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Sample records for chromophoric dissolved organic

  1. CHROMOPHORIC DISSOLVED ORGANIC MATTER (CDOM) DERIVED FROM DECOMPOSITION OF VARIOUS VASCULAR PLANT AND ALGAL SOURCES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chromophoric dissolved organic (CDOM) in aquatic environments is derived from the microbial decomposition of terrestrial and microbial organic matter. Here we present results of studies of the spectral properties and photoreactivity of the CDOM derived from several organic matter...

  2. Chromophoric Dissolved Organic Material, Aqua MODIS, NPP, 0.125 degrees, East US

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — MODIS data is used to develop an index of the amount of chromophoric dissolved organic material (CDOM) in the surface waters. CDOM absorbs heavily in the blue...

  3. Photobleaching Kinetics of Chromophoric Dissolved Organic Matter Derived from Mangrove Leaf Litter and Floating Sargassum Colonies

    Science.gov (United States)

    We examined the photoreactivity of chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) derived from Rhizophora mangle (red mangrove) leaf litter and floating Sargassum colonies as these marine plants can be important contributors to coastal and open ocean CDOM pools, respectively. Mangr...

  4. Chromophoric Dissolved Organic Material, Aqua MODIS, NPP, 0.05 degrees, Global, Science Quality

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — MODIS data is used to develop an index of the amount of chromophoric dissolved organic material (CDOM) in the surface waters. CDOM absorbs heavily in the blue...

  5. Chromophoric Dissolved Organic Material, Aqua MODIS, NPP, 0.125 degrees, West US

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — MODIS data is used to develop an index of the amount of chromophoric dissolved organic material (CDOM) in the surface waters. CDOM absorbs heavily in the blue...

  6. Dissolved organic carbon and chromophoric dissolved organic matter properties of rivers in the USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Robert G.M.; Butler, Kenna D.; Aiken, George R.

    2012-01-01

    Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration and chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) parameters were measured over a range of discharge in 30 U.S. rivers, covering a diverse assortment of fluvial ecosystems in terms of watershed size and landscape drained. Relationships between CDOM absorption at a range of wavelengths (a254, a350, a440) and DOC in the 30 watersheds were found to correlate strongly and positively for the majority of U.S. rivers. However, four rivers (Colorado, Colombia, Rio Grande and St. Lawrence) exhibited statistically weak relationships between CDOM absorption and DOC. These four rivers are atypical, as they either drain from the Great Lakes or experience significant impoundment of water within their watersheds, and they exhibited values for dissolved organic matter (DOM) parameters indicative of autochthonous or anthropogenic sources or photochemically degraded allochthonous DOM and thus a decoupling between CDOM and DOC. CDOM quality parameters in the 30 rivers were found to be strongly correlated to DOM compositional metrics derived via XAD fractionation, highlighting the potential for examining DOM biochemical quality from CDOM measurements. This study establishes the ability to derive DOC concentration from CDOM absorption for the majority of U.S. rivers, describes characteristics of riverine systems where such an approach is not valid, and emphasizes the possibility of examining DOM composition and thus biogeochemical function via CDOM parameters. Therefore, the usefulness of CDOM measurements, both laboratory-based analyses and in situ instrumentation, for improving spatial and temporal resolution of DOC fluxes and DOM dynamics in future studies is considerable in a range of biogeochemical studies.

  7. Dissolved organic carbon and chromophoric dissolved organic matter properties of rivers in the USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Robert G. M.; Butler, Kenna D.; Aiken, George R.

    2012-09-01

    Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration and chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) parameters were measured over a range of discharge in 30 U.S. rivers, covering a diverse assortment of fluvial ecosystems in terms of watershed size and landscape drained. Relationships between CDOM absorption at a range of wavelengths (a254, a350, a440) and DOC in the 30 watersheds were found to correlate strongly and positively for the majority of U.S. rivers. However, four rivers (Colorado, Colombia, Rio Grande and St. Lawrence) exhibited statistically weak relationships between CDOM absorption and DOC. These four rivers are atypical, as they either drain from the Great Lakes or experience significant impoundment of water within their watersheds, and they exhibited values for dissolved organic matter (DOM) parameters indicative of autochthonous or anthropogenic sources or photochemically degraded allochthonous DOM and thus a decoupling between CDOM and DOC. CDOM quality parameters in the 30 rivers were found to be strongly correlated to DOM compositional metrics derived via XAD fractionation, highlighting the potential for examining DOM biochemical quality from CDOM measurements. This study establishes the ability to derive DOC concentration from CDOM absorption for the majority of U.S. rivers, describes characteristics of riverine systems where such an approach is not valid, and emphasizes the possibility of examining DOM composition and thus biogeochemical function via CDOM parameters. Therefore, the usefulness of CDOM measurements, both laboratory-based analyses and in situ instrumentation, for improving spatial and temporal resolution of DOC fluxes and DOM dynamics in future studies is considerable in a range of biogeochemical studies.

  8. Absorption features of chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) and tracing implication for dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in Changjiang Estuary, China

    OpenAIRE

    X. Y. Zhang; Chen, X.; Deng, H.; Du, Y; Jin, H. Y.

    2013-01-01

    Chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) represents the light absorbing fraction of dissolved organic carbon (DOC). Studies have shown that the optical properties of CDOM can be used to infer the distribution and diffusion characteristics of DOC in the estuary and coastal zone. The inversion of DOC concentrations from remote sensing has been implemented in certain regions. In this study we investigate the potential of tracing DOC from CDOM by the measure...

  9. Production of Chromophoric Dissolved Organic Matter from Mangrove Leaf Litter and Floating Sargassum Colonies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) strongly absorbs solar radiation in the blue-green and serves as the primary attenuator of water column ultraviolet radiation (UV-R). CDOM interferes with remote sensing of ocean chlorophyll and can control UV-R-induced damage to light...

  10. Sources and transformations of dissolved lignin phenols and chromophoric dissolved organic matter in Otsuchi Bay, Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Jung eLu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Dissolved lignin phenols and optical properties of dissolved organic matter (DOM were measured to investigate the sources and transformations of terrigenous DOM (tDOM in Otsuchi Bay, Japan. Three rivers discharge into the bay, and relatively high values of syringyl:vanillyl phenols (0.73 ± 0.07 and cinnamyl:vanillyl phenols (0.33 ± 0.10 indicated large contributions of non-woody angiosperm tissues to lignin and tDOM. The physical mixing of river and seawater played an important role in controlling the concentrations and distributions of lignin phenols and chromophoric DOM (CDOM optical properties in the bay. Lignin phenol concentrations and the CDOM absorption coefficient at 350 nm, a(350, were strongly correlated in river and bay waters. Measurements of lignin phenols and CDOM in bay waters indicated a variety of photochemical and biological transformations of tDOM, including oxidation reactions, photobleaching and a decrease in molecular weight. Photodegradation and biodegradation of lignin and CDOM were investigated in decomposition experiments with river water and native microbial assemblages exposed to natural sunlight or kept in the dark. There was a rapid and substantial removal of lignin phenols and CDOM during the first few days in the light treatment, indicating transformations of tDOM and CDOM can occur soon after discharge of buoyant river water into the bay. The removal of lignin phenols was slightly greater in the dark (34% than in the light (30% during the remaining 59 days of the incubation. Comparison of the light and dark treatments indicated biodegradation was responsible for 67% of total lignin phenol removal during the 62-day incubation exposed to natural sunlight, indicating biodegradation is a dominant removal process in Otsuchi Bay.

  11. PHOTOREACTIVITY OF CHROMOPHORIC DISSOLVED ORGANIC MATTER (CDOM) DERIVED FROM DECOMPOSITION OF VARIOUS VASCULAR PLANT AND ALGAL SOURCES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) in aquatic environments is derived from the microbial decomposition of terrestrial and microbial organic matter. Here we present results of studies of the spectral properties and photoreactivity of the CDOM derived from several organi...

  12. Absorption features of chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM and tracing implication for dissolved organic carbon (DOC in Changjiang Estuary, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Y. Zhang

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM represents the light absorbing fraction of dissolved organic carbon (DOC. Studies have shown that the optical properties of CDOM can be used to infer the distribution and diffusion characteristics of DOC in the estuary and coastal zone. The inversion of DOC concentrations from remote sensing has been implemented in certain regions. In this study we investigate the potential of tracing DOC from CDOM by the measurement of DOC, absorption spectrum of CDOM, Chla concentration, suspended sediment (SS, and salinity from cruises in different seasons around the Changjiang estuary. Our results show that around the Changjiang estuary the absorption coefficients of CDOM in general have the similar spatial and temporal characteristics as that of DOC, but the strength of the correlation between CDOM and DOC varies locally and seasonally. The input of pollutants from outside the estuary, the bloom of phytoplankton in spring, re-suspension of deposited sediment, and light bleaching all contribute to the local and seasonal variation of the correlation between DOC and CDOM. An inversion model for the determination of DOC from CDOM is established, but the stability of model parameters and its application in different environments need further study. We find that relative to the absorption coefficient of CDOM, the fitted parameters of the absorption spectrum of DOM are better indictors for the composition of DOC. In addition, it is found that the terrestrial input of DOC to Changjiang estuary is a typical two-stage dilution process instead of a linear diffusion process.

  13. Predicting dissolved lignin phenol concentrations in the coastal ocean from chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM absorption coefficients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cédric G. Fichot

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Dissolved lignin is a well-established biomarker of terrigenous dissolved organic matter (DOM in the ocean, and a chromophoric component of DOM. Although evidence suggests there is a strong linkage between lignin concentrations and chromophoric DOM (CDOM absorption coefficients in coastal waters, the characteristics of this linkage and the existence of a relationship that is applicable across coastal oceans remain unclear. Here, 421 paired measurements of dissolved lignin concentrations (sum of 9 lignin phenols and CDOM absorption coefficients (ag(λ were used to examine their relationship along the river-ocean continuum (0-37 salinity and across contrasting coastal oceans (sub-tropical, temperate, high-latitude. Overall, lignin concentrations spanned four orders of magnitude and revealed a strong, non-linear relationship with ag(λ. The characteristics of the relationship (shape, wavelength dependency, lignin-composition dependency and evidence from degradation indicators were all consistent with lignin being an important driver of CDOM variability in coastal oceans, and suggested physical mixing and long-term photodegradation were important in shaping the relationship. These observations were used to develop two simple empirical models for estimating lignin concentrations from ag(λ with a +/- 20% error relative to measured values. The models are expected to be applicable in most coastal oceans influenced by terrigenous inputs.

  14. Photoproduction of hydrogen peroxide in aqueous solution from model compounds for chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • CDOM produces hydrogen peroxide in sunlit surface waters. • Quinone moieties have been proposed as the photo-active chromophore in CDOM. • Hydrogen peroxide is produced in irradiated aqueous quinone solutions. • Concentrations and production rates are comparable to humic and fulvic acids. • Optical properties post-irradiation were similar to CDOM. - Abstract: To explore whether quinone moieties are important in chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) photochemistry in natural waters, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) production and associated optical property changes were measured in aqueous solutions irradiated with a Xenon lamp for CDOM model compounds (dihydroquinone, benzoquinone, anthraquinone, napthoquinone, ubiquinone, humic acid HA, fulvic acid FA). All compounds produced H2O2 with concentrations ranging from 15 to 500 μM. Production rates were higher for HA vs. FA (1.32 vs. 0.176 mM h−1); values ranged from 6.99 to 0.137 mM h−1 for quinones. Apparent quantum yields (Θapp; measure of photochemical production efficiency) were higher for HA vs. FA (0.113 vs. 0.016) and ranged from 0.0018 to 0.083 for quinones. Dihydroquinone, the reduced form of benzoquinone, had a higher production rate and efficiency than its oxidized form. Post-irradiation, quinone compounds had absorption spectra similar to HA and FA and 3D-excitation–emission matrix fluorescence spectra (EEMs) with fluorescent peaks in regions associated with CDOM

  15. Dynamics of chromophoric dissolved organic matter in Mandovi and Zuari estuaries — A study through in situ and satellite data

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Menon, H.B.; Sangekar, N.P.; Lotliker, A.A.; Vethamony, P.

    The spatial and temporal distribution of absorption of chromophoric dissolved organic matter at 440 nm (a sub (CDOM) (440)) in the Mandovi and Zuari estuaries situated along the west coast of India, has been analysed. The study was carried out using...

  16. Photochemical degradation of chromophoric-dissolved organic matter exposed to simulated UV-B and natural solar radiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Y.; Liu, M.; Qin, B.; Feng, S.

    2009-01-01

    Photochemical degradation of chromophoric-dissolved organic matter (CDOM) by UV-B radiation decreases CDOM absorption in the UV region and fluorescence intensity, and alters CDOM composition. CDOM absorption, fluorescence, and the spectral slope indicating the CDOM composition were studied using 0.2

  17. Excitation Emission Matrix Spectra (EEMS) of Chromophoric Dissolved Organic Matter Produced during Microbial Incubation

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, N.; Nelson, N. B.; Parsons, R.

    2013-12-01

    The chromophoric or light-absorbing fraction of dissolved organic matter (CDOM) is present ubiquitously in natural waters and has a significant impact on ocean biogeochemistry, affecting photosynthesis and primary production as well direct and indirect photochemical reactions (Siegel et al., 2002; Nelson et al., 2007). It has been largely researched in the past few decades, however the exact chemical composition remains unknown. Instrumental methods of analysis including simultaneous excitation-emission fluorescence spectra have allowed for further insight into source and chemical composition. While certain excitation-emission peaks have been associated with ';marine' sources, they have not been exclusively linked to bacterial production of CDOM (Coble, 1996; Zepp et al., 2004). In this study, ';grazer diluted' seawater samples (70% 0.2μm filtered water; 30% whole water) were collected at the Bermuda Atlantic Time Series (BATS) site in the Sargasso Sea (31° 41' N; 64° 10' W) and incubated with an amendment of labile dissolved organic carbon (10μM C6H12O6), ammonium (1μM NH4Cl) and phosphate (0.1μM K2HPO4) to facilitate bacterial production. These substrates and concentrations have been previously shown to facilitate optimum bacterial and CDOM production (Nelson et al., 2004). Sample depths were chosen at 1m and 200m as water at these depths has been exposed to UV light (the Subtropical Mode Water at 200m has been subducted from the surface) and therefore has low initial concentrations of CDOM. After the samples were amended, they were incubated at in-situ temperatures in the dark for 72 hours, with bacteria counts, UV-Vis absorption and EEMS measurements taken at 6-8 hour intervals. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) measurements were collected daily. For the surface water experiment specific bacteria populations were investigated using Fluorescence In-Situ Hybridization (FISH) analysis. Results showed a clear production of bacteria and production of CDOM, which

  18. Chromophoric Dissolved Organic Matter across a Marine Distributed Biological Observatory in the Pacific Arctic Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, S. L.; Frey, K. E.; Shake, K. L.; Cooper, L. W.; Grebmeier, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) plays an important role in marine ecosystems as both a carbon source for the microbial food web (and thus a source of CO2 to the atmosphere) and as a light inhibitor in marine environments. The presence of chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM; the optically active portion of total DOM) can have significant controlling effects on transmittance of sunlight through the water column and therefore on primary production as well as the heat balance of the upper ocean. However, CDOM is also susceptible to photochemical degradation, which decreases the flux of solar radiation that is absorbed. Knowledge of the current spatial and temporal distribution of CDOM in marine environments is thus critical for understanding how ongoing and future changes in climate may impact these biological, biogeochemical, and physical processes. We describe the quantity and quality of CDOM along five key productive transects across a developing Distributed Biological Observatory (DBO) in the Pacific Arctic region. The samples were collected onboard the CCGS Sir Wilfred Laurier in July 2013 and 2014. Monitoring of the variability of CDOM along transects of high productivity can provide important insights into biological and biogeochemical cycling across the region. Our analyses include overall concentrations of CDOM, as well as proxy information such as molecular weight, lability, and source (i.e., autochthonous vs. allochthonous) of organic matter. We utilize these field observations to compare with satellite-derived CDOM concentrations determined from the Aqua MODIS satellite platform, which ultimately provides a spatially and temporally continuous synoptic view of CDOM concentrations throughout the region. Examining the current relationships among CDOM, sea ice variability, biological productivity, and biogeochemical cycling in the Pacific Arctic region will likely provide key insights for how ecosystems throughout the region will respond in future

  19. Utilizing chromophoric dissolved organic matter measurements to derive export and reactivity of dissolved organic carbon exported to the Arctic Ocean: A case study of the Yukon River, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, R.G.M.; Aiken, G.R.; Butler, K.D.; Dornblaser, M.M.; Striegl, R.G.; Hernes, P.J.

    2009-01-01

    The quality and quantity of dissolved organic matter (DOM) exported by Arctic rivers is known to vary with hydrology and this exported material plays a fundamental role in the biogeochemical cycling of carbon at high latitudes. We highlight the potential of optical measurements to examine DOM quality across the hydrograph in Arctic rivers. Furthermore, we establish chromophoric DOM (CDOM) relationships to dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and lignin phenols in the Yukon River and model DOC and lignin loads from CDOM measurements, the former in excellent agreement with long-term DOC monitoring data. Intensive sampling across the historically under-sampled spring flush period highlights the importance of this time for total export of DOC and particularly lignin. Calculated riverine DOC loads to the Arctic Ocean show an increase from previous estimates, especially when new higher discharge data are incorporated. Increased DOC loads indicate decreased residence times for terrigenous DOM in the Arctic Ocean with important implications for the reactivity and export of this material to the Atlantic Ocean. Citation: Spencer, R. G. M., G. R. Aiken, K. D. Butler, M. M. Dornblaser, R. G. Striegl, and P. J. Hernes (2009), Utilizing chromophoric dissolved organic matter measurements to derive export and reactivity of dissolved organic carbon exported to the Arctic Ocean: A case study of the Yukon River, Alaska, Geophys. Res. Lett., 36, L06401, doi:10.1029/ 2008GL036831. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  20. Influence of environmental factors on spectral characteristics of chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) in Inner Mongolia Plateau, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Z. D.; Song, K. S.; Zhao, Y.; Du, J.; Ma, J. H.

    2016-02-01

    Spectral characteristics of chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) were examined in conjunction with environmental factors in the waters of rivers and terminal lakes within the Hulun Buir plateau, northeast China. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC), total nitrogen (TN), and total phosphorous (TP) were significantly higher in terminal lakes than rivers waters (p RDA) indicated that the environmental variables total suspended matter (TSM), TN, and electrical conductivity (EC) had a strong correlation with light absorption characteristics, followed by total dissolved solid (TDS) and chlorophyll a. In most sampling locations, CDOM was the dominant non-water light-absorbing substance. Light absorption by non-algal particles often exceeded that by phytoplankton in the plateau waters. Study of these optical-physicochemical correlations is helpful in the evaluation of the potential influence of water quality factors on non-water light absorption in cold plateau water environments. The construction of a correlation between DOC concentration and water quality factors may help contribute to regional estimates of carbon sources and fate for catchment carbon budget assessments.

  1. Parameterization of the light absorption properties of chromophoric dissolved organic matter in the Baltic Sea and Pomeranian lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meler, Justyna; Kowalczuk, Piotr; Ostrowska, Mirosława; Ficek, Dariusz; Zabłocka, Monika; Zdun, Agnieszka

    2016-08-01

    This study presents three alternative models for estimating the absorption properties of chromophoric dissolved organic matter aCDOM(λ). For this analysis we used a database containing 556 absorption spectra measured in 2006-2009 in different regions of the Baltic Sea (open and coastal waters, the Gulf of Gdańsk and the Pomeranian Bay), at river mouths, in the Szczecin Lagoon and also in three lakes in Pomerania (Poland) - Obłęskie, Łebsko and Chotkowskie. The variability range of the chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) absorption coefficient at 400 nm, aCDOM(400), lay within 0.15-8.85 m-1. The variability in aCDOM(λ) was parameterized with respect to the variability over 3 orders of magnitude in the chlorophyll a concentration Chl a (0.7-119 mg m-3). The chlorophyll a concentration and aCDOM(400) were correlated, and a statistically significant, nonlinear empirical relationship between these parameters was derived (R2 = 0.83). On the basis of the covariance between these parameters, we derived two empirical mathematical models that enabled us to design the CDOM absorption coefficient dynamics in natural waters and reconstruct the complete CDOM absorption spectrum in the UV and visible spectral domains. The input variable in the first model was the chlorophyll a concentration, and in the second one it was aCDOM(400). Both models were fitted to a power function, and a second-order polynomial function was used as the exponent. Regression coefficients for these formulas were determined for wavelengths from 240 to 700 nm at 5 nm intervals. Both approximations reflected the real shape of the absorption spectra with a low level of uncertainty. Comparison of these approximations with other models of light absorption by CDOM demonstrated that our parameterizations were superior (bias from -1.45 to 62 %, RSME from 22 to 220 %) for estimating CDOM absorption in the optically complex waters of the Baltic Sea and Pomeranian lakes.

  2. Characterization of chromophoric dissolved organic matter and relationships among PARAFAC components and water quality parameters in Heilongjiang, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Hongyang; Shi, Jianhong; Qiu, Linlin; Zhao, Yue; Wei, Zimin; Wang, Xinglei; Jia, Liming; Li, Jiming

    2016-05-01

    Chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) is an important optically active substance that can transports nutrients and pollutants from terrestrial to aquatic systems. Additionally, it is used as a measure of water quality. To investigate the source and composition of CDOM, we used chemical and fluorescent analyses to characterize CDOM in Heilongjiang. The composition of CDOM can be investigated by excitation-emission matrix (EEM) fluorescence and parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC). PARAFAC identified four individual components that were attributed to microbial humic-like (C1) and terrestrial humic-like (C2-4) in water samples collected from the Heilongjiang River. The relationships between the maximum fluorescence intensities of the four PARAFAC components and the water quality parameters indicate that the dynamic of the four components is related to nutrients in the Heilongjiang River. The relationships between the fluorescence component C3 and the biochemical oxygen demand (BOD5) indicates that component C3 makes a great contribution to BOD5 and it can be used as a carbon source for microbes in the Heilongjiang River. Furthermore, the relationships between component C3, the particulate organic carbon (POC), and the chemical oxygen demand (CODMn) show that component C3 and POC make great contributions to BOD5 and CODMn. The use of these indexes along with PARAFAC results would be of help to characterize the co-variation between the CDOM and water quality parameters in the Heilongjiang River. PMID:26865492

  3. Seasonal dynamics of light absorption by chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) in the NW Mediterranean Sea (BOUSSOLE site)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Organelli, Emanuele; Bricaud, Annick; Antoine, David; Matsuoka, Atsushi

    2014-09-01

    We analyze a two-year time-series of chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) light absorption measurements in the upper 400 m of the water column at the BOUSSOLE site in the NW Mediterranean Sea. The seasonal dynamics of the CDOM light absorption coefficients at 440 nm (acdom(440)) is essentially characterized by (i) subsurface maxima forming in spring and progressively reinforcing throughout summer, (ii) impoverishment in the surface layer throughout summer and (iii) vertical homogeneity in winter. Seasonal variations of the spectral dependence of CDOM absorption, as described by the exponential slope value (Scdom), are characterized by highest values in summer and autumn at the surface and low values at the depths of acdom(440) subsurface maxima or just below them. Variations of acdom(440) are likely controlled by microbial digestion of phytoplankton cells, which leads to CDOM production, and by photochemical destruction (photobleaching), which leads to CDOM degradation. Photobleaching is also the main driver of Scdom variations. Consistently with previous observations, acdom(440) for a given chlorophyll a concentration is higher than expected from Case I waters bio-optical models. The total non-water light absorption budget shows that surface waters at the BOUSSOLE site are largely dominated by CDOM during all seasons but the algal bloom in March and April. These results improve the knowledge of CDOM absorption dynamics in the Mediterranean Sea, which is scarcely documented. In addition, they open the way to improved algorithms for the retrieval of CDOM absorption from field or satellite radiometric measurements.

  4. Study of influencing factors to chromophoric dissolved organic matter absorption properties from fluorescence features in Taihu lake in autumn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuang-Chun Huang

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In order to identify the components of chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM, confirm the influence of components to the absorption coefficient of CDOM (aCDOM, and estimate aCDOM from fluorescence spectra, fluorescence and optical measurements of CDOM were carried out in November 2008. The results indicate that, the primary component of CDOM is humic-like. The secondary component is tryptophan-like, which is the product of phytoplankton and aquatic debris rather than the wastewater treatment drainaged from city. In this study, six fluorophores with multiple excitation-emission matrices (EEMs peaks (A, B, C, N, M, T were identified according to the parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC. The average contribution of each component to the CDOM is 19.93, 18.82, 16.88, 16.39, 12.26, and 15.72%, respectively. Red Shifted phenomenon will happen with the increase of fluorescence intensity for ultraviolet and terrestrially humic-like. Conversely, marine humic-like will appear Reverse Red Shifted with the increase of fluorescence intensity. The primary contributor to the shoulder value of CDOM’s absorption coefficient at 275 nm is phytoplankton productivity, followed by marine humic-like. The main contributors to the shoulder shape are UV humic-like and phytoplankton productivity, followed by marine humic-like and tryptophan-like. A strong correlation between CDOM absorption and fluorescence intensity at emission wavelength of 424 nm and excitation wavelength ranging from 280 to 360 nm was found. The absorption coefficient can be retrieved successfully from the same excitation wavelength’s fluorescence intensity by an exponential model.

  5. Inflow rate-driven changes in the composition and dynamics of chromophoric dissolved organic matter in a large drinking water lake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yongqiang; Zhang, Yunlin; Jeppesen, Erik; Murphy, Kathleen R; Shi, Kun; Liu, Mingliang; Liu, Xiaohan; Zhu, Guangwei

    2016-09-01

    Drinking water lakes are threatened globally and therefore in need of protection. To date, few studies have been carried out to investigate how the composition and dynamics of chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) in drinking water lakes are influenced by inflow rate. Such CDOM can lead to unpleasant taste and odor of the water and produce undesirable disinfection byproducts during drinking water treatment. We studied the drinking water Lake Qiandao, China, and found that the concentrations of suspended particulate matter (SPM) in the lake increased significantly with inflow rate (p water safety and requires higher removal efficiency of CDOM during drinking water treatment processes.

  6. The contribution of mycosporine-like amino acids, chromophoric dissolved organic matter and particles to the UV protection of sea-ice organisms in the Baltic Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piiparinen, Jonna; Enberg, Sara; Rintala, Janne-Markus; Sommaruga, Ruben; Majaneva, Markus; Autio, Riitta; Vähätalo, Anssi V

    2015-05-01

    The effects of ultraviolet radiation (UVR) on the synthesis of mycosporine-like amino acids (MAAs) in sea-ice communities and on the other UV-absorption properties of sea ice were studied in a three-week long in situ experiment in the Gulf of Finland, Baltic Sea in March 2011. The untreated snow-covered ice and two snow-free ice treatments, one exposed to wavelengths > 400 nm (PAR) and the other to full solar spectrum (PAR + UVR), were analysed for MAAs and absorption coefficients of dissolved (aCDOM) and particulate (ap) fractions, the latter being further divided into non-algal (anap) and algal (aph) components. Our results showed that the diatom and dinoflagellate dominated sea-ice algal community responded to UVR down to 25-30 cm depth by increasing their MAA : chlorophyll-a ratio and by extending the composition of MAA pool from shinorine and palythine to porphyra-334 and an unknown compound with absorption peaks at ca. 335 and 360 nm. MAAs were the dominant absorbing components in algae in the top 10 cm of ice, and their contribution to total absorption became even more pronounced under UVR exposure. In addition to MAAs, the high absorption by chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) and by deposited atmospheric particles provided UV-protection for sea-ice organisms in the exposed ice. Efficient UV-protection will especially be of importance under the predicted future climate conditions with more frequent snow-free conditions. PMID:25837523

  7. Spatiotemporal variations in the abundance and composition of bulk and chromophoric dissolved organic matter in seasonally hypoxia-influenced Green Bay, Lake Michigan, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeVilbiss, Stephen E; Zhou, Zhengzhen; Klump, J Val; Guo, Laodong

    2016-09-15

    Green Bay, Lake Michigan, USA, is the largest freshwater estuary in the Laurentian Great Lakes and receives disproportional terrestrial inputs as a result of a high watershed to bay surface area ratio. While seasonal hypoxia and the formation of "dead zones" in Green Bay have received increasing attention, there are no systematic studies on the dynamics of dissolved organic matter (DOM) and its linkage to the development of hypoxia. During summer 2014, bulk dissolved organic carbon (DOC) analysis, UV-vis spectroscopy, and fluorescence excitation-emission matrices (EEMs) coupled with PARAFAC analysis were used to quantify the abundance, composition and source of DOM and their spatiotemporal variations in Green Bay, Lake Michigan. Concentrations of DOC ranged from 202 to 571μM-C (average=361±73μM-C) in June and from 279 to 610μM-C (average=349±64μM-C) in August. In both months, absorption coefficient at 254nm (a254) was strongly correlated to bulk DOC and was most abundant in the Fox River, attesting a dominant terrestrial input. Non-chromophoric DOC comprised, on average, ~32% of bulk DOC in June with higher terrestrial DOM and ~47% in August with higher aquagenic DOM, indicating that autochthonous and more degraded DOM is of lower optical activity. PARAFAC modeling on EEM data resulted in four major fluorescent DOM components, including two terrestrial humic-like, one aquagenic humic-like, and one protein-like component. Variations in the abundance of DOM components further supported changes in DOM sources. Mixing behavior of DOM components also indicated that while bulk DOM behaved quasi-conservatively, significant compositional changes occurred during transport from the Fox River to the open bay. PMID:27243792

  8. Inflow rate-driven changes in the composition and dynamics of chromophoric dissolved organic matter in a large drinking water lake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yongqiang; Zhang, Yunlin; Jeppesen, Erik; Murphy, Kathleen R; Shi, Kun; Liu, Mingliang; Liu, Xiaohan; Zhu, Guangwei

    2016-09-01

    Drinking water lakes are threatened globally and therefore in need of protection. To date, few studies have been carried out to investigate how the composition and dynamics of chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) in drinking water lakes are influenced by inflow rate. Such CDOM can lead to unpleasant taste and odor of the water and produce undesirable disinfection byproducts during drinking water treatment. We studied the drinking water Lake Qiandao, China, and found that the concentrations of suspended particulate matter (SPM) in the lake increased significantly with inflow rate (p C3 and a negative relationship between inflow rate and the first principal component (PC1) scores, which, in turn, were negatively related to the concentrations and relative molecular size of CDOM (p < 0.001), i.e. the concentration and molecular size of CDOM entering the lake increased proportionately with inflow rate. Furthermore, stable isotopes (δD and δ(18)O) were depleted in the upstream river mouth relative to downstream remaining lake regions, substantiating that riverine CDOM entering the lake was probably driven by inflow rate. This was further underpinned by remarkably higher mean chlorophyll-a and in situ measured terrestrial CDOM fluorescence (365/480 nm) and apparent oxygen utilization (AOU), and notably lower mean PC1 and CDOM spectral slope (S275-295) recorded in the upstream river mouth than in the downstream main lake area. Strong negative correlations between inflow rate and a(250):a(365), S275-295, and the spectral slope ratio (SR) implied that CDOM input to the lake in rainy period was dominated by larger organic molecules with a more humic-like character. Rainy period, especially rainstorm events, therefore poses a risk to drinking water safety and requires higher removal efficiency of CDOM during drinking water treatment processes. PMID:27192356

  9. Estimation of chromophoric dissolved organic matter in the Mississippi and Atchafalaya river plume regions using above-surface hyperspectral remote sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Weining; Yu, Qian; Tian, Yong Q.; Chen, Robert F.; Gardner, G. Bernard

    2011-02-01

    A method for the inversion of hyperspectral remote sensing was developed to determine the absorption coefficient for chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) in the Mississippi and Atchafalaya river plume regions and the northern Gulf of Mexico, where water types vary from Case 1 to turbid Case 2. Above-surface hyperspectral remote sensing data were measured by a ship-mounted spectroradiometer and then used to estimate CDOM. Simultaneously, water absorption and attenuation coefficients, CDOM and chlorophyll fluorescence, turbidities, and other related water properties were also measured at very high resolution (0.5-2 m) using in situ, underwater, and flow-through (shipboard, pumped) optical sensors. We separate ag, the absorption coefficient a of CDOM, from adg (a of CDOM and nonalgal particles) based on two absorption-backscattering relationships. The first is between ad (a of nonalgal particles) and bbp (total particulate backscattering coefficient), and the second is between ap (a of total particles) and bbp. These two relationships are referred as ad-based and ap-based methods, respectively. Consequently, based on Lee's quasi-analytical algorithm (QAA), we developed the so-called Extended Quasi-Analytical Algorithm (QAA-E) to decompose adg, using both ad-based and ap-based methods. The absorption-backscattering relationships and the QAA-E were tested using synthetic and in situ data from the International Ocean-Colour Coordinating Group (IOCCG) as well as our own field data. The results indicate the ad-based method is relatively better than the ap-based method. The accuracy of CDOM estimation is significantly improved by separating ag from adg (R2 = 0.81 and 0.65 for synthetic and in situ data, respectively). The sensitivities of the newly introduced coefficients were also analyzed to ensure QAA-E is robust.

  10. Absorption and fluorescence properties of chromophoric dissolved organic matter of the eastern Bering Sea in the summer with special reference to the influence of a cold pool

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Sa, E. J.; Goes, J. I.; Gomes, H.; Mouw, C.

    2014-06-01

    The absorption and fluorescence properties of chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) are reported for the inner shelf, slope waters and outer shelf regions of the eastern Bering Sea during the summer of 2008, when a warm, thermally stratified surface mixed layer lay over a cold pool (factor analysis (PARAFAC) revealed large variability in the characteristics of CDOM in different regions of the Bering Sea. PARAFAC analysis aided in the identification of three humic-like (components one, two and five) and two protein-like (a tyrosine-like component three, and a tryptophan-like component four) components. In the extensive shelf region, average absorption coefficients at 355 nm (ag355, m-1) and DOC concentrations (μM) were highest in the inner shelf (0.342 ± 0.11 m-1, 92.67 ± 14.60 μM) and lower in the middle (0.226 ± 0.05 m-1, 78.38 ± 10.64 μM) and outer (0.185 ± 0.05 m-1, 79.24 ± 18.01 μM) shelves, respectively. DOC concentrations, however were not significantly different, suggesting CDOM sources and sinks to be uncoupled from DOC. Mean spectral slopes S were elevated in the middle shelf (24.38 ± 2.25 μm-1) especially in the surface waters (26.87 ± 2.39 μm-1) indicating high rates of photodegradation in the highly stratified surface mixed layer, which intensified northwards in the northern middle shelf likely contributing to greater light penetration and to phytoplankton blooms at deeper depths. The fluorescent humic-like components one, two, and five were most elevated in the inner shelf most likely from riverine inputs. Along the productive "green belt" in the outer shelf/slope region, absorption and fluorescence properties indicated the presence of fresh and degraded autochthonous DOM. Near the Unimak Pass region of the Aleutian Islands, low DOC and ag355 (mean 66.99 ± 7.94 μM; 0.182 ± 0.05 m-1) and a high S (mean 25.95 ± 1.58 μm-1) suggested substantial photobleaching of the Alaska Coastal Water, but high intensities of humic-like and

  11. Chromophoric Dissolved Organic Matter and Dissolved Organic Carbon from Sea-Viewing Wide Field-of-View Sensor (SeaWiFS), Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and MERIS Sensors: Case Study for the Northern Gulf of Mexico

    OpenAIRE

    Blake A. Schaeffer; Bianchi, Thomas S; Eurico J. D'Sa; Christopher L Osburn; Nazanin Chaichi Tehrani

    2013-01-01

    Empirical band ratio algorithms for the estimation of colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) for Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS), Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and MERIS ocean color sensors were assessed and developed for the northern Gulf of Mexico. Match-ups between in situ measurements of CDOM absorption coefficients at 412 nm (aCDOM(412)) with that derived from SeaWiFS were examined using two previously reported r...

  12. Effects of nitrate and phosphate supply on chromophoric and fluorescent dissolved organic matter in the Eastern Tropical North Atlantic: a mesocosm study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. N. Loginova

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The Eastern Tropical North Atlantic (ETNA is an open ocean region with little input of terrestrial dissolved organic matter (DOM, suggesting that pelagic production has to be the main source of DOM. Inorganic nitrogen (DIN and phosphorus (DIP concentrations affect pelagic production, leading to DOM modifications. The quantitative and qualitative changes in DOM are often estimated by its optical properties. Colored DOM (CDOM is often used to estimate dissolved organic carbon (DOC concentrations by applied techniques, e.g. through remote sensing, whereas DOM properties, such as molecular weight, can be estimated from the slopes of the CDOM absorption spectra (S. Fluorescence properties of CDOM (FDOM allow discriminating between different structural CDOM properties. The investigation of distribution and cycling of CDOM and FDOM was recognized to be important for understanding of physical and biogeochemical processes, influencing DOM. However, little information is available about effects of nutrient variability on CDOM and FDOM dynamics. Here we present results from two mesocosm experiments conducted with a natural plankton community of the ETNA, where effects of DIP ("Varied P" and DIN ("Varied N" supply on optical properties of DOM were studied. CDOM accumulated proportionally to phytoplankton biomass during the experiments. S decreased over time indicating accumulation of high molecular weight DOM. In Varied N, an additional CDOM portion, as a result of bacterial DOM reworking, was determined. It increased the CDOM fraction in DOC proportionally to the supplied DIN. The humic-like FDOM component (Comp.1 was derived by bacteria proportionally to DIN supply. The bound-to-protein amino acid-like FDOM component (Comp.2 was released irrespectively to phytoplankton biomass, but depending on DIP and DIN concentrations, as a part of an overflow mechanism. Under high DIN supply, Comp.2 was removed by bacterial reworking processes, leading to an

  13. The Measurement and Changes of Chromophoric Dissolved Organic Matter in Water%水体中有色可溶性有机物的测量及其变化

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    付宇; 韦玉春; 周宇

    2012-01-01

    Chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) is one of the major constituents in water color remote sensing. It is significantly important in the research Held such as aquatic ecosystem, optical remote sensing, organic pollution and global carbon circulation, and becoming a hot research topic. This paper systematically summed up the measurement and calculation methods of CDOM, measurement problems, spatial and temporal changes of CDOM and its correlative factors, so as to provide a reference for related work. Presently, routine measurement and calculation methods of CDOM include spectral absorption coefficient and fluorescence spectrum method, CDOM concentration is expressed by absorption coefficient at 355 nm,375 nm or 440 nm in the former, and expressed by fluorescence intensity at excitation wavelength between 200 nm and 435 nm, and emission wavelength between 2S0 nm and 600 nm in the latter. CDOM absorption coefficient in water varying with time, region, depth or water body type, and its value is correlated with factors such as salinity, chlorophylla concentration, DOM (dissolved organic matter) , suspended sediment concentration and others.%有色可溶性有机物(CDOM)是水色遥感的重要组分之一,在水生生态系统、光学遥感、有机污染、全球碳循环等方面具有重要的研究意义,这已成为国内外学者研究的热点.本文系统总结了国内外CDOM测量计算的方法、测量中存在的问题、CDOM的时空变化特点及其相关因素,以期为相关的工作提供参考.目前CDOM的常规测量计算方法包括光谱吸收系数和荧光光谱法两种,前者使用355 nm、375 nm、440 nm等波长处的吸收系数来表示CDOM的浓度,后者采用200 nm~435 nm激发波长和250 nm~ 600 nm发射波长的荧光强度来表示CDOM的浓度.CDOM吸收系数在不同时间段、不同区域、不同深度或不同类型水体中均存在差异,且其值大小与盐度、叶绿素a浓度、DOC、悬浮泥沙浓

  14. Effect of chromophore-chromophore electrostatic interactions in the NLO response of functionalized organic-inorganic sol-gel materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes-Esqueda, J.; Darracq, B.; García-Macedo, J.; Canva, M.; Blanchard-Desce, M.; Chaput, F.; Lahlil, K.; Boilot, J. P.; Brun, A.; Lévy, Y.

    2001-10-01

    In the last years, important non-linear optical (NLO) results on sol-gel and polymeric materials have been reported, with values comparable to those found in crystals. These new materials contain push-pull chromophores either incorporated as guest in a high Tg polymeric matrix (doped polymers) or grafted onto the polymeric matrix. These systems present several advantages, however they require significant improvement at the molecular level—by designing optimized chromophores with very large molecular figure of merit, specific to each application targeted. Besides, it was recently stated in polymers that the chromophore-chromophore electrostatic interactions, which are dependent of chromophore concentration, have a strong effect into their NLO properties. This has not been explored at all in sol-gel systems. In this work, the sol-gel route was used to prepare hybrid organic-inorganic thin films with different NLO chromophores grafted into the skeleton matrix. Combining a molecular engineering strategy for getting a larger molecular figure of merit and by controlling the intermolecular dipole-dipole interactions through both: the tuning of the push-pull chromophore concentration and the control of tetraethoxysilane concentration, we have obtained a r33 coefficient around 15 pm/V at 633 nm for the classical DR1 azo-chromophore and a r33 around 50 pm/V at 831 nm for a new optimized chromophore structure.

  15. 藻类内源产生有色溶解有机物的吸收和三维荧光特性研究%Absorption and Fluorescence Properties of Chromophoric Dissolved Organic Matter Produced by Algae

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    彭彤; 陆小兰; 苏荣国; 张栋梅

    2015-01-01

    dinoflagellates (Prorocentrum donghaiense and Gym-nodinium)were cultured under laboratory conditions.Variations of optical properties of chromophoric dis-solved organic matter (CDOM)were studied with absorption and fluorescence excitation-emission matrix spec-troscopy(EEM)during growth of marine microalgae in incubation experiment.Absorption spectrum revealed absorption coefficientα(355)(CDOM absorption coefficients at 355 nm)of 6 kinds of marine microalgae above increased by 64.8%,242.3%,535.1%,903.2%,836% and 196.4%,respectively.Simultaneously,the ab-sorption spectral slope(Sg),determined between 270 and 350 nm,representing the size of molecular weight of CDOM and humic-like composition,decreased by 8.7%,34.6%,39.4%,53.1%,46.7%,and 35.7%,re-spectively.Applying parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC)together with EEM got four components of CDOM:C1(Ex/Em=350(260)nm/450 nm),C2 (Ex/Em=260(430)nm/525 nm),C3 (Ex/Em=325 nm/400 nm) and C4(Ex/Em=275 nm/325 nm),which were relative to three humic-like and one protein-like fluorescent components of Nitzschia closterium f .minutissima and Navicula halophile .In incubation experiment,fluo-rescence intensity of these four components during growth of Nitzschia closterium f .minutissima increased by,respectively,8.68,24.9,7.19 and 39.8 times,and those of Navicula halophile increased by 2.64,0.07, 4.39 and 12.4 times,respectively.Significant relationships were found between the fluorescence intensity of four components of CDOM,α(355)and Sg.All results demonstrated that both content and molecular weight of CDOM produced by diatom and dinoflagellate studied in incubation experiment increased,but these two pa-rameters changed more obviously of the diatom than those of dinoflagellate;the proportion of humic-like com-ponents in the composition of CDOM also increased clearly with the growth of marine microalgae,but protein-like fluorescent component had only a slow growth.Furthermore,the absorption spectrum of CDOM produced by different species of algae

  16. DNA-Conjugated Organic Chromophores in DNA Stacking Interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Filichev, Vyacheslav V.; Pedersen, Erik Bjerregaard

    2009-01-01

    Since the discovery of the intercalation of acridine derivatives into DNA (1961), chemists have synthesized many intercalators tethered to DNA. Advances in the chemical synthesis of modified nucleosides along with progress in oligonucleotide synthesis have made it possible to introduce organic...... review presents those efforts in the design of intercalators/organic chromophores as oligonucleotide conjugates that form a foundation for the generation of novel nucleic acid architectures...

  17. Linking CDOM spectral absorption to dissolved organic carbon concentrations and loadings in boreal estuaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asmala, Eero; Stedmon, Colin A.; Thomas, David N.

    2012-01-01

    The quantity of chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in three Finnish estuaries (Karjaanjoki, Kyrönjoki and Kiiminkijoki) was investigated, with respect to predicting DOC concentrations and loadings from spectral CDOM absorption measurements. Altogether 87...

  18. Resonance energy transfer from organic chromophores to fullerene molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yu-Xiang; Summers, Melissa A.; Scully, Shawn R.; McGehee, Michael D.

    2006-05-01

    The mechanism of charge separation in polymeric bulk heterojunction photovoltaic cells is usually described as electron transfer from the absorbing polymer to an electron acceptor material such as (6,6)-phenyl C61 butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM). We consider the possibility of energy transfer to PCBM as another potential mechanism for charge separation. We demonstrate resonance energy transfer from a red-emitting organic chromophore (Nile red) to PCBM and measure a Förster radius of 3.1 nm. Using standard Förster energy transfer theory, we calculate a Förster radius (R0) of around 2.7 nm for this donor-acceptor pair in polystyrene. Nile red has a similar emission spectrum to commonly used conjugated polymers used in polymer/PCBM photovoltaic cells. We consider the implications of an energy transfer mechanism on the design requirements for future photovoltaic cells.

  19. Evolution of dissolved and particulate chromophoric materials during the VAHINE mesocosm experiment in the New Caledonian coral lagoon (south-west Pacific)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tedetti, Marc; Marie, Lauriane; Röttgers, Rüdiger; Rodier, Martine; Van Wambeke, France; Helias, Sandra; Caffin, Mathieu; Cornet-Barthaux, Véronique; Dupouy, Cécile

    2016-06-01

    In the framework of the VAHINE project, we investigated the spectral characteristics and the variability of dissolved and particulate chromophoric materials throughout a 23-day mesocosm experiment conducted in the south-west Pacific at the mouth of the New Caledonian coral lagoon (22°29.073 S-166°26.905 E) from 13 January to 4 February 2013. Samples were collected in a mesocosm fertilized with phosphate at depths of 1, 6 and 12 m and in the surrounding waters. Light absorption coefficients of chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) [ag(λ)] and particulate matter [ap(λ)] were determined using a point-source integrating-cavity absorption meter (PSICAM), while fluorescent DOM (FDOM) components were determined from excitation-emission matrices (EEMs) combined with parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC). The evolutions of ag(λ) and ap(λ) in the mesocosm were similar to those of total chlorophyll a concentration, Synechococcus spp. and picoeukaryote abundances, bacterial production, particulate organic nitrogen and total organic carbon concentrations, with roughly a decrease from the beginning of the experiment to days 9-10, and an increase from days 9-10 to the end of the experiment. In the surrounding waters, the same trend was observed but the increase was much less pronounced, emphasizing the effect of the phosphate fertilization on the mesocosm's plankton community. Correlations suggested that both Synechococcus cyanobacteria and heterotrophic bacteria were strongly involved in the production of CDOM and absorption of particulate matter. The increase in phytoplankton biomass during the second part of the experiment led to a higher contribution of particulate material in the absorption budget at 442 nm. The three FDOM components identified (tryptophan-, tyrosine- and ultraviolet C (UVC) humic-like fluorophores) did not follow the evolution of CDOM and particulate matter, suggesting they were driven by different production/degradation processes. Finally, the

  20. Evolution of dissolved and particulate chromophoric materials during the VAHINE mesocosm experiment in the New Caledonian coral lagoon (South West Pacific

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Tedetti

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In the framework of the VAHINE project, we investigated the spectral characteristics and the variability of dissolved and particulate chromophoric materials throughout a 23 day mesocosm experiment conducted in the South West Pacific at the exit of the New Caledonian coral lagoon (22°29.073 S–166°26.905 E from 13 January to 4 February 2013. Samples were collected in a mesocosm fertilized with phosphorus at 1, 6 and 12 m depth and in the surrounding waters. Light absorption coefficients of chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM (ag(λ, particulate matter (ap(λ and CDOM + particulate matter (ag+p(λ were measured using a point-source integrating-cavity absorption meter (PSICAM, while fluorescent DOM (FDOM components were determined from excitation-emission matrices (EEMs combined with parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC. The evolutions of ag(λ, ap(λ and ag+p(λ in the mesocosm were similar to those of total chlorophyll a concentration, Synechococcus spp. and picoeukaryote abundances, bacterial production, particulate organic nitrogen and total organic carbon concentrations, with roughly a decrease from the beginning of the experiment to days 9–10, and an increase from days 9–10 to the end of the experiment. In the surrounding waters, the same trend was observed but the increase was much less pronounced, emphasizing the effect of the phosphorus fertilization on the mesocosm's plankton community. Correlations suggested that both Synechococcus cyanobacteria and heterotrophic bacteria were strongly involved in the production of CDOM and absorption of particulate matter. The increase in phytoplankton activities during the second part of the experiment led to a higher contribution of particulate material in the absorption budget at 442 nm. The three FDOM components identified (tryptophan-, tyrosine- and UVC humic-like fluorophores did not follow the evolution of CDOM and particulate matter, proving that these were driven by different

  1. Cycling downwards - dissolved organic matter in soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Kaiser; K. Kalbitz

    2012-01-01

    Dissolved organic matter has been recognized as mobile, thus crucial to translocation of metals, pollutants but also of nutrients in soil. We present a conceptual model of the vertical movement of dissolved organic matter with soil water, which deviates from the view of a chromatographic stripping a

  2. Chromophore-Based Luminescent Metal-Organic Frameworks as Lighting Phosphors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lustig, William P; Wang, Fangming; Teat, Simon J; Hu, Zhichao; Gong, Qihan; Li, Jing

    2016-08-01

    Energy-efficient solid-state-lighting (SSL) technologies are rapidly developing, but the lack of stable, high-performance rare-earth free phosphors may impede the growth of the SSL market. One possible alternative is organic phosphor materials, but these can suffer from lower quantum yields and thermal instability compared to rare-earth phosphors. However, if luminescent organic chromophores can be built into a rigid metal-organic framework, their quantum yields and thermal stability can be greatly improved. This Forum Article discusses the design of a group of such chromophore-based luminescent metal-organic frameworks with exceptionally high performance and rational control of the important parameters that influence their emission properties, including electronic structures of chromophore, coligands, metal ions, and guest molecules. PMID:27244591

  3. Cooperative TPA enhancement via through-space interactions in organic nanodots built from dipolar chromophores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robin, Anne-Claire; Parthasarathy, Venkatakrishnan; Pla-Quintana, Anna; Mongin, Olivier; Terenziani, Francesca; Caminade, Anne-Marie; Majoral, Jean-Pierre; Blanchard-Desce, Mireille

    2010-08-01

    Whereas structure-properties relationships have been widely investigated at the molecular level, supramolecular structure-property relationships have been somewhat overlooked. In many cases, interchromophoric interactions are found to be detrimental (in particular in second-order NLO) and a lot of efforts have been devoted to circumvent and control these effects to achieve efficient NLO materials for electrooptics. At opposite, we have implemented a countermainstream route based on the confinement of push-pull chromophores in close proximity within organic nanodots where both their number and relative position/distance are controlled by covalent attachment onto appropriate organic scaffolds. In such multichromophoric organic superstructures (namely covalent nanoclusters), dipole-dipole interactions can be tuned by playing on the internal architecture (topology, number of chromophoric subunits, length of the covalent linkers) and on the nature and properties (polarity, polarizability) of the chromophoric subunits. Following this strategy, we present the investigation of two series of such organic nanoclusters built from push-pull chromophores where through-space interactions are shown to modify both one-photon (OPA) and two-photon absorption (TPA) of each chromophoric subunits leading to cooperative enhancement of TPA properties and improved transparency.

  4. Photochemical and Nonphotochemical Transformations of Cysteine with Dissolved Organic Matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Chiheng; Erickson, Paul R; Lundeen, Rachel A; Stamatelatos, Dimitrios; Alaimo, Peter J; Latch, Douglas E; McNeill, Kristopher

    2016-06-21

    Cysteine (Cys) plays numerous key roles in the biogeochemistry of natural waters. Despite its importance, a full assessment of Cys abiotic transformation kinetics, products and pathways under environmental conditions has not been conducted. This study is a mechanistic evaluation of the photochemical and nonphotochemical (dark) transformations of Cys in solutions containing chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM). The results show that Cys underwent abiotic transformations under both dark and irradiated conditions. Under dark conditions, the transformation rates of Cys were moderate and were highly pH- and temperature-dependent. Under UVA or natural sunlight irradiations, Cys transformation rates were enhanced by up to two orders of magnitude compared to rates under dark conditions. Product analysis indicated cystine and cysteine sulfinic acid were the major photooxidation products. In addition, this study provides an assessment of the contributions of singlet oxygen, hydroxyl radical, hydrogen peroxide, and triplet dissolved organic matter to the CDOM-sensitized photochemical oxidation of Cys. The results suggest that another unknown pathway was dominant in the CDOM-sensitized photodegradation of Cys, which will require further study to identify. PMID:27172378

  5. Layer-by-layer deposited organic/inorganic hybrid multilayer films containing noncentrosymmetrically orientated azobenzene chromophores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, En-Hua; Bu, Tianjia; Jin, Pengcheng; Sun, Junqi; Yang, Yanqiang; Shen, Jiacong

    2007-07-01

    Organic/inorganic hybrid multilayer films with noncentrosymmetrically orientated azobenzene chromophores were fabricated by the sequential deposition of ZrO2 layers by a surface sol-gel process and subsequent layer-by-layer (LbL) adsorption of the nonlinear optical (NLO)-active azobenzene-containing polyanion PAC-azoBNS and poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) (PDDA). Noncentrosymmetric orientation of the NLO-active azobenzene chromophores was achieved because of the strong repulsion between the negatively charged ZrO(2) and the sulfonate groups of the azobenzene chromophore in PAC-azoBNS. Regular deposition of ZrO(2)/PAC-azoBNS/PDDA multilayer films was verified by UV-vis absorption spectroscopy and quartz crystal microbalance measurements. Both UV-vis absorption spectroscopy and transmission second harmonic generation (SHG) measurements confirmed the noncentrosymmetric orientation of the azobenzene chromophores in the as-prepared ZrO2/PAC-azoBNS/PDDA multilayer films. The square root of the SHG signal (I(2omega)(1/2)) increases with the increase of the azobenzene graft ratio in PAC-azoBNS as the number of deposition cycles of the ZrO(2)/PAC-azoBNS/PDDA films remains the same, while the second-order susceptibility chi(zzz)(2) of the film decreases with the increase of the azobenzene graft ratio. Furthermore, the present method was successfully extended to realize the noncentrosymmetric orientation of azobenzene chromophores in multilayer films when small organic azobenzene compounds with carboxylic acid and/or hydroxyl groups at one end and sulfonate groups at the other end were used. The present method was characterized by its simplicity and flexibility in film preparation, and it is anticipated to be a facile way to fabricate second-order nonlinear optical film materials. PMID:17555337

  6. Dissolved organic nitrogen uptake by seagrasses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vonk, J.A.; Middelburg, J.J.; Stapel, J.; Bouma, T.J.

    2008-01-01

    We examined the ability of seagrasses to take up dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) with leaves (in situ) and roots (laboratory) in an oligotrophic tropical offshore meadow in Indonesia using 15N-labeled nitrogen (N) substrates. We compared the uptake of urea and amino acids with that of ammonium (NH4

  7. Dissolved Organic Nitrogen in Mediterranean Ecosystems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M.DELGADO-BAQUERIZO; F.COVELO; A.GALLARDO

    2011-01-01

    Dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) in soils has recently gained increasing interest because it may be both a direct N source for plants and the dominant available N form in nutrient-poor soils, however, its prevalence in Mediterranean ecosystems remains unclear. The aims of this study were to i) estimate soil DON in a wide set of Mediterranean ecosystems and compare this levels with those for other ecosystems; ii) describe temporal changes in DON and dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) forms (NH4+ and NO3-), and characterize spatial heterogeneity within plant communities; and iii) study the relative proportion of soil DON and DIN forms as a test of Schimel and Bennett's hypothesis that the prevalence of different N forms follows a gradient of nutrient availability. The study was carried out in eleven plant communities chosen to represent a wide spectrum of Mediterranean vegetation types, ranging from early to late successional status. DON concentrations in the studied Mediterranean plant communities (0-18.2 mg N kg-1) were consistently lower than those found in the literature for other ecosystems. We found high temporal and spatial variability in soil DON for all plant communities. As predicted by the Schimel and Bennett model for nutrient-poor ecosystems, DON dominance over ammonium and nitrate was observed for most plant communities in winter and spring soil samples. However, mineral-N dominated over DON in summer and autumn. Thus, soil water content may have an important effect on DON versus mineral N dominance in Mediterranean ecosystems.

  8. Spatial and seasonal distribution of chromophoric dissolved organic matter in the Upper Paraná River floodplain environments ( Brazil Distribuição espacial e sazonal da matéria orgânica dissolvida cromófora em ambientes da planície de inundação do alto rio Paraná (Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Carolina Teixeira

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available AIM: Our aim was to identify dissolved organic matter (DOM main sources in environments of the Upper Paraná River floodplain and their seasonal and spatial variation. METHODS: Ultraviolet-visible and fluorescence spectroscopy were utilized. The samples were obtained from November 2007 to September 2008 in six lakes of the floodplain. RESULTS: DOM quality differs among environments and also between rainy and dry season. The environments connected with Paraná River showed a high variation on the allochthonous/autochthonous proportion. Aquatic macrophytes might represent an important contribution to DOM in Garças and Osmar lakes. CONCLUSIONS: In general, environments connected to Paraná River have a greater influence of autochthonous DOC, while the others are most influenced by allochthonous inputs.OBJETIVO: O objetivo deste estudo foi identificar a origem da matéria orgânica dissolvida (MOD em ambientes da planície de inundação do alto rio Paraná e sua variação sazonal e espacial. MÉTODOS: Para tal, foram utilizadas técnicas de espectroscopia ultravioleta-visível e de fluorescência. As amostras foram coletadas no período de novembro de 2007 a setembro de 2008 em seis lagoas da planície de inundação. RESULTADOS: A qualidade da MOD difere entre ambientes e também entre as estações seca e chuvosa. Os ambientes conectados ao rio Paraná apresentaram grande variação na proporção autóctone/alóctone. Macrófitas aquáticas podem representar uma contribuição importante à MOD nas lagoas Garças e Osmar. CONCLUSÕES: Em geral, ambientes conectados ao rio Paraná têm maior influência de COD autóctone, enquanto os demais têm maior influência de COD alóctone.

  9. Composition of dissolved organic matter in groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longnecker, Krista; Kujawinski, Elizabeth B.

    2011-05-01

    Groundwater constitutes a globally important source of freshwater for drinking water and other agricultural and industrial purposes, and is a prominent source of freshwater flowing into the coastal ocean. Therefore, understanding the chemical components of groundwater is relevant to both coastal and inland communities. We used electrospray ionization coupled with Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (ESI FT-ICR MS) to examine dissolved organic compounds in groundwater prior to and after passage through a sediment-filled column containing microorganisms. The data revealed that an unexpectedly high proportion of organic compounds contained nitrogen and sulfur, possibly due to transport of surface waters from septic systems and rain events. We matched 292 chemical features, based on measured mass:charge ( m/z) values, to compounds stored in the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG). A subset of these compounds (88) had only one structural isomer in KEGG, thus supporting tentative identification. Most identified elemental formulas were linked with metabolic pathways that produce polyketides or with secondary metabolites produced by plants. The presence of polyketides in groundwater is notable because of their anti-bacterial and anti-cancer properties. However, their relative abundance must be quantified with appropriate analyses to assess any implications for public health.

  10. Spectrophotometric discrimination of river dissolved organic matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Andy

    2002-11-01

    There is a need to be able to differentiate the dissolved organic matter (DOM) fraction in river waters. Research in the 1970s and 1980s has attempted to utilize both absorbance and fluorescence to distinguish between DOM fractions in river waters, but both were limited by the available technology. Total organic carbon content has, therefore, been widely used as a standard method of measuring DOM concentration, although it has little power to differentiate DOM fractions. Recent advances in fluorescence spectrophotometry enable rapid and optically precise analysis of DOM. Here, we show how a combination of both fluorescence and absorbance can be used to discriminate statistically between spatial variations of DOM in tributaries in a small catchment of the Ouseburn, NE England. The results of the discriminant analysis suggest that about 70% of the samples can be correctly classified to its tributary. Discriminant function 1 explains 60·8% of the variance in the data and the fulvic-like fluorescence intensity has the largest absolute correlation within this function; discriminant function 2 explains a further 21·5% of the variance and the fulvic-like fluorescence emission wavelength has the largest absolute correlation within this function. The discriminant analysis does not correctly classify all tributaries every time, and successfully discriminates between the different tributaries 70% of the time. Occasions when the tributary waters are less well discriminated are due to either episodic pollution events (at two sites) or due to tributaries that have strong seasonal trends in spectrophotometric parameters, which allows the sites to be misclassified. Results suggest that spectrophotometric techniques have considerable potential in the discrimination of DOM in rivers.

  11. Chromophore-immobilized luminescent metal-organic frameworks as potential lighting phosphors and chemical sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fangming; Liu, Wei; Teat, Simon J; Xu, Feng; Wang, Hao; Wang, Xinlong; An, Litao; Li, Jing

    2016-08-11

    An organic chromophore H4tcbpe-F was synthesized and immobilized into metal-organic frameworks along with two bipyridine derivatives as co-ligands to generate two strongly luminescent materials [Zn2(tcbpe-F)(4,4'-bpy)·xDMA] (1) and [Zn2(tcbpe-F)(bpee)·xDMA] (2) [4,4'-bpy = 4,4'-bipyridine, bpee = 4,4'-bipyridyl-ethylene, tcbpe-F = 4',4''',4''''',4'''''''-(ethene-1,1,2,2-tetrayl)tetrakis(3-fluoro-[1,1'-biphenyl]-4-carboxylic acid), DMA = N,N-dimethylacetamide]. Compounds 1 and 2 are isoreticular and feature a 2-fold interpenetrated three-dimensional porous structure. Both compounds give green-yellow emission under blue light excitation. Compound 1 has a high internal quantum yield of ∼51% when excited at 455 nm and shows selective luminescence signal change (e.g. emission energy and/or intensity) towards different solvents, including both aromatic and nonaromatic volatile organic species. These properties make it potentially useful as a lighting phosphor and a chemical sensor. PMID:27465685

  12. Explorations of soil microbial processes driven by dissolved organic carbon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Straathof, A.L.

    2015-01-01

    Explorations of soil microbial processes driven by dissolved organic carbon Angela L. Straathof June 17, 2015, Wageningen UR ISBN 978-94-6257-327-7 Abstract Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) is a complex, heterogeneous mixture of C compounds which, as

  13. Dissolved organic carbon release by marine macrophytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Barrón

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Estimates of dissolved organic carbon (DOC release by marine macrophyte communities (seagrass meadows and macroalgal beds were obtained experimentally using in situ benthic chambers. The effect of light availability on DOC release by macrophyte communities was examined in two communities both by comparing net DOC release under light and dark, and by examining the response of net DOC release to longer-term (days experimental shading of the communities. All most 85% of the seagrass communities and almost all of macroalgal communities examined acted as net sources of DOC. There was a weak tendency for higher DOC fluxes under light than under dark conditions in seagrass meadow. There is no relationship between net DOC fluxes and gross primary production (GPP and net community production (NCP, however, this relationship is positive between net DOC fluxes and community respiration. Net DOC fluxes were not affected by shading of a T. testudinum community in Florida for 5 days, however, shading of a mixed seagrass meadow in the Philippines led to a significant reduction on the net DOC release when shading was maintained for 6 days compared to only 2 days of shading. Based on published and unpublished results we also estimate the global net DOC production by marine macrophytes. The estimated global net DOC flux, and hence export, from marine macrophyte is about 0.197 ± 0.015 Pg C yr−1 or 0.212 ± 0.016 Pg C yr−1 depending if net DOC flux by seagrass meadows was estimated by taking into account the low or high global seagrass area, respectively.

  14. Estimation of the contribution of chromophoric dissolved organic matter to total light absorption by remote sensing in Lake Taihu%太湖有色溶解有机物对水体总吸收贡献的遥感估算

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姜广甲; 马荣华; 段洪涛

    2012-01-01

    Chromophnric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) mainly absorbs light in water which may influence the nature water color in lakes. Its absorption and photochemical degradation products play an important role in the primary productivity of water and carbon cycle. In Lake Taihu, a total of 333 sites were sampled in October 2004, October 2008 , April 2010 and January and March 2011 to analyze the contribution of CDOM to tolal light absorption und estimate [aCDOM/a1] (412 ) from remote sensing. It was found that the average of [ Ocdom/a1] (412) exhibited highly temporal variations during the five cruises. The maximum (0. 369) was determined in 2011 , comparing with all samples in Lake Taihu (0. 295 ±0. 139). The minimum average of [aCDOM\\a1] (412) in the dalaset 201004 was 0. 236 ± 0. 108 , varing from 0.046 to 0.455. No significant difference was observed in the data-set 200410 and 200810. The mean of [aCDOM/a1 ] ( 412) in Zhushan Bay was higher than that in both whole Lake Taihu and Meil lang Bay, For Meiliang Bay, it had almost the same value with the whole lake. A multi-band algorithm was adopted to estimate the [aCDOM/a1] (412) by remote sensing and acceptable results were detected (n =333, RMSE = 34. 60% ). Suspended sediments and pigments had an important impact on determination of [aCDOM/a1] (412) from remote sensing. It was underestimated because of pigments and overestimated as the suspended sediments in water and the latter was worse. Tile results also showed that the CDOM and detritus optically dominate thp water color in Lake Taihu.%有色溶解有机物(CDOM)是决定自然水体水色的主要溶解物质,其吸光能力和光化降解产物对水体初级生产力和碳循环过程具有重要影响.以太湖为研究区,2004年10月、2008年10月、2010年4月和2011年1月和3月共5期实测数据,采集了333个有效样点,分析不同时期CDOM对水体总吸收的贡献,并利用遥感技术估算[aCDOM/a1](412).结

  15. Dissolved organic nitrogen dynamics in coastal ecosystems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Engeland, T.

    2010-01-01

    Eutrophication threatens many coastal ecosystems throughout the world. Despite wastewater treatment, which led to dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) reductions in some regions, productivity has not decreased as expected. This is often attributed to internal loading and ef?cient recycling of nitrogen

  16. Size-fractionated production and bioavailability of dissolved organic matter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen-Leerbeck, Helle; Bronk, Deborah A.; Markager, Stiig

    Production and bioavailability of dissolved organic matter was quantified on a time scale of two days from size fractions ranging from bacteria to zooplankton in the York River, Virginia. The goal was to find the main contributor to DOM. Batch incubation experiments were labeled with N15-ammonium...... mainly in the phytoplankton size fraction, which on average contributed 62 % of total particulate nitrogen and 61 % of total particulate carbon. Up to 5 ± 0.4 μmol dissolved organic nitrogen L-1 and 33 ± 6.2 μmol dissolved organic carbon L-1 was produced during the incubation. Bioavailability of...

  17. Will enhanced turbulence in inland waters result in elevated production of autochthonous dissolved organic matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yongqiang; Zhou, Jian; Jeppesen, Erik; Zhang, Yunlin; Qin, Boqiang; Shi, Kun; Tang, Xiangming; Han, Xiaoxia

    2016-02-01

    Biological activity in lakes is strongly influenced by hydrodynamic conditions, not least turbulence intensity; which increases the encounter rate between plankter and nutrient patches. To investigate whether enhanced turbulence in shallow and eutrophic lakes may result in elevated biological production of autochthonous chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM), a combination of field campaigns and mesocosm experiments was used. Parallel factor analysis identified seven components: four protein-like, one microbial humic-like and two terrestrial humic-like components. During our field campaigns, elevated production of autochthonous CDOM was recorded in open water with higher wind speed and wave height than in inner bays, implying that elevated turbulence resulted in increased production of autochthonous CDOM. Confirming the field campaign results, in the mesocosm experiment enhanced turbulence resulted in a remarkably higher microbial humic-like C1 and tryptophan-like C3 (pchange. PMID:26599140

  18. Global effects of agriculture on fluvial dissolved organic matter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graeber, Daniel; Boëchat, Iola; Encina, Francisco;

    2015-01-01

    Agricultural land covers approximately 40% of Earth’s land surface and affects hydromorphological, biogeochemical and ecological characteristics of fluvial networks. In the northern temperate region, agriculture also strongly affects the amount and molecular composition of dissolved organic matte...

  19. Probing ultrafast \\pi\\pi*/n\\pi* internal conversion in organic chromophores via K-edge resonant absorption

    CERN Document Server

    Wolf, T J A; Cryan, J P; Coriani, S; Squibb, R J; Battistoni, A; Berrah, N; Bostedt, C; Bucksbaum, P; Coslovich, G; Feifel, R; Gaffney, K J; Grilj, J; Martinez, T J; Miyabe, S; Moeller, S P; Mucke, M; Natan, A; Obaid, R; Osipov, T; Plekan, O; Wang, S; Koch, H; Gühr, M

    2016-01-01

    Organic chromophores with heteroatoms possess an important excited state relaxation channel from an optically allowed {\\pi}{\\pi}* to a dark n{\\pi}*state. We exploit the element and site specificity of soft x-ray absorption spectroscopy to selectively follow the electronic change during the {\\pi}{\\pi}*/n{\\pi}* internal conversion. As a hole forms in the n orbital during {\\pi}{\\pi}*/n{\\pi}* internal conversion, the near edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectrum at the heteroatom K-edge exhibits an additional resonance. We demonstrate the concept with the nucleobase thymine, a prototypical heteroatomic chromophore. With the help of time resolved NEXAFS spectroscopy at the oxygen K-edge, we unambiguously show that {\\pi}{\\pi}*/n{\\pi}* internal conversion takes place within (60 \\pm 30) fs. High-level coupled cluster calculations on the isolated molecules used in the experiment confirm the superb electronic structure sensitivity of this new method for excited state investigations.

  20. Molecular characterization of brown carbon (BrC) chromophores in secondary organic aerosol generated from photo-oxidation of toluene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Peng; Liu, Jiumeng; Shilling, John E; Kathmann, Shawn M; Laskin, Julia; Laskin, Alexander

    2015-09-28

    Atmospheric brown carbon (BrC) is a significant contributor to light absorption and climate forcing. However, little is known about a fundamental relationship between the chemical composition of BrC and its optical properties. In this work, light-absorbing secondary organic aerosol (SOA) was generated in the PNNL chamber from toluene photo-oxidation in the presence of NOx (Tol-SOA). Molecular structures of BrC components were examined using nanospray desorption electrospray ionization (nano-DESI) and liquid chromatography (LC) combined with UV/Vis spectroscopy and electrospray ionization (ESI) high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS). The chemical composition of BrC chromophores and the light absorption properties of toluene SOA (Tol-SOA) depend strongly on the initial NOx concentration. Specifically, Tol-SOA generated under high-NOx conditions (defined here as initial NOx/toluene of 5/1) appears yellow and mass absorption coefficient of the bulk sample (MACbulk@365 nm = 0.78 m(2) g(-1)) is nearly 80 fold higher than that measured for the Tol-SOA sample generated under low-NOx conditions (NOx/toluene NOx. The integrated absorbance of these fifteen chromophores accounts for 40-60% of the total light absorbance by Tol-SOA at wavelengths between 300 nm and 500 nm. The combination of tandem LC-UV/Vis-ESI/HRMS measurements provides an analytical platform for predictive understanding of light absorption properties by BrC and their relationship to the structure of individual chromophores. General trends in the UV/Vis absorption by plausible isomers of the BrC chromophores were evaluated using theoretical chemistry calculations. The molecular-level understanding of BrC chemistry is helpful for better understanding the evolution and behavior of light absorbing aerosols in the atmosphere. PMID:26173064

  1. PHOTOBIOGEOCHEMISTRY OF SARGASSUM: A POTENTIALLY IMPORTANT SOURCE OF CHROMOPHORIC DISSOLVED ORGANIC MATTER IN THE UPPER OCEAN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sargassum is a genus of widely distributed, generally planktonic macroalgae that often is found near the surface of the ocean. Here we report that a consortium of commonly occurring species in the Gulf of Mexico, Caribbean Sea and North Atlantic, Sargassum natans and Sa...

  2. Synthesis of a novel organic nonlinear optical chromophore and the Testing for µg β Value

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Li-Kun; Jiang, Ya-Dong; Li, Wei; Cai, Yuan

    2007-01-01

    A novel second-order nonlinear optical chromophore (DCDHF-2-V) was synthesized from 3-Hydroxy-3-methyl-2-butanae, propanedinitrile and 4-diethylaminobenzaldehyde by aldol condensation reaction. Molecular structural characterization was investigated by elemental analysis, FTIR, and 1H-NMR spectra. The melting point obtained from DSC thermogram was almost 251 °C, and the compound shows a thermal stability up to 270 °C. Second-order NLO properties of the chromophore were measured by solvatochromic method. From the quantum-mechanical two-level model, it can be obtained that the µg β value of DCDHF-2-V is 6520 × 10-48esu at the wavelength of 1064 nm.

  3. Bacterial utilization of size-fractionated dissolved organic matter

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Khodse, V.B.; Bhosle, N.B.

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) is an important source of organic carbon for sustaining the growth of heterotrophic bacteria. The bacterial utilization of high-molecular-weight (HMW; greater than 30 kDa to 0.22 mu m) and low-molecular-weight (LMW...

  4. Molecular Characterization of Brown Carbon (BrC) Chromophores in Secondary Organic Aerosol Generated From Photo-Oxidation of Toluene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Peng; Liu, Jiumeng; Shilling, John E.; Kathmann, Shawn M.; Laskin, Julia; Laskin, Alexander

    2015-09-28

    Atmospheric Brown carbon (BrC) is a significant contributor to light absorption and climate forcing. However, little is known about a fundamental relationship between the chemical composition of BrC and its optical properties. In this work, light-absorbing secondary organic aerosol (SOA) was generated in the PNNL chamber from toluene photo-oxidation in the presence of NOx (Tol-SOA). Molecular structures of BrC components were examined using nanospray desorption electrospray ionization (nano-DESI) and liquid chromatography (LC) combined with UV/Vis spectroscopy and electrospray ionization (ESI) high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS). The chemical composition of BrC chromophores and the light absorption properties of toluene SOA (Tol-SOA) depend strongly on the initial NOx concentration. Specifically, Tol-SOA generated under high-NOx conditions (defined here as initial NOx/toluene of 5/1) appears yellow and mass absorption coefficient of the bulk sample (MACbulk@365nm = 0.78 m2 g-1) is nearly 80 fold higher than that measured for the Tol-SOA sample generated under low-NOx conditions (NOx/toluene < 1/300). Fifteen compounds, most of which are nitrophenols, are identified as major BrC chromophores responsible for the enhanced light absorption of Tol-SOA material produced in the presence of NOx. The integrated absorbance of these fifteen chromophores accounts for 40-60% of the total light absorbance by Tol-SOA at wavelengths between 300 nm and 500 nm. The combination of tandem LC-UV/Vis-ESI/HRMS measurements provides an analytical platform for predictive understanding of light absorption properties by BrC and their relationship to the structure of individual chromophores. General trends in the UV/vis absorption by plausible isomers of the BrC chromophores were evaluated using theoretical chemistry calculations. The molecular-level understanding of BrC chemistry is helpful for better understanding the evolution and behavior of light absorbing aerosols in the atmosphere.

  5. Dissolved organic matter uptake by temperate macrophytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Engeland, T.; Bouma, T.J.; Morris, E.P.; Brun, F.G.; Peralta, G.; Lara, M.; Hendriks, I.E.; Van Rijswijk, P.; Veuger, B.; Soetaert, K.; Middelburg, J.J.

