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Sample records for chromosomal phage resistance

  1. Host specific diversity in Lactobacillus johnsonii as evidenced by a major chromosomal inversion and phage resistance mechanisms.

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    Caitriona M Guinane

    Full Text Available Genetic diversity and genomic rearrangements are a driving force in bacterial evolution and niche adaptation. We sequenced and annotated the genome of Lactobacillus johnsonii DPC6026, a strain isolated from the porcine intestinal tract. Although the genome of DPC6026 is similar in size (1.97 mbp and GC content (34.8% to the sequenced human isolate L. johnsonii NCC 533, a large symmetrical inversion of approximately 750 kb differentiated the two strains. Comparative analysis among 12 other strains of L. johnsonii including 8 porcine, 3 human and 1 poultry isolate indicated that the genome architecture found in DPC6026 is more common within the species than that of NCC 533. Furthermore a number of unique features were annotated in DPC6026, some of which are likely to have been acquired by horizontal gene transfer (HGT and contribute to protection against phage infection. A putative type III restriction-modification system was identified, as were novel Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR elements. Interestingly, these particular elements are not widely distributed among L. johnsonii strains. Taken together these data suggest intra-species genomic rearrangements and significant genetic diversity within the L. johnsonii species and indicate towards a host-specific divergence of L. johnsonii strains with respect to genome inversion and phage exposure.

  2. Transfer of antibiotic-resistance genes via phage-related mobile elements.

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    Brown-Jaque, Maryury; Calero-Cáceres, William; Muniesa, Maite

    2015-05-01

    Antibiotic resistance is a major concern for society because it threatens the effective prevention of infectious diseases. While some bacterial strains display intrinsic resistance, others achieve antibiotic resistance by mutation, by the recombination of foreign DNA into the chromosome or by horizontal gene acquisition. In many cases, these three mechanisms operate together. Several mobile genetic elements (MGEs) have been reported to mobilize different types of resistance genes and despite sharing common features, they are often considered and studied separately. Bacteriophages and phage-related particles have recently been highlighted as MGEs that transfer antibiotic resistance. This review focuses on phages, phage-related elements and on composite MGEs (phages-MGEs) involved in antibiotic resistance mobility. We review common features of these elements, rather than differences, and provide a broad overview of the antibiotic resistance transfer mechanisms observed in nature, which is a necessary first step to controlling them.

  3. The phage-related chromosomal islands of Gram-positive bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Novick, Richard P.; Christie, Gail E.; Penadés, Jose R.

    2010-01-01

    The phage-related chromosomal islands (PRCIs) were first identified in Staphylococcus aureus as highly mobile, superantigen-encoding genetic elements known as the S. aureus pathogenicity islands (SaPIs). These elements are characterized by a specific set of phage-related functions that enable them to use the phage reproduction cycle for their own transduction and inhibit phage reproduction in the process. SaPIs produce many phage-like infectious particles; their streptococcal counterparts hav...

  4. Relative entropy differences in bacterial chromosomes, plasmids, phages and genomic islands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bohlin, Jon; van Passel, Mark W. J.; Snipen, Lars;

    2012-01-01

    Background: We sought to assess whether the concept of relative entropy (information capacity), could aid our understanding of the process of horizontal gene transfer in microbes. We analyzed the differences in information capacity between prokaryotic chromosomes, genomic islands (GI), phages, an...... chromosomes and stably incorporated GIs compared to the transient or independent replicons such as phages and plasmids....

  5. DISTRIBUTION OF PHAGE TYPES AND TRANSFERABLE DRUG RESISTANCE IN SHIGELLAE

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    K.Badalian

    1981-08-01

    Full Text Available A total of 610 strains of Shigellae isolated from cases of diarrhea in Iran during 1962-73 were studied with respect to their phage type, as well as antibiotic resistance and transferable drug resistance along with serotyping. It was shown that there was some relation between serotypes and phage types but no association could be found between phage types and resistance pattern.

  6. The phage-related chromosomal islands of Gram-positive bacteria.

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    Novick, Richard P; Christie, Gail E; Penadés, Jose R

    2010-08-01

    The phage-related chromosomal islands (PRCIs) were first identified in Staphylococcus aureus as highly mobile, superantigen-encoding genetic elements known as the S. aureus pathogenicity islands (SaPIs). These elements are characterized by a specific set of phage-related functions that enable them to use the phage reproduction cycle for their own transduction and inhibit phage reproduction in the process. SaPIs produce many phage-like infectious particles; their streptococcal counterparts have a role in gene regulation but may not be infectious. These elements therefore represent phage satellites or parasites, not defective phages. In this Review, we discuss the shared genetic content of PRCIs, their life cycle and their ability to be transferred across large phylogenetic distances.

  7. Staphylococcus aureus phage types and their correlation to antibiotic resistance

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    Mehndiratta P

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Context: Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most devastating human pathogen. The organism has a differential ability to spread and cause outbreak of infections. Characterization of these strains is important to control the spread of infection in the hospitals as well as in the community. Aim: To identify the currently existing phage groups of Staphylococcus aureus, their prevalence and resistance to antibiotics. Materials and Methods: Study was undertaken on 252 Staphylococcus aureus strains isolated from clinical samples. Strains were phage typed and their resistance to antibiotics was determined following standard microbiological procedures. Statistical Analysis: Chi square test was used to compare the antibiotic susceptibility between methicillin resistant Staph. aureus (MRSA and methicillin sensitive S. aureus (MSSA strains. Results: Prevalence of MRSA and MSSA strains was found to be 29.36% and 70.65% respectively. Of these 17.56% of MRSA and 40.44% of MSSA strains were community acquired. All the MSSA strains belonging to phage type 81 from the community were sensitive to all the antibiotics tested including clindamycin and were resistant to penicillin. Forty five percent strains of phage group III and 39% of non-typable MRSA strains from the hospital were resistant to multiple antibiotics. Conclusion: The study revealed that predominant phage group amongst MRSA strains was phage group III and amongst MSSA from the community was phage group NA (phage type 81. MSSA strains isolated from the community differed significantly from hospital strains in their phage type and antibiotic susceptibility. A good correlation was observed between community acquired strains of phage type 81 and sensitivity to gentamycin and clindamycin.

  8. Differences in DNA curvature-related sequence periodicity between prokaryotic chromosomes and phages, and relationship to chromosomal prophage content

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    Abel Jacob

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Periodic spacing of A-tracts (short runs of A or T with the DNA helical period of ~10–11 bp is characteristic of intrinsically bent DNA. In eukaryotes, the DNA bending is related to chromatin structure and nucleosome positioning. However, the physiological role of strong sequence periodicity detected in many prokaryotic genomes is not clear. Results We developed measures of intensity and persistency of DNA curvature-related sequence periodicity and applied them to prokaryotic chromosomes and phages. The results indicate that strong periodic signals present in chromosomes are generally absent in phage genomes. Moreover, chromosomes containing prophages are less likely to possess a persistent periodic signal than chromosomes with no prophages. Conclusions Absence of DNA curvature-related sequence periodicity in phages could arise from constraints associated with DNA packaging in the viral capsid. Lack of prophages in chromosomes with persistent periodic signal suggests that the sequence periodicity and concomitant DNA curvature could play a role in protecting the chromosomes from integration of phage DNA.

  9. The Phage-Inducible Chromosomal Islands: A Family of Highly Evolved Molecular Parasites.

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    Penadés, José R; Christie, Gail E

    2015-11-01

    The phage-inducible chromosomal islands (PICIs) are a family of highly mobile genetic elements that contribute substantively to horizontal gene transfer, host adaptation, and virulence. Initially identified in Staphylococcus aureus, these elements are now thought to occur widely in gram-positive bacteria. They are molecular parasites that exploit certain temperate phages as helpers, using a variety of elegant strategies to manipulate the phage life cycle and promote their own spread, both intra- and intergenerically. At the same time, these PICI-encoded mechanisms severely interfere with helper phage reproduction, thereby enhancing survival of the bacterial population. In this review we discuss the genetics and the life cycle of these elements, with special emphasis on how they interact and interfere with the helper phage machinery for their own benefit. We also analyze the role that these elements play in driving bacterial and viral evolution.

  10. Lysogenic Conversion and Phage Resistance Development in Phage Exposed Escherichia coli Biofilms

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    Abram Aertsen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, three-day old mature biofilms of Escherichia coli were exposed once to either a temperate Shiga-toxin encoding phage (H-19B or an obligatory lytic phage (T7, after which further dynamics in the biofilm were monitored. As such, it was found that a single dose of H-19B could rapidly lead to a near complete lysogenization of the biofilm, with a subsequent continuous release of infectious H-19B particles. On the other hand, a single dose of T7 rapidly led to resistance development in the biofilm population. Together, our data indicates a profound impact of phages on the dynamics within structured bacterial populations.

  11. Spontaneous deletion of a 209-kilobase-pair fragment from the Escherichia coli genome occurs with acquisition of resistance to an assortment of infectious phages.

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    Tanji, Yasunori; Hattori, Kenji; Suzuki, Kohichi; Miyanaga, Kazuhiko

    2008-07-01

    To breed resistance to an assortment of infectious phages, continuous cultures of Escherichia coli JM109 grown in a chemostat were exposed to phage mixtures prepared from sewage influent. Four sequential chemostat-grown cultures were each infected with a different phage mixture. At the end of a chemostat run, one phage-resistant colony was isolated and used to inoculate the subsequent culture. This process was repeated, and increased phage resistance of the input bacterial strain resulted from the successive challenges with different phage cocktails. Multiple mutations apparently accumulated progressively. A mutant isolated at the end of the four runs, designated D198, showed resistance to 38 of 40 phages that infect the parent strain, JM109. D198 produced less outer membrane protein C (OmpC) than JM109. However, restoration of the OmpC protein by plasmid-mediated complementation did not completely restore the susceptibility of D198 to the 38 phages. Therefore, alterations beyond the level of OmpC protein production contribute to the phage resistance of D198. PCR-based genetic analysis revealed that D198 has a genome that is 209 kbp (about 200 genes) smaller than JM109. The deletion includes the chromosomal section from ompC to wbbL that encodes the rhamnosyl transferase involved in lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis. Strains D198 and JM109 were comparable in their growth characteristics and their abilities to express a recombinant protein.

  12. Relative entropy differences in bacterial chromosomes, plasmids, phages and genomic islands

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    Bohlin, J.; Passel, van M.W.J.

    2012-01-01

    Background: We sought to assess whether the concept of relative entropy (information capacity), could aid our understanding of the process of horizontal gene transfer in microbes. We analyzed the differences in information capacity between prokaryotic chromosomes, genomic islands (GI), phages, and p

  13. Strain diversity and phage resistance in complex dairy starter cultures

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    Spus, M.; Alexeeva, S.V.; Wolkers-Rooijackers, J.C.M.; Zwietering, M.H.; Abee, T.; Smid, E.J.

    2015-01-01

    The compositional stability of the complex Gouda cheese starter culture Ur is thought to be influenced by diversity in phage resistance of highly related strains that co-exist together with bacteriophages. To analyze the role of bacteriophages in maintaining culture diversity at the level of genetic

  14. CRISPR: new horizons in phage resistance and strain identification.

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    Barrangou, Rodolphe; Horvath, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    Bacteria have been widely used as starter cultures in the food industry, notably for the fermentation of milk into dairy products such as cheese and yogurt. Lactic acid bacteria used in food manufacturing, such as lactobacilli, lactococci, streptococci, Leuconostoc, pediococci, and bifidobacteria, are selectively formulated based on functional characteristics that provide idiosyncratic flavor and texture attributes, as well as their ability to withstand processing and manufacturing conditions. Unfortunately, given frequent viral exposure in industrial environments, starter culture selection and development rely on defense systems that provide resistance against bacteriophage predation, including restriction-modification, abortive infection, and recently discovered CRISPRs (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats). CRISPRs, together with CRISPR-associated genes (cas), form the CRISPR/Cas immune system, which provides adaptive immunity against phages and invasive genetic elements. The immunization process is based on the incorporation of short DNA sequences from virulent phages into the CRISPR locus. Subsequently, CRISPR transcripts are processed into small interfering RNAs that guide a multifunctional protein complex to recognize and cleave matching foreign DNA. Hypervariable CRISPR loci provide insights into the phage and host population dynamics, and new avenues for enhanced phage resistance and genetic typing and tagging of industrial strains.

  15. Exposure to phages has little impact on the evolution of bacterial antibiotic resistance on drug concentration gradients

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Quan-Guo

    2014-01-01

    The use of phages for treating bacterial pathogens has recently been advocated as an alternative to antibiotic therapy. Here, we test a hypothesis that bacteria treated with phages may show more limited evolution of antibiotic resistance as the fitness costs of resistance to phages may add to those of antibiotic resistance, further reducing the growth performance of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. We did this by studying the evolution of phage-exposed and phage-free Pseudomonas fluorescens cul...

  16. A site required for termination of packaging of the phage lambda chromosome.

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    Cue, D; Feiss, M

    1993-10-15

    Lambda chromosomes are cut and packaged from concatemeric DNA by phage enzyme terminase. Terminase initiates DNA packaging by binding at a site called cosB and introducing staggered nicks at an adjacent site, cosN, to generate the left cohesive end of the DNA molecule to be packaged. After DNA packaging terminase recognizes and cuts the terminal cosN, an event that does not require a wild-type cosB. In this work a site, called cosQ, has been identified that is required for termination of DNA packaging. cosQ, defined by mutations in a sequence called R4, is located approximately 30 bp upstream from cosN. The order of sites is cosQ-cosN-cosB. Helper packaging of repressed, tandem prophage chromosomes demonstrated that a cosQ point mutation affects DNA packaging only when placed at the terminal cos site, whereas cosB mutations only affect packaging initiation. In vitro packaging studies confirmed that cosQ mutations do not affect packaging initiation. In vivo studies indicated that cosQ mutations do not affect cutting of initial cos sites but do cause a defect in packaging termination. cosQ mutants accumulated expanded phage heads, indicating that cosQ mutations affect a step that occurs after packaging of a substantial length of phage DNA. These results show that cosQ mutations define a site required for use of cos sites present at the ends of lambda chromosomes undergoing packaging. Available evidence suggests that other viruses, including phages T3 and T7 and the herpesviruses, may ultimately prove to use cosQ-like sites for packaging termination.

  17. CRISPR/Cas9-mediated phage resistance is not impeded by the DNA modifications of phage T4.

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    Stephanie J Yaung

    Full Text Available Bacteria rely on two known DNA-level defenses against their bacteriophage predators: restriction-modification and Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR-CRISPR-associated (Cas systems. Certain phages have evolved countermeasures that are known to block endonucleases. For example, phage T4 not only adds hydroxymethyl groups to all of its cytosines, but also glucosylates them, a strategy that defeats almost all restriction enzymes. We sought to determine whether these DNA modifications can similarly impede CRISPR-based defenses. In a bioinformatics search, we found naturally occurring CRISPR spacers that potentially target phages known to modify their DNA. Experimentally, we show that the Cas9 nuclease from the Type II CRISPR system of Streptococcus pyogenes can overcome a variety of DNA modifications in Escherichia coli. The levels of Cas9-mediated phage resistance to bacteriophage T4 and the mutant phage T4 gt, which contains hydroxymethylated but not glucosylated cytosines, were comparable to phages with unmodified cytosines, T7 and the T4-like phage RB49. Our results demonstrate that Cas9 is not impeded by N6-methyladenine, 5-methylcytosine, 5-hydroxymethylated cytosine, or glucosylated 5-hydroxymethylated cytosine.

  18. An improved method for rapid generation and screening of Bacillus thuringiensis phage-resistant mutants.

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    Gillis, Annika; Mahillon, Jacques

    2014-11-01

    A simple method to isolate, screen and select phage-resistant mutants of Bacillus thuringiensis was developed. The traditional double-layer agar method was improved by a combination of the spotting assay using a lytic phage, to generate the bacterial-resistant mutants, with an inverted spotting assay (ISA), to rapidly screen the candidate-resistant mutants.

  19. Effect of Bacteriophages on the Growth of Flavobacterium psychrophilum and Development of Phage-Resistant Strains.

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    Christiansen, Rói Hammershaimb; Madsen, Lone; Dalsgaard, Inger; Castillo, Daniel; Kalatzis, Panos G; Middelboe, Mathias

    2016-05-01

    The controlling effect of single and multiple phages on the density of Flavobacterium psychrophilum at different initial multiplicity of infection (MOI) was assessed in batch cultures to explore the potential for phage-based treatment of this important fish pathogen. A high initial phage concentration (MOI = 0.3-4) was crucial for efficient viral lysis, resulting in a 10(4)-10(5)-fold reduction of phage-sensitive cells (both single phages and phage cocktails), which was maintained throughout the incubation (>10 days). Following cell lysis, regrowth of phage-resistant strains was examined and resistant strains were isolated for further characterization. The application of a mathematical model allowed simulation of phage-host interactions and resistance development, confirming indications from strain isolations that phage-sensitive strains dominated the regrowing population (>99.8%) at low MOI and phage-resistant strains (>87.8%) dominated at high MOI. A cross-infectivity test covering 68 isolated strains and 22 phages resulted in 23 different host susceptibility patterns, with 20 of the isolates being resistant to all the applied phages. Eleven isolated strains with different susceptibility patterns had lower growth rates (0.093 to 0.31 h(-1)) than the host strain (0.33 h(-1)), while 10 of 14 examined strains had lost the ability to take up specific substrates as shown by BIOLOG profiles. Despite increased selection for phage resistance at high MOI, the results emphasize that high initial MOI is essential for fast and effective control of F. psychrophilum infection and suggest that the small populations of resistant clones had reduced competitive abilities relative to the sensitive ancestral strain.

  20. Lytic phages obscure the cost of antibiotic resistance in Escherichia coli.

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    Tazzyman, Samuel J; Hall, Alex R

    2015-03-17

    The long-term persistence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria depends on their fitness relative to other genotypes in the absence of drugs. Outside the laboratory, viruses that parasitize bacteria (phages) are ubiquitous, but costs of antibiotic resistance are typically studied in phage-free experimental conditions. We used a mathematical model and experiments with Escherichia coli to show that lytic phages strongly affect the incidence of antibiotic resistance in drug-free conditions. Under phage parasitism, the likelihood that antibiotic-resistant genetic backgrounds spread depends on their initial frequency, mutation rate and intrinsic growth rate relative to drug-susceptible genotypes, because these parameters determine relative rates of phage-resistance evolution on different genetic backgrounds. Moreover, the average cost of antibiotic resistance in terms of intrinsic growth in the antibiotic-free experimental environment was small relative to the benefits of an increased mutation rate in the presence of phages. This is consistent with our theoretical work indicating that, under phage selection, typical costs of antibiotic resistance can be outweighed by realistic increases in mutability if drug resistance and hypermutability are genetically linked, as is frequently observed in clinical isolates. This suggests the long-term distribution of antibiotic resistance depends on the relative rates at which different lineages adapt to other types of selection, which in the case of phage parasitism is probably extremely common, as well as costs of resistance inferred by classical in vitro methods.

  1. A site required for termination of packaging of the phage lambda chromosome.

    OpenAIRE

    Cue, D; Feiss, M

    1993-01-01

    Lambda chromosomes are cut and packaged from concatemeric DNA by phage enzyme terminase. Terminase initiates DNA packaging by binding at a site called cosB and introducing staggered nicks at an adjacent site, cosN, to generate the left cohesive end of the DNA molecule to be packaged. After DNA packaging terminase recognizes and cuts the terminal cosN, an event that does not require a wild-type cosB. In this work a site, called cosQ, has been identified that is required for termination of DNA ...

  2. On-demand isolation of bacteriophages against drug-resistant bacteria for personalized phage therapy

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    Sari eMattila

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Bacteriophages are bacterial viruses, capable of killing even multi-drug resistant bacterial cells. For this reason, therapeutic use of phages is considered as a possible alternative to conventional antibiotics. However, phages are very host specific in comparison to wide-spectrum antibiotics and thus preparation of phage-cocktails beforehand against pathogens can be difficult. In this study, we evaluate whether it may be possible to isolate phages on-demand from environmental reservoir. We attempted to enrich infectious bacteriophages from sewage against nosocomial drug-resistant bacterial strains of different medically important species in order to evaluate the probability of discovering novel therapeutic phages. Stability and host-range were determined for the acquired phages. Our results suggest that on-demand isolation of phages is possible against Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella and extended spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae. The probability of finding suitable phages was less than 40% against vancomycin resistant Enterococcus (VRE and Acinetobacter baumannii strains. Furthermore, isolation of new phages against methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA strains was found to be very difficult.

  3. On-Demand Isolation of Bacteriophages Against Drug-Resistant Bacteria for Personalized Phage Therapy.

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    Mattila, Sari; Ruotsalainen, Pilvi; Jalasvuori, Matti

    2015-01-01

    Bacteriophages are bacterial viruses, capable of killing even multi-drug resistant bacterial cells. For this reason, therapeutic use of phages is considered as a possible alternative to conventional antibiotics. However, phages are very host specific in comparison to wide-spectrum antibiotics and thus preparation of phage-cocktails beforehand against pathogens can be difficult. In this study, we evaluate whether it may be possible to isolate phages on-demand from environmental reservoir. We attempted to enrich infectious bacteriophages from sewage against nosocomial drug-resistant bacterial strains of different medically important species in order to evaluate the probability of discovering novel therapeutic phages. Stability and host-range were determined for the acquired phages. Our results suggest that on-demand isolation of phages is possible against Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella and extended spectrum beta-lactamase Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae. The probability of finding suitable phages was less than 40% against vancomycin resistant Enterococcus and Acinetobacter baumannii strains. Furthermore, isolation of new phages against methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains was found to be very difficult.

  4. Bacteriophage-resistant mutants in Yersinia pestis: identification of phage receptors and attenuation for mice.

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    Andrey A Filippov

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Bacteriophages specific for Yersinia pestis are routinely used for plague diagnostics and could be an alternative to antibiotics in case of drug-resistant plague. A major concern of bacteriophage therapy is the emergence of phage-resistant mutants. The use of phage cocktails can overcome this problem but only if the phages exploit different receptors. Some phage-resistant mutants lose virulence and therefore should not complicate bacteriophage therapy. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The purpose of this work was to identify Y. pestis phage receptors using site-directed mutagenesis and trans-complementation and to determine potential attenuation of phage-resistant mutants for mice. Six receptors for eight phages were found in different parts of the lipopolysaccharide (LPS inner and outer core. The receptor for R phage was localized beyond the LPS core. Most spontaneous and defined phage-resistant mutants of Y. pestis were attenuated, showing increase in LD₅₀ and time to death. The loss of different LPS core biosynthesis enzymes resulted in the reduction of Y. pestis virulence and there was a correlation between the degree of core truncation and the impact on virulence. The yrbH and waaA mutants completely lost their virulence. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We identified Y. pestis receptors for eight bacteriophages. Nine phages together use at least seven different Y. pestis receptors that makes some of them promising for formulation of plague therapeutic cocktails. Most phage-resistant Y. pestis mutants become attenuated and thus should not pose a serious problem for bacteriophage therapy of plague. LPS is a critical virulence factor of Y. pestis.

  5. Phenotypic resistance and the dynamics of bacterial escape from phage control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bull, James J.; Vegge, Christina Skovgaard; Schmerer, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    The canonical view of phage - bacterial interactions in dense, liquid cultures is that the phage will eliminate most of the sensitive cells; genetic resistance will then ascend to restore high bacterial densities. Yet there are various mechanisms by which bacteria may remain sensitive to phages...... mathematical models of these processes and suggest how different types of this 'phenotypic' resistance may be elucidated. We offer preliminary in vitro studies of a previously characterized E. coli model system and Campylobacter jejuni illustrating apparent phenotypic resistance. As phenotypic resistance may...

  6. Facing antibiotic resistance: Staphylococcus aureus phages as a medical tool.

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    Kaźmierczak, Zuzanna; Górski, Andrzej; Dąbrowska, Krystyna

    2014-07-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a common and often virulent pathogen in humans. This bacterium is widespread, being present on the skin and in the nose of healthy people. Staphylococcus aureus can cause infections with severe outcomes ranging from pustules to sepsis and death. The introduction of antibiotics led to a general belief that the problem of bacterial infections would be solved. Nonetheless, pathogens including staphylococci have evolved mechanisms of drug resistance. Among current attempts to address this problem, phage therapy offers a promising alternative to combat staphylococcal infections. Here, we present an overview of current knowledge on staphylococcal infections and bacteriophages able to kill Staphylococcus, including experimental studies and available data on their clinical use.

  7. Facing Antibiotic Resistance: Staphylococcus aureus Phages as a Medical Tool

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    Zuzanna Kaźmierczak

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is a common and often virulent pathogen in humans. This bacterium is widespread, being present on the skin and in the nose of healthy people. Staphylococcus aureus can cause infections with severe outcomes ranging from pustules to sepsis and death. The introduction of antibiotics led to a general belief that the problem of bacterial infections would be solved. Nonetheless, pathogens including staphylococci have evolved mechanisms of drug resistance. Among current attempts to address this problem, phage therapy offers a promising alternative to combat staphylococcal infections. Here, we present an overview of current knowledge on staphylococcal infections and bacteriophages able to kill Staphylococcus, including experimental studies and available data on their clinical use.

  8. Osmotic pressure: resisting or promoting DNA ejection from phage

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    Jeembaeva, Meerim; Larsson, Frida; Evilevitch, Alex

    2008-01-01

    Recent in vitro experiments have shown that DNA ejection from bacteriophage can be partially stopped by surrounding osmotic pressure when ejected DNA is digested by DNase I on the course of ejection. We argue in this work by combination of experimental techniques (osmotic suppression without DNaseI monitored by UV absorbance, pulse-field electrophoresis, and cryo-EM visualization) and simple scaling modeling that intact genome (i.e. undigested) ejection in a crowded environment is, on the contrary, enhanced or eventually complete with the help of a pulling force resulting from DNA condensation induced by the osmotic stress itself. This demonstrates that in vivo, the osmotically stressed cell cytoplasm will promote phage DNA ejection rather than resisting it. The further addition of DNA-binding proteins under crowding conditions is shown to enhance the extent of ejection. We also found some optimal crowding conditions for which DNA content remaining in the capsid upon ejection is maximum, which correlates well...

  9. Association between phage types and antimicrobial resistance among bovine Staphylococcus aureus from 10 countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vintov, J.; Aarestrup, Frank Møller; Zinn, C. E.;

    2003-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the diversity of phage types and associations between penicillin resistance and phage types among 815 Staphylococcus aureus isolates from bovine mastitis in nine European countries and USA. All isolates were examined for susceptibility to antimicrobial agents...... associated with penicillin resistance in contrast to phage group I (P = 0.0023) and phage complex-80 (P = 0.0066). This study confirms that a large number of phage types of S. aureus cause bovine mastitis, but that some types predominate. In addition, these findings could indicate that the use of penicillin...... in the bovine environment has selected for specific types of S. aureus in countries with a high frequency of resistance....

  10. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus phage plaque size enhancement using sublethal concentrations of antibiotics.

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    Kaur, Sandeep; Harjai, Kusum; Chhibber, Sanjay

    2012-12-01

    Phage therapy presents an alternative approach against the emerging methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) threat. Some of the problems encountered during isolation of MRSA phages include the high prevalence of enteric phages in natural sources, nonspecific absorption of viable phage, and the formation of pinpoint or tiny plaques. The phage isolated in this study, MR-5, also formed tiny plaques against its host S. aureus ATCC 43300 (MRSA), making its detection and enumeration difficult. An improved method of increasing the plaque size of MRSA phage by incorporating sublethal concentrations of three different classes of antibiotics (inhibitors of protein synthesis) in the classical double-layer agar (DLA) method was investigated. The β-lactam and quinolone antibiotics commonly employed in earlier studies for increasing the plaque size did not show any significant effect on the plaque size of isolated MR-5 phage. Linezolid (oxazolidinone class), tetracycline, and ketolide antibiotics brought significant enhancements (3 times the original size) in the plaque size of MR-5 phage. Prior treatment with these antibiotics resulted in significant reductions in the time of adsorption and the latent period of MR-5 phage. To rule out whether the action of linezolid (which brought the maximum increase in plaque size) was specific for a single phage only, its effect on the plaque size of seven other S. aureus-specific phages was also assessed. Significant enhancements in the plaque size of these phages were observed. These results indicate that this modification can therefore safely be incorporated in the traditional DLA overlay method to search for new MRSA-virulent phages.

  11. Tetracycline consumption and occurrence of tetracycline resistance in Salmonella typhimurium phage types from Danish pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Emborg, Hanne-Dorthe; Vigre, Håkan; Jensen, Vibeke Frøkjær;

    2007-01-01

    The aims of the present study were to investigate at the farm-owner level the effect of prescribed tetracycline consumption in pigs and different Salmonella Typhimurium phage types on the probability that the S. Typhimurium was resistant to tetracycline. In this study, 1,307 isolates were included......, originating from 877 farm owners, and data were analyzed using logistic regression. The analysis showed that both the S. Typhimurium phage type (p consumption (p = 0.0007) were significantly associated with tetracycline resistance. In particular, the phage type...... was strongly associated with tetracycline resistance. A further analysis of data from the Danish Integrated Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring and Research Programme (DANMAP) indicates that the tetracycline-susceptible phage types only slowly become tetracycline resistant, although tetracycline consumption...

  12. Antibiotic treatment expands the resistance reservoir and ecological network of the phage metagenome.

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    Modi, Sheetal R; Lee, Henry H; Spina, Catherine S; Collins, James J

    2013-07-11

    The mammalian gut ecosystem has considerable influence on host physiology, but the mechanisms that sustain this complex environment in the face of different stresses remain obscure. Perturbations to the gut ecosystem, such as through antibiotic treatment or diet, are at present interpreted at the level of bacterial phylogeny. Less is known about the contributions of the abundant population of phages to this ecological network. Here we explore the phageome as a potential genetic reservoir for bacterial adaptation by sequencing murine faecal phage populations following antibiotic perturbation. We show that antibiotic treatment leads to the enrichment of phage-encoded genes that confer resistance via disparate mechanisms to the administered drug, as well as genes that confer resistance to antibiotics unrelated to the administered drug, and we demonstrate experimentally that phages from treated mice provide aerobically cultured naive microbiota with increased resistance. Systems-wide analyses uncovered post-treatment phage-encoded processes related to host colonization and growth adaptation, indicating that the phageome becomes broadly enriched for functionally beneficial genes under stress-related conditions. We also show that antibiotic treatment expands the interactions between phage and bacterial species, leading to a more highly connected phage-bacterial network for gene exchange. Our work implicates the phageome in the emergence of multidrug resistance, and indicates that the adaptive capacity of the phageome may represent a community-based mechanism for protecting the gut microflora, preserving its functional robustness during antibiotic stress.

  13. Characterization of bacteriophages infecting Streptomyces erythreus and properties of phage-resistant mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donadio, S; Paladino, R; Costanzi, I; Sparapani, P; Schreil, W; Iaccarino, M

    1986-06-01

    Three bacteriophages infecting Streptomyces erythreus, called G3, G4 and G5, were isolated and characterized. They contain double-stranded linear DNA molecules with cohesive ends. The restriction map of G3 DNA (48 kilobases long) for four restriction endonucleases and that of G4 DNA (43 kilobases long) for seven restriction endonucleases are reported. Restriction analysis and hybridization experiments showed that G3 and G4 share little DNA homology, while G4 and G5 are apparently identical except for an additional EcoRI site present in G5. The region containing this EcoRI site has been mapped on G4 DNA. Microbiological and serological data showed that G5 is very similar to G4. G3- and G4-resistant mutants of S. erythreus PS1 were isolated. The screening of phage-resistant mutants showed a high frequency of strains with increased erythromycin production. The mechanism of phage resistance of strain PS3 (G3 resistant) and of strain PS16 (G4 resistant) was examined. The DNA of the resistant strains contains no phage DNA, ruling out lysogeny as a cause of phage resistance. Transfection of strains PS1, PS3, and PS16 with DNA of the three phages showed the same efficiency, indicating that resistance is at the level of the bacterial wall.

  14. Incorporation of a lambda phage recombination system and EGFP detection to simplify mutagenesis of Herpes simplex virus bacterial artificial chromosomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weir Jerry P

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Targeted mutagenesis of the herpesvirus genomes has been facilitated by the use of bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC technology. Such modified genomes have potential uses in understanding viral pathogenesis, gene identification and characterization, and the development of new viral vectors and vaccines. We have previously described the construction of a herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2 BAC and the use of an allele replacement strategy to construct HSV-2 recombinants. While the BAC mutagenesis procedure is a powerful method to generate HSV-2 recombinants, particularly in the absence of selective marker in eukaryotic culture, the mutagenesis procedure is still difficult and cumbersome. Results Here we describe the incorporation of a phage lambda recombination system into an allele replacement vector. This strategy enables any DNA fragment containing the phage attL recombination sites to be efficiently inserted into the attR sites of the allele replacement vector using phage lambda clonase. We also describe how the incorporation of EGFP into the allele replacement vector can facilitate the selection of the desired cross-over recombinant BACs when the allele replacement reaction is a viral gene deletion. Finally, we incorporate the lambda phage recombination sites directly into an HSV-2 BAC vector for direct recombination of gene cassettes using the phage lambda clonase-driven recombination reaction. Conclusion Together, these improvements to the techniques of HSV BAC mutagenesis will facilitate the construction of recombinant herpes simplex viruses and viral vectors.

  15. Exogenous phage recombinase-independent inactivation of chromosomal genes in Yersinia enterocolitica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhar, Mahesh S; Kumar, Pradeep; Virdi, Jugsharan S

    2013-11-01

    Characterization of newly identified genes is necessary to understand their functions. Phenotypic characterization of isogenic mutants provides good understanding of the functions of the genes in wild type strains. In the present study, we report the use of linear dsDNA as a substrate for homologous recombination in Yersinia enterocolitica. A double-stranded linear recombinant DNA (LRD) containing an antibiotic resistance gene flanked by homologous regions to the target gene was created. Transformation of this LRD into Y. enterocolitica led to the replacement of targeted loci with antibiotic resistance gene. Using this strategy, two chromosomal genes namely urease C (ureC) and hemophore A (hasA) were disrupted in three strains of Y. enterocolitica. These recombinations were independent of the EPR functions. This is the first report of EPR-independent inactivation of chromosomal genes in Y. enterocolitica strains.

  16. Chromosomal Instability Confers Intrinsic Multidrug Resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, Alvin J. X.; Endesfelder, David; Rowan, Andrew J.

    2011-01-01

    their diploid parental cells only with increasing chromosomal heterogeneity and isogenic cell line models of CIN+ displayed multidrug resistance relative to their CIN- parental cancer cell line derivatives. In a meta-analysis of CRC outcome following cytotoxic treatment, CIN+ predicted worse progression......-free or disease-free survival relative to patients with CIN- disease. Our results suggest that stratifying tumor responses according to CIN status should be considered within the context of clinical trials to minimize the confounding effects of tumor CIN status on drug sensitivity. Cancer Res; 71(5); 1858-70. (c......Aneuploidy is associated with poor prognosis in solid tumors. Spontaneous chromosome missegregation events in aneuploid cells promote chromosomal instability (CIN) that may contribute to the acquisition of multidrug resistance in vitro and heighten risk for tumor relapse in animal models...

  17. Viruses versus bacteria-novel approaches to phage therapy as a tool against multidrug-resistant pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viertel, Tania Mareike; Ritter, Klaus; Horz, Hans-Peter

    2014-09-01

    Bacteriophage therapy (the application of phages to treat bacterial infections) has a tradition dating back almost a century, but interest in phage therapy slowed down in the West when antibiotics were discovered. With the emerging threat of infections caused by multidrug-resistant bacteria and scarce prospects of newly introduced antibiotics in the future, phages are currently being reconsidered as alternative therapeutics. Conventional phage therapy uses lytic bacteriophages for treatment and recent human clinical trials have revealed encouraging results. In addition, several other modern approaches to phages as therapeutics have been made in vitro and in animal models. Dual therapy with phages and antibiotics has resulted in significant reductions in the number of bacterial pathogens. Bioengineered phages have overcome many of the problems of conventional phage therapy, enabled targeted drug delivery or reversed the resistance of drug-resistant bacteria. The use of enzymes derived from phages, such as endolysin, as therapeutic agents has been efficient in the elimination of Gram-positive pathogens. This review presents novel strategies for phage-related therapies and describes our current knowledge of natural bacteriophages within the human microbiome. Our aim is to provide an overview of the high number of different methodological concepts, thereby encouraging further research on this topic, with the ultimate goal of using phages as therapeutic or preventative medicines in daily clinical practice.

  18. Pre-adapting parasitic phages to a pathogen leads to increased pathogen clearance and lowered resistance evolution with Pseudomonas aeruginosacystic fibrosis bacterial isolates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friman, Ville-Petri; Soanes-Brown, Daniel; Sierocinski, Pawel

    2016-01-01

    Recent years have seen renewed interest in phage therapy - the use of viruses to specifically kill disease-causing bacteria – because of the alarming rise in antibiotic resistance. However, a major limitation of phage therapy is the ease at with bacteria can evolve resistance to phages. Here we...... determined if in vitro experimental coevolution can increase the efficiency of phage therapy by limiting the resistance evolution of intermittent and chronic cystic fibrosis Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung isolates to four different phages. We first pre-adapted all phage strains against all bacterial strains...... and then compared the efficacy of pre-adapted and non-adapted phages against ancestral bacterial strains. We found that evolved phages were more efficient in reducing bacterial densities than ancestral phages. This was primarily because only 50% of bacterial strains were able to evolve resistance to evolved phages...

  19. BREX is a novel phage resistance system widespread in microbial genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldfarb, Tamara; Sberro, Hila; Weinstock, Eyal; Cohen, Ofir; Doron, Shany; Charpak-Amikam, Yoav; Afik, Shaked; Ofir, Gal; Sorek, Rotem

    2015-01-13

    The perpetual arms race between bacteria and phage has resulted in the evolution of efficient resistance systems that protect bacteria from phage infection. Such systems, which include the CRISPR-Cas and restriction-modification systems, have proven to be invaluable in the biotechnology and dairy industries. Here, we report on a six-gene cassette in Bacillus cereus which, when integrated into the Bacillus subtilis genome, confers resistance to a broad range of phages, including both virulent and temperate ones. This cassette includes a putative Lon-like protease, an alkaline phosphatase domain protein, a putative RNA-binding protein, a DNA methylase, an ATPase-domain protein, and a protein of unknown function. We denote this novel defense system BREX (Bacteriophage Exclusion) and show that it allows phage adsorption but blocks phage DNA replication. Furthermore, our results suggest that methylation on non-palindromic TAGGAG motifs in the bacterial genome guides self/non-self discrimination and is essential for the defensive function of the BREX system. However, unlike restriction-modification systems, phage DNA does not appear to be cleaved or degraded by BREX, suggesting a novel mechanism of defense. Pan genomic analysis revealed that BREX and BREX-like systems, including the distantly related Pgl system described in Streptomyces coelicolor, are widely distributed in ~10% of all sequenced microbial genomes and can be divided into six coherent subtypes in which the gene composition and order is conserved. Finally, we detected a phage family that evades the BREX defense, implying that anti-BREX mechanisms may have evolved in some phages as part of their arms race with bacteria.

  20. Undetectable bacterial resistance to phage lytic proteins from the Staphylococcus aureus bacteriophage vB_SauS-phiIPLA88

    Science.gov (United States)

    The increase in antibiotic resistance world-wide revitalized the interest in the use of phage lysins to combat pathogenic bacteria. In this work, we tested for the emergence of resistant Staphylococcus aureus to any of three phage lytic proteins constructs. The investigated cell wall lytic enzymes w...

  1. Reversing bacterial resistance to antibiotics by phage-mediated delivery of dominant sensitive genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edgar, Rotem; Friedman, Nir; Molshanski-Mor, Shahar; Qimron, Udi

    2012-02-01

    Pathogen resistance to antibiotics is a rapidly growing problem, leading to an urgent need for novel antimicrobial agents. Unfortunately, development of new antibiotics faces numerous obstacles, and a method that resensitizes pathogens to approved antibiotics therefore holds key advantages. We present a proof of principle for a system that restores antibiotic efficiency by reversing pathogen resistance. This system uses temperate phages to introduce, by lysogenization, the genes rpsL and gyrA conferring sensitivity in a dominant fashion to two antibiotics, streptomycin and nalidixic acid, respectively. Unique selective pressure is generated to enrich for bacteria that harbor the phages carrying the sensitizing constructs. This selection pressure is based on a toxic compound, tellurite, and therefore does not forfeit any antibiotic for the sensitization procedure. We further demonstrate a possible way of reducing undesirable recombination events by synthesizing dominant sensitive genes with major barriers to homologous recombination. Such synthesis does not significantly reduce the gene's sensitization ability. Unlike conventional bacteriophage therapy, the system does not rely on the phage's ability to kill pathogens in the infected host, but instead, on its ability to deliver genetic constructs into the bacteria and thus render them sensitive to antibiotics prior to host infection. We believe that transfer of the sensitizing cassette by the constructed phage will significantly enrich for antibiotic-treatable pathogens on hospital surfaces. Broad usage of the proposed system, in contrast to antibiotics and phage therapy, will potentially change the nature of nosocomial infections toward being more susceptible to antibiotics rather than more resistant.

  2. Bacterail Pathogens Resistance to Phages During the Phage Therapy%噬菌体治疗中细菌对噬菌体的抗性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蔡刘体; 陈兴江; 刘艳霞; 石俊雄

    2014-01-01

    抗生素治疗尽管有几十年有效治疗的历史,但随着越来越多耐/抗药性细菌的出现,细菌对抗生素的抗药性已成为一个大问题。噬菌体治疗是使用噬菌体作为抗菌剂来感染细菌株系,它一直是人们倡导的一个很有前途的常规抗生素治疗的替代方案。然而,由于细菌与噬菌体的协同进化中,细菌可以通过多种机制获得对噬菌体的抗性。因此,人们对噬菌体治疗抱有期望的同时,也关注噬菌体治疗长时间的使用之后,是否会与抗生素使用之后结果相类似,导致抗性细菌病原菌感染的治疗困难。综述了细菌-噬菌体协同进化中细菌病原菌对有感染能力的噬菌体是否会产生抗性,及其在噬菌体治疗中影响的争论,并展望了噬菌体治疗的潜在前景。%Bacterial pathogens have been treated effectively with antibiotics for several decades, but with more and more resistant bacteria appeared, the resistance to antibiotics has become a difficulty issue in antibiotics therapies. Phages therapy, the application of the phages that infect bacterial pathogens as antimicrobials, has been expected and advocated as a promising alternative to conventional antibiotics. However, under the selection of the co-evolution between phages and bacteria, bacterial pathogens can became resistance to the phages by several mechanisms. So, at the same expecting and advocating, should we worry about the problem that whether the phage-treated pathogens will develop to resistance to the phages caused to treat difficulty at last? Here, the arguments about the bacterial pathogens resistance to the phages under the phage-bacterium co-evolution and its effect on the phages therapy were summarized and reviewed, and the phage therapy for control the bacterial pathogen was prospected.

  3. Bacteriophage-mediated acquisition of antibiotic resistance by Staphylococcus aureus type 88.

    OpenAIRE

    Schaefler, S.

    1982-01-01

    Antibiotic-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains of phage type 88, lysogenic for phage 188, when grown in mixed culture with a nonlysogenic novobiocin-resistant strain, acquired novobiocin resistance at a high rate from the nonlysogenic strain. With most strains of phage type 88, there was no detectable transfer of resistance from lysogenic to nonlysogenic cells. Lysogenization with phage 188 of phage-sensitive strains conferred on the lysogenized cells the ability to acquire chromosome and...

  4. Convergent evolution toward an improved growth rate and a reduced resistance range in Prochlorococcus strains resistant to phage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avrani, Sarit; Lindell, Debbie

    2015-01-01

    Prochlorococcus is an abundant marine cyanobacterium that grows rapidly in the environment and contributes significantly to global primary production. This cyanobacterium coexists with many cyanophages in the oceans, likely aided by resistance to numerous co-occurring phages. Spontaneous resistance occurs frequently in Prochlorococcus and is often accompanied by a pleiotropic fitness cost manifested as either a reduced growth rate or enhanced infection by other phages. Here, we assessed the fate of a number of phage-resistant Prochlorococcus strains, focusing on those with a high fitness cost. We found that phage-resistant strains continued evolving toward an improved growth rate and a narrower resistance range, resulting in lineages with phenotypes intermediate between those of ancestral susceptible wild-type and initial resistant substrains. Changes in growth rate and resistance range often occurred in independent events, leading to a decoupling of the selection pressures acting on these phenotypes. These changes were largely the result of additional, compensatory mutations in noncore genes located in genomic islands, although genetic reversions were also observed. Additionally, a mutator strain was identified. The similarity of the evolutionary pathway followed by multiple independent resistant cultures and clones suggests they undergo a predictable evolutionary pathway. This process serves to increase both genetic diversity and infection permutations in Prochlorococcus populations, further augmenting the complexity of the interaction network between Prochlorococcus and its phages in nature. Last, our findings provide an explanation for the apparent paradox of a multitude of resistant Prochlorococcus cells in nature that are growing close to their maximal intrinsic growth rates. PMID:25922520

  5. Designing phage therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodridge, Lawrence D

    2010-01-01

    Phage therapy is the application of phages to bodies, substances, or environments to effect the biocontrol of pathogenic or nuisance bacteria. To be effective, phages, minimally, must be capable of attaching to bacteria (adsorption), killing those bacteria (usually associated with phage infection), and otherwise surviving (resisting decay) until they achieve attachment and subsequent killing. While a strength of phage therapy is that phages that possess appropriate properties can be chosen from a large diversity of naturally occurring phages, a more rational approach to phage therapy also can include post-isolation manipulation of phages genetically, phenotypically, or in terms of combining different products into a single formulation. Genetic manipulation, especially in these modern times, can involve genetic engineering, though a more traditional approach involves the selection of spontaneously occurring phage mutants during serial transfer protocols. While genetic modification typically is done to give rise to phenotypic changes in phages, phage phenotype alone can also be modified in vitro, prior to phage application for therapeutic purposes, as for the sake of improving phage lethality (such as by linking phage virions to antibacterial chemicals such as chloramphenicol) or survival capabilities (e.g., via virion PEGylation). Finally, phages, both naturally occurring isolates or otherwise modified constructs, can be combined into cocktails which provide collectively enhanced capabilities such as expanded overall host range. Generally these strategies represent different routes towards improving phage therapy formulations and thereby efficacy through informed design.

  6. A novel Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteriophage, Ab31, a chimera formed from temperate phage PAJU2 and P. putida lytic phage AF: characteristics and mechanism of bacterial resistance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Libera Latino

    Full Text Available A novel temperate bacteriophage of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, phage vB_PaeP_Tr60_Ab31 (alias Ab31 is described. Its genome is composed of structural genes related to those of lytic P. putida phage AF, and regulatory genes similar to those of temperate phage PAJU2. The virion structure resembles that of phage AF and other lytic Podoviridae (S. enterica Epsilon 15 and E. coli phiv10 with similar tail spikes. Ab31 was able to infect P. aeruginosa strain PA14 and two genetically related strains called Tr60 and Tr162, out of 35 diverse strains from cystic fibrosis patients. Analysis of resistant host variants revealed different phenotypes, including induction of pigment and alginate overproduction. Whole genome sequencing of resistant variants highlighted the existence of a large deletion of 234 kbp in two strains, encompassing a cluster of genes required for the production of CupA fimbriae. Stable lysogens formed by Ab31 in strain Tr60, permitted the identification of the insertion site. During colonization of the lung in cystic fibrosis patients, P. aeruginosa adapts by modifying its genome. We suggest that bacteriophages such as Ab31 may play an important role in this adaptation by selecting for bacterial characteristics that favor persistence of bacteria in the lung.

  7. Site-specific integration of the temperate bacteriophage phi adh into the Lactobacillus gasseri chromosome and molecular characterization of the phage (attP) and bacterial (attB) attachment sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raya, R R; Fremaux, C; De Antoni, G L; Klaenhammer, T R

    1992-01-01

    The temperate bacteriophage phi adh integrates its genome into the chromosomal DNA of Lactobacillus gasseri ADH by a site-specific recombination process. Southern hybridization analysis of BclI-digested genomic DNA from six relysogenized derivatives of the prophage-cured strain NCK102 displayed phage-chromosomal junction fragments identical to those of the lysogenic parent. The phi adh attachment site sequence, attP, was located within a 365-bp EcoRI-HindIII fragment of phage phi adh. This fragment was cloned and sequenced. DNA sequence analysis revealed striking features common to the attachment sites of other site-specific recombination systems: five direct repeats of the sequence TGTCCCTTTT(C/T) and a 14-bp inverted repeat. Oligonucleotides derived from the sequence of the attP-containing fragment enabled us to amplify predicted junction fragment sequences and thus to identify attL, attR, and attB. The core region was defined as the 16-bp sequence TACACTTCTTAGGAGG. Phage-encoded functions essential for site-specific insertion of phage phi adh were located in a 4.5-kb BclI fragment. This fragment was cloned in plasmid pSA34 to generate the insertional vector pTRK182. Plasmid pTRK182 was introduced into L. gasseri NCK102 by electroporation. Hybridization analysis showed that a single copy of pTRK182 had integrated at the attB site of the NCK102 erythromycin-resistant transformants. This is the first site-specific recombination system described in lactobacilli, as well as the first attP-based site-specific integration vector constructed for L. gasseri ADH. Images PMID:1512192

  8. Pseudomonas aeruginosa adaptation to lungs of cystic fibrosis patients leads to lowered resistance to phage and protist enemies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ville-Petri Friman

    Full Text Available Pathogenic life styles can lead to highly specialized interactions with host species, potentially resulting in fitness trade-offs in other ecological contexts. Here we studied how adaptation of the environmentally transmitted bacterial pathogen, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, to cystic fibrosis (CF patients affects its survival in the presence of natural phage (14/1, ΦKZ, PNM and PT7 and protist (Tetrahymena thermophila and Acanthamoebae polyphaga enemies. We found that most of the bacteria isolated from relatively recently intermittently colonised patients (1-25 months, were innately phage-resistant and highly toxic for protists. In contrast, bacteria isolated from long time chronically infected patients (2-23 years, were less efficient in both resisting phages and killing protists. Moreover, chronic isolates showed reduced killing of wax moth larvae (Galleria mellonella probably due to weaker in vitro growth and protease expression. These results suggest that P. aeruginosa long-term adaptation to CF-lungs could trade off with its survival in aquatic environmental reservoirs in the presence of microbial enemies, while lowered virulence could reduce pathogen opportunities to infect insect vectors; factors that are both likely to result in poorer environmental transmission. From an applied perspective, phage therapy could be useful against chronic P. aeruginosa lung infections that are often characterized by multidrug resistance: chronic isolates were least resistant to phages and their poor growth will likely slow down the emergence of beneficial resistance mutations.

  9. Pseudomonas aeruginosa adaptation to lungs of cystic fibrosis patients leads to lowered resistance to phage and protist enemies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friman, Ville-Petri; Ghoul, Melanie; Molin, Søren; Johansen, Helle Krogh; Buckling, Angus

    2013-01-01

    Pathogenic life styles can lead to highly specialized interactions with host species, potentially resulting in fitness trade-offs in other ecological contexts. Here we studied how adaptation of the environmentally transmitted bacterial pathogen, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, to cystic fibrosis (CF) patients affects its survival in the presence of natural phage (14/1, ΦKZ, PNM and PT7) and protist (Tetrahymena thermophila and Acanthamoebae polyphaga) enemies. We found that most of the bacteria isolated from relatively recently intermittently colonised patients (1-25 months), were innately phage-resistant and highly toxic for protists. In contrast, bacteria isolated from long time chronically infected patients (2-23 years), were less efficient in both resisting phages and killing protists. Moreover, chronic isolates showed reduced killing of wax moth larvae (Galleria mellonella) probably due to weaker in vitro growth and protease expression. These results suggest that P. aeruginosa long-term adaptation to CF-lungs could trade off with its survival in aquatic environmental reservoirs in the presence of microbial enemies, while lowered virulence could reduce pathogen opportunities to infect insect vectors; factors that are both likely to result in poorer environmental transmission. From an applied perspective, phage therapy could be useful against chronic P. aeruginosa lung infections that are often characterized by multidrug resistance: chronic isolates were least resistant to phages and their poor growth will likely slow down the emergence of beneficial resistance mutations.

  10. Fluoroquinolone induction of phage-mediated gene transfer in multidrug-resistant Salmonella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bearson, Bradley L; Brunelle, Brian W

    2015-08-01

    Fluoroquinolones are broad-spectrum antibiotics that inhibit bacterial DNA gyrase and topoisomerase activity, which can cause DNA damage and result in bacterial cell death. In response to DNA damage, bacteria induce an SOS response to stimulate DNA repair. However, the SOS response may also induce prophage with production of infectious virions. Salmonella strains typically contain multiple prophages, and certain strains including phage types DT120 and DT104 contain prophage that upon induction are capable of generalised transduction. In this study, strains of multidrug-resistant (MDR) Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium DT120 and DT104 were exposed to fluoroquinolones important for use in human and veterinary disease therapy to determine whether prophage(s) are induced that could facilitate phage-mediated gene transfer. Cultures of MDR S. Typhimurium DT120 and DT104 containing a kanamycin resistance plasmid were lysed after exposure to fluoroquinolones (ciprofloxacin, enrofloxacin and danofloxacin). Bacterial cell lysates were able to transfer the plasmid to a recipient kanamycin-susceptible Salmonella strain by generalised transduction. In addition, exposure of DT120 to ciprofloxacin induced the recA gene of the bacterial SOS response and genes encoded in a P22-like generalised transducing prophage. This research indicates that fluoroquinolone exposure of MDR Salmonella can facilitate horizontal gene transfer, suggesting that fluoroquinolone usage in human and veterinary medicine may have unintended consequences, including the induction of phage-mediated gene transfer from MDR Salmonella. Stimulation of gene transfer following bacterial exposure to fluoroquinolones should be considered an adverse effect, and clinical decisions regarding antibiotic selection for infectious disease therapy should include this potential risk.

  11. PHAGE RESISTANCE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2009-01-01

    The present invention relates to the field of dairy science. In particular, the present invention relates to methods for improving dairy starter culture quality as well as food products that can be obtained using such methods....

  12. Phage therapy: present and future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolesnikova, S. G.; Tulyakova, E. N.; Moiseeva, I. Y.

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, bacteriophages are known to have become an effective alternative to antibiotic drugs. The article describes the current and potential applications of bacteriophages and phage endolysins. Also of interest is the devastating effect of phages on biofilms. The development of phage resistance is touched upon as well. Furthermore, the authors discuss the issue of laying down the rules of rational phage therapy.

  13. Fitness cost of chromosomal drug resistance-conferring mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sander, Peter; Springer, Burkhard; Prammananan, Therdsak; Sturmfels, Antje; Kappler, Martin; Pletschette, Michel; Böttger, Erik C

    2002-05-01

    To study the cost of chromosomal drug resistance mutations to bacteria, we investigated the fitness cost of mutations that confer resistance to different classes of antibiotics affecting bacterial protein synthesis (aminocyclitols, 2-deoxystreptamines, macrolides). We used a model system based on an in vitro competition assay with defined Mycobacterium smegmatis laboratory mutants; selected mutations were introduced by genetic techniques to address the possibility that compensatory mutations ameliorate the resistance cost. We found that the chromosomal drug resistance mutations studied often had only a small fitness cost; compensatory mutations were not involved in low-cost or no-cost resistance mutations. When drug resistance mutations found in clinical isolates were considered, selection of those mutations that have little or no fitness cost in the in vitro competition assay seems to occur. These results argue against expectations that link decreased levels of antibiotic consumption with the decline in the level of resistance.

  14. Effect of Bacteriophages on the Growth of Flavobacterium psychrophilum and Development of Phage-Resistant Strains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Rói Hammershaimb; Madsen, Lone; Dalsgaard, Inger;

    2016-01-01

    The controlling effect of single and multiple phages on the density of Flavobacterium psychrophilum at different initial multiplicity of infection (MOI) was assessed in batch cultures to explore the potential for phage-based treatment of this important fish pathogen. A high initial phage concentr...

  15. Isolation and characterization of φkm18p, a novel lytic phage with therapeutic potential against extensively drug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gwan-Han Shen

    Full Text Available AIMS: To isolate phages against extensively drug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (XDRAB and characterize the highest lytic capability phage as a model to evaluate the potential on phage therapy. METHODS AND RESULTS: Eight phages were isolated from hospital sewage and showed narrow host spectrum. Phage φkm18p was able to effectively lyse the most XDRAB. It has a dsDNA genome of 45 kb in size and hexagonal head of about 59 nm in diameter and no tail. Bacterial population decreased quickly from 10(8 CFU ml(-1 to 10(3 CFU ml(-1 in 30 min by φkm18p. The 185 kDa lysis protein encoded by φkm18p genome was detected when the extracted protein did not boil before SDS-PAGE; it showed that the lysis protein is a complex rather than a monomer. Phage φkm18p improved human lung epithelial cells survival rates when they were incubated with A. baumannii. Combination of phages (φkm18p, φTZ1 and φ314 as a cocktail could lyse all genotype-varying XDRAB isolates. CONCLUSION: Infections with XDRAB are extremely difficult to treat and development of a phage cocktails therapy could be a therapeutic alternative in the future. Phage φkm18p is a good candidate for inclusion in phage cocktails.

  16. Phage lysin LysK can be truncated to its CHAP domain and retain lytic activity against live antibiotic-resistant staphylococci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horgan, Marianne; O'Flynn, Gary; Garry, Jennifer; Cooney, Jakki; Coffey, Aidan; Fitzgerald, Gerald F; Ross, R Paul; McAuliffe, Olivia

    2009-02-01

    A truncated derivative of the phage endolysin LysK containing only the CHAP (cysteine- and histidine-dependent amidohydrolase/peptidase) domain exhibited lytic activity against live clinical staphylococcal isolates, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. This is the first known report of a truncated phage lysin which retains high lytic activity against live staphylococcal cells.

  17. Bacteria, phages and septicemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ausra Gaidelyte

    Full Text Available The use of phages is an attractive option to battle antibiotic resistant bacteria in certain bacterial infections, but the role of phage ecology in bacterial infections is obscure. Here we surveyed the phage ecology in septicemia, the most severe type of bacterial infection. We observed that the majority of the bacterial isolates from septicemia patients spontaneously secreted phages active against other isolates of the same bacterial strain, but not to the strain causing the disease. Such phages were also detected in the initial blood cultures, indicating that phages are circulating in the blood at the onset of sepsis. The fact that most of the septicemic bacterial isolates carry functional prophages suggests an active role of phages in bacterial infections. Apparently, prophages present in sepsis-causing bacterial clones play a role in clonal selection during bacterial invasion.

  18. Phage choice, isolation, and preparation for phage therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Jason J; Hyman, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Phage therapy is the use of bacteriophages--viruses that use bacteria as their host cells--as biocontrol agents of bacteria. Currently, phage therapy is garnering renewed interest as bacterial resistance to antibiotics becomes widespread. Historically, phage therapy was largely abandoned in the West in the 1940s due to the advent of chemical antibiotics, and the unreliability of phage-based treatments when compared to antibiotics. The choice of phage strain and the methods of phage preparation are now thought to have been critical to the success or failure of phage therapy trials. Insufficiently virulent phages, especially against actual target bacteria, allow bacteria to survive treatment while poorly prepared phage stocks, even if of sufficiently virulent phages, lack the numbers of viable phages required for adequate treatment. In this review we discuss the factors that determine the methods of isolation, analysis, and identification of phage species for phage therapy. We go on to discuss the various methods available for purifying phages as well as considerations of the degree of purification which is sufficient for various applications. Lastly, we review the current practices used to prepare commercial phage therapy products.

  19. Identification and Characterization of Phage Variants of a Strain of Epidemic Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (EMRSA-15)

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, G. L.; Murchan, S.; Gil-Setas, A.; Aucken, H. M.

    2001-01-01

    EMRSA-15 is one of the most important strains of epidemic methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (EMRSA) found in the United Kingdom. It was originally characterized by weak lysis with phage 75 and production of enterotoxin C but not urease. Two variant strains of EMRSA-15 which show a broader phage pattern than the progenitor strain have emerged. A total of 153 recent clinical isolates representing classical EMRSA-15 (55 isolates) or these phage variants (98 isolates) were compared by SmaI macrorestriction profiles in pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) as well as by urease and enterotoxin C production. Eight of the 98 isolates were shown to be other unrelated strains by both PFGE and their production of urease, a misidentification rate of 8% by phage typing. Seventy-one EMRSA-15 isolates were enterotoxin C negative, and the majority of these were sensitive to phage 81. Examination of PFGE profiles and Southern blotting studies suggest that the enterotoxin C gene locus is encoded on a potentially mobile DNA segment of ca. 15 kb. After elimination of the eight non-EMRSA-15 isolates, the remaining 145 were characterized by PFGE, yielding 22 profiles. All profiles were within five band differences of at least one other profile. Classical EMRSA-15 isolates showed nine PFGE profiles, with the majority of isolates (68%) in profile B1. Six of these nine PFGE profiles were unique to the classical EMRSA-15 isolates. Among the phage variants of EMRSA-15, 16 profiles were seen, but the majority of isolates (83%) fell into 1 of 4 profiles (B2, B3, B4, and B7) which correlated well with phage patterns. The most divergent PFGE profiles among the EMRSA-15 isolates had as many as 12 band differences from one another, suggesting that in examining isolates belonging to such a temporally and geographically disseminated epidemic strain, the range of PFGE profiles must be regarded as a continuum and analyzed by relating the profiles back to the most common or progenitor

  20. The revival of Phage Therapy to fight Antimicrobial Resistance – Part I: What are the legal implications?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Minssen, Timo

    2014-01-01

    Last week I blogged about recent publications concerning the global battle against anti-microbial resistance (AMR). I did not mention a recent paper published in the June 2014 issue of Nature, which describes how European and U.S. researchers and authorities are increasingly considering clinical ...... therapies, also addressed in the paper, lies in the reluctance of pharmaceutical companies to invest into the field. The potential obstacles for more private involvement in phage therapy are many and range from considerable risks of failure, reputational damage, and unforeseeable side...... provide a good basis for further considerations. Part II of this contribution will elaborate a little further on the IP situation in phage therapy and discuss alternatives to IP protection....

  1. Genomic and Gene-Expression Comparisons among Phage-Resistant Type-IV Pilus Mutants of Pseudomonas syringae pathovar phaseolicola.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Sistrom

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola (Pph is a significant bacterial pathogen of agricultural crops, and phage Φ6 and other members of the dsRNA virus family Cystoviridae undergo lytic (virulent infection of Pph, using the type IV pilus as the initial site of cellular attachment. Despite the popularity of Pph/phage Φ6 as a model system in evolutionary biology, Pph resistance to phage Φ6 remains poorly characterized. To investigate differences between phage Φ6 resistant Pph strains, we examined genomic and gene expression variation among three bacterial genotypes that differ in the number of type IV pili expressed per cell: ordinary (wild-type, non-piliated, and super-piliated. Genome sequencing of non-piliated and super-piliated Pph identified few mutations that separate these genotypes from wild type Pph--and none present in genes known to be directly involved in type IV pilus expression. Expression analysis revealed that 81.1% of gene ontology (GO terms up-regulated in the non-piliated strain were down-regulated in the super-piliated strain. This differential expression is particularly prevalent in genes associated with respiration--specifically genes in the tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA cycle, aerobic respiration, and acetyl-CoA metabolism. The expression patterns of the TCA pathway appear to be generally up and down-regulated, in non-piliated and super-piliated Pph respectively. As pilus retraction is mediated by an ATP motor, loss of retraction ability might lead to a lower energy draw on the bacterial cell, leading to a different energy balance than wild type. The lower metabolic rate of the super-piliated strain is potentially a result of its loss of ability to retract.

  2. Characterization of Siphoviridae phage Z and studying its efficacy against multidrug-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae planktonic cells and biofilm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamal, Muhsin; Hussain, Tahir; Das, Chythanya Rajanna; Andleeb, Saadia

    2015-04-01

    Biofilm has many serious consequences for public health and is a major virulence factor contributing to the chronicity of infections. The aim of the current study was to isolate and characterize a bacteriophage that inhibits multidrug-resistant Klebsiella pneumonia (M) in planktonic form as well as biofilm. This phage, designated bacteriophage Z, was isolated from wastewater. Its adsorption rate to its host bacterium was significantly enhanced by MgCl2 and CaCl2. It has a wide range of pH and heat stability. From its one-step growth, latent time and burst size were determined to be 24 min and about 320 virions per cell, respectively. As analysed by transmission electron microscopy, phage Z had an icosahedral head of width 76±10 nm, length 92±14 nm and icosahedron side 38 nm, and a non-contractile tail 200±15 nm long and 14-29 nm wide. It belongs to the family Siphoviridae in the order Caudovirales. Six structural proteins ranging from 18 to 65 kDa in size were revealed by SDS-PAGE. The genome was found to comprise double-stranded DNA with an approximate size of 36 kb. Bacteria were grown in suspension and as biofilms to compare the susceptibility of both phenotypes to the phage lytic action. Phage Z was effective in reducing biofilm biomass after 24 and 48 h, showing more than twofold and threefold reduction, respectively. Biofilm cells and stationary-phase planktonic bacteria were killed at a lower rate than exponential-phase planktonic bacteria.

  3. The phage lytic proteins from the Staphylococcus aureus bacteriophage vB_SauS-phiIPLA88 display multiple active catalytic domains and do not trigger staphylococcal resistance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorena Rodríguez-Rubio

    Full Text Available The increase in antibiotic resistance world-wide revitalized the interest in the use of phage lysins to combat pathogenic bacteria. In this work, we analyzed the specific cleavage sites on the staphylococcal peptidoglycan produced by three phage lytic proteins. The investigated cell wall lytic enzymes were the endolysin LysH5 derived from the S. aureus bacteriophage vB_SauS-phi-IPLA88 (phi-IPLA88 and two fusion proteins between lysostaphin and the virion-associated peptidoglycan hydrolase HydH5 (HydH5SH3b and HydH5Lyso. We determined that all catalytic domains present in these proteins were active. Additionally, we tested for the emergence of resistant Staphylococcus aureus to any of the three phage lytic proteins constructs. Resistant S. aureus could not be identified after 10 cycles of bacterial exposure to phage lytic proteins either in liquid or plate cultures. However, a quick increase in lysostaphin resistance (up to 1000-fold in liquid culture was observed. The lack of resistant development supports the use of phage lytic proteins as future therapeutics to treat staphylococcal infections.

  4. Structural Comparison of Three Types of Staphylococcal Cassette Chromosome mec Integrated in the Chromosome in Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    OpenAIRE

    Ito, Teruyo; Katayama, Yuki; Asada, Kazumi; Mori, Namiko; Tsutsumimoto, Kanae; Tiensasitorn, Chuntima; Hiramatsu, Keiichi

    2001-01-01

    The β-lactam resistance gene mecA of Staphylococcus aureus is carried by a novel mobile genetic element, designated staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec), identified in the chromosome of a Japanese methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) strain. We now report identification of two additional types of mecA-carrying genetic elements found in the MRSA strains isolated in other countries of the world. There were substantial differences in the size and nucleotide sequences between the ele...

  5. Detection of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus using phage amplification combined with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, Jon C; Barr, John R

    2017-02-01

    Antibiotic resistance continues to contribute significantly to morbidity and mortality across the world. Developing new tests for antibiotic-resistant bacteria is a core action to combat resistant infections. We describe a method that uses phage amplification detection (PAD) combined with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) to rapidly identify Staphylococcus aureus and determine phenotypic susceptibility to cefoxitin. Samples tested for S. aureus are incubated together with bacteriophage in the presence and absence of cefoxitin and subjected to rapid trypsin digestion followed by MALDI-MS analysis. Tryptic peptides derived from amplified phage proteins can be detected by MALDI-MS, as validated by time-of-flight (TOF)/TOF analysis of each peptide combined with database searching. Methicillin-resistant S. aureus show significant phage amplification in the presence of cefoxitin, while methicillin-sensitive S. aureus show no phage amplification relative to a no-antibiotic control. We also show that PAD methodology can be implemented on an FDA-approved commercial MALDI-MS bacterial identification system to identify S. aureus and determine antibiotic susceptibility. The novelty of this assay includes the use of phage-derived tryptic peptides as detected by MALDI-MS to monitor the results of PAD on an instrument common to many modern microbiology laboratories.

  6. Phage type conversion in Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis caused by the introduction of a resistance plasmid of incompatibility group X (IncX)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brown, D. J.; Baggesen, Dorte Lau; Platt, D. J.;

    1999-01-01

    The plasmid pOG670, a 54 kb, conjugative plasmid that specifies resistance to ampicillin and kanamycin and belonging to the incompatibility group X (IncX), was transferred into 10 isolates of Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis belonging to 10 different phage types (PT1, 2, 3, 4, 8, 9, 9b, 10......, 11 and 13). Acquisition of the plasmid by these strains did not result in the loss of any resident plasmids but resulted in phage type conversion in 8 of the 10 strains (PT1, 2, 4, 8, 9, 9b, 10 and 11). The observed changes in phage type were found to result from the loss of sensitivity to 3...... of the 10 typing phages used (phages 3, 5 and 7). Where the conversion resulted in a change to a defined phage type, both the new and original PTs belonged to the same, previously described, evolutionary lines. Enteritidis PTs 1, 4 and 8, commonly associated with poultry world-wide, were converted to PTs 21...

  7. Antibiotic Treatment Expands the Resistance Reservoir and Ecological Network of the Phage Metagenome

    OpenAIRE

    Modi, Sheetal R.; Lee, Henry H.; Spina, Catherine S.; Collins, James J.

    2013-01-01

    The mammalian gut ecosystem has significant influence on host physiology 1–4 , but the mechanisms that sustain this complex environment in the face of different stresses remain obscure. Perturbations to this ecosystem, such as through antibiotic treatment or diet, are currently interpreted at the level of bacterial phylogeny 5–7 . Less is known about the contributions of the abundant population of phage to this ecological network. Here, we explore the phageome as a potential genetic reservoir...

