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Sample records for chromium nitrides

  1. Synthesis of chromium nitride powder by carbo-thermal nitriding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fine chromium nitride powders were synthesized by carbo-thermal nitriding from Cr2O3 and carbon black. Thermal nitriding reaction of Cr2O3 and carbon black mixture was investigated by TG-DTA. The products were identified by XRD. Cr3C2 and Cr2 (CN) were formed in the early stage of the reaction, but finally they changed into Cr2N and CrN. Lab-scale syntheses of Cr2N and CrN were carried out using an electric tube furnace. Cr2N was synthesized by firing the mixed powder at 1393 K for 1 hr under nitrogen and hydrogen mixed gas flow, whereas CrN was synthesized by sequentially nitriding of Cr2N at 1173 K. The both synthesized powders showed homogeneous morphology with narrow particle size distribution and average size of about 1 μm. Cr2N and CrN contained 11 and 20 % of nitrogen respectively, sub percents of oxygen and carbon. (author)

  2. Intragranular Chromium Nitride Precipitates in Duplex and Superduplex Stainless Steel

    OpenAIRE

    Iversen, Torunn Hjulstad

    2012-01-01

    Intragranular chromium nitrides is a phenomenon with detrimental effects on material properties in superduplex stainless steels which have not received much attention. Precipitation of nitrides occurs when the ferritic phase becomes supersaturated with nitrogen and there is insufficient time during cooling for diffusion of nitrogen into austenite. Heat treatment was carried out at between 1060◦C and 1160◦C to study the materials susceptibility to nitride precipitation with...

  3. Chemical Stability of Chromium Carbide and Chromium Nitride Powders Compared with Chromium Metal in Synthetic Biological Solutions

    OpenAIRE

    Tao Jiang; Inger Odnevall Wallinder; Gunilla Herting

    2012-01-01

    Chromium carbide (Cr-C) and chromium nitride (Cr-N) powders were compared with a chromium metal powder (Cr-metal) to evaluate their chemical stability in solution. All three powders were exposed in five different synthetic biological solutions of varying pH and chemical composition simulating selected human exposure conditions. Characterisation of the powders, using GI-XRD, revealed that the predominant bulk crystalline phases were Cr7C3 and Cr2N for Cr-C and Cr-N respectively. The outermost ...

  4. Si doped and undoped chromium nitride coatings : a comparative study of physical properties

    OpenAIRE

    CUNHA L.; Moura, C.

    2011-01-01

    Chromium nitride and silicon doped chromium nitride thin films have been deposited by r.f. reactive magnetron sputtering. This study corresponds to the investigation of the influence of processing parameters and of the addition of silicon on the chromium nitride matrix on the properties of the produced films. The characterization of the coatings was performed by X-ray diffraction (XRD), and nano-indentation experiments. Results concerning the crystalline phases, crystal orientation/texture...

  5. Characterisation of chromium nitride films produced by PVD techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Barata, A.; CUNHA L.; Moura, C.

    2001-01-01

    Chromium nitride thin films have been deposited on stainless steel substrates by r.f. reactive magnetron sputtering. The influence of process parameters such as substrate bias and partial pressure of reactive gas have been investigated. The characterisation of the coatings was performed by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman Spectroscopy (RS) and nano-indentation experiments. These studies allow to analyse the influence of deposition parameters in crystal phases, crystal orientationytextu...

  6. A chromium nitride/carbon nitride containing graphitic carbon nanocapsule hybrid as a Pt-free electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lu; Wang, Lei; Yu, Peng; Zhao, Dongdong; Tian, Chungui; Feng, He; Ma, Jing; Fu, Honggang

    2015-08-11

    Chromium nitride nanoparticles supported on graphitic carbon nanocapsules containing carbon nitride (CrN/GC) have been synthesized by a solvothermal-assisted ion-exchange route. As a Pt-free catalyst, the CrN/GC hybrid exhibits superior activity, stability, methanol immunity and a dominant 4-electron pathway towards oxygen reduction reaction. PMID:26145711

  7. Deposition of chromium nitride coatings from vacuum arc plasma in increased nitrogen pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The application of protective coatings on metal materials is the effective way to improve their durability. Chromium nitride coatings are applied mainly on tools due to good resistivity to oxidation compared to other metal nitride coatings and good wear resistance. Some characteristics of the coatings deposited in fixed position in regard of chromium cathode on the samples parallel directed to it and the other arranged opposite in the nitrogen pressure ranged from 0.5 to 3.0 Pa are investigated.

  8. Plasma nitriding of AISI 304L and AISI 316L stainless steels: effect of time in the formation of S phase and the chromium nitrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plasma nitriding can improve hardness and wear resistance of austenitic stainless steels without losses in corrosion resistance. This fact relies on a nitrided layer constituted only by S phase, without chromium nitrides precipitation. In this work, the effect of nitriding time on phases formed on nitrided layer was investigated in two austenitic stainless steels: AISI 304L e AISI 316L. The samples were nitrided at 420 deg C, using a mixture of 60 % N2 and 40% H2, during 5, 7 and 9 hours. It was noted that chromium nitrides were formed on samples of AISI 304L, nitrided for 7 e 9 hours, while all nitrided samples of AISI 316L showed only formation of S phase. The nitrided layers were characterized using optical microscope and x-ray diffraction. (author)

  9. Anti corrosion layer for stainless steel in molten carbonate fuel cell - comprises phase vapour deposition of titanium nitride, aluminium nitride or chromium nitride layer then oxidising layer in molten carbonate electrolyte

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2000-01-01

    Forming an anticorrosion protective layer on a stainless steel surface used in a molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) - comprises the phase vapour deposition (PVD) of a layer comprising at least one of titanium nitride, aluminium nitride or chromium nitride and then forming a protective layer in situ...... by replacement of the nitride ions with oxide ions in the molten carbonate electrolyte....

  10. Deposition of chromium nitrides, oxy-nitrides and titanium carbides on steel substrates by DC magnetron sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present paper deals with the deposition of chromium and titanium nitrides, oxynitrides, carbides and carbonitrides onto low carbon steel by reactive magnetron sputtering. The films were obtained by using different reactive gases (02, N2, CH4,). The process advancement and the corresponding film composition variations were investigated as a function of the specific reactivity of each gas. In addition, the cathode poisoning phenomena were studied. (author). 4 refs., 6 figs

  11. Precipitation of Chromium Nitrides in the Super Duplex Stainless Steel 2507

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettersson, Niklas; Pettersson, Rachel F. A.; Wessman, Sten

    2015-03-01

    Precipitation of chromium nitrides during cooling from temperatures in the range 1373 K to 1523 K (1100 °C to 1250 °C) has been studied for the super duplex stainless steel 2507 (UNS S32750). Characterization with optical, scanning and transmission electron microscopy was combined to quantify the precipitation process. Primarily Cr2N nitrides were found to precipitate with a high density in the interior of ferrite grains. An increased cooling rate and/or an increased austenite spacing clearly promoted nitride formation, resulting in precipitation within a higher fraction of the ferrite grains, and lager nitride particles. Furthermore, formation of the meta-stable CrN was induced by higher cooling rates. The toughness seemed unaffected by nitrides. A slight decrease in pitting resistance was, however, noticed for quenched samples with large amounts of precipitates. The limited adverse effect on pitting resistance is attributed to the small size (~200 nm) of most nitrides. Slower cooling of duplex stainless steels to allow nitrogen partitioning is suggested in order to avoid large nitrides, and thereby produce a size distribution with a smaller detrimental effect on pitting resistance.

  12. Spectroscopic characterization of nanocrystalline chromium nitride (CrN).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangamma, G; Sairam, T N; Dash, S; Rajalakshmi, M; Kamruddin, M; Mittal, V K; Narasimhan, S V; Arora, A K; Sundar, C S; Tyagi, A K; Raj, Baldev

    2007-03-01

    Nanocrystalline chromiuim nitride has been synthesised by direct gas phase nitridation of nanocrystalline chromia at 1100 degrees C in ammonia-atmosphere. XRD of this material showed formation of single phase CrN with particle size around 20 nm. AFM studies showed particle distribution along with some soft agglomerated nanostructures. Nanocrystalline Cr2O3 and partially-as well as fully--converted nanocrystalline CrN were also investigated using various spectroscopic techniques like XPS, FT-IR, and Raman for gaining insight into the conversion pathways. Spectroscopic investigations of these materials clearly indicate that complete conversion of CrN occurs by nitriding at 1100 degrees C for 4 hrs. The salient spectroscopic features of these nanocrystalline materials with respect to their microcrystalline counterparts are discussed. PMID:17450861

  13. Ionic nitriding of high chromium martensitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martensitic stainless steels are used in industrial applications where resistance to corrosion and mechanical resistance are needed simultaneously. These steels are normally used in tempering and annealing condition which gives them hardnesses of 500 and 600 HV (about 54 HRC). Ionic nitriding is an assisted diffusion technique that has recently been successfully applied to harden austenitic stainless steels without reducing their resistance to corrosion. The application with AISI 420 martensitic steels has not given good results yet, because in most cases, it affects their corrosion resistance. This work presents the results of the pulsed nitriding of martensitic steels with a higher chrome content, such as the M340 and M333 Boehler steels and they are compared with the same materials after tempering and annealing, without nitriding. The influence of the variations in the parameters of the process, such as the percentage of active time in the pulsed wave, partial nitrogen pressure, current density and effective tension in the microstructure, hardness and wear and corrosion resistance was studied. The microstructure was studied with an optic microscope; the wear resistance with abrasion tests following ASTM G-65 and corrosion with 100 hour long saline haze tests, in a device built according to ASTM B117. Hardness was found to rise to values of 1000 to 1350 HV in all the steels after ionic nitriding, the modified layers oscillated from 3 to 15 microns. As a result, wear resistance also increased, with differences depending on the microstructure and the thickness of the modified layer. However, corrosion resistance was not good, except in the case of the M333 steel test piece with less hardness and a less thick nitrided layer without a noticeable interphase (au)

  14. Chromium

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... health risks of too much chromium? Chromium and medication interactions Supplemental sources of chromium Chromium and Healthful Diets References Disclaimer What foods provide chromium? Chromium is widely distributed in the ...

  15. Investigation on the structural and mechanical properties of anti-sticking sputtered tungsten chromium nitride films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tungsten chromium nitride (WCrN) thin films are prepared by dual-gun co-sputter process. As the surface coatings on the molding die for glass forming, WCrN films show less deterioration at high temperature than the conventional CrN coating. WCrN thin films are deposited via the reactive co-sputtering of Cr/W targets. The working pressure is kept at 2.66 Pa and the argon/nitrogen ratio is 10. Applied power of chromium is fixed and the applied power of tungsten is varied. Experimental results indicate that the atomic ratio of tungsten in the films increases with the applied power of tungsten. The dominant crystalline phase is chromium nitride when the tungsten target power is below 100 W, while tungsten nitride dominates in the film structure when the tungsten target power is beyond 200 W. A dense structure with much finer particles is developed as the tungsten power is 200 W. As the power is increased to 300 W, the particles become coarser in size. The film roughness exhibits a decreasing trend at low tungsten power and then increases as the tungsten power increased up to 300 and 400 W, presumably due to the phase change from chromium nitrides to tungsten nitrides. Further annealing of the WCrN thin films is simulated as the glass molding condition to check the anti-sticking property which is a critical requirement in molding die surface coating application. The WCrN thin film coating shows good anti-sticking property at 400 °C annealing when the tungsten target power is 200 W. - Highlights: ► WCrN films are deposited by dual sputtering of pure Cr and W targets. ► The covalent bonding character of WCrN films explains the difference in hardness. ► WCrN (200 W W-target-power/400 °C-annealing) exhibits the best anti-sticking performance

  16. Plasma nitriding and plasma nitrocarburizing of electroplated hard chromium to increase the wear and the corrosion properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menthe, E.; Rie, K.-T. (Technische Univ. Braunschweig (Germany). Inst. fuer Oberflaechentechnik und Plasmatechnische Werkstoffentwicklung)

    1999-02-01

    We have investigated the effect of plasma nitriding and plasma nitrocarburizing on the microstructure and properties of electroplated chromium. Plasma nitriding and plasma nitrocarburizing are applied to 15-100 [mu]m thick electroplated hard chromium coatings to increase both the wear and the corrosion resistance. The properties of the plasma-modified hard chromium layers are characterized by measuring the wear resistance with a Taber wear tester and the corrosion resistance with a salt spray fog test. Cyclic voltammetry is performed in a standard electrochemical cell using a 0.5 M H[sub 2]SO[sub 4] solution acidified to pH 0.3. The compound layer after plasma nitriding consists of CrN and Cr[sub 2]N with a maximum hardness of about 1100 HK[sub 0.01]. After plasma nitrocarburizing, Cr[sub 3]C[sub 2] and Cr[sub 7]C[sub 3] are formed. After plasma nitrocarburizing, the maximum hardness is increased up to 2200 HK[sub 0.01]. The wear rate is reduced as compared to an untreated chromium layer. The exposure time in the salt spray fog, before corrosion products are visible can be increased by a factor of 5. The improvement in wear and corrosion resistance after plasma nitriding and plasma nitrocarburizing is discussed considering microstructural changes of the treated layer. (orig.) 10 refs.

  17. Study of corrosion behavior of a 22% Cr duplex stainless steel : influence of nano-sized chromium nitrides and exposure temperature

    OpenAIRE

    Bettini, Eleonora; Kivisäkk, Ulf; Leygraf, Christofer; Pan, Jinshan

    2013-01-01

    Chromium nitrides may precipitate in duplex stainless steels during processing and their influence on the corrosion behavior is of great importance for the steel performance. In this study, the influence of nano-sized quenched-in chromium nitrides on the corrosion behavior of a heat treated 2205 duplex stainless steel was investigated at room temperature and 50 °C (just above critical pitting temperature). The microstructure was characterized by SEM/EDS and AFM analyses, and quenched-in nitri...

  18. [Cr(N)(acac)2]: A simple chromium nitride complex and its reactivity towards late transition metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedegaard, Erik Donovan; Schau-Magnussen, Magnus; Bendix, Jesper

    2011-01-01

    A new simple chromium(V) nitride complex, Cr(N)(acac)2 (1) has been prepared by nitrogen atom transfer. X-ray crystallography shows a short Cr-N bond at 1.5564(11) Å and equatorial Cr-O distances in the range 1.9387(9) – 1.9485(9) Å. 1 reacts as a p-backbonding ligand ...

  19. X-ray elastic constants of chromium nitride films deposited by arc-ion plating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thin films have been successfully utilized to improve the property of mechanical components. However, it is generally known that mechanical properties, such as elastic constants and tensile strength of thin films, are different from those of bulk material, and they are not known in the present state. In many times, x-ray stress measurement revealed a very high compressive residual stress state in the film when bulk elastic constants were used in the stress calculation. The purpose of this research is to investigate the elastic constants of chromium nitride (CrN) films. The film was deposited on austenitic stainless steel (JIS: SUS304) substrates by the arc-ion-plating (AIP) method under the following conditions: the pressure of nitrogen atmosphere was maintained at 2.63 Pa, the substrate temperature of about 573 K, the arc discharge current of 100 A, the bias voltage between -300 and -100 V, and the substrate rotating rate at 3 rpm. The lattice strain of CrN films was measured by x-ray method at various loading stages and the x-ray elastic constants of CrN films were evaluated

  20. The influence of chromium oxide and titanium nitride layers on vacuum properties of stainless steel H17N13M2T (SS316) surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The outgassing rates of stainless steel H17N13M2T (SS316) covered by chromium oxide and titanium nitride have been presented. It was shown, that the modified layers are good hydrogen diffusion barrier and possess ability of decreased sorption of water steam. (author)

  1. Effect of plasma nitriding time on surface properties of hard chromium electroplated AISI 1010 steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kocabas, Mustafa [Yildiz Technical Univ., Istanbul (Turkey). Metallurgical and Materials Engineering Dept.; Danisman, Murat [Gedik Univ., Istanbul (Turkey). Electrical and Electronic Engineering Dept.; Cansever, Nurhan [Yildiz Technical Univ., Istanbul (Turkey); Uelker, Suekrue [Afyon Kocatepe Univ. (Turkey). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    2015-06-01

    Properties of steel can be enhanced by surface treatments such as coating. In some cases, further treatments such as nitriding can also be used in order to get even better results. In order to investigate the properties of nitride layer on hard Cr coated AISI 1010 steel, substrates were electroplated to form hard Cr coatings. Then hard Cr coatings were plasma nitrided at 700 C for 3 h, 5 h and 7 h and nitride phases on the coatings were investigated by X-ray diffraction analysis. The layer thickness and surface properties of nitride films were investigated by scanning electron microscopy. The hardness and adhesion properties of Cr-N phases were examined using nano indentation and Daimler-Benz Rockwell C adhesion tests. The highest measured hardness was 24.1 GPa and all the three samples exhibited poor adhesion.

  2. Diffusion characteristics of plasma nitrided hard chromium on AISI 1010 steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danisman, Murat [Gedik Univ., Istanbul (Turkey). Electronic Engineering Dept.; Kocabas, Mustafa; Cansever, Nurhan [Yildiz Technical Univ., Istanbul (Turkey)

    2015-06-01

    In order to investigate the different Cr-N formation characteristics of plasma nitrided hard Cr coatings, Cr was electrodeposited on AISI 1010 steel and plasma nitrided at 600, 700 and 800 C for 3 h, 5 h and 7 h, respectively. Phase analyses of resulting Cr-N phases and grain size of Cr layer before and after nitriding process were calculated by X-ray diffraction analysis. Structure of nitride layer and its thickness were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy micrographs. The micrographs indicated that samples consisted of three distinctive layers. In order to distinguish these layers, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDX) analysis were used as well as elemental distribution versus depth was plotted. The Cr-N diffusion was investigated by layer thickness measurements, and diffusion coefficient as well as activation energies were calculated.

  3. Ultrasensitive photoelectrochemical determination of chromium(VI) in water samples by ion-imprinted/formate anion-incorporated graphitic carbon nitride nanostructured hybrid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Tian; Yang, Xiaomin; Zhang, Lizhi; Gong, Jingming

    2016-07-15

    A rapid and highly sensitive photoelectrochemical (PEC) method has been proposed for the determination of trace amounts of chromium in water samples under visible-light irradiation. Here, a unique nanostructured hybrid of formate anion incorporated graphitic carbon nitride (F-g-C3N4) is smartly integrated with a Cr(VI) ion-imprinted polymer (IIP) as a photoactive electrode (denoted as IIP@F-g-C3N4). The nanohybrid of F-g-C3N4 exhibits an enhanced charge separation with substantially improved PEC responses versus g-C3N4. The newly designed IIP@F-g-C3N4 PEC sensor exhibits high sensitivity and selectivity for the determination of Cr(VI) because it offers efficient photogenerated electron reduction toward Cr(VI). The PEC analysis is highly linear over Cr(VI) concentrations ranging from 0.01 to 100.00ppb with a detection limit of 0.006ppb (S/N=3). Our approach can be used to detect Cr(VI), Cr(III) and the total chromium level in aqueous solution through oxidation of Cr(III) to Cr(VI) and the determination of the total chromium as Cr(VI). In practical applications, this low-cost and sensitive assay has been successfully applied for speciation determination of chromium in environmental water samples. PMID:27017396

  4. Influence of ion implantation on structural and tribological properties of chromium nitride layers of non-stoichiometric composition CrN0.4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Structural and tribological properties of nitrogen-implanted 1.4 μm thick layers of non-stoichiometric chromium nitride CrN0.4 were studied using GXRD, AES, ball-on-flat wear/friction test and microscratching test. The results of structural investigations revealed the amorphous structure of as-deposited layers and the formation of crystalline Cr2N and CrN phases after ion implantation. A significant reduction of wear was observed as a result of ion implantation; the wear reduction is similar for the all implanted samples. The surface damage caused by scratch test of the surface of ion-implanted samples is also reduced. (author)

  5. An investigation on corrosion protection of chromium nitride coated Fe-Cr alloy as a bipolar plate material for proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, T. J.; Zhang, B.; Li, J.; He, Y. X.; Lin, F.

    2014-12-01

    The corrosion properties of chromium nitride (CrN) coating are investigated to assess the potential use of this material as a bipolar plate for proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). Conductive metallic ceramic CrN layers are firstly deposited onto Fe-Cr alloy using a multi-arc ion plating technique to increase the corrosion resistance of the base alloy. Electrochemical measurements indicate that the corrosion resistance of the substrate alloy is greatly enhanced by the CrN coating. The free corrosion potential of the substrate is increased by more than 50 mV. Furthermore, a decrease in three orders of magnitude of corrosive current density for the CrN-coated alloy is observed compared to the as-received Fe-Cr alloy. Long-term immersion tests show that the CrN layer is highly stable and effectively acts as a barrier to inhibit permeation of corrosive species. On the contrary, corrosion of the Fe-Cr alloy is rather severe without the protection of CrN coating due to the active dissolution. Finally, the corresponding electrochemical impedance models are proposed to elucidate the corrosion process of the CrN/Fe-Cr alloy submerged in a simulated PEMFCs environment.

  6. High hardness of alloyed ferrite after nitriding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Detailed layer-by layer structure and phase analyses of the diffusion layer of nitrided binary alloys of iron with aluminium, chromium, vanadium and titanium have been carried out by means of a complex technique. Transition d-metals (chromium, vanadium and titanium) raise to a greater degree the solubility of nitrogen in the α solid solution, sharply increases the hardness of ferrite and decrease the depth of the layer. Nitrided binary alloys of iron with chromium, vanadium and titanium are strengthened through precipitation from the nitrogen-saturated α-solid solution of nitrides of alloying elements TiN, VN and CrN of a structure B1. A maximum hardness of ferrite alloyed by chromium, vanadium and titanium is observed after nitriding at 550 deg C when the precipitated special nitrides are fully coherent with the α matrix

  7. Ion nitriding post-oxidation as an alternative technique to electrolytic chromium; Nitruracion post-oxidacion ionica como tecnica alternativa al cromado electrolitico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz-Guillen, J. C.; Granda-Gutierrez, E.E.; Campa-Castilla, A.; Perez-Aguilar, S.I.; Garza-Gomez, A.; Candelas-Ramirez, J.; Mendez-Mendez, R. [COMIMSA. Corporacion Mexicana de Investigacion en Materiales S.A. de C.V., Saltillo, Coahuila (Mexico)]. E-mail: jcarlos@comimsa.com

    2010-11-15

    The effect of temperature and processing time during post-oxidation on hardness and corrosion resistance of AISI 1045 samples treated through nitriding and post-oxidation in a pulsed plasma discharge is evaluated in this paper. Also, a comparative analysis of the mechanical properties obtained with the dual nitriding - post oxidation process versus those properties of typical hard chrome coatings was performed with an aim to propose an alternative technique to the processes of galvanic coatings. The latter revealed that the process of ion nitriding and post-oxidation provides similar properties in hardness and improves the corrosion resistance compared to the hard chrome case. It is conclude that the technique of ion nitriding and post-oxidation is a non environmental harmful technology with strong potential to replace highly polluting electroplating techniques for application of hard chrome coatings. [Spanish] En el presente trabajo se evalua el efecto del tiempo y la temperatura de post-oxidacion sobre las propiedades de dureza y resistencia a la corrosion de muestras de acero AISI 1045 sometido al proceso de nitruracion post-oxidacion ionica en plasmas pulsados. Asi mismo, con el objetivo de fundamentar la propuesta de utilizacion de la nitruracion post-oxidacion ionica como una tecnica alternativa a los procesos galvanicos para aplicacion de recubrimientos de cromo duro, se realizo un analisis comparativo de propiedades, evidenciando que, mediante el proceso nitruracion postoxidacion ionica, es posible obtener caracteristicas similares en dureza y mejores en resistencia a la corrosion que las tipicas obtenidas para el cromo duro. Los resultados obtenidos permiten postular una tecnica que no dana al medio ambiente, como lo es la nitruracion post-oxidacion ionica, como candidata potencial para sustituir las tecnicas galvanicas altamente contaminantes para aplicacion de cromo duro.

  8. Nitriding of iron-based alloys : residual stresses and internal strain fields

    OpenAIRE

    Vives Díaz, Nicolás

    2007-01-01

    Different iron-chromium alloys (4, 8, 13 and 20 wt.% Cr) were nitrided in NH3/H2 gas mixtures at 580 ºC. The nitrided microstructure was investigated by X-ray diffraction, light microscopy, hardness measurements and scanning electron microscopy. Composition depth-profiles of the nitrided zone were determined by electron probe microanalysis. Various microstructures develop, depending on the nitriding conditions and the alloy composition (chromium content). The initial development of coherent, ...

  9. Semi-quantitative chemical analysis of hard coatings by Raman micro-spectroscopy: the aluminium chromium nitride system as an example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaindl, R; Sartory, B; Neidhardt, J; Franz, R; Reiter, A; Polcik, P; Tessadri, R; Mitterer, C

    2007-11-01

    A new method for chemical analyses of nitride-based hard coatings is presented. Raman band shifts in the spectra of Al(x)Cr(1-x)N coatings, deposited by physical vapour deposition from Al(x)Cr(1-x) targets with x (T,Al) = 0, 0.25, 0.50, 0.70 and 0.85, are calibrated using compositional data of the coatings derived by elastic recoil detection analysis (ERDA) and electron probe micro-analysis (EPMA). Inserting the composition-dependent Raman shift of a combinatorial acoustic-optic lattice mode into an empirically derived equation allows the determination of Al/Cr ratios of the coating with an accuracy of about +/-2%. Spot, line and area analyses of coated cemented carbide and cold work steel samples by using a computer-controlled, motorized x,y-stage are demonstrated and the most important errors influencing precision and accuracy are discussed. Figure Raman map of a coated cold-work steel sample. PMID:17932660

  10. First-Principles Study of Structural and Electronic Properties of Chromium Nitride/Gallium Nitride Multilayer (CrN/GaN Estudio por primeros principios de las propiedades estructurales y electrónicas de la multicapa CrN/GaN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Eulises Báez Cruz

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In this work we perform first-principles calculations to investigate the structural and electronic properties of the 1x1 CrN/GaN multilayer. The calculations were executed in zincblende and wurtzite phase, since they are the ground states of chromium nitride CrN and gallium nitride GaN, respectively. However, we study the stability of the multilayer in the NaCl phase, in order to predict possible phase transitions. We found that the most favorable phase for the multilayer is the hexagonal wurtzite type, with possibility of passing to the NaCl phase by applying an external pressure. Our calculations indicate that the pressure of transition is 13,5 GPa. From the density of states, we found that the multilayer present a metallic behavior produced by the hybrid orbitals d-Cr and N-p that cross level Fermi.En este trabajo realizamos cálculos de primeros principios para investigar las propiedades estructurales y electrónicas de la multicapa 1x1 CrN/GaN. Los cálculos se realizan en las fases zincblenda y wurtzita, debido a que este es el estado base del nitruro de cromo CrN y el nitruro de galio GaN, respectivamente. Sin embargo, se estudia la estabilidad de la multicapa en la fase NaCl, con el fin predecir posibles transiciones de fase. Encontramos que la fase más favorable para multicapa, es la hexagonal tipo wurtzita, con posibilidad de pasar a la fase NaCl mediante la aplicación de una presión externa. Nuestros cálculos nos permiten predecir que la presión de transición es 13,5 GPa. A partir de la densidad de estados encontramos que la multicapa posee un comportamiento metálico debido a la hibridación de los orbitales Cr-d y N-p que atraviesan el nivel de Fermi.

  11. EXAFS investigation of low temperature nitrided stainless steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oddershede, Jette; Christiansen, Thomas; Ståhl, Kenny;

    2008-01-01

    Low temperature nitrided stainless steel AISI 316 flakes were investigated with EXAFS and X-ray diffraction analysis. The stainless steel flakes were transformed into a mixture of nitrogen expanded austenite and nitride phases. Two treatments were carried out yielding different overall nitrogen...... contents: (1) nitriding in pure NH3 and (2)nitriding in pure NH3 followed by reduction in H2. The majority of the Cr atoms in the stainless steel after treatment 1 and 2 was associated with a nitrogen–chromium bond distance comparable to that of the chemical compound CrN. The possibility of the occurrence...

  12. High-temperature nitridation of Ni-Cr alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodentsov, A. A.; Gülpen, J. H.; Cserháti, C.; Kivilahti, J. K.; van Loo, F. J. J.

    1996-01-01

    The nitriding behavior of nickel-chromium alloys was investigated at 1398 K over the range 1 to 6000 bar of external nitrogen pressure. The morphology of the nitrided zone depends on the concentration of chromium in the initial alloy and the N2 pressure (fugacity) applied upon the system. The transition from CrN to Cr2N precipitation was observed within the reaction zone after nitriding at 100 to 6000 bar of N2 when the chromium content in the initial alloys was 28.0 at. pct or higher. It is shown that the ternary phase π (Cr10Ni7N3) is formed in this system at 1273 K. through a peritectoid reaction between Cr2N and nickel solid solution and becomes unstable above 1373 K. The thermodynamic evaluation of the Ni-Cr-N system was performed and phase equilibria calculated. Evidence for “up hill” diffusion of nitrogen near the reaction front during the internal nitridation of Ni-Cr alloys at 1398 K was found. It was attributed to the relative instability of chromium nitrides and strong Cr-N interaction in the matrix of the Ni-based solid solution within the nitrided zone.

  13. Microstructure and Hardness of High Temperature Gas Nitrided AISI 420 Martensitic Stainless Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim Nor Nurulhuda Md.

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the microstructure and hardness of as-received and nitrided AISI 420 martensitic stainless steels. High temperature gas nitriding was employed to treat the steels at 1200°C for one hour and four hours using nitrogen gas, followed by furnace cooled. Chromium nitride and iron nitride were formed and concentrated at the outmost surface area of the steels since this region contained the highest concentration of nitrogen. The grain size enlarged at the interior region of the nitrided steels due to nitriding at temperature above the recrystallization temperature of the steel and followed by slow cooling. The nitrided steels produced higher surface hardness compared to as-received steel due to the presence of nitrogen and the precipitation of nitrides. Harder steel was produced when nitriding at four hours compared to one hour since more nitrogen permeated into the steel.

  14. Iron-based alloy and nitridation treatment for PEM fuel cell bipolar plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Michael P. [Oak Ridge, TN; Yang, Bing [Oak Ridge, TN; Maziasz, Philip J. [Oak Ridge, TN

    2010-11-09

    A corrosion resistant electrically conductive component that can be used as a bipolar plate in a PEM fuel cell application is composed of an alloy substrate which has 10-30 wt. % Cr, 0.5 to 7 wt. % V, and base metal being Fe, and a continuous surface layer of chromium nitride and vanadium nitride essentially free of base metal. A oxide layer of chromium vanadium oxide can be disposed between the alloy substrate and the continuous surface nitride layer. A method to prepare the corrosion resistant electrically conductive component involves a two-step nitridization sequence by exposing the alloy to a oxygen containing gas at an elevated temperature, and subsequently exposing the alloy to an oxygen free nitrogen containing gas at an elevated temperature to yield a component where a continuous chromium nitride layer free of iron has formed at the surface.

  15. Surface nitride formation in N-implanted Cr-steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nitrogen-implanted steels of different composition (mainly a variable chromium content) and structure have been studied by nuclear reaction analysis (NRA) and conversion electron Moessbauer scattering (CEMS). For every given composition and structure, the relationship between a parameter measuring the amount of iron nitride produced and the nitrogen dose retained in the near-surface region is found to be almost linear with a nearly constant positive slope. The dose threshold for iron nitride formation increases with increasing chromium content and defect concentration in the matrix. (author)

  16. Cathodic cage nitriding of AISI 409 ferritic stainless steel with the addition of CH4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rômulo Ribeiro Magalhães de Sousa

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available AISI 409 ferritic stainless steel samples were nitrided using the cathodic cage plasma nitriding technique (CCPN, with the addition of methane to reduce chromium precipitation, increase hardness and wear resistance and reduce the presence of nitrides when compared to plasma carbonitriding. Microhardness profiles and X-Ray analysis confirm the formation of a very hard layer containing mainly ε-Fe3N and expanded ferrite phases.

  17. Cathodic cage nitriding of AISI 409 ferritic stainless steel with the addition of CH4

    OpenAIRE

    Rômulo Ribeiro Magalhães de Sousa; Francisco Odolberto de Araújo; José Alzamir Pereira da Costa; Antonio Maia de Oliveira; Mineia Sampaio Melo; Clodomiro Alves Junior

    2012-01-01

    AISI 409 ferritic stainless steel samples were nitrided using the cathodic cage plasma nitriding technique (CCPN), with the addition of methane to reduce chromium precipitation, increase hardness and wear resistance and reduce the presence of nitrides when compared to plasma carbonitriding. Microhardness profiles and X-Ray analysis confirm the formation of a very hard layer containing mainly ε-Fe3N and expanded ferrite phases.

  18. Heterogeneous chromium catalysts

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    The present invention relates to a heterogeneous chromium catalyst system for the polymerisation of ethylene and/or alpha olefins prepared by the steps of: (a) providing a silica-containing support, (b) treating the silica-containing support with a chromium compound to form a chromium-based silica-containing support, (c) activating the chromium-based silica-containing support, (d) chemically reducing the activated chromium-based silica-containing support to produce a precursor catalyst, (e) r...

  19. Hexavalent Chromium Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA is developing an updated IRIS assessment of hexavalent chromium. This assessment will evaluate the potential health effects of hexavalent chromium from oral and inhalation exposures. An important component of determining the cancer causing potential of ingested hexavalent chr...

  20. Chromium and Genomic Stability

    OpenAIRE

    Wise, Sandra S.; Wise, John Pierce

    2011-01-01

    Many metals serve as micronutrients which protect against genomic instability. Chromium is most abundant in its trivalent and hexavalent forms. Trivalent chromium has historically been considered an essential element, though recent data indicate that while it can have pharmacological effects and value, it is not essential. There are no data indicating that trivalent chromium promotes genomic stability and, instead may promote genomic instability. Hexavalent chromium is widely accepted as high...

  1. Oxidation of chromium telluride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors study the interaction between chromium telluride and oxygen at elevated temperatures in view of its application in semiconductor technology. Thermodynamic analysis of the oxidation process and experimental data showed that the alloys of chromium telluride suffer oxidation in the presence of even traces of oxygen in a gaseous medium. Chromium telluride oxidation is a complex process that gives rise to various oxides and is accompanied by partial sublimation

  2. Oxidation of chromium telluride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pakhomovskaya, N.S.; Iorga, E.V.; Sheveleva, T.F.; Solov' eva, A.E.

    1986-03-01

    The authors study the interaction between chromium telluride and oxygen at elevated temperatures in view of its application in semiconductor technology. Thermodynamic analysis of the oxidation process and experimental data showed that the alloys of chromium telluride suffer oxidation in the presence of even traces of oxygen in a gaseous medium. Chromium telluride oxidation is a complex process that gives rise to various oxides and is accompanied by partial sublimation.

  3. Peculiarities of Production of Chromium Carbonitride Nanopowder and Its Physical-Chemical Certification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiryaeva, L. S.; Nozdrin, I. V.; Galevsky, G. V.

    2015-09-01

    Scientific and technological basics of plasma synthesis of chromium carbonitride have been developed, including analysis of the current production state and application of chromium carbon compounds, defining characteristics of three-jet plasma reactor, modeling- mathematical study of interaction of raw materials and plasma streams, prediction of technological parameters of plasma stream based on the modeling results, selection of optimal technological option, implementation of plasma-metallurgical technology of chromium nitride production, its physical-chemical certification and defining technical-economical production factors.

  4. Hair chromium concentration and chromium excretion in tannery workers.

    OpenAIRE

    Saner, G; Yüzbasiyan, V; Cigdem, S

    1984-01-01

    Hair and urine samples were collected from 34 male tannery workers and from 12 normal adults. Eighteen of the workers dealt directly with chromium and the remaining 16 (controls) worked in the offices and kitchen of the same factory. All were found to be clinically healthy. Chromium was determined by flameless atomic absorption spectroscopy. When compared with normal adult values, urinary chromium concentration, Cr/Creatinine ratio, daily chromium excretion, and hair chromium, concentrations ...

  5. High-Purity Chromium Targets

    OpenAIRE

    Rudoy, A.; Milman, Yu.; Korzhova, N.

    1995-01-01

    A procedure for producing large-scale chromium ingots by means of induction-arc melting was developed. From the high-purity, low-alloyed chromium ingots obtained, chromium targets were produced by of thermoplastic treatment techniques. The method of electron-beam evaporation of high-purity chromium was also used for production of targets.

  6. Effect of pressurized solution nitriding on phase changes and mechanical properties of ferritic Fe–22.7Cr–2.4Mo stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohammadzadeh, Roghayeh, E-mail: r_mohammadzadeh@sut.ac.ir; Akbari, Alireza, E-mail: akbari@sut.ac.ir

    2014-01-13

    Pressurized solution nitriding (PSN) of ferritic Fe–22.7Cr–2.4Mo stainless steel at 1200 °C in nitrogen gas under pressure of 0.25 MPa for different times has been investigated. The structure and mechanical properties were characterized using X-ray diffraction, optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and tensile testing. Phase transformation of ferrite to austenite starts from the sample surface and grows further into the core with increasing nitriding time. A fully austenitic structure was achieved after 9 h nitriding for plates of 2 mm thick. Strip-like chromium nitride precipitates with discontinuous morphology are found in the edges of the sample nitrided for 12 h. The average solute nitrogen content of austenite phase was estimated based on lattice parameter calculations to vary from 1.25 to 1.75 wt%. The yield strength is monotonically increased above 900 MPa with increasing the PSN time. The solution nitrided samples for 6 h exhibit high elongation to fracture (above 30%) and high tensile strength (above 1000 MPa). Solution nitriding changes the fracture mode from ductile to a mixed mode inter-granular and trans-granular brittle fracture. Formation of the planar slip bands plays a major role in brittle fracture of the austenite phase. Brittle fracture is favored with precipitation of chromium nitrides. The time of the PSN should be optimized to suppress chromium nitride precipitation.

  7. Effect of pressurized solution nitriding on phase changes and mechanical properties of ferritic Fe–22.7Cr–2.4Mo stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pressurized solution nitriding (PSN) of ferritic Fe–22.7Cr–2.4Mo stainless steel at 1200 °C in nitrogen gas under pressure of 0.25 MPa for different times has been investigated. The structure and mechanical properties were characterized using X-ray diffraction, optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and tensile testing. Phase transformation of ferrite to austenite starts from the sample surface and grows further into the core with increasing nitriding time. A fully austenitic structure was achieved after 9 h nitriding for plates of 2 mm thick. Strip-like chromium nitride precipitates with discontinuous morphology are found in the edges of the sample nitrided for 12 h. The average solute nitrogen content of austenite phase was estimated based on lattice parameter calculations to vary from 1.25 to 1.75 wt%. The yield strength is monotonically increased above 900 MPa with increasing the PSN time. The solution nitrided samples for 6 h exhibit high elongation to fracture (above 30%) and high tensile strength (above 1000 MPa). Solution nitriding changes the fracture mode from ductile to a mixed mode inter-granular and trans-granular brittle fracture. Formation of the planar slip bands plays a major role in brittle fracture of the austenite phase. Brittle fracture is favored with precipitation of chromium nitrides. The time of the PSN should be optimized to suppress chromium nitride precipitation

  8. Elemental composition of chromium/titanium system after compression plasma flows influence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of elemental composition of chromium/titanium system treated by compression plasma flows (CPF) are presented in the work. The samples were prepared with chromium coating deposition (1 μm thick) and next CPF influence with absorbed energy density 19 - 35 J/cm2. Numerical solution of thermo conductivity equation showed that the CPF treatment provides the melting of the near surface layer and high solidification speed (105 - 107 K/s). The nitride TiN forms in result of high temperature (more than 2000 K) as an outer dendrite layer. This layer prevents the nitrogen penetration into the melted zone and because of it, the nitrogen concentration is decreased with absorbed energy density rising. Also the outer nitride layer results in formation near surface area with decreased chromium concentration. (authors)

  9. Microstructural characterisation of chromium slags

    OpenAIRE

    Burja, J.; F. Tehovnik; Vode, F.; Arh, B.

    2015-01-01

    In this chromium slags that form during melting of chromium alloyed steels are examined. During melting and oxidation of these steel grades a considerable amount of chromium is lost, and gained back with slag reduction. Laboratory experiments were performed to study the mechanism of chromium oxide reduction by silicon. Slags chemistry and phase composition have a strong effect on the steelmaking process. Phase analysis revealed two types of chromium oxides, calcium chromites and chromite spin...

  10. Substoichiometric extraction of chromium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Substoichiometric extraction of chromium with tetraphenylarsonium chloride (TPACl), tri-n-octylamine (TNOA), diethylammonium diethyldithiocarbamate (DDDC) and ammonium pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate (APDC) was examined in detail. Chromium can be extracted substoichiometrically in a pH range, which is 1.1-2.6 for the TPACl compound, 0.6-2.3 for the TNOA compound, 5.1-6.4 for the DDDC chelate and 3.9-4.9 for the APDC chelate. Chromium in high-purity calcium carbonate, Orchard Leaves (NBS SRM-1571) and Brewers Yeast (NBS SRM-1569) was determined by neutron activation analysis combined with substoichiometric extraction by DDDC and APDC. The values of 2.0+-0.02 ppm and 2.6+-0.2 ppm were obtained for Brewers Yeast and Orchard Leaves, respectively. These values were in good agreement with those reported by NBS. The reaction mechanism and the reaction ratio between hexavalent chromium and dithiocarbamate are also discussed. (author)

  11. Chromium in diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Chromium deficiency may be seen as impaired glucose tolerance. It occurs in older people with type 2 ... PhD, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Minerals Browse the Encyclopedia ...

  12. The carcinogenicity of chromium

    OpenAIRE

    Norseth, Tor

    1981-01-01

    The carcinogenicity of chromium compounds is reviewed with specific attention to the gaps in knowledge for risk estimation and research needs. The most important problems at present are whether trivalent chromium compounds cause cancer, and whether there is a difference in cancer causing effects between the soluble and the slightly soluble hexavalent compounds in the practical exposure situation. Dose estimates for risk estimation based on epidemiological investigations are also lacking. Pres...

  13. Ion-nitriding of austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although ion-nitriding is an extensively industrialized process enabling steel surfaces to be hardened by nitrogen diffusion, with a resulting increase in wear, seizure and fatigue resistance, its direct application to stainless steels, while enhancing their mechanical properties, also causes a marked degradation in their oxidation resistance. However, by adaption of the nitriding process, it is possible to maintain the improved wear resistant properties while retaining the oxidation resistance of the stainless steel. The controlled diffusion permits the growth of a nitrogen supersaturated austenite layer on parts made of stainless steel (AISI 304L and 316L) without chromium nitride precipitation. The diffusion layer remains stable during post heat treatments up to 650 F for 5,000 hrs and maintains a hardness of 900 HV. A very low and stable friction coefficient is achieved which provides good wear resistance against stainless steels under diverse conditions. Electrochemical and chemical tests in various media confirm the preservation of the stainless steel characteristics. An example of the application of this process is the treatment of Reactor Control Rod Cluster Assemblies (RCCAs) for Pressurized Water Nuclear Reactors

  14. Obtaining decorative chromium plating from trivalent chromium solutions

    OpenAIRE

    Óscar Javier Suárez García

    2010-01-01

    The present work was aimed at a qualitative evaluation, in the laboratory, of different alternatives for assembling and operating a trivalent chromium bath for decorative chromium plating. Different chromium concentration solutions and different complexing agents were used. The initial result of this analysis was that chloride, formate and acetate solutions produced the best results. Solution preparation conditions were evaluated: temperature, chromium III complex formation time and also ...

  15. Nitriding behavior of nickel-based superalloys at 1273 K and above

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The corrosion behavior of four nickel-based superalloys, Inconel 617, Incoloy 800h, Haynes 230, and Hastelloy X, was studied in various nitrogen-containing atmospheres in the temperature range between 1273 and 1523 K. Inner and outer oxidation, inner nitriding, and decarburization were observed. Aluminum, titanium, and chromium nitrides were found after annealing in pure nitrogen and in N2/Ar/H2 atmosphere. Chromium and tungsten carbides disappeared. Instead of these carbides, a chromium and tungsten-rich phase was formed at the grain boundaries. Under these conditions, Incoloy 800h shows the highest and Haynes 230 the lowest corrosion susceptibility. The type of corrosion products and the kinetics of their formation will be described. The suitability of these alloys for application in the intermediate heat exchanger and in the nitrogen atmospheres of the second cooling circuit will be discussed

  16. The analytical biochemistry of chromium.

    OpenAIRE

    Katz, S A

    1991-01-01

    The essentiality and carcinogenicity of chromium depend on its chemical form. Oxidation state and solubility are particularly important in determining the biological effects of chromium compounds. For this reason, total chromium measurements are of little value in assessing its nutritional benefits or its toxicological hazards. Aqueous sodium carbonate-sodium hydroxide solutions have been successfully used for extracting hexavalent chromium from a variety of environmental and biological matri...

  17. Chromium in potatoes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chromium concentration in potatoes was determined, and tubes were labeled either intrinsically or extrinsically with radioactive chromate (51Cr). A labeled chromium complex was isolated from preparations of raw, baked, or fried potatoes and chromatographed on gel permeation media. Potato pulp and peel contained 1.63 and 2.70 μg of Cr/g tissue, respectively. There was no correlation between the two, nor did they respond similarly to changes of variety or locations. No significant differences were apparent in relative migration of the isolated complexes except between raw and cooked extrinsically labeled preparations

  18. Effect of glycine on the synthesis of CrN nanopowder using nitridation combustion synthesis precursors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CrN nanopowder was synthesized by nitridation method using a combustion synthesis precursor derived from chromium nitrate and glycine mixed solution. Effects of glycine on the morphology and nitridation rate of the precursors, the particle size and morphology of synthesized CrN were studied in detail. The results indicated that Cr2O3 precursor with a high specific surface area of 162 m2 g−1 could be prepared by selecting an optimum molar ratio of glycine to chromium nitrate (G/C). Furthermore, a regular variation in the morphology of precursors had been observed with increasing (G/C). The nitridation products retained the morphology of Cr2O3 in the precursors. The nitridation products, prepared with (G/C = 4), comprised well-distributed spherical particles of CrN with the average size of 30 nm. Moreover, the nitridation rate of products with (G/C = 4) was significantly higher than that of the nitridation products prepared with (G/C = 0.5, 5/3, 3)

  19. Effect of glycine on the synthesis of CrN nanopowder using nitridation combustion synthesis precursors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Zhiqin, E-mail: cao-zhi-qing@163.com; Qin, Mingli, E-mail: qinml@mater.ustb.edu.cn [University of Science and Technology Beijing, School of Materials Science and Engineering (China); Zuo, Chengyang [Pan Zhihua University, School of Materials Science and Engineering (China); Jia, Baorui; Liu, Ye; Gu, Yueru; Qu, Xuanhui [University of Science and Technology Beijing, School of Materials Science and Engineering (China)

    2015-02-15

    CrN nanopowder was synthesized by nitridation method using a combustion synthesis precursor derived from chromium nitrate and glycine mixed solution. Effects of glycine on the morphology and nitridation rate of the precursors, the particle size and morphology of synthesized CrN were studied in detail. The results indicated that Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} precursor with a high specific surface area of 162 m{sup 2} g{sup −1} could be prepared by selecting an optimum molar ratio of glycine to chromium nitrate (G/C). Furthermore, a regular variation in the morphology of precursors had been observed with increasing (G/C). The nitridation products retained the morphology of Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} in the precursors. The nitridation products, prepared with (G/C = 4), comprised well-distributed spherical particles of CrN with the average size of 30 nm. Moreover, the nitridation rate of products with (G/C = 4) was significantly higher than that of the nitridation products prepared with (G/C = 0.5, 5/3, 3)

  20. Molybdenum nitride nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molybdenum nitride nanotubes were prepared by depositing nitride film on anodized aluminum oxide (AAO) template by atomic layer deposition and then etching away the template with sodium hydroxide solution. The effect of deposition parameters on film growth and the properties of the nanotubes was investigated. The maximum depth of intrusion of the molybdenum nitride film into the AAO pores was found to be 20 μm, achieved with 7-second precursor pulses. Precursor diffusion into the AAO pores dominated over the intrusion. Three different architectures of molybdenum nitride nanotubes were isolated. Separated nanotubes were found when the template was etched in an ultrasonic bath, while bundling dominated when template etching was conducted without ultrasound. When the nitride-coated AAO template was mounted onto a steel plate before etching the nanotubes remained on the surface with the tips strongly intertwined

  1. Nitrogen Availability Of Nitriding Atmosphere In Controlled Gas Nitriding Processes

    OpenAIRE

    Michalski J; Burdyński K.; Wach P.; Łataś Z.

    2015-01-01

    Parameters which characterize the nitriding atmosphere in the gas nitriding process of steel are: the nitriding potential KN, ammonia dissociation rate α and nitrogen availabilitymN2. The article discusses the possibilities of utilization of the nitriding atmosphere’s nitrogen availability in the design of gas nitriding processes of alloyed steels in atmospheres derived from raw ammonia, raw ammonia diluted with pre-dissociated ammonia, with nitrogen, as well as with both nitrogen and pre-dis...

  2. Chromium and aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aging is associated with increased blood glucose, insulin, blood lipids, and fat mass, and decreased lean body mass leading to increased incidences of diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. Improved chromium nutrition is associated with improvements in all of these variables. Insulin sensitivity de...

  3. A study on Z-phase nucleation in martensitic chromium steels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Golpayegani, Ardeshir; Andrén, Hans-Olof; Danielsen, Hilmar Kjartansson;

    2008-01-01

    9–12% chromium martensitic steels are liable to the precipitation of Z-phase, Cr(V,Nb)N, after long time exposure at 550–650 ◦C. This complex nitride consumes vanadium nitrides and causes the creep strength of the material to fall drastically after several thousand hours of exposure. In this work....... Furthermore, such a nucleation site would provide vanadium and nitrogen for the growth of Z-phase. The presence of niobium carbide has also been observed close to Z-phase nucleation sites, indicating niobium to be important for the nucleation and growth of Z-phase....

  4. Boron nitride composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuntz, Joshua D.; Ellsworth, German F.; Swenson, Fritz J.; Allen, Patrick G.

    2016-02-16

    According to one embodiment, a composite product includes hexagonal boron nitride (hBN), and a plurality of cubic boron nitride (cBN) particles, wherein the plurality of cBN particles are dispersed in a matrix of the hBN. According to another embodiment, a composite product includes a plurality of cBN particles, and one or more borate-containing binders.

