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Sample records for chromium nitrides

  1. Direct access to macroporous chromium nitride and chromium titanium nitride with inverse opal structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Weitian; DiSalvo, Francis J

    2015-03-21

    We report a facile synthesis of single-phase, nanocrystalline macroporous chromium nitride and chromium titanium nitride with an inverse opal morphology. The material is characterized using XRD, SEM, HR-TEM/STEM, TGA and XPS. Interconversion of macroporous CrN to Cr2O3 and back to CrN while retaining the inverse opal morphology is also demonstrated.

  2. Performance of chromium nitride based coatings under plastic processing conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Cunha, l.; Andritschky, M.; Pischow, K.; Wang, Z.(Institute of High Energy Physics, Beijing, China); Zarychta, A.; Miranda, A. S.; A.M. Cunha

    2000-01-01

    Chromium nitride based coatings were produced in the form of monolithic and multilayer coatings, by DC and RF reactive magnetron sputtering. These coatings were deposited onto stainless steel and tool steel substrates. Chromium nitride coatings have;proved to be wear and corrosion resistant. The combination of these characteristics was necessary to protect surfaces during plastic processing. In order to select the best coatings, some mechanical and tribological tests were performed. Har...

  3. Intragranular Chromium Nitride Precipitates in Duplex and Superduplex Stainless Steel

    OpenAIRE

    Iversen, Torunn Hjulstad

    2012-01-01

    Intragranular chromium nitrides is a phenomenon with detrimental effects on material properties in superduplex stainless steels which have not received much attention. Precipitation of nitrides occurs when the ferritic phase becomes supersaturated with nitrogen and there is insufficient time during cooling for diffusion of nitrogen into austenite. Heat treatment was carried out at between 1060◦C and 1160◦C to study the materials susceptibility to nitride precipitation with...

  4. A chromium nitride/carbon nitride containing graphitic carbon nanocapsule hybrid as a Pt-free electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lu; Wang, Lei; Yu, Peng; Zhao, Dongdong; Tian, Chungui; Feng, He; Ma, Jing; Fu, Honggang

    2015-08-11

    Chromium nitride nanoparticles supported on graphitic carbon nanocapsules containing carbon nitride (CrN/GC) have been synthesized by a solvothermal-assisted ion-exchange route. As a Pt-free catalyst, the CrN/GC hybrid exhibits superior activity, stability, methanol immunity and a dominant 4-electron pathway towards oxygen reduction reaction.

  5. The influence of substrate temperature on the tribo- mechanical properties of chromium nitride thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merie, V. V.; Negrea, G.; Modi, E.

    2016-08-01

    Different nitrides such as titanium nitride, chromium nitride and so on are used in a widespread range of applications such as cutting tools, medical implants, and microelectromechanical devices and all that due to their mechanical, physical and chemical properties. The aim of this study is to obtain chromium nitride thin films and to characterize them by atomic force microscopy investigations. The chromium nitride thin films were deposited by reactive magnetron sputtering on silicon substrates. During the deposition process, the discharge current, the argon and nitrogen flows, the pressure inside the chamber and the deposition time were kept constant. A chromium target with a purity of 99.95 % was used. Some of the films were deposited after a chromium buffer layer was previously deposited on the silicon substrate. The deposition was carried out when substrate temperature was at room temperature, at 300 and 500°C respectively. Once the films were deposited, atomic force microscopy investigations were performed in order to emphasize the influence of the substrate temperature on the topographical, mechanical and tribological characteristics. The results pointed out an important influence of the substrate temperature on topographical, mechanical and tribological properties of the investigated chromium nitride thin films.

  6. Anti corrosion layer for stainless steel in molten carbonate fuel cell - comprises phase vapour deposition of titanium nitride, aluminium nitride or chromium nitride layer then oxidising layer in molten carbonate electrolyte

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2000-01-01

    Forming an anticorrosion protective layer on a stainless steel surface used in a molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) - comprises the phase vapour deposition (PVD) of a layer comprising at least one of titanium nitride, aluminium nitride or chromium nitride and then forming a protective layer in situ...... by replacement of the nitride ions with oxide ions in the molten carbonate electrolyte....

  7. MICROSTRUCTURE AND CORROSION RESISTANCE OF CHROMIUM NITRIDES OBTAINED BY VACUUM GAS NITRIDING OF ELECTROLYTIC CHROMIUM DEPOSITED ON AISI H13 STEEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Cifuentes

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In this scientific research paper, the microstructure and corrosion resistance of chromium nitrides obtained from a duplex treatment consisting of an electroplated hard chromium coating applied on a steel AISI H13 follow by a thermochemical treatment in vacuum using NH3 as precursor gas of nitrogen, is evaluated. This type of duplex treatments combine the benefits of each individual treatment in order to obtain, with this synergic effect, compounds type CrxN more economic than those obtained by other kind of treatments e.g. physical vapor deposition (PVD. The results obtained by X-Ray Diffraction (XRD indicate the surface and subsurface transformation of the electrolytic hard chromium coating by formation of CrN and Cr2N phases. Likewise, potentiodynamic polarization tests indicate an increase in corrosion resistance of such kind of compounds in comparison with the obtained results with electroplated hard chromium.

  8. Deposition of chromium nitrides, oxy-nitrides and titanium carbides on steel substrates by DC magnetron sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present paper deals with the deposition of chromium and titanium nitrides, oxynitrides, carbides and carbonitrides onto low carbon steel by reactive magnetron sputtering. The films were obtained by using different reactive gases (02, N2, CH4,). The process advancement and the corresponding film composition variations were investigated as a function of the specific reactivity of each gas. In addition, the cathode poisoning phenomena were studied. (author). 4 refs., 6 figs

  9. Precipitation of Chromium Nitrides in the Super Duplex Stainless Steel 2507

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettersson, Niklas; Pettersson, Rachel F. A.; Wessman, Sten

    2015-03-01

    Precipitation of chromium nitrides during cooling from temperatures in the range 1373 K to 1523 K (1100 °C to 1250 °C) has been studied for the super duplex stainless steel 2507 (UNS S32750). Characterization with optical, scanning and transmission electron microscopy was combined to quantify the precipitation process. Primarily Cr2N nitrides were found to precipitate with a high density in the interior of ferrite grains. An increased cooling rate and/or an increased austenite spacing clearly promoted nitride formation, resulting in precipitation within a higher fraction of the ferrite grains, and lager nitride particles. Furthermore, formation of the meta-stable CrN was induced by higher cooling rates. The toughness seemed unaffected by nitrides. A slight decrease in pitting resistance was, however, noticed for quenched samples with large amounts of precipitates. The limited adverse effect on pitting resistance is attributed to the small size (~200 nm) of most nitrides. Slower cooling of duplex stainless steels to allow nitrogen partitioning is suggested in order to avoid large nitrides, and thereby produce a size distribution with a smaller detrimental effect on pitting resistance.

  10. Ionic nitriding of high chromium martensitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martensitic stainless steels are used in industrial applications where resistance to corrosion and mechanical resistance are needed simultaneously. These steels are normally used in tempering and annealing condition which gives them hardnesses of 500 and 600 HV (about 54 HRC). Ionic nitriding is an assisted diffusion technique that has recently been successfully applied to harden austenitic stainless steels without reducing their resistance to corrosion. The application with AISI 420 martensitic steels has not given good results yet, because in most cases, it affects their corrosion resistance. This work presents the results of the pulsed nitriding of martensitic steels with a higher chrome content, such as the M340 and M333 Boehler steels and they are compared with the same materials after tempering and annealing, without nitriding. The influence of the variations in the parameters of the process, such as the percentage of active time in the pulsed wave, partial nitrogen pressure, current density and effective tension in the microstructure, hardness and wear and corrosion resistance was studied. The microstructure was studied with an optic microscope; the wear resistance with abrasion tests following ASTM G-65 and corrosion with 100 hour long saline haze tests, in a device built according to ASTM B117. Hardness was found to rise to values of 1000 to 1350 HV in all the steels after ionic nitriding, the modified layers oscillated from 3 to 15 microns. As a result, wear resistance also increased, with differences depending on the microstructure and the thickness of the modified layer. However, corrosion resistance was not good, except in the case of the M333 steel test piece with less hardness and a less thick nitrided layer without a noticeable interphase (au)

  11. Adhesion analysis for chromium nitride thin films deposited by reactive magnetron sputtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusu, F. M.; Merie, V. V.; Pintea, I. M.; Molea, A.

    2016-08-01

    The thin film industry is continuously growing due to the wide range of applications that require the fabrication of advanced components such as sensors, biological implants, micro-electromechanical devices, optical coatings and so on. The selection regarding the deposition materials, as well as the deposition technology influences the properties of the material and determines the suitability of devices for certain real-world applications. This paper is focused on the adhesion force for several chromium nitride thin films obtained by reactive magnetron sputtering. All chromium nitride thin films were deposited on a silicon substrate, the discharge current and the argon flow being kept constant. The main purpose of the paper is to determine the influence of deposition parameters on the adhesion force. Therefore some of the deposition parameters were varied in order to study their effect on the adhesion force. Experimentally, the values of the adhesion force were determined in multiple points for each sample using the spectroscopy in point mode of the atomic force microscope. The obtained values were used to estimate the surface energy of the CrN thin films based on two existing mathematical models for the adhesion force when considering the contact between two bodies.

  12. Plasma nitriding and plasma nitrocarburizing of electroplated hard chromium to increase the wear and the corrosion properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menthe, E.; Rie, K.-T. (Technische Univ. Braunschweig (Germany). Inst. fuer Oberflaechentechnik und Plasmatechnische Werkstoffentwicklung)

    1999-02-01

    We have investigated the effect of plasma nitriding and plasma nitrocarburizing on the microstructure and properties of electroplated chromium. Plasma nitriding and plasma nitrocarburizing are applied to 15-100 [mu]m thick electroplated hard chromium coatings to increase both the wear and the corrosion resistance. The properties of the plasma-modified hard chromium layers are characterized by measuring the wear resistance with a Taber wear tester and the corrosion resistance with a salt spray fog test. Cyclic voltammetry is performed in a standard electrochemical cell using a 0.5 M H[sub 2]SO[sub 4] solution acidified to pH 0.3. The compound layer after plasma nitriding consists of CrN and Cr[sub 2]N with a maximum hardness of about 1100 HK[sub 0.01]. After plasma nitrocarburizing, Cr[sub 3]C[sub 2] and Cr[sub 7]C[sub 3] are formed. After plasma nitrocarburizing, the maximum hardness is increased up to 2200 HK[sub 0.01]. The wear rate is reduced as compared to an untreated chromium layer. The exposure time in the salt spray fog, before corrosion products are visible can be increased by a factor of 5. The improvement in wear and corrosion resistance after plasma nitriding and plasma nitrocarburizing is discussed considering microstructural changes of the treated layer. (orig.) 10 refs.

  13. Study of corrosion behavior of a 22% Cr duplex stainless steel : influence of nano-sized chromium nitrides and exposure temperature

    OpenAIRE

    Bettini, Eleonora; Kivisäkk, Ulf; Leygraf, Christofer; Pan, Jinshan

    2013-01-01

    Chromium nitrides may precipitate in duplex stainless steels during processing and their influence on the corrosion behavior is of great importance for the steel performance. In this study, the influence of nano-sized quenched-in chromium nitrides on the corrosion behavior of a heat treated 2205 duplex stainless steel was investigated at room temperature and 50 °C (just above critical pitting temperature). The microstructure was characterized by SEM/EDS and AFM analyses, and quenched-in nitri...

  14. [Cr(N)(acac)2]: A simple chromium nitride complex and its reactivity towards late transition metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedegaard, Erik Donovan; Schau-Magnussen, Magnus; Bendix, Jesper

    2011-01-01

    A new simple chromium(V) nitride complex, Cr(N)(acac)2 (1) has been prepared by nitrogen atom transfer. X-ray crystallography shows a short Cr-N bond at 1.5564(11) Å and equatorial Cr-O distances in the range 1.9387(9) – 1.9485(9) Å. 1 reacts as a p-backbonding ligand ...

  15. Plasma assisted metal-organic chemical vapor deposition of hard chromium nitride thin film coatings using chromium(III) acetylacetonate as the precursor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dasgupta, Arup; Kuppusami, P.; Lawrence, Falix; Raghunathan, V.S.; Antony Premkumar, P.; Nagaraja, K.S

    2004-06-15

    A new technique has been developed for depositing hard nanocrystalline chromium nitride (CrN) thin films on metallic and ceramic substrates using plasma assisted metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (PAMOCVD) technique. In this low temperature and environment-friendly process, a volatile mixture of chromium(III) acetylacetonate and either ammonium iodide or ammonium bifluoride were used as precursors. Nitrogen and hydrogen have been used as the gas precursors. By optimizing the processing conditions, a maximum deposition rate of {approx}0.9 {mu}m/h was obtained. A comprehensive characterization of the CrN films was carried out using X-ray diffraction (XRD), microhardness, and microscopy. The microstructure of the CrN films deposited on well-polished stainless steel (SS) showed globular particles, while a relatively smooth surface morphology was observed for coatings deposited on polished yittria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ)

  16. Plasma nitriding of AISI 304L and AISI 316L stainless steels: effect of time in the formation of S phase and the chromium nitrides; Nitretacao a plasma dos acos inoxidaveis AISI 304L e AISI 316L: efeito do tempo na formacao da fase S e dos nitretos de cromo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, D.A. de; Barbosa, G.C.; Pinto, F.A.M.; Gontijo, L.C. [Instituto Federal de Educacao, Ciencia e Tecnologia do Espirito Santo - IFES, Vitoria, ES (Brazil); Canal, G.P.; Cunha, A.G., E-mail: disouzam@yahoo.com.br [Universidade Federal do Espirito Santo (UFES), Vitoria, ES (Brazil). Dept. de Fisica

    2009-07-01

    Plasma nitriding can improve hardness and wear resistance of austenitic stainless steels without losses in corrosion resistance. This fact relies on a nitrided layer constituted only by S phase, without chromium nitrides precipitation. In this work, the effect of nitriding time on phases formed on nitrided layer was investigated in two austenitic stainless steels: AISI 304L e AISI 316L. The samples were nitrided at 420 deg C, using a mixture of 60 % N{sub 2} and 40% H{sub 2}, during 5, 7 and 9 hours. It was noted that chromium nitrides were formed on samples of AISI 304L, nitrided for 7 e 9 hours, while all nitrided samples of AISI 316L showed only formation of S phase. The nitrided layers were characterized using optical microscope and x-ray diffraction. (author)

  17. Effect of plasma nitriding time on surface properties of hard chromium electroplated AISI 1010 steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kocabas, Mustafa [Yildiz Technical Univ., Istanbul (Turkey). Metallurgical and Materials Engineering Dept.; Danisman, Murat [Gedik Univ., Istanbul (Turkey). Electrical and Electronic Engineering Dept.; Cansever, Nurhan [Yildiz Technical Univ., Istanbul (Turkey); Uelker, Suekrue [Afyon Kocatepe Univ. (Turkey). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    2015-06-01

    Properties of steel can be enhanced by surface treatments such as coating. In some cases, further treatments such as nitriding can also be used in order to get even better results. In order to investigate the properties of nitride layer on hard Cr coated AISI 1010 steel, substrates were electroplated to form hard Cr coatings. Then hard Cr coatings were plasma nitrided at 700 C for 3 h, 5 h and 7 h and nitride phases on the coatings were investigated by X-ray diffraction analysis. The layer thickness and surface properties of nitride films were investigated by scanning electron microscopy. The hardness and adhesion properties of Cr-N phases were examined using nano indentation and Daimler-Benz Rockwell C adhesion tests. The highest measured hardness was 24.1 GPa and all the three samples exhibited poor adhesion.

  18. Diffusion characteristics of plasma nitrided hard chromium on AISI 1010 steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danisman, Murat [Gedik Univ., Istanbul (Turkey). Electronic Engineering Dept.; Kocabas, Mustafa; Cansever, Nurhan [Yildiz Technical Univ., Istanbul (Turkey)

    2015-06-01

    In order to investigate the different Cr-N formation characteristics of plasma nitrided hard Cr coatings, Cr was electrodeposited on AISI 1010 steel and plasma nitrided at 600, 700 and 800 C for 3 h, 5 h and 7 h, respectively. Phase analyses of resulting Cr-N phases and grain size of Cr layer before and after nitriding process were calculated by X-ray diffraction analysis. Structure of nitride layer and its thickness were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy micrographs. The micrographs indicated that samples consisted of three distinctive layers. In order to distinguish these layers, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDX) analysis were used as well as elemental distribution versus depth was plotted. The Cr-N diffusion was investigated by layer thickness measurements, and diffusion coefficient as well as activation energies were calculated.

  19. Ultrasensitive photoelectrochemical determination of chromium(VI) in water samples by ion-imprinted/formate anion-incorporated graphitic carbon nitride nanostructured hybrid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Tian; Yang, Xiaomin; Zhang, Lizhi; Gong, Jingming

    2016-07-15

    A rapid and highly sensitive photoelectrochemical (PEC) method has been proposed for the determination of trace amounts of chromium in water samples under visible-light irradiation. Here, a unique nanostructured hybrid of formate anion incorporated graphitic carbon nitride (F-g-C3N4) is smartly integrated with a Cr(VI) ion-imprinted polymer (IIP) as a photoactive electrode (denoted as IIP@F-g-C3N4). The nanohybrid of F-g-C3N4 exhibits an enhanced charge separation with substantially improved PEC responses versus g-C3N4. The newly designed IIP@F-g-C3N4 PEC sensor exhibits high sensitivity and selectivity for the determination of Cr(VI) because it offers efficient photogenerated electron reduction toward Cr(VI). The PEC analysis is highly linear over Cr(VI) concentrations ranging from 0.01 to 100.00ppb with a detection limit of 0.006ppb (S/N=3). Our approach can be used to detect Cr(VI), Cr(III) and the total chromium level in aqueous solution through oxidation of Cr(III) to Cr(VI) and the determination of the total chromium as Cr(VI). In practical applications, this low-cost and sensitive assay has been successfully applied for speciation determination of chromium in environmental water samples.

  20. An investigation on corrosion protection of chromium nitride coated Fe-Cr alloy as a bipolar plate material for proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, T. J.; Zhang, B.; Li, J.; He, Y. X.; Lin, F.

    2014-12-01

    The corrosion properties of chromium nitride (CrN) coating are investigated to assess the potential use of this material as a bipolar plate for proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). Conductive metallic ceramic CrN layers are firstly deposited onto Fe-Cr alloy using a multi-arc ion plating technique to increase the corrosion resistance of the base alloy. Electrochemical measurements indicate that the corrosion resistance of the substrate alloy is greatly enhanced by the CrN coating. The free corrosion potential of the substrate is increased by more than 50 mV. Furthermore, a decrease in three orders of magnitude of corrosive current density for the CrN-coated alloy is observed compared to the as-received Fe-Cr alloy. Long-term immersion tests show that the CrN layer is highly stable and effectively acts as a barrier to inhibit permeation of corrosive species. On the contrary, corrosion of the Fe-Cr alloy is rather severe without the protection of CrN coating due to the active dissolution. Finally, the corresponding electrochemical impedance models are proposed to elucidate the corrosion process of the CrN/Fe-Cr alloy submerged in a simulated PEMFCs environment.

  1. Study on Macro-morphology of Hard whirling Chips with PCBN Cutting Tools Coated with Chromium Aluminum Nitride%氮化铬铝涂层PCBN刀具旋风硬铣切屑宏观特征研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱红雨; 李迎

    2011-01-01

    氮化铬铝具有比氮化钛铝更高的硬度和抗氧化性,能否作为PCBN刀具的涂层需要进行试验研究验证.通过对氮化铬铝涂层PCBN刀具在硬态旋风铣削淬硬钢GCr15平均硬度为63.5HRC)加工中,选用不同的切削参数、冷却方式和刀具个数的研究,从而得出氮化铬铝涂层PCBN刀具旋风硬铣加工的特点和应用范围,对涂层刀具的研究和切屑预报研究提供了依据.%Chromium Aluminum Nitride has much more hardness and oxidation resistance than Titanium Aluminum Nitride. This article studied on cutting tool wear, surface processing quality of work piece and macro-morphology of chips during the hard whirling machining on hardened steel GCrl5 with average hardness at 63. 5HRC through PCBN cutting tools coated with Chromium Aluminum Nitride. Through testing with different cutting parameters, different cooling mode and different cutting tool numbers, this article illustrated characters and application scope of hard whirling machining with PCBN cutting tools coated with Chromium Aluminum Nitride and provided a basis for research on cutting tool coating or research on machining forecasting through chips.

  2. High hardness of alloyed ferrite after nitriding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Detailed layer-by layer structure and phase analyses of the diffusion layer of nitrided binary alloys of iron with aluminium, chromium, vanadium and titanium have been carried out by means of a complex technique. Transition d-metals (chromium, vanadium and titanium) raise to a greater degree the solubility of nitrogen in the α solid solution, sharply increases the hardness of ferrite and decrease the depth of the layer. Nitrided binary alloys of iron with chromium, vanadium and titanium are strengthened through precipitation from the nitrogen-saturated α-solid solution of nitrides of alloying elements TiN, VN and CrN of a structure B1. A maximum hardness of ferrite alloyed by chromium, vanadium and titanium is observed after nitriding at 550 deg C when the precipitated special nitrides are fully coherent with the α matrix

  3. Ion nitriding post-oxidation as an alternative technique to electrolytic chromium; Nitruracion post-oxidacion ionica como tecnica alternativa al cromado electrolitico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz-Guillen, J. C.; Granda-Gutierrez, E.E.; Campa-Castilla, A.; Perez-Aguilar, S.I.; Garza-Gomez, A.; Candelas-Ramirez, J.; Mendez-Mendez, R. [COMIMSA. Corporacion Mexicana de Investigacion en Materiales S.A. de C.V., Saltillo, Coahuila (Mexico)]. E-mail: jcarlos@comimsa.com

    2010-11-15

    The effect of temperature and processing time during post-oxidation on hardness and corrosion resistance of AISI 1045 samples treated through nitriding and post-oxidation in a pulsed plasma discharge is evaluated in this paper. Also, a comparative analysis of the mechanical properties obtained with the dual nitriding - post oxidation process versus those properties of typical hard chrome coatings was performed with an aim to propose an alternative technique to the processes of galvanic coatings. The latter revealed that the process of ion nitriding and post-oxidation provides similar properties in hardness and improves the corrosion resistance compared to the hard chrome case. It is conclude that the technique of ion nitriding and post-oxidation is a non environmental harmful technology with strong potential to replace highly polluting electroplating techniques for application of hard chrome coatings. [Spanish] En el presente trabajo se evalua el efecto del tiempo y la temperatura de post-oxidacion sobre las propiedades de dureza y resistencia a la corrosion de muestras de acero AISI 1045 sometido al proceso de nitruracion post-oxidacion ionica en plasmas pulsados. Asi mismo, con el objetivo de fundamentar la propuesta de utilizacion de la nitruracion post-oxidacion ionica como una tecnica alternativa a los procesos galvanicos para aplicacion de recubrimientos de cromo duro, se realizo un analisis comparativo de propiedades, evidenciando que, mediante el proceso nitruracion postoxidacion ionica, es posible obtener caracteristicas similares en dureza y mejores en resistencia a la corrosion que las tipicas obtenidas para el cromo duro. Los resultados obtenidos permiten postular una tecnica que no dana al medio ambiente, como lo es la nitruracion post-oxidacion ionica, como candidata potencial para sustituir las tecnicas galvanicas altamente contaminantes para aplicacion de cromo duro.

  4. Nitriding of iron-based alloys : residual stresses and internal strain fields

    OpenAIRE

    Vives Díaz, Nicolás

    2007-01-01

    Different iron-chromium alloys (4, 8, 13 and 20 wt.% Cr) were nitrided in NH3/H2 gas mixtures at 580 ºC. The nitrided microstructure was investigated by X-ray diffraction, light microscopy, hardness measurements and scanning electron microscopy. Composition depth-profiles of the nitrided zone were determined by electron probe microanalysis. Various microstructures develop, depending on the nitriding conditions and the alloy composition (chromium content). The initial development of coherent, ...

  5. Hard and low friction nitride coatings and methods for forming the same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdemir, Ali; Urgen, Mustafa; Cakir, Ali Fuat; Eryilmaz, Osman Levent; Kazmanli, Kursat; Keles, Ozgul

    2007-05-01

    An improved coating material possessing super-hard and low friction properties and a method for forming the same. The improved coating material includes the use of a noble metal or soft metal homogeneously distributed within a hard nitride material. The addition of small amounts of such metals into nitrides such as molybdenum nitride, titanium nitride, and chromium nitride results in as much as increasing of the hardness of the material as well as decreasing the friction coefficient and increasing the oxidation resistance.

  6. Semi-quantitative chemical analysis of hard coatings by Raman micro-spectroscopy: the aluminium chromium nitride system as an example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaindl, R; Sartory, B; Neidhardt, J; Franz, R; Reiter, A; Polcik, P; Tessadri, R; Mitterer, C

    2007-11-01

    A new method for chemical analyses of nitride-based hard coatings is presented. Raman band shifts in the spectra of Al(x)Cr(1-x)N coatings, deposited by physical vapour deposition from Al(x)Cr(1-x) targets with x (T,Al) = 0, 0.25, 0.50, 0.70 and 0.85, are calibrated using compositional data of the coatings derived by elastic recoil detection analysis (ERDA) and electron probe micro-analysis (EPMA). Inserting the composition-dependent Raman shift of a combinatorial acoustic-optic lattice mode into an empirically derived equation allows the determination of Al/Cr ratios of the coating with an accuracy of about +/-2%. Spot, line and area analyses of coated cemented carbide and cold work steel samples by using a computer-controlled, motorized x,y-stage are demonstrated and the most important errors influencing precision and accuracy are discussed. Figure Raman map of a coated cold-work steel sample. PMID:17932660

  7. First-Principles Study of Structural and Electronic Properties of Chromium Nitride/Gallium Nitride Multilayer (CrN/GaN Estudio por primeros principios de las propiedades estructurales y electrónicas de la multicapa CrN/GaN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Eulises Báez Cruz

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In this work we perform first-principles calculations to investigate the structural and electronic properties of the 1x1 CrN/GaN multilayer. The calculations were executed in zincblende and wurtzite phase, since they are the ground states of chromium nitride CrN and gallium nitride GaN, respectively. However, we study the stability of the multilayer in the NaCl phase, in order to predict possible phase transitions. We found that the most favorable phase for the multilayer is the hexagonal wurtzite type, with possibility of passing to the NaCl phase by applying an external pressure. Our calculations indicate that the pressure of transition is 13,5 GPa. From the density of states, we found that the multilayer present a metallic behavior produced by the hybrid orbitals d-Cr and N-p that cross level Fermi.En este trabajo realizamos cálculos de primeros principios para investigar las propiedades estructurales y electrónicas de la multicapa 1x1 CrN/GaN. Los cálculos se realizan en las fases zincblenda y wurtzita, debido a que este es el estado base del nitruro de cromo CrN y el nitruro de galio GaN, respectivamente. Sin embargo, se estudia la estabilidad de la multicapa en la fase NaCl, con el fin predecir posibles transiciones de fase. Encontramos que la fase más favorable para multicapa, es la hexagonal tipo wurtzita, con posibilidad de pasar a la fase NaCl mediante la aplicación de una presión externa. Nuestros cálculos nos permiten predecir que la presión de transición es 13,5 GPa. A partir de la densidad de estados encontramos que la multicapa posee un comportamiento metálico debido a la hibridación de los orbitales Cr-d y N-p que atraviesan el nivel de Fermi.

  8. High-temperature nitridation of Ni-Cr alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodentsov, A. A.; Gülpen, J. H.; Cserháti, C.; Kivilahti, J. K.; van Loo, F. J. J.

    1996-01-01

    The nitriding behavior of nickel-chromium alloys was investigated at 1398 K over the range 1 to 6000 bar of external nitrogen pressure. The morphology of the nitrided zone depends on the concentration of chromium in the initial alloy and the N2 pressure (fugacity) applied upon the system. The transition from CrN to Cr2N precipitation was observed within the reaction zone after nitriding at 100 to 6000 bar of N2 when the chromium content in the initial alloys was 28.0 at. pct or higher. It is shown that the ternary phase π (Cr10Ni7N3) is formed in this system at 1273 K. through a peritectoid reaction between Cr2N and nickel solid solution and becomes unstable above 1373 K. The thermodynamic evaluation of the Ni-Cr-N system was performed and phase equilibria calculated. Evidence for “up hill” diffusion of nitrogen near the reaction front during the internal nitridation of Ni-Cr alloys at 1398 K was found. It was attributed to the relative instability of chromium nitrides and strong Cr-N interaction in the matrix of the Ni-based solid solution within the nitrided zone.

  9. Microstructure and Hardness of High Temperature Gas Nitrided AISI 420 Martensitic Stainless Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim Nor Nurulhuda Md.

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the microstructure and hardness of as-received and nitrided AISI 420 martensitic stainless steels. High temperature gas nitriding was employed to treat the steels at 1200°C for one hour and four hours using nitrogen gas, followed by furnace cooled. Chromium nitride and iron nitride were formed and concentrated at the outmost surface area of the steels since this region contained the highest concentration of nitrogen. The grain size enlarged at the interior region of the nitrided steels due to nitriding at temperature above the recrystallization temperature of the steel and followed by slow cooling. The nitrided steels produced higher surface hardness compared to as-received steel due to the presence of nitrogen and the precipitation of nitrides. Harder steel was produced when nitriding at four hours compared to one hour since more nitrogen permeated into the steel.

  10. Cathodic cage nitriding of AISI 409 ferritic stainless steel with the addition of CH4

    OpenAIRE

    Rômulo Ribeiro Magalhães de Sousa; Francisco Odolberto de Araújo; José Alzamir Pereira da Costa; Antonio Maia de Oliveira; Mineia Sampaio Melo; Clodomiro Alves Junior

    2012-01-01

    AISI 409 ferritic stainless steel samples were nitrided using the cathodic cage plasma nitriding technique (CCPN), with the addition of methane to reduce chromium precipitation, increase hardness and wear resistance and reduce the presence of nitrides when compared to plasma carbonitriding. Microhardness profiles and X-Ray analysis confirm the formation of a very hard layer containing mainly ε-Fe3N and expanded ferrite phases.

  11. Cathodic cage nitriding of AISI 409 ferritic stainless steel with the addition of CH4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rômulo Ribeiro Magalhães de Sousa

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available AISI 409 ferritic stainless steel samples were nitrided using the cathodic cage plasma nitriding technique (CCPN, with the addition of methane to reduce chromium precipitation, increase hardness and wear resistance and reduce the presence of nitrides when compared to plasma carbonitriding. Microhardness profiles and X-Ray analysis confirm the formation of a very hard layer containing mainly ε-Fe3N and expanded ferrite phases.

  12. Chromium in diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    The best source of chromium is brewer's yeast. However, many people do not use brewer's yeast because it causes bloating ( abdominal distention ) and nausea . Other good sources of chromium include ...

  13. Chromium and Genomic Stability

    OpenAIRE

    Wise, Sandra S.; Wise, John Pierce

    2011-01-01

    Many metals serve as micronutrients which protect against genomic instability. Chromium is most abundant in its trivalent and hexavalent forms. Trivalent chromium has historically been considered an essential element, though recent data indicate that while it can have pharmacological effects and value, it is not essential. There are no data indicating that trivalent chromium promotes genomic stability and, instead may promote genomic instability. Hexavalent chromium is widely accepted as high...

  14. Effect of pressurized solution nitriding on phase changes and mechanical properties of ferritic Fe–22.7Cr–2.4Mo stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohammadzadeh, Roghayeh, E-mail: r_mohammadzadeh@sut.ac.ir; Akbari, Alireza, E-mail: akbari@sut.ac.ir

    2014-01-13

    Pressurized solution nitriding (PSN) of ferritic Fe–22.7Cr–2.4Mo stainless steel at 1200 °C in nitrogen gas under pressure of 0.25 MPa for different times has been investigated. The structure and mechanical properties were characterized using X-ray diffraction, optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and tensile testing. Phase transformation of ferrite to austenite starts from the sample surface and grows further into the core with increasing nitriding time. A fully austenitic structure was achieved after 9 h nitriding for plates of 2 mm thick. Strip-like chromium nitride precipitates with discontinuous morphology are found in the edges of the sample nitrided for 12 h. The average solute nitrogen content of austenite phase was estimated based on lattice parameter calculations to vary from 1.25 to 1.75 wt%. The yield strength is monotonically increased above 900 MPa with increasing the PSN time. The solution nitrided samples for 6 h exhibit high elongation to fracture (above 30%) and high tensile strength (above 1000 MPa). Solution nitriding changes the fracture mode from ductile to a mixed mode inter-granular and trans-granular brittle fracture. Formation of the planar slip bands plays a major role in brittle fracture of the austenite phase. Brittle fracture is favored with precipitation of chromium nitrides. The time of the PSN should be optimized to suppress chromium nitride precipitation.

  15. Elemental composition of chromium/titanium system after compression plasma flows influence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of elemental composition of chromium/titanium system treated by compression plasma flows (CPF) are presented in the work. The samples were prepared with chromium coating deposition (1 μm thick) and next CPF influence with absorbed energy density 19 - 35 J/cm2. Numerical solution of thermo conductivity equation showed that the CPF treatment provides the melting of the near surface layer and high solidification speed (105 - 107 K/s). The nitride TiN forms in result of high temperature (more than 2000 K) as an outer dendrite layer. This layer prevents the nitrogen penetration into the melted zone and because of it, the nitrogen concentration is decreased with absorbed energy density rising. Also the outer nitride layer results in formation near surface area with decreased chromium concentration. (authors)

  16. Substoichiometric extraction of chromium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Substoichiometric extraction of chromium with tetraphenylarsonium chloride (TPACl), tri-n-octylamine (TNOA), diethylammonium diethyldithiocarbamate (DDDC) and ammonium pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate (APDC) was examined in detail. Chromium can be extracted substoichiometrically in a pH range, which is 1.1-2.6 for the TPACl compound, 0.6-2.3 for the TNOA compound, 5.1-6.4 for the DDDC chelate and 3.9-4.9 for the APDC chelate. Chromium in high-purity calcium carbonate, Orchard Leaves (NBS SRM-1571) and Brewers Yeast (NBS SRM-1569) was determined by neutron activation analysis combined with substoichiometric extraction by DDDC and APDC. The values of 2.0+-0.02 ppm and 2.6+-0.2 ppm were obtained for Brewers Yeast and Orchard Leaves, respectively. These values were in good agreement with those reported by NBS. The reaction mechanism and the reaction ratio between hexavalent chromium and dithiocarbamate are also discussed. (author)

  17. The carcinogenicity of chromium

    OpenAIRE

    Norseth, Tor

    1981-01-01

    The carcinogenicity of chromium compounds is reviewed with specific attention to the gaps in knowledge for risk estimation and research needs. The most important problems at present are whether trivalent chromium compounds cause cancer, and whether there is a difference in cancer causing effects between the soluble and the slightly soluble hexavalent compounds in the practical exposure situation. Dose estimates for risk estimation based on epidemiological investigations are also lacking. Pres...

  18. Nitriding behavior of nickel-based superalloys at 1273 K and above

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The corrosion behavior of four nickel-based superalloys, Inconel 617, Incoloy 800h, Haynes 230, and Hastelloy X, was studied in various nitrogen-containing atmospheres in the temperature range between 1273 and 1523 K. Inner and outer oxidation, inner nitriding, and decarburization were observed. Aluminum, titanium, and chromium nitrides were found after annealing in pure nitrogen and in N2/Ar/H2 atmosphere. Chromium and tungsten carbides disappeared. Instead of these carbides, a chromium and tungsten-rich phase was formed at the grain boundaries. Under these conditions, Incoloy 800h shows the highest and Haynes 230 the lowest corrosion susceptibility. The type of corrosion products and the kinetics of their formation will be described. The suitability of these alloys for application in the intermediate heat exchanger and in the nitrogen atmospheres of the second cooling circuit will be discussed

  19. Obtaining decorative chromium plating from trivalent chromium solutions

    OpenAIRE

    Óscar Javier Suárez García

    2010-01-01

    The present work was aimed at a qualitative evaluation, in the laboratory, of different alternatives for assembling and operating a trivalent chromium bath for decorative chromium plating. Different chromium concentration solutions and different complexing agents were used. The initial result of this analysis was that chloride, formate and acetate solutions produced the best results. Solution preparation conditions were evaluated: temperature, chromium III complex formation time and also ...

  20. The analytical biochemistry of chromium.

    OpenAIRE

    Katz, S A

    1991-01-01

    The essentiality and carcinogenicity of chromium depend on its chemical form. Oxidation state and solubility are particularly important in determining the biological effects of chromium compounds. For this reason, total chromium measurements are of little value in assessing its nutritional benefits or its toxicological hazards. Aqueous sodium carbonate-sodium hydroxide solutions have been successfully used for extracting hexavalent chromium from a variety of environmental and biological matri...

  1. Chromium in potatoes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chromium concentration in potatoes was determined, and tubes were labeled either intrinsically or extrinsically with radioactive chromate (51Cr). A labeled chromium complex was isolated from preparations of raw, baked, or fried potatoes and chromatographed on gel permeation media. Potato pulp and peel contained 1.63 and 2.70 μg of Cr/g tissue, respectively. There was no correlation between the two, nor did they respond similarly to changes of variety or locations. No significant differences were apparent in relative migration of the isolated complexes except between raw and cooked extrinsically labeled preparations

  2. A study on Z-phase nucleation in martensitic chromium steels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Golpayegani, Ardeshir; Andrén, Hans-Olof; Danielsen, Hilmar Kjartansson;

    2008-01-01

    9–12% chromium martensitic steels are liable to the precipitation of Z-phase, Cr(V,Nb)N, after long time exposure at 550–650 ◦C. This complex nitride consumes vanadium nitrides and causes the creep strength of the material to fall drastically after several thousand hours of exposure. In this work....... Furthermore, such a nucleation site would provide vanadium and nitrogen for the growth of Z-phase. The presence of niobium carbide has also been observed close to Z-phase nucleation sites, indicating niobium to be important for the nucleation and growth of Z-phase....

  3. Effect of Plasma Nitriding Temperatures on Characteristics of Aisi 201 Austenitic Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yuxin; Zheng, Shaomei

    2016-10-01

    Samples of AISI 201 austenitic stainless steel were produced by plasma nitriding at 350∘C, 390∘C, 420∘C, 450∘C and 480∘C for 5h. Systematic characterization of the nitrided layer was carried out in terms of micrograph observations, phase identification, chemical composition depth profiling, surface microhardness measurements and electrochemical corrosion tests. The results show that the surface hardness and the layer thickness increased with increasing temperature. XRD indicated that a single S-phase layer was formed during low temperature (≤420∘C), while Cr2N or CrN phase was formed besides S-phase when nitrided at 450∘C and 480∘C. The specimen treated at 390∘C presents a much enhanced corrosion resistance compared to the untreated substrate. The corrosion resistance deteriorated for samples treated above 450∘C due to the formation of chromium nitrides.

  4. Boron nitride composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuntz, Joshua D.; Ellsworth, German F.; Swenson, Fritz J.; Allen, Patrick G.

    2016-02-16

    According to one embodiment, a composite product includes hexagonal boron nitride (hBN), and a plurality of cubic boron nitride (cBN) particles, wherein the plurality of cBN particles are dispersed in a matrix of the hBN. According to another embodiment, a composite product includes a plurality of cBN particles, and one or more borate-containing binders.

  5. Boron Nitride Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Michael W. (Inventor); Jordan, Kevin (Inventor); Park, Cheol (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Boron nitride nanotubes are prepared by a process which includes: (a) creating a source of boron vapor; (b) mixing the boron vapor with nitrogen gas so that a mixture of boron vapor and nitrogen gas is present at a nucleation site, which is a surface, the nitrogen gas being provided at a pressure elevated above atmospheric, e.g., from greater than about 2 atmospheres up to about 250 atmospheres; and (c) harvesting boron nitride nanotubes, which are formed at the nucleation site.

  6. Nitrogen Availability Of Nitriding Atmosphere In Controlled Gas Nitriding Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michalski J.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Parameters which characterize the nitriding atmosphere in the gas nitriding process of steel are: the nitriding potential KN, ammonia dissociation rate α and nitrogen availabilitymN2. The article discusses the possibilities of utilization of the nitriding atmosphere’s nitrogen availability in the design of gas nitriding processes of alloyed steels in atmospheres derived from raw ammonia, raw ammonia diluted with pre-dissociated ammonia, with nitrogen, as well as with both nitrogen and pre-dissociated ammonia. The nitriding processes were accomplished in four series. The parameters selected in the particular processes were: process temperature (T, time (t, value of nitriding potential (KN, corresponding to known dissociation rate of the ammonia which dissociates during the nitriding process (α. Variable parameters were: nitrogen availability (mN2, composition of the ingoing atmosphere and flow rate of the ingoing atmosphere (FIn.

  7. Sulfide Stress Cracking and Electrochemical Corrosion of Precipitation Hardening Steel After Plasma Oxy-Nitriding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granda-Gutiérrez, E. E.; Díaz-Guillén, J. C.; Díaz-Guillén, J. A.; González, M. A.; García-Vázquez, F.; Muñóz, R.

    2014-11-01

    In this paper, we present the results of a duplex plasma nitriding followed by an oxidizing stage process (which is also referred as oxy-nitriding) on the corrosion behavior of a 17-4PH precipitation hardening stainless steel. The formation of both, expanded martensite (b.c.t. α'N-phase) and chromium oxide (type Cr2O3) in the subsurface of oxy-nitrided samples at specific controlled conditions, leads in a noticeable increasing in the time-to-rupture during the sulfide stress cracking test, in comparison with an untreated reference sample. Oxy-nitriding improves the corrosion performance of the alloy when it is immersed in solutions saturated by sour gas, which extends the application potential of this type of steel in the oil and gas extraction and processing industry. The presence of the oxy-nitrided layer inhibits the corrosion process that occurs in the near-surface region, where hydrogen is liberated after the formation of iron sulfides, which finally produces a fragile fracture by micro-crack propagation; the obtained results suggest that oxy-nitriding slows this process, thus delaying the rupture of the specimen. Moreover, oxy-nitriding produces a hard, sour gas-resistant surface, but do not significantly affect the original chloride ion solution resistance of the material.

  8. Metal Nitrides for Plasmonic Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naik, Gururaj V.; Schroeder, Jeremy; Guler, Urcan;

    2012-01-01

    Metal nitrides as alternatives to metals such as gold could offer many advantages when used as plasmonic material. We show that transition metal nitrides can replace metals providing equally good optical performance for many plasmonic applications.......Metal nitrides as alternatives to metals such as gold could offer many advantages when used as plasmonic material. We show that transition metal nitrides can replace metals providing equally good optical performance for many plasmonic applications....

  9. Groundwater contaminant by hexavalent chromium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parsons, C. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

    1995-11-01

    Oxidation of trivalent chromium to hexavalent chromium has been investigated as a function of total manganese in soils as well as various incubation conditions. Chromium and manganese contents were analyzed by atomic absorption (graphite furnace and flame emission respectively) following acid digestion. Total hexavalent chromium generation capacity was determined by addition of 0.001 M CrCL3, incubation, and analysis by s-diphenyl carbazide. Samples were then leached with CaSO{sub 4} and MgSO{sub 4} and incubated in various environments (oven, freeze-drier, field moist, ultrafreeze) to test for geogenic generation of Cr(IV). The degree of geogenic generation of hexavalent chromium was compared with total Mn and Cr content as well as hexavalent generational capacity.

  10. On texture formation of chromium electrodeposits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Christian Bergenstof; Leisner, Peter; Horsewell, Andy

    1998-01-01

    The microstructure, texture and hardness of electrodeposited hard, direct current (DC) chromium and pulsed reversed chromium has been investigated. These investigations suggest that the growth and texture of hard chromium is controlled by inhibition processes and reactions. Further, it has been e...... established that codeposition of Cr2O3 nanoparticles is a general feature of DC chromium electrodeposition....

  11. Modeling of Nitrogen Penetration in Medical Grade CoCrMo Alloy during Plasma Nitriding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arvaidas GALDIKAS

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available For analysis of plasma nitriding process and nitrogen penetration into CoCrMo alloy the trapping-detrapping model is applied. This model is commonly used for analysis of stainless steel nitriding, however, in this work it is shown that the same nitrogen penetration mechanism takes place in CoCrMo alloys. From the fitting of experimental curves, taken from literature, it is found by the proposed model that diffusion coefficient depends on nitrogen concentration according to Einstein-Smoluchowski relation D µ 1/CN. The diffusion coefficients for 400oC temperature nitriding of in CoCrMo are calculated. The shape of nitrogen depth profile curves are analyzed showing influence of different parameters such as detrapping activation energy, chromium concentration, etc.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.20.1.3458

  12. Chromium reduction in Pseudomonas putida.

    OpenAIRE

    Ishibashi, Y.; Cervantes, C; Silver, S

    1990-01-01

    Reduction of hexavalent chromium (chromate) to less-toxic trivalent chromium was studied by using cell suspensions and cell-free supernatant fluids from Pseudomonas putida PRS2000. Chromate reductase activity was associated with soluble protein and not with the membrane fraction. The crude enzyme activity was heat labile and showed a Km of 40 microM CrO4(2-). Neither sulfate nor nitrate affected chromate reduction either in vitro or with intact cells.

  13. Gallium nitride electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajan, Siddharth; Jena, Debdeep

    2013-07-01

    In the past two decades, there has been increasing research and industrial activity in the area of gallium nitride (GaN) electronics, stimulated first by the successful demonstration of GaN LEDs. While the promise of wide band gap semiconductors for power electronics was recognized many years before this by one of the contributors to this issue (J Baliga), the success in the area of LEDs acted as a catalyst. It set the field of GaN electronics in motion, and today the technology is improving the performance of several applications including RF cell phone base stations and military radar. GaN could also play a very important role in reducing worldwide energy consumption by enabling high efficiency compact power converters operating at high voltages and lower frequencies. While GaN electronics is a rapidly evolving area with active research worldwide, this special issue provides an opportunity to capture some of the great advances that have been made in the last 15 years. The issue begins with a section on epitaxy and processing, followed by an overview of high-frequency HEMTs, which have been the most commercially successful application of III-nitride electronics to date. This is followed by review and research articles on power-switching transistors, which are currently of great interest to the III-nitride community. A section of this issue is devoted to the reliability of III-nitride devices, an area that is of increasing significance as the research focus has moved from not just high performance but also production-worthiness and long-term usage of these devices. Finally, a group of papers on new and relatively less studied ideas for III-nitride electronics, such as interband tunneling, heterojunction bipolar transistors, and high-temperature electronics is included. These areas point to new areas of research and technological innovation going beyond the state of the art into the future. We hope that the breadth and quality of articles in this issue will make it

  14. Study of Corrosion Behavior of a 2507 Super Duplex Stainless Steel : Influence of Quenched-in and Isothermal Nitrides

    OpenAIRE

    Bettini, Eleonora; Kivisäkk, Ulf; Leygraf, Christofer; Pan, Jinshan

    2014-01-01

    Precipitation of different types of chromium nitrides may occur during processing of super duplex stainless steels, affecting the properties of the material. In this study the influence of quenched-in (size range ca. 50-100 nm) and isothermal (size range ca. 80-250 nm) types of nitrides on the corrosion behavior of a 2507 super duplex stainless steel has been investigated at room temperature and at 90 degrees C (above the critical pitting temperature) in 1 M NaCl solution. The microstructure ...

  15. Initial nitride formation during plasma-nitridation of cobalt surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattson, E. C.; Michalak, D. J.; Cabrera, W.; Veyan, J. F.; Chabal, Y. J.

    2016-08-01

    Nitridation of metal surfaces is of central importance in microelectronics and spintronics due to the excellent mechanical, thermal, and electrical properties of refractory nitrides. Here, we examine the chemical and structural modification of cobalt surfaces upon nitrogen plasma treatment, using in situ spectroscopic methods, as a method for synthesis of cobalt nitride thin films. We find that nitrogen is incorporated below the surface and forms an ultrathin film of CoN at temperatures as low as 50 °C. In addition, we observe the incorporation of oxygen and NO+ within the surface region. The nitrided cobalt surfaces are fully passivated by N, O, and NO+. These results provide a route for incorporation of cobalt nitride into a wide range applications.

  16. Optical characterization of gallium nitride

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kirilyuk, Victoria

    2002-01-01

    Group III-nitrides have been considered a promising system for semiconductor devices since a few decades, first for blue- and UV-light emitting diodes, later also for high-frequency/high-power applications. Due to the lack of native substrates, heteroepitaxially grown III-nitride layers are usually

  17. Galvanic cells including cobalt-chromium alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gjerdet, N R

    1980-01-01

    Galvanic cells may be created when dentures made of cobalt-chromium alloys are placed on teeth with metallic restorations. The power of such cells was evaluated in an in vitro galvanic using amalgams, gold alloy, and nickel-chromium alloys. The amalgams and one of the nickel-chromium alloys revealed high corrosion currents when placed in contact with cobalt-chromium alloy, the conventional amalgam showing the highest values. The gold alloy and another nickel-chromium alloy exhibited low corrosion currents and they were noble with respect to cobalt-chromium.

  18. Hydrogen permeation through chromium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steady state and non-steady state measurements of hydrogen permeation through metallic chromium are reported. The experiments have been conducted by use of hydrogen and deuterium within a pressure range of 10-8 - 1 bar and temperatures between 600 - 8000C. Numerical values for the physical quantities permeability, diffusion constant and solubility could be derived. At an upstream pressure above around 10-3 bar classical Sieverts-low was found (permeation rate proportional √p) with activation energies Qsub(perm) = 65 kJoule/mole, Qsub(Diff) = 4-8 kJoule/mole, Qsub(Sol) = 57-61 kJoule/mole for the respective processes involved. The isotopic effect between H and D of the permeabilities could be represented by a factor of 1,5 independence on temperature. All non steady-state measurements could be approximated reasonably well by classical diffusion kinetics. Below up-stream pressures of approx.= 10-7 bar the kinetics was no longer diffusion controlled, the dependence on up-stream pressure changed from √p -> p, the activation energy for permetation increased to 127 kJoule/mole and the isotopic factor resulted in about 2-3. (orig.)

  19. Functionalized boron nitride nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sainsbury, Toby; Ikuno, Takashi; Zettl, Alexander K

    2014-04-22

    A plasma treatment has been used to modify the surface of BNNTs. In one example, the surface of the BNNT has been modified using ammonia plasma to include amine functional groups. Amine functionalization allows BNNTs to be soluble in chloroform, which had not been possible previously. Further functionalization of amine-functionalized BNNTs with thiol-terminated organic molecules has also been demonstrated. Gold nanoparticles have been self-assembled at the surface of both amine- and thiol-functionalized boron nitride Nanotubes (BNNTs) in solution. This approach constitutes a basis for the preparation of highly functionalized BNNTs and for their utilization as nanoscale templates for assembly and integration with other nanoscale materials.

  20. Effects of Aqueous Vapour Consistence in Nitriding Furnace on the Quality of the Sintered Nitride

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANGZijiang

    1998-01-01

    If the aqueous vapour consistence is too high(>0.7%),it is very disadvantageous to the sintered products in the nitriding furnace,when silcon nitride bonded silicon carbide products are synthesized by nitridation of silicon.

  1. Hard carbon nitride and method for preparing same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haller, Eugene E.; Cohen, Marvin L.; Hansen, William L.

    1992-01-01

    Novel crystalline .alpha. (silicon nitride-like)-carbon nitride and .beta. (silicon nitride-like)-carbon nitride are formed by sputtering carbon in the presence of a nitrogen atmosphere onto a single crystal germanium or silicon, respectively, substrate.

  2. Chromium(III) -- chromium(VI) interconversions in seawater

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weijden, C.H. van der; Reith, M.

    1982-01-01

    The stable form of dissolved chromium in oxygenated seawater is Cr(VI). But Cr(III)-species are also present at an analytically significant level. It is shown that Cr(III) is oxidized only slowly by dissolved oxygen, and that manganese oxide is a strong catalyst for such oxidation. However, the low

  3. X-Ray Phase Analysis Of Nitrided Layers Of X2CrNiMo17-12-2 Austenitic Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frączek T.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This work presents the results of diffraction analyses carried out using X-ray phase analyses (XRD and GIXRD of nitrided layers of X2CrNiMo17-12-2 austenitic steel. Plasma nitriding process was c arried out in the temperature range of 325 ÷ 400 °C and time of 2 ÷ 4 h. Hydrogen-nitrogen plasma was used as reactive atmosphere (H2 75% + N2 25% with pressure of 150 Pa. On the basis of the X-ray analyses it was stated that the obtained nitrided layers consisted of a subsurface layer of chromium nitrides and a zone of nitrogen saturated austenite.

  4. Study of the Active Screen Plasma Nitriding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao Cheng; C. X. Li; H. Dong; T. Bell

    2004-01-01

    Active screen plasma nitriding (ASPN) is a novel nitriding process, which overcomes many of the practical problems associated with the conventional DC plasma nitriding (DCPN). Experimental results showed that the metallurgical characteristics and hardening effect of 722M24 steel nitrided by ASPN at both floating potential and anodic (zero) potential were similar to those nitrided by DCPN. XRD and high-resolution SEM analysis indicated that iron nitride particles with sizes in sub-micron scale were deposited on the specimen surface in AS plasma nitriding. These indicate that the neutral iron nitride particles, which are sputtered from the active screen and transferred through plasma to specimen surface, are considered to be the dominant nitrogen carder in ASPN. The OES results show that NH could not be a critical species in plasma nitriding.

  5. Boron nitride converted carbon fiber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rousseas, Michael; Mickelson, William; Zettl, Alexander K.

    2016-04-05

    This disclosure provides systems, methods, and apparatus related to boron nitride converted carbon fiber. In one aspect, a method may include the operations of providing boron oxide and carbon fiber, heating the boron oxide to melt the boron oxide and heating the carbon fiber, mixing a nitrogen-containing gas with boron oxide vapor from molten boron oxide, and converting at least a portion of the carbon fiber to boron nitride.