  8. Characterisation of recently emerged multiple antibiotic-resistant Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium DT104 and other multiresistant phage types from Danish pig herds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baggesen, Dorte Lau; Aarestrup, Frank Møller

    1998-01-01

    A total of 670 isolates of Salmonella enterica were isolated from Danish pig herds, phage typed and tested for susceptibility to amoxycillin + clavulanate, ampicillin, colistin, enrofloxacin, gentamicin, neomycin, spectinomycin, streptomycin, tetracyclines, and trimethoprim + sulphadiazine. S...... electrophoresis (PFGE) using the restriction enzyme Xba I, Overall, 66 per cent of the 670 isolates were sensitive to all the antimicrobial agents tested. Eleven isolates of S typhimurium were resistant to ampicillin, streptomycin and tetracycline and also resistant to other antibiotics in different resistance...

  9. Phage 8-9 defines a cluster of site polymorphisms on chromosome 16q22-q24 (HGM9 no. D16S20)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maslen, C.; Magenis, R.E.; Sheehy, R.; Litt, M. (Oregon Health Sciences Univ., Portland (USA))

    1988-08-25

    Phage 8-9 was isolated from a genomic library of a mouse x human somatic cell hybrid (CF-52) containing an 11q-16q translocation as the only human chromosome. A 17 kb partial Sau 3A fragment was cloned in the BamHI site of EMBL3. Sac I identifies constant bands at 4.1, 2.3 and 1.3 kb and two 2-allele RFLPs with A1=10, A2=7.4+2.6 kb and B1=2.9, B2=1.9+1.0 kb. BgI II identifies a constant band of 8 kb and a 3-allele RFLP. Pvu II identifies 8 constant bands <3.5 kb and a 2-allele RFLP with D1=6.5, D2=5.8+0.7 kb. Co-dominant inheritance has been shown at each of the four loci in at least 2 informative families with a total of at least 13 children.

  10. Phage antibodies obtained by competitive selection oil complement-resistant Moraxella (Branhamella) catarrhalis recognize the high-molecular-weight outer membrane protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boel, E; Bootsma, E; de Kruif, J; Jansze, M; Klingman, KL; van Dijk, H; Logtenberg, T

    1998-01-01

    We used competitive panning to select a panel of 10 different human antibodies from a large semisynthetic phage display library that distinguish between serum complement-resistant and complement-sensitive strains of the gram-negative diplococcus Moraxella (Branhamella) catarrhalis. Western blotting

  11. Structural comparison of three types of staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec integrated in the chromosome in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, T; Katayama, Y; Asada, K; Mori, N; Tsutsumimoto, K; Tiensasitorn, C; Hiramatsu, K

    2001-05-01

    The beta-lactam resistance gene mecA of Staphylococcus aureus is carried by a novel mobile genetic element, designated staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec), identified in the chromosome of a Japanese methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) strain. We now report identification of two additional types of mecA-carrying genetic elements found in the MRSA strains isolated in other countries of the world. There were substantial differences in the size and nucleotide sequences between the elements and the SCCmec. However, new elements shared the chromosomal integration site with the SCCmec. Structural analysis of the new elements revealed that they possessed all of the salient features of the SCCmec: conserved terminal inverted repeats and direct repeats at the integration junction points, conserved genetic organization around the mecA gene, and the presence of cassette chromosome recombinase (ccr) genes responsible for the movements of SCCmec. The elements, therefore, were considered to comprise the SCCmec family of staphylococcal mobile genetic elements together with the previously identified SCCmec. Among 38 epidemic MRSA strains isolated in 20 countries, 34 were shown to possess one of the three typical SCCmec elements on the chromosome. Our findings indicated that there are at least three distinct MRSA clones in the world with different types of SCCmec in their chromosome.

  12. Luciferase reporter phage phAE85 for rapid detection of rifampicin resistance in clinical isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gomathi Sivaramakrishnan; Balaji Subramanyam; Ponnuraja C; Vanaja Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Objective:To evaluate luciferase reporter phage (LRP) phAE85 in rapid detection of rifampicin resistance in a region where TB is endemic. Methods:One hundred and ninety primary isolates on Lowenstein-Jensen medium were tested. Middlebrook 7H9 complete medium with and without rifampicin at 2μg/mL was inoculated with standard inoculum from suspensions of the clinical isolate. After incubation for 72 h, LRP was added. Following 4 h of further incubation, light output from both control and test was measured as relative light units. Strains exhibiting a reduction of less than 50%relative light units in the drug containing vial compared to control were classified as resistant. Results were compared with the conventional minimum inhibitory concentration method (MIC) of drug susceptibility testing. Results:The two methods showed high level of agreement of 97% (CI 0.94, 0.99) and P value was 0.000 1. The sensitivity and specificity of LRP assay for detection of rifampicin resistance were 91%(CI 0.75, 0.98) and 99%(CI 0.95, 1.00) respectively. Time to detection of resistance by LRP assay was 3 d in comparison with 28 d by the minimum inhibitory concentration method. Conclusions: LRP assay with phAE85 is 99%specific, 91%sensitive and is highly reproducible. Thus the assay offers a simple procedure for drug sensitivity testing, within the scope of semi-automation.

  13. [Chromosome composition of wheat-rye lines and the influence of rye chromosomes on disease resistance and agronomic traits].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chumanova, E V; Efremova, T T; Trubacheeva, N V; Arbuzova, V S; Rosseeva, L P

    2014-11-01

    Identification of the chromosomal composition of common wheat lines with rye chromosomes was carried out using genomic in situ hybridization and 1RS- and 5P-specific PCR markers. It was demonstrated that wheat chromosomes 5A or 5D were substituted by rye chromosome 5R in the wheat-rye lines. It was established that one of the lines with complex disease resistance contained rye chromosome 5R and T1RS.1BL, while another line was found to contain, in addition to T1RS.1BL, a new Robertsonian translocation, T5AS.5RL. Substitution of the wheat chromosome 5A with the dominant Vrn-A1 gene for the Onokhoiskaya rye chromosome 5R led to lengthening of the germination-heading period or to a change in the type of development. A negative influence of T1RS.1BL on SDS sedimentation volume and grain hardness was demonstrated, along with a positive effect of the combination of T1RS. BL and 5R(5D) substitution on grain protein content. Quantitative traits of the 5R(5A) and 5R(5D) substitution lines were at the level of recipient cultivars. A line with two translocations, T1RS.1BL + T5AS.5R1, appeared to be more productive as compared to the line carrying T1RS.1BL in combination with the 5R(5D) substitution.

  14. Chromosome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chromosomes are structures found in the center (nucleus) of cells that carry long pieces of DNA. DNA ... is the building block of the human body. Chromosomes also contain proteins that help DNA exist in ...

  15. Phage therapy pharmacology phage cocktails.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Benjamin K; Abedon, Stephen T

    2012-01-01

    Phage therapy is the clinical or veterinary application of bacterial viruses (bacteriophages) as antibacterial "drugs." More generally, phages can be used as biocontrol agents against plant as well as foodborne pathogens. In this chapter, we consider the therapeutic use of phage cocktails, which is the combining of two or more phage types to produce more pharmacologically diverse formulations. The primary motivation for the use of cocktails is their broader spectra of activity in comparison to individual phage isolates: they can impact either more bacterial types or achieve effectiveness under a greater diversity of conditions. The combining of phages can also facilitate better targeting of multiple strains making up individual bacterial species or covering multiple species that might be responsible for similar disease states, in general providing, relative to individual phage isolates, a greater potential for presumptive or empirical treatment. Contrasting the use of phage banks, or even phage isolation against specific etiologies that have been obtained directly from patients under treatment, here we consider the utility as well as potential shortcomings associated with the use of phage cocktails as therapeutic antibacterial agents.

  16. Modular and aggregation resistant Vh antibodies from a phage display library

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, Niels Anton; Mandrup, Ole Aalund; Lykkemark, Simon

    2012-01-01

    Directed evolution of antibodies through phage display is a powerful technique for producing binders of various biological targets. One of the recent innovations in the fi eld is the domain antibody, an antibody consisting only of a single variable domain. These anti bodies can be obtained either...... through immunisation of sharks or camels, or alternatively from recombinant libraries1. The domain antibodies have certain advantages, both pharmacologically and technically. Here we report the construction of a semi-synthetic and highly modular antibody library, based on a human framework (V3-23/D47......). The antibody scaffold has been codon optimised to improve expression, and the CDR’s have been created using trinucleotide synthesis. These methods give a strict control over the randomisations, and the ability to design a library with minimal aggregation propensity. To facilitate further manipulation, unique...

  17. Cytogenetic Mapping of Disease Resistance Genes and Analysis of Their Distribution Features on Chromosomes in Maize

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LiLi-jia; SongYun-chun

    2003-01-01

    Cytogenetic maps of four clusters of disease resistance genes were generated by ISH of the two RFLP markers tightly linked to and flanking each of maize resistance genes and the cloned resistance genes from other plant species onto maize chromosomes, combining with data published before. These genes include Helminthosporium turcium Pass resistance genes Htl, Htnl and Ht2, Helminthosporium maydis Nisik resistance genes Rhml and Rhm2,maize dwarf mosaic virus resistance gene Mdml, wheat streak mosaic virus resistance gene Wsml, Helminthosporium carbonum ULLstrup resistance gene Hml and the cloned Xanthomonas oryzae pv. Oryzae resistance gene Xa21 of rice, Cladosporium fulvum resistance genes Cf-9 and Cf-2. 1 of tomato, and Pseudomonas syringae resistance gene RPS2 of Arabidopsis. Most of the tested disease resistance genes located on the four chromosomes, i. e. , chromosomesl, 3, 6 and 8, and they closely distributed at the interstitial regions of these chromosomal long arms with percentage distances ranging 31.44(±3.72)-72.40(±3. 25) except for genes Rhml, Rhm2, Mdml and Wsml which mapped on the satellites of the short arms of chromosome6. It showed that the tested RFLP markers and genes were duplicated or triplicated in maize genome. Homology and conservation of disease resistance genes among species, and relationship between distribution features and functions of the genes were discussed. The results provide important scientific basis for deeply understanding structure and function of disease resistance genes and breeding in maize.

  18. Genes for resistance to stripe rust on chromosome 2B and their application in wheat breeding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peigao Luo; Xueyun Hu; Huaiyu Zhang; Zhenglong Ren

    2009-01-01

    Stripe rust,caused by Puccinia striiformis f.sp.tritici,is one of the most damaging diseases of wheat worldwide.Growing resistant cultivars is the most economic and environmental friendly way to control the disease.There are many resistance genes to stripe rust located on wheat chromosome 2B.Here,we propose a strategy to construct the recombinant wheat chromosome 2B with multiple resistances to stripe rust by making crosses between wheat lines or cultivars carrying Yr genes and using marker-assisted selection,based on the reported information about resistance spectrum,chromosomal location,and linked markers of the genes.Pyramiding the resistance genes on 2B would afford a valuable strategy to control the disease by cultivating varieties with durable resistance.The possibility,efficiency,and prospect of the suggested strategy are reviewed in the paper.

  19. Pseudomonas aeruginosa adaptation to lungs of cystic fibrosis patients leads to lowered resistance to phage and protist enemies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friman, Ville-Petri; Ghoul, Melanie; Molin, Søren

    2013-01-01

    ) patients affects its survival in the presence of natural phage (14/1, ΦKZ, PNM and PT7) and protist (Tetrahymena thermophila and Acanthamoebae polyphaga) enemies. We found that most of the bacteria isolated from relatively recently intermittently colonised patients (1-25 months), were innately phage...

  20. Bacteriophages with potential to inactivate Salmonella Typhimurium: Use of single phage suspensions and phage cocktails.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Carla; Moreirinha, Catarina; Lewicka, Magdalena; Almeida, Paulo; Clemente, Carla; Cunha, Ângela; Delgadillo, Ivonne; Romalde, Jésus L; Nunes, Maria L; Almeida, Adelaide

    2016-07-15

    The aim of this study was to compare the dynamics of three previously isolated bacteriophages (or phages) individually (phSE-1, phSE-2 and phSE-5) or combined in cocktails of two or three phages (phSE-1/phSE-2, phSE-1/phSE-5, phSE-2/phSE-5 and phSE-1/phSE-2/phSE-5) to control Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (Salmonella Typhimurium) in order to evaluate their potential application during depuration. Phages were assigned to the family Siphoviridae and revealed identical restriction digest profiles, although they showed a different phage adsorption, host range, burst size, explosion time and survival in seawater. The three phages were effective against S. Typhimurium (reduction of ∼2.0 log CFU/mL after 4h treatment). The use of cocktails was not significantly more effective than the use of single phages. A big fraction of the remained bacteria are phage-resistant mutants (frequency of phage-resistant mutants 9.19×10(-5)-5.11×10(-4)) but phage- resistant bacterial mutants was lower for the cocktail phages than for the single phage suspensions and the phage phSE-1 presented the highest rate of resistance and phage phSE-5 the lowest one. The spectral changes of S. Typhimurium resistant and phage-sensitive cells were compared and revealed relevant differences for peaks associated to amide I (1620cm(-1)) and amide II (1515cm(-1)) from proteins and from carbohydrates and phosphates region (1080-1000cm(-1)). Despite the similar efficiency of individual phages, the development of lower resistance indicates that phage cocktails might be the most promising choice to be used during the bivalve depuration to control the transmission of salmonellosis.

  1. Cytogenetic Mapping of Disease Resistance Genes and Analysis of Their Distribution Features on Chromosomes in Maize

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Li-jia; Song Yun-chun

    2003-01-01

    Cytogenetic maps of four clusters of disease resistance genes were generated by ISH of the two RFLP markers tightly linked to and flanking each of maize resistance genes and the cloned resistance genes from other plant species onto maize chromosomes, combining with data published before. These genes include Helminthosporium turcium Pass resistance genes Ht1, Htn1 and Ht2, Helminthosporium maydis Nisik resistance genes Rhm1 and Rhm2, maize dwarf mosaic virus resistance gene Mdm1, wheat streak mosaic virus resistance gene Wsm1, Helminthosporium carbonum ULLstrup resistance gene Hml and the cloned Xanthomonas oryzae pv. Oryzae resistance gene Xa21 of rice, Cladosporium fulvum resistance genes Cf-9 and Cf-2.1 of tomato,and Pseudomonas syringae resistance gene RPS2 of Arabidopsis. Most of the tested disease resistance genes located on the four chromosomes, i.e., chromosomes1, 3, 6 and 8, and they closely distributed at the interstitial regions of these chromosomal long arms with percentage distances ranging 31.44(±3.72)-72.40(±3.25) except for genes Rhm1, Rhm2, Mdm1 and Wsm1 which mapped on the satellites of the short arms of chromosome6. It showed that the tested RFLP markers and genes were duplicated or triplicated in maize genome. Homology and conservation of disease resistance genes among species, and relationship between distribution features and functions of the genes were discussed. The results provide important scientific basis for deeply understanding structure and function of disease resistance genes and breeding in maize.

  2. Phage-Host Interactions in Flavobacterium psychrophilum and the Potential for Phage Therapy in Aquaculture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Rói Hammershaimb

    , the increasing problem with antibiotic resistance has led to increased attention to the use of phages for controlling F. psychrophilum infections in aquaculture. In a synopsis and four scientific papers, this PhD project studies the potential and optimizes the use of phage therapy for treatment and prevention...... of F. psychrophilum infections in rainbow trout fry. In the first paper, studies of the controlling effect of different phages infecting F. psychrophilum in liquid cultures showed that a high initial phage concentration was crucial for fast and effective bacterial lysis in the cultures and sensitive...... cells could be maintained at a low level throughout the rest of the experiment. Surprisingly, no difference was observed between infection with single phages or phage cocktails. At the end of incubation phage-sensitive strains dominated in the cultures with low initial phage concentrations and phage...

  3. Resistance genes, phage types and pulsed field gel electrophoresis pulsotypes in Salmonella enterica strains from laying hen farms in southern Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camarda, Antonio; Pugliese, Nicola; Pupillo, Antonia; Oliva, Marta; Circella, Elena; Dionisi, Anna Maria; Ricci, Antonia; Legretto, Marilisa; Caroli, Anna; Pazzani, Carlo

    2013-08-06

    Twenty-four Salmonella enterica isolates (13 serovar Enteritidis and 11 Typhimurium) isolated from 5,600 samples from intensive laying hen farms in Italy in 1998-2007 were characterized for antimicrobial resistance genes, pulsotype and phage type. Most of S. Typhimurium strains were pulsotype STYMXB.0147 (81.8%), phage type DT143 and resistant to sulfamethoxazole encoded by sul2. Two multidrug resistant (MDR) strains were identified. One strain, STYMXB.0061, was resistant to ampicillin (A), chloramphenicol (C), streptomycin (S), sulfamethoxazole (Su) and tetracycline (T) encoded by the Salmonella Genomic Island SGI1. The second MDR strain, STYMXB.0110, was resistant to SSuT encoded by sul1 and sul2, aadA1 and tet(C)-flanked by an IS26 element, respectively. The tet(C) gene has been reported to confer low levels of resistance and it has very rarely been detected in S. Typhimurium from poultry. In the current study, the MIC value (32 µg/mL) was consistent with the breakpoint (≥16 µg/mL) reported for Enterobacteriaceae. Most of the S. Enteritidis strains were resistant to Su (encoded by sul2). One MDR strain (ANxSSuT) was identified. With the exception of nalidixic acid (Nx), the resistances were respectively encoded by bla(TEM), strAB, sul2 and tet(A) harbored by an IncN conjugative plasmid. All isolates were pulsotype SENTXB.0001 with PT14b being the most prevalent identified phage type (57.1%). In Europe, SENTXB.0001 is the predominant PFGE profile from clinical cases and the identification of PT14b has steadily been on the increase since 2001. The findings presented in this study highlight the potential spread of S. Enteritidis phage types PT14b and S. Typhimurium DT143 in a field of particular relevance for zoonoses. Additional, the presence of resistance genes and genetic elements (conjugative plasmid and IS element) underlines the need to assess routinely studies in field, such as poultry farms, relevant fot the public health and suitable for the storage

  4. Chromosomal location of genes encoding for resistance to septoria tritici blotch (Mycosphaerella graminicola) in substitution lines of wheat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simón, M.R.; Worland, A.J.; Struik, P.C.

    2005-01-01

    Chromosomal location of resistance to Mycosphaerella graminicola was studied in substitution lines of resistant Triticum genotypes into the (susceptible) cultivar Chinese Spring (T. aestivum). (Moderately) resistant genotypes for which substitution lines were available were tested in a first screeni

  5. In Vivo Assessment of Phage and Linezolid Based Implant Coatings for Treatment of Methicillin Resistant S. aureus (MRSA Mediated Orthopaedic Device Related Infections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Kaur

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus comprises up to two-thirds of all pathogens in orthopaedic implant infections with two species respectively Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis, being the predominate etiological agents isolated. Further, with the emergence of methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA, treatment of S. aureus implant infections has become more difficult, thus representing a devastating complication. Use of local delivery system consisting of S.aureus specific phage along with linezolid (incorporated in biopolymer allowing gradual release of the two agents at the implant site represents a new, still unexplored treatment option (against orthopaedic implant infections that has been studied in an animal model of prosthetic joint infection. Naked wire, hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC coated wire and phage and /or linezolid coated K-wire were surgically implanted into the intra-medullary canal of mouse femur bone of respective groups followed by inoculation of S.aureus ATCC 43300(MRSA. Mice implanted with K-wire coated with both the agents i.e phage as well as linezolid (dual coated wires showed maximum reduction in bacterial adherence, associated inflammation of the joint as well as faster resumption of locomotion and motor function of the limb. Also, all the coating treatments showed no emergence of resistant mutants. Use of dual coated implants incorporating lytic phage (capable of self-multiplication as well as linezolid presents an attractive and aggressive early approach in preventing as well as treating implant associated infections caused by methicillin resistant S. aureus strains as assessed in a murine model of experimental joint infection.

  6. Phage therapy--constraints and possibilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Anders S

    2014-05-01

    The rise of antibiotic-resistant bacterial strains, causing intractable infections, has resulted in an increased interest in phage therapy. Phage therapy preceded antibiotic treatment against bacterial infections and involves the use of bacteriophages, bacterial viruses, to fight bacteria. Virulent phages are abundant and have proven to be very effective in vitro, where they in most cases lyse any bacteria within the hour. Clinical trials on animals and humans show promising results but also that the treatments are not completely effective. This is partly due to the studies being carried out with few phages, and with limited experimental groups, but also the fact that phage therapy has limitations in vivo. Phages are large compared with small antibiotic molecules, and each phage can only infect one or a few bacterial strains. A very large number of different phages are needed to treat infections as these are caused by genetically different strains of bacteria. Phages are effective only if enough of them can reach the bacteria and increase in number in situ. Taken together, this entails high demands on resources for the construction of phage libraries and the testing of individual phages. The effectiveness and host range must be characterized, and immunological risks must be assessed for every single phage.

  7. Typing discrepancy between phenotypic and molecular characterization revealing an emerging biovar 9 variant of smooth phage-resistant B. abortus strain 8416 in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YaoXia eKang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A newly isolated smooth colony morphology phage-resistant (SPR strain 8416 isolated from a 45-year-old cattle farm cleaner with clinical features of brucellosis in China was reported. The most unusual phenotype was its resistance to two Brucella phages Tbilisi and Weybridge, but sensitive to Berkeley 2, a pattern similar to that of B. melitensis biovar 1. VITEK 2 biochemical identification system found that both strain 8416 and B. melitensis strains shared positive ILATk, but negative in other B. abortus strains. However, routine biochemical and phenotypic characteristics of strain 8416 were most similar to that of B. abortus biovar 9 except CO2 requirement. In addition, multiple PCR molecular typing assays including AMOS-PCR, B. abortus special PCR (B-ab PCR and a novel sub-biovar typing PCR, indicated that strain 8416 may belong to either biovar 3b or 9 of B. abortus. Surprisingly, further MLVA typing results showed that strain 8416 was most closely related to B. abortus biovar 3 in the Brucella MLVA database, primarily differing in 4 out of 16 screened loci. Therefore, due to the unusual discrepancy between phenotypic (biochemical reactions and particular phage lysis profile and molecular typing characteristics, strain 8416 couldn’t be exactly classified to any of the existing B. abortus biovars and might be a new variant of B. abortus biovar 9. The present study also indicates that the present phage typing scheme for Brucella spp. is subject to variation and the routine Brucella biovar typing needs further studies.

  8. Genetic dissection of tetraploid cotton resistant to Verticillium wilt using interspecific chromosome segment introgression lines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peng; Wang; Zhiyuan; Ning; Ling; Lin; Hong; Chen; Hongxian; Mei; Jun; Zhao; Bingliang; Liu; Xin; Zhang; Wangzhen; Guo; Tianzhen; Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Verticillium wilt(caused by the pathogen Verticillium dahliae) is of high concern for cotton producers and consumers. The major strategy for controlling this disease is the development of resistant cotton(Gossypium spp.) cultivars. We used interspecific chromosome segment introgression lines(CSILs) to identify quantitative trait loci(QTL) associated with resistance to Verticillium wilt in cotton grown in greenhouse and inoculated with three defoliating V. dahliae isolates. A total of 42 QTL, including 23 with resistance-increasing and 19 with resistancedecreasing, influenced host resistance against the three isolates. These QTL were identified and mapped on 18 chromosomes(chromosomes A1, A3, A4, A5, A7, A8, A9, A12, A13, D1, D2,D3, D4, D5, D7, D8, D11, and D12), with LOD values ranging from 3.00 to 9.29. Among the positive QTL with resistance-increasing effect, 21 conferred resistance to only one V. dahliae isolate, suggesting that resistance to V. dahliae conferred by most QTL is pathogen isolate-specific. The At subgenome of cotton had greater effect on resistance to Verticillium wilt than the Dt subgenome. We conclude that pyramiding different resistant QTL could be used to breed cotton cultivars with broad-spectrum resistance to Verticillium wilt.

  9. Resistência de bactérias ácido-láticas a bacteriófagos provenientes de unidades de processamento de queijo Coalho Phage resistance of acid lactic bacteria isolated from Coalho cheese industries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiane Pereira de Lima

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho teve como objetivos isolar bacteriófagos de amostras de leite, soro e queijo de Coalho e avaliar a resistência de cepas de Lactobacillus paracasei, pertencentes à Coleção de Micro-organismos de Interesse para a Agroindústria Tropical da Embrapa Agroindústria Tropical, aos fagos isolados. Posteriormente, a resistência destas cepas a fagos específicos para L. paracasei, da Coleção do Instituto de Lactología Industrial - INLAIN (Santa Fe, Argentina, também foi avaliada. As amostras para isolamento dos fagos foram obtidas em quatro unidades de processamento de queijo de Coalho, sendo duas artesanais e duas industriais, localizadas no Estado do Ceará. Para o isolamento dos bacteriófagos, foi empregado o teste de lise celular (spot, enquanto que a resistência das culturas aos fagos foi avaliada pelos testes de capacidade de produção de ácido e avaliação da turbidez. As cepas avaliadas foram resistentes aos bacteriófagos provenientes das unidades de processamento de queijo de Coalho e aos bacteriófagos da Coleção do INLAIN. Os resultados obtidos indicaram que as culturas láticas testadas, resistentes aos bacteriófagos, podem ser utilizadas na composição de fermento lático destinado à elaboração de queijo de Coalho, a partir de leite pasteurizado.The objectives of this research were to isolate bacteriophages from milk samples, whey and Coalho cheese and to evaluate the resistance of strains of Lactobacillus paracasei from the Collection of Microorganisms of Interest for the Tropical Agroindustry, belonging to Embrapa Tropical Agroindustry, to isolate phages. The strains resistance to specific L. paracasei phages from the collection of the Instituto de Lactología Industrial - INLAIN (Santa Fe, Argentina was also evaluated. Samples for phage isolation were from four Coalho cheese processing units, two artisanal and two industrial, localized in the state of Ceará. Spot test was employed for bacteriophages

  10. Salmonellosis outbreak due to Salmonella enteritidis phage type 14b resistant to nalidixic acid, Austria, September 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrivniaková, L; Schmid, D; Luckner-Hornischer, A; Lassnig, H; Kornschober, C; Angermayer, J; Allerberger, F

    2011-08-25

    We report on a salmonellosis-outbreak due to Salmonella Enteritidis phage type 14b resistant to nalidixic acid (S. Enteritidis PT14b Nx) among residents and employees of a student residence in Austria, September 2010. The outbreak was described and analysed by a retrospective cohort study, and microbiological environmental investigations were conducted to identify the outbreak source(s) and the reservoir of the outbreak strain. A total of 66 persons fulfilled the outbreak case definition including 14 laboratory-confirmed cases. Food specific cohort-analyses by day revealed that consumption of potato salad (RR: 1.65, 95%CI: 1.35–2.01, p=0.001) and a cheese-sausage cold plate (RR: 2.24, 95%CI: 1.29–3.88, p=0.002) on 14 September was associated with being an outbreak case. We hypothesised that cross-contamination with S. Enteritidis PT14b Nx positive eggs had occurred during preparation of the potato salad and cold plate as a result of preparing in parallel egg-containing breaded cutlets on 14 September. A traced laying hen holding in eastern Austria was identified as the sole source of the consumable eggs in the student residence. By applying the legally mandated sampling method for epidemiological-related laying hen farms (one pooled dust sample à 150g, two paired boot swabs cultured separately), the outbreak strain could not be detected. Our findings, that legally required sampling methods for laying hen farms failed to detect the causative pathogen in a laying hen holding, despite an epidemiological link, underline the request stated by the European Food Safety Authority Panel on Biological Hazards for a more sensitive sampling plan in epidemiologically-associated laying hen flocks.

  11. Short communication: Heat-resistant Escherichia coli as potential persistent reservoir of extended-spectrum β-lactamases and Shiga toxin-encoding phages in dairy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marti, Roger; Muniesa, Maite; Schmid, Michael; Ahrens, Christian H; Naskova, Javorka; Hummerjohann, Jörg

    2016-11-01

    Here we report the isolation of heat-resistant Escherichia coli from raw milk cheeses. Detection of the heat-resistance markers clpK and orfI by PCR was followed by phenotypical confirmation of increased heat-resistance. These strains were Shiga toxin-negative and, although several were found to be multidrug resistant, no plasmids encoding extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBL) were found in any of the isolates. The aim of this study was to assess the potential of these strains to acquire ESBL plasmids and a modified Shiga toxin-encoding phage. Only 4 ESBL-encoding, heat-sensitive E. coli strains were isolated from 1,251 dairy samples (2/455 raw milk and 2/796 raw milk cheese samples). One incompatibility group FII plasmid (CTX-M-14, 79.0 kb) and 3 incompatibility group I1 plasmids (CTX-M-15, 95.2, 96.1, and 97.8 kb) were fully sequenced and de novo assembled. All 4 plasmids are readily transferred to heat-resistant E. coli isolates in plate matings (9.7×10(-5) to 3.7×10(-1) exconjugants per recipient) and, to a lesser extent, in milk (up to 7.4×10(-5) exconjugants per recipient). Importantly, the plasmids are stably maintained during passaging in liquid media without antimicrobial pressure. The heat-resistant isolate FAM21805 was also shown to be capable of acting as donor of all 4 ESBL plasmids. In addition, 3 of 11 tested ESBL exconjugants of heat-resistant strains were lysogenized by the modified Shiga toxin-encoding phage 933W ∆stx::gfp::cat. The higher fraction of heat-resistant E. coli (93 of 256 isolates) compared with the estimated 2% previously predicted based on genomic prevalence of heat resistance genes seems to indicate a selection advantage in the raw milk cheese production environment. The combination of 2 factors may lead to said advantage: increased survival during thermization of raw milk (heating to subpasteurization temperatures) and increased survival rates during cheese ripening. Should these strains acquire ESBL-encoding plasmids, Shiga

  12. Physical mapping, expression analysis and polymorphism survey of resistance gene analogues on chromosome 11 of rice

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Irfan A Ghazi; Prem S Srivastava; Vivek Dalal; Kishor Gaikwad; Ashok K Singh; Tilak R Sharma; Nagendra K Singh; Trilochan Mohapatra

    2009-06-01

    Rice is the first cereal genome with a finished sequence and a model crop that has important syntenic relationships with other cereal species. The objectives of our study were to identify resistance gene analogue (RGA) sequences from chromosome 11 of rice, understand their expression in other cereals and dicots by in silico analysis, determine their presence on other rice chromosomes, and evaluate the extent of polymorphism and actual expression in a set of rice genotypes. A total of 195 RGAs were predicted and physically localised. Of these, 91.79% expressed in rice, and 51.28% expressed in wheat, which was the highest among other cereals. Among monocots, sugarcane showed the highest (78.92%) expression, while among dicots, RGAs were maximally expressed in Arabidopsis (11.79%). Interestingly, two of the chromosome 11-specific RGAs were found to be expressing in all the organisms studied. Eighty RGAs of chromosome 11 had significant homology with chromosome 12, which was the maximum among all the rice chromosomes. Thirty-one per cent of the RGAs used in polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification showed polymorphism in a set of rice genotypes. Actual gene expression analysis revealed post-inoculation induction of one RGA in the rice line IRBB-4 carrying the bacterial blight resistance gene Xa-4. Our results have implications for the development of sequence-based markers and functional validation of specific RGAs in rice.

  13. Aegilops-Secale amphiploids: chromosome categorisation, pollen viability and identification of fungal disease resistance genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwiatek, M; Błaszczyk, L; Wiśniewska, H; Apolinarska, B

    2012-02-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the potential breeding value of goatgrass-rye amphiploids, which we are using as a "bridge" in a transfer of Aegilops chromatin (containing, e.g. leaf rust resistance genes) into triticale. We analysed the chromosomal constitution (by genomic in situ hybridisation, GISH), fertility (by pollen viability tests) and the presence of leaf rust and eyespot resistance genes (by molecular and endopeptidase assays) in a collection of 6× and 4× amphiploids originating from crosses between five Aegilops species and Secale cereale. In the five hexaploid amphiploids Aegilops kotschyi × Secale cereale (genome UUSSRR), Ae. variabilis × S. cereale (UUSSRR), Ae. biuncialis × S. cereale (UUMMRR; two lines) and Ae. ovata × S. cereale (UUMMRR), 28 Aegilops chromosomes were recognised, while in the Ae. tauschii × S. cereale amphiploid (4×; DDRR), only 14 such chromosomes were identified. In the materials, the number of rye chromosomes varied from 14 to 16. In one line of Ae. ovata × S. cereale, the U-R translocation was found. Pollen viability varied from 24.4 to 75.4%. The leaf rust resistance genes Lr22, Lr39 and Lr41 were identified in Ae. tauschii and the 4× amphiploid Ae. tauschii × S. cereale. For the first time, the leaf rust resistance gene Lr37 was found in Ae. kotschyi, Ae. ovata, Ae. biuncialis and amphiploids derived from those parental species. No eyespot resistance gene Pch1 was found in the amphiploids.

  14. Screening and incorporation of rust resistance from Allium cepa into bunching onion (Allium fistulosum) via alien chromosome addition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wako, Tadayuki; Yamashita, Ken-ichiro; Tsukazaki, Hikaru; Ohara, Takayoshi; Kojima, Akio; Yaguchi, Shigenori; Shimazaki, Satoshi; Midorikawa, Naoko; Sakai, Takako; Yamauchi, Naoki; Shigyo, Masayoshi

    2015-04-01

    Bunching onion (Allium fistulosum L.; 2n = 16), bulb onion (Allium cepa L. Common onion group), and shallot (Allium cepa L. Aggregatum group) cultivars were inoculated with rust fungus, Puccinia allii, isolated from bunching onion. Bulb onions and shallots are highly resistant to rust, suggesting they would serve as useful resources for breeding rust resistant bunching onions. To identify the A. cepa chromosome(s) related to rust resistance, a complete set of eight A. fistulosum - shallot monosomic alien addition lines (MAALs) were inoculated with P. allii. At the seedling stage, FF+1A showed a high level of resistance in controlled-environment experiments, suggesting that the genes related to rust resistance could be located on shallot chromosome 1A. While MAAL, multi-chromosome addition line, and hypoallotriploid adult plants did not exhibit strong resistance to rust. In contrast to the high resistance of shallot, the addition line FF+1A+5A showed reproducibly high levels of rust resistance.

  15. The Agricultural Antibiotic Carbadox Induces Phage-mediated Gene Transfer in Salmonella

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bradley L. Bearson

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotics are used for disease therapeutic or preventative effects in humans and animals, as well as for enhanced feed conversion efficiency in livestock. Antibiotics can also cause undesirable effects in microbial populations, including selection for antibiotic resistance, enhanced pathogen invasion, and stimulation of horizontal gene transfer. Carbadox is a veterinary antibiotic used in the U.S. during the starter phase of swine production for improved feed efficiency and control of swine dysentery and bacterial swine enteritis. Carbadox has been shown in vitro to induce phage-encoded Shiga toxin in Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli and a phage-like element transferring antibiotic resistance genes in Brachyspira hyodysenteriae, but the effect of carbadox on prophages in other bacteria is unknown. This study examined carbadox exposure on prophage induction and genetic transfer in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, a human foodborne pathogen that frequently colonizes swine without causing disease. S. Typhimurium LT2 exposed to carbadox induced prophage production, resulting in bacterial cell lysis and release of virions that were visible by electron microscopy. Carbadox induction of phage-mediated gene transfer was confirmed by monitoring the transduction of a sodCIII::neo cassette in the Fels-1 prophage from LT2 to a recipient Salmonella strain. Furthermore, carbadox frequently induced generalized transducing phages in multidrug-resistant phage type DT104 and DT120 isolates, resulting in the transfer of chromosomal and plasmid DNA that included antibiotic resistance genes. Our research indicates that exposure of Salmonella to carbadox induces prophages that can transfer virulence and antibiotic resistance genes to susceptible bacterial hosts. Carbadox-induced, phage-mediated gene transfer could serve as a contributing factor in bacterial evolution during animal production, with prophages being a reservoir for bacterial fitness

  16. Two flagellotropic phages and one pilus-specific phage active against Asticcacaulis biprosthecum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pate, J L; Petzold, S J; Umbreit, T H

    1979-04-15

    Three phages active against cells of Asticcacaulis biprosthecum attach to receptor sites located at the pole of the cell where pili, flagella, and holdfast are produced. Phage phiAcS2, a large phage with a prolate cylindrical head and flexible, noncontractile tail, attaches to flagella as well as to receptor sites at the pole of the cell. Attachment to flagella occurs at the region where head and tail of the phage are joined, leaving the distal end of the tail free for attachment to receptor sites at the cell surface. Phages phiAcM2 and phiAcM4, are identical in appearance to each other, possessing prolate cylindrical heads and flexible, noncontractile tails, and are smaller than phage phiAcS2. Phage phiAcM4, exhibits the same flagellotropic characteristic as described for phage phiAcS2, including the manner of attachment to flagella. Phage phiAcM2 has no affinity for flagella, but attaches by the distal end of the tail to pili and to receptor sites at the pole of the cell. Mechanical removal of flagella and pili protects against infection by all three phages. Studies with phage-resistant mutants and with KCN-treated cells suggest that pili are required for infection by both flagellotropic and pilus-specific phages.

  17. Phages Preying on Bacillus anthracis, Bacillus cereus, and Bacillus thuringiensis: Past, Present and Future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annika Gillis

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Many bacteriophages (phages have been widely studied due to their major role in virulence evolution of bacterial pathogens. However, less attention has been paid to phages preying on bacteria from the Bacillus cereus group and their contribution to the bacterial genetic pool has been disregarded. Therefore, this review brings together the main information for the B. cereus group phages, from their discovery to their modern biotechnological applications. A special focus is given to phages infecting Bacillus anthracis, B. cereus and Bacillus thuringiensis. These phages belong to the Myoviridae, Siphoviridae, Podoviridae and Tectiviridae families. For the sake of clarity, several phage categories have been made according to significant characteristics such as lifestyles and lysogenic states. The main categories comprise the transducing phages, phages with a chromosomal or plasmidial prophage state, γ-like phages and jumbo-phages. The current genomic characterization of some of these phages is also addressed throughout this work and some promising applications are discussed here.

  18. Selection of phages and conditions for the safe phage therapy against Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Victor; Krylov; Olga; Shaburova; Elena; Pleteneva; Sergey; Krylov; Alla; Kaplan; Maria; Burkaltseva; Olga; Polygach; Elena; Chesnokova

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of multidrug-resistant bacterial pathogens forced us to consider the phage therapy as one of the possible alternative approaches to treatment. The purpose of this paper is to consider the conditions for the safe, long-term use of phage therapy against various infections caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We describe the selection of the most suitable phages, their most effective combinations and some approaches for the rapid recognition of phages unsuitable for use in therapy. The benefi ts and disadvantages of the various different approaches to the preparation of phage mixtures are considered, together with the specifi c conditions that are required for the safe application of phage therapy in general hospitals and the possibilities for the development of personalized phage therapy.

  19. Selection of phages and conditions for the safe phage therapy against Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krylov, Victor; Shaburova, Olga; Pleteneva, Elena; Krylov, Sergey; Kaplan, Alla; Burkaltseva, Maria; Polygach, Olga; Chesnokova, Elena

    2015-02-01

    The emergence of multidrug-resistant bacterial pathogens forced us to consider the phage therapy as one of the possible alternative approaches to treatment. The purpose of this paper is to consider the conditions for the safe, long-term use of phage therapy against various infections caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We describe the selection of the most suitable phages, their most effective combinations and some approaches for the rapid recognition of phages unsuitable for use in therapy. The benefits and disadvantages of the various different approaches to the preparation of phage mixtures are considered, together with the specific conditions that are required for the safe application of phage therapy in general hospitals and the possibilities for the development of personalized phage therapy.

  20. Detection and analysis of chromosomal arsenic resistance in Pseudomonas fluorescens strain MSP3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prithivirajsingh, S; Mishra, S K; Mahadevan, A

    2001-02-09

    Pseudomonas fluorescens MSP3 isolated from sea water was resistant to arsenate. This bacterium harbored no plasmids, indicating that arsenic resistance was chromosomally encoded. The chromosomal DNA from MSP3 when transformed onto Escherichia coli DH5alpha using pBluescript exhibited resistance to sodium arsenate and sodium arsenite. Three clones MSA1, MSA2, and MSI3 containing the ars genes were obtained and further subcloning resulted in three fragments of size 2.2, 2.6, and 2.1 kb for pMSA11, pMSA12, and pMSI13, respectively, which contained the genes arsRBC of the arsenic operon. An efflux mechanism of detoxification was observed which was ATP dependent. The resistance mechanism was encoded from a single operon which consisted of an arsenite inducible repressor that regulates the expression of arsenate reductase (ars C) and inner membrane associated arsenite export system encoded by ars B. The chromosomal operon was cloned, sequenced, and found to consist of three cistrons, named as ars R, ars B, and ars C. Southern hybridization and mating experiments confirmed the functioning of the ars genes in the operon, thereby conferring increased resistance to sodium arsenate and sodium arsenite.

  1. Characterisation of recently emerged multiple antibiotic-resistant Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium DT104 and other multiresistant phage types from Danish pig herds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baggesen, D L; Aarestrup, F M

    1998-07-25

    A total of 670 isolates of Salmonella enterica were isolated from Danish pig herds, phage typed and tested for susceptibility to amoxycillin + clavulanate, ampicillin, colistin, enrofloxacin, gentamicin, neomycin, spectinomycin, streptomycin, tetracyclines, and trimethoprim + sulphadiazine. S enterica serovar typhimurium (S typhimurium) isolates resistant to ampicillin, streptomycin and tetracycline and three isolates of S typhimurium DT104, two from 1994 and one from 1995, were further tested for resistance against chloramphenicol and sulphonamide and analysed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) using the restriction enzyme Xba I. Overall, 66 per cent of the 670 isolates were sensitive to all the antimicrobial agents tested. Eleven isolates of S typhimurium were resistant to ampicillin, streptomycin and tetracycline and also resistant to other antibiotics in different resistance patterns. Seven different multiresistant clones were identified. The most common clones were four isolates of DT104 and three isolates of DT193. Two of the three S typhimurium DT104 from 1994 and 1995 were sensitive to all the antimicrobials tested whereas the remaining isolate from 1994 was resistant to spectinomycin, streptomycin and sulphonamides. All three isolates showed PFGF profiles identical to the four multiresistant DT104 isolates. Compared with most other countries antimicrobial resistance among S enterica isolated from Danish pig herds is uncommon. However, several different multiresistant clones were found.

  2. Phage therapy pharmacology: calculating phage dosing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abedon, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    Phage therapy, which can be described as a phage-mediated biocontrol of bacteria (or, simply, biocontrol), is the application of bacterial viruses-also bacteriophages or phages-to reduce densities of nuisance or pathogenic bacteria. Predictive calculations for phage therapy dosing should be useful toward rational development of therapeutic as well as biocontrol products. Here, I consider the theoretical basis of a number of concepts relevant to phage dosing for phage therapy including minimum inhibitory concentration (but also "inundation threshold"), minimum bactericidal concentration (but also "clearance threshold"), decimal reduction time (D value), time until bacterial eradication, threshold bacterial density necessary to support phage population growth ("proliferation threshold"), and bacterial density supporting half-maximal phage population growth rates (K(B)). I also address the concepts of phage killing titers, multiplicity of infection, and phage peak densities. Though many of the presented ideas are not unique to this chapter, I nonetheless provide variations on derivations and resulting formulae, plus as appropriate discuss relative importance. The overriding goal is to present a variety of calculations that are useful toward phage therapy dosing so that they may be found in one location and presented in a manner that allows facile appreciation, comparison, and implementation. The importance of phage density as a key determinant of the phage potential to eradicate bacterial targets is stressed throughout the chapter.

  3. Clinical aspects of phage therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Międzybrodzki, Ryszard; Borysowski, Jan; Weber-Dąbrowska, Beata; Fortuna, Wojciech; Letkiewicz, Sławomir; Szufnarowski, Krzysztof; Pawełczyk, Zdzisław; Rogóż, Paweł; Kłak, Marlena; Wojtasik, Elżbieta; Górski, Andrzej

    2012-01-01

    Phage therapy (PT) is a unique method of treatment of bacterial infections using bacteriophages (phages)-viruses that specifically kill bacteria, including their antibiotic-resistant strains. Over the last decade a marked increase in interest in the therapeutic use of phages has been observed, which has resulted from a substantial rise in the prevalence of antibiotic resistance of bacteria, coupled with an inadequate number of new antibiotics. The first, and so far the only, center of PT in the European Union is the Phage Therapy Unit (PTU) established at the Ludwik Hirszfeld Institute of Immunology and Experimental Therapy, Wrocław, Poland in 2005. This center continues the rich tradition of PT in Poland, which dates from the early 1920s. The main objective of this chapter is to present a detailed retrospective analysis of the results of PT of 153 patients with a wide range of infections resistant to antibiotic therapy admitted for treatment at the PTU between January 2008 and December 2010. Analysis includes the evaluation of both the efficacy and the safety of PT. In general, data suggest that PT can provide good clinical results in a significant cohort of patients with otherwise untreatable chronic bacterial infections and is essentially well tolerated. In addition, the whole complex procedure employed to obtain and characterize therapeutic phage preparations, as well as ethical aspects of PT, is discussed.

  4. The revival of Phage Therapy to fight Antimicrobial Resistance – Part II: What about patent protection and alternative incentives?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Minssen, Timo

    2014-01-01

    eligibility, i.e. Bilski v. Kappos (2010), Mayo v. Prometheus (2012) , AMP v. Myriad (2013) and Alice v. CLS (2014). Most relevant in this context are the decisions in Prometheus and Myriad. In its unanimous Prometheus opinion, the Supreme Court held that a claim to a “natural law” is not patentable unless...... into patentable subject matter. That the claims were directed to a specific regime optimizing the dosage for each patient to reduce side-effects of a particular drug (i.e. a typical claim in personalized medicine) did not rescue the patent. Then, in Myriad, the Court unanimously held that patent claims directed...... occurring viruses, such as phages, and the processes in which these are used. Myriad and Prometheus could thus have a fundamental impact on many patent portfolios relating to phage therapy and thus business involvement. In that context, it is important to realize that an important component of proper use...

  5. Vi I typing phage for generalized transduction of Salmonella typhi.

    OpenAIRE

    Cerquetti, M C; Hooke, A M

    1993-01-01

    Salmonella typhi Vi typing phages were used to transduce temperature-sensitive (Ts) mutants of Salmonella typhi. Antibiotic resistance and Ts+ markers were transduced at high frequency (> 10(-4) per virulent phage). Several markers were cotransduced by phage Vi I, suggesting that it may be useful for mapping studies of the S. typhi genome.

  6. The revival of Phage Therapy to fight Antimicrobial Resistance (AMR) – Part III: What about patent protection and alternative incentives?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Minssen, Timo

    2014-01-01

    to “natural laws”. Thus there still seems to be considerable leeway for patenting within the area of page therapy. One example, mentioned in a recent Nature article, could be the skillful selection and precise combination of different phages in order to attack one specific type of bacteria. Such selections...... and proactive approaches. Any initiative must be coupled with preventive and conservational considerations, so that we are not only battling the symptoms but also the cause of AMR....

  7. Aerosol phage therapy efficacy in Burkholderia cepacia complex respiratory infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semler, Diana D; Goudie, Amanda D; Finlay, Warren H; Dennis, Jonathan J

    2014-07-01

    Phage therapy has been suggested as a potential treatment for highly antibiotic-resistant bacteria, such as the species of the Burkholderia cepacia complex (BCC). To address this hypothesis, experimental B. cenocepacia respiratory infections were established in mice using a nebulizer and a nose-only inhalation device. Following infection, the mice were treated with one of five B. cenocepacia-specific phages delivered as either an aerosol or intraperitoneal injection. The bacterial and phage titers within the lungs were assayed 2 days after treatment, and mice that received the aerosolized phage therapy demonstrated significant decreases in bacterial loads. Differences in phage activity were observed in vivo. Mice that received phage treatment by intraperitoneal injection did not demonstrate significantly reduced bacterial loads, although phage particles were isolated from their lung tissue. Based on these data, aerosol phage therapy appears to be an effective method for treating highly antibiotic-resistant bacterial respiratory infections, including those caused by BCC bacteria.

  8. Microdissection and molecular manipulation of single chromosomes in woody fruit trees with small chromosomes using pomelo (Citrus grandis) as a model. II. Cloning of resistance gene analogs from single chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, D; Wu, W; Lu, L

    2004-05-01

    Amplification of resistance gene analogs (RGAs) is both a useful method for acquiring DNA markers closely linked to disease resistance (R) genes and a potential approach for the rapid cloning of R genes in plants. However, the screening of target sequences from among the numerous amplified RGAs can be very laborious. The amplification of RGAs from specific chromosomes could greatly reduce the number of RGAs to be screened and, consequently, speed up the identification of target RGAs. We have developed two methods for amplifying RGAs from single chromosomes. Method 1 uses products of Sau3A linker adaptor-mediated PCR (LAM-PCR) from a single chromosome as the templates for RGA amplification, while Method 2 directly uses a single chromosomal DNA molecule as the template. Using a pair of degenerate primers designed on the basis of the conserved nucleotide-binding-site motifs in many R genes, RGAs were successfully amplified from single chromosomes of pomelo using both these methods. Sequencing and cluster analysis of RGA clones obtained from single chromosomes revealed the number, type and organization of R-gene clusters on the chromosomes. We suggest that Method 1 is suitable for analyzing chromosomes that are unidentifiable under a microscope, while Method 2 is more appropriate when chromosomes can be clearly identified.

  9. Sequencing and Characterization of Pseudomonas aeruginosa phage JG004

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bunk Boyke

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Phages could be an important alternative to antibiotics, especially for treatment of multiresistant bacteria as e.g. Pseudomonas aeruginosa. For an effective use of bacteriophages as antimicrobial agents, it is important to understand phage biology but also genes of the bacterial host essential for phage infection. Results We isolated and characterized a lytic Pseudomonas aeruginosa phage, named JG004, and sequenced its genome. Phage JG004 is a lipopolysaccharide specific broad-host-range phage of the Myoviridae phage family. The genome of phage JG004 encodes twelve tRNAs and is highly related to the PAK-P1 phage genome. To investigate phage biology and phage-host interactions, we used transposon mutagenesis of the P. aeruginosa host and identified P. aeruginosa genes, which are essential for phage infection. Analysis of the respective P. aeruginosa mutants revealed several characteristics, such as host receptor and possible spermidine-dependance of phage JG004. Conclusions Whole genome sequencing of phage JG004 in combination with identification of P. aeruginosa host genes essential for infection, allowed insights into JG004 biology, revealed possible resistance mechanisms of the host bacterium such as mutations in LPS and spermidine biosynthesis and can also be used to characterize unknown gene products in P. aeruginosa.

  10. Analysis of phage Mu DNA transposition by whole-genome Escherichia coli tiling arrays reveals a complex relationship to distribution of target selection protein B, transcription and chromosome architectural elements

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jun Ge; Zheng Lou; Hong Cui; Lei Shang; Rasika M Harshey

    2011-09-01

    Of all known transposable elements, phage Mu exhibits the highest transposition efficiency and the lowest target specificity. In vitro, MuB protein is responsible for target choice. In this work, we provide a comprehensive assessment of the genome-wide distribution of MuB and its relationship to Mu target selection using high-resolution Escherichia coli tiling DNA arrays. We have also assessed how MuB binding and Mu transposition are influenced by chromosome-organizing elements such as AT-rich DNA signatures, or the binding of the nucleoid-associated protein Fis, or processes such as transcription. The results confirm and extend previous biochemical and lower resolution in vivo data. Despite the generally random nature of Mu transposition and MuB binding, there were hot and cold insertion sites and MuB binding sites in the genome, and differences between the hottest and coldest sites were large. The new data also suggest that MuB distribution and subsequent Mu integration is responsive to DNA sequences that contribute to the structural organization of the chromosome.

  11. Mammalian Host-Versus-Phage immune response determines phage fate in vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Katarzyna Hodyra-Stefaniak; Paulina Miernikiewicz; Jarosław Drapała; Marek Drab; Ewa Jończyk-Matysiak; Dorota Lecion; Zuzanna Kaźmierczak; Weronika Beta; Joanna Majewska; Marek Harhala; Barbara Bubak; Anna Kłopot; Andrzej Górski; Krystyna Dąbrowska

    2015-01-01

    Emerging bacterial antibiotic resistance draws attention to bacteriophages as a therapeutic alternative to treat bacterial infection. Examples of phage that combat bacteria abound. However, despite careful testing of antibacterial activity in vitro, failures nevertheless commonly occur. We investigated immunological response of phage antibacterial potency in vivo. Anti-phage activity of phagocytes, antibodies, and serum complement were identified by direct testing and by high-resolution fluor...

  12. Surviving and thriving in terms of symbiotic performance of antibiotic and phage-resistant mutants of Bradyrhizobium of soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merrill].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Akhil; Jaiswal, Sanjay Kumar; Dhar, Banshi; Vaishampayan, Akhouri

    2012-10-01

    Rhizobial inoculation plays an important role in yielding enhancement of soybean, but it is frequently disturbed by competition with bacterial population present in the soil. Identification of potential indigenous rhizobia as competitive inoculants for efficient nodulation and N(2)-fixation of soybean was assessed under laboratory and field conditions. Two indigenous bradyrhizobial isolates (MPSR033 and MPSR220) and its derived different antibiotic (streptomycin and gentamicin) and phage (RT5 and RT6)-resistant mutant strains were used for competition study. Nodulation occupancy between parent and mutant strains was compared on soybean cultivar JS335 under exotic condition. Strain MPSR033 Sm(r) V(r) was found highly competitive for nodule occupancy in all treatment combinations. On the basis of laboratory experiments four indigenous strains (MPSR033, MPSR033 Sm(r), MPSR033 Sm(r) V(r), MPSR220) were selected for their symbiotic performance along with two exotic strains (USDA123 and USDA94) on two soybean cultivars under field conditions. A significant symbiotic interaction between Bradyrhizobium strains and soybean cultivar was observed. Strain MPSR033 Sm(r) V(r) was found superior among the rhizobial treatments in seed yield production with both cultivars. The 16S rRNA region sequence analysis of the indigenous strains showed close relationship with Bradyrhizobium yuanmingense strain. These findings widen out the usefulness of antibiotic-resistance marked phage-resistant bradyrhizobial strains in interactive mode for studying their symbiotic effectiveness with host plant, and open the way to study the mechanism of contact-dependent growth inhibition in rhizobia.

  13. Allelic variation on murine chromosome 11 modifies host inflammatory responses and resistance to Bacillus anthracis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terra, Jill K; France, Bryan; Cote, Christopher K; Jenkins, Amy; Bozue, Joel A; Welkos, Susan L; Bhargava, Ragini; Ho, Chi-Lee; Mehrabian, Margarete; Pan, Calvin; Lusis, Aldons J; Davis, Richard C; LeVine, Steven M; Bradley, Kenneth A

    2011-12-01

    Anthrax is a potentially fatal disease resulting from infection with Bacillus anthracis. The outcome of infection is influenced by pathogen-encoded virulence factors such as lethal toxin (LT), as well as by genetic variation within the host. To identify host genes controlling susceptibility to anthrax, a library of congenic mice consisting of strains with homozygous chromosomal segments from the LT-responsive CAST/Ei strain introgressed on a LT-resistant C57BL/6 (B6) background was screened for response to LT. Three congenic strains containing CAST/Ei regions of chromosome 11 were identified that displayed a rapid inflammatory response to LT similar to, but more severe than that driven by a LT-responsive allele of the inflammasome constituent NRLP1B. Importantly, increased response to LT in congenic mice correlated with greater resistance to infection by the Sterne strain of B. anthracis. The genomic region controlling the inflammatory response to LT was mapped to 66.36-74.67 Mb on chromosome 11, a region that encodes the LT-responsive CAST/Ei allele of Nlrp1b. However, known downstream effects of NLRP1B activation, including macrophage pyroptosis, cytokine release, and leukocyte infiltration could not fully explain the response to LT or the resistance to B. anthracis Sterne in congenic mice. Further, the exacerbated response in congenic mice is inherited in a recessive manner while the Nlrp1b-mediated response to LT is dominant. Finally, congenic mice displayed increased responsiveness in a model of sepsis compared with B6 mice. In total, these data suggest that allelic variation of one or more chromosome 11 genes in addition to Nlrp1b controls the severity of host response to multiple inflammatory stimuli and contributes to resistance to B. anthracis Sterne. Expression quantitative trait locus analysis revealed 25 genes within this region as high priority candidates for contributing to the host response to LT.

  14. Allelic variation on murine chromosome 11 modifies host inflammatory responses and resistance to Bacillus anthracis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jill K Terra

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Anthrax is a potentially fatal disease resulting from infection with Bacillus anthracis. The outcome of infection is influenced by pathogen-encoded virulence factors such as lethal toxin (LT, as well as by genetic variation within the host. To identify host genes controlling susceptibility to anthrax, a library of congenic mice consisting of strains with homozygous chromosomal segments from the LT-responsive CAST/Ei strain introgressed on a LT-resistant C57BL/6 (B6 background was screened for response to LT. Three congenic strains containing CAST/Ei regions of chromosome 11 were identified that displayed a rapid inflammatory response to LT similar to, but more severe than that driven by a LT-responsive allele of the inflammasome constituent NRLP1B. Importantly, increased response to LT in congenic mice correlated with greater resistance to infection by the Sterne strain of B. anthracis. The genomic region controlling the inflammatory response to LT was mapped to 66.36-74.67 Mb on chromosome 11, a region that encodes the LT-responsive CAST/Ei allele of Nlrp1b. However, known downstream effects of NLRP1B activation, including macrophage pyroptosis, cytokine release, and leukocyte infiltration could not fully explain the response to LT or the resistance to B. anthracis Sterne in congenic mice. Further, the exacerbated response in congenic mice is inherited in a recessive manner while the Nlrp1b-mediated response to LT is dominant. Finally, congenic mice displayed increased responsiveness in a model of sepsis compared with B6 mice. In total, these data suggest that allelic variation of one or more chromosome 11 genes in addition to Nlrp1b controls the severity of host response to multiple inflammatory stimuli and contributes to resistance to B. anthracis Sterne. Expression quantitative trait locus analysis revealed 25 genes within this region as high priority candidates for contributing to the host response to LT.

  15. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus saprophyticus in Sweden carries various types of staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Söderquist, B; Berglund, C

    2009-12-01

    Staphylococcus saprophyticus is a common cause of uncomplicated urinary tract infections and is usually susceptible to the antimicrobial agents used for their treatment. However, S. saprophyticus resistant to beta-lactam antibiotics and carrying mecA has been reported. Eight Swedish isolates of mecA-positive S. saprophyticus with diverse origin carrying at least three different types of staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) are described here.

  16. Antibacterial activity of fosmidomycin on chromosomic and plasmid-determined fosfomycin-resistant strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendez, F J; Alvarez, A A; Mendoza, M C; Hardisson, C

    1985-04-01

    The antibacterial activity of fosmidomycin (Fm) on chromosomic and plasmid-determined fosfomycin-resistant (For) strains of Gram-negative bacteria was studied. Presence of For-plasmids did not protect host bacteria from the antibiotic effect of Fm. In clinical isolates Fm was more active than Fo in 67% of the strains whereas Fo was more active for only 2%; 76% of the strains showed cross resistance to both antibiotics. The Fmr character was not transferred by conjugation. For mutants selected in the hospital environment as well as in the laboratory did not always show cross resistance with Fm, and the alterations in the transport systems of both antibiotics were not the only mechanism of cross resistance.

  17. HostPhinder: A Phage Host Prediction Tool

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villarroel, Julia; Kleinheinz, Kortine Annina; Jurtz, Vanessa Isabell

    2016-01-01

    The current dramatic increase of antibiotic resistant bacteria has revitalised the interest in bacteriophages as alternative antibacterial treatment. Meanwhile, the development of bioinformatics methods for analysing genomic data places high-throughput approaches for phage characterization within...... reach. Here, we present HostPhinder, a tool aimed at predicting the bacterial host of phages by examining the phage genome sequence. Using a reference database of 2196 phages with known hosts, HostPhinder predicts the host species of a query phage as the host of the most genomically similar reference...... phages. As a measure of genomic similarity the number of co-occurring k-mers (DNA sequences of length k) is used. Using an independent evaluation set, HostPhinder was able to correctly predict host genus and species for 81% and 74% of the phages respectively, giving predictions for more phages than BLAST...

  18. Differential epigenetic compatibility of qnr antibiotic resistance determinants with the chromosome of Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María B Sánchez

    Full Text Available Environmental bacteria harbor a plethora of genes that, upon their horizontal transfer to new hosts, may confer resistance to antibiotics, although the number of such determinants actually acquired by pathogenic bacteria is very low. The founder effect, fitness costs and ecological connectivity all influence the chances of resistance transfer being successful. We examined the importance of these bottlenecks using the family of quinolone resistance determinants Qnr. The results indicate the epigenetic compatibility of a determinant with the host genome to be of great importance in the acquisition and spread of resistance. A plasmid carrying the widely distributed QnrA determinant was stable in Escherichia coli, whereas the SmQnr determinant was unstable despite both proteins having very similar tertiary structures. This indicates that the fitness costs associated with the acquisition of antibiotic resistance may not derive from a non-specific metabolic burden, but from the acquired gene causing specific changes in bacterial metabolic and regulatory networks. The observed stabilization of the plasmid encoding SmQnr by chromosomal mutations, including a mutant lacking the global regulator H-NS, reinforces this idea. Since quinolones are synthetic antibiotics, and since the origin of QnrA is the environmental bacterium Shewanella algae, the role of QnrA in this organism is unlikely to be that of conferring resistance. Its evolution toward this may have occurred through mutations or because of an environmental change (exaptation. The present results indicate that the chromosomally encoded Qnr determinants of S. algae can confer quinolone resistance upon their transfer to E. coli without the need of any further mutation. These results suggest that exaptation is important in the evolution of antibiotic resistance.

  19. Introgression of Resistance to Powdery Mildew Conferred by Chromosome 2R by Crossing Wheat Nullisomic 2D with Rye

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Using the nullisomic back-cross procedure, four wheat-rye chromosome substitution 2R (2D) lines with different agronomic performance, designated WR02-145-1, WR01-145-2, WR02-145-3, and WR02-145-4, were produced from a cross between 2D nullisomic wheat (Triticum aestivum L. cv. "Xiaoyan 6") and rye (Secale cereale L. cv. "German White"). The chromosomal constitution of 2n=42=21 in WR02-145 lines was confirmed by cytological and molecular cytogenetic methods. Using genomic in situ hybridization on root tip chromosome preparations, a pair of intact rye chromosomes was detected in the WR02-145 lines. PCR using chromosome-specific primers confirmed the presence of 2R chromosomes of rye in these wheat-rye lines, indicating that WR02-145 lines are disomic chromosome substitution lines 2R (2D). The WR02-145 lines are resistant to the powdery mildew (Erysiphe graminis DC. f. sp. tritici E. Marchal) isolates prevalent in northern China and may possess gene(s) for resistance to powdery mildew, which differ from the previously identified Pm7 gene located on chromosome 2RL. The newly developed "Xiaoyan 6"- "German White"2R (2D) chromosome substitution lines are genetically stable, show desirable agronomic traits, and are expected to be useful in wheat improvement.

  20. Chromosome substitutions in progeny of hybrids Triticum aestivum x Triticum timopheevii resistant to brown rust and powdery mildew

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badaeva, E.D. [Engelhardt Institute of Molecular Biology, Moscow (Russian Federation); Badaev, N.S. [Bioengineering Center, Moscow (Russian Federation); Enno, T.M.; Peusha, H.O. [Institute of Experimental Biology, Moscow (Russian Federation); Zeller, F.J. [Institut fuer Pflanzenbau und Pflanzenzuechtung, Muenchen (Germany)

    1995-01-01

    By the C-banding technique, chromosome analysis of introgressive wheat lines derived from the tetraploid species T. timopheevii and T. militinae, with complex immunity to pathogens, was performed. It is shown that all hybrid lines possess genetic material of T. timopheevii and are stable in chromosome number (2n = 6x = 42) and composition. In the lines studied, the number of substitutions per genome varied from one to three; variation in the spectrum of chromosome substitutions was observed. Karyotypes of lines 146-155-T, SMT 30, SMT 34, SMT 37, and SMT 45, resistant to brown rust and powdery mildew, had one common chromosome substitution 6B(6G). It is suggested that the resistance to pathogens of these lines is determined by chromosome 6G of T. timopheevii.

  1. Localization of the Laevigatum powdery mildew resistance gene to barley chromosome 2 by the use of RFLP markers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giese, H.; Holm-Jensen, A.G.; Jensen, H.P.;

    1993-01-01

    The powdery mildew disease resistance gene Ml(La) was found to belong to a locus on barely chromosome 2. We suggest that this locus be designated MlLa. Linkage analysis was carried out on 72 chromosome-doubled, spring-type progeny lines from a cross between the winter var 'Vogelsanger Gold' and t......' and the spring var 'Alf'. A map of chromosome 2 spanning 119 cM and flanked by two peroxidase gene loci was constructed. In addition to the Laevigatum resistance locus the map includes nine RFLP markers, the two peroxidase gene loci and the six-row locus in barley....

  2. Analisis Tipe Staphylococcal Cassette Chromosome mec (SCCmec Isolat Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunarjati Sudigdoadi

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Resistance of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA were based mainly on insertion of mobile genetic elements namely Staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec in the chromosome of Staphylococcus aureus. SCCmec consists of recombinase genes (ccr, mec genes complex, additional resistance genes, and insertion sequences. Recombinase genes structure mediates transfer of SCCmec from one bacteria to another. Identification of SCCmec is very important to know basic genetic resistance and to predict spreading of MRSA. The aim of this research was to analyze SCCmec type and antimicrobial susceptibility patterns. The design of this study was observational analytic study by typing SCCmec and antimicrobial susceptibility testing on July– December 2007. Isolation and identification of 45 MRSA isolates was performed in the Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Padjadjaran, whereas identification of mecA gene and typing of SCCmec by multiplex PCR was performed in the Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, Sriwijaya University, Palembang. The result showed that all isolates contained mecA gene. Multiplex PCR revealed that 40 MRSA isolates had SCCmec type III and 5 isolates with type IV. All SCCmec type III isolates were multiresistant and all of the type IV were not multiresistant. In conclusion, MRSA isolates with SCCmec type III was associated with multiresistant whereas type IV was not.

  3. Supersize me: Cronobacter sakazakii phage GAP32

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbasifar, Reza; Griffiths, Mansel W. [Canadian Research Institute for Food Safety, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON, Canada N1G 2W1 (Canada); Sabour, Parviz M. [Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Guelph Food Research Centre, Guelph, ON, Canada N1G 5C9 (Canada); Ackermann, Hans-Wolfgang [Department of Microbiology-Infectiology and Immunology, Faculty of Medicine, Université Laval, Quebec, QC (Canada); Vandersteegen, Katrien; Lavigne, Rob [Laboratory of Gene Technology, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Leuven (Belgium); Noben, Jean-Paul [Biomedical Research Institute and Transnational University Limburg, School of Life Sciences, Hasselt University, Diepenbeek (Belgium); Alanis Villa, Argentina; Abbasifar, Arash [Canadian Research Institute for Food Safety, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON, Canada N1G 2W1 (Canada); Nash, John H.E. [Public Health Agency of Canada, Laboratory for Foodborne Zoonoses, Guelph, ON, Canada N1G 3W4 (Canada); Kropinski, Andrew M., E-mail: akropins@uoguelph.ca [Public Health Agency of Canada, Laboratory for Foodborne Zoonoses, Guelph, ON, Canada N1G 3W4 (Canada); Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON, Canada N1G 2W1 (Canada)

    2014-07-15

    Cronobacter sakazakii is a Gram-negative pathogen found in milk-based formulae that causes infant meningitis. Bacteriophages have been proposed to control bacterial pathogens; however, comprehensive knowledge about a phage is required to ensure its safety before clinical application. We have characterized C. sakazakii phage vB{sub C}saM{sub G}AP32 (GAP32), which possesses the second largest sequenced phage genome (358,663 bp). A total of 571 genes including 545 protein coding sequences and 26 tRNAs were identified, thus more genes than in the smallest bacterium, Mycoplasma genitalium G37. BLASTP and HHpred searches, together with proteomic analyses reveal that only 23.9% of the putative proteins have defined functions. Some of the unique features of this phage include: a chromosome condensation protein, two copies of the large subunit terminase, a predicted signal-arrest-release lysin; and an RpoD-like protein, which is possibly involved in the switch from immediate early to delayed early transcription. Its closest relatives are all extremely large myoviruses, namely coliphage PBECO4 and Klebsiella phage vB{sub K}leM-RaK2, with whom it shares approximately 44% homologous proteins. Since the homologs are not evenly distributed, we propose that these three phages belong to a new subfamily. - Highlights: • Cronobacter sakazakii phage vB{sub C}saM{sub G}AP32 has a genome of 358,663 bp. • It encodes 545 proteins which is more than Mycoplasma genitalium G37. • It is a member of the Myoviridae. • It is peripherally related to coliphage PBECO4 and Klebsiella phage vB{sub K}leM-RaK2. • GAP32 encodes a chromosome condensation protein.

  4. Exploring the risks of phage application in the environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean eMeaden

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Interest in using bacteriophages to control the growth and spread of bacterial pathogens is being revived in the wake of widespread antibiotic resistance. However, little is known about the ecological effects that high concentrations of phages in the environment might have on natural microbial communities. We review the current evidence suggesting phage-mediated environmental perturbation, with a focus on agricultural examples, and describe the potential implications for human health and agriculture. Specifically, we examine the known and potential consequences of phage application in certain agricultural practices, discuss the risks of evolved bacterial resistance to phages, and question whether the future of phage therapy will emulate that of antibiotic treatment in terms of widespread resistance. Finally, we propose some basic precautions that could preclude such phenomena and highlight existing methods for tracking bacterial resistance to phage therapeutic agents.