  5. Studies of chromium gettering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preliminary results have shown that hydrogen pumping by chromium is a surface effect. Unlike with titanium, the getter material used in many present day tokamaks, there is no significant diffusion into the bulk. Additional experiments have been carried out to measure the basic characteristics of chromium films for gases of interest in tokamak research. These gases include deuterium, oxygen and nitrogen. A vacuum system is described which allowed precise control of the test gas, a constant wall temperature and determination of the projected getter surface area. A quadrupole mass spectrometer, rather than simply a total pressure gauge, was utilized to measure the partial pressure of the test gas as well as the residual gas composition in the system. A quartz crystal monitor was used to measure film thickness. Pumping speeds and sticking coefficients are given as a function of surface coverage for each test gas. A comparison will be made with titanium films deposited in the same vacuum system and under similar conditions

  6. Nitrogen Availability Of Nitriding Atmosphere In Controlled Gas Nitriding Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michalski J.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Parameters which characterize the nitriding atmosphere in the gas nitriding process of steel are: the nitriding potential KN, ammonia dissociation rate α and nitrogen availabilitymN2. The article discusses the possibilities of utilization of the nitriding atmosphere’s nitrogen availability in the design of gas nitriding processes of alloyed steels in atmospheres derived from raw ammonia, raw ammonia diluted with pre-dissociated ammonia, with nitrogen, as well as with both nitrogen and pre-dissociated ammonia. The nitriding processes were accomplished in four series. The parameters selected in the particular processes were: process temperature (T, time (t, value of nitriding potential (KN, corresponding to known dissociation rate of the ammonia which dissociates during the nitriding process (α. Variable parameters were: nitrogen availability (mN2, composition of the ingoing atmosphere and flow rate of the ingoing atmosphere (FIn.

  7. Sulfide Stress Cracking and Electrochemical Corrosion of Precipitation Hardening Steel After Plasma Oxy-Nitriding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granda-Gutiérrez, E. E.; Díaz-Guillén, J. C.; Díaz-Guillén, J. A.; González, M. A.; García-Vázquez, F.; Muñóz, R.

    2014-11-01

    In this paper, we present the results of a duplex plasma nitriding followed by an oxidizing stage process (which is also referred as oxy-nitriding) on the corrosion behavior of a 17-4PH precipitation hardening stainless steel. The formation of both, expanded martensite (b.c.t. α'N-phase) and chromium oxide (type Cr2O3) in the subsurface of oxy-nitrided samples at specific controlled conditions, leads in a noticeable increasing in the time-to-rupture during the sulfide stress cracking test, in comparison with an untreated reference sample. Oxy-nitriding improves the corrosion performance of the alloy when it is immersed in solutions saturated by sour gas, which extends the application potential of this type of steel in the oil and gas extraction and processing industry. The presence of the oxy-nitrided layer inhibits the corrosion process that occurs in the near-surface region, where hydrogen is liberated after the formation of iron sulfides, which finally produces a fragile fracture by micro-crack propagation; the obtained results suggest that oxy-nitriding slows this process, thus delaying the rupture of the specimen. Moreover, oxy-nitriding produces a hard, sour gas-resistant surface, but do not significantly affect the original chloride ion solution resistance of the material.

  8. Catalytic Spectrophotometric Determination of Chromium

    OpenAIRE

    STOYANOVA, Angelina Miltcheva

    2005-01-01

    The catalytic effect of chromium(III) and chromium(VI) on the oxidation of sulfanilic acid by hydrogen peroxide was studied. The reaction was followed spectrophotometrically by measuring the absorbance of the reaction product at 360 nm. Under the optimum conditions 2 calibration graphs (for chromium(III) up to 100 ng mL-1, and for chromium(VI) up to 200 ng mL-1) were obtained, using the ``fixed time'' method with detection limits of 4.9 ng mL-1 and 3.8 ng mL-1, respectively...

  9. Abnormal Nitride Morphologies upon Nitriding Iron-Based Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meka, Sai Ramudu; Mittemeijer, Eric Jan

    2013-06-01

    Nitriding of iron-based components is a very well-known surface engineering method for bringing about great improvement of the mechanical and chemical properties. An overview is presented of the strikingly different nitride morphologies developing upon nitriding iron-based alloy substrates. Observed abnormal morphologies are the result of intricate interplay of the thermodynamic and kinetic constraints for the nucleation and growth of both alloying element nitride particles in the matrix and iron nitrides at the surface of the substrate. Alloying elements having strong Me-N interaction, such as Cr, V, and Ti, precipitate instantaneously as internal Me-nitrides, thus allowing the subsequent nucleation and growth of "normal" layer-type iron nitride. Alloying elements having weak Me-N interaction, such as Al, Si, and Mo, and simultaneously having low solubility in iron nitride, obstruct/delay the nucleation and growth of iron nitrides at the surface, thus leading to very high nitrogen supersaturation over an extended depth range from the surface. Eventually, the nucleation and growth of "abnormal" plate-type iron nitride occurs across the depth range of high nitrogen supersaturation. On this basis, strategies can be devised for tuned development of specific nitride morphologies at the surface of nitrided components.

  10. Properties of minor actinide nitrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present status of the research on properties of minor actinide nitrides for the development of an advanced nuclear fuel cycle based on nitride fuel and pyrochemical reprocessing is described. Some thermal stabilities of Am-based nitrides such as AmN and (Am, Zr)N were mainly investigated. Stabilization effect of ZrN was cleary confirmed for the vaporization and hydrolytic behaviors. New experimental equipments for measuring thermal properties of minor actinide nitrides were also introduced. (author)

  11. Metal Nitrides for Plasmonic Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naik, Gururaj V.; Schroeder, Jeremy; Guler, Urcan;

    2012-01-01

    Metal nitrides as alternatives to metals such as gold could offer many advantages when used as plasmonic material. We show that transition metal nitrides can replace metals providing equally good optical performance for many plasmonic applications.......Metal nitrides as alternatives to metals such as gold could offer many advantages when used as plasmonic material. We show that transition metal nitrides can replace metals providing equally good optical performance for many plasmonic applications....

  12. CHROMIUM, METABOLIC SYNDROME AND DIABESITY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suboptimal intakes of the essential nutrient, chromium, are characterized by elevated blood glucose, insulin resistance, obesity, hypertriglyceridemia, and low HDL. These are also signs and symptoms of the metabolic syndrome. Improvements due to increased intake of chromium are related to the degr...

  13. Groundwater contaminant by hexavalent chromium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parsons, C. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

    1995-11-01

    Oxidation of trivalent chromium to hexavalent chromium has been investigated as a function of total manganese in soils as well as various incubation conditions. Chromium and manganese contents were analyzed by atomic absorption (graphite furnace and flame emission respectively) following acid digestion. Total hexavalent chromium generation capacity was determined by addition of 0.001 M CrCL3, incubation, and analysis by s-diphenyl carbazide. Samples were then leached with CaSO{sub 4} and MgSO{sub 4} and incubated in various environments (oven, freeze-drier, field moist, ultrafreeze) to test for geogenic generation of Cr(IV). The degree of geogenic generation of hexavalent chromium was compared with total Mn and Cr content as well as hexavalent generational capacity.

  14. Practical application of silicon nitride ceramics for sliding parts of rotary engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research on ceramic substitutes for the apex seals of the rotary engine have been carrying out. The aim of the substitution of apex seals, the development of high strength silicon nitride ceramics, and the application of the ceramic to the apex seals are described. The properties of silicon nitride ceramics used as apex seals in rotary engines for racing cars are presented. The apex seals were recovered from the rotary engines of racing cars in the 1989 and 1990 Le Mans 24-hour Grand Prix races, and the damage of the seals was investigated and analyzed in detail. One problem was the adhesion to the seals of the hardened chromium plating detached from the inside surface of the rotor housing. The adhesion of chromium caused the fine cracking and subsequent chipping of the apex seals. (orig.)

  15. Role of paramagnetic chromium in chromium(VI)-induced damage in cultured mammalian cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Sugiyama, M

    1994-01-01

    Chromium(VI) compounds are known to be potent toxic and carcinogenic agents. Because chromium(VI) is easily taken up by cells and is subsequently reduced to chromium(III), the formation of paramagnetic chromium such as chromium(V) and chromium(III) is believed to play a role in the adverse biological effects of chromium(VI) compounds. The present report, uses electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy; the importance of the role of paramagnetic chromium in chromium(VI)-induced damage in intac...

  16. Sintering silicon nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Narottam P. (Inventor); Levine, Stanley R. (Inventor); Sanders, William A. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    Oxides having a composition of (Ba(1-x)Sr(x))O-Al2O3-2SiO2 are used as sintering aids for producing an improved silicon nitride ceramic material. The x must be greater than 0 to insure the formation of the stable monoclinic celsian glass phase.

  17. Hot pressing aluminum nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experiment was performed on the hot pressing of aluminum nitride, using three kinds of powder which are: a) made by electric arc method, b) made by nitrifying aluminum metal powder, and c) made from alumina and carbon in nitrogen atmosphere. The content of oxygen of these powders was analyzed by activation analysis using high energy neutron irradiation. The density of hot pressed samples was classified into two groups. The high density group contained oxygen more than 3 wt. %, and the low density group contained about 0.5 wt %. Typical density vs. temperature curves have a bending point near 1,5500C, and the sample contains iron impurity of 0.5 wt. %. Needle crystals were found to grow near 1,5500C by VLS mechanism, and molten iron acts a main part of mechanism as a liquid phase. According to the above-mentioned curve, the iron impurity in aluminum nitride prevents densification. The iron impurity accelerates crystal growth. Advance of densification may be expected by adding iron impurity, but in real case, the densification is delayed. Densification and crystal growth are greatly accelerated by oxygen impurity. In conclusion, more efforts must be made for the purification of aluminum nitride. In the present stage, the most pure nitride powder contains about 0.1 wt. % of oxygen, as compared with good silicon carbide crystals containing only 10-5 wt. % of nitrogen. (Iwakiri, K.)

  18. Fate and transport of chromium through soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chromium chemistry relevant to the problem facing state of New Jersey (Usa) was examined. Transport of chromium through soil depends on its chemical forms. Transformation of chromium within bulk of soil depends on soil constituents, soil condition, such as pH, Eh and organic compounds applied onto soil or present in soil. Total chromium in soil can be determined. Speciation of chromium based on ionization, hydrolysis, complex formation, redox reactions and adsorption is predicted using MINIQ program

  19. Release of Chromium from Orthopaedic Arthroplasties

    OpenAIRE

    Afolaranmi, G.A.; Tettey, J; Meek, R.M.D; Grant, M.H

    2008-01-01

    Many orthopaedic implants are composed of alloys containing chromium. Of particular relevance is the increasing number of Cobalt Chromium bearing arthroplasies being inserted into young patients with osteoarthritis. Such implants will release chromium ions. These patients will be exposed to the released chromium for over 50 years in some cases. The subsequent chromium ion metabolism and redistribution in fluid and tissue compartments is complex. In addition, the potential biological effects o...

  20. Chromium isotope variations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    D'Arcy, Joan Mary

    Chromium (Cr) stable isotopes are a useful tracer of changes in redox conditions because changes in its oxidation state are accompanied by an isotopic fractionation. For this reason the Cr isotope system is being developed as a potential tool for paleo-redox reconstruction. Dissolved Cr in seawater...... is incorporated into carbonates. Hence, ancient carbonates can potentially record the Cr isotopic composition (δ53Cr ‰) of seawater in the geological past. Reliable application and interpretation of this proxy requires a detailed knowledge about processes that fractionate Cr on the Earth’s surface......, and the quantification the Cr isotope composition of major Cr fluxes into and out of ocean. This thesis adds to the current knowledge of the Cr isotope system and is divided into two studies. The focus of the first study was to determine what processes control the Cr isotopic compositionof river...

  1. Contact damage of silicon nitride whisker-silicon nitride composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The influence of β-silicon nitride whiskers content on Hertzian contact damage in silicon nitride matrix prepared by tape casting and gas pressure sintering (GPS) is discussed. Hertzian indentations with different loads were applied to follow the evolution of damage in these whisker-reinforced composites. The morphology of contact damage was investigated by using optical microscopy, as well as electron microscopy. With increasing β-silicon nitride whiskers content in α-silicon nitride, the porosity of materials increased and the micro structure of matrix became finer. With decreasing grain size, the subsurface contact damage increased by increasing crack length. The samples with 2 mass % β-silicon nitride addition had showed shallow ring crack and quasi-plastic deformation. On the other hand, for sample with 10 mass % β-silicon nitride whisker added sample and coarse microstructures subsurface deformation was not observed. Copyright (2002) AD-TECH - International Foundation for the Advancement of Technology Ltd

  2. Modeling of Nitrogen Penetration in Medical Grade CoCrMo Alloy during Plasma Nitriding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arvaidas GALDIKAS

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available For analysis of plasma nitriding process and nitrogen penetration into CoCrMo alloy the trapping-detrapping model is applied. This model is commonly used for analysis of stainless steel nitriding, however, in this work it is shown that the same nitrogen penetration mechanism takes place in CoCrMo alloys. From the fitting of experimental curves, taken from literature, it is found by the proposed model that diffusion coefficient depends on nitrogen concentration according to Einstein-Smoluchowski relation D µ 1/CN. The diffusion coefficients for 400oC temperature nitriding of in CoCrMo are calculated. The shape of nitrogen depth profile curves are analyzed showing influence of different parameters such as detrapping activation energy, chromium concentration, etc.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.20.1.3458

  3. Chromium reduction in Pseudomonas putida.

    OpenAIRE

    Ishibashi, Y.; Cervantes, C; Silver, S

    1990-01-01

    Reduction of hexavalent chromium (chromate) to less-toxic trivalent chromium was studied by using cell suspensions and cell-free supernatant fluids from Pseudomonas putida PRS2000. Chromate reductase activity was associated with soluble protein and not with the membrane fraction. The crude enzyme activity was heat labile and showed a Km of 40 microM CrO4(2-). Neither sulfate nor nitrate affected chromate reduction either in vitro or with intact cells.

  4. Chromium reduction in Pseudomonas putida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishibashi, Y; Cervantes, C; Silver, S

    1990-01-01

    Reduction of hexavalent chromium (chromate) to less-toxic trivalent chromium was studied by using cell suspensions and cell-free supernatant fluids from Pseudomonas putida PRS2000. Chromate reductase activity was associated with soluble protein and not with the membrane fraction. The crude enzyme activity was heat labile and showed a Km of 40 microM CrO4(2-). Neither sulfate nor nitrate affected chromate reduction either in vitro or with intact cells. PMID:2389940

  5. Wear of plasma nitrided and nitrocarburized AISI 316L austenitic stainless steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.A.P. Fernandes

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: the purpose of the work is to compare the wear resistance, in dry and lubricated conditions, of AISI 316L austenitic stainless steel samples that were plasma nitrided or nitrocarburized at 450°C for 5 and 10 h, respectively.Design/methodology/approach: Hardness and wear resistance of austenitic stainless steel can be increased substantially, without losing corrosion resistance, by plasma nitriding or nitrocarburizing surface treatments. In this work, AISI 316L austenitic stainless steel was plasma nitrided and nitrocarburized at 450°C, for 5 and 10 h respectively.Findings: The obtained layers were characterized by optical microscopy, X-ray diffraction, microhardness and micro-wear tests in dry and lubricated conditions. Optical microscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis demonstrated that the nitrided layer is homogeneous and primarily composed of nitrogen rich expanded austenite with a thickness of about 15 µm. Nitrocarburized samples exhibited an external layer of chromium and iron compounds and a sub-layer of expanded austenite with a total thickness of 45 µm. Microhardness profiles showed that the hardness near to the surface was close to 1100 HV for nitriding and 1300 HV for nitrocarburizing. Plasma nitrided and nitrocarburized layers exhibited substantial wear reduction in dry and lubricated test conditions. The use of a lubricant oil reduces wear by a factor of approximately 200 compared to the dry test results.Research limitations/implications: The plasma nitrided layer yielded the best wear performance in both dry and lubricated conditions.Originality/value: Plasma nitriding resulted in the best wear performance when compared with nitrocarburizing in dry and lubricated sliding which is probably due to reduced layer fragility.

  6. Study of Corrosion Behavior of a 2507 Super Duplex Stainless Steel : Influence of Quenched-in and Isothermal Nitrides

    OpenAIRE

    Bettini, Eleonora; Kivisäkk, Ulf; Leygraf, Christofer; Pan, Jinshan

    2014-01-01

    Precipitation of different types of chromium nitrides may occur during processing of super duplex stainless steels, affecting the properties of the material. In this study the influence of quenched-in (size range ca. 50-100 nm) and isothermal (size range ca. 80-250 nm) types of nitrides on the corrosion behavior of a 2507 super duplex stainless steel has been investigated at room temperature and at 90 degrees C (above the critical pitting temperature) in 1 M NaCl solution. The microstructure ...

  7. Hydrogen permeation through chromium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steady state and non-steady state measurements of hydrogen permeation through metallic chromium are reported. The experiments have been conducted by use of hydrogen and deuterium within a pressure range of 10-8 - 1 bar and temperatures between 600 - 8000C. Numerical values for the physical quantities permeability, diffusion constant and solubility could be derived. At an upstream pressure above around 10-3 bar classical Sieverts-low was found (permeation rate proportional √p) with activation energies Qsub(perm) = 65 kJoule/mole, Qsub(Diff) = 4-8 kJoule/mole, Qsub(Sol) = 57-61 kJoule/mole for the respective processes involved. The isotopic effect between H and D of the permeabilities could be represented by a factor of 1,5 independence on temperature. All non steady-state measurements could be approximated reasonably well by classical diffusion kinetics. Below up-stream pressures of approx.= 10-7 bar the kinetics was no longer diffusion controlled, the dependence on up-stream pressure changed from √p -> p, the activation energy for permetation increased to 127 kJoule/mole and the isotopic factor resulted in about 2-3. (orig.)

  8. Optical characterization of gallium nitride

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kirilyuk, Victoria

    2002-01-01

    Group III-nitrides have been considered a promising system for semiconductor devices since a few decades, first for blue- and UV-light emitting diodes, later also for high-frequency/high-power applications. Due to the lack of native substrates, heteroepitaxially grown III-nitride layers are usually

  9. Trivalent chromium sorption on alginate beads

    OpenAIRE

    Araújo, M. Manuela; Teixeira, J.A.

    1997-01-01

    The applicability of trivalent chromium removal from aqueous solutions using calcium alginate beads was studied. The equilibrium isotherms were plotted at two temperatures. The relationship between the chromium sorbed and the calcium released was determined as well as the effect of alginate amount and initial pH on the equilibrium results. Chromium sorption kinetics were evaluated as a function of chromium initial concentration and temperature. Transport properties of trival...

  10. Glow-discharge nitriding of gears

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The method of glow-discharge nitriding of gear parts made of 30Kh2NMFA steel is introduced. The diffusion saturation is carried out in the atmosphere of dissociated ammonia at the temperature of 520-540 deg C and 200-800 Pa pressure for 16-40 h depending on the required thickness of the nitrided layer (0.2-0.5 mm). The structure of the nitrided metal is a layer of nitride compounds of the Fe4N type and diffusion zone enriched with nitrides. Glow-discharge nitrided parts with 600-650 HV strength retain certain wear resistance and fatigue strength as compared with gas nitriding

  11. On texture formation of chromium electrodeposits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Christian Bergenstof; Leisner, Peter; Horsewell, Andy

    1998-01-01

    The microstructure, texture and hardness of electrodeposited hard, direct current (DC) chromium and pulsed reversed chromium has been investigated. These investigations suggest that the growth and texture of hard chromium is controlled by inhibition processes and reactions. Further, it has been...

  12. Chromium Salen Mediated Alkene Epoxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Kaare Brandt; Norrby, Per-Ola; Daly, Adrian M.; Gilheany, Declan G.

    2002-01-01

    The mechanism of alkene epoxidation by chromium(v) oxo salen complexes has been studied by DFT and experimental methods. The reaction is compared to the closely related Mn-catalyzed process in an attempt to understand the dramatic difference in selectivity between the two systems. Overall, the......-spin surface. The low-spin addition of metal oxo species to an alkene leads to an intermediate which forms epoxide either with a barrier on the low-spin surface or without a barrier after spin inversion. Supporting evidence for this intermediate was obtained by using vinylcyclopropane traps. The chromium...

  13. Electrospun Gallium Nitride Nanofibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The high thermal conductivity and wide bandgap of gallium nitride (GaN) are desirable characteristics in optoelectronics and sensing applications. In comparison to thin films and powders, in the nanofiber morphology the sensitivity of GaN is expected to increase as the exposed area (proportional to the length) increases. In this work we present electrospinning as a novel technique in the fabrication of GaN nanofibers. Electrospinning, invented in the 1930s, is a simple, inexpensive, and rapid technique to produce microscopically long ultrafine fibers. GaN nanofibers are produced using gallium nitrate and dimethyl-acetamide as precursors. After electrospinning, thermal decomposition under an inert atmosphere is used to pyrolyze the polymer. To complete the preparation, the nanofibers are sintered in a tube furnace under a NH3 flow. Both scanning electron microscopy and profilometry show that the process produces continuous and uniform fibers with diameters ranging from 20 to a few hundred nanometers, and lengths of up to a few centimeters. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis shows the development of GaN nanofibers with hexagonal wurtzite structure. Future work includes additional characterization using transmission electron microscopy and XRD to understand the role of precursors and nitridation in nanofiber synthesis, and the use of single nanofibers for the construction of optical and gas sensing devices.

  14. Chromium content of selected Greek foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bratakos, Michael S; Lazos, Evangelos S; Bratakos, Sotirios M

    2002-05-01

    The total chromium content of a wide variety of Greek foods was determined by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy (GFAAS). Meat, fish and seafood, cereals and pulses were rich sources of chromium (>0.100 microg/g). Fruits, milk, oils and fats and sugar were poor sources. Differences in chromium content were found between different food classes from Greece and those from some other countries. Based on available food consumption data and chromium levels in this study, it was estimated that the chromium intake of Greeks is 143 microg/day, with vegetables, cereals and meat being the main contributors. PMID:12083715

  15. Nitride fuel development in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nitride fuel for ADS has been developed by Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) under a double strata fuel cycle concept. In this case the nitride fuel contains MA elements as a principal component and is diluted by inert materials in place of U, which is totally different from the fuel for power reactors. So the fuel fabrication manner, fuel properties and irradiation behaviour have to be investigated in detail as well as the treatment of spent fuel. Through the experimental R&D, technical feasibility of nitride fuel cycle for the transmutation of MA will be demonstrated

  16. Nitriding iron at lower temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, W P; Tao, N R; Wang, Z B; Lu, J; Lu, K

    2003-01-31

    The microstructure in the surface layer of a pure iron plate was refined at the nanometer scale by means of a surface mechanical attrition treatment that generates repetitive severe plastic deformation of the surface layer. The subsequent nitriding kinetics of the treated iron with the nanostructured surface layer were greatly enhanced, so that the nitriding temperature could be as low as 300 degrees C, which is much lower than conventional nitriding temperatures (above 500 degrees C). This enhanced processing method demonstrates the technological significance of nanomaterials in improving traditional processing techniques and provides a new approach for selective surface reactions in solids. PMID:12560546

  17. X-Ray Phase Analysis Of Nitrided Layers Of X2CrNiMo17-12-2 Austenitic Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frączek T.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This work presents the results of diffraction analyses carried out using X-ray phase analyses (XRD and GIXRD of nitrided layers of X2CrNiMo17-12-2 austenitic steel. Plasma nitriding process was c arried out in the temperature range of 325 ÷ 400 °C and time of 2 ÷ 4 h. Hydrogen-nitrogen plasma was used as reactive atmosphere (H2 75% + N2 25% with pressure of 150 Pa. On the basis of the X-ray analyses it was stated that the obtained nitrided layers consisted of a subsurface layer of chromium nitrides and a zone of nitrogen saturated austenite.

  18. Determination of chromium combined with DNA, RNA and protein in chromium-rich brewer's yeast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The contents of chromium in the DNA, RNA and protein fractions separated from chromium-rich and normal brewer's yeast were determined with the neutron activation analysis in order to study the combination of Cr with DNA, RNA and protein in chromium-rich brewer's yeast. The results showed that the extracting rats and concentrations of DNA, RNA and protein had no significant difference in two types of yeast, but the chromium contents of DNA, RNA and protein in the chromium-rich yeast were significantly higher than those in the normal. In addition, the content of chromium in DNA was much higher than that in RNA and protein, which indicated that the inorganic chromium compounds entered into the yeast cell, during the yeast cultivation in the culture medium containing chromium were converted into organic chromium compounds combined with DNA, RNA and protein

  19. Study of the Active Screen Plasma Nitriding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao Cheng; C. X. Li; H. Dong; T. Bell

    2004-01-01

    Active screen plasma nitriding (ASPN) is a novel nitriding process, which overcomes many of the practical problems associated with the conventional DC plasma nitriding (DCPN). Experimental results showed that the metallurgical characteristics and hardening effect of 722M24 steel nitrided by ASPN at both floating potential and anodic (zero) potential were similar to those nitrided by DCPN. XRD and high-resolution SEM analysis indicated that iron nitride particles with sizes in sub-micron scale were deposited on the specimen surface in AS plasma nitriding. These indicate that the neutral iron nitride particles, which are sputtered from the active screen and transferred through plasma to specimen surface, are considered to be the dominant nitrogen carder in ASPN. The OES results show that NH could not be a critical species in plasma nitriding.

  20. Reaction-bonded silicon nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reaction-bonded silicon nitride (RBSN) has been characterized. The oxidation behaviour in air up to 15000C and 3000 h and the effects of static and cyclic oxidation on room-temperature strength have been studied. (orig./IHOE)

  1. Boron nitride converted carbon fiber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rousseas, Michael; Mickelson, William; Zettl, Alexander K.

    2016-04-05

    This disclosure provides systems, methods, and apparatus related to boron nitride converted carbon fiber. In one aspect, a method may include the operations of providing boron oxide and carbon fiber, heating the boron oxide to melt the boron oxide and heating the carbon fiber, mixing a nitrogen-containing gas with boron oxide vapor from molten boron oxide, and converting at least a portion of the carbon fiber to boron nitride.

  2. The role of nitrogen in the preferential chromium segregation on the ferritic stainless steel (1 1 1) surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The temperature dependence on the segregation behavior of the ferritic stainless steel single crystal (1 1 1) surface morphology has been examined by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), and low energy electron diffraction (LEED). AES clearly showed the surface segregations of chromium and nitrogen upon annealing. Nanoscale triangular chromium nitride clusters were formed around 650 deg. C and were regularly aligned in a hexagonal configuration. In contrast, for the ferritic stainless steel (1 1 1) surface with low-nitrogen content, chromium and carbon were found to segregate on the surface upon annealing and Auger spectra of carbon displayed the characteristic carbide peak. For the low-nitrogen surface, LEED identified a facetted surface with (2 x 2) superstructure at 650 deg. C. High-resolution STM identified a chromium carbide film with segregated carbon atoms randomly located on the surface. The facetted (2 x 2) superstructure changed into a (3 x 3) superstructure with no faceting upon annealing at 750 deg. C. Also, segregated sulfur seems to contribute to the reconstruction or interfacial relaxation between the ferritic stainless steel (1 1 1) substrate and chromium carbide film.

  3. Tissues and urinary chromium concentrations in rats fed high-chromium diets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complete text of publication follows. Chromium is an essential trace elements and enhances the function of insulin as a form of chromodulin. In the subjects with a certain type of diabetics, 200 to 1,000 μg/d of chromium is administered to reduced the symptoms of diabetics. However, although there are not any health-promotive effects of chromium-administration in healthy subjects, various types of chromium supplements are commercially available in many countries; the adverse effects caused by an excessive chromium intake are feared. In the present study, to clarify the tolerable upper limit of chromium, tissue and urinary chromium concentrations, liver function and iron status were examined in rats fed high-chromium diets. Thirty-six male 4-weeks Wistar rats were divided into six groups and fed casein-based diets containing 1, 10 or 100 μg/g of chromium as chromium chloride (CrCl3) or chromium picolinate (CrPic) for 4 weeks. After the feeding, chromium concentrations in liver, kidney, small intestine and tibia were determined by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. In addition, urine samples were collected on 3rd to 4th week and their chromium concentrations were also determined. Chromium concentrations in liver, kidney, small intestine and tibia were elevated with increase of dietary chromium concentration. Urinary chromium excretion was also elevated with the increase of dietary chromium and the rate of urinary chromium excretion was less than 2% to dietary chromium intake in all the experimental groups. In the administration of 100 μg/g of chromium, rats given CrCl3 showed significantly higher tibia chromium concentration and lower urinary chromium excretion than those given CrPic. There were not any differences in iron status among the experimental groups. Activities of serum aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase in rats fed diet containing 100 μg/g of chromium as CrPic were significantly higher than those in rats fed other diets.

  4. Food Chromium Contents, Chromium Dietary Intakes And Related Biological Variables In French Free-Living Elderly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chromium (Cr III), an essential trace element, functions in potentiating insulin sensitivity, regulating glucose homeostasis, improving lipid profile, and maintaining lean body mass. Glucose intolerance and chromium deficiency increase with age, and could be aggravating factors of the metabolic synd...

  5. Soils contaminated with hexavalent chromium

    OpenAIRE

    Fonseca, Bruna Catarina da Silva

    2011-01-01

    Tese de doutoramento em Engenharia Química e Biológica The interest in environmental soil science has been growing in the last years due to the continuous degradation of this major natural resource. With this in mind, and because chromium and lead are two of the most toxic heavy metals frequently detected as soil contaminants in the Portuguese territory, the study and development of few remediation techniques and the indissociable description of the sorption and migration of...

  6. Carbon, chromium and molybdenum contents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work describes solidification experiments on white cast iron, with 15 and 20% of chromium, 2.3, 3.0 and 3.6 % of carbon and 0.0, 1.5 and 2.5 % of molybdenum in test de samples with 30 mm diameter. Measurements were performed on the austenite and eutectic formation arrests, the number of the eutectic carbide particles relative to the total and the eutectic volumes, and the volume fraction of the primary austenite

  7. Preparation and Characterization of Nanocrystalline Hard Chromium Coatings Using Eco-Friendly Trivalent Chromium Bath

    OpenAIRE

    V. S. Protsenko; V. O Gordiienko; Danilov, F. I.; Kwon, S.C.

    2011-01-01

    A new aqueous sulfate trivalent chromium bath is described. The chromium bath contains formic acid and carbamide as complexing agents. Chromium was deposited at a temperature of 30÷40 oC and a cathode current density of 10÷25 A dm-2. The bath allows obtaining thick (up to several hundred micrometers) hard chromium coatings with nanocrystalline structure. The electrodeposition rate reaches 0.8÷0.9 µm min-1.

  8. REMOVAL OF HEXAVALENT CHROMIUM FROM DRINKING WATER

    OpenAIRE

    A. R. Asgari ، F. Vaezi ، S. Nasseri ، O. Dördelmann ، A. H. Mahvi ، E. Dehghani Fard

    2008-01-01

    Removal of chromium can be accomplished by various methods but none of them is cost-effective in meeting drinking water standards. For this study, granular ferric hydroxide was used as adsorbent for removal of hexavalent chromium. Besides, the effects of changing contact time, pH and concentrations of competitive anions were determined for different amounts of granular ferric hydroxide. It was found that granular ferric hydroxide has a high capacity for adsorption of hexavalent chromium from ...

  9. Inoculation of chromium white cast iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Kopyciński

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been proved that an addition of boron carbide introduced as an inoculant to the chromium white cast iron changes the structureof castings. Castings after inoculation revealed a different structure with numerous grains. Primary precipitates of chromium carbide also appeared, reducing the mechanical properties of as-cast parts. Properly established heat treatment regime makes chromium iron castings regain their, originally high, mechanical properties.

  10. Inoculation of chromium white cast iron

    OpenAIRE

    D. Kopyciński

    2009-01-01

    It has been proved that an addition of boron carbide introduced as an inoculant to the chromium white cast iron changes the structureof castings. Castings after inoculation revealed a different structure with numerous grains. Primary precipitates of chromium carbide also appeared, reducing the mechanical properties of as-cast parts. Properly established heat treatment regime makes chromium iron castings regain their, originally high, mechanical properties.

  11. Cathodic Cage Plasma Nitriding: An Innovative Technique

    OpenAIRE

    de Sousa, R. R. M.; de Araújo, F. O.; da Costa, J. A. P.; A. de S. Brandim; de Brito, R. A.; Alves, C

    2012-01-01

    Cylindrical samples of AISI 1020, AISI 316, and AISI 420 steels, with different heights, were simultaneously treated by a new technique of ionic nitriding, entitled cathodic cage plasma nitriding (CCPN), in order to evaluate the efficiency of this technique to produce nitrided layers with better properties compared with those obtained using conventional ionic nitriding technique. This method is able to eliminate the edge effect in the samples, promoting a better uniformity of temperature, and...

  12. Corrosion of plasma nitrided austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The corrosion behaviour of plasma nitrided austenitic stainless steel grades AISI 304, 316 and 321 was studied at various temperatures. Certain plasma nitriding cycles included a post-oxidation treatment. The corrosion rates were measured using linear polarisation technique. Results showed that corrosion rate increased with the plasma nitriding temperature. Minimum deterioration occurred at 653K. (author). 2 tabs., 4 figs., 10 refs

  13. Ion nitridation - physical and technological aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ion nitridation, is a technique which allows the formation of a controlled thickness of nitrides in the surface of the material, using this material as the cathode in a low pressure glow discharge, which presents many advantages over the conventional method. A brief review of the ion nitriding technique, the physical fenomena involved, and we discuss technological aspects of this method, are presented. (Author)

  14. Effect of partial pressure of reactive gas on chromium nitride and chromium oxide deposited by arc ion plating

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Ming-sheng; FENG Chang-jie; WANG Fu-hui

    2006-01-01

    The effects of reactive gas partial pressure on droplet formation,deposition rate and change of preferred orientation of CrN and Cr2O3 coatings were studied. For CrN coatings,as nitrogen partial pressure increases,the number and size of droplets increases,the deposition rate initially increases obviously and then slowly,and the preferred orientation of CrN changes from high-index plane to low-index one. For Cr2O3 coatings,with the increase of oxygen partial pressure,the number and size of droplets decreases,the deposition rate decreases and the (300) becomes the preferred orientation. These differences are ascribed to the formation of CrN (with a lower melting point) and Cr2O3 (with a higher melting point) on the surface of Cr target during the deposition of CrN and Cr2O3. Complete coatings CrN or Cr2O3 film can be formed when reactive gas partial pressure gets up to 0.1 Pa. The optimized N2 partial pressure for CrN deposition is about 0.1-0.2 Pa in order to suppress the formation of droplets and the suitable O2 partial pressure for Cr2O3 deposition is approximately 0.1 Pa for the attempt to prevent the peel of the coating.

  15. Permeation of chromium salts through human skin in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gammelgaard, Bente; Fullerton, A; Avnstorp, C;

    1992-01-01

    of the dichromate solution. Chromium skin levels increased with increasing concentrations of applied chromium salts up to 0.034 M Cr. The amount of chromium in recipient phase and skin layers increased with increasing pH when the applied solution contained potassium dichromate. This was ascribed to a decreased skin...... barrier function of the skin. The amount of chromium found in all skin layers after application of chromium chloride decreased with increasing pH due to lower solubility of the salt. The % of chromium found in the recipient phase as chromium(VI) increased with increasing total chromium concentration...... indicating a limited reduction ability of the skin in vitro....

  16. III-Nitride nanowire optoelectronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Songrui; Nguyen, Hieu P. T.; Kibria, Md. G.; Mi, Zetian

    2015-11-01

    Group-III nitride nanowire structures, including GaN, InN, AlN and their alloys, have been intensively studied in the past decade. Unique to this material system is that its energy bandgap can be tuned from the deep ultraviolet (~6.2 eV for AlN) to the near infrared (~0.65 eV for InN). In this article, we provide an overview on the recent progress made in III-nitride nanowire optoelectronic devices, including light emitting diodes, lasers, photodetectors, single photon sources, intraband devices, solar cells, and artificial photosynthesis. The present challenges and future prospects of III-nitride nanowire optoelectronic devices are also discussed.

  17. Mathematical Modelling of Nitride Layer Growth of Low Temperature Gas and Plasma Nitriding of AISI 316L

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Triwiyanto A.

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper present mathematical model which developed to predict the nitrided layer thickness (case depth of gas nitrided and plasma nitrided austenitic stainless steel according to Fick’s first law for pure iron by adapting and manipulating the Hosseini’s model to fit the diffusion mechanism where nitrided structure formed by nitrided AISI 316L austenitic stainless steel. The mathematical model later tested against various actual gas nitriding and plasma nitriding experimental results with varying nitriding temperature and nitriding duration to see whether the model managed to successfully predict the nitrided layer thickness. This model predicted the coexistence of ε-Fe2-3N and γ΄-Fe4N under the present nitriding process parameters. After the validation process, it is proven that the mathematical model managed to predict the nitrided layer growth of the gas nitrided and plasma nitrided of AISI 316L SS up to high degree of accuracy.

  18. Chromium in aqueous nitrate plutonium process streams: Corrosion of 316 stainless steel and chromium speciation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was undertaken to determine if chromium(+6) could exist in plutonium process solutions under normal operating conditions. Four individual reactions were studied: the rate of dissolution of stainless steel, which is the principal source of chromium in process solutions; the rate of oxidation of chromium(+3) to chromium(+6) by nitric acid; and the reduction of chromium(+6) back to chromium(+3) by reaction with stainless steel and with oxalic acid. The stainless steel corrosion rate was found to increase with increasing nitric acid concentration, increasing hydrofluoric acid concentration, and increasing temperature. Oxidation of chromium(+3) to chromium(+6) was negligible at room temperature and only became significant in hot concentrated nitric acid. The rate of reduction of chromium(+6) back to chromium(+3) by reaction with stainless steel or oxalic acid was found to be much greater than the rate of the reverse oxidation reaction. Based on these findings and taking into account normal operating conditions, it was determined that although there would be considerable chromium in plutonium process streams it would rarely be found in the (+6) oxidation state and would not exist in the (+6) state in the final process waste solutions

  19. Mathematical Modelling of Nitride Layer Growth of Low Temperature Gas and Plasma Nitriding of AISI 316L

    OpenAIRE

    Triwiyanto A.; Zainuddin A.; Abidin K.A.Z; Billah M.A; Hussain P.

    2014-01-01

    This paper present mathematical model which developed to predict the nitrided layer thickness (case depth) of gas nitrided and plasma nitrided austenitic stainless steel according to Fick’s first law for pure iron by adapting and manipulating the Hosseini’s model to fit the diffusion mechanism where nitrided structure formed by nitrided AISI 316L austenitic stainless steel. The mathematical model later tested against various actual gas nitriding and plasma nitriding experimental results with ...

  20. Alkane dehydrogenation over supported chromium oxide catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weckhuysen, B.M.; Schoonheydt, R.A.

    1999-01-01

    The dehydrogenation of alkanes over supported chromium oxide catalysts in the absence of oxygen is of high interest for the industrial production of propene and isobutene. In this review, a critical overview is given of the current knowledge nowadays available about chromium-based dehydrogenation ca

  1. Hydrodenitrogenation of pyridine over transition metal nitrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milad, I.K.; Smith, K.J. [British Columbia Univ., Vancouver, BC (Canada). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    1997-11-01

    The use of transition metal nitrides (TMN) as catalysts for hydrodenitrogenation (HDN) was discussed. A study was conducted in which a series of unsupported and supported Mo, Fe, W, Co, Nb, Cr, V and Ti nitrides were examined as catalysts for the HDN of pyridine at atmospheric pressure and 350 degrees C. The catalysts were prepared by temperature programmed nitridation of the metal oxide with NH{sub 3}. It was shown that a single nitride phase was present in each of the catalysts. The Mo nitride showed the greatest activity per gram of catalyst. Co and Fe nitrides showed the highest activities per surface area of the unsupported catalyst. Metal nitrides with lower heats of formation showed higher HDN activity. 1 tab.

  2. Homogeneous dispersion of gallium nitride nanoparticles in a boron nitride matrix by nitridation with urea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusunose, Takafumi; Sekino, Tohru; Ando, Yoichi

    2010-07-01

    A Gallium Nitride (GaN) dispersed boron nitride (BN) nanocomposite powder was synthesized by heating a mixture of gallium nitrate, boric acid, and urea in a hydrogen atmosphere. Before heat treatment, crystalline phases of urea, boric acid, and gallium nitrate were recognized, but an amorphous material was produced by heat treatment at 400 degrees C, and then was transformed into GaN and turbostratic BN (t-BN) by further heat treatment at 800 degrees C. TEM obsevations of this composite powder revealed that single nanosized GaN particles were homogeneously dispersed in a BN matrix. Homogeneous dispersion of GaN nanoparticles was thought to be attained by simultaneously nitriding gallium nitrate and boric acid to GaN and BN with urea. PMID:21128417

  3. Neutron scattering and models: Chromium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Differential neutron elastic-scattering cross sections of elemental chromium are measured from 4.5 ∼ 10 MeV in steps of ∼ 0.5 MeV and at ≥ 40 scattering angles distributed between ∼ 17 degree--160 degree. Concurrently differential cross sections for the inelastic neutron excitation of the yrast 2+ (1.434 MeV) level in d52Cr are determined. In addition, broad inelastically-scattered neutron groups are observed corresponding to composite excitation of levels up to ∼ 5.5 MeV in the various chromium isotopes. These experimental results are combined with low-energy values previously reported from this laboratory, with recent ∼ 8 → 15 MeV data measured at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt and with a 21.6 MeV result from the literature to form an extensive neutron-scattering data base which is interpreted in the context of spherical-optical and coupled-channels (rotational and vibrational) models. These models reasonably describe the observables but indicate rather large energy-dependent parameter trends at low energies similar to those previously reported near the peak of the So strength function in studies at this laboratory. The physical implications of the measurements and models are discussed including deformation, coupling, dispersive and asymmetry effects

  4. Luminescence spectra of chromium-doped LiGaO 2 crystals as indicator of their phase heterogeneity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meylman, Mikhail L.

    2006-02-01

    The luminescent properties of chromium-doped LiGaO2 single crystals grown from melt by Cz pulling technique are considered and compared with similar data for the other stable crystalline compounds in Li2O-Ga2O3 oxide system. It is proposed that co-crystallization of large LiGaO2 single crystal and a great number of LiGa5O8 spinel microcrystallites of nano scale dimensions is the key cause for appearance of numerous inclusions observed in LiGaO2 plates used as substrates at the III nitride films epitaxial growth.

  5. Low-chromium reduced-activation chromium-tungsten steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klueh, R.L.; Alexander, D.J.; Maziasz, P.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1996-10-01

    Bainitic microstructures formed during continuous cooling can differ from classical upper and lower bainite formed during isothermal transformation. Two types of non-classical bainite were observed depending on the cooling rate: carbide-free acicular bainite at rapid cooling rates and granular bainite at slower cooling rates. The Charpy impact toughness of the acicular ferrite was found to be considerably better than for the granular bainite. It was postulated that alloying to improve the hardenability of the steel would promote the formation of acicular bainite, just as increasing the cooling rate does. To test this, chromium and tungsten were added to the 2 1/4Cr-2W and 2 1/4Cr-2WV steel compositions to increase their hardenability, and the microstructures and mechanical properties were examined.

  6. Bainitic chromium-tungsten steels with 3 pct chromium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Previous work on 3Cr-1.5MoV (nominally Fe-3Cr-2.5Mo-0.25V-0.1C), 2.25Cr-2W (Fe-2.25Cr-2W-0.1C), and 2.25Cr-2WV (Fe-2.25Cr-2W-0.25V-0.1C) steels indicated that the impact toughness of these steels depended on the microstructure of the bainite formed during continuous cooling from the austenization temperature. Microstructures formed during continuous cooling can differ from classical upper and lower bainite formed during isothermal transformation. Two types of nonclassical microstructures were observed depending on the cooling rate: carbide-free acicular bainite at rapid cooling rates and granular bainite at slower cooling rates. The Charpy impact toughness of the acicular ferrite was considerably better than for the granular bainite. It was postulated that alloying to improve the hardenability of the steel would promote the formation of acicular bainite, just as increasing the cooling rate does. To test this, chromium and tungsten were added to the 2.25Cr-2W and 2.25Cr-2WV steel compositions to increase their hardenability. Charpy testing indicated that the new 3Cr-W and 3Cr-WV steels had improved impact toughness, as demonstrated by lower ductile-brittle transition temperatures and higher upper-shelf energies. This improvement occurred with less tempering than was necessary to achieve similar toughness for the 2.25Cr steels and for high-chromium (9 to 12 pct Cr) Cr-W and Cr-Mo steels

  7. Reproductive toxicological aspects of chromium in males

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To expand our present understanding of the effects of chromium on male fertility a number of studies were designed to achieve this through the use of chromium intoxicated experimental animals and through investigation of sexual hormones and sperm quality in welders. Also in view of the lack of an experimental model for effects of noxious substance on the epididymal spermatozoa the main objectives of the series of studies reviewed here were: A. To establish a model for evaluation of epididymal sperm count and motility in the rat. B. To investigate and compare the effects of tri- and hexavalent chromium on epididymal spermatozoa. Further to describe the effects of low-dose long-time exposure of rats to the most toxicological interesting chromium oxidative state - hexavalent chromium. C. By the use of autoradiography and γ-countinuing to expand the present knowledge on the distribution of chromium in the body with special reference to the male reproductive organs. D. To describe the effects of exposure to hexavalent chromium in welding fume on levels of sexual hormones and semen parameters in welders. (EG)

  8. Synthesis of Chromium (Ⅲ) 5-aminosalicylate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Wei; HAO Er-jun; JIANG Yu-qin

    2004-01-01

    As we all known that diabetes is a chronic disease with major health consequences.Research has revealed that the occurrence of diabetes have great thing to do with the chromium deficient. Almost 40 years after the first report of glucose tolerance factor(GTF) [1], no conclusive evidence for an isolable ,biologically active form of chromium exited. Three materials have been proposed to be the biologically active form of chromium: "glucose tolerance factor", chromium Picolinate and low-molecular-weight chromium-binding substance (LWMCr) [2] . So there is potential for the design of new chromium drugs .5-Aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA) is identified as an active component in the therapy of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) such as Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis . The therapeutic action of 5-ASA is believed to be coupled to its ability to act as a free radical scavenger [3-4],acting locally on the inflamed colonic mucosa [5-7]. However, the clinical use of 5-ASA is limited, since orally administered 5-ASA is rapidly and completely absorbed from the upper gastrointestinal tract and therefore the local therapeutic effects of 5-ASA in the colon is hardly expected.In this paper, we report the synthesis of chromium(Ⅲ)5-aminosalicylate from 5-ASA and CrCl3. 6H2O.The synthesis route is as follow:The complex has been characterized by elemental analysis, IR spectra, X-ray powder diffractionand TG-DTA . They indicate that the structure is tris(5-ASA) Chromium . Experiments show that thecomplex has a good activity for supplement tiny dietary chromium, lowering blood glucose levels,lowering serum lipid levels and in creasing lean body mass .

  9. Effect of grain refinement and electrochemical nitridation on corrosion resistance of the 316L stainless steel for bipolar plates in PEMFCs environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jinlong, Lv; Tongxiang, Liang; Hongyun, Luo

    2015-10-01

    The stain-induced nanocrystalline α'-martensite was obtained by cryogenic cold rolling at liquid-nitrogen temperature for 316L stainless steel. The electrochemical results showed nanocrystalline 316L stainless steel deteriorated its corrosion resistance in a typical proton exchange membrane fuel cell environment compared with coarse grained one. However, comparing with electrochemically nitrided coarse grained stainless steel, electrochemically nitrided nanocrystalline stainless steel improved significantly corrosion resistance in the same environment, which was supported further by Mott-Shottky analysis. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis revealed that the nanocrystalline promoted the enrichment of nitrogen and chromium and inhibited form of NH3 on the surface, which could significantly improve the corrosion resistance of the 316L stainless steel. The present study showed that the electrochemically nitrided 316L stainless steel was more suitable for the bipolar plates in proton exchange membrane fuel cell environment than the untreated one, especially for nanocrystalline stainless steel.

  10. Chromium in leather footwear-risk assessment of chromium allergy and dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyssen, Jacob P; Strandesen, Maria; Poulsen, Pia B;

    2012-01-01

    Background. Chromium-tanned leather footwear, which releases >3 ppm hexavalent Cr(VI), may pose a risk of sensitizing and eliciting allergic dermatitis. Objectives. To determine the content and potential release of chromium in leather footwear and to discuss the prevention of chromium contact...... allergy and dermatitis. Methods. Sixty pairs of leather shoes, sandals and boots (20 children's, 20 men's, and 20 women's) were purchased in Copenhagen and examined with X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy. Chromium was extracted according to the International Standard, ISO 17075. The detection level for Cr......(VI) was 3 ppm. Results. Chromium was identified in 95% of leather footwear products, the median content being 1.7% (range 0-3.3%). No association with store category or footwear category was found. A tendency for there to be a higher chromium content in footwear with high prices was shown (p(trend) = 0...

  11. Characteristics of chromium-allergic dermatitis patients prior to regulatory intervention for chromium in leather

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bregnbak, David; Thyssen, Jacob P; Zachariae, Claus;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chromium-tanned leather articles currently constitute the most important cause of contact allergy to chromium in Denmark. A regulation on the content of hexavalent chromium in leather was adopted in November 2013 by the EU member states. OBJECTIVES: To characterize patients with...... chromium allergy and their disease, to serve as a baseline for future studies on the potential effect of the new regulation on chromium in leather. METHODS: A questionnaire case-control study was performed on 155 dermatitis patients with positive patch test reactions to potassium dichromate and a matched...... control group of 621 dermatitis patients. Comparisons were made by use of a χ(2) -test and the Mann-Whitney U-test. Logistic regression analyses were used to test for associations. RESULTS: Sixty-six per cent of chromium-allergic patients had a positive history of contact dermatitis caused by leather...

  12. Chromium intensification of a processed dental radiograph

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was undertaken to determine (1) the usefulness of chromium intensifier to improve the diagnostic quality of light radiograph; (2) the effect of chromium intensifier on density contrast; and (3) the effect of various chemical concentrations on density. The following results obtained: 1. CHROMIUM INTENSIFIER is useful for intensifying and improving the diagnostic quality of a light dental radiograph. 2. The degree of intensification can be controlled by varying bleaching time, repeating the processing, varying the proportions of the potassium bicarbonate and hydrochloric acid solutions. 3. The image produced is black and permanent. 4. The intensifier increases density and contrast

  13. Chromium (VI) adsorption on boehmite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granados-Correa, F. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Apartado Postal 18-1027 Col., Escandon, Delegacion Miguel Hidalgo, C.P. 11801 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)], E-mail: fgc@nuclear.inin.mx; Jimenez-Becerril, J. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Apartado Postal 18-1027 Col., Escandon, Delegacion Miguel Hidalgo, C.P. 11801 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)

    2009-03-15

    Boehmite was synthesized and characterized in order to study the adsorption behavior and the removal of Cr(VI) ions from aqueous solutions as a function of contact time, initial pH solution, amount of adsorbent and initial metal ion concentration, using batch technique. Adsorption data of Cr(VI) on the boehmite were analyzed according to Freundlich, Langmuir and Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R) adsorption models. Thermodynamic parameters for the adsorption system were determinated at 293, 303, 313 and 323 K temperatures. The kinetic values and thermodynamic parameters from the adsorption process show that the Cr(VI) ions adsorption on boehmite is an endothermic and spontaneous process. These results show that the boehmite could be considered as a potential adsorbent for chromium ions in aqueous solutions.