  6. Determination of chromium combined with DNA, RNA and protein in chromium-rich brewer's yeast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The contents of chromium in the DNA, RNA and protein fractions separated from chromium-rich and normal brewer's yeast were determined with the neutron activation analysis in order to study the combination of Cr with DNA, RNA and protein in chromium-rich brewer's yeast. The results showed that the extracting rats and concentrations of DNA, RNA and protein had no significant difference in two types of yeast, but the chromium contents of DNA, RNA and protein in the chromium-rich yeast were significantly higher than those in the normal. In addition, the content of chromium in DNA was much higher than that in RNA and protein, which indicated that the inorganic chromium compounds entered into the yeast cell, during the yeast cultivation in the culture medium containing chromium were converted into organic chromium compounds combined with DNA, RNA and protein

  7. Microstructural investigation of iron nitride layers formed by low-temperature gaseous nitriding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Inia, DK; Vredenberg, AM; Boerma, DO; Tichelaar, FD; Schut, H; van Veen, A

    1999-01-01

    Iron nitride layers were formed by a novel low-temperature gaseous nitriding process. Nitriding occurs at a temperature of 325 degrees C through NH3 decomposition at the surface of Ni (25 nm) coated Fe, followed by N transport through the Ni film into the underlying Fe, where nitride precipitation t

  8. Plasmonic titanium nitride nanostructures for perfect absorbers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guler, Urcan; Li, Wen-Wei; Kinsey, Nathaniel;

    2013-01-01

    We propose a metamaterial based perfect absorber in the visible region, and investigate the performance of titanium nitride as an alternative plasmonic material. Numerical and experimental results reveal that titanium nitride performs better than gold as a plasmonic absorbing material...

  9. Synthesis of chromium containing pigments from chromium galvanic sludges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreola, F; Barbieri, L; Bondioli, F; Cannio, M; Ferrari, A M; Lancellotti, I

    2008-08-15

    In this work the screening results of the scientific activity conducted on laboratory scale to valorise chromium(III) contained in the galvanic sludge as chromium precursor for ceramic pigments are reported. The valorisation of this waste as a secondary raw material (SRM) is obtained by achievement of thermal and chemical stable crystal structures able to color ceramic material. Two different pigments pink CaCr(0.04)Sn(0.97)SiO(5) and green Ca(3)Cr(2)(SiO(4))(3) were synthesized by solid-state reactions using dried Cr sludge as chromium oxide precursor. The obtained pigments were characterized by X-ray diffraction and SEM analysis. Furthermore the color developed in a suitable ceramic glaze was investigated in comparison with the color developed by the pigments prepared from pure Cr(2)O(3). The characterization carried out corroborates the thermal and chemical stability of the synthesized pigments and, especially for the Cr-Sn pink pigment, the powders develop an intense color that is very similar to the color developed by the pigments obtained starting from pure Cr(2)O(3). PMID:18289775

  10. Synthesis of chromium containing pigments from chromium galvanic sludges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreola, F.; Barbieri, L. [Dipartimento di Ingegneria dei Materiali e dell' Ambiente, Universita di Modena e Reggio Emilia, Via Vignolese 905, 41100 Modena (Italy); Bondioli, F. [Dipartimento di Ingegneria dei Materiali e dell' Ambiente, Universita di Modena e Reggio Emilia, Via Vignolese 905, 41100 Modena (Italy)], E-mail: bondioli.federica@unimore.it; Cannio, M. [Dipartimento di Ingegneria dei Materiali e dell' Ambiente, Universita di Modena e Reggio Emilia, Via Vignolese 905, 41100 Modena (Italy); Ferrari, A.M. [Dipartimento di Scienza e Metodi dell' Ingegneria, Universita di Modena e Reggio Emilia, Viale Amendola 2, 42100 Reggio Emilia (Italy); Lancellotti, I. [Dipartimento di Ingegneria dei Materiali e dell' Ambiente, Universita di Modena e Reggio Emilia, Via Vignolese 905, 41100 Modena (Italy)

    2008-08-15

    In this work the screening results of the scientific activity conducted on laboratory scale to valorise chromium(III) contained in the galvanic sludge as chromium precursor for ceramic pigments are reported. The valorisation of this waste as a secondary raw material (SRM) is obtained by achievement of thermal and chemical stable crystal structures able to color ceramic material. Two different pigments pink CaCr{sub 0.04}Sn{sub 0.97}SiO{sub 5} and green Ca{sub 3}Cr{sub 2}(SiO{sub 4}){sub 3} were synthesized by solid-state reactions using dried Cr sludge as chromium oxide precursor. The obtained pigments were characterized by X-ray diffraction and SEM analysis. Furthermore the color developed in a suitable ceramic glaze was investigated in comparison with the color developed by the pigments prepared from pure Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The characterization carried out corroborates the thermal and chemical stability of the synthesized pigments and, especially for the Cr-Sn pink pigment, the powders develop an intense color that is very similar to the color developed by the pigments obtained starting from pure Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}.

  11. Tissues and urinary chromium concentrations in rats fed high-chromium diets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complete text of publication follows. Chromium is an essential trace elements and enhances the function of insulin as a form of chromodulin. In the subjects with a certain type of diabetics, 200 to 1,000 μg/d of chromium is administered to reduced the symptoms of diabetics. However, although there are not any health-promotive effects of chromium-administration in healthy subjects, various types of chromium supplements are commercially available in many countries; the adverse effects caused by an excessive chromium intake are feared. In the present study, to clarify the tolerable upper limit of chromium, tissue and urinary chromium concentrations, liver function and iron status were examined in rats fed high-chromium diets. Thirty-six male 4-weeks Wistar rats were divided into six groups and fed casein-based diets containing 1, 10 or 100 μg/g of chromium as chromium chloride (CrCl3) or chromium picolinate (CrPic) for 4 weeks. After the feeding, chromium concentrations in liver, kidney, small intestine and tibia were determined by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. In addition, urine samples were collected on 3rd to 4th week and their chromium concentrations were also determined. Chromium concentrations in liver, kidney, small intestine and tibia were elevated with increase of dietary chromium concentration. Urinary chromium excretion was also elevated with the increase of dietary chromium and the rate of urinary chromium excretion was less than 2% to dietary chromium intake in all the experimental groups. In the administration of 100 μg/g of chromium, rats given CrCl3 showed significantly higher tibia chromium concentration and lower urinary chromium excretion than those given CrPic. There were not any differences in iron status among the experimental groups. Activities of serum aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase in rats fed diet containing 100 μg/g of chromium as CrPic were significantly higher than those in rats fed other diets.

  12. Ion nitridation - physical and technological aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ion nitridation, is a technique which allows the formation of a controlled thickness of nitrides in the surface of the material, using this material as the cathode in a low pressure glow discharge, which presents many advantages over the conventional method. A brief review of the ion nitriding technique, the physical fenomena involved, and we discuss technological aspects of this method, are presented. (Author)

  13. Soils contaminated with hexavalent chromium

    OpenAIRE

    Fonseca, Bruna Catarina da Silva

    2011-01-01

    Tese de doutoramento em Engenharia Química e Biológica The interest in environmental soil science has been growing in the last years due to the continuous degradation of this major natural resource. With this in mind, and because chromium and lead are two of the most toxic heavy metals frequently detected as soil contaminants in the Portuguese territory, the study and development of few remediation techniques and the indissociable description of the sorption and migration of...

  14. Simultaneous determination of chromium(III) and chromium(VI) in aqueous solutions by ion chromatography and chemiluminescence detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gammelgaard, Bente; Jøns, O; Nielsen, B

    1992-01-01

    A method for the simultaneous determination of chromium(iii) and chromium(vi) in a flow system based on chemiluminescence was developed. A Dionex cation-exchange guard column was used to separate chromium(iii) from chromium(vi), and chromium(vi) was reduced by potassium sulfite, whereupon both sp...

  15. Mathematical Modelling of Nitride Layer Growth of Low Temperature Gas and Plasma Nitriding of AISI 316L

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Triwiyanto A.

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper present mathematical model which developed to predict the nitrided layer thickness (case depth of gas nitrided and plasma nitrided austenitic stainless steel according to Fick’s first law for pure iron by adapting and manipulating the Hosseini’s model to fit the diffusion mechanism where nitrided structure formed by nitrided AISI 316L austenitic stainless steel. The mathematical model later tested against various actual gas nitriding and plasma nitriding experimental results with varying nitriding temperature and nitriding duration to see whether the model managed to successfully predict the nitrided layer thickness. This model predicted the coexistence of ε-Fe2-3N and γ΄-Fe4N under the present nitriding process parameters. After the validation process, it is proven that the mathematical model managed to predict the nitrided layer growth of the gas nitrided and plasma nitrided of AISI 316L SS up to high degree of accuracy.

  16. Inoculation of chromium white cast iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Kopyciński

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been proved that an addition of boron carbide introduced as an inoculant to the chromium white cast iron changes the structureof castings. Castings after inoculation revealed a different structure with numerous grains. Primary precipitates of chromium carbide also appeared, reducing the mechanical properties of as-cast parts. Properly established heat treatment regime makes chromium iron castings regain their, originally high, mechanical properties.

  17. REMOVAL OF HEXAVALENT CHROMIUM FROM DRINKING WATER

    OpenAIRE

    A. R. Asgari ، F. Vaezi ، S. Nasseri ، O. Dördelmann ، A. H. Mahvi ، E. Dehghani Fard

    2008-01-01

    Removal of chromium can be accomplished by various methods but none of them is cost-effective in meeting drinking water standards. For this study, granular ferric hydroxide was used as adsorbent for removal of hexavalent chromium. Besides, the effects of changing contact time, pH and concentrations of competitive anions were determined for different amounts of granular ferric hydroxide. It was found that granular ferric hydroxide has a high capacity for adsorption of hexavalent chromium from ...

  18. Modelling the evolution of composition-and stress-depth profiles in austenitic stainless steels during low-temperature nitriding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, Freja Nygaard; Hattel, Jesper Henri; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2016-01-01

    Nitriding of stainless steel causes a surface zone of expanded austenite, which improves the wear resistance of the stainless steel while preserving the stainless behaviour. During nitriding huge residual stresses are introduced in the treated zone, arising from the volume expansion that accompan......Nitriding of stainless steel causes a surface zone of expanded austenite, which improves the wear resistance of the stainless steel while preserving the stainless behaviour. During nitriding huge residual stresses are introduced in the treated zone, arising from the volume expansion...... that accompanies the dissolution of high nitrogen contents in expanded austenite. An intriguing phenomenon during low-temperature nitriding is that the residual stresses evoked by dissolution of nitrogen in the solid state, affect the thermodynamics and the diffusion kinetics of nitrogen dissolution...... ordering (trapping) of nitrogen atoms by chromium atoms, and the effect of composition-induced stress on surface concentration and diffusive flux. The effect of plasticity and concentration-dependence of the yield stress was also included....

  19. Effect of partial pressure of reactive gas on chromium nitride and chromium oxide deposited by arc ion plating

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Ming-sheng; FENG Chang-jie; WANG Fu-hui

    2006-01-01

    The effects of reactive gas partial pressure on droplet formation,deposition rate and change of preferred orientation of CrN and Cr2O3 coatings were studied. For CrN coatings,as nitrogen partial pressure increases,the number and size of droplets increases,the deposition rate initially increases obviously and then slowly,and the preferred orientation of CrN changes from high-index plane to low-index one. For Cr2O3 coatings,with the increase of oxygen partial pressure,the number and size of droplets decreases,the deposition rate decreases and the (300) becomes the preferred orientation. These differences are ascribed to the formation of CrN (with a lower melting point) and Cr2O3 (with a higher melting point) on the surface of Cr target during the deposition of CrN and Cr2O3. Complete coatings CrN or Cr2O3 film can be formed when reactive gas partial pressure gets up to 0.1 Pa. The optimized N2 partial pressure for CrN deposition is about 0.1-0.2 Pa in order to suppress the formation of droplets and the suitable O2 partial pressure for Cr2O3 deposition is approximately 0.1 Pa for the attempt to prevent the peel of the coating.

  20. Hydrodenitrogenation of pyridine over transition metal nitrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milad, I.K.; Smith, K.J. [British Columbia Univ., Vancouver, BC (Canada). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    1997-11-01

    The use of transition metal nitrides (TMN) as catalysts for hydrodenitrogenation (HDN) was discussed. A study was conducted in which a series of unsupported and supported Mo, Fe, W, Co, Nb, Cr, V and Ti nitrides were examined as catalysts for the HDN of pyridine at atmospheric pressure and 350 degrees C. The catalysts were prepared by temperature programmed nitridation of the metal oxide with NH{sub 3}. It was shown that a single nitride phase was present in each of the catalysts. The Mo nitride showed the greatest activity per gram of catalyst. Co and Fe nitrides showed the highest activities per surface area of the unsupported catalyst. Metal nitrides with lower heats of formation showed higher HDN activity. 1 tab.

  1. Synthesis of ternary nitrides by mechanochemical alloying

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, C.J.H.; Zhu, J.J.; Lindelov, H.;

    2002-01-01

    Ternary metal nitrides ( of general formula MxM'N-y(z)) attract considerable interest because of their special mechanical, electrical, magnetic, and catalytic properties. Usually they are prepared by ammonolysis of ternary oxides (MxM'O-y(m)) at elevated temperatures. We show that ternary...... transition metal nitrides are also obtained by nitridation of the corresponding ternary carbide at 823 K. This transformation appears to occur by solid-state diffusion of carbide and nitride ions. To establish more general synthesis schemes for ternary nitrides, we have focused on the preparation of ternary...... nitrides by mechanochemical alloying of a binary transition metal nitride (MxN) with an elemental transition metal. In this way, we have been able to prepare Fe3Mo3N and Co3Mo3N by ball-milling of Mo2N with Fe and Co, respectively. The transformation sequence from the starting materials ( the binary...

  2. Permeation of chromium salts through human skin in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gammelgaard, Bente; Fullerton, A; Avnstorp, C;

    1992-01-01

    of the dichromate solution. Chromium skin levels increased with increasing concentrations of applied chromium salts up to 0.034 M Cr. The amount of chromium in recipient phase and skin layers increased with increasing pH when the applied solution contained potassium dichromate. This was ascribed to a decreased skin...... barrier function of the skin. The amount of chromium found in all skin layers after application of chromium chloride decreased with increasing pH due to lower solubility of the salt. The % of chromium found in the recipient phase as chromium(VI) increased with increasing total chromium concentration...... indicating a limited reduction ability of the skin in vitro....

  3. Chromium in aqueous nitrate plutonium process streams: Corrosion of 316 stainless steel and chromium speciation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was undertaken to determine if chromium(+6) could exist in plutonium process solutions under normal operating conditions. Four individual reactions were studied: the rate of dissolution of stainless steel, which is the principal source of chromium in process solutions; the rate of oxidation of chromium(+3) to chromium(+6) by nitric acid; and the reduction of chromium(+6) back to chromium(+3) by reaction with stainless steel and with oxalic acid. The stainless steel corrosion rate was found to increase with increasing nitric acid concentration, increasing hydrofluoric acid concentration, and increasing temperature. Oxidation of chromium(+3) to chromium(+6) was negligible at room temperature and only became significant in hot concentrated nitric acid. The rate of reduction of chromium(+6) back to chromium(+3) by reaction with stainless steel or oxalic acid was found to be much greater than the rate of the reverse oxidation reaction. Based on these findings and taking into account normal operating conditions, it was determined that although there would be considerable chromium in plutonium process streams it would rarely be found in the (+6) oxidation state and would not exist in the (+6) state in the final process waste solutions

  4. Electrodeposition of chromium from trivalent chromium urea bath containing sulfate and chloride

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    The reduction of Cr( Ⅲ) to Cr( Ⅱ ) on copper electrode in trivalent chromium urea bath containing chromium sulfate and chromium chloride as chromium source has been investigated by potentiodynamic sweep. The transfer coefficient α for reduction of Cr( Ⅲ ) to Cr( Ⅱ ) on copper electrode was calculated as 0.46. The reduction is a quasi-reversible process. J-t responses at different potential steps showed that the generation and adsorption characteristics of carboxylate bridged oligomer are relevant to cathode potential. The interface behavior between electrode and solution for Cr( Ⅲ ) complex is a critical factor influencing sustained electrode position of chromium. The hypotheses of the electro-inducing polymerization of Cr( Ⅲ ) was proposed. The potential scope in which sustained chromium deposits can be prepared is from- 1.3 V to- 1.7 V (vs SCE) in the urea bath. Bright chromium deposits with thickness of 30 μm can be prepared in the bath.

  5. Alkane dehydrogenation over supported chromium oxide catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weckhuysen, B.M.; Schoonheydt, R.A.

    1999-01-01

    The dehydrogenation of alkanes over supported chromium oxide catalysts in the absence of oxygen is of high interest for the industrial production of propene and isobutene. In this review, a critical overview is given of the current knowledge nowadays available about chromium-based dehydrogenation ca

  6. Luminescence spectra of chromium-doped LiGaO 2 crystals as indicator of their phase heterogeneity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meylman, Mikhail L.

    2006-02-01

    The luminescent properties of chromium-doped LiGaO2 single crystals grown from melt by Cz pulling technique are considered and compared with similar data for the other stable crystalline compounds in Li2O-Ga2O3 oxide system. It is proposed that co-crystallization of large LiGaO2 single crystal and a great number of LiGa5O8 spinel microcrystallites of nano scale dimensions is the key cause for appearance of numerous inclusions observed in LiGaO2 plates used as substrates at the III nitride films epitaxial growth.

  7. Effect of grain refinement and electrochemical nitridation on corrosion resistance of the 316L stainless steel for bipolar plates in PEMFCs environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jinlong, Lv; Tongxiang, Liang; Hongyun, Luo

    2015-10-01

    The stain-induced nanocrystalline α'-martensite was obtained by cryogenic cold rolling at liquid-nitrogen temperature for 316L stainless steel. The electrochemical results showed nanocrystalline 316L stainless steel deteriorated its corrosion resistance in a typical proton exchange membrane fuel cell environment compared with coarse grained one. However, comparing with electrochemically nitrided coarse grained stainless steel, electrochemically nitrided nanocrystalline stainless steel improved significantly corrosion resistance in the same environment, which was supported further by Mott-Shottky analysis. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis revealed that the nanocrystalline promoted the enrichment of nitrogen and chromium and inhibited form of NH3 on the surface, which could significantly improve the corrosion resistance of the 316L stainless steel. The present study showed that the electrochemically nitrided 316L stainless steel was more suitable for the bipolar plates in proton exchange membrane fuel cell environment than the untreated one, especially for nanocrystalline stainless steel.

  8. The Role of Diffusion Media in Nitriding Process on Surface Layers Characteristics of AISI 4140 with and without Hard Chrome Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.A. Widi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The surface layer characteristics of the AISI 4140 tool steel treated by nitriding gas before and after hard chrome plating utilizing pure nitrogen diffusion media (fluidized bed reactor and the without gas (muffle reactor has been studied experimentally. The result shows that nitriding substrate with hard chrome layers has nitrogen atoms concentration almost twice greater than that without hard chrome layers. After being given a hard chrome plating, nitriding on AISI 4140 steel generally has a nitrogen concentration of up to 4 times more than the substrate without hard chrome coating. Almost the entire specimen showed the highest concentration of N atoms in the area below the surface (hardening depth of 200 to 450 µm. N atoms diffusion depth profile has a correlation with hardening depth profile, especially on the specimens layered with hard chromium. The substrate without hard chrome plating tends to have higher surface hardness than the sub-surface. The results show that the effectiveness and efficiency of the gas nitriding diffusion process can be produced without the use of gas in the muffle reactor but the specimens must be hard chromium coated first. This phenomenon can be explained by the role of the passive layer formation that works as a barrier to keeps the spreading of N atoms concentrated in sub-surface areas.

  9. Internal nitride formation during gas-phase thermal nitridation of titanium

    OpenAIRE

    Ajikumar, PK; M. Kamruddin; Shankar, P; Gouda, Ramakrishna; Balamurugan, AK; Nithya, R.; Tyagi, AK; Jayaram, V; Biswas, SK; Raj, Baldev

    2009-01-01

    Titanium nitride surface layers were prepared by gas-phase thermal nitridation of pure titanium in an ammonia atmosphere at 1373 K for different times. In addition to the surface nitride layer, nitride/hydride formation was observed in the bulk of the specimen. The cross-section of the specimen was characterized by various techniques such as optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, secondary ion mass spectrometry and nanomechanical testing, ...

  10. [Bioremediation of chromium (VI) contaminated site by reduction and microbial stabilization of chromium].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jia-Chuan; Zhang, Jian-Rong; Liu, Xi-Wen; Xu, Qian; Shi, Wei-Lin

    2014-10-01

    Chromium (VI) contaminated soil samples were collected from a chemical plant in Suzhou. Firstly, the reduced soil was prepared by adding reagent (Stone-sulfure reagent) into polluted soil to transfer most chromium (VI) into chromium (III), then a nutrient solution was introduced into the reduced soil, and the stabilized soil was obtained after 60 days culturing. The chromium (VI) content of the three kinds of soil was analyzed. The results showed that the chromium (VI) content in toxicity characteristic leaching liquid (TCLL) dropped by 96. 8% (from 8.26 mg · L(-1) to 0.26 mg · L(-1)), and the total chromium content dropped by 95.7% (from 14.66 mg · L(-1) to 0.63 mg · L(-1)) after bioremediation in 5% nutrient solution. Additionally, the durability of chromium stabilization was tested by potassium permanganate oxidation and sterilization of microbe-treated soil. After oxidation, the chromium (VI) content in TCLL of the reduced soil was increased from 8.26 mg · L(-1) to 14.68 mg · L(-1). However, the content after bioremediation was decreased to 2.68 mg · L(-1). The results of sterilization demonstrated that the death of microbe had no significant effect on the stabilization of chromium. Consequently, the research in this paper demonstrated the feasibility of bioremediation of chromium (VI) polluted soil through reduction followed by stabilization/soilidification, and provided a technique with low cost but high efficiency.

  11. Ion nitriding of steel in plasma of non-selfsustained low-pressure arc discharge: phase transitions, faulted substructure and mechanical characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    recrystallization are suppressed and processes of nitrides formation with rather high concentration of nitrogen atoms counting upon atom of iron are more developed. The opportunity of nitriding of steel in plasma of pure nitrogen (without addition of hydrogen) at low temperature is caused by realization of effect of surface clearing from oxides as a result of its bombardment by the ions accelerated in collisionless near-surface layer of a spatial charge, formed near to a sample due to presence of a negative bias voltage and low working pressure. It is established, that in austenitic steel hardness of surface nitride layer (14 GPa) almost twice exceeds hardness of nitride layer of ferrite-pearlite steel. It is due to allocation of disperse chromium nitrides. It is shown, that formation in a near-surface layer of particles of chromium nitride accelerates processes of nitriding due to development in researched steel deformation induced transformation γ-phase (austenite) in α-phase (nitrous ferrite). Existence of some critical value of size of negative bias voltage on a sample (∼ 200 V), determining energy of nitrogen ions at their acceleration in a layer of the spatial discharge is revealed. It is caused, first, by effective destruction oxide film formed on a surface and blocking process of nitriding, and, second, by high concentration of high-energy ions of atomic nitrogen acting on a sample surface. (author)

  12. Low-chromium reduced-activation chromium-tungsten steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klueh, R.L.; Alexander, D.J.; Maziasz, P.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1996-10-01

    Bainitic microstructures formed during continuous cooling can differ from classical upper and lower bainite formed during isothermal transformation. Two types of non-classical bainite were observed depending on the cooling rate: carbide-free acicular bainite at rapid cooling rates and granular bainite at slower cooling rates. The Charpy impact toughness of the acicular ferrite was found to be considerably better than for the granular bainite. It was postulated that alloying to improve the hardenability of the steel would promote the formation of acicular bainite, just as increasing the cooling rate does. To test this, chromium and tungsten were added to the 2 1/4Cr-2W and 2 1/4Cr-2WV steel compositions to increase their hardenability, and the microstructures and mechanical properties were examined.

  13. A Novel kind of Air Cooling Bainite Nitriding Steel and Plasma Nitriding Test

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xin-sheng; LIANG Shu-rong

    2004-01-01

    In order to avoid serious distortion and cracking that may occur with nitrided parts while quenching and tempering, a novel kind of air cooling bainite nitriding steel consisting of Ct, Mo, Mn and Si was developed. After normalized and high temperature tempered, the tested steel has satisfactory strength, toughness and microstructure as well as good nitriding properties.

  14. Bainitic chromium-tungsten steels with 3 pct chromium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Previous work on 3Cr-1.5MoV (nominally Fe-3Cr-2.5Mo-0.25V-0.1C), 2.25Cr-2W (Fe-2.25Cr-2W-0.1C), and 2.25Cr-2WV (Fe-2.25Cr-2W-0.25V-0.1C) steels indicated that the impact toughness of these steels depended on the microstructure of the bainite formed during continuous cooling from the austenization temperature. Microstructures formed during continuous cooling can differ from classical upper and lower bainite formed during isothermal transformation. Two types of nonclassical microstructures were observed depending on the cooling rate: carbide-free acicular bainite at rapid cooling rates and granular bainite at slower cooling rates. The Charpy impact toughness of the acicular ferrite was considerably better than for the granular bainite. It was postulated that alloying to improve the hardenability of the steel would promote the formation of acicular bainite, just as increasing the cooling rate does. To test this, chromium and tungsten were added to the 2.25Cr-2W and 2.25Cr-2WV steel compositions to increase their hardenability. Charpy testing indicated that the new 3Cr-W and 3Cr-WV steels had improved impact toughness, as demonstrated by lower ductile-brittle transition temperatures and higher upper-shelf energies. This improvement occurred with less tempering than was necessary to achieve similar toughness for the 2.25Cr steels and for high-chromium (9 to 12 pct Cr) Cr-W and Cr-Mo steels

  15. Chromium

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 6+), a toxic form that results from industrial pollution. This fact sheet focuses exclusively on trivalent (3+) ... 1 medium 1 Banana, 1 medium 1 Green beans, ½ cup 1 What are recommended intakes of ...

  16. Silicon nitride-fabrication, forming and properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article, which is a literature survey of the recent years, includes description of several methods for the formation of silicone nitride, and five methods of forming: Reaction-bonded silicon nitride, sintering, hot pressing, hot isostatic pressing and chemical vapour deposition. Herein are also included data about mechanical and physical properties of silicon nitride and the relationship between the forming method and the properties. (author)

  17. Reproductive toxicological aspects of chromium in males

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To expand our present understanding of the effects of chromium on male fertility a number of studies were designed to achieve this through the use of chromium intoxicated experimental animals and through investigation of sexual hormones and sperm quality in welders. Also in view of the lack of an experimental model for effects of noxious substance on the epididymal spermatozoa the main objectives of the series of studies reviewed here were: A. To establish a model for evaluation of epididymal sperm count and motility in the rat. B. To investigate and compare the effects of tri- and hexavalent chromium on epididymal spermatozoa. Further to describe the effects of low-dose long-time exposure of rats to the most toxicological interesting chromium oxidative state - hexavalent chromium. C. By the use of autoradiography and γ-countinuing to expand the present knowledge on the distribution of chromium in the body with special reference to the male reproductive organs. D. To describe the effects of exposure to hexavalent chromium in welding fume on levels of sexual hormones and semen parameters in welders. (EG)

  18. Property database of TRU nitride fuel

    OpenAIRE

    西 剛史; 荒井 康夫; 高野 公秀; 倉田 正輝

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to prepare a property database of nitride fuel needed for the fuel design of accelerator-driven system (ADS) for transmutation of minor actinide (MA). Nitride fuel of ADS is characterized by high content of Pu and MA as principal components, and addition of a diluent material such as ZrN. Experimental data or evaluated values from the raw data on properties Pu and MA nitrides, and nitride solid solutions containing ZrN are collected and summarized, which cover the...

  19. Synthesis of Chromium (Ⅲ) 5-aminosalicylate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Wei; HAO Er-jun; JIANG Yu-qin

    2004-01-01

    As we all known that diabetes is a chronic disease with major health consequences.Research has revealed that the occurrence of diabetes have great thing to do with the chromium deficient. Almost 40 years after the first report of glucose tolerance factor(GTF) [1], no conclusive evidence for an isolable ,biologically active form of chromium exited. Three materials have been proposed to be the biologically active form of chromium: "glucose tolerance factor", chromium Picolinate and low-molecular-weight chromium-binding substance (LWMCr) [2] . So there is potential for the design of new chromium drugs .5-Aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA) is identified as an active component in the therapy of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) such as Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis . The therapeutic action of 5-ASA is believed to be coupled to its ability to act as a free radical scavenger [3-4],acting locally on the inflamed colonic mucosa [5-7]. However, the clinical use of 5-ASA is limited, since orally administered 5-ASA is rapidly and completely absorbed from the upper gastrointestinal tract and therefore the local therapeutic effects of 5-ASA in the colon is hardly expected.In this paper, we report the synthesis of chromium(Ⅲ)5-aminosalicylate from 5-ASA and CrCl3. 6H2O.The synthesis route is as follow:The complex has been characterized by elemental analysis, IR spectra, X-ray powder diffractionand TG-DTA . They indicate that the structure is tris(5-ASA) Chromium . Experiments show that thecomplex has a good activity for supplement tiny dietary chromium, lowering blood glucose levels,lowering serum lipid levels and in creasing lean body mass .

  20. Characteristics of chromium-allergic dermatitis patients prior to regulatory intervention for chromium in leather

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bregnbak, David; Thyssen, Jacob P; Zachariae, Claus;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chromium-tanned leather articles currently constitute the most important cause of contact allergy to chromium in Denmark. A regulation on the content of hexavalent chromium in leather was adopted in November 2013 by the EU member states. OBJECTIVES: To characterize patients...... with chromium allergy and their disease, to serve as a baseline for future studies on the potential effect of the new regulation on chromium in leather. METHODS: A questionnaire case-control study was performed on 155 dermatitis patients with positive patch test reactions to potassium dichromate and a matched...... control group of 621 dermatitis patients. Comparisons were made by use of a χ(2) -test and the Mann-Whitney U-test. Logistic regression analyses were used to test for associations. RESULTS: Sixty-six per cent of chromium-allergic patients had a positive history of contact dermatitis caused by leather...

  1. Chromium in leather footwear-risk assessment of chromium allergy and dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyssen, Jacob P; Strandesen, Maria; Poulsen, Pia B;

    2012-01-01

    Background. Chromium-tanned leather footwear, which releases >3 ppm hexavalent Cr(VI), may pose a risk of sensitizing and eliciting allergic dermatitis. Objectives. To determine the content and potential release of chromium in leather footwear and to discuss the prevention of chromium contact...... allergy and dermatitis. Methods. Sixty pairs of leather shoes, sandals and boots (20 children's, 20 men's, and 20 women's) were purchased in Copenhagen and examined with X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy. Chromium was extracted according to the International Standard, ISO 17075. The detection level for Cr......(VI) was 3 ppm. Results. Chromium was identified in 95% of leather footwear products, the median content being 1.7% (range 0-3.3%). No association with store category or footwear category was found. A tendency for there to be a higher chromium content in footwear with high prices was shown (p(trend) = 0...

  2. Characterization of bulk hexagonal boron nitride single crystals grown by the metal flux technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edgar, J. H.; Hoffman, T. B.; Clubine, B.; Currie, M.; Du, X. Z.; Lin, J. Y.; Jiang, H. X.

    2014-10-01

    The optical and physical properties of hexagonal boron nitride single crystals grown from a molten metal solution are reported. The hBN crystals were grown by precipitation from a nickel-chromium flux with a boron nitride source, by slowly cooling from 1500 °C at 2-4 °C/h under a nitrogen flow at atmospheric pressure. The hBN crystals formed on the surface of the flux with an apparent crystal size up to 1-2 mm in diameter. Individual grains were as large as 100-200 μm across. Typically, the flakes removed from the metal were 6-20 μm thick. Optical absorption measurements suggest a bandgap of 5.8 eV by neglecting the binding energy of excitons in hBN. The highest energy photoluminescence peak was at 5.75 eV at room temperature. The hBN crystals typically had a pit density of 5×106 cm-2 after etching in a molten eutectic mixture of potassium hydroxide and sodium hydroxide. The quality of these crystals suggests they are suitable as substrates for two dimensional materials such as graphene and gallium nitride based devices.

  3. Further investigation of the structure and properties of austenitic stainless steel after plasma nitriding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menthe, E.; Rie, K.-T. [Technische Univ. Braunschweig (Germany). Inst. fuer Oberflaechentechnik und Plasmatechnische Werkstoffentwicklung

    1999-09-01

    A series of plasma nitriding experiments has been conducted on AISI 304L austenitic stainless steel at temperatures ranging from 375 to 475 C using pulsed-DC plasma with different pulse duty cycles, N{sub 2}-H{sub 2} gas mixtures and treatment times. It is shown that a wide range of treatment parameters exist that allow the formation of the S-phase. The formation and growth of this surface layer depend strongly on the treatment parameters, such as nitrogen partial pressure and duty cycle. Within the parameter range investigated, the layer growth appears to be diffusion controlled with an activation energy about 107 kJ/mol. The formation of CrN precipitates during plasma nitriding is not accompanied by the formation of bcc iron, which might be expected due to the loss of free chromium. However, the S-phase transforms into CrN and bcc iron following a heat treatment at 450 C or higher for 25 h. The wear rate after plasma nitriding is greatly reduced compared with the untreated material. (orig.)

  4. Nucleation of iron nitrides during gaseous nitriding of iron; the effect of a preoxidation treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friehling, Peter B.; Poulsen, Finn Willy; Somers, Marcel A.J.

    2001-01-01

    grains. On prolonged nitriding, immediate nucleation at the surface of iron grains becomes possible. Calculated incubation times for the nucleation of gamma'-Fe4N1-x during nitriding are generally longer than those observed experimentally in the present work. The incubation time is reduced dramatically......The nucleation of iron nitrides during gaseous nitriding has been investigated using light microscopy and X-ray diffraction. Initially, the nucleation of gamma'-Fe4N1-x on a pure iron surface starts at grain boundaries meeting the surface, from where the nitride grains grow laterally into the iron...

  5. Potentiometry: A Chromium (III) -- EDTA Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoppe, J. I.; Howell, P. J.

    1975-01-01

    Describes an experiment that involves the preparation of a chromium (III)-EDTA compound, a study of its infrared spectrum, and the potentiometric determination of two successive acid dissociation constants. (Author/GS)

  6. AEROSOL BEHAVIOR IN CHROMIUM WASTE INCINERATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Suyuan Yu

    2003-01-01

    Cr2O3 is considered as the dominant incineration product during the combustion disposal of chromium waste. A hydrogen/air diffusion flame was employed to simulate the industrial process of incineration. Cr2O3 aerosols were generated inside the flame by the gas phase reaction of chromium and oxygen. Chromium came from the rapid decomposition of chromium hexacarbonyl (Cr(CO)6) at room temperature and was carried into the combustion chamber by hydrogen. Aerosol and clusters can then be easily formed in the flame by nucleation and coagulation. A two dimensional Discrete-Sectional Model (DSM) was adopted to calculate the Cr2O3 aerosol behavior. The experimental measurement method was Dynamic Light Scattering. The numerically predicted results agreed well with those of the experimental measurement. Both results show that the Cr2O3 aerosol size reached about 70 nanometers at the flame top.

  7. Localized Corrosion of Chromium Coated Steel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, X.; Beentjes, P.; Mol, A.; Terryn, H.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we report on the studies of the local corrosion behaviour of chromium-coated ultra low carbon steel in NaCl solution using polarization, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and SVET.

  8. MICROSTRUCTURE AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF ULTRAFINE WC/Co CEMENTED CARBIDES WITH CUBIC BORON NITRIDE AND Cr₃C₂ ADDITIONS

    OpenAIRE

    Genrong Zhang; Haiyan Chen; Dong Lihua; Yin,; Li Kun

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates the microstructure and mechanical properties of ultrafine tungsten carbide and cobalt (WC/Co) cemented carbides with cubic boron nitride (CBN) and chromium carbide (Cr₃C₂) fabricated by a hot pressing sintering process. This study uses samples with 8 wt% Co content and 7.5 vol% CBN content, and with different Cr₃C₂ content ranging from 0 to 0.30 wt%. Based on the experimental results, Cr₃C₂ content has a significant influence on inhibiting abnormal grain growth and dec...

  9. Synthesis and Characterization of Chromium Oxide Nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Vivek Sheel Jaswal; Avnish Kumar Arora; Joginder Singh; Mayank Kinger; Vishnu Dev Gupta

    2014-01-01

    Chromium oxide nanoparticles (NPs)have been rapidly synthesized by precipitation method using ammomia as precipitating agent and are characterized by using X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Thermo Gravimetric Analysis (TGA), UV-Visible absorption (UV), Infrared Spectoscopy (IR), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). XRD studies show that chromium oxide NP is formed as Cr2O3 and it has hexagonal structure. The shape and particle size of the synthesized Cr2O3 NP...

  10. Low temperature anodic bonding to silicon nitride

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weichel, Steen; Reus, Roger De; Bouaidat, Salim;

    2000-01-01

    Low-temperature anodic bonding to stoichiometric silicon nitride surfaces has been performed in the temperature range from 3508C to 4008C. It is shown that the bonding is improved considerably if the nitride surfaces are either oxidized or exposed to an oxygen plasma prior to the bonding. Both bulk...

  11. PECVD silicon nitride diaphragms for condenser microphones

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheeper, P.R.; Voorthuyzen, J.A.; Bergveld, P.

    1991-01-01

    The application of plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposited (PECVD) silicon nitride as a diaphragm material for condenser microphones has been investigated. By means of adjusting the SiH4/NH3 gas-flow composition, silicon-rich silicon nitride films have been obtained with a relatively low tensile s

  12. Method of preparation of uranium nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiplinger, Jaqueline Loetsch; Thomson, Robert Kenneth James

    2013-07-09

    Method for producing terminal uranium nitride complexes comprising providing a suitable starting material comprising uranium; oxidizing the starting material with a suitable oxidant to produce one or more uranium(IV)-azide complexes; and, sufficiently irradiating the uranium(IV)-azide complexes to produce the terminal uranium nitride complexes.

  13. Atomic Resolution Microscopy of Nitrides in Steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danielsen, Hilmar Kjartansson

    2014-01-01

    MN and CrMN type nitride precipitates in 12%Cr steels have been investigated using atomic resolution microscopy. The MN type nitrides were observed to transform into CrMN both by composition and crystallography as Cr diffuses from the matrix into the MN precipitates. Thus a change from one...

  14. Thermodynamics, kinetics and process control of nitriding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mittemeijer, Eric J.; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    1997-01-01

    , the nitriding result is determined largely by kinetics. Nitriding kinetics are shown to be characterised by local near equilibria and stationary states at surfaces and interfaces, and the diffusion coefficient of nitrogen in the various phases, for which new data are presented. The necessary background...

  15. Thermodynamics, kinetics and process control of nitriding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mittemeijer, Eric J.; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    1999-01-01

    , the nitriding result is determined largely by the kinetics of the process. The nitriding kinetics have been shown to be characterised by the occurring local near-equilibria and stationary states at surfaces and interfaces, and the diffusion coefficient of nitrogen in the various phases, for which new data have...

  16. Standard Specification for Low-Carbon Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum, Low-Carbon Nickel-Molybdenum-Chromium, Low-Carbon Nickel-Molybdenum-Chromium-Tantalum, Low-Carbon Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum-Copper, and Low-Carbon Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum-Tungsten Alloy Rod

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2015-01-01

    Standard Specification for Low-Carbon Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum, Low-Carbon Nickel-Molybdenum-Chromium, Low-Carbon Nickel-Molybdenum-Chromium-Tantalum, Low-Carbon Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum-Copper, and Low-Carbon Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum-Tungsten Alloy Rod

  17. Standard Specification for Low-Carbon Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum, Low-Carbon Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum-Copper, Low-Carbon Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum-Tantalum, Low-Carbon Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum-Tungsten, and Low-Carbon Nickel-Molybdenum-Chromium Alloy Plate, Sheet, and Strip

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2015-01-01

    Standard Specification for Low-Carbon Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum, Low-Carbon Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum-Copper, Low-Carbon Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum-Tantalum, Low-Carbon Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum-Tungsten, and Low-Carbon Nickel-Molybdenum-Chromium Alloy Plate, Sheet, and Strip

  18. Bioremediation of chromium solutions and chromium containing wastewaters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malaviya, Piyush; Singh, Asha

    2016-08-01

    Cr(VI) represents a serious threat to human health, living resources and ecological system as it is persistent, carcinogenic and toxic, whereas, Cr(III), another stable oxidation state of Cr, is less toxic and can be readily precipitated out of solution. The conventional methods of Cr(VI) removal from wastewaters comprise of chemical reduction followed by chemical precipitation. However, these methods utilize large amounts of chemicals and generate toxic sludge. This necessitates the need for devising an eco-technological strategy that would use the untapped potential of the biological world for remediation of Cr(VI) containing wastewaters. Among several viable approaches, biotransformation of Cr(VI) to relatively non-toxic Cr(III) by chromium resistant bacteria offers an economical- and environment-friendly option for its detoxification. Various studies on use of Cr(VI) tolerant viable bacterial isolates for treatment of Cr(VI) containing solutions and wastewater have been reported. Therefore, a detailed account of mechanisms and processes involved in bioreduction of Cr(VI) from solutions and wastewaters by bacterial isolates are the focus of this review article in addition to a discussion on toxicity of Cr(VI) on bacterial strains and various factors affecting Cr(VI) bioreduction. PMID:25358056

  19. Cathodic Cage Plasma Nitriding: An Innovative Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. R. M. de Sousa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cylindrical samples of AISI 1020, AISI 316, and AISI 420 steels, with different heights, were simultaneously treated by a new technique of ionic nitriding, entitled cathodic cage plasma nitriding (CCPN, in order to evaluate the efficiency of this technique to produce nitrided layers with better properties compared with those obtained using conventional ionic nitriding technique. This method is able to eliminate the edge effect in the samples, promoting a better uniformity of temperature, and consequently, a smaller variation of the thickness/height relation can be obtained. The compound layers were characterized by X-ray diffraction, optical microscopy, and microhardness test profile. The results were compared with the properties of samples obtained with the conventional nitriding, for the three steel types. It was verified that samples treated by CCPN process presented, at the same temperature, a better uniformity in the thickness and absence of the edge effect.

  20. Study of a New Chromium-Free Conversion Coating Formed on ZnAl Alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LONG Jin-ming; GUO Zhong-cheng; HAN Xia-yun; YANG Ning

    2004-01-01

    A new chromium-free conversion film was obtained on surface of a ZnAl alloy by chemical conversion process.Influence of the additives in treating solution containing cerium salt on the corrosion protection of the conversion film formed on zinc alloy was investigated. Corrosion tests and electrochemical measurements in sodium chloride solution were performed. The microstructure and composition of the coatings were examined by means of SEM, EDS and XRD. It was found that the corrosion protection capabilities of the conversion film are markedly increased with the cerium nitride plus additives (hydrogen fluoride acid and an organic inhibitor) treating process. The modified conversion film is an organic/inorganic composite coating and is much more corrosion resistant than the conventional chromate conversion coating and the single cerium conversion coating.

  1. Study of a New Chromium-Free Conversion Coating Formed on ZnAl Alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LONGJin-ming; GUOZhong-cheng; HANXia-yun; YANGNing

    2004-01-01

    A new chromium-free conversion film was obtained on surface of a ZnA1 alloy by chemical conversion process. Influence of the additives in treating solution containing cerium salt on the corrosion protection of the conversion film formed on zinc alloy was investigated. Corrosion tests and electrochemical measurements in sodium chloride solution were performed. The microstructure and composition of the coatings were examined by means of SEM, EDS and XRD. It was found that the corrosion protection capabilities of the conversion film are markedly increased with the cerium nitride plus additives (hydrogen fluoride acid and an organic inhibitor) treating process. The modified conversion film is an organic/inorganic composite coating and is much more corrosion resistant than the conventional chromate conversion coating and the single cerium conversion coating.

  2. Development of a brazing process for the production of water- cooled bipolar plates made of chromium-coated metal foils for PEM fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, M.; Hoehlich, D.; Scharf, I.; Lampke, T.; Hollaender, U.; Maier, H. J.

    2016-03-01

    Beside lithium batteries, PEM fuel cells are the most promising strategy as a power source to achieve the targets for introducing and increasing the usage of electric vehicles. Due to limited space and weight problems, water cooled, metallic bipolar plates in a fuel cell metal stack are preferred in motor vehicles. These plates are stamped metal sheets with a complex structure, interconnected media-tight. To meet the multiple tasks and requirements in use, complex and expensive combinations of materials are currently in use (carbon fiber composites, graphite, gold-plated nickel, stainless and acid resistant steel). The production of such plates is expensive as it is connected with considerable effort or the usage of precious metals. As an alternative, metalloid nitrides (CrN, VN, W2N, etc.) show a high chemical resistance, hardness and a good conductivity. So this material category meets the basic requirements of a top layer. However, the standard methods for their production (PVD, CVD) are expensive and have a slow deposition rate and a lower layer thicknesses. Because of these limitations, a full functionality over the life cycle of a bipolar plate is not guaranteed. The contribution shows the development and quantification of an alternative production process for bipolar plates. The expectation is to get significant advantages from the combination of chromium electrodeposition and thermochemical treatment to form chromium nitrides. Both processes are well researched and suitable for series production. The thermochemical treatment of the chromium layer also enables a process-integrated brazing.

  3. Diminishing Chromium Use on Combined Chromium-Gambier Tanning Process Upon the Characteristics of Tanned Leather

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Kasim

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The research was aimed to investigate the influence of minimizing chromium use on combined chromium-gambier process upon the characteristics of tanned leather. At the first stage of tanning process, chromium was used and in the second stage it was replaced by gambier. The raw material used was dried saline-preserved goat skin. The treatments applied on the tanning process were the different concentrations of chromium ranging from the highest level of 6% to the lowest level of 1% which was then re-tanned by using 8% concentration of gambier. The examination parameters included chemical and physical properties as well as visual investigation on the tanned leather in accordance with SNI-06-0463-1989-A. The result showed that the tanning process by using 2% chromium in the first step and 8% gambier in the second step was a treatment combination producing tanned leather that met the standard. The examination on tanned leather resulted from such treatment showed 56.33% rawhide, 17.45% of bound tannin, 31.22% of tanning level, tensile strength 386.30 kg/cm2, flexibility 31.91%, leather width 1.3 mm, density 0.75 g/cm3, the leather was quite elastic with light brownish color. In conclusion, minimizing the use of chromium in the combined tanning process of chromium and gambier can be implemented to the lowest of 2% chromium concentration and 8% gambier in the first and second step, respectively.

  4. Solvothermal synthesis: a new route for preparing nitrides

    CERN Document Server

    Demazeau, G; Denis, A; Largeteau, A

    2002-01-01

    Solvothermal synthesis appears to be an interesting route for preparing nitrides such as gallium nitride and aluminium nitride, using ammonia as solvent. A nitriding additive is used to perform the reaction and, in the case of gallium nitride, is encapsulated by melt gallium. The syntheses are performed in the temperature range 400-800 deg. C and in the pressure range 100-200 MPa. The synthesized powders are characterized by x-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. Finely divided gallium nitride GaN and aluminium nitride AlN, both with wurtzite-type structure, can be obtained by this route.

  5. Tribological characterization of chromium nitride coating deposited by filtered cathodic vacuum arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, J. L.; Zhu, M. H.

    2009-06-01

    CrN coatings were prepared by filtered cathodic vacuum arc (FCVA) technique. The influence of the deposition parameters (nitrogen partial pressure P, substrate bias voltage Vs and preheating of the substrate) on the structural, mechanical and tribological properties of the FCVA CrN coatings was investigated. Further, the FCVA CrN coating was compared in dry reciprocating sliding with commercial multi-arc ion plating (MAIP) CrN coating as to friction and wear properties. Profilometer, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDX) were used to evaluate the wear scars and the wear mechanisms were discussed. The results showed that the structural, mechanical and tribological properties of the FCVA CrN coatings were significantly dependent on the deposition parameters. The FCVA CrN coating deposited with P of 0.1 Pa, Vs of -100 V and without preheating exhibited the optimal mechanical and tribological properties. The FCVA CrN coating exhibited much better anti-abrasive and anti-spalling properties than the MAIP CrN coating, which was resulted from significant reduction of macroparticles and pitting defects by the FCVA technique. The MAIP CrN coating suffered severe concentrated wear by a combination wear mechanisms of delamination, abrasive and oxidative wear when high normal load was applied, while for the FCVA CrN coating the wear mechanisms were ultra-mild abrasive and oxidative wear.

  6. Tribological characterization of chromium nitride coating deposited by filtered cathodic vacuum arc

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mo, J.L. [Tribology Research Institute, Traction Power State Key Laboratory, Southwest Jiaotong University, 111 Er Huan Road, Chengdu 610031 (China); Zhu, M.H., E-mail: zhuminhao@swjtu.cn [Tribology Research Institute, Traction Power State Key Laboratory, Southwest Jiaotong University, 111 Er Huan Road, Chengdu 610031 (China)

    2009-06-15

    CrN coatings were prepared by filtered cathodic vacuum arc (FCVA) technique. The influence of the deposition parameters (nitrogen partial pressure P{sub N{sub 2}}, substrate bias voltage V{sub s} and preheating of the substrate) on the structural, mechanical and tribological properties of the FCVA CrN coatings was investigated. Further, the FCVA CrN coating was compared in dry reciprocating sliding with commercial multi-arc ion plating (MAIP) CrN coating as to friction and wear properties. Profilometer, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDX) were used to evaluate the wear scars and the wear mechanisms were discussed. The results showed that the structural, mechanical and tribological properties of the FCVA CrN coatings were significantly dependent on the deposition parameters. The FCVA CrN coating deposited with P{sub N{sub 2}} of 0.1 Pa, V{sub s} of -100 V and without preheating exhibited the optimal mechanical and tribological properties. The FCVA CrN coating exhibited much better anti-abrasive and anti-spalling properties than the MAIP CrN coating, which was resulted from significant reduction of macroparticles and pitting defects by the FCVA technique. The MAIP CrN coating suffered severe concentrated wear by a combination wear mechanisms of delamination, abrasive and oxidative wear when high normal load was applied, while for the FCVA CrN coating the wear mechanisms were ultra-mild abrasive and oxidative wear.

  7. Corrosion resistance and electrical properties of carbon/chromium-titanium-nitride multilayer coatings on stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Kai; Li, Zhuguo; Lu, Fenggui; Huang, Jian; Cai, Xun; Wu, Yixiong

    2014-03-01

    High electrical conductivity and corrosion resistance are central to advances in wider application of metallic bipolar plates in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). In this study, C/Cr-Ti-N multilayer coatings are deposited by physical vapor deposition and the effect of Cr:Ti ratio on the corrosion resistance and interfacial contact resistance (ICR) are systematically investigated. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) result shows that the carbon layer is compact and uniform. Excellent corrosion resistance of 0.127 μA cm-2 current density at operating voltage in PEMFC cathode environment and low ICR of 2.03 mΩ-cm2 at compaction force of 150 N cm-2 are achieved when Cr:Ti ratio is 2:4 and 3:3, respectively. The significant enhancement in surface conductivity is probably because that the current comes from carbon paper is homogenized by two electrically conductive layers and flows to the passive film with much more contact area. After polarization, ICR increase to 3.07 mΩ-cm2 and 3.02 mΩ-cm2 in the simulated PEMFC cathode and anode environment, respectively. However, the Raman spectroscopy results disclose that the bonding type of top carbon film before and after polarization shows little difference. The results indicate that C/Cr-Ti-N multilayer coating with Cr:Ti ratio of 2:4 achieves the optimal composition.

  8. A comparative study of transport properties in polycrystalline and epitaxial chromium nitride films

    KAUST Repository

    Duan, X. F.

    2013-01-08

    Polycrystalline CrNx films on Si(100) and glass substrates and epitaxial CrNx films on MgO(100) substrates were fabricated by reactive sputtering with different nitrogen gas flow rates (fN2). With the increase of fN2, a lattice phase transformation from metallic Cr2N to semiconducting CrN appears in both polycrystalline and epitaxial CrNx films. At fN2= 100 sccm, the low-temperature conductance mechanism is dominated by both Mott and Efros-Shklovskii variable-range hopping in either polycrystalline or epitaxial CrN films. In all of the polycrystalline and epitaxial films, only the polycrystalline CrNx films fabricated at fN2 = 30 and 50 sccm exhibit a discontinuity in ρ(T) curves at 260-280 K, indicating that both the N-vacancy concentration and grain boundaries play important roles in the metal-insulator transition. © 2013 American Institute of Physics.

  9. Electron spectroscopy of dilute nitrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The application of electron spectroscopies in dilute nitride semiconductor research for both chemical analysis and the determination of electronic and lattice vibrational properties is described. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of the nitrogen bonding configurations in dilute InNxSb1-x and InNxAs1-x alloys is presented. High resolution electron-energy-loss spectroscopy (HREELS) of the plasmon excitations in InNxSb1-x is shown to provide information on the electronic properties of the material, before and after annealing. HREELS is also used to investigate the GaN-like phonon modes in GaNxAs1-x alloys

  10. Lateral stress evolution in chromium sulfide cermets with varying excess chromium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petel, O. E.; Appleby-Thomas, G. J.; Wood, D. C.; Capozzi, A.; Nabavi, A.; Goroshin, S.; Frost, D. L.; Hazell, P. J.

    2016-04-01

    The shock response of chromium sulfide-chromium, a cermet of potential interest as a matrix material for ballistic applications, has been investigated at two molar ratios. Using a combustion synthesis technique allowed for control of the molar ratio of the material, which was investigated under near-stoichiometric (cermet) and excess chromium (interpenetrating composite) conditions, representing chromium:sulfur molar ratios of 1.15:1 and 4:1, respectively. The compacts were investigated via the plate-impact technique, which allowed the material to be loaded under a one-dimensional state of strain. Embedded manganin stress gauges were employed to monitor the temporal evolution of longitudinal and lateral components of stress in both materials. Comparison of these two components has allowed assessment of the variation of material shear strength both with impact pressure/strain-rate and time for the two molar ratio conditions. The two materials exhibited identical material strength despite variations in their excess chromium contents.

  11. Graphitic Carbon Nitride Supported Catalysts for Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Mansor, N.; Jorge, A. B.; Corà, F.; Gibbs, C.; Jervis, R.; Mcmillan, P. F.; X. Wang; Brett, D. J.

    2014-01-01

    Graphitic carbon nitrides are investigated for developing highly durable Pt electrocatalyst supports for polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs). Three different graphitic carbon nitride materials were synthesized with the aim to address the effect of crystallinity, porosity, and composition on the catalyst support properties: polymeric carbon nitride (gCNM), poly(triazine) imide carbon nitride (PTI/Li(+)Cl(-)), and boron-doped graphitic carbon nitride (B-gCNM). Following accelerated corrosion...