  5. A Cmv2 QTL on chromosome X affects MCMV resistance in New Zealand male mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Marisela R; Lundgren, Alyssa; Sabastian, Pearl; Li, Qian; Churchill, Gary; Brown, Michael G

    2009-07-01

    NK cell-mediated resistance to viruses is subject to genetic control in humans and mice. Here we used classical and quantitative genetic strategies to examine NK-mediated murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) control in genealogically related New Zealand white (NZW) and black (NZB) mice. NZW mice display NK cell-dependent MCMV resistance while NZB NK cells fail to limit viral replication after infection. Unlike Ly49H(+) NK resistance in C57BL/6 mice, NZW NK-mediated MCMV control was Ly49H-independent. Instead, MCMV resistance in NZW (Cmv2) involves multiple genetic factors. To establish the genetic basis of Cmv2 resistance, we further characterized a major chromosome X-linked resistance locus (DXMit216) responsible for innate MCMV control in NZW x NZB crosses. We found that the DXMit216 locus affects early MCMV control in New Zealand F(2) crosses and demonstrate that the NZB-derived DXMit216 allele enhances viral resistance in F(2) males. The evolutionary conservation of the DXMit216 region in mice and humans suggests that a Cmv2-related mechanism may affect human antiviral responses.

  6. Engineered phages for electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yue

    2016-11-15

    Phages are traditionally widely studied in biology and chemistry. In recent years, engineered phages have attracted significant attentions for functionalization or construction of electronic devices, due to their specific binding, catalytic, nucleating or electronic properties. To apply the engineered phages in electronics, these are a number of interesting questions: how to engineer phages for electronics? How are the engineered phages characterized? How to assemble materials with engineered phages? How are the engineered phages micro or nanopatterned? What are the strategies to construct electronics devices with engineered phages? This review will highlight the early attempts to address these questions and explore the fundamental and practical aspects of engineered phages in electronics, including the approaches for selection or expression of specific peptides on phage coat proteins, characterization of engineered phages in electronics, assembly of electronic materials, patterning of engineered phages, and construction of electronic devices. It provides the methodologies and opens up ex-cit-ing op-por-tu-ni-ties for the development of a variety of new electronic materials and devices based on engineered phages for future applications.

  7. Use of the lambda Red recombinase system to produce recombinant prophages carrying antibiotic resistance genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jofre Juan

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Red recombinase system of bacteriophage lambda has been used to inactivate chromosomal genes in E. coli K-12 through homologous recombination using linear PCR products. The aim of this study was to induce mutations in the genome of some temperate Shiga toxin encoding bacteriophages. When phage genes are in the prophage state, they behave like chromosomal genes. This enables marker genes, such as antibiotic resistance genes, to be incorporated into the stx gene. Once the phages' lytic cycle is activated, recombinant Shiga toxin converting phages are produced. These phages can transfer the marker genes to the bacteria that they infect and convert. As the Red system's effectiveness decreased when used for our purposes, we had to introduce significant variations to the original method. These modifications included: confirming the stability of the target stx gene increasing the number of cells to be transformed and using a three-step PCR method to produce the amplimer containing the antibiotic resistance gene. Results Seven phages carrying two different antibiotic resistance genes were derived from phages that are directly involved in the pathogenesis of Shiga toxin-producing strains, using this modified protocol. Conclusion This approach facilitates exploration of the transduction processes and is a valuable tool for studying phage-mediated horizontal gene transfer.

  8. Chromosomally and Extrachromosomally Mediated High-Level Gentamicin Resistance in Streptococcus agalactiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sendi, Parham; Furitsch, Martina; Mauerer, Stefanie; Florindo, Carlos; Kahl, Barbara C; Shabayek, Sarah; Berner, Reinhard; Spellerberg, Barbara

    2016-01-04

    Streptococcus agalactiae (group B Streptococcus [GBS]) is a leading cause of sepsis in neonates. The rate of invasive GBS disease in nonpregnant adults also continues to climb. Aminoglycosides alone have little or no effect on GBS, but synergistic killing with penicillin has been shown in vitro. High-level gentamicin resistance (HLGR) in GBS isolates, however, leads to the loss of a synergistic effect. We therefore performed a multicenter study to determine the frequency of HLGR GBS isolates and to elucidate the molecular mechanisms leading to gentamicin resistance. From eight centers in four countries, 1,128 invasive and colonizing GBS isolates were pooled and investigated for the presence of HLGR. We identified two strains that displayed HLGR (BSU1203 and BSU452), both of which carried the aacA-aphD gene, typically conferring HLGR. However, only one strain (BSU1203) also carried the previously described chromosomal gentamicin resistance transposon designated Tn3706. For the other strain (BSU452), plasmid purification and subsequent DNA sequencing resulted in the detection of plasmid pIP501 carrying a remnant of a Tn3 family transposon. Its ability to confer HLGR was proven by transfer into an Enterococcus faecalis isolate. Conversely, loss of HLGR was documented after curing both GBS BSU452 and the transformed E. faecalis strain from the plasmid. This is the first report showing plasmid-mediated HLGR in GBS. Thus, in our clinical GBS isolates, HLGR is mediated both chromosomally and extrachromosomally.

  9. HostPhinder: A Phage Host Prediction Tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Villarroel

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The current dramatic increase of antibiotic resistant bacteria has revitalised the interest in bacteriophages as alternative antibacterial treatment. Meanwhile, the development of bioinformatics methods for analysing genomic data places high-throughput approaches for phage characterization within reach. Here, we present HostPhinder, a tool aimed at predicting the bacterial host of phages by examining the phage genome sequence. Using a reference database of 2196 phages with known hosts, HostPhinder predicts the host species of a query phage as the host of the most genomically similar reference phages. As a measure of genomic similarity the number of co-occurring k-mers (DNA sequences of length k is used. Using an independent evaluation set, HostPhinder was able to correctly predict host genus and species for 81% and 74% of the phages respectively, giving predictions for more phages than BLAST and significantly outperforming BLAST on phages for which both had predictions. HostPhinder predictions on phage draft genomes from the INTESTI phage cocktail corresponded well with the advertised targets of the cocktail. Our study indicates that for most phages genomic similarity correlates well with related bacterial hosts. HostPhinder is available as an interactive web service [1] and as a stand alone download from the Docker registry [2].

  10. Staphylococcal Cassette Chromosome mec Types Among Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Northern Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taherirad, Akram; Jahanbakhsh, Roghayeh; Shakeri, Fatemeh; Anvary, Shaghayegh; Ghaemi, Ezzat Allah

    2016-01-01

    Background Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a common cause of nosocomial and community-acquired infections around the world. Staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) typing methods are often used to study MRSA molecular epidemiology. Objectives The current study was designed to explore the distribution profiles of different SCCmec types among methicillin-resistant S. aureus strains isolated from hospitals in Gorgan, in northern Iran, and to correlate the types into observed bacterial virulence factors. Materials and Methods Staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec typing of 62 MRSA strains isolated from patients and health-care workers in Gorgan was performed using multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay. The prevalence of the strains was then compared according to isolation source, antibiotic susceptibility profiles, biofilm production, and the presence of the Panton-Valentine gene in isolates. Results The most common SCCmec type was type III, with a frequency rate of 76%, followed by types IV, I, and V, with frequency rates of 11.2%, 4.8%, and 3.2%, respectively; three isolates (4.8%) were not typeable by this method. SCCmec type I was only isolated from blood culture, and types IV and V were mainly isolated from wounds and urine samples; SCCmec type III was isolated from all of the clinically samples. All of the MRSA strains that were isolated from healthy carriers were type III. Multidrug resistance in the type III strains was higher compared to the other types. The frequencies of Panton-Valentine and biofilm production were significantly lower in the type III strains compared to the other SCCmec types (P < 0.05). Conclusions Similarly to other geographical regions of Iran, the SCCmec type III MRSA strain was the most frequently isolated strain from patients in Gorgan. Staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec type III showed fewer virulence factors compared to other SCCmec types. PMID:27800133

  11. Precisely modulated pathogenicity island interference with late phage gene transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ram, Geeta; Chen, John; Ross, Hope F; Novick, Richard P

    2014-10-07

    Having gone to great evolutionary lengths to develop resistance to bacteriophages, bacteria have come up with resistance mechanisms directed at every aspect of the bacteriophage life cycle. Most genes involved in phage resistance are carried by plasmids and other mobile genetic elements, including bacteriophages and their relatives. A very special case of phage resistance is exhibited by the highly mobile phage satellites, staphylococcal pathogenicity islands (SaPIs), which carry and disseminate superantigen and other virulence genes. Unlike the usual phage-resistance mechanisms, the SaPI-encoded interference mechanisms are carefully crafted to ensure that a phage-infected, SaPI-containing cell will lyse, releasing the requisite crop of SaPI particles as well as a greatly diminished crop of phage particles. Previously described SaPI interference genes target phage functions that are not required for SaPI particle production and release. Here we describe a SaPI-mediated interference system that affects expression of late phage gene transcription and consequently is required for SaPI and phage. Although when cloned separately, a single SaPI gene totally blocks phage production, its activity in situ is modulated accurately by a second gene, achieving the required level of interference. The advantage for the host bacteria is that the SaPIs curb excessive phage growth while enhancing their gene transfer activity. This activity is in contrast to that of the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs), which totally block phage growth at the cost of phage-mediated gene transfer. In staphylococci the SaPI strategy seems to have prevailed during evolution: The great majority of Staphylococcus aureus strains carry one or more SaPIs, whereas CRISPRs are extremely rare.

  12. Diversity and geographical distribution of Flavobacterium psychrophilum isolates and their phages: patterns of susceptibility to phage infection and phage host range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, Daniel; Christiansen, Rói Hammershaimb; Espejo, Romilio; Middelboe, Mathias

    2014-05-01

    Flavobacterium psychrophilum is an important fish pathogen worldwide that causes cold water disease (CWD) or rainbow trout fry syndrome (RTFS). Phage therapy has been suggested as an alternative method for the control of this pathogen in aquaculture. However, effective use of bacteriophages in disease control requires detailed knowledge about the diversity and dynamics of host susceptibility to phage infection. For this reason, we examined the genetic diversity of 49 F. psychrophilum strains isolated in three different areas (Chile, Denmark, and USA) through direct genome restriction enzyme analysis (DGREA) and their susceptibility to 33 bacteriophages isolated in Chile and Denmark, thus covering large geographical (>12,000 km) and temporal (>60 years) scales of isolation. An additional 40 phage-resistant isolates obtained from culture experiments after exposure to specific phages were examined for changes in phage susceptibility against the 33 phages. The F. psychrophilum and phage populations isolated from Chile and Denmark clustered into geographically distinct groups with respect to DGREA profile and host range, respectively. However, cross infection between Chilean phage isolates and Danish host isolates and vice versa was observed. Development of resistance to certain bacteriophages led to susceptibility to other phages suggesting that "enhanced infection" is potentially an important cost of resistance in F. psychrophilum, possibly contributing to the observed co-existence of phage-sensitive F. psychrophilum strains and lytic phages across local and global scales. Overall, our results showed that despite the identification of local communities of phages and hosts, some key properties determining phage infection patterns seem to be globally distributed.

  13. Fine mapping of quantitative trait loci for mastitis resistance on bovine chromosome 11

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schulman, N F; Sahana, G; Iso-Touru, T;

    2009-01-01

    Quantitative trait loci (QTL) affecting clinical mastitis (CM) and somatic cell score (SCS) were mapped on bovine chromosome 11. The mapping population consisted of 14 grandsire families belonging to three Nordic red cattle breeds: Finnish Ayrshire (FA), Swedish Red and White (SRB) and Danish Red......, each affecting one trait; or one QTL affecting a single trait. A QTL affecting CM was fine-mapped. In FA, a haplotype having a strong association with a high negative effect on mastitis resistance was identified. The mapping precision of an earlier detected SCS-QTL was not improved by the LDLA analysis...

  14. Resistance to β-Lactams in Neisseria ssp Due to Chromosomally Encoded Penicillin-Binding Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Zapun

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Neisseria meningitidis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae are human pathogens that cause a variety of life-threatening systemic and local infections, such as meningitis or gonorrhoea. The treatment of such infection is becoming more difficult due to antibiotic resistance. The focus of this review is on the mechanism of reduced susceptibility to penicillin and other β-lactams due to the modification of chromosomally encoded penicillin-binding proteins (PBP, in particular PBP2 encoded by the penA gene. The variety of penA alleles and resulting variant PBP2 enzymes is described and the important amino acid substitutions are presented and discussed in a structural context.

  15. Chromosomal location of genomic SSR markers associated with yellow rust resistance in Turkish bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L.)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    F. Senturk Akfirat; F. Ertugrul; S. Hasancebi; Y. Aydin; K. Akan; Z. Mert; M. Cakir; A. Altinkut Uncuoglu

    2013-08-01

    We have previously reported Xgwm382 as a diagnostic marker for disease resistance against yellow rust in Izgi2001 × ES14 F2 population. Among the same earlier tested 230 primers, one SSR marker (Xgwm311) also amplified a fragment which is present in the resistant parent and in the resistant bulks, but absent in the susceptible parent and in the susceptible bulks. To understand the chromosome group location of these diagnostic markers, Xgwm382 and Xgwm311, in the same population, we selected 16 SSR markers mapped only in one genome of chromosome group 2 around 1–21 cM distance to these diagnostic markers based on the SSR consensus map of wheat. Out of 16 SSRs, Xwmc658 identified resistant F2 individuals as a diagnostic marker for yellow rust disease and provided the location of Xgwm382 and Xgwm311 on chromosome 2AL in our plant material.

  16. Heat tolerance of dairy lactococcal c2 phages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Cecilie Lykke Marvig; Basheer, Aideh; Neve, H.

    2011-01-01

    Nine Lactococcus lactis c2 phages propagated on different hosts were screened for thermal resistance in skimmed milk. Pronounced variations in thermal resistance were found. Three phages displayed high sensitivity towards heat resulting in >8 log reductions after 70 °C for 5 min, whereas the most...

  17. Bivariate linkage analysis of the insulin resistance syndrome phenotypes on chromosome 7q.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehman, Donna M; Arya, Rector; Blangero, John; Almasy, Laura; Puppala, Sobha; Dyer, Thomas D; Leach, Robin J; O'Connell, Peter; Stern, Michael P; Duggirala, Ravindranath

    2005-04-01

    Metabolic abnormalities of the insulin resistance syndrome (IRS) have been shown to aggregate in families and to exhibit trait-pair correlations, suggesting a common genetic component. A broad region on chromosome 7q has been implicated in several studies to contain loci that cosegregate with IRS-related traits. However, it is not clear whether such loci have any common genetic (pleiotropic) influences on the correlated traits. Also, it is not clear whether the chromosomal regions contain more than one locus influencing the IRS-related phenotypes. In this study we present evidence for linkage of five IRS-related traits [body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC), In split proinsulin (LSPI), In triglycerides (LTG), and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDLC)] to a region at 7q11.23. Subsequently, to gain further insight into the genetic component(s) mapping to this region, we explored whether linkage of these traits is due to pleiotropic effects using a bivariate linkage analytical technique, which has been shown to localize susceptibility regions with precision. Four hundred forty individuals from 27 Mexican American families living in Texas were genotyped for 19 highly polymorphic markers on chromosome 7. Multipoint variance component linkage analysis was used to identify genetic location(s) influencing IRS-related traits of obesity (BMI and WC), dyslipidemia (LTG and HDLC), and insulin levels (LSPI); the analysis identified a broad chromosomal region spanning approximately 24 cM. To gain more precision in localization, we used a bivariate linkage approach for each trait pair. These analyses suggest localization of most of these bivariate traits to an approximately 6-cM region near marker D7S653 [7q11.23, 103-109 cM; a maximum bivariate LOD of 4.51 was found for the trait pair HDLC and LSPI (the LODeq score is 3.94)]. We observed evidence of pleiotropic effects in this region on obesity and insulin-related trait pairs.

  18. Analysis of Resistant Spectrum to Rice Blast in Transgenic Rice Lines Introduced Lysozyme Gene from T4 Phage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Ming-hui; LI Cheng-yun; LI Jin-bin; TAN Xue-lin; TIAN Wen-zhong; TANG Zuo-shun

    2003-01-01

    The receptor cultivar Nan29 and thirty-six T5 rice lines derived from ten T0 generation transgen-ic plants harboring lysozyme gene were challenged in the greenhouse by inoculating 63 isolates belonging to 48races of Magnaporthe grisea from Yunnan Province. The transgenic rice lines exhibited resistance to morethan 72% of isolates inoculated in this experiment, and 38.1% (24 isolates) of them could infect the receptorcultivar Nan29. The results indicated that the transgenic rice lines possessed wide-spectrum resistance againstvarious rice blast races and the resistant spectrum of rice lines were different although some lines derived fromsame T0 plant. The transgenic rice lines exhibited also high resistance to leaf and neck blast in the disease fieldevaluation, but not all of resistant lines against leaf blast were resistant to neck blast.

  19. Many chromosomal genes modulate MarA-mediated multidrug resistance in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Cristian; Levy, Stuart B

    2010-05-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) in clinical isolates of Escherichia coli can be associated with overexpression of marA, a transcription factor that upregulates multidrug efflux and downregulates membrane permeability. Using random transposome mutagenesis, we found that many chromosomal genes and environmental stimuli affected MarA-mediated antibiotic resistance. Seven genes affected resistance mediated by MarA in an antibiotic-specific way; these were mostly genes encoding unrelated enzymes, transporters, and unknown proteins. Other genes affected MarA-mediated resistance to all antibiotics tested. These genes were acrA, acrB, and tolC (which encode the major MarA-regulated multidrug efflux pump AcrAB-TolC), crp, cyaA, hns, and pcnB (four genes involved in global regulation of gene expression), and the unknown gene damX. The last five genes affected MarA-mediated MDR by altering marA expression or MarA function specifically on acrA. These findings demonstrate that MarA-mediated MDR is regulated at multiple levels by different genes and stimuli, which makes it both complex and fine-tuned and interconnects it with global cell regulation and metabolism. Such a regulation could contribute to the adaptation and spread of MDR strains and may be targeted to treat antibiotic-resistant E. coli and related pathogens.

  20. Characterization and genome sequencing of a Citrobacter freundii phage CfP1 harboring a lysin active against multidrug-resistant isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Hugo; Pinto, Graça; Oliveira, Ana; Oliveira, Carla; Faustino, Maria Alberta; Briers, Yves; Domingues, Lucília; Azeredo, Joana

    2016-12-01

    Citrobacter spp., although frequently ignored, is emerging as an important nosocomial bacterium able to cause various superficial and systemic life-threatening infections. Considered to be hard-to-treat bacterium due to its pattern of high antibiotic resistance, it is important to develop effective measures for early and efficient therapy. In this study, the first myovirus (vB_CfrM_CfP1) lytic for Citrobacter freundii was microbiologically and genomically characterized. Its morphology, activity spectrum, burst size, and biophysical stability spectrum were determined. CfP1 specifically infects C. freundii, has broad host range (>85 %; 21 strains tested), a burst size of 45 PFU/cell, and is very stable under different temperatures (-20 to 50 °C) and pH (3 to 11) values. CfP1 demonstrated to be highly virulent against multidrug-resistant clinical isolates up to 12 antibiotics, including penicillins, cephalosporins, carbapenems, and fluroquinoles. Genomically, CfP1 has a dsDNA molecule with 180,219 bp with average GC content of 43.1 % and codes for 273 CDSs. The genome architecture is organized into function-specific gene clusters typical for tailed phages, sharing 46 to 94 % nucleotide identity to other Citrobacter phages. The lysin gene encoding a predicted D-Ala-D-Ala carboxypeptidase was also cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli and its activity evaluated in terms of pH, ionic strength, and temperature. The lysine optimum activity was reached at 20 mM HEPES, pH 7 at 37 °C, and was able to significantly reduce all C. freundii (>2 logs) as well as Citrobacter koseri (>4 logs) strains tested. Interestingly, the antimicrobial activity of this enzyme was performed without the need of pretreatment with outer membrane-destabilizing agents. These results indicate that CfP1 lysin is a good candidate to control problematic Citrobacter infections, for which current antibiotics are no longer effective.

  1. 噬菌体治疗耐药性幽门螺杆菌的研究进展%Advances of phage therapy in antibiotic-resistant Helicobacter pylori infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    熊婧; 白杨

    2011-01-01

    幽门螺杆菌感染是胃癌重要致病因子.目前,幽门螺杆菌对抗生素耐药情况日趋普遍.噬菌体治疗作为一种生物疗法在治疗幽门螺杆菌方面有极大的潜力.本文就噬菌体治疗耐药性幽门螺杆菌的现状及趋势进行综述.%Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is one of the most important risk factors leading to gastric cancer.To date, it has been more and more popular that H. pylori is resistant to antibiotics. Phage therapy has a great advantages in control of H. pylori infection. In this article, we will review the advance of phage therapy in antibiotic-resistant H.pylori infection.

  2. Phage lytic enzymes: a history

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    David; Trudil

    2015-01-01

    There are many recent studies regarding the efficacy of bacteriophage-related lytic enzymes: the enzymes of ‘bacteria-eaters’ or viruses that infect bacteria. By degrading the cell wall of the targeted bacteria, these lytic enzymes have been shown to efficiently lyse Gram-positive bacteria without affecting normal flora and non-related bacteria. Recent studies have suggested approaches for lysing Gram-negative bacteria as well(Briersa Y, et al., 2014). These enzymes include: phage-lysozyme, endolysin, lysozyme, lysin, phage lysin, phage lytic enzymes, phageassociated enzymes, enzybiotics, muralysin, muramidase, virolysin and designations such as Ply, PAE and others. Bacteriophages are viruses that kill bacteria, do not contribute to antimicrobial resistance, are easy to develop, inexpensive to manufacture and safe for humans, animals and the environment. The current focus on lytic enzymes has been on their use as anti-infectives in humans and more recently in agricultural research models. The initial translational application of lytic enzymes, however, was not associated with treating or preventing a specifi c disease but rather as an extraction method to be incorporated in a rapid bacterial detection assay(Bernstein D, 1997).The current review traces the translational history of phage lytic enzymes–from their initial discovery in 1986 for the rapid detection of group A streptococcus in clinical specimens to evolving applications in the detection and prevention of disease in humans and in agriculture.

  3. Paving a regulatory pathway for phage therapy: Europe should muster the resources to financially, technically and legally support the introduction of phage therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Huys, Isabelle; Pirnay, Jean-Paul; Lavigne, Rob; Jennes, Serge; De Vos, Daniel; Casteels, Minne; Verbeken, Gilbert

    2013-01-01

    The growing problem of antibiotic-resistant bacteria has re-kindled interest in phage-based therapies. Yet, the use of phages to treat life-threatening bacterial infections is held back by the lack of an appropriate regulatory framework for phage therapy.

  4. Evolutionary Rationale for Phages as Complements of Antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Barceló, Clara; Hochberg, Michael E

    2016-04-01

    Antibiotic-resistant bacterial infections are a major concern to public health. Phage therapy has been proposed as a promising alternative to antibiotics, but an increasing number of studies suggest that both of these antimicrobial agents in combination are more effective in controlling pathogenic bacteria than either alone. We advocate the use of phages in combination with antibiotics and present the evolutionary basis for our claim. In addition, we identify compelling challenges for the realistic application of phage-antibiotic combined therapy.

  5. Isolation and Characterization of Phages Infecting Bacillus subtilis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Krasowska

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacteriophages have been suggested as an alternative approach to reduce the amount of pathogens in various applications. Bacteriophages of various specificity and virulence were isolated as a means of controlling food-borne pathogens. We studied the interaction of bacteriophages with Bacillus species, which are very often persistent in industrial applications such as food production due to their antibiotic resistance and spore formation. A comparative study using electron microscopy, PFGE, and SDS-PAGE as well as determination of host range, pH and temperature resistance, adsorption rate, latent time, and phage burst size was performed on three phages of the Myoviridae family and one phage of the Siphoviridae family which infected Bacillus subtilis strains. The phages are morphologically different and characterized by icosahedral heads and contractile (SIOΦ, SUBω, and SPOσ phages or noncontractile (ARπ phage tails. The genomes of SIOΦ and SUBω are composed of 154 kb. The capsid of SIOΦ is composed of four proteins. Bacteriophages SPOσ and ARπ have genome sizes of 25 kbp and 40 kbp, respectively. Both phages as well as SUBω phage have 14 proteins in their capsids. Phages SIOΦ and SPOσ are resistant to high temperatures and to the acid (4.0 and alkaline (9.0 and 10.0 pH.

  6. Learning from bacteriophages - advantages and limitations of phage and phage-encoded protein applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drulis-Kawa, Zuzanna; Majkowska-Skrobek, Grazyna; Maciejewska, Barbara; Delattre, Anne-Sophie; Lavigne, Rob

    2012-12-01

    The emergence of bacteria resistance to most of the currently available antibiotics has become a critical therapeutic problem. The bacteria causing both hospital and community-acquired infections are most often multidrug resistant. In view of the alarming level of antibiotic resistance between bacterial species and difficulties with treatment, alternative or supportive antibacterial cure has to be developed. The presented review focuses on the major characteristics of bacteriophages and phage-encoded proteins affecting their usefulness as antimicrobial agents. We discuss several issues such as mode of action, pharmacodynamics, pharmacokinetics, resistance and manufacturing aspects of bacteriophages and phage-encoded proteins application.

  7. Chromosomal imbalance maps of human 5FU-resistant colorectal cancer cell lines: implications in the analysis of 5FU-acquired resistance mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plasencia, C; Rooney, P H; Taron, M; Martinez-Balibrea, E; McLeod, H L; Abad, A

    2003-05-01

    Thymidylate synthase (TS), a critical enzyme in the de novo synthesis of thymidylate, is an important target for fluoropyrimidines and folate-based TS inhibitors. Overexpression of TS has been correlated to 5-fluorouracil (5FU)-resistance. Because 5FU still remains a basic component of the treatment of colorectal cancer, circumvention of resistance is of vital importance. A panel of sensitive (HT29 and LoVo) and 5FU-resistant colorectal cancer cell lines (HT29-5FUR and LoVo-5FUR) were subjected to comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) analysis to identify possible amplified/deleted regions associated with 5FU-resistance in colon tumours. We have identified chromosomal gains at 5p, 6, 7p, 7q and 8q and one loss at 3q in 5FU-resistant cells as compared to corresponding sensitive cell lines. Neither chromosomal gains at 18p nor gene amplification of TS were observed in our resistant cell lines although an overexpression of TS gene exists (at mRNA level) in these cell lines as compared with corresponding parental cells. Most of the chromosomal gains identified in this study occur frequently in sporadic colorectal tumours and has been associated to a poor prognosis and a greater progression of the tumour and could be related to a worse chemotherapy response. The chromosomal imbalance profile detected in 5FU-resistant cell lines should provide a basis for interpreting mechanisms of 5FU-resistance in colorectal cancer and also possibly in other tumours treated with this agent. This study also identified new genes potentially implicated in 5FU-resistance and suggests new targets that could be useful for the chemotherapy treatment of colorectal cancer.

  8. TaXA21-A1 on chromosome 5AL is associated with resistance to multiple pests in wheat

    Science.gov (United States)

    A quantitative trait locus QYr.osu-5A on the long arm of chromosome 5A in bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L., 2n=6x=42; AABBDD) was previously reported to confer consistent resistance in adult plants to predominant stripe rust races, but the gene causing the quantitative trait locus (QTL) is not know...

  9. Burkholderia cepacia complex Phage-Antibiotic Synergy (PAS): antibiotics stimulate lytic phage activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamal, Fatima; Dennis, Jonathan J

    2015-02-01

    The Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) is a group of at least 18 species of Gram-negative opportunistic pathogens that can cause chronic lung infection in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Bcc organisms possess high levels of innate antimicrobial resistance, and alternative therapeutic strategies are urgently needed. One proposed alternative treatment is phage therapy, the therapeutic application of bacterial viruses (or bacteriophages). Recently, some phages have been observed to form larger plaques in the presence of sublethal concentrations of certain antibiotics; this effect has been termed phage-antibiotic synergy (PAS). Those reports suggest that some antibiotics stimulate increased production of phages under certain conditions. The aim of this study is to examine PAS in phages that infect Burkholderia cenocepacia strains C6433 and K56-2. Bcc phages KS12 and KS14 were tested for PAS, using 6 antibiotics representing 4 different drug classes. Of the antibiotics tested, the most pronounced effects were observed for meropenem, ciprofloxacin, and tetracycline. When grown with subinhibitory concentrations of these three antibiotics, cells developed a chain-like arrangement, an elongated morphology, and a clustered arrangement, respectively. When treated with progressively higher antibiotic concentrations, both the sizes of plaques and phage titers increased, up to a maximum. B. cenocepacia K56-2-infected Galleria mellonella larvae treated with phage KS12 and low-dose meropenem demonstrated increased survival over controls treated with KS12 or antibiotic alone. These results suggest that antibiotics can be combined with phages to stimulate increased phage production and/or activity and thus improve the efficacy of bacterial killing.

  10. Extensive phage dynamics in Staphylococcus aureus contributes to adaptation to the human host during infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goerke, Christiane; Wirtz, Christiane; Flückiger, Ursula; Wolz, Christiane

    2006-09-01

    Bacteriophages serve as a driving force in microbial evolution, adaptation to new environments and the pathogenesis of human bacterial infections. In Staphylococcus aureus phages encoding immune evasion molecules (SAK, SCIN, CHIPS), which integrate specifically into the beta-haemolysin (Hlb) gene, are widely distributed. When comparing S. aureus strain collections from infectious and colonizing situations we could detect a translocation of sak-encoding phages to atypical genomic integration sites in the bacterium only in the disease-related isolates. Additionally, significantly more Hlb producing strains were detected in the infectious strain collection. Extensive phage dynamics (intragenomic translocation, duplication, transfer between hosts, recombination events) during infection was shown by analysing cocolonizing and consecutive isolates of patients. This activity leads to the splitting of the strain population into various subfractions exhibiting different virulence potentials (Hlb-production and/or production of immune evasion molecules). Thus, phage-inducing conditions and strong selection for survival of the bacterial host after phage movement are typical for the infectious situation. Further in vitro characterization of phages revealed that: (i) SAK is encoded not only on serogroup F phages showing a conserved tropism for hlb but also on serogroup B phages which always integrate in a distinct intergenic region, (ii) the level of sak transcription correlates to phage inducibility but is independent of the phage localization in the chromosome, and (iii) phages can be stabilized extra-chromosomally during their life cycle.

  11. Bacterial viruses enable their host to acquire antibiotic resistance genes from neighbouring cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haaber, Jakob; Leisner, Jørgen J; Cohn, Marianne T;

    2016-01-01

    Prophages are quiescent viruses located in the chromosomes of bacteria. In the human pathogen, Staphylococcus aureus, prophages are omnipresent and are believed to be responsible for the spread of some antibiotic resistance genes. Here we demonstrate that release of phages from a subpopulation of S...

  12. Bacterial viruses enable their host to acquire antibiotic resistance genes from neighbouring cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haaber, Jakob Krause; Leisner, Jørgen; Cohn, Marianne Thorup;

    2016-01-01

    Prophages are quiescent viruses located in the chromosomes of bacteria. In the human pathogen, Staphylococcus aureus, prophages are omnipresent and are believed to be responsible for the spread of some antibiotic resistance genes. Here we demonstrate that release of phages from a subpopulation of...

  13. Introgression of chromosome segments from multiple alien species in wheat breeding lines with wheat streak mosaic virus resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, N; Heslop-Harrison, Js Pat; Ahmad, H; Graybosch, R A; Hein, G L; Schwarzacher, T

    2016-08-01

    Pyramiding of alien-derived Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV) resistance and resistance enhancing genes in wheat is a cost-effective and environmentally safe strategy for disease control. PCR-based markers and cytogenetic analysis with genomic in situ hybridisation were applied to identify alien chromatin in four genetically diverse populations of wheat (Triticum aestivum) lines incorporating chromosome segments from Thinopyrum intermedium and Secale cereale (rye). Out of 20 experimental lines, 10 carried Th. intermedium chromatin as T4DL*4Ai#2S translocations, while, unexpectedly, 7 lines were positive for alien chromatin (Th. intermedium or rye) on chromosome 1B. The newly described rye 1RS chromatin, transmitted from early in the pedigree, was associated with enhanced WSMV resistance. Under field conditions, the 1RS chromatin alone showed some resistance, while together with the Th. intermedium 4Ai#2S offered superior resistance to that demonstrated by the known resistant cultivar Mace. Most alien wheat lines carry whole chromosome arms, and it is notable that these lines showed intra-arm recombination within the 1BS arm. The translocation breakpoints between 1BS and alien chromatin fell in three categories: (i) at or near to the centromere, (ii) intercalary between markers UL-Thin5 and Xgwm1130 and (iii) towards the telomere between Xgwm0911 and Xbarc194. Labelled genomic Th. intermedium DNA hybridised to the rye 1RS chromatin under high stringency conditions, indicating the presence of shared tandem repeats among the cereals. The novel small alien fragments may explain the difficulty in developing well-adapted lines carrying Wsm1 despite improved tolerance to the virus. The results will facilitate directed chromosome engineering producing agronomically desirable WSMV-resistant germplasm.

  14. Bacteriophages and phage-derived proteins--application approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drulis-Kawa, Zuzanna; Majkowska-Skrobek, Grazyna; Maciejewska, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Currently, the bacterial resistance, especially to most commonly used antibiotics has proved to be a severe therapeutic problem. Nosocomial and community-acquired infections are usually caused by multidrug resistant strains. Therefore, we are forced to develop an alternative or supportive treatment for successful cure of life-threatening infections. The idea of using natural bacterial pathogens such as bacteriophages is already well known. Many papers have been published proving the high antibacterial efficacy of lytic phages tested in animal models as well as in the clinic. Researchers have also investigated the application of non-lytic phages and temperate phages, with promising results. Moreover, the development of molecular biology and novel generation methods of sequencing has opened up new possibilities in the design of engineered phages and recombinant phage-derived proteins. Encouraging performances were noted especially for phage enzymes involved in the first step of viral infection responsible for bacterial envelope degradation, named depolymerases. There are at least five major groups of such enzymes - peptidoglycan hydrolases, endosialidases, endorhamnosidases, alginate lyases and hyaluronate lyases - that have application potential. There is also much interest in proteins encoded by lysis cassette genes (holins, endolysins, spanins) responsible for progeny release during the phage lytic cycle. In this review, we discuss several issues of phage and phage-derived protein application approaches in therapy, diagnostics and biotechnology in general.

  15. Bacteriophages and Phage-Derived Proteins – Application Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drulis-Kawa, Zuzanna; Majkowska-Skrobek, Grazyna; Maciejewska, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Currently, the bacterial resistance, especially to most commonly used antibiotics has proved to be a severe therapeutic problem. Nosocomial and community-acquired infections are usually caused by multidrug resistant strains. Therefore, we are forced to develop an alternative or supportive treatment for successful cure of life-threatening infections. The idea of using natural bacterial pathogens such as bacteriophages is already well known. Many papers have been published proving the high antibacterial efficacy of lytic phages tested in animal models as well as in the clinic. Researchers have also investigated the application of non-lytic phages and temperate phages, with promising results. Moreover, the development of molecular biology and novel generation methods of sequencing has opened up new possibilities in the design of engineered phages and recombinant phage-derived proteins. Encouraging performances were noted especially for phage enzymes involved in the first step of viral infection responsible for bacterial envelope degradation, named depolymerases. There are at least five major groups of such enzymes – peptidoglycan hydrolases, endosialidases, endorhamnosidases, alginate lyases and hyaluronate lyases – that have application potential. There is also much interest in proteins encoded by lysis cassette genes (holins, endolysins, spanins) responsible for progeny release during the phage lytic cycle. In this review, we discuss several issues of phage and phage-derived protein application approaches in therapy, diagnostics and biotechnology in general. PMID:25666799

  16. Allocation of the S-genome chromosomes of Aegilops variabilis Eig. carrying powdery mildew resistance in triticale (× Triticosecale Wittmack).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwiatek, M; Belter, J; Majka, M; Wiśniewska, H

    2016-03-01

    It has been hypothesized that the powdery mildew adult plant resistance (APR) controlled by the Pm13 gene in Aegilops longissima Schweinf. & Muschl. (S(l)S(l)) has been evolutionary transferred to Aegilops variabilis Eig. (UUSS). The molecular marker analysis and the visual evaluation of powdery mildew symptoms in Ae. variabilis and the Ae. variabilis × Secale cereale amphiploid forms (2n = 6x = 42, UUSSRR) showed the presence of product that corresponded to Pm13 marker and the lower infection level compared to susceptible model, respectively. This study also describes the transfer of Ae. variabilis Eig. (2n = 4x = 28, U(v)U(v)S(v)S(v)) chromosomes, carrying powdery mildew resistance, into triticale (× Triticosecale Wittm., 2n = 6x = 42, AABBRR) using Ae. variabilis × S. cereale amphiploid forms. The individual chromosomes of Ae. variabilis, triticale 'Lamberto' and hybrids were characterized by genomic and fluorescence in situ hybridization (GISH/FISH). The chromosome configurations of obtained hybrid forms were studied at first metaphase of meiosis of pollen mother cells (PMCs) using GISH. The statistical analysis showed that the way of S-genome chromosome pairing and transmission to subsequent hybrid generations was diploid-like and had no influence on chromosome pairing of triticale chromosomes. The cytogenetic study of hybrid forms were supported by the marker-assisted selection using Pm13 marker and visual evaluation of natural infection by Blumeria graminis, that allowed to select the addition or substitution lines of hybrids carrying chromosome 3S(v) which were tolerant to the powdery mildew infection.

  17. Interference with phage lambda development by the small subunit of the phage 21 terminase, gp1.

    OpenAIRE

    1991-01-01

    Bacteriophage lambda development is blocked in cells carrying a plasmid that expresses the terminase genes of phage 21. The interference is caused by the small subunit of phage 21 terminase, gp1. Mutants of lambda able to form plaques in the presence of gp1 include sti mutants. One such mutation, sti30, is an A. T-to-G.C transition mutation at base pair 184 on the lambda chromosome. The sti30 mutation extends the length of the ribosome-binding sequence of the Nul gene that is complementary to...

  18. Location of a High-Lysine Gene and the DDT-Resistance Gene on Barley Chromosome 7

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, J.

    1979-01-01

    mutants, nos 1508.18, and 19. Linkage studies with translocations locate the Lys3 locus in the centromere region ofchromosome 7. A linkage study involving the loci lys3 and ddt (resistance to DDT) together with the marker locifi (fragile stem), s(short rachilla hairs), and r (smooth awn) show...... that the order of the five loci on chromosome 7 from the long to the short chromosome arm is Y, s,fi, lys3, ddt. The distance from locus I to locus ddt is about 100 centimorgans....

  19. Phage & phosphatase: a novel phage-based probe for rapid, multi-platform detection of bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcaine, S D; Pacitto, D; Sela, D A; Nugen, S R

    2015-11-21

    Genetic engineering of bacteriophages allows for the development of rapid, highly specific, and easily manufactured probes for the detection of bacterial pathogens. A challenge for novel probes is the ease of their adoption in real world laboratories. We have engineered the bacteriophage T7, which targets Escherichia coli, to carry the alkaline phosphatase gene, phoA. This inclusion results in phoA overexpression following phage infection of E. coli. Alkaline phosphatase is commonly used in a wide range of diagnostics, and thus a signal produced by our phage-based probe could be detected using common laboratory equipment. Our work demonstrates the successful: (i) modification of T7 phage to carry phoA; (ii) overexpression of alkaline phosphatase in E. coli; and (iii) detection of this T7-induced alkaline phosphatase activity using commercially available colorimetric and chemilumiscent methods. Furthermore, we demonstrate the application of our phage-based probe to rapidly detect low levels of bacteria and discern the antibiotic resistance of E. coli isolates. Using our bioengineered phage-based probe we were able to detect 10(3) CFU per mL of E. coli in 6 hours using a chemiluminescent substrate and 10(4) CFU per mL within 7.5 hours using a colorimetric substrate. We also show the application of this phage-based probe for antibiotic resistance testing. We were able to determine whether an E. coli isolate was resistant to ampicillin within 4.5 hours using chemiluminescent substrate and within 6 hours using a colorimetric substrate. This phage-based scheme could be readily adopted in labs without significant capital investments and can be translated to other phage-bacteria pairs for further detection.

  20. Beyond the chromosome: the prevalence of unique extra-chromosomal bacteriophages with integrated virulence genes in pathogenic Staphylococcus aureus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryan Utter

    Full Text Available In Staphylococcus aureus, the disease impact of chromosomally integrated prophages on virulence is well described. However, the existence of extra-chromosomal prophages, both plasmidial and episomal, remains obscure. Despite the recent explosion in bacterial and bacteriophage genomic sequencing, studies have failed to specifically focus on extra-chromosomal elements. We selectively enriched and sequenced extra-chromosomal DNA from S. aureus isolates using Roche-454 technology and uncovered evidence for the widespread distribution of multiple extra-chromosomal prophages (ExPΦs throughout both antibiotic-sensitive and -resistant strains. We completely sequenced one such element comprised of a 43.8 kbp, circular ExPΦ (designated ФBU01 from a vancomycin-intermediate S. aureus (VISA strain. Assembly and annotation of ФBU01 revealed a number of putative virulence determinants encoded within a bacteriophage immune evasion cluster (IEC. Our identification of several potential ExPΦs and mobile genetic elements (MGEs also revealed numerous putative virulence factors and antibiotic resistance genes. We describe here a previously unidentified level of genetic diversity of stealth extra-chromosomal elements in S. aureus, including phages with a larger presence outside the chromosome that likely play a prominent role in pathogenesis and strain diversity driven by horizontal gene transfer (HGT.

  1. Tandem amplification of a chromosomal segment harboring 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase locus confers glyphosate resistance in Kochia scoparia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jugulam, Mithila; Niehues, Kindsey; Godar, Amar S; Koo, Dal-Hoe; Danilova, Tatiana; Friebe, Bernd; Sehgal, Sunish; Varanasi, Vijay K; Wiersma, Andrew; Westra, Philip; Stahlman, Phillip W; Gill, Bikram S

    2014-11-01

    Recent rapid evolution and spread of resistance to the most extensively used herbicide, glyphosate, is a major threat to global crop production. Genetic mechanisms by which weeds evolve resistance to herbicides largely determine the level of resistance and the rate of evolution of resistance. In a previous study, we determined that glyphosate resistance in Kochia scoparia is due to the amplification of the 5-Enolpyruvylshikimate-3-Phosphate Synthase (EPSPS) gene, the enzyme target of glyphosate. Here, we investigated the genomic organization of the amplified EPSPS copies using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and extended DNA fiber (Fiber FISH) on K. scoparia chromosomes. In both glyphosate-resistant K. scoparia populations tested (GR1 and GR2), FISH results displayed a single and prominent hybridization site of the EPSPS gene localized on the distal end of one pair of homologous metaphase chromosomes compared with a faint hybridization site in glyphosate-susceptible samples (GS1 and GS2). Fiber FISH displayed 10 copies of the EPSPS gene (approximately 5 kb) arranged in tandem configuration approximately 40 to 70 kb apart, with one copy in an inverted orientation in GR2. In agreement with FISH results, segregation of EPSPS copies followed single-locus inheritance in GR1 population. This is the first report of tandem target gene amplification conferring field-evolved herbicide resistance in weed populations.

  2. Phage typing and Multidrug resistance profile in S. Typhimurium isolated from different sources in Brazil from 1999 to 2004 Fagotipagem e Perfil de multirresistência antimicrobiana em S. Typhimurium isoladas de diferentes fontes no Brasil de 1999 a 2004

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christiane Soares Pereira

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Salmonella Typhimurium has become a widespread cause of salmonellosis among humans and animals worldwide. In Brazil, Salmonella Typhimurium (STM is one of the most prevalent serovars isolated from food for human consumption. The uncontrolled sale and use of antimicrobials in agriculture and for treating human patients contributes to increase multidrug resistance of this serovar. In the present study, a total of 278 STM isolates from different sources and regions of Brazil over the period 1999 to 2004 were phage typed and analyzed for their antimicrobial resistance profile at Laboratory of Enterobacteria, Oswaldo Cruz Institute, FIOCRUZ. The main STM phage types isolated were DT 193 (64.3%, DT 19 (17.4% and DT 18 (4%. Others phage types as DT 10 (2%, DT 27 (3.24%, DT 13 (0.36%, DT 22 (0.36%, DT 28 (0.36%, DT 29 (0.36% and DT 149 (0.36% were obtained in low percentages. A total of 54% STM strains were resistant to three or more antimicrobial classes, while no resistance to third generation cephalosporin or ciprofloxacin was identified in these strains. Those results show the STM phage types circulating among animals, food for human consumption and humans in Brazil as well as the increasing of multidrug resistance. The surveillance of STM strains based on phage typing and antimicrobial resistance profile are useful for detecting outbreaks, identifying sources of infection and implementing prevention and control measures.Salmonella Typhimurium é considerada uma das principais bactérias causadoras de salmonelose nos animais e no homem em todo o mundo. No Brasil, Salmonella Typhimurium é um dos mais prevalentes sorovares isolados de alimentos para consumo humano. O uso indiscriminado de antibióticos em produtos agrícolas e no tratamento de pacientes humanos tem contribuído para aumentar a multirresistência desse sorovar a diversos antimicrobianos. No presente estudo, 278 cepas de STM foram selecionadas de diferentes fontes e regiões do Brasil

  3. Estimating richness from phage metagenomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacteriophages are important drivers of ecosystem functions, yet little is known about the vast majority of phages. Phage metagenomics, or the study of the collective genome of an assemblage of phages, enables the investigation of broad ecological questions in phage communities. One ecological cha...

  4. Quality and safety requirements for sustainable phage therapy products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirnay, Jean-Paul; Blasdel, Bob G; Bretaudeau, Laurent; Buckling, Angus; Chanishvili, Nina; Clark, Jason R; Corte-Real, Sofia; Debarbieux, Laurent; Dublanchet, Alain; De Vos, Daniel; Gabard, Jérôme; Garcia, Miguel; Goderdzishvili, Marina; Górski, Andrzej; Hardcastle, John; Huys, Isabelle; Kutter, Elizabeth; Lavigne, Rob; Merabishvili, Maia; Olchawa, Ewa; Parikka, Kaarle J; Patey, Olivier; Pouilot, Flavie; Resch, Gregory; Rohde, Christine; Scheres, Jacques; Skurnik, Mikael; Vaneechoutte, Mario; Van Parys, Luc; Verbeken, Gilbert; Zizi, Martin; Van den Eede, Guy

    2015-07-01

    The worldwide antibiotic crisis has led to a renewed interest in phage therapy. Since time immemorial phages control bacterial populations on Earth. Potent lytic phages against bacterial pathogens can be isolated from the environment or selected from a collection in a matter of days. In addition, phages have the capacity to rapidly overcome bacterial resistances, which will inevitably emerge. To maximally exploit these advantage phages have over conventional drugs such as antibiotics, it is important that sustainable phage products are not submitted to the conventional long medicinal product development and licensing pathway. There is a need for an adapted framework, including realistic production and quality and safety requirements, that allows a timely supplying of phage therapy products for 'personalized therapy' or for public health or medical emergencies. This paper enumerates all phage therapy product related quality and safety risks known to the authors, as well as the tests that can be performed to minimize these risks, only to the extent needed to protect the patients and to allow and advance responsible phage therapy and research.

  5. Phage therapy against Enterococcus faecalis in dental root canals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalifa, Leron; Shlezinger, Mor; Beyth, Shaul; Houri-Haddad, Yael; Coppenhagen-Glazer, Shunit; Beyth, Nurit; Hazan, Ronen

    2016-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance is an ever-growing problem faced by all major sectors of health care, including dentistry. Recurrent infections related to multidrug-resistant bacteria such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae, and vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) in hospitals are untreatable and question the effectiveness of notable drugs. Two major reasons for these recurrent infections are acquired antibiotic resistance genes and biofilm formation. None of the traditionally known effective techniques have been able to efficiently resolve these issues. Hence, development of a highly effective antibacterial practice has become inevitable. One example of a hard-to-eradicate pathogen in dentistry is Enterococcus faecalis, which is one of the most common threats observed in recurrent root canal treatment failures, of which the most problematic to treat are its biofilm-forming VRE strains. An effective response against such infections could be the use of bacteriophages (phages). Phage therapy was found to be highly effective against biofilm and multidrug-resistant bacteria and has other advantages like ease of isolation and possibilities for genetic manipulations. The potential of phage therapy in dentistry, in particular against E. faecalis biofilms in root canals, is almost unexplored. Here we review the efforts to develop phage therapy against biofilms. We also focus on the phages isolated against E. faecalis and discuss the possibility of using phages against E. faecalis biofilm in root canals. PMID:27640530

  6. Phage therapy against Enterococcus faecalis in dental root canals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leron Khalifa

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotic resistance is an ever-growing problem faced by all major sectors of health care, including dentistry. Recurrent infections related to multidrug-resistant bacteria such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae, and vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE in hospitals are untreatable and question the effectiveness of notable drugs. Two major reasons for these recurrent infections are acquired antibiotic resistance genes and biofilm formation. None of the traditionally known effective techniques have been able to efficiently resolve these issues. Hence, development of a highly effective antibacterial practice has become inevitable. One example of a hard-to-eradicate pathogen in dentistry is Enterococcus faecalis, which is one of the most common threats observed in recurrent root canal treatment failures, of which the most problematic to treat are its biofilm-forming VRE strains. An effective response against such infections could be the use of bacteriophages (phages. Phage therapy was found to be highly effective against biofilm and multidrug-resistant bacteria and has other advantages like ease of isolation and possibilities for genetic manipulations. The potential of phage therapy in dentistry, in particular against E. faecalis biofilms in root canals, is almost unexplored. Here we review the efforts to develop phage therapy against biofilms. We also focus on the phages isolated against E. faecalis and discuss the possibility of using phages against E. faecalis biofilm in root canals.

  7. Peptide-binding motif prediction by using phage display library for SasaUBA*0301, a resistance haplotype of MHC class I molecule from Atlantic Salmon (Salmo salar)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Heng; Hermsen, Trudi; Stet, Rene J M;

    2008-01-01

    -terminus. Meanwhile, phage display peptide library encoding random 12mer peptides was also screened against beta(2)m/SasaUBA*0301. Eighty-five percentages of the corresponding peptides have an enrichment of leucine, methionine, valine, or isoleucine at the C-terminus. We predict that this particular allele of Salmon...

  8. Construction of specific erythromycin resistance mutations in the temperate lactococcal bacteriophage TP901-1 and their use in studies of phage biology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, Birgit; Christiansen, Bettina; Evison, Tim;

    1997-01-01

    A method for the construction and isolation of specifically designed mutations of the temperate lactococcal phage TP901-1 has been developed. Two different erm-labeled mutants were isolated. One was shown to be defective in lysogenization and excision. The other, showing normal lysogenization, wa...

  9. Analysis of root-knot nematode and fusarium wilt disease resistance in cotton (Gossypium spp.) using chromosome substitution lines from two alien species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulloa, M; Wang, C; Saha, S; Hutmacher, R B; Stelly, D M; Jenkins, J N; Burke, J; Roberts, P A

    2016-04-01

    Chromosome substitution (CS) lines in plants are a powerful genetic resource for analyzing the contribution of chromosome segments to phenotypic variance. In this study, a series of interspecific cotton (Gossypium spp.) CS lines were used to identify a new germplasm resource, and to validate chromosomal regions and favorable alleles associated with nematode or fungal disease resistance traits. The CS lines were developed in the G. hirsutum L. TM-1 background with chromosome or chromosome segment substitutions from G. barbadense L. Pima 3-79 or G. tomentosum. Root-knot nematode (Meloidogyne incognita) and fusarium wilt (Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. vasinfectum) (races 1 and 4) resistance alleles and quantitative trait loci (QTL) previously placed on cotton chromosomes using SSR markers in two interspecific recombinant inbred line populations were chosen for testing. Phenotypic responses of increased resistance or susceptibility in controlled inoculation and infested field assays confirmed the resistance QTLs, based on substitution with the positive or negative allele for resistance. Lines CS-B22Lo, CS-B04, and CS-B18 showed high resistance to nematode root-galling, confirming QTLs on chromosomes 4 and 22 (long arm) with resistance alleles from Pima 3-79. Line CS-B16 had less fusarium race 1-induced vascular root staining and higher percent survival than the TM-1 parent, confirming a major resistance QTL on chromosome 16. Lines CS-B(17-11) and CS-B17 had high fusarium race 4 vascular symptoms and low survival due to susceptible alleles introgressed from Pima 3-79, confirming the localization on chromosome 17 of an identified QTL with resistance alleles from TM1 and other resistant lines. Analyses validated regions on chromosomes 11, 16, and 17 harboring nematode and fusarium wilt resistance genes and demonstrated the value of CS lines as both a germplasm resource for breeding programs and as a powerful genetic analysis tool for determining QTL effects for disease

  10. Analysis of root-knot nematode and fusarium wilt disease resistance in cotton (Gossypium spp.) using chromosome substitution lines from two alien species

    Science.gov (United States)

    To Identify a new germplasm resource, and to validate chromosomal regions and favorable alleles associated with nematode and fungal disease resistance traits, a series of interspecific cotton (Gossypium spp.) chromosome substitution (CS) lines were used in this study. The CS lines were developed in ...

  11. Bacteriophage exploitation of bacterial biofilms: phage preference for less mature targets?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abedon, Stephen T

    2016-02-01

    Robust evidence is somewhat lacking for biofilm susceptibility to bacteriophages in nature, contrasting often substantial laboratory biofilm vulnerability to phages. To help bridge this divide, I review a two-part scenario for 'heterogeneous' phage interaction even with phage-permissive single-species biofilms. First, through various mechanisms, those bacteria which are both more newly formed and located at biofilm surfaces may be particularly vulnerable to phage adsorption, rather than biofilm matrix being homogeneously resistant to phage penetration. Second, though phage infection of older, less metabolically active bacteria may still be virion productive, nevertheless the majority of phage population growth in association with biofilm bacteria could involve infection particularly of those bacteria which are more metabolically active and thereby better able to support larger phage bursts, versus clonally related biofilm bacteria equivalently supporting phage production. To the extent that biofilms are physiologically or structurally heterogeneous, with phages exploiting particularly relatively newly divided biofilm-surface bacteria, then even effective phage predation of natural biofilms could result in less than complete overall biofilm clearance. Phage tendencies toward only partial exploitation of even single-species biofilms could be consistent with observations that chronic bacterial infections in the clinic can require more aggressive or extensive phage therapy to eradicate.

  12. Lysis-deficient phages as novel therapeutic agents for controlling bacterial infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kempashanaiah Nanjundappa

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interest in phage therapy has grown over the past decade due to the rapid emergence of antibiotic resistance in bacterial pathogens. However, the use of bacteriophages for therapeutic purposes has raised concerns over the potential for immune response, rapid toxin release by the lytic action of phages, and difficulty in dose determination in clinical situations. A phage that kills the target cell but is incapable of host cell lysis would alleviate these concerns without compromising efficacy. Results We developed a recombinant lysis-deficient Staphylococcus aureus phage P954, in which the endolysin gene was rendered nonfunctional by insertional inactivation. P954, a temperate phage, was lysogenized in S. aureus strain RN4220. The native endolysin gene on the prophage was replaced with an endolysin gene disrupted by the chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (cat gene through homologous recombination using a plasmid construct. Lysogens carrying the recombinant phage were detected by growth in presence of chloramphenicol. Induction of the recombinant prophage did not result in host cell lysis, and the phage progeny were released by cell lysis with glass beads. The recombinant phage retained the endolysin-deficient genotype and formed plaques only when endolysin was supplemented. The host range of the recombinant phage was the same as that of the parent phage. To test the in vivo efficacy of the recombinant endolysin-deficient phage, immunocompromised mice were challenged with pathogenic S. aureus at a dose that results in 80% mortality (LD80. Treatment with the endolysin-deficient phage rescued mice from the fatal S. aureus infection. Conclusions A recombinant endolysin-deficient staphylococcal phage has been developed that is lethal to methicillin-resistant S. aureus without causing bacterial cell lysis. The phage was able to multiply in lytic mode utilizing a heterologous endolysin expressed from a plasmid in the propagation host

  13. Phage therapy in the food industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endersen, Lorraine; O'Mahony, Jim; Hill, Colin; Ross, R Paul; McAuliffe, Olivia; Coffey, Aidan

    2014-01-01

    Despite advances in modern technologies, the food industry is continuously challenged with the threat of microbial contamination. The overuse of antibiotics has further escalated this problem, resulting in the increasing emergence of antibiotic-resistant foodborne pathogens. Efforts to develop new methods for controlling microbial contamination in food and the food processing environment are extremely important. Accordingly, bacteriophages (phages) and their derivatives have emerged as novel, viable, and safe options for the prevention, treatment, and/or eradication of these contaminants in a range of foods and food processing environments. Whole phages, modified phages, and their derivatives are discussed in terms of current uses and future potential as antimicrobials in the traditional farm-to-fork context, encompassing areas such as primary production, postharvest processing, biosanitation, and biodetection. The review also presents some safety concerns to ensure safe and effective exploitation of bacteriophages in the future.

  14. The population and evolutionary dynamics of phage and bacteria with CRISPR-mediated immunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruce R Levin

    Full Text Available Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR, together with associated genes (cas, form the CRISPR-cas adaptive immune system, which can provide resistance to viruses and plasmids in bacteria and archaea. Here, we use mathematical models, population dynamic experiments, and DNA sequence analyses to investigate the host-phage interactions in a model CRISPR-cas system, Streptococcus thermophilus DGCC7710 and its virulent phage 2972. At the molecular level, the bacteriophage-immune mutant bacteria (BIMs and CRISPR-escape mutant phage (CEMs obtained in this study are consistent with those anticipated from an iterative model of this adaptive immune system: resistance by the addition of novel spacers and phage evasion of resistance by mutation in matching sequences or flanking motifs. While CRISPR BIMs were readily isolated and CEMs generated at high rates (frequencies in excess of 10(-6, our population studies indicate that there is more to the dynamics of phage-host interactions and the establishment of a BIM-CEM arms race than predicted from existing assumptions about phage infection and CRISPR-cas immunity. Among the unanticipated observations are: (i the invasion of phage into populations of BIMs resistant by the acquisition of one (but not two spacers, (ii the survival of sensitive bacteria despite the presence of high densities of phage, and (iii the maintenance of phage-limited communities due to the failure of even two-spacer BIMs to become established in populations with wild-type bacteria and phage. We attribute (i to incomplete resistance of single-spacer BIMs. Based on the results of additional modeling and experiments, we postulate that (ii and (iii can be attributed to the phage infection-associated production of enzymes or other compounds that induce phenotypic phage resistance in sensitive bacteria and kill resistant BIMs. We present evidence in support of these hypotheses and discuss the implications of these

  15. Outbreak of bullous impetigo caused by Staphylococcus aureus strains of phage type 3C/71 in a maternity ward linked to nasal carriage of a healthcare worker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piechowicz, Lidia; Garbacz, Katarzyna; Budzyńska, Anna; Dąbrowska-Szponar, Maria

    2012-01-01

    We describe an outbreak of bullous impetigo (BI) that occurred in a maternity unit and show phenotypic and genotypic properties and relatedness of isolated Staphylococcus aureus strains. Clinical material was obtained from 11 affected neonates. Additionally, nasal swabs from 67 healthy care workers (HCWs) as well as 107 environmental swabs were investigated. All isolates were screened for exfoliative toxin genes (eta, etb), antibiotic susceptibility and phage typed. Chromosomal DNA was genotyped by MLVF method and PCR/RFLP of coagulase gene were tested. Affected neonates were infected by two clusters of eta-positive S. aureus of phage type 3C/71: (1) MLVF type A isolates resistant only to penicillin, and (2) MLVF type B isolates resistant to penicillin and erythromycin/clindamycin. All isolates were susceptible to methicillin. We found 19 of 67 HCWs to be S. aureus nasal carriers. Two nasal isolates from HCWs were related to the outbreak on the basis of phage typing, PCR detection of eta/etb genes, antibiotyping and genotyping. Additionally, environmental swabs from the maternity unit revealed a 3C/71 S. aureus in the mattress of a baby bed. This is the first documented case of an outbreak of BI caused by phage type 3C/71 eta-positive strain of S. aureus.

  16. Molecular Cytogenetic Identification of a New Wheat-Rye 6R Chromosome Disomic Addition Line with Powdery Mildew Resistance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diaoguo An

    Full Text Available Rye (Secale cereale L. possesses many valuable genes that can be used for improving disease resistance, yield and environment adaptation of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.. However, the documented resistance stocks derived from rye is faced severe challenge due to the variation of virulent isolates in the pathogen populations. Therefore, it is necessary to develop desirable germplasm and search for novel resistance gene sources against constantly accumulated variation of the virulent isolates. In the present study, a new wheat-rye line designated as WR49-1 was produced through distant hybridization and chromosome engineering protocols between common wheat cultivar Xiaoyan 6 and rye cultivar German White. Using sequential GISH (genomic in situ hybridization, mc-FISH (multicolor fluorescence in situ hybridization, mc-GISH (multicolor GISH and EST (expressed sequence tag-based marker analysis, WR49-1 was proved to be a new wheat-rye 6R disomic addition line. As expected, WR49-1 showed high levels of resistance to wheat powdery mildew (Blumeria graminis f. sp. tritici, Bgt pathogens prevalent in China at the adult growth stage and 19 of 23 Bgt isolates tested at the seedling stage. According to its reaction pattern to different Bgt isolates, WR49-1 may possess new resistance gene(s for powdery mildew, which differed from the documented powdery mildew gene, including Pm20 on chromosome arm 6RL of rye. Additionally, WR49-1 was cytologically stable, had improved agronomic characteristics and therefore could serve as an important bridge for wheat breeding and chromosome engineering.

  17. Safety and efficacy of phage therapy via the intravenous route.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speck, Peter; Smithyman, Anthony

    2016-02-01

    Increasing development of antimicrobial resistance is driving a resurgence in interest in phage therapy: the use of bacteriophages to treat bacterial infections. As the lytic action of bacteriophages is unaffected by the antibiotic resistance status of their bacterial target, it is thought that phage therapy may have considerable potential in the treatment of a wide range of topical and localized infections. As yet this interest has not extended to intravenous (IV) use, which is surprising given that the historical record shows that phages are likely to be safe and effective when delivered by this route. Starting almost 100 years ago, phages were administered intravenously in treatment of systemic infections including typhoid, and Staphylococcal bacteremia. There was extensive IV use of phages in the 1940s to treat typhoid, reportedly with outstanding efficacy and safety. The safety of IV phage administration is also underpinned by the detailed work of Ochs and colleagues in Seattle who have over four decades' experience with IV injection into human subjects of large doses of highly purified coliphage PhiX174. Though these subjects included a large number of immune-deficient children, no serious side effects were observed over this extended time period. The large and continuing global health problems of typhoid and Staphylococcus aureus are exacerbated by the increasing antibiotic resistance of these pathogens. We contend that these infections are excellent candidates for use of IV phage therapy.

  18. Biofilm control with natural and genetically-modified phages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motlagh, Amir Mohaghegh; Bhattacharjee, Ananda Shankar; Goel, Ramesh

    2016-04-01

    Bacteriophages, as the most dominant and diverse entities in the universe, have the potential to be one of the most promising therapeutic agents. The emergence of multidrug-resistant bacteria and the antibiotic crisis in the last few decades have resulted in a renewed interest in phage therapy. Furthermore, bacteriophages, with the capacity to rapidly infect and overcome bacterial resistance, have demonstrated a sustainable approach against bacterial pathogens-particularly in biofilm. Biofilm, as complex microbial communities located at interphases embedded in a matrix of bacterial extracellular polysaccharide substances (EPS), is involved in health issues such as infections associated with the use of biomaterials and chronic infections by multidrug resistant bacteria, as well as industrial issues such as biofilm formation on stainless steel surfaces in food industry and membrane biofouling in water and wastewater treatment processes. In this paper, the most recent studies on the potential of phage therapy using natural and genetically-modified lytic phages and their associated enzymes in fighting biofilm development in various fields including engineering, industry, and medical applications are reviewed. Phage-mediated prevention approaches as an indirect phage therapy strategy are also explored in this review. In addition, the limitations of these approaches and suggestions to overcome these constraints are discussed to enhance the efficiency of phage therapy process. Finally, future perspectives and directions for further research towards a better understanding of phage therapy to control biofilm are recommended.

  19. Phage abortive infection in lactococci: variations on a theme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopin, Marie-Christine; Chopin, Alain; Bidnenko, Elena

    2005-08-01

    Abortive infection (Abi) systems, also called phage exclusion, block phage multiplication and cause premature bacterial cell death upon phage infection. This decreases the number of progeny particles and limits their spread to other cells allowing the bacterial population to survive. Twenty Abi systems have been isolated in Lactococcus lactis, a bacterium used in cheese-making fermentation processes, where phage attacks are of economical importance. Recent insights in their expression and mode of action indicate that, behind diverse phenotypic and molecular effects, lactococcal Abis share common traits with the well-studied Escherichia coli systems Lit and Prr. Abis are widespread in bacteria, and recent analysis indicates that Abis might have additional roles other than conferring phage resistance.

  20. Characterization of Five Podoviridae Phages Infecting Citrobacter freundii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdi, Sana; Rousseau, Geneviève M; Labrie, Simon J; Kourda, Rim S; Tremblay, Denise M; Moineau, Sylvain; Slama, Karim B

    2016-01-01

    Citrobacter freundii causes opportunistic infections in humans and animals, which are becoming difficult to treat due to increased antibiotic resistance. The aim of this study was to explore phages as potential antimicrobial agents against this opportunistic pathogen. We isolated and characterized five new virulent phages, SH1, SH2, SH3, SH4, and SH5 from sewage samples in Tunisia. Morphological and genomic analyses revealed that the five C. freundii phages belong to the Caudovirales order, Podoviridae family, and Autographivirinae subfamily. Their linear double-stranded DNA genomes range from 39,158 to 39,832 bp and are terminally redundant with direct repeats between 183 and 242 bp. The five genomes share the same organization as coliphage T7. Based on genomic comparisons and on the phylogeny of the DNA polymerases, we assigned the five phages to the T7virus genus but separated them into two different groups. Phages SH1 and SH2 are very similar to previously characterized phages phiYeO3-12 and phiSG-JL2, infecting, respectively, Yersinia enterocolitica and Salmonella enterica, as well as sharing more than 80% identity with most genes of coliphage T7. Phages SH3, SH4, and SH5 are very similar to phages K1F and Dev2, infecting, respectively, Escherichia coli and Cronobacter turicensis. Several structural proteins of phages SH1, SH3, and SH4 were detected by mass spectrometry. The five phages were also stable from pH 5 to 10. No genes coding for known virulence factors or integrases were found, suggesting that the five isolated phages could be good candidates for therapeutic applications to prevent or treat C. freundii infections. In addition, this study increases our knowledge about the evolutionary relationships within the T7virus genus.

  1. Isolation of phages for phage therapy: a comparison of spot tests and efficiency of plating analyses for determination of host range and efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan Mirzaei, Mohammadali; Nilsson, Anders S

    2015-01-01

    Phage therapy, treating bacterial infections with bacteriophages, could be a future alternative to antibiotic treatment of bacterial infections. There are, however, several problems to be solved, mainly associated to the biology of phages, the interaction between phages and their bacterial hosts, but also to the vast variation of pathogenic bacteria which implies that large numbers of different phages are going to be needed. All of these phages must under present regulation of medical products undergo extensive clinical testing before they can be applied. It will consequently be of great economic importance that effective and versatile phages are selected and collected into phage libraries, i.e., the selection must be carried out in a way that it results in highly virulent phages with broad host ranges. We have isolated phages using the Escherichia coli reference (ECOR) collection and compared two methods, spot testing and efficiency of plating (EOP), which are frequently used to identify phages suitable for phage therapy. The analyses of the differences between the two methods show that spot tests often overestimate both the overall virulence and the host range and that the results are not correlated to the results of EOP assays. The conclusion is that single dilution spot tests cannot be used for identification and selection of phages to a phage library and should be replaced by EOP assays. The difference between the two methods can be caused by many factors. We have analysed if the differences and lack of correlation could be caused by lysis from without, bacteriocins in the phage lysate, or by the presence of prophages harbouring genes coding for phage resistance systems in the genomes of the bacteria in the ECOR collection.

  2. Exploration of Phage-Host Interactions in Fish Pathogen Vibrio anguillarum and Anti-Phage Defense Strategies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tan, Demeng

    of V. anguillarum have been isolated, indicating that antibiotic use has to be restricted and alternatives have to be developed. Lytic phages have been demonstrated to play an essential role in preventing bacterial infection. However, phages are also known to play a critical role in the evolution......The disease vibriosis is caused by the bacterial pathogen Vibrio anguillarum and results in large losses in aquaculture both in Denmark and around the world. Antibiotics have been widely used in antimicrobial prophylaxis and treatment of vibriosis. Recently, numerous multidrug-resistant strains...... of bacterial pathogenicity development. Therefore, successful application of phage therapy in the treatment of vibriosis requires a detailed understanding of phage-host interactions, especially with regards to anti-phage defense mechanisms in the host. Part I. As a first approach, 24 V. anguillarum and 13...

  3. Computational models of populations of bacteria and lytic phage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krysiak-Baltyn, Konrad; Martin, Gregory J O; Stickland, Anthony D; Scales, Peter J; Gras, Sally L

    2016-11-01

    The use of phages to control and reduce numbers of unwanted bacteria can be traced back to the early 1900s, when phages were explored as a tool to treat infections before the wide scale use of antibiotics. Recently, phage therapy has received renewed interest as a method to treat multiresistant bacteria. Phages are also widely used in the food industry to prevent the growth of certain bacteria in foods, and are currently being explored as a tool for use in bioremediation and wastewater treatment. Despite the large body of biological research on phages, relatively little attention has been given to computational modeling of the population dynamics of phage and bacterial interactions. The earliest model was described by Campbell in the 1960s. Subsequent modifications to this model include partial or complete resistance, multiple phage binding sites, and spatial heterogeneity. This review provides a general introduction to modeling of the population dynamics of bacteria and phage. The review introduces the basic model and relevant concepts and evaluates more complex variations of the basic model published to date, including a model of disease epidemics caused by infectious bacteria. Finally, the shortcomings and potential ways to improve the models are discussed.