  14. Chromium – An essential mineral

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merlin D Lindemann

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The status of chromium (Cr is not a new question. Cr is clearly an essential nutrient; this is a position that has been held for over three decades by individual scientists, groups of scientists, and governmental committees. The most uniform response across species with regard to Cr deficiency symptoms that are responsive to Cr supplementation are alterations in glucose metabolism with special reference to peripheral tissue sensitivity to insulin. Because the body’s ability to control blood glucose is critical to many life functions, and loss of ability to adequately control blood glucose can lead to many health debilitations, a consequence of Cr supplementation can be improved health and reproductive outcomes as well as improved survival rate or life span.

  15. Occupational asthma due to chromium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leroyer, C; Dewitte, J D; Bassanets, A; Boutoux, M; Daniel, C; Clavier, J

    1998-01-01

    We describe a 28-year-old subject employed as a roofer in a construction company since the age of 19, who developed work-related symptoms of a cough, shortness of breath, wheezing, rhinitis and headaches. A description of a usual day at work suggested that the symptoms worsened while he was sawing corrugated fiber cement. Baseline spirometry was normal, and there was a mild bronchial hyperresponsiveness to carbachol. A skin patch test to chromium was negative. A specific inhalation challenge showed a boderline fall in forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) after exposure to fiber cement dust. Exposure to nebulization of potassium dichromate (K2Cr2O7), at 0.1 mg.ml-1 for 30 min, was followed by an immediate fall by 20% FEV1. Simultaneously, a significant increase in bronchial hyperresponsiveness was demonstrated. PMID:9782225

  16. Chromium isotope uptake in carbonates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodler, Alexandra

    Chromium (Cr) is a redox sensitive element potentially capable of tracing fine-scale fluctuations of the oxygenation of Earth’s early surface environments and seawater. The Cr isotope composition of carbonates could perhaps be used as paleo-redox proxy to elucidate changes in the geological past....... Processes that potentially fractionate Cr isotopes, perhaps during deposition, burial and alteration need to be constrained.Previous studies have shown that Cr isotopes are fractionated during oxidative weathering on land, where heavy Cr isotopes are preferentially removed with Cr(VI) while residual soils...... retain an isotopically light Cr signature. Cr(VI) enriched in heavy Cr isotopes is then transported via river waters to the oceans and sequestered into marine sediments. Marine chemical sediments such asbanded iron formations and modern marine carbonates have proven useful in recording the Cr isotope...

  17. Internal nitride formation during gas-phase thermal nitridation of titanium

    OpenAIRE

    Ajikumar, PK; M. Kamruddin; Shankar, P; Gouda, Ramakrishna; Balamurugan, AK; Nithya, R.; Tyagi, AK; Jayaram, V; Biswas, SK; Raj, Baldev

    2009-01-01

    Titanium nitride surface layers were prepared by gas-phase thermal nitridation of pure titanium in an ammonia atmosphere at 1373 K for different times. In addition to the surface nitride layer, nitride/hydride formation was observed in the bulk of the specimen. The cross-section of the specimen was characterized by various techniques such as optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, secondary ion mass spectrometry and nanomechanical testing, ...

  18. Ion nitriding of steel in plasma of non-selfsustained low-pressure arc discharge: phase transitions, faulted substructure and mechanical characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    recrystallization are suppressed and processes of nitrides formation with rather high concentration of nitrogen atoms counting upon atom of iron are more developed. The opportunity of nitriding of steel in plasma of pure nitrogen (without addition of hydrogen) at low temperature is caused by realization of effect of surface clearing from oxides as a result of its bombardment by the ions accelerated in collisionless near-surface layer of a spatial charge, formed near to a sample due to presence of a negative bias voltage and low working pressure. It is established, that in austenitic steel hardness of surface nitride layer (14 GPa) almost twice exceeds hardness of nitride layer of ferrite-pearlite steel. It is due to allocation of disperse chromium nitrides. It is shown, that formation in a near-surface layer of particles of chromium nitride accelerates processes of nitriding due to development in researched steel deformation induced transformation γ-phase (austenite) in α-phase (nitrous ferrite). Existence of some critical value of size of negative bias voltage on a sample (∼ 200 V), determining energy of nitrogen ions at their acceleration in a layer of the spatial discharge is revealed. It is caused, first, by effective destruction oxide film formed on a surface and blocking process of nitriding, and, second, by high concentration of high-energy ions of atomic nitrogen acting on a sample surface. (author)

  19. PLASMA NITRIDING FOR IMPROVING WEAR RESISTANCE OF CABLE BOLT

    OpenAIRE

    SHAOQING NIU; SHUANGSUO YANG; YI LI

    2013-01-01

    In order to improve the wear resistance of the cable bolt and increase its life-time during operation, plasma nitriding was employed to obtain a protective nitriding layer on its surface. The microstructure, phase constitution, microhardness and wear resistance of the nitriding layer were investigated. It was shown that continuous and dense nitriding layers were formed on the surface of the samples. The microhardness of the nitrided sample was enhanced by the formation of nitriding layer, whi...

  20. Simultaneous determination of chromium(III) and chromium(VI) in aqueous solutions by ion chromatography and chemiluminescence detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gammelgaard, Bente; Jøns, O; Nielsen, B

    1992-01-01

    A method for the simultaneous determination of chromium(iii) and chromium(vi) in a flow system based on chemiluminescence was developed. A Dionex cation-exchange guard column was used to separate chromium(iii) from chromium(vi), and chromium(vi) was reduced by potassium sulfite, whereupon both sp....... The detection limit was 0.5 micrograms l-1 for both species. Data were in agreement with Zeeman-effect background corrected atomic absorption spectrometry measurements....

  1. Silicon nitride-fabrication, forming and properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article, which is a literature survey of the recent years, includes description of several methods for the formation of silicone nitride, and five methods of forming: Reaction-bonded silicon nitride, sintering, hot pressing, hot isostatic pressing and chemical vapour deposition. Herein are also included data about mechanical and physical properties of silicon nitride and the relationship between the forming method and the properties. (author)

  2. AEROSOL BEHAVIOR IN CHROMIUM WASTE INCINERATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Suyuan Yu

    2003-01-01

    Cr2O3 is considered as the dominant incineration product during the combustion disposal of chromium waste. A hydrogen/air diffusion flame was employed to simulate the industrial process of incineration. Cr2O3 aerosols were generated inside the flame by the gas phase reaction of chromium and oxygen. Chromium came from the rapid decomposition of chromium hexacarbonyl (Cr(CO)6) at room temperature and was carried into the combustion chamber by hydrogen. Aerosol and clusters can then be easily formed in the flame by nucleation and coagulation. A two dimensional Discrete-Sectional Model (DSM) was adopted to calculate the Cr2O3 aerosol behavior. The experimental measurement method was Dynamic Light Scattering. The numerically predicted results agreed well with those of the experimental measurement. Both results show that the Cr2O3 aerosol size reached about 70 nanometers at the flame top.

  3. Potentiometry: A Chromium (III) -- EDTA Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoppe, J. I.; Howell, P. J.

    1975-01-01

    Describes an experiment that involves the preparation of a chromium (III)-EDTA compound, a study of its infrared spectrum, and the potentiometric determination of two successive acid dissociation constants. (Author/GS)

  4. Property database of TRU nitride fuel

    OpenAIRE

    西 剛史; 荒井 康夫; 高野 公秀; 倉田 正輝

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to prepare a property database of nitride fuel needed for the fuel design of accelerator-driven system (ADS) for transmutation of minor actinide (MA). Nitride fuel of ADS is characterized by high content of Pu and MA as principal components, and addition of a diluent material such as ZrN. Experimental data or evaluated values from the raw data on properties Pu and MA nitrides, and nitride solid solutions containing ZrN are collected and summarized, which cover the...

  5. Plasmonic titanium nitride nanostructures for perfect absorbers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guler, Urcan; Li, Wen-Wei; Kinsey, Nathaniel; Naik, Gururaj V.; Boltasseva, Alexandra; Guan, Jianguo; Kildishev, Alexander V.; Shalaev, Vladimir M.

    2013-01-01

    We propose a metamaterial based perfect absorber in the visible region, and investigate the performance of titanium nitride as an alternative plasmonic material. Numerical and experimental results reveal that titanium nitride performs better than gold as a plasmonic absorbing material.Renewable E......We propose a metamaterial based perfect absorber in the visible region, and investigate the performance of titanium nitride as an alternative plasmonic material. Numerical and experimental results reveal that titanium nitride performs better than gold as a plasmonic absorbing material...

  6. Further investigation of the structure and properties of austenitic stainless steel after plasma nitriding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menthe, E.; Rie, K.-T. [Technische Univ. Braunschweig (Germany). Inst. fuer Oberflaechentechnik und Plasmatechnische Werkstoffentwicklung

    1999-09-01

    A series of plasma nitriding experiments has been conducted on AISI 304L austenitic stainless steel at temperatures ranging from 375 to 475 C using pulsed-DC plasma with different pulse duty cycles, N{sub 2}-H{sub 2} gas mixtures and treatment times. It is shown that a wide range of treatment parameters exist that allow the formation of the S-phase. The formation and growth of this surface layer depend strongly on the treatment parameters, such as nitrogen partial pressure and duty cycle. Within the parameter range investigated, the layer growth appears to be diffusion controlled with an activation energy about 107 kJ/mol. The formation of CrN precipitates during plasma nitriding is not accompanied by the formation of bcc iron, which might be expected due to the loss of free chromium. However, the S-phase transforms into CrN and bcc iron following a heat treatment at 450 C or higher for 25 h. The wear rate after plasma nitriding is greatly reduced compared with the untreated material. (orig.)

  7. Characterization of bulk hexagonal boron nitride single crystals grown by the metal flux technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edgar, J. H.; Hoffman, T. B.; Clubine, B.; Currie, M.; Du, X. Z.; Lin, J. Y.; Jiang, H. X.

    2014-10-01

    The optical and physical properties of hexagonal boron nitride single crystals grown from a molten metal solution are reported. The hBN crystals were grown by precipitation from a nickel-chromium flux with a boron nitride source, by slowly cooling from 1500 °C at 2-4 °C/h under a nitrogen flow at atmospheric pressure. The hBN crystals formed on the surface of the flux with an apparent crystal size up to 1-2 mm in diameter. Individual grains were as large as 100-200 μm across. Typically, the flakes removed from the metal were 6-20 μm thick. Optical absorption measurements suggest a bandgap of 5.8 eV by neglecting the binding energy of excitons in hBN. The highest energy photoluminescence peak was at 5.75 eV at room temperature. The hBN crystals typically had a pit density of 5×106 cm-2 after etching in a molten eutectic mixture of potassium hydroxide and sodium hydroxide. The quality of these crystals suggests they are suitable as substrates for two dimensional materials such as graphene and gallium nitride based devices.

  8. III-nitride blue microdisplays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prototype blue microdisplays have been fabricated from InGaN/GaN quantum wells. The device has a dimension of 0.5x0.5mm2 and consists of 10x10 pixels 12 μm in diameter. Emission properties such as electroluminescence spectra, output power versus forward current (L--I) characteristic, viewing angle, and uniformity have been measured. Due to the unique properties of III-nitride wide-band-gap semiconductors, microdisplays fabricated from III nitrides can potentially provide unsurpassed performance, including high-brightness/resolution/contrast, high-temperature/high-power operation, high shock resistance, wide viewing angles, full-color spectrum capability, long life, high speed, and low-power consumption, thus providing an enhancement and benefit to the present capabilities of miniature display systems

  9. Nucleation of iron nitrides during gaseous nitriding of iron; the effect of a preoxidation treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friehling, Peter B.; Poulsen, Finn Willy; Somers, Marcel A.J.

    2001-01-01

    grains. On prolonged nitriding, immediate nucleation at the surface of iron grains becomes possible. Calculated incubation times for the nucleation of gamma'-Fe4N1-x during nitriding are generally longer than those observed experimentally in the present work. The incubation time is reduced dramatically......The nucleation of iron nitrides during gaseous nitriding has been investigated using light microscopy and X-ray diffraction. Initially, the nucleation of gamma'-Fe4N1-x on a pure iron surface starts at grain boundaries meeting the surface, from where the nitride grains grow laterally into the iron...

  10. Bioremediation of chromium solutions and chromium containing wastewaters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malaviya, Piyush; Singh, Asha

    2016-08-01

    Cr(VI) represents a serious threat to human health, living resources and ecological system as it is persistent, carcinogenic and toxic, whereas, Cr(III), another stable oxidation state of Cr, is less toxic and can be readily precipitated out of solution. The conventional methods of Cr(VI) removal from wastewaters comprise of chemical reduction followed by chemical precipitation. However, these methods utilize large amounts of chemicals and generate toxic sludge. This necessitates the need for devising an eco-technological strategy that would use the untapped potential of the biological world for remediation of Cr(VI) containing wastewaters. Among several viable approaches, biotransformation of Cr(VI) to relatively non-toxic Cr(III) by chromium resistant bacteria offers an economical- and environment-friendly option for its detoxification. Various studies on use of Cr(VI) tolerant viable bacterial isolates for treatment of Cr(VI) containing solutions and wastewater have been reported. Therefore, a detailed account of mechanisms and processes involved in bioreduction of Cr(VI) from solutions and wastewaters by bacterial isolates are the focus of this review article in addition to a discussion on toxicity of Cr(VI) on bacterial strains and various factors affecting Cr(VI) bioreduction. PMID:25358056

  11. MICROSTRUCTURE AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF ULTRAFINE WC/Co CEMENTED CARBIDES WITH CUBIC BORON NITRIDE AND Cr₃C₂ ADDITIONS

    OpenAIRE

    Genrong Zhang; Haiyan Chen; Dong Lihua; Yin,; Li Kun

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates the microstructure and mechanical properties of ultrafine tungsten carbide and cobalt (WC/Co) cemented carbides with cubic boron nitride (CBN) and chromium carbide (Cr₃C₂) fabricated by a hot pressing sintering process. This study uses samples with 8 wt% Co content and 7.5 vol% CBN content, and with different Cr₃C₂ content ranging from 0 to 0.30 wt%. Based on the experimental results, Cr₃C₂ content has a significant influence on inhibiting abnormal grain growth and dec...

  12. Microstructure analysis of the iron nitride thin films nitrided on the surface of machinery component materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On this study the ion nitriding process of the machinery component materials, which consist of the piston pen and the piston rings, have been conducted. Ion nitriding of the machinery component materials was performed for some variation of nitriding temperature, nitriding time and pressure of nitrogen gas using DC glow discharge. The optimum hardness of the piston pen samples was obtained at the nitriding temperature of 100°C, the nitriding time of 3 hours and the nitrogen gas pressure of 1.6 mbar, and the hardness value increased approximately six times compared with the non nitrided samples; while the hardness value of the piston ring was increase approximately 2.6 time at the temperature nitriding of 100°C, the nitriding time of 3 hours and the nitrogen gas pressure of 1.2 mbar. To observe the micro-structure and elemental composition of iron nitride thin films formed on the surface of the samples was used SEM-EDAX, and the phase structure of iron nitride thin films was observed by using XRD. Based on the observations was known that a compound layer formed on the surface of samples containing different nitrogen and form the phase structure of γ-Fe4N, ε-Fe3N and ζ-Fe2N that have a very good mechanical properties. (author)

  13. Diminishing Chromium Use on Combined Chromium-Gambier Tanning Process Upon the Characteristics of Tanned Leather

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Kasim

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The research was aimed to investigate the influence of minimizing chromium use on combined chromium-gambier process upon the characteristics of tanned leather. At the first stage of tanning process, chromium was used and in the second stage it was replaced by gambier. The raw material used was dried saline-preserved goat skin. The treatments applied on the tanning process were the different concentrations of chromium ranging from the highest level of 6% to the lowest level of 1% which was then re-tanned by using 8% concentration of gambier. The examination parameters included chemical and physical properties as well as visual investigation on the tanned leather in accordance with SNI-06-0463-1989-A. The result showed that the tanning process by using 2% chromium in the first step and 8% gambier in the second step was a treatment combination producing tanned leather that met the standard. The examination on tanned leather resulted from such treatment showed 56.33% rawhide, 17.45% of bound tannin, 31.22% of tanning level, tensile strength 386.30 kg/cm2, flexibility 31.91%, leather width 1.3 mm, density 0.75 g/cm3, the leather was quite elastic with light brownish color. In conclusion, minimizing the use of chromium in the combined tanning process of chromium and gambier can be implemented to the lowest of 2% chromium concentration and 8% gambier in the first and second step, respectively.

  14. Study of a New Chromium-Free Conversion Coating Formed on ZnAl Alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LONG Jin-ming; GUO Zhong-cheng; HAN Xia-yun; YANG Ning

    2004-01-01

    A new chromium-free conversion film was obtained on surface of a ZnAl alloy by chemical conversion process.Influence of the additives in treating solution containing cerium salt on the corrosion protection of the conversion film formed on zinc alloy was investigated. Corrosion tests and electrochemical measurements in sodium chloride solution were performed. The microstructure and composition of the coatings were examined by means of SEM, EDS and XRD. It was found that the corrosion protection capabilities of the conversion film are markedly increased with the cerium nitride plus additives (hydrogen fluoride acid and an organic inhibitor) treating process. The modified conversion film is an organic/inorganic composite coating and is much more corrosion resistant than the conventional chromate conversion coating and the single cerium conversion coating.

  15. Lateral stress evolution in chromium sulfide cermets with varying excess chromium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petel, O. E.; Appleby-Thomas, G. J.; Wood, D. C.; Capozzi, A.; Nabavi, A.; Goroshin, S.; Frost, D. L.; Hazell, P. J.

    2016-04-01

    The shock response of chromium sulfide-chromium, a cermet of potential interest as a matrix material for ballistic applications, has been investigated at two molar ratios. Using a combustion synthesis technique allowed for control of the molar ratio of the material, which was investigated under near-stoichiometric (cermet) and excess chromium (interpenetrating composite) conditions, representing chromium:sulfur molar ratios of 1.15:1 and 4:1, respectively. The compacts were investigated via the plate-impact technique, which allowed the material to be loaded under a one-dimensional state of strain. Embedded manganin stress gauges were employed to monitor the temporal evolution of longitudinal and lateral components of stress in both materials. Comparison of these two components has allowed assessment of the variation of material shear strength both with impact pressure/strain-rate and time for the two molar ratio conditions. The two materials exhibited identical material strength despite variations in their excess chromium contents.

  16. Development of a brazing process for the production of water- cooled bipolar plates made of chromium-coated metal foils for PEM fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, M.; Hoehlich, D.; Scharf, I.; Lampke, T.; Hollaender, U.; Maier, H. J.

    2016-03-01

    Beside lithium batteries, PEM fuel cells are the most promising strategy as a power source to achieve the targets for introducing and increasing the usage of electric vehicles. Due to limited space and weight problems, water cooled, metallic bipolar plates in a fuel cell metal stack are preferred in motor vehicles. These plates are stamped metal sheets with a complex structure, interconnected media-tight. To meet the multiple tasks and requirements in use, complex and expensive combinations of materials are currently in use (carbon fiber composites, graphite, gold-plated nickel, stainless and acid resistant steel). The production of such plates is expensive as it is connected with considerable effort or the usage of precious metals. As an alternative, metalloid nitrides (CrN, VN, W2N, etc.) show a high chemical resistance, hardness and a good conductivity. So this material category meets the basic requirements of a top layer. However, the standard methods for their production (PVD, CVD) are expensive and have a slow deposition rate and a lower layer thicknesses. Because of these limitations, a full functionality over the life cycle of a bipolar plate is not guaranteed. The contribution shows the development and quantification of an alternative production process for bipolar plates. The expectation is to get significant advantages from the combination of chromium electrodeposition and thermochemical treatment to form chromium nitrides. Both processes are well researched and suitable for series production. The thermochemical treatment of the chromium layer also enables a process-integrated brazing.

  17. Ion-beam nitriding of steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salik, Joshua (Inventor); Hubbell, Theodore E. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A surface of a steel substrate is nitrided without external heating by exposing it to a beam of nitrogen ions under low pressure, a pressure much lower than that employed for ion-nitriding. An ion source is used instead of a glow discharge. Both of these features reduce the introduction of impurities into the substrate surface.

  18. Synthesis of ternary nitrides by mechanochemical alloying

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, C.J.H.; Zhu, J.J.; Lindelov, H.; Jiang, Jianzhong

    2002-01-01

    nitrides by mechanochemical alloying of a binary transition metal nitride (MxN) with an elemental transition metal. In this way, we have been able to prepare Fe3Mo3N and Co3Mo3N by ball-milling of Mo2N with Fe and Co, respectively. The transformation sequence from the starting materials ( the binary...

  19. Corrosion resistance and electrical properties of carbon/chromium-titanium-nitride multilayer coatings on stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Kai; Li, Zhuguo; Lu, Fenggui; Huang, Jian; Cai, Xun; Wu, Yixiong

    2014-03-01

    High electrical conductivity and corrosion resistance are central to advances in wider application of metallic bipolar plates in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). In this study, C/Cr-Ti-N multilayer coatings are deposited by physical vapor deposition and the effect of Cr:Ti ratio on the corrosion resistance and interfacial contact resistance (ICR) are systematically investigated. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) result shows that the carbon layer is compact and uniform. Excellent corrosion resistance of 0.127 μA cm-2 current density at operating voltage in PEMFC cathode environment and low ICR of 2.03 mΩ-cm2 at compaction force of 150 N cm-2 are achieved when Cr:Ti ratio is 2:4 and 3:3, respectively. The significant enhancement in surface conductivity is probably because that the current comes from carbon paper is homogenized by two electrically conductive layers and flows to the passive film with much more contact area. After polarization, ICR increase to 3.07 mΩ-cm2 and 3.02 mΩ-cm2 in the simulated PEMFC cathode and anode environment, respectively. However, the Raman spectroscopy results disclose that the bonding type of top carbon film before and after polarization shows little difference. The results indicate that C/Cr-Ti-N multilayer coating with Cr:Ti ratio of 2:4 achieves the optimal composition.

  20. Synthesis of Cubic Chromium Nitride Nanocrystals Powders by Arc Discharge Plasma Method

    OpenAIRE

    SHEN Long-Hai,CUI Qi-Liang

    2010-01-01

    Cubic CrN nanoparticles with the size less than 10 nm were synthesized through direct reaction of metal Cr with N2 by arc discharge plasma method. The products synthesized under different nitrogen gas pressure were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscope (TEM) and Fourier transform infrared spectra (FT-IR). The effect of N2 pressure and accession of NH3 on the formation of cubic phase CrN were studied. The results indicate that it is beneficial for the conve...

  1. A comparative study of transport properties in polycrystalline and epitaxial chromium nitride films

    KAUST Repository

    Duan, X. F.

    2013-01-08

    Polycrystalline CrNx films on Si(100) and glass substrates and epitaxial CrNx films on MgO(100) substrates were fabricated by reactive sputtering with different nitrogen gas flow rates (fN2). With the increase of fN2, a lattice phase transformation from metallic Cr2N to semiconducting CrN appears in both polycrystalline and epitaxial CrNx films. At fN2= 100 sccm, the low-temperature conductance mechanism is dominated by both Mott and Efros-Shklovskii variable-range hopping in either polycrystalline or epitaxial CrN films. In all of the polycrystalline and epitaxial films, only the polycrystalline CrNx films fabricated at fN2 = 30 and 50 sccm exhibit a discontinuity in ρ(T) curves at 260-280 K, indicating that both the N-vacancy concentration and grain boundaries play important roles in the metal-insulator transition. © 2013 American Institute of Physics.

  2. Tribological characterization of chromium nitride coating deposited by filtered cathodic vacuum arc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CrN coatings were prepared by filtered cathodic vacuum arc (FCVA) technique. The influence of the deposition parameters (nitrogen partial pressure PN2, substrate bias voltage Vs and preheating of the substrate) on the structural, mechanical and tribological properties of the FCVA CrN coatings was investigated. Further, the FCVA CrN coating was compared in dry reciprocating sliding with commercial multi-arc ion plating (MAIP) CrN coating as to friction and wear properties. Profilometer, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDX) were used to evaluate the wear scars and the wear mechanisms were discussed. The results showed that the structural, mechanical and tribological properties of the FCVA CrN coatings were significantly dependent on the deposition parameters. The FCVA CrN coating deposited with PN2 of 0.1 Pa, Vs of -100 V and without preheating exhibited the optimal mechanical and tribological properties. The FCVA CrN coating exhibited much better anti-abrasive and anti-spalling properties than the MAIP CrN coating, which was resulted from significant reduction of macroparticles and pitting defects by the FCVA technique. The MAIP CrN coating suffered severe concentrated wear by a combination wear mechanisms of delamination, abrasive and oxidative wear when high normal load was applied, while for the FCVA CrN coating the wear mechanisms were ultra-mild abrasive and oxidative wear.

  3. Tribological characterization of chromium nitride coating deposited by filtered cathodic vacuum arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, J. L.; Zhu, M. H.

    2009-06-01

    CrN coatings were prepared by filtered cathodic vacuum arc (FCVA) technique. The influence of the deposition parameters (nitrogen partial pressure P, substrate bias voltage Vs and preheating of the substrate) on the structural, mechanical and tribological properties of the FCVA CrN coatings was investigated. Further, the FCVA CrN coating was compared in dry reciprocating sliding with commercial multi-arc ion plating (MAIP) CrN coating as to friction and wear properties. Profilometer, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDX) were used to evaluate the wear scars and the wear mechanisms were discussed. The results showed that the structural, mechanical and tribological properties of the FCVA CrN coatings were significantly dependent on the deposition parameters. The FCVA CrN coating deposited with P of 0.1 Pa, Vs of -100 V and without preheating exhibited the optimal mechanical and tribological properties. The FCVA CrN coating exhibited much better anti-abrasive and anti-spalling properties than the MAIP CrN coating, which was resulted from significant reduction of macroparticles and pitting defects by the FCVA technique. The MAIP CrN coating suffered severe concentrated wear by a combination wear mechanisms of delamination, abrasive and oxidative wear when high normal load was applied, while for the FCVA CrN coating the wear mechanisms were ultra-mild abrasive and oxidative wear.

  4. Tribological characterization of chromium nitride coating deposited by filtered cathodic vacuum arc

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mo, J.L. [Tribology Research Institute, Traction Power State Key Laboratory, Southwest Jiaotong University, 111 Er Huan Road, Chengdu 610031 (China); Zhu, M.H., E-mail: zhuminhao@swjtu.cn [Tribology Research Institute, Traction Power State Key Laboratory, Southwest Jiaotong University, 111 Er Huan Road, Chengdu 610031 (China)

    2009-06-15

    CrN coatings were prepared by filtered cathodic vacuum arc (FCVA) technique. The influence of the deposition parameters (nitrogen partial pressure P{sub N{sub 2}}, substrate bias voltage V{sub s} and preheating of the substrate) on the structural, mechanical and tribological properties of the FCVA CrN coatings was investigated. Further, the FCVA CrN coating was compared in dry reciprocating sliding with commercial multi-arc ion plating (MAIP) CrN coating as to friction and wear properties. Profilometer, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDX) were used to evaluate the wear scars and the wear mechanisms were discussed. The results showed that the structural, mechanical and tribological properties of the FCVA CrN coatings were significantly dependent on the deposition parameters. The FCVA CrN coating deposited with P{sub N{sub 2}} of 0.1 Pa, V{sub s} of -100 V and without preheating exhibited the optimal mechanical and tribological properties. The FCVA CrN coating exhibited much better anti-abrasive and anti-spalling properties than the MAIP CrN coating, which was resulted from significant reduction of macroparticles and pitting defects by the FCVA technique. The MAIP CrN coating suffered severe concentrated wear by a combination wear mechanisms of delamination, abrasive and oxidative wear when high normal load was applied, while for the FCVA CrN coating the wear mechanisms were ultra-mild abrasive and oxidative wear.

  5. Cathodic Cage Plasma Nitriding: An Innovative Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. R. M. de Sousa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cylindrical samples of AISI 1020, AISI 316, and AISI 420 steels, with different heights, were simultaneously treated by a new technique of ionic nitriding, entitled cathodic cage plasma nitriding (CCPN, in order to evaluate the efficiency of this technique to produce nitrided layers with better properties compared with those obtained using conventional ionic nitriding technique. This method is able to eliminate the edge effect in the samples, promoting a better uniformity of temperature, and consequently, a smaller variation of the thickness/height relation can be obtained. The compound layers were characterized by X-ray diffraction, optical microscopy, and microhardness test profile. The results were compared with the properties of samples obtained with the conventional nitriding, for the three steel types. It was verified that samples treated by CCPN process presented, at the same temperature, a better uniformity in the thickness and absence of the edge effect.

  6. The enriched chromium neutrino source for GALLEX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The preparation and study of an intense source of neutrinos in the form of neutron irradiated materials which are enriched in Cr-50 for use in the GALLEX solar neutrino experiment are discussed. Chromyl fluoride gas is enriched in the Cr-50 isotope by gas centrifugation and subsequently converted to a very stable form of chromium oxide. The results of neutron activation analyses of such chromium samples indicate low levels of any long-lived activities, but show that short-lived activities, in particular Na-24, may be of concern. These results show that irradiating chromium oxide enriched in Cr-50 is preferable to irradiating either natural chromium or argon gas as a means of producing a neutrino source to calibrate the GALLEX detector. These results of the impurity level analysis of the enriched chromyl fluoride gas and its conversion to the oxide are also of interest to work in progress by other members of the Collaboration investigating an alternative conversion of the enriched gas to chromium metal. 35 refs., 12 figs., 5 tabs

  7. Serum chromium levels in gestational diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P G Sundararaman

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To measure serum chromium level in women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM from Chennai, South India. Materials and Methods: Thirty women with gestational diabetes, 60 age matched controls. Inclusion criteria: Gestational age 22-28 weeks, age group 20-35 years. Exclusion Criteria: Gestational age beyond 28 weeks, malnutrition or presence of infection. Serum chromium was measured using inductive couple plasma emission spectrometer. Results: Serum chromium levels of women with GDM, 1.59+/-0.02 ng/ml (range: 0.16-4.0 ng/ml were lower than in controls (4.58+/-0.62 ng/ml; range 0.82-5.33 ng/ml (P < 0.001. However, there were no significant differences among cases and controls when subdivided by parity. Conclusions: Women with GDM from a South Indian city had lower levels of serum chromium compared to pregnant women without GDM. Studies may be done whether chromium supplementation is useful in this group of women.

  8. Occupational exposure to chromium(VI compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jolanta Skowroń

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses the effect of chromium(VI (Cr(VI on human health under conditions of acute and chronic exposure in the workplace. Chromium(VI compounds as carcinogens and/or mutagens pose a direct danger to people exposed to them. If carcinogens cannot be eliminated from the work and living environments, their exposure should be reduced to a minimum. In the European Union the proposed binding occupational exposure limit value (BOELV for chromium(VI of 0.025 mg/m³ is still associated with high cancer risk. Based on the Scientific Commitee of Occupational Exposure Limits (SCOEL document chromium(VI concentrations at 0.025 mg/m³ increases the risk of lung cancer in 2–14 cases per 1000 exposed workers. Exposure to chromium(VI compounds expressed in Cr(VI of 0.01 mg Cr(VI/m3 is responsible for the increased number of lung cancer cases in 1–6 per 1000 people employed in this condition for the whole period of professional activity. Med Pr 2015;66(3:407–427

  9. [Occupational exposure to chromium(VI) compounds].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skowroń, Jolanta; Konieczko, Katarzyna

    2015-01-01

    This article discusses the effect of chromium(VI) (Cr(VI)) on human health under conditions of acute and chronic exposure in the workplace. Chromium(VI) compounds as carcinogens and/or mutagens pose a direct danger to people exposed to them. If carcinogens cannot be eliminated from the work and living environments, their exposure should be reduced to a minimum. In the European Union the proposed binding occupational exposure limit value (BOELV) for chromium(VI) of 0.025 mg/m³ is still associated with high cancer risk. Based on the Scientific Commitee of Occupational Exposure Limits (SCOEL) document chromium(VI) concentrations at 0.025 mg/m³ increases the risk of lung cancer in 2-14 cases per 1000 exposed workers. Exposure to chromium(VI) compounds expressed in Cr(VI) of 0.01 mg Cr(VI)/m3; is responsible for the increased number of lung cancer cases in 1-6 per 1000 people employed in this condition for the whole period of professional activity. PMID:26325053

  10. III-nitride semiconductor materials

    CERN Document Server

    Feng, Zhe Chuan

    2006-01-01

    III-Nitride semiconductor materials - (Al, In, Ga)N - are excellent wide band gap semiconductors very suitable for modern electronic and optoelectronic applications. Remarkable breakthroughs have been achieved recently, and current knowledge and data published have to be modified and upgraded. This book presents the new developments and achievements in the field. Written by renowned experts, the review chapters in this book cover the most important topics and achievements in recent years, discuss progress made by different groups, and suggest future directions. Each chapter also describes the

  11. Electron spectroscopy of dilute nitrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The application of electron spectroscopies in dilute nitride semiconductor research for both chemical analysis and the determination of electronic and lattice vibrational properties is described. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of the nitrogen bonding configurations in dilute InNxSb1-x and InNxAs1-x alloys is presented. High resolution electron-energy-loss spectroscopy (HREELS) of the plasmon excitations in InNxSb1-x is shown to provide information on the electronic properties of the material, before and after annealing. HREELS is also used to investigate the GaN-like phonon modes in GaNxAs1-x alloys

  12. Surface analysis in steel nitrides by using Moessbauer spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The formation of iron nitride layer at low temperatures, 600-700 K, by Moessbauer spectroscopy is studied. These layers were obtained basically through two different processes: ion nitriding and ammonia gas nitriding. A preliminary study about post-discharge nitriding was made using discharge in hollow cathode as well as microwave excitation. The assembly of these chambers is also described. The analysis of the nitrided samples was done by CEMS and CXMS, aided by optical microscopy, and the CEMS and CXMS detectors were constructed by ourselves. We also made a brief study about these detectors, testing as acetone as the mixture 80% He+10% C H4 as detection gases for the use of CEMS. The surface analysis of the samples showed that in the ammonia gas process nitriding the nitrided layer starts by the superficial formation of an iron nitride rich nitrogen. By thermal evolution this nitride promotes the diffusion of nitrogen and the formation of other more stable nitrides. (author)

  13. Flashlamp-pumped lasing of chromium-doped GSG garnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The implications for the practical use of chromium:GSGG in lamp-pumped tunable lasers are discussed in this paper. The authors report here some major improvements in the performance of the flashlamp-pumped chromium:GSGG laser

  14. Surface Chemistry and Spectroscopy of Chromium in Inorganic Oxides

    OpenAIRE

    Weckhuysen, B. M.; Wachs, I.E.; Schoonheydt, R. A.

    1996-01-01

    Focuses on the surface chemistry and spectroscopy of chromium in inorganic oxides. Characterization of the molecular structures of chromium; Mechanics of hydrogenation-dehydrogenation reactions; Mobility and reactivity on oxidic surfaces.

  15. Studies of Some Novel Chromium Pyridine Dicarboxylate Complexes

    OpenAIRE

    Chauhan Jayprakash S; Patel Rameshchandra P; Pandya Ajit V

    2014-01-01

    Chromium pyridine di-carboxylate complexes are synthesized from Chromium (III) with pyridine 2, 6- dicarboxylic acid, pyridine 2, 3 and 2, 5- dicarboxylic acids. Chromium forms colored complexes. Chromium (III) forms a violate complex with pyridine 2, 6- dicarboxylic acid and purple violate complex with pyridine 2, 3 and 2, 5- dicarboxylic acids. The job’s method indicates metal ligand ratio to be 1:2. The interpretation of UV-VIS spectra indicates octahedral geometry and IR spectra give clue...

  16. Determination of chromium combined with DNA, RNA and proteins in chromium-rich brewer's yeast by NAA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The content of chromium in the DNA, RNA and protein fractions separated from chromium-rich and normal brewer's yeast was determined by neutron activation analysis (NAA). Our results show that the extracted relative amounts and concentrations of DNA, RNA and proteins have no significant difference for two types of yeast, but the chromium content in DNA, RNA and proteins fractions extracted from the chromium-rich yeast are substantially higher than those from the normal. In addition, the concentration of chromium in DNA is much higher than that in RNA and proteins. It is evident that the inorganic chromium compounds can enter the yeast cell during the yeast cultivation in the chromium-containing culture medium and are converted into organic chromium species, which are combined with DNA, RNA and proteins. (author)

  17. Chromium allergy and dermatitis: prevalence and main findings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bregnbak, David; Johansen, Jeanne D.; Jellesen, Morten Stendahl;

    2015-01-01

    The history of chromium as an allergen goes back more than a century, and includesan interventional success with national legislation that led to significant changes inthe epidemiology of chromium allergy in construction workers. The 2015 EU Leather Regulation once again put a focus on chromium...

  18. 21 CFR 73.1326 - Chromium hydroxide green.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Chromium hydroxide green. 73.1326 Section 73.1326... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1326 Chromium hydroxide green. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive chromium hydroxide green is principally hydrated chromic sesquioxide...

  19. 21 CFR 73.2326 - Chromium hydroxide green.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Chromium hydroxide green. 73.2326 Section 73.2326... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2326 Chromium hydroxide green. (a) Identity and specifications.The color additive chromium hydroxide green shall conform in identity and specifications to...

  20. Thermodynamic properties of chromium bearing slags and minerals. A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao Yanping; Holappa, L.

    1996-12-31

    In this report, the thermodynamic properties of chromium bearing slags and minerals were reviewed based on the available information in the literature. It includes the analysing methods for oxidation state of chromium in slags, oxidation state of chromium and activities of chromium oxides in slags and minerals. The phase diagrams of chromium oxide systems and chromium distributions between slag and metal phases are also covered ill this review. Concerning the analysing methods, it was found that most of the available approaches are limited to iron free slag systems and the sample preparation is very sensitive to the analysing results. In silicate slags under reducing atmosphere, divalent and trivalent chromium co-exist in the slags. It is agreed that the fraction of divalent chromium to total chromium increases with higher temperature, lower slag basicity and oxygen potential. For the slags under oxidising atmosphere, trivalent, pentavalent and hexavalent states were reported to be stable. The activities of CrO and CrO{sub 1.5} were concluded to have positive deviation from ideal solution. Slag basicity has a positive effect and temperature has a negative effect on the activities of chromium oxides. The phase diagrams of the Cr-O, binary, and ternary chromium containing oxide systems have been examined systematically. The analysis shows that the data on the quaternary and quinary systems are insufficient, and require further investigation. The most important features of the chromium containing silicate slags are the large miscibility gaps and the stability of the chromite spinel. (orig.) (76 refs.)

  1. 21 CFR 73.1015 - Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide. 73.1015 Section 73... LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1015 Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide. (a) Identity. The color additive chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide is a blue-green pigment obtained by calcining...

  2. Hexavalent and trivalent chromium in leather: What should be done?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moretto, Angelo

    2015-11-01

    Trivalent chromium compounds are used for leather tanning, and chromium may be released during use of leather goods. In certain instances, small amounts of hexavalent chromium can be formed and released. Both trivalent and hexavalent chromium can elicit allergic skin reaction in chromium sensitised subjects, the latter being significantly more potent. Induction of sensitisation only occurs after exposure to hexavalent chromium. A minority of subjects are sensitised to chromium, and in a fraction of these subjects allergic skin reaction have been described after wearing leather shoes or, less frequently, other leather goods. The evidence that in all these cases the reaction is related to hexavalent chromium is not always strong. The content of hexavalent chromium in leather is regulated in European Union, but rate of release rather than content is relevant for allergic skin reaction. The role of trivalent chromium appear much less relevant if at all. Modern tanning procedure do not pose significant risk due to either hexavalent or trivalent chromium. Dismissing bad quality and worn-off leather goods is relevant in reducing or eliminating the skin reaction. It should also be pointed out that shoe components or substances other than chromium in leather may cause allergic/irritative skin reactions. PMID:26361854

  3. SAFETY OF TRIVALENT CHROMIUM COMPLEXES USED IN NUTRIENT SUPPLEMENTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toxicity studies regarding trivalent chromium have often been completed under conditions that are not designed to reflect conditions that would be encountered under normal physiological conditions. We have shown that the incorporation of chromium into tissues of rats from chromium chloride and chro...

  4. Electrospun Gallium Nitride Nanofibers (abstract)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meléndez, Anamaris; Morales, Kristle; Ramos, Idalia; Campo, Eva; Santiago, Jorge J.

    2009-04-01

    The high thermal conductivity and wide bandgap of gallium nitride (GaN) are desirable characteristics in optoelectronics and sensing applications. In comparison to thin films and powders, in the nanofiber morphology the sensitivity of GaN is expected to increase as the exposed area (proportional to the length) increases. In this work we present electrospinning as a novel technique in the fabrication of GaN nanofibers. Electrospinning, invented in the 1930s, is a simple, inexpensive, and rapid technique to produce microscopically long ultrafine fibers. GaN nanofibers are produced using gallium nitrate and dimethyl-acetamide as precursors. After electrospinning, thermal decomposition under an inert atmosphere is used to pyrolyze the polymer. To complete the preparation, the nanofibers are sintered in a tube furnace under a NH3 flow. Both scanning electron microscopy and profilometry show that the process produces continuous and uniform fibers with diameters ranging from 20 to a few hundred nanometers, and lengths of up to a few centimeters. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis shows the development of GaN nanofibers with hexagonal wurtzite structure. Future work includes additional characterization using transmission electron microscopy and XRD to understand the role of precursors and nitridation in nanofiber synthesis, and the use of single nanofibers for the construction of optical and gas sensing devices.

  5. Strategies for chromium bioremediation of tannery effluent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Satyendra Kumar; Tripathi, Manikant; Srinath, Thiruneelakantan

    2012-01-01

    Bioremediation offers the possibility of using living organisms (bacteria, fungi, algae,or plants), but primarily microorganisms, to degrade or remove environmental contaminants, and transform them into nontoxic or less-toxic forms. The major advantages of bioremediation over conventional physicochemical and biological treatment methods include low cost, good efficiency, minimization of chemicals, reduced quantity of secondary sludge, regeneration of cell biomass, and the possibility of recover-ing pollutant metals. Leather industries, which extensively employ chromium compounds in the tanning process, discharge spent-chromium-laden effluent into nearby water bodies. Worldwide, chromium is known to be one of the most common inorganic contaminants of groundwater at pollutant hazardous sites. Hexavalent chromium poses a health risk to all forms of life. Bioremediation of chromium extant in tannery waste involves different strategies that include biosorption, bioaccumulation,bioreduction, and immobilization of biomaterial(s). Biosorption is a nondirected physiochemical interaction that occurs between metal species and the cellular components of biological species. It is metabolism-dependent when living biomass is employed, and metabolism-independent in dead cell biomass. Dead cell biomass is much more effective than living cell biomass at biosorping heavy metals, including chromium. Bioaccumulation is a metabolically active process in living organisms that works through adsorption, intracellular accumulation, and bioprecipitation mechanisms. In bioreduction processes, microorganisms alter the oxidation/reduction state of toxic metals through direct or indirect biological and chemical process(es).Bioreduction of Cr6+ to Cr3+ not only decreases the chromium toxicity to living organisms, but also helps precipitate chromium at a neutral pH for further physical removal,thus offering promise as a bioremediation strategy. However, biosorption, bioaccumulation, and

  6. Collisional properties of trapped cold chromium atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Pavlovich, Z; Côté, R; Sadeghpour, H R; Pavlovic, Zoran; Roos, Bjoern O.; Côté, Robin

    2004-01-01

    We report on calculations of the elastic cross section and thermalization rate for collision between two maximally spin-polarized chromium atoms in the cold and ultracold regimes, relevant to buffer-gas and magneto-optical cooling of chromium atoms. We calculate ab initio potential energy curves for Cr2 and the van der Waals coefficient C6, and construct interaction potentials between two colliding Cr atoms. We explore the effect of shape resonances on elastic cross section, and find that they dramatically affect the thermalization rate. Our calculated value for the s-wave scattering length is compared in magnitude with a recent measurement at ultracold temperatures.

  7. Wear behaviour of plasma nitrided tool steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devi, M.U. [Tata Iron and Steel Co. Ltd., Jamshedpur (India). Research and Development Div.; Chakraborty, T.K. [Wire Rod Mill, Tata Iron and Steel Co. Ltd., Jamshedpur (India); Mohanty, O.N. [Research and Development Division, Tata Iron and Steel Co. Ltd., Jamshedpur (India)

    1999-09-01

    Plasma nitriding of three grades of tool steels, namely H13, D2 and a special purpose proprietary tool steel, referred to as L7', has been explored in an effort to enhance the working life of roll entry (RE) guides in wire rod rolling mill that are subjected to a complex wear mode including impact, sliding and rolling. In the case of H13 and D2 steels, plasma nitriding is found to improve the life of guide rolls by two to three times depending upon the type of tool steel. The working life of the guide rolls made from L7' steel, however, was observed to be lower after plasma nitriding due to softening of the substrate at plasma nitriding temperature. The cross-section normal to wear scar and the surface of worn-out rolls were characterised by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to understand the wear mechanisms. The SEM examination of worn-out surfaces revealed signatures for the adhesion, abrasion, delamination and tribochemical (oxidative) modes of wear. In the case of rolls without plasma nitriding, adhesion was one of the important causes of wear in all the tool steels. Delamination wear occurred in H13 steel and both delamination and microcutting modes of wear contributed to the overall damage in D2 steel rolls. L7' steel showed breaking of surface oxide film, indicating tribochemical wear. Plasma nitriding decreased the adhesive wear substantially. Delamination was found to be the primary mode of wear in nitrided H13 steel rolls. Abrasive wear contributed to damage in nitrided D2 steel rolls. Severe roll damage occurred in L7' steel, primarily by microcutting, due to softening during plasma nitriding. The working life of the rolls has been deliberated upon in the light of wear mechanisms observed in the different tool steels. (orig.)

  8. Friction Characteristics of Nitrided Layers on AISI 430 Ferritic Stainless Steel Obtained by Various Nitriding Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hakan AYDIN

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The influence of plasma, gas and salt-bath nitriding techniques on the friction coefficient of AISI 430 ferritic stainless steel was studied in this paper. Samples were plasma nitrided in 80 % N2 + 20 % H2 atmosphere at 450 °C and 520 °C for 8 h at a pressure of 2 mbar, gas nitrided in NH3 and CO2 atmosphere at 570 °C for 13 h and salt-bath nitrided in a cyanide-cyanate salt-bath at 570 °C for 1.5 h. Characterisation of nitrided layers on the ferritic stainless steel was carried out by means of microstructure, microhardness, surface roughness and friction coefficient measurements. Friction characteristics of the nitrided layers on the 430 steel were investigated using a ball-on-disc friction-wear tester with a WC-Co ball as the counter-body under dry sliding conditions. Analysis of wear tracks was carried out by scanning electron microscopy. Maximum hardness and maximum case depth were achieved on the plasma nitrided sample at 520 ºC for 8 h. The plasma and salt-bath nitriding techniques significantly decreased the average surface roughness of the 430 ferritic stainless steel. The friction test results showed that the salt-bath nitrided layer had better friction-reducing ability than the other nitrided layers under dry sliding conditions. Furthermore, the friction characteristic of the plasma nitrided layer at 520 ºC was better than that of the plasma nitrided layer at 450 °C.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.19.1.3819

  9. Low temperature anodic bonding to silicon nitride

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weichel, Steen; Reus, Roger De; Bouaidat, Salim;

    2000-01-01

    Low-temperature anodic bonding to stoichiometric silicon nitride surfaces has been performed in the temperature range from 3508C to 4008C. It is shown that the bonding is improved considerably if the nitride surfaces are either oxidized or exposed to an oxygen plasma prior to the bonding. Both bulk...... and thin-film glasses were used in the bonding experiments. Bond quality was evaluated using a tensile test on structured dies. The effect of oxygen-based pre-treatments of the nitride surface on the bond quality has been evaluated. Bond strengths up to 35 Nrmm2 and yields up to 100% were obtained....

  10. Atomic Resolution Microscopy of Nitrides in Steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danielsen, Hilmar Kjartansson

    2014-01-01

    MN and CrMN type nitride precipitates in 12%Cr steels have been investigated using atomic resolution microscopy. The MN type nitrides were observed to transform into CrMN both by composition and crystallography as Cr diffuses from the matrix into the MN precipitates. Thus a change from one precip...... layer between the crystalline nitride and ferrite matrix. Usually precipitates are described as having (semi) coherent or incoherent interfaces, but in this case it is more energetically favourable to create an amorphous layer instead of the incoherent interface....

  11. Influence of nitrogen on the structure and properties of chromium, chromium-molybdenum and chromium-manganese steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phase transformations, precipitation processes and properties of the chromium, chromium-molybdenum and chromium-manganese steels with a high content of nitrogen as the dependence on thermal treatment were investigated. In case of Fe-0.08C-18Cr-18Mn-N and Fe-0.08C-18Cr-18Mn-2Mo-N steels the samples in the state after solution at temperature 1050oC and 1150oC and 1250oC and after subsequent annealing in 600oC and 800oC were investigated. heat treatment of the Fe-0.5C-10Cr-N and Fe-0.5C-10Cr-1Mo-N steels included austenitizment from 1000oC with air cooling and hardening from 1000oC with oil cooling and tempering in 650oC and 750oC in two hours with cooling in the air. These investigations show that the influence of nitrogen as an alloy element on the phase transformations, precipitation processes, mechanical and corrosion properties is connected with the presence of molybdenum and chromium in the steel. Nitrogen with these elements creates complex ions with the coordinate number 6. This statement is formed on the base of both calculations and investigation results. (author)

  12. Plasma nitriding of AISI 52100 ball bearing steel and effect of heat treatment on nitrided layer

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ravindra Kumar; J Alphonsa; Ram Prakash; K S Boob; J Ghanshyam; P A Rayjada; P M Raole; S Mukherjee

    2011-02-01

    In this paper an effort has been made to plasma nitride the ball bearing steel AISI 52100. The difficulty with this specific steel is that its tempering temperature (∼170–200°C) is much lower than the standard processing temperature (∼460–580°C) needed for the plasma nitriding treatment. To understand the mechanism, effect of heat treatment on the nitrided layer steel is investigated. Experiments are performed on three different types of ball bearing races i.e. annealed, quenched and quench-tempered samples. Different gas compositions and process temperatures are maintained while nitriding these samples. In the quenched and quench-tempered samples, the surface hardness has decreased after plasma nitriding process. Plasma nitriding of annealed sample with argon and nitrogen gas mixture gives higher hardness in comparison to the hydrogen–nitrogen gas mixture. It is reported that the later heat treatment of the plasma nitrided annealed sample has shown improvement in the hardness of this steel. X-ray diffraction analysis shows that the dominant phases in the plasma nitrided annealed sample are (Fe2−3N) and (Fe4N), whereas in the plasma nitrided annealed sample with later heat treatment only -Fe peak occurs.

