results showed that plasmids were isolated from 55% (11/20) of the isolates and the plasmids exhibited 10 molecular types as determined by restriction enzyme digestion. Furthermore, 65% and 15% of the isolates were tolerant to cadmium and benzalkonium chloride (BC), respectively. All the BC-resistant isolates were resistant to cadmium. The prevalence of predicted cadmium resistance determinants (cadA1, cadA2, cadA3 and cadC) was determined and the results showed that cadA1 (35%) in isolates of serotypes 1/2a and 1/2b was much more prevalent than cadC (15%). As expected, both cadA and cadC mutants had reduced resistance to cadmium, while the resistance to BC was not significantly affected. Interestingly, both cadA and cadC mutants showed significantly higher susceptibility against L. monocytogenes phage LipG2-5 and FWLLm3 compared with the wide-type strain. Based on these results, we concluded that plasmids from L. monocytogenes encoded important functional determinants that are not only associated with cadmium resistance, but also phage susceptibility. PMID:25721472

  20. A GFP-based bacterial biosensor with chromosomally integrated sensing cassette for quantitative detection of Hg(II) in environment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Himanshu Priyadarshi; Absar Alam; Gireesh-Babu P; Rekha Das; Pankaj Kishore; Shivendra Kumar; Aparna Chaudhari

    2012-01-01

    A mercury biosensor was constructed by integrating biosensor genetic elements into E.coli JM109 chromosome in a single copy number,using the attP/attB recombination mechanism of λ phage.The genetic elements used include a regulatory protein gene (merR) along with operator/promoter (O/P) derived from the mercury resistance operon from pDU1358 plasmid of Serratia marcescens.The expression of reporter gene gfp is also controlled by merR/O/P.Integration of the construct into the chromosome was done to increase the stability and precision of the biosensor.This biosensor could detect Hg(Ⅱ) ions in the concentration range of 100-1700 mnol/L,and manifest the result as the expression of GFP.The GFP expression was significantly different (P ≤ 0.05) for each concentration of inducing Hg(Ⅱ) ions in the detection range,which reduces the chances of misinterpretation of results.A model using regression method was also derived for the quantification of the concentration of Hg(Ⅱ) in water samples.

  1. Phage specific for Vibrio cholerae O139 Bengal.

    OpenAIRE

    Albert, M J; Bhuiyan, N A; Rahman, A; Ghosh, A. N.; Hultenby, K; Weintraub, A; Nahar, S; Kibriya, A K; Ansaruzzaman, M; Shimada, T

    1996-01-01

    From the stool of a Vibrio cholerae O139 Bengal-infected patient, a phage that specifically lysed capsulated V. cholerae O139 strains only was isolated. The phage is useful for the confirmatory diagnosis of V. cholerae O139 infection and for the differentiation of variants that lack the capsule.

  2. Fluorescent T7 display phages obtained by translational frameshift

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slootweg, E.J.; Keller, H.J.H.G.; Hink, M.A.; Borst, J.W.; Bakker, J.; Schots, A.

    2006-01-01

    Lytic phages form a powerful platform for the display of large cDNA libraries and offer the possibility to screen for interactions with almost any substrate. To visualize these interactions directly by fluorescence microscopy, we constructed fluorescent T7 phages by exploiting the flexibility of pha

  3. Expression of a Thatcher wheat adult plant stem rust resistance QTL on chromosome arm 2BL is enhanced by Lr34

    Science.gov (United States)

    An F6 recombinant inbred line (RIL) spring wheat population derived from RL6071, a stem rust susceptible line and RL6058, a backcross line of Thatcher wheat with Lr34 that is highly resistant to stem rust, was evaluated for adult plant stem rust resistance in North Dakota in 1999, and in Kenya in 20...

  4. Assessment of genetic correlation between bacterial cold water disease resistance and spleen index in a domesticated population of rainbow trout: Identification of QTL on chromosome Omy19

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selective breeding of animals for increased disease resistance is an effective strategy to reduce mortality in aquaculture. However, implementation of selective breeding programs is limited by an incomplete understanding of host resistance traits. We previously reported results of a rainbow trout ...

  5. Two Different Tetracycline Resistance Mechanisms, Plasmid-Carried tet(L) and Chromosomally Located Transposon-Associated tet(M), Coexist in Lactobacillus sakei Rits 9

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ammor, M.S.; Gueimonde, M.; Danielsen, M.; Zagorec, M.; Hoek, van A.H.A.M.; Reyes-Gavilán, de los C.G.; Mayo, B.; Margolles, A.

    2008-01-01

    Lactobacillus sakei is extensively used as functional starter culture in fermented meat products. One of the safety criteria of a starter culture is the absence of potentially transferable antibiotic resistance determinants. However, tetracycline-resistant L. sakei strains have already been observed

  6. Using SNP markers to dissect linkage disequilibrium at a major quantitative trait locus for resistance to the potato cyst nematode Globodera pallida on potato chromosome V

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Achenbach, U.; Caldas Paulo, M.J.; Ilarionova, E.; Lübeck, J.; Strahwald, J.; Tacke, E.; Hofferbert, H.R.

    2009-01-01

    The damage caused by the parasitic root cyst nematode Globodera pallida is a major yield-limiting factor in potato cultivation . Breeding for resistance is facilitated by the PCR-based marker 'HC', which is diagnostic for an allele conferring high resistance against G. pallida pathotype Pa2/3 that h

  7. Antibodies against Pseudomonas aeruginosa chromosomal beta-lactamase inpatients with cystic fibrosis are markers of the development of resistance of P. aeruginosa to beta-lactams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ciofu, O; Giwercman, B; Walter-Rasmussen, J;

    1995-01-01

    infection and was significantly higher (P infected with resistant strains than in those from whom resistant strains were occasionally isolated. The a beta ab levels correlated (r = 0.51, P = 0.0001) with the number of beta-lactam courses. A 14 fold increase in a beta ab...

  8. Typing of Panton-Valentine Leukocidin-Encoding Phages and lukSF-PV Gene Sequence Variation in Staphylococcus aureus from China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Huanqiang; Hu, Fupin; Jin, Shu; Xu, Xiaogang; Zou, Yuhan; Ding, Baixing; He, Chunyan; Gong, Fang; Liu, Qingzhong

    2016-01-01

    Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL, encoded by lukSF-PV genes), a bi-component and pore-forming toxin, is carried by different staphylococcal bacteriophages. The prevalence of PVL in Staphylococcus aureus has been reported around the globe. However, the data on PVL-encoding phage types, lukSF-PV gene variation and chromosomal phage insertion sites for PVL-positive S. aureus are limited, especially in China. In order to obtain a more complete understanding of the molecular epidemiology of PVL-positive S. aureus, an integrated and modified PCR-based scheme was applied to detect the PVL-encoding phage types. Phage insertion locus and the lukSF-PV variant were determined by PCR and sequencing. Meanwhile, the genetic background was characterized by staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) typing, staphylococcal protein A (spa) gene polymorphisms typing, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) typing, accessory gene regulator (agr) locus typing and multilocus sequence typing (MLST). Seventy eight (78/1175, 6.6%) isolates possessed the lukSF-PV genes and 59.0% (46/78) of PVL-positive strains belonged to CC59 lineage. Eight known different PVL-encoding phage types were detected, and Φ7247PVL/ΦST5967PVL (n = 13) and ΦPVL (n = 12) were the most prevalent among them. While 25 (25/78, 32.1%) isolates, belonging to ST30, and ST59 clones, were unable to be typed by the modified PCR-based scheme. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were identified at five locations in the lukSF-PV genes, two of which were non-synonymous. Maximum-likelihood tree analysis of attachment sites sequences detected six SNP profiles for attR and eight for attL, respectively. In conclusion, the PVL-positive S. aureus mainly harbored Φ7247PVL/ΦST5967PVL and ΦPVL in the regions studied. lukSF-PV gene sequences, PVL-encoding phages, and phage insertion locus generally varied with lineages. Moreover, PVL-positive clones that have emerged worldwide likely carry distinct phages. PMID:27536288

  9. Typing of Panton-Valentine Leukocidin-encoding Phages and lukSF-PV Gene Sequence Variation in Staphylococcus aureus from China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huanqiang Zhao

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Panton-Valentine leucocidin (PVL, encoded by lukSF-PV genes, a bi-component and pore-forming toxin, is carried by different staphylococcal bacteriophages. The prevalence of PVL in Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus have been reported around the globe. However, the data on PVL-encoding phage types, lukSF-PV gene variation and chromosomal phage insertion sites for PVL-positive S. aureus are limited, especially in China. In order to obtain a more complete understanding of the molecular epidemiology of PVL-positive S. aureus, an integrated and modified PCR-based scheme was applied to detect the PVL-encoding phage types. Phage insertion locus and the lukSF-PV variant were determined by PCR and sequencing. Meanwhile, the genetic background was characterized by staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec typing, staphylococcal protein A (spa gene polymorphisms typing, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE typing, accessory gene regulator (agr locus typing and multilocus sequence typing (MLST. Seventy eight (78/1175, 6.6% isolates possessed the lukSF-PV genes and 59.0% (46/78 of PVL-positive strains belonged to CC59 lineage. Eight known different PVL-encoding phage types were detected, and Φ7247PVL/ΦST5967PVL (n=13 and ΦPVL (n=12 were the most prevalent among them. While 25 (25/78, 32.1% isolates, belonging to ST30 and ST59 clones, were unable to be typed by the modified PCR-based scheme. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs were identified at five locations in the lukSF-PV genes, two of which were non-synonymous. Maximum-likelihood tree analysis of attachment sites sequences detected six SNP profiles for attR and eight for attL, respectively. In conclusion, the PVL-positive S. aureus mainly harbored Φ7247PVL/ΦST5967PVL and ΦPVL in the regions studied. lukSF-PV gene sequences, PVL-encoding phages and phage insertion locus generally varied with lineages. Moreover, PVL-positive clones that have emerged worldwide likely carry distinct phages.

  10. Phages in the global fruit and vegetable industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Żaczek, M; Weber-Dąbrowska, B; Górski, A

    2015-03-01

    From recent articles, we have learned that phages can constitute a promising alternative in the food industry to eliminate bacterial pathogens from seedlings in greenhouse and field environments, as well as from fresh-cut food products. The fruit and vegetable industry requires quite a different approach than the meat or dairy industry. Several factors can inhibit efficacy of phage treatment such as plant watering or washing ready-to-eat products (water may dilute therapeutic doses), UV irradiation or extensive spreading of phytopathogens by wind, insects or even humans. Spontaneously occurring anomalous weather conditions in different parts of the world also may have an enormous impact on phage persistence in cultivations and on yields. Despite that, some phage preparations are commercially available and, without doubt, are much safer than chemical treatments. Along with increasing worldwide fruit and vegetable consumption, plant diseases and human foodborne illnesses are becoming a serious economic problem, resulting in a focus on optimization of phage treatment. PMID:25410419

  11. Sustainability of virulence in a phage-bacterial ecosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heilmann, Silja; Sneppen, Kim; Krishna, Sandeep

    2010-03-01

    Virulent phages and their bacterial hosts represent an unusual sort of predator-prey system where each time a prey is eaten, hundreds of new predators are born. It is puzzling how, despite the apparent effectiveness of the phage predators, they manage to avoid driving their bacterial prey to extinction. Here we consider a phage-bacterial ecosystem on a two-dimensional (2-d) surface and show that homogeneous space in itself enhances coexistence. We analyze different behavioral mechanisms that can facilitate coexistence in a spatial environment. For example, we find that when the latent times of the phage are allowed to evolve, selection favors "mediocre killers," since voracious phage rapidly deplete local resources and go extinct. Our model system thus emphasizes the differences between short-term proliferation and long-term ecosystem sustainability. PMID:20071588

  12. Phage Particles as Vaccine Delivery Vehicles: Concepts, Applications and Prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari, Narjes; Abediankenari, Saeid

    2015-01-01

    The development of new strategies for vaccine delivery for generating protective and long-lasting immune responses has become an expanding field of research. In the last years, it has been recognized that bacteriophages have several potential applications in the biotechnology and medical fields because of their intrinsic advantages, such as ease of manipulation and large-scale production. Over the past two decades, bacteriophages have gained special attention as vehicles for protein/peptide or DNA vaccine delivery. In fact, whole phage particles are used as vaccine delivery vehicles to achieve the aim of enhanced immunization. In this strategy, the carried vaccine is protected from environmental damage by phage particles. In this review, phage-based vaccine categories and their development are presented in detail, with discussion of the potential of phage-based vaccines for protection against microbial diseases and cancer treatment. Also reviewed are some recent advances in the field of phage- based vaccines.

  13. Possible association between phages, Hoc protein, and the immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabrowska, K; Switała-Jeleń, K; Opolski, A; Górski, A

    2006-02-01

    Mammals have become "an environment" for enterobacterial phage life cycles. Therefore it could be expected that bacteriophages adapt to them. This adaptation must comprise bacteriophage proteins. Gp Hoc seems to have significance neither for phage particle structure nor for phage antibacterial activity. It is evidently not necessary for the "typical" antibacterial actions of bacteriophages. But the rules of evolution make it improbable that gp Hoc really has no function, and non-essential genes of T4-type phages are probably important for phages' adaptation to their particular lifestyle. More interesting is the eukaryotic origin of gp Hoc: a resemblance to immunoglobulin-like proteins that reflects their evolutionary relation. Substantial differences in biological activity between T4 and a mutant that lacks gp Hoc were observed in a mammalian system. Hoc protein seems to be one of the molecules predicted to interact with mammalian organisms and/or modulate these interactions. PMID:16195787

  14. Structural engineering of a phage lysin that targets Gram-negative pathogens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lukacik, Petra; Barnard, Travis J.; Keller, Paul W.; Chaturvedi, Kaveri S.; Seddiki, Nadir; Fairman, James W.; Noinaj, Nicholas; Kirby, Tara L.; Henderson, Jeffrey P.; Steven, Alasdair C.; Hinnebusch, B. Joseph; Buchanan, Susan K. (NIH); (WU-MED)

    2012-11-13

    Bacterial pathogens are becoming increasingly resistant to antibiotics. As an alternative therapeutic strategy, phage therapy reagents containing purified viral lysins have been developed against Gram-positive organisms but not against Gram-negative organisms due to the inability of these types of drugs to cross the bacterial outer membrane. We solved the crystal structures of a Yersinia pestis outer membrane transporter called FyuA and a bacterial toxin called pesticin that targets this transporter. FyuA is a {beta}-barrel membrane protein belonging to the family of TonB dependent transporters, whereas pesticin is a soluble protein with two domains, one that binds to FyuA and another that is structurally similar to phage T4 lysozyme. The structure of pesticin allowed us to design a phage therapy reagent comprised of the FyuA binding domain of pesticin fused to the N-terminus of T4 lysozyme. This hybrid toxin kills specific Yersinia and pathogenic E. coli strains and, importantly, can evade the pesticin immunity protein (Pim) giving it a distinct advantage over pesticin. Furthermore, because FyuA is required for virulence and is more common in pathogenic bacteria, the hybrid toxin also has the advantage of targeting primarily disease-causing bacteria rather than indiscriminately eliminating natural gut flora.

  15. Molecular cloning of bacterial DNA in vivo using a transposable R6K ori and a P1vir phage.

    OpenAIRE

    Stojiljkovic, I; Bozja, J; Salaj-Smic, E

    1994-01-01

    A new method of cloning in vivo using the P1vir phage and transposon Tn5-rpsL oriR6K was developed. The method relies upon recircularization of transducing DNA containing a transposon insertion in a recombination-deficient strain of Escherichia coli K-12 and subsequent stable replication of the recircularized DNA. Using this method, we were able to clone in vivo the chromosomal region located between approximately 7.1 and 9.2 min on the E. coli K-12 map in a 95-kb plasmid.

  16. Dispersal and Survival of Flavobacterium psychrophilum Phages In Vivo in Rainbow Trout and In Vitro under Laboratory Conditions: Implications for Their Use in Phage Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Lone; Bertelsen, Sif K.; Dalsgaard, Inger;

    2013-01-01

    Attention has been drawn to phage therapy as an alternative approach for controlling pathogenic bacteria such as Flavobacterium psychrophilum in salmonid aquaculture, which can give rise to high mortalities, especially in rainbow trout fry. Recently, phages have been isolated with a broad host...... range and a strong lytic potential against pathogenic F. psychrophilum under experimental conditions. However, little is known about the fate of phages at environmental conditions. Here, we quantified the dispersal and fate of F. psychrophilum phages and hosts in rainbow trout fry after intraperitoneal...... injection. Both phages and bacteria were isolated from the fish organs for up to 10 days after injection, and coinjection with both bacteria and phages resulted in a longer persistence of the phage in the fish organs, than when the fish had been injected with the phages only. The occurrence of both phage...

  17. Genomic comparison of Escherichia coli O104:H4 isolates from 2009 and 2011 reveals plasmid, and prophage heterogeneity, including shiga toxin encoding phage stx2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanaa A Ahmed

    Full Text Available In May of 2011, an enteroaggregative Escherichia coli O104:H4 strain that had acquired a Shiga toxin 2-converting phage caused a large outbreak of bloody diarrhea in Europe which was notable for its high prevalence of hemolytic uremic syndrome cases. Several studies have described the genomic inventory and phylogenies of strains associated with the outbreak and a collection of historical E. coli O104:H4 isolates using draft genome assemblies. We present the complete, closed genome sequences of an isolate from the 2011 outbreak (2011C-3493 and two isolates from cases of bloody diarrhea that occurred in the Republic of Georgia in 2009 (2009EL-2050 and 2009EL-2071. Comparative genome analysis indicates that, while the Georgian strains are the nearest neighbors to the 2011 outbreak isolates sequenced to date, structural and nucleotide-level differences are evident in the Stx2 phage genomes, the mer/tet antibiotic resistance island, and in the prophage and plasmid profiles of the strains, including a previously undescribed plasmid with homology to the pMT virulence plasmid of Yersinia pestis. In addition, multiphenotype analysis showed that 2009EL-2071 possessed higher resistance to polymyxin and membrane-disrupting agents. Finally, we show evidence by electron microscopy of the presence of a common phage morphotype among the European and Georgian strains and a second phage morphotype among the Georgian strains. The presence of at least two stx2 phage genotypes in host genetic backgrounds that may derive from a recent common ancestor of the 2011 outbreak isolates indicates that the emergence of stx2 phage-containing E. coli O104:H4 strains probably occurred more than once, or that the current outbreak isolates may be the result of a recent transfer of a new stx2 phage element into a pre-existing stx2-positive genetic background.

  18. Vibrio vulnificus phage PV94 is closely related to temperate phages of V. cholerae and other Vibrio species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Pryshliak

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Vibrio vulnificus is an important pathogen which can cause serious infections in humans. Yet, there is limited knowledge on its virulence factors and the question whether temperate phages might be involved in pathogenicity, as is the case with V. cholerae. Thus far, only two phages (SSP002 and VvAW1 infecting V. vulnificus have been genetically characterized. These phages were isolated from the environment and are not related to Vibrio cholerae phages. The lack of information on temperate V. vulnificus phages prompted us to isolate those phages from lysogenic strains and to compare them with phages of other Vibrio species. RESULTS: In this study the temperate phage PV94 was isolated from a V. vulnificus biotype 1 strain by mitomycin C induction. PV94 is a myovirus whose genome is a linear double-stranded DNA of 33,828 bp with 5'-protruding ends. Sequence analysis of PV94 revealed a modular organization of the genome. The left half of the genome comprising the immunity region and genes for the integrase, terminase and replication proteins shows similarites to V. cholerae kappa phages whereas the right half containing genes for structural proteins is closely related to a prophage residing in V. furnissii NCTC 11218. CONCLUSION: We present the first genomic sequence of a temperate phage isolated from a human V. vulnificus isolate. The sequence analysis of the PV94 genome demonstrates the wide distribution of closely related prophages in various Vibrio species. Moreover, the mosaicism of the PV94 genome indicates a high degree of horizontal genetic exchange within the genus Vibrio, by which V. vulnificus might acquire virulence-associated genes from other species.

  19. PARTIAL CHARACTERIZATION OF A LYTIC METHICILLIN RESISTANT-STAPHYLOCOCCUS AUREUS BACTERIOPHAGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sulaiman Al-Yousef

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A marked increase in the infection incidence caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA strains has been noted in medical practice in recent years. This study was conducted to study the biological and characterize of MRSA-phage. Methicillin resistance of Staphylococcus aureus was detected and confirmed by determining of the MIC of oxacillin by the standard agar dilution method. Phage was biologically purified using single plaque technique, then phage characterization were studied using host range, adsorption time, particle morphology and its structural protein. MRSA phage showing lytic nature was purified by repeated plating after picking of single isolated plaques. This phage is active against all 11 isolates either of S. aureus or MRSA tested as hosts. Phage produced clear plaques indicating their lytic nature. This phage was concentrated employing polyethylene glycol (PEG-NaCl precipitation method. Morphologically, MRSA Phage has a hexagonal head having a long non-contractile tail, indicating his icosahedral nature. Adsorption studies showed 100% adsorption of MRSA-Phage after 35 minutes of exposure. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE experimentation indicated that the phage particles contain one major structural protein (about 30 Kda.

  20. The core oligosaccharide and thioredoxin of Vibrio cholerae are necessary for binding and propagation of its typing phage VP3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jingyun; Li, Wei; Zhang, Qian; Wang, Hongxia; Xu, Xiao; Diao, Baowei; Zhang, Lijuan; Kan, Biao

    2009-04-01

    VP3 is a T7-like phage and was used as one of the typing phages in a phage-biotyping scheme that has been used for the typing of Vibrio cholerae O1 biotype El Tor. Here, we studied the receptor and other host genes of V. cholerae necessary for the lytic propagation of VP3. Six mutants resistant to VP3 infection were obtained from the random transposon insertion mutant bank of the sensitive strain N16961. The genes VC0229 and VC0231, which belong to the wav gene cluster encoding the core oligosaccharide (OS) region of lipopolysaccharide, were found to be interrupted by the transposon in five mutants, and the sixth mutant had the transposon inserted between the genes rhlB and trxA, which encode the ATP-dependent RNA helicase RhlB and thioredoxin, respectively. Gene complementation, transcription analysis, and the loss of VP3 sensitivity by the gene deletion mutants confirmed the relationship between VP3 resistance and VC0229, VC0231, and trxA mutation. The product of VP3 gene 44 (gp44) was predicted to be a tail fiber protein. gp44 could bind to the sensitive wild-type strain and the trxA mutant, but not to VC0229 and VC0231 mutants. The results showed that OS is a VP3 receptor on the surface of N16961, thioredoxin of the host strain is involved in the propagation of the phage, and gp44 is the tail fiber protein of VP3. This revealed the first step in the infection mechanism of the T7-like phage VP3 in V. cholerae.