  4. [Chromosomal structure of the hybrids between Allium cepa L. and Allium fistulosum L. with relative resistance to downy mildew based on in situ hybridization].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budylin, M V; Kan, L Iu; Romanov, V S; Khrustaleva, L I

    2014-04-01

    Genomic in situ hybridization (GISH) was used for a chromosomal composition study of the later generations of interspecific hybrids between A. cepa L. and A. fistulosum L., which are relatively resistant to downy mildew (peronosporosis). GISH revealed that F2 hybrids, which did not produce seeds, were triploids (2n = 3x = 24) with 24 chromosomes and possessed in their compliments 16 chromosomes of A. fistulosum L. and eight chromosomes of A. cepa L. or eight chromosomes of A. fistulosum L. and 16 chromosomes of A. cepa L. The advanced F5 hybrid, which produced few seeds, was amphidiploid with 32 chromosomes. BC1F5 hybrid was triploid with eight chromosomes of A. fistulosum L. and 16 chromosomes of A. cepa L., which did not produce seeds. BC2 (BC1F5) plant was amphidiploid that possessed 4 recombinant chromosomes and produced few seeds. GISH results point to 2n-gametes formation in macro- and microsporogenesis of the hybrids. The mechanism of 2n-gametes formation and the possibility of apomixes events in the backcrossing progeny are discussed.

  5. Phage Therapy in Bacterial Infections Treatment: One Hundred Years After the Discovery of Bacteriophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cisek, Agata Anna; Dąbrowska, Iwona; Gregorczyk, Karolina Paulina; Wyżewski, Zbigniew

    2017-02-01

    The therapeutic use of bacteriophages has seen a renewal of interest blossom in the last few years. This reversion is due to increased difficulties in the treatment of antibiotic-resistant strains of bacteria. Bacterial resistance to antibiotics, a serious problem in contemporary medicine, does not implicate resistance to phage lysis mechanisms. Lytic bacteriophages are able to kill antibiotic-resistant bacteria at the end of the phage infection cycle. Thus, the development of phage therapy is potentially a way to improve the treatment of bacterial infections. However, there are antibacterial phage therapy difficulties specified by broadening the knowledge of the phage nature and influence on the host. It has been shown during experiments that both innate and adaptive immunity are involved in the clearance of phages from the body. Immunological reactions against phages are related to the route of administration and may vary depending on the type of bacterial viruses. For that reason, it is very important to test the immunological response of every single phage, particularly if intravenous therapy is being considered. The lack of these data in previous years was one of the reasons for phage therapy abandonment despite its century-long study. Promising results of recent research led us to look forward to a phage therapy that can be applied on a larger scale and subsequently put it into practice.

  6. Bacterial viruses enable their host to acquire antibiotic resistance genes from neighbouring cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haaber, Jakob Krause; Leisner, Jørgen; Cohn, Marianne Thorup

    2016-01-01

    Prophages are quiescent viruses located in the chromosomes of bacteria. In the human pathogen, Staphylococcus aureus, prophages are omnipresent and are believed to be responsible for the spread of some antibiotic resistance genes. Here we demonstrate that release of phages from a subpopulation of S....... aureus cells enables the intact, prophage-containing population to acquire beneficial genes from competing, phage-susceptible strains present in the same environment. Phage infection kills competitor cells and bits of their DNA are occasionally captured in viral transducing particles. Return...... of such particles to the prophage-containing population can drive the transfer of genes encoding potentially useful traits such as antibiotic resistance. This process, which can be viewed as ‘auto-transduction’, allows S. aureus to efficiently acquire antibiotic resistance both in vitro and in an in vivo virulence...

  7. Phage ΦPan70, a Putative Temperate Phage, Controls Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Planktonic, Biofilm and Burn Mouse Model Assays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holguín, Angela V.; Rangel, Guillermo; Clavijo, Viviana; Prada, Catalina; Mantilla, Marcela; Gomez, María Catalina; Kutter, Elizabeth; Taylor, Corinda; Fineran, Peter C.; Barrios, Andrés Fernando González; Vives, Martha J.

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is one of the Multi-Drug-Resistant organisms most frequently isolated worldwide and, because of a shortage of new antibiotics, bacteriophages are considered an alternative for its treatment. Previously, P. aeruginosa phages were isolated and best candidates were chosen based on their ability to form clear plaques and their host range. This work aimed to characterize one of those phages, ΦPan70, preliminarily identified as a good candidate for phage-therapy. We performed infection curves, biofilm removal assays, transmission-electron-microscopy, pulsed-field-gel-electrophoresis, and studied the in vivo ΦPan70 biological activity in the burned mouse model. ΦPan70 was classified as a member of the Myoviridae family and, in both planktonic cells and biofilms, was responsible for a significant reduction in the bacterial population. The burned mouse model showed an animal survival between 80% and 100%, significantly different from the control animals (0%). However, analysis of the ΦPan70 genome revealed that it was 64% identical to F10, a temperate P. aeruginosa phage. Gene annotation indicated ΦPan70 as a new, but possible temperate phage, therefore not ideal for phage-therapy. Based on this, we recommend genome sequence analysis as an early step to select candidate phages for potential application in phage-therapy, before entering into a more intensive characterization. PMID:26274971

  8. Complete Sequence of pABTJ2, A Plasmid from Acinetobacter baumannii MDR-TJ, Carrying Many Phage-like Elements

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    He Huang; Yan Dong; Zhi-Liang Yang; Hao Luo; Xi Zhang; Feng Gao

    2014-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is an important opportunistic pathogen in hospital, and the multidrug-resistant isolates of A. baumannii have been increasingly reported in recent years. A num-ber of different mechanisms of resistance have been reported, some of which are associated with plasmid-mediated acquisition of genes. Therefore, studies on plasmids in A. baumannii have been a hot issue lately. We have performed complete genome sequencing of A. baumannii MDR-TJ, which is a multidrug-resistant isolate. Finalizing the remaining large scaffold of the previous assem-bly, we found a new plasmid pABTJ2, which carries many phage-like elements. The plasmid pAB-TJ2 is a circular double-stranded DNA molecule, which is 110,967 bp in length. We annotated 125 CDSs from pABTJ2 using IMG ER and ZCURVE_V, accounting for 88.28%of the whole plasmid sequence. Many phage-like elements and a tRNA-coding gene were detected in pABTJ2, which is rarely reported among A. baumannii. The tRNA gene is specific for asparagine codon GTT, which may be a small chromosomal sequence picked up through incorrect excision during plasmid forma-tion. The phage-like elements may have been acquired during the integration process, as the GC content of the region carrying phage-like elements was higher than that of the adjacent regions. The finding of phage-like elements and tRNA-coding gene in pABTJ2 may provide a novel insight into the study of A. baumannii pan-plasmidome.

  9. Phage approved in food, why not as a therapeutic?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarhan, Wessam A; Azzazy, Hassan M E

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial resistance is not only restricted to human infections but is also a major problem in food. With the marked decrease in produced antimicrobials, the world is now reassessing bacteriophages. In 2006, ListShield™ received the US FDA approval for using phage in food. Nevertheless, regulatory approval of phage-based therapeutics is still facing many challenges. This review highlights the use of bacteriophages as biocontrol agents in the food industry. It also focuses on the challenges still facing the regulatory approval of phage-based therapeutics and the proposed approaches to overcome such challenges.

  10. Review: phage therapy: a modern tool to control bacterial infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qadir, Muhammad Imran

    2015-01-01

    The evolution of antibiotic-resistant in bacteria has aggravated curiosity in development of alternative therapy to conventional drugs. One of the emerging drugs that can be used alternative to antibiotics is bacteriophage therapy. The use of living phages in the cure of lethal infectious life threatening diseases caused by Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria has been reported. Another development in the field of bacteriophage therapy is the use of genetically modified and non replicating phages in the treatment of bacterial infection. Genetically engineered bacteriophages can be used as adjuvant along with antibiotic therapy. Phages encoded with lysosomal enzymes are also effectual in the treatment of infectious diseases.

  11. Complete genome sequence of Klebsiella pneumoniae phage JD001.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Zelin; Shen, Wenbin; Wang, Zheng; Zhang, Haotian; Me, Rao; Wang, Yanchun; Zeng, Lingbin; Zhu, Yongzhang; Qin, Jinhong; He, Ping; Guo, Xiaokui

    2012-12-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is a member of the family Enterobacteriaceae, opportunistic pathogens that are among the eight most prevalent infectious agents in hospitals. The emergence of multidrug-resistant strains of K. pneumoniae has became a public health problem globally. To develop an effective antimicrobial agent, we isolated a bacteriophage, named JD001, from seawater and sequenced its genome. Comparative genome analysis of phage JD001 with other K. pneumoniae bacteriophages revealed that phage JD001 has little similarity to previously published K. pneumoniae phages KP15, KP32, KP34, and phiKO2. Here we announce the complete genome sequence of JD001 and report major findings from the genomic analysis.

  12. Molecular mapping of Verticillium wilt resistance QTL clustered on chromosomes D7 and D9 in upland cotton

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Feng; ZHAO Jun; ZHOU Lei; GUO WangZhen; ZHANG TianZhen

    2009-01-01

    Verticillium wilt is s destructive disease with international consequences for cotton production. Breeding broad-spectrum resistant cultivars is considered to be one of the most effective means for reducing crop losses. A resistant cotton cultivar, 60182, was crossed with a susceptible cultivar, Junmian 1, to identify markers for Verticillium resistance genes and validate the mode of its inheritance. Genetic segregation analysis for Verticillium wilt resistance was evaluated based upon infected leaf percentage in the seedling stage using major gene-polygene mixed inheritance models and joint analysis of P_1, P_2, F_1, B_1, B_2 and F_2 populations obtained from the cultivar cross. We found that resistance of upland cotton cultivar 60182 to isolates BP2, VD8 and T9, and their isoconcentration mixture was controlled by two major genes with additive-dominance-epistatic effects, and the inheritance of the major gene was dominant. Furthermore, a genetic linkage map was constructed using F_2 segregating population and resistance phenotypic data were obtained using F_(2:3) families inoculated with different isolates and detected in different developmental stages. The genetic linkage map with 139 loci was comprised of 31 linkage groups covering 1165 cM, with an average distance of 8.38 cM between two markers, or 25.89% of the cotton genome length. From 60182, we found 4 QTL on chromosome D7 and 4 QTL on D9 for BP2, 5 QTL on D7 and 9 QTL on D9 for VD8, 4 QTL on D7 and 5 QTL on D9 for T9 and 3 QTL on D7 and 7 QTL on D7 for mixed pathogens. The QTL mapping results revealed that QTL clusters with high contribution rates were screened simultaneously on chromosomes D9 and D7 by multiple interval mapping (CIM), whether from resistance phenotypic data from different developmental stages or for different isolates. The result is consistent with the genetic model of two major genes in 60182 and suggests broad-spectrum resistance to both defoliating isolates of V. dahliae and

  13. Oral Application of T4 Phage Induces Weak Antibody Production in the Gut and in the Blood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Majewska

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available A specific humoral response to bacteriophages may follow phage application for medical purposes, and it may further determine the success or failure of the approach itself. We present a long-term study of antibody induction in mice by T4 phage applied per os: 100 days of phage treatment followed by 112 days without the phage, and subsequent second application of phage up to day 240. Serum and gut antibodies (IgM, IgG, secretory IgA were analyzed in relation to microbiological status of the animals. T4 phage applied orally induced anti-phage antibodies when the exposure was long enough (IgG day 36, IgA day 79; the effect was related to high dosage. Termination of phage treatment resulted in a decrease of IgA again to insignificant levels. Second administration of phage induces secretory IgA sooner than that induced by the first administrations. Increased IgA level antagonized gut transit of active phage. Phage resistant E. coli dominated gut flora very late, on day 92. Thus, the immunological response emerges as a major factor determining phage survival in the gut. Phage proteins Hoc and gp12 were identified as highly immunogenic. A low response to exemplary foreign antigens (from Ebola virus presented on Hoc was observed, which suggests that phage platforms can be used in oral vaccine design.

  14. Chromosomal locations of the maize (Zea mays L. HtP and rt genes that confer resistance to Exserohilum turcicum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Bernardi Ogliari

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available We used 125 microsatellite markers to genotype the maize (Zea mays L. near isogenic lines (NIL L30HtPHtPRtRt and L30htphtpRtRt and the L40htphtprtrt line which contrast regarding the presence of the recently described dominant HtP and the recessive rt genes that confer resistance to Exserohilum turcicum. Five microsatellite markers revealed polymorphisms between the NIL and were considered candidate linked markers for the HtP resistance gene. Linkage was confirmed by bulked segregant sample (BSS analysis of 32 susceptible and 34 resistant plants from a BC1F1 population derived from the cross (L30HtPHtPRtRt x L40htphtprtrt x L40htphtprtrt. The bnlg198 and dupssr25 markers, both located on maize chromosome 2L (bin 2.08, were polymorphic between bulks. Linkage distances were estimated based on co-segregation data of the 32 susceptible plants and indicated distances of 28.7 centimorgans (cM between HtP and bnlg198 and 23.5 cM between HtP and dupssr25. The same set of susceptible plants was also genotyped with markers polymorphic between L30HtPHtPRtRt and L40htphtprtrt in order to find markers linked to the rt gene. Marker bnlg197, from chromosome 3L (bin 3.06, was found linked to rt at a distance of 9.7 cM. This is the first report on the chromosomal locations of these newly described genes.

  15. Safety assessment of Staphylococcus phages of the family Myoviridae based on complete genome sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Zelin; Guo, Xiaokui; Dong, Ke; Zhang, Yan; Li, Qingtian; Zhu, Yongzhang; Zeng, Lingbing; Tang, Rong; Li, Li

    2017-01-01

    Staphylococcus phages of the Myoviridae family have a wide host range and potential applications in phage therapy. In this report, safety assessments of these phages were conducted based on their complete genome sequences. The complete genomes of Staphylococcus phages of the Myoviridae family were analyzed, and the Open Reading Frame (ORFs) were compared with a pool of virulence and antibiotic resistance genes using the BLAST algorithm. In addition, the lifestyle of the phages (virulent or temperate) was also confirmed using PHACTS. The results showed that all phages were lytic and did not contain resistance or virulence genes based on bioinformatic analyses, excluding the possibility that they could be vectors for the dissemination of these undesirable genes. These findings suggest that the phages are safe at the genome level. The SceD-like transglycosylase, which is a biomarker for vancomycin-intermediate strains, was widely distributed in the phage genomes. Approximately 70% of the ORFs encoded in the phage genomes have unknown functions; therefore, their roles in the antibiotic resistance and virulence of Staphylococcus aureus are still unknown and require consideration before use in phage therapy. PMID:28117392

  16. Sequence composition of BAC clones and SSR markers mapped to Upland cotton chromosomes 11 and 21 targeting resistance to soil-borne pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genetic and physical framework mapping in cotton (Gossypium spp.) were used to discover putative gene sequences involved in resistance to common soil-borne pathogens. Chromosome (Chr) 11 and its homoeologous Chr 21 of Upland cotton (G. hirsutum) is a focus for discovery of resistance (R) or pathoge...

  17. Diversity and Geographical Distribution of Flavobacterium psychrophilum Isolates and Their Phages: Patterns of Susceptibility to Phage Infection and Phage Host Range

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castillo, Daniel; Christiansen, Rói Hammershaimb; Espejo, Romilio

    2014-01-01

    Flavobacterium psychrophilum is an important fish pathogen worldwide that causes cold water disease (CWD) or rainbow trout fry syndrome (RTFS). Phage therapy has been suggested as an alternative method for the control of this pathogen in aquaculture. However, effective use of bacteriophages...... in disease control requires detailed knowledge about the diversity and dynamics of host susceptibility to phage infection. For this reason, we examined the genetic diversity of 49 F. psychrophilum strains isolated in three different areas (Chile, Denmark, and USA) through direct genome restriction enzyme...... analysis (DGREA) and their susceptibility to 33 bacteriophages isolated in Chile and Denmark, thus covering large geographical (>12,000 km) and temporal (>60 years) scales of isolation. An additional 40 phage-resistant isolates obtained from culture experiments after exposure to specific phages were...

  18. Characterization of a Novel Composite Staphylococcal Cassette Chromosome mec in Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius from Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanchaithong, Pattrarat; Prapasarakul, Nuvee; Perreten, Vincent; Schwendener, Sybille

    2016-02-01

    A novel staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) composite island (SCCmecAI16-SCCczrAI16-CI) was identified in Staphylococcus pseudintermedius. Four integration site sequences for SCC subdivided the 60,734-bp island into 41,232-bp SCCmecAI16, 19,400-bp SCCczrAI16, and 102-bp SCC-likeAI16 elements. SCCmecAI16 represents a new combination of ccrA1B3 genes with a class A mec complex. SCCczrAI16 contains ccrA1B6 and genes related to restriction modification and heavy metal resistance. SCCmecAI16-SCCczrAI16-CI was found in methicillin-resistant S. pseudintermedius sequence type 112 (ST112) and ST111 isolated from dogs and veterinarians in Thailand.

  19. Quantitative models of in vitro bacteriophage-host dynamics and their application to phage therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin J Cairns

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Phage therapy is the use of bacteriophages as antimicrobial agents for the control of pathogenic and other problem bacteria. It has previously been argued that successful application of phage therapy requires a good understanding of the non-linear kinetics of phage-bacteria interactions. Here we combine experimental and modelling approaches to make a detailed examination of such kinetics for the important food-borne pathogen Campylobacter jejuni and a suitable virulent phage in an in vitro system. Phage-insensitive populations of C. jejuni arise readily, and as far as we are aware this is the first phage therapy study to test, against in vitro data, models for phage-bacteria interactions incorporating phage-insensitive or resistant bacteria. We find that even an apparently simplistic model fits the data surprisingly well, and we confirm that the so-called inundation and proliferation thresholds are likely to be of considerable practical importance to phage therapy. We fit the model to time series data in order to estimate thresholds and rate constants directly. A comparison of the fit for each culture reveals density-dependent features of phage infectivity that are worthy of further investigation. Our results illustrate how insight from empirical studies can be greatly enhanced by the use of kinetic models: such combined studies of in vitro systems are likely to be an essential precursor to building a meaningful picture of the kinetic properties of in vivo phage therapy.

  20. Recombinations in staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec elements compromise the molecular detection of methicillin resistance in Staphylococcus aureus

    KAUST Repository

    Hill-Cawthorne, Grant A.

    2014-06-27

    Clinical laboratories are increasingly using molecular tests for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) screening. However, primers have to be targeted to a variable chromosomal region, the staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec). We initially screened 726 MRSA isolates from a single UK hospital trust by recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA), a novel, isothermal alternative to PCR. Undetected isolates were further characterised using multilocus sequence, spa typing and whole genome sequencing. 96% of our tested phenotypically MRSA isolates contained one of the six orfX-SCCmec junctions our RPA test and commercially available molecular tests target. However 30 isolates could not be detected. Sequencing of 24 of these isolates demonstrated recombinations within the SCCmec element with novel insertions that interfered with the RPA, preventing identification as MRSA. This result suggests that clinical laboratories cannot rely solely upon molecular assays to reliably detect all methicillin-resistance. The presence of significant recombinations in the SCCmec element, where the majority of assays target their primers, suggests that there will continue to be isolates that escape identification. We caution that dependence on amplification-based molecular assays will continue to result in failure to diagnose a small proportion (?4%) of MRSA isolates, unless the true level of SCCmec natural diversity is determined by whole genome sequencing of a large collection of MRSA isolates. © 2014 Hill-Cawthorne et al.

  1. Recombinations in staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec elements compromise the molecular detection of methicillin resistance in Staphylococcus aureus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grant A Hill-Cawthorne

    Full Text Available Clinical laboratories are increasingly using molecular tests for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA screening. However, primers have to be targeted to a variable chromosomal region, the staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec. We initially screened 726 MRSA isolates from a single UK hospital trust by recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA, a novel, isothermal alternative to PCR. Undetected isolates were further characterised using multilocus sequence, spa typing and whole genome sequencing. 96% of our tested phenotypically MRSA isolates contained one of the six orfX-SCCmec junctions our RPA test and commercially available molecular tests target. However 30 isolates could not be detected. Sequencing of 24 of these isolates demonstrated recombinations within the SCCmec element with novel insertions that interfered with the RPA, preventing identification as MRSA. This result suggests that clinical laboratories cannot rely solely upon molecular assays to reliably detect all methicillin-resistance. The presence of significant recombinations in the SCCmec element, where the majority of assays target their primers, suggests that there will continue to be isolates that escape identification. We caution that dependence on amplification-based molecular assays will continue to result in failure to diagnose a small proportion (∼4% of MRSA isolates, unless the true level of SCCmec natural diversity is determined by whole genome sequencing of a large collection of MRSA isolates.

  2. Genetic engineering of a temperate phage-based delivery system for CRISPR/Cas9 antimicrobials against Staphylococcus aureus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Joo Youn; Moon, Bo Youn; Park, Juw Won; Thornton, Justin A.; Park, Yong Ho; Seo, Keun Seok

    2017-01-01

    Discovery of clustered, regularly interspaced, short palindromic repeats and the Cas9 RNA-guided nuclease (CRISPR/Cas9) system provides a new opportunity to create programmable gene-specific antimicrobials that are far less likely to drive resistance than conventional antibiotics. However, the practical therapeutic use of CRISPR/Cas9 is still questionable due to current shortcomings in phage-based delivery systems such as inefficient delivery, narrow host range, and potential transfer of virulence genes by generalized transduction. In this study, we demonstrate genetic engineering strategies to overcome these shortcomings by integrating CRISPR/Cas9 system into a temperate phage genome, removing major virulence genes from the host chromosome, and expanding host specificity of the phage by complementing tail fiber protein. This significantly improved the efficacy and safety of CRISPR/Cas9 antimicrobials to therapeutic levels in both in vitro and in vivo assays. The genetic engineering tools and resources established in this study are expected to provide an efficacious and safe CRISPR/Cas9 antimicrobial, broadly applicable to Staphylococcus aureus. PMID:28322317

  3. Antimicrobial resistance profile, phage typing and molecular characterization of Salmonella Enteritidis strains from poultry originPerfil de resistência a antimicrobianos, fagotipagem e caracterização molecular de cepas de Salmonella Enteritidis de origem avícola

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marciane Magnani

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Enteritidis (SE is currently responsible for significant losses in the poultry industry with consequences on public health. In the present study, 38 SE isolates from biological material of chicken breeders were characterized using phage typing, antimicrobial resistance profile and pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE. The phage type (PT 7 and 9 were predominant and 26.3% of the isolates were resistance to nalidixic acid (NAL. The phage typing and analysis of antimicrobial resistance profile showed high discriminatory power (0.85. The PFGE profile of 13 strains with XbaI and SpeI discriminated the SE phage types, as well characterized strains from the same serovar. The results showed the importance to associate different methods for the characterization of SE and suggest that poultry products may have been source of human salmonellosis in the Parana State during the period of study. Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica sorovar Enteritidis (SE é responsável por prejuízos significativos à avicultura, com conseqüências importantes para saúde pública. No presente estudo foi realizada a caracterização de 38 isolados de SE provenientes de material biológico de reprodutoras destinadas à produção de frangos de corte através de fagotipagem, perfil de resistência antimicrobiana e de eletrofose de campo pulsado (PFGE. Os fagotipos (PT predominantes foram PT7 e PT9 e 26,3% dos isolados apresentaram resistência ao ácido nalidíxico (NAL. A fagotipagem e a análise do perfil de resistência antimicrobiana juntos mostraram elevado poder discriminatório (0,85. Os perfis de PFGE de 13 cepas, com as endonucleases XbaI e SpeI permitiram discriminar os fagotipos de SE, bem como associar perfis de um mesmo fagotipo. Os resultados mostram a importância da associação de métodos para a caracterização de SE e sugerem que produtos da avicultura de corte podem ser fonte de salmonelose humana.

  4. Phage sensitivity and prophage carriage in Staphylococcus aureus isolated from foods in Spain and New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez, Diana; Rodríguez-Rubio, Lorena; García, Pilar; Billington, Craig; Premarante, Aruni; Rodríguez, Ana; Martínez, Beatriz

    2016-08-02

    Bacteriophages (phages) are a promising tool for the biocontrol of pathogenic bacteria, including those contaminating food products and causing infectious diseases. However, the success of phage preparations is limited by the host ranges of their constituent phages. The phage resistance/sensitivity profile of eighty seven Staphylococcus aureus strains isolated in Spain and New Zealand from dairy, meat and seafood sources was determined for six phages (Φ11, K, ΦH5, ΦA72, CAPSa1 and CAPSa3). Most of the S. aureus strains were sensitive to phage K (Myoviridae) and CAPSa1 (Siphoviridae) regardless of their origin. There was a higher sensitivity of New Zealand S. aureus strains to phages isolated from both Spain (ΦH5 and ΦA72) and New Zealand (CAPSa1 and CAPSa3). Spanish phages had a higher infectivity on S. aureus strains of Spanish dairy origin, while Spanish strains isolated from other environments were more sensitive to New Zealand phages. Lysogeny was more prevalent in Spanish S. aureus compared to New Zealand strains. A multiplex PCR reaction, which detected ΦH5 and ΦA72 sequences, indicated a high prevalence of these prophages in Spanish S. aureus strains, but were infrequently detected in New Zealand strains. Overall, the correlation between phage resistance and lysogeny in S. aureus strains was found to be weak.

  5. Functional characterization of a novel lytic phage EcSw isolated from Sus scrofa domesticus and its potential for phage therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Easwaran, Maheswaran; Paudel, Sarita; De Zoysa, Mahanama; Shin, Hyun-Jin

    2015-06-01

    In this study, multi-drug resistant Escherichia coli Sw1 (E. coli Sw1) and active lytic phage EcSw was isolated from feces samples of Sus scrofa domesticus (piglet) suffering from diarrhea. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) indicated that isolated EcSw belongs to the Myoviridae family with an icosahedral head (80 ± 4) and a long tail (180 ± 5 nm). The EcSw phage genome size was estimated to be approximately 75 Kb of double-stranded DNA (dsDNA). Phage dynamic studies show that the latent period and burst size of EcSw were approximately 20 min and 28 PFU per cell, respectively. Interestingly, the EcSw phage can tolerate a wide range of environmental conditions, such as temperature, pH and ions (Ca(2+) and Mg(2+)). Furthermore, genome sequence analysis revealed that the lytic genes of the EcSw phage are notably similar to those of enterobacteria phages. In addition, phage-antibiotic synergy has notable effects compared with the effects of phages or antibiotics alone. Inhibition of E. coli Sw1 and 0157:H7 strains showed that the limitations of host specificity and infectivity of EcSw. Even though, it has considerable potential for phage therapy for handling the problem of the emergence of multidrug resistant pathogens.

  6. Clostridium difficile phages: still difficult?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine Rose Hargreaves

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Phages that infect Clostridium difficile were first isolated for typing purposes in the 1980s, but their use was short lived. However, the rise of C. difficile epidemics over the last decade has triggered a resurgence of interest in using phages to combat this pathogen. Phage therapy is an attractive treatment option for C. difficile infection, however developing suitable phages is challenging. In this review we summarise the difficulties faced by researchers in this field, and we discuss the solutions and strategies used for the development of C. difficile phages for use as novel therapeutics.Epidemiological data has highlighted the diversity and distribution of C. difficile, and shown that novel strains continue to emerge in clinical settings. In parallel with epidemiological studies, advances in molecular biology have bolstered our understanding of C. difficile biology, and our knowledge of phage-host interactions in other bacterial species. These three fields of biology have therefore paved the way for future work on C. difficile phages to progress and develop. Benefits of using C. difficile phages as therapeutic agents include the fact that they have highly specific interactions with their bacterial hosts. Studies also show that they can reduce bacterial numbers in both in vitro and in vivo systems. Genetic analysis has revealed the genomic diversity among these phages and provided an insight into their taxonomy and evolution.No strictly virulent C. difficile phages have been reported and this contributes to the difficulties with their therapeutic exploitation. Although treatment approaches using the phage-encoded endolysin protein have been explored, the benefits of using whole-phages are such that they remain a major research focus. Whilst we don’t envisage working with C. difficile phages will be problem free, sufficient study should inform future strategies to facilitate their development to combat this problematic pathogen.

  7. Phage neutralization by sera of patients receiving phage therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Łusiak-Szelachowska, Marzanna; Zaczek, Maciej; Weber-Dąbrowska, Beata; Międzybrodzki, Ryszard; Kłak, Marlena; Fortuna, Wojciech; Letkiewicz, Sławomir; Rogóż, Paweł; Szufnarowski, Krzysztof; Jończyk-Matysiak, Ewa; Owczarek, Barbara; Górski, Andrzej

    2014-08-01

    The aim of our investigation was to verify whether phage therapy (PT) can induce antiphage antibodies. The antiphage activity was determined in sera from 122 patients from the Phage Therapy Unit in Wrocław with bacterial infections before and during PT, and in sera from 30 healthy volunteers using a neutralization test. Furthermore, levels of antiphage antibodies were investigated in sera of 19 patients receiving staphylococcal phages and sera of 20 healthy volunteers using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The phages were administered orally, locally, orally/locally, intrarectally, or orally/intrarectally. The rate of phage inactivation (K) estimated the level of phages' neutralization by human sera. Low K rates were found in sera of healthy volunteers (K ≤ 1.73). Low K rates were detected before PT (K ≤ 1.64). High antiphage activity of sera K > 18 was observed in 12.3% of examined patients (n = 15) treated with phages locally (n = 13) or locally/orally (n = 2) from 15 to 60 days of PT. High K rates were found in patients treated with some Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Enterococcus faecalis phages. Low K rates were observed during PT in sera of patients using phages orally (K ≤ 1.04). Increased inactivation of phages by sera of patients receiving PT decreased after therapy. These results suggest that the antiphage activity in patients' sera depends on the route of phage administration and phage type. The induction of antiphage activity of sera during or after PT does not exclude a favorable result of PT.

  8. Antibodies against Pseudomonas aeruginosa chromosomal beta-lactamase inpatients with cystic fibrosis are markers of the development of resistance of P. aeruginosa to beta-lactams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ciofu, O; Giwercman, B; Walter-Rasmussen, J

    1995-01-01

    Chromosomal beta-lactamase production is considered to be the most important resistance mechanism of Pseudomonas aeruginosa against beta-lactams. Recently we have detected serum and sputum antibodies against P. aeruginosa chromosomal beta-lactamase (a beta ab), using immunoblotting techniques...... infection and was significantly higher (P beta-lactam courses. A 14 fold increase in a beta ab...... levels occurred during the 14 year period covered by the longitudinal study. The results of this study show that a beta ab to P. aeruginosa is a specific marker for resistance development of P. aeruginosa to beta-lactams....

  9. Chromosomal duplications and cointegrates generated by the bacteriophage lamdba Red system in Escherichia coli K-12

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadkarni Ashwini

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An Escherichia coli strain in which RecBCD has been genetically replaced by the bacteriophage λ Red system engages in efficient recombination between its chromosome and linear double-stranded DNA species sharing sequences with the chromosome. Previous studies of this experimental system have focused on a gene replacement-type event, in which a 3.5 kbp dsDNA consisting of the cat gene and flanking lac operon sequences recombines with the E. coli chromosome to generate a chloramphenicol-resistant Lac- recombinant. The dsDNA was delivered into the cell as part of the chromosome of a non-replicating λ vector, from which it was released by the action of a restriction endonuclease in the infected cell. This study characterizes the genetic requirements and outcomes of a variety of additional Red-promoted homologous recombination events producing Lac+ recombinants. Results A number of observations concerning recombination events between the chromosome and linear DNAs were made: (1 Formation of Lac+ and Lac- recombinants depended upon the same recombination functions. (2 High multiplicity and high chromosome copy number favored Lac+ recombinant formation. (3 The Lac+ recombinants were unstable, segregating Lac- progeny. (4 A tetracycline-resistance marker in a site of the phage chromosome distant from cat was not frequently co-inherited with cat. (5 Recombination between phage sequences in the linear DNA and cryptic prophages in the chromosome was responsible for most of the observed Lac+ recombinants. In addition, observations were made concerning recombination events between the chromosome and circular DNAs: (6 Formation of recombinants depended upon both RecA and, to a lesser extent, Red. (7 The linked tetracycline-resistance marker was frequently co-inherited in this case. Conclusions The Lac+ recombinants arise from events in which homologous recombination between the incoming linear DNA and both lac and cryptic prophage

  10. Diversity of staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec structures in coagulase-negative staphylococci and relationship to drug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garza-González, Elvira; López, Daniel; Pezina, Cesar; Muruet, Walter; Bocanegra-García, Virgilio; Muñoz, Ivan; Ramírez, Camilo; Llaca-Díaz, Jorge M

    2010-03-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the distribution of staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) elements in meticillin-resistant coagulase-negative staphylococci (MR-CoNS) isolated from a tertiary-care hospital in Mexico and to examine the relationship to drug resistance. Fifty selected MR-CoNS isolates collected from catheters (n=15), blood (n=15), bone (n=9), bronchial lavage (n=2) and urine (n=2) and one isolate each from an abscess, cerebrospinal fluid, eye, pleural effusion, synovial fluid, tracheal aspirate and wound secretion were examined. Susceptibility testing was performed by the broth microdilution method. SCCmec types were determined by multiplex PCR and PFGE was carried out as described previously for Staphylococcus aureus. Among the MR-CoNS strains studied, the most frequently isolated species were Staphylococcus epidermidis (n=26) and Staphylococcus haemolyticus (n=13). Staphylococcus cohnii (n=5), Staphylococcus hominis (n=3), Staphylococcus sciuri (n=1), Staphylococcus pasteuri (n=1) and the recently described species Staphylococcus pettenkoferi (n=1) were also identified. The most frequent MR-CoNS genotype identified was SCCmec type IVa in S. epidermidis isolates, which also showed a high diversity in their PFGE patterns. A clone was found that amplified both SCCmec III and V elements in five isolates examined. The single MR S. pettenkoferi isolate harboured SCCmec type IVd and the single MR S. pasteuri isolate harboured SCCmec type I. The carriage of SCCmec type III was associated with resistance or intermediate resistance to meropenem (P IVa and the high genetic diversity among MR-CoNS strains. As far as is known, this is the first report describing the newly identified S. pettenkoferi possessing SCCmec IVd and S. pasteuri harbouring SCCmec type I. MR-CoNS harbouring SCCmec type III were found to be more resistant to meropenem.

  11. Helper plasmid cloning in Streptococcus sanguis: cloning of a tetracycline resistance determinant from the Streptococcus mutans chromosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobian, J A; Macrina, F L

    1982-10-01

    A model system for testing the helper plasmid cloning system of Gryczan et al. (Mol. Gen. Genet. 177:459-467, 1980) was devised for the Streptococcus sanguis (Challis) host-vector system. In this system, linearized pVA736 plasmid efficiently transformed an S. sanguis (Challis) host containing a homologous plasmid, pVA380-1, but did not transform a plasmidless host or a host containing a nonhomologous plasmid, pVA380. In addition, whereas monomeric circular pVA736 transformed a plasmidless host with two-hit kinetics, it transformed a pVA380-1-containing host with one-hit kinetics. This helper plasmid cloning system was used to isolate two HindIII fragments (5.0 megadaltons [Mdal] and 1.9 Mdal in size) from the chromosome of Streptococcus mutans V825 which conferred high-level tetracycline resistance. One tetracycline-resistant clone was examined and found to contain three plasmids which were sized and designated pVA868 (9.0 Mdal), pVA869 (9.5 Mdal), and pVA870 (9.8 Mdal). Results of Southern blot hybridization and restriction endonuclease digestion confirmed that all three chimeras were composed of two HindIII fragments of the S. mutans V825 chromosome, as well as a large portion, varying in size for each chimera, of the 2.8 Mdal cloning vector, pVA380-1. Incompatibility observed between pVA380-1 and each of the chimeras indicated that replication of the chimeras was governed by the pVA380-1 replicative origin. Southern blotting experiments revealed that the chimeras hybridized to Tn916, providing the first evidence that transposon-related genes of enteric streptococcal origin are disseminated among oral streptococci.

  12. AbiV, a Novel Antiphage Abortive Infection Mechanism on the Chromosome of Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris MG1363

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haaber, Jakob Brandt Borup; Moineau, Sylvain; Fortier, Louis-Charles;

    2008-01-01

    MG1363. This gene was also found to confer phage resistance to L. lactis MG1363 when it was cloned into an expression vector. A subsequent frameshift mutation in the ORF completely eliminated the phage resistance phenotype, confirming that the ORF was necessary for phage resistance. This ORF provided...

  13. Phage Tail-Like (High-Molecular-Weight) Bacteriocins of Budvicia aquatica and Pragia fontium (Enterobacteriaceae)

    OpenAIRE

    Šmarda, Jan; Benada, Oldřich

    2005-01-01

    Electron microscopic analysis of contractile phage tail-like bacteriocins of three Pragia fontium strains and one Budvicia aquatica strain was performed. Fonticin and aquaticin are remarkably heat sensitive but trypsin resistant. Simultaneous production of contractile and flexible phage tail-like bacteriocins in the P. fontium 64613 strain is shown for the first time.

  14. The phage-host arms race: Shaping the evolution of microbes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stern, Adi [Weizmann Inst. of Science, Rehovot (Israel). Dept. of Molecular Genetics; Sorek, Rotem [Weizmann Inst. of Science, Rehovot (Israel). Dept. of Molecular Genetics

    2010-10-26

    Bacteria, the most abundant organisms on the planet, are outnumbered by a factor of 10 to 1 by phages that infect them. Faced with the rapid evolution and turnover of phage particles, bacteria have evolved various mechanisms to evade phage infection and killing, leading to an evolutionary arms race. The extensive co-evolution of both phage and host has resulted in considerable diversity on the part of both bacterial and phage defensive and offensive strategies. In this paper, we discuss the unique and common features of phage resistance mechanisms and their role in global biodiversity. Finally, the commonalities between defense mechanisms suggest avenues for the discovery of novel forms of these mechanisms based on their evolutionary traits.

  15. Association of virulence plasmid and antibiotic resistance determinants with chromosomal multilocus genotypes in Mexican Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silva Claudia

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bacterial genomes are mosaic structures composed of genes present in every strain of the same species (core genome, and genes present in some but not all strains of a species (accessory genome. The aim of this study was to compare the genetic diversity of core and accessory genes of a Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica serovar Typhimurium (Typhimurium population isolated from food-animal and human sources in four regions of Mexico. Multilocus sequence typing (MLST and macrorestriction fingerprints by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE were used to address the core genetic variation, and genes involved in pathogenesis and antibiotic resistance were selected to evaluate the accessory genome. Results We found a low genetic diversity for both housekeeping and accessory genes. Sequence type 19 (ST19 was supported as the founder genotype of STs 213, 302 and 429. We found a temporal pattern in which the derived ST213 is replacing the founder ST19 in the four geographic regions analyzed and a geographic trend in the number of resistance determinants. The distribution of the accessory genes was not random among chromosomal genotypes. We detected strong associations among the different accessory genes and the multilocus chromosomal genotypes (STs. First, the Salmonella virulence plasmid (pSTV was found mostly in ST19 isolates. Second, the plasmid-borne betalactamase cmy-2 was found only in ST213 isolates. Third, the most abundant integron, IP-1 (dfrA12, orfF and aadA2, was found only in ST213 isolates. Fourth, the Salmonella genomic island (SGI1 was found mainly in a subgroup of ST19 isolates carrying pSTV. The mapping of accessory genes and multilocus genotypes on the dendrogram derived from macrorestiction fingerprints allowed the establishment of genetic subgroups within the population. Conclusion Despite the low levels of genetic diversity of core and accessory genes, the non-random distribution of the accessory genes

  16. Fine mapping of the chromosome 5B region carrying closely linked rust resistance genes Yr47 and Lr52 in wheat

    Science.gov (United States)

    The widely effective and linked rust resistance genes Yr47 and Lr52 were previously mapped in the short arm of chromosome 5B in two F3 populations (Aus28183/Aus27229 and Aus28187/Aus27229). The Aus28183/Aus27229 F3 population was advanced to generate an F6 recombinant inbred line (RIL) population t...

  17. CHROMOSOMAL MAPPING IN STRAINS OF STAPHYLOCOCCUS AUREUS,

    Science.gov (United States)

    STAPHYLOCOCCUS AUREUS , CHROMOSOMES), (*CHROMOSOMES, MAPPING), NITROSO COMPOUNDS, GUANIDINES, GENETICS, MUTATIONS, DRUGS, TOLERANCES(PHYSIOLOGY), TEST METHODS, DEOXYRIBONUCLEIC ACIDS, INHIBITION, RESISTANCE(BIOLOGY).

  18. Phage cocktails and the future of phage therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Benjamin K; Abedon, Stephen T; Loc-Carrillo, Catherine

    2013-06-01

    Viruses of bacteria, known as bacteriophages or phages, were discovered nearly 100 years ago. Their potential as antibacterial agents was appreciated almost immediately, with the first 'phage therapy' trials predating Fleming's discovery of penicillin by approximately a decade. In this review, we consider phage therapy that can be used for treating bacterial infections in humans, domestic animals and even biocontrol in foods. Following an overview of the topic, we explore the common practice - both experimental and, in certain regions of the world, clinical - of mixing therapeutic phages into cocktails consisting of multiple virus types. We conclude with a discussion of the commercial and medical context of phage cocktails as therapeutic agents. In comparing off-the-shelf versus custom approaches, we consider the merits of a middle ground, which we deem 'modifiable'. Finally, we explore a regulatory framework for such an approach based on an influenza vaccine model.

  19. Conserved termini and adjacent variable region of Twortlikevirus Staphylococcus phages

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xianglilan Zhang; Huaixing Kang; Yuyuan Li; Xiaodong Liu; Yu Yang; Shasha Li; Guangqian Pei; Qiang Sun; Peng Shu; Zhiqiang Mi; Yong Huang; Zhiyi Zhang; Yannan Liu; Xiaoping An; Xiaolu Xu; Yigang Tong

    2015-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus(MRSA) is an increasing cause of serious infection,both in the community and hospital settings. Despite sophisticated strategies and efforts, the antibiotic options for treating MRSA infection are narrowing because of the limited number of newly developed antimicrobials. Here, four newly-isolated MRSA-virulent phages, IME-SA1, IMESA2, IME-SA118 and IME-SA119, were sequenced and analyzed. Their genome termini were identified using our previously proposed "termini analysis theory". We provide evidence that remarkable conserved terminus sequences are found in IME-SA1/2/118/119, and, moreover, are widespread throughout Twortlikevirus Staphylococcus phage G1 and K species. Results also suggested that each phage of the two species has conserved 5′ terminus while the 3′ terminus is variable. More importantly, a variable region with a specific pattern was found to be present near the conserved terminus of Twortlikevirus S. phage G1 species. The clone with the longest variable region had variable terminus lengths in successive generations, while the clones with the shortest variable region and with the average length variable region maintained the same terminal length as themselves during successive generations. IME-SA1 bacterial infection experiments showed that the variation is not derived from adaptation of the phage to different host strains. This is the first study of the conserved terminus and variable region of Twortlikevirus S. phages.

  20. Localization of powdery mildew resistance gene Ml-ra on barley chromosome 5

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doll, Hans; Jensen, Hans Peter

    1986-01-01

    Evidence is presented that the powdery mildew resistance gene called Ml-(41/145) represents a unique, unnamed locus, which we suggest to be designated Ml-ra with reference to variety 'Ragusa b' [Hordeum vulgare]. Ml-ra is located on the short arm of chormosome 5 near powdery mildew resistance locus...... Ml-a and the seed storage protein loci Hor1 and Hor2. The most likely order of the loci is Hor1, Ml-a, Ml-ra, and Hor2....

  1. Characterization of Five Novel Brevibacillus Bacteriophages and Genomic Comparison of Brevibacillus Phages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Jordan A; Merrill, Bryan D; Crockett, Justin T; Esplin, Kyle P; Evans, Marlee R; Heaton, Karli E; Hilton, Jared A; Hyde, Jonathan R; McBride, Morgan S; Schouten, Jordan T; Simister, Austin R; Thurgood, Trever L; Ward, Andrew T; Breakwell, Donald P; Hope, Sandra; Grose, Julianne H

    2016-01-01

    Brevibacillus laterosporus is a spore-forming bacterium that causes a secondary infection in beehives following European Foulbrood disease. To better understand the contributions of Brevibacillus bacteriophages to the evolution of their hosts, five novel phages (Jenst, Osiris, Powder, SecTim467, and Sundance) were isolated and characterized. When compared with the five Brevibacillus phages currently in NCBI, these phages were assigned to clusters based on whole genome and proteome synteny. Powder and Osiris, both myoviruses, were assigned to the previously described Jimmer-like cluster. SecTim467 and Jenst, both siphoviruses, formed a novel phage cluster. Sundance, a siphovirus, was assigned as a singleton phage along with the previously isolated singleton, Emery. In addition to characterizing the basic relationships between these phages, several genomic features were observed. A motif repeated throughout phages Jenst and SecTim467 was frequently upstream of genes predicted to function in DNA replication, nucleotide metabolism, and transcription, suggesting transcriptional co-regulation. In addition, paralogous gene pairs that encode a putative transcriptional regulator were identified in four Brevibacillus phages. These paralogs likely evolved to bind different DNA sequences due to variation at amino acid residues predicted to bind specific nucleotides. Finally, a putative transposable element was identified in SecTim467 and Sundance that carries genes homologous to those found in Brevibacillus chromosomes. Remnants of this transposable element were also identified in phage Jenst. These discoveries provide a greater understanding of the diversity of phages, their behavior, and their evolutionary relationships to one another and to their host. In addition, they provide a foundation with which further Brevibacillus phages can be compared.

  2. Characterization of Five Novel Brevibacillus Bacteriophages and Genomic Comparison of Brevibacillus Phages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordan A Berg

    Full Text Available Brevibacillus laterosporus is a spore-forming bacterium that causes a secondary infection in beehives following European Foulbrood disease. To better understand the contributions of Brevibacillus bacteriophages to the evolution of their hosts, five novel phages (Jenst, Osiris, Powder, SecTim467, and Sundance were isolated and characterized. When compared with the five Brevibacillus phages currently in NCBI, these phages were assigned to clusters based on whole genome and proteome synteny. Powder and Osiris, both myoviruses, were assigned to the previously described Jimmer-like cluster. SecTim467 and Jenst, both siphoviruses, formed a novel phage cluster. Sundance, a siphovirus, was assigned as a singleton phage along with the previously isolated singleton, Emery. In addition to characterizing the basic relationships between these phages, several genomic features were observed. A motif repeated throughout phages Jenst and SecTim467 was frequently upstream of genes predicted to function in DNA replication, nucleotide metabolism, and transcription, suggesting transcriptional co-regulation. In addition, paralogous gene pairs that encode a putative transcriptional regulator were identified in four Brevibacillus phages. These paralogs likely evolved to bind different DNA sequences due to variation at amino acid residues predicted to bind specific nucleotides. Finally, a putative transposable element was identified in SecTim467 and Sundance that carries genes homologous to those found in Brevibacillus chromosomes. Remnants of this transposable element were also identified in phage Jenst. These discoveries provide a greater understanding of the diversity of phages, their behavior, and their evolutionary relationships to one another and to their host. In addition, they provide a foundation with which further Brevibacillus phages can be compared.

  3. The epic of phage therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Alain Dublanchet; Shawna Bourne

    2007-01-01

    The present report describes the presentation given by Dr Alain Dublanchet at the Stanier/Oxford Hygiene Symposium, held in Oxford, England, on November 10, 2004. Dr Dublanchet's lecture, entitled ‘The epic of phage therapy’, provided a sequential account of the use of phage as an antimicrobial from its discovery to its rise and fall and current rediscovery.

  4. Co-evolutionary dynamics of the bacteria Vibrio sp. CV1 and phages V1G, V1P1, and V1P2: implications for phage therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Camilo; Venail, Patrick; Holguin, Angela V; Vives, Martha J

    2013-11-01

    Bacterial infections are the second largest cause of mortality in shrimp hatcheries. Among them, bacteria from the genus Vibrio constitute a major threat. As the use of antibiotics may be ineffective and banned from the food sector, alternatives are required. Historically, phage therapy, which is the use of bacteriophages, is thought to be a promising option to fight against bacterial infections. However, as for antibiotics, resistance can be rapidly developed. Since the emergence of resistance is highly undesirable, a formal characterization of the dynamics of its acquisition is mandatory. Here, we explored the co-evolutionary dynamics of resistance between the bacteria Vibrio sp. CV1 and the phages V1G, V1P1, and V1P2. Single-phage treatments as well as a cocktail composed of the three phages were considered. We found that in the presence of a single phage, bacteria rapidly evolved resistance, and the phages decreased their infectivity, suggesting that monotherapy may be an inefficient treatment to fight against Vibrio infections in shrimp hatcheries. On the contrary, the use of a phage cocktail considerably delayed the evolution of resistance and sustained phage infectivity for periods in which shrimp larvae are most susceptible to bacterial infections, suggesting the simultaneous use of multiple phages as a serious strategy for the control of vibriosis. These findings are very promising in terms of their consequences to different industrial and medical scenarios where bacterial infections are present.

  5. Chromosomal mechanisms of aminoglycoside resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from cystic fibrosis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Islam, S; Oh, H; Jalal, S;

    2009-01-01

    . aeruginosa, were analysed. MexY mRNA overproduction was found in 17/20 isolates collected in 1994 and 1997, and was correlated with decreased susceptibility to aminoglycosides. Alteration of the MexXY-OprM efflux system has been the main mechanism of resistance to aminoglycoside antibiotics in CF P...

  6. Localization to chicken chromosome 5 of a novel locus determining salmonellosis resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mariana, P.; Barrow, P.A.; Cheng, H.H.; Groenen, M.A.M.; Negrini, R.; Bumstead, N.

    2001-01-01

    Clear genetic differences in the susceptibility of chickens to visceral infection by Salmonella have been observed and it has been possible to identify resistant and susceptible lines of inbred chickens. We report here the results of experiments to map directly the gene(s) controlling this trait in

  7. 烧伤细菌感染的噬菌体治疗%Phage therapy for bacterial infection of burn

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    彭毅志; 黄广涛

    2016-01-01

    With the long-term and widespread use of antibiotics,drug resistance of bacteria has become a major problem in the treatment of burn infection.For treating multidrug resistant bacteria,phage therapy has become the focus of attention.Development of phage therapy to fill the blank of this field in China is extremely urgent.

  8. Phage therapy: delivering on the promise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, D R; Anderson, J; Enright, M C

    2011-07-01

    Bacteriophages are viruses that infect and, in many cases, destroy their bacterial targets. Within a few years of their initial discovery they were being investigated as therapeutic agents for infectious disease, an approach known as phage therapy. However, the nature of these exquisitely specific agents was not understood and much early use was both uninformed and unsuccessful. As a result they were replaced by chemical antibiotics once these became available. Although work on phage therapy continued (and continues) in Eastern Europe, this was not conducted to a standard allowing it to support clinical uses in areas regulated by the European Medicines Agency or the US FDA. To develop phage therapy for these areas requires work carried out in accordance with the requirements of these agencies, and, driven by the current crisis of antibiotic resistance, such clinical trials are now under way. The first Phase I clinical trial of safety was reported in 2005, and the results of the first Phase II clinical trial of efficacy of a bacteriophage therapeutic was published in 2009. While the delivery of these relatively large and complex agents to the site of disease can be more challenging than for conventional, small-molecule antibiotics, bacteriophages are then able to multiply locally even from an extremely low (picogram range) initial dose. This multiplication where and only where they are needed underlies the potential for bacteriophage therapeutics to become a much needed and powerful weapon against bacterial disease.

  9. BCR-ABL1 compound mutations combining key kinase domain positions confer clinical resistance to ponatinib in Ph chromosome-positive leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabriskie, Matthew S; Eide, Christopher A; Tantravahi, Srinivas K; Vellore, Nadeem A; Estrada, Johanna; Nicolini, Franck E; Khoury, Hanna J; Larson, Richard A; Konopleva, Marina; Cortes, Jorge E; Kantarjian, Hagop; Jabbour, Elias J; Kornblau, Steven M; Lipton, Jeffrey H; Rea, Delphine; Stenke, Leif; Barbany, Gisela; Lange, Thoralf; Hernández-Boluda, Juan-Carlos; Ossenkoppele, Gert J; Press, Richard D; Chuah, Charles; Goldberg, Stuart L; Wetzler, Meir; Mahon, Francois-Xavier; Etienne, Gabriel; Baccarani, Michele; Soverini, Simona; Rosti, Gianantonio; Rousselot, Philippe; Friedman, Ran; Deininger, Marie; Reynolds, Kimberly R; Heaton, William L; Eiring, Anna M; Pomicter, Anthony D; Khorashad, Jamshid S; Kelley, Todd W; Baron, Riccardo; Druker, Brian J; Deininger, Michael W; O'Hare, Thomas

    2014-09-08

    Ponatinib is the only currently approved tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) that suppresses all BCR-ABL1 single mutants in Philadelphia chromosome-positive (Ph(+)) leukemia, including the recalcitrant BCR-ABL1(T315I) mutant. However, emergence of compound mutations in a BCR-ABL1 allele may confer ponatinib resistance. We found that clinically reported BCR-ABL1 compound mutants center on 12 key positions and confer varying resistance to imatinib, nilotinib, dasatinib, ponatinib, rebastinib, and bosutinib. T315I-inclusive compound mutants confer high-level resistance to TKIs, including ponatinib. In vitro resistance profiling was predictive of treatment outcomes in Ph(+) leukemia patients. Structural explanations for compound mutation-based resistance were obtained through molecular dynamics simulations. Our findings demonstrate that BCR-ABL1 compound mutants confer different levels of TKI resistance, necessitating rational treatment selection to optimize clinical outcome.

  10. Phages targeting infected tissues: novel approach to phage therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Górski, Andrzej; Dąbrowska, Krystyna; Hodyra-Stefaniak, Katarzyna; Borysowski, Jan; Międzybrodzki, Ryszard; Weber-Dąbrowska, Beata

    2015-01-01

    While the true efficacy of phage therapy still requires formal confirmation in clinical trials, it continues to offer realistic potential treatment in patients in whom antibiotics have failed. Novel developments and approaches are therefore needed to ascertain that future clinical trials would evaluate the therapy in its optimal form thus allowing for reliable conclusions regarding the true value of phage therapy. In this article, we present our vision to develop and establish a bank of phages specific to most threatening pathogens and armed with homing peptides enabling their localization in infected tissues in densities assuring efficient and stable eradication of infection.

  11. Staphylococcal pathogenicity island interference with helper phage reproduction is a paradigm of molecular parasitism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ram, Geeta; Chen, John; Kumar, Krishan; Ross, Hope F; Ubeda, Carles; Damle, Priyadarshan K; Lane, Kristin D; Penadés, José R; Christie, Gail E; Novick, Richard P

    2012-10-02

    Staphylococcal pathogenicity islands (SaPIs) carry superantigen and resistance genes and are extremely widespread in Staphylococcus aureus and in other Gram-positive bacteria. SaPIs represent a major source of intrageneric horizontal gene transfer and a stealth conduit for intergeneric gene transfer; they are phage satellites that exploit the life cycle of their temperate helper phages with elegant precision to enable their rapid replication and promiscuous spread. SaPIs also interfere with helper phage reproduction, blocking plaque formation, sharply reducing burst size and enhancing the survival of host cells following phage infection. Here, we show that SaPIs use several different strategies for phage interference, presumably the result of convergent evolution. One strategy, not described previously in the bacteriophage microcosm, involves a SaPI-encoded protein that directly and specifically interferes with phage DNA packaging by blocking the phage terminase small subunit. Another strategy involves interference with phage reproduction by diversion of the vast majority of virion proteins to the formation of SaPI-specific small infectious particles. Several SaPIs use both of these strategies, and at least one uses neither but possesses a third. Our studies illuminate a key feature of the evolutionary strategy of these mobile genetic elements, in addition to their carriage of important genes-interference with helper phage reproduction, which could ensure their transferability and long-term persistence.

  12. In vitro management of hospital Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm using indigenous T7-like lytic phage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahiwale, Sangeeta; Tamboli, Nilofer; Thorat, Kiran; Kulkarni, Rajendra; Ackermann, Hans; Kapadnis, Balasaheb

    2011-02-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a human pathogen capable of forming biofilm and contaminating medical settings, is responsible for 65% mortality in the hospitals all over the world. This study was undertaken to isolate lytic phages against biofilm forming Ps. aeruginosa hospital isolates and to use them for in vitro management of biofilms in the microtiter plate. Multidrug resistant strains of Ps. aeruginosa were isolated from the hospital environment in and around Pimpri-Chinchwad, Maharashtra by standard microbiological methods. Lytic phages against these strains were isolated from the Pavana river water by double agar layer plaque assay method. A wide host range phage bacterial virus Ps. aeruginosa phage (BVPaP-3) was selected. Electron microscopy revealed that BVPaP-3 phage is a T7-like phage and is a relative of phage species gh-1. A phage at MOI-0.001 could prevent biofilm formation by Ps. aeruginosa hospital strain-6(HS6) on the pegs within 24 h. It could also disperse pre-formed biofilms of all hospital isolates (HS1-HS6) on the pegs within 24 h. Dispersion of biofilm was studied by monitoring log percent reduction in cfu and log percent increase in pfu of respective bacterium and phage on the peg as well as in the well. Scanning electron microscopy confirmed that phage BVPaP-3 indeed causes biofilm reduction and bacterial cell killing. Laboratory studies prove that BVPaP-3 is a highly efficient phage in preventing and dispersing biofilms of Ps. aeruginosa. Phage BVPaP-3 can be used as biological disinfectant to control biofilm problem in medical devices.

  13. A window of opportunity to control the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa combining antibiotics and phages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Barceló, Clara; Arias-Sánchez, Flor I; Vasse, Marie; Ramsayer, Johan; Kaltz, Oliver; Hochberg, Michael E

    2014-01-01

    The evolution of antibiotic resistance in bacteria is a global concern and the use of bacteriophages alone or in combined therapies is attracting increasing attention as an alternative. Evolutionary theory predicts that the probability of bacterial resistance to both phages and antibiotics will be lower than to either separately, due for example to fitness costs or to trade-offs between phage resistance mechanisms and bacterial growth. In this study, we assess the population impacts of either individual or combined treatments of a bacteriophage and streptomycin on the nosocomial pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We show that combining phage and antibiotics substantially increases bacterial control compared to either separately, and that there is a specific time delay in antibiotic introduction independent of antibiotic dose, that minimizes both bacterial density and resistance to either antibiotics or phage. These results have implications for optimal combined therapeutic approaches.

  14. Selection and characterization of spontaneous phage-resistant strains of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp.bulgaricus%德氏乳杆菌保加利亚亚种自发突变抗噬菌体菌株的选育及其特性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    方伟; 魏冉冉; 孙懿琳; 邓凯波; 杨丽杰

    2012-01-01

    Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp.bulgaricus KLDS08021 was used as original strain. The bacteriophage-resistant mutants were isolated by secondary culture. Random amplification of polymorphic DNA (RAPD-PCR) was used to confirm strain identity among seven phage-resistant strains and their parent strain. Characteristics related to their phage-resistance capacities, EOP, phage- resistance stability, lysogeny were determined. The yogurt fermentation properties of mutants were also studied for two strains of mutants (BIM1, BIM7). The study show that the phage-resistant strains were isolated from original strains and were stable and non-lysogen. The fermentation characteristic(viable count, acidifying) and texture characteristic (consistency, firmness) were superior to the origin strain regardless of the absence or presence of phage, so the two strains of mutants could be used for yogurt industrial production.%利用德氏乳杆菌L.bulgaricusKLDS08021为宿主菌,采用次级感染的方法筛选自发突变的抗噬菌体菌株,将筛选出的有抗性的7株菌株进行RAPD—PCR鉴定,然后进行EOP、遗传稳定性、溶源性检测,并对其中的2株抗性菌BIMl、BIM7及野生株进行发酵性能测定。结果显示,7株菌RAPD—PCR电泳图谱一致,均来自宿主菌,是遗传性稳定的非溶源性菌;无论噬菌体是否存在2株抗性菌BIMl、BIM7其发酵活菌数、产酸能力都比野生株高,且制作的发酵乳黏度与硬度也比野生菌株强,适于作为酸奶发酵菌株。

  15. A bacterial artificial chromosome library for soybean PI 437654 and identification of clones associated with cyst nematode resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomkins, J P; Mahalingam, R; Smith, H; Goicoechea, J L; Knap, H T; Wing, R A

    1999-09-01

    We have constructed a soybean bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library using the plant introduction (PI) 437654. The library contains 73 728 clones stored in 192 384-well microtiter plates. A random sampling of 230 BACs indicated an average insert size of 136 kb with a range of 20 to 325 kb, and less than 4% of the clones do not contain inserts. Ninety percent of BAC clones in the library have an average insert size greater than 100 kb. Based on a genome size of 1115 Mb, library coverage is 9 haploid genome equivalents. Screening the BAC library colony filters with cpDNA sequences showed that contamination of the genomic library with chloroplast clones was low (1.85%). Library screening with three genomic RFLP probes linked to soybean cyst nematode (SCN) resistance genes resulted in an average of 18 hits per probe (range 7 to 30). Two separate pools of forward and reverse suppression subtractive cDNAs obtained from SCN-infected and uninfected roots of PI437654 were hybridized to the BAC library filters. The 488 BACs identified from positive signals were fingerprinted and analyzed using FPC software (version 4.0) resulting in 85 different contigs. Contigs were grouped and analyzed in three categories: (1) contigs of BAC clones which hybridized to forward subtracted cDNAs, (2) contigs of BAC clones which hybridized to reverse subtracted cDNAs, and (3) contigs of BAC clones which hybridized to both forward and reverse subtracted cDNAs. This protocol provides an estimate of the number of genomic regions involved in early resistance response to a pathogenic attack.

  16. Late blight resistance gene from Solanum ruiz-ceballosii is located on potato chromosome X and linked to violet flower colour

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    Śliwka Jadwiga

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Phytophthora infestans (Mont. de Bary, the causal organism of late blight, is economically the most important pathogen of potato and resistance against it has been one of the primary goals of potato breeding. Some potentially durable, broad-spectrum resistance genes against this disease have been described recently. However, to obtain durable resistance in potato cultivars more genes are needed to be identified to realize strategies such as gene pyramiding or use of genotype mixtures based on diverse genes. Results A major resistance gene, Rpi-rzc1, against P. infestans originating from Solanum ruiz-ceballosii was mapped to potato chromosome X using Diversity Array Technology (DArT and sequence-specific PCR markers. The gene provided high level of resistance in both detached leaflet and tuber slice tests. It was linked, at a distance of 3.4 cM, to violet flower colour most likely controlled by the previously described F locus. The marker-trait association with the closest marker, violet flower colour, explained 87.1% and 85.7% of variance, respectively, for mean detached leaflet and tuber slice resistance. A genetic linkage map that consisted of 1,603 DArT markers and 48 reference sequence-specific PCR markers of known chromosomal localization with a total map length of 1204.8 cM was constructed. Conclusions The Rpi-rzc1 gene described here can be used for breeding potatoes resistant to P. infestans and the breeding process can be expedited using the molecular markers and the phenotypic marker, violet flower colour, identified in this study. Knowledge of the chromosomal localization of Rpi-rzc1 can be useful for design of gene pyramids. The genetic linkage map constructed in this study contained 1,149 newly mapped DArT markers and will be a valuable resource for future mapping projects using this technology in the Solanum genus.

  17. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus saprophyticus isolates carrying staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec have emerged in urogenital tract infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashide, Masato; Kuroda, Makoto; Omura, Carlos Takashi Neves; Kumano, Miyuki; Ohkawa, Saburo; Ichimura, Sadahiro; Ohta, Toshiko

    2008-06-01

    Staphylococcus saprophyticus is a uropathogenic bacterium that causes acute uncomplicated urinary tract infections, particularly in female outpatients. We investigated the dissemination and antimicrobial susceptibilities of 101 S. saprophyticus isolates from the genitourinary tracts of patients in Japan. Eight of these isolates were mecA positive and showed beta-lactam resistance. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis showed that only some isolates were isogenic, indicating that the mecA gene was apparently acquired independently by mecA-positive isolates through staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec). Type determination of SCCmec by multiplex PCR showed a nontypeable element in the eight mecA-positive isolates. Sequence analysis of the entire SCCmec element from a prototype S. saprophyticus strain revealed that it was nontypeable with the current SCCmec classification due to the novel composition of the class A mec gene complex (IS431-mecA-mecR1-mecI genes) and the ccrA1/ccrB3 gene complex. Intriguingly, the attachment sites of SCCmec are similar to those of type I SCCmec in S. aureus NCTC 10442. Furthermore, the genes around the mec gene complex are similar to those of type II/III SCCmec in S. aureus, while those around the ccr gene complex are similar to those of SCC15305RM found in S. saprophyticus ATCC 15305. In comparison with known SCCmec elements, this S. saprophyticus SCCmec is a novel type.

  18. Chromosomal location and comparative genomics analysis of powdery mildew resistance gene Pm51 in a putative wheat-Thinopyrum ponticum introgression line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Haixian; Li, Guangrong; Zhang, Xiaojun; Li, Xin; Guo, Huijuan; Gong, Wenping; Jia, Juqing; Qiao, Linyi; Ren, Yongkang; Yang, Zujun; Chang, Zhijian

    2014-01-01

    Powdery mildew (PM) is a very destructive disease of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). Wheat-Thinopyrum ponticum introgression line CH7086 was shown to possess powdery mildew resistance possibly originating from Th. ponticum. Genomic in situ hybridization and molecular characterization of the alien introgression failed to identify alien chromatin. To study the genetics of resistance, CH7086 was crossed with susceptible genotypes. Segregation in F2 populations and F2:3 lines tested with Chinese Bgt race E09 under controlled conditions indicated that CH7086 carries a single dominant gene for powdery mildew resistance. Fourteen SSR and EST-PCR markers linked with the locus were identified. The genetic distances between the locus and the two flanking markers were 1.5 and 3.2 cM, respectively. Based on the locations of the markers by nullisomic-tetrasomic and deletion lines of 'Chinese Spring', the resistance gene was located in deletion bin 2BL-0.89-1.00. Conserved orthologous marker analysis indicated that the genomic region flanking the resistance gene has a high level of collinearity to that of rice chromosome 4 and Brachypodium chromosome 5. Both resistance specificities and tests of allelism suggested the resistance gene in CH7086 was different from previously reported powdery mildew resistance genes on 2BL, and the gene was provisionally designated PmCH86. Molecular analysis of PmCH86 compared with other genes for resistance to Bgt in the 2BL-0.89-1.00 region suggested that PmCH86 may be a new PM resistance gene, and it was therefore designated as Pm51. The closely linked flanking markers could be useful in exploiting this putative wheat-Thinopyrum translocation line for rapid transfer of Pm51 to wheat breeding programs.

  19. Four Escherichia coli O157:H7 phages: a new bacteriophage genus and taxonomic classification of T1-like phages.

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    Yan D Niu

    Full Text Available The T1-like bacteriophages vB_EcoS_AHP24, AHS24, AHP42 and AKS96 of the family Siphoviridae were shown to lyse common phage types of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli O157:H7 (STEC O157:H7, but not non-O157 E. coli. All contained circularly permuted genomes of 45.7-46.8 kb (43.8-44 mol% G+C encoding 74-81 open reading frames and 1 arginyl-tRNA. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed that the structural proteins were identical among the four phages. Further proteomic analysis identified seven structural proteins responsible for tail fiber, tail tape measure protein, major capsid, portal protein as well as major and minor tail proteins. Bioinformatic analyses on the proteins revealed that genomes of AHP24, AHS24, AHP42 and AKS96 did not encode for bacterial virulence factors, integration-related proteins or antibiotic resistance determinants. All four phages were highly lytic to STEC O157:H7 with considerable potential as biocontrol agents. Comparative genomic, proteomic and phylogenetic analysis suggested that the four phages along with 17 T1-like phage genomes from database of National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI can be assigned into a proposed subfamily "Tunavirinae" with further classification into five genera, namely "Tlslikevirus" (TLS, FSL SP-126, "Kp36likevirus" (KP36, F20, Tunalikevirus (T1, ADB-2 and Shf1, "Rtplikevirus" (RTP, vB_EcoS_ACG-M12 and "Jk06likevirus" (JK06, vB_EcoS_Rogue1, AHP24, AHS24, AHP42, AKS96, phiJLA23, phiKP26, phiEB49. The fact that the viruses related to JK06 have been isolated independently in Israel (JK06 (GenBank Assession #, NC_007291, Canada (vB_EcoS_Rogue1, AHP24, AHS24, AHP42, AKS96 and Mexico (phiKP26, phiJLA23 (between 2005 and 2011 indicates that these similar phages are widely distributed, and that horizontal gene transfer does not always prevent the characterization of bacteriophage evolution. With this new scheme, any new discovered phages with same type

  20. Four Escherichia coli O157:H7 phages: a new bacteriophage genus and taxonomic classification of T1-like phages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Yan D; McAllister, Tim A; Nash, John H E; Kropinski, Andrew M; Stanford, Kim

    2014-01-01

    The T1-like bacteriophages vB_EcoS_AHP24, AHS24, AHP42 and AKS96 of the family Siphoviridae were shown to lyse common phage types of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli O157:H7 (STEC O157:H7), but not non-O157 E. coli. All contained circularly permuted genomes of 45.7-46.8 kb (43.8-44 mol% G+C) encoding 74-81 open reading frames and 1 arginyl-tRNA. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed that the structural proteins were identical among the four phages. Further proteomic analysis identified seven structural proteins responsible for tail fiber, tail tape measure protein, major capsid, portal protein as well as major and minor tail proteins. Bioinformatic analyses on the proteins revealed that genomes of AHP24, AHS24, AHP42 and AKS96 did not encode for bacterial virulence factors, integration-related proteins or antibiotic resistance determinants. All four phages were highly lytic to STEC O157:H7 with considerable potential as biocontrol agents. Comparative genomic, proteomic and phylogenetic analysis suggested that the four phages along with 17 T1-like phage genomes from database of National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) can be assigned into a proposed subfamily "Tunavirinae" with further classification into five genera, namely "Tlslikevirus" (TLS, FSL SP-126), "Kp36likevirus" (KP36, F20), Tunalikevirus (T1, ADB-2 and Shf1), "Rtplikevirus" (RTP, vB_EcoS_ACG-M12) and "Jk06likevirus" (JK06, vB_EcoS_Rogue1, AHP24, AHS24, AHP42, AKS96, phiJLA23, phiKP26, phiEB49). The fact that the viruses related to JK06 have been isolated independently in Israel (JK06) (GenBank Assession #, NC_007291), Canada (vB_EcoS_Rogue1, AHP24, AHS24, AHP42, AKS96) and Mexico (phiKP26, phiJLA23) (between 2005 and 2011) indicates that these similar phages are widely distributed, and that horizontal gene transfer does not always prevent the characterization of bacteriophage evolution. With this new scheme, any new discovered phages with same type can be

  1. Human Volunteers Receiving Escherichia coli Phage T4 Orally: a Safety Test of Phage Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Bruttin, Anne; Brüssow, Harald

    2005-01-01

    Fifteen healthy adult volunteers received in their drinking water a lower Escherichia coli phage T4 dose (103 PFU/ml), a higher phage dose (105 PFU/ml), and placebo. Fecal coliphage was detected in a dose-dependent way in volunteers orally exposed to phage. All volunteers receiving the higher phage dose showed fecal phage 1 day after exposure; this prevalence was only 50% in subjects receiving the lower phage dose. No fecal phage was detectable a week after a 2-day course of oral phage applic...