  13. Internal nitride formation during gas-phase thermal nitridation of titanium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Titanium nitride surface layers were prepared by gas-phase thermal nitridation of pure titanium in an ammonia atmosphere at 1373 K for different times. In addition to the surface nitride layer, nitride/hydride formation was observed in the bulk of the specimen. The cross-section of the specimen was characterized by various techniques such as optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, secondary ion mass spectrometry and nanomechanical testing, and the mechanism of formation of these phases is discussed.

  14. Characterization of TiN, TiC and Ti(C,N) in titanium-alloyed ferritic chromium steels focusing on the significance of different particle morphologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Titanium-alloyed ferritic chromium steels are a competitive option to classical austenitic stainless steels owing to their similar corrosion resistance. The addition of titanium significantly influences their final steel cleanliness. The present contribution focuses on the detailed metallographic characterization of titanium nitrides, titanium carbides and titanium carbonitrides with regard to their size, morphology and composition. The methods used are manual and automated Scanning Electron Microscopy with Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy as well as optical microscopy. Additional thermodynamic calculations are performed to explain the precipitation procedure of the analyzed titanium nitrides. The analyses showed that homogeneous nucleation is decisive at an early process stage after the addition of titanium. Heterogeneous nucleation gets crucial with ongoing process time and essentially influences the final inclusion size of titanium nitrides. A detailed investigation of the nuclei for heterogeneous nucleation with automated Scanning Electron Microscopy proved to be difficult due to their small size. Manual Scanning Electron Microscopy and optical microscopy have to be applied. Furthermore, it was found that during solidification an additional layer around an existing titanium nitride can be formed which changes the final inclusion morphology significantly. These layers are also characterized in detail. Based on these different inclusion morphologies, in combination with thermodynamic results, tendencies regarding the formation and modification time of titanium containing inclusions in ferritic chromium steels are derived. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • The formation and modification of TiN in the steel 1.4520 was examined. • Heterogeneous nucleation essentially influences the final steel cleanliness. • In most cases heterogeneous nuclei in TiN inclusions are magnesium based. • Particle morphology provides important information

  15. Electrodeposition of black chromium thin films from trivalent chromium-ionic liquid solution

    OpenAIRE

    Eugénio, S.; Vilar, Rui; C. M. Rangel; Baskaran, I.

    2009-01-01

    In the present study, black chromium thin films were electrodeposited from a solution of 1-butyl-3- methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate ([BMIm][BF4] ionic liquid containing trivalent chromium (Cr(III)). Homogeneous and well adherent coatings have been obtained on nickel, copper and stainless steel substrates. The nucleation and growth of the films were investigated by cyclic voltammetry and current-density/time transient techniques. SEM/EDS, XPS and XRD were used to study the morphology, chem...

  16. Reduction of Hexavalent Chromium by Viable Cells of Chromium Resistant Bacteria Isolated from Chromite Mining Environment

    OpenAIRE

    Satarupa Dey; Baishali Pandit; A. K. Paul

    2014-01-01

    Environmental contamination of hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] is of serious concern for its toxicity as well as mutagenic and carcinogenic effects. Bacterial chromate reduction is a cost-effective technology for detoxification as well as removal of Cr(VI) from polluted environment. Chromium resistant and reducing bacteria, belonging to Arthrobacter, Pseudomonas, and Corynebacterium isolated from chromite mine overburden and seepage samples of Orissa, India, were found to tolerate 12–18 mM Cr(VI...

  17. Reduction of Chromium-VI by Chromium Resistant Lactobacilli: A Prospective Bacterium for Bioremediation

    OpenAIRE

    Mishra, Ritesh; Sinha, Vartika; Kannan, Ambrose; Upreti, Raj K.

    2012-01-01

    Chromium is a toxic heavy metal, which primarily exists in two inorganic forms, Cr (VI) and Cr (III). Highly soluble hexavalent chromium is carcinogenic due to its oxidizing nature. It is well established that the intestinal bacteria including Lactobacilli have regulatory effect on intestinal homeostasis and a breakdown in the relationship between intestinal cells and bacteria results in the manifestation of gastrointestinal (GI) disorders. In this study Cr (VI) resistance was developed in La...

  18. Mechanical properties of metal-ceramic systems from nickel-chromium and cobalt-chromium alloys

    OpenAIRE

    Mirković Nemanja

    2007-01-01

    Background/Aim. Metal-ceramic bond strength and alloys' elastic modulus clearly determine the potential of alloy application, because the ceramic integrity during mastication depends on these two characteristics. The aim of this study was to evaluate metal-ceramic bond strength and elastic modulus of cobalt-chromium alloys in making porcelainfused- to-metal restorations, regarding the application of the most frequent nickel-chromium alloy. Methods. The research was performed as an experimenta...

  19. Nitriding of Aluminum Extrusion Die: Effect of Die Geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhtar, S. S.; Arif, A. F. M.; Yilbas, B. S.

    2010-04-01

    Nitriding of complex-shaped extrusion dies may result in non-uniform nitride layers and hence a required hardness may not be achieved in some regions of the bearing area. The present study is carried out to assess the effect of extrusion die profile on the characteristics and growth behavior of nitride layers so that the critical die design feature can be identified to enhance the uniformity of the nitride layer. For this purpose, AISI H13 steel samples have been manufactured with profiles similar to those of hot extrusion dies. The samples were then gas nitrided under controlled nitriding potential. The uniformity and depth of nitride layers have been investigated in terms of compound layer and total nitride case depth for selected die features. The results of this study indicated the need to include the effect of profile on the nitride layer for the optimal die design with improved service life.

  20. Chromium-manganese steels of transition class

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Possibilities of nickel replacing by manganese and preparing the same level of mechanical properties as in chromium-nickel steels due to γ-α transformations taking place during property tests, are studied. Chromium-manganese steels with the composition of 0.05-0.1%C, 13-14%Cr, 5.0-6.5%Mn, 0.2-0.5%Si, 0.03-0.13%N, 0.05-0.01%Al and additionally alloyed 0.3-2.0%Cu, 0.05-0.6%V, 0.3-1.0%Mo, 0.02-0.05%Ca in various combinations have been melted. It is shown, that using alloying and heat treatment one can control the phase composition, austenite resistance to martensite transformation during loading and mechanical properties of chromium-manganese steels of the transition class. The use of the phase transformation in the process of testing determines the level of mechanical properties. The optimum development of the transformation accompanied by a sufficient development of processes of hardening and microstresses relaxation permits to obtain a high level of mechanical properties: σsub(B)=1500 MPa, σsub(0.2)-1130MPa, delta=15%, psi=37%, asub(H)=1000 kJ/msup(2) which exceeds the level for chromium-nickel steels. Steels have a lower cost and do not require any complecated heat treatment regime

  1. Defect structure of electrodeposited chromium layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Positron annihilation spectroscopy was applied to study the effects of pre-treatment and composition of substrates on the quality and defect structure of electrodeposited thick chromium coatings. The results show that both parameters are important, and a scenario is proposed why the mechanically polished substrate gives more defective film than the electro polished one.

  2. Defect structure of electrodeposited chromium layers

    CERN Document Server

    Marek, T; Vertes, A; El-Sharif, M; McDougall, J; Chisolm, C U

    2000-01-01

    Positron annihilation spectroscopy was applied to study the effects of pre-treatment and composition of substrates on the quality and defect structure of electrodeposited thick chromium coatings. The results show that both parameters are important, and a scenario is proposed why the mechanically polished substrate gives more defective film than the electro polished one.

  3. Flashlamp-pumped lasing of chromium: GSGG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lasing action in chromium-doped gadolinium scandium gallium garnet (Cr:GSGG) is well established for both CW/sup (1)/ and flashlamp/sup (2)/ pumping. This paper describes an investigation of flashlamp-pumped Cr:GSGG lasers and indicates some of the factors which limit performance

  4. Trace Elements Excluding Iron - Chromium and Zinc

    Science.gov (United States)

    The percentage of middle-aged US adults who are participating in leisure-time physical activities is growing. These adults also seek credible information about specific supplements that the public press routinely describes as necessary to enable increases in physical performance. Chromium and zinc a...

  5. HEALTH ASSESSMENT DOCUMENT FOR CHROMIUM. FINAL REPORT

    Science.gov (United States)

    The full document represents a comprehensive data base that considers all sources of chromium in the environment, the likelihood for its exposure to humans, and the possible consequences to man and lower organisms from its absorption. This information is integrated into a format ...

  6. 29 CFR 1926.1126 - Chromium (VI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... CFR 1926.51 Where skin contact with chromium (VI) occurs, the employer shall provide washing facilities in conformance with 29 CFR 1926.51. Eating and drinking areas provided by the employer shall also... requirements of the Hazard Communication Standard, 29 CFR 1910.1200. (3) Cleaning and replacement. (i)...

  7. 29 CFR 1910.1026 - Chromium (VI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... CFR 1910.141. Where skin contact with chromium (VI) occurs, the employer shall provide washing facilities in conformance with 29 CFR 1910.141. Eating and drinking areas provided by the employer shall also... requirements of the Hazard Communication Standard, 29 CFR 1910.1200. (3) Cleaning and replacement. (i)...

  8. 29 CFR 1915.1026 - Chromium (VI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... CFR 1910.141. Where skin contact with chromium (VI) occurs, the employer shall provide washing facilities in conformance with 29 CFR 1915.97. Eating and drinking areas provided by the employer shall also... requirements of the Hazard Communication Standard, 29 CFR 1910.1200. (3) Cleaning and replacement. (i)...

  9. Chromium(III) and chromium(VI) surface treated galvanized steel for outdoor constructions: environmental aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindström, David; Hedberg, Yolanda; Odnevall Wallinder, Inger

    2010-06-01

    The long-term degradation of chromium(III) (Zn-Cr(III)) and chromium(VI)-based (Zn-Cr(VI)) surface treatments on galvanized steel and their capacities to hinder the release of zinc induced by atmospheric corrosion at nonsheltered urban and marine exposure conditions for 2 years are investigated. Compared to bare zinc sheet, both surface treatments revealed high corrosion protection abilities and capacities to hinder the release of zinc, still evident after 2 years of exposure. The zinc barrier properties of the thinner Zn-Cr(VI) (10 nm) treatment were during the first 100 days of urban exposure slightly improved compared with Zn-Cr(III) (35 nm). However, their long-term protection capacities were inverse. Released concentrations of total chromium correspond to annual release rates less than 0.000032 (Zn-Cr(III)) and 0.00014 g Cr m(-2) yr(-1) (Zn-Cr(VI)) after 1 year of urban exposure. Aging by indoor storage of the surface treatments prior to outdoor exposure reduced the released Cr concentrations from the surface treatments. No Cr(VI) was released from the aged surfaces but from the freshly exposed Zn-Cr(VI). Marine exposure conditions resulted in a faster reduction of chromate to chromium(III)oxide compared with urban conditions, and a significantly lower amount of both chromium(III) and chromium(VI) released from Zn-Cr(VI) at the marine site compared with the urban site. PMID:20462267

  10. Biological groundwater treatment for chromium removal at low hexavalent chromium concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamais, Daniel; Noutsopoulos, Constantinos; Kavallari, Ioanna; Nyktari, Eleni; Kaldis, Apostolos; Panousi, Eleni; Nikitopoulos, George; Antoniou, Kornilia; Nasioka, Maria

    2016-06-01

    The objective of this work is to develop and evaluate biological groundwater treatment systems that will achieve hexavalent chromium reduction and total chromium removal from groundwater at hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) groundwater concentrations in the 0-200 μg/L range. Three lab-scale units operated, as sequencing batch reactors (SBR) under aerobic, anaerobic and anaerobic-aerobic conditions. All systems received groundwater with a Cr(VI) content of 200 μg/L. In order to support biological growth, groundwater was supplemented with milk, liquid cheese whey or a mixture of sugar and milk to achieve a COD concentration of 200 mg/L. The results demonstrate that a fully anaerobic system or an anaerobic-aerobic system dosed with simple or complex external organic carbon sources can lead to practically complete Cr(VI) reduction to Cr(III). The temperature dependency of maximum Cr(VI) removal rates can be described by the Arrhenius relationship. Total chromium removal in the biological treatment systems was not complete because a significant portion of Cr(III) remained in solution. An integrated system comprising of an anaerobic SBR followed by a sand filter achieved more than 95% total chromium removal thus resulting in average effluent total and dissolved chromium concentrations of 7 μg/L and 3 μg/L, respectively. PMID:26971177

  11. Method of nitriding refractory metal articles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiegs, Terry N.; Holcombe, Cressie E.; Dykes, Norman L.; Omatete, Ogbemi O.; Young, Albert C.

    1994-01-01

    A method of nitriding a refractory-nitride forming metal or metalloid articles and composite articles. A consolidated metal or metalloid article or composite is placed inside a microwave oven and nitrogen containing gas is introduced into the microwave oven. The metal or metalloid article or composite is heated to a temperature sufficient to react the metal or metalloid with the nitrogen by applying a microwave energy within the microwave oven. The metal or metalloid article or composite is maintained at that temperature for a period of time sufficient to convert the article of metal or metalloid or composite to an article or composite of refractory nitride. In addition, a method of applying a coating, such as a coating of an oxide, a carbide, or a carbo-nitride, to an article of metal or metalloid by microwave heating.

  12. ALUMINUM NITRIDE AS A HIGH TEMPERATURE TRANSDUCER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The high temperature capabilities of bulk single crystal aluminum nitride are investigated experimentally. Temperatures in excess of 1100 deg. Celsius are obtained and held for eight hours. Variation in the performance of single crystal samples is demonstrated.

  13. Titanium nitride nanoparticles for therapeutic applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guler, Urcan; Kildishev, Alexander V.; Boltasseva, Alexandra;

    2014-01-01

    Titanium nitride nanoparticles exhibit plasmonic resonances in the biological transparency window where high absorption efficiencies can be obtained with small dimensions. Both lithographic and colloidal samples are examined from the perspective of nanoparticle thermal therapy. © 2014 OSA....

  14. Nephrotoxic and hepatotoxic effects of chromium compounds in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laborda, R.; Diaz-Mayans, J.; Nunez, A.

    1986-03-01

    The nephrotoxic, hepatotoxic and cardiotoxic actions of hexavalent chromium compounds, as well as their effects on lung, blood and circulation may contribute to the fatal outcome of chromium intoxication. Although trivalent chromium have been regarded as relatively biologically inert, there are a few salts of chromium III that have been found to be carcinogenic when inhaled, ingested or brought in contact with the tissues. Sensitive persons and industry workers have been subjects of dermatitis, respiratory tract injuries and digestive ulcers due to chromium compounds. In this work, the authors have studied the effect of trivalent and hexavalent chromium compounds on rats measuring the transaminases (GOT and GPT), urea and creatinine levels in serum of chromium poisoned animals at different times.

  15. A Kinetic Model of Chromium in a Flame

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Chromium has been identified as a carcinogenic metal.Incineration is the useful method for disposal of toxic chromium hazard waste and a chromium kinetic model in a flame is very important to study chromium oxidation.Chromium chemical kinetics over a range of temperatures of a hydrogen/air flame is proposed.Nine chromium compounds and fifty-eight reversible chemical reactions were considered The forward reaction rates are calculated based on the molecular collision approach for unknown ones and Arrhenius's Law for known ones.The backward reaction rates were calculated according to forward reaction rates, the equilibrium constants and chemical thermodynamics.It is verified by several equilibrium cases and is tested by a hydrogen/air diffusion flame.The results show that the kinetic model could be used in cases in which the chromium kinetics play an important role in a flame

  16. The Chromium is an essential element in the human

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Chromium is an essential element for human and animals, because it a preponderant function in the insulin metabolism as a glucose tolerance factor (GTF). The deficiency of chromium engenders a deterioration in the glucose metabolism due to bad efficiency of insulin. Because the importance of this element an exhaustive reference review was made and this presents some studies realized in laboratory animals and in human beings where it is prove with resuits the effect of chromium over the improvement of patients with non-insulin dependant diabetes. Three substances are presented as chromium active biological forms: a material rich in chromium known as glucose tolerance factor, chromium picolinate and a substance of low molecular weight LMWCr in its forms of apo and holo that contains chromium and it links the insulin receptor and improves its activity. Also this paper presents information about the condition of diabetes in Costa Rica. (Author)

  17. The Nitrogen-Nitride Anode.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delnick, Frank M.

    2014-10-01

    Nitrogen gas N 2 can be reduced to nitride N -3 in molten LiCl-KCl eutectic salt electrolyte. However, the direct oxidation of N -3 back to N 2 is kinetically slow and only occurs at high overvoltage. The overvoltage for N -3 oxidation can be eliminated by coordinating the N -3 with BN to form the dinitridoborate (BN 2 -3 ) anion which forms a 1-D conjugated linear inorganic polymer with -Li-N-B-N- repeating units. This polymer precipitates out of solution as Li 3 BN 2 which becomes a metallic conductor upon delithiation. Li 3 BN 2 is oxidized to Li + + N 2 + BN at about the N 2 /N -3 redox potential with very little overvoltage. In this report we evaluate the N 2 /N -3 redox couple as a battery anode for energy storage.

  18. Reaction of chromium(VI) with glutathione or with hydrogen peroxide: identification of reactive intermediates and their role in chromium(VI)-induced DNA damage.

    OpenAIRE

    Aiyar, J; Berkovits, H J; Floyd, R A; Wetterhahn, K E

    1991-01-01

    The types of reactive intermediates generated upon reduction of chromium(VI) by glutathione or hydrogen peroxide and the resulting DNA damage have been determined. In vitro, reaction of chromium(VI) with glutathione led to formation of two chromium(V) complexes and the glutathione thiyl radical. When chromium(VI) was reacted with DNA in the presence of glutathione, chromium-DNA adducts were obtained, with no DNA strand breakage. The level of chromium-DNA adduct formation correlated with chrom...

  19. Nitrogen-rich transition metal nitrides

    OpenAIRE

    Salamat, Ashkan; Hector, Andrew L.; Kroll, Peter; McMillan, Paul F.

    2013-01-01

    The solid state chemistry leading to the synthesis and characterization of metal nitrides with N:M ratios >1 is summarized. Studies of these compounds represent an emerging area of research. Most transition metal nitrides have much lower nitrogen contents, and they often form with non- or sub-stoichiometric compositions. These materials are typically metallic with often superconducting properties, and they provide highly refractory, high hardness materials with many technological applications...

  20. Progress in molecular uranium-nitride chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    King, David M.; Liddle, Stephen T

    2014-01-01

    The coordination, organometallic, and materials chemistry of uranium nitride has long been an important facet of actinide chemistry. Following matrix isolation experiments and computational characterisation, molecular, solution-based uranium chemistry has developed significantly in the last decade or so culminating most recently in the isolation of the first examples of long-sought terminal uranium nitride linkages. Herein, the field is reviewed with an emphasis on well-defined molecular spec...

  1. Surface modification of titanium by plasma nitriding

    OpenAIRE

    Myriam Pereira Kapczinski; Carlos Gil; Eder Julio Kinast; Carlos Alberto dos Santos

    2003-01-01

    A systematic investigation was undertaken on commercially pure titanium submitted to plasma nitriding. Thirteen different sets of operational parameters (nitriding time, sample temperature and plasma atmosphere) were used. Surface analyses were performed using X-ray diffraction, nuclear reaction and scanning electron microscopy. Wear tests were done with stainless steel Gracey scaler, sonic apparatus and pin-on-disc machine. The obtained results indicate that the tribological performance can ...

  2. Plasma nitriding of Al 99.5

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, H. -Y; Stock, H.-R.; Mayr, P.

    1993-01-01

    Aluminium nitride (AlN) is a very interesting ceramic because of its combination of properties such as high thermal stability, high hardness and an unusual combination of high thermal and low electrical conductivity. But it is very difficulty to obtain an AlN layer on the aluminium substrates by thermochemical nitriding process. Since a thin film of aluminium oxide existing on the surface of every aluminium substrate prevents the nitrogen atoms from diffusing into the aluminium lattice. Howev...

  3. Aluminum Nitride Sensors for Harsh Environments

    OpenAIRE

    Goericke, Fabian Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Harsh environment applications include high temperature, pressure and mechanical shock. Aluminum nitride is a strong ceramic material with very good high temperature survivability. It also has piezoelectric properties that can be used for sensing applications and it can be deposited with good control as thin polycrystalline film for the fabrication of micro-electromechanical systems. In this dissertation, optimized deposition parameters for aluminum nitride films and characterization techniqu...

  4. Innovative boron nitride-doped propellants

    OpenAIRE

    Thelma Manning; Richard Field; Kenneth Klingaman; Michael Fair; John Bolognini; Robin Crownover; Carlton P. Adam; Viral Panchal; Eugene Rozumov; Henry Grau; Paul Matter; Michael Beachy; Christopher Holt; Samuel Sopok

    2016-01-01

    The U.S. military has a need for more powerful propellants with balanced/stoichiometric amounts of fuel and oxidants. However, balanced and more powerful propellants lead to accelerated gun barrel erosion and markedly shortened useful barrel life. Boron nitride (BN) is an interesting potential additive for propellants that could reduce gun wear effects in advanced propellants (US patent pending 2015-026P). Hexagonal boron nitride is a good lubricant that can provide wear resistance and lower ...

  5. Design and performance of chromium mist generator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tirgar Aram

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Chromium mist generator is an essential tool for conducting researches and making science-based recommendations to evaluate air pollution and its control systems. The purpose of this research was to design and construct a homogenous chromium mist generator and the study of some effective factors including sampling height and distances between samplers in side-by-side sampling on chromium mist sampling method. A mist generator was constructed, using a chromium electroplating bath in pilot scale. Concentration of CrO3 and sulfuric acid in plating solution was 125 g L-1 and 1.25 g L-1, respectively. In order to create permanent air sampling locations, a Plexiglas cylindrical chamber (75 cm height, 55 cm i.d was installed the bath overhead. Sixty holes were produced on the chamber in 3 rows (each 20. The distance between rows and holes was 15 and 7.5 cm, respectively. Homogeneity and effective factors were studied via side-by-side air sampling method. So, 48 clusters of samples were collected on polyvinyl chloride (PVC filters housed in sampling cassettes. Cassettes were located in 35, 50, and 65 cm above the solution surface with less than 7.5 and/or 7.5-15 cm distance between heads. All samples were analyzed according to the NIOSH method 7600. According to the ANOVA test, no significant differences were observed between different sampling locations in side-by-side sampling (P=0.82 and between sampling heights and different samplers distances (P=0.86 and 0.86, respectively. However, there were notable differences between means of coefficient of variations (CV in various heights and distances. It is concluded that the most chromium mist homogeneity could be obtained at height 50 cm from the bath solution surface and samplers distance of < 7.5 cm.

  6. Nucleation of iron nitrides during gaseous nitriding of iron; the effect of a preoxidation treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friehling, Peter B.; Poulsen, Finn Willy; Somers, Marcel A.J.

    2001-01-01

    grains. On prolonged nitriding, immediate nucleation at the surface of iron grains becomes possible. Calculated incubation times for the nucleation of gamma'-Fe4N1-x during nitriding are generally longer than those observed experimentally in the present work. The incubation time is reduced dramatically...

  7. Microstructural characterization of an AISI-SAE 4140 steel without nitridation and nitrided

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It was micro structurally characterized an AISI-SAE 4140 steel before and after of nitridation through the nitridation process by plasma post-unloading microwaves through Optical microscopy (OM), Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) by means of secondary electrons and retrodispersed, X-ray diffraction (XRD), Energy dispersion spectra (EDS) and mapping of elements. (Author)

  8. Synthesis of Vanadium Nitride by a One Step Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sansan YU; Nianxin FU; Feng GAO; Zhitong SUI

    2007-01-01

    Vanadium nitrides were prepared via one step method of carbothermal reduction and nitridation of vanadium trioxide. Thermalgravimetric analysis (TGA) and X-ray diffraction were used to determine the reaction paths of vanadium carbide, namely the following sequential reaction: V2O3→V8C7 in higher temperature stage, the rule of vanadium nitride synthesized was established, and defined conditions of temperature for the production of the carbides and nitrides were determined. Vanadium oxycarbide may consist in the front process of carbothermal reduction of vanadium trioxide. In one step method for vanadium nitride by carbothermal reduction and nitridation of vanadium trioxide, the nitridation process is simultaneous with the carbothermal reduction. A one-step mechanism of the carbothermal reduction with simultaneous nitridation leaded to a lower terminal temperature in nitridation process for vanadium nitride produced, compared with that of carbothermal reduction process without nitridation. The grain size and shape of vanadium nitride were uniform, and had the shape of a cube. The one step method combined vacuum carborization and nitridation (namely two step method) into one process. It simplified the technological process and decreased the costs.

  9. Growth of epitaxial iron nitride ultrathin film on zinc-blende gallium nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors report the growth of iron nitride on zinc-blende gallium nitride using molecular beam epitaxy. First, zinc-blende GaN is grown on a magnesium oxide substrate having (001) orientation; second, an ultrathin layer of FeN is grown on top of the GaN layer. In situ reflection high-energy electron diffraction is used to monitor the surface during growth, and a well-defined epitaxial relationship is observed. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy is used to reveal the epitaxial continuity at the gallium nitride-iron nitride interface. Surface morphology of the iron nitride, similar to yet different from that of the GaN substrate, can be described as plateau valley. The FeN chemical stoichiometry is probed using both bulk and surface sensitive methods, and the magnetic properties of the sample are revealed.

  10. Interaction between hydrogen and a nitrided layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Ćwiek

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: of this paper is to reveal the influence of nitrided layer on 34CrAlNi7-10 steel to its susceptibility to hydrogen degradation. Investigation was carried out with the use of slow strain tensile rate test (SSRT.Design/methodology/approach: Nitriding was done in the nitrogen-hydrogen (or argon gas atmospheres with various hydrogen content, i. e. 0%, 30%, and 70%, at the glow discharge at temperature 560°C for 6 hrs. In order to estimate the degree of hydrogen degradation SSRT test was conducted on round smooth specimens 4 mm in diameter. Tests were performed at ambient temperature either in dry air or in 0.005 M H2SO4 solution. The applied strain rate was 10-6 s-1. Tests in acid solution were conducted under cathodic polarization with constant current densities: 0.1; 1; 5 and 10 mA/cm2. Fracture surfaces after SSRT test were examined with scanning electron microscope (SEM to reveal a mode and mechanism of cracking.Findings: Plasma nitrided layers are effective barriers to hydrogen entry into structural steel which decreases susceptibility of steel to hydrogen degradation. Hydrogen is mainly accumulated in a compact nitrides zone. Evidences of no increase in brittleness of nitrided layers with absorbed hydrogen were observed.Research limitations/implications: There is no possibility to perform direct observations of exact mechanism of hydrogen-assisted cracking so far. Further research should be taken to reveal the exact mechanism of increased plasticity of nitrided layer with absorbed hydrogen.Practical implications: Plasma nitrided layers are effective barriers to hydrogen entry into structural steel utilized in aggressive environments, which could be potential sources of hydrogen charging of exploited steels.Originality/value: Plasma assisted nitriding provides the formation of thin compact nitride zone which protects high-strength steels against corrosion and hydrogen degradation. Evidences of no increase in brittleness of nitrided

  11. Chromium supplementation improved post-stroke brain infarction and hyperglycemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wen-Ying; Mao, Frank Chiahung; Liu, Chia-Hsin; Kuan, Yu-Hsiang; Lai, Nai-Wei; Wu, Chih-Cheng; Chen, Chun-Jung

    2016-04-01

    Hyperglycemia is common after acute stroke and is associated with a worse outcome of stroke. Thus, a better understanding of stress hyperglycemia is helpful to the prevention and therapeutic treatment of stroke. Chromium is an essential nutrient required for optimal insulin activity and normal carbohydrate and lipid metabolism. Beyond its nutritional effects, dietary supplement of chromium causes beneficial outcomes against several diseases, in particular diabetes-associated complications. In this study, we investigated whether post-stroke hyperglycemia involved chromium dynamic mobilization in a rat model of permanent focal cerebral ischemia and whether dietary supplement of chromium improved post-stroke injury and alterations. Stroke rats developed brain infarction, hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, glucose intolerance, and insulin resistance. Post-stroke hyperglycemia was accompanied by elevated secretion of counter-regulatory hormones including glucagon, corticosterone, and norepinephrine, decreased insulin signaling in skeletal muscles, and increased hepatic gluconeogenesis. Correlation studies revealed that counter-regulatory hormone secretion showed a positive correlation with chromium loss and blood glucose increased together with chromium loss. Daily chromium supplementation increased tissue chromium levels, attenuated brain infarction, improved hyperglycemia, and decreased plasma levels of glucagon and corticosterone in stroke rats. Our findings suggest that stroke rats show disturbance of tissue chromium homeostasis with a net loss through urinary excretion and chromium mobilization and loss might be an alternative mechanism responsible for post-stroke hyperglycemia. PMID:26477944

  12. Monitoring the near-surface pH to probe the role of nitrogen in corrosion behaviour of low-temperature plasma nitrided 316L stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Nitrided steel is pitting resistant but in acidic solution anodic current is high. • Sb electrode showed a rise of pH at nitrided surface during anodic dissolution. • In cathodic sweeps nitrided steel showed reactivation indicating poor passivity. • Improvement of passivity after injection of NH4OH is ascribed to oxides and NO2−. • Pitting resistance is ascribed to oxides and NO2− following the formation of NH4+. -- Abstract: Low temperature plasma nitriding of stainless steels improves tribological properties and pitting resistance, but it can activate anodic dissolution in acidic solutions. This work aimed at determining how anodic behaviour can be affected by nitrogen present in the steel. The electrochemical behaviour of AISI 316L steel after nitriding at 415 °C (with up to 17 at.% N) was examined in solutions of 0.1 M Na2SO4 + 0.4 M NaCl acidified down to pH 2.4. An antimony microelectrode was used to measure pH close to the sample surface. It was found that the nitrided layer was resistant to pitting corrosion at all pH's, but at pH below about 3.5 anodic currents were higher than those on untreated steel. For nitrided steel the near-surface pH was increasing when anodic current was rising in the active region, evidently due to binding of protons into NH4+. Nitrided steel underwent reactivation during reverse cathodic sweeps which is characteristic of low content of chromium oxide in surface film. Injection of NH4OH into the solution improved the passivation. Thermodynamic data indicated that the accompanying pH rise enabled the formation of Fe3O4, Fe2O3, Cr2O3, FeCr2O4, NiFe2O4, MoO42− and NO2−. It is suggested that the pitting resistance of nitrided steel results from an easy repassivation of incipient pits due to the formation of the above species

  13. New amorphous interface for precipitate nitrides in steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danielsen, Hilmar Kjartansson; Kadkhodazadeh, Shima; Grumsen, Flemming Bjerg; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2014-01-01

    According to classical theories precipitate interfaces are described by their degree of coherency with the matrix, which affects their strengthening contribution. Investigations of nitride precipitate interfaces in 12% Cr steels with transmission electron microscopy have shown the nitrides to be...

  14. Femtosecond laser surface structuring and oxidation of chromium thin coatings: Black chromium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotsedi, L., E-mail: Kotsedi@tlabs.ac.za [UNESCO-UNISA Africa Chair in Nanosciences-Nanotechnology, College of Graduate Studies, University of South Africa, Muckleneuk Ridge, P.O. Box 392, Pretoria (South Africa); Nanosciences African Network (NANOAFNET), iThemba LABS-National Research Foundation, 1 Old Faure Road, Somerset West 7129, P.O. Box 722, Somerset West, Western Cape (South Africa); Nuru, Z.Y. [UNESCO-UNISA Africa Chair in Nanosciences-Nanotechnology, College of Graduate Studies, University of South Africa, Muckleneuk Ridge, P.O. Box 392, Pretoria (South Africa); Nanosciences African Network (NANOAFNET), iThemba LABS-National Research Foundation, 1 Old Faure Road, Somerset West 7129, P.O. Box 722, Somerset West, Western Cape (South Africa); Mthunzi, P. [National Laser Centre, Council for Scientific and Industrial Research, 0001 Pretoria (South Africa); Muller, T.F.G. [University of the Western Cape, Physics Department, Bellville, 7535 Cape Town (South Africa); Eaton, S.M. [Physics Department, Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo Da Vinci, 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Julies, B. [University of the Western Cape, Physics Department, Bellville, 7535 Cape Town (South Africa); Manikandan, E. [UNESCO-UNISA Africa Chair in Nanosciences-Nanotechnology, College of Graduate Studies, University of South Africa, Muckleneuk Ridge, P.O. Box 392, Pretoria (South Africa); Nanosciences African Network (NANOAFNET), iThemba LABS-National Research Foundation, 1 Old Faure Road, Somerset West 7129, P.O. Box 722, Somerset West, Western Cape (South Africa); Ramponi, R. [Physics Department, Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo Da Vinci, 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Maaza, M. [UNESCO-UNISA Africa Chair in Nanosciences-Nanotechnology, College of Graduate Studies, University of South Africa, Muckleneuk Ridge, P.O. Box 392, Pretoria (South Africa); Nanosciences African Network (NANOAFNET), iThemba LABS-National Research Foundation, 1 Old Faure Road, Somerset West 7129, P.O. Box 722, Somerset West, Western Cape (South Africa)

    2014-12-01

    Highlights: • Oxidation of the chromium thin film to chromium oxide by femtosecond laser with a fundamental wavelength of 1064 nm. • Solar absorber from chromium oxide that low percentage reflectance. • Femtosecond laser oxidation, with a de-focused laser. • Chromium oxide formation by femtosecond laser in normal ambient. - Abstract: In view of their potential applications as selective solar absorbers, chromium coatings on float glass substrates were nano/micro structured by femtosecond laser in air. Raman and X-rays diffraction investigations confirmed the formation of an ultra-porous α-Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer at the surface; higher is the input laser power, enhanced is the crystallinity of the α-Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer. The α-Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer with the Cr underneath it in addition to the photo-induced porosity acted as a classical ceramic–metal nano-composite making the reflectance to decrease significantly within the spectral range of 190–1100 nm. The average reflectance decreased from 70 to 2%.

  15. Femtosecond laser surface structuring and oxidation of chromium thin coatings: Black chromium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Oxidation of the chromium thin film to chromium oxide by femtosecond laser with a fundamental wavelength of 1064 nm. • Solar absorber from chromium oxide that low percentage reflectance. • Femtosecond laser oxidation, with a de-focused laser. • Chromium oxide formation by femtosecond laser in normal ambient. - Abstract: In view of their potential applications as selective solar absorbers, chromium coatings on float glass substrates were nano/micro structured by femtosecond laser in air. Raman and X-rays diffraction investigations confirmed the formation of an ultra-porous α-Cr2O3 layer at the surface; higher is the input laser power, enhanced is the crystallinity of the α-Cr2O3 layer. The α-Cr2O3 layer with the Cr underneath it in addition to the photo-induced porosity acted as a classical ceramic–metal nano-composite making the reflectance to decrease significantly within the spectral range of 190–1100 nm. The average reflectance decreased from 70 to 2%

  16. Production of basic chromium sulfate by using recovered chromium from ashes of thermally treated leather.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dettmer, Aline; Nunes, Keila Guerra Pacheco; Gutterres, Mariliz; Marcílio, Nilson Romeu

    2010-04-15

    Leather wastes tanned with chromium are generated during the production process of leather, hence the wastes from hand crafted goods and footwear industries are a serious environmental problem. The thermal treatment of leather wastes can be one of the treatment options because the wastes are rich in chromium and can be used as a raw material for sodium chromate production and further to obtain several chromium compounds. The objective of this study was to utilize the chromium from leather wastes via basic chromium sulfate production to be subsequently applied in a hide tanning. The obtained results have shown that this is the first successful attempt to achieve desired base properties of the product. The result was achieved when the following conditions were applied: a molar ratio between sodium sulfite and sodium dichromate equal to 6; reaction time equal to 5 min before addition of sulfuric acid; pH of sodium dichromate solution equal to 2. Summarizing, there is an opportunity to utilize the dangerous wastes and reused them in the production scheme by minimizing or annulling the environmental impact and to attend a sustainable process development concept. PMID:20031309

  17. Nitriding and Nitrocarburizing; Current Status and Future Challenges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Somers, Marcel A. J.

    This contribution addresses the current understanding of gaseous nitriding and nitrocarburizing. Aspects of thermodynamics, kinetics and microstructure development in iron and heat treatable steel will be explained. In these materials the nitrided/ nitrocarburized case can be subdivided in a...... compound layer consisting of iron (carbo-)nitrides and a diffusion zone, consisting of a dispersion of alloying element nitrides in ferrite. The compound layer provides beneficial tribological and corrosion performance, while the diffusion zone is responsible for improved fatigue performance. Furthermore...

  18. Nitriding and Nitrocarburizing; Current Status and Future Challenges

    OpenAIRE

    Somers, Marcel A.J.

    2013-01-01

    This contribution addresses the current understanding of gaseous nitriding and nitrocarburizing. Aspects of thermodynamics, kinetics and microstructure development in iron and heat treatable steel will be explained. In these materials the nitrided/ nitrocarburized case can be subdivided in a compound layer consisting of iron (carbo-)nitrides and a diffusion zone, consisting of a dispersion of alloying element nitrides in ferrite. The compound layer provides beneficial tribological and corrosi...

  19. Advancing liquid metal reactor technology with nitride fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review of the use of nitride fuels in liquid metal fast reactors is presented. Past studies indicate that both uranium nitride and uranium/plutonium nitride possess characteristics that may offer enhanced performance, particularly in the area of passive safety. To further quantify these effects, the analysis of a mixed-nitride fuel system utilizing the geometry and power level of the US Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor as a reference is described. 18 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs

  20. Diffusion kinetics of nitrogen in tantalum during plasma-nitriding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张德元; 林勤; 曾卫军; 李放; 许兰萍; 付青峰

    2001-01-01

    The activation energies of nitrogen in tantalum on plasma nitriding conditions were calculated according to the experimental data of hardness of plasma-nitriding of tantalum vs time and temperature. The activation energy calculated is 148.873±0.390  kJ/mol. The depth increasing of nitriding layer with time follows square root relation. The nitriding process of tantalum is controlled by diffusion of nitrogen atoms in tantalum solid solution.

  1. Inelastic Scattering of Neutrons in Chromium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The phonon spectrum of chromium has been studied by neutron inelastic scattering. The dispersion curves are very similar, in form to those of tungsten and molybdenum, indicating similar interionic force constants. The neutron groups broaden but do not shift appreciably when the temperature is raised. No effect has been observed which can be attributed to the interaction between the phonons and the crystal magnetization in the antiferromagnetic phase. (author)

  2. Observational Approach to Chromium Site Remediation - 13266

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Production reactors at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site in Richland, Washington, required massive quantities of water for reactor cooling and material processing. To reduce corrosion and the build-up of scale in pipelines and cooling systems, sodium dichromate was added to the water feedstock. Spills and other releases at the makeup facilities, as well as leaks from miles of pipelines, have led to numerous areas with chromium-contaminated soil and groundwater, threatening fish populations in the nearby Columbia River. Pump-and-treat systems have been installed to remove chromium from the groundwater, but significant contamination remain in the soil column and poses a continuing threat to groundwater and the Columbia River. Washington Closure Hanford, DOE, and regulators are working on a team approach that implements the observational approach, a strategy for effectively dealing with the uncertainties inherent in subsurface conditions. Remediation of large, complex waste sites at a federal facility is a daunting effort. It is particularly difficult to perform the work in an environment of rapid response to changing field and contamination conditions. The observational approach, developed by geotechnical engineers to accommodate the inherent uncertainties in subsurface conditions, is a powerful and appropriate method for site remediation. It offers a structured means of quickly moving into full remediation and responding to the variations and changing conditions inherent in waste site cleanups. A number of significant factors, however, complicate the application of the observational approach for chromium site remediation. Conceptual models of contamination and site conditions are difficult to establish and get consensus on. Mid-stream revisions to the design of large excavations are time-consuming and costly. And regulatory constraints and contract performance incentives can be impediments to the flexible responses required under the observational

  3. Stainless chromium-nickel steels. Chapter I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The chemical composition is tabulated of 90 chromium-nickel stainless steels and alloys given in volume %. The values are also given of the corrosion resistance of the steels and alloys. The tables show data on the surface condition or the methods of material working, types and chemical composition of the medium where corrosion resistance tests were carried out, temperature, pressure, time of tests, corrosion rates, corrosion types, and literature references. A total of 35 references is given. (J.B.)

  4. Loading chromium atoms in a magnetic guide

    OpenAIRE

    Greiner, A; Sebastian, J.; Rehme, P.; Aghajani-Talesh, A.; Griesmaier, A.; Pfau, T.

    2007-01-01

    We have realized a magnetic guide for ultracold chromium atoms by continuously loading atoms directly from a Zeeman slower into a horizontal guide. We observe an atomic flux of $2 \\cdot 10^7$ atoms/s and are able to control the mean velocity of the guided atoms between 0 m/s and 3 m/s. We present our experimental results on loading and controlling the mean velocity of the guided atoms and discuss the experimental techniques that are used.

  5. X-616 Chromium Sludge Lagoons pictorial overview, Piketon, Ohio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant uses large quantities of water for process cooling. The X-616 Liquid Effluent Control Facility was placed in operation in December 1976 to treat recirculation cooling water blowdown from the process cooling system. A chromium-based corrosion inhibitor was used in the cooling water system. A chromium sludge was produced in a clarifier to control chromium levels in the water. Chromium sludge produced by this process was stored in two surface impoundments called the X-616 Chromium Sludge Lagoons. The sludge was toxic due to its chromium concentration and therefore required treatment. The sludge was treated, turning it into a sanitary waste, and buried in an Ohio EPA approved landfill. The plant's process cooling water system has changed to a more environmentally acceptable phosphate-based inhibitor. Closure activities at X-616 began in August 1990, with all construction activities completed in June 1991, at a total cost of $8.0 million

  6. Chromium oxidation state mapping in human cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, R.; Fayard, B.; Salomé, M.; Devès, G.; Susini, J.

    2003-03-01

    The widespread use of chromium in industrial applications such as chemical production of pigments, refractory brick production, tanning, metallurgy, electroplating, and combustion of fuels has lead to human occupational exposure and to its increased introduction into the environment. Hexavalent chromium compounds are established carcinogens but their mechanism of cell transformation is not known. Up to now, no microanalytical technique was sensitive enough to allow the observation of chromium distribution, and oxidation state identification, within isolated cells at carcinogenic concentrations. In this experiment, we used successfully the ID-21 X-ray microscope to map Cr(VI) and total Cr distributions in cells exposed in vitro to soluble, and insoluble, Cr(VI) compounds. Exposure to soluble compounds, weak carcinogens, resulted in a homogeneous intracellular distribution of Cr, confirming by in situ measurement that Cr is present in the cell nucleus. Cr(VI) was never detected in cells which suggests a mechanism of rapid intracellular reducticn. On the other hand, exposure to insoluble compounds, strong carcinogens, also resulted in a homogeneous distribution of reduced forms of Cr in cells, and their nucleus. However, in this case, Cr(VI)-rich structures were observed into the cells suggesting that carcinogenicity is enhanced when oxidation reactions due to Cr(VI) chronic exposure are associated to Cr-DNA alterations.

  7. Dimensionally Controlled Lithiation of Chromium Oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fister, Tim T. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Hu, Xianyi [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); Esbenshade, Jennifer [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States); Chen, Xiao [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); Wu, Jinsong [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); Dravid, Vinayak [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); Bedzyk, Michael [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); Long, Brandon [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Gewirth, Andrew A. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States); Shi, Bing [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Schlepütz, Christian M. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Fenter, Paul [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-01-12

    Oxide conversion reactions are an alternative approach for high capacity lithium ion batteries but are known to suffer from structural irreversibility associated with the phase separation and reconstitution of reduced metal species and Li2O. In particular, the morphology of the reduced metal species is thought to play a critical role in the electrochemical properties of a conversion material. Here we use a model electrode with alternating layers of chromium and chromium oxide to better understand and control these phase changes in real-time and at molecular length scales. Despite lacking crystallinity at the atomic scale, this superstructure is observed (with X-ray reflectivity, XR) to lithiate and delithiate in a purely one-dimensional manner, preserving the layered structure. The XR data show that the metal layers act as nucleation sites for the reduction of chromium in the conversion reaction. Irreversibility during delithiation is due to the formation of a ternary phase, LiCrO2, which can be further delithiated at higher potentials. The results reveal that the combination of confining lithiation to nanoscale sheets of Li2O and the availability of reaction sites in the metal layers in the layered structure is a strategy for improving the reversibility and mass transport properties that can be used in a wide range of conversion materials.

  8. Chromium--a material for fusion technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Due to their low neutron-induced radioactivity chromium based materials are considered to be candidates for structure materials in fusion technology. In this paper investigations are presented of unirradiated chromium with a purity of 99.96% (DUCROPUR) and a dispersion strengthened chromium alloy Cr5Fe1Y2O3 (DUCROLLOY). Both materials have been produced in a powder metallurgical route. Mechanical tests of smooth and pre-cracked specimens have been performed in a wide temperature range. Below 280 deg. C the fracture toughness values of DUCROPUR are very low (1/2), above the transition temperature they exceed 500 MPa m1/2. Large plastic deformations have been observed. DUCROLLOY does not indicate such a significant increase of fracture toughness in the tested temperature range. But above 400 deg. C large plastic deformations can be obtained in bending samples, too. The fatigue crack propagation behaviour of DUCROPUR at 300 deg. C is similar to that of a ductile metal

  9. Ion nitriding in 316=L stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ion nitriding is a glow discharge process that is used to induce surface modification in metals. It has been applied to 316-L austenitic stainless steel looking for similar benefits already obtained in other steels. An austenitic stainless steel was selected because is not hardenable by heat treatment and is not easy to nitride by gas nitriding. The samples were plastically deformed to 10, 20, 40, 50 AND 70% of their original thickness in order to obtain bulk hardening and to observe nitrogen penetration dependence on it. The results were: an increase of one to two rockwell hardness number (except in 70% deformed sample because of its thickness); an increase of even several hundreds per cent in microhardness knoop number in nitrided surface. The later surely modifies waste resistance which would be worth to quantify in further studies. Microhardness measured in an internal transversal face to nitrided surface had a gradual diminish in its value with depth. Auger microanalysis showed a higher relative concentration rate CN/CFe near the surface giving evidence of nitrogen presence till 250 microns deep. The color metallography etchant used, produced faster corrosion in nitrited regions. Therefore, corrosion studies have to be done before using ion nitrited 316-L under these chemicals. (Author)

  10. Innovative boron nitride-doped propellants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thelma Manning

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The U.S. military has a need for more powerful propellants with balanced/stoichiometric amounts of fuel and oxidants. However, balanced and more powerful propellants lead to accelerated gun barrel erosion and markedly shortened useful barrel life. Boron nitride (BN is an interesting potential additive for propellants that could reduce gun wear effects in advanced propellants (US patent pending 2015-026P. Hexagonal boron nitride is a good lubricant that can provide wear resistance and lower flame temperatures for gun barrels. Further, boron can dope steel, which drastically improves its strength and wear resistance, and can block the formation of softer carbides. A scalable synthesis method for producing boron nitride nano-particles that can be readily dispersed into propellants has been developed. Even dispersion of the nano-particles in a double-base propellant has been demonstrated using a solvent-based processing approach. Stability of a composite propellant with the BN additive was verified. In this paper, results from propellant testing of boron nitride nano-composite propellants are presented, including closed bomb and wear and erosion testing. Detailed characterization of the erosion tester substrates before and after firing was obtained by electron microscopy, inductively coupled plasma and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. This promising boron nitride additive shows the ability to improve gun wear and erosion resistance without any destabilizing effects to the propellant. Potential applications could include less erosive propellants in propellant ammunition for large, medium and small diameter fire arms.

  11. Transition Metal Nitrides: A First Principles Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, Ashish; Singh, A. K.

    2016-04-01

    The present work describes the structural stability and electronic and mechanical properties of transition metal nitrides (TmNs: B1 cubic structure (cF8, Fm ‾ overline 3 m)) using first principles density functional theory (DFT) within generalized gradient approximation (GGA). The lattice constant of TmNs increases with increasing the atomic radii of the transition metals. Stability of the TmNs decreases from IVB to VIB groups due to increase in formation energy/atom. The bonding characteristics of these nitrides have been explained based on electronic density of states and charge density. All the TmNs satisfy Born stability criteria in terms of elastic constants except CrN and MoN that do not exist in equilibrium binary phase diagrams. The groups IVB and V-VIB nitrides are associated with brittle and ductile behaviour based on G/B ratios, respectively. The estimated melting temperatures of these nitrides exhibit reasonably good agreement with calculated with B than those of the C11 for all nitrides.

  12. Innovative boron nitride-doped propellants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Thelma MANNING; Henry GRAU; Paul MATTER; Michael BEACHY; Christopher HOLT; Samuel SOPOK; Richard FIELD; Kenneth KLINGAMAN; Michael FAIR; John BOLOGNINI; Robin CROWNOVER; Carlton P. ADAM; Viral PANCHAL; Eugene ROZUMOV

    2016-01-01

    The U.S. military has a need for more powerful propellants with balanced/stoichiometric amounts of fuel and oxidants. However, balanced and more powerful propellants lead to accelerated gun barrel erosion and markedly shortened useful barrel life. Boron nitride (BN) is an interesting potential additive for propellants that could reduce gun wear effects in advanced propellants (US patent pending 2015-026P). Hexagonal boron nitride is a good lubricant that can provide wear resistance and lower flame temperatures for gun barrels. Further, boron can dope steel, which drastically improves its strength and wear resistance, and can block the formation of softer carbides. A scalable synthesis method for producing boron nitride nano-particles that can be readily dispersed into propellants has been developed. Even dispersion of the nano-particles in a double-base propellant has been demonstrated using a solvent-based processing approach. Stability of a composite propellant with the BN additive was verified. In this paper, results from propellant testing of boron nitride nano-composite propellants are presented, including closed bomb and wear and erosion testing. Detailed characterization of the erosion tester substrates before and after firing was obtained by electron microscopy, inductively coupled plasma and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. This promising boron nitride additive shows the ability to improve gun wear and erosion resistance without any destabilizing effects to the propellant. Potential applications could include less erosive propellants in propellant ammunition for large, medium and small diameter fire arms.

  13. A REVIEW OF BIOSORPTION OF CHROMIUM IONS BY MICROORGANISMS

    OpenAIRE

    Inga Zinicovscaia

    2012-01-01

    Due to its widespread industrial use, chromium has become a serious pollutant in diverse environmental settings. The main source of chromium pollution including the Republic o Moldova is industry. It is a great need to develop new eco-friendly methods of chromium removal. Biosorption of heavy metals is a most promising technology involved in the removal of toxic metals from industrial waste streams and natural waters. This article is an extended abstract of a communication presented at the...