  1. Phage-based surface plasmon resonance strategies for the detection of pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tawil, Nancy

    MRSA bacteriophages to gold, using several immobilization methods[2]. We found that mixed self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of L-cysteine and MUA permitted oriented positioning of the phages, thus preserving their biofunctionality and their bacterial lysing efficiency. This was due to the formation of uniform cavity islands on the gold surfaces, permitting an oriented positioning of the phages, thus better exposing their recognition proteins towards the medium containing the bacterial hosts. T4 bacteriophages were then used to detect E. coli, while a novel, highly specific phage was isolated, characterized and used to detect MRSA[3]. We found that our technique, combined with the use of SPR permits label-free, real-time, specific, rapid and cost-effective detection of pathogens, for concentrations of 103 colony forming units/milliliter (CFU/mL), in less than 20 minutes. We then turned our attention towards the differential detection of community-acquired MRSA (CA-MRSA), hospital-acquired MRSA (HA-MRSA), methicillin susceptible S. aureus (MSSA), and borderline resistant oxacillin-resistant S. aureus (BORSA), using SPR[4]. We studied two hundred fifty Staphylococcus aureus clinical isolates to determine their susceptibilities to â- lactam antibiotics. A surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor was used to differentiate among CA-MRSA, HA-MRSA, BORSA and MSSA strains by specifically detecting PBP2a, an altered penicilling binding proteins that confers resistance to S. aureus strains, on whole bacterial cells, without labeling, without recourse to PCR or enrichment steps. We found that the system permits, specific detection of pathogens for concentrations as low as 10 CFU/mL. This approach has the advantages of being simple and rapid, allowing for identification of resistant strains of Staphylococcus aureus up to 48 hours earlier than conventional microbiological techniques. This method could have a significant impact on hospital costs, effective infection control, and

  2. Mapping genes on human chromosome 20

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keith, T.; Phipps, P.; Serino, K. [Collaborative Research, Inc., Waltham, MA (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    While a substantial number of genes have been physically localized to human chromosome 20, few have been genetically mapped. In the process of developing a genetic linkage map of chromosome 20, we have mapped microsatellite polymorphisms associated with six genes. Three of these had highly informative polymorphisms (greater than 0.70) that were originally identified by other investigators. These include avian sarcoma oncogene homolog (SRC), ribophorin II (RPN2), and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PCK1). Polymorphisms associated with two genes were determined following a screen of their DNA sequences in GenBank. These include dinucleotide polymorphisms in introl II of cystatin c (CST3) and in the promoter region of neuroendocrine convertase 2 (NEC2) with heterozygosities of 0.52 and 0.54, respectively. A sixth gene, prodynorphin (PDYN) was mapped following the identification of a dinucleotide repeat polymorphism (heterozygosity of 0.35) in a cosmid subclone from a YAC homologous to the original phage clone. CA-positive cosmid subclones from a YAC for an additional gene, guanine nucleotide binding protein, alpha (GNAS10), have been identified and sequencing is in progress. Similar efforts were utilized to identify a microsatellite polymorphism from a half-YAC cloned by W. Brown and localized by FISH to 20pter. This polymorphism is highly informative, with a heterozygosity of 0.83, and serves to delimit the genetic map of the short arm of this chromosome.

  3. Identification of E. coli K12 chromosomal insertion sites of bacteriophage φ297

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAI Jing; CAO Qi-zhi; CHANG Wei-shan

    2005-01-01

    Objective:To identify the specific integration site of prophage φ297 in the host of E. coli K12 chromosome. Methods:Using molecular techniques such as Siebert PCR for walking from the int gene of prophage 297, which is similar to that of phage 933W to an unknown region in genomic DNA. A special adaptor is ligated to the ends of DNA fragments generated by digestion of genomic DNA with restriction enzymes that generates blunt ended fragments. Clone and subclone of PCR products, DNA sequencing and data analysis were used in this study. Results:The attL, attR and the core sequences were determined. The bacterial attachment site of phage φ297 was located in the yecE gene of E. coli K12. Conclusion:The phage φ297 integrates into the yecE gene of the E. coli K12 genome.

  4. Undetected sex chromosome aneuploidy by chromosomal microarray.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markus-Bustani, Keren; Yaron, Yuval; Goldstein, Myriam; Orr-Urtreger, Avi; Ben-Shachar, Shay

    2012-11-01

    We report on a case of a female fetus found to be mosaic for Turner syndrome (45,X) and trisomy X (47,XXX). Chromosomal microarray analysis (CMA) failed to detect the aneuploidy because of a normal average dosage of the X chromosome. This case represents an unusual instance in which CMA may not detect chromosomal aberrations. Such a possibility should be taken into consideration in similar cases where CMA is used in a clinical setting.

  5. Coevolution of CRISPR bacteria and phage in 2 dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Pu; Deem, Michael

    2014-03-01

    CRISPR (cluster regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats) is a newly discovered adaptive, heritable immune system of prokaryotes. It can prevent infection of prokaryotes by phage. Most bacteria and almost all archae have CRISPR. The CRISPR system incorporates short nucleotide sequences from viruses. These incorporated sequences provide a historical record of the host and predator coevolution. We simulate the coevolution of bacteria and phage in 2 dimensions. Each phage has multiple proto-spacers that the bacteria can incorporate. Each bacterium can store multiple spacers in its CRISPR. Phages can escape recognition by the CRISPR system via point mutation or recombination. We will discuss the different evolutionary consequences of point mutation or recombination on the coevolution of bacteria and phage. We will also discuss an intriguing ``dynamic phase transition'' in the number of phage as a function of time and mutation rate. We will show that due to the arm race between phages and bacteria, the frequency of spacers and proto-spacers in a population can oscillate quite rapidly.

  6. Variation of resistance and infectivity between Pseudomonas fluorescens SBW25 and bacteriophage Ф2 and its therapeutic implications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hanchen; Chen; Guohua; Chen

    2015-01-01

    <正>Dear Editor,Studies of the coevolutionary dynamics between Pseudomonas fluorescens SBW25 and bacteriophageФ2 can explore host resistance and parasite infectivity with applications in the ecological and therapeutic fields.Coevolutionary dynamics determine the efficacy of phage-based therapy.In the study described here,bacterial resistance and phage infectivity fluctuated with culture

  7. Adaptation through chromosomal inversions in Anopheles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego eAyala

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Chromosomal inversions have been repeatedly involved in local adaptation in a large number of animals and plants. The ecological and behavioral plasticity of Anopheles species - human malaria vectors - is mirrored by high amounts of polymorphic inversions. The adaptive significance of chromosomal inversions has been consistently attested by strong and significant correlations between their frequencies and a number of phenotypic traits. Here, we provide an extensive literature review of the different adaptive traits associated with chromosomal inversions in the genus Anopheles. Traits having important consequences for the success of present and future vector control measures, such as insecticide resistance and behavioral changes, are discussed.

  8. An anti-tumor protein produced by Trichinella spiralis and identified by screening a T7 phage display library, induces apoptosis in human hepatoma H7402 cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trichinella spiralis infection confers effective resistance to tumor cell expansion. In this study, a T7 phage cDNA display library was constructed to express genes encoded by T. spiralis. Organic phase multi-cell screening was used to sort through candidate proteins in a transfected human chronic m...

  9. Hydroxyapatite chromatography of phage-display virions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, George P; Gingrich, Todd R

    2005-12-01

    Hydroxyapatite column chromatography can be used to purify filamentous bacteriophage--the phage most commonly used for phage display. Virions that have been partially purified from culture supernatant by two cycles of precipitation in 2% polyethylene glycol are adsorbed onto the matrix at a density of at least 7.6 x 10(13) virions (about 3 mg) per milliliter of packed bed volume in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS; 0.15 M NaCl, 5 mM NaH2PO4, pH-adjusted to 7.0 with NaOH). The matrix is washed successively with wash buffer I(150 mM NaCl, 125 mM phosphate, pH 7.0), wash buffer II (2.55 M NaCl, 125 mM phosphate, pH 7.0), and wash buffer I; after which virions are desorbed in desorption buffer (150 mM NaCl, 200 mM phosphate, pH 7.0), and the matrix is stripped with stripping buffer (150 mM NaCl, 1 Mphosphate, pH 7.0). About half of the applied virions are recovered in desorption buffer. Western blot analysis shows that they have undetectable levels of host-derived protein contaminants that are present in the input virions and in virions purified by CsCl equilibrium density gradient centrifugation--the method most commonly used to prepare virions in high purity. Hydroxyapatite chromatography is thus an attractive alternative method for purifying filamentous virions, particularly when the scale is too large for ultracentrifugation to be practical. PMID:16382907

  10. Rapid development in vitro and in vivo of resistance to ceftazidime in biofilm-growing Pseudomonas aeruginosa due to chromosomal beta-lactamase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagge, N; Ciofu, O; Skovgaard, L T;

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the development of resistance of biofilm-growing P. aeruginosa during treatment with ceftazidime. Biofilms were established in vitro using a modified Robbins device (MRD) and in vivo in the rat model of chronic lung infection. Three P. aeruginosa strains...

  11. Development of wheat-Aegilops speltoides recombinants and simple PCR-based markers for stem rust resistance genes on the 2S#1 chromosome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wild relatives of wheat are important but underutilized resources for new rust resistance genes because linked negative traits often hinder deployment of these genes in commercial wheats. Here we report reduced alien chromatin recombinants derived from E.R. Sears' wheat-Aegilops speltoides transloca...

  12. Fetal chromosome analysis: screening for chromosome disease?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Philip, J; Tabor, Ann; Bang, J;

    1983-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the rationale of the current indications for fetal chromosome analysis. 5372 women had 5423 amniocentesis performed, this group constituting a consecutive sample at the chromosome laboratory, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen from March 1973 to September 1980 (Group...... A + B). Pregnant women 35 years of age, women who previously had a chromosomally abnormal child, families with translocation carriers or other heritable chromosomal disease, families where the father was 50 years or more and women in families with a history of Down's syndrome (group A), were compared...... to women having amniocentesis, although considered not to have any increased risk of fetal chromosome abnormality (1390 pregnancies, group B). They were also compared with 750 consecutive pregnancies in women 25-34 years of age, in whom all heritable diseases were excluded (group C). The risk of unbalanced...

  13. Chromosome Disorder Outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... BLOG Join Us Donate You are not alone. Chromosome Disorder Outreach, Inc. is a non-profit organization, ... Support For all those diagnosed with any rare chromosome disorder. Since 1992, CDO has supported the parents ...

  14. Plasmids and packaging cell lines for use in phage display

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradbury, Andrew M.

    2012-07-24

    The invention relates to a novel phagemid display system for packaging phagemid DNA into phagemid particles which completely avoids the use of helper phage. The system of the invention incorporates the use of bacterial packaging cell lines which have been transformed with helper plasmids containing all required phage proteins but not the packaging signals. The absence of packaging signals in these helper plasmids prevents their DNA from being packaged in the bacterial cell, which provides a number of significant advantages over the use of both standard and modified helper phage. Packaged phagemids expressing a protein or peptide of interest, in fusion with a phage coat protein such as g3p, are generated simply by transfecting phagemid into the packaging cell line.

  15. Complete Genome Sequence of the Streptomyces Phage Nanodon

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Streptomyces phage Nanodon is a temperate double-stranded DNA Siphoviridae belonging to cluster BD1. It was isolated from soil collected in Kilauea, HI, using Streptomyces griseus subsp. griseus as a host.

  16. [Inactivation of T4 phage in water environment using proteinase].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lü, Wen-zhou; Yang, Qing-xiang; Zhang, Yu; Yang, Min; Zhu, Chun-fang

    2004-09-01

    The inactivation effectiveness of proteinase to viruses was investigated by using T4 phage as a model virus. The results showed that the inactivation effectiveness of proteinase to T4 phage was obvious. In the optimum conditions and 67.5 u/mL concentration, the inactivation rate of proteinase K to T4 phage in sterilized water and in sewage achieved 99.4% and 49.4% respectively in an hour, and achieved >99.9% and 81.1% in three hours. The inactivation rate of the industrial proteinase 1398 to T4 phage in sterilized water achieved 74.4% in an hour. The effects of pH and temperature on the inactivation effectiveness was not evident.

  17. Sequence analysis of the Lactobacillus temperate phage Sha1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Bo Hyun; Jang, Se Hwan; Chang, Hyo-Ihl

    2011-09-01

    Bacteriophage Sha1, a newly isolated temperate phage from a mitomycin-C-induced lysate of Lactobacillus plantarum isolated from Kimchi, has an isometric head (58 nm × 60 nm) and a long tail (259 nm × 11 nm). The double-strand DNA genome of the phage Sha1 was 41,726 base pairs (bp) long, with a G+C content of 40.61%. Bioinformatic analysis of Sha1 shows that this phage contains 58 putative open reading frames (ORFs). Sha1 can be classified as a member of the large family Siphoviridae by genomic structure and morphology. To our knowledge, this is the first report of genomic sequencing and characterization of temperate phage Sha1 from wild-type L. plantarum isolated from kimchi in Korea. PMID:21701917

  18. Killing cancer cells by targeted drug-carrying phage nanomedicines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yacoby Iftach

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Systemic administration of chemotherapeutic agents, in addition to its anti-tumor benefits, results in indiscriminate drug distribution and severe toxicity. This shortcoming may be overcome by targeted drug-carrying platforms that ferry the drug to the tumor site while limiting exposure to non-target tissues and organs. Results We present a new form of targeted anti-cancer therapy in the form of targeted drug-carrying phage nanoparticles. Our approach is based on genetically-modified and chemically manipulated filamentous bacteriophages. The genetic manipulation endows the phages with the ability to display a host-specificity-conferring ligand. The phages are loaded with a large payload of a cytotoxic drug by chemical conjugation. In the presented examples we used anti ErbB2 and anti ERGR antibodies as targeting moieties, the drug hygromycin conjugated to the phages by a covalent amide bond, or the drug doxorubicin conjugated to genetically-engineered cathepsin-B sites on the phage coat. We show that targeting of phage nanomedicines via specific antibodies to receptors on cancer cell membranes results in endocytosis, intracellular degradation, and drug release, resulting in growth inhibition of the target cells in vitro with a potentiation factor of >1000 over the corresponding free drugs. Conclusion The results of the proof-of concept study presented here reveal important features regarding the potential of filamentous phages to serve as drug-delivery platform, on the affect of drug solubility or hydrophobicity on the target specificity of the platform and on the effect of drug release mechanism on the potency of the platform. These results define targeted drug-carrying filamentous phage nanoparticles as a unique type of antibody-drug conjugates.

  19. Shear-induced assembly of lambda-phage DNA.

    OpenAIRE

    Haber, C.; Wirtz, D

    2000-01-01

    Recombinant DNA technology, which is based on the assembly of DNA fragments, forms the backbone of biological and biomedical research. Here we demonstrate that a uniform shear flow can induce and control the assembly of lambda-phage DNA molecules: increasing shear rates form integral DNA multimers of increasing molecular weight. Spontaneous assembly and grouping of end-blunted lambda-phage DNA molecules are negligible. It is suggested that shear-induced DNA assembly is caused by increasing th...

  20. Properties of Klebsiella Phage P13 and Associated Exopolysaccharide Depolymerase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Yang; LI Guiyang; MO Zhaolan; CHAI Zihan; SHANG Anqi; MOU Haijin

    2014-01-01

    The bacteriophage P13 that infects Klebsiella serotype K13 contains a heat-stable depolymerase capable of effective degradation of exopolysaccharide (EPS) produced by this microorganism. In this study, the titer of phage P13, initially 2.0 × 107 pfu mL-1, was found increasing 20 min after infection and reached 5.0 × 109 pfu mL-1 in 60 min. Accordingly, the enzyme activity of de-polymerase approached the maximum 60 min after infection. Treatment at 70℃for 30 min inactivated all the phage, but retained over 90%of the depolymerase activity. Addition of acetone into the crude phage lysate led to precipitation of the protein, with a marked increase in bacterial EPS degradation activity and a rapid drop in the titer of phage. After partial purification by acetone precipitation and ultrafiltration centrifugation, the enzyme was separated from the phage particles, showing two components with enzyme activity on Q-Sepharose Fast Flow. The soluble enzyme had an optimum degradation activity at 60℃and pH 6.5. Transmission electron mi-croscopy demonstrated that the phage P13 particles were spherical with a diameter of 50 nm and a short stumpy tail. It was a dou-ble-strand DNA virus consisting of a nucleic acid molecule of 45976 bp. This work provides an efficient purification operation in-cluding thermal treatment and ultrafiltration centrifugation, to dissociate depolymerase from phage particles. The characterization of phage P13 and associated EPS depolymerase is beneficial for further application of this enzyme.

  1. Antibody Phage Library Screening Efficiency Measured by KD Values

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Hui-tang; SHAN Ya-ming; TANG Li-li; GAO Li-zeng; WANG Li-ping; LI Wei; LI Yu-xin

    2005-01-01

    An antibody phage library was screened with two target molecules, IFNα-2a and FGFR-GST, and the KD value of each round of panning was measured. It was found that the apparent KD values decreased along with each additional panning round, which indicates the increase of the binding affinity between the phage and the target molecules.This result shows that the KD value is a reliable intrinsic parameter and a new method for screening efficiency detection is thus provided.

  2. Rapid evolutionary dynamics in a 2.8-Mb chromosomal region containing multiple prolamin and resistance gene families in Aegilops tauschii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Lingli; Huo, Naxin; Wang, Yi; Deal, Karin; Wang, Daowen; Hu, Tiezhu; Dvorak, Jan; Anderson, Olin D; Luo, Ming-Cheng; Gu, Yong Q

    2016-09-01

    Prolamin and resistance gene families are important in wheat food use and in defense against pathogen attacks, respectively. To better understand the evolution of these multi-gene families, the DNA sequence of a 2.8-Mb genomic region, representing an 8.8 cM genetic interval and harboring multiple prolamin and resistance-like gene families, was analyzed in the diploid grass Aegilops tauschii, the D-genome donor of bread wheat. Comparison with orthologous regions from rice, Brachypodium, and sorghum showed that the Ae. tauschii region has undergone dramatic changes; it has acquired more than 80 non-syntenic genes and only 13 ancestral genes are shared among these grass species. These non-syntenic genes, including prolamin and resistance-like genes, originated from various genomic regions and likely moved to their present locations via sequence evolution processes involving gene duplication and translocation. Local duplication of non-syntenic genes contributed significantly to the expansion of gene families. Our analysis indicates that the insertion of prolamin-related genes occurred prior to the separation of the Brachypodieae and Triticeae lineages. Unlike in Brachypodium, inserted prolamin genes have rapidly evolved and expanded to encode different classes of major seed storage proteins in Triticeae species. Phylogenetic analyses also showed that the multiple insertions of resistance-like genes and subsequent differential expansion of each R gene family. The high frequency of non-syntenic genes and rapid local gene evolution correlate with the high recombination rate in the 2.8-Mb region with nine-fold higher than the genome-wide average. Our results demonstrate complex evolutionary dynamics in this agronomically important region of Triticeae species.

  3. Primary isolation strain determines both phage type and receptors recognised by Campylobacter jejuni bacteriophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martine C Holst Sørensen

    Full Text Available In this study we isolated novel bacteriophages, infecting the zoonotic bacterium Campylobacter jejuni. These phages may be used in phage therapy of C. jejuni colonized poultry to prevent spreading of the bacteria to meat products causing disease in humans. Many C. jejuni phages have been isolated using NCTC12662 as the indicator strain, which may have biased the selection of phages. A large group of C. jejuni phages rely on the highly diverse capsular polysaccharide (CPS for infection and recent work identified the O-methyl phosphoramidate modification (MeOPN of CPS as a phage receptor. We therefore chose seven C. jejuni strains each expressing different CPS structures as indicator strains in a large screening for phages in samples collected from free-range poultry farms. Forty-three phages were isolated using C. jejuni NCTC12658, NCTC12662 and RM1221 as host strains and 20 distinct phages were identified based on host range analysis and genome restriction profiles. Most phages were isolated using C. jejuni strains NCTC12662 and RM1221 and interestingly phage genome size (140 kb vs. 190 kb, host range and morphological appearance correlated with the isolation strain. Thus, according to C. jejuni phage grouping, NCTC12662 and NCTC12658 selected for CP81-type phages, while RM1221 selected for CP220-type phages. Furthermore, using acapsular ∆kpsM mutants we demonstrated that phages isolated on NCTC12658 and NCTC12662 were dependent on the capsule for infection. In contrast, CP220-type phages isolated on RM1221 were unable to infect non-motile ∆motA mutants, hence requiring motility for successful infection. Hence, the primary phage isolation strain determines both phage type (CP81 or CP220 as well as receptors (CPS or flagella recognised by the isolated phages.

  4. Expression of Pseudomonas aeruginosa transposable phages in Pseudomonas putida cells. I. Establishment of lysogeny and lytic growth efficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Expression of the genomes of Pseudomonas aeruginosa transposable phages (TP) in the cells of a heterologous host, P. putida PpGl, was studied. A high efficiency of TP lytic growth in PpGl cells was obtained both after zygotic induction following RP4::TP plasmid transfer and after thermoinduction of PpGl cells lysogenic for thermoinducible prophage D3112cts15. Characteristic for PpGl cells was a high TP yield (20-25 phage D3112cts15 particles per cell), which was evidence of a high level of TP transposition in cells of this species. The frequency of RP4::TP transfer into PpGl and PA01 cells was equal, but the lysogeny detection rat was somewhat lower in PpGl. Pseudomonas aeruginosa TP can integrate into the PpGl chromosome, producing inducible lysogens. The presence of RP4 is not necessary for the expression of the TP genome in PpGl cells. The D3112cts15 TP may be used for interspecific transduction of plasmids and chromosomal markers

  5. ZEBRAFISH CHROMOSOME-BANDING

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    PIJNACKER, LP; FERWERDA, MA

    1995-01-01

    Banding techniques were carried out on metaphase chromosomes of zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos. The karyotypes with the longest chromosomes consist of 12 metacentrics, 26 submetacentrics, and 12 subtelocentrics (2n = 50). All centromeres are C-band positive. Eight chromosomes have a pericentric C-b

  6. Chromosome painting in plants.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schubert, I.; Fransz, P.F.; Fuchs, J.; Jong, de J.H.