  12. Kinetic process of nitridation on the α-sapphire surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tang Xingzhou; Li Shuping; Kang Junyong; Chen Jiaqi

    2014-01-01

    We established a model to simulate the growth process of nitridation and clarified the inner mechanisms of nitridation and over-nitridation by combining the kinetic Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics methods.Supported by reflection high-energy electron diffraction results with growth in an MBE system,the tendency of nitridation on α-sapphire in different conditions was observed and analyzed.The best conditions for nitridation on the α-sapphire surface are found by our simulation.

  13. Microstructural Characterization of Low Temperature Gas Nitrided Martensitic Stainless Steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandes, Frederico Augusto Pires; Christiansen, Thomas Lundin; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2015-01-01

    The present work presents microstructural investigations of the surface zone of low temperature gas nitrided precipitation hardening martensitic stainless steel AISI 630. Grazing incidence X-ray diffraction was applied to investigate the present phases after successive removal of very thin sections...... of the sample surface. The development of epsilon nitride, expanded austenite and expanded martensite resulted from the low temperature nitriding treatments. The microstructural features, hardness and phase composition are discussed with emphasis on the influence of nitriding duration and nitriding potential....

  14. Process for the production of metal nitride sintered bodies and resultant silicon nitride and aluminum nitride sintered bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yajima, S.; Omori, M.; Hayashi, J.; Kayano, H.; Hamano, M.

    1983-01-01

    A process for the manufacture of metal nitride sintered bodies, in particular, a process in which a mixture of metal nitrite powders is shaped and heated together with a binding agent is described. Of the metal nitrides Si3N4 and AIN were used especially frequently because of their excellent properties at high temperatures. The goal is to produce a process for metal nitride sintered bodies with high strength, high corrosion resistance, thermal shock resistance, thermal shock resistance, and avoidance of previously known faults.

  15. Serum chromium levels in gestational diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P G Sundararaman

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To measure serum chromium level in women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM from Chennai, South India. Materials and Methods: Thirty women with gestational diabetes, 60 age matched controls. Inclusion criteria: Gestational age 22-28 weeks, age group 20-35 years. Exclusion Criteria: Gestational age beyond 28 weeks, malnutrition or presence of infection. Serum chromium was measured using inductive couple plasma emission spectrometer. Results: Serum chromium levels of women with GDM, 1.59+/-0.02 ng/ml (range: 0.16-4.0 ng/ml were lower than in controls (4.58+/-0.62 ng/ml; range 0.82-5.33 ng/ml (P < 0.001. However, there were no significant differences among cases and controls when subdivided by parity. Conclusions: Women with GDM from a South Indian city had lower levels of serum chromium compared to pregnant women without GDM. Studies may be done whether chromium supplementation is useful in this group of women.

  16. Friction Characteristics of Nitrided Layers on AISI 430 Ferritic Stainless Steel Obtained by Various Nitriding Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hakan AYDIN

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The influence of plasma, gas and salt-bath nitriding techniques on the friction coefficient of AISI 430 ferritic stainless steel was studied in this paper. Samples were plasma nitrided in 80 % N2 + 20 % H2 atmosphere at 450 °C and 520 °C for 8 h at a pressure of 2 mbar, gas nitrided in NH3 and CO2 atmosphere at 570 °C for 13 h and salt-bath nitrided in a cyanide-cyanate salt-bath at 570 °C for 1.5 h. Characterisation of nitrided layers on the ferritic stainless steel was carried out by means of microstructure, microhardness, surface roughness and friction coefficient measurements. Friction characteristics of the nitrided layers on the 430 steel were investigated using a ball-on-disc friction-wear tester with a WC-Co ball as the counter-body under dry sliding conditions. Analysis of wear tracks was carried out by scanning electron microscopy. Maximum hardness and maximum case depth were achieved on the plasma nitrided sample at 520 ºC for 8 h. The plasma and salt-bath nitriding techniques significantly decreased the average surface roughness of the 430 ferritic stainless steel. The friction test results showed that the salt-bath nitrided layer had better friction-reducing ability than the other nitrided layers under dry sliding conditions. Furthermore, the friction characteristic of the plasma nitrided layer at 520 ºC was better than that of the plasma nitrided layer at 450 °C.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.19.1.3819

  17. Plasma Nitriding of Low Alloy Sintered Steels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shiva Mansoorzadeh; Fakhreddin Ashrafizadeh; Xiao-Ying Li; Tom Bell

    2004-01-01

    Fe-3Cr-0.5Mo-0.3C and Fe-3Cr-1.4Mn-0.5Mo-0.367C sintered alloys were plasma nitrided at different temperatures. Characterization was performed by microhardness measurement, optical microscopy, SEM and XRD. Both materials had similar nitriding case properties. 1.4% manganese did not change the as-sintered microstructure considerably.It was observed that monophase compound layer, γ, formed with increasing temperature. Compound layer thickness increased with increasing temperature while nitriding depth increased up to a level and then decreased. Core softening was more pronounced at higher temperature owing to cementite coarsening.

  18. Flashlamp-pumped lasing of chromium-doped GSG garnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The implications for the practical use of chromium:GSGG in lamp-pumped tunable lasers are discussed in this paper. The authors report here some major improvements in the performance of the flashlamp-pumped chromium:GSGG laser

  19. Internal nitride formation during gas-phase thermal nitridation of titanium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Titanium nitride surface layers were prepared by gas-phase thermal nitridation of pure titanium in an ammonia atmosphere at 1373 K for different times. In addition to the surface nitride layer, nitride/hydride formation was observed in the bulk of the specimen. The cross-section of the specimen was characterized by various techniques such as optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, secondary ion mass spectrometry and nanomechanical testing, and the mechanism of formation of these phases is discussed.

  20. Plasma nitriding of AISI 52100 ball bearing steel and effect of heat treatment on nitrided layer

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ravindra Kumar; J Alphonsa; Ram Prakash; K S Boob; J Ghanshyam; P A Rayjada; P M Raole; S Mukherjee

    2011-02-01

    In this paper an effort has been made to plasma nitride the ball bearing steel AISI 52100. The difficulty with this specific steel is that its tempering temperature (∼170–200°C) is much lower than the standard processing temperature (∼460–580°C) needed for the plasma nitriding treatment. To understand the mechanism, effect of heat treatment on the nitrided layer steel is investigated. Experiments are performed on three different types of ball bearing races i.e. annealed, quenched and quench-tempered samples. Different gas compositions and process temperatures are maintained while nitriding these samples. In the quenched and quench-tempered samples, the surface hardness has decreased after plasma nitriding process. Plasma nitriding of annealed sample with argon and nitrogen gas mixture gives higher hardness in comparison to the hydrogen–nitrogen gas mixture. It is reported that the later heat treatment of the plasma nitrided annealed sample has shown improvement in the hardness of this steel. X-ray diffraction analysis shows that the dominant phases in the plasma nitrided annealed sample are (Fe2−3N) and (Fe4N), whereas in the plasma nitrided annealed sample with later heat treatment only -Fe peak occurs.

  1. Cubic nitrides of the sixth group of transition metals formed by nitrogen ion irradiation during metal condensation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ensinger, W. [Augsburg Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik; Kiuchi, M. [Osaka National Research Institute, Midorigaoka 1-8-31, Ikeda, Osaka 563 (Japan)

    1996-10-01

    Nitrogen-containing phases of chromium, molybdenum and tungsten were formed by evaporation of the metal under simultaneous nitrogen ion irradiation. With gradually increasing ion irradiation intensity, chromium forms initially Cr and Cr{sub 2}N phase mixtures, then additionally CrN appears, and at the highest intensities pure CrN films are formed. Molybdenum also forms pure nitride MoN under intense ion bombardment. However, in this case two different crystal structures are found, the stable hexagonal phase and the metastable cubic high-temperature phase. The latter is favoured under intense ion irradiation. In the case of tungsten, even at the highest intensities, only phase mixtures of W and W{sub 2}N were formed. These observed differences can be explained by the low reactivity of these metals towards nitrogen and the low chemical stability of the nitrides, particularly of WN. The metastable high-temperature structure of MoN is formed under the particular conditions of ion bombardment with rapid energy dissipation. (orig.)

  2. Determination of chromium combined with DNA, RNA and proteins in chromium-rich brewer's yeast by NAA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The content of chromium in the DNA, RNA and protein fractions separated from chromium-rich and normal brewer's yeast was determined by neutron activation analysis (NAA). Our results show that the extracted relative amounts and concentrations of DNA, RNA and proteins have no significant difference for two types of yeast, but the chromium content in DNA, RNA and proteins fractions extracted from the chromium-rich yeast are substantially higher than those from the normal. In addition, the concentration of chromium in DNA is much higher than that in RNA and proteins. It is evident that the inorganic chromium compounds can enter the yeast cell during the yeast cultivation in the chromium-containing culture medium and are converted into organic chromium species, which are combined with DNA, RNA and proteins. (author)

  3. Hexavalent and trivalent chromium in leather: What should be done?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moretto, Angelo

    2015-11-01

    Trivalent chromium compounds are used for leather tanning, and chromium may be released during use of leather goods. In certain instances, small amounts of hexavalent chromium can be formed and released. Both trivalent and hexavalent chromium can elicit allergic skin reaction in chromium sensitised subjects, the latter being significantly more potent. Induction of sensitisation only occurs after exposure to hexavalent chromium. A minority of subjects are sensitised to chromium, and in a fraction of these subjects allergic skin reaction have been described after wearing leather shoes or, less frequently, other leather goods. The evidence that in all these cases the reaction is related to hexavalent chromium is not always strong. The content of hexavalent chromium in leather is regulated in European Union, but rate of release rather than content is relevant for allergic skin reaction. The role of trivalent chromium appear much less relevant if at all. Modern tanning procedure do not pose significant risk due to either hexavalent or trivalent chromium. Dismissing bad quality and worn-off leather goods is relevant in reducing or eliminating the skin reaction. It should also be pointed out that shoe components or substances other than chromium in leather may cause allergic/irritative skin reactions.

  4. Chromium allergy and dermatitis: prevalence and main findings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bregnbak, David; Johansen, Jeanne D.; Jellesen, Morten Stendahl;

    2015-01-01

    The history of chromium as an allergen goes back more than a century, and includesan interventional success with national legislation that led to significant changes inthe epidemiology of chromium allergy in construction workers. The 2015 EU Leather Regulation once again put a focus on chromium...

  5. Thermodynamic properties of chromium bearing slags and minerals. A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao Yanping; Holappa, L.

    1996-12-31

    In this report, the thermodynamic properties of chromium bearing slags and minerals were reviewed based on the available information in the literature. It includes the analysing methods for oxidation state of chromium in slags, oxidation state of chromium and activities of chromium oxides in slags and minerals. The phase diagrams of chromium oxide systems and chromium distributions between slag and metal phases are also covered ill this review. Concerning the analysing methods, it was found that most of the available approaches are limited to iron free slag systems and the sample preparation is very sensitive to the analysing results. In silicate slags under reducing atmosphere, divalent and trivalent chromium co-exist in the slags. It is agreed that the fraction of divalent chromium to total chromium increases with higher temperature, lower slag basicity and oxygen potential. For the slags under oxidising atmosphere, trivalent, pentavalent and hexavalent states were reported to be stable. The activities of CrO and CrO{sub 1.5} were concluded to have positive deviation from ideal solution. Slag basicity has a positive effect and temperature has a negative effect on the activities of chromium oxides. The phase diagrams of the Cr-O, binary, and ternary chromium containing oxide systems have been examined systematically. The analysis shows that the data on the quaternary and quinary systems are insufficient, and require further investigation. The most important features of the chromium containing silicate slags are the large miscibility gaps and the stability of the chromite spinel. (orig.) (76 refs.)

  6. 21 CFR 73.1015 - Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide. 73.1015 Section 73... LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1015 Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide. (a) Identity. The color additive chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide is a blue-green pigment obtained by calcining...

  7. Hexavalent and trivalent chromium in leather: What should be done?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moretto, Angelo

    2015-11-01

    Trivalent chromium compounds are used for leather tanning, and chromium may be released during use of leather goods. In certain instances, small amounts of hexavalent chromium can be formed and released. Both trivalent and hexavalent chromium can elicit allergic skin reaction in chromium sensitised subjects, the latter being significantly more potent. Induction of sensitisation only occurs after exposure to hexavalent chromium. A minority of subjects are sensitised to chromium, and in a fraction of these subjects allergic skin reaction have been described after wearing leather shoes or, less frequently, other leather goods. The evidence that in all these cases the reaction is related to hexavalent chromium is not always strong. The content of hexavalent chromium in leather is regulated in European Union, but rate of release rather than content is relevant for allergic skin reaction. The role of trivalent chromium appear much less relevant if at all. Modern tanning procedure do not pose significant risk due to either hexavalent or trivalent chromium. Dismissing bad quality and worn-off leather goods is relevant in reducing or eliminating the skin reaction. It should also be pointed out that shoe components or substances other than chromium in leather may cause allergic/irritative skin reactions. PMID:26361854

  8. Collisional properties of trapped cold chromium atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Pavlovich, Z; Côté, R; Sadeghpour, H R; Pavlovic, Zoran; Roos, Bjoern O.; Côté, Robin

    2004-01-01

    We report on calculations of the elastic cross section and thermalization rate for collision between two maximally spin-polarized chromium atoms in the cold and ultracold regimes, relevant to buffer-gas and magneto-optical cooling of chromium atoms. We calculate ab initio potential energy curves for Cr2 and the van der Waals coefficient C6, and construct interaction potentials between two colliding Cr atoms. We explore the effect of shape resonances on elastic cross section, and find that they dramatically affect the thermalization rate. Our calculated value for the s-wave scattering length is compared in magnitude with a recent measurement at ultracold temperatures.

  9. Studying chromium biosorption using arabica coffee leaves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Carlos Florez García

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available This work was aimed at providing an alternative for removing heavy metals such as chromium from waste water (effluent from the leather industry and galvanoplasty (coating with a thin layer of metal by electrochemical means, using coffee leaves as bio- mass. Using arabica coffee (Castle variety leaves led to 82% chromium removal efficiency for 1,000 mg/L synthetic dissolutions in 4 pH dissolution operating conditions, 0 rpm agitation, 0.149 mm diameter biomass particle size and 0.85 g/ml biomass / dissolution volume ratio.

  10. Strategies for chromium bioremediation of tannery effluent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Satyendra Kumar; Tripathi, Manikant; Srinath, Thiruneelakantan

    2012-01-01

    Bioremediation offers the possibility of using living organisms (bacteria, fungi, algae,or plants), but primarily microorganisms, to degrade or remove environmental contaminants, and transform them into nontoxic or less-toxic forms. The major advantages of bioremediation over conventional physicochemical and biological treatment methods include low cost, good efficiency, minimization of chemicals, reduced quantity of secondary sludge, regeneration of cell biomass, and the possibility of recover-ing pollutant metals. Leather industries, which extensively employ chromium compounds in the tanning process, discharge spent-chromium-laden effluent into nearby water bodies. Worldwide, chromium is known to be one of the most common inorganic contaminants of groundwater at pollutant hazardous sites. Hexavalent chromium poses a health risk to all forms of life. Bioremediation of chromium extant in tannery waste involves different strategies that include biosorption, bioaccumulation,bioreduction, and immobilization of biomaterial(s). Biosorption is a nondirected physiochemical interaction that occurs between metal species and the cellular components of biological species. It is metabolism-dependent when living biomass is employed, and metabolism-independent in dead cell biomass. Dead cell biomass is much more effective than living cell biomass at biosorping heavy metals, including chromium. Bioaccumulation is a metabolically active process in living organisms that works through adsorption, intracellular accumulation, and bioprecipitation mechanisms. In bioreduction processes, microorganisms alter the oxidation/reduction state of toxic metals through direct or indirect biological and chemical process(es).Bioreduction of Cr6+ to Cr3+ not only decreases the chromium toxicity to living organisms, but also helps precipitate chromium at a neutral pH for further physical removal,thus offering promise as a bioremediation strategy. However, biosorption, bioaccumulation, and

  11. Titanium nitride nanoparticles for therapeutic applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guler, Urcan; Kildishev, Alexander V.; Boltasseva, Alexandra;

    2014-01-01

    Titanium nitride nanoparticles exhibit plasmonic resonances in the biological transparency window where high absorption efficiencies can be obtained with small dimensions. Both lithographic and colloidal samples are examined from the perspective of nanoparticle thermal therapy. © 2014 OSA....

  12. Standard Specification for Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum-Columbium Alloy (UNS N06625), Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum-Silicon Alloy (UNS N06219), and Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum-Tungsten Alloy (UNS N06650) Rod and Bar

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2014-01-01

    Standard Specification for Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum-Columbium Alloy (UNS N06625), Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum-Silicon Alloy (UNS N06219), and Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum-Tungsten Alloy (UNS N06650) Rod and Bar

  13. Progress in molecular uranium-nitride chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    King, David M.; Liddle, Stephen T

    2014-01-01

    The coordination, organometallic, and materials chemistry of uranium nitride has long been an important facet of actinide chemistry. Following matrix isolation experiments and computational characterisation, molecular, solution-based uranium chemistry has developed significantly in the last decade or so culminating most recently in the isolation of the first examples of long-sought terminal uranium nitride linkages. Herein, the field is reviewed with an emphasis on well-defined molecular spec...

  14. Innovative boron nitride-doped propellants

    OpenAIRE

    Thelma Manning; Richard Field; Kenneth Klingaman; Michael Fair; John Bolognini; Robin Crownover; Carlton P. Adam; Viral Panchal; Eugene Rozumov; Henry Grau; Paul Matter; Michael Beachy; Christopher Holt; Samuel Sopok

    2016-01-01

    The U.S. military has a need for more powerful propellants with balanced/stoichiometric amounts of fuel and oxidants. However, balanced and more powerful propellants lead to accelerated gun barrel erosion and markedly shortened useful barrel life. Boron nitride (BN) is an interesting potential additive for propellants that could reduce gun wear effects in advanced propellants (US patent pending 2015-026P). Hexagonal boron nitride is a good lubricant that can provide wear resistance and lower ...

  15. The Nitrogen-Nitride Anode.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delnick, Frank M.

    2014-10-01

    Nitrogen gas N 2 can be reduced to nitride N -3 in molten LiCl-KCl eutectic salt electrolyte. However, the direct oxidation of N -3 back to N 2 is kinetically slow and only occurs at high overvoltage. The overvoltage for N -3 oxidation can be eliminated by coordinating the N -3 with BN to form the dinitridoborate (BN 2 -3 ) anion which forms a 1-D conjugated linear inorganic polymer with -Li-N-B-N- repeating units. This polymer precipitates out of solution as Li 3 BN 2 which becomes a metallic conductor upon delithiation. Li 3 BN 2 is oxidized to Li + + N 2 + BN at about the N 2 /N -3 redox potential with very little overvoltage. In this report we evaluate the N 2 /N -3 redox couple as a battery anode for energy storage.

  16. Characterization of TiN, TiC and Ti(C,N) in titanium-alloyed ferritic chromium steels focusing on the significance of different particle morphologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Titanium-alloyed ferritic chromium steels are a competitive option to classical austenitic stainless steels owing to their similar corrosion resistance. The addition of titanium significantly influences their final steel cleanliness. The present contribution focuses on the detailed metallographic characterization of titanium nitrides, titanium carbides and titanium carbonitrides with regard to their size, morphology and composition. The methods used are manual and automated Scanning Electron Microscopy with Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy as well as optical microscopy. Additional thermodynamic calculations are performed to explain the precipitation procedure of the analyzed titanium nitrides. The analyses showed that homogeneous nucleation is decisive at an early process stage after the addition of titanium. Heterogeneous nucleation gets crucial with ongoing process time and essentially influences the final inclusion size of titanium nitrides. A detailed investigation of the nuclei for heterogeneous nucleation with automated Scanning Electron Microscopy proved to be difficult due to their small size. Manual Scanning Electron Microscopy and optical microscopy have to be applied. Furthermore, it was found that during solidification an additional layer around an existing titanium nitride can be formed which changes the final inclusion morphology significantly. These layers are also characterized in detail. Based on these different inclusion morphologies, in combination with thermodynamic results, tendencies regarding the formation and modification time of titanium containing inclusions in ferritic chromium steels are derived. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • The formation and modification of TiN in the steel 1.4520 was examined. • Heterogeneous nucleation essentially influences the final steel cleanliness. • In most cases heterogeneous nuclei in TiN inclusions are magnesium based. • Particle morphology provides important information

  17. Characterization of TiN, TiC and Ti(C,N) in titanium-alloyed ferritic chromium steels focusing on the significance of different particle morphologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michelic, S.K., E-mail: susanne.michelic@unileoben.ac.at [Chair of Ferrous Metallurgy, Montanuniversitaet Leoben, Franz-Josef-Straße 18, 8700 Leoben (Austria); Loder, D. [Chair of Ferrous Metallurgy, Montanuniversitaet Leoben, Franz-Josef-Straße 18, 8700 Leoben (Austria); Reip, T.; Ardehali Barani, A. [Outokumpu Nirosta GmbH, Essener Straße 244, 44793 Bochum (Germany); Bernhard, C. [Chair of Ferrous Metallurgy, Montanuniversitaet Leoben, Franz-Josef-Straße 18, 8700 Leoben (Austria)

    2015-02-15

    Titanium-alloyed ferritic chromium steels are a competitive option to classical austenitic stainless steels owing to their similar corrosion resistance. The addition of titanium significantly influences their final steel cleanliness. The present contribution focuses on the detailed metallographic characterization of titanium nitrides, titanium carbides and titanium carbonitrides with regard to their size, morphology and composition. The methods used are manual and automated Scanning Electron Microscopy with Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy as well as optical microscopy. Additional thermodynamic calculations are performed to explain the precipitation procedure of the analyzed titanium nitrides. The analyses showed that homogeneous nucleation is decisive at an early process stage after the addition of titanium. Heterogeneous nucleation gets crucial with ongoing process time and essentially influences the final inclusion size of titanium nitrides. A detailed investigation of the nuclei for heterogeneous nucleation with automated Scanning Electron Microscopy proved to be difficult due to their small size. Manual Scanning Electron Microscopy and optical microscopy have to be applied. Furthermore, it was found that during solidification an additional layer around an existing titanium nitride can be formed which changes the final inclusion morphology significantly. These layers are also characterized in detail. Based on these different inclusion morphologies, in combination with thermodynamic results, tendencies regarding the formation and modification time of titanium containing inclusions in ferritic chromium steels are derived. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • The formation and modification of TiN in the steel 1.4520 was examined. • Heterogeneous nucleation essentially influences the final steel cleanliness. • In most cases heterogeneous nuclei in TiN inclusions are magnesium based. • Particle morphology provides important information

  18. Electrodeposition of black chromium thin films from trivalent chromium-ionic liquid solution

    OpenAIRE

    Eugénio, S.; Vilar, Rui; C. M. Rangel; Baskaran, I.

    2009-01-01

    In the present study, black chromium thin films were electrodeposited from a solution of 1-butyl-3- methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate ([BMIm][BF4] ionic liquid containing trivalent chromium (Cr(III)). Homogeneous and well adherent coatings have been obtained on nickel, copper and stainless steel substrates. The nucleation and growth of the films were investigated by cyclic voltammetry and current-density/time transient techniques. SEM/EDS, XPS and XRD were used to study the morphology, chem...

  19. Reduction of Hexavalent Chromium by Viable Cells of Chromium Resistant Bacteria Isolated from Chromite Mining Environment

    OpenAIRE

    Satarupa Dey; Baishali Pandit; A. K. Paul

    2014-01-01

    Environmental contamination of hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] is of serious concern for its toxicity as well as mutagenic and carcinogenic effects. Bacterial chromate reduction is a cost-effective technology for detoxification as well as removal of Cr(VI) from polluted environment. Chromium resistant and reducing bacteria, belonging to Arthrobacter, Pseudomonas, and Corynebacterium isolated from chromite mine overburden and seepage samples of Orissa, India, were found to tolerate 12–18 mM Cr(VI...

  20. Reduction of Chromium-VI by Chromium Resistant Lactobacilli: A Prospective Bacterium for Bioremediation

    OpenAIRE

    Mishra, Ritesh; Sinha, Vartika; Kannan, Ambrose; Upreti, Raj K.

    2012-01-01

    Chromium is a toxic heavy metal, which primarily exists in two inorganic forms, Cr (VI) and Cr (III). Highly soluble hexavalent chromium is carcinogenic due to its oxidizing nature. It is well established that the intestinal bacteria including Lactobacilli have regulatory effect on intestinal homeostasis and a breakdown in the relationship between intestinal cells and bacteria results in the manifestation of gastrointestinal (GI) disorders. In this study Cr (VI) resistance was developed in La...

  1. The electronic structure of antiferromagnetic chromium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skriver, Hans Lomholt

    1981-01-01

    The author has used the local spin density formalism to perform self-consistent calculations of the electronic structure of chromium in the non-magnetic and commensurate antiferromagnetic phases, as a function of the lattice parameter. A change of a few per cent in the atomic radius brings...

  2. Flashlamp-pumped lasing of chromium: GSGG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lasing action in chromium-doped gadolinium scandium gallium garnet (Cr:GSGG) is well established for both CW/sup (1)/ and flashlamp/sup (2)/ pumping. This paper describes an investigation of flashlamp-pumped Cr:GSGG lasers and indicates some of the factors which limit performance

  3. Defect structure of electrodeposited chromium layers

    CERN Document Server

    Marek, T; Vertes, A; El-Sharif, M; McDougall, J; Chisolm, C U

    2000-01-01

    Positron annihilation spectroscopy was applied to study the effects of pre-treatment and composition of substrates on the quality and defect structure of electrodeposited thick chromium coatings. The results show that both parameters are important, and a scenario is proposed why the mechanically polished substrate gives more defective film than the electro polished one.

  4. 29 CFR 1910.1026 - Chromium (VI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Enhancements In Lieu of LEV Retrofitting • Eductors. Many chemical baths are currently mixed via air agitation... requirements of the Hazard Communication Standard, 29 CFR 1910.1200. (3) Cleaning and replacement. (i) The... CFR 1910.141. Where skin contact with chromium (VI) occurs, the employer shall provide...

  5. Synthesis of Vanadium Nitride by a One Step Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sansan YU; Nianxin FU; Feng GAO; Zhitong SUI

    2007-01-01

    Vanadium nitrides were prepared via one step method of carbothermal reduction and nitridation of vanadium trioxide. Thermalgravimetric analysis (TGA) and X-ray diffraction were used to determine the reaction paths of vanadium carbide, namely the following sequential reaction: V2O3→V8C7 in higher temperature stage, the rule of vanadium nitride synthesized was established, and defined conditions of temperature for the production of the carbides and nitrides were determined. Vanadium oxycarbide may consist in the front process of carbothermal reduction of vanadium trioxide. In one step method for vanadium nitride by carbothermal reduction and nitridation of vanadium trioxide, the nitridation process is simultaneous with the carbothermal reduction. A one-step mechanism of the carbothermal reduction with simultaneous nitridation leaded to a lower terminal temperature in nitridation process for vanadium nitride produced, compared with that of carbothermal reduction process without nitridation. The grain size and shape of vanadium nitride were uniform, and had the shape of a cube. The one step method combined vacuum carborization and nitridation (namely two step method) into one process. It simplified the technological process and decreased the costs.

  6. Biological groundwater treatment for chromium removal at low hexavalent chromium concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamais, Daniel; Noutsopoulos, Constantinos; Kavallari, Ioanna; Nyktari, Eleni; Kaldis, Apostolos; Panousi, Eleni; Nikitopoulos, George; Antoniou, Kornilia; Nasioka, Maria

    2016-06-01

    The objective of this work is to develop and evaluate biological groundwater treatment systems that will achieve hexavalent chromium reduction and total chromium removal from groundwater at hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) groundwater concentrations in the 0-200 μg/L range. Three lab-scale units operated, as sequencing batch reactors (SBR) under aerobic, anaerobic and anaerobic-aerobic conditions. All systems received groundwater with a Cr(VI) content of 200 μg/L. In order to support biological growth, groundwater was supplemented with milk, liquid cheese whey or a mixture of sugar and milk to achieve a COD concentration of 200 mg/L. The results demonstrate that a fully anaerobic system or an anaerobic-aerobic system dosed with simple or complex external organic carbon sources can lead to practically complete Cr(VI) reduction to Cr(III). The temperature dependency of maximum Cr(VI) removal rates can be described by the Arrhenius relationship. Total chromium removal in the biological treatment systems was not complete because a significant portion of Cr(III) remained in solution. An integrated system comprising of an anaerobic SBR followed by a sand filter achieved more than 95% total chromium removal thus resulting in average effluent total and dissolved chromium concentrations of 7 μg/L and 3 μg/L, respectively. PMID:26971177

  7. Chromium(III) and chromium(VI) surface treated galvanized steel for outdoor constructions: environmental aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindström, David; Hedberg, Yolanda; Odnevall Wallinder, Inger

    2010-06-01

    The long-term degradation of chromium(III) (Zn-Cr(III)) and chromium(VI)-based (Zn-Cr(VI)) surface treatments on galvanized steel and their capacities to hinder the release of zinc induced by atmospheric corrosion at nonsheltered urban and marine exposure conditions for 2 years are investigated. Compared to bare zinc sheet, both surface treatments revealed high corrosion protection abilities and capacities to hinder the release of zinc, still evident after 2 years of exposure. The zinc barrier properties of the thinner Zn-Cr(VI) (10 nm) treatment were during the first 100 days of urban exposure slightly improved compared with Zn-Cr(III) (35 nm). However, their long-term protection capacities were inverse. Released concentrations of total chromium correspond to annual release rates less than 0.000032 (Zn-Cr(III)) and 0.00014 g Cr m(-2) yr(-1) (Zn-Cr(VI)) after 1 year of urban exposure. Aging by indoor storage of the surface treatments prior to outdoor exposure reduced the released Cr concentrations from the surface treatments. No Cr(VI) was released from the aged surfaces but from the freshly exposed Zn-Cr(VI). Marine exposure conditions resulted in a faster reduction of chromate to chromium(III)oxide compared with urban conditions, and a significantly lower amount of both chromium(III) and chromium(VI) released from Zn-Cr(VI) at the marine site compared with the urban site. PMID:20462267

  8. Growth of epitaxial iron nitride ultrathin film on zinc-blende gallium nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors report the growth of iron nitride on zinc-blende gallium nitride using molecular beam epitaxy. First, zinc-blende GaN is grown on a magnesium oxide substrate having (001) orientation; second, an ultrathin layer of FeN is grown on top of the GaN layer. In situ reflection high-energy electron diffraction is used to monitor the surface during growth, and a well-defined epitaxial relationship is observed. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy is used to reveal the epitaxial continuity at the gallium nitride-iron nitride interface. Surface morphology of the iron nitride, similar to yet different from that of the GaN substrate, can be described as plateau valley. The FeN chemical stoichiometry is probed using both bulk and surface sensitive methods, and the magnetic properties of the sample are revealed.

  9. A Kinetic Model of Chromium in a Flame

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Chromium has been identified as a carcinogenic metal.Incineration is the useful method for disposal of toxic chromium hazard waste and a chromium kinetic model in a flame is very important to study chromium oxidation.Chromium chemical kinetics over a range of temperatures of a hydrogen/air flame is proposed.Nine chromium compounds and fifty-eight reversible chemical reactions were considered The forward reaction rates are calculated based on the molecular collision approach for unknown ones and Arrhenius's Law for known ones.The backward reaction rates were calculated according to forward reaction rates, the equilibrium constants and chemical thermodynamics.It is verified by several equilibrium cases and is tested by a hydrogen/air diffusion flame.The results show that the kinetic model could be used in cases in which the chromium kinetics play an important role in a flame

  10. Nitriding and Nitrocarburizing; Current Status and Future Challenges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Somers, Marcel A. J.

    This contribution addresses the current understanding of gaseous nitriding and nitrocarburizing. Aspects of thermodynamics, kinetics and microstructure development in iron and heat treatable steel will be explained. In these materials the nitrided/ nitrocarburized case can be subdivided...

  11. Method of manufacture of atomically thin boron nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zettl, Alexander K

    2013-08-06

    The present invention provides a method of fabricating at least one single layer hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN). In an exemplary embodiment, the method includes (1) suspending at least one multilayer boron nitride across a gap of a support structure and (2) performing a reactive ion etch upon the multilayer boron nitride to produce the single layer hexagonal boron nitride suspended across the gap of the support structure. The present invention also provides a method of fabricating single layer hexagonal boron nitride. In an exemplary embodiment, the method includes (1) providing multilayer boron nitride suspended across a gap of a support structure and (2) performing a reactive ion etch upon the multilayer boron nitride to produce the single layer hexagonal boron nitride suspended across the gap of the support structure.

  12. Colloidal Plasmonic Titanium Nitride Nanoparticles: Properties and Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guler, Urcan; Suslov, Sergey; Kildishev, Alexander V.;

    2015-01-01

    Optical properties of colloidal plasmonic titanium nitride nanoparticles are examined with an eye on their photothermal and photocatalytic applications via transmission electron microscopy and optical transmittance measurements. Single crystal titanium nitride cubic nanoparticles with an average ...

  13. Advancing liquid metal reactor technology with nitride fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review of the use of nitride fuels in liquid metal fast reactors is presented. Past studies indicate that both uranium nitride and uranium/plutonium nitride possess characteristics that may offer enhanced performance, particularly in the area of passive safety. To further quantify these effects, the analysis of a mixed-nitride fuel system utilizing the geometry and power level of the US Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor as a reference is described. 18 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs

  14. Diffusion kinetics of nitrogen in tantalum during plasma-nitriding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张德元; 林勤; 曾卫军; 李放; 许兰萍; 付青峰

    2001-01-01

    The activation energies of nitrogen in tantalum on plasma nitriding conditions were calculated according to the experimental data of hardness of plasma-nitriding of tantalum vs time and temperature. The activation energy calculated is 148.873±0.390  kJ/mol. The depth increasing of nitriding layer with time follows square root relation. The nitriding process of tantalum is controlled by diffusion of nitrogen atoms in tantalum solid solution.

  15. Studies on Dielectric Properties of Silicon Nitride at High Temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ting Zhang; Shu-Ren Zhang; Meng-Qiang Wu; Wei-Jun Sang; Zheng-Ping Gao; Zhong-Ping Li

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, the dielectric properties of silicon nitride are studied using the dielectric polarization theories. According to the developed dielectric models, the temperature dependence of dielectric constant and loss of silicon nitride is mainly analyzed. In addition, the impact of Li+, K+, Ca2+, Al3+ and Mg2+ doping on the dielectric properties of silicon nitride are also estimated.

  16. Ion nitriding in 316=L stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ion nitriding is a glow discharge process that is used to induce surface modification in metals. It has been applied to 316-L austenitic stainless steel looking for similar benefits already obtained in other steels. An austenitic stainless steel was selected because is not hardenable by heat treatment and is not easy to nitride by gas nitriding. The samples were plastically deformed to 10, 20, 40, 50 AND 70% of their original thickness in order to obtain bulk hardening and to observe nitrogen penetration dependence on it. The results were: an increase of one to two rockwell hardness number (except in 70% deformed sample because of its thickness); an increase of even several hundreds per cent in microhardness knoop number in nitrided surface. The later surely modifies waste resistance which would be worth to quantify in further studies. Microhardness measured in an internal transversal face to nitrided surface had a gradual diminish in its value with depth. Auger microanalysis showed a higher relative concentration rate CN/CFe near the surface giving evidence of nitrogen presence till 250 microns deep. The color metallography etchant used, produced faster corrosion in nitrited regions. Therefore, corrosion studies have to be done before using ion nitrited 316-L under these chemicals. (Author)

  17. Innovative boron nitride-doped propellants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thelma Manning

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The U.S. military has a need for more powerful propellants with balanced/stoichiometric amounts of fuel and oxidants. However, balanced and more powerful propellants lead to accelerated gun barrel erosion and markedly shortened useful barrel life. Boron nitride (BN is an interesting potential additive for propellants that could reduce gun wear effects in advanced propellants (US patent pending 2015-026P. Hexagonal boron nitride is a good lubricant that can provide wear resistance and lower flame temperatures for gun barrels. Further, boron can dope steel, which drastically improves its strength and wear resistance, and can block the formation of softer carbides. A scalable synthesis method for producing boron nitride nano-particles that can be readily dispersed into propellants has been developed. Even dispersion of the nano-particles in a double-base propellant has been demonstrated using a solvent-based processing approach. Stability of a composite propellant with the BN additive was verified. In this paper, results from propellant testing of boron nitride nano-composite propellants are presented, including closed bomb and wear and erosion testing. Detailed characterization of the erosion tester substrates before and after firing was obtained by electron microscopy, inductively coupled plasma and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. This promising boron nitride additive shows the ability to improve gun wear and erosion resistance without any destabilizing effects to the propellant. Potential applications could include less erosive propellants in propellant ammunition for large, medium and small diameter fire arms.

  18. Innovative boron nitride-doped propellants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Thelma MANNING; Henry GRAU; Paul MATTER; Michael BEACHY; Christopher HOLT; Samuel SOPOK; Richard FIELD; Kenneth KLINGAMAN; Michael FAIR; John BOLOGNINI; Robin CROWNOVER; Carlton P. ADAM; Viral PANCHAL; Eugene ROZUMOV

    2016-01-01

    The U.S. military has a need for more powerful propellants with balanced/stoichiometric amounts of fuel and oxidants. However, balanced and more powerful propellants lead to accelerated gun barrel erosion and markedly shortened useful barrel life. Boron nitride (BN) is an interesting potential additive for propellants that could reduce gun wear effects in advanced propellants (US patent pending 2015-026P). Hexagonal boron nitride is a good lubricant that can provide wear resistance and lower flame temperatures for gun barrels. Further, boron can dope steel, which drastically improves its strength and wear resistance, and can block the formation of softer carbides. A scalable synthesis method for producing boron nitride nano-particles that can be readily dispersed into propellants has been developed. Even dispersion of the nano-particles in a double-base propellant has been demonstrated using a solvent-based processing approach. Stability of a composite propellant with the BN additive was verified. In this paper, results from propellant testing of boron nitride nano-composite propellants are presented, including closed bomb and wear and erosion testing. Detailed characterization of the erosion tester substrates before and after firing was obtained by electron microscopy, inductively coupled plasma and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. This promising boron nitride additive shows the ability to improve gun wear and erosion resistance without any destabilizing effects to the propellant. Potential applications could include less erosive propellants in propellant ammunition for large, medium and small diameter fire arms.

  19. CHROMIUM INDUCED CYTOTOXICITY IN BLACKGRAM (VIGNA MUNGO L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Chidambaram ، P. Sundaramoorthy ، A. Murugan ، K. Sankar Ganesh ، L. Baskaran

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Chromium is known to be highly toxic to biological systems. This study was designed to determine the mutagenic effects of different concentrations (0, 10, 25, 50, 100 and 200 mg/L of hexavalent chromium on root tip cells of blackgram (Vigna mungo L. Hepper. The blackgram seeds were equi-spacially arranged in sterilized petriplates lined with filter paper and they were treated with different concentrations of chromium solution. In germination studies, the morphological growth parameters such as germination percentage, root length, shoot length fresh weight and dry weight of blackgram seedlings were decreased with increasing dose of chromium concentrations. No germination of blackgram seeds was recorded at 300mg/l chromium concentration. Chromosome aberration assay was used to determine the mitotic indices and rate of chromosome aberration in blackgram root tip cells due to chromium treatment. The results showed that the mitotic indices were complicated due to different concentrations of chromium. However, the increase in chromium concentration has led to a gradual increase in the percentage of chromosomal aberration and mitotic index. The chromosome length, absolute chromosome length and average chromosome lengths were gradually found to decrease. There was no considerable change in 2n number of chromosome with the increase in chromium concentrations. It is concluded that the hexavalent chromium has significant mutagenic effect on the root tip cells of blackgram.

  20. Chromium supplementation improved post-stroke brain infarction and hyperglycemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wen-Ying; Mao, Frank Chiahung; Liu, Chia-Hsin; Kuan, Yu-Hsiang; Lai, Nai-Wei; Wu, Chih-Cheng; Chen, Chun-Jung

    2016-04-01

    Hyperglycemia is common after acute stroke and is associated with a worse outcome of stroke. Thus, a better understanding of stress hyperglycemia is helpful to the prevention and therapeutic treatment of stroke. Chromium is an essential nutrient required for optimal insulin activity and normal carbohydrate and lipid metabolism. Beyond its nutritional effects, dietary supplement of chromium causes beneficial outcomes against several diseases, in particular diabetes-associated complications. In this study, we investigated whether post-stroke hyperglycemia involved chromium dynamic mobilization in a rat model of permanent focal cerebral ischemia and whether dietary supplement of chromium improved post-stroke injury and alterations. Stroke rats developed brain infarction, hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, glucose intolerance, and insulin resistance. Post-stroke hyperglycemia was accompanied by elevated secretion of counter-regulatory hormones including glucagon, corticosterone, and norepinephrine, decreased insulin signaling in skeletal muscles, and increased hepatic gluconeogenesis. Correlation studies revealed that counter-regulatory hormone secretion showed a positive correlation with chromium loss and blood glucose increased together with chromium loss. Daily chromium supplementation increased tissue chromium levels, attenuated brain infarction, improved hyperglycemia, and decreased plasma levels of glucagon and corticosterone in stroke rats. Our findings suggest that stroke rats show disturbance of tissue chromium homeostasis with a net loss through urinary excretion and chromium mobilization and loss might be an alternative mechanism responsible for post-stroke hyperglycemia. PMID:26477944

  1. Improvement on simultaneous determination of chromium species in aqueous solution by ion chromatography and chemiluminescence detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gammelgaard, Bente; Liao, Y.P.; Jons, O.

    1997-01-01

    A sensitive method for the simultaneous determination of chromium(III) and chromium(VI) was chromatography and chemiluminescence detection. Two Dionex ion-exchange guard columns in series, CG5 and AG7, were used to separate chromium(III) from chromium(VI). Chromium(VI) was reduced by potassium su...

  2. Production of basic chromium sulfate by using recovered chromium from ashes of thermally treated leather.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dettmer, Aline; Nunes, Keila Guerra Pacheco; Gutterres, Mariliz; Marcílio, Nilson Romeu

    2010-04-15

    Leather wastes tanned with chromium are generated during the production process of leather, hence the wastes from hand crafted goods and footwear industries are a serious environmental problem. The thermal treatment of leather wastes can be one of the treatment options because the wastes are rich in chromium and can be used as a raw material for sodium chromate production and further to obtain several chromium compounds. The objective of this study was to utilize the chromium from leather wastes via basic chromium sulfate production to be subsequently applied in a hide tanning. The obtained results have shown that this is the first successful attempt to achieve desired base properties of the product. The result was achieved when the following conditions were applied: a molar ratio between sodium sulfite and sodium dichromate equal to 6; reaction time equal to 5 min before addition of sulfuric acid; pH of sodium dichromate solution equal to 2. Summarizing, there is an opportunity to utilize the dangerous wastes and reused them in the production scheme by minimizing or annulling the environmental impact and to attend a sustainable process development concept.

  3. Production of basic chromium sulfate by using recovered chromium from ashes of thermally treated leather.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dettmer, Aline; Nunes, Keila Guerra Pacheco; Gutterres, Mariliz; Marcílio, Nilson Romeu

    2010-04-15

    Leather wastes tanned with chromium are generated during the production process of leather, hence the wastes from hand crafted goods and footwear industries are a serious environmental problem. The thermal treatment of leather wastes can be one of the treatment options because the wastes are rich in chromium and can be used as a raw material for sodium chromate production and further to obtain several chromium compounds. The objective of this study was to utilize the chromium from leather wastes via basic chromium sulfate production to be subsequently applied in a hide tanning. The obtained results have shown that this is the first successful attempt to achieve desired base properties of the product. The result was achieved when the following conditions were applied: a molar ratio between sodium sulfite and sodium dichromate equal to 6; reaction time equal to 5 min before addition of sulfuric acid; pH of sodium dichromate solution equal to 2. Summarizing, there is an opportunity to utilize the dangerous wastes and reused them in the production scheme by minimizing or annulling the environmental impact and to attend a sustainable process development concept. PMID:20031309

  4. Femtosecond laser surface structuring and oxidation of chromium thin coatings: Black chromium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Oxidation of the chromium thin film to chromium oxide by femtosecond laser with a fundamental wavelength of 1064 nm. • Solar absorber from chromium oxide that low percentage reflectance. • Femtosecond laser oxidation, with a de-focused laser. • Chromium oxide formation by femtosecond laser in normal ambient. - Abstract: In view of their potential applications as selective solar absorbers, chromium coatings on float glass substrates were nano/micro structured by femtosecond laser in air. Raman and X-rays diffraction investigations confirmed the formation of an ultra-porous α-Cr2O3 layer at the surface; higher is the input laser power, enhanced is the crystallinity of the α-Cr2O3 layer. The α-Cr2O3 layer with the Cr underneath it in addition to the photo-induced porosity acted as a classical ceramic–metal nano-composite making the reflectance to decrease significantly within the spectral range of 190–1100 nm. The average reflectance decreased from 70 to 2%

  5. Femtosecond laser surface structuring and oxidation of chromium thin coatings: Black chromium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotsedi, L., E-mail: Kotsedi@tlabs.ac.za [UNESCO-UNISA Africa Chair in Nanosciences-Nanotechnology, College of Graduate Studies, University of South Africa, Muckleneuk Ridge, P.O. Box 392, Pretoria (South Africa); Nanosciences African Network (NANOAFNET), iThemba LABS-National Research Foundation, 1 Old Faure Road, Somerset West 7129, P.O. Box 722, Somerset West, Western Cape (South Africa); Nuru, Z.Y. [UNESCO-UNISA Africa Chair in Nanosciences-Nanotechnology, College of Graduate Studies, University of South Africa, Muckleneuk Ridge, P.O. Box 392, Pretoria (South Africa); Nanosciences African Network (NANOAFNET), iThemba LABS-National Research Foundation, 1 Old Faure Road, Somerset West 7129, P.O. Box 722, Somerset West, Western Cape (South Africa); Mthunzi, P. [National Laser Centre, Council for Scientific and Industrial Research, 0001 Pretoria (South Africa); Muller, T.F.G. [University of the Western Cape, Physics Department, Bellville, 7535 Cape Town (South Africa); Eaton, S.M. [Physics Department, Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo Da Vinci, 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Julies, B. [University of the Western Cape, Physics Department, Bellville, 7535 Cape Town (South Africa); Manikandan, E. [UNESCO-UNISA Africa Chair in Nanosciences-Nanotechnology, College of Graduate Studies, University of South Africa, Muckleneuk Ridge, P.O. Box 392, Pretoria (South Africa); Nanosciences African Network (NANOAFNET), iThemba LABS-National Research Foundation, 1 Old Faure Road, Somerset West 7129, P.O. Box 722, Somerset West, Western Cape (South Africa); Ramponi, R. [Physics Department, Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo Da Vinci, 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Maaza, M. [UNESCO-UNISA Africa Chair in Nanosciences-Nanotechnology, College of Graduate Studies, University of South Africa, Muckleneuk Ridge, P.O. Box 392, Pretoria (South Africa); Nanosciences African Network (NANOAFNET), iThemba LABS-National Research Foundation, 1 Old Faure Road, Somerset West 7129, P.O. Box 722, Somerset West, Western Cape (South Africa)

    2014-12-01

    Highlights: • Oxidation of the chromium thin film to chromium oxide by femtosecond laser with a fundamental wavelength of 1064 nm. • Solar absorber from chromium oxide that low percentage reflectance. • Femtosecond laser oxidation, with a de-focused laser. • Chromium oxide formation by femtosecond laser in normal ambient. - Abstract: In view of their potential applications as selective solar absorbers, chromium coatings on float glass substrates were nano/micro structured by femtosecond laser in air. Raman and X-rays diffraction investigations confirmed the formation of an ultra-porous α-Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer at the surface; higher is the input laser power, enhanced is the crystallinity of the α-Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer. The α-Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer with the Cr underneath it in addition to the photo-induced porosity acted as a classical ceramic–metal nano-composite making the reflectance to decrease significantly within the spectral range of 190–1100 nm. The average reflectance decreased from 70 to 2%.

  6. Fusion bonding of silicon nitride surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reck, Kasper; Østergaard, Christian; Thomsen, Erik Vilain;

    2011-01-01

    While silicon nitride surfaces are widely used in many micro electrical mechanical system devices, e.g. for chemical passivation, electrical isolation or environmental protection, studies on fusion bonding of two silicon nitride surfaces (Si3N4–Si3N4 bonding) are very few and highly application...... results on bonding of thin and thick Si3N4 layers. The new results include high temperature bonding without any pretreatment, along with improved bonding ability achieved by thermal oxidation and chemical pretreatment. The bonded wafers include both unprocessed and processed wafers with a total silicon...... nitride thickness of up to 440 nm. Measurements of bonding strength, void characterization, oxidation rate and surface roughness are also presented. Bonding strengths for stoichiometric low pressure chemical vapor deposition Si3N4–Si3N4 direct fusion bonding in excess of 2 J cm−2 are found...

  7. Synthesis and Characterization of Chromium Oxide Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivek Sheel Jaswal

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Chromium oxide nanoparticles (NPshave been rapidly synthesized by precipitation method using ammomia as precipitating agent and are characterized by using X-ray Diffraction (XRD, Thermo Gravimetric Analysis (TGA, UV-Visible absorption (UV, Infrared Spectoscopy (IR, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM. XRD studies show that chromium oxide NP is formed as Cr2O3 and it has hexagonal structure. The shape and particle size of the synthesized Cr2O3 NPs is determined by SEM and TEM. The images showed that the size of NPs of Cr2O3 varied from 20 nm to 70 nm with average crystalline size 45 nm. UV-Visible absorption and IR spectoscopy confirm the formation of nanosized Cr2O3. TGA verifies that the Cr2O3 NPs are thermally stable upto 1000 °C.

  8. CHROMIUM(II) AMIDES - SYNTHESIS AND STRUCTURES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    EDEMA, JJH; GAMBAROTTA, S; MEETSMA, A; SPEK, AL; SMEETS, WJJ; CHIANG, MY

    1993-01-01

    A novel class of mono- and di-meric chromium(II) amides has been prepared and characterized. Reaction of [CrCl2(thf)2] (thf = tetrahydrofuran) with 2 equivalents of M(NR2) (R = C6H11, Pr(i), Ph, or phenothiazinyl; M = Li or Na) allowed the formation of the homoleptic amides [{Cr(mu-NR2)(NR2)}2] (R =

  9. Stainless chromium-nickel steels. Chapter I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The chemical composition is tabulated of 90 chromium-nickel stainless steels and alloys given in volume %. The values are also given of the corrosion resistance of the steels and alloys. The tables show data on the surface condition or the methods of material working, types and chemical composition of the medium where corrosion resistance tests were carried out, temperature, pressure, time of tests, corrosion rates, corrosion types, and literature references. A total of 35 references is given. (J.B.)

  10. Nitride Fuel Development at the INL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    W.E. Windes

    2007-06-01

    A new method for fabricating nitride-based fuels for nuclear applications is under development at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). A primary objective of this research is the development of a process that could be operated as an automated or semi-automated technique reducing costs, worker doses, and eventually improving the final product form. To achieve these goals the fabrication process utilizes a new cryo-forming technique to produce microspheres formed from sub-micron oxide powder to improve material handling issues, yield rapid kinetics for conversion to nitrides, and reduced material impurity levels within the nitride compounds. The microspheres are converted to a nitride form within a high temperature particle fluidizing bed using a carbothermic process that utilizes a hydrocarbon – hydrogen - nitrogen gas mixture. A new monitor and control system using differential pressure changes in the fluidizing gas allows for real-time monitoring and control of the spouted bed reactor during conversion. This monitor and control system can provide real-time data that is used to control the gas flow rates, temperatures, and gas composition to optimize the fluidization of the particle bed. The small size (0.5 µm) of the oxide powders in the microspheres dramatically increases the kinetics of the conversion process yielding reduced process times and temperatures. Initial studies using surrogate ZrO2 powder have yielded conversion efficiencies of 90 -95 % nitride formation with only small levels of oxide and carbide contaminants present. Further studies are being conducted to determine optimal gas mixture ratios, process time, and temperature range for providing complete conversion to a nitride form.

  11. Nitride Fuel Development at the INL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new method for fabricating nitride-based fuels for nuclear applications is under development at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). A primary objective of this research is the development of a process that could be operated as an automated or semi-automated technique reducing costs, worker doses, and eventually improving the final product form. To achieve these goals the fabrication process utilizes a new cryo-forming technique to produce microspheres formed from sub-micron oxide powder to improve material handling issues, yield rapid kinetics for conversion to nitrides, and reduced material impurity levels within the nitride compounds. The microspheres are converted to a nitride form within a high temperature particle fluidizing bed using a carbothermic process that utilizes a hydrocarbon-hydrogen-nitrogen gas mixture. A new monitor and control system using differential pressure changes in the fluidizing gas allows for real-time monitoring and control of the spouted bed reactor during conversion. This monitor and control system can provide real-time data that is used to control the gas flow rates, temperatures, and gas composition to optimize the fluidization of the particle bed. The small size (0.5 (micro)m) of the oxide powders in the microspheres dramatically increases the kinetics of the conversion process yielding reduced process times and temperatures. Initial studies using surrogate ZrO2 powder have yielded conversion efficiencies of 90-95% nitride formation with only small levels of oxide and carbide contaminants present. Further studies are being conducted to determine optimal gas mixture ratios, process time, and temperature range for providing complete conversion to a nitride form

  12. Precipitate-Accommodated Plasma Nitriding for Aluminum Alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Patama Visittipitukul; Tatsuhiko Aizawa; Hideyuki Kuwahara

    2004-01-01

    Reliable surface treatment has been explored to improve the strength and wear resistance of aluminum alloy parts in automotives. Long duration time as well as long pre-sputtering time are required for plasma nitriding of aluminum or its alloys only with the thickness of a few micrometers. New plasma inner nitriding is proposed to realize the fast-rate nitriding of aluminum alloys. Al-6Cu alloy is employed as a targeting material in order to demonstrate the effectiveness of this plasma nitriding. Mechanism of fast-rate nitriding process is discussed with consideration of the role of Al2Cu precipitates.

