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Sample records for chromium oxides

  1. Alkane dehydrogenation over supported chromium oxide catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weckhuysen, B.M.; Schoonheydt, R.A.

    1999-01-01

    The dehydrogenation of alkanes over supported chromium oxide catalysts in the absence of oxygen is of high interest for the industrial production of propene and isobutene. In this review, a critical overview is given of the current knowledge nowadays available about chromium-based dehydrogenation ca

  2. Synthesis and Characterization of Chromium Oxide Nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Vivek Sheel Jaswal; Avnish Kumar Arora; Joginder Singh; Mayank Kinger; Vishnu Dev Gupta

    2014-01-01

    Chromium oxide nanoparticles (NPs)have been rapidly synthesized by precipitation method using ammomia as precipitating agent and are characterized by using X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Thermo Gravimetric Analysis (TGA), UV-Visible absorption (UV), Infrared Spectoscopy (IR), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). XRD studies show that chromium oxide NP is formed as Cr2O3 and it has hexagonal structure. The shape and particle size of the synthesized Cr2O3 NP...

  3. 21 CFR 73.1015 - Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide. 73.1015 Section 73... LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1015 Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide. (a) Identity. The color additive chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide is a blue-green pigment obtained by calcining...

  4. Synthesis and Characterization of Chromium Oxide Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivek Sheel Jaswal

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Chromium oxide nanoparticles (NPshave been rapidly synthesized by precipitation method using ammomia as precipitating agent and are characterized by using X-ray Diffraction (XRD, Thermo Gravimetric Analysis (TGA, UV-Visible absorption (UV, Infrared Spectoscopy (IR, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM. XRD studies show that chromium oxide NP is formed as Cr2O3 and it has hexagonal structure. The shape and particle size of the synthesized Cr2O3 NPs is determined by SEM and TEM. The images showed that the size of NPs of Cr2O3 varied from 20 nm to 70 nm with average crystalline size 45 nm. UV-Visible absorption and IR spectoscopy confirm the formation of nanosized Cr2O3. TGA verifies that the Cr2O3 NPs are thermally stable upto 1000 °C.

  5. Dimensionally Controlled Lithiation of Chromium Oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fister, Tim T. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Hu, Xianyi [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); Esbenshade, Jennifer [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States); Chen, Xiao [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); Wu, Jinsong [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); Dravid, Vinayak [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); Bedzyk, Michael [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); Long, Brandon [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Gewirth, Andrew A. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States); Shi, Bing [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Schlepütz, Christian M. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Fenter, Paul [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-01-12

    Oxide conversion reactions are an alternative approach for high capacity lithium ion batteries but are known to suffer from structural irreversibility associated with the phase separation and reconstitution of reduced metal species and Li2O. In particular, the morphology of the reduced metal species is thought to play a critical role in the electrochemical properties of a conversion material. Here we use a model electrode with alternating layers of chromium and chromium oxide to better understand and control these phase changes in real-time and at molecular length scales. Despite lacking crystallinity at the atomic scale, this superstructure is observed (with X-ray reflectivity, XR) to lithiate and delithiate in a purely one-dimensional manner, preserving the layered structure. The XR data show that the metal layers act as nucleation sites for the reduction of chromium in the conversion reaction. Irreversibility during delithiation is due to the formation of a ternary phase, LiCrO2, which can be further delithiated at higher potentials. The results reveal that the combination of confining lithiation to nanoscale sheets of Li2O and the availability of reaction sites in the metal layers in the layered structure is a strategy for improving the reversibility and mass transport properties that can be used in a wide range of conversion materials.

  6. Femtosecond laser surface structuring and oxidation of chromium thin coatings: Black chromium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Oxidation of the chromium thin film to chromium oxide by femtosecond laser with a fundamental wavelength of 1064 nm. • Solar absorber from chromium oxide that low percentage reflectance. • Femtosecond laser oxidation, with a de-focused laser. • Chromium oxide formation by femtosecond laser in normal ambient. - Abstract: In view of their potential applications as selective solar absorbers, chromium coatings on float glass substrates were nano/micro structured by femtosecond laser in air. Raman and X-rays diffraction investigations confirmed the formation of an ultra-porous α-Cr2O3 layer at the surface; higher is the input laser power, enhanced is the crystallinity of the α-Cr2O3 layer. The α-Cr2O3 layer with the Cr underneath it in addition to the photo-induced porosity acted as a classical ceramic–metal nano-composite making the reflectance to decrease significantly within the spectral range of 190–1100 nm. The average reflectance decreased from 70 to 2%

  7. Femtosecond laser surface structuring and oxidation of chromium thin coatings: Black chromium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotsedi, L., E-mail: Kotsedi@tlabs.ac.za [UNESCO-UNISA Africa Chair in Nanosciences-Nanotechnology, College of Graduate Studies, University of South Africa, Muckleneuk Ridge, P.O. Box 392, Pretoria (South Africa); Nanosciences African Network (NANOAFNET), iThemba LABS-National Research Foundation, 1 Old Faure Road, Somerset West 7129, P.O. Box 722, Somerset West, Western Cape (South Africa); Nuru, Z.Y. [UNESCO-UNISA Africa Chair in Nanosciences-Nanotechnology, College of Graduate Studies, University of South Africa, Muckleneuk Ridge, P.O. Box 392, Pretoria (South Africa); Nanosciences African Network (NANOAFNET), iThemba LABS-National Research Foundation, 1 Old Faure Road, Somerset West 7129, P.O. Box 722, Somerset West, Western Cape (South Africa); Mthunzi, P. [National Laser Centre, Council for Scientific and Industrial Research, 0001 Pretoria (South Africa); Muller, T.F.G. [University of the Western Cape, Physics Department, Bellville, 7535 Cape Town (South Africa); Eaton, S.M. [Physics Department, Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo Da Vinci, 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Julies, B. [University of the Western Cape, Physics Department, Bellville, 7535 Cape Town (South Africa); Manikandan, E. [UNESCO-UNISA Africa Chair in Nanosciences-Nanotechnology, College of Graduate Studies, University of South Africa, Muckleneuk Ridge, P.O. Box 392, Pretoria (South Africa); Nanosciences African Network (NANOAFNET), iThemba LABS-National Research Foundation, 1 Old Faure Road, Somerset West 7129, P.O. Box 722, Somerset West, Western Cape (South Africa); Ramponi, R. [Physics Department, Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo Da Vinci, 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Maaza, M. [UNESCO-UNISA Africa Chair in Nanosciences-Nanotechnology, College of Graduate Studies, University of South Africa, Muckleneuk Ridge, P.O. Box 392, Pretoria (South Africa); Nanosciences African Network (NANOAFNET), iThemba LABS-National Research Foundation, 1 Old Faure Road, Somerset West 7129, P.O. Box 722, Somerset West, Western Cape (South Africa)

    2014-12-01

    Highlights: • Oxidation of the chromium thin film to chromium oxide by femtosecond laser with a fundamental wavelength of 1064 nm. • Solar absorber from chromium oxide that low percentage reflectance. • Femtosecond laser oxidation, with a de-focused laser. • Chromium oxide formation by femtosecond laser in normal ambient. - Abstract: In view of their potential applications as selective solar absorbers, chromium coatings on float glass substrates were nano/micro structured by femtosecond laser in air. Raman and X-rays diffraction investigations confirmed the formation of an ultra-porous α-Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer at the surface; higher is the input laser power, enhanced is the crystallinity of the α-Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer. The α-Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer with the Cr underneath it in addition to the photo-induced porosity acted as a classical ceramic–metal nano-composite making the reflectance to decrease significantly within the spectral range of 190–1100 nm. The average reflectance decreased from 70 to 2%.

  8. Reduction of chromium oxide from slags

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gutiérrez-Paredes, J.

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Experimental and theoretical work were performed to estimate the effect of slag basicity and amount of reducing agents on the reduction of chromium oxide from the slag which interacted with molten steel at 1,600 °C. The slag system contained CaO, MgO, SiO2, CaF2 and Cr2O3 together with Fe-alloys (Fe-Si and Fe-Si-Mg. The CaF2 and MgO contents in the slags were 10 mass % each; Cr2O3 was 25%. The amount of the ferroalloys ranged from 12.5 to 50 g per 100 g of slag. The (CaO+MgO/SiO2 ratio was held at 1 and 2. The Cr yield was determined using both Fe-alloys as reducing agents. Some estimations were made to determine the theoretical effect of temperature, slag basicity, (CaO+MgO/SiO2, and amount of reducing agents in the slag on the chromium recovery. The FACT (Facility for the Analysis of Chemical Thermodynamics computational package is used to determine the equilibrium between the slag and molten steel.

    En el presente trabajo se realiza un estudio teórico y experimental para determinar el efecto de la basicidad de la escoria y la cantidad de agentes reductores sobre la reducción de óxidos de cromo contenidos en la escoria, la cual está en contacto con acero líquido a 1.600 °C. La escoria se prepara con los reactivos CaO, MgO, SiO2, CaF2 y ferroaleaciones (Fe-Si y Fe-Si-Mg. Los contenidos de CaF2 y MgO en la escoria son de 10 %, cada uno, y el de Cr2O3 es 25 %. La cantidad de la ferroaleación varía de 12,5 a 50 g por cada 100 g de escoria. La relación (CaO+MgO/SiO2 tiene los valores de 1 y 2. Se determina la eficiencia de recuperación de cromo empleando los dos tipos de ferroaleaciones. Se realizaron cálculos para determinar el efecto teórico de la temperatura, la basicidad de la escoria, (CaO+MgO/SiO2, y la cantidad de agentes reductores sobre la reducci

  9. Structure and growth of oxide on iron-chromium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several oxides form during the initial stages of oxidation of iron-chromium alloys at 400 to 6000C in CO2-1%CO gas. The nature of the oxidation product depends upon crystallographic orientation and composition of the substrate, and can be explained by considering the maximum solubility of chromium in different oxide phases together with interfacial and strain energy factors. Kinetics of oxidation together with micrographic observations indicate that, as oxidation proceeds spinel oxide M3O4 nucleates at sites on the substrate surface associated with asperities. The spinel nuclei grow laterally and vertically until they coalesce and the scale subsequently thickens according to a parabolic rate law. The duplex structure of scales is interpreted in terms of an outward diffusion of cations together with simultaneous growth of an inner layer in the space created by this outward movement. Scale porosity provides a route for gas-phase transport of oxidant to support the growth of the inner layer. Regularly spaced lamellar voids which may form in the inner layer are believed to be associated with a cyclic vacancy condensation process. Enrichment of the inner layer in chromium is explained by analysis of the possible diffusion path networks in close-packed oxides. Some comments are made concerning possible practical applications of these data. (author)

  10. 21 CFR 73.3110a - Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide. 73.3110a Section... LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Medical Devices § 73.3110a Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide. (a) Identity. The color additive chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide (Pigment Blue 36) (CAS Reg....

  11. The oxidation and reduction of chromium of stainless steels in an eletric arc furnace

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Arh

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The oxidation of chromium during the elaboration of stainless steels occurs with oxygen in solution blown inthe melt and with oxides in the slag. A higher content of silicon in the furnace charge decreases the extent of oxidation of chromium, however, the efficient reduction of chromium from the slag is of essential importance for a minimal loss of chromium. In this survey, the theory of the oxidation of chromium, its reduction from the slag and the conditions for the formation of foaming slag are discussed.

  12. High temperature oxidation of iron-chromium alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mikkelsen, Lars

    2003-06-15

    The high temperature oxidation of the ferritic alloy Fe78Cr22 has been investigated in the present work. The effect of small alloying additions of cerium and/or silicon was also investigated. The alloys were oxidized at 973, 1173 and 1373 K in either air or a hydrogen/argon mixture. The various reaction atmospheres contained between 0.02 and 50% water vapour. The oxide scales formed on the various alloys at 973 K consisted of thin chromia layers. The oxide scales grown on the alloys at 1173 K also consisted of a chromia layer. The microstructure of the chromia scales was found to depend on the reaction atmosphere. The chromia scales grown in hydrogen/argon atmospheres formed oxide whiskers and oxide ridges at the surface of the scales, while the chromia scales grown in air formed larger oxide grains near the surface. This difference in oxide microstructure was due to the vaporization of chromium species from the chromia scales grown in air. Two different growth mechanisms are proposed for the growth of oxide whiskers. The growth rate of the chromia scales was independent of the oxygen activity. This is explained by a growth mechanism of the chromia scales, where the growth is governed by the diffusion of interstitial chromium. The addition of silicon to the iron-chromium alloy resulted in the formation of silica particles beneath the chromia scale. The presence of silicon in the alloy was found to decrease the growth rate of the chromia scale. This is explained by a blocking mechanism, where the silica particles beneath the chromia scale partly block the outwards diffusion of chromium from the alloy to the chromia scale. The addition of cerium to the iron-chromium alloy improved the adhesion of the chromia scale to the alloy and decreased the growth rate of chromia. It was observed that the minimum concentration of cerium in the alloy should be 0.3 at.% in order to observe an effect of the cerium addition. The effect of cerium is explained by the &apos

  13. Recovery of Chromium from Waste Taning Liquors by Magnesium Oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmood M. Barbooti

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available This is a case study of AL-Za’afaraniya tanning factory, 15 km to the south of Baghdad, to spot light on simple chemical treatment of the discharged water to solve the environmental problems associated with its chromium content management. The treatment was extended to the recovery and reuse of chromium. Chromium was precipitated by the addition of magnesium oxide which also aid as a neutralizer for the acidic effluent. The laboratory treatment was carried out to find the optimum conditions. The wastewater samples were taken from the outline area of the tannery. Box-Wilson method was adopted to find useful relationships between the operating variables (temperature, mixing period and magnesium oxide dose and the pH and chromium content of effluent. The experimental data were successfully fitted to second order polynomial mathematical models for the treatment. The most favorable operating conditions for the treatment were: temperature, 30 ºC; mixing period, 50 min and magnesium oxide concentration, 3000 mg/L. On using the optimum conditions a mathematical model simulating the operation for the treatment was obtained as follows:Cr = 6.0848 – 0.001839 X11 – 0.105334 X12 – 0.041038 X13pH = 10.29086 – 0.001223 X11 – 0.140043 X12 – 0.00953 X13Experimentally Cr concentration was decreased to about (0.5 mg/L in wastewater after raising the pH value to (7.35 by adding magnesium oxide.

  14. Evidence of weak ferromagnetism in chromium(III) oxide particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vazquez-Vazquez, Carlos E-mail: qfmatcvv@usc.es; Banobre-Lopez, Manuel; Lopez-Quintela, M.A.; Hueso, L.E.; Rivas, J

    2004-05-01

    The low temperature (4chromium(III) oxide particles have been studied. A clear evidence of the presence of weak ferromagnetism is observed below 250 K. The magnetisation curves as a function of the applied field show coercive fields due to the canted antiferromagnetism of the particles. Around 55 K a maximum is observed in the zero-field-cooled curves; this maximum can be assumed as a blocking temperature, similarly to ultrafine ferromagnetic particles.

  15. Isocyanide and Phosphine Oxide Coordination in Binuclear Chromium Pacman Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Charlotte J; Nichol, Gary S; Arnold, Polly L; Love, Jason B

    2013-12-01

    The new binuclear chromium Pacman complex [Cr2(L)] of the Schiff base pyrrole macrocycle H4L has been synthesized and structurally characterized. Addition of isocyanide, C≡NR (R = xylyl, (t)Bu), or triphenylphosphine oxide donors to [Cr2(L)] gives contrasting chemistry with the formation of the new coordination compounds [Cr2(μ-CNR)(L)], in which the isocyanides bridge the two Cr(II) centers, and [Cr2(OPPh3)2(L)], a Cr(II) phosphine oxide adduct with the ligands exogenous to the cleft.

  16. Study of Chromium Oxide Activities in EAF Slags

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Baijun; Li, Fan; Wang, Hui; Sichen, Du

    2016-02-01

    The activity coefficients of chromium in Cu-Cr melts were determined by equilibrating liquid copper with solid Cr2O3 in CO-CO2 atmosphere. The temperature dependence of the activity coefficients of chromium in Cu-Cr melts could be expressed as lg γ_{Cr}(s)^{0} = { 3 2 5 9( ± 1 8 6} )/T - 0. 5 9( { ± 0. 1} ). Based on the above results, the activities of bivalent and trivalent chromium oxide in some slags at 1873 K (1600 °C) were measured. The slags were equilibrated with Cu-Cr melts under two oxygen partial pressures ( {p_{O}_{ 2} }} } = 6.9 × 10-4 and 1.8 × 10-6 Pa, respectively). The morphology of the quenched slags and the solubility of chromium oxide in the melts were investigated by EPMA, SEM, and XRD. Under both oxygen partial pressures, the slags were saturated by the solid solution MgAl2- x Cr x O4- δ . At the low oxygen partial pressure (1.8 × 10-6 Pa), the content of Cr in the liquid phase varied from 0.4 to 1.6 mass pct with the total Cr content in the slags increasing from 1.3 to 10.8 mass pct. At the high oxygen partial pressure (6.9 × 10-4 Pa), the content of Cr in the liquid phase decreased to the level of 0.2 to 0.6 mass pct. Both the activities of CrO and Cr2O3 in slag were found to increase approximately linearly with the increase of the total Cr content in slag. While the oxygen partial pressure had minor effect on the activity of Cr2O3 in the slag, it had significant effect on the activity of CrO.

  17. Effective bioleaching of chromium in tannery sludge with an enriched sulfur-oxidizing bacterial community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Jing; Gou, Min; Tang, Yue-Qin; Li, Guo-Ying; Sun, Zhao-Yong; Kida, Kenji

    2016-10-01

    In this study, a sulfur-oxidizing community was enriched from activated sludge generated in tannery wastewater treatment plants. Bioleaching of tannery sludge containing 0.9-1.2% chromium was investigated to evaluate the effectiveness of the enriched community, the effect of chromium binding forms on bioleaching efficiency, and the dominant microbes contributing to chromium bioleaching. Sludge samples inoculated with the enriched community presented 79.9-96.8% of chromium leaching efficiencies, much higher than those without the enriched community. High bioleaching efficiencies of over 95% were achieved for chromium in reducible fraction, while 60.9-97.9% were observed for chromium in oxidizable and residual fractions. Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans, the predominant bacteria in the enriched community, played an important role in bioleaching, whereas some indigenous heterotrophic species in sludge might have had a supporting role. The results indicated that A. thiooxidans-dominant enriched microbial community had high chromium bioleaching efficiency, and chromium binding forms affected the bioleaching performance.

  18. Nanotwin hardening in a cubic chromium oxide thin film

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuma Suzuki

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available NaCl-type (B1 chromium oxide (CrO has been expected to have a high hardness value and does not exist as an equilibrium phase. We report a B1-based Cr0.67O thin film with a thickness of 144 nm prepared by pulsed laser deposition as an epitaxial thin film on a MgO single crystal. The thin film contained a number of stacking faults and had a nanotwinned structure composed of B1 with disordered vacancies and corundum structures. The Cr0.67O thin film had a high indentation hardness value of 44 GPa, making it the hardest oxide thin film reported to date.

  19. A metastable chromium carbide powder obtained by carburization of a metastable chromium oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loubiere, S. [Univ. Paul-Sabatier, Toulouse (France). Lab. de Chimie des Materiaux Inorganique; Laurent, C. [Univ. Paul-Sabatier, Toulouse (France). Lab. de Chimie des Materiaux Inorganique; Bonino, J.P. [Univ. Paul-Sabatier, Toulouse (France). Lab. de Chimie des Materiaux Inorganique; Rousset, A. [Univ. Paul-Sabatier, Toulouse (France). Lab. de Chimie des Materiaux Inorganique

    1996-10-15

    A metastable Cr{sub 3}C{sub 2-x} carbide powder is prepared by carburization of a metastable chromium oxide in H{sub 2}-CH{sub 4} atmosphere under the appropriate conditions (temperature, dwell time and CH{sub 4} content). A very high specific surface area (greater than 210 m{sup 2} g{sup -1}) of the starting oxide is necessary to avoid the formation of the sole stable Cr{sub 3}C{sub 2} phase. The transformation from the stable Cr{sub 3}C{sub 2} to the metastable Cr{sub 3}C{sub 2-x} is observed for the first time. The driving force could be an epitaxial effect between Cr{sub 3}C{sub 2-x} and the surrounding graphite layer. This is consistent with the observation that the formation of graphite layers by CH{sub 4} cracking is easier in the Cr{sub 3}C{sub 2-x}-containing powders. (orig.)

  20. Raman spectroscopy of supported chromium oxide catalysts : determination of chromium-oxygen bond distances and bond orders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weckhuysen, B.M.; Wachs, I.E.

    1996-01-01

    An empirical correlation is described for relating Raman stretching frequencies of chromium—oxygen (Cr—O) bonds to their bond lengths in chromium oxide reference compounds. An exponential fit of crystallographically determined Cr—O bond lengths to Cr—O Raman symmetric stretching frequencies (800–130

  1. Ab initio calculation of chromium oxide containing Ti dopant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maldonado, Frank [Grupo de Fisicoquimica de Materiales, Universidad Tecnica Particular de Loja, Apartado 11-01-608, Loja (Ecuador); Novillo, Corina [Escuela de Ingenieria Quimica, Universidad Tecnica Particular de Loja, Apartado 11-01-608, Loja (Ecuador); Stashans, Arvids, E-mail: arvids@utpl.edu.ec [Grupo de Fisicoquimica de Materiales, Universidad Tecnica Particular de Loja, Apartado 11-01-608, Loja (Ecuador)

    2012-01-17

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Microstructure changes in chromium oxide due to the Ti doping. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Discovery of magnetism in Ti-doped {alpha}-Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} crystal. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Explanation of the origin of n-type electrical conductivity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Detailed analysis of electronic properties and density of states. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer As to authors' knowledge, Ti-doped crystal is studied for the first time by the DFT. - Abstract: First-principles computations based on the density functional theory within the generalised gradient approximation and introduced intra-atomic interaction term for strongly correlated electrons (DFT + U method) has been used in this work. Ti impurity doping in the {alpha}-Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} crystal has been carried out considering single defect model within the periodic crystalline structure. Atomic displacements, Bader charges on atoms have been computed showing that Ti dopant converts the chemical bonding in its neighbourhood into more ionic one. The defect-local microstructure is such as there exist general tendency of atomic rearrangements away with respect to the Ti imperfection. It is found that defect incorporation produces some local changes upon the band structure of the material and also induces a metallic state. That implies n-type electrical conductivity in the Ti-doped {alpha}-Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} crystals and relates our work directly to a number of experimental studies in this area. Our results provide evidence over change in magnetic moments in the vicinity of defect, which means that the chromium oxide doped with Ti impurity might not act as an antiferromagnetic substance.

  2. Chromium related degradation of solid oxide fuel cells; Chrom-bezogene Degradation von Festoxid-Brennstoffzellen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neumann, Anita

    2011-05-04

    Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFCs) offer a high potential for application as an auxiliary power unit (APU) for heavy goods vehicles as well as combined heat and power (CHP) systems. SOFCs are especially attractive due to their high efficiencies and the use of different fuel types. However, optimization in terms of long term stability and costs are still necessary. This work characterized the degradation of SOFCs with lanthanum strontium manganite (LSM) cathodes under chromium influence. Galvanostatic cell tests were carried out at 800 C with operation times from 250 - 3000 h and variation of the chromium source and current density. The current densities of j = 0 (A)/(cm{sup 2}), j = 0,3 (A)/(cm{sup 2}) and j = 0,5 (A)/(cm{sup 2}) were applied. The high temperature ferritic alloy Crofer22APU was used as a chromium source. Variation of the chromium source was realized by coating the Crofer22APU insert with the chromium retention layer Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4} and the cathode contact layer LCC10. Cell degradation was analyzed with regard to cell voltage, current density and area specific resistance (ASR). Microstructural alterations of the cathode as well as chromium content and distribution across the cell were investigated after completion of the cell tests. For cells with a chromium source present and operation with a nonzero current density, the course of cell degradation was divided into three phases: a run-in, weak linear degradation and strong linear degradation. A decrease of the chromium release rate by means of different coatings stretched the course of degradation along the timescale. Strong degradation, which is characterized by a significant increase in ASR as well as a decrease of current density at the operating point, was only observed when a chromium source in the setup was comb ined with operation of the cell with a non-zero current density. Operation of the cell with a chromium source but no current density caused a degradation of current density at the

  3. Enhancing collagen stability through nanostructures containing chromium(III) oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangeetha, Selvam; Ramamoorthy, Usha; Sreeram, Kalarical Janardhanan; Nair, Balachandran Unni

    2012-12-01

    Stabilization of collagen for various applications employs chemicals such as aldehydes, metal ions, polyphenols, etc. Stability against enzymatic, thermal and mechanical degradation is required for a range of biomedical applications. The premise of this research is to explore the use of nanoparticles with suitable functionalization/encapsulation to crosslink with collagen, such that the three dimensional architecture had the desired stability. Collagen solution prepared as per standard protocols is treated with chromium(III) oxide nanoparticules encapsulated within a polymeric matrix (polystyrene-block-polyacrylic acid copolymer). Selectivity towards encapsulation was ensured by the reaction in dimethyl sulfoxide, where the PS groups popped out and encapsulated the Cr(2)O(3). Subsequently when immersed in aqueous solution, PAA units popped up to react with functional groups of collagen. The interaction with collagen was monitored through techniques such as CD, FTIR, viscosity measurements, stress analysis. CD studies and FTIR showed no degradation of collagen. Thermal stability was enhanced upon interaction of nanostructures with collagen. Self-assembly of collagen was delayed but not inhibited, indicating a compete binding of the metal oxide encapsulated polymer to collagen. Metal oxide nanoparticles encapsulated within a polymeric matrix could provide thermal and mechanical stability to collagen. The formed fibrils of collagen could serve as ideal material for various smart applications such as slow/sustained drug release. The study is also relevant to the leather industry in that the nanostructures can diffuse through the highly networked collagen fibre bundles in skin matrix easily, thus overcoming the rate limiting step of diffusion. PMID:22766281

  4. Development of Alkaline Oxidative Dissolution Methods for Chromium (III) Compounds Present in Hanford Site Tank Sludges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NN Krot; VP Shilov; AM Fedoseev; NA Budantseva; MV Nikonov; AB Yusov; AYu Garnov; IA Charushnikova; VP Perminov; LN Astafurova; TS Lapitskaya; VI Makarenkov

    1999-07-02

    The high-level radioactive waste sludge in the underground storage tanks at the Hanford Site contains various chromium(III)solid phases. Dissolution and removal of chromium from tank waste sludges is desirable prior to high-level waste vitrification because increased volume is required to incorporate the residual chromium. Unfortunately, dissolution of chromium from the sludge to form Cr(OH){sub 4}{sup {minus}} through treatment with heated NaOH solution (also used to dissolve aluminum phases and metathesize phosphates to sodium salts) generally has been unsuccessful in tests with both simulated and genuine Hanford waste sludges. Oxidative dissolution of the Cr(III) compounds to form soluble chromate has been proposed as an alternative chromium solid phase dissolution method and results of limited prior testing have been reported.

  5. Investigations on the Oxidation of Iron-chromium and Iron-vanadium Molten Alloys

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Haijuan

    2010-01-01

    With the progress of high alloy steelmaking processes, it is essential to minimize the loss of valuable metals, like chromium and vanadium during the decarburization process, from both economic as well as environmental view points. One unique technique to realize this aim, used in the present work, is the decarburization of high alloy steel grades using oxygen with CO2 in order to reduce the partial pressure of oxygen. In the present work, the investigation on the oxidation of iron-chromium a...

  6. Zinc-oxide charge trapping memory cell with ultra-thin chromium-oxide trapping layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazek El-Atab

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available A functional zinc-oxide based SONOS memory cell with ultra-thin chromium oxide trapping layer was fabricated. A 5 nm CrO2 layer is deposited between Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD steps. A threshold voltage (Vt shift of 2.6V was achieved with a 10V programming voltage. Also for a 2V Vt shift, the memory with CrO2 layer has a low programming voltage of 7.2V. Moreover, the deep trapping levels in CrO2 layer allows for additional scaling of the tunnel oxide due to an increase in the retention time. In addition, the structure was simulated using Physics Based TCAD. The results of the simulation fit very well with the experimental results providing an understanding of the charge trapping and tunneling physics.

  7. Activities of chromium oxides in slag in the process of argon-oxygen refining of corrosion-resistant steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On the basis of computer simulation results and available experimental data the behaviour of chromium oxides on stainless steel refining is studied. It is revealed that during melting and argon-oxygen refining of stainless steels chromium oxides occur in the solution if the slag contains not more than 25% (by mass) Cr2O3; this fact generates a need for accounting chromium oxide activity in thermodynamic calculations. An increase of Cr2O3 activity in the slag of this type results in increasing percentage ratio of chromium and carbon in the metal

  8. Influence of promoters and oxidants on propane dehydrogenation over chromium-oxide catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lapidus, A.L.; Agafonov, Yu.A.; Shaporeva, N.Yu.; Trushin, D.V.; Gaidai, N.A.; Nekrasov, N.V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation). N.D. Zelinsky Inst. of Organic Chemistry

    2010-12-30

    Possibilities for increasing the efficiency of supported on SiO{sub 2} chromium-oxide catalysts in propane oxidative dehydrogenation in CO{sub 2} presence are investigated: the introduction of Li, Na, K, Ca in catalysts and the addition of O{sub 2} in the reaction mixture. It was been found that the positive role of K - the increase of the selectivity to propene and stability of catalysts at long-duration tests - appeared at the relation of Cr:K=20. It was shown that the presence of little amount of O{sub 2} (2%) in the reaction mixtures of propane and carbon dioxide resulted in the increase of propene yield and catalyst stability. (orig.)

  9. Opto-electronic properties of chromium doped indium-tin-oxide films deposited at room temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Indium-tin-oxide (ITO) doped chromium films were deposited on Corning 7059 glass prepared by radio frequency (RF) magnetron sputtering under various levels of sputtering power for the chromium target. Experimental results show that the surface roughness slightly decreases by co-sputtering Cr. The pure ITO films deposited at room temperature were amorphous-like. At 15 W of chromium target power, the structure of ITO: Cr film mainly consists of (2 2 2) crystallization plane, with minority of (2 1 1), (4 4 0), (6 6 2) crystallization planes. The carrier concentration of the ITO films increases with increasing the doping of chromium, however the mobility of the carrier decreases. When the sputtering power of the chromium target is at 7.5 W, there has a maximum carrier mobility of 27.3 cm2 V -1 s -1, minimum carrier concentration of 2.47 x 1020 cm-3, and lowest resistivity of 7.32 x 10-4 Ω cm. The transmittance of all the chromium doped ITO films at the 300-800 nm wavelength region in this experiment can reach up to 70-85%. In addition, the blue shift of UV-Vis spectrum is not observed with the increase of carrier concentration

  10. Compact chromium oxide thin film resistors for use in nanoscale quantum circuits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nash, C. R.; Fenton, J. C.; Constantino, N. G. N.; Warburton, P. A. [London Centre for Nanotechnology, UCL, 17–19 Gordon Street, London WC1H 0AH (United Kingdom)

    2014-12-14

    We report on the electrical characterisation of a series of thin amorphous chromium oxide (CrO{sub x}) films, grown by dc sputtering, to evaluate their suitability for use as on-chip resistors in nanoelectronics. By increasing the level of oxygen doping, the room-temperature sheet resistance of the CrO{sub x} films was varied from 28 Ω/◻ to 32.6 kΩ/◻. The variation in resistance with cooling to 4.2 K in liquid helium was investigated; the sheet resistance at 4.2 K varied with composition from 65 Ω/◻ to above 20 GΩ/◻. All of the films measured displayed linear current–voltage characteristics at all measured temperatures. For on-chip devices for quantum phase-slip measurements using niobium–silicon nanowires, interfaces between niobium–silicon and chromium oxide are required. We also characterised the contact resistance for one CrO{sub x} composition at an interface with niobium–silicon. We found that a gold intermediate layer is favourable: the specific contact resistivity of chromium-oxide-to-gold interfaces was 0.14 mΩcm{sup 2}, much lower than the value for direct CrO{sub x} to niobium–silicon contact. We conclude that these chromium oxide films are suitable for use in nanoscale circuits as high-value resistors, with resistivity tunable by oxygen content.

  11. Electron microscopic study on pyrolysis of CCA (chromium, copper and arsenic oxide)-treated wood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hata, T.; Bronsveld, P.M; Vystavel, T.; Kooi, B.J.; de Hosson, J.T.M.; Kakitani, T.; Otono, A.; Imamura, Y.

    2003-01-01

    The effectiveness of pyrolysis as a possible technique for disposing of CCA (chromium, copper and arsenic oxide)-treated wood was studied. A CCA-treated sample given an extra heat treatment at 450 degreesC for 10 min was thoroughly investigated in order to establish the details of the reaction in wh

  12. Chromium VI adsorption on cerium oxide nanoparticles and morphology changes during the process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, suspended cerium oxide nanoparticles stabilized with hexamethylenetetramine were used for the removal of dissolved chromium VI in pure water. Several concentrations of adsorbent and adsorbate were tested, trying to cover a large range of possible real conditions. Results showed that the Freundlich isotherm represented well the adsorption equilibrium reached between nanoparticles and chromium, whereas adsorption kinetics could be modeled by a pseudo-second-order expression. The separation of chromium-cerium nanoparticles from the medium and the desorption of chromium using sodium hydroxide without cerium losses was obtained. Nanoparticles agglomeration and morphological changes during the adsorption-desorption process were observed by TEM. Another remarkable result obtained in this study is the low toxicity in the water treated by nanoparticles measured by the Microtox commercial method. These results can be used to propose this treatment sequence for a clean and simple removal of drinking water or wastewater re-use when a high toxicity heavy metal such as chromium VI is the responsible for water pollution.

  13. Influence of Nanometric Ceria Coating on Oxidation Behavior of Chromium at 900 ℃

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Isothermal and cyclic oxidation behaviors of chromium samples with and without nanometric CeO2 coating were studied at 900 ℃ in air. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and high-resolution electron microscopy (HREM) were used to examine the morphology and microstructure of the oxide film. It was found that ceria coating greatly improved the oxidation resistance of Cr both in isothermal and cyclic oxidizing experiments. Acoustic emission (AE) technique was used in situ to monitor the cracking and spalling of oxide film, and AE signals were analyzed in time-domain and number-domain according to related oxide fracture model. Laser Raman spectrometer was also used to study the stress of oxide film formed on Cr with and without ceria. The improvement in oxidation resistance of chromium is believed mainly due to that ceria greatly reduced the growth speed and grain size of Cr2O3. This fine-grained Cr2O3 oxide film might have better high temperature plasticity and could relieve parts of the compressive stress by means of creeping and maintained ridge character and relatively lower level of internal stress. Meanwhile, ceria application reduced the size and number of interfacial defects, remarkably enhanced the adhesive property of Cr2O3 oxide scale formed on Cr substrate.

  14. Environmental Factors Affecting Chromium-Manganese Oxidation-Reduction Reactions in Soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    D.O.P.TREBIEN; L.BORTOLON; M.J.TEDESCO; C.A.BISSANI; F.A.O.CAMARGO

    2011-01-01

    Disposal of chromium (Cr) hexavalent form, Cr(Ⅵ), in soils as additions in organic fertilizers, liming materials or plant nutrient sources can be dangerous since Cr(Ⅵ) can be highly toxic to plants, animals, and humans. In order to explore soil conditions that lead to Cr(Ⅵ) generation, this study were performed using a Paleudult (Dystic Nitosol) from a region that has a high concentration of tannery operations in the Rio Grande do Sul State, southern Brazil. Three laboratory incubation experiments were carried out to examine the influences of soil moisture content and concentration of cobalt and organic matter additions on soil Cr(Ⅵ) formation and release and manganese (Mn) oxide reduction with a salt of chromium chloride (CrCl3) and tannery sludge as inorganic and organic sources of Cr(Ⅲ), respectively. The amount of Cr(Ⅲ) oxidation depended on the concentration of easily reducible Mn oxides and the oxidation was more intense at the soil water contents in which Mn(Ⅲ/Ⅳ) oxides were more stable. Soluble organic compounds in soil decreased Cr(Ⅵ) formation due to Cr(Ⅲ) complexation. This mechanism also resulted in the decrease in the oxidation of Cr(Ⅲ) due to the tannery sludge additions. Chromium(Ⅲ) oxidation to Cr(Ⅵ) at the solid/solution interface involved the following mechanisms:the formation of a precursor complex on manganese (Mn) oxide surfaces, followed by electron transfer from Cr(Ⅲ) to Mn(Ⅲ or Ⅳ),the formation of a successor complex with Mn(Ⅱ) and Cr(Ⅵ), and the breakdown of the successor complex and release of Mn(Ⅱ) and Cr(Ⅵ) into the soil solution.

  15. A fundamental study of chromium deposition on solid oxide fuel cell cathode materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Michael C.; Kurokawa, Hideto; Jacobson, Craig P.; De Jonghe, Lutgard C.; Visco, Steven J.

    Chromium contamination of metal oxides and SOFC cathode catalysts is studied in the range 700-1000 °C. Samples are exposed to a moist air atmosphere saturated with volatile Cr species in the presence and absence of direct contact between the sample and ferritic stainless steel powder. Chromium contamination of the samples is observed to occur via two separate pathways: surface diffusion from the stainless steel surface and vapor deposition from the atmosphere. Surface diffusion dominates in all cases. Surface diffusion is found to be a significant source of Cr contamination for LSM and LSCF at 700, 800, and 1000 °C. Vapor deposition of Cr onto LSCF was observed at each of these temperatures, but was not observed for LSM at 700 or 800 °C. Comparison of the behavior for LSM, LSCF, and single metal oxides suggests that Mn and Co, respectively, are responsible for the Cr contamination of these catalysts.

  16. Optical and structural properties of chromium impurities in niobium–gallium oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, G.K.B. [Instituto de Física, Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, RJ 20559-900 (Brazil); Departamento de Física, Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, RJ 22453-900 (Brazil); López, A. [Instituto de Física, Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, RJ 20559-900 (Brazil); Carvalho, I.C.S. [Departamento de Física, Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, RJ 22453-900 (Brazil); Nakamura, O. [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal da Bahia, Salvador, BA 40210-340 (Brazil); Cella, N. [Instituto Politécnico, Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, P.O. Box 97282, Nova Friburgo, RJ 28601-970 (Brazil); Sosman, L.P., E-mail: sosman@uerj.br [Instituto de Física, Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, RJ 20559-900 (Brazil)

    2014-12-15

    In this work, the optical properties of the gallium–niobium oxide doped with chromium ions were investigated. The samples were obtained by wet chemical and solid-state methods, investigated by X-ray powder diffraction and the data were refined by Rietveld methods. The morphology was determined by scanning electron microscope (SEM) images. The photoluminescence, excitation and photoacoustic measurements showed broad and intense bands in the red region of the spectrum, associated with energy transitions of chromium ions in octahedral sites. From the optical spectra and using the crystal field theory, the energy parameters were obtained. - Highlights: • Cr{sup 3+} doped niobium–gallium oxides were prepared by solid state reaction and wet chemical method. • We show bands in red region. • Spectra are associated to Cr{sup 3+} ions in octahedral sites.

  17. Stability of Chromium Carbide/Chromium Oxide Based Porous Ceramics in Supercritical Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Ziqiang

    This research was aimed at developing porous ceramics as well as ceramic-metal composites that can be potentially used in Gen-IV supercritical water reactors (SCWR). The research mainly includes two parts: 1) fabricating and engineering the porous ceramics and porous ceramic-metal composite; 2) Evaluating the stability of the porous ceramics in SCW environments. Reactive sintering in carbonaceous environments was used to fabricate porous Cr3C2/Cr2O3-based ceramic. A new process consisting of freeze casting and reactive sintering has also been successfully developed to fabricate highly porous Cr3C 2 ceramics with multiple interconnected pores. Various amounts of cobalt powders were mixed with ceramic oxides in order to modify the porous structure and property of the porous carbide obtained by reactive sintering. The hardness of the M(Cr,Co)7C3-Co composite has been evaluated and rationalized based on the solid solution of cobalt in the ceramic phase, the composite effect of soft Co metal and the porous structure of the ceramic materials. Efforts have also been made in fabricating and evaluating interpenetrating Cr3C2-Cu composites formed by infiltrating liquid copper into porous Cr3C2. The corrosion evaluation mainly focused on assessing the stability of porous Cr3C2 and Cr2O3 under various SCW conditions. The corrosion tests showed that the porous Cr3C 2 is stable in SCW at temperatures below 425°C. However, cracking and disintegrating of the porous Cr3C2 occurred when the SCW temperature increased above 425°C. Mechanisms of the corrosion attack were also investigated. The porous Cr2O3 obtained by oxidizing the porous Cr3C2 was exposed to various SCW environments. It was found that the stability of Cr 2O 3 was dependent on its morphology and the SCW testing conditions. Increasing SCW temperature increased the dissociation rate of the Cr2O 3. Adding proper amount of Y2O3 can increase the stability of the porous Cr2O3 in SCW. It was also concluded that decreasing

  18. Oxidative leaching of chromium from layered double hydroxides: Mechanistic studies

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A V Radha; P Vishnu Kamath

    2004-08-01

    The layered double hydroxide (LDH) of Zn with Cr on treatment with a hypochlorite solution releases chromate ions as a result of oxidative leaching by a dissolution–reprecipitation mechanism. The residue is found to be -Zn(OH)2. The LDH of Mg with Cr on the other hand is resistant to oxidative leaching. In contrast, a X-ray amorphous gel of the coprecipitated hydroxides of Mg and Cr yields chromate ions. These results suggest that the oxidation potential of Cr(III) in LDHs is determined by the nature of the divalent ion and the crystallinity of the phase while being unaffected by the nature of the intercalated anions.

  19. Effect Of Oxidation On Chromium Leaching And Redox Capacity Of Slag-Containing Waste Forms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almond, P. M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Stefanko, D. B. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Langton, C. A. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2013-03-01

    The rate of oxidation is important to the long-term performance of reducing salt waste forms because the solubility of some contaminants, e.g., technetium, is a function of oxidation state. TcO4- in the salt solution is reduced to Tc(IV) and has been shown to react with ingredients in the waste form to precipitate low solubility sulfide and/or oxide phases [Shuh, et al., 1994, Shuh, et al., 2000, Shuh, et al., 2003]. Upon exposure to oxygen, the compounds containing Tc(IV) oxidize to the pertechnetate ion, Tc(VII)O4-, which is very soluble. Consequently the rate of technetium oxidation front advancement into a monolith and the technetium leaching profile as a function of depth from an exposed surface are important to waste form performance and ground water concentration predictions. An approach for measuring contaminant oxidation rate (effective contaminant specific oxidation rate) based on leaching of select contaminants of concern is described in this report. In addition, the relationship between reduction capacity and contaminant oxidation is addressed. Chromate was used as a non-radioactive surrogate for pertechnetate in simulated waste form samples. Depth discrete subsamples were cut from material exposed to Savannah River Site (SRS) field cured conditions. The subsamples were prepared and analyzed for both reduction capacity and chromium leachability. Results from field-cured samples indicate that the depth at which leachable chromium was detected advanced further into the sample exposed for 302 days compared to the sample exposed to air for 118 days (at least 50 mm compared to at least 20 mm). Data for only two exposure time intervals is currently available. Data for additional exposure times are required to develop an equation for the oxidation front progression. Reduction capacity measurements (per the Angus-Glasser method, which is a measurement of the ability of a material to chemically reduce Ce(IV) to Ce

  20. Identification of chromium oxides and other solids in BWR reactor water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioactive solid particles in reactor water may deposit as hot spots on reactor component surfaces, contributing to plant radiation field build-up. Phase identification of these solid particles would improve our understanding about the origins of the 'hot spots' and their behaviour under various water chemistry conditions. Phase identification is also important for the purpose of experimental verification of some thermodynamic calculations that predict thermodynamic stability of certain solid phases in BWR water environments. This paper concerns a transmission electron microscopy study on solid particles that were collected from two Swedish BWRs operated with hydrogen water chemistry. In the samples collected from both reactors, a significant fraction of the total activities came from radionuclide Cr-51. Among various solid particles detected, a significant number of chromium oxide particles were found. From one reactor amorphous chromium oxide particles were detected while from another reactor crystalline Cr2O3 was found. The presence of the metastable amorphous chromium oxide in the coolant suggests that any assumption of achieving thermodynamic equilibrium in the coolant system would not be valid. (author)

  1. High temperature oxidation of chromium with nanometric ceria sol-gel coating

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Isothermal oxidation behavior of chromium with and without nanometric sol-gel CeO2 coating is studied at 1000℃ in air. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) are used to examine the surface morphology and microstructure of their oxide films. It is found that ceria coating greatly improves the anti-oxidation property of chromium. Laser Raman spectrometer and X-ray diffraction spectrometer (XRD) are also used to study the stress level in oxide films formed on ceria-coated and ceria-free Cr. The difference in oxidation behavior is mainly attributed to the fact that ceria greatly reduces the growth speed and grain size of Cr2O3 film, and this fine grain-sized Cr2O3 film probably has better high temperature plasticity, i.e. oxide film can relieve parts of compressive stress by means of creeping. XRD and Raman testing results both show the stress declination due to nano-CeO2 application, and their deviation is analyzed concerning to the rare earth effect.

  2. Ten-Year Comparison of Oxidized Zirconium and Cobalt-Chromium Femoral Components in Total Knee Arthroplasty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roe, Justin; Vioreanu, Mihai; Salmon, Lucy; Waller, Alison; Pinczewski, Leo

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to determine if oxidized zirconium femoral components had better outcomes than cobalt-chromium in vivo at medium and long term and if the use of oxidized zirconium components had clinical adverse effects. Methods: Forty consecutive patients (eighty knees) underwent simultaneous bilateral cruciate-retaining total knee arthroplasty for primary osteoarthritis from January 2002 to December 2003. For each patient, the knees were randomized to receive the oxidized zirconium femoral component, with the contralateral knee receiving the cobalt-chromium component. Outcome measures included the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index, Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score, Knee Society score, and British Orthopaedic Association patient satisfaction scale. Radiographic outcomes include the Knee Society total knee arthroplasty roentgenographic evaluation and scoring system and measurement of radiographic wear. Patients and assessors were blinded to the treatment groups and results. Results: There were no significant differences in clinical, subjective, and radiographic outcomes between the two implants at ten years postoperatively. Ten years following surgery, 36% of the patients preferred the cobalt-chromium knee compared with 11% who preferred the oxidized zirconium knee (p = 0.02) and 53% had no preference. Conclusions: Ten-year outcomes after total knee arthroplasty with oxidized zirconium and cobalt-chromium femoral components showed no significant differences in clinical, subjective, and radiographic outcomes. Patients had no preference or preferred the cobalt chromium prosthesis to the oxidized zirconium prosthesis. There were no adverse effects associated with the use of oxidized zirconium femoral implants.

  3. Dehydrogenation of propane in the presence of carbon dioxide over chromium and gallium oxides catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lapidus, A.L.; Agafonov, Yu.A.; Gaidai, N.A.; Nekrasov, N.V.; Menshova, M.V.; Kunusova, R.M. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation). N.D. Zelinsky Inst. of Organic Chemistry

    2011-07-01

    Effective chromium and gallium oxides supported catalysts were prepared and tested in longduration experiments for propane dehydrogenation in the presence of CO{sub 2}. The optimal concentrations of active metals were found. It was shown that the activity, selectivity and stability of chromium oxides catalysts were higher than these parameters for gallium ones. Mechanism of propane oxidative dehydrogenation was studied over both catalysts using unstationary and spectroscopic methods. The employment of these methods allowed to establish the differences in process mechanism. It was shown that surface hydroxides took participation in propene formation over Cr-catalysts and hydrides - over Ga-ones. Propane and carbon dioxide participated in the reaction from the adsorbed state over both catalysts but they were differed by the adsorption capacity of the reaction components: CO2 was tied more firmly than C{sub 3}H{sub 6} over both catalysts, CO{sub 2} and C{sub 3}H{sub 6} were tied more strongly with Cr-catalysts than with Ga-ones. It was shown that CO{sub 2} took active participation in reverse watergas shift reaction and in oxidation of catalyst surface over chromium oxides catalysts. The main role of CO{sub 2} in propane dehydrogenation over gallium catalysts consisted in a decrease of coke formation. Step-schemes of propene and cracking products formation were proposed on the basis of literature and obtained data: via the redox mechanism over Cr-catalysts and through a heterolytic dissociation reaction pathway over Ga-ones. (orig.)

  4. Nitrogen Impurity Gettering in Oxide Dispersion Ductilized Chromium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brady, Michael P [ORNL; Anderson, Ian M [ORNL; Weaver, Mark [University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa; Meyer III, Harry M [ORNL; Walker, Larry R [ORNL; Miller, Michael K [ORNL; Larson, David James [ORNL; Wright, Ian G [ORNL; Sikka, Vinod K [ORNL; Rar, Andrei [ORNL; Pharr, George Mathews [ORNL; Keiser, James R [ORNL; Walls, Claudia Alexandra [ORNL

    2003-01-01

    Work by Scruggs in the 1960s demonstrated that tensile ductility could be achieved at room temperature in powder metallurgically-produced Cr alloyed with MgO. During consolidation, much of the MgO converted to the MgCr{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinel phase, which was hypothesized to getter nitrogen from the Cr, rendering it ductile. We have duplicated this effect, achieving room temperature tensile elongations of 4% for hot-pressed Cr-6MgO-(0-1)Ti (wt.%) and 10% for hot-pressed and extruded Cr-6MgO-0.75Ti. Direct incorporation of nitrogen into the MgCr{sub 2}O{sub 4} phase was not detected; however, impurities, particularly nitrogen and sulfur, were observed to segregate to and/or precipitate at interfaces between the MgO/MgCr{sub 2}O{sub 4} phases and the Cr matrix. Exploratory studies of other non-spinel forming oxide dispersions (La{sub 2}O{sub 3}, TiO{sub 2} and Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}) showed a similar pattern of impurity segregation/precipitation, suggesting that there is nothing unique about spinel dispersions in Cr with regards to impurities. However, none of these other dispersions resulted in similar levels of tensile elongation.

  5. Removal of trivalent chromium from aqueous solution using aluminum oxide hydroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedemo, Agaje; Chandravanshi, Bhagwan Singh; Zewge, Feleke

    2016-01-01

    Water is second most essential for human being. Contamination of water makes it unsuitable for human consumption. Chromium ion is released to water bodies from various industries having high toxicity which affects the biota life in these waters. In this study aluminum oxide hydroxide was tested for its efficiency to remove trivalent chromium from aqueous solutions through batch mode experiments. Chromium concentrations in aqueous solutions and tannery waste water before and after adsorption experiments were determined using flame atomic absorption spectrometry. The effects of pH, contact time, initial concentration and adsorbent dosage on the adsorption of Cr(III) were studied. The study revealed that more than 99 % removal of Cr(III) was achieved over wide range of initial pH (3-10). The optimum conditions for the removal of Cr(III) were found to be at pH 4-6 with 40 g/L adsorbent dose at 60 min of contact time. The adsorption capacity was assessed using Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms. The equilibrium data at varying adsorbent dose obeyed the two isotherms. The adsorbent was found to be efficient for the removal of Cr(III) from tannery waste effluent. PMID:27547663

  6. Chromium and Ruthenium-Doped Zinc Oxide Thin Films for Propane Sensing Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maximino Avendaño-Alejo

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Chromium and ruthenium-doped zinc oxide (ZnO:Cr and (ZnO:Ru thin solid films were deposited on soda-lime glass substrates by the sol-gel dip-coating method. A 0.6 M solution of zinc acetate dihydrate dissolved in 2-methoxyethanol and monoethanolamine was used as basic solution. Chromium (III acetylacetonate and Ruthenium (III trichloride were used as doping sources. The Ru incorporation and its distribution profile into the films were proved by the SIMS technique. The morphology and structure of the films were studied by SEM microscopy and X-ray diffraction measurements, respectively. The SEM images show porous surfaces covered by small grains with different grain size, depending on the doping element, and the immersions number into the doping solutions. The sensing properties of ZnO:Cr and ZnO:Ru films in a propane (C3H8 atmosphere, as a function of the immersions number in the doping solution, have been studied in the present work. The highest sensitivity values were obtained for films doped from five immersions, 5.8 and 900, for ZnO:Cr and ZnO:Ru films, respectively. In order to evidence the catalytic effect of the chromium (Cr and ruthenium (Ru, the sensing characteristics of undoped ZnO films are reported as well.

  7. Characterization of Physical, Thermal and Structural Properties of Chromium (VI) Oxide Powder: Impact of Biofield Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Trivedi, Mahendra; Branton, Alice; Trivedi, Dahryn; Nayak, Gopal

    2015-01-01

    Chromium (VI) oxide (CrO3) has gained extensive attention due to its versatile physical and chemical properties. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the impact of biofield treatment on physical, thermal and structural properties of CrO3 powder. In this study, CrO3 powder was divided into two parts i.e. control and treatment. Control part was remained as untreated and treated part received Mr. Trivedi’s biofield treatment. Subsequently, control and treated CrO3 samples were char...

  8. Lysozyme adsorption on the colloidal chromium(III) oxide surface: Its impact on the system stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szewczuk-Karpisz, Katarzyna, E-mail: k.szewczuk-karpisz@wp.pl; Wiśniewska, Małgorzata; Myśliwiec, Dawid

    2015-08-30

    Highlights: • Lysozyme adsorption mechanism on the chromium(III) oxide surface was determined. • Surface charge density as well as zeta potential of Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles were measured. • Turbidimetric method was used to estimate the suspension stability. • Depending on the pH value, lysozyme increases or decreases the system stability. - Abstract: This paper describes the lysozyme (LSZ) presence effect on the chromium(III) oxide (Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}) suspension stability. First, the electrokinetic properties of the examined system, i.e. surface charge density and zeta potential of solid particles in the absence and presence of LSZ, were determined. The lysozyme addition reduces the metal oxide surface charge, which may be related to the interaction of the LSZ protonated amino groups with the adsorbent surface moieties. The LSZ macromolecules undergo adsorption on the Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} surface only under electrostatic attraction. At the LSZ concentrations above 50 ppm the macromolecules cover completely the particle surface, which is evidenced by the observed zeta potential values. The LSZ influence on the Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} suspension stability depends on the solution pH value. At pH 3, 4.6 and 7.6, the LSZ addition improves the system stability. In turn, at pH 9 it is associated with the slight suspension destabilization.

  9. Oxidation state of chromium associated with cell surfaces of Shewanella oneidensis during chromate reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neal, Andrew L.; Lowe, Kristine; Daulton, Tyrone L.; Jones-Meehan, Joanne; Little, Brenda J

    2002-12-30

    Employing electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), we demonstrate that in both aerobic and anaerobic culture Shewanella oneidensis cells are capable of chromate reduction. No Cr(VI) or Cr(V) species were identified at the cell surfaces in Cr 2p{sub 3/}ore photoelectron spectra. More chromium was associated with cell surfaces recovered from anaerobic medium than aerobic. Multiplet-splitting models derived for Cr(III) and Cr(IV) were employed to determine contributions from each ion to Cr 2p{sub 3/2} photopeaks collected from the various cell treatments. Whilst in all cases Cr(III) was the major ion associated with cell surfaces, a significant contribution was identified due to Cr(IV) in anaerobically grown cells. The Cr(IV) contribution was far less when cells were grown aerobically. Moreover, when anaerobically grown cells were exposed to oxygen very little re-oxidation of Cr-precipitates occurred, the precipitates were again identified as a mixture of Cr(III) and Cr(IV). A positive relationship was observed between amounts of chromium and phosphorous associated with cell surfaces resulting from the various treatments, suggesting the precipitates included Cr(III)-phosphate. The fact that Cr(IV) remained associated with precipitates following re-oxidation suggests that under anaerobic conditions the intermediate ion is afforded sufficient stability to be incorporated within the precipitate matrix and thus conferred a degree of protection from oxidation.

  10. Conversion of Chromium(III) Propionate to Chromate/dichromate(VI) by the Advanced Oxidation Process. Pretreatment of a Biomimetic Complex for Metal Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Lynn Rodman, D.; Carrington, Nathan A.; Xue, Zi-Ling

    2006-01-01

    The use of H2O2 and UV irradiation to remove organic ligands in a chromium(III) complex for the subsequent chromium analysis is reported. The Advanced Oxidation Process (AOP) using a 5.5-W UV lamp, H2O2 and Fe2+/Fe3+ as catalyst (photo Fenton process) was found to give complete and quantitative Cr(III) → Cr(VI) conversion and removal of ligands in chromium(III) propionate [Cr3O(O2CCH2CH3)6(H2O)3]NO3, a biomimetic chromium species, as subsequent chromium analyses by the 1,5-diphenylcarbazide m...

  11. Amorphous iron–chromium oxide nanoparticles with long-term stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iacob, Mihail [“Petru Poni” Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry, Iasi 700487 (Romania); Institute of Chemistry of ASM, Academiei str. 3, Chisinau 2028, Republic of Moldova (Moldova, Republic of); Cazacu, Maria, E-mail: mcazacu@icmpp.ro [“Petru Poni” Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry, Iasi 700487 (Romania); Turta, Constantin [Institute of Chemistry of ASM, Academiei str. 3, Chisinau 2028, Republic of Moldova (Moldova, Republic of); Doroftei, Florica [“Petru Poni” Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry, Iasi 700487 (Romania); Botko, Martin; Čižmár, Erik; Zeleňáková, Adriana; Feher, Alexander [Institute of Physics, Faculty of Science, P.J. Šafárik University, Park Angelinum 9, SK-04154 Košice (Slovakia)

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • Fe–Cr oxide nanoparticles with pre-established metals ratio were obtained. • The amorphous state and its long-term stability were highlighted by X-ray diffraction. • The average diameter of dried nanoparticles was 3.5 nm, as was estimated by TEM, AFM. • In hexane dispersion, nanoparticles with diameter in the range 2.33–4.85 nm were found. • Superparamagnetic state of NPs co-exists with diamagnetism of the organic layer. - Abstract: Iron–chromium nanoparticles (NPs) were obtained through the thermal decomposition of μ{sub 3}-oxo heterotrinuclear (FeCr{sub 2}O) acetate in the presence of sunflower oil and dodecylamine (DA) as surfactants. The average diameter of the NPs was 3.5 nm, as estimated on the basis of transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy images. Both techniques revealed the formation of roughly approximated spheres with some irregularities and agglomerations in larger spherical assemblies of 50–100 nm. In hexane, NPs with diameters in the 2.33–4.85 nm range are individually dispersed, as emphasized by dynamic light scattering measurements. The amorphous nature of the product was emphasized by X-ray powder diffraction. The study of the magnetic properties shows the presence of superparamagnetic state of iron–chromium oxide NPs and the diamagnetic contribution from DA layer forming a shell of NPs.

  12. The phosphine oxides Cyanex 921 and Cyanex 923 as carriers for facilitated transport of chromium (VI)-chloride aqueous solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alguacil, Francisco José; López-Delgado, Aurora; Alonso, Manuel; Sastre, Ana Maria

    2004-11-01

    The behaviour of the phosphine oxides Cyanex 921 and Cyanex 923 in the facilitated transport of chromium (VI) from chloride solutions is described. Transport is studied as a function of several variables such as stirring speeds of the aqueous phases, membrane phase diluent, hydrochloric acid concentration in the source phase and chromium and carrier concentrations. The separation of chromium (VI) from other metals presented in the source phase as well as the behaviour of phosphine oxides with respect to other neutral organophosphorous derivatives (tri-n-butylphosphate (TBP) and dibutyl butylphosphonate (DBBP)) are also investigated. Moreover, by using hydrazine sulphate in the receiving phase, Cr(VI) is immediately reduced to the less toxic Cr(III).

  13. Chromium poisoning in (La,Sr)MnO3 cathode: Three-dimensional simulation of a solid oxide fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyoshi, Kota; Iwai, Hiroshi; Kishimoto, Masashi; Saito, Motohiro; Yoshida, Hideo

    2016-09-01

    A three-dimensional numerical model of a single solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) considering chromium poisoning on the cathode side has been developed to investigate the evolution of the SOFC performance over long-term operation. The degradation model applied in the simulation describes the loss of the cathode electrochemical activity as a decrease in the active triple-phase boundary (TPB) length. The calculations are conducted for two types of cell: lanthanum strontium manganite (LSM)/yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ)/Ni-YSZ and LSM-YSZ/YSZ/Ni-YSZ. Their electrode microstructures are acquired by imaging with a focused ion beam scanning-electron microscope (FIB-SEM). The simulation results qualitatively reproduce the trends of chromium poisoning reported in the literature. It has been revealed that the performance degradation by chromium is primarily due to an increase in the cathode activation overpotential. In addition, in the LSM-YSZ composite cathode, TPBs in the vicinity of the cathode-electrolyte interface preferentially deteriorate, shifting the active reaction site towards the cathode surface. This also results in an increase in the cathode ohmic loss associated with oxide ion conduction through the YSZ phase. The effects of the cell temperature, the partial pressure of steam at the chromium source, the cathode microstructure, and the cathode thickness on chromium poisoning are also discussed.

  14. Role of Iron Anode Oxidation on Transformation of Chromium by Electrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarahney, Hussam; Mao, Xuhui; Alshawabkeh, Akram N.

    2012-01-01

    The potential for chemical reduction of hexavalent chromium Cr(VI) in contaminated water and formation of a stable precipitate by Zero Valent Iron (ZVI) anode electrolysis is evaluated in separated electrodes system. Oxidation of iron electrodes produces ferrous ions causing the development of a reducing environment in the anolyte, chemical reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) and formation of stable iron-chromium precipitates. Cr(VI) transformation rates are dependent on the applied electric current density. Increasing the electric current increases the transformation rates; however, the process is more efficient under lower volumetric current density (for example 1.5 mA L−1 in this study). The transformation follows a zero order rate that is dependent on the electric current density. Cr(VI) transformation occurs in the anolyte when the electrodes are separated as well as when the electrolytes (anolyte/catholyte) are mixed, as used in electrocoagulation. The study shows that the transformation occurs in the anolyte as a result of ferrous ion formation and the product is a stable Fe15Cr5(OH)60 precipitate. PMID:23284182

  15. Role of Iron Anode Oxidation on Transformation of Chromium by Electrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarahney, Hussam; Mao, Xuhui; Alshawabkeh, Akram N

    2012-12-30

    The potential for chemical reduction of hexavalent chromium Cr(VI) in contaminated water and formation of a stable precipitate by Zero Valent Iron (ZVI) anode electrolysis is evaluated in separated electrodes system. Oxidation of iron electrodes produces ferrous ions causing the development of a reducing environment in the anolyte, chemical reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) and formation of stable iron-chromium precipitates. Cr(VI) transformation rates are dependent on the applied electric current density. Increasing the electric current increases the transformation rates; however, the process is more efficient under lower volumetric current density (for example 1.5 mA L(-1) in this study). The transformation follows a zero order rate that is dependent on the electric current density. Cr(VI) transformation occurs in the anolyte when the electrodes are separated as well as when the electrolytes (anolyte/catholyte) are mixed, as used in electrocoagulation. The study shows that the transformation occurs in the anolyte as a result of ferrous ion formation and the product is a stable Fe(15)Cr(5)(OH)(60) precipitate.

  16. Computer Simulation and Experimental Validation on the Oxidation and Sulfate Corrosion Resistance of Novel Chromium Based High Temperature Alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Shizhong

    2013-02-28

    This report summarizes our recent works of ab initio molecular dynamics inter-atomic potentials development on dilute rare earth element yttrium (Y) etc. doped chromium (Cr) alloy systems, its applications in oxidation and corrosion resistance simulation, and experiment validation on the candidate systems. The simulation methods, experimental validation techniques, achievements already reached, students training, and future improvement are briefly introduced.

  17. Chemical Insight into the Adsorption of Chromium(III) on Iron Oxide/Mesoporous Silica Nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egodawatte, Shani; Datt, Ashish; Burns, Eric A; Larsen, Sarah C

    2015-07-14

    Magnetic iron oxide/mesoporous silica nanocomposites consisting of iron oxide nanoparticles embedded within mesoporous silica (MCM-41) and modified with aminopropyl functional groups were prepared for application to Cr(III) adsorption followed by magnetic recovery of the nanocomposite materials from aqueous solution. The composite materials were extensively characterized using physicochemical techniques, such as powder X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetric and elemental analysis, nitrogen adsorption, and zeta potential measurements. For aqueous Cr(III) at pH 5.4, the iron oxide/mesoporous silica nanocomposite exhibited a superior equilibrium adsorption capacity of 0.71 mmol/g, relative to 0.17 mmol/g for unmodified mesoporous silica. The aminopropyl-functionalized iron oxide/mesoporous silica nanocomposites displayed an equilibrium adsorption capacity of 2.08 mmol/g, the highest adsorption capacity for Cr(III) of all the materials evaluated in this study. Energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) experiments provided insight into the chemical nature of the adsorbed chromium species. PMID:26134074

  18. Mobility of chromium in inorganic oxides, Spectroscopic fingerprinting of oxidation states and coordination environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weckhuysen, B.M.; Schoofs, B.; Schoonheydt, R.A.

    1997-01-01

    The mobility of Crn+ in inorganic oxides has been investigated by combined diffuse reflectance (DR)-EPR spectroscopies as a function of the Cr oxidation state, the type of inorganic oxide (silica, alumina and mordenite) and the environmental conditions (hydrated and dehydrated state). Crn+ ions are

  19. Removal of hexavalent chromium in carbonic acid solution by oxidizing slag discharged from steelmaking process in electric arc furnace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, Seiji; Okazaki, Kohei; Sasano, Junji; Izaki, Masanobu

    2014-02-01

    Hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) is well-known to be a strong oxidizer, and is recognized as a carcinogen. Therefore, it is regulated for drinking water, soil, groundwater and sea by the environmental quality standards all over the world. In this study, it was attempted to remove Cr(VI) ion in a carbonic acid solution by the oxidizing slag that was discharged from the normal steelmaking process in an electric arc furnace. After the addition of the slag into the aqueous solution contained Cr(VI) ion, concentrations of Cr(VI) ion and total chromium (Cr(VI) + trivalent chromium (Cr(III)) ions decreased to lower detection limit of them. Therefore, the used slag could reduce Cr(VI) and fix Cr(III) ion on the slag. While Cr(VI) ion existed in the solution, iron did not dissolve from the slag. From the relation between predicted dissolution amount of iron(II) ion and amount of decrease in Cr(VI) ion, the Cr(VI) ion did not react with iron(II) ion dissolved from the slag. Therefore, Cr(VI) ion was removed by the reductive reaction between Cr(VI) ion and the iron(II) oxide (FeO) in the slag. This reaction progressed on the newly appeared surface of iron(II) oxide due to the dissolution of phase composed of calcium etc., which existed around iron(II) oxide grain in the slag.

  20. Chromium oxide (51Cr2O3 used as biological marker was not absorbed by fish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.Z. Sakita

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the rate absorption of radio-labeled chromium oxide (51Cr2O3, used as biological marker in nutrition studies with Nile tilapia Oreochromis niloticus. An experimental diet with approximately 58 µCi of specific activity of the element was encapsulated and fed daily to 35 adult Nile tilapia; a group of 35 fish was used as control feeding on a basal diet. At the beginning of the experiment five fish from each group were randomly selected and blood samples were drawn from control (BC and experimental fish (BE. Fish were then euthanized by anesthetic overdoses and samples of the liver tissue (LT, renal tissue (RT, stomach without content (S, intestine without content (I, gills tissue (GT, muscle tissue (fillet; MT, visceral fat (VF, content of the digestive tract (CTDE and water aquarium were collected from the experimental fish. The procedure was repeated daily for one week. Simple linear regressions were adjusted - days of collection vs. determination coefficients, and were established for statistical comparisons of the measured activity of 51Cr readings in sampled blood and tissues (logarithmic transformation for samples of the control and experimental fish. No differences (P>0.05 were detected between samples from BC fish and BE, RT, VF, MT and LT of treated fish, but samples of GT, I, S, CTDE and WA from the tanks holding fish which received the experimental diet differed from control (P<0.05. The experimental results indicate that the trivalent chromium in the form of 51Cr2O3 was not significantly absorbed by the gastrointestinal tract, gills or another possible route of absorption under these experimental conditions and with Nile tilapia. Therefore, this marker was shown to be inert and can be safely used in nutrition studies.