    2001-01-01

    The current 'state-of-art' as to chromosome painting in plants is reviewed. We define different situations described as painting so far: i) Genomic in situ hybridisation (GISH) with total genomic DNA to distinguish alien chromosomes on the basis of divergent dispersed repeats, ii) 'Chromosomal in si

  7. High-throughput analysis of growth differences among phage strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Paul E; Draghi, Jeremy A; Wilpiszeski, Regina

    2012-01-01

    Although methods such as spectrophotometry are useful for identifying growth differences among bacterial strains, it is currently difficult to similarly determine whether bacteriophage strains differ in growth using high throughput methods. Here we use automated spectrophotometry to develop an in vitro method for indirectly distinguishing fitness (growth) differences among virus strains, based on direct measures of their infected bacterial hosts. We used computer simulations of a mathematical model for phage growth to predict which features of bacterial growth curves were best associated with differences in growth among phage strains. We then tested these predictions using the in vitro method to confirm which of the inferred viral growth traits best reflected known fitness differences among genotypes of the RNA phage phi-6, when infecting a Pseudomonas syringae host. Results showed that the inferred phage trait of time-to-extinction (time required to drive bacterial density below detectable optical density) reliably correlated with genotype rankings based on absolute fitness (phage titer per ml). These data suggested that the high-throughput analysis was valuable for identifying growth differences among virus strains, and that the method may be especially useful for high throughput analyses of fitness differences among phage strains cultured and/or evolved in liquid (unstructured) environments. PMID:22101310

  8. Characterisation of a novel enterobacteria phage, CAjan, isolated from rat faeces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carstens, Alexander B; Kot, Witold; Lametsch, Rene; Neve, Horst; Hansen, Lars H

    2016-08-01

    In this study, we describe the isolation and characterisation of the novel enterobacteria phage CAjan. This phage belongs to the order Caudovirales and the family Siphoviridae. The phage possesses a linear, double-stranded DNA genome consisting of 59,670 bp with a G+C content of 44.7 % and 91 predicted open reading frames (ORFs). Putative functions were assigned to 39 of the ORFs (37.4 %). The phage structural genes were furthermore functionally characterised by LC MS/MS. CAjan, together with Escherichia phage Seurat and Escherichia phage slur01, represent a novel and genetically distinct clade of Siphoviridae phages that could be considered to constitute a new phage genus. Despite limited sequence similarity, the phages in this group share a number of other common features, including genome structure and the presence of queuosine biosynthesis genes. PMID:27231007

  9. Chromosomal Islands of Streptococcus pyogenes and related streptococci: Molecular Switches for Survival and Virulence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott Van Nguyen

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pyogenes is a significant pathogen of humans, annually causing over 700,000,000 infections and 500,000 deaths. Virulence in S. pyogenes is closely linked to mobile genetic elements like phages and chromosomal islands (CI. S. pyogenes phage-like chromosomal islands (SpyCI confer a complex mutator phenotype on their host. SpyCI integrate into the 5’ end of DNA mismatch repair (MMR gene mutL, which also disrupts downstream operon genes lmrP, ruvA, and tag. During early logarithmic growth, SpyCI excise from the bacterial chromosome and replicate as episomes, relieving the mutator phenotype. As growth slows and the cells enter stationary phase, SpyCI reintegrate into the chromosome, again silencing the MMR operon. This system creates a unique growth-dependent and reversible mutator phenotype. Additional CI using the identical attachment site in mutL have been identified in related species, including Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis, Streptococcus anginosus, Streptococcus intermedius, Streptococcus parauberis, and Streptococcus canis. These CI have small genomes, which range from 13-20 kB, conserved integrase and DNA replication genes, and no identifiable genes encoding capsid proteins. SpyCI may employ a helper phage for packaging and dissemination in a fashion similar to the Staphylococcus aureus pathogenicity islands (SaPI. Outside of the core replication and integration genes, SpyCI and related CI show considerable diversity with the presence of many indels that may contribute to the host cell phenotype or fitness. SpyCI are a subset of a larger family of streptococcal CI who potentially regulate the expression of other host genes. The biological and phylogenetic analysis of streptococcal chromosomal islands provides important clues as to how these chromosomal islands help S. pyogenes and other streptococcal species persist in human populations in spite of antibiotic therapy and immune challenges.

  10. Chromosomal islands of Streptococcus pyogenes and related streptococci: molecular switches for survival and virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Scott V; McShan, William M

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes is a significant pathogen of humans, annually causing over 700,000,000 infections and 500,000 deaths. Virulence in S. pyogenes is closely linked to mobile genetic elements like phages and chromosomal islands (CI). S. pyogenes phage-like chromosomal islands (SpyCI) confer a complex mutator phenotype on their host. SpyCI integrate into the 5' end of DNA mismatch repair (MMR) gene mutL, which also disrupts downstream operon genes lmrP, ruvA, and tag. During early logarithmic growth, SpyCI excise from the bacterial chromosome and replicate as episomes, relieving the mutator phenotype. As growth slows and the cells enter stationary phase, SpyCI reintegrate into the chromosome, again silencing the MMR operon. This system creates a unique growth-dependent and reversible mutator phenotype. Additional CI using the identical attachment site in mutL have been identified in related species, including Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis, Streptococcus anginosus, Streptococcus intermedius, Streptococcus parauberis, and Streptococcus canis. These CI have small genomes, which range from 13 to 20 kB, conserved integrase and DNA replication genes, and no identifiable genes encoding capsid proteins. SpyCI may employ a helper phage for packaging and dissemination in a fashion similar to the Staphylococcus aureus pathogenicity islands (SaPI). Outside of the core replication and integration genes, SpyCI and related CI show considerable diversity with the presence of many indels that may contribute to the host cell phenotype or fitness. SpyCI are a subset of a larger family of streptococcal CI who potentially regulate the expression of other host genes. The biological and phylogenetic analysis of streptococcal chromosomal islands provides important clues as to how these chromosomal islands help S. pyogenes and other streptococcal species persist in human populations in spite of antibiotic therapy and immune challenges. PMID:25161960

  11. Chromosomal instability determines taxane response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Swanton, C.; Nicke, B.; Schuett, M.;

    2009-01-01

    -positive breast cancer and occurs frequently in basal-like and Her2-positive cases. In diploid cells, but not in chromosomally unstable cells, paclitaxel causes repression of CIN-survival genes, followed by cell death. In the OV01 ovarian cancer clinical trial, a high level of CIN was associated with taxane...... chromosomal instability (CIN). Silencing 22/50 of these genes, many of which are involved in DNA repair, caused cancer cell death, suggesting that these genes are involved in the survival of aneuploid cells. Overexpression of these "CIN-survival'' genes is associated with poor outcome in estrogen receptor...... resistance but carboplatin sensitivity, indicating that CIN may determine MTS response in vivo. Thus, pretherapeutic assessment of CIN may optimize treatment stratification and clinical trial design using these agents....

  12. In vivo damage and recA-dependent repair of plasmid and chromosomal DNA in the radiation-resistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans.

    OpenAIRE

    Daly, M J; Ouyang, L; Fuchs, P.; Minton, K W

    1994-01-01

    Deinococcus radiodurans R1 and other members of this genus share extraordinary resistance to the lethal and mutagenic effects of ionizing radiation. We have recently identified a RecA homolog in strain R1 and have shown that mutation of the corresponding gene causes marked radiosensitivity. We show here that following high-level exposure to gamma irradiation (1.75 megarads, the dose required to yield 37% of CFU for plateau-phase wild-type R1), the wild-type strain repairs > 150 double-strand ...

  13. Using experimental evolution to explore natural patterns between bacterial motility and resistance to bacteriophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koskella, Britt; Taylor, Tiffany B; Bates, Jennifer; Buckling, Angus

    2011-11-01

    Resistance of bacteria to phages may be gained by alteration of surface proteins to which phages bind, a mechanism that is likely to be costly as these molecules typically have critical functions such as movement or nutrient uptake. To address this potential trade-off, we combine a systematic study of natural bacteria and phage populations with an experimental evolution approach. We compare motility, growth rate and susceptibility to local phages for 80 bacteria isolated from horse chestnut leaves and, contrary to expectation, find no negative association between resistance to phages and bacterial motility or growth rate. However, because correlational patterns (and their absence) are open to numerous interpretations, we test for any causal association between resistance to phages and bacterial motility using experimental evolution of a subset of bacteria in both the presence and absence of naturally associated phages. Again, we find no clear link between the acquisition of resistance and bacterial motility, suggesting that for these natural bacterial populations, phage-mediated selection is unlikely to shape bacterial motility, a key fitness trait for many bacteria in the phyllosphere. The agreement between the observed natural pattern and the experimental evolution results presented here demonstrates the power of this combined approach for testing evolutionary trade-offs.

  14. Reduced disease in black abalone following mass mortality: Phage therapy and natural selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanblaricom, Glenn R.

    2014-01-01

    Black abalone, Haliotis cracherodii, populations along the NE Pacific ocean have declined due to the rickettsial disease withering syndrome (WS). Natural recovery on San Nicolas Island (SNI) of Southern California suggested the development of resistance in island populations. Experimental challenges in one treatment demonstrated that progeny of disease-selected black abalone from SNI survived better than did those from naïve black abalone from Carmel Point in mainland coastal central California. Unexpectedly, the presence of a newly observed bacteriophage infecting the WS rickettsia (WS-RLO) had strong effects on the survival of infected abalone. Specifically, presence of phage-infected RLO (RLOv) reduced the host response to infection, RLO infection loads, and associated mortality. These data suggest that the black abalone: WS-RLO relationship is evolving through dual host mechanisms of resistance to RLO infection in the digestive gland via tolerance to infection in the primary target tissue (the post-esophagus) coupled with reduced pathogenicity of the WS-RLO by phage infection, which effectively reduces the infection load in the primary target tissue by half. Sea surface temperature patterns off southern California, associated with a recent hiatus in global-scale ocean warming, do not appear to be a sufficient explanation for survival patterns in SNI black abalone. These data highlight the potential for natural recovery of abalone populations over time and that further understanding of mechanisms governing host–parasite relationships will better enable us to manage declining populations.

  15. Reduced disease in black abalone following mass mortality: Phage therapy and natural selection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolyn S Friedman

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Black abalone, Haliotis cracherodii, populations along the NE Pacific ocean have declined due to the rickettsial disease withering syndrome (WS. Natural recovery on San Nicolas Island (SNI off Southern California suggested the development of resistance in island populations. Experimental challenges in one treatment demonstrated that progeny of disease-selected black abalone from SNI survived better than did those from naïve black abalone from Carmel Point (CP in mainland coastal central California. Unexpectedly, the presence of a newly observed bacteriophage infecting the WS rickettsia (WS-RLO had strong effects on the survival of infected abalone. Specifically, presence of phage-infected RLO (RLOv reduced the host response to infection, RLO infection loads, and associated mortality. These data suggest that the black abalone: WS-RLO relationship is evolving through dual host mechanisms of resistance to RLO infection in the digestive gland via tolerance to infection in the primary target tissue (the post-esophagus coupled with reduced pathogenicity of the WS-RLO by phage infection, which effectively reduces the infection load in the primary target tissue by half. Sea surface temperature patterns off southern California, associated with a recent hiatus in global-scale ocean warming, do not appear to be a sufficient explanation for survival patterns in SNI black abalone. These data highlight the potential for natural recovery of abalone populations over time and that further understanding of mechanisms governing host-parasite relationships will better enable us to manage declining populations.

  16. Effects of antibiotic resistance alleles on bacterial evolutionary responses to viral parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias-Sánchez, Flor I; Hall, Alex R

    2016-05-01

    Antibiotic resistance has wide-ranging effects on bacterial phenotypes and evolution. However, the influence of antibiotic resistance on bacterial responses to parasitic viruses remains unclear, despite the ubiquity of such viruses in nature and current interest in therapeutic applications. We experimentally investigated this by exposing various Escherichia coli genotypes, including eight antibiotic-resistant genotypes and a mutator, to different viruses (lytic bacteriophages). Across 960 populations, we measured changes in population density and sensitivity to viruses, and tested whether variation among bacterial genotypes was explained by their relative growth in the absence of parasites, or mutation rate towards phage resistance measured by fluctuation tests for each phage. We found that antibiotic resistance had relatively weak effects on adaptation to phages, although some antibiotic-resistance alleles impeded the evolution of resistance to phages via growth costs. By contrast, a mutator allele, often found in antibiotic-resistant lineages in pathogenic populations, had a relatively large positive effect on phage-resistance evolution and population density under parasitism. This suggests costs of antibiotic resistance may modify the outcome of phage therapy against pathogenic populations previously exposed to antibiotics, but the effects of any co-occurring mutator alleles are likely to be stronger. PMID:27194288

  17. Effects of antibiotic resistance alleles on bacterial evolutionary responses to viral parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias-Sánchez, Flor I; Hall, Alex R

    2016-05-01

    Antibiotic resistance has wide-ranging effects on bacterial phenotypes and evolution. However, the influence of antibiotic resistance on bacterial responses to parasitic viruses remains unclear, despite the ubiquity of such viruses in nature and current interest in therapeutic applications. We experimentally investigated this by exposing various Escherichia coli genotypes, including eight antibiotic-resistant genotypes and a mutator, to different viruses (lytic bacteriophages). Across 960 populations, we measured changes in population density and sensitivity to viruses, and tested whether variation among bacterial genotypes was explained by their relative growth in the absence of parasites, or mutation rate towards phage resistance measured by fluctuation tests for each phage. We found that antibiotic resistance had relatively weak effects on adaptation to phages, although some antibiotic-resistance alleles impeded the evolution of resistance to phages via growth costs. By contrast, a mutator allele, often found in antibiotic-resistant lineages in pathogenic populations, had a relatively large positive effect on phage-resistance evolution and population density under parasitism. This suggests costs of antibiotic resistance may modify the outcome of phage therapy against pathogenic populations previously exposed to antibiotics, but the effects of any co-occurring mutator alleles are likely to be stronger.

  18. Nanoscale bacteriophage biosensors beyond phage display.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jong-Wook; Song, Jangwon; Hwang, Mintai P; Lee, Kwan Hyi

    2013-01-01

    Bacteriophages are traditionally used for the development of phage display technology. Recently, their nanosized dimensions and ease with which genetic modifications can be made to their structure and function have put them in the spotlight towards their use in a variety of biosensors. In particular, the expression of any protein or peptide on the extraluminal surface of bacteriophages is possible by genetically engineering the genome. In addition, the relatively short replication time of bacteriophages offers researchers the ability to generate mass quantities of any given bacteriophage-based biosensor. Coupled with the emergence of various biomarkers in the clinic as a means to determine pathophysiological states, the development of current and novel technologies for their detection and quantification is imperative. In this review, we categorize bacteriophages by their morphology into M13-based filamentous bacteriophages and T4- or T7-based icosahedral bacteriophages, and examine how such advantages are utilized across a variety of biosensors. In essence, we take a comprehensive approach towards recent trends in bacteriophage-based biosensor applications and discuss their outlook with regards to the field of biotechnology.

  19. Nanoscale bacteriophage biosensors beyond phage display

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee JW

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Jong-Wook Lee,1 Jangwon Song,1,2 Mintai P Hwang,1 Kwan Hyi Lee1,2 1Center for Biomaterials, Biomedical Research Institute, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul, Korea; 2Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Science and Technology, Seoul, Korea Abstract: Bacteriophages are traditionally used for the development of phage display technology. Recently, their nanosized dimensions and ease with which genetic modifications can be made to their structure and function have put them in the spotlight towards their use in a variety of biosensors. In particular, the expression of any protein or peptide on the extraluminal surface of bacteriophages is possible by genetically engineering the genome. In addition, the relatively short replication time of bacteriophages offers researchers the ability to generate mass quantities of any given bacteriophage-based biosensor. Coupled with the emergence of various biomarkers in the clinic as a means to determine pathophysiological states, the development of current and novel technologies for their detection and quantification is imperative. In this review, we categorize bacteriophages by their morphology into M13-based filamentous bacteriophages and T4- or T7-based icosahedral bacteriophages, and examine how such advantages are utilized across a variety of biosensors. In essence, we take a comprehensive approach towards recent trends in bacteriophage-based biosensor applications and discuss their outlook with regards to the field of biotechnology. Keywords: biosensing, M13 bacteriophage, T4 bacteriophage, bacterial detection, Escherichia coli, SPR sensor

  20. Chimpanzee chromosome 12 is homologous to human chromosome 2q

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, N. C.; Sun, C. R.Y.; Ho, T.

    1977-01-01

    Most of the 46 human chromosomes find their counterparts in the 48 chimpanzee chromosomes except for chromosome 2 which has been hypothesized to have been derived from a centric fusion of two chimpanzee acrocentric chromosomes. These two chromosomes correspond to the human chromosomes 2p and 2g. This conclusion is based primarily on chromosome banding techniques, and the somatic cell hybridization technique has also been used. (HLW)

  1. Activation of mRNA translation by phage protein and low temperature: the case of Lactococcus lactis abortive infection system AbiD1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehrlich S Dusko

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Abortive infection (Abi mechanisms comprise numerous strategies developed by bacteria to avoid being killed by bacteriophage (phage. Escherichia coli Abis are considered as mediators of programmed cell death, which is induced by infecting phage. Abis were also proposed to be stress response elements, but no environmental activation signals have yet been identified. Abis are widespread in Lactococcus lactis, but regulation of their expression remains an open question. We previously showed that development of AbiD1 abortive infection against phage bIL66 depends on orf1, which is expressed in mid-infection. However, molecular basis for this activation remains unclear. Results In non-infected AbiD1+ cells, specific abiD1 mRNA is unstable and present in low amounts. It does not increase during abortive infection of sensitive phage. Protein synthesis directed by the abiD1 translation initiation region is also inefficient. The presence of the phage orf1 gene, but not its mutant AbiD1R allele, strongly increases abiD1 translation efficiency. Interestingly, cell growth at low temperature also activates translation of abiD1 mRNA and consequently the AbiD1 phenotype, and occurs independently of phage infection. There is no synergism between the two abiD1 inducers. Purified Orf1 protein binds mRNAs containing a secondary structure motif, identified within the translation initiation regions of abiD1, the mid-infection phage bIL66 M-operon, and the L. lactis osmC gene. Conclusion Expression of the abiD1 gene and consequently AbiD1 phenotype is specifically translationally activated by the phage Orf1 protein. The loss of ability to activate translation of abiD1 mRNA determines the molecular basis for phage resistance to AbiD1. We show for the first time that temperature downshift also activates abortive infection by activation of abiD1 mRNA translation.

  2. Ricin Detection Using Phage Displayed Single Domain Antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellen R. Goldman

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Phage-displayed single domain antibodies (sdAb were compared to monomeric solubly expressed sdAb and llama polyclonal antibodies for the detection of ricin. SdAb are comprised of the variable domain derived from camelid heavy chain only antibodies (HcAb. Although HcAb lack variable light chains, they as well as their derivative sdAb are able to bind antigens with high affinity. The small size of sdAb (~16 kDa, while advantageous in many respects, limits the number of labels that can be incorporated. The ability to incorporate multiple labels is a beneficial attribute for reporter elements. Opportunely, sdAb are often selected using phage display methodology. Using sdAb displayed on bacteriophage M13 as the reporter element gives the potential for incorporating a very high number of labels. We have demonstrated the use of both sdAb and phage- displayed sdAb for the detection of ricin using both enzyme linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs and Luminex fluid array assays. The phage-displayed sdAb led to five to ten fold better detection of ricin in both the ELISA and Luminex assays, resulting in limits of detection of 1 ng/mL and 64 pg/mL respectively. The phage-displayed sdAb were also dramatically more effective for the visualization of binding to target in nitrocellulose dot blot assays, a method frequently used for epitope mapping.

  3. Exploring the mycobacteriophage metaproteome: phage genomics as an educational platform.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graham F Hatfull

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Bacteriophages are the most abundant forms of life in the biosphere and carry genomes characterized by high genetic diversity and mosaic architectures. The complete sequences of 30 mycobacteriophage genomes show them collectively to encode 101 tRNAs, three tmRNAs, and 3,357 proteins belonging to 1,536 "phamilies" of related sequences, and a statistical analysis predicts that these represent approximately 50% of the total number of phamilies in the mycobacteriophage population. These phamilies contain 2.19 proteins on average; more than half (774 of them contain just a single protein sequence. Only six phamilies have representatives in more than half of the 30 genomes, and only three-encoding tape-measure proteins, lysins, and minor tail proteins-are present in all 30 phages, although these phamilies are themselves highly modular, such that no single amino acid sequence element is present in all 30 mycobacteriophage genomes. Of the 1,536 phamilies, only 230 (15% have amino acid sequence similarity to previously reported proteins, reflecting the enormous genetic diversity of the entire phage population. The abundance and diversity of phages, the simplicity of phage isolation, and the relatively small size of phage genomes support bacteriophage isolation and comparative genomic analysis as a highly suitable platform for discovery-based education.