  13. Dimensionally Controlled Lithiation of Chromium Oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fister, Tim T. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Hu, Xianyi [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); Esbenshade, Jennifer [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States); Chen, Xiao [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); Wu, Jinsong [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); Dravid, Vinayak [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); Bedzyk, Michael [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); Long, Brandon [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Gewirth, Andrew A. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States); Shi, Bing [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Schlepütz, Christian M. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Fenter, Paul [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-01-12

    Oxide conversion reactions are an alternative approach for high capacity lithium ion batteries but are known to suffer from structural irreversibility associated with the phase separation and reconstitution of reduced metal species and Li2O. In particular, the morphology of the reduced metal species is thought to play a critical role in the electrochemical properties of a conversion material. Here we use a model electrode with alternating layers of chromium and chromium oxide to better understand and control these phase changes in real-time and at molecular length scales. Despite lacking crystallinity at the atomic scale, this superstructure is observed (with X-ray reflectivity, XR) to lithiate and delithiate in a purely one-dimensional manner, preserving the layered structure. The XR data show that the metal layers act as nucleation sites for the reduction of chromium in the conversion reaction. Irreversibility during delithiation is due to the formation of a ternary phase, LiCrO2, which can be further delithiated at higher potentials. The results reveal that the combination of confining lithiation to nanoscale sheets of Li2O and the availability of reaction sites in the metal layers in the layered structure is a strategy for improving the reversibility and mass transport properties that can be used in a wide range of conversion materials.

  14. Chromium--a material for fusion technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Due to their low neutron-induced radioactivity chromium based materials are considered to be candidates for structure materials in fusion technology. In this paper investigations are presented of unirradiated chromium with a purity of 99.96% (DUCROPUR) and a dispersion strengthened chromium alloy Cr5Fe1Y2O3 (DUCROLLOY). Both materials have been produced in a powder metallurgical route. Mechanical tests of smooth and pre-cracked specimens have been performed in a wide temperature range. Below 280 deg. C the fracture toughness values of DUCROPUR are very low (1/2), above the transition temperature they exceed 500 MPa m1/2. Large plastic deformations have been observed. DUCROLLOY does not indicate such a significant increase of fracture toughness in the tested temperature range. But above 400 deg. C large plastic deformations can be obtained in bending samples, too. The fatigue crack propagation behaviour of DUCROPUR at 300 deg. C is similar to that of a ductile metal

  15. Chromium Enrichment on P11 Ferritic Steel by Pack Cementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fauzi F. A.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The future thermal power plant is expected to operate at higher temperature to improve its efficiency and to reduce greenhouse gas emission. This target requires better corrosion properties of ferritic steels, which commonly used as materials for superheater and reheater of boiler tubes. In this work, chromium enrichment on the surface of ferritic steel is studied. The deposited chromium is expected to become a reservoir for the formation of chromia protective layer. Chromium was deposited on the substrate of steel by pack cementation process for two hours at the temperature of 850ºC, 950ºC and 1050ºC, respectively. XRD analysis indicated that chromium was successfully deposited at all temperatures. Somehow, SEM cross sectional image showed that continuous layer of chromium was not continuously formed at 850oC. Therefore, this research clarify that chromium enrichment by pack cementation may be conducted at the temperature above 950°C.

  16. Effect of polyethylene glycol on electrochemically deposited trivalent chromium layers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Joo-Yul LEE; Man KIM; Sik-Chol KWON

    2009-01-01

    The structural characteristics of the trivalent chromium deposits and their interfacial behavior in the plating solution with and without polyethylene glycol molecules were observed by using various electrochemical methods such as cyclic voltammetry, open circuit potential transition, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectrometry. It is shown that the polyethylene glycol molecules make the reductive current density lower in the trivalent chromium plating system and promote a hydrogen evolution reaction through their adsorption on the electrode surface. And the trivalent chromium layer formed from the polyethylene glycol-containing solution has somewhat higher density of cracks on its surface and results in a lower film resistance, lower polarization resistance, and higher capacitance in a corrosive atmosphere. It is also revealed that the formation of chromium carbide layer is facilitated in the presence of polyethylene glycol, which means easier electrochemical codeposition of chromium and carbon, not single chromium deposition.

  17. Local heating with titanium nitride nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guler, Urcan; Ndukaife, Justus C.; Naik, Gururaj V.;

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the feasibility of titanium nitride (TiN) nanoparticles as local heat sources in the near infrared region, focusing on biological window. Experiments and simulations provide promising results for TiN, which is known to be bio-compatible.......We investigate the feasibility of titanium nitride (TiN) nanoparticles as local heat sources in the near infrared region, focusing on biological window. Experiments and simulations provide promising results for TiN, which is known to be bio-compatible....

  18. Alkaline Capacitors Based on Nitride Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldissi, Matt

    2003-01-01

    High-energy-density alkaline electrochemical capacitors based on electrodes made of transition-metal nitride nanoparticles are undergoing development. Transition- metal nitrides (in particular, Fe3N and TiN) offer a desirable combination of high electrical conductivity and electrochemical stability in aqueous alkaline electrolytes like KOH. The high energy densities of these capacitors are attributable mainly to their high capacitance densities, which, in turn, are attributable mainly to the large specific surface areas of the electrode nanoparticles. Capacitors of this type could be useful as energy-storage components in such diverse equipment as digital communication systems, implanted medical devices, computers, portable consumer electronic devices, and electric vehicles.

  19. New technology for comprehensive utilization of aluminum-chromium residue from chromium salts production

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xiao-bin; QI Tian-gui; JIANG Xin-min; ZHOU Qiu-sheng; LIU Gui-hua; PENG Zhi-hong; HAN Deng-lun; ZHANG Zhong-yuan; YANG Kun-shan

    2008-01-01

    Colloidal aluminum-chromium residue(ACR) was mass-produced in chromate production process, and the large energy consumption and high recovery cost existed in traditional methods of utilizing such ACR. To overcome those problems, a new comprehensive method was proposed to deal with the ACR, and was proven valid in industry. In the new process, the chromate was separated firstly from the colloidal ACR by ripening and washing with additives, by which more than 95% hexavalent chromium was recovered. The chromium-free aluminum residue(CFAR), after properly dispersed, was digested at 120-130 ℃ and more than 90% alumina can be recovered. And then the pregnant aluminate solution obtained from digestion was seeded to precipitate aluminum hydroxide. This new method can successfully recover both alumina and sodium chromate, and thus realize the comprehensive utilization of ACR from chromate industry.

  20. Analysis of molybdenum, chromium, vanadium and iron by polarographic techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The application of direct current Tast polarograph, differential pulse polarography and phase-selective alternative current Tast polarography to the problem of determining molybdenum, chromium, vanadium and iron in various supporting electrolytes is reported. The effect of the supporting electrolyte on the wave/peak potential and sensitivity of the metal ion have been examined. The polarographic methods were applied for simultaneous determination of chromium (3)/chromium (6), vanadium (4), vanadium (5) and iron (2)/iron (3) in different supporting electrolytes

  1. A REVIEW OF BIOSORPTION OF CHROMIUM IONS BY MICROORGANISMS

    OpenAIRE

    Inga Zinicovscaia

    2012-01-01

    Due to its widespread industrial use, chromium has become a serious pollutant in diverse environmental settings. The main source of chromium pollution including the Republic o Moldova is industry. It is a great need to develop new eco-friendly methods of chromium removal. Biosorption of heavy metals is a most promising technology involved in the removal of toxic metals from industrial waste streams and natural waters. This article is an extended abstract of a communication presented at the...

  2. CHROMIUM INDUCED CYTOTOXICITY IN BLACKGRAM (VIGNA MUNGO L.)

    OpenAIRE

    A. Chidambaram ، P. Sundaramoorthy ، A. Murugan ، K. Sankar Ganesh ، L. Baskaran

    2009-01-01

    Chromium is known to be highly toxic to biological systems. This study was designed to determine the mutagenic effects of different concentrations (0, 10, 25, 50, 100 and 200 mg/L) of hexavalent chromium on root tip cells of blackgram (Vigna mungo L. Hepper). The blackgram seeds were equi-spacially arranged in sterilized petriplates lined with filter paper and they were treated with different concentrations of chromium solution. In germination studies, the morphological growth parameters such...

  3. Processes affecting the remediation of chromium-contaminated sites.

    OpenAIRE

    Palmer, C.D.; Wittbrodt, P R

    1991-01-01

    The remediation of chromium-contaminated sites requires knowledge of the processes that control the migration and transformation of chromium. Advection, dispersion, and diffusion are physical processes affecting the rate at which contaminants can migrate in the subsurface. Heterogeneity is an important factor that affects the contribution of each of these mechanisms to the migration of chromium-laden waters. Redox reactions, chemical speciation, adsorption/desorption phenomena, and precipitat...

  4. Production of a chromium Bose-Einstein condensate

    OpenAIRE

    Griesmaier, Axel; Stuhler, Jürgen; Pfau, Tilman

    2005-01-01

    The recent achievement of Bose-Einstein condensation of chromium atoms [1] has opened longed-for experimental access to a degenerate quantum gas with long-range and anisotropic interaction. Due to the large magnetic moment of chromium atoms of 6 {$\\mu$}B, in contrast to other Bose- Einstein condensates (BECs), magnetic dipole-dipole interaction plays an important role in a chromium BEC. Many new physical properties of degenerate gases arising from these magnetic forces have been predicted in ...

  5. Increase of chromium utilization in stainless steel melting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The processes of deoxidizing when melting stainless 18-10 steels in electric are furnaces by the method of remelting with wastes are investigated. The dependences of amount of reduced chromium on silicon consumption are made more precise. It is shown that it is useful to apply aluminium for deoxidation of acid high-chromium slags. Based on the data on pilot melts the extent to which aluminium can be used as a reducing agent for chromium is estimated. 3 refs., 2 figs

  6. Boron Nitride Nanotubes for Spintronics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamal B. Dhungana

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available With the end of Moore’s law in sight, researchers are in search of an alternative approach to manipulate information. Spintronics or spin-based electronics, which uses the spin state of electrons to store, process and communicate information, offers exciting opportunities to sustain the current growth in the information industry. For example, the discovery of the giant magneto resistance (GMR effect, which provides the foundation behind modern high density data storage devices, is an important success story of spintronics; GMR-based sensors have wide applications, ranging from automotive industry to biology. In recent years, with the tremendous progress in nanotechnology, spintronics has crossed the boundary of conventional, all metallic, solid state multi-layered structures to reach a new frontier, where nanostructures provide a pathway for the spin-carriers. Different materials such as organic and inorganic nanostructures are explored for possible applications in spintronics. In this short review, we focus on the boron nitride nanotube (BNNT, which has recently been explored for possible applications in spintronics. Unlike many organic materials, BNNTs offer higher thermal stability and higher resistance to oxidation. It has been reported that the metal-free fluorinated BNNT exhibits long range ferromagnetic spin ordering, which is stable at a temperature much higher than room temperature. Due to their large band gap, BNNTs are also explored as a tunnel magneto resistance device. In addition, the F-BNNT has recently been predicted as an ideal spin-filter. The purpose of this review is to highlight these recent progresses so that a concerted effort by both experimentalists and theorists can be carried out in the future to realize the true potential of BNNT-based spintronics.

  7. Boron nitride nanotubes for spintronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhungana, Kamal B; Pati, Ranjit

    2014-01-01

    With the end of Moore's law in sight, researchers are in search of an alternative approach to manipulate information. Spintronics or spin-based electronics, which uses the spin state of electrons to store, process and communicate information, offers exciting opportunities to sustain the current growth in the information industry. For example, the discovery of the giant magneto resistance (GMR) effect, which provides the foundation behind modern high density data storage devices, is an important success story of spintronics; GMR-based sensors have wide applications, ranging from automotive industry to biology. In recent years, with the tremendous progress in nanotechnology, spintronics has crossed the boundary of conventional, all metallic, solid state multi-layered structures to reach a new frontier, where nanostructures provide a pathway for the spin-carriers. Different materials such as organic and inorganic nanostructures are explored for possible applications in spintronics. In this short review, we focus on the boron nitride nanotube (BNNT), which has recently been explored for possible applications in spintronics. Unlike many organic materials, BNNTs offer higher thermal stability and higher resistance to oxidation. It has been reported that the metal-free fluorinated BNNT exhibits long range ferromagnetic spin ordering, which is stable at a temperature much higher than room temperature. Due to their large band gap, BNNTs are also explored as a tunnel magneto resistance device. In addition, the F-BNNT has recently been predicted as an ideal spin-filter. The purpose of this review is to highlight these recent progresses so that a concerted effort by both experimentalists and theorists can be carried out in the future to realize the true potential of BNNT-based spintronics. PMID:25248070

  8. Graphitic Carbon Nitride Supported Catalysts for Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansor, Noramalina; Jorge, A Belen; Corà, Furio; Gibbs, Christopher; Jervis, Rhodri; McMillan, Paul F; Wang, Xiaochen; Brett, Daniel J L

    2014-04-01

    Graphitic carbon nitrides are investigated for developing highly durable Pt electrocatalyst supports for polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs). Three different graphitic carbon nitride materials were synthesized with the aim to address the effect of crystallinity, porosity, and composition on the catalyst support properties: polymeric carbon nitride (gCNM), poly(triazine) imide carbon nitride (PTI/Li(+)Cl(-)), and boron-doped graphitic carbon nitride (B-gCNM). Following accelerated corrosion testing, all graphitic carbon nitride materials are found to be more electrochemically stable compared to conventional carbon black (Vulcan XC-72R) with B-gCNM support showing the best stability. For the supported catalysts, Pt/PTI-Li(+)Cl(-) catalyst exhibits better durability with only 19% electrochemical surface area (ECSA) loss versus 36% for Pt/Vulcan after 2000 scans. Superior methanol oxidation activity is observed for all graphitic carbon nitride supported Pt catalysts on the basis of the catalyst ECSA.

  9. Study of the nitrides formation in the ionic nitriding process of zircaloy-2 zirconium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zircaloy and Zr-Sn alloys are used in nuclear techniques because they show a very low effective absorption section for neutrons and a high corrosion resistance. This paper shows that by ionic nitriding of Zircaloy type alloys, a structure is obtained that enhances the wear resistance. From the study of the N2/H2 ratio on the nitride quantity formed by ion nitriding of Zircaloy-2 alloy, it can be concluded that the gaseous mixtures with high nitrogen and hydrogen content used in discharge are not favourable in the nitride forming process. The optimum ratio is 1/1. The ZrN superficial layer hardness was checked according to the exposure time and to the layer thickness. (J.S.). 6 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs

  10. Optimization of processing temperature in the nitridation process for the synthesis of iron nitride nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rohith Vinod, K.; Sakar, M.; Balakumar, S., E-mail: balasuga@yahoo.com [National Centre for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, University of Madras, Chennai-600025 (India); Saravanan, P. [Defence Metallurgical Research Laboratory, Hyderabad-500058 (India)

    2015-06-24

    We have demonstrated an effective strategy on the nitridation process to synthesize ε-Fe{sub 3}N nanoparticles (NPs) from the zero valent iron NPs as a starting material. The transformation of iron into iron nitride phase was systematically studied by performing the nitridation process at different processing temperatures. The phase, crystal structure was analyzed by XRD. Morphology and size of the ZVINPs and ε-Fe{sub 3}N NPs were analyzed by field emission scanning electron microscope. Further, their room temperature magnetic properties were studied by using vibrating sample magnetometer and it revealed that the magnetic property of ε-Fe{sub 3}N is associated with ratio of Fe-N in the iron nitride system.

  11. Chromium depletion from stainless steels during vacuum annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The behaviour of chromium during selective evaporation by high temperature vacuum annealing has been investigated by means of energy dispersive X-ray analysis and by neutron activation analysis. It was established that the rate of chromium loss from austenitic stainless steels 316 and 321 is controlled by chromium inter-diffusion rather than tracer diffusion in the alloy. Two important parameters in selective removal of chromium from alloy steels are the variation in the chromium surface concentration with time and the depletion profile in the alloy. The present work gives support for the model in which loss of chromium is dependent on its diffusivity in the alloy and on an interface transfer coefficient. The results showed that the surface concentration of chromium decreased with increasing vacuum annealing time. The chromium depletion profile in the metal was in accord with the previous derived model, apart from an anomalous near surface region. Here the higher resolution of a neutron activation technique indicated a region within approximately 2 microns of the surface where the chromium concentration decreased more steeply than expected. (author)

  12. Stabilization and solidification of chromium-contaminated soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cherne, C.A.; Thomson, B.M. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States). Civil Engineering Dept.; Conway, R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1997-11-01

    Chromium-contaminated soil is a common environmental problem in the United States as a result of numerous industrial processes involving chromium. Hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] is the species of most concern because of its toxicity and mobility in groundwater. One method of diminishing the environmental impact of chromium is to reduce it to a trivalent oxidation state [Cr(III)], in which it is relatively insoluble and nontoxic. This study investigated a stabilization and solidification process to minimize the chromium concentration in the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) extract and to produce a solidified waste form with a compressive strength in the range of 150 to 300 pounds per square inch (psi). To minimize the chromium in the TCLP extract, the chromium had to be reduced to the trivalent oxidation state. The average used in this study was an alluvium contaminated with chromic and sulfuric acid solutions. The chromium concentration in the in the in situ soil was 1212 milligrams per kilogram (mg/kg) total chromium and 275 mg/kg Cr(VI). The effectiveness of iron, ferrous sulfate to reduce Cr(VI) was tested in batch experiments.

  13. Defect transformation in GSGG crystals during chromium ion activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Absorption and induced absorption spectra, dose dependence of induced absorption, thermoluminescence of GSGG crystals, nominally pure and activated with chromium and neodymium ions in different concentrations, are investigated. It is shown that it is chromium ion presence in large concentration that decreases the induced coloration in GSGG crystals after γ-irradiation at 300 K. Optimum concentration of chromium ions for the minimum of induced coloration are found. The mechanism of decrease of induced coloration consisting in Fermi level displacement by chromium ion activation is established. Defect concentration and localization and recombination possibilities of electrons and holes in GSGG crystals are estimated by computer simulation

  14. Tribological Characteristics of Chromium-active Carbon Electroplated Composite Coatings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUKa-fi; HUAMeng; Yi-min

    2004-01-01

    A process of chromium electroplating using a standard bath with additives and active carbon particles was reported, and the tribological behaviors of the composite coatings using the pin-on-disk tester and the table wear tester were i nvestig(aed. Experimental results indicate that the electroplated chromium-active carbon composite coatings exhibited the low friction coefficient anti excellent anti-wear properties whets coffered with the normal chromium electroplated ones. The formation of active carbon particles within the chromium matrices can be explained by SEM analysis and the mechanis of wear resistance of the composite coatings were studied.

  15. Method of trivalent chromium concentration determination by atomic spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reheulishvili, Aleksandre N.; Tsibakhashvili, Neli Ya.

    2006-12-12

    A method is disclosed for determining the concentration of trivalent chromium Cr(III) in a sample. The addition of perchloric acid has been found to increase the atomic chromium spectrometric signal due to Cr(III), while leaving the signal due to hexavalent chromium Cr(VI) unchanged. This enables determination of the Cr(III) concentration without pre-concentration or pre-separation from chromium of other valences. The Cr(III) concentration may be measured using atomic absorption spectrometry, atomic emission spectrometry or atomic fluorescence spectrometry.

  16. Influence of Chelating Agents on Chromium Fate in Sediment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANGXIAOCHANG; SUNJINHE; 等

    1996-01-01

    A laboratory investigation on reaction between chelating agents and chromium was conducted to evaluate the effect of chelating agents on the adsorption and desorption of chromium in sediment.The amount of adsorbed chromium(VI) in sediment decreased slightly by 5%-10% because of addition of chelating agents.Chelating agents inhibited the removal of Cr(Ⅲ)by sediment from solutions and the inhibiting effect was in the order:citric acid>tartaric acid>EDTA,Salicylic acid.No effect of chelating agents on desorption of chromium in sediment was observed.

  17. Residual Stress Induced by Nitriding and Nitrocarburizing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Somers, Marcel A.J.

    2005-01-01

    The present chapter is devoted to the various mechanisms involved in the buildup and relief of residual stress in nitrided and nitrocarburized cases. The work presented is an overview of model studies on iron and iron-based alloys. Subdivision is made between the compound (or white) layer...

  18. Styrene Aziridination by Iron(IV) Nitrides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, Salvador B; Lee, Wei-Tsung; Dickie, Diane A; Scepaniak, Jeremiah J; Subedi, Deepak; Pink, Maren; Johnson, Michael D; Smith, Jeremy M

    2015-09-01

    Thermolysis of the iron(IV) nitride complex [PhB(tBuIm)3Fe≡N] with styrene leads to formation of the high-spin iron(II) aziridino complex [PhB(tBuIm)3Fe-N(CH2CHPh)]. Similar aziridination occurs with both electron-rich and electron-poor styrenes, while bulky styrenes hinder the reaction. The aziridino complex [PhB(tBuIm)3Fe-N(CH2CHPh)] acts as a nitride synthon, reacting with electron-poor styrenes to generate their corresponding aziridino complexes, that is, aziridine cross-metathesis. Reaction of [PhB(tBuIm)3Fe-N(CH2CHPh)] with Me3SiCl releases the N-functionalized aziridine Me3SiN(CH2CHPh) while simultaneously generating [PhB(tBuIm)3FeCl]. This closes a synthetic cycle for styrene azirdination by a nitride complex. While the less hindered iron(IV) nitride complex [PhB(MesIm)3Fe≡N] reacts with styrenes below room temperature, only bulky styrenes lead to tractable aziridino products. PMID:26179563

  19. Local residual stress measurements on nitride layers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mansilla, C.; Ocelik, V.; De Hosson, J. Th. M.

    2015-01-01

    In this work, local stresses in different nitrided maraging steel samples of high practical interest for industrial applications were studied through the so-called micro-slit milling method using a focused ion beam. The nitrogen concentration profiles were acquired by glow discharge optical emission

  20. Ammonothermal Growth of Gallium Nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pimputkar, Siddha

    Bulk, single crystal Gallium Nitride (GaN) crystals are essential for enabling high performance electronic and optoelectronic devices by providing arbitrarily oriented, high quality, large, single crystal GaN substrates. Methods of producing single crystals of sufficient size and quality at a rate that would enable successful commercialization has been a major focus for research groups and companies worldwide. Recent advances have demonstrated remarkable improvements, though high cost and lack of high volume production remain key challenges. Major investments in bulk GaN growth were made at UCSB with particular focus on the ammonothermal method. The existing lab was upgraded and a new facility was designed and built with improved experimental setups for ammonothermal growth of GaN. The facilities can simultaneously operate up to 15 reactors of differing designs and capabilities with the ability to grow crystals up to 2 inches in diameter. A novel in-situ technique was devised to investigate the growth chemistry which occurs at typical operating conditions of 3,000 atm and 600 °C. Improvements in ammonothermal GaN include improved growth rates for c-plane by a factor of four to 344 μm/day with an overall record growth rate of 544 μm/day achieved for the (112¯2) plane. Crystal qualities comparable to that of the seed crystal were achieved. Impurity concentrations for transition metals were consistently reduced by a factor of 100 to concentrations below 1017 atoms/cm3. Optical transparency was improved by significantly reducing the yellow coloration typically seen for ammonothermal GaN. Single crystal GaN was successfully grown on large seeds and a 1 inch x ½ inch x ½ inch GaN crystal was demonstrated. To better understand the growth chemistry, models were created for the decomposition of ammonia under growth conditions, with initial experiments performed using the designed in-situ setup to verify the model's accuracy. To investigate the surface morphology and

  1. Metal surface nitriding by laser induced plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomann, A. L.; Boulmer-Leborgne, C.; Andreazza-Vignolle, C.; Andreazza, P.; Hermann, J.; Blondiaux, G.

    1996-10-01

    We study a nitriding technique of metals by means of laser induced plasma. The synthesized layers are composed of a nitrogen concentration gradient over several μm depth, and are expected to be useful for tribological applications with no adhesion problem. The nitriding method is tested on the synthesis of titanium nitride which is a well-known compound, obtained at present by many deposition and diffusion techniques. In the method of interest, a laser beam is focused on a titanium target in a nitrogen atmosphere, leading to the creation of a plasma over the metal surface. In order to understand the layer formation, it is necessary to characterize the plasma as well as the surface that it has been in contact with. Progressive nitrogen incorporation in the titanium lattice and TiN synthesis are studied by characterizing samples prepared with increasing laser shot number (100-4000). The role of the laser wavelength is also inspected by comparing layers obtained with two kinds of pulsed lasers: a transversal-excited-atmospheric-pressure-CO2 laser (λ=10.6 μm) and a XeCl excimer laser (λ=308 nm). Simulations of the target temperature rise under laser irradiation are performed, which evidence differences in the initial laser/material interaction (material heated thickness, heating time duration, etc.) depending on the laser features (wavelength and pulse time duration). Results from plasma characterization also point out that the plasma composition and propagation mode depend on the laser wavelength. Correlation of these results with those obtained from layer analyses shows at first the important role played by the plasma in the nitrogen incorporation. Its presence is necessary and allows N2 dissociation and a better energy coupling with the target. Second, it appears that the nitrogen diffusion governs the nitriding process. The study of the metal nitriding efficiency, depending on the laser used, allows us to explain the differences observed in the layer features

  2. Microstructural Characteristics of Plasma Nitrided Layer on Hot-Rolled 304 Stainless Steel with a Small Amount of α-Ferrite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaolei; Yu, Zhiwei; Cui, Liying; Niu, Xinjun; Cai, Tao

    2016-02-01

    The hot-rolled 304 stainless steel with γ-austenite and approximately 5 pct α-ferrite elongated along the rolling direction was plasma-nitrided at a low temperature of 693 K (420 °C). X-ray diffraction results revealed that the nitrided layer was mainly composed of the supersaturated solid solution of nitrogen in austenite ( γ N). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observations showed that the microstructure of the γ N phase exhibited "fracture factor contrast" reflective of the occurrence of fine pre-precipitations in γ N by the continuous precipitation. The occurrence of a diffuse scattering effect on the electron diffraction spots of γ N indicated that the pre-precipitation took place in γ N in the form of strongly bonded Cr-N clusters or pairs due to a strong attractive interaction of nitrogen with chromium. Scanning electron microscopy and TEM observations indicated that the discontinuous precipitation initiated from the γ/ α interfaces and grew from the austenite boundaries into austenite grains to form a lamellar structure consisting of CrN and ferrite. The orientation relationship between CrN and ferrite corresponded to a Baker-Nutting relationship: (100)CrN//(100) α ; [011]CrN//[001] α . A zigzag boundary line following the banded structure of alternating γ-austenite and elongated α-ferrite was presented between the nitrided layer and the substrate to form a continuous varying layer thickness, which resulted from the difference in diffusivities of nitrogen in α-ferrite and γ-austenite, along the γ/ α interfaces and through the lattice. Microstructural features similar to the γ N were also revealed in the ferrite of the nitrided layer by TEM. It was not excluded that a supersaturated solid solution of nitrogen in ferrite ( α N) formed in the nitrided layer.

  3. Nitriding of Co–Cr–Mo alloy in nitrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Ning, E-mail: ningtang@imr.tohoku.ac.jp; Li, Yunping, E-mail: lyping@imr.tohoku.ac.jp; Koizumi, Yuichiro; Chiba, Akihiko, E-mail: a.chiba@imr.tohoku.ac.jp

    2014-06-01

    Using the results of a thermodynamic analysis, a Co–Cr–Mo alloy was successfully nitrided in nitrogen at temperatures of 1073–1473 K. The near-surface microstructure of the treated Co–Cr–Mo alloy was characterized using X-ray diffraction, field-emission scanning electron microscopy, electron probe micro-analyzer, and transmission electron microscopy equipped with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The results indicated that the highest nitriding efficiency was achieved at the treatment temperature of 1273 K, with the size and coverage of the nitride particles on sample's surface increasing with an increase in the treatment duration. After nitriding at 1273 K for 2 h, numerous nitride particles, consisting of an outer Cr{sub 2}N layer and an inner π phase layer, were formed on top of the nitrogen-containing γ phase, and some π phase also precipitated in the alloy matrix at the sub-surface level. - Highlights: • A Co–Cr–Mo alloy was successfully nitrided in nitrogen at 1073–1473 K. • The highest nitriding efficiency of the Co–Cr–Mo alloy was achieved at 1273 K. • Numerous nitride particles formed on sample's surface during nitriding at 1273 K. • The nitride particles consist of an outer Cr{sub 2}N layer and an inner π phase layer.

  4. Nitriding behavior of Ni and Ni-based binary alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fonovic, Matej

    2015-01-15

    Gaseous nitriding is a prominent thermochemical surface treatment process which can improve various properties of metallic materials such as mechanical, tribological and/or corrosion properties. This process is predominantly performed by applying NH{sub 3}+H{sub 2} containing gas atmospheres serving as the nitrogen donating medium at temperatures between 673 K and 873 K (400 C and 600 C). NH{sub 3} decomposes at the surface of the metallic specimen and nitrogen diffuses into the surface adjacent region of the specimen whereas hydrogen remains in the gas atmosphere. One of the most important parameters characterizing a gaseous nitriding process is the so-called nitriding potential (r{sub N}) which determines the chemical potential of nitrogen provided by the gas phase. The nitriding potential is defined as r{sub N} = p{sub NH{sub 3}}/p{sub H{sub 2}{sup 3/2}} where p{sub NH{sub 3}} and p{sub H{sub 2}} are the partial pressures of the NH{sub 3} and H{sub 2} in the nitriding atmosphere. In contrast with nitriding of α-Fe where the nitriding potential is usually in the range between 0.01 and 1 atm{sup -1/2}, nitriding of Ni and Ni-based alloys requires employing nitriding potentials higher than 100 atm{sup -1/2} and even up to ∞ (nitriding in pure NH{sub 3} atmosphere). This behavior is compatible with decreased thermodynamic stability of the 3d-metal nitrides with increasing atomic number. Depending on the nitriding conditions (temperature, nitriding potential and treatment time), different phases are formed at the surface of the Ni-based alloys. By applying very high nitriding potential, formation of hexagonal Ni{sub 3}N at the surface of the specimen (known as external nitriding) leads to the development of a compound layer, which may improve tribological properties. Underneath the Ni{sub 3}N compound layer, two possibilities exist: (i) alloying element precipitation within the nitrided zone (known as internal nitriding) and/or (ii) development of metastable and

  5. IRIS Toxicological Review of Hexavalent Chromium (2010 External Review Draft)

    Science.gov (United States)

    [UPDATE] New Schedule for IRIS Hexavalent Chromium Assessment In Feb 2012, EPA developed a new schedule for completing the IRIS hexavalent chromium assessment. Based on the recommendations of the external peer review panel, which met in May 2011 to review the dra...

  6. Chromium and Polyphenols From Cinnamon Improve Insulin Sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naturally occurring compounds that have been shown to improve insulin sensitivity include chromium and polyphenols found in cinnamon. These compounds also have similar effects on insulin signaling and glucose control. The signs of chromium deficiency are similar to those for the metabolic syndrome ...

  7. Safety, absorption, and antioxidant effects of chromium histidine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supplemental chromium has been shown to be involved in the alleviation of the metabolic syndrome, glucose intolerance, polycystic ovary syndrome, depression, excess body fat, and gestational, steroid-induced, and type 2 diabetes. Chromium amino acid complexes that contained histidine displayed cons...

  8. Toxicity and adaptation of Dictyosphaerium chlorelloides to extreme chromium contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Fortún, Sebastián; López-Rodas, Victoria; Navarro, Macarena; Marvá, Fernando; D'ors, Ana; Rouco, Mónica; Haigh-Florez, David; Costas, Eduardo

    2009-09-01

    Metals are often spilled by industries into inland water environments, with adverse consequences. Numerous papers have reported that heavy metals produce massive destruction of algae. Nevertheless, algal populations seem to become tolerant when they have had previous exposures to heavy metals. Because the mechanisms allowing heavy metal tolerance of algae are not yet known, the present study analyzed the effect of hexavalent chromium on growth and photosynthetic performance of Dictyosphaerium chlorelloides, stressing on the adaptation mechanisms to chromium contamination. Growth and photosynthetic performance of algal cells were inhibited by Cr(VI) at 10 mg/L, and the 72-h median inhibition concentration was established as 1.64 and 1.54 mg/L, respectively. However, after further incubation for a three month period in an environment with 25 mg/L of chromium, some rare, chromium-resistant cells occasionally were found. A Luria-Delbrück fluctuation analysis was performed to distinguish between resistant algae arising from rare, spontaneous mutations and resistant algae arising from physiological adaptation and other adaptive mechanisms. Resistant cells arose only by spontaneous mutations before the addition of chromium, with a rate of 1.77 x 10(-6) mutants per cell division. From a practical point of view, the use of both chromium-sensitive and chromium-resistant genotypes could make possible a specific algal biosensor for chromium. PMID:19323601

  9. Residual Chromium in Leather by Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Okoh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Most tanning processes employ the use of chromium sulphate. For chromium tanned leather, finished products may contain high amount of residual chromium. This may pose some health hazards, since chromium is known to be toxic at elevated concentration. This justifies the need for the study. Approach: Various samples of leather were collected from a tannery, a leather crafts market, a leather dump site and from local tanners all in Kano, Nigeria in 2009. The samples were irradiated for 6 h in the inner site of the Nigerian Research Reactor (NIRR-1 at a flux of 5×1011 ncm-2 sec-1. Results: After evaluating the spectrum, the mean results for chromium in the samples were determined as 2.33±0.3, 2.23±0.3 and 2.93±0.4% for samples from the tannery, leather crafts market and leather dump sites respectively. Chromium concentration in samples collected from local tanners who use tannins from Acacia nilotica as tanning agent was below the detection limit of Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA technique used in the study. Conclusion: Although, the concentrations of chromium in the analysed samples were not much higher than what were obtained in literature, they may be enough to sensitize the population that is allergic to chromium.

  10. CHROMIUM BIOACCUMULATION FROM COMPOSTS AND VERMICOMPOSTS BASED ON TANNERY SLUDGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krzysztof GONDEK

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Storage of waste substances is not indifferent to ecological equilibrium in the environment therefore should not be the ultimate way to limit waste arduousness. Therefore, the conducted investigations aimed to determine the effect of tannery composts and vermicomposts loaded with chromium on this element bioaccumulation in earthworm bodies and biomass of selected plants. Chromium in composts and vermicomposts based on tannery sludges occurred in small quantities and easily soluble compounds. Chromium concentrations in redworm biomass points to this metal accumulation in Eisenia fetida body tissues. This element content in redworm biomass was signifi cantly positively correlated with its content in composts. Chromium content in plants was diversifi ed and on treatments was generally smaller than on mineral treatment or farmyard manure. Chromium absorbed by plants was stored mainly in the root systems, and over the norm content of this element found in vermicomposts did not cause its excessive accumulation in plant biomass.

  11. Bioleaching of chromium from tannery sludge by indigenous Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuan-Shan; Pan, Zhi-Yan; Lang, Jian-Min; Xu, Jian-Miao; Zheng, Yu-Guo

    2007-08-17

    Chromium in tannery sludge will cause serious environmental problems and is toxic to organisms. The acidophilic sulfur-oxidizing Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans can leach heavy metals form urban and industrial wastes. This study examined the ability of an indigenous sulfur-oxidizing A. thiooxidans to leach chromium from tannery sludge. The results showed that the pH of sludge mixture inoculated with the indigenous A. thiooxidans decreased to around 2.0 after 4 days. After 6 days incubation in shaking flasks at 30 degrees C and 160 rpm, up to 99% of chromium was solubilized from tannery sludge. When treated in a 2-l bubble column bioreactor for 5 days at 30 degrees C and aeration of 0.5 vvm, 99.7% of chromium was leached from tannery sludge. The results demonstrated that chromium in tannery sludge can be efficiently leached by the indigenous A. thiooxidans.

  12. Biosorption potency of Aspergillus niger for removal of chromium (VI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Shaili; Thakur, Indu Shekhar

    2006-09-01

    Aspergillus niger isolated from soil and effluent of leather tanning mills had higher activity to remove chromium. The potency of Aspergillus niger was evaluated in shake flask culture by absorption of chromium at pH 6 and temperature 30 degrees C. The results of the study indicated removal of more than 75% chromium by Aspergillus niger determined by diphenylcarbazide colorimetric assay and atomic absorption spectrophotometry after 7 days. Study of microbial Cr(VI) reduction and identification of reduction intermediates has been hindered by the lack of analytical techniques that can identify the oxidation state with subcellular spatial resolution. Therefore, removal of chromium was further substantiated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), which indicated an accumulation of chromium in the fungal mycelium. PMID:16874547

  13. Examination of Plasma Nitriding Microstructure with Addition of Rare Earths

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张津

    2004-01-01

    Medium-carbon alloy steel was plasma nitrided with rare earths La,Ce and Nd into the nitriding chamber respectively.The nitriding layer microstructures with and without rare earths were compared using optical microscope,normal SEM and high resolution SEM,as well as TEM.It was found that the extent of the influence on plasma nitriding varies with different contents of rare earth.The effect of plasma nitriding is benefit from adding of Ce or Nd.The formation of hard and brittle phase Fe2-3N can be prevented and the butterfly-like structure can be improved by adding Ce or Nd.However,pure La may prevent the diffusion of nitrogen and the formation of iron nitride,and reduce the depth of diffusion layer.

  14. Liquid flow cells having graphene on nitride for microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adiga, Vivekananda P.; Dunn, Gabriel; Zettl, Alexander K.; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2016-09-20

    This disclosure provides systems, methods, and apparatus related to liquid flow cells for microscopy. In one aspect, a device includes a substrate having a first and a second oxide layer disposed on surfaces of the substrate. A first and a second nitride layer are disposed on the first and second oxide layers, respectively. A cavity is defined in the first oxide layer, the first nitride layer, and the substrate, with the cavity including a third nitride layer disposed on walls of the substrate and the second oxide layer that define the cavity. A channel is defined in the second oxide layer. An inlet port and an outlet port are defined in the second nitride layer and in fluid communication with the channel. A plurality of viewports is defined in the second nitride layer. A first graphene sheet is disposed on the second nitride layer covering the plurality of viewports.

  15. The Study of Plasma Nitriding of AISI304 Stainless Steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Liang; JI Shi-jun; GAO Yu-zhou; SUN Jun-cai

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents results on the plasma nitriding of AISI 304 stainless steel at different temperatures in NH 3 gas. The working pressure was 100~200 Pa and the discharge voltage was 700~800V. The phase of nitrided layer formed on the surface was confirmed by X-ray diffraction. The hardness of the samples was measured by using a Vickers microhardness tester with the load of 50g. After nitriding at about 400 ℃ for two hours a nitrided layer consisting of single γN phase with thickness of 5μm was obtained. Microhardness measurements showed significant increase in the hardness from 240 HV (for untreated samples) up to 950 HV (for nitrided samples at temperature of 420℃). The phase composition, the thickness, the microstructure and the surface topography of the nitrided layer as well as its properties depend essentially on the process parameters.

  16. An assessment of the thermodynamic properties of uranium nitride, plutonium nitride and uranium-plutonium mixed nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thermodynamic properties such as vapour pressures, heat capacities and enthalpies of formation for UN(s), PuN(s) and (U, Pu)N(s) are critically evaluated. The equations of the vapour pressures and the heat capacities for the three nitrides are assessed. Thermal functions, and thermodynamic functions for the formation of UN(s), PuN(s) and (U, Pu)N(s), are calculated

  17. Selenium protection from cadmium and chromium poisoning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The interaction of selenium with cadmium and chromium was studied in 168 chicken-broilers (DWCxWR) divided into four equal groups. Eight-week old control animals received an intravenous dose of /sup 115m/Cd Chloride 370 KBq/Kg (Group I), or 51Cr Chloride 370 KBq/Kg (Group II). The kinetics of these isotopes were studied by scintillation spectrometry (NaI/TI) carried out for whole blood, plasma, plasma proteins, urine, feces and homogenates of all organs at various time intervals. Animals in Groups III and IV received eight subcutaneous doses of sodium selenate (5ug) at 8-week intervals prior to /sup 115m/Cd or 51Cr. The kinetics of these elements were studied as in the previous two groups. It was found that selenium affected those kinetics in two ways: (a) by increasing the excretion of Cd by 11 +/- 3% (P < 0.001) and that of Cr by 7 +/- 1% (P < 0.001); and (b) by favoring redistribution of those elements, with significant (P < 0.001) reductions in liver, endocrine glands and kidney and increases (P < 0.01) in bone. The study suggests that selenium protects the animals' vital organs from environmental pollutants, such as cadmium and chromium

  18. Synthesis of Uranium nitride powders using metal uranium powders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Jae Ho; Kim, Dong Joo; Oh, Jang Soo; Rhee, Young Woo; Kim, Jong Hun; Kim, Keon Sik [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-15

    Uranium nitride (UN) is a potential fuel material for advanced nuclear reactors because of their high fuel density, high thermal conductivity, high melting temperature, and considerable breeding capability in LWRs. Uranium nitride powders can be fabricated by a carbothermic reduction of the oxide powders, or the nitriding of metal uranium. The carbothermic reduction has an advantage in the production of fine powders. However it has many drawbacks such as an inevitable engagement of impurities, process burden, and difficulties in reusing of expensive N{sup 15} gas. Manufacturing concerns issued in the carbothermic reduction process can be solved by changing the starting materials from oxide powder to metals. However, in nitriding process of metal, it is difficult to obtain fine nitride powders because metal uranium is usually fabricated in the form of bulk ingots. In this study, a simple reaction method was tested to fabricate uranium nitride powders directly from uranium metal powders. We fabricated uranium metal spherical powder and flake using a centrifugal atomization method. The nitride powders were obtained by thermal treating those metal particles under nitrogen containing gas. We investigated the phase and morphology evolutions of powders during the nitriding process. A phase analysis of nitride powders was also a part of the present work.

  19. Low temperature gaseous nitriding and carburising of stainless steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Thomas; Somers, Marcel A.J.

    2005-01-01

    The response of various austenitic and duplex stainless steel grades to low temperature gaseous nitriding and carburising was investigated. Gaseous nitriding was performed in ammonia/hydrogen mixtures at temperatures ,723 K; gaseous carburising was carried out in carbon monoxide/hydrogen mixtures...... for temperatures (783 K. The case developed by thermochemical treatment was examined using reflected light microscopy, X-ray diffraction analysis and microhardness testing. Both nitriding and carburising led to the development of expanded austenite in the surface adjacent zone, irrespective of the phase...... constitution of the substrate. A two step process, consisting of carburising followed by nitriding, provides great flexibility with regard to adjusting the hardness–depth profile....

  20. Quantum chemistry and atomistic simulations of solid nitrides

    OpenAIRE

    Eck, Bernhard

    2000-01-01

    The present thesis covers, at first, the binary nitrides of the the 3d transition metals. Based on their electronic band structures and bonding analyses for the sodium chloride as well as the zinc blend structure type it is then determined why the early nitrides crystallize in the NaCl structure while Fe- and Co-nitride adopt the ZnS structure. Thereafter all stoichiometrically well-defined iron nitrides are theoretically investigated, in particular with respect to the influence of the nitrog...

  1. Review of actinide nitride properties with focus on safety aspects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albiol, Thierry [CEA Cadarache, St Paul Lez Durance Cedex (France); Arai, Yasuo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2001-12-01

    This report provides a review of the potential advantages of using actinide nitrides as fuels and/or targets for nuclear waste transmutation. Then a summary of available properties of actinide nitrides is given. Results from irradiation experiments are reviewed and safety relevant aspects of nitride fuels are discussed, including design basis accidents (transients) and severe (core disruptive) accidents. Anyway, as rather few safety studies are currently available and as many basic physical data are still missing for some actinide nitrides, complementary studies are proposed. (author)

  2. Investigation of surface properties of high temperature nitrided titanium alloys

    OpenAIRE

    Koyuncu, E.; F. Kahraman; Ö. Karadeniz

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of paper is to investigate surface properties of high temperature nitrided titanium alloys.Design/methodology/approach: In this study, surface modification of Ti6Al4V titanium alloy was made at various temperatures by plasma nitriding process. Plasma nitriding treatment was performed in 80% N2-20% H2 gas mixture, for treatment times of 2-15 h at the temperatures of 700-1000°C. Surface properties of plasma nitrided Ti6Al4V alloy were examined by metallographic inspection, ...

  3. Low Temperature Gaseous Nitriding of Ni-based Superalloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eliasen, K.M.; Christiansen, Thomas Lundin; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2009-01-01

    In the present work the nitriding response of selected Ni-based superalloys at low temperatures is addressed. The alloys investigated are Nimonic series no. 80, 90, 95 and 100 and Nichrome (Ni:Cr » 80:20). Systematic nitriding experiments at different temperatures were carried out in a thermo...... balance. The morphology of the “case” developed upon low temperature nitriding of Ni-based superalloys was characterised with reflected light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis. The alloy composition proved to have a major influence on the nitriding response...

  4. Atomic-layer deposition of silicon nitride

    CERN Document Server

    Yokoyama, S; Ooba, K

    1999-01-01

    Atomic-layer deposition (ALD) of silicon nitride has been investigated by means of plasma ALD in which a NH sub 3 plasma is used, catalytic ALD in which NH sub 3 is dissociated by thermal catalytic reaction on a W filament, and temperature-controlled ALD in which only a thermal reaction on the substrate is employed. The NH sub 3 and the silicon source gases (SiH sub 2 Cl sub 2 or SiCl sub 4) were alternately supplied. For all these methods, the film thickness per cycle was saturated at a certain value for a wide range of deposition conditions. In the catalytic ALD, the selective deposition of silicon nitride on hydrogen-terminated Si was achieved, but, it was limited to only a thin (2SiO (evaporative).

  5. Aluminum Reduction and Nitridation of Bauxite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Zhikuan; ZHANG Dianwei; XU Enxia; HOU Xinmei; DONG Yanling

    2007-01-01

    The application of bauxite with low Al2O3 content has been studied in this paper and β-SiAlON has been obtained from two kinds of bauxites (Al203 content 68.08 mass% and 46.30 mass% respectively) by aluminum reduction and nitridation method.The sequence of reactions has been studied using thermal analysis (TG-DTA),X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with EDS.Compared with carbon thermal reduction and nitridation of aluminosilicates employed presently,the reaction in the system of bauxite-Al-N2 occurs at lower temperature.β-SiAlON appears as one of the main products from 1573K and exists' stably in the range of the present experimental temperature.The microstructure of β-SiAlON obtained at 1773 K is short column with 5-10μm observed by SEM.

  6. Local residual stress measurements on nitride layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mansilla, C.; Ocelík, V.; De Hosson, J.Th.M., E-mail: j.t.m.de.hosson@rug.nl

    2015-06-11

    In this work, local stresses in different nitrided maraging steel samples of high practical interest for industrial applications were studied through the so-called micro-slit milling method using a focused ion beam. The nitrogen concentration profiles were acquired by glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy. The residual stress state was measured on the surface and also in cross-section, i.e. examining effects of the nitrogen concentration gradient. It is shown that an enhanced lateral resolution can be achieved when a novel multiple fitting approach is employed. The results presented show an overall agreement with stress profiles obtained by X-ray diffraction. Finite Element Modeling is used to explain the apparent discrepancies. A clear correlation between the residual stress and nitriding profiles has been found and the applicability of this method is shown in particular when stress gradients are present.

  7. Sheath Characteristic in ECR Plasma Nitriding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The sheath plasma characteristics changing with the negative bias applied to the substrate during electron cyclotron resonance plasma nitriding are studied. The sheath characteristics obtained by a Langmuir single probe and an ion energy analyzer show that when the negative bias applied to the substrate is increasing, the most probable energy of ions in the sheath and the full width of half maximum of ions energy distribution increase, the thickness of the sheath also increases, whereas the saturation current of ion decreases. It has been found from the optical emission spectrum that there are strong lines of N2 and N2+. Based on our experiment results the mechanism of plasma nitriding is discussed.

  8. Silicon Nitride Balls For Cryogenic Bearings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butner, Myles F.; Ng, Lillian W.

    1990-01-01

    Resistance to wear greater than that of 440C steel. Experiments show lives of ball bearings immersed in liquid nitrogen or liquid oxygen increased significantly when 440C steel balls (running on 440C steel races) replaced by balls of silicon nitride. Developed for use at high temperatures, where lubrication poor or nonexistent. Best wear life of any bearing tested to date and ball material spalls without fracturing. Plans for future tests call for use of liquid oxygen as working fluid.

  9. Magnetron sputtering of thin nitride films

    OpenAIRE

    Kola, Prashanthi V

    1995-01-01

    The objective in this investigation was to design and commission a magnetron sputter deposition system and investigate the properties of hard coatings for mechanical and biomedical applications. The deposition of titanium (Ti) and titanium nitride (TiN) was undertaken as part of the commissioning tests and further work was conducted on the effect of the deposition parameters on the properties of TiN, specifically for biocompatible applications. A thorough understanding of the deposition proce...

  10. Nitride phosphors and solid-state lighting

    CERN Document Server

    Xie, Rong-Jun; Hirosaki, Naoto

    2011-01-01

    Introduction to Solid-State LightingBasics of Solid-State LightingBasics of White Light-Emitting Diodes (LEDs)Applications of Solid-State LightingIntroduction to LuminescenceClassification of Optical ProcessesFundamentals of LuminescenceLuminescent CentersMeasurement of LuminescenceTraditional Phosphors in White LEDsRequirements for Phosphors in White LEDsClassification of PhosphorsPhotoluminescent Properties of Traditional PhosphorsNitride Phosphors i

  11. Amorphous Carbon-Boron Nitride Nanotube Hybrids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae Woo (Inventor); Siochi, Emilie J. (Inventor); Wise, Kristopher E. (Inventor); Lin, Yi (Inventor); Connell, John (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A method for joining or repairing boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs). In joining BNNTs, the nanotube structure is modified with amorphous carbon deposited by controlled electron beam irradiation to form well bonded hybrid a-C/BNNT structures. In repairing BNNTs, the damaged site of the nanotube structure is modified with amorphous carbon deposited by controlled electron beam irradiation to form well bonded hybrid a-C/BNNT structures at the damage site.

  12. Formation and Structure of Boron Nitride Nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiang ZHANG; Zongquan LI; Jin XU

    2005-01-01

    Boron nitride (BN) nanotubes were simply synthesized by heating well-mixed boric acid, urea and iron nitrate powders at 1000℃. A small amount of BN nanowires was also obtained in the resultants. The morphological and structural characters of the BN nanostructures were studied using transmission electron microscopy. Other novel BN nanostructures, such as Y-junction nanotubes and bamboo-like nanotubes, were simultaneously observed. The growth mechanism of the BN nanotubes was discussed briefly.

  13. Boron Nitride Nanosheets for Metal Protection

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Lu Hua; Xing, Tan; Chen, Ying; Jones, Rob

    2015-01-01

    Although the high impermeability of graphene makes it an excellent barrier to inhibit metal oxidation and corrosion, graphene can form a galvanic cell with the underlying metal that promotes corrosion of the metal in the long term. Boron nitride (BN) nanosheets which have a similar impermeability could be a better choice as protective barrier, because they are more thermally and chemically stable than graphene and, more importantly, do not cause galvanic corrosion due to their electrical insu...

  14. Anomalous thermal conductivity of monolayer boron nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabarraei, Alireza; Wang, Xiaonan

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we use nonequilibrium molecular dynamics modeling to investigate the thermal properties of monolayer hexagonal boron nitride nanoribbons under uniaxial strain along their longitudinal axis. Our simulations predict that hexagonal boron nitride shows an anomalous thermal response to the applied uniaxial strain. Contrary to three dimensional materials, under uniaxial stretching, the thermal conductivity of boron nitride nanoribbons first increases rather than decreasing until it reaches its peak value and then starts decreasing. Under compressive strain, the thermal conductivity of monolayer boron nitride ribbons monolithically reduces rather than increasing. We use phonon spectrum and dispersion curves to investigate the mechanism responsible for the unexpected behavior. Our molecular dynamics modeling and density functional theory results show that application of longitudinal tensile strain leads to the reduction of the group velocities of longitudinal and transverse acoustic modes. Such a phonon softening mechanism acts to reduce the thermal conductivity of the nanoribbons. On the other hand, a significant increase in the group velocity (stiffening) of the flexural acoustic modes is observed, which counteracts the phonon softening effects of the longitudinal and transverse modes. The total thermal conductivity of the ribbons is a result of competition between these two mechanisms. At low tensile strain, the stiffening mechanism overcomes the softening mechanism which leads to an increase in the thermal conductivity. At higher tensile strain, the softening mechanism supersedes the stiffening and the thermal conductivity slightly reduces. Our simulations show that the decrease in the thermal conductivity under compressive strain is attributed to the formation of buckling defects which reduces the phonon mean free path.

  15. Silicon Nitride Antireflection Coatings for Photovoltaic Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, C.; Wydeven, T.; Donohoe, K.

    1984-01-01

    Chemical-vapor deposition adapted to yield graded index of refraction. Silicon nitride deposited in layers, refractive index of which decreases with distance away from cell/coating interface. Changing index of refraction allows adjustment of spectral transmittance for wavelengths which cell is most effective at converting light to electric current. Average conversion efficiency of solar cells increased from 8.84 percent to 12.63 percent.

  16. ABS塑胶真空镀金色氮化锆工艺%Vacuum plating of golden zirconium nitride on ABS plastic surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    雷大法

    2014-01-01

    介绍了ABS塑胶制品表面真空镀金黄色氮化锆镀层的工艺,主要包括除油、亲水、粗化、中和、预浸、沉钯、解胶、碱性镀镍、焦磷酸盐镀铜、硫酸盐镀铜、镀镍、镀铬和真空镀氮化锆。采用该工艺制备的氮化锆镀层为光亮的金黄色,结合力、硬度和耐蚀性等性能满足不同环境的正常使用要求,可应用于家电和电子产品领域。%A process for vacuum plating of golden yellow zirconium nitride coating on the surface of ABS plastic product was introduced. The process flow is mainly composed of degreasing, hydrophilizing, roughening, neutralizing, pre-impregnation, palladium activation, acceleration, alkaline nickel plating, pyrophosphate copper plating, sulfate copper plating, nickel plating, chromium plating, and zirconium nitride vacuum plating. The zirconium nitride coating prepared by the given process is bright golden yellow and has qualified adhesion, hardness, and corrosion resistance for normal use in different environments, and can be applied to the production of household appliances and electronic products.