  1. Chromium vaporization from mechanically deformed pre-coated interconnects in Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falk-Windisch, Hannes; Sattari, Mohammad; Svensson, Jan-Erik; Froitzheim, Jan

    2015-11-01

    Cathode poisoning, associated with Cr evaporation from interconnect material, is one of the most important degradation mechanisms in Solid Oxide Fuel Cells when Cr2O3-forming steels are used as the interconnect material. Coating these steels with a thin Co layer has proven to decrease Cr vaporization. To reduce production costs, it is suggested that thin metallic PVD coatings be applied to each steel strip before pressing the material into interconnect shape. This process would enable high volume production without the need for an extra post-coating step. However, when the pre-coated material is mechanically deformed, cracks may form and lower the quality of the coating. In the present study, Chromium volatilization is measured in an air-3% H2O environment at 850 °C for 336 h. Three materials coated with 600 nm Co are investigated and compared to an uncoated material. The effect of deformation is investigated on real interconnects. Microscopy observations reveal the presence of cracks in the order of several μm on the deformed pre-coated steel. However, upon exposure, the cracks can heal and form a continuous surface oxide rich in Co and Mn. As an effect of the rapid healing, no increase in Cr vaporization is measured for the pre-coated material.

  2. Oxidative alkaline dissolution of chromium from Hanford tank sludges: Results of FY 98 studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rapko, B.M.

    1998-08-01

    Plans for disposing of the high-level radioactive wastes at the Hanford Site call for retrieving, pretreating, and finally immobilizing the wastes in a glass matrix. Since the cost for vitrifying and disposing of high-level wastes will be very great, pretreatment processes are being developed to reduce their volume. The baseline method for pretreating Hanford tank sludges is caustic leaching. Earlier studies with Hanford tank-sludge simulants and with actual Hanford tank sludges have indicated that treating water-washed and caustic-leached solids with oxidants can significantly increase the removal of Cr. Permanganate and ozone have been shown to be generally the most rapid and effective chemical agents for this purpose. The work described in this report continues to examine the effectiveness of solubilizing additional Cr from Hanford tank wastes by oxidation of the water-insoluble solids from tanks U-108, U-109, and SX-108 under alkaline conditions. The current study confirms that permanganate is highly effective at removing chromium from water solids under alkaline conditions, with Cr removals of up to 99+%. Elemental oxygen can also be highly effective, with removals up to 97+%.

  3. Surface analytical characterization of chromium-stabilized protecting oxide layers on stainless steel referring to activity buildup

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thieme, M.; Scharnweber, D.; Drechsler, L.; Heiser, C.; Adolphi, B.; Weiss, A.

    1992-08-01

    Surface analytical methods were used to characterize both protecting oxide layers formed by hydrothermal chromate treatment (HTCT) on stabilized austenitic stainless steel and hydrothermally grown corrosion product layers (CPL) within the scope of lowering the activity buildup in the primary circuit of nuclear power plants. Morphology, thickness and chromium depth distribution of the layers proved to be considerably different from each other. According to Raman microspectrometry, there were also alterations in the chemical nature of the oxide species. Preceding electropolishing gave rise to particular properties of the respective layers. Prerequisites for an optimal corrosion behaviour of the protecting layers are discussed. Titanium-containing precipitations were oxidatively transformed by HTCT.

  4. The role of intracellular zinc in chromium(VI)-induced oxidative stress, DNA damage and apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudolf, Emil; Cervinka, Miroslav

    2006-09-25

    Several studies have demonstrated that zinc is required for the optimal functioning of the skin. Changes in intracellular zinc concentrations have been associated with both improved protection of skin cells against various noxious factors as well as with increased susceptibility to external stress. Still, little is known about the role of intracellular zinc in hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI))-induced skin injury. To address this question, the effects of zinc deficiency or supplementation on Cr(VI)-induced cytotoxicity, oxidative stress, DNA injury and cell death were investigated in human diploid dermal fibroblasts during 48 h. Zinc levels in fibroblasts were manipulated by pretreatment of cells with 100 microM ZnSO4 and 4 or 25 microM zinc chelator TPEN. Cr(VI) (50, 10 and 1 microM) was found to produce time- and dose-dependent cytotoxicity resulting in oxidative stress, suppression of antioxidant systems and activation of p53-dependent apoptosis which is reported for the first time in this model in relation to environmental Cr(VI). Increased intracellular zinc partially attenuated Cr(VI)-induced cytotoxicity, oxidative stress and apoptosis by enhancing cellular antioxidant systems while inhibiting Cr(VI)-dependent apoptosis by preventing the activation of caspase-3. Decreased intracellular zinc enhanced cytotoxic effects of all the tested Cr(VI) concentrations, leading to rapid loss of cell membrane integrity and nuclear dispersion--hallmarks of necrosis. These new findings suggest that Cr(VI) as a model environmental toxin may damage in deeper regions residing skin fibroblasts whose susceptibility to such toxin depends among others on their intracellular Zn levels. Further investigation of the impact of Zn status on skin cells as well as any other cell populations exposed to Cr(VI) or other heavy metals is warranted.

  5. Effects of chromium and chromium + vitamin C combination on metabolic, oxidative, and fear responses of broilers transported under summer conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perai, A. H.; Kermanshahi, H.; Moghaddam, H. Nassiri; Zarban, A.

    2015-04-01

    A total of 240 female broilers (42 days old) were randomly assigned to four groups with six replicates and fed either a basal diet (two control groups) or a basal diet supplemented with either 1,200 μg Cr+3 from chromium (Cr) methionine/kg (Cr group) or 1,200 μg Cr+3 from Cr methionine plus 800 mg vitamin C (Vit C)/kg of diet (Cr + Vit C group). After 7 days on the dietary treatment, all groups except one of the controls were transported for 3 h under the summer conditions. Performance parameters were not influenced by dietary treatments. The plasma concentrations of insulin, triiodothyronine, triglyceride, and the ratio of triiodothyronine/thyroxin were decreased and the ratio of glucose/insulin was increased due to transport process. Road transportation also increased the plasma concentrations of protein, cholesterol, aspartate aminotransferase, and creatine kinase and decreased the concentration of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol in the Cr + Vit C group. The pretransport concentrations of insulin and triiodothyronine were highest in the Cr + Vit C group. The concentration of phosphorous was lower in the Cr group than that in the other groups after transport. No significant effects of dietary treatments were observed on the other biochemical parameters. Transport increased malondialdehyde concentration in the control group and did not change plasma total antioxidant capacity and erythrocyte glutathione peroxidase activity. Either in combination or alone, Cr increased plasma total antioxidant capacity (before transport P ≤ 0.05, after transport P = 0.07) but did not affect the concentration of malondialdehyde and activity of glutathione peroxidase. The duration of tonic immobility (TI) was similar between nontransported control chicks and transported chicks without any supplements. Pretreatment with Cr + Vit C significantly reduced the duration of TI.

  6. Avoiding chromium transport from stainless steel interconnects into contact layers and oxygen electrodes in intermediate temperature solid oxide electrolysis stacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlupp, Meike V. F.; Kim, Ji Woo; Brevet, Aude; Rado, Cyril; Couturier, Karine; Vogt, Ulrich F.; Lefebvre-Joud, Florence; Züttel, Andreas

    2014-12-01

    We investigated the ability of (La0.8Sr0.2)(Mn0.5Co0.5)O3-δ (LSMC) and La(Ni0.6Fe0.4)O3-δ (LNF) contact coatings to avoid the transport of Cr from steel interconnects to solid oxide electrolysis electrodes, especially to the anode. The transport of chromium from commercial Crofer 22 APU (ThyssenKrupp) and K41X (AISI441, Aperam Isbergues) steels through LSMC and LNF contact coatings into adjacent (La0.8Sr0.2)MnO3-δ (LSM) oxygen electrodes was investigated in an oxygen atmosphere at 700 °C. Chromium concentrations of up to 4 atom% were detected in the contact coatings after thermal treatments for 3000 h, which also lead to the presence of chromium in adjacent LSM electrodes. Introduction of a dense (Co,Mn)3O4 coating between steel and contact coating was necessary to prevent the diffusion of chromium into contact coatings and electrodes and should lead to extended stack performance and lifetime.

  7. Chromium oxide nanoparticle-induced genotoxicity and p53-dependent apoptosis in human lung alveolar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senapati, Violet Aileen; Jain, Abhishek Kumar; Gupta, Govind Sharan; Pandey, Alok Kumar; Dhawan, Alok

    2015-10-01

    Chromium oxide (Cr2 O3 ) nanoparticles (NPs) are being increasingly used as a catalyst for aromatic compound manufacture, abrading agents and as pigments (e.g., Viridian). Owing to increased applications, it is important to study the biological effects of Cr2 O3 NPs on human health. The lung is one of the main exposure routes to nanomaterials; therefore, the present study was designed to determine the genotoxic and apoptotic effect of Cr2 O3 NPs in human lung epithelial cells (A549). The study also elucidated the molecular mechanism of its toxicity. Cr2 O3 NPs led to DNA damage, which was deduced by comet assay and cytokinesis block micronucleus assay. The damage could be mediated by the increased levels of reactive oxygen species. Further, the oxygen species led to a decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential and an increase in the ratio of BAX/Bcl-2 leading to mitochondria-mediated apoptosis induced by Cr2 O3 NPs, which ultimately leads to cell death. Hence, there is a need of regulations to be imposed in NP usage. The study provided insight into the caspase-dependent mechanistic pathway of apoptosis. PMID:26086747

  8. Effect Of Chromium Nicotinate On Oxidative Stability, Chemical Composition And Meat Quality Of Growing-Finishing Pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ondřej Bučko

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The effect of different organic sources of Cr on growth, feed efficiency and carcass value is known but there is a lack of information between chromium nicotinate (CrNic and pork quality. Therefore, purpose of this research was to investigate the effects of CrNic on chemical composition, quality and oxidative stability of pork meat. In the study, pigs of Large White breed (40 pcs were used. The pigs were divided into two groups, namely the control and the experimental of 20 pcs with equal number of barrows and gilts. The pigs were fed the same diet which consisted of three feed mixtures applied at the different growth phases, from 30 - 45 kg OS-03, 45 - 70 kg OS-04 and 70 - 100 kg OS-05. The pigs were allowed ad libitum access to feed and water. The diet of experimental group was supplemented with 0.75 mg.kg-1 CrNic in the form of chromium-inactivated yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The fattening period in pigs lasted from 30 to 100 kg. The chromium supplementation led to a significantly higher content of chromium in longissimus thoracis muscle (LT of experimental pigs. In addition, the results showed a statistically significant difference (p ≤0.05 in retention of chromium in the LT, monounsaturated and omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids content in experimental group compared with control. Moreover, there was highly significant (p £0.05 difference in essential fatty acids, as well as in oxidative stability in 7 days, among the groups. The highly significant differences were also observed among sexes, namely in total water, protein and intramuscular fat contents, colour CIE b* in both times, and oxidative stability. However, physical-technological parameters (pH, drip loss, shear force and meat colour were not affected when pigs were fed the supplement. On the whole, the positive effect of chromium nicotinate in most of investigated parameters may be beneficial not only for pork industry but also for consumers. Normal 0 21 false false false

  9. Influence of Nano-Ceria Sol-Gel Coating on Oxidation Behavior of Chromium at 1 000℃

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIN Hui-ming; ZHOU Xiao-wei; ZHANG Lin-nan

    2009-01-01

    Isothermal oxidation behavior of chromium with and without nanon sol-gel CeO_2 coating is studied at 1 000 ℃ in air. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM)and transmission electron microscopy (TEM)are used to examine the sur-face morphology and mierostructure of the oxide films. It is found that ceria coating greatly improves the anti-oxida-tion property of chromium. Laser Raman spectrometer and X-ray diffraction spectrometer (XRD)are also used to study the stress level in oxide films formed on ceria-coated and ceria-free Cr. Secondary ion mass spectrometer (SIMS)is used to examine Cr, O and Ce element distribution in depth in oxide films. Results show that nano-ceria application greatly reduces the growth speed and grain size of Cr_2O_3 film, and this fine grained Cr_2O_3 film probably has better high temperature plasticity, i.e. , oxide film relieves part of the compressive stress by means of creeping. Meanwhile, CeO_2 changes the oxide film growth mechanism from predominant cation outward diffusion to anion in-ward diffusion. XRD and Raman testing results both show the stress declination effect due to nano-CeO_2 application, and their discrepancy in the rare earth effect is analyzed.

  10. Thermal and Photochemical Reactions of NO2 on a Chromium (III) Oxide Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishino, N.; Finlayson-Pitts, B. J.

    2011-12-01

    Chromium oxide (Cr2O3) is a major component of the oxide layer on stainless steel surfaces. It is also widely used as pigment in paints and roofs and as a protective coating on various surfaces. While many studies have focused on the catalytic activity of Cr2O3 surfaces for selective catalytic reduction (SCR), less attention has been paid to its surface chemistry involving atmospherically important species such as NO2 under atmospheric conditions. In this study, we have investigated thermal and photochemical reactions of NO2 in the presence and the absence of water vapor, using a thin layer of Cr2O3 as a model for the surface of stainless steel as well as other similarly coated surfaces in the boundary layer. A 30 nm thick Cr2O3 film was deposited on a germanium attenuated total reflectance (ATR) crystal, and the changes in the surface species were monitored by Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Upon NO2 adsorption, nitrate (NO3-) ions appeared likely coordinated to Cr3+ ion(s). The NO3- peaks reversibly shifted when water vapor was added, suggesting that NO3- become solvated. Irradiation at 311 nm led to a decrease in NO3- ions under both dry and humid conditions. The major gas-phase species formed by the irradiation was NO under dry conditions, while NO2 was mainly formed in the presence of H2O. Possible mechanisms and the implications for heterogeneous NO2 chemistry in the boundary layer will be discussed. The results will also be compared to similar chemistry on other surfaces.

  11. Fabrication of a novel chromium-iron oxide (Cr2Fe6O12) nanoparticles by thermal treatment method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this research,a novel chromium-iron oxide (Cr2Fe6O12) nanoparticle with rhombohedral symmetry was prepared by a simple thermal treatment method.Heat treatment was conducted using an electric cylinder furnace in an air atmosphere at temperatures between 773 and 923 K, where the produced chromium-ironoxide nanoparticles had different crystallite sizes ranging from 9 to 20 nm. The products were well characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM), X-ray analysis (EDXA), and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). The samples demonstrated a magnetic behavior with unpaired electron spins, which was confirmed by using vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. - Highlights: • An aqueous solution of PVA and metal nitrates consist of Fe (NO3)3·9H2O and Cr (NO3)3·9H2O was prepared at 353 K • The mixed solution was heated at 373 K to evaporate the water and the resulting solid was crushed to powder • The influence of calcination temperature on structure and magnetic properties of a novel chromium-iron oxide (Cr2Fe6O12) nanoparticle was characterized

  12. Reduction of chromium oxides with calcium carbide during thestainless steelmaking process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Arh

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available An efficient reduction of chromium from slag requires an appropriate reduction agent for the given steelmaking technology. The usual slag reduction praxis consists of carbon injections and additions of ferrosilicon and aluminum.Reduction of chromium containing slags with calcium carbide is an appealing alternative. Calcium carbide is a strong reduction agent that unlike ferrosilicon and aluminum also provides the possibility of foaming slag formation.Experimental work regarding chromium slag reduction with calcium carbide towards usual slag reduction praxis is described in this work. The results show that higher reduction rates in the stage of refining period of the melt and higher level of overall chromium reduction from slag can be reached with the blowing of CaC2.

  13. Chromium-Induced Ultrastructural Changes and Oxidative Stress in Roots of Arabidopsis thaliana

    OpenAIRE

    Eleftheriou, Eleftherios P.; Adamakis, Ioannis-Dimosthenis S.; Emmanuel Panteris; Maria Fatsiou

    2015-01-01

    Chromium (Cr) is an abundant heavy metal in nature, toxic to living organisms. As it is widely used in industry and leather tanning, it may accumulate locally at high concentrations, raising concerns for human health hazards. Though Cr effects have extensively been investigated in animals and mammals, in plants they are poorly understood. The present study was then undertaken to determine the ultrastructural malformations induced by hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)], the most toxic form provided a...

  14. Synergy between hexavalent chromium ions and TiO2 nanoparticles inside TUD-1 in the photocatalytic oxidation of propane, a spectroscopic study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdy, Mohamed S.

    2016-02-01

    Siliceous TUD-1 mesoporous material was bi-functionalized by titanium dioxide nanoparticles and hexavalent chromium ions. The synthesis was carried out by one-pot procedure based on sol-gel technique. The photocatalytic performance of the prepared material was evaluated in the oxidation of propane under the illumination of ultraviolet light (wavelength = 360 nm) and monitored by in situ Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The photocatalytic activity of the prepared material exhibited an extra-ordinary activity than the reference samples that contain either hexavalent chromium ions or titanium dioxide nanoparticles only, confirming the true synergy between hexavalent chromium and tetravalent titanium ions of titanium dioxide nanoparticles.

  15. The analytical biochemistry of chromium.

    OpenAIRE

    Katz, S A

    1991-01-01

    The essentiality and carcinogenicity of chromium depend on its chemical form. Oxidation state and solubility are particularly important in determining the biological effects of chromium compounds. For this reason, total chromium measurements are of little value in assessing its nutritional benefits or its toxicological hazards. Aqueous sodium carbonate-sodium hydroxide solutions have been successfully used for extracting hexavalent chromium from a variety of environmental and biological matri...

  16. Enhanced photocatalytic activity of chromium(VI) reduction and EDTA oxidization by photoelectrocatalysis combining cationic exchange membrane processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Chromium(VI) reduction and EDTA oxidization were conducted by photoelectrocatalysis. ► Apply the concept of cationic exchange membrane to enhance the conversion efficiency. ► The optimum TiO2 loading of 1 g/L was observed at acidic pH with current density 4 mA/cm2. ► Transformation pathway of EDTA was determined from analyzed byproducts and molecular orbital package analysis. -- Abstract: A novel technology of photoelectrocatalysis (PEC) combining with cationic exchange membrane (CEM) was proposed for simultaneous reduction of chromium(VI) and oxidization of EDTA. The application of CEM was used to enhance the efficiency for prevention of the re-oxidation of reduced chromium with the electron–hole pairs. In this study, effects of current density, pH, TiO2 dosage, hydraulic retention time (HRT), light intensity and EDTA/Cr(VI) molar ratio were all investigated. The results showed that the optimum conversion efficiency occurred at 4 mA/cm2 with the presence of CEM. Higher conversion efficiencies were observed at lower pH due to the electrostatic attractions between positive charged Ti-OH2+, and negatively charged Cr(VI) and EDTA. The optimum TiO2 loading of 1 g/L was depended mainly on the acidic pH range, especially at higher HRT and irradiation intensity. In addition, higher EDTA/Cr(VI) molar ratio enhanced the reduction efficiency of Cr(VI), indicating EDTA plays the role of hole scavenger in this system. Moreover, incomplete EDTA decomposition contributes to the occurrence of intermediates, including nitrilotriacetic acid, iminodiacetic acid, glycine, oxamic acid, lyoxylic acid, oxalic acid, acetic acid and formic acid, as identified by GC/MS. Consequently, transformation pathway was determined from these analyzed byproducts and molecular orbital package analysis

  17. Enhanced photocatalytic activity of chromium(VI) reduction and EDTA oxidization by photoelectrocatalysis combining cationic exchange membrane processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsu, Hung-Te, E-mail: der11065@hotmail.com [Institute of Environmental Engineering and Management, National Taipei University of Technology, No. 1, Sec. 3, Chung-Hsiao E. Rd., Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Chen, Shiao-Shing, E-mail: f10919@ntut.edu.tw [Institute of Environmental Engineering and Management, National Taipei University of Technology, No. 1, Sec. 3, Chung-Hsiao E. Rd., Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Tang, Yi-Fang, E-mail: sweet39005@hotmail.com [Institute of Environmental Engineering and Management, National Taipei University of Technology, No. 1, Sec. 3, Chung-Hsiao E. Rd., Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Hsi, Hsing-Cheng, E-mail: hchsi@ntut.edu.tw [Institute of Environmental Engineering and Management, National Taipei University of Technology, No. 1, Sec. 3, Chung-Hsiao E. Rd., Taipei 106, Taiwan (China)

    2013-03-15

    Highlights: ► Chromium(VI) reduction and EDTA oxidization were conducted by photoelectrocatalysis. ► Apply the concept of cationic exchange membrane to enhance the conversion efficiency. ► The optimum TiO{sub 2} loading of 1 g/L was observed at acidic pH with current density 4 mA/cm{sup 2}. ► Transformation pathway of EDTA was determined from analyzed byproducts and molecular orbital package analysis. -- Abstract: A novel technology of photoelectrocatalysis (PEC) combining with cationic exchange membrane (CEM) was proposed for simultaneous reduction of chromium(VI) and oxidization of EDTA. The application of CEM was used to enhance the efficiency for prevention of the re-oxidation of reduced chromium with the electron–hole pairs. In this study, effects of current density, pH, TiO{sub 2} dosage, hydraulic retention time (HRT), light intensity and EDTA/Cr(VI) molar ratio were all investigated. The results showed that the optimum conversion efficiency occurred at 4 mA/cm{sup 2} with the presence of CEM. Higher conversion efficiencies were observed at lower pH due to the electrostatic attractions between positive charged Ti-OH{sub 2}{sup +}, and negatively charged Cr(VI) and EDTA. The optimum TiO{sub 2} loading of 1 g/L was depended mainly on the acidic pH range, especially at higher HRT and irradiation intensity. In addition, higher EDTA/Cr(VI) molar ratio enhanced the reduction efficiency of Cr(VI), indicating EDTA plays the role of hole scavenger in this system. Moreover, incomplete EDTA decomposition contributes to the occurrence of intermediates, including nitrilotriacetic acid, iminodiacetic acid, glycine, oxamic acid, lyoxylic acid, oxalic acid, acetic acid and formic acid, as identified by GC/MS. Consequently, transformation pathway was determined from these analyzed byproducts and molecular orbital package analysis.

  18. Vacuum-arc chromium coatings for Zr-1%Nb alloy protection against high-temperature oxidation in air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of vacuum-arc Cr coatings on the alloy E110 resistance to the oxidation in air at temperatures 1020 and 1100 deg C for 3600 s has been investigated. The methods of scanning electron microscope, X-ray analysis and nanoindentation were used to determine the thickness, phase, mechanical properties of coatings and oxide layers. The results show that the chromium coating can effectively protect fuel tubes against high-temperature oxidation in air for one hour. In the coating during oxidation at T = 1100 deg C a Cr2O3 oxide layer of 5 μm thickness is formed preventing further oxygen penetration into the coating, and thus the tube shape is conserved. Under similar test conditions the oxidation of uncoated tubes with formation of a porous monocline oxide of ZrO2 of a thickness more than ≥ 250 μm is observed, then the deformation and cracking of samples occur and the oxide layer breaks away

  19. The properties and transport phenomena in oxide films on iron, nickel, chromium and their alloys in aqueous environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laitinen, T.; Bojinov, M.; Betova, I.; Maekelae, K.; Saario, T. [VTT Manufacturing Technology, Espoo (Finland)

    1999-01-01

    The construction materials used in coolant systems in nuclear power plants become covered with oxide films as a result of exposure to the aqueous environment. The susceptibility of the materials to different forms of corrosion, as well as the extent of the incorporation of radioactive species on the surfaces of the primary circuit, are greatly influenced by the physical and chemical properties of these oxide films. The composition and characteristics of the oxide films in turn depend on the applied water chemistry. This work was undertaken in order to collect and evaluate the present views on the structure and behaviour of oxide films formed on iron- and nickel-based materials in aqueous environments. This survey should serve to recognise the areas in which more understanding and research effort is needed. The review begins with a discussion on the bulk oxides of iron, nickel and chromium, as well as their mixed oxides. In addition to bulk oxides, the structure and properties of oxide films forming on pure iron, nickel and chromium and on iron- and nickel-based engineering alloys are considered. General approaches to model the structure and growth of oxide films on metals are discussed in detail. The specific features of the oxide structures, properties and growth at high temperatures are presented with special focus on the relevance of existing models. Finally, the role of oxide films in localised corrosion, oxide breakdown pitting. Stress corrosion cracking and related phenomena is considered. The films formed on the surfaces of iron- and nickel-based alloys in high-temperature aqueous environments generally comprise two layers, i.e. the so-called duplex structure. The inner part is normally enriched in chromium and has a more compact structure, while the outer part is enriched in iron and has a cracked or porous structure. The information collected clearly indicates the effect of the chemical environment on the properties of oxide films growing on metal surfaces

  20. Thermoelastic properties of chromium oxide Cr2O3 (eskolaite) at high pressures and temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dymshits, Anna M.; Dorogokupets, Peter I.; Sharygin, Igor S.; Litasov, Konstantin D.; Shatskiy, Anton; Rashchenko, Sergey V.; Ohtani, Eiji; Suzuki, Akio; Higo, Yuji

    2016-06-01

    A new synchrotron X-ray diffraction study of chromium oxide Cr2O3 (eskolaite) with the corundum-type structure has been carried out in a Kawai-type multi-anvil apparatus to pressure of 15 GPa and temperatures of 1873 K. Fitting the Birch-Murnaghan equation of state (EoS) with the present data up to 15 GPa yielded: bulk modulus ( K 0, T0), 206 ± 4 GPa; its pressure derivative K'0 ,T , 4.4 ± 0.8; (∂ K 0 ,T /∂ T) = ‒0.037 ± 0.006 GPa K‒1; a = 2.98 ± 0.14 × 10-5 K-1 and b = 0.47 ± 0.28 × 10‒8 K‒2, where α 0, T = a + bT is the volumetric thermal expansion coefficient. The thermal expansion of Cr2O3 was additionally measured at the high-temperature powder diffraction experiment at ambient pressure and α 0, T0 was determined to be 2.95 × 10-5 K-1. The results indicate that coefficient of the thermal expansion calculated from the EoS appeared to be high-precision because it is consistent with the data obtained at 1 atm. However, our results contradict α 0 value suggested by Rigby et al. (Brit Ceram Trans J 45:137-148, 1946) widely used in many physical and geological databases. Fitting the Mie-Grüneisen-Debye EoS with the present ambient and high-pressure data yielded the following parameters: K 0, T0 = 205 ± 3 GPa, K'0, T = 4.0, Grüneisen parameter ( γ 0) = 1.42 ± 0.80, q = 1.82 ± 0.56. The thermoelastic parameters indicate that Cr2O3 undergoes near isotropic compression at room and high temperatures up to 15 GPa. Cr2O3 is shown to be stable in this pressure range and adopts the corundum-type structure. Using obtained thermoelastic parameters, we calculated the reaction boundary of knorringite formation from enstatite and eskolaite. The Clapeyron slope (with {{d}}P/{{d}}T = - 0.014 GPa/K) was found to be consistent with experimental data.

  1. Comparative studies of tri- and hexavalent chromium cytotoxicity and their effects on oxidative state of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zhiwei; Kuang, Xin; Chen, Zhongxiang; Fang, Zhijia; Wang, Song; Shi, Ping

    2014-04-01

    Chromium is a significant mutagen and carcinogen in environment. We compared the effects of tri- and hexavalent chromium on cytotoxicity and oxidative stress in yeast. Cell growth was inhibited by Cr(3+) or Cr(6+), and Cr(6+) significantly increased the lethal rate compared with Cr(3+). Both Cr(3+) and Cr(6+) can enter into the yeast cells. The percent of propidium iodide permeable cells treated with Cr(3+) is almost five times as that treated with the same concentration of Cr(6+). Levels of TBARS, O2 (-), and carbonyl protein were significantly increased in both Cr(6+)- and Cr(3+)-treated cells in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. Moreover, the accumulation of these stress markers in Cr(6+)-treated cells was over the Cr(3+)-treated ones. The decreased GSH level and increased activity of GPx were observed after 300 μM Cr(6+)-exposure compared with the untreated control, whereas there was no other change of GSH content in cells treated with Cr(3+) even at very high concentration. Exposure to both Cr(3+) and Cr(6+) resulted in the decrease of activities of SOD and catalase. Furthermore, the effect of Cr(6+) is stronger than that of Cr(3+). Null mutation sensitivity assay demonstrated that the gsh1 mutant was sensitive to Cr(6+) other than Cr(3+), the apn1 mutant is more sensitive to Cr(6+) than Cr(3+), and the rad1 mutant is sensitive to both Cr(6+) and Cr(3+). Therefore, Cr(3+) can be concluded to inhibit cell growth probably due to the damage of plasma membrane integrality in yeast. Although both tri- and hexavalent chromium can induce cytotoxicity and oxidative stress, the action mode of Cr(3+) is different from that of Cr(6+), and serious membrane damage caused by Cr(3+) is not the direct consequence of the increase of lipid peroxidation. PMID:24306148

  2. Effect of oxidation heat treatment on the bond strength between a ceramic and cast and milled cobalt-chromium alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jieyin; Ye, Xiuhua; Li, Bohua; Liao, Juankun; Zhuang, Peilin; Ye, Jiantao

    2015-08-01

    There is a dearth of dental scientific literature on the effect of different oxidation heat treatments (OHTs) (as surface pretreatments) on the bonding performance of cast and milled cobalt-chromium (CoCr) alloys. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of different OHTs on the bond strength between a ceramic and cast and milled CoCr alloys. Cobalt-chromium metallic specimens were prepared using either a cast or a milled method. Specimens were subjected to four different OHT methods: without OHT; OHT under normal atmospheric pressure; OHT under vacuum; and OHT under vacuum followed by sandblasting. The metal-ceramic bond strength was evaluated using a three-point bending test according to ISO9693. Scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive spectroscopy were used to study the specimens' microstructure and elemental composition. The bond strength was not affected by the CoCr manufacturing method. Oxidation heat treatment performed under normal atmospheric pressure resulted in the highest bond strength. The concentration of oxygen on the alloy surfaces varied with the different pretreatment methods in the following order: OHT under normal atmospheric pressure > OHT under vacuum > without OHT ≈ OHT under vacuum followed by sandblasting. PMID:26104804

  3. Enhanced photocatalytic activity of chromium(VI) reduction and EDTA oxidization by photoelectrocatalysis combining cationic exchange membrane processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Hung-Te; Chen, Shiao-Shing; Tang, Yi-Fang; Hsi, Hsing-Cheng

    2013-03-15

    A novel technology of photoelectrocatalysis (PEC) combining with cationic exchange membrane (CEM) was proposed for simultaneous reduction of chromium(VI) and oxidization of EDTA. The application of CEM was used to enhance the efficiency for prevention of the re-oxidation of reduced chromium with the electron-hole pairs. In this study, effects of current density, pH, TiO2 dosage, hydraulic retention time (HRT), light intensity and EDTA/Cr(VI) molar ratio were all investigated. The results showed that the optimum conversion efficiency occurred at 4mA/cm(2) with the presence of CEM. Higher conversion efficiencies were observed at lower pH due to the electrostatic attractions between positive charged TiOH2(+), and negatively charged Cr(VI) and EDTA. The optimum TiO2 loading of 1g/L was depended mainly on the acidic pH range, especially at higher HRT and irradiation intensity. In addition, higher EDTA/Cr(VI) molar ratio enhanced the reduction efficiency of Cr(VI), indicating EDTA plays the role of hole scavenger in this system. Moreover, incomplete EDTA decomposition contributes to the occurrence of intermediates, including nitrilotriacetic acid, iminodiacetic acid, glycine, oxamic acid, lyoxylic acid, oxalic acid, acetic acid and formic acid, as identified by GC/MS. Consequently, transformation pathway was determined from these analyzed byproducts and molecular orbital package analysis. PMID:23380448

  4. Oxidative Stress and Antimicrobial Activity of Chromium(III and Ruthenium(II Complexes on Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulina L. Páez

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of antibiotic resistance has resulted in the need for new approaches to be developed to combat previously easily treatable infections. The main aim of this work was to establish the potential of the synthetic α-diimine chromium(III and ruthenium(II complexes (where the α-diimine ligands are bpy = 2,2-bipyridine, phen = 1,10-phenanthroline, and dppz = dipyrido[3,2-a:2′,3′-c]-phenazine like [Cr(phen3]3+, [Cr(phen2(dppz]3+, [Ru(phen3]2+, and [Ru(bpy3]2+ as antibacterial agents by generating oxidative stress. The [Cr(phen3]3+ and [Cr(phen2(dppz]3+ complexes showed activity against Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria with minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs ranging from 0.125 μg/mL to 1 μg/mL, while [Ru(phen3]2+ and [Ru(bpy3]2+ do not exhibit antimicrobial activity against the two bacterial genera studied at the concentration range used. When ciprofloxacin was combined with [Cr(phen3]3+ for the inhibition of Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli, an important synergistic effect was observed, FIC 0.066 for S. aureus and FIC 0.064 for E. coli. The work described here shows that chromium(III complexes are bactericidal for S. aureus and E. coli. Our results indicate that α-diimine chromium(III complexes may be interesting to open new paths for metallodrug chemotherapy against different bacterial genera since some of these complexes have been found to exhibit remarkable antibacterial activities.

  5. Stability of phosphonic self assembled monolayers (SAMs) on cobalt chromium (Co-Cr) alloy under oxidative conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhure, Rahul; Abdel-Fattah, Tarek M.; Bonner, Carl; Hall, Felicia; Mahapatro, Anil

    2011-04-01

    Cobalt chromium (Co-Cr) alloys have been widely used in the biomedical arena for cardiovascular, orthopedic and dental applications. Surface modification of the alloy allows us to tailor the interfacial properties to address critical challenges of Co-Cr alloy in medical applications. Self assembled monolayers (SAMs) of Octadecylphosphonic acid (ODPA) have been used to form thin films on the oxide layer of the Co-Cr alloy surface by solution deposition technique. The SAMs formed were investigated for their stability to oxidative conditions of ambient laboratory environment over periods of 1, 3, 7 and 14 days. The samples were then characterized for their stability using X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and contact angle measurements. Detailed high energy XPS elemental scans confirmed the presence of the phosphonic monolayer after oxidative exposure which suggested that the SAMs were firmly attached to the oxide layer of Co-Cr alloy. AFM images gave topographical data of the surface and showed islands of SAMs on Co-Cr alloy surface, before and after SAM formation and also over the duration of the oxidative exposure. Contact angle measurements confirmed the hydrophobicity of the surface over 14 days. Thus the SAMs were found to be stable for the duration of the study. These SAMs could be subsequently tailored by modifying the terminal functional groups and could be used for various potential biomedical applications such as drug delivery, biocompatibility and tissue integration.

  6. Investigation of iron-chromium-niobium-titanium ferritic stainless steel for solid oxide fuel cell interconnect applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhenguo; Xia, Guan-Guang; Wang, Chong-Min; Nie, Zimin; Templeton, Joshua; Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Singh, Prabhakar

    As part of an effort to develop cost-effective ferritic stainless steel-based interconnects for solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) stacks, both bare AISI441 and AISI441 coated with (Mn,Co) 3O 4 protection layers were studied in terms of its metallurgical characteristics, oxidation behavior, and electrical performance. The addition of minor alloying elements, in particular Nb, led to formation of Laves phases both inside grains and along grain boundaries. In particular, the Laves phase which precipitated out along grain boundaries during exposure at intermediate SOFC operating temperatures was found to be rich in both Nb and Si. The capture of Si in the Laves phase minimized the Si activity in the alloy matrix and prevented formation of an insulating silica layer at the scale/metal interface, resulting in a reduction in area-specific electrical resistance (ASR). However, the relatively high oxidation rate of the steel, which leads to increasing ASR over time, and the need to prevent volatilization of chromium from the steel necessitates the application of a conductive protection layer on the steel. In particular, the application of a Mn 1.5Co 1.5O 4 spinel protection layer substantially improved the electrical performance of the 441 by reducing the oxidation rate.

  7. Application of Fe-Cu binary oxide nanoparticles for the removal of hexavalent chromium from aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Saif Ullah; Zaidi, Rumman; Hassan, Saeikh Z; Farooqi, I H; Azam, Ameer

    2016-01-01

    The adsorption process has been used as an effective technique for the removal of metal ions from aqueous solutions. Groundwater remediation by nanoparticles has received interest in recent years. In the present study, a binary metal oxide of Fe-Cu was prepared and used for the removal of hexavalent chromium from aqueous solution. Batch experiments were performed to investigate the effects of initial Cr (VI) concentration, dose of adsorbent, and pH of solution on the removal efficiency of Cr (VI). The prepared nanostructured Fe-Cu binary oxides were able to reduce the concentration of Cr (VI) in aqueous solution. Binary metal oxides nanoparticle exhibited an outstanding ability to remove Cr (VI) due to high surface area, low particle size, and high inherent activity. The percentage removal efficiency of Cr (VI) increased with nanoparticles doses (0.1 g L(-1)-2.5 g L(-1)), whereas it decreased with initial Cr (VI) concentration (1 mg L(-1)-25 mg L(-1)) and with pH (3-9). The Freundlich model was found to be the better fit for adsorption isotherm. The prepared nanomaterial was characterized using powder X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and ultraviolet (UV)-visible spectroscopy. It showed that the Fe-Cu binary oxides were formed in single phase. SEM micrograph showed aggregates with many nano-sized particles. UV-visible spectroscopy showed quantum confinement effect. PMID:27386994

  8. The prospective protective effect of selenium nanoparticles against chromium-induced oxidative and cellular damage in rat thyroid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassanin KMA

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Kamel MA Hassanin,1 Samraa H Abd El-Kawi,2 Khalid S Hashem1 1Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, 2Department of Histology, Faculty of Medicine, Beni-Suef University, Beni-Suef, Egypt Background: Nanotechnology has enabled researchers to synthesize nanosize particles that possess increased surface areas. Compared to conventional microparticles, it has resulted in increased interactions with biological targets. Objective: The objective of this study was to determine the protective ability of selenium nanoparticles against hexavalent chromium-induced thyrotoxicity. Design: Twenty male rats were used in the study, and arbitrarily assigned to four groups. Group 1 was the control group, and was given phosphate-buffered saline. Group 2 was the chromium-treated group and was given K2Cr2O7 60 µg/kg body weight intraperitoneally as a single dose on the third day of administration. Group 3 was the nano-selenium-treated group and was given selenium nanoparticles (size 3–20 nm 0.5 mg/kg body weight intraperitoneally daily for 5 consecutive days. Group 4 was the nano-selenium chromium-treated group, which received selenium nanoparticles for 5 days and a single dose of K2Cr2O7 on the third day of administration. Materials and methods: Blood samples were collected from rats for measuring thyroid hormones (free triiodothyronine [T3] and free thyroxine [T4] and oxidative and antioxidant parameters (malondialdehyde [MDA], reduced glutathione [GSH], catalase, and superoxide dismutase [SOD]. Upon dissection, thyroid glands were taken for histopathological examination by using paraffin preparations stained with hematoxylin and eosin (H&E and Masson’s trichrome. Immunohistochemical staining was performed for detecting cellular proliferation using Ki67 antibodies. Results: The present study shows that K2Cr2O7 has a toxic effect on the thyroid gland as a result of inducing a marked oxidative damage and release of reactive oxygen species

  9. Radiometric and spectrophotometric studies of the behavior of chromium(VI) oxide in concentrated perchloric acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pezzin, S.H.; Collins, C.H.; Collins, K.E. [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica; Archundia, C. [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico City (Mexico). Inst. de Ciencias Nucleares

    1997-11-01

    A study of the behavior of {sup 51}CrO{sub 3} in 70% HClO{sub 4} over the temperature range from 20 to 194 C by means of Cr-51 labelling, UV-VIS spectrophotometry and ion exchange chromatography, shows that the solubility of {sup 51}CrO{sub 3} depends on a competition between the dissolution process and the acid reduction of solution phase Cr(VI). These processes occur simultaneously and are dependent on both the temperature and the concentration of Cr(VI), as shown by comparison between radiometric measurements (where total chromium can be accurately determined) and spectrophotometric measurements (where only the Cr(VI) is detectable at the wavelengths studied). These conclusions are confirmed by PbCrO{sub 4} precipitation of {sup 51}Cr(VI), where at 194 C, 97% of the total chromium appears as Pb{sup 51}CrO{sub 4} while at 86 C only 5% does. Cation exchange chromatography of the solution after brief contact of {sup 51}CrO{sub 3} with concentrated HClO{sub 4} at 20 C shows only traces of {sup 51}Cr(VI), most of the radioactivity eluting as {sup 51}Cr(H{sub 2}O){sup 3+}{sub 6}, with smaller amounts of species with +2 and +1 charges. These results imply serious limitations to the spectrophotometric determination of low concentrations of total chromium in alloys or in biological material which use dissolution in 70% HClO{sub 4} as a primary analytical step. (orig.)

  10. The effect of chromium oxide on the properties of simulated nuclear waste glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vojtech, O.; Sussmilch, J.; Urbanec, Z. [and others

    1996-02-01

    A study of the effect of chromium on the properties of selected glasses was performed in the frame of a Contract between Battelle, Pacific Northwest Laboratories and Nuclear Research Institute, ReZ. In the period from July 1994 to June 1995 two borosilicate glasses of special composition were prepared according to the PNL procedure and their physical and structural characteristics of glasses were studied. This Final Report contains a vast documentation on the properties of all glasses studied. For the preparation of the respective technology more detailed study of physico-chemical properties and crystallinity of investigated systems would be desirable.

  11. Structure, magnetism, and dissociation energy of small bimetallic cobalt-chromium oxide cluster cations: A density-functional-theory study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Hung Tan; Cuong, Ngo Tuan; Tam, Nguyen Minh; Lam, Vu Dinh; Tung, Nguyen Thanh

    2016-01-01

    We study CoxCryOm+ (x + y = 2, 3 and 1 ≤ m ≤ 4) clusters by means of density-functional-theory calculations. It is found that the clusters grow preferentially through maximizing the number of metal-oxygen bonds with a favor on Cr sites. The size- and composition-dependent magnetic behavior is discussed in relation with the local atomic magnetic moments. While doped species show an oscillatory magnetic behavior, the total magnetic moment of pure cobalt and chromium oxide clusters tends to enhance or reduce as increasing the oxygen content, respectively. The dissociation energies for different evaporation channels are also calculated to suggest the stable patterns, as fingerprints for future photofragmentation experiments.

  12. Examination of zinc oxide, copper chromium oxide, and copper scandium oxide properties for use in transparent electronics and chemical sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadik, Patrick

    Greater progress in the field of TCO (transparent oxide semiconductor) research has been hampered by a lack of availability of p-type candidates. Though the n-type TCO's are well documented and easily produced only one well documented oxide has spurred continued efforts at producing robust, p-type behavior, namely ZnO. Though p-ZnO has been produced, a coterminous research effort into improving the film qualities of lesser known naturally p-type TCO's could prove fruitful. Thus, this research has examined the thin film properties of two delafossites, CuCr1-xMgxO 2 and CuSc1-xMgxO2 as well as the surface properties of ZnO. The delafossites, CuCr1-xMgxO2 and CuSc 1-xMgxO2 have been shown to have the superlative properties of high conductivities (220 S cm-1 and 70 S cm-1) and high transparencies in 400 nm thick films of ˜40% and ˜80% throughout the visible spectrum. We have also been the first to describe a near band edge photo-luminescence in CuSc1-x MgxO2 for 0.00spinel interface. We have found that a strategy of using a CuCr1-xMgxO 2/CuSc1-xMgxO2/ZnO on c-Al2O 3 in two ways may allow the growth of either a buffer/p/n or a p/i/n structure. Specifically, growing CuCrO2 at 700°C as a 100 nm nucleation layer followed by a 750°C growth of CuSc1-xMg xO2 and a 400°C growth of ZnO secures an epitaxial growth for the entire structure despite large lattice mismatches between c-Al2O3/CuCrO2 (8.7%) and CuCrO 2/CuScO2 (7.7%). This combined research takes the first steps in making robust pn-heterojunctions possible. Also, in an effort to progress an understanding of the surface chemistry of ZnO we provide results showing marked difference in the chemisorptions of dodecane thiol upon Zn- and O-terminated faces of ZnO.

  13. Insights into synergistic effect of chromium oxides and ceria supported on Ti-PILC for NO oxidation and their surface species study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhong, Lei [School of Environmental and Biological Engineering, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210094 (China); Nanjing AIREP Environmental Protection Technology Co., Ltd., Nanjing, Jiangsu 210091 (China); Cai, Wei; Yu, Yang [School of Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210094 (China); Nanjing AIREP Environmental Protection Technology Co., Ltd., Nanjing, Jiangsu 210091 (China); Zhong, Qin, E-mail: zq304@mail.njust.edu.cn [School of Environmental and Biological Engineering, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210094 (China); School of Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210094 (China); Nanjing AIREP Environmental Protection Technology Co., Ltd., Nanjing, Jiangsu 210091 (China)

    2015-01-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Synergistic effect between CrO{sub x} and ceria supported on TP were studied for NO oxidation. • TPD results indicated NO and O{sub 2} were activated by CrO{sub x} and ceria, respectively. • H{sub 2}-TPR analysis suggested that CrO{sub x} undertook the main function in catalysis. • The nature and stability of surface-bound species were investigated by in situ DRIFTS. - Abstract: The insights of synergistic effect between chromium oxides and ceria supported on Ti-PILC were studied for NO oxidation. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of chromium oxides and ceria and their synergistic effect in textural properties, redox performance and surface species over the Cr{sub 1−x}Ce{sub x}/TP catalysts. These catalysts were investigated in detail by means of Brunauer–Emmertt–Teller (BET) surface area analysis, X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscope (TEM), temperature-programmed reduction of H{sub 2} (H{sub 2}-TPR), temperature-programmed desorption (NO-TPD, O{sub 2}-TPD), photoluminescence spectra (PL), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and in situ diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (in situ DRIFTS). It has been found that CrO{sub x} were beneficial to adsorb and activate NO to form NO{sup +} and then generate nitrates while ceria were inclined to activate O{sub 2} via oxygen vacancies to produce nitrates. Besides, the results of in situ DRIFTS further demonstrated that surface species were associated with not only reaction atmosphere but also reaction temperature. Hence, a possible reaction model was tentatively proposed.

  14. Preparation of Chromium Oxide Coatings on Aluminum Borate Whiskers by a Hydrothermal Deposition Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Aluminum borate whiskers (9Al2O32B2O3) can be used to reinforce aluminum alloys to produce light and strong composites. However, the adverse interfacial reactions between the whiskers and the aluminum alloys inhibit their practical uses; therefore, a protective coating is needed on whiskers. In this work, aluminum borate whiskers were coated with chromium-coating deposits in a hydrothermal solution containing CrCl3, Na2C4H4O6, NaPH2O2, and H3BO3. The presence of the impurity P in the hydrothermal deposits can be avoided by reducing the amount of NaPH2O2 in the coating solution. Thermodynamic analysis was used to discuss the behavior of ions in the coating process. The subsequent heating of the hydrothermal products in air at 800 ℃ yielded smooth Cr2O3 films with a thickness of 0.060.07 μm.

  15. Chromium-Induced Ultrastructural Changes and Oxidative Stress in Roots of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eleftheriou, Eleftherios P; Adamakis, Ioannis-Dimosthenis S; Panteris, Emmanuel; Fatsiou, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Chromium (Cr) is an abundant heavy metal in nature, toxic to living organisms. As it is widely used in industry and leather tanning, it may accumulate locally at high concentrations, raising concerns for human health hazards. Though Cr effects have extensively been investigated in animals and mammals, in plants they are poorly understood. The present study was then undertaken to determine the ultrastructural malformations induced by hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)], the most toxic form provided as 100 μM potassium dichromate (K2Cr2O7), in the root tip cells of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. A concentration-dependent decrease of root growth and a time-dependent increase of dead cells, callose deposition, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) production and peroxidase activity were found in Cr(VI)-treated seedlings, mostly at the transition root zone. In the same zone, nuclei remained ultrastructurally unaffected, but in the meristematic zone some nuclei displayed bulbous outgrowths or contained tubular structures. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) was less affected under Cr(VI) stress, but Golgi bodies appeared severely disintegrated. Moreover, mitochondria and plastids became spherical and displayed translucent stroma with diminished internal membranes, but noteworthy is that their double-membrane envelopes remained structurally intact. Starch grains and electron dense deposits occurred in the plastids. Amorphous material was also deposited in the cell walls, the middle lamella and the vacuoles. Some vacuoles were collapsed, but the tonoplast appeared integral. The plasma membrane was structurally unaffected and the cytoplasm contained opaque lipid droplets and dense electron deposits. All electron dense deposits presumably consisted of Cr that is sequestered from sensitive sites, thus contributing to metal tolerance. It is concluded that the ultrastructural changes are reactive oxygen species (ROS)-correlated and the malformations observed are organelle specific. PMID:26204828

  16. Chromium-Induced Ultrastructural Changes and Oxidative Stress in Roots of Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleftherios P. Eleftheriou

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Chromium (Cr is an abundant heavy metal in nature, toxic to living organisms. As it is widely used in industry and leather tanning, it may accumulate locally at high concentrations, raising concerns for human health hazards. Though Cr effects have extensively been investigated in animals and mammals, in plants they are poorly understood. The present study was then undertaken to determine the ultrastructural malformations induced by hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI], the most toxic form provided as 100 μM potassium dichromate (K2Cr2O7, in the root tip cells of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. A concentration-dependent decrease of root growth and a time-dependent increase of dead cells, callose deposition, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 production and peroxidase activity were found in Cr(VI-treated seedlings, mostly at the transition root zone. In the same zone, nuclei remained ultrastructurally unaffected, but in the meristematic zone some nuclei displayed bulbous outgrowths or contained tubular structures. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER was less affected under Cr(VI stress, but Golgi bodies appeared severely disintegrated. Moreover, mitochondria and plastids became spherical and displayed translucent stroma with diminished internal membranes, but noteworthy is that their double-membrane envelopes remained structurally intact. Starch grains and electron dense deposits occurred in the plastids. Amorphous material was also deposited in the cell walls, the middle lamella and the vacuoles. Some vacuoles were collapsed, but the tonoplast appeared integral. The plasma membrane was structurally unaffected and the cytoplasm contained opaque lipid droplets and dense electron deposits. All electron dense deposits presumably consisted of Cr that is sequestered from sensitive sites, thus contributing to metal tolerance. It is concluded that the ultrastructural changes are reactive oxygen species (ROS-correlated and the malformations observed are organelle specific.

  17. Investigation of the weldability of iron-aluminum-chromium overlay coatings for corrosion protection in oxidizing/sulfidizing environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regina, Jonathan R.

    The current study investigated the effect of chromium additions on the hydrogen cracking susceptibility of Fe-Al weld overlay claddings containing chromium additions. It was found that the weldability of FeAlCr claddings was a function of both the aluminum and chromium concentrations of the weld coatings. Weld overlay compositions that were not susceptible to hydrogen cracking were identified and the underlying mechanism behind the hydrogen cracking phenomenon was investigated further. It was concluded that the cracking behavior of the FeAlCr welds depended strongly on the microstructure of the weld fusion zone. Although it was found that the cracking susceptibility was influenced by the presence of Fe-Al intermetallic phases (namely Fe3 Al and FeAl), the cracking behavior of FeAlCr weld overlay claddings also depended on the size and distribution of carbide and oxide particles present within the weld structure. These particles acted as hydrogen trapping sites, which are areas where free hydrogen segregates and can no longer contribute to the hydrogen embrittlement of the metal. It was determined that in practical applications of these FeAlCr weld overlay coatings, carbon should be present within these welds to reduce the amount of hydrogen available for hydrogen cracking. Based on the weldability results of the FeAlCr weld claddings, coating compositions that were able to be deposited crack-free were used for long-term corrosion testing in a simulated low NOx environment. These alloys were compared to a Ni-based superalloy (622), which is commonly utilized as boiler tube coatings in power plant furnaces for corrosion protection. It was found that the FeAlCr alloys demonstrated superior corrosion resistance when compared to the Ni-based superalloy. Due to the excellent long-term corrosion behavior of FeAlCr weld overlays that were immune to hydrogen cracking, it was concluded that select FeAlCr weld overlay compositions would make excellent corrosion resistant

  18. Dehydrogenation of propane in the presence of CO{sub 2} over polyacid chromium oxide catalysts modified by Mo, W and Mn

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lapidus, A.L.; Agafonov, Yu.A.; Gaidai, N.A.; Nekrasov, N.V.; Davydov, P.E. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation). N.D. Zelinsky Institute of Organic Chemistry

    2013-11-01

    Effective chromium oxide catalysts without additions and with addition of Mo, W and Mn were prepared and tested in long-duration experiments for propane dehydrogenation in the presence of CO{sub 2}. The optimal concentrations of metals were found. It was shown that the best combination of acid-base and redox properties necessary for a decrease of aggregation of chromium-oxide particles was observed over the following catalyst: (3.0 wt.%Cr-1.5 wt.% Mn)/SiO{sub 2}. This catalyst worked stably in durable tests (500 h). Mechanism of propane oxidative dehydrogenation was studied using unstationary response method. It was shown that the process mechanism was similar over all studied catalysts but the catalysts were differed by the adsorption capacity of the reaction components: CO{sub 2} was tied more firmly than C{sub 3}H{sub 6} over Cr and Cr-Mn, C{sub 3}H{sub 6} was tied more strongly than CO{sub 2} over Cr-W. The reverse water-gas shift reaction proceeded in more extent over chromium-oxide catalysts without additions. (orig.)

  19. Chromium isotope fractionation during oxidative weathering of a modern basaltic weathering profile

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    D'Arcy, Joan Mary; Døssing, Lasse Nørbye; Frei, Robert

    contrasting climates; 1) Northern Ireland, a marine temperate climate, and 2) Uruguay, a sub-tropical climate. The oxidation of Cr in soils can be broken down into two important stages, (i) The breaking down of Cr-bearing minerals in the basalt, which make Cr (III) accessible to oxidizing processes. Cr3+ + 2H...

  20. The Behaviour of Chromium Isotopes during the Oxidative Weathering of Ultramafic Rocks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paulukat, Cora Stefanie; Døssing, Lasse Nørbye; Mondal, Sisir K.;

    The chromium isotope system has been proven to be a redox-sensitve proxy in ancient and modern environmental studies (e.g. [1], [2]). In this study we investigated Cr isotope fractionation during soil formation from Archean (3.1-3.3 Ga) ultramafic rocks, intruded into metamorphic rocks of the Iron...... Ore Group in the southern Singhbhum Craton (Orissa, India)[3]. A modern weathering profile was logged in an active open cast chromite mine (Sukinda valley). The Cr isotope data of samples from the weathering profile are fractionaed. While the least weathered horizons at the base of the profile reflect...... mantle inventory values (-0.124±0.101‰ [4]), the δ53Cr values from the more weathered upper part of the profile are as low as -1.28±0.08‰, indicative of the loss of an isotopically heavy (53Cr enriched) fraction to the runoff. Mass-balance calculations show that the highly weathered horizons...

  1. The charge percolation mechanism and simulation of Ziegler–Natta polymerizations. Part VI. Mechanism of ethylene polymerization by supported chromium oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DRAGOSLAV STOILJKOVIC

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Despite intensive research over the last 50 years, many questions concerning ethylene polymerization by supported chromium oxide are still unanswered. Hence, the very fundamental issues of this polymerization are discussed in this paper. It is shown that a charge percolation mechanism (CPM of olefin polymerization by Ziegler–Natta transition metal complexes, recently proposed by us, can give the answers in this case, too.

  2. Solvent extraction of seven trivalent metal ions in aqueous perchlorate solutions with trioctylphosphine oxide in hexane and rapid extraction of chromium(III)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solvent extraction of scandium(III), yttrium(III), lanthanum(III), europium(III), gallium(III), indium(III), and chromium(III) in weakly acidified 1 mol dm-3 NaClO4 solutions with trioctylphosphine oxide (TOPO) in hexane was studied. The extraction equilibrium was established by the two phase agitation for within 3 min and the extracted species except chromium(III) were found to be M(TOPO)43+(ClO4-)3. The extraction of chromium(III) was also achieved by the two phase agitation for only a short time but, from the dependence of the extraction on the TOPO concentration, the extracted species was assumed to be Cr(TOPO)63+(ClO4-)3. Since the inert Cr(H2O)63+ was so rapidly extracted and the solvation number was higher than that of the other metal ions, the TOPO molecules were assumed to combine with the hydrating water molecules by hydrogen bonds which can be formed in a short time even when the metal ion was inert. The chromium(III) was also extracted rapidly from 1 mol dm-3 NaSCN, NaNO3, NaBr, and NaCl solutions with TOPO in hexane and the extraction was better from NaSCN solution than from NaClO4 solution but it was not effective from the solutions of other salts. (author)

  3. Influence of hydrogen and water vapour on the kinetics of chromium oxide growth at high temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In support of the selection of structural materials for heat exchangers in helium-cooled high temperature reactors, the oxidation behaviour of the Ni-base chromia-former alloy 230 was investigated at 850 A degrees C in diluted helium atmosphere with a low water vapour content. In such a media, the equivalent partial pressure of oxygen (imposed by the 850 degrees C in diluted helium atmosphere with a low water vapour content. In such a media, the equivalent partial pressure of oxygen (imposed by the P(H2O)/P(H2) ratio) is very low (P(O2)eq around 10-16 Pa). The equivalent partial pressure of oxygen has no straight influence on the parabolic rate constant (kp); on the other hand, P(H2) and P(H2O) demonstrate a complex influence on kp. Photo-electrochemistry analyses revealed that this oxide could simultaneously contain two types of cationic defects. Specific oxidation tests with D2O showed that the oxide scale also contains hydrogen. A mechanist model is proposed in order to describe the scale growth using both cationic defects. Those theoretical results show, at least qualitatively, how P(H2) and P(H2O) may concurrently influence the oxidation rate. (authors)

  4. Associations of neonatal lead, cadmium, chromium and nickel co-exposure with DNA oxidative damage in an electronic waste recycling town

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ni, Wenqing; Huang, Yue; Wang, Xiaoling; Zhang, Jingwen; Wu, Kusheng, E-mail: kswu@stu.edu.cn

    2014-02-01

    Objective: This study aimed to evaluate the effects of toxic heavy metal co-exposure on DNA oxidative damage in neonates from a primitive e-waste recycling region, Guiyu town, China. Methods: Our participants included 201 pregnant women: 126 from Guiyu town and 75 from Jinping district of Shantou city, where no e-waste recycling and dismantling activities existed. Structured interview questionnaires were administered to the pregnant women and umbilical cord blood (UCB) samples were collected after delivery. The UCB concentrations of lead, cadmium, chromium, and nickel were analyzed by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS). Levels of UCB plasma 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG, a DNA oxidative damage biomarker) were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results: Our results suggested that UCB lead and cadmium concentrations in neonates of Guiyu were significantly higher than those of Jinping (lead: median 110.45 ng/mL vs. 57.31 ng/mL; cadmium: median 2.50 ng/mL vs. 0.33 ng/mL, both P < 0.001). Parents' residence in Guiyu, and parents' work related to e-waste recycling were the risk factors associated with neonate's UCB lead and cadmium levels. No significant difference of UCB plasma 8-OHdG levels was found between Guiyu and the control area. After adjusting for potential confounders, cord plasma 8-OHdG concentrations (ng/mL) were positively associated with blood cadmium (β = 0.126 ng/mL, 95% CI: 0.055 to 0.198 ng/mL), chromium (β = 0.086 ng/mL, 95% CI: 0.014 to 0.158 ng/mL) and nickel (β = 0.215 ng/mL, 95% CI: 0.113 to 0.317 ng/mL) concentrations. Conclusions: The primitive e-waste recycling and dismantling activities may contribute to the elevated umbilical cord blood toxic heavy metal levels in neonates born in Guiyu. Exposures to cadmium, chromium and nickel were associated with increased oxidative DNA damage in neonates. - Highlights: • DNA oxidative damage levels (8-OHdG) in neonates from Guiyu were assessed.

  5. Associations of neonatal lead, cadmium, chromium and nickel co-exposure with DNA oxidative damage in an electronic waste recycling town

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: This study aimed to evaluate the effects of toxic heavy metal co-exposure on DNA oxidative damage in neonates from a primitive e-waste recycling region, Guiyu town, China. Methods: Our participants included 201 pregnant women: 126 from Guiyu town and 75 from Jinping district of Shantou city, where no e-waste recycling and dismantling activities existed. Structured interview questionnaires were administered to the pregnant women and umbilical cord blood (UCB) samples were collected after delivery. The UCB concentrations of lead, cadmium, chromium, and nickel were analyzed by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS). Levels of UCB plasma 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG, a DNA oxidative damage biomarker) were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results: Our results suggested that UCB lead and cadmium concentrations in neonates of Guiyu were significantly higher than those of Jinping (lead: median 110.45 ng/mL vs. 57.31 ng/mL; cadmium: median 2.50 ng/mL vs. 0.33 ng/mL, both P < 0.001). Parents' residence in Guiyu, and parents' work related to e-waste recycling were the risk factors associated with neonate's UCB lead and cadmium levels. No significant difference of UCB plasma 8-OHdG levels was found between Guiyu and the control area. After adjusting for potential confounders, cord plasma 8-OHdG concentrations (ng/mL) were positively associated with blood cadmium (β = 0.126 ng/mL, 95% CI: 0.055 to 0.198 ng/mL), chromium (β = 0.086 ng/mL, 95% CI: 0.014 to 0.158 ng/mL) and nickel (β = 0.215 ng/mL, 95% CI: 0.113 to 0.317 ng/mL) concentrations. Conclusions: The primitive e-waste recycling and dismantling activities may contribute to the elevated umbilical cord blood toxic heavy metal levels in neonates born in Guiyu. Exposures to cadmium, chromium and nickel were associated with increased oxidative DNA damage in neonates. - Highlights: • DNA oxidative damage levels (8-OHdG) in neonates from Guiyu were assessed. • Neonatal lead

  6. Pyrite oxidation by hexavalent chromium: investigation of the chemical processes by monitoring of aqueous metal species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demoisson, Frédéric; Mullet, Martine; Humbert, Bernard

    2005-11-15

    Pyrite, an iron sulfide, occurs in many soils and sediments, making it an important natural reductant of toxic metal pollutants. This study investigated the processes leading to aqueous Cr(VI) reduction by pyrite in a closed thermostated (25 +/- 0.1 degrees C) system and under an argon atmosphere. Synthetic pyrite suspensions were reacted with a range of Cr(VI) solutions from 0 to 7 x 10(-4) M and at pH 2-8. Metal species concentrations were continuously monitored during a period lasting approximately 20 h. Preliminary experiments carried out in acidic media without Cr(VI) have shown that some pyrite dissolution occurred. Then, metal species concentration changes with time during pyrite oxidation by Cr(VI) solutions exhibited two distinct trends depending on the complete or incomplete Cr(VI) removal. As long as chromate existed in solution, the Cr-(Ill) to Fe(lIl) ratio was found to be an effective parameter to investigate the pyrite reaction stoichiometry with Cr(VI). Experimental values close to 2 suggest that sulfur compounds with oxidation states between 0 and 2 should be formed during pyrite oxidation by Cr(VI). If Cr(VI) was completely reduced from solution, then the pyrite oxidation by Fe(lll) ions took place to generate ferrous ions. PMID:16323772

  7. On the nature of iron-chromium oxides in stainless steel steelmaking slags

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matteazzi, P.; Magrini, M.; Ramous, E.

    1986-02-01

    A number of slags from electric steelmaking production of AISI 420 and AISI 304 steels, were examined by Mössbauer spectroscopy. The slag samples were taken before and after oxygen blowing. The slag constitution showed the presence of a metallic part, MO mixed oxide and Fe-Cr spinel (Fe2+ Fe{x/3+} Cr2-xO4' x<1).

  8. On the nature of iron-chromium oxides in stainless steel steelmaking slags

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A number of slags from electric steelmaking production of AISI 420 and AISI 304 steels, were examined by Moessbauer spectroscopy. The slag samples were taken before and after oxygen blowing. The slag constitution showed the presence of a metallic part, MO mixed oxide and Fe-Cr spinel. (Auth.)

  9. Oxidative Weathering of Earth's Surface 3.7 Billion Years ago? - A Chromium Isotope Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frei, R.; Crowe, S.; Bau, M.; Polat, A.; Fowle, D. A.; Døssing, L. N.

    2015-12-01

    The Great Oxidation Event signals the first large-scale oxygenation of the atmosphere roughly 2.4 Gyr ago. Geochemical signals diagnostic of oxidative weathering, however, extend as far back as 3.3-2.9 Gyr ago. 3.8-3.7 Gyr old rocks from Isua, Greenland stand as a deep time outpost, recording information on Earth's earliest surface chemistry and the low oxygen primordial biosphere. We find positive Cr isotope values (average δ53Cr = +0.05 +/- 0.10 permil; δ53Cr = (53Cr/52Cr)sample/(53Cr/52Cr)SRM 979 - 1) x 1000, where SRM 979 denotes Standard Reference Material 979 in both the Fe and Si-rich mesobands of 7 compositionally distinct quartz-magnetite and magnesian banded iron formation (BIF) samples collected from the eastern portion of the Isua BIF (Western Greenland). These postively fractioned Cr isotopes, relative to the igneous silicate Earth reservoir, in metamorphosed BIFs from Isua indicate oxidative Cr cycling 3.8-3.7 Gyr ago. We also examined the distribution of U, which is immobile in its reduced state but mobile when it is oxidized. Elevated U/Th ratios (mean U/Th ratio of 0.70 ± 0.29) in these BIFs relative to the contemporary crust, also signal oxidative mobilization of U. We suggest that reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulated in Earth's surface environment inducing the oxidative weathering of rocks during the deposition of the Isua BIFs. The precise threshold atmospheric O2 concentrations for the induction of Cr isotope fractionation remain uncertain, but we argue that our data are consistent with the very low levels of oxygen or other ROS indicated by other proxies. Importantly, any trace of Cr that cycled through redox reactions on land would tend both to be heavy, and to mobilize into the contemporaneous run-off more readily than Cr weathered directly as Cr(III). Once having reached the oceans, this fractionated Cr would have been stripped from seawater by Fe (oxy)hydroxides formed during the deposition of BIFs from low oxygen oceans. The

  10. Fabrication of a novel chromium-iron oxide (Cr{sub 2}Fe{sub 6}O{sub 12}) nanoparticles by thermal treatment method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naseri, Mahmoud Goodarz, E-mail: m.naseri@malayeru.ac.ir [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Malayer University, Malayer (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Kamari, Halimah Mohamed [Department of Physics, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 UPM Serdang, Selangor (Malaysia); Dehzangi, Arash [Institute of Microengineering and Nanoelectronics (IMEN), Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Kamalianfar, Ahmad [Department of physics, Farhangian University (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Saion, Elias B. [Department of Physics, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 UPM Serdang, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2015-09-01

    In this research,a novel chromium-iron oxide (Cr{sub 2}Fe{sub 6}O{sub 12}) nanoparticle with rhombohedral symmetry was prepared by a simple thermal treatment method.Heat treatment was conducted using an electric cylinder furnace in an air atmosphere at temperatures between 773 and 923 K, where the produced chromium-ironoxide nanoparticles had different crystallite sizes ranging from 9 to 20 nm. The products were well characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM), X-ray analysis (EDXA), and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). The samples demonstrated a magnetic behavior with unpaired electron spins, which was confirmed by using vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. - Highlights: • An aqueous solution of PVA and metal nitrates consist of Fe (NO{sub 3}){sub 3}·9H{sub 2}O and Cr (NO{sub 3}){sub 3}·9H{sub 2}O was prepared at 353 K • The mixed solution was heated at 373 K to evaporate the water and the resulting solid was crushed to powder • The influence of calcination temperature on structure and magnetic properties of a novel chromium-iron oxide (Cr{sub 2}Fe{sub 6}O{sub 12}) nanoparticle was characterized.

  11. Thermal incorporation behavior during the reduction and stabilization of chromium wastes

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Jun; 楊駿

    2015-01-01

    The possibility of employing periclase to stabilize chromium in chromium wastes into spinel-based ceramics through thermal method was investigated by heating mixture of simulated chromium waste and magnesium oxide. Different types of magnesium oxide precursors were introduced to incorporate chromium oxide into magnesiochromite (MgCr2O4) ranging from 550 ºC to 1350 ºC. Magnesium oxide precursors of both types can effectively incorporate chromium oxide but via different mechanisms. Three main f...