    2011-01-01

    Ecosystems dominated by seagrasses often exhibit low inorganic nitrogen concentrations. Given the high productivity in these systems, recycling of nitrogen is expected to be high. We investigated the use of inorganic and organic nitrogen compounds by co-occuring primary producers in a temperate macr

  6. Novel hybrid organic-inorganic sol-gel materials based on highly efficient heterocyclic push-pull chromophores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbotto, Alessandro; Bozio, Renato; Brusatin, Giovanna; Facchetti, Antonio; Guglielmi, Massimo; Innocenzi, Plinio; Meneghetti, Moreno; Pagani, Giorgio A.; Signorini, Raffaella

    1999-10-01

    We report the synthesis of sol-gel materials based on highly efficient heterocycle-based push-pull chromophores showing second- and third-order nonlinear optical activity. We show the proper functionalization of the best performing chromophores and their incorporation into a hybrid organic- inorganic sol-gel matrix. Different types of functionalization of the active molecule have been considered, including hydroxyl and alkoxysilyl end-groups. The functionalization strategy responded to different criteria such as stability and synthetic availability of the final molecular precursors, their solubility, and the used synthetic approach to the sol-gel material. The synthesis of the sol-gel materials has been tuned in order to preserve molecular properties and control important factors such as final concentration of the active dye in the matrix. Both acid- and base-catalyzed sol-gel synthesis has been taken into account. 3-Glycidoxypropyltrimethoxysilane and 3- aminopropyltriethoxysilane have been used as the organically modified alkoxides to prepare the hybrid organic-inorganic matrix. Characterization of the spectroscopic properties of the sol-gel materials is presented.

  7. Dissolved organic carbon and dissolved organic nitrogen data collected using bottle in a world wide distribution from 02 September 1998 to 02 November 2003 (NODC Accession 0002403)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) data were collected using bottle casts in a world wide distribution. Data were collected from 02...

  8. The removal kinetics of dissolved organic matter and the optical clarity of groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapelle, Francis H.; Shen, Yuan; Strom, Eric W.; Benner, Ronald

    2016-09-01

    Concentrations of dissolved organic matter (DOM) and ultraviolet/visible light absorbance decrease systematically as groundwater moves through the unsaturated zones overlying aquifers and along flowpaths within aquifers. These changes occur over distances of tens of meters (m) implying rapid removal kinetics of the chromophoric DOM that imparts color to groundwater. A one-compartment input-output model was used to derive a differential equation describing the removal of DOM from the dissolved phase due to the combined effects of biodegradation and sorption. The general solution to the equation was parameterized using a 2-year record of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration changes in groundwater at a long-term observation well. Estimated rates of DOC loss were rapid and ranged from 0.093 to 0.21 micromoles per liter per day (μM d-1), and rate constants for DOC removal ranged from 0.0021 to 0.011 per day (d-1). Applying these removal rate constants to an advective-dispersion model illustrates substantial depletion of DOC over flow-path distances of 200 m or less and in timeframes of 2 years or less. These results explain the low to moderate DOC concentrations (20-75 μM; 0.26-1 mg L-1) and ultraviolet absorption coefficient values ( a 254 < 5 m-1) observed in groundwater produced from 59 wells tapping eight different aquifer systems of the United States. The nearly uniform optical clarity of groundwater, therefore, results from similarly rapid DOM-removal kinetics exhibited by geologically and hydrologically dissimilar aquifers.

  9. Dissolved organic matter uptake in a temperate seagrass ecosystem

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Engeland, T.; Bouma, T.J.; Morris, E.P.; Brun, F.G.; Peralta, G.; Lara, M.; Hendriks, I.E.; van Rijswijk, P.; Veuger, B.; Soetaert, K.; Middelburg, J.J.

    2013-01-01

    We assessed the utilization of inorganic and organic nitrogen compounds of different complexity by primary producers and bacteria in a seagrass ecosystem. Using double-labeled (C-13 and N-15) substrates, the net transfers from the dissolved nitrogen and carbon pools to phytoplankton, planktonic bact

  10. Inner filter correction of dissolved organic matter fluorescence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kothawala, D.N.,; Murphy, K.R.; Stedmon, Colin;

    2013-01-01

    The fluorescence of dissolved organic matter (DOM) is suppressed by a phenomenon of self-quenching known as the inner filter effect (IFE). Despite widespread use of fluorescence to characterize DOM in surface waters, the advantages and constraints of IFE correction are poorly defined. We assessed...

  11. Photosensitizing and Inhibitory Effects of Ozonated Dissolved Organic Matter on Triplet-Induced Contaminant Transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenk, Jannis; Aeschbacher, Michael; Sander, Michael; von Gunten, Urs; Canonica, Silvio

    2015-07-21

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) is both a promoter and an inhibitor of triplet-induced organic contaminant oxidation. This dual role was systematically investigated through photochemical experiments with three types of DOM of terrestrial and aquatic origins that were preoxidized to varying extents by ozonation. The inhibitory effect of DOM was assessed by determining the 4-carboxybenzophenone photosensitized transformation rate constants of two sulfonamide antibiotics (sulfamethoxazole and sulfadiazine) in the presence of untreated or preoxidized DOM. The inhibitory effect decreased with the increasing extent of DOM preoxidation, and it was correlated to the loss of phenolic antioxidant moieties, as quantified electrochemically, and to the loss of DOM ultraviolet absorbance. The triplet photosensitizing ability of preoxidized DOM was determined using the conversion of the probe compound 2,4,6-trimethylphenol (TMP), which is unaffected by DOM inhibition effects. The DOM photosensitized transformation rate constants of TMP decreased with increasing DOM preoxidation and were correlated to the concomitant loss of chromophores (i.e., photosensitizing moieties). The combined effects of DOM preoxidation on the inhibiting and photosensitizing properties were assessed by phototransformation experiments of the sulfonamides in DOM-containing solutions. At low extents of DOM preoxidation, the sulfonamide phototransformation rate constants remained either unchanged or slightly increased, indicating that the removal of antioxidant moieties had larger effects than the loss of photosensitizing moieties. At higher extents of DOM preoxidation, transformation rates declined, mainly reflecting the destruction of photosensitizing moieties. PMID:26091366

  12. Chemical composition of dissolved organic nitrogen in the ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Matthew; Pratum, Tom; Hedges, John; Benner, Ronald

    1997-11-01

    Fixed nitrogen is one of the main limiting nutrients for primary production in the ocean, where it is biologically available in the form of dissolved inorganic and organic matter. Inorganic nitrogen concentrations are consequently very low in surface waters of temperate ocean gyres, yet fixed nitrogen persists in the form of dissolved organic matter. The small, rapidly cycling organic compounds fundamental to microbial and planktonic growth (such as free amino acids, amines and urea) account for only a minor fraction of total dissolved organic nitrogen (DON). In contrast, the vast majority of DON, especially in the deep ocean, resides in the form of nitrogenous substances that are resistant to biological degradation. These substances, which represent an enormous reservoir of fixed nitrogen, are not readily identified by conventional biochemical techniques, but have been assumed to consist largely of structurally complex macromolecules resulting from the degradation and spontaneous abiotic condensation of biochemical precursors. Here we present 15N NMR measurements that contradict this view. Our results show that most higher-molecular-weight DON in the ocean exists in amide form, rather than as a collection of nitrogen heterocycles that might be indicative of spontaneous condensation products. Because these amides are unlikely to form abiotically, the bulk of the ocean's DON reservoir appears to derive directly from degradation-resistant biomolecules.

  13. Photochemical flocculation of terrestrial dissolved organic matter and iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helms, John R.; Mao, Jingdong; Schmidt-Rohr, Klaus; Abdulla, Hussain; Mopper, Kenneth

    2013-11-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) rich water samples (Great Dismal Swamp, Virginia) were 0.1-μm filtered and UV-irradiated in a solar simulator for 30 days. During the irradiation, pH increased, particulate organic matter (POM) and particulate iron formed. After 30 days, 7% of the dissolved organic carbon (DOC) was converted to POC while 75% was remineralized. Approximately 87% of the iron was removed from the dissolved phase after 30 days, but iron did not flocculate until a major fraction of DOM was removed by photochemical degradation and flocculation (>10 days); thus, during the initial 10 days, there were sufficient organic ligands present or the pH was low enough to keep iron in solution. Nuclear magnetic resonance and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopies indicated that photochemically flocculated POM was more aliphatic than the residual non-flocculated DOM. Photochemically flocculated POM was also enriched in amide functionality, while carbohydrate-like material was resistant to both photochemical degradation and flocculation. Abiotic photochemical flocculation likely removes a significant fraction of terrestrial DOM from the upper water column between headwaters and the ocean, but has previously been ignored. Preliminary evidence suggests that this process may significantly impact the transport of DOM and POM in ocean margin environments including estuaries.

  14. Biologically labile photoproducts from riverine non-labile dissolved organic carbon in the coastal waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Kasurinen

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to assess the production of biologically labile photoproducts (BLPs from non-labile riverine dissolved organic carbon (DOC, we collected water samples from ten major rivers, removed labile DOC and mixed the residual non-labile DOC with artificial seawater for microbial and photochemical experiments. Bacteria grew on non-labile DOC with a growth efficiency of 11.5% (mean; range from 3.6 to 15.3%. Simulated solar radiation transformed a part of non-labile DOC into BLPs, which stimulated bacterial respiration and production, but did not change bacterial growth efficiency (BGE compared to the non-irradiated dark controls. In the irradiated water samples, the amount of BLPs stimulating bacterial production depended on the photochemical bleaching of chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM. The apparent quantum yields for BLPs supporting bacterial production ranged from 9.5 to 76 (mean 39 (μmol C mol photons−1 at 330 nm. The corresponding values for BLPs supporting bacterial respiration ranged from 57 to 1204 (mean 320 (μmol C mol photons−1. According to the calculations based on spectral apparent quantum yields and local solar radiation, the annual production of BLPs ranged from 21 (St. Lawrence to 584 (Yangtze mmol C m−2 yr−1 in the plumes of the examined rivers. Complete photobleaching of riverine CDOM in the coastal ocean was estimated to produce 10.7 Mt C BLPs yr−1 from the rivers examined in this study and globally 38 Mt yr−1 (15% of riverine DOC flux from all rivers, which support 4.1 Mt yr−1 of bacterial production and 33.9 Mt yr−1 bacterial respiration.

  15. The role of hydrologic regimes on dissolved organic carbon composition in an agricultural watershed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernes, P.J.; Spencer, R.G.M.; Dyda, R.Y.; Pellerin, B.A.; Bachand, P.A.M.; Bergamaschi, B.A.

    2008-01-01

    Willow Slough, a seasonally irrigated agricultural watershed in the Sacramento River valley, California, was sampled weekly in 2006 in order to investigate seasonal concentrations and compositions of dissolved organic carbon (DOC). Average DOC concentrations nearly doubled from winter baseflow (2.75 mg L-1) to summer irrigation (5.14 mg L-1), while a concomitant increase in carbon-normalized vanillyl phenols (0.11 mg 100 mg OC-1 increasing to 0.31 mg 100 mg OC-1, on average) indicates that this additional carbon is likely vascular plant-derived. A strong linear relationship between lignin concentration and total suspended sediments (r2 = 0.79) demonstrates that agricultural management practices that mobilize sediments will likely have a direct and significant impact on DOC composition. The original source of vascular plant-derived DOC to Willow Slough appears to be the same throughout the year as evidenced by similar syringyl to vanillyl and cinnamyl to vanillyl ratios. However, differing diagenetic pathways during winter baseflow as compared to the rest of the year are evident in acid to aldehyde ratios of both vanillyl and syringyl phenols. The chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) absorption coefficient at 350 nm showed a strong correlation with lignin concentration (r2 = 0.83). Other CDOM measurements related to aromaticity and molecular weight also showed correlations with carbon-normalized yields (e.g. specific UV absorbance at 254 nm (r2 = 0.57) and spectral slope (r2 = 0.54)). Our overall findings suggest that irrigated agricultural watersheds like Willow Slough can potentially have a significant impact on mainstem DOC concentration and composition when scaled to the entire watershed of the main tributary. ?? 2008 Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Selective incorporation of dissolved organic matter (DOM) during sea ice formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, Susan; Vähätalo, Anssi V.; Stedmon, Colin;

    2013-01-01

    as concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), dissolved organic nitrogen (DON), dissolved carbohydrates (dCHOs) and dissolved uronic acids (dUAs) were measured. Enrichment factors (EFs), calculated from salinity-normalized concentrations of DOM in bulk ice, brine and frost flowers relative to under-ice water...

  17. Hidden cycle of dissolved organic carbon in the deep ocean

    OpenAIRE

    Follett, Christopher L.; Repeta, Daniel J.; Rothman, Daniel H.; Xu, Li; Santinelli, Chiara

    2014-01-01

    Oceanic dissolved organic carbon (DOC) contains as much carbon as Earth’s atmosphere, yet its cycling timescales and composition remain poorly constrained. We use serial oxidation experiments to measure the quantitative distribution of carbon isotopes inside the DOC reservoir, allowing us to estimate both its cycling timescales and source distribution. We find that a large portion of deep water DOC has a modern radiocarbon age and a fast turnover time supported by particle dissolution. In add...

  18. Dissolved organic carbon fluxes by seagrass meadows and macroalgal beds

    OpenAIRE

    Barrón, Cristina; Apostolaki, Eugenia T.; Duarte, Carlos M.

    2014-01-01

    Estimates of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) release by marine macrophyte communities (seagrass meadows and macroalgal beds) based on in situ benthic chambers from published and unpublished are compiled in this study. The effect of temperature and light availability on DOC release by macrophyte communities was examined. Almost 85% of the seagrass communities and all of macroalgal communities examined acted as net sources of DOC. Net DOC fluxes in seagrass communities increase positively with w...

  19. Preliminary result of dissolved organic radiocarbon in the western North Pacific Ocean

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, Takayuki, E-mail: tanaka.takayuki@jaea.go.j [AMS Management Section, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 4-24 Minatomachi, Mutsu, Aomori 035-0064 (Japan); Otosaka, Shigeyoshi [Research Group for Environmental Science, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 2-4 Shirakata-Shirane, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Wakita, Masahide [Mutsu Institute for Oceanography, Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology, 690 Kitasekine, Sekine, Mutsu, Aomori 035-0022 (Japan); Amano, Hikaru [Japan Chemical Analysis Center, 293-5 Sanno-cho, Inage-ku, Chiba-shi 263-0002 (Japan); Togawa, Orihiko [Research Group for Environmental Science, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 2-4 Shirakata-Shirane, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan)

    2010-04-15

    Radiocarbon in dissolved organic matter in seawater gives information on the dynamics and origin of the dissolved organic matter. Here, we present the vertical profile of DELTA{sup 14}C of dissolved organic carbon in the western North Pacific Ocean. The profile was almost parallel to that for DELTA{sup 14}C of dissolved inorganic carbon, indicating that the time scale of seawater circulation was the main influence on the DELTA{sup 14}C signature of dissolved organic carbon. On the basis of the DELTA{sup 14}C differences between dissolved organic carbon and dissolved inorganic carbon, and a comparison with DELTA{sup 14}C of dissolved organic carbon in the central North Pacific Ocean, we suggest that there may be a source of younger dissolved organic carbon in the western North Pacific Ocean.

  20. Response of Dissolved Organic Matter to Warming and Nitrogen Addition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, J. H.; Nguyen, H.

    2014-12-01

    Dissolved Organic Matter (DOM) is a ubiquitous mixture of soluble organic components. Since DOM is produced from the terrestrial leachate of various soil types, soil may influence the chemistry and biology of freshwater through the input of leachate and run-off. The increased temperature by climate change could dramatically change the DOM characteristics of soils through enhanced decomposition rate and losses of carbon from soil organic matter. In addition, the increase in the N-deposition affects DOM leaching from soils by changing the carbon cycling and decomposition rate of soil decay. In this study, we conducted growth chamber experiments using two types of soil (wetland and forest) under the conditions of temperature increase and N-deposition in order to investigate how warming and nitrogen addition influence the characteristics of the DOM leaching from different soil types. This leachate controls the quantity and quality of DOM in surface water systems. After 10 months of incubation, the dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations decreased for almost samples in the range of 7.6 to 87.3% (ANOVA, pHumification index (HIX) showed the significant increase trends during the duration of incubation and temperature for almost the samples (ANOVA, psoil samples. During the experiment, labile DOM from the soils was consumed and transformed into resistant aromatic carbon structures and less biodegradable components via microbial processes. Both time and the temperature presented the statistically significant effects on DOM characteristics of soil samples while the N-addition exhibited the insignificant difference among the samples.

  1. Dissolved organic matter fluorescence at wavelength 275/342 nm as a key indicator for detection of point-source contamination in a large Chinese drinking water lake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yongqiang; Jeppesen, Erik; Zhang, Yunlin; Shi, Kun; Liu, Xiaohan; Zhu, Guangwei

    2016-02-01

    Surface drinking water sources have been threatened globally and there have been few attempts to detect point-source contamination in these waters using chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) fluorescence. To determine the optimal wavelength derived from CDOM fluorescence as an indicator of point-source contamination in drinking waters, a combination of field campaigns in Lake Qiandao and a laboratory wastewater addition experiment was used. Parallel factor (PARAFAC) analysis identified six components, including three humic-like, two tryptophan-like, and one tyrosine-like component. All metrics showed strong correlation with wastewater addition (r(2) > 0.90, p water quality in surface drinking water sources.

  2. Dissolved oxygen as an indicator of bioavailable dissolved organic carbon in groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapelle, Francis H.; Bradley, Paul M.; McMahon, Peter B.; Kaiser, Karl; Benner, Ron

    2012-01-01

    Concentrations of dissolved oxygen (DO) plotted vs. dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in groundwater samples taken from a coastal plain aquifer of South Carolina (SC) showed a statistically significant hyperbolic relationship. In contrast, DO-DOC plots of groundwater samples taken from the eastern San Joaquin Valley of California (CA) showed a random scatter. It was hypothesized that differences in the bioavailability of naturally occurring DOC might contribute to these observations. This hypothesis was examined by comparing nine different biochemical indicators of DOC bioavailability in groundwater sampled from these two systems. Concentrations of DOC, total hydrolysable neutral sugars (THNS), total hydrolysable amino acids (THAA), mole% glycine of THAA, initial bacterial cell counts, bacterial growth rates, and carbon dioxide production/consumption were greater in SC samples relative to CA samples. In contrast, the mole% glucose of THNS and the aromaticity (SUVA254) of DOC was greater in CA samples. Each of these indicator parameters were observed to change with depth in the SC system in a manner consistent with active biodegradation. These results are uniformly consistent with the hypothesis that the bioavailability of DOC is greater in SC relative to CA groundwater samples. This, in turn, suggests that the presence/absence of a hyperbolic DO-DOC relationship may be a qualitative indicator of relative DOC bioavailability in groundwater systems.

  3. Bioavailability of autochthonous dissolved organic nitrogen in marine plankton communities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Helle; Markager, Svend Stiig; Søndergaard, Morten

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the bioavailability of dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) produced during a phytoplankton bloom. The experiments were conducted with natural plankton communities as batch growth experiments over approximately 30 days with nitrogen limitation. Five to six...... times during the exponential and stationary phases of each experimental bloom the bioavailability of DON was measured over 60 days together with DOC and oxygen consumption. The overall aim was to quantify remineralization of the added nitrate. The results showed that maximum 33 % of the added nitrate....... Otherwise nitrogen was retained in the bacterial biomass. We hypothesize that photochemistry and grazing may increase mineralization of DON in shallow ecosystems....

  4. Utilizing Colored Dissolved Organic Matter to Derive Dissolved Black Carbon Export by Arctic Rivers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aron eStubbins

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Wildfires have produced black carbon (BC since land plants emerged. Condensed aromatic compounds, a form of BC, have accumulated to become a major component of the soil carbon pool. Condensed aromatics leach from soils into rivers, where they are termed dissolved black carbon (DBC. The transport of DBC by rivers to the sea is a major term in the global carbon and BC cycles. To estimate Arctic river DBC export, 25 samples collected from the six largest Arctic rivers (Kolyma, Lena, Mackenzie, Ob’, Yenisey and Yukon were analyzed for dissolved organic carbon (DOC, colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM, and DBC. A simple, linear regression between DOC and DBC indicated that DBC accounted for 8.9 ± 0.3% DOC exported by Arctic rivers. To improve upon this estimate, an optical proxy for DBC was developed based upon the linear correlation between DBC concentrations and CDOM light absorption coefficients at 254 nm (a254. Relatively easy to measure a254 values were determined for 410 Arctic river samples between 2004 and 2010. Each of these a254 values was converted to a DBC concentration based upon the linear correlation, providing an extended record of DBC concentration. The extended DBC record was coupled with daily discharge data from the six rivers to estimate riverine DBC loads using the LOADEST modeling program. The six rivers studied cover 53% of the pan-Arctic watershed and exported 1.5 ± 0.1 million tons of DBC per year. Scaling up to the full area of the pan-Arctic watershed, we estimate that Arctic rivers carry 2.8 ± 0.3 million tons of DBC from land to the Arctic Ocean each year. This equates to ~8% of Arctic river DOC export, slightly less than indicated by the simpler DBC vs DOC correlation-based estimate. Riverine discharge is predicted to increase in a warmer Arctic. DBC export was positively correlated with river runoff, suggesting that the export of soil BC to the Arctic Ocean is likely to increase as the Arctic warms.

  5. Utilizing Colored Dissolved Organic Matter to Derive Dissolved Black Carbon Export by Arctic Rivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stubbins, Aron; Spencer, Robert; Mann, Paul; Holmes, R.; McClelland, James; Niggemann, Jutta; Dittmar, Thorsten

    2015-10-01

    Wildfires have produced black carbon (BC) since land plants emerged. Condensed aromatic compounds, a form of BC, have accumulated to become a major component of the soil carbon pool. Condensed aromatics leach from soils into rivers, where they are termed dissolved black carbon (DBC). The transport of DBC by rivers to the sea is a major term in the global carbon and BC cycles. To estimate Arctic river DBC export, 25 samples collected from the six largest Arctic rivers (Kolyma, Lena, Mackenzie, Ob’, Yenisey and Yukon) were analyzed for dissolved organic carbon (DOC), colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM), and DBC. A simple, linear regression between DOC and DBC indicated that DBC accounted for 8.9 ± 0.3% DOC exported by Arctic rivers. To improve upon this estimate, an optical proxy for DBC was developed based upon the linear correlation between DBC concentrations and CDOM light absorption coefficients at 254 nm (a254). Relatively easy to measure a254 values were determined for 410 Arctic river samples between 2004 and 2010. Each of these a254 values was converted to a DBC concentration based upon the linear correlation, providing an extended record of DBC concentration. The extended DBC record was coupled with daily discharge data from the six rivers to estimate riverine DBC loads using the LOADEST modeling program. The six rivers studied cover 53% of the pan-Arctic watershed and exported 1.5 ± 0.1 million tons of DBC per year. Scaling up to the full area of the pan-Arctic watershed, we estimate that Arctic rivers carry 2.8 ± 0.3 million tons of DBC from land to the Arctic Ocean each year. This equates to ~8% of Arctic river DOC export, slightly less than indicated by the simpler DBC vs DOC correlation-based estimate. Riverine discharge is predicted to increase in a warmer Arctic. DBC export was positively correlated with river runoff, suggesting that the export of soil BC to the Arctic Ocean is likely to increase as the Arctic warms.

  6. Ocean metabolism and dissolved organic matter: How do small dissolved molecules persist in the ocean?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benner, Ronald

    2010-05-01

    The ocean reservoir of dissolved organic matter (DOM) is among the largest global reservoirs (~700 Pg C) of reactive organic carbon. Marine primary production (~50 Pg C/yr) by photosynthetic microalgae and cyanobacteria is the major source of organic matter to the ocean and the principal substrate supporting marine food webs. The direct release of DOM from phytoplankton and other organisms as well as a variety of other processes, such as predation and viral lysis, contribute to the ocean DOM reservoir. Continental runoff and atmospheric deposition are relatively minor sources of DOM to the ocean, but some components of this material appear to be resistant to decomposition and to have a long residence time in the ocean. Concentrations of DOM are highest in surface waters and decrease with depth, a pattern that reflects the sources and diagenesis of DOM in the upper ocean. Most (70-80%) marine DOM exists as small molecules of low molecular weight (1 kDalton) DOM is relatively enriched in major biochemicals, such as combined neutral sugars and amino acids, and is more bioavailable than low-molecular-weight DOM. The observed relationships among the size, composition, and reactivity of DOM have led to the size-reactivity continuum model, which postulates that diagenetic processes lead to the production of smaller molecules that are structurally altered and resistant to microbial degradation. The radiocarbon content of these small dissolved molecules also indicates these are the most highly aged components of DOM. Chemical signatures of bacteria are abundant in DOM and increase during diagenesis, indicating bacteria are an important source of slowly cycling biochemicals. Recent analyses of DOM isolates by ultrahigh-resolution mass spectrometry have revealed an incredibly diverse mixture of molecules. Carboxyl-rich alicyclic molecules are abundant in DOM, and they appear to be derived from diagenetically-altered terpenoids, such as sterols and hopanoids. Thermally

  7. Dissolved organic matter in Arizona reservoirs: assessment of carbonaceous sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mash, H.; Westerhoff, P.K. [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering; Baker, L.A. [University of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN (United States). Water Resources Center; Nieman, R.A. [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States). Dept. of Chemistry and Biochemistry; Nguyen, M.L. [AWWA Research Foundation, Denver, CO (United States)

    2004-07-01

    Most studies of freshwater dissolved organic matter (DOM) have been conducted in temperate climates where allochthonous organic material is abundant. Because climatic conditions of the Southwestern USA are different than temperate environments, DOM from three freshwater reservoirs (Saguaro Lake, Bartlett Lake and Lake Pleasant) was investigated to determine the importance of allochthonous and autochthonous organic material. Results from the study show hydrophobic acids constitute a small percentage of the DOM, while the neutral and hydrophilic fractions are more prevalent. C/N ratios are comparatively low relative to other freshwater systems, ranging between 28 and 35 for the hydrophobic acid fractions, while DOC/DON ratios are seasonally influenced by epilimnionic algal growth. The isolated organic fractions were low in aromatic content measured by solid-state {sup 13}C NMR resulting in low aromatic to aliphatic carbon ratios. Organic material recovered from Saguaro Lake and Lake Pleasant display traits that suggest most allochthonous contributions are highly attenuated favoring organic material from autochthonous sources (low C/N and aromatic/aliphatic carbon ratios), whereas organic material from Bartlett Lake demonstrated a greater seasonal perturbation in source influence. (author)

  8. The composition and degradability of upland dissolved organic matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moody, Catherine; Worrall, Fred; Clay, Gareth

    2016-04-01

    In order to assess controls on the degradability of DOM in stream water, samples of dissolved organic matter (DOM) and particulate organic matter (POM) were collected every month for a period of 24 months from an upland, peat-covered catchment in northern England. Each month the degradability of the DOM was assessed by exposing river water to light for up to 24 hours, and the change in the dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration in the water was measured. To provide context for the analysis of DOM and its degradability, samples of peat, vegetation, and litter were also taken from the same catchment and analysed. The organic matter samples were analysed by several methods including: elemental analysis (CHN and O), bomb calorimetry, thermogravimetric analysis, pyrolysis GC/MS, ICP-OES, stable isotope analysis (13C and 15N) and 13C solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). The water samples were analysed for pH, conductivity, absorbance at 400nm, anions, cations, particulate organic carbon (POC) and DOC concentrations. River flow conditions and meteorology were also recorded at the site and included in the analysis of the composition and degradability of DOM. The results of multiple regression models showed that the rates of DOC degradation were affected by the N-alkyl, O-alkyl, aldehyde and aromatic relative intensities, gross heat, OR and C:N. Of these, the N-alkyl relative intensity had the greatest influence, and this in turn was found to be dependent on the rainfall and soil temperature in the week before sampling.

  9. Global effects of agriculture on fluvial dissolved organic matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graeber, Daniel; Boëchat, Iola G; Encina-Montoya, Francisco; Esse, Carlos; Gelbrecht, Jörg; Goyenola, Guillermo; Gücker, Björn; Heinz, Marlen; Kronvang, Brian; Meerhoff, Mariana; Nimptsch, Jorge; Pusch, Martin T; Silva, Ricky C S; von Schiller, Daniel; Zwirnmann, Elke

    2015-11-06

    Agricultural land covers approximately 40% of Earth's land surface and affects hydromorphological, biogeochemical and ecological characteristics of fluvial networks. In the northern temperate region, agriculture also strongly affects the amount and molecular composition of dissolved organic matter (DOM), which constitutes the main vector of carbon transport from soils to fluvial networks and to the sea, and is involved in a large variety of biogeochemical processes. Here, we provide first evidence about the wider occurrence of agricultural impacts on the concentration and composition of fluvial DOM across climate zones of the northern and southern hemispheres. Both extensive and intensive farming altered fluvial DOM towards a more microbial and less plant-derived composition. Moreover, intensive farming significantly increased dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) concentrations. The DOM composition change and DON concentration increase differed among climate zones and could be related to the intensity of current and historical nitrogen fertilizer use. As a result of agriculture intensification, increased DON concentrations and a more microbial-like DOM composition likely will enhance the reactivity of catchment DOM emissions, thereby fuelling the biogeochemical processing in fluvial networks, and resulting in higher ecosystem productivity and CO2 outgassing.

  10. Dilution limits dissolved organic carbon utilization in the deep ocean

    KAUST Repository

    Arrieta, Jesus

    2015-03-19

    Oceanic dissolved organic carbon (DOC) is the second largest reservoir of organic carbon in the biosphere. About 72% of the global DOC inventory is stored in deep oceanic layers for years to centuries, supporting the current view that it consists of materials resistant to microbial degradation. An alternative hypothesis is that deep-water DOC consists of many different, intrinsically labile compounds at concentrations too low to compensate for the metabolic costs associated to their utilization. Here, we present experimental evidence showing that low concentrations rather than recalcitrance preclude consumption of a substantial fraction of DOC, leading to slow microbial growth in the deep ocean. These findings demonstrate an alternative mechanism for the long-term storage of labile DOC in the deep ocean, which has been hitherto largely ignored. © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science. All rights reserved.

  11. Pan-arctic trends in terrestrial dissolved organic matter from optical measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul James Mann

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Climate change is causing extensive warming across arctic regions resulting in permafrost degradation, alterations to regional hydrology, and shifting amounts and composition of dissolved organic matter (DOM transported by streams and rivers. Here, we characterize the DOM composition and optical properties of the six largest arctic rivers draining into the Arctic Ocean to examine the ability of optical measurements to provide meaningful insights into terrigenous carbon export patterns and biogeochemical cycling. The chemical composition of aquatic DOM varied with season, spring months were typified by highest lignin phenol and dissolved organic carbon (DOC concentrations with greater hydrophobic acid content, and lower proportions of hydrophilic compounds, relative to summer and winter months. Chromophoric DOM (CDOM spectral slope (S275-295 tracked seasonal shifts in DOM composition across river basins. Fluorescence and parallel factor analysis identified seven components across the six Arctic rivers. The ratios of ‘terrestrial humic-like’ versus ‘marine humic-like’ fluorescent components co-varied with lignin monomer ratios over summer and winter months, suggesting fluorescence may provide information on the age and degradation state of riverine DOM. CDOM absorbance (a350 proved a sensitive proxy for lignin phenol concentrations across all six river basins and over the hydrograph, enabling for the first time the development of a single pan-arctic relationship between a350 and terrigenous DOC (R2 = 0.93. Combining this lignin proxy with high-resolution monitoring of a350, pan-arctic estimates of annual lignin flux were calculated to range from 156 to 185 Gg, resulting in shorter and more constrained estimates of terrigenous DOM residence times in the Arctic Ocean (spanning 7 months to 2½ years. Furthermore, multiple linear regression models incorporating both absorbance and fluorescence variables proved capable of explaining much of the

  12. Dynamics of dissolved organic matter in fjord ecosystems: Contributions of terrestrial dissolved organic matter in the deep layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Youhei; McCallister, S. Leigh; Koch, Boris P.; Gonsior, Michael; Jaffé, Rudolf

    2015-06-01

    Annually, rivers and inland water systems deliver a significant amount of terrestrial organic matter (OM) to the adjacent coastal ocean in both particulate and dissolved forms; however, the metabolic and biogeochemical transformations of OM during its seaward transport remains one of the least understood components of the global carbon cycle. This transfer of terrestrial carbon to marine ecosystems is crucial in maintaining trophic dynamics in coastal areas and critical in global carbon cycling. Although coastal regions have been proposed as important sinks for exported terrestrial materials, most of the global carbon cycling data, have not included fjords in their budgets. Here we present distributional patterns on the quantity and quality of dissolved OM in Fiordland National Park, New Zealand. Specifically, we describe carbon dynamics under diverse environmental settings based on dissolved organic carbon (DOC) depth profiles, oxygen concentrations, optical properties (fluorescence) and stable carbon isotopes. We illustrate a distinct change in the character of DOC in deep waters compared to surface and mid-depth waters. Our results suggest that, both, microbial reworking of terrestrially derived plant detritus and subsequent desorption of DOC from its particulate counterpart (as verified in a desorption experiment) are the main sources of the humic-like enriched DOC in the deep basins of the studied fjords. While it has been suggested that short transit times and protection of OM by mineral sorption may ultimately result in significant terrestrial carbon burial and preservation in fjords, our data suggests the existence of an additional source of terrestrial OM in the form of DOC generated in deep, fjord water.

  13. Latitudinal gradients in degradation of marine dissolved organic carbon.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carol Arnosti

    Full Text Available Heterotrophic microbial communities cycle nearly half of net primary productivity in the ocean, and play a particularly important role in transformations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC. The specific means by which these communities mediate the transformations of organic carbon are largely unknown, since the vast majority of marine bacteria have not been isolated in culture, and most measurements of DOC degradation rates have focused on uptake and metabolism of either bulk DOC or of simple model compounds (e.g. specific amino acids or sugars. Genomic investigations provide information about the potential capabilities of organisms and communities but not the extent to which such potential is expressed. We tested directly the capabilities of heterotrophic microbial communities in surface ocean waters at 32 stations spanning latitudes from 76°S to 79°N to hydrolyze a range of high molecular weight organic substrates and thereby initiate organic matter degradation. These data demonstrate the existence of a latitudinal gradient in the range of complex substrates available to heterotrophic microbial communities, paralleling the global gradient in bacterial species richness. As changing climate increasingly affects the marine environment, changes in the spectrum of substrates accessible by microbial communities may lead to shifts in the location and rate at which marine DOC is respired. Since the inventory of DOC in the ocean is comparable in magnitude to the atmospheric CO(2 reservoir, such a change could profoundly affect the global carbon cycle.

  14. Transformations and Fates of Terrigenous Dissolved Organic Matter in River-influenced Ocean Margins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fichot, Cedric G.

    Rivers contribute about 0.25 Pg of terrigenous dissolved organic carbon (tDOC) to the ocean each year. The fate and transformations of this material have important ramifications for the metabolic state of the ocean, air-sea CO2 exchange, and the global carbon cycle. Stable isotopic compositions and terrestrial biomarkers suggest tDOC must be efficiently mineralized in ocean margins. Nonetheless, the extent of tDOC mineralization in these environments remains unknown, as no quantitative estimate is available. The complex interplay of biogeochemical and physical processes in these systems compounded by the limited practicality of chemical proxies (organic biomarkers, isotopic compositions) make the quantification of tDOC mineralization in these dynamic systems particularly challenging. In this dissertation, new optical proxies were developed (Chapters 1 and 2) and facilitated the first quantitative assessment of tDOC mineralization in a dynamic river-influenced ocean margin (Chapter 3) and the monitoring of continental runoff distributions in the coastal ocean using remote sensing (Chapter 4). The optical properties of chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) were used as optical proxies for dissolved organic carbon concentration ([DOC]) and %tDOC. In both proxies, the CDOM spectral slope coefficient ( S275-295) was exploited for its informative properties on the chemical nature and composition of dissolved organic matter. In the first proxy, a strong relationship between S275-295 and the ratio of CDOM absorption to [DOC] facilitated accurate retrieval (+/- 4%) of [DOC] from CDOM. In the second proxy, the existence of a strong relationship between S275-295 and the DOC-normalized lignin yield facilitated the estimation of the %tDOC from S 275-295. Using the proxies, the tDOC concentration can be retrieved solely from CDOM absorption coefficients (lambda = 275-295 nm) in river-influenced ocean margins. The practicality of optical proxies facilitated the calculation

  15. Catchment scale molecular composition of hydrologically mobilized dissolved organic matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raeke, Julia; Lechtenfeld, Oliver J.; Oosterwoud, Marieke R.; Bornmann, Katrin; Tittel, Jörg; Reemtsma, Thorsten

    2016-04-01

    Increasing concentrations of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in rivers of temperate catchments in Europe and North Amerika impose new technical challenges for drinking water production. The driving factors for this decadal increase in DOM concentration are not conclusive and changes in annual temperatures, precipitation and atmospheric deposition are intensely discussed. It is known that the majority of DOM is released by few but large hydrologic events, mobilizing DOM from riparian wetlands for export by rivers and streams. The mechanisms of this mobilization and the resulting molecular composition of the released DOM may be used to infer long-term changes in the biogeochemistry of the respective catchment. Event-based samples collected over two years from streams in three temperate catchments in the German mid-range mountains were analyzed after solid-phase extraction of DOM for their molecular composition by ultra-high resolution mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS). Hydrologic conditions, land use and water chemistry parameters were used to complement the molecular analysis. The molecular composition of the riverine DOM was strongly dependent on the magnitude of the hydrologic events, with unsaturated, oxygen-enriched compounds being preferentially mobilized by large events. This pattern is consistent with an increase in dissolved iron and aluminum concentrations. In contrast, the relative proportions of nitrogen and sulfur bearing compounds increased with an increased agricultural land use but were less affected by the mobilization events. Co-precipitation experiments with colloidal aluminum showed that unsaturated and oxygen-rich compounds are preferentially removed from the dissolved phase. The precipitated compounds thus had similar chemical characteristics as compared to the mobilized DOM from heavy rain events. Radiocarbon analyses also indicated that this precipitated fraction of DOM was of comparably young radiocarbon age. DOM radiocarbon from field samples

  16. Climate Variability, Dissolved Organic Carbon, UV Exposure, and Amphibian Decline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, P. D.; O'Reilly, C. M.; Diamond, S.; Corn, S.; Muths, E.; Tonnessen, K.; Campbell, D. H.

    2001-12-01

    Increasing levels of UV radiation represent a potential threat to aquatic organisms in a wide range of environments, yet controls on in situ variability on UV exposure are relatively unknown. The primary control on the penetration of UV radiation in surface water environments is the amount of photoreactive dissolved organic carbon (DOC). Consequently, biogeochemical processes that control the cycling of DOC also affect the exposure of aquatic organisms to UV radiation. Three years of monitoring UV extinction and DOC composition in Rocky Mountain, Glacier, Sequoia/ Kings Canyon, and Olympic National Parks demonstrate that the amount of fulvic acid DOC is much more important than the total DOC pool in controlling UV attenuation. This photoreactive component of DOC originates primarily in soil, and is subject both to biogeochemical controls (e.g. temperature, moisture, vegetation, soil type) on production, and hydrologic controls on transport to surface water and consequently UV exposure to aquatic organisms. Both of these controls are positively related to precipitation with greater production and transport associated with higher precipitation amounts. For example, an approximately 20 percent reduction in precipitation from 1999 to 2000 resulted in a 27% - 59% reduction in the amount of photoreactive DOC at three sites in Rocky Mountain National Park. These differences in the amount of hydrophobic DOC result in an increase in UV exposure in the aquatic environment by a factor of 2 or more. Implications of these findings for observed patterns of amphibian decline will be discussed.

  17. Tracking changes in the optical properties and molecular composition of dissolved organic matter during drinking water production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavonen, E E; Kothawala, D N; Tranvik, L J; Gonsior, M; Schmitt-Kopplin, P; Köhler, S J

    2015-11-15

    Absorbance, 3D fluorescence and ultrahigh resolution electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (ESI-FT-ICR-MS) were used to explain patterns in the removal of chromophoric and fluorescent dissolved organic matter (CDOM and FDOM) at the molecular level during drinking water production at four large drinking water treatment plants in Sweden. When dissolved organic carbon (DOC) removal was low, shifts in the dissolved organic matter (DOM) composition could not be detected with commonly used DOC-normalized parameters (e.g. specific UV254 absorbance - SUVA), but was clearly observed by using differential absorbance and fluorescence or ESI-FT-ICR-MS. In addition, we took a novel approach by identifying how optical parameters were correlated to the elemental composition of DOM by using rank correlation to connect optical properties to chemical formulas assigned to mass peaks from FT-ICR-MS analyses. Coagulation treatment selectively removed FDOM at longer emission wavelengths (450-600 nm), which significantly correlated with chemical formulas containing oxidized carbon (average carbon oxidation state ≥ 0), low hydrogen to carbon ratios (H/C: average ± SD = 0.83 ± 0.13), and abundant oxygen-containing functional groups (O/C = 0.62 ± 0.10). Slow sand filtration was less efficient in removing DOM, yet selectively targeted FDOM at shorter emission wavelengths (between 300 and 450 nm), which commonly represents algal rather than terrestrial sources. This shorter wavelength FDOM correlated with chemical formulas containing reduced carbon (average carbon oxidation state ≤ 0), with relatively few carbon-carbon double bonds (H/C = 1.32 ± 0.16) and less oxygen per carbon (O/C = 0.43 ± 0.10) than those removed during coagulation. By coupling optical approaches with FT-ICR-MS to characterize DOM, we were for the first time able to confirm the molecular composition of absorbing and fluorescing DOM selectively targeted during drinking

  18. Dissolved organic carbon and its potential predictors in eutrophic lakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toming, Kaire; Kutser, Tiit; Tuvikene, Lea; Viik, Malle; Nõges, Tiina

    2016-10-01

    Understanding of the true role of lakes in the global carbon cycle requires reliable estimates of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and there is a strong need to develop remote sensing methods for mapping lake carbon content at larger regional and global scales. Part of DOC is optically inactive. Therefore, lake DOC content cannot be mapped directly. The objectives of the current study were to estimate the relationships of DOC and other water and environmental variables in order to find the best proxy for remote sensing mapping of lake DOC. The Boosted Regression Trees approach was used to clarify in which relative proportions different water and environmental variables determine DOC. In a studied large and shallow eutrophic lake the concentrations of DOC and coloured dissolved organic matter (CDOM) were rather high while the seasonal and interannual variability of DOC concentrations was small. The relationships between DOC and other water and environmental variables varied seasonally and interannually and it was challenging to find proxies for describing seasonal cycle of DOC. Chlorophyll a (Chl a), total suspended matter and Secchi depth were correlated with DOC and therefore are possible proxies for remote sensing of seasonal changes of DOC in ice free period, while for long term interannual changes transparency-related variables are relevant as DOC proxies. CDOM did not appear to be a good predictor of the seasonality of DOC concentration in Lake Võrtsjärv since the CDOM-DOC coupling varied seasonally. However, combining the data from Võrtsjärv with the published data from six other eutrophic lakes in the world showed that CDOM was the most powerful predictor of DOC and can be used in remote sensing of DOC concentrations in eutrophic lakes. PMID:27318445

  19. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC in Arctic ground ice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Fritz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermal permafrost degradation and coastal erosion in the Arctic remobilize substantial amounts of organic carbon (OC and nutrients which have been accumulated in late Pleistocene and Holocene unconsolidated deposits. Their vulnerability to thaw subsidence, collapsing coastlines and irreversible landscape change is largely due to the presence of large amounts of massive ground ice such as ice wedges. However, ground ice has not, until now, been considered to be a source of dissolved organic carbon (DOC, dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC and other elements, which are important for ecosystems and carbon cycling. Here we show, using geochemical data from a large number of different ice bodies throughout the Arctic, that ice wedges have the greatest potential for DOC storage with a maximum of 28.6 mg L−1 (mean: 9.6 mg L−1. Variation in DOC concentration is positively correlated with and explained by the concentrations and relative amounts of typically terrestrial cations such as Mg2+ and K+. DOC sequestration into ground ice was more effective during the late Pleistocene than during the Holocene, which can be explained by rapid sediment and OC accumulation, the prevalence of more easily degradable vegetation and immediate incorporation into permafrost. We assume that pristine snowmelt is able to leach considerable amounts of well-preserved and highly bioavailable DOC as well as other elements from surface sediments, which are rapidly stored in ground ice, especially in ice wedges, even before further degradation. In the Yedoma region ice wedges represent a significant DOC (45.2 Tg and DIC (33.6 Tg pool in permafrost areas and a fresh-water reservoir of 4172 km3. This study underlines the need to discriminate between particulate OC and DOC to assess the availability and vulnerability of the permafrost carbon pool for ecosystems and climate feedback upon mobilization.

  20. The soil organic carbon content of anthropogenically altered organic soils effects the dissolved organic matter quality, but not the dissolved organic carbon concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Stefan; Tiemeyer, Bärbel; Bechtold, Michel; Lücke, Andreas; Bol, Roland

    2016-04-01

    Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) is an important link between terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. This is especially true for peatlands which usually show high concentrations of DOC due to the high stocks of soil organic carbon (SOC). Most previous studies found that DOC concentrations in the soil solution depend on the SOC content. Thus, one would expect low DOC concentrations in peatlands which have anthropogenically been altered by mixing with sand. Here, we want to show the effect of SOC and groundwater level on the quantity and quality of the dissolved organic matter (DOM). Three sampling sites were installed in a strongly disturbed bog. Two sites differ in SOC (Site A: 48%, Site B: 9%) but show the same mean annual groundwater level of 15 and 18 cm below ground, respectively. The SOC content of site C (11%) is similar to Site B, but the groundwater level is much lower (-31 cm) than at the other two sites. All sites have a similar depth of the organic horizon (30 cm) and the same land-use (low-intensity sheep grazing). Over two years, the soil solution was sampled bi-weekly in three depths (15, 30 and 60 cm) and three replicates. All samples were analyzed for DOC and selected samples for dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) and delta-13C and delta-15N. Despite differences in SOC and groundwater level, DOC concentrations did not differ significantly (A: 192 ± 62 mg/L, B: 163 ± 55 mg/L and C: 191 ± 97 mg/L). At all sites, DOC concentrations exceed typical values for peatlands by far and emphasize the relevance even of strongly disturbed organic soils for DOC losses. Individual DOC concentrations were controlled by the temperature and the groundwater level over the preceding weeks. Differences in DOM quality were clearer. At site B with a low SOC content, the DOC:DON ratio of the soil solution equals the soil's C:N ratio, but the DOC:DON ratio is much higher than the C:N ratio at site A. In all cases, the DOC:DON ratio strongly correlates with delta-13C. There is no

  1. Microbial community structure affects marine dissolved organic matter composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth B Kujawinski

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Marine microbes are critical players in the global carbon cycle, affecting both the reduction of inorganic carbon and the remineralization of reduced organic compounds back to carbon dioxide. Members of microbial consortia all depend on marine dissolved organic matter (DOM and in turn, affect the molecules present in this heterogeneous pool. Our understanding of DOM produced by marine microbes is biased towards single species laboratory cultures or simplified field incubations, which exclude large phototrophs and protozoan grazers. Here we explore the interdependence of DOM composition and bacterial diversity in two mixed microbial consortia from coastal seawater: a whole water community and a <1.0-μm community dominated by heterotrophic bacteria. Each consortium was incubated with isotopically-labeled glucose for 9 days. Using stable-isotope probing techniques and electrospray ionization Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry, we show that the presence of organisms larger than 1.0-μm is the dominant factor affecting bacterial diversity and low-molecular-weight (<1000 Da DOM composition over this experiment. In the <1.0-μm community, DOM composition was dominated by compounds with lipid and peptide character at all time points, confirmed by fragmentation spectra with peptide-containing neutral losses. In contrast, DOM composition in the whole water community was nearly identical to that in the initial coastal seawater. These differences in DOM composition persisted throughout the experiment despite shifts in bacterial diversity, underscoring an unappreciated role for larger microorganisms in constraining DOM composition in the marine environment.

  2. Toward a quantitative and empirical dissolved organic carbon budget for the Gulf of Maine, a semienclosed shelf sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balch, William; Huntington, Thomas; Aiken, George; Drapeau, David; Bowler, Bruce; Lubelczyk, Laura; Butler, Kenna

    2016-02-01

    A time series of organic carbon export from Gulf of Maine (GoM) watersheds was compared to a time series of biological, chemical, bio-optical, and hydrographic properties, measured across the GoM between Yarmouth, NS, Canada, and Portland, ME, U.S. Optical proxies were used to quantify the dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and particulate organic carbon in the GoM. The Load Estimator regression model applied to river discharge data demonstrated that riverine DOC export (and its decadal variance) has increased over the last 80 years. Several extraordinarily wet years (2006-2010) resulted in a massive pulse of chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM; proxy for DOC) into the western GoM along with unidentified optically scattering material (<0.2 µm diameter). A survey of DOC in the GoM and Scotian Shelf showed the strong influence of the Gulf of Saint Lawrence on the DOC that enters the GoM. A deep plume of CDOM-rich water was observed near the coast of Maine which decreased in concentration eastward. The Forel-Ule color scale was derived and compared to the same measurements made in 1912-1913 by Henry Bigelow. Results show that the GoM has yellowed in the last century, particularly in the region of the extension of the Eastern Maine Coastal Current. Time lags between DOC discharge and its appearance in the GoM increased with distance from the river mouths. Algae were also a significant source of DOC but not CDOM. Gulf-wide algal primary production has decreased. Increases in precipitation and DOC discharge to the GoM are predicted over the next century.

  3. Seasonal Variation in the Quality of Dissolved and Particulate Organic Matter Exchanged Between a Salt Marsh and Its Adjacent Estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osburn, C. L.; Mikan, M.; Etheridge, J. R.; Burchell, M. R.; Birgand, F.

    2015-12-01

    Salt marshes are transitional ecosystems between terrestrial and marine environments. Along with mangroves and other vegetated coastal habitats, salt marshes rank among the most productive ecosystems on Earth, with critical global importance for the planet's carbon cycle. Fluorescence was used to examine the quality of dissolved and particulate organic matter (DOM and POM) exchanging between a tidal creek in a created salt marsh and its adjacent estuary in eastern North Carolina, USA. Samples from the creek were collected hourly over four tidal cycles in May, July, August, and October of 2011. Absorbance and fluorescence of chromophoric DOM (CDOM) and of base-extracted POM (BEPOM) served as the tracers for organic matter quality while dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and base-extracted particulate organic carbon (BEPOC) were used to compute fluxes. Fluorescence was modeled using parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC) and principle components analysis (PCA) of the PARAFAC results. Of nine PARAFAC components modeled, we used multiple linear regression to identify tracers for recalcitrant DOM; labile soil-derived source DOM; detrital POM; and planktonic POM. Based on mass balance, recalcitrant DOC export was 86 g C m-2 yr-1 and labile DOC export was 49 g C m-2 yr-1. The marsh also exported 41 g C m-2 yr-1 of detrital terrestrial POC, which likely originated from lands adjacent to the North River estuary. Planktonic POC export from the marsh was 6 g C m-2 yr-1. Using the DOM and POM quality results obtained via fluorescence measurements and scaling up to global salt marsh area, we estimated that the potential release of CO2 from the respiration of salt marsh DOC and POC transported to estuaries could be 11 Tg C yr-1, roughly 4% of the recently estimated CO2 release for marshes and estuaries globally.

  4. Toward a quantitative and empirical dissolved organic carbon budget for the Gulf of Maine, a semienclosed shelf sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balch, William; Huntington, Thomas G.; Aiken, George R.; Drapeau, David; Bowler, Bruce; Lubelczyk, Laura; Butler, Kenna

    2016-01-01

    A time series of organic carbon export from Gulf of Maine (GoM) watersheds was compared to a time series of biological, chemical, bio-optical, and hydrographic properties, measured across the GoM between Yarmouth, NS, Canada, and Portland, ME, U.S. Optical proxies were used to quantify the dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and particulate organic carbon in the GoM. The Load Estimator regression model applied to river discharge data demonstrated that riverine DOC export (and its decadal variance) has increased over the last 80 years. Several extraordinarily wet years (2006–2010) resulted in a massive pulse of chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM; proxy for DOC) into the western GoM along with unidentified optically scattering material (<0.2 μm diameter). A survey of DOC in the GoM and Scotian Shelf showed the strong influence of the Gulf of Saint Lawrence on the DOC that enters the GoM. A deep plume of CDOM-rich water was observed near the coast of Maine which decreased in concentration eastward. The Forel-Ule color scale was derived and compared to the same measurements made in 1912–1913 by Henry Bigelow. Results show that the GoM has yellowed in the last century, particularly in the region of the extension of the Eastern Maine Coastal Current. Time lags between DOC discharge and its appearance in the GoM increased with distance from the river mouths. Algae were also a significant source of DOC but not CDOM. Gulf-wide algal primary production has decreased. Increases in precipitation and DOC discharge to the GoM are predicted over the next century.

  5. Black Carbon in Estuarine and Coastal Ocean Dissolved Organic Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannino, Antonio; Harvey, H. Rodger

    2003-01-01

    Black carbon (BC) in ultrafiltered high-molecular-weight DOM (UDOM) was measured in surface waters of Delaware Bay, Chesapeake Bay and the adjacent Atlantic Ocean (USA) to ascertain the importance of riverine and estuarine DOM as a source of BC to the ocean. BC comprised 5-72% of UDOM-C (27+/-l7%) and on average 8.9+/-6.5% of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) with higher values in the turbid region of the Delaware Estuary and lower yields in the river and coastal ocean. The spatial and seasonal distributions of BC along the salinity gradient of Delaware Bay suggest that the higher levels of BC in surface water UDOM originated from localized sources, possibly from atmospheric deposition or released from resuspended sediments. Black carbon comprised 4 to 7% of the DOC in the coastal Atlantic Ocean, revealing that river-estuary systems are important exporters of colloidal BC to the ocean. The annual flux of BC from Delaware Bay UDOM to the Atlantic Ocean was estimated at 2.4x10(exp 10) g BC yr(exp -1). The global river flux of BC through DOM to the ocean could be on the order of 5.5x1O(exp 12)g BC yr (exp -1). These results support the hypothesis that the DOC pool is the intermediate reservoir in which BC ages prior to sedimentary deposition.

  6. The Oxidant Budget of Dissolved Organic Carbon Driven Isotope Excursions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bristow, T. F.; Kennedy, M. J.

    2008-12-01

    Negative carbon isotope values, falling below the mantle average of about -5 per mil, in carbonate phases of Ediacaran age sedimentary rocks are widely regarded as reflecting negative excursions in the carbon isotopic composition of seawater lasting millions of years. These isotopic signals form the basis of chemostratigraphic correlations between Ediacaran aged sections in different parts of the world, and have been used to track the oxidation of the biosphere. However, these isotopic values are difficult to accommodate within limits prescribed by the current understanding of the carbon cycle, and a hypothetical Precambrian ocean dissolved organic carbon (DOC) pool 100 to 1000 times the size of the modern provides a potential source of depleted carbon not considered in Phanerozoic carbon cycle budgets. We present box model results that show the remineralization of such a DOC pool to drive an isotope excursion of the magnitude observed in the geological record exhausts global budgets of free oxygen and sulfate in 800 k.y. These results are incompatible with the estimated duration of late Ediacaran isotope excursions of more than 10 m.y., as well as geochemical and biological indicators that oceanic sulfate and oxygen levels were maintained or even increased at the same time. Therefore the carbon isotope record is probably not a useful tool for monitoring oxygen levels in the atmosphere and ocean. Covariation between the carbon and oxygen isotope records is often observed during negative excursions and is indicative of local processes or diagenetic overprinting.

  7. Hidden cycle of dissolved organic carbon in the deep ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Follett, Christopher L; Repeta, Daniel J; Rothman, Daniel H; Xu, Li; Santinelli, Chiara

    2014-11-25

    Marine dissolved organic carbon (DOC) is a large (660 Pg C) reactive carbon reservoir that mediates the oceanic microbial food web and interacts with climate on both short and long timescales. Carbon isotopic content provides information on the DOC source via δ(13)C and age via Δ(14)C. Bulk isotope measurements suggest a microbially sourced DOC reservoir with two distinct components of differing radiocarbon age. However, such measurements cannot determine internal dynamics and fluxes. Here we analyze serial oxidation experiments to quantify the isotopic diversity of DOC at an oligotrophic site in the central Pacific Ocean. Our results show diversity in both stable and radio isotopes at all depths, confirming DOC cycling hidden within bulk analyses. We confirm the presence of isotopically enriched, modern DOC cocycling with an isotopically depleted older fraction in the upper ocean. However, our results show that up to 30% of the deep DOC reservoir is modern and supported by a 1 Pg/y carbon flux, which is 10 times higher than inferred from bulk isotope measurements. Isotopically depleted material turns over at an apparent time scale of 30,000 y, which is far slower than indicated by bulk isotope measurements. These results are consistent with global DOC measurements and explain both the fluctuations in deep DOC concentration and the anomalous radiocarbon values of DOC in the Southern Ocean. Collectively these results provide an unprecedented view of the ways in which DOC moves through the marine carbon cycle. PMID:25385632

  8. Ocean warming-acidification synergism undermines dissolved organic matter assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chi-Shuo; Anaya, Jesse M; Chen, Eric Y-T; Farr, Erik; Chin, Wei-Chun

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the influence of synergisms on natural processes is a critical step toward determining the full-extent of anthropogenic stressors. As carbon emissions continue unabated, two major stressors--warming and acidification--threaten marine systems on several scales. Here, we report that a moderate temperature increase (from 30°C to 32°C) is sufficient to slow--even hinder--the ability of dissolved organic matter, a major carbon pool, to self-assemble to form marine microgels, which contribute to the particulate organic matter pool. Moreover, acidification lowers the temperature threshold at which we observe our results. These findings carry implications for the marine carbon cycle, as self-assembled marine microgels generate an estimated global seawater budget of ~1016 g C. We used laser scattering spectroscopy to test the influence of temperature and pH on spontaneous marine gel assembly. The results of independent experiments revealed that at a particular point, both pH and temperature block microgel formation (32°C, pH 8.2), and disperse existing gels (35°C). We then tested the hypothesis that temperature and pH have a synergistic influence on marine gel dispersion. We found that the dispersion temperature decreases concurrently with pH: from 32°C at pH 8.2, to 28°C at pH 7.5. If our laboratory observations can be extrapolated to complex marine environments, our results suggest that a warming-acidification synergism can decrease carbon and nutrient fluxes, disturbing marine trophic and trace element cycles, at rates faster than projected.

  9. Chemodiversity of dissolved organic matter in the Amazon Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonsior, Michael; Valle, Juliana; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe; Hertkorn, Norbert; Bastviken, David; Luek, Jenna; Harir, Mourad; Bastos, Wanderley; Enrich-Prast, Alex

    2016-07-01

    Regions in the Amazon Basin have been associated with specific biogeochemical processes, but a detailed chemical classification of the abundant and ubiquitous dissolved organic matter (DOM), beyond specific indicator compounds and bulk measurements, has not yet been established. We sampled water from different locations in the Negro, Madeira/Jamari and Tapajós River areas to characterize the molecular DOM composition and distribution. Ultrahigh-resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR-MS) combined with excitation emission matrix (EEM) fluorescence spectroscopy and parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC) revealed a large proportion of ubiquitous DOM but also unique area-specific molecular signatures. Unique to the DOM of the Rio Negro area was the large abundance of high molecular weight, diverse hydrogen-deficient and highly oxidized molecular ions deviating from known lignin or tannin compositions, indicating substantial oxidative processing of these ultimately plant-derived polyphenols indicative of these black waters. In contrast, unique signatures in the Madeira/Jamari area were defined by presumably labile sulfur- and nitrogen-containing molecules in this white water river system. Waters from the Tapajós main stem did not show any substantial unique molecular signatures relative to those present in the Rio Madeira and Rio Negro, which implied a lower organic molecular complexity in this clear water tributary, even after mixing with the main stem of the Amazon River. Beside ubiquitous DOM at average H / C and O / C elemental ratios, a distinct and significant unique DOM pool prevailed in the black, white and clear water areas that were also highly correlated with EEM-PARAFAC components and define the frameworks for primary production and other aspects of aquatic life.

  10. Bioavailable and biodegradable dissolved organic nitrogen in activated sludge and trickling filter wastewater treatment plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    A study was carried out to understand the fate of biodegradable dissolved organic nitrogen (BDON) and bioavailable dissolved organic nitrogen (ABDON) along the treatment trains of a wastewater treatment facility (WWTF) equipped with an activated sludge (AS) system and a WWTF equipped with a two-stag...

  11. Dissolved organic matter and lake metabolism. Technical progress report, 1 July 1975--30 June 1976

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wetzel, R. G.

    1976-01-01

    Progress is reported in the following areas of research: interactions of dissolved organic matter with inorganic nutrient cycling; regulation of the photosynthetic and decompositional metabolism of micro- and macroflora; regulatory mechanisms of growth and rates of carbon cycling; and fate of detrital dissolved and particulate organic matter. (HLW)

  12. Synthesis of a novel organic nonlinear optical chromophore and the Testing for μgβ Value

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAN Li-kun; JIANG Ya-dong; LI Wei; CAI Yuan

    2007-01-01

    A novel second-order nonlinear optical chromophore (DCDHF-2-V) was synthesized from 3-Hydroxy-3-methyl-2-butanae,propanedinitrile and 4-diethylaminobenzaldehyde by aldol condensation reaction. Molecular structural characterization was investigated by elemental analysis,FTIR,and 1H-NMR spectra. The melting point obtained from DSC thermogram was almost 251 ℃,and the compound shows a thermal stability up to 270 ℃. Second-order NLO properties of the chromophore were measured by solvatochromic method. From the quantum-mechanical two-level model,it can be obtained that the μgβ value of DCDHF-2-V is 6520 × 10-48 esu atthe wavelength of 1064 nm.

  13. Selective Sorption of Dissolved Organic Carbon Compounds by Temperate Soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jagadamma, Sindhu [ORNL; Mayes, Melanie [ORNL; Phillips, Jana Randolph [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    Physico-chemical sorption of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) on soil minerals is one of the major processes of organic carbon (OC) stabilization in soils, especially in deeper layers. The attachment of C on soil solids is related to the reactivity of the soil minerals and the chemistry of the sorbate functional groups, but the sorption studies conducted without controlling microbial activity may overestimate the sorption potential of soil. This study was conducted to examine the sorptive characteristics of a diverse functional groups of simple OC compounds (D-glucose, L-alanine, oxalic acid, salicylic acid, and sinapyl alcohol) on temperate climate soil orders (Mollisols, Ultisols and Alfisols) with and without biological degradative processes. Equilibrium batch experiments were conducted using 0-100 mg C L-1 at a solid-solution ratio of 1:60 for 48 hrs and the sorption parameters were calculated by Langmuir model fitting. The amount of added compounds that remained in the solution phase was detected by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and total organic C (TOC) analysis. Soil sterilization was performed by -irradiation technique and experiments were repeated to determine the contribution of microbial degradation to apparent sorption. Overall, Ultisols did not show a marked preference for apparent sorption of any of the model compounds, as indicated by a narrower range of maximum sorption capacity (Smax) of 173-527 mg kg soil-1 across compounds. Mollisols exhibited a strong preference for apparent sorption of oxalic acid (Smax of 5290 mg kg soil-1) and sinapyl alcohol (Smax of 2031 mg kg soil-1) over the other compounds. The propensity for sorption of oxalic acid is mainly attributed to the precipitation of insoluble Ca-oxalate due to the calcareous nature of most Mollisol subsoils and its preference for sinapyl alcohol could be linked to the polymerization of this lignin monomer on 2:2 mineral dominated soils. The reactivity of Alfisols to DOC was in

  14. Adsorption of dissolved natural organic matter by modified activated carbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Wei; Dastgheib, Seyed A; Karanfil, Tanju

    2005-06-01

    Adsorption of dissolved natural organic matter (DOM) by virgin and modified granular activated carbons (GACs) was studied. DOM samples were obtained from two water treatment plants before (i.e., raw water) and after coagulation/flocculation/sedimentation processes (i.e., treated water). A granular activated carbon (GAC) was modified by high temperature helium or ammonia treatment, or iron impregnation followed by high temperature ammonia treatment. Two activated carbon fibers (ACFs) were also used, with no modification, to examine the effect of carbon porosity on DOM adsorption. Size exclusion chromatography (SEC) and specific ultraviolet absorbance (SUVA(254)) were employed to characterize the DOMs before and after adsorption. Iron-impregnated (HDFe) and ammonia-treated (HDN) activated carbons showed significantly higher DOM uptakes than the virgin GAC. The enhanced DOM uptake by HDFe was due to the presence of iron species on the carbon surface. The higher uptake of HDN was attributed to the enlarged carbon pores and basic surface created during ammonia treatment. The SEC and SUVA(254) results showed no specific selectivity in the removal of different DOM components as a result of carbon modification. The removal of DOM from both raw and treated waters was negligible by ACF10, having 96% of its surface area in pores smaller than 1 nm. Small molecular weight (MW) DOM components were preferentially removed by ACF20H, having 33% of its surface area in 1--3 nm pores. DOM components with MWs larger than 1600, 2000, and 2700 Da of Charleston raw, Charleston-treated, and Spartanburg-treated waters, respectively, were excluded from the pores of ACF20H. In contrast to carbon fibers, DOM components from entire MW range were removed from waters by virgin and modified GACs. PMID:15927230

  15. Photo-reactivity of natural dissolved organic matter from fresh to marine waters in the Florida Everglades, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timko, Stephen A; Romera-Castillo, Cristina; Jaffé, Rudolf; Cooper, William J

    2014-04-01

    Natural dissolved organic matter (DOM) is the major absorber of sunlight in most natural waters and a critical component of carbon cycling in aquatic systems. The combined effect of light absorbance properties and related photo-production of reactive species are essential in determining the reactivity of DOM. Optical properties and in particular excitation-emission matrix fluorescence spectroscopy combined with parallel factor analysis (EEM-PARAFAC) have been used increasingly to track sources and fate of DOM. Here we describe studies conducted in water from two estuarine systems in the Florida Everglades, with a salinity gradient of 2 to 37 and dissolved organic carbon concentrations from 19.3 to 5.74 mg C L(-1), aimed at assessing how the quantity and quality of DOM is coupled to the formation rates and steady-state concentrations of reactive species including singlet oxygen, hydroxyl radical, and the triplet excited state of DOM. These species were related to optical properties and PARAFAC components of the DOM. The formation rate and steady-state concentration of the carbonate radical was calculated in all samples. The data suggests that formation rates, particularly for singlet oxygen and hydroxyl radicals, are strongly coupled to the abundance of terrestrial humic-like substances. A decrease in singlet oxygen, hydroxyl radical, and carbonate radical formation rates and steady-state concentration along the estuarine salinity gradient was observed as the relative concentration of terrestrial humic-like DOM decreased due to mixing with microbial humic-like and protein-like DOM components, while the formation rate of triplet excited-state DOM did not change. Fluorescent DOM was also found to be more tightly coupled to reactive species generation than chromophoric DOM. PMID:24549208

  16. Dissolved organic matter dynamics in the oligo/meso-haline zone of wetland-influenced coastal rivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maie, Nagamitsu; Sekiguchi, Satoshi; Watanabe, Akira; Tsutsuki, Kiyoshi; Yamashita, Youhei; Melling, Lulie; Cawley, Kaelin M.; Shima, Eikichi; Jaffé, Rudolf

    2014-08-01

    Wetlands are key components in the global carbon cycle and export significant amounts of terrestrial carbon to the coastal oceans in the form of dissolved organic carbon (DOC). Conservative behavior along the salinity gradient of DOC and chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) has often been observed in estuaries from their freshwater end-member (salinity = 0) to the ocean (salinity = 35). While the oligo/meso-haline (salinity Malaysia. For the first two rivers, a clear decoupling between DOC and A254 was observed, while these parameters showed similar conservative behavior for the third. Three distinct EEM-PARAFAC models established for each of the rivers provided similar spectroscopic characteristics except for some unique fluorescence features observed for the Judan River. The distribution patterns of PARAFAC components suggested that the inputs from plankton and/or submerged aquatic vegetation can be important in the Bekanbeushi River. Further, DOM photo-products formed in the estuarine lake were also found to be transported upstream. In the Harney River, whereas upriver-derived terrestrial humic-like components were mostly distributed conservatively, some of these components were also derived from mangrove inputs in the oligo/meso-haline zone. Interestingly, fluorescence intensities of some terrestrial humic-like components increased with salinity for the Judan River possibly due to changes in the dissociation state of acidic functional groups and/or increase in the fluorescence quantum yield along the salinity gradient. The protein-like and microbial humic-like components were distributed differently between three wetland rivers, implying that interplay between loss to microbial degradation and inputs from diverse sources are different for the three wetland-influenced rivers. The results presented here indicate that upper estuarine oligo/meso-haline regions of coastal wetland rivers are highly dynamic with regard to the biogeochemical behavior of DOM.

  17. PHOTOREACTIVITY OF CHROMOPHORIC DISSOLVED ORGANIC MATTER (CDOM) DERIVED FROM DECOMPOSITION OF VARIOUS VASCULAR PLANT AND ALGAL SOURCES. (R826939)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  18. Seasonal dynamics in dissolved organic matter, hydrogen peroxide, and cyanobacterial blooms in Lake Erie

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rose M. Cory

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 has been suggested to influence cyanobacterial community structure and toxicity. However, no study has investigated H2O2 concentrations in freshwaters relative to cyanobacterial blooms when sources and sinks of H2O2 may be highly variable. For example, photochemical production of H2O2 from chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM may vary over the course of the bloom with changing CDOM and UV light in the water column, while microbial sources and sinks of H2O2 may change with community biomass and composition. To assess relationships between H2O2 and harmful algal blooms dominated by toxic cyanobacteria in the western basin of Lake Erie, we measured H2O2 weekly at six stations from June – November, 2014 and 2015, with supporting physical, chemical, and biological water quality data. Nine additional stations across the western, eastern, and central basins of Lake Erie were sampled during August and October, 2015. CDOM sources were quantified from the fluorescence fraction of CDOM using parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC. CDOM concentration and source were significantly correlated with specific conductivity, demonstrating that discharge of terrestrially-derived CDOM from rivers can be tracked in the lake. Autochthonous sources of CDOM in the lake increased over the course of the blooms. Concentrations of H2O2 in Lake Erie ranged from 47 ± 16 nM to 1570 ± 16 nM (average of 371 ± 17 nM; n = 225, and were not correlated to CDOM concentration or source, UV light, or estimates of photochemical production of H2O2 by CDOM. Temporal patterns in H2O2 were more closely aligned with bloom dynamics in the lake. In 2014 and 2015, maximum concentrations of H2O2 were observed prior to peak water column respiration and chlorophyll a, coinciding with the onset of the widespread Microcystis blooms in late July. The spatial and temporal patterns in H2O2 concentrations suggested that production and decay of H2O2 from aquatic

  19. Dissolved organic carbon reduces the toxicity of aluminum to three tropical freshwater organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trenfield, Melanie A; Markich, Scott J; Ng, Jack C; Noller, Barry; van Dam, Rick A

    2012-02-01

    The influence of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) on the toxicity of aluminum (Al) at pH 5 (relevant to acid mine drainage conditions), to the tropical green hydra (Hydra viridissima), green alga (Chlorella sp.), and cladoceran (Moinodaphnia macleayi) was assessed. Two DOC sources, a natural in situ DOC in soft billabong water (SBW) and Suwannee River fulvic acid (SRFA) standard, were compared. The order of sensitivity of the test organisms to dissolved Al (0.1 µm fraction) was Hydra viridissima > Moinodaphnia macleayi > Chlorella sp. with DOC reducing dissolved Al toxicity most for Hydra viridissima. However, colloidal or precipitated Al may contribute indirectly to the toxicity for M. macleayi and Chlorella sp. The toxicity of dissolved Al was up to six times lower in test waters containing 10 mg L(-1) DOC (in the form of SRFA), relative to toxicity observed at 1 mg L(-1) DOC. In contrast, the toxicity of Al was up to two times lower in SBW containing 10 mg L(-1) DOC, relative to water containing 1 mg L(-1) DOC. The increased ability of SRFA in reducing Al toxicity was linked to its greater affinity for complexing Al compared with the in situ DOC. This has important implications for studies that use commercial standards of humic substances to predict Al toxicity in local environments. Speciation modeling demonstrated that Al(3+) and AlOH(2+) provided a strong relationship with toxicity. An empirical relationship is provided for each organism that can be used to predict Al toxicity at a given Al and DOC concentration. PMID:22105345

  20. Dissolved organic carbon pools and export from the coastal ocean

    KAUST Repository

    Barrón, Cristina

    2015-10-21

    The distribution of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration across coastal waters was characterized based on the compilation of 3510 individual estimates of DOC in coastal waters worldwide. We estimated the DOC concentration in the coastal waters that directly exchange with open ocean waters in two different ways, as the DOC concentration at the edge of the shelf break and as the DOC concentration in coastal waters with salinity close to the average salinity in the open ocean. Using these estimates of DOC concentration in the coastal waters that directly exchange with open ocean waters, the mean DOC concentration in the open ocean and the estimated volume of water annually exchanged between coastal and open ocean, we estimated a median ± SE (and average ± SE) global DOC export from coastal to open ocean waters ranging from 4.4 ± 1.0 Pg C yr−1 to 27.0 ± 1.8 Pg C yr−1 (7.0 ± 5.8 Pg C yr−1 to 29.0 ± 8.0 Pg C yr−1) depending on the global hydrological exchange. These values correspond to a median and mean median (and average) range between 14.7 ± 3.3 to 90.0 ± 6.0 (23.3 ± 19.3 to 96.7 ± 26.7) Gg C yr−1 per km of shelf break, which is consistent with the range between 1.4 to 66.1 Gg C yr−1 per km of shelf break of available regional estimates of DOC export. The estimated global DOC export from coastal to open ocean waters is also consistent with independent estimates of the net metabolic balance of the coastal ocean. The DOC export from the coastal to the open ocean is likely to be a sizeable flux and is likely to be an important term in the carbon budget of the open ocean, potentially providing an important subsidy to support heterotrophic activity in the open ocean.