  17. Influence of low-temperature nitriding on the strain-induced martensite and laser-quenched austenite in a magnetic encoder made from 304L stainless steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leskovšek, Vojteh; Godec, Matjaž; Kogej, Peter

    2016-08-05

    We have investigated the possibility of producing a magnetic encoder by an innovative process. Instead of turning grooves in the encoder bar for precise positioning, we incorporated the information in 304L stainless steel by transforming the austenite to martensite after bar extrusion in liquid nitrogen and marking it with a laser, which caused a local transformation of martensite back into austenite. 304L has an excellent corrosion resistance, but a low hardness and poor wear resistance, which limits its range of applications. However, nitriding is a very promising way to enhance the mechanical and magnetic properties. After low-temperature nitriding at 400 °C it is clear that both ε- and α'-martensite are present in the deformed microstructure, indicating the simultaneous stress-induced and strain-induced transformations of the austenite. The effects of a laser surface treatment and the consequent appearance of a non-magnetic phase due to the α' → γ transformation were investigated. The EDS maps show a high concentration of nitrogen in the alternating hard surface layers of γN and α'N (expanded austenite and martensite), but no significantly higher concentration of chromium or iron was detected. The high surface hardness of this nitride layer will lead to steels and encoders with better wear and corrosion resistance.

  18. Influence of low-temperature nitriding on the strain-induced martensite and laser-quenched austenite in a magnetic encoder made from 304L stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leskovšek, Vojteh; Godec, Matjaž; Kogej, Peter

    2016-08-01

    We have investigated the possibility of producing a magnetic encoder by an innovative process. Instead of turning grooves in the encoder bar for precise positioning, we incorporated the information in 304L stainless steel by transforming the austenite to martensite after bar extrusion in liquid nitrogen and marking it with a laser, which caused a local transformation of martensite back into austenite. 304L has an excellent corrosion resistance, but a low hardness and poor wear resistance, which limits its range of applications. However, nitriding is a very promising way to enhance the mechanical and magnetic properties. After low-temperature nitriding at 400 °C it is clear that both ε- and α‧-martensite are present in the deformed microstructure, indicating the simultaneous stress-induced and strain-induced transformations of the austenite. The effects of a laser surface treatment and the consequent appearance of a non-magnetic phase due to the α‧ → γ transformation were investigated. The EDS maps show a high concentration of nitrogen in the alternating hard surface layers of γN and α‧N (expanded austenite and martensite), but no significantly higher concentration of chromium or iron was detected. The high surface hardness of this nitride layer will lead to steels and encoders with better wear and corrosion resistance.

  19. Nitride inclusions in titanium-containing high-nitrogen steel after solid-phase nitriding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lysenkova, E. V.; Kadach, M. V.; Butskii, E. V.; Dorofievich, I. V.; Stomakhin, A. Ya.

    2015-09-01

    The principal possibility of production of sheet titanium-containing high-nitrogen steels without extreme harmful coarse nitride inclusions and their aggregates, which are characteristic of these compositions even at a relatively low (impurity) nitrogen content, is studied. To this end, the nitrogen content in the initial metal before its solidification is limited to the calculation level at which titanium nitrides are thermally unstable. Nitrogen is introduced in metal (08Cr18Ni12Ti steel) during its chemical thermal treatment in a nitrogen atmosphere at 1200°C. The nitrogen content in the finished metal is 0.4% (at 0.31% Ti). Studies in this direction are thought to be promising, since it is evident that the production of a metal of such a composition using the standard method of nitrogen introduction (in melt) is impossible. Scanning electron microscopy shows that titanium nitride particles in the finished metal are ≤0.5 μm in size.

  20. Standard Specification for Pressure Consolidated Powder Metallurgy Iron-Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum (UNS N08367), Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum-Columbium (Nb) (UNS N06625), Nickel-Chromium-Iron Alloys (UNS N06600 and N06690), and Nickel-Chromium-Iron-Columbium-Molybdenum (UNS N07718) Alloy Pipe Flanges, Fittings, Valves, and Parts

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2015-01-01

    Standard Specification for Pressure Consolidated Powder Metallurgy Iron-Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum (UNS N08367), Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum-Columbium (Nb) (UNS N06625), Nickel-Chromium-Iron Alloys (UNS N06600 and N06690), and Nickel-Chromium-Iron-Columbium-Molybdenum (UNS N07718) Alloy Pipe Flanges, Fittings, Valves, and Parts

  1. 75 FR 65067 - National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutant Emissions: Hard and Decorative Chromium...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-21

    ... Decorative Chromium Electroplating and Chromium Anodizing Tanks; Group I Polymers and Resins; Marine Tank...: Hard and Decorative Chromium Electroplating and Chromium Anodizing Tanks; Group I Polymers and Resins... Tanks. Group I Polymers and Resins Production.. Scott Throwe, (202) 564-7013,...

  2. Heavy ion bombardment of silicates and nitrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several silicates, including α-quartz, zirconium silicate, thorium silicate, LiAlSiO4, a silicate glass and several nitrides, α and β Si3N4, AlN, ZrN as well as Si2N2O and ThO2, have been irradiated by 1019 to 1021 Krypton (3 MeV) ions/m2. The damaged powders of original particle size less than 5 μm, have been examined by x-ray diffraction and electron microscope methods. The silicates and Si2N2O become non-crystalline by 10 x 1019 ions/m2. The particles change shape, extending and bloating under prolonged irradiations of the order of 100 x 1019 ions/m2. Silicate glass also undergoes this irradiation creep process. The nitrides and ThO2 behave quite differently and even at fluences of 200 x 1019 x ions/m-2 the powders remain crystalline, retaining relatively sharp edges to the particles without exhibiting irradiation creep. This difference in behavior can be related to the nature of the framework crystal structures, flexible for the silicates with variable bond angles, rigid for the nitrides with fixed bond angles. This may explain the behavior of radioactive minerals not found in a metamict condition. (author)

  3. Microscopic modeling of nitride intersubband absorbance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montano, Ines; Allerman, A. A.; Wierer, J. J.; Moseley, M.; Skogen, E. J.; Tauke-Pedretti, A.; Vawter, G. A.

    III-nitride intersubband structures have recently attracted much interest because of their potential for a wide variety of applications ranging from electro-optical modulators to terahertz quantum cascade lasers. To overcome present simulation limitations we have developed a microscopic absorbance simulator for nitride intersubband devices. Our simulator calculates the band structure of nitride intersubband systems using a fully coupled 8x8 k.p Hamiltonian and determines the material response of a single period in a density-matrix-formalism by solving the Heisenberg equation including many-body and dephasing contributions. After calculating the polarization due to intersubband transitions in a single period, the resulting absorbance of a superlattice structure including radiative coupling between the different periods is determined using a non-local Green's-function formalism. As a result our simulator allows us to predict intersubband absorbance of superlattice structures with microscopically determined lineshapes and linewidths accounting for both many-body and correlation contributions. This work is funded by Sandia National Laboratories Laboratory Directed Research and Development program. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin.

  4. Chromium-induced membrane damage: protective role of ascorbic acid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Importance of chromium as environmental toxicant is largely due to impact on the body to produce cellular toxicity. The impact of chromium and their supplementation with ascorbic acid was studied on plasma membrane of liver and kidney in male Wistar rats (80 - 100gbody weight). It has been observed that the intoxication with chromium ( i. p. ) at the dose of 0.8 mg/100g body weight per day for a period of 28 days causes significant increase in the level of cholesterol and decrease in the level of phospbolipid of both liver and kidney. The alkaline pbosphatase, total ATPase and Na + -K + -ATPase activities were significantly decreased in both liver and kidney after chromium treatment,except total ATPase activity of kidney. It is suggested that chromium exposure at the present dose and duration induce for the alterations of structure and function of both liver and kidney plasma membrane. Ascorbic acid ( i.p. at the dose of 0.5 mg,/100g body weight per day for period of 28 days) supplementation can reduce these structural changes in the plasma membrane of liver and kidney. But the functional changes can not be completely replenished by the ascorbic acid supplementation in response to chromium exposure. So it is also suggested that ascorbic acid (nutritional antioxidant) is useful free radical scavenger to restrain the chromium-induced membrane damage.

  5. Bioavailability of a potato chromium complex to the laboratory rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research objectives were to study the effect of food source, preparation method and chemical form on bioavailability of chromium. Chromium concentration in potatoes was determined and tubers labeled either intrinsically or extrinsically with radioactive chromate. A labeled chromium complexes was isolated from preparations of raw, baked or fried potatoes and chromatographed on gel permeation media. Availability of the potato chromium complex to the rat was examined in three feeding studies. Animals were dosed with radioactive extrinsically or intrinsically labeled potato extract or with chromate. A labeled chromium complex was isolated from gastrointestinal contents of rats and chromatographed. Potato pulp and peel contained 1.63 and 2.70 μg Cr/g tissue respectively. True and apparent absorption from extrinsically labeled feedings were 33.4 +/- 4.7 and 29.8 +/- 11.2% respectively, and no differences existed between absorption from raw and cooked potatoes. Absorption from the extrinsic labeled potatoes differed significantly from absorption of inorganic chromatium. Apparent absorption of raw (11.1 +/- 7.9%) and cooked (-0.7 +/- 2.8%) intrinsically labeled feedings differed significantly. Absorption of inorganic chromium was 17.8% (true) and 11.5% (apparent). Examination of the chromium complex isolated from gastrointestinal tract contents showed enlargement of the complex in the stomach after consumption

  6. Stabilization of chromium salt in ordinary portland cement

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Damir Barbir; Pero Dabić; Petar Krolo

    2012-12-01

    Ordinary Portland cement (OPC) samples containing the chromium salt have been investigated using differential microcalorimetry, conductometry and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic analysis. The effect of chromium on OPC hydration was evaluated by continuous observing of early hydration. The microcalorimetrical results show that with increasing the share of chromium salt, heat maximums assume lower values and the occurrence of the maximum registered in the earlier hydration times. Conductometrical measurements show that with increasing addition of chromium salt, curve did not show any specific shape, immediate drop in specific conductivity is noticed and the maximum is reached earlier. This coincides with microcalorimetrical results. It can be concluded that the addition of chromium does not affect the mechanism of the hydration process, but it does affect the kinetic parameters and dynamics of the cement hydration process. It was found that chromium salt addition to the cement–water system is acceptable up to 2 wt.%. According to standard EN 196-3 for OPC, the beginning of binding time should occur after 60 minutes. Increased amount of chromium over 2 wt.% significantly accelerate the beginning of binding time and for the system it is not acceptable.

  7. Chromium speciation in rainwater: temporal variability and atmospheric deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kieber, R.J.; Willey, J.D.; Zvalaren, S.D. [University of North Carolina at Wilmington, Wilmington, NC (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    2002-12-15

    Chromium is released into the atmosphere by a variety of anthropogenic activities which include steel manufacturing, leather tanning, wood presentation and fossil fuel combustion. The concentrations of the various chromium species were determined in 89 rainwater samples collected in Wilmington, NC from October 1, 1999 to December 31, 2001. Volume weighted annual average concentrations of Cr{sub total}, particulate Cr, Cr(III)(aq), and Cr(VI)(aq) were 4.6, 2.2, 0.8 and 1.2 nM, respectively. There was distinct seasonal and diurnal variability in the concentrations of the various chromium species. Chromium emissions to the global atmosphere by both natural and anthropogenic sources are estimated to be 2.2 x 10{sup 9} mol/yr. Using rainwater concentration data along with other published rainwater Cr concentrations and an estimate for total global annual rain, the total global flux of chromium removed from the atmosphere via wet deposition is 2.1 x 10{sup 9} mol/yr. This represents complete removal of Cr and indicates that essentially all chromium released into the global atmosphere is removed via rain. About half this chromium is dissolved with roughly equal concentrations of toxic Cr(VI) and relatively harmless Cr(III) species. 48 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. Workshop on effects of chromium coating on Nb3Sn superconductor strand: Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report discusses the following topics: Chromium coating on superconductor strand -- an overview; technology of chromium plating; comparison of wires plated by different platers; search for chromium in copper; strand manufactures' presentations; chromium plating at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory; a first look at a chromium plating process development project tailored for T.P.X. and I.T.E.R. strand; and influence of chromium diffusion and related phenomena on the reference ratios of bare and chromium plated Nb3Sn strand

  9. Workshop on effects of chromium coating on Nb{sub 3}Sn superconductor strand: Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-04-12

    This report discusses the following topics: Chromium coating on superconductor strand -- an overview; technology of chromium plating; comparison of wires plated by different platers; search for chromium in copper; strand manufactures` presentations; chromium plating at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory; a first look at a chromium plating process development project tailored for T.P.X. and I.T.E.R. strand; and influence of chromium diffusion and related phenomena on the reference ratios of bare and chromium plated Nb{sub 3}Sn strand.

  10. Fertilizers and Mixed Crop Cultivation of Chromium Tolerant and Sensitive Plants under Chromium Toxicity

    OpenAIRE

    B. Dheeba; Sampathkumar, P; Kannan, K.

    2015-01-01

    Zea mays (maize) and Vigna radiata (green gram) are found to be the chromium (Cr) tolerant and sensitive plants, respectively. In the present paper, we investigate the reduction of the toxicity of Cr in the sensitive plants by the mixed crop cultivation in the field using various amendments. Further, the potassium dichromate was used as the source of hexavalent Cr. The results indicated that Cr adversely affects both the growth and yield of plants. The soil properties vary with Cr and differe...

  11. Development of compound layer of iron (carbo)nitrides during nitriding of steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ratajski, J.; Tacikowski, J.; Somers, Marcel A.J.

    2003-01-01

    The composition and phase constitution of a compound layer developing during gaseous nitriding was investigated at 853 K for three commercial steels (AISI 120, 4340 and 1090) and Armco iron. The compound layers were characterised by light optical microscopy, X-ray diffraction and electron probe...... microanalysis. The formation of the compound layer occurs along two distinct sequences: alpha-gamma prime-epsilon and/or alpha(theta)-epsilon2-gamma prime-epsilon1. The preferred sequence depends mainly on the chemical composition of steel and on the nitriding potential....

  12. Microbial Diversity of Chromium-Contaminated Soils and Characterization of Six Chromium-Removing Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Zhiguo; Hu, Yuting; Yin, Zhen; Hu, Yuehua; Zhong, Hui

    2016-06-01

    Three soil samples obtained from different sites adjacent to a chromium slag heap in a steel alloy factory were taken to examine the effect of chromium contamination on soil bacterial diversity as determined by construction of 16S rDNA clone libraries and sequencing of selected clones based on restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis. Results revealed that Betaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, Firmicutes, and Alphaproteobacteria occurred in all three soil samples, although the three samples differed in their total diversity. Sample 1 had the highest microbial diversity covering 12 different classes, while Sample 3 had the lowest microbial diversity. Strains of six different species were successfully isolated, one of which was identified as Zobellella denitrificans. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a strain belonging to the genus Zobellella able to resist and reduce chromium. Among all isolates studied, Bacillus odysseyi YH2 exhibited the highest Cr(VI)-reducing capability, with a total removal of 23.5 % of an initial Cr(VI) concentration of 350 mg L-1.

  13. A REVIEW OF BIOSORPTION OF CHROMIUM IONS BY MICROORGANISMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inga Zinicovscaia

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Due to its widespread industrial use, chromium has become a serious pollutant in diverse environmental settings. The main source of chromium pollution including the Republic o Moldova is industry. It is a great need to develop new eco-friendly methods of chromium removal. Biosorption of heavy metals is a most promising technology involved in the removal of toxic metals from industrial waste streams and natural waters. This article is an extended abstract of a communication presented at the Conference Ecological Chemistry 2012

  14. Thermal incorporation behavior during the reduction and stabilization of chromium wastes

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Jun; 楊駿

    2015-01-01

    The possibility of employing periclase to stabilize chromium in chromium wastes into spinel-based ceramics through thermal method was investigated by heating mixture of simulated chromium waste and magnesium oxide. Different types of magnesium oxide precursors were introduced to incorporate chromium oxide into magnesiochromite (MgCr2O4) ranging from 550 ºC to 1350 ºC. Magnesium oxide precursors of both types can effectively incorporate chromium oxide but via different mechanisms. Three main f...

  15. Effects of Supplemental Dietary Chromium on Yield and Nutrient Digestibility of Laying Hens Under Low Temperature

    OpenAIRE

    ŞAHİN, Kazım; ERTAŞ, O. Nihat; GÜLER, Talat; ÇİFTÇİ, Mehmet

    2001-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the effects of chromium picolinate (CrPi) added into diet containing 710.3 ppb chromium on yield and nutrient digestibility of laying hens at low temperature. Forty-six-week-old laying hens were randomly assigned to four groups of 30 hens per group. Treatment groups were fed different supplemental dietary chromium levels. Thus, hens were fed diets with no supplemental chromium (Control Group), 100 ppb of supplemental chromium (100 Group), 200 ppb of s...

  16. The fate of chromium during tropical weathering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berger, Alfons; Frei, Robert

    2014-01-01

    We performed a mineral, geochemical and Cr–Sr–Pb isotope study on a laterite profile developed on ca. 540 Ma old tonalitic bedrock in Madagascar with special emphasis on the behavior of chromium during tropical weathering. The observed strong depletions of Ca, Si, and P, and enrichment of Fe and Al...... of the soil profile relative to stage one altered saprolite. This gain in Cr is accompanied by decreasing δ53Cr values and can be explained by partial immobilization (possibly by adsorption/coprecipitation on/with Fe-oxy-hydroxides) of mobile Cr(III) during upward transport in the weathering profile....... The negatively fractionated δ53Cr values measured in the weathering profile relative to the unaltered tonalitic bedrock characterized by a high temperature magmatic inventory Cr isotope signature are consistent with loss of a positively fractionated Cr(VI) pool formed during weathering. The predicted existence...

  17. Evaluation of chromium in red blood cells as an indicator of exposure to hexavalent chromium: An in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devoy, Jérôme; Géhin, Antoine; Müller, Samuel; Melczer, Mathieu; Remy, Aurélie; Antoine, Guillaume; Sponne, Isabelle

    2016-07-25

    Chromium(VI) compounds are classified as carcinogenic to humans. Whereas chromium measurements in urine and whole blood (i.e., including plasma) are indicative of recent exposure, chromium in red blood cells (RBC) is attributable specifically to Cr(VI) exposure. Before recommending Cr in RBC as a biological indicator of Cr(VI) exposure, in-vitro studies must be undertaken to assess its reliability. The present study examines the relationship between the chromium added to a blood sample and that subsequently found in the RBC. After incubation of total blood with chromium, RBC were isolated, counted and their viability assessed. Direct analysis of chromium in RBC was conducted using Atomic Absorption Spectrometry. Hexavalent, but not trivalent Cr, was seen to accumulate in the RBC and we found a strong correlation between the Cr(VI) concentration added to a blood sample and the amount of Cr in RBC. This relationship appears to be independent of the chemical properties of the human blood samples (e.g., different blood donors or different reducing capacities). Even though in-vivo studies are still needed to integrate our understanding of Cr(VI) toxicokinetics, our findings reinforce the idea that a single determination of the chromium concentration in RBC would enable biomonitoring of critical cases of Cr(VI) exposure. PMID:27178267

  18. Chromium accumulation, microorganism population and enzyme activities in soils around chromium-containing slag heap of steel alloy factory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Shun-hong; PENG Bing; YANG Zhi-hui; CHAI Li-yuan; ZHOU Li-cheng

    2009-01-01

    The environmental risk of chromium pollution is pronounced in soils adjacent to chromate industry. It is important to investigate the functioning of soil microorganisms in ecosystems exposed to long-term contamination by chromium. 45 soil samples obtained from different places of the slag heap in a steel alloy factory were analyzed for chromium contamination level and its effect on soil microorganisms and enzyme activities. The results show that the average concentrations of total Cr in the soil under the slag heap, adjacent to the slag heap and outside the factory exceed the threshold of Secondary Environmental Quality Standard for Soil in China by 354%, 540% and 184%, respectively, and are 15, 21 and 9 times higher than the local background value, respectively. Elevated chromium loadings result in changes in the activity of the soil microbe, as indicated by the negative correlations between soil microbial population and chromium contents. Dehydrogenase activity is greatly depressed by chromium in the soil. The results imply that dehydrogenase activity can be used as an indicator for the chromium pollution level in the area of the steel alloy factory.

  19. Effects of Chromium(VI) and Chromium(III) on Desulfovibrio vulgaris Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M.E. Clark; A. Klonowska; S.B. Thieman; B. Giles; J.D. Wall; and M.W. Fields

    2007-04-19

    Desulfovibrio vulgaris ATCC 29579 is a well studied sulfate reducer that has known capabilities of reducing heavy metals and radionuclides, like chromium and uranium. Cultures grown in a defined medium (i.e. LS4D) had a lag period of approximately 40 h when exposed to 50 μMof Cr(VI). Substrate analysis revealed that although chromium is reduced within the first 5 h, growth does not resume for another 35 h. During this time, small amounts of lactate are still utilized but the reduction of sulfate does not occur. Sulfate reduction occurs concurrently with the accumulation of acetate approximately 40 h after inoculation, when growth resumes. Similar amounts of hydrogen are produced during this time compared to hydrogen production by cells not exposed to Cr(VI); therefore an accumulation of hydrogen cannot account for the utilization of lactate. There is a significant decrease in the carbohydrate to protein ratio at approximately 25 h, and this result indicated that lactate is not converted to glycogen. Most probable number analysis indicated that cell viability decreased steadily after inoculation and reached approximately 6 x 104 cells/ml 20 h post-chromium exposure. Regeneration of reducing conditions during chromium exposure does not induce growth and in fact may make the growth conditions even more unfavorable. This result suggested that an increase in Eh was not solely responsible for the decline in viability. Cell pellets collected 10 h after chromium-exposure were unable to resume growth when suspended into fresh medium. Supernatants from these pellets were able to support cell growth upon re- inoculation. D. vulgaris cells treated with a non-dose dependent addition of ascorbate at the same time of Cr(VI) addition did not enter a lag period. Ascorbate added 3 h post-Cr(VI) exposure did not prevent the growth lag. These results indicated that Desulfovibrio utilized lactate to reduce Cr(VI) without the reduction of sulfate, that the decline in cell viability and

  20. Scientific Opinion on ChromoPrecise® cellular bound chromium yeast added for nutritional purposes as a source of chromium in food supplements and the bioavailability of chromium from this source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EFSA Panel on Food Additives and Nutrient Sources added to Food (ANS

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The Panel on Food Additives and Nutrient Sources added to Food (ANS provides a scientific opinion re-evaluating the safety of ChromoPrecise® cellular bound chromium yeast added for nutritional purposes as a source of chromium in food supplements and the bioavailability of chromium from this source. ChromoPrecise® is a yeast preparation with an enriched trivalent chromium content, obtained by culture of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in the presence of chromium chloride. A daily intake of 100 µg chromium(III. There are limited data on the nature and identity of the organic chromium(III compounds contained in chromium-enriched yeast and on their toxicokinetic and toxicodynamic behaviour in the body. Overall, the Panel concluded that the bioavailability in man of chromium from chromium-enriched yeast is potentially up to approximately ten times higher than that of chromium from chromium chloride. A NOAEL of 2500 mg/kg bw/day ChromoPrecise® was identified in a 90-day feeding study in rats; no evidence of adverse effects of chromium yeasts were reported in other animal studies investigating the effects of dietary supplementation with chromium yeast. ChromoPrecise® chromium yeast was non-genotoxic in a range of in vitro genotoxicity studies. Although no information was available on the chronic toxicity, carcinogenicity or reproductive toxicity of ChromoPrecise® chromium yeast, the ANS Panel has previously concluded that trivalent chromium is not carcinogenic, and limited data on other chromium yeasts provide no evidence of an effect on reproductive endpoints. No adverse effects have been reported in clinical efficacy trials with chromium yeasts. The Panel concluded that the use of ChromoPrecise® chromium yeast in food supplements is not of concern, despite the lack of data on the nature and identity of the organic chromium(III compounds contained in the product, provided that the intake does not exceed 250 μg/day, as recommended by the WHO.

  1. New amorphous interface for precipitate nitrides in steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danielsen, Hilmar Kjartansson; Kadkhodazadeh, Shima; Grumsen, Flemming Bjerg;

    2014-01-01

    during electron beam exposure. The amorphous shells were observed around Ta- and Nb-based nitrides, which are considered to have a high interfacial energy with the ferrite matrix. They were not observed around V-based nitrides which have a Baker–Nutting relationship with low-misfit to the matrix....

  2. Synthesis of metal-nitrides using high pressures and temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guillaume, C; Serghiou, G [University of Edinburgh, School of Engineering and Electronics, Kings Buildings, Mayfield Road, EH9 3JL UK (United Kingdom); Morniroli, J P [Laboratoire de Metallurgie Physique et Genie des Materiaux, UMR CNRS 8517, Universite des Sciences et Technologies de Lille et Ecole Nationale Superieure de Chimie de Lille, Cite Scientifique, 59655 Villeneuve d' Ascq Cedex (France); Frost, D J [Bayerisches Geoinstitut, Universitat Bayreuth, D-95440, Bayreuth (Germany)], E-mail: george.serghiou@ed.ac.uk

    2008-07-15

    Technologically, high density nitrides are showing promise for both ceramic and electronic applications. In a laser-heated diamond cell we prepare high density metal-nitrides by reaction of the nitrogen pressure medium with an elemental substrate. Two of our objectives are to develop criteria governing whether denser than ambient nitride phases will form, and to in particular establish the parameters required for synthesis in a multianvil press using elemental starting materials. We have already synthesized transition metal nitrides in a multianvil press using elemental starting materials, including hexagonal nickel nitride and alkali rhenium nitrides. Unlike previous metals, we also report that Cu does not form a nitride after heating with NaN{sub 3} at 2000 K and 20 GPa. Notably, Cu{sub 3}N is a semiconductor exhibiting weak directional bonds, whereas the immediately adjacent lower atomic number systems are metallic interstitial nitrides. We also briefly mention our work on processing high pressure and temperature recovered reaction products with focused ion beam methods for tailored characterization using electron microscopy.

  3. EXAFS investigation of low temperature nitrided stainless steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oddershede, Jette; Christiansen, Thomas; Ståhl, Kenny;

    2008-01-01

    Low temperature nitrided stainless steel AISI 316 flakes were investigated with EXAFS and X-ray diffraction analysis. The stainless steel flakes were transformed into a mixture of nitrogen expanded austenite and nitride phases. Two treatments were carried out yielding different overall nitrogen...

  4. Composition and microhardness of CAE boron nitride films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper deals with boron nitride produced by cathodic arc evaporation techniques.The films were applied on titanium and cemented carbide substrates. Their characterization was carried out using X-ray diffraction and Knoop microhardness tests. Demonstrated are the high properties of two-phase films, containing β (cubic) and γ (wurtzitic) modifications of boron nitride. (author). 7 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs

  5. Contingency plans for chromium utilization. Publication NMAB-335

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The United States depends entirely on foreign sources for the critical material, chromium, making it very vulnerable to supply disruptions. This vulnerability results because chromium is essential for the fabrication of corrosion-resisting steels and high-temperature, oxidation-resisting alloys in applications that are vital to the nation's technological well-being; because no substitutes are known for these materials in those applications; and because the known, substantial deposits of chromite ore are only in a few geographical locations that could become inaccessible to the United States as a result of political actions. The effectiveness of programs such as stockpiling, conservation, and research and development for substitutes to reduce the impact of disruption of imports of chromite and ferrochromium are discussed. Alternatives for decreasing chromium consumption also are identified for chromium-containing materials in the areas of design, processing, and substitution

  6. Fabrication of high rate chromium getter sources for fusion applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Design and fabrication techniques are described for the manufacture of large-capacity chromium getter sources, analogous to the commercially available titanium getter source known as Ti-Ball, manufactured by Varian Associates

  7. IRIS Toxicological Review of Hexavalent Chromium (Peer Review Plan)

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA is conducting a peer review of the scientific basis supporting the human health hazard and dose-response assessment of hexavalent chromium that will appear on the Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS) database.

  8. Chromium and Polyphenols from Cinnamon and Insulin Sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Factors that improve insulin sensitivity usually lead to improvements in risk factors associated with the metabolic syndrome, diabetes, and cardiovascular diseases. Naturally occurring bioactive compounds that have been shown to improve insulin sensitivity include chromium and polyphenols found in ...

  9. The diffusion of chromium in a duplex alloy steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diffusion of chromium in a duplex stainless steel containing approximately 8% ferrite has been investigated in the temperature range 600 to 10000C using the standard serial sectioning technique. The resulting concentration profiles exhibited up to four distinct regions. The two main regions are attributed to volume diffusion in the austenite and ferrite phases, the other zones being due to short circuiting paths. Volume diffusion in the austenite phase is in good agreement with chromium diffusion in Type 316 steel. The chromium diffusion coefficient in the ferrite phase of approximate composition 25 wt % Cr, 5 wt % Ni is given by: Dsub(α) = (6.0(+11,-3)) x 10-6 exp - ((212+-5)/RT) m2s-1 the activation energy being expressed in kJ.mol-1. Little evidence was found for enhanced chromium diffusion along austenite/ferrite interface boundaries. (author)

  10. Epitaxial aluminum nitride tunnel barriers grown by nitridation with a plasma source

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zijlstra, T.; Lodewijk, C.F.J.; Vercruyssen, N.; Tichelaar, F.D.; Loudkov, D.N.; Klapwijk, T.M.

    2007-01-01

    High critical current-density (10 to 420 kA/cm2) superconductor-insulator-superconductor tunnel junctions with aluminum nitride barriers have been realized using a remote nitrogen plasma from an inductively coupled plasma source operated in a pressure range of 10−3–10−1 mbar. We find a much better r

  11. Low Temperature Gaseous Nitriding of a Stainless Steel Containing Strong Nitride Formers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandes, Frederico Augusto Pires; Christiansen, Thomas Lundin; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    Low temperature thermochemical surface hardening of the precipitation hardening austenitic stainless steel A286 in solution treated state was investigated. A286 contains, besides high amounts of Cr, also substantial amounts of strong nitride formers as Ti, Al and V. It is shown that simultaneous...

  12. Facile Solid-State Synthesis Route to Metal Nitride Nanoparticles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yinxiao DU; Ming LEI; Hui YANG

    2008-01-01

    By a facile and efficient solid-state reaction route using an organic reagent cyanamide (CN2H2) as a precursor with another one being metal oxides, we successfully synthesized seven technologically important metal nitrides including cubic VN, CrN, NbN, hexagonal GaN, AIN, BN, and WN at moderate temperatures. The experimental results show that cyanamide (CN2H2) is a powerfully reducing and nitridizing reagent and the metal oxides are completely converted into the corresponding nitride nanoparticles at lower temperatures than that reported in the conventional methods. It is found that CN2H2 can exhibit some interesting condensation processes, and the final products, highly active carbon nitride species, play a crucial role in the reducing and nitridizing processes.

  13. Safety Assessment of Boron Nitride as Used in Cosmetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiume, Monice M; Bergfeld, Wilma F; Belsito, Donald V; Hill, Ronald A; Klaassen, Curtis D; Liebler, Daniel C; Marks, James G; Shank, Ronald C; Slaga, Thomas J; Snyder, Paul W; Andersen, F Alan

    2015-01-01

    The Cosmetic Ingredient Review Expert Panel (Panel) assessed the safety of boron nitride which functions in cosmetics as a slip modifier (ie, it has a lubricating effect). Boron nitride is an inorganic compound with a crystalline form that can be hexagonal, spherical, or cubic; the hexagonal form is presumed to be used in cosmetics. The highest reported concentration of use of boron nitride is 25% in eye shadow formulations. Although boron nitride nanotubes are produced, boron nitride is not listed as a nanomaterial used in cosmetic formulations. The Panel reviewed available chemistry, animal data, and clinical data and concluded that this ingredient is safe in the present practices of use and concentration in cosmetic formulations.

  14. Gaseous Nitriding Process of Surface Nanocrystallized (SNCed) Steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The behavior of gaseous nitriding on the surface nanocrystallized (SNCed) steel was investigated. The mild steel discs were SNCed on one side by using the method of ultrasonic shot peening. The opposite side of the discs maintained the original coarse-grained condition. The gaseous nitriding was subsequently carried out at three different temperatures:460, 500 and 560℃. The compound layer growth and diffusion behavior were then studied. It was revealed that SNC pretreatment greatly enhances both diffusion coefficient D and surface reaction rate. As a result, nitriding time could be reduced to the half. It was also found that the growth of compound layer with nitriding time conformed with parabolic relationship from the start of nitriding process in the SNCed samples.

  15. Design of nitride semiconductors for solar energy conversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zakutayev, Andriy

    2016-01-01

    Nitride semiconductors are a promising class of materials for solar energy conversion applications, such as photovoltaic and photoelectrochemical cells. Nitrides can have better solar absorption and electrical transport properties than the more widely studied oxides, as well as the potential for better scalability than other pnictides or chalcogenides. In addition, nitrides are also relatively unexplored compared to other chemistries, so they provide a great opportunity for new materials discovery. This paper reviews the recent advances in the design of novel semiconducting nitrides for solar energy conversion technologies. Both binary and multinary nitrides are discussed, with a range of metal chemistries (Cu3N, ZnSnN2, Sn3N4, etc.) and crystal structures (delafossite, perovskite, spinel, etc.), including a brief overview of wurtzite III-N materials and devices. The current scientific challenges and promising future directions in the field are also highlighted.

  16. Biosorption of Chromium (VI) from Aqueous Solutions onto Fungal Biomass

    OpenAIRE

    Ismael Acosta R.; Xöchitl Rodríguez; Conrado Gutiérrez; Ma. de Guadalupe Moctezuma

    2004-01-01

    The biosorption of chromium (VI) on eighteen different natural biosorbents: Natural sediment, chitosan, chitin, Aspergillus flavus I-V, Aspergillus fumigatus I-ll, Helmintosporium sp, Cladosporium sp, Mucor rouxii mutant, M. rouxii IM-80, Mucor sp-I and 2, Candida albicans and Cryptococcus neoformans was studied in this work. It was found that the biomass of C. neoformans, natural sediment, Helmintosporium sp and chitosan was more efficient to remove chromium (VI) (determined spectrophotometr...

  17. Stereology of carbide phase in modified hypereutectic chromium cast iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Suchoń

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available In paper are presented results of studies of carbide phase stereology modified hypereutectic wear resistance chromium cast iron which contains carbon about 3,5% and chromium about 25%. Three substances were applied to the modification: boron carbide (B4C, ferroniobium (FeNb and mixture of ferroniobium and rare-earth (RE. The measurements of geometrical features of carbides were conducted on microsection taken from castings wich were cooled with various velocities.

  18. Thermodynamic Equilibrium Diagrams of Sulphur-Chromium System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The chemical and electrochemical equilibria in the presence of gaseous phase were investigated. Many substances, which consisted of sulphur and chromium, were considered. Various thermodynamic equilibria were calculated in different pressures. Calculation results were shown as log p―1/T and E―T diagrams. These diagrams may be used to study the corrosion of chromium in sulphur-containing circumstances. The diagrams are also used to thermodynami-cally determine the existence area of various substances and so on.

  19. Stereology of carbide phase in modified hypereutectic chromium cast iron

    OpenAIRE

    J. Suchoń; A. Studnicki; M. Przybył

    2010-01-01

    In paper are presented results of studies of carbide phase stereology modified hypereutectic wear resistance chromium cast iron which contains carbon about 3,5% and chromium about 25%. Three substances were applied to the modification: boron carbide (B4C), ferroniobium (FeNb) and mixture of ferroniobium and rare-earth (RE). The measurements of geometrical features of carbides were conducted on microsection taken from castings wich were cooled with various velocities.

  20. SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY ACTIVITIES FOR CHROMIUM IN THE 100 AREAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    PETERSEN SW

    2009-07-02

    {sm_bullet} Primary Objective: Protect the Columbia River - Focus is control and treatment of contamination at or near the shoreline, which is influenced by bank storage {sm_bullet} Secondary Objective: Reduce hexavalent chromium to <48 parts per billion (ppb) in aquifer (drinking water standard) - Large plumes with isolated areas of high chromium concentrations (> 40,000 ppb), - Unknown source location(s); probably originating in reactor operation areas

  1. Genetic Predisposition for Dermal Problems in Hexavalent Chromium Exposed Population

    OpenAIRE

    Priti Sharma; Vipin Bihari; Agarwal, Sudhir K.; Goel, Sudhir K.

    2012-01-01

    We studied the effect of genetic susceptibility on hexavalent chromium induced dermal adversities. The health status of population was examined from the areas of Kanpur (India) having the elevated hexavalent chromium levels in groundwater. Blood samples were collected for DNA isolation to conduct polymorphic determination of genes, namely: NQO1 (C609T), hOGG1 (C1245G), GSTT1, and GSTM1 (deletion). Symptomatic exposed subjects (n = 38) were compared with asymptomatic exposed subjects (n = 108)...

  2. DANGER OF HEXAVALENT CHROMIUM AND STRATEGY FOR THE REMEDITATION

    OpenAIRE

    Aniruddha Roy; Ayan Das; Nirmal Paul

    2013-01-01

    Some metals as micronutrients have a major role in the life and growth process of plants and animals. However, certain forms of some metals may also act as toxic material even in relatively small quantities. Chromium is such a metal, whose concentration above a certain limit may cause a serious problem to the health of living organisms. Chromium (Cr) may occur in several chemical forms in organic and inorganic systems. In biological systems only Cr (III) and Cr (VI) are signifi...

  3. Chromium reduction from slag on electromelting of stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Specific features of chromium reduction from the slag on electromelting of stainless steel type Kh18N10T according to one- or two-slag procedure were studied. It was shown that one-slag melting technology allows double decrease of chromium losses in the form of incompletely reduced oxides. This occurs due to additional chemical reactions between metal and slag on their combined pouring into the ladle. 1 ref.; 3 figs

  4. Removal of Chromium and Lead from Industrial Wastewater Using

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Hilal

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In this research an attempt is made on the ability of aerobic treatment of synthetic solutions containing lead and chromium using effective microorganisms within the reactor. To achieve the desired objectives of the research, synthetic aqueous solutions of lead and chromium was used in the concentration of chromium and lead ions of 5, 10,50 and 100 mg / l .The work was done at constant pH equal to 4.5 and temperature of 30 ± 1 º C. Effective microorganisms solutions was added to the reactor at Vol.% of 1/50 ,1/100 ,1/500 and 1/1000, with retention time was 24 hours to measure the heavy metals concentration the atomic absorption device was used. The experimental results showed that each 1mg / l of lead and chromium ions need 24 mg of effective microorganisms to achieve removal of 92.0% and 82.60% for lead and chromium respectively. Increasing the concentration of effective microorganisms increases the surface of adsorption and thus increasing the removal efficiency. It is found that the microorganisms activity occur in the first five hours of processing and about 94% of adsorption capacity of biomass will take place. It is also found the selectivity of microorganisms to lead ions is higher than for chromium ions.

  5. Evaluating trivalent chromium toxicity on wild terrestrial and wetland plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukina, A O; Boutin, C; Rowland, O; Carpenter, D J

    2016-11-01

    Elevated chromium levels in soil from mining can impact the environment, including plants. Mining of chromium is concentrated in South Africa, several Asian countries, and potentially in Northern Ontario, Canada, raising concerns since chromium toxicity to wild plants is poorly understood. In the first experiment, concentration-response tests were conducted to evaluate effects of chromium on terrestrial and wetland plants. Following established guidelines using artificial soil, seeds of 32 species were exposed to chromium (Cr(3+)) at concentrations simulating contamination (0-1000 mg kg(-1)). This study found that low levels of chromium (250 mg kg(-1)) adversely affected the germination of 22% of species (33% of all families), while higher levels (500 and 1000 mg kg(-1)) affected 69% and 94% of species, respectively, from 89% of the families. Secondly, effects on seedbanks were studied using soil collected in Northern Ontario and exposed to Cr(3+) at equivalent concentrations (0-1000 mg kg(-1)). Effects were less severe in the seedbank study with significant differences only observed at 1000 mg kg(-1). Seeds exposed to Cr(3+) during stratification were greatly affected. Seed size was a contributing factor as was possibly the seed coat barrier. This study represents an initial step in understanding Cr(3+) toxicity on wild plants and could form the basis for future risk assessments. PMID:27543852

  6. Lime enhanced chromium removal in advanced integrated wastewater pond system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadesse, I; Isoaho, S A; Green, F B; Puhakka, J A

    2006-03-01

    The removal of trivalent chromium from a combined tannery effluent in horizontal settling tanks and subsequent Advanced Integrated Wastewater Pond System (AIWPS) reactors was investigated. The raw combined effluent from Modjo tannery had pH in the range of 11.2-12. At this pH, a trivalent chromium removal of 46-72% was obtained in the horizontal settling tanks after a one-day detention time. Trivalent chromium precipitated as chromium hydroxide, Cr(OH)3. 58-95% Cr(III) was removed in the advanced facultative pond (AFP) where the water column pH of 7.2-8.4 was close to pH 8, which is the optimum precipitation pH for trivalent chromium. Chromium removals in the secondary facultative pond (SFP) and maturation pond (MP) were 30-50% and 6-16%, respectively. With Cr(III) concentration of 0.2-0.8 mg/l in the final treated effluent, the AIWPS preceded by horizontal settling tanks produced effluent that could easily meet most of the current Cr(III) discharge limits to receive water bodies.

  7. Effect of Plasma Nitriding on the Performance of WC-Co Cutting Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamzaoglu, Ebru; Yilmaz, Safak; Gulmez, Turgut

    2011-04-01

    This paper presents the effect of nitriding process parameters on the cutting performance of WC-Co tools. The cutting performance was measured by CNC machining of GG25 cast iron parts. The hardness and phase composition of nitrided layer were determined for different plasma nitriding temperatures and times. The hardness of the nitrided layer increased at all plasma nitrided conditions investigated. However, the machining performance of the cutting inserts varied in the range between a 60% increase and a 40% decrease after plasma nitriding. The maximum number of machined parts was seen when the insert was nitrided at 600 °C-4 h and at 500 °C-4 h.

  8. Experimental skin deposition of chromium on the hands following handling of samples of leather and metal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bregnbak, David; Thyssen, Jacob P.; Jellesen, Morten Stendahl;

    2016-01-01

    Background: Chromium is an important skin sensitizer. Exposure to it has been regulated in cement, and recently in leather. Studies on the deposition of chromium ions on the skin as a result of handling different chromium-containing materials are sparse, but could improve the risk assessment...... of contact sensitization and allergic contact dermatitis caused by chromium. Objectives: To determine whether the handling of chromium-containing samples of leather and metal results in the deposition of chromium onto the skin. Methods: Five healthy volunteers participated. For 30 min, they handled samples...... of leather and metal known to contain and release chromium. Skin deposition of chromium was assessed with the acid wipe sampling technique. Results: Acid wipe sampling of the participants' fingers showed chromium deposition on the skin in all participants who had been exposed to leather (range 0.01–0.20 µg...

  9. Ballistic thermoelectric properties in boron nitride nanoribbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Zhong-Xiang; Tang, Li-Ming; Pan, Chang-Ning; Chen, Qiao; Chen, Ke-Qiu

    2013-10-01

    Ballistic thermoelectric properties (TPs) in boron nitride nanoribbons (BNNRs) are studied using the nonequilibrium Green's function atomistic simulation of electron and phonon transport. A comparative analysis for TPs between BNNRs and graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) is made. Results show that the TPs of BNNRs are better than those of GNRs stemming from the higher power factor and smaller thermal conductance of BNNRs. With increasing the ribbon width, the maximum value of ZT (ZTmax) of BNNRs exhibits a transformation from the monotonic decrease to nonlinear increase. We also show that the lattice defect can enhance the ZTmax of these nanoribbons strongly depending on its positions and the edge shape.

  10. Low-dimensional boron nitride nanomaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Pakdel

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In this review, a concise research history of low-dimensional boron nitride (BN nanomaterials followed by recent developments in their synthesis, morphology, properties, and applications are presented. Seventeen years after the initial synthesis of BN nanotubes, research on BN nanomaterials has developed far enough to establish them as one of the most promising inorganic nanosystems. In this regard, it is envisaged that the unique properties of low-dimensional BN systems, such as superb mechanical stiffness, high thermal conductivity, wide optical bandgap, strong ultraviolet emission, thermal stability and chemical inertness will play a key role in prospective developments.

  11. Nitride Semiconductors Handbook on Materials and Devices

    CERN Document Server

    Ruterana, Pierre; Neugebauer, Jörg

    2003-01-01

    Semiconductor components based on silicon have been used in a wide range of applications for some time now. These elemental semiconductors are now well researched and technologically well developed. In the meantime the focus has switched to a new group of materials: ceramic semiconductors based on nitrides are currently the subject of research due to their optical and electronic characteristics. They open up new industrial possibilities in the field of photosensors, as light sources or as electronic components. This collection of review articles provides a systematic and in-depth overview of t

  12. Magnesium doping of boron nitride nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legg, Robert; Jordan, Kevin

    2015-06-16

    A method to fabricate boron nitride nanotubes incorporating magnesium diboride in their structure. In a first embodiment, magnesium wire is introduced into a reaction feed bundle during a BNNT fabrication process. In a second embodiment, magnesium in powder form is mixed into a nitrogen gas flow during the BNNT fabrication process. MgB.sub.2 yarn may be used for superconducting applications and, in that capacity, has considerably less susceptibility to stress and has considerably better thermal conductivity than these conventional materials when compared to both conventional low and high temperature superconducting materials.

  13. Method for exfoliation of hexagonal boron nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yi (Inventor); Connell, John W. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A new method is disclosed for the exfoliation of hexagonal boron nitride into mono- and few-layered nanosheets (or nanoplatelets, nanomesh, nanoribbons). The method does not necessarily require high temperature or vacuum, but uses commercially available h-BN powders (or those derived from these materials, bulk crystals) and only requires wet chemical processing. The method is facile, cost efficient, and scalable. The resultant exfoliated h-BN is dispersible in an organic solvent or water thus amenable for solution processing for unique microelectronic or composite applications.

  14. Novel nanoscroll structures from carbon nitride layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perim, Eric; Galvao, Douglas S

    2014-08-01

    Nanoscrolls (papyrus-like nanostructures) are very attractive structures for a variety of applications, owing to their tunable diameter and large accessible surface area. They have been successfully synthesized from different materials. In this work, we investigate, through fully atomistic molecular dynamics simulations, the dynamics of scroll formation for a series of graphene-like carbon nitride (CN) two-dimensional systems: g-CN, triazine-based g-C3 N4 , and heptazine-based g-C3 N4 . Our results show that stable nanoscrolls can be formed for each of these structures. Possible synthetic routes to produce these nanostructures are also addressed. PMID:24819427

  15. Boron nitride nanomaterials for thermal management applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meziani, Mohammed J; Song, Wei-Li; Wang, Ping; Lu, Fushen; Hou, Zhiling; Anderson, Ankoma; Maimaiti, Halidan; Sun, Ya-Ping

    2015-05-18

    Hexagonal boron nitride nanosheets (BNNs) are analogous to their two-dimensional carbon counterparts in many materials properties, in particular, ultrahigh thermal conductivity, but also offer some unique attributes, including being electrically insulating, high thermal stability, chemical and oxidation resistance, low color, and high mechanical strength. Significant recent advances in the production of BNNs, understanding of their properties, and the development of polymeric nanocomposites with BNNs for thermally conductive yet electrically insulating materials and systems are highlighted herein. Major opportunities and challenges for further studies in this rapidly advancing field are also discussed. PMID:25652360

  16. Ab Initio Study on Hypothetical Silver Nitride

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DELIGOZ Engin; COLAKOGLU Kemal; CIFTCI Yasemin Oztekin

    2008-01-01

    We perform the ab initio calculations based on norm-conserving pseudopotentials and density functional theory to investigate the structural, elastic, and thermodynamical properties for silver nitride (AgN) compound that is a member of the 4d transition metal group and has not been synthesized yet. The obtained results are compared with the other available theoretical data, and the agreement is, generally, quite good. We also present the pressure-dependent behaviour of some mechanical and thermodynamical properties for the same compounds.

  17. USE OF TWO DIGESTION METHODS IN THE EVALUATION OF CHROMIUM CONTENT IN CATTLE'S MEAT SUPPLEMENTED WITH CHROMIUM CHELATES

    OpenAIRE

    R. L. T. Andrade; P.S.A. Moreira; R. Arruda; F. J. Lourenço; C. Palhari, F. F. Faria, V. B. Arevalo; Faria, F. F.; V. B. Arevalo

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to analyze the chromium content in beef using two digestion methods. There were used samples from 24 18-month-old male cattle, and twelve of them were supplemented and twelve were not supplemented with chromium chelate. These samples were evaluated by atomic absorption spectroscopy, previously submitted to digestion method using nitric acid (65%) with hydrogen peroxide (35%) and to digestion method, using solution of nitric perchloric acid in the proportion 3:1. Immedi...

  18. Activation of bentonite to remove the chromium from waste water produced by panning industry, and studying the chromium recovery efficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fast development of tanning industry led to an increase in environmental problems resulting from discharging its wastes to the surrounding environment. Thus solving this problem became one of the most important aims that the researchers work on. The chromium content of the industrial water wastes of the tanning industry considered as the main pollutant for the environment. The Aleppo Bentonite is used in early research to remove the chromium from the industrial waste water.The current research aims to find a method to activate the Aleppo Bentonite in order to increase the effective removal of chromium from the industrial waste water which is produced by tanning industry, as well as to specify the optimal conditions for chromium recovery.This study used the Aleppo Bentonite, whose origin is Tal Ajar-Aleppo to study the activation aspects using Sulfuric Acid, Hydrochloric Acid and Nitric Acid, in addition to study the recovery aspects using the same acids and hydrogen peroxide and to specify the optimal conditions for chromium recovery through applying some experiments based on three main factors: concentration, settling time and temperature.It was observed from the applied experiments that it is possible to recover chromium from Bentonite efficiently up to (80% - 90%) by treating the Bentonite with hydrogen peroxide(33% concentration) at room temperature, or by treating it with hydrogen peroxide(8.25% concentration) at 75oC, while the settling time factor proved that full recovery of chromium is obtained during the first hour, and increasing the time factor does not affect the efficiency of chromium recovery. (author)

  19. Ammonia Decomposition over Bimetallic Nitrides Supported on γ-Al2O3

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chun Shan LU; Xiao Nian LI; Yi Feng ZHU; Hua Zhang LIU; Chun Hui ZHOU

    2004-01-01

    A series of monometallic nitrides and bimetallic nitrides were prepared by temperature-programmed reaction with NH3. The effects of Co, Ni and Fe additives and the synergic action between Fe, Co, Ni and Mo on the ammonia decomposition activity were investigated. TPR-MS, XRD were also carried out to obtain better insight into the structure of the bimetallic nitride. The results of ammonia decomposition activity show that bimetallic nitrides are more active than monometallic nitrides or bimetallic oxides.

  20. Estrutura e propriedades do aço inoxidável austenítico AISI 316L Grau ASTM F138 nitretado sob plasma à baixa temperatura Structure and properties of an austenitic stainless steel AISI 316L grade ASTM F138 after low temperature plasma nitriding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Paulo Tschiptschin

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Os aços inoxidáveis austeníticos possuem restrições para a nitretação nas temperaturas convencionais, próximas de 550ºC, devido à precipitação intensa de nitretos de cromo na zona de difusão. Essa precipitação eleva a dureza, mas deteriora as propriedades de corrosão. O uso do processo de nitretação sob plasma permite introduzir nitrogênio em temperaturas inferiores a 450ºC, levando à formação de uma fina camada de austenita expandida pelo nitrogênio (gN. Essa fase possui uma estrutura cristalina mais bem representada pelo reticulado triclínico, com elevada concentração de nitrogênio em solução sólida supersaturada, a qual promove um estado de tensões residuais de compressão capaz de elevar a dureza do substrato de 4 GPa para valores próximos de 14 GPa. O Módulo de Elasticidade mantém-se próximo de 200 GPa após a nitretação.Austenitic stainless steels cannot be conventionally nitrided at temperatures near 550°C due to the intense precipitation of chromium nitrides in the diffusion zone. The precipitation of chromium nitrides increases the hardness but severely impairs corrosion resistance. Plasma nitriding allows introducing nitrogen in the steel at temperatures below 450°C, forming pre-dominantly expanded austenite (gN, with a crystalline structure best represented by a special triclinic lattice, with a very high nitrogen atomic concentration promoting high compressive residual stresses at the surface, increasing substrate hardness from 4 GPa up to 14 GPa on the nitrided case.

  1. Investigation of surface properties of high temperature nitrided titanium alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Koyuncu

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of paper is to investigate surface properties of high temperature nitrided titanium alloys.Design/methodology/approach: In this study, surface modification of Ti6Al4V titanium alloy was made at various temperatures by plasma nitriding process. Plasma nitriding treatment was performed in 80% N2-20% H2 gas mixture, for treatment times of 2-15 h at the temperatures of 700-1000°C. Surface properties of plasma nitrided Ti6Al4V alloy were examined by metallographic inspection, X-Ray diffraction and Vickers hardness.Findings: Two layers were determined by optic inspection on the samples that were called the compound and diffusion layers. Compound layer contain TiN and Ti2N nitrides, XRD results support in this formations. Maximum hardness was obtained at 10h treatment time and 1000°C treatment temperature. Micro hardness tests showed that hardness properties of the nitrided samples depend on treatment time and temperature.Practical implications: Titanium and its alloys have very attractive properties for many industries. But using of titanium and its alloys is of very low in mechanical engineering applications because of poor tribological properties.Originality/value: The nitriding of titanium alloy surfaces using plasma processes has already reached the industrial application stage in the biomedical field.

  2. Characterization of plasma nitrided layers produced on sintered iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Alves Fontes

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Plasma nitriding is a thermo-physical-chemical treatment process, which promotes surface hardening, caused by interstitial diffusion of atomic nitrogen into metallic alloys. In this work, this process was employed in the surface modification of a sintered ferrous alloy. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM, X-ray diffraction (XRD analyses, and wear and microhardness tests were performed on the samples submitted to ferrox treatment and plasma nitriding carried out under different conditions of time and temperature. The results showed that the nitride layer thickness is higher for all nitrided samples than for ferrox treated samples, and this layer thickness increases with nitriding time and temperature, and temperature is a more significant variable. The XRD analysis showed that the nitrided layer, for all samples, near the surface consists in a mixture of γ′-Fe4N and ɛ-Fe3N phases. Both wear resistance and microhardness increase with nitriding time and temperature, and temperature influences both the characteristics the most.