  12. Semi-continuous detection of toxic hexavalent chromium using a sulfur-oxidizing bacteria biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurung, Anup; Oh, Sang-Eun; Kim, Ki Duck; Shin, Beom-Soo

    2012-09-15

    Toxicity testing is becoming a useful tool for environmental risk assessment. A biosensor based on the metabolic properties of sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (SOB) has been applied for the detection of toxic chemicals in water. The methodology exploits the ability of SOB to oxidize elemental sulfur to sulfuric acid under aerobic conditions. The reaction results in an increase in electrical conductivity (EC) and a decrease in pH. Five hours after Cr(6+) was added to the SOB biosensor operated in semi-continuous mode (1 min rapid feeding and 29 min batch reaction), a decrease in effluent EC and an increase in pH (from 2-3 to 6) were detected due to Cr(6+) toxicity to SOB. The SOB biosensor is simple; it can detect toxic levels of Cr(6+) on the order of minutes to hours, a useful time scale for early warning detection systems designed to protect the environment from further degradation. PMID:22647672

  13. Chromium(III) -- chromium(VI) interconversions in seawater

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weijden, C.H. van der; Reith, M.

    1982-01-01

    The stable form of dissolved chromium in oxygenated seawater is Cr(VI). But Cr(III)-species are also present at an analytically significant level. It is shown that Cr(III) is oxidized only slowly by dissolved oxygen, and that manganese oxide is a strong catalyst for such oxidation. However, the low

  14. Determination of hexavalent chromium in ambient air: A story of method induced Cr(III) oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tirez, Kristof; Silversmit, Geert; Bleux, Nico; Adriaensens, Elke; Roekens, Edward; Servaes, Kelly; Vanhoof, Chris; Vincze, Laszlo; Berghmans, Patrick

    2011-09-01

    The accuracy of the determination of Cr(VI) in ambient particulate matter remains a challenge from the point of view of minimal Cr species interconversion. Knowledge of this method induced oxidation and reduction is particularly relevant for the determination of Cr(VI) in ambient particulate matter, as the level of observed Cr(III) oxidation (average of 1.7% in this study) can contribute significantly to the monitored range of measured Cr(VI) in PM 10. For Cr concentrations in PM 10 > 10 ng Cr m -3, this method induced oxidation could lead to false positive exceeding of an air quality guideline value of 0.2 ng Cr(VI) m -3 in PM 10. The median daily Cr(VI) concentration in PM 10 measured over a monitoring period of more than 2 months at two locations close to a stainless steel factory amounted to 0.9 ng Cr(VI) m -3 and 0.27 ng Cr(VI) m -3. Average daily Cr(VI)/Cr ratios in PM 10 of 3.5% and 2.6% were measured at these locations. The described monitoring for the determination of Cr(VI) in ambient air via alkaline impregnated filters is sensitive (method detection limit of 0.015 ng Cr(VI) m -3) and reproducible (precision of the method ˜25%). The average Cr(VI) recovery of 75% strongly indicates the effects of ambient sampling conditions and ambient particles on the Cr(VI) recoveries. The stability of the Cr(VI) and the Cr(III) spike on 0.12 M NaHCO 3 impregnated filters observed with XANES, indicates that the alkaline extraction of the filter in combination with the sampled air matrix is likely to induce the Cr conversions. The XANES spectra shows further that a Cr-spinel is the predominant component of Cr in ambient air PM 10 at the monitored locations.

  15. Groundwater contaminant by hexavalent chromium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parsons, C. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

    1995-11-01

    Oxidation of trivalent chromium to hexavalent chromium has been investigated as a function of total manganese in soils as well as various incubation conditions. Chromium and manganese contents were analyzed by atomic absorption (graphite furnace and flame emission respectively) following acid digestion. Total hexavalent chromium generation capacity was determined by addition of 0.001 M CrCL3, incubation, and analysis by s-diphenyl carbazide. Samples were then leached with CaSO{sub 4} and MgSO{sub 4} and incubated in various environments (oven, freeze-drier, field moist, ultrafreeze) to test for geogenic generation of Cr(IV). The degree of geogenic generation of hexavalent chromium was compared with total Mn and Cr content as well as hexavalent generational capacity.

  16. Oxidative dissolution of pyrite surfaces by hexavalent chromium: Surface site saturation and surface renewal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Andrew M.; Bouwer, Edward J.

    2012-04-01

    In-situ reduction of toxic Cr(VI) to nontoxic Cr(III) represents an important natural attenuation process for Cr(VI)-impacted environments. This study investigates the stoichiometry and kinetics of Cr(VI) reduction by pyrite, a reduced iron-sulfur mineral ubiquitous in recent estuarine and marine sediments. Pyrite suspensions at surface loadings of 0.28-2.10 m2/L (typical of estuarine or marine sediments) were capable of completely reducing 7-120 μM Cr(VI) on the timescale of minutes to days, with the time to reaction completion decreasing with increasing pyrite loading, decreasing initial Cr(VI) concentration, and decreasing suspension pH. Analysis of metal species (Cr and Fe) and sulfur species in solution and at the mineral surface indicated that Cr(VI) oxidatively dissolved the pyrite surface, releasing ferrous iron and sulfate into solution as the reaction progressed. Surface disulfide groups were postulated as the Cr(VI)-reactive surface entity. Net production or consumption of aqueous Fe(II) was shown to depend upon the relative rates of proton-promoted Fe(II) release, Fe(II) release due to oxidative dissolution of pyrite in the presence of Cr(VI), and Fe(II) consumption due to homogeneous reaction with Cr(VI). Kinetics of Cr(VI) reduction by pyrite displayed a biphasic pattern, and the time to reaction completion increased dramatically with increasing initial Cr(VI) concentration. Rapid Cr(VI) removal occurred early in the reaction progress, attributable to Cr(VI) loss under an adsorption-limited regime. Slow, approximately zero-order, Cr(VI) removal occurred over the bulk of the time courses, and corresponded to Cr(VI) removal under surface site saturation conditions. Stoichiometric Cr(VI) reduction was able to proceed under surface site limited conditions owing to regeneration of reactive surface sites following desorption/dissolution of oxidized surface products, as demonstrated in repeat Cr(VI)-spiking experiments. The role of surface passivation was

  17. Kinetics of propane dehydrogenation in CO{sub 2} presence over chromium and gallium oxide catalysts based on MCM-41

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lapidus, A.L.; Gaidai, N.A.; Nekrasov, N.V.; Agafonov, A.Yu.; Botavina, M.A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation). N.D. Zelinsky Institute of Organic Chemistry

    2012-07-01

    Chromium and gallium catalysts based on MCM-41 with different contents of active metals were prepared and tested for propane dehydrogenation in the presence and absence of CO{sub 2}. It was shown that CO{sub 2} increased the yield of propene and decreased considerably the rate of deactivation of Cr/MCM-41 and decreased propene yield and slightly improved the stability of Ga/MCM-41. The study of kinetics in unstationary and stationary fields showed that the decrease of propene yield was connected with strong competitive adsorption of CO{sub 2} over Ga-catalysts what presented difficulties for propane adsorption. The formation of cracking products was decreased in CO{sub 2} presence over both catalysts. The catalysts were differed by the adsorption capacity of the reaction components: C{sub 3}H{sub 6} was tied more strongly than CO{sub 2} over Cr-catalysts, CO{sub 2} was tied more firmly than C{sub 3}H{sub 6} over Ga-catalysts. Kinetic data showed that of H{sub 2} was bounded with the surface of Ga-catalysts very firmly, reverse watergas shift reaction proceeded in considerably more extent over Cr-catalysts than over Gaones. CO{sub 2} took active participation in oxidation of coke and surface of Cr-catalysts. The positive role of CO{sub 2} in propane dehydrogenation over Ga-catalysts consisted in a decrease of coke and cracking products. Kinetic equations and step-schemes for propene and cracking products formation were proposed. (orig.)

  18. Genotoxic effects of chromium oxide nanoparticles and microparticles in Wistar rats after 28 days of repeated oral exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Shailendra Pratap; Chinde, Srinivas; Kamal, Sarika Srinivas Kalyan; Rahman, M F; Mahboob, M; Grover, Paramjit

    2016-02-01

    The nanotechnology industry has advanced rapidly in the last 10 years giving rise to the growth of the nanoparticles (NPs) with great potential in various arenas. However, the same properties that make NPs interesting raise concerns because their toxicity has not been explored. The in vivo toxicology of chromium oxide (Cr2O3)-NPs is not known till date. Therefore, this study investigated the 28-day repeated toxicity after 30, 300 and 1000 mg/kg body weight (bw)/day oral treatment with Cr2O3-NPs and Cr2O3 microparticles (MPs) in Wistar rats. The mean size of Cr2O3-NPs and Cr2O3-MPs was 34.89 ± 2.65 nm and 3.76 ± 3.41 μm, respectively. Genotoxicity was assessed using comet, micronucleus and chromosomal aberration (CA) assays. The results revealed a significant increase in DNA damage in peripheral blood leucocytes and liver, micronuclei and CA in bone marrow after exposure of 300 and 1000 mg/kg doses of Cr2O3-NPs and Cr2O3-MPs only at 1000 mg/kg bw/day. Cr biodistribution was observed in all the tissues in a dose-dependent manner. The maximum amount of Cr was found in the kidneys and least in the brain of the treated rats. More of the Cr was excreted in the faeces than in the urine. Furthermore, nanotreated rats displayed much higher absorption and tissue accumulation. These findings provide initial data of the probable genotoxicity and biodistribution of NPs and MPs of Cr2O3 generated through repeated oral treatment. PMID:26503004

  19. Adsorption of titanium, chromium, and copper atoms on thin aluminum and magnesium oxide film surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tvauri, I. V.; Turiev, A. M.; Tsidaeva, N. I.; Gazzaeva, M. E.; Vladimirov, G. G.; Magkoev, T. T.

    2012-04-01

    Methods of Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), spectroscopy of characteristic electron energy losses (SCEEL), slow electron diffraction (SED), and contact potential difference (CPD) in ultrahigh vacuum are used to investigate the adsorption-emission properties and stability of two-component film systems formed by putting of Ti, Cr, and Cu atoms on MgO-Mo(011) and Al2O3-Mo(011) surfaces. All atoms have the properties of electronegative adsorbates. Continuous adatom monolayers are formed on the Al2O3-Mo(011) system surface, and three-dimensional islands are formed on the MgO-Mo(011) surface. The properties of monoatomic films on the oxide layer surface are close to those observed for bulk materials. No radical changes of the system properties are detected with increasing dielectric layer thickness. The thermal stability of the newly formed structures decreases in the order Ti, Cr, Cu, Al2O3(MgO), and Mo(011).

  20. Oxidative stress related enzymes in response to chromium (Ⅵ) toxicity in Oxya chinensis ( Orthoptera : Acridoidae)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Li-jun; ZHANG Feng; LIU Xue-mei; GUO Ya-ping; MA En-bo

    2005-01-01

    The toxic effects of Cr(Ⅵ) on antioxidant enzymes of Oxya chinensis(Orthoptera: Acridoidae) were determined. Changes in the activities of the antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase(SOD), catalase(CAT), and guaiacol peroxidase(GPx) were measured in O. chinensis insects injected with Cr(Ⅵ). Fifth-nymphs of O. chinensis insects were injected with Cr(Ⅵ) with different concentrations (0, 75, 150, 225, 300, 375, 450 mg/kg of body weight). The results showed that Cr(Ⅵ) led to the change of SOD, CAT, and GPx activities at different concentrations, which revealed that: (1) The oxidative stress of SOD increased with the increase of Cr (Ⅵ)concentration. (2) With the increase of Cr (Ⅵ) concentrations, CAT activities for females increased at lower concentrations, but decreased at higher concentration range, which indicated that antioxidant system of O. chinensis was not influenced by the presence of Cr (Ⅵ). A very similar response to Cr(Ⅵ) effect for males indicated that Cr(Ⅵ) concentrations were not high enough to damage O. chinensis in terms of CAT. (3) The GPx activity for females increased in all treatments, which revealed that the damage power of Cr(Ⅵ)was increased with the increase of Cr(Ⅵ) concentrations in terms of GPx, but the effect was not so remarkable. There was not a consistent trend of GPx activities for males in all treatments of Cr(Ⅵ). Cr(Ⅵ)-induced changes in antioxidant enzymes were different for SOD, CAT and GPx, of which the tendency was that activities generally changed with increase of concentrations of Cr(Ⅵ) suggesting SOD, CAT, and GPx could serve as indices of oxidative stress to some extent.

  1. Metal-ceramic adhesion: Synthesis of aluminum and chromium mixed metal oxides and extended Hueckel modeling of metal-metal oxide interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boorse, R.S.

    1993-01-01

    Methods of chemical synthesis and theoretical calculation was used to form new materials that have improved adhesion of a thin metal film to a ceramic. Two goals of this investigation were to develop new synthesis of metal-ceramic couples with improved adhesion between the two components and a fundamental understanding of the chemical factors that affect adhesion. Extended Hueckel calculations were performed on a series of Pt- and NiPt-NiO metal-ceramic couples to examine bonding. The calculations showed an 5 fold increase in adhesion energy in NiPt-NiO over Pt-NiO. Bonding across the interface is found to decrease with increased electron donation as interfacially antibonding orbitals are filled. The synthesis of (Al[sub 1[minus]x]Cr[sub x])[sub 2]O[sub 3] mixed metal oxide powders and coatings by sol-gel methodology utilizing three chromium precursors is reported. Thus, Al[Cr(CO)[sub 3]C[sub 5]H[sub 5

  2. Electrochemical investigation of the two-stage decomposition of oxide deposits on a high-alloy chromium nickel steel by the MOPAC decontamination process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dissertation explains the application of the MOPAC technique for decomposition of oxide layers deposited under PWR conditions on an austenitic, high-alloy chromium nickel steel (DIN material number 1.4550). The examinations were mainly done by impedance spectrometry. With this technique, Cr(III)-oxide is oxidized to chromate in a first step, in 'oxidation solution', and the remaining oxide deposit is then dissolved in 'decontamination solution'. The various specimens used for the examinations were pre-treated ('oxidized') in water in an autoclave at 300deg C and 160 bar, remaining there for either one, two, three, six, or eight months. Extensive pre-experiments were carried out with polished sections of the same material. Comparison of the impedance spectra of these specimens with those of specimens from the autoclave were expected to yield data allowing assignment of impedance spectra to specific transformations in the oxide layers produced in the autoclave. It was found out that the treatment in oxidation solution is the decisive step for oxide decomposition, and hence for the entire result of the decontamination process. (orig.)

  3. Chromium in aqueous nitrate plutonium process streams: Corrosion of 316 stainless steel and chromium speciation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was undertaken to determine if chromium(+6) could exist in plutonium process solutions under normal operating conditions. Four individual reactions were studied: the rate of dissolution of stainless steel, which is the principal source of chromium in process solutions; the rate of oxidation of chromium(+3) to chromium(+6) by nitric acid; and the reduction of chromium(+6) back to chromium(+3) by reaction with stainless steel and with oxalic acid. The stainless steel corrosion rate was found to increase with increasing nitric acid concentration, increasing hydrofluoric acid concentration, and increasing temperature. Oxidation of chromium(+3) to chromium(+6) was negligible at room temperature and only became significant in hot concentrated nitric acid. The rate of reduction of chromium(+6) back to chromium(+3) by reaction with stainless steel or oxalic acid was found to be much greater than the rate of the reverse oxidation reaction. Based on these findings and taking into account normal operating conditions, it was determined that although there would be considerable chromium in plutonium process streams it would rarely be found in the (+6) oxidation state and would not exist in the (+6) state in the final process waste solutions

  4. Research progress in heterogeneous chromium oxide catalyst for PE%非均相氧化铬PE催化剂的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冉印; 崔楠楠; 徐国强; 刘东兵; 王洪涛

    2011-01-01

    非均相氧化铬催化剂的聚合机理包括Cr6+还原为Cr2+形成活性中心的过程、链引发的单活性中心机理、链增长的Cossee机理、通过B-H消除的链终止机理.硅胶、磷酸铝等载体的改性影响催化剂活性和聚合物性质:氧化铬催化剂的负载和活化过程,氟、钛、磷、卤代烃等改性剂对氧化铬催化剂性能有重要的影响,铬系催化剂与其他催化剂复配使用也能缩短诱导期,提高聚合活性,并制备出宽相对分子质量分布的聚乙烯.%The polymerization mechanisms in the presence of heterogeneous chromium oxide catalysts involve the reduction and activation from Cr6+ to Cr2+, the single active center mechanism of chain initiation, the Cossee mechanism of chain propagation and the termination mechanism based on |J-hydrogen elimination. The modification of carriers like silicon and aluminophosphates exerts influence on the catalysts' activity and the resultant polymers' properties. The loading and activation process of the catalysts and the addition of modifiers like fluorine, titanium, phosphorus and halohydrocarbon have impact on the properties of chromium oxide catalysts. The application of composite catalysts consisting of the chromium-based catalysts and other catalysts can shorten the induction time, improve the polymerization activity and produce polyethylene with broad relative molecular mass distribution.

  5. Thermodynamic properties of chromium bearing slags and minerals. A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao Yanping; Holappa, L.

    1996-12-31

    In this report, the thermodynamic properties of chromium bearing slags and minerals were reviewed based on the available information in the literature. It includes the analysing methods for oxidation state of chromium in slags, oxidation state of chromium and activities of chromium oxides in slags and minerals. The phase diagrams of chromium oxide systems and chromium distributions between slag and metal phases are also covered ill this review. Concerning the analysing methods, it was found that most of the available approaches are limited to iron free slag systems and the sample preparation is very sensitive to the analysing results. In silicate slags under reducing atmosphere, divalent and trivalent chromium co-exist in the slags. It is agreed that the fraction of divalent chromium to total chromium increases with higher temperature, lower slag basicity and oxygen potential. For the slags under oxidising atmosphere, trivalent, pentavalent and hexavalent states were reported to be stable. The activities of CrO and CrO{sub 1.5} were concluded to have positive deviation from ideal solution. Slag basicity has a positive effect and temperature has a negative effect on the activities of chromium oxides. The phase diagrams of the Cr-O, binary, and ternary chromium containing oxide systems have been examined systematically. The analysis shows that the data on the quaternary and quinary systems are insufficient, and require further investigation. The most important features of the chromium containing silicate slags are the large miscibility gaps and the stability of the chromite spinel. (orig.) (76 refs.)

  6. On the spherical chromium oxide particulates via pulsed laser ablation at a very high power density in vacuum with a specified oxygen flow rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, C. H.; Shen, P.; Chen, S. Y.

    2010-02-01

    Chromium oxide condensates nearly spherical in shape ranging from 0.1 to 0.2 micron in diameter were fabricated by laser ablation on a Cr target at a very high power density of 1.8×1012 W/cm2 for a very rapid heating and cooling effect. Analytical electron microscopic observations of such spherical particulates revealed three types: (1) α-Cr2O3 single crystal with ( bar{1}101),(bar{1}012) and (1 bar{2}10) facets, (2) spinel-like Cr3O4 polycrystals with spherulitic texture, i.e. a rather corrugated solidification front, (3) recrystallized Cr3O4 polycrystals derived from type 2 by radiant heating. The microstructure and phase difference among the particulates can be attributed to a varied extent of supercooling under the influence of rather complicated Cr2+ solute trapping of the molten and solid phases in the Cr3O4-O pseudo-binary in vacuum. The chromium oxide condensates being spherical yet full of facets, with significant internal compressive stress up to ca. 3.4 GPa according to Raman shift, and with UV-absorbance close to violet light due to the presence of internal stress and/or Cr2+, may have potential optoelectronic and catalytic applications.

  7. An investigation of the chromium oxidation state of a monoanionic chromium tris(catecholate) complex by X-ray absorption and EPR spectroscopies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pattison, D I; Levina, A; Davies, Michael Jonathan;

    2001-01-01

    , in conjunction with EPR spectroscopy and a reevaluation of XRD structures and theoretical calulations, that the complex is best described as a Cr(V) center with delocalization from the catechol ligands. The [Cr(catecholato)3]n+ (n = 1, 0) complexes have similar EPR spectroscopic and structural properties......, respectively, to the 1- complex and are also best described as Cr(V) complexes. Such intermediates are important in the redox reactions of catechol(amine)s, and oxidized amino acids (e.g., DOPA), with carcinogenic Cr(VI) and may have relevance in Cr-induced cancers....

  8. The influence of transition metal oxides on the kinetics of Li2O2 oxidation in Li-O2 batteries: high activity of chromium oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Koffi P C; Lu, Yi-Chun; Amanchukwu, Chibueze V; Kwabi, David G; Risch, Marcel; Zhou, Jigang; Grimaud, Alexis; Hammond, Paula T; Bardé, Fanny; Shao-Horn, Yang

    2014-02-14

    Reducing the energy loss associated with Li2O2 electrochemical oxidation is paramount to the development of efficient rechargeable lithium-oxygen (Li-O2) batteries for practical use. The influence of a series of perovskites with different eg filling on the kinetics of Li2O2 oxidation was examined using Li2O2-prefilled electrodes. While LaCrO3 is inactive for oxygen evolution upon water oxidation in alkaline solution, it was found to provide the highest specific current towards Li2O2 oxidation among all the perovskites examined. Further exploration of Cr-based catalysts showed that Cr nanoparticles (Cr NP) with an average particle size of 40 nm, having oxidized surfaces, had comparable surface area activities to LaCrO3 but much greater mass activities. Unlike Pt/C and Ru/C that promote electrolyte oxidation in addition to Li2O2 oxidation, no evidence of enhanced electrolyte oxidation was found for Cr NP relative to Vulcan carbon. X-ray absorption spectroscopy at the O K and Cr L edge revealed a redox process of Cr(3+) ↔ Cr(6+) on the surface of Cr NP upon Li2O2 oxidation, which might be responsible for the enhanced oxidation kinetics of Li2O2 and the reduced charging voltages of Li-O2 batteries. PMID:24352578

  9. Liberation of chromium from ferrochrome waste materials utilising aqueous ozonation and the advanced oxidation process / Yolindi van Staden

    OpenAIRE

    Van Staden, Yolindi

    2014-01-01

    During ferrochrome (FeCr) production, three types of generic chromium (Cr) containing wastes are generated, i.e. slag, bag filter dust (BFD) and venturi sludge. The loss of these Cr units contributes significantly to the loss in revenue for FeCr producers. In this study, the liberation of Cr units was investigated utilising two case study waste materials, i.e. BFD from a semi-closed submerged arc furnace (SAF) operating on acid slag and the ultrafine fraction of slag (UFS) orig...

  10. [Bioremediation of chromium (VI) contaminated site by reduction and microbial stabilization of chromium].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jia-Chuan; Zhang, Jian-Rong; Liu, Xi-Wen; Xu, Qian; Shi, Wei-Lin

    2014-10-01

    Chromium (VI) contaminated soil samples were collected from a chemical plant in Suzhou. Firstly, the reduced soil was prepared by adding reagent (Stone-sulfure reagent) into polluted soil to transfer most chromium (VI) into chromium (III), then a nutrient solution was introduced into the reduced soil, and the stabilized soil was obtained after 60 days culturing. The chromium (VI) content of the three kinds of soil was analyzed. The results showed that the chromium (VI) content in toxicity characteristic leaching liquid (TCLL) dropped by 96. 8% (from 8.26 mg · L(-1) to 0.26 mg · L(-1)), and the total chromium content dropped by 95.7% (from 14.66 mg · L(-1) to 0.63 mg · L(-1)) after bioremediation in 5% nutrient solution. Additionally, the durability of chromium stabilization was tested by potassium permanganate oxidation and sterilization of microbe-treated soil. After oxidation, the chromium (VI) content in TCLL of the reduced soil was increased from 8.26 mg · L(-1) to 14.68 mg · L(-1). However, the content after bioremediation was decreased to 2.68 mg · L(-1). The results of sterilization demonstrated that the death of microbe had no significant effect on the stabilization of chromium. Consequently, the research in this paper demonstrated the feasibility of bioremediation of chromium (VI) polluted soil through reduction followed by stabilization/soilidification, and provided a technique with low cost but high efficiency.

  11. Hepatoprotective efifciency of methanol extract of red algae against chromium-induced oxidative damage in Wistar rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Murugesan Subbiah; Bhuvaneswari Sundaresan; Kalandar Ameer; Sivamurugan Vajiravelu

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the hepatoprotective activity of red algaePortieria hornemannii (Lyngbye) Silva (P. hornemannii) andSpyridia fusiformis Boergesen (S. fusiformis) by using the chromium treated rat liver as the animal model. Methods: The extract of red algae at a dosage of 0.200 g/kg of whole body weight was orally administrated to Cr (VI) intoxicated rats for 28 consecutive days. The effect of drug in rats was evaluated by comparing the degree of the production of enzymes responsible for antioxidant activity such lipid peroxidase, superoxide dismutase, catalase and reduced glutathione with Cr (VI) analogs in the absence of any secondary treatment. The overall damage of liver was detected by measuring serum enzymes such as aspartateamino transferase and alanine aminotransferase activities which released into the blood from the damaged cells. Results:It was observed that these enzyme levels were noticed in the animals treated with methanol extracts of red algae (200 mg/kg) through preventing the leakage of the above enzymes into the blood. The hepatoprotection obtained usingLIV 52 (standard reference drug) appeared relatively higher. The antihepatotoxic potential of red algaeP. hornemannii andS. fusiformis might be due to their antioxidative and membrane stabilizing activities. Conclusions: Our results indicated that the extract ofP. hornemannii andS. fusiformis obtained from methanol could be a promising hepatoprotective agent against chromium (VI)-induced liver damage.

  12. IN-VIVO EVALUATION OF HEXAVALENT CHROMIUM INDUCED DNA DAMAGE BY ALKALINE COMET ASSAY AND OXIDATIVE STRESS IN CATLA CATLA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kantha Deivi Arunachalam

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, the acute toxicity of Chromium in fingerlings of Catla catla, an Indian major carp, was evaluated with renewal bioassay method. In vivo studies were designed to assess the extent of Micronucleus Assay, Comet Assay under the exposure of common heavy-metal compounds, namely, Chromium Nitrate, using Catla catla (2n = 20, as a test model. The laboratory acclimatized fishes were divided into four groups. Group I served as positive control and the other three as exposed groups for three different time durations of 7, 14 and 21 days and were subjected to uninterrupted sub lethal concentrations (50% of 96 h LC50. The experiments were planned in such a way that fish from all the groups were sacrificed on the same day. The frequencies of micronuclei and bi-nuclei were evaluated comparatively in peripheral erythrocytes. As a result, it was observed that, the fishes and different tissues showed differential sensitivity to the heavy-metal treatment. A significant increase in the frequencies of micronucleated and binucleated cells and percentage increase in DNA tail (pCatla catla during sub lethal toxicity study was also calculated.

  13. Effect of Supplementing Organic Forms of Zinc, Selenium and Chromium on Performance, Anti-Oxidant and Immune Responses in Broiler Chicken Reared in Tropical Summer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, S V Rama; Prakash, B; Raju, M V L N; Panda, A K; Kumari, R K; Reddy, E Pradeep Kumar

    2016-08-01

    Two experiments were conducted to study the effect of supplementing organic forms of zinc (Zn), selenium (Se) and chromium (Cr) on performance, anti-oxidant activities and immune responses in broiler chickens from 1 to 21 days of age, which were reared in cyclic heat-stressed condition under tropical summer in open-sided poultry house. A total of 200 (experiment I) and 450-day-old (experiment II) broiler male chicks (Cobb 400) were randomly distributed in stainless steel battery brooders (610 mm × 762 mm × 475 mm) at the rate of five birds per pen. A maize-soybean meal-based control diet (CD) containing recommended (Vencobb 400, Broiler Management Guide) concentrations of inorganic trace minerals and other nutrients was prepared. The CD was supplemented individually with organic form of selenium (Se, 0.30 mg/kg), chromium (Cr, 2 mg/kg) and zinc (Zn, 40 mg/kg) in experiment I. In experiment II, two concentrations of each Zn (20 and 40 mg/kg), Se (0.15 and 0.30 mg/kg) and Cr (1 and 2 mg/kg) were supplemented to the basal diet in 2 × 2 × 2 factorial design. A group without supplementing inorganic trace minerals was maintained as control group in both experiments. Each diet was allotted randomly to ten replicates in both experiments and fed ad libitum from 1 to 21 days of age. At 19th day of age, blood samples were collected for estimation of anti-oxidant and immune responses. Supplementation of Se, Cr and Zn increased (P  0.05) by the interaction between levels of Zn, Se and Cr in broiler diet. The FE improved (P  0.05) the immune responses (Newcastle disease titre and cell-mediated immune response to phytohaemagglutinin-P) in both the experiments. Based on the results, it is concluded that supplementation of organic form of Se, Cr and Zn (0.30, 2 and 40 mg/kg, respectively) either alone or in combination significantly improved performance and anti-oxidant responses (reduced LP and increased superoxide dismutase) in commercial

  14. Cleaning-induced arsenic mobilization and chromium oxidation from CCA-wood deck: Potential risk to children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gress, J; de Oliveira, L M; da Silva, E B; Lessl, J M; Wilson, P C; Townsend, T; Ma, L Q

    2015-09-01

    Concern about children's exposure to arsenic (As) from wood treated with chromated-copper-arsenate (CCA) led to its withdrawal from residential use in 2004. However, due to its effectiveness, millions of American homes still have CCA-wood decks on which children play. This study evaluated the effects of three deck-cleaning methods on formation of dislodgeable As and hexavalent chromium (CrVI) on CCA-wood surfaces and in leachate. Initial wipes from CCA-wood wetted with water showed 3-4 times more dislodgeable As than on dry wood. After cleaning with a bleach solution, 9.8-40.3μg/100cm(2) of CrVI was found on the wood surface, with up to 170μg/L CrVI in the leachate. Depending on the cleaning method, 699-2473mg of As would be released into the environment from cleaning a 18.6-m(2)-deck. Estimated As doses in children aged 1-6 after 1h of playing on a wet CCA-wood deck were 0.25-0.41μg/kg. This is the first study to identify increased dislodgeable As on wet CCA-wood and to evaluate dislodgeable CrVI after bleach application. Our data suggest that As and CrVI in 25-year old CCA-wood still show exposure risks for children and potential for soil contamination. PMID:26004992

  15. Final Report - Effects of High Spinel and Chromium Oxide Crystal Contents on Simulated HLW Vitrification in DM100 Melter Tests, VSL-09R1520-1, Rev. 0, dated 6/22/09

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruger, Albert A.; Matlack, K. S.; Kot, W.; Pegg, I. L.; Chaudhuri, M.; Lutze, W.

    2013-11-13

    The principal objective of the work was to evaluate the effects of spinel and chromium oxide particles on WTP HLW melter operations and potential impacts on melter life. This was accomplished through a combination of crucible-scale tests, settling and rheological tests, and tests on the DM100 melter system. Crucible testing was designed to develop and identify HLW glass compositions with high waste loadings that exhibit formation of crystalline spinel and/or chromium oxide phases up to relatively high crystal contents (i.e., > 1 vol%). Characterization of crystal settling and the effects on melt rheology was performed on the HLW glass formulations. Appropriate candidate HLW glass formulations were selected, based on characterization results, to support subsequent melter tests. In the present work, crucible melts were formulated that exhibit up to about 4.4 vol% crystallization.

  16. The mechanical, electrochemical, and morphological characteristics of passivating oxide films covering cobalt-chromium-molybdenum alloys: A study of five microstructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Megremis, Spiro John

    2001-07-01

    Cobalt-chromium-molybdenum (Co-Cr-Mo) alloys possess a combination of properties that make them well suited for employment as biomaterials, such as high-strength and excellent wear and corrosion resistance. They receive this excellent corrosion resistance from passive oxide films which cover their surface. Because of the important role these oxide films play in protecting Co-Cr Mo alloys used in biological applications, there is a need to better understand them. This thesis investigated the structural and physical properties of the passivating oxide films covering Co-Cr Mo alloys with five different microstructures. The Co-Cr-Mo alloys were separated into the following groups: cast, wrought high carbon, wrought high carbon aged, forged high carbon, and forged low carbon. Electrochemical scratch tests were performed which provided information on the electrochemical kinetics of oxide fracture and repassivation for the different Co-Cr-Mo alloys. Furthermore, the stability and mechanical integrity of the oxide films covering the alloys were also evaluated. Step-polarization impedance spectroscopy tests were also performed on the different Co-Cr-Mo alloys, which provided valuable information about their electrochemical behavior when immersed in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) solution. For instance, it was observed that the corrosion properties of the different alloy types did not vary significantly with respect to the behavior of their individual polarization curves. Likewise, impedance values (maximum early resistance, maximum polarization resistance, and minimum capacitance) for the five alloy groups did not reveal any statistically meaningful differences. The similar passive electrochemical behavior of the five alloy groups suggests that the oxide films covering them were not significantly altered by changes in carbon content and processing. This research also showed that it was possible to monitor changes in the surface morphology of the cast Co-Cr-Mo alloys over a

  17. Preparation of explosive nanoparticles in a porous chromium(III) oxide matrix: a first attempt to control the reactivity of explosives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comet, M; Siegert, B; Pichot, V; Gibot, P; Spitzer, D

    2008-07-16

    This paper reports the first attempt to control the combustion and the detonation properties of a high explosive through its structure. A porous chromium(III) oxide matrix produced by the combustion of ammonium dichromate was infiltrated by hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX). The structure of the Cr(2)O(3) matrix was studied by both scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM, TEM); the Cr(2)O(3)/RDX nanocomposites were characterized by nitrogen adsorption. A mathematical model based on these techniques was used to demonstrate that the Cr(2)O(3) matrix encloses and stabilizes RDX particles at the nanoscale. The decomposition process of the nanocomposites was investigated by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The reactivity and sensitivity of the nanocomposites were studied by impact and friction tests, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), time-resolved cinematography and detonation experiments, and were correlated with their structure. The size of RDX nanoparticles and their distribution in the Cr(2)O(3) matrix have an important influence on their reactivity. The reactive properties of nanostructured RDX differ significantly from those of classical micron-sized RDX. For instance, the melting point disappears and the decomposition temperature is significantly lowered. The quantization of the explosive particles in the Cr(2)O(3) matrix decreases the sensitivity to mechanical stress and allows controlling the decomposition mode-i.e. combustion versus detonation. PMID:21828750

  18. Preparation of explosive nanoparticles in a porous chromium(III) oxide matrix: a first attempt to control the reactivity of explosives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Comet, M; Siegert, B; Pichot, V; Gibot, P; Spitzer, D [Laboratoire ISL/CNRS ' Nanomateriaux pour les Systemes Sous Sollicitations Extremes' (NS3E), FRE 3026, French-German Research Institute of Saint-Louis (ISL), 5 rue du General Cassagnou, 68301 Saint-Louis (France)], E-mail: comet@isl.tm.fr

    2008-07-16

    This paper reports the first attempt to control the combustion and the detonation properties of a high explosive through its structure. A porous chromium(III) oxide matrix produced by the combustion of ammonium dichromate was infiltrated by hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX). The structure of the Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} matrix was studied by both scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM, TEM); the Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}/RDX nanocomposites were characterized by nitrogen adsorption. A mathematical model based on these techniques was used to demonstrate that the Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} matrix encloses and stabilizes RDX particles at the nanoscale. The decomposition process of the nanocomposites was investigated by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The reactivity and sensitivity of the nanocomposites were studied by impact and friction tests, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), time-resolved cinematography and detonation experiments, and were correlated with their structure. The size of RDX nanoparticles and their distribution in the Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} matrix have an important influence on their reactivity. The reactive properties of nanostructured RDX differ significantly from those of classical micron-sized RDX. For instance, the melting point disappears and the decomposition temperature is significantly lowered. The quantization of the explosive particles in the Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} matrix decreases the sensitivity to mechanical stress and allows controlling the decomposition mode-i.e. combustion versus detonation.

  19. Effect of gallium,aluminium,and chromium on silica supported V-Mg-O catalysts during oxidative dehydrogenation of propane:Kinetic study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    B.Ravi Kumar; Rajeev Kumar

    2008-01-01

    The oxidative dehydrogenation(ODH)of propane was conducted on gallium,aluminum.and chromium doped Si30VMgO catalysts.On doping,the concentrations of the phases responsible for the activity and selectivity increased in their concentrations.The reaction studies were conducted in a tubular steel reactor at temperatures of 753,783,813.and 843 K and atmospheric pressure.The total flow rates of the feed were chosen as 30,40,50,and 60 ml/min.The propane to oxygen ratios were chosen at 1:1,2:1,and 3:1,respectively.The effect of various dopants on the activity and selectivity of the catalysts was studied.Deactivation studies were conducted over all the catalysts.The kinetic data were analyzed in terms of power law models and Langmuir-Hinshelwood(LH)models.The kinetic data results were analyzed by comparing the effect of dopants.Statistical model discrimination was done for the proposed models.AIC and BIC criteria were used for discrimination of the models.

  20. Electrochemical modification of chromium surfaces using 4-nitro- and4-fluorobenzenediazonium salts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hinge, Mogens; Cecatto, Marcel; Kingshott, Peter;

    2009-01-01

    Chromium surfaces can be electrografted with organic surface films using 4-nitro- or 4-fluorobenzenediazonium salts, despite the fact that the surfaces are covered with a protective chromium oxide layer...

  1. The effects of alkaline earth metal ions and halogen ions on the chromium oxide activities in alkaline earth metal oxide-halide-Cr2O3 system fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lian-Fu; Jiang, Mao-Fa; Wang, Wen-Zhong; Chen, Zhao-Ping

    2000-06-01

    The solid electrolyte cell — Mo|Cr + Cr2O3‖ZrO2(MgO)‖{Cu-Cr}alloy + (Cr2O3)fluxes|Mo+ is used at 1673 K to determine Cr2O3 activities in MO-MX 2-Cr2O3 (M = Ca2+, Ba2-, X = F- or Cl-) ternary fluxes, which are in equilibrium with the copper-chromium binary alloy. The ternary isothermal phase diagrams of CaO-CaF2-Cr2O3 and BaO-BaCl2-Cr2O3 system fluxes are inferred on the basis of the experimental results and binary phase diagrams. The results indicate that Cr2O3 activities in all fluxes always decrease with the increase of the X MO /X MX2 ratio. Partial replacement of BaO in BaO-BaF2-Cr2O3 fluxes by CaO is acceptable for economy and efficiency considerations. At the same time, partial substitution of BaO for CaO in CaO-CaF2-Cr2O3 fluxes is advantageous for phosphorus removal and chromium retention as a result of the increased Cr2O3 activities, increased basicities, and widening of the liquid zones. Compared to those in BaO-BaF2-Cr2O3 fluxes, Cr2O3 activities in CaO-CaF2-Cr2O3 fluxes approximately follow the same curve as the former, although the position and the width of the liquid zones are considerably different, and activities in BaO-BaCl2-Cr2O3 fluxes are higher at the lower Cr2O3 content, or vice versa. The activity coefficients of Cr2O3 in the fluxes decrease with the increase of the X MO /X MX 2 ratios.

  2. Chromium in diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    The best source of chromium is brewer's yeast. However, many people do not use brewer's yeast because it causes bloating ( abdominal distention ) and nausea . Other good sources of chromium include ...

  3. A Kinetic Model of Chromium in a Flame

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Chromium has been identified as a carcinogenic metal.Incineration is the useful method for disposal of toxic chromium hazard waste and a chromium kinetic model in a flame is very important to study chromium oxidation.Chromium chemical kinetics over a range of temperatures of a hydrogen/air flame is proposed.Nine chromium compounds and fifty-eight reversible chemical reactions were considered The forward reaction rates are calculated based on the molecular collision approach for unknown ones and Arrhenius's Law for known ones.The backward reaction rates were calculated according to forward reaction rates, the equilibrium constants and chemical thermodynamics.It is verified by several equilibrium cases and is tested by a hydrogen/air diffusion flame.The results show that the kinetic model could be used in cases in which the chromium kinetics play an important role in a flame

  4. Chromium Oxidation State in Planetary Basalts: Oxygen Fugacity Indicator and Critical Variable for Cr-Spinel Stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, A. S.; Burger, P. V.; Le, Loan; Papike, J. J.; Jone, J.; Shearer, C. K.

    2014-01-01

    Cr is a ubiquitous and relatively abundant minor element in basaltic, planetary magmas. At the reduced oxidation states (Cr2+. We have applied these results to modeling Cr spinel stability and Cr redox ratios in a primitive, iron-rich martian basalt.

  5. Chromium and Genomic Stability

    OpenAIRE

    Wise, Sandra S.; Wise, John Pierce

    2011-01-01

    Many metals serve as micronutrients which protect against genomic instability. Chromium is most abundant in its trivalent and hexavalent forms. Trivalent chromium has historically been considered an essential element, though recent data indicate that while it can have pharmacological effects and value, it is not essential. There are no data indicating that trivalent chromium promotes genomic stability and, instead may promote genomic instability. Hexavalent chromium is widely accepted as high...

  6. Response of Mentha haplocalyx Briq.to Chromium-Induced Oxidative Stress and Chromium Distribution%铬诱导下薄荷的氧化胁迫响应和铬分布

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张昌存; 高洁

    2011-01-01

    A pot culture experiment was carried out to investigate the effects of chromium on antioxidant enzyme activities, subcellular distribution and chromium accumulation of Mentha haplocalyx Briq. It was observed that with increasing chromium concentrations and time in the first 50 days, the activities of antioxidant enzymes (SOD, POD and CAT) first increased and then decreased, with a peak occurring at 40 mg/L of chromium. At the subcellular level, chromium content was distributed in cell wall > plastid > nucleus > mitochondrion > soluble fraction of the root cells and in soluble fraction > cell wall > chloroplast > nucleus > mitochondrion of the leaf cells. At the organ level, chromium accumulation in different organs increased continuously, and the chromic content of the roots accounted for 80%~93% of the total. These results suggested that antioxidant enzymes, the cell wall of the root and the vacuoles of the leaf played important roles in the major mechanism for M. haplocalyx Briq. accumulating chromium and its resistance to chromium toxicity.%为探讨薄荷(Mentha haplocalyx Briq.)耐受和富集重金属铬的生理机制,采用盆栽法研究不同质量浓度、不同处理时间Cr6+对薄荷不同器官中抗氧化酶(SOD,POD,CAT)活性、铬含量和亚细胞组分中铬分布的影响.结果表明:随着Cr6+质量浓度的增加,SOD,POD,CAT 3种酶活性呈先升后降的趋势,在Cr6+质量浓度为40 mg/L时,3种酶活性均出现峰值;在50 d内,3种酶活性整体上呈增长趋势.在亚细胞水平上,铬在根中的亚细胞分布从大到小依次为细胞壁、质体、细胞核、线粒体、可溶部分;铬在叶片中的亚细胞分布从大到小依次为可溶部分、细胞壁、叶绿体、细胞核、线粒体.在器官水平上,根中铬含量占整个植株铬含量的80%~93%,为器官中最高.研究表明薄荷体内的抗氧化酶,根中的细胞壁和叶片中的液泡在铬耐受和解毒中起到重要作用.

  7. Chromium isotope fractionation during oxidative weathering of the Antrim Basalts: An insight into the global Cr geochemical cycle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    D'Arcy, Joan Mary; Døssing, Lasse Nørbye; Frei, Robert;

    Cr isotopes fractionate during oxidative weathering of the continents; the oxidation of Cr (III) bearing minerals produces soluble Cr (VI) which is enriched in the heavy isotope, Cr (VI) is lost to local rivers resulting in a Cr depleted, isotopically light residual soil [1] [2]. To date, research...... in this area has focused on laterites, a unique soil type produced by intense tropical weathering. To evaluate if this phenomenon is unique to tropical regions we have measured the Cr isotope composition (d53/52Cr ‰) of soils and river water from the Antrim Plateau, Northern Ireland, a marine temperate climate....... Cr is enriched in the soil horizon relative to basaltic bedrock. Cr isotope fractionation is minimal with d53/52Cr values (-0.27 + 0.02 ‰ to -0.15 + 0.03‰) near to bedrock values (-0.25 + 0.04 ‰) indicating a lack of oxidative weathering. However, local river waters are enriched in isotopically heavy...

  8. Reproductive toxicological aspects of chromium in males

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To expand our present understanding of the effects of chromium on male fertility a number of studies were designed to achieve this through the use of chromium intoxicated experimental animals and through investigation of sexual hormones and sperm quality in welders. Also in view of the lack of an experimental model for effects of noxious substance on the epididymal spermatozoa the main objectives of the series of studies reviewed here were: A. To establish a model for evaluation of epididymal sperm count and motility in the rat. B. To investigate and compare the effects of tri- and hexavalent chromium on epididymal spermatozoa. Further to describe the effects of low-dose long-time exposure of rats to the most toxicological interesting chromium oxidative state - hexavalent chromium. C. By the use of autoradiography and γ-countinuing to expand the present knowledge on the distribution of chromium in the body with special reference to the male reproductive organs. D. To describe the effects of exposure to hexavalent chromium in welding fume on levels of sexual hormones and semen parameters in welders. (EG)

  9. IN-VIVO EVALUATION OF HEXAVALENT CHROMIUM INDUCED DNA DAMAGE BY ALKALINE COMET ASSAY AND OXIDATIVE STRESS IN CATLA CATLA

    OpenAIRE

    Kantha Deivi Arunachalam; Sathesh Kumar Annamalai; Jaya Krishna Kuruva

    2013-01-01

    In the present study, the acute toxicity of Chromium in fingerlings of Catla catla, an Indian major carp, was evaluated with renewal bioassay method. In vivo studies were designed to assess the extent of Micronucleus Assay, Comet Assay under the exposure of common heavy-metal compounds, namely, Chromium Nitrate, using Catla catla (2n = 20), as a test model. The laboratory acclimatized fishes were divided into four groups. Group I served as positive control and the other three as exposed group...

  10. Quantitative Analysis of Trace Chromium in Blood Samples. Combination of the Advanced Oxidation Process with Catalytic Adsorptive Stripping Voltammetry

    OpenAIRE

    Yong, Li; Armstrong, Kristie C.; Dansby-Sparks, Royce N.; Carrington, Nathan A.; Chambers, James Q.; Xue, Zi-Ling

    2006-01-01

    A new method for pretreating blood samples for trace Cr analysis is described. The Advanced Oxidation Process (AOP with H2O2 and 5.5-W irradiation for 60 min) is used to remove biological/organic species for subsequent analysis. Prior to the AOP pretreatment, acid (HNO3) is used at pH 3.0 to inhibit the enzyme catalase in the blood samples. Catalytic Adsorptive Stripping Voltammetry (CAdSV) at a bismuth film electrode (BiFE) gives Cr concentration of 6.0 ± 0.3 ppb in the blood samples. This c...

  11. Activated carbon adsorption for chromium treatment and recovery; Adsorbimento di cromo su carboni attivi a scopo di recupero e decontaminazione

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baroncelli, F.; Castelli, S.; De Francesco, M. [ENEA, Casaccia (Italy). Area Energia e Innovazione

    1994-05-01

    The capability of actived carbon systems to adsorb chromium from wastewater of galvanic industry is valued. Batch tests and column tests are carried out with good results. An activated carbon with acidic surface oxides can adsorb both chromate and chromium (III); chromate is reduced in situ and then adsorbed as chromium (III). Chromium can be desorbed from carbon by an acid or basic treatment obtaining respectively chromium (III) or chromate solutions. Carbon can be regenerated many times without evident signs of deterioration.

  12. Reduction of Chromium-VI by Chromium Resistant Lactobacilli: A Prospective Bacterium for Bioremediation

    OpenAIRE

    Mishra, Ritesh; Sinha, Vartika; Kannan, Ambrose; Upreti, Raj K.

    2012-01-01

    Chromium is a toxic heavy metal, which primarily exists in two inorganic forms, Cr (VI) and Cr (III). Highly soluble hexavalent chromium is carcinogenic due to its oxidizing nature. It is well established that the intestinal bacteria including Lactobacilli have regulatory effect on intestinal homeostasis and a breakdown in the relationship between intestinal cells and bacteria results in the manifestation of gastrointestinal (GI) disorders. In this study Cr (VI) resistance was developed in La...

  13. Speciation dependent radiotracer studies on chromium preconcentration using iron doped calcium alginate biopolymer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The work aims to study the differential attitude of Ca-alginate (CA) and Fe-doped calcium alginate (Fe-CA) and towards Cr(III) and Cr (IV) so that, depending on the oxidation state of chromium effluent, environmentally sustainable methodologies can be prescribed for removal of chromium. Throughout the experiment 51Cr has been used as the precursor of stable chromium

  14. Stabilization and solidification of chromium-contaminated soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cherne, C.A.; Thomson, B.M. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States). Civil Engineering Dept.; Conway, R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1997-11-01

    Chromium-contaminated soil is a common environmental problem in the United States as a result of numerous industrial processes involving chromium. Hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] is the species of most concern because of its toxicity and mobility in groundwater. One method of diminishing the environmental impact of chromium is to reduce it to a trivalent oxidation state [Cr(III)], in which it is relatively insoluble and nontoxic. This study investigated a stabilization and solidification process to minimize the chromium concentration in the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) extract and to produce a solidified waste form with a compressive strength in the range of 150 to 300 pounds per square inch (psi). To minimize the chromium in the TCLP extract, the chromium had to be reduced to the trivalent oxidation state. The average used in this study was an alluvium contaminated with chromic and sulfuric acid solutions. The chromium concentration in the in the in situ soil was 1212 milligrams per kilogram (mg/kg) total chromium and 275 mg/kg Cr(VI). The effectiveness of iron, ferrous sulfate to reduce Cr(VI) was tested in batch experiments.

  15. Synthesis of chromium containing pigments from chromium galvanic sludges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreola, F; Barbieri, L; Bondioli, F; Cannio, M; Ferrari, A M; Lancellotti, I

    2008-08-15

    In this work the screening results of the scientific activity conducted on laboratory scale to valorise chromium(III) contained in the galvanic sludge as chromium precursor for ceramic pigments are reported. The valorisation of this waste as a secondary raw material (SRM) is obtained by achievement of thermal and chemical stable crystal structures able to color ceramic material. Two different pigments pink CaCr(0.04)Sn(0.97)SiO(5) and green Ca(3)Cr(2)(SiO(4))(3) were synthesized by solid-state reactions using dried Cr sludge as chromium oxide precursor. The obtained pigments were characterized by X-ray diffraction and SEM analysis. Furthermore the color developed in a suitable ceramic glaze was investigated in comparison with the color developed by the pigments prepared from pure Cr(2)O(3). The characterization carried out corroborates the thermal and chemical stability of the synthesized pigments and, especially for the Cr-Sn pink pigment, the powders develop an intense color that is very similar to the color developed by the pigments obtained starting from pure Cr(2)O(3). PMID:18289775

  16. Synthesis of chromium containing pigments from chromium galvanic sludges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreola, F.; Barbieri, L. [Dipartimento di Ingegneria dei Materiali e dell' Ambiente, Universita di Modena e Reggio Emilia, Via Vignolese 905, 41100 Modena (Italy); Bondioli, F. [Dipartimento di Ingegneria dei Materiali e dell' Ambiente, Universita di Modena e Reggio Emilia, Via Vignolese 905, 41100 Modena (Italy)], E-mail: bondioli.federica@unimore.it; Cannio, M. [Dipartimento di Ingegneria dei Materiali e dell' Ambiente, Universita di Modena e Reggio Emilia, Via Vignolese 905, 41100 Modena (Italy); Ferrari, A.M. [Dipartimento di Scienza e Metodi dell' Ingegneria, Universita di Modena e Reggio Emilia, Viale Amendola 2, 42100 Reggio Emilia (Italy); Lancellotti, I. [Dipartimento di Ingegneria dei Materiali e dell' Ambiente, Universita di Modena e Reggio Emilia, Via Vignolese 905, 41100 Modena (Italy)

    2008-08-15

    In this work the screening results of the scientific activity conducted on laboratory scale to valorise chromium(III) contained in the galvanic sludge as chromium precursor for ceramic pigments are reported. The valorisation of this waste as a secondary raw material (SRM) is obtained by achievement of thermal and chemical stable crystal structures able to color ceramic material. Two different pigments pink CaCr{sub 0.04}Sn{sub 0.97}SiO{sub 5} and green Ca{sub 3}Cr{sub 2}(SiO{sub 4}){sub 3} were synthesized by solid-state reactions using dried Cr sludge as chromium oxide precursor. The obtained pigments were characterized by X-ray diffraction and SEM analysis. Furthermore the color developed in a suitable ceramic glaze was investigated in comparison with the color developed by the pigments prepared from pure Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The characterization carried out corroborates the thermal and chemical stability of the synthesized pigments and, especially for the Cr-Sn pink pigment, the powders develop an intense color that is very similar to the color developed by the pigments obtained starting from pure Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}.

  17. Determinação de rotina do crômio em fezes, como marcador biológico, pelo método espectrofotométrico ajustado da 1,5-difenilcarbazida The spectrophotometric method on the routine of 1,5-diphenylcarbazide was adjusted on chromium determination in feces, after its utilization as a biological marker as chromium (III oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hermann Bremer Neto

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste estudo foi ajustar o método espectrofotométrico da 1,5-difenilcarbazida à determinação do crômio em fezes, como marcador biológico, adequando-o à rotina laboratorial. Fatores que poderiam exercer interferência na transformação do crômio (III à crômio (VI foram testados, como a recuperação do metal, quantidade de amostra, quantidade e ordem de emprego dos ácidos oxidantes da digestão úmida, temperatura e tempo de digestão e perda por volatilização do crômio como cloreto de cromila, porém não se determinou estatisticamente interferência destes fatores. No método ajustado, a amostra é digerida pela clássica mistura ácida nítrica/perclórica, levando a oxidação do crômio (III a crômio (VI, e alíquota do extrato diluído é usado para reação com 1,5-difenilcarbazida; as absorbâncias são medidas a 550nm, utilizando-se de cubetas de um centímetro de caminho óptico, contra prova em branco conduzida simultaneamente. Dicromato de potássio foi empregado como substância de referência para obtenção da curva padrão na faixa de 0,25 - 2,5mg.mL-1 de Cr2O3 (1mg Cr2O3 º 1,9355mg K2Cr2O7.This work aims at adjusting the spectrophotometric method of 1,5-diphenylcarbazide for the determination of chromium in feces, as a biological marker. Factors that could interfere with the transformation of chromium (III into chromium (VI were tested, as the metal recovery, the sample amount, the amount and the order of use of the oxidant acids of the wet digestion, digestion temperature and digestion time, loss of chromium by volatilization as chromyl chlorid. However the interference of these factors were not statistically determined. In the adjusted method, the sample is classically digested by nitric/perchloric acid mixture leading to the oxidation of chromium (III to chromium (VI, and an aliquot of the diluted extract is used for reaction with 1,5-diphenylcarbazide; absorbance was measured at 550nm, using 1cm

  18. Surface redox properties of lanthanum chromium nickel oxide, lanthanum strontium cobalt oxide, and silver explored via in-situ x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vovk, Gregory

    The surface redox properties of LaCr0.6Ni0.4O 3 (powder), La0.5Sr0.5CoO3 (thin film) and silver (powder) were investigated using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). In order to control the oxidation state of a sample in ultra high vacuum (UHV) conditions, it was incorporated as the working electrode in a solid state electrochemical cell with the following configuration: (sample|YSZ|Pd:PdO)), where YSZ is 8 mol% yttria-stabilized zirconia, an oxide ion conducting electrolyte and Pd:PdO is a palladium-palladium oxide powder mixture serving as the reference electrode and an oxygen reservoir. Reduction/oxidation of the sample was initiated by applying an external bias voltage to the sample. It was found that the surface of LaCr0.6Ni0.4O 3 and LaNiO3 powders could be reversibly reduced and oxidized electrochemically to changes involving La, Cr, Ni, and to a lesser extent, O surface atoms. Binding energy shifts (with respect to the La 3d5/2 peak) were seen for the Cr 2p, Ni 3p, and O 1s peaks. The La 3d peaks did not shift noticeably upon reduction, but did exhibit La 3d5/2 parent:satellite ratio changes. The reduced surfaces of LaCr0.6Ni 0.4O3 and LaNiO3 were found to be active in adsorbing CO2, an indication of the increased Lewis basicity of these surfaces upon electrochemical reduction. La0.5Sr0.5CoO3 thin films displayed similar La 3d5/2 parent:satellite ratio changes as to those seen on LaCr0.6Ni0.4O3 and LaNiO3. The electronic behavior of the B-cation, Co, showed localized electronic changes. Furthermore, the surface stoichiometry of La0.5Sr0.5CoO 3 was rich in La and Sr and displayed irreversible binding energy changes in the Sr 3d and O 1s XPS signals. Two different species of oxygen and strontium were always present on the La0.5Sr0.5CoO3 surface. Ag showed reversible changes to O 1s XPS binding energy shifts and amounts. Although this behavior is in agreement with previous reports, the results were complicated by the reversible movement of sodium arising

  19. Bioleaching of chromium from tannery sludge by indigenous Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuan-Shan; Pan, Zhi-Yan; Lang, Jian-Min; Xu, Jian-Miao; Zheng, Yu-Guo

    2007-08-17

    Chromium in tannery sludge will cause serious environmental problems and is toxic to organisms. The acidophilic sulfur-oxidizing Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans can leach heavy metals form urban and industrial wastes. This study examined the ability of an indigenous sulfur-oxidizing A. thiooxidans to leach chromium from tannery sludge. The results showed that the pH of sludge mixture inoculated with the indigenous A. thiooxidans decreased to around 2.0 after 4 days. After 6 days incubation in shaking flasks at 30 degrees C and 160 rpm, up to 99% of chromium was solubilized from tannery sludge. When treated in a 2-l bubble column bioreactor for 5 days at 30 degrees C and aeration of 0.5 vvm, 99.7% of chromium was leached from tannery sludge. The results demonstrated that chromium in tannery sludge can be efficiently leached by the indigenous A. thiooxidans.

  20. Structure and morphology studies of chromium film at elevated temperature in hypersonic environment

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    G M Hegde; V Kulkarni; M Nagaboopathy; K P J Reddy

    2012-06-01

    This paper presents the after shock heated structural and morphological studies of chromium film coated on hypersonic test model as a passive drag reduction element. The structural changes and the composition of phases of chromium due to shock heating (2850 K) are characterized using X-ray diffraction studies. Surface morphology changes of chromium coating have been studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) before and after shock heating. Significant amount of chromium ablation and sublimation from the model surface is noticed from SEM micrographs. Traces of randomly oriented chromium oxides formed along the coated surface confirm surface reaction of chromium with oxygen present behind the shock. Large traces of amorphous chromium oxide phases are also observed.

  1. Chromium(VI) transport and fate in unsaturated zone and aquifer: 3D Sandbox results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xingmin; Sobecky, Patricia A; Zhao, Lanpo; Crawford, Patrice; Li, Mingtang

    2016-04-01

    The simulation of Cr(VI) behavior in an unsaturated zone and aquifer, using a 3D experimental set-up were performed to illustrate the distribution, transport and transformation of Cr(VI), and further to reveal the potential harm of Cr(VI) after entering the groundwater. The result indicated that chromium(VI) was transported in the vertical direction, meanwhile, was transported in the horizontal direction under the influence of groundwater flow. The direction and distance away from the pollution source zone had great effect on the chromium(VI) concentration. At the sampling sites near the pollution source zone, there was a sudden increase of chromium(VI) concentration. The concentration of chromium(III) concentration in some random effluent samples was not detected. Chromium had not only transported but also had fraction and specie transformation in the unsaturated zone and aquifer. The relative concentration of residue fraction chromium was decreased with time. The content of Fe-Mn oxide fraction chromium was increased with time. The relative content of exchangeable and carbonate-bound fraction chromium was lower and the content variations were not obvious. Chromium(VI) (91-98%) was first reduced to chromium(III) rapidly. The oxidation reaction occurred later and the relative content of chromium(VI) was increased again. The presence of manganese oxides under favorable soil conditions can promote the reoxidation of Cr(III) to Cr(VI).

  2. Chromium(III) and chromium(VI) surface treated galvanized steel for outdoor constructions: environmental aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindström, David; Hedberg, Yolanda; Odnevall Wallinder, Inger

    2010-06-01

    The long-term degradation of chromium(III) (Zn-Cr(III)) and chromium(VI)-based (Zn-Cr(VI)) surface treatments on galvanized steel and their capacities to hinder the release of zinc induced by atmospheric corrosion at nonsheltered urban and marine exposure conditions for 2 years are investigated. Compared to bare zinc sheet, both surface treatments revealed high corrosion protection abilities and capacities to hinder the release of zinc, still evident after 2 years of exposure. The zinc barrier properties of the thinner Zn-Cr(VI) (10 nm) treatment were during the first 100 days of urban exposure slightly improved compared with Zn-Cr(III) (35 nm). However, their long-term protection capacities were inverse. Released concentrations of total chromium correspond to annual release rates less than 0.000032 (Zn-Cr(III)) and 0.00014 g Cr m(-2) yr(-1) (Zn-Cr(VI)) after 1 year of urban exposure. Aging by indoor storage of the surface treatments prior to outdoor exposure reduced the released Cr concentrations from the surface treatments. No Cr(VI) was released from the aged surfaces but from the freshly exposed Zn-Cr(VI). Marine exposure conditions resulted in a faster reduction of chromate to chromium(III)oxide compared with urban conditions, and a significantly lower amount of both chromium(III) and chromium(VI) released from Zn-Cr(VI) at the marine site compared with the urban site. PMID:20462267

  3. Biosorption potency of Aspergillus niger for removal of chromium (VI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Shaili; Thakur, Indu Shekhar

    2006-09-01

    Aspergillus niger isolated from soil and effluent of leather tanning mills had higher activity to remove chromium. The potency of Aspergillus niger was evaluated in shake flask culture by absorption of chromium at pH 6 and temperature 30 degrees C. The results of the study indicated removal of more than 75% chromium by Aspergillus niger determined by diphenylcarbazide colorimetric assay and atomic absorption spectrophotometry after 7 days. Study of microbial Cr(VI) reduction and identification of reduction intermediates has been hindered by the lack of analytical techniques that can identify the oxidation state with subcellular spatial resolution. Therefore, removal of chromium was further substantiated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), which indicated an accumulation of chromium in the fungal mycelium. PMID:16874547

  4. Substoichiometric extraction of chromium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Substoichiometric extraction of chromium with tetraphenylarsonium chloride (TPACl), tri-n-octylamine (TNOA), diethylammonium diethyldithiocarbamate (DDDC) and ammonium pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate (APDC) was examined in detail. Chromium can be extracted substoichiometrically in a pH range, which is 1.1-2.6 for the TPACl compound, 0.6-2.3 for the TNOA compound, 5.1-6.4 for the DDDC chelate and 3.9-4.9 for the APDC chelate. Chromium in high-purity calcium carbonate, Orchard Leaves (NBS SRM-1571) and Brewers Yeast (NBS SRM-1569) was determined by neutron activation analysis combined with substoichiometric extraction by DDDC and APDC. The values of 2.0+-0.02 ppm and 2.6+-0.2 ppm were obtained for Brewers Yeast and Orchard Leaves, respectively. These values were in good agreement with those reported by NBS. The reaction mechanism and the reaction ratio between hexavalent chromium and dithiocarbamate are also discussed. (author)

  5. The carcinogenicity of chromium

    OpenAIRE

    Norseth, Tor

    1981-01-01

    The carcinogenicity of chromium compounds is reviewed with specific attention to the gaps in knowledge for risk estimation and research needs. The most important problems at present are whether trivalent chromium compounds cause cancer, and whether there is a difference in cancer causing effects between the soluble and the slightly soluble hexavalent compounds in the practical exposure situation. Dose estimates for risk estimation based on epidemiological investigations are also lacking. Pres...

  6. Polymeric precursors method for obtaining pigments based on Inorganic oxides of chromium and iron deposited on TiO{sub 2}; Metodo dos precursores polimericos para obtencao de pigmentos inorganicos a base de oxidos de cromo e de ferro, depositados sobre TiO{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-07-01

    The case study was the use of chromium oxides and iron, as a precursor in the synthesis of inorganic pigments. The synthesis was based on the dissolution of citric acid as a complexing agent, addition of metal oxides, such as ion chromophores; polymerization with ethylene glycol and doping with titanium oxide. Going through pre-calcination, breakdown, calcination at different temperatures (700, 900 and 1100 deg C resulting in pigments: green for pigment and chromium deposited on TiO2, orange for iron on TiO2. The thermal analysis (TG and DTA), evaluated their thermal decompositions, the XRD revealed the formation of crystalline phases such as iron titanate and chrome titanate; SEM showed the formation of hexagonal particles for both oxides. Under the different analysis, one can see the potential stability of pigments and powders, can be proposed its use as pigments in polymers. (author)

  7. Propriedades texturais e catalíticas de óxidos de ferro contendo cromo e cobre Textural and catalytic properties of chromium and copper-doped iron oxides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marluce Oliveira da Guarda Souza

    1998-07-01

    Full Text Available Chromium and copper-doped hematites were prepared with the aim of studying the synergistic effect of these dopants on the textural and on the catalytic properties of the iron oxides towards the high temperature shift reaction. It was found that the most active catalysts were those with the highest amount of copper. They had the Fe(II/Fe(III ratio near the stoichiometric value of magnetite, the highest surface areas under the reactional atmosphere and the greatest tendency to produce the active form; they also were poorly crystalline solids. The best performance was shown by the catalyst with Fe/Cu=10, heated at 300ºC. It can thus be concluded that copper acts both as textural and structural promoter in these catalysts.

  8. BIOSORPTION OF CHROMIUM (VI) FROM INDUSTRIAL EFFLUENT BY WILD ANDMUTANT TYPE STRAIN OF SACCHAROMYCES CEREVISIAE AND ITS IMMOBILIZED FORM

    OpenAIRE

    K Selvam, K Arungandhi, B Vishnupriya, T Shanmuga priya and M Yamuna

    2013-01-01

    Biosorption of chromium was studied by wild type Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain, mutant strain, immobilized-wild type and mutant strain. Chromium absorption pattern was observed in all experimental conditions. Hexavalent chromium (VI) was analyzed by diphenyl carbazide method, by oxidizing the trivalent chromium (III). The percentage efficiency of wild type S. cerevisiae and its mutant strain, immobilized-wild type and mutant strain were 94.8%, 98.7%, 97.4% and 100% respectively. S. cerevisi...

  9. Obtaining decorative chromium plating from trivalent chromium solutions

    OpenAIRE

    Óscar Javier Suárez García

    2010-01-01

    The present work was aimed at a qualitative evaluation, in the laboratory, of different alternatives for assembling and operating a trivalent chromium bath for decorative chromium plating. Different chromium concentration solutions and different complexing agents were used. The initial result of this analysis was that chloride, formate and acetate solutions produced the best results. Solution preparation conditions were evaluated: temperature, chromium III complex formation time and also ...