  1. Composition of dissolved organic nitrogen in rivers associated with wetlands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, Akira, E-mail: akiraw@agr.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Bioagricultural Sciences, Nagoya University, Chikusa, Nagoya 464-8601 (Japan); Tsutsuki, Kiyoshi [Obihiro University of Agriculture and Veterinary Medicine, Obihiro, Hokkaido 080-8555 (Japan); Inoue, Yudzuru [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Saitama University, Sakura, Saitama 338-8570 (Japan); Maie, Nagamitsu [School of Veterinary Medicine, Kitasato University, Towada, Aomori 034-8628 (Japan); Melling, Lulie [Tropical Peat Research Laboratory Unit, Chief Minister' s Department, Jalan Badruddin 93400, Kuching, Sarawak (Malaysia); Jaffé, Rudolf [Southeast Environmental Research Center, Florida International University, 3000 NE 151 Str., Marine Sciences Building, North Miami, FL 33181 (United States); Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Florida International University, 3000 NE 151 Str., Marine Sciences Building, North Miami, FL 33181 (United States)

    2014-09-15

    As basic information for assessing reactivity and functionality of wetland-associated dissolved organic matter (DOM) based on their composition and structural properties, chemical characteristics of N in ultrafiltered DOM (UDON; > 1 kD) isolated from wetland-associated rivers in three climates (cool-temperate, Hokkaido, Japan; sub-tropical, Florida, USA; tropical, Sarawak, Malaysia) were investigated. The UDON was isolated during dry and wet seasons, or during spring, summer, and autumn. The proportion of UDON present as humic substances, which was estimated as the DAX-8 adsorbed fraction, ranged from 47 to 91%, with larger values in the Sarawak than at the other sites. The yield of hydrolyzable amino acid N ranged 1.24 to 7.01mg g{sup −1}, which correlated positively to the total N content of UDOM and tended to be larger in the order of Florida > Hokkaido > Sarawak samples. X-ray photoelectron N1s spectra of UDON showed a strong negative correlation between the relative abundances of amide/peptide N and primary amine N. The relative abundances of amide/peptide N and primary amine N in the Sarawak samples were smaller (70–76%) and larger (20–23%) respectively compared to those (80–88% and 4–9%) in the Florida and Hokkaido samples. Assuming terminal amino groups and amide N of peptides as major constituents of primary amine N and amide/peptide N, respectively, the average molecular weight of peptides was smaller in the Sarawak samples than that in the Florida and Hokkaido samples. Seasonal variations in UDON composition were scarce in the Sarawak and Florida samples, whereas the distribution of humic substance-N and nonhumic substance-N and compositions of amino acids and N functional groups showed a clear seasonality in the Hokkaido samples. While aromatic N increased from spring to autumn, contributions from fresh proteinaceous materials were also enhanced during autumn, resulting in the highest N content of UDOM for this season. - Highlights: • DON in

  2. Insight into dissolved organic matter fractions in Lake Wivenhoe during and after a major flood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aryal, Rupak; Grinham, Alistair; Beecham, Simon

    2016-03-01

    Dissolved organic matter is an important component of biogeochemical processes in aquatic environments. Dissolved organic matter may consist of a myriad of different fractions and resultant processing pathways. In early January 2011, heavy rainfall occurred across South East Queensland, Australia causing significant catchment inflow into Lake Wivenhoe, which is the largest water supply reservoir for the city of Brisbane, Australia. The horizontal and vertical distributions of dissolved organic matter fractions in the lake during the flood period were investigated and then compared with stratified conditions with no catchment inflows. The results clearly demonstrate a large variation in dissolved organic matter fractions associated with inflow conditions compared with stratified conditions. During inflows, dissolved organic matter concentrations in the reservoir were fivefold lower than during stratified conditions. Within the dissolved organic matter fractions during inflow, the hydrophobic and humic acid fractions were almost half those recorded during the stratified period whilst low molecular weight neutrals were higher during the flood period compared to during the stratified period. Information on dissolved organic matter and the spatial and vertical variations in its constituents' concentrations across the lake can be very useful for catchment and lake management and for selecting appropriate water treatment processes.

  3. Natural versus wastewater derived dissolved organic carbon: implications for the environmental fate of organic micropollutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neale, Peta A; Antony, Alice; Gernjak, Wolfgang; Leslie, Greg; Escher, Beate I

    2011-08-01

    The interaction of organic micropollutants with dissolved organic carbon (DOC) can influence their transport, degradation and bioavailability. While this has been well established for natural organic carbon, very little is known regarding the influence of DOC on the fate of micropollutants during wastewater treatment and water recycling. Dissolved organic carbon-water partition coefficients (K(DOC)) for wastewater derived and reference DOC were measured for a range of micropollutants using a depletion method with polydimethylsiloxane disks. For micropollutants with an octanol-water partition coefficient (log K(OW)) greater than 4 there was a significant difference in K(DOC) between reference and wastewater derived DOC, with partitioning to wastewater derived DOC over 1000 times lower for the most hydrophobic micropollutants. The interaction of nonylphenol with wastewater derived DOC from different stages of a wastewater and advanced water treatment train was studied, but little difference in K(DOC) was observed. Organic carbon characterisation revealed that reference and wastewater derived DOC had very different properties due to their different origins. Consequently, the reduced sorption capacity of wastewater derived DOC may be related to their microbial origin which led to reduced aromaticity and lower molecular weight. This study suggests that for hydrophobic micropollutants (log K(OW) > 4) a higher concentration of freely dissolved and thus bioavailable micropollutants is expected in the presence of wastewater derived DOC than predicted using K(DOC) values quantified using reference DOC. The implication is that naturally derived DOC may not be an appropriate surrogate for wastewater derived DOC as a matrix for assessing the fate of micropollutants in engineered systems. PMID:21703657

  4. High-pressure size exclusion chromatography analysis of dissolved organic matter isolated by tangential-flow ultra filtration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everett, C.R.; Chin, Y.-P.; Aiken, G.R.

    1999-01-01

    A 1,000-Dalton tangential-flow ultrafiltration (TFUF) membrane was used to isolate dissolved organic matter (DOM) from several freshwater environments. The TFUF unit used in this study was able to completely retain a polystyrene sulfonate 1,800-Dalton standard. Unaltered and TFUF-fractionated DOM molecular weights were assayed by high-pressure size exclusion chromatography (HPSEC). The weight-averaged molecular weights of the retentates were larger than those of the raw water samples, whereas the filtrates were all significantly smaller and approximately the same size or smaller than the manufacturer-specified pore size of the membrane. Moreover, at 280 nm the molar absorptivity of the DOM retained by the ultrafilter is significantly larger than the material in the filtrate. This observation suggests that most of the chromophoric components are associated with the higher molecular weight fraction of the DOM pool. Multivalent metals in the aqueous matrix also affected the molecular weights of the DOM molecules. Typically, proton-exchanged DOM retentates were smaller than untreated samples. This TFUF system appears to be an effective means of isolating aquatic DOM by size, but the ultimate size of the retentates may be affected by the presence of metals and by configurational properties unique to the DOM phase.

  5. Spatial and temporal variations of dissolved organic matter dynamics in adisturbed Sphagnum peatland after hydrological restoration

    OpenAIRE

    Le Moing, Franck; Guirimand-Dufour, Audrey; Jozja, Nevila; Défarge, Christian; D'Angelo, Benoît; Binet, Stéphane; Gogo, Sébastien; Laggoun-Défarge, Fatima

    2015-01-01

    International audience Fluorescence Intensity Spatial and temporal variations of dissolved organic matter (DOM) dynamics in a disturbed Sphagnum peatland after hydrological restoration Alberts J.J., Takacs M., 2003. Total luminescence spectra of IHSS standard and reference fulvic acids, humic acids and natural organic matter: comparison of aquatic and terrestrial source terms. Dissolved organic matter fluorescence spectroscopy as a tool to estimate biological activity in a coastal zone sub...

  6. Linkage between the temporal and spatial variability of dissolved organic matter and whole stream metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halbedel, Susanne; Büttner, Olaf; Weitere, Markus

    2013-04-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) is an important resource for microbes, thus affecting the whole stream metabolism. The factors influencing its chemical composition and thereby also its bio-availability are complex and not thoroughly understood. We hypothesized that the whole stream metabolism itself can affect the DOM composition and that the coupling of both is influenced by seasonality and different land use forms. We tested this hypothesis in a comparative study on two pristine forestry streams and on two non-forestry streams. The investigated streams were located in the Harz Mountains (Central Europe, Germany). The whole stream metabolism was measured with a classical two station oxygen change technique and the variability of DOM with fluorescence spectroscopy. We take also into account the geochemical and geophysical characteristic of each stream. All streams were clearly net heterotrophic, whereby the non-forestry streams showed a higher primary production in general, which was correlated with irradiance and with the total phosphorus concentration. The whole stream metabolism but also the chromophoric DOM (CDOM) showed distinct seasonal patterns. We detected three CDOM component groups (C1, C2, C3) by the use of the parallel-factor-analysis (PARAFAC) and found temporarily variable, typical component fingerprints (C1:C2, C1:C3, C3:C2) for CDOM originated from forestry streams and from non-forestry streams. Based on comparative literature studies and correlation analysis with different indices, we demonstrate that two of the components are clearly from terrigenous sources (C1, C3) and one is rather autochthonously (C2) derived. The whole CDOM matrix was dominated by humic like, high molecular-weight substances, followed by humic like, fulfic acids, low molecular-weight substances, and with minor amounts of amino-acids and proteins. We showed for the first time a correlation between the gross primary production (GPP) and the autochthonously derived, low molecular

  7. Dissolved organic matter (DOM) export to a temperate estuary: Seasonal variations and implications of land use

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stedmon, C. A.; Markager, S.; Søndergaard, M.;

    2006-01-01

    nutrient inputs to the estuary, dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) and dissolved organic phosphorus dominated the loadings. Although 81% of the nitrogen annually supplied to the estuary was DIN, 83% of the nitrogen exported from the estuary was dissolved organic nitrogen (DON). Results show that increasing......, and the percentage of catchment area used for agriculture. Colored DOM (CDOM) loading measurements were found to be a good predictor of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) loading across the different subcatchments, offering a rapid and inexpensive alternative of operationally monitoring DOC export. For all the dissolved...... the area of the catchment covered by forest and natural pastures would have a positive effect on the trophic status of the estuary, leading to a considerable decrease in the phosphorus loading and a shift in the nitrogen loading from DIN to DON. Such a change in land use would also increase the export...

  8. Dissolved organic nitrogen dominates in European bogs under increasing atmospheric N deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bragazza, L.; Limpens, J.

    2004-01-01

    To assess the effects of increased atmospheric N input on N availability in ombrotrophic peatlands, the relative concentrations of dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) to dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) were measured in bog waters along a natural gradient of atmospheric N deposition. Six European bog

  9. Influence of dissolved organic matter on dissolved vanadium speciation in the Churchill River estuary (Manitoba, Canada).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yong Xiang; Mangal, Vaughn; Guéguen, Céline

    2016-07-01

    Diffusive gradients in thin films (DGT) devices were used to investigate the temporal and spatial changes in vanadium (V) speciation in the Churchill estuary system (Manitoba). Thirty-six DGT sets and 95 discrete water samples were collected at 8 river and 3 estuary sites during spring freshet and summer base flow. Dissolved V concentration in the Churchill River at summer base flow was approximately 5 times higher than those during the spring high flow (27.3 ± 18.9 nM vs 4.8 ± 3.5 nM). DGT-labile V showed an opposite trend with greater values found during the spring high flow (2.6 ± 1.8 nM vs 1.4 ± 0.3 nM). Parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC) conducted on 95 excitation-emission matrix spectra validated four humic-like (C1C4) and one protein-like (C5) fluorescent components. Significant positive relationship was found between protein-like DOM and DGT-labile V (r = 0.53, p V concentration in Churchill River. Sediment leachates were enriched in DGT-labile V and protein-like DOM, which can be readily released when river sediment began to thaw during spring freshet. PMID:27065459

  10. Influence of dissolved organic matter on dissolved vanadium speciation in the Churchill River estuary (Manitoba, Canada).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yong Xiang; Mangal, Vaughn; Guéguen, Céline

    2016-07-01

    Diffusive gradients in thin films (DGT) devices were used to investigate the temporal and spatial changes in vanadium (V) speciation in the Churchill estuary system (Manitoba). Thirty-six DGT sets and 95 discrete water samples were collected at 8 river and 3 estuary sites during spring freshet and summer base flow. Dissolved V concentration in the Churchill River at summer base flow was approximately 5 times higher than those during the spring high flow (27.3 ± 18.9 nM vs 4.8 ± 3.5 nM). DGT-labile V showed an opposite trend with greater values found during the spring high flow (2.6 ± 1.8 nM vs 1.4 ± 0.3 nM). Parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC) conducted on 95 excitation-emission matrix spectra validated four humic-like (C1C4) and one protein-like (C5) fluorescent components. Significant positive relationship was found between protein-like DOM and DGT-labile V (r = 0.53, p Churchill River. Sediment leachates were enriched in DGT-labile V and protein-like DOM, which can be readily released when river sediment began to thaw during spring freshet.

  11. Characteristics and transformations of dissolved organic nitrogen in municipal biological nitrogen removal wastewater treatment plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Shouliang; Xi, Beidou; Yu, Honglei; Qin, Yanwen; Zan, Fengyu; Zhang, Jingtian

    2013-12-01

    Dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) represents most of the dissolved nitrogen in the effluent of biological nitrogen removal (BNR) wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). The characteristics of wastewater-derived DON in two different WWTPs were investigated by several different methods. The major removals of DON and biodegradable dissolved organic nitrogen (BDON) along the treatment train were observed in the anaerobic process. Dissolved combined amino acids (DCAA) and dissolved free amino acids (DFAA) in the effluent accounted approximately for less than 4% and 1% of the effluent DON, respectively. Approximately half of wastewater-derived DON was capable of passing through a 1 kDa ultrafilter, and low MW DON cannot effectively be removed by BNR processes. More than 80% of effluent DON was composed of hydrophilic compounds, which stimulate algal growth. The study provided important information for future upgrading of WWTPs or the selection of DON removal systems to meet more demanding nitrogen discharge limits.

  12. Fluorescence characteristic changes of dissolved organic matter during municipal solid waste composting

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI Zi-min; XI Bei-dou; WANG Shi-ping; XU Jing-gang; ZHOU Yu-yan; LIU Hong-liang

    2005-01-01

    Dissolved organic matter(DOM) of municipal solid waste(MSW) consists of minerals, water, ash and humic substances, and is known to enhance plant growth. In this study, inoculating microbes (Z J, MS) were used in municipal solid wastes composting, and composting implemented a industrialized technology. During composting, dissolved organic matter was extracted from the compost and purified. The spectral characteristics of dissolved organic matter was determined by fluorescence emission, excitation, and synchronous spectroscopy. Fluorescence emission, excitation, and synchronous spectra characterized by different relative fluorescent intensities and peaks over time. Fluorescence spectra were similar to that of fulvic acid in sewage sludge, indicating the presence of dissolved organic matter with aromatic structures and a high degree of molecular polymerization. Compared with the controls with no microbial inoculation,the microbe-inoculated treatments exhibited the increase of aromatic polycondensation, in the following order: MS + ZJ > ZJ > MS >CK.

  13. Northern Gulf of Mexico estuarine coloured dissolved organic matter derived from MODIS data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coloured dissolved organic matter (CDOM) is relevant for water quality management and may become an important measure to complement future water quality assessment programmes. An approach to derive CDOM using the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) was developed...

  14. A New Class of Organic Luminophores With a stilbene Chromophore: 3-Phenylmethylene-1(3-H) Isobenzofuranones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolov, Peter; Fratev, Filip; Minchev, Stoyan

    1983-02-01

    A new class of luminophores with a stilbene chromophore, 3-phenylmethylene-1(3H)-iso-benzofuranones (BPH's), has been investigated. The fluorescence occurs in the region 26000-16000 cm-1, the maximal quantum yield being about 0.6. As a result of substitution or higher polarity of the solvent the ππ* state of the BPH's separates from the fluorescently inactive nπ* state. The S0-S2 absorption transition of the BPH's results from an excitation which is practically localized in the stilbene fragment. The good linear correlation of the fluorescence and absorption maxima and O-O transitions in ethanol with the σp-Hammett constants has been used for an interpretation of the changes in the potential hyperfaces of S0 and S1 states.

  15. Dissolved organic matter in anoxic pore waters from Mangrove Lake, Bermuda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orem, W.H.; Hatcher, P.G.; Spiker, E. C.; Szeverenyi, N.M.; Maciel, G.E.

    1986-01-01

    Dissolved organic matter and dissolved inorganic chemical species in anoxic pore water from Mangrove Lake, Bermuda sediments were studied to evaluate the role of pore water in the early diagenesis of organic matter. Dissolved sulphate, titration alkalinity, phosphate, and ammonia concentration versus depth profiles were typical of many nearshore clastic sediments and indicated sulphate reduction in the upper 100 cm of sediment. The dissolved organic matter in the pore water was made up predominantly of large molecules, was concentrated from large quantities of pore water by using ultrafiltration and was extensively tudied by using elemental and stable carbon isotope analysis and high-resolution, solid state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance and infrared spectroscopy. The results indicate that this material has a predominantly polysaccharide-like structure and in addition contains a large amount of oxygen-containing functional groups (e.g., carboxyl groups). The 13C nulcear magnetic resonance spectra of the high-molecular-weight dissolved organic matter resemble those of the organic matter in the surface sediments of Mangrove Lake. We propose that this high-molecular-weight organic matter in pore waters represents the partially degraded, labile organic components of the sedimentary organic matter and that pore waters serve as a conduit for removal of these labile organic components from the sediments. The more refractory components are, thus, selectively preserved in the sediments as humic substances (primarily humin). ?? 1986.

  16. Optical properties of estuarine dissolved organic matter isolated using cross-flow ultrafiltration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YI Yueyuan; ZHENG Airong; GUO Weidong; YANG Liyang; CHEN Ding

    2014-01-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) from freshwater, mid-salinity, and seawater endmember samples in the Jiulong River Estuary, China were fractionated using cross-flow ultrafiltration with a 10-kDa membrane. The colloidal organic matter (COM;10 kDa-0.22μm) retentate, low molecular weight (LMW ) DOM (<10 kDa) permeate, and bulk samples were analyzed using absorption spectroscopy and three-dimensional fluores-cence excitation-emission-matrix spectroscopy. The UV-visible spectra of COM were very similar to those obtained for permeate and bulk samples, decreasing monotonically with increasing wavelength. Most of the chromophoric DOM (CDOM, expressed as the absorption coefficient a355) occurred in the LMW fraction, while the percentage of CDOM in the colloidal fraction was substantially higher in the freshwater endmem-ber (13.4%of the total) than in the seawater endmember (6.8%). The bulk CDOM showed a conservative mixing behavior in the estuary, while there was removal of the COM fraction and a concurrent addition of the permeate fraction in the mid-salinity sample, implying that part of the colloidal CDOM was transformed into LMW CDOM. Two humic-like components (C1:<250, 325/402 nm;and C2:265, 360/458 nm) and one protein-like component (C3:275/334 nm) were identified using parallel factor analysis. The contributions of the C1, C2, and C3 components of the COM fraction to the bulk sample were 2.5%-8.7%, 4.8%-12.6%, and 7.4%-14.7%, respectively, revealing that fluorescent DOM occurred mainly in the LMW fraction in the Jiulong River Estuary. The C1 and C2 components in the retentate and permeate samples showed conserva-tive mixing behavior, but the intensity ratio of C2/C1 was higher in the retentate than in the permeate frac-tions for all salinity samples, showing that the humic component was more enriched in the COM than the fulvic component. The intensity ratio of C3/(C1+C2) was much higher in the retentate than in the permeate fraction for mid-salinity and seawater

  17. Challenges in modelling dissolved organic matter dynamics in agricultural soil using DAISY

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjettermann, Birgitte; Styczen, Merete; Hansen, Hans Christian Bruun;

    2008-01-01

    -clover swards. Suction cups were installed at depths 30, 60 and 90 cm and soil solution was sampled for quantification of dissolved organic C (DOC) and dissolved organic N (DON). In the topsoil, the observed fluctuations in DOC were successfully simulated when the sorption/desorption rate coefficient k was low......Because dissolved organic matter (DOM) plays an important role is terrestrial C-, N- and P-balances and transport of these three components to aquatic environments, there is a need to include it in models. This paper presents the concept of the newly developed DOM modules implemented in the DAISY...... pedotransfer functions taking into account the soil content of organic matter, Al and Fe oxides. The turnover of several organic matter pools including one DOM pool are described by first-order kinetics. The DOM module was tested at field scale for three soil treatments applied after cultivating grass...

  18. Hydrological and biogeochemical Controls on Absorption and Fluorescence of Dissolved Organic Matter in the Northern South China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Weidong; Wang, Chao; Li, Yan; Li, Yizhen; Song, Guodong; Wang, Lei; Cheng, Yuanyue

    2016-04-01

    Absorption and fluorescence of dissolved organic matter (DOM) were investigated in the northern South China Sea (SCS) and adjacent Kuroshio section of the West Philippine Sea (WPS). Two humic-like (C1, C2) and three protein-like (C3-C5) fluorescent components were identified using parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC). chromophoric DOM (CDOM) and fluorescent DOM (FDOM) in the northern SCS showed similar distribution patterns to the adjacent Kuroshio section and global open ocean, yet exhibited higher values in the whole water column. An isopycnal mixing model was adopted to quantify the difference in CDOM and FDOM in the euphotic zone between the northern SCS and WPS. Results showed that CDOM and humic-like FDOM were mainly modulated by Kuroshio intrusion, while protein-like FDOM were more affected by biological activities. At mid-depth, significant linear relationships between a350, C1, C2 and apparent oxygen utilization (AOU) suggested that CDOM and humic-like FDOM were produced in situ coupled to remineralization of biogenic sinking particle. Excess humic-like FDOM in the intermediate water of northern SCS were determined and more proportion of high molecular weight organic carbon was exported to the open ocean interior. In addition, regional distribution patterns of CDOM and FDOM were also tuned by mesoscale processes in the northern SCS. Different CDOM and FDOM components in the euphotic zone have apparently different responses for changes of biological activity and vertical mixing driven by eddies. Moreover, cold eddy could capture more sinking particles and finally increase the accumulation of bio-refractory CDOM and humic-like FDOM in the dark ocean. Finally, we demonstrated that the ratio of two humic-like FDOM (C1:C2, or peak C:M) may be a good indicator of water mixing, evolution of mesoscale eddies, photochemistry in the upper water and remineralization in the deeper layer.

  19. Effects of sulfate deposition on pore water dissolved organic carbon, nutrients, and microbial enzyme activities in a northern peatland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Export of dissolved organic carbon from lakes and streams has increased throughout Europe and North America over the past several decades. One possible cause is altered deposition chemistry; specifically, decreasing sulfate inputs leading to changes in ionic strength and dissolve...

  20. Physical and bacterial controls on inorganic nutrients and dissolved organic carbon during a sea ice growth and decay experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, J.; Delille, B.; Kaartokallio, H.;

    2014-01-01

    We investigated how physical incorporation, brine dynamics and bacterial activity regulate the distribution of inorganic nutrients and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in artificial sea ice during a 19-day experiment that included periods of both ice growth and decay. The experiment was performed...... regulating the distribution of the dissolved compounds within sea ice are clearly a complex interaction of brine dynamics, biological activity and in the case of dissolved organic matter, the physico-chemical properties of the dissolved constituents themselves....

  1. Dust inputs and bacteria influence dissolved organic matter in clear alpine lakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mladenov, N; Sommaruga, R; Morales-Baquero, R; Laurion, I; Camarero, L; Diéguez, M C; Camacho, A; Delgado, A; Torres, O; Chen, Z; Felip, M; Reche, I

    2011-01-01

    Remote lakes are usually unaffected by direct human influence, yet they receive inputs of atmospheric pollutants, dust, and other aerosols, both inorganic and organic. In remote, alpine lakes, these atmospheric inputs may influence the pool of dissolved organic matter, a critical constituent for the biogeochemical functioning of aquatic ecosystems. Here, to assess this influence, we evaluate factors related to aerosol deposition, climate, catchment properties, and microbial constituents in a global dataset of 86 alpine and polar lakes. We show significant latitudinal trends in dissolved organic matter quantity and quality, and uncover new evidence that this geographic pattern is influenced by dust deposition, flux of incident ultraviolet radiation, and bacterial processing. Our results suggest that changes in land use and climate that result in increasing dust flux, ultraviolet radiation, and air temperature may act to shift the optical quality of dissolved organic matter in clear, alpine lakes.

  2. Comparison of the molecular mass and optical properties of colored dissolved organic material in two rivers and coastal waters by flow field-flow fractionation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanardi-Lamardo, Eliete; Clark, Catherine D; Moore, Cynthia A; Zika, Rod G

    2002-07-01

    Colored dissolved organic material (CDOM) is an important sunlight absorbing substance affecting the optical properties of natural waters. However, little is known about its structural and optical properties mainly due to its complex matrix and the limitation of the techniques available. A comparison of two southwestern Florida rivers [the Caloosahatchee River (CR) and the Shark River (SR)] was done in terms of molecular mass (MM) and diffusion coefficients (D). The novel technique Frit inlet/frit outlet-flow field-flow fractionation (FIFO-FIFFF) with absorbance and fluorescence detectors was used to determine these properties. The SR receives organic material from the Everglades. By contrast, the CR arises from Lake Okeechobee in central Florida, receiving anthropogenic inputs, farming runoff, and natural organics. Both rivers discharge to the Gulf of Mexico. Fluorescence identified, for both rivers, two different MM distributions in low salinity water samples: the first was centered at approximately 1.7 kDa (CR) and approximately 2 kDa (SR); the second centered at approximately 13 kDa for both rivers, which disappeared gradually in the river plumes to below detection limit in coastal waters. Absorbance detected only one MM distribution centered at approximately 2 kDa (CR) and 2.2-2.4 kDa (SR). Fluorescence in general peaked at a lower MM than absorbance, suggesting a different size distribution for fluorophores vs chromophores. A photochemical study showed that, after sunlight, irradiated freshwater samples have similar characteristics to more marine waters, including a shift in MM distribution of chromophores. The differences observed between the rivers in the optical characteristics, MM distributions, and D values suggest that the CDOM sources, physical, and photochemical degradation processes are different for these two rivers. PMID:12144250

  3. Comparison of the molecular mass and optical properties of colored dissolved organic material in two rivers and coastal waters by flow field-flow fractionation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanardi-Lamardo, Eliete; Clark, Catherine D; Moore, Cynthia A; Zika, Rod G

    2002-07-01

    Colored dissolved organic material (CDOM) is an important sunlight absorbing substance affecting the optical properties of natural waters. However, little is known about its structural and optical properties mainly due to its complex matrix and the limitation of the techniques available. A comparison of two southwestern Florida rivers [the Caloosahatchee River (CR) and the Shark River (SR)] was done in terms of molecular mass (MM) and diffusion coefficients (D). The novel technique Frit inlet/frit outlet-flow field-flow fractionation (FIFO-FIFFF) with absorbance and fluorescence detectors was used to determine these properties. The SR receives organic material from the Everglades. By contrast, the CR arises from Lake Okeechobee in central Florida, receiving anthropogenic inputs, farming runoff, and natural organics. Both rivers discharge to the Gulf of Mexico. Fluorescence identified, for both rivers, two different MM distributions in low salinity water samples: the first was centered at approximately 1.7 kDa (CR) and approximately 2 kDa (SR); the second centered at approximately 13 kDa for both rivers, which disappeared gradually in the river plumes to below detection limit in coastal waters. Absorbance detected only one MM distribution centered at approximately 2 kDa (CR) and 2.2-2.4 kDa (SR). Fluorescence in general peaked at a lower MM than absorbance, suggesting a different size distribution for fluorophores vs chromophores. A photochemical study showed that, after sunlight, irradiated freshwater samples have similar characteristics to more marine waters, including a shift in MM distribution of chromophores. The differences observed between the rivers in the optical characteristics, MM distributions, and D values suggest that the CDOM sources, physical, and photochemical degradation processes are different for these two rivers.

  4. Application of portable online LED UV fluorescence sensor to predict the degradation of dissolved organic matter and trace organic contaminants during ozonation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wen-Tao; Majewsky, Marius; Abbt-Braun, Gudrun; Horn, Harald; Jin, Jing; Li, Qiang; Zhou, Qing; Li, Ai-Min

    2016-09-15

    This work aims to correlate signals of LED UV/fluorescence sensor with the degradation of dissolved organic matter (DOM) and trace-level organic contaminants (TOrCs) during ozonation process. Six sets of bench-scale ozonation kinetic experiments incorporated with three different water matrices and 14 TOrCs of different reactivity (group I ∼ V) were conducted. Calibrated by tryptophan and humic substances standards and verified by the lab benchtop spectroscopy, the newly developed portable/online LED sensor, which measures the UV280 absorbance, protein-like and humic-like fluorescence simultaneously, was feasible to monitor chromophores and fluorophores with good sensitivity and accuracy. The liquid chromatography with organic carbon detector combined with 2D synchronous correlation analysis further demonstrated how the DOM components of large molecular weight were transformed into small moieties as a function of the decrease of humic-like fluorescence. For TOrCs, their removal rates were well correlated with the decrease of the LED UV/fluorescence signals, and their elimination patterns were mainly determined by their reactivity with O3 and hydroxyl radicals. At approximately 50% reduction of humic-like fluorescence almost complete oxidation of TOrCs of group I and II was reached, a similar removal percentage (25-75%) of TOrCs of group III and IV, and a poor removal percentage (<25%) of group V. This study might contribute to the smart control of advanced oxidation processes for the water and wastewater treatment in the future. PMID:27267474

  5. Transport of organic contaminants in subsoil horizons and effects of dissolved organic matter related to organic waste recycling practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chabauty, Florian; Pot, Valérie; Bourdat-Deschamps, Marjolaine; Bernet, Nathalie; Labat, Christophe; Benoit, Pierre

    2016-04-01

    Compost amendment on agricultural soil is a current practice to compensate the loss of organic matter. As a consequence, dissolved organic carbon concentration in soil leachates can be increased and potentially modify the transport of other solutes. This study aims to characterize the processes controlling the mobility of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in deep soil layers and their potential impacts on the leaching of organic contaminants (pesticides and pharmaceutical compounds) potentially present in cultivated soils receiving organic waste composts. We sampled undisturbed soil cores in the illuviated horizon (60-90 cm depth) of an Albeluvisol. Percolation experiments were made in presence and absence of DOM with two different pesticides, isoproturon and epoxiconazole, and two pharmaceutical compounds, ibuprofen and sulfamethoxazole. Two types of DOM were extracted from two different soil surface horizons: one sampled in a plot receiving a co-compost of green wastes and sewage sludge applied once every 2 years since 1998 and one sampled in an unamended plot. Results show that DOM behaved as a highly reactive solute, which was continuously generated within the soil columns during flow and increased after flow interruption. DOM significantly increased the mobility of bromide and all pollutants, but the effects differed according the hydrophobic and the ionic character of the molecules. However, no clear effects of the origin of DOM on the mobility of the different contaminants were observed. PMID:26676540

  6. Turnover time of fluorescent dissolved organic matter in the dark global ocean

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Catalá, Teresa Serrano; Reche, Isabel; Fuentes-Lema, Antonio;

    2015-01-01

    Marine dissolved organic matter (DOM) is one of the largest reservoirs of reduced carbon on Earth. In the dark ocean (>200 m), most of this carbon is refractory DOM. This refractory DOM, largely produced during microbial mineralization of organic matter, includes humic-like substances generated i...

  7. Latitudinal gradients in degradation of marine dissolved organic carbon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arnosti, Carol; Steen, Andrew; Ziervogel, Kai;

    2011-01-01

    climate increasingly affects the marine environment, changes in the spectrum of substrates accessible by microbial communities may lead to shifts in the location and rate at which marine DOC is respired. Since the inventory of DOC in the ocean is comparable in magnitude to the atmospheric CO2 reservoir...... molecular weight organic substrates and thereby initiate organic matter degradation. These data demonstrate the existence of a latitudinal gradient in the range of complex substrates available to heterotrophic microbial communities, paralleling the global gradient in bacterial species richness. As changing......, such a change could profoundly affect the global carbon cycle....

  8. Diurnal variability in riverine dissolved organic matter composition determined by in situ optical measurement in the San Joaquin River (California, USA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, R.G.M.; Pellerin, B.A.; Bergamaschi, B.A.; Downing, B.D.; Kraus, T.E.C.; Smart, D.R.; Dahlgren, R.A.; Hernes, P.J.

    2007-01-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) concentration and composition in riverine and stream systems are known to vary with hydrological and productivity cycles over the annual and interannual time scales. Rivers are commonly perceived as homogeneous with respect to DOM concentration and composition, particularly under steady flow conditions over short time periods. However, few studies have evaluated the impact of short term variability (<1 day) on DOM dynamics. This study examined whether diurnal processes measurably altered DOM concentration and composition in the hypereutrophic San Joaquin River (California) during a relatively quiescent period. We evaluated the efficacy of using optical in situ measurements to reveal changes in DOM which may not be evident from bulk dissolved organic carbon (DOC) measurement alone. The in situ optical measurements described in this study clearly showed for the first time diurnal variations in DOM measurements, which have previously been related to both composition and concentration, even though diurnal changes were not well reflected in bulk DOC concentrations. An apparent asynchronous trend of DOM absorbance and chlorophyll-a in comparison to chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) fluorescence and spectral slope S290-350 suggests that no one specific CDOM spectrophotometric measurement explains absolutely DOM diurnal variation in this system; the measurement of multiple optical parameters is therefore recommended. The observed diurnal changes in DOM composition, measured by in situ optical instrumentation likely reflect both photochemical and biologically-mediated processes. The results of this study highlight that short-term variability in DOM composition may complicate trends for studies aiming to distinguish different DOM sources in riverine systems and emphasizes the importance of sampling specific study sites to be compared at the same time of day. The utilization of in situ optical technology allows short-term variability

  9. Dynamics of dissolved organic carbon in the northwestern Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    DileepKumar, M.; Rajendran, A.; Somasundar, K.; Haake, B.; Jenisch, A.; Shuo, Z.; Ittekkot, V.; Desai, B.N.

    in the conversion of detrital 0304-4203/90/$03.50 © 1990 -- Elsevier Science Publishers B.V. 300 M. DILEEP KUMAR ET AL. matter into inorganic carbon dioxide and plays a pivotal role in food chain processes by becoming a substrate for micro-organisms. The nature...

  10. Dissolved organic matter and lake metabolism. Technical progress report, 1 July 1976--30 June 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wetzel, R.G.

    1977-01-01

    Progress is reported on investigations on the qualitative and quantitative cycling of particulate and dissolved organic matter within lakes and their drainage basins. Interactions of dissolved organic matter with inorganic nutrient cycling and regulation of the photosynthetic and decompositional metabolism of micro- and macroflora remain the focal point of these studies. Major efforts were directed towards the sources fates, pathways, and interactions of dissolved organic matter in inorganic chemical cycling; allochthonous sources, metabolism en route, and inputs to the lake systems of increasing stages of eutrophication; and the relationships of these compounds to the nutrient physiology and metabolism of phytoplankton, sessile algae, macrophytes, and bacterial populations. Results of studies carried out in a freshwater lake in Michigan (Lawrence Lake) are reported. 165 references.

  11. Interactions Between Prokaryotes and Dissolved Organic Matter in Marine Waters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Traving, Sachia Jo

    Microscopic unicellular organisms display a wealth of diversity, and occupy many different roles on Earth. Due to their ubiquitous distribution and high numbers, what they do and when they do it are of vital importance for the biogeochemical cycles on Earth. A large and important group of microbes...... – ranging from bacterioplankton communities in seasonally variable coastal ecosystems, a manipulated pelagic food web, to a mathematical model of free-living prokaryotes and extracellular enzyme strategies. The results characterize links between community dynamics and function in prokaryotes, and emphasize...

  12. Changes in dissolved organic carbon and total dissolved nitrogen fluxes across subtropical forest ecosystems at different successional stages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Junhua; Li, Kun; Wang, Wantong; Zhang, Deqiang; Zhou, Guoyi

    2015-05-01

    Lateral transports of carbon and nitrogen are important processes linking terrestrial ecosystems and aquatic systems. Most previous studies made in temperate forests found that fluxes of carbon and nitrogen by runoff water varied in different forests, but few studies have been made in subtropical forests. This study was to investigate dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and total dissolved nitrogen (TDN) fluxes at the catchment scale along a subtropical forest succession gradient from pine forest (pioneer) to coniferous and broadleaved mixed forest (transitional) to broadleaved forest (mature). Our results showed that DOC concentration significantly decreased (pforests, which in turn resulted in a decrease in DOC flux and an increase in TDN flux, as mean annual runoff did not vary significantly among three succession forest catchments. The mean (±standard deviation) annual DOC flux was 118.1±43.6, 88.3±16.7 and 77.2±11.7 kg ha-1 yr-1for pioneer, transitional and mature forest catchments, respectively; and the mean annual TDN flux was 9.9 ±2.7, 18.2±3.0 and 21.2 ±4.5 kg ha-1 yr-1for pioneer, transitional and mature forest catchments, respectively. The mature forest reduced DOC flux by increased soil chemical adsorption and physical protection. An increase in TDN flux from pioneer to mature forests was consistent with the previous finding that mature forest was nitrogen saturated while pioneer forest was nitrogen limited. Therefore large-scale conversion of pioneer forests to transitional or mature forests in subtropical China will reduce DOC concentration and increase TDN concentration in the down-stream water, which may have significant impact on its water quality and aquatic biological activities.

  13. Complexation of trace organic contaminants with fractionated dissolved organic matter: implications for mass spectrometric quantification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Selene Hernandez; Wickramasekara, Samanthi; Abrell, Leif; Gao, Xiaodong; Chefetz, Benny; Chorover, Jon

    2013-04-01

    Interaction with aqueous phase dissolved organic matter (DOM) can alter the fate of trace organic contaminants of emerging concern once they enter the water cycle. In order to probe possible DOM binding mechanisms and their consequences for contaminant detection and quantification in natural waters, a set of laboratory experiments was conducted with aqueous solutions containing various operationally-defined "hydrophilic" and "hydrophobic" freshwater DOM fractions isolated by resin adsorption techniques from reference Suwannee River natural organic matter (SROM). Per unit mass of SROM carbon, hydrophobic acids (HoA) comprised the largest C fraction (0.63±0.029), followed by hydrophilic-neutrals (HiN, 0.11±0.01) and acids (HiA, 0.09±0.017). Aqueous solutions comprising 8mgL(-1) DOC of each SROM fraction were spiked with a concentration range (10-1000μgL(-1)) of bisphenol A (BPA), carbamazepine (CBZ), or ibuprofen (IBU) as model target compounds in 24mM NH4HCO3 background electrolyte at pH 7.4. Contaminant interaction with the SROM fractions was probed using fluorescence spectroscopy, and effects on quantitative analysis of the target compounds were measured using direct aqueous-injection liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Total quenching was greater for the hydrophilic fractions of SROM and associations were principally with protein-like and fulvic acid-like constituents. Whereas LC-MS/MS recoveries indicated relatively weak interactions with most SROM factions, an important exception was the HiA fraction, which diminished recovery of CBZ and IBU by ca. 30% and 70%, respectively, indicating relatively strong molecular interactions. PMID:23276460

  14. Improved speciation of dissolved organic nitrogen in natural waters: amide hydrolysis with fluorescence derivatization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ryan L.Firnmen; Tamara D.Trouts; Daniel D.Richter Jr.; Dharni Vasudevan

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to improve primary-amine nitrogen (1°-N) quantification in dissolved organic matter (DOM)originating from natural waters where inorganic forms of N, which may cause analytical interference, are commonly encountered.Efforts were targeted at elucidating organic-N structural criteria influencing the response of organic amines to known colorimetric andfluorescent reagents and exploring the use of divalent metal-assisted amide hydrolysis in combination with fluorescence analyses.We found that reaction of o-phthaldialdehyde (OPA) with primary amines is significantly influenced by steric factors, whereasfluorescamine (FLU) lacks sensitivity to steric factors and allows for the detection of a larger suite of organic amines, includingdi- and tri-peptides and sterically hindered 1°-N. Due to the near quantitative recovery of dissolved peptides with the FLU reagent andlack of analytical response to inorganic nitrogen, we proposed that FLU be utilized for the quantification of primary amine nitrogen.In exploring the application of divalent metal promoted peptide hydrolysis to the analysis of organic forms of nitrogen in DOM, wefound that Zn(Ⅱ) reaction increased the total fraction of organic-N detectable by both OPA and FLU reagents. Zn-hydrolysis improvedrecovery of organic-N in natural waters from<5% to 35%. The above method, coupled with standard inorganic-N analyses, allows forenhanced resolution of dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) speciation in natural waters.

  15. Fe-binding dissolved organic ligands in the oxic and suboxic waters of the Black Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loes J.A. Gerringa

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In the oxygen-rich layer of the Black Sea, above the permanent halocline, the Fe and nitrate concentrations are low where fluorescence is relatively high , indicating uptake by phytoplankton. In this study we used ligand exchange adsorptive cathodic stripping voltammetry (CLE-aCSV, using 2-(2-Thiazolylazo-p-cresol (TAC as measuring ligand, to investigate the role of Fe-binding dissolved organic ligands in keeping Fe in the dissolved phase and potentially biologically available. The conditional stability constant, logK´, was between 21 and 22 in most samples, which is on average lower than in ocean water. The Fe-binding dissolved organic ligand concentrations varied between 0.35 and 4.81 nEq of M Fe, which was higher than the dissolved concentration of Fe (DFe as found in most samples. At two stations ligands were saturated in the surface. At one station ligands were saturated near the oxycline, where ligand concentrations seemed to increase, indicating that they play a role in keeping Fe in the dissolved phase across the redox gradient. At the fluorescence maximum (between 40 and 50 m, the dissolved organic ligand binding capacity (alphaFeL=K´*[L´] of Fe was at its highest while the concentration DFe was at its lowest. Here, we find a statistically significant, positive relationship between fluorescence and the logarithm of alphaFeL, along with fluorescence and the ratio of the total ligand concentration over DFe. These relationships are best explained by phytoplankton utilizing Fe from Fe-binding organic ligands, resulting in an increase in free Fe-binding ligands.

  16. Dialysis is superior to anion exchange for removal of dissolved inorganic nitrogen from freshwater samples prior to dissolved organic nitrogen determination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graeber, Daniel; Gücker, Björn; Zwirnmann, Elke;

    2012-01-01

    Dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) is usually determined as the difference between total dissolved nitrogen (TDN) and dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN). When applying this approach to samples with high DIN concentrations, there is a risk, that small relative errors in TDN and DIN measurements may...... of AEP and DP for DIN removal in order to increase DON determination accuracy of freshwater samples. The AEP pretreatment performed well for standard compounds, yielding high dissolved organic carbon (DOC) recovery rates and > 99% removal of nitrate, whereas DON recovery rates varied and no removal...... propagate into high absolute errors of the determined DON concentration. To reduce such errors, two pretreatment methods have been suggested for the removal of DIN prior to the determination of DON: anion-exchange pretreatment (AEP) and dialysis pretreatment (DP). In this study, we tested the suitability...

  17. Dissolved organic sulfur in streams draining forested catchments in southern China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhanyi Wang; Xiaoshan Zhang; Zhangwei Wang; Yi Zhang; Bingwen Li; Rolf Vogt

    2012-01-01

    Dissolved organic sulfur (DOS) is an important fraction for sulfur mobilization in ecosystem.In this work stream waters were sampled in 25 forested sites in southern China to study the dissolved sulfur fractions.Dissolved sulfur was fractionated into dissolved organic sulfur (DOS) and inorganic sulfate (SO42-) for 95 stream water samples.The results showed that the concentration of DOS ranged from 0 to 13.1 mg/L (average 1.3 mg/L) in all the streams.High concentrations of DOS in stream waters were found in the sites with high concentrations of sulfate.DOS constituted less than 60.1% of dissolved sulfur (average 17.9%).Statistical analysis showed that DOS concentration was correlated with SO42- in streams waters and total sulfur in surface layer soils.The results also showed that DOS concentration in stream waters had a seasonal variation,but no trends were found with it.The implication was that the long term sulfur deposition had led the increase of the concentration and fraction of DOS in stream waters in acid rain prevailing regions

  18. Dissolved organic carbon in the INDEX area of the Central Indian Basin

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sardessai, S.; DeSousa, S.N.

    , Supplement 75, 106. Carlson, D.J., Brann, M.L., Mague, T.H., Mayer, L.M., 1985. Molecular weight distribution of dissolved organic materials in sea water determined by ultrafiltration: A reexamination. Marine Chemistry 16, 155–171. Carlson, C.A., Ducklow, H...

  19. Pyrolysis temperature-dependent release of dissolved organic carbon from plant, manure, and biorefinery wastes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limited information is available to understand the chemical structure of biochar’s labile dissolved organic carbon (DOC) fraction that will change amended soil’s DOC composition. This study utilized the high sensitivity of fluorescence excitation-emission (EEM) spectrophotometry to understand the s...

  20. Effect of dissolved organic matter composition on metal speciation in soil solutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ren, Zong Ling; Tella, Marie; Bravin, M.N.; Comans, R.N.J.; Dai, Jun; Garnier, Jean Marie; Sivry, Yann; Doelsch, Emmanuel; Straathof, Angela; Benedetti, M.F.

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of the speciation of heavy metals and the role of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in soil solution is a key to understand metal mobility and ecotoxicity. In this study, soil column-Donnan membrane technique (SC-DMT) was used to measure metal speciation of Cd, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn in eighte

  1. Fine-scale temporal characterization of trends in soil water dissolved organic carbon and potential drivers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sawicka, K.; Monteith, D.T.; Vanguelova, E.I.; Wade, A.J.; Clark, J.M.

    2016-01-01

    Long-term monitoring of surface water quality has shown increasing concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) across a large part of the Northern Hemisphere. Several drivers have been implicated including climate change, land management change, nitrogen and sulphur deposition and CO2

  2. CONSTANTS FOR MERCURY BINDING BY DISSOLVED ORGANIC MATTER ISOLATES FROM THE FLORIDA EVERGLADES. (R827653)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) has been implicated as an important complexing agent for Hg that can affect its mobility and bioavailability in aquatic ecosystems. However, binding constants for natural Hg-DOM complexes are not well known. We employed a competitive ligand appro...

  3. Complexation with dissolved organic matter and solubility control of heavy metals in sandy soil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weng, L.; Temminghoff, E.J.M.; Lofts, S.; Tipping, E.; Riemsdijk, van W.H.

    2002-01-01

    The complexation of heavy metals with dissolved organic matter (DOM) in the environment influences the solubility and mobility of these metals. In this paper, we measured the complexation of Cu, Cd, Zn, Ni, and Pb with DOM in the soil solution at pH 3.7-6.1 using a Donnan membrane technique. The res

  4. Drivers of fluorescent dissolved organic matter in the global epipelagic ocean

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Catalá, T.S.; Álvarez-Salgado, X. A.; Otero, J.;

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescent dissolved organic matter (FDOM) in open surface waters (< 200 m) of the Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian oceans was analysed by excitation-emission matrix (EEM) spectroscopy and parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC). A four-component PARAFAC model was fit to the EEMs, which included two hum...

  5. ESTIMATING THE POTENTIAL FOR FACILITATED TRANSPORT OF NAPROPAMIDE BY DISSOLVED ORGANIC MATTER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) has been found to significantly affect the soil sorption/desorption of napropamide [2-(a-naphthoxy-N, N-diethylpropionamide] and to enhance its transport through soil columns. A method to qualitatively predict if DOM will enhance the transport of napropamide based on e...

  6. Response to Comment on "Dilution limits dissolved organic carbon utilization in the deep ocean"

    KAUST Repository

    Arrieta, Jesus

    2015-12-18

    Our recent finding that dilution limits dissolved organic carbon (DOC) utilization in the deep ocean has been criticized based on the common misconception that lability equates to rapid and complete utilization. Even when considering the redefinition of recalcitrant DOC recently proposed by Jiao et al., the dilution hypothesis best explains our experimental observations.

  7. Linkages between the circulation and distribution of dissolved organic matter in the White Sea, Arctic Ocean

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pavlov, Alexey K.; Stedmon, Colin A.; Semushin, Andrey V.;

    2016-01-01

    The White Sea is a semi-enclosed Arctic marginal sea receiving a significant loading of freshwater (225-231 km3 yr-1 equaling an annual runoff yield of 2.5 m) and dissolved organic matter (DOM) from river run-off. We report discharge weighed values of stable oxygen isotope ratios (δ18O) of -14.0‰...

  8. The role of dissolved organic matter in adsorbing heavy metals in clay-rich soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Y. Refaey; B. Jansen; A.H. El-Shater; A.A. El-Haddad; K. Kalbitz

    2014-01-01

    Adsorption of tested heavy metals on Egyptian soils was large in all situations tested and follows the order: Cu >> Ni ≈ Zn. Copper was influenced by the timing of dissolved organic matter addition more than Ni and Zn. Specific binding mechanisms (inner-sphere complexes) dominated the affinity of Cu

  9. Salinity, dissolved organic carbon and water hardness affect peracetic acid (PAA) degradation in aqueous solutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Dibo; Steinberg, Christian E.W.; Straus, David L.;

    2014-01-01

    -degradation of three commercial products, Wofasteril® E400, Wofasteril® E250 and Wofasteril® Lspez, at a nominal concentration of 1 mg L−1 in relation to two levels of salinity, water hardness, or dissolved organic carbon (DOC). The results showed that salinity and DOC stimulate PAA-degradation, while water hardness...

  10. Tracing dissolved organic matter (DOM) from land-based aquaculture systems in North Patagonian streams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nimptsch, Jorge; Woelfl, Stefan; Osorio, Sebastian;

    2015-01-01

    Chile is the second largest producer of salmonids worldwide. The first step in the production of salmonids takes place in land-based aquacultures. However, the effects of the discharge from these aquacultures on stream dissolved organic matter (DOM) content, molecular composition and degradabilit...

  11. Effect of Dissolved Organic Matter on Basalt Weathering Rates under Flow Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dontsova, K.; Steefel, C. I.; Chorover, J. D.

    2009-12-01

    Rock weathering is an important aspect of soil formation that is tightly coupled to the progressive colonization of grain surfaces by microorganisms and plant tissue, both of which are associated with the exudation of complexing ligands and reducing equivalents that are incorporated into dissolved organic matter. As part of a larger hillslope experimental study being designed for Biosphere 2 (Oracle, AZ), we seek to determine how the presence and concentration of dissolved organic matter affects the incongruent dissolution rates of basaltic tuff. Saturated flow column experiments are being conducted using plant-derived soluble organic matter solutions of variable concentrations, and comparisons are being made to experiments conducted with malic acid, a low-molecular weight organic acid commonly exuded into the rhizosphere. Dissolved organic matter was extracted from Ponderosa Pine forest floor and was characterized for aqueous geochemical parameters (pH, EC, ion balance, DOC/TN) and also for DOC composition (UV-Vis, FTIR spectroscopy). Column effluents are being analyzed for major and trace cations, anions, silica and organic solutes. Dissolution rates of primary minerals and precipitation rates of secondary phases will be estimated by fitting the data to a numerical reactive transport model, CrunchFlow2007. At the end of the fluid flow experiment, column materials will be analyzed for biogeochemical composition to detect preferential dissolution of specific phases, the precipitation of new ones, and to monitor the associated formation of biofilms. The influence of organic solutions on weathering patterns of basalt will be discussed.

  12. Efficiency and stability of spectral sensitization of boron-doped-diamond electrodes through covalent anchoring of a donor-acceptor organic chromophore (P1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krysova, Hana; Barton, Jan; Petrak, Vaclav; Jurok, Radek; Kuchar, Martin; Cigler, Petr; Kavan, Ladislav

    2016-06-28

    A novel procedure is developed for chemical modification of H-terminated B-doped diamond surfaces with a donor-π-bridge-acceptor molecule (P1). A cathodic photocurrent near 1 μA cm(-2) flows under 1 Sun (AM 1.5) illumination at the interface between the diamond electrode and aqueous electrolyte solution containing dimethylviologen (electron mediator). The efficiency of this new electrode outperforms that of the non-covalently modified diamond with the same dye. The found external quantum efficiency of the P1-sensitized diamond is not far from that of the flat titania electrode sensitized by a standard organometallic dye used in solar cells. However, the P1 dye, both pure and diamond-anchored, shows significant instability during illumination by solar light. The degradation is a two-stage process in which the initially photo-generated products further decompose in complicated dark reactions. These findings need to be taken into account for optimization of organic chromophores for solar cells in general. PMID:27264474

  13. Processes controlling production and transport of dissolved organic carbon in forest soils

    OpenAIRE

    Fröberg, Mats

    2004-01-01

    Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) leached from the O horizon of forest soils is a major source of soil organic carbon in the mineral soil, where a major proportion of the organic carbon in forest ecosystems is located. The relative contribution of recent litter and humified organic matter to the leaching of DOC from the O horizon is still being debated. In the present work, I studied the sources of DOC leached from the O horizon by manipulating the amounts of litter and humus and measuring DOC c...

  14. Effect of biostimulation on biodegradation of dissolved organic carbon in biological filters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Tihomirova

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The addition of labile organic carbon (LOC to enhance the biodegradation rate of dissolved organic carbon (DOC in biological columns was studied. Acetate standard solution (NaAc and Luria Bertrani (LB medium were used as LOC as biostimulants in glass column system used for measurements of biodegradable dissolved organic carbon (BDOC. The addition of LOC related with the increase of total DOC in sample. The concentration of BDOC increased up to 7 and 5 times and was utilized after 24 min. contact time. The biodegradation rate constant was increased at least 26 times during adaptation-biostimulation period. There was a strong positive correlation between the biodegradation rate constant and the concentration of BDOC. Biostimulation period ranged from 24 to 53 h for NaAc biostimulant and from 20 to 168 h for LB. The study has shown that LOC could be used as stimulator to enhance the biodegradation rate of DOC during biofiltration.

  15. Effect of biostimulation on biodegradation of dissolved organic carbon in biological granular activated carbon filters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Tihomirova

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The addition of labile organic carbon (LOC to enhance the biodegradation rate of dissolved organic carbon (DOC in biological columns was studied. Acetate standard solution (NaAc and LB (Luria Bertrani medium were used as LOC as biostimulants in glass column system used for measurements of biodegradable dissolved organic carbon (BDOC. The addition of LOC related with the increase of total DOC in sample. The concentration of BDOC increased up to 7 and 5 times and was utilized after 24 min. contact time. The biodegradation rate constant was increased at least 8 times during adaptation-biostimulation period. There was a strong positive correlation between the biodegradation rate constant and the concentration of BDOC. Biostimulation period ranged from 24 to 53 h for NaAc biostimulant and from 20 to 168 h for LB. The study has shown that LOC could be used as stimulator to enhance the biodegradation rate of DOC during biofiltration.

  16. Effects of dissolved organic matter on the growth and pigments synthesis of Spirulina platensis ( Arthrospira )

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Zengling; GAO Kunshan; WATANABE Teruo

    2006-01-01

    Excessive accumulation of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in the culture ponds of Spirulina platensis is usually considered to be one of the potential factors affecting the production of S. platensis, however, we are not quite aware of effects of DOM on the growth and pigments synthesis of S. platensis. In the present study, S. platensis was grown in batch or semi-continuous cultures using the filtrate in the culture ponds that had not been renewed for years. It was found that disssolved organic carbon up to 60 mg/L did not bring about an inhibitory effect on the growth of S. platensis, but increased the contents of chlorophyll a and phycocyanin instead. However, further accumulation of dissolved organic matter could decrease the content of chlorophyll a.

  17. Nitrogen and dissolved organic carbon (DOC losses from an artificially drained grassland on organic soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Tiemeyer

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Nitrate-nitrogen (NO3-N as well as dissolved organic carbon (DOC and nitrogen (DON concentrations and losses were studied for three respectively two years in a small catchment dominated by a degraded peatland used as intensive grassland. Concentrations in the shallow groundwater were spatially and temporally very variable with NO3-N being the most dynamic component (7.3 ± 12.5 mg L–1. Average NO3-N concentrations of 10.3 ± 5.4 mg L–1 in the ditch draining the catchment and annual NO3-N losses of 19, 35 and 26 kg ha–1 confirmed drained peatlands as an important source of diffuse N pollution. The highest NO3-N losses occurred during the wettest year. Resulting from concentrations of 2.4 ± 0.8 mg L–1, DON added further 4.5 to 6.4 kg ha–1 to the N losses and thus formed a relevant component of the total N losses. Ditch DOC concentrations of 24.9 ± 5.9 mg L–1 resulted in DOC losses of 66 kg ha–1 in the wet year 2006/07 and 39 kg ha–1 in the dry year 2007/08. Both DOC and N concentrations were governed by hydrological conditions, but NO3-N reacted much faster and clearer on rising discharge rates than DOC which tended to be higher under dryer conditions. In the third year of the study, the superposition of a very wet summer and land use changes from grassland to arable land in a part of the catchment suggests that under re-wetting conditions with a high groundwater table in summer, NO3-N would diminish quickly, while DOC would remain on a similar level. Further intensification of the land use, on the other hand, would increase N losses to receiving water bodies.

  18. PRELIMINARY STUDY ON THE DISSOLVED AND COLLOIDAL ORGANIC CARBON IN THE ZHUJIANG RIVER ESTUARY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    This paper reports data on the dissolved and colloidal organic carbon in the Zhujiang (Pearl) River estuary. DOC concentration was 142 to 239 μmol/L in the freshwater taken in March 1997 from the four Zhujiang River tributaries flowing into the Lingdingyang estuary. High concentration was observed in the Humen tributary located near Guangzhou. The rapidly increased DOC concentration at low salinities (~5) may be attributed to the exchange between macroparticulate and dissolved organic matter during the early stage of estuarine mixing. DOC concentration overall followed the mixing line until salinity ~25, where the Deep Bay is located and where DOC was elevated. This elevated DOC may suggest a local organic matter source from Shenzhen. Using a cross-flow ultrafiltration (CFF) system equipped with a Millipore Prep-scale CFF 1 kD regenerated cellulose membrane, we also separated the colloidal organic matter from the truly dissolved fraction (<1 kD). CFF membranes were carefully evaluated for their applicability (retention characteristics, blank level and mass balance) to separate colloidal organic matter. COC in the study area ranged from 5 to 85 μmol/L, representing ~ 3%-32% of DOC. The highest COC percentage was found at low salinities (< 5) in both winter and summer. Evidence suggests in-situ production of colloidal material at this salinity range. Beyond this point, a very modest removal was observable until high salinities. Again, an increase in COC concentration was shown in the samples taken from the Deep Bay.

  19. A major biopolymeric component to dissolved organic carbon in surface sea water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aluwihare, Lihini I.; Repeta, Daniel J.; Chen, Robert F.

    1997-05-01

    Organic carbon dissolved in sea water is an important component of the global carbon cycle1. Concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in the ocean's surface mixed layer are at least twice those in the deep sea2,3, because of the production of soluble carbon compounds by marine algae in the euphotic zone4,5. But very little is known about the chemical composition of DOC, and the connection between photosynthetic production and DOC accumulation is not well understood6,7. Here we report the chemical characterization of macromolecular DOC at several sites in the Atlantic and Pacific oceans. Neutral sugars, acetate and lipids show similar distributions, suggesting that these constituents are linked together in a common macromolecular structure. Chemical linkage patterns between the oligosaccharide portions of dissolved organic matter subjected to ultrafiltration are highly specific, with little variation between ocean basins. We show that laboratory culture experiments on the decomposition of algal exudate produce macromolecular organic matter with similar compositions and linkage characteristics. We propose that a significant fraction of DOC in sea surface water consists of structurally related and biosynthetically derived acyl oligosaccharides that persist after more labile organic matter has been degraded.

  20. Optical signatures of dissolved organic matter from the Endeavour and Axial vent fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stubbins, A.; Butterfield, D.; Rossel, P. E.; Dittmar, T.

    2011-12-01

    Recent studies have revealed that hydrothermal systems in the deep ocean are both sources and processors of dissolved organic matter (DOM). Sub-floor stores of fossil organic carbon may be exported to the deep ocean directly adding fossil C to the deep ocean dissolved organic carbon (DOC) pool and altering its apparent age. Fossil methane and carbon dioxide are also exported from vents. These C sources can then be utilized by chemotrophs and later enter the DOM pool as fossil DOC. Finally, when deep ocean waters are entrained into vent systems, the resultant heating may alter the chemical and optical properties of the DOM in these deep ocean waters. Dissolved organic matter (DOM) samples were collected from vents ranging in temperature from 10 to over 300 degrees centigrade across the Endeavour and Axial fields along the Juan de Fuca ridge. Elevated DOC and protein-like fluorescence reveal the vents to fuel the chemotrophic production of organic matter either in the adjacent water column or local sediments. High DOC and increased humic-like fluorescence in the hottest vent fluids, suggests the thermal degradation of DOM either from buried fossil sources or the entrainment of local waters enriched in DOC due to chemotrophic productivity. Natural and radio-carbon analyses are underway and will provide further insight into the ultimate source of this colored, fluorescent hydrothermal DOM.

  1. Exchanges and photo-biogeochemical transformation of dissolved organic compounds in Eastern US tidal marsh ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzortziou, Maria; Neale, Patrick; Megonigal, Patrick; Butterworth, Megan; Jaffe, Rudolf

    2010-05-01

    The role of tidal marshes as sources, sinks and/or transformers of biologically important nutrients, carbon and pollutants has been studied in various marsh-estuarine environments and geomorphological settings. Although there is no consensus on the magnitude and direction of marsh-estuary net (particulate and dissolved) organic fluxes, most previous studies suggest that salt marshes export dissolved organic carbon (DOC) to the surrounding estuarine waters. There has been less attention, however, to the influence of transformations on marsh-exported organic carbon composition or "quality". Yet, carbon composition affects a wide variety of estuarine processes, including microbial respiration and photochemistry. Our objectives in this study were to quantify the photo-reactivity and bio-availability of dissolved organic carbon compounds exported from tidal wetlands of the Chesapeake Bay and determine their effects on the optical properties of colored organic matter (CDOM). We quantified DOC bioavailability with two assays of microbial mineralization: the traditional batch incubation approach in which a suspension of DOM and microbial cells (1 µm filtrate) was incubated in bottles for 7 d, and a continuous-flow bioreactor approach in which DOC (0.2 µm filtrate) was passed through a microbial community that had been pre-established on glass beads from the same source water. Photochemical degradation was measured after a 10h exposure to filtered xenon irradiance simulating midday surface exposure. We measured decreases in CDOM absorption and fluorescence spectra, DOC concentrations, changes in molecular weight distribution, and increases in dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and CO2. Results provide important insights on the transformation, fate and cycling of marsh-exported organic compounds, and the role of tidal marsh systems as major regulators of short-scale biological, optical and biogeochemical variability in highly dynamic coastal margins and catchment areas.

  2. Dynamics of Dissolved Organic Matter and its Bioavailability to Heterotrophic Bacteria in the Gulf of Finland, Northern Baltic Sea

    OpenAIRE

    Hoikkala, Laura

    2012-01-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) in surface waters originates from allochthonous and autochthonous sources, the latter of which includes exudation by phytoplankton, viral lysis of planktonic organisms and 'sloppy' feeding by zooplankton. The concentration of DOM in seawater exceeds by one to two orders of magnitude that of particulate organic matter. Thus the DOM pool may be crucial to nutrition of pelagic osmotrophs, such as bacteria and algae, which are capable of exploiting dissolved organic...

  3. Cellulase activity and dissolved organic carbon release from lignocellulose macrophyte-derived in four trophic conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávia Bottino

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Considering the importance of lignocellulose macrophyte-derived for the energy flux in aquatic ecosystems and the nutrient concentrations as a function of force which influences the decomposition process, this study aims to relate the enzymatic activity and lignocellulose hydrolysis in different trophic statuses. Water samples and two macrophyte species were collected from the littoral zone of a subtropical Brazilian Reservoir. A lignocellulosic matrix was obtained using aqueous extraction of dried plant material (≈40 °C. Incubations for decomposition of the lignocellulosic matrix were prepared using lignocelluloses, inoculums and filtered water simulating different trophic statuses with the same N:P ratio. The particulate organic carbon and dissolved organic carbon (POC and DOC, respectively were quantified, the cellulase enzymatic activity was measured by releasing reducing sugars and immobilized carbon was analyzed by filtration. During the cellulose degradation indicated by the cellulase activity, the dissolved organic carbon daily rate and enzyme activity increased. It was related to a fast hydrolysable fraction of cellulose that contributed to short-term carbon immobilization (ca. 10 days. After approximately 20 days, the dissolved organic carbon and enzyme activity were inversely correlated suggesting that the respiration of microorganisms was responsible for carbon mineralization. Cellulose was an important resource in low nutrient conditions (oligotrophic. However, the detritus quality played a major role in the lignocelluloses degradation (i.e., enzyme activity and carbon release.

  4. Removal of dissolved organic carbon in pilot wetlands of subsuperficial and superficial flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth M. Agudelo C

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to compare removal of dissolved organic carbon (d o c obtained with pilot wetlands of subsuperficial flow (p h s s and superficial flow (p h s, with Phragmites australis as treatment alternatives for domestic residual waters of small communities and rural areas. Methodology: an exploratory and experimental study was carried out adding 100,12 mg/L of dissolved organic carbon to synthetic water contaminated with Chlorpyrifos in order to feed the wetlands. A total amount of 20 samples were done, 16 of them in four experiments and the other ones in the intervals with no use of pesticides. Samples were taken on days 1, 4, 8, and 11 in the six wetlands, three of them subsuperficial, and three of them superficial. The main variable answer was dissolved organic carbon, measured in the organic carbon analyzer. Results: a high efficiency in the removal of d o c was obtained with the two types of wetlands: 92,3% with subsuperficial flow and 95,6% with superficial flow. Such a high removal was due to the interaction between plants, gravel and microorganisms. Conclusion: although in both types of wetlands the removal was high and similar, it is recommended to use those of subsuperficial flow because in the superficial ones algae and gelatinous bio-films are developed, which becomes favorable to the development of important epidemiologic vectors in terms of public health.

  5. Study of fouling and scaling in capacitive deionisation by using dissolved organic and inorganic salts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mossad, Mohamed; Zou, Linda

    2013-01-15

    In this work, fouling, scaling and cleaning of the capacitive deionisation (CDI) with activated carbon electrodes were systematically investigated for the first time. Electrode fouling caused by dissolved organic matter using sodium salt of humic acid as a model foulant (measured by total organic carbon concentration, TOC) and inorganic salt (NaCl, MgCl(2), CaCl(2) and FeCl(3)) in the CDI feed solutions was investigated in a series of controlled fouling experiments. After each CDI experiment, a series of cleaning steps was performed to understand the reversibility of fouling accumulated on the electrode surface by analysing the cleaning solutions. The higher the TOC concentration in the CDI feed solution, the more the reduction of salt removal efficiency, declination in the production rate and energy consumption. Dissolved organic matter is the main cause of electrode fouling, as it blocks the activated carbon pores and reduces their electrosorption capacitance. Ca and Mg have no noticeable effect on the CDI treatment performance. However, Fe seemed to have a greater effect on CDI electrode fouling. Alkaline and acid cleaning solutions were able to restore the recovery of the CDI performance from fouling. Pre-treatment to reduce the dissolved organic matter levels is recommended to achieve sustainable treatment performance. PMID:23274796

  6. Dynamics of Dissolved Organic Matter in Amazon Basin: Insights into Negro River Contribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira-Turcq, P.; Perez, M. P.; Benedetti, M.; Oliveira, M. A.; Lagane, C.; Seyler, P.; Oliveira, E.

    2006-12-01

    The study of global carbon cycle requires a precise knowledge of spatial and temporal distributions and exportation from continents to oceans. Organic carbon fluxes represent approximately half of the total carbon budget carried by rivers. Tropical rivers transport two third of the total organic carbon discharged into the world oceans but important gaps still exist in the knowledge of the tropical river carbon biochemistry. The Amazon River is responsible for 10% of the annual amount of organic carbon transported from rivers to oceans. The most important portion of total organic matter transported in the Amazon Basin is the dissolved fraction (between 80% and 95%). Amazonian annual flux of dissolved organic matter is directly related to hydrological variations. All rivers in the Amazon basin are characterized by monomodal hydrograms, with a low water period in october/november and a high water period in may/june. Temporal variations in Amazon dissolved organic carbon (3.0 to 9.1 mg l^{- 1}) are mainly controled by Negro River inputs. DOC and DON contributions from the Negro River can vary between 120 kgC s-1 and 520 kg C s-1, and between 5 kgN s--1 and 15 kgN s-1, during low and high water period, respectivelly. In the Negro River, during high water stages, while DOC concentrations are stable from the upstream stations to the downstream ones (about 11 mg l-1), discharge increases from 16000 to 46000 m3 s-1 and NOD can quintuple from upstream (0.071 mg l-1) to downstream (0.341 mg l-1). Then the nature of dissolved organic matter is variable (C/N ratio varied from 33 to 120 from upstream to downstream). During low water stages DOC concentrations are lower (mean DOC of 8.1 mg l-1) while DON is in the same range, discharge is about 10000 m3 s-1 at downstream stations of Negro River and the C/N ratio is lower and steadier along the River. Finaly, despite a low basin surface (12%) compared with the two other main Amazon tributaries, Solimões and Madeira Rivers, and a

  7. Influence of dissolved organic carbon on methylmercury bioavailability across Minnesota stream ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsui, Martin Tsz Ki; Finlay, Jacques C

    2011-07-15

    Stream ecosystems are widely contaminated by mercury (Hg) via atmospheric transport and deposition in watersheds. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) is well-known to be the dominant ligand for aqueous methylmercury (MeHg), the bioaccumulative form of Hg in aquatic food webs. However, it is less clear if and how the concentration and character (e.g., aromaticity) of DOC influences the availability of dissolved MeHg to stream food webs. In this work, we analyzed total-Hg and/or MeHg concentrations in water, seston, and macroinvertebrates (filter-feeding hydropsychid caddisflies), and other physiochemical properties in 30 streams along a south-north geographic gradient in eastern Minnesota that corresponds to substantial changes in dominant land cover (i.e., agriculture, urban, wetland, and forest). In general, MeHg concentrations in seston and hydropsychids were higher in watersheds with more forest and wetland coverage, and increased with dissolved MeHg concentration. However, we found that the efficiency of MeHg incorporation into the stream food webs (i.e., bioconcentration factors of MeHg in both seston and hydropsychids, BCF(MeHg) = solid MeHg ÷ dissolved MeHg) decreased significantly with DOC concentration and aromaticity, suggesting that MeHg bioavailability to the base of food webs was attenuated at higher levels of terrestrial DOC. Therefore, our findings suggest that there is a dual role of DOC on MeHg cycling in streams: terrestrial DOC acts as the primary carrier ligand of dissolved MeHg for transport into surface waters, yet this aromatic DOC also attenuates dissolved MeHg uptake by aquatic food webs. Thus, consideration of MeHg bioavailability and its environmental regulation could help improve predictive models of MeHg bioaccumulation in stream ecosystems.

  8. [Ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) and fluorescence spectral characteristics of soil dissolved organic matter (DOM) in typical agricultural watershed of Three Gorges Reservoir Region].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qi-Lei; Jiang, Tao; Zhao, Zheng; Mu, Zhi-Jian; Wei, Shi-Qiang; Yan, Jin-Long; Liang, Jian

    2015-03-01

    As an important geo-factor to decide the environmental fate of pollutants in watershed, soil dissolved organic matter (DOM) sampled from a typical agricultural watershed in the Three Gorges Reservoir area was investigated using ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) and fluorescence spectroscopies, to analyze and discuss the effect of different land uses including forest, cropland, vegetable field and residence, on soil DOM geochemical characteristics. The results showed that significant differences in DOM samples amongst different land uses were observed, and DOM from forest had the highest aromaticity and humification degree, followed by DOM from cropland. Although DOM from vegetable field and residence showed the highest dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration (average values 0.81 g x kg(-1) and 0.89 g x kg(-1), respectively), but the aromaticity was lower indicating lower humification, which further suggested that the non-chromophoric component in these DOM samples contributed significantly to total DOM compositions. Additionally, in all DOM samples that were independent of land uses, fluorescence index (FI) values were between 1.4 (terrigenous) and 1.9 (authigenic) , evidently indicating both the allochthonous and autochthonous sources contributed to DOM characteristics. Meanwhile, r(T/C) values in most of samples were higher than 2.0, suggesting that soil DOM in this agricultural watershed was heavily affected by anthropogenic activities such as agricultural cultivation, especially, vegetable field was a good example. Additionally, sensitivities of different special spectral parameters for reflecting the differences of DOM characteristics amongst different land uses were not identical. For example, neither spectral slope ratio (S(R)) nor humification index (HIX) could clearly unveil the various geochemical characteristics of soil DOM from different sources. Thus, simple and single special spectral parameter cannot comprehensively provide the detailed information

  9. Seasonal dynamics and conservative mixing of dissolved organic matter in the temperate eutrophic estuary Horsens Fjord

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markager, Stiig; Stedmon, Colin; Søndergaard, Morten

    2011-01-01

    of different DOM parameters i.e. dissolved organic carbon (DOC), nitrogen (DON), and phosphorous (DOP), light absorption and eight fluorescence components, were analysed relative to conservative mixing. Many of the parameters did not behave conservatively. For DON, DOP and absorption, more than 65......This study presents the results of a year-long study investigating the characteristics of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in the Danish estuary, Horsens Fjord. The estuary is shallow with a mean depth of 2.9 m and receives high loadings of inorganic nutrients from its catchment. The behaviour......% of the freshwater concentration was removed initially at salinities below 12. At higher salinities two general patterns were identified. Concentrations of DON, DOP and four humic fluorescent fractions were not, or only weakly, related to salinity, showing that other processes than mixing were involved. Other...

  10. A novel aminated polymeric adsorbent for removing refractory dissolved organic matter from landfill leachate treatment plant

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Long; LI Aimin; WANG Jinnan; LU Yufei; ZHOU Youdong

    2009-01-01

    Refractory dissolved organic matter (DOM) from landfill leachate treatment plant was with high dissolved organic carbon (DOC) content.An aminated polymeric adsorbent NDA-8 with tertiary amino groups and sufficient mesopore was synthesized, which exhibited high adsorption capacity to the DOM (raw water after coagulation).Resin NDA-8 performed better in the uptake of the DOM than resin DAX-8 and A100.Electrostatic attraction was considered as the decisive interaction between the adsorbent and adsorbate.Special attention was paid to the correlation between porous structure and adsorption capacity.The mesopore of NDA-8 played a crucial role during uptake of the DOM.In general, resin in chloride form performed a higher removal rate of DOC.According to the column adsorption test, total adsorption capacity of NDA-8 was calculated to 52.28 mg DOC/mL wet resin.0.2 mol/L sodium hydroxide solution could regenerate the adsorbent efficiently.

  11. Changes in the composition and bioavailability of dissolved organic matter during sea ice formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Linda; Stedmon, Colin A.; Kaartokallio, Hermanni;

    2015-01-01

    The Arctic Ocean receives a large amount of terrestrial dissolved organic matter (DOM) from rivers and more than half of this is removed during its passage through the Arctic Ocean. Terrestrial DOM is generally believed to have a low bioavailability and recent studies point to physicochemical...... processes such as sea ice formation as the source of the significant DOM removal in the Arctic Ocean. We present the results of a mesocosm experiment designed to investigate how sea ice formation affects DOM composition and bioavailability. We measured the change in different fluorescent dissolved organic...... formation, leading to modifications in composition and increased bioavailability, which can in part explain terrestrial DOC removal in the Arctic Ocean....

  12. δ15N, δ13C and radiocarbon in dissolved organic carbon as indicators of environmental change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decomposition, humification, and stabilization of soil organic matter are closely related to the dynamics of dissolved organic matter. Enhanced peat decomposition results in increasing aromatic structures and polycondensation of dissolved organic molecules. Although recent studies support the concept that DOM can serve as an indicator for processes driven by changing environmental processes in soils affecting the C and N cycle (like decomposition and humification) and also permit insight in former conditions some 1000 years ago, it is unknown whether dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and nitrogen (DON) have an equal response to these processes. (author)

  13. Effect of Composting on Dissolved Organic Matter in Animal Manure and Its Binding with Cu

    OpenAIRE

    Fengsong Zhang; Yanxia Li; Xiong Xiong; Ming Yang; Wei Li

    2012-01-01

    The agricultural application of raw animal manure introduces large amounts of dissolved organic matter (DOM) into soil and would increase transport of heavy metals such as Cu which are widely present in animal manure. The purpose of this research was to evaluate the evolution of DOM from pig and cattle manures during composting through excitation-emission matrix (EEM) fluorescence spectroscopy and the binding ability of DOM toward copper (Cu) ions with the aid of fluorescence quenching titrat...