  3. Low energy spin excitations in chromium metal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pynn, R. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Azuah, R.T. [Hahn-Meitner-Inst., Berlin (Germany); Stirling, W.G. [Univ. of Liverpool (United Kingdom). Dept. of Physics; Kulda, J. [Inst. Laue Langevin, Grenoble (France)

    1997-12-31

    Neutron scattering experiments with full polarization analysis have been performed with a single crystal of chromium to study the low-energy spin fluctuations in the transverse spin density wave (TSDW) state. A number of remarkable results have been found. Inelastic scattering observed close to the TSDW satellite positions at (1 {+-} {delta},0,0) does not behave as expected for magnon scattering. In particular, the scattering corresponds to almost equally strong magnetization fluctuations both parallel and perpendicular to the ordered moments of the TSDW phase. As the Neel temperature is approached from below, scattering at the commensurate wavevector (1,0,0) increases in intensity as a result of critical scattering at silent satellites (1,0, {+-} {delta}) being included within the spectrometer resolution function. This effect, first observed by Sternlieb et al, does not account for all of the inelastic scattering around the (1,0,0) position, however, Rather, there are further collective excitations, apparently emanating from the TSDW satellites, which correspond to magnetic fluctuations parallel to the ordered TSDW moments. These branches have a group velocity that is close to that of (1,0,0) longitudinal acoustic (LA) phonons, but assigning their origin to magneto-elastic scattering raises other unanswered questions.

  4. Solvothermal synthesis of crystalline carbon nitrides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    A solvothermal reaction of anhydrous C3N3Cl3 and Li3N using benzene as the solvent has been carried out to prepare crystalline carbon nitrides successfully at 350℃ and 5-6 MPa. X-ray diffraction (XRD) indicated that the major part of our brown sample was mainly composed of α-C3N4 and β-C3N4 with lattice parameters of a = 0. 65 nm, c = 0.47 nm for α-C3N4 and a = 0.644 nm, c = 0. 246 nm for β-C3N4, which match the latest ab-initio calculations quite well. The N/C ratio in the powder is about 0.66. The Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analyses suggested the presence of both single and double carbon-nitrogen bonds. The kinetics effects of our solvothermal reaction to prepare crystalline carbon nitrides are also discussed chiefly.

  5. High efficiency III-nitride light-emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Mary; Koleske, Daniel; Cho, Jaehee; Zhu, Di; Noemaun, Ahmed; Schubert, Martin F; Schubert, E. Fred

    2013-05-28

    Tailored doping of barrier layers enables balancing of the radiative recombination among the multiple-quantum-wells in III-Nitride light-emitting diodes. This tailored doping enables more symmetric carrier transport and uniform carrier distribution which help to reduce electron leakage and thus reduce the efficiency droop in high-power III-Nitride LEDs. Mitigation of the efficiency droop in III-Nitride LEDs may enable the pervasive market penetration of solid-state-lighting technologies in high-power lighting and illumination.

  6. Preparation of Ultra-fine Aluminum Nitride in Thermal Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    漆继红; 罗义文; 印永祥; 代晓雁

    2002-01-01

    Ultra-fine aluminum nitride has been synthesized by the evaporation of aluminum powder at atmospheric-pressure nitrogen plasma in a hot-wall reactor. The average size of aluminum nitride particle is 0.11μm measured by scanning electric mirror (SEM), and the purity is at least over 90% evaluated by X-Ray diffraction (XRD). The conversion of Al powder to aluminum nitride is strongly depended on the injection of NH3. Typical experimental parameters such as the feed rate of raw material, the flow rate of ammonia and the position of injecting aluminum powder into the reactor are given.

  7. Local Heating with Lithographically Fabricated Plasmonic Titanium Nitride Nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guler, Urcan; Ndukaife, Justus C.; Naik, Gururaj V.;

    2013-01-01

    Titanium nitride is considered a promising alternative plasmonic material and is known to exhibit localized surface plasmon resonances within the near-infrared biological transparency window. Here, local heating efficiencies of disk-shaped nanoparticles made of titanium nitride and gold...... are compared in the visible and near-infrared regions numerically and experimentally with samples fabricated using e-beam lithography. Results show that plasmonic titanium nitride nanodisks are efficient local heat sources and outperform gold nanodisks in the biological transparency window, dispensing the need...

  8. Conductive and robust nitride buffer layers on biaxially textured substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankar, Sambasivan [Chicago, IL; Goyal, Amit [Knoxville, TN; Barnett, Scott A [Evanston, IL; Kim, Ilwon [Skokie, IL; Kroeger, Donald M [Knoxville, TN

    2009-03-31

    The present invention relates to epitaxial, electrically conducting and mechanically robust, cubic nitride buffer layers deposited epitaxially on biaxially textured substrates such as metals and alloys. The invention comprises of a biaxially textured substrate with epitaxial layers of nitrides. The invention also discloses a method to form such epitaxial layers using a high rate deposition method as well as without the use of forming gases. The invention further comprises epitaxial layers of oxides on the biaxially textured nitride layer. In some embodiments the article further comprises electromagnetic devices which may have superconducting properties.

  9. A high Tc superconductor bolometer on a silicon nitride membrane

    OpenAIRE

    Sanchez, Stefan; Elwenspoek, Miko; Gui, Chengqun; Nivelle, de, M.J.M.E.; De, Vries; Korte, de, N.; Bruijn, Marcel P.; Wijnbergen, Jan J.; Michalke, Wolfgang; Steinbeiss, Erwin; Heidenblut, Torsten; Schwierzi, Bernard

    1998-01-01

    In this paper, we describe the design, fabrication, and performance of a high-Tc GdBa2Cu3O7-¿ superconductor bolometer positioned on a 2× 2-mm2 1-¿m-thick silicon nitride membrane. The bolometer structure has an effective area of 0.64 mm2 and was grown on a specially developed silicon-on-nitride (SON) layer. This layer was made by direct bonding of silicon nitride to silicon after chemical mechanical polishing. The operation temperature of the bolometer is 85 K. A thermal conductance G=3.3·10...

  10. Application Of Active Screen Method For Ion Nitriding Efficiency Improvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ogórek M.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Paper presents the research of austenitic steel AISI 304 after ion nitriding at 400°C and at t =4h, for the two different variants of samples distribution in the working plasma reactive chamber tube. In order to assess the effectiveness of ion nitriding variants emission spectroscopy – GDOES, surface hardness tests, microstructure research (LM of nitrided layers were made. It has been found that the use of active screens increases the surface layer thickness and depth of nitrogen diffusion into austenitic steel 304.

  11. Limitations to band gap tuning in nitride semiconductor alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gorczyca, I.; Suski, T.; Christensen, Niels Egede;

    2010-01-01

    Relations between the band gaps of nitride alloys and their lattice parameters are presented and limits to tuning of the fundamental gap in nitride semiconductors are set by combining a large number of experimental data with ab initio theoretical calculations. Large band gap bowings obtained...... theoretically for GaxAl1-xN, InxGa1-xN, and InxAl1-xN for uniform as well as clustered arrangements of the cation atoms are considered in the theoretical analysis. It is shown that indium plays a particular role in nitride alloys being responsible for most of the observed effects....

  12. Hexavalent Chromium Reduction and Its Distribution in the Cell and Medium by Chromium Resistant Fusarium solani

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mousumi Sen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, batch biosorption of Cr(VI was studied using the fungal strain isolated from soil. The fungal strain was characterized as Fusarium solani. The total Cr distribution in the biomass (fungus and in the media obtained from the experiment conducted at 500 mg l -1 initial Cr(VI concentration and pH 5.0. The results indicated both intracellular and extracellular accumulation and enzymatic reduction of Cr(VI and this was supported by the Transmission Electron Microscopic (TEM observation at the same Cr(VI concentration and pH value. Chromium elution from Fusarium solani containing Cr was then tried out using a number of chromium eluting reagents and a maximum Cr could be eluted using 0.5N sodium hydroxide solution without destructing the biomass structure. The total Cr was recovered by pH adjustment from both biomass and media was found to be 44% of the initial Cr(VI concentration (500 mg l-1.

  13. Characteristics of Au/PZT/TiO2/Nitride/Si structure capacitors with ICP nitride treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, the characteristics of PZT/TiO2 ferroelectric gate stack capacitors with Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP) nitridation were investigated for field effect transistor (FET)-type Ferroelectric Random Access Memory (FeRAM) applications. If a high accumulation capacitance is to be had, the ICP nitridation time needs to be optimized. While a short ICP treatment time results in thermal oxide growth due to lack of nitrogen, a long nitridation time causes a nitride layer which is too thick. Au/PZT(200 nm)/TiO2(40 nm)/Nitride/Si (MeFINS) structure capacitors show a memory window (ΔV) of 1.6 V under ±3-V operation while Au/PZT(200 nm)/TiO2(40 nm)/Si (MeFIS) capacitors without nitride treatment exhibit a small memory window of 0.6 V. At the same time, the capacitance of the MeFINS device is almost twice that of the MeFIS capacitor. This result implies that the ICP nitride treatment suppresses the formation of a low dielectric constant interfacial SiOx layer and alleviates the series capacitance problem

  14. Characteristics of Au/PZT/TiO{sub 2}/Nitride/Si structure capacitors with ICP nitride treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Min, Hyung Seob; Kim, Tae Ho; Jeon, Chang Bae; Lee, Jae Gab; Kim, Ji Young [Kookmin Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-01-01

    In this study, the characteristics of PZT/TiO{sub 2} ferroelectric gate stack capacitors with Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP) nitridation were investigated for field effect transistor (FET)-type Ferroelectric Random Access Memory (FeRAM) applications. If a high accumulation capacitance is to be had, the ICP nitridation time needs to be optimized. While a short ICP treatment time results in thermal oxide growth due to lack of nitrogen, a long nitridation time causes a nitride layer which is too thick. Au/PZT(200 nm)/TiO{sub 2}(40 nm)/Nitride/Si (MeFINS) structure capacitors show a memory window ({delta}V) of 1.6 V under {+-}3-V operation while Au/PZT(200 nm)/TiO{sub 2}(40 nm)/Si (MeFIS) capacitors without nitride treatment exhibit a small memory window of 0.6 V. At the same time, the capacitance of the MeFINS device is almost twice that of the MeFIS capacitor. This result implies that the ICP nitride treatment suppresses the formation of a low dielectric constant interfacial SiO{sub x} layer and alleviates the series capacitance problem.

  15. Beryllium decorated armchair boron nitride nanoribbon: A new planar tetracoordinate nitride containing system with enhanced conductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Bo; Yu, Xuefang; Hu, Hong; Ding, Yihong

    2014-07-01

    In this Letter, a new kind of planar tetracoordinate nitride (ptN) structure is obtained via Be-decorated armchair boron nitride nanoribbon (aBNNR). The high stability of such a ptN system is confirmed by both global minimization and molecular dynamical simulation at 1500 K. The results suggest that this Be-decorated aBNNR will be a thermally stable material. The electronic property of aBNNR is significantly increased after the addition of Be atoms to the edges and the band gap decreases as the width of the ribbon decreases. Our Letter posits a new and potentially stable and useful BNNR and augments the literature on ptN.

  16. Preparation of carbon-nitride bulk samples in the presence of seed carbon-nitride films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, J. I. [Korea University of Technology and Education, Chonan (Korea, Republic of); Zorov, N. B. [Moscow State University, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2004-05-15

    A procedure was developed for preparing bulk carbon-nitride crystals from polymeric alpha-C{sub 3}N{sub 4.2} at high pressure and high temperature in the presence of seeds of crystalline carbon-nitride films prepared by using a high-voltage discharge plasma combined with pulsed laser ablation of a graphite target. The samples were evaluated by using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), infrared (IR) spectroscopy, Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), secondary-ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Notably, XPS studies of the film composition before and after thermobaric treatments demonstrated that the nitrogen composition in the alpha-C{sub 3}N{sub 4.2} material, which initially contained more than 58 % nitrogen, decreased during the annealing process and reached a common, stable composition of approx 45 %. The thermobaric experiments were performed at 10 - 77 kbar and 350 - 1200 .deg. C.

  17. Electron transfer. 75. Reduction of carboxylato-bound chromium(V) with vanadium(IV). Intervention of chromium(IV)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The chelated (carboxylato)chromium(V) anion bis(2-hydroxy-2-ethylbutyrato)oxochromate(V) (I), [(Lig)2Cr(O)]-, reacts with oxovanadium(IV) to form a strongly absorbing species (lambda/sub max/ = 515 nm; epsilon = 1.7 x 103 M-1) in the presence of 2-hydroxy-2-ethylbutyric acid buffers (pH 2-4). EPR data support 1:1 stoichiometry with VO2+ in deficiency, indicating the formation of a chromium(IV) species by reduction. With excess VO2+ a chromium(III) product was obtained. Spectral and ion-exchange properties of this product correspond to those observed for the titanium(III) and iron(II) reductions of chromium(V) and are consistent with the formulation of the product as a bis(hydroxycarboxylate) chelate of (H2O)2Cr/sup III/. With excess vanadium(IV), the reaction exhibits triphasic kinetics. The remaining step of the reaction is the reduction of the chromium(IV) intermediate with VO2+. Rates for all steps increase with decreasing [H+] and level off at low [H+]. The limiting rate constants for the formation of the chromium(IV) intermediate by the (Lig)3Cr(O)2- and (Lig)2Cr(O)- pathways are 2.8 x 103 and 2.2 x 102 M-1s-1. The bimolecular limiting rate constant for the reduction of chromium(IV) is computed to be 7.7 x 102 M-1 s-1. 33 references, 7 tables

  18. High Temperature Oxidation of Boron Nitride. Part 1; Monolithic Boron Nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Nathan; Farmer, Serene; Moore, Arthur; Sayir, Haluk

    1997-01-01

    High temperature oxidation of monolithic boron nitride (BN) is examined. Hot pressed BN and both low and high density CVD BN were studied. It is shown that oxidation rates are quite sensitive to microstructural factors such as orientation, porosity, and degree of crystallinity. In addition small amounts of water vapor lead to volatilization of the B2O3 oxide as H(x)B(y)O(z). For these reasons, very different oxidation kinetics were observed for each type of BN.

  19. Fabrication of Aluminum Gallium Nitride/Gallium Nitride MESFET And It's Applications in Biosensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alur, Siddharth

    Gallium Nitride has been researched extensively for the past three decades for its application in Light Emitting Diodes (LED's), power devices and UV photodetectors. With the recent developments in crystal growth technology and the ability to control the doping there has been an increased interest in heterostructures formed between Gallium nitride and it's alloy Aluminium Gallium Nitride. These heterostructures due to the combined effect of spontaneous and piezoelectric effect can form a high density and a high mobility electron gas channel without any intentional doping. This high density electron gas makes these heterostructures ideal to be used as sensors. Gallium Nitride is also chemically very stable. Detection of biomolecules in a fast and reliable manner is very important in the areas of food safety and medical research. For biomolecular detection it is paramount to have a robust binding of the probes on the sensor surface. Therefore, in this dissertation, the fabrication and application of the AlGaN/GaN heterostructures as biological sensors for the detection of DNA and Organophosphate hydrolase enzyme is discussed. In order to use these AlGaN/GaN heterostructures as biological sensors capable of working in a liquid environment photodefinable polydimethyl-siloxane is used as an encapsulant. The immobilization conditions for a robust binding of thiolated DNA and the catalytic receptor enzyme organophosphate hydrolase on gold surfaces is developed with the help of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. DNA and OPH are detected by measuring the change in the drain current of the device as a function of time.

  20. Low-chromium reduced-activation ferritic steels for fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klueh, R.L.; Alexander, D.J.; Kenik, E.A. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, TN (United States)

    1996-04-01

    Development of reduced-activation ferritic steels has concentrated on high-chromium (8-10 wt% Cr) steels. However, there are advantages for a low-chromium steel, and initial ORNL studies on reduced-activation steels were on compositions with 2.25 to 12% Cr. Those studies showed an Fe-2.25Cr-2W-0.25V-0.1C (2 1/4Cr-2WV) steel to have the highest strenglth of the steels studied. Although this steel had the best strength, Charpy impact properties were inferior to those of an Fe-9Cr-2W-0.25V-0.07Ta-0.1C (9Cr-2WVTa) and an Fe-2.25Cr-2W-0.1C (2 1/4Cr-2W) steel. Therefore, further development of the low-chromium Cr-W steels was required. These results indicate that it is possible to develop low-chromium reduced-activation ferritic steels that have tensile and impact properties as good or better than those of high-chromium (7-9% Cr) steels. Further improvement of properties should be possible by optimizing the composition.

  1. Bioaccumulation and biosorption of chromium by Aspergillus niger MTCC 2594.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandana Mala, John Geraldine; Unni Nair, Balachandran; Puvanakrishnan, Rengarajulu

    2006-06-01

    Chromium toxicity is of prime concern due to chrome tanning processes in the leather sector. Chrome tanning results in the discharge of toxic levels of chromium causing pollution hazards. Chromium levels of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) were high above permissible limits in chrome samples after chrome tanning. The potential of Aspergillus niger MTCC 2594 to accumulate chromium as well as its biosorption capacity is investigated in this study. Bioaccumulation of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) in the spent chrome liquor has resulted in a 75-78% reduction of the initial Cr content in 24-36 h. A. niger biomass is found to be very effective in the biosorption of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) in spent chrome liquor. Maximum adsorption of 83% for biosorption of Cr(III) at 48 h and 79% of Cr(VI) at 36 h in spent chrome liquor is observed. The biosorption characteristics fit well with Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms and the adsorption parameters are evaluated. The biosorption of Cr also follows Lagergren kinetics. A. niger biomass is effectively used for the biosorption of chromium with 79-83% Cr removal in 36-48 h.

  2. Chromium propionate enhances adipogenic differentiation of bovine intramuscular adipocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca eTokach

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In vitro experiments were performed to determine the effects of increasing concentrations of chromium propionate on mRNA and protein abundance of different enzymes and receptors. Intramuscular and subcutaneous preadipocytes and bovine satellite cells were isolated from the longissimus muscle to determine the effect of treatment on glucose transporter type 4 (GLUT4 and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ mRNA and GLUT4 protein abundance. Preadipocyte cultures were treated with differentiation media plus either sodium propionate or different concentrations of chromium propionate (CrPro for 96, 120, and 144 h before harvest. This study indicated adipogenesis of the bovine intramuscular adipocytes were more sensitive to the treatment of chromium propionate as compared to subcutaneous adipocytes. Enhancement of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase and GLUT4 mRNA by CrPro treatment may enhance glucose uptake in intramuscular adipocytes. Chromium propionate decreased GLUT4 protein levels in muscle cell cultures suggesting those cells have increased efficiency of glucose uptake due to exposure to increased levels of CrPro. In contrast, each of the two adipogenic lines had opposing responses to the CrPro. It appeared that CrPro had the most stimulative effect of GLUT4 response in the intramuscular adipocytes as compared to subcutaneous adipocytes. These findings indicated opportunities to potentially augment marbling in beef cattle fed chromium propionate during the finishing phase.

  3. Anthropogenic chromium emissions in china from 1990 to 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Hongguang; Zhou, Tan; Li, Qian; Lu, Lu; Lin, Chunye

    2014-01-01

    An inventory of chromium emission into the atmosphere and water from anthropogenic activities in China was compiled for 1990 through to 2009. We estimate that the total emission of chromium to the atmosphere is about 1.92×10⁵ t. Coal and oil combustion were the two leading sources of chromium emission to the atmosphere in China, while the contribution of them showed opposite annual growth trend. In total, nearly 1.34×10⁴ t of chromium was discharged to water, mainly from six industrial categories in 20 years. Among them, the metal fabrication industry and the leather tanning sector were the dominant sources of chromium emissions, accounting for approximately 68.0% and 20.0% of the total emissions and representing increases of 15.6% and 10.3% annually, respectively. The spatial trends of Cr emissions show significant variation based on emissions from 2005 to 2009. The emission to the atmosphere was heaviest in Hebei, Shandong, Guangdong, Zhejiang and Shanxi, whose annual emissions reached more than 1000t for the high level of coal and oil consumption. In terms of emission to water, the largest contributors were Guangdong, Jiangsu, Shandong and Zhejiang, where most of the leather production and metal manufacturing occur and these four regions accounted for nearly 47.4% of the total emission to water. PMID:24505309

  4. Anthropogenic chromium emissions in china from 1990 to 2009.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongguang Cheng

    Full Text Available An inventory of chromium emission into the atmosphere and water from anthropogenic activities in China was compiled for 1990 through to 2009. We estimate that the total emission of chromium to the atmosphere is about 1.92×10⁵ t. Coal and oil combustion were the two leading sources of chromium emission to the atmosphere in China, while the contribution of them showed opposite annual growth trend. In total, nearly 1.34×10⁴ t of chromium was discharged to water, mainly from six industrial categories in 20 years. Among them, the metal fabrication industry and the leather tanning sector were the dominant sources of chromium emissions, accounting for approximately 68.0% and 20.0% of the total emissions and representing increases of 15.6% and 10.3% annually, respectively. The spatial trends of Cr emissions show significant variation based on emissions from 2005 to 2009. The emission to the atmosphere was heaviest in Hebei, Shandong, Guangdong, Zhejiang and Shanxi, whose annual emissions reached more than 1000t for the high level of coal and oil consumption. In terms of emission to water, the largest contributors were Guangdong, Jiangsu, Shandong and Zhejiang, where most of the leather production and metal manufacturing occur and these four regions accounted for nearly 47.4% of the total emission to water.

  5. Enhancement of chromium uptake in tanning using oxazolidine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundarapandiyan, S; Brutto, Patrick E; Siddhartha, G; Ramesh, R; Ramanaiah, B; Saravanan, P; Mandal, A B

    2011-06-15

    Monocyclic and bicyclic oxazolidines were offered at three different junctures of chrome tanning process viz. prior to BCS offer, along with BCS and after basification. It was found that oxazolidine when offered after basification brought about better chromium uptake and reduction of chromium load in the wastewater. Offer of oxazolidine was also varied. Increase in offer of oxazolidine from 0.25% to 1% was found to enhance the chromium uptake and decrease the chromium load in wastewater. But the increase in uptake was not proportionate to the increase in oxazolidine offer more than 0.75%. Offer of 1% Zoldine ZA 78 (monocyclic oxazolidine) and Zoldine ZE (bicyclic oxazolidine) after basification brought about 63.4% and 73.1% enhancement in chrome content in leather compared to control where oxazolidine was not offered. The tone of the wetblue was found to be altered moderately. However this did not call for any process adjustments in wet-finishing. The oxazolidine treated leathers were found to be immensely fuller and tighter. It was found experimentally that offer of 1% of oxazolidine facilitated reduction in the offer of syntans administered for filling and grain tightening by around 46%. Oxazolidine could bring about significant reduction in cost of chemicals apart from resulting environmental benefits due to enhancement of chromium uptake during tanning. PMID:21536383

  6. Plasma nitriding monitoring reactor: A model reactor for studying plasma nitriding processes using an active screen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamann, S.; Börner, K.; Burlacov, I.; Spies, H.-J.; Strämke, M.; Strämke, S.; Röpcke, J.

    2015-12-01

    A laboratory scale plasma nitriding monitoring reactor (PLANIMOR) has been designed to study the basics of active screen plasma nitriding (ASPN) processes. PLANIMOR consists of a tube reactor vessel, made of borosilicate glass, enabling optical emission spectroscopy (OES) and infrared absorption spectroscopy. The linear setup of the electrode system of the reactor has the advantages to apply the diagnostic approaches on each part of the plasma process, separately. Furthermore, possible changes of the electrical field and of the heat generation, as they could appear in down-scaled cylindrical ASPN reactors, are avoided. PLANIMOR has been used for the nitriding of steel samples, achieving similar results as in an industrial scale ASPN reactor. A compact spectrometer using an external cavity quantum cascade laser combined with an optical multi-pass cell has been applied for the detection of molecular reaction products. This allowed the determination of the concentrations of four stable molecular species (CH4, C2H2, HCN, and NH3). With the help of OES, the rotational temperature of the screen plasma could be determined.

  7. Plasma nitriding monitoring reactor: A model reactor for studying plasma nitriding processes using an active screen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamann, S., E-mail: hamann@inp-greifswald.de; Röpcke, J. [INP-Greifswald, Felix-Hausdorff-Str. 2, 17489 Greifswald (Germany); Börner, K.; Burlacov, I.; Spies, H.-J. [TU Bergakademie Freiberg, Institute of Materials Engineering, Gustav-Zeuner-Str. 5, 09599 Freiberg (Germany); Strämke, M.; Strämke, S. [ELTRO GmbH, Arnold-Sommerfeld-Ring 3, 52499 Baesweiler (Germany)

    2015-12-15

    A laboratory scale plasma nitriding monitoring reactor (PLANIMOR) has been designed to study the basics of active screen plasma nitriding (ASPN) processes. PLANIMOR consists of a tube reactor vessel, made of borosilicate glass, enabling optical emission spectroscopy (OES) and infrared absorption spectroscopy. The linear setup of the electrode system of the reactor has the advantages to apply the diagnostic approaches on each part of the plasma process, separately. Furthermore, possible changes of the electrical field and of the heat generation, as they could appear in down-scaled cylindrical ASPN reactors, are avoided. PLANIMOR has been used for the nitriding of steel samples, achieving similar results as in an industrial scale ASPN reactor. A compact spectrometer using an external cavity quantum cascade laser combined with an optical multi-pass cell has been applied for the detection of molecular reaction products. This allowed the determination of the concentrations of four stable molecular species (CH{sub 4}, C{sub 2}H{sub 2}, HCN, and NH{sub 3}). With the help of OES, the rotational temperature of the screen plasma could be determined.

  8. Reduction of chromium oxide from slags

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gutiérrez-Paredes, J.

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Experimental and theoretical work were performed to estimate the effect of slag basicity and amount of reducing agents on the reduction of chromium oxide from the slag which interacted with molten steel at 1,600 °C. The slag system contained CaO, MgO, SiO2, CaF2 and Cr2O3 together with Fe-alloys (Fe-Si and Fe-Si-Mg. The CaF2 and MgO contents in the slags were 10 mass % each; Cr2O3 was 25%. The amount of the ferroalloys ranged from 12.5 to 50 g per 100 g of slag. The (CaO+MgO/SiO2 ratio was held at 1 and 2. The Cr yield was determined using both Fe-alloys as reducing agents. Some estimations were made to determine the theoretical effect of temperature, slag basicity, (CaO+MgO/SiO2, and amount of reducing agents in the slag on the chromium recovery. The FACT (Facility for the Analysis of Chemical Thermodynamics computational package is used to determine the equilibrium between the slag and molten steel.

    En el presente trabajo se realiza un estudio teórico y experimental para determinar el efecto de la basicidad de la escoria y la cantidad de agentes reductores sobre la reducción de óxidos de cromo contenidos en la escoria, la cual está en contacto con acero líquido a 1.600 °C. La escoria se prepara con los reactivos CaO, MgO, SiO2, CaF2 y ferroaleaciones (Fe-Si y Fe-Si-Mg. Los contenidos de CaF2 y MgO en la escoria son de 10 %, cada uno, y el de Cr2O3 es 25 %. La cantidad de la ferroaleación varía de 12,5 a 50 g por cada 100 g de escoria. La relación (CaO+MgO/SiO2 tiene los valores de 1 y 2. Se determina la eficiencia de recuperación de cromo empleando los dos tipos de ferroaleaciones. Se realizaron cálculos para determinar el efecto teórico de la temperatura, la basicidad de la escoria, (CaO+MgO/SiO2, y la cantidad de agentes reductores sobre la reducci

  9. Electrochemical modification of chromium surfaces using 4-nitro- and4-fluorobenzenediazonium salts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hinge, Mogens; Cecatto, Marcel; Kingshott, Peter;

    2009-01-01

    Chromium surfaces can be electrografted with organic surface films using 4-nitro- or 4-fluorobenzenediazonium salts, despite the fact that the surfaces are covered with a protective chromium oxide layer...

  10. FORMATION AND DESTRUCTION OF HEXAVALENT CHROMIUM IN A LABORATORY SWIRL FLAME INCINERATOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    The partitioning of chromium (Cr) in combustion systems was investigated theoretically and experimentally. Theoretical predictions were based on chemical equilibrium and suggested that hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] was favored by the presence of chlorine (Cl) and diminished by the...

  11. Effective bioleaching of chromium in tannery sludge with an enriched sulfur-oxidizing bacterial community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Jing; Gou, Min; Tang, Yue-Qin; Li, Guo-Ying; Sun, Zhao-Yong; Kida, Kenji

    2016-10-01

    In this study, a sulfur-oxidizing community was enriched from activated sludge generated in tannery wastewater treatment plants. Bioleaching of tannery sludge containing 0.9-1.2% chromium was investigated to evaluate the effectiveness of the enriched community, the effect of chromium binding forms on bioleaching efficiency, and the dominant microbes contributing to chromium bioleaching. Sludge samples inoculated with the enriched community presented 79.9-96.8% of chromium leaching efficiencies, much higher than those without the enriched community. High bioleaching efficiencies of over 95% were achieved for chromium in reducible fraction, while 60.9-97.9% were observed for chromium in oxidizable and residual fractions. Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans, the predominant bacteria in the enriched community, played an important role in bioleaching, whereas some indigenous heterotrophic species in sludge might have had a supporting role. The results indicated that A. thiooxidans-dominant enriched microbial community had high chromium bioleaching efficiency, and chromium binding forms affected the bioleaching performance.

  12. CHROMIUM ELECTROANALYSIS AT SCREEN PRINTED ELECTRODE MODIFIED BY THIN FILMS OF NICKEL

    Science.gov (United States)

    A rapid and potentially cost-effective electrochemical method is reported for analysis of chromium (VI) and Chromium(III) using a nickel modified screen printed carbon ink electrode. Electrochemical characteristics of nickel modified electrode as well voltammetric behavior f...

  13. Physics of wurtzite nitrides and oxides passport to devices

    CERN Document Server

    Gil, Bernard

    2014-01-01

    This book gives a survey of the current state of the art of a special class of nitrides semiconductors, Wurtzite Nitride and Oxide Semiconductors. It includes properties, growth and applications. Research in the area of nitrides semiconductors is still booming although some basic materials sciences issues were solved already about 20 years ago. With the advent of modern technologies and the successful growth of nitride substrates, these materials currently experience a second birth. Advanced new applications like light-emitters, including UV operating LEDs, normally on and normally off high frequency operating transistors are expected. With progress in clean room technology, advanced photonic and quantum optic applications are envisioned in a close future. This area of research is fascinating for researchers and students in materials science, electrical engineering, chemistry, electronics, physics and biophysics. This book aims to be the ad-hoc instrument to this active field of research.

  14. Thermal Effect of Ceramic Nanofiller Aluminium Nitride on Polyethylene Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omer Bin Sohail

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Ethylene polymerization was done to form polyethylene nano-composite with nanoaluminum nitride using zirconocene catalysts. Results show that the catalytic activity is maximum at a filler loading of 15 mg nanoaluminum nitride. Differential scanning calorimeter (DSC and X-ray diffraction (XRD results show that percentage crystallinity was also marginally higher at this amount of filler. Thermal behavior of polyethylene nanocomposites (0, 15, 30, and 45 mg was studied by DSC and thermal gravimetric analyzer (TGA. Morphology of the component with 15 mg aluminium nitride is more fibrous as compared to 0 mg aluminium nitride and higher filler loading as shown by SEM images. In order to understand combustibility behavior, tests were performed on microcalorimeter. Its results showed decrease in combustibility in polyethylene nanocomposites as the filler loading increases.

  15. Plasma-nitriding of tantalum at relatively low temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Deyuan; LIN Qin; ZHAO Haomin; FEI Qinyong; GENG Man

    2004-01-01

    The combined quadratic orthogonal regression method of experiment design was employed to explore the effects of process parameters of plasma nitriding of tantalum such as total pressure, temperature and original hydrogen molar fraction on the hardness, roughness and structure of nitriding surfaces. The regression equations of hardness, roughness and structure were given according to the results of regression and statistic analysis. And the diffusion activation energy of nitrogen in tantalum on plasma nitriding conditions was calculated according to the experimental data of hardness of plasma-nitriding of tantalum vs time and temperature. The diffusion activation energy calculated belongs to (155.49 + 10.51)kJ/mol (783-983 K).

  16. Research of functional properties of nitride ion-plasma coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaulina, O. Yu; Ovechkin, B. B.; Papchenko, A. V.; Shvagrukova, E. V.

    2016-02-01

    This paper considers the influence of ion-plasma coatings with the use of nitrogen (N), zirconium nitride (ZrN), titanium-aluminum nitride (Ti,Al)N and titanium nitride and zirconium nitride by-layer (TiN+ZrN - eight layers) on the properties of steel 65X13. The main functional properties of the coatings are determined: microhardness, nanohardness, Young's modulus and corrosion resistance. It is shown that all the types of coatings allow increasing the physical and mechanical characteristics of instrument steel 65X13. Hardness and wear-resistance, depending on the type of the deposited coating, increase from 1, 5 to 4 times, corrosion resistance increases by tens times.

  17. Scientific Opinion on chromium(III lactate tri-hydrate as a source of chromium added for nutritional purposes to foodstuff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EFSA Panel on Food Additives and Nutrient Sources added to Food (ANS

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available

    The Panel on Food Additives and Nutrient Sources added to Food provides a scientific opinion on the safety and bioavailability of chromium(III lactate tri-hydrate as a source of chromium(III added for nutritional purposes to foodstuffs. The safety of chromium itself, in terms of the amounts that may be consumed, is outside the remit of this Panel. No new data have been provided as regards the safety and bioavailability of chromium from chromium(III lactate tri-hydrate. The Panel concurs with its earlier views stating that no evidence was provided supporting the bioavailability of chromium from chromium(III lactate tri-hydrate. Chromium(III lactate tri-hydrate is claimed to be freely soluble in water, however, chromium(III lactate tri-hydrate exists as a weak complex that may influence the bioavailability of chromium(III in the gastrointestinal tract. The Panel re-iterates that because of the complex chemistry of chromium(III lactate tri-hydrate in aqueous solutions and its limited solubility at pH >5, the bioavailability of chromium(III from chromium(III lactate tri-hydrate is low. Based on a conservative exposure estimate, the Panel calculated the combined intake of chromium(III from supplements and from foods fortified with chromium(III lactate tri-hydrate, for both adults and children, to be approximately 240 μg chromium(III/day, which is below the value of 250 µg/day established by the WHO for supplemental intake of chromium that should not be exceeded. The Panel noted that the use of chromium(III lactate tri-hydrate in the form of a premix with lactose, added to foods, would result in an exposure at the mean for adults of approximately 7-37 mg lactose/day (0.12-0.62 μg lactose/kg bw/day and to 36-192 μg lactate/day (0.60-3.20 μg/kg bw/day. Given that subjects with lactose maldigestion will tolerate up to 12 g of lactose with no or minor symptoms, these levels are not of safety concern.

  18. Biosorption of hexavalent chromium in a tannery industry wastewater using fungi species

    OpenAIRE

    Sivakumar, D.

    2016-01-01

    The isolated fungi species of different kinds from chromium contaminated soil sites located in Nagalkeni, Chennai were used for reducing chromium(VI) in a tannery industry wastewater of Nagalkeni, Chennai.  The experiments were conducted to know biosorption potential of isolated fungi species for removing chromium(VI) in a tannery industry wastewater against the different pH, fungi biomass and chromium(VI) concentration (dilution ratio).  The results of this study indicated that the order of ...

  19. Investigation of hexavalent chromium removal from Synthetic wastewater by using Peaganum

    OpenAIRE

    Ali Akbar Taghizadeh; Maryam khodadadi; Taher Shahriary; Hadighe Dorri; mahla zaferanieh; rasoul khosravi

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aim: Discharge of industrial wastewater containing hexavalent chromium into the environment can have harmful effects to the types of organisms. So, chromium should remove before discharging to the environment with an effective method. The purpose of this study of is hexavalent chromium removed with Peganum harmala granular seeds(PGS).   Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, The removal of hexavalent chromium with using PGS, with changes in time, pH, adsorbent dose,...

  20. Influence of chromium, oxygen, carbon and nitrogen on iron viscosity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinetic viscosity of 70 beforehand melted iron samples with additions of chromium (up to 2%) and carbon (up to 1%) has been investigated. Different conditions of melting brought about differences in oxygen and nitrogen contents. Viscosity of most samples has been determined in the 1550-1650 deg C temperature range. It is stated that small additions to pure iron of each of the investigated elements (O, Cr, C, N) decrease its viscosity. Combined effect of these additions on viscosity is inadditive. Simultaneous introduction of oxygen and carbon may result in increase of melt viscosity. The same fact is observed at combined introduction of chromium and nitrogen. Simultaneous introduction of other impurities-chromium with oxygen or carbon, nitrogen with oxygen causes amplification of their individual effect. Reasons for the observed regularities result from changes in energies of interparticle interactions in the melt and therefore rebuilding of structure of its short-range order

  1. A study of the process of desorption of hexavalent chromium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W.B. Amorim

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available In this work the process of desorption of hexavalent chromium, a toxic metal ion, from the marine algae Sargassum sp, following biosorption experiments 2³ factorial design was studied. A technique was applied to three eluents: HCl, H2SO4 and EDTA. Three factors of importance were evaluated: concentration of eluent, the ratio between mass of biosorbent and volume of eluent (S/L and process time. A statistical analysis of the experimental results showed that the three variables evaluated are significant for all three eluents. The models for chromium desorption were validated, as the results agreed well with the observed values. Through use of the response surface methodology, a factorial design based optimization technique; it was possible to identify the most suitable eluent and the interval of values for the process variables that resulted in the most significant desorption of chromium, which is relevant information for work aiming at process optimization.

  2. Structural and magnetic properties of chromium doped zinc ferrite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zinc chromium ferrites with chemical formula ZnCrxFe2−xO4 (x = 0.0, 0.2, 0.4, 0.6, 0.8, 1.0) were prepared by Sol - Gel technique. The structural as well as magnetic properties of the synthesized samples have been studied and reported here. The structural characterizations of the samples were analyzed by using X – Ray Diffraction (XRD), Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), and Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM). The single phase spinel cubic structure of all the prepared samples was tested by XRD and FTIR. The particle size was observed to decrease from 18.636 nm to 6.125 nm by chromium doping and induced a tensile strain in all the zinc chromium mixed ferrites. The magnetic properties of few samples (x = 0.0, 0.4, 1.0) were investigated using Vibrating Sample Magnetometer (VSM)

  3. Chromium Resistant Bacteria: Impact on Plant Growth in Soil Microcosm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayel Hanane

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Three chromium resistant bacterial strains, Pseudomonas fluorescens PF28, Enterobacter amnigenus EA31 and Enterococcus gallinarum S34 isolated from tannery waste contaminated soil were used in this study. All strains could resist a high concentration of K2Cr2O7 that is up to 300 mg/L. The effect of these strains on clover plants (Trifolium campestre in the presence of two chromium salts CrCl3 and K2Cr2O7 was studied in soil microcosm. Application of chromium salts adversely affected seed germination, root and shoot length. Bacterial inoculation improved the growth parameters under chromate stress when compared with non inoculated respective controls. There was observed more than 50% reduction of Cr(VI in inoculated soil microcosms, as compared to the uninoculated soil under the same conditions. The results obtained in this study are significant for the bioremediation of chromate pollution.

  4. Electron magnetic resonance investigation of chromium diffusion in yttria powders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biasi, R.S. de, E-mail: rsbiasi@ime.eb.b [Secao de Engenharia Mecanica e de Materiais, Instituto Militar de Engenharia, Pr. General Tiburcio, 80, 22290-270 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Grillo, M.L.N., E-mail: mluciag@uerj.b [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, 20550-013 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2010-03-01

    The electron magnetic resonance (EMR) technique was used to investigate the diffusion of chromium in yttria (Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}) powders. The EMR absorption intensity was measured for several annealing times and three different temperatures of isothermal annealing: 1273, 1323 and 1373 K. The activation temperature for diffusion, calculated from the experimental data using a theoretical model based on the Fick equation, was found to be E{sub A}=342+-5 kJ mol{sup -1}. This value is larger than the activation energy for the diffusion of chromium in rutile (TiO{sub 2}), periclase (MgO) and cobalt monoxide (CoO) and smaller than the activation energy for the diffusion of chromium in chrysoberyl (BeAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}).

  5. Infrared Dielectric Properties of Low-stress Silicon Nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cataldo, Giuseppe; Beall, James A.; Cho, Hsiao-Mei; McAndrew, Brendan; Niemack, Michael D.; Wollack, Edward J.

    2012-01-01

    Silicon nitride thin films play an important role in the realization of sensors, filters, and high-performance circuits. Estimates of the dielectric function in the far- and mid-IR regime are derived from the observed transmittance spectra for a commonly employed low-stress silicon nitride formulation. The experimental, modeling, and numerical methods used to extract the dielectric parameters with an accuracy of approximately 4% are presented.

  6. LASER GAS NITRIDING OF TITANIUM AND TITANIUM ALLOYS

    OpenAIRE

    J. J. DAI; Hou, S. Q.

    2009-01-01

    Titanium and titanium alloys are widely used in many fields due to some of their characteristics such as light density, high strength, and excellent corrosion resistance. However, poor mechanical performances limit their practical applications. Laser gas nitriding is a promising method used to improve the surface properties of components. Recent developments on laser gas nitriding of titanium and titanium alloys are reviewed. The processing parameters have important effects on the resulting c...

  7. Triple templating of graphitic carbon nitride to enhance photocatalytic properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Yang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Graphitic carbon nitride materials show some promising properties for applications such as photocatalytic water splitting. However, the conversion efficiency is still low due to factors such as a low surface area and limited light absorption. In this paper, we describe a “triple templating” approach to generating porous graphitic carbon nitride. The introduction of pores on several length-scales results in enhanced photocatalytic properties.

  8. Platinum group metal nitrides and carbides: synthesis, properties and simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanovskii, Alexander L [Institute of Solid State Chemistry, Urals Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation)

    2009-04-30

    Experimental and theoretical data on new compounds, nitrides and carbides of the platinum group 4d and 5d metals (ruthenium, rhodium, palladium, osmium, iridium, platinum), published over the past five years are summarized. The extreme mechanical properties of platinoid nitrides and carbides, i.e., their high strength and low compressibility, are noted. The prospects of further studies and the scope of application of these compounds are discussed.

  9. Research of nanocomposite structure of boron nitride at proton radiation

    OpenAIRE

    Borodin, Yuri Viktorovich; Ermolaev, D. S.; Pak, V.; Zhang, K.

    2016-01-01

    Using roentgen diffraction and electron microscopy, the influence of nanosecond irradiation by ion beams of high energy on forming of self-organized nanoblocks in near surface's layers of boron nitride (BN) has been studied. It was shown that low temperature transitions from hexagonal to wrutz boron nitrides is associated with changes of shape and sizes of self-organized particles consisting the nanoblocks. We have calculated the parameters of nanoblocks using the meanings of interplane dista...

  10. Corrosion behavior of tantalum and its nitride in alkali solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Deyuan; LIN Qin; FEI Qinyong; ZHAO Haomin; KANG Guangyu; GENG Man

    2003-01-01

    The corrosion behavior of tantalum and its nitrides in stirring NaOH solutions was researched by potenfiostatic method, cyclic voltammetry and XPS. The results showed that the corrosion products were composed of Ta2O5 and NaTaO3.The corrosion reaction formula of tantalum and its nitrides was written according to cyclic volt-ampere curves. The electric charge transfer coefficient and the electric charge transfer number were calculated.

  11. Grafting titanium nitride surfaces with sodium styrene sulfonate thin films

    OpenAIRE

    Zorn, Gilad; MIGONNEY, Véronique; Castner, David G.

    2014-01-01

    The importance of titanium nitride lies in its high hardness and its remarkable resistance to wear and corrosion, which has led to its use as a coating for the heads of hip prostheses, dental implants and dental surgery tools. However, the usefulness of titanium nitride coatings for biomedical applications could be significantly enhanced by modifying their surface with a bioactive polymer film. The main focus of the present work was to graft a bioactive poly(sodium styrene sulf...

  12. Cubic boron nitride- a new material for ultracold neutron application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the first time, the Fermi potential of cubic boron nitride (cBN) was measured at the ultra cold neutron source at the TRIGA reactor, Mainz using the time of flight method (TOF). The investigated samples have a Fermi potential of about 300 neV. Because of its good dielectric characteristics, cubic boron nitride could be used as suitable coating for insulator in storage chambers of future EDM projects. This talk presents recent results and an outlook on further investigations.

  13. Study on Titanium Nitride Film Modified for Intraocular Lens

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Objective:To study the characteristics of the intraocular lens using ion beam sputtering depositing titanium nitride thin film on the intraocular lens(IOLs).Methods:To deposite titanium nitride thin film on the top of intraocular lens by ion beam sputtering depositing.We analyzed the surface morphology of intraocular lens through SEM and AFM.We detected intraocular lens resolution through the measurement of intraocular lens.Biocompatibility of intraocular lens is preliminary evaluated in this test.Results:T...

  14. Apparatus for the production of boron nitride nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Michael W; Jordan, Kevin

    2014-06-17

    An apparatus for the large scale production of boron nitride nanotubes comprising; a pressure chamber containing; a continuously fed boron containing target; a source of thermal energy preferably a focused laser beam; a cooled condenser; a source of pressurized nitrogen gas; and a mechanism for extracting boron nitride nanotubes that are condensed on or in the area of the cooled condenser from the pressure chamber.

  15. Vertical transport in graphene-hexagonal boron nitride heterostructure devices

    OpenAIRE

    Samantha Bruzzone; Demetrio Logoteta; Gianluca Fiori; Giuseppe Iannaccone

    2015-01-01

    Research in graphene-based electronics is recently focusing on devices based on vertical heterostructures of two-dimensional materials. Here we use density functional theory and multiscale simulations to investigate the tunneling properties of single- and double-barrier structures with graphene and few-layer hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) or hexagonal boron carbon nitride (h-BC2N). We find that tunneling through a single barrier exhibit a weak dependence on energy. We also show that in double...

  16. Optical loss analysis of silicon rich nitride waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mertens, Hans; Andersen, Karin Nordström; Svendsen, Winnie Edith

    2002-01-01

    An analysis of the propagation loss in high-index LPCVD-grown silicon rich nitride (SRN) slab waveguides and channel waveguides is presented. A propagation loss as low as 0.6 dB/cm has been achieved.......An analysis of the propagation loss in high-index LPCVD-grown silicon rich nitride (SRN) slab waveguides and channel waveguides is presented. A propagation loss as low as 0.6 dB/cm has been achieved....

  17. Low temperature gaseous nitriding of Ni based superalloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eliasen, K. M.; Christiansen, Thomas Lundin; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2010-01-01

    In the present work the nitriding response of selected Ni based superalloys at low temperatures is addressed. The alloys investigated are nimonic series nos. 80, 90, 95 and 100 and nichrome (Ni/Cr......In the present work the nitriding response of selected Ni based superalloys at low temperatures is addressed. The alloys investigated are nimonic series nos. 80, 90, 95 and 100 and nichrome (Ni/Cr...

  18. Four-Wave Mixing in Silicon-Rich Nitride Waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mitrovic, Miranda; Guan, Xiaowei; Ji, Hua;

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate four-wave mixing wavelength conversion in silicon-rich nitride waveguides which are a promising alternative to silicon for nonlinear applications. The obtained conversion efficiency reaches -13.6 dB while showing no significant nonlinear loss.......We demonstrate four-wave mixing wavelength conversion in silicon-rich nitride waveguides which are a promising alternative to silicon for nonlinear applications. The obtained conversion efficiency reaches -13.6 dB while showing no significant nonlinear loss....

  19. Nitrogen Atom Transfer From High Valent Iron Nitrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Michael D. [New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces, NM (United States); Smith, Jeremy M. [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States)

    2015-10-14

    This report describes the synthesis and reactions of high valent iron nitrides. Organonitrogen compounds such as aziridines are useful species for organic synthesis, but there are few efficient methods for their synthesis. Using iron nitrides to catalytically access these species may allow for their synthesis in an energy-and atom-efficient manner. We have developed a new ligand framework to achieve these goals as well as providing a method for inducing previously unknown reactivity.

  20. Laser ablation of molecular carbon nitride compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, D., E-mail: d.fischer@fkf.mpg.de [Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research, Heisenbergstr. 1, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Schwinghammer, K. [Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research, Heisenbergstr. 1, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Department of Chemistry, University of Munich, LMU, Butenandtstr. 5-13, 81377 Munich (Germany); Nanosystems Initiative Munich (NIM) and Center for Nanoscience (CeNS), 80799 Munich (Germany); Sondermann, C. [Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research, Heisenbergstr. 1, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Department of Chemistry, University of Munich, LMU, Butenandtstr. 5-13, 81377 Munich (Germany); Lau, V.W.; Mannhart, J. [Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research, Heisenbergstr. 1, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Lotsch, B.V. [Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research, Heisenbergstr. 1, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Department of Chemistry, University of Munich, LMU, Butenandtstr. 5-13, 81377 Munich (Germany); Nanosystems Initiative Munich (NIM) and Center for Nanoscience (CeNS), 80799 Munich (Germany)

    2015-09-15

    We present a method for the preparation of thin films on sapphire substrates of the carbon nitride precursors dicyandiamide (C{sub 2}N{sub 4}H{sub 4}), melamine (C{sub 3}N{sub 6}H{sub 6}), and melem (C{sub 6}N{sub 10}H{sub 6}), using the femtosecond-pulsed laser deposition technique (femto-PLD) at different temperatures. The depositions were carried out under high vacuum with a femtosecond-pulsed laser. The focused laser beam is scanned on the surface of a rotating target consisting of the pelletized compounds. The resulting polycrystalline, opaque films were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction, infrared, Raman, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, photoluminescence, SEM, and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry measurements. The crystal structures and optical/spectroscopic results of the obtained rough films largely match those of the bulk materials.

  1. Pure and doped boron nitride nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Terrones

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available More than ten years ago, it was suggested theoretically that boron nitride (BN nanotubes could be produced. Soon after, various reports on their synthesis appeared and a new area of nanotube science was born. This review aims to cover the latest advances related to the synthesis of BN nanotubes. We show that these tubes can now be produced in larger amounts and, in particular, that the chemistry of BN tubes appears to be very important to the production of reinforced composites with insulating characteristics. From the theoretical standpoint, we also show that (BN-C heteronanotubes could have important implications for nanoelectronics. We believe that BN nanotubes (pure and doped could be used in the fabrication of novel devices in which pure carbon nanotubes do not perform very efficiently.

  2. Thermal Conductivity of Uranium Nitride and Carbide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Szpunar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the electronic thermal conductivity of alternative fuels like uranium nitride and uranium carbide. We evaluate the electronic contribution to the thermal conductivity, by combining first-principles quantum-mechanical calculations with semiclassical correlations. The electronic structure of UN and UC was calculated using Quantum Espresso code. The spin polarized calculations were performed for a ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic ordering of magnetic moments on uranium lattice and magnetic moment in UC was lower than in UN due to stronger hybridization between 2p electrons of carbon and 5f electrons of uranium. The nonmagnetic electronic structure calculations were used as an input to BolzTrap code that was used to evaluate the electronic thermal conductivity. It is predicted that the thermal conductivity should increase with the temperature increase, but to get a quantitative agreement with the experiment at higher temperatures the interaction of electrons with phonons (and electron-electron scattering needs to be included.

  3. Quantum emission from hexagonal boron nitride monolayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Toan Trong; Bray, Kerem; Ford, Michael J; Toth, Milos; Aharonovich, Igor

    2016-01-01

    Artificial atomic systems in solids are widely considered the leading physical system for a variety of quantum technologies, including quantum communications, computing and metrology. To date, however, room-temperature quantum emitters have only been observed in wide-bandgap semiconductors such as diamond and silicon carbide, nanocrystal quantum dots, and most recently in carbon nanotubes. Single-photon emission from two-dimensional materials has been reported, but only at cryogenic temperatures. Here, we demonstrate room-temperature, polarized and ultrabright single-photon emission from a colour centre in two-dimensional hexagonal boron nitride. Density functional theory calculations indicate that vacancy-related defects are a probable source of the emission. Our results demonstrate the unprecedented potential of van der Waals crystals for large-scale nanophotonics and quantum information processing. PMID:26501751

  4. Boron nitride: A new photonic material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chubarov, M., E-mail: mihcu@ifm.liu.se [Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Linköping University, SE-581 83 Linköping (Sweden); Pedersen, H., E-mail: henke@ifm.liu.se [Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Linköping University, SE-581 83 Linköping (Sweden); Högberg, H., E-mail: hanho@ifm.liu.se [Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Linköping University, SE-581 83 Linköping (Sweden); Filippov, S., E-mail: stafi@ifm.liu.se [Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Linköping University, SE-581 83 Linköping (Sweden); Engelbrecht, J.A.A., E-mail: Japie.Engelbrecht@nmmu.ac.za [Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, Port Elizabeth (South Africa); O' Connel, J., E-mail: jacques.oconnell@gmail.com [Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, Port Elizabeth (South Africa); Henry, A., E-mail: anne.henry@liu.se [Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Linköping University, SE-581 83 Linköping (Sweden)

    2014-04-15

    Rhombohedral boron nitride (r-BN) layers were grown on sapphire substrate in a hot-wall chemical vapor deposition reactor. Characterization of these layers is reported in details. X-ray diffraction (XRD) is used as a routine characterization tool to investigate the crystalline quality of the films and the identification of the phases is revealed using detailed pole figure measurements. Transmission electron microscopy reveals stacking of more than 40 atomic layers. Results from Fourier Transform InfraRed (FTIR) spectroscopy measurements are compared with XRD data showing that FTIR is not phase sensitive when various phases of sp{sup 2}-BN are investigated. XRD measurements show a significant improvement of the crystalline quality when adding silicon to the gas mixture during the growth; this is further confirmed by cathodoluminescence which shows a decrease of the defects related luminescence intensity.

  5. Hexagonal boron nitride and water interaction parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yanbin; Wagner, Lucas K.; Aluru, Narayana R.

    2016-04-01

    The study of hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) in microfluidic and nanofluidic applications at the atomic level requires accurate force field parameters to describe the water-hBN interaction. In this work, we begin with benchmark quality first principles quantum Monte Carlo calculations on the interaction energy between water and hBN, which are used to validate random phase approximation (RPA) calculations. We then proceed with RPA to derive force field parameters, which are used to simulate water contact angle on bulk hBN, attaining a value within the experimental uncertainties. This paper demonstrates that end-to-end multiscale modeling, starting at detailed many-body quantum mechanics and ending with macroscopic properties, with the approximations controlled along the way, is feasible for these systems.