  10. Chromium reduction from slag on electromelting of stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Specific features of chromium reduction from the slag on electromelting of stainless steel type Kh18N10T according to one- or two-slag procedure were studied. It was shown that one-slag melting technology allows double decrease of chromium losses in the form of incompletely reduced oxides. This occurs due to additional chemical reactions between metal and slag on their combined pouring into the ladle. 1 ref.; 3 figs

  11. Contribution of photoelectron spectrometry and infrared spectrometry to the study of various oxidised forms of chromium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Securate knowledge of internal surface of primary coolant circuits of PWR is required for an estimation of dissolution of used materials and for estimation of decontamination efficiency. The binding energies of various electron levels of chromium were determined by photoelectron spectrometry (ESCA), both for the metal and for certain compounds. Because of the intensities of the signals obtained the 2 p 3/2 level alone can be used for analytical purposes. Owing to a possible interference between this level due to hexavalent chromium and a satellite peak caused by trivalent chromium the method is not able to show up small amounts of chromium VI in chromium III. Simultaneous detection of the hexavalent and trivalent forms was achieved by infrared spectrometry. The problem of revealing traces of chromium VI in surface layers of trivalent chromium oxide has thus been solved

  12. Strategies for chromium bioremediation of tannery effluent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Satyendra Kumar; Tripathi, Manikant; Srinath, Thiruneelakantan

    2012-01-01

    Bioremediation offers the possibility of using living organisms (bacteria, fungi, algae,or plants), but primarily microorganisms, to degrade or remove environmental contaminants, and transform them into nontoxic or less-toxic forms. The major advantages of bioremediation over conventional physicochemical and biological treatment methods include low cost, good efficiency, minimization of chemicals, reduced quantity of secondary sludge, regeneration of cell biomass, and the possibility of recover-ing pollutant metals. Leather industries, which extensively employ chromium compounds in the tanning process, discharge spent-chromium-laden effluent into nearby water bodies. Worldwide, chromium is known to be one of the most common inorganic contaminants of groundwater at pollutant hazardous sites. Hexavalent chromium poses a health risk to all forms of life. Bioremediation of chromium extant in tannery waste involves different strategies that include biosorption, bioaccumulation,bioreduction, and immobilization of biomaterial(s). Biosorption is a nondirected physiochemical interaction that occurs between metal species and the cellular components of biological species. It is metabolism-dependent when living biomass is employed, and metabolism-independent in dead cell biomass. Dead cell biomass is much more effective than living cell biomass at biosorping heavy metals, including chromium. Bioaccumulation is a metabolically active process in living organisms that works through adsorption, intracellular accumulation, and bioprecipitation mechanisms. In bioreduction processes, microorganisms alter the oxidation/reduction state of toxic metals through direct or indirect biological and chemical process(es).Bioreduction of Cr6+ to Cr3+ not only decreases the chromium toxicity to living organisms, but also helps precipitate chromium at a neutral pH for further physical removal,thus offering promise as a bioremediation strategy. However, biosorption, bioaccumulation, and

  13. Chromium in potatoes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chromium concentration in potatoes was determined, and tubes were labeled either intrinsically or extrinsically with radioactive chromate (51Cr). A labeled chromium complex was isolated from preparations of raw, baked, or fried potatoes and chromatographed on gel permeation media. Potato pulp and peel contained 1.63 and 2.70 μg of Cr/g tissue, respectively. There was no correlation between the two, nor did they respond similarly to changes of variety or locations. No significant differences were apparent in relative migration of the isolated complexes except between raw and cooked extrinsically labeled preparations

  14. Investigation of the surface composition of electrodeposited black chromium by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Survilienė, S., E-mail: sveta@ktl.mii.lt; Češūnienė, A.; Jasulaitienė, V.; Jurevičiūtė, I.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Black chromium electrodeposited from a Cr(III) bath is composed of oxide, hydroxide and metallic chromium. • Metallic phase is absent in black chromium electrodeposited from a Cr(III) + ZnO bath. • The near-surface layer is rich in hydroxides, whereas oxides of both metals predominate in the depth of the coatings. - Abstract: The paper reviews black chromium electrodeposited from a trivalent chromium bath containing ZnO as a second main component. The chemical compositions of the top layers of the black chromium coatings were studied by the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy method. The surface of black chromium was found to be almost entirely covered with organic substances. To gain information on the state of each element in the deposit bulk, the layer-by-layer etching of the black chromium surface with argon gas was used. Analysis of XPS spectra has shown that the top layers of black chromium without zinc are composed of various Cr(III) components, organic substances and metallic Cr, whereas metallic Cr is almost absent in black chromium containing some amount of Zn(II) compounds. The ratios of metal/oxide phases were found to be 10/27 and 2/28 for black chromium without and with zinc, respectively. It has been determined that owing to the presence of ZnO in the Cr(III) bath, the percentage of metallic chromium is substantially reduced in black chromium which is quite important for good solar selective characteristics of the coating. The results confirm some of earlier observations and provide new information on the composition of the near-surface layers.

  15. Investigation of the surface composition of electrodeposited black chromium by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Black chromium electrodeposited from a Cr(III) bath is composed of oxide, hydroxide and metallic chromium. • Metallic phase is absent in black chromium electrodeposited from a Cr(III) + ZnO bath. • The near-surface layer is rich in hydroxides, whereas oxides of both metals predominate in the depth of the coatings. - Abstract: The paper reviews black chromium electrodeposited from a trivalent chromium bath containing ZnO as a second main component. The chemical compositions of the top layers of the black chromium coatings were studied by the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy method. The surface of black chromium was found to be almost entirely covered with organic substances. To gain information on the state of each element in the deposit bulk, the layer-by-layer etching of the black chromium surface with argon gas was used. Analysis of XPS spectra has shown that the top layers of black chromium without zinc are composed of various Cr(III) components, organic substances and metallic Cr, whereas metallic Cr is almost absent in black chromium containing some amount of Zn(II) compounds. The ratios of metal/oxide phases were found to be 10/27 and 2/28 for black chromium without and with zinc, respectively. It has been determined that owing to the presence of ZnO in the Cr(III) bath, the percentage of metallic chromium is substantially reduced in black chromium which is quite important for good solar selective characteristics of the coating. The results confirm some of earlier observations and provide new information on the composition of the near-surface layers

  16. Characteristics of Aerosols Containing Chromium and Nickel From Some Thermal Spraying Operations

    OpenAIRE

    Bohgard, Mats; Welinder, Hans; Akselsson, Roland

    1983-01-01

    Characterization of aerosols, emitted from five methods of thermal spraying with materials containing chromium and nickel were carried out. The characterization procedure includes the determinations of the metal content, the particle size distribution, the oxidation state of chromium and a measure of the solubility of chromium. Three different kinds of samplers and the analytical methods PIXE (Particle Induced X-ray Emission analysis), ESCA (Electron Spectroscopy for Chemical Analysis), AAS (...

  17. Contingency plans for chromium utilization. Publication NMAB-335

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The United States depends entirely on foreign sources for the critical material, chromium, making it very vulnerable to supply disruptions. This vulnerability results because chromium is essential for the fabrication of corrosion-resisting steels and high-temperature, oxidation-resisting alloys in applications that are vital to the nation's technological well-being; because no substitutes are known for these materials in those applications; and because the known, substantial deposits of chromite ore are only in a few geographical locations that could become inaccessible to the United States as a result of political actions. The effectiveness of programs such as stockpiling, conservation, and research and development for substitutes to reduce the impact of disruption of imports of chromite and ferrochromium are discussed. Alternatives for decreasing chromium consumption also are identified for chromium-containing materials in the areas of design, processing, and substitution

  18. BIOSORPTION OF CHROMIUM (VI FROM INDUSTRIAL EFFLUENT BY WILD ANDMUTANT TYPE STRAIN OF SACCHAROMYCES CEREVISIAE AND ITS IMMOBILIZED FORM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Selvam, K Arungandhi, B Vishnupriya, T Shanmuga priya and M Yamuna

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Biosorption of chromium was studied by wild type Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain, mutant strain, immobilized-wild type and mutant strain. Chromium absorption pattern was observed in all experimental conditions. Hexavalent chromium (VI was analyzed by diphenyl carbazide method, by oxidizing the trivalent chromium (III. The percentage efficiency of wild type S. cerevisiae and its mutant strain, immobilized-wild type and mutant strain were 94.8%, 98.7%, 97.4% and 100% respectively. S. cerevisiae mutant strain and their immobilized form was found to be effective in biosorption of chromium (VI than the wild type forms.

  19. Effect of chromium oxide (III) nanoparticles on the production of reactive oxygen species and photosystem II activity in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Cristina Henning da; Perreault, François; Oukarroum, Abdallah; Melegari, Sílvia Pedroso; Popovic, Radovan; Matias, William Gerson

    2016-09-15

    With the growth of nanotechnology and widespread use of nanomaterials, there is an increasing risk of environmental contamination by nanomaterials. However, the potential implications of such environmental contamination are hard to evaluate since the toxicity of nanomaterials if often not well characterized. The objective of this study was to evaluate the toxicity of a chromium-based nanoparticle, Cr2O3-NP, used in a wide diversity of industrial processes and commercial products, on the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. The deleterious impacts of Cr2O3-NP were characterized using cell density measurements, production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), esterase enzymes activity, and photosystem II electron transport as indicators of toxicity. Cr2O3-NP exposure inhibited culture growth and significantly lowered cellular Chlorophyll a content. From cell density measurements, EC50 values of 2.05±0.20 and 1.35±0.06gL(-1) Cr2O3-NP were obtained after 24 and 72h of exposure, respectively. In addition, ROS levels were increased to 160.24±2.47% and 59.91±0.15% of the control value after 24 and 72h of exposition to 10gL(-1) Cr2O3-NP. At 24h of exposure, the esterase activity increased to 160.24% of control value, revealing a modification of the short-term metabolic response of algae to Cr2O3-NP exposure. In conclusion, the metabolism of C. reinhardtii was the most sensitive to Cr2O3-NP after 24h of treatment. PMID:26803219

  20. Investigations of the oxidation-induced service life of chromium steels for high temperature fuel cell application (SOFC); Untersuchungen zur oxidationsbedingten Lebensdauer von Chromstaehlen fuer die Anwendung in der Hochtemperaturbrennstoffzelle (SOFC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ertl, S.T.

    2006-08-17

    The increasing energy consumption of future automobiles should be covered by a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) used as an additional energy supply (auxiliary power unit). The application of a SOFC with about 5 kW power in cars requires small size, low weight and an economic fabrication. To achieve this goal the interconnector and the metallic anode substrate (depending on an alternative concept of construction) should be manufactured out of thin Crofer22APU, a high chromium ferritic steel. The scale formation mechanisms on Crofer22APU sheets, wires and powder metallurgical produced foils of different thicknesses were investigated in several atmospheres of water vapour/hydrogen at 800 and 900 C, simulating the anode conditions. For scale characterization a number of conventional analysis techniques such as optical metallography, scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction were used in combination with deflection testing in monofacial oxidation and two-stage oxidation studies using {sup 18}O and H{sub 2} {sup 18}O tracer. With these results a theoretical model for the determination of lifetime was developed for Crofer22APU components in simulated anode gas. It was found that the lifetime at a given temperature depends not only on the surface-to-volume ratio, but also on the geometry of the component (e.g. sheet or wire). The critical Cr content required for breakaway oxidation depends on microcrack formation in the surface oxide scale, which occurs on ridges of a sheet during thermal cycling. The development of a metallic interconnector and a metallic anode substrate requires measures to avoid interdiffusion between the alloy and the bordering nickel-YSZ (yttrium stabilized zirconia) cermet of the anode, or depending on the conception of the stack, the bordering nickel-YSZ cermet of the anode functional layer. Therefore the suitability of preoxidation layers after different preoxidation conditions was tested. It was found that the inhibition of the interdiffusion

  1. Ion nitriding post-oxidation as an alternative technique to electrolytic chromium; Nitruracion post-oxidacion ionica como tecnica alternativa al cromado electrolitico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz-Guillen, J. C.; Granda-Gutierrez, E.E.; Campa-Castilla, A.; Perez-Aguilar, S.I.; Garza-Gomez, A.; Candelas-Ramirez, J.; Mendez-Mendez, R. [COMIMSA. Corporacion Mexicana de Investigacion en Materiales S.A. de C.V., Saltillo, Coahuila (Mexico)]. E-mail: jcarlos@comimsa.com

    2010-11-15

    The effect of temperature and processing time during post-oxidation on hardness and corrosion resistance of AISI 1045 samples treated through nitriding and post-oxidation in a pulsed plasma discharge is evaluated in this paper. Also, a comparative analysis of the mechanical properties obtained with the dual nitriding - post oxidation process versus those properties of typical hard chrome coatings was performed with an aim to propose an alternative technique to the processes of galvanic coatings. The latter revealed that the process of ion nitriding and post-oxidation provides similar properties in hardness and improves the corrosion resistance compared to the hard chrome case. It is conclude that the technique of ion nitriding and post-oxidation is a non environmental harmful technology with strong potential to replace highly polluting electroplating techniques for application of hard chrome coatings. [Spanish] En el presente trabajo se evalua el efecto del tiempo y la temperatura de post-oxidacion sobre las propiedades de dureza y resistencia a la corrosion de muestras de acero AISI 1045 sometido al proceso de nitruracion post-oxidacion ionica en plasmas pulsados. Asi mismo, con el objetivo de fundamentar la propuesta de utilizacion de la nitruracion post-oxidacion ionica como una tecnica alternativa a los procesos galvanicos para aplicacion de recubrimientos de cromo duro, se realizo un analisis comparativo de propiedades, evidenciando que, mediante el proceso nitruracion postoxidacion ionica, es posible obtener caracteristicas similares en dureza y mejores en resistencia a la corrosion que las tipicas obtenidas para el cromo duro. Los resultados obtenidos permiten postular una tecnica que no dana al medio ambiente, como lo es la nitruracion post-oxidacion ionica, como candidata potencial para sustituir las tecnicas galvanicas altamente contaminantes para aplicacion de cromo duro.

  2. Synthesis and characterization of ceramic pigments based on oxides of chromium and iron, on TiO{sub 2}; Sintese e caracterizacao de pigmentos ceramicos a base de oxidos de cromo e de ferro, depositados sobre TiO{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, E.M. da; Galvao, S.B.; Paskocimas, C.A., E-mail: everlania_siva@yahoo.com.br [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte (UFRN), Natal, RN (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    This work used oxides of chromium and iron, as precursors of the synthesis of ceramic pigments. The synthesis is based on the dissolution of citric acid as a complexing agent, addition of metal oxides, such as ion chromophores; polymerization with ethylene glycol and doping with titanium oxide. Passing through pre-calcination, breakdown, calcination at different temperatures (900 and 1100 ° C), resulting in pigments: green for pigment chrome deposited on TiO{sub 2} and orange for iron on TiO{sub 2}. Noticing an increase in the opacity with increasing temperature. The thermal analysis (TG and DTA), evaluated their thermal behavior, the XRD revealed the formation of crystalline phases as Iron Titanate and Chrome Titanate; SEM showed the formation of hexagonal particles for both oxides. Thus, the synthesized oxides were within the requirements for application as ceramic pigments. (author)

  3. Bioremediation of chromium solutions and chromium containing wastewaters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malaviya, Piyush; Singh, Asha

    2016-08-01

    Cr(VI) represents a serious threat to human health, living resources and ecological system as it is persistent, carcinogenic and toxic, whereas, Cr(III), another stable oxidation state of Cr, is less toxic and can be readily precipitated out of solution. The conventional methods of Cr(VI) removal from wastewaters comprise of chemical reduction followed by chemical precipitation. However, these methods utilize large amounts of chemicals and generate toxic sludge. This necessitates the need for devising an eco-technological strategy that would use the untapped potential of the biological world for remediation of Cr(VI) containing wastewaters. Among several viable approaches, biotransformation of Cr(VI) to relatively non-toxic Cr(III) by chromium resistant bacteria offers an economical- and environment-friendly option for its detoxification. Various studies on use of Cr(VI) tolerant viable bacterial isolates for treatment of Cr(VI) containing solutions and wastewater have been reported. Therefore, a detailed account of mechanisms and processes involved in bioreduction of Cr(VI) from solutions and wastewaters by bacterial isolates are the focus of this review article in addition to a discussion on toxicity of Cr(VI) on bacterial strains and various factors affecting Cr(VI) bioreduction. PMID:25358056

  4. A Study of the High Temperature on Chromium Carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The oxidation rates of chromium carbide have been measured at 900 to 1300 .deg. C and oxygen pressures between 2x10-2 8 x 10-2 Pa using thermogravimetric analysis method. Oxidation behavior of chromium carbide appeared to change very sensitively with both temperature and oxygen pressure. In case with the oxygen pressure lower than 8 x 10-2 Pa, the weight gain in the specimen due to the formation of chromium oxide occurred linearly with time at the every temperature studied, but when the oxygen pressure was increased up to 8 x 10-2Pa, the weight gain behavior versus time showed entirely different tendency. That is, in the temperature range of 900 .deg. C to 1000 .deg. C weight gain occurred, however in the range of 1000 .deg. C to 1300 .deg. C weight lost was observed. The reason for the observed linear kinetics could be inferred as follows. As the oxidation of carbide proceeded carbon monoxide would build up at the interface of the chromium oxide and carbide. If the equilibrium pressure of carbon monoxide at the interface exceeds the gas pressure at the outer specimen surface, the oxide scale formed on it might be cracked exposing new carbide sites on which oxidation could occur successively. Through a thermodynamic consideration it was judged that the above deduction was reasonable. On the other hand, the weight lost mentioned above was explained that it could occur mainly due to the further oxidation of Cr2O3 to the volatile CrO3 at the corresponding experimental conditions. Weight loss phenomenon mentioned before which was observed in the oxidation of chromium carbide was also clearified by X-ray diffraction method and SEM. That is, at 900 .deg. C stable oxide of chromium, (Cr2O3) was identified easily on the specimen surface. However, at 1300 .deg. C, only a few amount of this stable oxide could be found on to specimen surface, indicating Cr2O3 had been evaporated to CrO3 gas

  5. Chromium stable isotope fractionation in modern biogeochemical cycling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paulukat, Cora Stefanie

    Chromium (Cr) is, due to its redox-sensitive properties, a powerful tracer for redox processes in environmental studies. Changes in its preferred oxidation state (III and VI) are accompanied by Crisotope fractionation. The Cr-isotope system is a promising tool to reconstruct the evolution of free...

  6. A Comprehensive Review on Nickel (II) And Chromium VI Toxicities - Possible Antioxidant (Allium Sativum Linn) Defenses

    OpenAIRE

    Kusal K. Das

    2009-01-01

    The toxicity associated with nickel (II) and chromium (VI) is mainly due to generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) with subsequent oxidative deterioration of biological macromolecules. Both nickel and chromium can generate free radicals (FR) directly from molecular oxygen in a two step process to produce superoxide anion and in continued process, produce highly toxic hydroxyl radical. The pro-oxidative effects are compounded by fact that they also inhibit antioxidant enzymes and deplete ...

  7. Anti-diabetic potential of chromium histidinate in diabetic retinopathy rats

    OpenAIRE

    Ulas, Mustafa; Orhan, Cemal; Tuzcu, Mehmet; Ozercan, Ibrahim Hanifi; Sahin, Nurhan; Gencoglu, Hasan; Komorowski, James R; Sahin, Kazim

    2015-01-01

    Background Chromium (Cr) is commonly used as a complementary medicine for diabetes mellitus. Several studies suggest that Cr intakes may improve glucose metabolism and decrease oxidative stress. Therefore, we aimed to assess the effects of chromium histidinate (CrHis) supplementation using a range of reliable biomarkers of oxidative damage and histopathological changes in rats with diabetic retinopathy. Methods Diabetes was induced with streptozotocin [(STZ), 55 mg/kg] by intraperitoneal inje...

  8. Hexavalent chromium and its effect on health: possible protective role of garlic (Allium sativum Linn).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Kusal K; Dhundasi, Salim A; Das, Swastika N

    2011-01-01

    Hexavalent chromium or chromium (VI) is a powerful epithelial irritant and a confirmed human carcinogen. This heavy metal is toxic to many plants, aquatic animals, and bacteria. Chromium (VI) which consists of 10%-15% total chromium usage, is principally used for metal plating (H2Cr2O7), as dyes, paint pigments, and leather tanning, etc. Industrial production of chromium (II) and (III) compounds are also available but in small amounts as compared to chromium (VI). Chromium (VI) can act as an oxidant directly on the skin surface or it can be absorbed through the skin, especially if the skin surface is damaged. The prooxidative effects of chromium (VI) inhibit antioxidant enzymes and deplete intracellular glutathione in living systems and act as hematotoxic, immunotoxic, hepatotoxic, pulmonary toxic, and nephrotoxic agents. In this review, we particularly address the hexavalent chromium-induced generation of reactive oxygen species and increased lipid peroxidation in humans and animals, and the possible role of garlic (Allium sativum Linn) as a protective antioxidant. PMID:22865357

  9. Biosorption and biotransformation of chromium by Serratia sp. isolated from tannery effluent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Shaili; Thakur, Indu Shekhar

    2012-01-01

    A bacterium isolated from soil and sediment ofa leather tanning mill's effluent was identified as Serratia sp. by the analysis of 16S rDNA. Scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray analysis (SEM-EDX) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were used to assess morphological changes and confirm chromium biosorption in Serratia sp. both in a shake-flask culture containing chromium and in a tannery wastewater. The SEMEDX and the elemental analysis of the chromate-containing samples confirmed the binding of chromium with the bacterial biomass. The TEM exhibited chromium accumulation throughout the bacterial cell, with some granular deposits in the cell periphery and in the cytoplasm. X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD) was used to quantify the chromium and to determine the chemical nature of the metal-microbe interaction. The XRD data showed the crystalline character of the precipitates, which consisted of mainly calcium chromium oxide, chromium fluoride phosphate and related organo-Cr(III) complex crystals. The XRD data also revealed a strong involvement of cellular carboxyl and phosphate groups in chromium binding by the bacterial biomass. The results of the study indicated that a combined mechanism of ion-exchange, complexation, croprecipitation and immobilization was involved in the biosorption of chromium by bacterial cells in contaminated environments. PMID:22519094

  10. On texture formation of chromium electrodeposits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Christian Bergenstof; Leisner, Peter; Horsewell, Andy

    1998-01-01

    The microstructure, texture and hardness of electrodeposited hard, direct current (DC) chromium and pulsed reversed chromium has been investigated. These investigations suggest that the growth and texture of hard chromium is controlled by inhibition processes and reactions. Further, it has been e...... established that codeposition of Cr2O3 nanoparticles is a general feature of DC chromium electrodeposition....

  11. Chromium reduction in Pseudomonas putida.

    OpenAIRE

    Ishibashi, Y.; Cervantes, C; Silver, S

    1990-01-01

    Reduction of hexavalent chromium (chromate) to less-toxic trivalent chromium was studied by using cell suspensions and cell-free supernatant fluids from Pseudomonas putida PRS2000. Chromate reductase activity was associated with soluble protein and not with the membrane fraction. The crude enzyme activity was heat labile and showed a Km of 40 microM CrO4(2-). Neither sulfate nor nitrate affected chromate reduction either in vitro or with intact cells.

  12. Internal Friction In The PFN Ceramics With Chromium Dopand

    OpenAIRE

    Zachariasz R.; Bochenek D.; Bruś B.

    2015-01-01

    An aim of this work was to determine an influence of an admixture, the chromium (for x from 0.01 to 0.06), on the mechanical properties of the PFN ceramics. The ceramics with chemical composition Pb(Fe0.5−xCrxNb0.5)O3 was synthesized in two steps from simple oxides PbO, Fe2O3, Nb2O5, Cr2O3. The first stage was based on obtaining the FeNbO4 from the Fe2O3 and Nb2O5 simple oxides. At this stage an admixture in a form the Cr2O3 chromium oxide was added to the solution. In the second stage the Pb...

  13. Environmental optimization of chromium recovery from tannery sludge using a life cycle assessment approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiliç, Eylem; Puig, Rita; Baquero, Grau; Font, Joaquim; Colak, Selime; Gürler, Deniz

    2011-08-15

    Life cycle assessment (LCA) was used to evaluate the environmental impact of an oxidative chromium recovery method from tannery sludge, in comparison with the usual landfilling process. Three improvement options (water reduction, byproduct use and anaerobic sludge digestion) were considered. The results showed that the proposed chromium recovery process would be better environmentally than conventional landfilling in all the evaluated impact categories if the amount of chromium recovered was 43 kg per ton of sludge. This amount could be recovered if the chromium concentration was about 20 times higher than that considered in this study. Alternatively, a lower chromium concentration would produce a better result if the recovery method was optimized and implemented at industrial rather than laboratory scale, and if more accurate data were provided on environmental credits for avoiding the chromium production process. Thus, the recovery method is environmentally beneficial when tannery sludge contains a chromium concentration of about 100,000 ppm. According to the literature, such concentrations are not unusual. The results could serve as the basis for further environmental improvements in chromium recovery and tannery sludge management and should be used in decision-making processes, especially for end-of-pipe treatments.

  14. Determination of hexavalent chromium in cosmetic products by ion chromatography and postcolumn derivatization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Eun Kyung; Lee, Somi; Park, Jin-Hee; Joo, Kyung-Mi; Jeong, Hye-Jin; Chang, Ih Seop

    2006-05-01

    Chromium hydroxide green [Cr(2)O(OH)(4)] and chromium oxide green (Cr(2)O(3)) are colouring agents for use in cosmetic products. These colourants may contain chromium (VI), which cause skin allergies through percutaneous adsorption on the skin. Eye shadow is a representative cosmetic product in which significant colourants are used. We analysed the chromium (VI) in the eye shadows by ion chromatography and post column derivatization. We optimize conditions of chromium (VI) analysis in eye shadows. During the pretreatment procedure, there are no exchange of chromium (III) to chromium (VI). This method has a limit of quantification for chromium (VI) of 1.0 microg l(-1), recovery rate of 100 +/- 3% and analysis time less than 10 min. This result is 300 times more sensitive than the high-performance liquid chromatography method. We applied the optimized method to analyse 22 eye shadows and 6 colouring agents. 2 out of 22 of the products contained more than 5 mg l(-1). In our previous work, 5 mg l(-1) of Cr represented a threshold level. There was much more Cr(VI) in the colouring agents. The Cr(VI) in one of the colouring agents was 97.6 mg l(-1). PMID:16689807

  15. Friction and wear behavior of chromium carbide coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chromium carbides, tungsten carbide, and chromium oxide have been tested and evaluated as coatings to protect high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) steam generator and other HTGR components from adhesion, galling associated with sliding wear or from fretting. Tests were performed in commercially-pure helium and in helium doped with various gaseous impurities (H2, H2O, CH4, CO) to simulate the primary coolant of an HTGR. Several types of chromium carbide coatings including Cr3C2, Cr7C3, and Cr23C6, were tested for wear resistance and resistance to long-term spalling. Tungsten carbide and chromium oxide coatings were tested in sliding wear tests. Cr23C6-NiCr coatings showed the best performance (from 400 to 8160C) whether they were applied by detonation gun or plasma gun spraying methods. The presence of the Cr23C6-NiCr coatings did not affect the creep rupture properties of Alloy 800H substrates at temperatures up to 7600C. Low-cycle fatigue life of similar specimens at 5930C was reduced to 10 to 20% when tested in the 1 to 0.6% strain range

  16. Chromium behavior during cement-production processes: A clinkerization, hydration, and leaching study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinyoung, Suthatip [Department of Environmental Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, King Mongkut' s University of Technology Thonburi, Bangkok, 10140 (Thailand); Songsiriritthigul, Prayoon [Synchrotron Light Research Institute, PO Box 93 Nakhon Ratchasima, 30000 (Thailand); School of Physics, Suranaree University of Technology, Nakhon Ratchasima, 30000 (Thailand); Asavapisit, Suwimol, E-mail: suwimol_s@hotmail.com [Environmental Technology, School of Energy and Materials, King Mongkut' s University of Technology Thonburi, Bangkok, 10140 (Thailand); National Center of Excellence for Environmental and Hazardous Waste Management, Faculty of Engineering, King Mongkut' s University of Technology Thonburi, Bangkok, 10140 (Thailand); Kajitvichyanukul, Puangrat, E-mail: puangratk@nu.ac.th [National Center of Excellence for Environmental and Hazardous Waste Management, Faculty of Engineering, King Mongkut' s University of Technology Thonburi, Bangkok, 10140 (Thailand); Department of Civil Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Naresuan University, Phitsanulok, 65000 (Thailand)

    2011-07-15

    Highlights: {yields} Behavior of chromium during cement-production processes. {yields} Formation of new chromium compounds in clinker with chromium oxidation states of +3, +4.6, +5, and +6. {yields} Addition of chromium altered the composition of the clinker phases, setting time, and compressive strength of hydrated mixes. {yields} Cr{sup 3+} and Cr{sup 6} were leached during leaching tests, whereas other species remained in the mortar. - Abstract: The behavior of chromium during the production of cement clinker, during the hydration of cement and during the leaching of cement mortars was investigated. The microstructures of clinker and mortar properties were investigated using free lime, XRD, SEM/EDS, and TG/DTA techniques. Chromium was found to be incorporated in the clinker phase. The formation of new chromium compounds such as Ca{sub 6}Al{sub 4}Cr{sub 2}O{sub 15}, Ca{sub 5}Cr{sub 3}O{sub 12}, Ca{sub 5}Cr{sub 2}SiO{sub 12}, and CaCr{sub 2}O{sub 7}, with chromium oxidation states of +3, +4.6, +5, and +6, respectively, was detected. After the hydration process, additional chromium compounds were identified in the mortar matrix, including Ca{sub 5}(CrO{sub 4}){sub 3}OH, CaCrO{sub 4}.2H{sub 2}O, and Al{sub 2}(OH){sub 4}CrO{sub 4}, with chromium oxidation states of +4.6, +6, and +6, respectively. Additionally, some species of chromium, such as Cr{sup 3+} from Ca{sub 6}Al{sub 4}Cr{sub 2}O{sub 15} and Cr{sup 6+} from CaCr{sub 2}O{sub 7}, CaCrO{sub 4}.2H{sub 2}O, and Al{sub 2}(OH){sub 4}CrO{sub 4}, were leached during leaching tests, whereas other species remained in the mortar. The concentrations of chromium that leached from the mortar following U.S. EPA Method 1311 and EA NEN 7375:2004 leaching tests were higher than limits set by the U.S. EPA and the Environment Agency of England and Wales related to hazardous waste disposal in landfills. Thus, waste containing chromium should not be allowed to mix with raw materials in the cement manufacturing process.

  17. Galvanic cells including cobalt-chromium alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gjerdet, N R

    1980-01-01

    Galvanic cells may be created when dentures made of cobalt-chromium alloys are placed on teeth with metallic restorations. The power of such cells was evaluated in an in vitro galvanic using amalgams, gold alloy, and nickel-chromium alloys. The amalgams and one of the nickel-chromium alloys revealed high corrosion currents when placed in contact with cobalt-chromium alloy, the conventional amalgam showing the highest values. The gold alloy and another nickel-chromium alloy exhibited low corrosion currents and they were noble with respect to cobalt-chromium.

  18. Hydrogen permeation through chromium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steady state and non-steady state measurements of hydrogen permeation through metallic chromium are reported. The experiments have been conducted by use of hydrogen and deuterium within a pressure range of 10-8 - 1 bar and temperatures between 600 - 8000C. Numerical values for the physical quantities permeability, diffusion constant and solubility could be derived. At an upstream pressure above around 10-3 bar classical Sieverts-low was found (permeation rate proportional √p) with activation energies Qsub(perm) = 65 kJoule/mole, Qsub(Diff) = 4-8 kJoule/mole, Qsub(Sol) = 57-61 kJoule/mole for the respective processes involved. The isotopic effect between H and D of the permeabilities could be represented by a factor of 1,5 independence on temperature. All non steady-state measurements could be approximated reasonably well by classical diffusion kinetics. Below up-stream pressures of approx.= 10-7 bar the kinetics was no longer diffusion controlled, the dependence on up-stream pressure changed from √p -> p, the activation energy for permetation increased to 127 kJoule/mole and the isotopic factor resulted in about 2-3. (orig.)

  19. Intracellular chromium localization and cell physiological response in the unicellular alga Micrasterias

    OpenAIRE

    Volland, Stefanie; Lütz, Cornelius; Michalke, Bernhard; LÜTZ-MEINDL, URSULA

    2012-01-01

    Various contaminants like metals and heavy metals are constantly released into the environment by anthropogenic activities. The heavy metal chromium has a wide industrial use and exists in two stable oxidation states: trivalent and hexavalent. Chromium can cause harm to cell metabolism and development, when it is taken up by plants instead of necessary micronutrients such as for example iron. The uptake of Cr VI into plant cells has been reported to be an active process via carriers of essent...

  20. Olefin polymerization over supported chromium oxide catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weckhuysen, B.M.; Schoonheydt, R.A.

    1999-01-01

    Cr/SiO2 or Phillips-type catalysts are nowadays responsible for a large fraction of all polyethylene (HDPE and LLDPE) worldwide produced. In this review, several key-properties of Cr/SiO2 catalysts will be discussed in relation to their polymerization characteristics. It will be shown how the polyol

  1. Chromium behavior during cement-production processes: a clinkerization, hydration, and leaching study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinyoung, Suthatip; Songsiriritthigul, Prayoon; Asavapisit, Suwimol; Kajitvichyanukul, Puangrat

    2011-07-15

    The behavior of chromium during the production of cement clinker, during the hydration of cement and during the leaching of cement mortars was investigated. The microstructures of clinker and mortar properties were investigated using free lime, XRD, SEM/EDS, and TG/DTA techniques. Chromium was found to be incorporated in the clinker phase. The formation of new chromium compounds such as Ca(6)Al(4)Cr(2)O(15), Ca(5)Cr(3)O(12), Ca(5)Cr(2)SiO(12), and CaCr(2)O(7), with chromium oxidation states of +3, +4.6, +5, and +6, respectively, was detected. After the hydration process, additional chromium compounds were identified in the mortar matrix, including Ca(5)(CrO(4))(3)OH, CaCrO(4)·2H(2)O, and Al(2)(OH)(4)CrO(4), with chromium oxidation states of +4.6, +6, and +6, respectively. Additionally, some species of chromium, such as Cr(3+) from Ca(6)Al(4)Cr(2)O(15) and Cr(6+) from CaCr(2)O(7), CaCrO(4)·2H(2)O, and Al(2)(OH)(4)CrO(4), were leached during leaching tests, whereas other species remained in the mortar. The concentrations of chromium that leached from the mortar following U.S. EPA Method 1311 and EA NEN 7375:2004 leaching tests were higher than limits set by the U.S. EPA and the Environment Agency of England and Wales related to hazardous waste disposal in landfills. Thus, waste containing chromium should not be allowed to mix with raw materials in the cement manufacturing process.

  2. Study of the mechanism of chromium cluster formation by laser microprobe mass spectrometry. Correlation with theoretical computations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hachimi, A.; Poitevin, E.; Krier, G.; Muller, J. F.; Ruiz-Lopez, M. F.

    1995-05-01

    Different stoichiometries of micrometric particles of powdered chromium oxides and salts are examined by time-of-flight laser microprobe mass spectrometry (TOF-LMMS). The negative cluster ion distributions show a good correlation with the stoichiometry of the chromium in the oxide. We have noticed a great spectral similarity between chromium(VI) oxide and hydrated chromium(III), salts leading to difficulties in differentiating these two kinds of compounds and determining the valency of chromium. The formation of CrO4- ions could be associated with product hydration, and could modify the fingerprint spectra of the chromium oxides and salts. We demonstrate that the CrO4- ion arises from collision between molecules present in the plasma generated by laser ablation. The mechanism of cluster formation is closely associated with the presence of neutral or ionized species (water, sulfate, nitrate, etc.). In particular, the hydration effect is very marked in the initial chromium salt. To confirm these results, an FT ion cyclotron MS investigation has been carried out, which allowed determination of the laser power dependence and relative stability of CrO-, CrO-2 and CrO3-. Results from a theoretical study of these types of cluster ions are presented and compared with the experimental data.

  3. Trivalent chromium removal from aqueous solutions by a sol–gel synthesized silica adsorbent functionalized with sulphonic acid groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez-Gonzalez, Sergio Efrain [Departamento de Ingeniería Química, Universidad de Guadalajara, Blvd. Marcelino García Barragán # 1421, esq. Calzada Olímpica, C.P. 44430 Guadalajara, Jalisco (Mexico); Carbajal-Arizaga, Gregorio Guadalupe [Departamento de Química, CUCEI, Universidad de Guadalajara, Blvd. Marcelino García Barragán # 1421, esq. Calzada Olímpica, C.P. 44430 Guadalajara, Jalisco (Mexico); Manriquez-Gonzalez, Ricardo [Departamento de Madera, Celulosa y Papel, CUCEI, Universidad de Guadalajara, Km 15.5, carretera Guadalajara-Nogales, Las Agujas, C.P. 45020 Zapopan, Jalisco (Mexico); De la Cruz-Hernandez, Wencel [Centro de Nanociencias y Nanotecnología, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Km 107 carretera Tijuana-Ensenada, C.P. 22830 Ensenada, Baja California (Mexico); Gomez-Salazar, Sergio, E-mail: sergio.gomez@cucei.udg.mx [Departamento de Ingeniería Química, Universidad de Guadalajara, Blvd. Marcelino García Barragán # 1421, esq. Calzada Olímpica, C.P. 44430 Guadalajara, Jalisco (Mexico)

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • Corpuscular sulphonic acid-functionalized silica holds improved uptake of chromium. • Mesopores on adsorbent facilitate (CH{sub 3}COO){sub 2}Cr{sup +} ion uptake on sulphonate sites. • Formation of chromium acetate sulphonate complex proposed from XPS results. • Fixed bed chromium uptake results suggest potential industrial use. - Abstract: A high capacity hybrid silica adsorbent was synthesized via sol–gel processing with sulphonic acid groups as trivalent chromium complex ions chelators from aqueous solutions. The synthesis included co-condensation of tetraethoxysilane (TEOS) with 3-(mercaptopropyl)trimethoxysilane (MPS), and oxidation of thiol to sulphonic acid groups. Chromium uptake kinetic, batch and fixed-bed experiments were performed to assess the removal of this metal from aqueous solutions. {sup 13}C, {sup 29}Si CPMAS NMR, FTIR, XPS were used to characterize the adsorbent structure and the nature of chromium complexes on the adsorbent surface. Chromium maximum uptake was obtained at pH 3 (72.8 mg/g). Elemental analysis results showed ligand density of 1.48 mmol sulphonic groups/g. About 407 mL of Cr(III) solution (311 mg/L) were treated to breakthrough point reaching ≤0.06 mg/L at the effluent. These results comply with USEPA regulation for chromium concentration in drinking water (≤0.1 mg/L). The adsorbent shows potential to be used in chromium separations to the industrial level.

  4. Microbial biotechnology for remediation of aquatic habitats polluted with chromium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viorica Coşier

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Chromium may occur in nine different forms of oxidation ranging from ?II to +VI, with forms II, III and VI as the most commonly encountered. In Cluj county, chromium pollution dates well back in time and has caused important dysfunction to the mechanical-biological wastewater purification station of the city of Cluj (Coşier & Diţă 1996. The purpose of this study was to develop one microbial method able to reduce hexavalent chromium (mobile, permeable to cell membrane, carcinogenic and mutagenic (Ishikawa et al 1994 to the trivalent form (insoluble and an essential element for humans (Song et al 2006. Different sources of chromium-reducing bacteria and many sources of carbon and energy added to the Kvasnikov mineral basal medium (Komori et al 1990 with increasing amount of chromate (200- 1000 mg/l were tested. Two bacterial strains, able to reduce even 1000 mg chromate/l, were isolated in pure culture. For one of these bacterial strains, we determined the optimum conditions for the reduction of Cr (VI.

  5. Evaluation of chromium speciation and transport characteristics in the Hanford Site 100D and 100H areas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thornton, E.C.; Amonette, J.E.; Olivier, J. [and others

    1995-08-01

    Field and laboratory investigations have been conducted to define the fate and transport characteristics of chromium contamination present in the 100D/H Areas of the Hanford Site. This information is relevant to assessing the impact of the release of hexavalent chromium to the Columbia River. Included in this study was the determination of the concentration and aqueous speciation of chromium in the unconfined acquifer and an assessment of potential changes in speciation as groundwater passes through the river/acquifer transition zone and mixes with the Columbia River. The results of this study indicate that chromium present within the Hanford acquifer is predominantly in the oxidized hexavalent state. Chromium is apparently stable in the oxidized form owing to its lack of organic matter within the acquifer. A portion of the chromium is removed as groundwater passes through the transition zone due to reduction and precipitation associated with sediment/water interaction processes. Chemical data collected from seep water samples, however, suggests, that most of the hexavalent chromium ultimately discharges into the Columbia River. Dilution of hexavalent chromium subsequently occurs during the mixing of groundwater and river water, with relatively little change taking place in speciation.

  6. Iron monosulfide as a scavenger for dissolved hexavalent chromium and cadmium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, S; Lee, J Y; Kong, S H; Choi, J; Park, J W

    2008-09-01

    Iron sulfide minerals are common components of soil/sedimentary environments. Reactions near the surfaces of iron sulfides play important roles in metal retention, mobility, and bioavailability. A series of batch experiments was conducted to study the removal of aqueous chromium and cadmium by iron monosulfide. Hexavalent chromium was reduced to Cr(III) by iron monosulfide with simultaneous precipitation of chromium and iron oxyhydroxide. In contrast to chromium, the primary retention mechanism of cadmium by iron monosulfide was lattice exchange. Surface adsorption to iron monosulfide and precipitation with sulfide on the iron monosulfide surface also contributed to the removal of aqueous cadmium. New phases of both chromium and cadmium were confirmed with transmission electron microscopy. The solution pH was an important factor in this research; it can change particle surface charge and metal species, hence affecting the removal of chromium, but not cadmium. Ferrous ions without FeS exhibited less Cr(VI) removal than with FeS, which might be owing to sulfides from FeS and the existence of the solid phase. Iron monosulfide exhibited higher removal efficiency for chromium and cadmium than zero valent iron and other iron oxide minerals, and the synergistic effect of ferrous iron and sulfide appeared to cause this result.

  7. The effects of water rock interaction and the human activities on the occurrence of hexavalent chromium in waters. The case study of the Psachna basin, Central Euboea, Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasileiou, Eleni; Perraki, Maria; Stamatis, George; Gartzos, Efthimios

    2014-05-01

    High concentrations of heavy metals, particularly of the toxic hexavalent chromium, are recorded in surface and ground waters in many areas, and constitute one of the most severe environmental problems nowadays. The natural genesis of chromium is associated with the geological environment (peridotites and serpentintites). Chromium is structured in many minerals, mainly in spinel (e.g. chromite), in silicate minerals such as phyllosilicate serpentine minerals, chlorite, talc and chain-silicate minerals of pyroxene and amphibole group. Chromium is found in two forms in soils, waters and rocks, the hexavalent and the trivalent one. The relation between Cr(III) and Cr(VI) strongly depends on pH and oxidative properties of the area; however, in most cases, Cr(III) is the dominating variant. The natural oxidation of trivalent to hexavalent chromium can be achieved by manganese oxides, H2O2, O2 gas and oxy-hydroxides of trivalent iron. Anthropogenic factors may also cause the process of chromium's oxidation. In the Psachna basin, Central Euboea, Greece, high concentrations of hexavalent chromium were recently measured in spring- and drill- waters. In this work, we study the effect of the geological environment and of the anthropogenic activities on the water quality with emphasis on chromium. A detailed geochemical, petrological and mineralogical study of rocks and soils was carried out by means of optical microscopy, XRF, XRD and SEM/EDS. Ground and surface water samples were physically characterized and hydrochemically studied by means of ICP and AAF. Combined result evaluation indicates a natural source for the trivalent chromium in waters, attributed to the alteration of Cr-bearing minerals of the ultramafic rocks. However the oxidation of trivalent to hexavalent chromium results from anthropogenic activities, mainly from intensive agricultural activities and the extensive use of fertilizers and pesticides causing nitrate pollution in groundwater. It has been shown

  8. Determination of chromium combined with DNA, RNA and protein in chromium-rich brewer's yeast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The contents of chromium in the DNA, RNA and protein fractions separated from chromium-rich and normal brewer's yeast were determined with the neutron activation analysis in order to study the combination of Cr with DNA, RNA and protein in chromium-rich brewer's yeast. The results showed that the extracting rats and concentrations of DNA, RNA and protein had no significant difference in two types of yeast, but the chromium contents of DNA, RNA and protein in the chromium-rich yeast were significantly higher than those in the normal. In addition, the content of chromium in DNA was much higher than that in RNA and protein, which indicated that the inorganic chromium compounds entered into the yeast cell, during the yeast cultivation in the culture medium containing chromium were converted into organic chromium compounds combined with DNA, RNA and protein

  9. Effects of chromium and cobalt compounds on burning rate of ammonium nitrate/hydroxyl-terminated polybutadiene composite propellants. Shosan ammonium/HTPB kei composite suishin'yaku no nensho sokudo ni oyobosu chromium to cobalt kagobutsu no eikyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagihara, Y.; Ichikawa, T.; Shinpo, H.; Suzuki, M. (The National Defense Academy, Yokosuka (Japan))

    1991-12-31

    Study was made on the effects of chromium and cobalt compounds on burning rate of AN/HTPB composite propellants by using 14 types of chromium and cobalt compounds as catalysts and it was clear that burning rate of composite propellants increases with all catalysts and increase in burning rate by ammonium dichromate and chromium (III) acetylacetone is significantly large. Pressure exponent for cobalt(II) oxide and cobalt(II) benzoate has decreased but it has increased with other catalysts. Pressure exponent has significantly increased in the case of cobalt 2-ethylhexanoate and cobalt(II) acetylacetone. Effect of compounds on slurry viscosity also has shown the decrease in the viscosity except chromium(III) oxide and cobalt(II,III) oxide, and in the case of cobalt 2-ethylhexanoate the viscosity is significantly low. Drophammer sensitivity of AN is not affected with the added compounds. 4 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  10. Synthesis of chromium and ferrochromium alloy in molten salts by the electro-reduction method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ge X.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we successfully applied the Fray-Farthing-Chen Cambridge electro-reduction process on the preparation of chromium from chromium oxide, and for the first time, the synthesis of ferrochromium alloy from chromium oxide and iron oxide mixture and the chromite ore in molten calcium chloride. The present work systematically investigated the influences of sintered temperature of the solid precursor, electrochemical potential, electrolysis temperature and time on the products by using a set of advanced characterization techniques, including XRD and SEM/EDS analyses. In particular, our results show that this process is energy-friendly and technically-feasible for the direct extraction of ferrochromium alloy from chromite ore. Our findings thus provide useful insights for designing a novel green process to produce ferrochromium alloy from low-grade chromite ore or stainless steel slag.

  11. 低温法制备TiO2薄膜及其光催化氧化法处理电镀含铬废水的研究%A Research on Low Temperature Preparation of TiO2 Film and Photocatalytic Oxidation Treatment of Electroplating Wastewater Containing Chromium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    霍小平; 刘存海; 喻莹; 李仲谨

    2013-01-01

    The TiO2 film was prepared on glass substrate with microwave-assisted low-temperature method. The phase and morphology of as-prepared samples were characterized by X-ray diffracmeter and scanning electron microscope. Through photocatalytic degradation experiment of actual electroplating wastewater containing chromium, with total chromium removal rate as the standard of evaluating photocatalyst activity, the effects of light source, pH value, initial mass concentration of wastewater, light application time and number of film layers on total chromium removal rate were explored. The results indicate that when the initial mass concentration of wastewater is between 1 500 mg/L and 2 500 mg/L, pH 8, and ultraviolet light (λ=254 nm) application time 3 hours, the effect of oxidation is the best, total chromium removal rate of wastewater reaching 85. 6 %.%采用微波辅助低温法在玻璃基片上制备TiO2薄膜.通过X射线衍射仪和扫描电子显微镜对其物相及显微结构进行了表征.通过光催化降解实际电镀含铬废水实验,以总铬的去除率来评价光催化剂的活性,探讨了光源、pH值、废水初始质量浓度、光照时间及薄膜层数对总铬的去除率的影响.结果表明:当废水初始质量浓度在1 500~2 500 mg/L范围内,pH值为8,负载4层薄膜,紫外光(λ=254 nm)照射3h时,光催化氧化效果最佳,总铬的去除率达到85.6%.

  12. Chromium isotope variations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    D'Arcy, Joan Mary

    fractionate during oxidative weathering of the continents. High river water δ53Cr values (+1.6‰) indicate that dissolved Cr has been back-reduced either in the weathering profile or during river transport. The main conclusion from this study is that δ53Cr value for continental runoff is not uniform....... The positive excursion does not correlated with other redox proxies (carbon and sulphur stable isotopes profiles from the Lower Ordovician), suggesting that Cr isotopes behave non-conservatively and are more sensitive to changes in local redox conditions. These results demonstrate that Cr isotope composition...

  13. Eolian transport of geogenic hexavalent chromium to ground water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, W.W.; Clark, D.; Imes, J.L.; Councell, T.B.

    2010-01-01

    A conceptual model of eolian transport is proposed to address the widely distributed, high concentrations of hexavalent chromium (Cr+6) observed in ground water in the Emirate of Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates. Concentrations (30 to more than 1000 μg/L Cr+6) extend over thousands of square kilometers of ground water systems. It is hypothesized that the Cr is derived from weathering of chromium-rich pyroxenes and olivines present in ophiolite sequence of the adjacent Oman (Hajar) Mountains. Cr+3 in the minerals is oxidized to Cr+6 by reduction of manganese and is subsequently sorbed on iron and manganese oxide coatings of particles. When the surfaces of these particles are abraded in this arid environment, they release fine, micrometer-sized, coated particles that are easily transported over large distances by wind and subsequently deposited on the surface. During ground water recharge events, the readily soluble Cr+6 is mobilized by rain water and transported by advective flow into the underlying aquifer. Chromium analyses of ground water, rain, dust, and surface (soil) deposits are consistent with this model, as are electron probe analyses of clasts derived from the eroding Oman ophiolite sequence. Ground water recharge flux is proposed to exercise some control over Cr+6 concentration in the aquifer.

  14. Bioadsorption and bioaccumulation of chromium trivalent in Cr(III)-tolerant microalgae: a mechanisms for chromium resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, M; Bartolomé, M C; Sánchez-Fortún, S

    2013-10-01

    Anthropogenic activity constantly releases heavy metals into the environment. The heavy metal chromium has a wide industrial use and exists in two stable oxidation states: trivalent and hexavalent. While hexavalent chromium uptake in plant cells has been reported that an active process by carrying essential anions, the cation Cr(III) appears to be taken up inactively. Dictyosphaerium chlorelloides (Dc1M), an unicellular green alga is a well-studied cell biological model organism. The present study was carried out to investigate the toxic effect of chromium exposures on wild-type Cr(III)-sensitive (Dc1M(wt)) and Cr(III)-tolerant (Dc1M(Cr(III)R30)) strains of these green algae, and to determine the potential mechanism of chromium resistance. Using cell growth as endpoint to determine Cr(III)-sensitivity, the IC₅₀(₇₂) values obtained show significant differences of sensitivity between wild type and Cr(III)-tolerant cells. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed significant morphological differences between both strains, such as decrease in cell size or reducing the coefficient of form; and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed ultrastructural changes such as increased vacuolization and cell wall thickening in the Cr(III)-tolerant strain with respect to the wild-type strain. Energy dispersive X-ray analysis (SEM/XEDS) revealed that Cr(III)-tolerant D. chlorelloides cells are able to accumulate considerable amounts of chromium distributed in cell wall (bioadsorption) as well as in cytoplasm, vacuoles, and chloroplast (bio-accumulation). Morphological changes of Cr(III)-tolerant D. chlorelloides cells and the presence of these electron-dense bodies in their cell structures can be understood as a Cr(III) detoxification mechanism. PMID:23810518

  15. Tissues and urinary chromium concentrations in rats fed high-chromium diets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complete text of publication follows. Chromium is an essential trace elements and enhances the function of insulin as a form of chromodulin. In the subjects with a certain type of diabetics, 200 to 1,000 μg/d of chromium is administered to reduced the symptoms of diabetics. However, although there are not any health-promotive effects of chromium-administration in healthy subjects, various types of chromium supplements are commercially available in many countries; the adverse effects caused by an excessive chromium intake are feared. In the present study, to clarify the tolerable upper limit of chromium, tissue and urinary chromium concentrations, liver function and iron status were examined in rats fed high-chromium diets. Thirty-six male 4-weeks Wistar rats were divided into six groups and fed casein-based diets containing 1, 10 or 100 μg/g of chromium as chromium chloride (CrCl3) or chromium picolinate (CrPic) for 4 weeks. After the feeding, chromium concentrations in liver, kidney, small intestine and tibia were determined by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. In addition, urine samples were collected on 3rd to 4th week and their chromium concentrations were also determined. Chromium concentrations in liver, kidney, small intestine and tibia were elevated with increase of dietary chromium concentration. Urinary chromium excretion was also elevated with the increase of dietary chromium and the rate of urinary chromium excretion was less than 2% to dietary chromium intake in all the experimental groups. In the administration of 100 μg/g of chromium, rats given CrCl3 showed significantly higher tibia chromium concentration and lower urinary chromium excretion than those given CrPic. There were not any differences in iron status among the experimental groups. Activities of serum aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase in rats fed diet containing 100 μg/g of chromium as CrPic were significantly higher than those in rats fed other diets.

  16. Soils contaminated with hexavalent chromium

    OpenAIRE

    Fonseca, Bruna Catarina da Silva

    2011-01-01

    Tese de doutoramento em Engenharia Química e Biológica The interest in environmental soil science has been growing in the last years due to the continuous degradation of this major natural resource. With this in mind, and because chromium and lead are two of the most toxic heavy metals frequently detected as soil contaminants in the Portuguese territory, the study and development of few remediation techniques and the indissociable description of the sorption and migration of...

  17. Simultaneous determination of chromium(III) and chromium(VI) in aqueous solutions by ion chromatography and chemiluminescence detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gammelgaard, Bente; Jøns, O; Nielsen, B

    1992-01-01

    A method for the simultaneous determination of chromium(iii) and chromium(vi) in a flow system based on chemiluminescence was developed. A Dionex cation-exchange guard column was used to separate chromium(iii) from chromium(vi), and chromium(vi) was reduced by potassium sulfite, whereupon both sp...

  18. Photocatalysis with chromium-doped TiO2: Bulk and surface doping

    KAUST Repository

    Ould-Chikh, Samy

    2014-04-15

    The photocatalytic properties of TiO2 modified by chromium are usually found to depend strongly on the preparation method. To clarify this problem, two series of chromium-doped titania with a chromium content of up to 1.56 wt % have been prepared under hydrothermal conditions: the first series (Cr:TiO2) is intended to dope the bulk of TiO2, whereas the second series (Cr/TiO2) is intended to load the surface of TiO2 with Cr. The catalytic properties have been compared in the photocatalytic oxidation of formic acid. Characterization data provides evidence that in the Cr/TiO2 catalysts chromium is located on the surface of TiO2 as amorphous CrOOH clusters. In contrast, in the Cr:TiO 2 series, chromium is mostly dissolved in the titania lattice, although a minor part is still present on the surface. Photocatalytic tests show that both series of chromium-doped titania demonstrate visible-light-driven photo-oxidation activity. Surface-doped Cr/TiO2 solids appear to be more efficient photocatalysts than the bulk-doped Cr:TiO2 counterparts. It\\'s classified! The photocatalytic properties of TiO2 modified by chromium depend strongly on the preparation method. To clarify this problem, two types of modified titania are discussed: one with CrIII doped in the bulk and one with CrOOH clusters on the TiO2 surface (see picture). Both series show visible-light-driven photo-oxidation activity. However, surface modification appears to be a more efficient strategy. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Study on the adsorption capacity for mercury (Ⅱ) with chromium/cobaIt-doped graphene oxide materiaIs%负载铬钴石墨烯基材料对汞(Ⅱ)的吸附性能研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王卓; 邓娟; 朱君妍; 周超; 周晓吉; 郭永福; 白仁碧

    2016-01-01

    The chromium and cobalt doped reduced graphene oxide (RGO/Cr,RGO/Co) composite materials have been synthesized by making use of the reducibility of RGO and the oxidability of transition metallic salts ,and app-lied to the adsorption for Hg2+. The results show that the specific surface area of RGO/Cr is higher than that of RGO/Co and RGO. The hydrophilicity of RGO is effectively improved after having been doped with chromium or cobalt. The theoretical monolayer adsorption capacities of RGO,RGO/Cr and RGO/Co fitting Langmuir model are 128.98,181.86, and 146.86 mg/g,respectively,and the adsorption processes of these three materials complies with the pseudo-first-order and pseudo-second-order kinetic model.%利用石墨烯的还原性与过渡金属盐类的氧化性,制备得到分别负载有铬和钴的还原氧化石墨烯(RGO)复合材料RGO/Cr和RGO/Co,并将其应用于对Hg2+的吸附。结果表明:RGO/Cr比RGO/Co及RGO具有更大比表面积,负载铬和钴后RGO的亲水性能显著增加。 Langmuir拟合RGO、RGO/Cr、RGO/Co对Hg2+的理论单层最大吸附容量分别为128.98、181.86、146.86 mg/g,同时吸附过程均符合伪一级和伪二级动力学模型。

  20. Inoculation of chromium white cast iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Kopyciński

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been proved that an addition of boron carbide introduced as an inoculant to the chromium white cast iron changes the structureof castings. Castings after inoculation revealed a different structure with numerous grains. Primary precipitates of chromium carbide also appeared, reducing the mechanical properties of as-cast parts. Properly established heat treatment regime makes chromium iron castings regain their, originally high, mechanical properties.

  1. REMOVAL OF HEXAVALENT CHROMIUM FROM DRINKING WATER

    OpenAIRE

    A. R. Asgari ، F. Vaezi ، S. Nasseri ، O. Dördelmann ، A. H. Mahvi ، E. Dehghani Fard

    2008-01-01

    Removal of chromium can be accomplished by various methods but none of them is cost-effective in meeting drinking water standards. For this study, granular ferric hydroxide was used as adsorbent for removal of hexavalent chromium. Besides, the effects of changing contact time, pH and concentrations of competitive anions were determined for different amounts of granular ferric hydroxide. It was found that granular ferric hydroxide has a high capacity for adsorption of hexavalent chromium from ...

  2. Baixa dosagem de óxido de cromo para estimativa da produção fecal em bovinos Low level of chromium oxide to estimate faecal output in cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrique Mendonça Nunes Ribeiro Filho

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Foi avaliado o uso de baixa dosagem de óxido de cromo (Cr2O3 incorporado em um alimento concentrado para estimativa da produção fecal (PF em bovinos. Para tanto, foram conduzidos quatro ensaios de digestibilidade in vivo utilizando quatro novilhos com peso vivo médio de 214±31kg, recebendo ad libitum no cocho azevém anual (Lolium multiflorum Lam. cortado verde. Aproximadamente 200g de ração contendo 5g kg-1 do indicador foi fornecida diariamente durante 12 dias, sendo feito a coleta de dados e amostras nos últimos cinco dias de cada período. A PF foi medida com o uso de sacolas de coleção total ou estimada com base na concentração do indicador em amostras fecais coletadas duas vezes ao dia (8 e 16h ou a intervalos de duas horas entre 8 e 22h. A concentração média de cromo nas amostras coletadas às 8 e 16h (445mg kg-1 foi semelhante à média geral de todos os horários (447mg kg-1. O grau de recuperação fecal (GR do indicador aumentou linearmente, de aproximadamente 40% para em torno de 80%, com o aumento da concentração fecal de cromo até esta última atingir um valor em torno de 250mg kg-1 de MO. Quando a concentração de cromo nas fezes foi superior a este valor o GR se manteve relativamente constante, em média 76%. A produção fecal foi superestimada pelo indicador em até 35% quando não corrigido para o GR. Quando corrigido para a recuperação fecal, as estimativas de produção fecal de MO estimadas foram similares às observadas. A excreção fecal de bovinos alimentados com azevém pode ser acuradamente estimada com o uso de baixa dosagem de óxido de cromo incorporado em uma ração peletizada concomitante à coleta de duas amostragens diárias de fezes.The aim of this research was to evaluate the use of a low level of chromium oxide (Cr2O3 incorporated into the concentrate ration to estimate faecal output (FO in cattle. Four in vivo digestibility essays were conducted using four steers with live weights of

  3. Chromium (III Removal and Recovery from Tannery Wastewater by Precipitation Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abass Esmaeili

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Chromium (III salts are the most widely used chemicals for tanning processes, but 60-70% of total chromium salts reacts with the hides. In the other word, about 30-40% of the chromium amount remains in the solids and liquid wastes (especially spent tanning solutions. Therefore, the removal and recovery of the chromium content of these wastewaters are necessary for environmental protection and economic reasons. Removal and recovery of chromium were carried out by using precipitation process. For this purpose, three precipitating agents calcium hydroxide, sodium hydroxide and magnesium oxide were used. The effects of pH, stirring time, settling rate and sludge volume were studied in batch experiments. Results show that the optimum pH is 8-9 and the good sludge with high settling rate and lower volume obtain by the MgO precipitating agent. Hence the MgO is a good precipitating agent for removal and recovery of chromium from tanning wastewater.

  4. Brief report on thermodynamics of chromium slags and kinetic modelling of chromite reduction (1995-96)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao Yamping; Holappa, L. [Helsinki Univ. of Technology, Otaniemi (Finland). Lab. of Metallurgy

    1996-12-31

    This article summaries the research work on thermodynamics of chromium slags and kinetic modelling of chromite reduction. The thermodynamic properties of FeCr slag systems were calculated with the regular solution model. The effects of CaO/MgO ratio, Al{sub 2}0{sub 3} amount as well as the slag basicity on the activities of chromium oxides and the oxidation state of chromium were examined. The calculated results were compared to the experimental data in the literature. In the kinetic modelling of the chromite reduction, the reduction possibilities and tendencies of the chromite constitutes with CO were analysed based on the thermodynamic calculation. Two reaction models, a structural grain model and a multi-layers reaction model, were constructed and applied to simulate the chromite pellet reduction and chromite lumpy ore reduction, respectively. The calculated reduction rates were compared with the experimental measurements and the reaction mechanisms were discussed. (orig.) SULA 2 Research Programme; 4 refs.

  5. A Comprehensive Review on Nickel (II And Chromium VI Toxicities - Possible Antioxidant (Allium Sativum Linn Defenses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kusal K.Das

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The toxicity associated with nickel (II and chromium (VI is mainly due to generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS with subsequent oxidative deterioration of biological macromolecules. Both nickel and chromium can generate free radicals (FR directly from molecular oxygen in a two step process to produce superoxide anion and in continued process, produce highly toxic hydroxyl radical. The pro-oxidative effects are compounded by fact that they also inhibit antioxidant enzymes and deplete intracellular glutathione. Garlic (Allium sativum has played an important dietary and medicinal role throughout the history of mankind. Garlic has the potential to enhance the endogenous antioxidant status in nickel as well as hexavalent chromium induced lipid peroxidation in normal and diabetic rats.

  6. Thermodynamic studies of chromium adsorption on iron species generated by electrocoagulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parga, J.R.; Vazquez, V.; Gonzalez, G.; Cisneros, M.M. [Metallurgy and Materials Science Department, Institute Technology of Saltillo (Mexico)

    2010-10-15

    The protection of the global environment and in particular, the provision of a sustainable source of clean water is a necessity for human survival. Specifically, large quantities of chromium containing compounds are being discharged into the environment. This study has been carried out to determine the feasibility of chromium adsorption on iron species by an Electrocoagulation (EC) process using the Langmuir Isotherm. The full potential of EC with air injection as an alternative wastewater treatment technique to remove chromium from well water shows more than 99 % removal without the addition of any chemical reagents. In this study, X-Ray Diffraction, Scanning Electron Microscopy, Moessbauer Spectroscopy and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy are used to characterize the solid products that reveal the expected crystalline iron oxides, i.e., lepidocrocite, magnetite, gohetite, and iron oxide. (Abstract Copyright [2010], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  7. Permeation of chromium salts through human skin in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gammelgaard, Bente; Fullerton, A; Avnstorp, C;

    1992-01-01

    of the dichromate solution. Chromium skin levels increased with increasing concentrations of applied chromium salts up to 0.034 M Cr. The amount of chromium in recipient phase and skin layers increased with increasing pH when the applied solution contained potassium dichromate. This was ascribed to a decreased skin...... barrier function of the skin. The amount of chromium found in all skin layers after application of chromium chloride decreased with increasing pH due to lower solubility of the salt. The % of chromium found in the recipient phase as chromium(VI) increased with increasing total chromium concentration...... indicating a limited reduction ability of the skin in vitro....

  8. Intracellular chromium localization and cell physiological response in the unicellular alga Micrasterias

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volland, Stefanie, E-mail: Stefanie.Volland@stud.sbg.ac.at [Plant Physiology Division, Cell Biology Department, University of Salzburg, Hellbrunnerstr 34, 5020 Salzburg (Austria); Luetz, Cornelius, E-mail: cornelius.luetz@uibk.ac.at [Institute of Botany, University of Innsbruck, Sternwartestrasse 15, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Michalke, Bernhard, E-mail: bernhard.michalke@helmholtz-muenchen.de [Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen, German Research Centre for Environmental Health, Institute of Ecological Chemistry, Ingolstaedter Landstrasse 1, 85764 Neuherberg (Germany); Luetz-Meindl, Ursula, E-mail: ursula.luetz-meindl@sbg.ac.at [Plant Physiology Division, Cell Biology Department, University of Salzburg, Hellbrunnerstr 34, 5020 Salzburg (Austria)

    2012-03-15

    Various contaminants like metals and heavy metals are constantly released into the environment by anthropogenic activities. The heavy metal chromium has a wide industrial use and exists in two stable oxidation states: trivalent and hexavalent. Chromium can cause harm to cell metabolism and development, when it is taken up by plants instead of necessary micronutrients such as for example iron. The uptake of Cr VI into plant cells has been reported to be an active process via carriers of essential anions, while the cation Cr III seems to be taken up inactively. Micrasterias denticulata, an unicellular green alga of the family Desmidiaceae is a well-studied cell biological model organism. Cr III and VI had inhibiting effects on its cell development, while cell division rates were only impaired by Cr VI. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed ultrastructural changes such as increased vacuolization, condensed cytoplasm and dark precipitations in the cell wall after 3 weeks of Cr VI treatment. Electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) and electron spectroscopic imaging (ESI) were applied to measure intracellular chromium distribution. Chromium was only detected after 3 weeks of 10 {mu}M Cr VI treatment in electron dense precipitations found in bag-like structures along the inner side of the cell walls together with iron and elevated levels of oxygen, pointing toward an accumulation respectively extrusion of chromium in form of an iron-oxygen compound. Atomic emission spectroscopy (EMS) revealed that Micrasterias cells are able to accumulate considerable amounts of chromium and iron. During chromium treatment the Cr:Fe ratio shifted in favor of chromium, which implied that chromium may be taken up instead of iron. Significant and rapid increase of ROS production within the first 5 min of treatment confirms an active Cr VI uptake. SOD and CAT activity after Cr VI treatment did not show a response, while the glutathione pool determined by immuno-TEM decreased

  9. Intracellular chromium localization and cell physiological response in the unicellular alga Micrasterias

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Various contaminants like metals and heavy metals are constantly released into the environment by anthropogenic activities. The heavy metal chromium has a wide industrial use and exists in two stable oxidation states: trivalent and hexavalent. Chromium can cause harm to cell metabolism and development, when it is taken up by plants instead of necessary micronutrients such as for example iron. The uptake of Cr VI into plant cells has been reported to be an active process via carriers of essential anions, while the cation Cr III seems to be taken up inactively. Micrasterias denticulata, an unicellular green alga of the family Desmidiaceae is a well-studied cell biological model organism. Cr III and VI had inhibiting effects on its cell development, while cell division rates were only impaired by Cr VI. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed ultrastructural changes such as increased vacuolization, condensed cytoplasm and dark precipitations in the cell wall after 3 weeks of Cr VI treatment. Electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) and electron spectroscopic imaging (ESI) were applied to measure intracellular chromium distribution. Chromium was only detected after 3 weeks of 10 μM Cr VI treatment in electron dense precipitations found in bag-like structures along the inner side of the cell walls together with iron and elevated levels of oxygen, pointing toward an accumulation respectively extrusion of chromium in form of an iron–oxygen compound. Atomic emission spectroscopy (EMS) revealed that Micrasterias cells are able to accumulate considerable amounts of chromium and iron. During chromium treatment the Cr:Fe ratio shifted in favor of chromium, which implied that chromium may be taken up instead of iron. Significant and rapid increase of ROS production within the first 5 min of treatment confirms an active Cr VI uptake. SOD and CAT activity after Cr VI treatment did not show a response, while the glutathione pool determined by immuno-TEM decreased

  10. Intracellular chromium localization and cell physiological response in the unicellular alga Micrasterias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volland, Stefanie; Lütz, Cornelius; Michalke, Bernhard; Lütz-Meindl, Ursula

    2012-03-01

    Various contaminants like metals and heavy metals are constantly released into the environment by anthropogenic activities. The heavy metal chromium has a wide industrial use and exists in two stable oxidation states: trivalent and hexavalent. Chromium can cause harm to cell metabolism and development, when it is taken up by plants instead of necessary micronutrients such as for example iron. The uptake of Cr VI into plant cells has been reported to be an active process via carriers of essential anions, while the cation Cr III seems to be taken up inactively. Micrasterias denticulata, an unicellular green alga of the family Desmidiaceae is a well-studied cell biological model organism. Cr III and VI had inhibiting effects on its cell development, while cell division rates were only impaired by Cr VI. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed ultrastructural changes such as increased vacuolization, condensed cytoplasm and dark precipitations in the cell wall after 3 weeks of Cr VI treatment. Electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) and electron spectroscopic imaging (ESI) were applied to measure intracellular chromium distribution. Chromium was only detected after 3 weeks of 10 μM Cr VI treatment in electron dense precipitations found in bag-like structures along the inner side of the cell walls together with iron and elevated levels of oxygen, pointing toward an accumulation respectively extrusion of chromium in form of an iron-oxygen compound. Atomic emission spectroscopy (EMS) revealed that Micrasterias cells are able to accumulate considerable amounts of chromium and iron. During chromium treatment the Cr:Fe ratio shifted in favor of chromium, which implied that chromium may be taken up instead of iron. Significant and rapid increase of ROS production within the first 5 min of treatment confirms an active Cr VI uptake. SOD and CAT activity after Cr VI treatment did not show a response, while the glutathione pool determined by immuno-TEM decreased

  11. Intracellular chromium localization and cell physiological response in the unicellular alga Micrasterias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volland, Stefanie; Lütz, Cornelius; Michalke, Bernhard; Lütz-Meindl, Ursula

    2012-01-01

    Various contaminants like metals and heavy metals are constantly released into the environment by anthropogenic activities. The heavy metal chromium has a wide industrial use and exists in two stable oxidation states: trivalent and hexavalent. Chromium can cause harm to cell metabolism and development, when it is taken up by plants instead of necessary micronutrients such as for example iron. The uptake of Cr VI into plant cells has been reported to be an active process via carriers of essential anions, while the cation Cr III seems to be taken up inactively. Micrasterias denticulata, an unicellular green alga of the family Desmidiaceae is a well-studied cell biological model organism. Cr III and VI had inhibiting effects on its cell development, while cell division rates were only impaired by Cr VI. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed ultrastructural changes such as increased vacuolization, condensed cytoplasm and dark precipitations in the cell wall after 3 weeks of Cr VI treatment. Electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) and electron spectroscopic imaging (ESI) were applied to measure intracellular chromium distribution. Chromium was only detected after 3 weeks of 10 μM Cr VI treatment in electron dense precipitations found in bag-like structures along the inner side of the cell walls together with iron and elevated levels of oxygen, pointing toward an accumulation respectively extrusion of chromium in form of an iron–oxygen compound. Atomic emission spectroscopy (EMS) revealed that Micrasterias cells are able to accumulate considerable amounts of chromium and iron. During chromium treatment the Cr:Fe ratio shifted in favor of chromium, which implied that chromium may be taken up instead of iron. Significant and rapid increase of ROS production within the first 5 min of treatment confirms an active Cr VI uptake. SOD and CAT activity after Cr VI treatment did not show a response, while the glutathione pool determined by immuno-TEM decreased

  12. Electrodeposition of chromium from trivalent chromium urea bath containing sulfate and chloride

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    The reduction of Cr( Ⅲ) to Cr( Ⅱ ) on copper electrode in trivalent chromium urea bath containing chromium sulfate and chromium chloride as chromium source has been investigated by potentiodynamic sweep. The transfer coefficient α for reduction of Cr( Ⅲ ) to Cr( Ⅱ ) on copper electrode was calculated as 0.46. The reduction is a quasi-reversible process. J-t responses at different potential steps showed that the generation and adsorption characteristics of carboxylate bridged oligomer are relevant to cathode potential. The interface behavior between electrode and solution for Cr( Ⅲ ) complex is a critical factor influencing sustained electrode position of chromium. The hypotheses of the electro-inducing polymerization of Cr( Ⅲ ) was proposed. The potential scope in which sustained chromium deposits can be prepared is from- 1.3 V to- 1.7 V (vs SCE) in the urea bath. Bright chromium deposits with thickness of 30 μm can be prepared in the bath.