  14. In-Lake Processes Offset Increased Terrestrial Inputs of Dissolved Organic Carbon and Color to Lakes

    OpenAIRE

    Köhler, Stephan J.; Dolly Kothawala; Martyn N. Futter; Olof Liungman; Lars Tranvik

    2013-01-01

    Increased color in surface waters, or browning, can alter lake ecological function, lake thermal stratification and pose difficulties for drinking water treatment. Mechanisms suggested to cause browning include increased dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and iron concentrations, as well as a shift to more colored DOC. While browning of surface waters is widespread and well documented, little is known about why some lakes resist it. Here, we present a comprehensive study of Malaren, the third lar...

  15. Fate of secondary effluent dissolved organic matter during soil-aquifer treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XUE Shuang; ZHAO QingLiang; WEI LiangLiang; WANG LiNa; LIU ZhiGang

    2007-01-01

    The reduction of mass and trihalomethane formation potential (THMFP) of dissolved organic matter (DOM) and its fractions from secondary effluent during laboratory-scale soil-aquifer treatment (SAT) soil columns were studied. Reduction in dissolved organic carbon (DOC), absorbance of ultraviolet light at 254 nm (UV-254), biodegradable dissolved organic carbon (BDOC) and nonbiodegradable dissolved organic carbon (NBDOC) for the bulk DOM averaged 72.35%, 53.98%, 97.49% and 35.33% across the soil columns, respectively. Using XAD-8 and XAD-4 resins, DOM was fractionated into 3 fractions: hydrophobic acid (HPO-A), transphilic acid (TPI-A) and hydrophilic fraction (HPI). HPO-A was removed by 61.06%, TPI-A by 54.86% and HPI by 74.95% as DOC as a consequence of the laboratory-scale SAT, respectively. The reduction of THMFP from HPO-A, TPI-A and HPI was 27.24%, 26.24% and 36.08%, respectively. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR) spectra revealed that the HPO-A isolated from the secondary effluent contained more aromatic functional groups than the corresponding TPI-A. Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) spectrum analysis illustrated that TPI-A had decreased hydrocarbon and increased aromatics content in the SAT columns. Specific ultraviolet light absorbance (SUVA) and specific THMFP for each DOM fraction increased across the soil columns and HPI exhibited greater increase in both than HPO-A and TPI-A. The most problematic THM precursor was found to be HPO-A with its high quantity present in recharged water and high chlorine reactivity.

  16. Fluorescent characteristics of dissolved organic matter produced by bloom-forming coastal phytoplankton

    OpenAIRE

    Fukuzaki, K; Imai, I.; Fukushima, K; Ishii, K.-I.; SAWAYAMA, S.; Yoshioka, T.

    2014-01-01

    Dynamics and sources of fluorescent dissolved organic matter (FDOM) are important for understanding biogeochemical processes in aquatic ecosystems. This study aimed to analyse direct production of FDOM by marine phytoplankton cultures and reveal fluorescent characteristics of exuded FDOM. Axenic cultures of eight species of bloom-forming marine phytoplankton, including two diatoms; a raphidophyte; two dinoflagellates; a chlorophyte; a cryptophyte and a haptophyte, were incubated in an artific...

  17. Nitrogen and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) losses from an artificially drained grassland on organic soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiemeyer, B.; Kahle, P.

    2014-08-01

    Nitrate-nitrogen (NO3-N) as well as dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and nitrogen (DON) concentrations and losses were studied for three and two years, respectively, in a small catchment dominated by a degraded peatland used as intensive grassland. Concentrations in the shallow groundwater were spatially and temporally very variable, with NO3-N being the most dynamic component (7.3 ± 12.5 mg L-1) and ranging from 0 to 79.4 mg L-1. Average NO3-N concentrations of 10.3 ± 5.4 mg L-1 (0 to 25.5 mg L-1) in the ditch draining the catchment and annual NO3-N losses of 19, 35 and 26 kg ha-1 confirmed drained peatlands as an important source of diffuse N pollution. The highest NO3-N losses occurred during the wettest year. Resulting from concentration of 2.4 ± 0.8 mg L-1 (0.7 to 6.2 mg L-1), DON added a further 4.5 to 6.4 kg ha-1 to the N losses and thus formed a relevant (15%) component of the total N losses. Ditch DOC concentrations of 24.9 ± 5.9 mg L-1 (13.1 to 47.7 mg L-1) resulted in DOC losses of 66 kg ha-1 in the wet year of 2006/2007 and 39 kg ha-1 in the dry year of 2007/2008. Ditch DOC concentration were lower than the groundwater DOC concentration of 50.6 ± 15.2 mg L-1 (14.9 to 88.5 mg L-1). Both DOC and N concentrations were governed by hydrological conditions, but NO3-N reacted much faster and clearer on rising discharge rates than DOC, which tended to be higher under drier conditions. In the third year of the study, the superposition of a very wet summer and land use changes from grassland to arable land in a part of the catchment suggests that, under re-wetting conditions with a high groundwater table in summer, NO3-N would diminish quickly, while DOC would remain on a similar level. Further intensification of the land use, on the other hand, would increase N losses to receiving water bodies.

  18. Landscape controls on dissolved nutrients, organic matter and major ions in a suburbanizing watershed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daley, M. L.; McDowell, W. H.

    2010-12-01

    Understanding the relative importance of anthropogenic and natural landscape features that drive spatial variability in water quality is a central challenge in studying the biogeochemistry of heterogeneous landscapes. We quantified the average annual flux and concentration of dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN), dissolved organic nitrogen (DON), dissolved organic carbon (DOC), phosphate-P (PO4-P), sodium (Na+) and chloride (Cl-) at ~40 stream sites in three major (51 to 903 km2) NH basins. We used GIS to quantify anthropogenic (e.g. human population density, % impervious surface cover and % agriculture) and natural (e.g. % forest, % wetlands and soil C:N) landscape features for each sub-basin and then employed multiple-regression analysis to relate water quality parameters to landscape characteristics. Anthropogenic features were strong predictors of DIN flux and Na+ and Cl- concentrations, whereas wetland cover (a natural feature) was a significant, but weak predictor of DOC (r2=0.26, pstream Na+ and Cl- concentrations (r2 = 0.75 to 0.78, p<0.01) and % impervious surface was a stronger predictor (r2 = 0.86 to 0.92, p<0.01) among a subset of sites. Our results suggest that DIN and DON result from different sources in the landscape and although sources of DON and DOC are similar, DON and DOC concentrations respond differently to hydrologic events. Concentrations of DON were negatively correlated with discharge (r2= 0.06, p < 0.01), but DOC concentrations did not respond to discharge, suggesting there is much to learn about the decoupling of C and N rich dissolved organic matter (DOM). Our landscape models do not account for spatial variability in dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), dissolved organic P (DOP) or particulate C, N and P; however, at our site with the longest record, the Lamprey River, DIC and particulate C account for only 25% and 5% respectively of the total C flux. Among three sites ranging from 3-16% development, particulate N only accounted for 12

  19. Towards an understanding of feedbacks between plant productivity, acidity and dissolved organic matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, Ed; Tipping, Ed; Davies, Jessica; Monteith, Don; Evans, Chris

    2014-05-01

    The recent origin of much dissolved organic carbon (DOC) (Tipping et al., 2010) implies that plant productivity is a major control on DOC fluxes. However, the flocculation, sorption and release of potentially-dissolved organic matter are governed by pH, and widespread increases in DOC concentrations observed in northern temperate freshwater systems seem to be primarily related to recovery from acidification (Monteith et al., 2007). We explore the relative importance of changes in productivity and pH using a model, MADOC, that incorporates both these effects (Rowe et al., 2014). The feedback whereby DOC affects pH is included. The model uses an annual timestep and relatively simple flow-routing, yet reproduces observed changes in DOC flux and pH in experimental (Evans et al., 2012) and survey data. However, the first version of the model probably over-estimated responses of plant productivity to nitrogen (N) deposition in upland semi-natural ecosystems. There is a strong case that plant productivity is an important regulator of DOC fluxes, and theoretical reasons for suspecting widespread productivity increases in recent years due not only to N deposition but to temperature and increased atmospheric CO2 concentrations. However, evidence that productivity has increased in upland semi-natural ecosystems is sparse, and few studies have assessed the major limitations to productivity in these habitats. In systems where phosphorus (P) limitation prevails, or which are co-limited, productivity responses to anthropogenic drivers will be limited. We present a revised version of the model that incorporates P cycling and appears to represent productivity responses to atmospheric N pollution more realistically. Over the long term, relatively small fluxes of nutrient elements into and out of ecosystems can profoundly affect productivity and the accumulation of organic matter. Dissolved organic N (DON) is less easily intercepted by plants and microbes than mineral N, and DON

  20. Tracing inputs of terrestrial high molecular weight dissolved organic matter within the Baltic Sea Ecosystem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Deutsch

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available To test the hypothesis whether dissolved organic matter (DOM in a high latitude marginal sea is dominated by terrestrial derived matter 10 stations were sampled along the salinity gradient of the central and northern Baltic Sea and were analyzed for concentrations of dissolved organic carbon as well as δ13C values of high molecular weight DOM. Different end-member-mixing models were applied to quantify the influence of terrestrial DOM and to test for conservative versus non-conservative behavior of the terrestrial dissolved organic matter in the different Baltic Sea basins. The share of terrestrial DOM to the total DOM was calculated for each station, ranging from 43 to 83%. This shows the high influence of terrestrial DOM inputs for the Baltic Sea ecosystem. The data also suggest that terrestrial DOM that reaches the open Baltic Sea is not subject to substantial removal anymore. However compared to riverine DOM concentrations our results indicate that substantial amounts of DOM (>50% seems to be removed near the coastline during estuarine mixing. A budget approach yielded residence times for terrestrial DOM of 2.3, 2.7, and 4.1 yr for the Bothnian Bay, the Bothnian Sea and the Baltic Proper.

  1. The surface Arctic Ocean: A dynamic reservoir of terrigenous dissolved organic carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansell, D. A.; Letscher, R. T.

    2012-04-01

    The upper mixed layer of the Arctic Ocean is a globally important sink for dissolved organic matter mobilized from adjacent continents, which in turn are subject to substantial changes with warming of the Arctic system. Understanding the dynamics and fate of this terrigenous material has become critical for our understanding the contributions of the Arctic to the global carbon cycle. Terrigenous dissolved organic carbon (tDOC) had long been viewed as highly conserved within the Arctic Ocean, yet only a fraction of that entering from the rivers survived for export to the North Atlantic. Extensive surveys of tDOC and other tracers between the shelves and the waters overlying the deep basins indicate that a large fraction of the tDOC is subject to slow mineralization. The extent of removal within the Arctic system depends then on the time scale for water mass retention; the longer the retention, the greater the remineralization within the Arctic. Remineralization of tDOC adds to the inorganic carbon inventory and seawater pCO2, thus impacting exchange of CO2 with the atmosphere. This talk will begin with a global view of marine dissolved organic carbon (DOC), from which the context for tDOC in the Arctic Ocean will be established. The surface Arctic Ocean distribution of tDOC will be presented, along with consideration of its dynamics and export to the North Atlantic.

  2. Riverine Dissolved Organic Matter Degradation Modeled Through Microbial Incubations of Vascular Plant Leachates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harfmann, J.; Hernes, P.; Chuang, C. Y.

    2015-12-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) contains as much carbon as is in the atmosphere, provides the main link between terrestrial and marine carbon reservoirs, and fuels the microbial food web. The fate and removal of DOM is a result of several complex conditions and processes, including photodegradation, sorption/desorption, dominant vascular plant sources, and microbial abundance. In order to better constrain factors affecting microbial degradation, laboratory incubations were performed using Sacramento River water for microbial inoculums and vascular plant leachates. Four vascular plant sources were chosen based on their dominance in the Sacramento River Valley: gymnosperm needles from Pinus sabiniana (foothill pine), angiosperm dicot leaves from Quercus douglassi (blue oak), angiosperm monocot mixed annual grasses, and angiosperm monocot mixed Schoenoplectus acutus (tule) and Typha spp. (cattails). Three concentrations of microbial inoculum were used for each plant material, ranging from 0.2% to 10%. Degradation was monitored as a function of time using dissolved organic carbon (DOC), UV-Vis absorbance, and fluorescent dissolved organic matter (fDOM), and was compared across vascular plant type and inoculum concentration.

  3. Chemical characterization of high molecular weight dissolved organic matter in fresh and marine waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repeta, Daniel J.; Quan, Tracy M.; Aluwihare, Lihini I.; Accardi, AmyMarie

    2002-03-01

    The high molecular weight fraction of dissolved organic matter in a suite of lakes, rivers, seawater, and marine sediment interstitial water samples was collected by ultrafiltration and characterized by molecular level and spectroscopic techniques. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of all samples show a high degree of similarity, with major contributions from carbohydrates, bound acetate, and lipids. Molecular level analyses of neutral sugars show seven monosaccharides, rhamnose, fucose, arabinose, xylose, mannose, glucose, and galactose, to be abundant, and to occur in comparable relative amounts in each sample. Previous studies have emphasized the distinctive composition of dissolved humic substances in fresh and marine waters, and have attributed these differences to sources and transformations of organic matter unique to each environment. In contrast we find a large fraction of freshwater high molecular weight dissolved organic matter (HMWDOM; > 1kD) to be indistinguishable from marine HMWDOM in bulk and molecular-level chemical properties. Aquatic HMWDOM is similar in chemical composition to biologically derived acylated heteropolysaccharides isolated from marine algal cultures, suggesting a biological source for some fraction of persistent HMWDOM. High molecular weight DOC contributes 51 ± 26% of the total DOC, and monosaccharides 18 ± 8% of the total HMWDOC in our freshwater samples. These contributions are on average higher and more variable, but not significantly different than for surface seawater (30% and 16% respectively). Biogeochemical processes that produce, accumulate, and recycle DOM may therefore share important similarities and be broadly comparable across a range of environmental settings.

  4. Biliprotein maturation: the chromophore attachment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheer, H; Zhao, K-H

    2008-04-01

    Biliproteins are a widespread group of brilliantly coloured photoreceptors characterized by linear tetrapyrrolic chromophores, bilins, which are covalently bound to the apoproteins via relatively stable thioether bonds. Covalent binding stabilizes the chromoproteins and is mandatory for phycobilisome assembly; and, it is also important in biliprotein applications such as fluorescence labelling. Covalent binding has, on the other hand, also considerably hindered biliprotein research because autocatalytic chromophore additions are rare, and information on enzymatic addition by lyases was limited to a single example, an EF-type lyase attaching phycocyanobilin to cysteine-alpha84 of C-phycocyanin. The discovery of new activities for the latter lyases, and of new types of lyases, have reinvigorated research activities in the subject. So far, work has mainly concentrated on cyanobacterial phycobiliproteins. Methodological advances in the process, however, as well as the finding of often large numbers of homologues, opens new possibilities for research on the subsequent assembly/disassembly of the phycobilisome in cyanobacteria and red algae, on the assembly and organization of the cryptophyte light-harvesting system, on applications in basic research such as protein folding, and on the use of phycobiliproteins for labelling.

  5. Microbial metabolism mediates interactions between dissolved organic matter and clay minerals in streamwater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, W R; Battin, T J

    2016-01-01

    Sorption of organic molecules to mineral surfaces is an important control upon the aquatic carbon (C) cycle. Organo-mineral interactions are known to regulate the transport and burial of C within inland waters, yet the mechanisms that underlie these processes are poorly constrained. Streamwater contains a complex and dynamic mix of dissolved organic compounds that coexists with a range of organic and inorganic particles and microorganisms. To test how microbial metabolism and organo-mineral complexation alter amino acid and organic carbon fluxes we experimented with (13)C-labelled amino acids and two common clay minerals (kaolinite and montmorillonite). The addition of (13)C-labelled amino acids stimulated increased microbial activity. Amino acids were preferentially mineralized by the microbial community, concomitant with the leaching of other (non-labelled) dissolved organic molecules that were removed from solution by clay-mediated processes. We propose that microbial processes mediate the formation of organo-mineral particles in streamwater, with potential implications for the biochemical composition of organic matter transported through and buried within fluvial environments. PMID:27481013

  6. Microbial metabolism mediates interactions between dissolved organic matter and clay minerals in streamwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, W. R.; Battin, T. J.

    2016-08-01

    Sorption of organic molecules to mineral surfaces is an important control upon the aquatic carbon (C) cycle. Organo-mineral interactions are known to regulate the transport and burial of C within inland waters, yet the mechanisms that underlie these processes are poorly constrained. Streamwater contains a complex and dynamic mix of dissolved organic compounds that coexists with a range of organic and inorganic particles and microorganisms. To test how microbial metabolism and organo-mineral complexation alter amino acid and organic carbon fluxes we experimented with 13C-labelled amino acids and two common clay minerals (kaolinite and montmorillonite). The addition of 13C-labelled amino acids stimulated increased microbial activity. Amino acids were preferentially mineralized by the microbial community, concomitant with the leaching of other (non-labelled) dissolved organic molecules that were removed from solution by clay-mediated processes. We propose that microbial processes mediate the formation of organo-mineral particles in streamwater, with potential implications for the biochemical composition of organic matter transported through and buried within fluvial environments.

  7. Association of dissolved mercury with dissolved organic carbon in U.S. rivers and streams: The role of watershed soil organic carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoken, Olivia M.; Riscassi, Ami L.; Scanlon, Todd M.

    2016-04-01

    Streams and rivers are important pathways for the export of atmospherically deposited mercury (Hg) from watersheds. Dissolved Hg (HgD) is strongly associated with dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in stream water, but the ratio of HgD to DOC is highly variable between watersheds. In this study, the HgD:DOC ratios from 19 watersheds were evaluated with respect to Hg wet deposition and watershed soil organic carbon (SOC) content. On a subset of sites where data were available, DOC quality measured by specific ultra violet absorbance at 254 nm, was considered as an additional factor that may influence HgD:DOC . No significant relationship was found between Hg wet deposition and HgD:DOC, but SOC content (g m-2) was able to explain 81% of the variance in the HgD:DOC ratio (ng mg-1) following the form: HgD:DOC=17.8*SOC-0.41. The inclusion of DOC quality as a secondary predictor variable explained only an additional 1% of the variance. A mathematical framework to interpret the observed power-law relationship between HgD:DOC and SOC suggests Hg supply limitation for adsorption to soils with relatively large carbon pools. With SOC as a primary factor controlling the association of HgD with DOC, SOC data sets may be utilized to predict stream HgD:DOC ratios on a more geographically widespread basis. In watersheds where DOC data are available, estimates of HgD may be readily obtained. Future Hg emissions policies must consider soil-mediated processes that affect the transport of Hg and DOC from terrestrial watersheds to streams for accurate predictions of water quality impacts.

  8. Dissolved organic matter release and retention in ultisols in relation to land use patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qichun; Hou, Changping; Liang, Yingying; Feng, Ying

    2014-07-01

    The application of organic fertilizer to maintain soil fertility and crop yield has been practiced for thousands of years in China. This practice improves soil carbon sequestration, due to the high level of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in organic manure. In this study, batch equilibrium studies were conducted to examine the capacity of three ultisols from areas under different land use patterns to retain dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) extracted from rape cake and chicken manure. The results showed that the amount of DOM removed or released in solution by the soil was a linear function of the initial amount added to the soil-water system; therefore, analysis of sorption isotherms was best conducted using the initial mass isotherm IM method. The ultisol retained, on average, 19.9% of the total DOC and 41.7% of the total DON in solution, suggesting that ultisol has a relatively low DOC adsorption capacity. The ultisol from a bamboo forest was found to have a higher capacity than that from a pear orchard to retain DOC and DON. The adsorption affinities of DOM according to soil type were in the following order: bamboo forest (BF)>tea garden (TG)>pear orchard (PO). These results suggested that the continuous application of high doses of organic manure, particularly rape cake, may saturate the DOC adsorptive sites, thereby permitting increased leaching of DOC and the possibility of ground water contamination. Furthermore, we note that amorphous Fe and Al oxides play an important role in the adsorption capacity of both DOC and DON in ultisols.

  9. Dissolved organic matter release and retention in ultisols in relation to land use patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qichun; Hou, Changping; Liang, Yingying; Feng, Ying

    2014-07-01

    The application of organic fertilizer to maintain soil fertility and crop yield has been practiced for thousands of years in China. This practice improves soil carbon sequestration, due to the high level of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in organic manure. In this study, batch equilibrium studies were conducted to examine the capacity of three ultisols from areas under different land use patterns to retain dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) extracted from rape cake and chicken manure. The results showed that the amount of DOM removed or released in solution by the soil was a linear function of the initial amount added to the soil-water system; therefore, analysis of sorption isotherms was best conducted using the initial mass isotherm IM method. The ultisol retained, on average, 19.9% of the total DOC and 41.7% of the total DON in solution, suggesting that ultisol has a relatively low DOC adsorption capacity. The ultisol from a bamboo forest was found to have a higher capacity than that from a pear orchard to retain DOC and DON. The adsorption affinities of DOM according to soil type were in the following order: bamboo forest (BF)>tea garden (TG)>pear orchard (PO). These results suggested that the continuous application of high doses of organic manure, particularly rape cake, may saturate the DOC adsorptive sites, thereby permitting increased leaching of DOC and the possibility of ground water contamination. Furthermore, we note that amorphous Fe and Al oxides play an important role in the adsorption capacity of both DOC and DON in ultisols. PMID:24704143

  10. Sources, behaviors and degradation of dissolved organic matter in the East China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yan; Yang, Gui-Peng; Liu, Li; Zhang, Peng-Yan; Leng, Wei-Song

    2016-03-01

    Concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN), dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) and its major compound classes-total hydrolysable amino acids (THAA) were measured at 4 cross-shelf transects of the East China Sea in July 2011. Surface concentrations of DOC, DIN, DON and THAA at the nearshore stations were mostly in excess of those found at the offshore sites, indicating either substantial autochthonous production or allochthonous inputs from the Changjiang River. The vertical distributions of DOC, DON and THAA showed similar trends with higher values in the surface layer, whereas the elevated concentrations of DIN were observed in the bottom layer. Major constituents of THAA presented in the study area were glycine, serine, alanine, glutamic acid, aspartic acid and valine. The mole percentages of neutral amino acids increased from surface water to bottom water, whereas acidic and hydroxy amino acids decreased with the water depth. Concentrations of DOC and THAA were negatively correlated to the ΔDIN values (the difference between the real concentration and theoretical concentration), respectively, indicating the coupling relation between dissolved organic matter (DOM) remineralization and nutrient regeneration in the water column. The C/N ratios in the water column exhibited different characteristics with elevated values appearing in the surface and bottom layers. Box and whisker plots showed that both degradation index (DI) values and THAA yields displayed a decreasing trend from the surface layer to the bottom layer, implying increasing degradation with the water depth. Our data revealed that glycine and alanine increased in relative abundance with decreasing DI, while tyrosine, valine, phenylalanine and isoleucine increased with increasing DI.

  11. Effects of Total Dissolved Solids on Aquatic Organisms: A Review of Literature and Recommendation for Salmonid Species

    OpenAIRE

    P. K. Weber-Scannell; Duffy, L K; Phyllis K. Weber-Scannell; Duffy, Lawrence K.

    2007-01-01

    Total dissolves solids (TDS) are naturally present in water or are the result of mining or some industrial treatment of water. TDS contain minerals and organic molecules that provide benefits such as nutrients or contaminants such as toxic metals and organic pollutants. Current regulations require the periodic monitoring of TDS, which is a measurement of inorganic salts, organic matter and other dissolved materials in water. Measurements of TDS do not differentiate among ions. The amount of T...

  12. Fast-freezing with liquid nitrogen preserves bulk dissolved organic matter concentrations, but not its composition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thieme, Lisa; Graeber, Daniel; Kaupenjohann, Martin;

    2016-01-01

    Freezing can affect concentrations and spectroscopic properties of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in water samples. Nevertheless, water samples are regularly frozen for sample preservation. In this study we tested the effect of different freezing methods (standard freezing at −18 °C and fast......-freezing with liquid nitrogen) on DOM concentrations measured as organic carbon (DOC) concentrations and on spectroscopic properties of DOM from different terrestrial ecosystems (forest and grassland). Fresh and differently frozen throughfall, stemflow, litter leachate and soil solution samples were analyzed...... spectroscopic properties of DOM....

  13. Evaluation of Powdered Activated Carbon Efficiency in Removal of Dissolved Organic Carbon inWater Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    G.R Bonyadi nejad; R Hadian; M Saadani; B Jaberian; M.M Amin; A Khodabakhshi

    2010-01-01

    "n "nBackgrounds and Objectives: Powdered Activated$ carbon is known as a suitable absorbent for organic materials. The aim of this research is evaluation of Powdered Activated-Carbon (PAC) efficiency in removal of Dissolved Organic Carbon (DOC) in water treatment in Isfahan."nMaterials and Methods : The increase of PAC for DOC reduction has done in three paths in the Isfahan water treatment plant (WTP). These paths including: 1) Intake up to entrance of WTP 2) Intake to exit ofWTP 3) Between...

  14. DISSOLVED AND PARTICULATE ORGANIC CARBON IN YANTAI SISHILI BAY AQUICULTURE WATERS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵卫红; 王江涛; 焦念志; 赵增霞

    2001-01-01

    Investigation of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and particulate organic carbon (POC) at 12 stations in Yantal Sishili Bay in May, August, and November of 1997 and March and May of 1998 showed that DOC concentrations varied from 1.14 mg/L to 5.35 mg/L; that the average values at all staticrLs ineach entise varied from 1.52 mg/L to 2.12 mg/L; that POC concentrafions varied from 0.049 mg/L to 1.411mg/L; and averaged 0.159 mg/L to 0.631 mg/L in each cruise. Horizontal distribution of DOC was influ-enced by factors such as continental input, organism activity, temperature, aquieulture environment, etc. The higher POC concentration occurred along the coast. The vertical distribution of DOC and POC changed obviously in spring and summer, but not obviously in autumn and winter. DOC concentration was highest in summer and POC in spring; both were lowest in winter. The seasonal change of DOC was con-sistent with primary productivity seasonal variation, and that of POC was consistent with ehlorophyll-a sea-sanal variation. The seasonal change trend of the C/N ratio of dissolved organic matter was obvious, but the C/N ratio of particulate organic matter had no such trend.

  15. DISSOLVED AND PARTICULATE ORGANIC CARBON IN YANTAI SISHILI BAY AQUICULTURE WATERS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Investigation of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and particulate organic carbon (POC) at 12 stations in Yantai Sishili Bay in May, August, and November of 1997 and March and May of 1998 showed that DOC concentrations varied from 1.14 mg/L to 5.35 mg/L; that the average values at all stations in each cruise varied from 1.52 mg/L to 2.12 mg/L; that POC concentrations varied from 0.049 mg/L to 1.411 mg/L; and averaged 0.159 mg/L to 0.631 mg/L in each cruise. Horizontal distribution of DOC was influenced by factors such as continental input, organism activity, temperature, aquiculture environment, etc. The higher POC concentration occurred along the coast. The vertical distribution of DOC and POC changed obviously in spring and summer, but not obviously in autumn and winter. DOC concentration was highest in summer and POC in spring; both were lowest in winter. The seasonal change of DOC was consistent with primary productivity seasonal variation, and that of POC was consistent with chlorophyll-a seasonal variation. The seasonal change trend of the C/N ratio of dissolved organic matter was obvious, but the C/N ratio of particulate organic matter had no such trend.

  16. Effect of algal flocculation on dissolved organic matters using cationic starch modified soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Wenqing; Bi, Lei; Pan, Gang

    2016-07-01

    Modified soils (MSs) are being increasingly used as geo-engineering materials for the sedimentation removal of cyanobacterial blooms. Cationic starch (CS) has been tested as an effective soil modifier, but little is known about its potential impacts on the treated water. This study investigated dissolved organic matters in the bloom water after algal removal using cationic starch modified soils (CS-MSs). Results showed that the dissolved organic carbon (DOC) could be decreased by CS-MS flocculation and the use of higher charge density CS yielded a greater DOC reduction. When CS with the charge density of 0.052, 0.102 and 0.293meq/g were used, DOC was decreased from 3.4 to 3.0, 2.3 and 1.7mg/L, respectively. The excitation-emission matrix fluorescence spectroscopy and UV254 analysis indicated that CS-MS exhibits an ability to remove some soluble organics, which contributed to the DOC reduction. However, the use of low charge density CS posed a potential risk of DOC increase due to the high CS loading for effective algal removal. When CS with the charge density of 0.044meq/g was used, DOC was increased from 3.4 to 3.9mg/L. This study suggested, when CS-MS is used for cyanobacterial bloom removal, the content of dissolved organic matters in the treated water can be controlled by optimizing the charge density of CS. For the settled organic matters, other measures (e.g., capping treatments using oxygen loaded materials) should be jointly applied after algal flocculation. PMID:27372131

  17. Long-term dynamics of dissolved organic carbon: implications for drinking water supply.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledesma, José L J; Köhler, Stephan J; Futter, Martyn N

    2012-08-15

    Surface waters are the main source of drinking water in many regions. Increasing organic carbon concentrations are a cause for concern in Nordic countries since both dissolved and particulate organic carbon can transport contaminants and adversely affect drinking water treatment processes. We present a long-term study of dynamics of total (particulate and dissolved) organic carbon (TOC) concentrations in the River Fyris. This river supplies drinking water to approximately 200000 people in Uppsala, Sweden. The River Fyris is a main tributary to Lake Mälaren, which supplies drinking water to approximately 2 million people in the greater Stockholm area. Utilities responsible for drinking water supply in both Uppsala and Stockholm have expressed concerns about possible increases in TOC. We evaluate organic carbon dynamics within the Fyris catchment by calculating areal mass exports using observed TOC concentrations and modeled flows and by modeling dissolved organic carbon (as a proxy for TOC) using the dynamic, process based INCA-C model. Exports of TOC from the catchment ranged from 0.8 to 5.8 g m(-2) year(-1) in the period 1995-2010. The variation in annual exports was related to climatic variability which influenced seasonality and amount of runoff. Exports and discharge uncoupled at the end of 2008. A dramatic increase in TOC concentrations was observed in 2009, which gradually declined in 2010-2011. INCA-C successfully reproduced the intra- and inter-annual variation in concentrations during 1996-2008 and 2010-2011 but failed to capture the anomalous increase in 2009. We evaluated a number of hypotheses to explain the anomaly in 2009 TOC values, ultimately none proved satisfactory. We draw two main conclusions: there is at least one unknown or unmeasured process controlling or influencing surface water TOC and INCA-C can be used as part of the decision-making process for current and future use of rivers for drinking water supply.

  18. Applications of Fluorescence Spectroscopy for dissolved organic matter characterization in wastewater treatment plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goffin, Angélique; Guérin, Sabrina; Rocher, Vincent; Varrault, Gilles

    2016-04-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) influences wastewater treatment plants efficiency (WTTP): variations in its quality and quantity can induce a foaming phenomenon and a fouling event inside biofiltration processes. Moreover, in order to manage denitrification step (control and optimization of the nitrate recirculation), it is important to be able to estimate biodegradable organic matter quantity before biological treatment. But the current methods used to characterize organic matter quality, like biological oxygen demand are laborious, time consuming and sometimes not applicable to directly monitor organic matter in situ. In the context of MOCOPEE research program (www.mocopee.com), this study aims to assess the use of optical techniques, such as UV-Visible absorbance and more specifically fluorescence spectroscopy in order to monitor and to optimize process efficiency in WWTP. Fluorescence excitation-emission matrix (EEM) spectroscopy was employed to prospect the possibility of using this technology online and in real time to characterize dissolved organic matter in different effluents of the WWTP Seine Centre (240,000 m3/day) in Paris, France. 35 sewage water influent samples were collected on 10 days at different hours. Data treatment were performed by two methods: peak picking and parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC). An evolution of DOM quality (position of excitation - emission peaks) and quantity (intensity of fluorescence) was observed between the different treatment steps (influent, primary treatment, biological treatment, effluent). Correlations were found between fluorescence indicators and different water quality key parameters in the sewage influents. We developed different multivariate linear regression models in order to predict a variety of water quality parameters by fluorescence intensity at specific excitation-emission wavelengths. For example dissolved biological oxygen demand (r2=0,900; p<0,0001) and ammonium concentration (r2=0,898; p<0

  19. Technical Note: Comparison between a direct and the standard, indirect method for dissolved organic nitrogen determination in freshwater environments with high dissolved inorganic nitrogen concentrations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graeber, Daniel; Gelbrecht, Jörg; Kronvang, Brian;

    2012-01-01

    Research on dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) in aquatic systems with high dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN, the sum of NO3–, NO2– and NH4+) concentrations is often hampered by high uncertainties regarding the determined DON concentration. The reason is that DON is determined indirectly...... as the difference between total dissolved nitrogen (TDN) and DIN. In this standard approach to determine DON concentrations, even small relative measurement errors of the DIN and TDN concentrations propagate into high absolute errors of DON concentrations at high DIN : TDN ratios. To improve the DON measurement...... accuracy at high DIN : TDN ratios, we investigated the DON measurement accuracy of this standard approach according to the DIN : TDN ratio and compared it to the direct measurement of DON by size-exclusion chromatography (SEC) for freshwater systems. For this, we used standard compounds and natural samples...

  20. Leaching of dissolved organic and inorganic nitrogen from legume-based grasslands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kusliene, Gedrime; Eriksen, Jørgen; Rasmussen, Jim

    2015-01-01

    Leaching of dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) and dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) is a considerable loss pathway in grassland soils. We investigated the white clover (Trifolium repens) contribution to N transport and temporal N dynamics under a pure stand of white clover and white clover......-ryegrass (Lolium perenne) mixture. The temporal dynamics of white clover N contribution was analysed by 15N incorporation into DIN and DON in percolating soil solution collected at 25 cm depth following white clover 15N leaf-labelling that was applied at different times during the growing season. The white clover...... contribution to N transport in the soil profile was investigated over two years by analysing 15N in DIN and DON in percolating soil solution collected at 25, 45, and 80 cm depth following 15N leaf labelling of white clover. The 15N analyses showed that white clover was a direct and major source of both DIN...

  1. Regiospecific protonation of organic chromophores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Tao; Lin, Tingting; Wang, FuKe; He, Chaobin

    2016-07-28

    Highly conductive, acid doped polymers such as PEDOT/PSS and polyaniline (PANI) have attracted much attention due to their potential applications in flexible electronics. However, the understanding of the mechanism behind the doping process is still lacking. In this paper, we conduct a systematic and detailed investigation on the acid doping behaviors of four model compounds which were synthesized by combining different protonatable units such as pyridal[2,1,3]thiadiazole (PT), benzo[2,1,3]thiadiazole (BT), cyclopentadithiophene (CPDT), and azulene. DFT simulation and UV-vis-NIR spectral studies show that while the site of first protonation was mainly determined by proton affinity, the subsequent site of protonation and doping density were determined by the nature of the first protonation and influenced by the following two factors: (1) electrostatic charge repulsion and (2) the possible delocalization of protonated charge in the conjugated structure. If the first protonation occurs at heteroatoms and results in a coplanar structure, the subsequent sites of protonation are mainly determined by the distance from the positive charge center to lower the effect of static repulsion and charge delocalization. On the other hand, if the first protonation occurs on the main chain carbon atoms which induce a large torsional angle (non-coplanar) as the carbon hybridization changes from sp(2) to sp(3), the conformation and the possible charge delocalization in the protonated molecules will play an important role in determining the subsequent protonation. Our study provides new insight into the acid-doping mechanism of conductive polymers, which could be used as a guide to design new acid doped highly conductive polymers. PMID:27346384

  2. Application of isotope dilution method for measuring bioavailability of organic contaminants sorbed to dissolved organic matter (DOM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delgado-Moreno, Laura, E-mail: laura.delgado@eez.csic.es; Wu, Laosheng; Gan, Jay

    2015-08-15

    Natural waters such as surface water and sediment porewater invariably contain dissolved organic matter (DOM). Association of strongly hydrophobic contaminants (HOCs) with DOM leads to decreased toxicity and bioavailability, but bioavailability of DOM-sorbed HOCs is difficult to measure. Current methods to estimate bioavailability of HOCs in water are based on only the freely dissolved concentration (C{sub free}). The ignorance of the exchangeable fraction of HOCs sorbed on DOM may result in an underestimation of the toxicity potential of HOCs to aquatic organisms. Here we explore the applicability of an isotope dilution method (IDM) to measuring the desorption fraction of DOM-sorbed pyrene and bifenthrin and determining their exchangeable pool (E) as an approximation of bioavailability. E values, expressed as percentage of the total concentration, ranged between 0.80 and 0.92% for pyrene and 0.74 and 0.85% for bifenthrin, depending primarily on the amount of chemical in the freely dissolved form. However, between 34 and 78% of the DOM-sorbed pyrene was exchangeable. This fraction ranged between 23% and 82% for bifenthrin. The ability of IDM to predict bioavailability was further shown from a significant relationship (r{sup 2} > 0.72, P < 0.0001) between E and bioaccumulation into Daphnia magna. Therefore, IDM may be used to improve the bioavailability measurement and risk assessment of HOCs in aquatic systems.

  3. Indications for a ubiquitous dissolved pigment degradation product in subsurface waters of the global ocean

    OpenAIRE

    Röttgers, R.; B. P. Koch

    2011-01-01

    Measurements of light absorption by chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) from sub-surface waters of the tropical Atlantic and Pacific showed a distinct absorption shoulder at 410–415 nm, indicating an underlying absorption of a pigment. A similar absorption maximum at ~410 nm was also found in the particulate fraction and is usually attributed to absorption by respiratory pigments of heterotrophic unicellular organisms. The CDOM absorption shoulder was described earlier in the Indian ...

  4. Evolution of Pretreatment Methods for Nanofiltration Membrane Used for Dissolved Organic Matter Removal in Raw Water Supply

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sirikul Siriraksophon

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Coagulation and microfiltration using polyaluminium chloride (PACl were investigated as a pretreatment process by nanofiltration to reduce dissolved organic matter in both raw water and treated water at water treatment plants. The dissolved organic matter in the raw water supply may be a precursor of carcinogens produced during the disinfection process. Raw water from pumping stations and treated water from Hat Yai Provincial Waterworks Authority, Songkhla Province, Thailand were used as samples for this study. Fractionation of raw water samples by DAX-8 and XAD-4 resin revealed that they contained hydrophilic, transphilic and hydrophobic groups with hydrophilic the major organic component. PACl coagulation resulted in a higher dissolved organic matter removal than microfiltration techniques. A hybrid coagulation-nanofiltration process was studied. This effectively reduced dissolved organic matter as dissolved organic carbon and UV-254 by 86% and 94% respectively. The hybrid coagulation-nanofiltration process reduced dissolved organic carbons of the hydrophobic group more effectively than the hydrophilic group. Chloroform and bromodichloroform were the two major species of the trihalomethane group produced when raw water reacted with chlorine. The hybrid coagulation-nanofiltration process reduced the trihalomethane formation potential (THMFP in raw water samples by up to 90%

  5. PHOTOGENERATION OF SINGLET OXYGEN AND FREE RADICALS IN DISSOLVED ORGANIC MATTER ISOLATED FROM THE MISSISSIPPI AND ATCHAFALAYA RIVER PLUMES

    Science.gov (United States)

    The photoreactivity to UV light of ultrafiltered dissolved organic matter (DOM) collected during cruises along salinity transects in the Mississippi and Atchafalaya River plumes was examined by measuring photogenerated free radicals and singlet molecular oxygen (1O2) photosensiti...

  6. Dissolved effluent organic matter: Characteristics and potential implications in wastewater treatment and reuse applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael-Kordatou, I; Michael, C; Duan, X; He, X; Dionysiou, D D; Mills, M A; Fatta-Kassinos, D

    2015-06-15

    Wastewater reuse is currently considered globally as the most critical element of sustainable water management. The dissolved effluent organic matter (dEfOM) present in biologically treated urban wastewater, consists of a heterogeneous mixture of refractory organic compounds with diverse structures and varying origin, including dissolved natural organic matter, soluble microbial products, endocrine disrupting compounds, pharmaceuticals and personal care products residues, disinfection by-products, metabolites/transformation products and others, which can reach the aquatic environment through discharge and reuse applications. dEfOM constitutes the major fraction of the effluent organic matter (EfOM) and due to its chemical complexity, it is necessary to utilize a battery of complementary techniques to adequately describe its structural and functional character. dEfOM has been shown to exhibit contrasting effects towards various aquatic organisms. It decreases metal uptake, thus potentially reducing their bioavailability to exposed organisms. On the other hand, dEfOM can be adsorbed on cell membranes inducing toxic effects. This review paper evaluates the performance of various advanced treatment processes (i.e., membrane filtration and separation processes, activated carbon adsorption, ion-exchange resin process, and advanced chemical oxidation processes) in removing dEfOM from wastewater effluents. In general, the literature findings reveal that dEfOM removal by advanced treatment processes depends on the type and the amount of organic compounds present in the aqueous matrix, as well as the operational parameters and the removal mechanisms taking place during the application of each treatment technology. PMID:25917290

  7. Cu Binding to Iron Oxide-Organic Matter Coprecipitates in Solid and Dissolved Phases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadas, T. M.; Koenigsmark, F.

    2015-12-01

    Recent studies indicate that Cu is released from wetlands following storm events. Assymetrical field flow field fractionation (AF4) analyses as well as total and dissolved metal concentration measurements suggest iron oxide-organic matter complexes control Cu retention and release. Coprecipitation products of Fe oxide and organic matter were prepared under conditions similar to the wetland to assess Cu partitioning to and availability from solid phases that settle from solution as well as phases remaining suspended. Cu coprecipitation and sorption to organomineral precipitation solids formed at different Fe:organic carbon (OC) ratios were compared for net Cu removal and extractability. As more humic acid was present during precipitation of Fe, TEM images indicated smaller Fe oxide particles formed within an organic matrix as expected. In coprecipitation reactions, as the ratio of Fe:OC decreased, more Cu was removed from solution at pH 5.5 and below. However, in sorption reactions, there was an inhibition of Cu removal at low OC concentrations. As the pH increased from 5.5 to 7 and as solution phase OC concentration increased, more Cu remained dissolved in both coprecipitation and sorption reactions. The addition of Ca2+, glycine, histidine and citric acid or lowering the pH resulted in more extractable Cu from the coprecipitation compared with the sorption reactions. The variations in Cu extraction were likely due to a combination of a more amorphous structure in CPT products, and the relative abundance of available Fe oxide or OC binding sites. Suspended Fe oxide-organic matter coprecipitates were assessed using AF4 coupled to online TOC analysis and ICP-MS. In laboratory prepared samples, Cu was observed in a mixture of small 1-5 nm colloids of Fe oxide-organic matter precipitates, but the majority was observed in larger organic matter colloids and were not UV absorbing, suggesting more aliphatic carbon materials. In field samples, up to 60% of the dissolved Cu

  8. State factor relationships of dissolved organic carbon and nitrogen losses from unpolluted temperate forest watersheds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perakis, S.S.; Hedin, L.O.

    2007-01-01

    We sampled 100 unpolluted, old-growth forested watersheds, divided among 13 separate study areas over 5 years in temperate southern Chile and Argentina, to evaluate relationships among dominant soil-forming state factors and dissolved carbon and nitrogen concentrations in watershed streams. These watersheds provide a unique opportunity to examine broad-scale controls over carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) biogeochemistry in the absence of significant human disturbance from chronic N deposition and land use change. Variations in the ratio dissolved organic carbon (DOC) to nitrogen (DON) in watershed streams differed by underlying soil parent material, with average C:N = 29 for watersheds underlain by volcanic ash and basalt versus C:N = 73 for sedimentary and metamorphic parent materials, consistent with stronger adsorption of low C:N hydrophobic materials by amorphous clays commonly associated with volcanic ash and basalt weathering. Mean annual precipitation was related positively to variations in both DOC (range: 0.2-9.7 mg C/L) and DON (range: 0.008-0.135 mg N/L) across study areas, suggesting that variations in water volume and concentration may act synergistically to influence C and N losses across dry to wet gradients in these forest ecosystems. Dominance of vegetation by broadleaf versus coniferous trees had negligible effects on organic C and N concentrations in comparison to abiotic factors. We conclude that precipitation volume and soil parent material are important controls over chemical losses of dissolved organic C and N from unpolluted temperate forest watersheds. Our results raise the possibility that biotic imprints on watershed C and N losses may be less pronounced in naturally N-poor forests than in areas impacted by land use change and chronic N deposition. Copyright 2007 by the American Geophysical Union.

  9. Effects of coral reef benthic primary producers on dissolved organic carbon and microbial activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas F Haas

    Full Text Available Benthic primary producers in marine ecosystems may significantly alter biogeochemical cycling and microbial processes in their surrounding environment. To examine these interactions, we studied dissolved organic matter release by dominant benthic taxa and subsequent microbial remineralization in the lagoonal reefs of Moorea, French Polynesia. Rates of photosynthesis, respiration, and dissolved organic carbon (DOC release were assessed for several common benthic reef organisms from the backreef habitat. We assessed microbial community response to dissolved exudates of each benthic producer by measuring bacterioplankton growth, respiration, and DOC drawdown in two-day dark dilution culture incubations. Experiments were conducted for six benthic producers: three species of macroalgae (each representing a different algal phylum: Turbinaria ornata--Ochrophyta; Amansia rhodantha--Rhodophyta; Halimeda opuntia--Chlorophyta, a mixed assemblage of turf algae, a species of crustose coralline algae (Hydrolithon reinboldii and a dominant hermatypic coral (Porites lobata. Our results show that all five types of algae, but not the coral, exuded significant amounts of labile DOC into their surrounding environment. In general, primary producers with the highest rates of photosynthesis released the most DOC and yielded the greatest bacterioplankton growth; turf algae produced nearly twice as much DOC per unit surface area than the other benthic producers (14.0±2.8 µmol h⁻¹ dm⁻², stimulating rapid bacterioplankton growth (0.044±0.002 log10 cells h⁻¹ and concomitant oxygen drawdown (0.16±0.05 µmol L⁻¹ h⁻¹ dm⁻². Our results demonstrate that benthic reef algae can release a significant fraction of their photosynthetically-fixed carbon as DOC, these release rates vary by species, and this DOC is available to and consumed by reef associated microbes. These data provide compelling evidence that benthic primary producers differentially influence

  10. Enhancing organic matter removal in desalination pretreatment systems by application of dissolved air flotation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shutova, Yulia; Karna, Barun Lal; Hambly, Adam C.;

    2016-01-01

    Membrane fouling in reverse osmosis (RO) systems caused by organic matter (OM) remains a significant operational issue during desalination. Dissolved air flotation (DAF) has recently received attention as a pre-treatment option for seawater OM removal; however, only a limited number of studies have...... been undertaken. This may be because it is difficult to characterise OM in seawater due to the high salt content and low carbon concentration. In this study, DAF pre-treatment experiments were conducted using a model seawater solution, and real seawater and brackish water samples. DAF performance...... was determined via conventional water quality parameters as well as fluorescence excitation-emission matrix (FEEM) spectroscopy and liquid chromatography with organic carbon detection (LC-OCD). Biopolymers and humic substances were the major organic fractions removed between 38 and 84% and 20-61% depending...

  11. Chemical and carbon isotopic composition of dissolved organic carbon in a regional confined methanogenic aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aravena, R.; Wassenaar, L.I.; Spiker, E. C.

    2004-01-01

    This study demonstrates the advantage of a combined use of chemical and isotopic tools to understand the dissolved organic carbon (DOC) cycle in a regional confined methanogenic aquifer. DOC concentration and carbon isotopic data demonstrate that the soil zone is a primary carbon source of groundwater DOC in areas close to recharge zones. An in-situ DOC source linked to organic rich sediments present in the aquifer matrix is controlling the DOC pool in the central part of the groundwater flow system. DOC fractions, 13C-NMR on fulvic acids and 14C data on DOC and CH4 support the hypothesis that the in-situ DOC source is a terrestrial organic matter and discard the Ordovician bedrock as a source of DOC. ?? 2004 Taylor and Francis Ltd.

  12. Differences in dissolved organic matter between reclaimed water source and drinking water source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Hong-Ying; Du, Ye; Wu, Qian-Yuan; Zhao, Xin; Tang, Xin; Chen, Zhuo

    2016-05-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) significantly affects the quality of reclaimed water and drinking water. Reclaimed water potable reuse is an effective way to augment drinking water source and de facto reuse exists worldwide. Hence, when reclaimed water source (namely secondary effluent) is blended with drinking water source, understanding the difference in DOM between drinking water source (dDOM) and reclaimed water source (rDOM) is essential. In this study, composition, transformation, and potential risk of dDOM from drinking water source and rDOM from secondary effluent were compared. Generally, the DOC concentration of rDOM and dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) content in reclaimed water source were higher but rDOM exhibited a lower aromaticity. Besides, rDOM comprises a higher proportion of hydrophilic fractions and more low-molecular weight compounds, which are difficult to be removed during coagulation. Although dDOM exhibited higher specific disinfection byproducts formation potential (SDBPFP), rDOM formed more total disinfection byproducts (DBPs) during chlorination including halomethanes (THMs) and haloacetic acids (HAAs) due to high DOC concentration. Likewise, in consideration of DOC basis, rDOM contained more absolute assimilable organic carbon (AOC) despite showing a lower specific AOC (normalized AOC per unit of DOC). Besides, rDOM exhibited higher biotoxicity including genotoxicity and endocrine disruption. Therefore, rDOM presents a greater potential risk than dDOM does. Reclaimed water source needs to be treated carefully when it is blended with drinking water source. PMID:26874770

  13. Assessing the Influences of Urbanization On Dissolved Organic Nitrogen in Stormwater and a Receiving Stream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lusk, M. G.; Toor, G.

    2013-12-01

    Nitrogen (N) is present in several forms in terrestrial and aquatic systems. In water bodies, N is present in inorganic (NH4, NO3) and organic (both dissolved and particulate) forms. Nitrogen carried via stormwater runoff or leaching from fertilized urban landscapes to water bodies can have detrimental effects on water quality because the inorganic N forms are readily available to phytoplankton. There is growing evidence that a part of the dissolved organic N (DON) may also be bioavailable to phytoplankton. DON in urban stormwater runoff, for example, has been shown to be highly bioavailable. The objective of this research is to characterize the sources and chemical fractionation of organic N in stormwater runoff from an urban residential neighborhood and in streamwater along an urban to rural gradient. We hypothesize that urban stormwater DON will be highly fractionated into labile low-molecular weight fractions and that streamwater DON will become increasingly bioavailable with increased urbanization because of shifts in vegetation patterns and hydrologic flowpaths. To test this hypothesis, we are collecting stormwater runoff from an urban neighborhood near Tampa, Florida and streamwater from both urban and rural sub-basins of the adjacent Alafia River.

  14. Black Carbon in Estuarine (Coastal) High-molecular-weight Dissolved Organic Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannino, Antonio; Harvey, H. Rodger

    2003-01-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) in the ocean constitutes one of the largest pools of organic carbon in the biosphere, yet much of its composition is uncharacterized. Observations of black carbon (BC) particles (by-products of fossil fuel combustion and biomass burning) in the atmosphere, ice, rivers, soils and marine sediments suggest that this material is ubiquitous, yet the contribution of BC to the ocean s DOM pool remains unknown. Analysis of high-molecular-weight DOM isolated from surface waters of two estuaries in the northwest Atlantic Ocean finds that BC is a significant component of DOM, suggesting that river-estuary systems are important exporters of BC to the ocean through DOM. We show that BC comprises 4-7% of the dissolved organic carbon (DOC) at coastal ocean sites, which supports the hypothesis that the DOC pool is the intermediate reservoir in which BC ages prior to sedimentary deposition. Flux calculations suggest that BC could be as important as vascular plant-derived lignin in terms of carbon inputs to the ocean. Production of BC sequesters fossil fuel- and biomass-derived carbon into a refractory carbon pool. Hence, BC may represent a significant sink for carbon to the ocean.

  15. Characterization of Rainwater Dissolved Organic Matter by Ultrahigh Resolution Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mead, R. N.; Podgorski, D. C.; Mullaugh, K. M.; Avery, B.; Kieber, R. J.; Willey, J. D.; Cooper, W. T.

    2011-12-01

    Rainwater is a complex, heterogeneous mixture of dissolved organic matter (DOM) that remains largely uncharacterized at the molecular level. Rainwater with dissolved organic carbon values ranging from 3 to 450 μM was collected during 40 separate rain events from 2007-2011 that included coastal and terrestrial storms based upon 36 hour back trajectories. Individual rain samples were lypholized and solvent added in preparation for analysis by negative electrospray ionization and atmospheric pressure photoionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS). This data set is unique in that each rain event was analyzed individually and not combined allowing for unprecedented insight into rainwater DOM at the molecular level on an episodic basis. Unique elemental compositions were assigned for compounds belonging to CHO, CHOS and CHON classes. Data visualization by van Krevelen diagrams showed clear differences in coastal and terrestrial storm events with a majority of coastal storms having high H/C (1.5-2.0) relative to terrestrial storms. Further inspection of the data revealed that rainwater has relatively high O/C (1.4) and low H/C (<0.5) which suggests rainwater DOM is compositionally different than fog water, water soluble organic carbon isolated from aerosols and surface waters.

  16. Dissolved organic matter and lake metabolism. Technical progress report, 1 July 1978--30 Jun 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wenzel, R.G.

    1979-01-01

    Progress is reported in continuing investigations focused on integrated studies of the qualitative and quantitative cycling and metabolism of particulate and dissolved organic carbon in lakes and their inflow sources (surface and subsurface). Emphasis is placed on the sources, fates, and interactions of dissolved and particulate organic matter in relation to: (a) inorganic chemical cycling, (b) allochthonous loading to the lake system, and (c) the coupled nutrient physiology and metabolism of phytoplankton, bacterial populations, macrophytes, and attendant sessile algal-bacterial communities. Regulatory mechanisms of growth and rates of carbon and nutrient cycling are being evaluated among the (a) inorganic-organic influxes of allochthonous sources as they are controlled by wetland-littoral communities, (b) the littoral photosynthetic producer-decomposer complex, and (c) the microflora of the pelagial zone. Quantification of carbon fluxes among these components and control mechanisms is fundamental to elucidation of the rate functions of lake eutrophication. The integrated studies addressing these multifacted objectives are summarized in three summary diagrams.

  17. Dissolved organic matter and lake metabolism. Technical progress report, 1 July 1977--30 June 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wetzel, R.G.

    1978-01-01

    Interactions of dissolved organic matter with inorganic nutrient cycling and regulation of the photosynthetic and decompositional metabolism of micro- and macroflora remains the focal point of these studies. Major efforts are directed towards the sources, fates, pathways, and interactions of dissolved organic matter in inorganic chemical cycling; allochthonous sources, metabolism en route, and inputs to the lake systems of increasing stages of eutrophication; and the relationships of these compounds to the nutrient physiology and metabolism of phytoplankton, sessile algae, macrophytes, and bacterial populations of the littoral zones and wetlands of the drainage basin. Analyses of regulatory mechanisms of growth and rates of carbon cycling center on evaluation of quantitative control interactions among the microflora of the pelagial zones of seversal lakes of progressively greater eutrophy, littoral photosynthetic producer-decomposer complex, and allochthonous inorganic--organic influxes and their biotic processing. The underlying thesis is that quantification of the dynamic carbon fluxes among these components and their rate control mechanisms by physical and chemical factors are fundamental to elucidation of the rate functions of lake eutrophication.

  18. Seasonal changes in the optical properties of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in large Arctic rivers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walker, S.A.; Amon, R.M.; Stedmon, Colin

    Arctic rivers deliver over 10% of the annual global river discharge yet little is known about the seasonal fluctuations in the quantity and quality of terrigenous dissolved organic matter (tDOM). A good constraint on such fluctuations is paramount to understand the role that climate change may have...... on tDOM input to the Arctic Ocean. To understand such changes the optical properties of colored tDOM (tCDOM) were studied. Samples were collected over several seasonal cycles from the six largest Arctic Rivers as part of the PARTNERS project. This unique dataset is the first of its kind capturing...

  19. Temperature dependence of the relationship between pCO2 and dissolved organic carbon in lakes

    KAUST Repository

    Pinho, L.

    2016-02-15

    The relationship between the partial pressure of carbon dioxide (pCO2) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration in Brazilian lakes, encompassing 225 samples across a wide latitudinal range in the tropics, was tested. Unlike the positive relationship reported for lake waters, which was largely based on temperate lakes, we found no significant relationship for low-latitude lakes (< 33°), despite very broad ranges in both pCO2 and DOC levels. These results suggest substantial differences in the carbon cycling of low-latitude lakes, which must be considered when upscaling limnetic carbon cycling to global scales.

  20. Relevance of dissolved organic nutrients for the Arctic Ocean nutrient budget

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Valdés, Sinhué; Tsubouchi, Takamasa; Davey, Emily; Yashayaev, Igor; Bacon, Sheldon

    2016-06-01

    We ask whether dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) and phosphorus (DOP) could account for previously identified Arctic Ocean (AO) inorganic nutrient budget imbalances. We assess transports to/from the AO by calculating indicative budgets. Marked DON:DOP ratio differences between the Amerasian and Eurasian AO reflect different physical and biogeochemical pathways. DON and DOP are exported to the North Atlantic via Davis Strait potentially being enhanced in transit from Bering Strait. Fram Strait transports are balanced. Barents Sea Opening transports may provide an additional nutrient source to the Barents Sea or may be locked within the wider AO Atlantic Water circulation. Gaps in our knowledge are identified and discussed.

  1. Influence of dissolved organic carbon on the efficiency of P sequestration by a lanthanum modified clay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dithmer, Line; Nielsen, Ulla Gro; Lundberg, Daniel;

    2016-01-01

    A laboratory scale experiment was set up to test the effect of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) as well as ageing of the La–P complex formed during phosphorus (P) sequestration by a La modified clay (Phoslock®). Short term (7 days) P adsorption studies revealed a significant negative effect of added...... DOC on the P sequestration of Phoslock®, whereas a long-term P adsorption experiment revealed that the negative effect of added DOC was reduced with time. The reduced P binding efficiency is kinetic, as evident from solid-state 31P magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy, who showed that the P...

  2. Measuring the pollutant transport capacity of dissolved organic matter in complex matrixes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Persson, L.; Alsberg, T.; Odham, G.;

    2003-01-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) facilitated transport in contaminated groundwater was investigated through the measurement of the binding capacity of landfill leachate DOM (Vejen, Denmark) towards two model pollutants (pyrene and phenanthrene). Three different methods for measuring binding capacity....... It was further concluded that DOM facilitated transport should be taken into account for non-ionic PAHs with lg K OW above 5, at DOM concentrations above 250 mg C/L. The total DOM concentration was found to be more important for the potential of facilitated transport than differences in the DOM binding capacity....

  3. Dissolved Organic Carbon and Disinfection By-Product Precursor Release from Managed Peat Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleck, J.A.; Bossio, D.A.; Fujii, R.

    2004-01-01

    A wetland restoration demonstration project examined the effects of a permanently flooded wetland on subsidence of peat soils. The project, started in 1997, was done on Twitchell Island, in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta of California. Conversion of agricultural land to a wetland has changed many of the biogeochemical processes controlling dissolved organic carbon (DOC) release from the peat soils, relative to the previous land use. Dissolved organic C in delta waters is a concern because it reacts with chlorine, added as a disinfectant in municipal drinking waters, to form carcinogenic disinfection byproducts (DBPs), including trihalomethanes (THMs) and haloacetic acids (HAAs). This study explores the effects of peat soil biogeochemistry on DOC and DBP release under agricultural and wetland management. Results indicate that organic matter source, extent of soil organic matter decomposition, and decomposition pathways all are factors in THM formation. The results show that historical management practices dominate the release of DOC and THM precursors. However, within-site differences indicate that recent management decisions can contribute to changes in DOC quality and THM precursor formation. Not all aromatic forms of carbon are highly reactive and certain environmental conditions produce the specific carbon structures that form THMs. Both HAA and THM precursors are elevated in the DOC released under wetland conditions. The findings of this study emphasize the need to further investigate the roles of organic matter sources, microbial decomposition pathways, and decomposition status of soil organic matter in the release of DOC and DBP precursors from delta soils under varying land-use practices.

  4. Characterization of Dissolved Organic Carbon in Deep Groundwater from the Witwatersrand Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pullin, M. J.; Hendrickson, S.; Simon, P.; Sherwood Lollar, B.; Wilkie, K.; Onstott, T. C.; Washton, N.; Clewett, C.

    2013-12-01

    This work describes the isolation, fractionation, and chemical analysis of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in deep groundwater in the Witwatersrand Basin, South Africa. The groundwater was accessed through mining boreholes in gold and diamond mine shafts. Filtered water samples were collected and preserved for later analysis. In some cases, the organic carbon was also collected on DAX-8 and XAD-4 adsorption resins in situ and then transported to the surface for removal, clean-up, and lyophilization. Solid state C-13 NMR analysis of that organic carbon was conducted. Organic compounds were also isolated from the water using solid phase extraction cartridges for later analysis by GC-MS. Absorbance, fluorescence, and HPLC analyses was were used to analyze the DOC in the filtered water samples. C-14 and C-13 isotopic analysis of the organic carbon was also conducted. Identifiable components of the DOC include both organic acids and amino acids. However, initial results indicate that the majority of the subsurface DOC is a complex heterogeneous mixture with an average molecular weight of approximately 1000 Da, although this DOC is less complex than that found in soils or surface water. Finally, we will discuss possible sources of the organic carbon and its biogeochemical cycling in the subsurface.

  5. Co-precipitation of dissolved organic matter by calcium carbonate in Pyramid Lake, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leenheer, Jerry A.; Reddy, Michael M.

    2008-01-01

    Our previous research has demonstrated that dissolved organic matter (DOM) influences calcium carbonate mineral formation in surface and ground water. To better understand DOM mediation of carbonate precipitation and DOM co-precipitation and/or incorporation with carbonate minerals, we characterized the content and speciation of DOM in carbonate minerals and in the lake water of Pyramid Lake, Nevada, USA. A 400-gram block of precipitated calcium carbonate from the Pyramid Lake shore was dissolved in 8 liters of 10% acetic acid. Particulate matter not dissolved by acetic acid was removed by centrifugation. DOM from the carbonate rock was fractionated into nine portions using evaporation, dialysis, resin adsorption, and selective precipitations to remove acetic acid and inorganic constituents. The calcium carbonate rock contained 0.23% DOM by weight. This DOM was enriched in polycarboxylic proteinaceous acids and hydroxy-acids in comparison with the present lake water. DOM in lake water was composed of aliphatic, alicyclic polycarboxylic acids. These compound classes were found in previous studies to inhibit calcium carbonate precipitation. DOM fractions from the carbonate rock were 14C-age dated at about 3,100 to 3,500 years before present. The mechanism of DOM co-precipitation and/or physical incorporation in the calcium carbonate is believed to be due to formation of insoluble calcium complexes with polycarboxylic proteinaceous acids and hydroxy-acids that have moderately large stability constants at the alkaline pH of the lake. DOM co-precipitation with calcium carbonate and incorporation in precipitated carbonate minerals removes proteinaceous DOM, but nearly equivalent concentrations of neutral and acidic forms of organic nitrogen in DOM remain in solution. Calcium carbonate precipitation during lime softening pretreatment of drinking water may have practical applications for removal of proteinaceous disinfection by-product precursors.

  6. Inhibition of hydroxyl radical reaction with aromatics by dissolved natural organic matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindsey, M.E.; Tarr, M.A.

    2000-02-01

    Remediation of hydrophobic pollutants is complicated by sorption of these compounds to hydrophobic sites of dissolved natural organic matter (NOM), suspended particulates, soil, and sediment. This sorption causes the pollutants to be less easily degraded by remediation techniques. Reaction of aromatic compounds with hydroxyl radical is inhibited by dissolved natural organic matter (NOM). The degree of inhibition is significantly greater than that expected based on a simple model in which aromatic compound molecules bound to NOM are considered to be unreactive. In this study, hydroxyl radical was produced at steady-state concentrations using Fenton chemistry (H{sub 2}O{sub 2} + Fe{sup 2+} {yields} Fe{sup 3+} + HO{sup {minus}} + HO{sm_bullet}). Suwannee River fulvic acid and humic acid were used as NOM. The most likely mechanism for the observed inhibition is that hydroxyl radical formation occurs in microenvironmental sites remote from the aromatic compounds. In addition to changes in kinetics, pyrene hydroxyl radical reaction also exhibited a mechanistic change in the presence of fulvic acid. The mechanism changed from a reaction that was apparently first-order in pyrene to one that was apparently second-order in pyrene, indicating that pyrene self-reaction may have become the dominant mechanism in the presence of fulvic acid. Dissolved NOM causes significant changes in the rate and mechanism of hydroxyl radical degradation of aromatic compounds. Consequently, literature rate constants measured in pure water will not be useful for predicting the degradation of pollutants in environmental systems. The kinetic and mechanistic information in this study will be useful for developing improved degradation methods involving Fenton chemistry.

  7. Dissolved organic phosphorus speciation in the waters of the Tamar estuary (SW England)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monbet, Phil; McKelvie, Ian D.; Worsfold, Paul J.

    2009-02-01

    The speciation of dissolved organic phosphorus (DOP) in the temperate Tamar estuary of SW England is described. Eight stations from the riverine to marine end-members were sampled during four seasonal campaigns in 2007 and the DOP pool in the water column and sediment porewater was characterized and quantified using a flow injection manifold after sequential enzymatic hydrolysis. This enabled the enzymatically hydrolysable phosphorus (EHP) fraction and its component labile monoester phosphates, diester phosphates and a phytase-hydrolysable fraction that includes myo-inositol hexakisphosphate (phytic acid), to be determined and compared with the total DOP, dissolved reactive phosphorus (DRP) and total dissolved phosphorus (TDP) pools. The results showed that the DOP pool in the water column varied temporally and spatially within the estuary (1.1-22 μg L -1) and constituted 6-40% of TDP. The EHP fraction of DOP ranged from 1.1-15 μg L -1 and represented a significant and potentially bioavailable phosphorus fraction. Furthermore the spatial profiles of the three components of the EHP pool generally showed non-conservative behavior along the salinity gradient, with apparent internal estuarine sources. Porewater profiles followed broadly similar trends but were notably higher at the marine station throughout the year. In contrast to soil organic phosphorus profiles, the labile monoester phosphate fraction was the largest component, with diester phosphates also prevalent. Phytic acid concentrations were higher in the lower estuary, possibly due to salinity induced desorption processes. The EHP fraction is not commonly determined in aquatic systems due to the lack of a suitable measurement technique and the Tamar results reported here have important implications for phosphorus biogeochemistry, estuarine ecology and the development of efficient strategies for limiting the effects of phosphorus on water quality.

  8. Photochemical Flocculation of Terrestrial Dissolved Organic Matter (tDOM) and Iron: Mechanisms and Geochemical Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mopper, K.; Helms, J. R.; Mao, J.; Abdulla, H. A.; Schmidt-Rohr, K.

    2013-12-01

    Photoflocculation of DOM has received relatively little attention. No previous studies have examined the chemical composition of the flocs nor investigated the coagulation mechanisms. We observed that, after 30 days of simulated solar UV irradiation of 0.1-um filtered Great Dismal Swamp (Virginia) water, 7.1% of the DOC was converted to POC while 75% was remineralized. Approximately 87% of the iron was removed from the dissolved phase after 30 days, but iron did not flocculate until a major fraction of DOM was removed by photochemical degradation and flocculation (>10 days); thus, during the initial 10 days, there were sufficient organic ligands present and/or the pH was low enough to keep iron in solution. Although photoflocculation of iron did eventually occur, it is not clear if iron is required for the initial flocculation of DOM. Using NMR and FT-IR techniques, we found that photochemically flocculated POM was enriched in aliphatics and amide functionality relative to the residual non-flocculated DOM, while carbohydrate-like material was neither photochemical degraded nor flocculated. Based on this spectroscopic evidence, we propose several mechanisms for the formation of the flocs during irradiation. We also speculate that abiotic photochemical flocculation may remove a significant fraction of tDOM and iron from the upper water column between headwaters and the ocean, including estuaries. Fig. 1. Concentrations of dissolved (gray), particulate (black), and adsorbed (white) material as a function of irradiation time: (a) organic carbon, (b) absorption at 300 nm, (c) total iron by atomic absorption, and (d) total nitrogen. Error bars represent the combined standard deviations of the 'total,' 'dissolved,' and 'adsorbed' terms from which the 'particulate' term was calculated. Total nitrogen was not determined for the 'adsorbed' material

  9. High molecular weight dissolved organic matter enrichment selects for methylotrophs in dilution to extinction cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosa, Oscar A; Gifford, Scott M; Repeta, Daniel J; DeLong, Edward F

    2015-12-01

    The role of bacterioplankton in the cycling of marine dissolved organic matter (DOM) is central to the carbon and energy balance in the ocean, yet there are few model organisms available to investigate the genes, metabolic pathways, and biochemical mechanisms involved in the degradation of this globally important carbon pool. To obtain microbial isolates capable of degrading semi-labile DOM for growth, we conducted dilution to extinction cultivation experiments using seawater enriched with high molecular weight (HMW) DOM. In total, 93 isolates were obtained. Amendments using HMW DOM to increase the dissolved organic carbon concentration 4x (280 μM) or 10x (700 μM) the ocean surface water concentrations yielded positive growth in 4-6% of replicate dilutions, whereas <1% scored positive for growth in non-DOM-amended controls. The majority (71%) of isolates displayed a distinct increase in cell yields when grown in increasing concentrations of HMW DOM. Whole-genome sequencing was used to screen the culture collection for purity and to determine the phylogenetic identity of the isolates. Eleven percent of the isolates belonged to the gammaproteobacteria including Alteromonadales (the SAR92 clade) and Vibrio. Surprisingly, 85% of isolates belonged to the methylotrophic OM43 clade of betaproteobacteria, bacteria thought to metabolically specialize in degrading C1 compounds. Growth of these isolates on methanol confirmed their methylotrophic phenotype. Our results indicate that dilution to extinction cultivation enriched with natural sources of organic substrates has a potential to reveal the previously unsuspected relationships between naturally occurring organic nutrients and the microorganisms that consume them.

  10. Efficient removal of recalcitrant deep-ocean dissolved organic matter during hydrothermal circulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkes, Jeffrey A.; Rossel, Pamela E.; Stubbins, Aron; Butterfield, David; Connelly, Douglas P.; Achterberg, Eric P.; Koschinsky, Andrea; Chavagnac, Valérie; Hansen, Christian T.; Bach, Wolfgang; Dittmar, Thorsten

    2015-11-01

    Oceanic dissolved organic carbon (DOC) is an important carbon pool, similar in magnitude to atmospheric CO2, but the fate of its oldest forms is not well understood. Hot hydrothermal circulation may facilitate the degradation of otherwise un-reactive dissolved organic matter, playing an important role in the long-term global carbon cycle. The oldest, most recalcitrant forms of DOC, which make up most of oceanic DOC, can be recovered by solid-phase extraction. Here we present measurements of solid-phase extractable DOC from samples collected between 2009 and 2013 at seven vent sites in the Atlantic, Pacific and Southern oceans, along with magnesium concentrations, a conservative tracer of water circulation through hydrothermal systems. We find that magnesium and solid-phase extractable DOC concentrations are correlated, suggesting that solid-phase extractable DOC is almost entirely lost from solution through mineralization or deposition during circulation through hydrothermal vents with fluid temperatures of 212-401 °C. In laboratory experiments, where we heated samples to 380 °C for four days, we found a similar removal efficiency. We conclude that thermal degradation alone can account for the loss of solid-phase extractable DOC in natural hydrothermal systems, and that its maximum lifetime is constrained by the timescale of hydrothermal cycling, at about 40 million years.

  11. New nutrients exert fundamental control on dissolved organic carbon accumulation in the surface Atlantic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romera-Castillo, Cristina; Letscher, Robert T.; Hansell, Dennis A.

    2016-09-01

    The inventories of carbon residing in organic matter dissolved in the ocean [dissolved organic carbon (DOC)] and in the atmosphere as CO2 are of the same order of magnitude, such that small changes in the DOC pool could have important consequences in atmospheric carbon and thus climate. DOC in the global ocean is largely formed in the sunlit euphotic zone, but identifying predictable controls on that production is an important yet unrealized goal. Here, we use a testable and causative correlation between the net production of DOC and the consumption of new nutrients in the euphotic zone of the Atlantic Ocean. We demonstrate that new nutrients introduced to the euphotic zone by upwelling in divergence zones and by winter convective overturn of the water column, and the primary production associated with those nutrients, are the ultimate driver of DOC distributions across the Atlantic basins. As new nutrient input will change with a changing climate, the role of DOC in the ocean’s biological pump should likewise be impacted.

  12. The behavior of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in the Kuji estuary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some scientists have pointed out that there were old DOM which may be more than 2,000 years old in the sea surface water and they were significantly older than the atmosphere (0 year old) in contact with the sea surface water and terrestrial organic matter. In this study, to resolve the generation mechanism of the refractory DOM, we investigate the temporal variations of some different factors affecting estuarine DOM flux at both the field observation and the quasi-field observation by three steps on a seasonal basis during the period of August 2009 to August 2010. In this presentation, we report several biogeochemical parameters (dissolved organic carbon (DOC), dissolved oxygen (DO), nutrients (nitrate (NO3), nitrite (NO2), phosphate (PO4), silicate (Si(OH)4)), Chlorophyll-a (Chl.a) and bacterial abundance (BP)) in the Kuji estuary, Japan in August 2009, and part of the results. We found that the estuary DOC concentration in our study region was changeable with 1.26-1.61 mg/L within a day. The autotrophic biological effect (phytoplankton) and the physical effect greatly governed the variation of DOC concentration by -52 to 47 % and -65 to 90 %, respectively, as the contribution ratio of each variable for the time-series. (author)

  13. Linkages between the circulation and distribution of dissolved organic matter in the White Sea, Arctic Ocean

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pavlov, Alexey K.; Stedmon, Colin A.; Semushin, Andrey V.;

    2016-01-01

    deep waters. We investigated properties and distribution of colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in the White Sea basin and coastal areas in summer. We found contrasting DOM properties in the inflowing Barents Sea waters and White Sea waters influenced by.......0‰ in Northern Dvina river for the period 10 May-12 October 2012. We found a significant linear relationship between salinity (S) and δ18O (δ18O=-17.66±0.58+0.52±0.02×S; R2=0.96, N=162), which indicates a dominant contribution of river water to the freshwater budget and little influence of sea ice...... formation or melt. No apparent brine additions from sea-ice formation is evident in the White Sea deep waters as seen from a joint analysis of temperature (T), S, δ18O and aCDOM(350) data, confirming previous suggestions about strong tidal induced vertical mixing in winter being the likely source of the...

  14. New nutrients exert fundamental control on dissolved organic carbon accumulation in the surface Atlantic Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romera-Castillo, Cristina; Letscher, Robert T; Hansell, Dennis A

    2016-09-20

    The inventories of carbon residing in organic matter dissolved in the ocean [dissolved organic carbon (DOC)] and in the atmosphere as CO2 are of the same order of magnitude, such that small changes in the DOC pool could have important consequences in atmospheric carbon and thus climate. DOC in the global ocean is largely formed in the sunlit euphotic zone, but identifying predictable controls on that production is an important yet unrealized goal. Here, we use a testable and causative correlation between the net production of DOC and the consumption of new nutrients in the euphotic zone of the Atlantic Ocean. We demonstrate that new nutrients introduced to the euphotic zone by upwelling in divergence zones and by winter convective overturn of the water column, and the primary production associated with those nutrients, are the ultimate driver of DOC distributions across the Atlantic basins. As new nutrient input will change with a changing climate, the role of DOC in the ocean's biological pump should likewise be impacted.