  4. Nongenetic individuality in the host-phage interaction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sivan Pearl

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Isogenic bacteria can exhibit a range of phenotypes, even in homogeneous environmental conditions. Such nongenetic individuality has been observed in a wide range of biological processes, including differentiation and stress response. A striking example is the heterogeneous response of bacteria to antibiotics, whereby a small fraction of drug-sensitive bacteria can persist under extensive antibiotic treatments. We have previously shown that persistent bacteria enter a phenotypic state, identified by slow growth or dormancy, which protects them from the lethal action of antibiotics. Here, we studied the effect of persistence on the interaction between Escherichia coli and phage lambda. We used long-term time-lapse microscopy to follow the expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP under the phage lytic promoter, as well as cellular fate, in single infected bacteria. Intriguingly, we found that, whereas persistent bacteria are protected from prophage induction, they are not protected from lytic infection. Quantitative analysis of gene expression reveals that the expression of lytic genes is suppressed in persistent bacteria. However, when persistent bacteria switch to normal growth, the infecting phage resumes the process of gene expression, ultimately causing cell lysis. Using mathematical models for these two host-phage interactions, we found that the bacteria's nongenetic individuality can significantly affect the population dynamics, and might be relevant for understanding the coevolution of bacterial hosts and phages.

  5. Molecular mapping of chromosomes 17 and X. Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barker, D.F.

    1991-01-15

    Progress toward the construction of high density genetic maps of chromosomes 17 and X has been made by isolating and characterizing a relatively large set of polymorphic probes for each chromosome and using these probes to construct genetic maps. We have mapped the same polymorphic probes against a series of chromosome breakpoints on X and 17. The probes could be assigned to over 30 physical intervals on the X chromosome and 7 intervals on 17. In many cases, this process resulted in improved characterization of the relative locations of the breakpoints with respect to each other and the definition of new physical intervals. The strategy for isolation of the polymorphic clones utilized chromosome specific libraries of 1--15 kb segments from each of the two chromosomes. From these libraries, clones were screened for those detecting restriction fragment length polymorphisms. The markers were further characterized, the chromosomal assignments confirmed and in most cases segments of the original probes were subcloned into plasmids to produce probes with improved signal to noise ratios for use in the genetic marker studies. The linkage studies utilize the CEPH reference families and other well-characterized families in our collection which have been used for genetic disease linkage work. Preliminary maps and maps of portions of specific regions of 17 and X are provided. We have nearly completed a map of the 1 megabase Mycoplasma arthritidis genome by applying these techniques to a lambda phage library of its genome. We have found bit mapping to be an efficient means to organize a contiguous set of overlapping@ clones from a larger genome.

  6. The Precarious Prokaryotic Chromosome

    OpenAIRE

    Kuzminov, Andrei

    2014-01-01

    Evolutionary selection for optimal genome preservation, replication, and expression should yield similar chromosome organizations in any type of cells. And yet, the chromosome organization is surprisingly different between eukaryotes and prokaryotes. The nuclear versus cytoplasmic accommodation of genetic material accounts for the distinct eukaryotic and prokaryotic modes of genome evolution, but it falls short of explaining the differences in the chromosome organization. I propose that the t...

  7. Characterization of a novel arginine catabolic mobile element (ACME) and staphylococcal chromosomal cassette mec composite island with significant homology to Staphylococcus epidermidis ACME type II in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus genotype ST22-MRSA-IV.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Shore, Anna C

    2011-05-01

    The arginine catabolic mobile element (ACME) is prevalent among methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) isolates of sequence type 8 (ST8) and staphylococcal chromosomal cassette mec (SCCmec) type IVa (USA300) (ST8-MRSA-IVa isolates), and evidence suggests that ACME enhances the ability of ST8-MRSA-IVa to grow and survive on its host. ACME has been identified in a small number of isolates belonging to other MRSA clones but is widespread among coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS). This study reports the first description of ACME in two distinct strains of the pandemic ST22-MRSA-IV clone. A total of 238 MRSA isolates recovered in Ireland between 1971 and 2008 were investigated for ACME using a DNA microarray. Twenty-three isolates (9.7%) were ACME positive, and all were either MRSA genotype ST8-MRSA-IVa (7\\/23, 30%) or MRSA genotype ST22-MRSA-IV (16\\/23, 70%). Whole-genome sequencing and comprehensive molecular characterization revealed the presence of a novel 46-kb ACME and staphylococcal chromosomal cassette mec (SCCmec) composite island (ACME\\/SCCmec-CI) in ST22-MRSA-IVh isolates (n=15). This ACME\\/SCCmec-CI consists of a 12-kb DNA region previously identified in ACME type II in S. epidermidis ATCC 12228, a truncated copy of the J1 region of SCCmec type I, and a complete SCCmec type IVh element. The composite island has a novel genetic organization, with ACME located within orfX and SCCmec located downstream of ACME. One PVL locus-positive ST22-MRSA-IVa isolate carried ACME located downstream of SCCmec type IVa, as previously described in ST8-MRSA-IVa. These results suggest that ACME has been acquired by ST22-MRSA-IV on two independent occasions. At least one of these instances may have involved horizontal transfer and recombination events between MRSA and CoNS. The presence of ACME may enhance dissemination of ST22-MRSA-IV, an already successful MRSA clone.

  8. Ring chromosome 13

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, C A; Hertz, Jens Michael; Petersen, M B;

    1992-01-01

    A stillborn male child with anencephaly and multiple malformations was found to have the karyotype 46,XY,r(13) (p11q21.1). The breakpoint at 13q21.1, determined by high resolution banding, is the most proximal breakpoint ever reported in patients with ring chromosome 13. In situ hybridisation...... with the probe L1.26 confirmed the derivation from chromosome 13 and DNA polymorphism analysis showed maternal origin of the ring chromosome. Our results, together with a review of previous reports of cases with ring chromosome 13 with identified breakpoints, could neither support the theory of distinct clinical...

  9. Understanding the enormous diversity of bacteriophages: the tailed phages that infect the bacterial family Enterobacteriaceae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grose, Julianne H.; Casjens, Sherwood R.

    2014-01-01

    Bacteriophages are the predominant biological entity on the planet. The recent explosion of sequence information has made estimates of their diversity possible. We describe the genomic comparison of 337 fully sequenced tailed phages isolated on 18 genera and 31 species of bacteria in the Enterobacteriaceae. These phages were largely unambiguously grouped into 56 diverse clusters (32 lytic and 24 temperate) that have syntenic similarity over >50% of the genomes within each cluster, but substantially less sequence similarity between clusters. Most clusters naturally break into sets of more closely related subclusters, 78% of which are correlated with their host genera. The largest groups of related phages are superclusters united by genome synteny to lambda (81 phages) and T7 (51 phages). This study forms a robust framework for understanding diversity and evolutionary relationships of existing tailed phages, for relating newly discovered phages and for determining host/phage relationships. PMID:25240328

  10. Evolutionary relationships among diverse bacteriophages and prophages: all the world's a phage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrix, R W; Smith, M C; Burns, R N; Ford, M E; Hatfull, G F

    1999-03-01

    We report DNA and predicted protein sequence similarities, implying homology, among genes of double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) bacteriophages and prophages spanning a broad phylogenetic range of host bacteria. The sequence matches reported here establish genetic connections, not always direct, among the lambdoid phages of Escherichia coli, phage phiC31 of Streptomyces, phages of Mycobacterium, a previously unrecognized cryptic prophage, phiflu, in the Haemophilus influenzae genome, and two small prophage-like elements, phiRv1 and phiRv2, in the genome of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The results imply that these phage genes, and very possibly all of the dsDNA tailed phages, share common ancestry. We propose a model for the genetic structure and dynamics of the global phage population in which all dsDNA phage genomes are mosaics with access, by horizontal exchange, to a large common genetic pool but in which access to the gene pool is not uniform for all phage.

  11. Understanding the enormous diversity of bacteriophages: the tailed phages that infect the bacterial family Enterobacteriaceae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grose, Julianne H; Casjens, Sherwood R

    2014-11-01

    Bacteriophages are the predominant biological entity on the planet. The recent explosion of sequence information has made estimates of their diversity possible. We describe the genomic comparison of 337 fully sequenced tailed phages isolated on 18 genera and 31 species of bacteria in the Enterobacteriaceae. These phages were largely unambiguously grouped into 56 diverse clusters (32 lytic and 24 temperate) that have syntenic similarity over >50% of the genomes within each cluster, but substantially less sequence similarity between clusters. Most clusters naturally break into sets of more closely related subclusters, 78% of which are correlated with their host genera. The largest groups of related phages are superclusters united by genome synteny to lambda (81 phages) and T7 (51 phages). This study forms a robust framework for understanding diversity and evolutionary relationships of existing tailed phages, for relating newly discovered phages and for determining host/phage relationships.

  12. Cryptic single-stranded-DNA binding activities of the phage λ P and Escherichia coli DnaC replication initiation proteins facilitate the transfer of E. coli DnaB helicase onto DNA

    OpenAIRE

    Learn, Brian A.; Um, Soo-Jong; Huang, Li; McMacken, Roger

    1997-01-01

    The bacteriophage λ P and Escherichia coli DnaC proteins are known to recruit the bacterial DnaB replicative helicase to initiator complexes assembled at the phage and bacterial origins, respectively. These specialized nucleoprotein assemblies facilitate the transfer of one or more molecules of DnaB helicase onto the chromosome; the transferred DnaB, in turn, promotes establishment of a processive replication fork apparatus. To learn more about the mechanism of the DnaB transfer reaction, we ...

  13. Biochemical functionalization of peptide nanotubes with phage displayed peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swaminathan, Swathi; Cui, Yue

    2016-09-01

    The development of a general approach for the biochemical functionalization of peptide nanotubes (PNTs) could open up existing opportunities in both fundamental studies as well as a variety of applications. PNTs are spontaneously assembled organic nanostructures made from peptides. Phage display has emerged as a powerful approach for identifying selective peptide binding motifs. Here, we demonstrate for the first time the biochemical functionalization of PNTs via peptides identified from a phage display peptide library. The phage-displayed peptides are shown to recognize PNTs. These advances further allow for the development of bifunctional peptides for the capture of bacteria and the self-assembly of silver particles onto PNTs. We anticipate that these results could provide significant opportunities for using PNTs in both fundamental studies and practical applications, including sensors and biosensors nanoelectronics, energy storage devices, drug delivery, and tissue engineering.

  14. Biochemical functionalization of peptide nanotubes with phage displayed peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swaminathan, Swathi; Cui, Yue

    2016-09-01

    The development of a general approach for the biochemical functionalization of peptide nanotubes (PNTs) could open up existing opportunities in both fundamental studies as well as a variety of applications. PNTs are spontaneously assembled organic nanostructures made from peptides. Phage display has emerged as a powerful approach for identifying selective peptide binding motifs. Here, we demonstrate for the first time the biochemical functionalization of PNTs via peptides identified from a phage display peptide library. The phage-displayed peptides are shown to recognize PNTs. These advances further allow for the development of bifunctional peptides for the capture of bacteria and the self-assembly of silver particles onto PNTs. We anticipate that these results could provide significant opportunities for using PNTs in both fundamental studies and practical applications, including sensors and biosensors nanoelectronics, energy storage devices, drug delivery, and tissue engineering. PMID:27479451

  15. Characterization and Comparative Genomic Analyses of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Phage PaoP5: New Members Assigned to PAK_P1-like Viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Mengyu; Le, Shuai; Jin, Xiaolin; Li, Gang; Tan, Yinling; Li, Ming; Zhao, Xia; Shen, Wei; Yang, Yuhui; Wang, Jing; Zhu, Hongbin; Li, Shu; Rao, Xiancai; Hu, Fuquan; Lu, Shuguang

    2016-01-01

    As a potential alternative to antibiotics, phages can be used to treat multi-drug resistant bacteria. As such, the biological characteristics of phages should be investigated to utilize them as effective antimicrobial agents. In this study, phage PaoP5, a lytic virus that infects Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1, was isolated and genomically characterized. PaoP5 comprises an icosahedral head with an apex diameter of 69 nm and a contractile tail with a length of 120 nm. The PaoP5 genome is a linear dsDNA molecule containing 93,464 base pairs (bp) with 49.51% G + C content of 11 tRNA genes and a 1,200 bp terminal redundancy. A total of 176 protein-coding genes were predicted in the PaoP5 genome. Nine PaoP5 structural proteins were identified. Three hypothetical proteins were determined as structural. Comparative genomic analyses revealed that seven new Pseudomonas phages, namely, PaoP5, K8, C11, vB_PaeM_C2-10_Ab02, vB_PaeM_C2-10_Ab08, vB_PaeM_C2-10_Ab10, and vB_PaeM_C2-10_Ab15, were similar to PAK_P1-like viruses. Phylogenetic and pan-genome analyses suggested that the new phages should be assigned to PAK_P1-like viruses, which possess approximately 100 core genes and 150 accessory genes. This work presents a detailed and comparative analysis of PaoP5 to enhance our understanding of phage biology. PMID:27659070

  16. Genetic evidence for the involvement of the S-layer protein gene sap and the sporulation genes spo0A, spo0B, and spo0F in Phage AP50c infection of Bacillus anthracis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plaut, Roger D; Beaber, John W; Zemansky, Jason; Kaur, Ajinder P; George, Matroner; Biswas, Biswajit; Henry, Matthew; Bishop-Lilly, Kimberly A; Mokashi, Vishwesh; Hannah, Ryan M; Pope, Robert K; Read, Timothy D; Stibitz, Scott; Calendar, Richard; Sozhamannan, Shanmuga

    2014-03-01

    In order to better characterize the Bacillus anthracis typing phage AP50c, we designed a genetic screen to identify its bacterial receptor. Insertions of the transposon mariner or targeted deletions of the structural gene for the S-layer protein Sap and the sporulation genes spo0A, spo0B, and spo0F in B. anthracis Sterne resulted in phage resistance with concomitant defects in phage adsorption and infectivity. Electron microscopy of bacteria incubated with AP50c revealed phage particles associated with the surface of bacilli of the Sterne strain but not with the surfaces of Δsap, Δspo0A, Δspo0B, or Δspo0F mutants. The amount of Sap in the S layer of each of the spo0 mutant strains was substantially reduced compared to that of the parent strain, and incubation of AP50c with purified recombinant Sap led to a substantial reduction in phage activity. Phylogenetic analysis based on whole-genome sequences of B. cereus sensu lato strains revealed several closely related B. cereus and B. thuringiensis strains that carry sap genes with very high similarities to the sap gene of B. anthracis. Complementation of the Δsap mutant in trans with the wild-type B. anthracis sap or the sap gene from either of two different B. cereus strains that are sensitive to AP50c infection restored phage sensitivity, and electron microscopy confirmed attachment of phage particles to the surface of each of the complemented strains. Based on these data, we postulate that Sap is involved in AP50c infectivity, most likely acting as the phage receptor, and that the spo0 genes may regulate synthesis of Sap and/or formation of the S layer.

  17. The diverse genetic switch of enterobacterial and marine telomere phages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammerl, Jens A; Jäckel, Claudia; Funk, Eugenia; Pinnau, Sabrina; Mache, Christin; Hertwig, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Temperate bacteriophages possess a genetic switch which regulates the lytic and lysogenic cycle. The genomes of the enterobacterial telomere phages N15, PY54 and ϕKO2 harbor a primary immunity region (immB) comprising genes for the prophage repressor, the lytic repressor and a putative antiterminator, similar to CI, Cro and Q of lambda, respectively. Moreover, N15 and ϕKO2 contain 3 related operator (OR) sites between cI and cro, while only one site (OR3) has been detected in PY54. Marine telomere phages possess a putative cI gene but not a cro-like gene. Instead, a gene is located at the position of cro, whose product shows some similarity to the PY54 ORF42 product, the function of which is unknown. We have determined the transcription start sites of the predicted repressor genes of N15, PY54, ϕKO2 and of the marine telomere phage VP58.5. The influence of the genes on phage propagation was analyzed in E. coli, Y. enterocolitica and V.parahaemolyticus. We show that the repressors and antiterminators of N15, ϕKO2 and PY54 exerted their predicted activities. However, while the proteins of both N15 and ϕKO2 affected lysis and lysogeny by N15, they did not affect PY54 propagation. On the other hand, the respective PY54 proteins exclusively influenced the propagation of this phage. The immB region of VP58.5 contains 2 genes that revealed prophage repressor activity, while a lytic repressor gene could not be identified. The results indicate an unexpected diversity of the growth regulation mechanisms in these temperate phages.

  18. Primary Isolation Strain Determines Both Phage Type and Receptors Recognised by Campylobacter jejuni Bacteriophages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Martine C. Holst; Gencay, Yilmaz Emre; Birk, Tina;

    2015-01-01

    In this study we isolated novel bacteriophages, infecting the zoonotic bacterium Campylobacter jejuni. These phages may be used in phage therapy of C. jejuni colonized poultry to prevent spreading of the bacteria to meat products causing disease in humans. Many C. jejuni phages have been isolated...

  19. Phage mutations in response to CRISPR diversification in a bacterial population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Christine L; Barrangou, Rodolphe; Thomas, Brian C; Horvath, Philippe; Fremaux, Christophe; Banfield, Jillian F

    2013-02-01

    Interactions between bacteria and their coexisting phage populations impact evolution and can strongly influence biogeochemical processes in natural ecosystems. Periodically, mutation or migration results in exposure of a host to a phage to which it has no immunity; alternatively, a phage may be exposed to a host it cannot infect. To explore the processes by which coexisting, co-evolving hosts and phage populations establish, we cultured Streptococcus thermophilus DGCC7710 with phage 2972 and tracked CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats) diversification and host-phage co-evolution in a population derived from a colony that acquired initial CRISPR-encoded immunity. After 1 week of co-culturing, the coexisting host-phage populations were metagenomically characterized using 454 FLX Titanium sequencing. The evolved genomes were compared with reference genomes to identify newly incorporated spacers in S. thermophilus DGCC7710 and recently acquired single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in phage 2972. Following phage exposure, acquisition of immune elements (spacers) led to a genetically diverse population with multiple subdominant strain lineages. Phage mutations that circumvented three early immunization events were localized in the proto-spacer adjacent motif (PAM) or near the PAM end of the proto-spacer, suggesting a strong selective advantage for the phage that mutated in this region. The sequential fixation or near fixation of these single mutations indicates selection events so severe that single phage genotypes ultimately gave rise to all surviving lineages and potentially carried traits unrelated to immunity to fixation.

  20. Phage mutations in response to CRISPR diversification in a bacterial population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Christine L; Barrangou, Rodolphe; Thomas, Brian C; Horvath, Philippe; Fremaux, Christophe; Banfield, Jillian F

    2013-02-01

    Interactions between bacteria and their coexisting phage populations impact evolution and can strongly influence biogeochemical processes in natural ecosystems. Periodically, mutation or migration results in exposure of a host to a phage to which it has no immunity; alternatively, a phage may be exposed to a host it cannot infect. To explore the processes by which coexisting, co-evolving hosts and phage populations establish, we cultured Streptococcus thermophilus DGCC7710 with phage 2972 and tracked CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats) diversification and host-phage co-evolution in a population derived from a colony that acquired initial CRISPR-encoded immunity. After 1 week of co-culturing, the coexisting host-phage populations were metagenomically characterized using 454 FLX Titanium sequencing. The evolved genomes were compared with reference genomes to identify newly incorporated spacers in S. thermophilus DGCC7710 and recently acquired single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in phage 2972. Following phage exposure, acquisition of immune elements (spacers) led to a genetically diverse population with multiple subdominant strain lineages. Phage mutations that circumvented three early immunization events were localized in the proto-spacer adjacent motif (PAM) or near the PAM end of the proto-spacer, suggesting a strong selective advantage for the phage that mutated in this region. The sequential fixation or near fixation of these single mutations indicates selection events so severe that single phage genotypes ultimately gave rise to all surviving lineages and potentially carried traits unrelated to immunity to fixation. PMID:23057534

  1. Multidimensional metrics for estimating phage abundance, distribution, gene density, and sequence coverage in metagenomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramy Karam Aziz

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Phages are the most abundant biological entities on Earth and play major ecological roles, yet the current sequenced phage genomes do not adequately represent their diversity, and little is known about the abundance and distribution of these sequenced genomes in nature. Although the study of phage ecology has benefited tremendously from the emergence of metagenomic sequencing, a systematic survey of phage genes and genomes in various ecosystems is still lacking, and fundamental questions about phage biology, lifestyle, and ecology remain unanswered. To address these questions and improve comparative analysis of phages in different metagenomes, we screened a core set of publicly available metagenomic samples for sequences related to completely sequenced phages using the web tool, Phage Eco-Locator. We then adopted and deployed an array of mathematical and statistical metrics for a multidimensional estimation of the abundance and distribution of phage genes and genomes in various ecosystems. Experiments using those metrics individually showed their usefulness in emphasizing the pervasive, yet uneven, distribution of known phage sequences in environmental metagenomes. Using these metrics in combination allowed us to resolve phage genomes into clusters that correlated with their genotypes and taxonomic classes as well as their ecological properties. We propose adding this set of metrics to current metaviromic analysis pipelines, where they can provide insight regarding phage mosaicism, habitat specificity, and evolution.

  2. Selective posttranslational modification of phage-displayed polypeptides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsao, Meng-Lin; Tian, Feng; Schultz, Peter

    2013-11-19

    The invention relates to posttranslational modification of phage-displayed polypeptides. These displayed polypeptides comprise at least one unnatural amino acid, e.g., an aryl-azide amino acid such as p-azido-L-phenylalanine, or an alkynyl-amino acid such as para-propargyloxyphenylalanine, which are incorporated into the phage-displayed fusion polypeptide at a selected position by using an in vivo orthogonal translation system comprising a suitable orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase and a suitable orthogonal tRNA species. These unnatural amino acids advantageously provide targets for posttranslational modifications such as azide-alkyne [3+2] cycloaddition reactions and Staudinger modifications.

  3. Selective posttranslational modification of phage-displayed polypeptides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsao, Meng-Lin; Tian, Feng; Schultz, Peter

    2013-02-05

    The invention relates to posttranslational modification of phage-displayed polypeptides. These displayed polypeptides comprise at least one unnatural amino acid, e.g., an aryl-azide amino acid such as p-azido-L-phenylalanine, or an alkynyl-amino acid such as para-propargyloxyphenylalanine, which are incorporated into the phage-displayed fusion polypeptide at a selected position by using an in vivo orthogonal translation system comprising a suitable orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase and a suitable orthogonal tRNA species. These unnatural amino acids advantageously provide targets for posttranslational modifications such as azide-alkyne [3+2]cycloaddition reactions and Staudinger modifications.