  13. Simultaneously Recovering High-Purity Chromium and Removing Organic Pollutants from Tannery Effluent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Zong

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Chromium pollution is a serious issue because of carcinogenic toxicities of the pollutants and low recovery rate of chromium because of the presence of organic, such as protein and fat. In this work, high recovery rate and high purity of the chromium ion were successfully prepared by the way of acid enzyme, flocculant, and Fenton oxidation. The experiments were characterized by TG, TOC, UV-VIS, and SEM. In the work, the tannery waste chrome liquor was used as experimental material. The results showed that the percentage of reduction of TOC in the tannery waste chrome liquor by method of Fenton oxidation, acid enzyme, and the flocculant was 71.15%, 65.26%, and 22.05%, respectively. Therefore, the organism content of chrome tanning waste liquid was greatly reduced through the pretreatment. And the application experiment showed that the properties and grain surface and fibers of the tanned leather with commercial chromium powder and chrome tanning agent prepared from the chromium waste liquid treated with Fenton are nearly the same.

  14. Fluoridation of gaseous phase chlorinated hydrocarbons in presence of chromium oxide-based catalysts. Effect of doping substance addition; Fluoration d'hydrocarbures chlores en phase gazeuse en presence de catalyseurs a base d'oxyde de chrome. Effet de l'ajout de dopant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loustaunau, A.

    2003-11-01

    The preparation of various hydro-fluorocarbons (HFC), like CF{sub 3}CH{sub 2}F, CF{sub 3}CHF{sub 2} and CH{sub 2}F{sub 2}, has been studied at temperatures of 380 deg. C and 250 deg. C in gaseous phase by catalytic fluoridation of the corresponding chlorinated hydrocarbons. The addition of doping substances like zinc, nickel or magnesium to fluorinated alumina supported chromium oxide-based catalysts, has been particularly examined in order to favour the main fluoridation reaction (by simple Cl/F exchange) with respect to secondary reactions (de-hydro-fluoridation and Deacon). Only the addition of small amounts of Zn (Zn/(Zn+Cr) = 0.15) allows to promote the fluoridation reaction and to inhibit the secondary reactions. This effect is enhanced when the molecule is less reactive and when the quantity of matter at the surface of the fluorinated alumina is low. Therefore, the promoting effect is more important in presence of CF{sub 3}CH{sub 2}Cl than in presence of CF{sub 3}CHCl{sub 2} and CH{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}. This positive effect of zinc may result from the formation of a mixed ZnCr{sub 2}O{sub 4} phase during the preparation of the catalyst (evidenced by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS)) which may have modified the chemical properties of chromium atoms. Moreover, the XPS and electron microscopy characterizations indicate that the presence of zinc (contrary to nickel and magnesium) may allow a better dispersion of the active chromium atoms for Cl/F exchanges after fluoridation of the catalyst. Those may correspond to the presence of very fluorinated species, like 'Cr-F', and oxi-fluorinated like 'CrOF'. Thus, in the presence of a small amount of metals at the surface of the support, the formation of these different species is favoured. (J.S.)

  15. Chromium Isotopes Record Fluctuations in Precambrian Biospheric Oxygenation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frei, R.; Gaucher, C.; Poulton, S. W.; Canfield, D. E.

    2009-12-01

    There is a direct relationship between life, oxygen, and the surface chemistry of the Earth. Geochemical data suggest that oxygenation of the Earth's atmosphere occurred in two broad steps, near the beginning and the end of the Proterozoic Eon (2500 to 542 million years ago), but the details of this history are unclear. The geochemical behaviour of chromium (Cr) is highly sensitive to the redox state of the surface environment as oxidative weathering processes produce the oxidised hexavalent [Cr(VI)] form. Oxidation of reduced trivaltent [Cr(III)] chromium on land is accompanied by an isotopic fractionation, leading to enrichment of the mobile hexavalent form in the heavier isotope. The fractionated Cr isotope signature is then tranfered by riverine transport to the sea. Here, we use Cr stable isotopes from banded iron formations (BIFs) to track the presence of Cr(VI) in Precambrian oceans, providing a time-resolved picture of the oxygenation history of Earth’s atmosphere-hydrosphere system. Fractionated Cr isotopes indicate the accumulation of Cr(VI) in ocean surface waters ~2.8 to 2.6 billion years (Gyr) ago and a likely transient elevation in atmospheric and surface ocean oxygen prior to the first great rise of oxygen 2.45-2.2 Gyr ago (the Great Oxidation Event; GOE). In contrast, Cr isotopes in ~1.88 Gyr old BIFs are not fractionated, indicating a major decline in atmospheric oxygen and demonstrating that the GOE did not lead to a unidirectional stepwise increase in atmospheric oxygen. In the late Neoproterozoic, ~800 to 542 million years (Myr) ago, we observe strong positive fractionations in Cr isotopes (δ53Cr up to +4.9 ‰) providing independent support for increased surface oxygenation at this time. This may have stimulated rapid evolution of macroscopic multicellular life. Our chromium isotope data thus provide new insights into the oxygenation history of the Earth, and highlight its use as a powerful redox tracer in aquatic systems.

  16. Selective Leaching of Chromium from Hanford Tank Sludge 241-U-108

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rapko, Brian M.; Vienna, John D.

    2002-09-09

    This study evaluated the oxidants permanganate, MnO4-, and peroxynitrite, ONOO-, as selective chromium-leaching agents from washed 241-U-108 tank sludge under varying conditions of hydroxide concentration, temperature, and time. The mass changes and final sludge compositions were evaluated using glass-property models to ascertain the relative impacts of the various oxidative alkaline leach conditions on the amount of borosilicate glass required to immobilize a given amount of washed 241-U-108 Hanford tank sludge. Only permanganate leaching removes sufficient chromium to make the chromium concentration in the oxidatively alkaline leached solids non-limiting. In the absence of added oxidants, continued washing or caustic leaching have no beneficial effects. Peroxynitrite addition reduces the amount of glass required to immobilize a given amount of washed 241-U-108 tank sludge by approximately a factor of two. Depending on the leach conditions and the exact chromium concentration limits, contact with alkaline permanganate solutions reduces the amount of immobilized high-level waste glass by a factor of 10 to 30.

  17. Core and Valence Structures in K beta X-ray Emission Spectra of Chromium Materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Torres Deluigi, Maria; de Groot, Frank M. F.; Lopez-Diaz, Gaston; Tirao, German; Stutz, Guillermo; Riveros de la Vega, Jose

    2014-01-01

    We analyze the core and valence transitions in chromium in a series of materials with a number of different ligands and including the oxidation states: Cr-II, Cr-III, Cr-IV, and Cr-VI. To study the core-to-core transitions we employ the CTM4XAS program and investigate the shapes, widths, intensities

  18. Chromium poisoning of LSM/YSZ and LSCF/CGO composite cathodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentzen, Janet Jonna; Høgh, Jens Valdemar Thorvald; Barfod, Rasmus;

    2009-01-01

    An electrochemical study of SOFC cathode degradation, due to poisoning by chromium oxide vapours, was performed applying 3-electrode set-ups. The cathode materials comprised LSM/YSZ and LSCF/CGO composites, whereas the electrolyte material was 8YSZ. The degradation of the cathode performance...

  19. Initiation and Performance of a Coating for Countering Chromium Poisoning in a SOFC-stack

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Karsten Agersted; Persson, Åsa Helen; Beeaff, Dustin;

    2007-01-01

    Minimising transport of chromium from the metallic interconnect (e.g. of Crofer 22APU) to the cathode in a planar solid oxide fuel cell is done by application of a coating between the two parts. The coating is applied by slurry coating, and taken through stack initialisation it transforms...

  20. MODELING THE RATE-CONTROLLED SORPTION OF HEXAVALENT CHROMIUM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grove, D.B.; Stollenwerk, K.G.

    1985-01-01

    Sorption of chromium VI on the iron-oxide- and hydroxide-coated surface of alluvial material was numerically simulated with rate-controlled reactions. Reaction kinetics and diffusional processes, in the form of film, pore, and particle diffusion, were simulated and compared with experimental results. The use of empirically calculated rate coefficients for diffusion through the reacting surface was found to simulate experimental data; pore or particle diffusion is believed to be a possible rate-controlling mechanism. The use of rate equations to predict conservative transport and rate- and local-equilibrium-controlled reactions was shown to be feasible.

  1. Low-chromium reduced-activation chromium-tungsten steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klueh, R.L.; Alexander, D.J.; Maziasz, P.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1996-10-01

    Bainitic microstructures formed during continuous cooling can differ from classical upper and lower bainite formed during isothermal transformation. Two types of non-classical bainite were observed depending on the cooling rate: carbide-free acicular bainite at rapid cooling rates and granular bainite at slower cooling rates. The Charpy impact toughness of the acicular ferrite was found to be considerably better than for the granular bainite. It was postulated that alloying to improve the hardenability of the steel would promote the formation of acicular bainite, just as increasing the cooling rate does. To test this, chromium and tungsten were added to the 2 1/4Cr-2W and 2 1/4Cr-2WV steel compositions to increase their hardenability, and the microstructures and mechanical properties were examined.

  2. Chromium(VI) reduction by ascorbate: role of reactive intermediates in DNA damage in vitro.

    OpenAIRE

    Stearns, D M; Courtney, K D; Giangrande, P H; Phieffer, L S; Wetterhahn, K E

    1994-01-01

    Reaction of chromium(VI) with one equivalent of ascorbate was studied by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy in the presence of 0.10 M 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline-1-oxide (DMPO) at room temperature in 0.10 M (N-[2-hydroxyethyl]piperazine-N'-[2-ethanesulfonic acid]) (HEPES) and 0.05 M tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane hydrochloride (Tris-HCl) buffers (pH 7.0 room temperature). Chromium(V), ascorbyl radical, and carbon-based DMPO-radical adducts were observed. A higher level of Cr(V) was ob...

  3. Removal of chromium hexavalent of residual water from tannery using hydrotalcite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the main problems of leather tanned is the treatment that must be give to the waste water polluted with chrome which stays in trivalent form, but it is easily oxidated at chromium hexavalent. This work pretends to find an elimination media for chromium (VI) from water using the original synthetic hydrotalcite and calcined as sorbent by its anion exchange and memory effect properties. The tannery water was characterized by X-ray diffraction, thermal gravimetric analysis, specific surface and infrared spectroscopy. (Author)

  4. Bainitic chromium-tungsten steels with 3 pct chromium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Previous work on 3Cr-1.5MoV (nominally Fe-3Cr-2.5Mo-0.25V-0.1C), 2.25Cr-2W (Fe-2.25Cr-2W-0.1C), and 2.25Cr-2WV (Fe-2.25Cr-2W-0.25V-0.1C) steels indicated that the impact toughness of these steels depended on the microstructure of the bainite formed during continuous cooling from the austenization temperature. Microstructures formed during continuous cooling can differ from classical upper and lower bainite formed during isothermal transformation. Two types of nonclassical microstructures were observed depending on the cooling rate: carbide-free acicular bainite at rapid cooling rates and granular bainite at slower cooling rates. The Charpy impact toughness of the acicular ferrite was considerably better than for the granular bainite. It was postulated that alloying to improve the hardenability of the steel would promote the formation of acicular bainite, just as increasing the cooling rate does. To test this, chromium and tungsten were added to the 2.25Cr-2W and 2.25Cr-2WV steel compositions to increase their hardenability. Charpy testing indicated that the new 3Cr-W and 3Cr-WV steels had improved impact toughness, as demonstrated by lower ductile-brittle transition temperatures and higher upper-shelf energies. This improvement occurred with less tempering than was necessary to achieve similar toughness for the 2.25Cr steels and for high-chromium (9 to 12 pct Cr) Cr-W and Cr-Mo steels

  5. Chromium

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 6+), a toxic form that results from industrial pollution. This fact sheet focuses exclusively on trivalent (3+) ... 1 medium 1 Banana, 1 medium 1 Green beans, ½ cup 1 What are recommended intakes of ...

  6. Synthesis of Chromium (Ⅲ) 5-aminosalicylate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Wei; HAO Er-jun; JIANG Yu-qin

    2004-01-01

    As we all known that diabetes is a chronic disease with major health consequences.Research has revealed that the occurrence of diabetes have great thing to do with the chromium deficient. Almost 40 years after the first report of glucose tolerance factor(GTF) [1], no conclusive evidence for an isolable ,biologically active form of chromium exited. Three materials have been proposed to be the biologically active form of chromium: "glucose tolerance factor", chromium Picolinate and low-molecular-weight chromium-binding substance (LWMCr) [2] . So there is potential for the design of new chromium drugs .5-Aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA) is identified as an active component in the therapy of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) such as Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis . The therapeutic action of 5-ASA is believed to be coupled to its ability to act as a free radical scavenger [3-4],acting locally on the inflamed colonic mucosa [5-7]. However, the clinical use of 5-ASA is limited, since orally administered 5-ASA is rapidly and completely absorbed from the upper gastrointestinal tract and therefore the local therapeutic effects of 5-ASA in the colon is hardly expected.In this paper, we report the synthesis of chromium(Ⅲ)5-aminosalicylate from 5-ASA and CrCl3. 6H2O.The synthesis route is as follow:The complex has been characterized by elemental analysis, IR spectra, X-ray powder diffractionand TG-DTA . They indicate that the structure is tris(5-ASA) Chromium . Experiments show that thecomplex has a good activity for supplement tiny dietary chromium, lowering blood glucose levels,lowering serum lipid levels and in creasing lean body mass .

  7. Characteristics of chromium-allergic dermatitis patients prior to regulatory intervention for chromium in leather

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bregnbak, David; Thyssen, Jacob P; Zachariae, Claus;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chromium-tanned leather articles currently constitute the most important cause of contact allergy to chromium in Denmark. A regulation on the content of hexavalent chromium in leather was adopted in November 2013 by the EU member states. OBJECTIVES: To characterize patients...... with chromium allergy and their disease, to serve as a baseline for future studies on the potential effect of the new regulation on chromium in leather. METHODS: A questionnaire case-control study was performed on 155 dermatitis patients with positive patch test reactions to potassium dichromate and a matched...... control group of 621 dermatitis patients. Comparisons were made by use of a χ(2) -test and the Mann-Whitney U-test. Logistic regression analyses were used to test for associations. RESULTS: Sixty-six per cent of chromium-allergic patients had a positive history of contact dermatitis caused by leather...

  8. Chromium in leather footwear-risk assessment of chromium allergy and dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyssen, Jacob P; Strandesen, Maria; Poulsen, Pia B;

    2012-01-01

    Background. Chromium-tanned leather footwear, which releases >3 ppm hexavalent Cr(VI), may pose a risk of sensitizing and eliciting allergic dermatitis. Objectives. To determine the content and potential release of chromium in leather footwear and to discuss the prevention of chromium contact...... allergy and dermatitis. Methods. Sixty pairs of leather shoes, sandals and boots (20 children's, 20 men's, and 20 women's) were purchased in Copenhagen and examined with X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy. Chromium was extracted according to the International Standard, ISO 17075. The detection level for Cr......(VI) was 3 ppm. Results. Chromium was identified in 95% of leather footwear products, the median content being 1.7% (range 0-3.3%). No association with store category or footwear category was found. A tendency for there to be a higher chromium content in footwear with high prices was shown (p(trend) = 0...

  9. Release of Hexavalent Chromium by Ash and Soils in Wildfire-Impacted Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Ruth E.; Morman, Suzette A.; Plumlee, Geoffrey S.; Hageman, Philip L.; Adams, Monique

    2008-01-01

    The highly oxidizing environment of a wildfire has the potential to convert any chromium present in the soil or in residential or industrial debris to its more toxic form, hexavalent chromium, a known carcinogen. In addition, the highly basic conditions resulting from the combustion of wood and wood products could result in the stabilization of any aqueous hexavalent chromium formed. Samples were collected from the October 2007 wildfires in Southern California and subjected to an array of test procedures to evaluate the potential effects of fire-impacted soils and ashes on human and environmental health. Soil and ash samples were leached using de-ionized water to simulate conditions resulting from rainfall on fire-impacted areas. The resulting leachates were of high pH (10-13) and many, particularly those of ash from burned residential areas, contained elevated total chromium as much as 33 micrograms per liter. Samples were also leached using a near-neutral pH simulated lung fluid to model potential chemical interactions of inhaled particles with fluids lining the respiratory tract. High Performance Liquid Chromatography coupled to Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry was used to separate and detect individual species (for example, Cr+3, Cr+6, As+3, As+5, Se+4, and Se+6). These procedures were used to determine the form of the chromium present in the de-ionized water and simulated lung fluid leachates. The results show that in the de-ionized water leachate, all of the chromium present is in the form of Cr+6, and the resulting high pH tends to stabilize Cr+6 from reduction to Cr+3. Analysis of the simulated lung fluid leachates indicates that the predominant form of chromium present in the near-neutral pH of lung fluid would be Cr+6, which is of concern due to the high possibility of inhalation of the small ash and soil particulates, particularly by fire or restoration crews.

  10. Electronic structure simulation of chromium aluminum oxynitride by discrete variational-X alpha method and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Choi, Y; Lee, J D; Kim, E; No, K

    2002-01-01

    We use a first-principles discrete variational (DV)-X alpha method to investigate the electronic structure of chromium aluminum oxynitride. When nitrogen is substituted for oxygen in the Cr-Al-O system, the N2p level appears in the energy range between O2p and Cr3d levels. Consequently, the valence band of chromium aluminum oxynitride becomes broader and the band gap becomes smaller than that of chromium aluminum oxide, which is consistent with the photoelectron spectra for the valence band using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS). We expect that this valence band structure of chromium aluminum oxynitride will modify the transmittance slope which is a requirement for photomask application.

  11. Galvanic Interaction between Chalcopyrite and Pyrite with Low Alloy and High Carbon Chromium Steel Ball

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asghar Azizi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was aimed to investigate the galvanic interaction between pyrite and chalcopyrite with two types of grinding media (low alloy and high carbon chromium steel ball in grinding of a porphyry copper sulphide ore. Results indicated that injection of different gases into mill altered the oxidation-reduction environment during grinding. High carbon chromium steel ball under nitrogen gas has the lowest galvanic current, and low alloy steel ball under oxygen gas had the highest galvanic current. Also, results showed that the media is anodic relative to pyrite and chalcopyrite, and therefore pyrite or chalcopyrite with a higher rest potential acted as the cathode, whilst the grinding media with a lower rest potential acted as the anode, when they are electrochemically contacted. It was also found that low alloy steel under oxygen produced the highest amount of EDTA extractable iron in the slurry, whilst high carbon chromium steel under nitrogen atmosphere led to the lowest amount.

  12. Chromium containing silica: effect of ultrasonic and purification methods on color products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chromium containing silica has numerous applications, such as: fiber-optics, luminescent materials, catalysts and pigments. In paint and ceramic pigments, chromate and dichromate ions, and silica are largely used. In this paper, it has been investigated the effect of pH, heating methods, and ultrasonic stirring on chromium oxidation states coprecipitated with silica. The material has been obtained from the coprecipitation of an aqueous diluted sodium silicate solution and acid chromium nitrate solution, purified by extractions and dialysis, and dried with microwave oven. Products have been characterized by X-ray powder diffraction, infrared vibrational spectroscopy and nitrogem adsorption isotherm (BET). Coprecipitates are non cristalline and the specific surface area value for sample obtained by conventional heating is smaller than the one for sample obtained by ultrasonic method. It is possible to obtain silica with different colors from blue due to the Cr(III), to yellow due to the Cr (VI), depending on the precipitation, purification and drying methods. (author)

  13. Effects of annealing time on the structure, morphology, and stress of gold-chromium bilayer film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hong; Jin, Yun-Xia; Wang, Hu; Kong, Fang-Yu; Huang, Hao-Peng; Cui, Yun

    2016-10-01

    In this work, a 200-nm-thick gold film with a 10-nm-thick chromium layer used as an adhesive layer is fabricated on fused silica by the electron beam evaporation method. The effects of annealing time at 300 °C on the structure, morphology and stress of the film are studied. We find that chromium could diffuse to the surface of the film by formatting a solid solution with gold during annealing. Meanwhile, chromium is oxidized on the surface and diffused downward along the grain grooves in the gold film. The various operant mechanisms that change the residual stresses of gold films for different annealing times are discussed. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61405225).

  14. Fluctuations in Precambrian atmospheric oxygenation recorded by chromium isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frei, Robert; Gaucher, Claudio; Poulton, Simon W.; Canfield, Don E.

    2009-09-01

    Geochemical data suggest that oxygenation of the Earth's atmosphere occurred in two broad steps. The first rise in atmospheric oxygen is thought to have occurred between ~2.45 and 2.2Gyr ago, leading to a significant increase in atmospheric oxygen concentrations and concomitant oxygenation of the shallow surface ocean. The second increase in atmospheric oxygen appears to have taken place in distinct stages during the late Neoproterozoic era (~800-542Myr ago), ultimately leading to oxygenation of the deep ocean ~580Myr ago, but details of the evolution of atmospheric oxygenation remain uncertain. Here we use chromium (Cr) stable isotopes from banded iron formations (BIFs) to track the presence of Cr(VI) in Precambrian oceans, providing a time-resolved picture of the oxygenation history of the Earth's atmosphere-hydrosphere system. The geochemical behaviour of Cr is highly sensitive to the redox state of the surface environment because oxidative weathering processes produce the oxidized hexavalent [Cr(VI)] form. Oxidation of reduced trivalent [Cr(III)] chromium on land is accompanied by an isotopic fractionation, leading to enrichment of the mobile hexavalent form in the heavier isotope. Our fractionated Cr isotope data indicate the accumulation of Cr(VI) in ocean surface waters ~2.8 to 2.6Gyr ago and a likely transient elevation in atmospheric and surface ocean oxygenation before the first great rise of oxygen 2.45-2.2Gyr ago (the Great Oxidation Event). In ~1.88-Gyr-old BIFs we find that Cr isotopes are not fractionated, indicating a decline in atmospheric oxygen. Our findings suggest that the Great Oxidation Event did not lead to a unidirectional stepwise increase in atmospheric oxygen. In the late Neoproterozoic, we observe strong positive fractionations in Cr isotopes (δ53Cr up to +4.9‰), providing independent support for increased surface oxygenation at that time, which may have stimulated rapid evolution of macroscopic multicellular life.

  15. Synthesis, characterization and catalytic activity of chromium substituted cobalt ferrospinels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chromium substituted cobalt ferrospinels were prepared by soft citrate gel method. The synthesized material was characterized by various physico-chemical methods. All the samples showed a single-phase cubic structure. Lattice constant varies from 8.389 to 8.323 A. Transmission electron microscopic study indicated the nanostructure of the catalysts while homogenous grain distribution was presented by scanning electron microscopic studies. The catalytic activity of the samples was investigated towards acetylation of phenols. The presence of active centers on the surface of the material was confirmed through pyridine adsorption studies. The surface acidity of the catalyst is responsible for better catalytic performance. The material was found to serve as a promising catalyst for acylation and benzoylation of phenols under solvent free condition. These catalysts are ∼100% selective towards o-acylation of phenols, a promising reaction for perfumery intermediates. The catalysts were seen to be reusable without any further treatment. Catalytic activities of cobalt, chromium and iron oxides were also investigated for comparison. The cobalt ferrospinel was found to have better catalytic activity as compared to the Cr-substituted ferrospinels and the pure oxides. Cobalt ferrite catalyst offers high yields in a short reaction time under solvent-free conditions.

  16. Synthesis, characterization and catalytic activity of chromium substituted cobalt ferrospinels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hankare, P.P., E-mail: p_hankarep@rediffmail.com [Department of Chemistry, Shivaji University, Kolhapur, Maharashtra, 416 004 (India); Sankpal, U.B., E-mail: sankpalumesh@gmail.com [Department of Chemistry, Shivaji University, Kolhapur, Maharashtra, 416 004 (India); Patil, R.P. [Department of Chemistry, Shivaji University, Kolhapur, Maharashtra, 416 004 (India); Lokhande, P.D. [Department of Chemistry, University of Pune, Pune, Maharashtra, 411 007 (India); Sasikala, R. [Chemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India)

    2011-02-15

    Chromium substituted cobalt ferrospinels were prepared by soft citrate gel method. The synthesized material was characterized by various physico-chemical methods. All the samples showed a single-phase cubic structure. Lattice constant varies from 8.389 to 8.323 A. Transmission electron microscopic study indicated the nanostructure of the catalysts while homogenous grain distribution was presented by scanning electron microscopic studies. The catalytic activity of the samples was investigated towards acetylation of phenols. The presence of active centers on the surface of the material was confirmed through pyridine adsorption studies. The surface acidity of the catalyst is responsible for better catalytic performance. The material was found to serve as a promising catalyst for acylation and benzoylation of phenols under solvent free condition. These catalysts are {approx}100% selective towards o-acylation of phenols, a promising reaction for perfumery intermediates. The catalysts were seen to be reusable without any further treatment. Catalytic activities of cobalt, chromium and iron oxides were also investigated for comparison. The cobalt ferrospinel was found to have better catalytic activity as compared to the Cr-substituted ferrospinels and the pure oxides. Cobalt ferrite catalyst offers high yields in a short reaction time under solvent-free conditions.

  17. Potentiometry: A Chromium (III) -- EDTA Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoppe, J. I.; Howell, P. J.

    1975-01-01

    Describes an experiment that involves the preparation of a chromium (III)-EDTA compound, a study of its infrared spectrum, and the potentiometric determination of two successive acid dissociation constants. (Author/GS)

  18. AEROSOL BEHAVIOR IN CHROMIUM WASTE INCINERATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Suyuan Yu

    2003-01-01

    Cr2O3 is considered as the dominant incineration product during the combustion disposal of chromium waste. A hydrogen/air diffusion flame was employed to simulate the industrial process of incineration. Cr2O3 aerosols were generated inside the flame by the gas phase reaction of chromium and oxygen. Chromium came from the rapid decomposition of chromium hexacarbonyl (Cr(CO)6) at room temperature and was carried into the combustion chamber by hydrogen. Aerosol and clusters can then be easily formed in the flame by nucleation and coagulation. A two dimensional Discrete-Sectional Model (DSM) was adopted to calculate the Cr2O3 aerosol behavior. The experimental measurement method was Dynamic Light Scattering. The numerically predicted results agreed well with those of the experimental measurement. Both results show that the Cr2O3 aerosol size reached about 70 nanometers at the flame top.

  19. Localized Corrosion of Chromium Coated Steel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, X.; Beentjes, P.; Mol, A.; Terryn, H.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we report on the studies of the local corrosion behaviour of chromium-coated ultra low carbon steel in NaCl solution using polarization, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and SVET.

  20. Standard Specification for Low-Carbon Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum, Low-Carbon Nickel-Molybdenum-Chromium, Low-Carbon Nickel-Molybdenum-Chromium-Tantalum, Low-Carbon Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum-Copper, and Low-Carbon Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum-Tungsten Alloy Rod

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2015-01-01

    Standard Specification for Low-Carbon Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum, Low-Carbon Nickel-Molybdenum-Chromium, Low-Carbon Nickel-Molybdenum-Chromium-Tantalum, Low-Carbon Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum-Copper, and Low-Carbon Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum-Tungsten Alloy Rod

  1. Standard Specification for Low-Carbon Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum, Low-Carbon Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum-Copper, Low-Carbon Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum-Tantalum, Low-Carbon Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum-Tungsten, and Low-Carbon Nickel-Molybdenum-Chromium Alloy Plate, Sheet, and Strip

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2015-01-01

    Standard Specification for Low-Carbon Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum, Low-Carbon Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum-Copper, Low-Carbon Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum-Tantalum, Low-Carbon Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum-Tungsten, and Low-Carbon Nickel-Molybdenum-Chromium Alloy Plate, Sheet, and Strip

  2. Surface Reactions Limiting Chromium(VI) Generation from Naturally Derived Chromium(III) Minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hausladen, D.; Fendorf, S. E.

    2015-12-01

    Chromium(III)-bearing minerals, commonly found in serpentinite and ultramaphic rocks, are ubiquitous in California soils and along convergent plate boundaries worldwide. Elevated concentrations of carcinogenic Cr(VI) have been measured in groundwater throughout the state, even in aquifers untouched by anthropogenic contamination. In most natural systems, manganese oxides are the only known, kinetically viable, oxidant of Cr(III). Numerous laboratory studies have demonstrated a finite capacity of Mn-oxides to generate Cr(VI) before surface alterations inhibit further Cr-oxidation. The extent to which these processes dictate the inhibition, and subsequent regeneration, of Mn-oxidation capacity within structured soils and sediments is not well understood. Here we use artificial soil aggregates made of Fe(III),Cr(III)-hydroxide-coated quartz sand and surrounded by aerated solute flow (pH 8, 30mM HEPES, 10mM HCO3-) to investigate C(VI) generation within ultramafic rock derived sediment and processes inhibiting manganese reactivity. We found that while Cr(VI)-production scaled with Cr-mineral solubility; Cr(VI) effluent concentrations from aggregates of both lower and higher solubility Cr(III)-minerals peaked very soon after reaction with birnessite (within 2 days and 4 days, respectively). Once Cr(VI) production plateaued (t=22 days) aggregate influent was acidified (pH 5, 30mM C2H3O2-). Despite increasing Cr(III) solubility at lower pH, aqueous Cr(VI) production further decreased. A secondary pulse of Cr(VI) generation was seen only after the surrounding solute returned to initial conditions (pH 8). As with the initial pulse, Cr(VI) concentration scaled with mineral solubility. Collectively, our results demonstrate the extent that natural fluctuations in groundwater composition, both as a result of irrigation or precipitation events, have the potential to both regenerate and inhibit Mn-oxide surfaces. These synthetic soil aggregates provide insight into how fluctuating

  3. Direct access to macroporous chromium nitride and chromium titanium nitride with inverse opal structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Weitian; DiSalvo, Francis J

    2015-03-21

    We report a facile synthesis of single-phase, nanocrystalline macroporous chromium nitride and chromium titanium nitride with an inverse opal morphology. The material is characterized using XRD, SEM, HR-TEM/STEM, TGA and XPS. Interconversion of macroporous CrN to Cr2O3 and back to CrN while retaining the inverse opal morphology is also demonstrated.

  4. Diminishing Chromium Use on Combined Chromium-Gambier Tanning Process Upon the Characteristics of Tanned Leather

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Kasim

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The research was aimed to investigate the influence of minimizing chromium use on combined chromium-gambier process upon the characteristics of tanned leather. At the first stage of tanning process, chromium was used and in the second stage it was replaced by gambier. The raw material used was dried saline-preserved goat skin. The treatments applied on the tanning process were the different concentrations of chromium ranging from the highest level of 6% to the lowest level of 1% which was then re-tanned by using 8% concentration of gambier. The examination parameters included chemical and physical properties as well as visual investigation on the tanned leather in accordance with SNI-06-0463-1989-A. The result showed that the tanning process by using 2% chromium in the first step and 8% gambier in the second step was a treatment combination producing tanned leather that met the standard. The examination on tanned leather resulted from such treatment showed 56.33% rawhide, 17.45% of bound tannin, 31.22% of tanning level, tensile strength 386.30 kg/cm2, flexibility 31.91%, leather width 1.3 mm, density 0.75 g/cm3, the leather was quite elastic with light brownish color. In conclusion, minimizing the use of chromium in the combined tanning process of chromium and gambier can be implemented to the lowest of 2% chromium concentration and 8% gambier in the first and second step, respectively.

  5. Lateral stress evolution in chromium sulfide cermets with varying excess chromium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petel, O. E.; Appleby-Thomas, G. J.; Wood, D. C.; Capozzi, A.; Nabavi, A.; Goroshin, S.; Frost, D. L.; Hazell, P. J.

    2016-04-01

    The shock response of chromium sulfide-chromium, a cermet of potential interest as a matrix material for ballistic applications, has been investigated at two molar ratios. Using a combustion synthesis technique allowed for control of the molar ratio of the material, which was investigated under near-stoichiometric (cermet) and excess chromium (interpenetrating composite) conditions, representing chromium:sulfur molar ratios of 1.15:1 and 4:1, respectively. The compacts were investigated via the plate-impact technique, which allowed the material to be loaded under a one-dimensional state of strain. Embedded manganin stress gauges were employed to monitor the temporal evolution of longitudinal and lateral components of stress in both materials. Comparison of these two components has allowed assessment of the variation of material shear strength both with impact pressure/strain-rate and time for the two molar ratio conditions. The two materials exhibited identical material strength despite variations in their excess chromium contents.

  6. Chromium(VI) but not chromium(III) species decrease mitoxantrone affinity to DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowicka, Anna M; Stojek, Zbigniew; Hepel, Maria

    2013-01-31

    Binding of mitoxantrone (MXT) to double-stranded DNA has been investigated as a model drug-DNA binding system to evaluate the effects of various forms of chromium on the binding properties. We have found that Cr(III), which binds strongly to DNA, does not affect the MXT affinity to DNA. In contrast, Cr(VI), in the form of chromate ions CrO(4)(2-), decreases the MXT affinity to DNA despite electrostatic repulsions with phosphate-deoxyribose chains of DNA. The MXT-DNA binding constant was found to decrease from (1.96 ± 0.005) × 10(5) to (0.77 ± 0.018) × 10(5) M(-1) for Cr(VI) concentration changing from 0 to 30 μM. The influence of Cr(VI) on MXT-DNA binding has been attributed to the oxidation of guanine residue, thus interrupting the intercalation of MXT into the DNA double helix at the preferential CpG intercalation site. This supposition is corroborated by the observed increase in the MXT binding site size from 2 bp (base pairs) to 4-6 bp in the presence of Cr(VI). The measurements of the MXT-DNA binding constant and the MXT binding site size on a DNA molecule have been carried out using spectroscopic, voltammetric, and nanogravimetric techniques, providing useful information on the mechanism of the interactions.

  7. Chromium stable isotope systematic – implications for the redox evolution of the earth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Døssing, Lasse Nørbye

    isotopes as modern soil profiles and indicate that oxidative weathering in the terrestrial environment started well before and after the Great Oxidation Event ~2.3 billion years ago. The signals of oxidative weathering on land are traceable in contemporaneous marine sediments such as Banded Iron Formations......The isotopic composition of chromium (Cr) holds great promise as a paleo-redox proxy.Whereas the reduction of oxidized Cr(VI) to Cr(III) yields a well-defined kineticfractionation, the fractionation imparted during oxidative weathering is only described theoretically. This thesis demonstrates...... that Cr isotopes fractionate during oxidative weathering of modern soil systems. The result is the retention of light Cr(III) and the release of heavy Cr(VI) to runoff. Deviations in Cr isotope compositions from mantle inventory values are ultimately attributed to oxidative weathering in modern systems...

  8. Serum chromium levels in gestational diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P G Sundararaman

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To measure serum chromium level in women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM from Chennai, South India. Materials and Methods: Thirty women with gestational diabetes, 60 age matched controls. Inclusion criteria: Gestational age 22-28 weeks, age group 20-35 years. Exclusion Criteria: Gestational age beyond 28 weeks, malnutrition or presence of infection. Serum chromium was measured using inductive couple plasma emission spectrometer. Results: Serum chromium levels of women with GDM, 1.59+/-0.02 ng/ml (range: 0.16-4.0 ng/ml were lower than in controls (4.58+/-0.62 ng/ml; range 0.82-5.33 ng/ml (P < 0.001. However, there were no significant differences among cases and controls when subdivided by parity. Conclusions: Women with GDM from a South Indian city had lower levels of serum chromium compared to pregnant women without GDM. Studies may be done whether chromium supplementation is useful in this group of women.

  9. Investigation on steam oxidation behaviour of TP347H FG Part I Exposure at 256 bar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jianmin, J; Montgomery, Melanie; Larsen, OH;

    2005-01-01

    , but the subsequent growth of oxide from further exposure is slower due to the formation of a healing layer consisting of chromium rich oxide near original alloy grain boundaries. At a temperature region above 600C a thin oxide rich in chromium and manganese is formed. In addition precipitation of secondary carbides...... with the aforementioned steel in coal-fired boilers and this paper focuses on the steam oxidation behaviour for specimens tested at various metal temperatures for exposure times of 7700, 23000 and 30000 hours as investigated by light optical and scanning electron microscopy. The oxide present on the specimens is a duplex...... oxide, where the outer layer consists of two sub-layers, an iron oxide layer and an iron-nickel oxide layer; the inner layer is chromium rich chromium-iron-nickel oxide. Microstructure examination showed that for all these samples the varying grain size of subsurface metal affected the oxide thickness...

  10. Effect of water vapour on growth and adherence of chromia scales on pure chromium

    OpenAIRE

    Michalik, Marek

    2007-01-01

    The oxidation behaviour of chromium was studied in the temperature range 950 to 1050oC. A number of atmospheres such as Ar-O2, Ar-H2-H2O, and more complex N2-O2-H2O and N2-H2-H2O were used, to allow the effects of oxygen and water vapour partial pressures to be determined. It was shown that the oxide scale formed in Ar-O2 environments was dependent on the oxygen partial pressure. Decreasing the pO2 in such gas mixtures lowered the oxidation rate and improved scale adherence. Different behavio...

  11. Flashlamp-pumped lasing of chromium-doped GSG garnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The implications for the practical use of chromium:GSGG in lamp-pumped tunable lasers are discussed in this paper. The authors report here some major improvements in the performance of the flashlamp-pumped chromium:GSGG laser

  12. Determination of chromium combined with DNA, RNA and proteins in chromium-rich brewer's yeast by NAA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The content of chromium in the DNA, RNA and protein fractions separated from chromium-rich and normal brewer's yeast was determined by neutron activation analysis (NAA). Our results show that the extracted relative amounts and concentrations of DNA, RNA and proteins have no significant difference for two types of yeast, but the chromium content in DNA, RNA and proteins fractions extracted from the chromium-rich yeast are substantially higher than those from the normal. In addition, the concentration of chromium in DNA is much higher than that in RNA and proteins. It is evident that the inorganic chromium compounds can enter the yeast cell during the yeast cultivation in the chromium-containing culture medium and are converted into organic chromium species, which are combined with DNA, RNA and proteins. (author)

  13. Hexavalent and trivalent chromium in leather: What should be done?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moretto, Angelo

    2015-11-01

    Trivalent chromium compounds are used for leather tanning, and chromium may be released during use of leather goods. In certain instances, small amounts of hexavalent chromium can be formed and released. Both trivalent and hexavalent chromium can elicit allergic skin reaction in chromium sensitised subjects, the latter being significantly more potent. Induction of sensitisation only occurs after exposure to hexavalent chromium. A minority of subjects are sensitised to chromium, and in a fraction of these subjects allergic skin reaction have been described after wearing leather shoes or, less frequently, other leather goods. The evidence that in all these cases the reaction is related to hexavalent chromium is not always strong. The content of hexavalent chromium in leather is regulated in European Union, but rate of release rather than content is relevant for allergic skin reaction. The role of trivalent chromium appear much less relevant if at all. Modern tanning procedure do not pose significant risk due to either hexavalent or trivalent chromium. Dismissing bad quality and worn-off leather goods is relevant in reducing or eliminating the skin reaction. It should also be pointed out that shoe components or substances other than chromium in leather may cause allergic/irritative skin reactions.

  14. Chromium allergy and dermatitis: prevalence and main findings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bregnbak, David; Johansen, Jeanne D.; Jellesen, Morten Stendahl;

    2015-01-01

    The history of chromium as an allergen goes back more than a century, and includesan interventional success with national legislation that led to significant changes inthe epidemiology of chromium allergy in construction workers. The 2015 EU Leather Regulation once again put a focus on chromium...

  15. Hexavalent and trivalent chromium in leather: What should be done?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moretto, Angelo

    2015-11-01

    Trivalent chromium compounds are used for leather tanning, and chromium may be released during use of leather goods. In certain instances, small amounts of hexavalent chromium can be formed and released. Both trivalent and hexavalent chromium can elicit allergic skin reaction in chromium sensitised subjects, the latter being significantly more potent. Induction of sensitisation only occurs after exposure to hexavalent chromium. A minority of subjects are sensitised to chromium, and in a fraction of these subjects allergic skin reaction have been described after wearing leather shoes or, less frequently, other leather goods. The evidence that in all these cases the reaction is related to hexavalent chromium is not always strong. The content of hexavalent chromium in leather is regulated in European Union, but rate of release rather than content is relevant for allergic skin reaction. The role of trivalent chromium appear much less relevant if at all. Modern tanning procedure do not pose significant risk due to either hexavalent or trivalent chromium. Dismissing bad quality and worn-off leather goods is relevant in reducing or eliminating the skin reaction. It should also be pointed out that shoe components or substances other than chromium in leather may cause allergic/irritative skin reactions. PMID:26361854

  16. Collisional properties of trapped cold chromium atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Pavlovich, Z; Côté, R; Sadeghpour, H R; Pavlovic, Zoran; Roos, Bjoern O.; Côté, Robin

    2004-01-01

    We report on calculations of the elastic cross section and thermalization rate for collision between two maximally spin-polarized chromium atoms in the cold and ultracold regimes, relevant to buffer-gas and magneto-optical cooling of chromium atoms. We calculate ab initio potential energy curves for Cr2 and the van der Waals coefficient C6, and construct interaction potentials between two colliding Cr atoms. We explore the effect of shape resonances on elastic cross section, and find that they dramatically affect the thermalization rate. Our calculated value for the s-wave scattering length is compared in magnitude with a recent measurement at ultracold temperatures.

  17. Studying chromium biosorption using arabica coffee leaves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Carlos Florez García

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available This work was aimed at providing an alternative for removing heavy metals such as chromium from waste water (effluent from the leather industry and galvanoplasty (coating with a thin layer of metal by electrochemical means, using coffee leaves as bio- mass. Using arabica coffee (Castle variety leaves led to 82% chromium removal efficiency for 1,000 mg/L synthetic dissolutions in 4 pH dissolution operating conditions, 0 rpm agitation, 0.149 mm diameter biomass particle size and 0.85 g/ml biomass / dissolution volume ratio.

  18. Novel high chromium containing braze filler metals for heat exchanger applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rangaswamy, S.; Fortuna, D. [Sulzer Metco, Troy (United States)

    2007-07-01

    A new family of boron-free, high chromium containing braze filler metal compositions were developed (Amdry 105, Amdry 108, Amdry 805). Filler metal properties including metallurgical phases, melting range, flow, corrosion resistance and high temperature oxidation resistance are reported. Additionally, the technical and economical advantages of using these new filler metals in fabricating flat plate type of heat exchangers and metallic catalytic converters is discussed. (orig.)

  19. Comparative Biosorption Studies of Hexavalent Chromium Ion onto Raw and Modified Palm Branches

    OpenAIRE

    Mona A. Shouman; Nady A. Fathy; Soheir A. Khedr; Amina A. Attia

    2013-01-01

    The waste of palm branches (PB) was tested for its ability to remove chromium (VI) from aqueous solution by batch and column experiments. Palm branches chemically modified with an oxidizing agent (sulphuric acid) then coated with chitosan and surfactant (hexadecyl trimethyl ammonium bromide surfactant, HDTMA), respectively, were carried out to improve the removal performance of PB. The results of their Cr (VI) removal performances are pH dependent. The adsorption data could be well interprete...

  20. Standard Specification for Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum-Columbium Alloy (UNS N06625), Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum-Silicon Alloy (UNS N06219), and Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum-Tungsten Alloy (UNS N06650) Rod and Bar

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2014-01-01

    Standard Specification for Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum-Columbium Alloy (UNS N06625), Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum-Silicon Alloy (UNS N06219), and Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum-Tungsten Alloy (UNS N06650) Rod and Bar

  1. Chromium accumulation potential of Zea mays grown under four different fertilizers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dheeba, B; Sampathkumar, P; Kannan, K

    2014-12-01

    Chromium (Cr) contamination in soil is a growing concern in sustainable agriculture production and food safety. We performed pot experiment with chromium (30 mg/soil) to assess the accumulation potential of Zea mays and study the influence of four fertilizers, viz. Farm Yard Manure (FYM), NPK, Panchakavya (PK) and Vermicompost (VC) with respect to Cr accumulation. The oxidative stress and pigment (chlorophyll) levels were also examined. The results showed increased accumulation of chromium in both shoots and roots of Zea mays under FYM and NPK supply, and reduced with PK and VC. While the protein and pigment contents decreased in Cr treated plants, the fertilizers substantiated the loss to overcome the stress. Similarly, accumulation of Cr increased the levels of antioxidant enzymes such as catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and peroxidase (POD) indicating the enhanced damage control activity. However, these levels were relatively low in plants supplemented with fertilizers. Our results confirm that the maize can play an effective role in bioremediation of soils polluted with chromium, particularly in supplementation with fertilizers such as farm yard manure and NPK.

  2. Chromium accumulation potential of Zea mays grown under four different fertilizers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dheeba, B; Sampathkumar, P; Kannan, K

    2014-12-01

    Chromium (Cr) contamination in soil is a growing concern in sustainable agriculture production and food safety. We performed pot experiment with chromium (30 mg/soil) to assess the accumulation potential of Zea mays and study the influence of four fertilizers, viz. Farm Yard Manure (FYM), NPK, Panchakavya (PK) and Vermicompost (VC) with respect to Cr accumulation. The oxidative stress and pigment (chlorophyll) levels were also examined. The results showed increased accumulation of chromium in both shoots and roots of Zea mays under FYM and NPK supply, and reduced with PK and VC. While the protein and pigment contents decreased in Cr treated plants, the fertilizers substantiated the loss to overcome the stress. Similarly, accumulation of Cr increased the levels of antioxidant enzymes such as catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and peroxidase (POD) indicating the enhanced damage control activity. However, these levels were relatively low in plants supplemented with fertilizers. Our results confirm that the maize can play an effective role in bioremediation of soils polluted with chromium, particularly in supplementation with fertilizers such as farm yard manure and NPK. PMID:25651615

  3. Bioremediation Of Heavy Metal Toxicity-With Special Reference To Chromium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suranjana (Arora Ray and Manas Kanti Ray

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available All metals are toxic and our bodies require special transport and handling mechanisms to keep them from harming us. The toxicity occurs in humans due to environmental pollution via soil or water contamination or due to occupational exposure. Some of these metals are useful to us in low concentrations but are highly toxic in higher concentrations. These metal toxicity cause serious morbidity and mortality. Among these heavy metals chromium toxicity can cause serious carcinogenic, genotoxic and immunotoxic effects in humans and animals. Of the two oxidative states in which chromium can be present Cr (III and Cr (VI, Cr (III is essential for the human system whereas Cr (VI has harmful effects. So, one of the ways of reducing Cr-toxicity in Cr-contaminated soil and water is to reduce soluble Cr (VI to insoluble Cr (III. This can be achieved by microbial activity and is a cost-effective and environment friendly method. Many genera of microbes like Bacillus, Enterobacter, Escherichia, Pseudomonas and also some yeasts and fungi help in bioremediation of metals and chromium-contaminated soil and water by bio-absorption and bioaccumulation of chromium. The potential of bioremediation of metal toxicity and its impact on the environment is discussed.

  4. Electroanalytical sensing of chromium(III) and (VI) utilising gold screen printed macro electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metters, Jonathan P; Kadara, Rashid O; Banks, Craig E

    2012-02-21

    We report the fabrication of gold screen printed macro electrodes which are electrochemically characterised and contrasted to polycrystalline gold macroelectrodes with their potential analytical application towards the sensing of chromium(III) and (VI) critically explored. It is found that while these gold screen printed macro electrodes have electrode kinetics typically one order of magnitude lower than polycrystalline gold macroelectrodes as is measured via a standard redox probe, in terms of analytical sensing, these gold screen printed macro electrodes mimic polycrystalline gold in terms of their analytical performance towards the sensing of chromium(III) and (VI), whilst boasting additional advantages over the macro electrode due to their disposable one-shot nature and the ease of mass production. An additional advantage of these gold screen printed macro electrodes compared to polycrystalline gold is the alleviation of the requirement to potential cycle the latter to form the required gold oxide which aids in the simplification of the analytical protocol. We demonstrate that gold screen printed macro electrodes allow the low micro-molar sensing of chromium(VI) in aqueous solutions over the range 10 to 1600 μM with a limit of detection (3σ) of 4.4 μM. The feasibility of the analytical protocol is also tested through chromium(VI) detection in environmental samples.

  5. The Electrochemical Reduction of Chromium Sesquioxide in Molten Calcium Chloride under Cathodic Potential Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwandt, Carsten; Fray, Derek J.

    2007-11-01

    Electrochemical polarization and reduction experiments are reported which were performed with a three-terminal cell and a molten salt electrolyte consisting of calcium chloride with additions of calcium oxide. Employing a metal cathode, a graphite anode and a pseudo-reference electrode also made from graphite, polarization measurements were carried out with the aim to validate the performance of the pseudo-reference electrode and to assess the stability of the electrolyte. Using a chromium sesquioxide cathode in conjunction with a graphite anode and a graphite pseudo-reference electrode, electrochemical reduction experiments were conducted under potentiostatic control. The key results are: a graphite pseudo-reference electrode has been shown to be appropriate in the present type of molten salt electrochemical experiments that take place on a time scale of many hours; the conversion of chromium oxide into chromium metal has been accomplished under cathodic potential control and in the absence of calcium metal deposition; a significant amount of calcium oxide in the calcium chloride has been found necessary to preclude anodic chlorine formation throughout the entire experiment; a considerable overpotential has been identified at the anode.

  6. Electrodeposition of black chromium thin films from trivalent chromium-ionic liquid solution

    OpenAIRE

    Eugénio, S.; Vilar, Rui; C. M. Rangel; Baskaran, I.

    2009-01-01

    In the present study, black chromium thin films were electrodeposited from a solution of 1-butyl-3- methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate ([BMIm][BF4] ionic liquid containing trivalent chromium (Cr(III)). Homogeneous and well adherent coatings have been obtained on nickel, copper and stainless steel substrates. The nucleation and growth of the films were investigated by cyclic voltammetry and current-density/time transient techniques. SEM/EDS, XPS and XRD were used to study the morphology, chem...

  7. Reduction of Hexavalent Chromium by Viable Cells of Chromium Resistant Bacteria Isolated from Chromite Mining Environment

    OpenAIRE

    Satarupa Dey; Baishali Pandit; A. K. Paul

    2014-01-01

    Environmental contamination of hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] is of serious concern for its toxicity as well as mutagenic and carcinogenic effects. Bacterial chromate reduction is a cost-effective technology for detoxification as well as removal of Cr(VI) from polluted environment. Chromium resistant and reducing bacteria, belonging to Arthrobacter, Pseudomonas, and Corynebacterium isolated from chromite mine overburden and seepage samples of Orissa, India, were found to tolerate 12–18 mM Cr(VI...

  8. Fluctuations in Precambrian atmospheric oxygenation recorded by chromium isotopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frei, Robert; Gaucher, Claudio; Poulton, Simon W; Canfield, Don E

    2009-09-10

    Geochemical data suggest that oxygenation of the Earth's atmosphere occurred in two broad steps. The first rise in atmospheric oxygen is thought to have occurred between approximately 2.45 and 2.2 Gyr ago, leading to a significant increase in atmospheric oxygen concentrations and concomitant oxygenation of the shallow surface ocean. The second increase in atmospheric oxygen appears to have taken place in distinct stages during the late Neoproterozoic era ( approximately 800-542 Myr ago), ultimately leading to oxygenation of the deep ocean approximately 580 Myr ago, but details of the evolution of atmospheric oxygenation remain uncertain. Here we use chromium (Cr) stable isotopes from banded iron formations (BIFs) to track the presence of Cr(VI) in Precambrian oceans, providing a time-resolved picture of the oxygenation history of the Earth's atmosphere-hydrosphere system. The geochemical behaviour of Cr is highly sensitive to the redox state of the surface environment because oxidative weathering processes produce the oxidized hexavalent [Cr(VI)] form. Oxidation of reduced trivalent [Cr(III)] chromium on land is accompanied by an isotopic fractionation, leading to enrichment of the mobile hexavalent form in the heavier isotope. Our fractionated Cr isotope data indicate the accumulation of Cr(VI) in ocean surface waters approximately 2.8 to 2.6 Gyr ago and a likely transient elevation in atmospheric and surface ocean oxygenation before the first great rise of oxygen 2.45-2.2 Gyr ago (the Great Oxidation Event). In approximately 1.88-Gyr-old BIFs we find that Cr isotopes are not fractionated, indicating a decline in atmospheric oxygen. Our findings suggest that the Great Oxidation Event did not lead to a unidirectional stepwise increase in atmospheric oxygen. In the late Neoproterozoic, we observe strong positive fractionations in Cr isotopes (delta(53)Cr up to +4.9 per thousand), providing independent support for increased surface oxygenation at that time, which may

  9. Evaluation of Tris-Bipyridine Chromium Complexes for Flow Battery Applications: Impact of Bipyridine Ligand Structure on Solubility and Electrochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera, Pablo J; Yang, Xingyi; Suttil, James A; Brooner, Rachel E M; Thompson, Levi T; Sanford, Melanie S

    2015-11-01

    This report describes the design, synthesis, solubility, and electrochemistry of a series of tris-bipyridine chromium complexes that exhibit up to six reversible redox couples as well as solubilities approaching 1 M in acetonitrile. We have systematically modified both the ligand structure and the oxidation state of these complexes to gain insights into the factors that impact solubility and electrochemistry. The results provide a set of structure-solubility-electrochemistry relationships to guide the future development of electrolytes for nonaqueous flow batteries. In addition, we have identified a promising candidate from the series of chromium complexes for further electrochemical and battery assessment. PMID:26468668

  10. The electronic structure of antiferromagnetic chromium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skriver, Hans Lomholt

    1981-01-01

    The author has used the local spin density formalism to perform self-consistent calculations of the electronic structure of chromium in the non-magnetic and commensurate antiferromagnetic phases, as a function of the lattice parameter. A change of a few per cent in the atomic radius brings...

  11. Flashlamp-pumped lasing of chromium: GSGG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lasing action in chromium-doped gadolinium scandium gallium garnet (Cr:GSGG) is well established for both CW/sup (1)/ and flashlamp/sup (2)/ pumping. This paper describes an investigation of flashlamp-pumped Cr:GSGG lasers and indicates some of the factors which limit performance

  12. Defect structure of electrodeposited chromium layers

    CERN Document Server

    Marek, T; Vertes, A; El-Sharif, M; McDougall, J; Chisolm, C U

    2000-01-01

    Positron annihilation spectroscopy was applied to study the effects of pre-treatment and composition of substrates on the quality and defect structure of electrodeposited thick chromium coatings. The results show that both parameters are important, and a scenario is proposed why the mechanically polished substrate gives more defective film than the electro polished one.

  13. 29 CFR 1910.1026 - Chromium (VI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Enhancements In Lieu of LEV Retrofitting • Eductors. Many chemical baths are currently mixed via air agitation... requirements of the Hazard Communication Standard, 29 CFR 1910.1200. (3) Cleaning and replacement. (i) The... CFR 1910.141. Where skin contact with chromium (VI) occurs, the employer shall provide...

  14. Biological groundwater treatment for chromium removal at low hexavalent chromium concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamais, Daniel; Noutsopoulos, Constantinos; Kavallari, Ioanna; Nyktari, Eleni; Kaldis, Apostolos; Panousi, Eleni; Nikitopoulos, George; Antoniou, Kornilia; Nasioka, Maria

    2016-06-01

    The objective of this work is to develop and evaluate biological groundwater treatment systems that will achieve hexavalent chromium reduction and total chromium removal from groundwater at hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) groundwater concentrations in the 0-200 μg/L range. Three lab-scale units operated, as sequencing batch reactors (SBR) under aerobic, anaerobic and anaerobic-aerobic conditions. All systems received groundwater with a Cr(VI) content of 200 μg/L. In order to support biological growth, groundwater was supplemented with milk, liquid cheese whey or a mixture of sugar and milk to achieve a COD concentration of 200 mg/L. The results demonstrate that a fully anaerobic system or an anaerobic-aerobic system dosed with simple or complex external organic carbon sources can lead to practically complete Cr(VI) reduction to Cr(III). The temperature dependency of maximum Cr(VI) removal rates can be described by the Arrhenius relationship. Total chromium removal in the biological treatment systems was not complete because a significant portion of Cr(III) remained in solution. An integrated system comprising of an anaerobic SBR followed by a sand filter achieved more than 95% total chromium removal thus resulting in average effluent total and dissolved chromium concentrations of 7 μg/L and 3 μg/L, respectively. PMID:26971177

  15. Graphitization in chromium cast iron

    OpenAIRE

    LECOMTE-BECKERS, Jacqueline; Terziev, L.; Breyer, J. P.

    1998-01-01

    Some trials with graphite Hi-Cr iron rolls have been done mainly in Japan, for the rolling of stainless steel. This material could lead to good compromise between oxidation, wear and thermal behaviour. By using thermal analysis and resistometry, the conditions for secondary graphite formation have been studied. The amount and volume of free graphite may be strongly increased by a suitable heat treatment, allowing a good thermal conductivity as well as high wear and mechanical properties.

  16. Elementary surface processes during reactive magnetron sputtering of chromium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monje, Sascha; Corbella, Carles, E-mail: carles.corbella@rub.de; Keudell, Achim von [Research Group Reactive Plasmas, Ruhr-University Bochum, Universitystr. 150, 44801 Bochum (Germany)

    2015-10-07

    The elementary surface processes occurring on chromium targets exposed to reactive plasmas have been mimicked in beam experiments by using quantified fluxes of Ar ions (400–800 eV) and oxygen atoms and molecules. For this, quartz crystal microbalances were previously coated with Cr thin films by means of high-power pulsed magnetron sputtering. The measured growth and etching rates were fitted by flux balance equations, which provided sputter yields of around 0.05 for the compound phase and a sticking coefficient of O{sub 2} of 0.38 on the bare Cr surface. Further fitted parameters were the oxygen implantation efficiency and the density of oxidation sites at the surface. The increase in site density with a factor 4 at early phases of reactive sputtering is identified as a relevant mechanism of Cr oxidation. This ion-enhanced oxygen uptake can be attributed to Cr surface roughening and knock-on implantation of oxygen atoms deeper into the target. This work, besides providing fundamental data to control oxidation state of Cr targets, shows that the extended Berg's model constitutes a robust set of rate equations suitable to describe reactive magnetron sputtering of metals.

  17. Dietary chromium and nickel enhance UV-carcinogenesis in skin of hairless mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The skin cancer enhancing effect of chromium (in male mice) and nickel in UVR-irradiated female Skh1 mice was investigated. The dietary vitamin E and selenomethionine were tested for prevention of chromium-enhanced skin carcinogenesis. The mice were exposed to UVR (1.0 kJ/m2 3x weekly) for 26 weeks either alone, or combined with 2.5 or 5.0 ppm potassium chromate, or with 20, 100 or 500 ppm nickel chloride in drinking water. Vitamin E or selenomethionine was added to the lab chow for 29 weeks beginning 3 weeks before the start of UVR exposure. Both chromium and nickel significantly increased the UVR-induced skin cancer yield in mice. In male Skh1 mice, UVR alone induced 1.9 ± 0.4 cancers/mouse, and 2.5 or 5.0 ppm potassium chromate added to drinking water increased the yields to 5.9 ± 0.8 and 8.6 ± 0.9 cancers/mouse, respectively. In female Skh1 mice, UVR alone induced 1.7 ± 0.4 cancers/mouse, and the addition of 20, 100 or 500 ppm nickel chloride increased the yields to 2.8 ± 0.9, 5.6 ± 0.7 and 4.2 ± 1.0 cancers/mouse, respectively. Neither vitamin E nor selenomethionine reduced the cancer yield enhancement by chromium. These results confirm that chromium and nickel, while not good skin carcinogens per se, are enhancers of UVR-induced skin cancers in Skh1 mice. Data also suggest that the enhancement of UVR-induced skin cancers by chromate may not be oxidatively mediated since the antioxidant vitamin E as well as selenomethionine, found to prevent arsenite-enhanced skin carcinogenesis, failed to suppress enhancement by chromate

  18. Ultrasound-assisted dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction for the speciation of traces of chromium using electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-García, Ignacio; Briceño, Marisol; Vicente-Martínez, Yesica; Hernández-Córdoba, Manuel

    2013-10-15

    A microextraction procedure for the speciation of very low concentrations (0.005-0.2 µg L(-1)) of chromium is discussed. To the aqueous sample (10 mL), diluted hydrochloric acid, sodium chloride and a small amount of tributylphosphate (80 µL) are incorporated, and the mixture is submitted to ultrasounds for 10 min. The organic phase recovered after centrifuging is injected into the electrothermal atomizer, and the signal due to hexavalent chromium obtained. The repetition of the procedure using another aliquot in which all the chromium present is oxidized to Cr (VI) allows the Cr(III) content to be obtained by difference. The enrichment factor is 240 and the detection limit 0.002 µg L(-1) chromium. The relative standard deviation for ten consecutive microextractions of a 0.1 µg L(-1) chromium solution is close to 8%. The procedure is applied to waters and to the leachates obtained from low cost toys made of plastic materials. PMID:24054574

  19. Effects of Maternal Chromium Restriction on the Long-Term Programming in MAPK Signaling Pathway of Lipid Metabolism in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qian; Sun, Xiaofang; Xiao, Xinhua; Zheng, Jia; Li, Ming; Yu, Miao; Ping, Fan; Wang, Zhixin; Qi, Cuijuan; Wang, Tong; Wang, Xiaojing

    2016-01-01

    It is now broadly accepted that the nutritional environment in early life is a key factor in susceptibility to metabolic diseases. In this study, we evaluated the effects of maternal chromium restriction in vivo on the modulation of lipid metabolism and the mechanisms involved in this process. Sixteen pregnant C57BL mice were randomly divided into two dietary treatments: a control (C) diet group and a low chromium (L) diet group. The diet treatment was maintained through gestation and lactation period. After weaning, some of the pups continued with either the control diet or low chromium diet (CC or LL), whereas other pups switched to another diet (CL or LC). At 32 weeks of age, serum lipid metabolism, proinflammatory indexes, oxidative stress and anti-oxidant markers, and DNA methylation status in adipose tissue were measured. The results indicated that the maternal low chromium diet increased body weight, fat pad weight, serum triglyceride (TG), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), malondialdehyde (MDA), and oxidized glutathione (GSSG). There was a decrease in serum reduced/oxidized glutathione (GSH/GSSG) ratio at 32 weeks of age in female offspring. From adipose tissue, we identified 1214 individual hypomethylated CpG sites and 411 individual hypermethylated CpG sites in the LC group when compared to the CC group. Pathway analysis of the differential methylation genes revealed a significant increase in hypomethylated genes in the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway in the LC group. Our study highlights the importance of the MAPK signaling pathway in epigenetic changes involved in the lipid metabolism of the offspring from chromium-restricted dams. PMID:27517955

  20. Effects of Maternal Chromium Restriction on the Long-Term Programming in MAPK Signaling Pathway of Lipid Metabolism in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qian; Sun, Xiaofang; Xiao, Xinhua; Zheng, Jia; Li, Ming; Yu, Miao; Ping, Fan; Wang, Zhixin; Qi, Cuijuan; Wang, Tong; Wang, Xiaojing

    2016-01-01

    It is now broadly accepted that the nutritional environment in early life is a key factor in susceptibility to metabolic diseases. In this study, we evaluated the effects of maternal chromium restriction in vivo on the modulation of lipid metabolism and the mechanisms involved in this process. Sixteen pregnant C57BL mice were randomly divided into two dietary treatments: a control (C) diet group and a low chromium (L) diet group. The diet treatment was maintained through gestation and lactation period. After weaning, some of the pups continued with either the control diet or low chromium diet (CC or LL), whereas other pups switched to another diet (CL or LC). At 32 weeks of age, serum lipid metabolism, proinflammatory indexes, oxidative stress and anti-oxidant markers, and DNA methylation status in adipose tissue were measured. The results indicated that the maternal low chromium diet increased body weight, fat pad weight, serum triglyceride (TG), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), malondialdehyde (MDA), and oxidized glutathione (GSSG). There was a decrease in serum reduced/oxidized glutathione (GSH/GSSG) ratio at 32 weeks of age in female offspring. From adipose tissue, we identified 1214 individual hypomethylated CpG sites and 411 individual hypermethylated CpG sites in the LC group when compared to the CC group. Pathway analysis of the differential methylation genes revealed a significant increase in hypomethylated genes in the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway in the LC group. Our study highlights the importance of the MAPK signaling pathway in epigenetic changes involved in the lipid metabolism of the offspring from chromium-restricted dams. PMID:27517955

  1. Iron -chromium alloys and free surfaces: from ab initio calculations to thermodynamic modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferritic steels possibly strengthened by oxide dispersion are candidates as structural materials for generation IV and fusion nuclear reactors. Their use is limited by incomplete knowledge of the iron-chromium phase diagram at low temperatures and of the phenomena inducing preferential segregation of one element at grain boundaries or at surfaces. In this context, this work contributes to the multi-scale study of the model iron-chromium alloy and their free surfaces by numerical simulations. This study begins with ab initio calculations of properties related to the mixture of atoms of iron and chromium. We highlight complex dependency of the magnetic moments of the chromium atoms on their local chemical environment. Surface properties are also proving sensitive to magnetism. This is the case of impurity segregation of chromium in iron and of their interactions near the surface. In a second step, we construct a simple energy model for high numerical efficiency. It is based on pair interactions on a rigid lattice to which are given local chemical environment and temperature dependencies. With this model, we reproduce the ab initio results at zero temperature and experimental results at high temperature. We also deduce the solubility limits at all intermediate temperatures with mean field approximations that we compare to Monte Carlo simulations. The last step of our work is to introduce free surfaces in our model. We then study the effect of ab initio calculated bulk and surface properties on surface segregation.Finally, we calculate segregation isotherms. We therefore propose an evolution model of surface composition of iron-chromium alloys as a function of bulk composition. which are given local chemical environment and temperature dependencies. With this model, we reproduce the ab initio results at zero temperature and experimental results at high temperature. We also deduce the solubility limits at all intermediate temperatures with mean field approximations that

  2. CHROMIUM INDUCED CYTOTOXICITY IN BLACKGRAM (VIGNA MUNGO L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Chidambaram ، P. Sundaramoorthy ، A. Murugan ، K. Sankar Ganesh ، L. Baskaran

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Chromium is known to be highly toxic to biological systems. This study was designed to determine the mutagenic effects of different concentrations (0, 10, 25, 50, 100 and 200 mg/L of hexavalent chromium on root tip cells of blackgram (Vigna mungo L. Hepper. The blackgram seeds were equi-spacially arranged in sterilized petriplates lined with filter paper and they were treated with different concentrations of chromium solution. In germination studies, the morphological growth parameters such as germination percentage, root length, shoot length fresh weight and dry weight of blackgram seedlings were decreased with increasing dose of chromium concentrations. No germination of blackgram seeds was recorded at 300mg/l chromium concentration. Chromosome aberration assay was used to determine the mitotic indices and rate of chromosome aberration in blackgram root tip cells due to chromium treatment. The results showed that the mitotic indices were complicated due to different concentrations of chromium. However, the increase in chromium concentration has led to a gradual increase in the percentage of chromosomal aberration and mitotic index. The chromosome length, absolute chromosome length and average chromosome lengths were gradually found to decrease. There was no considerable change in 2n number of chromosome with the increase in chromium concentrations. It is concluded that the hexavalent chromium has significant mutagenic effect on the root tip cells of blackgram.