  15. Effect of Soil Passage and Ozonation on Dissolved Organic Carbon and Microbial Quantification in Wastewater

    KAUST Repository

    Ahmed, Elaf A.

    2013-05-01

    Water quality data are presented from a laboratory bench scale soil columns study, to simulate an aquifer recharge system injected with MBR wastewater effluent. This study investigates the effect of soil filtration and ozonation on the dissolved organic carbon and bacterial count in the wastewater. Flow Cytometry was used to quantify microorganisms in water samples. Other analytical tests were conducted as well, such as seven anions, fluorescence spectroscopy (FEEM), ultraviolet absorption (UV 254 nm) and dissolved organic carbon measurement (DOC). Influent in this study was injected into two identical soil columns. One of the columns was injected with treated wastewater combined with ozonation called SC1, The second column was injected with treated wastewater only and called SC2. Passing the wastewater through a deeper depth in the soil column showed a reduction in the DOC concentration. Removal of DOC was 53.7 % in SC1 and 53.8 % in SC2. UV 254 nm results demonstrated that the majority of the UV absorbing compounds were removed after the first 30 cm in the soil columns. FEEM results revealed that soil column treatment only doesn\\'t remove humic-like and fulvic-like substances. However, combining soil column treatment with ozonation was capable of removing humic-like, fulvic-like and protein-like substances from the wastewater. Flow Cytometry results showed a bacteria removal of 52.5 %-89.5 % in SC1 which was higher than SC2 removal of 29.1 %-56.5 %.

  16. Impact of dissolved organic matter on bioavailability of chlorotoluron to wheat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chlorotoluron (Chl) is a phenylurea herbicide and is widely used for controlling weeds. While it has brought great benefits to crop production, it has also resulted in contamination to ecosystem. In this study, we investigated accumulation of chlorotoluron (Chl) and biological responses of wheat plants as affected by dissolved organic matter (DOM). Wheat seedlings grown under 10 mg kg-1 Chl for 4 d showed a low level of chlorophyll accumulation and damage to plasma membrane. The growth was inhibited by exposure of chlorotoluron. Treatment with 50 mg DOC kg-1 DOM derived either from sludge (DOM-SL) or straw (DOM-ST) attenuated the chlorotoluron toxicity to plants. Both DOMs decreased activities of catalase, peroxidase and superoxide dismutase in Chl-treated seedlings. However, an increased glutathione S-transferases activity was observed under the same condition. Wheat plants treated with Chl in the presence of DOM accumulated less Chl than those treated with Chl alone. Moreover, in the presence of DOM, bioconcentration factor (BCF) decreased whereas translocation factors increased. Analyses with FT-IR spectra confirmed the regulatory role of DOMs in reducing Chl accumulation in wheat. - Dissolved organic matter (DOM) as a soil amendment can reduce herbicide accumulation in crops.

  17. Dissolved organic matter in the Florida everglades: Implications for ecosystem restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiken, G.R.; Gilmour, C.C.; Krabbenhoft, D.P.; Orem, W.

    2011-01-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) in the Florida Everglades controls a number of environmental processes important for ecosystem function including the absorption of light, mineral dissolution/precipitation, transport of hydrophobic compounds (e.g., pesticides), and the transport and reactivity of metals, such as mercury. Proposed attempts to return the Everglades to more natural flow conditions will result in changes to the present transport of DOM from the Everglades Agricultural Area and the northern conservation areas to Florida Bay. In part, the restoration plan calls for increasing water flow throughout the Everglades by removing some of the manmade barriers to flow in place today. The land- and water-use practices associated with the plan will likely result in changes in the quality, quantity, and reactivity of DOM throughout the greater Everglades ecosystem. The authors discuss the factors controlling DOM concentrations and chemistry, present distribution of DOM throughout the Everglades, the potential effects of DOM on key water-quality issues, and the potential utility of dissolved organic matter as an indicator of success of restoration efforts. Copyright ?? 2011 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

  18. Hydrologic Controls on Dissolved Organic Matter Mobilization and Transport within Undisturbed Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, N.; Saiers, J.

    2007-12-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) in soils plays an important role in the transport of nutrients and contaminants through the terrestrial environment. Subsurface pathways deliver a significant portion of carbon to streams that drain forested and agricultural watersheds. Although the importance of rainfall events to the DOM soil-water flux is well known, the hydrologic factors that govern this flux have not been fully examined. The primary purpose of this study is to investigate the soil and rainfall characteristics controlling the mobilization and transport of DOM in undisturbed soils. Intact soil columns including topsoil and subsoil layers were taken from the Harvard forest in Petersham, MA. Unsaturated flow conditions were maintained by applying suction to the bottom of the soil columns. The columns were irrigated by series of interrupted rainfall events using the same total volume of artificial rain water. Preliminary experiments showed continuous leaching of DOM (measured by dissolved organic carbon) with an initial peak in concentration that coincided with the passage of the wetting front. The leached DOM was also characterized by UV absorbance, fluorescence spectroscopy in the emission mode, and additional spectroscopic derived indexes such as the humification index. Ongoing column experiments are focusing on the effects of rainfall intensity, frequency, and rainfall history on DOM mobilization and transport through natural, structured soils. These investigations can elucidate the influence of factors that are associated with climate change on DOC dynamics. Results of our analyses should also provide insight into the mechanisms that govern DOM mobilization in soils.

  19. Effects of compositional changes on reactivity continuum and decomposition kinetics of lake dissolved organic matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostovaya, Alina; Koehler, Birgit; Guillemette, François; Brunberg, Anna-Kristina; Tranvik, Lars J.

    2016-07-01

    To address the link between the composition and decomposition of freshwater dissolved organic matter (DOM), we manipulated the DOM from three boreal lakes using preincubations with UV light to cleave large aromatic molecules and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) to remove colored phenolic compounds. Subsequently, we monitored the dissolved organic carbon (DOC) loss over 4 months of microbial degradation in the dark to assess how compositional changes in DOM affected different aspects of the reactivity continuum, including the distribution of the apparent decay coefficients. We observed profound effects on decomposition kinetics, with pronounced shifts in the relative share of rapidly and more slowly decomposing fractions of the DOM. In the UV-exposed treatment initial apparent decay coefficient k0 was almost threefold higher than in the control. Significantly higher relative DOC loss in the UV-exposed treatment was sustained for 2 months of incubation, after which decay coefficients converged with those in the control. The PVP removed compounds with absorbance and fluorescence characteristics representative of aromatic compounds, which led to slower decomposition, compared to that in the control. Our results demonstrate the reactivity continuum underlying the decomposition of DOM in freshwaters and highlight the importance of intrinsic properties of DOM in determining its decomposition kinetics.

  20. Selection of magnetic anion exchange resins for the removal of dissolved organic and inorganic matters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiongjie Wang; Aimin Li; Jinnan Wang; Chengdong Shuang

    2012-01-01

    Four magnetic anion exchange resins (MAERs) were used as adsorbents to purify drinking water.The effect of water quality (pH,temperature,ionic strength,etc.) on the performance of MAER for the removal of dissolved organic matter (DOM) was also investigated.Among the four studied MAERs,the strong base resin named NDMP-1 with high water content and enhanced exchange capacity exhibited the highest removal rate of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) (48.9% removal rate) and UV-absorbing substances (82.4% removal rate) with a resin dose of 10 mL/L after 30 min of contact time.The MAERs could also effectively remove inorganic matter such as sulfate,nitrate and fluoride.Because of the higher specific UV absorbance (SUVA) value,the DOM in the raw water was found to be removed more effectively than that in the clarified water by NDMP resin.The temperature showed a weak influence on the removal of DOC from 6 to 26℃,while a relatively strong one at 36℃.The removal of DOM by NDMP was also affected to some extent by the pH value.Moreover,increasing the sulfate concentration in the raw water could decrease the removal rates of DOC and UV-absorbing substances.

  1. Removal and transformation of dissolved organic matter in secondary effluent during granular activated carbon treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liang-liang WEI; Qing-liang ZHAO; Shuang XUE; Ting JIA

    2008-01-01

    This paper focused on the removal and transformation of the dissolved organic matter (DOM) in secondary effluent during the granular activated carbon (GAC) treatment. Using XAD-8/XAD-4 resins, DOM was fractionated into five classes:hydrophobic acid (HPO-A), hydrophobic neutral (HPO-N), transphilic acid (TPI-A), transphilic neutral (TPI-N) and hydrophilic fraction (HPI). Subsequently, the water quality parameters of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), absorbance of ultraviolet light at 254 nm (UV-254), specific ultraviolet light absorbance (SUVA) and trihalomethane formation potential (THMFP) were analyzed for the unfractionated and fractionated water samples. The results showed that the order of the DOC removal with respect to DOM fractions was observed to be HPI>HPO-A>HPO-N>TPI-A>TPI-N. During the GAC treatment, the THMFP of the unfractionated water samples decreased from 397.4 μg/L to 176.5 μg/L, resulting in a removal efficiency of 55.6%. The removal order of the trihalomethanes (THMs) precursor was as follows: HPO-A>TPI-A>TPI-N>HPO-N>HPI. By the GAC treatment, the specific THMFP of HPO-A, TPI-A, TPI-N and the original unfractionated water samples had a noticeable decrease, while that of HPO-N and HPI showed a converse trend. The Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) results showed that the hydroxide groups, carboxylic acids, aliphatie C-H were significantly reduced by GAC treatment.

  2. A study on the photo catalytic decomposition reactions of organics dissolved in water (II)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experiments on aqueous TiO2 photo catalytic reaction of nitrogen containing organic compounds such as ethylamine, phenylhydrazine, pyridine, urea and EDTA were carried out. Based on the values calculated for the distribution of ionic species and atomic charge, the characteristics of their photo catalytic decomposition were estimated. It was shown that the decomposition characteristics was linearly proportional to nitrogen atomic charge value. On the other hand, the effects of aqueous pH, oxygen content and concentration on the TiO2 photo catalytic characteristics of EDTA, EDTA-Cu(II) and EDTA-Fe(III) were experimentally investigated. All EDTA systems were decomposed better in the pH range of 2.5-3.0 and with more dissolved oxygen. These results could be applied to construction of a process for removal of organic impurities dissolved in a source of system water, or for treatment of EDTA-containing liquid waste produced by a chemical cleaning in the domestic NPPs. (author)

  3. Removal of fluorescence and ultraviolet absorbance of dissolved organic matter in reclaimed water by solar light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qianyuan; Li, Chao; Wang, Wenlong; He, Tao; Hu, Hongying; Du, Ye; Wang, Ting

    2016-05-01

    Storing reclaimed water in lakes is a widely used method of accommodating changes in the consumption of reclaimed water during wastewater reclamation and reuse. Solar light serves as an important function in degrading pollutants during storage, and its effect on dissolved organic matter (DOM) was investigated in this study. Solar light significantly decreased the UV254 absorbance and fluorescence (FLU) intensity of reclaimed water. However, its effect on the dissolved organic carbon (DOC) value of reclaimed water was very limited. The decrease in the UV254 absorbance intensity and FLU excitation-emission matrix regional integration volume (FLU volume) of reclaimed water during solar light irradiation was fit with pseudo-first order reaction kinetics. The decrease of UV254 absorbance was much slower than that of the FLU volume. Ultraviolet light in solar light had a key role in decreasing the UV254 absorbance and FLU intensity during solar light irradiation. The light fluence-based removal kinetic constants of the UV254 and FLU intensity were independent of light intensity. The peaks of the UV254 absorbance and FLU intensity with an apparent molecular weight (AMW) of 100Da to 2000Da decreased after solar irradiation, whereas the DOC value of the major peaks did not significantly change. PMID:27155416

  4. A study on the photocatalytic decomposition reactions of organics dissolved in water (II)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experiments on aqueous TiO2 photocatalytic reaction characteristics of 4 nitrogen-containing and 12 aromatic organic compounds were carried out. Based on the values calculated for the distribution of ionic species and atomic charge, the characteristics of their photocatalytic decomposition were estimated. It was shown that the dependence of decomposition of the N-containing compounds were linearly proportional to their nitrogen atomic charge values, while that of the aromatic compounds were inversely proportional. The effects of aqueous pH, oxygen content and concentration on the TiO2 photocatalytic characteristics of EDTA-Cu(II) and EDTA-Fe(III) were experimentally investigated. All EDTA systems were decomposed better in the pH range of 2.5∼3.0 and with more dissolved oxygen. These results could be applied to a unit process for removal of organic impurities dissolved in a source water of the system water, and for treatment of EDTA-containing liquid waste produced by chemical cleaning process in the domestic NPPs

  5. Shift in the chemical composition of dissolved organic matter in the Congo River network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Thibault; Bouillon, Steven; Darchambeau, François; Massicotte, Philippe; Borges, Alberto V.

    2016-09-01

    The processing of terrestrially derived dissolved organic matter (DOM) during downstream transport in fluvial networks is poorly understood. Here, we report a dataset of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations and DOM composition (stable carbon isotope ratios, absorption and fluorescence properties) acquired along a 1700 km transect in the middle reach of the Congo River basin. Samples were collected in the mainstem and its tributaries during high-water (HW) and falling-water (FW) periods. DOC concentrations and DOM composition along the mainstem were found to differ between the two periods because of a reduced lateral mixing between the central water masses of the Congo River and DOM-rich waters from tributaries and also likely because of a greater photodegradation during FW as water residence time (WRT) increased. Although the Cuvette Centrale wetland (one of the world's largest flooded forests) continuously releases highly aromatic DOM in streams and rivers of the Congo Basin, the downstream transport of DOM was found to result in an along-stream gradient from aromatic to aliphatic compounds. The characterization of DOM through parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC) suggests that this transition results from (1) the losses of aromatic compounds by photodegradation and (2) the production of aliphatic compounds by biological reworking of terrestrial DOM. Finally, this study highlights the critical importance of the river-floodplain connectivity in tropical rivers in controlling DOM biogeochemistry at a large spatial scale and suggests that the degree of DOM processing during downstream transport is a function of landscape characteristics and WRT.

  6. Experimental evidence of dust-induced shaping of surface dissolved organic matter in the oligotrophic ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulido-Villena, Elvira; Djaoudi, Kahina; Barani, Aude; Charrière, Bruno; Delmont, Anne; Hélias-Nunige, Sandra; Marc, Tedetti; Wambeke France, Van

    2016-04-01

    Recent research has shown that dust deposition may impact the functioning of the microbial loop. On one hand, it enhances bacterial mineralization of dissolved organic matter (DOM), and so may limit the carbon export. On the other hand, the interaction between heterotrophic bacteria and DOM in the surface ocean can increase the residence time of DOM, promoting its export and sequestration in the deep ocean. The main goal of this study was to experimentally assess whether the bacterial response to dust deposition is prone to have an effect on the residence time of the DOM pool by modifying its bioavailability. The bacterial degradation of DOM was followed on dust-amended and control treatments during long-term incubations. Dissolved organic carbon concentration decreased by 9 μmol L-1 over the course of the experiment in both control and dust-enriched conditions, with no significant differences between treatments. However, significant differences in DOM optical properties appeared at the latest stage of the incubations suggesting an accumulation of DOM of high molecular weight in the dust-amended treatment. At the end of the incubations, the remaining water was filtered and re-used as a new culture medium for a bacterial natural assemblage. Bacterial abundance and production was lower in the treatment previously submitted to dust enrichment, suggesting a decrease in DOM lability after a dust deposition event. These preliminary results point to a new link between dust and ocean carbon cycle through the modification of the residence time of the DOM pool.

  7. [Impact of dissolved organic matter on plant uptake of phenanthrene and its mechanisms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Xin-hua; Zhou, Li-xiang; Wan, Yin-jing; Jiang, Ting-hui

    2006-09-01

    Hydroponic assays were conducted to investigate the influence of dissolved organic matter on uptake of phenanthrene by wheat as well as its mechanisms. The results showed that, under hydroponic condition, phenanthrene impairment of plant growth occurred with wheat growth inhibited rate of 18.01%. The impairment would be greatly enhanced in the presence of dissolved organic matter (DOM) derived from pig manure, and the inhibited rate increased to 24.38%. Wheat could uptake and accumulate phenanthrene in the nutrient solution, which could be escalated by DOM, as indicated by wheat root bioconcentration factor being increased to 37.63 L x kg(-1) in the presence of DOM from 2.84 L x kg(-1) in the absence of DOM. At the same time, DOM could facilitate phenanthrene translocation from plant roots to the upper. As a result, the pH value of nutrient solution could increase by more than 1 unit when the co-existence of DOM and phenanthrene occurred in solution, suggesting that H+ -phenanthrene cotransport system is involved in the uptake of phenanthrene by plants. A synergism was also found between wheat uptakes of phenanthrene and inorganic nutrients, Moreover, DOM accelerated markedly the synergism. It is concluded that DOM affects the uptake of phenanthrene by plants and the environmental behaviors of phenanthrene. PMID:17117650

  8. Estimating dissolved organic carbon concentration in turbid coastal waters using optical remote sensing observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherukuru, Nagur; Ford, Phillip W.; Matear, Richard J.; Oubelkheir, Kadija; Clementson, Lesley A.; Suber, Ken; Steven, Andrew D. L.

    2016-10-01

    Dissolved Organic Carbon (DOC) is an important component in the global carbon cycle. It also plays an important role in influencing the coastal ocean biogeochemical (BGC) cycles and light environment. Studies focussing on DOC dynamics in coastal waters are data constrained due to the high costs associated with in situ water sampling campaigns. Satellite optical remote sensing has the potential to provide continuous, cost-effective DOC estimates. In this study we used a bio-optics dataset collected in turbid coastal waters of Moreton Bay (MB), Australia, during 2011 to develop a remote sensing algorithm to estimate DOC. This dataset includes data from flood and non-flood conditions. In MB, DOC concentration varied over a wide range (20-520 μM C) and had a good correlation (R2 = 0.78) with absorption due to coloured dissolved organic matter (CDOM) and remote sensing reflectance. Using this data set we developed an empirical algorithm to derive DOC concentrations from the ratio of Rrs(412)/Rrs(488) and tested it with independent datasets. In this study, we demonstrate the ability to estimate DOC using remotely sensed optical observations in turbid coastal waters.

  9. A study on the photocatalytic decomposition reactions of organics dissolved in water (II)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sung, K. W.; Na, J. W.; Cho, Y. H.; Chung, H. H

    2001-01-01

    Experiments on aqueous TiO{sup 2} photocatalytic reaction characteristics of 4 nitrogen-containing and 12 aromatic organic compounds were carried out. Based on the values calculated for the distribution of ionic species and atomic charge, the characteristics of their photocatalytic decomposition were estimated. It was shown that the dependence of decomposition of the N-containing compounds were linearly proportional to their nitrogen atomic charge values, while that of the aromatic compounds were inversely proportional. The effects of aqueous pH, oxygen content and concentration on the TiO{sup 2} photocatalytic characteristics of EDTA-Cu(II) and EDTA-Fe(III) were experimentally investigated. All EDTA systems were decomposed better in the pH range of 2.5{approx}3.0 and with more dissolved oxygen. These results could be applied to a unit process for removal of organic impurities dissolved in a source water of the system water, and for treatment of EDTA-containing liquid waste produced by chemical cleaning process in the domestic NPPs.

  10. Molecular evidence for abiotic sulfurization of dissolved organic matter in marine shallow hydrothermal systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez-Saez, Gonzalo V.; Niggemann, Jutta; Dittmar, Thorsten; Pohlabeln, Anika M.; Lang, Susan Q.; Noowong, Ann; Pichler, Thomas; Wörmer, Lars; Bühring, Solveig I.

    2016-10-01

    Shallow submarine hydrothermal systems are extreme environments with strong redox gradients at the interface of hot, reduced fluids and cold, oxygenated seawater. Hydrothermal fluids are often depleted in sulfate when compared to surrounding seawater and can contain high concentrations of hydrogen sulfide (H2S). It is well known that sulfur in its various oxidation states plays an important role in processing and transformation of organic matter. However, the formation and the reactivity of dissolved organic sulfur (DOS) in the water column at hydrothermal systems are so far not well understood. We investigated DOS dynamics and its relation to the physicochemical environment by studying the molecular composition of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in three contrasting shallow hydrothermal systems off Milos (Eastern Mediterranean), Dominica (Caribbean Sea) and Iceland (North Atlantic). We used ultra-high resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR-MS) to characterize the DOM on a molecular level. The molecular information was complemented with general geochemical data, quantitative dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and DOS analyses as well as isotopic measurements (δ2H, δ18O and F14C). In contrast to the predominantly meteoric fluids from Dominica and Iceland, hydrothermal fluids from Milos were mainly fed by recirculating seawater. The hydrothermal fluids from Milos were enriched in H2S and DOS, as indicated by high DOS/DOC ratios and by the fact that >90% of all assigned DOM formulas that were exclusively present in the fluids contained sulfur. In all three systems, DOS from hydrothermal fluids had on average lower O/C ratios (0.26-0.34) than surrounding surface seawater DOS (0.45-0.52), suggesting shallow hydrothermal systems as a source of reduced DOS, which will likely get oxidized upon contact with oxygenated seawater. Evaluation of hypothetical sulfurization reactions suggests DOM reduction and sulfurization during seawater

  11. SEASONAL CHANGES OF DISSOLVED AND PARTICULATE ORGANIC CARBON IN DONGHU LAKE, CHINA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Concentrations of dissolved and particulate organic carbon (DOC and POC) were documented in 1996-1997 at 4 different trophic state stations in Donghu Lake, a typical shallow eutrophic lake along the Changjiang River's middle reaches. The mean concentrations of DOC were 15.11±3.26, 15.19±4.24, 14.27±3.43, and 13.31±3.30 mg/L in Station I, II, III, and IV, respectively. The DOC concentrations of the studied area were very similar to that in other lakes along the Changjiang River's middle reaches. The POC mean of the whole lake was 5.01 mg/L due to the large amount of organic detritus of both allochthonous and autochthonous origin. Significant linear relationship was found between POC and chlorophyll a at all 4 stations, which presumably reflect that phytoplankton, its exudates and its metabolic products were the main contributors to the POC pool in the water column. The slope of such linear relationship at Station IV was significantly steeper than that at Station I, II and III. In addition, the DOC/POC ratios (mean value: 4.40) indicated that the organic detritus was the most important component of the particulate organic matter; in other words, next to organic detritus, phytoplankton dominated the particulate organic matter in Donghu Lake.

  12. Significant anaerobic production of fluorescent dissolved organic matter in the deep East Sea (Sea of Japan)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeonghyun; Kim, Guebuem

    2016-07-01

    The distribution of fluorescent dissolved organic matter (FDOM) in the East Sea (Sea of Japan) was examined by excitation-emission matrix spectroscopy with parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC). Humic-like FDOM (FDOMH) increased with depth and was significantly correlated with Apparent Oxygen Utilization (AOU), indicating that FDOMH in the deep water is mainly produced by oxidation of organic matter. In addition, a surprisingly large excess of FDOMH relative to that expected from the observed AOU was found from 1000 m to the bottom (up to 3500 m). Based on the high-resolution geographical distribution and characteristics of FDOM in the East Sea, we conclude that this excess likely originates from anaerobic FDOMH production in subsurface bottom sediments. This FDOMH flux accounts for 8-15% of the total FDOM production in the water column. Our results suggest that anaerobic activities in subsurface sediments are an important hidden source of FDOM in the ocean.

  13. Changes in dissolved organic carbon of soil amendments with aging: effect on pesticide adsorption behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Lucia; Fernandes, M Conceicao; Zsolnay, Adam; Hermosín, M Carmen; Cornejo, Juan

    2004-09-01

    The effect of aging in the soil of three organic amendments (OAs), one liquid (LF) and two solid ones (SF and AL), has been investigated and related to changes in soil adsorption of metalaxyl and tricyclazole. LF and AL have very high dissolved organic carbon (DOC) contents with low humification index values, whereas SF has a low DOC content but the highest amounts of highly humified material. All OAs increased the adsorption of tricyclazole, whereas adsorption of metalaxyl decreased in soils amended with LF and AL, due to competition with DOC for mineral adsorption sites. With aging, DOC from SF amended soils is not significantly affected and neither is adsorption behavior. On the contrary, the great reduction of DOC from LF and AL with aging has been shown to affect adsorption of metalaxyl and tricyclazole, and this effect is dependent on the pesticide, the nature of the DOC, and the type of soil, in particular its clay mineralogy.

  14. Fast-freezing with liquid nitrogen preserves bulk dissolved organic matter concentrations, but not its composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thieme, Lisa; Graeber, Daniel; Kaupenjohann, Martin; Siemens, Jan

    2016-08-01

    Freezing can affect concentrations and spectroscopic properties of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in water samples. Nevertheless, water samples are regularly frozen for sample preservation. In this study we tested the effect of different freezing methods (standard freezing at -18 °C and fast-freezing with liquid nitrogen) on DOM concentrations measured as organic carbon (DOC) concentrations and on spectroscopic properties of DOM from different terrestrial ecosystems (forest and grassland). Fresh and differently frozen throughfall, stemflow, litter leachate and soil solution samples were analyzed for DOC concentrations, UV-vis absorption and fluorescence excitation-emission matrices combined with parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC). Fast-freezing with liquid nitrogen prevented a significant decrease of DOC concentrations observed after freezing at -18 °C. Nonetheless, the share of PARAFAC components 1 (EXmax nitrogen for preservation of bulk DOC concentrations of samples from terrestrial sources, whereas immediate measuring is preferable to preserve spectroscopic properties of DOM.

  15. Forest soil response to acid and salt additions of sulfate. 3. Solubilization and composition of dissolved organic carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A year-long experiment, using reconstructed spodosol and intact alfisol soil columns, was conducted to examine the effects of various simulated throughfall solutions on soil C dynamics. Soil organic C solubilization, dissolved organic C fractions, and decomposition rates were studied using simulated acidic and salt throughfall solutions. Based on the results of the study the authors propose that throughfall solutions of pH above 3.7 will have little or no influences on dissolved organic C cycling in the types of spodosol and alfisol forest soils used here. However, at pH 3.0 some alterations in organic C solubilization, dissolved organic C fractions, and mobility could be expected

  16. Inhibition of hydroxyl radical reaction with aromatics by dissolved natural organic matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsey, M.E.; Tarr, M.A.

    2000-01-01

    Reaction of aromatic compounds with hydroxyl radical is inhibited by dissolved natural organic matter (NOM). The degree of inhibition is significantly greater than that expected based on a simple model in which aromatic compound molecules bound to NOM are considered to be unreactive. In this study, hydroxyl radical was produced at steady-state concentrations using Fenton chemistry (H2O2 + Fe2+ ??? Fe3+ + HO- + HO??). Suwannee River fulvic acid and humic acid were used as NOM. The most likely mechanism for the observed inhibition is that hydroxyl radical formation occurs in microenvironmental sites remote from the aromatic compounds. In addition to changes in kinetics, pyrene hydroxyl radical reaction also exhibited a mechanistic change in the presence of fulvic acid. The mechanism changed from a reaction that was apparently firstorder in pyrene to one that was apparently secondorder in pyrene, indicating that pyrene self-reaction may have become the dominant mechanism in the presence of fulvic acid. Dissolved NOM causes significant changes in the rate and mechanism of hydroxyl radical degradation of aromatic compounds. Consequently, literature rate constants measured in pure water will not be useful for predicting the degradation of pollutants in environmental systems. The kinetic and mechanistic information in this study will be useful for developing improved degradation methods involving Fenton chemistry.Reaction of aromatic compounds with hydroxyl radical is inhibited by dissolved natural organic matter (NOM). The degree of inhibition is significantly greater than that expected based on a simple model in which aromatic compounds molecules bounds to NOM are considered to be unreactive. In this study, hydroxyl radical was produced at steady-state concentrations using Fenton chemistry (H2O2 + Fe2+ ??? Fe3+ + HO- + HO??). Suwannee River fulvic acid and humic acid were used as NOM. The most likely mechanisms for the observed inhibition is that hydroxyl radical

  17. Colored dissolved organic matter in shallow estuaries: relationships between carbon sources and light attenuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oestreich, W.K.; Ganju, Neil Kamal; Pohlman, John; Suttles, Steven

    2016-01-01

    Light availability is of primary importance to the ecological function of shallow estuaries. For example, benthic primary production by submerged aquatic vegetation is contingent upon light penetration to the seabed. A major component that attenuates light in estuaries is colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM). CDOM is often measured via a proxy, fluorescing dissolved organic matter (fDOM), due to the ease of in situ fDOM sensor measurements. Fluorescence must be converted to CDOM absorbance for use in light attenuation calculations. However, this CDOM–fDOM relationship varies among and within estuaries. We quantified the variability in this relationship within three estuaries along the mid-Atlantic margin of the eastern United States: West Falmouth Harbor (MA), Barnegat Bay (NJ), and Chincoteague Bay (MD/VA). Land use surrounding these estuaries ranges from urban to developed, with varying sources of nutrients and organic matter. Measurements of fDOM (excitation and emission wavelengths of 365 nm (±5 nm) and 460 nm (±40 nm), respectively) and CDOM absorbance were taken along a terrestrial-to-marine gradient in all three estuaries. The ratio of the absorption coefficient at 340 nm (m−1) to fDOM (QSU) was higher in West Falmouth Harbor (1.22) than in Barnegat Bay (0.22) and Chincoteague Bay (0.17). The CDOM : fDOM absorption ratio was variable between sites within West Falmouth Harbor and Barnegat Bay, but consistent between sites within Chincoteague Bay. Stable carbon isotope analysis for constraining the source of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in West Falmouth Harbor and Barnegat Bay yielded δ13C values ranging from −19.7 to −26.1 ‰ and −20.8 to −26.7 ‰, respectively. Concentration and stable carbon isotope mixing models of DOC (dissolved organic carbon) indicate a contribution of 13C-enriched DOC in the estuaries. The most likely source of 13C-enriched DOC for the systems we investigated is Spartina cordgrass. Comparison of

  18. Colored dissolved organic matter in shallow estuaries: relationships between carbon sources and light attenuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oestreich, W. K.; Ganju, N. K.; Pohlman, J. W.; Suttles, S. E.

    2016-02-01

    Light availability is of primary importance to the ecological function of shallow estuaries. For example, benthic primary production by submerged aquatic vegetation is contingent upon light penetration to the seabed. A major component that attenuates light in estuaries is colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM). CDOM is often measured via a proxy, fluorescing dissolved organic matter (fDOM), due to the ease of in situ fDOM sensor measurements. Fluorescence must be converted to CDOM absorbance for use in light attenuation calculations. However, this CDOM-fDOM relationship varies among and within estuaries. We quantified the variability in this relationship within three estuaries along the mid-Atlantic margin of the eastern United States: West Falmouth Harbor (MA), Barnegat Bay (NJ), and Chincoteague Bay (MD/VA). Land use surrounding these estuaries ranges from urban to developed, with varying sources of nutrients and organic matter. Measurements of fDOM (excitation and emission wavelengths of 365 nm (±5 nm) and 460 nm (±40 nm), respectively) and CDOM absorbance were taken along a terrestrial-to-marine gradient in all three estuaries. The ratio of the absorption coefficient at 340 nm (m-1) to fDOM (QSU) was higher in West Falmouth Harbor (1.22) than in Barnegat Bay (0.22) and Chincoteague Bay (0.17). The CDOM : fDOM absorption ratio was variable between sites within West Falmouth Harbor and Barnegat Bay, but consistent between sites within Chincoteague Bay. Stable carbon isotope analysis for constraining the source of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in West Falmouth Harbor and Barnegat Bay yielded δ13C values ranging from -19.7 to -26.1 ‰ and -20.8 to -26.7 ‰, respectively. Concentration and stable carbon isotope mixing models of DOC (dissolved organic carbon) indicate a contribution of 13C-enriched DOC in the estuaries. The most likely source of 13C-enriched DOC for the systems we investigated is Spartina cordgrass. Comparison of DOC source to CDOM : f

  19. Dissolved organic phosphorus (DOP) and its potential role for ecosystem nutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brödlin, Dominik; Hagedorn, Frank; Kaiser, Klaus

    2016-04-01

    During ecosystem development and soil formation, primary mineral sources of phosphorus are becoming increasingly depleted. Inorganic phosphorus forms tend to be bound strongly to or within secondary minerals, thus, are hardly available to plants and are not leached from soil. What about organic forms of phosphorus? Since rarely studied, little is known about the fluxes of dissolved organic phosphorus (DOP) forms and their role in the P cycle. However, there is evidence that DOP is composed of some plant-derived organic phosphorus compounds, such as phytate, which are less mobile and prone to be sorbed to mineral surfaces, whereas microbial-derived compounds like nucleic acids and simple phospho-monoester may represent more mobile forms of soil phosphorus. In our study, we estimated fluxes, composition, and bioavailability of DOP along a gradient in phosphorus availability at five sites on silicate bedrock across Germany (Bad Brückenau, Conventwald, Vessertal, Mitterfels and Lüss) and at a calcareous site in Switzerland (Schänis). Soil solution was collected at 0 down to 60 to 150 cm soil depth at different intervals. Since most solutions had very low P concentrations (<0.05 mg total dissolved P/L), soil solutions had to be concentrated by freeze-drying for the enzymatic characterization of DOP. In order to test the potential bioavailability, we used an enzyme assay distinguishing between phytate-like P (phytate), diester-like P (nucleic acids), monoester-like P (glucose-6-phosphate), and pyrophosphate of bulk molybdate unreactive phosphorus (MUP). First results from the enzymatic assay indicated that monoester-like P and diester-like P were the most prominent form of the hydrolysable DOP constituents. In leachates from the organic layer, there was a high enzymatic activity for monoester-like P, indicating high recycling efficiency and rapid hydrolysis of labile DOP constituents. DOP was the dominating P form in soil solution at some of the sites, with a greater

  20. A proteomic fingerprint of dissolved organic carbon and of soil particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulze, Waltraud X; Gleixner, Gerd; Kaiser, Klaus; Guggenberger, Georg; Mann, Matthias; Schulze, Ernst-Detlef

    2005-01-01

    Mass spectrometry-based proteomics was applied to analyze proteins isolated from dissolved organic matter (DOM). The focal question was to identify the type and biological origin of proteins in DOM, and to describe diversity of protein origin at the level of higher taxonomic units, as well as to detect extracellular enzymes possibly important in the carbon cycle. Identified proteins were classified according to their phylogenetic origin and metabolic function using the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) protein and taxonomy database. Seventy-eight percent of the proteins in DOM from the lake but less than 50% in forest soil DOM originated from bacteria. In a deciduous forest, the number of identified proteins decreased from 75 to 28 with increasing soil depth and decreasing total soil organic carbon content. The number of identified proteins and taxonomic groups was 50% higher in winter than in summer. In spruce forest, number of proteins and taxonomic groups decreased by 50% on a plot where trees had been girdled a year before and carbohydrate transport to roots was terminated. After girdling, proteins from four taxonomic groups remained as compared to nine taxonomic groups in healthy forest. Enzymes involved in degradation of organic matter were not identified in free soil DOM. However, cellulases and laccases were found among proteins extracted from soil particles, indicating that degradation of soil organic matter takes place in biofilms on particle surfaces. These results demonstrate a novel application of proteomics to obtain a "proteomic fingerprint" of presence and activity of organisms in an ecosystem.

  1. Negative effect of dissolved organic compounds on settling behavior of synthetic monominerals in red mud

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王梦; 胡慧萍; 刘锦伟; 陈启元

    2016-01-01

    Hydration grossular and hematite monominerals were synthesized. The effects of dissolved organic compounds (including sodium formate, sodium acetate, sodium oxalate, sodium salicylate or disodium phthalate) on the settling performance of hydration grossular or hematite slurries were studied. The settling of the slurries was also investigated with the addition of sodium polyacrylate (PAAS) or hydroxamated polyacrylamide flocculant (HCPAM). The adsorption mechanism of organic compounds on monominerals surfaces was studied by FT-IR and XPS, respectively. A deterioration in settling is observed in order of disodium phthalate>sodium salicylate>sodium oxalate>sodium formate (or sodium acetate). Moreover, PAAS can efficiently eliminate the negative effects of organic compounds on the settling performance of the hydration grossular slurry. HCPAM can efficiently eliminate the negative effects of sodium formate, sodium acetate and sodium oxalate on the settling performance of the hematite slurry, but it only partially improves the settling performance of hematite slurry containing sodium salicylate or disodium phthalate. FT-IR and XPS results show that organic compounds are physically adsorbed on hydration grossular surface, and chemisorptions of organic compounds occur on hematite surface with a bidentate chelating complex.

  2. Dissolved inorganic carbon and organic carbon in mires in the Forsmark area. A pilot study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) are the large dissolved carbon pools in mires. They are both related to a number of factors such as groundwater flow, minerogenic influence and peat properties, which all are more or less related to peatland development stage. In a scenario of a release of radionuclides from an underground repository containing radioactive material, behaviour of these pools during the mire ontogeny will be of importance for the understanding of how C-14 will constitute a potential risk to humans and non-human biota. In this pilot study, DIC and DOC concentrations were investigated for three mires representing a potential sequence of peatland development in a coastal area at Forsmark in central Sweden characterized by land upheaval, a flat topography and calcareous content in the soil. The mires where chosen based on difference in height above the sea level, covering approximate 1000 years, and characteristics based on their vegetation. Water samples were collected during August from all three mires at two different depths in the anoxic layer of the mires, by extracting water from peat obtained with a peat corer. DIC concentrations where related to the age of the mires, with the lowest concentrations in the highest located mire. There was a positive correlation between pH and DIC, where the higher DIC concentrations were found in the 'richer' fens. DIC concentrations were also positively related to the conductivity within and between the mires, where conductivity would be a proxy for the dominating cation Ca2+ associated to the calcareous-influenced groundwater. DOC concentrations were highest in the oldest mire, but were similar in the younger mires. No patterns were found between DIC and DOC, and the peat bulk density. The report ends with suggestions on how a continued study could be improved

  3. Dissolved inorganic carbon and organic carbon in mires in the Forsmark area. A pilot study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loefgren, Anders [EcoAnalytica, Haegersten (Sweden)

    2011-12-15

    Dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) are the large dissolved carbon pools in mires. They are both related to a number of factors such as groundwater flow, minerogenic influence and peat properties, which all are more or less related to peatland development stage. In a scenario of a release of radionuclides from an underground repository containing radioactive material, behaviour of these pools during the mire ontogeny will be of importance for the understanding of how C-14 will constitute a potential risk to humans and non-human biota. In this pilot study, DIC and DOC concentrations were investigated for three mires representing a potential sequence of peatland development in a coastal area at Forsmark in central Sweden characterized by land upheaval, a flat topography and calcareous content in the soil. The mires where chosen based on difference in height above the sea level, covering approximate 1000 years, and characteristics based on their vegetation. Water samples were collected during August from all three mires at two different depths in the anoxic layer of the mires, by extracting water from peat obtained with a peat corer. DIC concentrations where related to the age of the mires, with the lowest concentrations in the highest located mire. There was a positive correlation between pH and DIC, where the higher DIC concentrations were found in the 'richer' fens. DIC concentrations were also positively related to the conductivity within and between the mires, where conductivity would be a proxy for the dominating cation Ca{sup 2+} associated to the calcareous-influenced groundwater. DOC concentrations were highest in the oldest mire, but were similar in the younger mires. No patterns were found between DIC and DOC, and the peat bulk density. The report ends with suggestions on how a continued study could be improved.

  4. Seasonal Changes in Estuarine Dissolved Organic Matter Due to Variations in Discharge, Flushing Times and Wind-driven Mixing Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Jennifer Louise

    Estuaries are highly productive habitats that transport and transform organic matter (OM), experience large changes in ionic composition and act as a transition zone between terrestrial and marine environments (Paerl et al. 1998; Markager et al. 2011; Osburn et al. 2012). OM source and matrix effects (such as salinity and pH) influence the chemical structure of DOM in estuaries and therefore affect its bioavailability, photo-reactivity, and its overall fate in these systems (Jaffe et al. 2004; Boyd et al. 2010; Pace et al. 2012; Osburn et al. 2012; Cawley et al. 2013). Within estuaries, dissolved organic matter (DOM) is a heterogeneous mixture of aromatic and aliphatic compounds, and its composition in aquatic systems varies spatially and temporally with source (Bauer and Bianchi 2011). However, the main source of DOM in estuaries, rivers and other aquatic systems, originates from vascular plant detritus, soil humus, older fossil (i.e., petrogenic) organic carbon, black carbon, marine OM and in situ production (Hedges 2002; Houghton 2007; Bauer and Bianchi 2011). Chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM), the light absorbing fraction of DOM, can be characterized using optical methods such as absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy (e.g. Coble, 1996; Stedmon and Markager, 2003). By analyzing the spatial and temporal variability of DOM and CDOM within estuaries, information pertaining to OM source and fate across the freshwater-marine continuum can be obtained. These methods offer an inexpensive, non-destructive means for obtaining sensitive measurements of a diverse group of organic compounds. By using this technology to analyze the spatial and temporal variability of CDOM within estuaries, information pertaining to OM source and fate across the freshwater-marine continuum can be obtained (Fellman et al. 2011; Osburn et al. 2012; Murphy et al. 2014). Chemical biomarkers are also routinely used to identify DOM sources in coastal waters. Examples are carbon stable

  5. Impact of total organic carbon (in sediments) and dissolved organic carbon (in overlying water column) on Hg sequestration by coastal sediments from the central east coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Chakrabortya, P.; Sharma, B.M.; Babu, P.V.R.; Yao, K.M.; Jaychandran, S.

          1.0 Introduction Mercury (Hg) has received a worldwide attention due to its significant global adverse impact on both environment and human health (Boening, 2000; Ratcliffe et al., 1996; Wolfe et al., 2009). Due to its high toxicity... of dissolved organic carbon and salinity on bioavailability of mercury. Applied and Environmental Microbiology, 63, 4267–4271. Bengtsson, G., Picado, F., 2008. Mercury sorption to sediments: Dependence on grain size, dissolved organic carbon, and suspended...

  6. Dissolved organic carbon ameliorates the effects of UV radiation on a freshwater fish

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anthropogenic activities over the past several decades have depleted stratospheric ozone, resulting in a global increase in ultraviolet radiation (UVR). Much of the negative effects of UVR in aquatic systems is minimized by dissolved organic carbon (DOC) which is known to attenuate UVR across the water column. The skin of many fishes contains large epidermal club cells (ECCs) that are known to play a role in innate immune responses and also release chemical alarm cues that warn other fishes of danger. This study investigated the effects of in vivo UVR exposure to fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas), under the influence of two sources of DOC: Sigma Aldrich humic acid, a coal based commercial source of DOC and Luther Marsh natural organic matter, a terrigenous source of DOC. Specifically, we examined ECC investment and physiological stress responses and found that fish exposed to high UVR, in the presence of either source of DOC, had higher ECC investment than fish exposed to high UVR only. Similarly, exposure to high UVR under either source of DOC, reduced cortisol levels relative to that in the high UVR only treatment. This indicates that DOC protects fish from physiological stress associated with UVR exposure and helps maintain production of ECC under conditions of UVR exposure. - Highlights: • We examined the combined effect of UV radiation and Dissolved Organic Carbon on fish. • Physiological stress response and epidermal club cell investment were measured. • Fish exposed to high UVR and DOC had higher ECC investment and reduced cortisol levels. • DOC plays a role in protecting fish from physiological stress and maintains ECC production

  7. Controls on the composition and lability of dissolved organic matter in Siberia's Kolyma River basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, P. J.; Davydova, A.; Zimov, N.; Spencer, R. G. M.; Davydov, S.; Bulygina, E.; Zimov, S.; Holmes, R. M.

    2012-03-01

    High-latitude northern rivers export globally significant quantities of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) to the Arctic Ocean. Climate change, and its associated impacts on hydrology and potential mobilization of ancient organic matter from permafrost, is likely to modify the flux, composition, and thus biogeochemical cycling and fate of exported DOC in the Arctic. This study examined DOC concentration and the composition of dissolved organic matter (DOM) across the hydrograph in Siberia's Kolyma River, with a particular focus on the spring freshet period when the majority of the annual DOC load is exported. The composition of DOM within the Kolyma basin was characterized using absorbance-derived measurements (absorbance coefficienta330, specific UV absorbance (SUVA254), and spectral slope ratio SR) and fluorescence spectroscopy (fluorescence index and excitation-emission matrices (EEMs)), including parallel factor analyses of EEMs. Increased surface runoff during the spring freshet led to DOM optical properties indicative of terrestrial soil inputs with high humic-like fluorescence, SUVA254, and low SRand fluorescence index (FI). Under-ice waters, in contrast, displayed opposing trends in optical properties representing less aromatic, lower molecular weight DOM. We demonstrate that substantial losses of DOC can occur via biological (˜30% over 28 days) and photochemical pathways (>29% over 14 days), particularly in samples collected during the spring freshet. The emerging view is therefore that of a more dynamic and labile carbon pool than previously thought, where DOM composition plays a fundamental role in controlling the fate and removal of DOC at a pan-Arctic scale.

  8. Predicting Sources of Dissolved Organic Nitrogen to an Estuary from an Agro-Urban Coastal Watershed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osburn, Christopher L; Handsel, Lauren T; Peierls, Benjamin L; Paerl, Hans W

    2016-08-16

    Dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) is the nitrogen (N)-containing component of dissolved organic matter (DOM) and in aquatic ecosystems is part of the biologically reactive nitrogen pool that can degrade water quality in N-sensitive waters. Unlike inorganic N (nitrate and ammonium) DON is comprised of many different molecules of variable reactivity. Few methods exist to track the sources of DON in watersheds. In this study, DOM excitation-emission matrix (EEM) fluorescence of eight discrete DON sources was measured and modeled with parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC) and the resulting model ("FluorMod") was fit to 516 EEMs measured in surface waters from the main stem of the Neuse River and its tributaries, located in eastern North Carolina. PARAFAC components were positively correlated to DON concentration. Principle components analysis (PCA) was used to confirm separation of the eight sources and model validation was achieved by measurement of source samples not included in the model development with an error of FluorMod to surface waters of streams within the Neuse River Basin showed that while >70% of DON was attributed to natural sources, nonpoint sources, such as soil and poultry litter leachates and street runoff, accounted for the remaining 30%. This result was consistent with changes in land use from urbanized Raleigh metropolitan area to the largely agricultural Southeastern coastal plain. Overall, the predicted fraction of nonpoint DON sources was consistent with previous reports of increased organic N inputs in this river basin, which are suspected of impacting the water quality of its estuary. PMID:27404466

  9. Assessing the drivers of dissolved organic matter export from two contrasting lowland catchments, U.K.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yates, Christopher A; Johnes, Penny J; Spencer, Robert G M

    2016-11-01

    Two lowland catchments in the U.K. were sampled throughout 2010-11 to investigate the dominant controls on dissolved organic matter quantity and composition. The catchments had marked differences in terms of nutrient status, land cover and contrasting lithologies resulting in differences in the dominant flow pathways (groundwater vs. surface water dominated). The Upper Wylye is a chalk stream with a baseflow index of 0.98, draining a catchment dominated by intensive agricultural production. Millersford Brook is a lowland peat catchment with a baseflow index of 0.43, draining a semi-natural catchment with heather moorland and coniferous forest. Samples were collected weekly between October 2010 and September 2011 from eleven sampling locations. Samples were analysed to determine dissolved organic carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus fractions with DOM composition evaluated via the DOC:DON ratio, DOC:DOP ratio, specific UV absorption at 254nm, absorbance ratio (a250:a365) and the spectral slope parameter between 350 and 400nm (S350-400). Significant differences were observed in all determinands between the catchments, over time, and spatially along nutrient enrichment and geoclimatic gradients. Seasonal variation in preferential flow pathways mobilising groundwater-derived DOM were identified as likely controls on the delivery of DOM in the permeable chalk dominated catchment. Steeper S350-400 values and elevated a250:a365 ratios in this catchment suggest material of a lower bulk aromatic C content and molecular weight delivered during the winter months when compared to the summer. DOC:DON ratios were markedly lower in the chalk catchment than the peatland catchment, reflecting the paucity of organic matter within the mineral soils of the chalk landscape, and higher fertiliser application rates. This manuscript highlights that DOM composition varies according to catchment landscape character and hydrological function. PMID:27422728

  10. Chemical composition and cycling of dissolved organic matter in the Mid-Atlantic Bight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aluwihare, Lihini I.; Repeta, Daniel J.; Chen, Robert F.

    This study focuses on the chemical characterization of high molecular-weight dissolved organic matter (HMW DOM) isolated from the Middle Atlantic Bight in April 1994 and March 1996. Using proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy ( 1HNMR) and monosaccharide analysis we compared both spatial and temporal variations in the chemical structure of HMW DOM across this region. Our analyses support the presence of at least two compositionally distinct components to HMW DOM. The major component is acyl polysaccharide (APS), a biopolymer rich in carbohydrates, acetate and lipid, accounting for between 50% and 80% of the total high molecular-weight dissolved organic carbon (HMW DOC) in surface samples. APS is most abundant in fully marine, surface-water samples, and is a product of autochthonous production. Organic matter with spectral properties characteristic of humic substances is the second major component of HMW DOM. Humic substances are most abundant (up to 49% of the total carbon) in samples collected from estuaries, near the coast, and in deep water, suggesting both marine and perhaps terrestrial sources. Radiocarbon analyses of neutral monosaccharides released by the hydrolysis of APS have similar and modern (average 71‰) Δ 14C values. Radiocarbon data support our suggestion that these sugars occur as part of a common macromolecule, with an origin via recent biosynthesis. Preliminary radiocarbon data for total neutral monosaccharides isolated from APS at 300 and 750 m show this fraction to be substantially enriched relative to total HMW DOC and DOC. The relatively enriched radiocarbon values of APS at depth suggest APS is rapidly transported into the deep ocean.

  11. Biochar amendment to soil changes dissolved organic matter content and composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smebye, Andreas; Alling, Vanja; Vogt, Rolf D; Gadmar, Tone C; Mulder, Jan; Cornelissen, Gerard; Hale, Sarah E

    2016-01-01

    Amendments of biochar, a product of pyrolysis of biomass, have been shown to increase fertility of acidic soils by enhancing soil properties such as pH, cation-exchange-capacity and water-holding-capacity. These parameters are important in the context of natural organic matter contained in soils, of which dissolved organic matter (DOM) is the mobile and most bioavailable fraction. The effect of biochar on the content and composition of DOM in soils has received little research attention. This study focuses on the effects of amendments of two different biochars to an acidic acrisol and a pH-neutral brown soil. A batch experiment showed that mixing biochar with the acrisols at a 10 wt.% dose increased the pH from 4.9 to 8.7, and this resulted in a 15-fold increase in the dissolved organic carbon concentration (from 4.5 to 69 mg L(-1)). The pH-increase followed the same trend as the release of DOM in the experiment, causing higher DOM solubility and desorption of DOM from mineral sites. The binding to biochar of several well-characterised reference DOM materials was also investigated and results showed a higher sorption of aliphatic DOM to biochar than aromatic DOM, with DOM-water partitioning coefficients (Kd-values) ranging from 0.2 to 590 L kg(-1). A size exclusion occurring in biochar's micropores, could result in a higher sorption of smaller aliphatic DOM molecules than larger aromatic ones. These findings indicate that biochar could increase the leaching of DOM from soil, as well as change the DOM composition towards molecules with a larger size and higher aromaticity.

  12. Biochar amendment to soil changes dissolved organic matter content and composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smebye, Andreas; Alling, Vanja; Vogt, Rolf D; Gadmar, Tone C; Mulder, Jan; Cornelissen, Gerard; Hale, Sarah E

    2016-01-01

    Amendments of biochar, a product of pyrolysis of biomass, have been shown to increase fertility of acidic soils by enhancing soil properties such as pH, cation-exchange-capacity and water-holding-capacity. These parameters are important in the context of natural organic matter contained in soils, of which dissolved organic matter (DOM) is the mobile and most bioavailable fraction. The effect of biochar on the content and composition of DOM in soils has received little research attention. This study focuses on the effects of amendments of two different biochars to an acidic acrisol and a pH-neutral brown soil. A batch experiment showed that mixing biochar with the acrisols at a 10 wt.% dose increased the pH from 4.9 to 8.7, and this resulted in a 15-fold increase in the dissolved organic carbon concentration (from 4.5 to 69 mg L(-1)). The pH-increase followed the same trend as the release of DOM in the experiment, causing higher DOM solubility and desorption of DOM from mineral sites. The binding to biochar of several well-characterised reference DOM materials was also investigated and results showed a higher sorption of aliphatic DOM to biochar than aromatic DOM, with DOM-water partitioning coefficients (Kd-values) ranging from 0.2 to 590 L kg(-1). A size exclusion occurring in biochar's micropores, could result in a higher sorption of smaller aliphatic DOM molecules than larger aromatic ones. These findings indicate that biochar could increase the leaching of DOM from soil, as well as change the DOM composition towards molecules with a larger size and higher aromaticity. PMID:25980657

  13. Dissolved organic matter transport reflects hillslope to stream connectivity during snowmelt in a montane catchment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Margaret A.; Barnard, Holly R.; Gabor, Rachel S.; McKnight, Diane M.; Brooks, Paul D.

    2016-06-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) transport is a key biogeochemical linkage across the terrestrial-aquatic interface in headwater catchments, and quantifying the biological and hydrological controls on DOM composition provides insight into DOM cycling at the catchment scale. We evaluated the mobility of DOM components during snowmelt in a montane, semiarid catchment. DOM composition was evaluated on a near-daily basis within the soil and the stream during snowmelt, and was compared to groundwater samples using a site-specific parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC) model derived from soil extracts. The fluorescent component loadings in the interstitial soil water and in the groundwater were significantly different and did not temporally change during snowmelt. In the stream, a transition occurred during snowmelt from fluorescent DOM with higher contributions of amino acid-like components indicative of groundwater to higher humic-like contributions indicative of soil water. Furthermore, we identified a humic-like fluorescent component in the soil water and the stream that is typically only observed in extracted water soluble organic matter from soil which may suggest hillslope to stream connectivity over very short time scales. Qualitative interpretations of changes in stream fluorescent DOM were supported by two end-member mixing analyses of conservative tracers. After normalizing fluorescent DOM loadings for dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration, we found that the peak in DOC concentration in the stream was driven by the nonfluorescent fraction of DOM. This study demonstrated how PARAFAC analysis can be used to refine our conceptual models of runoff generation sources, as well as provide a more detailed understanding of stream chemistry dynamics.

  14. Dissolved organic carbon ameliorates the effects of UV radiation on a freshwater fish

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manek, Aditya K., E-mail: aditya.manek@usask.ca [Department of Biology, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, S7N 5E2 SK (Canada); Ferrari, Maud C.O. [Department of Biomedical Sciences, WCVM, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, S7N 5B4 SK (Canada); Chivers, Douglas P.; Niyogi, Som [Department of Biology, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, S7N 5E2 SK (Canada)

    2014-08-15

    Anthropogenic activities over the past several decades have depleted stratospheric ozone, resulting in a global increase in ultraviolet radiation (UVR). Much of the negative effects of UVR in aquatic systems is minimized by dissolved organic carbon (DOC) which is known to attenuate UVR across the water column. The skin of many fishes contains large epidermal club cells (ECCs) that are known to play a role in innate immune responses and also release chemical alarm cues that warn other fishes of danger. This study investigated the effects of in vivo UVR exposure to fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas), under the influence of two sources of DOC: Sigma Aldrich humic acid, a coal based commercial source of DOC and Luther Marsh natural organic matter, a terrigenous source of DOC. Specifically, we examined ECC investment and physiological stress responses and found that fish exposed to high UVR, in the presence of either source of DOC, had higher ECC investment than fish exposed to high UVR only. Similarly, exposure to high UVR under either source of DOC, reduced cortisol levels relative to that in the high UVR only treatment. This indicates that DOC protects fish from physiological stress associated with UVR exposure and helps maintain production of ECC under conditions of UVR exposure. - Highlights: • We examined the combined effect of UV radiation and Dissolved Organic Carbon on fish. • Physiological stress response and epidermal club cell investment were measured. • Fish exposed to high UVR and DOC had higher ECC investment and reduced cortisol levels. • DOC plays a role in protecting fish from physiological stress and maintains ECC production.

  15. Synoptic Sampling of Dissolved Nitrogen Species and Organic Carbon in the Rio Grande Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villinski, J. E.; Hogan, J. F.; Brooks, P. D.; Haas, P. A.; Mills, S. K.

    2002-12-01

    Synoptic sampling has been performed along the Rio Grande from the headwaters in Colorado to Fort Quitman, Texas, south of El Paso. Samples from August 2001 and January 2002 were analyzed for nitrate (NO3-), ammonium (NH_{4}$+), total dissolved nitrogen (TDN), and dissolved organic carbon (DOC). DOC concentrations increase slowly between Colorado and southern New Mexico and then approximately double in Texas. Large sources of N during both sampling periods were the urban areas around Albuquerque and El Paso, Texas and Ciudad Juarez, Mexico, and agricultural regions in the Rincon and Mesilla valleys of southern New Mexico. Nitrate-N concentrations remained high south of Albuquerque to Elephant Butte reservoir in the summer, presumably due to lack of primary production. Inorganic N concentrations generally are higher in the winter than in the summer. During the summer, ammonium concentrations were greater than 100 mg N/l only at the outlet of Elephant Butte Reservoir, and in Texas. However, winter concentrations were on average an order of magnitude greater, again with the largest ammonium values (5000 \\mug N/l) in Texas. These patterns are consistent with a reduction in biological nutrient demand during the non-growing season.

  16. Linking the Molecular Signature of Heteroatomic Dissolved Organic Matter to Watershed Characteristics in World Rivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Sasha; Riedel, Thomas; Niggemann, Jutta; Vähätalo, Anssi V; Dittmar, Thorsten; Jaffé, Rudolf

    2015-12-01

    Large world rivers are significant sources of dissolved organic matter (DOM) to the oceans. Watershed geomorphology and land use can drive the quality and reactivity of DOM. Determining the molecular composition of riverine DOM is essential for understanding its source, mobility and fate across landscapes. In this study, DOM from the main stem of 10 global rivers covering a wide climatic range and land use features was molecularly characterized via ultrahigh-resolution Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR-MS). FT-ICR mass spectral data revealed an overall similarity in molecular components among the rivers. However, when focusing specifically on the contribution of nonoxygen heteroatomic molecular formulas (CHON, CHOS, CHOP, etc.) to the bulk molecular signature, patterns relating DOM composition and watershed land use became apparent. Greater abundances of N- and S-containing molecular formulas were identified as unique to rivers influenced by anthropogenic inputs, whereas rivers with primarily forested watersheds had DOM signatures relatively depleted in heteroatomic content. A strong correlation between cropland cover and dissolved black nitrogen was established when focusing specifically on the pyrogenic class of compounds. This study demonstrated how changes in land use directly affect downstream DOM quality and could impact C and nutrient cycling on a global scale. PMID:26153846

  17. Treatment of dissolved perchlorate, nitrate, and sulfate using zero-valent iron and organic carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, YingYing; Ptacek, Carol J; Blowes, David W

    2014-05-01

    Waters containing ClO and dissolved NO, derived from detonated explosives and solid propellants, often also contain elevated concentrations of other dissolved constituents, including SO. Four column experiments, containing mixtures of silica sand, zero-valent Fe (ZVI) and organic C (OC) were conducted to evaluate the potential for simultaneous removal of NO, SO and ClO. Initially, the flow rate was maintained at 0.5 pore volumes (PV) d and then decreased to 0.1 PV d after 100 PV of flow. Nitrate concentrations decreased from 10.8 mg L (NO-N) to trace levels through NO reduction to NH using ZVI alone and through denitrification using OC. Observations from the mixture of ZVI and OC suggest a combination of NO reduction and denitrification. Up to 71% of input SO (24.5 ± 3.5 mg L) was removed in the column containing OC, and >99.7% of the input ClO (857 ± 63 μg L) was removed by the OC- and (ZVI + OC)-containing columns as the flow rate was maintained at 0.1 PV d. Nitrate and ClO removal followed first-order and zero-order rates, respectively. Nitrate >2 mg L (NO-N) inhibited ClO removal in the OC-containing column but not in the (ZVI + OC)-containing column. Sulfate did not inhibit ClO degradation within any of the columns.

  18. Fluorescent dissolved organic matter in the continental shelf waters of western Bay of Bengal

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    N V H K Chari; P Sudarsana Rao; Nittala S Sarma

    2013-10-01

    Fluorescent dissolved organic matter (FDOM) of southwestern Bay of Bengal surface water during southwest monsoon consisted five fluorophores, three humic-like and two protein-like. The humification index (HIX) and humic fluorophores, viz., visible (C), marine (M) and UV (A) humic-likes indicated, better than biogeochemical constituents analyzed, that the northern-half region of the study area which is closer to the head bay (less salinity) is distinctly more terrestrially influenced. Similarly, the southernhalf region (less dissolved oxygen) is indicated as more in situ influenced. This region is enriched with tyrosine protein-like fluorophore (B), an indicator of bacterial metabolism in some of its samples due to upwelled water. Although chlorophyll is less in this (southern) region, the fluorescence based biological index (BIX) which is an index of recent phytoplankton production is about the same in the two regions, and the lower chlorophyll of southern region is attributed to greater grazing pressure. Fluorescence properties, e.g., BIX are more informative about phytoplankton production than chlorophyll .

  19. Short-term dynamics of North Sea bacterioplankton-dissolved organic matter coherence on molecular level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith eLucas

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Remineralisation and transformation of dissolved organic matter (DOM by marine microbes shape the DOM composition and thus, have large impact on global carbon and nutrient cycling. However, information on bacterioplankton-DOM interactions on a molecular level is limited. We examined the variation of bacterial community composition at Helgoland Roads (North Sea in relation to variation of molecular DOM composition and various environmental parameters on short-time scales. Surface water samples were taken daily over a period of twenty days. Bacterial community and molecular DOM composition were assessed via 16S rRNA gene tag sequencing and ultrahigh resolution Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR-MS, respectively. Environmental conditions were driven by a coastal water influx during the first half of the sampling period and the onset of a summer phytoplankton bloom towards the end of the sampling period. These phenomena led to a distinct grouping of bacterial communities and DOM composition which was particularly influenced by total dissolved nitrogen concentration, temperature and salinity, as revealed by distance-based linear regression analyses. Bacterioplankton-DOM interaction was demonstrated in strong correlations between specific bacterial taxa and particular DOM molecules, thus, suggesting potential specialization on particular substrates. We propose that a combination of high resolution techniques, as used in this study, may provide substantial information on substrate generalists and specialists and thus, contribute to prediction of bacterial community composition variation.

  20. Mechanical biological treatment of organic fraction of MSW affected dissolved organic matter evolution in simulated landfill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salati, Silvia; Scaglia, Barbara; di Gregorio, Alessandra; Carrera, Alberto; Adani, Fabrizio

    2013-08-01

    The aim of this paper was to study the evolution of DOM during 1 year of observation in simulated landfill, of aerobically treated vs. untreated organic fraction of MSW. Results obtained indicated that aerobic treatment of organic fraction of MSW permitted getting good biological stability so that, successive incubation under anaerobic condition in landfill allowed biological process to continue getting a strong reduction of soluble organic matter (DOM) that showed, also, an aromatic character. Incubation of untreated waste gave similar trend, but in this case DOM decreasing was only apparent as inhibition of biological process in landfill did not allow replacing degraded/leached DOM with new material coming from hydrolysis of fresh OM. PMID:23743423

  1. Dissolved pesticides, dissolved organic carbon, and water-quality characteristics in selected Idaho streams, April--December 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, Timothy J.; Smalling, Kelly L.; Wilson, Emma R.; Battaglin, William A.

    2012-01-01

    Water-quality samples were collected from April through December 2010 from four streams in Idaho and analyzed for a suite of pesticides, including fungicides, by the U.S. Geological Survey. Water samples were collected from two agricultural and two nonagricultural (control) streams approximately biweekly from the beginning of the growing season (April) through the end of the calendar year (December). Samples were analyzed for 90 pesticides using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Twenty-three pesticides, including 8 fungicides, 10 herbicides, 3 insecticides, and 2 pesticide degradates, were detected in 45 water samples. The most frequently detected compounds in the two agricultural streams and their detection frequencies were metolachlor, 96 percent; azoxystrobin, 79 percent; boscalid, 79 percent; atrazine, 46 percent; pendimethalin, 33 percent; and trifluralin, 33 percent. Dissolved-pesticide concentrations ranged from below instrumental limits of detection (0.5-1.0 nanograms per liter) to 771 nanograms per liter (hexazinone). The total number of pesticides detected in any given water sample ranged from 0 to 11. Only three pesticides (atrazine, fipronil, and simazine) were detected in samples from the control streams during the sampling period.

  2. Assessing the bioavailability of dissolved organic phosphorus in pasture and cultivated soils treated with different rates of nitrogen fertiliser

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McDowell, R.W.; Koopmans, G.F.

    2006-01-01

    A proportion of dissolved organic phosphorus (DOP) in soil leachates is readily available for uptake by aquatic organisms and, therefore, can represent a hazard to surface water quality. A study was conducted to characterise DOP in water extracts and soil P fractions of lysimeter soils (pasture befo

  3. A novel molecular approach for tracing terrigenous dissolved organic matter into the deep ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medeiros, Patricia M.; Seidel, Michael; Niggemann, Jutta; Spencer, Robert G. M.; Hernes, Peter J.; Yager, Patricia L.; Miller, William L.; Dittmar, Thorsten; Hansell, Dennis A.

    2016-05-01

    Marine dissolved organic matter (DOM) contains one of the largest exchangeable organic carbon pools on Earth. Riverine input represents an important source of DOM to the oceans, yet much remains to be learned about the fate of the DOM linking terrestrial to oceanic carbon cycles through rivers at the global scale. Here we use ultrahigh-resolution mass spectrometry to identify 184 molecular formulae that are indicators of riverine inputs (referred to as t-Peaks) and to track their distribution in the deep North Atlantic and North Pacific Oceans. The t-Peaks were found to be enriched in the Amazon River, to be highly correlated with known tracers of terrigenous input, and to be observed in all samples from four different rivers characterized by vastly different landscapes and vegetation coverage spanning equatorial (Amazon and Congo), subtropical (Altamaha), and Arctic (Kolyma) regions. Their distribution reveals that terrigenous organic matter is injected into the deep ocean by the global meridional overturning circulation, indicating that a fraction of the terrigenous DOM introduced by rivers contributes to the DOM pool observed in the deep ocean and to the storage of terrigenous organic carbon. This novel molecular approach can be used to further constrain the transfer of DOM from land to sea, especially considering that Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer analysis is becoming increasingly frequent in studies characterizing the molecular composition of DOM in lakes, rivers, and the ocean.

  4. Increases in dissolved organic carbon accelerate loss of toxic Al in Adirondack lakes recovering from acidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Gregory B.; Dukett, James E; Houck, Nathan; Snyder, Phillip; Capone, Susan B.

    2013-01-01

    Increasing pH and decreasing Al in surface waters recovering from acidification have been accompanied by increasing concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and associated organic acids that partially offset pH increases and complicate assessments of recovery from acidification. To better understand the processes of recovery, monthly chemistry from 42 lakes in the Adirondack region, NY, collected from 1994 to 2011, were used to (1) evaluate long-term changes in DOC and associated strongly acidic organic acids and (2) use the base-cation surplus (BCS) as a chemical index to assess the effects of increasing DOC concentrations on the Al chemistry of these lakes. Over the study period, the BCS increased (p organic complexation of Al resulted in a decrease in the IMAl fraction of total monomeric Al from 57% in 1994 to 23% in 2011. Increasing DOC concentrations have accelerated recovery in terms of decreasing toxic Al beyond that directly accomplished by reducing atmospheric deposition of strong mineral acids.

  5. Coextracted dissolved organic carbon has a suppressive effect on the acetylcholinesterase inhibition assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neale, Peta A; Escher, Beate I

    2013-07-01

    The acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibition assay is frequently applied to detect organophosphates and carbamate pesticides in different water types, including dissolved organic carbon (DOC)-rich wastewater and surface water. The aim of the present study was to quantify the effect of coextracted DOC from different water samples on the commonly used enzyme-based AChE inhibition assay. Approximately 40% to 70% of DOC is typically recovered by solid-phase extraction, and this comprises not only organic micropollutants but also natural organic matter. The inhibition of the water extracts in the assay differed greatly from the expected mixture effects based on chemical analysis of organophosphates and carbamates. Binary mixture experiments with the known AChE inhibitor parathion and the water extracts showed reduced toxicity in comparison with predictions using the mixture models of concentration addition and independent action. In addition, the extracts and reference organic matter had a suppressive effect on a constant concentration of parathion. The present study thus indicated that concentrations of DOC as low as 2 mg carbon/L can impair the AChE inhibition assay and, consequently, that only samples with a final DOC concentration of less than 2 mgC /L are suitable for this assay. To check for potential suppression in environmental samples, standard addition experiments using an AChE-inhibiting reference compound are recommended. PMID:23424099

  6. Dissolved organic matter (DOM) dynamics in spruce forested sites -examinations by analytical DOM fractionation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dissolved organic matter from two spruce forested sites in the Fichtelgebirge (Germany) was divided into different chemical and functional fractions, and the budgets of the fractions obtained were calculated. For both sites hydrophobic acids (HoS), hydropholic acids (HiS), hydrophobic neutrals (HoN), hydrophilic neutrals (HiN), and hydrophilic bases (HiB) are discriminated concerning their dynamics in the compartments. Most of the HiN and HoN are mobilized by leaching from the forest canopy. Both neutral fractions are netto retained in the forest floor as well as in the mineral soil. In contrast, HoS and HiS are mainly released in the organic layers with a total input of organic acids from the forest floor into the mineral soil of ca. 100 kg C (HoS) ha-1 a-1, and 50 kg C (HiS) ha-1 a-1, respectively. HoS are selectively better retained in the mineral horizons, leading to a mineral soil output of 2.4-4.4 kg C (HoS) ha-1 a-1, and 2.7-6.5 kg C (HiS) ha-1 a-1, respectively. It is concluded that the different mobility of the DOM fractions has implications for the mobilization and transport or organic pollutants and heavy metals. (orig.)

  7. Dissolved Organic Carbon Determination Using FIA and Photo-Fenton Reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kondo Márcia M.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The FIA-photo-Fenton system is based on the flow oxidation of the organic matter. A small amount of the sample containing H2O2 is injected into the acidic flow solution of Fe2+, which passes through a tubular PTFE reactor irradiated with UV light. The generated CO2 is quantified by a conductometric detector and is directly proportional to the dissolved organic carbon concentration in the sample. The optimization studies were performed using EDTA solutions. The average recovery of organic carbon was 83% with a relative standard deviation of 3.7% using a 1:5 molar ratio of Fe2+:H2O2, pH 2.0, 100 muL of sample injection and a liquid flow of 1 mL min-1. After optimization, the DOC concentration was quantified using 13 different organic compounds, where the average recovery was 90%. The rate of the analysis was in average 50 samples hour-1.

  8. Characterization and origin of polar dissolved organic matter from the Great Salt Lake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leenheer, J.A.; Noyes, T.I.; Rostad, C.E.; Davisson, M.L.

    2004-01-01

    Polar dissolved organic matter (DOM) was isolated from a surface-water sample from the Great Salt Lake by separating it from colloidal organic matter by membrane dialysis, from less-polar DOM fractions by resin sorbents, and from inorganic salts by a combination of sodium cation exchange followed by precipitation of sodium salts by acetic acid during evaporative concentration. Polar DOM was the most abundant DOM fraction, accounting for 56% of the isolated DOM. Colloidal organic matter was 14C-age dated to be about 100% modern carbon and all of the DOM fractions were 14C-age dated to be between 94 and 95% modern carbon. Average structural models of each DOM fraction were derived that incorporated quantitative elemental and infrared, 13C-NMR, and electrospray/mass spectrometric data. The polar DOM model consisted of open-chain N-acetyl hydroxy carboxylic acids likely derived from N-acetyl heteropolysaccharides that constituted the colloidal organic matter. The less polar DOM fraction models consisted of aliphatic alicyclic ring structures substituted with carboxyl, hydroxyl, ether, ester, and methyl groups. These ring structures had characteristics similar to terpenoid precursors. All DOM fractions in the Great Salt Lake are derived from algae and bacteria that dominate DOM inputs in this lake.

  9. The hydrophilic/hydrophobic ratio vs. dissolved organics removal by coagulation – A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Djamel Ghernaout

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This review discusses the hydrophilic/hydrophobic ratio as a function of the hydrophilic and hydrophobic contents removal by coagulation process. It is well established that coagulation process could bring a reduction in dissolved organic carbon of around 30–60% by increasing the coagulant dose and optimising reaction pH, in which large organic molecules with hydrophobic property was removed preferentially. Furthermore, the literature affirmed that the greater removal of UV-absorbing substances indicates that alum coagulation preferentially removed the hydrophobic fraction of the total organic carbon. For the hydrophobic fraction, it needs to be removed entirely without its transformation into hydrophilic fractions by coagulation process avoiding pre-chlorination/pre-oxidation due to the risk of organic molecules fragmentation. Determining the exact numerical values of the hydrophilic/hydrophobic ratio for raw water and treated water at different stages of the treatment processes in a water treatment plant, as for the DCO/DBO5 ratio in the case of wastewater treatment, would help on more focusing on OM control and removal.

  10. Dissolved organic matter and lake metabolism. Technical progress report, 1 July 1979-30 June 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wetzel, R.G.

    1980-01-01

    Progress in research to evaluate the impact of utilization of fossil fuels on surface water is reported. Analyses of regulatory mechanisms of growth and rates of carbon cycling center on evaluation of quantitative control interactions among the microflora of the pelagial zones of several lakes of progressively greater eutrophy, littoral photosynthetic producer-decomposer complex, and allochthonous inorganic-organic influxes and their biotic processing. The underlying thesis is that quantification of the dynamic carbon fluxes among these components and their rate control mechanisms by physical and chemical factors are fundamental to elucidation of the rate functions of lake eutrophication. A major portion of the research has been directed towards the fate and nutrient mechanisms regulating qualitative and quantitative utilization and losses of organic carbon synthesized within lakes and their drainage basins. It has become increasingly apparent that the wetland and littoral flora, and attendant epiphytic and benthic microflora, have major regulatory controls on biogeochemical cycling of whole lake systems. A major effort on factors regulating the metabolism of littoral macrophytes and attached algae has been coupled to integrated studies on their decomposition and the fate of detrital dissolved and particulate organic matter. These organic products are being coupled to influences on enzymatic activity and inorganic nutrient cycling.

  11. Unraveling the chromophoric disorder of poly(3-hexylthiophene)

    CERN Document Server

    Thiessen, Alexander; Adachi, Takuji; Steiner, Florian; Bout, David Vanden; Lupton, John M

    2015-01-01

    The spectral breadth of conjugated polymers gives these materials a clear advantage over other molecular compounds for organic photovoltaic applications and is a key factor in recent efficiencies topping 10%. But why do excitonic transitions, which are inherently narrow, lead to absorption over such a broad range of wavelengths in the first place? Using single-molecule spectroscopy, we address this fundamental question in a model material, poly(3-hexylthiophene). Narrow zero-phonon lines from single chromophores are found to scatter over 200nm, an unprecedented inhomogeneous broadening which maps the ensemble. The giant red-shift between solution and bulk films arises from energy transfer to the lowest-energy chromophores in collapsed polymer chains which adopt a highly-ordered morphology. We propose that the extreme energetic disorder of chromophores is structural in origin. This structural disorder on the single-chromophore level may actually enable the high degree of polymer chain ordering found in bulk fi...