  2. A Multicenter Study of Beta-Lactamase Resistant Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae Reveals High Level Chromosome Mediated Extended Spectrum β Lactamase Resistance in Ogun State, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Folasoge A. Adeyankinnu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available As a result of the ever increasing problem of multiresistant bacteria, we instituted a surveillance program with the aim of identifying the basic molecular properties of ESBL in our environment. About 197 isolates of Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae were selected and tested for ESBL production and antimicrobial susceptibility. Plasmid profiles were determined and curing ability was tested. ESBL prevalence was 26.4% for all isolates tested, with E. coli having a greater proportion. There was absolute resistance to ampicilin, tetracycline, and co-trimaxole among tested isolates. There was above average susceptibility to the 2nd and 3rd generation cephalosporins. Plasmid profiles of tested isolates ranged from 9 kbp to 26 kbp with average of 14.99±2.3 kbp for E. coli and 20.98±1.8 kbp K. pneumoniae, 9.6% of ESBL positive E. coli plasmids were cured, while 3.9% of K. pneumoniae plasmids were cured after treatment. The present study shows an upsurge in ESBL acquisition by gram negative bacteria and evidence of cocirculation of varying subtypes of ESBL with both plasmid transmissible and chromosome encoded subtypes. This calls for universal surveillance and more effort towards molecular epidemiology of this public health treatment.

  3. Discovery of a new source of resistance to Fusarium oxysporum, cause of Fusarium wilt in Allium fistulosum, located on chromosome 2 of Allium cepa Aggregatum group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu, Hoa Q; El-Sayed, Magdi A; Ito, Shin-Ichi; Yamauchi, Naoki; Shigyo, Masayoshi

    2012-11-01

    This study was carried out to evaluate the antifungal effect of Allium cepa Aggregatum group (shallot) metabolites on Fusarium oxysporum and to determine the shallot chromosome(s) related to Fusarium wilt resistance using a complete set of eight Allium fistulosum - shallot monosomic addition lines. The antifungal effects of hexane, butanol, and water extraction fractions from bulbs of shallot on 35 isolates of F. oxysporum were examined using the disc diffusion method. Only hexane and butanol fractions showed high antifungal activity. Shallot showed no symptom of disease after inoculation with F. oxysporum f. sp. cepae. The phenolic content of the roots and the saponin content of root exudates of inoculated shallot increased to much higher levels than those of the control at 3 days after inoculation. Application of freeze-dried shallot root exudates to seeds of A. fistulosum soaked in a spore suspension of F. oxysporum resulted in protection of seedlings against infection. Among eight monosomic addition lines and A. fistulosum, FF+2A showed the highest resistance to Fusarium wilt. This monosomic addition line also showed a specific saponin band derived from shallot on the thin layer chromatography profile of saponins in the eight monosomic addition lines. The chromosome 2A of shallot might possess some of the genes related to Fusarium wilt resistance.

  4. Effective transfer of chromosomes carrying leaf rust resistance genes from Aegilops tauschii Coss. into hexaploid triticale (X Triticosecale Witt.) using Ae. tauschii × Secale cereale amphiploid forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwiatek, Michał; Majka, Maciej; Wiśniewska, Halina; Apolinarska, Barbara; Belter, Jolanta

    2015-05-01

    This paper shows the results of effective uses of a molecular cytogenetics toolbox and molecular marker to transfer leaf rust resistance genes from Aegilops tauschii × Secale cereale (DDRR, 2n = 4x = 28) amphiploid forms to triticale cv. Bogo (AABBRR, 2n = 6x = 42). The molecular markers of resistance genes and in situ hybridization analysis of mitotic metaphase of root meristems confirmed the stable inheritance of chromosome 3D segments carrying Lr32 from the BC2F2 to the BC2F5 generation of (Ae. tauschii × S. cereale) × triticale hybrids. The chromosome pairing analysis during metaphase I of meiosis of BC2F4 and BC2F5 hybrids showed increasing regular bivalent formation of 3D chromosome pairs and decreasing number of univalents in subsequent generations. The results indicate that using amphiploid forms as a bridge between wild and cultivated forms can be a successful technology to transfer the D-genome chromatin carrying leaf rust resistance genes into triticale.

  5. Isolation and characterization of lytic phages TSE1-3 against Enterobacter cloacae

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    Khawaja Komal Ameer

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The emergence of antibiotic resistant bacterial pathogens is becoming a major challenge for patient care. The utilization of alternative therapies for infectious diseases other than antibiotics is an urgent need of today medical practice. The utilization of lytic bacteriophages and their gene products as therapeutic agents against antibiotic resistant bacteria is one of the convincing alternative approaches. Here we present the isolation and characterization of three lytic bacteriophages TSE1-3 against Enterobacter cloacae from sewage effluent. The isolates maintained antibacterial activity for 10 hours of incubation followed by the development of phage resistance. Their stability at different temperatures and pH, established their possible application in phage therapy. The highest activity of the phages was observed at 37°C and pH 7.0, while they gave lytic activity up to 60°C. The latent period of all the TSE phages was 20 minutes, while the burst size was 360 for TSE1, 270 for TSE2 and 311 for TSE3. The phages were harboring double-stranded DNA larger than 12kb in size. Further research into the phages genome and proteins, animal experiments, delivery parameters and clinical trials may lead to their utilization in phage therapy.

  6. Using a bacteriocin structure to engineer a phage lysin that targets Yersinia pestis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukacik, Petra; Barnard, Travis J; Buchanan, Susan K

    2012-12-01

    Purified phage lysins present an alternative to traditional antibiotics and work by hydrolysing peptidoglycan. Phage lysins have been developed against Gram-positive pathogens such as Bacillus anthracis and Streptococcus pneumoniae, where the peptidoglycan layer is exposed on the cell surface. Addition of the lysin to a bacterial culture results in rapid death of the organism. Gram-negative bacteria are resistant to phage lysins because they contain an outer membrane that protects the peptidoglycan from degradation. We solved crystal structures of a Yersinia pestis outer-membrane protein and the bacteriocin that targets it, which informed engineering of a bacterial-phage hybrid lysin that can be transported across the outer membrane to kill specific Gram-negative bacteria. This work provides a template for engineering phage lysins against a wide variety of bacterial pathogens.

  7. Influence of environmental factors on phage-bacteria interaction and on the efficacy and infectivity of phage P100

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    Susanne Fister

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available When using bacteriophages to control food-borne bacteria in food production plants and processed food, it is crucial to consider that environmental conditions influence their stability. These conditions can also affect the physiological state of bacteria and consequently host-virus interaction and the effectiveness of the phage ability to reduce bacteria numbers. In this study we investigated the stability, binding and replication capability of phage P100 and its efficacy to control L. monocytogenes under conditions typically encountered in dairy plants. The influences of SDS, Lutensol AO 7, salt, smear water and different temperatures were investigated. Results indicate that phage P100 is stable and able to bind to the host under most conditions tested. Replication was dependent upon the growth of L. monocytogenes and efficacy was higher when bacterial growth was reduced by certain environmental conditions. In long-term experiments at different temperatures phages were initially able to reduce bacteria up to seven log10 units after two weeks at 4 °C. However, thereafter re-growth and development of phage-resistant L. monocytogenes isolates were encountered.

  8. Dynamics of success and failure in phage and antibiotic therapy in experimental infections

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    Walker Nina

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In 1982 Smith and Huggins showed that bacteriophages could be at least as effective as antibiotics in preventing mortality from experimental infections with a capsulated E. coli (K1 in mice. Phages that required the K1 capsule for infection were more effective than phages that did not require this capsule, but the efficacies of phages and antibiotics in preventing mortality both declined with time between infection and treatment, becoming virtually ineffective within 16 hours. Results We develop quantitative microbiological procedures that (1 explore the in vivo processes responsible for the efficacy of phage and antibiotic treatment protocols in experimental infections (the Resistance Competition Assay, or RCA, and (2 survey the therapeutic potential of phages in vitro (the Phage Replication Assay or PRA. We illustrate the application and utility of these methods in a repetition of Smith and Huggins' experiments, using the E. coli K1 mouse thigh infection model, and applying treatments of phages or streptomycin. Conclusions 1 The Smith and Huggins phage and antibiotic therapy results are quantitatively and qualitatively robust. (2 Our RCA values reflect the microbiological efficacies of the different phages and of streptomycin in preventing mortality, and reflect the decline in their efficacy with a delay in treatment. These results show specifically that bacteria become refractory to treatment over the term of infection. (3 The K1-specific and non-specific phages had similar replication rates on bacteria grown in broth (based on the PRA, but the K1-specific phage had markedly greater replication rates in mouse serum.

  9. Evolving interactions between diazotrophic cyanobacterium and phage mediate nitrogen release and host competitive ability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coloma, Sebastián; Sivonen, Kaarina

    2016-01-01

    Interactions between nitrogen-fixing (i.e. diazotrophic) cyanobacteria and their viruses, cyanophages, can have large-scale ecosystem effects. These effects are mediated by temporal alterations in nutrient availability in aquatic systems owing to the release of nitrogen and carbon sources from cells lysed by phages, as well as by ecologically important changes in the diversity and fitness of cyanobacterial populations that evolve in the presence of phages. However, ecological and evolutionary feedbacks between phages and nitrogen-fixing cyanobacteria are still relative poorly understood. Here, we used an experimental evolution approach to test the effect of interactions between a common filamentous, nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium (Nodularia sp.) and its phage on cellular nitrogen release and host properties. Ecological, community-level effects of phage-mediated nitrogen release were tested with a phytoplankton bioassay. We found that cyanobacterial nitrogen release increased significantly as a result of viral lysis, which was associated with enhanced growth of phytoplankton species in cell-free filtrates compared with phage-resistant host controls in which lysis and subsequent nutrient release did not occur after phage exposure. We also observed an ecologically important change among phage-evolved cyanobacteria with phage-resistant phenotypes, a short-filamentous morphotype with reduced buoyancy compared with the ancestral long-filamentous morphotype. Reduced buoyancy might decrease the ability of these morphotypes to compete for light compared with longer, more buoyant filaments. Together, these findings demonstrate the potential of cyanobacteria–phage interactions to affect ecosystem biogeochemical cycles and planktonic community dynamics. PMID:28083116

  10. Characterization of temperate phages infecting Clostridium difficile isolates of human and animal origins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekulovic, Ognjen; Garneau, Julian R; Néron, Audrey; Fortier, Louis-Charles

    2014-04-01

    Clostridium difficile is a Gram-positive pathogen infecting humans and animals. Recent studies suggest that animals could represent potential reservoirs of C. difficile that could then transfer to humans. Temperate phages contribute to the evolution of most bacteria, for example, by promoting the transduction of virulence, fitness, and antibiotic resistance genes. In C. difficile, little is known about their role, mainly because suitable propagating hosts and conditions are lacking. Here we report the isolation, propagation, and preliminary characterization of nine temperate phages from animal and human C. difficile isolates. Prophages were induced by UV light from 58 C. difficile isolates of animal and human origins. Using soft agar overlays with 27 different C. difficile test strains, we isolated and further propagated nine temperate phages: two from horse isolates (ΦCD481-1 and ΦCD481-2), three from dog isolates (ΦCD505, ΦCD506, and ΦCD508), and four from human isolates (ΦCD24-2, ΦCD111, ΦCD146, and ΦCD526). Two phages are members of the Siphoviridae family (ΦCD111 and ΦCD146), while the others are Myoviridae phages. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and restriction enzyme analyses showed that all of the phages had unique double-stranded DNA genomes of 30 to 60 kb. Phages induced from human C. difficile isolates, especially the members of the Siphoviridae family, had a broader host range than phages from animal C. difficile isolates. Nevertheless, most of the phages could infect both human and animal strains. Phage transduction of antibiotic resistance was recently reported in C. difficile. Our findings therefore call for further investigation of the potential risk of transduction between animal and human C. difficile isolates.

  11. Molecular Mapping of a Stripe Rust Resistance Gene YrH9020a Transferred from Psathyrostachys huashanica Keng on Wheat Chromosome 6D

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Ze-guang; YAO Wei-yuan; SHEN Xue-xue; CHAO Kai-xiang; FAN Yu; LI Min-zhou; WANG Bao-tong; LI Qiang; JING Jin-xue

    2014-01-01

    Stripe rust (yellow rust), caused by Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici (Pst), is one of the most devastating diseases of wheat throughout the world. H9020-1-6-8-3 is a translocation line originally developed from interspeciifc hybridization between wheat line 7182 and Psathyrostachys huashanica Keng and is resistant to most Pst races in China. To identify the resistance gene(s) in the translocation line, H9020-1-6-8-3 was crossed with susceptible cultivar Mingxian 169, and seedlings of the parents, F1, F2, F3, and BC1 generations were tested with prevalent Chinese Pst race CYR32 under controlled greenhouse conditions. The results indicated that there is a single dominant gene, temporarily designated as YrH9020a, conferring resistance to CYR32. The resistance gene was mapped by the F2 population from Mingxian 169/H9020-1-6-8-3. It was linked to six microsatellite markers, including Xbarc196, Xbarc202, Xbarc96, Xgpw4372, Xbarc21, and Xgdm141, lfanked by Xbarc96 and Xbarc202 with at 4.5 and 8.3 cM, respectively. Based on the chromosomal locations of these markers and the test of Chinese Spring (CS) nullitetrasomic and ditelosomic lines, the gene was assigned to chromosome 6D. According to the origin and the chromosomal location, YrH9020a might be a new resistance gene to stripe rust. The lfanking markers linked to YrH9020a could be useful for marker-assisted selection in breeding programs.

  12. Transcription of the phage-encoded Panton-Valentine leukocidin of Staphylococcus aureus is dependent on the phage life-cycle and on the host background.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirtz, Christiane; Witte, Wolfgang; Wolz, Christiane; Goerke, Christiane

    2009-11-01

    Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) is a pore-forming, bi-component toxin secreted by Staphylococcus aureus strains epidemiologically associated with diseases such as necrotizing pneumonia and skin and soft-tissue infections. Here we demonstrate that transcription of the phage-encoded PVL (encoded in the luk-PV operon) is dependent on two major determinants: the phage life-cycle and the host chromosomal background. Mitomycin C induction of PVL-encoding prophages from different community-acquired MRSA strains led to an increase in the amount of luk-PV mRNA as a result of read-through transcription from latent phage promoters and an increase in phage copy numbers. Failing prophage excision was reflected in a constant expression of luk-PV as in the case of strain USA300, suggesting that phi Sa2USA300 is a replication-defective prophage. Additionally, we could show that luk-PV transcription is influenced by the S. aureus global virulence regulators agr and sae. We found a strong impact of the host background on prophage induction and replication when analysing PVL phages in different S. aureus strains. For example phage phi Sa2mw was greatly induced by mitomycin C in its native host MW2 and in strain Newman but to a considerably lesser extent in strains 8325-4, RN6390 and ISP479c. This discrepancy was not linked to the SOS response of the bacteria since recA transcription did not vary between the strains. These results suggest a fine tuning between certain phages and their host, with major impact on the expression of phage-encoded virulence genes.

  13. A Novel erm(44) Gene Variant from a Human Staphylococcus saprophyticus Isolate Confers Resistance to Macrolides and Lincosamides but Not Streptogramins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauss, Christian; Hu, Yanmin; Coates, Anthony; Perreten, Vincent

    2017-01-01

    A novel erm(44) gene variant, erm(44)v, has been identified by whole-genome sequencing in a Staphylococcus saprophyticus isolate from the skin of a healthy person. It has the particularity to confer resistance to macrolides and lincosamides but not to streptogramin B when expressed in S. aureus The erm(44)v gene resides on a 19,400-bp genomic island which contains phage-associated proteins and is integrated into the chromosome of S. saprophyticus.

  14. Screening of Phage-Resistant Tryptophanase Genetic Engineering Strains%抗噬菌体色氨酸酶基因工程菌的筛选

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梅运军; 牟艳华; 石德太; 胡纯; 王文清

    2012-01-01

    利用自发突变、紫外诱变、协同进化、紫外耦合协同进化4种方法对色氨酸酶基因工程菌WD0801进行了抗噬菌体筛选.结果表明紫外耦合协同进化法具有较好的筛选效果,筛选的42株稳定遗传的抗性菌株中有23株的长势高于出发株,11株的酶活优于出发株.%4 methods, spontaneous mutation,UV mutagenesis,co-evolution,UV coupled co-evolution, were employed to screen EscheTichia coli tryptophanase genetic engineering strains. The results showed that the screening efficiency of UV-coupled co-evolution method was the best. Among the 42 stable phage—resistant strains screened out, the growth vigor of 23 strains, and enzyme activity of 11 strains were higher than the original strain.

  15. The T7-related Pseudomonas putida phage φ15 displays virion-associated biofilm degradation properties.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anneleen Cornelissen

    Full Text Available Formation of a protected biofilm environment is recognized as one of the major causes of the increasing antibiotic resistance development and emphasizes the need to develop alternative antibacterial strategies, like phage therapy. This study investigates the in vitro degradation of single-species Pseudomonas putida biofilms, PpG1 and RD5PR2, by the novel phage ϕ15, a 'T7-like virus' with a virion-associated exopolysaccharide (EPS depolymerase. Phage ϕ15 forms plaques surrounded by growing opaque halo zones, indicative for EPS degradation, on seven out of 53 P. putida strains. The absence of haloes on infection resistant strains suggests that the EPS probably act as a primary bacterial receptor for phage infection. Independent of bacterial strain or biofilm age, a time and dose dependent response of ϕ15-mediated biofilm degradation was observed with generally a maximum biofilm degradation 8 h after addition of the higher phage doses (10(4 and 10(6 pfu and resistance development after 24 h. Biofilm age, an in vivo very variable parameter, reduced markedly phage-mediated degradation of PpG1 biofilms, while degradation of RD5PR2 biofilms and ϕ15 amplification were unaffected. Killing of the planktonic culture occurred in parallel with but was always more pronounced than biofilm degradation, accentuating the need for evaluating phages for therapeutic purposes in biofilm conditions. EPS degrading activity of recombinantly expressed viral tail spike was confirmed by capsule staining. These data suggests that the addition of high initial titers of specifically selected phages with a proper EPS depolymerase are crucial criteria in the development of phage therapy.

  16. Fine-scale genetic characterization of Plasmodium falciparum chromosome 7 encompassing the antigenic var and the drug-resistant pfcrt genes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ruchi Bajaj; Sujata Mohanty; A. P. Dash; Aparup Das

    2008-04-01

    The fact that malaria is still an uncontrolled disease is reflected by the genetic organization of the parasite genome. Efforts to curb malaria should begin with proper understanding of the mechanism by which the parasites evade human immune system and evolve resistance to different antimalarial drugs. We have initiated such a study and presented herewith the results from the in silico understanding of a seventh chromosomal region of the malarial parasite Plasmodium falciparum encompassing the antigenic var genes (coding pfemp1) and the drug-resistant gene pfcrt located at a specified region of the chromosome 7. We found 60 genes of various functions and lengths, majority (61.67%) of them were performing known functions. Almost all the genes have orthologs in other four species of Plasmodium, of which P. chabaudi seems to be the closest to P. falciparum. However, only two genes were found to be paralogous. Interestingly, the drug-resistant gene, pfcrt was found to be surrounded by seven genes coding for several CG proteins out of which six were reported to be responsible for providing drug resistance to P. vivax. The intergenic regions, in this specified region were generally large in size, majority (73%) of them were of more than 500 nucleotide bp length. We also designed primers for amplification of 21 noncoding DNA fragments in the whole region for estimating genetic diversity and inferring the evolutionary history of this region of P. falciparum genome.

  17. Complete Genome Sequence of Vibrio anguillarum Phage CHOED Successfully Used for Phage Therapy in Aquaculture

    OpenAIRE

    Romero, Jaime; Higuera, Gastón; Gajardo,Felipe; Castillo, Daniel; Middleboe, Mathias; García, Katherine; Ramírez, Carolina; Espejo, Romilio T.

    2014-01-01

    Vibrio anguillarum phage CHOED was isolated from Chilean mussels. It is a virulent phage showing effective inhibition of V. anguillarum. CHOED has potential in phage therapy, because it can protect fish from vibriosis in fish farms. Here, we announce the completely sequenced genome of V. anguillarum phage CHOED.

  18. Chromosomal integration of a cephalosporinase gene from Acinetobacter baumannii into Oligella urethralis as a source of acquired resistance to beta-lactams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mammeri, Hedi; Poirel, Laurent; Mangeney, Nicole; Nordmann, Patrice

    2003-05-01

    Clinical Oligella urethralis isolate COH-1, which was uncommonly resistant to penicillins and narrow-spectrum cephalosporins, was recovered from a 55-year-old patient with a urinary tract infection. Shotgun cloning into Escherichia coli and expression experiments gave recombinant clones expressing either an AmpC beta-lactamase-type phenotype of resistance or a carbenicillin-hydrolyzing beta-lactamase-type phenotype of resistance. The AmpC beta-lactamase identified (ABA-1), which had a pI value of 8.2, had 98% amino acid identity with a chromosomally encoded cephalosporinase of Acinetobacter baumannii. A 820-bp insertion sequence element, ISOur1, belonging to the IS6 family of insertion sequence elements, was identified immediately upstream of bla(ABA-1), providing a -35 promoter sequence and likely giving rise to a hybrid promoter region. The carbenicillin-hydrolyzing beta-lactamase identified (CARB-8), which had a pI value of 6.4, differed from CARB-5 by two amino acid substitutions. Hybridization of CeuI fragment I-restricted DNA fragments of O. urethralis COH-1 with bla(ABA-1)-, bla(CARB-8)-, and 16S rRNA-specific probes indicated the chromosomal integration of the beta-lactamase genes. PCR and hybridization experiments failed to detect bla(CARB-8)- and bla(ABA-1)-like genes in three O. urethralis reference strains, indicating that the beta-lactamase genes identified were the source of acquired resistance in O. urethralis COH-1. This is one of the few examples of the interspecies transfer and the chromosomal integration of a gene encoding a naturally occurring beta-lactamase.

  19. Linkage relationships among multiple QTL for horticultural traits and late blight (P. infestans) resistance on chromosome 5 introgressed from wild tomato Solanum habrochaites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haggard, J Erron; Johnson, Emily B; St Clair, Dina A

    2013-12-09

    When the allele of a wild species at a quantitative trait locus (QTL) conferring a desirable trait is introduced into cultivated species, undesirable effects on other traits may occur. These negative phenotypic effects may result from the presence of wild alleles at other closely linked loci that are transferred along with the desired QTL allele (i.e., linkage drag) and/or from pleiotropic effects of the desired allele. Previously, a QTL for resistance to Phytophthora infestans on chromosome 5 of Solanum habrochaites was mapped and introgressed into cultivated tomato (S. lycopersicum). Near-isogenic lines (NILs) were generated and used for fine-mapping of this resistance QTL, which revealed coincident or linked QTL with undesirable effects on yield, maturity, fruit size, and plant architecture traits. Subsequent higher-resolution mapping with chromosome 5 sub-NILs revealed the presence of multiple P. infestans resistance QTL within this 12.3 cM region. In our present study, these sub-NILs were also evaluated for 17 horticultural traits, including yield, maturity, fruit size and shape, fruit quality, and plant architecture traits in replicated field experiments over the course of two years. Each previously detected single horticultural trait QTL fractionated into two or more QTL. A total of 41 QTL were detected across all traits, with ∼30% exhibiting significant QTL × environment interactions. Colocation of QTL for multiple traits suggests either pleiotropy or tightly linked genes control these traits. The complex genetic architecture of horticultural and P. infestans resistance trait QTL within this S. habrochaites region of chromosome 5 presents challenges and opportunities for breeding efforts in cultivated tomato.

  20. Phage Therapy: Eco-Physiological Pharmacology

    OpenAIRE

    Abedon, Stephen T.

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial virus use as antibacterial agents, in the guise of what is commonly known as phage therapy, is an inherently physiological, ecological, and also pharmacological process. Physiologically we can consider metabolic properties of phage infections of bacteria and variation in those properties as a function of preexisting bacterial states. In addition, there are patient responses to pathogenesis, patient responses to phage infections of pathogens, and also patient responses to phage virio...

  1. Genetic background specific hypoxia resistance in rat is correlated with balanced activation of a cross-chromosomal genetic network centering on physiological homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei eMao

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Genetic background of an individual can drastically influence an organism’s response upon environmental stress and pathological stimulus. Previous studies in inbred rats showed that compared to Brown Norway (BN, Dahl salt-sensitive (SS rat exerts strong hypoxia susceptibility. However, despite extensive narrow-down approaches via the chromosome substitution methodology, this genome-based physiological predisposition could not be traced back to distinct quantitative trait loci. Upon the completion and public data availability of PhysGen SS-BN consomic rat platform, I employed systems biology approach attempting to further our understanding of the molecular basis of genetic background effect in light of hypoxia response. I analyzed the physiological screening data of 22 consomic rat strains under normoxia and two-weeks of hypoxia, and cross-compared them to the parental strains. The analyses showed that SS-9BN and SS-18BN represent the most hypoxia resistant CS strains with phenotype similar to BN, whereas SS-6BN and SS-YBN segregated to the direction of SS. A meta-analysis on the transcriptomic profiles of these consomic rat strains under hypoxia treatment showed that although polymorphisms on the substituted BN chromosomes could be directly involved in hypoxia resistance, this seems to be embedded in a more complex trans-chromosomal genetic regulatory network. Via information theory based modeling approach, this hypoxia-relevant core genetic network was reverse-engineered. Network analyses showed that the protective effects of BN chromosome 9 and 18 were reflected by a balanced activation of this core network centering on physiological homeostasis. Presumably, it is the system robustness constituted on such differential network activation that acts as hypoxia response modifier. Understanding of the intrinsic link between the individual genetic background and the network robustness will set a basis in the current scientific efforts toward

  2. Genetic Background Specific Hypoxia Resistance in Rat is Correlated with Balanced Activation of a Cross-Chromosomal Genetic Network Centering on Physiological Homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Lei

    2012-01-01

    Genetic background of an individual can drastically influence an organism's response upon environmental stress and pathological stimulus. Previous studies in inbred rats showed that compared to Brown Norway (BN), Dahl salt-sensitive (SS) rat exerts strong hypoxia susceptibility. However, despite extensive narrow-down approaches via the chromosome substitution methodology, this genome-based physiological predisposition could not be traced back to distinct quantitative trait loci. Upon the completion and public data availability of PhysGen SS-BN consomic (CS) rat platform, I employed systems biology approach attempting to further our understanding of the molecular basis of genetic background effect in light of hypoxia response. I analyzed the physiological screening data of 22 CS rat strains under normoxia and 2-weeks of hypoxia, and cross-compared them to the parental strains. The analyses showed that SS-9(BN) and SS-18(BN) represent the most hypoxia-resistant CS strains with phenotype similar to BN, whereas SS-6(BN) and SS-Y(BN) segregated to the direction of SS. A meta-analysis on the transcriptomic profiles of these CS rat strains under hypoxia treatment showed that although polymorphisms on the substituted BN chromosomes could be directly involved in hypoxia resistance, this seems to be embedded in a more complex trans-chromosomal genetic regulatory network. Via information theory based modeling approach, this hypoxia relevant core genetic network was reverse engineered. Network analyses showed that the protective effects of BN chromosome 9 and 18 were reflected by a balanced activation of this core network centering on physiological homeostasis. Presumably, it is the system robustness constituted on such differential network activation that acts as hypoxia response modifier. Understanding of the intrinsic link between the individual genetic background and the network robustness will set a basis in the current scientific efforts toward personalized medicine.

  3. Synthetic Phage for Tissue Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    So Young Yoo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Controlling structural organization and signaling motif display is of great importance to design the functional tissue regenerating materials. Synthetic phage, genetically engineered M13 bacteriophage has been recently introduced as novel tissue regeneration materials to display a high density of cell-signaling peptides on their major coat proteins for tissue regeneration purposes. Structural advantages of their long-rod shape and monodispersity can be taken together to construct nanofibrous scaffolds which support cell proliferation and differentiation as well as direct orientation of their growth in two or three dimensions. This review demonstrated how functional synthetic phage is designed and subsequently utilized for tissue regeneration that offers potential cell therapy.

  4. Comparative sequence analysis of Solanum and Arabidopsis in a hot spot for pathogen resistance on potato chromosome V reveals a patchwork of conserved and rapidly evolving genome segments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruggmann Rémy

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Quantitative phenotypic variation of agronomic characters in crop plants is controlled by environmental and genetic factors (quantitative trait loci = QTL. To understand the molecular basis of such QTL, the identification of the underlying genes is of primary interest and DNA sequence analysis of the genomic regions harboring QTL is a prerequisite for that. QTL mapping in potato (Solanum tuberosum has identified a region on chromosome V tagged by DNA markers GP21 and GP179, which contains a number of important QTL, among others QTL for resistance to late blight caused by the oomycete Phytophthora infestans and to root cyst nematodes. Results To obtain genomic sequence for the targeted region on chromosome V, two local BAC (bacterial artificial chromosome contigs were constructed and sequenced, which corresponded to parts of the homologous chromosomes of the diploid, heterozygous genotype P6/210. Two contiguous sequences of 417,445 and 202,781 base pairs were assembled and annotated. Gene-by-gene co-linearity was disrupted by non-allelic insertions of retrotransposon elements, stretches of diverged intergenic sequences, differences in gene content and gene order. The latter was caused by inversion of a 70 kbp genomic fragment. These features were also found in comparison to orthologous sequence contigs from three homeologous chromosomes of Solanum demissum, a wild tuber bearing species. Functional annotation of the sequence identified 48 putative open reading frames (ORF in one contig and 22 in the other, with an average of one ORF every 9 kbp. Ten ORFs were classified as resistance-gene-like, 11 as F-box-containing genes, 13 as transposable elements and three as transcription factors. Comparing potato to Arabidopsis thaliana annotated proteins revealed five micro-syntenic blocks of three to seven ORFs with A. thaliana chromosomes 1, 3 and 5. Conclusion Comparative sequence analysis revealed highly conserved collinear regions

  5. Phage type and sensitivity to antibiotics of Staphylococcus aureus film-forming strains isolated from airway mucosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. S. Voronkova

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Today film-forming strains of bacteria play very important role in clinical pathology. Staphylococci are ones of most dangerous of them. This bacteria can determine different pathological processes, for example, complication of airway mucosa. The ability to form a biofilm is one of the main properties of nosocomial strains. These strains should be monitored and their carriers are to be properly treated. To determine the origin of staphylococci strains we used bacteriophages from the International kit. The aim of research was to determine the phage type of staphylococci film-forming strains, that were isolated from naso-pharingial mucosa. Phage typing has been carried out for 16 film-forming strains of S. aureus. To solve this problem, we used the International phage kit by Fisher’s method. As a result, sensitivity to phages from the International kit showed 53.8% of studied strains of S. aureus. 64.3% of sensitivity strains were lysed by one of the phage, 21.4% – were by two of the phages, 14.3% – by three of the phages. Isolates were sensitive to phages: 81 – 42.9%, 75 – 35.7%, 28.6% were sensitive to phages 47 and 53. All cases of detection of sensitivity to phage 47 coincided with the ability to form biofilm. Among non-film-forming strains there was no sensitive strains for this phage. Film-forming strains resist to erythromycin (62.5%, ciprofloxacin (43.8%, gentamicin (56.3%, tetracycline (87.5%, amoxicillin (93.8%, and cefuroxime (37.5%. All cases of sensitivity to phage 47 coincided with resistance to erythromycin, amoxicillin and tetracycline. For two of these strains, we also defined resistance to gentamicin and for one of them – to ciprofloxacin. Results of research allowed to relate the bacterial cultures for determining the type. This may have implications for studying of film-forming ability, because surface structures of bacterial cell take place in this process. Belonging of an isolate to specific phage type may

  6. Isolation of New Stenotrophomonas Bacteriophages and Genomic Characterization of Temperate Phage S1▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Pilar; Monjardín, Cristina; Martín, Rebeca; Madera, Carmen; Soberón, Nora; Garcia, Eva; Meana, Álvaro; Suárez, Juan E.

    2008-01-01

    Twenty-two phages that infect Stenotrophomonas species were isolated through sewage enrichment and prophage induction. Of them, S1, S3, and S4 were selected due to their wide host ranges compared to those of the other phages. S1 and S4 are temperate siphoviruses, while S3 is a virulent myovirus. The genomes of S3 and S4, about 33 and 200 kb, were resistant to restriction digestion. The lytic cycles lasted 30 min for S3 and about 75 min for S1 and S4. The burst size for S3 was 100 virions/cell, while S1 and S4 produced about 75 virus particles/cell. The frequency of bacteriophage-insensitive host mutants, calculated by dividing the number of surviving colonies by the bacterial titer of a parallel, uninfected culture, ranged between 10−5 and 10−6 for S3 and 10−3 and 10−4 for S1 and S4. The 40,287-bp genome of S1 contains 48 open reading frames (ORFs) and 12-bp 5′ protruding cohesive ends. By using a combination of bioinformatics and experimental evidence, functions were ascribed to 21 ORFs. The morphogenetic and lysis modules are well-conserved, but no lysis-lysogeny switch or DNA replication gene clusters were recognized. Two major clusters of genes with respect to transcriptional orientation were observed. Interspersed among them were lysogenic conversion genes encoding phosphoadenosine phosphosulfate reductase and GspM, a protein involved in the general secretion system II. The attP site of S1 may be located within a gene that presents over 75% homology to a Stenotrophomonas chromosomal determinant. PMID:18952876

  7. Staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec characterization of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains isolated at the military hospital of Constantine/Algeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouchenane, Z; Agabou, A; Smati, F; Rolain, J-M; Raoult, D

    2013-12-01

    Staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec is a genetic mobile element that carries the gene mecA mediating the methicillin resistance in staphylococci. The aim of this study is to type the Staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) in 64 non-redundant methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains recovered at the military hospital of Constantine (Algeria) between 2005 and 2007. Methicillin resistance was detected by oxacillin and cefoxitin discs and PBP2a test, and then confirmed by mecA PCR. The SCCmec complex types were determined by real time PCR. The analysis showed that 50 isolates were hospital acquired (HA-MRSA) and 14 were community-acquired (CA-MRSA). SCCmec type IV and V (traditionally attributed to CA-MRSA) were harbored by both HA-MRSA and CA-MRSA, while SCCmec type I, II and III were not recorded. These findings motivate more investigations to be carried on HA-MRSA in our hospital and other national health care centers.

  8. Loss of plasmids containing cloned inserts coding for novobiocin resistance or novobiocin sensitivity in Haemophilus influenzae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Setlow, J.K.; Spikes, D.; Ledbetter, M.

    1984-06-01

    Plasmids pNov1 and pNov1s, coding for resistance and sensitivity to novobiocin, respectively, were readily lost from wild-type Haemophilus influenzae but retained in a strain lacking an inducible defective prophage. The plasmid loss could be partly or wholly eliminated by a low-copy-number mutation in the plasmid or by the presence of certain antibiotic resistance markers in the host chromosome. Release of both phage HP1c1, measured by plaque assay, and defective phage, measured by electron microscopy, was increased when the plasmids were present. The frequency of recombination between pNov1 and the chromosome, causing the plasmid to be converted to pNov1s, could under some circumstances be decreased from the normal 60 to 70% to below 10% by the presence of a kanamycin resistance marker in the chromosome. This suggested that a gene product coded for by the plasmid, the expression of which was affected by the kanamycin resistance marker, was responsible for the high recombination frequency. Evidence was obtained from in vitro experiments that the gene product was a gyrase.

  9. Formation of biofilms under phage predation: considerations concerning a biofilm increase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseinidoust, Zeinab; Tufenkji, Nathalie; van de Ven, Theo G M

    2013-01-01

    Bacteriophages are emerging as strong candidates for combating bacterial biofilms. However, reports indicating that host populations can, in some cases, respond to phage predation by an increase in biofilm formation are of concern. This study investigates whether phage predation can enhance the formation of biofilm and if so, if this phenomenon is governed by the emergence of phage-resistance or by non-evolutionary mechanisms (eg spatial refuge). Single-species biofilms of three bacterial pathogens (Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium, and Staphylococcus aureus) were pretreated and post-treated with species-specific phages. Some of the phage treatments resulted in an increase in the levels of biofilm of their host. It is proposed that the phenotypic change brought about by acquiring phage resistance is the main reason for the increase in the level of biofilm of P. aeruginosa. For biofilms of S. aureus and S. enterica Typhimurium, although resistance was detected, increased formation of biofilm appeared to be a result of non-evolutionary mechanisms.

  10. Salmonella spp. in raw broiler parts: occurrence, antimicrobial resistance profile and phage typing of the Salmonella Enteritidis isolates Salmonella spp. em cortes de frango: ocorrência, resistência antimicrobiana e fagotipificação dos isolados de Salmonella Enteritidis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aldemir Reginato Ribeiro

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The present study was carried out to evaluate the occurrence of Salmonellae in raw broiler parts and to determine the antimicrobial resistance profile of the isolated strains. Twenty-four (39.3% broiler parts samples were positive for Salmonella and twenty-five Salmonella strains were isolated, since two different serovars were detected in one single positive sample. Salmonella Enteritidis was the most prevalent serovar. Among Salmonella Enteritidis isolates, 95.2% belonged to Phage Type 4 (PT4 (20/21 and 4.8% to PT7 (1/21. Twenty-two (88% strains of Salmonella were resistant to at least one antimicrobial agent, generating eight different resistance patterns. The S. Typhimurium (n: 1 and S. Hadar (n: 3 isolates presented multiple resistance. Three S. Enteritidis isolates were susceptible to all antimicrobials tested, two were resistant only to tetracycline. The high prevalence of Salmonella in the broiler parts strenghtens the importance of the use of good manufacturing practices (GMP, and HACCP. The results also emphasize the need for the responsible use of antimicrobials in animal production.Este trabalho foi conduzido para avaliar a ocorrência de Salmonella em cortes de frango e para determinar o perfil de resistência antimicrobiana das cepas isoladas. Vinte e quatro (39,3% cortes de frango foram positivas para Salmonella, tendo sido isoladas vinte e cinco cepas de Salmonella, uma vez que em uma amostra isolaram-se dois sorovares. Salmonella Enteritidis foi o sorovar prevalente. Entre as Salmonella Enteritidis isoladas, 95,2% pertencem ao Fagotipo 4 (PT4 (20/21 e 4,8% ao PT7 (1/21. Vinte e duas (88% cepas de Salmonella foram resistentes a pelo menos um agente antimicrobiano e oito diferentes padrões de resistência foram observados. S. Typhimurium (n:1 e S. Hadar (n: 3, apresentaram múltipla resistência. Três cepas de S. Enteritidis foram sensíveis a todos os antimicrobianos e duas resistentes somente a tetraciclina. A elevada ocorr

  11. Genetic Evidence for O-Specific Antigen as Receptor of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Phage K8 and Its Genomic Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuewei ePan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Phage therapy requires the comprehensive understanding of the mechanisms underlying the host-phage interactions. In this work, to identify the genes related to Pseudomonas aeruginosa phage K8 receptor synthesis, 16 phage-resistant mutants were selected from a Tn5G transposon mutant library of strain PAK. The disrupted genetic loci were identified and they were related to O-specific antigen (OSA synthesis, including gene wbpR, ssg, wbpV, wbpO, and Y880_RS05480, which encoded a putative O-antigen polymerase Wzy. The LPS profile of the Y880_RS05480 mutant was analyzed and shown to lack the O-antigen. Therefore, the data from characterization of Y880_RS05480 by TMHMM and SDS-PAGE silver staining analysis suggest that this locus might encode Wzy. The complete phage K8 genome was characterized as 93879 bp in length and contained identical 1188-bp terminal direct repeats. Comparative genomic analysis showed that phage K8 was highly homologous to members of the genus PaP1-like phages. On the basis of our genetic findings, OSA of P. aeruginosa PAK is proven to be the receptor of phage K8. The highly conserved structural proteins among the genetic closely related phages suggest that they may recognize the same receptor.

  12. Challenging packaging limits and infectivity of phage {\\lambda}

    CERN Document Server

    Nurmemmedov, Elmar; Medina, Elizabeth; Catalano, Carlos Enrique; Evilevitch, Alex

    2011-01-01

    The terminase motors of bacteriophages have been shown to be among the strongest active machines in the biomolecular world, being able to package several tens of kilobase pairs of viral genome into a capsid within minutes. Yet these motors are hindered at the end of the packaging process by the progressive build-up of a force resisting packaging associated with already packaged DNA. In this experimental work, we raise the issue of what sets the upper limit on the length of the genome that can be packaged by the terminase motor of phage {\\lambda} and still yield infectious virions, and the conditions under which this can be efficiently performed. Using a packaging strategy developed in our laboratory of building phage {\\lambda} from scratch, together with plaque assay monitoring, we have been able to show that the terminase motor of phage {\\lambda} is able to produce infectious particles with up to 110% of the wild-type (WT) {\\lambda}-DNA length. However, the phage production rate, and thus the infectivity, de...

  13. Construction of a shuttle vector consisting of the Escherichia coli plasmid pACYC177 inserted into the Streptomyces cattleya phage TG1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foor, F; Morin, N

    1990-09-28

    The Escherichia coli plasmid, pACYC177, was inserted into the single PstI site of a deletion derivative of the Streptomyces cattleya phage, TG1. The hybrid molecule can be propagated as a phage in S. cattleya and as a plasmid in E. coli and is readily transferred between the two species by transfection and transformation. The kanamycin-resistance-encoding gene derived from pACYC177 is not expressed in lysogens of the hybrid phage. Analysis of deletion mutants of the hybrid phage indicated that at least 7.5 kb of phage DNA is dispensable. Some of the deletion mutants fail to lysogenize S. cattleya (Lyg- phenotype). The locations of these deletions are consistent with the location of the phage att site as previously established by Southern hybridization analysis. The thiostrepton-resistance-encoding gene derived from Streptomyces azureus was inserted into Lyg+ and Lyg- deletion derivatives and is expressed in S. cattleya.

  14. The habits of highly effective phages: population dynamics as a framework for identifying therapeutic phages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James J Bull

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The use of bacteriophages as antibacterial agents is being actively researched on a global scale. Typically, the phages used are isolated from the wild by plating on the bacteria of interest, and a far larger set of candidate phages is often available than can be used in any application. When an excess of phages is available, how should the best phages be identified? Here we consider phage-bacterial population dynamics as a basis for evaluating and predicting phage success. A central question is whether the innate dynamical properties of phages are the determinants of success, or instead, whether extrinsic, indirect effects can be responsible. We address the dynamical perspective, motivated in part by the absence of dynamics in previously suggested principles of phage therapy. Current mathematical models of bacterial-phage dynamics do not capture the realities of in vivo dynamics, nor is this likely to change, but they do give insight to qualitative properties that may be generalizable. In particular, phage adsorption rate may be critical to treatment success, so understanding the effects of the in vivo environment on host availability may allow prediction of useful phages prior to in vivo experimentation. Principles for predicting efficacy may be derived by developing a greater understanding of the in vivo system, or such principles could be determined empirically by comparing phages with known differences in their dynamic properties. The comparative approach promises to be a powerful method of discovering the key to phage success. We offer five recommendations for future study: (i compare phages differing in treatment efficacy to identify the phage properties associated with success, (ii assay dynamics in vivo, (iii understand mechanisms of bacterial escape from phages, (iv test phages in model infections that are relevant to the intended clinical applications, and (v develop new classes of models for phage growth in spatially heterogeneous

  15. PHAGE RESISTANT LACTIC ACID BACTERIAL MUTANTS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2001-01-01

    Method of obtaining mutated lactic acid bacteria having a reduced susceptibility towards attack by bacteriophages, the method comprising mutating a gene involved in the pyrimidine metabolism, including pyrG encoding CTP synthetase. Such lactic acid bacteria are useful in starter cultures...

  16. Staphylococcal pathogenicity island DNA packaging system involving cos-site packaging and phage-encoded HNH endonucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiles-Puchalt, Nuria; Carpena, Nuria; Alonso, Juan C; Novick, Richard P; Marina, Alberto; Penadés, José R

    2014-04-22

    Staphylococcal pathogenicity islands (SaPIs) are the prototypical members of a widespread family of chromosomally located mobile genetic elements that contribute substantially to intra- and interspecies gene transfer, host adaptation, and virulence. The key feature of their mobility is the induction of SaPI excision and replication by certain helper phages and their efficient encapsidation into phage-like infectious particles. Most SaPIs use the headful packaging mechanism and encode small terminase subunit (TerS) homologs that recognize the SaPI-specific pac site and determine SaPI packaging specificity. Several of the known SaPIs do not encode a recognizable TerS homolog but are nevertheless packaged efficiently by helper phages and transferred at high frequencies. In this report, we have characterized one of the non-terS-coding SaPIs, SaPIbov5, and found that it uses two different, undescribed packaging strategies. SaPIbov5 is packaged in full-sized phage-like particles either by typical pac-type helper phages, or by cos-type phages--i.e., it has both pac and cos sites--a configuration that has not hitherto been described for any mobile element, phages included--and uses the two different phage-coded TerSs. To our knowledge, this is the first example of SaPI packaging by a cos phage, and in this, it resembles the P4 plasmid of Escherichia coli. Cos-site packaging in Staphylococcus aureus is additionally unique in that it requires the HNH nuclease, carried only by cos phages, in addition to the large terminase subunit, for cos-site cleavage and melting.

  17. Marker chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Kiran Prabhaker; Belogolovkin, Victoria

    2013-04-01

    Marker chromosomes are a morphologically heterogeneous group of structurally abnormal chromosomes that pose a significant challenge in prenatal diagnosis. Phenotypes associated with marker chromosomes are highly variable and range from normal to severely abnormal. Clinical outcomes are very difficult to predict when marker chromosomes are detected prenatally. In this review, we outline the classification, etiology, cytogenetic characterization, and clinical consequences of marker chromosomes, as well as practical approaches to prenatal diagnosis and genetic counseling.

  18. Detection of Hereditary 1,25-Hydroxyvitamin D-Resistant Rickets Caused by Uniparental Disomy of Chromosome 12 Using Genome-Wide Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamura, Mayuko; Isojima, Tsuyoshi; Kawashima, Minae; Yoshida, Hideki; Yamamoto, Keiko; Kitaoka, Taichi; Namba, Noriyuki; Oka, Akira; Ozono, Keiichi; Tokunaga, Katsushi; Kitanaka, Sachiko

    2015-01-01

    Context Hereditary 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D-resistant rickets (HVDRR) is an autosomal recessive disease caused by biallelic mutations in the vitamin D receptor (VDR) gene. No patients have been reported with uniparental disomy (UPD). Objective Using genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array to confirm whether HVDRR was caused by UPD of chromosome 12. Materials and Methods A 2-year-old girl with alopecia and short stature and without any family history of consanguinity was diagnosed with HVDRR by typical laboratory data findings and clinical features of rickets. Sequence analysis of VDR was performed, and the origin of the homozygous mutation was investigated by target SNP sequencing, short tandem repeat analysis, and genome-wide SNP array. Results The patient had a homozygous p.Arg73Ter nonsense mutation. Her mother was heterozygous for the mutation, but her father was negative. We excluded gross deletion of the father’s allele or paternal discordance. Genome-wide SNP array of the family (the patient and her parents) showed complete maternal isodisomy of chromosome 12. She was successfully treated with high-dose oral calcium. Conclusions This is the first report of HVDRR caused by UPD, and the third case of complete UPD of chromosome 12, in the published literature. Genome-wide SNP array was useful for detecting isodisomy and the parental origin of the allele. Comprehensive examination of the homozygous state is essential for accurate genetic counseling of recurrence risk and appropriate monitoring for other chromosome 12 related disorders. Furthermore, oral calcium therapy was effective as an initial treatment for rickets in this instance. PMID:26153892

  19. Detection of Hereditary 1,25-Hydroxyvitamin D-Resistant Rickets Caused by Uniparental Disomy of Chromosome 12 Using Genome-Wide Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Array.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayuko Tamura

    Full Text Available Hereditary 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D-resistant rickets (HVDRR is an autosomal recessive disease caused by biallelic mutations in the vitamin D receptor (VDR gene. No patients have been reported with uniparental disomy (UPD.Using genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP array to confirm whether HVDRR was caused by UPD of chromosome 12.A 2-year-old girl with alopecia and short stature and without any family history of consanguinity was diagnosed with HVDRR by typical laboratory data findings and clinical features of rickets. Sequence analysis of VDR was performed, and the origin of the homozygous mutation was investigated by target SNP sequencing, short tandem repeat analysis, and genome-wide SNP array.The patient had a homozygous p.Arg73Ter nonsense mutation. Her mother was heterozygous for the mutation, but her father was negative. We excluded gross deletion of the father's allele or paternal discordance. Genome-wide SNP array of the family (the patient and her parents showed complete maternal isodisomy of chromosome 12. She was successfully treated with high-dose oral calcium.This is the first report of HVDRR caused by UPD, and the third case of complete UPD of chromosome 12, in the published literature. Genome-wide SNP array was useful for detecting isodisomy and the parental origin of the allele. Comprehensive examination of the homozygous state is essential for accurate genetic counseling of recurrence risk and appropriate monitoring for other chromosome 12 related disorders. Furthermore, oral calcium therapy was effective as an initial treatment for rickets in this instance.

  20. Assessment of genetic correlation between bacterial cold water disease resistance and spleen index in a domesticated population of rainbow trout: identification of QTL on chromosome Omy19.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory D Wiens

    Full Text Available Selective breeding of animals for increased disease resistance is an effective strategy to reduce mortality in aquaculture. However, implementation of selective breeding programs is limited by an incomplete understanding of host resistance traits. We previously reported results of a rainbow trout selection program that demonstrated increased survival following challenge with Flavobacterium psychrophilum, the causative agent of bacterial cold water disease (BCWD. Mechanistic study of disease resistance identified a positive phenotypic correlation between post-challenge survival and spleen somatic-index (SI. Herein, we investigated the hypothesis of a genetic correlation between the two traits influenced by colocalizing QTL. We evaluated the inheritance and calculated the genetic correlation in five year-classes of odd- and even-year breeding lines. A total of 322 pedigreed families (n = 25,369 fish were measured for disease resistance, and 251 families (n = 5,645 fish were evaluated for SI. Spleen index was moderately heritable in both even-year (h(2  = 0.56±0.18 and odd-year (h(2  = 0.60±0.15 lines. A significant genetic correlation between SI and BCWD resistance was observed in the even-year line (rg  = 0.45±0.20, P = 0.03 but not in the odd-year line (rg  = 0.16±0.12, P = 0.19. Complex segregation analyses of the even-year line provided evidence of genes with major effect on SI, and a genome scan of a single family, 2008132, detected three significant QTL on chromosomes Omy19, 16 and 5, in addition to ten suggestive QTL. A separate chromosome scan for disease resistance in family 2008132 identified a significant BCWD QTL on Omy19 that was associated with time to death and percent survival. In family 2008132, Omy19 microsatellite alleles that associated with higher disease resistance also associated with increased spleen size raising the hypothesis that closely linked QTL contribute to the correlation between

  1. Rec-8 dimorphism affects longevity, stress resistance and X-chromosome nondisjunction in C. elegans, and replicative lifespan in S. cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayyadevara, Srinivas; Tazearslan, Cagdas; Alla, Ramani; Jiang, James C; Jazwinski, S Michal; Shmookler Reis, Robert J

    2014-01-01

    A quantitative trait locus (QTL) in the nematode C. elegans, "lsq4," was recently implicated by mapping longevity genes. QTLs for lifespan and three stress-resistance traits coincided within a span of thermal stresses, and lower male frequency (reflecting X-chromosome non-disjunction), traits reversed uniquely by rec-8 knockdown. A strain bearing the longer-lived lsq4 allele, differing from the short-lived strain at resistance response mediated by innate immunity. Replicative lifespan was extended 20% in haploid S. cerevisiae (BY4741) by deletion of REC8, orthologous to nematode rec-8, implying that REC8 disruption of mitotic-cell survival is widespread, exemplifying antagonistic pleiotropy (opposing effects on lifespan vs. reproduction), and/or balancing selection wherein genomic disruption increases genetic variation under harsh conditions.

  2. Genomic Comparison of Escherichia coli O104:H4 Isolates from 2009 and 2011 Reveals Plasmid, and Prophage Heterogeneity, Including Shiga Toxin Encoding Phage stx2

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-01

    evident in the Stx2 phage genomes, the mer/tet antibiotic resistance island, and in the prophage and plasmid profiles of the strains, including a...2011 outbreak isolates sequenced to date structural and nucleotide-level differences are evident in the Stx2 phage genomes, the mer/tet antibiotic ...replicating when the bacteria are subjected to DNA-damaging growth conditions including the presence of antibiotics [16,17,18], and phage particles arising

  3. Antibiotic resistance genes in the bacteriophage DNA fraction of environmental samples.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Colomer-Lluch

    Full Text Available Antibiotic resistance is an increasing global problem resulting from the pressure of antibiotic usage, greater mobility of the population, and industrialization. Many antibiotic resistance genes are believed to have originated in microorganisms in the environment, and to have been transferred to other bacteria through mobile genetic elements. Among others, β-lactam antibiotics show clinical efficacy and low toxicity, and they are thus widely used as antimicrobials. Resistance to β-lactam antibiotics is conferred by β-lactamase genes and penicillin-binding proteins, which are chromosomal- or plasmid-encoded, although there is little information available on the contribution of other mobile genetic elements, such as phages. This study is focused on three genes that confer resistance to β-lactam antibiotics, namely two β-lactamase genes (blaTEM and blaCTX-M9 and one encoding a penicillin-binding protein (mecA in bacteriophage DNA isolated from environmental water samples. The three genes were quantified in the DNA isolated from bacteriophages collected from 30 urban sewage and river water samples, using quantitative PCR amplification. All three genes were detected in the DNA of phages from all the samples tested, in some cases reaching 104 gene copies (GC of blaTEM or 102 GC of blaCTX-M and mecA. These values are consistent with the amount of fecal pollution in the sample, except for mecA, which showed a higher number of copies in river water samples than in urban sewage. The bla genes from phage DNA were transferred by electroporation to sensitive host bacteria, which became resistant to ampicillin. blaTEM and blaCTX were detected in the DNA of the resistant clones after transfection. This study indicates that phages are reservoirs of resistance genes in the environment.

  4. Antibiotic resistance genes in the bacteriophage DNA fraction of environmental samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colomer-Lluch, Marta; Jofre, Juan; Muniesa, Maite

    2011-03-03

    Antibiotic resistance is an increasing global problem resulting from the pressure of antibiotic usage, greater mobility of the population, and industrialization. Many antibiotic resistance genes are believed to have originated in microorganisms in the environment, and to have been transferred to other bacteria through mobile genetic elements. Among others, β-lactam antibiotics show clinical efficacy and low toxicity, and they are thus widely used as antimicrobials. Resistance to β-lactam antibiotics is conferred by β-lactamase genes and penicillin-binding proteins, which are chromosomal- or plasmid-encoded, although there is little information available on the contribution of other mobile genetic elements, such as phages. This study is focused on three genes that confer resistance to β-lactam antibiotics, namely two β-lactamase genes (blaTEM and blaCTX-M9) and one encoding a penicillin-binding protein (mecA) in bacteriophage DNA isolated from environmental water samples. The three genes were quantified in the DNA isolated from bacteriophages collected from 30 urban sewage and river water samples, using quantitative PCR amplification. All three genes were detected in the DNA of phages from all the samples tested, in some cases reaching 104 gene copies (GC) of blaTEM or 102 GC of blaCTX-M and mecA. These values are consistent with the amount of fecal pollution in the sample, except for mecA, which showed a higher number of copies in river water samples than in urban sewage. The bla genes from phage DNA were transferred by electroporation to sensitive host bacteria, which became resistant to ampicillin. blaTEM and blaCTX were detected in the DNA of the resistant clones after transfection. This study indicates that phages are reservoirs of resistance genes in the environment.

  5. Recombinant phage probes for Listeria monocytogenes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carnazza, S; Gioffre, G; Felici, F; Guglielmino, S [Department of Microbiological, Genetic and Molecular Sciences, University of Messina, Messina (Italy)

    2007-10-03

    Monitoring of food and environmental samples for biological threats, such as Listeria monocytogenes, requires probes that specifically bind biological agents and ensure their immediate and efficient detection. There is a need for robust and inexpensive affinity probes as an alternative to antibodies. These probes may be recruited from random peptide libraries displayed on filamentous phage. In this study, we selected from two phage peptide libraries phage clones displaying peptides capable of specific and strong binding to the L. monocytogenes cell surface. The ability of isolated phage clones to interact specifically with L. monocytogenes was demonstrated using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and confirmed by co-precipitation assay. We also assessed the sensitivity of phage-bacteria binding by PCR on phage-captured Listeria cells, which could be detected at a concentration of 10{sup 4} cells ml{sup -1}. In addition, as proof-of-concept, we tested the possibility of immobilizing the affinity-selected phages to a putative biosensor surface. The quality of phage deposition was monitored by ELISA and fluorescent microscopy. Phage-bacterial binding was confirmed by high power optical phase contrast microscopy. Overall, the results of this work validate the concept of affinity-selected recombinant filamentous phages as probes for detecting and monitoring bacterial agents under any conditions that warrant their recognition, including in food products.

  6. Complete genome sequence analysis of two Pseudomonas plecoglossicida phages, potential therapeutic agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawato, Yasuhiko; Yasuike, Motoshige; Nakamura, Yoji; Shigenobu, Yuya; Fujiwara, Atushi; Sano, Motohiko; Nakai, Toshihiro

    2015-02-01

    Pseudomonas plecoglossicida is a lethal pathogen of ayu (Plecoglossus altivelis) in Japan and is responsible for substantial economic costs to ayu culture. Previously, we demonstrated the efficacy of phage therapy against P. plecoglossicida infection using two lytic phages (PPpW-3 and PPpW-4) (S. C. Park, I. Shimamura, M. Fukunaga, K. Mori, and T. Nakai, Appl Environ Microbiol 66:1416-1422, 2000, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/AEM.66.4.1416-1422.2000; S. C. Park and T. Nakai, Dis Aquat Org 53:33-39, 2003, http://dx.doi.org/10.3354/dao053033). In the present study, the complete genome sequences of these therapeutic P. plecoglossicida phages were determined and analyzed for deleterious factors as therapeutic agents. The genome of PPpW-3 (myovirus) consisted of 43,564 bp with a GC content of 61.1% and 66 predicted open reading frames (ORFs). Approximately half of the genes were similar to the genes of the Escherichia coli phage vB_EcoM_ECO1230-10 (myovirus). The genome of PPpW-4 (podovirus) consisted of 41,386 bp with a GC content of 56.8% and 50 predicted ORFs. More than 70% of the genes were similar to the genes of Pseudomonas fluorescens phage ϕIBB-PF7A and Pseudomonas putida phage ϕ15 (podoviruses). The whole-genome analysis revealed that no known virulence genes were present in PPpW-3 and PPpW-4. An integrase gene was found in PPpW-3, but other factors used for lysogeny were not confirmed. The PCR detection of phage genes in phage-resistant variants provided no evidence of lysogenic activity in PPpW-3 and PPpW-4. We conclude that these two lytic phages qualify as therapeutic agents.

  7. 噬菌体治疗创面细菌感染研究进展%Advances in the treatment of wound bacterial infection with phage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    崔泽龙

    2015-01-01

    The treatment of wound bacterial infection is an extremely difficult problem in clinic, especially in patients with large wounds which are infected by multidrug resistant, pan-resistant or omni-resistant bacteria.In recent years, with a grim prospect of antibiotic resistance, phage therapy is re-valued by researchers after being ignored for nearly half a century.Phage therapy has made great achievements in prevention and control of bacterial infection of open wounds.This review is mainly focused on the latest research progress of phage therapy in wound bacterial infection.

  8. 噬菌体治疗泛耐药鲍氏不动杆菌所致脓毒症小鼠的效果%Therapeutic effect of phages on extensively drug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii-induced sepsis in mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邓柳洋; 杨子晨; 龚雅利; 黄广涛; 殷素鹏; 姜北; 彭毅志

    2016-01-01

    Objective To study the therapeutic effect of phages on extensively drug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii-induced sepsis in mice.Methods (1) Sixty BALB/c mice were divided into blank control group,sepsis control group,antibiotics treatment group,phage treatment group,and phage control group according to the random number table,with 12 mice in each group.Mice in blank control group were intraperitoneally (the same injection position below) injected with 1 mL normal saline.Mice in sepsis control group,antibiotics treatment group,and phage treatment group were injected with 1 mL extensively drug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (the strain was isolated from the blood of a severely burned patient hospitalized in our unit) in the concentration of 5 × 107 colony-forming unit/mL to reproduce sepsis model.Two hours later,mice in sepsis control group,antibiotics treatment group,and phage treatment group were injected with 1 mL saline,1 mg/mL imipenem/cilastatin,and 1 × 108 plaque-forming unit (PFU)/mL phages screened based on above-mentioned Acinetobacter baumannii (the same phages below) respectively.Mice in phage control group were injected with 1 mL phages in the titer of 1 × 108 PFU/mL.The injection was performed continuously for 7 days in each living mouse,and the survival situation of mice was observed each day to calculate the survival ratio in one week.(2) Another 60 BALB/c mice were grouped and treated as in experiment (1),and the injection was performed continuously for 5 days in each living mouse.On experiment day 2,4,and 6,3 mice from each group were selected (if the number of survived mouse in any group was less than 3 at sample collecting,all the survived mice were selected),and blood was drawn to determine white blood cell count (WBC,with 3 samples at each time point in each group).On experiment day 2,blood was drawn from the mice that had their blood taken earlier for bacterial culture,and lung,liver,kidney,and spleen tissue was collected from the same

  9. Last of the T Phages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Studier, F. W.

    1978-01-01

    Results clearly show that it is possible to induce mutations in T7 DNA at a physically measurable rate in the laboratory, and to follow genetic divergence by restriction analysis. The rate of accumulation of changes in the presence of mutagen is high enough that it may be feasible to induce changes at least as great as those found among the T7-related phages isolated from nature.

  10. Resistance to Soil-borne cereal mosaic virus in durum wheat is controlled by a major QTL on chromosome arm 2BS and minor loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maccaferri, Marco; Ratti, Claudio; Rubies-Autonell, Concepcion; Vallega, Victor; Demontis, Andrea; Stefanelli, Sandra; Tuberosa, Roberto; Sanguineti, Maria Corinna

    2011-08-01

    Soil-borne cereal mosaic (SBCM) is a viral disease, which seriously affects hexaploid as well as tetraploid wheat crops in Europe. In durum wheat (Triticum durum Desf.), the elite germplasm is characterized by a wide range of responses to SBCMV, from susceptibility to almost complete resistance. In this study, the genetic analysis of SBCMV resistance was carried out using a population of 181 durum wheat recombinant inbred lines (RILs) obtained from Meridiano (resistant) × Claudio (moderately susceptible), which were profiled with SSR and DArT markers. The RILs were characterized for SBCMV response in the field under severe and uniform SBCMV infection during 2007 and 2008. A wide range of disease reactions (as estimated by symptom severity and DAS-ELISA) was observed. A large portion of the variability for SBCMV response was explained by a major QTL (QSbm.ubo-2BS) located in the distal telomeric region of chromosome 2BS near the marker triplet Xbarc35-Xwmc661-Xgwm210, with R(2) values ranging from 51.6 to 91.6%. The favorable allele was contributed by Meridiano. Several QTLs with minor effects on SBCMV response were also detected. Consistently with the observed transgressive segregation, the resistance alleles at minor QTLs were contributed by both parents. The presence and effects of QSbm.ubo-2BS were validated through association mapping in a panel of 111 elite durum wheat accessions.

  11. Antibody Production in Response to Staphylococcal MS-1 Phage Cocktail in Patients Undergoing Phage Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Maciej Żaczek; Marzanna Łusiak-Szelachowska; Ewa Jończyk-Matysiak; Beata Weber-Dąbrowska; Ryszard Międzybrodzki; Barbara Owczarek; Agnieszka Kopciuch; Wojciech Fortuna; Paweł Rogóż; Andrzej Górski

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the humoral immune response (through the release of IgG, IgA, and IgM antiphage antibodies) to a staphylococcal phage cocktail in patients undergoing experimental phage therapy at the Phage Therapy Unit, Medical Center of the Ludwik Hirszfeld Institute of Immunology and Experimental Therapy in Wrocław, Poland. We also evaluated whether occurring antiphage antibodies had neutralizing properties towards applied phages (K rate). Among 20 examined patients receiving...

  12. Genetic analyses of the antibiotic resistance of Bifidobacterium bifidum strain Yakult YIT 4007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Takashi; Iino, Tohru

    2010-02-28

    Bifidobacterium bifidum strain Yakult YIT 4007 (abbreviated as B. bifidum YIT 4007) is a commercial strain and resistant to erythromycin, neomycin, and streptomycin. Resistances to these antibiotics were endowed by sequential isolation of resistant mutants from its susceptible progenitor strain YIT 4001. Comparison of nucleotide sequences of various candidate genes of both strains led us to find that B. bifidum YIT 4007 had mutations on three copies of 23S ribosomal RNA genes, an 8 bp deletion of the rluD gene for pseudouridine synthase, and a mutation on the rpsL gene for ribosomal protein S12. The responsibility of these mutations to antibiotic resistances was supported by analyses of newly isolated mutants resistant to these antibiotics. The antibiotic resistances of B. bifidum YIT 4007 were evidently acquired by mutations of the structural genes on the chromosome and not associated with mobile genetic elements like insertion sequences, phages, and plasmids.

  13. Use of phages to control Campylobacter spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janež, Nika; Loc-Carrillo, Catherine

    2013-10-01

    The use of phages to control pathogenic bacteria has been investigated since they were first discovered in the beginning of the 1900s. Over the last century we have slowly gained an in-depth understanding of phage biology including which phage properties are desirable when considering phage as biocontrol agents and which phage characteristics to potentially avoid. Campylobacter infections are amongst the most frequently encountered foodborne bacterial infections around the world. Handling and consumption of raw or undercooked poultry products have been determined to be the main route of transmission. The ability to use phages to target these bacteria has been studied for more than a decade and although we have made progress towards deciphering how best to use phages to control Campylobacter associated with poultry production, there is still much work to be done. This review outlines methods to improve the isolation of these elusive phages, as well as methods to identify desirable characteristics needed for a successful outcome. It also highlights the body of research undertaken so far and what criteria to consider when doing in-vivo studies, especially because some in-vitro studies have not been found to translate into to phage efficacy in-vivo.

  14. [Peptide phage display in biotechnology and biomedicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzmicheva, G A; Belyavskaya, V A

    2016-07-01

    To date peptide phage display is one of the most common combinatorial methods used for identifying specific peptide ligands. Phage display peptide libraries containing billions different clones successfully used for selection of ligands with high affinity and selectivity toward wide range of targets including individual proteins, bacteria, viruses, spores, different kind of cancer cells and variety of nonorganic targets (metals, alloys, semiconductors etc.) Success of using filamentous phage in phage display technologies relays on the robustness of phage particles and a possibility to genetically modify its DNA to construct new phage variants with novel properties. In this review we are discussing characteristics of the most known non-commercial peptide phage display libraries of different formats (landscape libraries in particular) and their successful applications in several fields of biotechnology and biomedicine: discovery of peptides with diagnostic values against different pathogens, discovery and using of peptides recognizing cancer cells, trends in using of phage display technologies in human interactome studies, application of phage display technologies in construction of novel nano materials.

  15. Inhibition of bacterial conjugation by phage M13 and its protein g3p: quantitative analysis and model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abraham Lin

    Full Text Available Conjugation is the main mode of horizontal gene transfer that spreads antibiotic resistance among bacteria. Strategies for inhibiting conjugation may be useful for preserving the effectiveness of antibiotics and preventing the emergence of bacterial strains with multiple resistances. Filamentous bacteriophages were first observed to inhibit conjugation several decades ago. Here we investigate the mechanism of inhibition and find that the primary effect on conjugation is occlusion of the conjugative pilus by phage particles. This interaction is mediated primarily by phage coat protein g3p, and exogenous addition of the soluble fragment of g3p inhibited conjugation at low nanomolar concentrations. Our data are quantitatively consistent with a simple model in which association between the pili and phage particles or g3p prevents transmission of an F plasmid encoding tetracycline resistance. We also observe a decrease in the donor ability of infected cells, which is quantitatively consistent with a reduction in pili elaboration. Since many antibiotic-resistance factors confer susceptibility to phage infection through expression of conjugative pili (the receptor for filamentous phage, these results suggest that phage may be a source of soluble proteins that slow the spread of antibiotic resistance genes.

  16. Temperate Myxococcus xanthus phage Mx8 encodes a DNA adenine methylase, Mox.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magrini, V; Salmi, D; Thomas, D; Herbert, S K; Hartzell, P L; Youderian, P

    1997-07-01

    Temperate bacteriophage Mx8 of Myxococcus xanthus encapsidates terminally repetitious DNA, packaged as circular permutations of its 49-kbp genome. During both lytic and lysogenic development, Mx8 expresses a nonessential DNA methylase, Mox, which modifies adenine residues in occurrences of XhoI and PstI recognition sites, CTCGAG and CTGCAG, respectively, on both phage DNA and the host chromosome. The mox gene is necessary for methylase activity in vivo, because an amber mutation in the mox gene abolishes activity. The mox gene is the only phage gene required for methylase activity in vivo, because ectopic expression of mox as part of the M. xanthus mglBA operon results in partial methylation of the host chromosome. The predicted amino acid sequence of Mox is related most closely to that of the methylase involved in the cell cycle control of Caulobacter crescentus. We speculate that Mox acts to protect Mx8 phage DNA against restriction upon infection of a subset of natural M. xanthus hosts. One natural isolate of M. xanthus, the lysogenic source of related phage Mx81, produces a restriction endonuclease with the cleavage specificity of endonuclease BstBI.