  3. Chromium supplementation improved post-stroke brain infarction and hyperglycemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wen-Ying; Mao, Frank Chiahung; Liu, Chia-Hsin; Kuan, Yu-Hsiang; Lai, Nai-Wei; Wu, Chih-Cheng; Chen, Chun-Jung

    2016-04-01

    Hyperglycemia is common after acute stroke and is associated with a worse outcome of stroke. Thus, a better understanding of stress hyperglycemia is helpful to the prevention and therapeutic treatment of stroke. Chromium is an essential nutrient required for optimal insulin activity and normal carbohydrate and lipid metabolism. Beyond its nutritional effects, dietary supplement of chromium causes beneficial outcomes against several diseases, in particular diabetes-associated complications. In this study, we investigated whether post-stroke hyperglycemia involved chromium dynamic mobilization in a rat model of permanent focal cerebral ischemia and whether dietary supplement of chromium improved post-stroke injury and alterations. Stroke rats developed brain infarction, hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, glucose intolerance, and insulin resistance. Post-stroke hyperglycemia was accompanied by elevated secretion of counter-regulatory hormones including glucagon, corticosterone, and norepinephrine, decreased insulin signaling in skeletal muscles, and increased hepatic gluconeogenesis. Correlation studies revealed that counter-regulatory hormone secretion showed a positive correlation with chromium loss and blood glucose increased together with chromium loss. Daily chromium supplementation increased tissue chromium levels, attenuated brain infarction, improved hyperglycemia, and decreased plasma levels of glucagon and corticosterone in stroke rats. Our findings suggest that stroke rats show disturbance of tissue chromium homeostasis with a net loss through urinary excretion and chromium mobilization and loss might be an alternative mechanism responsible for post-stroke hyperglycemia. PMID:26477944

  4. Natural and induced reduction of hexavalent chromium in soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leita, Liviana; Margon, Alja; Sinicco, Tania; Mondini, Claudio; Valentini, Massimiliano; Cantone, Pierpaolo

    2013-04-01

    Even though naturally elevated levels of chromium can be found naturally in some soils, distressing amounts of the hexavalent form (CrVI) are largely restricted to sites contaminated by anthropogenic activities. In fact, the widespread use of chromium in various industries and the frequently associated inadequate disposal of its by-products and wastes have created serious environmental pollution problems in many parts of the world. CrVI is toxic to plants, animals and humans and exhibits also mutagenic effects. However, being a strong oxidant, CrVI can be readily reduced to the much less harmful trivalent form (CrIII) when suitable electron donors are present in the environment. CrIII is relatively insoluble, less available for biological uptake, and thus definitely less toxic for web-biota. Various electron donors in soil can be involved in CrVI reduction in soil. The efficiency of CrVI reducing abiotic agents such as ferrous iron and sulphur compounds is well documented. Furthermore, CrVI reduction is also known to be significantly enhanced by a wide variety of cell-produced monosaccharides, including glucose. In this study we evaluated the dynamics of hexavalent chromium (CrVI) reduction in contaminated soil amended or not with iron sulphate or/and glucose and assessed the effects of CrVI on native or glucose-induced soil microbial biomass size and activity. CrVI negatively affected both soil microbial activity and the size of the microbial biomass. During the incubation period, the concentration of CrVI in soil decreased over time whether iron sulphate or/and glucose was added or not, but with different reduction rates. Soil therefore displayed a natural attenuation capacity towards chromate reduction. Addition of iron sulphate or/and glucose, however, increased the reduction rate by both abiotic and biotic mechanisms. Our data suggest that glucose is likely to have exerted an indirect role in the increased rate of CrVI reduction by promoting growth of

  5. Improvement on simultaneous determination of chromium species in aqueous solution by ion chromatography and chemiluminescence detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gammelgaard, Bente; Liao, Y.P.; Jons, O.

    1997-01-01

    A sensitive method for the simultaneous determination of chromium(III) and chromium(VI) was chromatography and chemiluminescence detection. Two Dionex ion-exchange guard columns in series, CG5 and AG7, were used to separate chromium(III) from chromium(VI). Chromium(VI) was reduced by potassium su...

  6. Activities of chromium in molten copper at dilute concentrations by solid-state electrochemical cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inouye, T. K.; Fujiwara, H.; Iwase, M.

    1991-08-01

    In order to obtain the activities of chromium in molten copper at dilute concentrations (copper was brought to equilibrium with molten CaCl2 + Cr2O3 slag saturated with Cr2O3 (s), at temperatures between 1423 and 1573 K, and the equilibrium oxygen partial pressures were measured by means of solid-oxide galvanic cells of the type Mo/Mo + MoO2/ZrO2(MgO)/(Cu + Cr))alloy + Cr2O3 + (CaCl2 + Cr2O3)slag/Mo. The free energy changes for the dissolution of solid chromium in molten copper at infinite dilution referred to 1 wt pct were determined as Cr (s) = Cr(1 wt pct, in Cu) and Δ G° = + 97,000 + 73.3 (T/K) ± 2,000 J mol-1.

  7. Production of basic chromium sulfate by using recovered chromium from ashes of thermally treated leather.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dettmer, Aline; Nunes, Keila Guerra Pacheco; Gutterres, Mariliz; Marcílio, Nilson Romeu

    2010-04-15

    Leather wastes tanned with chromium are generated during the production process of leather, hence the wastes from hand crafted goods and footwear industries are a serious environmental problem. The thermal treatment of leather wastes can be one of the treatment options because the wastes are rich in chromium and can be used as a raw material for sodium chromate production and further to obtain several chromium compounds. The objective of this study was to utilize the chromium from leather wastes via basic chromium sulfate production to be subsequently applied in a hide tanning. The obtained results have shown that this is the first successful attempt to achieve desired base properties of the product. The result was achieved when the following conditions were applied: a molar ratio between sodium sulfite and sodium dichromate equal to 6; reaction time equal to 5 min before addition of sulfuric acid; pH of sodium dichromate solution equal to 2. Summarizing, there is an opportunity to utilize the dangerous wastes and reused them in the production scheme by minimizing or annulling the environmental impact and to attend a sustainable process development concept.

  8. Production of basic chromium sulfate by using recovered chromium from ashes of thermally treated leather.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dettmer, Aline; Nunes, Keila Guerra Pacheco; Gutterres, Mariliz; Marcílio, Nilson Romeu

    2010-04-15

    Leather wastes tanned with chromium are generated during the production process of leather, hence the wastes from hand crafted goods and footwear industries are a serious environmental problem. The thermal treatment of leather wastes can be one of the treatment options because the wastes are rich in chromium and can be used as a raw material for sodium chromate production and further to obtain several chromium compounds. The objective of this study was to utilize the chromium from leather wastes via basic chromium sulfate production to be subsequently applied in a hide tanning. The obtained results have shown that this is the first successful attempt to achieve desired base properties of the product. The result was achieved when the following conditions were applied: a molar ratio between sodium sulfite and sodium dichromate equal to 6; reaction time equal to 5 min before addition of sulfuric acid; pH of sodium dichromate solution equal to 2. Summarizing, there is an opportunity to utilize the dangerous wastes and reused them in the production scheme by minimizing or annulling the environmental impact and to attend a sustainable process development concept. PMID:20031309

  9. Scale growth process at 1473 K on unmodified and yttrium- or chromium-implanted {beta}-NiAl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jedlinski, J. [Department of Solid State Chemistry, AGH University of Science and Technology, al. Mickiewicza 30, PL-30-059 Krakow (Poland); Grosseau-Poussard, J.L.; Bonnet, G. [LEMMA, University of La Rochelle, La Rochelle (France); Kowalski, K.; Bernasik, A.; Smola, G.; Nocun, M. [AGH University of Science and Technology, Krakow (Poland)

    2011-06-15

    Early oxidation of unmodified and yttrium-implanted or chromium-implanted {beta}-NiAl intermetallic compound at 1473 K was studied using a combination of two-stage-oxidation exposure with {sup 18}O{sub 2} as a tracer, SIMS elemental distribution analysis (depth profiling and imaging modes) and photoluminescence spectroscopy analysis of the scale phase composition. It was found that phase transformation of transient aluminium oxides, represented by {theta}- Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} into stable and protective {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} occurs locally and is affected by implanted additions: Yttrium retarded while chromium appeared to accelerate it. Typical patch- and/or web-like scale morphology of the growing scales was observed. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  10. CHROMIUM(II) AMIDES - SYNTHESIS AND STRUCTURES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    EDEMA, JJH; GAMBAROTTA, S; MEETSMA, A; SPEK, AL; SMEETS, WJJ; CHIANG, MY

    1993-01-01

    A novel class of mono- and di-meric chromium(II) amides has been prepared and characterized. Reaction of [CrCl2(thf)2] (thf = tetrahydrofuran) with 2 equivalents of M(NR2) (R = C6H11, Pr(i), Ph, or phenothiazinyl; M = Li or Na) allowed the formation of the homoleptic amides [{Cr(mu-NR2)(NR2)}2] (R =

  11. Stainless chromium-nickel steels. Chapter I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The chemical composition is tabulated of 90 chromium-nickel stainless steels and alloys given in volume %. The values are also given of the corrosion resistance of the steels and alloys. The tables show data on the surface condition or the methods of material working, types and chemical composition of the medium where corrosion resistance tests were carried out, temperature, pressure, time of tests, corrosion rates, corrosion types, and literature references. A total of 35 references is given. (J.B.)

  12. Chromium--a material for fusion technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Due to their low neutron-induced radioactivity chromium based materials are considered to be candidates for structure materials in fusion technology. In this paper investigations are presented of unirradiated chromium with a purity of 99.96% (DUCROPUR) and a dispersion strengthened chromium alloy Cr5Fe1Y2O3 (DUCROLLOY). Both materials have been produced in a powder metallurgical route. Mechanical tests of smooth and pre-cracked specimens have been performed in a wide temperature range. Below 280 deg. C the fracture toughness values of DUCROPUR are very low (1/2), above the transition temperature they exceed 500 MPa m1/2. Large plastic deformations have been observed. DUCROLLOY does not indicate such a significant increase of fracture toughness in the tested temperature range. But above 400 deg. C large plastic deformations can be obtained in bending samples, too. The fatigue crack propagation behaviour of DUCROPUR at 300 deg. C is similar to that of a ductile metal

  13. The Structure and Properties of Plasma Sprayed Iron Oxide Doped Manganese Cobalt Oxide Spinel Coatings for SOFC Metallic Interconnectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puranen, Jouni; Lagerbom, Juha; Hyvärinen, Leo; Kylmälahti, Mikko; Himanen, Olli; Pihlatie, Mikko; Kiviaho, Jari; Vuoristo, Petri

    2011-01-01

    Manganese cobalt oxide spinel doped with Fe2O3 was studied as a protective coating on ferritic stainless steel interconnects. Chromium alloying causes problems at high operation temperatures in such oxidizing conditions where chromium compounds evaporate and poison the cathode active area, causing the degradation of the solid oxide fuel cell. In order to prevent chromium evaporation, these interconnectors need a protective coating to block the chromium evaporation and to maintain an adequate electrical conductivity. Thermal spraying is regarded as a promising way to produce dense and protective layers. In the present work, the ceramic Mn-Co-Fe oxide spinel coatings were produced by using the atmospheric plasma spray process. Coatings with low thickness and low amount of porosity were produced by optimizing deposition conditions. The original spinel structure decomposed because of the fast transformation of solid-liquid-solid states but was partially restored by using post-annealing treatment.

  14. Chromium Enrichment on P11 Ferritic Steel by Pack Cementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fauzi F. A.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The future thermal power plant is expected to operate at higher temperature to improve its efficiency and to reduce greenhouse gas emission. This target requires better corrosion properties of ferritic steels, which commonly used as materials for superheater and reheater of boiler tubes. In this work, chromium enrichment on the surface of ferritic steel is studied. The deposited chromium is expected to become a reservoir for the formation of chromia protective layer. Chromium was deposited on the substrate of steel by pack cementation process for two hours at the temperature of 850ºC, 950ºC and 1050ºC, respectively. XRD analysis indicated that chromium was successfully deposited at all temperatures. Somehow, SEM cross sectional image showed that continuous layer of chromium was not continuously formed at 850oC. Therefore, this research clarify that chromium enrichment by pack cementation may be conducted at the temperature above 950°C.

  15. Effect of polyethylene glycol on electrochemically deposited trivalent chromium layers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Joo-Yul LEE; Man KIM; Sik-Chol KWON

    2009-01-01

    The structural characteristics of the trivalent chromium deposits and their interfacial behavior in the plating solution with and without polyethylene glycol molecules were observed by using various electrochemical methods such as cyclic voltammetry, open circuit potential transition, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectrometry. It is shown that the polyethylene glycol molecules make the reductive current density lower in the trivalent chromium plating system and promote a hydrogen evolution reaction through their adsorption on the electrode surface. And the trivalent chromium layer formed from the polyethylene glycol-containing solution has somewhat higher density of cracks on its surface and results in a lower film resistance, lower polarization resistance, and higher capacitance in a corrosive atmosphere. It is also revealed that the formation of chromium carbide layer is facilitated in the presence of polyethylene glycol, which means easier electrochemical codeposition of chromium and carbon, not single chromium deposition.

  16. New technology for comprehensive utilization of aluminum-chromium residue from chromium salts production

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xiao-bin; QI Tian-gui; JIANG Xin-min; ZHOU Qiu-sheng; LIU Gui-hua; PENG Zhi-hong; HAN Deng-lun; ZHANG Zhong-yuan; YANG Kun-shan

    2008-01-01

    Colloidal aluminum-chromium residue(ACR) was mass-produced in chromate production process, and the large energy consumption and high recovery cost existed in traditional methods of utilizing such ACR. To overcome those problems, a new comprehensive method was proposed to deal with the ACR, and was proven valid in industry. In the new process, the chromate was separated firstly from the colloidal ACR by ripening and washing with additives, by which more than 95% hexavalent chromium was recovered. The chromium-free aluminum residue(CFAR), after properly dispersed, was digested at 120-130 ℃ and more than 90% alumina can be recovered. And then the pregnant aluminate solution obtained from digestion was seeded to precipitate aluminum hydroxide. This new method can successfully recover both alumina and sodium chromate, and thus realize the comprehensive utilization of ACR from chromate industry.

  17. Inhibition of CO poisoning on Pt catalyst coupled with the reduction of toxic hexavalent chromium in a dual-functional fuel cell

    OpenAIRE

    Dong Young Chung; Hyoung-il Kim; Young-Hoon Chung; Myeong Jae Lee; Sung Jong Yoo; Alok D. Bokare; Wonyong Choi; Yung-Eun Sung

    2014-01-01

    We propose a method to enhance the fuel cell efficiency with the simultaneous removal of toxic heavy metal ions. Carbon monoxide (CO), an intermediate of methanol oxidation that is primarily responsible for Pt catalyst deactivation, can be used as an in-situ reducing agent for hexavalent chromium (Cr (VI)) with reactivating the CO-poisoned Pt catalyst. Using electro-oxidation measurements, the oxidation of adsorbed CO molecules coupled with the concurrent conversion of Cr (VI) to Cr (III) was...

  18. Analysis of molybdenum, chromium, vanadium and iron by polarographic techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The application of direct current Tast polarograph, differential pulse polarography and phase-selective alternative current Tast polarography to the problem of determining molybdenum, chromium, vanadium and iron in various supporting electrolytes is reported. The effect of the supporting electrolyte on the wave/peak potential and sensitivity of the metal ion have been examined. The polarographic methods were applied for simultaneous determination of chromium (3)/chromium (6), vanadium (4), vanadium (5) and iron (2)/iron (3) in different supporting electrolytes

  19. A REVIEW OF BIOSORPTION OF CHROMIUM IONS BY MICROORGANISMS

    OpenAIRE

    Inga Zinicovscaia

    2012-01-01

    Due to its widespread industrial use, chromium has become a serious pollutant in diverse environmental settings. The main source of chromium pollution including the Republic o Moldova is industry. It is a great need to develop new eco-friendly methods of chromium removal. Biosorption of heavy metals is a most promising technology involved in the removal of toxic metals from industrial waste streams and natural waters. This article is an extended abstract of a communication presented at the...

  20. CHROMIUM INDUCED CYTOTOXICITY IN BLACKGRAM (VIGNA MUNGO L.)

    OpenAIRE

    A. Chidambaram ، P. Sundaramoorthy ، A. Murugan ، K. Sankar Ganesh ، L. Baskaran

    2009-01-01

    Chromium is known to be highly toxic to biological systems. This study was designed to determine the mutagenic effects of different concentrations (0, 10, 25, 50, 100 and 200 mg/L) of hexavalent chromium on root tip cells of blackgram (Vigna mungo L. Hepper). The blackgram seeds were equi-spacially arranged in sterilized petriplates lined with filter paper and they were treated with different concentrations of chromium solution. In germination studies, the morphological growth parameters such...

  1. Processes affecting the remediation of chromium-contaminated sites.

    OpenAIRE

    Palmer, C.D.; Wittbrodt, P R

    1991-01-01

    The remediation of chromium-contaminated sites requires knowledge of the processes that control the migration and transformation of chromium. Advection, dispersion, and diffusion are physical processes affecting the rate at which contaminants can migrate in the subsurface. Heterogeneity is an important factor that affects the contribution of each of these mechanisms to the migration of chromium-laden waters. Redox reactions, chemical speciation, adsorption/desorption phenomena, and precipitat...

  2. Production of a chromium Bose-Einstein condensate

    OpenAIRE

    Griesmaier, Axel; Stuhler, Jürgen; Pfau, Tilman

    2005-01-01

    The recent achievement of Bose-Einstein condensation of chromium atoms [1] has opened longed-for experimental access to a degenerate quantum gas with long-range and anisotropic interaction. Due to the large magnetic moment of chromium atoms of 6 {$\\mu$}B, in contrast to other Bose- Einstein condensates (BECs), magnetic dipole-dipole interaction plays an important role in a chromium BEC. Many new physical properties of degenerate gases arising from these magnetic forces have been predicted in ...

  3. Increase of chromium utilization in stainless steel melting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The processes of deoxidizing when melting stainless 18-10 steels in electric are furnaces by the method of remelting with wastes are investigated. The dependences of amount of reduced chromium on silicon consumption are made more precise. It is shown that it is useful to apply aluminium for deoxidation of acid high-chromium slags. Based on the data on pilot melts the extent to which aluminium can be used as a reducing agent for chromium is estimated. 3 refs., 2 figs

  4. Chromium depletion from stainless steels during vacuum annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The behaviour of chromium during selective evaporation by high temperature vacuum annealing has been investigated by means of energy dispersive X-ray analysis and by neutron activation analysis. It was established that the rate of chromium loss from austenitic stainless steels 316 and 321 is controlled by chromium inter-diffusion rather than tracer diffusion in the alloy. Two important parameters in selective removal of chromium from alloy steels are the variation in the chromium surface concentration with time and the depletion profile in the alloy. The present work gives support for the model in which loss of chromium is dependent on its diffusivity in the alloy and on an interface transfer coefficient. The results showed that the surface concentration of chromium decreased with increasing vacuum annealing time. The chromium depletion profile in the metal was in accord with the previous derived model, apart from an anomalous near surface region. Here the higher resolution of a neutron activation technique indicated a region within approximately 2 microns of the surface where the chromium concentration decreased more steeply than expected. (author)

  5. Defect transformation in GSGG crystals during chromium ion activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Absorption and induced absorption spectra, dose dependence of induced absorption, thermoluminescence of GSGG crystals, nominally pure and activated with chromium and neodymium ions in different concentrations, are investigated. It is shown that it is chromium ion presence in large concentration that decreases the induced coloration in GSGG crystals after γ-irradiation at 300 K. Optimum concentration of chromium ions for the minimum of induced coloration are found. The mechanism of decrease of induced coloration consisting in Fermi level displacement by chromium ion activation is established. Defect concentration and localization and recombination possibilities of electrons and holes in GSGG crystals are estimated by computer simulation

  6. Tribological Characteristics of Chromium-active Carbon Electroplated Composite Coatings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUKa-fi; HUAMeng; Yi-min

    2004-01-01

    A process of chromium electroplating using a standard bath with additives and active carbon particles was reported, and the tribological behaviors of the composite coatings using the pin-on-disk tester and the table wear tester were i nvestig(aed. Experimental results indicate that the electroplated chromium-active carbon composite coatings exhibited the low friction coefficient anti excellent anti-wear properties whets coffered with the normal chromium electroplated ones. The formation of active carbon particles within the chromium matrices can be explained by SEM analysis and the mechanis of wear resistance of the composite coatings were studied.

  7. Method of trivalent chromium concentration determination by atomic spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reheulishvili, Aleksandre N.; Tsibakhashvili, Neli Ya.

    2006-12-12

    A method is disclosed for determining the concentration of trivalent chromium Cr(III) in a sample. The addition of perchloric acid has been found to increase the atomic chromium spectrometric signal due to Cr(III), while leaving the signal due to hexavalent chromium Cr(VI) unchanged. This enables determination of the Cr(III) concentration without pre-concentration or pre-separation from chromium of other valences. The Cr(III) concentration may be measured using atomic absorption spectrometry, atomic emission spectrometry or atomic fluorescence spectrometry.

  8. Influence of Chelating Agents on Chromium Fate in Sediment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANGXIAOCHANG; SUNJINHE; 等

    1996-01-01

    A laboratory investigation on reaction between chelating agents and chromium was conducted to evaluate the effect of chelating agents on the adsorption and desorption of chromium in sediment.The amount of adsorbed chromium(VI) in sediment decreased slightly by 5%-10% because of addition of chelating agents.Chelating agents inhibited the removal of Cr(Ⅲ)by sediment from solutions and the inhibiting effect was in the order:citric acid>tartaric acid>EDTA,Salicylic acid.No effect of chelating agents on desorption of chromium in sediment was observed.

  9. Refractory oxides containing aluminium and barium

    OpenAIRE

    Davies T.J.; Biedermann M.; Q-G. Chen; Emblem H. G.; Al-Douri W. A.

    1998-01-01

    Oxides containing aluminium and barium, optionally with chromium, are refractory with several possible industrial uses. A gel precursor of an oxide having the formula BaO.n(Al2xCr2yO3), where 1chromium III salt, then forming a gel which was fired to obtain the desired oxide. Filaments may be drawn as the gel is forming or extr...

  10. Bonding evolution with sintering temperature in low alloyed steels with chromium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuentes-Pacheco L.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available At present, high performance PM steels for automotive applications follow a processing route that comprises die compaction of water-atomized powder, followed by sintering and secondary treatments, and finishing operations. This study examines Cr-alloyed sintered steels with two level of alloying. In chromium-alloyed steels, the surface oxide on the powder is of critical importance for developing the bonding between the particles during sintering. Reduction of this oxide depends mainly on three factors: temperature, dew point of the atmosphere, and carbothermic reduction provided by the added graphite. The transformation of the initial surface oxide evolves sequence as temperature increases during sintering, depending on the oxide composition. Carbothermic reduction is supposed to be the controlling mechanism, even when sintering in hydrogen-containing atmospheres. The effect of carbothermic reduction can be monitored by investigating the behavior of the specimens under tensile testing, and studying the resultant fracture surfaces.

  11. Disorders induced by chromium to health and the use of antioxidants in the prevention or treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio L. Becerra-Torres

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The cell maintains a constant balance of redox processes, thus preserving regulating the balance between pro-oxidant production and antioxidant defense systems. Disruption of this balance leads to oxidative stress state which is characterized by increased levels of free radicals, leading to damage or cell death. Oxidative stress is associated with the pathogenesis of various diseases. In this regard, the evidence shows the oxidizing capacity of heavy metals, including chromium. However, this event can be regulated by nucleophilic nature substances which prevent or reverse the respective disorders. In this context, when the capacity of cellular response against the action of reactive oxygen species is suppressed, the intake of products that help keep the respective functional integrity is indispensable. Already reported some beneficial effects of antioxidants on the functional alterations promoted by heavy metals. The intent of this review is to summarize the scientific ability of chromium to induce pathology in different organ systems and the ability of some antioxidants to prevent or reverse this quality.

  12. Studies on the process aspects related to chemical decontamination of chromium-containing alloys with redox processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Presence of chromium in the oxide layer makes oxidative pre-treatment with oxidizing agents such as potassium permanganate (KMnO4) a must for the decontamination of stainless steels and other chromium containing alloys. The effectiveness of pre-treatment with oxidizing reagent varies with the conditions of treatment such as temperature, concentration and whether the medium is acidic or alkaline. A comparative study of the two acidic oxidizing agents, i.e., nitric acid-permanganate and permanganic acid was made. The dissolution behavior of copper and its oxide in permanganic acid was found to be comparable to that of chromium oxide. Citric acid and ascorbic acid were investigated as alternatives to oxalic acid for the reduction/decomposition of permanganate left over after the oxidizing pre-treatment step. It has been established that the reduction of chromate by citric acid is instantaneous only in presence of Mn2+ ions. It has also been established that reduction of residual permanganate can be achieved with ascorbic acid and with minimum chemical requirement. The capabilities of nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA)-ascorbic acid mixture for the dissolution of hematite have been explored. This study would help to choose the suitable oxidizing agent, the reducing agent used for decomposition of permanganate and to optimize the concentration of reducing formulation so that the process of decontamination is achieved with a minimum requirement of chemicals. The generation of radioactive ion exchange resin as waste is therefore held at a minimum. Ion exchange studies with metal ion complexes of relevance to decontamination were carried out with a view to choose a suitable type of ion exchanger. It has been established that treatment of the ion exchange resin with brine solution can solve the problem of leaching out of non-ionic organics from the resin. (orig.)

  13. Chromium oxide catalysts in the dehydrogenation of alkanes

    OpenAIRE

    Airaksinen, Sanna

    2005-01-01

    Light alkenes, such as propene and butenes, are important intermediates in the manufacture of fuel components and chemicals. The direct catalytic dehydrogenation of the corresponding alkanes is a selective way to produce these alkenes and is frequently carried out using chromia/alumina catalysts. The aim of this work was to obtain structure–activity information, which could be utilised in the optimisation of this catalytic system. The properties of chromia/alumina catalysts were investigated ...

  14. Photoelectrochemical water splitting on chromium-doped titanium dioxide nanotube photoanodes prepared by single-step anodizing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: Current–potential curves with chopped light measured in 1 M NaOH with a scan rate of 5 mV s−1 for the different samples. - Highlights: • Cr-doped TiO2 nanotube layers (Cr–TiO2NTs) were synthesized by anodizing of titanium in a single-step process. • Photoelectrochemical water splitting of Cr–TiO2NTs is higher than that of pure TiO2 nanotubes (TiO2NTs). • Quantity effect of chromium in these composite for photoelectrochemical water splitting is investigated. • Maximum hydrogen production of 37 μL/cm2 after 240 min is obtained. - Abstract: Cr-doped TiO2 nanotubes (Cr–TiO2NTs) with different amounts of chromium were obtained directly by the electrochemical anodic oxidation of titanium foils in a single-step process using potassium chromate as the chromium source. The effects of chromium amount in anodizing solution on the morphologies, structure, photoabsorption and photoelectrochemical water splitting of the TiO2 nanotube array film were investigated. Diffuse reflectance spectra showed an increase in the visible absorption relative to undoped TiO2NTs. The photoelectrochemical performance was examined under visible irradiation in 1 M NaOH electrolyte. Photo-electrochemical characterization shows that chromium doping efficiently enhances the photo-catalytic water splitting performance of Cr-doped TiO2 nanotube samples. The sample (Cr–TiO2NTs-1) exhibited better photo-catalytic activity than the undoped TiO2NTs and Cr–TiO2NTs fabricated using other chromium concentrations. This can be attributed to the effective separation of photogenerated electron–hole upon the substitutional introduction of appropriate Cr amount in to the TiO2 nanotube structure

  15. Photoelectrochemical water splitting on chromium-doped titanium dioxide nanotube photoanodes prepared by single-step anodizing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Momeni, Mohamad Mohsen, E-mail: mm.momeni@cc.iut.ac.ir; Ghayeb, Yousef

    2015-07-15

    Graphical abstract: Current–potential curves with chopped light measured in 1 M NaOH with a scan rate of 5 mV s{sup −1} for the different samples. - Highlights: • Cr-doped TiO{sub 2} nanotube layers (Cr–TiO{sub 2}NTs) were synthesized by anodizing of titanium in a single-step process. • Photoelectrochemical water splitting of Cr–TiO{sub 2}NTs is higher than that of pure TiO{sub 2} nanotubes (TiO{sub 2}NTs). • Quantity effect of chromium in these composite for photoelectrochemical water splitting is investigated. • Maximum hydrogen production of 37 μL/cm{sup 2} after 240 min is obtained. - Abstract: Cr-doped TiO{sub 2} nanotubes (Cr–TiO{sub 2}NTs) with different amounts of chromium were obtained directly by the electrochemical anodic oxidation of titanium foils in a single-step process using potassium chromate as the chromium source. The effects of chromium amount in anodizing solution on the morphologies, structure, photoabsorption and photoelectrochemical water splitting of the TiO{sub 2} nanotube array film were investigated. Diffuse reflectance spectra showed an increase in the visible absorption relative to undoped TiO{sub 2}NTs. The photoelectrochemical performance was examined under visible irradiation in 1 M NaOH electrolyte. Photo-electrochemical characterization shows that chromium doping efficiently enhances the photo-catalytic water splitting performance of Cr-doped TiO{sub 2} nanotube samples. The sample (Cr–TiO{sub 2}NTs-1) exhibited better photo-catalytic activity than the undoped TiO{sub 2}NTs and Cr–TiO{sub 2}NTs fabricated using other chromium concentrations. This can be attributed to the effective separation of photogenerated electron–hole upon the substitutional introduction of appropriate Cr amount in to the TiO{sub 2} nanotube structure.

  16. A Study of Chromium Adsorption on Natural Goethite Biomineralized with Iron Bacteria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Zhenya; ZHU Chunshui; HUANG Jiangbo; GONG Wenqi; CHEN Hesheng; MU Shanbin

    2006-01-01

    Goethite, especially biogenic goethite, has high specific surface area and great capacity for the adsorption of many contaminants including metal ions and organic chelates. Chromium is a redox actively toxic metal ion that exists as either CrⅢ or CrⅥ in nature, and as such it is essential to understand its behavior of adsorption on natural goethite mineralized by iron bacteria, as Gallionella and Leptothrix in water body. The adsorption of Cr3+ and CrⅥ on naturally biomineralized goethite is studied in this paper. The results show that both Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isothermal models are able to accurately describe the adsorption of these two ions. Investigation of SEM/EDS,TEM/EDS indicates that the two ions do not adsorb homogeneously on goethite owing to the different microstructures of goethite, and that the microspherical goethite has a greater adsorption capacity for chromium ions than the helical one. XPS data show that redox reaction of chromium on the surface of biomineralized goethite takes place in the adsorption of both Cr3+ and CrⅥ. The CrⅥ adsorbed on biogoethite is much easier to transform into CrⅢ than the oxidization of CrⅢ on the bio-goethite.

  17. Cycling performance of the iron-chromium redox energy storage system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gahn, R. F.; Hagedorn, N. H.; Johnson, J. A.

    1985-01-01

    Extended charge-discharge cycling of this electrochemical storage system at 65 C was performed on 14.5 sq cm single cells and a four cell, 867 sq cm bipolar stack. Both the anolyte and catholyte reactant fluids contained 1 molar concentrations of iron and chromium chlorides in hydrochloric acid and were separated by a low-selectivity, cation-exchange membrane. The effect of cycling on the chromium electrode and the cation-exchange membrane was determined. Bismuth and bismuth-lead catalyzed chromium electrodes and a radiation-grafted polyethylene membrane were evaluated by cycling between 5 and 85 percent state-of-charge at 80 mA/sq cm and by periodic charge-discharge polarization measurements to 140 mA/sq cm. Gradual performance losses were observed during cycling but were recoverable by completely discharging the system. Good scale-up to the 867 sq cm stack was achieved. The only difference appeared to be an unexplained resistive-type loss which resulted in a 75 percent W-hr efficiency (at 80 mA/sq cm versus 81 percent for the 14.5 sq cm cell). A new rebalance cell was developed to maintain reactant ionic balance. The cell successfully reduced ferric ions in the iron reactant stream to ferrous ions while chloride ions were oxidized to chlorine gas.

  18. Towards zero discharge of chromium-containing leather waste through improved alkali hydrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Changdao; Lin, Wei; Zhang, Mingrang; Zhu, Qingshi

    2003-01-01

    The treatment of chromium-containing leather waste (CCLW), the major solid waste generated at the post-tanning operations of leather processing, has the potential to generate value-added leather chemicals. Various alkali and enzymatic hydrolysis were compared, and calcium oxide was found to be important for effective (but still incomplete) hydrolysis. Three possible reasons are given for the incomplete hydrolysis under alkaline conditions. Data for 19 amino acids are presented for four different treatment products. On the basis of the results, a novel three-step CCLW treatment process is proposed. The gelatin extracted in the first step is chemically modified to produce leather finishing agents. The collagen hydrolysates isolated in the second step are used as proteinic retanning agents by chemical modification. The remaining chrome cake is further hydrolyzed with acids in the third step, and the obtained chromium-containing protein hydrolysates could be used for the preparation of chromium-containing retanning agents for leather industry. The proposed three-step process provides a feasible zero discharge process for the treatment of CCLW. PMID:14583246

  19. Assessment of the removal mechanism of hexavalent chromium from aqueous solutions by olive stone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Lara, María Ángeles; Calero de Hoces, Mónica; Ronda Gálvez, Alicia; Pérez Muñoz, Antonio; Trujillo Miranda, Ma Carmen

    2016-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to study the removal mechanism of Cr(VI) by natural olive stone (OS) and to present a sequential-batch process for the removal of total chromium (original Cr(VI) and Cr(III) derived from reduction of Cr(VI) during biosorption at acidic conditions). First, experiments were conducted varying pH from 1 to 4, and showed that a combined effect of biosorption and reduction is involved in the Cr(VI) removal. Then, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and desorption tests were employed to verify the oxidation state of the chromium bound to OS and to elucidate the removal mechanism of Cr(VI) by this material. The goal of these tests was to confirm that Cr(III) is the species mainly absorbed by OS. Finally, the possibility of total chromium removal by biosorption in a sequential-batch process was analyzed. In the first stage, 96.38% of Cr(VI) is removed by OS and reduced to Cr(III). In the second stage, approximately 31% of the total Cr concentration was removed. However, the Cr(III) released in the first stage is not completely removed, and it could suggest that the Cr(III) could be in a hydrated compound or a complex, which could be more difficult to remove under these conditions. PMID:27232404

  20. IRIS Toxicological Review of Hexavalent Chromium (2010 External Review Draft)

    Science.gov (United States)

    [UPDATE] New Schedule for IRIS Hexavalent Chromium Assessment In Feb 2012, EPA developed a new schedule for completing the IRIS hexavalent chromium assessment. Based on the recommendations of the external peer review panel, which met in May 2011 to review the dra...

  1. Chromium and Polyphenols From Cinnamon Improve Insulin Sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naturally occurring compounds that have been shown to improve insulin sensitivity include chromium and polyphenols found in cinnamon. These compounds also have similar effects on insulin signaling and glucose control. The signs of chromium deficiency are similar to those for the metabolic syndrome ...

  2. Safety, absorption, and antioxidant effects of chromium histidine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supplemental chromium has been shown to be involved in the alleviation of the metabolic syndrome, glucose intolerance, polycystic ovary syndrome, depression, excess body fat, and gestational, steroid-induced, and type 2 diabetes. Chromium amino acid complexes that contained histidine displayed cons...

  3. Toxicity and adaptation of Dictyosphaerium chlorelloides to extreme chromium contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Fortún, Sebastián; López-Rodas, Victoria; Navarro, Macarena; Marvá, Fernando; D'ors, Ana; Rouco, Mónica; Haigh-Florez, David; Costas, Eduardo

    2009-09-01

    Metals are often spilled by industries into inland water environments, with adverse consequences. Numerous papers have reported that heavy metals produce massive destruction of algae. Nevertheless, algal populations seem to become tolerant when they have had previous exposures to heavy metals. Because the mechanisms allowing heavy metal tolerance of algae are not yet known, the present study analyzed the effect of hexavalent chromium on growth and photosynthetic performance of Dictyosphaerium chlorelloides, stressing on the adaptation mechanisms to chromium contamination. Growth and photosynthetic performance of algal cells were inhibited by Cr(VI) at 10 mg/L, and the 72-h median inhibition concentration was established as 1.64 and 1.54 mg/L, respectively. However, after further incubation for a three month period in an environment with 25 mg/L of chromium, some rare, chromium-resistant cells occasionally were found. A Luria-Delbrück fluctuation analysis was performed to distinguish between resistant algae arising from rare, spontaneous mutations and resistant algae arising from physiological adaptation and other adaptive mechanisms. Resistant cells arose only by spontaneous mutations before the addition of chromium, with a rate of 1.77 x 10(-6) mutants per cell division. From a practical point of view, the use of both chromium-sensitive and chromium-resistant genotypes could make possible a specific algal biosensor for chromium. PMID:19323601

  4. Residual Chromium in Leather by Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Okoh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Most tanning processes employ the use of chromium sulphate. For chromium tanned leather, finished products may contain high amount of residual chromium. This may pose some health hazards, since chromium is known to be toxic at elevated concentration. This justifies the need for the study. Approach: Various samples of leather were collected from a tannery, a leather crafts market, a leather dump site and from local tanners all in Kano, Nigeria in 2009. The samples were irradiated for 6 h in the inner site of the Nigerian Research Reactor (NIRR-1 at a flux of 5×1011 ncm-2 sec-1. Results: After evaluating the spectrum, the mean results for chromium in the samples were determined as 2.33±0.3, 2.23±0.3 and 2.93±0.4% for samples from the tannery, leather crafts market and leather dump sites respectively. Chromium concentration in samples collected from local tanners who use tannins from Acacia nilotica as tanning agent was below the detection limit of Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA technique used in the study. Conclusion: Although, the concentrations of chromium in the analysed samples were not much higher than what were obtained in literature, they may be enough to sensitize the population that is allergic to chromium.

  5. Molecular aspects of glucose dehydration by chromium chlorides in ionic liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanmei; Pidko, Evgeny A; Hensen, Emiel J M

    2011-05-01

    A combined experimental and computational study of the ionic-liquid-mediated dehydration of glucose and fructose by Cr(II) and Cr(III) chlorides has been performed. The ability of chromium to selectively dehydrate glucose to 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) in the ionic liquid 1-ethyl-3-methyl imidazolium chloride does not depend on the oxidation state of chromium. Nevertheless, Cr(III) exhibits higher activity and selectivity to HMF than Cr(II) . Anhydrous CrCl(2) and CrCl(3)⋅6 H(2)O readily catalyze glucose dehydration with HMF yields of 60 and 72%, respectively, after 3 h. Anhydrous CrCl(3) has a lower activity, because it only slowly dissolves in the reaction mixture. The transformation of glucose to HMF involves the formation of fructose as an intermediate. The exceptional catalytic performance of the chromium catalysts is explained by their unique ability to catalyze glucose to fructose isomerization and fructose to HMF dehydration with high selectivity. Side reactions leading to humins by means of condensation reactions take predominantly place during fructose dehydration. The higher HMF selectivity for Cr(III) is tentatively explained by the higher activity in fructose dehydration compared to Cr(II) . This limits the concentration of intermediates that are involved in bimolecular condensation reactions. Model DFT calculations indicate a substantially lower activation barrier for glucose isomerization by Cr(III) compared to Cr(II) . Qualitatively, glucose isomerization follows a similar mechanism for Cr(II) and Cr(III) . The mechanism involves ring opening of D-glucopyranose coordinated to a single Cr ion, followed by a transient self-organization of catalytic chromium complexes that promotes the rate-determining hydrogen-shift step.

  6. CHROMIUM BIOACCUMULATION FROM COMPOSTS AND VERMICOMPOSTS BASED ON TANNERY SLUDGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krzysztof GONDEK

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Storage of waste substances is not indifferent to ecological equilibrium in the environment therefore should not be the ultimate way to limit waste arduousness. Therefore, the conducted investigations aimed to determine the effect of tannery composts and vermicomposts loaded with chromium on this element bioaccumulation in earthworm bodies and biomass of selected plants. Chromium in composts and vermicomposts based on tannery sludges occurred in small quantities and easily soluble compounds. Chromium concentrations in redworm biomass points to this metal accumulation in Eisenia fetida body tissues. This element content in redworm biomass was signifi cantly positively correlated with its content in composts. Chromium content in plants was diversifi ed and on treatments was generally smaller than on mineral treatment or farmyard manure. Chromium absorbed by plants was stored mainly in the root systems, and over the norm content of this element found in vermicomposts did not cause its excessive accumulation in plant biomass.

  7. Effects of chromium(III and VI) on spring barley and maize biomass yield and content of nitrogenous compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyszkowski, Mirosław; Radziemska, Maja

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to (1) determine the effects of trivalent Cr(III) or hexavalent chromium Cr(VI) soil contamination on biomass yield and nitrogenous compound content of spring barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) as the main crop and subsequently maize (Zea mays L.) grown successively, and (2) examine whether the neutralizing additives applied (compost, zeolite, and calcium oxide) may be effective in reducing adverse impact of chromium (Cr) on crops. Spring barley yield was markedly decreased by Cr compounds, particularly Cr(VI). In contrast, maize yield was significantly increased by Cr(VI). Hexavalent Cr exerted a greater effect than the Cr(III) form on nitrogen levels in spring barley. Chromium significantly increased ammonia nitrogen content in maize. The accumulation of NO(3)(-)-N in plants treated with Cr(VI) was lower than in controls. The application of compost, zeolite, and calcium oxide onto the soil increased yield of maize only in pots containing Cr(III). Neutralizing additives exerted a positive, increased effect on the N-total content of maize but not spring barley, which was apparent with calcium oxide. Accumulation of NH(4)(+)-N in maize in pots with Cr(VI) was increased by all additives applied. The content of nitrate nitrogen in spring barley was predominantly affected by addition of compost and calcium oxide into the soil, producing a significant rise in NO(3)(-)-N content. Chromium, especially Cr(VI), used at doses of 100 and 150 mg/kg soil exerted adverse effects in treated plants, particularly spring barley.

  8. Biological Monitoring of Hexavalent Chromium and Serum Levels of the Senescence Biomarker Apolipoprotein J/Clusterin in Welders

    OpenAIRE

    Vassilios Makropoulos; Gonos, Efstathios S.; Magda Lourda; Trougakos, Ioannis P.; Xenophon Cominos; Alexopoulos, Evangelos C.

    2008-01-01

    Welding fumes contain metals and other toxic substances known or strongly suspected to be related with oxidative stress and premature cellular senescence. Apolipoprotein J/Clusterin (ApoJ/CLU) is a glycoprotein that is differentially regulated in various physiological and disease states including ageing and age-related diseases. In vitro data showed that exposure of human diploid fibroblasts to hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) resulted in premature senescence and significant upregulation of the A...

  9. Lubricated sliding wear mechanism of chromium-doped graphite-like carbon coating

    OpenAIRE

    Mandal, Paranjayee; Ehiasarian, Arutiun; Hovsepian, Papken

    2014-01-01

    The current research aims to discuss the tribological behaviour of Chromium-doped graphite-like carbon coatings and suggest a wear mechanism under both dry (in air) and boundary lubricated sliding condition based on phase composition of the wear product generated in wear track during pin-on-disc experiments. As expected, the friction coefficient reduces from 0.22 to 0.12 due to addition of lubricant. Raman analysis indicates that wear mechanism is oxidative in dry sliding condition whereas it...

  10. Thermal Fatigue Behaviour of a Chromium Electroplated 32NiCrMo145 Steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    A.Abdollah-zadeh; M.S.Jamshidi; S.M.M.Hadavi

    2004-01-01

    Thermal fatigue behavior of hard chromium electroplated steel in three different crack intensities of high contraction (HC), medium contraction (MC) and Iow contraction (LC) was studied. Maximum and minimum temperatures during thermal cycle were 800 and 100℃, respectively. The topography and cross sections of the samples exposed to 50, 100 and 200 thermal cycles were studied. The thermal fatigue behavior was analyzed using the data obtained from surface roughness, crack networks and stress induced during cycles. Although the as-coated sample with LC chromium contained no crack, it appeared to have a high crack density after only 50 cycles. The crack depth and width in cyclically oxidized LC coating were much less than those in MC and HC coatings. It was concluded that the LC coating protected the substrate from having cracks or subsurface oxidation during thermal fatigue. The cracks in the HC and MC coatings increased in density as well as in depth by thermal cycles. Moreover, the opening of the cracks to the substrate resulted in sub-surface oxidation.

  11. Selenium protection from cadmium and chromium poisoning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The interaction of selenium with cadmium and chromium was studied in 168 chicken-broilers (DWCxWR) divided into four equal groups. Eight-week old control animals received an intravenous dose of /sup 115m/Cd Chloride 370 KBq/Kg (Group I), or 51Cr Chloride 370 KBq/Kg (Group II). The kinetics of these isotopes were studied by scintillation spectrometry (NaI/TI) carried out for whole blood, plasma, plasma proteins, urine, feces and homogenates of all organs at various time intervals. Animals in Groups III and IV received eight subcutaneous doses of sodium selenate (5ug) at 8-week intervals prior to /sup 115m/Cd or 51Cr. The kinetics of these elements were studied as in the previous two groups. It was found that selenium affected those kinetics in two ways: (a) by increasing the excretion of Cd by 11 +/- 3% (P < 0.001) and that of Cr by 7 +/- 1% (P < 0.001); and (b) by favoring redistribution of those elements, with significant (P < 0.001) reductions in liver, endocrine glands and kidney and increases (P < 0.01) in bone. The study suggests that selenium protects the animals' vital organs from environmental pollutants, such as cadmium and chromium

  12. The mitigative effect of Raphanus sativus oil on chromium-induced geno- and hepatotoxicity in male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elshazly, M O; Morgan, Ashraf M; Ali, Merhan E; Abdel-Mawla, Essam; Abd El-Rahman, Sahar S

    2016-05-01

    To study the impact of radish oil on the possible genotoxic and hepatotoxic effects of hexavalent chromium, male rats were divided into 4 groups. Group 1 served as control, group 2 received radish oil at the recommended human therapeutic dose (0.07 mL/kg) by gavage, group 3 received sodium dichromate dihydrate (SDD) 520 mg/L in drinking water, and group 4 received both SDD and radish oil as previously mentioned in groups 2 and 3. All treatments were continued for six months. The results revealed that chromium exposure promoted oxidative stress with a consequently marked hepatic histopathological alterations, increased serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activities, alfa fetoprotein (AFP) levels, and micronucleated erythrocytes (MNE) % in peripheral blood. Moreover, COMET assay of hepatic DNA revealed that SDD exposure significantly decreased the intact cells %, head diameter, and head DNA % compared to control, indicating DNA damage. However, radish oil co-administration with SDD resulted in marked amendment in the altered parameters as detected by improved liver function markers (ALT and ALP) and AFP level, decreased lipid peroxidation, increased antioxidant markers, inhibited hepatic DNA damage and restored the hepatic histology by preventing the appearance of the altered hepatocytes' foci and decreasing chromium induced histopathological lesions. It could be concluded that radish oil was able to provide a convergent complete protection against the geno- and hepatotoxicity of chromium by its potent antioxidant effect. PMID:27222746

  13. Hexavalent chromium reduction in contaminated soil: A comparison between ferrous sulphate and nanoscale zero-valent iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Palma, L; Gueye, M T; Petrucci, E

    2015-01-01

    Iron sulphate (FeSO4) and colloidal nano zero-valent iron (nZVI) as reducing agents were compared, with the aim of assessing their effectiveness in hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] removal from a contaminated industrial soil. Experiments were performed on soil samples collected from an industrial site where a nickel contamination, caused by a long-term productive activity, was also verified. The influence of reducing agents amount with respect to chromium content and the effectiveness of deoxygenation of the slurry were discussed. The soil was fully characterized before and after each test, and sequential extractions were performed to assess chemico-physical modifications and evaluate metals mobility induced by washing. Results show that both the reducing agents successfully lowered the amount of Cr(VI) in the soil below the threshold allowed by Italian Environmental Regulation for industrial reuse. Cr(VI) reduction by colloidal nZVI proved to be faster and more effective: the civil reuse of soil [Cr(VI)<2mg/kg] was only achieved using colloidal nZVI within 60min adopting a nZVI/Cr(VI) molar ratio of 30. The reducing treatment resulted in an increase in the amount of chromium in the oxide-hydroxide fraction, thus confirming a mechanism of chromium-iron hydroxides precipitation. In addition, a decrease of nickel (Ni) and lead (Pb) content in soil was also observed when acidic conditions were established. PMID:25139286

  14. Nopalea cochenillifera, a potential chromium (VI) hyperaccumulator plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adki, Vinayak S; Jadhav, Jyoti P; Bapat, Vishwas A

    2013-02-01

    Hexavalant chromium [Cr(VI)] tolerance and accumulation in in vitro grown Nopalea cochenillifera Salm. Dyck. plants was investigated. A micropropagation protocol was establish for a rapid multiplication of N. cochenillifera and [Cr(VI)] tolerance and accumulation was studied in in vitro grown cultures. Cr concentration was estimated by atomic absorption spectroscopy in roots and shoots to confirm plant's hyperaccumulation capacity. Plants showed tolerance up to 100 μM K(2)Cr(2)O(7) without any significant changes in root growth after 16 days treatment; whereas, chlorophyll content in plants treated with 1 and 10 μM K(2)Cr(2)O(7) were not so different than the control plant. The levels of lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation increased significantly (p 100 μM) inhibited the activities of CAT and SOD. Roots accumulated a maximum of 25,263.396 ± 1,722.672 mg Cr Kg(-1) dry weight (DW); while the highest concentration of Cr in N. cochenillifera shoots was 705.714 ± 32.324 mg Cr Kg(-1) DW. N. cochenillifera could be a prospective hyperaccumulator plant of Cr(VI) and a promising candidate for phytoremediation purposes. PMID:22914913

  15. Standard Specification for Pressure Consolidated Powder Metallurgy Iron-Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum (UNS N08367), Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum-Columbium (Nb) (UNS N06625), Nickel-Chromium-Iron Alloys (UNS N06600 and N06690), and Nickel-Chromium-Iron-Columbium-Molybdenum (UNS N07718) Alloy Pipe Flanges, Fittings, Valves, and Parts

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2015-01-01

    Standard Specification for Pressure Consolidated Powder Metallurgy Iron-Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum (UNS N08367), Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum-Columbium (Nb) (UNS N06625), Nickel-Chromium-Iron Alloys (UNS N06600 and N06690), and Nickel-Chromium-Iron-Columbium-Molybdenum (UNS N07718) Alloy Pipe Flanges, Fittings, Valves, and Parts

  16. 75 FR 65067 - National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutant Emissions: Hard and Decorative Chromium...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-21

    ... Decorative Chromium Electroplating and Chromium Anodizing Tanks; Group I Polymers and Resins; Marine Tank...: Hard and Decorative Chromium Electroplating and Chromium Anodizing Tanks; Group I Polymers and Resins... Tanks. Group I Polymers and Resins Production.. Scott Throwe, (202) 564-7013,...

  17. Removal of chromium hexavalent of residual water from tannery using hydrotalcite; Remocion de cromo hexavalente de aguas residuales de teneria utilizando hidrotalcita

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez G, S.; Martinez, V.; Bulbulian, S. [Instituto nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, A.P. 18-1027, C.P. 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2000-07-01

    One of the main problems of leather tanned is the treatment that must be give to the waste water polluted with chrome which stays in trivalent form, but it is easily oxidated at chromium hexavalent. This work pretends to find an elimination media for chromium (VI) from water using the original synthetic hydrotalcite and calcined as sorbent by its anion exchange and memory effect properties. The tannery water was characterized by X-ray diffraction, thermal gravimetric analysis, specific surface and infrared spectroscopy. (Author)

  18. Chromium in drinking water: sources, metabolism, and cancer risks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhitkovich, Anatoly

    2011-10-17

    Drinking water supplies in many geographic areas contain chromium in the +3 and +6 oxidation states. Public health concerns are centered on the presence of hexavalent Cr that is classified as a known human carcinogen via inhalation. Cr(VI) has high environmental mobility and can originate from anthropogenic and natural sources. Acidic environments with high organic content promote the reduction of Cr(VI) to nontoxic Cr(III). The opposite process of Cr(VI) formation from Cr(III) also occurs, particularly in the presence of common minerals containing Mn(IV) oxides. Limited epidemiological evidence for Cr(VI) ingestion is suggestive of elevated risks for stomach cancers. Exposure of animals to Cr(VI) in drinking water induced tumors in the alimentary tract, with linear and supralinear responses in the mouse small intestine. Chromate, the predominant form of Cr(VI) at neutral pH, is taken up by all cells through sulfate channels and is activated nonenzymatically by ubiquitously present ascorbate and small thiols. The most abundant form of DNA damage induced by Cr(VI) is Cr-DNA adducts, which cause mutations and chromosomal breaks. Emerging evidence points to two-way interactions between DNA damage and epigenetic changes that collectively determine the spectrum of genomic rearrangements and profiles of gene expression in tumors. Extensive formation of DNA adducts, clear positivity in genotoxicity assays with high predictive values for carcinogenicity, the shape of tumor-dose responses in mice, and a biological signature of mutagenic carcinogens (multispecies, multisite, and trans-sex tumorigenic potency) strongly support the importance of the DNA-reactive mutagenic mechanisms in carcinogenic effects of Cr(VI). Bioavailability results and kinetic considerations suggest that 10-20% of ingested low-dose Cr(VI) escapes human gastric inactivation. The directly mutagenic mode of action and the incompleteness of gastric detoxification argue against a threshold in low

  19. Chromium-induced membrane damage: protective role of ascorbic acid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Importance of chromium as environmental toxicant is largely due to impact on the body to produce cellular toxicity. The impact of chromium and their supplementation with ascorbic acid was studied on plasma membrane of liver and kidney in male Wistar rats (80 - 100gbody weight). It has been observed that the intoxication with chromium ( i. p. ) at the dose of 0.8 mg/100g body weight per day for a period of 28 days causes significant increase in the level of cholesterol and decrease in the level of phospbolipid of both liver and kidney. The alkaline pbosphatase, total ATPase and Na + -K + -ATPase activities were significantly decreased in both liver and kidney after chromium treatment,except total ATPase activity of kidney. It is suggested that chromium exposure at the present dose and duration induce for the alterations of structure and function of both liver and kidney plasma membrane. Ascorbic acid ( i.p. at the dose of 0.5 mg,/100g body weight per day for period of 28 days) supplementation can reduce these structural changes in the plasma membrane of liver and kidney. But the functional changes can not be completely replenished by the ascorbic acid supplementation in response to chromium exposure. So it is also suggested that ascorbic acid (nutritional antioxidant) is useful free radical scavenger to restrain the chromium-induced membrane damage.

  20. Bioavailability of a potato chromium complex to the laboratory rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research objectives were to study the effect of food source, preparation method and chemical form on bioavailability of chromium. Chromium concentration in potatoes was determined and tubers labeled either intrinsically or extrinsically with radioactive chromate. A labeled chromium complexes was isolated from preparations of raw, baked or fried potatoes and chromatographed on gel permeation media. Availability of the potato chromium complex to the rat was examined in three feeding studies. Animals were dosed with radioactive extrinsically or intrinsically labeled potato extract or with chromate. A labeled chromium complex was isolated from gastrointestinal contents of rats and chromatographed. Potato pulp and peel contained 1.63 and 2.70 μg Cr/g tissue respectively. True and apparent absorption from extrinsically labeled feedings were 33.4 +/- 4.7 and 29.8 +/- 11.2% respectively, and no differences existed between absorption from raw and cooked potatoes. Absorption from the extrinsic labeled potatoes differed significantly from absorption of inorganic chromatium. Apparent absorption of raw (11.1 +/- 7.9%) and cooked (-0.7 +/- 2.8%) intrinsically labeled feedings differed significantly. Absorption of inorganic chromium was 17.8% (true) and 11.5% (apparent). Examination of the chromium complex isolated from gastrointestinal tract contents showed enlargement of the complex in the stomach after consumption

  1. Stabilization of chromium salt in ordinary portland cement

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Damir Barbir; Pero Dabić; Petar Krolo

    2012-12-01

    Ordinary Portland cement (OPC) samples containing the chromium salt have been investigated using differential microcalorimetry, conductometry and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic analysis. The effect of chromium on OPC hydration was evaluated by continuous observing of early hydration. The microcalorimetrical results show that with increasing the share of chromium salt, heat maximums assume lower values and the occurrence of the maximum registered in the earlier hydration times. Conductometrical measurements show that with increasing addition of chromium salt, curve did not show any specific shape, immediate drop in specific conductivity is noticed and the maximum is reached earlier. This coincides with microcalorimetrical results. It can be concluded that the addition of chromium does not affect the mechanism of the hydration process, but it does affect the kinetic parameters and dynamics of the cement hydration process. It was found that chromium salt addition to the cement–water system is acceptable up to 2 wt.%. According to standard EN 196-3 for OPC, the beginning of binding time should occur after 60 minutes. Increased amount of chromium over 2 wt.% significantly accelerate the beginning of binding time and for the system it is not acceptable.

  2. Chromium speciation in rainwater: temporal variability and atmospheric deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kieber, R.J.; Willey, J.D.; Zvalaren, S.D. [University of North Carolina at Wilmington, Wilmington, NC (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    2002-12-15

    Chromium is released into the atmosphere by a variety of anthropogenic activities which include steel manufacturing, leather tanning, wood presentation and fossil fuel combustion. The concentrations of the various chromium species were determined in 89 rainwater samples collected in Wilmington, NC from October 1, 1999 to December 31, 2001. Volume weighted annual average concentrations of Cr{sub total}, particulate Cr, Cr(III)(aq), and Cr(VI)(aq) were 4.6, 2.2, 0.8 and 1.2 nM, respectively. There was distinct seasonal and diurnal variability in the concentrations of the various chromium species. Chromium emissions to the global atmosphere by both natural and anthropogenic sources are estimated to be 2.2 x 10{sup 9} mol/yr. Using rainwater concentration data along with other published rainwater Cr concentrations and an estimate for total global annual rain, the total global flux of chromium removed from the atmosphere via wet deposition is 2.1 x 10{sup 9} mol/yr. This represents complete removal of Cr and indicates that essentially all chromium released into the global atmosphere is removed via rain. About half this chromium is dissolved with roughly equal concentrations of toxic Cr(VI) and relatively harmless Cr(III) species. 48 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. 污染场地六价铬的还原和微生物稳定化研究%Bioremediation of Chromium (Ⅵ(Contaminated Site by Reduction and Microbial Stabilization of Chromium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑家传; 张建荣; 刘希雯; 许倩; 施维林

    2014-01-01

    Chromium(Ⅵ) contaminated soil samples were collected from a chemical plant in Suzhou. Firstly, the reduced soil was prepared by adding reagent (Stone-sulfure reagent) into polluted soil to transfer most chromium(Ⅵ) into chromium(Ⅲ), then a nutrient solution was introduced into the reduced soil, and the stabilized soil was obtained after 60 days culturing. The chromium(Ⅵ) content of the three kinds of soil was analyzed. The results showed that the chromium(Ⅵ) content in toxicity characteristic leaching liquid ( TCLL) dropped by 96. 8% ( from 8. 26 mg·L-1 to 0. 26 mg·L-1 ) , and the total chromium content dropped by 95. 7% ( from 14. 66 mg·L-1 to 0. 63 mg·L-1 ) after bioremediation in 5% nutrient solution. Additionally, the durability of chromium stabilization was tested by potassium permanganate oxidation and sterilization of microbe-treated soil. After oxidation, the chromium(Ⅵ) content in TCLL of the reduced soil was increased from 8. 26 mg·L-1 to 14. 68 mg·L-1 . However, the content after bioremediation was decreased to 2. 68 mg·L-1 . The results of sterilization demonstrated that the death of microbe had no significant effect on the stabilization of chromium. Consequently, the research in this paper demonstrated the feasibility of bioremediation of chromium (Ⅵ) polluted soil through reduction followed by stabilization/soilidification, and provided a technique with low cost but high efficiency.%通过采集苏州某化工原址场地铬污染土壤,首先加入石硫合剂使大部分六价铬[ Cr(Ⅵ)]还原,再加入营养液促进土著微生物大量生长,利用微生物还原稳定化土壤中的铬.培养60 d后,通过毒性浸出、土壤中剩余Cr(Ⅵ)测定等实验确定稳定化效果,结果表明,加入5%营养液培养后,土壤毒性浸出液中Cr(Ⅵ)浓度由原来的8.26 mg·L-1降低到0.26 mg·L-1,降低了96.8%,总铬浓度由原来14.66 mg·L-1降低到0.63 mg·L-1,降低了95.7%.另外,通过高锰酸钾氧化

  4. Workshop on effects of chromium coating on Nb3Sn superconductor strand: Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report discusses the following topics: Chromium coating on superconductor strand -- an overview; technology of chromium plating; comparison of wires plated by different platers; search for chromium in copper; strand manufactures' presentations; chromium plating at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory; a first look at a chromium plating process development project tailored for T.P.X. and I.T.E.R. strand; and influence of chromium diffusion and related phenomena on the reference ratios of bare and chromium plated Nb3Sn strand

  5. Workshop on effects of chromium coating on Nb{sub 3}Sn superconductor strand: Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-04-12

    This report discusses the following topics: Chromium coating on superconductor strand -- an overview; technology of chromium plating; comparison of wires plated by different platers; search for chromium in copper; strand manufactures` presentations; chromium plating at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory; a first look at a chromium plating process development project tailored for T.P.X. and I.T.E.R. strand; and influence of chromium diffusion and related phenomena on the reference ratios of bare and chromium plated Nb{sub 3}Sn strand.

  6. Fertilizers and Mixed Crop Cultivation of Chromium Tolerant and Sensitive Plants under Chromium Toxicity

    OpenAIRE

    B. Dheeba; Sampathkumar, P; Kannan, K.

    2015-01-01

    Zea mays (maize) and Vigna radiata (green gram) are found to be the chromium (Cr) tolerant and sensitive plants, respectively. In the present paper, we investigate the reduction of the toxicity of Cr in the sensitive plants by the mixed crop cultivation in the field using various amendments. Further, the potassium dichromate was used as the source of hexavalent Cr. The results indicated that Cr adversely affects both the growth and yield of plants. The soil properties vary with Cr and differe...

  7. Chromium isotope composition of reducing and anoxic sediments from the Peru Margin and Cariaco Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gueguen, B.; Planavsky, N.; Wang, X.; Algeo, T. J.; Peterson, L. C.; Reinhard, C. T.

    2014-12-01

    Chromium isotope systematics in marine sediments are now being used as a new redox proxy of the modern and ancient Earth's surface. Chromium is primarily delivered to the oceans by riverine inputs through weathering of Cr(III)-rich minerals present in the continental crust and oxidation of insoluble Cr(III) to soluble Cr(VI) species. Since oxidation-reduction reactions fractionate Cr isotopes whereby oxidized Cr(VI) species are preferentially enriched in heavy Cr isotopes, the Cr isotope composition of marine sediments may be useful tracers of redox conditions at the Earth's surface through geological time. Chromium is quantitatively removed in organic-rich sediments where reducing conditions prevail and promote reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III), and thus, these sediments should capture the ambient seawater Cr isotope composition. However, the isotopic composition of modern organic-rich sediments is poorly documented so far, and this step is essential for further modeling the global oceanic Cr isotope mass balance and assessing the effects of sedimentation and post-depositional processes on the marine Cr isotopes archive. In this study, we have characterized modern marine organic-rich sediments for their Cr isotope composition (δ53/52Cr) from two different settings, the Peru margin upwelling zone and the anoxic Cariaco Basin (Venezuela). Chromium isotopes were measured on a MC-ICP-MS (Nu Plasma) using a double-spike correction method. The authigenic fraction of shallow samples from the Peru margin sedimentary sequence with a high Total Organic Carbon (TOC) content (>10 wt%) yield an average δ53/52Crauthigenic value of +0.67 ±0.05 ‰ (2sd). However, although this value is close to the seawater value (Atlantic Ocean) and to Cariaco basin sediments (~ +0.6 ‰), reducing sediments from the Peru margin are on average isotopically slightly heavier, especially in samples having a low authigenic fraction and a low TOC content (δ53/52Crauthigenic values up to +1.30

  8. Microbial Diversity of Chromium-Contaminated Soils and Characterization of Six Chromium-Removing Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Zhiguo; Hu, Yuting; Yin, Zhen; Hu, Yuehua; Zhong, Hui

    2016-06-01

    Three soil samples obtained from different sites adjacent to a chromium slag heap in a steel alloy factory were taken to examine the effect of chromium contamination on soil bacterial diversity as determined by construction of 16S rDNA clone libraries and sequencing of selected clones based on restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis. Results revealed that Betaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, Firmicutes, and Alphaproteobacteria occurred in all three soil samples, although the three samples differed in their total diversity. Sample 1 had the highest microbial diversity covering 12 different classes, while Sample 3 had the lowest microbial diversity. Strains of six different species were successfully isolated, one of which was identified as Zobellella denitrificans. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a strain belonging to the genus Zobellella able to resist and reduce chromium. Among all isolates studied, Bacillus odysseyi YH2 exhibited the highest Cr(VI)-reducing capability, with a total removal of 23.5 % of an initial Cr(VI) concentration of 350 mg L-1.

  9. A REVIEW OF BIOSORPTION OF CHROMIUM IONS BY MICROORGANISMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inga Zinicovscaia

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Due to its widespread industrial use, chromium has become a serious pollutant in diverse environmental settings. The main source of chromium pollution including the Republic o Moldova is industry. It is a great need to develop new eco-friendly methods of chromium removal. Biosorption of heavy metals is a most promising technology involved in the removal of toxic metals from industrial waste streams and natural waters. This article is an extended abstract of a communication presented at the Conference Ecological Chemistry 2012

  10. Hexavalent chromium reduction in a sulfur reducing packed-bed bioreactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Elemental sulfur can be used as electron acceptor for sulfide production. ► Biogenically produced sulfide reduces Cr(VI) to the much less toxic and immobile form of Cr(III). ► Sulfur packed bioreactor is efficient for Cr(VI) containing wastewater treatment. ► Reduced form of chromium precipitates in the bioreactor. - Abstract: The most commonly used approach for the detoxification of hazardous industrial effluents and wastewaters containing Cr(VI) is its reduction to the much less toxic and immobile form of Cr(III). This study investigates the cleanup of Cr(VI) containing wastewaters using elemental sulfur as electron acceptor, for the production of hydrogen sulfide that induces Cr(VI) reduction. An elemental sulfur reducing packed-bed bioreactor was operated at 28–30 °C for more than 250 days under varying influent Cr(VI) concentrations (5.0–50.0 mg/L) and hydraulic retention times (HRTs, 0.36–1.0 day). Ethanol or acetate (1000 mg/L COD) was used as carbon source and electron donor. The degree of COD oxidation varied between 30% and 85%, depending on the operating conditions and the type of organic carbon source. The oxidation of organic matter was coupled with the production of hydrogen sulfide, which reached a maximum concentration of 750 mg/L. The biologically produced hydrogen sulfide reduced Cr(VI) chemically to Cr(III) that precipitated in the reactor. Reduction of Cr(VI) and removal efficiency of total chromium always exceeded 97% and 85%, respectively, implying that the reduced chromium was retained in the bioreactor. This study showed that sulfur can be used as an electron acceptor to produce hydrogen sulfide that induces efficient reduction and immobilization of Cr(VI), thus enabling decontamination of Cr(VI) polluted wastewaters.