  4. Analysis of the Resveratrol-binding Protein using Phage-displayed Random Peptide Library

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lei FENG; Jian JIN; Lian-Feng ZHANG; Ting YAN; Wen-Yi TAO

    2006-01-01

    Resveratrol, a plant polyphenol, is found in significant amounts in the skin of grapes and in some traditional herbs. It is reported to exert different biological activities, such as inhibiting lipid peroxidation,scavenging free radicals, inhibiting platelet aggregation, and anticancer activity. In order to screen the resveratrol-binding proteins, we synthesized biotinylated resveratrol, purified by liquid chromatography and immobilized it into streptavidin-coated microplate wells. 3-(4,5-Demethylthiazol-)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide assay showed little change in the anticancer activity of biotinylated resveratrol in vitro. A random library of phage-displayed peptides was screened for binding to immobilized resveratrol to isolate resveratrolbinding proteins. Several peptides were found to bind to resveratrol specifically, which was proven by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Through amino acid sequence analysis of the selected peptides and human proteins using the BLAST program, the results showed that resveratrol has an affinity for various proteins such as breast cancer-associated antigen, breast cancer resistance protein, death-associated transcription factor, and human cyclin-dependent kinase. These results demonstrate that our study provides a feasible method for the study of binding proteins of natural compounds using a phage-displayed random peptide library.

  5. Thermal Stability of RNA Phage Virus-Like Particles Displaying Foreign Peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peabody David S

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To be useful for genetic display of foreign peptides a viral coat protein must tolerate peptide insertions without major disruption of subunit folding and capsid assembly. The folding of the coat protein of RNA phage MS2 does not normally tolerate insertions in its AB-loop, but an engineered single-chain dimer readily accepts them as long as they are restricted to one of its two halves. Results Here we characterize the effects of peptide insertions on the thermal stabilities of MS2 virus-like particles (VLPs displaying a variety of different peptides in one AB-loop of the coat protein single-chain dimer. These particles typically denature at temperatures around 5-10°C lower than unmodified VLPs. Even so, they are generally stable up to about 50°C. VLPs of the related RNA phage PP7 are cross-linked with intersubunit disulfide bonds and are therefore significantly more stable. An AB-loop insertion also reduces the stability of PP7 VLPs, but they only begin to denature above about 70°C. Conclusions VLPs assembled from MS2 single-chain dimer coat proteins with peptide insertions in one of their AB-loops are somewhat less stable than the wild-type particle, but still resist heating up to about 50°C. Because they possess disulfide cross-links, PP7-derived VLPs provide an alternate platform with even higher stability.

  6. Isolation and Host Range of Bacteriophage with Lytic Activity against Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Potential Use as a Fomite Decontaminant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Kyle C; Hair, Bryan B; Wienclaw, Trevor M; Murdock, Mark H; Hatch, Jacob B; Trent, Aaron T; White, Tyler D; Haskell, Kyler J; Berges, Bradford K

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus (SA) is a commensal bacterium and opportunistic pathogen commonly associated with humans and is capable of causing serious disease and death including sepsis, pneumonia, and meningitis. Methicillin-resistant SA (MRSA) isolates are typically resistant to many available antibiotics with the common exception of vancomycin. The presence of vancomycin resistance in some SA isolates combined with the current heavy use of vancomycin to treat MRSA infections indicates that MRSA may achieve broad resistance to vancomycin in the near future. New MRSA treatments are clearly needed. Bacteriophages (phages) are viruses that infect bacteria, commonly resulting in death of the host bacterial cell. Phage therapy entails the use of phage to treat or prevent bacterial infections. In this study, 12 phages were isolated that can replicate in human SA and/or MRSA isolates as a potential way to control these infections. 5 phage were discovered through mitomycin C induction of prophage and 7 others as extracellular viruses. Primary SA strains were also isolated from environmental sources to be used as tools for phage discovery and isolation as well as to examine the target cell host range of the phage isolates by spot testing. Primary isolates were tested for susceptibility to oxacillin in order to determine which were MRSA. Experiments were performed to assess the host range and killing potential of newly discovered phage, and significant reductions in bacterial load were detected. We explored the utility of some phage to decontaminate fomites (glass and cloth) and found a significant reduction in colony forming units of MRSA following phage treatment, including tests of a phage cocktail against a cocktail of MRSA isolates. Our findings suggest that phage treatment can be used as an effective tool to decontaminate human MRSA from both hard surfaces and fabrics.

  7. Isolation and Host Range of Bacteriophage with Lytic Activity against Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Potential Use as a Fomite Decontaminant.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyle C Jensen

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus (SA is a commensal bacterium and opportunistic pathogen commonly associated with humans and is capable of causing serious disease and death including sepsis, pneumonia, and meningitis. Methicillin-resistant SA (MRSA isolates are typically resistant to many available antibiotics with the common exception of vancomycin. The presence of vancomycin resistance in some SA isolates combined with the current heavy use of vancomycin to treat MRSA infections indicates that MRSA may achieve broad resistance to vancomycin in the near future. New MRSA treatments are clearly needed. Bacteriophages (phages are viruses that infect bacteria, commonly resulting in death of the host bacterial cell. Phage therapy entails the use of phage to treat or prevent bacterial infections. In this study, 12 phages were isolated that can replicate in human SA and/or MRSA isolates as a potential way to control these infections. 5 phage were discovered through mitomycin C induction of prophage and 7 others as extracellular viruses. Primary SA strains were also isolated from environmental sources to be used as tools for phage discovery and isolation as well as to examine the target cell host range of the phage isolates by spot testing. Primary isolates were tested for susceptibility to oxacillin in order to determine which were MRSA. Experiments were performed to assess the host range and killing potential of newly discovered phage, and significant reductions in bacterial load were detected. We explored the utility of some phage to decontaminate fomites (glass and cloth and found a significant reduction in colony forming units of MRSA following phage treatment, including tests of a phage cocktail against a cocktail of MRSA isolates. Our findings suggest that phage treatment can be used as an effective tool to decontaminate human MRSA from both hard surfaces and fabrics.

  8. Nano-Magnetic Immunosensor Based on Staphylococcus Protein A and the Amplification Effect of HRP-Conjugated Phage Antibody

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xihui Mu

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In this research, super-paramagnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles (magnetic particles were coated with Staphylococcus protein A (SPA and coupled with polyclonal antibody (pcAb to construct magnetic capturing probes, and HRP-conjugated phage antibody was then used as specific detecting probe to design a labeled immunosensor for trace detection of Staphylococcus aureus enterotoxin B (SEB. The linear detection range of the sensor was 0.008~125 µg/L, the regression equation was Y = 0.487X + 1.2 (R = 0.996, N = 15, p < 0.0001, the limit of detection (LOD was 0.008 µg/L, and the limit of quantification (LOQ was 0.008 µg/L. HRP-conjugated phage antibody, SPA and magnetic particles can enhance the sensitivity 4-fold, 3-fold and 2.6-fold higher, respectively. Compared with conventional double-antibody sandwich ELISA, the detection sensitivity of the sensor was 31-fold higher resulting from the integrated amplifying effect. The immunosensor integrates the unique advantages of SPA-oriented antibody as magnetic capturing probe, HRP-conjugated phage antibody as detecting probe, magnetic separation immunoassay technique, and several other advanced techniques, so it achieves high sensitivity, specificity and interference-resistance. It is proven to be well suited for analysis of trace SEB in various environmental samples with high recovery rate and reproducibility.

  9. Electochemical detection of chromosome translocation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kwasny, Dorota; Dimaki, Maria; Silahtaroglu, Asli;

    2014-01-01

    Cytogenetics is a study of the cell structure with a main focus on chromosomes content and their structure. Chromosome abnormalities, such as translocations may cause various genetic disorders and heametological malignancies. Chromosome translocations are structural rearrangements of two chromoso...

  10. Transforming growth factor-β1 phage model peptides isolated from a phage display 7-mer peptide library can inhibit the activity of keloid fibroblasts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZONG Xian-lei; JIANG Du-yin; WANG Ji-chang; LIU Jun-li; LIU Zhen-zhong; CAI Jing-long

    2011-01-01

    Background Transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) is known to have a role in keloid formation through the activation of fibroblasts and the acceleration of collagen deposition. The objective of this current study was to isolate TGF-β1 phage model peptides from a phage display 7-mer peptide library to evaluate their therapeutic effect on inhibiting the activity of keloid fibroblasts.Methods A phage display 7-mer peptide library was screened using monoclonal anti-human TGF-β1 as the target to obtain specific phages containing ectogenous model peptides similar to TGF-β1. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was performed to select monoclonal phages with good binding activity, which underwent DNA sequencing. MTT assay and apoptosis assessment were used to evaluate the biological effects of the phage model peptides on keloid fibroblasts. Immunofluorescence assay was employed to show the binding affinity of the model peptides on phages causing keloid fibroblasts. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis was carried out to detect the expressions of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) mRNA, connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) mRNA and TGF-β receptor Ⅱ (TβRII) mRNA in keloid fibroblasts.Results Specific phages with good results of ELISA were beneficiated. Four phage model peptides were obtained. The data of MTT showed that TGF-β1 and one phage model peptide (No. 4) could promote keloid fibroblasts proliferation,however, three phage model peptides (No. 1-3) could inhibit keloid fibroblasts proliferation. The results of apoptosis assessment showed that the three phage model peptides could slightly induce the apoptosis in keloid fibroblasts. The data of immunofluorescence assay revealed that the model peptides on phages rather than phages could bind to keloid fibroblasts. The findings of quantitative real-time PCR analysis suggested that the expressions of NF-κB mRNA and CTGF mRNA in the three phage model peptide groups decreased, while the expression of TβRII m

  11. Marine phages as excellent tracers for reactive colloidal transport in porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanem, Nawras; Chatzinotas, Antonis; Harms, Hauke; Wick, Lukas Y.

    2016-04-01

    Question: Here we evaluate marine phages as specific markers of hydrological flow and reactive transport of colloidal particles in the Earth's critical zone (CZ). Marine phages and their bacterial hosts are naturally absent in the CZ, and can be detected with extremely high sensitivity. In the framework of the DFG Collaborative Research Center AquaDiva, we asked the following questions: (1) Are marine phages useful specific markers of hydrological flow and reactive transport in porous media? and (2) Which phage properties are relevant drivers for the transport of marine phages in porous media? Methods: Seven marine phages from different families (as well two commonly used terrestrial phages) were selected based on their morphology, size and physico-chemical surface properties (surface charge and hydrophobicity). Phage properties were assessed by electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering and water contact angle analysis (CA). Sand-filled laboratory percolation columns were used to study transport. The breakthrough curves of the phages were analyzed using the clean bed filtration theory and the XDLVO theory of colloid stability, respectively. Phages were quantified by a modified high- throughput plaque assay and a culture-independent particle counting method approach. Results: Our data show that most marine tested phages exhibited highly variable transport rates and deposition efficiency, yet generally high colloidal stability and viability. We find that size, morphology and hydrophobicity are key factors shaping the transport efficiency of phages. Differing deposition efficiencies of the phages were also supported by calculated XDLVO interaction energy profile. Conclusion: Marine phages have a high potential for the use as sensitive tracers in terrestrial habitats with their surface properties playing a crucial role for their transport. Marine phages however, exhibit differences in their deposition efficiency depending on their morphology, hydrophobicity and

  12. Screening tumor-targeting bacteriophage particles by pre-clearing phage display

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phage display technique provides a powerful approach for the discovery of new tumor-specific peptides. However, the peptides isolated through this technique usually did not possess high tumor-specific property. A pre-clearing step was introduced to increase the efficiency of biopanning by removal of particles that could interact with ubiquitously expressed cellular receptors in the non-target organs. The randomized Ph. D-CX7C phage library (Phage III) was first pre-cleared in normal mice to reduce vasculature- or organ-targeting phages to get the pre-cleared phage library, and then the tumor-targeting bacteriophage particles (Phage I) were screened from pre-clearing phage library in S180 tumor-bearing mice.The biodistribution results of 99mTc-labeled phages in mice bearing S180 tumor show that the uptake of 99mTc-labeled Phage I in tumor is high but low in normal organs, and the tumor-to-liver and tumor-to-spleen ratios of 99mTc-labeled Phage I are higher than those of 99mTc-labeled Phage II (tumor-specific phages screened from the original CX7C library) and Phage III (unscreened phages from the original CX7C library). It indicates that the yield of tumor-targeting bacteriophage particles could be improved and the non-specific binding in organs becomes weak. Consequently, the pre-clearing phage display method could improve the yield of positive hits by reducing the non-target organ accumulation of bacteriophage particles. (authors)

  13. Phage display of the serpin alpha-1 proteinase inhibitor randomized at consecutive residues in the reactive centre loop and biopanned with or without thrombin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin M Scott

    Full Text Available In spite of the power of phage display technology to identify variant proteins with novel properties in large libraries, it has only been previously applied to one member of the serpin superfamily. Here we describe phage display of human alpha-1 proteinase inhibitor (API in a T7 bacteriophage system. API M358R fused to the C-terminus of T7 capsid protein 10B was directly shown to form denaturation-resistant complexes with thrombin by electrophoresis and immunoblotting following exposure of intact phages to thrombin. We therefore developed a biopanning protocol in which thrombin-reactive phages were selected using biotinylated anti-thrombin antibodies and streptavidin-coated magnetic beads. A library consisting of displayed API randomized at residues 357 and 358 (P2-P1 yielded predominantly Pro-Arg at these positions after five rounds of thrombin selection; in contrast the same degree of mock selection yielded only non-functional variants. A more diverse library of API M358R randomized at residues 352-356 (P7-P3 was also probed, yielding numerous variants fitting a loose consensus of DLTVS as judged by sequencing of the inserts of plaque-purified phages. The thrombin-selected sequences were transferred en masse into bacterial expression plasmids, and lysates from individual colonies were screening for API-thrombin complexing. The most active candidates from this sixth round of screening contained DITMA and AAFVS at P7-P3 and inhibited thrombin 2.1-fold more rapidly than API M358R with no change in reaction stoichiometry. Deep sequencing using the Ion Torrent platform confirmed that over 800 sequences were significantly enriched in the thrombin-panned versus naïve phage display library, including some detected using the combined phage display/bacterial lysate screening approach. Our results show that API joins Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 (PAI-1 as a serpin amenable to phage display and suggest the utility of this approach for the selection

  14. Phage-host interaction in Lactococcus and Leuconostoc

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kot, Witold Piotr

    corresponds with the species of the host. The two groups shared overall genomic organization but differed significantly on the nucleotide level. One of the specific genes, presumably coding for the receptor binding protein (RBP) in Leuconostoc pseudomesenteroides phages, was functionally characterized....... In order to prove its biological function a chimeric phage with altered host range was generated. Obtained results demonstrated that ORF23"LN04 and ORF21P793 code for the RBP in Leuconostoc pseudomesenteroides phages.Characterization of phage-host interaction in the lactococcal 936 phages was performed...

  15. The phage-driven microbial loop in petroleum bioremediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, Eugene; Bittan-Banin, Gili; Sharon, Gil; Shon, Avital; Hershko, Galit; Levy, Itzik; Ron, Eliora Z

    2010-07-01

    During the drilling process and transport of crude oil, water mixes with the petroleum. At oil terminals, the water settles to the bottom of storage tanks. This drainage water is contaminated with emulsified oil and water-soluble hydrocarbons and must be treated before it can be released into the environment. In this study, we tested the efficiency of a continuous flow, two-stage bioreactor for treating drainage water from an Israeli oil terminal. The bioreactor removed all of the ammonia, 93% of the sulfide and converted 90% of the total organic carbon (TOC) into carbon dioxide. SYBR Gold staining indicated that reactor 1 contained 1.7 × 10(8) bacteria and 3.7 × 10(8) phages per millilitre, and reactor 2 contained 1.3 × 10(8) bacteria and 1.7 × 10(9) phages per millilitre. The unexpectedly high mineralization of TOC and high concentration of phage in reactor 2 support the concept of a phage-driven microbial loop in the bioremediation of the drainage water. In general, application of this concept in bioremediation of contaminated water has the potential to increase the efficiency of processes. PMID:21255344

  16. What Can Phages Tell Us about Host-Pathogen Coevolution?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John J. Dennehy

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The outcomes of host-parasite interactions depend on the coevolutionary forces acting upon them, but because every host-parasite relation is enmeshed in a web of biotic and abiotic interactions across a heterogeneous landscape, host-parasite coevolution has proven difficult to study. Simple laboratory phage-bacteria microcosms can ameliorate this difficulty by allowing controlled, well-replicated experiments with a limited number of interactors. Genetic, population, and life history data obtained from these studies permit a closer examination of the fundamental correlates of host-parasite coevolution. In this paper, I describe the results of phage-bacteria coevolutionary studies and their implications for the study of host-parasite coevolution. Recent experimental studies have confirmed phage-host coevolutionary dynamics in the laboratory and have shown that coevolution can increase parasite virulence, specialization, adaptation, and diversity. Genetically, coevolution frequently proceeds in a manner best described by the Gene for Gene model, typified by arms race dynamics, but certain contexts can result in Red Queen dynamics according to the Matching Alleles model. Although some features appear to apply only to phage-bacteria systems, other results are broadly generalizable and apply to all instances of antagonistic coevolution. With laboratory host-parasite coevolutionary studies, we can better understand the perplexing array of interactions that characterize organismal diversity in the wild.

  17. Genome Sequence of Bacillus cereus Group Phage SalinJah.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erill, Ivan; Caruso, Steven M

    2016-01-01

    The double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) Myoviridae Bacillus cereus group bacteriophage SalinJah was isolated from soil collected in Gyeonggi-do, South Korea. SalinJah, a cluster C phage with a broad host range, suggests the need to create a new subcluster with SalinJah and Helga as founding members. PMID:27688335

  18. Genome Sequences of Gordonia terrae Phages Benczkowski14 and Katyusha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, Welkin H; Benczkowski, Matthew S; Green, Daryn E; Hwang, Melina; Kennedy, Bryan; Kocak, Bradley; Kruczek, Ellen; Lin, Leon; Moretti, Matthew L; Onelangsy, Faith L; Mezghani, Nadia; Milliken, Katherine A; Toner, Chelsea L; Thompson, Paige K; Ulbrich, Megan C; Furbee, Emily C; Grubb, Sarah R; Warner, Marcie H; Montgomery, Matthew T; Garlena, Rebecca A; Russell, Daniel A; Jacobs-Sera, Deborah; Hatfull, Graham F

    2016-01-01

    Bacteriophages Katyusha and Benczkowski14 are newly isolated phages that infect Gordonia terrae 3612. Both have siphoviral morphologies with isometric heads and long tails (500 nm). The genomes are 75,380 bp long and closely related, and the tape measure genes (9 kbp) are among the largest to be identified. PMID:27340062

  19. Diagnostic value of phage typing, antibiogram typing and plasmid profiling of Staphylococcus hyicus from piglets with exudative epidermitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wegener, Henrik Caspar

    1993-01-01

    A total of 989 isolates of S. hyicus were recovered from the skin of 103 piglets (9.6 isolates per piglet) with exudative epidermitis (EE), and phage typed. Phage patterns of 806 typable isolates (81 %) could be divided into 44 distinct phage types. From 1 to 6 different phage types were found...

  20. Analysis of the site-specific integration system of the Streptomyces aureofaciens phage μ1/6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farkašovská, Jarmila; Godány, Andrej

    2012-03-01

    The bacteriophage μ1/6 integrates its DNA into the chromosome of tetracycline producing strains of Streptomyces aureofaciens by a site-specific recombination process. A bioinformatic analysis of the μ1/6 genome revealed that orf5 encodes a putative integrase, a basic protein of 416 amino acids. The μ1/6 integrase was found to belong to the integrase family of site-specific tyrosine recombinases. The phage attachment site (attP) was localized downstream of the int gene. The attachment junctions (attL and attR) were determined, allowing identification of the bacterial attachment site (attB). All attachment sites shared a 46-bp common core sequence within which a site-specific recombination occurs. This core sequence comprises the 3' end of a putative tRNA(Thr) gene (anticodon TGT) which is completely restored in attL after integration of the phage into the host genome. An integration vector containing μ1/6 int-attP region was inserted stably into the S. aureofaciens B96, S. lividans TK24, and S. coelicolor A3. The μ1/6 integrase was shown to be functional in vivo in heterologous Escherichia coli without any other factors encoded by Streptomyces. In vitro recombination assay using purified μ1/6 integrase demonstrated its ability to catalyze integrative recombination in the presence of a crude extract of E. coli cells.

  1. Sequential cloning of chromosomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacks, S.A.

    1991-12-31

    A method for sequential cloning of chromosomal DNA and chromosomal DNA cloned by this method are disclosed. The method includes the selection of a target organism having a segment of chromosomal DNA to be sequentially cloned. A first DNA segment, having a first restriction enzyme site on either side. homologous to the chromosomal DNA to be sequentially cloned is isolated. A first vector product is formed by ligating the homologous segment into a suitably designed vector. The first vector product is circularly integrated into the target organism`s chromosomal DNA. The resulting integrated chromosomal DNA segment includes the homologous DNA segment at either end of the integrated vector segment. The integrated chromosomal DNA is cleaved with a second restriction enzyme and ligated to form a vector-containing plasmid, which is replicated in a host organism. The replicated plasmid is then cleaved with the first restriction enzyme. Next, a DNA segment containing the vector and a segment of DNA homologous to a distal portion of the previously isolated DNA segment is isolated. This segment is then ligated to form a plasmid which is replicated within a suitable host. This plasmid is then circularly integrated into the target chromosomal DNA. The chromosomal DNA containing the circularly integrated vector is treated with a third, retrorestriction enzyme. The cleaved DNA is ligated to give a plasmid that is used to transform a host permissive for replication of its vector. The sequential cloning process continues by repeated cycles of circular integration and excision. The excision is carried out alternately with the second and third enzymes.