  17. Introgression of chromosome segments from multiple alien species in wheat breeding lines with wheat streak mosaic virus resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyramiding of alien-derived Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV) resistance and resistance enhancing genes in wheat is a costeffective and environmentally safe strategy for disease control. PCR-based markers and cytogenetic analysis with genomic in situ hybridisation were applied to identify alien chrom...

  18. Selection and characterization of cyanophage resistance in marine Synechococcus strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoddard, Lauren I; Martiny, Jennifer B H; Marston, Marcia F

    2007-09-01

    Marine viruses are an important component of the microbial food web, influencing microbial diversity and contributing to bacterial mortality rates. Resistance to cooccurring cyanophages has been reported for natural communities of Synechococcus spp.; however, little is known about the nature of this resistance. This study examined the patterns of infectivity among cyanophage isolates and unicellular marine cyanobacteria (Synechococcus spp.). We selected for phage-resistant Synechococcus mutants, examined the mechanisms of phage resistance, and determined the extent of cross-resistance to other phages. Four strains of Synechococcus spp. (WH7803, WH8018, WH8012, and WH8101) and 32 previously isolated cyanomyophages were used to select for phage resistance. Phage-resistant Synechococcus mutants were recovered from 50 of the 101 susceptible phage-host pairs, and 23 of these strains were further characterized. Adsorption kinetic assays indicate that resistance is likely due to changes in host receptor sites that limit viral attachment. Our results also suggest that receptor mutations conferring this resistance are diverse. Nevertheless, selection for resistance to one phage frequently resulted in cross-resistance to other phages. On average, phage-resistant Synechococcus strains became resistant to eight other cyanophages; however, there was no significant correlation between the genetic similarity of the phages (based on g20 sequences) and cross-resistance. Likewise, host Synechococcus DNA-dependent RNA polymerase (rpoC1) genotypes could not be used to predict sensitivities to phages. The potential for the rapid evolution of multiple phage resistance may influence the population dynamics and diversity of both Synechococcus and cyanophages in marine waters.

  19. Corruption of phage-display libraries by target-unrelated clones: Diagnosis and countermeasures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, William D.; Golomb, Miriam; Smith, George P.

    2010-01-01

    Phage display is used to discover peptides or proteins with a desired target property—most often, affinity for a target selector molecule. Libraries of phage clones displaying diverse surface peptides are subject to a selection process designed to enrich for the target behavior, and subsequently propagated to restore phage numbers. A recurrent problem is enrichment of clones, called target-unrelated phage (TUPs), that lack the target behavior. Many TUPs are propagation-related; they have mutations conferring a growth advantage, and are enriched during the propagations accompanying selection. Unlike other filamentous phage libraries, fd-tet-based libraries are relatively resistant to propagation-related TUP corruption. Their minus strand origin is disrupted by a large cassette that simultaneously confers resistance to tetracycline and imposes a rate-limiting growth defect that cannot be bypassed with simple mutations. Nonetheless, a new type of propagation-related TUP emerged in the output of in vivo selections from an fd-tet library. The founding clone had a complex rearrangement that restored the minus strand origin while retaining tetracycline resistance. The rearrangement involved two recombination events, one with a contaminant having a wild-type minus strand origin. The founder’s infectivity advantage spread by simple recombination to clones displaying different peptides. We propose measures for minimizing TUP corruption. PMID:20692225

  20. Corruption of phage display libraries by target-unrelated clones: diagnosis and countermeasures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, William D; Golomb, Miriam; Smith, George P

    2010-12-15

    Phage display is used to discover peptides or proteins with a desired target property-most often, affinity for a target selector molecule. Libraries of phage clones displaying diverse surface peptides are subject to a selection process designed to enrich for the target behavior and subsequently propagated to restore phage numbers. A recurrent problem is enrichment of clones, called target-unrelated phages or peptides (TUPs), that lack the target behavior. Many TUPs are propagation related; they have mutations conferring a growth advantage and are enriched during the propagations accompanying selection. Unlike other filamentous phage libraries, fd-tet-based libraries are relatively resistant to propagation-related TUP corruption. Their minus-strand origin is disrupted by a large cassette that simultaneously confers resistance to tetracycline and imposes a rate-limiting growth defect that cannot be bypassed with simple mutations. Nonetheless, a new type of propagation-related TUP emerged in the output of in vivo selections from an fd-tet library. The founding clone had a complex rearrangement that restored the minus-strand origin while retaining tetracycline resistance. The rearrangement involved two recombination events, one with a contaminant having a wild-type minus-strand origin. The founder's infectivity advantage spread by simple recombination to clones displaying different peptides. We propose measures for minimizing TUP corruption.

  1. An AFLP marker linked to the leaf rust resistance gene LrBi16 and test of allelism with Lr14a on chromosome arm 7BL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peipei Zhang

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Leaf rust (LR, caused by Puccinia triticina, is one of the most widespread diseases of common wheat (Triticum aestivum L. worldwide. The LR resistance gene LrBi16 has been mapped on chromosome arm 7BL in Chinese wheat cultivar Bimai 16 and was closely linked to SSR loci Xcfa2257 and Xgwm344 with genetic distances of 2.8 cM and 2.9 cM, respectively. In the present study, a total of 304 AFLP primer pairs were used to screen Bimai 16 and Thatcher and resistant and susceptible DNA bulks. The polymorphic AFLP marker P-ATT/M-CGC173 bp was used to genotype F2 and F3 populations to identify markers more closely linked to LrBi16. Marker P-ATT/M-CGC173 bp was tightly linked to LrBi16 with a genetic distance of 0.5 cM. As LrBi16 was mapped near the Lr14a locus, 809 F2 plants from the Bimai 16/RL6013 (Lr14a cross were inoculated with the Pt pathotype FHNQ to test the allelism of Lr14a and LrBi16. All of the F2 plants were resistant to FHNQ (IT between; and 2, suggesting that Lr14a and LrBi16 are allelic.

  2. Characterization of the staphylococcal cassette chromosome composite island of Staphylococcus haemolyticus SH32, a methicillin-resistant clinical isolate from China.

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    Dongliang Yu

    Full Text Available Staphylococcal cassette chromosome (SCC elements contribute considerably to virulence and resistance to antibiotic agents in staphylococci. SCC elements in coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS are highly diverse and there is evidence suggesting that they serve as a reservoir for antibiotic resistance genes in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA. However, only a small number of SCC elements have been characterized in CoNS and their exact roles in the emergence and evolution of MRSA remain to be demonstrated. Here, we determined the structure of an SCC composite island (CISH32 found in the clinical Staphylococcus haemolyticus isolate SH32 by whole-genome DNA sequencing. CISH32 was 48 kb in length and mainly composed of two imperfect SCC elements, namely (i a ΨSCCmec(SH32 part containing a class C1 mec gene complex but lacking ccr genes and (ii a SCCSH32 part with a ccrA5B3 gene complex but lacking mec genes. In addition, CISH32 contained a type III restriction-modification system and several resistance loci, for example genes conferring resistance to cadmium and arsenic. ΨSCCmec(SH32 is almost entirely identical to a pseudo SCCmec element found in S. haemolyticus WCH1 and shares pronounced sequence similarity to a ΨSCCmec element of S. haemolyticus JCSC1435. However, staphylococci other than S. haemolyticus, including S. aureus and S. epidermidis, contain homologs of SCCSH32 that are more similar to SCCSH32 than those elements found in S. haemolyticus, suggesting that CISH32 of S. haemolyticus SH32 was assembled in recent evolutionary events. Moreover, the composite structure of CISH32 indicates that the detection of class C1 mec and ccrA5B3 gene complexes in S. haemolyticus does not always indicate the existence of a UT9-type SCCmec element, which has remained questionable.

  3. Phage therapy as an approach to prevent Vibrio anguillarum infections in fish larvae production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Yolanda J; Costa, Liliana; Pereira, Carla; Mateus, Cristiana; Cunha, Angela; Calado, Ricardo; Gomes, Newton C M; Pardo, Miguel A; Hernandez, Igor; Almeida, Adelaide

    2014-01-01

    Fish larvae in aquaculture have high mortality rates due to pathogenic bacteria, especially the Vibrio species, and ineffective prophylactic strategies. Vaccination is not feasible in larvae and antibiotics have reduced efficacy against multidrug resistant bacteria. A novel approach to controlling Vibrio infections in aquaculture is needed. The potential of phage therapy to combat vibriosis in fish larvae production has not yet been examined. We describe the isolation and characterization of two bacteriophages capable of infecting pathogenic Vibrio and their application to prevent bacterial infection in fish larvae. Two groups of zebrafish larvae were infected with V. anguillarum (∼106 CFU mL-1) and one was later treated with a phage lysate (∼108 PFU mL-1). A third group was only added with phages. A fourth group received neither bacteria nor phages (fish control). Larvae mortality, after 72 h, in the infected and treated group was similar to normal levels and significantly lower than that of the infected but not treated group, indicating that phage treatment was effective. Thus, directly supplying phages to the culture water could be an effective and inexpensive approach toward reducing the negative impact of vibriosis in larviculture.

  4. A Novel Application of Synthetic Biology and Directed Evolution to Engineer Phage-based Antibiotics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Meiye [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2014-09-01

    The emergence of multiple drug resistant bacteria poses threats to human health, agriculture and food safety. Annually over 100,000 deaths and up to $20 billion loss to the U.S. economy are attributed to multiple drug resistant bacteria. With only four new chemical antibiotics in the drug development pipeline, we are in dire need of new solutions to address the emerging threat of multiple drug resistance. We propose a paradigm-changing approach to address the multi-drug resistant bacteria problem by utilizing Synthetic Biology (SynBio) methodologies to create and evolve “designer” bacteriophages or phages – viruses that specifically infect bacteria – to infect and kill newly emerging pathogenic bacterial strains WITHOUT the need for chemical antibiotics. A major advantage of using phage to combat pathogenic bacteria is that phages can co-evolve with their bacterial host, and Sandia can be the first in the world to establish an industrial scale Synthetic Biology pipeline for phage directed evolution for safe, targeted, customizable solution to bacterial drug resistance. Since there is no existing phage directed evolution effort within or outside of Sandia, this proposal is suitable as a high-risk LDRD effort to create the first pipeline for such an endeavor. The high potential reward nature of this proposal will be the immediate impact in decontamination and restoration of surfaces and infrastructure, with longer term impact in human or animal therapeutics. The synthetic biology and screening approaches will lead to fundamental knowledge of phage/bacteria co-evolution, making Sandia a world leader in directed evolution of bacteriophages.

  5. Whole-Genome Resequencing of a Cucumber Chromosome Segment Substitution Line and Its Recurrent Parent to Identify Candidate Genes Governing Powdery Mildew Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ting; Xu, Xuewen; Yan, Yali; Qi, Xiaohua; Chen, Xuehao

    2016-01-01

    Cucumber is an economically important vegetable crop worldwide. Powdery mildew (PM) is one of the most severe diseases that can affect cucumber crops. There have been several research efforts to isolate PM resistance genes for breeding PM-resistant cucumber. In the present study, we used a chromosome segment substitution line, SSL508-28, which carried PM resistance genes from the donor parent, JIN5-508, through twelve generations of backcrossing with a PM-susceptible inbred line, D8. We performed whole-genome resequencing of SSL508-28 and D8 to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), and insertions and deletions (indels). When compared against the reference genome of the inbred cucumber line 9930, a total of 468,616 SNPs and 67,259 indels were identified in SSL508-28, and 537,352 SNPs and 91,698 indels were identified in D8. Of these, 3,014 non-synonymous SNPs and 226 frameshift indels in SSL508-28, and 3,104 non-synonymous SNPs and 251 frameshift indels in D8, were identified. Bioinformatics analysis of these variations revealed a total of 15,682 SNPs and 6,262 indels between SSL508-28 and D8, among which 120 non-synonymous SNPs and 30 frameshift indels in 94 genes were detected between SSL508-28 and D8. Finally, out of these 94 genes, five resistance genes with nucleotide-binding sites and leucine-rich repeat domains were selected for qRT-PCR analysis. This revealed an upregulation of two transcripts, Csa2M435460.1 and Csa5M579560.1, in SSL508-28. Furthermore, the results of qRT-PCR analysis of these two genes in ten PM resistant and ten PM susceptible cucumber lines showed that when exposed to PM, Csa2M435460.1 and Csa5M579560.1 exhibited a higher expression level of resistant lines than susceptible lines. This indicates that Csa2M435460.1 and Csa5M579560.1 are candidate genes for PM resistance in cucumber. In addition, the non-synonymous SNPs in Csa2M435460.1 and Csa5M579560.1, identified in SSL508-28 and D8, might be the key to high PM-resistance in

  6. A shortcut in phage screening technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre de Andrade

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available A simple modification of the traditional Benton & Davis technique for phage screening is presented that avoids the tedious sample dilutions of putative spots/phages towards the second screening. With the use of a sole agar plate and nylon filter, the modification distinguishes a true positive recombinant from a false positive, with high probability of success.

  7. Methods for Selecting Phage Display Antibody Libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jara-Acevedo, Ricardo; Diez, Paula; Gonzalez-Gonzalez, Maria; Degano, Rosa Maria; Ibarrola, Nieves; Gongora, Rafael; Orfao, Alberto; Fuentes, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    The selection process aims sequential enrichment of phage antibody display library in clones that recognize the target of interest or antigen as the library undergoes successive rounds of selection. In this review, selection methods most commonly used for phage display antibody libraries have been comprehensively described.

  8. Aeromonas phages encode tRNAs for their overused codons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhakaran, Ramanandan; Chithambaram, Shivapriya; Xia, Xuhua

    2014-01-01

    The GC-rich bacterial species, Aeromonas salmonicida, is parasitised by both GC-rich phages (Aeromonas phages - phiAS7 and vB_AsaM-56) and GC-poor phages (Aeromonas phages - 25, 31, 44RR2.8t, 65, Aes508, phiAS4 and phiAS5). Both the GC-rich Aeromonas phage phiAS7 and Aeromonas phage vB_AsaM-56 have nearly identical codon usage bias as their host. While all the remaining seven GC-poor Aeromonas phages differ dramatically in codon usage from their GC-rich host. Here, we investigated whether tRNA encoded in the genome of Aeromonas phages facilitate the translation of phage proteins. We found that tRNAs encoded in the phage genome correspond to synonymous codons overused in the phage genes but not in the host genes.

  9. Neisseria gonorrhoeae: resistência cromossômica à tetraciclina em São Paulo, Brasil Neisseria gonorrhoeae: chromosomal resistance to tetracycline in São Paulo, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter Belda Junior

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available FUNDAMENTO: A utilização de antimicrobianos no tratamento da gonorréia iniciou-se em 1930 com as sulfonamidas. No decorrer dos anos outras drogas passaram a ser utilizadas, entre elas a tetraciclina. Embora eficaz no início, esta droga, ao longo do tempo, passou a não mais apresentar o resultado terapêutico esperado em virtude do aparecimento de quadros de resistência cromossômica e plasmidial em diversos países. Como a tetraciclina ainda continua sendo indicada, isoladamente ou associada a outras drogas antimicrobianas, para o tratamento da gonorréia no Brasil, tornou-se necessária a realização de um estudo de sensibilidade do gonococo à mesma, no intuito de se estimar a real dimensão da resistência do gonococo à tetraciclina. OBJETIVO: Avaliar a incidência de resistência cromossômica das cepas de Neisseria gonorrhoeae à tetraciclina. MÉTODO: Estudo da concentração inibitória mínima pelo método de diluição em ágar. RESULTADOS: A resistência cromossômica à tetraciclina detectada foi de 40,3% entre todas as cepas estudadas, segundo os critérios estabelecidos pelo Center for Diseases Control. CONCLUSÕES: Desaconselha-se definitivamente o uso isolado ou associado da tetraciclina e derivados, no tratamento da gonorréia no Brasil, no atual momento epidemiológico.BACKGROUND: The use of antimicrobials in the treatment of gonorrhoea started in 1930 with sulphonamides. Subsequently other drugs, such as tetracycline and its derivatives, were indicated for treating gonorrhoea. Therapeutic response to these drugs has tended to decline due to chromossomal and plasmidic resistance. However, tetracycline as a monotherapy or in association with other drugs is still prescribed for treating gonorrhea in Brazil. This justifies the need for a critical analysis in order to evaluate the sensitivity of gonococcus to this drug. OBJETIVE: Evaluate the real incidence of chromosomal resistance of Neisseria gonorrhoeae strains to

  10. Comparative genomics of Bacillus thuringiensis phage 0305φ8-36: defining patterns of descent in a novel ancient phage lineage

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    Serwer Philip

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The recently sequenced 218 kb genome of morphologically atypical Bacillus thuringiensis phage 0305φ8-36 exhibited only limited detectable homology to known bacteriophages. The only known relative of this phage is a string of phage-like genes called BtI1 in the chromosome of B. thuringiensis israelensis. The high degree of divergence and novelty of phage genomes pose challenges in how to describe the phage from its genomic sequences. Results Phage 0305φ8-36 and BtI1 are estimated to have diverged 2.0 – 2.5 billion years ago. Positionally biased Blast searches aligned 30 homologous structure or morphogenesis genes between 0305φ8-36 and BtI1 that have maintained the same gene order. Functional clustering of the genes helped identify additional gene functions. A conserved long tape measure gene indicates that a long tail is an evolutionarily stable property of this phage lineage. An unusual form of the tail chaperonin system split to two genes was characterized, as was a hyperplastic homologue of the T4gp27 hub gene. Within this region some segments were best described as encoding a conservative array of structure domains fused with a variable component of exchangeable domains. Other segments were best described as multigene units engaged in modular horizontal exchange. The non-structure genes of 0305φ8-36 appear to include the remnants of two replicative systems leading to the hypothesis that the genome plan was created by fusion of two ancestral viruses. The case for a member of the RNAi RNA-directed RNA polymerase family residing in 0305φ8-36 was strengthened by extending the hidden Markov model of this family. Finally, it was noted that prospective transcriptional promoters were distributed in a gradient of small to large transcripts starting from a fixed end of the genome. Conclusion Genomic organization at a level higher than individual gene sequence comparison can be analyzed to aid in understanding large phage

  11. Phage display: concept, innovations, applications and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pande, Jyoti; Szewczyk, Magdalena M; Grover, Ashok K

    2010-01-01

    Phage display is the technology that allows expression of exogenous (poly)peptides on the surface of phage particles. The concept is simple in principle: a library of phage particles expressing a wide diversity of peptides is used to select those that bind the desired target. The filamentous phage M13 is the most commonly used vector to create random peptide display libraries. Several methods including recombinant techniques have been developed to increase the diversity of the library. On the other extreme, libraries with various biases can be created for specific purposes. For instance, when the sequence of the peptide that binds the target is known, its affinity and selectivity can be increased by screening libraries created with limited mutagenesis of the peptide. Phage libraries are screened for binding to synthetic or native targets. The initial screening of library by basic biopanning has been extended to column chromatography including negative screening and competition between selected phage clones to identify high affinity ligands with greater target specificity. The rapid isolation of specific ligands by phage display is advantageous in many applications including selection of inhibitors for the active and allosteric sites of the enzymes, receptor agonists and antagonists, and G-protein binding modulatory peptides. Phage display has been used in epitope mapping and analysis of protein-protein interactions. The specific ligands isolated from phage libraries can be used in therapeutic target validation, drug design and vaccine development. Phage display can also be used in conjunction with other methods. The past innovations and those to come promise a bright future for this field.

  12. The involvement of tetA and tetE tetracycline resistance genes in plasmid and chromosomal resistance of Aeromonas in Brazilian strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilana Teruszkin Balassiano

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available This study analyzed the involvement of tetA and tetE genes in the tetracycline resistance of 16 strains of genus Aeromonas, isolated from clinical and food sources. Polymerase chain reactions revealed that 37.5% of the samples were positive for tetA, and also 37.5% were tetE positive. One isolate was positive for both genes. Only the isolate A. caviae 5.2 had its resistance associated to the presence of a plasmid, pSS2. The molecular characterization of pSS2 involved the construction of its restriction map and the determination of its size. The digestion of pSS2 with HindIII originated two fragments (A and B that were cloned separately into the pUC18 vector. The tetA gene was shown to be located on the HindIII-A fragment by PCR. After transforming a tetracycline-sensitive strain with pSS2, the transformants expressed the resistance phenotype and harbored a plasmid whose size was identical to that of pSS2. The results confirmed the association between pSS2 and the tetracycline resistance phenotype, and suggest a feasible dissemination of tetA and tetE among strains of Aeromonas. This study suggests the spreading tetA and tetE genes in Aeromonas in Brazil and describes a resistance plasmid that probably contributes to the dissemination of the resistance.

  13. Diverse genomic location and sequence content of a Listeria monocytogenes chromosomal island harboring heavy metal resistance and other genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Listeria monocytogenes remains a major foodborne pathogen with three serotype 4b clonal groups (ECI, ECII, ECIa) repeatedly implicated in human listeriosis. For reasons that are unknown, many of these strains are also resistant to heavy metals, i.e. cadmium and arsenic. The acquisition and fitness i...

  14. Novel QTL for stripe rust resistance on chromosomes 4A and 6B in soft white winter wheat cultivars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stripe rust (caused by Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici) of wheat (Triticum aestivum) is a devastating disease in temperate regions when susceptible varieties are grown and environmental conditions sustain high disease pressures. With frequent and severe outbreaks, disease resistance is a key too...

  15. Variation in chromosome constitution of the Xiaoyan series partial amphiploids and its relations to stripe rust and stem rust resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    In the tertiary gene pool of wheat, tall wheatgrass Thinopyrum ponticum (2n = 10x = 70) is an excellent source of resistance genes against numerous wheat diseases. The creation of wheat-Th. ponticum partial amphiploids is an intermediate step for transferring the useful genes from Th. ponticum to w...

  16. Rapid enumeration of phage in monodisperse emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tjhung, Katrina F; Burnham, Sean; Anany, Hany; Griffiths, Mansel W; Derda, Ratmir

    2014-06-17

    Phage-based detection assays have been developed for the detection of viable bacteria for applications in clinical diagnosis, monitoring of water quality, and food safety. The majority of these assays deliver a positive readout in the form of newly generated progeny phages by the bacterial host of interest. Progeny phages are often visualized as plaques, or holes, in a lawn of bacteria on an agar-filled Petri dish; however, this rate-limiting step requires up to 12 h of incubation time. We have previously described an amplification of bacteriophages M13 inside droplets of media suspended in perfluorinated oil; a single phage M13 in a droplet yields 10(7) copies in 3-4 h. Here, we describe that encapsulation of reporter phages, both lytic T4-LacZ and nonlytic M13, in monodisperse droplets can also be used for rapid enumeration of phage. Compartmentalization in droplets accelerated the development of the signal from the reporter enzyme; counting of "positive" droplets yields accurate enumeration of phage particles ranging from 10(2) to 10(6) pfu/mL. For enumeration of T4-LacZ phage, the fluorescent signal appeared in as little as 90 min. Unlike bulk assays, quantification in emulsion is robust and insensitive to fluctuations in environmental conditions (e.g., temperature). Power-free emulsification using gravity-driven flow in the absence of syringe pumps and portable fluorescence imaging solutions makes this technology promising for use at the point of care in low-resource environments. This droplet-based phage enumeration method could accelerate and simplify point-of-care detection of the pathogens for which reporter bacteriophages have been developed.

  17. Chromosomal localization of the murine RFC-1 gene encoding a folate transporter and its amplification in an antifolate resistant variant overproducing the transporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, K; Chiao, J H; Spengler, B A; Tolner, B; Yang, C H; Biedler, J L; Sirotnak, F M

    1998-08-01

    A variant of the L1210 cell (L1210/R83) selected in the presence of the lipophilic antifolate, metoprine, and a concentration of the natural diastereoisomer of 5-formyltetrahydrofolate, lL5CHO-folateH4, suboptimum for growth exhibited a 35-fold increase compared to parental L1210 cells in one-carbon, reduced folate transport. This was evidenced by the increase in Vmax for [3H]MTX (methotrexate) influx and a commensurate increase in the amount of the 46 kilodalton (kDa) transport protein and reduced folate carrier (RFC-1) mRNA. The variant is resistant to lipophilic antifolates, but shows collateral sensitivity to classical folate analogues. Karyotype analysis of L1210/R83 cells revealed the presence of several new chromosome abnormalities. One of these was a large, submetacentric marker chromosome comprising a normal #10 and a longer, abnormally banded arm of uncertain origin which exhibited an interstitial, palely staining, HSR-like segment. The results of Southern and Northern blotting showed that the RFC-1 gene copy number and RNA transcript level were markedly increased (30-35 fold) in L1210/R83 cells. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis revealed that the HSR-like segment in these cells was the site of amplified RFC-1 genes. Independent revertant subclones, obtained following growth in the absence of selection pressure, showed four- to 12-fold decreases in [3H]MTX influx Vmax and in amount of NHS (N-hydroxysuccinimide)-[3H]MTX affinity labeled one-carbon, reduced folate transporter compared to L1210/R83 cells. RFC-1 gene copy number also decreased, and the mean length of the HSR in these revertants declined 1.6- to 5-fold. Based upon genomic nucleotide sequencing, the RFC-1 gene in the normal mouse genome was localized to chromosome 10 in close association with the alpha 1 (Col18a1) collagen gene at 10B3(locus 41cM). The close association of these genes was confirmed by other data showing that the alpha 1 collagen gene was co-amplified in L1210/R

  18. Intravitreal injection of a chimeric phage endolysin Ply187 protects mice from Staphylococcus aureus endophthalmitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Objectives: The treatment of endophthalmitis is becoming very challenging due to the emergence of multidrug-resistant bacteria. Hence, the development of novel therapeutic alternatives for ocular use is essential. Here, we evaluated the therapeutic potential of Ply187AN-KSH3b, a chimeric phage endol...

  19. Emergence of sequence type 779 methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus harboring a novel pseudo staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec)-SCC-SCCCRISPR composite element in Irish hospitals.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kinnevey, Peter M

    2013-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has been a major cause of nosocomial infection in Irish hospitals for 4 decades, and replacement of predominant MRSA clones has occurred several times. An MRSA isolate recovered in 2006 as part of a larger study of sporadic MRSA exhibited a rare spa (t878) and multilocus sequence (ST779) type and was nontypeable by PCR- and DNA microarray-based staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) element typing. Whole-genome sequencing revealed the presence of a novel 51-kb composite island (CI) element with three distinct domains, each flanked by direct repeat and inverted repeat sequences, including (i) a pseudo SCCmec element (16.3 kb) carrying mecA with a novel mec class region, a fusidic acid resistance gene (fusC), and two copper resistance genes (copB and copC) but lacking ccr genes; (ii) an SCC element (17.5 kb) carrying a novel ccrAB4 allele; and (iii) an SCC element (17.4 kb) carrying a novel ccrC allele and a clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR) region. The novel CI was subsequently identified by PCR in an additional 13 t878\\/ST779 MRSA isolates, six from bloodstream infections, recovered between 2006 and 2011 in 11 hospitals. Analysis of open reading frames (ORFs) carried by the CI showed amino acid sequence similarity of 44 to 100% to ORFs from S. aureus and coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS). These findings provide further evidence of genetic transfer between S. aureus and CoNS and show how this contributes to the emergence of novel SCCmec elements and MRSA strains. Ongoing surveillance of this MRSA strain is warranted and will require updating of currently used SCCmec typing methods.

  20. Deletion of Chromosomal Region 8p21 Confers Resistance to Bortezomib and Is Associated with Upregulated Decoy TRAIL Receptor Expression in Patients with Multiple Myeloma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adil Doganay Duru

    Full Text Available Loss of the chromosomal region 8p21 negatively effects survival in patients with multiple myeloma (MM that undergo autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT. In this study, we aimed to identify the immunological and molecular consequences of del(8(p21 with regards to treatment response and bortezomib resistance. In patients receiving bortezomib as a single first line agent without any high-dose therapy, we have observed that patients with del(8(p21 responded poorly to bortezomib with 50% showing no response while patients without the deletion had a response rate of 90%. In vitro analysis revealed a higher resistance to bortezomib possibly due to an altered gene expression profile caused by del(8(p21 including genes such as TRAIL-R4, CCDC25, RHOBTB2, PTK2B, SCARA3, MYC, BCL2 and TP53. Furthermore, while bortezomib sensitized MM cells without del(8(p21 to TRAIL/APO2L mediated apoptosis, in cells with del(8(p21 bortezomib failed to upregulate the pro-apoptotic death receptors TRAIL-R1 and TRAIL-R2 which are located on the 8p21 region. Also expressing higher levels of the decoy death receptor TRAIL-R4, these cells were largely resistant to TRAIL/APO2L mediated apoptosis. Corroborating the clinical outcome of the patients, our data provides a potential explanation regarding the poor response of MM patients with del(8(p21 to bortezomib treatment. Furthermore, our clinical analysis suggests that including immunomodulatory agents such as Lenalidomide in the treatment regimen may help to overcome this negative effect, providing an alternative consideration in treatment planning of MM patients with del(8(p21.

  1. A Genetic Approach to the Development of New Therapeutic Phages to Fight Pseudomonas Aeruginosa in Wound Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Pleteneva

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a frequent participant in wound infections. Emergence of multiple antibiotic resistant strains has created significant problems in the treatment of infected wounds. Phage therapy (PT has been proposed as a possible alternative approach. Infected wounds are the perfect place for PT applications, since the basic condition for PT is ensured; namely, the direct contact of bacteria and their viruses. Plenty of virulent (“lytic” and temperate (“lysogenic” bacteriophages are known in P. aeruginosa. However, the number of virulent phage species acceptable for PT and their mutability are limited. Besides, there are different deviations in the behavior of virulent (and temperate phages from their expected canonical models of development. We consider some examples of non-canonical phage-bacterium interactions and the possibility of their use in PT. In addition, some optimal approaches to the development of phage therapy will be discussed from the point of view of a biologist, considering the danger of phage-assisted horizontal gene transfer (HGT, and from the point of view of a surgeon who has accepted the Hippocrates Oath to cure patients by all possible means. It is also time now to discuss the possible approaches in international cooperation for the development of PT. We think it would be advantageous to make phage therapy a kind of personalized medicine.

  2. Modeling Chromosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Carol

    2016-01-01

    Learning about chromosomes is standard fare in biology classrooms today. However, students may find it difficult to understand the relationships among the "genome", "chromosomes", "genes", a "gene locus", and "alleles". In the simple activity described in this article, which follows the 5E approach…

  3. Characterization of Vibrio parahaemolyticus and its specific phage from shrimp pond in Palk Strait, South East coast of India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stalin, Nattan; Srinivasan, Pappu

    2016-11-01

    Phage therapy is an alternative and eco-friendly biocontrol agent to prevent and control multidrug resistant bacteria in the aquatic system. The aim of this study is to isolate and characterize the Vibrio parahaemolyticus and its potential lytic phage from Penaeus monodon growing-out by rearing in shrimp ponds in Palk Strait, South East coast of India. The conventional phenotypic characteristics and molecular identification was confirmed using 16S rRNA sequence and to determine the antibiotic resistant profiles. The V. parahaemolyticus phage was effective against V. parahaemolyticus through one-step growth experiments, phage survival was determined by long-term storage at various temperatures and pH. Further, transmission electron microscope (TEM) revealed that the lytic phage belongs to the Myoviridae family. The isolated lytic phage (VVP1) was more specific against N1A V. parahaemolyticus and was able to infect N7A V. parahaemolyticus, N3B and N13B Vibrio alginolyticus strains. Evaluation of microcosm studies with P. monodon larvae infected with V. parahaemolyticus showed the survival of larvae in the presence of phage treatment at 2.3 × 10(10) PFU/mL(-1) was enhanced when compared with the control. This study provides the application of phage as a useful strategy to prevent and eliminate or reduce shrimp pathogenic V. parahaemolyticus in the aquaculture system.

  4. Serotyping, PCR, phage-typing and antibiotic sensitivity testing of Salmonella serovars isolated from urban drinking water supply systems of Nepal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bhatta, D.R.; Bangtrakulnonth, A.; Tishyadhigama, P.

    2007-01-01

    . A total of 54 isolates identified to genus level by standard tests were subsequently confirmed by serotyping, phage typing and PCR detection of virulence genes (inv A and spv C). The predominant serotype was Salmonella Typhimurium, followed by Salm. Typhi, Salm. Paratyphi A and Salmonella Enteritidis....... Most of the Salm. Typhi isolates were E1 phage type followed by UVS4, A and UVS1. All isolates of Salm. Paratyphi A and Salm. Enteritidis were an untypable (UT) phage type. The majority of isolates were multi-drug resistant as revealed by Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion technique. Ceftriaxone resistant...

  5. Phage-Antibiotic Synergy (PAS): beta-lactam and quinolone antibiotics stimulate virulent phage growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comeau, André M; Tétart, Françoise; Trojet, Sabrina N; Prère, Marie-Françoise; Krisch, H M

    2007-08-29

    Although the multiplication of bacteriophages (phages) has a substantial impact on the biosphere, comparatively little is known about how the external environment affects phage production. Here we report that sub-lethal concentrations of certain antibiotics can substantially stimulate the host bacterial cell's production of some virulent phage. For example, a low dosage of cefotaxime, a cephalosporin, increased an uropathogenic Escherichia coli strain's production of the phage PhiMFP by more than 7-fold. We name this phenomenon Phage-Antibiotic Synergy (PAS). A related effect was observed in diverse host-phage systems, including the T4-like phages, with beta-lactam and quinolone antibiotics, as well as mitomycin C. A common characteristic of these antibiotics is that they inhibit bacterial cell division and trigger the SOS system. We therefore examined the PAS effect within the context of the bacterial SOS and filamentation responses. We found that the PAS effect appears SOS-independent and is primarily a consequence of cellular filamentation; it is mimicked by cells that constitutively filament. The fact that completely unrelated phages manifest this phenomenon suggests that it confers an important and general advantage to the phages.

  6. Phage as a modulator of immune responses: practical implications for phage therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Górski, Andrzej; Międzybrodzki, Ryszard; Borysowski, Jan; Dąbrowska, Krystyna; Wierzbicki, Piotr; Ohams, Monika; Korczak-Kowalska, Grażyna; Olszowska-Zaremba, Natasza; Łusiak-Szelachowska, Marzena; Kłak, Marlena; Jończyk, Ewa; Kaniuga, Ewelina; Gołaś, Aneta; Purchla, Sylwia; Weber-Dąbrowska, Beata; Letkiewicz, Sławomir; Fortuna, Wojciech; Szufnarowski, Krzysztof; Pawełczyk, Zdzisław; Rogóż, Paweł; Kłosowska, Danuta

    2012-01-01

    Although the natural hosts for bacteriophages are bacteria, a growing body of data shows that phages can also interact with some populations of mammalian cells, especially with cells of the immune system. In general, these interactions include two main aspects. The first is the phage immunogenicity, that is, the capacity of phages to induce specific immune responses, in particular the generation of specific antibodies against phage antigens. The other aspect includes the immunomodulatory activity of phages, that is, the nonspecific effects of phages on different functions of major populations of immune cells involved in both innate and adaptive immune responses. These functions include, among others, phagocytosis and the respiratory burst of phagocytic cells, the production of cytokines, and the generation of antibodies against nonphage antigens. The aim of this chapter is to discuss the interactions between phages and cells of the immune system, along with their implications for phage therapy. These topics are presented based on the results of experimental studies and unique data on immunomodulatory effects found in patients with bacterial infections treated with phage preparations.

  7. Phage-Antibiotic Synergy (PAS: beta-lactam and quinolone antibiotics stimulate virulent phage growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André M Comeau

    Full Text Available Although the multiplication of bacteriophages (phages has a substantial impact on the biosphere, comparatively little is known about how the external environment affects phage production. Here we report that sub-lethal concentrations of certain antibiotics can substantially stimulate the host bacterial cell's production of some virulent phage. For example, a low dosage of cefotaxime, a cephalosporin, increased an uropathogenic Escherichia coli strain's production of the phage PhiMFP by more than 7-fold. We name this phenomenon Phage-Antibiotic Synergy (PAS. A related effect was observed in diverse host-phage systems, including the T4-like phages, with beta-lactam and quinolone antibiotics, as well as mitomycin C. A common characteristic of these antibiotics is that they inhibit bacterial cell division and trigger the SOS system. We therefore examined the PAS effect within the context of the bacterial SOS and filamentation responses. We found that the PAS effect appears SOS-independent and is primarily a consequence of cellular filamentation; it is mimicked by cells that constitutively filament. The fact that completely unrelated phages manifest this phenomenon suggests that it confers an important and general advantage to the phages.

  8. Phage therapy--history from Twort and d'Herelle through Soviet experience to current approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanishvili, Nina

    2012-01-01

    Felix d'Herelle proposed the use of bacteriophages for the therapy of human and animal bacterial infections at the beginning of the 20th century. This approach, however, was not widely accepted in the West. After the emergence of antibiotics in 1940s, phage research was diverted to a more fundamental level. At the same time, phage therapy was widely practiced in the Soviet Union due to collaboration of Felix d'Herelle with his Georgian colleagues. The majority of the articles dedicated to this subject are from the 1930s and 1940s. The old Soviet literature indicates that phage therapy was used extensively to treat a wide range of bacterial infections in the areas of dermatology (Beridze, 1938), ophthalmology (Rodigina, 1938), urology (Tsulukidze, 1938), stomatology (Ruchko and Tretyak, 1936), pediatrics (Alexandrova et al., 1935; Lurie, 1938), otolaryngology (Ermolieva, 1939), and surgery (Tsulukidze, 1940, 1941). These articles were published in Russian and thus were not readily available to Western scientists. The Western skepticism toward phage therapy itself was again followed by renewed interest and reappraisal, mainly due to the emergence of drug-resistant bacteria. Often the experiments described in the old Soviet articles were not designed properly: the use of placebos and the coding of preparations were absent from most of the studies, number of patients in the experimental and control groups was unequal or missing, sometimes no control groups were used at all, or patients treated previously unsuccessfully with antibiotics were employed as an experimental group and as control. The results obtained and the efficiency of phage prophylaxis were estimated by comparing with results obtained in previous years. In most publications, phage titers and descriptions of methods used for evaluation of the results are not specified. Nevertheless, past experience indicates some effectiveness of phage therapy and prophylaxis. Therefore, these clinical results should not

  9. Intra-domain phage display (ID-PhD of peptides and protein mini-domains censored from canonical pIII phage display

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrina F Tjhung

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we describe multivalent display of peptide and protein sequences typically censored from traditional N-terminal display on protein pIII of filamentous bacteriophage M13. Using site-directed mutagenesis of commercially available M13KE phage cloning vector, we introduced sites that permit efficient cloning using restriction enzymes between domains N1 and N2 of the pIII protein. As infectivity of phage is directly linked to the integrity of the connection between N1 and N2 domains, intra-domain phage display (ID-PhD allows for simple quality control of the display and the natural variations in the displayed sequences. Additionally, direct linkage to phage propagation allows efficient monitoring of sequence cleavage, providing a convenient system for selection and evolution of protease-susceptible or protease-resistant sequences. As an example of the benefits of such an ID-PhD system, we displayed a charged FLAG sequence, which is known to be post-translationally excised from pIII when displayed on the N-terminus. ID-PhD of FLAG exhibited sub-nanomolar apparent Kd suggesting multivalent nature of the display. A TEV-protease recognition sequence (TEVrs co-expressed in tandem with FLAG, allowed us to demonstrate that 99.9997% of the phage displayed the FLAG-TEVrs tandem and can be recognized and cleaved by TEV-protease. The residual 0.0003% consisted of phage clones that have excised the insert from their genome. ID-PhD is also amenable to display of protein mini-domains, such as the 33-residue minimized Z-domain of protein A. We show that it is thus possible to use ID-PhD for multivalent display and selection of mini-domain proteins (Affibodies, scFv, etc..

  10. Expression of lysozymes from Erwinia amylovora phages and Erwinia genomes and inhibition by a bacterial protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Ina; Gernold, Marina; Schneider, Bernd; Geider, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    Genes coding for lysozyme-inhibiting proteins (Ivy) were cloned from the chromosomes of the plant pathogens Erwinia amylovora and Erwinia pyrifoliae. The product interfered not only with activity of hen egg white lysozyme, but also with an enzyme from E. amylovora phage ΦEa1h. We have expressed lysozyme genes from the genomes of three Erwinia species in Escherichia coli. The lysozymes expressed from genes of the E. amylovora phages ΦEa104 and ΦEa116, Erwinia chromosomes and Arabidopsis thaliana were not affected by Ivy. The enzyme from bacteriophage ΦEa1h was fused at the N- or C-terminus to other peptides. Compared to the intact lysozyme, a His-tag reduced its lytic activity about 10-fold and larger fusion proteins abolished activity completely. Specific protease cleavage restored lysozyme activity of a GST-fusion. The bacteriophage-encoded lysozymes were more active than the enzymes from bacterial chromosomes. Viral lyz genes were inserted into a broad-host range vector, and transfer to E. amylovora inhibited cell growth. Inserted in the yeast Pichia pastoris, the ΦEa1h-lysozyme was secreted and also inhibited by Ivy. Here we describe expression of unrelated cloned 'silent' lyz genes from Erwinia chromosomes and a novel interference of bacterial Ivy proteins with a viral lysozyme.

  11. Genome Sequence of Mycobacterium Phage Waterfoul

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Paige N.; Embry, Ella K.; Johnson, Christa O.; Watson, Tiara L.; Weast, Sayre K.; DeGraw, Caroline J.; Douglas, Jessica R.; Sellers, J. Michael; D’Angelo, William A.

    2016-01-01

    Waterfoul is a newly isolated temperate siphovirus of Mycobacterium smegmatis mc2155. It was identified as a member of the K5 cluster of Mycobacterium phages and has a 61,248-bp genome with 95 predicted genes. PMID:27856585

  12. Phage Therapy: Combating Infections with Potential for Evolving from Merely a Treatment for Complications to Targeting Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej Gorski

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial resistance is considered to be one of the greatest challenges of medicine and our civilization. Lack of progress in developing new anti-bacterial agents has greatly revived interest in using phage therapy to combat antibiotic-resistant infections. Although a number of clinical trials are underway and more are planned, the realistic perspective of registration of phage preparations and their entering the health market and significantly contributing to the current antimicrobial crisis is rather remote. Therefore, in addition to planning further clinical trials, our present approach of phage treatment carried out as experimental therapy (compassionate use should be expanded to address the growing and urgent needs of increasing cohorts of patients for whom no alternative treatment is currently available. During the past eleven years of our phage therapy center`s operation we have obtained relevant clinical and laboratory data which not only confirm the safety of the therapy but also provide important information shedding more light on many aspects of the therapy, contributing to its optimization and allowing for construction of the most appropriate clinical trials. New data on phage biology and interactions with the immune system suggest that in the future phage therapy may evolve from dealing with complications to targeting diseases. However, further studies are necessary to confirm this promising trend.

  13. Phage Therapy: Combating Infections with Potential for Evolving from Merely a Treatment for Complications to Targeting Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Górski, Andrzej; Międzybrodzki, Ryszard; Weber-Dąbrowska, Beata; Fortuna, Wojciech; Letkiewicz, Sławomir; Rogóż, Paweł; Jończyk-Matysiak, Ewa; Dąbrowska, Krystyna; Majewska, Joanna; Borysowski, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance is considered to be one of the greatest challenges of medicine and our civilization. Lack of progress in developing new anti-bacterial agents has greatly revived interest in using phage therapy to combat antibiotic-resistant infections. Although a number of clinical trials are underway and more are planned, the realistic perspective of registration of phage preparations and their entering the health market and significantly contributing to the current antimicrobial crisis is rather remote. Therefore, in addition to planning further clinical trials, our present approach of phage treatment carried out as experimental therapy (compassionate use) should be expanded to address the growing and urgent needs of increasing cohorts of patients for whom no alternative treatment is currently available. During the past 11 years of our phage therapy center’s operation, we have obtained relevant clinical and laboratory data which not only confirm the safety of the therapy but also provide important information shedding more light on many aspects of the therapy, contributing to its optimization and allowing for construction of the most appropriate clinical trials. New data on phage biology and interactions with the immune system suggest that in the future phage therapy may evolve from dealing with complications to targeting diseases. However, further studies are necessary to confirm this promising trend. PMID:27725811

  14. The Lytic SA Phage Demonstrate Bactericidal Activity against Mastitis Causing Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamza Ameer

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is the major causative agent of mastitis among dairy animals as it causes intramammary gland infection. Due to antibiotic resistance and contamination of antibiotics in the milk of diseased animals; alternative therapeutic agents are required to cure mastitis. Lytic bacteriophages and their gene products can be potential therapeutic agents against bacteria as they are host specific and less harmful than antibiotics. In this study, Staphylococcus aureus were isolated from milk samples of the infected animals and identified biochemically. SA phage was isolated from sewage water showing lytic activity against Staphylococcus aureus isolates. The highest lytic activity of bacteriophages was observed at 37°C and pH 7, and the most suitable storage condition was at 4°C. SA phage efficiently reduced bacterial growth in the bacterial reduction assay. The characterization and bacterial growth reduction activity of the bacteriophages against Staphylococcus aureus signifies their underlying potential of phage therapy against mastitis.

  15. Phage-antibiotic synergism: a possible approach to combatting Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knezevic, Petar; Curcin, Sanja; Aleksic, Verica; Petrusic, Milivoje; Vlaski, Ljiljana

    2013-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a highly resistant opportunistic pathogen and an important etiological agent of various types of infections. During the last decade, P. aeruginosa phages have been extensively examined as alternative antimicrobial agents. The aim of the study was to determine antimicrobial effectiveness of combining subinhibitory concentrations of gentamicin, ceftriaxone, ciprofloxacin or polymyxin B with P. aeruginosa-specific bacteriophages belonging to families Podoviridae and Siphoviridae. The time-kill curve method showed that a combination of bacteriophages and subinhibitory concentrations of ceftriaxone generally reduced bacterial growth, and synergism was proven for a Siphoviridae phage σ-1 after 300 min of incubation. The detected alteration in morphology after ceftriaxone application, resulting in cell elongation, along with its specific mode of action, seemed to be a necessary but was not a sufficient reason for phage-antibiotic synergism. The phenomenon offers an opportunity for future development of treatment strategies for potentially lethal infections caused by P. aeruginosa.

  16. The factors affecting effectiveness of treatment in phages therapy, mini review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mai Huong eCHATAIN-LY

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the use of lytic bacteriophages as antimicrobial agents controlling pathogenic bacteria has appeared as a promising new alternative strategy in the face of growing antibiotic resistance which has caused problems in many fields including medicine, veterinary medicine and aquaculture. The use of bacteriophages has numerous advantages over traditional antimicrobials. The effectiveness of phage applications in fighting against pathogenic bacteria depends on several factors such as the bacteriophages/target bacteria ratio, the mode and moment of treatment, environmental conditions (pH, temperature ..., the neutralization of phage and accessibility to target bacteria, amongst others. This report presents these factors and the challenges involved in developing phage therapy applications

  17. Rec-8 dimorphism affects longevity, stress resistance and X-chromosome nondisjunction in C. elegans, and replicative lifespan in yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srinivas eAyyadevara

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available A quantitative trait locus (QTL in the nematode C. elegans, lsq4, was recently implicated by mapping longevity genes. QTLs for lifespan and 3 stress-resistance traits coincided within a span of <300 kbp, later narrowed to <200 kbp. A single gene in this interval is now shown to modulate all lsq4-associated traits. Full-genome analysis of transcript levels indicates that lsq4 contains a dimorphic gene governing expression of sperm-specific genes, suggesting effects on spermatogenesis. Quantitation of allele-specific transcripts encoded within the lsq4 interval revealed significant, 2- to 15-fold expression differences for 10 of 33 genes. Fourteen genes, implicated by both position and expression, were tested for RNA-interference effects on QTL-linked traits. In a strain carrying the shorter-lived allele, knockdown of rec-8 (encoding a meiotic cohesin reduced its transcripts 4-fold, to a level similar to the longer-lived strain, and extended lifespan 25–26% whether begun before fertilization or at maturity. The short-lived lsq4 allele also conferred sensitivity to oxidative and thermal stresses, and lower male frequency, traits reversed uniquely by rec-8 knockdown. A strain bearing the longer-lived lsq4 allele, differing from the short-lived strain at <0.3% of its genome, derived no lifespan or stress-survival benefit from rec-8 knockdown. We consider two possible explanations: high rec-8 expression may include increased leaky expression in mitotic cells, leading to deleterious destabilization of somatic genomes; or REC-8 may act entirely in germ-line meiotic cells to reduce aberrations such as nondisjunction, thereby blunting a stress-resistance response mediated by innate immunity. Replicative lifespan was extended 20% in haploid S. cerevisiae (BY4741 by deletion of REC8, orthologous to nematode rec-8, implying that REC8 disruption of mitotic-cell survival is widespread, reflecting antagonistic pleiotropy and/or balancing selection.

  18. The in vivo efficacy of two administration routes of a phage cocktail to reduce numbers of Campylobacter coli and Campylobacter jejuni in chickens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carvalho Carla M

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Poultry meat is one of the most important sources of human campylobacteriosis, an acute bacterial enteritis which is a major problem worldwide. Campylobacter coli and Campylobacter jejuni are the most common Campylobacter species associated with this disease. These pathogens live in the intestinal tract of most avian species and under commercial conditions they spread rapidly to infect a high proportion of the flock, which makes their treatment and prevention very difficult. Bacteriophages (phages are naturally occurring predators of bacteria with high specificity and also the capacity to evolve to overcome bacterial resistance. Therefore phage therapy is a promising alternative to antibiotics in animal production. This study tested the efficacy of a phage cocktail composed of three phages for the control of poultry infected with C. coli and C. jejuni. Moreover, it evaluated the effectiveness of two routes of phage administration (by oral gavage and in feed in order to provide additional information regarding their future use in a poultry unit. Results The results indicate that experimental colonisation of chicks was successful and that the birds showed no signs of disease even at the highest dose of Campylobacter administered. The phage cocktail was able to reduce the titre of both C. coli and C. jejuni in faeces by approximately 2 log10 cfu/g when administered by oral gavage and in feed. This reduction persisted throughout the experimental period and neither pathogen regained their former numbers. The reduction in Campylobacter titre was achieved earlier (2 days post-phage administration when the phage cocktail was incorporated in the birds' feed. Campylobacter strains resistant to phage infection were recovered from phage-treated chickens at a frequency of 13%. These resistant phenotypes did not exhibit a reduced ability to colonize the chicken guts and did not revert to sensitive types. Conclusions Our findings provide

  19. KSY1, a lactococcal phage with a T7-like transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopin, Alain; Deveau, Hélène; Ehrlich, S Dusko; Moineau, Sylvain; Chopin, Marie-Christine

    2007-08-15

    The virulent lactococcal phage KSY1 possesses a large elongated capsid (223 nm long, 45 nm wide) and a short tail (32 nm). This phage of the Podoviridae group (C3 morphotype) has a linear 79,232-bp double-stranded DNA genome, which encodes 131 putative proteins and 3 tRNAs. This is the first description of the genome of a phage of this morphotype. KSY1 possesses a T7-like transcription system, including an RNA polymerase and a series of specific promoters, showing sequence homology to other known T7-like RNA polymerase promoters. Late stages of KSY1 multiplication are resistant to rifampicin. Otherwise, KSY1 shares limited similarity with other Podoviridae phages. Fourteen KSY1 structural proteins were identified by SDS-PAGE analysis. Among these proteins, those forming the distal tail structure and likely involved in host recognition are encoded by a 5-kb genomic region of KSY1. This region consists of a mosaic of DNA segments highly homologous to DNA of other lactococcal phages, suggesting an horizontal gene transfer.

  20. The Staphylococci Phages Family: An Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurence Van Melderen

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Due to their crucial role in pathogenesis and virulence, phages of Staphylococcus aureus have been extensively studied. Most of them encode and disseminate potent staphylococcal virulence factors. In addition, their movements contribute to the extraordinary versatility and adaptability of this prominent pathogen by improving genome plasticity. In addition to S. aureus, phages from coagulase-negative Staphylococci (CoNS are gaining increasing interest. Some of these species, such as S. epidermidis, cause nosocomial infections and are therefore problematic for public health. This review provides an overview of the staphylococcal phages family extended to CoNS phages. At the morphological level, all these phages characterized so far belong to the Caudovirales order and are mainly temperate Siphoviridae. At the molecular level, comparative genomics revealed an extensive mosaicism, with genes organized into functional modules that are frequently exchanged between phages. Evolutionary relationships within this family, as well as with other families, have been highlighted. All these aspects are of crucial importance for our understanding of evolution and emergence of pathogens among bacterial species such as Staphylococci.

  1. Sequences of a co-existing SXT element, a chromosomal integron (CI) and an IncA/C plasmid and their roles in multidrug resistance in a Vibrio cholerae O1 El Tor strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ruibai; Li, Jie; Kan, Biao

    2016-09-01

    The ongoing seventh cholera pandemic is attributed to Vibrio cholerae O1 El Tor biotype strains. Although antibiotic therapy ameliorates symptoms in patients and reduces pathogen transfer to the environment, multidrug resistance remains a major clinical threat. An O1 El Tor strain isolated from a patient in 1998 was intermediate or resistant to 13 antibiotics and could potentially produce extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL), which is very rare in O1 strains. Using genome sequencing, three relevant genetic elements were identified in this strain: a hybrid SXT element (ICEVchCHN1307); a new IncA/C plasmid (pVC1307); and a chromosomal integron. Twenty antibiotic resistance genes were located on them, including blaTEM-1, blaCTX-M-14 and phenotypically silenced tetRA genes. These data elucidate the role of individual genetic components in antibiotic resistance and the accumulation of drug resistance genes in V. cholerae.

  2. Strain Specific Phage Treatment for Staphylococcus aureus Infection Is Influenced by Host Immunity and Site of Infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan B Pincus

    Full Text Available The response to multi-drug resistant bacterial infections must be a global priority. While mounting resistance threatens to create what the World Health Organization has termed a "post-antibiotic era", the recent discovery that antibiotic use may adversely impact the microbiome adds further urgency to the need for new developmental approaches for anti-pathogen treatments. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA, in particular, has declared itself a serious threat within the United States and abroad. A potential solution to the problem of antibiotic resistance may not entail looking to the future for completely novel treatments, but instead looking into our history of bacteriophage therapy. This study aimed to test the efficacy, safety, and commercial viability of the use of phages to treat Staphylococcus aureus infections using the commercially available phage SATA-8505. We found that SATA-8505 effectively controls S. aureus growth and reduces bacterial viability both in vitro and in a skin infection mouse model. However, this killing effect was not observed when phage was cultured in the presence of human whole blood. SATA-8505 did not induce inflammatory responses in peripheral blood mononuclear cultures. However, phage did induce IFN gamma production in primary human keratinocyte cultures and induced inflammatory responses in our mouse models, particularly in a mouse model of chronic granulomatous disease. Our findings support the potential efficacy of phage therapy, although regulatory and market factors may limit its wider investigation and use.

  3. Characterization and Testing the Efficiency of Acinetobacter baumannii Phage vB-GEC_Ab-M-G7 as an Antibacterial Agent

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    Ia Kusradze

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Acinetobacter baumannii is a gram-negative, non-motile bacterium that, due to its multidrug resistance, has become a major nosocomial pathogen .The increasing number of multidrug resistant (MDR strains has renewed interest in phage therapy. The aim of our study was to assess the effectiveness of phage administration in Acinetobacter baumannii wound infections in an animal model to demonstrate phage therapy as non-toxic, safe and alternative antibacterial remedy. Using classical methods for the study of bacteriophage properties, we characterized phage vB-GEC_Ab-M-G7 as a dsDNA myovirus with a 90kb genome size. Important characteristics of vB-GEC_Ab-M-G7include a short latent period and large burst size, wide host range, resistance to chloroform and thermal and pH stability. In a rat wound model, phage application effectively decreased the number of bacteria isolated from the wounds of successfully treated animals. This study highlights the effectiveness of the phage therapy and provides further insight into treating infections caused by MDR strains using phage administration.

  4. Changing patterns among the subgroups of strains of Staphylococcus aureus of phage group II in Danish hospitals from 1961-91

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, N H; Hartzen, S H; Bangsborg, Jette Marie

    1994-01-01

    During the period 1961-91 a total of 567,635 strains of Staphylococcus aureus from hospitalized patients in Denmark have been characterized according to their antibiotic resistance, site of isolation and phage type. Strains of phage group II (typed by the phages 3A, 3C, 55 and 71) have been...... analysed further. The occurrence of group II strains was relatively constant (approximately 16%) from 1961 until 1983. Since then the frequency of group II strains increased; in 1991 they accounted for 22.7% of all S. aureus strains isolated. Strains of group II can, on the basis of their phage types......, be divided in four subgroups: 3A, 71, 71+ and the 'rest of group II'. Furthermore, within these groups strains may differ from one another in respect to their sensitivity to phages. The increased isolation of group II strains during recent years was because of an increase in strains of subgroups 71...

  5. Phage therapy of staphylococcal chronic osteomyelitis in experimental animal model

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    Chandan Kishor

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA are the commonest cause of osteomyelitis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of an alternative therapy i.e. application of S. aureus specific bacteriophages in cases of osteomyelitis caused by MRSA in animal model. Methods: Twenty two rabbits were included in this study. The first two rabbits were used to test the safety of phage cocktail while the remaining 20 rabbits were divided into three groups; group A (n=4 to assess the establishment of osteomyelitis; group B (n=4 osteomyelitis developed but therapy started only after six weeks; and group C (n=12 osteomyelitis developed and therapy started after three weeks. Groups B and C rabbits were treated with four doses of cocktail of seven virulent bacteriophages at the interval of 48 h. Comparison between three groups was made on the basis of observation of clinical, radiological, microbiological, and histopathological examinations. Results: Experimental group rabbits recovered from the illness in the subsequent two weeks of the therapy. Appetite and activity of the rabbits improved, local oedema, erythema and induration subsided. There were minimal changes associated with osteomyelitis in X-ray and histopathology also showed no signs of infection with new bone formation. Control B group rabbits also recovered well from the infection. Interpretation & conclusions: The present study shows a potential of phage therapy to treat difficult infections caused by multidrug resistant bacteria.

  6. Colonisation of a phage susceptible Campylobacter jejuni population in two phage positive broiler flocks.

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    Sophie Kittler

    Full Text Available The pathogens Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli are commensals in the poultry intestine and campylobacteriosis is one of the most frequent foodborne diseases in developed and developing countries. Phages were identified to be effective in reducing intestinal Campylobacter load and this was evaluated, in the first field trials which were recently carried out. The aim of this study was to further investigate Campylobacter population dynamics during phage application on a commercial broiler farm. This study determines the superiority in colonisation of a Campylobacter type found in a field trial that was susceptible to phages in in vitro tests. The colonisation factors, i.e. motility and gamma glutamyl transferase activity, were increased in this type. The clustering in phylogenetic comparisons of MALDI-TOF spectra did not match the ST, biochemical phenotype and phage susceptibility. Occurrence of Campylobacter jejuni strains and phage susceptibility types with different colonisation potential seem to play a very important role in the success of phage therapy in commercial broiler houses. Thus, mechanisms of both, phage susceptibility and Campylobacter colonisation should be further investigated and considered when composing phage cocktails.

  7. Bacteriophage selection against a plasmid-encoded sex apparatus leads to the loss of antibiotic-resistance plasmids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalasvuori, Matti; Friman, Ville-Petri; Nieminen, Anne; Bamford, Jaana K H; Buckling, Angus

    2011-12-23

    Antibiotic-resistance genes are often carried by conjugative plasmids, which spread within and between bacterial species. It has long been recognized that some viruses of bacteria (bacteriophage; phage) have evolved to infect and kill plasmid-harbouring cells. This raises a question: can phages cause the loss of plasmid-associated antibiotic resistance by selecting for plasmid-free bacteria, or can bacteria or plasmids evolve resistance to phages in other ways? Here, we show that multiple antibiotic-resistance genes containing plasmids are stably maintained in both Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica in the absence of phages, while plasmid-dependent phage PRD1 causes a dramatic reduction in the frequency of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. The loss of antibiotic resistance in cells initially harbouring RP4 plasmid was shown to result from evolution of phage resistance where bacterial cells expelled their plasmid (and hence the suitable receptor for phages). Phages also selected for a low frequency of plasmid-containing, phage-resistant bacteria, presumably as a result of modification of the plasmid-encoded receptor. However, these double-resistant mutants had a growth cost compared with phage-resistant but antibiotic-susceptible mutants and were unable to conjugate. These results suggest that bacteriophages could play a significant role in restricting the spread of plasmid-encoded antibiotic resistance.

  8. Characterization and lytic activity of Pseudomonas fluorescens phages from sewage

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    Ananthi Radhakrishnan

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas fluorescens phages from sewage were tested against P. fluorescens isolates of soil and sewage. The phages were characterized as to host range, morphology, structural proteins and genome fingerprint. Of the seven phages isolated, one was found to be abundant in sewage (5.9×10(7 pfu/mL, having broad host range, and distinct protein and DNA profile when compared to the other six phages. DNA restriction and protein profiles of the phages and their morphology indicate the diversity in the sewage environment. None of the isolates from the rhizosphere regions of various cultivated soils were susceptible to phages isolated from sewage.

  9. Isolation and characterization of the Streptomyces cattleya temperate phage TG1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foor, F; Roberts, G P; Morin, N; Snyder, L; Hwang, M; Gibbons, P H; Paradiso, M J; Stotish, R L; Ruby, C L; Wolanski, B

    1985-01-01

    A temperate actinophage, TG1, was isolated from soil by growth on Streptomyces cattleya and has been shown to be potentially useful for the cloning of DNA in this organism and other streptomycetes. It forms stable lysogens by integration at a unique site on the chromosome. The phage genome consists of 41 kb of double-stranded DNA with cohesive ends. It has unique sites for ClaI, NdeI, PstI, SmaI, and XbaI. The PstI site has been shown to be in a dispensable region of the phage genome. Deletions (2 kb in length) were obtained which retain this site and should be useful for the cloning of DNA.

  10. Influence of environmental variables in the efficiency of phage therapy in aquaculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Yolanda J; Costa, Liliana; Pereira, Carla; Cunha, Ângela; Calado, Ricardo; Gomes, Newton C M; Almeida, Adelaide

    2014-09-01

    Aquaculture facilities worldwide continue to experience significant economic losses because of disease caused by pathogenic bacteria, including multidrug-resistant strains. This scenario drives the search for alternative methods to inactivate pathogenic bacteria. Phage therapy is currently considered as a viable alternative to antibiotics for inactivation of bacterial pathogens in aquaculture systems. While phage therapy appears to represent a useful and flexible tool for microbiological decontamination of aquaculture effluents, the effect of physical and chemical properties of culture waters on the efficiency of this technology has never been reported. The present study aimed to evaluate the effect of physical and chemical properties of aquaculture waters (e.g. pH, temperature, salinity and organic matter content) on the efficiency of phage therapy under controlled experimental conditions in order to provide a basis for the selection of the most suitable protocol for subsequent experiments. A bioluminescent genetically transformed Escherichia coli was selected as a model microorganism to monitor real-time phage therapy kinetics through the measurement of bioluminescence, thus avoiding the laborious and time-consuming conventional method of counting colony-forming units (CFU). For all experiments, a bacterial concentration of ≈ 10(5) CFU ml(-1) and a phage concentration of ≈ 10(6-8) plaque forming unit ml(-1) were used. Phage survival was not significantly affected by the natural variability of pH (6.5-7.4), temperature (10-25 °C), salinity (0-30 g NaCl l(-1) ) and organic matter concentration of aquaculture waters in a temperate climate. Nonetheless, the efficiency of phage therapy was mostly affected by the variation of salinity and organic matter content. As the effectiveness of phage therapy increases with water salt content, this approach appears to be a suitable choice for marine aquaculture systems. The success of phage therapy may also be enhanced in

  11. The Bacillus anthracis chromosome contains four conserved, excision-proficient, putative prophages

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    Sozhamannan Shanmuga

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bacillus anthracis is considered to be a recently emerged clone within the Bacillus cereus sensu lato group. The B. anthracis genome sequence contains four putative lambdoid prophages. We undertook this study in order to understand whether the four prophages are unique to B. anthracis and whether they produce active phages. Results More than 300 geographically and temporally divergent isolates of B. anthracis and its near neighbors were screened by PCR for the presence of specific DNA sequences from each prophage region. Every isolate of B. anthracis screened by PCR was found to produce all four phage-specific amplicons whereas none of the non-B. anthracis isolates, produced more than one phage-specific amplicon. Excision of prophages could be detected by a PCR based assay for attP sites on extra-chromosomal phage circles and for attB sites on phage-excised chromosomes. SYBR-green real-time PCR assays indicated that prophage excision occurs at very low frequencies (2 × 10-5 - 8 × 10-8/cell. Induction with mitomycin C increased the frequency of excision of one of the prophages by approximately 250 fold. All four prophages appear to be defective since, mitomycin C induced culture did not release any viable phage particle or lyse the cells or reveal any phage particle under electron microscopic examination. Conclusion The retention of all four putative prophage regions across all tested strains of B. anthracis is further evidence of the very recent emergence of this lineage and the prophage regions may be useful for differentiating the B. anthracis chromosome from that of its neighbors. All four prophages can excise at low frequencies, but are apparently defective in phage production.

  12. Genetic Evidence for the Involvement of the S-Layer Protein Gene sap and the Sporulation Genes spo0A, spo0B, and spo0F in Phage AP50c Infection of Bacillus anthracis

    OpenAIRE

    Roger D Plaut; Beaber, John W.; Zemansky, Jason; Kaur, Ajinder P.; George, Matroner; Biswas, Biswajit; Henry, Matthew; Bishop-Lilly, Kimberly A.; Mokashi, Vishwesh; Hannah, Ryan M.; Pope, Robert K.; Timothy D. Read; Stibitz, Scott; Calendar, Richard; Sozhamannan, Shanmuga

    2014-01-01

    In order to better characterize the Bacillus anthracis typing phage AP50c, we designed a genetic screen to identify its bacterial receptor. Insertions of the transposon mariner or targeted deletions of the structural gene for the S-layer protein Sap and the sporulation genes spo0A, spo0B, and spo0F in B. anthracis Sterne resulted in phage resistance with concomitant defects in phage adsorption and infectivity. Electron microscopy of bacteria incubated with AP50c revealed phage particles assoc...

  13. Genetic dissection of milk yield traits and mastitis resistance quantitative trait loci on chromosome 20 in dairy cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadri, Naveen K; Guldbrandtsen, Bernt; Lund, Mogens S; Sahana, Goutam

    2015-12-01

    Intense selection to increase milk yield has had negative consequences for mastitis incidence in dairy cattle. Due to low heritability of mastitis resistance and an unfavorable genetic correlation with milk yield, a reduction in mastitis through traditional breeding has been difficult to achieve. Here, we examined quantitative trait loci (QTL) that segregate for clinical mastitis and milk yield on Bos taurus autosome 20 (BTA20) to determine whether both traits are affected by a single polymorphism (pleiotropy) or by multiple closely linked polymorphisms. In the latter but not the former situation, undesirable genetic correlation could potentially be broken by selecting animals that have favorable variants for both traits. First, we performed a within-breed association study using a haplotype-based method in Danish Holstein cattle (HOL). Next, we analyzed Nordic Red dairy cattle (RDC) and Danish Jersey cattle (JER) with the goal of determining whether these QTL identified in Holsteins were segregating across breeds. Genotypes for 12,566 animals (5,966 HOL, 5,458 RDC, and 1,142 JER) were determined by using the Illumina Bovine SNP50 BeadChip (50K; Illumina, San Diego, CA), which identifies 1,568 single nucleotide polymorphisms on BTA20. Data were combined, phased, and clustered into haplotype states, followed by within- and across-breed haplotype-based association analyses using a linear mixed model. Association signals for both clinical mastitis and milk yield peaked in the 26- to 40-Mb region on BTA20 in HOL. Single-variant association analyses were carried out in the QTL region using whole sequence level variants imputed from references of 2,036 HD genotypes (BovineHD BeadChip; Illumina) and 242 whole-genome sequences. The milk QTL were also segregating in RDC and JER on the BTA20-targeted region; however, an indication of differences in the causal factor(s) was observed across breeds. A previously reported F279Y mutation (rs385640152) within the growth hormone

  14. Isolation and characterization of numerous novel phages targeting diverse strains of the ubiquitous and opportunistic pathogen Achromobacter xylosoxidans.

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    Johannes Wittmann

    Full Text Available The clinical relevance of nosocomially acquired infections caused by multi-resistant Achromobacter strains is rapidly increasing. Here, a diverse set of 61 Achromobacter xylosoxidans strains was characterized by MultiLocus Sequence Typing and Phenotype MicroArray technology. The strains were further analyzed in regard to their susceptibility to 35 antibiotics and to 34 different and newly isolated bacteriophages from the environment. A large proportion of strains were resistant against numerous antibiotics such as cephalosporines, aminoglycosides and quinolones, whereas piperacillin-tazobactam, ticarcillin, mezlocillin and imipenem were still inhibitory. We also present the first expanded study on bacteriophages of the genus Achromobacter that has been so far a blank slate with respect to phage research. The phages were isolated mainly from several waste water treatment plants in Germany. Morphological analysis of all of these phages by electron microscopy revealed a broad diversity with different members of the order Caudovirales, including the families Siphoviridae, Myoviridae, and Podoviridae. A broad spectrum of different host ranges could be determined for several phages that lysed up to 24 different and in part highly antibiotic resistant strains. Molecular characterisation by DNA restriction analysis revealed that all phages contain linear double-stranded DNA. Their restriction patterns display distinct differences underlining their broad diversity.