  12. Spectroscopic detection of a ubiquitous dissolved pigment degradation product in subsurface waters of the global ocean

    OpenAIRE

    Röttgers, R.; B. P. Koch

    2012-01-01

    Measurements of light absorption by chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) from subsurface waters of the tropical Atlantic and Pacific Oceans showed a distinct absorption shoulder at 410–415 nm. This indicates an underlying absorption of a pigment whose occurrence is partly correlated with the apparent oxygen utilization (AOU) but also found in the deep chlorophyll maximum. A similar absorption maximum at ~415 nm was also found in the particulate fraction of samples taken below the surf...

  13. Chemodiversity of dissolved organic matter in lakes driven by climate and hydrology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellerman, Anne M; Dittmar, Thorsten; Kothawala, Dolly N; Tranvik, Lars J

    2014-01-01

    Despite the small continental coverage of lakes, they are hotspots of carbon cycling, largely due to the processing of terrestrially derived dissolved organic matter (DOM). As DOM is an amalgam of heterogeneous compounds comprising gradients of microbial and physicochemical reactivity, the factors influencing DOM processing at the molecular level and the resulting patterns in DOM composition are not well understood. Here we show, using ultrahigh-resolution mass spectrometry to unambiguously identify 4,032 molecular formulae in 120 lakes across Sweden, that the molecular composition of DOM is shaped by precipitation, water residence time and temperature. Terrestrially derived DOM is selectively lost as residence time increases, with warmer temperatures enhancing the production of nitrogen-containing compounds. Using biodiversity concepts, we show that the molecular diversity of DOM, or chemodiversity, increases with DOM and nutrient concentrations. The observed molecular-level patterns indicate that terrestrially derived DOM will become more prevalent in lakes as climate gets wetter.

  14. Radiocarbon measurements of dissolved organic carbon in sewage-treatment-plant effluent and domestic sewage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In an attempt to better characterize dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in several specific sources to Lake Kasumigaura, such as sewage-treatment-plant effluent (STPE), domestic sewage (DS) and forest stream (FS), we analyzed radiocarbon (14C) and stable carbon isotopic compositions (13C) of the DOCs. The measurements of 14C for DOC were performed by an accelerator mass spectrometer (AMS) at the National Institute for Environmental Studies (NIES-TERRA) in Japan. The Δ14C and δ13C values of the DOCs in several sources to Lake Kasumigaura, have low carbon isotopic values, ranging from -470 per mille to -79 per mille and from -27.9 per mille to -24.2 per mille , respectively. These carbon isotopic values are substantially different from those of Lake Kasumigaura. These results imply different origins for the DOC in Lake Kasumigaura. The 14C and 13C analyses of DOC led to a useful classification for DOCs in Lake Kasumigaura, Japan.

  15. Fate of dissolved organic nitrogen during biological nutrient removal wastewater treatment processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bing; Lin, Huirong; Yu, Guozhong; Zhang, Shenghua; Zhao, Chengmei

    2013-04-01

    Due to its potential to form toxic nitrogenous disinfection byproducts (N-DBPs), dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) is considered as one of the most important parameters in wastewater treatment plants (WWTP). This study describes a comprehensive investigation of variations in DON levels in orbal oxidation ditches. The results showed that DON increased gradually from 0.71 to 1.14 mg I(-1) along anaerobic zone, anoxic zone, aerobic zone 1 and aerobic 2. Molecular weight fractionation of DON in one anaerobic zone and one aerobic zone (aerobic zone 2) was performed. We found that the proportion of small molecular weight ( 20 kDa) showed opposite trend. This variation may have been caused due to the release of different types of soluble microbial products (SMPs) during biological processes. These SMPs contained both tryptophan protein-like and aromatic protein-like substances, which were confirmed by three-dimensional excitation-emission matrix (EEM) analysis. PMID:24620601

  16. Phototransformation of pesticides in prairie potholes: effect of dissolved organic matter in triplet-induced oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpuzcu, M Ekrem; McCabe, Andrew J; Arnold, William A

    2016-02-01

    Photochemical reactions involving a variety of photosensitizers contribute to the abiotic transformation of pesticides in prairie pothole lakes (PPLs). Despite the fact that triplet excited state dissolved organic matter (DOM) enhances phototransformation of pesticides by acting as a photosensitizer, it may also decrease the overall phototransformation rate through various mechanisms. In this study, the effect of DOM on the phototransformation of four commonly applied pesticides in four different PPL waters was investigated under simulated sunlight using photoexcited benzophenone-4-carboxylate as the oxidant with DOM serving as an anti-oxidant. For atrazine and mesotrione, a decrease in phototransformation rates was observed, while phototransformations of metolachlor and isoproturon were not affected by DOM inhibition. Phototransformation rates and the extent of inhibition/enhancement by DOM varied spatially and temporally across the wetlands studied. Characterization of DOM from the sites and different seasons suggested that the DOM type and variations in the DOM structure are important factors controlling phototransformation rates of pesticides in PPLs.

  17. Influence of dissolved organic nitrogen on Ni bioavailability in Prorocentrum donghaiense and Skeletonema costatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xu-Guang; Li, Hao; Huang, Bang-qin; Liu, Feng-Jiao

    2015-07-15

    Dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) is an important nutrient in the aquatic environment. This study examined the influence of DON addition on the adsorption, absorption, and distribution in macromolecular forms of environmentally deleterious trace metal (Ni) in Prorocentrum donghaiense and Skeletonema costatum over eight days. Ni adsorption and absorption of two species increased with the addition of urea, while Ni adsorption and absorption of two species in the presence of humic substances (HS) decreased. Meanwhile, Ni adsorption and absorption of P. donghaiense were higher than that of S. costatum. Furthermore, Ni contents in the protein fraction of the cells, both in P. donghaiense and S. costatum, were increased with both urea and HS addition. Thus, urea and HS input could impact Ni biogeochemistry and bioavailability, and then affect the biodynamics thereafter. PMID:25935806

  18. Characterization of the dissolved organic carbon in landfill leachate-polluted groundwater

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Jette B.; Jensen, Dorthe Lærke; Grøn, Christian;

    1998-01-01

    Samples of dissolved organic carbon (DOG) were obtained from landfill leachate-polluted groundwater at Vejen Landfill, Denmark. The humic acids, fulvic acids and the hydrophilic fraction were isolated and purified. Based on DOC measurements, the fulvic acid fraction predominated, accounting...... molecular weight of about 2600 Da. The elemental compositions of the humic acids, fulvic acids and the hydrophilic fraction were in the ranges typical for humic substances from other origins. The O/C ratios for humic acids, fulvic acids and the hydrophilic fraction were similar in the leachate-polluted...... groups made up about 3 meg g-(-1) and the weakly acidic groups made up about 1.5 meg g(-1). The total acidity accounted for 29-32% of the O/C ratio. The characterization of DOC in leachate-polluted groundwater in terms of humic acids, fulvic acids and hydrophilic fraction showed that the hydrophilic...

  19. Effect of dissolved organic carbon quality on microbial decomposition and nitrification rates in stream sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauss, E.A.; Lamberti, G.A.

    2002-01-01

    1. Microbial decomposition of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) contributes to overall stream metabolism and can influence many processes in the nitrogen cycle, including nitrification. Little is known, however, about the relative decomposition rates of different DOC sources and their subsequent effect on nitrification. 2. In this study, labile fraction and overall microbial decomposition of DOC were measured for leaf leachates from 18 temperate forest tree species. Between 61 and 82% (mean, 75%) of the DOC was metabolized in 24 days. Significant differences among leachates were found for labile fraction rates (P bacteria, which then out-competed nitrifying bacteria for NH4+. White pine leachate probably increased heterotrophic metabolism and directly inhibited nitrification by allelopathy.

  20. The source and distribution of thermogenic dissolved organic matter in the ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittmar, T.; Suryaputra, I. G. N. A.; Paeng, J.

    2009-04-01

    Thermogenic organic matter (ThOM) is abundant in the environment. ThOM is produced at elevated temperature and pressure in deep sediments and earth's crust, and it is also a residue of fossil fuel and biomass burning ("black carbon"). Because of its refractory character, it accumulates in soils and sediments and, therefore, may sequester carbon from active cycles. It was hypothesized that a significant component of marine dissolved organic matter (DOM) might be thermogenic. Here we present a detailed data set on the distribution of thermogenic DOM in major water masses of the deep and surface ocean. In addition, several potential sources of thermogenic DOM to the ocean were investigated: active seeps of brine fluids in the deep Gulf of Mexico, rivers, estuaries and submarine groundwaters. Studies on deep-sea hydrothermal vents and aerosol deposition are ongoing. All DOM samples were isolated from seawater via solid phase extraction (SPE-DOM). ThOM was quantified in the extracts as benzene-polycarboxylic acids (BPCAs) after nitric acid oxidation via high-performance liquid chromatography and diode array detection (HPLC-DAD). BPCAs are produced exclusively from fused ring systems and are therefore unambiguous molecular tracers for ThOM. In addition to BPCA determination, the molecular composition and structure of ThOM was characterized in detail via ultrahigh resolution mass spectrometry (FT-ICR-MS). All marine and river DOM samples yielded significant amounts of BPCAs. The cold seep system in the deep Gulf of Mexico, but also black water rivers (like the Suwannee River) were particularly rich in ThOM. Up to 10% of total dissolved organic carbon was thermogenic in both systems. The most abundant BPCA was benzene-pentacarboxylic acid (B5CA). The molecular composition of BPCAs and the FT-ICR-MS data indicate a relatively small number (5-8) of fused aromatic rings per molecule. Overall, the molecular BPCA patterns were very similar independent of the source of Th

  1. Spatial and Temporal Patterns of Dissolved Organic Matter Characteristics in the Upper Willamette River Basin, Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, B. S.; Lajtha, K.

    2014-12-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) leaching through soil affects soil carbon sequestration and the carbon metabolism of receiving water bodies. Improving our understanding of the sources and fate of DOM at varying spatial and temporal patterns is crucial for land management decisions. However, little is known about how DOM sources change with land use types and seasonal flow patterns. In the Willamette River Basin (WRB), which is home to Oregon's major cities including Portland and Salem, forested headwaters transition to agricultural and urban land. The climate of WRB has a distinctive seasonal pattern with dry warm summers and wet winters driven by winter precipitation and snowmelt runoff between November and March. This study examined DOM fluorescence characteristic in stream water from 21 locations collected monthly and 16 locations collected seasonally to identify the sources and fate of DOM in the upper WRB in contrasting land uses. DOC and dissolved organic nitrogen concentrations increased as the flow rate increased during winter precipitation at all sites. This indicates that increased flow rate increased the connectivity between land and nearby water bodies. DOM fluorescent properties varied among land use types. During the first precipitation event after a long dry summer, a microbial DOM signature in agricultural areas increased along with nitrate concentrations. This may be because accumulated nutrients on land during the dry season flowed to nearby streams during the first rain event and promoted microbial growth in the streams. During the month of the highest flow rate in 2014, sampling sites near forest showed evidence of a greater terrestrial DOM signature compared to its signature during the dry season. This indicates fluorescent DOM characteristics in streams vary as the flow connectivity changes even within the same land type.

  2. Human activities cause distinct dissolved organic matter composition across freshwater ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Clayton J.; Frost, Paul C.; Morales-Williams, Ana M.; Larson, James H.; Richardson, William B.; Chiandet, Aisha S.; Xenopoulos, Marguerite A.

    2016-01-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) composition in freshwater ecosystems is influenced by interactions between physical, chemical, and biological processes that are controlled, at one level, by watershed landscape, hydrology, and their connections. Against this environmental template, humans may strongly influence DOM composition. Yet, we lack a comprehensive understanding of DOM composition variation across freshwater ecosystems differentially affected by human activity. Using optical properties, we described DOM variation across five ecosystem groups of the Laurentian Great Lakes Region: large lakes, Kawartha Lakes, Experimental Lakes Area, urban stormwater ponds, and rivers (n = 184 sites). We determined how between ecosystem variation in DOM composition related to watershed size, land use and cover, water quality measures (conductivity, dissolved organic carbon (DOC), nutrient concentration, chlorophyll a), and human population density. The five freshwater ecosystem groups had distinctive DOM composition from each other. These significant differences were not explained completely through differences in watershed size nor spatial autocorrelation. Instead, multivariate partial least squares regression showed that DOM composition was related to differences in human impact across freshwater ecosystems. In particular, urban/developed watersheds with higher human population densities had a unique DOM composition with a clear anthropogenic influence that was distinct from DOM composition in natural land cover and/or agricultural watersheds. This nonagricultural, human developed impact on aquatic DOM was most evident through increased levels of a microbial, humic-like parallel factor analysis component (C6). Lotic and lentic ecosystems with low human population densities had DOM compositions more typical of clear water to humic-rich freshwater ecosystems but C6 was only present at trace to background levels. Consequently, humans are strongly altering the quality of DOM in

  3. Proposed Guidelines for Solid Phase Extraction of Suwannee River Dissolved Organic Matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Harir, Mourad; Lucio, Marianna; Kanawati, Basem; Smirnov, Kirill; Flerus, Ruth; Koch, Boris P; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe; Hertkorn, Norbert

    2016-07-01

    This paper proposes improved guidelines for dissolved organic matter (DOM) isolation by solid phase extraction (SPE) with a styrene-divinylbenzene copolymer (PPL) sorbent, which has become an established method for the isolation of DOM from natural waters, because of its ease of application and appreciable carbon recovery. Suwannee River water was selected to systematically study the effects of critical SPE variables such as loading mass, concentration, flow rate, and up-scaling on the extraction selectivity of the PPL sorbent. High-field Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR MS) and proton nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H NMR) spectroscopy were performed to interpret the DOM chemical space of eluates, as well as permeates and wash liquids with molecular resolution. Up to 89% dissolved organic carbon (DOC) recovery was obtained with a DOC/PPL mass ratio of 1:800 at a DOC concentration of 20 mg/L. With the application of larger loading volumes, low proportions of highly oxygenated compounds were retained on the PPL sorbent. The effects of the flow rate on the extraction selectivity of the sorbent were marginal. Up-scaling had a limited effect on the extraction selectivity with the exception of increased self-esterification with a methanol solvent, resulting in methyl ester groups. Furthermore, the SPE/PPL extract exhibited highly authentic characteristics in comparison with original water and reverse osmosis samples. These findings will be useful for reproducibly isolating DOM with representative molecular compositions from various sources and concentrations and minimizing potential inconsistencies among interlaboratory comparative studies. PMID:27176119

  4. Human activities cause distinct dissolved organic matter composition across freshwater ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Clayton J; Frost, Paul C; Morales-Williams, Ana M; Larson, James H; Richardson, William B; Chiandet, Aisha S; Xenopoulos, Marguerite A

    2016-02-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) composition in freshwater ecosystems is influenced by the interactions among physical, chemical, and biological processes that are controlled, at one level, by watershed landscape, hydrology, and their connections. Against this environmental template, humans may strongly influence DOM composition. Yet, we lack a comprehensive understanding of DOM composition variation across freshwater ecosystems differentially affected by human activity. Using optical properties, we described DOM variation across five ecosystem groups of the Laurentian Great Lakes region: large lakes, Kawartha Lakes, Experimental Lakes Area, urban stormwater ponds, and rivers (n = 184 sites). We determined how between ecosystem variation in DOM composition related to watershed size, land use and cover, water quality measures (conductivity, dissolved organic carbon (DOC), nutrient concentration, chlorophyll a), and human population density. The five freshwater ecosystem groups had distinctive DOM composition from each other. These significant differences were not explained completely through differences in watershed size nor spatial autocorrelation. Instead, multivariate partial least squares regression showed that DOM composition was related to differences in human impact across freshwater ecosystems. In particular, urban/developed watersheds with higher human population densities had a unique DOM composition with a clear anthropogenic influence that was distinct from DOM composition in natural land cover and/or agricultural watersheds. This nonagricultural, human developed impact on aquatic DOM was most evident through increased levels of a microbial, humic-like parallel factor analysis component (C6). Lotic and lentic ecosystems with low human population densities had DOM compositions more typical of clear water to humic-rich freshwater ecosystems but C6 was only present at trace to background levels. Consequently, humans are strongly altering the quality of DOM in

  5. Effects of Hydrology and Temperature on Dissolved Organic Matter Mobilization and Transport within forest soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, N.; Saiers, J.

    2008-12-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) in soils plays an important role in surface water and groundwater quality. Higher concentrations of DOM may enhance the transport of nutrients and associated pollutants to freshwaters and coastal zones. The primary purpose of this study is to investigate the influences of temperature and hydrologic factors on the mobilization and transport of DOM in unsaturated soils. Laboratory columns were packed with soils taken from the Harvard forest in Petersham, MA. Unsaturated flow conditions were maintained by applying suction to the bottom of the soil columns. Columns packed with topsoil (A horizon) were irrigated by series of rainfall events using the same total volume of artificial rain water. The experiments were distinguished on the basis of the period of time between successive rainfall events and the rainfall intensity. In all experiments, DOM (measured by dissolved organic carbon) concentration peaked simultaneously with the passage of wetting front and then rapidly declined as flow stabilized during each rainfall event. In all cases, DOC concentrations declined with successive rainfall events. The results show greater DOM mobilization under rainfall with lower intensity. The interruption interval between successive rainfall events also significantly affected the DOM leaching. Higher DOC concentrations were observed within treatments with longer interruption intervals. The leached DOM was also characterized by UV absorbance, fluorescence spectroscopy in the emission mode, and additional spectroscopic-based indices, such as the humification index. Ongoing experiments are focusing on the transport and adsorptive fractionation of DOM in subsoils (B horizon). The effects of flow rate and temperature on these processes are being investigated. The information gained will provide insight into predicting the environmental fate of DOM-associated pollutants and in understanding the mechanisms that govern DOM mobilization and transport in soils.

  6. Tracing dissolved organic matter (DOM) from land-based aquaculture systems in North Patagonian streams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimptsch, Jorge; Woelfl, Stefan; Osorio, Sebastian; Valenzuela, Jose; Ebersbach, Paul; von Tuempling, Wolf; Palma, Rodrigo; Encina, Francisco; Figueroa, David; Kamjunke, Norbert; Graeber, Daniel

    2015-12-15

    Chile is the second largest producer of salmonids worldwide. The first step in the production of salmonids takes place in land-based aquacultures. However, the effects of the discharge from these aquacultures on stream dissolved organic matter (DOM) content, molecular composition and degradability are unknown. The aim of this study was thus to investigate the inputs of anthropogenic DOM from land-based aquaculture to the predominantly pristine river systems of North Patagonia. We hypothesized, that i) DOM exported from land-based aquaculture mainly consists of protein-like fluorescence (tyrosine and tryptophan) released from fish feces and food remains, and that ii) this DOM is highly degradable and therefore rapidly turned-over within the receiving streams. In the North Patagonian region we conducted a screening of ten land-based aquacultures and an intensive sampling campaign for one aquaculture. This was combined with longitudinal transects and a degradation experiment in order to couple the composition of DOM exported from land-based aquacultures to its degradability in streams. We measured dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration by high-temperature catalytic oxidation and DOM composition by fluorescence spectroscopy and parallel factor analysis. In the effluent of the ten screened aquacultures and in the repeated sampling of one aquaculture, we consistently found an increase of DOC concentrations and a dominance of protein-like fluorescence. The protein-like fluorescence rapidly disappeared downstream of the aquacultures, and in the degradation experiment. 21% of the DOC export from the repeatedly sampled aquaculture resulted from food addition and 76% from fish production. We conclude that large amounts of degradable DOM are exported from land-based aquacultures. This probably has strong effects on the ecological structure and function of North Patagonian streams, and similarly affected streams worldwide.

  7. Small scale variability of transport and composition of dissolved organic matter in the subsoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leinemann, Timo; Kalbitz, Karsten; Mikutta, Robert; Guggenberger, Georg

    2016-04-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) is the most mobile fraction of carbon in the soil and connects the carbon-rich topsoil with the subsoil where translocated OM may get stabilized. The water flux in soil is highly heterogeneous, both temporarily and spatially. We, therefore, hypothesize that at high flow velocities, DOM can bypass possible mineral binding sites and microorganisms, thus leading to less degraded DOM under high flow velocities. To address this question, we investigated water and DOM fluxes in situ using segmented suction plates (4 x 4 segments on 24 x 24 cm) installed into three soil observatories at three depths (10 cm, 50 cm, and 150 cm) in a Podzolic Cambisol under Beech (Fagus sylvatica) near Hannover, Germany. To follow the transport of carbon from the litter layer through the soil, an in situ 13C-labelling experiment has been conducted in January 2015. Concentration of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and DOM composition was analyzed using high temperature combustion and photometric methods. The amount of transported DOC decreased by ca. 80% from 10 to 50 cm depth and by 40% from 50 to 150 cm depth. Different flow patterns existed at the centimeter scale, which were stable over time for individual suction plate segments. The specific UV280 nm absorbance of DOM decreased with increasing soil depth. This indicates a selective loss of aromatic compounds. The influence of different flow regimes on the DOM quality became apparent in the subsoil samples (>50 cm depth) showing a correlation of increasing UV280 nm absorbance with increasing water flux. Together with juvenile DO14C up to 150 cm depth this can be an indication for the importance of preferential flow on carbon transport to subsoil.

  8. Temporal patterns of dissolved organic matter biodegradability are similar across three rivers of varying size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coble, Ashley A.; Marcarelli, Amy M.; Kane, Evan S.; Toczydlowski, David; Stottlemyer, Robert

    2016-06-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) composition may be an important determinant of its fate in freshwaters, but little is known about temporal variability in DOM composition and the biodegradability of DOM in northern temperate watersheds. We measured biodegradable dissolved organic carbon (BDOC) via incubation assays and DOM composition using optical indices on 11 dates in three Lake Superior tributaries. Percent BDOC (%BDOC) and BDOC concentrations were seasonally synchronous across these watersheds, despite that they vary in size by orders of magnitude (1.7 to 3400 km2). Relative to %BDOC, BDOC concentrations were more tightly constrained among sites on any given date. BDOC also varied within seasons; for example, %BDOC on two different dates in winter were among the highest (29% and 54%) and lowest (0%) values observed for each site (overall %BDOC range: 0 to 72%). DOM composition varied the most among tributaries during a summer storm event when BDOC (both as percent and concentration) was elevated but was remarkably similar among tributaries during fall, spring, and winter. Multivariate models identified humic-like and tryptophan-like fluorophores as predictors of %BDOC, but DOM composition only described 21% of the overall variation in %BDOC. Collectively, these three rivers exported ~18 Gg C yr-1 as DOC and ~2 Gg C yr-1 as BDOC, which corresponded to 9 to 17% of annual DOC exported in biodegradable form. Our results suggest much of the C exported from these northern temperate watersheds may be biodegradable within 28 days and that large pulses of labile DOM can be exported during storm events and spring snowmelt.

  9. High Frequency Monitoring of the Quantity and Quality of Dissolved Organic Matter Flux Between Salt Marshes and Plum Island Sound, MA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Y.; Raymond, P.

    2012-12-01

    Salt marshes are highly productive continental margin ecosystems, due to abundant solar radiation, water, and nutrients provided by tidal water. The unique bi-directional water movement introduced by tidal effect has a major impact on the formation and productivity of salt marsh and the material exchange between salt marsh and adjacent estuary. As a major term in carbon, energy, and nutrient budget for aquatic ecosystem, dissolved organic matter (DOM) has broad impact on food webs, carbon cycle, and nutrient retention/release. The frequency and period of DOM measurement is greatly increased by the use of reagent-free, low-cost, and reliable measurement with fluorescent and UV sensors measuring the chromophoric fraction of total DOM. Although fluorescent sensors can only measure concentration, UV absorbance in a wide spectral range (200nm-380nm) could potentially provide information on DOM composition. With the help of accurate direct real time water flux measurement and lab analysis of lability, DON, and 3D excitation emission matrix spectroscopy (EEMs), a database of DOM quantity and quality exchanged between several comparative salt marshes and Plum Island Sound, MA could be established to study the dynamics of DOM behavior in the salt marsh-estuary system. Understanding DOM source and fate is very important for evaluating the role of salt marsh in the carbon cycle and food web in coastal and global scale because coastal carbon cycling represents up to 21% of the ocean's primary production (Jahnke 2008). In addition, the approaches outlined in this proposal have broad applicability to study DOM quantity and quality in the material exchange theme between systems.

  10. Spatiotemporal Distribution, Sources, and Photobleaching Imprint of Dissolved Organic Matter in the Yangtze Estuary and Its Adjacent Sea Using Fluorescence and Parallel Factor Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Penghui Li

    Full Text Available To investigate the seasonal and interannual dynamics of dissolved organic matter (DOM in the Yangtze Estuary, surface and bottom water samples in the Yangtze Estuary and its adjacent sea were collected and characterized using fluorescence excitation-emission matrices (EEMs and parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC in both dry and wet seasons in 2012 and 2013. Two protein-like components and three humic-like components were identified. Three humic-like components decreased linearly with increasing salinity (r>0.90, p<0.001, suggesting their distribution could primarily be controlled by physical mixing. By contrast, two protein-like components fell below the theoretical mixing line, largely due to microbial degradation and removal during mixing. Higher concentrations of humic-like components found in 2012 could be attributed to higher freshwater discharge relative to 2013. There was a lack of systematic patterns for three humic-like components between seasons and years, probably due to variations of other factors such as sources and characteristics. Highest concentrations of fluorescent components, observed in estuarine turbidity maximum (ETM region, could be attributed to sediment resuspension and subsequent release of DOM, supported by higher concentrations of fluorescent components in bottom water than in surface water at two stations where sediments probably resuspended. Meanwhile, photobleaching could be reflected from the changes in the ratios between fluorescence intensity (Fmax of humic-like components and chromophoric DOM (CDOM absorption coefficient (a355 along the salinity gradient. This study demonstrates the abundance and composition of DOM in estuaries are controlled not only by hydrological conditions, but also by its sources, characteristics and related estuarine biogeochemical processes.

  11. Dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) losses from nested artificially drained lowland catchments with contrasting soil types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiemeyer, Bärbel; Kahle, Petra; Lennartz, Bernd

    2010-05-01

    Artificial drainage is a common practice to improve moisture and aeration conditions of agricultural land. It shortens the residence time of water in the soil and may therefore contribute to the degradation of peatlands as well as to the still elevated level of diffuse pollution of surface water bodies, particularly if flow anomalies like preferential flow cause a further acceleration of water and solute fluxes. Especially in the case of nitrate, artificially drained sub-catchments are found to control the catchment-scale nitrate losses. However, it is frequently found that nitrate losses and nitrogen field balances do not match. At the same time, organic fertilizers are commonly applied and, especially in lowland catchments, organic soils have been drained for agricultural use. Thus, the question arises whether dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) forms an important component of the nitrogen losses from artificially drained catchments. However, in contrast to nitrate and even to dissolved organic carbon (DOC), this component is frequently overlooked, especially in nested catchment studies with different soil types and variable land use. Here, we will present data from a hierarchical water quantity and quality measurement programme in the federal state Mecklenburg-Vorpommern (North-Eastern Germany). The monitoring programme in the pleistocene lowland catchment comprises automatic sampling stations at a collector drain outlet (4.2 ha catchment), at a ditch draining arable land on mineral soils (179 ha), at a ditch mainly draining grassland on organic soils (85 ha) and at a brook with a small rural catchment (15.5 km²) of mixed land use and soil types. At all sampling stations, daily to weekly composite samples were taken, while the discharge and the meteorological data were recorded continuously. Water samples were analyzed for nitrate-nitrogen, ammonium-nitrogen and total nitrogen. We will compare two years: 2006/07 was a very wet year (P = 934 mm) with a high summer

  12. Dissolved organic matter in sea spray: a transfer study from marine surface water to aerosols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Schmitt-Kopplin

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric aerosols impose direct and indirect effects on the climate system, for example, by absorption of radiation in relation to cloud droplets size, on chemical and organic composition and cloud dynamics. The first step in the formation of Organic primary aerosols, i.e. the transfer of dissolved organic matter from the marine surface into the atmosphere, was studied. We present a molecular level description of this phenomenon using the high resolution analytical tools of Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR. Our experiments confirm the chemoselective transfer of natural organic molecules, especially of aliphatic compounds from the surface water into the atmosphere via bubble bursting processes. Transfer from marine surface water to the atmosphere involves a chemical gradient governed by the physicochemical properties of the involved molecules when comparing elemental compositions and differentiating CHO, CHNO, CHOS and CHNOS bearing compounds. Typical chemical fingerprints of compounds enriched in the aerosol phase were CHO and CHOS molecular series, smaller molecules of higher aliphaticity and lower oxygen content, and typical surfactants. A non-targeted metabolomics analysis demonstrated that many of these molecules corresponded to homologous series of oxo-, hydroxy-, methoxy-, branched fatty acids and mono-, di- and tricarboxylic acids as well as monoterpenes and sugars. These surface active biomolecules were preferentially transferred from surface water into the atmosphere via bubble bursting processes to form a significant fraction of primary organic aerosols. This way of sea spray production leaves a selective biological signature of the surface water in the corresponding aerosol that may be transported into higher altitudes up to the lower atmosphere, thus contributing to the formation of secondary organic aerosol on a global scale or transported

  13. Effect of catchment land use and soil type on the concentration, quality, and bacterial degradation of riverine dissolved organic matter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Autio, Iida; Soinne, Helena; Helin, Janne;

    2016-01-01

    of dissolved organic carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus (DOC, DON, and DOP, respectively), and was linked to DOM quality. Soil type was more important than land use in determining the concentration and quality of riverine DOM. On average, 5–9 % of the DOC and 45 % of the DON were degraded by the bacterial......We studied the effects of catchment characteristics (soil type and land use) on the concentration and quality of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in river water and on the bacterial degradation of terrestrial DOM. The share of organic soil was the strongest predictor of high concentrations...... communities within 2–3 months. Simultaneously, the proportion of humic-like compounds in the DOM pool increased. Bioavailable DON accounted for approximately one-third of the total bioavailable dissolved nitrogen, and thus, terrestrial DON can markedly contribute to the coastal plankton dynamics and support...

  14. Changes in the quality of dissolved organic matter in soil water with time since last fire in a boreal forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ide, Jun'ichiro; Ohashi, Mizue; Köster, Kajar; Berninger, Frank; Miura, Ikumi; Makita, Naoki; Yamase, Keitaro; Pumpanen, Jukka

    2016-04-01

    Wildfires strongly influence carbon stocks in boreal forests by inducing combustion of the aboveground and ground biomass. Simultaneously, they greatly influence the quality of dissolved organic matter in the soils, which in turn can alter water and carbon cycles in the forest. However, little information is available on how the quality of dissolved organic matter in boreal forest soils changes with time after forest fire occurred. To examine this, we collected soil water samples in Pinus sylvestris stands located in Finnish Lapland, where fire occurred 6, 46, and 156 years ago, analyzed dissolved organic carbon and inorganic elements concentrations, and then compared them among those three stands. In the assembly, we are going to report the results.

  15. Natural Variability in Dissolved Organic Carbon and Dissolved Organic Nitrogen Transport in Artificially Drained Landscapes of the U.S. Midwest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuadra, P. E.; Vidon, P.

    2009-05-01

    Nutrient inputs into coastal ecosystems have become a major issue with serious consequences for water quality; nonetheless, few studies focus on N and C transport during storms in Midwestern tile-drained fields in spite of the known importance of N and C export from artificially drained landscapes of the U.S. Midwest on the development of the "Dead Zone" in the Gulf of Mexico in the summer. Monitoring tile-drain flow at a high temporal resolution during storms is difficult and expensive and little information is therefore available on natural spatial and temporal variability in dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) and carbon (DOC) concentration dynamics in tile drains during storms. This lack of information on DON and DOC export patterns from tile drains hinders our ability to accurately and precisely estimate total nutrient loads and hydrological processes regulating the movement of these nutrients from the watershed to streams via tile flow. The objective of this research is therefore to characterize natural variability in DOC and DON export in two seemingly identical tile drains (length, contributing area) in Leary Weber Ditch; a small (7.6 km2) artificially drained agricultural watershed near Indianapolis, IN. Four storms with various characteristics (intensity-duration) were sampled in May and June 2008. The two studied tile-drains showed different flow and discharge patterns but similar spatial and temporal patterns of DOC and DON concentrations. Large inter-storm variability in DOC and DON concentration patterns were attributed to different storm intensities and soil pre-event moisture conditions. Multiple other storms are currently being monitored to further characterize natural variability in nitrogen and carbon exports in the studied tile drains and identify primary hydrological controls (season, vegetation development stage, antecedent moisture conditions) regulating N and C export in tile drains over a 12-month period. This work will inform model

  16. Dissolved organic matter conformation and its interaction with pyrene as affected by water chemistry and concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Bo; Ghosh, Saikat; Xing, Baoshan

    2008-03-01

    Water chemistry and concentration of dissolved organic matter (DOM) have been reported to affect DOM conformation and binding properties with hydrophobic organic contaminants (HOCs). However, relationship between DOM conformation and its binding properties remains unclear. We designed a multibag equilibration system (MBES) to investigate the variation of carbon-normalized sorption coefficients (K(DOC)) of pyrene at different DOM concentrations based on an identical free solute concentration at different pHs and in the presence of Al ions. In addition, we studied the conformation of DOM under different conditions via atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging, dynamic light scattering, and zeta potential measurements. Zeta potential measurements indicated that intra- and intermolecular interaction was facilitated at low pH or with the presence of Al ions, and a more organized molecular aggregate (such as a micelle-like structure) could form, thus, enhancing K(DOC). As DOM concentration increased, DOM molecular aggregation was promoted in a way reducing K(DOC). This research is a first attempt to correlate DOM conformation with K(DOC). Aggregation of DOM molecules resulting from increased zeta potential (less negative) generally led to an increased K(DOC). Further study in this area will provide valuable information on HOC-DOM interactions, thus, leading to more accurate predictions of K(DOC).

  17. Agent-based modeling of hyporheic dissolved organic carbon transport and transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabrielsen, P. J.; Wilson, J. L.; Pullin, M.

    2011-12-01

    Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) is a complex suite of organic compounds present in natural ecosystems, and is particularly studied in river and stream systems. The hyporheic zone (HZ), a region of surface water-shallow groundwater exchange, has been identified as a hotspot of DOC processing and is generally regarded as a net sink of organic matter. More recent studies into stream DOC have shifted to examining DOC quality rather than bulk quantity. DOC quality variability has been linked to hydrologic and climatic variability, both focuses of current climate change research. A new agent-based model in the NetLogo modeling environment couples hydrologic transport with chemical and biological transformation of DOC to simulate changing DOC quality in hyporheic flow. A pore-scale model implements a Lattice Boltzmann fluid dynamic model and surficial interactions to simulate sorption and microbial uptake. Upscaled to a stream meander scale, this model displays spatial variation and evolution of DOC quality. Model output metrics are correlated to field sample analytical results from a hyporheic meander of the East Fork Jemez River, Sandoval Co., NM.

  18. Dynamics of dissolved organic carbon release from a permafrost wetland catchment in northeast China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Y. D.; Song, C. C.; Wan, Z. M.; Lu, Y. Z.; Qiao, T. H.; Tan, W. W.; Wang, L. L.

    2015-12-01

    A large reservoir of organic carbon is stored in the permafrost region. Therefore, understanding the export of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) from rivers in the permafrost zone is important in the context of climate change. This study investigated the dynamics of DOC export from the wetlands of the Kandu River catchment located in a cold temperate region in northeast China during the growing seasons of 2011 and 2012. Our findings indicated that subsurface flow was the primary runoff pathway that transports DOC from wetland soil to stream discharge. The organic-mineral soil structure resulted in substantial differences in water sources, as well as in DOC resources, between the flood and base flow volume during the growing seasons. The active layer depth is key, as it affects runoff generation and the DOC concentration and chemical characteristics of stream discharge. The DOC flux from our study area was estimated to be up to 1039.66 t during the growing season, which represents more than one third of the net ecosystem exchange (NEE) in wetlands. Given the expected increase in air temperature and precipitation, our results indicate that there will be an increase in the total DOC flux for the study region in the future as a result of increased DOC concentration.

  19. Molecular weight of dissolved organic matter-napropamide complex transported through soil columns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, C F; Letey, J; Farmer, W J

    2002-01-01

    Soil-derived dissolved organic matter (DOM) has been shown to form stable complexes with the herbicide napropamide [2-(alpha-naphthoxy-N,N-diethylpropionamide] capable of enhancing the transport of napropamide through soil columns. Two soils, one containing sewage sludge-derived organic matter (SS) and the other having only natural organic matter (NoSS) were treated with napropamide and allowed to dry to promote complex formation. Soil columns were prepared by packing a 10-cm layer of untreated, dry, sieved soil followed by an overlying 5-cm layer of napropamide-treated soil. Columns were irrigated and the effluent collected and placed in dialysis chambers. After equilibration napropamide concentrations were determined on both sides of the membrane and complex and quantified based on the amount of napropamide unable to cross the membrane. it was found that for the SS soil 7% and for the NoSS 2.4% of the applied napropamide underwent facilitated transport. In addition, most of the complex transported through the columns had a molecular weight between 500 and 1000 Daltons (Da). The solutions from the SS soil were also found to have formed at least two distinct complexes that were resolved after passing through the untreated soil layer. The results obtained were in agreement with other published results and the techniques used offer a way to separate and concentrate DOM complexes from column effluents for further characterization. PMID:11931454

  20. Impacts of Forest and Agricultural Land Use on Stream Dissolved Organic Carbon During Storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, N. H.; Shin, Y.; Jeon, Y. J.; Lee, E. J.; Eom, J. S.; Kim, B.

    2015-12-01

    Although many studies have been conducted to evaluate the effects of land use on concentrations and compositions of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in streams and rivers, the relationships are still not clear. To elucidate the impacts of forest and agricultural land use on stream DOC during storm events, we investigated concentrations, optical properties, δ13C, and Δ 14C of DOC in forest and agriculture dominated headwater streams in South Korea. Stream DOC concentrations were the highest in a forested subwatershed, and a significant positive correlation was observed between stream DOC concentrations and the proportion of forested area in watersheds, which was strengthened by increased rain intensity. Four PARAFAC components were extracted including terrestrial humic substances, terrestrial fulvic acids, microbial organic matter, and protein-like organic matter, all of which showed a positive correlation with stream DOC concentration although relative proportion of components were dependent on land use. While DOC in a forest stream was mostly composed of terrestrially derived and 14C-enriched, DOC in an agricultural stream included aged DOC up to ~1,000 years old. Although the impacts of hydrological changes due to irrigation, fertilizer use, and selected crop species were not examined, the results of this study suggest that agricultural land use can be a source of aged terrestrial DOC to streams during summer monsoon storms, potentially changing the balance of the regional carbon cycle.

  1. Review and suggestions for estimating particulate organic carbon and dissolved organic carbon inventories in the ocean using remote sensing data

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PAN Delu; LIU Qiong; BAI Yan

    2014-01-01

    Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and particulate organic carbon (POC) are basic variables for the ocean carbon cycle. Knowledge of the distribution and inventory of these variables is important for a better es-timation and understanding of the global carbon cycle. Owing to its considerable advantages in spatial and temporal coverage, remote sensing data provide estimates of DOC and POC inventories, which are able to give a synthetic view for the distribution and transportation of carbon pools. To estimate organic car-bon inventories using remote sensing involves integration of the surface concentration and vertical profile models, and the development of these models is critical to the accuracy of estimates. Hence, the distribu-tion and control factors of DOC and POC in the ocean first are briefly summarized, and then studies of DOC and POC inventories and flux estimations are reviewed, most of which are based on field data and few of which consider the vertical distributions of POC or DOC. There is some research on the estimation of POC inventory by remote sensing, mainly in the open ocean, in which three kinds of vertical profile models have been proposed:the uniform, exponential decay, and Gauss models. However, research on remote-sensing estimation of the DOC inventory remains lacking. A synthetic review of approaches used to estimate the or-ganic carbon inventories is offered and the future development of methods is discussed for such estimates using remote sensing data in coastal waters.

  2. [Vermicomposting of different organic materials and three-dimensional excitation emission matrix fluorescence spectroscopic characterization of their dissolved organic matter].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wei; Wang, Dong-sheng; Liu, Man-qiang; Hu, Feng; Li, Hui-xin; Huang, Zhong-yang; Chang, Yi-jun; Jiao, Jia-guo

    2015-10-01

    In this experiment, different proportions of the cattle manure, tea-leaf, herb and mushroom residues, were used as food for earthworm (Eisenia fetida) to study the growth of the earth-worm. Then the characteristics and transformation of nutrient content and three-dimensional excitation emission matrix fluorescence (3DEEM) of dissolved organic matter (DOM) during vermistabilization were investigated by means of chemical and spectroscopic methods. The result showed that the mixture of different ratios of cattle manure with herb residue, and cattle manure with tea-leaf were conducive to the growth of earthworm, while the materials compounded with mushroom residue inhibited the growth of earthworm. With the increasing time of verimcomposting, the pH in vermicompost tended to be circumneutral and weakly acidic, and there were increases in electrical conductivity, and the contents of total nitrogen, total phosphorus, available nitrogen, and available phosphorus, while the total potassium and available potassium increased first and then decreased, and the organic matter content decreased. 3DEEM and fluorescence regional integration results indicated that, the fluorescence of protein-like fluorescence peaks declined significantly, while the intensity of humic-like fluorescence peak increased significantly in DOM. Vermicomposting process might change the compositions of DOM with elevated concentrations of humic acid and fulvic acid in the organics. In all, this study suggested the suitability of 3DEEM for monitoring the organics transformation and assessing the maturity in the vermicomposting. PMID:26995929

  3. Effects of dissolved organic matter from sewage sludge on the atrazine sorption by soils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LING; Wanting; XU; Jianming; GAO; Yanzheng

    2005-01-01

    The effects of dissolved organic matter (DOM), water soluble organic matter derived from sewage sludge, on the sorption of atrazine (2-chloro-4-ethylamino-6-isopropylamino-1,3,5-trazine) by soils were studied using a batch equilibrium technique. Six paddy soils, chosen so as to have different organic carbon contents, were experimented in this investigation. Atrazine sorption isotherms on soils were described by the linear equation, and the distribution coefficients without DOM (Kd) or with DOM (Kd*) were obtained. Generally, the values of Kd*/Kd initially insoil-solution system form. Critical concentrations of DOM (DOMnp) were obtained where the value of Kd* was equal to Kd. The presence of DOM with concentrations lower than DOMnp promoted atrazine sorption on soils (Kd* > Kd), whereas the presence of DOM with concentrations higher than DOMnp tended to inhibit atrazine sorption (Kd* < Kd). Interestingly, DOMnp for tested soils was negatively correlated to the soil organic carbon content, and the maximum of Kd*/Kd (i.e.Kmax) correlated positively with the maximum of DOM sorption on soil (Xmax). Further investigations showed that the presence of hydrophobic fraction of DOM evidently promoted the atrazine sorption on soils, whereas the presence of hydrophilic DOM fraction obviously tended to inhibit the atrazine sorption. Interactions of soil surfaces with DOM and its fractions were suggested to be the major processes determining atrazine sorption on soils. The results of this work provide a reference to the agricultural use of organic amendment such as sewage sludge for improving the availability of atrazine in soils.

  4. Mobilization of optically invisible dissolved organic matter in response to rainstorm events in a tropical forest headwater river

    OpenAIRE

    Pereira, Ryan; Bovolo, C. Isabella; Spencer, Robert G. M.; Hernes, Peter J.; Tipping, Edward; Vieth-Hillebrand, Andrea; Pedentchouk, Nikolai; Chappell, Nick A.; Parkin, Geoff; Wagner, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    This study emphasizes the importance of rainstorm events in mobilizing carbon at the soil-stream interface from tropical rainforests. Half-hourly geochemical/isotopic records over a 13.5 h period from a 20 km2 tropical rainforest headwater in Guyana show an order of magnitude increase in dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration in less than 30 mins (10.6–114 mg/L). The composition of DOC varies significantly and includes optically invisible dissolved organic matter (iDOM) that accounts fo...

  5. Land Cover and Nutrient Loads Explain Changes in Enzymatic Processing of Stream Dissolved Organic Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosen, J. D.; Febria, C.; McDonough, O.; Palmer, M.

    2012-12-01

    Anthropogenic land use has been shown to alter organic matter composition as well as its processing, export, and retention in headwater streams. Human activities also increase stream nutrient loading and in turn organic matter processing by heterotrophic microbial communities. Using microbial extracellular enzyme activity (EEA) assays combined with dissolved organic matter (DOM) fluorescence spectroscopy, we investigated the interaction between catchment land use, nutrient limitation, heterotrophic microbial communities, and carbon processing in five forested and three urbanized Coastal Plain headwater streams (Maryland, USA). EEA measures microbial production of heterotrophic extracellular enzymes, including aminopeptidase, which facilitates the breakdown of organic nitrogen and phosphatase which facilitates breakdown of organic phosphate. DOM fluorescence spectroscopy enables rapid quantification of different organic matter fluorophores (e.g., amino acid-, humic acid-, and fulvic acid-like). Excitation-emission matrices (EEMs) of DOM fluorescence can be coupled with parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC) for detailed quantitative analysis. Samples were collected quarterly from May 2011 to July 2012 and characterized using both EEA and EEM. We show that significant differences in stream EEA are explained by DOM fluorescence, land cover, and inorganic nutrient inputs. Specifically, urbanized sites were characterized by relatively low ortho-phosphate concentrations, high inorganic nitrogen concentrations, high phosphatase EEA, and greater amino acid-like DOM fluorescence. Aminopeptidase activity increased with increasing amino acid-like DOM fluorescence (i.e., a labile form of DOM for microbes) in forested streams. By contrast aminopeptidase activity did not respond to increasing amino acid-like fluorescence in urbanized streams. This points to a difference in limitation in inorganic nutrients between stream types. Thus, we hypothesize that stream microbial communities

  6. Flocculation of Allochthonous Dissolved Organic Matter – a Significant Pathway of Sedimentation and Carbon Burial in Lakes

    OpenAIRE

    von Wachenfeldt, Eddie

    2008-01-01

    Inland waters receive substantial amounts of organic carbon from adjacent watersheds. Only about half of the carbon exported from inland waters reaches the oceans, while the remainder is lost en route. This thesis identifies flocculation as an important and significant fate of carbon in the boreal landscape. Flocculation reallocates organic carbon from the dissolved state into particles which are prone to settle. Thus, flocculation relocates organic carbon from the water column to the sedimen...

  7. Photochemical Production of Dissolved Inorganic Carbon from Oceanic Colored Dissolved Organic Matter: a Gentle Approach to Measuring a new "Wild Card" Carbon Cycle Term

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zafiriou, O. C.; Wang, W.; Johnson, C. G.

    2004-12-01

    BACKGROUND: Massive oceanic photochemical remineralization (termed "photo-CO2") has been reported[1-3]: CDOM + hv -----> CO2 (DIC) CDOM = Colored Dissolved Organic Matter. DIC = Dissolved Inorganic Carbon. The oceanic carbon cycle cannot be understood without quantifying photo-CO2 fluxes and their sensitivity to environmental variables. The optical model of Johannessen implies a global marine photo-CO2 of ˜1015 mol C or 12 Gt C a-1[4]; Kieber and Mopper find photo-CO2 formation rates in the NW Sargasso Sea of ˜20 nmol kg-1 hr-1, extrapolating to ˜1.3 Gt C a-1[5-7; D. Kieber pers. comm, 2003]. CURRENT METHOD: To achieve essential sensitivity, Antonio, TX). 2. Johannessen, S., L. Ziolkowski and W. Miller (2000). (Abstracts of Pacifichem 2000, Vol. 1, ENVR-332). 3. Miller, W.L. and S.C. Johannessen (1999). Eos, Trans. Am. Geophys. Un., 80:0S93, Abstract 0521K-09 (2000 AGU-ASLO Ocean Sciences Meeting, January 24-28, 2000. 4. Johannessen, S. C.H. A photochemical sink for dissolved organic carbon in the ocean. Ph.D Thesis, Dalhousie University, CA. 179pp May, 2000. 5. Kieber, D. J., K. Mopper and J.G. Qian (1999). Trans. Am. Geophys. Un. 80: OS 128, Abstract #0522J-01 6. Kieber, D., K. Mopper and J. Qian (2000). Abstracts of Pacifichem 2000, Vol. 1, ENVR-28). 7. Kieber, D.J., K. Mopper, J. Qian and O.C. Zafiriou 8. Zeebe, R.E., D.B. Wolf-Gladrow and H. Jansen (1999). Mar.Chem. 65, 135-153. 9. Nelson, N.B, D. A. Siegel, and A.F. Michaels (1998) Deep-Sea Res. 45, 931-957.

  8. Comparison of dissolved and total metals concentrations from acute tests with saltwater organisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lussier, S.M.; Boothman, W.S.; Champlin, D. [Environmental Protection Agency, Narragansett, RI (United States). Atlantic Ecology Div.; Poucher, S.; Helmstetten, A. [Science Applications International Corp., Narragansett, RI (United States)

    1999-05-01

    Aquatic life criteria (ALC) have traditionally been expressed for meals in terms of total-recoverable or acid-soluble concentrations. Recent US Environmental protection Agency policy recommended use of dissolved metal concentrations for setting water quality standards. Criteria derived from previous tests could be expressed in terms of dissolved metals if ratios of dissolved-to-total concentrations in those tests were consistent. Using those metals with insufficient dissolved metals data to directly derive criteria (arsenic (III), cadmium, chromium (VI), lead, nickel, selenium (IV), and zinc), the authors measured both total and dissolved metal concentrations in acute saltwater static and flow-through tests. Exposure conditions simulated those of original tests used to derive ALC. Partitioning of metals between dissolved and particulate forms was very consistent. Dissolved metal concentrations were greater than 90% of total concentrations in all tests, exceeding 95% in 10 of 13 tests. Dissolved-to-total metal ratios did not vary significantly with concentration, time, or type of test. Biological responses were consistent with historical data. Results implied that in acute saltwater toxicity tests used to establish ALC, metals were primarily dissolved. Thus criteria developed for metals based on total concentrations should be equally valid when expressed in terms of dissolved concentrations.

  9. Leaching of chloride, sulphate, heavy metals, dissolved organic carbon and phenolic organic pesticides from contaminated concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Praagh, M; Modin, H

    2016-10-01

    Concrete samples from demolition waste of a former pesticide plant in Sweden were analysed for total contents and leachate concentrations of potentially hazardous inorganic substances, TOC, phenols, as well as for pesticide compounds such as phenoxy acids, chlorophenols and chlorocresols. Leachates were produced by means of modified standard column leaching tests and pH-stat batch tests. Due to elevated contents of chromium and lead, as well as due to high chloride concentrations in the first leachate from column tests at L/S 0.1, recycling of the concrete as a construction material in groundworks is likely to be restricted according to Swedish guidelines. The studied pesticide compounds appear to be relatively mobile at the materials own pH>12, 12, 9 and 7. Potential leaching of pesticide residues from recycled concrete to ground water and surface water might exceed water quality guidelines for the remediation site and the EU Water Framework Directive. Results of this study stress the necessity to systematically study the mechanism behind mobility of organic contaminants from alkaline construction and demolition wastes rather than rely on total content limit values. PMID:27449537

  10. Leaching of chloride, sulphate, heavy metals, dissolved organic carbon and phenolic organic pesticides from contaminated concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Praagh, M; Modin, H

    2016-10-01

    Concrete samples from demolition waste of a former pesticide plant in Sweden were analysed for total contents and leachate concentrations of potentially hazardous inorganic substances, TOC, phenols, as well as for pesticide compounds such as phenoxy acids, chlorophenols and chlorocresols. Leachates were produced by means of modified standard column leaching tests and pH-stat batch tests. Due to elevated contents of chromium and lead, as well as due to high chloride concentrations in the first leachate from column tests at L/S 0.1, recycling of the concrete as a construction material in groundworks is likely to be restricted according to Swedish guidelines. The studied pesticide compounds appear to be relatively mobile at the materials own pH>12, 12, 9 and 7. Potential leaching of pesticide residues from recycled concrete to ground water and surface water might exceed water quality guidelines for the remediation site and the EU Water Framework Directive. Results of this study stress the necessity to systematically study the mechanism behind mobility of organic contaminants from alkaline construction and demolition wastes rather than rely on total content limit values.

  11. Detrital control on the release of dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) and dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) from the forest floor under chronic N deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The role of detrital quantity and quality in forest floor N leaching was investigated in a litter manipulation experiment at a deciduous forest under chronic N deposition. Dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) comprised the bulk of nitrogen leaching from the control except a short period following autumn litterfall. The dominance of DIN was strengthened by litter exclusion, whereas the addition of glucose or fresh litter led to a small increase in dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) and either a temporary or gradual reduction in NO3- release, respectively. Changes in soluble organic C and microbial C in the forest floor implied that increased availability of C sources might have enhanced microbial immobilization of DIN, either temporarily following glucose application or over the longer term following litter addition. The results suggest that detrital quantity and quality can play a crucial role in determining the balance between DIN and DON in N-enriched forest soils. - Detrital quantity and quality play a crucial role in regulating the release of DON and DIN from the forest floor under chronic N deposition

  12. Halogens in porewater of peat bogs – the role of peat decomposition and dissolved organic matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Biester

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Peatlands are one of the largest active terrestrial reservoirs of halogens. Formation of organo-halogens is a key process for the retention of halogens by organic matter and halogen enrichment in peat is strongly influenced by climatically controlled humification processes. However, little is known about release and transport of halogens in peat bogs. In this study we investigated the release of halogens from peat in three peat bogs located in the Magellanic Moorlands, southern Chile. Peat porewaters were collected using a sipping technique, which allows in situ sampling down to a depth of more than 6 m. Halogens and halogen species in porewater were determined by ion-chromatography (IC (chlorine and IC-ICP-MS (bromine and iodine. Results show that halogen concentrations in porewater are 15–30 times higher than in rainwater suggesting that their release from peat during diagenesis is the major source of halogens in porewater. Mean concentrations of chlorine, bromine and iodine in porewater were 7–15 mg l−1, 56–123μg l−1, and 10–20μg l−1, which correspond to mean proportions of 10–15%, 1–2.3% and 0.5–2.2% of total concentrations in peat, respectively. Organo-bromine and organoiodine were predominant in porewaters, whereas the release of organo-chlorine compounds from peat appears to be of minor importance. Results show that the release of bromine and iodine from peat depend on the degree of peat degradation, whereas this relationship is weak for chlorine. Relatively higher release of bromine and iodine was observed in less degraded peat sections, where the release of dissolved organic carbon (DOC was also the most intensive. Here, proportions of released iodine and bromine follow proportions of released dissolved organic matter (DOM indicating that the release of halogenated DOM is the predominant process of iodine and bromine release from peat.

  13. Release dynamics of dissolved organic matter in soil amended with biosolids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trifonov, Pavel; Ilani, Talli; Arye, Gilboa

    2014-05-01

    Among the soil organic matter (SOM) components, dissolved organic matter (DOM) is the link between the solid phase and the soil solution. Previous studies emphasize the turnover of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and nitrogen (DON) in soils as major pathways of element cycling. In addition to DOM contribution to carbon, nitrogen and other nutrient budgets, it also influence soil biological activity, reduces metal-ion toxicity, increase the transport of some compounds and contribute to the mineral weathering. Amending soils with biosolids originated from sludge have become very popular in the recent years. Those additions significantly affect the quantity and the composition of the DOM in agricultural soils. It should be noted that under most irrigation habitants, the soil is subjected to drying and re-wetting cycles, inducing a complex changes of soil structure, aggregation, SOM quality and micro-flora. However, most studies that addressed the above issues (directly or indirectly) are engaged with soils under cover of naturally occurring forests of relatively humid areas rather than agricultural soils in arid areas. In the current study we examined the DOC and DON release dynamic of sand and loess soils sampled from the Negev Desert of Israel. Each one of the soils were mixing with 5% (w/w) of one of the biosolids and packed into a Plexiglass column (I.d. 5.2 cm, L=20 cm). The flow-through experiments were conducted under low (1 ml/min) or high (10 ml/min) flow rates in a continuous or interrupted manner. The leachates were collected in time intervals equivalent to about 0.12 pore volume of a given soil-biosolids mixture. The established leaching curves of DOC, DON, NO3-, NH4+ and Cl- are analyzed by water flow and solute transport model for saturate (continuous runs) or variably saturate water flow conditions (interrupted runs). The chemical equilibrium or non-equilibrium (i.e. equilibrium and/or kinetics adsorption/desorption) versions of the convection dispersion

  14. Dissolved organic carbon reduces uranium bioavailability and toxicity. 2. Uranium[VI] speciation and toxicity to three tropical freshwater organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trenfield, Melanie A; Ng, Jack C; Noller, Barry N; Markich, Scott J; Dam, Rick A van

    2011-04-01

    The influence of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) on the toxicity of uranium (U) to three Australian tropical freshwater species, the Northern Trout Gudgeon (Mogurnda mogurnda), green hydra (Hydra viridissima) and unicellular green alga (Chlorella sp.) was assessed. Exposures were conducted in synthetic soft water without DOC and with DOC added in the form of standard Suwannee River Fulvic Acid (SRFA). Organisms were exposed to a range of U concentrations at a range of DOC concentrations (0-20 mg L(-1)). U toxicity was up to 20 times less in water containing 20 mg L(-1) DOC, relative to DOC-free test waters. U toxicity was also assessed using natural water from a tropical Australian billabong containing 10 mg L(-1) DOC. U toxicity was up to ten times less in the billabong water, relative to DOC--free test waters. SRFA was twice as effective at reducing U toxicity as the billabong water at equivalent DOC concentrations. Geochemical speciation modeling confirmed the decreased U toxicity that resulted from both DOC sources was primarily due to a decrease in the free uranyl ion (UO2(2+)) through complexation with DOC. A predictive model is presented for each of the organisms that can be used to predict U toxicity at a given U and DOC concentration. PMID:21351800

  15. Atmospheric fluxes of organic matter to the Mediterranean Sea: contribution to the elemental C: N: P ratios of surface dissolved organic matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djaoudi, Kahina; Barani, Aude; Hélias-Nunige, Sandra; Van Wambeke, France; Pulido-Villena, Elvira

    2016-04-01

    It has become increasingly apparent that atmospheric transport plays an important role in the supply of macro- and micro-nutrients to the surface ocean. This atmospheric input is especially important in oligotrophic regions where the vertical supply from the subsurface is low particularly during the stratification period. Compared to its inorganic counterpart, the organic fraction of atmospheric deposition and its impact on surface ocean biogeochemistry has been poorly explored. In the ocean, carbon export to depth (and therefore, its long term storage with presumed consequences on climate) occurs both through particle sedimentation and through the transfer of dissolved organic matter (DOM) via diffusion or convection. DOM export from the surface ocean represents up to 50% of total organic carbon flux to the deep ocean in oligotrophic regions such as the Mediterranean Sea. The efficiency of this C export pathway depends, among others, on the elemental C: N: P ratios of surface DOM which might be affected by the relative contribution of microbial processes and allochthonous sources. This work reports a one-year time-series (April 2015-April 2016) of simultaneous measurements of (1) total (dry + wet) atmospheric fluxes of organic carbon, organic nitrogen, and organic phosphorus and (2) concentration of dissolved organic carbon, dissolved organic nitrogen, and dissolved organic phosphate at the surface layer (0-200 m) in the NW Mediterranean Sea. Atmospheric and oceanic surveys were conducted at the Frioul and ANTARES sites, respectively, operated by the long-term observation network MOOSE (Mediterranean Oceanic Observation System for the Environment).

  16. Seasonal variability in the composition of dissolved organic matter in the Yukon River, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiken, G.; Cao, X.; Mao, J.; Stubbins, A.; Schmidt-Rohr, K.; Spencer, R. G.

    2015-12-01

    Modern analytical approaches allow for detailed characterization of the composition of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in aquatic systems. The utility of advanced FTICR-MS and 13C-NMR approaches is presented for assessing the seasonal variability in DOM composition for samples collected across the hydrograph (2008 and 2009) from the Yukon River at Pilot Station, Alaska. FTICR-MS analyses were obtained on whole water samples while one- and two-dimensional solid-state NMR analyses were performed on the hydrophobic organic acid (HPOA) and transphilic organic acid (TPIA) fractions obtained using XAD resins (accounting for 64-74% of the DOM). Both approaches indicated that lignin-derived and carboxyl-rich alicyclic molecules (CRAM) were major fractions of all samples collected throughout the year, and that contributions from black carbon were minor. Each approach also provided unique information. FTICR-MS indicated the presence in spring of compounds containing sulfur that previously were identified to be atmospherically deposited combustion products in glacial meltwaters. These likely were deposited with snowfall. NMR analyses indicated that HPOA isolates from the spring period were characterized by greater contributions from lignin residues and carbohydrate-like materials than those from summer-autumn and winter. In addition, the spring TPIA samples had a predominance of carbohydrate, which was much less evident in the structures of summer-autumn and winter TPIA isolates. Spring DOM, therefore, was representative of inputs from freshly leached plant materials. These relatively fresh organic materials were depleted in summer-fall and winter samples, indicating that summer-fall and especially winter DOM was associated with more extensively degraded DOM and older DOM pools. These results provide chemical evidence supporting observations that spring freshet DOM in Arctic rivers is more biolabile than DOM exported at other times of the year.

  17. Sorption of dissolved organic matter and its effects on the atrazine sorption on soils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LING Wan-ting; WANG Hai-zhen; XU Jian-ming; GAO Yan-zheng

    2005-01-01

    The dissolved organic matter(DOM), water soluble organic matter derived from sewage sludge was separated into hydrophobic fraction(Ho) and hydrophilic fraction(Hi). The sorption of DOM and its fractions on soils and the effects of DOM sorption on a nonionic pesticide(atrazine (2-chloro-4-ethylamino-6-isopropylamino-1,3,5-trazine)) distribution between soil and water were investigated using a batch equilibrium technique. The total DOM sorption on soils described by the Langmuir equation reached saturation as the DOMconcentration increased. The sorption of Ho fit the Freundlich model. In contrast, a negative retention evidently occurred as adding Hi at higher level in tested soils. The sorption of Ho dominated the total DOM sorption and the release of soil organic matter(SOM). Effects of DOM on the atrazine sorption by soils were DOM-concentration dependent and dominated by the interaction of atrazine, DOM, and soil solids. Generally, the presence of DOM with lower concentration promoted atrazine sorption on soils, namely the apparent partitioning constant( K; ) for atrazine sorption in the presence of DOM was larger than the distribution constant ( Kd ) without DOM; whereas the presence of DOM with higher concentration inhibited atrazine sorption(i. e., K; < Kd ) . The overall effects of DOM on atrazine sorption in soils might be related to the DOM sorption and the release of soil intrinsic organic matter into aqueous solution. The sorption of Ho on soils promoted the atrazine sorption on soil, while the release of SOM by Hi and the competitive sorption between Hi and atrazine on soil surface led to a decrease of atrazine sorption. Information provided in this work may contribute to a better understanding of the DOM sorption and its impacts on the contaminant soil-water distribution.

  18. Dissolved organic matter in sea spray: a transfer study from marine surface water to aerosols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Schmitt-Kopplin

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric aerosols impose direct and indirect effects on the climate system, for example, by adsorption of radiation in relation to cloud droplets size, on chemical and organic composition and cloud dynamics. The first step in the formation of primary marine aerosols, i.e., the transfer of dissolved organic matter from the marine surface into the atmosphere was studied, and we present a molecular level description of this phenomenon using high resolution analytical tools (Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance = FT-ICR MS and NMR. We could experimentally confirm the chemo-selective transfer of natural organic molecules, especially of aliphatic compounds from the surface water into the atmosphere via bubble bursting processes. Transfer from marine surface water to the atmosphere involves a chemical gradient governed by the physicochemical properties of the involved molecules when comparing elemental compositions and differentiating CHO, CHNO, CHOS and CHNOS bearing compounds. Typical chemical fingerprints of concentrated compounds were CHO and CHOS type of molecules, smaller molecules of higher aliphaticity and lower oxygen content and typical surfactants. A non-targeted mass spectrometric analysis of the samples showed that many of these molecules correspond to homologous series of oxo-, hydroxyl-, methoxy-, branched fatty acids and mono-, di- and tricarboxylic acids as well as monoterpenes and sugars. These surface active biomolecules were preferentially transferred from surface water into the atmosphere via bubble bursting processes to form a significant fraction of primary organic aerosols. This way of production of sea spray leaves a specific biological signature of the surface water in the corresponding lower atmosphere that can be transported laterally in the context of global cycling.

  19. Direct and indirect photolysis of triclocarban in the presence of dissolved organic matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara D. Trouts

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Photolysis is an important attenuation pathway for the removal of wastewater effluent organic micropollutants from surface waters. In this work, direct and indirect processes leading to the degradation of the disinfectant, triclocarban were studied. Photo-irradiation experiments were conducted in water collected from Old Woman Creek (OWC a tributary of Lake Erie near Huron, OH, USA and in solutions of fulvic acids isolated from the Suwannee River, Georgia, USA (SRFA, Old Woman Creek (OWCFA and Pony Lake, Antarctica (PLFA. Photodegradation of triclocarban proceeded faster in the presence of all three fulvic acids relative to deionized water. PLFA, an autochthonous dissolved organic matter (DOM was found to be more reactive than the other fulvic acids, while the mostly allochthonous SRFA exhibited the lowest reactivity toward triclocarban. The later observation can be in part explained by anti-oxidant moieties present in SRFA. Photosensitized triclocarban degradation in whole water DOM from OWC was entirely attributable to the fulvic acid fraction and suggests that this component is the most photo-reactive fraction of the DOM. Anoxic and methanol-quenched experiments revealed unexpected results whereby the former suggests oxidation through reaction with triplet DOM, while the later is indicative of reaction with photo-generated hydroxyl radicals. It is possible that methanol can quench excited DOM species, which would shut down the triplet oxidation pathway. Finally, we observed no enhancement of triclocarban-photosensitized degradation through the addition of iron.

  20. Dissolved organic nitrogen in urban streams: Biodegradability and molecular composition studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lusk, Mary G; Toor, Gurpal S

    2016-06-01

    A portion of the dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) is biodegradable in water bodies, yet our knowledge of the molecular composition and controls on biological reactivity of DON is limited. Our objective was to investigate the biodegradability and molecular composition of DON in streams that drain a gradient of 19-83% urban land use. Weekly sampling over 21 weeks suggested no significant relationship between urban land use and DON concentration. We then selected two streams that drain 28% and 83% urban land use to determine the biodegradability and molecular composition of the DON by coupling 5-day bioassay experiments with high resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR-MS). Both urban streams contained a wide range of N-bearing biomolecular formulas and had >80% DON in lignin-like compounds, with only 5-7% labile DON. The labile DON consisted mostly of lipid-and protein-like structures with high H/C and low O/C values. Comparison of reactive formulas and formed counterparts during the bioassay experiments indicated a shift toward more oxygenated and less saturated N-bearing DON formulas due to the microbial degradation. Although there was a little net removal (5-7%) of organic-bound N over the 5-day bioassay, there was some change to the carbon skeleton of DON compounds. These results suggest that DON in urban streams contains a complex mixture of compounds such as lipids, proteins, and lignins of variable chemical structures and biodegradability. PMID:27058880

  1. Dissolved organic nitrogen in urban streams: Biodegradability and molecular composition studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lusk, Mary G; Toor, Gurpal S

    2016-06-01

    A portion of the dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) is biodegradable in water bodies, yet our knowledge of the molecular composition and controls on biological reactivity of DON is limited. Our objective was to investigate the biodegradability and molecular composition of DON in streams that drain a gradient of 19-83% urban land use. Weekly sampling over 21 weeks suggested no significant relationship between urban land use and DON concentration. We then selected two streams that drain 28% and 83% urban land use to determine the biodegradability and molecular composition of the DON by coupling 5-day bioassay experiments with high resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR-MS). Both urban streams contained a wide range of N-bearing biomolecular formulas and had >80% DON in lignin-like compounds, with only 5-7% labile DON. The labile DON consisted mostly of lipid-and protein-like structures with high H/C and low O/C values. Comparison of reactive formulas and formed counterparts during the bioassay experiments indicated a shift toward more oxygenated and less saturated N-bearing DON formulas due to the microbial degradation. Although there was a little net removal (5-7%) of organic-bound N over the 5-day bioassay, there was some change to the carbon skeleton of DON compounds. These results suggest that DON in urban streams contains a complex mixture of compounds such as lipids, proteins, and lignins of variable chemical structures and biodegradability.

  2. Nitrogen loss from unpolluted South American forests mainly via dissolved organic compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perakis, Steven S.; Hedin, Lars O.

    2002-01-01

    Conceptual and numerical models of nitrogen cycling in temperate forests assume that nitrogen is lost from these ecosystems predominantly by way of inorganic forms, such as nitrate and ammonium ions. Of these, nitrate is thought to be particularly mobile, being responsible for nitrogen loss to deep soil and stream waters. But human activities-such as fossil fuel combustion, fertilizer production and land-use change-have substantially altered the nitrogen cycle over large regions, making it difficult to separate natural aspects of nitrogen cycling from those induced by human perturbations. Here we report stream chemistry data from 100 unpolluted primary forests in temperate South America. Although the sites exhibit a broad range of environmental factors that influence ecosystem nutrient cycles (such as climate, parent material, time of ecosystem development, topography and biotic diversity), we observed a remarkably consistent pattern of nitrogen loss across all forests. In contrast to findings from forests in polluted regions, streamwater nitrate concentrations are exceedingly low, such that nitrate to ammonium ratios were less than unity, and dissolved organic nitrogen is responsible for the majority of nitrogen losses from these forests. We therefore suggest that organic nitrogen losses should be considered in models of forest nutrient cycling, which could help to explain observations of nutrient limitation in temperate forest ecosystems.

  3. Influence of colloidal dissolved organic carbon (DOC) on the sorption of plutonium on natural sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It now appears possible to formulate a practical model to describe the absorption of Pu(IV) by suspended solids. In such a model the constants describing the association of plutonium with both soluble organics and solid adsorbers must be known, as well as any variation in these constants due to solution properties such as pH and ionic strength. If the complexing ability of dissolved organic carbon is sufficiently constant, such a model could describe plutonium behavior in a wide variety of surface and ground waters. Observations to date indicate that the variation in K/sub D/ (K/sub D/ = concentration of Pu(IV) in suspended solids divided by the concentration of Pu(IV) in the water) among water bodies is due primarily to differences in water chemistry and that differences in the character of the absorbing solid are less important. The mathematical relationship and parameter values presented in this report adequately describe the adsorption of Pu(IV) on one-specific sediment

  4. Sorption of phenanthrene by dissolved organic matter and its complex with aluminum oxide nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intent of this study was to explore the potential application of polymerin, the polymeric, dissolved organic matter fraction from olive oil wastewaters, in technologies aimed at remediating hydrophobic organic compounds (HOCs) point-source pollution. Phenanthrene binding with polymerin was investigated. Moreover, the effect of addition of micro and nanoscale aluminum oxides (Al2O3) was studied, as well as sorption of polymerin on the oxides. Phenanthrene binding capacity by polymerin was notably higher than the sorption capacities for both types of Al2O3 particles. Polymerin sorption on nanoparticles was nearly 100 times higher than microparticles. In a three-phase system, using microparticles, higher phenanthrene sorption was found by adding into water polymerin, oxides and phenanthrene simultaneously. In contrast, using nanoparticles, a considerable enhancement of phenanthrene sorption was shown by adding phenanthrene to a pre-formed and dried polymerin-oxide complex. These findings support the application of polymerin, especially associated with Al2O3 nanoparticles, in remediation of water contaminated with HOCs. This work highlights the significant role of nanoparticles. - Size of aluminum oxides significantly affects sorption of polymerin and phenanthrene

  5. Impacts of Polar Changes on the UV-induced Mineralization of Terrigenous Dissolved Organic Matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulzberger, Barbara; Arey, J Samuel

    2016-07-01

    Local climates in the Northern and Southern Hemisphere are influenced by Arctic Amplification and by interactions of the Antarctic ozone hole with climate change, respectively. Polar changes may affect hydroclimatic conditions in temperate regions, for example, by increasing the length and intensity of precipitation events at Northern Hemisphere midlatitudes. Additionally, global warming has led to the thawing of ancient permafrost soils, particularly in Arctic regions, due to Arctic Amplification. Both heavy precipitation events and thawing of permafrost are increasing the net transfer of terrestrially derived dissolved organic matter (DOM) from land to surface waters. In aquatic ecosystems, UV-induced oxidation of terrigenous DOM (tDOM) produces atmospheric CO2 and this process is one of several mechanisms by which natural organic matter in aquatic and soil environments may play an important role in climate feedbacks. The Arctic is particularly affected by these processes: for example, melting of Arctic sea ice allows solar UV radiation to penetrate into the ice-free Arctic Ocean and to cause photochemical reactions that result in bleaching and mineralization of tDOM. Open questions, in addition to those shown in the Graphical Abstract, remain regarding the resulting contributions of tDOM photomineralization to CO2 production and global warming. PMID:27110903

  6. Optical characterization of dissolved organic matter in the Amazon River Plume and the adjacent deep ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, F.; Medeiros, P. M.; Miller, W. L.

    2012-12-01

    The Amazon River is the largest river in the world and a major source of terrestrially-derived organic matter to the Atlantic Ocean, accounting for ~ 20% of the global freshwater discharge. To document the quantity and quality of the colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM) in the Amazon River Plume (ARP), the optical properties (absorption and fluorescence intensity) of the CDOM were investigated in water samples collected during two cruises conducted at periods of low (Sep/2011) and high (Jul/2012) river discharge. Excitation emission matrix fluoresces combined with parallel factor analysis (EEMS-PARAFAC) was used to determine the composition of the CDOM, and four components were identified: two terrestrial humic-like components (C1 and C4), one marine humic-like component (C3), and one autochthonous tryptophan-like component (C2). This agrees with results of mass spectrometry analysis that showed a distinction among DOM composition found in river, plume, and open ocean water. Correlation analysis between the fluorescence components and salinity in the ARP suggests that humic-like fluorescent components can be used to trace DOM mixing behavior in the ARP and adjacent waters.