  14. CHROMIUM INDUCED CYTOTOXICITY IN BLACKGRAM (VIGNA MUNGO L.)

    OpenAIRE

    A. Chidambaram ، P. Sundaramoorthy ، A. Murugan ، K. Sankar Ganesh ، L. Baskaran

    2009-01-01

    Chromium is known to be highly toxic to biological systems. This study was designed to determine the mutagenic effects of different concentrations (0, 10, 25, 50, 100 and 200 mg/L) of hexavalent chromium on root tip cells of blackgram (Vigna mungo L. Hepper). The blackgram seeds were equi-spacially arranged in sterilized petriplates lined with filter paper and they were treated with different concentrations of chromium solution. In germination studies, the morphological growth parameters such...

  15. Processes affecting the remediation of chromium-contaminated sites.

    OpenAIRE

    Palmer, C.D.; Wittbrodt, P R

    1991-01-01

    The remediation of chromium-contaminated sites requires knowledge of the processes that control the migration and transformation of chromium. Advection, dispersion, and diffusion are physical processes affecting the rate at which contaminants can migrate in the subsurface. Heterogeneity is an important factor that affects the contribution of each of these mechanisms to the migration of chromium-laden waters. Redox reactions, chemical speciation, adsorption/desorption phenomena, and precipitat...

  16. Analysis of molybdenum, chromium, vanadium and iron by polarographic techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The application of direct current Tast polarograph, differential pulse polarography and phase-selective alternative current Tast polarography to the problem of determining molybdenum, chromium, vanadium and iron in various supporting electrolytes is reported. The effect of the supporting electrolyte on the wave/peak potential and sensitivity of the metal ion have been examined. The polarographic methods were applied for simultaneous determination of chromium (3)/chromium (6), vanadium (4), vanadium (5) and iron (2)/iron (3) in different supporting electrolytes

  17. Production of a chromium Bose-Einstein condensate

    OpenAIRE

    Griesmaier, Axel; Stuhler, Jürgen; Pfau, Tilman

    2005-01-01

    The recent achievement of Bose-Einstein condensation of chromium atoms [1] has opened longed-for experimental access to a degenerate quantum gas with long-range and anisotropic interaction. Due to the large magnetic moment of chromium atoms of 6 {$\\mu$}B, in contrast to other Bose- Einstein condensates (BECs), magnetic dipole-dipole interaction plays an important role in a chromium BEC. Many new physical properties of degenerate gases arising from these magnetic forces have been predicted in ...

  18. Removal of chromium(VI) from saline wastewaters by

    OpenAIRE

    AKSU, Zümriye

    2002-01-01

    Some industrial wastewaters contain higher quantities of salts besides chromium(VI) ions so the effect of these salts on the biosorption of chromium(VI) should be investigated. The biosorption of chromium (VI) from saline solutions on two strains of living Dunaliella algae were tested under laboratory conditions as a function of pH, initial metal ion and salt (NaCl) concentrations in a batch system. The biosorption capacity of both Dunaliella strains strongly de...

  19. Increase of chromium utilization in stainless steel melting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The processes of deoxidizing when melting stainless 18-10 steels in electric are furnaces by the method of remelting with wastes are investigated. The dependences of amount of reduced chromium on silicon consumption are made more precise. It is shown that it is useful to apply aluminium for deoxidation of acid high-chromium slags. Based on the data on pilot melts the extent to which aluminium can be used as a reducing agent for chromium is estimated. 3 refs., 2 figs

  20. Scientific Opinion on ChromoPrecise® cellular bound chromium yeast added for nutritional purposes as a source of chromium in food supplements and the bioavailability of chromium from this source

    OpenAIRE

    EFSA Panel on Food Additives and Nutrient Sources added to Food (ANS)

    2012-01-01

    The Panel on Food Additives and Nutrient Sources added to Food (ANS) provides a scientific opinion re-evaluating the safety of ChromoPrecise® cellular bound chromium yeast added for nutritional purposes as a source of chromium in food supplements and the bioavailability of chromium from this source. ChromoPrecise® is a yeast preparation with an enriched trivalent chromium content, obtained by culture of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in the presence of chromium chloride. A daily intake of 100 µg ch...

  1. Chromium depletion from stainless steels during vacuum annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The behaviour of chromium during selective evaporation by high temperature vacuum annealing has been investigated by means of energy dispersive X-ray analysis and by neutron activation analysis. It was established that the rate of chromium loss from austenitic stainless steels 316 and 321 is controlled by chromium inter-diffusion rather than tracer diffusion in the alloy. Two important parameters in selective removal of chromium from alloy steels are the variation in the chromium surface concentration with time and the depletion profile in the alloy. The present work gives support for the model in which loss of chromium is dependent on its diffusivity in the alloy and on an interface transfer coefficient. The results showed that the surface concentration of chromium decreased with increasing vacuum annealing time. The chromium depletion profile in the metal was in accord with the previous derived model, apart from an anomalous near surface region. Here the higher resolution of a neutron activation technique indicated a region within approximately 2 microns of the surface where the chromium concentration decreased more steeply than expected. (author)

  2. Stabilization and solidification of chromium-contaminated soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cherne, C.A.; Thomson, B.M. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States). Civil Engineering Dept.; Conway, R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1997-11-01

    Chromium-contaminated soil is a common environmental problem in the United States as a result of numerous industrial processes involving chromium. Hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] is the species of most concern because of its toxicity and mobility in groundwater. One method of diminishing the environmental impact of chromium is to reduce it to a trivalent oxidation state [Cr(III)], in which it is relatively insoluble and nontoxic. This study investigated a stabilization and solidification process to minimize the chromium concentration in the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) extract and to produce a solidified waste form with a compressive strength in the range of 150 to 300 pounds per square inch (psi). To minimize the chromium in the TCLP extract, the chromium had to be reduced to the trivalent oxidation state. The average used in this study was an alluvium contaminated with chromic and sulfuric acid solutions. The chromium concentration in the in the in situ soil was 1212 milligrams per kilogram (mg/kg) total chromium and 275 mg/kg Cr(VI). The effectiveness of iron, ferrous sulfate to reduce Cr(VI) was tested in batch experiments.

  3. Method of trivalent chromium concentration determination by atomic spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reheulishvili, Aleksandre N.; Tsibakhashvili, Neli Ya.

    2006-12-12

    A method is disclosed for determining the concentration of trivalent chromium Cr(III) in a sample. The addition of perchloric acid has been found to increase the atomic chromium spectrometric signal due to Cr(III), while leaving the signal due to hexavalent chromium Cr(VI) unchanged. This enables determination of the Cr(III) concentration without pre-concentration or pre-separation from chromium of other valences. The Cr(III) concentration may be measured using atomic absorption spectrometry, atomic emission spectrometry or atomic fluorescence spectrometry.

  4. Tribological Characteristics of Chromium-active Carbon Electroplated Composite Coatings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUKa-fi; HUAMeng; Yi-min

    2004-01-01

    A process of chromium electroplating using a standard bath with additives and active carbon particles was reported, and the tribological behaviors of the composite coatings using the pin-on-disk tester and the table wear tester were i nvestig(aed. Experimental results indicate that the electroplated chromium-active carbon composite coatings exhibited the low friction coefficient anti excellent anti-wear properties whets coffered with the normal chromium electroplated ones. The formation of active carbon particles within the chromium matrices can be explained by SEM analysis and the mechanis of wear resistance of the composite coatings were studied.

  5. Defect transformation in GSGG crystals during chromium ion activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Absorption and induced absorption spectra, dose dependence of induced absorption, thermoluminescence of GSGG crystals, nominally pure and activated with chromium and neodymium ions in different concentrations, are investigated. It is shown that it is chromium ion presence in large concentration that decreases the induced coloration in GSGG crystals after γ-irradiation at 300 K. Optimum concentration of chromium ions for the minimum of induced coloration are found. The mechanism of decrease of induced coloration consisting in Fermi level displacement by chromium ion activation is established. Defect concentration and localization and recombination possibilities of electrons and holes in GSGG crystals are estimated by computer simulation

  6. Oral bioavailability of chromium from a specific site.

    OpenAIRE

    Witmer, C M; Harris, R.; Shupack, S I

    1991-01-01

    Analysis of soil from a specific site in New Jersey indicated a low level of sodium and chromium present as a calcium compound. Chromium was then administered orally to young, mature male rats at a level of 240 micrograms/kg for 14 days as chromium-contaminated soil, as CaCrO4, and as an equimolar mixture of the soil and calcium salts for 14 days. The rats were sacrificed 24 hr after the last dosing, and tissues were taken immediately for chromium analysis. Blood, muscle, and liver contained ...

  7. MICRO-SEGREGATION OF CHROMIUM IN Fe-Cr ALLOY

    OpenAIRE

    Igata, N.; Sato, S; ANDO, T.; H. Doi; Nishikawa, O.; Shibata, M.

    1984-01-01

    The objective of this investigation is to clarify the behavior of chromium atoms in iron-5at.% chromium alloy. When the specimens were quenched after soultion annealing at 1150°C for 1hr, FIM image was only a bright area, but when they were tempered from 450°C to 650°C, both bright areas and dark areas were observed in the FIM image. In these quenched specimens there was microsegregation of chromium atoms : In bright areas the chromium concentration was lower, and in dark areas it was higher ...

  8. Influence of Chelating Agents on Chromium Fate in Sediment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANGXIAOCHANG; SUNJINHE; 等

    1996-01-01

    A laboratory investigation on reaction between chelating agents and chromium was conducted to evaluate the effect of chelating agents on the adsorption and desorption of chromium in sediment.The amount of adsorbed chromium(VI) in sediment decreased slightly by 5%-10% because of addition of chelating agents.Chelating agents inhibited the removal of Cr(Ⅲ)by sediment from solutions and the inhibiting effect was in the order:citric acid>tartaric acid>EDTA,Salicylic acid.No effect of chelating agents on desorption of chromium in sediment was observed.

  9. Analysing the chromium-chromium multiple bond using multiconfigurational quantum chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Brynda, Marcin; Gagliardi, Laura; Roos, Björn O.

    2009-01-01

    This Letter discusses the nature of the chemical bond between two chromium atoms in different di-chromium complexes with the metal atoms in different oxidation states. Starting with the Cr diatom, with its formally sextuple bond and oxidation number zero, we proceed to analyse the bonding in some Cr(I)–Cr(I) XCrCrX complexes with X varying from F, to Phenyl, and Aryl. The bond distance in these complexes varies over a large range: 1.65–1.83 Å and we suggest explanations for these variations. ...

  10. Ceramics based on titanium nitride and silicon nitride sintered by SPS-method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivkov, A. A.; Gerasimov, D. Yu; Evdokimov, A. A.

    2015-10-01

    The dependences of the microstructure and physical and mechanical properties of ceramic mixtures Si3N4/TiN in the full range of mass ratios of the components. Was also investigated directly, and the process of sintering occurring during a physical or chemical processes, in particular, has been obtained and the hardness of the material density on the ratio of the conductive titanium nitride phase and a silicon nitride insulating phase with values above and below the percolation threshold. Also obtained was pure ceramics based on titanium nitride with high physical-mechanical characteristics (H = 21.5 GPa).

  11. Microstructural characterization of nitrided Timetal 834.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moskalewicz, T; Grogger, W; Czyrska-Filemonowicz, A

    2006-09-01

    The microstructure of Timetal 834, in as-received condition and after nitriding under glow discharge has been examined by light microscopy and analytical transmission electorn microscopy (TEM) methods (SAED, EDS, EELS and EFTEM). The microstructure of the as-received alloy consists of the alpha phase and a small amount of the beta phase. Silicide precipitates (Zr5Si4) are present both inside the grains and at the grain boundaries. TEM investigations of cross-sectional thin foils allow for detailed analysis of the nitrided layer microstructure. It was found that the nitrided layer exhibits a graded character with continuously varying nitrogen content. The outermost sublayer consists of nanocrystals of delta-TiN. The following sublayers consist mainly of delta'-Ti2N and epsilon-Ti2N grains. The last sublayer, closest to the substrate, is identified as a nitrogen-rich alpha(N) solid solution containing up to 14 at% of nitrogen. PMID:17059528

  12. Thermodynamics, kinetics and process control of nitriding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mittemeijer, Eric J.; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    1997-01-01

    As a prerequisite for the predictability of properties obtained by a nitriding treatment of iron based workpieces, the relation between the process parameters and the composition and structure of the surface layer produced must be known. At present, even the description of thermodynamic equilibrium...... 10th Congress of the International Federation for Heat Treatment and Surface Engineering held in Brighton, UK on 1-5 September 1996. (C) 1997 The Institute of Materials....... for, the nitriding result is determined largely by kinetics. Nitriding kinetics are shown to be characterised by local near equilibria and stationary states at surfaces and interfaces, and the diffusion coefficient of nitrogen in the various phases, for which new data are presented. The necessary...

  13. The effect of chromium picolinate on serum cholesterol and apolipoprotein fractions in human subjects.

    OpenAIRE

    Press, R. I.; Geller, J.; Evans, G. W.

    1990-01-01

    Chromium has been implicated as a cofactor in the maintenance of normal lipid and carbohydrate metabolism. A deficiency of chromium results from diets low in biologically available chromium. Picolinic acid, a metabolite of tryptophan, forms stable complexes with transitional metal ions, which results in an improved bioavailability of the metal ion chromium. To determine whether or not chromium picolinate is effective in humans, 28 volunteer subjects were given either chromium tripicolinate (3...

  14. Nitride Fuel Development at the INL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new method for fabricating nitride-based fuels for nuclear applications is under development at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). A primary objective of this research is the development of a process that could be operated as an automated or semi-automated technique reducing costs, worker doses, and eventually improving the final product form. To achieve these goals the fabrication process utilizes a new cryo-forming technique to produce microspheres formed from sub-micron oxide powder to improve material handling issues, yield rapid kinetics for conversion to nitrides, and reduced material impurity levels within the nitride compounds. The microspheres are converted to a nitride form within a high temperature particle fluidizing bed using a carbothermic process that utilizes a hydrocarbon-hydrogen-nitrogen gas mixture. A new monitor and control system using differential pressure changes in the fluidizing gas allows for real-time monitoring and control of the spouted bed reactor during conversion. This monitor and control system can provide real-time data that is used to control the gas flow rates, temperatures, and gas composition to optimize the fluidization of the particle bed. The small size (0.5 (micro)m) of the oxide powders in the microspheres dramatically increases the kinetics of the conversion process yielding reduced process times and temperatures. Initial studies using surrogate ZrO2 powder have yielded conversion efficiencies of 90-95% nitride formation with only small levels of oxide and carbide contaminants present. Further studies are being conducted to determine optimal gas mixture ratios, process time, and temperature range for providing complete conversion to a nitride form

  15. Nitride Fuel Development at the INL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    W.E. Windes

    2007-06-01

    A new method for fabricating nitride-based fuels for nuclear applications is under development at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). A primary objective of this research is the development of a process that could be operated as an automated or semi-automated technique reducing costs, worker doses, and eventually improving the final product form. To achieve these goals the fabrication process utilizes a new cryo-forming technique to produce microspheres formed from sub-micron oxide powder to improve material handling issues, yield rapid kinetics for conversion to nitrides, and reduced material impurity levels within the nitride compounds. The microspheres are converted to a nitride form within a high temperature particle fluidizing bed using a carbothermic process that utilizes a hydrocarbon – hydrogen - nitrogen gas mixture. A new monitor and control system using differential pressure changes in the fluidizing gas allows for real-time monitoring and control of the spouted bed reactor during conversion. This monitor and control system can provide real-time data that is used to control the gas flow rates, temperatures, and gas composition to optimize the fluidization of the particle bed. The small size (0.5 µm) of the oxide powders in the microspheres dramatically increases the kinetics of the conversion process yielding reduced process times and temperatures. Initial studies using surrogate ZrO2 powder have yielded conversion efficiencies of 90 -95 % nitride formation with only small levels of oxide and carbide contaminants present. Further studies are being conducted to determine optimal gas mixture ratios, process time, and temperature range for providing complete conversion to a nitride form.

  16. Precipitate-Accommodated Plasma Nitriding for Aluminum Alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Patama Visittipitukul; Tatsuhiko Aizawa; Hideyuki Kuwahara

    2004-01-01

    Reliable surface treatment has been explored to improve the strength and wear resistance of aluminum alloy parts in automotives. Long duration time as well as long pre-sputtering time are required for plasma nitriding of aluminum or its alloys only with the thickness of a few micrometers. New plasma inner nitriding is proposed to realize the fast-rate nitriding of aluminum alloys. Al-6Cu alloy is employed as a targeting material in order to demonstrate the effectiveness of this plasma nitriding. Mechanism of fast-rate nitriding process is discussed with consideration of the role of Al2Cu precipitates.

  17. The Moessbauer investigation in iron nitride/expanded graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We successfully prepared the composites possessed high magnetic properties and shielding effectiveness (SE) in RF band with the methods of loading iron nitride nanoparticles on expanded graphite (EG) by the gaseous reduction and nitridation. XRD measurement shows that the ferric phases changed in different nitridation temperature. The phase components of nanoparticles were analyzed in detail by the measurement of 57Fe Moessbauer spectra. The result shows that as the temperature increased, the Fe particles were gradually nitride until completely before 400℃ and the γ'-Fe4N was gradually converted to ε-FexN (2nitride after 400℃. (authors)

  18. Alkaline Capacitors Based on Nitride Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldissi, Matt

    2003-01-01

    High-energy-density alkaline electrochemical capacitors based on electrodes made of transition-metal nitride nanoparticles are undergoing development. Transition- metal nitrides (in particular, Fe3N and TiN) offer a desirable combination of high electrical conductivity and electrochemical stability in aqueous alkaline electrolytes like KOH. The high energy densities of these capacitors are attributable mainly to their high capacitance densities, which, in turn, are attributable mainly to the large specific surface areas of the electrode nanoparticles. Capacitors of this type could be useful as energy-storage components in such diverse equipment as digital communication systems, implanted medical devices, computers, portable consumer electronic devices, and electric vehicles.

  19. Local heating with titanium nitride nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guler, Urcan; Ndukaife, Justus C.; Naik, Gururaj V.;

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the feasibility of titanium nitride (TiN) nanoparticles as local heat sources in the near infrared region, focusing on biological window. Experiments and simulations provide promising results for TiN, which is known to be bio-compatible.......We investigate the feasibility of titanium nitride (TiN) nanoparticles as local heat sources in the near infrared region, focusing on biological window. Experiments and simulations provide promising results for TiN, which is known to be bio-compatible....

  20. Thermodynamics, kinetics and process control of nitriding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mittemeijer, Eric J.; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    1999-01-01

    As a prerequisite for predictability of properties obtained by a nitriding treatment of iron-based workpieces, the relation between the process parameters and the composition and structure of the surface layer produced must be known. At present (even) the description of thermodynamic equilibrium of...... pure iron-nitrogen phases has not been achieved fully. It has been shown that taking into account ordering of nitrogen in the epsilon and gamma' iron-nitride phases, leads to an improved understanding of the Fe-N phase diagram. Although thermodynamics indicate the state the system strives for, the...

  1. Four Terminal Gallium Nitride MOSFETs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veety, Matthew Thomas

    All reported gallium nitride (GaN) transistors to date have been three-terminal devices with source, drain, and gate electrodes. In the case of GaN MOSFETs, this leaves the bulk of the device at a floating potential which can impact device threshold voltage. In more traditional silicon-based MOSFET fabrication a bulk contact can be made on the back side of the silicon wafer. For GaN grown on sapphire substrates, however, this is not possible and an alternate, front-side bulk contact must be investigated. GaN is a III-V, wide band gap semiconductor that as promising material parameters for use in high frequency and high power applications. Possible applications are in the 1 to 10 GHz frequency band and power inverters for next generation grid solid state transformers and inverters. GaN has seen significant academic and commercial research for use in Heterojunction Field Effect Transistors (HFETs). These devices however are depletion-mode, meaning the device is considered "on" at zero gate bias. A MOSFET structure allows for enhancement mode operation, which is normally off. This mode is preferrable in high power applications as the device has lower off-state power consumption and is easier to implement in circuits. Proper surface passivation of seminconductor surface interface states is an important processing step for any device. Preliminary research on surface treatments using GaN wet etches and depletion-mode GaN devices utilizing this process are discussed. Devices pretreated with potassium pursulfate prior to gate dielectric deposition show significant device improvements. This process can be applied to any current GaN FET. Enhancement-mode GaN MOSFETs were fabricated on magnesium doped p-type Wurtzite gallium nitride grown by Metal Organic Chemical Vapor Deposition (MOCVD) on c-plane sapphire substrates. Devices utilized ion implant source and drain which was activated under NH3 overpressure in MOCVD. Also, devices were fabricated with a SiO2 gate dielectric

  2. Boron Nitride Nanotubes for Spintronics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamal B. Dhungana

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available With the end of Moore’s law in sight, researchers are in search of an alternative approach to manipulate information. Spintronics or spin-based electronics, which uses the spin state of electrons to store, process and communicate information, offers exciting opportunities to sustain the current growth in the information industry. For example, the discovery of the giant magneto resistance (GMR effect, which provides the foundation behind modern high density data storage devices, is an important success story of spintronics; GMR-based sensors have wide applications, ranging from automotive industry to biology. In recent years, with the tremendous progress in nanotechnology, spintronics has crossed the boundary of conventional, all metallic, solid state multi-layered structures to reach a new frontier, where nanostructures provide a pathway for the spin-carriers. Different materials such as organic and inorganic nanostructures are explored for possible applications in spintronics. In this short review, we focus on the boron nitride nanotube (BNNT, which has recently been explored for possible applications in spintronics. Unlike many organic materials, BNNTs offer higher thermal stability and higher resistance to oxidation. It has been reported that the metal-free fluorinated BNNT exhibits long range ferromagnetic spin ordering, which is stable at a temperature much higher than room temperature. Due to their large band gap, BNNTs are also explored as a tunnel magneto resistance device. In addition, the F-BNNT has recently been predicted as an ideal spin-filter. The purpose of this review is to highlight these recent progresses so that a concerted effort by both experimentalists and theorists can be carried out in the future to realize the true potential of BNNT-based spintronics.

  3. Silicon nitride for photovoltaic application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Lipiński

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: of this paper is to present the research results of silicon nitride SiNx films used for industrial silicon solar cells and for third generation solar cells.Design/methodology/approach: The SiNx films were deposited using RF- and LF-PECVD methods. The optical and structural properties were investigated by spectroscopic ellipsometry, XPS, FTIR spectroscopy and X-Ray reflectometry. The passivation properties were investigated by carriers lifetime measurements using a photoconductance decay (PCD technique. For the photovoltaics of third generation the multilayer structures of SiNx were deposited and annealed in order to obtain the silicon quantum superlattices. These structure were characterized by high-resolution TEM, GI-XRD, photoluminescence, Raman and SPV spectroscopy.Findings: It is shown that the layers deposited by LF PECVD have more profitable optical and electrical properties for industrial silicon solar cells than those deposited by RF PECVD. The other finding is that multi-layer structure of SiNx annealed at high temperature shows the properties of the new semiconductor with the gap energy broader then the gap of the silicon.Research limitations/implications: The maximal density of SiNx layers is equal to 2.6 g/cm3. It is too low to obtain high efficiency mc-Si cells. The deposition process should be further optimized. The other limitation is obtaining a regular structure of quantum superlattice composed of quantum dots with defined diameter and density which is a very difficult technological task. This work should be continued in the future.Practical implications: The results of SiNx investigation can be used to increase the efficiency of mc-Si solar cells. The results of multilayer SiNx investigations may be applied to a solar cells based on silicon QDs superlatice.

  4. The Effect of Chromium Added into Basal Diet on Serum Total Protein, Urea, Triglyceride, Cholesterol and Serum and Tissue Chromium, Zinc, Copper Levels in Rabbits

    OpenAIRE

    *, Kâzim ŞAHİN; *, Talat GÜLER; +, N. ŞAHİN; *, O. N. ERTAS; +, N. ERKAL

    1999-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the effect of supplemantal dietary chromium on serum total protein, urea, triglycerides, cholesterol, and serum and tissue chromium, zinc, and copper contents of pregnant rabbits, their offspring and their young rabbits. Treatment groups consisted of chromium level as follows: Control Group no supplementation chromium into basal diet, Treatment I (200 ppb Group) contained 200 ppb of supplemental chromium into basal diet, and Treatment II (400 ppb Group...

  5. Optimization of processing temperature in the nitridation process for the synthesis of iron nitride nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have demonstrated an effective strategy on the nitridation process to synthesize ε-Fe3N nanoparticles (NPs) from the zero valent iron NPs as a starting material. The transformation of iron into iron nitride phase was systematically studied by performing the nitridation process at different processing temperatures. The phase, crystal structure was analyzed by XRD. Morphology and size of the ZVINPs and ε-Fe3N NPs were analyzed by field emission scanning electron microscope. Further, their room temperature magnetic properties were studied by using vibrating sample magnetometer and it revealed that the magnetic property of ε-Fe3N is associated with ratio of Fe-N in the iron nitride system

  6. Study of the nitrides formation in the ionic nitriding process of zircaloy-2 zirconium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zircaloy and Zr-Sn alloys are used in nuclear techniques because they show a very low effective absorption section for neutrons and a high corrosion resistance. This paper shows that by ionic nitriding of Zircaloy type alloys, a structure is obtained that enhances the wear resistance. From the study of the N2/H2 ratio on the nitride quantity formed by ion nitriding of Zircaloy-2 alloy, it can be concluded that the gaseous mixtures with high nitrogen and hydrogen content used in discharge are not favourable in the nitride forming process. The optimum ratio is 1/1. The ZrN superficial layer hardness was checked according to the exposure time and to the layer thickness. (J.S.). 6 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs

  7. Optimization of processing temperature in the nitridation process for the synthesis of iron nitride nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rohith Vinod, K.; Sakar, M.; Balakumar, S., E-mail: balasuga@yahoo.com [National Centre for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, University of Madras, Chennai-600025 (India); Saravanan, P. [Defence Metallurgical Research Laboratory, Hyderabad-500058 (India)

    2015-06-24

    We have demonstrated an effective strategy on the nitridation process to synthesize ε-Fe{sub 3}N nanoparticles (NPs) from the zero valent iron NPs as a starting material. The transformation of iron into iron nitride phase was systematically studied by performing the nitridation process at different processing temperatures. The phase, crystal structure was analyzed by XRD. Morphology and size of the ZVINPs and ε-Fe{sub 3}N NPs were analyzed by field emission scanning electron microscope. Further, their room temperature magnetic properties were studied by using vibrating sample magnetometer and it revealed that the magnetic property of ε-Fe{sub 3}N is associated with ratio of Fe-N in the iron nitride system.

  8. Characterization and properties of highly adhesive titanium nitride and tungsten nitride thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper presents results on the physical characteristics and mechanical properties of titanium nitride (TiN) and tungsten nitride (W2N) thin films grown by reactive DC magnetron sputtering. The films were deposited in a system with several magnetron modules of different sputtering materials suitable for deposition of single-layer metal nitride films and multilayer nitride coatings. The deposition conditions were optimized to obtain films with the highest adhesion to substrates of machine steel and sintered hard alloy. The adhesion of the films was measured in dependence on two principal process parameters: the nitrogen partial pressure in the magnetron discharge gas mixture of nitrogen and argon and the substrate temperature. The composition of the TiN films was determined by Auger electron spectroscopy. The microstructure and the crystallization trend of the films were studied by transmission electron microscopy and selected area electron diffraction. The hardness of the films was examined using standard measuring methods

  9. STABILITY AND ABSORPTION OF CHROMIUM AND ABSORPTION OF CHROMIUM HISTIDINE BY HUMANS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Increased intake of chromium has been shown to lead to improvements in glucose, insulin, lipids, and related variables in studies involving humans, experimental and farm animals. However, the results are often variable depending not only upon the selection of subjects, but also dietary conditions a...

  10. Chromium and Polyphenols From Cinnamon Improve Insulin Sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naturally occurring compounds that have been shown to improve insulin sensitivity include chromium and polyphenols found in cinnamon. These compounds also have similar effects on insulin signaling and glucose control. The signs of chromium deficiency are similar to those for the metabolic syndrome ...

  11. IRIS Toxicological Review of Hexavalent Chromium (2010 External Review Draft)

    Science.gov (United States)

    [UPDATE] New Schedule for IRIS Hexavalent Chromium Assessment In Feb 2012, EPA developed a new schedule for completing the IRIS hexavalent chromium assessment. Based on the recommendations of the external peer review panel, which met in May 2011 to review the dra...

  12. Composition and structure of plasma sprayed chromium steel powders

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Schneeweiss, O.; Voleník, Karel; Kolman, Blahoslav Jan

    Praha, 2005, s. 105-111. ISBN 1899072 18 7. [EURO Powder Metallurgy Congress & Exhibition. Prague (CZ), 02.10.2005-05.10.2005] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : chromium steel * plasma spraying * chromium depletion * Mössbauer spectroscopy Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass

  13. Safety, absorption, and antioxidant effects of chromium histidine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supplemental chromium has been shown to be involved in the alleviation of the metabolic syndrome, glucose intolerance, polycystic ovary syndrome, depression, excess body fat, and gestational, steroid-induced, and type 2 diabetes. Chromium amino acid complexes that contained histidine displayed cons...

  14. Toxicity and adaptation of Dictyosphaerium chlorelloides to extreme chromium contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Fortún, Sebastián; López-Rodas, Victoria; Navarro, Macarena; Marvá, Fernando; D'ors, Ana; Rouco, Mónica; Haigh-Florez, David; Costas, Eduardo

    2009-09-01

    Metals are often spilled by industries into inland water environments, with adverse consequences. Numerous papers have reported that heavy metals produce massive destruction of algae. Nevertheless, algal populations seem to become tolerant when they have had previous exposures to heavy metals. Because the mechanisms allowing heavy metal tolerance of algae are not yet known, the present study analyzed the effect of hexavalent chromium on growth and photosynthetic performance of Dictyosphaerium chlorelloides, stressing on the adaptation mechanisms to chromium contamination. Growth and photosynthetic performance of algal cells were inhibited by Cr(VI) at 10 mg/L, and the 72-h median inhibition concentration was established as 1.64 and 1.54 mg/L, respectively. However, after further incubation for a three month period in an environment with 25 mg/L of chromium, some rare, chromium-resistant cells occasionally were found. A Luria-Delbrück fluctuation analysis was performed to distinguish between resistant algae arising from rare, spontaneous mutations and resistant algae arising from physiological adaptation and other adaptive mechanisms. Resistant cells arose only by spontaneous mutations before the addition of chromium, with a rate of 1.77 x 10(-6) mutants per cell division. From a practical point of view, the use of both chromium-sensitive and chromium-resistant genotypes could make possible a specific algal biosensor for chromium. PMID:19323601

  15. Residual Chromium in Leather by Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Okoh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Most tanning processes employ the use of chromium sulphate. For chromium tanned leather, finished products may contain high amount of residual chromium. This may pose some health hazards, since chromium is known to be toxic at elevated concentration. This justifies the need for the study. Approach: Various samples of leather were collected from a tannery, a leather crafts market, a leather dump site and from local tanners all in Kano, Nigeria in 2009. The samples were irradiated for 6 h in the inner site of the Nigerian Research Reactor (NIRR-1 at a flux of 5×1011 ncm-2 sec-1. Results: After evaluating the spectrum, the mean results for chromium in the samples were determined as 2.33±0.3, 2.23±0.3 and 2.93±0.4% for samples from the tannery, leather crafts market and leather dump sites respectively. Chromium concentration in samples collected from local tanners who use tannins from Acacia nilotica as tanning agent was below the detection limit of Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA technique used in the study. Conclusion: Although, the concentrations of chromium in the analysed samples were not much higher than what were obtained in literature, they may be enough to sensitize the population that is allergic to chromium.

  16. AMORPHOUS ALLOY SURFACE COATINGS FOR HARD CHROMIUM REPLACEMENT - PHASE I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hard chromium coatings (0.25 to10 mil thick) are used extensively for imparting wear and erosion resistance to components in both industrial and military applications. The most common means of depositing hard chromium has been through the use of chromic acid baths containing ...

  17. ADVANCES IN HEXAVALENT CHROMIUM REMOVAL AT HANFORD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NESHEM DO; RIDDELLE J

    2012-01-30

    At the Hanford Site, chromium was used as a corrosion inhibitor in the reactor cooling water and was introduced into the groundwater as a result of planned and unplanned discharges from reactors during plutonium production since 1944. Beginning in 1995, groundwater treatment methods were evaluated leading to the use of pump and treat facilities with ion exchange using Dowex 21 K, a regenerable strong base anion exchange resin. This required regeneration of the resin, which is currently performed offsite. Resin was installed in a 4 vessel train, with resin removal required from the lead vessel approximately once a month. In 2007, there were 8 trains (32 vessels) in operation. In 2008, DOE recognized that regulatory agreements would require significant expansion in the groundwater chromium treatment capacity. Previous experience from one of the DOE project managers led to identification of a possible alternative resin, and the contractor was requested to evaluate alternative resins for both cost and programmatic risk reductions. Testing was performed onsite in 2009 and 2010, using a variety of potential resins in two separate facilities with groundwater from specific remediation sites to demonstrate resin performance in the specific groundwater chemistry at each site. The testing demonstrated that a weak base anion single-use resin, ResinTech SIR-700, was effective at removing chromium, had a significantly higher capacity, could be disposed of efficiently on site, and would eliminate the complexities and programmatic risks from sampling, packaging, transportation and return of resin for regeneration. This resin was installed in Hanford's newest groundwater treatment facility, called 100-DX, which began operations in November, 2010, and used in a sister facility, 100-HX, which started up in September of 2011. This increased chromium treatment capacity to 25 trains (100 vessels). The resin is also being tested in existing facilities that utilize Dowex 21 K for

  18. Chromium-Makes stainless steel stainless

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kropschot, S.J.; Doebrich, Jeff

    2010-01-01

    Chromium, a steely-gray, lustrous, hard metal that takes a high polish and has a high melting point, is a silvery white, hard, and bright metal plating on steel and other material. Commonly known as chrome, it is one of the most important and indispensable industrial metals because of its hardness and resistance to corrosion. But it is used for more than the production of stainless steel and nonferrous alloys; it is also used to create pigments and chemicals used to process leather.

  19. The electronic structure of antiferromagnetic chromium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skriver, Hans Lomholt

    1981-01-01

    The author has used the local spin density formalism to perform self-consistent calculations of the electronic structure of chromium in the non-magnetic and commensurate antiferromagnetic phases, as a function of the lattice parameter. A change of a few per cent in the atomic radius brings...... the calculated ground state properties into agreement with experiment. The magnetisation is studied as function of volume in several models, and it is shown that a Stoner picture provides an extremely accurate description of the full calculation provided the sp-d hybridisation is taken into account. It is found...

  20. Styrene Aziridination by Iron(IV) Nitrides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, Salvador B; Lee, Wei-Tsung; Dickie, Diane A; Scepaniak, Jeremiah J; Subedi, Deepak; Pink, Maren; Johnson, Michael D; Smith, Jeremy M

    2015-09-01

    Thermolysis of the iron(IV) nitride complex [PhB(tBuIm)3Fe≡N] with styrene leads to formation of the high-spin iron(II) aziridino complex [PhB(tBuIm)3Fe-N(CH2CHPh)]. Similar aziridination occurs with both electron-rich and electron-poor styrenes, while bulky styrenes hinder the reaction. The aziridino complex [PhB(tBuIm)3Fe-N(CH2CHPh)] acts as a nitride synthon, reacting with electron-poor styrenes to generate their corresponding aziridino complexes, that is, aziridine cross-metathesis. Reaction of [PhB(tBuIm)3Fe-N(CH2CHPh)] with Me3SiCl releases the N-functionalized aziridine Me3SiN(CH2CHPh) while simultaneously generating [PhB(tBuIm)3FeCl]. This closes a synthetic cycle for styrene azirdination by a nitride complex. While the less hindered iron(IV) nitride complex [PhB(MesIm)3Fe≡N] reacts with styrenes below room temperature, only bulky styrenes lead to tractable aziridino products. PMID:26179563

  1. Boron nitride nanosheets reinforced glass matrix composites

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Saggar, Richa; Porwal, H.; Tatarko, P.; Dlouhý, Ivo; Reece, M. J.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 114, SEP (2015), S26-S32. ISSN 1743-6753 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 7AMB14SK155 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 264526 Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : Boron nitride nanosheets * Borosilicate glass * Mechanical properties Subject RIV: JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics Impact factor: 1.163, year: 2014

  2. Gallium nitride junction field-effect transistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zolper, John C.; Shul, Randy J.

    1999-01-01

    An all-ion implanted gallium-nitride (GaN) junction field-effect transistor (JFET) and method of making the same. Also disclosed are various ion implants, both n- and p-type, together with or without phosphorous co-implantation, in selected III-V semiconductor materials.

  3. Gallium Nitride Crystals: Novel Supercapacitor Electrode Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shouzhi; Zhang, Lei; Sun, Changlong; Shao, Yongliang; Wu, Yongzhong; Lv, Jiaxin; Hao, Xiaopeng

    2016-05-01

    A type of single-crystal gallium nitride mesoporous membrane is fabricated and its supercapacitor properties are demonstrated for the first time. The supercapacitors exhibit high-rate capability, stable cycling life at high rates, and ultrahigh power density. This study may expand the range of crystals as high-performance electrode materials in the field of energy storage. PMID:27007502

  4. Residual Stress Induced by Nitriding and Nitrocarburizing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Somers, Marcel A.J.

    2005-01-01

    The present chapter is devoted to the various mechanisms involved in the buildup and relief of residual stress in nitrided and nitrocarburized cases. The work presented is an overview of model studies on iron and iron-based alloys. Subdivision is made between the compound (or white) layer...

  5. Effects of UV light and chromium ions on wood flavonoids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The individual and simultaneous effect of UV light and chromium ions was investigated by spectrophotometric methods on inert surfaces impregnated with quercetin or robinetin. The UV-VIS spectra of the silica gel plates impregnated with these flavonoids were modified characteristically after irradiating ultraviolet light. Even a half an hour of irradiation has caused irreversible changes in the molecule structure. A certain chemical - presumably complexation - was concluded from the change of spectral bands assigned to flavonoids when impregnated with chromic ions. Hexavalent chromium caused more complex changes in the absorption spectra. The differences in the spectra could indicate either the oxidation and decomposition of flavonoids, or some kind of coordination process and the reduction of hexavalent chromium. The simultaneous application of UV light and chromium ions caused more pronounced effects. The complexation process between chromium(III) and flavonoid was completed

  6. CHROMIUM BIOACCUMULATION FROM COMPOSTS AND VERMICOMPOSTS BASED ON TANNERY SLUDGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krzysztof GONDEK

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Storage of waste substances is not indifferent to ecological equilibrium in the environment therefore should not be the ultimate way to limit waste arduousness. Therefore, the conducted investigations aimed to determine the effect of tannery composts and vermicomposts loaded with chromium on this element bioaccumulation in earthworm bodies and biomass of selected plants. Chromium in composts and vermicomposts based on tannery sludges occurred in small quantities and easily soluble compounds. Chromium concentrations in redworm biomass points to this metal accumulation in Eisenia fetida body tissues. This element content in redworm biomass was signifi cantly positively correlated with its content in composts. Chromium content in plants was diversifi ed and on treatments was generally smaller than on mineral treatment or farmyard manure. Chromium absorbed by plants was stored mainly in the root systems, and over the norm content of this element found in vermicomposts did not cause its excessive accumulation in plant biomass.

  7. Biosorption potency of Aspergillus niger for removal of chromium (VI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Shaili; Thakur, Indu Shekhar

    2006-09-01

    Aspergillus niger isolated from soil and effluent of leather tanning mills had higher activity to remove chromium. The potency of Aspergillus niger was evaluated in shake flask culture by absorption of chromium at pH 6 and temperature 30 degrees C. The results of the study indicated removal of more than 75% chromium by Aspergillus niger determined by diphenylcarbazide colorimetric assay and atomic absorption spectrophotometry after 7 days. Study of microbial Cr(VI) reduction and identification of reduction intermediates has been hindered by the lack of analytical techniques that can identify the oxidation state with subcellular spatial resolution. Therefore, removal of chromium was further substantiated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), which indicated an accumulation of chromium in the fungal mycelium. PMID:16874547

  8. Specific features of the electrocrystallization of chromium together with molybdenum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study was made on molybdenum effect on surface structure and some physicomechanical properties of electrolytic chromium during Cr-Mo electrodeposition from CrO3 solutions with additions of SO42- and SiFe62- anions. Cr-Mo deposition was conducted at 55 deg C and 0.5 A/cm2 current density which corresponds to conditions of hard chromizing. It is shown that the change hardness, hydridation and internal stresses of chromium coatings during their alloying with molybdenum is conditioned by structure change. Mo introduction into chromium is not manifested clearly in these characteristics. The change of chromium structure during deposition with molybdenum is probably related both with change of anion relation in cathode film (decrease of catalytic anion content in it) and peculiarities of chromium electrocrystallization. This requires special study with application of methods for investigation into fine and surface structure

  9. Ammonothermal Growth of Gallium Nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pimputkar, Siddha

    Bulk, single crystal Gallium Nitride (GaN) crystals are essential for enabling high performance electronic and optoelectronic devices by providing arbitrarily oriented, high quality, large, single crystal GaN substrates. Methods of producing single crystals of sufficient size and quality at a rate that would enable successful commercialization has been a major focus for research groups and companies worldwide. Recent advances have demonstrated remarkable improvements, though high cost and lack of high volume production remain key challenges. Major investments in bulk GaN growth were made at UCSB with particular focus on the ammonothermal method. The existing lab was upgraded and a new facility was designed and built with improved experimental setups for ammonothermal growth of GaN. The facilities can simultaneously operate up to 15 reactors of differing designs and capabilities with the ability to grow crystals up to 2 inches in diameter. A novel in-situ technique was devised to investigate the growth chemistry which occurs at typical operating conditions of 3,000 atm and 600 °C. Improvements in ammonothermal GaN include improved growth rates for c-plane by a factor of four to 344 μm/day with an overall record growth rate of 544 μm/day achieved for the (112¯2) plane. Crystal qualities comparable to that of the seed crystal were achieved. Impurity concentrations for transition metals were consistently reduced by a factor of 100 to concentrations below 1017 atoms/cm3. Optical transparency was improved by significantly reducing the yellow coloration typically seen for ammonothermal GaN. Single crystal GaN was successfully grown on large seeds and a 1 inch x ½ inch x ½ inch GaN crystal was demonstrated. To better understand the growth chemistry, models were created for the decomposition of ammonia under growth conditions, with initial experiments performed using the designed in-situ setup to verify the model's accuracy. To investigate the surface morphology and

  10. Problems of phase identification in high-nitrogen chromium-manganese cast steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Pirowski

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available An atzcrnpt has been madc to offcr an intcrprctation of ihc rnicrostructurc of chromium-mangancx cast stccl aftcr adding to 1his stccla targc amount of nitrogcn as an alloying clcrncnr. Nitropcn was addcd 10 rhc cast stccl by two mcthods: rhc first mcthod consistcrl inadding a nitridcd fcrrornangancsc, the second method in rcmclting thc nitrogen-rscc alloy undcr rhc atrnosphcrc of nitrogen maintaininghigh N1 prcssurc abovc the mctal meSt (33 MPa.Somc imponant diffcrcnces in the microstructurc of rhc cxamincd cast sleet havc bccn observed. dcpcnding on how the nitrogcn wasintroduced to Ihc alloy. Whcn melting was carried out undcr thc armosphcric prcssurc adding thc nitridcd fcrroaIloys. the matrix was composedof nitridcd nustcnitc, and numerous nitrides (carboni~rides wcrc forming a wcll-dcvclopcd ncrwork along tbc grain boundaries.Mcl t ing of alloy iindcr thc high prcsairc or nirrogcn enabPcs oblaining much highcr concentrarion of this clclncnt in lncral. Thc network ofprccipilarcs along lhc grain houndwics is obscrvcd to cxist no longcr. and thc Pamellar stmcturc occupics now practically ihc cnrirc mctalvolumc. Whcn :illoys arc mcltctt in rhc air, only small fragments oh the lamellar structurc, forming thc. so ca!lcd. "Chincse script" and localclusters arc! prcscnt.At this stagc of thc rcscarch. an artcmpa has bcen mad& to identify thc phascs in chromium-~nnngn~icsc cnst stccl u s i n ~a transmissionclectron rnicroscopc. Thc conducrcd slzldics pnnly confirrncd rhc conclusions resulting from ~ h ccx nminntions cnrricd out prcvioi~slyu ndcrthc optical rnicroscopc. So far. howcvcr, no consistcna answer has bccn found to thc qucstion of what typc arc Z ~ pCrc cipi~alcsp rcscnt inthe structurc of thc cxamincrh alloy.Attcmpts at furthcr intcrprcintion of thc obtained tcsults will hc taken at the next stage of thc work with n~tcntionfo ci~sscdo n thc prccipitatcsformed during rhc proccss of wlidilicat ion of thc cxnmincd chromium-manganese cast

  11. Microstructural Characteristics of Plasma Nitrided Layer on Hot-Rolled 304 Stainless Steel with a Small Amount of α-Ferrite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaolei; Yu, Zhiwei; Cui, Liying; Niu, Xinjun; Cai, Tao

    2016-02-01

    The hot-rolled 304 stainless steel with γ-austenite and approximately 5 pct α-ferrite elongated along the rolling direction was plasma-nitrided at a low temperature of 693 K (420 °C). X-ray diffraction results revealed that the nitrided layer was mainly composed of the supersaturated solid solution of nitrogen in austenite ( γ N). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observations showed that the microstructure of the γ N phase exhibited "fracture factor contrast" reflective of the occurrence of fine pre-precipitations in γ N by the continuous precipitation. The occurrence of a diffuse scattering effect on the electron diffraction spots of γ N indicated that the pre-precipitation took place in γ N in the form of strongly bonded Cr-N clusters or pairs due to a strong attractive interaction of nitrogen with chromium. Scanning electron microscopy and TEM observations indicated that the discontinuous precipitation initiated from the γ/ α interfaces and grew from the austenite boundaries into austenite grains to form a lamellar structure consisting of CrN and ferrite. The orientation relationship between CrN and ferrite corresponded to a Baker-Nutting relationship: (100)CrN//(100) α ; [011]CrN//[001] α . A zigzag boundary line following the banded structure of alternating γ-austenite and elongated α-ferrite was presented between the nitrided layer and the substrate to form a continuous varying layer thickness, which resulted from the difference in diffusivities of nitrogen in α-ferrite and γ-austenite, along the γ/ α interfaces and through the lattice. Microstructural features similar to the γ N were also revealed in the ferrite of the nitrided layer by TEM. It was not excluded that a supersaturated solid solution of nitrogen in ferrite ( α N) formed in the nitrided layer.

  12. Metal surface nitriding by laser induced plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomann, A. L.; Boulmer-Leborgne, C.; Andreazza-Vignolle, C.; Andreazza, P.; Hermann, J.; Blondiaux, G.

    1996-10-01

    We study a nitriding technique of metals by means of laser induced plasma. The synthesized layers are composed of a nitrogen concentration gradient over several μm depth, and are expected to be useful for tribological applications with no adhesion problem. The nitriding method is tested on the synthesis of titanium nitride which is a well-known compound, obtained at present by many deposition and diffusion techniques. In the method of interest, a laser beam is focused on a titanium target in a nitrogen atmosphere, leading to the creation of a plasma over the metal surface. In order to understand the layer formation, it is necessary to characterize the plasma as well as the surface that it has been in contact with. Progressive nitrogen incorporation in the titanium lattice and TiN synthesis are studied by characterizing samples prepared with increasing laser shot number (100-4000). The role of the laser wavelength is also inspected by comparing layers obtained with two kinds of pulsed lasers: a transversal-excited-atmospheric-pressure-CO2 laser (λ=10.6 μm) and a XeCl excimer laser (λ=308 nm). Simulations of the target temperature rise under laser irradiation are performed, which evidence differences in the initial laser/material interaction (material heated thickness, heating time duration, etc.) depending on the laser features (wavelength and pulse time duration). Results from plasma characterization also point out that the plasma composition and propagation mode depend on the laser wavelength. Correlation of these results with those obtained from layer analyses shows at first the important role played by the plasma in the nitrogen incorporation. Its presence is necessary and allows N2 dissociation and a better energy coupling with the target. Second, it appears that the nitrogen diffusion governs the nitriding process. The study of the metal nitriding efficiency, depending on the laser used, allows us to explain the differences observed in the layer features

  13. Nitriding of Co–Cr–Mo alloy in nitrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Ning, E-mail: ningtang@imr.tohoku.ac.jp; Li, Yunping, E-mail: lyping@imr.tohoku.ac.jp; Koizumi, Yuichiro; Chiba, Akihiko, E-mail: a.chiba@imr.tohoku.ac.jp

    2014-06-01

    Using the results of a thermodynamic analysis, a Co–Cr–Mo alloy was successfully nitrided in nitrogen at temperatures of 1073–1473 K. The near-surface microstructure of the treated Co–Cr–Mo alloy was characterized using X-ray diffraction, field-emission scanning electron microscopy, electron probe micro-analyzer, and transmission electron microscopy equipped with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The results indicated that the highest nitriding efficiency was achieved at the treatment temperature of 1273 K, with the size and coverage of the nitride particles on sample's surface increasing with an increase in the treatment duration. After nitriding at 1273 K for 2 h, numerous nitride particles, consisting of an outer Cr{sub 2}N layer and an inner π phase layer, were formed on top of the nitrogen-containing γ phase, and some π phase also precipitated in the alloy matrix at the sub-surface level. - Highlights: • A Co–Cr–Mo alloy was successfully nitrided in nitrogen at 1073–1473 K. • The highest nitriding efficiency of the Co–Cr–Mo alloy was achieved at 1273 K. • Numerous nitride particles formed on sample's surface during nitriding at 1273 K. • The nitride particles consist of an outer Cr{sub 2}N layer and an inner π phase layer.