  15. Isolation and characterization of numerous novel phages targeting diverse strains of the ubiquitous and opportunistic pathogen Achromobacter xylosoxidans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittmann, Johannes; Dreiseikelmann, Brigitte; Rohde, Christine; Rohde, Manfred; Sikorski, Johannes

    2014-01-01

    The clinical relevance of nosocomially acquired infections caused by multi-resistant Achromobacter strains is rapidly increasing. Here, a diverse set of 61 Achromobacter xylosoxidans strains was characterized by MultiLocus Sequence Typing and Phenotype MicroArray technology. The strains were further analyzed in regard to their susceptibility to 35 antibiotics and to 34 different and newly isolated bacteriophages from the environment. A large proportion of strains were resistant against numerous antibiotics such as cephalosporines, aminoglycosides and quinolones, whereas piperacillin-tazobactam, ticarcillin, mezlocillin and imipenem were still inhibitory. We also present the first expanded study on bacteriophages of the genus Achromobacter that has been so far a blank slate with respect to phage research. The phages were isolated mainly from several waste water treatment plants in Germany. Morphological analysis of all of these phages by electron microscopy revealed a broad diversity with different members of the order Caudovirales, including the families Siphoviridae, Myoviridae, and Podoviridae. A broad spectrum of different host ranges could be determined for several phages that lysed up to 24 different and in part highly antibiotic resistant strains. Molecular characterisation by DNA restriction analysis revealed that all phages contain linear double-stranded DNA. Their restriction patterns display distinct differences underlining their broad diversity.

  16. Therapeutic effect of the YH6 phage in a murine hemorrhagic pneumonia model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Mei; Du, Chongtao; Gong, Pengjuan; Xia, Feifei; Sun, Changjiang; Feng, Xin; Lei, Liancheng; Song, Jun; Zhang, Lei; Wang, Bin; Xiao, Feng; Yan, Xinwu; Cui, Ziyin; Li, Xinwei; Gu, Jingmin; Han, Wenyu

    2015-10-01

    The treatment, in farmed mink, of hemorrhagic pneumonia caused by multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains has become increasingly difficult. This study investigated the potential use of phages as a therapy against hemorrhagic pneumonia caused by P. aeruginosa in a murine hemorrhagic pneumonia model. An N4-like phage designated YH6 was isolated using P. aeruginosa strain D9. YH6 is a virulent phage with efficient and broad host lytic activity against P. aeruginosa. No bacterial virulence- or lysogenesis-related ORF is present in the YH6 genome, making it eligible for use in phage therapy. In our murine experiments, a single intranasal administration of YH6 (2 × 10(7) PFU) 2 h after D9 intranasal injections at double minimum lethal dose was sufficient to protect mice against hemorrhagic pneumonia. The bacterial load in the lungs of YH6-protected mice was less than 10(3) CFU/g within 24 h after challenge and ultimately became undetectable, whereas the amount of bacteria in the lung tissue derived from unprotected mice was more than 10(8) CFU/g within 24 h after challenge. In view of its protective efficacy in this murine hemorrhagic pneumonia model, YH6 may serve as an alternative treatment strategy for infections caused by multidrug-resistant P. aeruginosa.

  17. Isolation and molecular characterisation of Achromobacter phage phiAxp-3, an N4-like bacteriophage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yanyan; Li, Erna; Qi, Zhizhen; Li, Huan; Wei, Xiao; Lin, Weishi; Zhao, Ruixiang; Jiang, Aimin; Yang, Huiying; Yin, Zhe; Yuan, Jing; Zhao, Xiangna

    2016-01-01

    Achromobacter xylosoxidans, an opportunistic pathogen, is responsible for various nosocomial and community-acquired infections. We isolated phiAxp-3, an N4-like bacteriophage that infects A. xylosoxidans, from hospital waste and studied its genomic and biological properties. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that, with a 67-nm diameter icosahedral head and a 20-nm non-contractile tail, phiAxp-3 has features characteristic of Podoviridae bacteriophages (order Caudovirales). With a burst size of 9000 plaque-forming units and a latent period of 80 min, phiAxp-3 had a host range limited to only four A. xylosoxidans strains of the 35 strains that were tested. The 72,825 bp phiAxp-3 DNA genome, with 416-bp terminal redundant ends, contains 80 predicted open reading frames, none of which are related to virulence or drug resistance. Genome sequence comparisons place phiAxp-3 more closely with JWAlpha and JWDelta Achromobacter phages than with other N4 viruses. Using proteomics, we identified 25 viral proteins from purified phiAxp-3 particles. Notably, investigation of the phage phiAxp-3 receptor on the surface of the host cell revealed that lipopolysaccharide serves as the receptor for the adsorption of phage phiAxp-3. Our findings advance current knowledge about A. xylosoxidans phages in an age where alternative therapies to combat antibiotic-resistant bacteria are urgently needed. PMID:27094846

  18. In Vivo Imaging of Molecularly Targeted Phage

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    Kimberly A. Kelly

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Rapid identification of in vivo affinity ligands would have far-reaching applications for imaging specific molecular targets, in vivo systems imaging, and medical use. We have developed a high-throughput method for identifying and optimizing ligands to map and image biologic targets of interest in vivo. We directly labeled viable phage clones with far-red fluorochromes and comparatively imaged them in vivo by multichannel fluorescence ratio imaging. Using Secreted Protein Acidic and Rich in Cysteine (osteonectin and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 as model targets, we show that: 1 fluorescently labeled phage retains target specificity on labeling; 2 in vivo distribution can be quantitated (detection thresholds of ~ 300 phage/mm3 tissue throughout the entire depth of the tumor using fluorescent tomographic imaging; and 3 fluorescently labeled phage itself can serve as a replenishable molecular imaging agent. The described method should find widespread application in the rapid in vivo discovery and validation of affinity ligands and, importantly, in the use of fluorochrome-labeled phage clones as in vivo imaging agents.

  19. Synthetic chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindler, Daniel; Waldminghaus, Torsten

    2015-11-01

    What a living organism looks like and how it works and what are its components-all this is encoded on DNA, the genetic blueprint. Consequently, the way to change an organism is to change its genetic information. Since the first pieces of recombinant DNA have been used to transform cells in the 1970s, this approach has been enormously extended. Bigger and bigger parts of the genetic information have been exchanged or added over the years. Now we are at a point where the construction of entire chromosomes becomes a reachable goal and first examples appear. This development leads to fundamental new questions, for example, about what is possible and desirable to build or what construction rules one needs to follow when building synthetic chromosomes. Here we review the recent progress in the field, discuss current challenges and speculate on the appearance of future synthetic chromosomes.

  20. Phages of Listeria offer novel tools for diagnostics and biocontrol

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    Martin J Loessner

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Historically, bacteriophages infecting their hosts have perhaps been best known and even notorious for being a nuisance in dairy-fermentation processes. However, with the rapid progress in molecular microbiology and microbial ecology, a new dawn has risen for phages. This review will provide an overview on possible uses and applications of Listeria phages, including phage-typing, reporter phage for bacterial diagnostics, and use of phage as biocontrol agents for food safety. The use of phage-encoded enzymes such as endolysins for the detection and as antimicrobial will also be addressed. Desirable properties of candidate phages for biocontrol will be discussed. While emphasizing the enormous future potential for applications, we will also consider some of the intrinsic limitations dictated by both phage and bacterial ecology.

  1. Current taxonomy of phages infecting lactic acid bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer eMahony

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Phages infecting lactic acid bacteria have been the focus of significant research attention over the past three decades. Through the isolation and characterization of hundreds of phage isolates, it has been possible to classify phages of the dairy starter and adjunct bacteria Lactococus lactis, Streptococcus thermophilus, Leuconostoc spp. and Lactobacillus spp. Among these, phages of L. lactis have been most thoroughly scrutinized and serve as an excellent model system to address issues that arise when attempting taxonomic classification of phages infecting other LAB species. Here, we present an overview of the current taxonomy of phages infecting LAB genera of industrial significance, the methods employed in these taxonomic efforts and how these may be employed for the taxonomy of phages of currently underrepresented and emerging phage species.

  2. Physiological and Molecular Characterization of Salmonella Bacteriophages Previously Used in Phage Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, J; Hong, Y; Fealey, M; Singh, A; Walton, K; Martin, C; Harman, N J; Mahlie, J; Ebner, P D

    2015-12-01

    The use of bacteriophages as biocontrol agents to control Salmonella in food production has gained popularity over the last two decades. Previously, our laboratory demonstrated that bacteriophages can be direct fed to limit Salmonella colonization and transmission in pigs. Here, we characterized the bacteriophages in our treatment cocktail in terms of lytic spectrum, growth kinetics, survivability under various conditions, and genomic sequencing. PCR-based fingerprinting indicated that 9 of the 10 phages, while related, were distinct isolates. Single-step growth kinetics analysis determined that the eclipse periods, latent periods, and burst sizes averaged 21.5 min, 31.5 min, and 43.3 particles, respectively. The viability of the phages was measured after exposure to various pH ranges, temperatures, digestive enzymes, UV light, and chlorinated water. Temperatures greater than 87.5°C, pH of phages. Only select bacteriophages, however, were affected by incubation at temperatures of ≤75.0°C or pH of 4.0 to 10.0. Genomic sequencing of the phage with the broadest spectrum in the collection (effectively lysed all four Salmonella serovars tested), vB_SalM_SJ2, revealed it to belong to the Viunalikevirus genus of the Myoviridae family. Of the 197 predicted open reading frames, no toxin-associated, lysogenic, Salmonella virulence, or antimicrobial resistance genes were identified. Taken together, these data indicate that phages, as biologicals, may require some manner of protection (e.g., microencapsulation) to remain viable under various physiological and manufacturing conditions. In addition, based on its ability to effectively lyse diverse Salmonella serovars, phage vB_SalM-SJ2 could be further developed as an important biocontrol agent in various aspects of food production when the exact serovar or strain of contaminating Salmonella is not yet known.

  3. Rapid Detection of Viable Bacillus anthracis Spores in Environmental Samples by Using Engineered Reporter Phages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, Natasha J.; Molineux, Ian J.; Page, Martin A.

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus anthracis, the causative agent of anthrax, was utilized as a bioterrorism agent in 2001 when spores were distributed via the U.S. postal system. In responding to this event, the Federal Bureau of Investigation used traditional bacterial culture viability assays to ascertain the extent of contamination of the postal facilities within 24 to 48 h of environmental sample acquisition. Here, we describe a low-complexity, second-generation reporter phage assay for the rapid detection of viable B. anthracis spores in environmental samples. The assay uses an engineered B. anthracis reporter phage (Wβ::luxAB-2) which transduces bioluminescence to infected cells. To facilitate low-level environmental detection and maximize the signal response, expression of luxAB in an earlier version of the reporter phage (Wβ::luxAB-1) was optimized. These alterations prolonged signal kinetics, increased light output, and improved assay sensitivity. Using Wβ::luxAB-2, detection of B. anthracis spores was 1 CFU in 8 h from pure cultures and as low as 10 CFU/g in sterile soil but increased to 105 CFU/g in unprocessed soil due to an unstable signal and the presence of competing bacteria. Inclusion of semiselective medium, mediated by a phage-expressed antibiotic resistance gene, maintained signal stability and enabled the detection of 104 CFU/g in 6 h. The assay does not require spore extraction and relies on the phage infecting germinating cells directly in the soil sample. This reporter phage displays promise for the rapid detection of low levels of spores on clean surfaces and also in grossly contaminated environmental samples from complex matrices such as soils. PMID:26873316

  4. Rapid Detection of Viable Bacillus anthracis Spores in Environmental Samples by Using Engineered Reporter Phages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, Natasha J; Molineux, Ian J; Page, Martin A; Schofield, David A

    2016-04-01

    Bacillus anthracis, the causative agent of anthrax, was utilized as a bioterrorism agent in 2001 when spores were distributed via the U.S. postal system. In responding to this event, the Federal Bureau of Investigation used traditional bacterial culture viability assays to ascertain the extent of contamination of the postal facilities within 24 to 48 h of environmental sample acquisition. Here, we describe a low-complexity, second-generation reporter phage assay for the rapid detection of viableB. anthracis spores in environmental samples. The assay uses an engineered B. anthracis reporter phage (Wβ::luxAB-2) which transduces bioluminescence to infected cells. To facilitate low-level environmental detection and maximize the signal response, expression of luxABin an earlier version of the reporter phage (Wβ::luxAB-1) was optimized. These alterations prolonged signal kinetics, increased light output, and improved assay sensitivity. Using Wβ::luxAB-2, detection of B. anthracis spores was 1 CFU in 8 h from pure cultures and as low as 10 CFU/g in sterile soil but increased to 10(5)CFU/g in unprocessed soil due to an unstable signal and the presence of competing bacteria. Inclusion of semiselective medium, mediated by a phage-expressed antibiotic resistance gene, maintained signal stability and enabled the detection of 10(4)CFU/g in 6 h. The assay does not require spore extraction and relies on the phage infecting germinating cells directly in the soil sample. This reporter phage displays promise for the rapid detection of low levels of spores on clean surfaces and also in grossly contaminated environmental samples from complex matrices such as soils.

  5. Mechanistic Insights Into Filamentous Phage Integration In Vibrio cholerae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhabatosh eDas

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Vibrio cholerae, the etiological agent of acute diarrhoeal disease cholera, harbors large numbers of lysogenic filamentous phages, contribute significantly to the host pathogenesis and provide fitness factors to the pathogen that help the bacterium to survive in natural environment. Most of the vibriophage genomes are not equipped with integrase and thus exploit two host-encoded tyrosine recombinases, XerC and XerD, for lysogenic conversion. Integration is site-specific and it occurs at dimer resolution site (dif of either one or both chromosomes of V. cholerae. Each dif sequence contains two recombinase-binding sequences flanking a central region. The integration follows a sequential strand exchanges between dif and attP sites within a DNA-protein complex consisting of one pair of each recombinase and two DNA fragments. During entire process of recombination, both the DNA components and recombinases of the synaptic complex keep transiently interconnected. Within the context of synaptic complex, both of the actuated enzymes mediate cleavage of phosphodiester bonds. First cleavage generates a phosphotyrosyl-linked recombinase-DNA complex at the recombinase binding sequence and free 5’-hydroxyl end at the first base of the central region. Following the cleavage, the exposed bases with 5’-hydroxyl ends of the central region of dif and attP sites melt from their complementary strands and react with the recombinase-DNA phosphotyrosyl linkage of their recombining partner. Subsequent ligation between dif and attP strands requires complementary base pair interactions at the site of phosphodiester bond formation. Integration mechanism is mostly influenced by the compatibility of dif and attP sequences. dif sites are highly conserved across bacterial phyla. Different phage genomes have different attP sequences; therefore they rely on different mechanisms for integration. Here, I review our current understanding of integration mechanisms used by the

  6. The Caulobacter crescentus phage phiCbK: genomics of a canonical phage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gill Jason J

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The bacterium Caulobacter crescentus is a popular model for the study of cell cycle regulation and senescence. The large prolate siphophage phiCbK has been an important tool in C. crescentus biology, and has been studied in its own right as a model for viral morphogenesis. Although a system of some interest, to date little genomic information is available on phiCbK or its relatives. Results Five novel phiCbK-like C. crescentus bacteriophages, CcrMagneto, CcrSwift, CcrKarma, CcrRogue and CcrColossus, were isolated from the environment. The genomes of phage phiCbK and these five environmental phage isolates were obtained by 454 pyrosequencing. The phiCbK-like phage genomes range in size from 205 kb encoding 318 proteins (phiCbK to 280 kb encoding 448 proteins (CcrColossus, and were found to contain nonpermuted terminal redundancies of 10 to 17 kb. A novel method of terminal ligation was developed to map genomic termini, which confirmed termini predicted by coverage analysis. This suggests that sequence coverage discontinuities may be useable as predictors of genomic termini in phage genomes. Genomic modules encoding virion morphogenesis, lysis and DNA replication proteins were identified. The phiCbK-like phages were also found to encode a number of intriguing proteins; all contain a clearly T7-like DNA polymerase, and five of the six encode a possible homolog of the C. crescentus cell cycle regulator GcrA, which may allow the phage to alter the host cell’s replicative state. The structural proteome of phage phiCbK was determined, identifying the portal, major and minor capsid proteins, the tail tape measure and possible tail fiber proteins. All six phage genomes are clearly related; phiCbK, CcrMagneto, CcrSwift, CcrKarma and CcrRogue form a group related at the DNA level, while CcrColossus is more diverged but retains significant similarity at the protein level. Conclusions Due to their lack of any apparent relationship to

  7. Phage therapy reduces Campylobacter jejuni colonization in broilers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wagenaar, J.A.; Bergen, van M.A.P.; Mueller, M.A.; Wassenaar, T.M.; Carlton, R.M.

    2005-01-01

    The effect of phage therapy in the control of Campylobacter jejuni colonization in young broilers, either as a preventive or a therapeutic measure, was tested. A prevention group was infected with C. jejuni at day 4 of a 10-day phage treatment. A therapeutic group was phage treated for 6 days, start

  8. Effect of bacteriophage infection in combination with tobramycin on the emergence of resistance in Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coulter, Lindsey B; McLean, Robert J C; Rohde, Rodney E; Aron, Gary M

    2014-10-03

    Bacteriophage infection and antibiotics used individually to reduce biofilm mass often result in the emergence of significant levels of phage and antibiotic resistant cells. In contrast, combination therapy in Escherichia coli biofilms employing T4 phage and tobramycin resulted in greater than 99% and 39% reduction in antibiotic and phage resistant cells, respectively. In P. aeruginosa biofilms, combination therapy resulted in a 60% and 99% reduction in antibiotic and PB-1 phage resistant cells, respectively. Although the combined treatment resulted in greater reduction of E. coli CFUs compared to the use of antibiotic alone, infection of P. aeruginosa biofilms with PB-1 in the presence of tobramycin was only as effective in the reduction of CFUs as the use of antibiotic alone. The study demonstrated phage infection in combination with tobramycin can significantly reduce the emergence of antibiotic and phage resistant cells in both E. coli and P. aeruginosa biofilms, however, a reduction in biomass was dependent on the phage-host system.

  9. Cell biology perspectives in phage biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansaldi, Mireille

    2012-01-01

    Cellular biology has long been restricted to large cellular organisms. However, as the resolution of microscopic methods increased, it became possible to study smaller cells, in particular bacterial cells. Bacteriophage biology is one aspect of bacterial cell biology that has recently gained insight from cell biology. Despite their small size, bacteriophages could be successfully labeled and their cycle studied in the host cells. This review aims to put together, although non-extensively, several cell biology studies that recently pushed the elucidation of key mechanisms in phage biology, such as the lysis-lysogeny decision in temperate phages or genome replication and transcription, one step further.

  10. Comparative genetic mapping revealed powdery mildew resistance gene MlWE4 derived from wild emmer is located in same genomic region of Pm36 and Ml3D232 on chromosome 5BL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Dong; WANG Yong; CHEN Yong-xing; LIU Zhi-yong; OUYANG Shu-hong; WANG Li-li; CUI Yu; WU Qiu-hong; LIANG Yong; WANG Zhen-zhong; XIE Jing-zhong; ZHANG De-yun

    2015-01-01

    Powdery mildew, caused by Blumeria graminis f. sp. tritici, is one of the most devastating wheat diseases. Wild emmer wheat (Triticum turgidum ssp. dicoccoides) is a promising source of disease resistance for wheat. A powdery mildew resistance gene conferring resistance to B. graminis f. sp. tritici isolate E09, originating from wild emmer wheat, has been transferred into the hexaploid wheat line WE4 through crossing and backcrossing. Genetic analyses indicated that the powdery mildew resistance was control ed by a single dominant gene, temporarily designated MlWE4. By mean of comparative genomics and bulked segregant analysis, a genetic linkage map of MlWE4 was constructed, and MlWE4 was mapped on the distal region of chromosome arm 5BL. Comparative genetic linkage maps showed that genes MlWE4, Pm36 and Ml3D232 were co-segregated with markers XBD37670 and XBD37680, indicating they are likely the same gene or al eles in the same locus. The co-segregated markers provide a starting point for chromosome landing and map-based cloning of MlWE4, Pm36 and Ml3D232.

  11. Repetitive, Marker-Free, Site-Specific Integration as a Novel Tool for Multiple Chromosomal Integration of DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Kia Vest; Martinussen, Jan; Jensen, Peter Ruhdal

    2013-01-01

    We present a tool for repetitive, marker-free, site-specific integration in Lactococcus lactis, in which a nonreplicating plasmid vector (pKV6) carrying a phage attachment site (attP) can be integrated into a bacterial attachment site (attB). The novelty of the tool described here is the inclusion...... of a minimal bacterial attachment site (attBmin), two mutated loxP sequences (lox66 and lox71) allowing for removal of undesirable vector elements (antibiotic resistance marker), and a counterselection marker (oroP) for selection of loxP recombination on the pKV6 vector. When transformed into L. lactis...... expressing the phage TP901-1 integrase, pKV6 integrates with high frequency into the chromosome, where it is flanked by attL and attR hybrid attachment sites. After expression of Cre recombinase from a plasmid that is not able to replicate in L. lactis, loxP recombinants can be selected for by using 5...

  12. Complete genome sequence of Vibrio anguillarum phage CHOED successfully used for phage therapy in aquaculture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Romero, Jaime; Higuera, Gastón; Gajardo, Felipe

    2014-01-01

    Vibrio anguillarum phage CHOED was isolated from Chilean mussels. It is a virulent phage showing effective inhibition of V. anguillarum. CHOED has potential in phage therapy, because it can protect fish from vibriosis in fish farms. Here, we announce the completely sequenced genome of V. anguilla...

  13. Molecular cloning and chromosome assignment of murine N-ras.

    OpenAIRE

    Ryan, J.; Hart, C P; Ruddle, F H

    1984-01-01

    The murine N-ras gene was cloned by screening an EMBL-3 recombinant phage library with a human N-ras specific probe. Hybridization of two separate unique sequence N-ras probes, isolated from the 5' and 3' flanking sequences of the murine gene, to a mouse-Chinese hamster hybrid mapping panel assigns the N-ras locus to mouse chromosome three.

  14. Identification and chromosomal mapping of insect-resistant gene Bt in up-land cotton%陆地棉Bt抗虫基因类型鉴定与染色体定位

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    安百伟; 赵亮; 狄佳春; 陈旭升

    2016-01-01

    In order to define the inheritance of insect⁃resistant traits, insect⁃resistant gene types and the position of the insect⁃resistant gene on chromosomes in a Bt transgenic cotton germplasm N099, the insect resistance and susceptibility was evaluated in a F2 population of non⁃resistant N099 and resistant Hai7124 ( Gossypium barbadense) . Results showed that the resistance was controlled by a single pair of dominant gene. N099 was identified by Bt protein strip and DNA⁃PCR to contain bivalent Bt insect⁃resistant gene, Cry1Ac+Cry2A. A pair of polymorphic primer NAU2912 two hundred and thirty⁃four pairs of primers covering 26 cotton chromosomes was found in a near⁃isogenic pool consisting of resistant&susceptible F2 cotton plants to be linked with the Bt gene Cry1Ac+Cry2A. Known the primer on cotton chromosome 26, then other prim⁃ers on the chromosome flanking 50 cM from the primer were screened, which received 16 pairs of primers linked with the Bt gene. It was located between SSR marker dc40260 and cgr6702, with genetic distance 1�8 cM and 2�9 cM respectively. Thus, the bivalent Bt gene is mapped on the cotton chromosome 26.%为明确Bt抗虫棉种质系N099的抗虫性状遗传方式、抗虫基因类型以及抗虫基因插入染色体的位置,用N099为父本与非抗虫海岛棉海7124杂交,分析了F2分离世代遗传方式,结果表明该抗虫棉的抗虫性状呈简单的1对显性基因控制的质量遗传方式。进一步在Bt毒蛋白和DNA 2个层面对该抗虫基因类型进行鉴定,结果显示N099所含抗虫基因为双价Bt基因Cry1Ac+Cry2A。而后利用234对核心引物对F2代抗、感株组成的近等基因混池进行多态性筛选,发现其中1对多态性引物NAU2912与该Bt基因连锁。已知引物NAU2912位于棉花第26染色体上,通过对该引物上、下50�0 cM之间的其他引物进行多态性筛选,共获得16对引物与双价Bt基因相连锁,目

  15. Interaction Analysis through Proteomic Phage Display

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustav N. Sundell

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Phage display is a powerful technique for profiling specificities of peptide binding domains. The method is suited for the identification of high-affinity ligands with inhibitor potential when using highly diverse combinatorial peptide phage libraries. Such experiments further provide consensus motifs for genome-wide scanning of ligands of potential biological relevance. A complementary but considerably less explored approach is to display expression products of genomic DNA, cDNA, open reading frames (ORFs, or oligonucleotide libraries designed to encode defined regions of a target proteome on phage particles. One of the main applications of such proteomic libraries has been the elucidation of antibody epitopes. This review is focused on the use of proteomic phage display to uncover protein-protein interactions of potential relevance for cellular function. The method is particularly suited for the discovery of interactions between peptide binding domains and their targets. We discuss the largely unexplored potential of this method in the discovery of domain-motif interactions of potential biological relevance.

  16. Isolation and characterization of DNA probes for human chromosome 21.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, P C

    1990-01-01

    A coordinated effort to map and sequence the human genome has recently become a national priority. Chromosome 21, the smallest human chromosome accounting for less than 2% of the human genome, is an attractive model system for developing and evaluating genome mapping technology. Several strategies are currently being explored including the development of chromosome 21 libraries from somatic cell hybrids as reported here, the cloning of chromosome 21 in yeast artificial chromosomes (McCormick et al., 1989b), and the construction of chromosome 21 libraries using chromosome flow-sorting techniques (Fuscoe et al., 1989). This report describes the approaches used to identify DNA probes that are useful for mapping chromosome 21. Probes were successfully isolated from both phage and cosmid libraries made from two somatic cell hybrids that contain human chromosome 21 as the only human chromosome. The 15 cosmid clones from the WA17 library, reduced to cloned DNA sequences of an average size of 3 kb, total 525 kb of DNA which is approximately 1% of chromosome 21. From these clones, a set of polymorphic DNA markers that span the length of the long arm of chromosome 21 has been generated. All of the probes thus far analyzed from the WA17 libraries have been mapped to chromosome 21 both by physical and genetic mapping methods. It is therefore likely that the WA17 hybrid cell line contains human chromosome 21 as the only human component, in agreement with cytogenetic observation. The 153E7b cosmid libraries will provide an alternative source of cloned chromosome 21 DNA. Library screening techniques can be employed to obtain cloned DNA sequences from the same genetic loci of the two different chromosome 21s. Comparative analysis will allow direct estimation of DNA sequence variation for different regions of chromosome 21. Mapped DNA probes make possible the molecular analysis of chromosome 21 at a level of resolution not achievable by classical cytogenetic techniques (Graw et al

  17. Phage-bacteria interaction network in human oral microbiome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jinfeng; Gao, Yuan; Zhao, Fangqing

    2016-07-01

    Although increasing knowledge suggests that bacteriophages play important roles in regulating microbial ecosystems, phage-bacteria interaction in human oral cavities remains less understood. Here we performed a metagenomic analysis to explore the composition and variation of oral dsDNA phage populations and potential phage-bacteria interaction. A total of 1,711 contigs assembled with more than 100 Gb shotgun sequencing data were annotated to 104 phages based on their best BLAST matches against the NR database. Bray-Curtis dissimilarities demonstrated that both phage and bacterial composition are highly diverse between periodontally healthy samples but show a trend towards homogenization in diseased gingivae samples. Significantly, according to the CRISPR arrays that record infection relationship between bacteria and phage, we found certain oral phages were able to invade other bacteria besides their putative bacterial hosts. These cross-infective phages were positively correlated with commensal bacteria while were negatively correlated with major periodontal pathogens, suggesting possible connection between these phages and microbial community structure in oral cavities. By characterizing phage-bacteria interaction as networks rather than exclusively pairwise predator-prey relationships, our study provides the first insight into the participation of cross-infective phages in forming human oral microbiota.

  18. Essential validation methods for E. coli strains created by chromosome engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Krishnan, S.T.; Moolman, M.C.; van Laar, T.; Meyer, A. S; Dekker, N.H.

    2015-01-01

    Background Chromosome engineering encompasses a collection of homologous recombination-based techniques that are employed to modify the genome of a model organism in a controlled fashion. Such techniques are widely used in both fundamental and industrial research to introduce multiple insertions in the same Escherichia coli strain. To date, λ-Red recombination (also known as recombineering) and P1 phage transduction are the most successfully implemented chromosome engineering techniques in E....

  19. Therapeutic effect of Pseudomonas aeruginosa phage YH30 on mink hemorrhagic pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Jingmin; Li, Xinwei; Yang, Mei; Du, Chongtao; Cui, Ziyin; Gong, Pengjuan; Xia, Feifei; Song, Jun; Zhang, Lei; Li, Juecheng; Yu, Chuang; Sun, Changjiang; Feng, Xin; Lei, Liancheng; Han, Wenyu

    2016-07-15

    Hemorrhagic pneumonia caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa remains one of the most costly infectious diseases among farmed mink and commonly leads to large economic losses during mink production. The objective of this study was to investigate the potential of using phages as a therapy against hemorrhagic pneumonia in mink. A broad-host-range phage from the Podoviridae family, YH30, was isolated using the mink-originating P. aeruginosa (serotype G) D7 strain as a host. The genome of YH30 was 72,192bp (54.92% G+C), contained 86 open reading frames and lacked regions encoding known virulence factors, integration-related proteins or antibiotic resistance determinants. These characteristics make YH30 eligible for use in phage therapy. The results of a curative treatment experiment demonstrated that a single intranasal administration of YH30 was sufficient to cure hemorrhagic pneumonia in mink. The mean colony count of P. aeruginosa in the blood and lung of YH30-protected mink was less than 10(3) CFU/mL (g) within 24h of bacterial challenge and ultimately became undetectable, whereas that in unprotected mink reached more than 10(8) CFU/mL (g). Additionally, YH30 dramatically improved the pathological manifestations of lung injury in mink with hemorrhagic pneumonia. Our work demonstrates the potential of phages to treat P. aeruginosa-caused hemorrhagic pneumonia in mink.

  20. An Electrochemiluminescence Immunosensor Based on Gold-Magnetic Nanoparticles and Phage Displayed Antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Xihui; Tong, Zhaoyang; Huang, Qibin; Liu, Bing; Liu, Zhiwei; Hao, Lanqun; Dong, Hua; Zhang, Jinping; Gao, Chuan

    2016-02-27

    Using the multiple advantages of the ultra-highly sensitive electrochemiluminescence (ECL) technique, Staphylococcus protein A (SPA) functionalized gold-magnetic nanoparticles and phage displayed antibodies, and using gold-magnetic nanoparticles coated with SPA and coupled with a polyclonal antibody (pcAb) as magnetic capturing probes, and Ru(bpy)₃(2+)-labeled phage displayed antibody as a specific luminescence probe, this study reports a new way to detect ricin with a highly sensitive and specific ECL immunosensor and amplify specific detection signals. The linear detection range of the sensor was 0.0001~200 µg/L, and the limit of detection (LOD) was 0.0001 µg/L, which is 2500-fold lower than that of the conventional ELISA technique. The gold-magnetic nanoparticles, SPA and Ru(bpy)₃(2+)-labeled phage displayed antibody displayed different amplifying effects in the ECL immunosensor and can decrease LOD 3-fold, 3-fold and 20-fold, respectively, compared with the ECL immunosensors without one of the three effects. The integrated amplifying effect can decrease the LOD 180-fold. The immunosensor integrates the unique advantages of SPA-coated gold-magnetic nanoparticles that improve the activity of the functionalized capturing probe, and the amplifying effect of the Ru(bpy)₃(2+)-labeled phage displayed antibodies, so it increases specificity, interference-resistance and decreases LOD. It is proven to be well suited for the analysis of trace amounts of ricin in various environmental samples with high recovery ratios and reproducibility.

  1. Phage endolysins with broad antimicrobial activity against Enterococcus faecalis clinical strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proença, Daniela; Fernandes, Sofia; Leandro, Clara; Silva, Filipa Antunes; Santos, Sofia; Lopes, Fátima; Mato, Rosario; Cavaco-Silva, Patrícia; Pimentel, Madalena; São-José, Carlos

    2012-06-01

    Increasing antibiotic resistance of bacterial pathogens has drawn the attention to the potential use of bacteriophage endolysins as alternative antibacterial agents. Here we have identified, characterized, and studied the lytic potential of two endolysins, Lys168 and Lys170, from phages infecting Enterococcus faecalis. Lys168 and Lys170 belong to the cysteine, histidine-dependent amidohydrolases/peptidases (CHAP) and amidase-2 protein families, respectively. Lys168 is quite a unique enterococcal phage endolysin. It shares 95% amino acidic identity with the endolysin of Staphylococcus aureus phage SAP6, which in turn is distantly related to all known CHAP endolysins of S. aureus phages. Lys170 seems to be a natural chimera assembling catalytic and cell-wall-binding domains of different origin. Both endolysins showed a clear preference to act against E. faecalis and they were able to lyse a high proportion of clinical isolates of this species. Specifically, Lys168 and Lys170 lysed more than 70% and 90% of the tested isolates, respectively, which included a panel of diverse and typed strains representative of highly prevalent clonal complexes. Lys170 was active against all tested E. faecalis VRE strains. The quasi specificity toward E. faecalis is discussed considering the nature of the enzymes' functional domains and the structure of the cell wall peptidoglycan.

  2. Synergistic phage-antibiotic combinations for the control of Escherichia coli biofilms in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Elizabeth M; Alkawareek, Mahmoud Y; Donnelly, Ryan F; Gilmore, Brendan F

    2012-07-01

    The potential application of phage therapy for the control of bacterial biofilms has received increasing attention as resistance to conventional antibiotic agents continues to increase. The present study identifies antimicrobial synergy between bacteriophage T4 and a conventional antibiotic, cefotaxime, via standard plaque assay and, importantly, in the in vitro eradication of biofilms of the T4 host strain Escherichia coli 11303. Phage-antibiotic synergy (PAS) is defined as the phenomenon whereby sub-lethal concentrations of certain antibiotics can substantially stimulate the host bacteria's production of virulent phage. Increasing sub-lethal concentrations of cefotaxime resulted in an observed increase in T4 plaque size and T4 concentration. The application of PAS to the T4 one-step growth curve also resulted in an increased burst size and reduced latent period. Combinations of T4 bacteriophage and cefotaxime significantly enhanced the eradication of bacterial biofilms when compared to treatment with cefotaxime alone. The addition of medium (10(4) PFU mL(-1)) and high (10(7) PFU mL(-1)) phage titres reduced the minimum biofilm eradication concentration value of cefotaxime against E. coli ATCC 11303 biofilms from 256 to 128 and 32 μg mL(-1), respectively. Although further investigation is needed to confirm PAS, this study demonstrates, for the first time, that synergy between bacteriophage and conventional antibiotics can significantly improve biofilm control in vitro.

  3. Display technology on filamentous phage in the search for anti-infective biological agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson Santiago Vispo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The causes of antibiotic resistance are complex. The phage display technology has been used mainly to produce monoclonal antibodies (MAbs and peptides directed against cancer or inflammatory disease targets. Today, this technology is recognized as a powerful tool for selecting novel peptides and antibodies that can bind to a wide range of antigens, ranging from whole cells to proteins and lipid targets. In this review, we highlight research that exploits the phage display technology to discover new drugs against infectious diseases, with a focus on antimicrobial peptides and antibodies. Methods: Basic and recent literature review was made, mainly focused on general aspects of phage display technology and the application in the search of new peptides or antibodies of pharmaceutical use to combat the infectious diseases transmitted by bacteria and virus. Results: Updated information on the selected topics is shown, with a guiding and practical approach aimed at researchers in the field of molecular biology to continue deepening the technology with special emphasis in the applications that have been developed in Cuba. Conclusions: Advances in methods of screening, manufacturing, and humanization technologies show that phage display technology can significantly contribute in the fight against clinically important pathogens.

  4. An Electrochemiluminescence Immunosensor Based on Gold-Magnetic Nanoparticles and Phage Displayed Antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xihui Mu

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Using the multiple advantages of the ultra-highly sensitive electrochemiluminescence (ECL technique, Staphylococcus protein A (SPA functionalized gold-magnetic nanoparticles and phage displayed antibodies, and using gold-magnetic nanoparticles coated with SPA and coupled with a polyclonal antibody (pcAb as magnetic capturing probes, and Ru(bpy32+-labeled phage displayed antibody as a specific luminescence probe, this study reports a new way to detect ricin with a highly sensitive and specific ECL immunosensor and amplify specific detection signals. The linear detection range of the sensor was 0.0001~200 µg/L, and the limit of detection (LOD was 0.0001 µg/L, which is 2500-fold lower than that of the conventional ELISA technique. The gold-magnetic nanoparticles, SPA and Ru(bpy32+-labeled phage displayed antibody displayed different amplifying effects in the ECL immunosensor and can decrease LOD 3-fold, 3-fold and 20-fold, respectively, compared with the ECL immunosensors without one of the three effects. The integrated amplifying effect can decrease the LOD 180-fold. The immunosensor integrates the unique advantages of SPA-coated gold-magnetic nanoparticles that improve the activity of the functionalized capturing probe, and the amplifying effect of the Ru(bpy32+-labeled phage displayed antibodies, so it increases specificity, interference-resistance and decreases LOD. It is proven to be well suited for the analysis of trace amounts of ricin in various environmental samples with high recovery ratios and reproducibility.

  5. Small regulatory RNAs in lambdoid bacteriophages and phage-derived plasmids: Not only antisense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nejman-Faleńczyk, Bożena; Bloch, Sylwia; Licznerska, Katarzyna; Felczykowska, Agnieszka; Dydecka, Aleksandra; Węgrzyn, Alicja; Węgrzyn, Grzegorz

    2015-03-01

    Until recently, only two small regulatory RNAs encoded by lambdoid bacteriophages were known. These transcripts are derived from paQ and pO promoters. The former one is supposed to act as an antisense RNA for expression of the Q gene, encoding a transcription antitermination protein. The latter transcript, called oop RNA, was initially proposed to have a double role, in establishing expression of the cI gene and in providing a primer for DNA replication. Although the initially proposed mechanisms by which oop RNA could influence the choice between two alternative developmental pathways of the phage and the initiation of phage DNA replication were found not true, the pO promoter has been demonstrated to be important for both regulation of phage development and control of DNA replication. Namely, the pO-derived transcript is an antisense RNA for expression of the cII gene, and pO is a part of a dual promoter system responsible for regulation of initiation of DNA synthesis from the oriλ region. Very recent studies identified a battery of small RNAs encoded by lambdoid bacteriophages existing as prophages in chromosomes of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli strains. Some of them have very interesting functions, like anti-small RNAs.

  6. Chromosome Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    Perceptive Scientific Instruments, Inc., provides the foundation for the Powergene line of chromosome analysis and molecular genetic instrumentation. This product employs image processing technology from NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory and image enhancement techniques from Johnson Space Center. Originally developed to send pictures back to earth from space probes, digital imaging techniques have been developed and refined for use in a variety of medical applications, including diagnosis of disease.

  7. Antimicrobial Susceptibilities, Phage Types, and Molecular Characterization of Salmonella enterica Serovar Enteritidis from Chickens and Chicken Meat in Turkey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalender, H.; Sen, S.; Hasman, Henrik

    2009-01-01

    Thirty-eight Salmonella Enteritidis isolates from chickens and chicken meat in Turkey were examined for antimicrobial susceptibility, XbaI pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) patterns, phage types, plasmid profiles, and resistance genes. Seven different PFGE patterns were observed...

  8. Twelve previously unknown phage genera are ubiquitous in global oceans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmfeldt, Karin; Solonenko, Natalie; Shah, Manesh; Corrier, Kristen; Riemann, Lasse; Verberkmoes, Nathan C; Sullivan, Matthew B

    2013-07-30

    Viruses are fundamental to ecosystems ranging from oceans to humans, yet our ability to study them is bottlenecked by the lack of ecologically relevant isolates, resulting in "unknowns" dominating culture-independent surveys. Here we present genomes from 31 phages infecting multiple strains of the aquatic bacterium Cellulophaga baltica (Bacteroidetes) to provide data for an underrepresented and environmentally abundant bacterial lineage. Comparative genomics delineated 12 phage groups that (i) each represent a new genus, and (ii) represent one novel and four well-known viral families. This diversity contrasts the few well-studied marine phage systems, but parallels the diversity of phages infecting human-associated bacteria. Although all 12 Cellulophaga phages represent new genera, the podoviruses and icosahedral, nontailed ssDNA phages were exceptional, with genomes up to twice as large as those previously observed for each phage type. Structural novelty was also substantial, requiring experimental phage proteomics to identify 83% of the structural proteins. The presence of uncommon nucleotide metabolism genes in four genera likely underscores the importance of scavenging nutrient-rich molecules as previously seen for phages in marine environments. Metagenomic recruitment analyses suggest that these particular Cellulophaga phages are rare and may represent a first glimpse into the phage side of the rare biosphere. However, these analyses also revealed that these phage genera are widespread, occurring in 94% of 137 investigated metagenomes. Together, this diverse and novel collection of phages identifies a small but ubiquitous fraction of unknown marine viral diversity and provides numerous environmentally relevant phage-host systems for experimental hypothesis testing.

  9. The genome and proteome of a virulent Escherichia coli O157:H7 bacteriophage closely resembling Salmonella phage Felix O1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waddell Thomas E

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Based upon whole genome and proteome analysis, Escherichia coli O157:H7-specific bacteriophage (phage wV8 belongs to the new myoviral genus, "the Felix O1-like viruses" along with Salmonella phage Felix O1 and Erwinia amylovora phage φEa21-4. The genome characteristics of phage wV8 (size 88.49 kb, mol%G+C 38.9, 138 ORFs, 23 tRNAs are very similar to those of phage Felix O1 (86.16 kb, 39.0 mol%G+C, 131 ORFs and 22 tRNAs and, indeed most of the proteins have their closest homologs within Felix O1. Approximately one-half of the Escherichia coli O157:H7 mutants resistant to phage wV8 still serotype as O157:H7 indicating that this phage may recognize, like coliphage T4, two different surface receptors: lipopolysaccharide and, perhaps, an outer membrane protein.

  10. Detection of staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec type XI carrying highly divergent mecA, mecI, mecR1, blaZ, and ccr genes in human clinical isolates of clonal complex 130 methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Shore, Anna C

    2011-08-01

    Methicillin resistance in staphylococci is mediated by penicillin binding protein 2a (PBP 2a), encoded by mecA on mobile staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) elements. In this study, two clonal complex 130 (CC130) methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) isolates from patients in Irish hospitals were identified that were phenotypically PBP 2a positive but lacked mecA by conventional PCR and by DNA microarray screening. The isolates were identified as methicillin-susceptible S. aureus using the GeneXpert real-time PCR assay. Whole-genome sequencing of one isolate (M10\\/0061) revealed a 30-kb SCCmec element encoding a class E mec complex with highly divergent blaZ-mecA-mecR1-mecI, a type 8 cassette chromosome recombinase (ccr) complex consisting of ccrA1-ccrB3, an arsenic resistance operon, and flanking direct repeats (DRs). The SCCmec element was almost identical to that of SCCmec type XI (SCCmec XI) identified by the Sanger Institute in sequence type 425 bovine MRSA strain LGA251 listed on the website of the International Working Group on the Classification of Staphylococcal Cassette Chromosome Elements. The open reading frames (ORFs) identified within SCCmec XI of M10\\/0061 exhibited 21 to 93% amino acid identity to ORFs in GenBank. A third DR was identified ca. 3 kb downstream of SCCmec XI, indicating the presence of a possible SCC remnant. SCCmec XI was also identified in the second CC130 MRSA isolate by PCR and sequencing. The CC130 MRSA isolates may be of animal origin as previously reported CC130 S. aureus strains were predominantly from bovine sources. The highly divergent nature of SCCmec XI relative to other SCCmec elements indicates that it may have originated in another taxon.

  11. Construction and characterization of genomic libraries from specific human chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krumlauf, R; Jeanpierre, M; Young, B D

    1982-05-01

    Highly purified fractions of human chromosomes 21 and 22 were isolated from a suspension of metaphase chromosomes stained with ethidium bromide by using a fluorescence-activated cell sorter (FACS II). Two recombinant DNA libraries, representing chromosomes 21 and 22, were constructed by complete digestion of DNA from these fractions with EcoRI and insertion into the vector lambda gtWES lambda B. Twenty clones selected at random from the chromosome 22 library hybridized to EcoRI-digested human DNA, and five of these clones hybridized to single bands identical in size to the phage inserts. These five single-copy sequences and a clone coding for an 8S RNA isolated by screening the chromosome 22 library for expressed sequences were characterized in detail. Hybridization of all six clones to a panel of sorted chromosomes and hybrid cell lines confirmed the assignment of the sequences to chromosome 22. The sequences were localized to regions of chromosome 22 by hybridization to translocated chromosomes sorted from a cell line having a balanced translocation t(17;22)(p13;q11) and to hybrid cell lines containing the various portions of another translocation t(X;22)(q13;q112). Five clones reside on the long arm of chromosome 22 between q112 and pter, while one clone and an 18S rRNA gene isolated from the chromosome 22 library reside pter and g112. The construction of chromosome-specific libraries by this method has the advantage of being direct and applicable to nearly all human chromosomes and will be important in molecular analysis of human genetic diseases.

  12. Bacteriophage selection against a plasmid-encoded sex apparatus leads to the loss of antibiotic-resistance plasmids

    OpenAIRE

    Jalasvuori, Matti; Friman, Ville-Petri; Nieminen, Anne; Jaana K.H. Bamford; Buckling, Angus

    2011-01-01

    Antibiotic-resistance genes are often carried by conjugative plasmids, which spread within and between bacterial species. It has long been recognized that some viruses of bacteria (bacteriophage; phage) have evolved to infect and kill plasmid-harbouring cells. This raises a question: can phages cause the loss of plasmid-associated antibiotic resistance by selecting for plasmid-free bacteria, or can bacteria or plasmids evolve resistance to phages in other ways? Here, we show that multiple ant...

  13. THE CHARACTERIZATION OF DANISH ISOLATES OF SALMONELLA-ENTERICA SEROVAR ENTERITIDIS BY PHAGE TYPING AND PLASMID PROFILING - 1980-1990

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brown, D. J.; Baggesen, Dorte Lau; Hansen, H. B.

    1994-01-01

    flocks, quarantined imported poultry, environmental samples from hatchery units, and from bovines. Phage type (PT) 1 was found to be the most common type among isolates of poultry origin (57.6%) followed by PT4 (28.8%). Isolates belonging to PT8 were found exclusively in imported birds. Phage typing...... of a representative sample of human isolates revealed the predominance, as in most other Western European countries, of PT4 (61.8%). PT1, however, was found in 17.0% of human strains, a much higher incidence than expected. Antibiotic resistance was observed in 4 out of 107 human isolates (3.7%) and 2 out of 205 non...

  14. Convergent evolution of pathogenicity islands in helper cos phage interference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpena, Nuria; Manning, Keith A; Dokland, Terje; Marina, Alberto; Penadés, José R

    2016-11-05

    Staphylococcus aureus pathogenicity islands (SaPIs) are phage satellites that exploit the life cycle of their helper phages for their own benefit. Most SaPIs are packaged by their helper phages using a headful (pac) packaging mechanism. These SaPIs interfere with pac phage reproduction through a variety of strategies, including the redirection of phage capsid assembly to form small capsids, a process that depends on the expression of the SaPI-encoded cpmA and cpmB genes. Another SaPI subfamily is induced and packaged by cos-type phages, and although these cos SaPIs also block the life cycle of their inducing phages, the basis for this mechanism of interference remains to be deciphered. Here we have identified and characterized one mechanism by which the SaPIs interfere with cos phage reproduction. This mechanism depends on a SaPI-encoded gene, ccm, which encodes a protein involved in the production of small isometric capsids, compared with the prolate helper phage capsids. As the Ccm and CpmAB proteins are completely unrelated in sequence, this strategy represents a fascinating example of convergent evolution. Moreover, this result also indicates that the production of SaPI-sized particles is a widespread strategy of phage interference conserved during SaPI evolution.This article is part of the themed issue 'The new bacteriology'.

  15. Convergent evolution of pathogenicity islands in helper cos phage interference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, Keith A.; Dokland, Terje; Marina, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus pathogenicity islands (SaPIs) are phage satellites that exploit the life cycle of their helper phages for their own benefit. Most SaPIs are packaged by their helper phages using a headful (pac) packaging mechanism. These SaPIs interfere with pac phage reproduction through a variety of strategies, including the redirection of phage capsid assembly to form small capsids, a process that depends on the expression of the SaPI-encoded cpmA and cpmB genes. Another SaPI subfamily is induced and packaged by cos-type phages, and although these cos SaPIs also block the life cycle of their inducing phages, the basis for this mechanism of interference remains to be deciphered. Here we have identified and characterized one mechanism by which the SaPIs interfere with cos phage reproduction. This mechanism depends on a SaPI-encoded gene, ccm, which encodes a protein involved in the production of small isometric capsids, compared with the prolate helper phage capsids. As the Ccm and CpmAB proteins are completely unrelated in sequence, this strategy represents a fascinating example of convergent evolution. Moreover, this result also indicates that the production of SaPI-sized particles is a widespread strategy of phage interference conserved during SaPI evolution. This article is part of the themed issue ‘The new bacteriology’. PMID:27672154

  16. Assembling filamentous phage occlude pIV channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marciano, D K; Russel, M; Simon, S M

    2001-07-31

    Filamentous phage f1 is exported from its Escherichia coli host without killing the bacterial cell. Phage-encoded protein pIV, which is required for phage assembly and secretion, forms large highly conductive channels in the outer membrane of E. coli. It has been proposed that the phage are extruded across the bacterial outer membrane through pIV channels. To test this prediction, we developed an in vivo assay by using a mutant pIV that functions in phage export but whose channel opens in the absence of phage extrusion. In E. coli lacking its native maltooligosacharride transporter LamB, this pIV variant allowed oligosaccharide transport across the outer membrane. This entry of oligosaccharide was decreased by phage production and still further decreased by production of phage that cannot be released from the cell surface. Thus, exiting phage block the pIV-dependent entry of oligosaccharide, suggesting that phage occupy the lumen of pIV channels. This study provides the first evidence, to our knowledge, for viral exit through a large aqueous channel.

  17. Molecular mapping of chromosomes 17 and X

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barker, D.F.

    1991-01-15

    Progress toward the construction of high density genetic maps of chromosomes 17 and X has been made by isolating and characterizing a relatively large set of polymorphic probes for each chromosome and using these probes to construct genetic maps. We have mapped the same polymorphic probes against a series of chromosome breakpoints on X and 17. The probes could be assigned to over 30 physical intervals on the X chromosome and 7 intervals on 17. In many cases, this process resulted in improved characterization of the relative locations of the breakpoints with respect to each other and the definition of new physical intervals. The strategy for isolation of the polymorphic clones utilized chromosome specific libraries of 1--15 kb segments from each of the two chromosomes. From these libraries, clones were screened for those detecting restriction fragment length polymorphisms. The markers were further characterized, the chromosomal assignments confirmed and in most cases segments of the original probes were subcloned into plasmids to produce probes with improved signal to noise ratios for use in the genetic marker studies. The linkage studies utilize the CEPH reference families and other well-characterized families in our collection which have been used for genetic disease linkage work. Preliminary maps and maps of portions of specific regions of 17 and X are provided. We have nearly completed a map of the 1 megabase Mycoplasma arthritidis genome by applying these techniques to a lambda phage library of its genome. We have found bit mapping to be an efficient means to organize a contiguous set of overlapping clones from a larger genome.

  18. Bacteriophage Resistance Mechanisms in the Fish Pathogen Flavobacterium psychrophilum: Linking Genomic Mutations to Changes in Bacterial Virulence Factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castillo, Daniel; Christiansen, Rói Hammershaimb; Dalsgaard, Inger

    2015-01-01

    Flavobacterium psychrophilum is an important fish pathogen in salmonid aquaculture worldwide. Due to increased antibiotic resistance, pathogen control using bacteriophages has been explored as a possible alternative treatment. However, the effective use of bacteriophages in pathogen control...... requires overcoming the selection for phage resistance in the bacterial populations. Here, we analyzed resistance mechanisms in F. psychrophilum after phage exposure using whole-genome sequencing of the ancestral phage-sensitive strain 950106-1/1 and six phage-resistant isolates. The phage......-resistant strains had all obtained unique insertions and/or deletions and point mutations distributed among intergenic and genic regions. Mutations in genes related to cell surface properties, gliding motility, and biosynthesis of lipopolysaccharides and cell wall were found. The observed links between phage...

  19. Morphology, genome sequence, and structural proteome of type phage P335 from Lactococcus lactis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Labrie, Simon J.; Josephsen, Jytte; Neve, Horst;

    2008-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis phage P335 is a virulent type phage for the species that bears its name and belongs phage P335 is a virulent type phage for the species that bears its name and belongs to the Siphoviridae family. Morphologically, P335 resembled the L. lactis phages TP901-1 and Tuc2009, except...

  20. The phage growth limitation system in Streptomyces coelicolor A(3)2 is a toxin/antitoxin system, comprising enzymes with DNA methyltransferase, protein kinase and ATPase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoskisson, Paul A; Sumby, Paul; Smith, Margaret C M

    2015-03-01

    The phage growth limitation system of Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2) is an unusual bacteriophage defence mechanism. Progeny ϕC31 phage from an initial infection are thought to be modified such that subsequent infections are attenuated in a Pgl(+) host but normal in a Pgl(-) strain. Earlier work identified four genes required for phage resistance by Pgl. Here we demonstrate that Pgl is an elaborate and novel phage restriction system that, in part, comprises a toxin/antitoxin system where PglX, a DNA methyltransferase is toxic in the absence of a functional PglZ. In addition, the ATPase activity of PglY and a protein kinase activity in PglW are shown to be essential for phage resistance by Pgl. We conclude that on infection of a Pgl(+) cell by bacteriophage ϕC31, PglW transduces a signal, probably via phosphorylation, to other Pgl proteins resulting in the activation of the DNA methyltransferase, PglX and this leads to phage restriction.

  1. Genomic sequence and activity of KS10, a transposable phage of the Burkholderia cepacia complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shrivastava Savita

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Burkholderia cepacia complex (BCC is a versatile group of Gram negative organisms that can be found throughout the environment in sources such as soil, water, and plants. While BCC bacteria can be involved in beneficial interactions with plants, they are also considered opportunistic pathogens, specifically in patients with cystic fibrosis and chronic granulomatous disease. These organisms also exhibit resistance to many antibiotics, making conventional treatment often unsuccessful. KS10 was isolated as a prophage of B. cenocepacia K56-2, a clinically relevant strain of the BCC. Our objective was to sequence the genome of this phage and also determine if this prophage encoded any virulence determinants. Results KS10 is a 37,635 base pairs (bp transposable phage of the opportunistic pathogen Burkholderia cenocepacia. Genome sequence analysis and annotation of this phage reveals that KS10 shows the closest sequence homology to Mu and BcepMu. KS10 was found to be a prophage in three different strains of B. cenocepacia, including strains K56-2, J2315, and C5424, and seven tested clinical isolates of B. cenocepacia, but no other BCC species. A survey of 23 strains and 20 clinical isolates of the BCC revealed that KS10 is able to form plaques on lawns of B. ambifaria LMG 19467, B. cenocepacia PC184, and B. stabilis LMG 18870. Conclusion KS10 is a novel phage with a genomic organization that differs from most phages in that its capsid genes are not aligned into one module but rather separated by approximately 11 kb, giving evidence of one or more prior genetic rearrangements. There were no potential virulence factors identified in KS10, though many hypothetical proteins were identified with no known function.

  2. Pitfalls to avoid when using phage display for snake toxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laustsen, Andreas Hougaard; Lauridsen, Line Præst; Lomonte, Bruno; Andersen, Mikael Rørdam; Lohse, Brian

    2017-02-01

    Antivenoms against bites and stings from snakes, spiders, and scorpions are associated with immunological side effects and high cost of production, since these therapies are still derived from the serum of hyper-immunized production animals. Biotechnological innovations within envenoming therapies are thus warranted, and phage display technology may be a promising avenue for bringing antivenoms into the modern era of biologics. Although phage display technology represents a robust and high-throughput approach for the discovery of antibody-based antitoxins, several pitfalls may present themselves when animal toxins are used as targets for phage display selection. Here, we report selected critical challenges from our own phage display experiments associated with biotinylation of antigens, clone picking, and the presence of amber codons within antibody fragment structures in some phage display libraries. These challenges may be detrimental to the outcome of phage display experiments, and we aim to help other researchers avoiding these pitfalls by presenting their solutions.

  3. Phase variation in the phage growth limitation system of Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumby, Paul; Smith, Margaret C M

    2003-08-01

    The phase-variable phage growth limitation (Pgl) system of Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2) is an unusual bacteriophage resistance mechanism that confers protection against the temperate phage phiC31 and homoimmune relatives. Pgl is subject to phase variation, and data presented here show that this is at least partially due to expansion and contraction of a polyguanine tract present within the putative adenine-specific DNA methyltransferase gene, pglX. Furthermore, the pglX paralogue SC6G9.02, here renamed pglS, was shown to be able to interfere with the Pgl phenotype, suggesting that PglS could provide an alternative activity to that conferred by PglX.

  4. Revisiting phage therapy: new applications for old resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobrega, Franklin L; Costa, Ana Rita; Kluskens, Leon D; Azeredo, Joana

    2015-04-01

    The success of phage therapy is dependent on the development of strategies able to overcome the limitations of bacteriophages as therapeutic agents, the creation of an adequate regulatory framework, the implementation of safety protocols, and acceptance by the general public. Many approaches have been proposed to circumvent phages' intrinsic limitations but none have proved to be completely satisfactory. In this review we present the major hurdles of phage therapy and the solutions proposed to circumvent them. A thorough discussion of the advantages and drawbacks of these solutions is provided and special attention is given to the genetic modification of phages as an achievable strategy to shape bacteriophages to exhibit desirable biological properties.

  5. Bacteriophages: biosensing tools for multi-drug resistant pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tawil, N; Sacher, E; Mandeville, R; Meunier, M

    2014-03-21

    Pathogen detection is of utmost importance in many sectors, such as in the food industry, environmental quality control, clinical diagnostics, bio-defence and counter-terrorism. Failure to appropriately, and specifically, detect pathogenic bacteria can lead to serious consequences, and may ultimately be lethal. Public safety, new legislation, recent outbreaks in food contamination, and the ever-increasing prevalence of multidrug-resistant infections have fostered a worldwide research effort targeting novel biosensing strategies. This review concerns phage-based analytical and biosensing methods targeted towards theranostic applications. We discuss and review phage-based assays, notably phage amplification, reporter phage, phage lysis, and bioluminescence assays for the detection of bacterial species, as well as phage-based biosensors, including optical (comprising SPR sensors and fiber optic assays), electrochemical (comprising amperometric, potentiometric, and impedimetric sensors), acoustic wave and magnetoelastic sensors.

  6. Genome characteristics of a novel phage from Bacillus thuringiensis showing high similarity with phage from Bacillus cereus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yihui Yuan

    Full Text Available Bacillus thuringiensis is an important entomopathogenic bacterium belongs to the Bacillus cereus group, which also includes B. anthracis and B. cereus. Several genomes of phages originating from this group had been sequenced, but no genome of Siphoviridae phage from B. thuringiensis has been reported. We recently sequenced and analyzed the genome of a novel phage, BtCS33, from a B. thuringiensis strain, subsp. kurstaki CS33, and compared the gneome of this phage to other phages of the B. cereus group. BtCS33 was the first Siphoviridae phage among the sequenced B. thuringiensis phages. It produced small, turbid plaques on bacterial plates and had a narrow host range. BtCS33 possessed a linear, double-stranded DNA genome of 41,992 bp with 57 putative open reading frames (ORFs. It had a typical genome structure consisting of three modules: the "late" region, the "lysogeny-lysis" region and the "early" region. BtCS33 exhibited high similarity with several phages, B. cereus phage Wβ and some variants of Wβ, in genome organization and the amino acid sequences of structural proteins. There were two ORFs, ORF22 and ORF35, in the genome of BtCS33 that were also found in the genomes of B. cereus phage Wβ and may be involved in regulating sporulation of the host cell. Based on these observations and analysis of phylogenetic trees, we deduced that B. thuringiensis phage BtCS33 and B. cereus phage Wβ may have a common distant ancestor.

  7. Complete Genome Sequences of Four Novel Escherichia coli Bacteriophages Belonging to New Phage Groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carstens, Alexander B; Kot, Witold; Hansen, Lars H

    2015-01-01

    Here, we describe the sequencing and genome annotations of a set of four Escherichia coli bacteriophages (phages) belonging to newly discovered groups previously consisting of only a single phage and thus expand our knowledge of these phage groups.......Here, we describe the sequencing and genome annotations of a set of four Escherichia coli bacteriophages (phages) belonging to newly discovered groups previously consisting of only a single phage and thus expand our knowledge of these phage groups....

  8. Improvement and efficient display of Bacillus thuringiensis toxins on M13 phages and ribosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheco, Sabino; Cantón, Emiliano; Zuñiga-Navarrete, Fernando; Pecorari, Frédéric; Bravo, Alejandra; Soberón, Mario

    2015-12-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) produces insecticidal proteins that have been used worldwide in the control of insect-pests in crops and vectors of human diseases. However, different insect species are poorly controlled by the available Bt toxins or have evolved resistance to these toxins. Evolution of Bt toxicity could provide novel toxins to control insect pests. To this aim, efficient display systems to select toxins with increased binding to insect membranes or midgut proteins involved in toxicity are likely to be helpful. Here we describe two display systems, phage display and ribosome display, that allow the efficient display of two non-structurally related Bt toxins, Cry1Ac and Cyt1Aa. Improved display of Cry1Ac and Cyt1Aa on M13 phages was achieved by changing the commonly used peptide leader sequence of the coat pIII-fusion protein, that relies on the Sec translocation pathway, for a peptide leader sequence that relies on the signal recognition particle pathway (SRP) and by using a modified M13 helper phage (Phaberge) that has an amber mutation in its pIII genomic sequence and preferentially assembles using the pIII-fusion protein. Also, both Cry1Ac and Cyt1Aa were efficiently displayed on ribosomes, which could allow the construction of large libraries of variants. Furthermore, Cry1Ac or Cyt1Aa displayed on M13 phages or ribosomes were specifically selected from a mixture of both toxins depending on which antigen was immobilized for binding selection. These improved systems may allow the selection of Cry toxin variants with improved insecticidal activities that could counter insect resistances.

  9. Multiple-site mutations of phage Bp7 endolysin improves its activities against target bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Can; Wang, Yuanchao; Sun, Huzhi; Ren, Huiying

    2015-10-01

    The widespread use of antibiotics has caused serious drug resistance. Bacteria that were once easily treatable are now extremely difficult to treat. Endolysin can be used as an alternative to antibiotics for the treatment of drug-resistant bacteria. To analyze the antibacterial activity of the endolysin of phage Bp7 (Bp7e), a 489-bp DNA fragment of endolysin Bp7e was PCR-amplified from a phage Bp7 genome and cloned, and then a pET28a-Bp7e prokaryotic expression vector was constructed. Two amino acids were mutated (L99A, M102E) to construct pET28a-Bp7Δe, with pET28a-Bp7e as a template. Phylogenetic analysis suggested that BP7e belongs to a T4-like phage endolysin group. Bp7e and its mutant Bp7Δe were expressed in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) as soluble proteins. They were purified by affinity chromatography, and then their antibacterial activities were analyzed. The results demonstrated that the recombinant proteins Bp7e and Bp7Δe showed obvious antibacterial activity against Micrococcus lysodeikticus but no activity against Staphylococcus aureus. In the presence of malic acid, Bp7e and Bp7Δe exhibited an effect on most E. coli strains which could be lysed by phage Bp7, but no effect on Salmonella paratyphi or Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Moreover, Bp7Δe with double-site mutations showed stronger antibacterial activity and a broader lysis range than Bp7e.

  10. Multiple-site mutations of phage Bp7 endolysin improves its activities against target bacteria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Can; Zhang; Yuanchao; Wang; Huzhi; Sun; Huiying; Ren

    2015-01-01

    The widespread use of antibiotics has caused serious drug resistance. Bacteria that were once easily treatable are now extremely difficult to treat. Endolysin can be used as an alternative to antibiotics for the treatment of drug-resistant bacteria. To analyze the antibacterial activity of the endolysin of phage Bp7(Bp7e), a 489-bp DNA fragment of endolysin Bp7e was PCR-amplified from a phage Bp7 genome and cloned, and then a p ET28a-Bp7e prokaryotic expression vector was constructed. Two amino acids were mutated(L99A, M102E) to construct p ET28a-Bp7Δe, with p ET28a-Bp7e as a template. Phylogenetic analysis suggested that BP7e belongs to a T4-like phage endolysin group. Bp7e and its mutant Bp7Δe were expressed in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) as soluble proteins. They were purified by affinity chromatography, and then their antibacterial activities were analyzed. The results demonstrated that the recombinant proteins Bp7e and Bp7Δe showed obvious antibacterial activity against Micrococcus lysodeikticus but no activity against Staphylococcus aureus. In the presence of malic acid, Bp7e and Bp7Δe exhibited an effect on most E. coli strains which could be lysed by phage Bp7, but no effect on Salmonella paratyphi or Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Moreover, Bp7Δe with double-site mutations showed stronger antibacterial activity and a broader lysis range than Bp7e.

  11. Comparison of clinical categories for Escherichia coli harboring specific qnr and chromosomal-mediated fluoroquinolone resistance determinants according to CLSI and EUCAST.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machuca, Jesús; Briales, Alejandra; Díaz-de-Alba, Paula; Martínez-Martínez, Luis; Rodríguez-Martínez, José-Manuel; Pascual, Álvaro

    2016-03-01

    EUCAST breakpoints are more restrictive than those defined by CLSI. This study highlights the discrepancies between CLSI and EUCAST in a well characterized isogenic Escherichia coli collection and their correlations with specific quinolone resistance mechanisms. The greatest number of discrepancies was observed in strains containing 2-4 resistance mechanisms (MIC values on the borderline of clinical resistance). Bearing in mind that quinolones are concentration dependent antimicrobial agents, small changes in MIC may have relevant consequences for treatment outcomes.

  12. A GFP-based bacterial biosensor with chromosomally integrated sensing cassette for quantitative detection of Hg(II) in environment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Himanshu Priyadarshi; Absar Alam; Gireesh-Babu P; Rekha Das; Pankaj Kishore; Shivendra Kumar; Aparna Chaudhari

    2012-01-01

    A mercury biosensor was constructed by integrating biosensor genetic elements into E.coli JM109 chromosome in a single copy number,using the attP/attB recombination mechanism of λ phage.The genetic elements used include a regulatory protein gene (merR) along with operator/promoter (O/P) derived from the mercury resistance operon from pDU1358 plasmid of Serratia marcescens.The expression of reporter gene gfp is also controlled by merR/O/P.Integration of the construct into the chromosome was done to increase the stability and precision of the biosensor.This biosensor could detect Hg(Ⅱ) ions in the concentration range of 100-1700 mnol/L,and manifest the result as the expression of GFP.The GFP expression was significantly different (P ≤ 0.05) for each concentration of inducing Hg(Ⅱ) ions in the detection range,which reduces the chances of misinterpretation of results.A model using regression method was also derived for the quantification of the concentration of Hg(Ⅱ) in water samples.

  13. Characterization of two adult-plant stripe rust resistance genes on chromosomes 3BS and 4BL in soft red winter wheat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stripe rust, caused by Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici, is an important foliar disease of soft red winter wheat (SRWW) in the eastern U.S. However, very few resistance genes have been characterized in the SRWW germplasm pool. The SRWW line VA96W-270 is known to be resistant to stripe rust race P...

  14. Expression of a Thatcher wheat adult plant stem rust resistance QTL on chromosome arm 2BL is enhanced by Lr34

    Science.gov (United States)

    An F6 recombinant inbred line (RIL) spring wheat population derived from RL6071, a stem rust susceptible line and RL6058, a backcross line of Thatcher wheat with Lr34 that is highly resistant to stem rust, was evaluated for adult plant stem rust resistance in North Dakota in 1999, and in Kenya in 20...

  15. Identification and genetic mapping of the putative Thinopyrum intermedium-derived dominant powdery mildew resistance gene PmL962 on wheat chromosome arm 2BS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powdery mildew, caused by Blumeria graminis f. sp. tritici (Bgt), is a destructive disease affecting the production of wheat (Triticum aestivum). Powdery mildew resistance was putatively transferred from Thinopyrum intermedium to the common wheat line L962, which conferred resistance to multiple Ch...

  16. Fluorescent T7 display phages obtained by translational frameshift

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slootweg, E.J.; Keller, H.J.H.G.; Hink, M.A.; Borst, J.W.; Bakker, J.; Schots, A.

    2006-01-01

    Lytic phages form a powerful platform for the display of large cDNA libraries and offer the possibility to screen for interactions with almost any substrate. To visualize these interactions directly by fluorescence microscopy, we constructed fluorescent T7 phages by exploiting the flexibility of pha

  17. Development of a phage typing system for Staphylococcus hyicus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wegener, Henrik Caspar

    1993-01-01

    Bacteriophages were released by 98% of 100 Staphylococcus hyicus strains studied after treatment with mitomycin C. Twenty-three phages with different lytic spectra were included in a phage typing system and used f or typing S. hyicus. On a test-set of 100 epidemiologically unrelated S. hyicus...

  18. Typing of Panton-Valentine Leukocidin-encoding Phages and lukSF-PV Gene Sequence Variation in Staphylococcus aureus from China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huanqiang Zhao

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Panton-Valentine leucocidin (PVL, encoded by lukSF-PV genes, a bi-component and pore-forming toxin, is carried by different staphylococcal bacteriophages. The prevalence of PVL in Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus have been reported around the globe. However, the data on PVL-encoding phage types, lukSF-PV gene variation and chromosomal phage insertion sites for PVL-positive S. aureus are limited, especially in China. In order to obtain a more complete understanding of the molecular epidemiology of PVL-positive S. aureus, an integrated and modified PCR-based scheme was applied to detect the PVL-encoding phage types. Phage insertion locus and the lukSF-PV variant were determined by PCR and sequencing. Meanwhile, the genetic background was characterized by staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec typing, staphylococcal protein A (spa gene polymorphisms typing, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE typing, accessory gene regulator (agr locus typing and multilocus sequence typing (MLST. Seventy eight (78/1175, 6.6% isolates possessed the lukSF-PV genes and 59.0% (46/78 of PVL-positive strains belonged to CC59 lineage. Eight known different PVL-encoding phage types were detected, and Φ7247PVL/ΦST5967PVL (n=13 and ΦPVL (n=12 were the most prevalent among them. While 25 (25/78, 32.1% isolates, belonging to ST30 and ST59 clones, were unable to be typed by the modified PCR-based scheme. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs were identified at five locations in the lukSF-PV genes, two of which were non-synonymous. Maximum-likelihood tree analysis of attachment sites sequences detected six SNP profiles for attR and eight for attL, respectively. In conclusion, the PVL-positive S. aureus mainly harbored Φ7247PVL/ΦST5967PVL and ΦPVL in the regions studied. lukSF-PV gene sequences, PVL-encoding phages and phage insertion locus generally varied with lineages. Moreover, PVL-positive clones that have emerged worldwide likely carry distinct phages.