  7. Interaction of bisphenol A with dissolved organic matter in extractive and adsorptive removal processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Fei-Die; Choo, Kwang-Ho; Chang, Hyun-Shik; Lee, Byunghwan

    2012-05-01

    The fate of endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) in natural and engineered systems is complicated due to their interactions with various water constituents. This study investigated the interaction of bisphenol A (BPA) with dissolved organic matter (DOM) and colloids present in surface water and secondary effluent as well as its adsorptive removal by powdered activated carbons. The solid phase micro-extraction (SPME) method followed by thermal desorption and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was utilized for determining the distribution of BPA molecules in water. The BPA removal by SPME decreased with the increased DOM content, where the formation of BPA-DOM complexes in an aqueous matrix was responsible for the reduced extraction of BPA. Colloidal particles in water samples sorbed BPA leading to the marked reduction of liquid phase BPA. BPA-DOM complexes had a negative impact on the adsorptive removal of BPA by powered activated carbons. The complex formation was characterized based on Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) spectroscopy, along with the calculation of molecular interactions between BPA and functional groups in DOM. It was found that the hydrogen bonding between DOM and BPA would be preferred over aromatic interactions. A pseudo-equilibrium molecular coordination model for the complexation between a BPA molecule and a hydroxyl group of the DOM was developed, which enabled estimation of the maximum sorption site and complex formation constant as well as prediction of organic complexes at various DOM levels. PMID:22330311

  8. Sorption of Pyrene by Clay Minerals Coated with Dissolved Organic Matter (DOM from Landfill Leachate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pingxiao Wu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Interactions of dissolved organic matter (DOM from landfill leachate with clays could affect significantly the fate of hydrophobic organic compounds (HOCs in soils. The complexes of montmorillonite (MT and kaolinite (KL with DOM extracted from landfill leachate were prepared under controlled conditions, termed CMT and CKL, respectively. The bare clays and their complexes were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR, thermogravimetry (TG, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. Batch experiments were designed to investigate the sorption behavior of pyrene onto the clays in the presence of DOM. The maximum sorption capacities of pyrene on MT, CMT, KL, and CKL were 22.18, 38.96, 42.00, and 44.99 μg·g−1, respectively, at the initial concentration of 1000 ± 150 μg·L−1. The sorption isotherms of pyrene by the bare clays followed the Henry model well, whereas the Freundlich sorption isotherm provided a better fit to the equilibrium data of the sorption by the complexes. The role of montmorillonite and kaolinite complexes with DOM in the retention of pyrene in soils was different. This may be due to the different crystal structures between montmorillonite and kaolinite.

  9. Water Dynamics and Its Role in Structural Hysteresis of Dissolved Organic Matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conte, Pellegrino; Kucerik, Jiri

    2016-03-01

    Knowledge of structural dynamics of dissolved organic matter (DOM) is of paramount importance for understanding DOM stability and role in the fate of solubilized organic and inorganic compounds (e.g., nutrients and pollutants), either in soils or aquatic systems. In this study, fast field cycling (FFC) (1)H NMR relaxometry was applied to elucidate structural dynamics of terrestrial DOM, represented by two structurally contrasting DOM models such as Suwanee River (SRFA) and Pahokee peat (PPFA) fulvic acids purchased by the International Humic Substance Society. Measurement of NMR relaxation rate of water protons in heating-cooling cycles revealed structural hysteresis in both fulvic acids. In particular, structural hysteresis was related to the delay in re-establishing water network around fulvic molecules as a result of temperature fluctuations. The experiments revealed that the structural temperature dependency and hysteresis were more pronounced in SRFA than in PPFA. This was attributed to the larger content of hydrogel-like structure in SRFA stabilized, at a larger extent, by H-bonds between carboxylic and phenolic groups. Moreover, results supported the view that terrestrial DOM consist of a hydrophobic rigid core surrounded by progressively assembling amphiphilic and polar molecules, which form an elastic structure that can mediate reactivity of the whole DOM.

  10. Removal of terrestrial dissolved organic carbon in aquatic ecosystems of a temperate river network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollheim, W. M.; Stewart, R. J.; Aiken, G.; Butler, K. D.; Morse, N.; Salisbury, J.

    2015-12-01

    Surface waters play an important role in the global carbon balance. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) fluxes are a major transfer of terrestrial carbon to river systems, and the net removal of terrestrial DOC in aquatic systems is poorly constrained. We used a combination of spatially distributed sampling of three DOC fractions, nitrate, and chloride in streams of different size throughout a river network and modeling to quantify the net removal of terrestrial DOC relative to other constituents during a summer base flow period. The approach was applied to the 400 km2 Ipswich River watershed, MA, USA. We found that aquatic reactivity of terrestrial DOC leading to net loss is low, closer to conservative chloride than to reactive nitrogen. Net removal of DOC occurred mainly from the hydrophobic organic acid fraction, while hydrophilic and transphilic acids showed no net change. Model fits were improved using the different DOC fractions than when using bulk DOC, indicating that partitioning of bulk DOC into different fractions is critical for understanding terrestrial DOC removal. These findings suggest that river systems may have only a modest ability to alter the amounts of terrestrial DOC delivered to coastal zones.

  11. Effects of dissolved organic matter from sewage sludge on sorption of tetrabromobisphenol A by soils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Zhaohai; MAO Li; XIAN Qiming; YU Yijun; LI Hui; YU Hongxia

    2008-01-01

    Sorption of tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA) by soil influences its fate and transport in the environment. The presence of dissolved organic matter (DOM) may complicate the sorption process in soil. The effects of DOM from sewage sludge on TBBPA sorption by three soils were investigated using batch equilibration experiments in the study. DOM was observed to be sorbed on the soils and the isotherms could be fitted by the Langmuir model. The effects of DOM on TBBPA sorption were dependent on the characteristics of soils and the concentrations of DOM present. TBBPA sorption by Henan (HN) soil (sandy loam) and Liaoning (LN) soil (loamy clay) was promoted in the presence of DOM at low concentration (≤ 90 mg organic carbon (OC)/L), and the sorption was promoted by HN soil and inhibited by LN soil at DOM added concentration of 180 mg OC/L. TBBPA sorption by Guangxi (GX) soil (silt loam) was always inhibited in the presence of DOM. It was also found that the amount of TBBPA sorbed decreased with the increase in the solution pH value in the absence of DOM. The influencing mechanisms of DOM on the sorption of TBBPA by soils were also discussed.

  12. Dissolved organic carbon ameliorates the effects of UV radiation on a freshwater fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manek, Aditya K; Ferrari, Maud C O; Chivers, Douglas P; Niyogi, Som

    2014-08-15

    Anthropogenic activities over the past several decades have depleted stratospheric ozone, resulting in a global increase in ultraviolet radiation (UVR). Much of the negative effects of UVR in aquatic systems is minimized by dissolved organic carbon (DOC) which is known to attenuate UVR across the water column. The skin of many fishes contains large epidermal club cells (ECCs) that are known to play a role in innate immune responses and also release chemical alarm cues that warn other fishes of danger. This study investigated the effects of in vivo UVR exposure to fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas), under the influence of two sources of DOC: Sigma Aldrich humic acid, a coal based commercial source of DOC and Luther Marsh natural organic matter, a terrigenous source of DOC. Specifically, we examined ECC investment and physiological stress responses and found that fish exposed to high UVR, in the presence of either source of DOC, had higher ECC investment than fish exposed to high UVR only. Similarly, exposure to high UVR under either source of DOC, reduced cortisol levels relative to that in the high UVR only treatment. This indicates that DOC protects fish from physiological stress associated with UVR exposure and helps maintain production of ECC under conditions of UVR exposure. PMID:24914525

  13. Assessment of the Impact of Climate Change and Land Management Change on Soil Organic Carbon Content, Leached Carbon Rates and Dissolved Organic Carbon Concentrations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stergiadi, Maria; de Nijs, Ton; van der Perk, Marcel; Bonten, Luc

    2014-01-01

    Climate change is projected to significantly affect the concentrations and mobility of contaminants, such as metals and pathogens, in soil, groundwater and surface water. Climate- and land management-induced changes in soil organic carbon and dissolved organic carbon levels may promote the transport

  14. Theoretical investigation of nonlinear properties of electrooptical chromophores

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhou Yu-fang; Zhuang De-xin

    2004-01-01

    Organic electrooptical (EO) chromophores are now gaining more attention because the property of organic photorefrative (PR) materials could be controlled by doped EO chromophores. In this paper, nonlinear optical (NLO) properties of a new group of organic electrooptical chromophores, synthesized recently in our laboratory, were elucidated theoretically with the quantum chemical density functional theory (DFT) and the intermediate neglect of differential overlap Hamilton and the configuration interaction (INDO/CI), as well as semiemperical Austin Model 1 (AM1) methods. The electronic transition intensity, dipole moment and the second- order polarizability were obtained. The results show this group of chrormophores possess appropriate optical absorption property and good electrooptical property and optical activity. The second-order polarizabilities βare as large as the order of 10-29 to 10-28 ESU, indicating the promising applications in the future. The physical mechanism of NLO is discussed by means of molecular orbital and electronic charge distribution.

  15. Optical assessment of colored dissolved organic matter and its related parameters in dynamic coastal water systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanmugam, Palanisamy; Varunan, Theenathayalan; Nagendra Jaiganesh, S. N.; Sahay, Arvind; Chauhan, Prakash

    2016-06-01

    Prediction of the curve of the absorption coefficient of colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM) and differentiation between marine and terrestrially derived CDOM pools in coastal environments are hampered by a high degree of variability in the composition and concentration of CDOM, uncertainties in retrieved remote sensing reflectance and the weak signal-to-noise ratio of space-borne instruments. In the present study, a hybrid model is presented along with empirical methods to remotely determine the amount and type of CDOM in coastal and inland water environments. A large set of in-situ data collected on several oceanographic cruises and field campaigns from different regional waters was used to develop empirical methods for studying the distribution and dynamics of CDOM, dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and salinity. Our validation analyses demonstrated that the hybrid model is a better descriptor of CDOM absorption spectra compared to the existing models. Additional spectral slope parameters included in the present model to differentiate between terrestrially derived and marine CDOM pools make a substantial improvement over those existing models. Empirical algorithms to derive CDOM, DOC and salinity from remote sensing reflectance data demonstrated success in retrieval of these products with significantly low mean relative percent differences from large in-situ measurements. The performance of these algorithms was further assessed using three hyperspectral HICO images acquired simultaneously with our field measurements in productive coastal and lagoon waters on the southeast part of India. The validation match-ups of CDOM and salinity showed good agreement between HICO retrievals and field observations. Further analyses of these data showed significant temporal changes in CDOM and phytoplankton absorption coefficients with a distinct phase shift between these two products. Healthy phytoplankton cells and macrophytes were recognized to directly contribute to the

  16. Boreal forest riparian zones regulate stream sulfate and dissolved organic carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledesma, José L J; Futter, Martyn N; Laudon, Hjalmar; Evans, Christopher D; Köhler, Stephan J

    2016-08-01

    In boreal forest catchments, solute transfer to streams is controlled by hydrological and biogeochemical processes occurring in the riparian zone (RZ). However, RZs are spatially heterogeneous and information about solute chemistry is typically limited. This is problematic when making inferences about stream chemistry. Hypothetically, the strength of links between riparian and stream chemistry is time-scale dependent. Using a ten-year (2003-2012) dataset from a northern Swedish catchment, we evaluated the suitability of RZ data to infer stream dynamics at different time scales. We focus on the role of the RZ versus upslope soils in controlling sulfate (SO4(2)(-)) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC). A priori, declines in acid deposition and redox-mediated SO4(2)(-) pulses control sulfur (S) fluxes and pool dynamics, which in turn affect dissolved organic carbon (DOC). We found that the catchment is currently a net source of S, presumably due to release of the S pool accumulated during the acidification period. In both, RZ and stream, SO4(2-) concentrations are declining over time, whereas DOC is increasing. No temporal trends in SO4(2-) and DOC were observed in upslope mineral soils. SO4(2-) explained the variation of DOC in stream and RZ, but not in upslope mineral soil. Moreover, as SO4(2-) decreased with time, temporal variability of DOC increased. These observations indicate that: (1) SO4(2-) is still an important driver of DOC trends in boreal catchments and (2) RZ processes control stream SO4(2-) and subsequently DOC independently of upslope soils. These phenomena are likely occurring in many regions recovering from acidification. Because water flows through a heterogeneous mosaic of RZs before entering the stream, upscaling information from limited RZ data to the catchment level is problematic at short-time scales. However, for long-term trends and annual dynamics, the same data can provide reasonable representations of riparian processes and support

  17. A molecular perspective on the ageing of marine dissolved organic matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Flerus

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Dissolved organic matter (DOM was extracted by solid-phase extraction (SPE from 137 water samples from different climate zones and different depths along an eastern Atlantic Ocean transect. The extracts were analyzed with Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS with electrospray ionization (ESI. Δ14C analyses were performed on subsamples of the SPE-DOM. In addition, the amount of dissolved organic carbon was determined for all water and SPE-DOM samples as well as the yield of amino sugars for selected samples. Linear correlations were observed between the magnitudes of 43 % of the FT-ICR mass peaks and the extract Δ14C values. Decreasing SPE-DOM Δ14C values went along with a shift in the molecular composition to higher average masses (m/z and lower hydrogen/carbon (H/C ratios. The correlation was used to model the SPE-DOM Δ14C distribution for all 137 samples. Based on single mass peaks, a degradation index (IDEG was developed to compare the degradation state of marine SPE-DOM samples analyzed with FT-ICR MS. A correlation between Δ14C, IDEG, DOC values and amino sugar yield supports that SPE-DOM analyzed with FT-ICR MS reflects trends of bulk DOM. DOM weighted normalized mass peak magnitudes were used to compare aged and recent SPE-DOM on a semi-quantitative molecular basis. The magnitude comparison showed a continuum of different degradation rates for the detected compounds. A high proportion of the compounds should persist, possibly modified by partial degradation, in the course of thermohaline circulation. Prokaryotic (bacterial production, transformation and accumulation of this very stable DOM occur primarily in the upper ocean. This DOM is an important contribution to very old DOM, showing that production and degradation are dynamic processes.

  18. A molecular perspective on the ageing of marine dissolved organic matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Flerus

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Dissolved organic matter (DOM was extracted with solid phase extraction (SPE from 137 water samples from different climate zones and different depths along an Eastern Atlantic Ocean transect. The extracts were analyzed with Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS with electrospray ionization (ESI. Δ14C analyses were performed on subsamples of the SPE-DOM. In addition, the amount of dissolved organic carbon was determined for all water and SPE-DOM samples as well as the yield of amino sugars for selected samples. Linear correlations were observed between the magnitudes of 43 % of the FT-ICR mass peaks and the extract Δ14C values. Decreasing SPE-DOM Δ14C values went along with a shift in the molecular composition to higher average masses (m/z and lower hydrogen/carbon (H/C ratios. The correlation was used to model the SPE-DOM Δ14C distribution for all 137 samples. Based on single mass peaks a degradation index was developed to compare the degradation state of marine SPE-DOM samples analyzed with FT-ICR MS. A correlation between Δ14C, degradation index, DOC values and amino sugar yield supports that SPE-DOM analyzed with FT-ICR MS reflects trends of bulk DOM. A relative mass peak magnitude ratio was used to compare aged SPE-DOM and fresh SPE-DOM regarding single mass peaks. The magnitude ratios show a continuum of different reactivities for the single compounds. Only few of the compounds present in the FT-ICR mass spectra are expected to be highly degraded in the oldest water masses of the Pacific Ocean. All other compounds should persist partly thermohaline circulation. Prokaryotic (bacterial production, transformation and accumulation of this very stable DOM occurs probably primarily in the upper ocean. This DOM is an important contribution to very old DOM, showing that production and degradation are dynamic processes.

  19. Land management impacts on dairy-derived dissolved organic carbon in ground water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chomycia, J.C.; Hernes, P.J.; Harter, T.; Bergamaschi, B.A.

    2008-01-01

    Dairy operations have the potential to elevate dissolved organic carbon (DOC) levels in ground water, where it may interact with organic and inorganic contaminants, fuel denitrification, and may present problems for drinking water treatment. Total and percent bioavailable DOC and total and carbon-specific trihalomethane (THM) formation potential (TTHMFP and STHMFP, respectively) were determined for shallow ground water samples from beneath a dairy farm in the San Joaquin Valley, California. Sixteen wells influenced by specific land management areas were sampled over 3 yr. Measured DOC concentrations were significantly elevated over the background as measured at an upgradient monitoring well, ranging from 13 to 55 mg L-1 in wells downgradient from wastewater ponds, 8 to 30 mg L-1 in corral wells, 5 to 12 mg L-1 in tile drains, and 4 to 15 mg L-1 in wells associated with manured fields. These DOC concentrations were at the upper range or greatly exceeded concentrations in most surface water bodies used as drinking water sources in California. DOC concentrations in individual wells varied by up to a factor of two over the duration of this study, indicating a dynamic system of sources and degradation. DOC bioavailability over 21 d ranged from 3 to 10%, comparable to surface water systems and demonstrating the potential for dairy-derived DOC to influence dissolved oxygen concentrations (nearly all wells were hypoxic to anoxic) and denitrification. TTHMFP measurements across all management units ranged from 141 to 1731 ??g L-1, well in excess of the maximum contaminant level of 80 ??g L-1 established by the Environmental Protection Agency. STHMFP measurements demonstrated over twofold variation (???4 to ???8 mmol total THM/mol DOC) across the management areas, indicating the dependence of reactivity on DOC composition. The results indicate that land management strongly controls the quantity and quality of DOC to reach shallow ground water and hence should be considered

  20. Effect of dissolved organic matter on the toxicity of chlorotoluron to Triticum aestivum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG Ning-hui; YANG Zhi-min; ZHOU Li-xian; WU Xin; YANG Hong

    2006-01-01

    Response of two wheat cultivars (Triticum aestivum cv. YM 158 and NM 9) to the herbicide chlorotoluron and the effect of two forms of dissolved organic matter on the chlorotoluron toxicity to the plants were characterized. Treatment with chlorotoluron at 10-50 μg/ml inhibited the seed germination and a dose-response was observed. The inhibition of seed germination was correlated to the depression of α-amylase activities. To identify whether chlorotoluron induced oxidative damage to wheat plants, the malondlaldehyde (MDA) content and electrolyte leakage were measured. Results showed that both MDA content and electrolyte leakage in the chlorotoluron-treated roots significantly increased. Activities of several key enzymes were measured that operate in citric acid cycle and carbohydrate metabolic pathway. Inhibited activities of citrate synthase and NADP-isocitrate dehydrogenase were observed in the chlorotoluron-treated roots as compared to control plants. We also examined malate dehydrogenase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase in wheat roots exposed to 30 μg/ml chlorotoluron. However, none of the enzymes showed significant changes in activities. Application of 160 μg/ml dissolved organic matter (DOM) extracted from non-treated sludge(NTS)and heat-expanded sludge (HES) in the medium with 30 μg/ml chlorotoluron induced an additive inhibition of seed germination and plant growth. The inhibition of growth due to the DOM treatment was associated with the depression of activities of α-amylase, citrate synthase and NADP-isocitrate dehydrogenase, as well as the increase in malondlaldehyde content and electrolyte leakage. These results suggested that the presence of DOM might enhance the uptake and accumulation of chlorotoluron, and thus resulted in greater toxicity in wheat plants. The two forms of DOM exhibited differences in regulation of chlorotoluron toxicity to the wheat plants.Treatments with DOM-NTS induced greater toxicity to plants as compared to those with

  1. Production of dissolved organic carbon in forest soils along the north-south European transect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study is to estimate the C loss from forest soils due to the production of dissolved organic C (DOC) along a north-south European transect. Dissolved organic matter (DOM) was extracted from the forest soils incubated at a controlled temperature and water content. Soils were sampled from forest plots from Sweden to Italy. The plots represent monocultures of spruce, pine and beech and three selected chronosequences of spruce and beech spanning a range of mean annual temperature from 2 to 14 deg. C. The DOM was characterized by its DOC/DON ratio and the C isotope composition δ13C. The DOC/DON ratio of DOM varied from 25 to 15 after 16 days of incubation and it decreased to between 16 and 10 after 126 days. At the beginning of incubation the δ13C values of DOC were 1 per mille or 2 per mille less negative than incubated soils. At the end of the experiment δ13C of DOC were the same as soil values. In addition to DOC production heterotrophic respiration and N mineralization were measured on the incubated soils. The DON production rates decreased from 30 to 5 μgN gC-1 d-1 after 16 days of incubation to constant values from 5 to 2 μgN gC-1 d-1 after 126 days at the end of experiment. The DIN production rates were nearly constant during the experiments with values ranging from 20 to 4 μgN gC-1 d-1. DOC production followed first-order reaction kinetics and heterotrophic respiration followed zero-order reaction kinetics. Kinetic analysis of the experimental data yielded mean annual DOC and respiration productions with respect to sites. Mean annual estimates of DOC flux varied from 3 to 29 g of C m-2 (1-19 mg C g-1 of available C), corresponding to mean DOC concentrations from 2 to 85 mg C L-1.

  2. Universal molecular features of refractory dissolved organic matter in fresh- and seawater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittmar, T.; Blasius, B.; Steinbrink, C.; Feenders, C.; Stumm, M.; Christoffers, J.; Niggemann, J.; Gerdts, G.; Osterholz, H.; Seibt, M.; Seidel, M.; Vähätalo, A.

    2012-04-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) is among the largest pools of reduced carbon on Earth's surface. Its molecular structure and the reasons behind its stability in the aquatic environment are unknown. We present a mathematical model that predicts essential molecular features of refractory dissolved organic matter in fresh- and seawater. The model has only eight input variables and can accurately reproduce the presence and abundance of up to 10,000 molecular formulae in aquatic systems. The model was established with ultrahigh-resolution mass spectrometry data of North Pacific deep water (obtained on a 15 Tesla Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer, FT-ICR-MS). We determined the molecular formulae of DOM with help of FT-ICR-MS in >1,000 samples from around the globe, covering a wide variety of open ocean, freshwater and coastal systems. The molecular formulae predicted from our North Pacific deep water model were present in all sea- and fresh water samples. In terrigenous DOM, we detected a second group of compounds that could also accurately be predicted with our model, by using a different set of eight input variables. This exclusively terrigenous compound group was more photo-reactive than the universal compound group. During a two-year sampling period at a continental shelf station, the universal DOM compounds were always present at their predicted abundance. During plankton blooms, additional compounds were produced that did not match our model and that did not persist on a longer term. The universal DOM pattern was also not observed in mesocosm experiments where algae and bacteria blooms were artificially induced. Refractory DOM in any aquatic system not only shares the same molecular formulae at the same relative abundance, but compounds with the same molecular formulae most likely have the same molecular structure, independent of the origin of DOM. Fragmentation experiments in the FT-ICR-MS on a wide range of molecular formulae revealed

  3. Boreal forest riparian zones regulate stream sulfate and dissolved organic carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledesma, José L J; Futter, Martyn N; Laudon, Hjalmar; Evans, Christopher D; Köhler, Stephan J

    2016-08-01

    In boreal forest catchments, solute transfer to streams is controlled by hydrological and biogeochemical processes occurring in the riparian zone (RZ). However, RZs are spatially heterogeneous and information about solute chemistry is typically limited. This is problematic when making inferences about stream chemistry. Hypothetically, the strength of links between riparian and stream chemistry is time-scale dependent. Using a ten-year (2003-2012) dataset from a northern Swedish catchment, we evaluated the suitability of RZ data to infer stream dynamics at different time scales. We focus on the role of the RZ versus upslope soils in controlling sulfate (SO4(2)(-)) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC). A priori, declines in acid deposition and redox-mediated SO4(2)(-) pulses control sulfur (S) fluxes and pool dynamics, which in turn affect dissolved organic carbon (DOC). We found that the catchment is currently a net source of S, presumably due to release of the S pool accumulated during the acidification period. In both, RZ and stream, SO4(2-) concentrations are declining over time, whereas DOC is increasing. No temporal trends in SO4(2-) and DOC were observed in upslope mineral soils. SO4(2-) explained the variation of DOC in stream and RZ, but not in upslope mineral soil. Moreover, as SO4(2-) decreased with time, temporal variability of DOC increased. These observations indicate that: (1) SO4(2-) is still an important driver of DOC trends in boreal catchments and (2) RZ processes control stream SO4(2-) and subsequently DOC independently of upslope soils. These phenomena are likely occurring in many regions recovering from acidification. Because water flows through a heterogeneous mosaic of RZs before entering the stream, upscaling information from limited RZ data to the catchment level is problematic at short-time scales. However, for long-term trends and annual dynamics, the same data can provide reasonable representations of riparian processes and support

  4. Dissolved organic carbon in rainwater from areas heavily impacted by sugar cane burning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, C. H.; Francisco, J. G.; Nogueira, R. F. P.; Campos, M. L. A. M.

    This work reports on rainwater dissolved organic carbon (DOC) from Ribeirão Preto (RP) and Araraquara over a period of 3 years. The economies of these two cities, located in São Paulo state (Brazil), are based on agriculture and related industries, and the region is strongly impacted by the burning of sugar cane foliage before harvesting. Highest DOC concentrations were obtained when air masses traversed sugar cane fields burned on the same day as the rain event. Significant increases in the DOC volume weighted means (VWM) during the harvest period, for both sites, and a good linear correlation ( r = 0.83) between DOC and K (a biomass burning marker) suggest that regional scale organic carbon emissions prevail over long-range transport. The DOC VWMs and standard deviations were 272 ± 22 μmol L -1 ( n = 193) and 338 ± 40 μmol L -1 ( n = 80) for RP and Araraquara, respectively, values which are at least two times higher than those reported for other regions influenced by biomass burning, such as the Amazon. These high DOC levels are discussed in terms of agricultural activities, particularly the large usage of biogenic fuels in Brazil, as well as the analytical method used in this work, which includes volatile organic carbon when reporting DOC values. Taking into account rainfall volume, estimated annual rainwater DOC fluxes for RP (4.8 g C m -2 yr -1) and Araraquara (5.4 g C m -2 yr -1) were close to that previously found for the Amazon region (4.8 g C m -2 yr -1). This work also discusses whether previous calculations of the global rainwater carbon flux may have been underestimated, since they did not consider large inputs from biomass combustion sources, and suffered from a possible analytical bias.

  5. Characteristics and role of groundwater dissolved organic matter on arsenic mobilization and poisoning in Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tareq, Shafi M.; Maruo, Masahiro; Ohta, Keiichi

    The fluorescence and molecular weight characteristics of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in groundwater of Bangladesh were investigated to evaluate its multiple roles on arsenic (As) mobilization and poisoning. Fluorescence properties of DOM were measured in groundwater samples collected from two As contaminated areas of Bangladesh (Faridpur at the Ganges floodplain and Sonargaon at the Meghna floodplain) from different locations and depths. The three dimensional excitation-emission matrix (3DEEM) fluorescence spectra of groundwater samples showed two characteristic peaks around Ex/Em = 335-365 nm/435-480 nm for fulvic-like peaks and peak at around Ex/Em = 275-290 nm/310-335 nm for the protein-like materials. The similarity of fluorescence spectra of groundwater and surface water of both the study areas with high intensity of fluorescence and its strong correlation with DOC reflect the in situ generation of fluorescent DOM from sedimentary organic matter (SOM) and recent recharge of terrestrial labile organic carbon into shallow aquifer. High performance size-exclusion chromatography (HPSEC) analysis of DOM shows positive correlations between fluorescence intensities (FI) of small molecular fractions (0.65 kDa) and As concentrations, with the signatures of protein-like peaks of DOM in groundwater. This result provides new evidence that small molecular weight fraction of DOM in groundwater of Bangladesh can play an important role on As mobilization and toxicity. In addition, high concentration of fluorescence materials in DOM of As contaminated groundwater of Bangladesh may pose a threat to public health.

  6. Dissolved Organic Matter in Headwater Streams: Compositional Variability across Climatic Regions of North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffé, R.; Yamashita, Y.; Maie, N.; Cooper, W. T.; Dittmar, T.; Dodds, W. K.; Jones, J. B.; Myoshi, T.; Ortiz-Zayas, J. R.; Podgorski, D. C.; Watanabe, A.

    2012-10-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) represents the largest organic matter pool in freshwater systems, but much of it remains molecularly uncharacterized. Although freshwater systems cover only a small area of the earth's surface, inland waters are an important component of the global carbon cycle. The traditional idea that rivers are simply conduits for refractory carbon delivery to coastal areas is inconsistent with carbon flux estimates, and streams have been shown to serve as reactors for DOM cycling. The overall quality of DOM, and its associated reactivity, can be related to its chemical composition and molecular structure. However, the variability of DOM composition in freshwater ecosystems, particularly in headwater streams, is poorly characterized. Detailed molecular studies of DOM from small streams across climatic regions, which could provide critical information regarding carbon dynamics on a more global scale, have not been performed. To address these issues, this study applies a multi-method analytical approach in an attempt to assess molecular characteristics of DOM and ultrafiltered DOM (UDOM) in headwater streams from different climatic regions in North America. In general terms the chemical and molecular characteristics of UDOM from six different biomes were determined in unsurpassed detail to feature some clear general similarities but also specific differences. While the degree of similarity is remarkable, and suggests similar source strengths, such as soil-derived organic matter and/or similar diagenetic degradation processes for DOM from vastly different environments, each sample was clearly unique in its overall composition, featuring some distinct molecular patterns for at least one or more of the analytical determinations. Molecular and compositional differences of DOM from headwater streams should result from variations in DOM sources and localized environmental conditions, and consequently feature different photo- and bio-reactivity and

  7. Probing the oxidation reduction properties of terrestrially and microbially derived dissolved organic matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fimmen, Ryan L.; Cory, Rose M.; Chin, Yu-Ping; Trouts, Tamara D.; McKnight, Diane M.

    2007-06-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) has been shown to be an integral component in biogeochemical electron transfer reactions due to its demonstrated ability to facilitate redox reactions. While the role of DOM as a facilitator of electron transfer processes has been demonstrated, greater knowledge would lead to better understanding of the structural components responsible for redox behavior, such as quinones and nitrogen and sulfur (N/S) functional groups. This investigation uses direct scan voltammetry (DSV) coupled with fluorescence and NMR spectroscopy as well as thermochemolysis gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) to elucidate the organic moieties responsible for facilitating electron transfer reactions. We contrast electrochemical properties and structural details of three organic matter isolates from diverse sources; Great Dismal Swamp DOM (terrestrially derived, highly aromatic), Pony Lake DOM (microbially derived, highly aliphatic) and Toolik Lake (terrestrially derived, photochemically and microbially altered) with juglone (a redox-active model quinone). Aromatic and phenolic constituents were detected (by 13C NMR) and recovered (by thermochemolysis GC-MS) from all three fulvic acid samples, highlighting the ubiquity of these compounds and suggesting that the quinone-phenol redox couple is not limited to DOM derived from lignin precursors. The range of hydroxy-benzene and benzoic acid derivatives may explain the lack of a single pair of well-defined oxidation and reduction peaks in the DSV scans. The presence of a wide-range of hydroxylated benzoic acid isomers and other redox-active aromatic residues implies that native DOM possesses overlapping redox potentials analogous to their characteristic range of p Ka values.

  8. Characterization and treatment of dissolved organic matter from oilfield produced waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► A comprehensive chemical characterization of DOM from two oilfield produced waters. ► Compared to ocean DOM, oilfield produced water is less aromatic. ► Study addresses role of volatilization in DOM removal from oilfield produced water. ► Microbial transformations of DOM were found to be insignificant. - Abstract: Dissolved organic matter (DOM) has been studied intensively in streams, lakes and oceans due to its role in the global carbon cycle and because it is a precursor of carcinogenic disinfection by-products in drinking water; however, relatively little research has been conducted on DOM in oilfield produced waters. In this study, recovery of DOM from two oilfield produced waters was relatively low (∼34%), possibly due to the presence of high concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). A van Krevelen diagram of the extracted DOM suggested the presence of high concentrations of lipids, lignin, and proteins, but low concentrations of condensed hydrocarbons. Most of the compounds in the oilfield DOM contained sulfur in their structures. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra indicated the presence of methyl groups, amides, carboxylic acids, and aromatic compounds, which is in agreement with results of Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) analysis. Qualitatively, DOM in oilfield produced waters is similar to that reported in oceans and freshwater, except that it contains much more sulfur and is less aromatic. Treatment studies conducted in a fluidized bed reactor suggested that volatilization of organics may be a more important mechanism of DOM removal than microbial degradation.

  9. Terrestrially derived dissolved organic matter in the chesapeake bay and the middle atlantic bight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Siddhartha; Bianchi, Thomas S.; Guo, Laodong; Santschi, Peter H.

    2000-10-01

    Concentrations of lignin-phenols were analyzed in high molecular weight dissolved organic matter (0.2 μm > HMW DOM > 1 kDa) isolated from surface waters of the Chesapeake Bay (C. Bay), and surface and bottom waters of the Middle Atlantic Bight (MAB). The abundance of lignin-phenols in HMW DOM was higher in the C. Bay (0.128 ± 0.06 μg L -1) compared to MAB surface waters (0.016 ± 0.004 μg L -1) and MAB bottom waters (0.005 ± 0.003 μg L -1). On an organic carbon-normalized basis, lignin-phenol abundances in the HMW DOM (i.e., Λ 6), were significantly higher ( p vanillin (Ad/Al) V in HMW DOM, indicative of lignin decay, ranged from 0.611 to 1.37 in C. Bay, 0.534 to 2.62 in MAB surface waters, and 0.435 to 1.96 in MAB bottom water. Ratios of S/V and (Ad/Al) V showed no significant differences between each environment, providing no evidence of any compositionally distinct input of terrestrial organic matter into each environment. When considering depth profiles of suspended particulate matter in the MAB, with C:N ratios, and bulk radiocarbon ages and stable carbon isotopic values in HMW DOM isolated from these areas, two scenarios present themselves regarding the sources and transport of terrestrially derived HMW DOM in the MAB. Scenario #1 assumes that a low amount of refractory terrestrial organic matter and old DOC are uniformly distributed in the oceans, both in surface and bottom waters, and that primary production in surface waters increases DOC with low lignin and younger DOC which degrades easily. In this case, many of the trends in age and biomarker composition likely reflect general patterns of Atlantic Ocean surface and bottom water circulation in the area of the MAB. Scenario 2 assumes terrestrial organic matter in bottom waters of the MAB may have originated from weathered shelf and slope sediments in nearshore areas via a combination of mechanisms (e.g., diffusion, recent resuspension events, and/or desorption of DOM from riverine POM buried deep

  10. Effect of light and nutrient availability on the release of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) by Caribbean turf algae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mueller, B.; den Haan, J.; Visser, P.M.; Vermeij, M.J.A.; van Duyl, F.C.

    2016-01-01

    Turf algae increasingly dominate benthic communities on coral reefs. Given their abundance and high dissolved organic carbon (DOC) release rates, turf algae are considered important contributors to the DOC pool on modern reefs. The release of photosynthetically fixed carbon as DOC generally, but not

  11. Experimental insights into the importance of aquatic bacterial community composition to the degradation of dissolved organic matter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Logue, J.B.; Stedmon, Colin; Kellerman, A.M.;

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria play a central role in the cycling of carbon, yet our understanding of the relationship between the taxonomic composition and the degradation of dissolved organic matter (DOM) is still poor. In this experimental study, we were able to demonstrate a direct link between community composition...

  12. Nature, origin and average age of estuarine ultrafiltered dissolved organic matter as determined by molecular and carbon isotope characterization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Heemst, JDH; Megens, L; Hatcher, PG; de Leeuw, JW

    2000-01-01

    The Ems-Dollart estuary (on the border of the Netherlands and Germany) was chosen for a pilot study to characterize ultrafiltered dissolved organic matter (UDOM) in estuarine systems. UDOM samples were taken from four locations with salinities varying from 0.43 to 20 parts per thousand. The UDOM in

  13. The coupled mobilizations and transport of dissolved organic matter and metals (Cu and Zn) in soil columns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, L.Y.L.; Schulin, R.; Weng, L.P.; Nowack, B.

    2007-01-01

    Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) is a key component involved in metal displacement in soils. In this study, we investigated the concentration profiles of soil-borne DOC, Cu and Zn at various irrigation rates with synthetic rain water under quasi steady-state conditions, using repacked soil columns wit

  14. Processing of humic-rich riverine dissolved organic matter by estuarine bacteria: effects of predegradation and inorganic nutrients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asmala, E.; Autio, R.; Kaartokallio, H.;

    2014-01-01

    The bioavailability of predegraded dissolved organic matter (DOM) from a humic-rich, boreal river to estuarine bacteria from the Baltic Sea was studied in 39-day bioassays. The river waters had been exposed to various degrees of bacterial degradation by storing them between 0 and 465 days in dark...

  15. Benthic fluxes of dissolved organic nitrogen in the Lower St. Lawrence Estuary and implications for selective organic matter degradation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Alkhatib

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The distribution of dissolved organic nitrogen (DON and carbon (DOC in sediment pore waters was determined at nine locations along the St. Lawrence Estuary and in the Gulf of St. Lawrence. The study area is characterized by gradients in the sedimentary particulate organic matter (POM reactivity, bottom water oxygen concentrations, as well as benthic respiration rates. Based on pore water profiles we estimated the benthic diffusive fluxes of DON and DOC. Our results show that DON fluxed out of the sediments at significant rates (110 to 430 μmol m−2 d−1. DON fluxes were positively correlated with sedimentary POM reactivity and sediment oxygen exposure time (OET, suggesting direct links between POM quality, aerobic remineralization and the release of DON to the water column. DON fluxes were on the order of 30% to 64% of the total benthic inorganic fixed N loss due to denitrification, and often exceeded the diffusive nitrate fluxes into the sediments. Hence they represented a large fraction of the total benthic N exchange. This result is particularly important in light of the fact that DON fluxes are usually not accounted for in estuarine and coastal zone nutrient budgets. The ratio of the DON to nitrate flux increased from 0.6 in the Lower Estuary to 1.5 in the Gulf. In contrast to DON, DOC fluxes did not show any significant spatial variation along the Laurentian Channel (LC between the Estuary and the Gulf (2100 ± 100μmol m−2 d−1, suggesting that production and consumption of labile DOC components proceed at similar rates, irrespective of the overall benthic characteristics and the reactivity of POM. As a consequence, the molar C/N ratio of dissolved organic matter (DOM in pore water and the overlying bottom water varied significantly along the transect, with lowest C/N in the Lower Estuary (5–6 and highest C/N (> 10 in the Gulf. We observed large differences between the C/N of pore water DOM with respect to POM, and the degree of

  16. The Role of Dissolved Organic Carbon and Preadaptation in the Biotransformation of Trace Organic Chemicals during Aquifer Recharge and Recovery

    KAUST Repository

    Ouf, Mohamed

    2012-05-01

    Aquifer recharge and recovery (ARR) is a low-cost and environmentally-friendly treatment technology which uses conventionally treated wastewater effluent for groundwater recharge and subsequent recovery for agricultural, industrial or drinking water uses. This study investigated the effect of different dissolved organic carbon (DOC) composition in wastewater effluent on the fate of trace organic chemicals (TOrCs) during ARR. Four biologically active columns were setup receiving synthetic wastewater effluent with varying DOC compositions. The difference in DOC composition triggered variations in the microbial community’s diversity and hence its ability to degrade TOrCs. It was found that the presence of protein-like DOC enhances the removal of DOC in comparison with the presence of humic-like DOC. On the other hand, the presence of humic-like DOC, which is more difficult to degrade, improved the removal of several degradable TOrCs. Other column experiments were also carried out to investigate the role of previous and continuous exposure to TOrCs in their removal. The use of soil pre-exposed to low concentrations of TOrCs and DOC provided better removal of both DOC and TOrCs. The findings of this study suggest that the presence of more humic-like DOC in the effluent enhances the biotransformation of TOrCs during ARR. In addition, long exposure to both DOC and TOrCs increases the degree of their removal over time

  17. Modeling the Dynamics and Export of Dissolved Organic Matter in the Northeastern U.S. Continental Shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Druon, J.N.; Mannino, A.; Signorini, Sergio R.; McClain, Charles R.; Friedrichs, M.; Wilkin, J.; Fennel, K.

    2009-01-01

    Continental shelves are believed to play a major role in carbon cycling due to their high productivity. Particulate organic carbon (POC) burial has been included in models as a carbon sink, but we show here that seasonally produced dissolved organic carbon (DOC) on the shelf can be exported to the open ocean by horizontal transport at similar rates (1-2 mol C/sq m/yr) in the southern U.S. Mid-Atlantic Bight (MAB). The dissolved organic matter (DOM) model imbedded in a coupled circulation-biogeochemical model reveals a double dynamics: the progressive release of dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) in the upper layer during summer increases the regenerated primary production by 30 to 300%, which, in turns ; enhances the DOC production mainly from phytoplankton exudation in the upper layer and solubilization of particulate organic matter (POM) deeper in the water column. This analysis suggests that DOM is a key element for better representing the ecosystem functioning and organic fluxes in models because DOM (1) is a major organic pool directly related to primary production, (2) decouples partially the carbon and nitrogen cycles (through carbon excess uptake, POM solubilization and DOM mineralization) and (3) is intimately linked to the residence time of water masses for its distribution and export.

  18. Distributions of dissolved organic and inorganic carbon and radiocarbon in the eastern North Pacific continental margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, James E.; Druffel, Ellen R. M.; Wolgast, David M.; Griffin, Sheila; Masiello, Caroline A.

    Temporal variations in the natural radiocarbon ( 14C) signatures of dissolved organic and inorganic carbon (DOC and DIC, respectively) in seawater have been studied previously (Druffel, E.R.M., Bauer, J.E., Williams, P.M., Griffin, S., Wolgast, D.M., 1996. Seasonal variability of radiocarbon in particulate organic carbon in the northeast Pacific. J. Geophys. Res. 101, 20 543-20 552; Bauer, J.E., Druffel, E.R.M., Williams, P.M., Wolgast, D.M., Griffin, S., 1998. Temporal variability in dissolved organic carbon and radiocarbon in the eastern North Pacific Ocean. J. Geophys. Res. 103, 2867-2882) at a long-term time-series station (Sta. M: 32°N, 123W) in the eastern North Pacific located at the eastern edge of the North Pacific abyssal plain. In June 1995 a transect was made from Sta. M inshore to approximately 500 m depth in order to evaluate the distributions of 14C in DOC and DIC from the abyssal plain to the upper continental slope. Concentrations and Δ 14C values of DOC in mixed layer waters (25 and 85 m) decreased toward the upper slope. In deeper waters, concentrations and Δ 14C values were in general similar at all three sites. Differences in DOC concentrations and Δ 14C-DOC between Sta. M and the rise and upper slope sites were explained in part by the mixing of DOC and Δ 14C along constant density ( σt) surfaces. However, specific deviations from conservative behavior due to mixing were observed for Δ 14C-DOC at mesopelagic (˜700 m) and near-bottom (˜3600- 3900 m) depths of the continental rise. Comparable findings are reported for DIC, where σt-normalized concentrations and Δ 14C values in Sta. M, rise and upper slope waters were similar, with the exception of slight increases in concentrations and Δ 14C values in near-bottom waters of the rise. These observations indicate that both DOC and DIC in continental rise and slope surface waters of the eastern North Pacific Ocean margin are comprised of a component of actively upwelled material derived

  19. Dissolved Pesticide and Organic Carbon Concentrations Detected in Surface Waters, Northern Central Valley, California, 2001-2002

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlando, James L.; Jacobson, Lisa A.; Kuivila, Kathryn M.

    2004-01-01

    Field and laboratory studies were conducted to determine the effects of pesticide mixtures on Chinook salmon under various environmental conditions in surface waters of the northern Central Valley of California. This project was a collaborative effort between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the University of California. The project focused on understanding the environmental factors that influence the toxicity of pesticides to juvenile salmon and their prey. During the periods January through March 2001 and January through May 2002, water samples were collected at eight surface water sites in the northern Central Valley of California and analyzed by the USGS for dissolved pesticide and dissolved organic carbon concentrations. Water samples were also collected by the USGS at the same sites for aquatic toxicity testing by the Aquatic Toxicity Laboratory at the University of California Davis; however, presentation of the results of these toxicity tests is beyond the scope of this report. Samples were collected to characterize dissolved pesticide and dissolved organic carbon concentrations, and aquatic toxicity, associated with winter storm runoff concurrent with winter run Chinook salmon out-migration. Sites were selected that represented the primary habitat of juvenile Chinook salmon and included major tributaries within the Sacramento and San Joaquin River Basins and the Sacramento?San Joaquin Delta. Water samples were collected daily for a period of seven days during two winter storm events in each year. Additional samples were collected weekly during January through April or May in both years. Concentrations of 31 currently used pesticides were measured in filtered water samples using solid-phase extraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry at the U.S. Geological Survey's organic chemistry laboratory in Sacramento, California. Dissolved organic carbon concentrations were analyzed in filtered water samples using a Shimadzu TOC-5000A total organic carbon

  20. Effect of dissolved organic matter on mercury release from water body

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yutao Zhang; Xi Chen; Yongkui Yang; Dingyong Wang; Xiao Liu

    2011-01-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) plays an important role in the process of mercury release from water body. In this study, the influence of DOM from different sources (DOMR, DOMs and DOMH, extracted from rice straw, compost and humic soil respectively)on mercury reduction was investigated. The molecular weight distribution and chemical composition of DOM from each source were determined using ultrafiltration membrane technique and elemental analysis respectively. The result showed that mercury release from DOM-added samples was much lower than the control; the lowest mercury release flux was observed in the treatment of DOMH,25.02% of the control, followed by DOMs and DOMR, 62.46% and 64.95% of the control, respectively. The higher saturation degree and lower molecular weight of DOMH was responsible for the highest inhibition degree on the mercury release. The link between DOMH, concentration and mercury flux was also estimated and the result showed that mercury flux was increased with DOMH at lower concentration, while decreased with DOMH at higher concentration. Different mechanism dominated the influence of DOM on mercury release with variation of DOM concentration.

  1. Roxarsone binding to soil-derived dissolved organic matter: Insights from multi-spectroscopic techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Qing-Long; He, Jian-Zhou; Blaney, Lee; Zhou, Dong-Mei

    2016-07-01

    The fate and transport of roxarsone (ROX), a widely used organoarsenic feed additive, in soil is significantly influenced by the ubiquitous presence of soil-derived dissolved organic matter (DOM). In this study, fluorescence quenching titration and two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy (2D-COS) were employed to study ROX binding to DOM. Binding mechanisms were revealed by fluorescence lifetime measurement and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Humic- and protein-like fluorophores were identified in the excitation-emission matrix and synchronous fluorescence spectra of DOM. The conditional stability constant (log KC) for ROX binding to DOM was found to be 5.06, indicating that ROX was strongly bound to DOM. The binding order of ROX to DOM fluorophores revealed by 2D-COS followed the sequence of protein-like fluorophore ≈ the longer wavelength excited humic-like (L-humic-like) fluorophore > the shorter wavelength excited humic-like (S-humic-like) fluorophore. 2D-COS resolved issues with peak overlapping and allowed further exploration of the interaction between ROX and DOM. Results of fluorescence lifetime and FTIR spectra demonstrated that ROX interacted with DOM through the hydroxyl, amide II, carboxyl, aliphatic CH, and NO2 groups, yielding stable DOM-ROX complexes. The strong interaction between ROX and DOM implies that DOM plays an important role in the environmental fate of ROX in soil. PMID:27115847

  2. Photodegradation of estrone enhanced by dissolved organic matter under simulated sunlight

    KAUST Repository

    Caupos, Emilie

    2011-05-01

    In the present work the degradation of estrone (E1) a natural estrogenic hormone has been studied under simulated solar irradiation. The photodegradation of E1 has been investigated in the absence and in the presence of 7.7-8.9 mg L-1 of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), under solar light simulation with irradiance approximating that of the sun. DOC extracts from different origins have been used. Half-lives ranging between 3.9 h and 7.9 h were observed. Results indicated that E1 was photodegraded even in the absence of DOC. The presence of DOC was found to enhance the degradation of E1. Experiments performed with the addition of reactive species scavengers (azide ions and 2-propanol) have shown that these two species play a significant role in the photodegradation. Some experiments have been performed with a DOC previously submitted to solar irradiation. Changes in optical and physico-chemical properties of DOC strongly affect its photoinductive properties, and hence its efficiency on E1 degradation. A part of the study consisted in the investigation of photoproducts structures. Five photoproducts were shown by chromatographic analysis: one arising from direct photolysis and the four others from DOC photoinduced degradation. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Fate of terrestrial colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM) in the Arctic Ocean: exported or removed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granskog, M. A.; Stedmon, C. A.; Dodd, P. A.; Amon, R. M. W.; Pavlov, A. K.; de Steur, L.; Hansen, E.

    2012-04-01

    Colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM) was measured with hydrographic parameters (salinity, d18O and inorganic nutrients) across Fram Strait. East Greenland Current (EGC) surface waters showed a pronounced CDOM absorption maximum between 30 and 120 m depth associated with both river and sea ice brine-enriched water, characteristic of polar mixed layer water and upper halocline water. Lowest CDOM was found in the Atlantic inflow within the West Spitsbergen Current (WSC). Although applied elsewhere in the Arctic, we show that the salinity-CDOM relationship not suitable for evaluating the mixing behavior of CDOM (conservative vs. non-conservative) in Fram Strait. The strong correlation between meteoric water and optical properties of CDOM are indicative of the terrigenous origin of CDOM in the EGC and marine origin in WSC. Based on CDOM absorption in Polar Water and comparison with an Arctic river discharge weighted mean, we estimate that a 68% integrated loss of CDOM absorption across 250-600 nm has occurred, with a preferential removal of absorption at longer wavelengths reflecting the loss of high molecular weight material. Budget calculations of CDOM exports through Fram Strait using modeled volume transports indicate that the net southward export of CDOM in Fram Strait equals to 8 to 14% of the total riverine CDOM inputs to the Arctic Ocean, thus physical export is not a major sink of CDOM. We propose that CDOM can aid in discriminating glacial melt waters from Arctic riverine freshwater on the east Greenland shelf.

  4. Molecular characterization of dissolved organic matter through a desalination process by high resolution mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortés-Francisco, Nuria; Caixach, Josep

    2013-09-01

    The effect of different water treatments such as ultrafiltration (UF) and reverse osmosis (RO) on dissolved organic matter (DOM) is still unknown. Electrospray ionization Fourier transform orbitrap mass spectrometry has been used to provide valuable information of marine DOM evolution through a desalination process on a molecular scale. In the present manuscript, the characterization of four real composite water samples from a desalination pilot plant installed in the coast of Barcelona (Spain) has been carried out. The sampling was performed on each point of the pilot plant: raw seawater (RSW), UF effluent, brine RO and permeate RO. The mass spectra of the different samples show several thousand peaks, however for the present screening study, only the mass range m/z 200-500 and the main signals in this mass range (relative intensities ≥1%) have been considered. The analysis of RSW and UF samples reveal that there is little effect on DOM by the UF pilot. However, when the water is treated on the RO an important change on DOM has been observed. The recurring periodical patterns found in RSW and UF are lost in Permeate RO sample. Compounds with more aliphatic character, with higher H/C ratio (H/Cav 1.72) are present in the Permeate and some of them have been tentatively identified as fatty acids.

  5. Freeze-thaw Effects on Sorption/Desorption of Dissolved Organic Carbon in Wetland Soils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Xiaofei; ZHANG Yuxia; ZHAO Hongmei; LU Xianguo; WANG Guoping

    2010-01-01

    The effects of freeze-thaw cycles on sorption/desorption of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in two wetland soils and one reclaimed wetland soil were investigated. DOC concentrations added were 0-600 mg/L. Laboratory in-cubations of sorption/desorption of DOC had been carried out at -15℃ for 10 h, and then at +5℃ for 13 h. Soil sam-ples were refrozen and thawed subsequently for 5 cycles. Initial Mass model was used to describe sorption behavior of DOC. The results indicate that freeze-thaw cycles can significantly increase the sorption capacity of DOC and reduce the desorption capacity of DOC in the three soils. The freeze-thaw effects on desorption of DOC in soils increase with the increasing freeze-thaw cycles. The conversion of natural wetlands to soybean farmland can decrease the sorption capacity and increase the desorption capacity of DOC in soils. Global wanning and reclamation may increase DOC re-lease, and subsequently increase the loss of carbon and the emission of greenhouse gas.

  6. pH modeling for maximum dissolved organic matter removal by enhanced coagulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiankun Xie; Dongsheng Wang; John van Leeuwen; Yanmei Zhao; Linan Xing; Christopher W. K. Chow

    2012-01-01

    Correlations between raw water characteristics and pH after enhanced coagulation to maximize dissolved organic matter (DOM)removal using four typical coagulants (FeCl3,Al2(SO4)3,polyaluminum chloride (PAC1) and high performance polyaluminum chloride (HPAC)) without pH control were investigated.These correlations were analyzed on the basis of the raw water quality and the chemical and physical fractionations of DOM of thirteen Chinese source waters over three seasons.It was found that the final pH after enhanced coagulation for each of the four coagulants was influenced by the content of removable DOM (i.e.hydrophobic,and higher apparent molecular weight (AMW) DOM),the alkalinity and the initial pH of raw water.A set of feed-forward semi-empirical models relating the final pH after enhanced coagulation for each of the four coagulants with the raw water characteristics were developed and optimized based on correlation analysis.The established models were preliminarily validated for prediction purposes,and it was found that the deviation between the predicted data and actual data was low.This result demonstrated the potential for the application of these models in practical operation of drinking water treatment plants.

  7. Compositions and constituents of freshwater dissolved organic matter isolated by reverse osmosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yulong; Huang, Wen; Ran, Yong; Mao, Jingdong

    2014-08-15

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) from riverine and lacustrine water was isolated using a reverse osmosis (RO) system. Solid-state (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance ((13)C NMR) was used to quantitatively evaluate the compositions and constituents of DOM, which are compared with previous investigations on marine DOM. Results indicated that concentration factor (CF) was a key metric controlling yield and sorption of DOM on the RO system. The sorption was likely non-selective, based on the (13)C NMR and δ(13)C analyses. Carbohydrates and lipids accounted for 25.0-41.5% and 30.2-46.3% of the identifiable DOM, followed by proteins (18.2-19.8%) and lignin (7.17-12.8%). The freshwater DOM contained much higher alkyl and aromatic C but lower alkoxyl and carboxyl C than marine DOM. The structural difference was not completely accounted for by using structure of high molecular weight (HMW) DOM, suggesting a size change involved in transformations of DOM during the transport from rivers to oceans.

  8. Variations in dissolved organic nitrogen concentration in biofilters with different media during drinking water treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huining; Zhang, Kefeng; Jin, Huixia; Gu, Li; Yu, Xin

    2015-11-01

    Dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) is potential precursor of disinfection byproducts (DBPs), especially nitrogenous DBPs. In this study, we investigated the impact of biofilters on DON concentration changes in a drinking water plant. A small pilot plant was constructed next to a sedimentation tank in a drinking water plant and included activated carbon, quartz sand, anthracite, and ceramsite biofilters. As the biofilter layer depth increased, the DON concentration first decreased and then increased, and the variation in DON concentration differed among the biofilters. In the activated carbon biofilter, the DON concentration was reduced by the largest amount in the first part of the column and increased by the largest amount in the second part of the column. The biomass in the activated carbon filter was less than that in the quartz sand filter in the upper column. The heterotrophic bacterial proportion among bacterial flora in the activated carbon biofilter was the largest, which might be due to the significant reduction in DON in the first part of the column. Overall, the results indicate that the DON concentration in biofiltered water can be controlled via the selection of appropriate biofilter media. We propose that a two-layer biofilter with activated carbon in the upper layer and another media type in the lower layer could best reduce the DON concentration. PMID:25576130

  9. Effect of dissolved organic matter on adsorption and desorption of mercury by soils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Yongkui; LIANG Li; WANG Dingyong

    2008-01-01

    Effects of dissolved organic matter (DOM) on adsorption and desorption of Hg were investigated in two kinds of soils, Xanthi-Udic Ferralosols (XUF) and Typic Purpli-Udic Cambosols (TPUC). The DOM was obtained from humus soil (DOMH), rice straw (DOMR), and pig manure (DOMP). The presence of DOM obviously reduced Hg maximum adsorption capacity with up to 40% decreases over the control, being an order of DOMH (250.00 mg/kg) (270.27 mg/kg) (312.50 mg/kg)

  10. Fluorescence-based proxies for lignin in freshwater dissolved organic matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernes, Peter J.; Bergamaschi, Brian A.; Eckard, Robert S.; Spencer, Robert G.M.

    2009-01-01

    Lignin phenols have proven to be powerful biomarkers in environmental studies; however, the complexity of lignin analysis limits the number of samples and thus spatial and temporal resolution in any given study. In contrast, spectrophotometric characterization of dissolved organic matter (DOM) is rapid, noninvasive, relatively inexpensive, requires small sample volumes, and can even be measured in situ to capture fine-scale temporal and spatial detail of DOM cycling. Here we present a series of cross-validated Partial Least Squares models that use fluorescence properties of DOM to explain up to 91% of lignin compositional and concentration variability in samples collected seasonally over 2 years in the Sacramento River/San Joaquin River Delta in California, United States. These models were subsequently used to predict lignin composition and concentration from fluorescence measurements collected during a diurnal study in the San Joaquin River. While modeled lignin composition remained largely unchanged over the diurnal cycle, changes in modeled lignin concentrations were much greater than expected and indicate that the sensitivity of fluorescence-based proxies for lignin may prove invaluable as a tool for selecting the most informative samples for detailed lignin characterization. With adequate calibration, similar models could be used to significantly expand our ability to study sources and processing of DOM in complex surface water systems.

  11. Concentration, sources and flux of dissolved organic carbon of precipitation at Lhasa city, the Tibetan Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, C.

    2015-12-01

    Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) plays important role in climate system, but few data are available on the Tibetan Plateau (TP). In this study 89 precipitation samples were collected at Lhasa, the largest city of southern Tibet, from March to December 2013. The average concentration and wet deposition fluxes of DOC was 1.10 mg C/L and 0.62 g C m-2.yr-1, respectively. Seasonally, low DOC concentration and high flux appeared during monsoon period, which were in line with heavy precipitation amount, reflecting dilution effect of precipitation for the DOC. Compared to other regions, the values of Lhasa were lower than those of large cites (e.g. Beijing and Seoul) mainly because of less air pollution of Lhasa. The relationship between DOC and ion analysis showed that DOC of Lhasa was derived mainly from the natural sources, followed by burning activities. Furthermore, △14C value of DOC indicated that fossil combustion contributed around 20% of the precipitation DOC of Lhasa, indicating that the atmosphere of Lhasa has been influenced by vehicle emissions. Therefore, although atmosphere of Lhasa is relatively clean, pollutants emitted from local sources cannot be ignored.

  12. Photobleaching-induced changes in photosensitizing properties of dissolved organic matter

    KAUST Repository

    Niu, Xi-Zhi

    2014-12-01

    Photosensitizing properties of different dissolved organic matter (DOM) were investigated according to their performance in singlet oxygen (1O2), triplet state of DOM (3DOM*), and hydroxyl radical (·OH) productions. The photobleaching of DOM solutions after irradiation was characterized by fluorescence excitation-emission matrix and UV-Vis spectroscopy. The photosensitizing properties of pre-irradiated DOM solutions were changed in a sunlight simulator. The performance of DOMs in photosensitized degradation of several contaminants was investigated. For a 20h exposure, the observed degradation rate constant (kobs) of some contaminants decreased as a function of exposure time, and highly depended on the properties of both DOM and contaminant. Degradation of contaminants with lower kobs was more susceptible to DOM photobleaching-induced decrease in kobs. Under the current experimental conditions, the photobleaching-induced decrease of DOM photo-reactivity in contaminant degradation was mainly attributed to indirect phototransformation of DOM caused by the interactions between photo-inductive DOM moieties and photochemically-produced reactive species. Reactive contaminants can inhibit DOM indirect photobleaching by scavenging reactive species, photosensitized degradation of these contaminants exhibited a stable kobs as a result. This is the first study to report DOM photobleaching-induced changes in the simultaneous DOM photosensitized degradation of contaminants and the inhibitory effect of reactive contaminants on DOM photobleaching.

  13. Formation of haloacetamides during chlorination of dissolved organic nitrogen aspartic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu Wenhai, E-mail: 1world1water@tongji.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resources Reuse, College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai, 200092 (China); Gao Naiyun [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resources Reuse, College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai, 200092 (China); Deng Yang, E-mail: yang.deng@upr.edu [Department of Civil Engineering and Surveying, University of Puerto Rico, P.O. Box 9041, Mayaguez, Puerto Rico, 00681-9041 (Puerto Rico)

    2010-01-15

    The stability of haloacetamides (HAcAms) such as dichloroacetamide (DCAcAm) and trichloroacetamide (TCAcAm) was studied under different experimental conditions. The yield of HAcAms during aspartic acid (Asp) chlorination was measured at different molar ratio of chlorine atom to nitrogen atom (Cl/N), pH and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) mainly consisted of humic acid (HA) mixture. Ascorbic acid showed a better capacity to prevent the decay of DCAcAm and TCAcAm than the other two dechlorinating agents, thiosulfate and sodium sulfite. Lower Cl/N favored the DCAcAm formation, implying that breakpoint chlorination might minimize its generation. The pH decrease could lower the concentration of DCAcAm but favored dichloroacetonitrile (DCAN) formation. DCAcAm yield was sensitive to the DOC due to higher chlorine consumption caused by HA mixture. Two possible pathways of DCAcAm formation during Asp chlorination were proposed. Asp was an important precursor of DCAN, DCAcAm and dichloroacetic acid (DCAA), and thus removal of Asp before disinfection may be a method to prevent the formation of DCAcAm, DCAN and DCAA.

  14. Controls on dissolved organic carbon quantity and chemical character in temperate rivers of North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanley, Kevin W.; Wollheim, Wilfred M.; Salisbury, Joseph; Huntington, Thomas; Aiken, George

    2013-04-01

    the processes controlling the transfer and chemical composition of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in freshwater systems is crucial to understanding the carbon cycle and the effects of DOC on water quality. Previous studies have identified watershed-scale controls on bulk DOC flux and concentration among small basins but fewer studies have explored controls among large basins or simultaneously considered the chemical composition of DOC. Because the chemical character of DOC drives riverine biogeochemical processes such as metabolism and photodegradation, accounting for chemical character in watershed-scale studies will improve the way bulk DOC variability in rivers is interpreted. We analyzed DOC quantity and chemical character near the mouths of 17 large North American rivers, primarily between 2008 and 2010, and identified watershed characteristics that controlled variability. We quantified DOC chemical character using both specific ultraviolet absorbance at 254 nm (SUVA254) and XAD-resin fractionation. Mean DOC concentration ranged from 2.1 to 47 mg C L-1 and mean SUVA254 ranged from 1.3 to 4.7 L mg C-1 m-1. We found a significant positive correlation between basin wetland cover and both bulk DOC concentration (R2 = 0.78; p river systems with long surface water residence times. However, synoptic DOC sampling of both quantity and character throughout river networks will be needed to more rigorously test this finding. The inclusion of DOC chemical character will be vital to achieving a more complete understanding of bulk DOC dynamics in large river systems.

  15. Variations in dissolved organic nitrogen concentration in biofilters with different media during drinking water treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huining; Zhang, Kefeng; Jin, Huixia; Gu, Li; Yu, Xin

    2015-11-01

    Dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) is potential precursor of disinfection byproducts (DBPs), especially nitrogenous DBPs. In this study, we investigated the impact of biofilters on DON concentration changes in a drinking water plant. A small pilot plant was constructed next to a sedimentation tank in a drinking water plant and included activated carbon, quartz sand, anthracite, and ceramsite biofilters. As the biofilter layer depth increased, the DON concentration first decreased and then increased, and the variation in DON concentration differed among the biofilters. In the activated carbon biofilter, the DON concentration was reduced by the largest amount in the first part of the column and increased by the largest amount in the second part of the column. The biomass in the activated carbon filter was less than that in the quartz sand filter in the upper column. The heterotrophic bacterial proportion among bacterial flora in the activated carbon biofilter was the largest, which might be due to the significant reduction in DON in the first part of the column. Overall, the results indicate that the DON concentration in biofiltered water can be controlled via the selection of appropriate biofilter media. We propose that a two-layer biofilter with activated carbon in the upper layer and another media type in the lower layer could best reduce the DON concentration.

  16. Adsorption and desorption of dissolved organic matter by carbon nanotubes: Effects of solution chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, Maya; Chefetz, Benny

    2016-06-01

    Increasing use of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) has led to their introduction into the environment where they can interact with dissolved organic matter (DOM). This study focuses on solution chemistry effects on DOM adsorption/desorption processes by single-walled CNTs (SWCNTs). Our data show that DOM adsorption is controlled by the attachment of DOM molecules to the SWCNTs, and that the initial adsorption rate is dependent on solution parameters. Adsorbed amount of DOM at high ionic strength was limited, possibly due to alterations in SWCNT bundling. Desorption of DOM performed at low pH resulted in additional DOM adsorption, whereas at high pH, adsorbed DOM amount decreased. The extent of desorption conducted at increased ionic strength was dependent on pre-adsorbed DOM concentration: low DOM loading stimulated additional adsorption of DOM, whereas high DOM loading facilitated release of adsorbed DOM. Elevated ionic strength and increased adsorbed amount of DOM reduced the oxidation temperature of the SWCNTs, suggesting that changes in the assembly of the SWCNTs had occurred. Moreover, DOM-coated SWCNTs at increased ionic strength provided fewer sites for atrazine adsorption. This study enhances our understanding of DOM-SWCNT interactions in aqueous systems influenced by rapid changes in salinity, and facilitates potential use of SWCNTs in water-purification technologies.

  17. Along-stream transport and transformation of dissolved organic matter in a large tropical river

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Thibault; Teodoru, Cristian R.; Nyoni, Frank C.; Bouillon, Steven; Darchambeau, François; Massicotte, Philippe; Borges, Alberto V.

    2016-05-01

    Large rivers transport considerable amounts of terrestrial dissolved organic matter (DOM) to the ocean. However, downstream gradients and temporal variability in DOM fluxes and characteristics are poorly studied at the scale of large river basins, especially in tropical areas. Here, we report longitudinal patterns in DOM content and composition based on absorbance and fluorescence measurements along the Zambezi River and its main tributary, the Kafue River, during two hydrological seasons. During high-flow periods, a greater proportion of aromatic and humic DOM was mobilized along rivers due to the hydrological connectivity with wetlands, while low-flow periods were characterized by lower DOM content of less aromaticity resulting from loss of connectivity with wetlands, more efficient degradation of terrestrial DOM and enhanced autochthonous productivity. Changes in water residence time due to contrasting water discharge were found to modulate the fate of DOM along the river continuum. Thus, high water discharge promotes the transport of terrestrial DOM downstream relative to its degradation, while low water discharge enhances the degradation of DOM during its transport. The longitudinal evolution of DOM was also strongly impacted by a hydrological buffering effect in large reservoirs in which the seasonal variability of DOM fluxes and composition was strongly reduced.<

  18. Differential utilization patterns of dissolved organic phosphorus compounds by heterotrophic bacteria in two mountain lakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rofner, Carina; Sommaruga, Ruben; Pérez, María Teresa

    2016-09-01

    Although phosphorus limitation is common in freshwaters and bacteria are known to use dissolved organic phosphorus (DOP), little is known about how efficiently DOP compounds are taken up by individual bacterial taxa. Here, we assessed bacterial uptake of three model DOP substrates in two mountain lakes and examined whether DOP uptake followed concentration-dependent patterns. We determined bulk uptake rates by the bacterioplankton and examined bacterial taxon-specific substrate uptake patterns using microautoradiography combined with catalyzed reporter deposition-fluorescence in situ hybridization. Our results show that in the oligotrophic alpine lake, bacteria took up ATP, glucose-6-phosphate and glycerol-3-phosphate to similar extents (mean 29.7 ± 4.3% Bacteria), whereas in the subalpine mesotrophic lake, ca. 40% of bacteria took up glucose-6-phosphate, but only ∼20% took up ATP or glycerol-3-phosphate. In both lakes, the R-BT cluster of Betaproteobacteria (lineage of genus Limnohabitans) was over-represented in glucose-6-phosphate and glycerol-3-phosphate uptake, whereas AcI Actinobacteria were under-represented in the uptake of those substrates. Alphaproteobacteria and Bacteroidetes contributed to DOP uptake proportionally to their in situ abundance. Our results demonstrate that R-BT Betaproteobacteria are the most active bacteria in DOP acquisition, whereas the abundant AcI Actinobacteria may either lack high affinity DOP uptake systems or have reduced phosphorus requirements. PMID:27312963

  19. Estimation of the hydrophobic fraction of dissolved organic matter in water samples using UV photometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilling, Jörg; Kaiser, Klaus

    2002-12-01

    In this study, we tested a simple and rapid method for the estimation of carbon in the hydrophobic fraction of dissolved organic matter (DOM) of different origin (spruce, pine, and beech litter) in soil water. The method is based on the fact that the hydrophobic fraction of DOM contains almost entirely the aromatic moieties of DOM. Thus, it showed a clearly distinct light absorption at 260 nm compared to the hydrophilic fraction. This light absorption was directly proportional to the concentration of the hydrophobic fraction. Moreover, it was independent of the concentration of the hydrophilic fraction. We compared the concentrations of hydrophobic DOM estimated by the UV method with those of the conventional fractionation using chromatographic columns of XAD-8 macroporous resin and found an excellent agreement between the two methods for both solutions from laboratory sorption experiments and field samples of forest floor leachates and subsoil porewaters. In addition, the absorption at 260 nm of hydrophobic DOM proved to be independent of pH values ranging from 2.0 to 6.5. Compared to the conventional chromatographic fractionation, the method using the UV absorption at 260 nm is less time consuming, needs a much smaller sample volume, and showed a better reproducibility. However, its use is restricted to water samples of low nitrate (< 25 mg L(-1)) and Fe (< 5 mg L(-1)) concentrations and, probably, with the hydrophobic fraction dominated by aromatic compounds deriving from degradation of lignin.

  20. Optical properties of dissolved organic matter (DOM): Effects of biological and photolytic degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Angela; Kraus, Tamara; Pellerin, Brian; Fleck, Jacob; Downing, Bryan D.; Bergamaschi, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Advances in spectroscopic techniques have led to an increase in the use of optical properties (absorbance and fluorescence) to assess dissolved organic matter (DOM) composition and infer sources and processing. However, little information is available to assess the impact of biological and photolytic processing on the optical properties of original DOM source materials. We measured changes in commonly used optical properties and indices in DOM leached from peat soil, plants, and algae following biological and photochemical degradation to determine whether they provide unique signatures that can be linked to original DOM source. Changes in individual optical parameters varied by source material and process, with biodegradation and photodegradation often causing values to shift in opposite directions. Although values for different source materials overlapped at the end of the 111-day lab experiment, multivariate statistical analyses showed that unique optical signatures could be linked to original DOM source material even after degradation, with 17 optical properties determined by discriminant analysis to be significant (p<0.05) in distinguishing between DOM source and environmental processing. These results demonstrate that inferring the source material from optical properties is possible when parameters are evaluated in combination even after extensive biological and photochemical alteration.

  1. Hydrological controls on dissolved organic carbon production and release from UK peatlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenner, Nathalie; Freeman, Chris; Worrall, Fred

    Long-term increases in dissolved organic carbon (DOC) release from peatlands to British aquatic ecosystems are widely acknowledged, and are now confirmed to occur in a wide variety of boreal and subboreal settings. Depth to water table is probably the single most important hydrological factor governing that DOC generation and will modulate the response of the system to other environmental factors (such as warming and rising atmospheric carbon dioxide) in a changing climate. Many workers have attempted to attribute the rising DOC trend to a single "universal" driving variable. However, two fundamental problems prevent this: (1) universal theories, i.e., climate change theories that can account for rising trends in diverse catchment types, seem insufficient to account for the large observed increases, and (2) regional theories cannot account for the trend in all catchment types. Here it is suggested that multiple and possibly different drivers can modify DOC exports at four stages, namely, production, diffusion, solubility, and transport, with hydrology undoubtedly having a direct or indirect role in all the potential drivers considered here. These mechanisms, and the interactions between them, need to be more fully understood if we are to predict the response of the United Kingdom and global peatland carbon stores to environmental changes. Moreover, if we are to attempt to ameliorate rising DOC, we will need to fully appreciate the implications of restoration of drained peatlands and land management practices, to ensure that carbon losses are reduced on various temporal scales. These are research topics that remain in their infancy.

  2. [Effects of dissolved organic matter on napropamide adsorption and transport in soil system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ai-jun; Zhou, Li-xiang; He, Ren-hong

    2006-02-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) can affect the environmental behaviors of herbicides in soil. Batch adsorption and column experiments were conducted to measure the sorption and leaching of napropamide in soils in the presence of DOM derived from green manure (GM) and sewage sludge (SS). DOM reduced sorption of napropamide significantly onto the tested soils, consequently which facilitated the transport of napropamide exhibited by soil column experiment. The sorption inhibition and the increased mobility of napropamide caused by DOM of GM origin were more significant than that of SS origin for the same soil. Within the selected concentration range of the napropamide and DOM in this study napropamide sorption isotherm could be described well by the Freundlich equation. In comparison with the control, DOM of GM and SS origins could reduce napropamide adsorption by 22.9% and 11.3% in the yellow-brown soil and 9.5% and 6.5% in the calcareous soil, respectively. Correspondingly, in the presence of DOM the leaching losses of napropamide in soil column increased by 73.42% and 26.87% in the yellow-brown soil and 43.54% and 28.29% in the calcareous soil, respectively. PMID:16686205

  3. Effect of dissolved organic matters on napropamide availability and ecotoxicity in rapeseed ( Brassica napus ).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rui; Cui, Jing; Zhu, Hong Mei; Yang, Hong

    2010-03-10

    Napropamide is a herbicide widely used for controlling annual weeds. Substantial use of napropamide in recent years has led to its bioaccumulation in ecosystems and thus contamination to crops. Meanwhile, application of dissolved organic matters (DOMs) to soils in the form of compost, sludge, or plant residues has become a popular practice in agriculture management owning to its low cost and recycling of nutrients. However, whether DOMs affect environmental behaviors of herbicides in soil-plant systems is poorly understood. This study investigated napropamide accumulation and biological responses as affected by DOMs in Brassica napus . Plants exposed to 0-16 mg/kg napropamide show inhibited growth and oxidative damage. Treatment with 50 mg of DOC/kg DOMs derived from either sludge or straw improved plant growth and reduced napropamide accumulation in plants. Both DOMs reduced the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the activities of antioxidative enzymes in napropamide-exposed plants. Analysis of FT-IR spectra confirmed the difference between structures of the two DOMs. Additional evidence was provided by three-dimensional excitation-emission matrix (EEM) fluorescence spectra to demonstrate the DOM-napropamide complex formed during the process of the interaction. PMID:20143852

  4. Negligible in-stream processing of dissolved organic matter in low order boreal streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kothawala, Dolly; Ji, Xing; Laudon, Hjalmar; Ågren, Anneli; Futter, Martyn; Köhler, Stephan; Tranvik, Lars

    2016-04-01

    Low order boreal streams have been considered to be reactive interfaces where dissolved organic matter (DOM) enters inland waters from the surrounding catchment soils. Disentangling the relative influence of key environmental factors suspected to influence stream water DOM composition is highly relevant for predicting the reactivity, and fate of terrestrial DOM. Here, we examined changes to DOM composition using optical approaches from 17 boreal streams, ranging from first to fourth order, over 14 months. We identified two specific fluorescing components, which expressed either a clear mire-wetland or forest signature, providing distinct molecular markers of land cover that is typical of the boreal ecozone. In fact, land cover alone explained 49% of the variability in stream DOM composition. In contrast, seasonal fluctuations in hydrology only contributed to minor shifts (8%) in DOM composition. Perhaps most intriguingly, in-stream transformations to DOM composition were undetectable, suggesting that the extent of in-stream processing was negligible. These findings suggest that low order boreal streams act as passive pipes rather than active reactors. Ultimately, we find that that in-stream processing of DOM was restricted by water residence times (less than 2 days). In summary, these results now leave us better equipped to predict where in the landscape, and when during the year, key DOM transformations may occur within the aquatic conduit.