  14. Selenium protection from cadmium and chromium poisoning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The interaction of selenium with cadmium and chromium was studied in 168 chicken-broilers (DWCxWR) divided into four equal groups. Eight-week old control animals received an intravenous dose of /sup 115m/Cd Chloride 370 KBq/Kg (Group I), or 51Cr Chloride 370 KBq/Kg (Group II). The kinetics of these isotopes were studied by scintillation spectrometry (NaI/TI) carried out for whole blood, plasma, plasma proteins, urine, feces and homogenates of all organs at various time intervals. Animals in Groups III and IV received eight subcutaneous doses of sodium selenate (5ug) at 8-week intervals prior to /sup 115m/Cd or 51Cr. The kinetics of these elements were studied as in the previous two groups. It was found that selenium affected those kinetics in two ways: (a) by increasing the excretion of Cd by 11 +/- 3% (P < 0.001) and that of Cr by 7 +/- 1% (P < 0.001); and (b) by favoring redistribution of those elements, with significant (P < 0.001) reductions in liver, endocrine glands and kidney and increases (P < 0.01) in bone. The study suggests that selenium protects the animals' vital organs from environmental pollutants, such as cadmium and chromium

  15. The hydrogen anode in chromium electrowinning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of a hydrogen anode for electrowinning of chromium from an ammonium chromium sulfate electrolyte (chrome alum process) was investigated in a laboratory-scale cell equipped with a diaphragm. The composition of the solution and the temperature followed industrial practice. Current density, pH, and anolyte flow rate through the diaphragm were varied and optimized for the cell. For a cathodic current density of 915 A/m2 at 50oC, the optimum initial pH was 2.37. The hydrogen anode was made of a platinized Toray carbon paper (0.35 mg Pt per cm2) supplied by E-TEK. The hydrogen pressure was maintained at 2 cm H20 above ambient atmosphere. The potential of the hydrogen anode was about 1 V lower than that of a Pb-Ag anode (1%Ag) in a similar cell. As expected, no Cr+6 was generated in the anolyte. The cathodic current efficiency was slightly lower with the hydrogen anode than with the Pb-Ag anode. (author)

  16. Biliary excretion of chromium in the rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The relative amount of chromium excreted in rat bile after injection of Cr-III is much less than after injection of Cr-VI, about 0.1% and from 6-8% during 5 hours respectively, for corresponding dose levels. The liver to bile ratio was 50-100 for Cr-III injection for Cr-VI the ratio was 2-3. With doses up to 18 μmol Cr/kg, only Cr-III was found in bile even after injection of CR-VI.Glutathione depletion of the liver with cyclohexene oxide decreased chromium excretion in bile. Such treatment also decresed the reduction of Cr-VI to Cr-III in the liver cell as only Cr-VI was found in bile. A different distribution of Cr-III in the liver dependent on whether derived from Cr-VI or taken up by the liver as such must be assumed. Taking into account the usual low penetration of biological membranes by Cr-III, a possible active transport mechanism or a specific diffusable Cr-III compound must be postulated. (author)

  17. Characteristics of the nitrided layer formed on AISI 304 austenitic stainless steel by high temperature nitriding assisted hollow cathode discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • AISI 304 austenite steel was nitrided at high temperatures in short time. • It could critically reduce time compared with low temperature nitriding. • The nitrided layer was mainly composed of nitrogen expanded austenite. • It could improve pitting corrosion resistance in NaCl solution. - Abstract: A series of experiments have been conducted on AISI 304 stainless steel using a hollow cathode discharge assisted plasma nitriding apparatus. Specimens were nitrided at high temperatures (520–560 °C) in order to produce nitrogen expanded austenite phase within a short time. The nitrided specimen was characterized by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, potentiodynamic polarization and microhardness tester. The corrosion properties of nitrided samples were evaluated using anodic polarization tests in 3.5% NaCl solution. The nitrided layer was shown to consist of nitrogen expanded austenite and possibly a small amount of CrN precipitates and iron nitrides. The results indicated that rapid nitriding assisted hollow cathode discharge not only increased the surface hardness but also improved the corrosion resistance of the untreated substrate

  18. Workshop on effects of chromium coating on Nb3Sn superconductor strand: Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report discusses the following topics: Chromium coating on superconductor strand -- an overview; technology of chromium plating; comparison of wires plated by different platers; search for chromium in copper; strand manufactures' presentations; chromium plating at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory; a first look at a chromium plating process development project tailored for T.P.X. and I.T.E.R. strand; and influence of chromium diffusion and related phenomena on the reference ratios of bare and chromium plated Nb3Sn strand

  19. Stabilization of chromium salt in ordinary portland cement

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Damir Barbir; Pero Dabić; Petar Krolo

    2012-12-01

    Ordinary Portland cement (OPC) samples containing the chromium salt have been investigated using differential microcalorimetry, conductometry and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic analysis. The effect of chromium on OPC hydration was evaluated by continuous observing of early hydration. The microcalorimetrical results show that with increasing the share of chromium salt, heat maximums assume lower values and the occurrence of the maximum registered in the earlier hydration times. Conductometrical measurements show that with increasing addition of chromium salt, curve did not show any specific shape, immediate drop in specific conductivity is noticed and the maximum is reached earlier. This coincides with microcalorimetrical results. It can be concluded that the addition of chromium does not affect the mechanism of the hydration process, but it does affect the kinetic parameters and dynamics of the cement hydration process. It was found that chromium salt addition to the cement–water system is acceptable up to 2 wt.%. According to standard EN 196-3 for OPC, the beginning of binding time should occur after 60 minutes. Increased amount of chromium over 2 wt.% significantly accelerate the beginning of binding time and for the system it is not acceptable.

  20. Chromium speciation in rainwater: temporal variability and atmospheric deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kieber, R.J.; Willey, J.D.; Zvalaren, S.D. [University of North Carolina at Wilmington, Wilmington, NC (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    2002-12-15

    Chromium is released into the atmosphere by a variety of anthropogenic activities which include steel manufacturing, leather tanning, wood presentation and fossil fuel combustion. The concentrations of the various chromium species were determined in 89 rainwater samples collected in Wilmington, NC from October 1, 1999 to December 31, 2001. Volume weighted annual average concentrations of Cr{sub total}, particulate Cr, Cr(III)(aq), and Cr(VI)(aq) were 4.6, 2.2, 0.8 and 1.2 nM, respectively. There was distinct seasonal and diurnal variability in the concentrations of the various chromium species. Chromium emissions to the global atmosphere by both natural and anthropogenic sources are estimated to be 2.2 x 10{sup 9} mol/yr. Using rainwater concentration data along with other published rainwater Cr concentrations and an estimate for total global annual rain, the total global flux of chromium removed from the atmosphere via wet deposition is 2.1 x 10{sup 9} mol/yr. This represents complete removal of Cr and indicates that essentially all chromium released into the global atmosphere is removed via rain. About half this chromium is dissolved with roughly equal concentrations of toxic Cr(VI) and relatively harmless Cr(III) species. 48 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. Bioavailability of a potato chromium complex to the laboratory rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research objectives were to study the effect of food source, preparation method and chemical form on bioavailability of chromium. Chromium concentration in potatoes was determined and tubers labeled either intrinsically or extrinsically with radioactive chromate. A labeled chromium complexes was isolated from preparations of raw, baked or fried potatoes and chromatographed on gel permeation media. Availability of the potato chromium complex to the rat was examined in three feeding studies. Animals were dosed with radioactive extrinsically or intrinsically labeled potato extract or with chromate. A labeled chromium complex was isolated from gastrointestinal contents of rats and chromatographed. Potato pulp and peel contained 1.63 and 2.70 μg Cr/g tissue respectively. True and apparent absorption from extrinsically labeled feedings were 33.4 +/- 4.7 and 29.8 +/- 11.2% respectively, and no differences existed between absorption from raw and cooked potatoes. Absorption from the extrinsic labeled potatoes differed significantly from absorption of inorganic chromatium. Apparent absorption of raw (11.1 +/- 7.9%) and cooked (-0.7 +/- 2.8%) intrinsically labeled feedings differed significantly. Absorption of inorganic chromium was 17.8% (true) and 11.5% (apparent). Examination of the chromium complex isolated from gastrointestinal tract contents showed enlargement of the complex in the stomach after consumption

  2. Chromium-induced membrane damage: protective role of ascorbic acid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Importance of chromium as environmental toxicant is largely due to impact on the body to produce cellular toxicity. The impact of chromium and their supplementation with ascorbic acid was studied on plasma membrane of liver and kidney in male Wistar rats (80 - 100gbody weight). It has been observed that the intoxication with chromium ( i. p. ) at the dose of 0.8 mg/100g body weight per day for a period of 28 days causes significant increase in the level of cholesterol and decrease in the level of phospbolipid of both liver and kidney. The alkaline pbosphatase, total ATPase and Na + -K + -ATPase activities were significantly decreased in both liver and kidney after chromium treatment,except total ATPase activity of kidney. It is suggested that chromium exposure at the present dose and duration induce for the alterations of structure and function of both liver and kidney plasma membrane. Ascorbic acid ( i.p. at the dose of 0.5 mg,/100g body weight per day for period of 28 days) supplementation can reduce these structural changes in the plasma membrane of liver and kidney. But the functional changes can not be completely replenished by the ascorbic acid supplementation in response to chromium exposure. So it is also suggested that ascorbic acid (nutritional antioxidant) is useful free radical scavenger to restrain the chromium-induced membrane damage.

  3. Low-temperature nitridation of Fe nanoparticles precursor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, H; Lu, B; Lei, J P; Dong, X L

    2009-12-01

    Nitridation of Fe nanoparticle precursor was performed in a NH3 atmosphere at the temperatures of 473 K and 673 K for one hour. Fe nanoparticles precursor had a typical spherical shape with iron oxides shell and alpha-Fe core, which was obtained by an arc-discharge method. Up to date, the nitriding temperature of 473 K in present work was the lowest by thermal ammonolysis method because of the characteristics of the nano-sized particles. The resultant product after nitridation was a mixture of iron-nitrides (gamma'-Fe4N and epsilon-Fe3N) nanoparticles with homogeneous dispersion. The nitriding mechanism, oxidizing behaviors and magnetic properties of iron-nitride nanoparticles were measured and discussed. PMID:19908793

  4. An assessment of the thermodynamic properties of uranium nitride, plutonium nitride and uranium-plutonium mixed nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thermodynamic properties such as vapour pressures, heat capacities and enthalpies of formation for UN(s), PuN(s) and (U, Pu)N(s) are critically evaluated. The equations of the vapour pressures and the heat capacities for the three nitrides are assessed. Thermal functions, and thermodynamic functions for the formation of UN(s), PuN(s) and (U, Pu)N(s), are calculated

  5. Fabrication and characterization of hexagonal boron nitride powder by spray drying and calcining-nitriding technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) powder was fabricated prepared by the spray drying and calcining-nitriding technology. The effects of nitrided temperature on the phases, morphology and particle size distribution of hBN powder, were investigated. The synthesized powders were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM), Fourier transformed infrared spectrum, ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectrum and photoluminescence (PL) spectrum. UV-vis spectrum revealed that the product had one obvious band gap (4.7 eV) and PL spectrum showed that it had a visible emission at 457 nm (λex=230 nm). FESEM image indicated that the particle size of the synthesized hBN was mainly in the range of 0.5-1.5 μm in diameter, and 50-150 nm in thickness. The high-energy ball-milling process following 900 deg. C calcining process was very helpful to obtain fully crystallized hBN at lower temperature. - Graphical abstract: hBN powder was fabricated prepared by spray drying and calcining-nitriding technology. The results indicated that spray drying and calcining-nitriding technology assisted with high-energy ball-milling process following calcined process was a hopeful way to manufacture hBN powder with high crystallinity in industrial scale

  6. Preparation and study of the nitrides and mixed carbide-nitrides of uranium and of plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A detailed description is given of a simple method for preparing uranium and plutonium nitrides by the direct action of nitrogen under pressure at moderate temperatures (about 400 C) on the partially hydrogenated bulk metal. It is shown that there is complete miscibility between the UN and PuN phases. The variations in the reticular parameters of the samples as a function of temperature and in the presence of oxide have been used to detect and evaluate the solubility of oxygen in the different phases. A study has been made of the sintering of these nitrides as a function of the preparation conditions with or without sintering additives. A favorable but non-reproducible, effect has been found for traces of oxide. The best results were obtained for pure UN at 1600 C (96 per cent theoretical density) on condition that a well defined powder, was used. The criterion used is the integral width of the X-ray diffraction lines. The compounds UN and PuN are completely miscible with the corresponding carbides. This makes it possible to prepare carbide-nitrides of the general formula (U,Pu) (C,N) by solid-phase diffusion, at around 1400 C. The sintering of these carbide-nitrides is similar to that of the carbides if the nitrogen content is low; in particular, nickel is an efficient sintering agent. For high contents, the sintering is similar to that of pure nitrides. (author)

  7. Fertilizers and Mixed Crop Cultivation of Chromium Tolerant and Sensitive Plants under Chromium Toxicity

    OpenAIRE

    B. Dheeba; Sampathkumar, P; Kannan, K.

    2015-01-01

    Zea mays (maize) and Vigna radiata (green gram) are found to be the chromium (Cr) tolerant and sensitive plants, respectively. In the present paper, we investigate the reduction of the toxicity of Cr in the sensitive plants by the mixed crop cultivation in the field using various amendments. Further, the potassium dichromate was used as the source of hexavalent Cr. The results indicated that Cr adversely affects both the growth and yield of plants. The soil properties vary with Cr and differe...

  8. Nitride semiconductors studied by atom probe tomography and correlative techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Bennett, Samantha

    2011-01-01

    Optoelectronic devices fabricated from nitride semiconductors include blue and green light emitting diodes (LEDs) and laser diodes (LDs). To design efficient devices, the structure and composition of the constituent materials must be well-characterised. Traditional microscopy techniques used to examine nitride semiconductors include transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and atomic force microscopy (AFM). This thesis describes the study of nitride semiconductor materials using these tradi...

  9. Research and development of nitride fuel cycle for TRU burning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Susuki, Y.; Ogawa, T.; Osugi, T.; Arai, Y.; Mukaiyama, T. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1997-07-01

    The present status of the research and development of nitride fuel cycle for burning transuranium elements in actinide burner reactors and fast reactors at JAERI is described, especially focusing on the progress in the recent two years. The research and development cover fuel fabrication technology, property measurements such as thermal conductivity, basic irradiation tests at Japan Materials Testing Reactors(JMTR), electrorefining of actinide nitrides in fused salts, and the evaluation of mass balance in the reprocessing process of nitride fuel. (authors)

  10. Application Of Active Screen Method For Ion Nitriding Efficiency Improvement

    OpenAIRE

    Ogórek M.; Frączek T.; Skuza Z.

    2015-01-01

    Paper presents the research of austenitic steel AISI 304 after ion nitriding at 400°C and at t =4h, for the two different variants of samples distribution in the working plasma reactive chamber tube. In order to assess the effectiveness of ion nitriding variants emission spectroscopy – GDOES, surface hardness tests, microstructure research (LM) of nitrided layers were made. It has been found that the use of active screens increases the surface layer thickness and depth of nitrogen diffusion i...

  11. Microbial Diversity of Chromium-Contaminated Soils and Characterization of Six Chromium-Removing Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Zhiguo; Hu, Yuting; Yin, Zhen; Hu, Yuehua; Zhong, Hui

    2016-06-01

    Three soil samples obtained from different sites adjacent to a chromium slag heap in a steel alloy factory were taken to examine the effect of chromium contamination on soil bacterial diversity as determined by construction of 16S rDNA clone libraries and sequencing of selected clones based on restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis. Results revealed that Betaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, Firmicutes, and Alphaproteobacteria occurred in all three soil samples, although the three samples differed in their total diversity. Sample 1 had the highest microbial diversity covering 12 different classes, while Sample 3 had the lowest microbial diversity. Strains of six different species were successfully isolated, one of which was identified as Zobellella denitrificans. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a strain belonging to the genus Zobellella able to resist and reduce chromium. Among all isolates studied, Bacillus odysseyi YH2 exhibited the highest Cr(VI)-reducing capability, with a total removal of 23.5 % of an initial Cr(VI) concentration of 350 mg L-1.

  12. Chromium removal from tannery wastewater by using of flying ash

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A simple and economic method to chromium removal from tannery wastewater by means of flying ash is presented. The chromium removal operation is a discontinuous process that involve the mass of flying ash, time of contact and temperature or ph as variables, their which are optimized through Box-Wilson type experimental design. The results were successful: From an initial fluid whit chromium concentration of 1850m ppm, final concentrations of 0.008 ppm and 0.5 ppm of Cr+3 and Cr+6 respectively were achieved. These post-treatment concentrations are into the approved range definite by Government's Laws to this waste type

  13. A REVIEW OF BIOSORPTION OF CHROMIUM IONS BY MICROORGANISMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inga Zinicovscaia

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Due to its widespread industrial use, chromium has become a serious pollutant in diverse environmental settings. The main source of chromium pollution including the Republic o Moldova is industry. It is a great need to develop new eco-friendly methods of chromium removal. Biosorption of heavy metals is a most promising technology involved in the removal of toxic metals from industrial waste streams and natural waters. This article is an extended abstract of a communication presented at the Conference Ecological Chemistry 2012

  14. Investigation into some tribological properties of plasma nitrided hot-worked tool steel AISI H11

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yilbas, B.S.; Sahin, A.Z.; Said, S.A.M.; Nickel, J.; Coban, A. [King Fahd Univ. of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    1996-04-01

    Interest in the tribological properties of plasma nitriding has increased substantially over the past years because plasma nitriding provides a high nitride depth and improved hard facing. The present study examines the tribological properties of AISI H11 plasma nitrided, hot-worked steel. Different nitriding temperatures and durations were considered. Characterization of the composite structures was investigated with wear tests, x-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and microhardness tests. The depth profile of the nitrided zone was measured using the nuclear reaction analysis (NRA) technique. Plasma nitriding affected the microhardness, wear properties, and morphology considerably. Increase in process temperature increased the nitride zone depth.

  15. Thermal incorporation behavior during the reduction and stabilization of chromium wastes

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Jun; 楊駿

    2015-01-01

    The possibility of employing periclase to stabilize chromium in chromium wastes into spinel-based ceramics through thermal method was investigated by heating mixture of simulated chromium waste and magnesium oxide. Different types of magnesium oxide precursors were introduced to incorporate chromium oxide into magnesiochromite (MgCr2O4) ranging from 550 ºC to 1350 ºC. Magnesium oxide precursors of both types can effectively incorporate chromium oxide but via different mechanisms. Three main f...

  16. Effects of Supplemental Dietary Chromium on Yield and Nutrient Digestibility of Laying Hens Under Low Temperature

    OpenAIRE

    ŞAHİN, Kazım; ERTAŞ, O. Nihat; GÜLER, Talat; ÇİFTÇİ, Mehmet

    2001-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the effects of chromium picolinate (CrPi) added into diet containing 710.3 ppb chromium on yield and nutrient digestibility of laying hens at low temperature. Forty-six-week-old laying hens were randomly assigned to four groups of 30 hens per group. Treatment groups were fed different supplemental dietary chromium levels. Thus, hens were fed diets with no supplemental chromium (Control Group), 100 ppb of supplemental chromium (100 Group), 200 ppb of s...

  17. Evaluation of the comprehensiveness and reliability of the chromium composition of foods in the literature ☆

    OpenAIRE

    Thor, Mayly Y.; Harnack, Lisa; King, Denise; Jasthi, Bhaskarani; Pettit, Janet

    2011-01-01

    In the early 1960s, trivalent chromium Cr3+ became recognized as an essential trace element due to its potential metabolic and cardiovascular benefits. No comprehensive chromium database currently exists; thus a thorough review of the literature was conducted to examine the availability and reliability of chromium data for foods. A number of key issues were identified that challenge the feasibility of adding chromium to a food and nutrient database. Foremost, dietary chromium data reported in...

  18. Chromium(III) complexation to natural organic matter : Mechanisms and modeling

    OpenAIRE

    Gustafsson, Jon Petter; Persson, I.; Oromieh, A. G.; Van Schaik, J. W. J.; Sjöstedt, Carin; Kleja, D. B.

    2014-01-01

    Chromium is a common soil contaminant, and it often exists as chromium(III). However, limited information exists on the coordination chemistry and stability of chromium(III) complexes with natural organic matter (NOM). Here, the complexation of chromium(III) to mor layer material and to Suwannee River Fulvic Acid (SRFA) was investigated using EXAFS spectroscopy and batch experiments. The EXAFS results showed a predominance of monomeric chromium(III)-NOM complexes at low pH (<5), in which o...

  19. Abatement of Chromium Emissions from Steelmaking Slags - Cr Stabilization by Phase Separation

    OpenAIRE

    Albertsson, Galina

    2013-01-01

    Chromium is an important alloying element in stainless steel but also environmentally harmful element. A number of mineralogical phases present in the slag matrix can contain chromium and lead to chromium leaching. Chromium in slag if not stabilized, could oxidize to the cancerogenic hexavalent state, and leach out if exposed to acidic and oxygen rich environment. Other environmental concerns are slag dusting and chromium escape to the atmosphere. Despite the fact that there is a certain risk...

  20. The oxidation and reduction of chromium of stainless steels in an eletric arc furnace

    OpenAIRE

    Arh, B.; F. Tehovnik

    2011-01-01

    The oxidation of chromium during the elaboration of stainless steels occurs with oxygen in solution blown inthe melt and with oxides in the slag. A higher content of silicon in the furnace charge decreases the extent of oxidation of chromium, however, the efficient reduction of chromium from the slag is of essential importance for a minimal loss of chromium. In this survey, the theory of the oxidation of chromium, its reduction from the slag and the conditions for the formation of foaming sla...

  1. Chromium accumulation, microorganism population and enzyme activities in soils around chromium-containing slag heap of steel alloy factory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Shun-hong; PENG Bing; YANG Zhi-hui; CHAI Li-yuan; ZHOU Li-cheng

    2009-01-01

    The environmental risk of chromium pollution is pronounced in soils adjacent to chromate industry. It is important to investigate the functioning of soil microorganisms in ecosystems exposed to long-term contamination by chromium. 45 soil samples obtained from different places of the slag heap in a steel alloy factory were analyzed for chromium contamination level and its effect on soil microorganisms and enzyme activities. The results show that the average concentrations of total Cr in the soil under the slag heap, adjacent to the slag heap and outside the factory exceed the threshold of Secondary Environmental Quality Standard for Soil in China by 354%, 540% and 184%, respectively, and are 15, 21 and 9 times higher than the local background value, respectively. Elevated chromium loadings result in changes in the activity of the soil microbe, as indicated by the negative correlations between soil microbial population and chromium contents. Dehydrogenase activity is greatly depressed by chromium in the soil. The results imply that dehydrogenase activity can be used as an indicator for the chromium pollution level in the area of the steel alloy factory.

  2. Evaluation of chromium in red blood cells as an indicator of exposure to hexavalent chromium: An in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devoy, Jérôme; Géhin, Antoine; Müller, Samuel; Melczer, Mathieu; Remy, Aurélie; Antoine, Guillaume; Sponne, Isabelle

    2016-07-25

    Chromium(VI) compounds are classified as carcinogenic to humans. Whereas chromium measurements in urine and whole blood (i.e., including plasma) are indicative of recent exposure, chromium in red blood cells (RBC) is attributable specifically to Cr(VI) exposure. Before recommending Cr in RBC as a biological indicator of Cr(VI) exposure, in-vitro studies must be undertaken to assess its reliability. The present study examines the relationship between the chromium added to a blood sample and that subsequently found in the RBC. After incubation of total blood with chromium, RBC were isolated, counted and their viability assessed. Direct analysis of chromium in RBC was conducted using Atomic Absorption Spectrometry. Hexavalent, but not trivalent Cr, was seen to accumulate in the RBC and we found a strong correlation between the Cr(VI) concentration added to a blood sample and the amount of Cr in RBC. This relationship appears to be independent of the chemical properties of the human blood samples (e.g., different blood donors or different reducing capacities). Even though in-vivo studies are still needed to integrate our understanding of Cr(VI) toxicokinetics, our findings reinforce the idea that a single determination of the chromium concentration in RBC would enable biomonitoring of critical cases of Cr(VI) exposure. PMID:27178267

  3. Heterostructure field effect transistors based on nitride interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A key property of the nitrides is the fact that they possess large spontaneous and piezoelectric polarization fields that allow a significant tailoring of the carrier dynamics and optical properties of nitride devices. In this paper, based on first-principles calculations of structural and electronic properties of bulk nitrides and their heterostructure, we investigate the potential of this novel material class for modern device applications by performing self-consistent Monte Carlo simulations. Our studies reveal that the nitride based electronic devices have characteristics that predispose them for high power and high frequency applications. We demonstrate also that transistor characteristics are favourably influenced by the internal polarization induced electric fields. (author)

  4. Heterostructure field effect transistors based on nitride interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majewski, J. A.; Zandler, G.; Vogl, P.

    2002-04-01

    A key property of the nitrides is the fact that they possess large spontaneous and piezoelectric polarization fields that allow a significant tailoring of the carrier dynamics and optical properties of nitride devices. In this paper, based on first-principles calculations of structural and electronic properties of bulk nitrides and their heterostructure, we investigate the potential of this novel material class for modern device applications by performing self-consistent Monte Carlo simulations. Our studies reveal that the nitride based electronic devices have characteristics that predispose them for high power and high frequency applications. We demonstrate also that transistor characteristics are favourably influenced by the internal polarization induced electric fields.

  5. Heterostructure field effect transistors based on nitride interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Majewski, J.A.; Zandler, G.; Vogl, P. [Physics Department and Walter Schottky Institute, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Garching (Germany)

    2002-05-03

    A key property of the nitrides is the fact that they possess large spontaneous and piezoelectric polarization fields that allow a significant tailoring of the carrier dynamics and optical properties of nitride devices. In this paper, based on first-principles calculations of structural and electronic properties of bulk nitrides and their heterostructure, we investigate the potential of this novel material class for modern device applications by performing self-consistent Monte Carlo simulations. Our studies reveal that the nitride based electronic devices have characteristics that predispose them for high power and high frequency applications. We demonstrate also that transistor characteristics are favourably influenced by the internal polarization induced electric fields. (author)

  6. Review of actinide nitride properties with focus on safety aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report provides a review of the potential advantages of using actinide nitrides as fuels and/or targets for nuclear waste transmutation. Then a summary of available properties of actinide nitrides is given. Results from irradiation experiments are reviewed and safety relevant aspects of nitride fuels are discussed, including design basis accidents (transients) and severe (core disruptive) accidents. Anyway, as rather few safety studies are currently available and as many basic physical data are still missing for some actinide nitrides, complementary studies are proposed. (author)

  7. Review of actinide nitride properties with focus on safety aspects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albiol, Thierry [CEA Cadarache, St Paul Lez Durance Cedex (France); Arai, Yasuo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2001-12-01

    This report provides a review of the potential advantages of using actinide nitrides as fuels and/or targets for nuclear waste transmutation. Then a summary of available properties of actinide nitrides is given. Results from irradiation experiments are reviewed and safety relevant aspects of nitride fuels are discussed, including design basis accidents (transients) and severe (core disruptive) accidents. Anyway, as rather few safety studies are currently available and as many basic physical data are still missing for some actinide nitrides, complementary studies are proposed. (author)

  8. Quantum chemistry and atomistic simulations of solid nitrides

    OpenAIRE

    Eck, Bernhard

    2000-01-01

    The present thesis covers, at first, the binary nitrides of the the 3d transition metals. Based on their electronic band structures and bonding analyses for the sodium chloride as well as the zinc blend structure type it is then determined why the early nitrides crystallize in the NaCl structure while Fe- and Co-nitride adopt the ZnS structure. Thereafter all stoichiometrically well-defined iron nitrides are theoretically investigated, in particular with respect to the influence of the nitrog...

  9. Development of pseudocapacitive molybdenum oxide–nitride for electrochemical capacitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A thin film Mo oxide–nitride pseudocapacitive electrode was synthesized by electrodeposition of Mo oxide on Ti and a subsequent low-temperature (400 °C) thermal nitridation. Two nitridation environments, N2 and NH3, were used and the results were compared. Surface analyses of these nitrided films showed partial conversion of Mo oxide to nitrides, with a lower conversion percentage being the film produced in N2. However, the electrochemical analyses showed that the surface of the N2-treated film had better pseudocapacitive behaviors and outperformed that nitrided in NH3. Cycle life of the resultant N2-treated Mo oxide–nitride was also much improved over Mo oxide. A two-electrode cell using Mo oxide–nitride electrodes was demonstrated and showed high rate performance. - Highlights: • Mo(O,N)x was developed by electrodeposition and nitridation in N2 or NH3. • N2 treated Mo(O,N)x showed a capacitive performance superior to that treated by NH3. • The promising electrochemical performance was due to the formation of γ-Mo2N

  10. Investigation of surface properties of high temperature nitrided titanium alloys

    OpenAIRE

    Koyuncu, E.; F. Kahraman; Ö. Karadeniz

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of paper is to investigate surface properties of high temperature nitrided titanium alloys.Design/methodology/approach: In this study, surface modification of Ti6Al4V titanium alloy was made at various temperatures by plasma nitriding process. Plasma nitriding treatment was performed in 80% N2-20% H2 gas mixture, for treatment times of 2-15 h at the temperatures of 700-1000°C. Surface properties of plasma nitrided Ti6Al4V alloy were examined by metallographic inspection, ...

  11. ABS塑胶真空镀金色氮化锆工艺%Vacuum plating of golden zirconium nitride on ABS plastic surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    雷大法

    2014-01-01

    介绍了ABS塑胶制品表面真空镀金黄色氮化锆镀层的工艺,主要包括除油、亲水、粗化、中和、预浸、沉钯、解胶、碱性镀镍、焦磷酸盐镀铜、硫酸盐镀铜、镀镍、镀铬和真空镀氮化锆。采用该工艺制备的氮化锆镀层为光亮的金黄色,结合力、硬度和耐蚀性等性能满足不同环境的正常使用要求,可应用于家电和电子产品领域。%A process for vacuum plating of golden yellow zirconium nitride coating on the surface of ABS plastic product was introduced. The process flow is mainly composed of degreasing, hydrophilizing, roughening, neutralizing, pre-impregnation, palladium activation, acceleration, alkaline nickel plating, pyrophosphate copper plating, sulfate copper plating, nickel plating, chromium plating, and zirconium nitride vacuum plating. The zirconium nitride coating prepared by the given process is bright golden yellow and has qualified adhesion, hardness, and corrosion resistance for normal use in different environments, and can be applied to the production of household appliances and electronic products.

  12. Influence of low-temperature nitriding on the strain-induced martensite and laser-quenched austenite in a magnetic encoder made from 304L stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leskovšek, Vojteh; Godec, Matjaž; Kogej, Peter

    2016-08-01

    We have investigated the possibility of producing a magnetic encoder by an innovative process. Instead of turning grooves in the encoder bar for precise positioning, we incorporated the information in 304L stainless steel by transforming the austenite to martensite after bar extrusion in liquid nitrogen and marking it with a laser, which caused a local transformation of martensite back into austenite. 304L has an excellent corrosion resistance, but a low hardness and poor wear resistance, which limits its range of applications. However, nitriding is a very promising way to enhance the mechanical and magnetic properties. After low-temperature nitriding at 400 °C it is clear that both ε- and α‧-martensite are present in the deformed microstructure, indicating the simultaneous stress-induced and strain-induced transformations of the austenite. The effects of a laser surface treatment and the consequent appearance of a non-magnetic phase due to the α‧ → γ transformation were investigated. The EDS maps show a high concentration of nitrogen in the alternating hard surface layers of γN and α‧N (expanded austenite and martensite), but no significantly higher concentration of chromium or iron was detected. The high surface hardness of this nitride layer will lead to steels and encoders with better wear and corrosion resistance.

  13. Hydrogen permeability of nitrided stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The surface of a 316 stainless steel (316SS) specimen was nitrided by an electrochemical treatment in molten fluoride salt. Its hydrogen permeability was evaluated and compared with that of bare 316SS at temperature from 450degC to 650degC. When it was exposed to hydrogen pressure of 1.0 kPa from 450degC to 650degC, its permeability was 7.2×10-11 to 6.4×10-12 mol/sec.m.Pa1/2. The permeation flux was increased with temperature and the permeability is deviated from Sieverts' law around 450degC. It followed Sieverts' law and was similar to that of bare 316SS at elevated temperatures. This result suggested the surface nitriding increases solubility at low temperatures around 450degC. (author)

  14. Local residual stress measurements on nitride layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mansilla, C.; Ocelík, V.; De Hosson, J.Th.M., E-mail: j.t.m.de.hosson@rug.nl

    2015-06-11

    In this work, local stresses in different nitrided maraging steel samples of high practical interest for industrial applications were studied through the so-called micro-slit milling method using a focused ion beam. The nitrogen concentration profiles were acquired by glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy. The residual stress state was measured on the surface and also in cross-section, i.e. examining effects of the nitrogen concentration gradient. It is shown that an enhanced lateral resolution can be achieved when a novel multiple fitting approach is employed. The results presented show an overall agreement with stress profiles obtained by X-ray diffraction. Finite Element Modeling is used to explain the apparent discrepancies. A clear correlation between the residual stress and nitriding profiles has been found and the applicability of this method is shown in particular when stress gradients are present.

  15. Aluminum Reduction and Nitridation of Bauxite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Zhikuan; ZHANG Dianwei; XU Enxia; HOU Xinmei; DONG Yanling

    2007-01-01

    The application of bauxite with low Al2O3 content has been studied in this paper and β-SiAlON has been obtained from two kinds of bauxites (Al203 content 68.08 mass% and 46.30 mass% respectively) by aluminum reduction and nitridation method.The sequence of reactions has been studied using thermal analysis (TG-DTA),X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with EDS.Compared with carbon thermal reduction and nitridation of aluminosilicates employed presently,the reaction in the system of bauxite-Al-N2 occurs at lower temperature.β-SiAlON appears as one of the main products from 1573K and exists' stably in the range of the present experimental temperature.The microstructure of β-SiAlON obtained at 1773 K is short column with 5-10μm observed by SEM.

  16. Local residual stress measurements on nitride layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, local stresses in different nitrided maraging steel samples of high practical interest for industrial applications were studied through the so-called micro-slit milling method using a focused ion beam. The nitrogen concentration profiles were acquired by glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy. The residual stress state was measured on the surface and also in cross-section, i.e. examining effects of the nitrogen concentration gradient. It is shown that an enhanced lateral resolution can be achieved when a novel multiple fitting approach is employed. The results presented show an overall agreement with stress profiles obtained by X-ray diffraction. Finite Element Modeling is used to explain the apparent discrepancies. A clear correlation between the residual stress and nitriding profiles has been found and the applicability of this method is shown in particular when stress gradients are present

  17. Atomic-layer deposition of silicon nitride

    CERN Document Server

    Yokoyama, S; Ooba, K

    1999-01-01

    Atomic-layer deposition (ALD) of silicon nitride has been investigated by means of plasma ALD in which a NH sub 3 plasma is used, catalytic ALD in which NH sub 3 is dissociated by thermal catalytic reaction on a W filament, and temperature-controlled ALD in which only a thermal reaction on the substrate is employed. The NH sub 3 and the silicon source gases (SiH sub 2 Cl sub 2 or SiCl sub 4) were alternately supplied. For all these methods, the film thickness per cycle was saturated at a certain value for a wide range of deposition conditions. In the catalytic ALD, the selective deposition of silicon nitride on hydrogen-terminated Si was achieved, but, it was limited to only a thin (2SiO (evaporative).

  18. The fate of chromium during tropical weathering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berger, Alfons; Frei, Robert

    2014-01-01

    We performed a mineral, geochemical and Cr–Sr–Pb isotope study on a laterite profile developed on ca. 540 Ma old tonalitic bedrock in Madagascar with special emphasis on the behavior of chromium during tropical weathering. The observed strong depletions of Ca, Si, and P, and enrichment of Fe and Al...... weathering profile. The negatively fractionated δ53Cr values measured in the weathering profile relative to the unaltered tonalitic bedrock characterized by a high temperature magmatic inventory Cr isotope signature are consistent with loss of a positively fractionated Cr(VI) pool formed during weathering...... highly oxidative conditions, which in well drained sulfide-bearing parent bedrocks potentially lead to both, acid dissolution of sulfide-hosted Cr and redox-promoted mobilization of Cr(VI) from silicates during later stages of weathering under basic pH conditions....

  19. Neutron capture by the chromium isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capture cross sections of the chromium isotopes have been measured at neutron energies up to 350 keV using the capture cross section facility at the 40 m station of the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator. Parameters have been derived for 180 resonances. A moderate correlation [rho(gamma-n-0,gamma-gamma) approximately 0.45] is observed between reduced neutron widths and radiative widths for s-wave resonances. Calculations of valence widths show that valence capture can only account for the correlated component of the observed radiative widths. An additional mechanism such as a 2p-1h doorway state must therefore be occurring to explain the uncorrelated component. (author)

  20. Magnetron sputtering of thin nitride films

    OpenAIRE

    Kola, Prashanthi V

    1995-01-01

    The objective in this investigation was to design and commission a magnetron sputter deposition system and investigate the properties of hard coatings for mechanical and biomedical applications. The deposition of titanium (Ti) and titanium nitride (TiN) was undertaken as part of the commissioning tests and further work was conducted on the effect of the deposition parameters on the properties of TiN, specifically for biocompatible applications. A thorough understanding of the deposition proce...

  1. Boron Nitride Nanosheets for Metal Protection

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Lu Hua; Xing, Tan; Chen, Ying; Jones, Rob

    2015-01-01

    Although the high impermeability of graphene makes it an excellent barrier to inhibit metal oxidation and corrosion, graphene can form a galvanic cell with the underlying metal that promotes corrosion of the metal in the long term. Boron nitride (BN) nanosheets which have a similar impermeability could be a better choice as protective barrier, because they are more thermally and chemically stable than graphene and, more importantly, do not cause galvanic corrosion due to their electrical insu...

  2. Anomalous thermal conductivity of monolayer boron nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabarraei, Alireza; Wang, Xiaonan

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we use nonequilibrium molecular dynamics modeling to investigate the thermal properties of monolayer hexagonal boron nitride nanoribbons under uniaxial strain along their longitudinal axis. Our simulations predict that hexagonal boron nitride shows an anomalous thermal response to the applied uniaxial strain. Contrary to three dimensional materials, under uniaxial stretching, the thermal conductivity of boron nitride nanoribbons first increases rather than decreasing until it reaches its peak value and then starts decreasing. Under compressive strain, the thermal conductivity of monolayer boron nitride ribbons monolithically reduces rather than increasing. We use phonon spectrum and dispersion curves to investigate the mechanism responsible for the unexpected behavior. Our molecular dynamics modeling and density functional theory results show that application of longitudinal tensile strain leads to the reduction of the group velocities of longitudinal and transverse acoustic modes. Such a phonon softening mechanism acts to reduce the thermal conductivity of the nanoribbons. On the other hand, a significant increase in the group velocity (stiffening) of the flexural acoustic modes is observed, which counteracts the phonon softening effects of the longitudinal and transverse modes. The total thermal conductivity of the ribbons is a result of competition between these two mechanisms. At low tensile strain, the stiffening mechanism overcomes the softening mechanism which leads to an increase in the thermal conductivity. At higher tensile strain, the softening mechanism supersedes the stiffening and the thermal conductivity slightly reduces. Our simulations show that the decrease in the thermal conductivity under compressive strain is attributed to the formation of buckling defects which reduces the phonon mean free path.

  3. Sliding wear behaviour of surface nitrided zirconia

    OpenAIRE

    Valle Chiro, Jorge Antonio; Mestra Rodríguez, Álvaro Miguel; García Marro, Fernando; Anglada Gomila, Marcos Juan

    2011-01-01

    Tetragonal polycrystalline zirconia stabilised with 3% molar yttria (3Y-TZP) has found wide applications in orthopaedics and dentistry because of its excellent mechanical properties (flexural strength above 1000 MPa, fracture toughness about 5 MPa·m1/2, hardness above 12 GPa) and biocompatibility. However, 3Y-TZP has a strong drawback: poor resistance to hydrothermal ageing also referred to as low temperature degradation (LTD). Nitriding of 3Y-TZP can make the surface resistance to L...

  4. Formation and Structure of Boron Nitride Nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiang ZHANG; Zongquan LI; Jin XU

    2005-01-01

    Boron nitride (BN) nanotubes were simply synthesized by heating well-mixed boric acid, urea and iron nitrate powders at 1000℃. A small amount of BN nanowires was also obtained in the resultants. The morphological and structural characters of the BN nanostructures were studied using transmission electron microscopy. Other novel BN nanostructures, such as Y-junction nanotubes and bamboo-like nanotubes, were simultaneously observed. The growth mechanism of the BN nanotubes was discussed briefly.

  5. Thermal conductivity of nanostructured boron nitride materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Chengchun; Bando, Yoshio; Liu, Changhong; Fan, Shoushan; Zhang, Jun; Ding, Xiaoxia; Golberg, Dmitri

    2006-06-01

    We have measured the thermal conductivity of bulky pellets made of various boron nitride (BN)-based nanomaterials, including spherical nanoparticles, perfectly structured, bamboo-like nanotubes, and collapsed nanotubes. The thermal conductivity strongly depends on the morphology of the BN nanomaterials, especially on the surface structure. Spherical BN particles have the lowest thermal conductivity while the collapsed BN nanotubes possess the best thermoconductive properties. A model was proposed to explain the experimental observations based on the heat percolation passage considerations. PMID:16722739

  6. Nitride phosphors and solid-state lighting

    CERN Document Server

    Xie, Rong-Jun; Hirosaki, Naoto

    2011-01-01

    Introduction to Solid-State LightingBasics of Solid-State LightingBasics of White Light-Emitting Diodes (LEDs)Applications of Solid-State LightingIntroduction to LuminescenceClassification of Optical ProcessesFundamentals of LuminescenceLuminescent CentersMeasurement of LuminescenceTraditional Phosphors in White LEDsRequirements for Phosphors in White LEDsClassification of PhosphorsPhotoluminescent Properties of Traditional PhosphorsNitride Phosphors i

  7. Amorphous Carbon-Boron Nitride Nanotube Hybrids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae Woo (Inventor); Siochi, Emilie J. (Inventor); Wise, Kristopher E. (Inventor); Lin, Yi (Inventor); Connell, John (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A method for joining or repairing boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs). In joining BNNTs, the nanotube structure is modified with amorphous carbon deposited by controlled electron beam irradiation to form well bonded hybrid a-C/BNNT structures. In repairing BNNTs, the damaged site of the nanotube structure is modified with amorphous carbon deposited by controlled electron beam irradiation to form well bonded hybrid a-C/BNNT structures at the damage site.

  8. Nitride inclusions in titanium-containing high-nitrogen steel after solid-phase nitriding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lysenkova, E. V.; Kadach, M. V.; Butskii, E. V.; Dorofievich, I. V.; Stomakhin, A. Ya.

    2015-09-01

    The principal possibility of production of sheet titanium-containing high-nitrogen steels without extreme harmful coarse nitride inclusions and their aggregates, which are characteristic of these compositions even at a relatively low (impurity) nitrogen content, is studied. To this end, the nitrogen content in the initial metal before its solidification is limited to the calculation level at which titanium nitrides are thermally unstable. Nitrogen is introduced in metal (08Cr18Ni12Ti steel) during its chemical thermal treatment in a nitrogen atmosphere at 1200°C. The nitrogen content in the finished metal is 0.4% (at 0.31% Ti). Studies in this direction are thought to be promising, since it is evident that the production of a metal of such a composition using the standard method of nitrogen introduction (in melt) is impossible. Scanning electron microscopy shows that titanium nitride particles in the finished metal are ≤0.5 μm in size.

  9. Wetting and infiltration of nitride bonded silicon nitride by liquid silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, V.; Reimann, C.; Friedrich, J.

    2016-04-01

    Nitride bonded silicon nitride (NBSN) is a promising crucible material for the repeated use in the directional solidification of multicrystalline (mc) silicon ingots for photovoltaic applications. Due to wetting and infiltration, however, silicon nitride in its initial state does not offer the desired reusability. In this work the sessile drop method is used to systematically study the wetting and infiltration behavior of NBSN after applying different oxidation procedures. It is found that the wetting of the NBSN crucible by liquid silicon can be prevented by the oxidation of the geometrical surface. The infiltration of liquid silicon into the porous crucible can be suppressed by oxygen enrichment within the volume of the NBSN, i.e. at the pore walls of the crucibles. The realized reusability of the NBSN is demonstrated by reusing a NBSN crucible six times for the directional solidification of undoped multicrystalline silicon ingots.

  10. Microscopic modeling of nitride intersubband absorbance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montano, Ines; Allerman, A. A.; Wierer, J. J.; Moseley, M.; Skogen, E. J.; Tauke-Pedretti, A.; Vawter, G. A.

    III-nitride intersubband structures have recently attracted much interest because of their potential for a wide variety of applications ranging from electro-optical modulators to terahertz quantum cascade lasers. To overcome present simulation limitations we have developed a microscopic absorbance simulator for nitride intersubband devices. Our simulator calculates the band structure of nitride intersubband systems using a fully coupled 8x8 k.p Hamiltonian and determines the material response of a single period in a density-matrix-formalism by solving the Heisenberg equation including many-body and dephasing contributions. After calculating the polarization due to intersubband transitions in a single period, the resulting absorbance of a superlattice structure including radiative coupling between the different periods is determined using a non-local Green's-function formalism. As a result our simulator allows us to predict intersubband absorbance of superlattice structures with microscopically determined lineshapes and linewidths accounting for both many-body and correlation contributions. This work is funded by Sandia National Laboratories Laboratory Directed Research and Development program. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin.

  11. Fusion bonding of silicon nitride surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reck, Kasper; Østergaard, Christian; Thomsen, Erik Vilain;

    2011-01-01

    While silicon nitride surfaces are widely used in many micro electrical mechanical system devices, e.g. for chemical passivation, electrical isolation or environmental protection, studies on fusion bonding of two silicon nitride surfaces (Si3N4–Si3N4 bonding) are very few and highly application...... specific. Often fusion bonding of silicon nitride surfaces to silicon or silicon dioxide to silicon surfaces is preferred, though Si3N4–Si3N4 bonding is indeed possible and practical for many devices as will be shown in this paper. We present an overview of existing knowledge on Si3N4–Si3N4 bonding and new...... results on bonding of thin and thick Si3N4 layers. The new results include high temperature bonding without any pretreatment, along with improved bonding ability achieved by thermal oxidation and chemical pretreatment. The bonded wafers include both unprocessed and processed wafers with a total silicon...

  12. Shock Syntheses of Novel Nitrides and Biomolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekine, Toshimori

    2013-06-01

    High-pressure spinel nitride of Si3N4 was discovered more than 10 years ago. Since then there have been many studies on the spinel nitrides and related materials including oxynitrides. We have developed shock synthesis method to investigate their structural, mechanical, chemical, physical, and optical properties. At the same time we tried to synthesize carbon nitrides from the organic substances. And later we extended to shock synthesis of ammonia through the Haber-Bosch reaction under shock in order to apply geochemical subjects related to the origin of life. The simplest amino acid of glycine, as well as animes (up to propylamine) and carboxylic acids (up to pentanoic acid), has been synthesized successfully in aqueous solutions through meteoritic impact reactions. Recently we are trying to make more complex biomolecules for implications of biomolecule formation for the origin of life through meteorite impacts on early Earth's ocean. These results of shock syntheses may imply significant contributions to materials science and Earth and planetary sciences. This research is collaborated with National Institute for Materials Science and Tohoku University.

  13. Heavy ion bombardment of silicates and nitrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several silicates, including α-quartz, zirconium silicate, thorium silicate, LiAlSiO4, a silicate glass and several nitrides, α and β Si3N4, AlN, ZrN as well as Si2N2O and ThO2, have been irradiated by 1019 to 1021 Krypton (3 MeV) ions/m2. The damaged powders of original particle size less than 5 μm, have been examined by x-ray diffraction and electron microscope methods. The silicates and Si2N2O become non-crystalline by 10 x 1019 ions/m2. The particles change shape, extending and bloating under prolonged irradiations of the order of 100 x 1019 ions/m2. Silicate glass also undergoes this irradiation creep process. The nitrides and ThO2 behave quite differently and even at fluences of 200 x 1019 x ions/m-2 the powders remain crystalline, retaining relatively sharp edges to the particles without exhibiting irradiation creep. This difference in behavior can be related to the nature of the framework crystal structures, flexible for the silicates with variable bond angles, rigid for the nitrides with fixed bond angles. This may explain the behavior of radioactive minerals not found in a metamict condition. (author)

  14. Development of compound layer of iron (carbo)nitrides during nitriding of steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ratajski, J.; Tacikowski, J.; Somers, Marcel A.J.

    2003-01-01

    The composition and phase constitution of a compound layer developing during gaseous nitriding was investigated at 853 K for three commercial steels (AISI 120, 4340 and 1090) and Armco iron. The compound layers were characterised by light optical microscopy, X-ray diffraction and electron probe...... microanalysis. The formation of the compound layer occurs along two distinct sequences: alpha-gamma prime-epsilon and/or alpha(theta)-epsilon2-gamma prime-epsilon1. The preferred sequence depends mainly on the chemical composition of steel and on the nitriding potential....

  15. Chromium and Polyphenols from Cinnamon and Insulin Sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Factors that improve insulin sensitivity usually lead to improvements in risk factors associated with the metabolic syndrome, diabetes, and cardiovascular diseases. Naturally occurring bioactive compounds that have been shown to improve insulin sensitivity include chromium and polyphenols found in ...

  16. Contingency plans for chromium utilization. Publication NMAB-335

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The United States depends entirely on foreign sources for the critical material, chromium, making it very vulnerable to supply disruptions. This vulnerability results because chromium is essential for the fabrication of corrosion-resisting steels and high-temperature, oxidation-resisting alloys in applications that are vital to the nation's technological well-being; because no substitutes are known for these materials in those applications; and because the known, substantial deposits of chromite ore are only in a few geographical locations that could become inaccessible to the United States as a result of political actions. The effectiveness of programs such as stockpiling, conservation, and research and development for substitutes to reduce the impact of disruption of imports of chromite and ferrochromium are discussed. Alternatives for decreasing chromium consumption also are identified for chromium-containing materials in the areas of design, processing, and substitution

  17. Synthesis and characterization of novel chromium pillared clays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    New chromium pillared clays of basal spacing 2.45 nm were synthesized and characterized. The chromium oligomers used for intercalation were prepared by quick addition of base and acid to Cr(III) monomeric solutions followed by reflux. The synthesized clays exhibit increased BET surface area and higher micropore volume compared to clays with lower galleries, pillared either by smaller Cr(III) oligomers or by Cr(III) monomers. Important parameters affecting the d001 basal spacing were studied, e.g. the pH of the pillaring solution, the intercalation time, the chromium concentration and the counter-anion present in the chromium solutions. Scanning electron micrographs were acquired to demonstrate changes of the clay texture before and after pillaring. The thermal behavior of the synthesized clays was also examined

  18. Adsorption Properties of Chromium (VI by Chitosan Coated Montmorillonite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dahe Fan

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The adsorption of chromium (VI by Chitosan Coated Montmorillonite (CCM from aqueous solution was studied. To evaluate the adsorption capacity, the effects of pH, initial concentration and temperature on the adsorption were investigated. The isothermal data was applied to Langmuir linear and the Freundlich linear isotherm equation and the thermodynamic parameters (ΔH, ΔG, ΔS were calculated according to the values of binding Langmuir constant, KL. Results indicated that the adsorption between CCM and chromium (VI was significantly physical, the negative ΔH constant at lower temperature confirmed that the more chromium (VI was adsorbed by chitosan coated montmorillonite at lower temperature. The kinetics of the sorption process of chromium (VI on chitosan coated montmorillonite were investigated using the pseudo-first order and pseudo-second order kinetics, results showed that the pseudo-second order equation model provided the best correlation with the experimental results.