  2. Bioengineering bacteriophages to enhance the sensitivity of phage amplification-based paper fluidic detection of bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcaine, S D; Law, K; Ho, S; Kinchla, A J; Sela, D A; Nugen, S R

    2016-08-15

    Bacteriophage (phage) amplification is an attractive method for the detection of bacteria due to a narrow phage-host specificity, short amplification times, and the phages' ability to differentiate between viable and non-viable bacterial cells. The next step in phage-based bacteria detection is leveraging bioengineered phages to create low-cost, rapid, and easy-to-use detection platforms such as lateral flow assays. Our work establishes the proof-of-concept for the use of bioengineered T7 phage strains to increase the sensitivity of phage amplification-based lateral flow assays. We have demonstrated a greater than 10-fold increase in sensitivity using a phage-based protein reporter, maltose-binding protein, over the detection of replicated T7 phage viron itself, and a greater then 100-fold increase in sensitivity using a phage-based enzymatic reporter, alkaline phosphatase. This increase in sensitivity enabled us to detect 10(3)CFU/mL of Escherichia coli in broth after 7h, and by adding a filter concentration step, the ability to detect a regulatory relevant E. coli concentration of 100CFU/100mL in inoculated river water after 9h, where the current standard requires days for results. The combination of the paper fluidic format with phage-based detection provides a platform for the development of novel diagnostics that are sensitive, rapid, and easy to use.

  3. Diversity of phage infection types and associated terminology: the problem with 'Lytic or lysogenic'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobbs, Zack; Abedon, Stephen T

    2016-04-01

    Bacteriophages, or phages, are viruses of members of domain Bacteria. These viruses play numerous roles in shaping the diversity of microbial communities, with impact differing depending on what infection strategies specific phages employ. From an applied perspective, these especially are communities containing undesired or pathogenic bacteria that can be modified through phage-mediated bacterial biocontrol, that is, through phage therapy. Here we seek to categorize phages in terms of their infection strategies as well as review or suggest more descriptive, accurate or distinguishing terminology. Categories can be differentiated in terms of (1) whether or not virion release occurs (productive infections versus lysogeny, pseudolysogeny and/or the phage carrier state), (2) the means of virion release (lytic versus chronic release) and (3) the degree to which phages are genetically equipped to display lysogenic cycles (temperate versus non-temperate phages). We address in particular the use or overuse of what can be a somewhat equivocal phrase, 'Lytic or lysogenic', especially when employed as a means of distinguishing among phages types. We suggest that the implied dichotomy is inconsistent with both modern as well as historical understanding of phage biology. We consider, therefore, less ambiguous terminology for distinguishing between 'Lytic' versus 'Lysogenic' phage types. PMID:26925588

  4. Screening for PreS specific binding ligands with a phage displayed peptides library

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiang Deng; Ming Zhuang; Yu-Ying Kong; You-Hua Xie; Yuan Wang

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To construct a random peptide phage display library and search for peptides that specifically bind to the PreS region of hepatitis B virus (HBV).METHODS: A phage display vector, pFuse8, based on the gene 8 product (pⅧ) of M13 phage was made and used to construct a random peptide library. E. coli derived thioredoxin-PreS was purified with Thio-bond beads, and exploited as the bait protein for library screening. Five rounds of bio-panning were performed. The PreS-binding specificities of enriched phages were characterized with phage ELISA assay.RESULTS: A phage display vector was successfully constructed as demonstrated to present a pⅧ fused HBV PreS1 epitope on the phage surface with a high efficiency.A cysteine confined random peptide library was constructed containing independent clones exceeding 5±108 clone forming unit (CFU). A pool of phages showing a PreS-binding specificity was obtained after the screening against thioPres with an enrichment of approximately 400 times. Five phages with high PreS-binding specificities were selected and characterized. Sequences of the peptides displayed on these phages were determined.CONCLUSION: A phage library has been constructed,with random peptides displaying as pⅧ-fusion proteins.Specific PreS-binding peptides have been obtained, which may be useful for developing antivirals against HBV infection.

  5. Bioengineering bacteriophages to enhance the sensitivity of phage amplification-based paper fluidic detection of bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcaine, S D; Law, K; Ho, S; Kinchla, A J; Sela, D A; Nugen, S R

    2016-08-15

    Bacteriophage (phage) amplification is an attractive method for the detection of bacteria due to a narrow phage-host specificity, short amplification times, and the phages' ability to differentiate between viable and non-viable bacterial cells. The next step in phage-based bacteria detection is leveraging bioengineered phages to create low-cost, rapid, and easy-to-use detection platforms such as lateral flow assays. Our work establishes the proof-of-concept for the use of bioengineered T7 phage strains to increase the sensitivity of phage amplification-based lateral flow assays. We have demonstrated a greater than 10-fold increase in sensitivity using a phage-based protein reporter, maltose-binding protein, over the detection of replicated T7 phage viron itself, and a greater then 100-fold increase in sensitivity using a phage-based enzymatic reporter, alkaline phosphatase. This increase in sensitivity enabled us to detect 10(3)CFU/mL of Escherichia coli in broth after 7h, and by adding a filter concentration step, the ability to detect a regulatory relevant E. coli concentration of 100CFU/100mL in inoculated river water after 9h, where the current standard requires days for results. The combination of the paper fluidic format with phage-based detection provides a platform for the development of novel diagnostics that are sensitive, rapid, and easy to use. PMID:27031186

  6. Bacteriophages Isolated from Chicken Meat and the Horizontal Transfer of Antimicrobial Resistance Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shousha, Amira; Awaiwanont, Nattakarn; Sofka, Dmitrij; Smulders, Frans J. M.; Paulsen, Peter; Szostak, Michael P.; Humphrey, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance in microbes poses a global and increasing threat to public health. The horizontal transfer of antimicrobial resistance genes was thought to be due largely to conjugative plasmids or transposons, with only a minor part being played by transduction through bacteriophages. However, whole-genome sequencing has recently shown that the latter mechanism could be highly important in the exchange of antimicrobial resistance genes between microorganisms and environments. The transfer of antimicrobial resistance genes by phages could underlie the origin of resistant bacteria found in food. We show that chicken meat carries a number of phages capable of transferring antimicrobial resistance. Of 243 phages randomly isolated from chicken meat, about a quarter (24.7%) were able to transduce resistance to one or more of the five antimicrobials tested into Escherichia coli ATCC 13706 (DSM 12242). Resistance to kanamycin was transduced the most often, followed by that to chloramphenicol, with four phages transducing tetracycline resistance and three transducing ampicillin resistance. Phages able to transduce antimicrobial resistance were isolated from 44% of the samples of chicken meat that we tested. The statistically significant (P = 0.01) relationship between the presence of phages transducing kanamycin resistance and E. coli isolates resistant to this antibiotic suggests that transduction may be an important mechanism for transferring kanamycin resistance to E. coli. It appears that the transduction of resistance to certain antimicrobials, e.g., kanamycin, not only is widely distributed in E. coli isolates found on meat but also could represent a major mechanism for resistance transfer. The result is of high importance for animal and human health. PMID:25934615

  7. Bacteriophages Isolated from Chicken Meat and the Horizontal Transfer of Antimicrobial Resistance Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shousha, Amira; Awaiwanont, Nattakarn; Sofka, Dmitrij; Smulders, Frans J M; Paulsen, Peter; Szostak, Michael P; Humphrey, Tom; Hilbert, Friederike

    2015-07-01

    Antimicrobial resistance in microbes poses a global and increasing threat to public health. The horizontal transfer of antimicrobial resistance genes was thought to be due largely to conjugative plasmids or transposons, with only a minor part being played by transduction through bacteriophages. However, whole-genome sequencing has recently shown that the latter mechanism could be highly important in the exchange of antimicrobial resistance genes between microorganisms and environments. The transfer of antimicrobial resistance genes by phages could underlie the origin of resistant bacteria found in food. We show that chicken meat carries a number of phages capable of transferring antimicrobial resistance. Of 243 phages randomly isolated from chicken meat, about a quarter (24.7%) were able to transduce resistance to one or more of the five antimicrobials tested into Escherichia coli ATCC 13706 (DSM 12242). Resistance to kanamycin was transduced the most often, followed by that to chloramphenicol, with four phages transducing tetracycline resistance and three transducing ampicillin resistance. Phages able to transduce antimicrobial resistance were isolated from 44% of the samples of chicken meat that we tested. The statistically significant (P = 0.01) relationship between the presence of phages transducing kanamycin resistance and E. coli isolates resistant to this antibiotic suggests that transduction may be an important mechanism for transferring kanamycin resistance to E. coli. It appears that the transduction of resistance to certain antimicrobials, e.g., kanamycin, not only is widely distributed in E. coli isolates found on meat but also could represent a major mechanism for resistance transfer. The result is of high importance for animal and human health.

  8. CHROMOSOMES OF AMERICAN MARSUPIALS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    BIGGERS, J D; FRITZ, H I; HARE, W C; MCFEELY, R A

    1965-06-18

    Studies of the chromosomes of four American marsupials demonstrated that Caluromys derbianus and Marmosa mexicana have a diploid number of 14 chromosomes, and that Philander opossum and Didelphis marsupialis have a diploid number of 22. The karyotypes of C. derbianus and M. mexicana are similar, whereas those of P. opossum and D. marsupialis are dissimilar. If the 14-chromosome karyotype represents a reduction from a primitive number of 22, these observations suggest that the change has occurred independently in the American and Australasian forms.

  9. Identification of Novel Immunogenic Proteins of Neisseria gonorrhoeae by Phage Display.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connor, Daniel O; Zantow, Jonas; Hust, Michael; Bier, Frank F; von Nickisch-Rosenegk, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae is one of the most prevalent sexually transmitted diseases worldwide with more than 100 million new infections per year. A lack of intense research over the last decades and increasing resistances to the recommended antibiotics call for a better understanding of gonococcal infection, fast diagnostics and therapeutic measures against N. gonorrhoeae. Therefore, the aim of this work was to identify novel immunogenic proteins as a first step to advance those unresolved problems. For the identification of immunogenic proteins, pHORF oligopeptide phage display libraries of the entire N. gonorrhoeae genome were constructed. Several immunogenic oligopeptides were identified using polyclonal rabbit antibodies against N. gonorrhoeae. Corresponding full-length proteins of the identified oligopeptides were expressed and their immunogenic character was verified by ELISA. The immunogenic character of six proteins was identified for the first time. Additional 13 proteins were verified as immunogenic proteins in N. gonorrhoeae. PMID:26859666

  10. Identification of Novel Immunogenic Proteins of Neisseria gonorrhoeae by Phage Display.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel O Connor

    Full Text Available Neisseria gonorrhoeae is one of the most prevalent sexually transmitted diseases worldwide with more than 100 million new infections per year. A lack of intense research over the last decades and increasing resistances to the recommended antibiotics call for a better understanding of gonococcal infection, fast diagnostics and therapeutic measures against N. gonorrhoeae. Therefore, the aim of this work was to identify novel immunogenic proteins as a first step to advance those unresolved problems. For the identification of immunogenic proteins, pHORF oligopeptide phage display libraries of the entire N. gonorrhoeae genome were constructed. Several immunogenic oligopeptides were identified using polyclonal rabbit antibodies against N. gonorrhoeae. Corresponding full-length proteins of the identified oligopeptides were expressed and their immunogenic character was verified by ELISA. The immunogenic character of six proteins was identified for the first time. Additional 13 proteins were verified as immunogenic proteins in N. gonorrhoeae.

  11. Challenges and Future Prospects of Antibiotic Therapy: From Peptides to Phages Utilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santi M. Mandal

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial infections are raising serious concern across the globe. The effectiveness of conventional antibiotics is decreasing due to global emergence of multi-drug-resistant (MDR bacterial pathogens. This process seems to be primarily caused by an indiscriminate and inappropriate use of antibiotics in non-infected patients and in the food industry. New classes of antibiotics with different actions against MDR pathogens need to be developed urgently. In this context, this review focuses on several ways and future directions to search for the next generation of safe and effective antibiotics compounds including antimicrobial peptides, phage therapy, phytochemicals, metalloantibiotics, LPS and efflux pump inhibitors to control the infections caused by MDR pathogens.

  12. Sensitive detection of norovirus using phage nanoparticle reporters in lateral-flow assay.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna E V Hagström

    Full Text Available Noroviruses are recognized worldwide as the principal cause of acute, non-bacterial gastroenteritis, resulting in 19-21 million cases of disease every year in the United States. Noroviruses have a very low infectious dose, a short incubation period, high resistance to traditional disinfection techniques and multiple modes of transmission, making early, point-of-care detection essential for controlling the spread of the disease. The traditional diagnostic tools, electron microscopy, RT-PCR and ELISA require sophisticated and expensive instrumentation, and are considered too laborious and slow to be useful during severe outbreaks. In this paper we describe the development of a new, rapid and sensitive lateral-flow assay using labeled phage particles for the detection of the prototypical norovirus GI.1 (Norwalk, with a limit of detection of 107 virus-like particles per mL, one hundred-fold lower than a conventional gold nanoparticle lateral-flow assay using the same antibody pair.

  13. Antibacterial phage ORFans of Pseudomonas aeruginosa phage LUZ24 reveal a novel MvaT inhibiting protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeroen eWagemans

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The functional elucidation of small unknown phage proteins (‘ORFans’ presents itself as one of the major challenges of bacteriophage molecular biology. In this work, we mined the Pseudomonas aeruginosa infecting phage LUZ24 proteome for antibacterial and antibiofilm proteins against its host. Subsequently, their putative host target was identified. In one example, we observed an interaction between LUZ24 gp4 and the host transcriptional regulator MvaT. The polymerization of MvaT across AT-rich DNA strands permits gene silencing of foreign DNA, thereby limiting any potentially adverse effects of such DNA. Gel shift assays proved the inhibitory effect of LUZ24 gp4 on MvaT DNA binding activity. Therefore, we termed this gene product as Mip, the MvaT inhibiting protein. We hypothesize Mip prevents the AT-rich LUZ24 DNA from being physically blocked by MvaT oligomers right after its injection in the host cell, thereby allowing phage transcription and thus completion of the phage infection cycle.

  14. A Label-Free Electrochemical Impedance Cytosensor Based on Specific Peptide-Fused Phage Selected from Landscape Phage Library

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Lei; Liu, Pei; Petrenko, Valery A.; Liu, Aihua

    2016-02-01

    One of the major challenges in the design of biosensors for cancer diagnosis is to introduce a low-cost and selective probe that can recognize cancer cells. In this paper, we combined the phage display technology and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) to develop a label-free cytosensor for the detection of cancer cells, without complicated purification of recognition elements. Fabrication steps of the cytosensing interface were monitored by EIS. Due to the high specificity of the displayed octapeptides and avidity effect of their multicopy display on the phage scaffold, good biocompatibility of recombinant phage, the fibrous nanostructure of phage, and the inherent merits of EIS technology, the proposed cytosensor demonstrated a wide linear range (2.0 × 102 ‑ 2.0 × 108 cells mL‑1), a low limit of detection (79 cells mL‑1, S/N = 3), high specificity, good inter-and intra-assay reproducibility and satisfactory storage stability. This novel cytosensor designing strategy will open a new prospect for rapid and label-free electrochemical platform for tumor diagnosis.

  15. A Label-Free Electrochemical Impedance Cytosensor Based on Specific Peptide-Fused Phage Selected from Landscape Phage Library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Lei; Liu, Pei; Petrenko, Valery A; Liu, Aihua

    2016-02-24

    One of the major challenges in the design of biosensors for cancer diagnosis is to introduce a low-cost and selective probe that can recognize cancer cells. In this paper, we combined the phage display technology and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) to develop a label-free cytosensor for the detection of cancer cells, without complicated purification of recognition elements. Fabrication steps of the cytosensing interface were monitored by EIS. Due to the high specificity of the displayed octapeptides and avidity effect of their multicopy display on the phage scaffold, good biocompatibility of recombinant phage, the fibrous nanostructure of phage, and the inherent merits of EIS technology, the proposed cytosensor demonstrated a wide linear range (2.0 × 10(2) - 2.0 × 10(8) cells mL(-1)), a low limit of detection (79 cells mL(-1), S/N = 3), high specificity, good inter-and intra-assay reproducibility and satisfactory storage stability. This novel cytosensor designing strategy will open a new prospect for rapid and label-free electrochemical platform for tumor diagnosis.

  16. Loss of a 1.6 Mb chromosome in Pyricularia oryzae harboring two alleles of AvrPik leads to acquisition of virulence to rice cultivars containing resistance alleles at the Pik locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusaba, Motoaki; Mochida, Taiga; Naridomi, Takeshi; Fujita, Yoshikatsu; Chuma, Izumi; Tosa, Yukio

    2014-11-01

    A small and extra chromosome of 1.6 Mb was previously identified in a Pyricularia oryzae strain, 84R-62B. To understand a role of the 1.6 Mb chromosome in the pathogenic changeability of P. oryzae, we performed experiments designed to characterize the 1.6 Mb chromosome in the present study. A gene family encoding secreted protein Pex31s in P. oryzae consists of five homologs, Pex31-A to -E. Among them, Pex31-A and -D are known to be recognized by Pik-m and Pik/Pik-m/Pik-p, respectively. In the present study, we identified Pex31-A and -D in the genome of 84R-62B. Segregation analyses using an F1 population between 84R-62B and another rice blast strain, Y93-245c-2, revealed a strong linkage between the two homologs and the 1.6 Mb chromosome of 84R-62B. A CHEF-Southern analysis revealed an association between the 1.6 Mb chromosome and the homologs, indicating that both homologs are located on the 1.6 Mb chromosome of 84R-62B. The loss of the 1.6 Mb chromosome was observed in subcultures of a F1 progeny, F1-327. These subcultures concomitantly acquired virulence on Pik, Pik-m, and Pik-p. The present study is the first report showing that loss of a small and extra chromosome leads to pathogenic mutation of P. oryzae and may provide a new insight into the mechanisms generating pathogenic variation of this fungus. PMID:25056242

  17. One-Step Recovery of scFv Clones from High-Throughput Sequencing-Based Screening of Phage Display Libraries Challenged to Cells Expressing Native Claudin-1

    OpenAIRE

    Emanuele Sasso; Rolando Paciello; Francesco D’Auria; Gennaro Riccio; Guendalina Froechlich; Riccardo Cortese; Alfredo Nicosia; Claudia De Lorenzo; Nicola Zambrano

    2015-01-01

    Expanding the availability of monoclonal antibodies interfering with hepatitis C virus infection of hepatocytes is an active field of investigation within medical biotechnologies, to prevent graft reinfection in patients subjected to liver transplantation and to overcome resistances elicited by novel antiviral drugs. In this paper, we describe a complete pipeline for screening of phage display libraries of human scFvs against native Claudin-1, a tight-junction protein involved in hepatitis C ...

  18. Cloning, expression, and characterization of a peptidoglycan hydrolase from the Burkholderia pseudomallei phage ST79.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khakhum, Nittaya; Yordpratum, Umaporn; Boonmee, Atcha; Tattawasart, Unchalee; Rodrigues, Jorge L M; Sermswan, Rasana W

    2016-12-01

    The lytic phage ST79 of Burkholderia pseudomallei can lyse a broad range of its host including antibiotic resistant isolates from within using a set of proteins, holin, lysB, lysC and endolysin, a peptidoglycan (PG) hydrolase enzyme. The phage ST79 endolysin gene identified as peptidase M15A was cloned, expressed and purified to evaluate its potential to lyse pathogenic bacteria. The molecular size of the purified enzyme is approximately 18 kDa and the in silico study cited here indicated the presence of a zinc-binding domain predicted to be a member of the subfamily A of a metallopeptidase. Its activity, however, was reduced by the presence of Zn(2+). When Escherichia coli PG was used as a substrate and subjected to digestion for 5 min with 3 μg/ml of enzyme, the peptidase M15A showed 2 times higher in lysis efficiency when compared to the commercial lysozyme. The enzyme works in a broad alkaligenic pH range of 7.5-9.0 and temperatures from 25 to 42 °C. The enzyme was able to lyse 18 Gram-negative bacteria in which the outer membrane was permeabilized by chloroform treatment. Interestingly, it also lysed Enterococcus sp., but not other Gram-positive bacteria. In general, endolysin cannot lyse Gram-negative bacteria from outside, however, the cationic amphipathic C-terminal in some endolysins showed permeability to Gram-negative outer membranes. Genetically engineered ST79 peptidase M15A that showed a broad spectrum against Gram-negative bacterial PG or, in combination with an antibiotic the same way as combined drug methodology, could facilitate an effective treatment of severe or antibiotic resistant cases. PMID:27637947

  19. Structural and Enzymatic Characterization of ABgp46, a Novel Phage Endolysin with Broad Anti-Gram-Negative Bacterial Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Hugo; Vilas Boas, Diana; Mesnage, Stéphane; Kluskens, Leon D.; Lavigne, Rob; Sillankorva, Sanna; Secundo, Francesco; Azeredo, Joana

    2016-01-01

    The present study demonstrates the antibacterial potential of a phage endolysin against Gram-negative pathogens, particularly against multidrug resistant strains of Acinetobacter baumannii. We have cloned, heterologously expressed and characterized a novel endolysin (ABgp46) from Acinetobacter phage vb_AbaP_CEB1 and tested its antibacterial activity against several multidrug-resistant A. baumannii strains. LC-MS revealed that ABgp46 is an N-acetylmuramidase, that is also active over a broad pH range (4.0–10.0) and temperatures up to 50°C. Interestingly, ABgp46 has intrinsic and specific anti-A. baumannii activity, reducing multidrug resistant strains by up to 2 logs within 2 h. By combining ABgp46 with several organic acids that act as outer membrane permeabilizing agents, it is possible to increase and broaden antibacterial activity to include other Gram-negative bacterial pathogens. In the presence of citric and malic acid, ABgp46 reduces A. baumannii below the detection limit (>5 log) and more than 4 logs Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Salmonella typhimurium strains. Overall, this globular endolysin exhibits a broad and high activity against Gram-negative pathogens, that can be enhanced in presence of citric and malic acid, and be used in human and veterinary medicine. PMID:26955368

  20. Chromosomal abnormalities and autism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farida El-Baz

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Chromosomal abnormalities were not detected in the studied autistic children, and so the relation between the genetics and autism still needs further work up with different study methods and techniques.