  5. Seasonal variations of dissolved organic carbon in precipitation over urban and forest sites in central Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siudek, Patrycja; Frankowski, Marcin; Siepak, Jerzy

    2015-07-01

    Spatial and temporal variability of carbon species in rainwater (bulk deposition) was studied for the first time at two sites located in urban area of Poznań City and protected woodland area (Jeziory), in central Poland, between April and December 2013. The mean concentration of total carbon (TC) for the first site was 5.86 mg L(-1), whereas for the second, 5.21 mg L(-1). Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration accounted for, on average, 87 and 91 % of total carbon in precipitation at urban and non-urban sites, respectively. Significant changes in TC concentrations in rainwater were observed at both sites, indicating that atmospheric transformation, transport, and removal mechanisms of carbonaceous particles were affected by seasonal fluctuations in biogenic/anthropogenic emission and meteorological conditions (i.e., precipitation height and type, atmospheric transport). During the warm season, the DOC concentration in rainwater was mostly influenced by mixed natural and anthropogenic sources. In contrast, during the cold season, the DOC concentration significantly increased mainly as a result of anthropogenic activities, i.e., intensive coal combustion, domestic wood burning, high-temperature processes, etc. In addition, during the winter measurements, significant differences in mean DOC concentration (Kruskal-Wallis test, p urban and non-urban sites. These data imply that carbonaceous compounds are of crucial importance in atmospheric chemistry and should be considered as an important parameter while considering wet deposition, reactions with different substances, especially over polluted environments.

  6. Benthic fluxes of dissolved organic carbon from gas hydrate sediments in the northern South China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Chia-Wei; Huang, Kuo-Hao; Shih, Yung-Yen; Lin, Yu-Shih; Chen, Hsin-Hung; Wang, Chau-Chang; Ho, Chuang-Yi; Hung, Chin-Chang; Burdige, David J.

    2016-07-01

    Hydrocarbon vents have recently been reported to contribute considerable amounts of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) to the oceans. Many such hydrocarbon vents widely exist in the northern South China Sea (NSCS). To investigate if these hydrocarbon vent sites release DOC, we used a real-time video multiple-corer to collect bottom seawater and surface sediments at vent sites. We analyzed concentrations of DOC in these samples and estimated DOC fluxes. Elevated DOC concentrations in the porewaters were found at some sites suggesting that DOC may come from these hydrocarbon vents. Benthic fluxes of DOC from these sediments were 28 to 1264 μmol m‑2 d‑1 (on average ~321 μmol m‑2 d‑1) which are several times higher than most DOC fluxes in coastal and continental margin sediments. The results demonstrate that the real-time video multiple-corer can precisely collect samples at vent sites. The estimated benthic DOC flux from the methane venting sites (8.6 × 106 mol y‑1), is 24% of the DOC discharge from the Pearl River to the South China Sea, indicating that these sediments make an important contribution to the DOC in deep waters.

  7. Optical Proxies for Terrestrial Dissolved Organic Matter in Estuaries and Coastal Waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher L. Osburn

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Optical proxies, especially DOM fluorescence, were used to track terrestrial DOM fluxes through estuaries and coastal waters by comparing models developed for several coastal ecosystems. Key to using optical properties is validating and calibrating them with chemical measurements, such as lignin-derived phenols - a proxy to quantify terrestrial DOM. Utilizing parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC, and comparing models statistically using the OpenFluor database (http://www.openfluor.org we have found common, ubiquitous fluorescing components which correlate most strongly with lignin phenol concentrations in several estuarine and coastal environments. Optical proxies for lignin were computed for the following regions: Mackenzie River Estuary, Atchafalaya River Estuary, Charleston Harbor, Chesapeake Bay, and Neuse River Estuary. The slope of linear regression models relating CDOM absorption at 350 nm (a350 to DOC and to lignin, varied 5 to 10 fold among systems. Where seasonal observations were available from a region, there were distinct seasonal differences in equation parameters for these optical proxies. Despite variability, overall models using single linear regression were developed that related dissolved organic carbon (DOC concentration to CDOM (DOC = 40×a350+138; R2 = 0.77; N = 130 and lignin (Σ8 to CDOM (Σ8 = 2.03×a350-0.5; R2 = 0.87; N = 130. This wide variability suggested that local or regional optical models should be developed for predicting terrestrial DOM flux into coastal oceans and taken into account when upscaling to remote sensing observations and calibrations.

  8. Impact of Dissolved Organic Matter on Colloid Transport in the Vadose Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, V. L.; Gao, B.; Steenhuis, T. S.

    2008-05-01

    Mobile soil colloids can facilitate contaminant transport through the soil profile through complexation of pollutants previously thought to have very limited mobility in soil. Much work has been done to define the governing transport mechanisms of colloids in unsaturated media, and have demonstrated that the release, transport, and retention of colloidal particles in soil are very sensitive to flow chemistry. However, better understanding of the physicochemical interactions between dissolved organic matter (DOM) and soil colloids is clearly needed, as the transport in manure rich soils has been observed to be much greater than originally suspected. The goal of this study is to fill this knowledge gap by elucidating the role of DOM on the transport and retention of colloidal particles in the vadose zone through multi-scale investigations. The initial phase of the experimental work consists of collecting concomitant visual (with Bright Field Microscopy and Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy) and breakthrough data from medium sized (d50 = 0.4 mm) quartz sand filled chambers of 10x2x2 cm and 1 cm diameter x 10 cm length. Pulses of synthetic and clay colloid suspensions will be individually injected into the flow chambers at various concentrations of DOM (i.e. extracted humic acid from manure). Results from these experiments indicate that DOM can increase colloid stability in water and thereby potentially facilitate the transport of contaminants adsorbed onto suspended and mobile colloids.

  9. In situ determination of dissolved organic carbon in freshwaters using a reagentless UV sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandford, Richard Charles; Bol, Roland; Worsfold, Paul John

    2010-09-01

    Reliable, high temporal and spatial resolution data are essential for enhancing our understanding of aquatic dissolved organic carbon (DOC) biogeochemical cycling. This paper describes a novel UV spectrophotometric sensor for the real time, in situ, high resolution (every 30 s) mapping of DOC in freshwaters. The sensor incorporates high resolution, multi-wavelength spectral acquisition (256 channel photodiode array) and a hybrid linear analysis (HLA) curve fitting algorithm. The portable and reagentless in situ UV sensor has a good linear range (0.5-15 mg C L(-1)) and precision (mean RSD 8.5%, n = 7 standards each measured 5 times) and quantitative recoveries were obtained for spiked river water (93.8 +/- 6.2%, n = 35). The DOC field data were in good agreement with results from a laboratory high temperature combustion method (t test (p = 0.05) gave P = 0.20 (n = 14), 0.89 (n = 21) and 0.92 (n = 15) for three separate freshwater deployments). These data suggested that solar radiation, coupled with microbial uptake and release, together with the physico-chemical parameters of hydrological flow, temperature and pH were significant drivers of DOC cycling in this ecosystem. Real time data processing provided an immediate data stream for mapping diurnal and/or seasonal DOC cycling. This capability will enhance our understanding of DOC sources, delivery mechanisms and internal cycling and support sustainable catchment management. PMID:20652205

  10. Influence of chemical and structural evolution of dissolved organic matter on electron transfer capacity during composting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Electron transfer capability (ETC) of compost-derived DOM was investigated. • Composting treatment increased the ETC of DOM from municipal solid wastes. • The ETC increase related to humic matter, and molecule weight, and N and S content. - Abstract: Dissolved organic matter (DOM) can mediate electron transfer and change chemical speciation of heavy metals. In this study, the electron transfer capability (ETC) of compost-derived DOM was investigated through electrochemical approaches, and the factors influencing the ETC were studied using spectral and elemental analysis. The results showed that the electron accepting capacity (EAC) and electron donating capacity (EDC) of compost-derived DOM were 3.29–40.14 μmole− (g C)−1 and 57.1– 346.07 μmole− (g C)−1, respectively. Composting treatment increased the fulvic- and humic-like substance content, oxygenated aliphatic carbon content, lignin-derived aromatic carbon content, molecule weight, and N and S content of DOM, but decreased the aliphatic carbon content and the C and H content. This conversion increased the EDC and EAC of the DOM during composting

  11. Characteristics of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in leachate with different landfill ages

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUO Shouliang; XI Beidou; YU Haichan; HE Liansheng; FAN Shilei; LIU Hongliang

    2008-01-01

    The main objective of the study was to investigate the characteristics of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in leachate with different landfill ages through the chemical, spectroscopic, and elemental analysis. Humic acid (HA), fulvic acid (FA), and hydrophilic (HyI) fractions were isolated and purified by the XAD-8 resin combined with the cation exchange resin method. The analytical results of fluorescence excitation-emission matrix spectroscopy (EEMs) revealed that the fluorescence peaks were protein-like fluorescence for young landfill leachate, while the fluorescence peaks for medium and old landfill leachate were humic-like and fulvic-like fluorescence, respectively. Elemental analysis showed that carbon, hydrogen, and nitrogen content decreased with landfill age, while the oxygen content increased. Moreover, the nitrogen content in these isolated fractions followed: HA > HyI > FA. The results of elemental analysis, FT-IR, and fluorescence EEMs also confirmed that aromatic carbons and portions of aliphatic functional groups were more abundant in leachate samples with increasing landfill age.

  12. Cadmium transport mediated by soil colloid and dissolved organic matter: a field study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhaoli; Zhou, Lixiang

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the potential role of soil colloids and dissolved organic matter (DOM) in transporting Cd through in situ undisturbed paddy soil monoliths. Brilliant Blue was used as a tracer to assess the effect of preferential flow on Cd down migration. Experimental results showed that deep penetration of Cd and Brilliant Blue into the soil profile took place due to the preferential flow through macropores, mainly earthworm channels, with much of chemicals thus bypassing the soil matrix. Dye tracer and Cd distribution within the soil matrix was fairly restricted to several centimeters. Colloid restrained the migration of both dye and Cd in the matrix and preferential flow area. DOM facilitated the transport of Cd and Brilliant Blue in matrix and macropores by about 10 cm over that of the control. Pearson's is correlation analysis revealed strong associations between Brilliant Blue concentrations, exchangeable Cd and total Cd concentrations in three studied plots indicating that they had taken the same preferential flow pathway. PMID:20397394

  13. Production of bioavailable and refractory dissolved organic matter by coastal heterotrophic microbial populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lønborg, Christian; Álvarez-Salgado, Xosé A.; Davidson, Keith; Miller, Axel E. J.

    2009-05-01

    Production of dissolved organic matter (DOM) by heterotrophic microbial communities isolated from Loch Creran (Scotland) was studied in time course incubations in which cells were re-suspended in artificial seawater amended with variable proportions of glucose, ammonium and phosphate. The incubation experiments demonstrated that microheterotrophs released part of the substrate as new DOM, with a production efficiency of 11 ± 1% for DOC, 18 ± 2% for DON and 17 ± 2% for DOP. Estimating the impact of this production in Loch Creran, showed that from 3 ± 1% (DOC) to 72 ± 16% (DOP) of DOM could originate from the heterotrophic microbial community. The produced DOM (PDOM) was both bioavailable (BDOM) and refractory (RDOM). Bioavailability as assessed by the difference between the maximum and the end DOM concentration, was generally higher than found in natural systems, with DOP (73 ± 15%, average ± SD) more bioavailable than DON (70 ± 15%), and DON than DOC (34 ± 13%). The stoichiometry of PDOM was linked to both nutrient uptake and BDOM ratios. Absorption and fluorescence of DOM increased significantly during the incubation time, indicating that microheterotrophs were also a source of coloured DOM (CDOM) and that they produce both bioavailable protein-like and refractory humic-like fluorophores.

  14. Three-dimensional fluorescence characteristics of dissolved organic matter produced by Prorocentrum donghaiense Lu

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Weihong; WANG Jiangtao; CHEN Meimei

    2009-01-01

    Filtration and cross-flow ultrafiltration techniques were used to separate culture media of Prorocentrum donghaiense at the exponential growth, stationary and decline stages into <0.45 μm filtrate, 100 kDa-0.45 μm, 10-100 kDa and 1-10 kDa retentate and <1 kDa ultrafiltrate fractions. The fluorescence properties of different molecular weights of dissolved organic matter (DOM) were measured by excitation-emission matrix spectra. Protein-like and humic-like fluorophores were observed in the DOM produced by P. donghaiense. The central positions of protein-like fluorophores showed a red shift with prolonged growth duration, shifting from tyrosine-like properties at the exponential growth stage to tryptophan-like properties at the stationary and decline stages. The excitation wavelengths of protein-like fluorophores exhibited some change in the exponential growth and stationary stages with increased molecular size, but showed little change in the decline stage. However, the emission wavelengths in the decline stage exhibited a blue shift. Very distinct C type and A type peaks in humic-like fluorophores were observed. With a prolonged culture time, the intensities of both of the peaks became strong and the excitation wavelengths of peak A showed a red shift, while the A:C ratios fell. More than 94% of fluorescent DOM was in the lower than 1 kDa molecular weight fraction.

  15. Estimation of Biochemical Oxygen Demand Based on Dissolved Organic Carbon, UV Absorption, and Fluorescence Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jihyun Kwak

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Determination of 5-d biochemical oxygen demand (BOD5 is the most commonly practiced test to assess the water quality of surface waters and the waste loading. However, BOD5 is not a good parameter for the control of water or wastewater treatment processes because of its long test period. It is very difficult to produce consistent and reliable BOD5 results without using careful laboratory quality control practices. This study was performed to develop software sensors to predict the BOD5 of river water and wastewater. The software sensors were based on the multiple regression analysis using the dissolved organic carbon (DOC concentration, UV light absorbance at 254 nm, and synchronous fluorescence spectra. River water samples and wastewater treatment plant (WWTP effluents were collected at 1-hour interval to evaluate the feasibility of the software sensors. In short, the software sensors developed in this study could well predict the BOD5 of river water (r=0.78 and for the WWTP effluent (r=0.90.

  16. Removal characteristics of dissolved organic matters in modified A2O process of pilot test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haibo LI

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to guarantee the running effect of Guodian Shenyang North Wastewater Treatment Plant, based on excitation-emission matrix (EEM fluorescence spectroscopy, fluorescence regional integration (FRI and material balance are used to evaluate the dissolved organic matter removal performance of modified A2O process. The results suggest that the albuminoid matters are the dominant components in modified A2O process influent, and there is small amount of fulvic-like materials. The removal efficiencies of the normalized integral volume of region Ⅰ, Ⅱ and Ⅳ are 81.5%, 54.0% and 63.4%, respectively, while the removal performance of normalized integral volume of region Ⅲ and Ⅴ is low, and the removal efficiencies are 30.2%, 27.8%, respectively. The calculation of material balance shows that pre-anoxic and anaerobic zones are mainly used for the material removal in the region Ⅰ and Ⅳ. Anoxic zone is mainly used for material removal in the region Ⅰ. Aerobic zone could remove material in all regions. In addition, normalized integral volume of region Ⅳ and the soluble chemical oxygen demand have nice linear correlation, and the correlation coefficient R2 is 0.991 1. The normalized integral volume of region Ⅳ can better reflect the variation trend of soluble chemical oxygen demand in modified A2O process.

  17. Effect of Dissolved Organic Matter on Chlorotoluron Sorption and Desorption in Soils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Hong; WU Xin; ZHOU Li-Xiang; YANG Zhi-Min

    2005-01-01

    A batch equilibrium techniques was used to examine the effect of dissolved organic matter (DOM) extracted from both non-treated sludge (NTS) and heat-expanded sludge (HES) on the sorption and desorption of chlorotoluron (3-(3-chloro-p-tolyl)-1,1-dimethylurea) in two types of soils, a yellow fluvo-aquic and a red soil from China. Without DOM,sorption of chlorotoluron was significantly greater (P < 0.05) in the red soil than in the yellow fluvo-aquic soil. However,with DOM the effect was dependent on the soil type and nature of DOM. Chlorotoluron sorption was lower in the yellow fluvo-aquic soil than in the red soil, suggesting that with the same DOM levels the yellow fluvo-aquic soil had a lower sorption capacity for this herbicide. Application of DOM from both NTS and HES led to a general decrease in sorption to the soils and an increase in desorption from the soils. Desorption of chlorotoluron also significantly increased (P < 0.05)with an increase in the DOM concentration. Additionally, for sorption and desorption, at each DOM treatment level the NTS treatments were significantly lower (P < 0.05) than the HES treatments. This implied that non-treated sludge had a greater effect on the sorption and desorption of chlorotoluron than heat-expanded sludge.

  18. [Influence of land use change on dissolved organic carbon export in Naoli River watershed. Northeast China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Xiao-min; Lyu, Xian-guo; Liu, Xing-tu; Xue, Zhen-shan

    2015-12-01

    The present study was conducted to evaluate the influence of land use change on dissolved organic carbon (DOC) export in Naoli River watershed, Northeast China. Seasonal variation of DOC concentrations of the river water and its relationship with land use in the whole watershed and 100 m riparian zone at the annual average scale were analyzed using the method of field sampling, laboratory analysis, GIS and statistics analysis. The results showed that the concentrations of DOC under base flow conditions in spring and summer were significantly higher than that in fall in the study watershed. The seasonal trend of DOC concentrations in wetland-watersheds was similar to that in all the sub-watersheds, while significantly different from that in non-wetland watersheds. On the annual average scale, percentage of wetland in the whole watershed and paddy field in the 100 m riparian zone had positive relationship with the DOC concentration in the river water, while percentage of forest in the whole watershed had negative relationship with it (P riparian zone significantly promoted DOC export, while forest alleviated it. Land use change in the watershed in the past few decades dramatically changed the DOC balance of river water. PMID:27112020

  19. Characterization of dissolved organic matter fractions from Lake Hongfeng, Southwestern China Plateau

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Liying; WU Fengchang; ZHANG Runyu; LI Wen; LIAO Haiqing

    2009-01-01

    With XAD-series and ion exchange resins, dissolved organic matter (DOM) from Lake Hongfeng in Southwestern China Plateau was isolated into 6 fractions, i.e., humic acid (HA), fulvic acid (FA), hydrophobic neutrals (HON), hydrophilic acids (HIA), hydrophilic bases (HIB) and hydrophilic neutrals (HIN). Those fractions were characterized by high performance size exclusion chromatography, fluorescence spectroscopy and UV absorbance. Among the 6 fractions, FA was predominant and accounted for 51% of the total DOM. The hydrophobic fractions had larger molecular weight (1688--2355 Da) than hydrophilic fractions (1338--1928 Da). A strong correlation was observed between specific UV absorbance at 280 nm, E2/E3 (absorbance at 250 nm to 365 nm), and the molecular weight for DOM fractions. UV-Vis fulvic-like fluorescence peaks were found in all fractions. Protein-like fluorescence peaks existed in HON may indicate that microbial activity was severely in Lake Hongfeng. There was a significant relationship between fluorescence intensities and specific UV absorbance at 254 nm for those DOM fractions, suggesting their similar luminescence characteristics. The values of fluorescence index (?450/500) indicated that hydrophobic fractions may derive from terrestrial sources, in contrast to the hydrophilic fractions from microbial and terrestrial origins. Those results suggest that there were inter-relationships between molecular weight, fluorescence and absorbance characteristics, and also subtle consistencies between the hydrophilic and hydrophobic properties and sources for the 6 fractions from Lake Hongfeng.

  20. Benthic fluxes of dissolved organic carbon from gas hydrate sediments in the northern South China Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Chia-Wei; Huang, Kuo-Hao; Shih, Yung-Yen; Lin, Yu-Shih; Chen, Hsin-Hung; Wang, Chau-Chang; Ho, Chuang-Yi; Hung, Chin-Chang; Burdige, David J

    2016-01-01

    Hydrocarbon vents have recently been reported to contribute considerable amounts of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) to the oceans. Many such hydrocarbon vents widely exist in the northern South China Sea (NSCS). To investigate if these hydrocarbon vent sites release DOC, we used a real-time video multiple-corer to collect bottom seawater and surface sediments at vent sites. We analyzed concentrations of DOC in these samples and estimated DOC fluxes. Elevated DOC concentrations in the porewaters were found at some sites suggesting that DOC may come from these hydrocarbon vents. Benthic fluxes of DOC from these sediments were 28 to 1264 μmol m(-2 )d(-1) (on average ~321 μmol m(-2 )d(-1)) which are several times higher than most DOC fluxes in coastal and continental margin sediments. The results demonstrate that the real-time video multiple-corer can precisely collect samples at vent sites. The estimated benthic DOC flux from the methane venting sites (8.6 × 10(6 )mol y(-1)), is 24% of the DOC discharge from the Pearl River to the South China Sea, indicating that these sediments make an important contribution to the DOC in deep waters. PMID:27432631

  1. The Effects of Dissolved Organic Matter on Pollutant Removal and Formation in Aquatic Environment: From Stormwater to Drinking Water

    OpenAIRE

    Hsu, Meng-Horng

    2012-01-01

    Hydrophobic organic pollutants (HOPs), such as polyaromatic hydrocarbons primarily from automobile exhausts and dissolved organic matter (DOM) are ubiquitous in the aquatic environment. The association between DOM and HOPs as a bound interaction of DOM-HOPs minimizes the bioavailability of free HOPs and their potential health effects. In addition, DOM is also the precursor of disinfection by-products involving the disinfection treatment processes.It is very important to understand the relat...

  2. Dissolved Organic Carbon 14C in Southern Nevada Groundwater and Implications for Groundwater Travel Times

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hershey, Ronald L.; Fereday, Wyall; Thomas, James M

    2016-08-01

    Dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) carbon-14 (14C) ages must be corrected for complex chemical and physical reactions and processes that change the amount of 14C in groundwater as it flows from recharge to downgradient areas. Because of these reactions, DIC 14C can produce unrealistically old ages and long groundwater travel times that may, or may not, agree with travel times estimated by other methods. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) 14C ages are often younger than DIC 14C ages because there are few chemical reactions or physical processes that change the amount of DOC 14C in groundwater. However, there are several issues that create uncertainty in DOC 14C groundwater ages including limited knowledge of the initial (A0) DOC 14C in groundwater recharge and potential changes in DOC composition as water moves through an aquifer. This study examines these issues by quantifying A0 DOC 14C in recharge areas of southern Nevada groundwater flow systems and by evaluating changes in DOC composition as water flows from recharge areas to downgradient areas. The effect of these processes on DOC 14C groundwater ages is evaluated and DOC and DIC 14C ages are then compared along several southern Nevada groundwater flow paths. Twenty-seven groundwater samples were collected from springs and wells in southern Nevada in upgradient, midgradient, and downgradient locations. DOC 14C for upgradient samples ranged from 96 to 120 percent modern carbon (pmc) with an average of 106 pmc, verifying modern DOC 14C ages in recharge areas, which decreases uncertainty in DOC 14C A0 values, groundwater ages, and travel times. The HPLC spectra of groundwater along a flow path in the Spring Mountains show the same general pattern indicating that the DOC compound composition does not change along this flow path. Although DOC concentration decreases from recharge-area to downgradient groundwater, the organic compounds are similar, indicating that DOC 14C is unaffected by other processes such as microbial

  3. Chemical Characterization of Riverine Dissolved Organic Matter Using a Combination of Spectroscopic and Pyrolytic Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Templier, J.; Derenne, S.

    2006-12-01

    It is now well established that riverine dissolved organic matter (DOM) play a major role in environmental processes. However natural organic matter exhibit different properties depending on their sources and the fractions considered. As a result chemical characterization of DOM has appeared essential for a better understanding of their reactivity. The purpose of this work was to characterize all of the DOM at molecular level, including the non-hydrolysable fraction, which is a major part of this OM. To this aim a new analytical approach had to be considered. A combination of spectroscopic and pyrolytic methods has been applied to various fractions of DOM originating from different catchments (French and Amazonian rivers). The fractions were termed hydrophilic, transphilic and colloids according to the IHSS fractionation procedure, and account for at least 70% of the total dissolved organic carbon. Solid state 13C NMR and FTIR afford information on the nature and relative abundance of the chemical functions occurring in macromolecules. Differential thermogravimetric analysis allows to determine the thermal behaviour of the studied material and hence to optimize analytical pyrolysis conditions. Curie point pyrolysis combined to gas chromatography and mass spectrometry leads to identification of characteristic pyrolysis products, some of them being specific of a macromolecular source. Additional information can be provided by thermochemolysis with tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH). TMAH was shown to allow an increase in the efficiency of the cracking of macromolecular structures and an enhancement of the detection of the polar pyrolysis products especially due to methylation of the alcohol, phenol and acid groups. The results obtained have established the importance of terrestrial contribution to DOM. Hydrophobic fractions mainly originate from lignin-derived units, whereas transphilic fractions mostly contain cellulose units together with lignin derived ones and

  4. Sources and fate of bioavailable dissolved organic nitrogen in the Neuse River Estuary, North Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paerl, H. W.; Peierls, B. L.; Hounshell, A.; Osburn, C. L.

    2015-12-01

    Eutrophication is a widespread problem affecting the structure and function of estuaries and is often linked to anthropogenic nitrogen (N) enrichment, since N is the primary nutrient limiting algal production. Watershed management actions typically have ignored dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) loading because of its perceived refractory nature and instead focused on inorganic N as targets for loading reductions. A fluorescence-based model indicated that anthropogenic sources of DON near the head of the microtidal Neuse River Estuary (NRE), NC were dominated by septic systems and poultry waste. A series of bioassays were used to determine the bioavailability of river DON and DON-rich sources to primary producers and whether those additions promoted the growth of certain phytoplankton taxa, particularly harmful species. Overall, at time scales up to two to three weeks, estuarine phytoplankton and bacteria only showed limited responses to additions of high molecular weight (HMW, >1 kDa) river DON. When increases in productivity and biomass did occur, they were quite small compared with the response to inorganic N. Low molecular weight (LMW) river DON, waste water treatment plant effluent, and poultry litter extract did have a positive effect on phytoplankton and bacterial production, indicating a bioavailable fraction. High variability of bulk DON concentration suggested that bioavailable compounds added in the experimental treatments were low in concentration and turned over quite rapidly. Some phytoplankton taxa, as measured by diagnostic photopigments, appeared to be selectively enhanced by the HMW and specific source DON additions, although the taxa could not be positively identified as harmful species. Preliminary tests show that labile autochthonous organic matter may act as a primer for the mineralization of the HMW DON. These and other, longer-term bioavailability studies will be needed to adequately address the fate of watershed DON in estuarine ecosystems.

  5. Changes and characteristics of dissolved organic matter in a constructed wetland system using fluorescence spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Yuan; Li, Yun-Zhen; Guo, Xu-Jing; Huang, Tao; Gao, Ping-Ping; Zhang, Ying-Pei; Yuan, Feng

    2016-06-01

    Domestic wastewater was treated by five constructed wetland beds in series. Dissolved organic matter (DOM) collected from influent and effluent samples from the constructed wetland was investigated using fluorescence spectroscopy combined with fluorescence regional integration (FRI), parallel factor (PARAFAC) analysis, and two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy (2D-COS). This study evaluates the capability of these methods in detecting the spectral characteristics of fluorescent DOM fractions and their changes in constructed wetlands. Fluorescence excitation-emission matrix (EEM) combined with FRI analysis showed that protein-like materials displayed a higher removal ratio compared to humic-like substances. The PARAFAC analysis of wastewater DOM indicated that six fluorescent components, i.e., two protein-like substances (C1 and C6), three humic-like substances (C2, C3 and C5), and one non-humic component (C4), could be identified. Tryptophan-like C1 was the dominant component in the influent DOM. The removal ratios of six fluorescent components (C1-C6) were 56.21, 32.05, 49.19, 39.90, 29.60, and 45.87 %, respectively, after the constructed wetland treatment. Furthermore, 2D-COS demonstrated that the sequencing of spectral changes for fluorescent DOM followed the order 298 nm → 403 nm → 283 nm (310-360 nm) in the constructed wetland, suggesting that the peak at 298 nm is associated with preferential tryptophan fluorescence removal. Variation of the fluorescence index (FI) and the ratio of fluorescence components indicated that the constructed wetland treatment resulted in the decrease of fluorescent organic pollutant with increasing the humification and chemical stability of the DOM. PMID:26976008

  6. Seasonal Variation in Dissolved Organic Matter Composition and Photoreactivity within a Small Sub-arctic Stream.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerard, J.; Osborne, R.

    2015-12-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) is a complex heterogeneous mixture, ubiquitous to all natural surface waters, uniquely composed of source inputs specific to spatial, temporal, and ecological circumstances. In arctic and sub-arctic regions, elucidating DOM composition and reactivity is complicated by seasonal variations. These include changes in productivity and source inputs to the water column, as well as winter overflow events that may contribute allochthonous organic material. DOM from a small boreal stream in a watershed of discontinuous permafrost in the Goldstream Valley of interior Alaska was isolated by solid-phase extraction (PPL) at multiple points during the year - late spring, late summer, and in the winter during an active overflow event. Compositional characteristics of each of the isolates were characterized by SPR-W5-WATERGATE 1H NMR spectroscopy, specific UV-Vis absorbance, and excitation emission matrix (EEM) fluorescence spectroscopy and compared against end-member reference DOM isolates. Kinetics of photobleaching experiments reveal the influence of compositional differences among the isolated DOMs on their chemical reactivity, and offer insight into potential differences in their source materials and ecological function throughout the year. Photobleaching studies were conducted using a variety of reactive species quenchers or sensitizers in order to assess susceptibility of oxidative transformation mechanisms on the different DOM isolates, which were then analyzed by 1H NMR, UV-Vis degradation kinetics, and parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC) of fluorescence EEMs. Better understanding of the seasonal variations of boreal DOM character and function on a molecular level is critical to assessing alterations in its ecological role and cycling in the face of current and future ecosystem perturbations in arctic and sub-arctic regions.

  7. Evaluation of Powdered Activated Carbon Efficiency in Removal of Dissolved Organic Carbon inWater Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.R Bonyadi nejad

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available "n "nBackgrounds and Objectives: Powdered Activated$ carbon is known as a suitable absorbent for organic materials. The aim of this research is evaluation of Powdered Activated-Carbon (PAC efficiency in removal of Dissolved Organic Carbon (DOC in water treatment in Isfahan."nMaterials and Methods : The increase of PAC for DOC reduction has done in three paths in the Isfahan water treatment plant (WTP. These paths including: 1 Intake up to entrance of WTP 2 Intake to exit ofWTP 3 Between entrance and exit of waterworks. The paths were simulated by the Jar test system. Then DOC and UV254 absorption were analyzed and SUVA parameter for samples and activated-carbon adsorption isotherm was calculated."nResults: The injected PAC doses of 20,40,60,80 and 100 mg/l caused decreasing in DOC and UV254 absorption in every sample in all paths. The average of this decrease, from intake to WTP.s exit (second path was the greatest 69.8± 3.9%and the commonWTP process had capability of removing 35% of DOC. The first path also showed that PAC can reduce 33± 2% DOC of raw water by itself. Activated-carbon absorption results were adhered from Freundlich adsorption isotherm."nConclusion: In the third path therewas lessDOCremoval efficiency than exceptedwhen Activated- Carbon injected in rapid mixed basin with coagulant. Powdered activated carbon porosity reduction due to effect of coagulant can be the reason for this issue.Also according to different paths, the point of intake is more suitable for powdered activated carbon addition.

  8. Hydrological and biogeochemical controls on watershed dissolved organic matter transport: pulse-shunt concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, Peter A; Saiers, James E; Sobczak, William V

    2016-01-01

    Hydrological precipitation and snowmelt events trigger large "pulse" releases of terrestrial dissolved organic matter (DOM) into drainage networks due to an increase in DOM concentration with discharge. Thus, low-frequency large events, which are predicted to increase with climate change, are responsible for a significant percentage of annual terrestrial DOM input to drainage networks. These same events are accompanied by marked and rapid increases in headwater stream velocity; thus they also "shunt" a large proportion of the pulsed DOM to downstream, higher-order rivers and aquatic ecosystems geographically removed from the DOM source of origin. Here we merge these ideas into the "pulse-shunt concept" (PSC) to explain and quantify how infrequent, yet major hydrologic events may drive the timing, flux, geographical dispersion, and regional metabolism of terrestrial DOM. The PSC also helps reconcile long-standing discrepancies in C cycling theory and provides a robust framework for better quantifying its highly dynamic role in the global C cycle. The PSC adds a critical temporal dimension to linear organic matter removal dynamics postulated by the river continuum concept. It also can be represented mathematically through a model that is based on stream scaling approaches suitable for quantifying the important role of streams and rivers in the global C cycle. Initial hypotheses generated by the PSC include: (1) Infrequent large storms and snowmelt events account for a large and underappreciated percentage of the terrestrial DOM flux to drainage networks at annual and decadal time scales and therefore event statistics are equally important to total discharge when determining terrestrial fluxes. (2) Episodic hydrologic events result in DOM bypassing headwater streams and being metabolized in large rivers and exported to coastal systems. We propose that the PSC provides a framework for watershed biogeochemical modeling and predictions and discuss implications to

  9. The mysteriously variable half-life of dissolved organic matter in aquatic ecosystems: artefact or insight?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Chris; Fovet, Ophelie; Jones, Tim; Jones, Davey; Moldan, Filip; Futter, Martyn

    2016-04-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) fluxes from land to water represent an important loss term in the terrestrial carbon balance, a major pathway in the global carbon cycle, a significant influence on aquatic light, nutrient and energy regimes, and an important concern for drinking water production. Although freshwaters are now recognised as zones of active carbon cycling, rather than passive conduits for carbon transport, evidence regarding the magnitude of, and controls on, DOM cycling in aquatic systems is incomplete and in some cases seemingly contradictory, with DOM 'half-lives' ranging from a few days to many years. Bringing together experimental, isotopic, catchment mass balance and modelling data, we suggest that apparently conflicting results can be reconciled through understanding of differences in: i) the terrestrial sources of DOM within heterogeneous landscapes, and consequent differences in its reactivity and stoichiometry; ii) experimental methodologies (i.e. which reactions are actually being measured), and iii) the extent of prior transformation of DOM upstream of the point of study. We argue that rapid photo-degradation, particularly of peat-derived DOM, is a key process in headwaters, whilst apparently slow DOM turnover in downstream, agriculturally-influenced lakes and rivers can partly be explained by the offsetting effect of in situ DOM production. This production appears to be strongly constrained by nutrient supply, thus linking DOM turnover and composition to the supply of inorganic nutrient inputs from diffuse agricultural pollution, and also providing a possible mechanistic link between aquatic DOM production and terrestrial DOM breakdown via the mineralisation and re-assimilation of organic nutrients. A more complete conceptual understanding of these interlinked processes will provide an improved understanding of the sources and fate of aquatic DOM, its role in the global carbon cycle, and the impact of anthropogenic activities, for example

  10. In-lake processes offset increased terrestrial inputs of dissolved organic carbon and color to lakes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephan J Köhler

    Full Text Available Increased color in surface waters, or browning, can alter lake ecological function, lake thermal stratification and pose difficulties for drinking water treatment. Mechanisms suggested to cause browning include increased dissolved organic carbon (DOC and iron concentrations, as well as a shift to more colored DOC. While browning of surface waters is widespread and well documented, little is known about why some lakes resist it. Here, we present a comprehensive study of Mälaren, the third largest lake in Sweden. In Mälaren, the vast majority of water and DOC enters a western lake basin, and after approximately 2.8 years, drains from an eastern basin. Despite 40 years of increased terrestrial inputs of colored substances to western lake basins, the eastern basin has resisted browning over this time period. Here we find the half-life of iron was far shorter (0.6 years than colored organic matter (A₄₂₀; 1.7 years and DOC as a whole (6.1 years. We found changes in filtered iron concentrations relate strongly to the observed loss of color in the western basins. In addition, we observed a substantial shift from colored DOC of terrestrial origin, to less colored autochthonous sources, with a substantial decrease in aromaticity (-17% across the lake. We suggest that rapid losses of iron and colored DOC caused the limited browning observed in eastern lake basins. Across a wider dataset of 69 Swedish lakes, we observed greatest browning in acidic lakes with shorter retention times (< 1.5 years. These findings suggest that water residence time, along with iron, pH and colored DOC may be of central importance when modeling and projecting changes in brownification on broader spatial scales.

  11. Impact of dissolved organic matter on the photolysis of the ionizable antibiotic norfloxacin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Liang; Huimin Zhao; Minjie Deng; Xie Quan; Shuo Chen; Hua Wang

    2015-01-01

    Norfloxacin (NOR),an ionizable antibiotic frequently used in the aquaculture industry,has aroused public concern due to its persistence,bacterial resistance,and environmental ubiquity.Therefore,we investigated the photolysis of different species of NOR and the impact of a ubiquitous component of natural water-dissolved organic matter (DOM),which has a special photochemical activity and normally acts as a sensitizer or inhibiter in the photolysis of diverse organics; furthermore,scavenging experiments combined with electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) were performed to evaluate the transformation of NOR in water.The results demonstated that NOR underwent direct photolysis and self-sensitized photolysis via hydroxyl radical (·OH) and singlet oxygen (1O2) based on the scavenging experiments.In addition,DOM was found to influence the photolysis of different NOR species,and its impact was related to the concentration of DOM and type of NOR species.Photolysis of cationic NOR was photosensitized by DOM at low concentration,while zwitterionic and anionic NOR were photoinhibited by DOM,where quenching of ·OH predominated according to EPR experiments,accompanied by possible participation of excited triplet-state NOR and 1O2.Photo-intermediate identification of different NOR species in solutions with/without DOM indicated that NOR underwent different photodegradation pathways including dechlorination,cleavage of the piperazine side chain and photooxidation,and DOM had little impact on the distribution but influenced the concentration evolution of photolysis intermediates.The results implied that for accurate ecological risk assessment of emerging ionizable pollutants,the impact of DOM on the environmental photochemical behavior of all dissociated species should not be ignored.

  12. Advanced Residuals Analysis for Determining the Number of PARAFAC Components in Dissolved Organic Matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuss, Chad W; Guéguen, Céline; Andersson, Per; Porcelli, Don; Maximov, Trofim; Kutscher, Liselott

    2016-02-01

    Parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC) has facilitated an explosion in research connecting the fluorescence properties of dissolved organic matter (DOM) to its functions and biogeochemical cycling in natural and engineered systems. However, the validation of robust PARAFAC models using split-half analysis requires an oft unrealistically large number (hundreds to thousands) of excitation-emission matrices (EEMs), and models with too few components may not adequately describe differences between DOM. This study used self-organizing maps (SOM) and comparing changes in residuals with the effects of adding components to estimate the number of PARAFAC components in DOM from two data sets: MS (110 EEMs from nine leaf leachates and headwaters) and LR (64 EEMs from the Lena River). Clustering by SOM demonstrated that peaks clearly persisted in model residuals after validation by split-half analysis. Plotting the changes to residuals was an effective method for visualizing the removal of fluorophore-like fluorescence caused by increasing the number of PARAFAC components. Extracting additional PARAFAC components via residuals analysis increased the proportion of correctly identified size-fractionated leaf leachates from 56.0 ± 0.8 to 75.2 ± 0.9%, and from 51.7 ± 1.4 to 92.9 ± 0.0% for whole leachates. Model overfitting was assessed by considering the correlations between components, and their distributions amongst samples. Advanced residuals analysis improved the ability of PARAFAC to resolve the variation in DOM fluorescence, and presents an enhanced validation approach for assessing the number of components that can be used to supplement the potentially misleading results of split-half analysis.

  13. Dissolved organic matter: Fractional composition and sorbability by the soil solid phase (Review of literature)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karavanova, E. I.

    2013-08-01

    The behavior of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in soils under varying environmental conditions represents a poorly studied aspect of the problem of organic matter loss from soils. The equilibrium and sustainable development of ecosystems in the northern latitudes are largely determined by the balance between the formation of DOM, its accumulation in the lower soil horizons, and its input with runoff into surface waters. The residence time, retention strength in the soil, and thermodynamic and biochemical stabilities depend on the localization of DOM in the pore space and its chemical structure. Amphiphilic properties represent a valuable diagnostic parameter, which can be used to predict the behavior of DOM in the soil. Acidic components of hydrophobic and hydrophilic nature constitute the major portion of DOM in forest soils of the temperate zone. The hydrophilic fraction includes short-chain aliphatic carboxylic acids, hydrocarbons, and amino acids and is poorly sorbed by the solid phase. However, the existence of this fraction in soil solution is also limited both in space (in the finest pores) and time because of higher accessibility to microbial degradation. The hydrophilic fraction composes the major portion of labile DOM in soils. The hydrophobic fraction consists of soluble degradation products of lignin; it is enriched in structural ortho-hydroxybenzene fragments, which ensure its selective sorption and strong retention in soils. Sorption is favored by low pH values (3.5-5), the high ionic strength of solution, the heavy texture and fine porous structure of soil, the high contents of oxalate- and dithionite-soluble iron (and aluminum) compounds, and hydrological conditions characterized by slow water movement. The adsorbed DOM is chemically and biochemically recalcitrant and significantly contributes to the humus reserves in the low mineral horizons of soils.

  14. Poultry manure runoff and its influence on fluorescence characteristics of dissolved organic matter (DOM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, S.; Dutta, S.; Inamdar, S. P.

    2013-12-01

    Land application of poultry manure as a substitute for synthetic fertilizer is a common practice in states like Delaware which have a surplus of this animal waste. However, this practice can generate large amounts of labile DOM and nutrients in agricultural runoff that can cause eutrophication of downstream aquatic ecosystems. We determined the concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) and the quality of DOM for a cropland receiving poultry manure in the coastal plain soils of Delaware. Manure was applied at the rate of 9 Mg ha-1 in the spring (March 10) of 2010 to an agricultural field planted in corn. Sampling was performed for surface runoff and soil waters at four landscape positions - field edge, upper and lower riparian zones and the stream. Sampling was conducted for eight storm events, one before manure application and seven after (March through July spanning over 100 days). DOM quality was characterized using spectrofluorometric techniques and the development of a site-specific PARAFAC model. DOC and DIN concentrations in surface runoff ranged from 18.1 to 77.2 mg/l and 4.2 to 22.6 mg/l, respectively. The percent of protein-like and humic-like DOM in surface runoff ranged between 3.9 to 23.5% and 12.3 to 41.6%, respectively. Highest concentrations of DOC and DIN were observed at the field edge and lowest in the stream. Protein-like and humic-like DOM decreased from the field edge to stream in surface runoff and soil waters. Temporally, both humic-like and protein-like DOM showed significant increases in storm runoff following manure application. After manure application, humic-like DOM increased by 70% while protein-like DOM increased by more than 200% in surface runoff indicating elevated content of labile DOM in poultry manure. These concentrations remained high for more than 60 days following manure application. Protein-like DOM was significantly correlated with nitrate-nitrogen (r = 0.43; p < 0

  15. Storm dissolved organic matter : surface and sub-surface erosion controls its composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denis, Marie; Jeanneau, Laurent; Gruau, Gérard; Petitjean, Patrice; Pierson-Wickmann, Anne-Catherine

    2016-04-01

    In headwater catchments, flood events are responsible for exportation of the major part of DOM (dissolved organic matter) during the hydrological year. During these hot moments, the increased flow at the outlet is accompanied with an increase of DOM concentrations, implying the mobilisation of additional DOM sources which could have a different composition than DOM exported during base-flow. Molecular analysis performed on samples coming from the outlet of the Kervidy-Naizin catchment, an agricultural catchment located in France (Critical Zone Observatory AgrHyS) revealed a modification in the distribution of lignin compounds during flood events. This DOM, less biodegraded, could be produced by partition between particulate and dissolved phases when the soil/water ratio is low, that is to say when soil particles are isolated in water. The evolution of DOM composition during storm events has been assumed to reflect a combination of in-stream and in-soil erosion processes. So how soil erosion could be responsible for production of less degraded DOM? And is the composition of soil DOM modified during a storm event? Those questions were investigated during two flood events, by sampling soil solutions with high frequency in riparian soils equipped with zero-tension lysimeters in the Kervidy-Naizin catchment. In the same time stream DOM was sampled at the outlet of the watershed and runoff were investigated. Samples have been filtered at 0.2μm, analysed for DOC and freeze-dried for molecular analysis (thermally assisted hydrolysis methylation - gas chromatography / mass spectrometry). The hydraulic gradient was monitored every 15 minutes using piezometers implemented in the riparian soils and higher up in the toposequence. At the beginning of the events, hydraulic gradient increased rapidly and stayed high during several days. Modification of DOM composition in soil solution were recorded during the hydraulic gradient rise with an increase in the proportion of less

  16. Dissolved Organic Matter Along a North South Transect of the Yenisei River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, V.; Dittmar, T.; Gaupp, R.; Gleixner, G.

    2012-12-01

    The molecular composition of dissolved organic matter (DOM) contains important information on properties and processes like decomposition in terrestrial and aquatic systems. To explore the source characteristics of DOM in relation to environmental factors, tributaries and bogs along the Yenisei River between 56° N near Krasnoyarsk and 68° N at Khantayka River were sampled. This includes a transect of 1000 km across a climatic gradient with different vegetation zones and permafrost influence. The sampling took place in July and August 1998 during the one-month BOBCAT (Boat on a Boreal Carbon Tour) campaign of the Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry (Jena, Germany) and the Institute of Forest (Krasnoyarsk, Russia). After filtration with GF/F, the samples were freeze-dried for following analysis. To unravel the complexity of DOM in our samples on a molecular basis, we applied Electrospray Ionization Fourier-Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry (ESI-FT-ICR-MS). For ESI-FT-ICR-MS freeze-dried material was re-dissolved and extracted by solid phase extraction (SPE) with Varian Bond Elute PPL according to Dittmar et al. 2008. The desalted samples were measured in negative ionization mode at the Bruker Solarix 15 T FT-ICR-MS at the University of Oldenburg (Germany). The data of the highly resolved and accurately calibrated masses was used to calculate the corresponding molecular formulas. Different multivariate statistical tools, like principal component analysis (PCA) in combination with environmental parameters, and graphical display methods are applied to the data to explore differences and similarities between samples and as well possible correlations with environmental parameters. In our contribution we show the results of our comparative study. Major outcomes are the correlation between molecular composition of DOM and environmental parameters like DOC concentration, pH and geographical latitude. We found, that the pH in water is a driving factor

  17. Search for Singlet Fission Chromophores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Havlas, Z.; Akdag, A.; Smith, M. B.; Dron, P.; Johnson, J. C.; Nozik, A. J.; Michl, J.

    2012-01-01

    Singlet fission, in which a singlet excited chromophore shares its energy with a ground-state neighbor and both end up in their triplet states, is of potential interest for solar cells. Only a handful of compounds, mostly alternant hydrocarbons, are known to perform efficiently. In view of the large number of conditions that a successful candidate for a practical cell has to meet, it appears desirable to extend the present list of high performers to additional classes of compounds. We have (i) identified design rules for new singlet fission chromophores and for their coupling to covalent dimers, (ii) synthesized them, and (iii) evaluated their performance as neat solids or covalent dimers.

  18. Isotopic investigations of dissolved organic N in soils identifies N mineralization as a major sink process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanek, Wolfgang; Prommer, Judith; Hofhansl, Florian

    2016-04-01

    Dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) is a major component of transfer processes in the global nitrogen (N) cycle, contributing to atmospheric N deposition, terrestrial N losses and aquatic N inputs. In terrestrial ecosystems several sources and sinks contribute to belowground DON pools but yet are hard to quantify. In soils, DON is released by desorption of soil organic N and by microbial lysis. Major losses from the DON pool occur via sorption, hydrological losses and by soil N mineralization. Sorption/desorption, lysis and hydrological losses are expected to exhibit no 15N fractionation therefore allowing to trace different DON sources. Soil N mineralization of DON has been commonly assumed to have no or only a small isotope effect of between 0-4‰, however isotope fractionation by N mineralization has rarely been measured and might be larger than anticipated. Depending on the degree of 15N fractionation by soil N mineralization, we would expect DON to become 15N-enriched relative to bulk soil N, and dissolved inorganic N (DIN; ammonium and nitrate) to become 15N-depleted relative to both, bulk soil N and DON. Isotopic analyses of soil organic N, DON and DIN might therefore provide insights into the relative contributions of different sources and sink processes. This study therefore aimed at a better understanding of the isotopic signatures of DON and its controls in soils. We investigated the concentration and isotopic composition of bulk soil N, DON and DIN in a wide range of sites, covering arable, grassland and forest ecosystems in Austria across an altitudinal transect. Isotopic composition of ammonium, nitrate and DON were measured in soil extracts after chemical conversion to N2O by purge-and-trap isotope ratio mass spectrometry. We found that delta15N values of DON ranged between -0.4 and 7.6‰, closely tracking the delta15N values of bulk soils. However, DON was 15N-enriched relative to bulk soil N by 1.5±1.3‰ (1 SD), and inorganic N was 15N

  19. Landscape scale controls on the vascular plant component of dissolved organic carbon across a freshwater delta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckard, Robert S.; Hernes, Peter J.; Bergamaschi, Brian A.; Stepanauskas, Ramunas; Kendall, Carol

    2007-01-01

    Lignin phenol concentrations and compositions were determined on dissolved organic carbon (DOC) extracts (XAD resins) within the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta (the Delta), the tidal freshwater portion of the San Francisco Bay Estuary, located in central California, USA. Fourteen stations were sampled, including the following habitats and land-use types: wetland, riverine, channelized waterway, open water, and island drains. Stations were sampled approximately seasonally from December, 1999 through May, 2001. DOC concentrations ranged from 1.3 mg L-1 within the Sacramento River to 39.9 mg L-1 at the outfall from an island drain (median 3.0 mg L-1), while lignin concentrations ranged from 3.0 μL-1 within the Sacramento River to 111 μL-1 at the outfall from an island drain (median 11.6 μL-1). Both DOC and lignin concentrations varied significantly among habitat/land-use types and among sampling stations. Carbon-normalized lignin yields ranged from 0.07 mg (100 mg OC)-1 at an island drain to 0.84 mg (100 mg OC)-1 for a wetland (median 0.36 mg (100 mg OC)-1), and also varied significantly among habitat/land-use types. A simple mass balance model indicated that the Delta acted as a source of lignin during late autumn through spring (10-83% increase) and a sink for lignin during summer and autumn (13-39% decrease). Endmember mixing models using S:V and C:V signatures of landscape scale features indicated strong temporal variation in sources of DOC export from the Delta, with riverine source signatures responsible for 50% of DOC in summer and winter, wetland signatures responsible for 40% of DOC in summer, winter, and late autumn, and island drains responsible for 40% of exported DOC in late autumn. A significant negative correlation was observed between carbon-normalized lignin yields and DOC bioavailability in two of the 14 sampling stations. This study is, to our knowledge, the first to describe organic vascular plant DOC sources at the level of localized

  20. Do Long-Term Changes in Organic Matter Inputs to Forest Soils Affect Dissolved Organic Matter Chemistry and Export?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lajtha, K.; Strid, A.; Lee, B. S.

    2014-12-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) production and transport play an important role in regulating organic matter (OM) distribution through a soil profile and ultimately, OM stabilization or export to aquatic systems. The contributions of varying OM inputs to the quality and amount of DOM as it passes through a soil profile remain relatively unknown. The Detrital Input and Removal Treatment (DIRT) site at the H. J. Andrews Experimental Forest in Oregon has undergone 17 years of litter, wood and root input manipulations and allows us to guage shifts in DOM chemistry induced by long-term changes to aboveground and belowground OM additions and exclusions. Using fluorescence and UV spectroscopy to characterize fluorescent properties, extent of decomposition, and sources of DOM in streams and soil solutions collected with lysimeters and soil extractions, we have assessed the importance of fresh OM inputs to DOM chemistry. Soil extracts from DIRT plots had a higher fluorescence index (FI) than lysimeter solutions or stream water. A high FI in surface water is generally interpreted as indicative of a high proportion of microbially-derived DOM. However, we suspect that the high FI in soil extracts is due to a higher proportion of non-aromatic DOM from fresh soil that microorganisms consume in transit through the soil profile to lysimeters or to streams. High redox index (RI) values were observed in lysimeters from the April 2014 sampling compared with the November 2013 sampling. These RI values show evidence of more reducing conditions at the end of the rainy season in the spring compared to the onset of the rainy season in the fall. Lysimeter water collected in No Input, No Litter, and No Root treatments contained high proportions of protein, suggesting the absence of carbon inputs changes activities of the microbial community. Observed variations reflect the viability of using fluorescent properties to explore the terrestrial-aquatic interface.

  1. Advancing understanding of the fluvial export of organic matter through high-resolution profiling of dissolved organic carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldron, S.; Drew, S.; Gilvear, D.; Murray, H.; Heal, K.

    2012-04-01

    Quantifying the natural variation (complexity) of a system remains an enduring scientific challenge in better understanding controls on surface water quality. This characterisation is needed in order to reveal controlling processes, such as dilution, and also to identify unusual load profiles. In trying to capture that natural variation we still rely largely on concentration time series (and associated export budgets) generated from manual spot sampling, or from samples collected by autosamplers - approaches which are unlikely to provide the high temporal resolution of parameter concentration required. Now however, advances in sensor technology are helping us address this challenge. Here we present detailed dissolved organic carbon (DOC) export profiles from a small upland river (9.4 km sq.), generated since June 2011 by semi-continuous logging of UV-vis absorption (200-750 nm, every 2.5 nm) every 30 minutes. Observed increases in the concentration of the DOC, [DOC], in freshwaters have prompted significant research to understand the cause and consequences of increased export: higher levels of DOC require additional water purification of potable sources; increased aquatic export may represent a reduction in terrestrial C-soil sequestration; changes in light penetration can affect the heterotrophic / autotrophic balance in surface waters and this has consequences for the food web structure; increased aquatic export may also result in increased carbon dioxide evasion. Additionally, C export is often linked to nutrient export: we have observed statistically significant stoichiometric relationships between DOC and soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP) concentrations, thus understanding better this parameters offers insight into export of other nutrient and the source of material from which these dissolved compounds are produced; this may be particulate. Our Scottish study site is interesting because there are multiple processes that can contribute to DOC and other nutrient

  2. Understanding and modelling the variability in Dissolved Organic Carbon concentrations in catchment drainage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Martin; Waldron, Susan; Scott, Marian; Drew, Simon

    2013-04-01

    Our knowledge of dynamic natural habitats could be improved through the deployment of automated sensor technology. Dissolved organic carbon concentrations, [DOC], are of interest to water companies as purification removes this pool and currently in environmental science, due in part to rising DOC levels and also as respiration of this C pool can lead to an increased CO2 efflux. Manual sampling of catchment drainage systems has revealed seasonal patterns in DOC (Williams, P.J.L., 1995) and that hydrological events export most DOC(Raymond, P.A. and J.E. Saiers, 2010). However, manual sampling precludes detailed characterisation of the dynamic fluctuation of DOC over shorter but important time periods e.g. immediately prior to an event; the transition from base flow to a surface run-off dominated system as surface flow pathways defrost. Such insight is only gained through deployment of continuous-monitoring equipment. Since autumn 2010 we have deployed an S::CAN Spectrolyser (which from absorbance gives a measurement of [DOC]) in a 7.5 kilometre squared peaty catchment draining Europe's largest windfarm, Whitelee. Since autumn 2011, we have an almost complete time series of [DOC] every 30. Here [DOC] has ranged from 12.2 to 58.4 mg/l C and during event flow DOC had a maximum variation of 23.5 mg/l within a single day. Simultaneously with the Spectrolyser, we have logged stage height, pH and conductivity using an In-Situ Inc MD Troll 9000. Generally there is an inverse relationship between [DOC] and both pH and conductivity, but a positive relationship (albeit with seasonal differences) with [DOC] and stage height, from which we can infer hydrological changes in the source of the DOC. Here, in addition to presenting the time series of the data, and a more accurate export budget estimate, I will explore statistical methods for the handling of large datasets. Trends in the data of such large and dynamic data sets are challenging to model. Simple relationships with stage

  3. Heat impact caused molecular level changes in solid and dissolved soil organic matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Diana; Steffen, Bernhard; Eckhardt, Kai-Uwe; Leinweber, Peter

    2015-04-01

    The ubiquitous abundance of pyrolysed, highly aromatic organic matter, called "Black Carbon" (BC), in all environmental compartments became increasingly important in different fields of research beyond intensive investigated atmospheric aerosol due to climatic relevance. Its predominant high resistance to abiotic and biotic degradation resulted in turnover times from less than a century to several millennia. This recalcitrance led to the enrichment of BC in soils, accounting for 1-6% (European forest soils) to 60% (Chernozems) of total soil organic matter (SOM). Hence, soil BC acts an important sink in the global carbon cycle. In contrast, consequences for the nitrogen cycle up to date are rather inconsistently discussed. Soil related dissolved organic matter (DOM) is a major controlling factor in soil formation, an important pathway of organic matter transport and one of the largest active carbon reservoirs on earth, if considering oceans and other bodies of water. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of artificially simulated wildfire by thermal treatment on the molecular composition of water extractable soil organic matter (DOM). Soils from two outdoor lysimeters with different management history were investigated. Soil samples, non-heated and heated up to 350°C were analyzed for elemental composition (carbon, nitrogen and sulfur) and for bulk molecular composition by Pyrolysis-Field Ionization Mass Spectrometry (Py-FIMS) and synchrotron-based X-ray Absorption Near-Edge Spectroscopy (XANES) at the C- and N K-edges. DOM-samples obtained by hot water extraction, desalting and concentration by solid phase extraction were subsequently analyzed by flow injection analysis in a Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometer (FTICR-MS), equipped with an ESI source and a 7 T supra-conducting magnet (LTQ-FT Ultra, ThermoFisher Scientific). This technique is the key technique for the analysis of complex samples due to its outstanding mass

  4. Dissolved Organic Carbon Influences Microbial Community Composition and Diversity in Managed Aquifer Recharge Systems

    KAUST Repository

    Li, D.

    2012-07-13

    This study explores microbial community structure in managed aquifer recharge (MAR) systems across both laboratory and field scales. Two field sites, the Taif River (Taif, Saudi Arabia) and South Platte River (Colorado), were selected as geographically distinct MAR systems. Samples derived from unsaturated riverbed, saturated-shallow-infiltration (depth, 1 to 2 cm), and intermediate-infiltration (depth, 10 to 50 cm) zones were collected. Complementary laboratory-scale sediment columns representing low (0.6 mg/liter) and moderate (5 mg/liter) dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations were used to further query the influence of DOC and depth on microbial assemblages. Microbial density was positively correlated with the DOC concentration, while diversity was negatively correlated at both the laboratory and field scales. Microbial communities derived from analogous sampling zones in each river were not phylogenetically significantly different on phylum, class, genus, and species levels, as determined by 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing, suggesting that geography and season exerted less sway than aqueous geochemical properties. When field-scale communities derived from the Taif and South Platte River sediments were grouped together, principal coordinate analysis revealed distinct clusters with regard to the three sample zones (unsaturated, shallow, and intermediate saturated) and, further, with respect to DOC concentration. An analogous trend as a function of depth and corresponding DOC loss was observed in column studies. Canonical correspondence analysis suggests that microbial classes Betaproteobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria are positively correlated with DOC concentration. Our combined analyses at both the laboratory and field scales suggest that DOC may exert a strong influence on microbial community composition and diversity in MAR saturated zones.

  5. [Spectral Characteristics of Dissolved Organic Matters in Reject Water from Wastewater Treatment Plants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Tian-hao; Zhou, Zhen; Hu, Da-long; Wei, Hai-juan; Li, Jing; Dou, Wei-xiao; Ge, Hong-hua

    2016-04-15

    Reject water generated from sludge thickening, dewatering and stabilization process contains high-content and complex dissolved organic matters (DOM). The spectral characteristics of DOM in the reject water were investigated by three-dimensional excitation-emission matrix and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Fluorescent DOM (FDOM) from reject water were decomposed into six components by parallel factor analysis, the protein-like C1 (275/355 nm), C4 (235/350 nm) and C6 (275/305 nm) and the humic-like C2 (250, 340/440 nm) , C3 (320/380 nm) and CS (250/465 nm). Soluble COD in the sludge thickening reject water was positively correlated with all the three humic-like substances at P < 0.01 level, and was insignificantly influenced by protein-like substances. The tryptophan-like C1, C4 and humic-like CS increased in the centrifugal dewatering reject water (CDRW). FDOM in the advanced dewatering reject water (ADRW) were significantly different from those of other reject water in fluorescence peak locations and intensities, and humic-like C3 and tyrosine-like C6 in the DOM were 15.63 and 7.30 times higher than those in CDRW. Compared to sludge thickening reject water, infrared peaks related to polysaccharide and humic substances in CDRW were enhanced and massive proteins were released into ADRW. DOM structures in ADRW were changed owing to the complexation between metals and both humic substances and proteins. PMID:27548969

  6. Drivers of fluorescent dissolved organic matter in the global epipelagic ocean

    KAUST Repository

    Catalá, T. S.

    2016-03-24

    Fluorescent dissolved organic matter (FDOM) in open surface waters (< 200 m) of the Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian oceans was analysed by excitation-emission matrix (EEM) spectroscopy and parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC). A four-component PARAFAC model was fit to the EEMs, which included two humic- (C1 and C2) and two amino acid-like (C3 and C4) components previously identified in ocean waters. Generalized-additive models (GAMs) were used to explore the environmental factors that drive the global distribution of these PARAFAC components. The explained variance for the humic-like components was substantially larger (> 70%) than for the amino acid-like components (< 35%). The environmental variables exhibiting the largest effect on the global distribution of C1 and C2 were apparent oxygen utilisation followed by chlorophyll a. Positive non-linear relationships between both predictor variables and the two humic-like PARAFAC components suggest that their distribution are biologically controlled. Compared with the dark ocean (> 200 m), the relationships of C1 and C2 with AOU indicate a higher C1/AOU and C2/AOU ratios of the humic-like substances in the dark ocean than in the surface ocean where a net effect of photobleaching is also detected. C3 (tryptophan-like) and C4 (tyrosine-like) variability was mostly dictated by salinity (S), by means of positive non-linear relationships, suggesting a primary physical control of their distributions at the global surface ocean scale that could be related to the changing evaporation-precipitation regime. Remarkably, bacterial biomass (BB) only contributed to explain a minor part of the variability of C1 and C4.

  7. Contrasting UV-Vis Spectra of Terrestrial and Algal Derived Dissolved Organic Matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Jessica; Tipping, Edward; Scholefield, Paul; Feuchtmayr, Heidrun; Carter, Heather; Keenan, Patrick

    2016-04-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) is an important freshwater component. It controls aquatic ecological and biochemical cycling, and can be problematic in industrial water treatment. Thus, the demand for effective and reliable monitoring is growing. The heterogeneity of the spectroscopic properties of DOM are such that measurements of absorbance at a single wavelength cannot provide accurate predictions of [DOC]. Previous construction of a two-component model, based on the combination of absorbance at two wavelengths and a constant accountable for non-absorbing DOM, resulted in good predictions of [DOC] across approximately 1800 different freshwater systems (R2=0.99). However, there were isolated cases where the model appreciably underestimated [DOC], including shallow lakes and reservoirs in the Yangtze basin, China where waters were deemed to be highly eutrophic. Here, we used a revised series of samples, from small scale algal dominated microcosms, mesocosms and catchment scale field samples to explore the capability of the two component model in situations where algae may be the dominant producer of aquatic DOC. Absorbances were measured using a laboratory based UV-Vis spectrometer and subsamples were also analysed through combustion and infra-red detection. In both the microcosms and mesocosms, the model failed to provide a reliable fit, and [DOC] was considerably underestimated. At the field scale, analysis of 55 samples from a combination of reservoirs, arable ponds, streams and rivers produced mostly reliable predictions of [DOC] (R2=0.96), which can be attributed to the dominant input of terrestrial DOM. Samples of shallow, enclosed meres from the North-West of the UK showed hints of similar behaviour to that of the Chinese lakes, suggesting some influences from algal DOM. Our results therefore provide evidence that algae may produce complex forms of DOM that harbour different spectroscopic properties to terrestrially derived material, in the UV spectral range.

  8. Dissolved organic carbon export and internal cycling in small, headwater lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stets, Edward G.; Striegl, Rob; Aiken, George R.

    2010-01-01

    Carbon (C) cycling in freshwater lakes is intense but poorly integrated into our current understanding of overall C transport from the land to the oceans. We quantified dissolved organic carbon export (DOCX) and compared it with modeled gross DOC mineralization (DOCR) to determine whether hydrologic or within-lake processes dominated DOC cycling in a small headwaters watershed in Minnesota, USA. We also used DOC optical properties to gather information about DOC sources. We then compared our results to a data set of approximately 1500 lakes in the Eastern USA (Eastern Lake Survey, ELS, data set) to place our results in context of lakes more broadly. In the open-basin lakes in our watershed (n = 5), DOCX ranged from 60 to 183 g C m−2 lake area yr−1, whereas DOCR ranged from 15 to 21 g C m−2 lake area yr−1, emphasizing that lateral DOC fluxes dominated. DOCX calculated in our study watershed clustered near the 75th percentile of open-basin lakes in the ELS data set, suggesting that these results were not unusual. In contrast, DOCX in closed-basin lakes (n = 2) was approximately 5 g C m−2 lake area yr−1, whereas DOCR was 37 to 42 g C m−2 lake area yr−1, suggesting that internal C cycling dominated. In the ELS data set, median DOCX was 32 and 12 g C m−2 yr−1 in open-basin and closed-basin lakes, respectively. Although not as high as what was observed in our study watershed, DOCX is an important component of lake C flux more generally, particularly in open-basin lakes.

  9. Export of dissolved organic carbon from the Penobscot River basin in north-central Maine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huntington, Thomas G.; Aiken, George R.

    2013-01-01

    Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) flux from the Penobscot River and its major tributaries in Maine was determined using continuous discharge measurements, discrete water sampling, and the LOADEST regression software. The average daily flux during 2004–2007 was 71 kg C ha−1 yr−1 (392 Mt C d−1), an amount larger than measured in most northern temperate and boreal rivers. Distinct seasonal variation was observed in the relation between concentration and discharge (C–Q). During June through December (summer/fall), there was a relatively steep positive C–Q relation where concentration increased by a factor of 2–3 over the approximately 20-fold range of observed stream discharge for the Penobscot River near Eddington, Maine. In contrast, during January through May (winter/spring), DOC concentration did not increase with increasing discharge. In addition, we observed a major shift in the C–Q between 2004–2005 and 2006–2007, apparently resulting from unprecedented rainfall, runoff, and soil flushing beginning in late fall 2005. The relative contribution to the total Penobscot River basin DOC flux from each tributary varied dramatically by season, reflecting the role of large regulated reservoirs in certain basins. DOC concentration and flux per unit watershed area were highest in tributaries containing the largest areas in palustrine wetlands. Tributary DOC concentration and flux was positively correlated to percentage wetland area. Climatic or environmental changes that influence the magnitude or timing of river discharge or the abundance of wetlands will likely affect the export of DOC to the near-coastal ocean.

  10. Dissolved organic carbon in Alaskan boreal forest: Sources, chemical characteristics, and biodegradability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickland, K.P.; Neff, J.C.; Aiken, G.R.

    2007-01-01

    The fate of terrestrially-derived dissolved organic carbon (DOC) is important to carbon (C) cycling in both terrestrial and aquatic environments, and recent evidence suggests that climate warming is influencing DOC dynamics in northern ecosystems. To understand what determines the fate of terrestrial DOC, it is essential to quantify the chemical nature and potential biodegradability of this DOC. We examined DOC chemical characteristics and biodegradability collected from soil pore waters and dominant vegetation species in four boreal black spruce forest sites in Alaska spanning a range of hydrologic regimes and permafrost extents (Well Drained, Moderately Well Drained, Poorly Drained, and Thermokarst Wetlands). DOC chemistry was characterized using fractionation, UV-Vis absorbance, and fluorescence measurements. Potential biodegradability was assessed by incubating the samples and measuring CO2 production over 1 month. Soil pore water DOC from all sites was dominated by hydrophobic acids and was highly aromatic, whereas the chemical composition of vegetation leachate DOC varied significantly with species. There was no seasonal variability in soil pore water DOC chemical characteristics or biodegradability; however, DOC collected from the Poorly Drained site was significantly less biodegradable than DOC from the other three sites (6% loss vs. 13-15% loss). The biodegradability of vegetation-derived DOC ranged from 10 to 90% loss, and was strongly correlated with hydrophilic DOC content. Vegetation such as Sphagnum moss and feathermosses yielded DOC that was quickly metabolized and respired. In contrast, the DOC leached from vegetation such as black spruce was moderately recalcitrant. Changes in DOC chemical characteristics that occurred during microbial metabolism of DOC were quantified using fractionation and fluorescence. The chemical characteristics and biodegradability of DOC in soil pore waters were most similar to the moderately recalcitrant vegetation

  11. Characterisation of dissolved organic matter fluorescence properties by PARAFAC analysis and thermal quenching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carstea, Elfrida M; Baker, Andy; Bieroza, Magdalena; Reynolds, Darren M; Bridgeman, John

    2014-09-15

    The fluorescence intensity of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in aqueous samples is known to be highly influenced by temperature. Although several studies have demonstrated the effect of thermal quenching on the fluorescence of DOM, no research has been undertaken to assess the effects of temperature by combining fluorescence excitation - emission matrices (EEM) and parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC) modelling. This study further extends previous research on thermal quenching by evaluating the impact of temperature on the fluorescence of DOM from a wide range of environmental samples, in the range 20 °C - 0 °C. Fluorescence intensity increased linearly with respect to temperature decrease at all temperatures down to 0 °C. Results showed that temperature affected the PARAFAC components associated with humic-like and tryptophan-like components of DOM differently, depending on the water type. The terrestrial humic-like components, C1 and C2 presented the highest thermal quenching in rural water samples and the lowest in urban water samples, while C3, the tryptophan-like component, and C4, a reprocessed humic-like component, showed opposite results. These results were attributed to the availability and abundance of the components or to the degree of exposure to the heat source. The variable thermal quenching of the humic-like components also indicated that although the PARAFAC model generated the same components across sites, the DOM composition of each component differed between them. This study has shown that thermal quenching can provide additional information on the characteristics and composition of DOM and highlighted the importance of correcting fluorescence data collected in situ.

  12. Transformation of anti-estrogenic-activity related dissolved organic matter in secondary effluents during ozonation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xin; Wu, Qian-Yuan; Zhao, Xin; Du, Ye; Huang, Huang; Shi, Xiao-Lei; Hu, Hong-Ying

    2014-01-01

    Anti-estrogenic activity of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in reclaimed water is gaining increasing attention. In this study, anti-estrogenic activity removal efficiency by ozonation in the tertiary treatment process of domestic wastewater was investigated. The anti-estrogenic activity in the secondary effluents used in this study ranged between 0.95 and 2.00 mg-TAM L(-1) and decreased significantly after ozonation. The removal efficiency of anti-estrogenic activity at a dose of 10 mg-O3 L(-1) was 65-87%. The removal of the anti-estrogenic activity was highly correlated with the removal of UV254, suggesting that UV254 can be used as a surrogate for anti-estrogenic activity during ozonation. The results of size exclusion chromatography of the wastewater samples during ozonation showed that the UV254 absorbance of the DOM fraction with large apparent molecular weight (MW) around 7.6 k Da dropped significantly, and the DOM fraction was suspected to be humic substances which have been previously identified as anti-estrogenic constituents in secondary effluents. The excitation emission matrix fluorescence spectra of the wastewater samples proved that humic substances existed in the DOM and indeed reacted with the ozone. With the help of two-dimensional correlation of Fourier transform infrared, it was confirmed that the aromatic structures in the DOM were largely destroyed by ozonation. Therefore, it was suggested that the destruction of the aromatic structures in the DOM was related to the removal of the anti-estrogenic activity. PMID:24183562

  13. Source to sink characterization of dissolved organic matter in a tropical karst system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lechleitner, Franziska; Lang, Susan Q.; McIntyre, Cameron; Baldini, James U. L.; Dittmar, Thorsten; Eglinton, Timothy I.

    2016-04-01

    Karst systems are widespread surface features present on all continents. They are characterized by complex hydrology with a multitude of possible flow regimes, from diffuse seepage through the host rock to fracture flow in larger conduits. As stalagmite proxy records are important indicators of past terrestrial climate conditions, detailed understanding of the biogeochemistry of cave systems and their relationships to the overlying karst network is crucial. Microbial communities that drive the carbon cycle in caves are nourished by dissolved organic matter (DOM) carried with water into the cave system. Water samples from the Yok Balum cave in Belize were collected for DOM analysis, including soil waters, drip waters and pool waters from inside the cave. Additionally, DOM extracts from a stalagmite from the same cave were analysed to examine DOM signatures and test their applicability for reconstruction of environmental conditions. Ultrahigh-resolution mass spectrometry (via the ESI-FT-ICR-MS technique) yielded detailed molecular fingerprints on DOM from these samples. Several thousand molecular formulae of DOM compounds were identified. In addition, radiocarbon analyses were performed on the DOM samples to gain information on karst turnover times. A principal component analysis of the molecular data revealed a clear gradient between soil waters and cave waters, as soil waters were enriched in highly unsaturated oxygen-rich compounds (typical for vascular plants), which were much less abundant in drip waters. Conversely, peptides, which can originate from bacterial processes, were present only in the drip waters. Our data clearly show connectivity between the cave and overlaying soils, and reworking of DOM by the cave bacterial community. Furthermore, we found molecular evidence for the selective removal of vascular plant-derived DOM in the caves, possibly due to abiotic interactions with minerals.

  14. Comparison of PARAFAC components of fluorescent dissolved and particular organic matter from two urbanized rivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Huibin; Song, Yonghui; Du, Erdeng; Yang, Nan; Peng, Jianfeng; Liu, Ruixia

    2016-06-01

    Excitation-emission matrix (EEM) fluorescence spectroscopy combined with parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC) and multivariable analysis were employed to compare components of dissolved (DOM) and particulate (POM) organic matter and to reveal their correlations with water quality in Baitapuhe River and Xihe River in Shenyang City of northeast China. Eighteen water samples in Baitapuhe River and 16 water samples in Xihe River were collected along a human impact gradient. The DOM concentrations in Baitapuhe River were lower than those in Xihe River, so were the POM concentrations. The DOM in Baitapuhe River mainly derived from livestock wastewater and domestic sewage, which had strong biodegradability. However, the DOM in Xihe River mainly originated from industrial wastewater, which exhibited weak biodegradability. Four PARAFAC components (C1 to C4) were extracted from the DOM and POM. C1 was defined as fulvic-like component, and C2 was assigned as microbial humic component. C3 and C4 were ubiquitous protein-like component, which were referred as tryptophan-like and tyrosine-like components, respectively. The C3 was representative for the DOM in Baitapuhe River. The C3 and C4 were the main fractions of the DOM in Xihe River across the centralized wastewater-discharge region, whereas the C2 was the major component across the dispersed wastewater-discharge region. POM was dominated by the C4 in both rivers. Latent factors of water quality included the DOM, DO, Chl a, NO3-N, and NH4-N in Baitapuhe River, but the latent factors contained DOM, DO, BOD5, and COD in Xihe River. Baitapuhe River was under the aerobic condition, but Xihe River was under the anaerobic condition. PMID:26884238

  15. Dissolved organic carbon in ridge-axis and ridge-flank hydrothermal systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Susan Q.; Butterfield, David A.; Lilley, Marvin D.; Paul Johnson, H.; Hedges, John I.

    2006-08-01

    The circulation of hydrothermal fluid through the upper oceanic crustal reservoir has a large impact on the chemistry of seawater, yet the impact on dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in the ocean has received almost no attention. To determine whether hydrothermal circulation is a source or a sink for DOC in the oceans, we measured DOC concentrations in hydrothermal fluids from several environments. Hydrothermal fluids were collected from high-temperature vents and diffuse, low-temperature vents on the basalt-hosted Juan de Fuca Ridg