  19. IRIS Toxicological Review of Hexavalent Chromium (Peer Review Plan)

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA is conducting a peer review of the scientific basis supporting the human health hazard and dose-response assessment of hexavalent chromium that will appear on the Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS) database.

  20. Fabrication of high rate chromium getter sources for fusion applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Design and fabrication techniques are described for the manufacture of large-capacity chromium getter sources, analogous to the commercially available titanium getter source known as Ti-Ball, manufactured by Varian Associates

  1. Detecting Grain-Boundary Chromium Depletion in Inconel 600

    Science.gov (United States)

    Airey, G. P.; Vaia, A. R.; Pessall, N.; Aspden, R. G.

    1981-11-01

    Techniques to evaluate grain-boundary chromium depletion in Inconel Alloy 600 were investigated. Procedures studied were a modified Huey test, reactivation polarization, magnetic permeability measurements, and eddy current measurements. Results from these tests were correlated with susceptibility to stress-assisted intergranular cracking in polythionic acid. Thermally treated Inconel Alloy 600 steam generator tubing was the principal source of material evaluated, but experimental heats of Ni-Cr-Fe alloys with 8-18 wt.% Cr were prepared to determine the critical chromium level below which stress-assisted intergranular cracking occurs; this critical chromium content was found to be between 9.8 and 11.7 wt.%. All four techniques were considered suitable to evaluate grain-boundary chromium depletion; the modified Huey test and reactivation polarization technique showed a greater sensitivity than the magnetic permeability and eddy current measurements.

  2. The diffusion of chromium in a duplex alloy steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diffusion of chromium in a duplex stainless steel containing approximately 8% ferrite has been investigated in the temperature range 600 to 10000C using the standard serial sectioning technique. The resulting concentration profiles exhibited up to four distinct regions. The two main regions are attributed to volume diffusion in the austenite and ferrite phases, the other zones being due to short circuiting paths. Volume diffusion in the austenite phase is in good agreement with chromium diffusion in Type 316 steel. The chromium diffusion coefficient in the ferrite phase of approximate composition 25 wt % Cr, 5 wt % Ni is given by: Dsub(α) = (6.0(+11,-3)) x 10-6 exp - ((212+-5)/RT) m2s-1 the activation energy being expressed in kJ.mol-1. Little evidence was found for enhanced chromium diffusion along austenite/ferrite interface boundaries. (author)

  3. Chromium plating pollution source reduction by plasma source ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There is growing concern over the environmental toxicity and workers' health issues due to the chemical baths and rinse water used in the hard chromium plating process. In this regard the significant hardening response of chromium to nitrogen ion implantation can be environmentally beneficial from the standpoint of decreasing the thickness and the frequency of application of chromium plating. In this paper the results of a study of nitrogen ion implantation of chrome plated test flats using the non-line-of-sight Plasma Source Ion Implantation (PSII) process, are discussed. Surface characterization was performed using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Auger Electron Spectroscopy (AES), and Electron Spectroscopy for Chemical Analysis (ESCA). The surface properties were evaluated using a microhardness tester, a pin-on-disk wear tester, and a corrosion measurement system. Industrial field testing of nitrogen PSII treated chromium plated parts showed an improvement by a factor of two compared to the unimplanted case

  4. New Chromium Carbonyl Catalysts for [6+2] Cycloaddition Reactions

    OpenAIRE

    Kundig, Ernst Peter; Robvieux, Fabrice; Kondratenko, Mikhail

    2002-01-01

    The complexes, (benzene)chromiumdicarbonyl(methyl acrylate) and chromiumdicarbonylbis(cyclohexadiene), are precursors for the highly coordinatively unsaturated chromium dicarbonyl fragment 3, a catalyst for the cycloaddition of activated olefins to cycloheptatriene.

  5. Biosorption of Chromium (VI) from Aqueous Solutions onto Fungal Biomass

    OpenAIRE

    Ismael Acosta R.; Xöchitl Rodríguez; Conrado Gutiérrez; Ma. de Guadalupe Moctezuma

    2004-01-01

    The biosorption of chromium (VI) on eighteen different natural biosorbents: Natural sediment, chitosan, chitin, Aspergillus flavus I-V, Aspergillus fumigatus I-ll, Helmintosporium sp, Cladosporium sp, Mucor rouxii mutant, M. rouxii IM-80, Mucor sp-I and 2, Candida albicans and Cryptococcus neoformans was studied in this work. It was found that the biomass of C. neoformans, natural sediment, Helmintosporium sp and chitosan was more efficient to remove chromium (VI) (determined spectrophotometr...

  6. Stainless Steel Leaches Nickel and Chromium into Foods During Cooking

    OpenAIRE

    Kamerud, Kristin L.; Hobbie, Kevin A.; Anderson, Kim A.

    2013-01-01

    Toxicological studies show that oral doses of nickel and chromium can cause cutaneous adverse reactions such as dermatitis. Additional dietary sources, such as leaching from stainless steel cookware during food preparation, are not well characterized. This study examined stainless steel grades, cooking time, repetitive cooking cycles, and multiple types of tomato sauces for their effects on nickel and chromium leaching. Trials included three types of stainless steels and a stainless steel sau...

  7. Genetic Predisposition for Dermal Problems in Hexavalent Chromium Exposed Population

    OpenAIRE

    Priti Sharma; Vipin Bihari; Agarwal, Sudhir K.; Goel, Sudhir K.

    2012-01-01

    We studied the effect of genetic susceptibility on hexavalent chromium induced dermal adversities. The health status of population was examined from the areas of Kanpur (India) having the elevated hexavalent chromium levels in groundwater. Blood samples were collected for DNA isolation to conduct polymorphic determination of genes, namely: NQO1 (C609T), hOGG1 (C1245G), GSTT1, and GSTM1 (deletion). Symptomatic exposed subjects (n = 38) were compared with asymptomatic exposed subjects (n = 108)...

  8. Chromium (V) compounds as cathode material in electrochemical power sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delnick, F.M.; Guidotti, R.A.; McCarthy, D.K.

    A cathode for use in a thermal battery, comprising a chromium (V) compound. The preferred materials for this use are Ca/sub 5/(CrO/sub 4/)/sub 3/Cl, Ca/sub 5/(CrO/sub 4/)OH, and Cr/sub 2/O/sub 5/. The chromium (V) compound can be employed as a cathode material in ambient temperature batteries when blended with a suitably conductive filler, preferably carbon black.

  9. SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY ACTIVITIES FOR CHROMIUM IN THE 100 AREAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    PETERSEN SW

    2009-07-02

    {sm_bullet} Primary Objective: Protect the Columbia River - Focus is control and treatment of contamination at or near the shoreline, which is influenced by bank storage {sm_bullet} Secondary Objective: Reduce hexavalent chromium to <48 parts per billion (ppb) in aquifer (drinking water standard) - Large plumes with isolated areas of high chromium concentrations (> 40,000 ppb), - Unknown source location(s); probably originating in reactor operation areas

  10. DANGER OF HEXAVALENT CHROMIUM AND STRATEGY FOR THE REMEDITATION

    OpenAIRE

    Aniruddha Roy; Ayan Das; Nirmal Paul

    2013-01-01

    Some metals as micronutrients have a major role in the life and growth process of plants and animals. However, certain forms of some metals may also act as toxic material even in relatively small quantities. Chromium is such a metal, whose concentration above a certain limit may cause a serious problem to the health of living organisms. Chromium (Cr) may occur in several chemical forms in organic and inorganic systems. In biological systems only Cr (III) and Cr (VI) are signifi...

  11. Stereology of carbide phase in modified hypereutectic chromium cast iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Suchoń

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available In paper are presented results of studies of carbide phase stereology modified hypereutectic wear resistance chromium cast iron which contains carbon about 3,5% and chromium about 25%. Three substances were applied to the modification: boron carbide (B4C, ferroniobium (FeNb and mixture of ferroniobium and rare-earth (RE. The measurements of geometrical features of carbides were conducted on microsection taken from castings wich were cooled with various velocities.

  12. Stereology of carbide phase in modified hypereutectic chromium cast iron

    OpenAIRE

    J. Suchoń; A. Studnicki; M. Przybył

    2010-01-01

    In paper are presented results of studies of carbide phase stereology modified hypereutectic wear resistance chromium cast iron which contains carbon about 3,5% and chromium about 25%. Three substances were applied to the modification: boron carbide (B4C), ferroniobium (FeNb) and mixture of ferroniobium and rare-earth (RE). The measurements of geometrical features of carbides were conducted on microsection taken from castings wich were cooled with various velocities.

  13. Chromium reduction from slag on electromelting of stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Specific features of chromium reduction from the slag on electromelting of stainless steel type Kh18N10T according to one- or two-slag procedure were studied. It was shown that one-slag melting technology allows double decrease of chromium losses in the form of incompletely reduced oxides. This occurs due to additional chemical reactions between metal and slag on their combined pouring into the ladle. 1 ref.; 3 figs

  14. 40 CFR Appendix Xii to Part 266 - Nickel or Chromium-Bearing Materials that may be Processed in Exempt Nickel-Chromium Recovery...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Nickel or Chromium-Bearing Materials that may be Processed in Exempt Nickel-Chromium Recovery Furnaces XII Appendix XII to Part 266... FACILITIES Pt. 266, App. XII Appendix XII to Part 266—Nickel or Chromium-Bearing Materials that may...

  15. Evaluating trivalent chromium toxicity on wild terrestrial and wetland plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukina, A O; Boutin, C; Rowland, O; Carpenter, D J

    2016-11-01

    Elevated chromium levels in soil from mining can impact the environment, including plants. Mining of chromium is concentrated in South Africa, several Asian countries, and potentially in Northern Ontario, Canada, raising concerns since chromium toxicity to wild plants is poorly understood. In the first experiment, concentration-response tests were conducted to evaluate effects of chromium on terrestrial and wetland plants. Following established guidelines using artificial soil, seeds of 32 species were exposed to chromium (Cr(3+)) at concentrations simulating contamination (0-1000 mg kg(-1)). This study found that low levels of chromium (250 mg kg(-1)) adversely affected the germination of 22% of species (33% of all families), while higher levels (500 and 1000 mg kg(-1)) affected 69% and 94% of species, respectively, from 89% of the families. Secondly, effects on seedbanks were studied using soil collected in Northern Ontario and exposed to Cr(3+) at equivalent concentrations (0-1000 mg kg(-1)). Effects were less severe in the seedbank study with significant differences only observed at 1000 mg kg(-1). Seeds exposed to Cr(3+) during stratification were greatly affected. Seed size was a contributing factor as was possibly the seed coat barrier. This study represents an initial step in understanding Cr(3+) toxicity on wild plants and could form the basis for future risk assessments. PMID:27543852

  16. Wear resistance of chromium cast iron – research and application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Studnicki

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: A short characteristic of wear resistance chromium cast iron has been presented as well as possibilities of this material researches realization in Foundry Department have been discussed.Design/methodology/approach: Main attention was given on research process of crystallization and analysis of chromium cast iron microstructure and its resistance on erosion wears. Separate part of paper was devoted to discuss the bimetallic castings with chromium cast iron layer as well as typical applications of chromium cast iron castings in minig, proccesing, metallurgical and power industry.Findings: The new method of crystallization process research with three testers (DTA-K3 was found in the work. The method makes possible to characterize sensitivity of chromium cast iron on cooling kinetic.Research limitations/implications: DTA-K3 method can be used for research of crystallization proccess of cast materials particularly for abrasion-resisting alloy.Practical implications: Wide scope researches of chromium cast iron in Foundry Department enable extending applications its material in many industries.Originality/value: Value of the paper is the presentation of researches possibilities which undertaken in Foundry Department within the range of wear resistant materials.

  17. Experimental skin deposition of chromium on the hands following handling of samples of leather and metal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bregnbak, David; Thyssen, Jacob P.; Jellesen, Morten Stendahl;

    2016-01-01

    Background: Chromium is an important skin sensitizer. Exposure to it has been regulated in cement, and recently in leather. Studies on the deposition of chromium ions on the skin as a result of handling different chromium-containing materials are sparse, but could improve the risk assessment of...... contact sensitization and allergic contact dermatitis caused by chromium. Objectives: To determine whether the handling of chromium-containing samples of leather and metal results in the deposition of chromium onto the skin. Methods: Five healthy volunteers participated. For 30 min, they handled samples...... of leather and metal known to contain and release chromium. Skin deposition of chromium was assessed with the acid wipe sampling technique. Results: Acid wipe sampling of the participants' fingers showed chromium deposition on the skin in all participants who had been exposed to leather (range 0...

  18. Effect of recasting on the thickness of metal-ceramic interface of nickel-chromium and cobalt-chromium alloys

    OpenAIRE

    Mirković Nemanja; Draganjac Miroslav; Stamenković Dragoslav; Ristić Ljubiša

    2008-01-01

    Introduction/Aim. This research was done to establish recasting effects of nickel-chromium and cobalt-chromium alloys on the thickness of their metal-ceramic interface in making fixed partial dentures. Metal-ceramic interface determines their functional integrity and prevents damages on ceramics during mastication. Investigation of metal-ceramic samples is supposed to show if base metal alloys for metalceramics are successfully recycled without any risk of reduction of metal-ceramic interface...

  19. USE OF TWO DIGESTION METHODS IN THE EVALUATION OF CHROMIUM CONTENT IN CATTLE'S MEAT SUPPLEMENTED WITH CHROMIUM CHELATES

    OpenAIRE

    R. L. T. Andrade; P.S.A. Moreira; R. Arruda; F. J. Lourenço; C. Palhari, F. F. Faria, V. B. Arevalo; Faria, F. F.; V. B. Arevalo

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to analyze the chromium content in beef using two digestion methods. There were used samples from 24 18-month-old male cattle, and twelve of them were supplemented and twelve were not supplemented with chromium chelate. These samples were evaluated by atomic absorption spectroscopy, previously submitted to digestion method using nitric acid (65%) with hydrogen peroxide (35%) and to digestion method, using solution of nitric perchloric acid in the proportion 3:1. Immedi...

  20. Activation of bentonite to remove the chromium from waste water produced by panning industry, and studying the chromium recovery efficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fast development of tanning industry led to an increase in environmental problems resulting from discharging its wastes to the surrounding environment. Thus solving this problem became one of the most important aims that the researchers work on. The chromium content of the industrial water wastes of the tanning industry considered as the main pollutant for the environment. The Aleppo Bentonite is used in early research to remove the chromium from the industrial waste water.The current research aims to find a method to activate the Aleppo Bentonite in order to increase the effective removal of chromium from the industrial waste water which is produced by tanning industry, as well as to specify the optimal conditions for chromium recovery.This study used the Aleppo Bentonite, whose origin is Tal Ajar-Aleppo to study the activation aspects using Sulfuric Acid, Hydrochloric Acid and Nitric Acid, in addition to study the recovery aspects using the same acids and hydrogen peroxide and to specify the optimal conditions for chromium recovery through applying some experiments based on three main factors: concentration, settling time and temperature.It was observed from the applied experiments that it is possible to recover chromium from Bentonite efficiently up to (80% - 90%) by treating the Bentonite with hydrogen peroxide(33% concentration) at room temperature, or by treating it with hydrogen peroxide(8.25% concentration) at 75oC, while the settling time factor proved that full recovery of chromium is obtained during the first hour, and increasing the time factor does not affect the efficiency of chromium recovery. (author)

  1. Modeling the kinetics of the nitriding and nitrocarburizing of iron

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Somers, Marcel A. J.; Mittemeijer, Eric J.

    1998-01-01

    The growth kinetics of the iron-nitride compound layer during nitriding and nitrocarburizing of pure iron has been investigated for various temperatures and various combinations of imposed nitrogen and carbon activities. The results indicate that no local equilibrium occurs at the gas/solid inter...

  2. Limitations to band gap tuning in nitride semiconductor alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gorczyca, I.; Suski, T.; Christensen, Niels Egede;

    2010-01-01

    Relations between the band gaps of nitride alloys and their lattice parameters are presented and limits to tuning of the fundamental gap in nitride semiconductors are set by combining a large number of experimental data with ab initio theoretical calculations. Large band gap bowings obtained...

  3. Nitriding of super alloys for enhancing physical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purohit, A.

    1984-06-25

    The invention teaches the improvement of certain super alloys by exposing the alloy to an atmosphere of elemental nitrogen at elevated temperatures in excess of 750/sup 0/C but less than 1150/sup 0/C for an extended duration, viz., by nitriding the surface of the alloy, to establish barrier nitrides of the order of 25 to 100 micrometers thickness. These barrier

  4. Hydrogen charging of plasma nitrided steel in acid solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Sobieszczyk

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Purpose of this paper is evaluation of susceptibility of plasma nitrided structural steel to hydrogen absorption.Design/methodology/approach: Structural steel, nitrided at glow discharge in the gas mixture of various N2, H2, Ar content was subjected to cathodic hydrogen charging in acid solution simulating the aged engine oil. The effect of the nitrided layers on the hydrogen transport and on the irreversible trapping was evaluated by the measurements of the hydrogen permeation rate and by the vacuum extraction, respectively.Findings: In the presence of the not defected compact nitride layer, no hydrogen permeation through the steel has been stated under the experimental conditions. Absorbed hydrogen was accumulated within this layer.Research limitations/implications: Further research should be taken to evaluate the influence of compact nitride zone on hydrogen degradation under tensile stress.Practical implications: Plasma nitriding treatment could improve the properties of the low-alloy high-strength structural steels exploited in aggressive environments, which is especially important in the case of possible hydrogen charging of exploited steel.Originality/value: Using the atmosphere of the higher nitrogen to hydrogen ratio at plasma assisted nitriding provides the formation of thin compact nitride zone, highly protective against corrosion and hydrogen degradation.

  5. Composition and microhardness of CAE boron nitride films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper deals with boron nitride produced by cathodic arc evaporation techniques.The films were applied on titanium and cemented carbide substrates. Their characterization was carried out using X-ray diffraction and Knoop microhardness tests. Demonstrated are the high properties of two-phase films, containing β (cubic) and γ (wurtzitic) modifications of boron nitride. (author). 7 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs

  6. Synthesis of metal-nitrides using high pressures and temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guillaume, C; Serghiou, G [University of Edinburgh, School of Engineering and Electronics, Kings Buildings, Mayfield Road, EH9 3JL UK (United Kingdom); Morniroli, J P [Laboratoire de Metallurgie Physique et Genie des Materiaux, UMR CNRS 8517, Universite des Sciences et Technologies de Lille et Ecole Nationale Superieure de Chimie de Lille, Cite Scientifique, 59655 Villeneuve d' Ascq Cedex (France); Frost, D J [Bayerisches Geoinstitut, Universitat Bayreuth, D-95440, Bayreuth (Germany)], E-mail: george.serghiou@ed.ac.uk

    2008-07-15

    Technologically, high density nitrides are showing promise for both ceramic and electronic applications. In a laser-heated diamond cell we prepare high density metal-nitrides by reaction of the nitrogen pressure medium with an elemental substrate. Two of our objectives are to develop criteria governing whether denser than ambient nitride phases will form, and to in particular establish the parameters required for synthesis in a multianvil press using elemental starting materials. We have already synthesized transition metal nitrides in a multianvil press using elemental starting materials, including hexagonal nickel nitride and alkali rhenium nitrides. Unlike previous metals, we also report that Cu does not form a nitride after heating with NaN{sub 3} at 2000 K and 20 GPa. Notably, Cu{sub 3}N is a semiconductor exhibiting weak directional bonds, whereas the immediately adjacent lower atomic number systems are metallic interstitial nitrides. We also briefly mention our work on processing high pressure and temperature recovered reaction products with focused ion beam methods for tailored characterization using electron microscopy.

  7. Surface characterization of a decarburized and nitrided steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calliari, Irene; Dabalà, Manuele; Zanesco, Marzia; Bernardo, Enrico; Olmi, Filippo; Vagelli, Gloria

    2006-08-01

    This article describes the effects of surface controlled decarburization on the structure of a nitrided steel. Samples of quenched and tempered 40CrMo4 steel were decarburized by air heat treatment (800-900 degrees C) at different depths and submitted to gaseous nitriding. The microstructure of surface layers after decarburization and nitriding were investigated by optical (OM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The nitrogen and carbon profiles in the diffusion layers were determined by a scanning electron microscope equipped with a wavelength dispersive spectrometer (EPMA-WDS). The effect of nitriding was determined by microhardness measurements. The increasing of time and temperature of decarburization slightly affect the surface hardness values, while case hardness depths decrease. In all the specimens, the nitriding depth, as determined by the WDS nitrogen profile, is larger than the one determined by the hardness profile. PMID:16842649

  8. Design of nitride semiconductors for solar energy conversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zakutayev, Andriy

    2016-01-01

    Nitride semiconductors are a promising class of materials for solar energy conversion applications, such as photovoltaic and photoelectrochemical cells. Nitrides can have better solar absorption and electrical transport properties than the more widely studied oxides, as well as the potential for better scalability than other pnictides or chalcogenides. In addition, nitrides are also relatively unexplored compared to other chemistries, so they provide a great opportunity for new materials discovery. This paper reviews the recent advances in the design of novel semiconducting nitrides for solar energy conversion technologies. Both binary and multinary nitrides are discussed, with a range of metal chemistries (Cu3N, ZnSnN2, Sn3N4, etc.) and crystal structures (delafossite, perovskite, spinel, etc.), including a brief overview of wurtzite III-N materials and devices. The current scientific challenges and promising future directions in the field are also highlighted.

  9. Scientific Opinion on chromium(III) lactate tri-hydrate as a source of chromium added for nutritional purposes to foodstuff

    OpenAIRE

    EFSA Panel on Food Additives and Nutrient Sources added to Food (ANS)

    2012-01-01

    The Panel on Food Additives and Nutrient Sources added to Food provides a scientific opinion on the safety and bioavailability of chromium(III) lactate tri-hydrate as a source of chromium(III) added for nutritional purposes to foodstuffs. The safety of chromium itself, in terms of the amounts that may be consumed, is outside the remit of this Panel. No new data have been provided as regards the safety and bioavailability of chromium from chromium(III) lactate tri-hydrate. The Panel c...

  10. Radiofrequency cold plasma nitrided carbon steel: Microstructural and micromechanical characterizations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → C38 carbon steel samples were plasma nitrided using a radiofrequency (rf) nitrogen plasma discharge. → RF plasma treatment enables nitriding for non-heated substrates. → The morphological and chemical analyses show the formation of a uniform thickness on the surface of the nitrided C38 steel. → Nitrogen plasma active species diffuse into the samples and lead to the formation of FexN. → The increase in microhardness values for nitrided samples with plasma processing time is interpreted by the formation of a thicker nitrided layer on the steel surface. - Abstract: In this work, C38 carbon steel was plasma nitrided using a radiofrequency (rf) nitrogen plasma discharge on non-heated substrates. General characterizations were performed to compare the chemical compositions, the microstructures and hardness of the untreated and plasma treated surfaces. The plasma nitriding was carried out on non-heated substrates at a pressure of 16.8 Pa, using N2 gas. Surface characterizations before and after N2 plasma treatment were performed by means of the electron probe microanalysis (EPMA), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Vickers microhardness measurements. The morphological and chemical analysis showed the formation of a uniform structure on the surface of the nitrided sample with enrichment in nitrogen when compared to untreated sample. The thickness of the nitride layer formed depends on the treatment time duration and is approximately 14 μm for 10 h of plasma treatment. XPS was employed to obtain chemical-state information of the plasma nitrided steel surfaces. The micromechanical results show that the surface microhardness increases as the plasma-processing time increases to reach, 1487 HV0.005 at a plasma processing time of 8 h.

  11. Influence of increasing notch radius on properties of nitrided hot work tool steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosso, M.; Scavino, G.; Ugues, D. [Politecnico di Torino - Dipt. di Scienza dei Materiali e Ingegeneria Chimica (Italy); Bennani, A. [COGNE Acciai Speciali - Aosta (Italy)

    2000-07-01

    Tool steels are a very large group of complex alloys which have evolved for many diverse hot and cold forming applications and they constitute a class of strategic materials. Hot work tool steels fall into groups which have either chromium, tungsten, or molibdenum as the major alloying element. The medium carbon and the relatively high alloy content make these steels air hardenable and resistant to impact and softening during repeated exposure to hot working operations. In this work the impact properties of Charpy U-notch samples with increasing notch radius are presented and discussed. The samples were manufactured with AISI H13 hot working tool steel and a modified composition, and were tested in the as quenched state and after nitriding. After the impact test, the microhardness properties were evaluated and correlated to the heat treatment. The notch radius strongly affect the impact resistance of the samples, namely at the lowest values. The microstructure details and the fracture morphology were observed by light microscopy and SEM. (orig.)

  12. Pulsed Laser Deposition Processing of Improved Titanium Nitride Coatings for Implant Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haywood, Talisha M.

    Recently surface coating technology has attracted considerable attention of researchers to develop novel coatings with enhanced functional properties such as hardness, biocompatibility, wear and corrosion resistance for medical devices and surgical tools. The materials currently being used for surgical implants include predominantly stainless steel (316L), cobalt chromium (Co-Cr), titanium and its alloys. Some of the limitations of these implants include improper mechanical properties, corrosion resistance, cytotoxicity and bonding with bone. One of the ways to improve the performance and biocompatibility of these implants is to coat their surfaces with biocompatible materials. Among the various coating materials, titanium nitride (TiN) shows excellent mechanical properties, corrosion resistance and low cytotoxicity. In the present work, a systematic study of pulsed laser ablation processing of TiN coatings was conducted. TiN thin film coatings were grown on commercially pure titanium (Ti) and stainless steel (316L) substrates at different substrate temperatures and different nitrogen partial pressures using the pulsed laser deposition (PLD) technique. Microstructural, surface, mechanical, chemical, corrosion and biological analysis techniques were applied to characterize the TiN thin film coatings. The PLD processed TiN thin film coatings showed improvements in mechanical strength, corrosion resistance and biocompatibility when compared to the bare substrates. The enhanced performance properties of the TiN thin film coatings were a result of the changing and varying of the deposition parameters.

  13. Hydrolysis of hafnium nitrides and carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydrolysis of Hafnium Nitrides and Carbides. The hydrolytic behavior of Hafnium mononitride and monocarbide has been studied and compared with that of Titanium and Zirconium nitrides and carbides. In the case of hydrolysis of HfN the gaseous products were H2, N2 and a small amount of NO, and the liquid product was NH3, as in the case of TiN and ZrN. In isothermal hydrolysis the principal product was NH3 at temperatures lower than 8000C, which was replaced by N2 at temperatures higher than 9000C. In this respect HfN was similar to ZrN, but not to TiN which produced mainly N2 even by hydrolysis at 8000C. The products of hydrolysis of HfC were found to be CO, CO2, H2 and a small amount of CH4 also as in the case of TiC and ZrC. In the isothermal hydrolysis of HfC it was observed that a large amount of H2 evolved at the early stage of the hydrolysis while CO2 continued to evolve with some amount of H2 even after the ceasing of CO evolution. From analysis of the hydrolytic behavior the solid residue after the hydrolysis of HfC was considered to contain some waxes (Csub(n)Hsub(m)). It was suggested that the carbide of the element of smaller atomic number (Ti) would tend to form oxygen compounds (CO, CO2) while the carbide of the element of larger atomic number (Zr, Hf) hydrogen compounds(Csub(n)Hsub(m)), since ThC and UC formed only hydrocarbons and H2 by hydrolysis. This suggestion was also valid to nitride. (auth.)

  14. Creep deformation of TD--nickel chromium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The creep behavior of thoria dispersed nickel-chromium (TD-NiCr) was examined at 10930C. Major emphasis was placed on 1) the effects of the material and the test related variables (grain size, temperature, stress, strain and strain rate) on the deformation characteristics, and 2) the evaluation of single crystal TD-NiCr material produced by a directional recrystallization technique. Creep activation enthalpies were found to increase with increasing grain size reaching maximum values for the single crystal TD-NiCr. Stress exponent of the steady state creep rate was also significantly higher for the single crystal material as compared with that determined for the polycrystalline TD-NiCr. The elevated temperature deformation of TD-NiCr was analyzed in terms of two parallel-concurrent processes: 1) diffusion controlled grain boundary sliding and 2) dislocation motion. The characteristics of the dislocation motion deformation mode (as observed in the single crystal TD-NiCr) suggest that strong particle-dislocation interactions are present. The relative contributions of dislocation motion and grain boundary sliding in TD-NiCr were estimated. In creep, grain boundary sliding was found to predominate for the small, equiaxed grain structures, whereas the dislocation deformation mode became significant for only the large grain TD-NiCr and the single crystal material

  15. Low energy spin excitations in chromium metal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pynn, R. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Azuah, R.T. [Hahn-Meitner-Inst., Berlin (Germany); Stirling, W.G. [Univ. of Liverpool (United Kingdom). Dept. of Physics; Kulda, J. [Inst. Laue Langevin, Grenoble (France)

    1997-12-31

    Neutron scattering experiments with full polarization analysis have been performed with a single crystal of chromium to study the low-energy spin fluctuations in the transverse spin density wave (TSDW) state. A number of remarkable results have been found. Inelastic scattering observed close to the TSDW satellite positions at (1 {+-} {delta},0,0) does not behave as expected for magnon scattering. In particular, the scattering corresponds to almost equally strong magnetization fluctuations both parallel and perpendicular to the ordered moments of the TSDW phase. As the Neel temperature is approached from below, scattering at the commensurate wavevector (1,0,0) increases in intensity as a result of critical scattering at silent satellites (1,0, {+-} {delta}) being included within the spectrometer resolution function. This effect, first observed by Sternlieb et al, does not account for all of the inelastic scattering around the (1,0,0) position, however, Rather, there are further collective excitations, apparently emanating from the TSDW satellites, which correspond to magnetic fluctuations parallel to the ordered TSDW moments. These branches have a group velocity that is close to that of (1,0,0) longitudinal acoustic (LA) phonons, but assigning their origin to magneto-elastic scattering raises other unanswered questions.

  16. A Rare Terminal Dinitrogen Complex of Chromium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mock, Michael T.; Chen, Shentan; Rousseau, Roger J.; O' Hagan, Molly J.; Dougherty, William G.; Kassel, W. S.; DuBois, Daniel L.; Bullock, R. Morris

    2011-10-12

    The reduction of dinitrogen to ammonia from N2 and H2 is currently carried out by the Haber-Bosch process, an energy intensive process that requires high pressures and high temperatures and accounts for the production of millions of tons of ammonia per year. The development of a catalytic, energy-efficient process for N2 reduction is of great interest and remains a formidable challenge. In this communication, we are reporting the preparation, characterization and computational electronic structure analysis of a rare 'Chatt-type' ((P-P)2M(N2)2, P-P = diphosphine ligand) complex of chromium, cis-[Cr(N2)2(PPh2NBn2)2] and its reactivity with CO. This complex is supported by the diphosphine ligand PPh2NBn2, containing non-coordinating pendant amine bases, to serve as proton relays. Future studies for this complex are aimed at answering fundamental questions regarding the role of proton relays in the second coordination sphere in their ability to facilitate proton movement from an external acid to metal-bound dinitrogen ligands in the challenging multi-proton/electron reduction of N2 to ammonia.

  17. A Rare Terminal Dinitrogen Complex of Chromium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The reduction of dinitrogen to ammonia from N2 and H2 is currently carried out by the Haber-Bosch process, an energy intensive process that requires high pressures and high temperatures and accounts for the production of millions of tons of ammonia per year. The development of a catalytic, energy-efficient process for N2 reduction is of great interest and remains a formidable challenge. In this communication, we are reporting the preparation, characterization and computational electronic structure analysis of a rare 'Chatt-type' ((P-P)2M(N2)2, P-P = diphosphine ligand) complex of chromium, cis-(Cr(N2)2(PPh2NBn2)2) and its reactivity with CO. This complex is supported by the diphosphine ligand PPh2NBn2, containing non-coordinating pendant amine bases, to serve as proton relays. Future studies for this complex are aimed at answering fundamental questions regarding the role of proton relays in the second coordination sphere in their ability to facilitate proton movement from an external acid to metal-bound dinitrogen ligands in the challenging multi-proton/electron reduction of N2 to ammonia.

  18. Effect of Plasma Nitriding on the Performance of WC-Co Cutting Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamzaoglu, Ebru; Yilmaz, Safak; Gulmez, Turgut

    2011-04-01

    This paper presents the effect of nitriding process parameters on the cutting performance of WC-Co tools. The cutting performance was measured by CNC machining of GG25 cast iron parts. The hardness and phase composition of nitrided layer were determined for different plasma nitriding temperatures and times. The hardness of the nitrided layer increased at all plasma nitrided conditions investigated. However, the machining performance of the cutting inserts varied in the range between a 60% increase and a 40% decrease after plasma nitriding. The maximum number of machined parts was seen when the insert was nitrided at 600 °C-4 h and at 500 °C-4 h.

  19. Effects of Nitrogen Gas Ratio on Nitride Layer and Microhardness of Tool Steel(SKH51) in Plasma Nitriding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, D.J.; Lee, H.R. [Institute for Advanced Engineering, Yongin (Korea); Kwak, J.G. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea); Chung, U.C.; Cho, Y.R. [Pusan National University, Pusan (Korea)

    2002-06-01

    Pulsed DC-plasma nitriding has been applied to form nitride layer having only a diffusion layer. The discharge current with the variation of discharge gases is proportional to the intensity of N{sub 2}{sup +} peak in optical emission spectroscopy during the plasma nitriding. The discharge current, microhardness in surface of substrate and depth of nitride layer increased with the ratio of N{sub 2} to H{sub 2} gas in discharge gases. When the ratio of N{sub 2} to H{sub 2} is lower than 60% in the discharge gases, high microhardness value of 1100Hv nitride layer which contains no compound layer has been formed. (author). 20 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Ballistic thermoelectric properties in boron nitride nanoribbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Zhong-Xiang; Tang, Li-Ming; Pan, Chang-Ning; Chen, Qiao; Chen, Ke-Qiu

    2013-10-01

    Ballistic thermoelectric properties (TPs) in boron nitride nanoribbons (BNNRs) are studied using the nonequilibrium Green's function atomistic simulation of electron and phonon transport. A comparative analysis for TPs between BNNRs and graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) is made. Results show that the TPs of BNNRs are better than those of GNRs stemming from the higher power factor and smaller thermal conductance of BNNRs. With increasing the ribbon width, the maximum value of ZT (ZTmax) of BNNRs exhibits a transformation from the monotonic decrease to nonlinear increase. We also show that the lattice defect can enhance the ZTmax of these nanoribbons strongly depending on its positions and the edge shape.

  1. Magnesium doping of boron nitride nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legg, Robert; Jordan, Kevin

    2015-06-16

    A method to fabricate boron nitride nanotubes incorporating magnesium diboride in their structure. In a first embodiment, magnesium wire is introduced into a reaction feed bundle during a BNNT fabrication process. In a second embodiment, magnesium in powder form is mixed into a nitrogen gas flow during the BNNT fabrication process. MgB.sub.2 yarn may be used for superconducting applications and, in that capacity, has considerably less susceptibility to stress and has considerably better thermal conductivity than these conventional materials when compared to both conventional low and high temperature superconducting materials.

  2. Reactive sputter deposition of boron nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The preparation of fully dense, boron targets for use in planar magnetron sources has lead to the synthesis of Boron Nitride (BN) films by reactive rf sputtering. The deposition parameters of gas pressure, flow and composition are varied along with substrate temperature and applied bias. The films are characterized for composition using Auger electron spectroscopy, for chemical bonding using Raman spectroscopy and for crystalline structure using transmission electron microscopy. The deposition conditions are established which lead to the growth of crystalline BN phases. In particular, the growth of an adherent cubic BN coating requires 400--500 C substrate heating and an applied -300 V dc bias

  3. Boron nitride nanomaterials for thermal management applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meziani, Mohammed J; Song, Wei-Li; Wang, Ping; Lu, Fushen; Hou, Zhiling; Anderson, Ankoma; Maimaiti, Halidan; Sun, Ya-Ping

    2015-05-18

    Hexagonal boron nitride nanosheets (BNNs) are analogous to their two-dimensional carbon counterparts in many materials properties, in particular, ultrahigh thermal conductivity, but also offer some unique attributes, including being electrically insulating, high thermal stability, chemical and oxidation resistance, low color, and high mechanical strength. Significant recent advances in the production of BNNs, understanding of their properties, and the development of polymeric nanocomposites with BNNs for thermally conductive yet electrically insulating materials and systems are highlighted herein. Major opportunities and challenges for further studies in this rapidly advancing field are also discussed. PMID:25652360

  4. Cathodoluminescence spectra of gallium nitride nanorods

    OpenAIRE

    Tsai, Chia-Chang; Li, Guan-Hua; Lin, Yuan-Ting; Chang, Ching-Wen; Wadekar, Paritosh; Chen, Quark Yung-Sung; Rigutti, Lorenzo; Tchernycheva, Maria; Julien, François Henri; Tu, Li-Wei

    2011-01-01

    Gallium nitride [GaN] nanorods grown on a Si(111) substrate at 720°C via plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy were studied by field-emission electron microscopy and cathodoluminescence [CL]. The surface topography and optical properties of the GaN nanorod cluster and single GaN nanorod were measured and discussed. The defect-related CL spectra of GaN nanorods and their dependence on temperature were investigated. The CL spectra along the length of the individual GaN nanorod were also studie...

  5. Plasma-Activated Sintering of Aluminum Nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hensley, J. E.; Risbud, S. H.; Groza, J. R.; Yamazaki, K.

    1993-10-01

    The use of a new plasma- activated sintering (PAS) process to densify aluminum nitride (AIN) powders to nearly full theoretical density (97 to >99%) in 5 to 10 min was investigated. The process consists of a pulse activation step, followed by sintering at 1730 to 1800 °C using resistance heating in carbon dies. Submicron size (~0.44 μm) AIN powders of low oxygen content (submicron grain structure (~0.77 μm) with no apparent pores or intergranular phases. X- ray powder diffraction revealed no secondary crystalline phases.

  6. Low-dimensional boron nitride nanomaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Pakdel

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In this review, a concise research history of low-dimensional boron nitride (BN nanomaterials followed by recent developments in their synthesis, morphology, properties, and applications are presented. Seventeen years after the initial synthesis of BN nanotubes, research on BN nanomaterials has developed far enough to establish them as one of the most promising inorganic nanosystems. In this regard, it is envisaged that the unique properties of low-dimensional BN systems, such as superb mechanical stiffness, high thermal conductivity, wide optical bandgap, strong ultraviolet emission, thermal stability and chemical inertness will play a key role in prospective developments.

  7. Nitride and carbide preforms for infiltration process

    OpenAIRE

    A. Twardowska; Nowak, R; P. Kurtyka; B. Smuk; M. Podsiadło; L. Jaworska; N. Sobczak

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Infiltration of molten metals into porous ceramic preforms is the only technique suitable for the fabrication of high volume fraction of ceramic materials in MMCs. The most popular material for porous preforms is Al2O3 because of its low cost. Infiltration process generates thermal stresses in the Al2O3 preforms. The thermal shock resistance of Al2O3 is lower than for Si3N4 or Al2O3/TiC+TiN materials. The aim of this study is to obtain the nitride and carbide base preforms material f...

  8. Ion nitriding; Proceedings of the International Conference, Cleveland, OH, Sept. 15-17, 1986

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spalvins, T. (Editor)

    1987-01-01

    The present conference discusses plasma-assisted surface coating/modification processes, the applications to date of ion nitriding, the effects of nitrogen on metal surfaces, ion nitriding mechanisms in Cr, Al and Cr + Al-containing 1040 steel, ion nitriding of Al and its alloys, life enhancement for forging dies, novel anode plasma nitriding developments, and a comparative study of the pulsed and dc ion-nitriding behavior in specimens with blind holes. Also discussed are the influence of heating method on ion nitriding, surface hardening of marage steels by ion nitriding without core hardness reduction, plasma nitriding of nodular cast iron sput gears, NbN composites for superconductors, the carburization of tungsten in a glow discharge methane plasma, economic considerations concerning plasma nitriding, and the corrosion properties obtained by ion nitriding.

  9. Hexavalent Chromium Reduction and Its Distribution in the Cell and Medium by Chromium Resistant Fusarium solani

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mousumi Sen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, batch biosorption of Cr(VI was studied using the fungal strain isolated from soil. The fungal strain was characterized as Fusarium solani. The total Cr distribution in the biomass (fungus and in the media obtained from the experiment conducted at 500 mg l -1 initial Cr(VI concentration and pH 5.0. The results indicated both intracellular and extracellular accumulation and enzymatic reduction of Cr(VI and this was supported by the Transmission Electron Microscopic (TEM observation at the same Cr(VI concentration and pH value. Chromium elution from Fusarium solani containing Cr was then tried out using a number of chromium eluting reagents and a maximum Cr could be eluted using 0.5N sodium hydroxide solution without destructing the biomass structure. The total Cr was recovered by pH adjustment from both biomass and media was found to be 44% of the initial Cr(VI concentration (500 mg l-1.

  10. Behaviour of nitrided layers subjected to influence of hydrogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Ćwiek

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: of this paper is evaluation of behaviour of plasma nitrided layers subjected to influence of internal and external hydrogen. Properties of nitrided layers like: hydrogen permeation and trapping, fracture mode, and plasticity were examined.Design/methodology/approach: Structural low-alloy steel was nitrided at glow discharge in the gas mixture of various N2, H2, and Ar content. Samples with nitrided layers were subjected to cathodic hydrogen charging in acid solution simulating the aged engine oil hydrogenating environment. The effect of the nitrided layers on the hydrogen transport and on the irreversible trapping was evaluated by the measurements of the hydrogen permeation rate and by the vacuum extraction, respectively. Surfaces with modified layers were examined with the use of a scanning electron microscope (SEM before and after hydrogen permeation tests. Slow strain rate test (SSRT on samples with and without nitrided layers was carried out in hydrogen generating environment. After SSRT fracture mode and plasticity of nitrided layers were examined with SEM.Findings: In the presence of the not defected compact nitride layer, no hydrogen permeation through the steel has been stated under the experimental conditions. Influence of hydrogen content in working atmosphere, i.e. internal hydrogen, was found. Absorbed hydrogen, i.e. external hydrogen, was accumulated within this layer.Research limitations/implications: There is no possibility to perform direct observations of exact mechanism of hydrogen-assisted cracking so far. Further research should be taken to reveal the exact mechanism of increased plasticity of nitrided layer with absorbed hydrogen.Practical implications: Plasma nitrided layers are effective barriers to hydrogen entry into structural steel utilised in aggressive environments, which is especially important in the case of possible hydrogen charging of exploited steel.Originality/value: Using the atmosphere of the higher

  11. Estrutura e propriedades do aço inoxidável austenítico AISI 316L Grau ASTM F138 nitretado sob plasma à baixa temperatura Structure and properties of an austenitic stainless steel AISI 316L grade ASTM F138 after low temperature plasma nitriding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Paulo Tschiptschin

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Os aços inoxidáveis austeníticos possuem restrições para a nitretação nas temperaturas convencionais, próximas de 550ºC, devido à precipitação intensa de nitretos de cromo na zona de difusão. Essa precipitação eleva a dureza, mas deteriora as propriedades de corrosão. O uso do processo de nitretação sob plasma permite introduzir nitrogênio em temperaturas inferiores a 450ºC, levando à formação de uma fina camada de austenita expandida pelo nitrogênio (gN. Essa fase possui uma estrutura cristalina mais bem representada pelo reticulado triclínico, com elevada concentração de nitrogênio em solução sólida supersaturada, a qual promove um estado de tensões residuais de compressão capaz de elevar a dureza do substrato de 4 GPa para valores próximos de 14 GPa. O Módulo de Elasticidade mantém-se próximo de 200 GPa após a nitretação.Austenitic stainless steels cannot be conventionally nitrided at temperatures near 550°C due to the intense precipitation of chromium nitrides in the diffusion zone. The precipitation of chromium nitrides increases the hardness but severely impairs corrosion resistance. Plasma nitriding allows introducing nitrogen in the steel at temperatures below 450°C, forming pre-dominantly expanded austenite (gN, with a crystalline structure best represented by a special triclinic lattice, with a very high nitrogen atomic concentration promoting high compressive residual stresses at the surface, increasing substrate hardness from 4 GPa up to 14 GPa on the nitrided case.

  12. Ammonia Decomposition over Bimetallic Nitrides Supported on γ-Al2O3

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chun Shan LU; Xiao Nian LI; Yi Feng ZHU; Hua Zhang LIU; Chun Hui ZHOU

    2004-01-01

    A series of monometallic nitrides and bimetallic nitrides were prepared by temperature-programmed reaction with NH3. The effects of Co, Ni and Fe additives and the synergic action between Fe, Co, Ni and Mo on the ammonia decomposition activity were investigated. TPR-MS, XRD were also carried out to obtain better insight into the structure of the bimetallic nitride. The results of ammonia decomposition activity show that bimetallic nitrides are more active than monometallic nitrides or bimetallic oxides.

  13. ION NITRIDING AND THE INFLUENCE OF THE PROPERTIES OF THE STEEL

    OpenAIRE

    BAYCIK, Handan

    2002-01-01

    The nitriding performed to change the chemical composition of the surface is the method of a thermochemical surface hardening. Fine, hard nitrided case consist of two zones at the surface; The outer one white layer (compound layer), the inner one diffusion layer. The nitriding methods are determined at three groups as gas, salt and ion nitriding. Gas nitriding process is performed using ammonia. The nitrogen decompositing from the ammonia gas reacts with the iron and the alloy elements of the...

  14. Electron transfer. 75. Reduction of carboxylato-bound chromium(V) with vanadium(IV). Intervention of chromium(IV)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The chelated (carboxylato)chromium(V) anion bis(2-hydroxy-2-ethylbutyrato)oxochromate(V) (I), [(Lig)2Cr(O)]-, reacts with oxovanadium(IV) to form a strongly absorbing species (lambda/sub max/ = 515 nm; epsilon = 1.7 x 103 M-1) in the presence of 2-hydroxy-2-ethylbutyric acid buffers (pH 2-4). EPR data support 1:1 stoichiometry with VO2+ in deficiency, indicating the formation of a chromium(IV) species by reduction. With excess VO2+ a chromium(III) product was obtained. Spectral and ion-exchange properties of this product correspond to those observed for the titanium(III) and iron(II) reductions of chromium(V) and are consistent with the formulation of the product as a bis(hydroxycarboxylate) chelate of (H2O)2Cr/sup III/. With excess vanadium(IV), the reaction exhibits triphasic kinetics. The remaining step of the reaction is the reduction of the chromium(IV) intermediate with VO2+. Rates for all steps increase with decreasing [H+] and level off at low [H+]. The limiting rate constants for the formation of the chromium(IV) intermediate by the (Lig)3Cr(O)2- and (Lig)2Cr(O)- pathways are 2.8 x 103 and 2.2 x 102 M-1s-1. The bimolecular limiting rate constant for the reduction of chromium(IV) is computed to be 7.7 x 102 M-1 s-1. 33 references, 7 tables

  15. Chromium propionate enhances adipogenic differentiation of bovine intramuscular adipocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca eTokach

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In vitro experiments were performed to determine the effects of increasing concentrations of chromium propionate on mRNA and protein abundance of different enzymes and receptors. Intramuscular and subcutaneous preadipocytes and bovine satellite cells were isolated from the longissimus muscle to determine the effect of treatment on glucose transporter type 4 (GLUT4 and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ mRNA and GLUT4 protein abundance. Preadipocyte cultures were treated with differentiation media plus either sodium propionate or different concentrations of chromium propionate (CrPro for 96, 120, and 144 h before harvest. This study indicated adipogenesis of the bovine intramuscular adipocytes were more sensitive to the treatment of chromium propionate as compared to subcutaneous adipocytes. Enhancement of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase and GLUT4 mRNA by CrPro treatment may enhance glucose uptake in intramuscular adipocytes. Chromium propionate decreased GLUT4 protein levels in muscle cell cultures suggesting those cells have increased efficiency of glucose uptake due to exposure to increased levels of CrPro. In contrast, each of the two adipogenic lines had opposing responses to the CrPro. It appeared that CrPro had the most stimulative effect of GLUT4 response in the intramuscular adipocytes as compared to subcutaneous adipocytes. These findings indicated opportunities to potentially augment marbling in beef cattle fed chromium propionate during the finishing phase.

  16. Anthropogenic chromium emissions in china from 1990 to 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Hongguang; Zhou, Tan; Li, Qian; Lu, Lu; Lin, Chunye

    2014-01-01

    An inventory of chromium emission into the atmosphere and water from anthropogenic activities in China was compiled for 1990 through to 2009. We estimate that the total emission of chromium to the atmosphere is about 1.92×10⁵ t. Coal and oil combustion were the two leading sources of chromium emission to the atmosphere in China, while the contribution of them showed opposite annual growth trend. In total, nearly 1.34×10⁴ t of chromium was discharged to water, mainly from six industrial categories in 20 years. Among them, the metal fabrication industry and the leather tanning sector were the dominant sources of chromium emissions, accounting for approximately 68.0% and 20.0% of the total emissions and representing increases of 15.6% and 10.3% annually, respectively. The spatial trends of Cr emissions show significant variation based on emissions from 2005 to 2009. The emission to the atmosphere was heaviest in Hebei, Shandong, Guangdong, Zhejiang and Shanxi, whose annual emissions reached more than 1000t for the high level of coal and oil consumption. In terms of emission to water, the largest contributors were Guangdong, Jiangsu, Shandong and Zhejiang, where most of the leather production and metal manufacturing occur and these four regions accounted for nearly 47.4% of the total emission to water. PMID:24505309

  17. Anthropogenic chromium emissions in china from 1990 to 2009.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongguang Cheng

    Full Text Available An inventory of chromium emission into the atmosphere and water from anthropogenic activities in China was compiled for 1990 through to 2009. We estimate that the total emission of chromium to the atmosphere is about 1.92×10⁵ t. Coal and oil combustion were the two leading sources of chromium emission to the atmosphere in China, while the contribution of them showed opposite annual growth trend. In total, nearly 1.34×10⁴ t of chromium was discharged to water, mainly from six industrial categories in 20 years. Among them, the metal fabrication industry and the leather tanning sector were the dominant sources of chromium emissions, accounting for approximately 68.0% and 20.0% of the total emissions and representing increases of 15.6% and 10.3% annually, respectively. The spatial trends of Cr emissions show significant variation based on emissions from 2005 to 2009. The emission to the atmosphere was heaviest in Hebei, Shandong, Guangdong, Zhejiang and Shanxi, whose annual emissions reached more than 1000t for the high level of coal and oil consumption. In terms of emission to water, the largest contributors were Guangdong, Jiangsu, Shandong and Zhejiang, where most of the leather production and metal manufacturing occur and these four regions accounted for nearly 47.4% of the total emission to water.