  1. Chromosome condensation and segmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some aspects of chromosome condensation in mammalians -humans especially- were studied by means of cytogenetic techniques of chromosome banding. Two further approaches were adopted: a study of normal condensation as early as prophase, and an analysis of chromosome segmentation induced by physical (temperature and γ-rays) or chemical agents (base analogues, antibiotics, ...) in order to show out the factors liable to affect condensation. Here 'segmentation' means an abnormal chromosome condensation appearing systematically and being reproducible. The study of normal condensation was made possible by the development of a technique based on cell synchronization by thymidine and giving prophasic and prometaphasic cells. Besides, the possibility of inducing R-banding segmentations on these cells by BrdU (5-bromodeoxyuridine) allowed a much finer analysis of karyotypes. Another technique was developed using 5-ACR (5-azacytidine), it allowed to induce a segmentation similar to the one obtained using BrdU and identify heterochromatic areas rich in G-C bases pairs

  2. Chromosomal Abnormalties with Epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available The correlation between specific chromosome abnormalties and various epilepsies was investigated by a study of 76 patients’ records obtained by questionnaires distributed to members of Kyoto Multi-institutional Study Group of Pediatric Neurology.

  3. Angelman syndrome: Validation of molecular cytogenetic analysis of chromosome 15q11-q13 for deletion detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, L.; Knoll, J.H.M. [Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

    1995-03-13

    In a series of 18 individuals comprising parents of Angelman syndrome (AS) patients and AS patients with large deletions, microdeletions, and no deletions, we utilized fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with genomic phage clones for loci D15S63 and GABRB3 for deletion detection of chromosome 15q11-q13. Utilization of probes at these loci allows detection of common large deletions and permits discrimination of less common small deletions. In all individuals the molecular cytogenetic data were concordant with the DNA deletion analyses. FISH provides an accurate method of deletion detection for chromosome 15q11-q13. 23 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Chimpanzee chromosome 13 is homologous to human chromosome 2p

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, N. C.; Sun, C. R.Y.; Ho, T.

    1977-01-01

    Similarities between human and chimpanzee chromosomes are shown by chromosome banding techniques and somatic cell hybridization techniques. Cell hybrids were obtained from the chimpanzee lymphocyte LE-7, and the Chinese hamster mutant cell, Gal-2. Experiments showed that the ACPL, MDHs, and Gal-Act genes could be assigned to chimpanzee chromosome 13, and since these genes have been assigned to human chromosme 2p, it is suggested that chimpanzee chromosome 13 is homologous to human chromosome 2p. (HLW)

  5. Chromosome doubling method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Akio

    2006-11-14

    The invention provides methods for chromosome doubling in plants. The technique overcomes the low yields of doubled progeny associated with the use of prior techniques for doubling chromosomes in plants such as grasses. The technique can be used in large scale applications and has been demonstrated to be highly effective in maize. Following treatment in accordance with the invention, plants remain amenable to self fertilization, thereby allowing the efficient isolation of doubled progeny plants.

  6. Salmonella phages isolated from dairy farms in Thailand show wider host range than a comparable set of phages isolated from U.S. dairy farms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wongsuntornpoj, Sarach; Moreno Switt, Andrea I; Bergholz, Peter; Wiedmann, Martin; Chaturongakul, Soraya

    2014-08-01

    Salmonella is a zoonotic pathogen with globally distributed serovars as well as serovars predominantly found in certain regions; for example, serovar Weltevreden is rarely isolated in the U.S., but is common in Thailand. Relative to our understanding of Salmonella diversity, our understanding of the global diversity of Salmonella phages is limited. We hypothesized that the serovar diversity in a given environment and farming system will affect the Salmonella phage diversity associated with animal hosts. We thus isolated and characterized Salmonella phages from 15 small-scale dairy farms in Thailand and compared the host ranges of the 62 Salmonella phage isolates obtained with host range diversity for 129 phage isolates obtained from dairy farms in the U.S. The 62 phage isolates from Thailand represented genome sizes ranging from 40 to 200 kb and showed lysis of 6-25 of the 26 host strains tested (mean number of strain lysed=19). By comparison, phage isolates previously obtained in a survey of 15 U.S. dairy farms showed a narrow host range (lysis of 1-17; mean number of strains lysed=4); principal coordinate analysis also confirmed U.S. and Thai phages had distinct host lysis profiles. Our data indicate that dairy farms that differ in management practices and are located on different continents can yield phage isolates that differ in their host ranges, providing an avenue for isolation of phages with desirable host range characteristics for commercial applications. Farming systems characterized by coexistence of different animals may facilitate presence of Salmonella phages with wide host ranges.

  7. PhiSiGns: an online tool to identify signature genes in phages and design PCR primers for examining phage diversity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dwivedi Bhakti

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Phages (viruses that infect bacteria have gained significant attention because of their abundance, diversity and important ecological roles. However, the lack of a universal gene shared by all phages presents a challenge for phage identification and characterization, especially in environmental samples where it is difficult to culture phage-host systems. Homologous conserved genes (or "signature genes" present in groups of closely-related phages can be used to explore phage diversity and define evolutionary relationships amongst these phages. Bioinformatic approaches are needed to identify candidate signature genes and design PCR primers to amplify those genes from environmental samples; however, there is currently no existing computational tool that biologists can use for this purpose. Results Here we present PhiSiGns, a web-based and standalone application that performs a pairwise comparison of each gene present in user-selected phage genomes, identifies signature genes, generates alignments of these genes, and designs potential PCR primer pairs. PhiSiGns is available at (http://www.phantome.org/phisigns/; http://phisigns.sourceforge.net/ with a link to the source code. Here we describe the specifications of PhiSiGns and demonstrate its application with a case study. Conclusions PhiSiGns provides phage biologists with a user-friendly tool to identify signature genes and design PCR primers to amplify related genes from uncultured phages in environmental samples. This bioinformatics tool will facilitate the development of novel signature genes for use as molecular markers in studies of phage diversity, phylogeny, and evolution.

  8. Genomic Plasticity of Multidrug-Resistant NDM-1 Positive Clinical Isolate of Providencia rettgeri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olaitan, Abiola Olumuyiwa; Diene, Seydina M; Assous, Marc Victor; Rolain, Jean-Marc

    2016-03-01

    We performed a detailed whole-genome sequence analysis of Providencia rettgeri H1736, a multidrug-resistant clinical pathogen isolated in Israel in 2011. The objective was to describe the genomic flexibility of this bacterium that has greatly contributed to its pathogenicity. The genome has a chromosome size of 4,609,352 bp with 40.22% GC content. Five plasmids were predicted, as well as other mobile genetic elements (MGEs) including phages, genomic islands, and integrative and conjugative elements. The resistome consisted of a total of 27 different antibiotic resistance genes including blaNDM-1, mostly located on MGEs. Phenotypically, the bacteria displayed resistance to a total of ten different antimicrobial classes. Various features such as metabolic operons (including a novel carbapenem biosynthesis operon) and virulence genes were also borne on the MGEs, making P. rettgeri H1736 significantly different from other P. rettgeri isolates. A large quantity of the genetic diversity that exists in P. rettgeri H1736 was due to extensive horizontal gene transfer events, leading to an enormous presence of MGEs in its genome. Most of these changes contributed toward the pathogenic evolution of this bacterium. PMID:27386606

  9. 利用BAC-ISH对抗性基因Bph3物理定位及水稻第四染色体着丝粒识别的研究%Physical Location of Resistance Gene, Bph3 and Identification of Chromosome 4 in Oryza sativa with BAC-ISH

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    覃瑞; 鄢彗民; 宋运淳

    2003-01-01

    用水稻BAC克隆21K19作探针进行了ISH.这个克隆是由第4染色体着丝粒连锁的RFLP标记RZ69筛选得到.在Cot-l DNA 封阻条件下,DAB均获得第4染色体着丝粒区和间期染色质上的一对信号.这一方法不仅可用于特定染色体识别,而且可区分其长臂和短臂.因此,还获得了第四染色体的臂比值以作为它的形态识别依据.由于RFLP标记RZ69与抗性基因Bph3紧密连锁,从而确定抗性基因Bph3位于水稻第4染色体着丝粒处.相对于常规的RFLP-FISH,BAC-ISH可以提高5倍以上的检出率.%Rice chromosome 4 was identified by ISH of centromere-linked BAC clone 21K19. This clone was screened by a single copy RFLP marker RZ69. It only showed a pair of signal spots on centromere regions of each member of one chromosome pair, i.e.,chromosome 4 as well as interphase chromatin under the blocking of rice Cot-1 DNA with DAB detection system. This is applicable not only for the recognizing of chromosome 4 but also for the distinguishing of its long and short arms. Therefore, we also obtained the arm ratio data of chromosome 4 for its morphological identification. From the molecular genetic map, we know that the RZ69 linked to resistance gene, Bph3, so in this study, resistance gene, Bph3 was physical located in centromere region of chromosome 4 in Oryza. sativa.Compared with the routine FISH of single copy RFLP marker can increase the detection rate more than five times.

  10. Characterization of JG024, a pseudomonas aeruginosa PB1-like broad host range phage under simulated infection conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohde Manfred

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pseudomonas aeruginosa causes lung infections in patients suffering from the genetic disorder Cystic Fibrosis (CF. Once a chronic lung infection is established, P. aeruginosa cannot be eradicated by antibiotic treatment. Phage therapy is an alternative to treat these chronic P. aeruginosa infections. However, little is known about the factors which influence phage infection of P. aeruginosa under infection conditions and suitable broad host range phages. Results We isolated and characterized a phage, named JG024, which infects a broad range of clinical and environmental P. aeruginosa strains. Sequencing of the phage genome revealed that the phage JG024 is highly related to the ubiquitous and conserved PB1-like phages. The receptor of phage JG024 was determined as lipopolysaccharide. We used an artificial sputum medium to study phage infection under conditions similar to a chronic lung infection. Alginate production was identified as a factor reducing phage infectivity. Conclusions Phage JG024 is a suitable broad host range phage which could be used in phage therapy. Phage infection experiments under simulated chronic lung infection conditions showed that alginate production reduces phage infection efficiency.

  11. Micromechanics of human mitotic chromosomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eukaryote cells dramatically reorganize their long chromosomal DNAs to facilitate their physical segregation during mitosis. The internal organization of folded mitotic chromosomes remains a basic mystery of cell biology; its understanding would likely shed light on how chromosomes are separated from one another as well as into chromosome structure between cell divisions. We report biophysical experiments on single mitotic chromosomes from human cells, where we combine micromanipulation, nano-Newton-scale force measurement and biochemical treatments to study chromosome connectivity and topology. Results are in accord with previous experiments on amphibian chromosomes and support the 'chromatin network' model of mitotic chromosome structure. Prospects for studies of chromosome-organizing proteins using siRNA expression knockdowns, as well as for differential studies of chromosomes with and without mutations associated with genetic diseases, are also discussed

  12. Integrative bacterial artificial chromosomes for DNA integration into the Bacillus subtilis chromosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juhas, Mario; Ajioka, James W

    2016-06-01

    Bacillus subtilis is a well-characterized model bacterium frequently used for a number of biotechnology and synthetic biology applications. Novel strategies combining the advantages of B. subtilis with the DNA assembly and editing tools of Escherichia coli are crucial for B. subtilis engineering efforts. We combined Gibson Assembly and λ red recombineering in E. coli with RecA-mediated homologous recombination in B. subtilis for bacterial artificial chromosome-mediated DNA integration into the well-characterized amyE target locus of the B. subtilis chromosome. The engineered integrative bacterial artificial chromosome iBAC(cav) can accept any DNA fragment for integration into B. subtilis chromosome and allows rapid selection of transformants by B. subtilis-specific antibiotic resistance and the yellow fluorescent protein (mVenus) expression. We used the developed iBAC(cav)-mediated system to integrate 10kb DNA fragment from E. coli K12 MG1655 into B. subtilis chromosome. iBAC(cav)-mediated chromosomal integration approach will facilitate rational design of synthetic biology applications in B. subtilis.

  13. Bifunctional phage-based pretargeted imaging of human prostate carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newton-Northup, Jessica R. [Department of Biochemistry, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211 (United States)], E-mail: newtonj@missouri.edu; Figueroa, Said D. [Department of Radiology, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211 (United States); Quinn, Thomas P.; Deutscher, Susan L. [Department of Biochemistry, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211 (United States); Research Service, Harry S. Truman Veterans Memorial Hospital, Columbia, MO 65201 (United States)

    2009-10-15

    Introduction: Two-step and three-step pretargeting systems utilizing biotinylated prostate tumor-homing bacteriophage (phage) and {sup 111}In-radiolabeled streptavidin or biotin were developed for use in cancer radioimaging. The in vivo selected prostate carcinoma-specific phage (G1) displaying up to five copies of the peptide IAGLATPGWSHWLAL was the focus of the present study. Methods: The ability of G1 phage to extravasate and target prostate tumor cells was investigated using immunohistochemistry. G1 phages were biotinylated, streptavidin was conjugated to diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) and biotin was conjugated to 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA). Biodistribution studies and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/CT imaging of xenografted PC-3 tumors via two-step pretargeted {sup 111}In-labeled streptavidin and three-step pretargeted {sup 111}In-labeled biotin were performed in SCID mice to determine the optimal pretargeting method. Results: The ability of G1 phage to extravasate the vasculature and bind directly to human PC-3 prostate carcinoma tumor cells in vivo was demonstrated via immunocytochemical analysis. Comparative biodistribution studies of the two-step and three-step pretargeting strategies indicated increased PC-3 human prostate carcinoma tumor uptake in SCID mice of 4.34{+-}0.26 %ID g{sup -1} at 0.5 h postinjection of {sup 111}In-radiolabeled biotin (utilized in a three-step protocol) compared to 0.67{+-}0.06 %ID g{sup -1} at 24 h postinjection of {sup 111}In radiolabeled streptavidin (employed in a two-step protocol). In vivo SPECT/CT imaging of xenografted PC-3 tumors in SCID mice with the three-step pretargeting method was superior to that of the two-step pretargeting method, and, importantly, blocking studies demonstrated specificity of tumor uptake of {sup 111}In-labeled biotin in the three-step pretargeting scheme. Conclusion: This study demonstrates the use of multivalent bifunctional

  14. The Philadelphia chromosome in leukemogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZhiJieKang; JinSongYan; QuentinLiu; YuFeiLiu; LingZhiXu; ZiJieLong; DanHuang; YaYang; BingLiu; JiuXingFeng; YuJiaPan

    2016-01-01

    The truncated chromosome 22 that results from the reciprocal translocation t(9;22)(q34;q11) is known as the Phila‑delphia chromosome (Ph) and is a hallmark of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). In leukemia cells, Ph not only impairs the physiological signaling pathways but also disrupts genomic stability. This aberrant fusion gene encodes the breakpoint cluster region‑proto‑oncogene tyrosine‑protein kinase (BCR‑ABL1) oncogenic protein with persistently enhanced tyrosine kinase activity. The kinase activity is responsible for maintaining proliferation, inhibiting differentia‑tion, and conferring resistance to cell death. During the progression of CML from the chronic phase to the accelerated phase and then to the blast phase, the expression patterns of different BCR‑ABL1 transcripts vary. Each BCR‑ABL1 transcript is present in a distinct leukemia phenotype, which predicts both response to therapy and clinical outcome. Besides CML, the Ph is found in acute lymphoblastic leukemia, acute myeloid leukemia, and mixed‑phenotype acute leukemia. Here, we provide an overview of the clinical presentation and cellular biology of different phenotypes of Ph‑positive leukemia and highlight key ifndings regarding leukemogenesis.

  15. Chromosomal instability determines taxane response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanton, Charles; Nicke, Barbara; Schuett, Marion; Eklund, Aron C; Ng, Charlotte; Li, Qiyuan; Hardcastle, Thomas; Lee, Alvin; Roy, Rajat; East, Philip; Kschischo, Maik; Endesfelder, David; Wylie, Paul; Kim, Se Nyun; Chen, Jie-Guang; Howell, Michael; Ried, Thomas; Habermann, Jens K; Auer, Gert; Brenton, James D; Szallasi, Zoltan; Downward, Julian

    2009-05-26

    Microtubule-stabilizing (MTS) agents, such as taxanes, are important chemotherapeutics with a poorly understood mechanism of action. We identified a set of genes repressed in multiple cell lines in response to MTS agents and observed that these genes are overexpressed in tumors exhibiting chromosomal instability (CIN). Silencing 22/50 of these genes, many of which are involved in DNA repair, caused cancer cell death, suggesting that these genes are involved in the survival of aneuploid cells. Overexpression of these "CIN-survival" genes is associated with poor outcome in estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer and occurs frequently in basal-like and Her2-positive cases. In diploid cells, but not in chromosomally unstable cells, paclitaxel causes repression of CIN-survival genes, followed by cell death. In the OV01 ovarian cancer clinical trial, a high level of CIN was associated with taxane resistance but carboplatin sensitivity, indicating that CIN may determine MTS response in vivo. Thus, pretherapeutic assessment of CIN may optimize treatment stratification and clinical trial design using these agents. PMID:19458043

  16. Risk factors for anti-MRSA drug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Yasuhisa; Shigemura, Katsumi; Yoshida, Hiroyuki; Fujisawa, Masato; Arakawa, Soichi

    2012-11-01

    Meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA)-related infections have recently been spreading and are difficult to control, partly because affected patients are frequently in a poor condition. This study retrospectively investigated recent MRSA-related infections focusing on the relationship between clinical risk factors and anti-MRSA drug resistance. The patients with MRSA-related infections in Kobe University Hospital (Kobe, Japan) in 2009 were enrolled in the study. The relationships between various clinical risk factors as well as MRSA bacterial DNA concentration with minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of anti-MRSA drugs were examined. In total, 44 patients were enrolled in the study and MRSA was isolated from blood (23 patients), urine (12 patients) and nasal secretions (9 patients). There was only one resistant strain to linezolid (LZD) among the anti-MRSA drugs tested, and this strain was considered staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) type IIa from phage open-reading frame typing analyses. Statistical analyses showed that MRSA bacterial DNA concentration, cancer and use of a respirator, respectively, had a significant relationship with the MICs of LZD (P=0.0058) and arbekacin (ABK) (P=0.0003), of quinupristin/dalfopristin (Q/D) (P=0.0500) and ABK (P=0.0133), and of Q/D (P=0.0198) and vancomycin (P=0.0036). In conclusion, bacterial DNA concentration, cancer and use of a respirator were found to be significant risk factors for lower susceptibilities to anti-MRSA drugs; one strain was resistant to LZD. We suggest that further investigation and surveillance for MRSA-related infection are necessary for preventing the spread of MRSA-related infections. PMID:22999766

  17. Comparative genomic and morphological analyses of Listeria phages isolated from farm environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denes, Thomas; Vongkamjan, Kitiya; Ackermann, Hans-Wolfgang; Moreno Switt, Andrea I; Wiedmann, Martin; den Bakker, Henk C

    2014-08-01

    The genus Listeria is ubiquitous in the environment and includes the globally important food-borne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes. While the genomic diversity of Listeria has been well studied, considerably less is known about the genomic and morphological diversity of Listeria bacteriophages. In this study, we sequenced and analyzed the genomes of 14 Listeria phages isolated mostly from New York dairy farm environments as well as one related Enterococcus faecalis phage to obtain information on genome characteristics and diversity. We also examined 12 of the phages by electron microscopy to characterize their morphology. These Listeria phages, based on gene orthology and morphology, together with previously sequenced Listeria phages could be classified into five orthoclusters, including one novel orthocluster. One orthocluster (orthocluster I) consists of large genome (~135-kb) myoviruses belonging to the genus “Twort-like viruses,” three orthoclusters (orthoclusters II to IV) contain small-genome (36- to 43-kb) siphoviruses with icosahedral heads, and the novel orthocluster V contains medium-sized-genome (~66-kb) siphoviruses with elongated heads. A novel orthocluster (orthocluster VI) of E. faecalis phages, with medium-sized genomes (~56 kb), was identified, which grouped together and shares morphological features with the novel Listeria phage orthocluster V. This new group of phages (i.e., orthoclusters V and VI) is composed of putative lytic phages that may prove to be useful in phage-based applications for biocontrol, detection, and therapeutic purposes.

  18. A polystyrene binding target-unrelated peptide isolated in the screening of phage display library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhshinejad, Babak; Sadeghizadeh, Majid

    2016-11-01

    Phage display is a powerful methodology for the identification of peptide ligands binding to any desired target. However, the selection of target-unrelated peptides (TUPs) appears as a huge problem in the screening of phage display libraries through biopanning. The phage-displayed peptide TLHPAAD has been isolated both in our laboratory and by another reserach group on completely different screening targets prompting us to hypothesize that it may be a potential TUP. In the current study, we analyzed the binding characteristics and propagation rate of phage clone displaying TLHPAAD peptide (SW-TUP clone). The results of ELISA experiment and phage recovery assay provided strong support for the notion that SW-TUP phage binds to polystyrene with a significantly higher affinity than control phage clones. Furthermore, this polystyrene binding was demonstrated to occur in a concentration- and pH-dependent mode. Characterization of the propagation profile of phage clones within a specified time course revealed no statistically significant difference between the amplification rate of SW-TUP and control phages. Our findings lead us to the conclusion that SW-TUP phage clone with the displayed peptide TLHPAAD is not a true target binder and its selection in biopanning experiments results from its bidning affinity to the polystyrene surface of the solid phase.

  19. Inactivation of Escherichia coli phage by pulsed electric field treatment and analysis of inactivation mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanino, Takanori; Yoshida, Tomoki; Sakai, Kazuki; Ohshima, Takayuki

    2013-03-01

    Inactivation of bacteriophage by pulsed electric field (PEF) treatment, one of the effective procedures for bacteria nonthermal inactivation, was studied. Model phage particles Escherichia coli bacteriophages M13mp18 and λ phage, were successfully inactivated by PEF treatment. The survival ratios of both bacteriophages decreased depending on the PEF treatment time when applied peak voltage was 5 or 7 kV, and the survival ratios after 12 min PEF treatment were 10-4 - 10-5. Electrophoresis analyses of biological molecules of inactivated λ phage detected no degradation of total protein and genomic DNA. These results suggested that the factor of phage inactivation by PEF treatment was not based on the degradation of protein or DNA, but on the destruction of phage particle structure. Sensitivity of E. coli phage to PEF treatment was compared with that of E. coli cell. Phage and MV1184 cell were treated with same condition PEF at 5 kV, respectively. After 12 min treatment, the survival ration of λ phage and MV1184 were 4.0 × 10-5 and 1.7 × 10-3, respectively. The survival ratio of phage was lower than that of MV1184. E. coli cell is more tolerant to inactivation with PEF treatment than coli phage.