  6. Boron nitride: A new photonic material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhombohedral boron nitride (r-BN) layers were grown on sapphire substrate in a hot-wall chemical vapor deposition reactor. Characterization of these layers is reported in details. X-ray diffraction (XRD) is used as a routine characterization tool to investigate the crystalline quality of the films and the identification of the phases is revealed using detailed pole figure measurements. Transmission electron microscopy reveals stacking of more than 40 atomic layers. Results from Fourier Transform InfraRed (FTIR) spectroscopy measurements are compared with XRD data showing that FTIR is not phase sensitive when various phases of sp2-BN are investigated. XRD measurements show a significant improvement of the crystalline quality when adding silicon to the gas mixture during the growth; this is further confirmed by cathodoluminescence which shows a decrease of the defects related luminescence intensity.

  7. Thermal tuners on a Silicon Nitride platform

    CERN Document Server

    Pérez, Daniel; Baños, Rocío; Doménech, José David; Sánchez, Ana M; Cirera, Josep M; Mas, Roser; Sánchez, Javier; Durán, Sara; Pardo, Emilio; Domínguez, Carlos; Pastor, Daniel; Capmany, José; Muñoz, Pascual

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, the design trade-offs for the implementation of small footprint thermal tuners on silicon nitride are presented, and explored through measurements and supporting simulations of a photonic chip based on Mach-Zehnder Interferometers. Firstly, the electrical properties of the tuners are assessed, showing a compromise between compactness and deterioration. Secondly, the different variables involved in the thermal efficiency, switching power and heater dimensions, are analysed. Finally, with focus on exploring the limits of this compact tuners with regards to on chip component density, the thermal-cross talk is also investigated. Tuners with footprint of 270x5 {\\mu}m 2 and switching power of 350 mW are reported, with thermal-cross talk, in terms of induced phase change in adjacent devices of less than one order of magnitude at distances over 20 {\\mu}m. Paths for the improvement of thermal efficiency, power consumption and resilience of the devices are also outlined

  8. Carbon nitride frameworks and dense crystalline polymorphs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickard, Chris J.; Salamat, Ashkan; Bojdys, Michael J.; Needs, Richard J.; McMillan, Paul F.

    2016-09-01

    We used ab initio random structure searching (AIRSS) to investigate polymorphism in C3N4 carbon nitride as a function of pressure. Our calculations reveal new framework structures, including a particularly stable chiral polymorph of space group P 43212 containing mixed s p2 and s p3 bonding, that we have produced experimentally and recovered to ambient conditions. As pressure is increased a sequence of structures with fully s p3 -bonded C atoms and three-fold-coordinated N atoms is predicted, culminating in a dense P n m a phase above 250 GPa. Beyond 650 GPa we find that C3N4 becomes unstable to decomposition into diamond and pyrite-structured CN2.

  9. Gallium Nitride Room Temperature α Particle Detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallium Nitride (GaN) room temperature α particle detectors are fabricated and characterized, whose device structure is Schottky diode. The current-voltage (I – V) measurements reveal that the reverse breakdown voltage of the detectors is more than 200 V owing to the consummate fabrication processes, and that the Schottky barrier and ideal factor of the detectors are 0.64 eV and 1.02, respectively, calculated from the thermionic transmission model. 241Am α particles pulse height spectra from the GaN detectors biased at −8 V is obviously one Gauss peak located at channel 44 with the full width at half maximum (FWHM) of 15.87 in channel. One of the main reasons for the relatively wider FWHM is that the air between the detectors and isotope could widen the spectrum

  10. Mechanical Hysteresis of Hexagonal Boron Nitride

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Aiguo; LI Haoran

    2011-01-01

    Hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) is an important structural material with layered microstructure.Because of the plastic anisotropy,this material shows obvious mechanical hysteresis (nonlinear elastic deformation).There are hysteretic loops at the cyclical load-unload stress-strain curves of h-BN.Consequently,two hot-pressed h-BN cylinders with different textures were studied.The mechanical hysteresis is heavily texture-dependent.The area of hysteretic loop is linearly related with the square of loading stresslevel.Two minor loops attached on the hysteretic loops with the same extreme stresses have congruent shapes.It can be concluded that the mechanical hysteresis of h-BN can he explained by a Kink Nonlinear Elastic model developed from the study of a ternary carbide Ti3SiC2.

  11. Synthesis and characterization of boron nitrides nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents a new synthesis for the production of boron nitride nanotubes (BNNT) from boron powder, ammonium nitrate and hematite tube furnace CVD method. The samples were subjected to some characterization techniques as infrared spectroscopy, thermal analysis, X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy and transmission. By analyzing the results can explain the chemical reactions involved in the process and confirm the formation of BNNT with several layers and about 30 nanometers in diameter. Due to excellent mechanical properties and its chemical and thermal stability this material is promising for various applications. However, BNNT has received much less attention than carbon nanotubes, it is because of great difficulty to synthesize appreciable quantities from the techniques currently known, and this is one of the main reasons this work.(author)

  12. Excitons in boron nitride single layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvani, Thomas; Paleari, Fulvio; Miranda, Henrique P. C.; Molina-Sánchez, Alejandro; Wirtz, Ludger; Latil, Sylvain; Amara, Hakim; Ducastelle, François

    2016-09-01

    Boron nitride single layer belongs to the family of two-dimensional materials whose optical properties are currently receiving considerable attention. Strong excitonic effects have already been observed in the bulk and still stronger effects are predicted for single layers. We present here a detailed study of these properties by combining ab initio calculations and a tight-binding Wannier analysis in both real and reciprocal space. Due to the simplicity of the band structure with single valence (π ) and conduction (π*) bands the tight-binding analysis becomes quasiquantitative with only two adjustable parameters and provides tools for a detailed analysis of the exciton properties. Strong deviations from the usual hydrogenic model are evidenced. The ground-state exciton is not a genuine Frenkel exciton, but a very localized tightly bound one. The other ones are similar to those found in transition-metal dichalcogenides and, although more localized, can be described within a Wannier-Mott scheme.

  13. Hexagonal boron nitride and water interaction parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yanbin; Wagner, Lucas K; Aluru, Narayana R

    2016-04-28

    The study of hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) in microfluidic and nanofluidic applications at the atomic level requires accurate force field parameters to describe the water-hBN interaction. In this work, we begin with benchmark quality first principles quantum Monte Carlo calculations on the interaction energy between water and hBN, which are used to validate random phase approximation (RPA) calculations. We then proceed with RPA to derive force field parameters, which are used to simulate water contact angle on bulk hBN, attaining a value within the experimental uncertainties. This paper demonstrates that end-to-end multiscale modeling, starting at detailed many-body quantum mechanics and ending with macroscopic properties, with the approximations controlled along the way, is feasible for these systems. PMID:27131542

  14. Optical processes in dilute nitrides Semiconductors; Alloys

    CERN Document Server

    Potter, R J

    2003-01-01

    This thesis is concerned with the narrow bandgap semiconductor alloys known as dilute nitrides. The initial part of this project was concerned with characterisation of chemical beam epitaxy (CBE) grown samples so that growth techniques could be refined. Early samples show evidence of structural/compositional disorder resulting from the large miscibility gap induced by nitrogen. Non-equilibrium growth was employed to overcome this, eventually resulting in improved material. In the second part of this project, steady-state and time-resolved photoluminescence, along with photomodulated reflectance were employed to investigate the optical properties of molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) grown GalnNAs, GaNAs and InGaAs quantum wells (QWs). Low temperature results show evidence of carrier localization, which was interpreted in terms of structural/compositional fluctuations induced by the nitrogen incorporation. Poor photoluminescence efficiency and rapid decay of emission kinetics indicate the presence of strong non-radi...

  15. Boron Nitride Nanotube: Synthesis and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiano, Amanda L.; Park, Cheol; Lee, Joseph W.; Luong, Hoa H.; Gibbons, Luke J.; Chu, Sang-Hyon; Applin, Samantha I.; Gnoffo, Peter; Lowther, Sharon; Kim, Hyun Jung; Danehy, Paul M.; Inman, Jennifer A.; Jones, Stephen B.; Kang, Jin Ho; Sauti, Godfrey; Thibeault, Sheila A.; Yamakov, Vesselin; Wise, Kristopher E.; Su, Ji; Fay, Catharine C.

    2014-01-01

    Scientists have predicted that carbon's immediate neighbors on the periodic chart, boron and nitrogen, may also form perfect nanotubes, since the advent of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in 1991. First proposed then synthesized by researchers at UC Berkeley in the mid 1990's, the boron nitride nanotube (BNNT) has proven very difficult to make until now. Herein we provide an update on a catalyst-free method for synthesizing highly crystalline, small diameter BNNTs with a high aspect ratio using a high power laser under a high pressure and high temperature environment first discovered jointly by NASA/NIA JSA. Progress in purification methods, dispersion studies, BNNT mat and composite formation, and modeling and diagnostics will also be presented. The white BNNTs offer extraordinary properties including neutron radiation shielding, piezoelectricity, thermal oxidative stability (> 800 C in air), mechanical strength, and toughness. The characteristics of the novel BNNTs and BNNT polymer composites and their potential applications are discussed.

  16. Gallium Nitride Schottky betavoltaic nuclear batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research highlights: → Gallium Nitride nuclear batteries with Ni-63 are demonstrated for the first time. → Open circuit voltage of 0.1 V and conversion efficiency of 0.32% have been obtained. → The limited performance is due to thin effective energy deposition layer. → The output power is expected to greatly increase with growing thick GaN films. -- Abstract: Gallium Nitride (GaN) Schottky betavoltaic nuclear batteries (GNBB) are demonstrated in our work for the first time. GaN films are grown on sapphire substrates by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD), and then GaN Schottky diodes are fabricated by normal micro-fabrication process. Nickel with mass number of 63 (63Ni), which emits β particles, is loaded on the GaN Schottky diodes to achieve GNBB. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and photoluminescence (PL) are carried out to investigate the crystal quality for the GaN films as grown. Current-voltage (I-V) characteristics shows that the GaN Schottky diodes are not jet broken down at -200 V due to consummate fabrication processes, and the open circuit voltage of the GNBB is 0.1 V and the short circuit current density is 1.2 nA cm-2. The limited performance of the GNBB is due to thin effective energy deposition layer, which is only 206 nm to absorb very small partial energy of the β particles because of the relatively high dislocation density and carrier concentration. However, the conversion efficiency of 0.32% and charge collection efficiency (CCE) of 29% for the GNBB have been obtained. Therefore, the output power of the GNBB are expected to greatly increase with growing high quality thick GaN films.

  17. Chromium accumulation by the hyperaccumulator plant Leersia hexandra Swartz.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xue-Hong; Liu, Jie; Huang, Hai-Tao; Chen, Jun; Zhu, Yi-Nian; Wang, Dun-Qiu

    2007-04-01

    Leersia hexandra Swartz (Gramineae), which occurs in Southern China, has been found to be a new chromium hyperaccumulator by means of field survey and pot-culture experiment. The field survey showed that this species had an extraordinary accumulation capacity for chromium. The maximum Cr concentration in the dry leaf matter was 2978 mg kg(-1) on the side of a pond near an electroplating factory. The average concentration of chromium in the leaves was 18.86 times as that in the pond sediment, and 297.41 times as that in the pond water. Under conditions of the nutrient solution culture, it was found that L. hexandra had a high tolerance and accumulation capacity to Cr(III) and Cr(VI). Under 60 mg l(-1) Cr(III) and 10 mg l(-1) Cr(VI) treatment, there was no significant decrease of biomass in the leaves of L. hexandra (p>0.05). The highest bioaccumulation coefficients of the leaves for Cr(III) and Cr(VI) were 486.8 and 72.1, respectively. However, L. hexandra had a higher accumulation capacity for Cr(III) than for Cr(VI). At the Cr(III) concentration of 10 mg l(-1) in the culture solution, the concentration of chromium in leaves was 4868 mg kg(-1), while at the same Cr(VI) concentration, the concentration of chromium in leaves was only 597 mg kg(-1). These results confirmed that L. hexandra is a chromium hyperaccumulator which grows rapidly with a great tolerance to Cr and broad ecological amplitude. This species could provide a new plant resource that explores the mechanism of Cr hyperaccumulation, and has potential for usage in the phytoremediation of Cr-contaminated soil and water. PMID:17207838

  18. Improvement in Corrosion Resistance of Anchor Steel by Low Temperature Plasma Nitriding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NIU Shaoqing; YANG Shuangsuo; LI Yi

    2014-01-01

    Plasma nitriding was used to improve the corrosion performance of anchor steel. The microstructure, phase constitution, microhardness and corrosion resistance of the nitrided layer were systematically studied. The results show that the nitrided layer is continuous and dense, and consists of Fe4N and Fe3N in the outmost surface. The microhardness of the nitrided sample is improved because of the formation of nitrides in the outer side continuous layer and the inner parts. The nitrided layer on the surface of anchor steel can effectively improve the corrosion resistance of the anchor steel.

  19. Modeling the kinetics of the nitriding and nitrocarburizing of iron

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Somers, Marcel A. J.; Mittemeijer, Eric J.

    1998-01-01

    The growth kinetics of the iron-nitride compound layer during nitriding and nitrocarburizing of pure iron has been investigated for various temperatures and various combinations of imposed nitrogen and carbon activities. The results indicate that no local equilibrium occurs at the gas/solid inter......The growth kinetics of the iron-nitride compound layer during nitriding and nitrocarburizing of pure iron has been investigated for various temperatures and various combinations of imposed nitrogen and carbon activities. The results indicate that no local equilibrium occurs at the gas....../solid interface during nitriding/nitrocarburizing, due to the slow kinetics of ammonia dissociation, the development and subsequent desorption of molecular nitrogen gas at the surface and, for the case of nitrocarburizing, the fast initial carbon uptake. The kinetics of gaseous nitriding of pure iron can...... be adequately described by a model that adopts local equilibrium at the solid/solid interfaces and a composition-weighted intrinsic diffusion coefficient of nitrogen in the Fe-N phases. For nitrocarburizing modeling appears not possible yet, due to compositions at gas/solid and solid/solid interfaces which...

  20. 21 CFR 73.3110a - Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide. 73.3110a Section... LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Medical Devices § 73.3110a Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide. (a) Identity. The color additive chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide (Pigment Blue 36) (CAS Reg....

  1. 75 FR 60454 - Draft Toxicological Review of Hexavalent Chromium: In Support of Summary Information on the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-30

    ... AGENCY Draft Toxicological Review of Hexavalent Chromium: In Support of Summary Information on the..., ``Toxicological Review of Hexavalent Chromium: In Support of Summary Information on the Integrated Risk..., 2010. The listening session on the draft assessment for hexavalent chromium will be held on November...

  2. 76 FR 20349 - Draft Toxicological Review of Hexavalent Chromium: In Support of Summary Information on the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-12

    ... AGENCY Draft Toxicological Review of Hexavalent Chromium: In Support of Summary Information on the..., ``Toxicological Review of Hexavalent Chromium: In Support of Summary Information on the Integrated Risk... workshop on the draft assessment for Hexavalent Chromium will be held on May 12, 2011, beginning at 8:30...

  3. 77 FR 61431 - Hexavalent Chromium Standards; Extension of the Office of Management and Budget's (OMB) Approval...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-09

    ... Occupational Safety and Health Administration Hexavalent Chromium Standards; Extension of the Office of...) approval of the information collection requirements specified in the Hexavalent Chromium Standards for... requirements specified in the Hexavalent Chromium (Cr(VI)) Standards for General Industry (29 CFR...

  4. Speciation dependent radiotracer studies on chromium preconcentration using iron doped calcium alginate biopolymer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The work aims to study the differential attitude of Ca-alginate (CA) and Fe-doped calcium alginate (Fe-CA) and towards Cr(III) and Cr (IV) so that, depending on the oxidation state of chromium effluent, environmentally sustainable methodologies can be prescribed for removal of chromium. Throughout the experiment 51Cr has been used as the precursor of stable chromium

  5. Evaluation of flexural bond strength of porcelain to used nickel-chromium alloy in various percentages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VNV Madhav

    2012-01-01

    Fresh nickel-chromium alloy shows the greatest porcelain adherence.There is no significant change in bond strength of ceramic to alloy with up to 75% of used nickel-chromium alloy.At least 25%- of new alloy should be added when recycled nickel-chromium alloy is being used for metal ceramic restorations.

  6. Fertilizers and Mixed Crop Cultivation of Chromium Tolerant and Sensitive Plants under Chromium Toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dheeba, B; Sampathkumar, P; Kannan, K

    2015-01-01

    Zea mays (maize) and Vigna radiata (green gram) are found to be the chromium (Cr) tolerant and sensitive plants, respectively. In the present paper, we investigate the reduction of the toxicity of Cr in the sensitive plants by the mixed crop cultivation in the field using various amendments. Further, the potassium dichromate was used as the source of hexavalent Cr. The results indicated that Cr adversely affects both the growth and yield of plants. The soil properties vary with Cr and different fertilizer amendments and the yield of both plants were affected by Cr. We conclude that metal accumulation of seeds of green gram was higher than corn and the application of single fertilizer either farm yard manure (FYM) or nitrogen, phosphorous, and potassium (NPK) enhances the growth and yield of both the tolerant and sensitive plants in the mixed crop cultivations. PMID:25709647

  7. Urinary levels of nickel and chromium associated with dental restoration by nickel-chromium based alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bo; Xia, Gang; Cao, Xin-Ming; Wang, Jue; Xu, Bi-Yao; Huang, Pu; Chen, Yue; Jiang, Qing-Wu

    2013-03-01

    This paper aims to investigate if the dental restoration of nickel-chromium based alloy (Ni-Cr) leads to the enhanced excretions of Ni and Cr in urine. Seven hundred and ninety-five patients in a dental hospital had single or multiple Ni-Cr alloy restoration recently and 198 controls were recruited to collect information on dental restoration by questionnaire and clinical examination. Urinary concentrations of Ni and Cr from each subject were measure by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. Compared to the control group, the urinary level of Ni was significantly higher in the patient group of dental restoration. Potential short- and long-term effects of Ni-Cr alloy restoration need to be investigated.

  8. Primary and secondary crystallization of modified hypoeutectic chromium cast iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Studnicki

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents investigations of crystallization of modified hypoeutectic wear resistant chromium cast iron which contains carbon about 2% and chromium on three levels (12%, 18% and 25%. Three substances were applied to the modification ( boron carbide (B4C, ferroniobium (FeNb and mixture of ferroniobium and mischmetal (RE. The investigations of crystallization were conducted the DTA method in DTA-C and DTA-Is testers. The influence on the course of the process of primary and secondary crystallization was observed.

  9. Use of chitosan for chromium removal from exhausted tanning baths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesaro, Raffaele; Fabbricino, Massimiliano; Lanzetta, Rosa; Mancino, Anna; Naviglio, Biagio; Parrilli, Michelangelo; Sartorio, Roberto; Tomaselli, Michele; Tortora, Gelsomina

    2008-01-01

    A novel approach, based on chitosan heavy-metal sequestrating ability, is proposed for chromium(III) removal from spent tanning liquor. Experimental results, obtained at lab-scale using real wastewater, are presented and discussed. Resulting efficiencies are extremely high, and strongly dependent on chitosan dose and pH value. Comparative analyses with other polysaccharides is also carried out showing that amine groups are more efficient than carboxyl and sulphate ones. Chromium recovery from sorption complexes and chitosan regeneration is finally proposed to optimize the whole process.

  10. The prospect of uranium nitride (UN) and mixed nitride fuel (UN-PuN) for pressurized water reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Syarifah, Ratna Dewi, E-mail: syarifah.physics@gmail.com; Suud, Zaki, E-mail: szaki@fi.itb.ac.id [Nuclear Physics and Biophysics Research Division, Physics Department, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Science, Bandung Institute of Technology Jalan Ganesha 10, Bandung 40132 (Indonesia)

    2015-09-30

    Design study of small Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs) core loaded with uranium nitride fuel (UN) and mixed nitride fuel (UN-PuN), Pa-231 as burnable poison, and Americium has been performed. Pa-231 known as actinide material, have large capture cross section and can be converted into fissile material that can be utilized to reduce excess reactivity. Americium is one of minor actinides with long half life. The objective of adding americium is to decrease nuclear spent fuel in the world. The neutronic analysis results show that mixed nitride fuel have k-inf greater than uranium nitride fuel. It is caused by the addition of Pu-239 in mixed nitride fuel. In fuel fraction analysis, for uranium nitride fuel, the optimum volume fractions are 45% fuel fraction, 10% cladding and 45% moderator. In case of UN-PuN fuel, the optimum volume fractions are 30% fuel fraction, 10% cladding and 60% coolant/ moderator. The addition of Pa-231 as burnable poison for UN fuel, enrichment U-235 5%, with Pa-231 1.6% has k-inf more than one and excess reactivity of 14.45%. And for mixed nitride fuel, the lowest value of reactivity swing is when enrichment (U-235+Pu) 8% with Pa-231 0.4%, the excess reactivity value 13,76%. The fuel pin analyze for the addition of Americium, the excess reactivity value is lower than before, because Americium absorb the neutron. For UN fuel, enrichment U-235 8%, Pa-231 1.6% and Am 0.5%, the excess reactivity is 4.86%. And for mixed nitride fuel, when enrichment (U-235+Pu) 13%, Pa-231 0.4% and Am 0.1%, the excess reactivity is 11.94%. For core configuration, it is better to use heterogeneous than homogeneous core configuration, because the radial power distribution is better.

  11. Generation and Characteristics of IV-VI transition Metal Nitride and Carbide Nanoparticles using a Reactive Mesoporous Carbon Nitride

    KAUST Repository

    Alhajri, Nawal Saad

    2016-02-22

    Interstitial nitrides and carbides of early transition metals in groups IV–VI exhibit platinum-like electronic structures, which make them promising candidates to replace noble metals in various catalytic reactions. Herein, we present the preparation and characterization of nano-sized transition metal nitries and carbides of groups IV–VI (Ti, V, Nb, Ta, Cr, Mo, and W) using mesoporous graphitic carbon nitride (mpg-C3N4), which not only provides confined spaces for restricting primary particle size but also acts as a chemical source of nitrogen and carbon. We studied the reactivity of the metals with the template under N2 flow at 1023 K while keeping the weight ratio of metal to template constant at unity. The produced nanoparticles were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction, CHN elemental analysis, nitrogen sorption, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. The results show that Ti, V, Nb, Ta, and Cr form nitride phases with face centered cubic structure, whereas Mo and W forme carbides with hexagonal structures. The tendency to form nitride or carbide obeys the free formation energy of the transition metal nitrides and carbides. This method offers the potential to prepare the desired size, shape and phase of transition metal nitrides and carbides that are suitable for a specific reaction, which is the chief objective of materials chemistry.

  12. EDITORIAL: Non-polar and semipolar nitride semiconductors Non-polar and semipolar nitride semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jung; Kneissl, Michael

    2012-02-01

    Throughout the history of group-III-nitride materials and devices, scientific breakthroughs and technological advances have gone hand-in-hand. In the late 1980s and early 1990s, the discovery of the nucleation of smooth (0001) GaN films on c-plane sapphire and the activation of p-dopants in GaN led very quickly to the realization of high-brightness blue and green LEDs, followed by the first demonstration of GaN-based violet laser diodes in the mid 1990s. Today, blue InGaN LEDs boast record external quantum efficiencies exceeding 80% and the emission wavelength of the InGaN-based laser diode has been pushed into the green spectral range. Although these tremenduous advances have already spurred multi-billion dollar industries, there are still a number of scientific questions and technological issues that are unanswered. One key challenge is related to the polar nature of the III-nitride wurtzite crystal. Until a decade ago all research activities had almost exclusively concentrated on (0001)-oriented polar GaN layers and heterostructures. Although the device characteristics seem excellent, the strong polarization fields at GaN heterointerfaces can lead to a significant deterioration of the device performance. Triggered by the first demonstration non-polar GaN quantum wells grown on LiAlO2 by Waltereit and colleagues in 2000, impressive advances in the area of non-polar and semipolar nitride semiconductors and devices have been achieved. Today, a large variety of heterostructures free of polarization fields and exhibiting exceptional electronic and optical properties have been demonstrated, and the fundamental understanding of polar, semipolar and non-polar nitrides has made significant leaps forward. The contributions in this Semiconductor Science and Technology special issue on non-polar and semipolar nitride semiconductors provide an impressive and up-to-date cross-section of all areas of research and device physics in this field. The articles cover a wide range of

  13. Microstructure and corrosion behavior of nitrided X12Cr13 martensitic stainless steel%离子渗氮马氏体不锈钢的微观组织与腐蚀行为

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李成涛; 赵彦芬; 方可伟; 赖云亭; 刘艳; 沈剑; 张路; 薛飞

    2016-01-01

    Composition,microstructure,hardness and corrosion resistance of the nitrided layer on the X12Cr13 martensitic stainless steel surface were studied by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM),energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS) analysis,X-ray diffraction (XRD),potentiodynamic polarization and microhardness tests.The results show that the nitrided layer with a thickness of 70 μm is formed on the stainless steel by plasma nitriding.The nitrided layer consists of compound layer and diffusion zone.The compound layer is mainly composed of γ-FeN and ε-FeN.Pitting corrosion occurs for the nitrided stainless steel after corrosion test for 72 h.The diffusion from the matrix to the surface reduces the chromium content in the steel under the nitrided layer.The corrosion resistance of the martensitic stainless steel decreases because of pores and cracks formed in the nitrided layer.%采用扫描电镜、X射线衍射(XRD)、极化曲线和显微硬度等方法研究表面离子渗氮X12Cr13马氏体不锈钢的渗氮层成分、显微组织结构、硬度以及腐蚀性能.结果表明:离子渗氮马氏体不锈钢表面形成了70μm的渗氮层,渗氮层由化合物层和扩散层组成,化合物层的组成相主要为γ-FeN和ε-FeN.离子渗氮不锈钢经过72 h纯水浸泡后表面发生点蚀.基体内部向表层的扩散降低了钢中的固溶铬含量以及渗氮层形成的孔隙和裂纹共同降低马氏体不锈钢的耐腐蚀性.

  14. The oxidation and reduction of chromium of stainless steels in an eletric arc furnace

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Arh

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The oxidation of chromium during the elaboration of stainless steels occurs with oxygen in solution blown inthe melt and with oxides in the slag. A higher content of silicon in the furnace charge decreases the extent of oxidation of chromium, however, the efficient reduction of chromium from the slag is of essential importance for a minimal loss of chromium. In this survey, the theory of the oxidation of chromium, its reduction from the slag and the conditions for the formation of foaming slag are discussed.

  15. Friction and wear behavior of chromium carbide coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chromium carbides, tungsten carbide, and chromium oxide have been tested and evaluated as coatings to protect high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) steam generator and other HTGR components from adhesion, galling associated with sliding wear or from fretting. Tests were performed in commercially-pure helium and in helium doped with various gaseous impurities (H2, H2O, CH4, CO) to simulate the primary coolant of an HTGR. Several types of chromium carbide coatings including Cr3C2, Cr7C3, and Cr23C6, were tested for wear resistance and resistance to long-term spalling. Tungsten carbide and chromium oxide coatings were tested in sliding wear tests. Cr23C6-NiCr coatings showed the best performance (from 400 to 8160C) whether they were applied by detonation gun or plasma gun spraying methods. The presence of the Cr23C6-NiCr coatings did not affect the creep rupture properties of Alloy 800H substrates at temperatures up to 7600C. Low-cycle fatigue life of similar specimens at 5930C was reduced to 10 to 20% when tested in the 1 to 0.6% strain range

  16. Porosity of detonation coatings on the base of chromium carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porosity of detonation coatings on the base of chromium carbide is estimated by the hydrostatic weighing. The open porosity value dependence on the distance of spraying, depth of the charge, ratio and volume of the detonator barrie filing with gas components is established. Pore distribution in the cross section of a specimen tested for porosity is studied by the methods of metallographic analysis

  17. Intestinal absorption of chromium as affected by wheat bran

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keim, K.S.; Holloway, C.L.; Hegsted, M.

    1986-03-01

    This study was designed to investigate the influence of dietary fiber, as found in wheat bran, on the absorption of chromium. Twenty male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into two groups of 10. The control was fed a semi-purified diet containing casein, methionine, cornstarch, sucrose, corn oil, mineral and vitamin mix, and choline bitartrate. The experimental group was fed the same diet but with soft red winter wheat bran added to a level of 35% of the diet at the expense of sucrose. To determine chromium absorption and uptake by selected tissues, rats were fasted for 24 hr, fed 5 g of the respective diet, 2 hr later intubated with 100..mu..Ci of Cr-51of sacrificed 24 hr later. The rats wee housed in metabolic cages after the Cr-51 intubation. The addition of wheat brand to the diet did not significantly affect chromium absorption as measured by percent dose of Cr-51 in the 24 hr urine. The percent dose in the control group was 0.68 +/- 0.20% (mean +/- SEM) and in the experimental group 0.63 +/- 0.24% (mean +/-SEM) (N.S.). The cr-51 uptake of liver, spleen, jejunum, and blood was not statistically different between groups. These results indicate that dietary fiber as found in wheat bran does not impair intestinal absorption of chromium.

  18. Microbial biotechnology for remediation of aquatic habitats polluted with chromium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viorica Coşier

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Chromium may occur in nine different forms of oxidation ranging from ?II to +VI, with forms II, III and VI as the most commonly encountered. In Cluj county, chromium pollution dates well back in time and has caused important dysfunction to the mechanical-biological wastewater purification station of the city of Cluj (Coşier & Diţă 1996. The purpose of this study was to develop one microbial method able to reduce hexavalent chromium (mobile, permeable to cell membrane, carcinogenic and mutagenic (Ishikawa et al 1994 to the trivalent form (insoluble and an essential element for humans (Song et al 2006. Different sources of chromium-reducing bacteria and many sources of carbon and energy added to the Kvasnikov mineral basal medium (Komori et al 1990 with increasing amount of chromate (200- 1000 mg/l were tested. Two bacterial strains, able to reduce even 1000 mg chromate/l, were isolated in pure culture. For one of these bacterial strains, we determined the optimum conditions for the reduction of Cr (VI.

  19. 75 FR 67100 - Superalloy Degassed Chromium From Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-01

    ... superalloy degassed chromium from Japan (70 FR 76030). The Commission is conducting a review to determine..., subparts A, D, E, and F (19 CFR part 207), as most recently amended at 74 FR 2847 (January 16, 2009). \\1... rule 201.15(b)(19 CFR 201.15(b)), 73 FR 24609 (May 5, 2008). This advice was developed in...

  20. 76 FR 8773 - Superalloy Degassed Chromium From Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-15

    ... applicable deadline.'' (75 FR 80457). Accordingly, pursuant to section 751(c) of the Tariff Act of 1930 (19 U... COMMISSION Superalloy Degassed Chromium From Japan AGENCY: United States International Trade Commission... Japan would be likely to lead to continuation or recurrence of material injury. On December 22,...

  1. Intestinal absorption of chromium as affected by wheat bran

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was designed to investigate the influence of dietary fiber, as found in wheat bran, on the absorption of chromium. Twenty male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into two groups of 10. The control was fed a semi-purified diet containing casein, methionine, cornstarch, sucrose, corn oil, mineral and vitamin mix, and choline bitartrate. The experimental group was fed the same diet but with soft red winter wheat bran added to a level of 35% of the diet at the expense of sucrose. To determine chromium absorption and uptake by selected tissues, rats were fasted for 24 hr, fed 5 g of the respective diet, 2 hr later intubated with 100μCi of Cr-51of sacrificed 24 hr later. The rats wee housed in metabolic cages after the Cr-51 intubation. The addition of wheat brand to the diet did not significantly affect chromium absorption as measured by percent dose of Cr-51 in the 24 hr urine. The percent dose in the control group was 0.68 +/- 0.20% (mean +/- SEM) and in the experimental group 0.63 +/- 0.24% (mean +/-SEM) (N.S.). The cr-51 uptake of liver, spleen, jejunum, and blood was not statistically different between groups. These results indicate that dietary fiber as found in wheat bran does not impair intestinal absorption of chromium

  2. Invariant coefficients of diffusion in iron-chromium-nickel system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mokrov, A.P.; Akimov, V.K.; Golubev, V.G.

    1984-02-01

    The temperature and concentration dependences of the Dsub(c) coefficients in the ..gamma..-phase of iron-chromium-nickel system are determined. It is proposed to described mutual diffusion in multicomponent systems using invariant, i.e. independent of the choice of solvent, coefficients of diffusion. The assumption that their temperature dependence follows the Arrhenius law is confirmed by the experiment.

  3. Invariant coefficients of diffusion in iron-chromium-nickel system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The temperature and concentration dependences of the Dsub(c) coefficients in the γ-phase of iron-chromium-nickel system are determined. It is proposed to described mutual diffusion in mul-- ticomponent systems using invariant, i. e. independent of the choice of solvent, coefficients of diffusion. The assumption that their temperature dependence follows the Arrhenius law is confirmed by the experiment

  4. Differents remediation methodos for lead, chromium and cadmium contaminated soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The usage of phosphates in the remediation of plots contaminated with heavy metals appears to be a good strategy to lessen the danger of these metals. This study analyses the effect of the mobilization of: Lead, chromium and cadmium by utilizing diverse forms of phosphates in contaminated soils of three different origins with ph modification and without it

  5. IRIS TOXICOLOGICAL REVIEW OF HEXAVALENT CHROMIUM (INTERAGENCY SCIENCE CONSULTATION DRAFT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    On Septemeber 30, 2010, the draft Toxicological Review of Hexavalent Chromium and the charge to external peer reviewers were released for external peer review and public comment. The Toxicological Review and charge were reviewed internally by EPA and by other federal agenc...

  6. Chromium isotope fractionation during coprecipitation with calcium carbonate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodler, Alexandra; Sánchez-Pastor, Nuria; Fernández-Díaz, Lurdes;

    The chromium (Cr) isotopic composition of carbonates can potentially be used as a paleoclimate proxy to elucidate past fluctuations of oxygen contents in atmosphere and hydrosphere. The use of Cr isotopes to track paleoenvironmental changes, for example related to the rise of oxygen during...

  7. Fractionation behavior of chromium isotopes during coprecipitation with calcium carbonate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodler, Alexandra; Sánchez-Pastor, Nuria; Fernández-Díaz, Lurdes;

    2015-01-01

    Interest in chromium (Cr) isotope incorporation into carbonates arises from the observation that Cr isotopic composition of carbonates could be used as a paleoclimate proxy to elucidate past fluctuations of oxygen contents in atmosphere and hydrosphere. The use of Cr isotopes to track...

  8. Discovery of Chromium, Manganese, Nickel, and Copper Isotopes

    OpenAIRE

    Garofali, K.; Robinson, R; Thoennessen, M

    2010-01-01

    Twenty-seven chromium, twenty-five manganese, thirty-one nickel and twenty-six copper isotopes have so far been observed and the discovery of these isotopes is discussed. For each isotope a brief synopsis of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

  9. Chromium stable isotope fractionation in modern biogeochemical cycling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paulukat, Cora Stefanie

    Chromium (Cr) is, due to its redox-sensitive properties, a powerful tracer for redox processes in environmental studies. Changes in its preferred oxidation state (III and VI) are accompanied by Crisotope fractionation. The Cr-isotope system is a promising tool to reconstruct the evolution of free...

  10. FEATURES OF CHROMIUM DOPING OF WEAR-RESISTANT CAST IRON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Netrebko

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work analysis of the influence of chromium on the process of carbide formation, changes in chemical composition of the metal substrate in the areas adjacent to the carbides and at the hardness of iron while economy nickel and manganesealloying.

  11. Production performance of quails given chromium organic in ration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deden Sudrajat

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Egg production of quails depends on quality of ration. Nutrient manipulation by chromiun inclusion in ration is a possible way to improve production. It is known that chromium mineral in form of GTF in blood has a role not only in enhancement of glucose entering cells through improvement of insulin activity but also in metabolism of lipid and synthesis of protein and elimination of heat stress to improve egg production. This study aimed at assessing egg production of quails fed ration containing chromium-yeast. Sixty-four quails aged 40 days were used. A completely randomized design with 4 treatments and 4 replication was applied in this study. Treatment consisted of commercial ration + Cr 0 ppm (R1, commercial ration + Cr 0.5 ppm (R2, commercial ration + Cr 1 ppm (R3, and commercial ration+ Cr 1.5 ppm (R4. Measurements were taken on feed intake, egg weight, egg mass production, hen day, feed conversion rate, egg index, and egg shell thickness. Results showed that A ration containing organic chromium as much as 1,5 ppm did not affect feed intake, egg production, egg weight, and eggshell thickness, however lowered feed conversion rate by up to 32.25% from that of control. Supplementation of 0,5 ppm chromium in the ration lowered the value of eggs index in the fourth week.

  12. Chromium toxicity to nitrifying bacteria: implications to wastewater treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chromium, a heavy metal that enters wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) through industrial discharges, can be toxic to microorganisms carrying out important processes within biological wastewater treatment systems. The effect of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) on ammonia dependent specific ox...

  13. DANGER OF HEXAVALENT CHROMIUM AND STRATEGY FOR THE REMEDITATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aniruddha Roy

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Some metals as micronutrients have a major role in the life and growth process of plants and animals. However, certain forms of some metals may also act as toxic material even in relatively small quantities. Chromium is such a metal, whose concentration above a certain limit may cause a serious problem to the health of living organisms. Chromium (Cr may occur in several chemical forms in organic and inorganic systems. In biological systems only Cr (III and Cr (VI are significant. Among these two states, trivalent chromium (Cr-III is considered as an essential component, while hexavalent Chromium (Cr-VI in biological system has been detected as responsible for so many diseases, even some specific forms of cancer. This paper intends to present the adverse effect of Cr(VI on environment as well as on human beings and also try to find a way out to dissolve the problem by a newly developed efficient and cost effective technique.

  14. Effects of chromium picolinate supplementation in type 2 diabetic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niladê Rosinski Rocha

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The effects of chromium picolinate in Type 2 diabetic patients are investigated.  Seventeen Type 2 diabetic patients were randomly divided into two groups. The experimental group received fiber-rich hypocaloric diet and chromium picolinate whereas the control group received fiber-rich hypocaloric diet and placebo. The chromium picolinate was offered twice a day at the dose of 100 μg. Anthropometric data such as blood pressure, fasting glycemia and glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c were measured and these parameters were evaluated again after 90 days. No difference was reported in rates of body weight, waist, hip, body mass index, blood pressure and fasting glycemia (Control vs. Experimental groups after treatment. However, a decrease (p = 0.0405 of HbA1c occurred in the experimental group when the pre- and post-treatment rates were compared. HbA1c data showed that chromium picolinate improved the glycemic control in Type 2 diabetes.

  15. Electroless plating of thin gold films directly onto silicon nitride thin films and into micropores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whelan, Julie C; Karawdeniya, Buddini Iroshika; Bandara, Y M Nuwan D Y; Velleco, Brian D; Masterson, Caitlin M; Dwyer, Jason R

    2014-07-23

    A method to directly electrolessly plate silicon-rich silicon nitride with thin gold films was developed and characterized. Films with thicknesses coating planar, curved, and line-of-sight-obscured silicon nitride surfaces. PMID:24999923

  16. Chromium(VI) transport and fate in unsaturated zone and aquifer: 3D Sandbox results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xingmin; Sobecky, Patricia A; Zhao, Lanpo; Crawford, Patrice; Li, Mingtang

    2016-04-01

    The simulation of Cr(VI) behavior in an unsaturated zone and aquifer, using a 3D experimental set-up were performed to illustrate the distribution, transport and transformation of Cr(VI), and further to reveal the potential harm of Cr(VI) after entering the groundwater. The result indicated that chromium(VI) was transported in the vertical direction, meanwhile, was transported in the horizontal direction under the influence of groundwater flow. The direction and distance away from the pollution source zone had great effect on the chromium(VI) concentration. At the sampling sites near the pollution source zone, there was a sudden increase of chromium(VI) concentration. The concentration of chromium(III) concentration in some random effluent samples was not detected. Chromium had not only transported but also had fraction and specie transformation in the unsaturated zone and aquifer. The relative concentration of residue fraction chromium was decreased with time. The content of Fe-Mn oxide fraction chromium was increased with time. The relative content of exchangeable and carbonate-bound fraction chromium was lower and the content variations were not obvious. Chromium(VI) (91-98%) was first reduced to chromium(III) rapidly. The oxidation reaction occurred later and the relative content of chromium(VI) was increased again. The presence of manganese oxides under favorable soil conditions can promote the reoxidation of Cr(III) to Cr(VI).

  17. Structure and morphology studies of chromium film at elevated temperature in hypersonic environment

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    G M Hegde; V Kulkarni; M Nagaboopathy; K P J Reddy

    2012-06-01

    This paper presents the after shock heated structural and morphological studies of chromium film coated on hypersonic test model as a passive drag reduction element. The structural changes and the composition of phases of chromium due to shock heating (2850 K) are characterized using X-ray diffraction studies. Surface morphology changes of chromium coating have been studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) before and after shock heating. Significant amount of chromium ablation and sublimation from the model surface is noticed from SEM micrographs. Traces of randomly oriented chromium oxides formed along the coated surface confirm surface reaction of chromium with oxygen present behind the shock. Large traces of amorphous chromium oxide phases are also observed.

  18. Determination of Chromium in Beef Heifers Nellore Supplemented with Chelate Chrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.S.A Moreira

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to determine the amount of total chromium in beef heifers supplemented with chelated chromium in the rearing and finishing. We used 80 Nelore heifers at 12 months of age with mineral supplementation associated or not to chelate chromium, with average live weight of 220 kg. Were selected 36 heifer seach experimental group for analysis of meat samples. For the determination of chromium residue in the muscle tissue of the sample was1.5 g digested in a mixture of 5 ml 65% nitric acid and 1 ml of 30% hydrogen peroxide at 120° C for 12 hours block microdigestor. The total content of chromium was determined by spectrophotometry of atomic absorption flame. The experimental design was completely randomized and the results were analyzed by analysis of variance (ANOVA at 5% significance. It is concluded that the inclusion of chromium in the chelate heifers mineral supplementation increased the chromium content in the meat

  19. Contribution of photoelectron spectrometry and infrared spectrometry to the study of various oxidised forms of chromium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Securate knowledge of internal surface of primary coolant circuits of PWR is required for an estimation of dissolution of used materials and for estimation of decontamination efficiency. The binding energies of various electron levels of chromium were determined by photoelectron spectrometry (ESCA), both for the metal and for certain compounds. Because of the intensities of the signals obtained the 2 p 3/2 level alone can be used for analytical purposes. Owing to a possible interference between this level due to hexavalent chromium and a satellite peak caused by trivalent chromium the method is not able to show up small amounts of chromium VI in chromium III. Simultaneous detection of the hexavalent and trivalent forms was achieved by infrared spectrometry. The problem of revealing traces of chromium VI in surface layers of trivalent chromium oxide has thus been solved

  20. Evaluation of plasma nitriding efficiency of titanium alloys for medical applications

    OpenAIRE

    Frączek, T.; Olejnik, M.; Tokarz, A.

    2009-01-01

    The surface layers obtained on selected titanium alloys, used in medicine, by the nitriding under glow discharge condition were investigated. The results concern of: α- titanium alloy Grade 2 and α + β alloys Grade 5 and Grade 5 ELI nitrided in temperature below 873 K. The nitriding experiments were performed in a current glow-discharge furnace JON-600 with assisting of unconventional methods. After nitriding surface layers were characterised by surface microhardness measuremen...

  1. Molecular dynamics studies of the bonding properties of amorphous silicon nitride coatings on crystalline silicon

    OpenAIRE

    Butler, K.T.; Lamers, M.P.W.E.; Weeber, A. W.; Harding, J. H.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we present molecular dynamics simulations of silicon nitride, both in bulk and as an interface to crystalline silicon. We investigate, in particular, the bonding structure of the silicon nitride and analyze the simulations to search for de- fective geometries which have been identified as potential charge carrier traps when silicon nitride forms an interface with silicon semiconductors. The simulations reveal how the bonding patterns in silicon nitride are dependent upon the sto...

  2. Effect of Treatment Temperature on Iron Nitride Foils Irradiated with Nitrogen Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    We investigated the effect of treatment temperature on the magnetic property of iron nitride foils irradiated with nitrogen plasma. The iron nitride foils irradiated with nitrogen plasma were composed of ε-Fe2~3N, γ′-Fe4N and γ nitrogen austenite in α-Fe of the matrix. The saturation magnetization of the iron nitride foils decreased with increasing the surface temperature. The coercive force of the iron nitride foils increased with increasing the surface temperature.

  3. Technical assistance for development of thermally conductive nitride filler for epoxy molding compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, Ho Jin; Song, Kee Chan; Jung, In Ha

    2005-07-15

    Technical assistance was carried out to develop nitride filler for thermally conductive epoxy molding compounds. Carbothermal reduction method was used to fabricate silicon nitride powder from mixtures of silica and graphite powders. Microstructure and crystal structure were observed by using scanning electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction technique. Thermal properties of epoxy molding compounds containing silicon nitride were measured by using laser flash method. Fabrication process of silicon nitride nanowire was developed and was applied to a patent.

  4. DFT Studies on Electronic Structures of Boro-Nitride-Carbon Nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Ming; HUANG Chun-Hui

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, the configurations of Boro-Nitride-Carbon nanotubes with BNC2 composition were optimized by ROHF method. According to the density functional theory, the electronic structures of Boro-Nitride-Carbon nanotubes were calculated by DFT/ROB3LYP method. By analyzing the energy gap, density of electronic state and bonding maps of atoms, the conductive properties of Boro-Nitride-Carbon nanotubes were obtained, and compared with those of carbon nanotubes and other Boro-Nitride nanotubes.

  5. Microstructure and Mechanical Propertiesof a Nitride-Strengthened Reduced ActivationFerritic/Martensitic Steel

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Qiangguo; Zhang, Wenfeng; Yan, Wei; Wang, Wei; SHA, WEI; Shan, Yiyin; Yang, Ke

    2012-01-01

    Nitride-strengthened reduced activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steels are developed taking advantage of the high thermal stability of nitrides. In the current study, the microstructure and mechanical properties of a nitride-strengthened RAFM steel with improved composition were investigated. Fully martensitic microstructure with fine nitrides dispersion was achieved in the steel. In all, 1.4 pct Mn is sufficient to suppress delta ferrite and assure the steel of the full martensitic micro...

  6. Laboratory scale studies on removal of chromium from industrial wastes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Chromium being one of the major toxic pollutants is discharged from electroplating and chrome tanning processes and is also found in the effluents of dyes, paint pigments, manufacturing units etc. Chromium exists in aqueous systems in both trivalent (Cr 3+) and hexavalent (Cr 6+) forms. The hexavalent form is carcinogenic and toxic to aquatic life, whereas Cr3+ is however comparatively less toxic. This study was undertaken to investigate the total chromium removal from industrial effluents by chemical means in order to achieve the Pakistan NEQS level of 1 mg/L by the methods of reduction and precipitation. The study was conducted in four phases.In phase I, the optimum pH and cost effective reducing agent among the four popular commercial chemicals was selected. As a result, pH of 2 was found to be most suitable and sodium meta bisulfate was found to be the most cost effective reducing agent respectively. Phase II showed that lower dose of sodium meta bisulfate was sufficient to obtain 100 % efficiency in reducing Cr6+ to Cr3+, and it was noted that reaction time had no significance in the whole process. A design curve for reduction process was established which can act as a tool for treatment of industrial effluents.Phase III studies indicated the best pH was 8.5 for precipitation of Cr 3+ to chromium hydroxide by using lime. An efficiency of 100 % was achievable and a settling time of 30 minutes produced clear effluent. Finally in Phase IV actual waste samples from chrome tanning and electroplating industries, when precipitated at pH of 12 gave 100 % efficiency at a settling time of 30 minutes and confirmed that chemical means of reduction and precipitation is a feasible and viable solution for treating chromium wastes from industries.

  7. Arsenic and chromium topsoil levels and cancer mortality in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Núñez, Olivier; Fernández-Navarro, Pablo; Martín-Méndez, Iván; Bel-Lan, Alejandro; Locutura, Juan F; López-Abente, Gonzalo

    2016-09-01

    Spatio-temporal cancer mortality studies in Spain have revealed patterns for some tumours which display a distribution that is similar across the sexes and persists over time. Such characteristics would be common to tumours that shared risk factors, including the chemical soil composition. The objective of the present study is to assess the association between levels of chromium and arsenic in soil and the cancer mortality. This is an ecological cancer mortality study at municipal level, covering 861,440 cancer deaths in 7917 Spanish mainland towns from 1999 to 2008. Chromium and arsenic topsoil levels (partial extraction) were determined by ICP-MS at 13,317 sampling points. To estimate the effect of these concentrations on mortality, we fitted Besag, York and Mollié models, which included, as explanatory variables, each town's chromium and arsenic soil levels, estimated by kriging. In addition, we also fitted geostatistical-spatial models including sample locations and town centroids (non-aligned data), using the integrated nested Laplace approximation (INLA) and stochastic partial differential equations (SPDE). All results were adjusted for socio-demographic variables and proximity to industrial emissions. The results showed a statistical association in men and women alike, between arsenic soil levels and mortality due to cancers of the stomach, pancreas, lung and brain and non-Hodgkin's lymphomas (NHL). Among men, an association was observed with cancers of the prostate, buccal cavity and pharynx, oesophagus, colorectal and kidney. Chromium topsoil levels were associated with mortality among women alone, in cancers of the upper gastrointestinal tract, breast and NHL. Our results suggest that chronic exposure arising from low levels of arsenic and chromium in topsoil could be a potential risk factor for developing cancer.

  8. Sorption of chromium in soils of the Cerrado Goias, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Welershon José de Castro

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Land application of tannery sludge, which usually contain high levels of chromium, and considerable amounts of organic matter, macronutrients and micronutrients may contribute to the improvement of soil fertility and plant nutrition, and constitutes a form of disposal residue in the environment. The objective of this work was to determine the sorption isotherms of metal chromium (Cr+3 in a Ultisol, Oxisol Typic Acrustox, Quartzipsamment and Kandic Oxisol, identify soil classes that are prone to chromium mobility, and characterize the potential of agricultural soils of Goiás that are subject to groundwater contamination by the potentially toxic metal. For the establishment of sorption isotherms, solutions were prepared at 1:10 in volume. Air dried samples of 5.0 cm3 of each class of soil were placed in triplicates in beakers of 250.0 cm3. A solution containing 50.0 cm3 of the potentially toxic metal was added to solution. The solutions were prepared in CaCl2.(2H2O (0.01 mol.L-1 as electrolyte support and employing the basic chromium sulphate as a source of metal. Adjustments were made to the polynomial regression between the concentrations of potentially toxic levels of metal contaminants in the solution depending on the concentration of metal in the filtered solution after equilibrium. The Quartzipsamment showed lower retention compared to other classes of soils. Therefore it is more vulnerable to groundwater contamination if industrial wastes containing trivalent chromium are used as fertilizer.

  9. Chromium, chromium isotopes and selected trace elements, western Mojave Desert, USA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Izbicki, John A. [U.S. Geological Survey, 4165 Spruance Road, Suite O, San Diego, CA 92123 (United States)], E-mail: jaizbick@usgs.gov; Ball, James W. [U.S. Geological Survey, 3215 Marine Street, Boulder, Colorado, CO 80303 (United States); Bullen, Thomas D. [U.S. Geological Survey, 345 Middlefield Road, Building 15, McKelvey Building, MS-420, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Sutley, Stephen J. [Denver Federal Center, P.O. Box 25046, MS-964, Denver, CO 80225-0046 (United States)

    2008-05-15

    Chromium(VI) concentrations in excess of the California Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) of 50 {mu}g/L occur naturally in alkaline, oxic ground-water in alluvial aquifers in the western Mojave Desert, southern California. The highest concentrations were measured in aquifers eroded from mafic rock, but Cr(VI) as high as 27 {mu}g/L was measured in aquifers eroded from granitic rock. Chromium(VI) concentrations did not exceed 5 {mu}g/L at pH < 7.5 regardless of geology. {delta}{sup 53}Cr values in native ground-water ranged from 0.7 to 5.1 per mille and values were fractionated relative to the average {delta}{sup 53}Cr composition of 0 per mille in the earth's crust. Positive {delta}{sup 53}Cr values of 1.2 and 2.3 per mille were measured in ground-water recharge areas having low Cr concentrations, consistent with the addition of Cr(VI) that was fractionated on mineral surfaces prior to entering solution. {delta}{sup 53}Cr values, although variable, did not consistently increase or decrease with increasing Cr concentrations as ground-water flowed down gradient through more oxic portions of the aquifer. However, increasing {delta}{sup 53}Cr values were observed as dissolved O{sub 2} concentrations decreased, and Cr(VI) was reduced to Cr(III), and subsequently removed from solution. As a result, the highest {delta}{sup 53}Cr values were measured in water from deep wells, and wells in discharge areas near dry lakes at the downgradient end of long flow paths through alluvial aquifers. {delta}{sup 53}Cr values at an industrial site overlying mafic alluvium having high natural background Cr(VI) concentrations ranged from -0.1 to 3.2 per mille . Near zero {delta}{sup 53}Cr values at the site were the result of anthropogenic Cr. However, mixing with native ground-water and fractionation of Cr within the plume increased {delta}{sup 53}Cr values at the site. Although {delta}{sup 53}Cr was not necessarily diagnostic of anthropogenic Cr, it was possible to identify the extent

  10. Raman spectroscopy of supported chromium oxide catalysts : determination of chromium-oxygen bond distances and bond orders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weckhuysen, B.M.; Wachs, I.E.

    1996-01-01

    An empirical correlation is described for relating Raman stretching frequencies of chromium—oxygen (Cr—O) bonds to their bond lengths in chromium oxide reference compounds. An exponential fit of crystallographically determined Cr—O bond lengths to Cr—O Raman symmetric stretching frequencies (800–130

  11. Reduction of hexavalent chromium by ferrous iron: A process of chromium isotope fractionation and its relevance to natural environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Døssing, Lasse Nørbye; Dideriksen, Knud; Stipp, Susan Louise Svane;

    2011-01-01

    Stable chromium (Cr) isotopes can be used as a tracer for changing redox conditions in modern marine systems and in the geological record. We have investigated isotope fractionation during reduction of Cr(VI)aq by Fe(II)aq. Reduction of Cr(VI)aq by Fe(II)aq in batch experiments leads to significant...