  18. Enhancement of chromium uptake in tanning using oxazolidine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundarapandiyan, S; Brutto, Patrick E; Siddhartha, G; Ramesh, R; Ramanaiah, B; Saravanan, P; Mandal, A B

    2011-06-15

    Monocyclic and bicyclic oxazolidines were offered at three different junctures of chrome tanning process viz. prior to BCS offer, along with BCS and after basification. It was found that oxazolidine when offered after basification brought about better chromium uptake and reduction of chromium load in the wastewater. Offer of oxazolidine was also varied. Increase in offer of oxazolidine from 0.25% to 1% was found to enhance the chromium uptake and decrease the chromium load in wastewater. But the increase in uptake was not proportionate to the increase in oxazolidine offer more than 0.75%. Offer of 1% Zoldine ZA 78 (monocyclic oxazolidine) and Zoldine ZE (bicyclic oxazolidine) after basification brought about 63.4% and 73.1% enhancement in chrome content in leather compared to control where oxazolidine was not offered. The tone of the wetblue was found to be altered moderately. However this did not call for any process adjustments in wet-finishing. The oxazolidine treated leathers were found to be immensely fuller and tighter. It was found experimentally that offer of 1% of oxazolidine facilitated reduction in the offer of syntans administered for filling and grain tightening by around 46%. Oxazolidine could bring about significant reduction in cost of chemicals apart from resulting environmental benefits due to enhancement of chromium uptake during tanning. PMID:21536383

  19. Low-chromium reduced-activation ferritic steels for fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klueh, R.L.; Alexander, D.J.; Kenik, E.A. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, TN (United States)

    1996-04-01

    Development of reduced-activation ferritic steels has concentrated on high-chromium (8-10 wt% Cr) steels. However, there are advantages for a low-chromium steel, and initial ORNL studies on reduced-activation steels were on compositions with 2.25 to 12% Cr. Those studies showed an Fe-2.25Cr-2W-0.25V-0.1C (2 1/4Cr-2WV) steel to have the highest strenglth of the steels studied. Although this steel had the best strength, Charpy impact properties were inferior to those of an Fe-9Cr-2W-0.25V-0.07Ta-0.1C (9Cr-2WVTa) and an Fe-2.25Cr-2W-0.1C (2 1/4Cr-2W) steel. Therefore, further development of the low-chromium Cr-W steels was required. These results indicate that it is possible to develop low-chromium reduced-activation ferritic steels that have tensile and impact properties as good or better than those of high-chromium (7-9% Cr) steels. Further improvement of properties should be possible by optimizing the composition.

  20. Electronic structure and mechanical properties of plasma nitrided ferrous alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The electronic structures of the near-surface regions of two different nitrided steels (AISI 316 and 4140) were investigated using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Photoelectron groups from all main chemical elements involved were addressed for steel samples with implanted-N concentrations in the range 16-32 at.%. As the implanted-N concentrations were increased, rather contrasting behaviors were observed for the two kinds of steel. The N1s photoelectrons had spectral shifts toward lower (nitrided AISI 316) or higher (nitrided AISI 4140) binding energies, whereas the Fe2p3/2 photoelectron spectrum remains at a constant binding energy (nitrided AISI 316) or shifts toward higher binding energies (AISI 4140). These trends are discussed in terms of the metallic nitride formation and the overlapping of atomic orbitals. For nitrided AISI 316, a semi-classical approach of charge transfer between Cr and N is used to explain the experimental facts (formation of CrN), while for nitrided AISI 4140 we propose that the interaction between orbitals 4s from Fe and 2p from N promotes electrons to the conduction band increasing the electrical attraction of the N1s and Fe2p electrons in core shells (formation of FeNx). The increase in hardness of the steel upon N implantation is attributed to the localization of electrons in specific bonds, which diminishes the metallic bond character.

  1. Microstructural characterization of pulsed plasma nitrided 316L stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → The low temperature pulsed plasma nitrided layer of 316 SS was studied. → The plastic deformation induced in the austenite due to nitriding is characterized by EBSD at different depths (i.e., nitrogen concentration). → Nanomechanical properties of the nitride layer was investigated by nanoindentation at different depths (i.e., nitrogen concentration). → High hardness, high nitrogen concentration and high dislocation density is detected in the nitride layer. → The hardness and nitrogen concentration decreased sharply beyond the nitride layer. - Abstract: Pulsed plasma nitriding (PPN) treatment is one of the new processes to improve the surface hardness and tribology behavior of austenitic stainless steels. Through low temperature treatment (<440 deg. C), it is possible to obtain unique combinations of wear and corrosion properties. Such a combination is achieved through the formation of a so-called 'extended austenite phase'. These surface layers are often also referred to as S-phase, m-phase or γ-phase. In this work, nitrided layers on austenitic stainless steels AISI 316L (SS316L) were examined by means of a nanoindentation method at different loads. Additionally, the mechanical properties of the S-phase at different depths were studied. Electron back-scatter diffraction (EBSD) examination of the layer showed a high amount of plasticity induced in the layer during its formation. XRD results confirmed the formation of the S-phase, and no deleterious CrN phase was detected.

  2. Microstructural characterization of pulsed plasma nitrided 316L stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asgari, M. [Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim (Norway); Barnoush, A., E-mail: a.barnoush@matsci.uni-sb.de [Saarland University, Saarbruecken (Germany); Johnsen, R. [Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim (Norway); Hoel, R. [MOTecH Plasma Company, Oslo (Norway)

    2011-11-25

    Highlights: {yields} The low temperature pulsed plasma nitrided layer of 316 SS was studied. {yields} The plastic deformation induced in the austenite due to nitriding is characterized by EBSD at different depths (i.e., nitrogen concentration). {yields} Nanomechanical properties of the nitride layer was investigated by nanoindentation at different depths (i.e., nitrogen concentration). {yields} High hardness, high nitrogen concentration and high dislocation density is detected in the nitride layer. {yields} The hardness and nitrogen concentration decreased sharply beyond the nitride layer. - Abstract: Pulsed plasma nitriding (PPN) treatment is one of the new processes to improve the surface hardness and tribology behavior of austenitic stainless steels. Through low temperature treatment (<440 deg. C), it is possible to obtain unique combinations of wear and corrosion properties. Such a combination is achieved through the formation of a so-called 'extended austenite phase'. These surface layers are often also referred to as S-phase, m-phase or {gamma}-phase. In this work, nitrided layers on austenitic stainless steels AISI 316L (SS316L) were examined by means of a nanoindentation method at different loads. Additionally, the mechanical properties of the S-phase at different depths were studied. Electron back-scatter diffraction (EBSD) examination of the layer showed a high amount of plasticity induced in the layer during its formation. XRD results confirmed the formation of the S-phase, and no deleterious CrN phase was detected.

  3. Thermal stability of laser-produced iron nitrides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, M.; Carpene, E.; Landry, F.; Lieb, K.-P.; Schaaf, P.

    2001-04-01

    Laser nitriding is a very efficient method to improve the mechanical properties, surface hardness, corrosion, and wear resistance of iron and steel, with the advantages of a high nitrogen concentration, fast treatment, and accurate position control, and without any undesired heating effect on the substrate. However, the stability of laser-produced iron nitrides is still under investigation. This article reports investigations of the thermal stability of these iron nitrides upon annealing treatments, which were conducted both in vacuum and air. The phase and elemental composition of the nitride layers were deduced from conversion electron Mössbauer spectroscopy, resonant nuclear reaction analysis, and grazing incidence x-ray diffraction. The surface hardness was measured by the nanoindentation method. In laser-nitrided iron, two critical temperatures are found: at 523 K the predominant iron-nitride phase changes from the γ/ɛ to the γ' phase. When the temperature exceeds 773 K, all of the nitrogen has escaped from the surface layer. For annealing in air the nitrogen escapes completely already at 673 K, where a thick oxide layer has formed. Stainless steel proved to be more stable than iron, and even up to 973 K no new phases or oxides were produced, here, also, only at 973 K the nitrogen content decreased significantly. Therefore, laser-nitrided stainless steel is well suited for applications.

  4. Characterization of plasma nitrided layers produced on sintered iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Alves Fontes

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Plasma nitriding is a thermo-physical-chemical treatment process, which promotes surface hardening, caused by interstitial diffusion of atomic nitrogen into metallic alloys. In this work, this process was employed in the surface modification of a sintered ferrous alloy. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM, X-ray diffraction (XRD analyses, and wear and microhardness tests were performed on the samples submitted to ferrox treatment and plasma nitriding carried out under different conditions of time and temperature. The results showed that the nitride layer thickness is higher for all nitrided samples than for ferrox treated samples, and this layer thickness increases with nitriding time and temperature, and temperature is a more significant variable. The XRD analysis showed that the nitrided layer, for all samples, near the surface consists in a mixture of γ′-Fe4N and ɛ-Fe3N phases. Both wear resistance and microhardness increase with nitriding time and temperature, and temperature influences both the characteristics the most.

  5. Phase Transformations During the Low-Temperature Nitriding of AISI 2205 Duplex Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Jing; Gu, Tan; Qiu, Shaoyu; Wang, Jun; Xiong, Ji; Fan, Hongyuan

    2015-02-01

    Liquid nitriding of type AISI 2205 duplex stainless steel was conducted at 723 K (450 °C), using one type of novel low-temperature liquid chemical thermo-treatment. The transformation of the nitrided surface microstructure was systematically studied. Experimental results revealed that a nitrided layer formed on the sample surface with the thickness ranging from 3 to 28 μm, depending on nitriding time. After the 2205 duplex stainless steel was subjected to liquid nitriding 723 K (450 °C) for less than 8 hours, the pre-existing ferrite region on the surface transformed into the expanded austenite (S phase) by the infusion of nitrogen atoms, most of which stay in the interstitial sites. Generally, the dominant phase of the nitrided layer was the expanded austenite. When the nitriding time prolonged up to 16 hours, some pre-existing ferrite in expanded austenite was decomposed and ɛ-nitride precipitated subsequently. When the treatment time went up to 40 hours, large amount of ɛ-nitride and CrN precipitates were observed in the pre-existing ferritic region in the expanded austenite. Furthermore, many nitrides precipitated from the pre-austenite region. Acicular nitride was identified by transmission electron microscopy. The thickness of the nitrided layer increased with increasing nitriding time. The growth of the nitrided layer is mainly due to nitrogen diffusion in accordance with the expected parabolic rate law. Liquid nitriding effectively increased the surface hardness of 2205 duplex stainless steel by a factor of 3.

  6. Thermodynamics, kinetics and process control of nitriding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mittemeijer, Eric J.; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    1997-01-01

    As a prerequisite for the predictability of properties obtained by a nitriding treatment of iron based workpieces, the relation between the process parameters and the composition and structure of the surface layer produced must be known. At present, even the description of thermodynamic equilibri...... 10th Congress of the International Federation for Heat Treatment and Surface Engineering held in Brighton, UK on 1-5 September 1996. (C) 1997 The Institute of Materials.......As a prerequisite for the predictability of properties obtained by a nitriding treatment of iron based workpieces, the relation between the process parameters and the composition and structure of the surface layer produced must be known. At present, even the description of thermodynamic equilibrium...... AL Delft, The Netherlands; Professor Mittemeijer is now also at the Max Planck Institute for Metals Research, Seestrasse 92, D-70174 Stuttgart, Germany and Professor Somers is now in the Division of Metallurgy, Technical University of Denmark, Bldg 204, DK 2800, Lyngby, Denmark. Contribution to the...

  7. FORMATION AND DESTRUCTION OF HEXAVALENT CHROMIUM IN A LABORATORY SWIRL FLAME INCINERATOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    The partitioning of chromium (Cr) in combustion systems was investigated theoretically and experimentally. Theoretical predictions were based on chemical equilibrium and suggested that hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] was favored by the presence of chlorine (Cl) and diminished by the...

  8. Chromium solubility in anhydrous Phase B

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bindi, Luca; Sirotkina, Ekaterina A.; Bobrov, Andrey V.; Nestola, Fabrizio; Irifune, Tetsuo

    2016-02-01

    The crystal structure and chemical composition of a crystal of (Mg14- x Cr x )(Si5- x Cr x )O24 ( x ≈ 0.30) anhydrous Phase B (Anh-B) synthesized in the model system MgCr2O4-Mg2SiO4 at 12 GPa and 1600 °C have been investigated. The compound was found to be orthorhombic, space group Pmcb, with lattice parameters a = 5.900(1), b = 14.218(2), c = 10.029(2) Å, V = 841.3(2) Å3 and Z = 2. The structure was refined to R 1 = 0.065 using 1492 independent reflections. Chromium was found to substitute for both Mg at the M3 site (with a mean bond distance of 2.145 Å) and Si at the octahedral Si1 site (mean bond distance: 1.856 Å), according to the reaction Mg2+ + Si4+ = 2Cr3+. Such substitutions cause a reduction in the volume of the M3 site and an increase in the volume of the Si-dominant octahedron with respect to the values typically observed for pure Anh-B and Fe2+-bearing Anh-B. Taking into account that Cr3+ is not expected to be Jahn-Teller active, it appears that both the Cr3+-for-Mg and Cr3+-for-Si substitutions in the Anh-B structure decrease the distortion of the octahedra. Electron microprobe analysis gave the Mg13.66(8)Si4.70(6)Cr0.62(4)O24 stoichiometry for the studied phase. The successful synthesis of this phase provides new information for the possible mineral assemblages occurring in the Earth's deep upper mantle and shed new light on the so-called X discontinuity that has been observed at 275-345 km depth in several subcontinental and subduction zone environments.

  9. Scientific Opinion on chromium(III lactate tri-hydrate as a source of chromium added for nutritional purposes to foodstuff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EFSA Panel on Food Additives and Nutrient Sources added to Food (ANS

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available

    The Panel on Food Additives and Nutrient Sources added to Food provides a scientific opinion on the safety and bioavailability of chromium(III lactate tri-hydrate as a source of chromium(III added for nutritional purposes to foodstuffs. The safety of chromium itself, in terms of the amounts that may be consumed, is outside the remit of this Panel. No new data have been provided as regards the safety and bioavailability of chromium from chromium(III lactate tri-hydrate. The Panel concurs with its earlier views stating that no evidence was provided supporting the bioavailability of chromium from chromium(III lactate tri-hydrate. Chromium(III lactate tri-hydrate is claimed to be freely soluble in water, however, chromium(III lactate tri-hydrate exists as a weak complex that may influence the bioavailability of chromium(III in the gastrointestinal tract. The Panel re-iterates that because of the complex chemistry of chromium(III lactate tri-hydrate in aqueous solutions and its limited solubility at pH >5, the bioavailability of chromium(III from chromium(III lactate tri-hydrate is low. Based on a conservative exposure estimate, the Panel calculated the combined intake of chromium(III from supplements and from foods fortified with chromium(III lactate tri-hydrate, for both adults and children, to be approximately 240 μg chromium(III/day, which is below the value of 250 µg/day established by the WHO for supplemental intake of chromium that should not be exceeded. The Panel noted that the use of chromium(III lactate tri-hydrate in the form of a premix with lactose, added to foods, would result in an exposure at the mean for adults of approximately 7-37 mg lactose/day (0.12-0.62 μg lactose/kg bw/day and to 36-192 μg lactate/day (0.60-3.20 μg/kg bw/day. Given that subjects with lactose maldigestion will tolerate up to 12 g of lactose with no or minor symptoms, these levels are not of safety concern.

  10. Biosorption of hexavalent chromium in a tannery industry wastewater using fungi species

    OpenAIRE

    Sivakumar, D.

    2016-01-01

    The isolated fungi species of different kinds from chromium contaminated soil sites located in Nagalkeni, Chennai were used for reducing chromium(VI) in a tannery industry wastewater of Nagalkeni, Chennai.  The experiments were conducted to know biosorption potential of isolated fungi species for removing chromium(VI) in a tannery industry wastewater against the different pH, fungi biomass and chromium(VI) concentration (dilution ratio).  The results of this study indicated that the order of ...

  11. Investigation of hexavalent chromium removal from Synthetic wastewater by using Peaganum

    OpenAIRE

    Ali Akbar Taghizadeh; Maryam khodadadi; Taher Shahriary; Hadighe Dorri; mahla zaferanieh; rasoul khosravi

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aim: Discharge of industrial wastewater containing hexavalent chromium into the environment can have harmful effects to the types of organisms. So, chromium should remove before discharging to the environment with an effective method. The purpose of this study of is hexavalent chromium removed with Peganum harmala granular seeds(PGS).   Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, The removal of hexavalent chromium with using PGS, with changes in time, pH, adsorbent dose,...

  12. Chromium Exposure and Hygienic Behaviors in Printing Workers in Southern Thailand

    OpenAIRE

    Somsiri Decharat

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. The main objective of this study was to assess the chromium exposure levels in printing workers. The study evaluated the airborne, serum, and urinary chromium levels and determines any correlation between level of chromium in specimen and airborne chromium levels. Material and Methods. A cross-sectional study was conducted with 75 exposed and 75 matched nonexposed subjects. Air breathing zone was measured by furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometer. Serum and urine samples were...

  13. Structure and morphology studies of chromium film at elevated temperature in hypersonic environment

    OpenAIRE

    Hegde, GM; Kulkarni, V; Nagaboopathy, M; Reddy, KPJ

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the after shock heated structural and morphological studies of chromium film coated on hypersonic test model as a passive drag reduction element. The structural changes and the composition of phases of chromium due to shock heating (2850 K) are characterized using X-ray diffraction studies. Surface morphology changes of chromium coating have been studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) before and after shock heating. Significant amount of chromium ablation and sub...

  14. Cutaneous absorption of trivalent chromium: tissue levels and treatment by exchange transfusion

    OpenAIRE

    Kelly, W F; Ackrill, P; Day, J P; O'Hara, Maureen; Tye, C T; Burton, I.; Orton, C.; Harris, M.

    1982-01-01

    ABSTRACT A man was accidentally immersed in hot acidic trivalent chromium sulphate solution but none was swallowed. The clinical course was dominated by burns, intravascular haemolysis, and acute renal failure. Blood concentrations of chromium were measured during treatment and tissue concentrations were measured at death. Exchange transfusion reduced blood chromium concentrations by two-thirds. The total quantities of chromium absorbed and removed by various routes were calculated. In-vitro ...

  15. The risk to groundwater from wastewater irrigation using high chromium tannery effluent

    OpenAIRE

    Stuart, M E; Milne, C. J.

    2001-01-01

    Wastewater from Leon containing high concentrations of chromium from the tanning industry is used to irrigate agricultural land overlying an aquifer used for to supply potable water. Chromium from irrigation water is accumulating in agricultural soils, and in the lagoon and canal sediments, but groundwater appears to be unaffected and chromium concentrations remain low. A limited area of very high chromium concnetrations in groundwater was confirmed to be derived from a factory supplying the ...

  16. Local Heating with Lithographically Fabricated Plasmonic Titanium Nitride Nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guler, Urcan; Ndukaife, Justus C.; Naik, Gururaj V.;

    2013-01-01

    Titanium nitride is considered a promising alternative plasmonic material and is known to exhibit localized surface plasmon resonances within the near-infrared biological transparency window. Here, local heating efficiencies of disk-shaped nanoparticles made of titanium nitride and gold are...... compared in the visible and near-infrared regions numerically and experimentally with samples fabricated using e-beam lithography. Results show that plasmonic titanium nitride nanodisks are efficient local heat sources and outperform gold nanodisks in the biological transparency window, dispensing the need...

  17. Preparation of Ultra-fine Aluminum Nitride in Thermal Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    漆继红; 罗义文; 印永祥; 代晓雁

    2002-01-01

    Ultra-fine aluminum nitride has been synthesized by the evaporation of aluminum powder at atmospheric-pressure nitrogen plasma in a hot-wall reactor. The average size of aluminum nitride particle is 0.11μm measured by scanning electric mirror (SEM), and the purity is at least over 90% evaluated by X-Ray diffraction (XRD). The conversion of Al powder to aluminum nitride is strongly depended on the injection of NH3. Typical experimental parameters such as the feed rate of raw material, the flow rate of ammonia and the position of injecting aluminum powder into the reactor are given.

  18. High efficiency III-nitride light-emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Mary; Koleske, Daniel; Cho, Jaehee; Zhu, Di; Noemaun, Ahmed; Schubert, Martin F; Schubert, E. Fred

    2013-05-28

    Tailored doping of barrier layers enables balancing of the radiative recombination among the multiple-quantum-wells in III-Nitride light-emitting diodes. This tailored doping enables more symmetric carrier transport and uniform carrier distribution which help to reduce electron leakage and thus reduce the efficiency droop in high-power III-Nitride LEDs. Mitigation of the efficiency droop in III-Nitride LEDs may enable the pervasive market penetration of solid-state-lighting technologies in high-power lighting and illumination.

  19. TEM studies of the nitrided Ni-Ti surface layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lelatko, J; Paczkowski, P; Wierzchoń, T; Morawiec, H

    2006-09-01

    The structure of surface layer, obtained on the nearly equiatomic Ni-Ti alloy after nitriding under glow discharge conditions at temperatures 700 or 800 degrees C, was investigated. The structural characterization of the intruded layer was performed on cross-sectional thin foils by the use of the transmission and scanning electron microscopes. The obtained results show that the nitrided layers consist mainly of the nanocrystalline TiN phase and small amount of Ti(2)N. Between the nitrided layers and beta-NiTi matrix an intermediate Ti(2)Ni phase layer was observed. PMID:17059538

  20. Application Of Active Screen Method For Ion Nitriding Efficiency Improvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ogórek M.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Paper presents the research of austenitic steel AISI 304 after ion nitriding at 400°C and at t =4h, for the two different variants of samples distribution in the working plasma reactive chamber tube. In order to assess the effectiveness of ion nitriding variants emission spectroscopy – GDOES, surface hardness tests, microstructure research (LM of nitrided layers were made. It has been found that the use of active screens increases the surface layer thickness and depth of nitrogen diffusion into austenitic steel 304.

  1. Monolithic Gyroidal Mesoporous Mixed Titanium–Niobium Nitrides

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Mesoporous transition metal nitrides are interesting materials for energy conversion and storage applications due to their conductivity and durability. We present ordered mixed titanium–niobium (8:2, 1:1) nitrides with gyroidal network structures synthesized from triblock terpolymer structure-directed mixed oxides. The materials retain both macroscopic integrity and mesoscale ordering despite heat treatment up to 600 °C, without a rigid carbon framework as a support. Furthermore, the gyroidal lattice parameters were varied by changing polymer molar mass. This synthesis strategy may prove useful in generating a variety of monolithic ordered mesoporous mixed oxides and nitrides for electrode and catalyst materials. PMID:25122534

  2. Synthesis of hollow carbon nitride microspheres by an electrodeposition method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hollow carbon nitride microspheres have been synthesized using a novel liquid phase electrodeposition technique. The microspheres are composed of numerous nanoparticles with size of about 5-30 nm. The diameters of the spheres range from 800 nm to 1.1 μm, and shell thickness is about 80-250 nm. This is the first attempt to synthesize carbon nitride with specific nanostructure by the electrodeposition method, which is proved to be facile and effective, and can be performed in an atmospheric environment and at a rather low temperature. The hollow carbon nitride may have potential applications as lubrication, catalysis, biomolecule adsorption, drug delivery, electronic materials, etc. in the future.

  3. A high Tc superconductor bolometer on a silicon nitride membrane

    OpenAIRE

    Sanchez, Stefan; Elwenspoek, Miko; Gui, Chengqun; Nivelle, de, M.J.M.E.; De, Vries; Korte, de, N.; Bruijn, Marcel P.; Wijnbergen, Jan J.; Michalke, Wolfgang; Steinbeiss, Erwin; Heidenblut, Torsten; Schwierzi, Bernard

    1998-01-01

    In this paper, we describe the design, fabrication, and performance of a high-Tc GdBa2Cu3O7-¿ superconductor bolometer positioned on a 2× 2-mm2 1-¿m-thick silicon nitride membrane. The bolometer structure has an effective area of 0.64 mm2 and was grown on a specially developed silicon-on-nitride (SON) layer. This layer was made by direct bonding of silicon nitride to silicon after chemical mechanical polishing. The operation temperature of the bolometer is 85 K. A thermal conductance G=3.3·10...

  4. Liver Toxicity Resulted From Ingestion of Chromium Picolinate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baltacı D et al.

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Herein, liver toxicity resulted from chronic ingestion of chromium picolinate, recommended daily allowance of over-the-counter (OTC have been presented. A woman of 32 years-old presented with pruritis since three days. On physical examination, she had no skin rashes, discoloration and urticarial lesions. With detailed inquiry of the patient, it has been determined that she had been using over-the-counter medicine containing chromium picolinate to enhance weight loss and increase lean body mass. On blood test examination follows: ALT: 484 U/I, AST: 182, Total/direct Bilirubin: 0,43/0,88 mg/dl. Complete Blood Count (CBC was normal. Chromium supplements may cause serious liver function impairment although when ingested within normal doses. Medication histories should include attention to the use of OTC nutritional supplements.

  5. Influence of chromium, oxygen, carbon and nitrogen on iron viscosity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinetic viscosity of 70 beforehand melted iron samples with additions of chromium (up to 2%) and carbon (up to 1%) has been investigated. Different conditions of melting brought about differences in oxygen and nitrogen contents. Viscosity of most samples has been determined in the 1550-1650 deg C temperature range. It is stated that small additions to pure iron of each of the investigated elements (O, Cr, C, N) decrease its viscosity. Combined effect of these additions on viscosity is inadditive. Simultaneous introduction of oxygen and carbon may result in increase of melt viscosity. The same fact is observed at combined introduction of chromium and nitrogen. Simultaneous introduction of other impurities-chromium with oxygen or carbon, nitrogen with oxygen causes amplification of their individual effect. Reasons for the observed regularities result from changes in energies of interparticle interactions in the melt and therefore rebuilding of structure of its short-range order

  6. A study of the process of desorption of hexavalent chromium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W.B. Amorim

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available In this work the process of desorption of hexavalent chromium, a toxic metal ion, from the marine algae Sargassum sp, following biosorption experiments 2³ factorial design was studied. A technique was applied to three eluents: HCl, H2SO4 and EDTA. Three factors of importance were evaluated: concentration of eluent, the ratio between mass of biosorbent and volume of eluent (S/L and process time. A statistical analysis of the experimental results showed that the three variables evaluated are significant for all three eluents. The models for chromium desorption were validated, as the results agreed well with the observed values. Through use of the response surface methodology, a factorial design based optimization technique; it was possible to identify the most suitable eluent and the interval of values for the process variables that resulted in the most significant desorption of chromium, which is relevant information for work aiming at process optimization.

  7. Structural and magnetic properties of chromium doped zinc ferrite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zinc chromium ferrites with chemical formula ZnCrxFe2−xO4 (x = 0.0, 0.2, 0.4, 0.6, 0.8, 1.0) were prepared by Sol - Gel technique. The structural as well as magnetic properties of the synthesized samples have been studied and reported here. The structural characterizations of the samples were analyzed by using X – Ray Diffraction (XRD), Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), and Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM). The single phase spinel cubic structure of all the prepared samples was tested by XRD and FTIR. The particle size was observed to decrease from 18.636 nm to 6.125 nm by chromium doping and induced a tensile strain in all the zinc chromium mixed ferrites. The magnetic properties of few samples (x = 0.0, 0.4, 1.0) were investigated using Vibrating Sample Magnetometer (VSM)

  8. Chromium Resistant Bacteria: Impact on Plant Growth in Soil Microcosm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayel Hanane

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Three chromium resistant bacterial strains, Pseudomonas fluorescens PF28, Enterobacter amnigenus EA31 and Enterococcus gallinarum S34 isolated from tannery waste contaminated soil were used in this study. All strains could resist a high concentration of K2Cr2O7 that is up to 300 mg/L. The effect of these strains on clover plants (Trifolium campestre in the presence of two chromium salts CrCl3 and K2Cr2O7 was studied in soil microcosm. Application of chromium salts adversely affected seed germination, root and shoot length. Bacterial inoculation improved the growth parameters under chromate stress when compared with non inoculated respective controls. There was observed more than 50% reduction of Cr(VI in inoculated soil microcosms, as compared to the uninoculated soil under the same conditions. The results obtained in this study are significant for the bioremediation of chromate pollution.

  9. Studies of removal of chromium by model constructed wetland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Mant

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Chromium is a pollutant present in tannery wastewater, its removal is necessary for protection of the environment. Penisetum purpureum, Brancharia decumbens and Phragmites australis were grown hydroponically in experimental gravel beds to determine their potential for the phytoremediation of solutions containing 10 and 20 mg Cr dm-3. These concentrations, similar to tannery wastewater after initial physico-chemical treatment were used with the aim of developing an economic secondary treatment to protect the environment. All the systems achieved removal efficiencies of 97 - 99.6% within 24 hours. P. purpureum and B. decumbens removed 78.1% and 68.5% respectively within the first hour. Both P. purpureum and B. decumbens were tolerant of the concentrations of chromium applied, but P. purpureum showed the greatest potential because its faster growth and larger biomass achieved a much greater chromium removal over the whole length of time of the experiment.

  10. On the rational alloying of structural chromium-nickel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study was made on the influence of chromium nickel, phosphorus on the critical brittleness temperature of Cr-Ni-Mo-V structural steels. It is shown that the critical brittleness temperature of these steels increases at chromium content more over than 2% and nickel content more than 2% in the result of carbide transformations during tempering. Increase of nickel content in Cr-Ni-Mo-V-steels strengthens the tendency to embrittlement during slow cooling, from tempering temperature owing to development of process of phosphorus grain-boundary segregation. Two mentioned mechanisms of embrittlement determine principles of rational steel alloying. The extreme dependence of the critical brittleness temperature on chromium and nickel content, which enables to choose the optimum composition of Cr-Ni-Mo-V-steels, was established

  11. Characteristics of Au/PZT/TiO2/Nitride/Si structure capacitors with ICP nitride treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, the characteristics of PZT/TiO2 ferroelectric gate stack capacitors with Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP) nitridation were investigated for field effect transistor (FET)-type Ferroelectric Random Access Memory (FeRAM) applications. If a high accumulation capacitance is to be had, the ICP nitridation time needs to be optimized. While a short ICP treatment time results in thermal oxide growth due to lack of nitrogen, a long nitridation time causes a nitride layer which is too thick. Au/PZT(200 nm)/TiO2(40 nm)/Nitride/Si (MeFINS) structure capacitors show a memory window (ΔV) of 1.6 V under ±3-V operation while Au/PZT(200 nm)/TiO2(40 nm)/Si (MeFIS) capacitors without nitride treatment exhibit a small memory window of 0.6 V. At the same time, the capacitance of the MeFINS device is almost twice that of the MeFIS capacitor. This result implies that the ICP nitride treatment suppresses the formation of a low dielectric constant interfacial SiOx layer and alleviates the series capacitance problem

  12. Characteristics of Au/PZT/TiO{sub 2}/Nitride/Si structure capacitors with ICP nitride treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Min, Hyung Seob; Kim, Tae Ho; Jeon, Chang Bae; Lee, Jae Gab; Kim, Ji Young [Kookmin Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-01-01

    In this study, the characteristics of PZT/TiO{sub 2} ferroelectric gate stack capacitors with Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP) nitridation were investigated for field effect transistor (FET)-type Ferroelectric Random Access Memory (FeRAM) applications. If a high accumulation capacitance is to be had, the ICP nitridation time needs to be optimized. While a short ICP treatment time results in thermal oxide growth due to lack of nitrogen, a long nitridation time causes a nitride layer which is too thick. Au/PZT(200 nm)/TiO{sub 2}(40 nm)/Nitride/Si (MeFINS) structure capacitors show a memory window ({delta}V) of 1.6 V under {+-}3-V operation while Au/PZT(200 nm)/TiO{sub 2}(40 nm)/Si (MeFIS) capacitors without nitride treatment exhibit a small memory window of 0.6 V. At the same time, the capacitance of the MeFINS device is almost twice that of the MeFIS capacitor. This result implies that the ICP nitride treatment suppresses the formation of a low dielectric constant interfacial SiO{sub x} layer and alleviates the series capacitance problem.

  13. Beryllium decorated armchair boron nitride nanoribbon: A new planar tetracoordinate nitride containing system with enhanced conductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Bo; Yu, Xuefang; Hu, Hong; Ding, Yihong

    2014-07-01

    In this Letter, a new kind of planar tetracoordinate nitride (ptN) structure is obtained via Be-decorated armchair boron nitride nanoribbon (aBNNR). The high stability of such a ptN system is confirmed by both global minimization and molecular dynamical simulation at 1500 K. The results suggest that this Be-decorated aBNNR will be a thermally stable material. The electronic property of aBNNR is significantly increased after the addition of Be atoms to the edges and the band gap decreases as the width of the ribbon decreases. Our Letter posits a new and potentially stable and useful BNNR and augments the literature on ptN.

  14. Thin films of aluminum nitride and aluminum gallium nitride for cold cathode applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sowers, A. T.; Christman, J. A.; Bremser, M. D.; Ward, B. L.; Davis, R. F.; Nemanich, R. J.

    1997-10-01

    Cold cathode structures have been fabricated using AlN and graded AlGaN structures (deposited on n-type 6H-SiC) as the thin film emitting layer. The cathodes consist of an aluminum grid layer separated from the nitride layer by a SiO2 layer and etched to form arrays of either 1, 3, or 5 μm holes through which the emitting nitride surface is exposed. After fabrication, a hydrogen plasma exposure was employed to activate the cathodes. Cathode devices with 5 μm holes displayed emission for up to 30 min before failing. Maximum emission currents ranged from 10-100 nA and required grid voltages ranging from 20-110 V. The grid currents were typically 1 to 104 times the collector currents.

  15. Preparation of carbon-nitride bulk samples in the presence of seed carbon-nitride films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A procedure was developed for preparing bulk carbon-nitride crystals from polymeric α-C3N4.2 at high pressure and high temperature in the presence of seeds of crystalline carbon-nitride films prepared by using a high-voltage discharge plasma combined with pulsed laser ablation of a graphite target. The samples were evaluated by using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), infrared (IR) spectroscopy, Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), secondary-ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Notably, XPS studies of the film composition before and after thermobaric treatments demonstrated that the nitrogen composition in the α-C3N4.2 material, which initially contained more than 58 % nitrogen, decreased during the annealing process and reached a common, stable composition of ∼ 45 %. The thermobaric experiments were performed at 10 - 77 kbar and 350 - 1200 .deg. C.

  16. Effective Duration of Gas Nitriding Process on AISI 316L for the Formation of a Desired Thickness of Surface Nitrided Layer

    OpenAIRE

    Mahmoud Hassan R. S.; Yusoff Syafiq A.; Zainuddin Azman; Hussain Patthi; Ismail Mokhtar; Abidin Kamal

    2014-01-01

    High temperature gas nitriding performed on AISI 316L at the temperature of 1200°C. The microstructure of treated AISI 316L samples were observed to identify the formation of the microstructure of nitrided surface layer. The grain size of austenite tends to be enlarged when the nitriding time increases, but the austenite single phase structure is maintained even after the long-time solution nitriding. Using microhardness testing, the hardness values drop to the center of the samples. The incr...

  17. Chromium accumulation by the hyperaccumulator plant Leersia hexandra Swartz.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xue-Hong; Liu, Jie; Huang, Hai-Tao; Chen, Jun; Zhu, Yi-Nian; Wang, Dun-Qiu

    2007-04-01

    Leersia hexandra Swartz (Gramineae), which occurs in Southern China, has been found to be a new chromium hyperaccumulator by means of field survey and pot-culture experiment. The field survey showed that this species had an extraordinary accumulation capacity for chromium. The maximum Cr concentration in the dry leaf matter was 2978 mg kg(-1) on the side of a pond near an electroplating factory. The average concentration of chromium in the leaves was 18.86 times as that in the pond sediment, and 297.41 times as that in the pond water. Under conditions of the nutrient solution culture, it was found that L. hexandra had a high tolerance and accumulation capacity to Cr(III) and Cr(VI). Under 60 mg l(-1) Cr(III) and 10 mg l(-1) Cr(VI) treatment, there was no significant decrease of biomass in the leaves of L. hexandra (p>0.05). The highest bioaccumulation coefficients of the leaves for Cr(III) and Cr(VI) were 486.8 and 72.1, respectively. However, L. hexandra had a higher accumulation capacity for Cr(III) than for Cr(VI). At the Cr(III) concentration of 10 mg l(-1) in the culture solution, the concentration of chromium in leaves was 4868 mg kg(-1), while at the same Cr(VI) concentration, the concentration of chromium in leaves was only 597 mg kg(-1). These results confirmed that L. hexandra is a chromium hyperaccumulator which grows rapidly with a great tolerance to Cr and broad ecological amplitude. This species could provide a new plant resource that explores the mechanism of Cr hyperaccumulation, and has potential for usage in the phytoremediation of Cr-contaminated soil and water. PMID:17207838

  18. Heat resistance of carbon steel with chromium-based gas-thermal sprayed coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heat resistance of steel with chromium-base plasma sprayed coating is studied in comparison with chromium coating and base material. The specimens were oxidized at the air under 1250 K during 48 h. Investigations into steel-chromium coating interface were carried out and the structure of cinder was studied. Refs. 7, figs. 2

  19. Evaluation of flexural bond strength of porcelain to used nickel-chromium alloy in various percentages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VNV Madhav

    2012-01-01

    Fresh nickel-chromium alloy shows the greatest porcelain adherence.There is no significant change in bond strength of ceramic to alloy with up to 75% of used nickel-chromium alloy.At least 25%- of new alloy should be added when recycled nickel-chromium alloy is being used for metal ceramic restorations.

  20. 75 FR 60454 - Draft Toxicological Review of Hexavalent Chromium: In Support of Summary Information on the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-30

    ... AGENCY Draft Toxicological Review of Hexavalent Chromium: In Support of Summary Information on the..., ``Toxicological Review of Hexavalent Chromium: In Support of Summary Information on the Integrated Risk..., 2010. The listening session on the draft assessment for hexavalent chromium will be held on November...

  1. 76 FR 20349 - Draft Toxicological Review of Hexavalent Chromium: In Support of Summary Information on the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-12

    ... AGENCY Draft Toxicological Review of Hexavalent Chromium: In Support of Summary Information on the..., ``Toxicological Review of Hexavalent Chromium: In Support of Summary Information on the Integrated Risk... workshop on the draft assessment for Hexavalent Chromium will be held on May 12, 2011, beginning at 8:30...

  2. 77 FR 61431 - Hexavalent Chromium Standards; Extension of the Office of Management and Budget's (OMB) Approval...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-09

    ... Occupational Safety and Health Administration Hexavalent Chromium Standards; Extension of the Office of...) approval of the information collection requirements specified in the Hexavalent Chromium Standards for... requirements specified in the Hexavalent Chromium (Cr(VI)) Standards for General Industry (29 CFR...

  3. 21 CFR 73.3110a - Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide. 73.3110a Section... LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Medical Devices § 73.3110a Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide. (a) Identity. The color additive chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide (Pigment Blue 36) (CAS Reg....

  4. Speciation dependent radiotracer studies on chromium preconcentration using iron doped calcium alginate biopolymer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The work aims to study the differential attitude of Ca-alginate (CA) and Fe-doped calcium alginate (Fe-CA) and towards Cr(III) and Cr (IV) so that, depending on the oxidation state of chromium effluent, environmentally sustainable methodologies can be prescribed for removal of chromium. Throughout the experiment 51Cr has been used as the precursor of stable chromium

  5. 40 CFR 749.68 - Hexavalent chromium-based water treatment chemicals in cooling systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Cooling Systems § 749.68 Hexavalent chromium-based water treatment chemicals in cooling systems. (a... distribution in commerce of hexavalent chromium-based water treatment chemicals for use in cooling systems. (d... holds hexavalent chromium-based water treatment chemicals for use in cooling systems. (6) Cooling...

  6. Chromium supplementation alters both glucose and lipid metabolism in feedlot cattle during the receiving period

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crossbred steers (n = 20; 235 +/- 4 kg) were fed 53 days during a receiving period to determine if supplementing chromium (Cr; KemTRACE®brandChromium Propionate 0.04%, Kemin Industries) would alter the glucose or lipid metabolism of newly received cattle. Chromium premixes were supplemented to add 0...

  7. Enhancement of the acute phase response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge in steers supplemented with chromium

    Science.gov (United States)

    The study examined the effect of chromium supplementation on the response of steers to an LPS challenge. Twenty steers received a premix that added 0 (control) or 0.2 mg/kg of chromium (KemTRACE®brandChromiumProprionate 0.04%, Kemin Industries) to the total diet on a dry matter basis for 55 d. Steer...

  8. Chromium supplementation alters the glucose and lipid metabolism of feedlot cattle during the receiving period

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crossbreed steers (n = 20; 235 ± 4 kg) were fed 53 d during a receiving period to determine if supplementing chromium (Cr; KemTRACE®brand Chromium Propionate 0.04%, Kemin Industries) would alter the glucose or lipid metabolism of newly received cattle. Chromium premixes were supplemented to add 0 (C...

  9. Soil dehydrogenase activity in the presence of chromium (III) and (VI)

    OpenAIRE

    Wolińska A.; Stępniewska Z.

    2005-01-01

    The paper presents the influence of chromium forms (III) and (VI) on the soil dehydrogenase activity. Enzyme activities can be considered effective indicators of soil quality changes resulting from environmental stress or management practices. It was found that chromium compounds have detrimental effects on soil dehydrogenase activity. After the addition of chromium, a rapid and significant decrease in enzymatic activities was observed.

  10. 40 CFR 721.981 - Substituted naphtholoazo-substituted naphthalenyl-substituted azonaphthol chromium complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... naphthalenyl-substituted azonaphthol chromium complex. 721.981 Section 721.981 Protection of Environment...-substituted naphthalenyl-substituted azonaphthol chromium complex. (a) Chemical substance and significant new... naphtholoazo-substituted naphthalenyl-substituted azonaphthol chromium complex (PMN P-93-1631) is subject...

  11. 40 CFR 721.2097 - Azo chromium complex dyestuff preparation (generic name).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Azo chromium complex dyestuff... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2097 Azo chromium complex dyestuff preparation... substance identified generically as an azo chromium complex dyestuff preparation (PMN P-95-240) is...

  12. Fabrication of Aluminum Gallium Nitride/Gallium Nitride MESFET And It's Applications in Biosensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alur, Siddharth

    Gallium Nitride has been researched extensively for the past three decades for its application in Light Emitting Diodes (LED's), power devices and UV photodetectors. With the recent developments in crystal growth technology and the ability to control the doping there has been an increased interest in heterostructures formed between Gallium nitride and it's alloy Aluminium Gallium Nitride. These heterostructures due to the combined effect of spontaneous and piezoelectric effect can form a high density and a high mobility electron gas channel without any intentional doping. This high density electron gas makes these heterostructures ideal to be used as sensors. Gallium Nitride is also chemically very stable. Detection of biomolecules in a fast and reliable manner is very important in the areas of food safety and medical research. For biomolecular detection it is paramount to have a robust binding of the probes on the sensor surface. Therefore, in this dissertation, the fabrication and application of the AlGaN/GaN heterostructures as biological sensors for the detection of DNA and Organophosphate hydrolase enzyme is discussed. In order to use these AlGaN/GaN heterostructures as biological sensors capable of working in a liquid environment photodefinable polydimethyl-siloxane is used as an encapsulant. The immobilization conditions for a robust binding of thiolated DNA and the catalytic receptor enzyme organophosphate hydrolase on gold surfaces is developed with the help of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. DNA and OPH are detected by measuring the change in the drain current of the device as a function of time.

  13. Hot corrosion resistance of nickel-chromium-aluminum alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoro, G. J.; Barret, C. A.

    1977-01-01

    The hot corrosion resistance of nickel-chromium-aluminum alloys was examined by cyclically oxidizing sodium sulfate-coated specimens in still air at 900, 1000, and 1100 C. The compositions tested were within the ternary region: Ni, Ni-50 at.% Cr, and Ni-50 at.% Al. At each temperature the corrosion data were statistically fitted to a third order regression equation as a function of chromium and aluminum contents. From these equations corrosion isopleths were prepared. Compositional regions with the best hot corrosion resistance were identified.

  14. Primary and secondary crystallization of modified hypoeutectic chromium cast iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Studnicki

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents investigations of crystallization of modified hypoeutectic wear resistant chromium cast iron which contains carbon about 2% and chromium on three levels (12%, 18% and 25%. Three substances were applied to the modification ( boron carbide (B4C, ferroniobium (FeNb and mixture of ferroniobium and mischmetal (RE. The investigations of crystallization were conducted the DTA method in DTA-C and DTA-Is testers. The influence on the course of the process of primary and secondary crystallization was observed.

  15. Electrodeposited tungsten-nickel-boron: A replacement for hexavalent chromium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chromium, deposited from acidic solutions of its hexavalent ion, has been the rule for wear resistant, corrosion resistant coatings for many years. Although chromium coatings are durable, the plating process generates air emissions, effluent rinse waters, and process solutions that are toxic, suspected carcinogens, and a risk to human health and the environment. Tungsten-nickel-boron (W-Ni-B) alloy deposition is a potential substitute for hexavalent chrome. It has excellent wear, corrosion, and mechanical properties and also may be less of an environmental risk. This study examines the electroplating process and deposit properties of W-Ni-B and compares them with those of hexavalent chrome

  16. Fabrication of carbide and nitride pellets and the nitride irradiations Niloc 1 and Niloc 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Besides the relatively well-known advanced LMFBR mixed carbide fuel an advanced mixed nitride is also an attractive candidate for the optimised fuel cycle of the European Fast Reactor, but the present knowledge about the nitride is still insufficient and should be raised to the level of the carbide. For such an optimised fuel cycle the following general conditions have been set up for the fuel: (i) the burnup of the optimised MN and MC should be at least 15 a/o or even beyond, at moderate linear ratings of less than 75 kW/m (ii) the fuel will be used in a He-bonding pin concept and (iii) as far as available an advanced economic pellet fabrication method should be employed. (iv) The fuel structure must contain 15 - 20% porosity in order to accomodate the fission product swelling at high burnup. This report gives a comprehensive description of fuel and pellet fabrication and characterization, irradiation, and post-irradiation examination. From the results important conclusions can be drawn about future work on nitrides

  17. Plasma nitriding monitoring reactor: A model reactor for studying plasma nitriding processes using an active screen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamann, S., E-mail: hamann@inp-greifswald.de; Röpcke, J. [INP-Greifswald, Felix-Hausdorff-Str. 2, 17489 Greifswald (Germany); Börner, K.; Burlacov, I.; Spies, H.-J. [TU Bergakademie Freiberg, Institute of Materials Engineering, Gustav-Zeuner-Str. 5, 09599 Freiberg (Germany); Strämke, M.; Strämke, S. [ELTRO GmbH, Arnold-Sommerfeld-Ring 3, 52499 Baesweiler (Germany)

    2015-12-15

    A laboratory scale plasma nitriding monitoring reactor (PLANIMOR) has been designed to study the basics of active screen plasma nitriding (ASPN) processes. PLANIMOR consists of a tube reactor vessel, made of borosilicate glass, enabling optical emission spectroscopy (OES) and infrared absorption spectroscopy. The linear setup of the electrode system of the reactor has the advantages to apply the diagnostic approaches on each part of the plasma process, separately. Furthermore, possible changes of the electrical field and of the heat generation, as they could appear in down-scaled cylindrical ASPN reactors, are avoided. PLANIMOR has been used for the nitriding of steel samples, achieving similar results as in an industrial scale ASPN reactor. A compact spectrometer using an external cavity quantum cascade laser combined with an optical multi-pass cell has been applied for the detection of molecular reaction products. This allowed the determination of the concentrations of four stable molecular species (CH{sub 4}, C{sub 2}H{sub 2}, HCN, and NH{sub 3}). With the help of OES, the rotational temperature of the screen plasma could be determined.

  18. Plasma nitriding monitoring reactor: A model reactor for studying plasma nitriding processes using an active screen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamann, S; Börner, K; Burlacov, I; Spies, H-J; Strämke, M; Strämke, S; Röpcke, J

    2015-12-01

    A laboratory scale plasma nitriding monitoring reactor (PLANIMOR) has been designed to study the basics of active screen plasma nitriding (ASPN) processes. PLANIMOR consists of a tube reactor vessel, made of borosilicate glass, enabling optical emission spectroscopy (OES) and infrared absorption spectroscopy. The linear setup of the electrode system of the reactor has the advantages to apply the diagnostic approaches on each part of the plasma process, separately. Furthermore, possible changes of the electrical field and of the heat generation, as they could appear in down-scaled cylindrical ASPN reactors, are avoided. PLANIMOR has been used for the nitriding of steel samples, achieving similar results as in an industrial scale ASPN reactor. A compact spectrometer using an external cavity quantum cascade laser combined with an optical multi-pass cell has been applied for the detection of molecular reaction products. This allowed the determination of the concentrations of four stable molecular species (CH4, C2H2, HCN, and NH3). With the help of OES, the rotational temperature of the screen plasma could be determined. PMID:26724023

  19. Plasma nitriding monitoring reactor: A model reactor for studying plasma nitriding processes using an active screen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A laboratory scale plasma nitriding monitoring reactor (PLANIMOR) has been designed to study the basics of active screen plasma nitriding (ASPN) processes. PLANIMOR consists of a tube reactor vessel, made of borosilicate glass, enabling optical emission spectroscopy (OES) and infrared absorption spectroscopy. The linear setup of the electrode system of the reactor has the advantages to apply the diagnostic approaches on each part of the plasma process, separately. Furthermore, possible changes of the electrical field and of the heat generation, as they could appear in down-scaled cylindrical ASPN reactors, are avoided. PLANIMOR has been used for the nitriding of steel samples, achieving similar results as in an industrial scale ASPN reactor. A compact spectrometer using an external cavity quantum cascade laser combined with an optical multi-pass cell has been applied for the detection of molecular reaction products. This allowed the determination of the concentrations of four stable molecular species (CH4, C2H2, HCN, and NH3). With the help of OES, the rotational temperature of the screen plasma could be determined

  20. Plasma nitriding monitoring reactor: A model reactor for studying plasma nitriding processes using an active screen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamann, S.; Börner, K.; Burlacov, I.; Spies, H.-J.; Strämke, M.; Strämke, S.; Röpcke, J.

    2015-12-01

    A laboratory scale plasma nitriding monitoring reactor (PLANIMOR) has been designed to study the basics of active screen plasma nitriding (ASPN) processes. PLANIMOR consists of a tube reactor vessel, made of borosilicate glass, enabling optical emission spectroscopy (OES) and infrared absorption spectroscopy. The linear setup of the electrode system of the reactor has the advantages to apply the diagnostic approaches on each part of the plasma process, separately. Furthermore, possible changes of the electrical field and of the heat generation, as they could appear in down-scaled cylindrical ASPN reactors, are avoided. PLANIMOR has been used for the nitriding of steel samples, achieving similar results as in an industrial scale ASPN reactor. A compact spectrometer using an external cavity quantum cascade laser combined with an optical multi-pass cell has been applied for the detection of molecular reaction products. This allowed the determination of the concentrations of four stable molecular species (CH4, C2H2, HCN, and NH3). With the help of OES, the rotational temperature of the screen plasma could be determined.