  11. Evaluating the risk of chromium reoxidation in aquifer sediments following a reductive bioremediation treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varadharajan, C.; Nico, P. S.; Yang, L.; Han, R.; Bill, M.; Larsen, J.; Van Hise, A.; Molins, S.; Steefel, C.; Conrad, M. E.; Lim, H.; Brodie, E. L.; Beller, H. R.

    2011-12-01

    Remediation of chromium contamination typically involves reducing the toxic and soluble hexavalent form, Cr(VI), to the relatively harmless and mostly immobile trivalent state, Cr(III). The objective of this study is to investigate the potential for reduced chromium precipitates to be remobilized under oxidizing conditions that are expected to be prevalent some time after the bioremediation treatment is completed. In an initial phase of the experiment, reduction under anaerobic conditions was observed for over 12 months by subjecting flow-through columns containing homogenized sediments from the Hanford 100H aquifer to different dominant electron acceptors, i.e. NO3-, Fe(III), or SO42-, in the presence of 5 μM Cr(VI) and 5 mM lactate. Cr(VI) was depleted in the effluent solutions of the nitrate-treated columns, all of which exhibited denitrification, as well as in sulfate-amended columns in which fermentative conditions became dominant (with a minor amount of sulfate reduction). In the second phase of the study, oxygenated water with 2 mM nitrate was flowed through the denitrifying and fermentative columns for several months, without addition of Cr(VI) or lactate. The results show that the chromium that precipitated in the denitrifying columns was steadily mobilized under the oxidizing conditions, although the concentration of Cr(VI) in the effluent remained low (effluent from the fermentative sulfate-amended column. Reducing conditions were sustained in the fermentative column despite the continuous influx of O2, as indicated by the decrease of nitrate and accumulation of nitrite, potentially due to the presence of sulfides precipitated during the initial reducing phase of the experiment. The results from this study suggest that the biogeochemical conditions present during the reductive treatment phase can substantially impact the long-term sustainability of the remediation effort.

  12. Effects of Supplemental Dietary Chromium on Yield and Nutrient Digestibility of Laying Hens Under Low Temperature

    OpenAIRE

    ŞAHİN, Kazım; ERTAŞ, O. Nihat; GÜLER, Talat; ÇİFTÇİ, Mehmet

    2001-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the effects of chromium picolinate (CrPi) added into diet containing 710.3 ppb chromium on yield and nutrient digestibility of laying hens at low temperature. Forty-six-week-old laying hens were randomly assigned to four groups of 30 hens per group. Treatment groups were fed different supplemental dietary chromium levels. Thus, hens were fed diets with no supplemental chromium (Control Group), 100 ppb of supplemental chromium (100 Group), 200 ppb of s...

  13. The fate of chromium during tropical weathering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berger, Alfons; Frei, Robert

    2014-01-01

    We performed a mineral, geochemical and Cr–Sr–Pb isotope study on a laterite profile developed on ca. 540 Ma old tonalitic bedrock in Madagascar with special emphasis on the behavior of chromium during tropical weathering. The observed strong depletions of Ca, Si, and P, and enrichment of Fe and Al...... of the soil profile relative to stage one altered saprolite. This gain in Cr is accompanied by decreasing δ53Cr values and can be explained by partial immobilization (possibly by adsorption/coprecipitation on/with Fe-oxy-hydroxides) of mobile Cr(III) during upward transport in the weathering profile....... The negatively fractionated δ53Cr values measured in the weathering profile relative to the unaltered tonalitic bedrock characterized by a high temperature magmatic inventory Cr isotope signature are consistent with loss of a positively fractionated Cr(VI) pool formed during weathering. The predicted existence...

  14. Evaluation of chromium in red blood cells as an indicator of exposure to hexavalent chromium: An in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devoy, Jérôme; Géhin, Antoine; Müller, Samuel; Melczer, Mathieu; Remy, Aurélie; Antoine, Guillaume; Sponne, Isabelle

    2016-07-25

    Chromium(VI) compounds are classified as carcinogenic to humans. Whereas chromium measurements in urine and whole blood (i.e., including plasma) are indicative of recent exposure, chromium in red blood cells (RBC) is attributable specifically to Cr(VI) exposure. Before recommending Cr in RBC as a biological indicator of Cr(VI) exposure, in-vitro studies must be undertaken to assess its reliability. The present study examines the relationship between the chromium added to a blood sample and that subsequently found in the RBC. After incubation of total blood with chromium, RBC were isolated, counted and their viability assessed. Direct analysis of chromium in RBC was conducted using Atomic Absorption Spectrometry. Hexavalent, but not trivalent Cr, was seen to accumulate in the RBC and we found a strong correlation between the Cr(VI) concentration added to a blood sample and the amount of Cr in RBC. This relationship appears to be independent of the chemical properties of the human blood samples (e.g., different blood donors or different reducing capacities). Even though in-vivo studies are still needed to integrate our understanding of Cr(VI) toxicokinetics, our findings reinforce the idea that a single determination of the chromium concentration in RBC would enable biomonitoring of critical cases of Cr(VI) exposure. PMID:27178267

  15. Chromium accumulation, microorganism population and enzyme activities in soils around chromium-containing slag heap of steel alloy factory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Shun-hong; PENG Bing; YANG Zhi-hui; CHAI Li-yuan; ZHOU Li-cheng

    2009-01-01

    The environmental risk of chromium pollution is pronounced in soils adjacent to chromate industry. It is important to investigate the functioning of soil microorganisms in ecosystems exposed to long-term contamination by chromium. 45 soil samples obtained from different places of the slag heap in a steel alloy factory were analyzed for chromium contamination level and its effect on soil microorganisms and enzyme activities. The results show that the average concentrations of total Cr in the soil under the slag heap, adjacent to the slag heap and outside the factory exceed the threshold of Secondary Environmental Quality Standard for Soil in China by 354%, 540% and 184%, respectively, and are 15, 21 and 9 times higher than the local background value, respectively. Elevated chromium loadings result in changes in the activity of the soil microbe, as indicated by the negative correlations between soil microbial population and chromium contents. Dehydrogenase activity is greatly depressed by chromium in the soil. The results imply that dehydrogenase activity can be used as an indicator for the chromium pollution level in the area of the steel alloy factory.

  16. Pool Boiling Heat Transfer Characteristics of Chromium Coatings Deposited by RF Magnetron Sputtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Gwang Hyeok; Son, Hong Hyun; Jeong, Uiju; Jeun, Gyoodong; Kim, Sung Joong [Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    Many researches have suggested fundamental changes to satisfy the safety requirements, including development of accident tolerant fuels (ATFs). The adoption of coating techniques is one of promising approaches for ATF systems because surface modification with a highly oxidation-resistant material can prevent hydrogen generation and cladding embrittlement. Compared to the development of a new cladding for the replacement of the current zirconium-based alloy cladding and new fuel forms instead of the current ceramic oxide fuels, the surface coating technique is cost-effective and easily applicable to the current LWR system with no significant design changes. Recently, a wide variety of oxidation-resistant materials have been proposed: iron-based alloys and SiC-based materials. Among them, chromium (Cr) is suggested as a coating material for fuel claddings because it is known for has oxidation-resistant characteristic. In order to assess the feasibility of coating techniques with an oxidation-resistant material, in this study chromium (Cr) film was deposited on a metal substrate via a physical vapor deposition (PVD) process. After preparing test specimens, pool boiling heat transfer experiments were carried out to investigate the boiling performance of both cases. Moreover, during a test, visualization works were conducted for a phenomenological understanding. In this study, Cr deposition on the SS316 surface was conducted using the sputtering process. Specifically, sophisticated surface characterization was performed with the wettability measurement and surface morphology analysis. Furthermore, the pool boiling heat transfer experiments were carried out to obtain the CHF value of the test heater. The major findings observed from this study can be summarized as follows. The surface wettability increased 77% after the sputtering deposition.

  17. Effects of Chromium(VI) and Chromium(III) on Desulfovibrio vulgaris Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M.E. Clark; A. Klonowska; S.B. Thieman; B. Giles; J.D. Wall; and M.W. Fields

    2007-04-19

    Desulfovibrio vulgaris ATCC 29579 is a well studied sulfate reducer that has known capabilities of reducing heavy metals and radionuclides, like chromium and uranium. Cultures grown in a defined medium (i.e. LS4D) had a lag period of approximately 40 h when exposed to 50 μMof Cr(VI). Substrate analysis revealed that although chromium is reduced within the first 5 h, growth does not resume for another 35 h. During this time, small amounts of lactate are still utilized but the reduction of sulfate does not occur. Sulfate reduction occurs concurrently with the accumulation of acetate approximately 40 h after inoculation, when growth resumes. Similar amounts of hydrogen are produced during this time compared to hydrogen production by cells not exposed to Cr(VI); therefore an accumulation of hydrogen cannot account for the utilization of lactate. There is a significant decrease in the carbohydrate to protein ratio at approximately 25 h, and this result indicated that lactate is not converted to glycogen. Most probable number analysis indicated that cell viability decreased steadily after inoculation and reached approximately 6 x 104 cells/ml 20 h post-chromium exposure. Regeneration of reducing conditions during chromium exposure does not induce growth and in fact may make the growth conditions even more unfavorable. This result suggested that an increase in Eh was not solely responsible for the decline in viability. Cell pellets collected 10 h after chromium-exposure were unable to resume growth when suspended into fresh medium. Supernatants from these pellets were able to support cell growth upon re- inoculation. D. vulgaris cells treated with a non-dose dependent addition of ascorbate at the same time of Cr(VI) addition did not enter a lag period. Ascorbate added 3 h post-Cr(VI) exposure did not prevent the growth lag. These results indicated that Desulfovibrio utilized lactate to reduce Cr(VI) without the reduction of sulfate, that the decline in cell viability and

  18. Scientific Opinion on ChromoPrecise® cellular bound chromium yeast added for nutritional purposes as a source of chromium in food supplements and the bioavailability of chromium from this source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EFSA Panel on Food Additives and Nutrient Sources added to Food (ANS

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The Panel on Food Additives and Nutrient Sources added to Food (ANS provides a scientific opinion re-evaluating the safety of ChromoPrecise® cellular bound chromium yeast added for nutritional purposes as a source of chromium in food supplements and the bioavailability of chromium from this source. ChromoPrecise® is a yeast preparation with an enriched trivalent chromium content, obtained by culture of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in the presence of chromium chloride. A daily intake of 100 µg chromium(III. There are limited data on the nature and identity of the organic chromium(III compounds contained in chromium-enriched yeast and on their toxicokinetic and toxicodynamic behaviour in the body. Overall, the Panel concluded that the bioavailability in man of chromium from chromium-enriched yeast is potentially up to approximately ten times higher than that of chromium from chromium chloride. A NOAEL of 2500 mg/kg bw/day ChromoPrecise® was identified in a 90-day feeding study in rats; no evidence of adverse effects of chromium yeasts were reported in other animal studies investigating the effects of dietary supplementation with chromium yeast. ChromoPrecise® chromium yeast was non-genotoxic in a range of in vitro genotoxicity studies. Although no information was available on the chronic toxicity, carcinogenicity or reproductive toxicity of ChromoPrecise® chromium yeast, the ANS Panel has previously concluded that trivalent chromium is not carcinogenic, and limited data on other chromium yeasts provide no evidence of an effect on reproductive endpoints. No adverse effects have been reported in clinical efficacy trials with chromium yeasts. The Panel concluded that the use of ChromoPrecise® chromium yeast in food supplements is not of concern, despite the lack of data on the nature and identity of the organic chromium(III compounds contained in the product, provided that the intake does not exceed 250 μg/day, as recommended by the WHO.

  19. Analysis of chromium and sulphate origins in construction recycled materials based on leaching test results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Rey, I; Ayuso, J; Galvín, A P; Jiménez, J R; López, M; García-Garrido, M L

    2015-12-01

    Twenty samples of recycled aggregates from construction and demolition waste (CDW) with different compositions collected at six recycling plants in the Andalusia region (south of Spain) were characterised according to the Landfill Directive criteria. Chromium and sulphate were identified as the most critical compounds in the leachates. To detect the sources of these two pollutant constituents in recycled aggregate, environmental assessments were performed on eight construction materials (five unused ceramic materials, two old crushed concretes and one new mortar manufactured in the laboratory). The results confirmed that leached sulphate and Cr were mainly released by the ceramic materials (bricks and tiles). To predict the toxicological consequences, the oxidation states of Cr (III) and Cr (VI) were measured in the leachates of recycled aggregates and ceramic materials classified as non-hazardous. The bricks and tiles mainly released total Cr as Cr (III). However, the recycled aggregates classified as non-hazardous according to the Landfill Directive criteria mainly released Cr (VI), which is highly leachable and extremely toxic. The obtained results highlight the need for legislation that distinguishes the oxidative state in which chromium is released into the environment. Leaching level regulations must not be based solely on total Cr, which can lead to inaccurate predictions.

  20. Grafted chromium 13-membered dioxo-macrocyclic complex into aminopropyl-based nanoporous SBA-15

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tarlani, Aliakbar, E-mail: Tarlani@ccerci.ac.ir [Inorganic Nanostructures and Catalysts Research Laboratory, Chemistry and Chemical Engineering Research Center of Iran, Pajoohesh Boulevard, km 17, Karaj Highway, Tehran 14968-13151 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Joharian, Monika; Narimani, Khashayar [Inorganic Nanostructures and Catalysts Research Laboratory, Chemistry and Chemical Engineering Research Center of Iran, Pajoohesh Boulevard, km 17, Karaj Highway, Tehran 14968-13151 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Muzart, Jacques [Institut de Chimie Moléculaire de Reims, CNRS-Université de Reims Champagne-Ardenne, BP 1039, 51687 Reims Cedex 2 (France); Fallah, Mahtab [Inorganic Nanostructures and Catalysts Research Laboratory, Chemistry and Chemical Engineering Research Center of Iran, Pajoohesh Boulevard, km 17, Karaj Highway, Tehran 14968-13151 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-07-15

    In a new approach, chromium (III) tetraaza dioxo ligand was grafted onto functionalized SBA-15 after four step reactions by using coordinating ability of anchored amino functionalized SBA-15. After the termination of each step, the obtained product was characterized by FT-IR, low-angle X-ray diffraction (LA-XRD), N{sub 2} adsorption–desorption isotherms (Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET)–Barret–Joyner–Halenda (BJH)) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and used as catalyst for the efficient and regioselective alcoholysis of styrene oxide to 2-alkoxy-1-phenylethanol product at ambient temperature. - Graphical abstract: Chromium (III) tetraaza dioxo ligand was grafted onto functionalized SBA-15 using coordinating ability of anchored amino functionalized SBA-15. Preparation of the catalyst is depicted in Scheme 1. - Highlights: • Dioxo tetraazachromium macrocyclic complex grafted into the SBA-15-NH{sub 2} channels. • The bond is created by coordinating ability of anchored amino functionalized SBA-15. • The prepared nanocatalyst has superior activity in the alcoholysis of styrene oxide. • The catalyst is reusable at ambient temperature for the mentioned reaction.

  1. Fabrication of high rate chromium getter sources for fusion applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Design and fabrication techniques are described for the manufacture of large-capacity chromium getter sources, analogous to the commercially available titanium getter source known as Ti-Ball, manufactured by Varian Associates

  2. IRIS Toxicological Review of Hexavalent Chromium (Peer Review Plan)

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA is conducting a peer review of the scientific basis supporting the human health hazard and dose-response assessment of hexavalent chromium that will appear on the Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS) database.

  3. Chromium and Polyphenols from Cinnamon and Insulin Sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Factors that improve insulin sensitivity usually lead to improvements in risk factors associated with the metabolic syndrome, diabetes, and cardiovascular diseases. Naturally occurring bioactive compounds that have been shown to improve insulin sensitivity include chromium and polyphenols found in ...

  4. The diffusion of chromium in a duplex alloy steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diffusion of chromium in a duplex stainless steel containing approximately 8% ferrite has been investigated in the temperature range 600 to 10000C using the standard serial sectioning technique. The resulting concentration profiles exhibited up to four distinct regions. The two main regions are attributed to volume diffusion in the austenite and ferrite phases, the other zones being due to short circuiting paths. Volume diffusion in the austenite phase is in good agreement with chromium diffusion in Type 316 steel. The chromium diffusion coefficient in the ferrite phase of approximate composition 25 wt % Cr, 5 wt % Ni is given by: Dsub(α) = (6.0(+11,-3)) x 10-6 exp - ((212+-5)/RT) m2s-1 the activation energy being expressed in kJ.mol-1. Little evidence was found for enhanced chromium diffusion along austenite/ferrite interface boundaries. (author)

  5. Biosorption of Chromium (VI) from Aqueous Solutions onto Fungal Biomass

    OpenAIRE

    Ismael Acosta R.; Xöchitl Rodríguez; Conrado Gutiérrez; Ma. de Guadalupe Moctezuma

    2004-01-01

    The biosorption of chromium (VI) on eighteen different natural biosorbents: Natural sediment, chitosan, chitin, Aspergillus flavus I-V, Aspergillus fumigatus I-ll, Helmintosporium sp, Cladosporium sp, Mucor rouxii mutant, M. rouxii IM-80, Mucor sp-I and 2, Candida albicans and Cryptococcus neoformans was studied in this work. It was found that the biomass of C. neoformans, natural sediment, Helmintosporium sp and chitosan was more efficient to remove chromium (VI) (determined spectrophotometr...

  6. Stereology of carbide phase in modified hypereutectic chromium cast iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Suchoń

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available In paper are presented results of studies of carbide phase stereology modified hypereutectic wear resistance chromium cast iron which contains carbon about 3,5% and chromium about 25%. Three substances were applied to the modification: boron carbide (B4C, ferroniobium (FeNb and mixture of ferroniobium and rare-earth (RE. The measurements of geometrical features of carbides were conducted on microsection taken from castings wich were cooled with various velocities.

  7. Thermodynamic Equilibrium Diagrams of Sulphur-Chromium System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The chemical and electrochemical equilibria in the presence of gaseous phase were investigated. Many substances, which consisted of sulphur and chromium, were considered. Various thermodynamic equilibria were calculated in different pressures. Calculation results were shown as log p―1/T and E―T diagrams. These diagrams may be used to study the corrosion of chromium in sulphur-containing circumstances. The diagrams are also used to thermodynami-cally determine the existence area of various substances and so on.

  8. Stereology of carbide phase in modified hypereutectic chromium cast iron

    OpenAIRE

    J. Suchoń; A. Studnicki; M. Przybył

    2010-01-01

    In paper are presented results of studies of carbide phase stereology modified hypereutectic wear resistance chromium cast iron which contains carbon about 3,5% and chromium about 25%. Three substances were applied to the modification: boron carbide (B4C), ferroniobium (FeNb) and mixture of ferroniobium and rare-earth (RE). The measurements of geometrical features of carbides were conducted on microsection taken from castings wich were cooled with various velocities.

  9. SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY ACTIVITIES FOR CHROMIUM IN THE 100 AREAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    PETERSEN SW

    2009-07-02

    {sm_bullet} Primary Objective: Protect the Columbia River - Focus is control and treatment of contamination at or near the shoreline, which is influenced by bank storage {sm_bullet} Secondary Objective: Reduce hexavalent chromium to <48 parts per billion (ppb) in aquifer (drinking water standard) - Large plumes with isolated areas of high chromium concentrations (> 40,000 ppb), - Unknown source location(s); probably originating in reactor operation areas

  10. Genetic Predisposition for Dermal Problems in Hexavalent Chromium Exposed Population

    OpenAIRE

    Priti Sharma; Vipin Bihari; Agarwal, Sudhir K.; Goel, Sudhir K.

    2012-01-01

    We studied the effect of genetic susceptibility on hexavalent chromium induced dermal adversities. The health status of population was examined from the areas of Kanpur (India) having the elevated hexavalent chromium levels in groundwater. Blood samples were collected for DNA isolation to conduct polymorphic determination of genes, namely: NQO1 (C609T), hOGG1 (C1245G), GSTT1, and GSTM1 (deletion). Symptomatic exposed subjects (n = 38) were compared with asymptomatic exposed subjects (n = 108)...

  11. Performance of chromium nitride based coatings under plastic processing conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Cunha, l.; Andritschky, M.; Pischow, K.; Wang, Z.(Institute of High Energy Physics, Beijing, China); Zarychta, A.; Miranda, A. S.; A.M. Cunha

    2000-01-01

    Chromium nitride based coatings were produced in the form of monolithic and multilayer coatings, by DC and RF reactive magnetron sputtering. These coatings were deposited onto stainless steel and tool steel substrates. Chromium nitride coatings have;proved to be wear and corrosion resistant. The combination of these characteristics was necessary to protect surfaces during plastic processing. In order to select the best coatings, some mechanical and tribological tests were performed. Har...

  12. DANGER OF HEXAVALENT CHROMIUM AND STRATEGY FOR THE REMEDITATION

    OpenAIRE

    Aniruddha Roy; Ayan Das; Nirmal Paul

    2013-01-01

    Some metals as micronutrients have a major role in the life and growth process of plants and animals. However, certain forms of some metals may also act as toxic material even in relatively small quantities. Chromium is such a metal, whose concentration above a certain limit may cause a serious problem to the health of living organisms. Chromium (Cr) may occur in several chemical forms in organic and inorganic systems. In biological systems only Cr (III) and Cr (VI) are signifi...

  13. Comparative Biosorption Studies of Hexavalent Chromium Ion onto Raw and Modified Palm Branches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mona A. Shouman

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The waste of palm branches (PB was tested for its ability to remove chromium (VI from aqueous solution by batch and column experiments. Palm branches chemically modified with an oxidizing agent (sulphuric acid then coated with chitosan and surfactant (hexadecyl trimethyl ammonium bromide surfactant, HDTMA, respectively, were carried out to improve the removal performance of PB. The results of their Cr (VI removal performances are pH dependent. The adsorption data could be well interpreted by the Langmuir, Freundlich, and Flory-Huggins isotherm models. The maximum adsorption capacity obtained from the Langmuir model for the chitosan coated oxidized palm branches is 55 mg/mg. The adsorption process could be described by pseudo-second-order kinetic model. The intraparticle diffusion study revealed that film diffusion might be involved. The biosorbents were successfully regenerated using 1 M HCL solution.

  14. Removal of Chromium and Lead from Industrial Wastewater Using

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Hilal

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In this research an attempt is made on the ability of aerobic treatment of synthetic solutions containing lead and chromium using effective microorganisms within the reactor. To achieve the desired objectives of the research, synthetic aqueous solutions of lead and chromium was used in the concentration of chromium and lead ions of 5, 10,50 and 100 mg / l .The work was done at constant pH equal to 4.5 and temperature of 30 ± 1 º C. Effective microorganisms solutions was added to the reactor at Vol.% of 1/50 ,1/100 ,1/500 and 1/1000, with retention time was 24 hours to measure the heavy metals concentration the atomic absorption device was used. The experimental results showed that each 1mg / l of lead and chromium ions need 24 mg of effective microorganisms to achieve removal of 92.0% and 82.60% for lead and chromium respectively. Increasing the concentration of effective microorganisms increases the surface of adsorption and thus increasing the removal efficiency. It is found that the microorganisms activity occur in the first five hours of processing and about 94% of adsorption capacity of biomass will take place. It is also found the selectivity of microorganisms to lead ions is higher than for chromium ions.

  15. Evaluating trivalent chromium toxicity on wild terrestrial and wetland plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukina, A O; Boutin, C; Rowland, O; Carpenter, D J

    2016-11-01

    Elevated chromium levels in soil from mining can impact the environment, including plants. Mining of chromium is concentrated in South Africa, several Asian countries, and potentially in Northern Ontario, Canada, raising concerns since chromium toxicity to wild plants is poorly understood. In the first experiment, concentration-response tests were conducted to evaluate effects of chromium on terrestrial and wetland plants. Following established guidelines using artificial soil, seeds of 32 species were exposed to chromium (Cr(3+)) at concentrations simulating contamination (0-1000 mg kg(-1)). This study found that low levels of chromium (250 mg kg(-1)) adversely affected the germination of 22% of species (33% of all families), while higher levels (500 and 1000 mg kg(-1)) affected 69% and 94% of species, respectively, from 89% of the families. Secondly, effects on seedbanks were studied using soil collected in Northern Ontario and exposed to Cr(3+) at equivalent concentrations (0-1000 mg kg(-1)). Effects were less severe in the seedbank study with significant differences only observed at 1000 mg kg(-1). Seeds exposed to Cr(3+) during stratification were greatly affected. Seed size was a contributing factor as was possibly the seed coat barrier. This study represents an initial step in understanding Cr(3+) toxicity on wild plants and could form the basis for future risk assessments. PMID:27543852

  16. Lime enhanced chromium removal in advanced integrated wastewater pond system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadesse, I; Isoaho, S A; Green, F B; Puhakka, J A

    2006-03-01

    The removal of trivalent chromium from a combined tannery effluent in horizontal settling tanks and subsequent Advanced Integrated Wastewater Pond System (AIWPS) reactors was investigated. The raw combined effluent from Modjo tannery had pH in the range of 11.2-12. At this pH, a trivalent chromium removal of 46-72% was obtained in the horizontal settling tanks after a one-day detention time. Trivalent chromium precipitated as chromium hydroxide, Cr(OH)3. 58-95% Cr(III) was removed in the advanced facultative pond (AFP) where the water column pH of 7.2-8.4 was close to pH 8, which is the optimum precipitation pH for trivalent chromium. Chromium removals in the secondary facultative pond (SFP) and maturation pond (MP) were 30-50% and 6-16%, respectively. With Cr(III) concentration of 0.2-0.8 mg/l in the final treated effluent, the AIWPS preceded by horizontal settling tanks produced effluent that could easily meet most of the current Cr(III) discharge limits to receive water bodies.

  17. 镍铬-镍硅热电偶老化失效机理初探%Primary study of nickel chromium-nickel silicon thermocouple aging failure mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谌立新; 郭卫芳; 陈东

    2011-01-01

    In this paper,the oxidation of nickel chromium-nickel silicon thermocouple after 605h aging failure test in the atmosphere in 1200℃ was carried out and the oxidation process was analysed,and that the priority oxidation of the Si and Ni in the nickel-silicon alloy is main cause of the tolerance of nickel chromium-nickel silicon thermocouple thermo-electromotive force.%就镍铬-镍硅热电偶在大气中1200℃、605h老化失效试验后的氧化情况进行了分析,对氧化过程进行了探讨,结果表明镍硅合金中的硅和镍的优先氧化是引起镍铬-镍硅热电偶热电动势超差的主要原因。

  18. Experimental skin deposition of chromium on the hands following handling of samples of leather and metal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bregnbak, David; Thyssen, Jacob P.; Jellesen, Morten Stendahl;

    2016-01-01

    Background: Chromium is an important skin sensitizer. Exposure to it has been regulated in cement, and recently in leather. Studies on the deposition of chromium ions on the skin as a result of handling different chromium-containing materials are sparse, but could improve the risk assessment...... of contact sensitization and allergic contact dermatitis caused by chromium. Objectives: To determine whether the handling of chromium-containing samples of leather and metal results in the deposition of chromium onto the skin. Methods: Five healthy volunteers participated. For 30 min, they handled samples...... of leather and metal known to contain and release chromium. Skin deposition of chromium was assessed with the acid wipe sampling technique. Results: Acid wipe sampling of the participants' fingers showed chromium deposition on the skin in all participants who had been exposed to leather (range 0.01–0.20 µg...

  19. USE OF TWO DIGESTION METHODS IN THE EVALUATION OF CHROMIUM CONTENT IN CATTLE'S MEAT SUPPLEMENTED WITH CHROMIUM CHELATES

    OpenAIRE

    R. L. T. Andrade; P.S.A. Moreira; R. Arruda; F. J. Lourenço; C. Palhari, F. F. Faria, V. B. Arevalo; Faria, F. F.; V. B. Arevalo

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to analyze the chromium content in beef using two digestion methods. There were used samples from 24 18-month-old male cattle, and twelve of them were supplemented and twelve were not supplemented with chromium chelate. These samples were evaluated by atomic absorption spectroscopy, previously submitted to digestion method using nitric acid (65%) with hydrogen peroxide (35%) and to digestion method, using solution of nitric perchloric acid in the proportion 3:1. Immedi...

  20. Activation of bentonite to remove the chromium from waste water produced by panning industry, and studying the chromium recovery efficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fast development of tanning industry led to an increase in environmental problems resulting from discharging its wastes to the surrounding environment. Thus solving this problem became one of the most important aims that the researchers work on. The chromium content of the industrial water wastes of the tanning industry considered as the main pollutant for the environment. The Aleppo Bentonite is used in early research to remove the chromium from the industrial waste water.The current research aims to find a method to activate the Aleppo Bentonite in order to increase the effective removal of chromium from the industrial waste water which is produced by tanning industry, as well as to specify the optimal conditions for chromium recovery.This study used the Aleppo Bentonite, whose origin is Tal Ajar-Aleppo to study the activation aspects using Sulfuric Acid, Hydrochloric Acid and Nitric Acid, in addition to study the recovery aspects using the same acids and hydrogen peroxide and to specify the optimal conditions for chromium recovery through applying some experiments based on three main factors: concentration, settling time and temperature.It was observed from the applied experiments that it is possible to recover chromium from Bentonite efficiently up to (80% - 90%) by treating the Bentonite with hydrogen peroxide(33% concentration) at room temperature, or by treating it with hydrogen peroxide(8.25% concentration) at 75oC, while the settling time factor proved that full recovery of chromium is obtained during the first hour, and increasing the time factor does not affect the efficiency of chromium recovery. (author)

  1. Reduction of vanadium oxide by carbon in stainless steelmaking slags

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Divakar, M.; Lahiri, A.K. [Indian Inst. of Science, Bangalore (India). Dept. of Metallurgy; Goernerup, M. [Uddeholm Technology AB (Sweden)

    2001-02-01

    Simultaneous reduction of chromium, iron and vanadium oxides by carbon has been studied by conducting experiments on typical stainless steelmaking slags in the temperature range of 1823 to 1923 K. In-situ gas generated due to the reduction led to several phenomena such as foam/emulsion formation, change in foam height, size of gas bubbles and rate of gas generation. The kinetics of vanadium oxide reduction by carbon are studied under the influence of the above mentioned phenomena and the presence of chromium and iron oxides. (orig.)

  2. Development studies for a novel wet oxidation process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhooge, P.M.; Hakim, L.B.

    1994-01-01

    A catalytic wet oxidation process (DETOX), which uses an acidic iron solution to oxidize organic compounds to carbon dioxide, water, and other simple products, was investigated as a potential method for the treatment of multicomponent hazardous and mixed wastes. The organic compounds picric acid, poly(vinyl chloride), tetrachlorothiophene, pentachloropyridine, Aroclor 1260 (a polychlorinated biphenyl), and hexachlorobenzene were oxidized in 125 ml reaction vessels. The metals arsenic, barium, beryllium, cadmium, cerium (as a surrogate for plutonium), chromium, lead, mercury, neodymium (as a surrogate for uranium), nickel, and vanadium were tested in the DETOX solution. Barium, beryllium, cerium, chromium, mercury, neodymium, nickel, and vanadium were all found to be very soluble (>100 g/l) in the DETOX chloride-based solution. Arsenic, barium, cadmium, and lead solubilities were lower. Lead could be selectively precipitated from the DETOX solution. Chromium(VI) was reduced to relatively non-toxic chromium(III) by the solution. Six soils were contaminated with arsenic, barium, beryllium, chromium, lead, and neodymium oxides at approximately 0.1% by weight, and benzene, trichloroethene, mineral oil, and Aroclor 1260 at approximately 5% by weight total, and 5.g amounts treated with the DETOX solution in unstirred 125. ml reaction bombs. It is felt that soil treatment in a properly designed system is entirely possible despite incomplete oxidation of the less volatile organic materials in these unstirred tests.

  3. Speciation of chromium using chronoamperometric biosensors based on screen-printed electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Chronoamperometric determination of Cr(III) on tyrosinase based biosensors using SPCEs. • Chronoamperometric determination of Cr(VI) on GOx based biosensors using SPCEs. • High degree of sensitivity and selectivity in the analysis of both chromium species. • Bipotentiostatic chronoamperometric determination of both chromium species in the same sample. - Abstract: Chronoamperometric assays based on tyrosinase and glucose oxidase (GOx) inactivation have been developed for the monitoring of Cr(III) and Cr(VI). Tyrosinase was immobilized by crosslinking on screen-printed carbon electrodes (SPCEs) containing tetrathiafulvalene (TTF) as electron transfer mediator. The tyrosinase/SPCTTFE response to pyrocatechol is inhibited by Cr(III). This process, that is not affected by Cr(VI), allows the determination of Cr(III) with a capability of detection of 2.0 ± 0.2 μM and a reproducibility of 5.5%. GOx modified screen-printed carbon platinised electrodes (SPCPtEs) were developed for the selective determination of Cr(VI) using ferricyanide as redox mediator. The biosensor was able to discriminate two different oxidation states of chromium being able to reject Cr(III) and to detect the toxic species Cr(VI). Chronoamperometric response of the biosensor towards glucose decreases with the presence of Cr(VI), with a capability of detection of 90.5 ± 7.6 nM and a reproducibility of 6.2%. A bipotentiostatic chronoamperometric biosensor was finally developed using a tyrosinase/SPCTTFE and a GOx/SPCPtE connected in array mode for the simultaneous determination of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) in spiked tap water and in waste water from a tannery factory samples

  4. On the removal of hexavalent chromium from a Class F fly ash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huggins, F E; Rezaee, M; Honaker, R Q; Hower, J C

    2016-05-01

    Coarse and fine samples of a Class F fly ash obtained from commercial combustion of Illinois bituminous coal have been exposed to two long-term leaching tests designed to simulate conditions in waste impoundments. ICP-AES analysis indicated that the coarse and fine fly ash samples contained 135 and 171mg/kg Cr, respectively. Measurements by XAFS spectroscopy showed that the ash samples originally contained 5 and 8% of the chromium, respectively, in the hexavalent oxidation state, Cr(VI). After exposure to water for more than four months, the percentage of chromium as Cr(VI) in the fly-ash decreased significantly for the coarse and fine fly-ash in both tests. Combining the XAFS data with ICP-AES data on the concentration of chromium in the leachates indicated that, after the nineteen-week-long, more aggressive, kinetic test on the coarse fly ash, approximately 60% of the Cr(VI) had been leached, 20% had been reduced to Cr(III) and retained in the ash, and 20% remained as Cr(VI) in the ash. In contrast, during the six-month-long baseline test, very little Cr was actually leached from either the coarse or the fine fly-ash (<0.1mg/kg); rather, about 66% and 20%, respectively, of the original Cr(VI) in the coarse and fine fly-ash was retained in the ash in that form, while the remainder, 34% and 80%, respectively, was reduced and retained in the ash as Cr(III). The results are interpreted as indicating that Cr(VI) present in Class F fly-ash can be reduced to Cr(III) when in contact with water and that such chemical reduction can compete with physical removal of Cr(VI) from the ash by aqueous leaching. PMID:26951722

  5. Speciation of chromium using chronoamperometric biosensors based on screen-printed electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calvo-Pérez, Ana, E-mail: anacp@ubu.es; Domínguez-Renedo, Olga, E-mail: olgado@ubu.es; Alonso-Lomillo, MAsunción, E-mail: malomillo@ubu.es; Arcos-Martínez, MJulia, E-mail: jarcos@ubu.es

    2014-06-23

    Highlights: • Chronoamperometric determination of Cr(III) on tyrosinase based biosensors using SPCEs. • Chronoamperometric determination of Cr(VI) on GOx based biosensors using SPCEs. • High degree of sensitivity and selectivity in the analysis of both chromium species. • Bipotentiostatic chronoamperometric determination of both chromium species in the same sample. - Abstract: Chronoamperometric assays based on tyrosinase and glucose oxidase (GOx) inactivation have been developed for the monitoring of Cr(III) and Cr(VI). Tyrosinase was immobilized by crosslinking on screen-printed carbon electrodes (SPCEs) containing tetrathiafulvalene (TTF) as electron transfer mediator. The tyrosinase/SPC{sub TTF}E response to pyrocatechol is inhibited by Cr(III). This process, that is not affected by Cr(VI), allows the determination of Cr(III) with a capability of detection of 2.0 ± 0.2 μM and a reproducibility of 5.5%. GOx modified screen-printed carbon platinised electrodes (SPC{sub Pt}Es) were developed for the selective determination of Cr(VI) using ferricyanide as redox mediator. The biosensor was able to discriminate two different oxidation states of chromium being able to reject Cr(III) and to detect the toxic species Cr(VI). Chronoamperometric response of the biosensor towards glucose decreases with the presence of Cr(VI), with a capability of detection of 90.5 ± 7.6 nM and a reproducibility of 6.2%. A bipotentiostatic chronoamperometric biosensor was finally developed using a tyrosinase/SPC{sub TTF}E and a GOx/SPC{sub Pt}E connected in array mode for the simultaneous determination of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) in spiked tap water and in waste water from a tannery factory samples.

  6. Low energy spin excitations in chromium metal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pynn, R. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Azuah, R.T. [Hahn-Meitner-Inst., Berlin (Germany); Stirling, W.G. [Univ. of Liverpool (United Kingdom). Dept. of Physics; Kulda, J. [Inst. Laue Langevin, Grenoble (France)

    1997-12-31

    Neutron scattering experiments with full polarization analysis have been performed with a single crystal of chromium to study the low-energy spin fluctuations in the transverse spin density wave (TSDW) state. A number of remarkable results have been found. Inelastic scattering observed close to the TSDW satellite positions at (1 {+-} {delta},0,0) does not behave as expected for magnon scattering. In particular, the scattering corresponds to almost equally strong magnetization fluctuations both parallel and perpendicular to the ordered moments of the TSDW phase. As the Neel temperature is approached from below, scattering at the commensurate wavevector (1,0,0) increases in intensity as a result of critical scattering at silent satellites (1,0, {+-} {delta}) being included within the spectrometer resolution function. This effect, first observed by Sternlieb et al, does not account for all of the inelastic scattering around the (1,0,0) position, however, Rather, there are further collective excitations, apparently emanating from the TSDW satellites, which correspond to magnetic fluctuations parallel to the ordered TSDW moments. These branches have a group velocity that is close to that of (1,0,0) longitudinal acoustic (LA) phonons, but assigning their origin to magneto-elastic scattering raises other unanswered questions.

  7. Bioaccessibility, bioavailability and toxicity of commercially relevant iron- and chromium-based particles: in vitro studies with an inhalation perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hedberg Yolanda

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Production of ferrochromium alloys (FeCr, master alloys for stainless steel manufacture, involves casting and crushing processes where particles inevitably become airborne and potentially inhaled. The aim of this study was to assess potential health hazards induced by inhalation of different well-characterized iron- and chromium-based particles, i.e. ferrochromium (FeCr, ferrosiliconchromium (FeSiCr, stainless steel (316L, iron (Fe, chromium (Cr, and chromium(IIIoxide (Cr2O3, in different size fractions using in vitro methods. This was done by assessing the extent and speciation of released metals in synthetic biological medium and by analyzing particle reactivity and toxicity towards cultured human lung cells (A549. Results The amount of released metals normalized to the particle surface area increased with decreasing particle size for all alloy particles, whereas the opposite situation was valid for particles of the pure metals. These effects were evident in artificial lysosomal fluid (ALF of pH 4.5 containing complexing agents, but not in neutral or weakly alkaline biological media. Chromium, iron and nickel were released to very low extent from all alloy particles, and from particles of Cr due to the presence of a Cr(III-rich protective surface oxide. Released elements were neither proportional to the bulk nor to the surface composition after the investigated 168 hours of exposure. Due to a surface oxide with less protective properties, significantly more iron was released from pure iron particles compared with the alloys. Cr was predominantly released as Cr(III from all particles investigated and was strongly complexed by organic species of ALF. Cr2O3 particles showed hemolytic activity, but none of the alloy particles did. Fine-sized particles of stainless steel caused however DNA damage, measured with the comet assay after 4 h exposure. None of the particles revealed any significant cytotoxicity in terms of cell death

  8. Hexavalent Chromium Reduction and Its Distribution in the Cell and Medium by Chromium Resistant Fusarium solani

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mousumi Sen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, batch biosorption of Cr(VI was studied using the fungal strain isolated from soil. The fungal strain was characterized as Fusarium solani. The total Cr distribution in the biomass (fungus and in the media obtained from the experiment conducted at 500 mg l -1 initial Cr(VI concentration and pH 5.0. The results indicated both intracellular and extracellular accumulation and enzymatic reduction of Cr(VI and this was supported by the Transmission Electron Microscopic (TEM observation at the same Cr(VI concentration and pH value. Chromium elution from Fusarium solani containing Cr was then tried out using a number of chromium eluting reagents and a maximum Cr could be eluted using 0.5N sodium hydroxide solution without destructing the biomass structure. The total Cr was recovered by pH adjustment from both biomass and media was found to be 44% of the initial Cr(VI concentration (500 mg l-1.

  9. Simultaneous oxidation and carburization under oxyfuel conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kranzmann, Axel; Schulz, Wencke [Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, Berlin (Germany). Div. V.1 Composition and Microstructure of Engineering Materials; Huenert, Daniela [National Institute for Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States). Group 855.13 Thermodynamics and Kinetics

    2010-06-15

    The combustion of coal in CO{sub 2}-reduced oxyfuel power plants requires creep resistant and corrosion resistant materials which can withstand high temperatures up to 600 C (873 K) and CO{sub 2}-rich atmospheres. Among the heat resistant materials, the 9-12 % chromium steels have been proven to resist high wall temperatures in conventional power plants and are suitable as membrane walls, superheaters and steam piping. During oxyfuel combustion a flue gas is generated which consists mainly of H{sub 2}O (x{sub H{sub 2}}{sub O}=0.3) and CO{sub 2} (x{sub CO{sub 2}}=0.7). The present paper is focused on the corrosion of 9-12 % chromium steels under oxyfuel conditions in a temperature range between 550 C (823 K) and 625 C (898 K). Depending on the chromium content of the 9-12 % chromium steels, carburization of the base material, perlite formation and carbide formation were observed. Alloys with lower chromium content form a non-protective oxide scale with perlite at the scale-alloy interface. Steels with 12 % chromium have a small growing oxide scale with enlarged M{sub 23}C{sub 6} particles at the scale-alloy interface. The carburization of the base material is found to be increased for the 9 % Cr steel. Higher pressure of the flue gas results in the formation of less resistant scales and causes accelerated carburization of the base materials. However, the carburization has an impact on the mechanical properties at the surface and leads to an embrittlement, which is deleterious during thermal cycling. Oxidation kinetics, phase analysis of the scale (transmission electron microscope) and carburization depths (microprobe) of the base materials are presented. (orig.)

  10. Electron transfer. 75. Reduction of carboxylato-bound chromium(V) with vanadium(IV). Intervention of chromium(IV)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The chelated (carboxylato)chromium(V) anion bis(2-hydroxy-2-ethylbutyrato)oxochromate(V) (I), [(Lig)2Cr(O)]-, reacts with oxovanadium(IV) to form a strongly absorbing species (lambda/sub max/ = 515 nm; epsilon = 1.7 x 103 M-1) in the presence of 2-hydroxy-2-ethylbutyric acid buffers (pH 2-4). EPR data support 1:1 stoichiometry with VO2+ in deficiency, indicating the formation of a chromium(IV) species by reduction. With excess VO2+ a chromium(III) product was obtained. Spectral and ion-exchange properties of this product correspond to those observed for the titanium(III) and iron(II) reductions of chromium(V) and are consistent with the formulation of the product as a bis(hydroxycarboxylate) chelate of (H2O)2Cr/sup III/. With excess vanadium(IV), the reaction exhibits triphasic kinetics. The remaining step of the reaction is the reduction of the chromium(IV) intermediate with VO2+. Rates for all steps increase with decreasing [H+] and level off at low [H+]. The limiting rate constants for the formation of the chromium(IV) intermediate by the (Lig)3Cr(O)2- and (Lig)2Cr(O)- pathways are 2.8 x 103 and 2.2 x 102 M-1s-1. The bimolecular limiting rate constant for the reduction of chromium(IV) is computed to be 7.7 x 102 M-1 s-1. 33 references, 7 tables

  11. Low-chromium reduced-activation ferritic steels for fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klueh, R.L.; Alexander, D.J.; Kenik, E.A. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, TN (United States)

    1996-04-01

    Development of reduced-activation ferritic steels has concentrated on high-chromium (8-10 wt% Cr) steels. However, there are advantages for a low-chromium steel, and initial ORNL studies on reduced-activation steels were on compositions with 2.25 to 12% Cr. Those studies showed an Fe-2.25Cr-2W-0.25V-0.1C (2 1/4Cr-2WV) steel to have the highest strenglth of the steels studied. Although this steel had the best strength, Charpy impact properties were inferior to those of an Fe-9Cr-2W-0.25V-0.07Ta-0.1C (9Cr-2WVTa) and an Fe-2.25Cr-2W-0.1C (2 1/4Cr-2W) steel. Therefore, further development of the low-chromium Cr-W steels was required. These results indicate that it is possible to develop low-chromium reduced-activation ferritic steels that have tensile and impact properties as good or better than those of high-chromium (7-9% Cr) steels. Further improvement of properties should be possible by optimizing the composition.

  12. Bioaccumulation and biosorption of chromium by Aspergillus niger MTCC 2594.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandana Mala, John Geraldine; Unni Nair, Balachandran; Puvanakrishnan, Rengarajulu

    2006-06-01

    Chromium toxicity is of prime concern due to chrome tanning processes in the leather sector. Chrome tanning results in the discharge of toxic levels of chromium causing pollution hazards. Chromium levels of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) were high above permissible limits in chrome samples after chrome tanning. The potential of Aspergillus niger MTCC 2594 to accumulate chromium as well as its biosorption capacity is investigated in this study. Bioaccumulation of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) in the spent chrome liquor has resulted in a 75-78% reduction of the initial Cr content in 24-36 h. A. niger biomass is found to be very effective in the biosorption of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) in spent chrome liquor. Maximum adsorption of 83% for biosorption of Cr(III) at 48 h and 79% of Cr(VI) at 36 h in spent chrome liquor is observed. The biosorption characteristics fit well with Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms and the adsorption parameters are evaluated. The biosorption of Cr also follows Lagergren kinetics. A. niger biomass is effectively used for the biosorption of chromium with 79-83% Cr removal in 36-48 h.

  13. Chromium propionate enhances adipogenic differentiation of bovine intramuscular adipocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca eTokach

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In vitro experiments were performed to determine the effects of increasing concentrations of chromium propionate on mRNA and protein abundance of different enzymes and receptors. Intramuscular and subcutaneous preadipocytes and bovine satellite cells were isolated from the longissimus muscle to determine the effect of treatment on glucose transporter type 4 (GLUT4 and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ mRNA and GLUT4 protein abundance. Preadipocyte cultures were treated with differentiation media plus either sodium propionate or different concentrations of chromium propionate (CrPro for 96, 120, and 144 h before harvest. This study indicated adipogenesis of the bovine intramuscular adipocytes were more sensitive to the treatment of chromium propionate as compared to subcutaneous adipocytes. Enhancement of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase and GLUT4 mRNA by CrPro treatment may enhance glucose uptake in intramuscular adipocytes. Chromium propionate decreased GLUT4 protein levels in muscle cell cultures suggesting those cells have increased efficiency of glucose uptake due to exposure to increased levels of CrPro. In contrast, each of the two adipogenic lines had opposing responses to the CrPro. It appeared that CrPro had the most stimulative effect of GLUT4 response in the intramuscular adipocytes as compared to subcutaneous adipocytes. These findings indicated opportunities to potentially augment marbling in beef cattle fed chromium propionate during the finishing phase.

  14. Anthropogenic chromium emissions in china from 1990 to 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Hongguang; Zhou, Tan; Li, Qian; Lu, Lu; Lin, Chunye

    2014-01-01

    An inventory of chromium emission into the atmosphere and water from anthropogenic activities in China was compiled for 1990 through to 2009. We estimate that the total emission of chromium to the atmosphere is about 1.92×10⁵ t. Coal and oil combustion were the two leading sources of chromium emission to the atmosphere in China, while the contribution of them showed opposite annual growth trend. In total, nearly 1.34×10⁴ t of chromium was discharged to water, mainly from six industrial categories in 20 years. Among them, the metal fabrication industry and the leather tanning sector were the dominant sources of chromium emissions, accounting for approximately 68.0% and 20.0% of the total emissions and representing increases of 15.6% and 10.3% annually, respectively. The spatial trends of Cr emissions show significant variation based on emissions from 2005 to 2009. The emission to the atmosphere was heaviest in Hebei, Shandong, Guangdong, Zhejiang and Shanxi, whose annual emissions reached more than 1000t for the high level of coal and oil consumption. In terms of emission to water, the largest contributors were Guangdong, Jiangsu, Shandong and Zhejiang, where most of the leather production and metal manufacturing occur and these four regions accounted for nearly 47.4% of the total emission to water. PMID:24505309

  15. Anthropogenic chromium emissions in china from 1990 to 2009.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongguang Cheng

    Full Text Available An inventory of chromium emission into the atmosphere and water from anthropogenic activities in China was compiled for 1990 through to 2009. We estimate that the total emission of chromium to the atmosphere is about 1.92×10⁵ t. Coal and oil combustion were the two leading sources of chromium emission to the atmosphere in China, while the contribution of them showed opposite annual growth trend. In total, nearly 1.34×10⁴ t of chromium was discharged to water, mainly from six industrial categories in 20 years. Among them, the metal fabrication industry and the leather tanning sector were the dominant sources of chromium emissions, accounting for approximately 68.0% and 20.0% of the total emissions and representing increases of 15.6% and 10.3% annually, respectively. The spatial trends of Cr emissions show significant variation based on emissions from 2005 to 2009. The emission to the atmosphere was heaviest in Hebei, Shandong, Guangdong, Zhejiang and Shanxi, whose annual emissions reached more than 1000t for the high level of coal and oil consumption. In terms of emission to water, the largest contributors were Guangdong, Jiangsu, Shandong and Zhejiang, where most of the leather production and metal manufacturing occur and these four regions accounted for nearly 47.4% of the total emission to water.

  16. Enhancement of chromium uptake in tanning using oxazolidine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundarapandiyan, S; Brutto, Patrick E; Siddhartha, G; Ramesh, R; Ramanaiah, B; Saravanan, P; Mandal, A B

    2011-06-15

    Monocyclic and bicyclic oxazolidines were offered at three different junctures of chrome tanning process viz. prior to BCS offer, along with BCS and after basification. It was found that oxazolidine when offered after basification brought about better chromium uptake and reduction of chromium load in the wastewater. Offer of oxazolidine was also varied. Increase in offer of oxazolidine from 0.25% to 1% was found to enhance the chromium uptake and decrease the chromium load in wastewater. But the increase in uptake was not proportionate to the increase in oxazolidine offer more than 0.75%. Offer of 1% Zoldine ZA 78 (monocyclic oxazolidine) and Zoldine ZE (bicyclic oxazolidine) after basification brought about 63.4% and 73.1% enhancement in chrome content in leather compared to control where oxazolidine was not offered. The tone of the wetblue was found to be altered moderately. However this did not call for any process adjustments in wet-finishing. The oxazolidine treated leathers were found to be immensely fuller and tighter. It was found experimentally that offer of 1% of oxazolidine facilitated reduction in the offer of syntans administered for filling and grain tightening by around 46%. Oxazolidine could bring about significant reduction in cost of chemicals apart from resulting environmental benefits due to enhancement of chromium uptake during tanning. PMID:21536383

  17. Application of the Rietveld method to assess chromium(VI) speciation in chromite ore processing residue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrysochoou, Maria; Dermatas, Dimitris

    2007-03-15

    The Rietveld method allows the quantification of crystalline phases and amorphous material identified by X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) and other diffraction methods. The method assists in determining the speciation of contaminants in solid matrices both qualitatively and quantitatively in a statistically defensible approach, as it does not focus on a microscale. Rietveld was applied to chromite ore processing residue (COPR), a cementitious waste containing hexavalent chromium. Calcium aluminum chromium oxide hydrates (CACs) were the crystalline phases identified by XRPD that bind Cr(6+) in COPR according to their chemical formula. Rietveld quantification, combined with mass balances on Cr(6+), showed that CACs may bind Cr(6+) in variable percentages, ranging from 25% to 85%. Analysis of duplicate samples showed that material variability is the predominant factor of uncertainty in evaluating the role of CACs in Cr(6+) speciation, provided that a consistent quantification strategy is pursued. The choice of strategy was performed on the basis of the pertinent literature, preliminary analyses of the equipment and the software settings, and mass balances. The correlation between the average CAC-bound Cr(6+) concentration and the total Cr(6+) for five samples (R(2)=0.94), extracted from different zones and soil borings, suggests that CACs are a primary sink for Cr(6+) in COPR. PMID:16842911

  18. The relationship between microstructure and mechanical properties of ferritic chromium steel weldments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayr, Peter; Cerjak, Horst [Graz Univ. of Technology (Austria); Toda, Yoshiaki; Hara, Toru; Abe, Fujio [National Institute for Materials Science (Japan)

    2008-07-01

    Welding as the major joining and repair technology for steels in thermal power plants has a significant influence on the steels microstructure and, therefore, on its properties. Heat-resistant martensitic 9-12% chromium steels show an affinity to the retention of delta ferrite in the heat-affected zone of their weldments. This is related to their high level of ferrite stabilizing alloying elements such as Cr, W or Mo. Retained delta ferrite in martensitic steel grades has a significant negative influence on creep strength, fatigue strength, toughness and oxidation resistance. In the long-term range of creep exposure, many weldments of martensitic heatresistant steels fail by Type IV cracking in the fine-grained region of the heat-affected zone. In this work, the formation of the heat-affected zone microstructures in martensitic chromium steels is studied by in-situ X-ray diffraction using synchrotron radiation, optical microscopy as well as most advanced electron microscopical methods. The observed microstructure is directly linked to the mechanical properties, i.e. ductility, toughness and creep strength. Characteristic failure modes are discussed in detail. (orig.)

  19. Chromium, nickel and vanadium mobility in soils derived from fluvioglacial sands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agnieszka, Jeske, E-mail: agnieszka.jeske@ios.edu.pl [Institute of Environmental Protection-National Research Institute, Krucza 5/11, 00-548, Warsaw (Poland); Warsaw University of Life Sciences, Division of Soil Science, Nowoursynowska 157, Warsaw (Poland); Barbara, Gworek [Institute of Environmental Protection-National Research Institute, Krucza 5/11, 00-548, Warsaw (Poland); Warsaw University of Life Sciences, Division of Soil Science, Nowoursynowska 157, Warsaw (Poland)

    2012-10-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mobility of Cr, Ni, V was analysed in rusty soils derived from fluvioglacial sands. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The aim was the determination the link between soil constituents and fractions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer To determine mobile fractions the Tessier et al. method was used. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Metals occurred predominantly in immobile fractions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Potential mobility, bioavailability of mentioned metals is as follows Ni > Cr > V. - Abstract: The presented study was focused on soils developed from fluvioglacial sands from the Puszcza Borecka forest complex. The mobility of chromium, nickel and vanadium was evaluated with regard to litho- and pedogenic factors. The aim of the study was to determine with which soil constituents fractions of heavy metals are bound with particular attention drawn on the mobile fractions (F1 + F2). Heavy metal fractions in the soils were determined using the sequential extraction method of Tessier et al. The purpose of sequential extraction methods to soil samples provides relevant information about possible toxicity when they are discharged into the soil environment. Chromium, nickel, and vanadium occurred predominantly in the fraction bound with iron and manganese oxides and in the residual fraction, thus showed low mobility. With regard to mobility, the elements studied can be arranged as follows: V < Cr < Ni. The content of the mobile fractions depended on the soil texture. The influence of the rusting process on the distribution of the bioavailable fractions was observed in the soil profiles.

  20. Heterogeneous kinetics of the reduction of chromium (VI) by elemental iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zero valent iron (ZVI) has been extensively used as a reactive medium for the reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) in reactive permeable barriers. The kinetic rate depends strongly on the superficial oxidation of the iron particles used and the preliminary washing of ZVI increases the rate. The reaction has been primarily modelled using a pseudo-first-order kinetics which is inappropriate for a heterogeneous reaction. We assumed a shrinking particle type model where the kinetic rate is proportional to the available iron surface area, to the initial volume of solution and to the chromium concentration raised to a power α which is the order of the chemical reaction occurring at surface. We assumed α = 2/3 based on the likeness to the shrinking particle models with spherical symmetry. Kinetics studies were performed in order to evaluate the suitability of this approach. The influence of the following parameters was experimentally studied: initial available surface area, chromium concentration, temperature and pH. The assumed order for the reaction was confirmed. In addition, the rate constant was calculated from data obtained in different operating conditions. Digital pictures of iron balls were periodically taken and the image treatment allowed for establishing the time evolution of their size distribution.

  1. Inhibition of CO poisoning on Pt catalyst coupled with the reduction of toxic hexavalent chromium in a dual-functional fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Dong Young; Kim, Hyoung-Il; Chung, Young-Hoon; Lee, Myeong Jae; Yoo, Sung Jong; Bokare, Alok D.; Choi, Wonyong; Sung, Yung-Eun

    2014-12-01

    We propose a method to enhance the fuel cell efficiency with the simultaneous removal of toxic heavy metal ions. Carbon monoxide (CO), an intermediate of methanol oxidation that is primarily responsible for Pt catalyst deactivation, can be used as an in-situ reducing agent for hexavalent chromium (Cr (VI)) with reactivating the CO-poisoned Pt catalyst. Using electro-oxidation measurements, the oxidation of adsorbed CO molecules coupled with the concurrent conversion of Cr (VI) to Cr (III) was confirmed. This concept was also successfully applied to a methanol fuel cell to enhance its performance efficiency and to remove toxic Cr (VI) at the same time.

  2. The chromium isotope composition of reducing and oxic marine sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gueguen, Bleuenn; Reinhard, Christopher T.; Algeo, Thomas J.; Peterson, Larry C.; Nielsen, Sune G.; Wang, Xiangli; Rowe, Harry; Planavsky, Noah J.

    2016-07-01

    The chromium (Cr) isotope composition of marine sediments has the potential to provide new insights into the evolution of Earth-surface redox conditions. There are significant but poorly constrained isotope fractionations associated with oxidative subaerial weathering and riverine transport, the major source of seawater Cr, and with partial Cr reduction during burial in marine sediments, the major sink for seawater Cr. A more comprehensive understanding of these processes is needed to establish global Cr isotope mass balance and to gauge the utility of Cr isotopes as a paleoredox proxy. For these purposes, we investigated the Cr isotope composition of reducing sediments from the upwelling zone of the Peru Margin and the deep Cariaco Basin. Chromium is present in marine sediments in both detrital and authigenic phases, and to estimate the isotopic composition of the authigenic fraction, we measured δ53Cr on a weakly acid-leached fraction in addition to the bulk sediment. In an effort to examine potential variability in the Cr isotope composition of the detrital fraction, we also measured δ53Cr on a variety of oxic marine sediments that contain minimal authigenic Cr. The average δ53Cr value of the oxic sediments examined here is -0.05 ± 0.10‰ (2σ, n = 25), which is within the range of δ53Cr values characteristic of the bulk silicate Earth. This implies that uncertainty in estimates of authigenic δ53Cr values based on bulk sediment analyses is mainly linked to estimation of the ratio of Cr in detrital versus authigenic phases, rather than to the Cr-isotopic composition of the detrital pool. Leaches of Cariaco Basin sediments have an average δ53Cr value of +0.38 ± 0.10‰ (2σ, n = 7), which shows no dependency on sample location within the basin and is close to that of Atlantic deepwater Cr (∼+0.5‰). This suggests that authigenic Cr in anoxic sediments may reliably reflect the first-order Cr isotope composition of deepwaters. For Peru Margin samples

  3. Field Investigation of Steamside Oxidation for TP347H

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montgomery, Melanie; Larsen, Ole Hede; Jensen, Søren Aakjær;

    2004-01-01

    also investigated with grazing incidence X-ray diffraction. Results from coarse-grained and fine-grained specimens (machined and non-machined) show that grain size influenced oxide thickness and morphology. The oxides from non-machined specimens has an outer iron rich oxide and an inner iron chromium...... (machined on the inner side) to give a constant metal thickness so more precise wall thickness measurements could be undertaken. Machined and non-machined areas were investigated using light optical microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy with EDS analysis. The oxide on the fine-grained specimen was...... oxide. However a thinner oxide had grown on the fine-grained steel. The machining of fine-grained and coarse-grained specimens resulted in a thin chromium rich oxide layer. The presence of surface deformation of the inner metal surface was evident on the coarse-grained specimen but not on the fine...

  4. Reduction and immobilization of hexavalent chromium by microbially reduced Fe-bearing clay minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Michael E.; Glasser, Paul; Dong, Hailiang; Arey, Bruce; Kovarik, Libor

    2014-05-01

    Hexavalent chromium (Cr6+) is a major contaminant in the environment. As a redox-sensitive element, the fate and toxicity of chromium is controlled by reduction-oxidation (redox) reactions. Previous research has shown the ability of structural Fe(II) in naturally present and chemically reduced clay minerals to reduce Cr6+ to Cr(III) as a way of immobilization and detoxification. However, it is still poorly known whether or not structural Fe(II) in biologically reduced clay minerals exhibits a similar reactivity and if so, what the kinetics and mechanisms of Cr6+ reduction are. The objective of this study was to determine the kinetics and possible mechanisms of Cr6+ reduction by structural Fe(II) in microbially reduced clay minerals and the nature of reduced Cr(III). Structural Fe(III) in nontronite (NAu-2), montmorillonite (SWy-2), chlorite (CCa-2), and clay-rich sediments from the Ringold Formation of the Hanford site of Washington State, USA was first bioreduced to Fe(II) by an iron-reducing bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens with acetate as the sole electron donor and anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS) as electron shuttle in synthetic groundwater (pH 7). Biogenic Fe(II) was then used to reduce aqueous Cr6+ at three different temperatures, 10, 20, and 30 °C, in order to determine the temperature dependence of the redox reaction between Cr6+ and clay-Fe(II). The results showed that nontronite and montmorillonite were most effective in reducing aqueous Cr6+ at all three temperatures. In contrast, most Fe(II) in chlorite was not reactive towards Cr6+ reduction at 10 °C, though at 30 °C there was some reduction. For all the clay minerals, the ratio of total Fe(II) oxidized to Cr6+ reduced was close to the expected stoichiometric value of 3. Characterization of the Cr-clay reaction product with scanning electron microscopy with focused ion beam and transmission electron microscopy with electron energy loss spectroscopy revealed that reduced chromium was possibly

  5. Chromium(III, VI) speciation analysis with preconcentration on a maleic acid-functionalized XAD sorbent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chromium may exist in environmental waters as Cr(III) and Cr(IV), the latter being the toxic and carcinogenic form. Since atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry can only yield information on total Cr concentration, a polymer resin bearing O,O-donor chelating groups such as the maleic acid-functionalized XAD-(CO)CH-CH-COOH resin was synthesized to selectively retain Cr(III) at pH 4.0-5.5. The dynamic breakthrough capacity of the resin for Cr(III) at pH 5.0 was 7.52 mg g-1, and the preconcentration factor extended to 250-300. Chromium(III) in the presence of 250-fold Cr(VI)--which was not retained--could be effectively preconcentrated on the NH4+-form of the resin and determined by AAS or diphenylcarbazide (DPC) spectrophotometry. When Cr(VI) was reduced to Cr(III) with Na2SO3 solution brought to pH 1 by the addition of 1 M H2SO4, and preconcentrated on the resin, total Cr could be determined. The developed method was validated with a blended coal sample CRM-1632. Since the adsorption behavior as a function of pH of possible interferent metal ions, e.g. Ni(II), Co(II), Cu(II), Cd(II), Zn(II), Pb(II) and Fe(III), was similar to that of Cr(III), selective elution of Cr(III) from the resin was realized using a mixture of 1 wt.% H2O2+1 M NH3. The eluate containing Cr as chromate could be directly analyzed by diphenyl carbazide spectrophotometry without any adverse effect from the common interferents of this method, i.e. Fe(III), Cu(II) Hg(II), VO3-, MoO42- and WO42-. Various synthetic waste solutions typical of electroplating bath effluents containing Cr, Cu, Ni, Zn, Na, Ca, cyanide (and chemical oxidation demand (COD), achieved by glucose addition) were subjected to pretreatment procedures such as hypochlorite oxidation (of cyanide) and catalytic oxidation (of COD) with peroxodisulfate. Chromium determination gave satisfactory results. The combined column preconcentration--selective elution

  6. Reduction And Immobilization Of Hexavalent Chromium By Microbially Reduced Fe-bearing Clay Minerals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bishop, Michael E.; Glasser, Paul; Dong, Hailiang; Arey, Bruce W.; Kovarik, Libor

    2014-05-15

    Hexavalent chromium (Cr6+) is a major contaminant in the environment. As a redox-sensitive element, the fate and toxicity of chromium is controlled by reduction-oxidation (redox) reactions. Previous research has shown the ability of structural Fe(II) in naturally present and chemically reduced clay minerals to reduce Cr6+ to Cr(III) as a way of immobilization and detoxification. However, it is still poorly known whether or not structural Fe(II) in biologically reduced clay minerals exhibits a similar reactivity and if so, what the kinetics and mechanisms of Cr6+ reduction are. The objective of this study was to determine the kinetics and possible mechanisms of Cr6+ reduction by structural Fe(II) in microbially reduced clay minerals and the nature of reduced Cr(III). Structural Fe(III) in nontronite (NAu-2), montmorillonite (SWy-2), chlorite (CCa-2), and clay-rich sediments from the Ringold Formation of the Hanford site of Washington State, USA was first bioreduced to Fe(II) by an iron-reducing bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens with acetate as the sole electron donor and anthraquinone-2,6-disulfate (AQDS) as electron shuttle in synthetic groundwater (pH 7). Biogenic Fe(II) was then used to reduce aqueous Cr6+ at three different temperatures, 10°, 20°, and 30°C, in order to determine the temperature dependence of the redox reaction between Cr6+ and clay-Fe(II). The results showed that nontronite and montmorillonite were most effective in reducing aqueous Cr6+ at all three temperatures. In contrast, most Fe(II) in chlorite was not reactive towards Cr6+ reduction at 10°C, though at 30°C there was some reduction. For all the clay minerals, the ratio of total Fe(II) oxidized to Cr6+ reduced was close to the expected stoichiometric value of 3. Characterization of the Cr-clay reaction product with scanning electron microscopy with focused ion beam and transmission electron microscopy with electron energy loss spectroscopy revealed that reduced chromium was possibly

  7. FORMATION AND DESTRUCTION OF HEXAVALENT CHROMIUM IN A LABORATORY SWIRL FLAME INCINERATOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    The partitioning of chromium (Cr) in combustion systems was investigated theoretically and experimentally. Theoretical predictions were based on chemical equilibrium and suggested that hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] was favored by the presence of chlorine (Cl) and diminished by the...

  8. CHROMIUM ELECTROANALYSIS AT SCREEN PRINTED ELECTRODE MODIFIED BY THIN FILMS OF NICKEL

    Science.gov (United States)

    A rapid and potentially cost-effective electrochemical method is reported for analysis of chromium (VI) and Chromium(III) using a nickel modified screen printed carbon ink electrode. Electrochemical characteristics of nickel modified electrode as well voltammetric behavior f...

  9. Alloy selection for sulfidation: oxidation resistance in coal gasification environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradshaw, R.W.; Stoltz, R.E.