  20. A polystyrene binding target-unrelated peptide isolated in the screening of phage display library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhshinejad, Babak; Sadeghizadeh, Majid

    2016-11-01

    Phage display is a powerful methodology for the identification of peptide ligands binding to any desired target. However, the selection of target-unrelated peptides (TUPs) appears as a huge problem in the screening of phage display libraries through biopanning. The phage-displayed peptide TLHPAAD has been isolated both in our laboratory and by another reserach group on completely different screening targets prompting us to hypothesize that it may be a potential TUP. In the current study, we analyzed the binding characteristics and propagation rate of phage clone displaying TLHPAAD peptide (SW-TUP clone). The results of ELISA experiment and phage recovery assay provided strong support for the notion that SW-TUP phage binds to polystyrene with a significantly higher affinity than control phage clones. Furthermore, this polystyrene binding was demonstrated to occur in a concentration- and pH-dependent mode. Characterization of the propagation profile of phage clones within a specified time course revealed no statistically significant difference between the amplification rate of SW-TUP and control phages. Our findings lead us to the conclusion that SW-TUP phage clone with the displayed peptide TLHPAAD is not a true target binder and its selection in biopanning experiments results from its bidning affinity to the polystyrene surface of the solid phase. PMID:27555439

  1. Coexistence of phage and bacteria on the boundary of self-organized refuges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heilmann, Silja; Sneppen, Kim; Krishna, Sandeep

    2012-07-31

    Bacteriophage are voracious predators of bacteria and a major determinant in shaping bacterial life strategies. Many phage species are virulent, meaning that infection leads to certain death of the host and immediate release of a large batch of phage progeny. Despite this apparent voraciousness, bacteria have stably coexisted with virulent phages for eons. Here, using individual-based stochastic spatial models, we study the conditions for achieving coexistence on the edge between two habitats, one of which is a bacterial refuge with conditions hostile to phage whereas the other is phage friendly. We show how bacterial density-dependent, or quorum-sensing, mechanisms such as the formation of biofilm can produce such refuges and edges in a self-organized manner. Coexistence on these edges exhibits the following properties, all of which are observed in real phage-bacteria ecosystems but difficult to achieve together in nonspatial ecosystem models: (i) highly efficient virulent phage with relatively long lifetimes, high infection rates and large burst sizes; (ii) large, stable, and high-density populations of phage and bacteria; (iii) a fast turnover of both phage and bacteria; and (iv) stability over evolutionary timescales despite imbalances in the rates of phage vs. bacterial evolution. PMID:22807479

  2. Single-stranded DNA phages: from early molecular biology tools to recent revolutions in environmental microbiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Székely, Anna J; Breitbart, Mya

    2016-03-01

    Single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) phages are profoundly different from tailed phages in many aspects including the nature and size of their genome, virion size and morphology, mutation rate, involvement in horizontal gene transfer, infection dynamics and cell lysis mechanisms. Despite the importance of ssDNA phages as molecular biology tools and model systems, the environmental distribution and ecological roles of these phages have been largely unexplored. Viral metagenomics and other culture-independent viral diversity studies have recently challenged the perspective of tailed, double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) phages, dominance by demonstrating the prevalence of ssDNA phages in diverse habitats. However, the differences between ssDNA and dsDNA phages also substantially limit the efficacy of simultaneously assessing the abundance and diversity of these two phage groups. Here we provide an overview of the major differences between ssDNA and tailed dsDNA phages that may influence their effects on bacterial communities. Furthermore, through the analysis of 181 published metaviromes we demonstrate the environmental distribution of ssDNA phages and present an analysis of the methodological biases that distort their study through metagenomics. PMID:26850442

  3. Phage encoded H-NS: a potential achilles heel in the bacterial defence system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Connor T Skennerton

    Full Text Available The relationship between phage and their microbial hosts is difficult to elucidate in complex natural ecosystems. Engineered systems performing enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR, offer stable, lower complexity communities for studying phage-host interactions. Here, metagenomic data from an EBPR reactor dominated by Candidatus Accumulibacter phosphatis (CAP, led to the recovery of three complete and six partial phage genomes. Heat-stable nucleoid structuring (H-NS protein, a global transcriptional repressor in bacteria, was identified in one of the complete phage genomes (EPV1, and was most similar to a homolog in CAP. We infer that EPV1 is a CAP-specific phage and has the potential to repress up to 6% of host genes based on the presence of putative H-NS binding sites in the CAP genome. These genes include CRISPR associated proteins and a Type III restriction-modification system, which are key host defense mechanisms against phage infection. Further, EPV1 was the only member of the phage community found in an EBPR microbial metagenome collected seven months prior. We propose that EPV1 laterally acquired H-NS from CAP providing it with a means to reduce bacterial defenses, a selective advantage over other phage in the EBPR system. Phage encoded H-NS could constitute a previously unrecognized weapon in the phage-host arms race.

  4. Isolation of Human Antibodies Against Hepatitis E From Phage Display Library by Metal Affinity Chromatography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Objective To isolate human antibodies against hepatitis E virus from phage display library by a new method of panning phage antibody library based on immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC). Methods Phage antibody library was allowed to mix with hex-His tagged expressed HEV specific antigen, NE2, in solution for adequate binding before affinity resin for hex-His was added. The non-specific phage antibodies were removed by extensive washing and the specific bound phage antibodies could then be eluted to infect TG1 or repeat the binding process for subsequent rounds of purification. The specificity of the selected human antibodies were tested by antigen competitive ELISA, human sera blocking ELISA, scFv expression, and sequence analysis. Results His-NE2 specific recombinant phages were successfully enriched after panning procedure. Two individual phage clones, 126 and 138, showed 50% inhibition in NE2 antigen competition ELISA and obvious blocking effect by HEV positive serum in blocking ELISA. Soluble scFv of 126, 138 bound to NE2 specifically. Conclusion Two specific human phage antibodies against hepatitis E virus (HEV) from phage display library were isolated by immobilized metal affinity chromatography. The immobilized metal affinity chromatography applied to phage antibody selection was a helpful supplement to the selection in solution.

  5. High stability of Stx2 phage in food and under food-processing conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rode, Tone Mari; Axelsson, Lars; Granum, Per Einar; Heir, Even; Holck, Askild; L'abée-Lund, Trine M

    2011-08-01

    Bacteriophages (phages) carrying Shiga toxin genes constitute a major virulence attribute in enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC). Several EHEC outbreaks have been linked to food. The survival of such strains in different foods has received much attention, while the fate of the mobile Shiga toxin-converting phages (Stx phages) has been less studied. We have investigated the stability of an Stx phage in several food products and examined how storage, food processing, and disinfection influence the infectivity of phage particles. The study involved a recombinant Stx phage (Δstx::cat) of an E. coli O103:H25 strain from a Norwegian outbreak in 2006. Temperature, matrix, and time were factors of major importance for the stability of phage particles. Phages stored at cooling temperatures (4°C) showed a dramatic reduction in stability compared to those stored at room temperature. The importance of the matrix was evident at higher temperatures (60°C). Phages in ground beef were below the detection level when heated to 60°C for more than 10 min, while phages in broth exposed to the same heating conditions showed a 5-log-higher stability. The phages tolerated desiccation poorly but were infective for a substantial period of time in solutions. Under moist conditions, they also had a high ability to tolerate exposure to several disinfectants. In a dry-fermented sausage model, phages were shown to infect E. coli in situ. The results show that Stx phage particles can maintain their infectivity in foods and under food-processing conditions.

  6. Complete genome sequences of four novel Lactococcus lactis phages distantly related to the Rare 1706 Phage Species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kot, Witold Piotr; Neve, Horst; Vogensen, Finn Kvist;

    2014-01-01

    Lactoccocus lactis is a Gram-positive bacterium widely used in the dairy industry in the production of an array of cheeses and other fermented milk products. Here, we describe the sequencing and genome annotations of a set of four phages virulent to L. lactis and exhibiting similarities to phage...

  7. Parasite host range and the evolution of host resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorter, F A; Hall, A R; Buckling, A; Scanlan, P D

    2015-05-01

    Parasite host range plays a pivotal role in the evolution and ecology of hosts and the emergence of infectious disease. Although the factors that promote host range and the epidemiological consequences of variation in host range are relatively well characterized, the effect of parasite host range on host resistance evolution is less well understood. In this study, we tested the impact of parasite host range on host resistance evolution. To do so, we used the host bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens SBW25 and a diverse suite of coevolved viral parasites (lytic bacteriophage Φ2) with variable host ranges (defined here as the number of host genotypes that can be infected) as our experimental model organisms. Our results show that resistance evolution to coevolved phages occurred at a much lower rate than to ancestral phage (approximately 50% vs. 100%), but the host range of coevolved phages did not influence the likelihood of resistance evolution. We also show that the host range of both single parasites and populations of parasites does not affect the breadth of the resulting resistance range in a naïve host but that hosts that evolve resistance to single parasites are more likely to resist other (genetically) more closely related parasites as a correlated response. These findings have important implications for our understanding of resistance evolution in natural populations of bacteria and viruses and other host-parasite combinations with similar underlying infection genetics, as well as the development of phage therapy. PMID:25851735

  8. Bacteriophage therapy for membrane biofouling in membrane bioreactors and antibiotic-resistant bacterial biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharjee, Ananda Shankar; Choi, Jeongdong; Motlagh, Amir Mohaghegh; Mukherji, Sachiyo T; Goel, Ramesh

    2015-08-01

    To demonstrate elimination of bacterial biofilm on membranes to represent wastewater treatment as well as biofilm formed by antibiotic-resistant bacterial (ARB) to signify medical application, an antibiotic-resistant bacterium and its lytic bacteriophage were isolated from a full-scale wastewater treatment plant. Based on gram staining and complete 16 S rDNA sequencing, the isolated bacterium showed a more than 99% homology with Delftia tsuruhatensis, a gram-negative bacterium belonging to β-proteobacteria. The Delftia lytic phage's draft genome revealed the phage to be an N4-like phage with 59.7% G + C content. No transfer RNAs were detected for the phage suggesting that the phage is highly adapted to its host Delftia tsuruhatensis ARB-1 with regard to codon usage, and does not require additional tRNAs of its own. The gene annotation of the Delftia lytic phage found three different components of RNA polymerase (RNAP) in the genome, which is a typical characteristic of N4-like phages. The lytic phage specific to D. tsuruhatensis ARB-1 could successfully remove the biofilm formed by it on a glass slide. The water flux through the membrane of a prototype lab-scale membrane bioreactor decreased from 47 L/h m(2) to ∼15 L/h m(2) over 4 days due to a biofilm formed by D. tsuruhatensis ARB-1. However, the flux increased to 70% of the original after the lytic phage application. Overall, this research demonstrated phage therapy's great potential to solve the problem of membrane biofouling, as well as the problems posed by pathogenic biofilms in external wounds and on medical instruments.

  9. Dynamics of adaptive immunity against phage in bacterial populations

    CERN Document Server

    Bradde, Serena; Tesileanu, Tiberiu; Balasubramanian, Vijay

    2015-01-01

    The CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats) mechanism allows bacteria to adaptively defend against phages by acquiring short genomic sequences (spacers) that target specific sequences in the viral genome. We propose a population dynamical model where immunity can be both acquired and lost. The model predicts regimes where bacterial and phage populations can co-exist, others where the populations oscillate, and still others where one population is driven to extinction. Our model considers two key parameters: (1) ease of acquisition and (2) spacer effectiveness in conferring immunity. Analytical calculations and numerical simulations show that if spacers differ mainly in ease of acquisition, or if the probability of acquiring them is sufficiently high, bacteria develop a diverse population of spacers. On the other hand, if spacers differ mainly in their effectiveness, their final distribution will be highly peaked, akin to a "winner-take-all" scenario, leading to a specialized spacer ...

  10. The phage display technique: advantages and recent patents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Almeida, Sintia Silva; Magalhães, Aryane Aparecida C; de Castro Soares, Siomar; Zurita-Turk, Meritxell; Goulart, Luiz Ricardo; Miyoshi, Anderson; Azevedo, Vasco

    2011-08-01

    Phage display technology has advanced considerably since its creation, and the number of research projects using this technique is constantly increasing, generating numerous antibody and antigen libraries. These libraries, besides expediting library screening, improving selection methods and allowing evaluation of novel applications, have great potential for the development of new vaccines, drugs and diagnosis tests. Consequently, patent registries for the protection of these sequences are essential. PMID:21663585

  11. Chemical and Genetic Wrappers for Improved Phage and RNA Display

    OpenAIRE

    Lamboy, Jorge A.; Tam, Phillip Y.; Lee, Lucie S.; Jackson, Pilgrim J.; Avrantinis, Sara K; Lee, Hye Jin; Corn, Robert M.; Weiss, Gregory A.

    2008-01-01

    An Achilles heel inherent to all molecular display formats, background binding between target and display system introduces false positives into screens and selections. For example, the negatively charged surfaces of phage, mRNA, and ribosome display systems bind with unacceptably high non-specificity to positively charged target molecules, which represent an estimated 35% of proteins in the human proteome. We report the first systematic attempt to understand why a broad class of molecular di...

  12. The human chromosome. Electron microscopic observations on chromatin fiber organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abuelo, J G; Moore, D E

    1969-04-01

    Human lymphocytes were grown in short-term tissue culture and were arrested in metaphase with Colcemid. Their chromosomes were prepared by the Langmuir trough-critical point drying technique and were examined under the electron microscope. In addition, some chromosomes were digested with trypsin, Pronase, or DNase. The chromosomes consist entirely of tightly packed, 240 +/- 50-A chromatin fibers. Trypsin and Pronase treatments induce relaxation of fiber packing and reveal certain underlying fiber arrangements. Furthermore, trypsin treatment demonstrates that the chromatin fiber has a 25-50 A trypsin-resistant core surrounded by a trypsin-sensitive sheath. DNase digestion suggests that this core contains DNA.

  13. Communication: Origin of the contributions to DNA structure in phages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Christopher G; Pettitt, B Montgomery

    2013-02-21

    Cryo electron microscopy (cryo-EM) data of the interior of phages show ordering of the interior DNA that has been interpreted as a nearly perfectly ordered polymer. We show surface-induced correlations, excluded volume, and electrostatic forces are sufficient to predict most of the major features of the current structural data for DNA packaged within viral capsids without additional ordering due to elastic bending forces for the polymer. Current models assume highly-ordered, even spooled, hexagonally packed conformations based on interpretation of cryo-EM density maps. We show herein that the surface induced packing of short (6mer), unconnected DNA polymer segments is the only necessary ingredient in creating ringed densities consistent with experimental density maps. This implies the ensemble of possible conformations of polymeric DNA within the capsid that are consistent with cryo-EM data may be much larger than implied by traditional interpretations where such rings can only result from highly-ordered spool-like conformations. This opens the possibility of a more disordered, entropically-driven view of phage packaging thermodynamics. We also show the electrostatics of the DNA contributes a large portion of the internal hydrostatic and osmotic pressures of a phage virion, suggesting that nonlinear elastic anomalies might reduce the overall elastic bending enthalpy of more disordered conformations to have allowable free energies.

  14. Preliminary evidence for a phage in sewage utilizing Clostridium thermoaceticum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Misra, A.K.; Bose, N.K.; Uyamadu, N.; Agrawal, P.K. (Atlanta University Center, Atlanta, GA (USA))

    1990-03-01

    Briefly describes a method for isolating bacteriophages (viruses which infect bacteria) from {ital Clostridium thermoaceticum}. Water samples were anaerobically collected from the local sewage plant and sterile filtered inside a Coy-anaerobic chamber. Filtrate from the sewage liquid was added to the cultures of {ital C thermoaceticum} for observing lysis. Sterile filtrate was autoclaved (and/or treated with detergent) and added to bacterial cultures. Filtrates from lysed cultures were serially transferred from one culture to another. Virus (phage) was purified by ultracentrifugation in the form of pellets and stored at 4{degree}C in VSM (virus suspending medium). Phages were also observed under electron microscope after negative staining with glutaraldehyde. The sterile filtrate from sewage plant lysed the bacterial cultures, while the autoclaved and detergent treated was ineffective. Cultures where sterile water was added as controls grew normally. Reduced growth due to the addition of autoclaved filtrate could have resulted from the presence of bactericins. Virus by purified ultracentrifugation was also very effective in lysing the cultures. Though not very clear, icosahedral particles of the viruses were seen under the electron microscope. Further studies with this phage are in progress with the aim of obtaining a lysogenic strain (or developing one by mutagenesis) for its use as vector to transfer the genes for co-dehydrogenase and formate-dehydrogenase, the key enzymes involved in the conversion of CO or syngas into acetic acid by this organism. 14 refs., 1 fig.

  15. Enrichment of an in vivo phage display repertoire by subtraction for easy identification of pathology biomarkers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    karina Vargas Sanchez

    2015-03-01

    Conclusion. This physical subtraction discarded from a complex repertoire the non-specific selected ligands. STRATEGY 1 Three rounds of in vivo phage peptide selection in EAE female Lewis rats ("EAE repertoire" vs controls ("HEALTHY repertoire". 2 DNA subtraction of the most common sequences between «HEALTHY» and «EAE» phage repertoires to obtain a third EAE specific «SUBTRACTION » phage repertoire. 3 Massive sequencing of the three repertoires and bioinformatic analysis to identify the peptides sequences with high EAE specificity. 4 Biological tests of potential EAE specific phage clones with CNS tissues from EAE and Healthy control rats. 5 Biological tests of the EAE specific peptide and phage clones on the BBB in vitro model (hCMEC/D3 cells under inflammatory conditions (IL-1β stimulation. 6 Target separation and identification by cross-link between the selected phage clones and hMEC/D3 endothelial cells targets under IL-1β stimulation vs controls.

  16. Properties of Brucella-phages lytic for non-smooth Brucella strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbel, M J

    1984-01-01

    A series of host-range mutants has been selected for brucella-phage R. Two of these mutants designated R/O and R/C have been used for typing purposes. Phage R/O is lytic for non-smooth strains of Brucella abortus and for B. ovis. It is genetically unstable however and produces mutants lytic for smooth B. obortus and B. suis. Phage R/C is lytic for non-smooth B. abortus and for B. ovis and B. canis. It is much more stable than phages R or R/O and shows little or no lytic activity on smooth Brucella strains. It has been effective in differentiating B. canis from B. suis in tests on a limited number of strains. In their properties, all of the brucella-phages of the R series resemble their parent phage.

  17. P087, a lactococcal phage with a morphogenesis module similar to an Enterococcus faecalis prophage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villion, Manuela; Chopin, Marie-Christine; Deveau, Hélène; Ehrlich, S Dusko; Moineau, Sylvain; Chopin, Alain

    2009-05-25

    The virulent lactococcal phage P087 was isolated from a dairy environment in 1978. This phage was then recognized as the reference member for one of the ten phage groups currently known to infect Lactococcus lactis strains. The double-stranded DNA genome of this Siphoviridae phage is composed of 60,074 bp and is circularly permuted. Five tRNA and 88 orfs were found within an uncommon genome architecture. Eleven structural proteins were also identified through SDS-PAGE and LC-MS/MS analyses. Of note, 11 translated orfs from the structural module of phage P087 have identities to gene products found in a prophage located in the genome of Enterococcus faecalis V583. The alignment of both genomic sequences suggests that DNA exchanges could occur between these two phages which are infecting low G+C bacteria found in similar ecological niches.

  18. Characterization of Campylobacter phages including analysis of host range by selected Campylobacter Penner serotypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Vinni; Rosenquist, Hanne; Baggesen, Dorte Lau;

    2007-01-01

    Background: The predominant food borne pathogen in the western world today is Campylobacter. Campylobacter specific bacteriophages (phages) have been proposed as an alternative agent for reducing the burden of Campylobacter in broilers. One concern in relation to phage biocontrol is the narrow host...... (PFGE) and restriction endonuclease analysis (REA) were used to characterize the phage genomes. Three categories of bacteriophages were observed. I: a genome size of similar to 194 kb and refractory to digestion with HhaI; II: a genome size of similar to 140 kb and digestible by HhaI; and III: a genome...... size undeterminable in PFGE. The categorization of the phages correlated with the host range patterns displayed by the phages. Six phages were subjected to transmission electron microscopy (TEM). They all belonged to the family of Myoviridae. Conclusion: We have characterized and identified the host...

  19. Advancement and applications of peptide phage display technology in biomedical science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chien-Hsun; Liu, I-Ju; Lu, Ruei-Min; Wu, Han-Chung

    2016-01-01

    Combinatorial phage library is a powerful research tool for high-throughput screening of protein interactions. Of all available molecular display techniques, phage display has proven to be the most popular approach. Screening phage-displayed random peptide libraries is an effective means of identifying peptides that can bind target molecules and regulate their function. Phage-displayed peptide libraries can be used for (i) B-cell and T-cell epitope mapping, (ii) selection of bioactive peptides bound to receptors or proteins, disease-specific antigen mimics, peptides bound to non-protein targets, cell-specific peptides, or organ-specific peptides, and (iii) development of peptide-mediated drug delivery systems and other applications. Targeting peptides identified using phage display technology may be useful for basic research and translational medicine. In this review article, we summarize the latest technological advancements in the application of phage-displayed peptide libraries to applied biomedical sciences.

  20. Salmonella-Typhimurium phage types from human salmonellosis in denmark 1988 to 1993

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wegener, Henrik Caspar; Baggesen, Dorte Lau; Gaarslev, K.

    1994-01-01

    and 194. It is concluded that phage typing, although here performed retrospectively, produces valuable epidemiological information regarding changes in the relative importance of different sources of infection in humans. It is suggested that phage typing be performed prospectively on both human and animal......A total of 989 isolates of Salmonella enterica ssp. enterica serovar Typhimurium from cases of human salmonellosis were investigated by phage typing, The isolates comprised all isolates recovered during the month of August in each of the years from 1988 to 1993. Phage typing assigned 82.......6% of the strains to 36 different definitive types, 11.9% of the strains belonged to types of unknown lysis pattern (RDNC), and 5.5% could not be typed by the phages used (NT). Three phage types (12, 66 and 110) made up approximately 50% of the isolates in each of the years investigated. During the period...