  12. Turbostratic boron nitride coated on high-surface area metal oxide templates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klitgaard, Søren Kegnæs; Egeblad, Kresten; Brorson, M.;

    2007-01-01

    Boron nitride coatings on high-surface area MgAl2O4 and Al2O3 have been synthesized and characterized by transmission electron microscopy and by X-ray powder diffraction. The metal oxide templates were coated with boron nitride using a simple nitridation in a flow of ammonia starting from ammoniu...

  13. Mathematical Models and Computer Simulation of Nitrogen Concentration Profiles in Pulse Plasma Nitrided Layers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mufu YAN; Qingchang MENG; Jihong YAN

    2003-01-01

    Two materials, pure Fe and pure Al, were nitrided in a pulse plasma nitriding facility. The nitrogen profiles in surface layers and the surface phase structures of specimens nitrided at 500℃ for 8 h for Fe and for 6 h for Al were measured using the glow

  14. UN{sub 2−x} layer formed on uranium metal by glow plasma nitriding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Long, Zhong [China Academy of Engineering Physics, P.O. Box 919-71, Mianyang 621907 (China); Hu, Yin [Science and Technology on Surface Physics and Chemistry Laboratory, P.O. Box 718-35, Mianyang 621907 (China); Chen, Lin [China Academy of Engineering Physics, P.O. Box 919-71, Mianyang 621907 (China); Luo, Lizhu [Science and Technology on Surface Physics and Chemistry Laboratory, P.O. Box 718-35, Mianyang 621907 (China); Liu, Kezhao, E-mail: liukz@hotmail.com [Science and Technology on Surface Physics and Chemistry Laboratory, P.O. Box 718-35, Mianyang 621907 (China); Lai, Xinchun, E-mail: lai319@yahoo.com [Science and Technology on Surface Physics and Chemistry Laboratory, P.O. Box 718-35, Mianyang 621907 (China)

    2015-01-25

    Highlights: • We used a very simple method to prepare nitride layer on uranium metal surface. • This modified layer is nitrogen-rich nitride, which should be written as UN{sub 2−x}. • TEM images show the nitride layer is composed of nano-sized grains. • XPS analysis indicates there is uranium with abnormal low valence in the nitride. - Abstract: Glow plasma nitriding is a simple and economical surface treatment method, and this technology was used to prepare nitride layer on the surface of uranium metal with thickness of several microns. The composition and structure of the nitride layer were analyzed by AES and XRD, indicating that this modified layer is nitrogen-rich uranium nitride, which should be written as UN{sub 2−x}. TEM images show the nitride layer is composed of nano-sized grains, with compact structure. And XPS analysis indicates there is uranium with abnormal low valence existing in the nitride. After the treated uranium storage in air for a long time, oxygen just entered the surface several nanometers, showing the nitride layer has excellent oxidation resistance. The mechanism of nitride layer formation and low valence uranium appearance is discussed.

  15. Corrosion behaviour of the 42CrMo4 Steel Nitrided by Plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okba Belahssen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents corrosion behaviour of alloy 42CrMo4 steel nitrided by plasma. Different samples were tested: untreated and plasma nitrided samples. The corrosion behaviour was evaluated by electrochemical techniques (potentiodynamic curves and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The corrosion tests were carried out in acid chloride solution 1M. The best corrosion protection was observed for samples nitrided.

  16. Salt-bath Nitriding Process for 32 Cr2 Mo2 NiVNb Steel%32 Cr2 Mo2 NiVNb钢盐浴氮化工艺

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高志恒; 付扬帆

    2015-01-01

    Objective To develop a new salt-bath nitriding process for 32Cr2Mo2NiVNb steel surface treatment. Methods The 32Cr2Mo2NiVNb steel was treated with the new salt-bath nitriding process. The influences of the new salt-bath nitriding process on the microstructure and mechanical properties of 32Cr2Mo2NiVNb steel were concluded based on the analysis of several tests such as salt spray test and hardness test. The applicability of the salt-bath nitriding process for 32Cr2Mo2NiVNb steel was verified in this paper. Results After the salt-bath nitriding process, the 32Cr2Mo2NiVNb base material was composed of uniform fine needle-like sorbite + small amount of free ferrite, the depth of the nitriding layer was about 0. 23 mm, and the compound layer showed an even thickness of about 17μm. The level of the brittleness, nervation and wave-like nitrid, porosity of nitrided case all reached grade I. The hardness of 32Cr2Mo2NiVNb steel surface after salt-bath nitriding treatment was 1011HV0. 3, which was 250% of the surface hardness without salt-bath nitriding treatment. The tensile strength and the fracture morphology showed no significant change after salt-bath nitriding treatment. The tensile length after fracture, the reduction of cross-section area and impact absorption energy were slightly decreased. The time of resistance to neutral salt spray was 6. 3 fold as high as that of the sample coated with hard chromi-um. The surface wear scars after wear at high temperature for 190 s were fine and uniform, and the wear weight loss was reduced by 62. 8% as compared to the sample coated with hard chromium. Conclusion The salt-bath nitriding process did not damage the microstructure and mechanical properties of 32Cr2Mo2NiVNb steel, with only slight decreased in plasticity and toughness indexes, and could significantly improve the corrosion resistance and high-temperature wear resistance of 32Cr2Mo2NiVNb steel as compared to hard chromium plating. The new salt-bath nitriding process

  17. Effective Duration of Gas Nitriding Process on AISI 316L for the Formation of a Desired Thickness of Surface Nitrided Layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud Hassan R. S.

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available High temperature gas nitriding performed on AISI 316L at the temperature of 1200°C. The microstructure of treated AISI 316L samples were observed to identify the formation of the microstructure of nitrided surface layer. The grain size of austenite tends to be enlarged when the nitriding time increases, but the austenite single phase structure is maintained even after the long-time solution nitriding. Using microhardness testing, the hardness values drop to the center of the samples. The increase in surface hardness is due to the high nitrogen concentration at or near the surface. At 245HV, the graph of the effective duration of nitriding process was plotted to achieve the maximum depth of nitrogen diffuse under the surface. Using Sigma Plot software best fit lines of the experimental result found and plotted to find out effective duration of nitriding equation as Y=1.9491(1-0.7947x, where Y is the thickness of nitrided layer below the surface and X is duration of nitriding process. Based on this equation, the duration of gas nitriding process can be estimated to produce desired thickness of nitrided layer.

  18. The melting parameters of high-temperature nonmetallic nitrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ranges of temperatures and pressures for the existence of condensed boron, aluminum, and silicon nonmetallic nitrides in thermodynamic equilibrium with an ambient gas were calculated on the basis of reference data. The melting parameters of the high-temperature nitrides mentioned above were investigated experimentally in the nitrogen pressure range of 5200 MPa. The 99% purity nitride samples were prepared in the form of 4 x 4-mm plates with a thickness of 1 mm. The surfaces of samples were heated with stationary laser beam and analyzed by X-ray technique. The brightness temperature of nonmetallic nitrides was measured at 0.633-μm wavelength using the optical pyrometry method. The apparent melting temperatures were found from the analysis of heating and cooling thermograms. Based on the available literature data on normal spectral emmissivity, the true melting temperatures of nonmetallic nitrides were estimated as 3370 K for BN, 3025 K for AlN, and 2775 K for Si3N4

  19. Formation and nitridation of vanadium-aluminum intermetallic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewalter, H; Bock, W; Kolbesen, B O

    2002-10-01

    V(5)Al(8) and V(3)Al intermetallics have been formed by interdiffusion, by annealing of sputtered V/Al-multilayers at 700 degrees C in vacuo; sapphire (102) was used as substrate. The V/Al intermetallics were nitridated in NH(3) at 900 degrees C for 1 min by RTP (rapid thermal processing). The samples were investigated with XRD (X-ray diffraction), SNMS (secondary neutral mass spectrometry), and AFM (atomic force microscopy). A 5-10 nm thick AlN film (001 textured) was formed by nitridation of V(5)Al(8) (110 textured) and 2-3% nitrogen was incorporated in the V(5)Al(8) bulk. Nitridation of V(3)Al resulted in the formation of VN and AlN. Direct nitridation of V/Al-multilayers showed that near the surface nitridation is faster than intermixing of the V and Al layers. The capability of VN as diffusion barrier for Al could also be shown. PMID:12397502

  20. Activated carbon adsorption for chromium treatment and recovery; Adsorbimento di cromo su carboni attivi a scopo di recupero e decontaminazione

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baroncelli, F.; Castelli, S.; De Francesco, M. [ENEA, Casaccia (Italy). Area Energia e Innovazione

    1994-05-01

    The capability of actived carbon systems to adsorb chromium from wastewater of galvanic industry is valued. Batch tests and column tests are carried out with good results. An activated carbon with acidic surface oxides can adsorb both chromate and chromium (III); chromate is reduced in situ and then adsorbed as chromium (III). Chromium can be desorbed from carbon by an acid or basic treatment obtaining respectively chromium (III) or chromate solutions. Carbon can be regenerated many times without evident signs of deterioration.

  1. The effect of dietary supplementation with different forms and levels of organic chromium on broilers meat quality

    OpenAIRE

    Keleman Svetlana P.; Kevrešan Slavko E.; Supić Boriša; Perić Lidija; Strugar Vladimir

    2006-01-01

    This paper deals with the effect of supplementation with the three different preparations of organic chromium complexes: the ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid complex with chromium; chromium (III)­lysine and chromium picolinate, on broilers meat quality. In every preparation supplementing broilers diet chromium was present at the three different levels: 0.2; 0.4 and 0.6 mg/kg. The meat quality was monitored with respect to the following parameters: the contents of fat, protein, minerals and wat...

  2. Surface properties of nitrided layer on AISI 316L austenitic stainless steel produced by high temperature plasma nitriding in short time

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yang, E-mail: metalytu@163.com [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Yantai University, Qingquan Road 32, Yantai 264005 (China); Wang, Zhuo [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Yantai University, Qingquan Road 32, Yantai 264005 (China); Wang, Liang [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Dalian Maritime University, Linghai Road 1, Dalian 116026 (China)

    2014-04-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The 8 μm nitrided layer was produced on the surface of AISI 316L stainless steel by plasma nitrided at high temperatures (540 °C) within 1 h. • The nitrided layer consisted of nitrogen expanded austenite and possibly a small amount of free-CrN and iron nitrides. • It could critically reduce processing time compared with low temperature nitriding. • High temperature plasma nitriding could improve pitting corrosion resistance of the substrate in 3.5% NaCl solution. - Abstract: It has generally been believed that the formation of the S phase or expanded austenite γ{sub N} with enough thickness depends on the temperature (lower than 480 °C) and duration of the process. In this work, we attempt to produce nitrogen expanded austenite layer at high temperature in short time. Nitriding of AISI 316L austenitic stainless steel was carried out at high temperatures (>520 °C) for times ranging from 5 to 120 min. The microstructures, chemical composition, the thickness and the morphology of the nitrided layer, as well as its surface hardness, were investigated using X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and microhardness tester. The corrosion properties of the untreated and nitrided samples were evaluated using anodic polarization tests in 3.5% NaCl solution. The results confirmed that nitrided layer was shown to consist of γ{sub N} and a small amount of free-CrN and iron nitrides. High temperature plasma nitriding not only increased the surface hardness but also improved the corrosion resistance of the austenitic stainless steel, and it can critically reduce processing time compared with low temperature nitriding.

  3. Preparation of graphitic carbon nitride by electrodeposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Chao; CAO Chuanbao; ZHU Hesun

    2003-01-01

    The CNx thin film was deposited on Si(100) substrate from a saturated acetone solution of cyanuric trichloride and melamine (cyanuric trichloride/melamine=1︰1.5) at room temperature. X-ray diffraction (XRD) results showed that the diffraction peaks in the pattern coincided well with those of graphite-like carbon nitride calculated in the literature. The lattice constants (a=4.79 A, c=6.90 A) for g-C3N4 matched with those of ab initio calculations (a=4.74 A, c=6.72 A) quite well. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements indicated that the elements in the deposited films were mostly of C and N (N/C=0.75), and N (400.00 eV) bonded with C (287.72 eV) in the form of six-member C3N3 ring. The peaks at 800 cm-1, 1310 cm-1 and 1610 cm-1 in the Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrum indicated that triazine ring existed in the product. These results demonstrated that crystalline g-C3N4 was obtained in the CNx film.

  4. Fluorescent lighting with aluminum nitride phosphors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cherepy, Nerine J.; Payne, Stephen A.; Seeley, Zachary M.; Srivastava, Alok M.

    2016-05-10

    A fluorescent lamp includes a glass envelope; at least two electrodes connected to the glass envelope; mercury vapor and an inert gas within the glass envelope; and a phosphor within the glass envelope, wherein the phosphor blend includes aluminum nitride. The phosphor may be a wurtzite (hexagonal) crystalline structure Al.sub.(1-x)M.sub.xN phosphor, where M may be drawn from beryllium, magnesium, calcium, strontium, barium, zinc, scandium, yttrium, lanthanum, cerium, praseodymium, europium, gadolinium, terbium, ytterbium, bismuth, manganese, silicon, germanium, tin, boron, or gallium is synthesized to include dopants to control its luminescence under ultraviolet excitation. The disclosed Al.sub.(1-x)M.sub.xN:Mn phosphor provides bright orange-red emission, comparable in efficiency and spectrum to that of the standard orange-red phosphor used in fluorescent lighting, Y.sub.2O.sub.3:Eu. Furthermore, it offers excellent lumen maintenance in a fluorescent lamp, and does not utilize "critical rare earths," minimizing sensitivity to fluctuating market prices for the rare earth elements.

  5. Hexagonal boron-nitride nanomesh magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohata, C.; Tagami, R.; Nakanishi, Y.; Iwaki, R.; Nomura, K.; Haruyama, J.

    2016-09-01

    The formation of magnetic and spintronic devices using two-dimensional (2D) atom-thin layers has attracted attention. Ferromagnetisms (FMs) arising from zigzag-type atomic structure of edges of 2D atom-thin materials have been experimentally observed in graphene nanoribbons, hydrogen (H)-terminated graphene nanomeshes (NMs), and few-layer oxygen (O)-terminated black phosphorus NMs. Herein, we report room-temperature edge FM in few-layer hexagonal boron-nitride (hBN) NMs. O-terminated hBNNMs annealed at 500 °C show the largest FM, while it completely disappears in H-terminated hBNNMs. When hBNNMs are annealed at other temperatures, amplitude of the FM significantly decreases. These are highly in contrast to the case of graphene NMs but similar to the cases of black phosphorus NM and suggest that the hybridization of the O atoms with B(N) dangling bonds of zigzag pore edges, formed at the 500 °C annealing, strongly contribute to this edge FM. Room-temperature FM realizable only by exposing hBNNMs into air opens the way for high-efficiency 2D flexible magnetic and spintronic devices without the use of rare magnetic elements.

  6. Polymeric photocatalysts based on graphitic carbon nitride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Shaowen; Low, Jingxiang; Yu, Jiaguo; Jaroniec, Mietek

    2015-04-01

    Semiconductor-based photocatalysis is considered to be an attractive way for solving the worldwide energy shortage and environmental pollution issues. Since the pioneering work in 2009 on graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4) for visible-light photocatalytic water splitting, g-C3N4 -based photocatalysis has become a very hot research topic. This review summarizes the recent progress regarding the design and preparation of g-C3N4 -based photocatalysts, including the fabrication and nanostructure design of pristine g-C3N4 , bandgap engineering through atomic-level doping and molecular-level modification, and the preparation of g-C3N4 -based semiconductor composites. Also, the photo-catalytic applications of g-C3N4 -based photocatalysts in the fields of water splitting, CO2 reduction, pollutant degradation, organic syntheses, and bacterial disinfection are reviewed, with emphasis on photocatalysis promoted by carbon materials, non-noble-metal cocatalysts, and Z-scheme heterojunctions. Finally, the concluding remarks are presented and some perspectives regarding the future development of g-C3N4 -based photocatalysts are highlighted.

  7. Plasmonic enhancement of photoluminescence from aluminium nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Chris; Stewart, Matthew

    2016-03-01

    Aluminium nitride (AlN) films were grown on c-plane sapphire wafers by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) under aluminium-rich conditions. The excess aluminium (Al) accumulated on the surface of the films as micro-scale droplets 1-10 μm in size, and as Al nanoparticles with diameters in the range 10-110 nm. Photoluminescence (PL) measurements were performed on the AlN samples using a 193 nm Excimer laser as the excitation source. Prior to PL measurements the wafers were cleaved in half. One half of each wafer was submitted to a 10 min treatment in H3PO4 heated to 70 °C to remove the excess Al from the film surface. The remaining half was left in the as-deposited condition. The mean intensities of the near-band-edge PL peaks of the as-deposited samples were 2.0-3.4 times higher compared to the samples subjected to the H3PO4 Al-removal treatment. This observation motivated calculations to determine the optimal Al surface nanosphere size for plasmonic enhancement of PL from AlN. The PL enhancement was found to peak for an Al nanosphere radius of 15 nm, which is within the range of the experimentally-observed Al nanoparticle sizes.

  8. Fully CMOS-compatible titanium nitride nanoantennas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CMOS-compatible fabrication of plasmonic materials and devices will accelerate the development of integrated nanophotonics for information processing applications. Using low-temperature plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition (PEALD), we develop a recipe for fully CMOS-compatible titanium nitride (TiN) that is plasmonic in the visible and near infrared. Films are grown on silicon, silicon dioxide, and epitaxially on magnesium oxide substrates. By optimizing the plasma exposure per growth cycle during PEALD, carbon and oxygen contamination are reduced, lowering undesirable loss. We use electron beam lithography to pattern TiN nanopillars with varying diameters on silicon in large-area arrays. In the first reported single-particle measurements on plasmonic TiN, we demonstrate size-tunable darkfield scattering spectroscopy in the visible and near infrared regimes. The optical properties of this CMOS-compatible material, combined with its high melting temperature and mechanical durability, comprise a step towards fully CMOS-integrated nanophotonic information processing

  9. Fully CMOS-compatible titanium nitride nanoantennas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Briggs, Justin A., E-mail: jabriggs@stanford.edu [Department of Applied Physics, Stanford University, 348 Via Pueblo Mall, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Stanford University, 496 Lomita Mall, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Naik, Gururaj V.; Baum, Brian K.; Dionne, Jennifer A. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Stanford University, 496 Lomita Mall, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Petach, Trevor A.; Goldhaber-Gordon, David [Department of Physics, Stanford University, 382 Via Pueblo Mall, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

    2016-02-01

    CMOS-compatible fabrication of plasmonic materials and devices will accelerate the development of integrated nanophotonics for information processing applications. Using low-temperature plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition (PEALD), we develop a recipe for fully CMOS-compatible titanium nitride (TiN) that is plasmonic in the visible and near infrared. Films are grown on silicon, silicon dioxide, and epitaxially on magnesium oxide substrates. By optimizing the plasma exposure per growth cycle during PEALD, carbon and oxygen contamination are reduced, lowering undesirable loss. We use electron beam lithography to pattern TiN nanopillars with varying diameters on silicon in large-area arrays. In the first reported single-particle measurements on plasmonic TiN, we demonstrate size-tunable darkfield scattering spectroscopy in the visible and near infrared regimes. The optical properties of this CMOS-compatible material, combined with its high melting temperature and mechanical durability, comprise a step towards fully CMOS-integrated nanophotonic information processing.

  10. Conductivity of materials made of aluminum nitride and silicon nitride mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorbatov, A. G.; Kamyshov, V. M.

    1978-01-01

    To establish the possible mechanism for conductivity in aluminum nitride a study was made of the electric conductivity of pure AlN and its mixtures with silicon nitride at different temperatures and partial pressures of nitrogen in the gas phase. The thermoelectromotive force was also measured. The experiments used polycrystalline samples of cylindrical shape 18 mm in diameter made of powders by hot pressing in graphite press molds at a temperature of 1973-2273 K and pressure 1,470,000 n/sqm. The items obtained by this method had porosity not over 5%. After pressing, the samples were machined to remove carbon from the surface, and were annealed in a stream of dry ammonia for 10 h at a temperature of 1273-1373 K. Electric conductivity was measured according to the bridge scheme on an alternating current of frequency 10 kHz. In order to guarantee close contact of the platinum electrodes with the surface of the samples, a thin layer of platinum was sprayed on them. Experiments were conducted in the temperature interval 1273-1573 K with a half hour delay at each assigned temperature with heating and cooling.

  11. Effect of recasting on the thickness of metal-ceramic interface of nickel-chromium and cobalt-chromium alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirković Nemanja

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction/Aim. This research was done to establish recasting effects of nickel-chromium and cobalt-chromium alloys on the thickness of their metal-ceramic interface in making fixed partial dentures. Metal-ceramic interface determines their functional integrity and prevents damages on ceramics during mastication. Investigation of metal-ceramic samples is supposed to show if base metal alloys for metalceramics are successfully recycled without any risk of reduction of metal-ceramic interface thickness. Methods. The research was performed as an experimental study. Per six metal-ceramic samples of nickel-chromium alloy (Wiron99 and cobalt-chromium alloy (Wirobond C were made each. Alloy residues were recycled through twelve casting generations with the addition of 50% of new alloy on the occasion of every recasting. Analysis Energy Dispersive X-ray (EDX (Oxford Instruments and Scanning Electon Microscop (SEM analysis (JEOL were used to determine thickness of metal-ceramic interface together with PC Software for quantification of visual information's (KVI POPOVAC. Results. Results of this research introduced significant differences between thickness of metal-ceramic interface in every examined recycle generation. Recasting had negative effect on thickness of metal-ceramic interface of the examined alloys. This research showed almost linear reduction of elastic modulus up to the 12th generation of recycling. Conclusion. Recasting of nickel-chromium and cobaltchromium alloys is not recommended because of reduced thickness of metal-ceramic interface of these alloys. Instead of recycling, the alloy residues should be returned to the manufacturers.

  12. Bioadsorption and bioaccumulation of chromium trivalent in Cr(III)-tolerant microalgae: a mechanisms for chromium resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, M; Bartolomé, M C; Sánchez-Fortún, S

    2013-10-01

    Anthropogenic activity constantly releases heavy metals into the environment. The heavy metal chromium has a wide industrial use and exists in two stable oxidation states: trivalent and hexavalent. While hexavalent chromium uptake in plant cells has been reported that an active process by carrying essential anions, the cation Cr(III) appears to be taken up inactively. Dictyosphaerium chlorelloides (Dc1M), an unicellular green alga is a well-studied cell biological model organism. The present study was carried out to investigate the toxic effect of chromium exposures on wild-type Cr(III)-sensitive (Dc1M(wt)) and Cr(III)-tolerant (Dc1M(Cr(III)R30)) strains of these green algae, and to determine the potential mechanism of chromium resistance. Using cell growth as endpoint to determine Cr(III)-sensitivity, the IC₅₀(₇₂) values obtained show significant differences of sensitivity between wild type and Cr(III)-tolerant cells. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed significant morphological differences between both strains, such as decrease in cell size or reducing the coefficient of form; and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed ultrastructural changes such as increased vacuolization and cell wall thickening in the Cr(III)-tolerant strain with respect to the wild-type strain. Energy dispersive X-ray analysis (SEM/XEDS) revealed that Cr(III)-tolerant D. chlorelloides cells are able to accumulate considerable amounts of chromium distributed in cell wall (bioadsorption) as well as in cytoplasm, vacuoles, and chloroplast (bio-accumulation). Morphological changes of Cr(III)-tolerant D. chlorelloides cells and the presence of these electron-dense bodies in their cell structures can be understood as a Cr(III) detoxification mechanism. PMID:23810518

  13. Chromium(VI) but not chromium(III) species decrease mitoxantrone affinity to DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowicka, Anna M; Stojek, Zbigniew; Hepel, Maria

    2013-01-31

    Binding of mitoxantrone (MXT) to double-stranded DNA has been investigated as a model drug-DNA binding system to evaluate the effects of various forms of chromium on the binding properties. We have found that Cr(III), which binds strongly to DNA, does not affect the MXT affinity to DNA. In contrast, Cr(VI), in the form of chromate ions CrO(4)(2-), decreases the MXT affinity to DNA despite electrostatic repulsions with phosphate-deoxyribose chains of DNA. The MXT-DNA binding constant was found to decrease from (1.96 ± 0.005) × 10(5) to (0.77 ± 0.018) × 10(5) M(-1) for Cr(VI) concentration changing from 0 to 30 μM. The influence of Cr(VI) on MXT-DNA binding has been attributed to the oxidation of guanine residue, thus interrupting the intercalation of MXT into the DNA double helix at the preferential CpG intercalation site. This supposition is corroborated by the observed increase in the MXT binding site size from 2 bp (base pairs) to 4-6 bp in the presence of Cr(VI). The measurements of the MXT-DNA binding constant and the MXT binding site size on a DNA molecule have been carried out using spectroscopic, voltammetric, and nanogravimetric techniques, providing useful information on the mechanism of the interactions.

  14. Urinary levels of nickel and chromium associated with dental restoration by nickel-chromium based alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bo Chen; Gang Xia; Xin-Ming Cao; Jue Wang; Bi-Yao Xu; Pu Huang; Yue Chen; Qing-Wu Jiang

    2013-01-01

    This paper aims to investigate if the dental restoration of nickel-chromium based alloy (Ni-Cr) leads to the enhanced excretions of Ni and Cr in urine. Seven hundred and ninety-five patients in a dental hospital had single or multiple Ni-Cr alloy restoration recently and 198 controls were recruited to collect information on dental restoration by questionnaire and clinical examination. Urinary concentrations of Ni and Cr from each subject were measure by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. Compared to the control group, the urinary level of Ni was significantly higher in the patient group of 〈 1 month of the restoration duration, among which higher Ni excretions were found in those with either a higher number of teeth replaced by dental alloys or a higher index of metal crown not covered with the porcelain. Urinary levels of Cr were significantly higher in the three patient groups of 〈1, 1 to 〈3 and 3 to 〈6 months, especially in those with a higher metal crown exposure index. Linear curve estimations showed better relationships between urinary Ni and Cr in patients within 6-month groups. Our data suggested significant increased excretions of urinary Ni and Cr after dental restoration. Potential short- and long-term effects of Ni-Cr alloy restoration need to be investigated.

  15. A computational investigation of boron-doped chromium and chromium clusters by density functional theory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The geometries,stabilities and electronic properties of Crn and CrnB(n=2-9) clusters have been systematically investigated by density functional theory.The results suggest that the lowest energy structures for CrnB clusters can be obtained by substituting one Cr atom in Crn+1 clusters with B atom.The geometries of CrnB clusters are similar to that of Crn+1 clusters except for local structural distortion.The second-order difference and fragmentation energy show Cr4,Cr6,Cr8,Cr3B,Cr5B and Cr8B cluster are the most stable among these studied clusters.The impurity B increases the stabilities of chromium cluster.When B is doped on the Crn clusters,cluster geometry does dominate positive role in enhancing their stability.The doped B atom does not change the coupling way of the Cr site in Crn clusters,but breaks the symmetry and the Cr atoms are no longer equivalent.The doped B atom increases the total magnetic moments of Crn in most cases.

  16. A metastable chromium carbide powder obtained by carburization of a metastable chromium oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loubiere, S. [Univ. Paul-Sabatier, Toulouse (France). Lab. de Chimie des Materiaux Inorganique; Laurent, C. [Univ. Paul-Sabatier, Toulouse (France). Lab. de Chimie des Materiaux Inorganique; Bonino, J.P. [Univ. Paul-Sabatier, Toulouse (France). Lab. de Chimie des Materiaux Inorganique; Rousset, A. [Univ. Paul-Sabatier, Toulouse (France). Lab. de Chimie des Materiaux Inorganique

    1996-10-15

    A metastable Cr{sub 3}C{sub 2-x} carbide powder is prepared by carburization of a metastable chromium oxide in H{sub 2}-CH{sub 4} atmosphere under the appropriate conditions (temperature, dwell time and CH{sub 4} content). A very high specific surface area (greater than 210 m{sup 2} g{sup -1}) of the starting oxide is necessary to avoid the formation of the sole stable Cr{sub 3}C{sub 2} phase. The transformation from the stable Cr{sub 3}C{sub 2} to the metastable Cr{sub 3}C{sub 2-x} is observed for the first time. The driving force could be an epitaxial effect between Cr{sub 3}C{sub 2-x} and the surrounding graphite layer. This is consistent with the observation that the formation of graphite layers by CH{sub 4} cracking is easier in the Cr{sub 3}C{sub 2-x}-containing powders. (orig.)

  17. Structure and properties of nitrided surface layer produced on NiTi shape memory alloy by low temperature plasma nitriding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Czarnowska, Elżbieta [Children' s Memorial Health Institute, Pathology Department, Al. Dzieci Polskich 20, 04-730 Warsaw (Poland); Borowski, Tomasz [Warsaw University of Technology, Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Wołoska 141, 02-507 Warsaw (Poland); Sowińska, Agnieszka [Children' s Memorial Health Institute, Pathology Department, Al. Dzieci Polskich 20, 04-730 Warsaw (Poland); Lelątko, Józef [Silesia University, Faculty of Computer Science and Materials Science, 75 Pułku Piechoty 1A, 41-500 Chorzów (Poland); Oleksiak, Justyna; Kamiński, Janusz; Tarnowski, Michał [Warsaw University of Technology, Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Wołoska 141, 02-507 Warsaw (Poland); Wierzchoń, Tadeusz, E-mail: twierz@inmat.pw.edu.pl [Warsaw University of Technology, Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Wołoska 141, 02-507 Warsaw (Poland)

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: • Low temperature plasma nitriding process of NiTi shape memory alloy is presented. • The possibility of treatment details of sophisticated shape. • TiN surface layer has diffusive character. • TiN surface layer increases corrosion resistance of NiTi alloy. • Produced TiN layer modify the biological properties of NiTi alloy. - Abstract: NiTi shape memory alloys are used for bone and cardiological implants. However, on account of the metallosis effect, i.e. the release of the alloy elements into surrounding tissues, they are subjected to various surface treatment processes in order to improve their corrosion resistance and biocompatibility without influencing the required shape memory properties. In this paper, the microstructure, topography and morphology of TiN surface layer on NiTi alloy, and corrosion resistance, both before and after nitriding in low-temperature plasma at 290 °C, are presented. Examinations with the use of the potentiodynamic and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy methods were carried out and show an increase of corrosion resistance in Ringer's solution after glow-discharge nitriding. This surface titanium nitride layer also improved the adhesion of platelets and the proliferation of osteoblasts, which was investigated in in vitro experiments with human cells. Experimental data revealed that nitriding NiTi shape memory alloy under low-temperature plasma improves its properties for bone implant applications.

  18. Elastic properties of indium nitrides grown on sapphire substrates determined by nano-indentation: In comparison with other nitrides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ichiro Yonenaga

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The hardness of wurtzite indium nitride (α-InN films of 0.5 to 4 μm in thickness was measured by the nano-indentation method at room temperature. After investigation of crystalline quality by x-ray diffraction, the hardness and Young’s modulus were determined to be 8.8 ± 0.4 and 184 ± 5 GPa, respectively, for the In (0001- and N ( 000 1 ̄ -growth faces of InN films. The bulk and shear moduli were then derived to be 99 ± 3 and 77 ± 2 GPa, respectively. The Poisson’s ratio was evaluated to be 0.17 ± 0.03. The results were examined comprehensively in comparison with previously reported data of InN as well as those of other nitrides of aluminum nitride and gallium nitride. The underlying physical process determining the moduli and hardness was examined in terms of atomic bonding and dislocation energy of the nitrides and wurtzite zinc oxide.

  19. Electronic Biosensors Based on III-Nitride Semiconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirste, Ronny; Rohrbaugh, Nathaniel; Bryan, Isaac; Bryan, Zachary; Collazo, Ramon; Ivanisevic, Albena

    2015-01-01

    We review recent advances of AlGaN/GaN high-electron-mobility transistor (HEMT)-based electronic biosensors. We discuss properties and fabrication of III-nitride-based biosensors. Because of their superior biocompatibility and aqueous stability, GaN-based devices are ready to be implemented as next-generation biosensors. We review surface properties, cleaning, and passivation as well as different pathways toward functionalization, and critically analyze III-nitride-based biosensors demonstrated in the literature, including those detecting DNA, bacteria, cancer antibodies, and toxins. We also discuss the high potential of these biosensors for monitoring living cardiac, fibroblast, and nerve cells. Finally, we report on current developments of covalent chemical functionalization of III-nitride devices. Our review concludes with a short outlook on future challenges and projected implementation directions of GaN-based HEMT biosensors.

  20. Active Control of Nitride Plasmonic Dispersion in the Far Infrared.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaner, Eric A.; Dyer, Gregory Conrad; Seng, William Francis; Bethke, Donald Thomas; Grine, Albert Dario,; Baca, Albert G.; Allerman, Andrew A.

    2014-11-01

    We investigate plasmonic structures in nitride-based materials for far-infrared (IR) applications. The two dimensional electron gas (2DEG) in the GaN/AlGaN material system, much like metal- dielectric structures, is a patternable plasmonic medium. However, it also permits for direct tunability via an applied voltage. While there have been proof-of-principle demonstrations of plasma excitations in nitride 2DEGs, exploration of the potential of this material system has thus far been limited. We recently demonstrated coherent phenomena such as the formation of plasmonic crystals, strong coupling of tunable crystal defects to a plasmonic crystal, and electromagnetically induced transparency in GaAs/AlGaAs 2DEGs at sub-THz frequencies. In this project, we explore whether these effects can be realized in nitride 2DEG materials above 1 THz and at temperatures exceeding 77 K.

  1. Electron microscopy of gallium nitride growth on polycrystalline diamond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Transmission and scanning electron microscopy were used to examine the growth of gallium nitride (GaN) on polycrystalline diamond substrates grown by metalorganic vapour phase epitaxy with a low-temperature aluminium nitride (AlN) nucleation layer. Growth on unmasked substrates was in the (0001) orientation with threading dislocation densities ≈7 × 109 cm−2. An epitaxial layer overgrowth technique was used to reduce the dislocation densities further, by depositing silicon nitride stripes on the surface and etching the unmasked regions down to the diamond substrate. A re-growth was then performed on the exposed side walls of the original GaN growth, reducing the threading dislocation density in the overgrown regions by two orders of magnitude. The resulting microstructures and the mechanisms of dislocation reduction are discussed. (paper)

  2. Low-Temperature Nitriding by Means of SMAT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    W.P. Tong; H.W. Zhang; N.R. Tao; Z.B. Wang; J. Lu; K. Lu

    2004-01-01

    The microstructure in the surface layer of iron and steel samples can be refined at the nanometer scale by means of a surface mechanical attrition treatment (SMAT) that generates repetitive severe plastic deformation to the surface layer.The subsequent nitriding kinetics of the as-treated samples with the nanostructured surface layer is greatly enhanced so that the nitriding temperatures can be reduce to 300 ~ 400 ℃ regions. This enhanced processing method demonstrates both the technological significance of nanomaterials in advancing the traditional processing techniques, and provides a new approach for selective surface reactions in solids. This article reviews the present state of the art in this field. The microstructure and properties of SMAT samples nitrided will be summarized. Further considerations of the development and applications of this new technique will also be presented.

  3. Nanoparticle plasmonics: going practical with transition metal nitrides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urcan Guler

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Promising designs and experimental realizations of devices with unusual properties in the field of plasmonics have attracted a great deal of attention over the past few decades. However, the high expectations for realized technology products have not been met so far. The main complication is the absence of robust, high performance, low cost plasmonic materials that can be easily integrated into already established technologies such as microelectronics. This review provides a brief discussion on alternative plasmonic materials for localized surface plasmon applications and focuses on transition metal nitrides, in particular, titanium nitride, which has recently been shown to be a high performance refractory plasmonic material that could replace and even outperform gold in various plasmonic devices. As a material compatible with biological environments and the semiconductor industry, titanium nitride possesses superior properties compared to noble metals such as high temperature durability, chemical stability, corrosion resistance, low cost and mechanical hardness.

  4. Thermally grown thin nitride films as a gate dielectric

    CERN Document Server

    Shin, H C; Hwang, T K; Lee, K R

    1998-01-01

    High-quality very thin films ( <=6 nm) of silicon nitride were thermally grown in ammonia atmosphere with an IR (Infrared) gold image furnace. As-grown nitride film was analyzed using AES(Auger Emission Spectroscopy). Using MIS (Metal-Insulator-Semiconductor) devices, the growth rate was calculated using CV (Capacitance-Voltage) measurements and various electrical characteristics were obtained using CV, IV (Current-Voltage), trapping, time-dependent breakdown, high-field stress, constant current injection stress and dielectric breakdown techniques. These characteristics showed that very thin thermal silicon nitride films can be used as gate dielectrics for future highly scaled-down ULSI (Ultra Large Scale Integrated) devices, especially for EEPROM (Electrically Erasable and Programmable ROM)'s.

  5. Symmetric organization of self-assembled carbon nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A scheme for creating 'flower-like' nanostructures of carbon nitride is described that involves the self-assembly of nanocrystals following laser ablation of a solid graphite target immersed in aqueous ammonia solution. The primary nanocrystals possess rod-like symmetry, and then self-assemble upon drying to form nanoleaf or nanopetal shaped structures. Samples were characterized using x-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), x-ray photoelectron microscopy (XPS) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The analyses confirmed their composition to be consistent with that of crystalline β-phase carbon nitride. The morphologies of the carbon nitride nanostructures depended strongly on the synthesis conditions and upon the conditions under which the aqueous suspension of ablated particles were dried

  6. Pressureless sintered silicon carbide tailored with aluminium nitride sintering agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study reports the influence of aluminium nitride on the pressureless sintering of cubic phase silicon carbide nanoparticles (β-SiC). Pressureless sintering was achieved at 2000 degrees C for 5 min with the additions of boron carbide together with carbon of 1 wt% and 6 wt%, respectively, and a content of aluminium nitride between 0 and 10 wt%. Sintered samples present relative densities higher than 92%. The sintered microstructure was found to be greatly modified by the introduction of aluminium nitride, which reflects the influence of nitrogen on the β-SiC to α-SiC transformation. The toughness of sintered sample was not modified by AlN incorporation and is relatively low (around 2.5 MPa m1/2). Materials exhibited transgranular fracture mode, indicating a strong bonding between SiC grains. (authors)

  7. Kinetic modelling of chlorination of nitrided ilmenite using MATLAB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramakrishnan, Sivakumar; Kwok, Teong Chen; Hamid, Sheikh Abdul Rezan Sheikh Abdul

    2016-07-01

    In the present study, chlorination of nitride ilmenite using 2k factorial design was investigated. The reduction experiments were carried out in a temperature range of 400°C to 500°C, chlorination duration from 1 hour to 3 hours and using different type of carbon reactant. Phases of raw materials and reduced samples were analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD). Ilmenite was reduced to TiOxCyNz through carbothermal and nitridation for further chlorination into titanium tetrachloride. The Design of Experiment analysis suggested that the types of carbon reactant contribute most influence to the extent of chlorination of nitride ilmenite. The extent of chlorination was highest at 500°C with 3 hours chlorination time and carbon nanotube as carbon reactant.

  8. Design, Control and in Situ Visualization of Gas Nitriding Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerzy Ratajski

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The article presents a complex system of design, in situ visualization and control of the commonly used surface treatment process: the gas nitriding process. In the computer design conception, analytical mathematical models and artificial intelligence methods were used. As a result, possibilities were obtained of the poly-optimization and poly-parametric simulations of the course of the process combined with a visualization of the value changes of the process parameters in the function of time, as well as possibilities to predict the properties of nitrided layers. For in situ visualization of the growth of the nitrided layer, computer procedures were developed which make use of the results of the correlations of direct and differential voltage and time runs of the process result sensor (magnetic sensor, with the proper layer growth stage. Computer procedures make it possible to combine, in the duration of the process, the registered voltage and time runs with the models of the process.

  9. A Study of the High Temperature on Chromium Carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The oxidation rates of chromium carbide have been measured at 900 to 1300 .deg. C and oxygen pressures between 2x10-2 8 x 10-2 Pa using thermogravimetric analysis method. Oxidation behavior of chromium carbide appeared to change very sensitively with both temperature and oxygen pressure. In case with the oxygen pressure lower than 8 x 10-2 Pa, the weight gain in the specimen due to the formation of chromium oxide occurred linearly with time at the every temperature studied, but when the oxygen pressure was increased up to 8 x 10-2Pa, the weight gain behavior versus time showed entirely different tendency. That is, in the temperature range of 900 .deg. C to 1000 .deg. C weight gain occurred, however in the range of 1000 .deg. C to 1300 .deg. C weight lost was observed. The reason for the observed linear kinetics could be inferred as follows. As the oxidation of carbide proceeded carbon monoxide would build up at the interface of the chromium oxide and carbide. If the equilibrium pressure of carbon monoxide at the interface exceeds the gas pressure at the outer specimen surface, the oxide scale formed on it might be cracked exposing new carbide sites on which oxidation could occur successively. Through a thermodynamic consideration it was judged that the above deduction was reasonable. On the other hand, the weight lost mentioned above was explained that it could occur mainly due to the further oxidation of Cr2O3 to the volatile CrO3 at the corresponding experimental conditions. Weight loss phenomenon mentioned before which was observed in the oxidation of chromium carbide was also clearified by X-ray diffraction method and SEM. That is, at 900 .deg. C stable oxide of chromium, (Cr2O3) was identified easily on the specimen surface. However, at 1300 .deg. C, only a few amount of this stable oxide could be found on to specimen surface, indicating Cr2O3 had been evaporated to CrO3 gas

  10. Finished leather waste chromium acid extraction and anaerobic biodegradation of the products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Maria J; Almeida, Manuel F; Pinho, Sílvia C; Santos, Isabel C

    2010-06-01

    Due to the amounts of chromium in the leachate resulting from leather leaching tests, chromium sulfate tanned leather wastes are very often considered hazardous wastes. To overcome this problem, one option could be recovering the chromium and, consequently, lowering its content in the leather scrap. With this objective, chromium leather scrap was leached with sulfuric acid solutions at low temperature also aiming at maximizing chromium removal with minimum attack of the leather matrix. The effects of leather scrap dimension, sulfuric acid and sodium sulfate concentration in the solutions, as well as extraction time and temperature on chromium recovery were studied, and, additionally, organic matrix degradation was evaluated. The best conditions found for chromium recovery were leather scrap conditioning using 25mL of concentrated H(2)SO(4)/L solution at 293 or 313K during 3 or 6days. Under such conditions, 30-60+/-5% of chromium was recovered and as low as 3-6+/-1% of the leather total organic carbon (TOC) was dissolved. Using such treatment, the leather scrap area and volume are reduced and the residue is a more brittle material showing enhanced anaerobic biodegradability. Although good recovery results were achieved, due to the fact that the amount of chromium in eluate exceeded the threshold value this waste was still hazardous. Thus, it needs to be methodically washed in order to remove all the chromium de-linked from collagen.

  11. Investigation of the surface composition of electrodeposited black chromium by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Survilienė, S., E-mail: sveta@ktl.mii.lt; Češūnienė, A.; Jasulaitienė, V.; Jurevičiūtė, I.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Black chromium electrodeposited from a Cr(III) bath is composed of oxide, hydroxide and metallic chromium. • Metallic phase is absent in black chromium electrodeposited from a Cr(III) + ZnO bath. • The near-surface layer is rich in hydroxides, whereas oxides of both metals predominate in the depth of the coatings. - Abstract: The paper reviews black chromium electrodeposited from a trivalent chromium bath containing ZnO as a second main component. The chemical compositions of the top layers of the black chromium coatings were studied by the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy method. The surface of black chromium was found to be almost entirely covered with organic substances. To gain information on the state of each element in the deposit bulk, the layer-by-layer etching of the black chromium surface with argon gas was used. Analysis of XPS spectra has shown that the top layers of black chromium without zinc are composed of various Cr(III) components, organic substances and metallic Cr, whereas metallic Cr is almost absent in black chromium containing some amount of Zn(II) compounds. The ratios of metal/oxide phases were found to be 10/27 and 2/28 for black chromium without and with zinc, respectively. It has been determined that owing to the presence of ZnO in the Cr(III) bath, the percentage of metallic chromium is substantially reduced in black chromium which is quite important for good solar selective characteristics of the coating. The results confirm some of earlier observations and provide new information on the composition of the near-surface layers.

  12. Investigation of the surface composition of electrodeposited black chromium by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Black chromium electrodeposited from a Cr(III) bath is composed of oxide, hydroxide and metallic chromium. • Metallic phase is absent in black chromium electrodeposited from a Cr(III) + ZnO bath. • The near-surface layer is rich in hydroxides, whereas oxides of both metals predominate in the depth of the coatings. - Abstract: The paper reviews black chromium electrodeposited from a trivalent chromium bath containing ZnO as a second main component. The chemical compositions of the top layers of the black chromium coatings were studied by the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy method. The surface of black chromium was found to be almost entirely covered with organic substances. To gain information on the state of each element in the deposit bulk, the layer-by-layer etching of the black chromium surface with argon gas was used. Analysis of XPS spectra has shown that the top layers of black chromium without zinc are composed of various Cr(III) components, organic substances and metallic Cr, whereas metallic Cr is almost absent in black chromium containing some amount of Zn(II) compounds. The ratios of metal/oxide phases were found to be 10/27 and 2/28 for black chromium without and with zinc, respectively. It has been determined that owing to the presence of ZnO in the Cr(III) bath, the percentage of metallic chromium is substantially reduced in black chromium which is quite important for good solar selective characteristics of the coating. The results confirm some of earlier observations and provide new information on the composition of the near-surface layers

  13. Grafting titanium nitride surfaces with sodium styrene sulfonate thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorn, Gilad; Migonney, Véronique; Castner, David G

    2014-09-01

    The importance of titanium nitride lies in its high hardness and its remarkable resistance to wear and corrosion, which has led to its use as a coating for the heads of hip prostheses, dental implants and dental surgery tools. However, the usefulness of titanium nitride coatings for biomedical applications could be significantly enhanced by modifying their surface with a bioactive polymer film. The main focus of the present work was to graft a bioactive poly(sodium styrene sulfonate) (pNaSS) thin film from titanium nitride surfaces via a two-step procedure: first modifying the surface with 3-methacryloxypropyltrimethoxysilane (MPS) and then grafting the pNaSS film from the MPS modified titanium through free radical polymerization. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) were used after each step to characterize success and completeness of each reaction. The surface region of the titanium nitride prior to MPS functionalization and NaSS grafting contained a mixture of titanium nitride, oxy-nitride, oxide species as well as adventitious surface contaminants. After MPS functionalization, Si was detected by XPS, and characteristic MPS fragments were detected by ToF-SIMS. After NaSS grafting, Na and S were detected by XPS and characteristic NaSS fragments were detected by ToF-SIMS. The XPS determined thicknesses of the MPS and NaSS overlayers were ∼1.5 and ∼1.7 nm, respectively. The pNaSS film density was estimated by the toluidine blue colorimetric assay to be 260 ± 70 ng/cm(2). PMID:25280842

  14. Characterization of nitrided silicon-silicon dioxide interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polignano, M.L.; Alessandri, M.; Brazzelli, D. [and others

    2000-07-01

    A newly-developed technique for the simultaneous characterization of the oxide-silicon interface properties and of bulk impurities was used for a systematic study of the nitridation process of thin oxides. This technique is based upon surface recombination velocity measurements, and does not require the formation of a capacitor structure, so it is very suitable for the characterization of as-grown interfaces. Oxides grown both in dry and in wet environments were considered, and nitridation processes in N{sub 2}O and in NO were compared to N{sub 2} annealing processes. The effect of nitridation temperature and duration were also studied, and RTO/RTN processes were compared to conventional furnace nitridation processes. Surface recombination velocity was correlated with nitrogen concentration at the oxide-silicon interface obtained by Secondary Ion Mass Spectroscopy (SIMS) measurements. Surface recombination velocity (hence surface state density) decreases with increasing nitrogen pile-up at the oxide-silicon interface, indicating that in nitrided interfaces surface state density is limited by nitridation. NO treatments are much more effective than N{sub 2}O treatments in the formation of nitrogen-rich interface layer and, as a consequence, in surface state reduction. Surface state density was measured in fully processed wafers before and after constant current stress. After a complete device process surface states are annealed out by hydrogen passivation, however they are reactivated by the electrical stress, and surface state results after stress were compared with data of surface recombination velocity in as-processed wafers.

  15. Formation of niobium nitride by rapid thermal processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelkort, C.; Lewalter, H.; Warbichler, P.; Hofer, F.; Bock, W.; Kolbesen, B. O.

    2001-09-01

    The formation of group V transition metal nitride films by means of rapid thermal processing (RTP) has been investigated. Here we focus on the nitridation of niobium films of 200-500 nm thickness in the temperature range from 500 to 1100°C under laminar flow of molecular nitrogen or ammonia. The nitride phases formed were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD). Secondary neutral mass spectrometry (SNMS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) in combination with electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) were carried out on samples of selected experiments to provide more detailed information about the initial stages of nitride formation and the microstructure of the films. A classical formation sequence of nitride phases was observed with increasing nitrogen content in the order: α-Nb(N)→β-Nb 2N→γ-Nb 4N 3→δ'-NbN→Nb 5N 6. Furthermore, oxide enriched regions were discovered inside the metal films. These turned out to be formed mainly in the nitride sequence between the a-αNb(N) and β-Nb 2N-phases at the Nb/SiO 2 interface due to a reaction of the Nb with the SiO 2 layer of the silicon substrates on which the films had been deposited. The SiO 2 layer acts as diffusion barrier for nitrogen but also as source for oxygen, according to SNMS and TEM/EELS studies, resulting in the formation of Nb-oxides and/or oxynitrides at the Nb/SiO 2 interface.

  16. Synthesis of reduced carbon nitride at the reduction by hydroquinone of water-soluble carbon nitride oxide (g-C3N4)O

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharlamov, Alexey; Bondarenko, Marina; Kharlamova, Ganna; Fomenko, Veniamin

    2016-09-01

    For the first time at the reduction by hydroquinone of water-soluble carbon nitride oxide (g-C3N4)O reduced carbon nitride (or reduced multi-layer azagraphene) is obtained. It is differed from usually synthesized carbon nitride by a significantly large (on 0.09 nm) interplanar distance is. At the same time, the chemical bonds between atoms in a heteroatomic plane of reduced carbon nitride correspond to the bonds in a synthesized g-C3N4. The samples of water-soluble carbon nitride oxide were synthesized under the special reactionary conditions of a pyrolysis of melamine and urea. We believe that reduced carbon nitride consists of weakly connected carbon-nitrogen monosheets (azagraphene sheets) as well as reduced (from graphene oxide) graphene contains weakly connected graphene sheets.

  17. Preparation and characterization of morph-genetic aluminum nitride/carbon composites from filter paper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morph-genetic aluminum nitride/carbon composites with cablelike structure were prepared from filter paper template through the surface sol-gel process and carbothermal nitridation reaction. The resulting materials have a hierarchical structure originating from the morphology of cellulose paper. The aluminum nitride/carbon composites have the core-shell microstructure, the core is graphitic carbon, and the shell is aluminum nitride nanocoating formed by carbothermal nitridation reduction of alumina with the interfacial carbon in nitrogen atmosphere. Scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and transmission electron microscope were employed to characterize the structural morphology and phase compositions of the final products

  18. The influence of nitride thickness variations on the switching speed of MNOS memory transistors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Erik

    1978-01-01

    The influence of nitride thickness variations on the switching speed of MNOS memory transistors is examined. The switching time constant is calculated as a function of the nitride thickness using a model of modified Fowler-Nordheim injection. The calculated characteristics compare well with measu...... with measured characteristics and show a strong dependence on the nitride thickness.......The influence of nitride thickness variations on the switching speed of MNOS memory transistors is examined. The switching time constant is calculated as a function of the nitride thickness using a model of modified Fowler-Nordheim injection. The calculated characteristics compare well...

  19. Synthesis and Optimization of the Sintering Kinetics of Actinide Nitrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drryl P. Butt; Brian Jaques

    2009-03-31

    Research conducted for this NERI project has advanced the understanding and feasibility of nitride nuclear fuel processing. In order to perform this research, necessary laboratory infrastructure was developed; including basic facilities and experimental equipment. Notable accomplishments from this project include: the synthesis of uranium, dysprosium, and cerium nitrides using a novel, low-cost mechanical method at room temperature; the synthesis of phase pure UN, DyN, and CeN using thermal methods; and the sintering of UN and (Ux, Dy1-x)N (0.7 ≤ X ≤ 1) pellets from phase pure powder that was synthesized in the Advanced Materials Laboratory at Boise State University.

  20. Structure, Mechanics and Synthesis of Nanoscale Carbon and Boron Nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinaldo, Steven G.

    This thesis is divided into two parts. In Part I, we examine the properties of thin sheets of carbon and boron nitride. We begin with an introduction to the theory of elastic sheets, where the stretching and bending modes are considered in detail. The coupling between stretching and bending modes is thought to play a crucial role in the thermodynamic stability of atomically-thin 2D sheets such as graphene. In Chapter 2, we begin by looking at the fabrication of suspended, atomically thin sheets of graphene. We then study their mechanical resonances which are read via an optical transduction technique. The frequency of the resonators was found to depend on their temperature, as was their quality factor. We conclude by offering some interpretations of the data in terms of the stretching and bending modes of graphene. In Chapter 3, we look briefly at the fabrication of thin sheets of carbon and boron nitride nanotubes. We examine the structure of the sheets using transmission and scanning electron microscopy (TEM and SEM, respectively). We then show a technique by which one can make sheets suspended over a trench with adjustable supports. Finally, DC measurements of the resistivity of the sheets in the temperature range 600 -- 1400 C are presented. In Chapter 4, we study the folding of few-layer graphene oxide, graphene and boron nitride into 3D aerogel monoliths. The properties of graphene oxide are first considered, after which the structure of graphene and boron nitride aerogels is examined using TEM and SEM. Some models for their structure are proposed. In Part II, we look at synthesis techniques for boron nitride (BN). In Chapter 5, we study the conversion of carbon structures of boron nitride via the application of carbothermal reduction of boron oxide followed by nitridation. We apply the conversion to a wide variety of morphologies, including aerogels, carbon fibers and nanotubes, and highly oriented pyrolytic graphite. In the latter chapters, we look at the