    1980-01-01

    A series of iron-nickel-chromium and nickel-chromium alloys were studied for their combined sulfidation-oxidation resistance in simulated coal gasification environments. All alloys contained a minimum of 20 w/o chromium, and titanium and aluminum in the range 0 to 4 w/o. Corrosion resistance was evaluated at 1255/sup 0/K (1800/sup 0/F) in both high BTU and low BTU coal gasification atmospheres with 1 v/o H/sub 2/S. Titanium at levels greater than 1 w/o imparted significant sulfidation resistance due to an adherent, solid solution chromium-titanium oxide layer which prevented sulfur penetration. Aluminum was less effective in preventing sulfidation since surface scales were not adherent. Of the commercial alloys tested, Nimomic 81, Pyromet 31, IN801, and IN825 exhibited the best overall corrosion resistance. However, futher alloy development, tailored to produce solid solution chromium-titanium oxide scales, may lead to alloys with greater sulfidation-oxidation resistance than those investigated here.

  10. A novel hydrolysis method to synthesize chromium hydroxide nanoparticles and its catalytic effect in the thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Synthesis of Cr(OH)3 nanoparticles in Cr3+–F− aqueous solution. ► The F− ion tailors coagulated materials, Cr(OH)3 nanoparticles are obtained. ► Adding nanosized Cr(OH)3, AP thermal decomposition temperature decreases to 200 °C. ► The nanosized Cr(OH)3 catalyzes NH3 oxidation, accelerating AP thermal decomposition. - Abstract: A procedure for the preparation of spherical Cr(OH)3 nanoparticles was developed based on the aging of chromium nitrate aqueous solutions in the presence of sodium fluoride, urea, and polyvinylpyrrolidone. Using scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and energy dispersive spectroscopy, the morphological characteristics of Cr(OH)3 were controlled by altering the molar ratio of fluoride ion to chromium ion, as well as the initial pH and chromium ion concentration. The prepared nanosized Cr(OH)3 decreased the temperature required to decompose ammonium perchlorate from 450 °C to about 250 °C as the catalyst. The possible catalytic mechanism of the thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate was also discussed.

  11. Scientific Opinion on chromium(III lactate tri-hydrate as a source of chromium added for nutritional purposes to foodstuff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EFSA Panel on Food Additives and Nutrient Sources added to Food (ANS

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available

    The Panel on Food Additives and Nutrient Sources added to Food provides a scientific opinion on the safety and bioavailability of chromium(III lactate tri-hydrate as a source of chromium(III added for nutritional purposes to foodstuffs. The safety of chromium itself, in terms of the amounts that may be consumed, is outside the remit of this Panel. No new data have been provided as regards the safety and bioavailability of chromium from chromium(III lactate tri-hydrate. The Panel concurs with its earlier views stating that no evidence was provided supporting the bioavailability of chromium from chromium(III lactate tri-hydrate. Chromium(III lactate tri-hydrate is claimed to be freely soluble in water, however, chromium(III lactate tri-hydrate exists as a weak complex that may influence the bioavailability of chromium(III in the gastrointestinal tract. The Panel re-iterates that because of the complex chemistry of chromium(III lactate tri-hydrate in aqueous solutions and its limited solubility at pH >5, the bioavailability of chromium(III from chromium(III lactate tri-hydrate is low. Based on a conservative exposure estimate, the Panel calculated the combined intake of chromium(III from supplements and from foods fortified with chromium(III lactate tri-hydrate, for both adults and children, to be approximately 240 μg chromium(III/day, which is below the value of 250 µg/day established by the WHO for supplemental intake of chromium that should not be exceeded. The Panel noted that the use of chromium(III lactate tri-hydrate in the form of a premix with lactose, added to foods, would result in an exposure at the mean for adults of approximately 7-37 mg lactose/day (0.12-0.62 μg lactose/kg bw/day and to 36-192 μg lactate/day (0.60-3.20 μg/kg bw/day. Given that subjects with lactose maldigestion will tolerate up to 12 g of lactose with no or minor symptoms, these levels are not of safety concern.

  12. Biosorption of hexavalent chromium in a tannery industry wastewater using fungi species

    OpenAIRE

    Sivakumar, D.

    2016-01-01

    The isolated fungi species of different kinds from chromium contaminated soil sites located in Nagalkeni, Chennai were used for reducing chromium(VI) in a tannery industry wastewater of Nagalkeni, Chennai.  The experiments were conducted to know biosorption potential of isolated fungi species for removing chromium(VI) in a tannery industry wastewater against the different pH, fungi biomass and chromium(VI) concentration (dilution ratio).  The results of this study indicated that the order of ...

  13. Investigation of hexavalent chromium removal from Synthetic wastewater by using Peaganum

    OpenAIRE

    Ali Akbar Taghizadeh; Maryam khodadadi; Taher Shahriary; Hadighe Dorri; mahla zaferanieh; rasoul khosravi

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aim: Discharge of industrial wastewater containing hexavalent chromium into the environment can have harmful effects to the types of organisms. So, chromium should remove before discharging to the environment with an effective method. The purpose of this study of is hexavalent chromium removed with Peganum harmala granular seeds(PGS).   Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, The removal of hexavalent chromium with using PGS, with changes in time, pH, adsorbent dose,...

  14. Influence of chromium, oxygen, carbon and nitrogen on iron viscosity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinetic viscosity of 70 beforehand melted iron samples with additions of chromium (up to 2%) and carbon (up to 1%) has been investigated. Different conditions of melting brought about differences in oxygen and nitrogen contents. Viscosity of most samples has been determined in the 1550-1650 deg C temperature range. It is stated that small additions to pure iron of each of the investigated elements (O, Cr, C, N) decrease its viscosity. Combined effect of these additions on viscosity is inadditive. Simultaneous introduction of oxygen and carbon may result in increase of melt viscosity. The same fact is observed at combined introduction of chromium and nitrogen. Simultaneous introduction of other impurities-chromium with oxygen or carbon, nitrogen with oxygen causes amplification of their individual effect. Reasons for the observed regularities result from changes in energies of interparticle interactions in the melt and therefore rebuilding of structure of its short-range order

  15. A study of the process of desorption of hexavalent chromium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W.B. Amorim

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available In this work the process of desorption of hexavalent chromium, a toxic metal ion, from the marine algae Sargassum sp, following biosorption experiments 2³ factorial design was studied. A technique was applied to three eluents: HCl, H2SO4 and EDTA. Three factors of importance were evaluated: concentration of eluent, the ratio between mass of biosorbent and volume of eluent (S/L and process time. A statistical analysis of the experimental results showed that the three variables evaluated are significant for all three eluents. The models for chromium desorption were validated, as the results agreed well with the observed values. Through use of the response surface methodology, a factorial design based optimization technique; it was possible to identify the most suitable eluent and the interval of values for the process variables that resulted in the most significant desorption of chromium, which is relevant information for work aiming at process optimization.

  16. Structural and magnetic properties of chromium doped zinc ferrite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zinc chromium ferrites with chemical formula ZnCrxFe2−xO4 (x = 0.0, 0.2, 0.4, 0.6, 0.8, 1.0) were prepared by Sol - Gel technique. The structural as well as magnetic properties of the synthesized samples have been studied and reported here. The structural characterizations of the samples were analyzed by using X – Ray Diffraction (XRD), Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), and Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM). The single phase spinel cubic structure of all the prepared samples was tested by XRD and FTIR. The particle size was observed to decrease from 18.636 nm to 6.125 nm by chromium doping and induced a tensile strain in all the zinc chromium mixed ferrites. The magnetic properties of few samples (x = 0.0, 0.4, 1.0) were investigated using Vibrating Sample Magnetometer (VSM)

  17. Chromium Resistant Bacteria: Impact on Plant Growth in Soil Microcosm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayel Hanane

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Three chromium resistant bacterial strains, Pseudomonas fluorescens PF28, Enterobacter amnigenus EA31 and Enterococcus gallinarum S34 isolated from tannery waste contaminated soil were used in this study. All strains could resist a high concentration of K2Cr2O7 that is up to 300 mg/L. The effect of these strains on clover plants (Trifolium campestre in the presence of two chromium salts CrCl3 and K2Cr2O7 was studied in soil microcosm. Application of chromium salts adversely affected seed germination, root and shoot length. Bacterial inoculation improved the growth parameters under chromate stress when compared with non inoculated respective controls. There was observed more than 50% reduction of Cr(VI in inoculated soil microcosms, as compared to the uninoculated soil under the same conditions. The results obtained in this study are significant for the bioremediation of chromate pollution.

  18. Electron magnetic resonance investigation of chromium diffusion in yttria powders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biasi, R.S. de, E-mail: rsbiasi@ime.eb.b [Secao de Engenharia Mecanica e de Materiais, Instituto Militar de Engenharia, Pr. General Tiburcio, 80, 22290-270 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Grillo, M.L.N., E-mail: mluciag@uerj.b [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, 20550-013 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2010-03-01

    The electron magnetic resonance (EMR) technique was used to investigate the diffusion of chromium in yttria (Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}) powders. The EMR absorption intensity was measured for several annealing times and three different temperatures of isothermal annealing: 1273, 1323 and 1373 K. The activation temperature for diffusion, calculated from the experimental data using a theoretical model based on the Fick equation, was found to be E{sub A}=342+-5 kJ mol{sup -1}. This value is larger than the activation energy for the diffusion of chromium in rutile (TiO{sub 2}), periclase (MgO) and cobalt monoxide (CoO) and smaller than the activation energy for the diffusion of chromium in chrysoberyl (BeAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}).

  19. Chromium accumulation by the hyperaccumulator plant Leersia hexandra Swartz.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xue-Hong; Liu, Jie; Huang, Hai-Tao; Chen, Jun; Zhu, Yi-Nian; Wang, Dun-Qiu

    2007-04-01

    Leersia hexandra Swartz (Gramineae), which occurs in Southern China, has been found to be a new chromium hyperaccumulator by means of field survey and pot-culture experiment. The field survey showed that this species had an extraordinary accumulation capacity for chromium. The maximum Cr concentration in the dry leaf matter was 2978 mg kg(-1) on the side of a pond near an electroplating factory. The average concentration of chromium in the leaves was 18.86 times as that in the pond sediment, and 297.41 times as that in the pond water. Under conditions of the nutrient solution culture, it was found that L. hexandra had a high tolerance and accumulation capacity to Cr(III) and Cr(VI). Under 60 mg l(-1) Cr(III) and 10 mg l(-1) Cr(VI) treatment, there was no significant decrease of biomass in the leaves of L. hexandra (p>0.05). The highest bioaccumulation coefficients of the leaves for Cr(III) and Cr(VI) were 486.8 and 72.1, respectively. However, L. hexandra had a higher accumulation capacity for Cr(III) than for Cr(VI). At the Cr(III) concentration of 10 mg l(-1) in the culture solution, the concentration of chromium in leaves was 4868 mg kg(-1), while at the same Cr(VI) concentration, the concentration of chromium in leaves was only 597 mg kg(-1). These results confirmed that L. hexandra is a chromium hyperaccumulator which grows rapidly with a great tolerance to Cr and broad ecological amplitude. This species could provide a new plant resource that explores the mechanism of Cr hyperaccumulation, and has potential for usage in the phytoremediation of Cr-contaminated soil and water. PMID:17207838

  20. Quercetin Modulates the Effects of Chromium Exposure on Learning, Memory and Antioxidant Enzyme Activity in F1 Generation Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halder, Sumita; Kar, Rajarshi; Mehta, Ashish K; Bhattacharya, Swapan K; Mediratta, Pramod K; Banerjee, Basu D

    2016-06-01

    In the present study, we investigated whether chromium (Cr) administered to the dams (F0) during lactation period could affect memory and oxidative stress in F1 generation mice in their adulthood and whether quercetin could modulate these effects. Morris water maze (MWM) was used to test for spatial memory. Passive avoidance task and elevated plus maze were used to test for acquisition and retention memory. Oxidative stress was evaluated by measuring glutathione-S-transferase (GST), catalase activity and malonaldehyde (MDA) levels in the brain tissue. The results of MWM showed that the animals in the Cr-treated group compared to control have better spatial memory that was further enhanced when Cr was administered along with quercetin (50 mg/kg). The elevated plus maze test also showed the Cr-treated group to improve acquisition as well as retention memory compared to control. Co-treatment with quercetin (all doses) also exhibited enhanced acquisition and retention memory compared to control. The passive avoidance task demonstrated no significant improvement in memory in the Cr-treated mice but co-treatment with quercetin (100 mg/kg) showed improved acquisition memory compared to control which was significantly better than the animals treated with chromium alone. GST activity was significantly increased in the Cr-treated animals, and this was further increased in groups treated with Cr and quercetin (all doses). Chromium when administered alone and in combination with quercetin (all doses) significantly reduced MDA levels. However, Cr treatment did not show significant change in catalase activity. Nevertheless, co-treatment with quercetin (25 and 50 mg/kg) resulted in significant decrease in catalase activity. Thus, our study demonstrates that Cr exposure during lactation could be beneficial for pups with respect to augmentation of cognitive function and reduction of oxidative stress. Quercetin could probably enhance this effect to some extent.

  1. Quercetin Modulates the Effects of Chromium Exposure on Learning, Memory and Antioxidant Enzyme Activity in F1 Generation Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halder, Sumita; Kar, Rajarshi; Mehta, Ashish K; Bhattacharya, Swapan K; Mediratta, Pramod K; Banerjee, Basu D

    2016-06-01

    In the present study, we investigated whether chromium (Cr) administered to the dams (F0) during lactation period could affect memory and oxidative stress in F1 generation mice in their adulthood and whether quercetin could modulate these effects. Morris water maze (MWM) was used to test for spatial memory. Passive avoidance task and elevated plus maze were used to test for acquisition and retention memory. Oxidative stress was evaluated by measuring glutathione-S-transferase (GST), catalase activity and malonaldehyde (MDA) levels in the brain tissue. The results of MWM showed that the animals in the Cr-treated group compared to control have better spatial memory that was further enhanced when Cr was administered along with quercetin (50 mg/kg). The elevated plus maze test also showed the Cr-treated group to improve acquisition as well as retention memory compared to control. Co-treatment with quercetin (all doses) also exhibited enhanced acquisition and retention memory compared to control. The passive avoidance task demonstrated no significant improvement in memory in the Cr-treated mice but co-treatment with quercetin (100 mg/kg) showed improved acquisition memory compared to control which was significantly better than the animals treated with chromium alone. GST activity was significantly increased in the Cr-treated animals, and this was further increased in groups treated with Cr and quercetin (all doses). Chromium when administered alone and in combination with quercetin (all doses) significantly reduced MDA levels. However, Cr treatment did not show significant change in catalase activity. Nevertheless, co-treatment with quercetin (25 and 50 mg/kg) resulted in significant decrease in catalase activity. Thus, our study demonstrates that Cr exposure during lactation could be beneficial for pups with respect to augmentation of cognitive function and reduction of oxidative stress. Quercetin could probably enhance this effect to some extent. PMID:26521059

  2. 75 FR 60454 - Draft Toxicological Review of Hexavalent Chromium: In Support of Summary Information on the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-30

    ... AGENCY Draft Toxicological Review of Hexavalent Chromium: In Support of Summary Information on the..., ``Toxicological Review of Hexavalent Chromium: In Support of Summary Information on the Integrated Risk..., 2010. The listening session on the draft assessment for hexavalent chromium will be held on November...

  3. 76 FR 20349 - Draft Toxicological Review of Hexavalent Chromium: In Support of Summary Information on the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-12

    ... AGENCY Draft Toxicological Review of Hexavalent Chromium: In Support of Summary Information on the..., ``Toxicological Review of Hexavalent Chromium: In Support of Summary Information on the Integrated Risk... workshop on the draft assessment for Hexavalent Chromium will be held on May 12, 2011, beginning at 8:30...

  4. 77 FR 61431 - Hexavalent Chromium Standards; Extension of the Office of Management and Budget's (OMB) Approval...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-09

    ... Occupational Safety and Health Administration Hexavalent Chromium Standards; Extension of the Office of...) approval of the information collection requirements specified in the Hexavalent Chromium Standards for... requirements specified in the Hexavalent Chromium (Cr(VI)) Standards for General Industry (29 CFR...

  5. Evaluation of flexural bond strength of porcelain to used nickel-chromium alloy in various percentages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VNV Madhav

    2012-01-01

    Fresh nickel-chromium alloy shows the greatest porcelain adherence.There is no significant change in bond strength of ceramic to alloy with up to 75% of used nickel-chromium alloy.At least 25%- of new alloy should be added when recycled nickel-chromium alloy is being used for metal ceramic restorations.

  6. Fertilizers and Mixed Crop Cultivation of Chromium Tolerant and Sensitive Plants under Chromium Toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dheeba, B; Sampathkumar, P; Kannan, K

    2015-01-01

    Zea mays (maize) and Vigna radiata (green gram) are found to be the chromium (Cr) tolerant and sensitive plants, respectively. In the present paper, we investigate the reduction of the toxicity of Cr in the sensitive plants by the mixed crop cultivation in the field using various amendments. Further, the potassium dichromate was used as the source of hexavalent Cr. The results indicated that Cr adversely affects both the growth and yield of plants. The soil properties vary with Cr and different fertilizer amendments and the yield of both plants were affected by Cr. We conclude that metal accumulation of seeds of green gram was higher than corn and the application of single fertilizer either farm yard manure (FYM) or nitrogen, phosphorous, and potassium (NPK) enhances the growth and yield of both the tolerant and sensitive plants in the mixed crop cultivations. PMID:25709647

  7. Urinary levels of nickel and chromium associated with dental restoration by nickel-chromium based alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bo; Xia, Gang; Cao, Xin-Ming; Wang, Jue; Xu, Bi-Yao; Huang, Pu; Chen, Yue; Jiang, Qing-Wu

    2013-03-01

    This paper aims to investigate if the dental restoration of nickel-chromium based alloy (Ni-Cr) leads to the enhanced excretions of Ni and Cr in urine. Seven hundred and ninety-five patients in a dental hospital had single or multiple Ni-Cr alloy restoration recently and 198 controls were recruited to collect information on dental restoration by questionnaire and clinical examination. Urinary concentrations of Ni and Cr from each subject were measure by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. Compared to the control group, the urinary level of Ni was significantly higher in the patient group of dental restoration. Potential short- and long-term effects of Ni-Cr alloy restoration need to be investigated.

  8. Anti corrosion layer for stainless steel in molten carbonate fuel cell - comprises phase vapour deposition of titanium nitride, aluminium nitride or chromium nitride layer then oxidising layer in molten carbonate electrolyte

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2000-01-01

    Forming an anticorrosion protective layer on a stainless steel surface used in a molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) - comprises the phase vapour deposition (PVD) of a layer comprising at least one of titanium nitride, aluminium nitride or chromium nitride and then forming a protective layer in situ...... by replacement of the nitride ions with oxide ions in the molten carbonate electrolyte....

  9. Primary and secondary crystallization of modified hypoeutectic chromium cast iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Studnicki

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents investigations of crystallization of modified hypoeutectic wear resistant chromium cast iron which contains carbon about 2% and chromium on three levels (12%, 18% and 25%. Three substances were applied to the modification ( boron carbide (B4C, ferroniobium (FeNb and mixture of ferroniobium and mischmetal (RE. The investigations of crystallization were conducted the DTA method in DTA-C and DTA-Is testers. The influence on the course of the process of primary and secondary crystallization was observed.

  10. Use of chitosan for chromium removal from exhausted tanning baths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesaro, Raffaele; Fabbricino, Massimiliano; Lanzetta, Rosa; Mancino, Anna; Naviglio, Biagio; Parrilli, Michelangelo; Sartorio, Roberto; Tomaselli, Michele; Tortora, Gelsomina

    2008-01-01

    A novel approach, based on chitosan heavy-metal sequestrating ability, is proposed for chromium(III) removal from spent tanning liquor. Experimental results, obtained at lab-scale using real wastewater, are presented and discussed. Resulting efficiencies are extremely high, and strongly dependent on chitosan dose and pH value. Comparative analyses with other polysaccharides is also carried out showing that amine groups are more efficient than carboxyl and sulphate ones. Chromium recovery from sorption complexes and chitosan regeneration is finally proposed to optimize the whole process.

  11. Antioxidant Activity of Lawsonia inermis Extracts Inhibits Chromium(VI-Induced Cellular and DNA Toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunjan Guha

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Hexavalent chromium Cr(VI is a very strong oxidant which consequently causes high cytotoxicity through oxidative stress. Prevention of Cr(VI-induced cellular damage has been sought in this study in aqueous and methanolic extracts of Lawsonia inermis Linn. (Lythraceae, commonly known as Henna. The extracts showed significant (P < .05 potential in scavenging free radicals (DPPH• and ABTS•+ and Fe3+, and in inhibiting lipid peroxidation. DNA damage caused by exposure of pBR322 to Cr(VI-UV is markedly inhibited by both extracts in varying degrees. A distinct decline in Cr(VI-induced cytotoxicity was noticed in MDA-MB-435S (human breast carcinoma cells with an increase in dosage of both extracts individually. Furthermore, both extracts proved to contain a high content of phenolic compounds which were found to have a strong and significant (P < .05 positive correlation to the radical scavenging potential, lipid peroxidation inhibition capacity and cyto-protective efficiency against Cr(VI-induced oxidative cellular damage. HPLC analysis identified some of the major phenolic compounds in both extracts, which might be responsible for the antioxidant potential and the properties of DNA and cyto-protection. This study contributes to the search for natural resources that might yield potent therapeutic drugs against Cr(VI-induced oxidative cell damage.

  12. Luminescence spectra of chromium-doped LiGaO 2 crystals as indicator of their phase heterogeneity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meylman, Mikhail L.

    2006-02-01

    The luminescent properties of chromium-doped LiGaO2 single crystals grown from melt by Cz pulling technique are considered and compared with similar data for the other stable crystalline compounds in Li2O-Ga2O3 oxide system. It is proposed that co-crystallization of large LiGaO2 single crystal and a great number of LiGa5O8 spinel microcrystallites of nano scale dimensions is the key cause for appearance of numerous inclusions observed in LiGaO2 plates used as substrates at the III nitride films epitaxial growth.

  13. The influence of Chromium supplied by tanning and wet finishing processes on the formation of cr(vi) in leather

    OpenAIRE

    W. F. Fuck; M Gutterres; N. R. Marcílio; S. Bordingnon

    2011-01-01

    Chromium used in leather manufacturing can be oxidized from the trivalent to the hexavalent state, causing environmental concerns. In this study, the influence of Cr(III) from tanning, deacidification pH, fatliquors, chrome retanning and vegetable retanning on the formation of Cr(VI) in leather was analyzed by comparing natural and aged samples. In wet-blue leather, even after aging and in fatliquored leathers that did not suffer the aging process, the presence of Cr(VI) was always below the ...

  14. Study of Chromium-Frit-Type Coatings for High-Temperature Protection of Molybdenum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, D G; Bolz, L H; Pitts, J W; Harrison, W N

    1951-01-01

    The achievement of more compact and efficient power plants for aircraft is dependent, among other factors, on the perfection of heat-resisting materials that are superior to those in current use. Molybdenum is one of the high-melting metals (melting point, 4750 F). It is fairly abundant and also can be worked into many of the shapes required in modern power plants. To permit its widespread use at elevated temperatures, however, some means must first be found to prevent its rapid oxidation. The application of a protective coating is one method that might be used to achieve this goal. In the present work, a number of chromium-frit-type coatings were studied. These were bonded to molybdenum specimens by firing in controlled atmospheres to temperatures in the range of 2400 to 2700 F.

  15. Ultrasensitive photoelectrochemical determination of chromium(VI) in water samples by ion-imprinted/formate anion-incorporated graphitic carbon nitride nanostructured hybrid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Tian; Yang, Xiaomin; Zhang, Lizhi; Gong, Jingming

    2016-07-15

    A rapid and highly sensitive photoelectrochemical (PEC) method has been proposed for the determination of trace amounts of chromium in water samples under visible-light irradiation. Here, a unique nanostructured hybrid of formate anion incorporated graphitic carbon nitride (F-g-C3N4) is smartly integrated with a Cr(VI) ion-imprinted polymer (IIP) as a photoactive electrode (denoted as IIP@F-g-C3N4). The nanohybrid of F-g-C3N4 exhibits an enhanced charge separation with substantially improved PEC responses versus g-C3N4. The newly designed IIP@F-g-C3N4 PEC sensor exhibits high sensitivity and selectivity for the determination of Cr(VI) because it offers efficient photogenerated electron reduction toward Cr(VI). The PEC analysis is highly linear over Cr(VI) concentrations ranging from 0.01 to 100.00ppb with a detection limit of 0.006ppb (S/N=3). Our approach can be used to detect Cr(VI), Cr(III) and the total chromium level in aqueous solution through oxidation of Cr(III) to Cr(VI) and the determination of the total chromium as Cr(VI). In practical applications, this low-cost and sensitive assay has been successfully applied for speciation determination of chromium in environmental water samples.

  16. Waste minimization in chromium plating industry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frenzel, Ines

    2005-01-01

    Chromic acid is a strong oxidizing agent and plays an important role in metal finishing and plating industry. Chromate containing waste effluents are toxic and carcinogen and their treatment is chemical, energy and cost intensive. Therefore, waste prevention and waste treatment are in the focus of a

  17. Effect of inhaled chromium on pulmonary AlAT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, M.D.; Siso, M.; Baker, K.; Chen, L.C.; Schlesinger, R.B. [New York University, Tuxedo Park, NY (United States). School of Medicine, Dept. of Environmental Medicine

    2002-07-01

    A major health hazard to coal miners is development of emphysema following long-term exposure to coal dust. One mechanism underlying development of emphysema is the oxidation of critical methionine (Met) residues in antiproteolytic factor, alpha1-antitrypsin (AlAT) resulting in a protease-antiprotease imbalance in the lung. Several studies have documented an association between the incidence and severity of emphysema among miners and their exposure to crystalline silica (SiO{sub 2}). However, what remains unclear is the role of other co-inhaled nonemphysematogenic nonoxidant inorganic constituent in disease pathogenesis. We hypothesize that in miners, inhaled trivalent chromium (Cr{sup 3+}, the only form of Cr in coal) may potentially affect lung AlAT activity in situ via Cr complexing with Met residues, and thereby exacerbate any SiO{sub 2}-induced imbalance. To ascertain if Cr{sup 3+} could, in fact, affect AlAT activity, in vitro studies were done to assess elastase inhibitory activity following AlAT incubation with soluble Cr{sup 3+}. In addition, to determine if Cr{sup 3+} found in the lungs as detoxification products of inhaled hexavalent Cr could affect AlAT in situ, lavages from the lungs of chromate-exposed rats were also analyzed for elastase inhibitory activity The in vitro results indicate that Cr{sup 3+} ions clearly inhibited AlAT function, with an IC50 of 1.1 mM being estimated under the experimental conditions used. The in vivo results indicate that long-term inhalation (12 wk or longer) of chromate-bearing atmospheres also gave rise to significant (i.e., 50-70%) inhibition of the antielastase activity of AlAT. Together, these results clearly suggest that the Cr{sup 3+} present in coal dusts could potentially act to inhibit AlAT activity in the lungs of miners and thereby promote the emphysema togenicity of SiO{sub 2} or of other emphysematogens present as coconstituents in these dusts.

  18. Seawater and Chromium Isotopes - a Link to Atmospheric Weathering on Land?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frei, R.; Poire, D.; Gaucher, C.

    2013-12-01

    The chromium (Cr) isotope system is currently being developed as a sensitive tracer to record redox fluctuations in seawater, via assessing, in first instance, the record contained in marine chemical sediments (carbonates, banded iron formations). Understanding of the cycling of Cr is vital in this respect, if the ultimate goal is to somehow establish a link between seawater signatures and processes which mobilize Cr from the continents into riverine systems, and finally into seawater. We have investigated the transport pathway of Cr in Misiones (Argentina), a subtropical region, where weathering of Cretaceous flood basalts of the Paraná province is extensive, leading to deep laterite weathering profiles, and where respective riverine catchments can be sampled and followed into the Paraná River and onwards until its delta in the Atlantic Ocean. The Rio Paraná with its tributaries creates a massive watershed that spreads throughout much of the south central part of the South American continent. The studied weathering profiles in the province of Misiones show up to 30% loss of chromium, accompanied by negatively fractionated (average (δ53Cr ~-0.35 ‰) weathering products (bulk soils), and this is compatible with the expected atmospheric oxidation of trivalent Cr(III) and mobilization of portions of the respective hexavalent Cr(VI) pool into the riverine systems. The isotopic composition of total Cr in the different catchments varies (δ53Cr = -0.23 to +0.31 ‰). Lowering of the isotope compositions is attributed to the extremely finely suspended load (isotopic composition of surface seawater potentially reflects the presence of oxidative weathering conditions on land. To which degree the isotopic composition can be related to the intensity of such weathering, and ultimately to atmospheric oxygen levels, is unclear and awaits further more detailed investigations. Our study emphasizes a great potential in the analyses of chemically precipitated sediments in the

  19. Reclamation of reactive metal oxides from complex minerals using alkali roasting and leaching- an improved approach to process engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Sanchez Segado, S; Makanyire, T; Escudero-Castejon, L; Hara, Y.; Jha, A.

    2015-01-01

    In nature, the commonly occurring reactive metal oxides of titanium, chromium, aluminium, and vanadium often chemically combine with the transition metal oxides such as iron oxides and form complex minerals. Physico-chemical separation of transition metal oxides from the remaining reactive metal oxides is therefore an important step in the purification of reactive oxide constituents. Each purification step has quite a high energy requirement at present. Current practice in industry yields sul...

  20. Porosity of detonation coatings on the base of chromium carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porosity of detonation coatings on the base of chromium carbide is estimated by the hydrostatic weighing. The open porosity value dependence on the distance of spraying, depth of the charge, ratio and volume of the detonator barrie filing with gas components is established. Pore distribution in the cross section of a specimen tested for porosity is studied by the methods of metallographic analysis

  1. Intestinal absorption of chromium as affected by wheat bran

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keim, K.S.; Holloway, C.L.; Hegsted, M.

    1986-03-01

    This study was designed to investigate the influence of dietary fiber, as found in wheat bran, on the absorption of chromium. Twenty male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into two groups of 10. The control was fed a semi-purified diet containing casein, methionine, cornstarch, sucrose, corn oil, mineral and vitamin mix, and choline bitartrate. The experimental group was fed the same diet but with soft red winter wheat bran added to a level of 35% of the diet at the expense of sucrose. To determine chromium absorption and uptake by selected tissues, rats were fasted for 24 hr, fed 5 g of the respective diet, 2 hr later intubated with 100..mu..Ci of Cr-51of sacrificed 24 hr later. The rats wee housed in metabolic cages after the Cr-51 intubation. The addition of wheat brand to the diet did not significantly affect chromium absorption as measured by percent dose of Cr-51 in the 24 hr urine. The percent dose in the control group was 0.68 +/- 0.20% (mean +/- SEM) and in the experimental group 0.63 +/- 0.24% (mean +/-SEM) (N.S.). The cr-51 uptake of liver, spleen, jejunum, and blood was not statistically different between groups. These results indicate that dietary fiber as found in wheat bran does not impair intestinal absorption of chromium.

  2. 75 FR 67100 - Superalloy Degassed Chromium From Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-01

    ... superalloy degassed chromium from Japan (70 FR 76030). The Commission is conducting a review to determine..., subparts A, D, E, and F (19 CFR part 207), as most recently amended at 74 FR 2847 (January 16, 2009). \\1... rule 201.15(b)(19 CFR 201.15(b)), 73 FR 24609 (May 5, 2008). This advice was developed in...

  3. 76 FR 8773 - Superalloy Degassed Chromium From Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-15

    ... applicable deadline.'' (75 FR 80457). Accordingly, pursuant to section 751(c) of the Tariff Act of 1930 (19 U... COMMISSION Superalloy Degassed Chromium From Japan AGENCY: United States International Trade Commission... Japan would be likely to lead to continuation or recurrence of material injury. On December 22,...

  4. Intestinal absorption of chromium as affected by wheat bran

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was designed to investigate the influence of dietary fiber, as found in wheat bran, on the absorption of chromium. Twenty male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into two groups of 10. The control was fed a semi-purified diet containing casein, methionine, cornstarch, sucrose, corn oil, mineral and vitamin mix, and choline bitartrate. The experimental group was fed the same diet but with soft red winter wheat bran added to a level of 35% of the diet at the expense of sucrose. To determine chromium absorption and uptake by selected tissues, rats were fasted for 24 hr, fed 5 g of the respective diet, 2 hr later intubated with 100μCi of Cr-51of sacrificed 24 hr later. The rats wee housed in metabolic cages after the Cr-51 intubation. The addition of wheat brand to the diet did not significantly affect chromium absorption as measured by percent dose of Cr-51 in the 24 hr urine. The percent dose in the control group was 0.68 +/- 0.20% (mean +/- SEM) and in the experimental group 0.63 +/- 0.24% (mean +/-SEM) (N.S.). The cr-51 uptake of liver, spleen, jejunum, and blood was not statistically different between groups. These results indicate that dietary fiber as found in wheat bran does not impair intestinal absorption of chromium

  5. Invariant coefficients of diffusion in iron-chromium-nickel system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mokrov, A.P.; Akimov, V.K.; Golubev, V.G.

    1984-02-01

    The temperature and concentration dependences of the Dsub(c) coefficients in the ..gamma..-phase of iron-chromium-nickel system are determined. It is proposed to described mutual diffusion in multicomponent systems using invariant, i.e. independent of the choice of solvent, coefficients of diffusion. The assumption that their temperature dependence follows the Arrhenius law is confirmed by the experiment.

  6. Invariant coefficients of diffusion in iron-chromium-nickel system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The temperature and concentration dependences of the Dsub(c) coefficients in the γ-phase of iron-chromium-nickel system are determined. It is proposed to described mutual diffusion in mul-- ticomponent systems using invariant, i. e. independent of the choice of solvent, coefficients of diffusion. The assumption that their temperature dependence follows the Arrhenius law is confirmed by the experiment

  7. Differents remediation methodos for lead, chromium and cadmium contaminated soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The usage of phosphates in the remediation of plots contaminated with heavy metals appears to be a good strategy to lessen the danger of these metals. This study analyses the effect of the mobilization of: Lead, chromium and cadmium by utilizing diverse forms of phosphates in contaminated soils of three different origins with ph modification and without it

  8. IRIS TOXICOLOGICAL REVIEW OF HEXAVALENT CHROMIUM (INTERAGENCY SCIENCE CONSULTATION DRAFT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    On Septemeber 30, 2010, the draft Toxicological Review of Hexavalent Chromium and the charge to external peer reviewers were released for external peer review and public comment. The Toxicological Review and charge were reviewed internally by EPA and by other federal agenc...

  9. Chromium isotope fractionation during coprecipitation with calcium carbonate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodler, Alexandra; Sánchez-Pastor, Nuria; Fernández-Díaz, Lurdes;

    The chromium (Cr) isotopic composition of carbonates can potentially be used as a paleoclimate proxy to elucidate past fluctuations of oxygen contents in atmosphere and hydrosphere. The use of Cr isotopes to track paleoenvironmental changes, for example related to the rise of oxygen during...

  10. Fractionation behavior of chromium isotopes during coprecipitation with calcium carbonate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodler, Alexandra; Sánchez-Pastor, Nuria; Fernández-Díaz, Lurdes;

    2015-01-01

    Interest in chromium (Cr) isotope incorporation into carbonates arises from the observation that Cr isotopic composition of carbonates could be used as a paleoclimate proxy to elucidate past fluctuations of oxygen contents in atmosphere and hydrosphere. The use of Cr isotopes to track...

  11. Discovery of Chromium, Manganese, Nickel, and Copper Isotopes

    OpenAIRE

    Garofali, K.; Robinson, R; Thoennessen, M

    2010-01-01

    Twenty-seven chromium, twenty-five manganese, thirty-one nickel and twenty-six copper isotopes have so far been observed and the discovery of these isotopes is discussed. For each isotope a brief synopsis of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

  12. FEATURES OF CHROMIUM DOPING OF WEAR-RESISTANT CAST IRON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Netrebko

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work analysis of the influence of chromium on the process of carbide formation, changes in chemical composition of the metal substrate in the areas adjacent to the carbides and at the hardness of iron while economy nickel and manganesealloying.

  13. Production performance of quails given chromium organic in ration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deden Sudrajat

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Egg production of quails depends on quality of ration. Nutrient manipulation by chromiun inclusion in ration is a possible way to improve production. It is known that chromium mineral in form of GTF in blood has a role not only in enhancement of glucose entering cells through improvement of insulin activity but also in metabolism of lipid and synthesis of protein and elimination of heat stress to improve egg production. This study aimed at assessing egg production of quails fed ration containing chromium-yeast. Sixty-four quails aged 40 days were used. A completely randomized design with 4 treatments and 4 replication was applied in this study. Treatment consisted of commercial ration + Cr 0 ppm (R1, commercial ration + Cr 0.5 ppm (R2, commercial ration + Cr 1 ppm (R3, and commercial ration+ Cr 1.5 ppm (R4. Measurements were taken on feed intake, egg weight, egg mass production, hen day, feed conversion rate, egg index, and egg shell thickness. Results showed that A ration containing organic chromium as much as 1,5 ppm did not affect feed intake, egg production, egg weight, and eggshell thickness, however lowered feed conversion rate by up to 32.25% from that of control. Supplementation of 0,5 ppm chromium in the ration lowered the value of eggs index in the fourth week.

  14. Chromium toxicity to nitrifying bacteria: implications to wastewater treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chromium, a heavy metal that enters wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) through industrial discharges, can be toxic to microorganisms carrying out important processes within biological wastewater treatment systems. The effect of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) on ammonia dependent specific ox...

  15. DANGER OF HEXAVALENT CHROMIUM AND STRATEGY FOR THE REMEDITATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aniruddha Roy

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Some metals as micronutrients have a major role in the life and growth process of plants and animals. However, certain forms of some metals may also act as toxic material even in relatively small quantities. Chromium is such a metal, whose concentration above a certain limit may cause a serious problem to the health of living organisms. Chromium (Cr may occur in several chemical forms in organic and inorganic systems. In biological systems only Cr (III and Cr (VI are significant. Among these two states, trivalent chromium (Cr-III is considered as an essential component, while hexavalent Chromium (Cr-VI in biological system has been detected as responsible for so many diseases, even some specific forms of cancer. This paper intends to present the adverse effect of Cr(VI on environment as well as on human beings and also try to find a way out to dissolve the problem by a newly developed efficient and cost effective technique.

  16. Effects of chromium picolinate supplementation in type 2 diabetic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niladê Rosinski Rocha

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The effects of chromium picolinate in Type 2 diabetic patients are investigated.  Seventeen Type 2 diabetic patients were randomly divided into two groups. The experimental group received fiber-rich hypocaloric diet and chromium picolinate whereas the control group received fiber-rich hypocaloric diet and placebo. The chromium picolinate was offered twice a day at the dose of 100 μg. Anthropometric data such as blood pressure, fasting glycemia and glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c were measured and these parameters were evaluated again after 90 days. No difference was reported in rates of body weight, waist, hip, body mass index, blood pressure and fasting glycemia (Control vs. Experimental groups after treatment. However, a decrease (p = 0.0405 of HbA1c occurred in the experimental group when the pre- and post-treatment rates were compared. HbA1c data showed that chromium picolinate improved the glycemic control in Type 2 diabetes.

  17. Magnetic Properties and Structure of Chromium Niobium Oxide and Iron Tantalum Oxide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørlund Christensen, A.; Johansson, T.; Lebech, Bente

    1976-01-01

    Crystal structures were obtained from X-ray powder patterns. The magnetic properties were investigated between 4.2 and 300K by magnetization measurements and neutron diffraction. Both compounds show spin-glass transitions at low temperatures. In CrNbO4, the cusp in the susceptibility is observed ...

  18. Effect of partial pressure of reactive gas on chromium nitride and chromium oxide deposited by arc ion plating

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Ming-sheng; FENG Chang-jie; WANG Fu-hui

    2006-01-01

    The effects of reactive gas partial pressure on droplet formation,deposition rate and change of preferred orientation of CrN and Cr2O3 coatings were studied. For CrN coatings,as nitrogen partial pressure increases,the number and size of droplets increases,the deposition rate initially increases obviously and then slowly,and the preferred orientation of CrN changes from high-index plane to low-index one. For Cr2O3 coatings,with the increase of oxygen partial pressure,the number and size of droplets decreases,the deposition rate decreases and the (300) becomes the preferred orientation. These differences are ascribed to the formation of CrN (with a lower melting point) and Cr2O3 (with a higher melting point) on the surface of Cr target during the deposition of CrN and Cr2O3. Complete coatings CrN or Cr2O3 film can be formed when reactive gas partial pressure gets up to 0.1 Pa. The optimized N2 partial pressure for CrN deposition is about 0.1-0.2 Pa in order to suppress the formation of droplets and the suitable O2 partial pressure for Cr2O3 deposition is approximately 0.1 Pa for the attempt to prevent the peel of the coating.

  19. Determination of Chromium in Beef Heifers Nellore Supplemented with Chelate Chrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.S.A Moreira

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to determine the amount of total chromium in beef heifers supplemented with chelated chromium in the rearing and finishing. We used 80 Nelore heifers at 12 months of age with mineral supplementation associated or not to chelate chromium, with average live weight of 220 kg. Were selected 36 heifer seach experimental group for analysis of meat samples. For the determination of chromium residue in the muscle tissue of the sample was1.5 g digested in a mixture of 5 ml 65% nitric acid and 1 ml of 30% hydrogen peroxide at 120° C for 12 hours block microdigestor. The total content of chromium was determined by spectrophotometry of atomic absorption flame. The experimental design was completely randomized and the results were analyzed by analysis of variance (ANOVA at 5% significance. It is concluded that the inclusion of chromium in the chelate heifers mineral supplementation increased the chromium content in the meat

  20. Oxide-layer formation and stability on a nickel-base alloy in impure helium at high temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The corrosion behavior in impure helium of Haynes 230, a nickel base alloy candidate for heat exchangers in Very High Temperature Reactors (VHTR), has been investigated. The study focused on the formation and the subsequent destruction of the surface oxide layer at 900 C and 980 C. In-situ gas-phase analysis coupled to post-exposure surface analyses showed that a chromium-rich surface oxide formed on Haynes 230 at 900 C but was unstable above a critical temperature TA: the chromium-rich oxide reacted with carbon in solution in the alloy to produce chromium and CO(g). The effect of carbon monoxide partial pressure in the gas phase as well as the influence of chromium and carbon activities in the alloy on TA are discussed taking thermodynamics and kinetics aspects into account. (authors)

  1. Laboratory scale studies on removal of chromium from industrial wastes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Chromium being one of the major toxic pollutants is discharged from electroplating and chrome tanning processes and is also found in the effluents of dyes, paint pigments, manufacturing units etc. Chromium exists in aqueous systems in both trivalent (Cr 3+) and hexavalent (Cr 6+) forms. The hexavalent form is carcinogenic and toxic to aquatic life, whereas Cr3+ is however comparatively less toxic. This study was undertaken to investigate the total chromium removal from industrial effluents by chemical means in order to achieve the Pakistan NEQS level of 1 mg/L by the methods of reduction and precipitation. The study was conducted in four phases.In phase I, the optimum pH and cost effective reducing agent among the four popular commercial chemicals was selected. As a result, pH of 2 was found to be most suitable and sodium meta bisulfate was found to be the most cost effective reducing agent respectively. Phase II showed that lower dose of sodium meta bisulfate was sufficient to obtain 100 % efficiency in reducing Cr6+ to Cr3+, and it was noted that reaction time had no significance in the whole process. A design curve for reduction process was established which can act as a tool for treatment of industrial effluents.Phase III studies indicated the best pH was 8.5 for precipitation of Cr 3+ to chromium hydroxide by using lime. An efficiency of 100 % was achievable and a settling time of 30 minutes produced clear effluent. Finally in Phase IV actual waste samples from chrome tanning and electroplating industries, when precipitated at pH of 12 gave 100 % efficiency at a settling time of 30 minutes and confirmed that chemical means of reduction and precipitation is a feasible and viable solution for treating chromium wastes from industries.

  2. Arsenic and chromium topsoil levels and cancer mortality in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Núñez, Olivier; Fernández-Navarro, Pablo; Martín-Méndez, Iván; Bel-Lan, Alejandro; Locutura, Juan F; López-Abente, Gonzalo

    2016-09-01

    Spatio-temporal cancer mortality studies in Spain have revealed patterns for some tumours which display a distribution that is similar across the sexes and persists over time. Such characteristics would be common to tumours that shared risk factors, including the chemical soil composition. The objective of the present study is to assess the association between levels of chromium and arsenic in soil and the cancer mortality. This is an ecological cancer mortality study at municipal level, covering 861,440 cancer deaths in 7917 Spanish mainland towns from 1999 to 2008. Chromium and arsenic topsoil levels (partial extraction) were determined by ICP-MS at 13,317 sampling points. To estimate the effect of these concentrations on mortality, we fitted Besag, York and Mollié models, which included, as explanatory variables, each town's chromium and arsenic soil levels, estimated by kriging. In addition, we also fitted geostatistical-spatial models including sample locations and town centroids (non-aligned data), using the integrated nested Laplace approximation (INLA) and stochastic partial differential equations (SPDE). All results were adjusted for socio-demographic variables and proximity to industrial emissions. The results showed a statistical association in men and women alike, between arsenic soil levels and mortality due to cancers of the stomach, pancreas, lung and brain and non-Hodgkin's lymphomas (NHL). Among men, an association was observed with cancers of the prostate, buccal cavity and pharynx, oesophagus, colorectal and kidney. Chromium topsoil levels were associated with mortality among women alone, in cancers of the upper gastrointestinal tract, breast and NHL. Our results suggest that chronic exposure arising from low levels of arsenic and chromium in topsoil could be a potential risk factor for developing cancer.

  3. Sorption of chromium in soils of the Cerrado Goias, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Welershon José de Castro

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Land application of tannery sludge, which usually contain high levels of chromium, and considerable amounts of organic matter, macronutrients and micronutrients may contribute to the improvement of soil fertility and plant nutrition, and constitutes a form of disposal residue in the environment. The objective of this work was to determine the sorption isotherms of metal chromium (Cr+3 in a Ultisol, Oxisol Typic Acrustox, Quartzipsamment and Kandic Oxisol, identify soil classes that are prone to chromium mobility, and characterize the potential of agricultural soils of Goiás that are subject to groundwater contamination by the potentially toxic metal. For the establishment of sorption isotherms, solutions were prepared at 1:10 in volume. Air dried samples of 5.0 cm3 of each class of soil were placed in triplicates in beakers of 250.0 cm3. A solution containing 50.0 cm3 of the potentially toxic metal was added to solution. The solutions were prepared in CaCl2.(2H2O (0.01 mol.L-1 as electrolyte support and employing the basic chromium sulphate as a source of metal. Adjustments were made to the polynomial regression between the concentrations of potentially toxic levels of metal contaminants in the solution depending on the concentration of metal in the filtered solution after equilibrium. The Quartzipsamment showed lower retention compared to other classes of soils. Therefore it is more vulnerable to groundwater contamination if industrial wastes containing trivalent chromium are used as fertilizer.

  4. Effect of Coating Thickness on Performance of Chromium Plating Steel Plate%镀层厚度对镀铬钢板性能的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴首民; 陈声鹤; 周庚瑞; 高发明; 于升学

    2011-01-01

    利用两步法在二次冷轧钢板表面电镀金属铬层和氧化铬层得到了镀铬钢板,用分光光度计测试了镀铬钢板的铁溶出量,应用电化学方法测试镀铬钢板的极化曲线,采用湿热试验、盐雾试验和贴滤纸法评价了镀铬钢板的耐蚀性能,采用落锤法评定了镀铬钢板与油漆的结合强度,用扫描电镜观察了表面形貌.结果表明:在氧化铬层厚度一定时随着镀铬层厚度(单位面积质量)的增加,铁溶出值减小,耐湿热和盐雾性能增强,但耐盐雾性能都较差;在镀层总厚度一定时,镀铬钢板与油漆结合性能随氧化铬层厚度增大而增强;钢板电镀铬后,焊接性能变差.%Chromium plating steel plates containing chromium and chromium oxide on the surface of double cold rolling sheet by two-step method. The iron dissolved quantity and polarization curves of the plates were tested using spectrophotometer and electrochemical method. The corrosion resistance of the plates was evaluated by means of damp-heat test, salt-fog test and pasting filter paper method. The bonding strength of the plates with paint was studied by drop weight method, and the scanning electron microscopy was performed to observe the surface morphology. The results show that when the thickness of the chromium oxide coating was stable, with the increase of the thickness (weight per unit area) of the Cr plating coating, iron dissolved quantity decreased, damp-heat resistance and salt-fog performance enhanced, while the salt-fog resistance was poor. When the thickness of the whole chromium coating was stable, the bonding properties of the plates with paint increased with increasing the chromium oxide thickness. The weldability of the plates after electroplating Cr became poor.

  5. Oxidation and erosion-oxidation behavior of steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stela Maria de Carvalho Fernandes

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The high temperature oxidation and erosion-oxidation (E-O behavior of steels AISI 1020, 304, 310, and 410 were determined. These steels were selected to evaluate the effect of chromium content on its E-O resistance. The oxidation behavior was determined in a thermogravimetric analyzer. A test rig in which a specimen assembly was rotated through a fluidized bed of erodent particles was used to determine the E-O behavior. Alumina powder (200 µm was used as the erodent. The E-O tests were carried out in the temperature range 25-600 °C, with average particle impact velocities of 3.5 and 15 ms-1 and impact angle of 90°. The oxidation resistance of the steels increased with chromium content. The E-O behavior of the steels was determined as wastage. The E-O wastage of the steels exposed to particle impact at low velocity was low but increased with temperature above 300 °C. The E-O wastage of the different steels exposed to particle impact at high velocity was quite similar. The wastage increased with increase in temperature above 500 °C. The increases in E-O wastage of the steels observed at temperatures above 300, 400 or 500 °C, depending on the steel, were due mainly to a transition in the dominant wastage process, from 'erosion' to 'erosion-oxidation'.

  6. Chromium, chromium isotopes and selected trace elements, western Mojave Desert, USA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Izbicki, John A. [U.S. Geological Survey, 4165 Spruance Road, Suite O, San Diego, CA 92123 (United States)], E-mail: jaizbick@usgs.gov; Ball, James W. [U.S. Geological Survey, 3215 Marine Street, Boulder, Colorado, CO 80303 (United States); Bullen, Thomas D. [U.S. Geological Survey, 345 Middlefield Road, Building 15, McKelvey Building, MS-420, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Sutley, Stephen J. [Denver Federal Center, P.O. Box 25046, MS-964, Denver, CO 80225-0046 (United States)

    2008-05-15

    Chromium(VI) concentrations in excess of the California Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) of 50 {mu}g/L occur naturally in alkaline, oxic ground-water in alluvial aquifers in the western Mojave Desert, southern California. The highest concentrations were measured in aquifers eroded from mafic rock, but Cr(VI) as high as 27 {mu}g/L was measured in aquifers eroded from granitic rock. Chromium(VI) concentrations did not exceed 5 {mu}g/L at pH < 7.5 regardless of geology. {delta}{sup 53}Cr values in native ground-water ranged from 0.7 to 5.1 per mille and values were fractionated relative to the average {delta}{sup 53}Cr composition of 0 per mille in the earth's crust. Positive {delta}{sup 53}Cr values of 1.2 and 2.3 per mille were measured in ground-water recharge areas having low Cr concentrations, consistent with the addition of Cr(VI) that was fractionated on mineral surfaces prior to entering solution. {delta}{sup 53}Cr values, although variable, did not consistently increase or decrease with increasing Cr concentrations as ground-water flowed down gradient through more oxic portions of the aquifer. However, increasing {delta}{sup 53}Cr values were observed as dissolved O{sub 2} concentrations decreased, and Cr(VI) was reduced to Cr(III), and subsequently removed from solution. As a result, the highest {delta}{sup 53}Cr values were measured in water from deep wells, and wells in discharge areas near dry lakes at the downgradient end of long flow paths through alluvial aquifers. {delta}{sup 53}Cr values at an industrial site overlying mafic alluvium having high natural background Cr(VI) concentrations ranged from -0.1 to 3.2 per mille . Near zero {delta}{sup 53}Cr values at the site were the result of anthropogenic Cr. However, mixing with native ground-water and fractionation of Cr within the plume increased {delta}{sup 53}Cr values at the site. Although {delta}{sup 53}Cr was not necessarily diagnostic of anthropogenic Cr, it was possible to identify the extent

  7. Reduction of hexavalent chromium by ferrous iron: A process of chromium isotope fractionation and its relevance to natural environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Døssing, Lasse Nørbye; Dideriksen, Knud; Stipp, Susan Louise Svane;

    2011-01-01

    Stable chromium (Cr) isotopes can be used as a tracer for changing redox conditions in modern marine systems and in the geological record. We have investigated isotope fractionation during reduction of Cr(VI)aq by Fe(II)aq. Reduction of Cr(VI)aq by Fe(II)aq in batch experiments leads to significant...

  8. The effect of dietary supplementation with different forms and levels of organic chromium on broilers meat quality

    OpenAIRE

    Keleman Svetlana P.; Kevrešan Slavko E.; Supić Boriša; Perić Lidija; Strugar Vladimir

    2006-01-01

    This paper deals with the effect of supplementation with the three different preparations of organic chromium complexes: the ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid complex with chromium; chromium (III)­lysine and chromium picolinate, on broilers meat quality. In every preparation supplementing broilers diet chromium was present at the three different levels: 0.2; 0.4 and 0.6 mg/kg. The meat quality was monitored with respect to the following parameters: the contents of fat, protein, minerals and wat...

  9. Effect of recasting on the thickness of metal-ceramic interface of nickel-chromium and cobalt-chromium alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirković Nemanja

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction/Aim. This research was done to establish recasting effects of nickel-chromium and cobalt-chromium alloys on the thickness of their metal-ceramic interface in making fixed partial dentures. Metal-ceramic interface determines their functional integrity and prevents damages on ceramics during mastication. Investigation of metal-ceramic samples is supposed to show if base metal alloys for metalceramics are successfully recycled without any risk of reduction of metal-ceramic interface thickness. Methods. The research was performed as an experimental study. Per six metal-ceramic samples of nickel-chromium alloy (Wiron99 and cobalt-chromium alloy (Wirobond C were made each. Alloy residues were recycled through twelve casting generations with the addition of 50% of new alloy on the occasion of every recasting. Analysis Energy Dispersive X-ray (EDX (Oxford Instruments and Scanning Electon Microscop (SEM analysis (JEOL were used to determine thickness of metal-ceramic interface together with PC Software for quantification of visual information's (KVI POPOVAC. Results. Results of this research introduced significant differences between thickness of metal-ceramic interface in every examined recycle generation. Recasting had negative effect on thickness of metal-ceramic interface of the examined alloys. This research showed almost linear reduction of elastic modulus up to the 12th generation of recycling. Conclusion. Recasting of nickel-chromium and cobaltchromium alloys is not recommended because of reduced thickness of metal-ceramic interface of these alloys. Instead of recycling, the alloy residues should be returned to the manufacturers.

  10. Comparison of high temperature wear behaviour of plasma sprayed WC–Co coated and hard chromium plated AISI 304 austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► WC–12wt.%Co powders were deposited to a thickness of 300 μm on to steel substrates. ► The micro hardness of the above coatings was lower than that of chromium plating. ► Wear resistance of chromium coating was increased up to five times of AISI 304 austenitic stainless steel. ► Wear resistance of chromium coat higher than plasma coat at different temperatures. -- Abstract: The wear behaviour of plasma sprayed coating and hard chrome plating on AISI 304 austenitic stainless steel substrate is experimentally investigated in unlubricated conditions. Experiments were conducted at different temperatures (room temp, 100 °C, 200 °C and 300 °C) with 50 N load and 1 m/s sliding velocity. Wear tests were carried out by dry sliding contact of EN-24 medium carbon steel pin as counterpart on a pin-on-disc wear testing machine. In both coatings, specimens were characterised by hardness, microstructure, coating density and sliding wear resistance. Wear studies showed that the hard chromium coating exhibited improved tribological performance than that of the plasma sprayed WC–Co coating. X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD) of the coatings showed that the better wear resistance at high temperature has been attributed to the formation of a protective oxide layer at the surface during sliding. The wear mechanisms were investigated through scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and XRD. It was observed that the chromium coating provided higher hardness, good adhesion with the substrate and nearly five times the wear resistance than that obtained by uncoated AISI 304 austenitic stainless steel.

  11. Urinary levels of nickel and chromium associated with dental restoration by nickel-chromium based alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bo Chen; Gang Xia; Xin-Ming Cao; Jue Wang; Bi-Yao Xu; Pu Huang; Yue Chen; Qing-Wu Jiang

    2013-01-01

    This paper aims to investigate if the dental restoration of nickel-chromium based alloy (Ni-Cr) leads to the enhanced excretions of Ni and Cr in urine. Seven hundred and ninety-five patients in a dental hospital had single or multiple Ni-Cr alloy restoration recently and 198 controls were recruited to collect information on dental restoration by questionnaire and clinical examination. Urinary concentrations of Ni and Cr from each subject were measure by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. Compared to the control group, the urinary level of Ni was significantly higher in the patient group of 〈 1 month of the restoration duration, among which higher Ni excretions were found in those with either a higher number of teeth replaced by dental alloys or a higher index of metal crown not covered with the porcelain. Urinary levels of Cr were significantly higher in the three patient groups of 〈1, 1 to 〈3 and 3 to 〈6 months, especially in those with a higher metal crown exposure index. Linear curve estimations showed better relationships between urinary Ni and Cr in patients within 6-month groups. Our data suggested significant increased excretions of urinary Ni and Cr after dental restoration. Potential short- and long-term effects of Ni-Cr alloy restoration need to be investigated.

  12. A computational investigation of boron-doped chromium and chromium clusters by density functional theory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The geometries,stabilities and electronic properties of Crn and CrnB(n=2-9) clusters have been systematically investigated by density functional theory.The results suggest that the lowest energy structures for CrnB clusters can be obtained by substituting one Cr atom in Crn+1 clusters with B atom.The geometries of CrnB clusters are similar to that of Crn+1 clusters except for local structural distortion.The second-order difference and fragmentation energy show Cr4,Cr6,Cr8,Cr3B,Cr5B and Cr8B cluster are the most stable among these studied clusters.The impurity B increases the stabilities of chromium cluster.When B is doped on the Crn clusters,cluster geometry does dominate positive role in enhancing their stability.The doped B atom does not change the coupling way of the Cr site in Crn clusters,but breaks the symmetry and the Cr atoms are no longer equivalent.The doped B atom increases the total magnetic moments of Crn in most cases.

  13. Thermodynamic properties and environmental chemistry of chromium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, R.L.

    1984-07-01

    Values of standard entropy, standard enthalpy of formation, and standard free energy of formation for Cr and its solid and aqueous species are tabulated in this report. These values were selected or recalculated after careful evaluation of the best available current thermochemical data. The basis for selection of data centered on conformation with the recent studies of Vasil'ev et al. (1977a,b, 1978, 1980, 1981) for Cr/sup 3 +/ data and O'Hare and Boerio (1975) for CrO/sub 4//sup 2 -/ data. The thermodynamic data presented in this report will be incorporated into the data base of the geochemical computer model, MINTEQ. The distribution of Cr in the environment among its aqueous inorganic species is, according to the thermodynamic data, highly dependent upon pH and Eh and the presence of complexing ligands. The speciation of Cr in natural waters is also controlled by reduction and complexation by organic matter, adsorption and oxidation by Mn-oxide in suspended particulate matter and sediment, and reduction by H/sub 2/S released from anoxic sediments. 89 references, 8 figures, 11 tables.

  14. Finished leather waste chromium acid extraction and anaerobic biodegradation of the products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Maria J; Almeida, Manuel F; Pinho, Sílvia C; Santos, Isabel C

    2010-06-01

    Due to the amounts of chromium in the leachate resulting from leather leaching tests, chromium sulfate tanned leather wastes are very often considered hazardous wastes. To overcome this problem, one option could be recovering the chromium and, consequently, lowering its content in the leather scrap. With this objective, chromium leather scrap was leached with sulfuric acid solutions at low temperature also aiming at maximizing chromium removal with minimum attack of the leather matrix. The effects of leather scrap dimension, sulfuric acid and sodium sulfate concentration in the solutions, as well as extraction time and temperature on chromium recovery were studied, and, additionally, organic matrix degradation was evaluated. The best conditions found for chromium recovery were leather scrap conditioning using 25mL of concentrated H(2)SO(4)/L solution at 293 or 313K during 3 or 6days. Under such conditions, 30-60+/-5% of chromium was recovered and as low as 3-6+/-1% of the leather total organic carbon (TOC) was dissolved. Using such treatment, the leather scrap area and volume are reduced and the residue is a more brittle material showing enhanced anaerobic biodegradability. Although good recovery results were achieved, due to the fact that the amount of chromium in eluate exceeded the threshold value this waste was still hazardous. Thus, it needs to be methodically washed in order to remove all the chromium de-linked from collagen.

  15. Ultrasound-assisted cloud point extraction for speciation and indirect spectrophotometric determination of chromium(III) and (VI) in water samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashemi, Mahdi; Daryanavard, Seyed Mosayeb

    Ultrasound-assisted cloud point extraction (UACPE) procedure was developed for speciation and indirect spectrophotometric determination of chromium(III) and (VI) in environmental water samples. The method is based on the reduction of Cr(VI) by iodide in acidic media and subsequently formation of I3- anion. The I3- formed can further react with cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) and induce its clouding due to formation of an ion-association complex. The formed complex was separated from solution and dissolved in ethanol for spectrophotometric measurement. Cerium(IV) ammonium sulphate was chosen as an oxidizing reagent for pre-oxidation step of Cr(III) to Cr(VI) species before the addition of iodide to the system, up to chromium in trivalent can be determined by the procedure. Experimental parameters for both spectrophotometric reaction and extraction procedure have been optimized. Under optimized conditions Cr(VI) can be determined in the range 20-400 ng mL-1 (R2 = 0.999). Detection limit, preconcentration factor and relative standard deviation were 12 ng mL-1, 20.0 and 2.2% (n = 5), respectively with 10 mL sample volumes. The proposed method has been successfully applied for determination of chromium(V) in spiked water, synthetic seawater and electroplating wastewater samples with average recoveries of 100.1, 99.4 and 99.1%, respectively.

  16. New transition metal oxide fluorides with ReO3-type structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The new niobium oxide fluorides MNbO2F4 [M = (Cr, Fe)], CrNb2O4F5, and Fe2Nb3O6F9 were prepared by treatment of chromium or iron nitrate with Nb-containing hydrofluoric acid solutions. Crystal structures were investigated by means of X-ray powder diffraction. All new compounds can be structurally refined in the cubic ReO3-type. The iron niobium oxide fluorides are reddish orange, and chromium containing phases exhibit a light green color. The niobium atoms are in the highest formal oxidation state.

  17. Chromium valences in ureilite olivine and implications for ureilite petrogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodrich, C. A.; Sutton, S. R.; Wirick, S.; Jercinovic, M. J.

    2013-12-01

    Ureilites are a group of ultramafic achondrites commonly thought to be residues of partial melting on a carbon-rich asteroid. They show a large variation in FeO content (olivine Fo values ranging from ∼74 to 95) that cannot be due to igneous fractionation and suggests instead variation in oxidation state. The presence of chromite in only a few of the most ferroan (Fo 75-76) samples appears to support such a model. MicroXANES analyses were used in this study to determine the valence states of Cr (previously unknown) in olivine cores of 11 main group ureilites. The goal of this work was to use a method that is independent of Fo to determine the oxidation conditions under which ureilites formed, in order to evaluate whether the ureilite FeO-variation is correlated with oxidation state, and whether it is nebular or planetary in origin. Two of the analyzed samples, LEW 88774 (Fo 74.2) and NWA 766 (Fo 76.7) contain primary chromite; two others, LAP 03587 (Fo 74.4) and CMS 04048 (Fo 76.2) contain sub-micrometer-sized exsolutions of chromite + Ca-rich pyroxene in olivine; and one, EET 96328 (Fo 85.2) contains an unusual chromite grain of uncertain origin. No chromite has been observed in the remaining six samples (Fo 77.4-92.3). Chromium in olivine in all eleven samples was found to be dominated by the divalent species, with valences ranging from 2.10 ± 0.02 (1σ) to 2.46 ± 0.04. The non-chromite-bearing ureilites have the most reduced Cr, with a weighted mean valence of 2.12 ± 0.01, i.e., Cr2+/Cr3+ = 7.33. All low-Fo chromite-bearing ureilites have more oxidized Cr, with valences ranging from 2.22 ± 0.03 to 2.46 ± 0.04. EET 96328, whose chromite grain we interpret as a late-crystallizing phase, yielded a reduced Cr valence of 2.15 ± 0.07, similar to the non-chromite-bearing samples. Based on the measured Cr valences, magmatic (1200-1300 °C) oxygen fugacities (fO2) of the non-chromite-bearing samples were estimated to be in the range IW-1.9 to IW-2.8 (assuming

  18. The influence of reciprocating sliding wear on the oxidation behaviour of Fe-12Cr steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medium-chromium ferritic alloys are used extensively in the boiler and core sections of advanced gas cooled reactors. It was discovered in the early 1970s, that under certain conditions these alloys could undergo the phenomenon known as breakaway oxidation. In this type of oxidation the rate limiting step is located at the oxide/metal interface rather than the more usual gas/oxide interface and results in linear oxidation kinetics. It has been shown that repeated removal of oxide layers can expose chromium depleted metal to the oxidising gas and promote nucleation of breakaway oxidation. The question has been addressed as to whether high temperature sliding wear processes can also disrupt the surface so as to make the material potentially susceptible to breakaway oxidation. To this end high temperature reciprocating wear of Fe-12Cr material in both low and high pressure reactor gas has been investigated. (author)

  19. Chromium Activity Measurements in Nickel Based Alloys for Very High Temperature Reactors: Inconel 617, Haynes 230, and Model Alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The alloys Haynes 230 and Inconel 617 are potential candidates for the intermediate heat exchangers (IHXs) of (very) high temperature reactors ((V)-HTRs). The behavior under corrosion of these alloys by the (V)-HTR coolant (impure helium) is an important selection criterion because it defines the service life of these components. At high temperature, the Haynes 230 is likely to develop a chromium oxide on the surface. This layer protects from the exchanges with the surrounding medium and thus confers certain passivity on metal. At very high temperature, the initial microstructure made up of austenitic grains and coarse intra- and intergranular M6C carbide grains rich in W will evolve. The M6C carbides remain and some M23C6 richer in Cr appear. Then, carbon can reduce the protective oxide layer. The alloy loses its protective coating and can corrode quickly. Experimental investigations were performed on these nickel based alloys under an impure helium flow (Rouillard, F., 2007, 'Mecanismes de formation et de destruction de la couche d'oxyde sur un alliage chrominoformeur en milieu HTR, Ph.D. thesis, Ecole des Mines de Saint-Etienne, France). To predict the surface reactivity of chromium under impure helium, it is necessary to determine its chemical activity in a temperature range close to the operating conditions of the heat exchangers (T approximate to 1273 K). For that, high temperature mass spectrometry measurements coupled to multiple effusion Knudsen cells are carried out on several samples: Haynes 230, Inconel 617, and model alloys 1178, 1181, and 1201. This coupling makes it possible for the thermodynamic equilibrium to be obtained between the vapor phase and the condensed phase of the sample. The measurement of the chromium ionic intensity (I) of the molecular beam resulting from a cell containing an alloy provides the values of partial pressure according to the temperature. This value is compared with that of the pure substance (Cr) at the same temperature

  20. Hexavalent chromium effects on carbon assimilation in Selenastrum capricornutum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the difficulties in assessing toxic substances such as metals and complex organic compounds is the duration of the necessary tests. It would be beneficial to have available standardized tests of short duration that would allow a reduction in necessary manpower and overall cost as well as provide a method to evaluate chemicals that are readily degraded (i.e., within a few hours). One method available is the short-term photosynthesis response of algae to a given toxicant. Photosynthesis is not only a critical physiological response but is also one for which standard, accurate methods are available. The 14C method has been used to study the effects of chromium on algae. More recently, it was proposed that the 14C method be used to measure short-term photosynthetic response as a standard algal bioassay. The present study was designed to further evaluate, via photosynthetic response, the potential effects of hexavalent chromium on Selenastrum capricornutum