  19. Filamentous Phages As a Model System in Soft Matter Physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogic, Zvonimir

    2016-01-01

    Filamentous phages have unique physical properties, such as uniform particle lengths, that are not found in other model systems of rod-like colloidal particles. Consequently, suspensions of such phages provided powerful model systems that have advanced our understanding of soft matter physics in general and liquid crystals in particular. We described some of these advances. In particular we briefly summarize how suspensions of filamentous phages have provided valuable insight into the field of colloidal liquid crystals. We also describe recent experiments on filamentous phages that have elucidated a robust pathway for assembly of 2D membrane-like materials. Finally, we outline unique structural properties of filamentous phages that have so far remained largely unexplored yet have the potential to further advance soft matter physics and material science.

  20. Chemical posttranslational modification of phage-displayed peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Simon; Tjhung, Katrina F; Paschal, Beth M; Noren, Christopher J; Derda, Ratmir

    2015-01-01

    Phage-displayed peptide library has fueled the discovery of novel ligands for diverse targets. A new type of phage libraries that displays not only linear and disulfide-constrained cyclic peptides but moieties that cannot be encoded genetically or incorporated easily by bacterial genetic machinery has emerged recently. Chemical posttranslational modification of phage library is one of the simplest approaches to encode nonnatural moieties. It confers the library with new functionality and makes it possible to select and evolve molecules with properties not found in the peptides, for instance, glycopeptides recognized by carbohydrate-binding protein and peptides with photoswitching capability. To this end, we describe the newly emerging techniques to chemically modify the phage library and quantify the efficiency of the reaction with a biotin-capture assay. Finally, we provide the methods to construct N-terminal Ser peptide library that allows site-selective modification of phage.

  1. Phage Particles as Vaccine Delivery Vehicles: Concepts, Applications and Prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari, Narjes; Abediankenari, Saeid

    2015-01-01

    The development of new strategies for vaccine delivery for generating protective and long-lasting immune responses has become an expanding field of research. In the last years, it has been recognized that bacteriophages have several potential applications in the biotechnology and medical fields because of their intrinsic advantages, such as ease of manipulation and large-scale production. Over the past two decades, bacteriophages have gained special attention as vehicles for protein/peptide or DNA vaccine delivery. In fact, whole phage particles are used as vaccine delivery vehicles to achieve the aim of enhanced immunization. In this strategy, the carried vaccine is protected from environmental damage by phage particles. In this review, phage-based vaccine categories and their development are presented in detail, with discussion of the potential of phage-based vaccines for protection against microbial diseases and cancer treatment. Also reviewed are some recent advances in the field of phage- based vaccines.

  2. Structural engineering of a phage lysin that targets Gram-negative pathogens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lukacik, Petra; Barnard, Travis J.; Keller, Paul W.; Chaturvedi, Kaveri S.; Seddiki, Nadir; Fairman, James W.; Noinaj, Nicholas; Kirby, Tara L.; Henderson, Jeffrey P.; Steven, Alasdair C.; Hinnebusch, B. Joseph; Buchanan, Susan K. (NIH); (WU-MED)

    2012-11-13

    Bacterial pathogens are becoming increasingly resistant to antibiotics. As an alternative therapeutic strategy, phage therapy reagents containing purified viral lysins have been developed against Gram-positive organisms but not against Gram-negative organisms due to the inability of these types of drugs to cross the bacterial outer membrane. We solved the crystal structures of a Yersinia pestis outer membrane transporter called FyuA and a bacterial toxin called pesticin that targets this transporter. FyuA is a {beta}-barrel membrane protein belonging to the family of TonB dependent transporters, whereas pesticin is a soluble protein with two domains, one that binds to FyuA and another that is structurally similar to phage T4 lysozyme. The structure of pesticin allowed us to design a phage therapy reagent comprised of the FyuA binding domain of pesticin fused to the N-terminus of T4 lysozyme. This hybrid toxin kills specific Yersinia and pathogenic E. coli strains and, importantly, can evade the pesticin immunity protein (Pim) giving it a distinct advantage over pesticin. Furthermore, because FyuA is required for virulence and is more common in pathogenic bacteria, the hybrid toxin also has the advantage of targeting primarily disease-causing bacteria rather than indiscriminately eliminating natural gut flora.

  3. Genomic comparison of Escherichia coli O104:H4 isolates from 2009 and 2011 reveals plasmid, and prophage heterogeneity, including shiga toxin encoding phage stx2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanaa A Ahmed

    Full Text Available In May of 2011, an enteroaggregative Escherichia coli O104:H4 strain that had acquired a Shiga toxin 2-converting phage caused a large outbreak of bloody diarrhea in Europe which was notable for its high prevalence of hemolytic uremic syndrome cases. Several studies have described the genomic inventory and phylogenies of strains associated with the outbreak and a collection of historical E. coli O104:H4 isolates using draft genome assemblies. We present the complete, closed genome sequences of an isolate from the 2011 outbreak (2011C-3493 and two isolates from cases of bloody diarrhea that occurred in the Republic of Georgia in 2009 (2009EL-2050 and 2009EL-2071. Comparative genome analysis indicates that, while the Georgian strains are the nearest neighbors to the 2011 outbreak isolates sequenced to date, structural and nucleotide-level differences are evident in the Stx2 phage genomes, the mer/tet antibiotic resistance island, and in the prophage and plasmid profiles of the strains, including a previously undescribed plasmid with homology to the pMT virulence plasmid of Yersinia pestis. In addition, multiphenotype analysis showed that 2009EL-2071 possessed higher resistance to polymyxin and membrane-disrupting agents. Finally, we show evidence by electron microscopy of the presence of a common phage morphotype among the European and Georgian strains and a second phage morphotype among the Georgian strains. The presence of at least two stx2 phage genotypes in host genetic backgrounds that may derive from a recent common ancestor of the 2011 outbreak isolates indicates that the emergence of stx2 phage-containing E. coli O104:H4 strains probably occurred more than once, or that the current outbreak isolates may be the result of a recent transfer of a new stx2 phage element into a pre-existing stx2-positive genetic background.

  4. Pseudomonas aeruginosa chromosomal beta-lactamase in patients with cystic fibrosis and chronic lung infection. Mechanism of antibiotic resistance and target of the humoral immune response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ciofu, Oana

    2003-01-01

    of this therapeutic strategy and our results showed the development of resistance of P. aeruginosa to several antibiotics during 25 years of intensive antibiotic treatment. Our studies have been concentrating on the development of resistance to beta-lactam antibiotics. We have shown an association between...... the development of resistance to beta-lactam antibiotics and the occurrence of high beta-lactamase producing strains and between the MIC of the beta-lactams and the levels of beta-lactamase expression. Partially derepressed mutants, characterized by high basal levels of beta-lactamase with the possibility...... of induction to even higher levels during treatment with beta-lactam antibiotics, were the most frequent phenotype found among resistant Danish P. aeruginosa CF isolates. We have also shown that the high alginate producing P. aeruginosa isolates, that characterize the chronic lung infection in CF patients...

  5. PARTIAL CHARACTERIZATION OF A LYTIC METHICILLIN RESISTANT-STAPHYLOCOCCUS AUREUS BACTERIOPHAGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sulaiman Al-Yousef

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A marked increase in the infection incidence caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA strains has been noted in medical practice in recent years. This study was conducted to study the biological and characterize of MRSA-phage. Methicillin resistance of Staphylococcus aureus was detected and confirmed by determining of the MIC of oxacillin by the standard agar dilution method. Phage was biologically purified using single plaque technique, then phage characterization were studied using host range, adsorption time, particle morphology and its structural protein. MRSA phage showing lytic nature was purified by repeated plating after picking of single isolated plaques. This phage is active against all 11 isolates either of S. aureus or MRSA tested as hosts. Phage produced clear plaques indicating their lytic nature. This phage was concentrated employing polyethylene glycol (PEG-NaCl precipitation method. Morphologically, MRSA Phage has a hexagonal head having a long non-contractile tail, indicating his icosahedral nature. Adsorption studies showed 100% adsorption of MRSA-Phage after 35 minutes of exposure. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE experimentation indicated that the phage particles contain one major structural protein (about 30 Kda.

  6. Comparative Genotypes, Staphylococcal Cassette Chromosome mec (SCCmec) Genes and Antimicrobial Resistance amongst Staphylococcus epidermidis and Staphylococcus haemolyticus Isolates from Infections in Humans and Companion Animals

    OpenAIRE

    McManus, Brenda A.; David C Coleman; Deasy, Emily C.; Brennan, Gráinne I.; O’ Connell, Brian; Monecke, Stefan; Ehricht, Ralf; Leggett, Bernadette; Leonard, Nola; Shore, Anna C.

    2015-01-01

    This study compares the characteristics of Staphylococcus epidermidis (SE) and Staphylococcus haemolyticus (SH) isolates from epidemiologically unrelated infections in humans (Hu) (28 SE-Hu; 8 SH-Hu) and companion animals (CpA) (12 SE-CpA; 13 SH-CpA). All isolates underwent antimicrobial susceptibility testing, multilocus sequence typing and DNA microarray profiling to detect antimicrobial resistance and SCCmec-associated genes. All methicillin-resistant (MR) isolates (33/40 SE, 20/21 SH) und...

  7. Dispersal and Survival of Flavobacterium psychrophilum Phages In Vivo in Rainbow Trout and In Vitro under Laboratory Conditions: Implications for Their Use in Phage Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Lone; Bertelsen, Sif K.; Dalsgaard, Inger

    2013-01-01

    Attention has been drawn to phage therapy as an alternative approach for controlling pathogenic bacteria such as Flavobacterium psychrophilum in salmonid aquaculture, which can give rise to high mortalities, especially in rainbow trout fry. Recently, phages have been isolated with a broad host...... range and a strong lytic potential against pathogenic F. psychrophilum under experimental conditions. However, little is known about the fate of phages at environmental conditions. Here, we quantified the dispersal and fate of F. psychrophilum phages and hosts in rainbow trout fry after intraperitoneal...... injection. Both phages and bacteria were isolated from the fish organs for up to 10 days after injection, and coinjection with both bacteria and phages resulted in a longer persistence of the phage in the fish organs, than when the fish had been injected with the phages only. The occurrence of both phage...

  8. Mapping genes on human chromosome 20

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keith, T.; Phipps, P.; Serino, K. [Collaborative Research, Inc., Waltham, MA (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    While a substantial number of genes have been physically localized to human chromosome 20, few have been genetically mapped. In the process of developing a genetic linkage map of chromosome 20, we have mapped microsatellite polymorphisms associated with six genes. Three of these had highly informative polymorphisms (greater than 0.70) that were originally identified by other investigators. These include avian sarcoma oncogene homolog (SRC), ribophorin II (RPN2), and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PCK1). Polymorphisms associated with two genes were determined following a screen of their DNA sequences in GenBank. These include dinucleotide polymorphisms in introl II of cystatin c (CST3) and in the promoter region of neuroendocrine convertase 2 (NEC2) with heterozygosities of 0.52 and 0.54, respectively. A sixth gene, prodynorphin (PDYN) was mapped following the identification of a dinucleotide repeat polymorphism (heterozygosity of 0.35) in a cosmid subclone from a YAC homologous to the original phage clone. CA-positive cosmid subclones from a YAC for an additional gene, guanine nucleotide binding protein, alpha (GNAS10), have been identified and sequencing is in progress. Similar efforts were utilized to identify a microsatellite polymorphism from a half-YAC cloned by W. Brown and localized by FISH to 20pter. This polymorphism is highly informative, with a heterozygosity of 0.83, and serves to delimit the genetic map of the short arm of this chromosome.

  9. The temperate Burkholderia phage AP3 of the Peduovirinae shows efficient antimicrobial activity against B. cenocepacia of the IIIA lineage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roszniowski, Bartosz; Latka, Agnieszka; Maciejewska, Barbara; Vandenheuvel, Dieter; Olszak, Tomasz; Briers, Yves; Holt, Giles S; Valvano, Miguel A; Lavigne, Rob; Smith, Darren L; Drulis-Kawa, Zuzanna

    2017-02-01

    Burkholderia phage AP3 (vB_BceM_AP3) is a temperate virus of the Myoviridae and the Peduovirinae subfamily (P2likevirus genus). This phage specifically infects multidrug-resistant clinical Burkholderia cenocepacia lineage IIIA strains commonly isolated from cystic fibrosis patients. AP3 exhibits high pairwise nucleotide identity (61.7 %) to Burkholderia phage KS5, specific to the same B. cenocepacia host, and has 46.7-49.5 % identity to phages infecting other species of Burkholderia. The lysis cassette of these related phages has a similar organization (putative antiholin, putative holin, endolysin, and spanins) and shows 29-98 % homology between specific lysis genes, in contrast to Enterobacteria phage P2, the hallmark phage of this genus. The AP3 and KS5 lysis genes have conserved locations and high amino acid sequence similarity. The AP3 bacteriophage particles remain infective up to 5 h at pH 4-10 and are stable at 60 °C for 30 min, but are sensitive to chloroform, with no remaining infective particles after 24 h of treatment. AP3 lysogeny can occur by stable genomic integration and by pseudo-lysogeny. The lysogenic bacterial mutants did not exhibit any significant changes in virulence compared to wild-type host strain when tested in the Galleria mellonella moth wax model. Moreover, AP3 treatment of larvae infected with B. cenocepacia revealed a significant increase (P < 0.0001) in larvae survival in comparison to AP3-untreated infected larvae. AP3 showed robust lytic activity, as evidenced by its broad host range, the absence of increased virulence in lysogenic isolates, the lack of bacterial gene disruption conditioned by bacterial tRNA downstream integration site, and the absence of detected toxin sequences. These data suggest that the AP3 phage is a promising potent agent against bacteria belonging to the most common B. cenocepacia IIIA lineage strains.

  10. 稻瘟病抗病基因Pi15的精细定位%Fine Mapping of the Blast Resistance Gene Pil5, Linked to Pii, on Rice Chromosome 9

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    潘庆华; 胡珍娣; 谷坂隆俊; 王玲

    2003-01-01

    The gene Pi15for resistance of rice to Magnaporthe grisea was previously identified as beinglinked to the gene Pii However, there is a debate on the chromosomal position of the Pii gene, becauseit was originally mapped on chromosome 6, but recent work showed it might be located on chromosome 9.To determine the chromosomal location of the Pi15gene, a linkage analysis using molecular markers wasperformed in a F2 mapping population consisting of 15 resistant and 141 susceptible plants through bulked-segregant analysis (BSA) in combination with recessive-class analysis (RCA). Out of 20 microsatellitemarkers mapped on chromosomes 6 and 9 tested, only one marker, RM316 on chromosome 9, was foundto have a linkage with the Pi15gene with a recombination frequency of (19.1 ± 3.7)%. To confirm thisfinding, four sequence-tagged site (STS) markers mapped on chromosome 9 were tested. The resultssuggested that marker G103 was linked to the Pi15 gene with a recombination frequency of (5.7 ± 2.1)%. Tofind marker(s) more closely linked to the Pi15 gene, random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysiswas performed. Out of 1 000 primers tested, three RAPD markers, BAPi15486, BAPi15782 and BAPi15844 werefound to tightly flank the Pi15gene with recombination frequencies of 0.35%, 0.35% and 1.1%, respectively.These three RAPD markers should be viewed as the starting points for marker-aided gene pyramiding andcloning. A new gene cluster of rice blast resistance on chromosome 9 was also discussed.%稻瘟病抗病基因Pi15曾被作者鉴定为与已知抗病基因Pii具有连锁关系,但是,Pii基因究竟位于染色体6还是9上存在争议.为了确定Pi15基因的染色体位置,利用分子标记在由15个抗病个体和141个感病个体组成的F2群体中,通过混合群体分离法(BSA)与隐性群体分析法(RCA)相结合的手段,对目标基因进行了连锁分析.首先,从染色体6和9分别选择10个微卫星标记进行了分析,结果表明,只有位于染色体9

  11. Identification of E. coli K12 chromosomal insertion sites of bacteriophage φ297

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAI Jing; CAO Qi-zhi; CHANG Wei-shan

    2005-01-01

    Objective:To identify the specific integration site of prophage φ297 in the host of E. coli K12 chromosome. Methods:Using molecular techniques such as Siebert PCR for walking from the int gene of prophage 297, which is similar to that of phage 933W to an unknown region in genomic DNA. A special adaptor is ligated to the ends of DNA fragments generated by digestion of genomic DNA with restriction enzymes that generates blunt ended fragments. Clone and subclone of PCR products, DNA sequencing and data analysis were used in this study. Results:The attL, attR and the core sequences were determined. The bacterial attachment site of phage φ297 was located in the yecE gene of E. coli K12. Conclusion:The phage φ297 integrates into the yecE gene of the E. coli K12 genome.

  12. Variation of resistance and infectivity between Pseudomonas fluorescens SBW25 and bacteriophage Ф2 and its therapeutic implications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hanchen; Chen; Guohua; Chen

    2015-01-01

    <正>Dear Editor,Studies of the coevolutionary dynamics between Pseudomonas fluorescens SBW25 and bacteriophageФ2 can explore host resistance and parasite infectivity with applications in the ecological and therapeutic fields.Coevolutionary dynamics determine the efficacy of phage-based therapy.In the study described here,bacterial resistance and phage infectivity fluctuated with culture

  13. Vibrio vulnificus phage PV94 is closely related to temperate phages of V. cholerae and other Vibrio species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Pryshliak

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Vibrio vulnificus is an important pathogen which can cause serious infections in humans. Yet, there is limited knowledge on its virulence factors and the question whether temperate phages might be involved in pathogenicity, as is the case with V. cholerae. Thus far, only two phages (SSP002 and VvAW1 infecting V. vulnificus have been genetically characterized. These phages were isolated from the environment and are not related to Vibrio cholerae phages. The lack of information on temperate V. vulnificus phages prompted us to isolate those phages from lysogenic strains and to compare them with phages of other Vibrio species. RESULTS: In this study the temperate phage PV94 was isolated from a V. vulnificus biotype 1 strain by mitomycin C induction. PV94 is a myovirus whose genome is a linear double-stranded DNA of 33,828 bp with 5'-protruding ends. Sequence analysis of PV94 revealed a modular organization of the genome. The left half of the genome comprising the immunity region and genes for the integrase, terminase and replication proteins shows similarites to V. cholerae kappa phages whereas the right half containing genes for structural proteins is closely related to a prophage residing in V. furnissii NCTC 11218. CONCLUSION: We present the first genomic sequence of a temperate phage isolated from a human V. vulnificus isolate. The sequence analysis of the PV94 genome demonstrates the wide distribution of closely related prophages in various Vibrio species. Moreover, the mosaicism of the PV94 genome indicates a high degree of horizontal genetic exchange within the genus Vibrio, by which V. vulnificus might acquire virulence-associated genes from other species.

  14. Detection of Staphylococcal Cassette Chromosome mec Type XI Carrying Highly Divergent mecA, mecI, mecR1, blaZ, and ccr Genes in Human Clinical Isolates of Clonal Complex 130 Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus▿†

    OpenAIRE

    Shore, Anna C.; Deasy, Emily C.; Slickers, Peter; Brennan, Grainne; O'Connell, Brian; Monecke, Stefan; Ehricht, Ralf; David C Coleman

    2011-01-01

    Methicillin resistance in staphylococci is mediated by penicillin binding protein 2a (PBP 2a), encoded by mecA on mobile staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) elements. In this study, two clonal complex 130 (CC130) methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) isolates from patients in Irish hospitals were identified that were phenotypically PBP 2a positive but lacked mecA by conventional PCR and by DNA microarray screening. The isolates were identified as methicillin-susceptib...

  15. Phage-based surface plasmon resonance strategies for the detection of pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tawil, Nancy

    MRSA bacteriophages to gold, using several immobilization methods[2]. We found that mixed self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of L-cysteine and MUA permitted oriented positioning of the phages, thus preserving their biofunctionality and their bacterial lysing efficiency. This was due to the formation of uniform cavity islands on the gold surfaces, permitting an oriented positioning of the phages, thus better exposing their recognition proteins towards the medium containing the bacterial hosts. T4 bacteriophages were then used to detect E. coli, while a novel, highly specific phage was isolated, characterized and used to detect MRSA[3]. We found that our technique, combined with the use of SPR permits label-free, real-time, specific, rapid and cost-effective detection of pathogens, for concentrations of 103 colony forming units/milliliter (CFU/mL), in less than 20 minutes. We then turned our attention towards the differential detection of community-acquired MRSA (CA-MRSA), hospital-acquired MRSA (HA-MRSA), methicillin susceptible S. aureus (MSSA), and borderline resistant oxacillin-resistant S. aureus (BORSA), using SPR[4]. We studied two hundred fifty Staphylococcus aureus clinical isolates to determine their susceptibilities to â- lactam antibiotics. A surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor was used to differentiate among CA-MRSA, HA-MRSA, BORSA and MSSA strains by specifically detecting PBP2a, an altered penicilling binding proteins that confers resistance to S. aureus strains, on whole bacterial cells, without labeling, without recourse to PCR or enrichment steps. We found that the system permits, specific detection of pathogens for concentrations as low as 10 CFU/mL. This approach has the advantages of being simple and rapid, allowing for identification of resistant strains of Staphylococcus aureus up to 48 hours earlier than conventional microbiological techniques. This method could have a significant impact on hospital costs, effective infection control, and

  16. Undetected sex chromosome aneuploidy by chromosomal microarray.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markus-Bustani, Keren; Yaron, Yuval; Goldstein, Myriam; Orr-Urtreger, Avi; Ben-Shachar, Shay

    2012-11-01

    We report on a case of a female fetus found to be mosaic for Turner syndrome (45,X) and trisomy X (47,XXX). Chromosomal microarray analysis (CMA) failed to detect the aneuploidy because of a normal average dosage of the X chromosome. This case represents an unusual instance in which CMA may not detect chromosomal aberrations. Such a possibility should be taken into consideration in similar cases where CMA is used in a clinical setting.

  17. Coevolution of CRISPR bacteria and phage in 2 dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Pu; Deem, Michael

    2014-03-01

    CRISPR (cluster regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats) is a newly discovered adaptive, heritable immune system of prokaryotes. It can prevent infection of prokaryotes by phage. Most bacteria and almost all archae have CRISPR. The CRISPR system incorporates short nucleotide sequences from viruses. These incorporated sequences provide a historical record of the host and predator coevolution. We simulate the coevolution of bacteria and phage in 2 dimensions. Each phage has multiple proto-spacers that the bacteria can incorporate. Each bacterium can store multiple spacers in its CRISPR. Phages can escape recognition by the CRISPR system via point mutation or recombination. We will discuss the different evolutionary consequences of point mutation or recombination on the coevolution of bacteria and phage. We will also discuss an intriguing ``dynamic phase transition'' in the number of phage as a function of time and mutation rate. We will show that due to the arm race between phages and bacteria, the frequency of spacers and proto-spacers in a population can oscillate quite rapidly.

  18. A novel fluorescent probe: europium complex hybridized T7 phage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chin-Mei; Jin, Qiaoling; Sutton, April; Chen, Liaohai

    2005-01-01

    We report on the creation of a novel fluorescent probe of europium-complex hybridized T7 phage. It was made by filling a ligand-displayed T7 ghost phage with a fluorescent europium complex particle. The structure of the hybridized phage, which contains a fluorescent inorganic core surrounded by a ligand-displayed capsid shell, was confirmed by electron microscope, energy-dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX), bioassays, and fluorescence spectrometer. More importantly, as a benefit of the phage display technology, the hybridized phage has the capability to integrate an affinity reagent against virtually any target molecules. The approach provides an original method to fluorescently "tag" a bioligand and/or to "biofunctionalize" a fluorophore particle. By using other types of materials such as radioactive or magnetic particles to fill the ghost phage, we envision that the hybridized phages represent a new class of fluorescent, magnetic, or radioprobes for imaging and bioassays and could be used both in vitro and in vivo.

  19. Evolution of Lactococcus lactis phages within a cheese factory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousseau, Geneviève M; Moineau, Sylvain

    2009-08-01

    We have sequenced the double-stranded DNA genomes of six lactococcal phages (SL4, CB13, CB14, CB19, CB20, and GR7) from the 936 group that were isolated over a 9-year period from whey samples obtained from a Canadian cheese factory. These six phages infected the same two industrial Lactococcus lactis strains out of 30 tested. The CB14 and GR7 genomes were found to be 100% identical even though they were isolated 14 months apart, indicating that a phage can survive in a cheese plant for more than a year. The other four genomes were related but notably different. The length of the genomes varied from 28,144 to 32,182 bp, and they coded for 51 to 55 open reading frames. All five genomes possessed a 3' overhang cos site that was 11 nucleotides long. Several structural proteins were also identified by nano-high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry, confirming bioinformatic analyses. Comparative analyses suggested that the most recently isolated phages (CB19 and CB20) were derived, in part, from older phage isolates (CB13 and CB14/GR7). The organization of the five distinct genomes was similar to the previously sequenced lactococcal phage genomes of the 936 group, and from these sequences, a core genome was determined for lactococcal phages of the 936 group.

  20. Oligopeptide M13 Phage Display in Pathogen Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Hust

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Phage display has become an established, widely used method for selection of peptides, antibodies or alternative scaffolds. The use of phage display for the selection of antigens from genomic or cDNA libraries of pathogens which is an alternative to the classical way of identifying immunogenic proteins is not well-known. In recent years several new applications for oligopeptide phage display in disease related fields have been developed which has led to the identification of various new antigens. These novel identified immunogenic proteins provide new insights into host pathogen interactions and can be used for the development of new diagnostic tests and vaccines. In this review we focus on the M13 oligopeptide phage display system for pathogen research but will also give examples for lambda phage display and for applications in other disease related fields. In addition, a detailed technical work flow for the identification of immunogenic oligopeptides using the pHORF system is given. The described identification of immunogenic proteins of pathogens using oligopeptide phage display can be linked to antibody phage display resulting in a vaccine pipeline.

  1. Effect of single amino acid replacements on the thermal stability of the NH2-terminal domain of phage lambda repressor.

    OpenAIRE

    1984-01-01

    The thermal stabilities of mutant phage lambda repressors that have single amino acid replacements in the NH2-terminal domain have been studied by means of circular dichroism and differential scanning calorimetry. The variations in stability determined by these physical methods correlate with the resistance to proteolysis at various temperatures and can be compared with the temperature-sensitive activity of the mutants in vivo. In general, mutant proteins bearing solvent-exposed substitutions...

  2. An anti-tumor protein produced by Trichinella spiralis and identified by screening a T7 phage display library, induces apoptosis in human hepatoma H7402 cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trichinella spiralis infection confers effective resistance to tumor cell expansion. In this study, a T7 phage cDNA display library was constructed to express genes encoded by T. spiralis. Organic phase multi-cell screening was used to sort through candidate proteins in a transfected human chronic m...

  3. Phage display library screening for identification of interacting protein partners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addepalli, Balasubrahmanyam; Rao, Suryadevara; Hunt, Arthur G

    2015-01-01

    Phage display is a versatile high-throughput screening method employed to understand and improve the chemical biology, be it production of human monoclonal antibodies or identification of interacting protein partners. A majority of cell proteins operate in a concerted fashion either by stable or transient interactions. Such interactions can be mediated by recognition of small amino acid sequence motifs on the protein surface. Phage display can play a crucial role in identification of such motifs. This report describes the use of phage display for the identification of high affinity sequence motifs that could be responsible for interactions with a target (bait) protein.

  4. A Major Locus for Fasting Insulin Concentrations and Insulin Resistance on Chromosome 6q with Strong Pleiotropic Effects on Obesity-Related Phenotypes in Nondiabetic Mexican Americans

    OpenAIRE

    Duggirala, Ravindranath; Blangero, John; Almasy, Laura; Arya, Rector; Dyer, Thomas D.; Williams, Kenneth L.; Leach, Robin J.; O’Connell, Peter; Stern, Michael P.

    2001-01-01

    Insulin resistance and hyperinsulinemia are strong correlates of obesity and type 2 diabetes, but little is known about their genetic determinants. Using data on nondiabetics from Mexican American families and a multipoint linkage approach, we scanned the genome and identified a major locus near marker D6S403 for fasting “true” insulin levels (LOD score 4.1, empirical P

  5. Rapid development in vitro and in vivo of resistance to ceftazidime in biofilm-growing Pseudomonas aeruginosa due to chromosomal beta-lactamase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagge, N; Ciofu, O; Skovgaard, L T;

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the development of resistance of biofilm-growing P. aeruginosa during treatment with ceftazidime. Biofilms were established in vitro using a modified Robbins device (MRD) and in vivo in the rat model of chronic lung infection. Three P. aeruginosa strains...

  6. Development of wheat-Aegilops speltoides recombinants and simple PCR-based markers for stem rust resistance genes on the 2S#1 chromosome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wild relatives of wheat are important but underutilized resources for new rust resistance genes because linked negative traits often hinder deployment of these genes in commercial wheats. Here we report reduced alien chromatin recombinants derived from E.R. Sears' wheat-Aegilops speltoides transloca...

  7. Lethal effects of /sup 32/P decay on transfecting activity of Bacillus subtillis phage phie DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loveday, K.S.

    1979-07-15

    Disintegration of /sup 32/P present in the DNA of Bacillus subtilis phage phie (a phage containing double-strand DNA) results in the loss of viability of intact phage as well as transfecting activity of isolated DNA. Only 1/12 of the /sup 32/P disintegrations per phage DNA equivalent inactivities the intact phage while nearly every disintegration inactivates the transfecting DNA. This result provides evidence for a single-strand intermediate in the transfection of B. subtilis by phie DNA.

  8. Sequence and chromosomal localization of the mouse brevican gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rauch, U; Meyer, H; Brakebusch, C

    1997-01-01

    Brevican is a brain-specific proteoglycan belonging to the aggrecan family. Phage clones containing the complete mouse brevican open reading frame of 2649 bp and the complete 3'-untranslated region of 341 bp were isolated from a mouse brain cDNA library, and cosmid clones containing the mouse bre...... to an alternative brevican cDNA, coding for a GPI-linked isoform. Single strand conformation polymorphism analysis mapped the brevican gene (Bcan) to chromosome 3 between the microsatellite markers D3Mit22 and D3Mit11....

  9. Chromosome Disorder Outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... BLOG Join Us Donate You are not alone. Chromosome Disorder Outreach, Inc. is a non-profit organization, ... Support For all those diagnosed with any rare chromosome disorder. Since 1992, CDO has supported the parents ...

  10. Comparative Genotypes, Staphylococcal Cassette Chromosome mec (SCCmec Genes and Antimicrobial Resistance amongst Staphylococcus epidermidis and Staphylococcus haemolyticus Isolates from Infections in Humans and Companion Animals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brenda A McManus

    Full Text Available This study compares the characteristics of Staphylococcus epidermidis (SE and Staphylococcus haemolyticus (SH isolates from epidemiologically unrelated infections in humans (Hu (28 SE-Hu; 8 SH-Hu and companion animals (CpA (12 SE-CpA; 13 SH-CpA. All isolates underwent antimicrobial susceptibility testing, multilocus sequence typing and DNA microarray profiling to detect antimicrobial resistance and SCCmec-associated genes. All methicillin-resistant (MR isolates (33/40 SE, 20/21 SH underwent dru and mecA allele typing. Isolates were predominantly assigned to sequence types (STs within a single clonal complex (CC2, SE, 84.8%; CC1, SH, 95.2%. SCCmec IV predominated among MRSE with ST2-MRSE-IVc common to both Hu (40.9% and CpA (54.5%. Identical mecA alleles and nontypeable dru types (dts were identified in one ST2-MRSE-IVc Hu and CpA isolate, however, all mecA alleles and 2/4 dts detected among 18 ST2-MRSE-IVc isolates were closely related, sharing >96.5% DNA sequence homology. Although only one ST-SCCmec type combination (ST1 with a non-typeable [NT] SCCmec NT9 [class C mec and ccrB4] was common to four MRSH-Hu and one MRSH-CpA, all MRSH isolates were closely related based on similar STs, SCCmec genes (V/VT or components thereof, mecA alleles and dts. Overall, 39.6% of MR isolates harbored NT SCCmec elements, and ACME was more common amongst MRSE and CpA isolates. Multidrug resistance (MDR was detected among 96.7% of isolates but they differed in the prevalence of specific macrolide, aminoglycoside and trimethoprim resistance genes amongst SE and SH isolates. Ciprofloxacin, rifampicin, chloramphenicol [fexA, cat-pC221], tetracycline [tet(K], aminoglycosides [aadD, aphA3] and fusidic acid [fusB] resistance was significantly more common amongst CpA isolates. SE and SH isolates causing infections in Hu and CpA hosts belong predominantly to STs within a single lineage, harboring similar but variable SCCmec genes, mecA alleles and dts. Host and

  11. Rapid evolutionary dynamics in a 2.8-Mb chromosomal region containing multiple prolamin and resistance gene families in Aegilops tauschii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Lingli; Huo, Naxin; Wang, Yi; Deal, Karin; Wang, Daowen; Hu, Tiezhu; Dvorak, Jan; Anderson, Olin D; Luo, Ming-Cheng; Gu, Yong Q

    2016-09-01

    Prolamin and resistance gene families are important in wheat food use and in defense against pathogen attacks, respectively. To better understand the evolution of these multi-gene families, the DNA sequence of a 2.8-Mb genomic region, representing an 8.8 cM genetic interval and harboring multiple prolamin and resistance-like gene families, was analyzed in the diploid grass Aegilops tauschii, the D-genome donor of bread wheat. Comparison with orthologous regions from rice, Brachypodium, and sorghum showed that the Ae. tauschii region has undergone dramatic changes; it has acquired more than 80 non-syntenic genes and only 13 ancestral genes are shared among these grass species. These non-syntenic genes, including prolamin and resistance-like genes, originated from various genomic regions and likely moved to their present locations via sequence evolution processes involving gene duplication and translocation. Local duplication of non-syntenic genes contributed significantly to the expansion of gene families. Our analysis indicates that the insertion of prolamin-related genes occurred prior to the separation of the Brachypodieae and Triticeae lineages. Unlike in Brachypodium, inserted prolamin genes have rapidly evolved and expanded to encode different classes of major seed storage proteins in Triticeae species. Phylogenetic analyses also showed that the multiple insertions of resistance-like genes and subsequent differential expansion of each R gene family. The high frequency of non-syntenic genes and rapid local gene evolution correlate with the high recombination rate in the 2.8-Mb region with nine-fold higher than the genome-wide average. Our results demonstrate complex evolutionary dynamics in this agronomically important region of Triticeae species.

  12. Chromosome painting in plants.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schubert, I.; Fransz, P.F.; Fuchs, J.; Jong, de J.H.

    2001-01-01

    The current 'state-of-art' as to chromosome painting in plants is reviewed. We define different situations described as painting so far: i) Genomic in situ hybridisation (GISH) with total genomic DNA to distinguish alien chromosomes on the basis of divergent dispersed repeats, ii) 'Chromosomal in si

  13. ZEBRAFISH CHROMOSOME-BANDING

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    PIJNACKER, LP; FERWERDA, MA

    1995-01-01

    Banding techniques were carried out on metaphase chromosomes of zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos. The karyotypes with the longest chromosomes consist of 12 metacentrics, 26 submetacentrics, and 12 subtelocentrics (2n = 50). All centromeres are C-band positive. Eight chromosomes have a pericentric C-b

  14. Complete Genome Sequence of the Streptomyces Phage Nanodon

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Streptomyces phage Nanodon is a temperate double-stranded DNA Siphoviridae belonging to cluster BD1. It was isolated from soil collected in Kilauea, HI, using Streptomyces griseus subsp. griseus as a host.

  15. High-throughput Identification of Phage-derived Imaging Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly A. Kelly

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of phage-displayed peptide libraries is a powerful method for selecting peptides with desired binding properties. However, the validation and prioritization of “hits” obtained from this screening approach remains challenging. Here, we describe the development and testing of a new analysis method to identify and display hits from phage-display experiments and high-throughput enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay screens. We test the method using a phage screen against activated macrophages to develop imaging agents with higher specificity for active disease processes. The new methodology should be useful in identifying phage hits and is extendable to other library screening methods such as small-molecule and nanoparticle libraries.

  16. Plasmids and packaging cell lines for use in phage display

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradbury, Andrew M.

    2012-07-24

    The invention relates to a novel phagemid display system for packaging phagemid DNA into phagemid particles which completely avoids the use of helper phage. The system of the invention incorporates the use of bacterial packaging cell lines which have been transformed with helper plasmids containing all required phage proteins but not the packaging signals. The absence of packaging signals in these helper plasmids prevents their DNA from being packaged in the bacterial cell, which provides a number of significant advantages over the use of both standard and modified helper phage. Packaged phagemids expressing a protein or peptide of interest, in fusion with a phage coat protein such as g3p, are generated simply by transfecting phagemid into the packaging cell line.

  17. [Inactivation of T4 phage in water environment using proteinase].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lü, Wen-zhou; Yang, Qing-xiang; Zhang, Yu; Yang, Min; Zhu, Chun-fang

    2004-09-01

    The inactivation effectiveness of proteinase to viruses was investigated by using T4 phage as a model virus. The results showed that the inactivation effectiveness of proteinase to T4 phage was obvious. In the optimum conditions and 67.5 u/mL concentration, the inactivation rate of proteinase K to T4 phage in sterilized water and in sewage achieved 99.4% and 49.4% respectively in an hour, and achieved >99.9% and 81.1% in three hours. The inactivation rate of the industrial proteinase 1398 to T4 phage in sterilized water achieved 74.4% in an hour. The effects of pH and temperature on the inactivation effectiveness was not evident.

  18. Persistence of bacteria and phages in a chemostat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Hal L; Thieme, Horst R

    2012-05-01

    The model of bacteriophage predation on bacteria in a chemostat formulated by Levin et al. (Am Nat 111:3-24, 1977) is generalized to include a distributed latent period, distributed viral progeny release from infected bacteria, unproductive adsorption of phages to infected cells, and possible nutrient uptake by infected cells. Indeed, two formulations of the model are given: a system of delay differential equations with infinite delay, and a more general infection-age model that leads to a system of integro-differential equations. It is shown that the bacteria persist, and sharp conditions for persistence and extinction of phages are determined by the reproductive ratio for phage relative to the phage-free equilibrium. A novel feature of our analysis is the use of the Laplace transform.

  19. Deep sequencing analysis of phage libraries using Illumina platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matochko, Wadim L; Chu, Kiki; Jin, Bingjie; Lee, Sam W; Whitesides, George M; Derda, Ratmir

    2012-09-01

    This paper presents an analysis of phage-displayed libraries of peptides using Illumina. We describe steps for the preparation of short DNA fragments for deep sequencing and MatLab software for the analysis of the results. Screening of peptide libraries displayed on the surface of bacteriophage (phage display) can be used to discover peptides that bind to any target. The key step in this discovery is the analysis of peptide sequences present in the library. This analysis is usually performed by Sanger sequencing, which is labor intensive and limited to examination of a few hundred phage clones. On the other hand, Illumina deep-sequencing technology can characterize over 10(7) reads in a single run. We applied Illumina sequencing to analyze phage libraries. Using PCR, we isolated the variable regions from M13KE phage vectors from a phage display library. The PCR primers contained (i) sequences flanking the variable region, (ii) barcodes, and (iii) variable 5'-terminal region. We used this approach to examine how diversity of peptides in phage display libraries changes as a result of amplification of libraries in bacteria. Using HiSeq single-end Illumina sequencing of these fragments, we acquired over 2×10(7) reads, 57 base pairs (bp) in length. Each read contained information about the barcode (6bp), one complimentary region (12bp) and a variable region (36bp). We applied this sequencing to a model library of 10(6) unique clones and observed that amplification enriches ∼150 clones, which dominate ∼20% of the library. Deep sequencing, for the first time, characterized the collapse of diversity in phage libraries. The results suggest that screens based on repeated amplification and small-scale sequencing identify a few binding clones and miss thousands of useful clones. The deep sequencing approach described here could identify under-represented clones in phage screens. It could also be instrumental in developing new screening strategies, which can preserve

  20. Primary isolation strain determines both phage type and receptors recognised by Campylobacter jejuni bacteriophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martine C Holst Sørensen

    Full Text Available In this study we isolated novel bacteriophages, infecting the zoonotic bacterium Campylobacter jejuni. These phages may be used in phage therapy of C. jejuni colonized poultry to prevent spreading of the bacteria to meat products causing disease in humans. Many C. jejuni phages have been isolated using NCTC12662 as the indicator strain, which may have biased the selection of phages. A large group of C. jejuni phages rely on the highly diverse capsular polysaccharide (CPS for infection and recent work identified the O-methyl phosphoramidate modification (MeOPN of CPS as a phage receptor. We therefore chose seven C. jejuni strains each expressing different CPS structures as indicator strains in a large screening for phages in samples collected from free-range poultry farms. Forty-three phages were isolated using C. jejuni NCTC12658, NCTC12662 and RM1221 as host strains and 20 distinct phages were identified based on host range analysis and genome restriction profiles. Most phages were isolated using C. jejuni strains NCTC12662 and RM1221 and interestingly phage genome size (140 kb vs. 190 kb, host range and morphological appearance correlated with the isolation strain. Thus, according to C. jejuni phage grouping, NCTC12662 and NCTC12658 selected for CP81-type phages, while RM1221 selected for CP220-type phages. Furthermore, using acapsular ∆kpsM mutants we demonstrated that phages isolated on NCTC12658 and NCTC12662 were dependent on the capsule for infection. In contrast, CP220-type phages isolated on RM1221 were unable to infect non-motile ∆motA mutants, hence requiring motility for successful infection. Hence, the primary phage isolation strain determines both phage type (CP81 or CP220 as well as receptors (CPS or flagella recognised by the isolated phages.

  1. Primary isolation strain determines both phage type and receptors recognised by Campylobacter jejuni bacteriophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sørensen, Martine C Holst; Gencay, Yilmaz Emre; Birk, Tina; Baldvinsson, Signe Berg; Jäckel, Claudia; Hammerl, Jens A; Vegge, Christina S; Neve, Horst; Brøndsted, Lone

    2015-01-01

    In this study we isolated novel bacteriophages, infecting the zoonotic bacterium Campylobacter jejuni. These phages may be used in phage therapy of C. jejuni colonized poultry to prevent spreading of the bacteria to meat products causing disease in humans. Many C. jejuni phages have been isolated using NCTC12662 as the indicator strain, which may have biased the selection of phages. A large group of C. jejuni phages rely on the highly diverse capsular polysaccharide (CPS) for infection and recent work identified the O-methyl phosphoramidate modification (MeOPN) of CPS as a phage receptor. We therefore chose seven C. jejuni strains each expressing different CPS structures as indicator strains in a large screening for phages in samples collected from free-range poultry farms. Forty-three phages were isolated using C. jejuni NCTC12658, NCTC12662 and RM1221 as host strains and 20 distinct phages were identified based on host range analysis and genome restriction profiles. Most phages were isolated using C. jejuni strains NCTC12662 and RM1221 and interestingly phage genome size (140 kb vs. 190 kb), host range and morphological appearance correlated with the isolation strain. Thus, according to C. jejuni phage grouping, NCTC12662 and NCTC12658 selected for CP81-type phages, while RM1221 selected for CP220-type phages. Furthermore, using acapsular ∆kpsM mutants we demonstrated that phages isolated on NCTC12658 and NCTC12662 were dependent on the capsule for infection. In contrast, CP220-type phages isolated on RM1221 were unable to infect non-motile ∆motA mutants, hence requiring motility for successful infection. Hence, the primary phage isolation strain determines both phage type (CP81 or CP220) as well as receptors (CPS or flagella) recognised by the isolated phages.

  2. Properties of Klebsiella Phage P13 and Associated Exopolysaccharide Depolymerase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Yang; LI Guiyang; MO Zhaolan; CHAI Zihan; SHANG Anqi; MOU Haijin

    2014-01-01

    The bacteriophage P13 that infects Klebsiella serotype K13 contains a heat-stable depolymerase capable of effective degradation of exopolysaccharide (EPS) produced by this microorganism. In this study, the titer of phage P13, initially 2.0 × 107 pfu mL-1, was found increasing 20 min after infection and reached 5.0 × 109 pfu mL-1 in 60 min. Accordingly, the enzyme activity of de-polymerase approached the maximum 60 min after infection. Treatment at 70℃for 30 min inactivated all the phage, but retained over 90%of the depolymerase activity. Addition of acetone into the crude phage lysate led to precipitation of the protein, with a marked increase in bacterial EPS degradation activity and a rapid drop in the titer of phage. After partial purification by acetone precipitation and ultrafiltration centrifugation, the enzyme was separated from the phage particles, showing two components with enzyme activity on Q-Sepharose Fast Flow. The soluble enzyme had an optimum degradation activity at 60℃and pH 6.5. Transmission electron mi-croscopy demonstrated that the phage P13 particles were spherical with a diameter of 50 nm and a short stumpy tail. It was a dou-ble-strand DNA virus consisting of a nucleic acid molecule of 45976 bp. This work provides an efficient purification operation in-cluding thermal treatment and ultrafiltration centrifugation, to dissociate depolymerase from phage particles. The characterization of phage P13 and associated EPS depolymerase is beneficial for further application of this enzyme.

  3. Antibody Phage Library Screening Efficiency Measured by KD Values

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Hui-tang; SHAN Ya-ming; TANG Li-li; GAO Li-zeng; WANG Li-ping; LI Wei; LI Yu-xin

    2005-01-01

    An antibody phage library was screened with two target molecules, IFNα-2a and FGFR-GST, and the KD value of each round of panning was measured. It was found that the apparent KD values decreased along with each additional panning round, which indicates the increase of the binding affinity between the phage and the target molecules.This result shows that the KD value is a reliable intrinsic parameter and a new method for screening efficiency detection is thus provided.

  4. Chromosomal islands of Streptococcus pyogenes and related streptococci: molecular switches for survival and virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Scott V; McShan, William M

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes is a significant pathogen of humans, annually causing over 700,000,000 infections and 500,000 deaths. Virulence in S. pyogenes is closely linked to mobile genetic elements like phages and chromosomal islands (CI). S. pyogenes phage-like chromosomal islands (SpyCI) confer a complex mutator phenotype on their host. SpyCI integrate into the 5' end of DNA mismatch repair (MMR) gene mutL, which also disrupts downstream operon genes lmrP, ruvA, and tag. During early logarithmic growth, SpyCI excise from the bacterial chromosome and replicate as episomes, relieving the mutator phenotype. As growth slows and the cells enter stationary phase, SpyCI reintegrate into the chromosome, again silencing the MMR operon. This system creates a unique growth-dependent and reversible mutator phenotype. Additional CI using the identical attachment site in mutL have been identified in related species, including Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis, Streptococcus anginosus, Streptococcus intermedius, Streptococcus parauberis, and Streptococcus canis. These CI have small genomes, which range from 13 to 20 kB, conserved integrase and DNA replication genes, and no identifiable genes encoding capsid proteins. SpyCI may employ a helper phage for packaging and dissemination in a fashion similar to the Staphylococcus aureus pathogenicity islands (SaPI). Outside of the core replication and integration genes, SpyCI and related CI show considerable diversity with the presence of many indels that may contribute to the host cell phenotype or fitness. SpyCI are a subset of a larger family of streptococcal CI who potentially regulate the expression of other host genes. The biological and phylogenetic analysis of streptococcal chromosomal islands provides important clues as to how these chromosomal islands help S. pyogenes and other streptococcal species persist in human populations in spite of antibiotic therapy and immune challenges.

  5. Chromosomal instability determines taxane response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Swanton, C.; Nicke, B.; Schuett, M.;

    2009-01-01

    -positive breast cancer and occurs frequently in basal-like and Her2-positive cases. In diploid cells, but not in chromosomally unstable cells, paclitaxel causes repression of CIN-survival genes, followed by cell death. In the OV01 ovarian cancer clinical trial, a high level of CIN was associated with taxane...... chromosomal instability (CIN). Silencing 22/50 of these genes, many of which are involved in DNA repair, caused cancer cell death, suggesting that these genes are involved in the survival of aneuploid cells. Overexpression of these "CIN-survival'' genes is associated with poor outcome in estrogen receptor...... resistance but carboplatin sensitivity, indicating that CIN may determine MTS response in vivo. Thus, pretherapeutic assessment of CIN may optimize treatment stratification and clinical trial design using these agents....

  6. Using experimental evolution to explore natural patterns between bacterial motility and resistance to bacteriophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koskella, Britt; Taylor, Tiffany B; Bates, Jennifer; Buckling, Angus

    2011-11-01

    Resistance of bacteria to phages may be gained by alteration of surface proteins to which phages bind, a mechanism that is likely to be costly as these molecules typically have critical functions such as movement or nutrient uptake. To address this potential trade-off, we combine a systematic study of natural bacteria and phage populations with an experimental evolution approach. We compare motility, growth rate and susceptibility to local phages for 80 bacteria isolated from horse chestnut leaves and, contrary to expectation, find no negative association between resistance to phages and bacterial motility or growth rate. However, because correlational patterns (and their absence) are open to numerous interpretations, we test for any causal association between resistance to phages and bacterial motility using experimental evolution of a subset of bacteria in both the presence and absence of naturally associated phages. Again, we find no clear link between the acquisition of resistance and bacterial motility, suggesting that for these natural bacterial populations, phage-mediated selection is unlikely to shape bacterial motility, a key fitness trait for many bacteria in the phyllosphere. The agreement between the observed natural pattern and the experimental evolution results presented here demonstrates the power of this combined approach for testing evolutionary trade-offs.

  7. Low-level predation by lytic phage phiIPLA-RODI promotes biofilm formation and triggers the stringent response in Staphylococcus aureus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Lucía; González, Silvia; Campelo, Ana Belén; Martínez, Beatriz; Rodríguez, Ana; García, Pilar

    2017-01-01

    An important lesson from the war on pathogenic bacteria has been the need to understand the physiological responses and evolution of natural microbial communities. Bacterial populations in the environment are generally forming biofilms subject to some level of phage predation. These multicellular communities are notoriously resistant to antimicrobials and, consequently, very difficult to eradicate. This has sparked the search for new therapeutic alternatives, including phage therapy. This study demonstrates that S. aureus biofilms formed in the presence of a non-lethal dose of phage phiIPLA-RODI exhibit a unique physiological state that could potentially benefit both the host and the predator. Thus, biofilms formed under phage pressure are thicker and have a greater DNA content. Also, the virus-infected biofilm displayed major transcriptional differences compared to an untreated control. Significantly, RNA-seq data revealed activation of the stringent response, which could slow down the advance of the bacteriophage within the biofilm. The end result would be an equilibrium that would help bacterial cells to withstand environmental challenges, while maintaining a reservoir of sensitive bacterial cells available to the phage upon reactivation of the dormant carrier population. PMID:28102347

  8. The Legacy of 20th Century Phage Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Allan M

    2010-09-01

    The Golden Age of Phage Research, where phage was the favored material for attacking many basic questions in molecular biology, lasted from about 1940 to 1970. The era was initiated by Ellis and Delbrück, whose analysis defined the relevant parameters to measure in studying phage growth, and depended on the fact that the contents of a plaque can comprise descendants of a single infecting particle. It ended around 1970 because definitive methods had then become available for answering the same questions in other systems. Some of the accomplishments of phage research were the demonstration by Hershey and Chase that the genetic material of phage T2 is largely composed of DNA, the construction of linkage maps of T2 and T4 by Hershey and Rotman and their extension to very short molecular distances by Benzer, and the isolation of conditionally lethal mutants in T4 by Epstein et al. and in λ by Campbell. The dissection of the phage life cycle into causal chains was explored by Edgar and Wood for T4 assembly and later in the regulation of lysogeny by Kaiser, extended to the molecular level by Ptashne and others. Restriction/modification was discovered in λ by Bertani and Weigle, and the biochemical mechanism was elucidated by Arber and by Smith.

  9. Effects of antibiotic resistance alleles on bacterial evolutionary responses to viral parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias-Sánchez, Flor I; Hall, Alex R

    2016-05-01

    Antibiotic resistance has wide-ranging effects on bacterial phenotypes and evolution. However, the influence of antibiotic resistance on bacterial responses to parasitic viruses remains unclear, despite the ubiquity of such viruses in nature and current interest in therapeutic applications. We experimentally investigated this by exposing various Escherichia coli genotypes, including eight antibiotic-resistant genotypes and a mutator, to different viruses (lytic bacteriophages). Across 960 populations, we measured changes in population density and sensitivity to viruses, and tested whether variation among bacterial genotypes was explained by their relative growth in the absence of parasites, or mutation rate towards phage resistance measured by fluctuation tests for each phage. We found that antibiotic resistance had relatively weak effects on adaptation to phages, although some antibiotic-resistance alleles impeded the evolution of resistance to phages via growth costs. By contrast, a mutator allele, often found in antibiotic-resistant lineages in pathogenic populations, had a relatively large positive effect on phage-resistance evolution and population density under parasitism. This suggests costs of antibiotic resistance may modify the outcome of phage therapy against pathogenic populations previously exposed to antibiotics, but the effects of any co-occurring mutator alleles are likely to be stronger.

  10. Primary Isolation Strain Determines Both Phage Type and Receptors Recognised by Campylobacter jejuni Bacteriophages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Martine C. Holst; Gencay, Yilmaz Emre; Birk, Tina

    2015-01-01

    In this study we isolated novel bacteriophages, infecting the zoonotic bacterium Campylobacter jejuni. These phages may be used in phage therapy of C. jejuni colonized poultry to prevent spreading of the bacteria to meat products causing disease in humans. Many C. jejuni phages have been isolated...... using NCTC12662 as the indicator strain, which may have biased the selection of phages. A large group of C. jejuni phages rely on the highly diverse capsular polysaccharide (CPS) for infection and recent work identified the O-methyl phosphoramidate modification (MeOPN) of CPS as a phage receptor. We...... therefore chose seven C. jejuni strains each expressing different CPS structures as indicator strains in a large screening for phages in samples collected from free-range poultry farms. Forty-three phages were isolated using C. jejuni NCTC12658, NCTC12662 and RM1221 as host strains and 20 distinct phages...

  11. Effects of surface functionalization on the surface phage coverage and the subsequent performance of phage-immobilized magnetoelastic biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horikawa, Shin; Bedi, Deepa; Li, Suiqiong; Shen, Wen; Huang, Shichu; Chen, I-Hsuan; Chai, Yating; Auad, Maria L; Bozack, Michael J; Barbaree, James M; Petrenko, Valery A; Chin, Bryan A

    2011-01-15

    One of the important applications for which phage-immobilized magnetoelastic (ME) biosensors are being developed is the wireless, on-site detection of pathogenic bacteria for food safety and bio-security. Until now, such biosensors have been constructed by immobilizing a landscape phage probe on gold-coated ME resonators via physical adsorption. Although the physical adsorption method is simple, the immobilization stability and surface coverage of phage probes on differently functionalized sensor surfaces need to be evaluated as a potential way to enhance the detection capabilities of the biosensors. As a model study, a filamentous fd-tet phage that specifically binds streptavidin was adsorbed on either bare or surface-functionalized gold-coated ME resonators. The surface functionalization was performed through the formation of three self-assembled monolayers with a different terminator, based on the sulfur-gold chemistry: AC (activated carboxy-terminated), ALD (aldehyde-terminated), and MT (methyl-terminated). The results, obtained by atomic force microscopy, showed that surface functionalization has a large effect on the surface phage coverage (46.8%, 49.4%, 4.2%, and 5.2% for bare, AC-, ALD-, and MT-functionalized resonators, respectively). In addition, a direct correlation of the observed surface phage coverage with the quantity of subsequently captured streptavidin-coated microbeads was found by scanning electron microscopy and by resonance frequency measurements of the biosensors. The differences in surface phage coverage on the differently functionalized surfaces may then be used to pattern the phage probe layer onto desired parts of the sensor surface to enhance the detection capabilities of ME biosensors.

  12. Streptococcus suis, an emerging drug-resistant animal and human pathogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio ePalmieri

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Streptococcus suis, a major porcine pathogen, has been receiving growing attention not only for its role in severe and increasingly reported infections in humans, but also for its involvement in drug resistance. Recent studies and the analysis of sequenced genomes have been providing important insights into the S. suis resistome, and have resulted in the identification of resistance determinants for tetracyclines, macrolides, aminoglycosides, chloramphenicol, antifolate drugs, streptothricin, and cadmium salts. Resistance gene-carrying genetic elements described so far include integrative and conjugative elements, transposons, genomic islands, phages, and chimeric elements. Some of these elements are similar to those reported in major streptococcal pathogens such as Streptococcus pyogenes, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and Streptococcus agalactiae and share the same chromosomal insertion sites. The available information strongly suggests that S. suis is an important antibiotic resistance reservoir that can contribute to the spread of resistance genes to the above-mentioned streptococci. S. suis is thus a paradigmatic example of possible intersections between animal and human resistomes.

  13. Reduced disease in black abalone following mass mortality: Phage therapy and natural selection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolyn S Friedman

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Black abalone, Haliotis cracherodii, populations along the NE Pacific ocean have declined due to the rickettsial disease withering syndrome (WS. Natural recovery on San Nicolas Island (SNI off Southern California suggested the development of resistance in island populations. Experimental challenges in one treatment demonstrated that progeny of disease-selected black abalone from SNI survived better than did those from naïve black abalone from Carmel Point (CP in mainland coastal central California. Unexpectedly, the presence of a newly observed bacteriophage infecting the WS rickettsia (WS-RLO had strong effects on the survival of infected abalone. Specifically, presence of phage-infected RLO (RLOv reduced the host response to infection, RLO infection loads, and associated mortality. These data suggest that the black abalone: WS-RLO relationship is evolving through dual host mechanisms of resistance to RLO infection in the digestive gland via tolerance to infection in the primary target tissue (the post-esophagus coupled with reduced pathogenicity of the WS-RLO by phage infection, which effectively reduces the infection load in the primary target tissue by half. Sea surface temperature patterns off southern California, associated with a recent hiatus in global-scale ocean warming, do not appear to be a sufficient explanation for survival patterns in SNI black abalone. These data highlight the potential for natural recovery of abalone populations over time and that further understanding of mechanisms governing host-parasite relationships will better enable us to manage declining populations.

  14. Reduced disease in black abalone following mass mortality: Phage therapy and natural selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanblaricom, Glenn R.

    2014-01-01

    Black abalone, Haliotis cracherodii, populations along the NE Pacific ocean have declined due to the rickettsial disease withering syndrome (WS). Natural recovery on San Nicolas Island (SNI) of Southern California suggested the development of resistance in island populations. Experimental challenges in one treatment demonstrated that progeny of disease-selected black abalone from SNI survived better than did those from naïve black abalone from Carmel Point in mainland coastal central California. Unexpectedly, the presence of a newly observed bacteriophage infecting the WS rickettsia (WS-RLO) had strong effects on the survival of infected abalone. Specifically, presence of phage-infected RLO (RLOv) reduced the host response to infection, RLO infection loads, and associated mortality. These data suggest that the black abalone: WS-RLO relationship is evolving through dual host mechanisms of resistance to RLO infection in the digestive gland via tolerance to infection in the primary target tissue (the post-esophagus) coupled with reduced pathogenicity of the WS-RLO by phage infection, which effectively reduces the infection load in the primary target tissue by half. Sea surface temperature patterns off southern California, associated with a recent hiatus in global-scale ocean warming, do not appear to be a sufficient explanation for survival patterns in SNI black abalone. These data highlight the potential for natural recovery of abalone populations over time and that further understanding of mechanisms governing host–parasite relationships will better enable us to manage declining populations.

  15. Isolation of BNYVV coat protein-specific single chain Fv from a mouse phage library antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahromi, Zahra Moghaddassi; Salmanian, Ali Hatef; Rastgoo, Nasrin; Arbabi, Mehdi

    2009-10-01

    Beet necrotic yellow vein virus (BNYVV) infects sugar beet plants worldwide and is responsible for the rhizomania disease and severe economic losses. Disease severity and lack of naturally occurring resistant plants make it very difficult to control the virus, both from epidemiological and economic standpoints. Therefore, early detection is vital to impose hygiene restrictions and prevent further spread of the virus in the field. Immunoassays are one of the most popular methodologies for the primary identification of plant pathogens including BNYVV since they are robust, sensitive, fast, and inexpensive. In this study, the major coat protein (CP21) of BNYVV was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. Thereafter, mice were immunized with purified CP21 and a phage antibody library was constructed from their PCR-amplified immunoglobulin repertoire. Following filamentous phage rescue of the library and four rounds of panning against recombinant CP21 antigen, several specific single chain Fv fragments were isolated and characterized. This approach may pave the way to develop novel immunoassays for a rapid detection of viral infection. Moreover, it will likely provide essential tools to establish antibody-mediated resistant transgenic technology in sugar beet plants.

  16. Chromosomal instability in meningiomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Tilborg, Angela A G; Al Allak, Bushra; Velthuizen, Sandra C J M; de Vries, Annie; Kros, Johan M; Avezaat, Cees J J; de Klein, Annelies; Beverloo, H Berna; Zwarthoff, Ellen C

    2005-04-01

    Approximately 60% of sporadic meningiomas are caused by inactivation of the NF2 tumor suppressor gene on chromosome 22. No causative gene is known for the remaining 40%. Cytogenetic analysis shows that meningiomas caused by inactivation of the NF2 gene can be divided into tumors that show monosomy 22 as the sole abnormality and tumors with a more complex karyotype. Meningiomas not caused by the NF2 gene usually have a diploid karyotype. Here we report that, besides the clonal chromosomal aberrations, the chromosome numbers in many meningiomas varied from one metaphase spread to the other, a feature that is indicative of chromosomal instability. Unexpectedly and regardless of genotype, a subgroup of tumors was observed with an average number of 44.9 chromosomes and little variation in the number of chromosomes per metaphase spread. In addition, a second subgroup was recognized with a hyperdiploid number of chromosomes (average 48.5) and considerable variation in numbers per metaphase. However, this numerical instability resulted in a clonal karyotype with chromosomal gains and losses in addition to loss of chromosome 22 only in meningiomas caused by inactivation of the NF2 gene. In cultured cells of all tumor groups, bi- and multinucleated cells were seen, as well as anaphase bridges, residual chromatid strings, multiple spindle poles, and unseparated chromatids, suggesting defects in the mitotic apparatus or kinetochore. Thus, we conclude that even a benign and slow-growing tumor like a meningioma displays chromosomal instability.

  17. Nanoscale bacteriophage biosensors beyond phage display.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jong-Wook; Song, Jangwon; Hwang, Mintai P; Lee, Kwan Hyi

    2013-01-01

    Bacteriophages are traditionally used for the development of phage display technology. Recently, their nanosized dimensions and ease with which genetic modifications can be made to their structure and function have put them in the spotlight towards their use in a variety of biosensors. In particular, the expression of any protein or peptide on the extraluminal surface of bacteriophages is possible by genetically engineering the genome. In addition, the relatively short replication time of bacteriophages offers researchers the ability to generate mass quantities of any given bacteriophage-based biosensor. Coupled with the emergence of various biomarkers in the clinic as a means to determine pathophysiological states, the development of current and novel technologies for their detection and quantification is imperative. In this review, we categorize bacteriophages by their morphology into M13-based filamentous bacteriophages and T4- or T7-based icosahedral bacteriophages, and examine how such advantages are utilized across a variety of biosensors. In essence, we take a comprehensive approach towards recent trends in bacteriophage-based biosensor applications and discuss their outlook with regards to the field of biotechnology.

  18. Nanoscale bacteriophage biosensors beyond phage display

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee JW

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Jong-Wook Lee,1 Jangwon Song,1,2 Mintai P Hwang,1 Kwan Hyi Lee1,2 1Center for Biomaterials, Biomedical Research Institute, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul, Korea; 2Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Science and Technology, Seoul, Korea Abstract: Bacteriophages are traditionally used for the development of phage display technology. Recently, their nanosized dimensions and ease with which genetic modifications can be made to their structure and function have put them in the spotlight towards their use in a variety of biosensors. In particular, the expression of any protein or peptide on the extraluminal surface of bacteriophages is possible by genetically engineering the genome. In addition, the relatively short replication time of bacteriophages offers researchers the ability to generate mass quantities of any given bacteriophage-based biosensor. Coupled with the emergence of various biomarkers in the clinic as a means to determine pathophysiological states, the development of current and novel technologies for their detection and quantification is imperative. In this review, we categorize bacteriophages by their morphology into M13-based filamentous bacteriophages and T4- or T7-based icosahedral bacteriophages, and examine how such advantages are utilized across a variety of biosensors. In essence, we take a comprehensive approach towards recent trends in bacteriophage-based biosensor applications and discuss their outlook with regards to the field of biotechnology. Keywords: biosensing, M13 bacteriophage, T4 bacteriophage, bacterial detection, Escherichia coli, SPR sensor

  19. Characterization of the staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec insertion site in 108 isolates lacking the mecA gene and identified as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus by the Xpert MRSA assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stojanov, M; Blanc, D S

    2014-11-01

    During a 3-year period, 848 patients were detected as carriers of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) by the Xpert MRSA assay (Cepheid). Among them, 108 patients (12.7 %) were colonized with strains showing methicillin-susceptible phenotypes and absence of the mecA gene, despite being positive with the rapid polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay. DNA sequences of the staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) insertion site of these "false-positive" strains was determined by direct sequencing of the genomic DNA. More than half (53.7 %) of the strains had DNA sequences unrelated to either SCC or SCCmec and one-third had DNA sequences related to non-mec SCC. Only 10.2 % of the strains carried sequences related to SCCmec, suggesting that a sequence containing the mecA gene was lost from an SCCmec. These findings differ from the general idea that all methicillin-susceptible S. aureus having positive Xpert MRSA assay results are essentially MRSA that lost the mecA gene.

  20. Activation of mRNA translation by phage protein and low temperature: the case of Lactococcus lactis abortive infection system AbiD1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehrlich S Dusko

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Abortive infection (Abi mechanisms comprise numerous strategies developed by bacteria to avoid being killed by bacteriophage (phage. Escherichia coli Abis are considered as mediators of programmed cell death, which is induced by infecting phage. Abis were also proposed to be stress response elements, but no environmental activation signals have yet been identified. Abis are widespread in Lactococcus lactis, but regulation of their expression remains an open question. We previously showed that development of AbiD1 abortive infection against phage bIL66 depends on orf1, which is expressed in mid-infection. However, molecular basis for this activation remains unclear. Results In non-infected AbiD1+ cells, specific abiD1 mRNA is unstable and present in low amounts. It does not increase during abortive infection of sensitive phage. Protein synthesis directed by the abiD1 translation initiation region is also inefficient. The presence of the phage orf1 gene, but not its mutant AbiD1R allele, strongly increases abiD1 translation efficiency. Interestingly, cell growth at low temperature also activates translation of abiD1 mRNA and consequently the AbiD1 phenotype, and occurs independently of phage infection. There is no synergism between the two abiD1 inducers. Purified Orf1 protein binds mRNAs containing a secondary structure motif, identified within the translation initiation regions of abiD1, the mid-infection phage bIL66 M-operon, and the L. lactis osmC gene. Conclusion Expression of the abiD1 gene and consequently AbiD1 phenotype is specifically translationally activated by the phage Orf1 protein. The loss of ability to activate translation of abiD1 mRNA determines the molecular basis for phage resistance to AbiD1. We show for the first time that temperature downshift also activates abortive infection by activation of abiD1 mRNA translation.

  1. Analysis of plant meiotic chromosomes by chromosome painting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lysak, Martin A; Mandáková, Terezie

    2013-01-01

    Chromosome painting (CP) refers to visualization of large chromosome regions, entire chromosome arms, or entire chromosomes via fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). For CP in plants, contigs of chromosome-specific bacterial artificial chromosomes (BAC) from the target species or from a closely related species (comparative chromosome painting, CCP) are typically applied as painting probes. Extended pachytene chromosomes provide the highest resolution of CP in plants. CP enables identification and tracing of particular chromosome regions and/or entire chromosomes throughout all meiotic stages as well as corresponding chromosome territories in premeiotic interphase nuclei. Meiotic pairing and structural chromosome rearrangements (typically inversions and translocations) can be identified by CP. Here, we describe step-by-step protocols of CP and CCP in plant species including chromosome preparation, BAC DNA labeling, and multicolor FISH.

  2. Molecular mapping of chromosomes 17 and X. Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barker, D.F.

    1991-01-15

    Progress toward the construction of high density genetic maps of chromosomes 17 and X has been made by isolating and characterizing a relatively large set of polymorphic probes for each chromosome and using these probes to construct genetic maps. We have mapped the same polymorphic probes against a series of chromosome breakpoints on X and 17. The probes could be assigned to over 30 physical intervals on the X chromosome and 7 intervals on 17. In many cases, this process resulted in improved characterization of the relative locations of the breakpoints with respect to each other and the definition of new physical intervals. The strategy for isolation of the polymorphic clones utilized chromosome specific libraries of 1--15 kb segments from each of the two chromosomes. From these libraries, clones were screened for those detecting restriction fragment length polymorphisms. The markers were further characterized, the chromosomal assignments confirmed and in most cases segments of the original probes were subcloned into plasmids to produce probes with improved signal to noise ratios for use in the genetic marker studies. The linkage studies utilize the CEPH reference families and other well-characterized families in our collection which have been used for genetic disease linkage work. Preliminary maps and maps of portions of specific regions of 17 and X are provided. We have nearly completed a map of the 1 megabase Mycoplasma arthritidis genome by applying these techniques to a lambda phage library of its genome. We have found bit mapping to be an effi